REGULAR AGENDA BOARD of DIRECTORS MEETING CONSOLIDATED

REGULAR AGENDA BOARD of DIRECTORS MEETING  CONSOLIDATED
BOARD of DIRECTORS MEETING
Wednesday, October 21, 2015
4:00 p.m.
REGULAR AGENDA
CONSOLIDATED
This document is a consolidation of the above-noted meeting agenda and includes the
addition of the document(s) listed below. Note that documents listed below that have been
brought forward at the meeting and form a part of the agenda will be found at the back of
this agenda package.
AGENDA ADDITIONS
Agenda Item No.
C.1
Subject
−
Restorative Justice Society – North Okanagan
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BOARD of DIRECTORS MEETING
Wednesday, October 21, 2015
4:00 p.m.
REGULAR AGENDA
A.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. Board of Directors – October 21, 2015
(Opportunity for Introduction of Late Items)
(Opportunity for Introduction of Late Items – In Camera Agenda)
RECOMMENDATION 1
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the Agenda of the October 21, 2015 regular meeting of the Board of Directors be
approved as presented.
B.
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
1. Board of Directors – October 7, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 2
Page 1
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the October 7, 2015 meeting of the Board of Directors be adopted
as circulated.
2. Committee of the Whole – October 7, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 3
Page 5
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the October 7, 2015 meeting of the Committee of the Whole be
adopted as circulated.
3. Public Hearing [Bylaw 2689] – October 7, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 4
Page 7
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the October 7, 2015 Public Hearing [Bylaw 2689] of the Board of
Directors be adopted as circulated.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-2-
October 21, 2015
4. Ad Hoc Personnel Committee – October 2, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 5
Page 9
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the October 2, 2015 Ad Hoc Personnel Committee be adopted as
circulated.
5. Ad Hoc Personnel Committee – October 9, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 6
Page 10
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the October 9, 2015 Ad Hoc Personnel Committee be adopted as
circulated.
C.
DELEGATIONS
1. Restorative Justice Society – North Okanagan
- Presentation from Margaret Clark, Executive Director
D.
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
E.
NEW BUSINESS
Page 11
1. Bylaw 2682 - Grindrod Water Local Service Area Establishment Amendment
− Staff report dated July 7, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 7
Page 37
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, Grindrod Water
Local Service Area Establishment Amendment Bylaw No. 2682, 2015 be given First,
Second and Third Readings.
RECOMMENDATION 8
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – 2/3 Majority)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, Grindrod Water
Local Service Area Establishment Amendment Bylaw No. 2682, 2015 be Adopted.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-3-
October 21, 2015
2. Bylaw 2690 – Electoral Area “D” and “E” Official Community Plan Amendment
− Staff report dated September 22, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 9
Page 41
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, Electoral Areas “D”
and “E” Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2690, 2015 be given Second
Reading as amended and be referred to a Public Hearing
3. Bylaw 2694 - Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment
− Staff report dated September 23, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 10
Page 53
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Spallumcheen, Electoral Areas B, C, D, E and F
– Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, Silver Star Official
Community Plan Amendment Bylaw 2694, 2015 be given First Reading and
considered in conjunction with the Regional District
(i)
financial plan and
(ii)
waste management plan
pursuant to Section 882 of the Local Government Act; and further,
That Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2694, 2015 be
referred to various agencies and First Nations in accordance with Section 879 of the
Local Government Act; and further,
That Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2694, 2015 be
referred to Silver Star Resort and the Electoral Area “C” Advisory Planning
Commission for review and comment.
4. Fire Hydrants on Private Property
- Staff report dated September 17, 2015
Page 60
Greater Vernon Water Fire Hydrants on Private Property Policy No. ENG-WTR004
RECOMMENDATION 11
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the Greater
Vernon Water Fire Hydrants on Private Property Policy No. ENG-WTR-004 be
endorsed.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-4-
October 21, 2015
Bylaw 2695 - Greater Vernon Water – Water Use and Regulation Amendment
RECOMMENDATION 12
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, Greater Vernon
Water Use and Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2695, 2015 be given First, Second
and Third Readings.
RECOMMENDATION 13
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C – 2/3 Majority)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, Greater Vernon
Water Use Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2695, 2015 be Adopted.
Bylaw 2696 – Regional District of North Okanagan Cross Connection Control
Regulation Amendment
RECOMMENDATION 14
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee and the Electoral
Area Advisory Committee, Regional District of North Okanagan Cross Connection
Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015 be given First, Second and
Third Readings.
RECOMMENDATION 15
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – 2/3 Majority)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee and the Electoral
Area Advisory Committee, Regional District of North Okanagan Cross Connection
Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015 be Adopted.
5. Bylaw 2697 – Electoral Areas 2016 Property Tax Exemption Bylaw
− Staff report dated October 21, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 16
Page 85
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That Electoral Areas 2016 Property Tax Exemption Bylaw No. 2697, 2015 be given
First, Second and Third Readings.
RECOMMENDATION 17
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – 2/3 Majority)
That Electoral Areas 2016 Property Tax Exemption Bylaw No. 2697, 2015 be Adopted.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-5-
October 21, 2015
6. Community Works Fund Project #085 - Mara Community Hall Water System
Upgrade
− Staff report dated September 23, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 18
Page 89
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, the Mara
Community Hall Water System Upgrade be funded from the Electoral Area “F”
allocation of the Community Works Fund at a cost of up to $25,000.
7. Summary - Development of the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan
and Consideration of Shuswap River Boating Regulations
− Staff report dated September 29, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 19
Page 95
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the report dated September 29, 2015 from the Planning Department regarding
the establishment of the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan and
subsequent consideration of boating regulations for the Shuswap River, be received
for information.
8. Closing of Inactive Building Permit Files (Pre-2000)
− Staff report dated October 6, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 20
Page 102
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That Board Policy LU054, which outlines that all Municipal Building Permit files for
expired permits issued prior to December 31, 1999 which have not received a final
inspection be declared inactive and closed and that no further staff time be expended
on enforcement of closed files.
9. Vernon Public Art Gallery
− Letter from the Vernon Public Art Gallery dated September 8, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 21
Page 107
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the letter from the
Vernon Public Art Gallery, dated September 8, 2015, be forwarded for discussion at
the upcoming cultural facilities workshop of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-6-
October 21, 2015
10. Greater Vernon Water 2012 Master Water Plan Stakeholder Advisory Committee
− Letter dated September 15, 2015
− Letter dated July 21, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 22
Page 110
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the consideration
of the request from the Citizens for Changes to the Master Water Plan to hire an
independent engineering consultant be postponed pending review of the 2012 Master
Water Plan by the Committee.
RECOMMENDATION 23
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, engineering staff
from the District of Coldstream and the City of Vernon be invited to participate in the
2012 Master Water Plan review.
RECOMMENDATION 24
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, a representative
of the Consulting Engineering Technical Group be brought in to present the 2012
Master Water Plan to the Committee.
11. Greater Vernon Community Garden Water Rates
− Staff report dated September 24, 2015
RECOMMENDATION 25
Page 112
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon, Electoral Areas B and
C)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, a grant in the
amount of $1,500 be awarded to the Greater Vernon Community Garden Network to
offset the cost of water at the Okanagan College community garden, with funds to
come from Greater Vernon Parks and Recreation (060); and further,
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the rate
established during the annual water rate discussions for Community Gardens be set
in the range of $0.10 - $0.12 per cubic metre.
12. Air Quality
RECOMMENDATION 26
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Committee of the Whole, the matter of a proposed Air
Quality Function be referred to a future Committee of the Whole for discussion.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-7-
F.
BUSINESS ARISING FROM DELEGATIONS
G.
REPORTS
October 21, 2015
1. Standing and Select Committees
RECOMMENDATION 27
Page 139
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the following meetings be received for information:
− Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – Regular – October 8, 2015 (unadopted)
− Electoral Area Advisory Committee – Regular – October 8, 2015 (unadopted)
− White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee – Regular –
October 13, 2015 (unadopted)
2. External Committee Reports
3. Chief Administrative Officer’s Report
4. Chair’s Report
H.
IN CAMERA
RECOMMENDATION 28
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Board
of Directors convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in
accordance with Section 90(1)(c), (e), (g) and (k) of the Community Charter.
I.
REPORT FROM IN CAMERA
J.
ADJOURNMENT
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item B.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the BOARD of DIRECTORS of the REGIONAL DISTRICT
OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District Office on Wednesday,
October 7, 2015.
Members: Director R. Fairbairn
Director K. Acton
Director S. Fowler
Director D. Dirk
Director G. McCune
Director J. Brown
Director A. Mund
Director J. Cunningham
Director C. Lord
Director B. Quiring
Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Director H. Cameron
Director H. Halvorson
Electoral Area “D”
Village of Lumby
City of Armstrong
District of Coldstream
City of Enderby
Township of Spallumcheen
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “E”
Electoral Area “F”
Chair
Vice Chair
Staff:
D. Sewell
L. Mellott
R. Smailes
D. McTaggart
S. Banmen
P. Juniper
T. Nelson
C. Mazzotta
N. Kohnert
D. Danallanko
C. Howkins
Chief Administrative Officer
General Manager, Electoral Area Administration
General Manager, Planning and Building
General Manager, Engineering
General Manager, Finance
Deputy Corporate Officer
Community Development Coordinator
Information Services Manager
Regional Engineering Services Manager
RDF Operations Manager
Senior Clerk, Corporate Services
Also
Present:
Alternate Director J. Garlick
Alternate Director C. Fraser
Councillor G. Kiss
Media and Public
District of Coldstream
Township of Spallumcheen
District of Coldstream
Sydney Hogg was acknowledged for receiving the 2015 IPE 4-H Bursary.
Elaine Armstrong, Payroll Coordinator was acknowledged for her 20 years service to the Regional
District of North Okanagan.
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 4:12 p.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Page 1 of 149
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
-2-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item B.1
October 7, 2015
Board of Directors – October 7, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Cunningham
That the Agenda of the October 7, 2015 regular meeting of the Board of Directors be approved
as presented.
CARRIED
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Board of Directors – September 16, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Fowler
That the minutes of the September 16, 2015 meeting of the Board of Directors be adopted as
circulated.
CARRIED
Committee of the Whole – September 16, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Cunningham and Brown
That the minutes of the September 16, 2015 meeting of the Committee of the Whole be adopted
as circulated.
CARRIED
NEW BUSINESS
Bylaw 2477 – Electoral Area “F” Official Community Plan Amendment
Bylaw 2478 – Rezoning
VETTER, T, P & S [File No. 10-0497-F-OR]
64 Highway 97B, Electoral Area “F”
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Cameron
That Electoral Area “F” Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2477, 2011 which
proposes to amend the land use designation of the property legally described as Lot 1, Sec 14,
Twp 19, R9, W6M, KDYD, Plan 2168, Except Plans 21604, 23402 and H10220 and located at 64
Highway 97B, Electoral Area “F” from Agricultural to Country Residential be Adopted.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Fleming
That Rezoning Bylaw No. 2478, 2015 which proposes to rezone the property legally described as
Lot 1, Sec 14, Twp 19, R9, W6M, KDYD, Plan 2168, Except Plans 21604, 23402 and H10220
and located at 64 Highway 97B, Electoral Area “F” from the Non-Urban (N.U) zone to the Country
Residential (C.R) zone be Adopted.
CARRIED
Page 2 of 149
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
-3-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item B.1
October 7, 2015
Bylaw 2689 – Rezoning
HOLLENBACH, K & S [15-0231-C-RZ]
7616 McLennan Road, Electoral Area “C”
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fleming
That Rezoning Bylaw No. 2689, 2015 which proposes to rezone a 4.8 ha portion of the property
legally described as Lot 23, Sec 25, Twp 8, ODYD, Plan 1956, Except Plans 8464 and KAP83894
and located at 7616 McLennan Road, Electoral Area “C” from Non-Urban [N.U] Zone to the
Country Residential [C.R] Zone be considered for Third Reading; and further,
That Rezoning Bylaw No. 2689, 2015 be forwarded to the Ministry of Transportation and
Infrastructure for endorsement.
CARRIED
Recycling and Disposal Facility Recycling Drop Centre Service Levels
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Dirk
That the report dated September 25, 2015 from the Recycling and Disposal Facilities Operations
Manager regarding Recycling and Disposal Facility Recycling Drop Centre Service Levels be
received for information.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Dirk
That staff be authorized to purchase a single lidded bin in the amount of $7,500 for deployment
at the Cherryville Transfer Station.
CARRIED
Termination of Investigative Permit No. 341780, Potential Landfill Site East of Cherryville
(Kettle River Site 42A)
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Fleming
That Investigative Permit No. 341780 over Crown Land be terminated and the three groundwater
monitoring wells on Kettle River Site 42A be decommissioned in accordance with the
Groundwater Protection Regulation.
CARRIED
WVPRC-003 – Community Grant Policy Amendment
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Acton
That the White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Community Grant Policy – WVPRC-003, be
amended as outlined in the staff report dated August 25, 2015 titled WVPRC-003 Community
Grant Policy Amendment.
CARRIED
Lumby Curling Club Agreement Renewal
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Cameron
That the Operating and Management Agreement with the Lumby Curling Club Society be renewed
for a five (5) year term, with the amendments as outlined in the report titled, Lumby Curling Club
Agreement Renewal dated September 2, 2015.
CARRIED
Page 3 of 149
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
-4-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item B.1
October 7, 2015
REPORTS
Standing and Select Committees
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Fleming
That the minutes of the following meeting be received for information:
− White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee – Regular – September 14,
2015 (unadopted)
CARRIED
External Committee Reports
Directors provided updates for the following external committees:
– Okanagan Regional Library (ORL)
– Municipal Finance Authority (MFA)
– Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB)
Chief Administrative Officer’s Report
The Chief Administrative Officer provided a verbal update on the status of the Vernon and District
Multi-Use Facility Expansion Service Establishment Bylaw No. 2679, 2015 and Vernon and
District Multi-Use Facility Expansion Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 2680, 2015
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Dirk
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Board of
Directors convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in accordance with
Section 90(1)(c) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
The regular meeting of the Board of Directors adjourned to meet In Camera at 5:13 p.m.
The regular meeting of the Board of Directors reconvened at 6:55 p.m.
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 6:55 p.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 4 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item B.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE of the REGIONAL
DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District Office on
Wednesday, October 7, 2015.
Members: Director R. Fairbairn
Director K. Acton
Director S. Fowler
Director D. Dirk
Director G. McCune
Director A. Mund
Director J. Cunningham
Director C. Lord
Director B. Quiring
Director J. Brown
Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Director H. Cameron
Director H. Halvorson
Electoral Area “D”
Village of Lumby
City of Armstrong
District of Coldstream
City of Enderby
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
Township of Spallumcheen
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “E”
Electoral Area “F”
Chair
Vice Chair
Staff:
D. Sewell
S. Banmen
P. Juniper
C. Howkins
Chief Administrative Officer
General Manager, Finance
Deputy Corporate Officer
Senior Clerk, Corporate Services
Also
Present:
Alternate Director J. Garlick
T. Seibel
G. Kiss
Media and Public
District of Coldstream
Chief Administrative Officer, District of Coldstream
Councillor, District of Coldstream
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 2:31 p.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Committee of the Whole – October 7, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Cameron
That the Agenda of the October 7, 2015 regular meeting of the Committee of the Whole be
approved as presented.
CARRIED
Page 5 of 149
Committee of the Whole Minutes – Regular
-2-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item B.2
October 7, 2015
NEW BUSINESS
Air Quality
Ralph Adams - Air Quality Meteorologist and Tarek Ayache - Air Quality Meteorologist provided
a verbal presentation on the background of air quality in the North Okanagan.
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Lord
That the matter of a proposed Air Quality Function be referred to a future Committee of the Whole
for discussion.
CARRIED
Opposed: Director Acton
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 3:49 p.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 6 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item B.3
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a PUBLIC HEARING (BYLAW 2689) of the BOARD of DIRECTORS of the
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District
Office on Wednesday, October 7, 2015.
Members: Director R. Fairbairn
Director K. Acton
Director S. Fowler
Director D. Dirk
Director G. McCune
Director J. Brown
Director A. Mund
Director J. Cunningham
Director C. Lord
Director B. Quiring
Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Director H. Cameron
Director H. Halvorson
Electoral Area “D”
Village of Lumby
City of Armstrong
District of Coldstream
City of Enderby
Township of Spallumcheen
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “E”
Electoral Area “F”
Chair
Vice Chair
Staff:
D. Sewell
R. Smailes
L. Mellott
D. McTaggart
S. Banmen
P. Juniper
C. Mazzotta
N. Kohnert
D. Danallanko
C. Howkins
Chief Administrative Officer
General Manager, Planning and Building
General Manager, Electoral Area Administration
General Manager, Engineering
General Manager, Finance
Deputy Corporate Officer
Information Services Manager
Regional Engineering Service Manager
RDF Operations Manager
Senior Clerk, Corporate Services
Also
Present:
Alternate Director J. Garlick
Councilor G. Kiss
T. Seibel
Media and Public
District of Coldstream
District of Coldstream
Chief Administrative Officer, District of Coldstream
CALL PUBLIC HEARING TO ORDER
The Chair called the Public Hearing to order at 3:59 p.m. and outlined the procedures to be
followed for the public hearing.
Page 7 of 149
Public Hearing Minutes
-2-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item B.3
October 7, 2015
INTRODUCTION OF BYLAW
Bylaw 2689 – Rezoning
HOLLENBACH, K & S [15-0231-C-RZ]
7616 McLennan Road, Electoral Area “C”
Bylaw 2689 – Rezoning
Purpose: A bylaw to rezone a 4.8 ha portion of the property legally described as Lot 23, Sec 25,
Twp 8, ODYD, Plan 1956, Except Plans 8464 and KAP83894 and located at 7616 McLennan
Road, Electoral Area “C” from Non-Urban [N.U] Zone to the Country Residential [C.R] Zone.
The General Manager, Planning and Building introduced Bylaw 2689 and advised the following:
–
Notice of the Public Hearing for Bylaw 2689 was advertised in the Vernon Morning Star in
accordance with the Local Government Act on the following dates:
1. September 30, 2015
2. October 2, 2015
−
Adjacent land owners were notified in accordance with Regional District of North Okanagan
Procedures Bylaw.
PUBLIC PRESENTATIONS
The Chair asked if there were persons present who wished to speak to the bylaw. No one present
spoke to the bylaw.
CLOSE PUBLIC HEARING
There being no one to speak to Bylaw 2689, the Public Hearing was closed at 4:11 p.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 8 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item B.4
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the AD HOC PERSONNEL COMMITTEE of the
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District
Office on Friday, October 2, 2015.
Members:
Director R. Fairbairn
Director M. Macnabb
Director H. Halvorson
Director D. Dirk
Director K. Acton
Director A. Mund
Electoral Area “D”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “F”
District of Coldstream
Village of Lumby
City of Vernon
Staff:
D. Sewell
Chief Administrative Officer
Chair
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 1:25 p.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Ad Hoc Personnel Committee – October 2, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Mund and Acton
That the Agenda of the October 2, 2015 Ad Hoc Personnel Committee meeting be approved as
presented.
CARRIED
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Directors Mund and Dirk
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Ad Hoc
Personnel Committee convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in
accordance with Section 90(1)(c) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 3:47 p.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Chief Administrative Officer
David Sewell
Page 9 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item B.5
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the AD HOC PERSONNEL COMMITTEE of the
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District
Office on Friday, October 9, 2015.
Members:
Director R. Fairbairn
Director M. Macnabb
Director H. Halvorson
Director D. Dirk
Director K. Acton
Director A. Mund
Electoral Area “D”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “F”
District of Coldstream
Village of Lumby
City of Vernon
Staff:
D. Sewell
Chief Administrative Officer
Chair
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 12:02 p.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Ad Hoc Personnel Committee – October 9, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Mund
That the Agenda of the October 9, 2015 Ad Hoc Personnel Committee meeting be approved as
presented.
CARRIED
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Mund
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Ad Hoc
Personnel Committee convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in
accordance with Section 90(1)(c) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 1:32 p.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Chief Administrative Officer
David Sewell
Page 10 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
YEAR IN REVIEW – 2014
Prepared by:
Board of Directors and
Margaret Clark, Executive Director
Submitted in:
April 2015
Page 11 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Restorative Justice Society – North Okanagan
Year in Review – 2014
Table of Contents
Logo, Vision and Mission Statements
1
Acting/President’s Report
2
Executive Sub-Committee’s Report
3
Community Advisory Committee’s Report
3
Treasurer and Finance Committee’s Report
4
Executive Director’s Report
5
Referral Overview
6
Restorative Justice 2014 Data
7
Working/Days Summary
8
Types of Charges Summary
9
Types of Conditions on Agreements
10
Compliance Outcomes on Agreements
11
Update on Board of Directors and Volunteer RJ Practitioners
11
Presentations and Other Events
12
Thanks to Funding and Other Partners 2014
12
Attachment A – Portions of the Getting Serious About Crime Reduction
13
Attachment B – Anecdotal Comments and Post-Conference Levels of Satisfaction
17
Attachment C – Morning Star article: Restorative justice works for participants
22
Page 12 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Our logo represents the person harmed, the person who caused harm, the
guardians and supporters, the community and the RJ Team coming together in
a circle to reach an agreement on how to repair the harm.
Vision Statement
Our vision is to build safer and healthier communities through restorative
justice principles and practices.
Mission Statement
Our mission is to connect individuals, to strengthen relationships and to build
safe and healthy communities by repairing harm with the persons affected and
the person who caused harm.
1
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 13 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Acting/President’s Report
Like 2013, 2014 has continued to be a year of learning and growth for the Restorative Justice
Society – North Okanagan. Many thanks are due to our Executive Director, Margaret Clark for the
passion and commitment she brings to restorative justice. I also recognize and thank our volunteer
RJ Practitioners and Board Members who continue to make a difference and support the Society
through volunteering close to 1400 hours this past year. It is with their commitment, dedication
and training that we make a difference in the North Okanagan. I would also like to acknowledge
the support from the Vernon/North Okanagan RCMP and the Mayor, Council and staff of the City
of Vernon.
I thank the current members of the Board of Directors for their dedication and commitment. I
especially thank Warren Smith, Daniel Joe and Stuart Fraser for their service to our Board. We
wish you well in your future endeavours. We will miss you.
The best news will be delivered in the report of our Executive Director, who will tell you of the
successes of our Conferences and Resolved Agreements plus the number of persons who were
helped through the process of restorative justice.
Another highlight of our year was the Board’s exploration of Board governance and participation
in a SWOT (strength, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) Analysis which centred primarily on
an internal analysis of our strengths and weaknesses. This was accomplished through two
workshops attended by Board Members in August and December. The Board is committed to
following up on the SWOT Analysis and working toward developing a strategic plan to guide us in
making plans and allocating resources.
I am thrilled with the increase in our membership and the interest expressed by some of our new
members to become Board members. We all benefit from the influx of new ideas, enthusiasm and
sharing. Thank you to all of our new members and special thanks to those new members who are
letting their names stand for election to the Board at our Annual General Meeting in April 2015.
My largest concern as Acting President is the fact that we were forced to cancel our major
fundraiser, a Gala at the Vernon Lodge, due to very low ticket sales. We have rescheduled this
event for the fall of next year and will need your input and support to make it a success. The
monies contributed from the City of Vernon and several of the municipalities and towns within the
Regional District are not sufficient to fund our core operating costs. To help augment core
operating cost proposals have been submitted to the Aboriginal Justice Strategy: Capacity Building
Fund, BC Gaming Grants: Public Human and Social Services plus we are looking into other
funding opportunities, i.e., Civil Forfeiture. The challenge with some funding opportunities is that
they are usually “project funding” and not specifically operational funding.
I want to thank you for your on-going support and we look forward to opportunities to further raise
our profile in the North Okanagan and make members of our community aware of the important
service that restorative justice provides to individuals, families and community members.
Respectfully submitted,
Carole Lyons, Acting President
2
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 14 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Executive Sub-Committee’s Report
The Executive Committee is identified in our Constitution & Bylaws under Part 6, Proceedings of
Directors, Section 34 (1) (a) (i). This committee was incorporated into our Constitution with the
purpose of address issues and concerns in a smaller group, chaired by the President and consisting
of the chair of the Community Advisory Committee, Executive Director and at least one (1) other
Director. The purpose of this Committee is to address issues and concerns and prepare to bring
forward solutions and recommendations to the Board of Directors.
Respectfully submitted,
Carole Lyons, Acting Chair Executive Sub-Committee
Community Advisory Committee’s Report
The Community Advisory Committee is identified in our Constitution & Bylaws under Part 6,
Proceedings of Directors, Section 34 (1) (a) (iii). This committee was incorporated into our
Constitution with the purpose of being open and responsive to other stakeholders who reflect a
legal and/or judicial background within the North Okanagan. I was involved with the Steering
Committee, Advisory Committee and Sub Committee for several years preceding the incorporation
of the Restorative Justice Society – North Okanagan (RJS-NO). As a Board Member I have
continued to be involved with the Community Advisory Committee as its Chair.
At the Advisory Committee’s meeting in December we discussed planning future activities and
direction for the RJS-NO program and its services, how best to educate the community about
restorative justice principles and practices, community perceptions of the RJS-NO program and its
services and we looked at possible funding/fundraising opportunities.
Our goal is to work hard to see that information is shared from the community to the Board and
back to the community. I look forward to our next meeting.
Respectfully submitted,
Carole Lyons, Chair, Community Advisory Committee
3
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 15 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Treasurer and Finance Committee’s Report
We are a Society; Incorporated November 2011 and there has been many challenges and great
accomplishments in our third year of operation. During 2014, these are the activities and outcomes
of the Treasurer and Finance Committee:
1. Our main funder for 2014 was the City of Vernon (COV) providing us with $44.858.00.
2. We applied for and received an annual grant through the Ministry of Justice’s Community
Accountability Programs for $7,500.00
3. We received funds in 2014 after approaching the Rural Municipal Mayors and Councils
through their Grant Program to help with our operation costs and those that were able to
support us are as follows: Electoral Area D $489.36, Electoral Area B $500.00, Electoral Area
C $1500.00, Armstrong $1468.08 and Lumby $500.00
4. We also approached the Regional District of the North Okanagan (RDNO) to become a
function under the RDNO. We were unsuccessful in the venture.
5. A successful Membership drive was done. The Membership fee is $5.00 for a calendar year.
6. We achieved Charitable Status in 2012 with the Canadian Government and in 2014 we issued 7
tax deductible receipts for donations to our Society.
7. We started planning a fund raising Gala event in October 2014 and it was postponed it to a
future date and we experienced a net loss of $70.00.
8. This year a lease arrangement with the City of Vernon for office space and supports was
reached for 2014 and 2015.
9. Our income for the year 2014 was $58,993.03 with expenses of $67,275.49 and with retained
earnings of $14,065.35 we were able to operate.
10. We have submitted proposals to the Aboriginal Justice Strategy: Capacity Building Fund and
applied for a Community Gaming Grant plus we continue to look for other funding
opportunities to support restorative justice services within the North Okanagan.
Financials are available to the membership upon request.
Respectively submitted
Flemming Bech-Hansen, Treasurer
4
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 16 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Executive Director’s Report
The Restorative Justice Society – North Okanagan (Society) continues to provide services to
persons harmed (victims) and persons who caused harm (offenders) along with their guardians and
supporters within the North Okanagan. The primary restorative justice (RJ) referral source
continues to be the Vernon/North Okanagan RCMP, although in 2014 referrals were also received
from Insurance Corporation of British Columbia (ICBC).
The focus for the Society continues to be funding and there have been a variety of approaches to
address this issue. Currently and since 2006, the sustainability of the Society is made possible by
the on-going support of the City of Vernon (COV) accompanied by the Ministry of Justice
Community Accountability Program annual grant, as well as grants from some rural communities
and electoral areas.
This year marks three major events to increase the profile of the Society with the 1st being a
request to meet with the Minister of Justice, Honourable Suzanne Anton, the 2nd being the
anticipation of the Report from the Blue Ribbon Panel on Crime Reduction and the 3rd being Board
develop and planning.
The meeting with the Minister Anton accompanied by Deputy Minister Fyfe went very well and
the concerns of the Society were well received. We were informed during the meeting that
Minister Anton has never met with an RJ group before, so the opportunity was taken to express
three primary themes: protocols/program standards for RJ services; core versus project funding
and a BC plan for RJ services.
In attending the Blue Ribbon Panel on Crime Reduction a presentation was done about RJ and a
promise was made that there would in fact be a recommendation to the Minister of Justice on RJ
services. The Getting Serious About Crime Reduction: Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Crime
Reduction Report came out in December 2014 and Recommendation #3 speaks clearly about RJ
services. There seems to be a consistent messages and concerns about RJ programs/services in the
recent reports. And, an understanding that, “Municipal governments often contribute to funding
these programs and are apparently willing to continue to do so.” Please note that included in
Attachment A is Recommendation #3 and portions of the Report’s Appendix F as it relates to RJ.
There were some unique training opportunities for the Society and the Volunteer RJ Practitioners
that could be taken on-line. The Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) is open to anyone to take online and Indigenous Cultural Competency (ICC) was opened up to RJ services and serviceproviders. The YCJA training is provided by Justice Education Society of BC and ICC was
provided in concert with the Minister of Justice by the Provincial Health Services Authority in BC.
Respectfully submitted,
Margaret Clark, Executive Director
5
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 17 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Referral Overview
An overview of the referral for 2014
 Twenty-two (22) referrals were received in 2014 involving:
 Seventy-four (74) persons harmed (PH)
 Four-five (45) guardians/supporters (G/S)
 Fifteen (15) young persons who cause harm
 Fourteen (14) adult persons who caused harm_____
 One hundred and forty-eight (148) persons served in total
Outcomes of the twenty-two (22) referrals
 Fifteen (15) Conference:
 Eleven (11) Community Justice Forum Conferences (CJF)
 Four (4) Community Accountably Panel Conferences (CAP)
 Seven (7) Resolved
 Zero (0) Declined
 Zero (0) Pending at the submission of this report
Impacts on the Vernon/North Okanagan Detachment (V/NOD) Area
Location of Incident/Crime as per the Referral Information
 Seventy-three (73%) percent in Vernon
 Fourteen (14%) percent in Lumby
 Five (5%) percent in Armstrong
 Nine (9%) percent inside of V/NOD
*See Attachment B for Anecdotal Comments and Post-Conference Levels of Satisfaction
6
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 18 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Restorative Justice 2014 Data
14-001
Yes
14-002
Yes
Yes
14-003
Yes
Mischief
Uttering
Threats
False and
Misleading
Mischief
PWCH
Home
Incident
Location
Decline
or
Resolve
Date
Type of
Conference
Community Impact
Conference Date
Total Adult
Total G/S
Total PH
OTHER
SD
Type of
Charges
RCMP
RJ File
Number
Total Youth
Person Harmed,
Guardian/Supporte
rs and Person Who
Caused Harm
Referral
Source
CJF
Lumby
Lumby
9-Apr-14
Yes
1
Vernon
OKIB
9-Jun-14
Yes
2
1
Vernon
Silver Star
10-Jun-14
Yes
3
1
1
Kamloops
Vernon
3-Jun-14
Resolved
26-Jun-14
Resolved
4
1
10
1
2
1
CAP
14-004
Yes
14-005
Yes
Possession of
Stolen
Property (PSP)
1
2
1
Falkland
Vernon
14-006
Yes
Theft Under
4
3
1
Vernon
Vernon
14-Jul-14
Yes
14-007
Yes
Possession
of Cocaine
1
1
Enderby
Vernon
10-Jul-14
Yes
14-008
Yes
Mischief
3
2
Coldstream
Vernon
Vernon
24-Jul-14
14-009
Yes
Obstruction
2
1
1
Vernon
Vernon
14-010
Yes
Mischief
4
1
1
Vernon
Vernon
28-Jul-14
Yes
14-011
Yes
Theft Under
3
1
1
Vernon
Vernon
22-Aug-14
Yes
14-012
Yes
Mischief
2
1
1
Coldstream
Lumby
24-Sep-14
Yes
14-013
Yes
Theft of Motor
Vehicle & PSP
5
4
Lumby-2
Lumby
2-Oct-14
Yes
14-014
Yes
Domestic
Assault
3
2
1
Vernon
Vernon
28-Aug-14
Resolved
Fraud Over
2
1
1
Vernon
Vernon
15-Oct-14
Resolved
Mischief
5
1
1
Vernon
Vernon
24-Oct-14
1
Vernon
Vernon
25-Nov-14
Yes
Yes
14-015
Yes
1
2
2
15-Aug-14
Yes
Resolved
14-016
Yes
14-017
Yes
Theft Under
3
1
14-018
Yes
Yes
Trafficking in
a Schedule
Substance
4
9
6
Vernon-3
Coldstream-3
Vernon
25-Nov-14
14-019
Yes
Yes
Possession of
Weapon for
Dangerous
Purpose
6
6
1
Armstrong
Armstrong
12-Dec-14
14-020
Yes
Assaulting a
Peace Officer
2
2
1
Lumby
Vernon
14-021
Yes
Assault
3
1
1
Vernon
Vernon
False and
Misleading
2
1
1
Vernon
Vernon
74
45
14-022
Yes
19
Totals
7
3
3
15
14
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 19 of 149
15-Jan-15
Yes
Resolved
2-Feb-15
31-Dec-14
Yes
Yes
Resolved
TOTALS
11
4
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Working/Days Summary
This summary box indicates the timeliness of the handling referrals. The Working Days are
counted from the day after the referral is received to the day of the Conference or when the referral
was Resolved. (Working Days are counted Monday-Friday.)
On the average, from the day after the referral is received to the day each referral went to
Conference the timeline was approximately twenty-nine (29.1) Working Days. This category
represents both Community Justice Forums (CJF) and Community Accountability Panels (CAP).
Please note that a CJF Conference involves both the PH and PWCH with their guardian/supporters
whereas, a CAP Conference involve Panel Members who sit in to represent the PH when they are
unwilling, unable or unsuitable. A CAP Conference only goes ahead with the support of and
outcomes the PH wishes to have reached in the Conference.
This number is lower than last year’s average, although the complexities of the referrals stayed
about the same with a significant increase in the “Other Charges” as identified in the next page in
the Types of Charges Summary.
Total
Referrals
22
RJ Working/Days Summary
Outcome
Conference
Resolve
Pending
Number
15
7
0
W/Days
437
134
0
Averages
29.1
24.9
0.0
The category of Resolve took twenty-five (24.9) Working Days to reach. Referrals are Resolved
when taking the PH and/or PWCH to Conference would cause more harm, 2) when Conferences
have been set-up and postponed for reasons due to illnesses in the family, other health conditions
and/or concerns, e.g., FASD and mental health diagnoses, or 3) at the request of the PH for a
variety of reasons. Resolving a referral means that activities for the agreement are proposed by the
PH and their guardian/supporter, then supported by the referral source and agreed upon by the
PWCH and their guardian/supporter.
8
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 20 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Types of Charges Summary
This summary box identifies the types of charges that have been referred to the program in 2014.
A review of the Types of Charges from previous years identified the primary categories as Assault,
Mischief, and Theft Under following a review of referrals. 2014 is the first year that the Society
has been able to receive referrals other than those previously identifies as minor offences, i.e.,
assault, mischief under $5000 and theft under $5000.
The incidents of Other Charges is the highest at fifty-three (55%) percent of the referrals
generated in 2014. Mischief Under is second at twenty-six (26%) percent, Theft Under at
fourteen (14%) percent and Assault at five (5%) percent. The incident of Misconduct (schoolbased referrals) remains 0%, although some of the RCMP-based referrals were in fact schoolbased incidents and warranted RCMP involvement and an RCMP file to be generated. At, the time
of this reporting all referrals have been processed, although at the end of December 2014 there
were three (3) referrals Pending.
The increase in the kinds of referrals is also reflected in an increase in the amount of time
dedicated to the handling of referrals. In previous years the amount of documented time was an
average of about thirty (30) hours per referral and in 2014 jumped to close to forty (44) hours
from the time the referral is received to the time it is concluded and returned to the referral source.
Types of Charges and Number of PWCH Involved
Charges
Conference
Assault
1
Mischief
5
Resolve
Pending
5%
1
26%
Misconduct
0%
Theft Under
3
Other Charges
6
14%
6
55%
Totals
15
7
0
Averages
68%
32%
0%
Breakdown of Other Charges
Charges
Conference
Uttering Threats
1
False and Misleading
Possession of Stolen
Property
Possession of Cocaine
1
Obstruction
Theft of Motor Vehicle
& Possession of Stolen
Property
Domestic Assault
Fraud Over
Trafficking in a
Scheduled Substance
Possession of Weapon
for Dangerous Purpose
Assault a Peace Officer
9
Averages
Resolve
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 21 of 149
Pending
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Types of Conditions on Agreements
Key concepts to the restorative justice process are the types of activities on the Disposition or
Resolved Memorandums to repair the harm caused, create re-integration and reparation. Symbolic
reparation is through an apology or handshake and material reparation through repairs to
damages, community hours and/or other compensation. The referral source (RCMP or School) or
the Society support the kinds of activities that are generated in the Conference by the person
harmed, persons who caused harm and their guardians/supporters to determine what reparation will
be required to repair the harm caused. In the Agreement Phase of the Conference the activities on
the Disposition Agreement are reached by consensus. See Attachment B for the Anecdotal
Comments from Conference participants and the Level of Satisfaction.
Here are is a list of the activities that have been generated and fulfilled:
 Write letters of apology
 Attend counseling and support sessions to address specific issue(s)
 Pay for property damages in the amount totaling $1,964
 Complete 345 hours of community service
 Research and write an essay and/or multi-media presentation. See Attachment C, an
interview by Roger Knox, The Morning Star published on the 11th of March 2015.
 Plan, cook and clean up a family dinner and activity night
 Deliver a verbal apology to person harmed and/or RCMP Officer
 Write a letter of reflection
 Repair property damages
 Develop a budget plan
 Register with an employment program
 Make a $75 dollar donation
 Collect food for the Food Bank
 Participate fully in a Restorative Justice Conference
Reparation
Symbolic reparation
Apology
Forgiveness
versus
Material reparation
Compensation
27
Picture is from the Community Justice Forum Facilitator Training Manual
10
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 22 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Compliance Outcomes on Agreements
A Disposition Agreement is reached following a Conference or a Resolved Agreement and the
PWCH is supported to fulfill the Agreement. The box below indicates the level of compliance
with the activities.
Please note that the fourteen (14%) percent in Partial and Non-Compliance includes all
Agreements that are active, open and the timeframe for concluding has not been reached. The
14% of Agreements are to be concluded between May – December 2015, so more referrals could
reach Full Compliance between now and the end of 2015.
Compliance Outcomes
Number of Agreements
Full Compliance
Partial Compliance
Non-Compliance
29
86%
7%
7%
Update on Board of Directors and Volunteer RJ Practitioners
The Board currently has eight (8) members that represent the North Okanagan with Carole Lyons,
Volunteer RJ Practitioners; Gary Bonneau, Okanagan Indian Band; Flemming Bech-Hansen,
Bech-Hansen Bookkeeping & Consulting; Daniel Joe, Splatsin; David Mardiros, David Mardiros
Law Office; Rob Culos, Culos & Company Law Corporation with community members Sandra
Lynxleg and Stuart Fraser.
With a very special thanks going to Warren Smith of the Vernon/North Okanagan Safe
Communities Unit who will forever be the founding President of the RJS-NO.
The Society currently has ten (10) Volunteer RJ Practitioners that make up RJ Teams to be
involved in handling and supporting the referral process. An RJ Team is comprised of a Lead
Facilitator, 2nd Facilitator and Mentor/Observer. The Facilitators do the bulk of the preparation
work to bring each referral to Conference. Following the Conference the PWCH is supported to
fulfill the activities on the Agreement.
In 2015, close to fourteen hundred (1400) hours in referral handling and support, office support,
training, research, and the governance of the Society were served. This Society is enhanced by the
talent and diversity of the Board of Directors and Volunteer RJ Practitioners and they are truly the
backbone of RJ service delivery.
11
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 23 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Presentations and Other Events
Presentations were made on the program services and the development of the Society:
-
Bearisto Elementary School: 23rd of January 2014
24th of January 2014
27th of January 2014
RCMP Stakeholders Meeting – 5th of March 2014
Ministerial/Fellowship – 3rd of April 2014
National Victims of Crime Awareness Forum – 10th of April 2014
Law Day Display – 12th of April 2014
Law Class at A.L. Fortune – 16th of April 2014
City of Vernon: 28th of April 2014 – Year in Review – 2013 Report
27th of October 2014 – Semi-annual Report
Teen Street with R. Zubick – 13th of May 2014
Law Class at WL Seaton School with R. Zubick – 14th of May 2014
YAA Fest – 15th of May 2014
Creativity and Caution: Exploring Frameworks for Working With Victims within
Restorative Justice – 27th and 28th of May 2014
Minister of Justice Meeting – 17th of September 2014
Okanagan Valley RJ Network – 13th of November 2014
National Addiction Awareness Week Presentation – 19th of November 2014
On-line courses throughout the year on the Youth Criminal Justice Act and Indigenous
Cultural Competency
Thanks to our Funding and Other Partners in 2014
The Restorative Justice Society – North Okanagan is successful in providing RJ services
through the support of our funding and other partners. We would be remiss if we did not
thank the City of Vernon and its Mayor and Council first for their on-going financial and inkind support for our endeavors to provide RJ services on behalf of the communities and
citizens within Vernon and the North Okanagan. Special thanks go to Patti Bridal.
The Vernon/North Okanagan RCMP Detachment provides so much support, knowledge and of
course referrals from all areas with their Detachment area. Many thanks go to Superintendent
Reg Burgess, Inspector Jim McNamara, CST Kathy Szoboticsanec, the referring Officers and
the support staff within the Detachments.
We are grateful to the Mayors, Chiefs and Councils within the North Okanagan who support
our endeavors to carry on the RJ services on behalf of the communities and citizens of the
North Okanagan. The Ministry of Justice: Community Accountability Programs for on-going
financial and program direction support with a special thanks to Catherine Bargen and Clare
Whelan-Sadike.
RCMP “E” Division who through their RJ Program has continued to provide support, an ear to
the ground, sound direction, and training opportunities within BC. Sincere thanks to CPL
Darren Munroe and Jordan Diplock.
12
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 24 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Attachment A
Portions of the “Getting Serious About Crime Reduction: Report of the Blue
Ribbon Panel on Crime Reduction Report”
13
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 25 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
RECOMMENDATION #3: Make greater use of restorative justice.
In his report to the Minister of Justice, Geoffrey Cowper recommended that the government
develop a province-wide plan for diversion, including restorative justice, along with education,
quality assurance and control, performance measures, reporting and evaluation. The Panel
reiterates that recommendation and urges the Province to consider making greater use of
restorative justice (RJ) in particular. (Page 12)
9
For some offenders, a formal criminal sanction is neither necessary nor useful to facilitate their
social integration and prevent reoffending. Other, more effective and less stigmatizing
interventions are possible in the community, including diversion programs that redirect offenders
from the criminal justice process to more appropriate interventions.
10
In B.C., restorative justice is most commonly used for less serious offences such as mischief,
assault and theft. However, it can be used in any case where harm has occurred, the offender is
willing to make amends, and the victim would like an opportunity to be heard, to have questions
answered, or to seek restitution.
There are currently about 50 RJ programs across B.C., taking on low-risk cases referred to them
by local police departments, schools, First Nations and Crown counsel. The Union of BC
Municipalities (UBCM) and many other stakeholders would like to see this approach used more
widely. The Panel concurs and, after reviewing a number of different models, believes that RJ is
a cost-effective and promising approach.
Evidence is limited, but recent reviews indicate that, “a focus on reoffending outcomes alone
fails to capture the extent of other benefits, such as victim satisfaction, offender responsibility for
actions and increased compliance with a range of orders, among others”. A review of restorative
justice conferencing using face to face meetings of offenders and victims showed that, on
average, this approach can cause a modest but highly cost-effective reduction in repeat
offending, with substantial benefits for victims. In other words, like expanded access to mental
health and addiction treatment programs, any further investment in RJ is likely to produce
savings in the long-term.
11
12
The Panel recommends that the government develop, in collaboration with the UBCM, provincewide standards to govern the implementation and management of diversion and restorative
justice programs.
For a more comprehensive discussion of diversion programs in general and restorative justice in
particular, see Appendix F. (Page 13)
9
Cowper, D.G.(2012), A Criminal Justice System for the 21st Century, Final Report to the Minister of Justice and Attorney
General Honourable Shirley Bond, Victoria, August 27, 2012, p. 12.
10 The United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for Non-Custodial Measures state that the development of new non-custodial
measures should be encouraged and closely monitored (Rule 2.4).It is also stated that consideration should be given to
dealing with offenders in the community, avoiding as far as possible the use of formal proceedings or trial by a court, in
accordance with legal safeguards and the rule of law (Rule 2.5).The development of a wide range of community-based
measures is also advocated. The Bangkok Rules advocate the same for women offenders.
11 Joudo Larsen, J.(2014).Restorative Justice in the Australian Criminal Justice System. Canberra: Australian institute of
Criminology
12 Strang, H., Sherman, L.W., Mayo-Wilson, E., Woods, D., and B. Ariel (2013).Restorative Justice Conferencing (RJC)
Using Face-to-Face Meetings of Offenders and Victims: Effects on Offender Recidivism and Victim Satisfaction. A
Systematic Review. Campbell Systematic Reviews 2013:12
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Page 26 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
A concern was frequently expressed about the lack of effective diversion programs. Support
was generally expressed for meaningful programs and services to which offenders can be
diverted when appropriate. A number of presenters called for a greater use of the restorative
justice (RJ) approach. The Panel was told that the lack of referrals to existing diversion and RJ
programs has hindered their further development. However, some programs have found ways to
successfully address that issue.
The importance of effective RJ programs was reiterated at nearly every roundtable meeting.
The Ministry of Justice currently supports community-based restorative justice responses
through funding for Community Accountability Programs. The need to provide adequate
funding for these programs was frequently raised and it was suggested that a different funding
formula should be adopted. Municipal governments often contribute to funding these programs
and are apparently willing to continue to do so. (Please note underline added.) It is clear that
some impressive and valuable RJ programs are already in place in a number of communities.
However, it was also clear to many stakeholders that the quality of existing programs across the
province varies and that provincial standards should be adopted and their implementation
monitored…
…The problem of funding for community-based crime reduction programs was raised
countless times during the consultations. This included the need for adequate funding for nonprofit organizations and community partners whose work with offenders is often crucial to the
success of crime reduction initiatives. Some stakeholders complained bitterly about the absence
of funding for and adequate follow-up to, successful pilot crime reduction projects. It was
suggested that a fundamental change is required to the manner and basis upon which crime
reduction initiatives are currently funded in the province. (Page 30)
Appendix F
Meaningful and Effective Diversion and Restorative Justice Programs
The purpose of diversion is to address the factors associated with the risk of reoffending by
providing immediate and effective interventions without submitting the offender to the whole
criminal justice process. For some offenders, a formal criminal sanction is neither necessary nor
useful to facilitate their social integration and prevent reoffending. Other more effective and less
stigmatizing interventions are possible in the community, including diversion programs that
redirect offenders from the criminal justice process to other, more appropriate, interventions.85
Diversion programs are based on the discretionary authority of criminal justice officials, such as
the police and prosecutors, to refer offenders to suitable programs as an alternative to the
criminal justice process. In appropriate circumstances, and in particular for young offenders or
people suffering from mental illness or substance abuse disorders, diversion programs can ensure
that offenders receive the most suitable and effective interventions while avoiding unnecessary
exposure to a prison environment.
15
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Page 27 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
However, it should be obvious that diversion is an effective option only to the extent that
credible and effective community-based interventions to which offenders can be diverted are
present in a given community. It should be equally obvious that officials are unlikely to support
diversion unless they can rely on credible offender assessments, up-to-date information on
available programs, clear criteria on which to base their decisions and regular feedback on the
success of the interventions offered.
In his report to the Minister of Justice, Geoffrey Cowper recommended a province-wide plan for
diversion, including restorative justice, be developed to include education, quality assurance and
control, performance measures, reporting and evaluation.86 The Panel reiterates that
recommendation. (Page 59)
85
86
The United Nations Standard Minimum Rules for Non-Custodial Measures state that the
development of new noncustodial measures should be encouraged and closely monitored
(Rule 2.4). It is also stated that consideration should be given to dealing with offenders in
the community, avoiding as far as possible the use of formal proceedings or trial by a court,
in accordance with legal safeguards and the rule of law (Rule 2.5). The development of a
wide range of community-based measures is also advocated. The Bangkok Rules advocate
the same for women offenders.
Cowper, D. G. (2012), A Criminal Justice System for the 21st Century, Final Report to the Minister of Justice and Attorney
General Honourable Shirley Bond, Victoria, August 27, 2012, p. 12.
…As a matter of priority, clear provincial guidelines should be established and enforced to
encourage diversion to accredited treatment and recovery programs and other meaningful
interventions. (Page 60)
16
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Page 28 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Attachment B
Anecdotal Comments and Post-Conference Levels of Satisfaction
17
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 29 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Anecdotal Comments from Post-Conference
Evaluations with Level of Satisfaction
Comments from January – March:
RJ File # 2013-016
Level of Satisfaction: 94.7%
 Great Program. People need to own their choices & actions
 A good program for young adults 1st time offenders in most situations
 This was a very rewarding experience as an educator. Thank-you.
 A very good system from my experience.
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------RJ File 2013-017
Level of Satisfaction: 96.0%



