qb3atx00
IBM Network Station
IBM
Installing IBM Network Station
Manager for RS/6000
V2R1, September 1999
To view or print the latest update, go to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
SC41-0685-00
IBM Network Station
IBM
Installing IBM Network Station
Manager for RS/6000
V2R1, September 1999
To view or print the latest update, go to http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs
SC41-0685-00
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the information in “Appendix.
Notices” on page 55.
First Edition (September 1999)
This edition applies to version 2, release 1, modification 0 of IBM Network Station Manager (product number
5648-C07) and to all subsequent releases and modifications until otherwise indicated in new editions.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1999. All rights reserved.
US Government Users Restricted Rights – Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule Contract
with IBM Corp.
Contents
About Installing IBM Network Station
Manager for RS/6000 (SC41-0685) . .
Who should read this book . . . . .
Information available on the World Wide
Web . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Related information . . . . . . . .
How to send your comments. . . . .
Chapter 1. Understanding the IBM
Network Station . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station overview . . .
TCP/IP overview . . . . . . .
LAN network examples . . . .
MAC addresses . . . . . . .
IP addresses . . . . . . . .
Boot methods . . . . . . . . .
DHCP . . . . . . . . . .
BOOTP . . . . . . . . . .
NVRAM . . . . . . . . .
Boot file service . . . . . . . .
Java on the Network Station . . . .
Windows applications on the Network
Station . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Station memory requirements
Taking advantage of multiple server
environments . . . . . . . . .
New features in Version 2 Release 1 .
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Chapter 2. Installing and configuring IBM
Network Station Manager for AIX. . . .
About this chapter . . . . . . . . .
Installing and configuring the AIX server
software. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing IBM Network Station Manager
components after the initial installation
Strong Encryption Support . . . . .
Chapter 3. Optional configuration
information for IBM Network Station
Manager . . . . . . . . . .
About this chapter . . . . . . .
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
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Manually configuring Network Stations for
BootP . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the chbootptab script to automatically
configure Network Stations for BootP . . .
Setting up BootP relay configuration . . .
DHCP configuration file and description
Understanding the v2nsconf script . . . .
Administrative groups for the IBM Network
Station Manager . . . . . . . . . .
Setting up AIX server routing . . . . .
Printing from AIX to a printer that is
attached to a Network Station . . . . .
Defining the AIX remote print queue
Verifying printer operation . . . . .
Chapter 4. Migrating to IBM Network
Station Manager V2R1 . . . . . . .
About this Chapter . . . . . . . . .
Migration considerations . . . . . . .
Coexistence option . . . . . . . . .
Migrating IBM Network Station Manager to
V2R1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migration utility . . . . . . . . .
Migration procedure . . . . . . .
Client migration . . . . . . . . . .
Remotely restarting IBM Network Stations
Migrating Netscape Communicator
bookmarks and address book . . . . .
Migrating Netscape Communicator
bookmarks file . . . . . . . . .
Migrating Netscape Communicator
address book . . . . . . . . . .
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Appendix. Notices .
Trademarks . . .
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Index
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Readers’ Comments — We’d Like to Hear
from You . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
About Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
(SC41-0685)
Who should read this book
This information is intended for the person who is installing and
administering the IBM Network Station Manager.
Information available on the World Wide Web
You can obtain the latest version of this book on the World Wide Web from
the following URL: http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs This is the same URL that is
printed on the cover of this book.
Related information
The following information is available for the IBM Network Station Manager
product:
Information name
Information description
Installing IBM Network Station
Manager for AS/400, SC41-0684
Describes the installation and simple configuration
of an AS/400 Network Station environment. It is
shipped with the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program. Updates to this information are
at http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
Installing IBM Network Station
Manager for RS/6000, SC41-0685
Describes the installation and simple configuration
of an RS/6000 Network Station environment. It is
shipped with the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program. Updates to this information are
at http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
Installing IBM Network Station
Manager for Windows NT,
SC41-0688
Describes the installation and simple configuration
of a Windows NT Network Station environment. It
is shipped with the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program. Updates to this information are
at http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
Using IBM Network Station
Manager, SC41-0690
Describes the basic tasks for managing user
desktops through the IBM Network Station
Manager program. It is shipped with the IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program.
Updates to this information are at
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
v
Information name
Information description
IBM Network Station Advanced
Information
Describes tasks and information beyond a basic
installation and configuration of your Network
Station environment. This information is only
available at http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
IBM Network Station Manager
help text
Describes the basic how-to tasks for configuring
your Network Station desktop appearance. This
information is availble by clicking the help icon in
the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Desktop help
Describes how to use and operate the Network
Station desktop. This information is available by
clicking the help icon in the lower right of the
Network Station desktop.
How to send your comments
Your feedback is important in helping to provide the most accurate and
high-quality information. If you have any comments about this book or any
other documentation, fill out the readers’ comment form at the back of this
book.
v If you prefer to send comments by mail, use the readers’ comment form
with the address that is printed on the back. If you are mailing a readers’
comment form from a country other than the United States, you can give
the form to the local IBM branch office or IBM representative for
postage-paid mailing.
v If you prefer to send comments by FAX, use either of the following
numbers:
– United States and Canada: 1-800-937-3430
– Other countries: 1-507-253-5192
v If you prefer to send comments electronically, use this network ID:
– IBMMAIL, to IBMMAIL(USIB56RZ)
– [email protected]
Be sure to include the following:
v The name of the book.
v The publication number of the book.
v The page number or topic to which your comment applies.
vi
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Chapter 1. Understanding the IBM Network Station
IBM Network Station overview
TCP/IP overview . . . .
LAN network examples .
LAN network example 1
LAN network example 2
LAN network example 3
MAC addresses . . . .
IP addresses . . . . .
Boot methods . . . . . .
DHCP . . . . . . .
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BOOTP . . . . . . . . . .
NVRAM . . . . . . . . .
Boot file service . . . . . . . .
Java on the Network Station . . . .
Windows applications on the Network
Station . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Station memory requirements
Taking advantage of multiple server
environments . . . . . . . . .
New features in Version 2 Release 1 .
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IBM Network Station overview
The IBM Network Station Manager licenced program code is made up of
several programs that are installed on a server. One of these programs is the
IBM Network Station Manager program. The IBM Network Station Manager
program allows you to set and change configurations for IBM Network
Station thin clients (hereafter referred to as Network Stations) and Network
Station users through a Web browser. See the Using IBM Network Station
Manager book for more information about the IBM Network Station Manager
program.
Since the Network Station does not contain a hard drive, the Network Station
accesses the server to download the client operating system, client programs,
and data. After the Network Station loads the client operating system, the
Network Station displays a graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI can
provide the user access to the following kinds of resources:
v 5250 emulator application
v 3270 emulator application
v Telnet application
v Web browser application (Netscape Communicator)
v Java applets or applications
v Windows-based applications
v Local and remote printers
The Network Station communicates using Transmission Control
Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) over a token-ring or Ethernet connection
to the server. Each Network Station runs the client operating system and
communicates to a server that runs the IBM Network Station Manager
program and other application programs.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
1
Figure 1 shows what happens when you power on an IBM Network Station.
Figure 1. Network Station power-on sequence
«1¬ A non-volatile random access memory (NVRAM) resident program starts.
The Network Station automatically runs a series of power-on self tests (POST).
«2¬ The Network Station contacts a BOOTP or DHCP boot server. The
Network Station exchanges its media access control (MAC) address for the IP
address that is provided by the server. The boot server also provides the
address or path of the base code server. The Network Station may
alternatively retrieve this information from values that are stored in its
NVRAM.
«3¬ The Network Station downloads the base code from the base code server
using trivial file transfer protocol (TFTP) or network file system (NFS).
«4¬ The Network Station downloads the workstation-based configuration
information from the workstation configuration server.
2
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
«5¬ The Network Station presents a logon screen. When the user enters a user
id and password, the authentication server verifies the user’s identification.
«6¬ The user’s configuration server downloads and initiates the personalized
environment preferences of the user.
«7¬ The Network Station displays the personalized desktop of the user. The
user is able to access application programs that reside on the application
server (or host computer).
Each Network Station contains a simple network management protocol
(SNMP) agent as part of its operating system. An SNMP manager at a central
location can communicate and exchange information with the agent on a
Network Station. You can use this information to manage your network
environment. SNMP is an industry-standard protocol for network
management. See IBM Network Station Advanced Information for more
information about SNMP. You can find this document at
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
Each Network Station can display the IBM Network Station Setup Utility or
IBM Network Station NS Boot utility. The Setup Utility or NS Boot utility
allows you to View or Set (change) configuration settings on a particular
Network Station. For example, you can view the MAC address or you can set
the monitor resolution of the Network Station. See Using IBM Network Station
Manager for more information about the Setup Utility and NS Boot Utility.
TCP/IP overview
In order for the Network Station to communicate with your servers, you need
a TCP/IP network. If you understand your TCP/IP network, installing and
configuring your Network Station and IBM Network Station Manager
program is much easier. To help understand your network, draw a diagram of
your network.
Refer to the network examples in this section to help you understand how to
configure your network. Choose the network example that most closely
resembles your network diagram. Refer to these examples as you go about
configuring and installing Network Stations on your network.
Note: You do not need to be an expert in order to set up a TCP/IP network.
However, you should have an understanding of basic TCP/IP. A
detailed introduction to TCP/IP is beyond the scope of this book. If
you need to improve your understanding of TCP/IP, you can contact
Chapter 1. Understanding the IBM Network Station
3
your IBM sales representative, who has information about classes in
your area. You may also want to refer to the redbook, TCP/IP Tutorial
and Technical Overview, GG24-3376.
LAN network examples
LAN network example 1
Figure 2 shows an example of a network diagram in which two Network
Stations are connected over a simple local area network (LAN).
Figure 2. Two Network Stations connected to the server over a simple LAN
LAN network example 2
Figure 3 on page 5 shows an example of a network diagram in which two
Network Stations are connected to the server over a local LAN. Two more
Network Stations connect to the server through a router over a remote LAN.
4
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Figure 3. Two Network Stations connected to the server over a local LAN and two Network
Stations connected to the server through a router over a remote LAN
LAN network example 3
In Figure 4 on page 6, additional Network Stations connect to the server by
using Ethernet connections and token-ring connections. Two token-ring LANs
connect via a router. A Domain Name Server also connects to the network.
