STK500 User Guide [PDF/1350KB]

STK500 User Guide [PDF/1350KB]
STK500
.............................................................................
User Guide
Table of Contents
Section 1
Introduction ........................................................................................... 1-1
1.1
1.2
Starter Kit Features ...................................................................................1-1
Device Support .........................................................................................1-2
Section 2
Getting Started...................................................................................... 2-1
2.1
2.2
2.3
Unpacking the System ..............................................................................2-1
System Requirements...............................................................................2-1
Quick Start ................................................................................................2-1
2.3.1
Connecting the Hardware...................................................................2-2
2.3.2
Programming the Target AVR Device ................................................2-3
Section 3
Hardware Description ........................................................................... 3-1
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
Description of User LEDs..........................................................................3-1
Description of User Switches ....................................................................3-2
Connection of LEDs and Switches............................................................3-3
Port Connectors ........................................................................................3-3
Description of User RS232 Interface ........................................................3-4
Description of DataFlash Pins...................................................................3-5
Target Socket Section...............................................................................3-7
3.7.1
ISP Programming ...............................................................................3-8
3.7.2
High-voltage Programming...............................................................3-10
3.8
Jumper Settings ......................................................................................3-13
3.8.1
Target VCC Settings, VTARGET .......................................................3-14
3.8.2
Analog Reference Voltage, AREF ....................................................3-15
3.8.3
Reset Settings, RESET ....................................................................3-16
3.8.4
Clock Settings, XTAL1 and OSCSEL ...............................................3-17
3.8.5
BSEL2 Jumper .................................................................................3-19
3.8.6
PJUMP Jumpers...............................................................................3-19
3.9
Expansion Connectors ............................................................................3-19
3.9.1
Signal Descriptions...........................................................................3-21
3.10 Prog Ctrl and Prog Data Headers ...........................................................3-21
3.11 Miscellaneous .........................................................................................3-22
3.11.1 RESET Push Button .........................................................................3-23
3.11.2 PROGRAM Push Button ..................................................................3-23
i
Table of Contents
3.11.3 Main Power LED...............................................................................3-23
3.11.4 Target Power LED ............................................................................3-23
3.11.5 Status LED .......................................................................................3-23
Section 4
Installing AVR Studio ............................................................................ 4-1
Section 5
Using AVR Studio ................................................................................. 5-1
5.1
5.2
Windows Software ....................................................................................5-1
Starting the Windows Software .................................................................5-1
5.2.1
5.3
Starting STK500 .................................................................................5-1
STK500 User Interface .............................................................................5-2
5.3.1
“Program” Settings .............................................................................5-2
5.3.2
“Fuses” Settings .................................................................................5-3
5.3.3
“LockBits” Settings..............................................................................5-4
5.3.4
“Advanced” Settings ...........................................................................5-5
5.3.5
“Board” Settings..................................................................................5-6
5.3.6
“Auto” Settings....................................................................................5-7
5.3.7
History Window...................................................................................5-8
5.4
5.5
5.6
Command Line Software ..........................................................................5-8
Parameters ...............................................................................................5-8
Syntax for Supported Devices ................................................................5-10
Section 6
In-System Programming of an External Target System ....................... 6-1
Section 7
Troubleshooting Guide ......................................................................... 7-1
Section 8
Technical Support................................................................................. 8-1
Section 9
Example Applications ........................................................................... 9-1
9.1
Using LEDs and Switches.........................................................................9-1
Section 10
Warranty Statement............................................................................ 10-1
ii
Section 1
Introduction
Congratulations on your purchase of the STK500 AVR® Flash MCU Starter Kit. The
STK500 is a complete starter kit and development system for the AVR Flash microcontroller from Atmel Corporation. It is designed to give designers a quick start to develop
code on the AVR and for prototyping and testing of new designs.
1.1
Starter Kit
Features
STK500 User Guide
• AVR Studio® Compatible
• RS232 Interface to PC for Programming and Control
• Regulated Power Supply for 10 - 15V DC Power
• Sockets for 8-pin, 20-pin, 28-pin and 40-pin AVR Devices
• Parallel and Serial High-voltage Programming of AVR Parts
• Serial In-System Programming (ISP) of AVR Parts
• In-System Programmer for Programming AVR Parts in External Target System
• Reprogramming of AVR Parts
• 8 Push Buttons for General Use
• 8 LEDs for General Use
• All AVR I/O Ports Easily Accessible through Pin Header Connectors
• Additional RS232 Port for General Use
• Expansion Connectors for Plug-in Modules and Prototyping Area
• On-board 2-Mbit DataFlash® for Nonvolatile Data Storage
The STK500 is supported by AVR Studio, version 3.2 or newer. For up-to-date information on this and other AVR tool products, please read the document “avrtools.pdf”. The
newest version of AVR Studio, “avrtools.pdf”, and this user guide can be found in the
AVR section of the Atmel Web site.
1-1
Introduction
Figure 1-1. STK500
1.2
Device Support
The system software currently has support for the following devices in all speed grades:
AT90S1200
AT90S2313
AT90S2323
AT90S2333
AT90S2343
AT90S4414
AT90S4433
AT90S4434
AT90S8515
AT90S8535
ATmega161
ATmega163
ATtiny11
ATtiny12
ATtiny15
ATtiny28
Support for new AVR devices may be added in new versions of AVR Studio. The latest
version of AVR Studio is always available from www.atmel.com.
1-2
STK500 User Guide
Section 2
Getting Started
2.1
Unpacking the
System
Kit contents:
STK500 starter kit evaluation board
Cables for STK500:
(2 pcs) 10-wire cables for I/O ports and parallel mode programming
(1 pc) 6-wire cable for in-system programming
(4 pcs) 2-wire cable for UART and DataFlash connections
2.2
System
Requirements
Quick Start
DC power cable
Atmel CD-ROM with datasheets and software
AT90S8515-8PC sample microcontroller
The minimum hardware and software requirements are:
486 processor (Pentium® is recommended)
2.3
9-pin RS-232 cable
16 MB RAM
7 MB free hard disk space
Windows® 95, Windows 98, Windows NT® 4.0 or higher, or Windows 2000
115200 baud RS-232 port (COM port)
10 - 15V DC power supply, 500 mA min.
The STK500 starter kit is shipped with an AT90S8515-8PC microcontroller in the socket
marked SCKT3000D3. The default jumper settings will allow the microcontroller to execute from the clock source and voltage regulator on the STK500 board.
The microcontroller is programmed with a test program that toggles the LEDs. To test
the program, make sure the microcontroller is properly inserted and that the notch on
the microcontroller matches the notch on the socket.
Use the supplied 10-pin cables to connect the header marked “PORTB” with the header
marked “LEDS”, and connect the header marked “PORTD” with the header marked
“SWITCHES”. The connections are shown in Figure 2-1.
An external 10 - 15V DC power supply is required. The input circuit is a full bridge rectifier, and the polarity of the input voltage can be selected either positive or negative
center connector. Connect the power cable between a power supply and the STK500.
Apply 10 - 15V DC to the power connector. The power switch turns the STK500 main
STK500 User Guide
2-1
Getting Started
power on and off. The red LED is lit when power is on, and the status LEDs will go from
red, via yellow, to green. The green LED indicates that the target VCC is present. The
program now running in the AT90S8515 will respond to pressed switches by toggling
the LEDs.
Figure 2-1. Default Setup of STK500
The starter kit can be configured for various clock and power sources. A complete
description of the jumper settings is explained in paragraph 3.8 on page 3-13 and on the
reverse side of the starter kit.
2.3.1
Connecting the
Hardware
Figure 2-2. Connection to STK500
10 - 15V DC
To Computer (RS232)
To program the AT90S8515, connect the supplied 6-wire cable between the ISP6PIN
header and the SPROG3 target ISP header as shown in Figure 2-1. Paragraph 3.7.1 on
page 3-8 describes the programming cable connections.
Connect a serial cable to the connector marked “RS232 CTRL” on the evaluation board
to a COM port on the PC as shown in Figure 2-2. Install AVR Studio software on the PC.
