GE Fanuc Series Six Data Communications Manual

GE Fanuc Series Six Data Communications Manual
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Series Six
Programmable Controller
CCM Communications
tm
User’s Manual
Archive
Document
This electronic manual was created by scanning a
printed document, then processing the file using
character-recognition software.
Please be aware that this process may have
introduced minor errors. For critical applications,
use of a printed manual is recommended.
GE Fanuc Automation
September 1988
GEK-25364A
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WARNINGS, CAUTIONS, AND NOTES AS USED IN THIS PUBLICATION
WARNING
Warning notices are used in this publication to emphasize that hazardous voltages, currents, temperatures,
or other conditions that could cause personal injury exist in this equipment or may be associated with its
use.
In situations where inattention could cause either personal
notice is used.
I
I
CAUTION
or damage to equipment a Warning
I
I
Caution notices are used where equipment might be damaged if care is not taken.
NOTE
Notes merely call attention to information that is especially significant to understanding and operating the
equipment.
This document is based on information available at the time of its publication. While efforts have been made to be accurate,
the information contained in this document does not purport to cover all details or variations in hardware and software, nor to
provide for every contingency in connection with installation, operation, and maintenance. This document may describe
features not present in all hardware and software systems. GE Fanuc Automation assumes no obligation of notice to holders
of this document with respect to changes subsequently made.
GE Fanuc Automation makes no representation or warranty, expressed, implied, or statutory with respect to, and assumes no
responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the information contained in this document. No warranties of
merchantability of fitness for purpose shall apply.
Copyright
GE Fanuc Automation North
All Rights Reserved.
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.*.
III
Preface
PREFACE
The purpose of the CCM Communications User’s Manual is to provide the information
needed to implement a serial communications link betweexa Series Six’” Programmable
Logic Controller (PLC ), and a host
computer, color-graphics terminal, peripheral device,
or another Series Six PLC.
This manual is a general update and second edition of what was formerly called the Series
Six PLC Data Communication Manual. It includes all information previously found in
G E K - 9 0 5 0 5 S e r i e s S i x PLC S u p p l e m e n t t o D a t a C o m m u n i c a t i o n M a n u a l , C h a p t e r s 7
(CCM3) and Chapter 8 (CCM3-RTU Protocol).
Chapter 1. Introduction to Series Six PLC Communication is an introduction to data
communications with emphasis on those areas pertaining to the Series Six PLC.
Chapter 2. Communications Control Module explains the installation and operation of
the Communications Control Module (CCM2 and CCM3). This chapter includes sections
on: system configuration and protocol, cable wiring, CCM communications, CCM
programming, Operator Interface Unit (OIU) use with the CCM, and an introduction to
RTU protocol.
Chapter 3. Input/Output Communications Control Module describes the Input/Output
Communications Control Module (I/O CCM) used to link the Series Six PLC and a host
computer, programmable terminals, and other intelligent devices.
Chapter 4. Serial Interface Protocols for the CCM defines the CCM serial interface
protocol, Discusses CCM peer-to-peer and master-slave protocols and includes detailed
flow
charts for both.
Chapter 5. RTU Communications Protocol describes in detail the protocol used when
configured in Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) mode.
Chapter 6. Communication Applications contains basic Series Six PLC application
programs for using the CCM Status Byte, using the CCM Diagnostic Status Words, and
setting up a multidrop polling routine.
Appendix A. Host Computer Interface Software is a brief discussion of host computer
communication interface software for use with Series Six PLCs equipped with a CCM. It
includes sections on features and ordering of the software as well as basic software
operation.
Appendix B. Expanded Functions provides programming information for Series Six
Communication Control Module (CCM) Expanded Memory mapping, single bit write and
programmable timeout and retry.
of conventional
Appendix C. Glossary of Terms contains a concise, alphabetized lsting
communications terms and (where applicable) their associated acronyms.
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Preface
iV
GEK-25364
PREFACE
RELATED PUBLICATIONS
. GEK-25361
Series Six PLC Installation
models of Series Six PLCs.
and Maintenance Manual, describes earlier
. GFK-0013
G EnetTM F a c t o r y L A N S e r i e s S i x P r o g r a m m a b l e C o n t r o l N e t w o r k
I n t e r f a c e U s e r s M a n u a l , describes the installation, operation and
o f t h e GEnet N e t w o r k I n t e r f a c e .
Describes MAP,
programming
Datagram and Global Data communication services.
- GEK-96608
G Enet Factory LAN System Users Manual, contains information on
connecting various devices, which use the CCM protocol, to GEnet.
- GEK-25367
Series Six Data Sheet Manual, contains the specifications, description
and wiring of various communications modules.
- GEK-84866
S e r i e s S i x P L C O p e r a t o r I n t e r f a c e U n i t (OIU) D a t a S h e e t , c o n t a i n s
specifications, description and wiring of OIU module.
- GFK-0238
Series Six PLC Communications Control Module Type 2 and Type 3 Data
Sheet, contains module specifications, description, and wiring for current
(CCM2, CCM3) modules combined in one data sheet. The current CCMs
support expanded memory addressing but without tape function.
- GEK-90824
Series Six PLC Input/Output Communications Control Module (l/O CCM)
Data Sheet, contains specifications, description and wiring for the I/O
CCM.
- GEK-83539
S e r i e s S i x P L C C o m m u n i c a t i o n s C o n t r o l M o d u l e 1 (CCM1) D a t a S h e e t ,
contains specifications, description and wiring of early versions of the
CCM 1 module. This module has been superseded by the CCM2 and CCM3
modules and is not a production module.
This document is listed for reference only.
- GEK-83542
Series Six PLC Communications Control Module 2 (CCM2) Data Sheet,
contains specifications, description and wiring of earlier CCM2 modules
having tape functionality. This module has been superseded by enhanced
versions of the CCM2 and is not a production module.
This document is listed for reference only.
- GEK-90763
Series Six PLC Communications Control Module 3 (CCM3) Data Sheet,
contains specifications, description and wiring of earlier CCM3 modules
having tape functionality. This module has been superseded by enhanced
versions of the CCM3 and is not a production module.
This document is listed for reference only.
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vii
Contents
GEK-25364
CONTENTS
Page
Chapter 1: Introduction to Series Six Data Communication
Introduction to Data Communications
Communications Network (System) Configurations
Point to Point
Multidrop
Multidrop or Point-to-Point
Terminating Resistors
GEnet’” Local Area Network (LAN)
Communication Modes (CCM, RTU)
Initiating the Communication
Communications Control
Serial Communications
Information Codes (ASCII)
Protocols
Transmission Errors and Detection
Noise Errors
Parity Checking
Longitudinal Redundancy Checking
Transmission Timing Errors
Overrun
Framing Errors
Time-Out Errors
Serial Transmission
Asynchronous Transmission
Synchronous Transmission
Serial Communications Line
Modems
Communication Modes
Interface Standards
RS-232D
RS-449, RS-422, and RS-432
Current Loop
Chapter 2:
Communications Control Modules (CCM2, CCM3)
Introduction to the CCMs
Mode of Operation
CCM Mode
RTU Mode
CCM Interface
Short Haul Modem
Telephone Line Modem
Concurrent Use of CCM3 (RTU and CCM Mode)
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GEK-25364
CONTENTS
Page
Chapter 2: Communications Control Modules (CCM2, CCM3) (Continued)
System Configurations and Protocols
Point to Point
CCM to CCM, Modem, Operator interface,
or Dumb Terminal
CCM to Computer, Color-Graphics Terminal
or Microprocessor Based Device
(Direct Connection)
Multidrop
RS-422 Direct
RS-232D Using Modems
RS-232D Using Modems and Microwave
or Radio Transmitters
GEnet LAN Interface
Module Specifications
Descriptions of the CCM User Items
Descriptions of Module Functions
Data Rate
Protocol
CCM Protocol
Peer-to-Peer
Master-Slave
Test 1
RTU Protocol
Line Interfaces
RS-232D
RS-422
RS-422 With Clock
Turn-Around Delay
Keying Signal
Time-outs Disabled
Parity
Operator Interface Unit (OIU)
Module Configuration
Hardware Configuration
DIP Switch Settings
Terminating Resistors
Software Configuration
On-Line
Reconfiguration
Installing the CCM Module
Power-Up and Diagnostic Testing
Indicator lights
Board OK (Module Status)
Diag 1 (CCM Diagnostic)
Data OK (Serial Data Transmission)
Diag 2 (CCM Diagnostic)
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GEK-25364
CONTENTS
Page
Chapter 2: Communications Control Modules (CCM2, CCM3) (Continued)
Electrical Interface Circuits
Port Characteristics
Cable and Connector Specifications
Grounding
RS-232D Cables
CCM to CCM Connection
CCM or RTU to Computer or Other
Intelligent Device
CCM to Modem Without Flow Control
CCM to Modem With Flow Control
CCM to Dumb Terminal or Printer
GEnet Factory LAN BIU
RS-422 Cables
Terminating Resistors
RS-232D to RS-422 Adaptive Unit
Host to CCM
Operator Interface Unit (OIU)
Direct CCM to OIU Connection
CCM to GEnet BIU, 4-Wire Connection
CCM Multidrop Connections
CCM or Host Computer to Multiple CCMs
Using Modems and Radio Transmitters
CCM or Host Computer to Multipte CCMs
Using Modems
RS-232D CCM to Multiple CCMs
Using Modems
CCM to Multiple CCMs (4-Wire Multidrop)
Host to Multiple CCM3s in RTU Mode
(4-Wire Multidrop)
CCM to Multiple CCMs (2-Wire Multidrop)
Host to Multiple CCM3s in RTU Mode
(2-Wire Multidrop)
Keying Signal Usage
Grounding
Test Diagnostics
Module Diagnostics
Power-Up Diagnostics
Reinitialize
Diagnostics
Serial Interface Diagnostics (Test 1)
CPU/CCM Communications
CPU Scan
CCM Communications Windows
CPU [STATUS] Function
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GEK-25364
CONTENTS
Page
Chapter 2: Communications Control Modules (CCM2, CCM3) (Continued)
CPU/CCM Programming
CCM [SCREQ] Command Uses and Categories
Internal Commands
Port Commands
CPU to CPU Transfer
CCM to Remote CPU Transfer
Q Response Transfer
Character String Transfer
(Unformatted Data Transfer)
[SCREQ] Function Activation
[SCREQ] Register Assignments
Rn : Command Number
Rn+l: Target ID
Rn+2: Target Memory Type
Rn+3: Target Memory Address
Rn+4: Data Length
Rn+5: Source Memory Address
CCM Communication Request Status and
Diagnostic
Information
CCM Status Byte
Status Byte Definition (CCM and RTU)
CCM Diagnostic Status Words
Status Word Definition
Serial Port Error Codes
SCREQ Error Codes
[SCREQ] Command Programming Examples
Internal Commands
Port Commands
Operator Interface Unit (OIU)
Capabilities of the OIU
Configuring the CCM for OIU Operation
Hardware Configuration
Software Configuration
Simultaneous Port Operation
Permissable Simuitaneous Operations
Attempting Non-Permissible Simultaneous
Operations
RTU Protocol on one Port and CCM Protocol
on the Other Port
RTU Protocol on Both Ports
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Contents
GEK-25364
CONTENTS
Page
Chapter 3: Input/Output Communication Control Module (I/O CCM)
Introduction to the I/O CCM
Module
Specifications
Description of User Items
Installing the I/O CCM Module
I/O CCM Power Requirements
Configuring the I/O CCM Module
Positioning the Hybrid DIP Package
Setting the Module Address
Configuring the Communications Ports
Switch Bank A (Port 1)
Switch Bank B (Port 2)
Switch Bank C (Port 1)
Positioning the I/O CCM in the Rack
Cable Configuration
Cable
Specifications
Port Characteristics and Wiring (Jl, J2)
Cable Diagrams
RS-232D Cables
RS-422 Cables
Current Loop Cables
Power-Up and Diagnostic Testing
LED Power-up Status Indicators
Programming the I/O CCM
Programming the DPREQ
Establishing I/O CCM to CPU
Communications Windows
Running at the DPU Executive Window
I/O Terminator Plug (DPU)
Installing the I/O CCM (in CPU Rack)
Installing the l/O CCM (in I/O Rack)
Communications Command and Parameter Registers
Command Register (DPU Executive Window)
I/O CCM Status Byte
DPREQ Windows
DPU Executive Windows
Expanded Memory Mapping
Operational Information
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Contents
GEK-25364
CONTENTS
Page
Chapter 4: CCM Serial Interface Protocols
Introduction to CCM Protocol
Asynchronous Data Format
Control Character Coding
Peer-to-Peer Protocol
Enquiry Sequence
Enquiry Collision
Peer-to-Peer Protocol Format
Peer-to-Peer Flow Charts
Peer Request Initiate Sequence, Source Device
Peer Request Receive Sequence, Target Device
Peer Write Data Blocks
Peer Read Data Blocks
Master-Slave Protocol
Enquiry Response Delay
Normal Sequence, Master-Slave
Normal Sequence Protocol Format
Master-Slave Normal Sequence Flow Charts
Normal Sequence, Master
Normal Response, Slave
Write Data Blocks
Read Data Blocks
Q Sequence, Master-Slave
Q Sequence Flow Charts
Q Sequence, Master
Q Response, Slave
Header Blocks
Target ID (Bytes 2,3)
Data Flow Direction and Target Memory Type
(Bytes 4, 5)
Target Memory Address (Bytes 6, 7, 8, 9)
Number of Complete Data Blocks (Bytes 10, 11)
Number of Bytes in Last Data Block (Bytes 12, 13)
Source ID (Bytes 14, 15)
Data Text Blocks
CCM Header Example
Serial Link Time-Outs
Turn-Around Delays
Programmable Retries and Timeouts for CCM
Serial Link Communication Errors
lnvalid Header
lnvalid Data
Invalid NAK, ACK, or EOT
Serial Link Time-Out
Writing to CPU Scratch Pad
CPU Run and Command Status
Subroutine Vector Addresses
Scratch Pad Memory Allocation
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GEK-25364
CONTENTS
Chapter 5:
RTU Communications Protocol
lntroduction
Message Format
Message Types
Query
Normal Response
Error Response
Broadcast
Message Fields
Station Address
Function Code
lnformation Field
Error Check Field
Character Format
Message Termination
Time-Out Usage
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC)
Calculating the CRC-16
Example CRC-16 Calculation
Calculating the Length of Frame
Message Descriptions
Read Output Table
Read Input Table
Read Registers
Force Single Output
Preset Single Register
Read Exception Status
Loopback/Maintenance
(General)
Return Query Data
Initiate Communication Restart
Force Listen Only Mode
Force Multiple Outputs
Preset Multiple Registers
Report Device Type
Read Output Overrride Table
Read Input Override Table
Read Scratch Pad Memory
Read User Logic
Write Output Override Table
Write Input Override Table
Write Scratch Pad Memory
Write User Logic
Communication Errors
lnvalid Query Message
Invalid Function Code Error Response (1)
Invalid Address Error Response (2)
Invalid Data Value Error Response (3)
Query Processing Failure Error Response (4)
Serial Link Time-Out
lnval id Transact ions
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Contents
xiv
GEK-25364
CONTENTS
Page
Chapter 6:
Communication Applications
6-1
Introduction
Using the CCM Status Byte for SCREQ
Interlocks and Sequencing
Ladder Logic Program 1
Using the CCM Diagnostic Status Words
Ladder Logic Program 2
Multidrop Polling Routine
Ladder Logic Program 3
6-1
6-1
Appendix A: Host Computer Communication Interface Software
Introduction
DEC Communication Interface Software Package
Features of DEC Software Package
Ordering Software
Types of Licenses
Single Computer Licence
Copy License
Corporate License
Forms of Software
Source Code
Object Code
Executable Code
Hardware and Software Requirements for
VAX Computers
Memory Requirements for DEC
Communications Interface Software
Catalog Numbers for Ordering Software
6-4
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6-15
6-l 9
6-21
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Packages
Description of DEC Software Operation
Description of Components
System Control Program
Communication Manager
Network Event Logger
Event Processor
Database Configurator Program
System Database
Simulator
FORTRAN Interface Routines
Privileges
Allowable Hardware System Configurations
Point-to-Point Connection
Point-to-Multipoint (GEnet) Network
Multidrop Network Connection
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GEK-25364
CONTENTS
Appendix B:
Expanded Functions
Introduction
Hardware ldentification
Expanded Functions Overview
Expanded l/O Reference
Expanded User Memory Reference
Single Bit Write
Programmable Timeouts and Retrys
Expanded I/O Translation
Series Six Plus I/O and CCM/RTU Point Mapping
CCM Single Bit Write
Single Bit Write Data Flow
Programmable Timeout and Retry
Appendix C: Glossary of Terms
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GEK-25364
FIGURES
Figure 1 .1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
Components of Series Six Serial Communications
Point-to-Point System Configuration
Multidrop System Configuration
GEnet System Configuration
Modems Used in the Communications Line
RS-232D Direct Connection Without Flow Control
RS-232D Modem Connection Without Flow Control
1-1
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1-3
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1-15
Figure 2.1
CCM to CCM, Modem, OIU, or Dumb Terminal
System Configuration
CCM2 to Host Computer, Color-Graphics Terminal, or
Microprocessor Based Device System Configuration
RS-422 Mult idrop Configuration
RS-232 Multidrop Configuration Using Modems
CCM Layout and User Items
CCM Hardware Configuration Diagram
CCM Location in Series Six PLC
CCM Location in Series Six Plus PLC
Connector Configuration -- Ports (J1, J2)
RS-232 CCM to CCM Connection
RS-232 CCM to Computer or Other Intelligent Device
RS-232 CCM to Modem without Flow Control
RS-232 CCM to Modem with Flow Control
RS-232 CCM to Dumb Terminal or Printer
RS-232 CCM to BIU (GEnet)
RS-232D to RS-422 Adaptive Unit
RS-422 Host to CCM
RS-422 CCM to CCM Connection
RS-422 Direct CCM to OIU Connection
RS-422 4-Wire CCM to GEnet BIU
RS-232D CCM to Multiple CCMs Using Modems (Multidrop)
RS-422 4-Wire Multidrop Connection
RTU, RS-422 4-Wire CCM to GEnet Connection
RS-422 2-Wire Multidrop Connection
RTU, RS-422 2-Wire Multidrop Connection
Radio Transmitter Keying Signal Diagram
CPU Scan
[STATUS] Function Format
Simplified [SCR EQ] Function Format
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I/O CCM Module Layout and User Items
RS-232/RS-422 Hybrid DIP Switch Package
l/O Backplane SWitch Package
RS-232D Point-to Point (Port 1) Connection
RS-232D Point-to-Point (Port 2) Connection
RS-422 Point-to Point Connection
RS-422 Multidrop Connection
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2.24
2.25
2.26
2.27
2.28
2.29
Figure 3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
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2-4
Contents
xvii
GEK-25364
FIGURES
Figure 3.8
3.9
3.10
3.11
3.12
3.13
3.14
Active Current Loop Data Transmit
Active Current Loop Data Receive
Passive Current Loop Data Transmit
Passive Current Loop Data Receive
Backplane DIP Switch Setting (DPU Window)
I/O Terminator Plug (for Non-l/O Rack Installation)
I/O Terminator Plug (for I/O Rack Installation)
3-14
3-14
3-15
3-15
3-19
3-20
3-20
Figure 4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
4.8
4.9
4.10
4.11
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.15
4.16
4.17
4.18
Data Transfer from Source to Target (Peer-to-Peer)
Data Transfer from Target to Source (Peer-to-Peer)
Peer Request Initiate Sequence, Source Device
Peer Request Receive Sequence, Target Device
Peer Write Data Blocks, Source or Target Device
Peer Read Data Blocks, Source or Target Device
Normal Enquiry Sequence
Data Transfer from Master to Slave
Data Transfer from Slave to Master
N Sequence, Master
N Response, Slave
Write Data Blocks, Master or Slave
Read Data Blocks, Master or Slave
Q Sequence Protocol Format
Q Sequence, Master
Q Response, Slave
Header Block Format
CCM Master Slave Timing Diagram
4-3
4-4
4-5
4-6
4-7
4-8
4-11
4-12
4-12
4-14
4-15
4-16
4-17
4-18
4-20
4-21
4-22
4-30
Figure 5.1
5.2
5.3
Query/Broadcast Transaction
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) Register
System Configuration Byte
Figure 6.1
Register Transfer from Slave to Master
Figure A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
System Component Interaction
Point-to-Point Connection
Point-to-Multipoint (GEnet) Network
Multipoint Network
Figure 6.1
Single Bit Write Data Flow
5-1
5-6
5-22
6-20
A-4
A-7
A-8
A-8
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B-6
t..
XVIII
Contents
GEK-25364
TABLES
ASCII Information Code Format
ASCII Code List
Serial Data Format
Standard (RS-232D) Communication Interface Signals
RS-422 Signal Cross Reference to EIA Standard
Page
1-6
1-7
1-12
1-14
1-16
Table 2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
2.15
2.16
2.17
2.18
2.19
2.20
2.21
2.22
CCM Hardware Configuration Table (Port J1)
CCM Hardware Configuration Table (Port J2)
Hardware Configuration Table (CCM, RTU)
RTU Hardware Configuration Table (Port J1)
RTU Hardware Configuration Table (Port J2)
Software Configuration Table
CCM Software Configuration Table - Bit Pattern
RTU Software Configuration Table - Bit Pattern
LED Indicator Power-up Codes
Port (J1, J2) Pin-out Definition
CPU Scan Time
CPU [STATUS] Function Operation
[SCREQ] Commands
Target/Source Memory Addresses
Data Length
Status Byte Definition (CCM and RTU)
Diagnostic Status Word Definition
CCM Serial Port Error Codes (Status Word 1)
CCM SCREQ Error Codes (Status Word 13)
Hardware Configuration for the OIU
Software Configuration for the OIU
Permissible Simultaneous Port Operations
2-15
2-16
2-17
2-18
2-19
2-21
2-22
2-24
2-28
2-31
3-47
2-48
2-54
2-58
3-60
2-61
2-63
2-65
3-67
2-86
2-88
2-89
Table 3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
Backplane DIP Switch l/O Address
Configuration Switches for Port 1 (Bank A)
Configuration Switches for Port 2 (Bank B)
Configuration Switches for Port 1 (Bank C)
RS-232D/RS-422 Cable Specifications
Port Connection Pin-out (J1, J2)
RS-422 Signal Cross-Reference to EIA
LED Power-up Error Codes
LED Power-up Status Indicators Description
3-6
3-7
3-8
3-9
3-l 0
3-11
3-14
3-16
3-17
Table 4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
ASCII Control Characters for CCM Protocol
Back-Off Times
Target Memory Types
CCM Header Example
Serial Link Time-Outs
Programmable Time-Outs for CCM
Scratch Pad Fields
4-1
4-3
4-23
4-25
4-26
4-27
4-29
Table 1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
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xix
Contents
GEK-25364
TABLES
Page
RTU Turn-Around Time
Table 5.1
5.2 RTU Message length
5-5
5-9
Table 6 . 1
6-9
Trial SCREQs using Command 06101, Read from Target
to Source Registers
Table A.1 Catalog Numbers for VAX Software
T a b l e B.1
B.2
B.3
B.4
B.5
Series Six Plus I/O Channel and Point Mapping
New Memory Types for CCM Bit Write Function
New SCREQs for Single Bit Write
Required Data Field for CCM Bit Write Function
New SCREQs and Default Values
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A-3
B-3
B-5
B-6
B-7
B-7
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Introduction to Series Six Data Communications
1-1
GEK-25364
CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION TO SERIES SIX DATA COMMUNICATIONS
INTRODUCTION TO DATA COMMUNICATIONS
Data communications is generally defined as the electronically encoded transmission of
information from one point to another. This chapter will expand on this definition by
describing the essential components of data communications emphasizing those areas
pertaining to Series Six(tm) Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs).
The reader should have some familiarity with the binary and hexadecimal numbering
systems and a basic understanding of programmable controllers. The information in this
chapter is intended as background information only. Specific information on Series Six
PLC Communications Control Modules (CCMs) and related topics can be found in later
chapters.
Figure 1.1 shows the main components necessary for serial communications between a
host computer or Series Six PLC and another Series Six PLC.
84pcOOOl
HOST
COMPUTER
SERIES SIX
SERIES
SIX
CPU
CPU
USER
PROGRAM
USER
PROGRAM
COMMUNICATIONS
CONTROL
COMMUNlCATtONS
CONTROL
t
SERIAL
LINE
INTERFACE
SERIAL
LINE
INTERFACE
J
I
SERIAL COMMUNICATION LINE
Figure 1 .l COMPONENTS OF SERIES SIX SERIAL COMMUNICATIONS
COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK (SYSTEM) CONFIGURATIONS
The term network (system) configuration refers to the way in which computers,
terminals, and communication equipment are interconnected. In Series Six PLC data
communications the following system configurations are possible:
-
Point-to-point
Multidrop
GEnet Local Area Network (LAN)
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Introduction to Series Six Data Communications
1-2
GEK-25364
POINT-TO-POINT
This is the simplest type of system configurat ion; in it only two devices can be connected
to the same communication line. Figure 1.2 is a block d iagram of the point-to-point
configuration.
84pc0007
HOST
COMPUTER
SERIES SIX
COMMUNlCATlON
LINE
SERIES SlX
OR
OTHER DEVICE
Figure 1.2 POINT-TO-POINT SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
MULTIDROP
The muttidrop configuration is a party-line structure in which several devices share the
same communication Iine. This line may be direct if RS-422 or RS-232D is used, or
indirect with modems if RS-232D is used. One device is a master and the rest are slaves;
only the master can initiate communication with other elements in the system. Figure
1.3 is a block diagram of the multidrop configuration.
84pcOOO9
HOST
COMPUTER
SERIES SIX
(MASTER)
h
SERIES SIX
(SLAVE)
NO. 2
Figure 1.3 MULTIDROP SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
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Introduction to Series Six Data Communications
1-3
GEK-25364
Multidrop or Point-to-Point Terminating Resistor
The Communications Control Module (CCM) is supplied with a 150 Ohm terminating
resistor in each RS-422 receiver circuit. If the module is at either end of an RS-422
multidrop or point-to-point link, these resistors should be in the circuit.