Chapter 1. Understanding the IBM Network Station
5
Figure 4. Four Network Stations connected to a network using a router and a domain name server
MAC addresses
Every Network Station comes with a unique identifying number that can be
used to keep track of which IP address has been assigned to it. Media access
control (MAC) addresses of each Network Station are assigned by
manufacturing and hard-coded into the machine. The MAC address of a
Network Station is on the side panel of the small box in which the logic unit
is packaged. If you no longer have the box, see the Using IBM Network Station
Manager book for instructions on how to find the MAC address.
You can override the hard-coded MAC address with a customer-assigned
MAC address. See Using IBM Network Station Manager for instructions on how
to override the hard-coded MAC address.
IP addresses
Internet Protocol (IP) addresses are numbers that are assigned to devices on a
network (or on the Internet). IP addresses allow computers to communicate
through TCP/IP. IP addresses consist of four numbers (from 0 to 255) that are
separated by periods, for example 192.168.1.1. The numbers that are separated
6
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
by periods indicate the network to which a computer belongs and the specific
location of the host computer within that network.
IP addresses are not just for computers such as Network Stations, but also for
routers, servers, and even subnets and networks themselves. For example, the
IP address of a network might be 192.168.1.0. A router on that network might
use the IP address 192.168.1.1. A Network Station on the same network might
have the address 192.168.1.145.
Each Network Station must have a unique IP address. If you are using the
DHCP boot method, you must specify a range of IP addresses so that the
server can assign an address to each Network Station. For intranets (networks
within your own organization), you can assign your own addresses. However,
if you want to connect to the Internet, a central authority must officially
assign the network addresses and domain names. At the time of this writing,
the authority is as follows:
Network Solutions, Inc.
InterNIC Registration Services
505 Huntmar Park Drive
Herndon, VA 22070
1-703-742-4811
E-mail: [email protected]
WWW: http://rs.internic.net
Boot methods
Since a Network Station has no disk from which to start, it must request
information either from its own non-volatile random access memory
(NVRAM) or from a server. The Network Station needs to find an IP address
for itself. The IP address allows the Network Station to communicate with
other hosts. The Network Station can use one of the following methods to
request and receive this information:
v Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP)
v Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)
v Non-Volatile Random Access Memory (NVRAM)
BOOTP servers can only respond to BOOTP clients, but DHCP servers can
respond to both BOOTP and DHCP clients.
Note: If you use the BOOTP or DHCP boot methods, you must configure all
routers and gateways in your network to send and receive BOOTP or
DHCP packets. If you cannot configure your routers to be BOOTP or
DHCP relay agents, you could do either of the following:
Chapter 1. Understanding the IBM Network Station
7
v Use a system that has the necessary configuration support to receive
limited BOOTP or DHCP broadcasts. Then forward those broadcasts
to the appropriate server.
v Use the NVRAM boot method for those Network Stations that are
behind a router that cannot forward BOOTP or DHCP broadcasts.
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is a TCP/IP protocol. DHCP
provides a way for a server to automatically allocate IP addresses and
configuration information without forcing the administrator to record and
track the MAC addresses of the networked computers. DHCP is capable of
assigning either a permanent IP address or a temporary IP address for every
host or Network Station within a predetermined range of IP addresses. You
can also use DHCP to assign IP addresses either statically or dynamically.
In static IP address assignment, you define the MAC address of every
Network Station in the DHCP server configuration along with an IP address,
which is reserved for the Network Station with this MAC address. A Network
Station, identifying itself by its MAC address, sends a request to the DHCP
server. The server then returns the IP address that it has reserved for that
client.
In dynamic IP address assignment, the server still identifies a Network Station
by its MAC address. However, instead of using a fixed IP address, the server
allocates any address out of the available pool. The server leases the address
to the Network Station for a specified period of time. The address returns to
the pool either when the client releases it or when the lease runs out.
DHCP can allow for unlisted clients. Any client, even one with an undefined
MAC address in the DHCP configuration, may request an IP address from the
pool of available addresses. The use of unlisted clients might be appropriate
in an environment in which it is not necessary or preferable to keep track of
MAC addresses.
While BOOTP servers can handle requests only from BOOTP clients, DHCP
can handle requests from both DHCP and BOOTP clients.
DHCP servers (unlike BOOTP servers) can reuse IP addresses that are not
currently being used.
Finally, DHCP provides a large set of configuration options that may include
user-defined options. These options are useful in configuring advanced
network environments. See IBM Network Station Advanced Information for a
more in-depth discussion of advanced network environments. You can find
this document at http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
8
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
BOOTP
Bootstrap protocol (BOOTP) is a TCP/IP protocol that allows the Network
Station to request an IP address and the location of the base code file from a
server.
To use the BOOTP boot method, the network administrator must record the
MAC addresses of all the Network Stations on the network. Then the network
administrator assigns each of them an IP address. The administrator then
enters those assignments on a BOOTP table. When you need to change IP
addresses, you can do so centrally on the table in the boot server rather than
individually on each Network Station.
When a Network Station powers on, it broadcasts its MAC address to the
BOOTP server. The server looks up the IP address of the Network Station
according to its MAC address. BOOTP then returns a reply that assigns the IP
address for the Network Station and the name and location of the base code
file.
Because BOOTP assigns IP addresses statically (fixing an IP address according
to a computer’s MAC address and then recording this assignment), it is less
versatile than DHCP.
NVRAM
Non-Volatile Random-Access Memory (NVRAM) refers to local Network
Station memory. When you use the NVRAM boot method, you code the IP
addresses of the Network Station and its server into the memory of the
individual Network Station. The Network Station powers on and requests the
download of the base code file from the server.
The NVRAM boot method is most practical in small, stable networks. You
may also choose to use the NVRAM boot method for one of the following
reasons:
v As a method to avoid routers that block BOOTP and DHCP broadcast
requests. BOOTP and DHCP broadcast requests for IP addresses can create
unnecessary traffic on the network. Many network routers are configured
not to pass these broadcast requests. Since NVRAM does not need to
request its IP address (because it has been entered in the NVRAM of the
Network Station), it does not make broadcasts.
v As an aid in finding and correcting problems with network connections.
v As an aid in finding and correcting problems with BOOTP or DHCP
configurations.
This method may not work well for larger networks for the following reasons:
Chapter 1. Understanding the IBM Network Station
9
v You must enter setup data into each Network Station manually.
v DHCP and BOOTP can configure many more parameters that may not be
easily configured with this method.
For information about how to configure NVRAM in the Setup Utility or NS
Boot utility, see the Using IBM Network Station Manager book.
Boot file service
The Network Station uses either TFTP or NFS to receive the base code file
from the base code server. Trivial file transfer protocol (TFTP) is a simple
protocol that is used to transfer files. The network file system (NFS) makes
files and directories available to clients. NFS is generally more reliable than
TFTP.
Java on the Network Station
Java is a programming language that is designed to bridge the gap between
different platforms. Java’s imperative, ″Write once, run anywhere,″ refers to its
portability and to the ability of a single Java program to run on different
platforms. To view Java applications, you need a bundle of Java-enabling
programs called Java Virtual Machine (JVM). Using JVM on diskless clients
such as the Network Station allows the user to access applications without
using permanent disk space either on the Network Station or on the server.
There are two kinds of Java programs:
v Applets — require a browser or applet viewer
v Applications — display directly
The first variety, applets, rely on a browser or applet viewer to provide
windows and graphical layout. In general, the browser does not “trust”
applets because they are downloaded across the Internet. In other words, the
browser can restrict applets from reading or writing to local files and from
connecting to machines other than those from which they are downloaded.
These restrictions protect users from virus-contaminated programs and
provide a safe environment for examining programs on the Internet.
See IBM Network Station Advanced Information for a more information about
Java. You can find this document at at http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
10
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Windows applications on the Network Station
Network Stations can run Windows-based applications through the use of a
multi-user Windows server. There are several products that can provide a
multi-user Windows server:
v Citrix WinFrame is a multi-user Windows application server that is based
on Windows NT 3.51. Citrix WinFrame communicates to the Network
Station by using the independent computer architecture (ICA) protocol.
v NCD WinCenter is a multi-user Windows application product that requires
Citrix WinFrame or Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server
Edition. NCD WinCenter communicates to the Network Station by using
the X11 protocol.
v Citrix MetaFrame is a multi-user Windows application product that requires
Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition. Citrix
MetaFrame communicates to the Network Station by using the ICA
protocol.
Network Stations that start from a V1R3 or V2R1 IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program server can communicate to a multi-user Windows
server using the X11 protocol or the ICA protocol.
For more information, see the following Web sites:
v WinFrame and MetaFrame - http://www.citrix.com
v WinCenter - http://www.ncd.com
v Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition http://www.microsoft.com
Network Station memory requirements
Network Stations download each of their applications into memory. You
should verify that your Network Stations have enough memory to run their
applications. For more information on memory, do the following:
1. Go to this Web site: http://www.ibm.com/nc
2. In the left pane, click on Support.
3. In the Search field, enter memory requirements.
Taking advantage of multiple server environments
You can install the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program on
multiple computer systems. For a more in-depth discussion of this topic, see
the IBM Network Station Advanced Information. You can find this document at
http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
Chapter 1. Understanding the IBM Network Station
11
New features in Version 2 Release 1
Version 2 Release 1 (V2R1) of the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program introduces many new features. These features include:
Client desktop
The client desktop has a new look and includes the following:
v 16 bit color support
v Scalable fonts
v Desktop help
v Kiosk mode
For more information see the Using IBM Network Station Manager
book.
Netscape Communicator 4.5
Netscape Comunicator 4.5 includes the Navigator browser, and
Messenger (e-mail and news). The browser is fully compatible with
other Unix versions of Netscape Navigator. Key features that are new
in this version include:
v Netscape JVM
v Runtime Plug-in for the Network Station, Java Edition
v PDF helper application
v Real Player helper application
v Audio player helper application
v Video player helper application
For more information, see the Using IBM Network Station Manager
book.
Windows application support
Enhanced ICA support. For more information, see the Using IBM
Network Station Manager book.
VT emulator
Enhanced VT emulator. For more information, see the Using IBM
Network Station Manager book.
Productivity applications
v File manager
v Text editor
v Calendar
v Calculator
v Paint
12
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
For more information, see the Using IBM Network Station Manager
book.