2-2
STK500 User Guide
Getting Started
Instructions on how to install and use AVR Studio are given in Section 5 on page 5-1.
When AVR Studio is started, the program will automatically detect to which COM port
the STK500 is connected.
2.3.2
Programming the
Target AVR Device
The STK500 is controlled from AVR Studio, version 3.2 and higher. AVR Studio is an
integrated development environment (IDE) for developing and debugging AVR applications. AVR Studio provides a project management tool, source file editor, simulator, incircuit emulator interface and programming interface for STK500.
To program a hex file into the target AVR device, select “STK500” from the “Tools”
menu in AVR Studio.
Select the AVR target device from the pull-down menu on the “Program” tab and navigate to the “example” directory located in the AVR Studio installation directory. Select
the “example1.hex” file.
Click the “erase” button, followed by the “program” button. The status LED will now turn
yellow while the part is programmed, and when programming succeeds, the LED will
turn green. If programming fails, the LED will turn red after programming. See the troubleshooting guide in Section 7 on page 7-1.
Figure 2-3. AVR Studio STK500 Programming Menu
Complete descriptions of using the STK500 interface in AVR Studio are given in
Section 5 on page 5-1.
STK500 User Guide
2-3
Getting Started
2-4
STK500 User Guide
Section 3
Hardware Description
Figure 3-1. STK500 Components
Headers
for I/O ports
Sockets for
target AVR
Header for
expansion boards
Switches
Options setting
jumpers
Target reset
push button
Power switch
Power connector
Header for
switches
Power LED
Parallel programming
headers
RS232 interface
header
RS232 port
for programming
Master MCU
Status LED
DataFlash interface
header
RS232 port
for communication
Socket for
crystal
Header for LEDs
Program button
LEDs
3.1
Description of
User LEDs
STK500 User Guide
Header for
expansion boards
Target ISP headers
10-pin ISP header
(for external target only)
6-pin ISP header
The STK500 starter kit includes 8 yellow LEDs and 8 push-button switches. The LEDs
and switches are connected to debug headers that are separated from the rest of the
board. They can be connected to the AVR devices with the supplied 10-wire cable to the
pin header of the AVR I/O ports. Figure 3-4 shows how the LEDs and switches can be
connected to the I/O port headers. The cables should be connected directly from the
port header to the LED or switch header. The cable should not be twisted. A red wire on
the cable indicates pin 1. Confirm that this is connected to pin 1 on each of the headers.
Figure 3-2 shows how the LED control is implemented. This solution will give the same
amount of light from the LED for all target voltages from 1.8V to 6.0V.
3-1
Hardware Description
Figure 3-2. Implementation of LEDs and LED Headers
+5V
150R
VTG
1 2
LED0
LED2
LED4
LED6
GND
10K
LED1
LED3
LED5
LED7
VTG
LEDn
Note:
3.2
Description of
User Switches
The AVR can source or sink enough current to drive an LED directly. In the
STK500 design, a transistor with two resistors is used to give the same amount
of light from the LED, whatever the target voltage (VTG) may be, and to turn off
the LEDs when VTG is missing.
The switches connected to the debug headers are implemented as shown in Figure 3-3.
Pushing a switch causes the corresponding SWx to be pulled low, while releasing it will
result in VTG on the appropriate switch header connector. Valid target voltage range is
1.8V < VTG < 6.0V.
Figure 3-3. Implementation of Switches and Switch Headers
VTG
10K
SWn
150R
1 2
SW0
SW2
SW4
SW6
GND
SW1
SW3
SW5
SW7
VTG
SWn
Note:
3-2
In the AVR you can enable internal pull-ups on the input pins, removing the
need for an external pull-up on the push button. In the STK500 design we have
added an external 10K pull-up to give all users a logical “1” on SWn when the
push button is not pressed. The 560R resistor limits the current going into the
AVR.
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
3.3
Connection of
LEDs and
Switches
Figure 3-4. Connection of LEDs and Switches to I/O Port Headers
Any I/O port of the AVR can be connected to the LEDs and switches using the 10-wire
cables. The headers are supplied with VTG (target VCC) and GND lines in addition to the
signal lines.
3.4
Port Connectors
The pinout for the I/O port headers is explained in Figure 3-5. The square marking indicates pin 1.
Figure 3-5. General Pinout of I/O Port Headers
1 2
Px0
Px2
Px4
Px6
GND
Px1
Px3
Px5
Px7
VTG
PORTx
The PORTE/AUX header has some special signals and functions in addition to the
PORTE pins. The pinout of this header shown in Figure 3-6.
Figure 3-6. Pinout of Port E Header
1 2
PE0
PE2
REF
XT1
GND
PE1
RST
GND
XT2
VTG
PORTE/AUX
STK500 User Guide
3-3
Hardware Description
The special functions of this port are:
PE0 - PE2:
Table 3-1. Port E Connection
ATmega161
AT90S4414/AT90S8515
PE0
PE0/ICP/INT2
ICP
PE1
PE1/ALE
ALE
PE2
PE2/OC1B
OC1B
REF: Analog reference voltage. This pin is connected to the AREF pin on devices
having a separate analog reference pin.
XT1: XTAL 1 pin. The internal main clock signal to all sockets. If the XTAL1 jumper is
disconnected, this pin can be used as external clock signal.
XT2: XTAL 2 pin. If the XTAL1 jumper is disconnected, this pin can be used for
external crystal with the XT1 pin.
The headers for the LEDs and switches use the same pinout as the I/O port headers.
The pinout of the switch header is explained in Figure 3-7 and the pinout for the LED
header is explained in Figure 3-8. The square marking indicates pin 1.
Figure 3-7. Pinout of the Switch Header
1 2
SW0
SW2
SW4
SW6
GND
SW1
SW3
SW5
SW7
VTG
SWITCHES
Figure 3-8. Pinout of the LED Header
1 2
LED0
LED2
LED4
LED6
GND
LED1
LED3
LED5
LED7
VTG
LEDS
3.5
Description of
User RS232
Interface
The STK500 includes two RS232 ports. One RS232 port is used for communication with
AVR Studio. The other RS232 can be used for communication between the target AVR
microcontroller in the socket and a PC serial port connected to the RS232. To use the
RS232, the UART pins of the AVR need to be physically connected to the RS232.
The 2-pin header marked “RS232 SPARE” can be used for connecting the RS232 converter to the UART pins on the target AVR microcontroller in the socket. Use the 2-wire
cable to connect the UART pins to the RS232. The connection is shown in Figure 3-9.
The block schematic of the RS232 connection is shown in Figure 3-10.
3-4
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
Figure 3-9. Connection of I/O Pins to UART
Figure 3-10. Schematic of UART Pin Connections
TXD
VTG
5V
5V
1n2
470R
2
3
470R
RXD
3.6
Description of
DataFlash Pins
Voltage
converter
MAX202CSE
1n2
RS232
An AT45D021 2-Mbit DataFlash is included on the STK500 for nonvolatile data storage.
A DataFlash is a high-density Flash memory with SPI serial interface. A detailed
datasheet of the DataFlash can be obtained from the Flash memory section of the Atmel
CD-ROM or from the Atmel Web site.
The DataFlash can be connected to the I/O pins of the microcontroller sockets. The
4-pin header marked “DATAFLASH” can be used for connecting the SPI interface of the
DataFlash to the I/O pins on the target AVR microcontroller in the socket. 2-wire cables
are included with STK500 for connecting the DataFlash to the I/O pins. The supplied
10-wire cables can also be used if the DataFlash is connected to the hardware SPI interface on PORTB of the AVR microcontroller. The connection of the I/O pins is shown in
Figure 3-13. The block schematic of the DataFlash connection is shown in Figure 3-14,
for connection of the DataFlash to the AVR hardware SPI interface. The SPI interface
pinout is shown in Figure 3-11 and Figure 3-12.