Was very helpful
Thank you for supporting everyone in the circle is was obvious an impact was made.
Very effective process and very honoured to be a part of this in supporting

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comments from April – June:
RJ File #2014 -001
Level of Satisfaction 100%


Thank you for your time

I believe that Restorative Justice is a better way of making things right and the person’s
guilty becomes more accountable, it hits home harder, than a court house.
All great!
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


I believe in some cases such as this RJ is the way to go as it holds the participant accountably & in
most cases the consequences are directly related to actions.
RJ File #2014 -002
 More time committed than I expect



Level of Satisfaction 90.4%
The group was more empathic towards clients needs. More impact of eye-to-eye contact,
this helps in moving forward. Not living in the past.
I believe it helps repair communities and those affected.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014 -003





Level of Satisfaction 98.0%
Thanks for all your efforts
EXCELLENT…Forum…Meeting/Conference…Well prepared & quite relaxing environment.
ICBC-Kelowna – very successful outcomes anticipated!
This is a great program and it’s helped me realize how many things you can do to right
your wrongs and help the people you’ve hurt with bad decisions (mistakes).
I have found the process to be non-threatening or judgmental. I am grateful to have been
given the opportunity to be involved in the R.J.S.N.O.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
18
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Page 30 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
RJ File #2014 -004 – Resolved
RJ File #2014 -005 – Resolved
Comments from July – September:
RJ File #2014 -006
Level of Satisfaction 97.7%
 Thank you
 I thank everyone for their time and am sorry for the things caused by my actions



Thanks for helping my family in our situation
RJ was the most appropriate form of action on this file as victims could benefit. It also provides an
opportunity for the offender to fully understand the impact of his action. Win-win-win situation.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014 -007



Level of Satisfaction 98.0%
I appreciate that a process such as this is available. Thank you!
Thank you for the opportunity to address this through this format. I would also like to thank the
volunteers for their time and effort.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014-008
Level of Satisfaction 94.7%
 Help & spread the word to the community that Restorative Justice exists & helps people.





Thanks for doing this 
I appreciate the program
Depending on the crime
Well thought out process – definitely more effective to have them face the person harmed
than to face a judge.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014-009 – Resolved
RJ File #2014-010
Level of Satisfaction 100%
 I appreciated facilitator’s calm nature.
 I liked the chance to be able to talk things through in a peaceful, safe manner.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014-011




Level of Satisfaction 100%
This is a very good alternative for the court system.
This was my first adult session. I found it as effective as for young offenders. Compared to other
restorative situations in other towns, Margaret has a solid control over her program.
I am grateful for this opportunity and promise to resolve all relevant issues.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014-012
 This is an awesome program

Level of Satisfaction 100%
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
19
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Page 31 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
RJ File #2014-014 – Resolved
Comments from October – December:
RJ File #2014-013






Level of Satisfaction 95.6%
Thank you!
All depends on the situation & severity of the issue
Great program! Thanks for taking the time to help these guys find a way to move on from
this and not having to pay for their mistake for years in the future.
I believe the Restorative Justice System is a very fair way to deal with some offenders and I
feel it makes young people more aware of how their behavior has impacted others.
Great conference, well attended by all appropriate parties
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014-015 – Resolved
RJ File #2014-016
 It is good to give the person a second chance


Pleasantly surprised of the outcome
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014-017
 This was a good session good results.


Level of Satisfaction 85.6%
Level of Satisfaction 96.0%
I’m never at a loss to see how this particular system always works!!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014-018
Level of Satisfaction 98.2%
 I am really impressed and I think it really helped have those hard conversations and get everything
on the table.










Nothing beats face-to-face open communication. We benefited from this step in the
process.
Painful experience but well worth it.
I believe R.J. is a better alternative to criminal justice; these open meetings will impact and
help heal; whereas criminal only seeks punishment.
Thank you for this opportunity.
This was a positive forum to effectively define the impact of actions on others when
mistakes are made.
Great session – very powerful as a result of everyone’s participation.
This was a wonderful chance for students and parents to heal.
Great job!
Margaret expedited the process to facilitate the school suspensions. All parties involved
were very appreciative of this process. As always, Margaret used her knowledge &
experience exceeded expectations.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
20
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 32 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
RJ File #2014-019
Level of Satisfaction 80.0%
 I fell that the outcome of the matter was handled properly and everyone has realized that what has
realized that what was from something small.



I am grateful that this was an option as an alternative to criminal court, and the process was
sped up and this issue resolved so quickly.
Good job Margaret
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014-020 – Resolved
RJ File #2014-021
 Happy to be involved. Good idea. Glad it’s over.


Level of Satisfaction 100.0%
Well done by all involved!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
RJ File #2014-022 – Resolved
21
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 33 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Attachment C
An interview by Roger Knox, The Morning Star
22
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 34 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Restorative justice works for participant