Java
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program provides two
JVMs:
v Netscape 4.5 JVM
v IBM JVM (JDK 1.1.8)
Flash memory support
Flash memory support provides the ability to local boot from a flash
memory card and a flash memory management utility. For more
information, see IBM Network Station Advanced Information. You can
find this document at http://www.ibm.com/nc/pubs.
Hardware support
Table 1 shows the IBM Network Station hardware by machine type,
model number, and series. It also shows which version and release of
the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program is required to
support a particular hardware machine type and model.
For example:
v Machine type 8364 model Exx requires V2R1
v Machine type 8362 model A22 is supported by either V2R1 or V1R3
Table 1. IBM Network Station hardware types, models, and series
Compatible
release
Machine type - model
Series 100
Series 300
Series 1000
V2R1 only
both V2R1 and
V1R3
8361-110
8362-A22
8361-210
8362-A23
Series 2200
Series 2800
8363-Exx
8364-Exx
8363-Txx
8364-Txx
8362-A52
8362-A53
V1R3 only
8361-100
8361-341*
8361-200
* Twinaxial model supported only on AS/400 servers.
Coexistence with V1R3
When you install V2R1 on a system that already has V1R3 installed
on it, the V1R3 environment is preserved. Both V2R1 and V1R3 can
coexist and operate on the same server. The ability to have two
software versions that coexist on the same server allows support for
Chapter 1. Understanding the IBM Network Station
13
all Network Station hardware models. A migration utility can migrate
the V1R3 preference files to V2R1. You can uninstall the V1R3
environment after you migrate the V1R3 preference files. For more
information, see “Chapter 4. Migrating to IBM Network Station
Manager V2R1” on page 45.
14
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Chapter 2. Installing and configuring IBM Network Station
Manager for AIX
About this chapter . . . . . . . .
Installing and configuring the AIX server
software. . . . . . . . . . . .
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15
.
15
Installing IBM Network Station Manager
components after the initial installation
Strong Encryption Support . . . .
.
30
31
About this chapter
This chapter contains instructions for planning and installing the IBM
Network Station environment for RS/6000 servers that run the AIX operating
system.
Installing and configuring the AIX server software
These instructions should only be used for the IBM Network Station Manager
V2R1 licensed program.
Note: References to V2R1 indicate an eNetstation 2.1.0.x installation, while
V1R3 indicates a netstation 1.3.0.x installation.
Depending on what options you select and whether your server has the
proper requirements, the installation process may take from 15 minutes to 30
minutes.
If you plan to migrate your configuration data from an older version of the
IBM Network Station Manager licensed program, read the information in
“Chapter 4. Migrating to IBM Network Station Manager V2R1” on page 45
before you start the IBM Network Station Manager V2R1 program installation.
Note: You must install the IBM Network Station Manager V2R1 licensed
program, before performing the migration process. If you currently
have V1R3 installed on your system, it is recommended that you do not
uninstall it at this time. If you proceed with this installation and then
need to reinstall V1R3, you must install netstation 1.3.0.7 or above.
To install and configure the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program,
complete the following checklist and mark off each item as you complete it:
__ 1. Draw a diagram of your network. See “TCP/IP overview” on page 3.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
15
__ 2. Bookmark or copy the pages which contain the LAN network example
diagrams that you will use as you install and configure your network.
These diagrams are Figure 2 on page 4, Figure 3 on page 5, and
Figure 4 on page 6.
__ 3. Examine the README file on the IBM Network Station Manager
V2R1 licensed program CD. This file contains information about
prerequisites, installation, and late-breaking code changes.
__ 4. The Series 2800 (Type 8364) Network Station supports multiple
software releases. For information on the best way to setup Series 2800
(Type 8364) Network Stations for V2R1 IBM Network Station software,
you must see ″Running V2R1 on Series 2800″ in the README file.
__ 5. Network Stations download each application, including their base
systems, into memory. It is important that you verify that each
Network Station has enough memory to perform the desired
functions. Use the following procedure to determine your IBM
Network Station memory requirements:
a. Go tohttp://www.ibm.com/nc/.
b. In the left pane, click on Support.
c. In the Search field, type Memory Requirements.
__ 6. Verify the following server memory requirements and network
settings.
__ a. RS/6000 server with the AIX Version 4.2.1 or later operating
system installed.
__ b. Typically, all server functions will reside on a single server.
Therefore, the hard disk space requirements are cumulative.
Also, if the install images are acquired from a Web site,
additional space is required for the images themselves.
Depending on the type of function the server will perform, the
following hard-disk space requirements must be met:
v BootP/DHCP Server — These functions are provided with the
AIX operating system and do not require any additional
hard-disk space.
v Base-Code Server — This server provides the client operating
system with any desired local client applications. Depending
on the applications that are selected, the Network Station
models to be supported, and the selected international
languages, the server will require from 200 MB to 500 MB of
available hard-disk space.
v Configuration-Server — This server provides space for storing
terminal and user configuration data and requires at least 15
MB of available hard-disk space.
16
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
v Authentication-Server — This server provides the user login
functions. This server requires at least 50 MB of available
hard-disk space.
__ 7. Make sure that your server’s AIX operating system has all the proper
prerequisites.
Consult Table 2 to make sure that your system is ready for the
installation. If all of the prerequisites are in place, go to step 8.
Note: The recommended Web browser for use with the IBM Network
Station Manager licensed program is Netscape.nav-[us].rte 4.0.4
Table 2. AIX operating system prerequisites
Prerequisite
How do I know if the prerequisite fileset is
installed?
bos.rte
Type the following command at the prompt:
Version 4.2.1 or later
lslpp -h bos.rte
bos.net.tcp.server
Type the following command at the prompt:
Version 4.2.1 or later
lslpp -h bos.net.tcp.server
bos.iconv
Type the following command at the prompt:
(If using the configuration-server lslpp -h bos.iconv
installation with the IBM Network
Station Manager program.)
bos.net.nfs.client
Type the following command at the prompt:
Version 4.2.1 or later
lslpp -h bos.net.nfs.client
Lotus Domino Go Webserver
Type the following commands at the prompt:
Version 4.6.2.2 or later
lslpp -h internet_server.base.admin.httpd
Included on the IBM Network
Station Manager V2 licensed
program CD.
lslpp -h internet_server.base.admin.doc
(If using the configuration-server
installation with the IBM Network
Station Manager program.)
__ 8. Insert the IBM Network Station Manager V2 CD into the CD-ROM
drive.
__ 9. Log in as the root user on your server.
__ 10. Use the fast path below to open the System Management Interface
Tool (SMIT) Install/Update from All Available Software menu.
smitty install_selectable_all
Chapter 2. Installing and configuring IBM Network Station Manager for AIX
17
__ 11. Use the List function (F4) to select an input device or directory from
the list that is displayed.
For example, the CD-ROM drive is normally indicated as cd0.
__ 12. Depending on the server functionality that is desired, install the
filesets according to the guidelines that are listed in the following
tables:
Notes:
a. If you want to perform an installation other than the typical
single-server installation, and you do not have a full
understanding of separation of servers, review the information in
the IBM Network Station Advanced Information book before
attempting these types of installations.
b. In Tables 3 and 4, Sxxx below signifies S2x00 or S300_1000 series,
depending on the hardware models of Network Station that are in
your system environment.
Single-Server installation
The single-server installation places all elements of the IBM Network
Station Manager licensed program onto a single server. This
installation is the preferred method of installing the software. Other
methods should be used only after reviewing the information in the
IBM Network Station Advanced Information book.
18
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Table 3. Single-Server installation
Required Filesets
Optional Filesets
eNetstation.base
eNetstation.Sxxx.emul
eNetstation.S2x00.base*
Provides telnet, 3270, and 5250 emulation
capability
eNetstation.S300_1000.base*
eNetstation.Sxxx.ica
eNetstation.msg.en_US**
eNetstation.nsm
Provides ICA protocol capability.
eNetstation.Sxxx.java
eNetstation.nsm.en_US**
eNetstation.login
Provides Java support.
eNetstation.Sxxx.netscape
* The filesets used for installation
Installs Netscape browser.
are determined by the IBM
Network Station Manager hardware
models in your environment. These eNetstation.Sxxx.fonts_typ
filesets may be installed separately
Installs only the most commonly used fonts.
or together.
** Other languages optional.
eNetstation.Sxxx.fonts_all
Installs all available fonts.
eNetstation.Sxxx.lang
Provides non-English language support for local
Network Station applications.
eNetstation.tools
Base-Code server
This server provides the operating system and local application files
that are exported or downloaded to the Network Station clients. This
server is not used to configure the Network Stations.
Chapter 2. Installing and configuring IBM Network Station Manager for AIX
19
Table 4. Base-Code server
Required Filesets
Optional Filesets
eNetstation.base
eNetstation.Sxxx.emul
eNetstation.S2x00.base*
Provides telnet, 3270, and 5250 emulation
capability
eNetstation.S300_1000.base*
eNetstation.Sxxx.ica
eNetstation.msg.en_US**
Provides ICA protocol capability.
* The filesets used for installation
eNetstation.Sxxx.java
are determined by the IBM
Network Station Manager hardware
models in your environment. These Provides Java support.
filesets may be installed separately
eNetstation.Sxxx.netscape
or together.
** Other languages optional.
Installs Netscape browser.
eNetstation.Sxxx.fonts_typ
Installs only the most commonly used fonts.
eNetstation.Sxxx.fonts_all
Installs all available fonts.
eNetstation.Sxxx.lang
Provides non-English language support.
Terminal-Configuration server
This server provides the terminal configuration profiles
(userbase/profiles/ncs) required to configure the network stations
themselves. These profiles can be generated in the following ways:
v on the same server (you must install the optional filesets for the
IBM Network Station Manager program listed below).
v on another server (with the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program installed) and copied to this server.
20
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Table 5. Terminal-Configuration server
Required Filesets
Optional Filesets
eNetstation.base
eNetstation.nsm
eNetstation.msg.en_US**
eNetstation.nsm.en_US**
** Other languages optional.
Allows the user to configure the terminal
configuration profiles using the Network
Station Manager licensed program on this
server.
eNetstation.tools
Allows the user to use the Network Station
Manager Command Line Utility for
configuration. This will require Java to be
installed on your server. See the IBM Network
Station Advanced Information book for
information on using tools.