STK500 User Guide
3-5
Hardware Description
Figure 3-11. PORTB SPI Pinout (40-pin Parts)
1 2
PB0
PB2
(SS)PB4
(MISO)PB6
GND
PB1
PB3
PB5(MOSI)
PB7(SCK)
VTG
Figure 3-12. PORTB SPI Pinout (28-pin Analog Parts)
1 2
PB0
(SS)PB2
(MISO)PB4
PB6
GND
PB1
PB3(MOSI)
PB5(SCK)
PB7
VTG
Figure 3-13. Connection of I/O Pins to DataFlash for AT90S8515
3-6
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
Figure 3-14. Schematic of DataFlash Connections
VTG
S0
SCK
5V
CS
S0
CS
SI
SI
SCK
Voltage
converter
3.7
Target Socket
Section
5V
AT45D021
DataFlash
The programming module consists of the eight sockets in the white area in the middle of
the starter kit. In these sockets the target AVR devices can be inserted for programming
and used in the application.
Note:
Only one AVR device should be inserted in the sockets at a time.
The AVR Flash memory is guaranteed to be correct after 1,000 programming operations; the typical lifetime of the Flash memory is much longer.
Note:
When inserting a device in the socket, notice the orientation of the device.
The notch on the short side of the part must match the notch on the socket. If the device
is inserted the wrong way, it may damage the part and the starter kit.
The socket section is used for both running applications and target device programming.
Figure 3-15. The STK500 Programming Module
STK500 User Guide
3-7
Hardware Description
The part inserted in the socket can be programmed in the system from AVR Studio with
two different methods:
1. AVR In-System Programming (ISP) running at the parts normal supply voltage.
2. High-voltage programming, where the supply voltage is always 5 volts.
Four general nets (VTARGET, RESET, XTAL1 and AREF) can be connected to the
socket section.
The following sections describe how to use both programming methods. For instructions
on using the AVR Studio programming software, see Section 5, “Using AVR Studio” on
page 5-1.
3.7.1
ISP Programming
In-system programming uses the AVR internal SPI (serial peripheral interface) to download code into the Flash and EEPROM memory of the AVR. ISP programming requires
only VCC, GND, RESET and three signal lines for programming. All AVR devices except
AT90C8534, ATtiny10, ATtiny11 and ATtiny28 can be ISP programmed. The AVR can
be programmed at the normal operating voltage, normally 2.7V - 6.0V. No high-voltage
signals are required. The ISP programmer can program both the internal Flash and
EEPROM. It also programs fuse bits for selecting clock options, start-up time and internal brown-out detector (BOD) for most devices.
High-voltage programming can also program devices that are not supported by ISP programming. Some devices require high-voltage programming for programming certain
fuse bits. See the high-voltage programming section on page 3-10 for instructions on
how to use high-voltage programming.
Because the programming interface is placed on different pins from part to part, three
programming headers are used to route the programming signals to the correct pins. A
6-wire cable is supplied for connecting the ISP signals to the target ISP header. A color
coding system and a number system are used to explain which target ISP header is
used for each socket.
During ISP programming, the 6-wire cable must always be connected to the header
marked “ISP6PIN”. When programming parts in the blue sockets, connect the other end
of the cable to the blue SPROG1 target ISP header. When programming parts in the
green socket, use the green SPROG2 target ISP header. And when programming parts
in the red sockets, use the red SPROG3 target ISP header. Table 3-2 shows which
socket suits which AVR device, and which SPROG target ISP header to use for ISP
programming.
The 6-wire cables should be connected directly from the ISP6PIN header to the correct
SPROG target ISP header. The cable should not be twisted. A colored wire on the cable
indicates pin 1. Confirm that this is connected to pin 1 on each of the headers.
When programming 8-pin devices, note the following: Pin 1 is used both as RESET and
as PB5 on some devices (ATtiny11, ATtiny12 and ATtiny15). Pin 1 on the 8-pin sockets
SCKT3400D1 and SCKT3400D1 are connected to PB5. The RESET signal used during
ISP programming is therefore not connected to pin 1 on these sockets. This signal must
be connected by placing a wire between RST and the PORTE header and PB5 on the
PORTB header.
3-8
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
Table 3-2. AVR Sockets
AVR Devices
STK500 Socket
Color
Number
Target ISP Header
AT90S1200
AT90S2313
SCKT3300D3
Red
3
SPROG3
AT90S2323
AT90S2343
ATtiny12
SCKT3400D1
Blue
1
SPROG1. Connect RST on
PORTE to PB5 on PORTB.
ATtiny11
SCKT3400D1
Blue
1
High-voltage programming only
ATtiny28
SCKT3500D-
None
–
High-voltage programming only
AT90S4414
AT90S8515
ATmega161
SCKT3000D3
Red
3
SPROG3
AT90S4434
AT90S8535
ATmega163
SCKT3100A3
Red
3
SPROG3
AT90S2333
AT90S4433
SCKT3200A2
Green
2
SPROG2
ATtiny15
SCKT3600A1
Blue
1
SPROG1. Connect RST on
PORTE to PB5 on PORTB.
N/A
SCKT3700A1
Blue
1
Socket is not in use in this version
of STK500
Figure 3-16 shows an example of how AT90S2313 can be in-system programmed. The
6-wire cable is connected from the ISP6PIN header to the red SPROG3 target ISP
header, and the AT90S2313 part is inserted in the red socket marked “SCKT3100D3”.
Figure 3-16. Example Connection for Programming AT90S2313
SPROG1
AVR
SCKT3300D3
SPROG2
SPROG3
ISP6PIN
It is not necessary to remove the 6-wire cable from its ISP position while running a program in the AVR. The port pins used for ISP programming can be used for other
purposes in your program.
STK500 User Guide
3-9
Hardware Description
3.7.2
High-voltage
Programming
For high-voltage programming, a 12V programming voltage is applied to the RESET pin
of the AVR device. All AVR devices can be programmed with high-voltage programming, and the target device can be programmed while it is mounted in its socket.
Two different methods are used for high-voltage programming: 8-pin parts use a serial
programming interface, while other parts use a parallel programming interface. The programming signals are routed to the correct pins of the target device using the cables
supplied with STK500.
Table 3-3 summarizes the programming method and special considerations when using
high-voltage programming.
Table 3-3. High-voltage Programming Settings
AVR
Devices
3.7.2.1
3-10
Parallel High-voltage
Programming
STK500 Socket
Color
Number
AT90S1200
AT90S2313
SCKT3300D3
Red
3
AT90S4414
AT90S8515
SCKT3000D3
Red
3
AT90S4434
AT90S8535
SCKT3100A3
Red
3
ATtiny28
SCKT3500D-
None
–
ATmega161
SCKT3000D3
Red
3
ATmega163
SCKT3100A3
Red
3
AT90S2333
AT90S4433
SCKT3200A2
Green
2
AT90S2323
AT90S2343
ATtiny11
ATtiny12
SCKT3400D1
Blue
1
ATtiny15
SCKT3600A1
Blue
1
N/A
SCKT3700A1
Blue
1
High-voltage Programming Method
Parallel high-voltage programming.
Connect PROG CTRL header to
PORTD and PROG DATA to PORTB,
as shown in Figure 3-17 on
page 3-11.
Parallel programming as above;
mount BSEL jumpers
Parallel programming as above;
mount PJUMP jumper
Serial high-voltage programming
Socket not in use in this version of
STK500
To use high-voltage programming, the programming signal must be routed to the AVR
I/O pins. The two 10-wire cables supplied with the STK500 can be used to connect the
PROG DATA header to the PORTB header and the PROG CTRL header to the PORTD
header, as shown in Figure 3-17.
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
Figure 3-17. Connection for Parallel High-voltage Programming
Some of the jumper settings on STK500 must be changed when using high-voltage programming. Figure 3-18 explains these jumper settings.
Figure 3-18. Jumper Settings for High-voltage Programming
VTARGET
AREF
Jumpers
must be
mounted
RESET
XTAL1
OSCSEL
Devicedependent
jumpers
(see below)
BSEL2
PJUMP
Hardware setup for parallel high-voltage programming:
1. Switch power off.
2. Place the device to program in its socket according to Table 3-3 on page 3-10.
3. Connect the headers PROGDATA and PORTB with the 10-wire cable.
4. Connect the headers PROGCTRL and PORTD with the 10-wire cable.
5. Mount jumper OSCSEL on pins 1 and 2 to select software-controlled clock.
STK500 User Guide
3-11
Hardware Description
6. Mount jumper XTAL1 to route the oscillator signal to the device.
7. Mount jumpers VTARGET and RESET.
8. When programming AT90S2333 or AT90S4433, mount both PJUMP jumpers.
The 2-wire cables can be used instead of jumpers.