If the module is an intermediate drop in the multidrop link, the appropriate resistors
should be removed from the circuit by placing their jumpers in the storage position.
(Refer to Chapter 2 for detailed information concerning placement of these resistors.)
GEnet’” LOCAL AREA NETWORK (LAN)
For applications requiring much broader communications capabilities than the CCM can
provide; the GEnet Factory LAN is available. The GEnet Factory LAN is a 10 Mbps
broadband (5 Mbps for carrierband) token passing bus which provides high speed
communications between various types of processors such as Programmable Logic
Controllers (PLCs), Computer Numerical Controllers (CNCs), other high-level
factory-management control systems.
a42530
CNC With
MAP Option
series SIx family
With CCM
Series Five Family
With CCY
Series
Three Family
With DCY
Series One Family Series
Six Family
Wtth DCU
With LAN Interface
Series SIX Family
With LAN
Interface
Figure 1.4 GEnet SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
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l-4
Introduction to Series Six Data Communications
GEK-25364
The GEnet Factory LAN architecture is based on accepted industry standards set forth in
the Manufacturing Automation Protocol (MAP) specification. MAP services are based on
the Open System Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model developed by the International
Standards Organization (ISO).
Devices which use the CCM protocol can interface to the GEnet LAN through the GEnet
Bus Interface Unit (BIU). The BIU is tailored by loading device specific software to
provide the required interface to the various automation product.
The Series Six Plus PLC can be connected directly to the GEnet Factory LAN via the
Series Six LAN interface module. For more information refer to the GFK-0013, GEnet
Factory LAN Series Six PLC Network Interface User’s Manual.
The Data Communications Unit (DCU) is used to interface the Series One, Series One
Junior, and Series One Plus PLCs to the network via the BIU. Likewise, the Data
Communications Module (DCM) is used interface the Series Three PLC to the network via
the BIU. For detailed information refer to the GEK-90477, Series One/Series Three
Programmable Controllers Data Communications Manual.
For further information on connecting various devices, which use the CCM protocol, to
t h e G E n e t F a c t o r y L A N , r e f e r t o t h e GEnet Factory LAN System User’s Manual,
GEK-96608.
COMMUNICATION MODES (CCM, RTU)
Specific modes of communication are supported by each of the Communication Control
Modules. The CCM mode of operation supports peer, master, and slave communications.
The Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) mode of operation is a master/slave protocol. It is used
to link the PLC with a process controller, computer, or other intelligent device which
uses the RTU protocol. Only the master can initiate a communications request when
RTU mode is used. The CCM module can be configured only as an slave for RTU mode.
A summary of the Communication Control Modules (CCMs) with associated modes of
communication is listed below.
Module
Communication Modes
CCM2
CCM3
I/O CCM
CCM
CCM, RTU slave
CCM, RTU slave
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Introduction to Series Six Data Communications
1-5
GEK-25364
INITIATING
THE
COMMUNICATION
Transfer of data between a Series Six PLC and another device is initiated by a serial
communications request. The device which initiates the request is designated the source;
the device which receives the request, the target. This request resides in the user
program and contains the following information:
- Identification of the target device which is to receive the communications request.
- Direction of data transfer
- the requestor may choose to send or receive data.
- Address to which data is being transferred - in either source or target device.
- Address from which data is being transferred - in either source or target device.
- Amount of data being transferred.
COMMUNICATIONS
CONTROL
After the communications request is initiated by the user program of the source device,
the request information described above is transferred to communications control.
Communications control puts this information into the proper format for transmission via
the serial line interface. Serial transmission performs the following functions:
Encoding and decoding of required information according to a standard information
code.
Assembly and disassembly of the communications request information and data text
for transmission according to a set of rules or protocols.
Method of checking for errors which may occur during transmission.
SERIAL
COMMUNICATIONS
The operations on data explained thus far have occurred within the host computer or
Series Six and therefore have been in parallel, that is, in terms of 8-bit bytes or 16-bit
words. This is because within a computer or Series Six it is easier and faster to transfer
and manipulate data in parallel. When transferring information externally, however, the
cost of parallel transmission becomes prohibitive for distances more than a few feet.
Therefore, serial transmission is normally used between devices.
Once the communications request is initiated and the data is properly formatted
according to the protocols mentioned before, the serial line interface transmits it over
the communications line.
Figure 1 .1 shows a data transfer using the CCM protocol. The host may establish
communications with a target Series Six PLC by initiating the communications request
which begins with an enquiry sequence. To maintain the communications, the request
target (the remote Series Six) must acknowledge the enquiry within the appropriate time.
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Introduction to Series Six Data Communications
1-6
GEK-25364
After establishing communications, the source sends a header (containing information
necessary to transfer a block of data) to the target device. When the target receives this
information, data can either be transferred from source to target or from target to
source.
As characters are received by either device, the sequence discussed earlier for
transmitting characters is performed in reverse order. The incoming characters must
first be converted from serial to parallel, then the receiver must extract the characters
from the protocol to act upon them in the appropriate manner. Ultimately, information
is passed from one device’s memory to another device’s memory via user programs.
In the preceding text, key words or phrases about data communications have been
underlined. An explanation of these key words and phrases are given in the remaining
sections of this chapter.
INFORMATION CODES
An information code is a standard by which numbers, letters, symbols, and control
characters can be formed for serial transmission. In Series Six PLC communications,
characters in headers (discussed in the section, Protocols) as well as control characters
are encoded. Other characters such as those occurring in data, are uncoded binary data.
There are a number of different coding schemes used today, but the most common and
the type used in Series Six PLC communications is the American Standard Code for
Information Interchange or ASCII code.
As shown in the illustration below, the CCM uses an 8-bit character code plus an optional
parity bit to transfer serial data.
10
stop
9
Par i ty
(optional)
MSB
8
7
Data Bits
6
5
4
3
2
LSB
1
0
Start
Table 1.1 shows examples of the binary and hexadecimal forms, including parity bit, of
several ASCII characters. The parity bit is explained in the section, Parity Checking.
Table 1.2 contains a complete list of the ASCII character set represented in hexadecimal
and decimalTable 1.1 ASCII INFORMATION
BINARY FORM OF
CHARACTER
PARITY
BIT
CODE FORMAT
HEXADECIMAL FORM
OF CHARACTER
(odd) 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
0 2
(odd) 1
0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1
2B
(even) 1
0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
15
(even) 0
0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1
3 9
ASCI I
CHARACTER
STX (control char.)
Start Of Text
t
NAK (control char.)
Negative Ack.
9
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l-8
Introduction to Series Six Data Communications
GEK-25364
PROTOCOLS
A protocol is a set of rules which ensures the orderly transmission of data. In Series Six
PLC serial communications, it is the set of rules by which a communications link is
established and maintained between the device initiating the request (the source) and the
device receiving the request (the target). The example below illustrates Series Six CCM
peer-to-peer protocol. For a complete explanation of the CCM protocol, refer to
Chapter 4, CCM Serial Interface Protocol, and Chapter 5 for the RTU Protocol.
When a Series Six initiates a request, the foilowing sequence must occur for the data
transfer to take place.
3
S HEADER E L
O
H
Char. sent
from source
to target
A
A
K
K
III
l-1
A
C
K
Char. sent
from target.
to
source
1.
ENQ is an ASCII control character meaning ENQuire which seeks to determine
whether or not the target is ready.
2.
ACK is an ASCII control character meaning Acknowledge. (Device is ready to
communicate)
3.
The header block includes the following ASCII coded information:
SOH - ASCII control character meaning Start of Header.
ID of target device.
Direction of data transfer.
Type of data being transferred.
Target memory address for data being transferred.
Amount of data being transferred.
ID of source device.
ET6 - ASCII control character meaning End of Transmission Block.
LRC - Longitudinal Redundancy Checking.
4.
ACK - Acknowledge, header information is valid.
5.
The data block includes the following information:
STX - ASCII control character meaning Start of Text.
Uncoded binary data.
ETX - ASCII control character meaning End of Text.
LRC - Longitudinal Redundancy Checking.
6.
ACK - Acknowledge, data information is valid.
7.
EOT - ASCII control character meaning End of Transmission.
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introduction to Series Six Data Communications
l-11
GEK-25364
TRANSMISSION TIMING ERRORS
Timing problems between transmitter and receiver can produce other kinds of errors such
as overrun, framing, and time-out errors. All of these types of errors are detected by the
CCM and reflected by a change in the module Light Emitting Diode (LED) display.
Overrun
If timing problems between the transmitter and receiver cause characters to be sent
faster than the receiver can handle them, then this produces a situation known as
overrun. In this case the previous character is overwritten and an error is indicated.
Framing Errors
In asynchronous transmission (see section, Asynchronous Transmission) this type of error
occurs when the receiver mistakes a logic 0 data bit or a noise burst for a start bit. The
error is detected because the receiver knows which bit after the start bit must be a logic
1 stop bit. In the case where the start bit is really a data bit, and the expected stop bit is
not the stop bit but a start or data bit the framing error will be reported.
Time-out Errors
Time-outs are used to ensure that a good link exists between devices during a
communication. When a source device initiates a communication, the target must
respond within a certain a m o u n t o f t i m e o r a t i m e - o u t w i l l o c c u r c a u s i n g t h e
communication to be aborted. In a Series Six PLC communication, there are a number of
instances during a serial communication in which a time-out can occur. For a detailed
explanation of these instances refer to the section (Serial Link Time-out) in Chapter 4,
CCM Serial Interface Protocol.
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Introduction to Series Six Data Communications
1-16
GEK-25364
RS-449, RS-422, and RS-423
RS-449, RS-422, and RS-423 comprise a “family of standards” reflecting advances in
integrated circuit technology. These standards permit greater distance between
equipment and a higher maximum data rate, therefore they are often used for direct
connection. RS-422 and RS-423 are standards which define electrical interface
characteristics. RS-449 is a standard, used in conjunction with RS-422 and RS-423,
which defines the connector pin assignments, cable and connector characteristics, and
control signal sequences. RS-423 is an unbalanced voltage interface similar to RS-232D.
RS-422 is a balanced or differential voltage interface in which the signal lines are
isolated from ground unlike the unbalanced circuit. One of the interface options which
can be used in Series Six serial communications is based on the RS-422 and RS-449
standard. The basic characteristics of RS-422 and RS-449 (referenced as RS-422 in this
manual) are:
- Maximum cable length:
4000 feet (1200 meters).
- Maximum data rate:
100 KBps at 4000 feet and 10 MBps at 40 feet (12
meters).
-
Logic assignments; differential inputs not referenced to ground:
Circuit A is +200 mv to + 6 v with respect to circuit B.
Circuit A is -200 mv to - 6 v with respect to circuit B.
Space or logic 0:
Mark or logic 1:
-
37 pin or 9 pin D-type connector.
- 30 interchange circuits.
The RS-422 signal nomenclature used in this manual can be cross referenced to the
RS-422 EIA standard as follows:
Table 1.5 RS-422 SIGNAL CROSS-REFERENCE TO THE EIA STANDARD
FUNCTION
Send Data
Send Common
Receive Data
Receive Common
Signal Ground
RS-422 STANDARD SIGNAL NAME
t
t
-
(TXD+)
(TXD-)
(RXD+)
(RXD-)
B
A
B’
A’
GND
During a mark condition (logic 1), B will be positive with respect to A.
During a space condition (logic 0), B will be negative with respect to A.
For a complete explanation of the electrical and mechanical characteristics of these
interfaces, see EIA Standards RS-449, RS-422, and RS-423, and refer to Chapter 2.
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Introduction to Series Six Data Communications
1-17
GEK-25364
Current Loop
There is no true standard for this type of interface. It is normally used when the local
environment contains excessive electrical noise from machinery. There are many types of
current loop interfaces based on different voltage levels. It is not a modem interface like
the RS-232D standard, and generally contains just the transmit and receive data signals.
Since there is no proper standard for current loop, the characteristics below are
approximations only.
- Maximum cable length:
4000-5000 feet (1200-1500 meters).
- Maximum data rate:
1200 Bps at 4000-5000 feet and 9600 Bps at 500-1000
feet (150-300 meters).
- Logic assignments:
Polar working:
Neutral
working:
Mark or logic 1 - Current flow in one direction
Space or logic 0 - Current flow in opposite direction.
Mark or logic 1 - Presence of current
Space or logic 0 - Absence of current.
Current loop is only supported on the I/O CCM module.
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Communications Control Modules (CCM2/CCM3)
2-1
GEK-25364
CHAPTER 2
COMMUNICATIONS CONTROL MODULES (CCM2/CCM3)
INTRODUCTION TO THE CCMs
Communication Control Modules (CCM2 and CCM3) are Series Six PLC modules
containing--two communications ports, two switches, and four indicator lights--for
connection, control, and status of the module. Physically, the CCM2 and CCM3 (CCM)
modules are the same. Unless otherwise indicated, CCM applies to both CCM2 and CCM3.
The primary difference between the CCM2 and CCM3 modules is that the CCM3 module
supports 2-modes of operation: C C M p r o t o c o l a n d R e m o t e T e r m i n a l U n i t (RTU)
The CCM2 module supports only the CCM protocol. Options for data rate,
protocol .
protocol, turn-around delay, and parity can be selected for both the CCM2 and CCM3 by
hardware, using DIP switches, and by software, using configuration registers.
The main purpose of the CCM is to provide a serial interface between the Series Six PLC
and any intelligent device which can support communications based on the CCM or RTU
protocol and CCM electrical interface requirements. Examples of intell igent devices
which can be interfaced to the CCM are:
- DCU in Series One PLC family of controls
- DCM in Series Three PLC family of controls
- CCM2, CCM3, I/O CCM or OptiBASlC OIT
- Host computer or microprocessor based device
- Color-graphics terminal
G E n e t Factory LAN (Local Area Network) BIU (Bus Interface Unit)
In addition, the CCM provides an interface to the following:
-
-
Handheld Operator Interface Unit (OIU) which can monitor and modify
the CPU registers and l/O points
Dumb terminal or printer
Workmaster
or IBM PC computer
VuMaster
color graphics system
Host device emulating an RTU master
The CCM is capable of initiating data transfers to and from any Series Six PLC memory
type including register tables, input and output tables, override tables, scratchpad, and
user logic. During these data transfers, the status of the communications link is
continuously displayed by the DATA OK light.
If a Series Six PLC with CCM is connected to a host computer or other device that is not
a Series Six, the user must write or buy the software necessary to communicate with the
CCM module. The details needed to write the communications software to interface a
host with the CCM are given in Chapter 4, CCM Serial Interface Protocols. Also,
information on communications software packages currently available can be found in
Appendix A, Host Computer Interface Software.
The Series Six Plus PLC with expanded microcode increases the number of user
addressable I/O points. Expanded microcode allows addressing of channeled I/O points
with the Series Six instruction set. The l/O points can be accessed by the CCM2 module
in CCM mode, and the CCM3 module in either the CCM or RTU mode. The expanded
microcode also allows addressing of the Auxiliary I/O Override table. CCM mode
supports this addressing, but RTU mode does not support this feature.
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2-2
Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
GEK-25364
Expanded user memory reference allows addressing up to 64K of the user logic memory.
The expanded user logic memory is supported by both the CCM and RTU protocol. Refer
to Appendix B, for information concerning Expanded Functions.
GEnet is a Local Area Network (LAN) that provides expanded communication capabilities
between various types of processors such as Programmable Logic ControIIers (PLCs),
Computer Numerical Controllers (CNCs), other high-level factory-management control
systems. Interface units compatible with the CCM protocol may access the network
using the GEnet Bus Interface Unit (BIU).
MODES OF OPERATION
Two-modes of communication are supported by the Communication Control Modules:
CCM protocol for both the CCM2/CCM3 modules, and RTU protocol for the CCM3
module only.
CCM MODE
When the CCM3 is in CCM mode, operation is identical to the CCM2 except that the
following protocol options of the CCM2 do not exist on the CCM3.
-
_
RS-422 with clock on port Jl
Test 1 on port J2
These options are not available for the CCM3 because the hardware DIP switch settings
and the bit pattern used for the software configuration registers are reserved to select
the RTU mode for ports J1 and J2.
RTU MODE
In Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) mode the CCM3 is a slave device designed to link with a
host computer or other intelligent device capable of emulating RTU master protocol.
When using this mode, the CCM3 is capable of accessing the following Series Six PLC
memory types: register tables, input and output tables, override tables, scratchpad, and
user logic.
In addition, several Serial Communications REQuests which do not use the CCM protocol
(e.g., the Write and Read Character String commands) can be initiated by application
programming when using RTU Protocol.
CCM INTERFACE
Both CCM2 and CCM3 provide RS-232D and RS-422 electrical interface capability.
RS-232D can be used for direct connections at a maximum distance of 50 feet (15
meters); RS-422, for direct connections up to 4000 feet (1200 meters). The CCM can be
connected directly to short haul or telephone line modems via RS-232D if longer
transmission distances are required than are capable using RS-422.
Short Haul Modem
This type of modem is used when direct connections over wires can be made in the range
of about 5000 to 50,000 feet (1500 to 15,000 meters). It is capable of transmitting up to
9600 Bps and operates in the full-duplex mode.
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Communications Control Modules (CCM2/CCM3)
2-3
GEK-25364
Telephone Line Modem
This type of long line modem is used over conventional telephone lines or microwaves for
virtually unlimited distances at rates of 300 or 1200 Bps in either full or half duplex. The
following long line modem types are compatible with the CCM.
Bell 103
Bell 212
Concurrent Use of CCM3 in RTU Mode and CCM Mode
One CCM3 communication port can be configured in CCM mode at the same time that
the other port is configured in RTU mode. Restrictions regarding the use of the 2 modes
concurrently are given in a later section of this chapter, Simultaneous Port Operations.
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION AND PROTOCOL
A system configuration refers to the way in which multiple Series Six PLCs or other
elements are combined to form a communications network. The CCM protocol supports
three types of system configurations and the RTU protocol supports two types of system
configurations as follows:
CCM Protocol
RTU Protocol
Point-to-point
Multidrop
GEnet
Point-to-point
Mult idrop
System diagrams which follow show the basic structure of the various configurations. For
details on the connecting cables, see section Cable Connectors and Specifications.
POINT-TO-POINT
In the point-to-point configuration only two devices can be connected to the same
communication Iine. The communication line can be directly connected using RS-232
(50 feet, 15 meters maximum) or RS-422 (4000 feet, 1200 meters maximum). Modems
can be used for longer distances.
The CCM protocol selection in point-to-point communications can be peer, for
peer-to-peer protocol, or master or slave for master-slave protocol. In a peer-to-peer
system composed of two CCMs, either of the devices can initiate communications.
Several examples of the combination of elements possible with the point-to-point
configuration are shown below.
Combination of Elements
CCM or RTU mode to computer, process
control system, color graphics terminal
or other microprocessor based device
CCM to CCM mode
CCM or RTU mode to modem
-“-CCM mode to Operator Interface Unit
(OIU)
CCM mode to Dumb Terminal
GEnet to CCM mode
Compatible Interface Types
RS-2320, RS-422
RS-232D,
RS-232D,
RS-422
RS-232D,
RS-232D,
RS-422
RS-422
RS-422
RS-422
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Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
2-6
GEK-25364
RS-232D Using Modems
This configuration is used for long distance communication, primarily over telephone
l lines.
The maximum number of slaves on the line is determined by the modem
capabilies. A maximum of 90 slaves is possible with
RS-232D using modems in the CCM
mode, and 247 for RTU mode.
.
a4267 1
MASTER
DEVICE
I
I
RS-232
CABLE
50 FEET
MAXIMUM
MODEM 1
ANALOG
SIGNAL
ON
/
4-WIRE LINES
OR PRIVATE
LINE
CCM
RS-232
CABLE
50 FEET
MAXIMUM
I CCM
RS-232
CABLE
50 FEET
MAXIMUM
MODEM
(SWITCHED
CARRIER)
Figure 2.4 RS-232D MULTIDROP CONFIGURATION USING MODEMS
RS-232D Using Modems and Microwave or Radio Transmitters
This configuration is used where cables cannot be used between modems. The FCC
normally requires the use of single frequency transmitters with short transmitter-on
times. Therefore, a warm-up delay for the radio transmitter must be added before each
transmission. The CCM keys the radio transmitter to warm up and wait a short time
before actually transmitting the data.
The various time-out values for the
communication protocol are increased to include the added delay.
The wiring scheme, when using microwave or radio transmitters, depends on the
particular modems and transmitters used. Consult your local GE Fanuc Automation
salesperson or Application Engineering, for assistance.
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Communications Control Modules (CCM2/CCM3)
2-7
GEK-25364
GEnet LAN INTERFACE
GEnet is a Local Area Network (LAN) through which many devices can be
interconnected. The Series Six PLC can be connected to network with either the GEnet
LAN, CCM, or I/O CCM interface modules in the Series Six CPU rack or Bus Interface
Unit (BIU).
Each Bus Interface Unit (BIU), which permits access to GEnet, can support a maximum of
CCMs, then additional BlUs can be
16 CCM slaves. If it is desired to interconnect more
used. A maximum of 254 Series Six PLCs with CCMs can be connected to GEnet.
Figure 1.4, in Chapter 1, shows an overview of the GEnet Factory LAN Interface and
some of many devices that can be interconnected to communicate with the network.
For detailed information refer to:
GEK-96608 GEnet Factory LAN System User’s Manual provides information
concerning the system components and network interconnection.
G F K - 0 0 1 3 G E n e t F a c t o r y L A N S e r i e s S i x PLC N e t w o r k I n t e r f a c e U s e r ’ s M a n u a l
provides detailed information for installing, programming and troubleshooting the
network.
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Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
2-8
GEK-25364
MODULE SPECIFICATIONS
Space Requirements:
One communications slot in either a Series Six CPU rack or
Series Six Plus CPU rack.
Power Requirements:
+5 Vdc, +12 Vdc, -12Vdc (Rack CPU power supply)
17
4
4
U n i t s o f l o a d : CCM2/CCM3
Storage Temperature:
0C to 70C
Operating
0C to 60C (ambient temperature)
Temperature:
5% - 95% (non-condensing)
Humidity:
DESCRIPTION OF THE CCM USER ITEMS
C.
D.
E.
Faceplate
Single Pole/Double/Throw Center OFF Switch
Single Pole/Double/Throw Center OFF Switch
Switches A and B are used for CCM error diagnostics. (Both switches perform the
same function in either the UP or DOWN position)
LED Indicators 1 to 4 (Refer to Table 2.10)
J1 Connector: 25pin “D” type female connector for RS-232D and RS-422.
J2 Connector: 9-pin “D” type female connector for RS-232D and RS-422.
1.
2.
3.
DIP Switches 9 to 16, Configuration Selection for J1 (Reference Table 2.1, 2.4)
DIP Switches 1 to 8, Configuration Selection for J2 (Reference Table 2.2, 2.5)
DIP Switches 18 to 20, and Miscellaneous Selections (Reference Table 2.3)
A.
B.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Jumper
Jumper
Jumper
Jumper
a. Jumper
Jumper
9.
Jumper
Jumper
10. Jumper
11. Jumper
JP1 : Always set in 1-2 position
JP2: Always set in 1-2 position
JP3: Always set in 1-2 position
JP5: Always set in 1-2 position
JP4: 1-2 position OIU DISABLE
JP4: 2-3 position OIU ENABLE
JP6: 1-2 position disconnects +5V from pin 20 of Port J1
JP6: 2-3 position connects +5V from pin 20 of Port J1
JP7: Always set in 1-2 position
JP8: Always set in 1-2 position
12. See installation of RS-422 interfaces for terminating resistor configuration
Jumper T2: J 2 RS-422 receiver circuit
Jumper T4: RS-422 clock input
Jumper T6: J1,
RS-422 receiver circuit
Jumper T8: Always set in storage position
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Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
2-10
GEK-25364
DESCRIPTION OF MODULE FUNCTIONS
A brief description of the CCM communication characteristics is included in this section
followed by a complete explanation of each of these functions in later portions of this
chapter.
Also, refer to the Module Compatability information located in the Preface of this manual
for more information concerning hardware/software features and module compatability.
The CCM communication characteristics may be selected as either hardware or software
with the appropriate jumpers and DIP switch selection on the module. If the software
configuration is selected, a Series Six programmer (e.g., the Workmaster) is also required
to complete the software configuration.
Selectable CCM module functions are:
Data Rate (300 to 38.4 KBps)
Protocol -- CCM and
RTU
Line Interface -RS-232D, RS-422
(0 to 500 msec)
Turn-Around Delay
Parity (Odd, Even, or None)
DATA RATE
The data rates available are as listed in tables starting with Table 2.1. Other data rates
are provided for special purpose interfaces which include modems or radio transmitters
which limit allowable rates.
300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,19.2K, 38.4 KBps
The factory set position is 19.2 KBps.
PROTOCOL
The two-modes of communication are the CCM protocol for the CCM2/CCM3 module, and
the RTU protocol for the CCM3 module.
CCM Protocol
The CCM protocol options are:
Peer-to-Peer
Master-Slave
Test 1
Peer-To-Peer
A CCM module configured as peer for peer-to-peer communications can communicate
with any other device configured as a peer. The peer-to-peer configuration allows either
peer device to initiate a communication request.
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Communications Control Modules (CCM2/CCM3)
2-11
GEK-25364
Master-Slave
In the CCM mode, the CCM may be configured either as the master or slave device. When
a CCM is configured as a master, for master-slave communications, the CCM can only
communicate with another device or multiple devices configured as a slave. Only a master
can initiate a communication request.
When the CCM is configured as a slave, the CCM can only communicate with another
device configured as a master. A slave responds only to a communication request from a
master.
Test 1
Test 1 is a special configuration used for test diagnostics.
in a later section; CCM Power-Up Diagnostic Tests.
These diagnostics are explained
RTU Protocol
RTU protocol is a master-slave protocol whereby the CCM3 module can be configured as a
RTU slave. It is used on a link with a process controller, computer, or other intelligent
device capable of emulating RTU master protocol.
Only the master can initiate a communications request when RTU protocol is used. There
are, however, a limited number of serial communications requests which do not use the
CCM protocol that can be initiated by the application program.
The RTU function options can be configured by hardware, using jumpers and DIP switches;
or by software, using configuration registers R0247 and R0248.