** Other languages optional.
User-Configuration server
This server provides the user configuration profiles
(userbase/profiles/users [groups]) required to configure the network
station users. These profiles can be generated in the following ways:
v on the same server (you must install the optional filesets for the
IBM Network Station Manager program below).
v on another server (with IBM Network Station Manager program)
and copied to this server.
Chapter 2. Installing and configuring IBM Network Station Manager for AIX
21
Table 6. User-Configuration server
Required Filesets
Optional Filesets
eNetstation.base
eNetstation.nsm
eNetstation.msg.en_US**
eNetstation.nsm.en_US**
** Other languages optional.
Allows the user to configure the terminal
configuration profiles using the Network
Station Manager program on this server.
eNetstation.tools
Allows the user to use the Network Station
Manager Command Line Utility for
configuration. This will require Java to be
installed on your server. See the IBM Network
Station Advanced Information book for
information on using tools.
** Other languages optional.
Authentication server
This server provides the mechanism by which all Network Station
users must authenticate (log in) before use.
Table 7. Authentication server
Required Filesets
eNetstation.base
Optional Filesets
N/A
eNetstation.msg.en_US**
eNetstation.login
** Other languages optional.
Note: The Authentication and User-Configuration servers must be
used in combination, unless the AIX Network Information
System (NIS) is being used. NIS provides a way to share
uid/gid and other system information across servers.
__ 13. After you have selected the filesets you will be installing, press Enter
to proceed with the installation process. You do not have to restart the
system if you only installed the eNetstation filesets. The software
installation process will run the /usr/NetworkStationV2/bin/v2nsconf
script. This script will set up and enable the following elements on the
AIX server:
v RS/6000 host-specific configuration
v BootP
22
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
v Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP)
For more information about the /usr/NetworkStationV2/bin/v2nsconf
script, see “Understanding the v2nsconf script” on page 40.
__ 14. Gather information on your RS/6000 system configuration. Table 8 on
page 24 lists the information you need to configure your RS/6000
server and Network Stations. Print out this table and record the
configuration information for your system. This will provide you with
a quick reference when you need to complete the steps for configuring
your RS/6000 system.
Chapter 2. Installing and configuring IBM Network Station Manager for AIX
23
Table 8. RS/6000 configuration information
Field
Description
«1¬ RS/6000 server IP
Address
The RS/6000 server IP address is the address
that uniquely identifies this RS/6000 to
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol
(TCP/IP). This address is associated with the
local host name to create a name entry in the
Host Names table.
«2¬ Media Access Control
(MAC) address (hardware
address) of each Network
Station
The Media Access Control (MAC) address for
BOOTP and DHCP is a unique
hardware-specific identifier for each Network
Station. The address is located on the Network
Station’s box. To find the MAC address without
the box, follow this procedure:
Write Value Here
a. Power on the Network Station.
b. After the keyboard controller test, press the
Escape key.
c. In the Setup Utility, press F2.
d. Record the MAC address.
«3¬ IP address of each
Network Station or IP
address range needed for a
DHCP environment where
IP addresses are being
assigned dynamically.
Ensure all IP addresses and IP address ranges
are valid and unique for your network.
«4¬ Host name of each
Network Station
The host name identifies the Network Station as
a unique destination within a TCP/IP network.
«5¬ Subnet mask
The subnet mask is a value that enables
network devices to direct packets of information
accurately in a subnetted environment.
«6¬ IP address for the
Gateway (if one exists in
your network)
If the local area network (LAN) that you are
attaching Network Stations to is not directly
attached to the RS/6000, you need to specify
the IP address of the IP Router/Gateway that
the Network Stations use to access the server.
«7¬ IP address for the
Domain Name server (if one
exists for your network and
you are using the BOOTP or
DHCP)
The Domain Name server IP address is the
address of the system (if any) that will act as
primary name server in this domain.
__ 15.
24
You must now configure each Network Station so that the server
recognizes it when it attempts to connect during the boot process. You
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
can configure the Network Stations using Dynamic Host
Configuration Protocol (DHCP), BootP from the server, or locally
using NVRAM on each unit.
Each Network Station must be set using the NS Boot Main menu.
From this menu, select Configure network settings and set the
Network priority according to the server configuration you have
selected to use.
Note: The recommended boot method is DHCP for this release of the
IBM Network Station Manager licensed program. The other
methods of booting the server should only be used if there is a
problem in configuring your server for DHCP.
Choose the boot method you are using to configure your Network
Stations:
v If you choose to use DHCP, go to step 16.
v If you choose to use BootP, go to step 17 on page 26.
v If you choose to use NVRAM, go to step 18 on page 29.
__ 16.
The DHCP and BootP daemons cannot run on the same machine at
the same time because both daemons use the same protocol and the
same UDP port. DHCP replaces BootP and supports all features of
BootP. There is no need to run both daemons on the same machine.
It is also possible to set up a relay DHCP daemon. This server
forwards DHCP requests to another DHCP server. Use this relay
feature if you want to use a DHCP server in another network because
the broadcast requests from a Network Station will not cross subnets.
DHCP configuration is more advanced than BootP. If you already have
a running BootP configuration, convert the entries in the /etc/bootptab
file into the /etc/dhcpsd.cnf file automatically by using the
/usr/sbin/bootptodhcp command. This command appends the proper
client entries to the DHCP configuration file. You can find more
information within the /etc/dhcpsd.cnf file and in the AIX Version 4
System Management Guide: Communications and Networks. You can also
see AIX Version 4.3 System Management Guide: Communications and
Networks.
Use the following procedure to set up the /etc/dhcpsd.cnf file for your
network and start DHCP:
__ a. Edit the /etc/dhcpsd.cnf file by using the example in “DHCP
configuration file and description” on page 36 as a guide.
__ b. After you set up the configuration file, use the following
procedure to start the DHCP server:
__ 1) Disable the start of BootP.
Chapter 2. Installing and configuring IBM Network Station Manager for AIX
25
To disable the start of BootP, edit the /etc/inetd.conf file
and place a # in the first column of the ’bootps’ line.
Then enter the following command to restart the inetd
subsystem:
refresh -s inetd
__ 2) Enter the following command to check for any active
BootP daemons:
ps -eaf | grep bootp
__ 3) If any BootP processes are running, enter the following
command to stop them:
kill -9 PID
where PID is the process ID of the BootP process that is
listed by the ps command.
__ 4) Enter the following command to start DHCP:
startsrc -s dhcpsd
When you start DHCP for the first time, be sure to check
the log files for errors in your server or client
configuration. It is a good idea to enable all events for
logging.
This completes the DHCP configuration. Go to step 19 on
page 29.
__ 17. Each Network Station must have an entry in the BootP table on the
server. Use the procedure that is described below to add a line to the
server /etc/bootptab file for each Network Station:
__ a. Use the following fast path to open the SMIT BootP Device
menu:
smitty bootp
An example of the BootP Device menu is shown in Figure 5 on
page 27:
26
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
BootP Device
Move cursor to desired item and press Enter.
List All BootP Devices
Add a new BootP Device
Change / Show Characteristics of a BootP Device
Duplicate a new BootP Device from an existing Device
Remove a BootP Device
F1=Help
F9=Shell
F2=Refresh
F10=Exit
F3=Cancel
Enter=Do
F8=Image
Figure 5. RS/6000 BootP Device menu
__ b. Select Add a new BootP Device. The Add a new BootP Device
dialog box displays as shown in Figure 6:
Add a new BootP Device
Type or select values in entry fields.
Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
[Entry Fields]
* Hostname
* Hardware Type
Hardware Address
* IP Address
* TFTP Server IP
* Boot File
* Boot Directory
Domain Name Server
Gateway
* Subnet Mask
F1=Help
F5=Reset
F9=Shell
F2=Refresh
F6=Command
F10=Exit
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
[
F3=Cancel
F7=Edit
Enter=Do
]
]
]
]
]
]
]
]
]
]
+
F4=List
F8=Image
Figure 6. RS/6000 Add a new BootP Device dialog box
__ c. In the Add a new BootP Device dialog box, type or select the
following information:
__ 1) Host name of the Network Station
Chapter 2. Installing and configuring IBM Network Station Manager for AIX
27
Type the value that is recorded on line «4¬ in Table 8 on
page 24.
__ 2) Hardware Type of the Network Station (Choose from
the list)
__ 3) Hardware Address (the MAC address for the Network
Station that you are configuring)
Use the value that is recorded on line «2¬ in Table 8 on
page 24. Type the value without the : colon separators.
Type the string either with no separators or with period
separators.
__ 4) IP Address of the Network Station
Type the value that is recorded on line «3¬ in Table 8 on
page 24.
__ 5) TFTP Server IP address
This is typically the IP address of the RS/6000 that is
being configured. Type the value that is recorded on
line «1¬ in Table 8 on page 24.
__ 6) Boot file
Type kernel in this field.
Note: Depending on the specific hardware series you
are configuring DHCP for, use kernel.2200,
kernel.2800, kernel.300, or kernel.1000.
__ 7) Boot directory
Type /usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/[x86 or ppc]/
in this field. Type the directory path as shown including
the trailing /.
Note: Use x86 in this field if you are configuring a new
Series 2x00 machine. If you are configuring an
old Series 300 or 1000 machine, use ppc in this
field
__ 8) IP Address for the Domain Name Server
Type the value that is recorded on line «7¬ in Table 8 on
page 24.
Note: This field is optional. If your environment does
not require this address, leave the field blank.
__ 9) IP Address for the Gateway
Type the value that is recorded on line «6¬ in Table 8 on
page 24.
28
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Note: This field is optional. If your environment does
not require this address, leave the field blank.
__ 10) Subnet mask
Type the value that is recorded on line «5¬ in Table 8 on
page 24.
__ 11) If all fields and selections are correct, press the Enter
key to add this Network Station to the BootP table.
Repeat these steps for each Network Station.
Notes:
1) If you are configuring more than one Network Station,
select Duplicate a new BootP Device from an Existing
Device in the BootP Device Menu as a starting point to
configure the next network station. Many fields contain the
same information for all Network Stations.
2) You can also configure Network Stations by using the
chbootptab script (see “Using the chbootptab script to
automatically configure Network Stations for BootP” on
page 34) or by manually editing the /etc/bootptab file (see
“Manually configuring Network Stations for BootP” on
page 33).