by Roger Knox - Vernon Morning Star
posted Mar 11, 2015 at 1:00 AM— updated Mar 11, 2015 at 6:03 AM
Charlie (not his real name) knew right away he would not get away with the false and
misleading statement he gave to ICBC following a car incident in Vernon last April.
Charlie was simply trying to stay out of trouble.
“I was trying to brush things under the carpet without anyone knowing,” said Charlie. “I
was hoping to get by without bringing my parents into the whole ordeal and hurting their
feelings.
“I didn’t think I got away with it.”
And he didn’t.
During an interview with an ICBC investigator about the car incident a couple of weeks
after the fact, Charlie confessed that the entire original statement he gave was false.
Rather than have Charlie arrested and go through the court system, ICBC referred him to
a local organization he’d never heard of: the Restorative Justice Society – North
Okanagan (RJSNO).
The RJSNO supports and advocates on behalf of the persons affected and/or in conflict
with the law.
Restorative justice is for the person harmed (victim) by crime first and foremost with a
focus on the person who caused the harm (offender).
Participation is voluntary. The person who caused the harm must admit the harm and
agree to the referral.
Charlie agreed.
“Going through the program is a better way than putting them through the court process
and getting down on life,” said Charlie, who admitted his actions had left him depressed.
“They helped me lift myself back up, feel better about myself and get on with my life
rather than go through the police and court ordeal.”
Charlie met with Margaret Clark, the executive director of RJSNO and some of her
volunteer team. They discussed what happened to Charlie, how people were affected and
what could be done to repair the harm he caused.
23
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 35 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item C.1
Charlie’s restitution included cooking a barbecue steak dinner with all the fixings for his
family, and a two-and-a-half hour face-to-face conference in a circle with the persons
affected by his harm to hear how his actions upset others.
“After the conference, I felt better but I still needed to go and fix things,” said Charlie. “It
felt good that my parents were still there for me and willing to help me, and that Margaret
was here.
“It felt good to know that people were willing to help me get through this process rather
than do it all myself.”
Clark said restorative justice gives persons who cause harm a chance to deal with a
public issue in a private way.
“He was willing to do this,” said Clark of Charlie’s voluntary participation in the restorative
justice program.
The conference, said Charlie, wasn’t as hard as originally telling his parents the truth.
“They weren’t angry but they were pretty disappointed and pretty emotional. That hurt
me,” said Charlie.
The RJSNO continues to receive referrals from throughout the North Okanagan.
“Everyone has a voice, role and say in reaching the agreement that lists activities to
repair the harm,” said Clark. “We provide ongoing support for the person harmed and
provide mentoring for the person who caused the harm for the duration of the agreement
to encourage the fulfillment of the activities.”
Information on RJSNO can be found on their website, www.restorativejusticesociety.ca.
24
Year in Review - 2014 Report
Page 36 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3900.2682
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Engineering
DATE:
July 7, 2015
SUBJECT:
Grindrod Water Local Service Area Establishment Amendment Bylaw No.
2682, 2015
RECOMMENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Grindrod Water Local Service Area
Establishment Amendment Bylaw No. 2682, 2015 be given First, Second and Third Readings;
and further,
That Grindrod Water Local Service Area Establishment Amendment Bylaw No. 2682, 2015 be
Adopted.
DISCUSSION:
The Regional District of North Okanagan is the registered owner of that property located at 6920
Highway 97A [Grindrod Recreation Park], Electoral Area "F" and legally described as Lot 16,
District Lot 526, Osoyoos Division Yale District, Plan 593, except Plan B789, B4121 and B5922.
Staff advise that the property was connected to the Grindrod Water Utility without amending the
Grindrod Water Local Service Area. Subsequently, staff recommends that the Grindrod Water
Local Service Area be amended to include the subject property. In order for the property to be
included in the service area, an amendment to the Grindrod Water Local Service Area
Establishment Bylaw No. 1414, 1997 is required. Consent on behalf of electoral participating
area electors has been provided in accordance with section 801.5 of the LGA. Ministry approval
is not required prior to adoption under Approval Exemption Regulation 113/2007. Accordingly,
staff rec mmend that Bylaw 2682 receive First, Second and Third Readings and be Adopted.
Reviewed and endorsed by:
}I?);r~
McT~P.Eng.
Dale
General Manager, Engineering
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A
Corporate Officer
Schedule "A" to accompany
Bylaw No. 2682, 2015
Dated at Coldstream, B.C. this
_____ day of _____________, 2015
Proposed Boundary Extension
Area Boundary
2192
1
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17
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.1
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2682
A bylaw to amend the Grindrod Water Local Service Area Establishment Bylaw No. 1414, 1997
WHEREAS the Regional District of North Okanagan has established the Grindrod Water Service
cited as the “Grindrod Water Local Service Area Establishment Bylaw No. 1414, 1997”;
AND WHEREAS, Section 802 [Amendment or repeal of establishing bylaws] of the Local
Government Act, R.S.B.C., 1996, Chapter 323, as amended, and Regulations passed pursuant
thereto, authorizes the Regional District to amend an establishing bylaw at the option of the Board
of Directors;
AND WHEREAS the Board of Directors is desirous to extend the boundaries of the Grindrod
Water Local Service Area;
AND WHEREAS the consent of the participating Electoral Area "F" Director has been received in
accordance with sections 801.5 (2) [Consent on behalf of electoral participating area electors] of the
Local Government Act;
NOW THEREFORE, the Board of Directors of the Regional District of North Okanagan in open
meeting assembled, hereby ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:
CITATION
1.
This Bylaw may be cited as “Grindrod Water Local Service Area Establishment
Amendment Bylaw No. 2682, 2015”.
AMENDMENT
2.
Schedule “A” to Grindrod Water Local Service Area Establishment Bylaw No. 1414, 1997,
is amended by adjusting the boundaries to add that property located at 6920 Highway 97A,
Electoral Area “F” and legally described as Lot 16, District Lot 526, Osoyoos Division Yale
Land District, Plan 593, except Plan B789, B4121, and B5922, as shown on Schedule “A”
attached hereto and forming part of this bylaw.
Read a First, Second and THIRD Time
this
day of
, 2015
ADOPTED
this
day of
, 2015
Chair
Deputy Corporate Officer
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17
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.1
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3045.01.04
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Planning Department
DATE:
September 22, 2015
Electoral Areas "D" and "E" Official Community Plan Regional
Context Statement
SUBJECT:
RECOMMENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan
Amendment Bylaw No. 2690, 2015 be given Second Reading as amended and be referred to a Public
Hearing.
DISCUSSION:
On August 19, 2015 at the Regular Meeting of the Board, Bylaw No. 2690 received First Reading and
referral to government agencies, First Nations and the Advisory Planning Commissions for review and
comment. In addition, the Bylaw was forwarded on to the RDNO Finance and Engineering Departments
to be considered in conjunction with the financial and waste management plans. In response to the
referral, the Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) has indicated no objection to Bylaw No. 2690 finding
it to be consistent with the purposes of the ALC Act. The Electoral Area “E” Advisory Planning
Commission had some minor edits and additions to be incorporated into the Bylaw which are highlighted
in the “tracked changes” version attached to this report. It was also requested that the Cherryville
Community Interests be reviewed in relation to the Regional Growth Strategy (RGS) to identify any gaps
in existing policy. Upon review, staff can confirm that the objectives and opportunities highlighted in
Cherryville’s Community Interests are largely addressed in the RGS albeit at a broader, regional level.
The one area within Cherryville’s Community Interests that is not touched on in the RGS is the topic of
Arts, Cultural Heritage, Creative Pursuits and Expression. This could be a topic area for discussion in
the RGS 5-Year review.
The Regional Context Statement (RCS) summarizes how the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official
Community Plan aligns with and supports the nine policy areas of the Regional Growth Strategy. The
RGS is the coordinating plan for the Regional District of North Okanagan and member municipalities
on matters affecting the management of growth and regional sustainability. The RGS provides partners
with a framework to achieve shared goals while maintaining the autonomy of local jurisdictions in their
community planning decisions.
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:
The Regional District of North Okanagan adopted RGS Bylaw No. 2500 on September 21, 2011,
following acceptance by all affected local governments (including the City of Armstrong, District of
Coldstream, City of Enderby, Village of Lumby, Township of Spallumcheen, City of Vernon and adjacent
regional districts) and endorsement by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee.
Page 41 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
Electoral Areas "D" and "E" Official Community Plan Regional Context Statement
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – September 22, 2015
Page 2
The Regional District of North Okanagan received $250,000 from the Union of British Columbia
Municipalities (UBCM) Regionally Significant Projects Grant in February 2013 to coordinate Regional
Context Statement (RCS) development and provide assistance, staff and financial resources in
developing 10 municipal and Electoral Area RCSs.
The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP was under review during the development and adoption of the
RGS. During the OCP’s policy development, draft RGS goals and strategies were taken into
consideration. The OCP began the bylaw process in May 2011 and the Electoral Areas “D’ and “E”
Official Community Plan was adopted on March 21, 2012. The OCP currently does not include a RCS.
CONSULTATION PLAN:
To ensure that the RCS is aligned with the RGS in a way that retains and reflects the unique attributes
of the OCP, a period of review has been included that will involve Planning Department staff, the
Electoral Area Advisory Committee and both the Electoral Areas’ Advisory Planning Commissions
(APCs).
The RCS work plan, as represented in Table 1 below, outlines the tasks, target dates and resulting
deliverables.
Table 1: RCS Work Plan
Target Date
July-August 2015
Milestone
Deliverables
•
Staff Report: EAAC- request 1st Reading
Refer bylaw to external agencies, First
Nations, RDNO departments and APC’s (30
days for review)
•
•
Staff Report :EAAC
Public consultation, communications and
advertising (optional)
Public Hearing
Report #3 Refer bylaw to RDNO Board of Directors RGMAC for
endorsement
•
•
Public Hearing Minutes
Staff Report to EAAC/RGMAC and BoD
Report # 4: Report Final RCS, 3rd Reading and Adoption
•
•
Staff Report: BoD
Adopted OCP Amendment Bylaw [RCS]
Project Initiation, including Legislative Requirements, Project
Timelines
Report #1 Initial Draft RCS
September-October
2015
November 2015
December 2015
Report #2: Second draft of RCS Bylaw for review, request 2nd
Reading referral to Public Hearing
CONSULTATION REQUIREMENTS:
Section 879 of the Local Government Act states that during amendment of an OCP, such as when
developing and adopting a RCS, a jurisdiction must consider what opportunities will be provided for
early consultation and with whom. The local government must:
(a) consider whether the opportunities for consultation with one or more of the persons,
organizations and authorities should be early and ongoing; and,
(b) specifically consider whether consultation is required with:
i. the board of the regional district in which the area covered by the plan is located, in the
case of a municipal official community plan;
ii. the board of any regional district that is adjacent to the area covered by the plan;
iii. the council of any municipality that is adjacent to the area covered by the plan;
iv. first nations;
Page 42 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
Electoral Areas "D" and "E" Official Community Plan Regional Context Statement
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – September 22, 2015
Page 3
v. school district boards, greater boards and improvement district boards; and,
vi. the provincial and federal governments and their agencies.
The level of consultation on the development of RCSs, beyond what is required under Section 879, is
at the discretion of the Board of Directors. Based upon the extensive public consultation that was
undertaken during the development of the RGS and the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP Review, it is
the opinion of staff that consultation requirements, as specified in Section 879, are the appropriate level
of consultation for the preparation of an OCP Amendment Bylaw.
ANALYSIS:
The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP contains policies that address: Environment; Agricultural &
Resource Use; Rural, Rural Residential & Residential Use; Commercial; Industrial; Special Use Areas;
Quality of Life; Transportation & Servicing; Economy and Development Permit Areas.
The RCS has been developed as a mechanism to convey the consistency of the OCP’s policies and
approach with the goals and strategies of the RGS.
Urban Containment and Rural Protection:
The OCP policy framework restricts urban uses and development outside the Rural Protection
Boundary and directs residential and commercial growth towards municipal Growth Areas (Lumby),
which supports the RGS goal of creating a compact urban area. There is a policy which supports
development within the “downtown” Cherryville area however this is predicated on appropriate
servicing. The Rural Protection Boundary does not reflect the potential for development in downtown
Cherryville and will need to be examined during the RGS 5-Year review to ensure consistency between
the two plans.
Agriculture and Food Systems:
The OCP supports a robust and diverse agricultural sector by reinforcing the Agricultural Land
Commission in its efforts to protect and enhance farmland. The OCP also contains policies which
supports the production, processing, sale and distribution of locally grown products.
Water Stewardship
The RCS acknowledges the importance of water identifying the OCP supporting policies which address
the many dimensions of water sustainability and responsible water management.
Environment and Natural Lands
The RCS highlights the unique natural features found within the OCP plan area recognizing the need
to preserve and protect these natural assets. The OCP policy framework supports the three goals and
twenty-three policies that address a number of environmental and natural land issues, including
watershed management, environmentally sensitive areas, parks and open spaces, and pollution
reduction.
Economic Development
The RCS acknowledges the reliance of Areas “D” and “E” residents on primary industries, mainly
forestry, and agriculture for their livelihood and the need for a diversified regional approach to economic
development. The RCS identities how the OCP supports opportunities that are compatible with the
rural character of the Electoral Areas, including: home occupation; communication connectivity;
agriculture – local food production; and artistic events and festivals that provide economic benefits to
the community.
Page 43 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
Electoral Areas "D" and "E" Official Community Plan Regional Context Statement
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee - September 22, 2015
Page 4
Transportation and Infrastructure
The RCS identifies how the OCP supports a variety of transportation options that are appropriate within
the rural area and provides direction regarding alternative active transportation routes within
communities , including trails and multi-use paths.
Housing
The Electoral Areas "D" and "E" OCP policy framework supports a range of housing options appropriate
within a rural context, including secondary suites and mobile homes and recognizes that social housing
and affordable housing projects benefit from being in close proximity to an urban location.
Governance and Service Delivery
The RCS acknowledges the need for regional collaboration and community involvement in initiatives to
provide efficient, effective and fiscally responsible services that respond to community needs.
Energy and Emissions:
The OCP has adopted the RGS Green House Reduction target with supporting policies that are
achievable within the rural context of Electoral Areas "D" and "E". This approach is consistent with the
strategic direction of the RGS .
The RCS in the Electoral Areas "D" and "E" OCP confirms that the goals and policies of the OCP are
consistent with the regional goals of the RGS to create a sustainable and resilient region that balances
urban development and rural and agricu ltural protection.
SUMMARY:
This report presents a revised Regional Context Statement for the Electoral Areas "D" and "E" Official
Community Plan based upon feedback received during the referral process.
The draft Electoral Areas "D" and "E" Regional Context Statement, attached to this report as Bylaw No.
2690, 2015, demonstrates consistency with the twenty one goals of the Regional Growth Strategy,
adopted on September 21 , 2011.
It is recommended to the Board of Directors that the Electoral Areas "D" and "E" Regional Context
Statement be given Second Reading as amended and be referred to a Public Hearing.
Submitted by:
~kti_:J
Regional Planning Projects Manager
Endorsed by:
R~
General Manager, Plann ing and Building
Page 44 of 149
1.6 REGIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY (RGS)
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
The North Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 2500, 2011 was adopted by the
Regional District on September 21, 2011. The Regional Growth Strategy provides an
integrated strategic policy framework for addressing growth management, compact complete
communities, economic development, transportation, other infrastructure, environmental
concerns and long term regional sustainability, resilience and prosperity. These policies play
three key roles:
1) Provide direction for implementing the Regional Growth Strategy;
2) Create a common strategic framework for planning at various levels within the North
Okanagan; and,
3) Provide the vision for all levels of government to strive towards.
Much of the implementation of the Regional Growth Strategy occurs through local planning
and actions. The Regional Context Statement identifies the relationship between the OCP
and the policies included within the Regional Growth Strategy.
1.7 REGIONAL CONTEXT STATEMENT
The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan is required by the Local Government
Act to include a Regional Context Statement that identifies the relationship between the
Official Community Plan and the Regional Growth Strategy.
While the OCP and the RGS are separate documents, their content is inter-related. The OCP
is a comprehensive document which provides direction for the management of growth in the
rural unincorporated communities of Electoral Areas “D” and “E” over a twenty year period.
The OCP contains goals and a policy framework which directly supports the twenty-one goals
of the RGS.
In accordance with Section 865 of the Local Government Act, this OCP must be consistent
with the RGS. All policies in the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP are consistent with, or
complementary to, the goals and policies of the RGS.
The RGS identifies nine key policy areas covering a broad range of issues. Within each policy
area, the RGS has one or more goals, followed by more specific strategies. The Regional
Context Statement illustrates how the OCP will assist in achieving the goals and strategies
established in the RGS.
Urban Containment and Rural Protection
The OCP aligns with the RGS goal of focusing development into Growth Areas by encouraging
residential use (lots less than 1 ha in size) to be located within the Village of Lumby and not
within the plan area. This is done in an effort to protect rural lands.. Official Community Plan
policy 5.3.3 does indicateindicates supports for residential development in the
“downtowncentral” Cherryville area upon receipt of a comprehensive plan or showing
servicing details. Such a development would require a community sewer system. or
equivalent service. The current RGS rural protection area does not contemplate this type of
development in downtown“central” Cherryville but can be considered in the Five-year review
to ensure consistency between the plans.
Page 45 of 149
Agriculture and Food Systems
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
Agricultural lands within Electoral Areas “D” & “E” support extensive agricultural uses such as
forage and livestock production which contribute to the rural character of the area. The
Agricultural policies of the OCP support a robust and diverse agricultural sector protecting and
enhancing farmland by establishing minimum parcel sizes and setbacks to minimize the
potential for land use conflicts and support long term agricultural use.
Water Stewardship
The OCP supports the RGS goal of managing water sustainability so all reasonable needs,
including agriculture, are met in a balanced manner. The communities are opposed to interbasin transfers of water. Electoral Areas “D” and “E” recognize the value of water, supporting
policies within the OCP include: public education on water supply and water testing;
encouraging water conservation for all land uses and implementation of new technologies to
reduce water use; and collaboration with the province to ensure data collected by local water
stewardship groups and through the development review process contributes to a greater
understandingbetter stewardship of water resources over the long term.
Environment and Natural Lands
Electoral Areas “D” and “E” contain a diversity of natural features such as lakes, streams, hills,
valleys, canyons, mature forests with large stem, alpine areas and open space which are
home to various species such as raptors, owls, songbirds and amphibians. Many of the natural
features are in a delicate balance that may be disturbed by pollution and development. The
plan area contains significant natural features that help define the community and its
landscapes including: Mabel Lake, Sugar Lake, Shuswap River, Cherry Creek, Ferry Creek
and their tributaries, Sugar Lake, Echo Lake, Rawlings Lake, Kettle River, Upper Shuswap
and as well as Monashee Park, Canyons and Open Mature Forests with large stems; Camel’s
Hump and Shuswap Falls. The OCP contains a number of policies which support the RGS in
developing consistent, integrated environmental policies that will protect water ecosystem
function, drinking water sources, and conserve and enhance biodiversity and ecological
services within the Region. Policy areas include: Environmentally sensitive areas;
Watercourse and riparian areas; Wildlife; Floodplains & Alluvial Fans; Wildfire policies; Tree
retention and tree expansion policies; Energy and Conservation Policies; and Climate Change
Policies.
Economic Development
The RGS promotes a regional approach to economic development and encourages a
sustainable, resilient and diverse economy. The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP supports
the RGS goal of economic diversity to create a more sustainable future with various policies
including:
• fostering a wood culture -ensuring a livelihood for area residents; .
• recognizing the importance of communication connectivity for businesses and families
in rural areas; .
• supporting initiatives to promote local food production and sale of produce and other
local food products; .
• promoting tourism development; .
• incubating local business- machine shops and manufacturers, wildcrafting, herbal
products, farmer’s markets, home based businesses and home occupations; and
supporting.
• Ssupporting annual sporting and artistic events and festivals as important economic
benefits to the community.
Page 46 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
Transportation and Infrastructure
The RGS supports integrated regional transportation planning as well as managing regional
transportation corridors. There is also a commitment to create effective, efficient and
sustainable transportation infrastructure. The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP acknowledges
Highway 6 as the main highway corridor within the plan area. Over the years efforts have
been made to plan a transportation network with efficient linkages between and within the rural
areas. The Canadian National Railway line from Coldstream to Lumby has been designated
as a transportation corridor. The OCP is supportive of the development of a Bicycle and Trail
Network Plan which would consider crossovers between the road and trail network and
opportunities for alternative transportation modes including: bicycle and ATV routes, trails, a
Handi-dart, school bus rides; community van, carpool and car co-operatives.
Housing
Housing choice and affordability was identified as one of the most significant challenges facing
the communities of the North Okanagan during the public consultation process for the RGS.
It is a goal of the RGS to provide for a variety of housing options to meet the diverse needs of
all residents within the region. Within the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP secondary suites
and manufactured homes have been identified as a form of affordable housing within the rural
areas. The OCP does acknowledge that social housing and affordable housing projects
benefit from being in close proximity to an urban location (e.g. Lumby). The OCP also
recognizes that the Electoral Area Zoning Bylaw supports a second dwelling in some zones
for family members as a strategy to support aging in place with the ultimate goal of providing
additional housing opportunities for seniors.
Governance and Service Delivery
The RGS strives to support regional governance based upon a foundation of regional
cooperation while pursuing efficient, effective and fiscally responsible service delivery.
Residents within Electoral Areas “D” and “E” have indicated support for community
participation in local government initiatives to encourage community engagement and regional
collaboration however these communities are proud of their independence and selfsufficiency.
Energy and Emissions
Beginning in 2007, the province of British Columbia moved forward with a number of actions
designed to encourage energy efficiency and reduce emissions of Green House Gases. The
Local Government Act requires that the Regional Growth Strategy include a GHG target and
actions. The RGS has committed to a GHG emissions reduction of 15% by 2020 and 25% by
2030 from 2007 GHG emission levels. The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP supports the
regional target and has committed to a 25% reduction in community emissions by 2030 from
2007 GHG emission levels. Strategies and Actions have been identified including promoting
pedestrian and cycling facilities; supporting provincial and federal programs to encourage
energy retrofits; reduction of landfill waste; support for Smart Growth planning principles as
applicable to rural areas and protection of ecosystems that perform essential ecosystem
services such as cleaning air and purifying water.
Page 47 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2690
A bylaw to amend Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 2485, 2011 and
amendments thereto
WHEREAS pursuant to Section 876 [Authority to adopt a bylaw] of the Local Government Act,
R.S.B.C., 1996, Chapter 323, as amended, and Regulations passed pursuant thereto, the Board
of the Regional District of North Okanagan may, by Bylaw, adopt one or more official community
plans;
AND WHEREAS the Board has enacted the “Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community
Plan Bylaw No. 2485, 2011 and amendments thereto to provide a statement of objectives and
policies to guide decisions on planning and land use management, within the area covered by
the plan;
AND WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 895 [Development approval procedures] of the Local
Government Act, the Board must, by bylaw, define procedures under which an owner of land
may apply for an amendment to an Official Community Plan and must consider every
application for an amendment to the plan;
AND WHEREAS the Board has enacted the ”Regional District of North Okanagan Development
Application Procedures and Administrative Fees Bylaw No. 2315, 2008 and amendments
thereto“ to establish procedures to amend an Official Community Plan, a Zoning Bylaw, or a
Rural Land Use Bylaw, or to issue a Permit:
AND WHEREAS the Board is desirable and expedient to amend “Electoral Areas “D” and “E”
Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 2485, 2011”.
NOW THEREFORE, the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan in an open meeting
assembled, hereby ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:
CITATION
1. This Bylaw may be cited as “Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan
Amendment Bylaw No. 2690, 2015”.
AMENDMENTS
2. That Schedule “A” attached to and forming part of Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official
Community Plan Bylaw No. 2485, 2011 and amendments thereto be amended by including the
following as Sections 1.6 and 1.7 and renumbering the remaining Sections accordingly:
1.6 REGIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY (RGS)
The North Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 2500, 2011 was adopted by the
Regional District on September 21, 2011. The Regional Growth Strategy provides an
integrated strategic policy framework for addressing growth management, compact
complete communities, economic development, transportation, other infrastructure,
environmental concerns and long term regional sustainability, resilience and prosperity.
These policies play three key roles:
Page 48 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
Page 2 of 5
Bylaw No. 2690
1) Provide direction for implementing the Regional Growth Strategy;
2) Create a common strategic framework for planning at various levels within the North
Okanagan; and,
3) Provide the vision for all levels of government to strive towards.
Much of the implementation of the Regional Growth Strategy occurs through local planning
and actions. The Regional Context Statement identifies the relationship between the OCP
and the policies included within the Regional Growth Strategy.
1.7 REGIONAL CONTEXT STATEMENT
The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan is required by the Local
Government Act to include a Regional Context Statement that identifies the relationship
between the Official Community Plan and the Regional Growth Strategy.
While the OCP and the RGS are separate documents, their content is inter-related. The
OCP is a comprehensive document which provides direction for the management of growth
in the rural unincorporated communities of Electoral Areas “D” and “E” over a twenty year
period. The OCP contains goals and a policy framework which directly supports the twentyone goals of the RGS.
In accordance with Section 865 of the Local Government Act, this OCP must be consistent
with the RGS. All policies in the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP are consistent with, or
complementary to, the goals and policies of the RGS.
The RGS identifies nine key policy areas covering a broad range of issues. Within each
policy area, the RGS has one or more goals, followed by more specific strategies. The
Regional Context Statement illustrates how the OCP will assist in achieving the goals and
strategies established in the RGS.
Urban Containment and Rural Protection
The OCP aligns with the RGS goal of focusing development into Growth Areas by
encouraging lots less than 1 ha in size to be located within the Village of Lumby. Official
Community Plan policy 5.3.3 indicates supports residential development in the “central”
Cherryville area upon receipt of a comprehensive plan or showing servicing details. Such a
development would require a community sewer system or equivalent service. The current
RGS does not contemplate this type of development in “central” Cherryville but can be
considered in the Five-year review to ensure consistency between the plans.
Agriculture and Food Systems
Agricultural lands within Electoral Areas “D” & “E” support extensive agricultural uses which
contribute to the rural character of the area. The Agricultural policies of the OCP support a
robust and diverse agricultural sector protecting and enhancing farmland by establishing
minimum parcel sizes and setbacks to minimize the potential for land use conflicts and
support long term agricultural use.
Water Stewardship
The OCP supports the RGS goal of managing water sustainability so all reasonable needs,
including agriculture, are met in a balanced manner. The communities are opposed to interbasin transfers of water. Electoral Areas “D” and “E” recognize the value of water,
supporting policies within the OCP include: public education on water supply and water
testing; encouraging water conservation for all land uses and implementation of new
Page 49 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
Page 3 of 5
Bylaw No. 2690
technologies to reduce water use; and collaboration with the province to ensure data
collected by local water stewardship groups and through the development review process
contributes to better stewardship of water resources over the long term.
Environment and Natural Lands
Electoral Areas “D” and “E” contain a diversity of natural features such as lakes, streams,
hills, valleys, canyons, mature forests with large stem, alpine areas and open space which
are home to various species such as raptors, owls, songbirds and amphibians. Many of the
natural features are in a delicate balance that may be disturbed by pollution and
development. The plan area contains significant natural features that help define the
community and its landscapes including: Mabel Lake, Shuswap River, Cherry Creek, Ferry
Creek and their tributaries, Sugar Lake, Echo Lake, Rawlings Lake, Kettle River, Upper
Shuswap as well as Monashee Park, Camel’s Hump and Shuswap Falls. The OCP contains
a number of policies which support the RGS in developing consistent, integrated
environmental policies that will protect water ecosystem function, drinking water sources,
and conserve and enhance biodiversity and ecological services within the Region. Policy
areas include: Environmentally sensitive areas; Watercourse and riparian areas; Wildlife;
Floodplains & Alluvial Fans; Wildfire policies; Tree retention and tree expansion policies;
Energy and Conservation Policies; and Climate Change Policies.
Economic Development
The RGS promotes a regional approach to economic development and encourages a
sustainable, resilient and diverse economy. The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP supports
the RGS goal of economic diversity to create a sustainable future with various policies
including:
• fostering a wood culture -ensuring a livelihood for area residents.
• recognizing the importance of communication connectivity for businesses and
families in rural areas.
• supporting initiatives to promote local food production and sale of produce and other
local food products.
• promoting tourism development.
• incubating local business- machine shops and manufacturers, wildcrafting, herbal
products, farmer’s markets, home based businesses and home occupations.
• supporting annual sporting and artistic events and festivals as important economic
benefits to the community.
Transportation and Infrastructure
The RGS supports integrated regional transportation planning as well as managing regional
transportation corridors. There is also a commitment to create effective, efficient and
sustainable transportation infrastructure.
The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP
acknowledges Highway 6 as the main highway corridor within the plan area. Over the years
efforts have been made to plan a transportation network with efficient linkages between and
within the rural areas. The Canadian National Railway line from Coldstream to Lumby has
been designated as a transportation corridor. The OCP is supportive of the development of
a Bicycle and Trail Network Plan which would consider crossovers between the road and
trail network and opportunities for alternative transportation modes including: bicycle and
ATV routes, trails, a Handi-dart, school bus rides; community van, carpool and car cooperatives.
Page 50 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
Page 4 of 5
Bylaw No. 2690
Housing
Housing choice and affordability was identified as one of the most significant challenges
facing the communities of the North Okanagan during the public consultation process for the
RGS. It is a goal of the RGS to provide for a variety of housing options to meet the diverse
needs of all residents within the region. Within the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP
secondary suites and manufactured homes have been identified as a form of affordable
housing within the rural areas. The OCP does acknowledge that social housing and
affordable housing projects benefit from being in close proximity to an urban location (e.g.
Lumby). The OCP also recognizes that the Electoral Area Zoning Bylaw supports a second
dwelling in some zones for family members as a strategy to support aging in place with the
ultimate goal of providing additional housing opportunities for seniors.
Governance and Service Delivery
The RGS strives to support regional governance based upon a foundation of regional
cooperation while pursuing efficient, effective and fiscally responsible service delivery.
Residents within Electoral Areas “D” and “E” have indicated support for community
participation in local government initiatives and regional collaboration however these
communities are proud of their independence and self-sufficiency.
Energy and Emissions
Beginning in 2007, the province of British Columbia moved forward with a number of actions
designed to encourage energy efficiency and reduce emissions of Green House Gases.
The Local Government Act requires that the Regional Growth Strategy include a GHG target
and actions. The RGS has committed to a GHG emissions reduction of 15% by 2020 and
25% by 2030 from 2007 GHG emission levels. The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP
supports the regional target and has committed to a 25% reduction in community emissions
by 2030 from 2007 GHG emission levels. Strategies and Actions have been identified
including promoting pedestrian and cycling facilities; supporting provincial and federal
programs to encourage energy retrofits; reduction of landfill waste; support for Smart Growth
planning principles as applicable to rural areas and protection of ecosystems that perform
essential ecosystem services such as cleaning air and purifying water.
Read a First Time
this
19th
day of
August, 2015
Bylaw considered in conjunction with the
Regional District Financial Plan and Waste
Management Plan
this
19th
day of
August, 2015
Read a Second Time, as amended
this
day of
, 2015
Advertised on
this
this
day of
day of
, 2015
, 2015
Public Hearing held pursuant to the provisions of
Section 890 of the Local Government Act
this
day of
, 2015
Read a Third Time
this
day of
, 2015
Page 51 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.2
Page 5 of 5
Bylaw No. 2690
ADOPTED
this
Chair
day of
Deputy Corporate Officer
Page 52 of 149
, 2015
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.3
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3045.01.04
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Planning Department
DATE:
September 23, 2015
SUBJECT:
Silver Star Official Community Plan Regional Context Statement
RECOMMENDATION:
That Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw 2694, 2015 be given First Reading and
considered in conjunction with the Regional District
(i)
financial plan and
(ii)
waste management plan
pursuant to Section 882 of the Local Government Act; and further,
That Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2694, 2015 be referred to various
agencies and First Nations in accordance with Section 879 of the Local Government Act; and further,
That Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2694, 2015 be referred to Silver Star
Resort and the Electoral Area “C” Advisory Planning Commission for review and comment.
DISCUSSION:
The Regional Growth Strategy (RGS) is the coordinating plan for the Regional District of North
Okanagan and member municipalities on matters affecting the management of growth and regional
sustainability. The RGS provides partners with a framework to achieve shared goals while maintaining
the autonomy of local jurisdictions in their community planning decisions. The Regional District of North
Okanagan received $250,000 from the Union of British Columbia Municipalities (UBCM) Regionally
Significant Projects Grant in February 2013 to coordinate Regional Context Statement (RCS)
development and provide assistance, staff and financial resources in developing 10 municipal and
Electoral Area RCSs.
A draft RCS has been developed for Silver Star Official Community Plan (OCP) Bylaw No. 1925, 2004,
and is attached as Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2694, 2015. The RCS
summarizes how the OCP aligns with and supports the nine policy areas of the RGS.
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:
The Regional District of North Okanagan adopted the RGS Bylaw No. 2500 on September 21, 2011,
following acceptance by all affected local governments (including the City of Armstrong, District of
Coldstream, City of Enderby, Village of Lumby, Township of Spallumcheen, City of Vernon and adjacent
regional districts) and endorsement by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee.