LINE INTERFACES
The CCM line interface options are RS-232D and RS-422. Specific line interfaces for the
CCM2 and CCM3 modules are as follows:
CCM2 Module
CCM3 Module
RS-232D
RS-422
RS-422 with clocks
RS-232D
RS-422
RS-2320
The RS-232D interface may be selected for the CCM mode with either master-slave or
peer-to-peer protocol, but slave protocol only for the RTU mode. When making direct
connections using RS-232D, the CTS (clear to send) and RTS (request to send) lines can be
used if connected to a device which supports them or they can be disabled by jumpering
them together on both ends of the connecting cable. When connecting through moderns,
CTS and RTS might or might not be used depending on the type of modem. The RTS and
CTS signals correspond to the standard Data Terminal Equipment (DTE) usage as
explained below.
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Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
2-l 2
CEK-25364
-
When the CCM has nothing to transmit, the handshake output line (RTS) is in the fake
state.
-
When the CCM has received a command to transmit some data, the handshake output
line is set to true.
- After an optional turn-around delay, the CCM will check the handshake input line
(CTS) and begin transmitting the data if the handshake input line is true.
-
When the CCM has no more data to transmit, the handshake output Iine (RTS) will be
set false after the last data character is transmitted.
If the handshake input line (CTS) changes back to false before the CCM is finished
transmitting, the CCM will stop transmitting at a character boundary and wait for the
handshake input line (CTS) to change back to true.
-
When flow control is used, the device implementing it must also guarantee that (CTS)
will become false anytime (RTS) is set to false at the end of a data block.
These rules explain the transmit function only. The standard DTE data receive function
is independent of the RTS and CTS handshake lines. The DTE is able to receive data at
any time.
RS-422
The RS-422 interface
peer-to-peer protocol,
is used primarily for
total length of cable
(including all drops) is
may be selected for the CCM mode with either master-slave or
but slave protocol only for the RTU mode. This type of interface
direct connection for both point-to-point and muitidrop links. The
that can be used on either point-to-point links or multidrop links
4000 feet (1200 meters).
The CTS/RTS flow control works for RS-422 links also. When making direct connections,
the CTS/RTS lines may be jumpered together on both ends of the connecting cable.
RS-422 With Clock
This interface is supported for peer-to-peer protocol on a CCM2 module only. Only,
CCM2 Port J1, provides for the use of external synchronizing clocks. These clock signals
are used with synchronous modems. The CCM2 outputs a clock signal to the modem
corresponding to the data rate. The CCM2 in turn uses the incoming clock signal from
the modem to synchronize on incoming data.
TURN-AROUND
DELAY
This refers to a delay in the amount of time before sending a control character, start of
header, or start of a data block for the CCM protocol. The delay options for CCM
protocol are as follows:
- 0 msec. for any CCM to CCM connection
- I0 msec. for situations causing slow response connections
- 500 msec. for radio transmission
- 500 msec. with time-outs disabled for testing
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2-14
Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
GEK-25364
MODULE
CONFIGURATION
The CCM module functional options can be configured by hardware, using jumpers and
Dual-In-Line (DIP) switches; or by software, using configuration registers R0247 and
R0248. Selection of the CCM functional operation is explained in the tables on the
following pages.
Hardware Configuration
Software Configuration
Complete the hardware/software module configuration prior to installing the CCM
module into the Series Six CPU.
HARDWARE
CONFIGURATION
Terminating resistors, hardware jumpers, and Dual-In-Line (DIP) switches located on the
CCM are used to select desired option within each function. Before installing the module
into the PLC rack, select the desired options.
-
Set the on-board DIP Switches
Verify Terminating Resistors
DIP Switch Settings
The CCM module DIP switches are used to select the desired option within each
function.
Hardware configuration tables on the following pages, shows the options
available for the CCM and RTU modes of operation. All options except the required
positions (as indicated) can be changed to meet user needs.
Refer to the Configuration Tables beginning with Table 2.1, and Figure 2.6 Hardware
Configuration Diagram.
Terminating Resistors
The CCM module is also is supplied with a 150 Ohm terminating resistor in each RS-422
receiver circuit. If the module is at either end of an RS-422 multidrop or point-to-point
link, these resistors should be in the circuit. If the module is an intermediate drop in the
multidrop link, the appropriate-resistors should be removed from the circuit by placing
their jumpers in the storage position. (Refer to Table 2.3, CCM Hardware Configuration
and the Description of the CCM User Items.)
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Communications Control Modules (CCM2/CCM3)
2-27
GEK-25364
INSTALLING THE CCM MODULE (continued)
2.
Construct and install the CCM communication cable for port J1 or J2. Refer to Table
2.10 Port Characterist ics (J1 , J2) pin-out definition.
3.
Power up and test the CCM to verify that the module is operating properly.
To determine if the CCM is working properly, power up the module with factory
settings for the jumpers and switches. This w il I cause a short diagnostic test to be
performed by the CCM. The four lights on the faceplate cycle ON and OFF in a
pattern indicating the progress and results of the diagnostic test. At the end of the
test all lights should remain ON to show its successful completion. A further
explanation of this test can be found in the following section, Power-Up Diagnostic
Testing.
NOTE
Some older Series Six CPUs require a modification to operate with
the CCM. If you have a Model 60 or 600 manufactured before fiscal
week 38, 1981 or a Model 6000 manufactured before fiscal week 44,
1981, contact GE Fanuc Automation about the modification. To
determine the date of manufacture, first locate the serial number
on the CPU. The date of manufacture is indicated by the four
numbers following C188, the first two of which indicate the year
and the second two, the fiscal week.
Also, refer to the Module Compatability information located in the
P r e f a c e o f t h i s manual for more information concerning
hardware/software features and module compatability.
The ladder logic examples and programming information provided later in this chapter
may also be used to verify that the CCM is communicating properly. Refer to the
section later in this chapter, CPU/CCM Programming.
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Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
GEK-25364
ELECTRICAL INTERFACE CIRCUITS
The CCM module supports two types of system cable configurations Point-to Point and
Mult idrop.
In the Point-to-Point configuration only two devices can be connected to the same
communication Iine. The communication line can be directly connected using RS-232D
(50 feet, 15 meters maximum) or RS-422 (4000 feet, 1200 meters maximum). Modems
can be installed for longer distances.
When configured for CCM mode, in the multidrop configuration, more than two devices
can be connected to the same communication line. One CCM or host device is configured
as a master and one or more CCMs are configured as slaves. In the RTU mode, a host
computer is configured as a master and one or more CCMs are configured as slaves. A
master is capable of initiating communications; a slave is not. There are three ways to
connect CCMs in the multidrop configuration: RS-422 direct, RS-232D using modems,
and RS-232D using modems and microwave or radio transmitters.
RS-422 Direct: This method can be used when the maximum distance between the
master and the last slave does not exceed 4000 feet (1200 meters). This distance assumes
good quality cables and a moderately “noisy” environment. A maximum of eight slaves
can be connected using RS-422422in a daisy chain or multidrop configuration. The RS-422
line may be of the 2-wire or 4-wire type.
RS-232D Using Modems: This configuration is used for long distance communication,
primarily over telephone Iines. The number of slaves possible is determined by the
modem capabi I i ties.
RS-232D Using Modems and Microwave or Radio Transmitters: This configuration is
used where cables cannot be used between modems. The FCC normally requires the use
of single frequency transmitters with short transmitter-on times.
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Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
2-32
GEK-25364
CABLE AND CONNECTOR SPECIFICATIONS
- Cable connector to CCM Port J1 - Male, D-Subminiature Type, Cannon DB25P (solder
pot) with DB110963-3 Hood or equivalent (standard RS-232D connector)
- Cable connector to CCM Port J2 - Male, D-Subminiature Type, Cannon DE9P (solder
pot) with DE110963-1 Hood or equivalent
- Length, Maximum -
50 feet (15 meters) for RS-232D
4000 feet (1200 meters) for RS-422
- Overall shield
24 AWG (minimum)
-
Connector to external device - specified by external device manufacturer
- Cable Selection
The following cables provide acceptable operation at data rates up to 19.2K BPS for
RS-232D and distances up to 4000 feet for RS-422.
Belden
9184
Belden 9302
NEC 222P1SLCBT
At shorter distances (under 1000 feet, 300 meters) almost any twisted pair or shielded
twisted pair cable will work as long as the wire pairs are connected correctly.
When using RS-422, the twisted pairs should be matched so that both transmit siqnals
make up one twisted pair and both receive signals make up the other twisted pair. If
this is ignored, then cross-talk can result from the mis-matching which may affect
the performance of the communication system.
Best results have been obtained with General Semiconductor Industries Transzorb SA
series wired from each signal line to earth ground at both ends of the cable.
Grounding
Both the RS-232D and RS-422 require that the transmitter and receiver circuits be at the
same ground potential (within a few hundred millivolts). On the CCM, none of the
circuits are isolated from the Series Six chassis ground, which is also the “local” power
supply ground. In many cases this is not a problem. However, the user should insure that
the ground voltages are indeed within a few hundred millivolts of each other before
connecting the devices together.
A problem will exist only if the local power supply is exceptionally noisy, or if the Series
Six PLC rack or other device is floating with respect to this ground (which indicates an
incorrect or very unusual configuration). If the user’s configuration is such that the
grounds do not meet the above conditions, then isolating modems will be required instead
of a direct twisted pair hookup.
Communication cables should never be placed in the same trough or in
close proximity with power carrying cables. A good rule of thumb is to
allow at least one foot separation per 1000 watts (KVA) of power in the
carrying cable.
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2-36
Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
GEK-25364
RS-422 Cables
The RS-422 interface can be used for distances up to 4000 feet (1200 meters) for
point-to-point connections. On multidrop links the total length of cable used including
all drops cannot exceed 4000 feet.
The RS-422 signal nomenclature used in this manual can be cross referenced to the
RS-422 EIA standard as follows:
CCM SIGNAL NAME
RS-422 STANDARD SIGNAL NAME
B
A
B’
A’
RS-422 out + (TXD+)
RS-422 out R S - 4 2 2 i n + I%;!
RS-422 in - (RXD-)
During a mark condition (logic 1), B will be positive with respect to A. During a space
condition (logic 0), B will be negative with respect to A.
When connecting the CCM to a non-Series Six device using the RS-422 standard, the
non-Series Six device’s line receiver must contain “fail safe” capability. This means that
in an idle open, or shorted line condition, the output of the line receiver chip must
assume the “marking” state.
When using RS-422, the twisted pairs should be matched so that both transmit signals
make up one twisted pair and both receive signals make up the other twisted pair.
Terminating Resistors
When implementing an RS-422 link, the user must properly include or exclude a 150 Ohm
terminating resistor across the receiving circuits for optimum performance of the
transmission I ine.
Devices at both ends of an RS-422 multidrop or point-to-point link should include the
terminating resistor. Conversely, any device that is an intermediate drop in a multidrop
link should not include the terminating resistor. The appropriate resistors should be
removed from the circuit by placing the jumpers in the storage position. (See Table 2.3,
CHardware
CM
Configuration)
NOTE
Remove the terminating resistors for intermediate CCM modules in
the RS-422 multidrop configuration. Refer to Figure 2.6 and to
Tables 2.3
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Communications Control Modules (CCM2/CCM3)
2-45
GEK-25364
TEST DIAGNOSTICS
There are two types of diagnostics available to the user. The first type checks module
operation and the second checks the physical interface line.
- Module Diagnostics
- Serial Interface Diagnostics (Test 1 Mode)
Test 1 option is available for the CCM2 module only. The hardware DIP switch settings
on CCM3 are used to configure ports J1 and J2 for the RTU mode.
MODULE DIAGNOSTICS
When the CCM is powered-up a diagnostic test sequence is run which verifies whether or
not the module is functioning properly. This power-up diagnostic sequence is as follows:
Power-Up Diagnostics
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
A write/read test is performed on all of the CCM RAM.
A checksum test is performed on all of the CCM PROM.
The 8253 timer chip and 7201 USART are programmed and checked for proper
operation.
The module configuration is read to verify a valid configuration.
A write/read test is performed on the Series Six CPU.
A visual test of the indicators is then run to indicate that the previous steps of the
test were successful.
If any of the Power-Up Diagnostics (Steps 1-5 above fail, the BOARD OK light turns off
and the CCM will not operate. The specific error which occurred can be determined by
pressing either of the front panel switches and observing the resulting pattern of the
front panel lights (see section, Indicator Lights, Board OK).
Reinitialize Diagnostics
The reinitialize diagnostic occurs once every second when the module is powered-up and
idle. The purpose of this diagnostic is to reprogram the timer and USART at regular
intervals to prevent against accidental programming during a power glitch.
SERIAL INTERFACE DIAGNOSTICS (Test 1)
When the CCM2 is configured for Test 1 mode, the CCM2 will echo any characters that
are received in either port. This test corresponds to the BERT test (Bit Error Rate Test).
This test checks the physical line connected to the CCM2 without requiring a Series Six
user program to intitiate a data transfer. The user must supply a character generator
such as a communications analyzer to send characters to the CCM2 and then observe the
echo back from the CCM2.
When in this mode, the data rate and serial interface of both ports are determined by the
J1 port switches (9-16).
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Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
2-50
GEK-25364
CPU/CCM
PROGRAMMING
SCREQ commands are used to issue communication requests to the CCM module. This
section discusses specific [SCREQ] commands and the CPU programming required to
initiate them.
Three [SCREQ] port commands can be used with the RTU mode of operation. These
commands are:
-
Read Character String to Source Register Table
Write Character String from Source Register Table
Write then Read Immediate Character String
All other [SCREQ] commands described in this manual pertain to the CCM mode of
operation only.
CCM [SCREQ] COMMAND USES AND CATEGORIES
The main characteristics of the [SCREQ] command categories are given below. For
details of each type of [SCREQ] command, refer to the section, [SCREQ] Command
Programming Examples.
Internal
Commands
The internal [SCREQ] commands are numbered from 06000 to 06012. These commands
provide the means for a CPU to access its resident: CCM Quick Access Buffer (QAB),
Diagnostic Status Words, software memory protect function, and OIU timer and counter
configuration function.
Port Commands
There is an identical set of commands for both the J1 and J2 ports. J1 port commands
are numbered 06100-06128: J2 port commands are numbered 06200-06228. Four basic
types of data transfer commands can be implemented through the ports.
CPU to CPU Transfer
In this transfer, information is passed from CPU memory in one Series Six to CPU
memory in another Series Six, Series One, or Series Three PLC. The commands used to
implement this transfer include command numbers (06101-06106, 06201-06206; and
06111-06117, 06211-06217) and take the general form of:
Read
from
Target
(CPU
Memory
Type)
to
Source
(CPU
Memory
Type)
or
Write
to
Target
(CPU
Memory
Type)
from Source (CPU Memory Type)
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Communications Control Modules (CCM2/CCM3)
2-51
GEK-25364
CCM to Remote CPU Transfer
The QAB is a 1024 byte buffer resident on the CCM module; the Diagnostic Status Words
are also resident on the CCM and are used for communications error diagnostics. The
CCM to remote CPU transfer enables data to be transferred in both directions between
the CCM and an external CPU. The commands used to implement these transfers include
command numbers (06101-06106; 06201-06206 and 06111-061 17; 06211-06217) and take
the form of:
Read from Target <
(CPU
Memory
Type)
Write to Target
(CPU
Memory
Type)
> to Source
QAB
or
< Diagnostic Status Words ) from Source
These transfers are faster than the CPU to CPU transfer because they operate with the
CCM directly and do not have to wait for data to be transferred from the CPU to the
CCM. The QAB transfers operate in conjunction with internal commands, 06004-06009,
for loading and reading the QAB of the resident CCM.
Q Response Transfer
This is the fastest type of data transfer from one Series Six to another; it requires the
CCM master-slave protocol and transfers four 8-bit bytes of data at a time. An
abbreviated protocol sequence and the small amount of data capable of being transmitted
accounts for the speed of this transfer type. Command 06109, Read Q Response, is used
to initiate the transfer. This command operates in conjunction with internal command,
06001, which loads new data for the next Q response.
Character String Transfer (Unformatted Data Transfer)
This transfer type allows any ASCII character to be written out to a printer or dumb
terminal and for characters to be directly inputted from a dumb terminal. These
characters are transmitted verbatim, that is, not within the peer-to-peer or master-slave
protocol format. The commands used to implement this type of transfer are Read
Character String, 06108, 06208; Write Character String, 06118, 06218; and Write then
Read Immediate Character String, 06128, 06228.
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Communications Control Modules (CCM2/CCM3)
2-73
GEK-25364
SET CPU MEMORY WRITE PROTECT
INTERNAL COMMAND : 06010
(177A)
DESCRIPTION
:
- This command provides the user with a mechanism to protect all
but a specified block of each CPU memory type from being
overwritten by an external serial device such as another CPU or
an Operator interface Unit (OIU).
- Exceptions to SCREQ register definitions:
Rn+2: Protected Memory Type
Rn+3: Starting Memory Address of unprotected block
Rn+4: Data Length of unprotected block
- If a data length of 00000 is specified then the entire memory type
is write protected.
- The Set CPU Memory Write Protect function can be executed for
each memory type. (Refer to Table 2. Status Byte Definition)
CCM Memory Type
o*
CCM Target Table
Absolute
Register Table
Input Table
Output Table
Input Override Table
Output Override Table
CPU Scratch Pad Memory
User Logic Memory
CCM Quick Access Buffer
CCM Diagnostic Status Words
1
2
3
4*
5*
6*
7*
8
9
* Memory types 0, 4, 5, 6, and 7 are protected by the CPU
memory switch.
- Cycling power on the CPU rack will remove the Write Protect
settings.
PROGRAM EXAMPLE Set the CPU Memory Write Protect so that only registers
R0001-R0050 can be written to in the CPU.
Rn
:
Rn+l:
Rn+2:
Rn+3 :
Rn+:
Rnt5:
0 6 0 1 0 (177A)
Command Number
Protected Memory Type
00001 (0001)
Starting Memory Address
0000l (0001)
Unprotected data length
00050 (0032)
NOTE
When using the Input, Output, input Override, and Output Override
tables, the memory address must begin on a byte boundary and the
data length must be a multiple of 8.
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Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
2-74
GEK-25364
INTERNAL COMMAND: 06011
(177B)
DESCRIPTION :
REINITIALIZECCM TIMER AND USART
- Execution of this command will cause the reinitialize diagnostic
to occur.
This diagnostic reads the CCM configuration
information either from DIP switches or from Registers R0247
and R0248 and programs the timer and USART for the desired
mode of operation.
- This command can be used when an error condition is detected or
when doing on-line configuration.
See section, Software
Configuration.
PROGRAM EXAMPLE : Reinitialize CCM Timer and USART
Rn
: 06011 (177B)
Rn+l: Rn+2:
Rn+3: Rn+4: Rn+5:
-
Command Number
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Communications Control Modules (CCM2/CCM3)
2-75
- ..--
GEK-25364
INTERNAL COMMAND: 06012
(177C)
SET OIU TIMERS AND COUNTERS
D E S C R I P T I O N : . This command defines the location of timers and counters for the
OIU function.
- The execution of this command will cause the CCM to define the
location and number of registers used for the presets and
accumulates for the OIU timers and counters.
-
Exceptions to the SCREQ register definitions:
Rn+2: Timer memory type = IO, Counter memory type = 11
Rn+3: Address of first preset register
Rn+4: Number of timers or counters
Rn+5: Address of first accumulator register
There must not be overlap in the address ranges defined for timer
and counter preset and accumulate registers.
A data length of 00000 specifies 0 counters or timers.
The maximum number of any combination of timers and counters
is 512.
The table default values are as follows:
Number of timers
Timer p r e s e t s
Timer accumulators
Number of counters
Counter presets
Counter accumulators:
:
24
: R e g i s t e r s R0011-R0034
: R e g i s t e r s R0061-R0084
: 24
: R e g i s t e r s R0036-R0059
Registers R0086-R0109
PROGRAM EXAMPLE: Assign 5 t i m e r s w i t h p r e s e t s b e g i n n i n g a t R 0 2 0 0 a n d
accumulators at R0205
Rn
:
Rn+l
Rn+2:
Rn+3 :
Rn+4:
Rn+5:
0 6 0 1 2 (177C)
Command Number
: 00010 (000A)
Timer Memory
00200 (00C8)
First Timer Preset Register
00005 (0005)
Number of Timers
00205 (00CD)
First Counter Preset Register
NOTE
CCM PROM Revision 258 (102 Hex) or higher is required for
Command 06012, Set OIU Timers and Counters, to work properly.
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Communications Control Modules (CCM2/CCM3)
2-85
GEK-25364
OPERATOR INTERFACE UNIT (OIU)
The Operator Interface Unit (OlU) is a hand-held device with the capability of monitoring
and changing specified contents of the CPU.
CAPABILITIES OF THE OIU
The OIU can perform the following functions:
Display
: Registers, inputs, outputs, and predefined timers and counters.
(Maximum of 2 registers, fimers, or counters at one time;
maximum of 4 inputs or outputs at one time.)
Display Register
Contents In
: Decimal, hexadecimal, signed decimal, and double
precision format.
Change
: Register, timer, and counter values.
Force
: Inputs or outputs ON or OFF.
Override
: Inputs or outputs.
Search For
: Inputs and outputs that are overridden.
Increment or
Decrement Address
of
: Registers, timers, counters, inputs, or outputs being
displayed.
There are two SCREQ commands directly associated with the OIU: 06010, Set CPU
Memory Write Protect and 06012, Set OIU Timers and Counters. To implement these
commands refer to the section, CPU/CCM Programming. Examples are given for both
command types.
NOTE
CCM PROM Revision 258 (102 Hex) or higher is required for
Command 06012, Set OIU Timers and Counters, to work properly.
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Communications Control Module (CCM2/CCM3)
2-90
GEK-25364
RTU PROTOCOL ON ONE PORT AND CCM PROTOCOL ON OTHER PORT
If one port is busy and an external request is made to the other port, the port receiving
the request will
send a negative acknowledge to the external device. The incoming
request enters a buffer and that request will be executed as soon as the other port is
finished.
The user must be aware that the buffer does not stack external requests. If a second
request is sent by the external device before the first request is serviced, the second
request will not be serviced.
Care must be taken to ensure that a request by an external device is executed within the
time required by the external device. A time-out could occur if the busy port is
communicating at a slow data rate or even at a higher data rate if large amounts of data
are being transmitted.
The only exception to the explanation above is when:
The RTU port is busy with a serial session and a Q sequence is initiated on the CCM
port.
In this case, if the RTU port is busy at the time a Q Sequence arrives on the other
port, the execution of the Q Sequence will be inter-leaved with the servicing of the
RTU port. The Q Sequence uses an efficient protocol and only transfers 4 bytes of
data at a time; therefore, the interruption should not present a timing problem on
the other port.
RTU PROTOCOL ON BOTH PORTS
Normally, communications can occur on both ports at the same time. If the port is busy
with an RTU request and a external request is received on the other port, the second
request will be buffered until the busy port becomes idle. The user must be aware that
the buffer does not stack external requests. If a third external request is sent before the
second request (which is in the buffer) is serviced, the third request will not be serviced.
Care must be taken to ensure that a request received on one RTU port, when the other
RTU port is busy, is executed within the time required by the external device.
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I/O CCM Control Module
3-1
GEK-25364
CHAPTER 3
INPUT/OUTPUT COMMUNlCATlONS CONTROL MODULE (I/O CCM)
INTRODUCTION TO THE I/O CCM
The Input/Output Communications Control Module (I/O CCM) provides a serial data link
between a Series Six Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) and host computer,
programmable terminal and many other intelligent devices. The l/O CCM resides in an
I/O slot in the Series Six PLC, and more than one I/O CCM is allowed in a CPU
configuration. Some devices which can be connected to the I/O CCM are:
-
CCM2, CCM3, or I/O CCM in a Series Six PLC.
-
Data Communications Unit (DCU) in a Series One, or Series One Plus or Series One
Junior PLC.
-
Data Communications Module (DCM) in a Series Three PLC.
- WorkMaster , VuMaster and FactoryMaster software running on the Workmaster
computer.
-
Intelligent devices such as a host computer.
- Process Control Systems.
The I/O CCM contains two independently configurable serial ports. Both ports support
RS-232D and RS-422 serial interfaces, with Port 1 also supporting active/passive 20 mA
current loop. Both ports support asynchronous serial communications with data rates of
up to 19.2 Kbps. The user may select any of the following options using Dual-In-Line
(DIP) switches.
-
Data rate: 110 to 19.2 Kbps. Maximum data rate is limited to 4800 Kbps for current
loop operation on Port 1.
-
Protocol type:
CCM - master, slave, or peer
Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) - RTU slave
- Parity: even, odd, or none
-
Turn-around delay: 0 or 500 msec (Port 2 only)
The I/O CCM can be used in communication systems using:
-
Multidrop modem based Iinks
-
Multidrop RS-422 links
-
Radio links (Port 2 only)
NOTE
As a master device port 1 or port 2 can be used in multidrop
configurations.
As a slave device only port 2 can be used in
multidrop configurations.
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I/O CCM Control Modules
3-2
GEK-25364
The I/O CCM module provides isolation of the serial port receivers and transmitters and
also provides 1500 volts of isolation protection from port to port and from the ports to
the rest of the Series Six PLC system.
Six on-board Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) diagnostic and indicator lights show port
activity and module status. These LEDs simplify troubleshooting and indicate correct
data transfer. If the power-up diagnostics detect a failure, the BOARD OK LED will
remain OFF and the lower five LEDs will provide an error code to specify the error. The
CPU COMM LED blinks to indicate communications between the I/O CCM module and
the Series Six CPU. The remaining four LEDs show port activity of the transmitters and
receivers on both ports. They will BLlNK when a port is communicating and will be OFF
(See Tables 3.8 and 3.9 for the specific
when an error occurs on a particular port.
power-up error codes).
The user must provide Series Six CPU communication windows to the l/O CCM by use of
the DPREQ instruction. Refer to later sections of this chapter on programming the I/O
CCM.
The l/O CCM must be inserted in a High-Capacity I/O rack or a Series Six PLC rack I/O
slot.