This completes the BootP configuration procedure. Go to step
19.
__ 18. Configuring the server for the NVRAM boot method is only practical
if you are configuring a very small number of IBM Network Stations.
If you still want to configure the Network Stations for NVRAM, use
the procedure in the Using IBM Network Station Manager book to
configure Network Stations locally.
Note: Reverse Address Resolution Protocol (RARP) is a choice in the
Network Station NVRAM boot choices. However, the RS/6000
platform does not support RARP for booting Network Stations.
__ 19. This step is only applicable if you have IBM Network Station Manager
V1R3 installed and intend to migrate your current Series 300 or Series
1000 machines to V2R1.
You must update the boot code on your current Series 300 or 1000
Network Stations. Each of your Network Stations must have a
minimum boot code version of 3.0.8.7. You must access the IBM
Network Station Manager program at:
http://Server Name/networkstationv2/admin
Next, review the section on updating the boot code in the Using IBM
Network Station Manager book.
Chapter 2. Installing and configuring IBM Network Station Manager for AIX
29
__ 20. After you have completed the installation procedure, it is important
that you verify the following:
Note
To ensure correct operation and to take advantage of new
functionality, you must update the Network Station boot code to
the latest level. Even if you have purchased new Network
Stations, you must verify and update the boot code of your
Network Stations. For information about updating boot code, see
the Using IBM Network Station Manager book.
v Verify that your HTTP and DHCP (if used) servers have been
started, and whether or not the BootP, TFTP, and NFS daemons are
running (biod, nfsd, rpc.mountd, rpc.statd, and rpc.lockd).
Note: TFTP and BootP daemons are transient daemons. Unless you
run the ps -ef command while they are actually running, you
cannot verify that they have run successfully. Also, the TFTP
daemon is used only with AIX Version 4.3.1 and later.
v If you are using DHCP, and you have a router between your IBM
Network Stations and your boot server, verify that the router is
configured to handle DHCP requests.
v Use a Web browser to access the IBM Network Station Manager at
URL http://ServerName/networkstation/admin to administer
system or group level local-client applications, including the
Netscape Communicator Web browser and terminal emulators. You
need root user authority to perform this task on the server. See the
Using IBM Network Station Manager and IBM Network Station
Advanced Information books for more information.
v Verify that the network parameters that are configured in the Setup
Utility of each Network Station agree with your boot method. For
example, if you want an IBM Network Station to obtain its IP
address through a DHCP or BootP server, ensure that the IP
Address From field in the Setup Utility is set to Network. IBM
Network Stations are set to Network when they are shipped from
the factory. For more information about setting up Network
Stations, see the Using IBM Network Station Manager book.
Installing IBM Network Station Manager components after the initial installation
You may want to install certain software components after you have installed
the IBM Network Station Manager software.
30
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Strong Encryption Support
If you are in Canada or the United States, you may choose to install the
128-bit Strong Encryption Support software.
Note: If you are installing the secure Netscape Communicator software or the
secure ICA option, make sure that you have installed the following
prerequisite software. Select the prerequisite fileset according to the
Network Station hardware series you are installing the software on.
Table 9. Prerequisite software for Strong Encryption Support software
Strong Encryption Support Software
Prerequisite Software
Netscape Communicator (128 bit encryption)
eNetstation.S2x00.netscape
OR
eNetstation.S300_1000.netscape
ICA
eNetstation.S2x00.ica
OR
eNetstation.S300_1000.ica
To install the Strong Encryption Support software, perform the following
steps:
__ 1. Use the fast path shortcut to open the SMIT Install/Update From All
Available Software menu:
smitty install_selectable_all
__ 2. Use the List function (F4) to select an input device or directory from
the list that is displayed.
For example, the CD-ROM drive is normally indicated as cd0.
__ 3. Use the List function to display a list of all available software on the
selected input device or directory.
__ 4. To install the Netscape Communicator software, use the Find function
to search on eNetstation. Next, select the following fileset to install:
eNetstation.Sxxx.sec128.netscape-us
__ 5. To install the ICA option, use the Find function to search on
eNetstation. Next, select the following fileset to install:
eNetstation.Sxxx.sec128.ica
Chapter 2. Installing and configuring IBM Network Station Manager for AIX
31
__ 6. To install the SSL option, use the Find function to search on
eNetstation. Next, select the following fileset to install:
eNetstation.Sxxx.sec128.ssl
You have now completed your installation of the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program. If you are currently running with netstation.base
1.3.0.x (referred to as Version 1 Release 3), it is highly recommended that you
go to “Chapter 4. Migrating to IBM Network Station Manager V2R1” on
page 45 and read the information on migrating your system configurations
from V1R3 to V2R1.
32
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Chapter 3. Optional configuration information for IBM
Network Station Manager
About this chapter
This chapter contains instructions for configuring the IBM Network Station
environment for RS/6000 servers that run the AIX operating system.
Manually configuring Network Stations for BootP
Use the following procedure to configure Network Stations manually by
editing the /etc/bootptab file. For each Network Station that you want your
server to start, copy the template below and replace the field names (labels in
uppercase) with the appropriate values. Enter the following information on
one line only:
NC_HOST_NAME:ht=NETWORK_TYPE:ha=MAC_ADDRESS:ip=IP_ADDRESS:bf=kernel
hd=/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/[x86 or ppc]/:sm=SUBNET_MASK:
gw=GATEWAY_IP:ds=NAMESERVER_IP:
Notes:
1. When you edit the /etc/bootptab file manually, each entry is longer than
one line of text can display in your editor. Do not insert a manual return
(line feed) in the entry by pressing the Enter key. If you do this, the entry
will fail. Some editors wrap lines automatically; however, this does not
cause problems with the entry.
2. Depending on the specific hardware series you are configuring DHCP for,
use kernel.2200, kernel.2800, kernel.300, or kernel.1000.
Fieldname
Replace with ...
NC_HOST_NAME
NETWORK_TYPE
MAC_ADDRESS
IP_ADDRESS
network name of the Network Station (such as, hostname)
Ethernet, ieee802, or token-ring
hardware address of the Network Station
IP address of the Network Station
The following fields are optional. If the item does not exist in your network
setup, you do not need to make an entry in the field.
Fieldname
Replace with ...
SUBNET_MASK
subnet mask of the network
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
33
Fieldname
GATEWAY
NAMESERVER_IP
Replace with ...
gateway IP of the network
domain name server IP of the network
Note: Each Network Station that you want your AIX system to start using
BootP must have an entry in the /etc/bootptab file.
Using the chbootptab script to automatically configure Network Stations for
BootP
If you want to configure Network Stations centrally using the chbootptab
script, enter the following instructions at the command line:
/usr/NetworkStationV2/bin/chbootptab -A -h hostname -t hardware_type
-s tftp_server_ip -a hardware_address -b boot_file -i ip_address
-d boot_directory
Note: You must enter this information on a single line.
You can also use these optional flags:
-n domain_name_server
-g gateway_ip
-m subnet_mask
Where:
v hostname is the value that is recorded on line «4¬ in Table 8 on page 24.
v hardware_type is the Hardware Type of the Network Station.
v tftp_server_ip is the TFTP Server IP address.
This is typically the IP address of the RS/6000 that you are configuring. See
the value that is recorded on line «1¬ in Table 8 on page 24.
v hardware_address is the hardware address (the MAC address for the
Network Station that you are configuring).
Use the value that is recorded on line «2¬ in Table 8 on page 24. Enter the
value without the colon separators. Either enter the string with no
separators or with period separators.
v boot_file is kernel.
Note: Depending on the specific hardware series you are configuring
DHCP for, use kernel.2200, kernel.2800, kernel.300, or kernel.1000.
v ip_address is the IP address of the Network Station.
Enter the value that is recorded on line «3¬ in Table 8 on page 24.
v boot_directory is /usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/[x86 or ppc]/.
Note: Type the path as shown including the trailing /.
34
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
v domain_name_server is the IP address for the Domain Name Server.
Enter the value that is recorded on line «7¬ in Table 8 on page 24.
v gateway_ip is the IP address for the gateway.
Enter the value that is recorded on line «6¬ in Table 8 on page 24.
v subnet_mask is the subnet mask.
Enter the value that is recorded on line «5¬ in Table 8 on page 24.
Run the script again for each Network Station that you are configuring.
For information about additional flags that are available with the chbootptab
script, enter the following at the command line:
/usr/NetworkStationV2/bin/chbootptab -?
Setting up BootP relay configuration
If you set up your RS/6000 server to be a gateway between your Network
Stations and the Network Station boot server and you wish to use BootP or
DHCP, you must configure the /etc/dhcprd.cnf file to do direct broadcast
forwarding. Once configured, the RS/6000 will forward the Network Station
BootP or DHCP broadcast message to a specific boot server on another
network.
The RS/6000 can function as only one of the following:
v BootP server (bootpd should be enabled)
v DHCP server (dhcpsd should be enabled)
v BootP/DHCP Relay (dhcprd should be enabled)
Configure you boot server for BootP relay by using the following steps:
__ 1. Disable bootp in the /etc/inetd.conf file by placing a # in the first
column of the bootps line. Save the file and refresh the inetd subsystem
by entering the following command:
refresh -s inetd
__ 2. Check for any active BootP daemons by entering:
ps -ef | grep bootp
If any bootp processes are running, stop them by entering:
kill -9 PID
Chapter 3. Optional configuration information for IBM Network Station Manager
35
The PID is the process ID of the bootpd command listed in the
previous ps command output.
__ 3. Make sure that dhcpsd is not running by entering:
ps -ef | grep dhcpsd
If it is running, disable it by entering:
smit spdhcpsd
and select either NOW or BOTH. This will disable dhcpsd.
__ 4. Edit the /etc/dhcprd.cnf file to specify the IP address of each server to
which the Network Station BootP or DHCP broadcast should be
forwarded. Entries are in this form:
server IP_address
where IP_address is the IP address of the destination server. To have the
Network Station BootP or DHCP broadcast forwarded to multiple
BootP or DHCP servers, add additional ’server’ lines.
__ 5. Start the dhcprd daemon by entering the following command:
smit stdhcprd
and select NOW or BOTH to start dhcprd.