9. When programming ATmega163 or ATmega161, mount the BSEL2 jumper. A 2wire cable can be used instead of jumpers.
10. Disconnect target system.
11. Switch power on.
For a complete description of jumper settings, see paragraph 3.8, “Jumper Settings”.
Note:
3.7.2.2
Serial High-voltage
Programming
Remove the hardware setup for high-voltage programming before starting a
debug session.
The 8-pin AVRs have too few pins to use parallel communication during high-voltage
programming. They use serial communication instead.
This means that fewer signals have to be routed. Hardware setup for serial high-voltage
programming is as follows:
1. Switch power off.
2. Place the device to program in its socket according to Table 3-3 on page 3-10.
3. Mount jumper OSCSEL on pins 1 and 2 to select software-controlled clock.
4. Mount jumper XTAL1 to route the oscillator signal to the device.
5. Mount jumpers VTARGET and RESET.
6. Use one 2-wire cable to connect the PB3 pin (pin 4) on the PORTB header to the
XT1 pin (pin 7) on the PORTE/AUX header. This will connect the clock system to
the AVR device.
7. Use another 2-wire cable to connect the PB5 pin (pin 6) on the PORTB header to
the RST pin (pin 3) on the PORTE/AUX header. This will connect the reset system to the AVR device.
8. Use a third 2-wire cable to connect the PB0 and PB2 pins (pins 4 and 3) on the
SPROG1 header to the DATA0 and DATA2 pins (pins 1 and 3) on the PROG
DATA header.
9. Use the last 2-wire cable to connect the PB1 pin (pin 1) on the SPROG1 header
to the DATA1 pin (pin 2) on the PROG DATA header.
10. Switch power on and you are ready to program.
All connections are shown in Figure 3-19.
3-12
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
Figure 3-19. Connection for Serial High-voltage Programming
3.8
Jumper Settings
A master MCU and eight jumpers control the hardware settings of the starter kit. During
normal operation these jumpers should be mounted in the default position. To configure
the starter kit for advanced use, the jumpers can be removed or set to new positions.
The jumper settings and usage are explained in the following section. The default setting of the jumpers are shown in Figure 3-20.
Figure 3-20. Default Jumper Setting
VTARGET
AREF
RESET
XTAL1
OSCSEL
BSEL2
PJUMP
STK500 User Guide
3-13
Hardware Description
Table 3-4. Description of Jumpers
3.8.1
Target VCC Settings,
VTARGET
Jumper
Description of Default Setting
VTARGET
On-board VTARGET supply connected
AREF
On-board Analog Voltage Reference connected
RESET
On-board reset system connected
XTAL1
On-board clock system connected
OSCSEL
On-board oscillator selected
BSEL2
Unmounted. Used for high-voltage programming of ATmega161 and
ATmega163
PJUMP
Unmounted. Used for high-voltage programming of AT90S2333 and
AT90S4433
VTARGET controls the supply voltage to the target AVR microcontroller sockets. It can
either be controlled from AVR Studio or supplied from an external source. If the VTARGET jumper is mounted, the on-board supply voltage is connected. The on-board
supply voltage can be adjusted to 0 - 6V from AVR Studio. Always verify the respective
datasheet for the AVR device operating voltage before adjusting VTARGET voltage.
If the VTARGET jumper is disconnected, target VCC must be supplied from an external
source at one of the VTG pins on the PORT headers. Figure 3-21 explains VTARGET
jumper options.
When using an external source for VTARGET, the user must control that VTARGET is
at a higher voltage level than AREF (analog reference voltage). Always connect common ground (GND) when using an external VTARGET voltage.
Figure 3-21. VTARGET Jumper Options
Jumper mounted
VTARGET
AREF
On-board VTARGET supply connected (default)
Jumper not mounted
VTARGET
AREF
On-board VTARGET supply disconnected
The STK500 master MCU controls the target voltage using the internal PWM.
Figure 3-22 shows the internal connection of the VTARGET signal.
3-14
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
Figure 3-22. VTARGET Connection
VTARGET
10 - 15V
VIN
Voltage
regulator
0 - 6V
VTG NET
Jumper
Green LED
Master Wr PWM
MCU
Rd
ADC
Note:
3.8.2
Analog Reference
Voltage, AREF
The green LED will light when there is a voltage available on the VTG NET. It’s
impossible to use the debug or programming area of STK500 without VTG.
The analog reference voltage (AREF) can supply the reference voltage to the on-chip
A/D converter on the AVR. If the AREF jumper is mounted, the on-board analog reference voltage is connected to the AVR’s AREF. The on-board analog reference voltage
can be adjusted from AVR Studio to 0 - 6.0V, but not above VTARGET.
When the AREF jumper is disconnected, AREF voltage must be supplied from an external source at the AREF pin on the PORTE/AUX header (Figure 3-6). Figure 3-23
explains AREF jumper options.
When using an external source for AREF, the user must control VTARGET at a higher
voltage level than AREF. This can be controlled easily by reading the VTG value from
AVR Studio before setting AREF.
Figure 3-23. AREF Jumper Options
Jumper mounted
VTARGET
AREF
RESET
On-board AREF voltage connected (default)
Jumper not mounted
VTARGET
AREF
RESET
On-board AREF voltage disconnected
STK500 User Guide
3-15
Hardware Description
The STK500 master MCU controls the analog reference voltage using the internal
PWM. The AVR’s AREF signal is also accessible on the PORTE header; this pin can
also be used for external AREF signal. Figure 3-24 shows the internal connection of the
AREF signal.
Figure 3-24. Internal AREF Connection
10 - 15V
VIN
Voltage
regulator
0 - 6V
AREF
AREF
Jumper
1 2
PE0
PE2
REF
XT1
GND
Master Wr PWM
MCU
Rd
ADC
PE1
RST
GND
XT2
VTG
PORTE/AUX
The AVR Studio-controlled analog reference voltage can also be used as an input to the
analog comparator or for ADC measurements on the AVR. AVR’s AREF signal can then
be connected to VTG.
3.8.3
Reset Settings,
RESET
The RESET jumper controls the RESET signal to the STK500. When ISP programming
the target device in the socket, the master MCU programs the AVR device without interfering with the application. When the RESET jumper is mounted, the master MCU
controls the RESET signal of the AVR. When the RESET jumper is not mounted, the
RESET signal is disconnected. This is useful for prototype applications with an external
reset system.
The RESET jumper must always be mounted when high-voltage programming an AVR
device. When using an external reset system, it must allow the reset line to be controlled
by the master MCU reset system during programming. The RESET button is disconnected if the RESET jumper is not mounted. Figure 3-25 explains the RESET jumper
options.
Figure 3-25. RESET Jumper Options
Jumper mounted
AREF
RESET
XTAL1
On-board RESET signal connected (default)
Jumper not mounted
AREF
RESET
XTAL1
On-board RESET signal disconnected
3-16
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
The STK500 master MCU controls the RESET signal to the target AVR. The RESET
signal is accessible on the PORTE/AUX header; this pin can also be used for external
RESET signal. Figure 3-26 shows the internal connection of the RESET signal.
Figure 3-26. Internal RESET Connection
RESET
RESET
CIRCUIT
Master
MCU
0V - VTG - 12V
RESET NET
Jumper
1 2
RESET
PE0
PE2
REF
XT1
GND
PE1
RST
GND
XT2
VTG
PORTE/AUX
Note:
3.8.4
Clock Settings,
XTAL1 and OSCSEL
During high-voltage programming, STK500 applies 12V to the AVR’s RESET
line. Thus, an external reset circuit not capable of handling this must be disconnected before high-voltage programming the AVR.
STK500 includes several clock options for the target AVR. Setting the jumpers XTAL1
and OSCSEL controls the clock selections. OSCSEL determines what signal to route to
the XTAL1 pin of the AVR.