MODULE SPECIFICATIONS
Space Requirements:
One I/O slot in either a Series Six CPU rack, Series Six Plus
CPU rack, or a High-Capacity I/O rack
Power Requirements:
+5 Vdc requirement is 1.5A -- 20 units of load
+12 Vdc requirement is 300 mA -- 12 units of load
(supplied by rack power)
Storage
0C to 70C
Temperature:
Operating
Temperature:
0C to 60C
Humidity:
5% - 95% (non-condensing)
Attitude:
Up to 6,600 feet (2,000 meters) above sea level (operating)
Isolation:
(Port to Port and either Port to Series Six common).
Transient: 1500 Vac, 50/60 Hz for 1 minute maximum,
non repetitive.
Continuous: 240 Vdc or RMS ac, 50160 Hz.
Noise & Transient:
Meets following specifications
Immunity:
Showering arcs per NEMA ICS 2,230.40
Surges per ANSI C37.90.9
5 W R.F. transmitter 27-450 Mhz
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I/O CCM Control Modules
3-4
GEK-25364
INSTALLiNG THE I/O CCM MODULE
Complete the steps as listed below to install and operate the 1/O CCM module.
1.
Calculate the total power requirements for the rack which will contain the I/O
CCM. (Refer to “I/O CCM Power Requirements”)
2.
Configure the I/O CCM module.
- Check the RS-232/RS-422
Figure 3.2)
DIP package orientation -- for Port 2 only. (Reference
- Configure the I/O CCM communication ports using the three on-board DIP switch
packages: A, B and C. (Reference Tables 3.2, 3.3, 3.4)
3.
Set the l/O CCM module address using the backplane DIP switch package.
(Reference Figure 3.3, Table 3.1)
4.
Insert the l/O CCM module into the rack.
5.
Construct and install the I/O CCM port cable. (Reference Figures 3.4, 3.5, 3.6, and
3.7)
6.
Power up and test the I/O CCM to verify that it is operating properly. (Reference
Table 3.8)
7.
Verify that the I/O CCM is communicating properly by use of the simple ladder logic
examples and programming information provided later in this chapter. (Reference
“Programming the I/O CCM”)
NOTE
A special I/O terminator plug must be used when operating the I/O
CCM module at the Data Processing Unit (DPU) Executive Window.
The I/O Terminator Plug is dependent upon the operating
environment.
I/O CCM POWER REQUIREMENTS
The l/O CCM may be installed in a Series Six CPU rack I/O slot, the Series Six
High-Capacity l/O rack, or a Series Six Plus CPU rack.
The Series Six CPU rack can support a maximum of 300 units of load. A total of five I/O
CCMs can be powered by the Series Six CPU rack, when no other loading exists for +12
Vdc. Alternately, four I/O CCMs and a normal CCM can be powered.
A maximum of five I/O CCM modules can be powered by a high capacity I/O rack. In this
case there are 140 units of load remaining for I/O modules with +5v power only.
When other types of I/O modules are to be placed in the same rack as an I/O CCM,
calculate the power requirements of all the modules to ensure that the maximum power
of the rack is not exceeded. Refer to other sections of this chapter: “Module
Specifications” and “Operational lnfor mation”.
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3-5
I/O CCM Control Module
-~
GEK-25364
CONFIGURING THE I/O CCM MODULE
Configure the I/O CCM, prior to installing the module into the l/O rack.
Positioning the Hybrid DIP Package
The RS-422/RS-232 hybrid DiP package affects the operation of port 2 only. Verify the
position of the configuration hybrid DIP package located between ports J1 and J2. It is
marked “232" on one end and “422” on the other end and is mounted in a zero insertion
force socket. Use a small screwdriver to turn the screw which releases the hybrid DIP
package from the socket. Position the package with the desired interface type (RS-232
or RS-422) closest to port J 1 See Figure 3.2 for proper package orientation.
a42442
0
es c
RS-232-C
SELECTED
RS-422
SELECTED
Figure 3.2 RS-232/RS-422 HYBRID DIP PACKAGE (FOR PORT 2)
Settinq the Module Address
Before installing the module, set the backplane DIP switches (located adjacent to the
card slot in the Series Six rack) to establish which group of eight consecutive input points
in the CPU I/O tables will be used by the module. Figure 3.3 illustrates a typical I/O DIP
switch set for address 673-680. Table 3.1 shows switch settings for all possible module
addresses. Refer to a later section “Running at the DPU Executive Window”, to set the
I/O CCM module to run at the DPU Executive Window.
a4244 1
Figure 3.3 TYPiCAL l/O BACKPLANE DIP SWITCH
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I/O CCM Control Modules
3-l 8
GEK-25364
PROGRAMMING THE I/O CCM
This section describes the two methods of generating window communications between
the I/O CCM and the CPU:
- DPREQ Windows
- DPU Executive Window
PROGRAMMING THE DPREQ
The ladder logic program grants communication windows to the I/O CCM through the
programmed DPREQ or WINDOW instruction. The ladder logic programs initiates serial
data transfers to another device by loading a command into the I/O CCM command
registers.
-
Program the [DPREQ] or [WINDOW] instruction to establish windows between the l/O
CCM and the CPU. The [WINDOW] instruction is valid for CPU microcode Version
130 and thereafter.
-
Program the registers containing the communications command and parameters for
the required transfer of data if the I/O CCM is to initiate communications.
Establishing I/O CCM to CPU Communications Windows
The CPU provides a window to the I/O CCM using the DPREQ instruction (or WINDOW
instruction) as shown below. When properly programmed, the CPU COMM LED will start
blinking to indicate that windows are occurring.
An example ladder logic rung for programming the DPREQ instruction is as follows:
Rnnnn
oxxxx
Oyyyy
-] [---[DpREQ]-------------------(
)
HHHH
In this program, the l/O CCM will receive a CPU communications window if output Oxxxx
is on. The contents of register Rnnnn must correspond to the first I/O point address of
the I/O CCM plus 1000 decimal. If the I/O CCM address is for inputs 1-8, then HHHH
equals 03E9H (decimal 1001).
When the l/O CCM services the CPU communications window without fault, output Oyyyy
will remain off. If a fault occurs during the CPU communication window, Oyyyy will turn
on.
The l/O CCM does not process serial transfers until the first window is received after the
module has powered up. The module needs the first window to determine the CPU ID
number and the CPU register and user logic size.
The CPU COMM LED blink rate will show the frequency of DPREQ windows. The LED
blinking means that the module detects that the window opened and closed successfully.
(The module may or may not have transferred data during that window).
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3-19
I/O CCM Control Module
GK-25364
The frequency of DPREQ windows to the I/O CCM module affects the performance (time
to complete a message) of the serial links. Therefore, the user should guarantee that the
module receives windows on a regular and timely basis. For the fastest response times on
the serial link, the module can be given a window once per scan or even multiple windows
per scan.
The I/O CCM has a 5-second timeout on waiting for a window to transfer data to or from
the Series Six CPU. I f t h e t i m e o u t o c c u r s , t h e I/O C C M w i l l a b o r t t h e serial l i n k
communication (sends an EOT or an error response).
RUNNING AT THE DPU EXECUTIVE WINDOW
With the enhanced I/O CCM (Version 203 Hex, or thereafter), it is possible to get Data
Processing Unit (DPU) windows without having a DPREQ in the ladder logic. This feature
allows program uploads and downloads while the CPU is stopped.
The following steps are required to set-up the I/O CCM to run at the DPU address.
1. Power-down the unit.
2. Set the backplane DIP switch for Inputs 1009-1016 to be addressed (7E hexadecimal).
(Switch 1 CLOSED, all other switches OPEN -- Refer to Figure 3.12)
a42729
Figure 3.12 BACKPLANE DIP SWITCH SETTING FOR RUNNING AT DPU WINDOW
3. Connect the I/O terminator plug.
(Reference “I/O Terminator Plug”)
4. Power-up the unit.
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3-22
I/O CCM Control Modules
GEK-25364
Command Register for DPU Executive Window
The command register to be used when operating the I/O CCM at the DPU Executive
Window is R1009 (3F1 hex). This corresponds to Input/Output points I1009-1016 that are
translated from the DIP switch position 7E (Not shown in Table 3.1)
NOTE
This address is valid only for the l/O CCM module.
I/O CCM STATUS BYTE
The eight input points in the Series Six CPU which correspond to the address
of the I/O CCM module are used to provide the CPU with the status of the
module. The I/O CCM status byte has the same format as the CCM status
bytes and is updated in the same way as the CCM status bytes. The module
guarantees that the pulsed status bits will be pulsed a minimum of three
windows.
DPU Executive Windows
When running at the DPU Executive Window the I/O CCM status byte is
located at Input locations 10993 - I1000. In this way, the I/O CCM status byte
will not be in conflict with the CCM2/3 status byte.
EXPANDED MEMORY MAPPING
Expanded Memory Mapping is a feature in later versions of the Series Six
PLC Communications Control (CCM2, CCM3 and I/O CCM) module. Only a
brief listing of the features of the CCM expanded memory mapping is given in
Refer to Appendix B for information about
this section.
the CCM expanded memory mapping.
CCM module hardware and software identification
Expanded programming information
Expanded I/O Reference
Expanded User Memory Reference
Single Bit Write
Programmable Timeouts and Retries
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3-23
I/O CCM Control Module
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OPERATIONAL
INFORMATION
l/O CCM operational information which may be of interest to users familiar with CCM is
Iisted below.
1.
An external device can perform program uploads and downloads using the enhanced
I/O CCM module firmware.
When using the I/O CCM module firmware (Version 203 Hex, or later) uploads and
downloads may be performed when the I/O CCM is placed at locations I/O 1009-1016.
2.
The user is not restricted from executing CCM protocol functions to write to memory
areas which might stop the Series Six CPU (i.e., subroutine vector addresses and User
Logic). This could result in error conditions in the l/O CCM. The I/O CCM receives
windows from the CPU only if the CPU is running if it does not use the DPU executive
window.
3.
The software version number as read from Diagnostic Status Word 12 for the I/O CCM
starts with 512 (200H) and increments by one (1) for each revision. This relates to the
CCM2 and CCM3 as follows:
Board
Diagnostic Status Word 12
Software Version # Range
CCM2
CCM3
I/O CCM
1 - 255
(1 - 0FFH)
256 - 511 (100H - 1 FFH)
512 - 767 (200H - 2FFH)
4.
If a serial protocol error occurs when using the CCM protocol on the I/O CCM, both
the Txd and Rxd LEDs for the associated port will turn OFF. When the next
successful message is sent or received, the LEDs will turn ON again. The Rxd and Txd
LEDs will reflect the reception and transmission of characters.
5.
The I/O CCM cannot be configured from registers.
6.
The I/O CCM does not perform tape or OIU operations.
7.
The I/O CCM does not use a battery.
8.
The port 2 relay and RTS are turned on before all serial transmissions on Port 2. The
port 2 relay can be heard opening and closing when communications are occurring on
port 2; this is normal.
9.
The RTU protocol can be selected to use the 500 msec. turn-around delay on the J2
port.
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3-24
I/O CCM Control Modules
-~
GEK-25364
10. The I/O CCM module will check for commands (in the communications command
register) between communications with serial devices and continually when idle.
11. The maximum data rate for current loop operation is 4800 bps.
NOTE
If commands are not going to be initiated from the I/O CCM, a
value of zero should be placed in the command register. The five
successive command parameter registers can then be used as
desired.
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4-1
CCM Serial Interface Protocols
GEK-25364
CHAPTER 4
CCM SERIAL INTERFACE PROTOCOLS
INTRODUCTION TO CCM PROTOCOL
The purpose of this chapter is to provide complete information on CCM protocol and
timing to allow the user to write a serial communications driver for a host computer or
microprocessor.
Communications Control Module protocol was defined in Chapter 1 as a set of rules
governing the establishment of a communications link and the flow of data between a
In addition, t h i s p r o t o c o l g o v e r n s a n y o t h e r
target PLC and a source PLC.
communication element in the configuration. If a host computer or control device is to
be a part of a system configuration, it must communicate based on CCM protocol.
The CCM is capable of both peer-to-peer and master-slave protocols. The protocol
selection for CCM can be made by DIP switches or by using selected CPU registers as
explained in the section, Module Configuration, in Chapter 2.
ASYNCHRONOUS DATA FORMAT
Communications Control Module serial interface protocol is based on ANSI Standard
X3.28 implementing asynchronous character transfers using an 8-bit binary or ASCII
format with optional parity as shown below.
logic
1
Start
Bit
1
2
3
< ------------Direction
of
Data Bits
4
5
6
logic 0
data
7
8
Parity
Bit
-(optional)
stop
Bit
flow
The 8 data bits can contain either ASCII characters or uncoded binary numbers.
the CCM can be specified as either odd or none.
Parity on
CONTROL CHARACTER CODING
The ASCII control characters used for both peer-to-peer and master-slave protocol are
shown below.
Table 4.1 ASCII CONTROL CHARACTERS FOR CCM PROTOCOL
ABBREVIATION
SOH
STX
ETX
EOT
ENQ
ACK
NAK
ETB
HEX VALUE
01
02
03
04
05
06
15
17
MEANING
Start of Header
Start of Text
End of Text
End of Transmission
Enquire
Acknowledge
Negative Acknowledge
End of Block
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CCM Serial Interface Protocols
4-9
GEK-25364
Is there a time-out on the response? (Condition 4, Table 4.5)
If YES, send an EOT and exit the initiate sequence.
If NO, is response an ACK or NAK?
If not ACK or NAK, send EOT and exit initiate sequence.
if ACK or NAK is it NAK?
If YES, has header been retried 3 times?
If YES, send EOT and exit initiate sequence.
If NO, return to “Send Header”.
If NO, go to “Read or Write Data Blocks” depending on the direction of data
transfer.
Peer Request Receive Sequence, Target Device (See Figure 4.4).
Read character.
Is character an ENQ?
If NO, go to read character.
If YES, send ACK.
Read header.
Is there a time-out between ENQ response and the first character of the header?
(Condition 2, Table 4.5)
If YES, send EOT and exit.
If NO, is there a time-out on entire header? (Condition 3, Table 4.5)
If YES, send EOT and exit.
If NO, is header OK?
If NO, has header been retried 3 times?
If YES send EOT and exit.
If NO, send NAK and return to “Read Header”.
If YES, send ACK and go to “Read or Write Data Blocks” depending on the
direction of data transfer.
Peer Write Data Blocks, Source or Tarqet Device (See Figure 4.5).
Write data block.
Is there a time-out on the data block response? (Condition 6, Table 4.5)
If YES, send EOT to other device and exit.
If NO, is data block response ACK or NAK?
If not ACK or NAK, send EOT to other device and exit.
If ACK or NAK, is it a NAK?
If YES, has data block been retried 3 times?
If YES, send EOT and exit.
If NO, return to “Write Data Block”.
If NO, is it last data block?
If NO, set up next data block and return to “Write Data Block”.
If YES, send EOT to end session and exit sequence.
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4-10
CCM Serial Interface Protocols
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Peer Read Data Blocks, Source or Target Device (See Figure 4.6).
Read data block.
Is there a time-out on the first character of the data block? (Condition 5, Table 4.5)
lf YES, send an EOT and exit.
If NO, is there a time-out on the entire data block? (Condition 7, Table 4.5)
If YES, send and EOT and exit.
If NO, is the data block OK?
If NO, has the data block been retried 3 times?
If YES, send EOT and exit.
If NO, send NAK and return to “Read Data Block”,
If YES, send ACK.
Is it the last data block?
If NO, return to “Read Data Block”.
If YES, read EOT.
Is there a time-out on the EOT or is the character not an EOT? (Condition
8, Table 4.5)
If there is a time-out or character is not EOT, send EOT and exit the
sequence.
If EOT is OK, the session is complete. Exit sequence.
MASTER-SLAVE PROTOCOL
Master-slave protocol is typically used in a multidrop system configuration. It can be
used, however, in the point-to-point configuration. In master-slave protocol there is one
master and one or more slaves. Only the master can initiate communications.
The enquiry sequence for master-slave protocol differs from that for peer-to-peer. In
peer-to-peer protocol there are only 2 devices connected to the communication line.
When one of the devices initiates the communication, there is only one other device that
can be the target, therefore, the enquiry sequence needs no ID for the target. As stated
before, in the master-slave protocol there may be more than one slave which can respond
to an enquiry sequence. Because of this, in master-slave protocol the enquiry sequence
must include the target address for identifying the target device.
There are two forms of master-slave protocol: Normal (N) Sequence and Quick (Q)
Sequence. Both forms require that master-slave protocol be selected on the CCM2,
CCM3, or I/O CCM module. Q Sequence protocol is used only for serial communications
using the CCM commands 06109 or 06209, Read Q Response. All other master-slave
serial communications use the Normal Sequence form.
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CCM Serial Interface Protocois
4-l 3
GEK-25364
Is there a time-out on the response? (Condition 4, Table 4.5)
If YES, send an EOT and exit the initiate sequence.
If NO, is response an ACK or NAK?
If not ACK or NAK, send EOT and exit initiate sequence.
If ACK or NAK is it NAK?
If YES, has header been retried 3 times?
If YES, send EOT and exit initiate sequence.
If NO, return to “Send Header”.
If NO, go to ‘Read or Write Data Blocks” depending on the direction of data
transfer.
Normal Response, Slave (See Figure 4.1 1)
Start N Response.
Read N Enquiry.
Is N Enquiry sequence correct?
If NO, return to “Read N Enquiry”.
If YES, start timer of 10 msec plus 4 character times.
Is timer done?
If NO, have any characters arrived?
If NO, go to “Is Timer Done?“.
If YES, go to “Read N Enquiry”.
If YES, send N Enquiry Response.
Read header.
Is there a time-out between ENQ response and the first character of the header?
(Condition 2, Table 4.5)
If YES, send EOT and exit.
If NO, is there a time-out on entire header? (Condition 3, Table 4.5)
If YES, send EOT and exit.
If NO, is header OK?
If NO, has header been retried 3 times?
If YES send EOT and exit.
If NO, send NAK and return to “Read Header”.
If YES, send ACK and go to “Read or Write Data Blocks” depending on the
direction of data transfer.
Write Data Blocks, Master or Slave (See Figure 4.12)
Write data block.
Is there a time-out on the data block response? (Condition 6, Table 4.5)
If YES, send EOT to other device and exit.
If NO, is data block response ACK or NAK?
If not ACK or NAK, send EOT to other device and exit.
If ACK or NAK, is it a NAK?
If YES,has data block been retried 3 times?
If YES, send EOT and exit.
If NO, return to “Write Data Block”.
If NO, is it last data block?
If NO, set up next data
block and return to “Write Data Block”.
If YES, send EOT to end session.
(Explanation continued on page 4-18).
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CCM Serial Interface Protocols
4-l 6
GEK-25364
0
MASTER - SLAVE PROTOCOL
WRITE DATA BLOCK
(MASTER OR SLAVE)
2
r
-I
L
a42522
SEND
EOT
DATA BLOCK
SET UP
NEXT DATA
BLOCK
SEND
EOT TO
END SESSION
I
I
’ SEE CONDITtON 6, TABLE 4.5
2 SEE CONDITION 8, TABLE 4.5
READ
EOT
EXIT NFIESPONSE
Figure 4.12 WRITE DATA BLOCKS, MASTER OR SLAVE
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CCM Serial Interface Protocols
4-18
GEK-25364
Is this device a Master?
If YES, exit N Sequence.
If NO, read EOT.
Is there a time-out on EOT or is character not an EOT? (Condition 8, Table 4.5)
If there is a time-out or character is not EOT, send EOT and exit N Response.
If EOT is OK, session is complete. Exit N Response.
Read Data Blocks, Master or Slave (See Figure 4.13)
Read data block.
Is there a time-out on the first character of the data block? (Condition 5, Table 4.5)
If YES, send an EOT and exit.
If NO, is there a time-out on the entire data block? (Condition 7, Table 4.5)
If YES, send and EOT and exit.
If NO, is the data block OK?
If NO, has the data block been retried 3 times?
If YES, send EOT and exit.
If NO, send NAK and return to “Read Data Block”.
If YES, send ACK.
Is it the last data block?
If NO, return to “Read Data Block”.
If YES, read EOT.
Is there a time-out on the EOT or is the character not an EOT? (Condition
8, Table 4.5)
If there is a time-out or character is not EOT, send EOT and exit.
If EOT is OK, is this device a master?
If NO, the session is complete, exit N Response.
If YES, send EOT to end session, exit N Sequence.
Q SEQUENCE, MASTER-SLAVE
The Q sequence operation can be used to poll and transfer 4 bytes of data from slaves
without having to send a 17-byte header. To do this the CCM commands 06109 or 06209,
Read Q Response, are used. The Q Sequence protocol format is shown below.
Data sent from
source (master)
Data sent from
target (slave)
- Tgt
Q Add.
I/
-
E
N
iiI!
Data Data Data Data L A
Byte Byte Byte Byte R C
1
2
3
4
CK
Figure 4.14 Q SEQUENCE PROTOCOL FORMAT
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CCM Serial Interface Protocols
4-l 9
GEK-25364
?
ASClI coded “Q” signifying Q Sequence operation is sent by the master and
returned by the slave.
Slave target ID +20H is sent by the master and returned by slave.
ASCII control character ENQ for enquiry by Master.
Data byte 1 sent by slave.
Data byte 2 sent by slave.
Data byte 3 sent by slave.
Data byte 4 sent by slave.
LRC - Longitudinal redundancy check sent by slave (XOR of Data Bytes 1-4 only).
ACK - Acknowledge sent by slave.
This is the entire protocol format for Q Sequence operation. Only 4 data bytes can be
transferred at a time and the direction is aiways from slave to master. After the Q
Response is sent by the slave, it returns to the idle state without the need for an End of
Transmission control character (EOT).
If the slave response to a master enquiry is invalid, the master will retry the enquiry.
The master will retry the enquiry 3 times before aborting the communication.
Q Sequence Flow Charts
To fully understand how the protocol operates
and accompanying explanation.
under error cond i t ions see the flow charts
Q Sequence, Master (See Figure 4.16)
Start Q Sequence.
Start Q Enquiry.
Has Q Enquiry been retried 3 times?
If YES, exit Q Sequence.
If NO, send Q Enquiry Sequence (Q, Target Address, ENQ).
Read Q Response.
Is there a time-out or error in the Q Response? (Condition 1, Table 4.5)
If YES, increment retry count and return to “Start Q Enquiry”.
If NO, valid response has been received, exit Q Sequence.
Q Response, Slave (See Figure 4.16)
Start Q Response.
Read Q Enquiry Sequence.
Is Q Enquiry correct?
If NO, return to “Read Q Enquiry Sequence”.
If YES, start timer (10 msec plus 4 character times).
Is timer done?
if NO, have any characters arrived?
If YES, return to “Read Q Enquiry Sequence”.
If NO, return to “Is Timer Done?".
If YES, send Q Response and exit.
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CCM Serial Interface Protocols
4-28
GEK-25364
SERIAL LINK COMMUNICATION ERRORS
Serial link communication errors can be divided into 4 categories.
-
invalid header
Invalid data
Invalid ACK, NAK, EOT
Serial link time-out
Each of the errors in the four categories is detected by the CCM. The CCM reports
errors through the Diagnostic Status Words. The error codes are listed in Chapter 2.
INVALID HEADER
Target ID number does not match ID of device receiving header except when ID is
255 in peer-to-peer
incorrect header LRC
Missing or invalid SOH
Missing or invalid ETB
Invalid memory type
Transfer across a memory boundary
Invalid header character (not 0-9, A-F)
Invalid address for specified memory type
Number of complete blocks and number of bytes in last block both equal 0
Number of bytes in last block not an even number if memory type is register, user
logic memory, or diagnostic status words
Invalid CPU write command (trying to write to user logic memory, I/O override
table, or CPU scratch pad with the memory switch in the PROTECT position or
with memory protected by software memory protect)
Invalid CPU scratch pad write
Parity, overrun, or framing error
If any of the above errors occur, a NAK is sent to the external serial device. This signals
the device to retransmit the header. The DATA OK light on the CCM is turned off.
The header is retried a maximum of three times unless programmed otherwise. If the
header still has one of the above errors, the CCM will abort the communication and send
an EOT to the external device. The CCM then waits for an ENQ to start a new
The DATA OK light is turned on after the next successful
communication.
communication.
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CCM Serial Interface Protocols
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INVALID DATA
If any of the following errors occur, the same retry procedure is followed as for an invalid
header.
- Incorrect LRC
- Missing or invalid STX
- Missing or invalid ETB or ETX
- Parity, overrun, or framing error
INVALlD NAK, ACK, or EOT
If the CCM is expecting one of these control characters in response to a header or data
block, and a character is received that is not one of these, the CCM aborts the session
and sends an EOT to the other device.
SERIAL LINK TIME-OUT
If at any time during the communication after the enquiry sequence the CCM times out
waiting for the other device, the communication is aborted and an EOT is sent to the
other device.
WRITING TO CPU SCRATCH PAD
There are only 2 fields within the CPU Scratch Pad to which a remote device is permitted
to write data: the CPU Run and Status field and the Subroutine Vector Address field.
Table 4.7 SCRATCH PAD FIELDS
FIELD
ADDRESS
ABSOLUTE MEM.
SCRATCH PAD MEM.
CPU Run and Command Status
1000H1001H
000H0001H
Subroutine Vector Addresses
1060H107FH
0060H007FH
CPU RUN AND COMMAND STATUS
To stop the CPU, 128 (80H) is written to both 4096 and 4097 (1000H and 1001H) of
Absolute Memory or 0000H and 0001H of Scratch Pad Memory. To start the CPU, 01 H is
written to both locations.
SUBROUTINE VECTOR ADDRESSES
If a host computer is used to develop a Series Six logic program with subroutines, the
subroutine vector addresses must be written to the CPU Scratch Pad.
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RTU
Communications
Protocol
5-I
GEK-25364
CHAPTER 5
RTU COMMUNICATIONS PROTOCOL
INTRODUCTION
The Communications Control Modules (CCM3 and I/O CCM) use two protocols, CCM and
Remote Terminal Unit (RTU). The CCM protocol is explained in Chapter 4 of this
manual. When the CCM3 or I/O CCM module (CCM device) is configured as an RTU
slave, it uses the protocol as explained in this chapter.