Page 53 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.3
Silver Star Official Community Plan Regional Context Statement
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – September 23, 2015
Page 2
For Electoral Areas, the goals, objectives and policies in an OCP must not be in conflict with the goals
and policies of the RGS. Section 865(1) of the Local Government Act requires that: “All bylaws adopted
by a regional district board after the board has adopted a regional growth strategy, and all services
undertaken by a regional district after the board has adopted a regional growth strategy, must be
consistent with the regional growth strategy”.
This means that an Electoral Area OCP, because it is adopted by bylaw, must be consistent with the
RGS and a RCS is one mechanism that can be used to demonstrate that consistency. It is important
to note that formal acceptance of an Electoral Area RCS is not required under Section 866 because the
Board of Directors adopts an Electoral Area OCP Bylaw. The Regional District will be considering
endorsement of Electoral Area RCSs prior to final Bylaw adoption. The adoption of an Electoral Area
OCP Bylaw Amendment [RCS] will follow the normal OCP adoption process, as specified in Section
882 of the Local Government Act.
CONSULTATION PLAN:
To ensure that the RCS is aligned with the RGS in a way that retains and reflects the unique attributes
of the OCP, a period of review has been included that will involve Planning Department staff,
representatives from Silver Star Resort and the Electoral Area “C” Advisory Planning Commission.
The RCS work plan, as represented in Table 1 below, outlines the tasks, target dates and resulting
deliverables.
Table 1: Silver Star RCS Work Plan
Target Date
October 2015
Milestone
Project Initiation, including Legislative Requirements, Project
Timelines
Deliverables
•
Staff Report: EAAC- request 1st Reading
Refer bylaw to external agencies, Silver Star
Resort, First Nations, RDNO departments
and APC (30 days for review)
•
•
Staff Report :EAAC
Public consultation, communications and
advertising (optional)
Report #1 Initial Draft RCS
November 2015
Report #2: Second draft of RCS Bylaw for review, request 2nd
Reading referral to Public Hearing
November 2015
Public Hearing
Report #3 Refer bylaw to RDNO Board of Directors RGMAC for
endorsement
•
•
Public Hearing Minutes
Staff Report to EAAC/RGMAC and BoD
Report # 4: Report Final RCS, 3rd Reading and Adoption
•
•
Staff Report: BoD
Adopted OCP Amendment Bylaw [RCS]
December 2015
CONSULTATION REQUIREMENTS:
Section 879 of the Local Government Act states that during amendment of an OCP, such as when
developing and adopting a RCS, a jurisdiction must consider what opportunities will be provided for
early consultation and with whom. The local government must:
(a) consider whether the opportunities for consultation with one or more of the persons,
organizations and authorities should be early and ongoing; and,
(b) specifically consider whether consultation is required with:
i. the board of the regional district in which the area covered by the plan is located, in the
case of a municipal official community plan;
ii. the board of any regional district that is adjacent to the area covered by the plan;
Page 54 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.3
Silver Star Official Community Plan Regional Context Statement
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee - September 23, 2015
Page 3
iii.
iv.
v.
vi.
the counci l of any municipality that is adjacent to the area covered by the plan;
first nations;
school district boards, greater boards and improvement district boards; and,
the provincial and federal governments and their agencies.
The level of consultation on the development of RCSs, beyond what is required under Section 879, is
at the discretion of the Board of Directors. Based upon the extensive consultation that was undertaken
during the development of the RGS and the Silver Star OCP and the nature of this proposed
amendment, it is the opinion of staff that consu ltation requirements, as specified in Section 879, are the
appropriate level of consultation for the preparation of an OCP Amendment Bylaw.
ANALYSIS:
The Silver Star Official Community Plan contains policies that address: Community Objectives;
Residential Lands; Commercial Lands; Comprehensive Development Lands; Resort Use Lands; Utility
and Maintenance Facilities; Industrial Land Use Policies; Fire Smart Policies; Transportation, Public
Access and Parking; Open Space and Recreation; and Development Permit Areas.
The RCS has been developed as a mechanism to convey the consistency of the OCP's policies and
approach with the goals and strateg ies of the RGS. Overall, the Silver Star OCP policies directly support
seven of the nine policy areas. The Silver Star OCP does not currently contain policies related to
Agricultural and Foods Systems or Energy and Emissions. There are no Agricultural lands at Silver
Start and staff note that during the next Silver Star OCP comprehensive review Energy/Emissions can
be addressed and incorporated into the OCP to provide further support for the implementation of the
RGS.
SUMMARY:
The draft Silver Star Regional Context Statement, attached to this report as Silver Star Official
Community Plan Bylaw No. 2694, 2015, demonstrates consistency with the goals of the Reg ional
Growth Strategy, adopted on September 21, 2011.
It is recommended that Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2694, 2015 to
include a Regional Context Statement be given First Reading and referred to relevant agencies, First
Nations, RDNO departments, Silver Star Resort and Electoral Area "C" Advisory Planning Commission
for review and comment.
Submitted by:
~» -
Regional Planning Projects Manager
Endorsed by:
Rob~
~~
General Manager, Planning and Building
Page 55 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.3
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2694
A bylaw to amend Silver Star Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 1925, 2004 and amendments
thereto
WHEREAS pursuant to Section 876 [Authority to adopt a bylaw] of the Local Government Act,
R.S.B.C., 1996, Chapter 323, as amended, and Regulations passed pursuant thereto, the Board
of the Regional District of North Okanagan may, by Bylaw, adopt one or more official community
plans;
AND WHEREAS the Board has enacted the “Silver Star Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 1925,
2004” and amendments thereto to provide a statement of objectives and policies to guide
decisions on planning and land use management, within the area covered by the plan;
AND WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 895 [Development approval procedures] of the Local
Government Act, the Board must, by bylaw, define procedures under which an owner of land may
apply for an amendment to an Official Community Plan and must consider every application for
an amendment to the plan;
AND WHEREAS the Board has enacted the “Regional District of North Okanagan Development
Application Procedures and Administrative Fees Bylaw No. 2315, 2008” and amendments thereto
to establish procedures to amend an Official Community Plan, a Zoning Bylaw, or a Rural Land
Use Bylaw, or to issue a Permit:
AND WHEREAS the Board is desirable and expedient to amend “Silver Star Official Community
Plan Bylaw No. 1925, 2004”.
NOW THEREFORE, the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan in an open meeting
assembled, hereby ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:
CITATION
1. This Bylaw may be cited as “Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No.
2694, 2015”.
AMENDMENTS
2. That Schedule “A” attached to and forming part of Silver Star Official Community Plan Bylaw No.
1925, 2004 and amendments thereto be amended by including the following as Sections B and
B.1 and renumbering the remaining Sections accordingly:
B. REGIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY (RGS)
The North Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 2500, 2011 was adopted by the
Regional District on September 21, 2011. The Regional Growth Strategy provides an
integrated strategic policy framework for addressing growth management, compact complete
communities, economic development, transportation, other infrastructure, environmental
concerns and long term regional sustainability, resilience and prosperity. These policies play
three key roles:
Page 56 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.3
Page 2 of 4
Bylaw No. 2694
1) Provide direction for implementing the Regional Growth Strategy;
2) Create a common strategic framework for planning at various levels within the North
Okanagan; and,
3) Provide the vision for all levels of government to strive towards.
Much of the implementation of the Regional Growth Strategy occurs through local planning
and actions. The Regional Context Statement identifies the relationship between the OCP
and the policies included within the Regional Growth Strategy.
B.1 REGIONAL CONTEXT STATEMENT
The Silver Star Official Community Plan is required by the Local Government Act to include a
Regional Context Statement that identifies the relationship between the Official Community
Plan and the Regional Growth Strategy.
While the OCP and the RGS are separate documents, their content is inter-related. The OCP
is a comprehensive document which provides direction for the management of growth in the
resort community of Silver Star over a twenty year period. The OCP contains goals and a
policy framework which support the goals of the RGS.
In accordance with Section 865 of the Local Government Act, this OCP must be consistent
with the RGS. All policies in the Silver Star OCP are consistent with, or complementary to,
the goals and policies of the RGS.
The RGS identifies nine key policy areas covering a broad range of issues. Within each policy
area, the RGS has one or more goals, followed by more specific strategies. The Regional
Context Statement illustrates how the OCP will assist in achieving the goals and strategies
established in the RGS.
Urban Containment and Rural Protection
The OCP aligns with the RGS goal of focusing development into Growth Areas by
encouraging resort residential use (lots less than 1 ha in size) to be located within the Village
of Silver Star and not within the surrounding rural land base. There are a total of seven
residential areas that currently accommodate Silver Star inhabitants with room for expansion
in seven additional residential neighbourhoods. All future growth and development within the
resort community is identified as occurring within the Growth Area as mapped in the RGS.
Agriculture and Food Systems
Silver Star Resort is located 22 kilometers northeast of the City of Vernon and is surrounded
by Silver Star Provincial Park. Due to the elevation and topography of the area there are no
lands within the resort area that fall within the Agricultural Land Reserve and thus there are
no agricultural or food system policies found within the Official Community Plan.
Water Stewardship
The OCP contains policies that protect watercourses from development acknowledging the
value of water for both the natural environment and human consumption. The availability of
water is highlighted as an important consideration within the OCP for any future development.
This aligns with the RGS goal of protecting groundwater to ensure access to long term water
supply as well as assess impacts on supply to existing users.
Page 57 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.3
Page 3 of 4
Bylaw No. 2694
Environment and Natural Lands
The majority of lands within the Silver Star Official Community Plan area are forested. The
forests are predominantly lodgepole pine and hemlock with an understory of fir and cedar.
These forested areas provide habitat for local wildlife and birds and where feasible and
practical are to be preserved. The OCP contains a number of policies which support the RGS
in developing consistent, integrated environmental policies that will protect water ecosystem
function, drinking water sources, and conserve and enhance biodiversity and ecological
services within the Region. Policy areas include: Open Space, Protection of the Natural
Environment, Riparian Areas and watercourse considerations.
Economic Development
Silver Star Resort offers skiing and other winter activities which are the major focus of the
community with special summer entertainment programs and summer recreation sports which
complement a year round resort calendar. The resort not only has a regional draw but has
international reach in attracting recreation enthusiasts and investors to the area. The OCP
contains commercial, resort use lands, industrial and comprehensive development policies
which support the RGS goal of a sustainable, resilient and diverse regional economy.
Transportation and Infrastructure
The RGS supports integrated regional transportation planning as well as managing regional
transportation corridors. There is also a commitment to create effective, efficient and
sustainable transportation infrastructure. The Silver Star OCP transportation policies focus
mainly on the needs for local roads and adequate right-of-ways to accommodate snow
removal and pedestrian traffic. The OCP is supportive of the establishment of a new public
road to connect Silver Star eastward to Trinity Valley Rd and the accommodation facilities and
recreational opportunities in the Village of Lumby and Electoral Areas “D” and “E”.
Housing
It is a goal of the RGS to provide for a variety of housing options to meet the diverse needs of
all residents within the region. Within the Silver Star OCP a variety of housing options are
supported providing a range of development options for new residential land uses. To
respond to affordable and rental housing needs, the OCP supports the development of suites.
The OCP acknowledges that ultimately the goal for Silver Star is to evolve into a selfsustaining community.
Governance and Service Delivery
The RGS strives to support regional governance based upon a foundation of regional
cooperation while pursuing efficient, effective and fiscally responsible service delivery. The
Regional District has been provided legislative authority by the Province to provide local
government services to Silver Star. The OCP acknowledges a commitment between the
Government of British Columbia and its ministries and agencies; the Regional District of North
Okanagan; Silver Star Ski Resort Ltd; and private citizens to cooperate and consult on matters
concerning the future development and use of land around the community of Silver Star and
issues of regional significance.
Page 58 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.3
Page 4 of 4
Bylaw No. 2694
Energy and Emissions
Beginning in 2007, the province of British Columbia moved forward with a number of actions
designed to encourage energy efficiency and reduce emissions of Green House Gases. The
Local Government Act requires that the Regional Growth Strategy include a GHG target and
actions. The RGS has committed to a GHG emissions reduction of 15% by 2020 and 25% by
2030 from 2007 GHG emission levels. The Sliver Star OCP was adopted in 2004 and
therefore predates discussions regarding GHG reduction and inclusion of emission policies.
Staff note that during the next Silver Star OCP comprehensive review policies will be included
that address GHG targets and actions.
Read a First Time
this
day of
, 2015
Bylaw considered in conjunction with the
Regional District Financial Plan and Waste
Management Plan
this
day of
, 2015
Read a Second Time, as amended
this
day of
, 2015
Advertised on
this
this
day of
day of
, 2015
, 2015
Public Hearing held pursuant to the provisions of
Section 890 of the Local Government Act
this
day of
, 2015
Read a Third Time
this
day of
, 2015
ADOPTED
this
day of
, 2015
Chair
Deputy Corporate Officer
Page 59 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 5720.07.07.02
TO:
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
FROM:
Engineering and Finance
DATE:
September 17, 2015
SUBJECT:
Fire Hydrants on Private Property: Policy Endorsement, GVW Water Use and
Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2695, 2015 and RDNO Cross Connection
Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015, and Credit
Investigation
RECOMMENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Greater Vernon Water Fire Hydrants on Private
Property Policy No. ENG-WTR-004 be endorsed.
RECOMMENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Greater Vernon Water Use and Regulation
Amendment Bylaw No. 2695, 2015 be given First, Second and Third Readings; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Greater Vernon Water Use and Regulation
Amendment Bylaw No. 2695, 2015 be Adopted.
RECOMMENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Regional District of North Okanagan Cross
Connection Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015 be given First, Second and Third
Readings; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Regional District of North Okanagan Cross
Connection Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015 be Adopted.
BACKGROUND:
At the July 16, 2014 regular meeting, the Board of Directors received a report from Staff (attached) with
the following resolutions that were carried:
That the Report "Unmetered Fire Main Rates" dated June 18, 2014 be received for
information; and further,
That staff be directed to send a letter to Barb Mitchell, Highlands Golf to advise that the
Regional District of North Okanagan will not assume ownership of the private unmetered
150mm fire hydrant located on the property at 7961 Buchanan Road.
Page 60 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
Fire Hydrants on Private Property
Page 2 of 6
At the October 16, 2014 regular meeting, the Board of Directors received a report from Staff (attached)
with the following resolutions that were carried:
That staff be directed to provide options and recommendations for development of a policy
and procedure to monitor annual maintenance of private hydrants; and further,
That the information provided in the staff report dated September 18, 2014 titled Review
of Private Hydrant Policies and Rates be used in the 2015 Greater Vernon Water rate
setting discussion to review the current unmetered fire main rates and adjust the rates
appropriately.
At the February 18, 2015 regular meeting, the Board of Directors received a report from Staff (attached)
with the following resolutions that were carried:
That the draft Greater Vernon Water Hydrant on private property Policy No. ENG-WTR-004 be
received for information and discussion; and further,
That the draft Greater Vernon Water Hydrant on private property Policy No. ENG-WTR-004 be
referred to the local Fire Rescue Services that operate in the Greater Vernon Water local service
area, the City of Vernon and the District of Coldstream.
At the March 18, 2015 Board of Directors regular meeting during the review of the Greater Vernon
Water Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2672 review, the following resolutions were carried:
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the fee for private fire
hydrants be amended to $132. 00 per year and billed quarterly.
That staff be authorized to investigate the options to grant a credit to all Greater Vernon Water
customers that were billed for private fire hydrants in 2014.
SUMMARY:
Staff have completed the final referral process of the draft policy respecting hydrants on private property
as requested by the Board. Following the referral process, some minor changes to existing bylaws
have also been drafted and are being recommended to provide consistency with the proposed policy
and to help ensure various regulations are enforceable.
In addition, legal counsel has confirmed that the Regional District is not able to grant a credit to all
Greater Vernon Water customers that were billed for private fire hydrants in 2014.
DISCUSSION:
Policy for Fire Hydrants on Private Property
RDNO staff were directed by the Board of Directors to develop a policy to manage fire hydrants located
on private property within the Greater Vernon Water (GVW) service area. The Greater Vernon Water
Fire Hydrants on Private Property Policy No. ENG-WTR-004 ("the Policy" - Attached) was developed
after an extensive review of policies and bylaws to manage hydrants on private property in other water
utilities in BC and Alberta.
The Policy was developed in consultation with the City of Vernon and District of Coldstream staff. The
Policy was also discussed with various Fire Rescue Services (FRS) representatives during the Policy
Page 61 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
Fire Hydrants on Private Property
Page 3 of6
development stage. The final draft of the Policy was received for information by the Board on February
18, 2015 and then circulated to the following local FRSs for review and comment:
•
•
•
•
•
•
City of Vernon Fire Department
BX Fire Department
Coldstream Fire Department
Lavington Fire Department
Spallumcheen Fire Department
RDNO Regional Emergency Services
No comments were received from the FRSs with the exception of the City of Vernon Fire Department
who indicated they were fine with the Policy.
After the Policy was circulated to the FRSs, it was realized that minor changes to some GVW bylaws
were required in order for sections of the Policy to be enforceable. Hence, the following are
recommended amendments to GVW bylaws to ensure GVW has the legislative authority to enforce the
Policy:
The following definition is to be added to GVW Water Use and Regulation Bylaw No. 2545,
2014:
i.
Fire Hydrant: means a water conveyance device where a hose can be attached and supplied water
with typically elevated flows for the primary purpose of fighting fires. This definition includes the
hydrant, hydrant connection valve , lead and tee at the main and refers to all fire hydrants connected
to the Greater Vernon Water system, including fire hydrants on private property.
ii.
The following definition is to be added to RDNO Cross Connection Control Regulation Bylaw
No. 2651, 2014:
Fire Hydrant: means a water conveyance device where a hose can be attached and supplied water
with typically elevated flows for the primary purpose of fighting fires. This definition includes the
hydrant, hydrant connection valve, lead and tee at the main and refers to all fire hydrants connected
to a RDNO Waterworks System, including fire hydrants on private property.
The following GVW bylaws also mention hydrants but upon review of all hydrant references , the
language was deemed appropriate to provide RDNO legislative authority to enforce the Policy:
•
•
•
•
GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2672, 2015,
GVW Metering Bylaw No. 2678, 2015,
RDNO Ticket Information Authorization Amendment Bylaw No. 1148 and Amendment Bylaw
No. 2627, Schedule "L" and "M", and
GVW Subdivision and Development Servicing Bylaw No. 2650, 2013.
Based on the recommendations, some wording changes from the draft policy provided to the Board on
February 18, 2015 and reviewed by the Fire Rescue Services were completed and the definitions
reworded to be consistent with the recommended definitions to be included in the bylaw amendments
for GVW Water Use and Regulation Bylaw No. 2545, 2014 and RDNO Cross Connection Control
Regulation Bylaw No. 2651, 2014.
Notwithstanding changes to the policy, the intent of each section did not change and provides guidance
to GVW staff and our contract operators on acceptable uses, operations and servicing of fire hydrants
on private property. The Policy is consistent with governance of fire hydrants that are publically owned
and connected to GVW.
Page 62 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
Fire Hydrants on Private Property
Page 4 of6
The following is a summary of the Policy:
Only the local designated Fire Rescue Services (FRS) are authorized to use hydrants on
private property for firefighting purposes.
Private properties with one or more fire hydrants require a permit to operate the hydrant(s).
The permit will outline the requirement to have backflow protection and a meter during
operation of the hydrant.
-
An application for a permit can be obtained from the City of Vernon, District of Coldstream
or the RDNO office. The application must be filled out by the hydrant owner and the owner
must give permission to GVW Operators to access the hydrant to install and remove the
backflow prevention device and meter box.
-
A fee as per the GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw, will be required for the installation, removal
and rental of the backflow prevention device and meter box.
-
The Operator will record water use when removing the hydrant meter box and the water use
will be charged to the customer account.
-
Properties with a meter at the property line still require a permit to use hydrants located on
private property and require backflow prevention at the hydrant to protect on-site water
quality. The backflow prevention device provided with the permit comes with a water meter;
however, the metered amount of water used will be metered at property line and charged to
the property owner through the normal billing process.
-
The owner is responsible to have the hydrant maintained under the BC Fire Code and
National Fire Protection Association as per their private insurance conditions in addition to
recommended annual maintenance and record keeping.
-
Any hydrant maintenance and/or specific conditions required are between the hydrant owner
and the insurance company and does not involve GVW.
-
As a public service, GVW may remind the property owners that have private fire hydrants
from time to time, that annual maintenance is required and that a permit must be obtained
for hydrant use. Notwithstanding, GVW takes no responsibility to ensure the annual
maintenance or any other conditions required by private insurance companies are
completed.
If any connection to a hydrant on private property is made without a permit, backflow
protection and/or a meter, the Owner (and/or Contractor) involved could be subject to fines,
confiscation of connection equipment or the requirement to install hydrant security at the
owner's expense.
Investigation to Grant a Credit for Private Hydrants Rates billed in 2014
With respect to fees and charges, Regional Districts are only able to provide credits or refunds in very
limited situations. Section 363 of the Local Government Act (Imposition of Fees and Charges) applies
to the discussion around a potential credit or refund for Greater Vernon Water customers that were
billed for private fire hydrants in 2014.
As discussed in the March 18, 2015 Board meeting and the prior GVAC meeting, a credit is certainly
not possible by Board resolution, and if there is a legal ability to provide the credit it would need to be
done by bylaw. The S. 363(2) of the Act states:
A bylaw under this section may ... provide for the reduction, waiving or refund of a fee or charge if, as
specified in the bylaw, a person:
i.
Has already paid towards the costs to which the fee or charge relates,
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
Fire Hydrants on Private Property
ii.
iii.
iv.
Page 5 of 6
Does not require the service to which the fee or charge relates,
No longer undertakes the activity or thing for which a licence, permit, or approval was
required, or
Has prepaid towards the costs of the service to which the fee or charge relates and use of the
service by the person is discontinued.
In discussing the specific issue with legal counsel, the Regional District's lawyers confirm that a credit
is not possible. None of the conditions that allow for a credit or refund within the legislation apply in this
case; thus, the RDNO is not able to adopt a bylaw that retroactively provides a credit for 2014.
It should be noted that municipalities have somewhat more broad powers under the Community Charter
in this circumstance. Section 194(2) of the Charter, which is not applicable to Regional Districts, allows
that a bylaw may provide for the refund of a municipal fee, and more relevantly, the section does not
include conditions that need to be met for such a refund .
LEGAL/STATUTORY PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS:
Section 363 of the Local Government Act governs the imposition of fees and charges by Regional
Districts. Legal advice confirms that a potential bylaw to credit GVW customers that were billed for
private fire hydrants in 2014 is not possible and is contrary to the statute.
FINANCIAL/BUDGETARY CONSIDERATIONS:
Without the ability to provide a credit to customers billed in 2014, there is no impact on 2015 revenue,
and thus no budgetary implication.
EXTERNAL AGENCY/PUBLIC COMMENTS:
Input from GVW operators (City of Vernon and District of Coldstream) and all FRS departments within
the GVW Service Area were provided the opportunity to review and comment on Greater Vernon Water
Fire Hydrants on Private Property Policy No. ENG-WTR-004 and comments received were incorporated
into the Policy.
COMMUNICATIONS CONSIDERATIONS:
Upon approval of the recommended bylaw amendments and the Policy, GVW will send a letter to
owners of fire hydrants on private property to inform them of the Policy and recommend they implement
routine fire hydrant maintenance as per their private insurance requirements.
Submitted by:
Sfo~-~----.:- - -. . . ,_,
rnon Water
General Manager, Finance
~Eng
General Manager, Engineering
Page 64 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
Fire Hydrants on Private Property
Page 6 of 6
Attached: Staff report dated June 18, 2014 - Unmetered Fire Main Rates
Staff report dated September 18, 2014 - Review of Hydrant on private property Policies and
Rates
Staff report dated February 3, 2015 - Private Fire Hydrants
Draft G VW Water Use and Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2695
Draft RDNO Cross Connection Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696
Greater Vernon Water Fire Hydrants on Private Property Policy No. ENG-WTR-004
Page 65 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 5770.01
TO:
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
FROM:
Engineering
DATE:
June 18, 2014
SUBJECT:
Unmetered Fire Main Rates
RECOMMENDATION:
That the Report "Unmetered Fire Main Rates" dated June 18, 2014 be received for information; and
further
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that Barb Mitchell, Highlands Golf be advised that
the Regional District of North Okanagan does not wish to assume ownership of the private unmetered
150mm fire hydrant located on the property at 7961 Buchanan Road.
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:
At the May 8, 2014 Greater Vernon Advisory Committee meeting the Committee considered a request
received from Barb Mitchell, Highlands Golf to donate the private unmetered 150mm diameter fire
Following discussion the following
hydrant located on the Highlands Golf Course lands.
recommendation was passed:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, staff be directed to report
back to the Committee on the number of private hydrants that exist and the
breakdown of costs.
DISCUSSION:
Staff advise that the number of existing unmetered fire mains in use on the Greater Vernon Water
Utility system (GVW) number approximately 123. These unmetered fire mains were typically required
on private lands as a requirement of development to meet the requirements for fire protection.
The current rates in the Greater Vernon Water Utility Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2622, 2014 for
Unmetered Fire Main (hydrants and/or standpipes) rates are as follows:
7.
Unmetered Fire Main Rates
a.
50 mm diameter and smaller
75 mm diameter
100 mm diameter
b.
c.
$ 155.00 per annum
$220.00 per annum
$280.00 per annum
Page 66 of 149
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Engineering
Re: Unmetered Fire Main Rates
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
File No.: 5770.01
June 18, 201 4
Page 2 of3
f.
150 mm diameter
200 mm diameter
250 mm diameter
$ 560.00 per annum
$1 ,130.00 per annum
$2,260.00 per annum
g.
300 mm diameter
$4,530.00 per annum
d.
e.
The Unmetered Fire Main Rates are consistent with the current residential Unmetered fee where
metering IS possible (added to Infrastructure Base Fee) rates in the Greater Vernon Water Utility
Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2622, 2014 which are as follows:
4.d. Unmetered fee where metering IS possible (added to Infrastructure Base Fee)
i.
initial and first full quarter
after written warning
$300.00 per quarter or part
$1 ,200/annum
ii. second and third quarters
$500.00 per quarter or part
$2,000/annum
iii fourth quarter
$ 1,000.00 per quarter or part
$4,000/annum
iv after one year and beyond
$2,000.00 per quarter or part
$8,000/annum
GVW has established a policy whereby unmetered water is paid through a flat rate. Currently, the rate
for an unmetered fire main is significantly less than unmetered residential properties for similar sized
service connections. With regard to unmetered fire mains the water consumption can vary significantly
and it is unknown how much water is consumed through these services. The residential unmetered
fee where metering IS possible was set high as an incentive to encourage property owners to install
water meters on their premises and have all consumption metered.
In addition to the above, staff consulted both the City of Vernon and District of Coldstream fire
departments with respect to the use of private fire hydrants to fight fires. Both fire departments
advised that they use a universal principal that they have the author:ity to use any equipment, access
roads and/or fire hydrants that are available to fight a fire. With that said, they noted the following with
regard to private fire hydrants:
-
The majority of private fire hydrants are set back a considerable distance from the road and to
fight a fire on an adjacent property a public fire hydrant would typically be used.
Private hydrant bonnet and caps are not painted to indicate the available flow and pressure
available.
Fire departments are not as confident that private hydrants receive the same level of service as
public fire hydrants.
The RDNO provides base mapping to the fire departments with locations of all hydrants including
private hydrants.
An option for properties with an "Unmetered fire main rate" would be to allow the property to pay a flat
rate (status quo) or install a water meter and pay a base infrastructure fee and consumption rate for
water supply availability. While this may provide provide a net savings to those properties that have
an unmetered fire main and only use minor volumes of water, staff note that the cost to supply water
to an unmetered fire main is not known at this time. Staff note that the annual revenues must be
achieved throughout the entire GVW system for the budgets to balance. Should rates be reduced for
one customer base, then to achieve the overall budget, increases would be required to another
customer base.
Page 67 of 149
Report to: Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
From: Engineering
Re: Unmetered Fire Main Rates
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
File No.: 5770.01
June 18, 2014
Page 3 of 3
Staff recommend that that there is no benefit to GVW customers to assume ownership of private fire
hydrants and therefore recommend that a letter be forwarded to Bard Mitchell, Highlands Golf
advising of same.
Submitted by:
~~Eng
General Manager, Engineering
Page 68 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 5720.07.07
TO:
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
FROM:
Engineering
DATE:
September 18, 2014
SUBJECT:
Review of Private Hydrant Policies and Rates
RECOMMENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that staff be directed to develop a policy and
procedure to monitor annual maintenance of private hydrants; and further
That the information provided in the Staff report dated September 18, 2014 titled Review of Private
Hydrant Policies and Rates be used in the 2015 Greater Vernon Water rate setting discussion to
review the current unmetered fire main rates and adjust the rates appropriately.
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:
At the July 3, 2014 Greater Vernon Advisory Committee meeting the Committee received a report
from Staff (attached) with the following resolution was carried:
That the Report "Unmetered Fire Main Rates" dated June 18, 2014 be received for
information; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that Barb Mitchell, Highlands Golf be
advised that the Regional District of North Okanagan does not wish to assume
ownership of the private unmetered 150mm fire hydrant located on the property at 7961
Buchanan Road.
The report outlined the current fees we charge for Unmetered Fire Main Rates and why these fees are
charged. During the discussion, Committee members requested a review of what the maintenance
policies for private hydrants are for other water utilities and fee charged.
DISCUSSION:
Currently, GVW does not monitor annual maintenance of private hydrants. The following provides a
summary of policies and rates from other BC communities, including:
-
City of Vancouver
City of Kelowna
City of Abbotsford
Page 69 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
Page2of3
Review of Private Hydrant Policies and Rates
-
City of Penticton
Glenmore-EIIison Irrigation District
City of Kamloops
City of Prince George
City of Pembroke, Ontario
In general, there were four common private hydrant policies followed by the jurisdictions reviewed:
- Metering - Hydrants are placed after the property's water meter to account for any water
consumption. Also requires backflow prevention for private hydrants.
Limiting Use - Private hydrants are only to be used for fire fighting and briefly for annual
testing/flushing. Enforcement measures (fines) required to discourage uncontrolled use.
Permitting - A permit is required prior to use of public or private hydrants to ensure the utility
is aware of the use and can prepare accordingly to manage demand spikes and aid the fire
department in removing equipment is the hydrant is needed to fight a fire.
Owner's Responsibility - Private hydrants are the property owner's responsibility, which
includes paying for the costs of annual maintenance (as outlined in the B.C. Fire Code).
Sample Fees:
Water Utility
City of Vancouver
City of Kelowna
Bylaw Fees
50mm
75mm
100mm
150mm
200mm
250mm
300mm
$301.44
City of Pembroke, Ontario
$5/cubic meter plus HST
City of Abbotsford
Range from $0.92 to $1.15
depending on customer
class/tier
Glenmore-EIIison Irrigation
District
Approximately $0.40/cubic
meter
$210
$314
$434
$500
$587
$622
$667
$25/day
City of Prince George
$200 permit fee plus $25/day of
use
$150
Comments
Annual fireline rates based on
pipe size (mm)
Annual Fire Protection Use - a
flat fee for all diameter fire
mains.
Charge for water used from a
hydrant. (All hydrants metered)
All private mains metered at
property line. Rate includes
domestic water consumption
and fntdrant water use.
Estimated consumption charge
based on excess consumption
charge in domestic fees bylaw.
Hydrant use fee (primarily
applies to public hydrants1
Hydrant use fee.
Annual private hydrant
maintenance fee.
To discourage non-fire fighting uses, several jurisdictions require a permit for hydrant use and require
a staff person be present during testing/maintenance work to monitor and ensure hydrant use is
performed according to standards (in particular backflow prevention) to protect the public water
supply. The permit often requires that a meter box with backflow prevention device be used. This is a
requirement tor public hydrant use in the GVW service area.
Page 70 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
Reviau of Privata Hydrant Policies and Rates
Page 3 of 3
Other jurisdictions allow for certified private contractors to do annual maintenance but the annual
maintenance reports must be submitted to the utility and tracked. Some jurisdictions require that
annual maintenance reports be submitted for review by the local Fire Chief or Plumbing/Building
inspection Department. In Kamloops, maintenance reports won't be accepted unless the work was
pre-approved (permitted) by City staff as part of annual March 15 - May 15 maintenance period.
Other deterrents include significant fines ($10,000 in Abbotsford) and potential confiscation of any
equipment found attached to a hydrant.
Upon researching this topic, staff has received reports from City of Vernon and District of Goldstream
operators who have observed private hydrants being used by persons other than the fire department.
They note it is common for the private hydrant owner's to contract parking lot, road and sidewalk
cleaning and these contractors connect to the private hydrant. Not only is this unmetered water use
but also puts the drinking water supply at risk from cross connection contamination. Contractors that
want to connect to a GVW hydrant must apply for a permit and rent a backflow/metering box, which
allows GVW to recoup water use revenue and protects the supply from backflow Issues.
For the protection of the water system and for fire protection, it is proposed that staff develop policies
and procedures on use and maintenance of private hydrants. The policy would include (but not be
limited to) developing methodology to track annual maintenance of private hydrants, outline
acceptable uses and conditions (ie. require backflow prevention), educate private hydrant owners and
develop enforcement measures for non compliance. Based on the direction of the policy, rates for
unmetered use can be reexamined in 2015 based on the conditions of the policy.
PERSONNEL IMPLICATIONS:
Staff time will be required to develop a policy with procedures on the use and maintenance of private
hydrants. In addition, staff time would be required to track annual maintenance, liason with the private
hydrant owners and provide education on the GVW policy and carry out enforcement when required.
Sub
!fled~:
Reviewed and endorse by:
Page 71 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 5720.07.07
TO:
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
FROM:
Engineering
DATE:
February 3, 2015
SUBJECT:
Private Fire Hydrants
RECOMMENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the draft Greater Vernon Water Private Hydrant
Policy No. ENG-WTR-004 be received for information and discussion and referred to the local Fire
Rescue Services that operate in the Greater Vernon Water local service area, the City of Vernon and
the District of Coldstream.
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:
At the July 3, 2014 Greater Vernon Advisory Committee regular meeting the Committee received a
report from Staff (attached) with the following resolution that was carried:
That the Report “Unmetered Fire Main Rates” dated June 18, 2014 be received for
information; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that Barb Mitchell, Highlands Golf, be
advised that the Regional District of North Okanagan does not wish to assume