When the XTAL1 jumper is connected, the STK500 internal clock system is used as
main clock to the target AVR. When XTAL1 jumper is not mounted, the internal clock
system is disconnected. This allows external clock signals or crystals to be used as target clock source for the AVR. Figure 3-27 illustrates the XTAL1 jumper option.
Figure 3-27. XTAL1 Jumper Options
Jumper mounted
AREF
RESET
XTAL1
OSCSEL
On-board XTAL1 signal connected (default)
Jumper not mounted
AREF
RESET
XTAL1
OSCSEL
On-board XTAL1 signal disconnected
When the XTAL1 jumper is not mounted, an external clock source or crystal can be connected to the PORTE header. This is shown in Figure 3-29.
STK500 User Guide
3-17
Hardware Description
When the XTAL1 jumper is mounted, the STK500 internal clock system is used as main
clock to the target AVR. The internal clock system can either use a crystal in the
on-board crystal socket or a software-generated clock from the master MCU. The frequency of the software-generated clock can be set from 0 to 3.68 MHz. The default
value is 3.68 MHz. Paragraph 5.3.5.3 on page 5-6 explains how to set the clock frequency from AVR Studio.
When using the STK500 software-generated clock system as main clock, the target
AVR microcontroller fuses should be configured for “external clock” as clock source.
This gives shortest start-up time for the microcontroller. For details of start-up time, see
the datasheet for the AVR microcontroller. For an explanation of clock source fuses configuration, see paragraph 5.3.2 on page 5-3. Not all AVR devices have fuses for
selection between using a crystal or oscillator as clock source.
The internal clock system is selected with the OSCSEL jumper. Figure 3-28 shows the
jumper options for OSCSEL.
The on-board oscillator will work with ceramic resonators or crystals between
2 - 20 MHz (AT-cut, fundamental and parallel resonant crystals).
Figure 3-28. OSCSEL Jumper Options
Jumper mounted on pins 1 and 2
XTAL1
OSCSEL
On-board software clock signal connected (default)
Jumper mounted on pins 2 and 3
XTAL1
OSCSEL
On-board crystal signal connected
Jumper not mounted
XTAL1
OSCSEL
On-board XTAL1 signal disconnected
When programming AVR in high-voltage programming mode, OSCSEL should be
mounted on pins 1 and 2 to give the master MCU control of the target clock. This is
explained in detail in paragraph 3.7.2 on page 3-10.
Note:
3-18
In a real application with only one AVR connected to the crystal, there is no
need for an external oscillator circuit. The STK500 has eight different AVR
sockets connected to the same clock system. The long signal lines in this system makes it difficult to drive a crystal with the on-chip oscillators on the AVR.
The oscillator on STK500 is designed to operate on all target voltages from 1.8
to 6.0V.
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
Figure 3-29. XTAL1 and OSCSEL Connections
Oscillator
5V
VTG
CRYSTAL
OSCSEL
XTAL1
3
2
1
Jumper
AVR
Studio
MASTER
MCU
XTAL1 NET
Jumper
Voltage
converter
1 2
PE0
PE2
REF
XT1
GND
PE1
RST
GND
XT2
VTG
PORTE
3.8.5
BSEL2 Jumper
The BSEL2 jumper connects the Byte Select 2 signal for high-voltage programming of
ATmega161 and ATmega163. The BSEL2 jumper should only be mounted when highvoltage programming ATmega161 or ATmega163. For descriptions of the Byte Select 2
signal, see the programming section of the ATmega161 and ATmega163 datasheet.
3.8.6
PJUMP Jumpers
The PJUMP jumpers route the programming pin of AT90S2333 and AT90S4433 to the
programming lines when using high-voltage programming. The PJUMP jumpers should
only be mounted when using high-voltage programming on AT90S2333 or AT90S4433.
During debugging, high-voltage programming of other parts and ISP programming,
these jumpers should not be mounted.
3.9
Expansion
Connectors
STK500 has two expansion connectors, one on each side of the programming module.
All AVR I/O ports, programming signals and control signals are routed to the expansion
connectors. The expansion connectors allow easy prototyping of applications with
STK500. The pinout of the expansion connectors is shown in Figure 3-31 and
Figure 3-32.
STK500 User Guide
3-19
Hardware Description
Figure 3-30. Expansion Headers
Expansion header 0
Prog Ctrl
Pin 1
Pin 1
Expansion header 1
Prog Data
Figure 3-31. Expansion Connector 0 Pinout
GND
AUXI0
CT7
CT5
CT3
CT1
NC
RST
PE1
GND
VTG
PC7
PC5
PC3
PC1
PA7
PA5
PA3
PA1
GND
3-20
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
GND
AUXO0
CT6
CT4
CT2
BSEL2
REF
PE2
PE0
GND
VTG
PC6
PC4
PC2
PC0
PA6
PA4
PA2
PA0
GND
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
Figure 3-32. Expansion Connector 1 Pinout
GND
AUXI1
DATA7
DATA5
DATA3
DATA1
SI
SCK
XT1
VTG
GND
PB7
PB5
PB3
PB1
PD7
PD5
PD3
PD1
GND
3.9.1
Signal Descriptions
1
3
5
7
9
11
13
15
17
19
21
23
25
27
29
31
33
35
37
39
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
36
38
40
GND
AUXO1
DATA6
DATA4
DATA2
DATA0
SO
CS
XT2
VTG
GND
PB6
PB4
PB2
PB0
PD6
PD4
PD2
PD0
GND
The signals AUXI1, AUXI0, AUXO1 and AUXO0 are intended for future use. Do not connect these signals to your application.
The DATA[7:0] and CT[7:1] signals are also found on the Prog Data and Prog Ctrl connectors. These signals and connectors are explained in paragraph 3.10 on page 3-21.
The BSEL2 signal is the same as that found on the BSEL2 jumper. This jumper is
explained in paragraph 3.8.5 on page 3-19.
The SI, SO, SCK and CS signals are connected to the DataFlash. Use of the DataFlash
is described in paragraph 3.6 on page 3-5.
NC means that this pin is not connected.
The remaining signals are equal to those found on the PORT connectors, explained in
paragraph 3.4 on page 3-3.
Note:
3.10
Prog Ctrl and
Prog Data
Headers
The Prog Ctrl and Prog Data headers are used for high-voltage programming of the target AVR device. The placement of the headers is shown in Figure 3-30. During parallel
high-voltage programming, the Prog Ctrl signals are routed to PORTD of the target
device. The Prog Data signals are routed to PORTB. See paragraph 3.7.2 on page 3-10
for a complete description of high-voltage programming. The pinouts of the Prog Ctrl
and Prog Data headers are shown in Figure 3-33 and Figure 3-34. For more information
about high-voltage programming of AVR devices, see the programming section of each
AVR datasheet.
Note:
STK500 User Guide
DATA, CT and AUX signals are based on 5V CMOS logic. No voltage conversion to adapt to VTG is done on these signals.
Prog Ctrl and Data connectors are connected directly to the master MCU without level converters. This means that these signals are always 5V logic.
3-21
Hardware Description
Figure 3-33. Prog Ctrl Header Pinout
1 2
NC
(OE)CT2
(BS1)CT4
(XA1)CT6
GND
CT1(RDY/BSY)
CT3(/WR)
CT5(XA0)
CT7(PAGEL)
NC
The Prog Ctrl signals are normally used for the control signals when parallel highvoltage programming an AVR device.
Note:
All Prog Ctrl signals are based on 5V CMOS logic. No voltage conversion to
adapt to VTG is done on these signals.
Figure 3-34. Prog Data Header Pinout
1 2
DATA0
DATA2
DATA4
DATA6
GND
DATA1
DATA3
DATA5
DATA7
NC
The Prog Data signals are used for the data bus when parallel high-voltage programming an AVR device. During ISP programming, DATA5 is used as MOSI, DATA6 is
used as MISO and DATA7 is used for SCK.
Note:
3.11
3-22
Miscellaneous
All Prog Data signals are based on 5V CMOS logic. No voltage conversion to
adapt to VTG is done on these signals.