RTU protocol is a query-response protocol used for communication
device and a host computer which is capable of communicating using
host computer is the master device and it transmits a query to a
responds to the master. The CCM device, as an RTU slave, cannot
respond to the master.
between the CCM
RTU protocol. The
RTU slave which
query; it can only
The RTU data transferred consists of 8-bit binary characters with or without parity. No
control characters are used to control the flow of data, there is, however, an error check
(Cyclic Redundancy Check) included as the final field of each query and response to
ensure accurate transmission of data.
MESSAGE FORMAT
The general formats for RTU message transfers are shown below.
Slave Turn-around Time
Master
1
Query Message
Slave
Response
Query Transaction
Master
1
Broadcast Message
I
Slave
(No Response)
Broadcast Transaction
Figure 5.1 RTU MESSAGE TRANSFERS
A distinction is made between two communicating devices. The device which initiates a
data transfer is called the master and the other device is called the slave. The CCM
device can only be a RTU slave.
The master device begins a data transfer by sending a query or broadcast request
message.
A slave completes that data transfer by sending a response message if the
master sent a query message addressed to it. No response message is sent when the
master sends a broadcast request. The time between the end of a query and the beginning
of the response to that query is called the slave turn-around time.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-2
GEK-25364
MESSAGE TYPES
T h e RTU protoco I h a s f o u r m e s s a g e t y p e s ; q u e r y , normal
broadcast.
response, error response, and
Query
The master sends a message address to a single slave.
Normal Response
After the slave performs the function requested by the query, it sends back a normal
response for that function. This indicates that the request was successful.
Error
Response
The slave receives the query, but for some reason it cannot perform the requested
function. The slave sends back an error response which indicates the reason the request
could not be processed. (No error message will be sent for certain types of errors. For
more information see section, Communication Errors).
Broadcast
The master sends a message addressed to all of the slaves by using address 0. All slaves
that receive the broadcast message perform the requested function. This transaction is
ended by a time-out within the master.
MESSAGE FIELDS
The message fields for a typical message are shown below.
<-------------------
Station
Address
Function
Code
FRAME --------------------->
Information
Error
Check
Station Address
The station address is the address of the slave station selected for this data transfer. It
is one byte in length and has a value from 0 to 247 inclusive. An address of 0 selects all
slave stations, and indicates that this is a broadcast message. An address from 1 to 247
selects a slave station with that station address. T h e C C M d e v i c e ( m o d u l e ) a d d r e s s i s
equal to the CPU ID of the attached Series Six PLC.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-3
GEK-25364
Function Code
The function code identifies the command being issued to the station. It is one byte in
length and is defined for the values 0 to 255 as follows:
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9-14
15
16
17
18-64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73-127
128-255
If legal Function
Read Output Table
Read Input Table
* These two functions are identical.
Read Registers *
Read Registers *
Force Single Output
Preset Single Register
Read Exception Status
Loopback Maintenance
Unsupported Function
Force Multiple Outputs
Preset Multiple Registers
Report Device Type
Unsupported Function
Read Output Override Table
Read Input Override Table
Read Scratch Pad Memory
Read User Logic
Write Output Override Table
Write Input Override Table
Write Scratch Pad Memory
Write User Logic
Unsupported Function
Reserved for Exception Responses
Information Field
The information field contains all of the other information required to further specify or
respond to a requested function. Detailed specification of the contents of the
information field for each message type--broadcast, query, normal response, and error
response--and each function code is found in the section, Message Descriptions.
Error Check Field
The error check field is two bytes in length and contains a cyclic redundancy check
(CRC-16) code. Its value is a function of the contents of the station address, function
code, and information field. The details of generating the CRC-16 code are in the
section, Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC). Note that the information field is variable in
length. In order to properly generate the CRC-16 code, the length of frame must be
See section, Calculating the Length of Frame, to calculate the length of a
determined.
frame for each of the defined function codes.
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5-4
RTU Communications Protocol
-.
GEK-25364
CHARACTER
FORMAT
A message is sent as a series of characters. Each byte in a message is transmitted as a
character. The illustration below shows the character format. A character consists of a
start bit (O), eight data bits, an optional parity bit, and one stop bit (1). Between
characters the line is hetd in the 1 state.
- Sent First
Sent Last -
I
Least Significant
Data Bit
Most Significant
Data Bit
MESSAGE TERMINATION
Each station monitors the time between characters. When a period of three character
times elapses without the reception of a character, the end of a message is assumed. The
reception of the next character is assumed to be the beginning of a new message.
The end of a frame occurs when the first of the following two events occurs:
-
The number of characters received for the frame is equal to the calculated length of
the frame.
-
A length of 3 character times elapses without the reception of a character.
TIME-OUT USAGE
Time-outs are used on the serial link for error detection, error recovery, and to prevent
the missing of the end of messages and message sequences. Note that although the
module allows up to three character transmission times between each character in a
message that it receives, there is no more than half a character time between each
character in a message that the module transmits.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-5
GEK-25364
The slave turn-around times listed in Table 5.1 are the guaranteed maximum times for
the communication module. In many cases the actual turn-around times wilt be much less.
Table 5.1 RTU TURN-AROUND TIME
RTU
TURN-AROUND TIME*
(MILLISECONDS)
DESCRIPTION
Normal
Responses
Function
Code
1
500
2
3
4
5
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
500
6
7
8
15
16
17
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
Error
500
500
500
500
500
Responses
Error Code
1
2
3
4
500
500
500
500
* Times are given for one port busy. If both ports are busy double the times given.
CYCLIC REDUNDANCY CHECK (CRC)
The Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) is one of the most effective systems for checking
errors. The CRC consists of 2 check characters generated at the transmitter and added
at the end of the transmitted data characters. Using the same method, the receiver
generates its own CRC for the incoming data and compares it to the CRC sent by the
transmitter to ensure proper transmission.
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5-6
RTU Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
A complete mathematic derivation for the CRC will not be given in this section. This
information can be found in a number of texts on data communications. The essential
steps which should be understood in calculating the CRC are as follows:
-
The data bits which make up the message are multiplied by the number of bits in
the CRC.
- The resulting product is then divided by the generating polynomial (using modulo 2
with no carries). The CRC is the remainder of this division.
-
Disregard the quotient and add the remainder (CRC) to the data bits and transmit
the message with CRC.
- The receiver then divides the message plus CRC by the generating polynomial and
if the remainder is 0, the transmission was transmitted without error.
A generating polynomial is expressed algebraically as a string of terms in powers of X
such as X3 + X 3 + X0 (or 1) which can in turn be expressed as the binary number 1101. A
generating polynomial could be any length and contain any pattern of 1s and 0 s as long as
both the transmitter and receiver use the same value. For optimum error detection,
however, certain standard generating polynomials have been developed. RTU protocol
uses the polynomial X16 + X15+ X2 + 1 which in binary is 1 1000 0000 0000 0101. The
CRC this polynomial generates is known as CRC-16.
The discussion above can be implemented in hardware or software. One hardware
implementation involves constructing a multi-section shift register based on the
generating polynomial.
a40473
CRC REGISTER
13 12 11 10
0
+ =
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
EXCLUSIVE -OR
DATA
INPUT
Figure 5.2 CYCLlC REDUNDANCY CHECK (CRC) REGISTER
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-7
GEK-25364
To generate the CRC, the message data bits are fed to the shift register one at a time.
The CRC register contains a preset value. As each data bit is presented to the shift
register, the bits are shifted to the right. The LSB is XORed with the data bit and the
result is: XORed with the old contents of bit 7 (the result placed in bit O), XORed with
the old contents of bit 14 (and the result placed in bit 13), and finally, it is shifted into bit
15. This process is repeated until all data bits in a message have been processed.
Software implementation of the CRC-76 is explained in the next section.
CALCULATING THE CRC-16
The pseudo code for calculation of the CRC-76 is given below.
INIT SHIFT
SHIFT
Preset byte count for data to be sent.
Initialize the 16-bit remainder (CRC) register to all ones.
XOR the first 8-bit data byte with the high order byte of the
16-bit CRC register. The result is the current CRC.
Initialize the shift counter to 0.
Shift the current CRC register 1 bit to the right.
Increment shift count.
Is the bit shifted out to the right (flag) a 7 or a 0?
If it is a 1, XOR the generating polynomial with the current CRC.
If it is a 0, continue.
Is shift counter equal to 8?
If NO, return to SHIFT.
If YES, increment byte count.
Is byte count greater than the data length?
If NO, XOR the next 8-bit data byte with the current CRC
and go to INIT SHIFT.
If YES, add current CRC to end of data message for
transmission and exit.
When the message is transmitted, the receiver will perform the same CRC operation on
all the data bits and the transmitted CRC. If the information is received correctly the
resulting remainder (receiver CRC) will be 0.
EXAMPLE CRC-16 CALCULATION
The CCM device transmits the rightmost byte (of registers or discrete data) first. The
first bit of the CRC-76 transmitted is the MSB. Therefore, in the example the MSB of
the CRC polynomial is to the extreme right. The X16 term is dropped because it affects
only the quotient (which is discarded) and not the remainder (the CRC characters). The
generating polynomial is therefore 7070 0000 0000 0007. The remainder is initialized to
all 7s.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-10
GEK-25364
MESSAGE DESCRlPTlONS
The following pages explain the format and fields for each RTU message.
MESSAGE (01): READ OUTPUT TABLE
FORMAT:
Address
Func
01
Starting Pt.
Number
Hi
Lo
Number of
Points
Hi
Error
Check
Lo
Query
Address
Func
01
Byte
Count
Normal
QUERY:
, Da;" ,
Response
- An address of 0 is not allowed as this cannot be a broadcast request.
- The function code is 01.
- The starting point number is two bytes in length and may be any value
less than the highest output point number available in the attached Series
Six CPU. The starting point number is equal to one less than the number
of the first output point returned in the normal response to this request.
- The number of points value is two bytes in length. It specifies the
number of output points returned in the normal response. The sum of the
starting point value and the number of points value must be less than or
equal to the highest output point number available in the attached Series
Six CPU. The high order byte of the starting point number and number of
bytes fields is sent as the first byte. The low order byte is the second
byte in each of these fields.
RESPONSE: - The byte count is a binary number from 1 to 256 (0 = 256). It is the
number of bytes in the normal response following the byte count and
preceeding the error check.
- The data field of the normal response is packed output status data. Each
byte contains 8 output point values. The least significant bit (LSB) of the
first byte contains the value of the output point whose number is equal to
the starting point number plus one. The values of the output points are
ordered by number starting with the LSB of the first byte of the data
field and ending with the most significant bit (MSB) of the last byte of
the d a t a field. If the number of points is not a multiple of 8, then the
last data byte contains zeros in one to seven of its highest order bits.
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5-11
RTlJ Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (02): READ INPUT TABLE
FORMAT:
Address
Func
02
Starting Pt.
Number
Hi
Number of
Points
Lo
Hi
Error
Check
Lo
Query
Address
Func
02
Byte
count
Data
|
Normal
QUERY:
Error
Check
1
Response
-
An address of 0 is not allowed as this cannot be a broadcast request.
-
The function code is 02.
-
The starting point number is two bytes in length and may be any value
less than the highest input point number available in the attached Series
Six CPU. The starting point number is equal to one less than the number
of the first input point returned in the normal response to this request.
- The number of points value is two bytes in length. It specifies the
number of input points returned in the normal response. The sum of the
starting point value and the number of points value must be less than or
equal to the highest input point number available in the attached Series
Six CPU. The high order byte of the starting point number and number of
bytes fields is sent as the first byte. The low order byte is the second
byte in each of these fields.
RESPONSE: -
The byte count is a binary number from 1 to 256 (0 = 256). It is the
number of bytes in the normal response following the byte count and
preceeding the error check.
-
The data field of the normal response is packed input status data. Each
byte contains 8 input point values. The least significant bit (LSB) of the
first byte contains the value of the input point whose number is equal to
the starting point number plus one. The values of the input points are
ordered by number starting with the LSB of the first byte of the data
field and ending with the most significant bit (MSB) of the last byte of
the data field. If the number of points is not a multiple of 8, then the
last data byte contains zeros in one to seven of its highest order bits.
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5-12
RTU Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (03, 04): READ REGISTERS
FORMAT:
Address
Func
03 or 04
Starting
Register No.
Hi
Lo
No. Of
Registers
I
Hi Lo
Error
Check
Query
Address
Func
Byte
03 or 04 Count
Data
First
Register
I
I
I
Hi
Lo
Hi
Lo
Normal Response
QUERY:
- (An address of 0 is not allowed as this request cannot be a broadcast
request.
- The function code is equal to either 3 or 4.
-
The starting register number is two bytes in length. The starting register
number may be any value less than the highest register number available
in the attached Series Six CPU. It is equal to one less than the number of
the first register returned in the normal response to this request.
-
The number of reqisters value is two bytes in length. It must contain a
value from 1 to 125 inclusive. The sum of the starting register value and
the number of registers value must be less than or equal to the highest
register number available in the attached Series Six CPU. The high order
byte of the starting register number and number of registers fields is sent
as the first byte in each of these fields. The low order byte is the second
byte in each of these fields.
RESPONSE: - The byte count is a binary number from 2 to 250 inclusive. It is the
number of bytes in the normal response following the byte count and
preceeding the error check. Note that the byte count is equal to two
times the number of registers returned in the response. A maximum of
250 bytes (125) registers is set so that the entire response can fit into one
256 byte data block.
- The registers are returned in the data field in order of number with the
lowest number register in the first two bytes and the highest number
register in the last two bytes of the data field. The number of the first
register in the data field is equal to the starting register number plus
one. The high order byte is sent before the low order byte of each
register.
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5-13
RTU Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (05): FORCE SINGLE OUTPUT
FORMAT:
Address
Func
05
Point
Number
Hi
Data
Lo
Hi
Error
Check
1 00H
Lo
Query
Address
Func
05
Point
Number
Hi
Data
Lo
Hi
1 00H
Lo
Error
Check
I
Normal Response
QUERY:
- An address
a broadcast
of 0 indicates a broadcast request. All slave stations process
request and no response is sent.
- The function code is equal to 05.
- The point number field is two bytes in length. It may be any value less
than the highest output point number available in the attached Series 6
CPU. It is equal to one less than the number of the output point to be
forced on or off.
- The first byte of the data field is equal to either 0 or 255 (FFH). The
output point specified in the point number field is to be forced off if the
first data field byte is equal to 0. It is to be forced on if the first data
field byte is equal to 255 (FFH). The second byte of the data field is
always equal to zero.
RESPONSE:
- The normal response to a force single output query is identical to the
query.
NOTE
The force single output request is not an output override
command. The output specified in this request is insured to be
forced to the value specified only at the beginning of one sweep
of the Series Six user logic.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-I 4
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (06): PRESET SINGLE REGISTER
FORMAT:
Address
Func
06
Register
Number
I
Hi
Lo
L
Data
Hi
Error
Check
Lo
Query
Address
Func
06
Register
Number
I
Hi
Lo
Data
Hi
Error
Check
LO
Normal Response
QUERY:
-
An address 0 indicates a broadcast request. All slave stations process a
broadcast request and no response is sent.
The function code is equal to 06.
- The reqister number field is two bytes in length. It may be any value less
than the highest register available in the attached Series Six CPU. It is
equal to one less than the number of the register to be preset.
-
The data field is two bytes in length and contains the value that the
register specified by the register number field is to be preset to. The
first byte in the data field contains the high order byte of the preset
value. The second byte in the data field contains the low order byte.
RESPONSE: - The normal response to a preset single register query is identical to the
query.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-15
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (07): READ EXCEPTION STATUS
FORMAT:
Query
I
I
Address
Func
07
I
Data
Error
Check
Normal Response
QUERY:
This query is a short form of request for the purpose of reading the first
eight output points.
- An address of zero is not allowed as this cannot be a broadcast request.
- The function code is equal to 07.
RESPONSE: -
The data field of the normal response is one byte in length and contains
the states of output points one through eight. The output states are
packed in order of number with output point one’s state in the least
significant bit and output point eight’s state in the most significant bit.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-16
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (08): LOOPBACK/MAINTENANCE
(GENERAL)
FORMAT:
Address
Data
DATAl|DATA2
Normal
QUERY:
Error
Check
|
Response
- The function code is equal to 8.
- The diagnostic code is two bytes in length. The high order byte of the
diagnostic code is the first byte sent in the diagnostic code field. The
low order byte is the second byte sent. The loopback/maintenance
command is defined only for the diagnostic code equal to 0, 1, or 4. AlI
other diagnostic codes are reserved.
- The data field is two bytes in length. The contents of the two data bytes
are defined by the value of the diagnostic code.
RESPONSE: - See descriptions for individual diagnostic codes.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-17
GEK-25364
DIAGNOSTIC Return Query Data (Loopback/Maintenance)
CODE (00):
- A Ioopback/maintenance query with a diagnostic code equal to 0 is
called a return query data request.
-
An address of 0 is not allowed for the return query data request,
-
The values of the two data field bytes in the query are arbitrary.
-
The normal response is identical to the query.
-
The values of the data bytes in the response are equal to the values sent
in the query.
DlAGNOSTIC Initiate Communication Restart (Loopback/Maintenance)
CODE (01):
A Ioopback/maintenance request (query or broadcast) with a diagnostic code
equal to 1 is called an Initiate Communication Restart request.
-
An address of 0 indicates a broadcast request. All slave stations process
a broadcast request and no response is sent.
-
This request disables the listen-only mode (enables responses to be sent
when queries are received so that communications can be restarted).
-
The value of the first byte of the data field (DATA1) must be 0 or FF.
Any other value will cause an error response to be sent. The value of
the second byte of the data field (DATA2) is always equal to 0.
- The normal response to an Initiate Communication Restart query is
identical to the query.
DIAGNOSTIC Force Listen-Only Mode (Loopbackhlaintenance)
CODE (04):
A loopback/maintenance request (query or broadcast) with a diagnostic code
equal to 4 is called a Force Listen-Only Mode request.
-
An address of 0 indicates a broadcast request. All slave stations process
a broadcast request.
-
After receiving a Force Listen-Only mode request, the CCM device will
go into the listen-only mode and will not send either normal or error
responses to any queries. The listen-only mode is disabled when the
CCM device receives an Initiate Communication Restart request and
when the CCM device is powered up.
- Both bytes in the data field of a Force Listen-Only Mode request are
equal to 0. The CCM device never sends a response to a Force
Listen-Only Mode request.
NOTE
Upon power up, the CCM device disables the listen-only mode and
is configured to continue sending responses to queries.
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5-18
RTU Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (15): FORCE MULTIPLE OUTPUTS
FORMAT :
Address
Byte
Count
Query
Address
Func
15
Starting
Point No.
Number Of
Points
|
|
Normal
QUERY
-
Error
Check
Response
An address of 0 indicates a broadcast request. All slave stations process
a broadcast request and no response is sent.
The value of the function code is 15.
-
The startinq point number is two bytes in length and may be any value
less than the highest output point number available in the attached Series
Six CPU. The starting point number is equal to one less than the number
of the first output point forced by this request.
-
The number of points value is two bytes in length. The sum of the
starting point number and the number of points value must be less than or
equal to the highest output point number available in the attached Series
Six CPU. The high order byte of the starting point number and number of
bytes fields is sent as the first byte in each of these fields. The low order
byte is the second byte in each of these fields.
-
The byte count is a binary number from 1 to 256 (0 = 256). It is the
number of bytes in the data field of the force multiple outputs request.
- The data field is packed data containing the values that the outputs
specified by the starting point number and the number of points fields are
to be forced to. Each byte in the data field contains the values that eight
output points are to be forced to. The least significant bit (LSB) of the
first byte contains the value that the output point whose number is equal
to the starting point number plus one is to be forced to. The values for
the output points are ordered by number starting with the LSB of the first
byte of the data field and ending with the most significant bit (MSB) of
the last byte of the data field. If the number of points is not a multiple
in one to seven of its highest
of 8, then the last data byte contains
order bits.
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5-19
RTU Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
RESPONSE: - The description of the fields in the response are covered in the query
description.
NOTE
The force multiple outputs request is not an output override
command. The outputs specified in this request are ensured to
be forced to the values specified only at the beginning of one
sweep of the Series Six user logic.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-20
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (16): PRESET MULTIPLE REGISTERS
FORMAT:
Address
Func
16
Starting
Register
Number
Number Of
Registers
Byte
count
Data
Error
Check
|
Query
Address
Func
16
Starting
Register
Number
I
Number Of
Registers
Error
Check
I
Normal Response
- An address of 0 indicates a broadcast request. All slave stations process
QUERY:
a broadcast request and no response is sent.
- The value of the function code is 16.
-
The starting reqister number is two bytes in length. The starting register
number may be any value less than the highest register number available
in the attached Series Six CPU. It is equal to one less than the number of
the first register preset by this request.
-
The number of registers value is two bytes in length. It must contain a
value from 1 to 125 inclusive. The sum of the starting register number
and the number of registers value must be less than or equal to the
highest register number available in the attached Series Six CPU. The
high order byte of the starting register number and number of registers
fields is sent as the first byte in each of these fields. The low order byte
is the second byte in each of these fields.
- The byte count field is one byte in length. It is a binary number from 2 to
250 inclusive. It is equal to the number of bytes in the data field of the
preset multiple registers request. Note that the byte count is equal to
twice the value of the number of registers.
- The registers are returned in the data field in order of number with the
lowest number register in the first two bytes and the highest number
register in the last two bytes of the data field. The number of the first
register in the data field is equal to the starting register number plus
one. The high order byte is sent before the low order byte of each
register.
RESPONSE:
- The description of the fields in the response are covered in the query
description.
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5-21
RTU Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (17): REPORT DEVICE TYPE
FORMAT:
Address
Address
Func
17
Func
17
Byte
Count
5
Error
Check
Device
Type
60
Slave
Run
Light
Data
Error
Check
Normal Response
QUERY:
The Report Device Type query is sent by the master to a slave in order to
learn what type of programmable control or other computer it is. All
models of the Series Six return a device type 60 when this request is
received.
- An address of zero is not allowed as this cannot be a broadcast request.
- The function code is equal to 17.
RESPONSE:
- The byte count field is one byte in length and is equal to 5.
- The device type field is one byte in length and is equal to 60.
-
The slave run light field is one byte in length. The slave run light byte is
equal to OFFH if the Series Six CPU is running. It is equal to 0 if the
Series Six CPU is not running.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-22
GEK-25364
- The data field contains three bytes.
The first byte is called the system configuration byte and is shown
below. Bit 1 (the least significant bit) indicates whether or not the
attached Series Six CPU user logic memory is write protected. Bit 2
indicates whether or not a Data Processing Unit (DPU) is connected to
the attached Series Six CPU. Bit 3 indicates whether the attached Series
Six CPU contains a basic or an extended instruction set. Bits 4 and 5
indicate how many registers the attached Series Six CPU contains. Bits
6,7 and 8 are reserved for future use and are equal to 0.
The second and third data bytes specify the size of the attached Series
Six PLC user logic memory. The second data byte contains the high order
byte of the number of words of user logic memory (in units of 1024 words,
commonly called kilowords or K words).
The third data byte contains the low order byte of the number of K words
of user logic memory in the attached Series Six CPU.
MSB
8
0
1
|
7
0
I
6
0
5
4
1
I
3
I
l
-
-l
LSB
1
2
r
Bit Number
-l-l-’
I
- - - - - - 0 - Memory Protect Off
1 - Memory Protect On
------c-----
0 - DPU Not Present
1 - DPU Present
------------------ 0 - Basic Instruction Set
1 - Extended Instruction
Set
____c-e-v_----------------- 00
01
10
11
________-----+--------s-w------------
----
-
256
1024
8192
16384
Registers
Registers
Registers
Registers
Reserved
Figure 5.3 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION BYTE
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5-23
RTU Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (65): READ OUTPUT OVERRIDE TABLE
FORMAT:
Address
Func
65
Starting
Point No.
I
Number Of
Points
I
Error
Check
|
Query
Address
Func
65
Byte
Count
Data
|
Normal
QUERY:
Error
Check
I
Response
- An address 0 is not allowed as this cannot be a broadcast request.
- The function code is equal to 65.
- The starting point number is two bytes in length and may be any value
less than the highest output point number available in the attached Series
Six CPU. The starting point number is equal to one less than the number
of the first output point whose override status is returned in the normal
response to this request.
- The number of points value is two bytes in length. It specifies the
number of output points whose override status are returned in the normal
response. The sum of the starting point number and the number of points
values must be less than or equal to the highest output point number
available in the attached Series Six CPU. The high order byte of the
starting point number and number of points fields is sent as the first byte
in head of these fields. The low order byte is the second byte in each of
these fields.
RESPONSE: - The byte count is a binary number from 1 to 256 (0 = 256). It is the
number of bytes in the data field of the normal response.
- The data field of the normal response is packed output override table
data. Each byte contains the override status of eight output points. The
least significant bit (LSB) of the first byte contains the override status of
the output point whose number is equal to the starting point number plus
one. The override status of the output points are ordered by number
starting with the LSB of the first byte in the data field and ending with
the most signif icant bit (MSB) of the last byte of the data field. If the
number of points is not a multiple of eight, then the last data byte
contains zeros in one to seven of its highest order bits.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-24
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (66):
READ INPUT OVERRIDE TABLE
FORMAT:
Address
I
Func
66
Starting
Point No.
Number Of
Points
Error
Check
I
Query
Address
Func
66
Byte
Count
Data
|
Normal
QUERY:
I
Error
Check
I
Response
- An address 0 is not allowed as this cannot be a broadcast request.
- The function code is equal to 66.
- The starting point number is two bytes in length and may be any value
less than the highest input point number available in the attached Series
Six CPU. The starting point number is equal to one less than the number
of the first input point whose override status is returned in the normal
response to this request.
- The number of points value is two bytes in length. It specifies the
number of input points whose override status are returned in the normal
response. The sum of the starting point number and the number of points
values must be less than or equal to the highest input point number
available in the attached Series Six CPU. The high order byte of the
starting point number and number of points fields is sent as the first byte
in head of these fields. The low order byte is the second byte in each of
these fields.
RESPONSE: - The byte count is a binary number from 1 to 256 (0 = 256). It is the
number of bytes in the data field of the normal response.