Ownership of the private unmetered 150mm fire hydrant located on the property at 7961
Buchanan Road.
The report outlined the current fees Greater Vernon Water (GVW) charges for Unmetered Fire Mains
and why these fees are charged. During the discussion, Committee members requested a review of
private hydrant maintenance policies and fees charged by other water utilities.
At the October 2, 2014 Greater Vernon Advisory Committee regular meeting the Committee received
a report from Staff (attached) with the following resolution that was carried
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that staff be directed to develop a policy and
procedure to monitor annual maintenance of private hydrants; and further
That the information provided in the Staff report dated September 18, 2014 titled Review of
Private Hydrant Policies and Rates be used in the 2015 Greater Vernon Water rate setting
discussion to review the current unmetered fire main rates and adjust the rates appropriately.
Page 72 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
SUMMARY:
A draft GVW Private Hydrant Policy has been prepared to guide the use of private hydrants
connected to GVW and assist in setting appropriate fees.
In developing the draft GVW Private Hydrant Policy, a review of private hydrant policies from other
communities was completed. The discussion below provides a detailed analysis of the review and
rationale for the policy recommendation. The recommended GVW Private Hydrant Policy is attached
and the following is a summary of the Policy:
−
Only the local designated Fire Rescue Service (FRS) are authorized to use private
hydrants for fire fighting purposes.
−
Private properties with one or more private fire hydrants require a permit to operate the
hydrant(s). The permit will outline the requirement to have backflow protection and a
meter during operation of the hydrant.
−
An application for a permit can be obtained from the City of Vernon, District of Coldstream
or the RDNO office. The application must be filled out by the private hydrant Owner and
the Owner must give permission to GVW Operators to access the hydrant to install and
remove the backflow protection device and meter box.
−
A fee as per the GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw, will be required for the installation, removal
and rental of the backflow prevention device and meter box.
−
The Operator will record water use when removing the hydrant meter box and the water
use will be charged to the customer account.
−
Properties with a meter at the property line still require a permit to use the hydrant and
backflow prevention at the hydrant to protect on-site water quality. However the metered
amount of water used will not be charged to the property owner.
−
The Owner is responsible to have the hydrant maintained under the BC Fire Code and
NFPA and as per their private insurance conditions in addition to recommended annual
maintenance and must keep a maintenance record.
−
Any hydrant maintenance and/or specific conditions required are between the hydrant
owner and the insurance company and does not involve GVW.
−
As a public service, GVW may remind private hydrant Owners from time to time, that
annual maintenance is required and that a permit must be obtained for hydrant use. Not
withstanding, GVW takes no responsibility to ensure the annual maintenance or any other
conditions required by private insurance companies are completed.
−
If any connection to a private hydrant is made without a permit, backflow protection and/or
a meter, the Owner (and Contractor) involved could be subject to fines, confiscation of
connection equipment or the requirement to install hydrant security at the Owner’s
expense.
DISCUSSION:
RDNO staff was directed by the Board of Directors to review GVW private hydrant management and
clarify policy on private hydrant use, operations and servicing. This report makes recommendations
that have been incorporated into a formal policy entitled “GVW Private Hydrant Policy (Draft)” (The
Policy). Specific areas reviewed include:
1. Private hydrant use overview
2. Illegal use
Page 73 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
3.
4.
5.
6.
Monitoring consumption
Maintenance tracking
Rates paid by customers
Impact on insurance rates
1. PRIVATE HYDRANT USE OVERVIEW
The primary purpose of any hydrant is to provide water for fire fighting. Hydrants in the GVW service
area are also used for flushing pipes to improve water quality, construction purposes, and various
municipal operation and maintenance activities. There is strict oversight on public hydrants owned
and operated by GVW where only Fire Rescue Service (FRS) personnel and authorized GVW
Contract Operations Crews from the City of Vernon or District of Coldstream (Operator) are permitted
to operate a public hydrant without a permit.
Contractors may apply for a permit to connect to a GVW public hydrant and are required to pay a fee
that covers the rental of a backflow protection and meter box and to have GVW operations connect it
to the specified hydrant prior to use. Operators are the only designated people that can operate a
public hydrant other than the fire department crews. The contractor then must pay for the water used
according to the meter read after their work is completed.
A review of other jurisdictions indicated that the policies governing the use of private hydrants are split
– some have mixed uses similar to GVW and some limit hydrant access to only fire fighting use to
ensure a hydrant is in good working order in the event of an emergency. In these cases, street
cleaning and other activities are usually aided by water trucks filling at fill stations provided by the
water utility/municipality.
GVW does have one filling station, located near the City of Vernon Operations Services building, used
by water hauling trucks. However, GVW also allows the use of public hydrants by contractors as
outlined above.
According to the information collected for this report, the purpose of a permitting process is to ensure
the utility or FRS staff is aware of who is using private hydrants, for what purpose, for how long,
hydrant is properly serviced after use and to ensure backflow protection is installed to protect water
quality. Several jurisdictions also require that a staff person be present during testing/maintenance
work to monitor and ensure hydrant use is performed according to standards (in particular backflow
prevention) to protect the public water supply. The private hydrant Owner is required to be the permit
holder and their permission for staff to access private property is obtained at the permit application
time. The permitting process is beneficial to ensure the utility is aware of the use and operations can
prepare accordingly to manage demand spikes and aid the Fire Department in removing equipment if
the hydrant is needed to fight a fire. However, permitting requires staff time for managing applications,
monitoring the use and to ensure the hydrant is ready for fire fighting purposes after use.
While there are standards with respect to the installation and water supply to private hydrants, there is
currently no GVW policy regarding the use of private hydrants for any activity. It has been reported by
Operators that they have observed private hydrants being used for filling water hauling and street
cleaning trucks, presumably hired by the private hydrant Owner to clean their parking lots and/or
private roads or for other uses. Private hydrant owners will also hire contractors to flush their private
pipes for water quality purposes.
Concerns with respect to this non-regulated use of private hydrants include:
−
There is a contamination risk to the GVW water system from lack of backflow protection,
especially considering that the water hauling or street cleaning trucks connecting to the
hydrants may be used for other purposes and are likely not cleaned before connection.
Page 74 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
−
Risk to public safety from potential unreported damage to the hydrant. GVW only allows
Operators to operate GVW equipment as the risk of damaged valves is high and when
damage occurs, it goes often unreported. Hence, if the hydrant valves are damaged on
private hydrants, they likely won’t be repaired and may be non-operational if required to fight a
fire.
−
There is likely no post-use servicing. GVW requires that all public hydrants are checked by an
Operator and serviced as required after every use to ensure the hydrant is fully functional
when required by a FSR.
−
GVW does not collect revenue for the water used as most private hydrants are not metered.
However, GVW does collect an unmetered fire main rate in lieu of water use fees being
charged directly.
It is impractical to restrict the use of private hydrants to strictly fire fighting purposes as the private
hydrant Owner is required to complete annual maintenance, flushing for water quality (GVW often
recommends that condo owners have their system flushed via their private hydrants), and potentially
other uses. However, due to the backflow and contamination risks, it is prudent that any use other
than that for fire fighting requires backflow protection. As GVW already has a system in place for the
use of public hydrants requiring the installation of a backflow and meter box, it is recommended that
the current GVW public hydrant use permitting policy be extended to include private hydrants.
We are not recommending at this time that increased monitoring of hydrant use is required. However,
if increased staff time is required, rates would need be adjusted to cover those costs to the utility.
Policy Recommendation
That the GVW public hydrant use policy be extended to private hydrants, which include the following:
−
Only allows FSR to use private hydrants for fire fighting purposes without a permit.
−
A permit is required for all other uses. The permit application would be obtained from the City
of Vernon, District of Coldstream or RDNO office. The application must be filled out by the
private hydrant Owner and the Owner will be required to provide access permission for
Operators to install and remove the backflow and meter box, both of which are a requirement
for hydrant use.
−
A fee as per the GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw will be required for permit processing, meter
box/backflow installation and removal by an Operator, and rental of the equipment.
−
When the equipment is removed, the Operator will record the water used as per the meter
reading and a water use fee will be charged to the customer account.
−
The Owner will be responsible to have the hydrant serviced as required in addition to
recommended annual maintenance and must keep a maintenance record.
.
2. ILLEGAL USE
The illegal use of hydrants has similar issues to that outlined in Section 1 above. Unauthorized use of
hydrants is considered theft and is taken very seriously as it can impair the ability of the FSR to fight
fires. For instance, the illegal use of a GVW hydrant in the BX area caused 4 frozen hydrants in 2013
and in one case; one hydrant was not available for use when there was a fire in the area.
Many jurisdictions use the threat of significant fines ($10,000 in Abbotsford) and potential confiscation
of any equipment found attached to a hydrant to deter theft. Some jurisdictions require that a meter or
Double Check Detector Assembly (backflow protection and water use detection device) be installed at
the customer’s cost if they are caught using a hydrant illegally and have found this to be an effective
deterrent. If all non-fire fighting use was to be prohibited by GVW, an increase in enforcement activity
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
would be required to address illegal use, preceded by an education campaign to inform customers of
the change in policy.
Until 2014, GVW relied strictly on the Hydrant Tampering Fee in the GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw,
requiring that the fee would be imposed through the courts. Bylaw No. 2622, as adopted by the Board
in 2014, allows GVW to issue tickets by an RDNO Enforcement Officer. GVW staff is currently
developing Enforcement Procedures that will outline the response of Operators and Enforcement
Officers. These staff members will be trained in 2015 to complete these duties.
Long time Operators that use to work for the Vernon Irrigation District also report that any equipment
attached to a hydrant illegally was confiscated. GVW will be updating the current metering bylaw and
will include provisions for the confiscation of equipment.
Staff also completed a review on products that are available to deter water theft, which are listed in
the table below:
Security Device
Mueller Hydrant Defender Security Device
2 ½” Security Cap plus Wrench
KingLock™ Hydrant Lock
Universal Hydrant Lock
KingLock™ K2 Hydrant Lock
Double Check Detector Assembly (DCDA)
Price (excl. Tax)
$232.72
$323.10
$168.00
$130.00
$ 94.95
$7000.00
* Also see attached specifications for a Double Check Detector Assembly
used for both backflow protection and illegal use detection.
The illegal use of hydrants must be taken very seriously due to the potential public safety
consequences; hence staff recommends that all tools available be used to deter this practice,
including fines, confiscation of equipment, and education. Although none of the products above are
currently used, staff will continue to investigate the possible use of the devices listed above for both
public and private hydrants.
Policy Recommendation
With the criteria of use outlined in Section 1 above, illegal use of private hydrants will include anyone
that uses a private hydrant without a permit with the exception of the FSR for fire fighting purposes
and RDNO contracted Operators; the following Enforcement Procedures should be implemented to
deter illegal use:
−
Fines, as outlined in the Municipal Ticket Information (MTI) and GVW Rates Imposition
bylaws will be extended to include private hydrants.
−
Confiscation of any hoses or other equipment not authorized to be connected to the
hydrant.
−
If available and approved for use by the local FSR, installation of a hydrant security device
if unauthorized use of private hydrant at the expense of the Owner.
−
Education of private hydrant Owners.
3. MONITORING CONSUMPTION
Metering hydrant use ensures that water used is paid for and accounted in annual water consumption
records. Currently, most private hydrant use is not accounted for and contributes to uncertainty about
how much water supplied by GVW is lost to illegal use or leaks. Other jurisdictions often require
metering at the property line before private hydrants so that any water use is included in the property
Page 76 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
Owners water bill. However firefighters may raise the concern that a meter jam may impede flows
and prevent effective hydrant operation during a fire. This may be a valid concern with positive
displacement meters that have a propeller to measure water consumption; however, recent metering
advancements may resolve this issue with new metering produces. Nonetheless, it is the hydrant
Owner’s responsibility to ensure that any water meter used on a fire service must be approved by
Underwriters Laboratory (UL) Listed and Factory Manual (FM) for fire service use.
GVW requires all domestic, industrial, institutional, commercial and agricultural/irrigation customers to
install meters to measure water consumption. Historically, GVW generally does not enforce metering
for fire fighting applications due the high cost of the larger meters required and installation issues that
arise from hydrant locations typically being far away from a building where the meter is normally
located. Under GVW Subdivision Bylaw No. 2650, 2014, water used for fire hydrants, fire sprinklers
or other fire control facilities may not require metering. However, Bylaw No. 2650 has provisions
within this bylaw that requires “where there is more than one dwelling per legal lot and the length of
service is greater than 50 metres, or in other site specific cases, a meter vault will be required on the
Owner/Developer's property within one meter of property line at the Owner/Developer's cost.” This
allows GVW to ensure that new private hydrants that meet these conditions will be metered at the
property line. In addition, the property Owner will be required to install the appropriate backflow
device to protect the GVW system.
However, there are many existing private hydrants that are not metered and will remain unmetered
unless there is direction for a policy change to install meters at the property line. To monitor
consumption when a permanent meter is not present, many jurisdictions require that a meter box with
backflow prevention device be put in place while a hydrant is used. There is a concern that the
backflow devices within the metering boxes may not provide adequate velocities to complete flushing.
Although all the meter boxes currently used by Operations include backflow protection, the District of
Coldstream is testing a new flushing meter that allows flushing velocities without impeding flow. This
flushing meter can only be used for applications where the risk of backflow is low, such as where an
air gap is maintained between the hose end and the ground and the hose can not be connected to
anything (i.e. water hauling truck).
Policy Recommendation
If the policy recommendation outlined in #1 is approved, then the permit process should include
requirements for backflow protection and a metering box so that water consumption will be accounted
for and paid for by the Owner. However, the policy should include provisions that the temporary
backflow protection and metering box is not required for properties that have a vault at the property
line with a permanent meter and backflow protection.
4. MAINTENANCE TRACKING
GVW’s current policy is similar to the municipalities reviewed in that private hydrants are considered
the property Owner’s responsibility, which includes paying for the costs of annual maintenance. The
maintenance requirements are set by the B.C. Fire Code and NFPA in order to ensure that hydrants
are maintained in a condition useful to fire fighters. GVW Bylaw No. 2650 has the following hydrant
requirements:
−
New waterworks must be designed to take fire protection into consideration. This includes
assuring sufficient flow to meet the Fire Underwriters Survey, Insurers’ Advisory Organization,
and National Fire Protection Association requirements.
−
The construction completion report should include a Fire Hydrant Flow Test and Test Report
for all new hydrants (The Consulting Engineer or RDNO at the Owner/Developer's cost must
complete a hydrant flow test on all new hydrants in accordance with NFPA 291 and submit).
However, no requirement is made for annual testing.
Page 77 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
−
The hydrant(s) must also be color coded based on the available flow and an identification
number, as provided by GVW be stamped on the hydrant.
−
Hydrants may serve a dual purpose as a blow-off for flushing purposes.
The review of other jurisdictions conducted indicates the following key maintenance requirements:
−
Fire hydrants on private property are to be maintained by the Owner of the private property.
−
Fire hydrants should be serviced annually by a certified technician.
−
Proof of this service, in the form of a written certification by the certified technician that the
hydrant has been serviced within the current year is required (some utilities require a copy and
others require that the Owner maintain proof for their own files).
−
Some utilities monitor or restrict the timing of maintenance activities to manage impacts on the
distribution (flow spikes).
Many jurisdictions do not track private hydrant maintenance due to the liability risk. For example, if
the utility misses that a private hydrant is not maintained, and it fails during a fire, would the water
utility be liable for damages? Currently, annual maintenance is not tracked by GVW or the local FRS.
For water utilities that do track annual maintenance, either the utility tracks the maintenance records
or this is done by the local FRS. If maintenance records are to be collected, the following issues must
be considered:
−
Staff time to manage the data entry.
−
Staff time to enforce the requirement, either in the form of a reminder letter or more stringent
enforcement such as fines. In other jurisdictions, fines have been set as the charge to have
the maintenance completed by the local government (or their contractor).
−
Possible enforcement consequences of denying fire service coverage (in the form of refusal to
use hydrants with an unknown maintenance history).
−
Determining which staff would be tasked with maintaining the records. Some FRS have taken
the task on to ensure they are aware of which hydrants are available for their use. In other
jurisdictions the private maintenance records are maintained along with public hydrants so that
the records are stored in one location for easy access by the FRS.
If a private hydrant tracking system was implemented by GVW, there are two systems that GVW
currently uses to track operations that could be used:
1. The BPMS Cross Connection Control Program (CCCP) database, which tracks annual testing
of back flow protection devices (a requirement under the BC Drinking Water Protection Act).
2. Cityworks, a GIS based work order system that is currently used to track the maintenance
requirements of GVW public hydrants.
Policy Recommendation
Although GVW could implement a maintenance tracking procedure, it is not being recommended by
staff due to the increased liability risk that may be assumed and the increased staffing requirement to
implement. Nonetheless, staff recommend that annual letters be sent to private hydrant Owners to
remind them of their requirement to complete annual maintenance and to outline the GVW private
hydrant policy.
Page 78 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
5. RATES
Currently, the GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw No.2622 lists the following charges with respect to fire
hydrants:
7. Unmetered Fire Main Rates
a. 50 mm diameter and smaller
b. 75 mm diameter
c. 100 mm diameter
d. 150 mm diameter
e. 200 mm diameter
f. 250 mm diameter
g. 300 mm diameter
8. Fire Hydrants
C. Temporary Fire Hydrant connection
d. Temporary Fire Hydrant connectionConsumption Rate
e. Application for new fire hydrant
f. i. Fire Hydrant Flow Test - First Test
f. ii. Each additional test in immediate area at the
same time
$ 155.00 per annum
$ 220.00 per annum
$ 280.00 per annum
$ 560.00 per annum
$ 1,130.00 per annum
$ 2,260.00 per annum
$ 4,530.00 per annum
$ 246.00 per hydrant per week or part
$ 2.15 per cubic metre
$ 95.00 per hydrant
$ 600.00
$ 185.00
This fee reflects the lifecycle costs to maintain and replace the piping infrastructure required to
support fire flow standards set for fire fighting. For example, a 40 year lifespan would require
approximately $250 annually for the repair/replacement cost on a 150mm main. Additional costs to
support flow levels must also be recovered. For comparison, the Infrastructure Base Fee charged to
Domestic and Non-Domestic customers is approximately $400 per year. Lastly, consumptive costs
are considered as part of this fee to reflect that the hydrant provides unmetered water flows.
Sample Fees from Other Jurisdictions:
Water Utility
City of Vancouver
City of Kelowna
Bylaw Fees
50 mm
75 mm
100 mm
150 mm
200 mm
250 mm
300 mm
$301.44
City of Pembroke, Ontario
$5/cubic meter plus HST
City of Abbotsford
Range from $0.92 to $1.15 per
cubic meter, depending on
customer class/tier
Glenmore-Ellison Irrigation
District
Approximately $0.40/cubic
meter
$210
$314
$434
$500
$587
$622
$667
$25/day
Page 79 of 149
Comments
Annual fireline rates based on
pipe size (mm)
Annual Fire Protection Use - a
flat fee for all diameter fire
mains.
Charge for water used from a
hydrant. (All hydrants metered)
All private mains metered at
property line. Rate includes
domestic water consumption
and hydrant water use.
Estimated consumption charge
based on excess consumption
charge in domestic fees bylaw.
Hydrant use fee (primarily
applies to public hydrants).
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
City of Prince George
$200 permit fee plus $25/day of
use
$150
Hydrant use fee.
Annual private hydrant
maintenance fee.
Policy Recommendation
Once the GVW Private Hydrant Policy has been set, appropriate rates can be determined to reflect
the requirements for staff and infrastructure resources to support the operation of private hydrants.
6. INSURANCE RATES
In addition to the benefits of having access to a hydrant for flushing and property maintenance,
distance to a hydrant can impact property insurance rates. A private hydrant may give the property
Owner the benefit of reducing annual insurance rates by 30-50% (depending on the insurance
company). For example, an insurance policy sold within the RDNO may vary between $1100/year
and $2500/year based on the property being with the 1000 ft of a hydrant area, resulting in an annual
savings to the property Owner of $1400. However, if a hydrant isn’t considered usable by the FRS, its
value diminishes and is reflected in higher insurance rates.
Policy Recommendation
Input from all FRS departments within the GVW Service Area will be sought to review the draft GVW
Private Hydrant Policy requirements and provide input into their requirements.
Submitted by:
Reviewed and endorsed by:
Zee Marcolin, P.Eng.
Manager, Greater Vernon Water
Dale McTaggart, P.Eng.
General Manager Engineering
Approved for inclusion:
David Sewell,
Chief Administrative Officer
Attached: Staff report dated June 18, 2014 - Unmetered Fire Main Rates
Staff report dated September 18, 2014 - Review of Private Hydrant Policies and Rates
Draft GVW Private Hydrant Policy
Page 80 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
POLICY NO.
ENG-WTR-004
GREATER VERNON WATER FIRE HYDRANTS ON PRIVATE PROPERTY
POLICY
Approval Date:
Approved by the Board of Directors ________________
PURPOSE
This policy is to regulate the use of fire hydrants on private property with the intent of
reducing backflow and contamination risks to the Greater Vernon Water (GVW) system
and to ensure that GVW collects fees that are in line with the services provided by allowing
fire hydrants on private property to connect and use the GVW system for uses other than
fire protection purposes.
POLICY
1.
For the purposes of this policy:
Fire Hydrant: means a water conveyance device where a hose can be attached and
water supplied with fire flows as per the GVW Subdivision and Development Servicing
Bylaw No. 2650, 2013, as amended, for the primary purpose of fighting fires. This
definition includes the hydrant, hydrant connection valve, lead and tee at the main
and refers to all fire hydrants connected to GVW, including fire hydrants on private
property.
Fire Hydrant on Private Property means a fire hydrant that was required to be
located on private property as a condition of development, that is owned and
maintained by the property owner.
2.
As per the Regional District of North Okanagan Cross Connection Control Regulation
Bylaw No. 2651, 2014, as amended, and the Greater Vernon Water Use and
Regulation Bylaw No. 2545 as amended, only local designated Fire Rescue Services
(FRS) are authorized to use all fire hydrants, including fire hydrants on private
property, for firefighting purposes without a permit.
3.
Properties with one or more fire hydrants on private property are required to have a
permit to operate the fire hydrants for all other uses other than firefighting purposes
by FRS personnel. The permit outlines the requirement to have backflow protection
as per the Regional District of North Okanagan Cross Connection Control Regulation
Bylaw No. 2651, 2014, as amended, and a meter as per the Greater Vernon Water
Metering Bylaw No. 2678, 2015, as amended, during operation of the fire hydrant.
4.
A permit application for using a fire hydrant can be obtained from the City of Vernon,
District of Coldstream or the RDNO office. To use a fire hydrant on private property,
the application must be filled out by the fire hydrant Owner and the Owner must give
permission to GVW Operators to access the fire hydrant to install and remove the
backflow protection device and meter box.
Page 81 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
5.
A fee as per the Greater Vernon Water Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2672, 2015, as
amended, will be required for permit processing, the installation, removal and rental
of the backflow prevention device and meter box.
6.
The Operator will record water use from the fire hydrant meter box and the water use
as per the Greater Vernon Water Rates Imposition Bylaw, as amended, will be
charged to the Owners’ customer account.
7.
The Owner will be responsible to meet any requirements of their private insurance
coverage for the fire hydrants on private property in addition to recommended annual
maintenance. Any hydrant maintenance and/or specific conditions required by their
insurance company are between the fire hydrant owner and their insurance company
and is not the responsibility of GVW.
8.
Properties that have a meter at the property line still require a permit to use the fire
hydrant on private property and are required to have the backflow prevention device
and meter box installed at the fire hydrant to protect on-site water quality; however,
the metered amount of water used will be charged to the property owner through the
normal water billing process. It is also the Owner’s responsibility to ensure that the
fire hydrant on private property is serviced after each use and that they meet all
conditions of their insurance company and keep records of all fire hydrant servicing.
9.
As a public service, GVW may remind owners of fire hydrants on private property
from time to time, that annual maintenance is required and that a permit must be
obtained for use of any fire hydrant other than for fire fighting purposes.
Notwithstanding, GVW takes no responsibility to ensure the annual maintenance or
any other conditions required by private insurance companies are completed.
10. If any unauthorized connection to a fire hydrant is made without a permit, backflow
protection and/or a meter, the Owner of the fire hydrant on private property and/or the
Contractor connected to any fire hydrant may be subject to the following:
•
Fines, as outlined in the Regional District of North Okanagan Ticket Information
By-Law No. 1148, 1993 and the Greater Vernon Water Rates Imposition Bylaw
No. 2672, 2015, as amended from time to time.
•
Confiscation of any hoses or other equipment not authorized to be connected
to the hydrant; and/or
•
The requirement to install a hydrant security device at the expense of the
Owner.
Page 82 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2695
A bylaw to amend the text of Greater Vernon Water Use and Regulation Bylaw No. 2545 to add a
definition for fire hydrants.
WHEREAS the Regional District of North Okanagan has adopted Bylaw 2545, 2014 being
“Greater Vernon Water Use and Regulation Bylaw No. 2545, 2014” to Regulate the Use of Water
in the Greater Vernon Water Service Area;
AND WHEREAS the Regional Board is desirous to amend the text of Greater Vernon Water Use
and Regulation Bylaw No. 2545 to add a definition for fire hydrants;
NOW THEREFORE the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan in an open meeting
assembled, hereby ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:
CITATION
1. This Bylaw may be cited as “Greater Vernon Water Use and Regulation Amendment
Bylaw No. 2695, 2015”.
TEXT AMENDMENT
2. That the following definition be added to Section D., Definitions, of Bylaw 2545, 2014:
Fire Hydrant means a water conveyance device where a hose can be attached and supplied
water with typically elevated flows for the primary purpose of fighting fires. This definition
includes the hydrant, hydrant connection valve, lead and tee at the main and refers to all fire
hydrants connected to the Greater Vernon Water system, including fire hydrants on private
property.
Read a First, Second and THIRD Time
this
day of
, 2015
ADOPTED
this
day of
, 2015
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 83 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.4
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2696
A bylaw to amend the text of Regional District of North Okanagan Cross
Connection Control Regulation Bylaw No. 2651 to add a definition for fire hydrants.
WHEREAS the Regional District of North Okanagan has adopted Bylaw 2651, 2014 being
“Regional District of North Okanagan Cross Connection Control Regulation Bylaw No. 2651, 2014”
to Protect Public Health by Controlling Cross Connections to Water Utilities Owned and Operated
by the Regional District of North Okanagan;
AND WHEREAS the Regional Board is desirous to amend the text of Regional District of North
Okanagan Cross Connection Control Regulation Bylaw No. 2651 to add a definition for fire
hydrants;
NOW THEREFORE the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan in an open meeting
assembled, hereby ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:
CITATION
1. This Bylaw may be cited as “Regional District of North Okanagan Cross Connection
Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015”.
TEXT AMENDMENT
2. That the following definition be added to Section D., Definitions, of Bylaw 2651, 2014:
Fire Hydrant means a water conveyance device where a hose can be attached and supplied
water with typically elevated flows for the primary purpose of fighting fires. This definition
includes the hydrant, hydrant connection valve, lead and tee at the main and refers to all fire
hydrants connected to the Greater Vernon Water system, including fire hydrants on private
property.
Read a First, Second and THIRD Time
this
day of
, 2015
ADOPTED
this
day of
, 2015
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 84 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.5
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3900.2697
TO:
Board of Directors
FROM:
Finance
DATE:
October 21, 2015
SUBJECT:
Electoral Area Property Tax Exemptions 2016
RECOMMENDATION:
That Electoral Area 2016 Property Tax Exemption Bylaw No. 2697, 2015 be given First, Second
and Third Readings and further;
That Electoral Area 2016 Property Tax Exemption Bylaw No. 2697, 2015 be Adopted.
SUMMARY:
Bylaw 2697 exempts certain properties within the electoral areas of the North Okanagan Regional
District from property taxation for the 2016 calendar year. The bylaw is the same as the previous
year, with the exception of one property that no longer qualifies.
DISCUSSION:
Approval of property tax exemption by the Regional District under the Local Government Act
exempts these properties from all property taxes collected for the upcoming year, including
Provincial-Rural, School District and Hospital property taxes.
The property becomes exempt from taxation for next year by a municipality or regional district,
the assessed value for that property is not included in the total amount of net taxable values of
land and improvements calculated by the BC Assessment Authority. Therefore, any participation
in a regional district function containing tax exempt properties is affected by a reduction in net
taxable values for apportionment purposes.
The RDNO Property Tax Exemption Policy was advertised in the local newspapers to advise
potential applicants of the policy requirements and deadlines. Contact was also made directly
with property owners that received tax exempt status in 2015, if they had not already applied for
2016. The North Okanagan Community Life Society informed the regional district that while they
still own the property, they lease out the property and no longer qualify for a tax exemption.
Page 85 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.5
Page 86 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.5
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2697
A Bylaw to authorize property tax exemptions for qualifying properties
within the Electoral Areas for the taxation year 2016
WHEREAS Section 809(4) [Property tax exemptions] of the Local Government Act, R.S.B.C.,
1996, Chapter 323, as amended, and Regulations passed pursuant thereto, provides the Board
of a Regional District to authorize, by bylaw, the exemption of property taxes to certain types of
property within Electoral Areas;
AND WHEREAS requests have been received from a number of organizations deemed qualified
for exemption;
AND WHEREAS the Board is desirous of granting exemption from property taxation to qualifying
organizations in accordance with Section 809 [Property tax exemptions] of the Local Government
Act, for the next calendar year;
NOW THEREFORE, the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan, in open meeting
assembled, hereby ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:
CITATION
1.
This bylaw may be cited for all purposes as the "Electoral Areas 2016 Property Tax
Exemption Bylaw No. 2697, 2015".
EXEMPTIONS
2.
Pursuant to Section 809 [Property Tax Exemptions] of the Local Government Act, the
following properties are hereby exempt from taxation on both land and improvements for the
year 2016:
a. Vernon & District Association for Community Living
Assessment Roll No. 722-01170.001 PID n/a
Leased Portion of Plan 7726 and Plan B6253 (see Roll 01170.000)
420 Mountview Road
(E.A. “C”)
b. Gyro Club of Vernon
(Cabin site) 4450 Lumby-Mabel Lake SE
Assessment Roll No. 789-27001.000 PID n/a
(E.A. “F”)
Part DL 3517 KDYD, Crown Land Lease #336179 - East Shore of Mabel Lake
c. Mara Musical & Athletic Association
(Community Hall) 11 Coell-Jones Road
Assessment Roll No. 789-01632.000 PID 024-902-322
(E.A. “F”)
Plan KAP67887, Lot 1, Section 8, Township 20, Range 8, M6, KDYD
d. Mara Musical & Athletic Association
(“Putula” Community Park) Hwy 97A
Assessment Roll No. 789-01653.005 PID 011-254-823
(E.A.”F”)
Lot 1, Plan 39723, Section 9, Township 20, Range 8, M6, KDYD
Page 87 of 149
Electoral Areas 2016 Property Tax Exemption
Exemption Bylaw No. 2697, 2015
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.5
Page 2
e. Mara Musical & Athletic Association
(“Putula” Community Park) 30 Robson Road
Assessment Roll No. 789-01651.000 PID 011-520-558
(E.A.”F”)
Lot 2, Plan 1580, Section 9, Township 20, Range 8, M6, KDYD,
except Plans 18309 and KAP49020
Read a First, Second and THIRD Time
this
day of
2015
ADOPTED
this
day of
2015
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 88 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.6
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3046.01.04
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Sustainability Coordinator
DATE:
September 23, 2015
SUBJECT:
Community Works Fund Project #085
RECOMMENDATION:
That the Mara Community Hall Water System Upgrade be funded from the Electoral Area “F” allocation
of the Community Works Fund at a cost of up to $25,000.00
DISCUSSION:
The Mara Community Hall has been informed by Interior Health that their current drinking water system
does not meet the standards of the Drinking Water Protection Act. The Environmental Health Officer
has indicated that the existing water treatment system must be replaced and upgraded by year end for
the hall to continue to utilize their water source. Due to the existing water source being extremely hard,
the water source will be changed from a well to the Shuswap River and a disinfection system installed.
Installation of the intake line and stand in the Shuswap River will require diving access.
During the assessment of this project concerns were raised as to the costs associated with annual
maintenance and testing of the treatment system. The Mara Musical and Athletics Association has
indicated the annual operating costs will be approximately $1500.00. A small water system qualified
person on contract with Mountain View Electric would monitor the treatment system at $75.00/ month
including taking water samples. The additional money would be allocated for replacement of filters and
bulbs. The Mara Musical and Athletics Association is aware that the annual maintenance of the system
is not to be funded through the Community Works Fund as the $25,000.00 grant can only be applied to
the costs of installation and purchase of the treatment system.
COMMUNITY WORKS FUND:
The project has been assessed utilizing the Regional District of North Okanagan Community Works
Fund (CWF) Tier 2 project assessment which is attached to this report for your review and information.
The project is eligible for funding in the Drinking Water category, infrastructure that supports drinking
water collection, treatment and management systems.
SUMMARY:
It is recommended that the Mara Community Hall Water System Upgrade be funded from the Electoral
Area “F” allocation of the Community Works Fund at a cost of up to $25,000.00
Page 89 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.6
CWF#085
Report to EAAC - September 23, 2015
Page 2
Submitted by:
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Sustainability Coord inator
Endorsed by:
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General Manager, Planning and Building
Page 90 of 149
tive Officer
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.6
Community Works Fund Project Assessment – Tier 2
Over $8,000
Date: September 8, 2015
Project #: 085
Recipient: Mara Musical and Athletics Association- Mara Community Hall Water
Disinfection System Up-grade
Project Cost: Up to $25,000.00
Project Description: The Mara Community Hall has been informed by Interior Health that
their current drinking water system does not meet the standards of the Drinking Water
Protection Act. The Environmental Health Officer has indicated that the existing water
treatment system must be replaced and up-graded.
The new proposed up-grade to the Mara Hall water disinfection system will include a
change in water source, to the Shuswap River, relocation of the existing pump and
installation of a disinfection system. The works and costs are outlined in the attached
Mountain View Electric cost estimate, dated March 23, 2015, for $19,237.00 + GST. The
proposed works have been reviewed by the IHA Public Health Engineer and a construction
permit has been issued.
During the process of identifying a suitable water source, Mountain View Electric has taken
two water samples and had a comprehensive analysis run on each, for a total cost of
$1,515.66. This cost will also be invoiced to Mara Musical and Athletics Association.
An amount of up to $25,000.00 is being recommended for this project to cover both costs
outlined above and to build in contingency funding if additional costs are incurred during
installation. The IHA public health engineer has expressed some concern that there may
be additional costs associated with the flushing of filters once the works have been
completed.
Project Eligibility
Yes
Eligible funding recipient?