STK500 has 2 push buttons and 3 LEDs for special functions and status indication. The
following section explains these features. Figure 3-35 shows the placement of these
functions.
STK500 User Guide
Hardware Description
Figure 3-35. Special Functions and Status Indication LEDs
Target power LED
RESET push button
Main power LED
Program push button
Status LED
3.11.1
RESET Push Button
The RESET push button resets the target AVR device when pushed. The master MCU
is not controlled by the RESET push button. When the RESET jumper is not mounted,
the RESET push button is disabled.
3.11.2
PROGRAM Push
Button
Future versions of AVR Studio may upgrade the master MCU on STK500. AVR Studio
will then detect old software versions of STK500 and update the Flash program memory
of the master MCU. To do this, the user is required to push the PROGRAM button when
powering on STK500. AVR Studio issues instructions on how to perform the upgrade
during the upgrade process.
3.11.3
Main Power LED
The red power LED is directly connected to the STK500 main power supply. The power
LED is always lit when power is applied to STK500.
3.11.4
Target Power LED
The target power LED is connected to VCC lines (VTG) on the target AVR devices in the
sockets. The target power LED is lit when power is applied to the target AVR device.
3.11.5
Status LED
The PROGRAM LED is a 3-color LED. During programming, the LED is yellow. When
the target AVR device is successfully programmed, the LED will turn green. If programming fails, the LED will turn red to indicate that programming failed. When programming
fails, check the troubleshooting guide in Section 7 on page 7-1. During start-up, the status LED will shift from red, through yellow, to green to indicate that the master MCU is
ready.
STK500 User Guide
3-23
Hardware Description
3-24
STK500 User Guide
Section 4
Installing AVR Studio
AVR Studio, with its Integrated Development Environment (IDE), is the ideal software
for all AVR development. It has an editor, an assembler and a debugger and is front-end
for all AVR emulators and the STK500 starter kit.
To install AVR Studio, insert the supplied Atmel CD-ROM databook in the computer and
navigate to “Products > AVR 8-bit RISC > Software”. Right-click with the mouse on the
“AVRstudio.exe” file and select “save link as”. Select an empty directory and save the
file.
Execute the “AVRstudio.exe” file; this is a self-extracting file that will extract all required
files to the current directory. Execute the “Setup.exe” file; this will guide you through the
setup process.
Note:
STK500 User Guide
AVR Studio, version 3.2 or later, is required for STK500 support.
4-1
Installing AVR Studio
4-2
STK500 User Guide
Section 5
Using AVR Studio
5.1
Windows
Software
In this section, the supporting software for STK500 will be presented and an in-depth
description of the available programming options is given.
5.2
Starting the
Windows
Software
The software used for communicating with the STK500 development board is included
in AVR Studio, version 3.2 and later. For information on how to install this software,
please see Section 4 on page 4-1. Once installed, AVR Studio can be started by doubleclicking on the AVR Studio icon. If default install options are used, the program is
located in the Windows “Start menu > Programs > Atmel AVR Tools” folder.
5.2.1
Starting STK500
Pressing the “AVR” button on the AVR Studio toolbar will start the STK500 user interface as shown in Figure 5-1.
Figure 5-1. AVR Studio with STK500 User Interface
STK500 User Guide
5-1
Using AVR Studio
5.3
STK500 User
Interface
The STK500 user interface includes powerful features for the STK500 development
board. The available settings are divided into six groups, each selectable by clicking
on the appropriate tab. Since different devices have different features, the available
options and selections will depend on which device is selected. Unavailable features are
grayed out.
5.3.1
“Program” Settings
The program settings are divided into four different subgroups.
5.3.1.1
Device
A device is selected by selecting the correct device from the pull-down menu. This
group also includes a button that performs a chip erase on the selected device, erasing
both the Flash and EEPROM memories.
5.3.1.2
Programming Mode
This group selects programming mode. For devices only supporting high-voltage programming, the ISP option will be grayed out. If both modes are available, select a mode
by clicking on the correct method. Checking “Erase Device Before Programming” will
force STK500 to perform a chip erase before programming code to the program memory
(Flash). Checking “Verify Device After Programming” will force STK500 to perform a
verification of the memory after programming it (both Flash and EEPROM).
5.3.1.3
Flash
If the STK500 user interface is opened without a project loaded in AVR Studio, the “Use
Current Simulator/Emulator FLASH Memory” option will be grayed out. When a project
is open, this option allows programming of the Flash memory content currently present
in the Flash Memory view of AVR Studio. For more information about AVR Studio memory views, please take a look in the AVR Studio Help file.
If no project is running, or the source code is stored in a separate hex file, select the
“Input HEX File” option. Browse to the correct file by pressing the
button or type the
complete path and filename in the text field. The selected file must be in “Intel-hex” format or “extended Intel-hex” format.
Figure 5-2. Program
5-2
STK500 User Guide
Using AVR Studio
5.3.1.4
EEPROM
If the STK500 user interface is opened without a project loaded in AVR Studio, the “Use
Current Simulator/Emulator EEPROM Memory” option will be grayed out. When a
project is open, this option allows programming of the EEPROM memory content currently present in the EEPROM Memory view. For more information about AVR Studio
memory views, please take a look in the AVR Studio Help file.
If no project is running, or the source code is stored in a separate hex file, select the
“Input HEX File” option. Browse to the correct file by pressing the
button or type the
complete path and filename in the text field. The selected file must be in “Intel-hex” format or “extended Intel-hex” format.
5.3.2
“Fuses” Settings
In the “Fuses” tab an overview of accessible fuses are presented. Some fuses are only
available during high-voltage programming. These will be displayed but not accessible if
operating in ISP programming mode. Press the “Read” button to read the current value
of the fuses, and the “Write” button to write the current fuse setting to the device. Checking one of these check boxes indicates that this fuse should be enabled/programmed,
which means writing a “0” to the fuse location in the actual device. Note that the selected
fuse setting is not affected by erasing the device with a chip-erase cycle (i.e., pressing
“Chip Erase” button in the “Program” settings).
Detailed information on what fuses are available in the different programming modes
and their functions can be found in the appropriate device datasheet.
Figure 5-3. Fuses
STK500 User Guide
5-3
Using AVR Studio
5.3.3
“LockBits” Settings
Similar to the “Fuses” tab, the “LockBits” tab shows which lock modes are applicable to
the selected device. All lock bits are accessible in both ISP and high-voltage programming. A lock mode may consist of a combination of setting multiple lock bits. This is
handled by the STK500 user interface, and the correct lock bits are programmed automatically for the selected lock mode. Once a lock mode protection level is enabled, it is
not possible to lower the protection level by selecting a “lower” degree of protection or
by setting a different lock mode. The only way to remove a programmed lock bit is to
perform a complete chip erase, erasing both program and data memories. One exception exists: If the target device has a programmed “EESAVE” fuse, the contents of the
EEPROM will be saved even though a complete chip erase on the device is performed.
Figure 5-4. Lock Bits
5-4
STK500 User Guide
Using AVR Studio
5.3.4
“Advanced”
Settings
The “Advanced” tab is currently divided into two subgroups.
5.3.4.1
Signature Bytes
By pressing the “Read Signature” button, the signature bytes are read from the target
device. The signature bytes act like an identifier for the part. Please refer to the AVR
datasheets to read more about signature bytes.
Figure 5-5. Advanced
5.3.4.2
Oscillator
Calibration Byte
The oscillator calibration byte is written to the device during manufacturing, and cannot
be erased or altered by the user. The calibration byte is a tuning value that should be
written to the OSCCAL register in order to tune the internal RC oscillator.
5.3.4.3
Reading Oscillator
Calibration Byte
By pressing the “Read Cal. Byte” button, the calibration value is read from the device
and is shown in the “Value” text box. Note that the calibration byte is not directly accessible during program execution and must be written to a memory location during
programming if it shall be used by the program. If this option is grayed out, the selected
device does not have a tunable internal RC oscillator.