- The data field of the normal response is packed input override table
data. Each byte contains the override status of eight input points. The
least significant bit (LSB) of the first byte contains the override status of
the input point whose number is equal to the starting point number plus
one. The override status of the input points are ordered by number
starting with the LSB of the first byte in the data field and ending with
the most significant bit (MSB) of the last byte of the data field. If the
number of points is not a multiple of eight, then the last data byte
contains zeros in one to seven of its highest order bits.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-25
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (67): READ SCRATCH PAD MEMORY
FORMAT:
Address
Func
67
Starting
Byte Number
|
Number Of
Bytes
Error
Check
|
Query
Address
Func
67
Byte
Count
Normal
QUERY:
Data
Error
Check
Response
- An address of 0 is not allowed as this cannot be a broadcast request.
- The function code is equal to 67.
- The starting byte number is two bytes in length and may be any value less
than or equal to the highest scratch pad memory address available in the
attached Series Six CPU. The starting byte number is equal to the
address of the first scratch pad memory byte returned in the normal
response to this request.
- The number of bytes value is two bytes in length. It specifies the number
of scratch pad memory locations (bytes) returned in the normal response.
The sum of the starting byte number and the number of bytes values must
be less than two plus the highest scratch pad memory address available in
the attached Series Six CPU. The high order byte of the starting byte
number and number of bytes fields is sent as the first byte in each of
these fields. The low order byte is the second byte in each of the fields.
RESPONSE: - The byte count is a binary number from 1 to 256 (0 = 256). It is the
number of bytes in the data field of the normal response.
- The data field contains the contents of the scratch pad memory requested
by the query. The scratch pad memory bytes are sent in order of
address. The contents of the scratch pad memory byte whose address is
equal to the starting byte number is sent in the first byte of the data
field. The contents of the scratch pad memory byte whose address is
equal to one less than the sum of the starting byte number and number of
bytes values is sent in the last byte of the data field.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-26
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (68): READ USER LOGIC
FORMAT:
Address
Func
68
Starting
Address
|
Number Of
Words
Error
Check
Query
Address
Func
68
Byte
Count
Data
Error
Check
Normal Response
QUERY:
- An address of 0 is not allowed as this cannot be a broadcast request,
- The function code is equal to 68.
- The startinq address is two bytes in length and may be any value less than
or equal to the highest user logic memory address available in the
attached Series Six CPU. The starting address is equal to the address of
the first user logic memory word returned in the normal response to this
request .
- The number of words value is two bytes in length. It contains a value
from 1 to 125. It specifies the number of user logic memory words
returned in the normal response. The sum of the starting address and the
number of words values must be less than two plus the highest user logic
memory address available in the attached Series Six CPU. The high order
byte of the starting address and number of words fields is sent as the first
byte in each of these fields. The low order byte is the second byte in
each of these fields.
RESPONSE: - The byte count is a binary number from 2 to 250. It is the number of
bytes in the data field of the normal response.
- The contents of the user logic memory are returned in the data field in
order of address. The lowest address contents are returned in the first
two bytes and the highest address contents are returned in the last two
bytes. The address of the first user logic memory contents returned in
the data field is equal to the starting address. The high order byte of
each user logic memory address is sent before the low order byte of that
address.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-27
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (69):
WRITE OUTPUT OVERRIDE TABLE
FORMAT:
Address
Query
Address
Func
69
Starting
Point No.
I
Number Of
Points
Error
Check
Normal Response
QUERY:
-
An address of 0 indicates a broadcast request. All slave stations process
a broadcast request and no response is sent.
- The value of the function code is 69.
-
The starting point number is two bytes in length and may be any value
less than the highest output point number available in the attached Series
Six CPU. The starting point number is equal to one less than the number
of the first output point whose override status is returned in the normal
response to this request.
- The number of points value is two bytes in length. It specifies the
number of output points whose override status are returned in the normal
response. The sum of the starting point number and the number of points
values must be less than or equal to the highest output point number
available in the attached Series Six CPU. The high order byte of the
starting point number and number of points fields is sent as the first byte
in each of these fields. The low order byte is the second byte in each of
these fields.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-28
GEK-25364
- The byte count is a binary number from 1 to 256 (0 = 256). It is the
number of bytes in the data field of the normal response.
- The data field of the normal response is packed output override table
data. Each byte contains the override status of eight output points. The
least significant bit (LSB) of the first byte contains the override status of
the output point whose number is equal to the starting point number plus
one. The override status of the output points are ordered by number
starting with the LSB of the first byte in the data field and ending with
the most signif icant bit (MSB) of the last byte of the data field. If the
number of points is not a multiple of eight, then the last data byte
contains zeros in one to seven of its highest order bits.
RESPONSE: The description of the response fields are all covered in the description of
the query fields.
NOTE
The output override table cannot be written to when the
memory switch of the attached Series Six CPU is in the protect
position.
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5-29
RTU Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (70): WRITE INPUT OVERRIDE TABLE
FORMAT:
Address
Func
70
Starting
Point No.
Number Of
Points
Byte
Count
Data
I
-l-II
Error
Check
I
Query
Address
Func
70
Starting
Point No.
Number Of
Points
I
Error
Check
Normal Response
QUERY:
- An address of 0 indicates a broadcast request. All slave stations process
a broadcast request and no response is sent.
- The function code is equal to 70 for write input override table.
- The starting point number is two bytes in length and may be any value
less than the highest input point number available in the attached Series
Six CPU. The starting point number is equal to one less than the number
of the first input point whose override status is returned in the normal
response to this request.
- The number of points value is two bytes in length. It specifies the
number of input points whose override status are returned in the normal
response. The sum of the starting point number and the number of points
values must be less than or equal to the highest input point number
available in the attached Series Six CPU. The high order byte of the
starting point number and number of points fields is sent as the first byte
in head of these fields. The low order byte is the second byte in each of
these fields.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-30
GEK-25364
- The byte count is a binary number from 1 to 256 (0 = 256). It is the
number of bytes in the data field of the normal response.
- The data field of the normal response is packed input override table
data. Each byte contains the override status of eight input points. The
least significant bit (LSB) of the first byte contains the override status of
the input point whose number is equal to the starting point number plus
one. The override status of the input points are ordered by number
starting with the LSB of the first byte in the data field and ending with
the most significant bit (MSB) of the last byte of the data field. If the
number of points is not a multiple of eight, then the last data byte
contains zeros in one to seven of its highest order bits.
RESPONSE: The description of the response fields are covered in the description of the
query fields.
NOTE
The input override table cannot be written to when the memory
switch of the attached Series Six CPU is in the protect position.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-31
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (71): WRITE SCRATCH PAD MEMORY
FORMAT:
Address
Func
71
Starting
Number
Byte Number Of Bytes
I
Byte
Count
Data
Error
Check
I
Query
Address
Func
71
Starting
Byte Number
Normal
QUERY:
Number
Of Bytes
Error
Check
Response
An address of 0 indicates a broadcast request. All slave stations process a
broadcast request and no response is sent.
- The value of the function code is 71.
- The starting byte number, number of bytes, byte count, and data fields
are described in the read scratch pad memory.
- The starting byte number is two bytes in length and may be any value less
than or equal to the highest scratch pad memory address available in the
attached Series Six CPU. The starting byte number is equal to the
address of the first scratch pad memory byte returned in the normal
response to this request.
- The number of bytes value is two bytes in length. It specifies the number
of scratch pad memory locations (bytes) returned in the normal response.
The sum of the starting byte number and the number of bytes values must
be less than two plus the highest scratch pad memory address available in
the attached Series Six CPU. The high order byte of the starting byte
number and number of bytes fields is sent as the first byte in each of
these fields. The low order byte is the second byte in each of the fields.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-32
GEK-25364
- The byte count is a binary number from 1 to 256 (0 = 256). It is the
number of bytes in the data field of the normal response.
- The data field contains the contents of the scratch pad memory requested
by the query.
The scratch pad memory bytes are sent in order of
address. The contents of the scratch pad memory byte whose address is
equal to the starting byte number is sent in the first byte of the data
field. The contents of the scratch pad memory byte whose address is
equal to one less than the sum of the starting byte number and number of
bytes values is sent in the last byte of the data field.
RESPONSE:
The description of the response fields are covered in the query description.
REMARKS:
Only 2 writes are allowed to the CPU’s Scratch Pad from an external device:
A
B
Address 0 to 1
Address 60H to 7FH
CPU RUN and COMMAND STATUS
SUBROUTINE VECTOR ADDRESSES
Writing to CPU Scratch Pad Addresses 0 and 1 provides for stopping and
starting the CPU. To stop the CPU, 80H is written to both locations. To
start the CPU, 01H is written to both locations.
The Subroutine Vector Addresses are used in conjunction with the User
Logic programs stored in the CPU. Even addresses are most significant
bytes and odd addresses are least significant bytes that make up subroutine
vector addresses. Subroutine 0 address starts at 60H and subroutine F
address ends at 7FH.
NOTE
The scratch pad memory cannot be written to when the memory
protect switch of the attached Series Six CPU is in the protect
position.
When an external device writes to the CPU scratch pad, the CCM
device will first place the CPU in stop mode.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-33
GEK-25364
MESSAGE (72): WRITE USER LOGIC
FORMAT:
Address
Func
72
Starting
Address
Number
Of Words
Byte
Count
Data
Error
Check
I II
Query
Address
Func
72
Starting
Address
Number
Of Words
Error
Check
Normal Response
QUERY:
- An address of 0 indicates a broadcast request. All slave stations process
a broadcast request and no response is sent.
- The function code is equal to 72.
- The starting address is two bytes in length and may be any value less than
or equal to the highest user logic memory address available in the
attached Series Six CPU. The starting address is equal to the address of
the first user logic memory word returned in the normal response to this
request.
- The number of words value is two bytes in length. It contains a value
from 1 to 125. It specifies the number of user logic memory words
returned in the normal response. The sum of the starting address and the
number of words values must be less than two plus the highest user logic
memory address available in the attached Series Six CPU. The high order
byte of the starting address and number of words fields is sent as the first
byte in each of these fields. The low order byte is the second byte in
each of these fields.
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5-34
RTU Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
- The byte count is a binary number from 2 to 250. It is the number of
bytes in the data field of the normal response.
- The contents of the user logic memory are sent in the data field in order
of address with the lowest address contents in the first two bytes and the
highest address contents in the last two bytes. The address of the first
user logic memory contents returned in the data field is equal to the
starting address. The high order byte of each user logic memory address
is sent before the low order byte of that address.
The description of the response fields are covered in the query description.
RESPONSE:
NOTE
User logic memory cannot be written to when the memory
switch of the attached Series Six CPU is in the protect
position.
REMARKS:
The following procedure is recommended when writing to user logic:
1.
Read scratch pad memory (function 67) addresses 6 thru 14 (OEH). These
scratch pad addresses allow the master to check if it can load a program
into the Series Six CPU attached to the CCM device, and if the program is
compatible with that CPU. Scratch pad address 6 indicates the state of
the memory switch (protect or write), the type of instruction set (basic or
extended), and the number of registers in the attached Series Six CPC.
Scratch pad addresses 11 thru 14 (OBH thru OEH) indicate the amount of
user logic memory in the attached Series Six CPU.
2.
Replace the first two words of the user logic program with a SUSPEND I/O
and a ENDSW instruction and write the logic program t o t h e
communication module (using one or more write user logic requests). The
presence of the SUSPEND I/O and ENDSW instructions at the beginning of
the user logic programs prevents the execution of a partly loaded program.
3.
If the user logic program uses any subroutines write the user program
subroutine vector addresses to scratch pad memory with a write scratch
pad memory request.
4.
Load any initial register, input/output, or input/output override values that
are required by the user logic program.
5.
Write the first two words of the user logic program into the first two user
logic memory addresses.
NOTE
When an external device writes to the user logic the CCM device
will first place the CPU in stop mode.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-35
GEK-25364
COMMUNICATION
ERRORS
Serial link communication errors are divided into three groups:
- Invalid Query Message
- Serial Link Time Outs
- lnvalid Transaction
INVALID QUERY MESSAGE
When the communications module receives a query addressed to itself, but cannot
process the query, it sends one of the following error responses:
- lnvalid Function Code
- Invalid Address Field
- Invalid Data Field
- Query Processing Failure
Subcode
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
The format for an error response to a query is as follows.
Address
Exception
Func
Error
Subcode
Error
Check
I
An address of 0 is not allowed as there is no response to a broadcast request. The
exception function code is equal to the sum of the function code of the query which the
error response is a response to plus 128. The error subcode is equal to 1, 2, 3, or 4. The
value of the subcode indicates the reason that the properly received query could not be
processed.
Invalid Function Code Error Response (I)
An error response with a subcode of 1 is called an invalid function code error response.
This response is sent by a slave if it receives a query whose function code is not equal to
1 through 8, 15, 16, 17, or 65 through 72.
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5-36
RTU Communications Protocol
GEK-25364
Invalid Address Error Response (2)
An error response with a subcode of 2 is called an inva lid address error response. This
error response is sent in the following cases:
1.
The starting point number and number of points fields specify output status points
or input status points that are not available in the attached Series Six CPU
(returned for function codes 1, 2, 15, 65, 66, 69, 70).
2.
The starting register number and number of registers fields specify registers that
are not available in the attached Series Six CPU (returned for function codes 3, 4,
16).
3.
The point number field specifies an output status point not available in the
attached Series Six CPU (returned for function code 5).
4.
The register number field specifies a register not available in the attached Series
Six CPU (returned for function code 6).
5.
The diagnostic code is not equal to 0, 1, or 4 (returned for function code 8).
6.
The starting byte number and number of bytes fields specify a scratch pad memory
address that is not available in the attached Series Six CPU (returned for function
code 67).
7.
The starting byte number and number of bytes fields specify a write to a scratch
pad memory address other than addresses 0, 1, 60H thru 7FH, and 5CH thru 5FH
(returned for function code 71).
8.
The starting address and number of words fields specify a user logic memory
address not available in the attached Series Six CPU (returned for function codes
68, 72).
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-37
GEK-25364
Invalid Data Value Error Response (3)
An error response with a subcode of 3 is called an invalid data value error response.
response is sent in the following case:
This
The first byte of the data field is not equal to 0 or 255 (FFH) or the second byte of the
data field is not equal to 0 for the force single output request (function code 5) or the
initiate communication restart request (function code 8, diagnostic code 1).
NOTE
Although there are no checks for invalid data when the subroutine
vector addresses are written to scratch pad memory addresses 96
(60H) to 127 (7FH), a subroutine vector address should never be set
equal to 0.
Query Processing Failure Error Response (4)
An error response with a subcode of 4 is called a query processing failure response. This
error response is sent by a CCM device if it properly receives a query but communication
between the associated Series Six CPU and the CCM device fails.
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RTU Communications Protocol
5-38
GEK-25364
SERIAL LINK TIME-OUT
The only cause for a CCM device to time-out is if an interruption to a data stream of 3
character times occurs while a message is being received. If this occurs the message is
considered to have terminated and no response will be sent to the master. There are
certain timing considerations due to the characteristics of the slave that should be taken
into account by the master.
-
After sending a query message, the master should wait the length of the turn-around
time before assuming that the slave did not respond to its request. See Table 5.1 for
turn-around times using the various function codes.
-
The master must also consider the activity occurring on the CCM device port to
which the master is not connected. If there is activity occurring on the J2 port when
an RTU query message is sent to the J1 port, the query message will not be
processed until after the J2 port becomes idle. The time it takes for the port to
become idle must be allowed for by the master to prevent the master from timing
out. More information on dual port activity with the CCM device can be found in
Chapter 2, section: Simultaneous Port Operations.
INVALID TRANSACTIONS
If an error occurs during transmission that does not fall into the category of an invalid
query message or a serial link time-out, it is known as an invalid transaction. Types of
errors causing an invalid transaction include:
-
Bad CRC.
The data length specified by the memory address field is longer than the data
received .
Framing or overrun errors.
Parity errors.
If an error in this category occurs when a message is received by the CCM device, the
CCM device does not return an error message. The CCM device treats the incoming
message as though it was not intended for it.
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6-1
Communication Applications
GEK-25364
CHAPTER 6
COMMUNICATION APPLlCATIONS
INTRODUCTION
This chapter includes several application programs for using the features of the CCM2
and CCM3 (CCM) communications module. The programs present basic programming
techniques which the user can tailor to his specific needs. The following programs,
applicable to the CCM are included:
-
Using the CCM Status Byte for SCREQ Interlocks and Sequencing
-
Using the CCM Diagnostic Status Words
-
Multidrop Polling Routine
TITLE: USING THE CCM STATUS BYTE FOR SCREQ INTERLOCKS AND SEQUENCING
INTRODUCTION: The CCM Status Byte consists of 8 bits of status information as shown
below which are transferred from the CCM to CPU inputs I1009-I1016
during each CCM communications window.
Input No.
I1009
I1010
I1011
I1012
I1013
I1014
I1015
I 1016
Bit
Definition
CCM Port Busy with [SCREQ]
[SCREQ] complete without error
[SCREQ] complete with error
Externally initiated READ
occurred successfully
Externally initiated WRITE
occurred successfully
Q response sent
Spare (always 0)
CCM-CPU communications OK
Bit 1 is set to a 1 when the CCM accepts a port command from the
CPU and resets to 0 upon completion.
Bits 2-6 are pulsed by the CCM when the condition causing the status
change occurs. The pulse function ensures that the bit will be set to 1
for 3 windows minimum then will be set to 0 for 3 windows minimum.
The pulse function for a particular status bit will be completed before
another pulse function for the same status bit is activated.
Bit 8 is explained in the Theory of Operation section later in this
application.
This instructional program will show how bits 1 and 8 can be used as
SCREQ interlocks to prevent improper activation of the SCREQ
function and how bits 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 can be used to sequence a
series of SCREQ functions. Bit 3 indicates an error in the execution
of a SCREQ. An example program for using this bit is presented
later in the chapter.
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Communication Applications
6-2
GEK-25364
EQUIPMENT USED: 1 - CPU with extended functions
1 - CCM (all SCREQs in this example are internal commands)
Series Six I/O (optional)
MODULE
CONFIGURATION:
THEORY OF
OPERATION:
Any valid configuration is acceptable since the SCREQs in this
program are internal.
SEQUENCER
This program sequentially executes 2 internal requests: 06004,
Load QAB and 06007, Read QAB. In the first request, bytes 0-3 of
the QAB are loaded with the contents of R0050 and R0051, then in
the second request the same QAB bytes, 0-3, are read into R0052
and R0053. A shift register, which is reset and initialized manually
and advanced by the pulsing of bit 2 of the status byte (I1010),
controls the sequencing. The shift register consists of a block of
outputs 00001-00016. When input 10001 is active the shift register
is first cleared and then output 00001 is set to a 1:
00001
00016
| 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 |
This triggers the execution of the first SCREQ, 06004, Load QAB
(which loads the QAB from registers R0050, R0051). Upon
completion of 06004, bit 2 (I1010, [SCREQ] complete without error)
of the status byte pulses on and off which triggers the shift
register to shift 1 bit to the left.
00016
00001
| 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 |
This triggers the execution of the second SCREQ, 06007, Read QAB
(which reads the QAB to registers R0052, R0053). Upon completion
of 06007, Bit 2 pulses on and off and triggers the shift register to
shift 1 bit to the left again. Since there are no more SCREQs in the
program the sequence stops. With this type of shift register as
many as 16 different SCREQs could be sequenced. Larger shift
registers can be programmed using the extended shift functions.
This program consists of internal commands only; when port
commands are included, bits 1, 4, 5, and 6 can be used as triggers to
sequence SCREQs as well as other functions of the program.
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Communication Applications
6-3
GEK-25364
INTERLOCKS
Two interlocks are used in this program. One of the interlocks--bit 1,
I1009, of the status byte indicating CCM busy with [SCREQ]--can be
used as a normally closed contact permitting power flow to the [SCREQ]
function only when a CCM2 port is not busy.
The other interlock is based on bit 8 of the status byte, I1016, indicating
CCM-CPU communications is OK. This bit, however, cannot be used
directly as is the CCM busy bit. Bit 8 is set to a 1 if the CCM passes
power up indicating good communication between CCM and CPU. After
power up, a 1 is written to bit 8 during each window. If communications
between CCM and CPU fail, a 1 is not written because no window occurs.
To use bit 8 as an interlock, periodically reset the bit to a 0, wait a
period of time, and check to see if the bit has returned to a 1. If the bit
has not been set to a 1 again, then communications between the CCM
and CPU has failed. The length of time needed to wait must be longer
than the time required by the longest transmission: Rule of Thumb:
No. Char. x 10
Data Rate (bits/sec) + Longest Response Timeout
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6-6
GEK-25364
ANNOTATION OF
PROGRAM:
Rung No. 1 ensures the CCM windows are enabled by zeroing
the [STATUS] function register. (Note: A value of zero in the
[STATUS] function enables DPU as well as CCM windows).
Rung No. 2 triggers the shift register initialization.
Rung No. 3 places a 1 in O0001 turning it ON and causing the first
SCREQ to be executed.
Rung No. 4 triggers the [SHIFT] function when bit 2 (I1010) of the
status byte, indicating [SCREQI complete without error, pulses ON
and OFF.
Rung No. 5 shifts one bit to the left when triggered.
Rung No. 6 loads the [SCREQ] registers for command 06004 when
output O0001 is ON. This request loads QAB bytes 0-3 with the
contents of the 2 registers R0050, R0051.
Rung No. 7 allows for loading R0050 and R0051 from the user
program without going to the register tables. (For user convenience
only).
Rung No. 8 loads the [SCREQ] registers for command 06007 when
output O0002 is ON. This request reads the contents of QAB bytes
0-3 into 2 registers R0052, R0053.
Rung No. 9 permits monitoring R0052 and R0053 from the user
program without using the register tables. When commands 06004
and 06007 in this example are executed in sequence, the contents of
R0050 and R0051 are copied into the QAB and then copied back out
to R0052 and R0053. (For user convenience only).
Rung No. 10 is the [SCREQ] rung containing permissive contacts
O0019 and O0020 from the [BLOCK MOVE] functions and containing
interlocks I1009 (bit 1 of the status byte) and O0051 (derived from
I1016, which is bit 8 of the status byte, as shown in rungs 11, 12,
and 13).
Rung No. 11 is used with rungs 12 and 13 to provide an interlock for
t h e [ S C R E Q ] r u n g i n d i c a t i n g t h e s t a t u s o f CPU/CCM
communications. Rung 11 zeroes bit 8 of the status byte when the
accumulator register of the 5 second timer in rung 12 is 0. The
theory of programming this interlock is explained earlier in this
application in the section, Interlocks.
Rung No. 12 is a timer which runs continuously as long as
CPU/CCM communications are good. Its length is determined by
the longest serial transmission likely to occur in the application.
Rung No. 13 signals a failure in CPU/CCM communications if bit 8
does not return to a 1 before the timer times out. Output 00051
will turn on if communications have failed; and in rung 10 power to
the [SCREQ] function will be broken.
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6-7
Communication Applications
GEK-25364
TITLE: USING THE CCM DIAGNOSTIC STATUS WORDS
INTRODUCTION:
The CCM Diagnostic Status Words (defined in Table 2.20, CCM
Diagnostic Status Word Definition) are powerful tools which allow
the user to monitor and analyze SCREQ or serial port errors.
Unlike the CCM status byte which is automatical
transferred
l y
from the CCM to the CPU once each window, the Diagnostic Status
Words must be read from the CCM using an SCREQ.
This application program shows the user how to:
-
Read the host CCM Diagnostic Status Words
Clear the host CCM Diagnostic Status Words
Read the remote CCM Diagnostic Status Words
Clear the remote CCM Diagnostic Status Words
Analyze error codes of Diagnostic Status Words 1 and 13
EQUIPMENT USED: 2 - CPUs with extended functions
2 - CCMs
Series Six I/O (optional)
CCM to CCM, RS-232D cable configured as shown in Chapter
2, Section, Cable and Connector Specifications.
CCM AND CPU
CONFIGURATION:
CCM Software Configuration
- R0247 = 00038 (0026) for
both Series Six CPUs
- RS-232D
- Peer-to-peer protocol
- 19.2 Kbps
- 0 msec turn-around delay
- No parity
CPU ID Configuration
- Host CPU ID = 1
- Remote CPU ID = 2
All port SCREQs use Port J1
THEORY OF
OPERATION:
There are 2 main parts to this application program which
resides in the host CPU:
Trial SCREQ - which emulates a port SCREQ between the host and
remote devices occurring in a user program.
D i a g n o s t i c Status W o r d SCREQs - w h i c h r e a d a n d c l e a r t h e
Diagnostic Status Words in both the host and remote device.
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6-8
Communication Applications
GEK-25364
The trial SCREQ is used as a vehicle to introduce errors in an
SCREQ to cause the Diagnostic Status Word SCREQs to display the
Diagnostic Status Words. When a communication error occurs, a
SCREQ is activated to read the host Series Six Diagnostic Status
Words to registers R0201 - R0220. If further analysis is needed, the
remote Series Six Diagnostic Status Words can be read to registers
R0201 - R0220.
To illustrate the usefulness of the Diagnostic Status Words, several
trial SCREQs using command 06101, Read from Target to Source
Registers were made. Intentional errors were introduced into the
SCREQ registers or the communication line to simulate errors in
the user program.
Table 6.1 shows the error introduced into each trial SCREQ and the
resulting Diagnostic Status Words from R0201 - R0220 for the host
Series Six PLC and the remote Series Six PLC where applicable.
The error code definitions for Diagnostic Status Words 1 (Serial
Port Errors, Table 2.20) and (SCREQ Error Codes for Status Word
13, Table 2.21) are also included for each trial.
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6-l 8
Communication Applications
GEK-25364
Rung number 7 loads the SCREQ registers for SCREQ 06002, Clear
Diagnostic Status Words, when 10003 is closed.
Rung number 8 loads the SCREQ registers for SCREQ 06101 which
is used in this case to read the remote Series Six Diagnostic Status
Words when 10004 is closed.
Rung number 9 loads the SCREQ registers for SCREQ command
06111, which is used in this case to w r i t e zeroes to the remote
Series Six Diagnostic Status Words, when 10005 is closed.
Rung numbers
10-12a r e u s e d t o d i s p l a y t h e c o n t e n t s o f t h e
Diagnostic Status Words.