DHCP configuration file and description
The /etc/dhcpsd.cnf file example and description show configuration file
entries for a variety of DHCP configurations. These configurations are:
v Variable IP address, variable host name
v Variable IP address, static host name
v Static IP address inside managed IP range
v Static IP address outside managed IP range
v BootP address records
It is likely that your configuration file is less complex. This is because the
example below contains all possibilities of how DHCP can assign IP addresses
or host names. For more information on DHCP configuration settings, see the
IBM Network Station Advanced Information book.
Note: The following example spans more than one page. There should be no
breaks in your /etc/dhcpsd.cnf file. A description of each entry follows
this example.
36
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
#global declaration of the log files
«1¬ numLogFiles 4
logFileSize 100
logFileName /tmp/dhcp.log
«2¬ logItem SYSERR
logItem OBJERR
logItem PROTERR
logItem WARNING
logItem EVENT
logItem ACTION
logItem INFO
logItem ACNTING
logItem TRACE
#how long is IP address valid
«3¬ leaseTimeDefault
30 minutes
leaseExpireInterval 10 minutes
#BootP should be supported
«4¬ supportBOOTP yes
#All clients will be served
«5¬ supportUnlistedClients yes
#declare global options
«6¬ option 28 9.3.1.255
#broadcast address
option 3 9.3.1.74 #default gateway
option 6 9.3.1.74 #domain name server
option 15 austin.ibm.com #Domain name
option 12 "bootserv.austin.ibm.com"
#special BootP options
«7¬ option sa 9.3.1.116
#bootserver
option hd "/usr/netstation/"
#boot directory
option bf "kernel"
#kernel file
#our network with subnetmask
#this must be the first statement
«8¬ network 9.0.0.0 255.255.255.0
{
#BootP clients
«9¬ client 6 0000E568D75E 9.3.1.199
client 6 0000E5E8EC76 9.3.1.202
#DHCP clients outside managed subnet
«10¬ client 6 0000E568D739 9.3.1.201
{
option 51 0xffffffff #infinite address lease time
}
#subnet with variable IP addresses
«11¬ subnet 9.3.1.0
9.3.1.135-9.3.1.139
{
#hosts with variable IP addresses
#need not to be mentioned explicitly, since
#supportUnlistedClients=yes
#hosts with fixed IP addresses within managed subnet
«12¬ client 6 0000e568f5f0 9.3.1.135
#hosts with variable IP address, but fixed host name
#this needs DDNS enabled (last two lines)
«13¬ client 6 0000e568f5ee "any"
{
option 12 "sv2040b" #hostname
}
#To support multi-server environments the following is suggested
#hosts with class identifier for Network Station Model 8361-200
«14¬ class "IBMNSM 1.0.0" 9.3.1.138-9.3.1.139
{
option sa 9.3.1.116 #bootserver
option hd "/usr/netstation/" #boot directory
Chapter 3. Optional configuration information for IBM Network Station Manager
37
option bf "kernel" #kernel file
option 66 "9.3.1.116" #Network Station Class Boot
#Server IP address
option 67 "/usr/netstation/kernel" #Boot Image file
option 211 "nfs" #Boot Server TCPIP access protocol
option 212 "9.3.1.117" #Terminal Configuration Server(s)
#IP address(es) (two may be defined)
option 213 "/usr/netstation/configs" #Configuration file
#(two may be defined)
option 214 "nfs" #Terminal Server TCPIP access protocol
#(two may be defined)
} #end class definition
{
#hosts with class identifier for
#Network Station Model 8364 Token Ring
#class "IBM 8364-TXX" 9.3.1.40-9.3.1.42
option 66 "9.3.21.55" # Boot-Server IP address
option 67 "/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86/kernel.2800" #Boot-Server Boot file
option 211 "nfs" #Boot-Server file protocol
option 212 "9.3.21.55" #Terminal-Configuration Server IP address
option 213 "/usr/NetworkStationV2/userbase/profiles" #Terminal-Configuration Server
#data path
option 214 "nfs" #Terminal-Configuration Server file protocol
option 98 "9.3.21.55" #Authentication-Server IP address
option sa 9.3.21.55 #bootp suff
option hd "/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/x86" #boot directory
option bf "kernel.2800" #kernel file
} #end class definition
} #end subnet
} #end network
«16¬ #Actions for updating DNS
updateDNS
"/usr/sbin/dhcpaction '%s' '%s' '%s' '%s' PTR NONIM >>/tmp/rmdns.out 2>&1"
removeDNS
"/usr/sbin/dhcpremove '%s' PTR NONIM >>/tmp/rmdns.out 2>&1"
The following list describes the entries in the example configuration file in
“DHCP configuration file and description” on page 36:
«1¬ Declaration of the log files.
DHCP uses four log files with a maximum file size of 100KB and the base
name /tmp/dhcp.log. These log files are important and are the only source
of information for error messages and debugging.
«2¬ Events to be logged by DHCP.
During setup, enable all events. Once DHCP is running, you can decrease
the amount of logging.
«3¬ Declaration of the lease-time interval
After 30 minutes, the client must renew the lease interval. In the case
where the client cannot renew its IP address because the DHCP server is
not accessible, the IP will expire in 10 minutes.
«4¬ This DHCP server should answer BootP requests.
«5¬ If set to no, you must declare all MAC addresses of your clients in the
configuration file to serve them by DHCP. If set to yes, DHCP serves any
incoming requests.
38
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
«6¬ Global options that are transmitted to the client when it requests
start-up information.
If available, you should (at a minimum) declare these four options. Refer
to the comments in the original AIX /etc/dhcpsd.cnf file for additional
options.
«7¬ Special options for BootP.
The Network Station uses these options to load the kernel file and
configuration files. The Network Station reads these options even when
using the DHCP protocol.
«8¬ Declaration of the network.
You must adhere to the TCP/IP network conventions. Be sure to use the
correct network address and mask.
«9¬ Declaration of the BootP clients.
As with the BootP setup, you must register every client with its MAC
address and the corresponding IP address. If you want to specify different
BootP options for a client, you have to put these options into brackets
immediately after the client statement.
«10¬ An example for a DHCP client outside of the subnet that is managed
by DHCP
This looks similar to the BootP client definition. Because DHCP cannot
renew any IP addresses outside its managed range, you must specify an
infinite lease time for these clients. This results in the same behavior as
BootP clients, with the client that is assigned an IP address. The client does
not renew the IP address.
«11¬ Declaration of the subnet that is managed by DHCP and the range of
the IP addresses for the address pool of DHCP.
Unless otherwise specified, any client requesting an IP address from DHCP
will get an address from this pool, if possible. Because the option
supportUnlistedClients is yes, you do not have to specify any MAC
addresses of your clients.
«12¬ With statements similar to this, you can assign fixed IP addresses to
special clients, in the case where the software depends on a fixed address.
«13¬ If you use DDNS, the IP address of your host can vary but it will
always have the same host name. To specify the host name, you must
assign a host name with option 12 to this client.
«14¬ It is recommended that Release 3 clients be defined/isolated by class
instead of MAC address within a DHCP managed network. This is an
example of a V1R3 class file.
«15¬ It is recommended that Release 3 clients be defined/isolated by class
instead of MAC address within a DHCP managed network. This is an
example of a V2R1 class file.
Chapter 3. Optional configuration information for IBM Network Station Manager
39
«16¬ These commands update the DNS database if DHCP assigns or
releases IP addresses.
Understanding the v2nsconf script
The nsconf script enables TFTP access from the IBM Network Stations by
performing the following tasks for you during the software installation: You do
not need to perform these tasks!
v Removing the # in the far-left column for the ’tftp’ entry in the
/etc/inetd.conf file.
v Running /usr/bin/refresh -s inetd
v If the /etc/tftpaccess.ctl file exists, add the following line to it:
allow:/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase
Note: The existence of the /etc/tftpaccess.ctl file limits TFTP access to only
the directories that are explicitly listed in this file. You may want to
add additional ’allow’ statements to support other TFTP activity on
the server. If you want to allow unlimited TFTP access to the server,
you can remove the /etc/tftpaccess.ctl file. See the tftp man page for
additional information.
v Adding the entry ’/usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase -ro’ to the /etc/exports
file.
v Running /usr/sbin/exportfs -a, which exports all the directories that are
listed in the /etc/exports file for NFS client access.
v Running /usr/sbin/mknfs -B. The mknfs command configures the system
to run the Network File System (NFS) daemons. The mknfs command adds
an entry to the inittab file so that the /etc/rc.nfs file is run on system
restart. The mknfs command also runs the /etc/rc.nfs file immediately to
start the NFS daemons.
If at any time you need to disable the server code, enter the following
command:
/usr/NetworkStationV2/bin/v2nsconf -d
Running the v2nsconf script with the -d flag comments out references to the
Network Stations in the /etc/bootptab file. This keeps the Network Stations
from starting using the BootP protocol. Configuration information is not
erased from the system, and the server code can be reactivated by running the
v2nsconf script again with no flags.
Note: Running v2nsconf -d does not turn off BootP, TFTP, and NFS. These
processes must be shut down manually.
40
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Administrative groups for the IBM Network Station Manager
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program assigns administrative
control and sets directory permissions by using AIX local groups. The IBM
Network Station Manager installation program creates the NSMAdmin local
group on your server.
To assign full administrative control, add the user to the NSMAdmin group.
You should remember that the root user always has full administrative
control.
Setting up AIX server routing
If you set up your server as a gateway between your Network Stations and
other networks, you must configure the /etc/rc.net file to do IP forwarding.
Add the following line to the end of the /etc/rc.net file:
/usr/sbin/no -o ipforwarding=1
Note: If you would like your server to begin forwarding packets immediately,
run the same command manually at the command prompt.
Printing from AIX to a printer that is attached to a Network Station
In the RS/6000 environment, printing from an RS/6000 AIX application is
done through the AIX print-spooler subsystem. You can use the print-spooler
subsystem to print to a printer that is attached to the Network Station. To
print, define a remote queue for the printer attached to the Network Station
and submit jobs to be printed using standard AIX print commands, such as
qprt and enq. Local Network Station clients do not use a local spooler
subsystem for printing.
Refer to AIX Version 4 Guide to Printers and Printing for general AIX printer
installation and configuration information.