Eligible costs?

If project is related to a building,
is the building primarily used for
public good?

Explanation
Mara Musical and Athletes Association.
Expenditures associated with acquiring a
tangible capital asset
Community Hall.
Page 91 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.6
Benefits of the Project –
Benefit to local community
Yes

Explanation
Improvement in facilities at Mara Community
Hall.
Benefit to Electoral Area
Benefit to more than one
Electoral Area
Benefit to all Electoral Areas
Benefit to entire Regional
District
Does the Project meet funding agreement categories?
Project Category
Yes
Public Transit – infrastructure that supports a shared passenger transport
system available for public use
Community Energy Systems – infrastructure that generates or increases the
efficient use of energy
Drinking Water – infrastructure that supports drinking water conservation,
collection, treatment and management systems
Wastewater – infrastructure that supports wastewater and storm water
collection, treatment and management systems.
Solid Waste – infrastructure that supports solid waste management systems
including the collection, diversion and disposal of recyclables, compostable
materials and garbage.
Capacity Building – investments related to strengthening the ability of local
governments to develop long-term planning practices
Local roads, bridges (roads, bridges and active transportation infrastructure
Sport Infrastructure – amateur sport infrastructure
Recreational Infrastructure – recreational facilities and networks.
Cultural Infrastructure – infrastructure that supports arts, humanities and
heritage
Tourism Infrastructure – infrastructure that attract travelers for recreation,
leisure, business or other purposes.
Disaster Mitigation – infrastructure that reduces or eliminates long-term
impacts and risks associated with natural disasters.
Page 92 of 149

BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.6
Does the Project work towards achieving one of the three key national objectives?
Fund Priorities
Productivity and Economic
Growth
Yes
Explanation

Mara Hall is a focal centre for the
community, providing a central point for
activities, functions and events.
Clean Environment
Strong Cities and Communities
Does the Project incorporate principles of Sustainability?
Principles of Sustainability
Yes

Explanation
Mara Hall is a local community resource
providing facilities for community events and
functions. Such facilities can strengthen the
sense of community, providing a focal point
for local activities.
Yes