Rung number 13 is the SCREQ rung with permissive contacts for
activation and with the interlock 11009 to prevent execution of the
SCREQ when a CCM port is busy.
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TITLE: MULTIDROP POLLING ROUTINE
INTRODUCTION:
A multidrop configuration is one in which a Series Six PLC or host
computer is a master controller and two or more Series Six PLCs
are slaves to the master controller.
The master controller typically receives data from the slave
devices and transmits control information back to them. A polling
routine, whereby each slave is either written to or read from in
succession, is often used to pass information between master and
slaves, and that is the type of routine shown in this example.
EQUIPMENT USED:
2 or more CPUs with extended functions
2 or more CCMs
Series Six I/O (optional)
RS-422 multidrop cable configured as shown in Chapter 2 section:
Cable and Connector Specifications.
CCM AND CPU
CONFIGURATION:
CCM Software Configuration
Master R0247 = 00006 (0006H)
Slave R0247 = 00022 (0016H)
RS-422
Master-Slave Protocol
- 19.2 Kbps
- 0 msec turn-around delay
- No parity
CPU ID Conf iquration
Master CPU lD = 1
Slave 1 CPU ID = 2
Slave 2 CPU tD = 3
Slave 3 CPU ID = 4
All port SCREQs use Port J1.
THEORY OF
OPERATION:
A sequence of SCREQS that reads 10 registers from each slave is
triggered every 5 seconds. A shift register is used for controlling
the sequence of requests. The operation of a shift register for
sequencing is explained in the Theory of Operation section in the
application program, U s i n g t h e C C M S t a t u s B y t e f o r S C R E Q
Interlocks and Sequencing.
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Communication Applications
6-20
GEK-25364
The block diagram illustrates the transfer of registers f rom staves
to master.
MASTER (CPU ID = 1)
SLAVE NO. 1 (CPU ID = 2)
R0050
f i rst SCREQ
R0050
1
1
< __-________---__-----------R0059
R0059
I
!
R0060
1
<-R0069
l
R0070
1
<-R0079
SLAVE NO. 2 (CPU
second SCREQ
__---~_------------------
D = 3)
R0050
1
R0059
I
I
SLAVE NO. 3 (CPU
D = 4)
third SCREQ
____-___-----------------
Figure 6.1 REGISTER TRANSFER FROM SLAVE TO MASTER
The master and slaves are identified by their CPU ID number which
is configured through the CPU Scratchpad.
The first SCREQ executed reads registers R0050-R0059 from slave
number 1 to registers R0050-R0059 of the master; the second
SCREQ reads R0050-R0059 from slave number 2 to R0060-R0069
of the master; and the third SCREQ reads R0050-R0059 from slave
number 3 to R0070-R0079. This sequence is repeated every time
the timer times out.
To see the polling routine operate, first place known values in
registers ROO50-RO059 of each slave. The transfer can then be
seen by monitoring the register table of the master Series Six.
Before the sequence of SCREQs begins, the matrix function [A AND
B = C LEN] zeroes registers R0050-R0079 in the master Series Six
allowing repetitive polling sequences to be easily monitored.
The program which follows was written for 1 master and 3 slaves.
It can, however, be easily modified to work for 2 slaves or more
than 3 slaves by changing the length of the shift register and adding
or deleting SCREQs to slave Series Sixes.
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Communication Applications
6-21
GEK-25364
PROGRAM 3
(For a rung by rung explanation see the annotation following the program).
<RUNG
I
O>
+[NO OPl+
(
1
(
1
I
I
+
<RUNG
1 CONST
+[
A
1 0000
l>
R0006
MOVE
B
+
R0006
I+[
<RUNG
STATUS
I+
2>
1 10001
CONST
00030
+--I [-- +-------+-------+ -------+-------+-------+-------+------- +[PRESC]+-(TS)-+
I
005
(
1
R0030 ( )
1 00030
+--I [.m+ __I_ ---+-------+-- ___-v + --_____ + _____-_ + _------ +-------+[ACCRG]+-(
R)
I
I
+
<RUNG
1 10002
CONST
+--1 [--+C A
I
3>
0000 1
MOVE
1+ooooo
8
I+
(
1
1 00004 1
+--I [--+
I
I
+
I
1
<RUNG
R0030
+[
I
A
R0031
R0050
]+[
B
:
4>
A
+
R0050
=
<RUNG
I--+[
A
C
CONST
LEN]+
030
5>
1 00030 CONST
I
B
00002
I
+
+--I
ROO5O
EOR
00001
MOVE
B
I+
+00001
<RUNG
6>
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6-22
Communication Applications
GEK-25364
<RUNG
7>
I
1
00017
+--I
00001
I--+CSHIFT]+
(
)
I
1
+
<RUNG
8)
1
I
+ OOUOl
ROIOO
+--1 [--+I:
+06101
I
<RUNG
+
I
1
OOUl8
BLOCK
00002
+--I
*a0002
+oooa1
I+-(OS)-+
MOVE
+0005a
+ooaiu
+a0050
+ooaoo
9>
ROlOO
00019
BLOCK
[--+[
I
+06101
+
<RUNG lO>
+00003
1 00003 ROlOO
+--] [--+[
+OOOal
I+-(OS)-+
MOVE
+00050
+OOOlO
+00060
+OOOOO
00020
BLOCK
I
+06101
+
<RUNG ll>
noa
ROIOO
1 00018
+--I [--+--I/[--+[SCREQ]+
+00004
+00001
I+-(OS)-+
MOVE
+00050
+00010
+00070
+ooooo
(
)
I
I
1 00019 1
+--] [--+
I
I
1 00020 1
+--1 I--+
I
I
4
<RUNG 12>
I
I
+[ENDSW]+
<RUNG l3>
I
I
+[ENOSWI+
1
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Communication Applications
6-23
GEK-25364
ANNOTATION
OF PROGRAM:
Rung number 1 ensures the CCM windows are enabled by zeroing
the [STATUS] function register. (Note: A value of zero in the
[STATUS] function enables DPU as well as CCM windows).
Rung number 2 is a 5-second timer that runs continuously as long as
input 10001 is closed. When the timer times out, it initiates the
pal 1 i ng sequence.
Rung number 3 resets the shift register specified in rung No. 7
manually when input 10002 is closed or automatically when the shift
register contains:
00016
00001
| 0000 0000 0000 1000 |
Rung number 4 zeroes registers R0050-R0079 in the master Series
Six before each polling sequence (when the timer accumulator
equals 2 seconds).
Rung number 5 moves a 1 to the first bit of the shift register
specified in rung number 7. This turns output 00001 ON causing the
SCREQ in rung number 8 to execute.
Rung number 6 triggers the shift register to shift one bit to the left
when I1010 (SCREQ complete without error) transitions from OFF
to ON.
Rung number 7 contains the shift register
Rung number 8 loads the SCREQ registers to execute a read
command from registers in slave number 1, (CPU ID = 2).
Rung number 9 loads the SCREQ registers to execute a read
command from registers in slave number 2. (CPU ID = 3).
Rung number 10 loads the SCREQ registers to execute a read
command from registers in slave number 3. (CPU ID = 4).
Rung number 11 is the SCREQ rung with permissive contacts for
activation and with the interlock I1009 to prevent execution of the
SCREQ when a CCM port is busy.
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Host Computer Communication Interface Software
A-1
GEK-25364
APPENDIX A
HOST COMPUTER COMMUNICATION INTERFACE SOFTWARE
INTRODUCTION
Host computer communication i n t e r f a c e s o f t w a r e a l l o w s a h o s t c o m p u t e r t o
communicate with one or more Series Six Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs)
equipped with the Communications Control Module (CCM). This interface software
generally provides network and communications control, debugging and network event
messages, and interface routines for user application programs to transfer data to and
f r o m t h e PLCs.
With the communications interface software handling these
requirements, the user can concentrate on application programming specific to his needs
instead of communications programming.
DEC COMMUNICATION INTERFACE SOFTWARE PACKAGES
GE Fanuc Automation - NA has developed communication interface software for use on
The main features of this
Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX computers.
package are summarized below.
FEATURES Of DEC SOFTWARE PACKAGES
- Comprehensive communication package allowing the user to work on the
application task, not communications.
-
Includes software drivers for CCM protocol.
-
Supports all CCM2, CCM3, and I/O CCM system configurations:
Point-to-point
Point-to-multipoint (GEnet)
Multidrop (includes polling routine).
- Data transfers initiated from the host computer are made by FORTRAN
application programs using subroutine calls supplied as a part of this software.
-
Accepts normal or interrupt driven data transfers initiated by Series Six PLCs.
- Includes a terminal interface for configuring the network and for accessing
system performance data.
-
Includes diagnostics for troubleshooting and maintenance.
-
lncludes a simulator to verify application programs.
-
Can handle up to 16 channels.
* Trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation,
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Host Computer Communication Interface Software
A-2
GEK-25364
-
Can accommodate a total of 254 Series Six PLCs.
-
Can accommodate 60 application tasks.
ORDERING SOFTWARE
Types of Licenses
Three types of licenses are offered.
1.
SINGLE COMPUTER LICENSE: for use on one computer (registered by DEC
serial number on licensing agreement). This license provides the customer with
the software on the specified media, the user’s manual, and technical support.
2.
COPY LICENSE: allows the customer to copy the software for use on an
additional computer. Only a copy of the user’s manual is supplied. The
customer is responsible for copying the software; no technical support is
provided. If required, technical support can be ordered separately. For a
customer to have obtained this license, he must have previously ordered a Single
Computer License.
This type of license is intended for use by customers having multiple computer
installations of which only one site is supported or for OEMs that do not pass
support to their customers.
3.
CORPORATE LICENSE: Unrestricted use within a company division.
Forms of Software
There are three forms in which software is supplied.
1.
SOURCE CODE: This is the form of the software that a human can read and
is the form used when writing the software. Source software can easily be
modified by a user if he is skilled in programming.
2.
OBJECT CODE (Binary): This is the form of the software, generated from
source code, that a computer can read. Object software cannot be modified
and is the form usually supplied.
3.
EXECUTABLE CODE: This is the form of software that the computer uses to
perform the job. Executable software is created from object software on the
particular computer on which it will be used.
The communication interface software package is offered as a combined source and
object code distribution. The package includes a command file which will build the
executable code from the source or object code.
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Host Computer Communication Interface Software
A-3
GEK-25364
Hardware and Software Requirements for VAX Computers
-
Any valid VMS system configuration.
-
For version 1.3 of the communication interface software, the following software
is also required.
VMS, Version 4.*
FORTRAN-77, Version 5.0
- Full duplex terminal drivers for connecting to Series Six CCMs supporting
data with 9th bit parity: e.g. DL-11, DZ-11, and DH-11.
8-bit
Memory Requirements for DEC Communications Interface Software
The DEC software package consists of 8 system components as Iisted below.
The approximate task sizes (in 16 bit words) for the system components are as follows:
: 28K words
System Control Program (SCP)
Communication
Manager (COMMAN) : 36K words
(NETLOG) : 16K words
Network Event Logger
Configurator Program
(CFG) : 24K words
: Application dependent
Configuration
Database
(SIMLTR) : 24K words
Simulator
: Application dependent
FORTRAN Interface Routines
The components--COMMAN and the database region-- must be in memory to use the
software. Therefore, the memory size required for the software is 36K + the data base
region. The other components --SCP, CFG, NETLOG, and SIMLTR--require memory only
when called.
Catalog Numbers for Ordering Software Packages
Table A.1 CATALOG NUMBERS FOR VAX SOFTWARE
CATALOG
SOFTWARE AND
LICENSE TYPE
Single
Copy
Computer
License
License
MEDIA
NUMBER
IC60lV00lBlB
IC601V00lB3B
Magtape
1600BPI 9-Track
None Supplied
GEK-25377 User’s Manual, Object Code
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Host Computer Communication Interface Software
A-4
GEK-25364
DESCRIPTION OF DEC SOFTWARE OPERATION
The DEC software package consists of several major system components tied together to
as a comprehensive communications controller. The primary components are:
perform
System Control Program
Communication Manager
Network Event Logger
Event Processor
Database Configurator Program
System Database
Simulator
FORTRAN Interface Routines
All of these components serve particular roles and will be described on the following
pages. Figure A.1 below illustrates the system components and their interaction.
84pcOllO
EVENT
PROCESSOR
APPLICATION
TASK
COMMUNICATION
MANAGER
I
CONFIGURATION
DATABASE
1
4
=c
S Y S T E M C O N TR O L
PROGRAM
c”+oNEL
SERIES
SIXES)
CONAGURATOR
Figure A.1 SYSTEM COMPONENT INTERACTION
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Host Computer Communication Interface Software
A-5
GEK-25364
Description of Components
System Control Program
The System Control Program (SCP) is an interactive utility program that accepts
terminal commands to monitor, test, and control the network. Most SCP commands
consist of a command name, a component upon which the command acts, and selected
parameters for that component. SCP commands perform the following functions.
- Upline copy programs
- Downline load programs
- Setting channel parameters
- Control of the data logger
- Displaying status data
- Setting remote parameters
The channel and remote parameters are used to configure the network and specify timing
parameters.
Communication
Manager
The Communication Manager (COMMAN) is a stand alone task that provides the
communication network control and protocol functions. COMMAN performs all the
communication to and from the Series Six PLCs. COMMAN services the requests from
the application tasks, the System Control Program and the Event Processor. In addition,
COMMAN maintains status information and requests the logging of network events.
Network Event Logger
The network event logger allows a user to selectively record the activities of the
net work. It records two types of information: debugging messages and network event
messages.
The debugging messages are generated indirectly by application programs. These
messages enable the user to monitor the activities of an application program. The
messages trace application task subroutine calls, report a routine’s completion status, and
log the type, size, and direction of data transmission.
The network event messages record changes and problems in the network as they occur.
The information logged by these messages includes: any change of Series Six status, bad
data transmission, illegal data requests, read and write request failures, Series Six
allocation status, and network logger status.
The network loggers are controlled from the System Control Program. These types of
messages have been placed in categories which can be selectively enabled. This allows
the event logger to be tailored to obtain specific types of information.
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Host Computer Communication Interface Software
A-6
GEK-25364
Event Processor
The Event Processor informs application tasks or the System Control Program the results
of their service requests to the Communication Manager. The Event Processor is
included within the Communication Manager.
Database Configurator Program
The Database Configurator Program configures and tailors the configuration database to
the user’s specific requirements.
The size of the configuration database is determined by the number of channels and
remotes the user desires to be serviced by the Communication Manager.
System
Database
The system database consists of a group of parameters and counters. The parameters
define how the network is configured and will perform. The counters store information
describing actual system configuration and performance. Information is available on a
system, channel, or remote basis. Parameters and counters may be accessed from the
System Control Program.
Simulator
The simulator allows computer application tasks to be tested and debugged without
connecting to a Series Six CPU. The programmer develops a script of responses to
communications.
An application task that is in the simulator mode will then access the
script for data or the location to send data. The results then may be easily analyzed.
FORTRAN Interface Routines
The FORTRAN Interface Routines are a series of subroutine calls available to the
computer application task. These include:
Atlocating a remote Programmable Logic Controller (PLC)
Copying a remote PLC program
De-allocating a remote PLC
Getting a channel’s parameters
Getting a remote PLC’s parameters
Getting the system’s parameters
Retrieving the computer’s memory tables
Loading a program to a remote PLC
Initiating a computer data request from a remote PLC
Receiving an externally initiated exception message
Receiving an interrupt message
Sending data to a remote
After execution, each subroutine will respond with a completion code.
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Host Computer Communication Interface Software
A-7
_~.~
GEK-25364
Privileges
The VAX software uses a privilege account system. A privileged account is required to
be able to change communication parameters, load Series Six programs, or modify
contents of Series Six memory locations.
A non-privileged account can examine the status and configuration of the communication
parameters and can examine Series Six memory locations, but cannot modify them.
AlIowable Hardware System Configurations
The DEC interface software will support 3 configurations of the Series Six and a DEC
point-to-multipoint (GEnet), and multidrop.
point-to-point,
VAX computer:
All
connections are made to the Series Six CCM1 or CCM2/3 modules.
Any combination of configurations may coexist on the same computer, but only one
configuration is allowed per channel.
84pcOO63
I
COl%TER
;DL-11,
‘DZ-11,
: OR
;DH-11
SERIES
SIX
Figure A.2 POINT-TO-POINT CONNECTION
The computer can initiate a message; the Series Six PLC can also initiate a message if a
CCM2/3 is used. The maximum number of devices which can be connected to the
computer is determined by the number of channels the computer hardware and software
can support. The DEC software package can support a maximum of 16 channels.
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A-8
Host Computer Communication Interface Software
GEK-25364
84~~0064
GENET
9
----------------
I
BIU
K-232
t-
f DL-11,
I
DZ-11, DH-111
DEC
COMPUTER
1
1
I
E
BIU
BIU
* _
SERIES
SIX
SERIES
SIX
?I
BIU
SERIES
SIX
MAXIMUM OF 254 DEVICES
Figure A.3 POINT-TO-MULTIPOINT (GEnet) NETWORK
The DEC Communication Interface Software will support communications to Series Six
PLCs across GEnet. Any device may initiate a message to any other, except Seri
Six
PLCs with a CCM1 interface which respond only to another device.
84pcOO65
1
1 DL-11,
‘DX-1 1,
DEC
C O M P U T E R 1 OR
IDH-lt
I
I
SERIES
six
SER’ES .-----------m sz:s
SIX
Figure A.4 MULTIDROP NETWORK CONNECTION
This configuration is supported only by the CCM option. The computer serves as a master
in a multidrop network. The computer is the only device which can initiate a message in
this configuration. A polling routine is provided to perform polling of the remotes.
Consult CCM literature for maximum number of devices on the remote link (typically 8
without modems using the RS422 electrical interface; 90 with modems).
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Expanded Functions
B-1
GEK-25364A
APPENDIX B
EXPANDED FUNCTIONS
INTRODUCTION
The following pages explain the the eries Six’” Communications Control Module (CCM2,
CCM3, and I / O CCM) expanded functions and the CCM module hardware and software
ident if icat ion.
CCM modules that perform the extended functions are listed below. Those versions listed
or later versions may be used.
CCM Module
Hardware Id.
Software ID.
I/O CCM
CCM2
CCM3
I C600F948
IC 600CB536K
IC600CB537K
203 (hex), 515 (decimal)
006
104 (hex), 260 (decimat)
HARDWARE
IDENTIFICATION
CCM2, CCM3 hardware versions IC600CB536, IC600CB537 are a single-PROM module.
This new single-PROM module replaces either a 6-PROM or single-PROM module for
CCM2, and a 7-PROM or single-PROM module for CCM3.
The CCMA3 module (for both CCM2 and CCM3) is identified as follows:
Hardware id. CCMA3, 44A717545-GO2 R02 or later.
The l/O CCM module is identified as follows:
Hardware Id.
BAMA, 44A717588-GO1
R02 or later.
NOTE
Refer to the Module Compatability information located in the
Preface of this manual for more information concerning
hardware/s tware features and me
compatability.
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B-2
Expanded Functions
GEK-25364A
EXPANDED FUNCTIONS OVERVIEW
Several additional features and enhancements are available to the user with the
appropriate hardware/software release as listed above. A brief description of the Series
Six Communication Control Module (CCM) features and enhancements are as follows:
EXPANDED l/O REFERENCE
A new method of addressing the I/O points within the Expanded Instruction Set has been
devised to allow access of additional I/O points. This feature allows addressing of
channelized I/O points available with the Series Six expanded instruction set. The l/O
points can be accessed by both the CCM protocol and Remote Terminal Unit (RTU)
protocol for CCM3 and l/O CCM, and the CCM protocol only for CCM2. CCM protocol
also supports addressing of the Auxiliary I/O Override table. Refer to the attached
documentation, Table B.1, which shows the l/O addressing for CCM and RTU protocols.
EXPANDED USER MEMORY REFERENCE
The expanded II instruction set allows memory addressing up to 64K of the user logic
memory. The expanded user logic memory is supported by the CCM protocol.
SINGLE BIT WRITE
The CCM offers a single bit write feature that may be used on the input, output, auxiliary
input, auxiliary output and auxiliary override tables in the Series Six PLC This feature
has been added to the CCM protocol, and will permit the user to set, clear, or toggle a
bit. Refer to Table B.2, which lists the new memory types allocated for the single bit
write feature.
PROGRAMMABLE TIMEOUTS AND RETRYS
This feature allows timeout and retry value programming for the CCM protocol. Four
SCREQs have been defined to allow timeouts and retrys to be programmed for both
ports. Refer to Table 8.5 which shows the format of the new SCREQs allocated for this
feature.
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Expanded Functions
B-4
GEK-25364A
SERIES SIX PLUS I/O POINT - CCM/RTU POINT MAPPING
The CCM or RTU point corresponding to any Series Six Plus input or output point may be
found by following the steps listed below:
1. Select desired channel and point.
2. Find CCM or RTU point for first point within desired channel.
3. Add the desired point to value from step 2.
4. Deduct 1 from total in step 3.
The value in step (4) is the CCM or RTU point corresponding to the desired channel and
point.
EXAMPLE 1:
Find CCM point for “07 + 578”.
->
->
->
->
CCM point for 07 + 1 = 7169.
7169 + 578 = 7747.
7747 - 1 = 7746.
CCM point for 07 + 578 = 7746.
EXAMPLE 2:
Find RTU point for “IA - 213”.
->
->
->
->
RTU point for IA - 1 = 26624.
26624 + 213 = 26837.
26837 - 1 = 26836.
RTU point for IA - 213 = 26836.
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Expanded Functions
B-5
GEK-25364A
CCM SINGLE BIT WRITE
The CCM protocol includes a single bit write feature that may be used on the input,
output, aux. input, aux. output, and override tables in the Series Six. This feature will
support bit set, bit clear, and bit toggle functions.
The bit set operation allows a single point to be turned on in normal or expanded I/O, Aux
I/O, or override tables. The bit clear operation allows a single bit to be cleared in normal
or expanded I/O, Aux I/O, or override tables. The bit toggle function allows change of
the current state of a single bit in normal or expanded I/O or Aux l/O tables. The bit
toggle function will not be supported for the override tables.
Any of the bit write functions may be invoked by issuing a CCM write to one of the
following memory types defined for CCM. The memory types, which define the target
table and bit write operation, are listed in Table 8.2.
Table B.2 MEMORY TYPES FOR CCM BIT WRITE FUNCTION
CCM Memory type
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
CCM Target Table
Bit
Operation
Input table
Output table
Input Override table
Output Override table
Input table
Output table
Input Override table
Output Override table
Input table
Output table
Bit Set
Bit Set
Bit Set
Bit Set
Bit Clear
Bit Clear
Bit Clear
Bit Clear
Bit Toggle
Bit Toggle
Two SCREQ command numbers have been reserved for the bit write function, one for
each port. The ladder logic program may invoke the desired bit write function by issuing
the new SCREQ supplying the information defined in Table 8.3
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Expanded
B-6
Functions
GEK-25364A
Table B.3 NEW SCREQs FOR SINGLE BIT WRlTE FUNCTION
Single
Command
Port
6110
6210
Port 1
Port 2
SCREQ
Number
Bit
Write
Rn+l
Rn+2
a
Ia;
(b)
(b)
Function
SCREQ
Rn+3
Rn+4
Rn+5
X
X
X
X
Description
entry
Target I/D
Target Memory Type
Target Memory Address
Field not required
(a)
(b)
(c)
X
SINGLE BIT WRITE DATA FLOW
The following example shows the flow of the CCM protocol processing a bit write
function.
The CCM protocol processing the bit write fun ction with memory type 17 (11H) clear
input.
This example shows a write request to CPU ID 11( 0BH) to clear bit 41 (29H) of the Input
table.
The high bit of header byte 4 is set for the write function and leaves 7 bits free for the
memory type.
3
0
-
1
33
02
s
-
T 0
X 0
-
Figure B.l SINGLE BIT WRITE DATA FLOW
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Glossary of Terms
C-1
GEK-25364
APPENDIX C
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Address - A series of decimal numbers assigned to specific program memory locations
and used to access those locations.
Analog - A numerical expression of physical variables such as rotation and distance to
represent a quantity.
Application program - The ladder logic program executing in a PLC or user program in
computer.
ASCII - An 8-level code (7 bits plus 1 parity bit) commonly used for exchange of data
which is the American Standard Code for Information Interchange.
Asynchronous - Transmission of data in which time intervals between transmitted
characters may be of unequal length. Asynchronous transmission is controlled by start
and stop bits at the beginning and end of each character.
Backplane - A group of connectors physically mounted at the back of a rack so that
printed circuit boards can be mated to them.
Baud - A unit of data transmission speed equal to the number of code elements per
second.
Binary - A numbering system that uses only the digits 0 and 1. This system is also called
base 2.
B i t - The smallest unit of memory. Can be used to store only one piece of information
that has two states (for example, a One/Zero, On/Off, Good/Bad, Yes/No, etc.). Data
that requires more than two states (for example, numerical values 000-999) will require
multiple bits.
Broadband Network - A network which can handle medium-to-large size applications
with up to several hundred stations as a typical number which might be attached.
Broadband technology is used in larger networking systems and requires a headend
remodulator.
Bus - An electrical path for transmitting and receiving data.
Bus Interface Unit (BIU) - A functional unit that interconnects a local area network
(LAN) with another device or network that uses different protocols.
Byte - A group of binary digits operated on as a single unit. In the Series Six PLC, a byte
is made up of 8 bits.
A net work designed to handle small-to med ium-size applications
Carrierband Network
with 6-20 stations as a typical number of stations which might be attached.
Communication Control Module (CCM2, CCM3) - The Communications Control Module
provides a serial interface between the Series Six PLC and other devices on the network
which can initiate communications based on the CCM protocol.
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Glossary of Terms
C-2
GEK-25364
Communication Windows - Communication between the ladder log ic program and the
local interface module which takes place during the PL C scan.
CPU (Central Processing Unit) - The central device or controller that interprets user
instructions, makes decisions and executes the functions based on a stored program. This
program specifies actions to be taken to alI possible inputs.
Current Loop - There is no true standard for the current loop interface. The current loop
interface is normally used in environments where excessive electrical noise f r o m
machinery is a problem.