Setting up AIX to print to a printer attached to the Network Station includes
these tasks:
v Defining an AIX remote print queue
v Connecting a printer to the Network Station
v Verifying printer operation
Chapter 3. Optional configuration information for IBM Network Station Manager
41
Refer to the IBM Network Station Advanced Information publication for
information on connecting a printer to the Network Station.
Defining the AIX remote print queue
Use the following procedure to define the AIX remote print queue:
__ 1. As the root user, use the SMIT fast path:
smit mkpq
to open the Add a Print Queue menu.
__ 2. From the Add a Print Queue menu, select remote and press Enter.
__ 3. From the Type of Remote Printing menu, select Local filtering before
sending to print server and press Enter.
__ 4. From the Remote Printer Type menu, select your printer type and press
Enter.
__ 5. From the Remote Printer Type list, select your printer model and press
Enter. If your printer is not listed, select Other to use a generic printer
definition.
The Add a Remote Print Queue with Local Filtering dialog box displays
as shown in Figure 7:
Add a Remote Print Queue with Local Filtering
Type or select values in entry fields.
Press Enter AFTER making all desired changes.
[Entry Fields]
Hewlett-Packard LaserJ>
Description
* Name of new PRINT QUEUE to add
*
*
[]
Remote server characteristics
HOSTNAME of remote server
Name of QUEUE on remote server
TYPE of print spooler on remote server
Send PASS-THROUGH FLAG to queue
on remote server?
F1=Help
F5=Reset
F9=Shell
F2=Refresh
F6=Command
F10=Exit
F3=Cancel
F7=Edit
Enter=Do
[]
[]
AIX Version 3 or 4
yes
+
+
F4=List
F8=Image
Figure 7. RS/6000 Add a Remote Print Queue with Local Filtering Dialog Box
__ 6. In the Add a Remote Print Queue with Local Filtering dialog box, type
or select the following:
__ a. Type the name:
42
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
SERIAL1
or
PARALLEL
depending on which of the remote print queues you are adding.
__ b. Type the host name of the Network Station in the HOSTNAME
of remote server field.
__ c. Type the name of the Network Station remote print queue in the
Name of QUEUE on remote server field.
__ d. Select BSD for the TYPE of print spooler on remote server.
__ e. Press the Enter key to create the queue.
This completes the setup of the remote print queue.
Verifying printer operation
To verify printer operation, enter the following command to submit a job to a
printer queue:
enq -Pname_of_print_queue /etc/motd
If you need additional printer-support information, see the AIX Version 4
Guide to Printers and Printing.
Chapter 3. Optional configuration information for IBM Network Station Manager
43
44
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Chapter 4. Migrating to IBM Network Station Manager V2R1
About this Chapter . . . . . . . . .
Migration considerations . . . . . . .
Coexistence option . . . . . . . . .
Migrating IBM Network Station Manager to
V2R1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migration utility . . . . . . . . .
Migration procedure . . . . . . .
Client migration . . . . . . . . . .
45
45
46
46
47
48
49
Remotely restarting IBM Network Stations
Migrating Netscape Communicator
bookmarks and address book . . . . .
Migrating Netscape Communicator
bookmarks file . . . . . . . . .
Migrating Netscape Communicator
address book . . . . . . . . . .
51
52
52
52
About this Chapter
This chapter provides instructions for upgrading your IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program and migrating your IBM Network Station Manager
preference files.
These instructions are only for migrating IBM Network Station Manager V1R3
to IBM Network Station Manager V2R1. If you are using an earlier release of
the IBM Network Station Manager, you can update your current software
from http://service.boulder.ibm.com/nc/rs6000/preindx.shtml.
If you manually changed any configuration files instead of using the IBM
Network Station Manager V1R3 migration option in the past, refer to the IBM
Network Station Advanced Information publication.
Read this entire chapter before you take any steps to migrate your files.
Migrating preference files and clients is a complex process. Do not try to
migrate your preference files without reading the sections below.
Note: You may want to perform the migration after business hours or at a
time when there are no Network Station users on the network. Active
Network Station users will lose their applications if you need to restart
your server.
Migration considerations
When you install the IBM Network Station Manager V2R1 licensed program,
the installation program checks to see if your server has a previous version of
the software installed. The compatible version for migration to V2R1 is V1R3.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
45
If you have different Network Station hardware models on your network, you
must decide which Network Stations to support with a particular software
release. To find out if V2R1 supports your Network Station hardware model,
consult Table 1 on page 13.
Migration is one-way (V1R3 to V2R1). You cannot migrate subsequent changes
to the V2R1 environment back to V1R3. Languages and keyboards that were
available in V1R3 may not be available in V2R1. Changes made to V1R3 after
migration is run can be migrated to V2R1 if the migration utility is run again.
This overwrites any changes that are made to V2R1 since the previous
migration.
Coexistence option
Both V2R1 and V1R3 can coexist and operate on the same server. If you have
both V1R3 and V2R1 environments on your server, then:
v You use the V2R1 login daemon to log in and authenticate your Network
Stations.
v You have two IBM Network Station Manager program interfaces. Each
interface has its own URL.
v You have two directory structures for IBM Network Station Manager on
your server.
v You need to reconfigure DHCP or NVRAM to point to the V2R1
environment. Refer to “Client migration” on page 49.
v You have two sets of configuration files. You may need to configure users
in both the V1R3 and the V2R1 environments.
v Refer to V1R3 documentation for information about V1R3 and the V2R1
documentation for V2R1 information.
Migrating IBM Network Station Manager to V2R1
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program installs V2R1 on your
server while preserving your V1R3 environment. Your V1R3 environment is
preserved whether or not you choose to migrate to V2R1.
After installing the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program, you can
perform a migration. You can migrate individual user preferences or Network
Station configurations by using the migration utility. You can run the
migration utility from the command line to accomplish migration in stages.
The command-line interface allows you to specify an individual user, group,
or Network Station for migration.
46
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Migration is one-way (V1R3 to V2R1). You cannot migrate subsequent changes
to the V2R1 environment back to V1R3. Languages and keyboards that were
available in V1R3 may not be available in V2R1. Changes made to V1R3 after
migration is run can be migrated to V2R1 if the migration utility is run again.
This overwrites any changes that are made to V2R1 since the previous
migration.
Although you can perform migrations several times, it is recommended that
you only run migration once. You can perform a migration as many times as
you want. Each time migration runs, this process overwrites any settings that
are configured in V2R1 prior to rerunning migration.
The migration utility enables you to copy V1R3 configurations and user
preferences to the V2R1 environment. The V1R3 operating environment
remains unchanged. You can uninstall (delete) the V1R3 environment, after
the migration utility migrates the configuration information and user
information.
If you have Series 100 hardware and choose to coexist and operate both V2R1
and V1R3 on the same server, you can run migration to specify the Network
Stations that run under V2R1 and those that should continue with V1R3. In
addition to migrating configurations and users, you must change your DHCP
and NVRAM configurations so that your Network Stations use V2R1
software. You can perform this migration on a Network Station-by-Network
Station basis.
Migration utility
The migration utility has the following requirements and features:
v Your server must have V1R3 (netstation 1.3.0.x). The migration utility does
not support migration from a release earlier than V1R3.
v The migration utility can only be run from a server that has V2R1 installed.
v The migration utility does not include an option to delete V1R3. You must
manually uninstall (delete) the V1R3 environment after the migration utility
migrates the configuration information and user preference files to V2R1.
v After you manually remove the V1R3 environment, the migration utility
cannot run.
v Although you can run the migration utility several times, even for the same
users, groups, or Network Stations, it is recommended that you migrate
preference files for users, groups, or Network Stations only once. Each time
the migration utility runs, it overwrites any existing V2R1 preference files.
v The migration utility is not capable of handling client migration. You must
manually configure DHCP and NVRAM for each network station. Refer to
“Client migration” on page 49 for instructions.
v Only users with administrator authority can run the V2R1 migration utility.
Chapter 4. Migrating to IBM Network Station Manager V2R1
47
You can run the migration utility from the command-line using several option
flags customize the process. The syntax for this command and a table which
details the option flags is given below:
nsmmigr -P <Path(typically /usr/netstation/nsm)> -C -S -U [(<user1><user2> . . .)
or *ALL] -G [(<group1> <group2> . . .) or *ALL] -T[(<terminal1><terminal2> . . .)
or *ALL]
Table 10. Migration command option flags
Flag
-P
Description and Format
Path to the V1R3 USERBASE location. For AIX, this path is:
/usr/netstation/nsm
-A
Complete migration for all users, all groups, all terminals, and system
preferences.
-C
Client migration for all Series 1000 (8362 - all models) and Series 300
(8361-110 and 8362-210). This flag forces your Series 1000 (8362 - all
models) and Series 300 (8361-110 and 8362-210) Network Stations to start
from the V2R1 software, if they are configured locally and using NVRAM.
-U
Migrates user preference files. For example:
nsmmigr -U User1 User2
OR
nsmmigr -U *ALL
-G
Migrates group preference files. For example:
nsmmigr -G Group1 Group2
OR
nsmmigr -G *ALL (This command migrates all groups.)
-T
Migrates Network Station (terminal) configuration files. For example:
nsmmigr -T OriginIPaddress TargetIPaddress
OR
nsmmigr -T *ALL
-S
Migrates all system preference files.
Migration procedure
This is the recommended procedure for migrating your IBM Network Station
Manager from V1R3 to V2R1.
48
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
__ 1. Decide which configuration and preference files to migrate for the
users, groups, and specific Network Stations in your environment.
__ 2. Decide whether to migrate your system-preference files.
__ 3. From the command line, use the migration utility to migrate those
configuration or preference files you selected to keep.
Note: It is recommended that you migrate all of your configuration
and preference files. Use the following command:
nsmmigr -A
__ 4. Decide if you want to migrate all of your current NVRAM configured
Network Stations (Series 300 and 1000 clients) to IBM Network Station
Manager V2R1. Use the following command:
nsmmigr -C
If you do not have eNetstation.S300_1000.base installed, you must not
perform this step.
Your migration to IBM Network Station Manager V2R1 is now complete.
Client migration
Attention: Only proceed with client migration if you have
eNetstation.S300_1000.base already installed.
To move your existing Series 300 or 1000 Network Stations to your new
version of the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program, use the
following instructions:
__ 1. Select one Network Station first to migrate to V2R1. Consult Table 1
on page 13 to determine which of your Network Stations can migrate
to V2R1.