5.3.4.4
Writing Oscillator
Calibration Byte
Since the calibration byte is not directly accessible during program execution, the user
should write the calibration byte into a known location in Flash or EEPROM memory. Do
this by writing the desired memory address in the “Write Address” text box and then
press the “Write to Memory” button. The calibration byte is then written to the memory
indicated by the “Flash” and “Eeprom” radio buttons.
STK500 User Guide
5-5
Using AVR Studio
5.3.5
“Board” Settings
The “Board” tab allows the changing of operating conditions on the STK500 development board. The following properties can be modified: VTARGET, AREF and oscillator
frequency.
The interface is very flexible and it is possible to force the operating conditions beyond
the recommended specifications for the device. Doing this is not recommended, and
may damage the target device. The recommended operating conditions for the part are
stated in the device datasheet.
Figure 5-6. Board
5.3.5.1
VTARGET
VTARGET controls the operating voltage for the target board. Through the use of the
slide bar or the text box, this voltage can be regulated between 0 and 6.0V in 0.1V increments. Please refer to the device datasheet to find the specified voltage range for the
selected device. Both voltages are read by pressing the “Read Voltages” button, and
written by pressing the “Write Voltages” button.
The physical connection of the VTARGET voltage is shown in Figure 3-22 on page 3-15.
5.3.5.2
AREF
AREF controls the analog reference voltage for the ADC converter. This setting only
apply to devices with AD converter. Through the use of the slide bar or the text box, this
voltage can be regulated between 0 and 6.0V in 0.1V increments. Please refer to the
device datasheet to find the valid voltage range for the selected device. Both VTARGET
and AREF are read by pressing the “Read Voltages” button, and written by pressing the
“Write Voltages” button.
It is not possible to set AREF to a higher voltage than VTARGET because this will permanently damage the AVR.
The physical connection of the AREF voltage is shown in Figure 3-24 on page 3-16.
5.3.5.3
5-6
Oscillator
The STK500 development board uses a programmable oscillator circuit that offers a
wide range of frequencies for the target device.
STK500 User Guide
Using AVR Studio
Since it is not possible to generate an unlimited number of frequencies, the STK500
user interface will calculate the value closest to the value written to the oscillator text
box. The calculated value is then presented in the oscillator text box, overwriting the
previously written number.
5.3.6
“Auto” Settings
When programming multiple devices with the same code, the “Auto” tab offers a powerful method of automatically going through a user-defined sequence of commands. The
commands are listed in the order they are executed (if selected). To enable a command,
the appropriate check box should be checked. For example, if only “Program FLASH” is
checked when the “Start” button is pressed, the Flash memory will be programmed with
the hex file specified in the “Program” settings. All commands depend on and use the
settings given in the STK500 user interface.
Figure 5-7. Auto
It is possible to log the command execution to a text file by checking the “Log to file”
check box.
5.3.6.1
Setting Up the
System for Autoprogramming
Click on the check boxes for the commands that you want the STK500 user interface to
perform. A typical sequence where the device is erased and then programmed is shown
in Figure 5-7. The chip is erased, both memories programmed and verified, and finally,
fuses and lock bits are programmed.
Once configured, the same programming sequence is executed every time the “Start”
button is pressed. This reduces both work and possibilities for errors due to operational
errors.
5.3.6.2
Logging the Autoprogramming to a
File
STK500 User Guide
By clicking on the “Log to file” check box, all output from the commands are written to a
text file. Select or create the file by pressing the “Browse” button and navigate to the
location where the file is placed or should be created. The output is directed to this file,
and can be viewed and edited using a text editor.
5-7
Using AVR Studio
5.3.7
History Window
The History window is located at the bottom of the STK500 view. In this window the dialog between AVR Studio and STK500 is shown. For every new command performed,
the old dialog is replaced with the new one.
Figure 5-8. History Window
5.4
Command Line
Software
The DOS command line version of the STK500 software is useful for programming
STK500 from external editors or for use in production programmers. Simple batch files
can be made for automatic programming. Type STK500 -? for help.
Synopsis: stk500
[-d device name] [-m s|p] [-if infile] [-ie infile] [-of outfile]
[-oe outfile] [-s] [-e] [-p f|e|b] [-r f|e|b] [-v f|e|b] [-l value]
[-y] [-f value] [-q] [-x value] [-af start,stop] [-ae start,stop]
[-c port] [-ut value] [-ua value] [-wt] [-wa] [-j value] [-b h|s]
[-! n,p] [-?] [-t p|t] [-t] [-n] [-g] [-z] [-h|?]
5.5
5-8
Parameters
d
Device name. Must be applied when programming the device. See list below.
m
Select programming mode, serial (s) or parallel (p). Serial progr. mode is the
default, and is used if this parameter is not applied.
if
Name of Flash input file. Required for programming or verification of the Flash
memory. The file format is Intel Extended HEX.
ie
Name of Flash input file. Required for programming or verification of the EEPROM
memory. The file format is Intel Extended HEX.
of
Name of Flash output file. Required for readout of the Flash memory. The file
format is Intel Extended HEX.
oe
Name of EEPROM output file. Required for readout of the EEPROM memory. The
file format is Intel Extended HEX.
STK500 User Guide
Using AVR Studio
s
Read signature bytes.
e
Erase device. If applied with another programming parameter, the device will be
erased before any other programming takes place.
p
Program device; Flash (f), EEPROM (e) or both (b). Corresponding input files are
required.
r
Read out device; Flash (f), EEPROM (e) or both (b). Corresponding output
files are required
v
Verify device; Flash (f), EEPROM (e) or both (b). Can be used with -p or stand
alone. Corresponding input files are required.
l
Set lock byte. “Value” is an 8-bit hex value.
y
Read back lock byte.
f
Set fuse bytes. “Value” is a 16-bit hex value describing the settings for the upper
and lower fuse.
q
Read back fuse bytes.
x
Fill unspecified locations with a value (0x00 - 0xff). The default is to not program
locations not specified in the input files.
af
Flash address range. Specifies the address range of operations. The default is the
entire Flash. Byte addresses.
ae
EEPROM address range. Specifies the address range of operations. The default
is the entire EEPROM. Byte addresses.
c
Select communication port; “com1” to “com8”. If this parameter is omitted, the
program will scan the comm. ports for the STK500.
ut
Set target voltage (VTARGET) in volts. “Value” is a floating point value between
0.0 and 6.0, describing the new voltage.
ua
Set adjustable voltage (AREF) in volts. “Value” is a floating point value between
0.0 and 6.0, describing the new voltage.
wt
Get current target voltage (VTARGET).
wa
Get current adjustable voltage (AREF).
j
Activate the application reset line. “Value” is number of milliseconds the RESET
line is held active before it is released.
b
Get revisions; hardware revision (h) and software revision (s).
!
Set oscillator parameters; “n” is the compare register value and “p” is the
prescaler register value.
?
Get oscillator parameters.
t
Get currently selected device parameters.
n
Get current programming mode.
g
Silent operation.
z
No progress indicator. For example, if piping to a file for log purposes, use this
option to avoid the non-ASCII characters used for the indicator.
h|? Help information (overrides all other settings).
STK500 User Guide
5-9
Using AVR Studio
5.6
Syntax for
Supported
Devices
AT90S1200, AT90S2313, AT90S4414, AT90S4433, AT90S2333, AT90S8515,
AT90S2323,AT90S2343, AT90S8535, AT90S4434, AT90C8534, ATmega103,
ATmega161, ATmega163, ATtiny11, ATtiny12, ATtiny15, ATtiny28
Figure 5-9. Sample Usage
Program Flash
Erase before program
stk500
-dAT90S8515
-ms
Name of hex file
-e
-pf
-vf
-iftest.hex
Select device number
Serial programming mode
5-10
Verify device
STK500 User Guide
Section 6
In-System Programming of an
External Target System
The STK500 can be used as a programmer to program AVR devices in other applications. There are two different ISP connector pinouts available: a 6-pin and a 10-pin
version. Both are supported by STK500.
Figure 6-1. 6-pin ISP Connector Pinout
1 2
MISO
SCK
RST
VTG
MOSI
GND
ISP6PIN
Figure 6-2. 10-pin ISP Connector Pinout
1 2
MOSI
NC
RST
SCK
MISO
VTG
GND
GND
GND
GND
ISP10PIN
Select the device to be programmed in the same way as programming a device on the
STK500. The VCC of the target application is detected by STK500 and signals are converted into voltage levels suitable for the target system.