Data Link - The equipment including interface modules and cables that allow
transmission of information.
Diagnostic Status Words - A group of 20 words which provide detailed information about
the operation and configuration of the CCM module, and used for monitoring and
diagnosing transmission errors. The status words are maintained and updated in the CCM
module.
DIP Switch - An acronym for Dual-In-Line Package, which is a group of miniature toggle
or slide switches arranged side-by-side in a single package. Commonly used as the
physical device for setting the configuration of various parameters necessary to the
operation of electronic equipment.
Data Processing Request (DPREQ) - The Data Processing REQuest is an instruction in
the ladder logic program which opens a communications window between the Series Six
CPU and the l/O CCM. The DPREQ allows the I/O CCM to execute the communication
function specified in the request.
DPU Executive Window - The Data Processing Unit (DPU) executive window is a part of
the PLC scan which provides a window for the I/O CCM. The window is enabled by
setting hardware jumpers on the module.
CCM Executive Window - A part of the PLC scan which provides a mechanism for the
CCM to read and write PLC memory. The window is executed automatically once per
PLC scan as long as the CCM Interface module is installed and the windows have been
enabled by the STATUS instruction.
Firmware - A series of instructions contained in ROM (Read Only Memory) which are
used for internal processing functions only. These instructions are transparent to the user.
Hardware - All of the mechanical, electrical and electronic devices that comprise the
Series Six programmable controller and its application(s).
Hexadecimal - A numbering system,
through 9, then A through F.
having 16 as a base, represented by the digits 0
Initiating Station - The station from which communication originates.
Input - A signal, typically ON or OFF, that provides information to the PLC. Inputs are
usually generated by devices such as limit switches and pushbuttons.
Input Module - An I/O module that converts signals from user devices to logic levels used
by the CPU.
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Glossary of Terms
C- 3
GEK-25364
Interface - To connect a Programmable Logic Controller with its application devices,
communications channels, and peripherals through various modules and cables.
I/O (Input/Output) - That portion of the PLC to which field devices are connected.
I/O Module - A printed circuit assembly (I/O CCM) that interfaces between user devices
and the Series Six programmable logic controller.
I/O Scan - A method by which the CPU monitors all inputs and controls all outputs within
a prescribed time.
IS0 Standards - The international
Interconnect ion (OSI).
Standards Organization (ISO) for Open System
ISO Reference Model for Open System Interconnection - An international standard for
network architectures which define a seven layer model. The intent is to provide a
network design framework to allow equipment from different vendors to be able to
communicate.
Isolation - A method of separating field wiring from logic level
accomplished through the use of optical isolation devices.
circuitry.
Typically
K - An abbreviation for kilo or exactly 1024 in the world of computers. Usually related to
1024 words of memory.
Ladder Diagram - A representation of control logic relay systems. The user programmed
logic is expressed in relay equivalent symbology.
LED - An acronym for Light-Emitting-Diode, which is a solid state device commonly
used as a visual indicator in electronic equipment.
Local Area Network (LAN) - A communication network covering a limited physical
space, and having intermediate data transport capability.
Logic - A fixed set of responses (outputs) to various external conditions (inputs). All
possible situations for both synchronous and non-synchronous activity must be specified
by the user. Also referred to as the program.
Logic Memory - In the Series Six PLC, dedicated CMOS RAM memory accessible by the
user for storage of user ladder diagram programs.
Manufacturing Automation Protocol (MAP) - MAP communication protocol
b y t h e M a n u f a c t u r i n g A u t o m a t i o n Protocol (MAP) specification.
“Connection-oriented” protocol; that is, stations residing on a network
transfer information only after establishing a logical connection much like
using the telephone system.
is specified
MAP is a
are able to
two people
Memory - A grouping of physical circuit elements that have data entry, storage and
retrieval capability.
Memory Protect - A hardware capability that prevents user memory from being altered
by an external device. This capability is controlled by a key switch on the CPU power
supply.
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C-4
Glossary of Terms
GEK-25364
Microprocessor - An electronic computer processor consisting of integrated circuit chips
that contain arithmetic, logic, register, control and memory functions.
Microsecond (us) - One millionth of a second. 1 x 1 0-6 or 0.000001 second.
Millisecond (ms) - One thousandth of a second. 1 x l0-3 or 0.001 second.
Mnemonic - An abbreviation given to an instruction,
combining initial letters or parts of words.
usually an acronym formed by
Modules - A replaceable electronic subassembly usually plugged in and secured in place
but easily removable in case of fault or system redesign. In the Series Six PLC, a
combination of a printed circuit board and its associated faceplate which when combined
form a complete assembly.
Nanosecond (ns) - One billionth of a second. 1 x 10-9 or 0.000000001 second.
Noise - Undesirable electrical disturbances to normal signals, generally of high frequency
content.
Non-Volatile Memory - A memory capable of retaining its stored information under
no-power conditions (power removed or turned off).
OFF-Line - Equipment or devices that are not connected to a communications Iine; for
example, the Workmaster computer, when off-line, operates independent of the Series Six
CPU.
ON-Line - Descriptive of equipment or devices that are connected to the
communications Iine.
Optical Isolation - Use of a solid state device to isolate the user input and output devices
from internal circuitry of an I/O module and the CPU.
Output - Information transferred from the CPU, through a module for level conversion,
for controlling an external device or process.
Output Devices - Physical devices such as motor starters, solenoids, etc. that receive
data from the Programmable Logic Controller.
Output module - An I/O module that converts logic levels within the CPU to a usable
output signal for controlling a machine or process.
Outputs - A signal typically ON or OFF, originating from the PLC with user supplied
power, that controls external devices based upon commands from the CPU.
Parity - The anticipated state, either odd or even, of a set of binary digits.
Parity Bit - A bit added to a memory word to make the sum of the bits in a word always
even (even parity) or always odd (odd parity).
Parity Check - A check that determines whether the total number of ones in a word is
odd or even.
Parity Error - A condition that occurs when a computed parity check does not agree with
the parity bit.
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Glossary of Terms
C-5
GEK-25364
Peer-Peer - Communication between stations at the same level or layer in the hierarchy.
Peripheral Equipment - External units that can communicate with a PLC, for example,
programmers, printers, etc.
PLC - Commonly used abbreviation for Programmable Logic Controller.
Program - A sequence of functions entered into a Programmable Logic Controller to be
executed by the processor for the purpose of controlling a machine or process,
Programmable Logic Controller or Programmable Controller - A solid-state industrial
control device which receives inputs from user supplied control devices such as SWitches
and sensors, implements them in a precise pattern determined by ladder diagram based
programs stored in the user memory, and provides outputs for control of processes or user
supplied devices such as relays and motor starters.
Programmer - A device for entry, examination and alteration of the PLC’s memory,
including logic and storage areas.
PROM - An acronym for Programmable Read Only Memory. A retentive digital device
programmed at the factory and not readily alterable by the user.
Protocol - A set of rules for exchanging messages between two communicating processes.
Q Sequence - The Q sequence protocol format is used to poll and transfer 4 bytes of data
from a slave to a master without issuing the 17-byte header.
Quick Access Buffer (QAB) - The QAB is a 1024 byte buffer resident on the CCM module
used for faster data transfer than the CPU to CPU transfer.
R A M - An acronym for Random Access Memory. A solid-state memory that allows
individual bits to be stored and accessed. This type of memory is volatile; that is, stored
data is lost under no power conditions, therefore a battery backup is required. The Series
Six PLC uses a Lithium Manganese Dioxide battery or an optional external back-up
battery for this purpose.
Read - To have data entered from a storage device.
Reference - A number used in a program that tells the CPU where data is coming from or
where to transfer the data.
Register Memory - In the Series Six PLC, dedicated CMOS RAM memory accessible by
the user for data storage and manipulation.
Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) - RTU protocol is a query-response mode of operation used
for communication between the CCM device and host computer. The host computer
transmits the query to the RTU slave which can only respond to the master.
RS-232D - A standard specified by the Electronics Industries Association (EIA) for the
m e c h a n i c a l a n d e l e c t r i c a l c h a r a c t e r i s t i c s o f t h e i n t e r f a c e f o r c o n n e c t i n g Data
Communications Equipment (DCE) and Data Terminal Equipment (DTE).
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Glossary of Terms
C-6
GEK-25364
RS-422 - A recommended standard defining electrical interface characteristics to
connect Data Terminal Equipment (DTE) or Data Circuit-Transmitting Equipment (DCE).
The RS-422 standard permits longer range and faster transmission rate than the RS-232D
standard.
RUN Light - An LED indicator on the Arithmetic Control module which, when on,
indicates that the execution sequence of the PLC is proceeding normally and the l/O scan
is completed at least once every 200 milliseconds - 250 milliseconds.
Rung - A sequence or grouping of PLC functions that control one coil. One or more rungs
form a ladder diagram.
Scan - The technique of examining or solving all logic steps specified by the program in a
sequential order from the first step to the last.
Serial Communication - A method of data transfer within a PLC, whereby the bits are
handled sequentially rather than simultaneously as in parallel transmission.
Serial Communication Request (SCREQ) - Instruction which, when executed by the
ladder logic program, opens a window between the Series Six Plus CPU and the CCM
module, allowing the CCM to execute the communication function specified in the
request.
Significant Bit - A bit that contributes to the precision of a number. The number of
significant bits is counted beginning with the bit contributing the most value, referred to
as the Most Significant Bit (MSB), and ending with the bit contributing the least value,
referred to as the Least Significant Bit (LSB).
Status Byte - Indicates overall status of the CCM module and the communication
network.
Status Instruction - A ladder logic program instruction which enables and disables the
communication windows between the communications module and the PLC.
Storage - Used synonymous with memory.
Synchronous - Transmission in which data bits are transmitted at a fixed rate, with the
transmitter and receiver synchronized by a clock. This eliminates the need for start and
stop bits.
Terminator - A device or load connected to the output end of a transmission line to
terminate or end the signals on that fine. In the Series Six PLC, DIP shunts and jumper
packs connect on-board resistors which terminate the l/O chain signals on an l/O
Receiver or Advanced I/O Receiver if it is the last Receiver in any l/O chain.
Unit of Load - An expression used to describe the load placed on a power supply by an I/O
module or a CPU module. Also the amount of current or load capacity available from a
power supply.
User Memory - Term commonly used when referring to the memory circuits within the
PLC used for storage of user ladder diagram programs.
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Glossary of Terms
C-7
GEK-25364
Volatile Memory - A memory that will lose the information stored in it if power is
removed from the memory circuit devices.
Word - A measurement of memory length, usually 4, 8, or 16 bits long (16 bits for the
Series Six PLC)
Write - To transfer, record, or copy data from one storage device to another.
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l-1
Index
GEK-25364
INDEX
A
ACK 4-2
ACK, invalid 4-29
Acronyms C-1
Adaptive Unit 2-37
Addresses (see Target Memory Address,
Source Memory Address)
Annotation, program 6-6,6-17,6-23
Application program 6-4, 6-15, 6-21
Application programming 6-1
ASCII Code format 1 - 7
ASCII Code list 1-7
Asynchronous data format 4-1
Asynchronous transmission 1-12
Back-off times 4-3
Backplane address
CCM 2-25
I/O C C M 3 - 5
DPU 3 - 1 9
Bit pattern, CCM2/3 2-22
Board LED indicator
CCM2/3 2 - 2 8
I/O C C M 3 - 1 7
Board OK 2-28, 3-16
Broadcast message 5-2
Broadcast transact ion 5 - 1
C
CCM Communications Windows 2-47
CCM mode 2-2
CCM module installation 2-25
CPU Scan 2-46
CPU status function 2-47
CRC-16 5-5
CTS 2-12
Cable configuration
CCM2/3 2 - 3 2
I/O C C M 3-09
Cable diagrams 2-32, 3-11
Cable grounding 2-32
Cable recommendation 2-32
Cable specification
CCM 2-32
I/O CCM 3-10
Cables and Connectors 2-32, 3-10
Cables
Current loop, l/O CCM 3-14
GEnet 2 - 3 5 , 2 - 3 8
RS-232D - CCM2/3 2-33
RS-232D - I/O CCM 3-12
RS-422 - CCM2/3 2-36
3-13
RS-422 - I/O CCM
Multidrop 2-39
OIU 2 - 3 8
Calculating CRC-16 5-7
Communication Control Module (CCM)
2-1
capabi I i t ies (CCM2/3)
interface 2-2
status byte 2-61, 6 - l
Character
format 5-4
string 2-79
string transfer 2-51
Chassis grounding 2-32
Clear Diagnostic Status Word 2-70
Clear Status Word 2-70
Color-graphics terminal 2-4
COMMAN A-5
Commands
SCREQ Command Numbers 2-54
DPU Register 3-22
internal
2-50
port 2-50
list of commands 2-54
Communications
control 1-5
CPUXCM 2 - 4 5
4-28,5-35
errors
manager
A-5
modes 1-4
n e t w o r k 1-1
ports, I/O CCM 3-07
request 2-61
terms C-1
windows, I/O CCM 3-18
Compatability (see Module Compatability
Preface)
Compatible lnterfaces 2-3
Concurrent use, CCM and RTU 2-3
Configuration
CCM,RTU 2 - 3
hardware, CCM2/3 2-14
jumpers, CCM2/3 2-17
resistors, CCM2/3 2-17
software, CCM2/3 2-21
switches, I/O CCM 3-07
I/O C C M 3 - 0 5
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index
I-2
GEK-25364
INDEX
C
E
Connector
2-37
adaptive unit
2-32, 3-10
specifications
configuration 2-34
Control characters 4-1
Control program A-5
CPU command status 4-29
CPU ID (see Target ID)
CPU/CCM communications 2-45
CPU/CCM programming
2-50
CTS 1-15
Current loop 1-17, 3-13
Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) 5-6
Electrical interface circuits 2-30
ENQ 4-2
Enqui ry col I ision
4-2
Enquiry response delay 4-11
Enquiry sequence 4-2
EOT 4-3
EOT, invalid 4-29
Error checking 1-5
check field 5-3
codes 2-65
detection 1-9
response 5-2
ETS 4-3
ETX 4-3
Example
CR C-16 Calculation 5-7
ladder programs 6-4, 6-15, 6-21
programming (see Programming Examples)
Executive Window 2-47
Expanded Functions B-1
I/O reference B-2
I/O translation B-3
Memory Mapping 2-58, 3-22
user memory B-2
D
Data OK Indicator, I/O CCM 3-17
Data
blocks 4-24
flow direction 4-23
length 2-60
data OK, CCM2/3 2-28
data OK indicator 2-29
data rate, CCM2/3 2-10
data rate , I/O CCM 3-7
rate selection, CCM2/3
2-16
text blocks 4-24
transfer 2-50
invalid 4-29
Debugger A-6
DEC Software A-1
Diagnostic Indicators 2-28
Diag 1 and 2 - CCM2/3 2 - 2 9
Diag 2 Indicator 2-29
Diagnostic
Test 1 2-45
Status Word 2-62
LEDs 2 - 2 8
Status Word 6-7
powerup, CCM2/3 2 - 2 8
powerup, l/O C C M 2 - 2 8
DIP package, orientation 3-5
DIP switch
backplane
2-25, 3-5, 3-19
2-14
settings, CCM2/3
settings, I/O CCM 3-7
Distances, maximum cable 1-14
DPU executive windows 3-19, 3-22
DPU terminator plug 3-20
F, G
Glossary C-1
Grounding 2-32, 3-9
Grounding, transmitter
2-44
H
Half-duplex 1-13
Hardware configuration
CCM2/3 2 - 1 4
CCM port 12-15
CCM port 2 2-16
CCM and RTU 2-17
diagram 2-20
RTU port 1
2-18
RTU port 2 2-19
Header
blocks 4-22
example 4-25
format 4-22
invalid 4-28
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I-3
Index
GEK-25364
INDEX
I
I/O CCM, capabilities 3-1, 3-23
l/O Controller Module (IOI)
I/O c o n t r o l l e r 1014 m o d u l e 3 - 2 0
1015 module 3-20
module jumper 3-20
Indicator lights 2-28
I/O C C M 3-16
CCM2/3 2 - 2 8
lnformation field 5-3
Information codes 1-6
Initiate communications restart 5-17
Installing the module
I/O CCM Module 3-4, 3-9
CCMW3 M o d u l e 2 - 2 5
Interface
diagnostics 2-45
1-5, 1-14
standards
types 2-3
Interlocks 6-1, 6-3
Internal Command 2-50, 2-69
Invalid
address error response 5-36
data value error response 5-37
function code error response 5-35
query messages 5-47
transactions 5-38
data 4-29
J, K, L
Keying signal 2-13, 2-43
LED indicator Lights 2-28
Ladder logic program 6-4, 6-15, 6-21
L A N I n t e r f a c e 1-3, 2 - 7
LED indicator lights, CCM2/3 2-28
Length of frame 5-9
Line Interfaces 2-11
Load CCM Quick Access Buffer from
registers 2-71
Local Area Network (LAN) 1 - 3
Longitudinal Redundancy Checking (LRC)
1-10
Loopback/Maintenance, Message (08)
5-16
LRC 4-3
M
Master-slave 2-11
Master-slave protocol
4-10
Memory
addresses 2-58
allocation, scratch pad 4-29
mapping B-3, B-4
scratch pad 4-29
Message
broadcast 5-2
descriptions 5-10
lengths, RTU 5-9
termination 5-4
types 5-2
fields 5-2
format 5-1
Microwave Transmitters 2-6
Modems 1-13
full-duplex 1-13
1-13
half -duplex
short-haul 2-2
simplex 1 - 1 3
telephone 2-3
Modes of communication 1-4
Modes of operation 2-2
CCM mode 2-2
RTU mode 2-2
CCM and RTU 1-4
Module Address
l/O CCM address 3-5
CCM address 3-5
DPU address 3-19
Module Compatability Preface
Module Configuration
CCM2/3 2 - 1 4
I/O C C M 3 - 5 , 3 - 7
hardware 2-14, 3-5
software 2-21
Module
diagnostics 2-45
features (see Preface)
functions 2-10
l a y o u t , CCM2/3 2 - 9
layout, l/O CCM 3-3
modes of operation 1-4
Module Specifications
CCM2/3 2 - 8
I/O C C M 3 - 2
Module Update (see Preface)
1-2, 2-4
Multidrop
I/O C C M 3 - 1 2
cables 2-39, 3-13
CCM cables 2-39, 2-42
RTU cables 2-41, 2-43
Multiple polling 6-19
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Index
l-4
GEK-25364
INDEX
N
NAK 4-2
NAK, invalid 4-29
Network Configuration 1-1
Normal (n) sequence
response, slave 4-13,4-15
sequence, master 4-12, 4-14
sequence, read data block 4-17, 4-18
sequence, write data block 4-13, 4-16
Normal response 5-2
Normal enquiry, master-slave 4-11
Normal sequence
flow charts 4-12, 4-14
protocol format 4-12
master-slave 4-11
O
OIU hardware configuration 2-86
OIU operation 2-86
OIU software configuration 2-87
On-line reconfiguration 2-22
Operational information, I/O CCM 3-23
Operator Interface Unit (OIU) 2-13, 2-85
Operator Interface, cable 2-38
Ordering software A-2, A-3
P
Parity
CCM2/3 2 - 1 3
I/O C C M 3 - 7
checking 1-9
selection 2-16, 3-7
Peer read data blocks 4-8, 4-10
Peer request initiate sequence
4-4, 4-5
Peer request receive sequence, 4-6, 4-9
Peer write data blocks 4-7, 4-9
P e e r - t o - p e e r 2-10
flow charts 4-4
protocol
4-2
format 4-3
Point mapping B-3, B-4
Point-to-point 1-2
CCM2/3 2 - 3
I/O CCM 3 - 1 2
Polling routine 6-19
Port characteristics 2-31
CCM2/3
2-31
I/O C C M 3 - 1 1
Port command 2-50, 2-78
Power requirements, CCM2/3 2-8
Power-up
I/O C C M 3-16
C CM2/3 2 - 4 5
diagnost ics 2-45
Preset Multiple Registers, Message (16)
5-20
Preset Single Register, Message (06)
5-14
Privileges, software A-7
Program retries 2-76
Program, annotation 6-6, 6-17, 6-23
Programmable
retries 2-76, 4-27, B-2, B-7
timeout Z-77, 4-27, B-2, B-7
Programming
t h e I/O C C M 3 - 1 8
examples 2-69, 6-1
the DPREQ 3-18
Protocol
1-8, 2-3, 2-10
CCM 2-2
line interface 2-16
I/O C C M 3 - 7
RTU 2 - 2
Q
Q response, slave 4-19, 4-21
Q Sequence
flow c h a r t s 4 - 1 9
protocol format 4-18
m a s t e r 4-19, 4-20
master-slave 4-18
Query 5-2
Query Processing failure Error Response
5-37
Query Transact ion 5-1
Quick Access Buffer (QAB) 2-71
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l-5
Index
INDEX
R
2-33, 3-12
RS-232D cables
RS-422 2-5, 2-13
RS-422 cables 2-36, 3-13
RS-422, direct 2-5,
RS-422, using modems 2-6,
RTS 2-12
RTU message format 5-1
RTU Mode 2-2
Rack layout, PLC
Series Six PLC 2-25
Series Six Plus PLC 2-26
Radio transmitter keying 2-44
Read
Exception Status, Message (07)
5-15
Input Override Table, Message (66)
5-24
Input Table, Message (02) 5-11
Output Override Table, Message (65)
5-23
Output Table, Message (01)
5-10
Q response 2-80
Registers, Message (03, 04) 5-12
Scratch Pad Memory, Message (67) 5-25
User Logic, Message (68)
5-26
CCM diagnostic status words to source
registers 2-70
CCM Quick Access Buffer 2-72
character string to source register
table 2-79
Q response to source register table 2-80
Quick Access Buffer (QAB) 2-72
target to source memory 2-78
Reconfiguration 2-22
Register transfer 6-20
Reinitialize 2-45
2-74
CCM Timer and USART
diagnostics 2-45
timer 2-74
Related publications (see preface) iv
Remote Terminal Unit (RTU) 2-2
Remote CPU transfer 2-51
Report Device Type, Message (17), 5-21
Request Status 2-61
Resistors, terminating 2-36
Response 5-35
Retries, programmable 2-76
Return Query 5-17
RS-232D 1-14
RS-422 1-16
RS-423 1-16
RS-449 1-1 6
Request To Send (RTS) 1-15
RTU message transfer 5-1
RTU Status Byte 2-61
S
Scan Time, CPU 2-47
Scratch pad fields 4-29
Scratch pad memory 4-29
SCREQ Command 2-50, 2-54
activation 2-52
error codes (CCM2/3) 2-67
function activation 2-50
function commands, list 2-53
programming examples 2-69
register assignments 2-53
window
2-48
SCREQ Commands
6001 Set Q Response 2-69
6002 Clear CCM Diagnostic Status Words
2-70
6003 Read CCM Diagnostic Status Words to
Source Registers 2-70
6004-6006 Load CCM Quick Access Buffer
from Registers 2-71
6007-6009 Read CCM Quick Access
Buffer 2-72
6010 Set CPU Memory Write Protect
2-73
6011 Reinitialize CCM Timer and USART
2-74
6012 Set OIU Timers and Counters 2 - 7 5
6X01-6X06 Read Target to Source
Memory 2-78
6X08 Read Character String to Source
Register Table 2-79
6X09 Read Q Response to Source Register
Table 2-80
6X10 Single Bit Write 2-81
6X11-6X17 Write to Target from Source
Memory 2-82
6X18 Write Character String from Source
Register Table 2-83
6X28 Write then Read Immediate Character
String 2-84
6X30 Programmable Retries 2-76
6X31 Programmable Timeout 2-77
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Index
l-6
GEK-25364
INDEX
T
S e q u e n c i n g 6-1
Serial link timeout 4-26, 5-38
2-65
Serial port error codes (CCM2/3)
Serial transmission 1-5, 1-12
Series Six Plus PLC Rack Layout 2-26
Series Six PLC Rack layout 2-25
Set
OIU timers and counters 2-75
Q Response 2-69
counters 2-75
CPU memory write protect 2-73
Q response 2-69
timer 2-75
Simplex 1-13
Simultaneous port operations 2-88
Single bit write 2-81, B-2, B-5
data flow B-6
SCREQ B-6
Software
2-21, A-6
configuration
features A-1
packages A-1
copy A-2
database A-6
event logger A-5
event processor A-6
executable A-2
interface routines A-6
license A - 2
object A-2
operation A-4
ordering A-2
simulator A - 6
source
A-2
system
A-5
SOH 4-3
Source addresses 2-60
Source memory address 2-58
Stat ion Address 5-2
Status Byte
CCM, RTU 2-61
definition 2-61
I/O C C M 3 - 2 2
Status function 2-48
Status word 2-62
Status word definition 2-63
STX 4-3
Subroutine vector address 4-29
Synchronous transmission 1-12
System configuration 1-1, 2-3, A-7
System configuration and protocols 3-3
System protocol 2-3
Tables, list of xviii
Target ID 2-57, 4-22
Target memory 2-78
memory address 2-57, 4-24
memory type 2-57, 4-23
Target/source address 2-58
Terminating Resistors 1-3, 2-14, 2-36
Terminator plug (DPU) 3-20
2-11, 2-45
Test 1
Test diagnost ics 2-45
Time-out, Usage 5-4
Time-outs 4-26
Timeout disabled 2-13
Transfer 2-50
Transfer, Q response
2-51
Transfer, string 2-51
Transmission errors 1-9
Turn-around times 5-5
Turn-around delay 2-12, 4-27
Turn-around delay selection
2-l 6
U
V
Unformatted Protocol
programming Commands 2-51
write command 2-83
write then read command 2-84
Unformatted transfer 2-51
Update, modules vi
User i terns, description 2-8, 3-3
W
Wiring (see Cables)
Write
Write Input Override table, message (70)
5-29
Output Override table, message (69)
5-27
Scratch Pad memory, message (71)
5-31
User Logic, message (72) 5-33
Character String from Source Register
table 2-83
protect 2-73
then Read Immediate character string
2-84
to Target from Source 2-82
Character String 2-83
then Read 2-84
to Target
2-82
Writing to CPU, scratch pad 4-29
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