Explanation
Provides an opportunity to inform the public
of the importance and technologies available
to provide clean healthy drinking water.
Social
Environmental (e.g. energy
efficiency, water savings etc)
Economic
Other benefits of the Project
Project Benefits
Education value
Public Awareness (media
opportunities)
Leverage of additional
resources (funds, volunteer
time, in-kind contributions)
Integration with other Regional District of North Okanagan initiatives
The RDNO has utilized the Community Works Fund to support improvements to
community facilities such as halls throughout the life of the funding program.
Justification for prioritisation of project
Mara Hall currently has a boil water notice in place and the Environmental Health
Officer requires an improved system. The proposed water disinfection system at Mara
Hall will meet the requirements of the Environmental Health Officer.
Page 93 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.6
Distribution of Funds
Area F
Staff Recommendation
That the Mara Community Hall Water Disinfection System Up-grade be funded.
Page 94 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.7
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3046.01.04
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Planning Department
DATE:
September 29, 2015
Development of the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan
and Consideration of Shuswap River Boating Regulations
SUBJECT:
RECOMMENDATION:
That the report dated September 29, 2015 from the Planning Department regarding the establishment
of the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan and subsequent consideration of boating
regulations for the Shuswap River, be received for information.
DISCUSSION:
At the September 16, 2015 meeting, the Board of Directors requested staff to provide a summary of
events leading up to the establishment of the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan (SRWSP)
and subsequent consideration of boating regulations for the Shuswap River. The following report
provides this background information and Appendix A provides a list of Board resolutions pertaining to
the development and implementation of the SRWSP.
History to the SRWSP and Boating Regulations
The decision by the Regional Board to undertake development of the SRWSP was predicated by a
number of events and initiatives including delegations to the Board of Directors, local community
initiatives and broader planning processes. A timeline of events prior to the SRWSP development
follows:
•
1993 – An application was made to the Provincial Ministry of Environment, Lands & Parks for a
10 horsepower motor size restriction on the Shuswap River from Enderby north and downstream
to Mara and between Kingfisher Creek and the City of Enderby. At the time, the Ministry of
Environment, Lands & Parks administered regulation of motorized boats in partnership with the
Federal Department of Transport and the Canadian Coast Guard.
Proponents for the application were the Shuswap Environmental Action Society and the
Shuswap River Preservation Society. The Shuswap River Recreation Awareness Society,
opposed the application.
RDNO was called on to provide support for the application and in an attempt to resolve the issue
established the Shuswap River Safety Committee, with representation from all three groups. No
resolution or consensus came out of the committee and no regulations were implemented.
•
October 2007 – RDNO and the RCMP sign a Memorandum of Understanding to provide
enhanced boat patrols on the Shuswap River and a number of lakes within the North Okanagan
with a focus on boating safety within the region, including speed, proximity to shore, alcohol
consumption, noise, bank erosion and habitat destruction.
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Page 2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
February 2009 – Delegation to the Regional Board from Mara River Group representative
presenting concerns regarding boat traffic, dock construction and other issues on the Shuswap
River and requesting a comprehensive planning process including consideration of regulations
for boat traffic.
April 2009 – Delegations to the Regional Board from Carla Vierke and Save Silver Star Park
representative regarding concerns with mismanagement and lack of protection of watersheds
and specific concerns associated with resort development on water quality.
July 2009 – Delegation to the Regional Board from Elaine Durette requesting that the Regional
Board consider a petition to limit the engine power on Sugar Lake to 40 horsepower to address
public safety and environmental issues.
Summer 2009 – establishment of River Watch, program run by RCMP Safe Communities Unit,
as a mechanism for reporting illegal or unsafe behavior on the Shuswap River.
July 8th, 2009 – At the request of the Board of Directors, Planning staff provide a report to the
Board on options for addressing the planning needs for the Shuswap River, which included:
1. Boating Restrictions and regulation of structures (and uses) below the High Water Mark
2. Development of an Action Plan
3. Development of an Integrated Watershed Plan
The Board of Directors resolved “that this matter be brought forward for consideration in 2010
budget deliberations.”
February 2010 – Shuswap River Stakeholder Consultation meeting called and jointly facilitated
by the City of Enderby and RDNO Electoral Area “F”. A range of issues discussed, with a focus
on the impacts of recreation activities on the Shuswap River, surrounding area and residents.
The meeting resulted in a call for an integrated planning process for the Shuswap River. In
attendance were representatives from the City of Enderby, RDNO, Riverside Community Club,
Mara Musical and Athletics Association, Kingfisher Interpretive Centre, Splatsin, Lower
Shuswap Stewardship Society, Enderby & District Fish & Game Protective Association, Vernon
Safe Communities, Tube Taxi, DFO, Enderby RCMP, Mara River Group, Ministry of
Environment, Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, Kingfisher Community Society,
Mabel Lake Kingfisher East Ratepayers Association, Enderby and District Chamber of
Commerce.
May 5th 2010 – Board of Directors direct planning staff to draft Terms of Reference for the
preparation of an integrated watershed plan for the Shuswap River.
October and November 2010 – request by Ministry of Environment for RDNO to participate in
the Shuswap Lake Integrated Planning Process (SLIPP). Board of Directors appoint
representatives to the SLIPP Steering Committee but decide not to provide financial support at
this time and explore linkages between the Shuswap Lake Integrated Planning Process and the
development of the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan.
2010 and 2011 – RDNO resolutions to the Southern Interior Local Government Association
requesting the Provincial Government immediately take a leadership role and initiate an Inland
Waterways Task Force to review the current recreational, environmental and water quality
issues related to the safe, shared use of inland waterways and bring forward a comprehensive
plan to better manage, regulate, and enforce the shared use of these resources.
SRWSP Development
The process to develop the SRWSP began in late 2010 with the Board of Directors’ endorsement of the
Terms of Reference (October 6th) and approval to fund the plan development through the Community
Works Fund (Electoral Area funding) at a cost of $250,000.00 with the potential for an additional
$50,000.00 (November 3rd). On June 20th, 2012 the additional $50,000.00 in funding was approved by
the Board. Currently $45,000.00 remains in the SRWSP budget.
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Page 3
As outlined in the adopted Terms of Reference, the purpose of the planning process was to:
1. Create a common long-term vision for the management of the Shuswap River Watershed that
all stakeholders and community members agree to and strive to achieve.
2. Create a comprehensive plan that will guide agencies and the community in decision making
with regard to land and water planning within the Shuswap River Watershed.
During the initial stages of plan development a third component to the purpose evolved;
3. Develop a sense of responsibility within the community for the Watershed.
Development of the SRWSP was a three and a half year process and the final document was endorsed
by the Board on April 16th, 2014. Community consultation during the development of the SRWSP was
significant and included the following:
•
•
•
•
•
December 2010 – Stakeholders workshop, Enderby. The objective was to involve local
governments, agencies, first nations and community groups to introduce them to the planning
process and gauge the level of interest and involvement they could commit to. 27 organizations
represented, approximately 55 attendees. Invite list was based on staff and political
identification of organisations. Topics covered included a vision for the Shuswap River
Watershed, and identification of issues and concerns.
June 2011 – two public workshops held, one in Ashton Creek and one in Lumby, 76 attendees.
Topics covered were similar to the December 2010 workshop.
November 2011 – Sharing Experiences workshop held in Ashton Creek, 38 attendees.
Workshop included presenting on the Technical Assessment of the watershed, the work of
community groups within the watershed and the analyses of issue identification. Use of working
groups to inform the development of the plan was introduced and volunteers called for.
Early 2012 – three working groups were established, populated by 32 members of the
community. The working group members represented a diverse range of interests and came
from throughout the watershed. The working groups concentrated on three focus areas,
1. land use and the natural environment
2. recreation
3. inter-agency relations, roles and responsibilities.
The working groups developed goals, objectives and strategies for the SRWSP based on the
issues and concerns raised during earlier public consultation exercises.
March 2013 – two public information sessions held, one in Enderby and one in Lumby, more
than 74 attendees. The work of the working groups was presented to the wider community to
obtain feedback on the goals, objectives and strategies in the draft plan.
First Nations Input
Both Splatsin and Okanagan Indian Band undertook a process with their community members to
ascertain their values, concerns and areas of interest within the Shuswap River Watershed. Both Bands
then provided a document to be incorporated into the SRWSP outlining their interests in the watershed.
SRWSP Endorsement and Implementation
The final SRWSP was endorsed by the Regional Board on April 16th, 2014 and includes five goals and
a set of 19 objectives and 114 strategies drafted to support the sustainable management of the
Shuswap River Watershed and reflect the values, concerns and areas of interest of community
members who participated in the planning process. Implementation of all the strategies simultaneously
was not possible and therefore identification of priority strategies to focus initial action was required.
Prioritization exercises at the March 2013 public information sessions and a working group workshop
identified pursuing boating regulations, as described in the SRWSP, as one of the top four priorities for
implementation. The other three priority strategies were:
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Page 4
•
Improve consultation and community input on watershed management through the creation of
an independent permanent Shuswap River Watershed Advisory Body
•
Develop a comprehensive education program that addresses and incorporates all the strategies
that speak to education, and
•
Prioritize high value riparian sites based on available information and identify potential funding
sources for restoration.
These priority strategies were endorsed for implementation by the Board of Directors on July 16th, 2014.
RDNO, in partnership with Vernon Protective Services – Safe Communities Unit, Lower Shuswap
Stewardship Society, Enderby and District Services Commission, Enderby and District Chamber of
Commerce and the City of Enderby, developed and undertook a consultation strategy to seek feedback
on proposed boating regulations for the Shuswap River over the spring and summer of 2015.
The Shuswap River boating regulations being discussed in 2015 are proposed only and are as follows:
Zone 1:
Zone 2:
Zone 3:
From the mouth of the Lower Shuswap River at Mara Lake to the Baxter Bridge (Trinity
Valley Rd) – vessel engine size limit of 10 Horse power.
Lower Shuswap River from the Baxter Bridge (Trinity Valley Rd) upstream to the eastern
(upstream) end of Skookumchuck Rapids Park – no motorized vessels.
From the mouth of Mid Shuswap River at Mabel Lake South upstream to the Shuswap
Falls – no motorized vessels.
The proposed regulations were based on recommendations within the SRWSP, which were:
• No wake zone between Mara Lake and Trinity Valley Bridge (Baxter Bridge).
• Non-motorised watercraft zone between Trinity Valley Bridge (Baxter Bridge) and Mabel Lake
and from Mabel Lake to Shuswap Falls*.
* Enforcement activities, search and rescue and essential fish management operations exempt.
As Transport Canada regulations do not include a no-wake option and difficulties with enforcement of
a speed restriction, the partnership decided to consult on a horse power restriction for Zone 1 instead
of the no-wake recommendation from the SRWSP.
In partnership with the organizations listed above, and based on conversations with Transport Canada
staff, the RDNO has sought feedback on the proposed regulations to gauge the level of community
support for regulations to be established on the Shuswap River, prior to undertaking a full evaluation of
the proposed regulations, as required by the Transport Canada Vessel Operating Restriction
Regulations (VORR) process. If the Board of Directors decides to make an application to Transport
Canada for boating regulations on the Shuswap River an evaluation of how proposed regulations may
impact health, safety, environment, economy, public security, business, trade, society and culture will
need to be undertaken as well as a cost-benefit analysis.
The RDNO has received in excess of 2000 surveys regarding the proposed boating regulations. Staff
and a consultant are in the process of reviewing and analyzing this feedback and will endeavour to
provide a summary and options moving forward in the coming months. A number of options exist for
future action by the Regional Board:
1.
2.
3.
Initiate an application to Transport Canada for the boating regulations as currently proposed.
Consider and consult on alternative regulation options.
Do not initiate an application to Transport Canada
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Development of the SRWSP and Proposed Boating Regulations History
Report to EAAC - September 29, 2015
Page 5
SUMMARY:
The development of the SRWSP, and subsequent consideration of boating regulations for the Shuswap
River, were in response to concerns regarding the Shuswap River Watershed that have been raised
within the community and with the Regiona l Board over the last 22 years. The SRWSP reflects the
values, concerns and areas of interest of community members who participated in the planning process,
one of which was the impacts of motorized boats on land owners, other users and the natural
environment. Exploring boating regulations was identified as a priority action for implementation of the
SRWSP by the Board and as a result consultation on proposed regulations based on recommendations
within the SRWSP has been undertaken over the spring and summer of 2015.
Submitted by:
.: :.: - ·-_·-·_A~¢,,_,__
·'/. _-_
-- > - Anna PaR
Sustainability Coordinator
~
.
.
E~
R~
General Manager, Planning and Building
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Development of the SRWSP and Proposed Boating Regulations History
Report to EAAC – September 29, 2015
Page 6
Appendix A
RDNO Board of Directors Resolutions Pertaining to the development and
implementation of the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan.
July 8th, 2009
"That the report from the Sustainability Coordinator and the General Manager, Planning and Building
regarding the Shuswap River Planning Process dated June 11, 2009 BE RECEIVED;
and that this matter be brought forward for consideration in 2010 budget deliberations. "
CARRIED
May 5th, 2010
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, Planning Staff be directed to draft
Terms of Reference for the preparation of an integrated watershed plan for the Shuswap River with
the intent of utilizing Community Works Funds to complete the project based on the report dated April
7, 2010 from the Sustainability Coordinator.
CARRIED
October 6th, 2010
That the Terms of Reference for the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan dated August 18,
2010 be endorsed.
CARRIED
November 3rd, 2010
That the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan be funded from the Community Works Fund at
a cost of $250,000.00 with the potential for an additional $50,000.00 being sought after phase one is
complete;
And further, that the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan area include all tributaries to
Upper, Middle and Lower Shuswap River;
And further, that the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan Steering Committee include all five
Regional District of North Okanagan Electoral Area Directors.
CARRIED
December 8th, 2010
That the Revised Draft Terms of Reference for the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan
dated October 20, 2010 be endorsed.
CARRIED
October 19th, 2011
That the planning framework for the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan be endorsed for
public presentation.
CARRIED
October 19th, 2011
That staff be directed to review the cost of providing food and covering mileage costs for Shuswap
River Watershed Sustainability Plan working group volunteers.
CARRIED
June 20th, 2012
That the Community Works Fund Project #035 Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan, be
funded with an additional $50,000.
CARRIED
November 20th, 2013
That upon incorporation of First Nations feedback, the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan
be referred to relevant agencies for final review and endorsement.
CARRIED
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Development of the SRWSP and Proposed Boating Regulations History
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Page 7
April 16th, 2014
That the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan attached to the staff report dated March
19, 2014 be endorsed; and further,
That the Plan be referred to relevant agencies, municipalities and First Nations for final endorsement.
CARRIED
July 16th, 2014
That the implementation of the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan be undertaken with the
priority strategies for 2014- 2015 being:
•
Engage the community to pursue all available regulatory options to establish boating
regulations on the Shuswap River (Strategies 9.7, 10.1, 12.3, 13.3 and 15.3).
•
Improve consultation and community input on watershed management through the creation of
an independent permanent Shuswap River Watershed Advisory Body and develop terms of
reference for a Watershed Advisory Body which includes identifying a source of funding
(objective 18, strategy 18.2).
•
Develop a comprehensive education program that addresses and incorporates all the
strategies that speak to education (Strategies 16.1, 19.2, 19.3, 19.5, 19.6, 19.7).
•
Prioritize high value riparian sites based on available information (e.g. SHIM & FIM inventory
mapping work and Golder Shuswap River Technical Assessment) and identify potential
funding sources for restoration (Strategy 6.1 ); and further,
That staff be directed to initiate the process to apply for boating regulations through Transport
Canada on the Shuswap River; and further,
That staff be directed to explore the options for a Watershed Advisory Body for the Shuswap
River including:
•
identifying potential representatives (advisory body composition);
•
drafting the terms of reference; and,
•
highlighting funding options I opportunities.
CARRIED
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October 21, 2015 - Item E.8
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3760.08
TO:
Board of Directors
FROM:
Rob Smailes, General Manager, Planning and Building
DATE:
October 6, 2015
SUBJECT:
Closing of inactive Municipal Building Permit files (pre-2000)
PROPOSED RECOMMENDATION:
That Board Policy LU054, which outlines that all Municipal Building Permit files for expired permits
issued prior to December 31, 1999 which have not received a final inspection be declared inactive and
closed and that no further staff time be expended on enforcement of closed files.
DISCUSSION:
As a result of the adoption of Board Policy LU051 (attached) on July 18, 2012, all Electoral Area Building
Permit files for expired permits issued prior to December 31, 1999 which had not received a final
inspection were declared inactive and the files closed.
The matter of inactive Municipal Building Permit file closure was referred to a CAO Technical Committee
along with other items to be discussed (listed below) at a meeting initially scheduled for August 23,
2012:
• Report re Closing of Inactive Electoral Area Building Permit files
• Policy LU051 Closing of Inactive Building Permit files
• Report re Notice on Title Fees and Policy
• Policy LU031 Notice on Title Procedures
• Policy LU052 Notice on Title Timeline
• Building Amendment Bylaw No. 2554 re: increasing cost of removing a Notice on Title
The meeting was then rescheduled to September 20, 2012 due to some planned absences and the
annual UBCM convention. Subsequently, as a result of the request from the City of Armstrong for a
Service Review of the Building Inspection Service, the Technical meeting was then cancelled and it was
determined that the items that were to be discussed would be considered during the Service Review
process. The preliminary meeting for the Building Inspection Service Review was held October 10,
2012.
Additional Service Review meetings as well as Chief Administrative Officer’s meetings were held in
2013 and 2014; however, the topic of this report was never addressed specifically.
The Building Inspection Service in its current form will be terminating at the end of 2015, with the
adoption of Bylaw No. 2644, 2014 which amended Building Inspection Extended Service Establishment
Bylaw No. 842, 1989 by removing all references to member municipalities within the Building Inspection
Extended Service Area.
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October 21, 2015 - Item E.8
Closing of inactive Municipal Building Permit files
Report to Board of Directors – October 6, 2015
Page 2
Expired Building Permits 1970 – 1999 (Municipalities)
As shown on the below table there are 1,166 Building Permits issued from year 1970 to 1999 in the four
member municipalities which have expired with no final inspections being conducted.
Expired Municipal Building Permit numbers are as follows:
Municipalities (Arm, End, Lum, Spl)
1970-1992
1993-1999
855
311
TOTAL
1,166
Expired Building Permits 2000 – 2013 (Electoral Areas and Municipalities)
The Building Inspection Department has achieved significant success in reducing the number of
outstanding final inspections for expired or expiring Building Permits for those Permits issued between
January 2000 and December 2013 for both the electoral areas and municipalities.
All of the expired Building Permit records that are listed above have been reviewed by Building
Department staff to determine if there is evidence of substantial health and safety deficiencies. In
specific cases where substantial health and safety deficiencies have been observed, staff have notified
the current property owner of the deficiencies and made attempts to have outstanding issues resolved.
During the Spring/Summer of 2015, the new Chief Building Inspector provided memos to all four
municipal Chief Administrative Officers outlining that the RDNO is looking to identify Building Permit
files showing non-compliance to regulations and clean up stale dated files so that the separation from
the Service is a clean transition. The recommendation is for their respective Councils to consider
placing Notices on Title before the end of 2015 if there are any building permit files, listed in the
individual memos, that still require final inspections. The table below outlines the number of outstanding
files per jurisdiction.
Jurisdiction
City of Armstrong
City of Enderby
Village of Lumby
Township of Spallumcheen
Number of
Outstanding Files
4
1
10
14
The Chief Building Inspector is currently in the process of preparing reports recommending Notices be
filed on Title for properties for the City of Armstrong and will be working with the other municipal Chief
Administrative Officers (CAOs) in the near future to prepare similar reports.
If the municipalities who are no longer utilizing the RDNO Building Inspection service at the end of 2015
have not passed resolutions regarding Notices on Title on the outstanding files indicated by the Chief
Building Inspector, the Board of Directors will then do be required to do so, to reduce liability exposure
to the RDNO.
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Closing of inactive Municipal Building Permit files
Report to Board of Directors - October 6, 2015
Page 3
SUMMARY:
A number of inactive pre-2000 Electoral Area Building Permit files were closed in conjunction with the
adoption of Policy LU051 . The RDNO is looking to clean up stale dated Municipal Building Permit files
so that the separation from the Service, effective December 31 , 2015 is a clean transition. It is
recommended .t hat Board Policy LU054 be Adopted and that all pre-2000 Municipal Building Permit files
be closed and that no further staff time be expended on these files.
Submitted by:
~RPP
General Manager, Planning and Building
Page 104 of 149
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October 21, 2015 - Item E.8
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
POLICY NO. LU054
Closing of Municipal Building Permit Files (pre-2000)
Approval Date:
Amendment Date(s):
PURPOSE
To outline a procedure to close all Municipal Building Permit files for expired permits issued
prior to December 31, 1999 which have not received a final inspection.
BACKGROUND
A legal opinion has been obtained from Fulton & Company LLP law firm with regard to
appropriate procedure in the closing of the older expired Building Permit files. In
summary their opinion states:
The practice of formulating a policy for closing files, and the retention and
destruction of records is perfectly acceptable, and we recommend that the
District Board of Directors pass such a policy by resolution. The policy should
clearly state that files that have been opened for "x" length of time will be closed,
and that no further staff time will be expended on enforcement of closed files.
The recommendations from the Building Department Review Project completed in 2011,
to facilitate the closing of inactive files was endorsed by the Board of Directors at the
April 18, 2012 Committee of the Whole meeting. The specific recommendation was:
That a Board policy be developed and approved which authorizes the closing of
files from 1999 and prior years.
POLICY
That all Muncipal Building Permit files for expired permits issued prior to December 31,
1999 which have not received a final inspection be declared inactive and closed and that
no further staff time be expended on enforcement of closed files.
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October 21, 2015 - Item E.8
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
POLICY NO. LU051
Closing of Electoral Area Building Permit Files (pre-2000)
Approval Date:
July 18, 2012
Amendment Date(s):
PURPOSE
To outline a procedure to close all Electoral Area Building Permit files for expired permits
issued prior to December 31, 1999 which have not received a final inspection.
BACKGROUND
A legal opinion has been obtained from Fulton & Company LLP law firm with regard to
appropriate procedure in the closing of the older expired Building Permit files. In
summary their opinion states:
The practice of formulating a policy for closing files, and the retention and
destruction of records is perfectly acceptable, and we recommend that the
District Board of Directors pass such a policy by resolution. The policy should
clearly state that files that have been opened for "x" length of time will be closed,
and that no further staff time will be expended on enforcement of closed files.
The recommendations from the Building Department Review Project completed in 2011,
to facilitate the closing of inactive files was recently endorsed by the Board of Directors
at the April 18, 2012 Committee of the Whole meeting. The specific recommendation
was:
That a Board policy be developed and approved which authorizes the closing of
files from 1999 and prior years.
POLICY
That all Electoral Area Building Permit files for expired permits issued prior to December
31, 1999 which have not received a final inspection be declared inactive and closed and
that no further staff time be expended on enforcement of closed files.
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Attachment
A
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
POLICY NO. GVPRC-002
RDNO – GREATER VERNON PARKS, RECREATION & CULTURE COMMUNITY
GARDENS IN GREATER VERNON
Approval Date:
February 3, 2010
Amendment Date(s):
April 5, 2012
PURPOSE
Recognize that community gardening is a valuable recreation activity that can contribute to food
security, community development, environmental awareness, positive social interaction and
community education, and outline how the Regional District will encourage community gardening.
DEFINITIONS
“Community Garden” is defined in this policy as a garden containing plots that are available to
members of the community. The gardens may be located on publicly owned parks, publicly leased
land or on private lands that are donated or leased for the purpose of community gardening.
Activities may include:
•
Production of food for personal or shared use (or for donation) by the participants.
•
Demonstration gardening or other instructional programming.
“Plot” is defined as a garden plot, or small piece of land designated for gardening. A plot within a
community garden can be one of the following styles:
“Allotment” – A plot that is allotted to an individual to grow whatever they choose within the
guidelines provided within this policy. Maintenance of the plot is the responsibility of the
individual. The produce is for the individual, who can choose to donate or make available for
shared use.
“Collective” – A plot that is open to any members of the community to gather, garden and
grow what is collectively agreed to by the participating members. Maintenance of the plot is
the responsibility of all participating members and, ultimately, the Community Garden
Committee. The produce is for shared use.
POLICY STATEMENTS
1.
Community gardening is recognized as a valuable recreation activity that can contribute to
community development, environmental awareness, positive social interaction and community
education.
2.
The Regional District of North Okanagan will collaborate with interested groups in assisting the
development of community gardens.
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Community Gardens
-2-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item E.11
Policy No. GVPRC-002
PROCEDURES
The Regional District will support the development of community gardens in Greater Vernon through
the following means:
•
Consider the need for community gardens during the acquisition or development of park land;
especially in areas of high-density housing.
•
Provide tenure on public land for a minimum of three (3) years (or longer as long as user ship
is maintained), where a community garden is supported and has been approved by the
Regional District.
•
Negotiate leases for privately owned land, should they be required.
•
Issue charitable tax donation receipts, should it be requested by a land donor.
•
Provide in-kind support, where feasible.
•
Make available an annual Community Garden Start-up Grant, to a maximum of $2500, which
can be accessed through an application process, by community or neighbourhood
associations interested in developing a community garden.
Conditions of Use
The following conditions will apply to community gardens on parkland and community gardens on
privately owned property that is leased by the Regional District for the purpose of community
gardening:
•
The garden is developed at no cost to the Regional District, other than the Community Garden
Start-up Grant Program, and in-kind support outlined in the previous section.
•
A community consultation process indicates neighbourhood support for the garden.
•
A garden site plan will be drawn up and approved by the General Manager of Parks,
Recreation and Culture. The plan must include the layout and style of the plots and indicate
any proposed structures or fences.
•
A community group agrees to develop and operate the gardens according to a users
agreement which will specify the term of use, management responsibilities, user fees and
access procedures including the following specific terms:
a. "The standard term of the user agreement will be three (3) years with an option to
renew. The Regional District may consider the granting of multiple terms in exceptional
circumstances.
b. Garden plots must be filled from a waiting list on a first come first served basis.
c. While community gardens are a neighbourhood initiative, membership in the
committee or organization, and the opportunity to be allotted a plot, must be open to
any resident of Greater Vernon.
d. A list of site regulations is to be developed and signed by each participant as an
indication of their compliance.
e. No pesticides or chemical fertilizers are to be used.
f.
Agreement to sign a waiver to “hold harmless” the property owners from any liability.
g. The committee or organization must adhere to maintenance standards set by the
Regional District and the site can be revoked for non-compliance.
h. No barriers to general public access to the site can be erected.
i.
Garden practices shall comply with all district and municipal policies and bylaws.
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Attachment
B
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2672
A bylaw to impose rates for the Greater Vernon Water Service
WHEREAS Section 796(1) [General authority for services] of the Local Government Act, R.S.B.C.,
1996, Chapter 323, as may be amended, states that the Board of a Regional District may
operate any service that the Board considers necessary or desirable for all or part of the Regional
District;
AND WHEREAS the Regional District has adopted Bylaw No. 1262, being the Regional District of
North Okanagan – Greater Vernon Regional Water Supply Local Service Establishment Bylaw No.
1262, 1994, and amendments made thereto, which authorizes the Regional District to impose fees
and charges for the annual cost of providing water supply and distribution services;
AND WHEREAS Section 803(1) [Options for cost recovery] of the Local Government Act, states
that a Regional District may recover the costs of its services by way of fees and charges
imposed Section 363 [Imposition of fees and charges] of the Local Government Act;
AND WHEREAS Section 363 [Imposition of fees and charges] of the Local Government Act
provides that a Board of a Regional District may, by bylaw, impose a fee or charge payable in
respect of all or part of a service of the Regional District;
AND WHEREAS the Regional Board is desirous to amend the current rates and/or billing
process;
NOW THEREFORE, the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan, in open meeting
assembled, hereby ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:
A. CITATION
This Bylaw may be cited as “Greater Vernon Water Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2672,
2015”.
B. INTERPRETATION
1. Words or phrases defined in the British Columbia Interpretation Act, Community Charter, or
Local Government Act or any successor legislation shall have the same meaning when used
in this Bylaw unless otherwise defined in this Bylaw.
2. The headings contained in this Bylaw are for convenience only and are not to be construed
as defining or in any way limiting the scope or the intent of the provisions of this Bylaw.
3. Any act or enactment referred to herein is a reference to an enactment of the Province of
British Columbia and regulations thereto, as amended, revised, consolidated or replaced
from time to time, and any Bylaw referred to herein (as may be cited by short title or
otherwise) is a reference to an enactment of the Board of the Regional District of North
Okanagan, as amended, revised, consolidated or replaced from time to time.
4. If any provision of this Bylaw is held to be invalid by a court of competent jurisdiction, the
provision may be severed from the Bylaw and such invalidity shall not affect the validity of
the remaining portions of this Bylaw.
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Attachment
B
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Page 2
C. SCHEDULES
The following Schedules are attached to and form part of this bylaw and are enforceable in
the same manner as this Bylaw:
Schedule “A” – Rates and Fees for the Greater Vernon Water Service
D. DEFINITIONS
In this bylaw:
After Hours Call Out means requests for service from Greater Vernon Water requiring a
response after the regular hours of operations of the Operating Contractor and/or any time
during Saturday, Sunday and Statutory Holidays.
Agricultural Land means bona fide agricultural land.
Agricultural Over Consumption Rate means the price of water per cubic metre that is
charged to properties and Contiguous Farms when more than the Allocation Volume is used
during the Irrigation Season in accordance with Schedule “A” of this bylaw.
Agricultural Water Purchase Fees means the one time fee to increase the flow rate for
bona fide agricultural land.
Allocation means the amount of water assigned to a property by the RDNO for irrigation
purposes. The allocation is measured in hectares, and determines the maximum
instantaneous flow rate permitted to the property, and the maximum total volume of water
permitted per irrigation season.
Allocation Fee Credit means the amount credited to the Allocation Fee for a property with
Domestic or Non Domestic Units which equates to a maximum of 0.4 hectares per parcel and
shall not be greater than the property Allocation. The credit applies to properties that have at
least one Domestic or Non Domestic Unit connected to the Utility and assessed an
Infrastructure Base Fee.
Allocation Volume means a property’s Allocation in hectares times 5,500 cubic metres per
hectare.
Appeal For Agricultural Water Rates - Application Fee means the fee charged, per
property, to review the status of a property and determine if the property is Bona Fide
Agricultural Land.
Appeal For Agricultural Water Rates - Late Application Fee means an additional fee
applied to Appeals for Agricultural Water Rates applications received after February 15th of
each year.
Billing Date means the date the Utility Bills are sent to the customers.
Bona fide Agricultural Land means land used for agricultural purposes as defined by the
BC Assessment Authority, and supplementary criteria as approved by the Regional Board
from time to time.
Building Permit means a building permit issued for a property by the local jurisdiction having
authority to issue building permits.
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Page 3
Building Permit Review Fee means the one time fee to review building permits if the works
require an increase in demand on Greater Vernon Water.
Community Garden means a garden space containing allotment style gardens that are
available to members of the community and have a Community Garden Lease agreement
with the Regional District of North Okanagan.
Connection Fee means the fee for customers to connect to the Greater Vernon Water
system and have not paid a Development Cost Charge.
Consumption Charge means the Consumption Rate times the volume of water used and
billed to the customer.
Consumption Rate means the price of water per cubic metre that is charged to properties
with both a water service connection and water meter in accordance with Schedule A” of this
bylaw.
Contiguous Farm means more than one Bona Fide Agricultural Land parcel of the same
ownership, or immediate family, and sharing a common boundary line, and as approved by
the Regional District.
Delcliffe Water Utility means the stand alone water system that services lots on Delcliffe
and Cameron Roads.
Development Inquiry Fee means the fee charged to review a preliminary concept of a
proposed development where the water infrastructure has not been defined.
Domestic Fees means the fees and charges billed to domestic customers.
Domestic Unit means a single residential unit, including but not limited to, single family
dwelling, each unit in a multiple family dwelling, mobile home, occupiable space for a
mobile domestic vehicle or trailer, apartment unit, strata unit or plumbed residential or
agricultural outbuilding or other plumbed buildings including units within commercial,
institutional and industrial buildings. The number of Domestic Units may be calculated as
thirty (30) fixture units or a portion thereof being equal to one Domestic Unit as defined by
the British Columbia Building Code, current edition, as amended from time to time.
Fire Main means a service that is intended for the purpose of providing a supply of water for
fire fighting purposes.
Fixture Units means a fixture unit as defined in the British Columbia Plumbing Code, current
edition, as amended from time to time.
GVW or Greater Vernon Water means the water utility created by the Regional District of
North Okanagan – Greater Vernon Regional Water Supply Local Service Establishment
Bylaw No. 1262, 1994, and amendments made thereto.
Hemodialysis Consumption Rate means the rate per cubic metre that is used to calculate
the charge for water used on home hemodialysis on a dedicated water meter in accordance
with Schedule A” of this bylaw.
Hydrant Tampering Fee means the fee charged for the unauthorized use of any hydrant
connected to a Greater Vernon Water source.
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Attachment
B
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Page 4
Infrastructure Base Fee means the minimum fee per domestic unit or per non domestic and
mixed use service or water supply independent of water use.
Irrigation Season means the 5 month period from approximately mid April to Mid
September, as may be modified by drought or other conditions as determined by the RDNO
from time to time.
Latecomer Administration Fee means the fee charged to prepare and execute a latecomer
bylaw.
Leak Adjustment Application Fee means the application fee charged to submit a written
request for consideration of a financial adjustment to a utility account due to a possible leak
on the customer’s property.
Local Area Service Administration Fee means the fee charged to prepare and execute a
Local Area Service Agreement including any referendum, poll, etc.
Meter Re-Read Fee means the fee charged for Greater Vernon Water to re-read a meter
at the customer’s request in accordance with the GVW metering bylaw as amended from
time to time.
Meter Testing Fee means the fee charged for Greater Vernon Water to conduct an onsite
meter test at the customer’s request in accordance with the GVW metering bylaw as
amended from time to time.
Minimum Allocation Fee means the minimum fee per parcel for land with allocation.
Minimum Fee means the minimum charge added to the infrastructure base fee in lieu of a
smaller Consumption Charge per metered service.
Mixed Use means properties or buildings that contain Domestic and Non Domestic uses.
Non Domestic means all services that are not used for domestic or agricultural purposes
including but not limited to congregate care facilities, parks, commercial, institutional,
industrial and mixed use.
Non Domestic Non-Potable Rate means the rate assessed to customers for outdoor use
only for non-potable purposes as approved by the Regional Board. This rate is not available
to new users.
Non Potable means water that is not meant for human consumption or cleaning.
Obstructed Water Meter Fee means the charge to read a water meter that could not be
read due to some action or inaction of a property owner or occupier. This fee is charged
when the obstruction continues 30 days after a written warning.
Off Season Agricultural Water Use means water consumed outside of the Irrigation
Season on Agricultural Land and includes Stock Watering.
Operating Contractor means the contractor(s) Greater Vernon Water employs to operate
the water utility.
Page 125 of 149
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Attachment
B
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Page 5
Park Model Recreational Unit means a recreational vehicle designed as living quarters for
seasonal recreation accommodation, which can be relocated on occasion, and must be
connected to those utilities necessary for the operation of installed fixtures and appliances,
and has a Gross Floor Area, including lofts, not exceeding 50 square metres (538.2 square
feet) when in the setup mode, and has a width greater than 2.6 metres (8.5 feet) and less
than 4.42 metres (14.5 feet) in the transit mode. A park model recreational vehicle must
conform to CAN/CSA-Z241 Series Standard (dated 1992 or later) and is not a trailer as
defined by this bylaw.
Plan Review and Inspection Fee means the one time fee to have a complete set of
construction plans per phase reviewed, and the construction inspected from time to time by
Greater Vernon Water.
Quarter means a period of time that is a billing period approximately three months long.
Recreational Vehicle includes trailers, motor-homes, truck and camper combinations but
for the purposes of this bylaw does not include Park Model Recreational Units unless
otherwise specified elsewhere in this bylaw.
Regional Board means the Board of Directors of the Regional District of North Okanagan.
Regional District and RDNO means the Regional District of North Okanagan.
Shut-Off / Turn-On, Meter In / Meter Out Fee means the fee to interrupt or resume water
supply by means of a shut-off or turn-on of a water service valve or to remove or install an
existing meter at the request of a customer.
South Vernon Irrigation District means the stand alone non potable water system that
services customers on Okanagan Avenue and Okanagan Landing Road.
Subdivision Application Fee means the one time fee to apply for subdivision review.
Temporary Hydrant Use Fee means the fees and charges to use any hydrant connected to
the GVW system and that is charged on a per hydrant, per week or part thereof, plus
consumption.
Trailer means any vehicle, coach, house-car, conveyance, or conveyance with an addition,
designed to travel often on the highways, constructed or equipped to be used as temporary
living or sleeping quarters by travellers.
Truck Fill Station Fees means the fees and rates per cubic meter charged to use devices
provided by Greater Vernon Water to fill containers.
Unmetered means a water service without a water meter.
Utilities Collection Roll means a list of each property served by the water system that is
liable to a water charge; and which designates the lands as Residential, Commercial,
Agricultural, and/or indicates the water entitlement (allocation).
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