Note:
STK500 User Guide
If the other application has its own power supply to VTG, the jumper VTARGET
must be removed before connecting STK500 to the other application. STK500
may be damaged if the VTARGET jumper is not removed.
6-1
In-System Programming of an External Target System
6-2
STK500 User Guide
Section 7
Troubleshooting Guide
Table 7-1. Troubleshooting Guide
Problem
The red power LED is not on.
The preprogrammed
example code does not
toggle the LEDs.
The AVR device cannot be
programmed.
STK500 User Guide
Reason
Solution
The DC power cable is not
connected.
Connect the DC power cable
to the DC jack (page 2-2).
Wrong power supply is used.
Check that the power supply
is of DC type 10 - 15V, min.
500 mA (page 2-2).
The power switch is off.
Turn on the power switch.
There is no AVR device in the
socket.
Plug the AVR device into the
right socket (page 2-3).
The LEDs are not connected
to the I/O ports.
Connect the LEDS header to
the PORTD header, and the
SWITCHES header to the
PORTB header (page 3-3).
The Flash memory is erased.
Connect STK500 to a PC
and reprogram the AVR
device (page 2-3).
The PC serial cable is not
connected.
Connect the serial cable to
the PC COM port and the
RS232PROG port.
The AVR device is inserted in
wrong socket.
Check that the correct socket
is used (page 3-9).
The AVR device is inserted
with wrong orientation.
Check that the notch on the
AVR socket matches the
notch on the AVR device.
The target ISP header is not
connected.
Connect the 6-pin flexible
cable from ISP6PIN header
to the correct SPROG target
ISP header (page 3-9).
The jumpers settings are
wrong.
Set jumper to default setup
(page 3-14).
The VTARGET voltage is too
low.
Check the AVR datasheet for
minimum operating voltage.
The memory lock bits are
programmed.
Erase the memory before
programming.
7-1
Troubleshooting Guide
Table 7-1. Troubleshooting Guide (Continued)
Problem
AVR Studio does not detect
STK500.
Reason
Solution
Serial cable is not connected,
or power is off.
Connect serial cable to
RS232PROG and check
power connections.
PC COM port is in use.
Change PC COM port.
AVR Studio does not detect
COM port.
7-2
Disable other programs that
are using PC COM port.
Disable COM port autodetection in AVR Studio file
menu. Force COM port to
correct COM port.
STK500 User Guide
Section 8
Technical Support
For technical support, please contact [email protected] When requesting technical support for STK500, please include the following information:
Version number of AVR Studio. This can be found in the AVR Studio menu,
“Help > About”.
STK500 User Guide
PC processor type and speed
PC operating system and version
What target AVR device is used (complete part number)
Programming voltage
Jumper settings
A detailed description of the problem
8-1
Technical Support
8-2
STK500 User Guide
Section 9
Example Applications
9.1
Using LEDs and
Switches
Connect PORTB to LEDS and PORTD to SWITCHES.
LEDs will operate differently depending on what switch is pressed.
Tip: Copy the code from this document into AVR Studio.
;***** STK500 LEDS and SWITCH demonstration
.include "8515def.inc"
.def
Temp
=r16
; Temporary register
.def
Delay
=r17
; Delay variable 1
.def
Delay2
=r18
; Delay variable 2
;***** Initialization
RESET:
ser
Temp
out
DDRB,Temp
; Set PORTB to output
;**** Test input/output
LOOP:
STK500 User Guide
out
PORTB,temp
; Update LEDS
sbis
PIND,0x00
; If (Port D, pin0 == 0)
inc
Temp
; then count LEDS one down
sbis
PIND,0x01
; If (Port D, pin1 == 0)
dec
Temp
; then count LEDS one up
sbis
PIND,0x02
; If (Port D, pin2 == 0)
ror
Temp
; then rotate LEDS one right
9-1
Example Applications
sbis
PIND,0x03
; If (Port D, pin3 == 0)
rol
Temp
; then rotate LEDS one left
sbis
PIND,0x04
; If (Port D, pin4 == 0)
com
Temp
; then invert all LEDS
sbis
PIND,0x05
; If (Port D, pin5 == 0)
neg
Temp
; then invert all LEDS and add 1
sbis
PIND,0x06
; If (Port D, pin6 == 0)
swap
Temp
; then swap nibbles of LEDS
;**** Now wait a while to make LED changes visible.
DLY:
9-2
dec
Delay
brne
DLY
dec
Delay2
brne
DLY
rjmp
LOOP
; Repeat loop forever
STK500 User Guide
Section 10
Warranty Statement
Atmel warrants that the Product delivered hereunder shall conform to the applicable
Atmel Data Sheet or mutually agreed upon specifications and shall be free from defects
in material and workmanship under normal use and service for a period of 30 days from
the applicable date of invoice. Products which are “samples”, “design verification units”,
and/or “prototypes” are sold “AS IS,” “WITH ALL FAULTS,” and without a warranty.
If, during such warranty period, (i) Atmel is notified promptly in writing upon discovery of
any defect in the goods, including a detailed description of such defect; (ii) such goods
are returned to Atmel, DDP Atmel’s facility accompanied by Atmel’s Returned Material
Authorization form; and (iii) Atmel’s examination of such goods discloses to Atmel’s satisfaction that such goods are defective and such defects are not caused by accident,
abuse, misuse, neglect, alteration, improper installation, repair, improper testing, or use
contrary to any instructions issued by Atmel, Atmel shall (at its sole option) either repair,
replace, or credit Buyer the purchase price of such goods. No goods may be returned to
Atmel without Atmel’s Returned Material Authorization form.
Prior to any return of goods by Buyer pursuant to this Section, Buyer shall afford Atmel
the opportunity to inspect such goods at Buyer’s location, and any such goods so
inspected shall not be returned to Atmel without its prior written consent.
Atmel shall return any goods repaired or replaced under this warranty to Buyer transportation prepaid, and reimburse Buyer for the transportation charges paid by Buyer for
such goods. The performance of this warranty does not extend the warranty period for
any goods beyond that period applicable to the goods originally delivered.
THE FOREGOING WARRANTY CONSTITUTES ATMEL’S EXCLUSIVE LIABILITY,
AND THE EXCLUSIVE REMEDY OF BUYER, FOR ANY BREACH OF ANY WARRANTY OR OTHER NONCONFORMITY OF THE GOODS COVERED BY THIS
AGREEMENT. THIS WARRANTY IS EXCLUSIVE, AND IN LIEU OF ALL OTHER
WARRANTIES. ATMEL MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR
STATUTORY, INCLUDING WITHOUT LIMITATION ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. THE SOLE AND
EXCLUSIVE REMEDY FOR ANY BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY SHALL BE AS
EXPRESSLY PROVIDED HEREIN.
Limitation on Liability
Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained herein, Atmel shall not, under any
circumstances, be liable to Buyer or any third parties for consequential, incidental, indirect, exemplary, special, or other damages. Atmel’s total liability shall not exceed the
total amount paid by Buyer to Atmel hereunder. Atmel shall not under any circumstances be liable for excess costs of reprocurement.
STK500 User Guide
10-1
Atmel Headquarters
Atmel Operations
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e-mail
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BBS
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© Atmel Corporation 2000.
Atmel Corporation makes no warranty for the use of its products, other than those expressly contained in the Company’s standard warranty which is detailed in Atmel’s Terms and Conditions located on the Company’s web site. The Company assumes no responsibility for
any errors which may appear in this document, reserves the right to change devices or specifications detailed herein at any time without
notice, and does not make any commitment to update the information contained herein. No licenses to patents or other intellectual property of Atmel are granted by the Company in connection with the sale of Atmel products, expressly or by implication. Atmel’s products are
not authorized for use as critical components in life suppor t devices or systems.
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Marks bearing
®
and/or
™
are registered trademarks and trademarks of Atmel Corporation.
Terms and product names in this document may be trademarks of others.
Printed on recycled paper.
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