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October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Page 6
Vacant Land Infrastructure Base Fee means the fee for properties that have access to the
Greater Vernon Water system including a service connection whether the property is
connected or not and whether or not water is used but are not paying other Infrastructure
Base Fees or Allocation Fees. Properties that are actively using an alternate water supply
such as another water utility, well, lake or stream intake, for potable water use or will never
require a water service are exempt from this fee.
Water for New Construction means where there is no existing water meter for new
construction, the time between sixty [60] days after a building permit has been issued until
the time the water meter is enrolled into the billing system.
Water Meter means a device owned by Greater Vernon Water to measure the quantity of
water used by a customer.
Water Meter Tampering Fee means the fee charged for tampering with a water meter to
reduce the quantity of water that the meter will read. This includes altering the meter or
meter read out, bypassing the meter, providing a false meter read, installing the meter
incorrectly or not installing a water meter as directed in writing.
Water Service means the pipe connecting the Greater Vernon Water main to the property
line.
Water Service Application Fee means the one time fee to apply for a water service to an
existing lot.
Water Service Construction Fee means the fee to construct the water service from the
water main to the property line. This water service may have been constructed prior to the
subdivision, building permit, or other activities on the property.
Water System Tampering Fee means the fee charged for the repairs resulting from damage
or unauthorized use of Greater Vernon Water infrastructure or property.
Written Warning means a letter containing the property owners name and the location of
the property advising of the fees billable if the owner does not take action.
E. RATES
1. Every person being the owner of lands and premises and whose property is on the Greater
Vernon Water Collection Roll shall pay to Greater Vernon Water the rates established for the
service in accordance with Schedule "A" as attached hereto, and in the manner herein
provided.
2. All accounts shall be rendered to the owner of the lands and premises to which water service is
provided.
3. A Utilities Collection Roll will be prepared prior to June of each year and be updated from time
to time, which will serve as the basis for which the rates described in Schedule "A" will apply
and be levied for allocation and water use.
4. Water service rates may be pro-rated for new connections or new construction.
5. Where a customer can prove plumber’s receipts or other pertinent evidence that a plumbing
failure, resulting in a water loss in excess of 30 cubic metres, has been repaired, the customer
may complete a Billing Adjustment Application and submit the Application Fee. At the
discretion of the Manager – Greater Vernon Water or designate, a credit volume may be
calculated for half of the volume of the calculated water loss. The credit volume shall be
calculated by subtracting the historical average consumption of the billing quarter from the
actual consumption. Historical averages will only include years in which a representative water
Page 127 of 149
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
Attachment
B
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Page 7
use trend can be established, otherwise, estimates will be used based on typical customer
trends established by Greater Vernon Water. Adjustments will be limited to the last two
quarters of billing, including the quarter when the repair was completed, but only if the volume
lost is greater than 30 cubic metres. Each property is limited to one billing adjustment every 36
months. Billing adjustments will NOT be considered for the following:
6. i.
above-ground leaks in any type of sprinkler system;
broken sprinkler heads;
rental properties;
routine dripping or leaking faucets, water leaking commodes/toilets or any type of faulty
fixture; and
new construction for a period of one year.
Non Domestic Non Potable rates in Section 5.e.i apply to the following properties:
-
7921 Greenhow Road;
7961 Buchanan Road;
1101 – 14 Avenue;
7920 Highland Road; and
5100 Silver Star Road
All these properties shall be phased in to be billed at 100% of the Non Domestic and Mixed
Use Fee at the following:
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
60% of Non Domestic and Mixed Use Fee
70% of Non Domestic and Mixed Use Fee
80% of Non Domestic and Mixed Use Fee
90% of Non Domestic and Mixed Use Fee
100% of Non Domestic and Mixed Use Fee
ii. Non Domestic Non Potable rates in section 5.e.ii applies to the following property:
-
6325 Highway 97
6325 Highway 97 shall be phased in to be billed at 100% of the Non Domestic and Mixed Use
Fee at the following:
2015
2016
2017
66% of Non Domestic and Mixed Use Fee
83% of Non Domestic and Mixed Use Fee
100% of Non Domestic and Mixed Use Fee
7. For vacant land, the greater of the Vacant Land Infrastructure Base Fee or the Allocation Fee
will apply. Where the land has an alternate water supply the Allocation Fee will apply.
8. Off Season Agricultural Water Use consumption shall be based on the meter readings taken
during normal agricultural turn off (mid September) and turn on (mid April) and billed
accordingly. An agricultural customer who requires water for bona fide agricultural purposes
outside the normal irrigation season may complete an Early Agricultural Turn on or Late
Agricultural Turn off application and submit the application fee.
9. Subject to approval of the application in Section 8, the Early Agricultural Turn on or Late
Agricultural Turn off shall not exceed 30 calendar days of the irrigation season turn on of turn
off dates and water consumption shall be considered part of the properties annual allocation.
Any consumption over the annual allocation shall be billed in accordance with Schedule “A” Section 1e. Allocation Over Consumption Rate. The Off Season Agricultural Water Use rate
shall apply to any consumption beyond the 30 day extension.
Page 128 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
Attachment
B
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Page 129 of 149
GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2672, 2015
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
Attachment
B Page 1
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
SCHEDULE "A" attached to and
forming part of Bylaw No. 2672, 2015
SCHEDULE "A" - RATES AND FEES FOR GREATER VERNON WATER SERVICE
Effective April 1, 2015, in accordance with the Utilities Collection Roll, the following rates shall apply and be
levied for water use for the full year or, where applicable, prorated for a portion thereof:
1
Allocation Fees
1
a.
Allocation Fee
$66.86
per hectare of allocation per
fiscal quarter or part
1
b.
Allocation Fee Credit
$26.72
per fiscal quarter or part up to a
maximum of 0.4 hectares
1
c.
Minimum Allocation Fee
$26.72
per fiscal quarter or part
1
d.
Early Agricultural Turn on or Late Agricultural Turn off Fee
$75.00
per farm, application required
1
e.
Agricultural Over Consumption Rate
1
e.
i. Tier A
0 to 10% over allocation
$0.30
per cubic metre per year
1
e.
ii. Tier B
Over 10 to 30% over allocation
$0.60
per cubic metre per year
1
e.
iii. Tier C
Over 30 to 50% over allocation
$1.22
per cubic metre per year
1
e.
iv. Tier D
Over 50 to 90% over allocation
$1.53
per cubic metre per year
1
e.
v. Tier E
More than 90% over allocation
$2.19
per cubic metre per year
2
Agricultural Water and Non Agricultural Peak Flow Purchase Fees
2
a.
2
b.
2
c.
3
3
Application Fee
For each 0.1 of a hectare of agricultural allocation or part
thereof
For each 0.1 litres per second peak flow demand for nonagricultural purposes
$200.00
per application
$600.00
subject to availability
$770.00
subject to availability
Off Season Agricultural Water Use
a.
Based on metered consumption
$0.77
Page 130 of 149
per cubic metre
GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2672, 2015
4
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
Attachment
B Page 2
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Domestic Fees
4
a.
Infrastructure Base Fee for each domestic unit, for 0.78
litres per second maximum flow
4
b.
Domestic Fees - Metered Consumption Rate per Domestic Unit
4
b.
4
b.
4
b.
4
b.
4
b.
4
c.
4
d.
Unmetered fee where metering IS possible, added to Infrastructure Base Fee
4
4
4
4
d.
d.
d.
d.
i. initial and first full quarter after written warning
ii. second and third quarters
iii. fourth quarter
iv. after one year and beyond
4
e.
Hemodialysis consumption rate
5
i. Tier A
0 to 10 cubic metres
ii. Tier B
Over 1 Over 10 to 20 cubic metres
iii. Tier C
Over 20 to 40 cubic metres
iv. Tier D
Over 40 to 80 cubic metres
v. Tier E
Over 80 cubic metres
Unmetered fee (where metering is NOT possible as
determined by the Regional District) added to Infrastructure
Base Fee
$101.80
per quarter or part
$0.51
per cubic metre per quarter
$1.07
per cubic metre per quarter
$1.22
per cubic metre per quarter
$1.53
per cubic metre per quarter
$2.19
per cubic metre per quarter
$200.00
$300.00
$500.00
$1,000.00
$2,000.00
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
$0.10
per cubic meter
Non Domestic and Mixed Use Fees
5
a.
i. Minimum Fee measuring elements 16 mm and
smaller
$38.00
per quarter or part
5
a.
ii.
$57.00
per quarter or part
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
a.
a.
a.
a.
a.
a.
a.
$84.00
$208.00
$239.00
$770.00
$1,100.00
$1,440.00
$2,000.00
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
5
a.
$300.00
per quarter or part
5
b.
$101.80
per quarter or part
5
c.
iii. Minimum Fee measuring elements 22 to 26 mm
iv. Minimum Fee measuring elements 27 to 39 mm
v. Minimum Fee measuring elements 40 to 55 mm
vi. Minimum Fee measuring elements 56 to 80 mm
vii. Minimum Fee measuring elements 81 to 110 mm
viii. Minimum Fee measuring elements 111 to 160 mm
ix. Minimum Fee measuring elements over 160 mm
x. Minimum fee where metering is NOT possible as
determined by the Regional District.
Infrastructure Base Fee for each non domestic and mixed
use, for 0.78 litres per second maximum flow
Vacant Land Infrastructure Base Fee
$101.80
per quarter or part
5
d.
Metered Consumption (added to Infrastructure Base Fee)
$1.53
Minimum Fee measuring elements 17 mm to 21 mm
Page 131 of 149
per cubic metre
GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2672, 2015
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
Attachment
B Page 3
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
5
e.
Non Domestic Non-Potable Consumption Rate (added to Infrastructure Base Fee)
5
e.
i. Metered consumption (see section E.6.i)
$0.92
per cubic metre
5
e.
ii. Metered consumption (see section E.6.ii)
$1.01
per cubic metre
5
f.
Unmetered fee where metering IS possible (added to Infrastructure Base Fee)
5
5
5
5
f.
f.
f.
f.
i. initial and first full quarter after written warning
ii. second and third quarters
iii. fourth quarter
iv. after one year and beyond
6
$300.00
$500.00
$1,000.00
$2,000.00
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
per quarter or part
Metering
Water meter must be purchased from GVW and
includes the installation and/or inspection
completed during one site visit.
6
a.
Water Meter Cost [includes installation and inspection on
new construction and inspection on retrofits]
6
b.
Water Meter Inspection Fee
$50.00
per occasion
6
c.
Meter Re-read Fee
$50.00
per occasion
6
6
d.
e.
Meter Testing Fee
Leak Adjustment Application Fee
$84.00
$50.00
per occasion
per occasion
$33.00
$33.00
$33.00
$33.00
$33.00
$33.00
$33.00
per quarter
per quarter
per quarter
per quarter
per quarter
per quarter
per quarter
$250.00
per hydrant per week or part
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
8
Unmetered Fire Main Rates
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
50 mm diameter and smaller
75 mm diameter
100 mm diameter
150 mm diameter
200 mm diameter
250 mm diameter
300 mm diameter
Fire Hydrants
8
a
Temporary Fire Hydrant connection
8
b.
Temporary Fire Hydrant connection - Consumption Rate
$2.19
per cubic metre
8
8
8
c.
d.
d.
Application for new fire hydrant
Fire Hydrant Flow Test
$96.90
per hydrant
$600.00
8
d.
i. First Test
ii. Each additional test in immediate area at the same
time
9
9
9
$185.00
Truck Fill Station
a.
b.
Infrastructure Base Fee
Consumption Rate
$200.00
$2.60
Page 132 of 149
per quarter
per cubic metre
GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2672, 2015
10
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
Attachment
B Page 4
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Water Service Connection and Other Construction Fees
10 a.
10 b.
10 c.
Service under 26 mm diameter with a maximum length of
20 metres
Service 27 to 38 mm diameter with a maximum length of
20 metres
Service 39 to 55 mm diameter with a maximum length of
20 metres
$5,400.00
plus water meter
$5,500.00
plus water meter
$7,500.00
plus water meter
10 d.
Service 56 to 110 mm diameter with a maximum length of
20 metres
at actual cost, plus 20%
overhead
10 e.
Service 111 to 160 mm diameter with a maximum length of
20 metres
at actual cost, plus 20%
overhead
10
Service 161 to 210 mm diameter with a maximum length of
20 metres
at actual cost, plus 20%
overhead
Service Disconnection
at actual cost, plus 20%
overhead
f.
10 g.
at actual cost, plus 20%
overhead unless superseded by
bylaw rate of respective
Jurisdiction
at actual cost, plus 20%
overhead
10 h.
150 mm Hydrant
10
i.
Other Construction Services
10
j.
Fee for connection to Greater Vernon Water by:
- Existing water utilities that are not managed by or connected to the Regional District; or
- Existing buildings or lots not serviced by the Greater Vernon Water Utility; or
- Additional service to an existing customer where there is no new subdivision and/or building permits being
issued (including secondary suites)
10
j.
10
10
10
10
j.
j.
j.
j.
ii. Secondary Suites (SFD)
iii. Multi-family units
iv. Park Model Recreation Unit Lots or Pads
v. Recreational Vehicle and Trailer Lots or Pads
10
j.
vi.
10
j.
vii. Commercial - Residential
10
j.
viii. Commercial - Other
$7.27
10
j.
ix.
$3.63
10 k.
11
i.
Single family dwelling (SFD)
Institutional
$2,180.00
per unit
$1,090.00
$1,857.00
$1,090.00
$545.00
per unit
per unit
per lot or pad
per lot or pad
per square metre of gross floor
area
per unit
per square metre of gross floor
area
per square metre of gross floor
area
$8.90
$1,000.00
Industrial
Water for New Construction - to be billed at the unmetered
rate
Shut-Off / Turn-On / Meter In / Meter Out Fee
per quarter or part thereof
$50.00
Page 133 of 149
per use/per meter
GVW Rates Imposition Bylaw No. 2672, 2015
12
After Hours Call Out
13
Domestic Appeal for Agricultural Land
13 a.
13 b.
14
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
Attachment
B Page 5
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Appeal for Agricultural Water Rates - Application Fee
Late Application Fee (after Feb. 15) (charged in addition to
application fee under 13.a.)
$80.00
per hour, minimum $160.00
$60.00
per property
$50.00
per property
Development Fees
14 a.
14 b.
Development Inquiry Fee
Subdivision Application Fee
$240.00
$360.00
per inquiry
plus $10.00 per lot created
14 c.
Building Permit Review Fee
$180.00
plus $10.00 per 200 m2 based
on gross floor area
14 d.
14 e.
Water Service Application Fee for existing lots
Subdivision and Development Servicing Bylaw Variance
15
Plan Review
15
15
15
15
15
15
Inspection Fees
b.
b.
b.
b.
b.
b.
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
v.
$250.00
On first $100,000
$100,001 to $200,000
$200,001 to $500,000
$500,001 to $1,000,000
Above $1,000,000
5%
4%
3%
2%
1%
Site inspection Fees where plan review and inspection fees
not charged
16 b.
Hydraulic Model Inquiry
17
17
17
17
17
per sheet. Maximum of 2
reviews.
minimum $500.00
Development Fees
16 a.
17
per application
Plan Review and Inspection Fees
15 a.
16
$120.00
$1,200.00
$60.00
Actual Cost per
result
per occasion
$240.00 minimum
South Vernon Irrigation District Fees
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
Grade A
Grade B
Grade C
Grade D
Mobile Home
$208.08
$222.36
$114.24
$65.28
$32.64
per hectare per year
per hectare per year
per hectare per year
per hectare per year
per pad per year
$146.88
per Domestic Unit per quarter
18
Delcliffe Water Utility Fee
19
Latecomer Administration Fee
$2,400.00
20
Local Area Service Administration Fee
$2,400.00
21
Unauthorized Use Fees
21
a.
Water System Tampering Fee
21
21
21
b.
c.
d.
Hydrant Tampering Fee
Water Meter Tampering Fee
Obstructed Water Meter Fee
$ 10,000
maximum
$1,440.00
$600.00
$265.00
22
Community Garden User Fee
$0.60
per cubic metre
23
Proof of Water Form For Connection to a RDNO
Water System
$25.00
per application
Page 134 of 149
as approved by Regional Board
per hydrant per day or part
per occasion or per day
per occasion
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
Attachment
C
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Vernon Campus
7000 College Way
Vernon BC, V1B 2N5 Canada
Phone: 250-545-7291
Fax: 250-545-3277
www.okanagan.bc.ca
Tannis Nelson
Community Development Officer
Regional District North Okanagan
By Email: [email protected]
Dear Tannis:
Re: Agriculture Water Allocation
I am writing this letter on behalf of Okanagan College and Kindale Developmental Association
with respect to the sudden change in water rates for the Kalamalka Demonstration
Garden/Patchwork Farms site located at Okanagan College – Vernon Campus.
This garden/farm initiative was developed in 2012 from broad community support with a focus
on education and community participation to advance the social, economic, environmental
aspects of local sustainable agriculture and food systems. There has been considerable
community support for this project and over $352,000 has been invested to date.
The development of the activities for this site and the accompanying financial model for the farm
and garden were premised on the Greater Vernon Water's granting of the agricultural water rate.
Mr. Al Cotsworth granted the minimal agriculture allocation to this site with the support of the
District of Coldstream and the Regional District.
This allocation has been in place for two years and the College and Kindale Developmental
Association have been making operational decisions and contracts based on the continuation of
this rate. A review of the last two years of billing information indicates that the garden/farm used
considerable less water than the allocation allows. Furthermore, this spring we have invested in a
new irrigation system so that additional water conservation can be realized.
The change from an agricultural water allocation rate to the new community garden rate is
estimated to increase the cost of water from approximately $110/year to $1500/year based on last
year's meter readings. As stated earlier, the College and Kindale Development Association have
not developed a financial model for the site that can cover these costs.
At this time we are concerned about the Regional District changing the agreed upon terms for
water and the lack of any notice regarding this change. We believe that this site is providing
considerable community benefit through the various programs offered, is fulfilling the
Page 135 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
Attachment
C
October 21, 2015
- Item E.11
Agricultural Land Commission's request for agriculture education/initiatives outlined in the
decision on the ALR's alternative use of the sport field area, and reinforces the District of
Coldstream and Regional District's support for agricultural.
We are requesting that the Greater Vernon Water and Regional District North Okanagan
reconsider its decision and reinstate the agricultural water allocation that was promised to this
site.
If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me.
Regards,
Jane Lister
Jane Lister
Regional Dean
Page 136 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORSAttachment
- REGULAR
AGENDA
D
October 21, 2015 - Item E.11
APPLICATION FOR RDNO FARM CLASSIFICATION
Greater Vernon Water
NOTE: If your property has BC ASSESSMENT FARM CLASSIFICATION, you are automatically
eligible for the agricultural water rate and do not need to submit an appeal.
Name of Property Owner(S):
Phone #1:
Phone #2:
Address of Property Applied for:
Mailing Address (if different from above):
Total Property Size (Acres):
Existing Water Allocation (Hectares):
Type of Irrigation System (eg. drip, hand set, overhead
Income from Farming (Previous Year):
sprinkler, etc.):
PLEASE NOTE: Applications require proof of income unless classified as a
RDNO Community Garden. New farms without farms income may apply and
submit a New Farm supplemental application
Types of Crop and/or Livestock:
Land Leased:
† Yes † No
If Yes, Name of Renter:
(the owner or renter can provide proof of income)
Do you have an Agricultural Water Meter:
† Yes † No
PLEASE NOTE: water meters must be installed
before turn on.
Do you have a Backflow Preventor?
† Yes † No
PLEASE NOTE: testable backflow preventors must
be installed before turn on and tested annually.
PLEASE SEE REVERSE SIDE FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
THE APPLICANT ACCEPTS THE FOLLOWING TERMS:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
All agricultural water used must be metered separately prior to approval of application;
All domestic water used must be metered prior to approval of application;
Only one appeal per property may be filed per calendar year, successful appeals are valid for one calendar year;
$60 NON REFUNDABLE application fee made payable to the ‘Regional District of North Okanagan’;
Applications received after February 15th will be subject to a $50 non refundable late fee;
Must meet Cross Connection Control Standards;
The applicant will notify Greater Vernon Water (GVW) if farming activity ceases;
GVW can conduct random audits, including site inspections, to confirm eligibility;
Eligibility for agricultural water may be withdrawn at the discretion of GVW if land use ceases to meet the criteria for agricultural use or if access for
site inspections is denied; and
10. Current water restrictions must be adhered to at all times.
In the event of a successful application, the applicant will install (a) separate water meter(s) at their sole expense to measure all water used on
the property. The meter(s) must be installed and inspected before the agricultural water rate comes into effect.
Above fees are per Greater Vernon Water Rates Imposition Bylaw, as amended
Signature of Property Owner(s):
Date:
OFFICE USE ONLY
CCC File #:
PID File No.:
Legal Description:
ˆ
ˆ
Approved
Denied
Lot:
Plan:
Compliant:
ˆ Yes ˆ No
Sec:
Twp:
Valid Until:
Ref. No.:
Name Of Authorized Official (Print)
Signature
Date
Comments:
ˆ On non-potable water source
ˆ
ˆ
$60 Non-Refundable Application Fee
$50 Non-Refundable Late Fee (In Addition to the $60 Application
Fee After February 15)
ˆ
Cash
Receipt #:
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
9848 Aberdeen Road
Coldstream, BC V1B 2K9
Phone: 250-550-3700 Fax: 250-550-3701 www.rdno.ca
Page 137 of 149
ˆ Cheque
ˆ Debit
CRITERIA FOR AGRICULTURALBOARD
WATERof
USE
RATES
DIRECTORS
- REGULAR AGENDA
Attachment D
October 21, 2015 - Item E.11
The following criteria must be met in order for landowners to receive irrigation water at the agricultural rate:
1. An annual application for RDNO Farm Classification must be applied for no later than February 15. Applications submitted
after this date will be subject to a non-refundable late fee in addition to the appeal application fee.
2. Properties without BC Assessment Farm Classification with an existing irrigation allocation greater than 0.41 ha (1 acre)
can apply annually to receive irrigation water at the agricultural water rate.
3. Properties with an existing irrigation allocation less than or equal to 0.41 ha (1 acre) will not be eligible for an appealRDNO
Farm Classification, and will be invoiced at the domestic rate unless they meet the RDNO Community Garden Criteria as
set out in Community Gardens in Greater Vernon Policy No. GVPRC-002.
4. Properties without BC Assessment Farm Classification or without a RDNO Farm Classification will be considered
domestic. Domestic water use is required to be metered and is charged at the domestic water rate.
5. A successful application must meet the following conditions:
a. Agricultural use of the property is permitted pursuant to the appropriate zoning regulations;
b. The property is used for agricultural purposes, comprising at least one of the following uses:
-
Apiculture;
Aquaculture;
Christmas tree culture;
Community Garden;
Dairying;
Floriculture;
Forage production;
Forest seedling and
seed production;
-
-
-
Fruit and vegetable
production;
Herb production;
Horse rearing;
Horse Boarding;
Horticulture;
Populous species and salix
species intensively cultivated
in plantations;
Insects raised for biological
pest control;
-
Livestock raising;
Medicinal plant culture;
Poultry and egg
production;
Seed production;
Turf production;
Wool, hide, feather or fur
production; and
The raising of crops or
animals for human
consumption
The following activities are NOT considered agricultural for the purposes of water billing:
- Production of manufactured derivatives from agricultural raw materials;
- Production for the occupants’ own domestic consumption,
- Irrigation of lawns, gardens and landscaping;
- Agricultural support services; and
- Breeding and rearing of pets, except horses.
6. The property owner must purchase a second water meter from GVW and install it inside the property line to capture all
water use. The cost to purchase and install the meter, pit and appurtenances will be borne by the property owner. The
meter must be inspected by GVW before eligibility for the agricultural water rate is instated.
7. Landowners with water allocations less than or equal to 0.82 hectares (2 acres) will be required to meet the income threshold
of $1,000 per year. Landowners with water allocations greater than 0.82 hectares will be required to meet the income
threshold of $2,500 per year. Proof of income is required with ALL appeal applications made, except for Community
Gardens as defined by Greater Vernon Policy No. GVPRC-002.
8. New farms may apply for an interim approval process as follows:
a. Complete a “New Farm – SUPPLEMENTAL APPLICATION FOR RDNO FARM CLASSIFICATION”.
b. Provide receipts for purchases relating to new farm development.
c. Provide receipts for gross farm income for previous year (if available), and estimated annual income projections
that can be reasonably expected for the proposed farming operation (will be referenced in future applications).
d. New farms will be required to meet and sustain the minimum income threshold (see item 7. above) following two
years of operation. The RDNO Utility Manager may approve an extended interim approval period providing the
new farm activity meets the BC Assessment criteria for the classification of land under development as a farm.
Receipts will be required annually to demonstrate the income threshold has been met prior to approval of RDNO
Farm Classification for the third year of new farm operation.
9. All properties must be assessed for backflow prevention and meet the Cross Connection Control Bylaw including
installation of required backflow prevention devices and / or assemblies.
10. Notification regarding approved or rejected appeals will be mailed to the address provided. Rejected appeals will be
informed of the reasons.
Greater Vernon Water (GVW) is a function of the Regional District of the North Okanagan, responsible for water supply,
treatment and distribution. Please feel free to contact GVW for additional information at:
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
9848 Aberdeen Road
Coldstream, BC V1B 2K9
Phone: 250-550-3700 Fax: 250-550-3701 www.rdno.ca
Page 138 of 149
Revised: 03/31/2015
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1a
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the GREATER VERNON ADVISORY COMMITTEE of the
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District
Office on Thursday, October 8, 2015.
Members:
Director J. Cunningham
Alternate Director J. Garlick
Councillor G. Kiss
Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Alternate Director B. Spiers
Director A. Mund
J. Kidston
City of Vernon
Chair
District of Coldstream
Vice Chair
District of Coldstream
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area "C"
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
Alternate Agricultural Representative
Staff:
D. Sewell
D. McTaggart
S. Banmen
T. Nelson
K. Pinkoski
P. Juniper
Z. Marcolin
J. Miles
L. Schrauwen
B. Johnstone
Chief Administrative Officer
General Manager, Engineering
General Manager, Finance
Community Development Coordinator
Manager, Parks
Deputy Corporate Officer
Manager, Greater Vernon Water
Water Sustainability Coordinator
Executive Assistant, Engineering
Accounts Receivable Clerk
Also Present: Director R. Fairbairn
Director D. Dirk
Councillor P. McClean
Councillor G. Taylor
Director C. Lord
T. Siebel
Electoral Area “D”
Board Chair
District of Coldstream
District of Coldstream
District of Coldstream
City of Vernon
Chief Administrative Officer, District of
Coldstream
Media and Public
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 8:01 a.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – October 8, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Mund
That the Amended Agenda of the October 8, 2015 Greater Vernon Advisory Committee meeting
be approved as presented.
CARRIED
Page 139 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1a
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-2-
October 8, 2015
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – September 3, 2015
Moved and seconded by Director Macnabb and Councillor Kiss
That the minutes of the September 3, 2015 Greater Vernon Advisory Committee meeting be
adopted as circulated.
CARRIED
NEW BUSINESS
Vernon Public Art Gallery
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Mund
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the letter from the Vernon Public Art Gallery,
dated September 8, 2015, be forwarded for discussion at the upcoming cultural facilities workshop
of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee.
CARRIED
Greater Vernon Water 2012 Master Water Plan Stakeholder Advisory Committee
Moved and seconded by Director Fleming and Alternate Director Garlick
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the consideration of the request from the
Citizens for Changes to the Master Water Plan to hire an independent engineering consultant be
postponed pending review of the 2012 Master Water Plan by the Greater Vernon Water 2012
Master Water Plan Stakeholder Advisory Committee.
CARRIED
Opposed by: Councillor Kiss and
Alternate Director Spiers
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Spiers and Councillor Kiss
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, sufficient funds be budgeted from reserves in
the 2016 Greater Vernon Water budget to hire an independent engineering consultant to review
the 2012 Master Water Plan.
DEFEATED
Opposed: Directors Cunningham, Macnabb, Fleming,
Mund, and Alternate Director Garlick
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Mund
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, engineering staff from the District of
Coldstream and the City of Vernon be invited to participate in the 2012 Master Water Plan review.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Director Macnabb and Alternate Director Garlick
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, a representative of the Consulting Engineering
Technical Group be brought in to present the 2012 Master Water Plan to the Greater Vernon
Water 2012 Master Water Plan Stakeholder Advisory Committee.
CARRIED
Page 140 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1a
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-3-
October 8, 2015
Review of Greater Vernon Water Rates and Fees Structure
The Manager, Greater Vernon Water provided a presentation to the Committee regarding the
Greater Vernon Water rates and fees structure.
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fleming
That the report dated September 22, 2015 from the Manager, Greater Vernon Water regarding
the review of Greater Vernon Water rates and fees structure be received for information and
discussion.
CARRIED
Alternate Agricultural Representative Kidston left the meeting.
Parks and Water Development Cost Charges (DCC’s) – Non-profit Housing
The Committee discussed the Parks and Water DCC’s – Non-profit Housing item. It was
determined that additional information is required prior to coming back to a future Committee
meeting for consideration.
Greater Vernon Community Garden Water Rates
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Mund
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, a grant in the amount of $1,500 be awarded
to the Greater Vernon Community Garden Network to offset the cost of water at the Okanagan
College community garden, with funds to come from Greater Vernon Parks and Recreation (060);
and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the rate established during the annual water
rate discussions for Community Gardens be set in the range of $0.10 - $0.12 per cubic metre.
CARRIED
The Committee requested that the Kindale Association be invited as a delegation at a future
Committee meeting to provide information regarding their community garden operations.
Fire Hydrants on Private Property
Greater Vernon Water Fire Hydrants on Private Property Policy No. ENG-WTR-004
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Mund
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Greater Vernon Water Fire Hydrants on
Private Property Policy No. ENG-WTR-004 be endorsed.
CARRIED
Greater Vernon Water – Water Use and Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2695, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Fleming and Macnabb
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Greater Vernon Water Use and Regulation
Amendment Bylaw No. 2695, 2015 be given First, Second and Third Readings; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Greater Vernon Water Use Regulation
Amendment Bylaw No. 2695, 2015 be adopted.
CARRIED
Page 141 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1a
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-4-
October 8, 2015
Cross Connection Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Mund
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Regional District of North Okanagan Cross
Connection Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015 be given First, Second and
Third Readings; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Regional District of North Okanagan Cross
Connection Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015 be adopted.
CARRIED
South Vernon Irrigation District - East
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Fleming
That the report dated September 15, 2015 from the Manager, Greater Vernon Water regarding
the results of the second petition for the South Vernon Irrigation District – East be received for
information.
CARRIED
Special Greater Vernon Advisory Committee Meeting Date for Budget Discussions
The Committee requested that a Special Greater Vernon Advisory Committee meeting be
scheduled for 9:00 a.m. on October 29, 2015 for 2016 budget discussions.
REPORTS
Greater Vernon Water 2012 Master Water Plan Stakeholder Advisory Committee Meeting
Minutes
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Mund
That the minutes of the October 1, 2015 Greater Vernon Water 2012 Master Water Plan
Stakeholder Advisory Committee meeting be received for information.
CARRIED
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Fleming
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Greater Vernon
Advisory Committee convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in
accordance with Section 90(1)(e)(g) and (k) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
The regular meeting of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee adjourned to meet In Camera at
10:15 a.m.
The regular meeting of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee reconvened at 11:21 a.m.
Page 142 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1a
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-5-
October 8, 2015
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 11:21 a.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Juliette Cunningham
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 143 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1b
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the ELECTORAL AREA ADVISORY COMMITTEE of the
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District
Office on Thursday, October 8, 2015.
Members: Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Director R. Fairbairn
Director H. Cameron
Director H. Halvorson
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “D”
Electoral Area “E”
Electoral Area “F”
Chair
Vice Chair
Staff:
P. Juniper
R. Smailes
L. Frank
A. Page
J. de Pfyffer
C. Elley
Deputy Corporate Officer
General Manager, Planning and Building
Regional Planning Projects Manager
Sustainability Coordinator
Small Utilities Manager
Clerk, Electoral Area Administration
Also
Present:
R. Morgan
Regional Crime Prevention Coordinator
City of Vernon
Public
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 2:01 p.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Regular Agenda – October 8, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Cameron
That the Agenda of the October 8, 2015 Electoral Area Advisory Committee meeting be approved
with the following additions:
– E.9 - BX / Swan Lake Fire Hall
– E.10 - Cooperman – Author of Book about the Shuswap River
− In Camera Item - 90(1)(k)
CARRIED
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Electoral Area Advisory Committee – September 3, 2015
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Fairbairn
That the minutes of the September 3, 2015 Electoral Area Advisory Committee Meeting be
adopted as circulated.
CARRIED
Page 144 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1b
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-2-
October 8, 2015
DELEGATIONS
Vernon / North Okanagan Safe Communities Unit
The Regional Crime Prevention Coordinator provided an update on activities he has undertaken
over the past month.
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Fairbairn
That the report dated September 28, 2015 from the Vernon / North Okanagan Detachment – Safe
Communities Unit be received for information.
CARRIED
NEW BUSINESS
Bylaw 2682 - Grindrod Water Local Service Area Establishment Amendment
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Grindrod Water Local Service Area
Establishment Amendment Bylaw No. 2682, 2015 be given First, Second and Third Readings;
and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Grindrod Water Local Service Area
Establishment Amendment Bylaw No. 2682, 2015 be Adopted.
CARRIED
Bylaw 2696 – Regional District of North Okanagan Cross Connection Control Regulation
Amendment
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Cameron
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Regional District of North Okanagan Cross
Connection Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015 be given First, Second and
Third Readings; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Regional District of North Okanagan Cross
Connection Control Regulation Amendment Bylaw No. 2696, 2015 be Adopted.
CARRIED
Bylaw 2690 - Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan Amendment
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Fairbairn
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community
Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2690, 2015 be given Second Reading as amended and be referred
to a Public Hearing
CARRIED
Bylaw 2694 - Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Cameron
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Silver Star Official Community Plan
Amendment Bylaw 2694, 2015 be given First Reading and considered in conjunction with the
Regional District
(i)
financial plan and
(ii)
waste management plan
pursuant to Section 882 of the Local Government Act; and further,
Page 145 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1b
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-3-
October 8, 2015
That Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2694, 2015 be referred to various
agencies and First Nations in accordance with Section 879 of the Local Government Act; and
further,
That Silver Star Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2694, 2015 be referred to Silver
Star Resort and the Electoral Area “C” Advisory Planning Commission for review and comment.
CARRIED
Community Works Fund Project #085 - Mara Community Hall Water System Upgrade
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Fairbairn
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Mara Community Hall Water System
Upgrade be funded from the Electoral Area “F” allocation of the Community Works Fund at a cost
of up to $25,000.00
CARRIED
Summary - Development of the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan and
Consideration of Shuswap River Boating Regulations
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Cameron
That the report dated September 29, 2015 from the Planning Department regarding the
establishment of the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan and subsequent consideration
of boating regulations for the Shuswap River be amended to include additional details on funding
and implementation items; and further;
That the report dated September 29, 2015, as amended, be forwarded to the Board of Directors
for information.
CARRIED
Bylaw 2315 and Bylaw 2600 - Offsite Works Adjacent to City Roads
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Halvorson
That the letter dated September 17, 2015 from the City of Vernon regarding Bylaw 2315 and
Bylaw 2600 - Offsite Works Adjacent to City Roads be received for information.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Halvorson
That the matter of Offsite Works Adjacent to City Roads be brought forward for discussion in the
2016 work plan as a low to medium priority item.
CARRIED
Building Inspection Services
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Cameron
That the letter dated September 30, 2015 from the City of Armstrong regarding provision of
Building Inspection Services be received for information.
CARRIED
BX / Swan Lake Fire Hall
Director Macnabb provided a verbal update on the construction of the BX Swan Lake Fire Hall
expansion.
Page 146 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1b
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-4-
October 8, 2015
Cooperman – Author of Book about the Shuswap River
Moved and seconded by Directors Fairbairn and Macnabb
That $200 be allocated from each Electoral Area Directors’ Discretionary Fund for a total of $1000
contribution towards funding for Mr. Cooperman’s book about the Shuswap River.
CARRIED
REPORTS
Advisory Planning Commission Meetings
Moved and seconded by Directors Cameron and Halvorson
That the minutes of the following Advisory Planning Commission meetings be received for
information:
− Electoral Area “E” – Meeting of August 25, 2015
CARRIED
Building Inspections
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Cameron
That the August 2015 Building Inspections Statistical Reports and the September 2015 Building
Inspections Revenue Reports be received for information.
CARRIED
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Electoral Area
Advisory Committee convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in
accordance with Section 90(1)(f), (i) and (k) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
The regular meeting of the Electoral Area Advisory Committee adjourned to meet In Camera at
3:15 p.m.
The regular meeting of the Electoral Area Advisory Committee reconvened at 4:20 p.m.
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 4:20 p.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Bob Fleming
Deputy Corporate Officer
Paddy Juniper
Page 147 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1c
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the WHITE VALLEY PARKS, RECREATION AND
CULTURE ADVISORY COMMITTEE of the REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
held in the Boardroom at the Village of Lumby Municipal Hall, Lumby, BC on Tuesday, October
13, 2015.
Members: Director R. Fairbairn
Councillor R. Ostafichuk
Director H. Cameron
Electoral Area “D”
Village of Lumby
Electoral Area “E”
Staff:
Community Development Coordinator
Village of Lumby, Public Works and Parks
Superintendent
Village of Lumby, Administrator
Village of Lumby, Director of Finance
T. Nelson
D. Manson
T. Kadla
J. Sundin
Also
Present:
Trustee D. Squair
Media and Public
Chair
Vice Chair
School District No. 22
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 9:00 a.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee – October 13, 2015
Moved and seconded by Director Cameron and Councillor Ostafichuk
That the Agenda of the October 13, 2015 White Valley Parks, Recreation, and Culture Advisory
Committee meeting be approved with the following additions:
Item E.3 – Playground Equipment at Hanson Park
Item E.4 – After School Arts Classes at the Cherryville Community Hall
CARRIED
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee – September 14, 2015
Moved and seconded by Councillor Ostafichuk and Director Cameron
That the minutes of September 14, 2015 White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Advisory
Committee meeting be adopted as circulated.
CARRIED
Page 148 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
White Valley Parks, Recreation & Culture Advisory Committee
October 21, 2015 - Item G.1c
Minutes – Regular
-2October 13, 2015
NEW BUSINESS
White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Budget 2016
Staff provided a presentation, following which the committee engaged in preliminary discussions
regarding the 2016 White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture budget.
White Valley Communities in Bloom
Moved and seconded by Councillor Ostafichuk and Director Cameron
That the White Valley Communities in Bloom evaluation results, dated October 5, 2015, be
received for information.
CARRIED
Playground Equipment at Hanson Park
A letter from the Cherryville Community Club, dated October 13, 2015, was received and outlined
an initiative by the Cherryville Community Club to replace the playground at Hanson Park. The
Club was awarded $3,200 from the Canada 150 Funding program, and has raised $3,200 through
fundraising. Staff will bring this item forward to be considered as part of the draft 2016 budget.
After School Art Classes at the Cherryville Community Hall
Staff brought forward information to the committee on a request for funding to support the
purchase of materials for afterschool art classes at the Cherryville Community Hall. The school
trustee invited the request to be made at the upcoming Parent Advisory Committee meeting.
REPORTS
Monthly Reports – September 2015
Moved and seconded by Councillor Ostafichuk and Director Cameron
That the September 2015 White Valley Parks, Recreation, and Culture monthly reports be
received for information.
CARRIED
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 10:55 a.m.
Next meeting: Monday, November 9, 2015
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Community Development Coordinator
Tannis Nelson
Page 149 of 149
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
October 7, 2015 - Additional Item C.1
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