__ 2. If you plan to use DHCP with your new IBM Network Station
Manager software, you must configure the DHCP server to handle
Network Station start-up requests. Refer to step 16 on page 25.
__ 3. If your Network Stations use NVRAM to start from your old server,
go to step 4.
If your Network Stations use DHCP to start from your old server, go
to step 8 on page 50.
If your Network Stations use BootP to start from your old server, go
to step 16 on page 51.
__ 4. Make sure that you have completed step 19 on page 29 and that you
have run the nsmmigr -C command. After you have completed these
items, restart your Network Station. The Network Station will now
Chapter 4. Migrating to IBM Network Station Manager V2R1
49
start from the new IBM Network Station Manager V2R1 software. The
server may also automatically update the Network Station boot PROM
so that the Network Station restarts automatically.
Notes:
a. Do not touch the Network Station during the boot PROM update
process. If you interrupt the boot PROM update, you must replace
the Network Station.
b. To reboot your Network Station remotely, use the procedure that is
listed in “Remotely restarting IBM Network Stations” on page 51.
__ 5. If your Network Station has a token-ring adapter, it updates again and
restarts automatically.
__ 6. Each time you reboot the test Network Station, it will now use the new
IBM Network Station Manager software. Test the user-preference files
on the test client. Repeat the instructions from step 4 on page 49 for all
of the clients that you want to migrate.
__ 7. Once you migrate all of the clients so that they start from the new
server, test the preference files. If you are sure that you want to use
NVRAM to start your clients, your migration is complete. If you want
to use DHCP to start your clients, continue to step 8.
__ 8. If you have not yet done so, install and configure DHCP as instructed
in step 16 on page 25.
__ 9. In your current DHCP configuration, you should have already set the
following DHCP options so that the following values apply to all of
your Network Stations:
v Option 66: The IP address of the boot server.
v Option 67: /usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/[x86 or ppc]/[your kernel
filename]
If you have not set the above options, do so now.
__ 10. Configure the following option as a global parameter with the
following value:
v Option 211: ″nfs″ or ″tftp″
Note: If you select ″tftp″ as your boot protocol, the kernel
downloads via the TFTP protocol. The Network Station then
switches to the NFS protocol for all other data transfers.
The server automatically updates the boot PROM of the Network
Station and the client restarts automatically.
__ 11. If the test client has a token-ring adapter, it updates again, and restarts
automatically.
__ 12. Restart the test client to check the DHCP configuration.
50
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
__ 13. Restart all of the remaining Network Stations that you want to move
to the new server.
__ 14. Test your Network Stations to see if the user profile information is
correct. Your migration for DHCP is now complete. If you want to use
BootP to start clients, continue to the next step.
__ 15. You may continue to use BootP, or you can now change your server
configuration to DHCP. If you want to continue using BootP as your
boot method, go to step 16.
__ 16. Enter the BootP SMIT panels. Change the following fields:
v TFTP Server IP Address: IP address of the boot server
v Boot file: your kernel file name
v Boot directory: /usr/NetworkStationV2/prodbase/[x86 or ppc]
The server automatically updates the boot PROM of the Network
Station and the client restarts automatically.
__ 17. Restart the test client.
Note: To reboot your Network Station remotely, use the procedure
that is listed in “Remotely restarting IBM Network Stations”.
__ 18. If the test client has a token-ring adapter, it updates again and restarts
automatically.
__ 19. Restart the test client to check the BootP configuration.
__ 20. Restart all of the remaining Network Stations that you wish to move
to the new server.
Your migration for BootP is now complete.
Your client migration to IBM Network Station Manager V2R1 is now
complete.
Remotely restarting IBM Network Stations
To perform a remote reboot of your IBM Network Station, follow these steps:
__ 1. Verify that you have the SNMP function installed by running the
following command:
lspp -h bos.net.tcp.server
__ 2. Place host names or IP addresses of the clients you wish to restart into
the /usr/NetworkStationV2/reboot_names file.
__ 3. Create a community name by using the IBM Network Station Manager
program
__ 4. Now use the following command to restart your IBM Network Station:
/usr/NetworkStationV2/bin/nsreboot <community name>
Chapter 4. Migrating to IBM Network Station Manager V2R1
51
Migrating Netscape Communicator bookmarks and address book
The V1R3 bookmarks.html and address-book.html files in your NAV
directory will be renamed to v1r3_bm.htm and v1r3_ab.htm. These files are
located in the new V2R1 browser directory:
usr/NetworkStationV2/userbase/home/username/.netscape
This is done because the two default files already exist in the browser
directory.
Note: When selecting the files from the directory that is specified above,
username refers to the user whose files you wish to migrate.
Migrating Netscape Communicator bookmarks file
If you want to use your V1R3 bookmarks file with your IBM Network Station
Manager V2R1 licensed product, you must import the information from the
browser. Follow these steps:
__ 1. From the Netscape Communicator browser on a Network Station, click
on Bookmarks.
__ 2. From the drop-down menu, choose Edit Bookmarks.
__ 3. Select File—>Import.
__ 4. Go to the usr/NetworkStationV2/userbase/home/username/.netscape
directory, and select the v1r3_bm.htm file. Click on OK.
Your V1R3 bookmarks files should now be available for use with Netscape
Communicator and the IBM Network Station Manager V2R1 licensed
program.
Migrating Netscape Communicator address book
If you want to use your V1R3 address book file with your IBM Network
Station Manager V2R1 licensed program, you must import the information
from the browser. Follow these steps:
__ 1. From the Netscape Communicator browser on a Network Station, click
on Communicator.
__ 2. From the drop-down menu, choose Address Book.
__ 3. Select File->Import.
__ 4. Go to the usr/NetworkStationV2/userbase/home/username/.netscape
directory, and select the v1r3_ab.htm file. Click on OK.
Your V1R3 address book should now be available for use with Netscape
Communicator and the IBM Network Station Manager V2R1 licensed
52
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
program.
Chapter 4. Migrating to IBM Network Station Manager V2R1
53
54
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Appendix. Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the
U.S.A. IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this
document in other countries. Consult your local IBM representative for
information on the products and services currently available in your area. Any
reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or
imply that only that IBM product, program, or service may be used. Any
functionally equivalent product, program, or service that does not infringe
any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the
user’s responsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM
product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter
described in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give
you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
North Castle Drive
Armonk, NY 10504-1785
U.S.A.
For license inquiries regarding double-byte (DBCS) information, contact the
IBM Intellectual Property Department in your country or send inquiries, in
writing, to:
IBM World Trade Asia Corporation
Licensing
2-31 Roppongi 3-chome, Minato-ku
Tokyo 106, Japan
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any
other country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law:
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS
PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER
EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY
OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow
disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore,
this statement may not apply to you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.
Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will
be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
55
improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s)
described in this publication at any time without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for
convenience only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of those
Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of the materials for
this IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.
Licensees of this program who wish to have information about it for the
purpose of enabling: (i) the exchange of information between independently
created programs and other programs (including this one) and (ii) the mutual
use of the information which has been exchanged, should contact:
IBM Corporation
Software Interoperability Coordinator
3605 Highway 52 N
Rochester, MN 55901-7829
U.S.A.
Such information may be available, subject to appropriate terms and
conditions, including in some cases, payment of a fee.
The licensed program described in this information and all licensed material
available for it are provided by IBM under terms of the IBM Customer
Agreement, IBM International Program License Agreement, or any equivalent
agreement between us.
Any performance data contained herein was determined in a controlled
environment. Therefore, the results obtained in other operating environments
may vary significantly. Some measurements may have been made on
development-level systems and there is no guarantee that these measurements
will be the same on generally available systems. Furthermore, some
measurement may have been estimated through extrapolation. Actual results
may vary. Users of this document should verify the applicable data for their
specific environment.
Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of
those products, their published announcements or other publicly available
sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm the accuracy
of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM
products. Questions on the capabilities of non-IBM products should be
addressed to the suppliers of those products.
All statements regarding IBM’s future direction or intent are subject to change
or withdrawal without notice, and represent goals and objectives only.
56
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
This information is for planning purposes only. The information herein is
subject to change before the products described become available.
This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business
operations. To illustrate them as completely as possible, the examples include
the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products. All of these
names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an
actual business enterprise is entirely coincidental.
COPYRIGHT LICENSE:
This information contains sample application programs in source language,
which illustrates programming techniques on various operating platforms.
You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs in any form
without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or
distributing application programs conforming to the application programming
interface for the operating platform for which the sample programs are
written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions.
IBM, therefore, cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function
of these programs. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample
programs in any form without payment to IBM for the purposes of
developing, using, marketing, or distributing application programs
conforming to IBM’s application programming interfaces.
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of International Business Machines
Corporation in the United States, or other countries, or both:
AIX
Application System/400
AS/400
Client Access
DB2
eNetwork
IBM
IBM Network Station
InfoColor
Information Assistant
InfoPrint
IPDS
Micro Channel
MVS
NetView
Network Station
On-Demand Server
OpenEdition
Operating System/400
OS/390
OS/400
RS/6000
S/390
System/390
VM/ESA
400
Lotus is a trademark of Lotus Development Corporation in the United States
and other countries.
Appendix. Notices
57
Tivoli is a trademark of Tivoli Systems Inc. in the United States and other
countries.
Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows logo are trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.
Java and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
in the United States, other countries, or both.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries
licensed exclusively through The Open Group.
Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service
marks of others.
58
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
Index
A
I
address
IP 6
MAC 6
AIX
Netstation requirements
operating system
prerequisites 17
AIX remote print queue
defining 42
IBM Network Station
understanding 1
IBM Network Station hardware
models 13
IBM Network Station Manager
configuration 15
installation 15
server types 18, 19, 20, 21, 22
IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program
configuring for RS/6000 33
ICA protocol 11
installation
Strong Encryption Support 31
introduction 1
IP address 6
16
B
boot
methods 7
monitor 2
boot server
BootP 26
configuration 24
DHCP 25
NVRAM 29
BootP
boot method 9
configuring (RS/6000) 26
relay (RS/6000) 35
bootptab file (RS/6000) 33
J
Java
defined 10
L
LAN network examples 4
M
C
E
MAC address 6
memory requirements 11
MetaFrame 11
migrating
Netscape Communicator 52
address book 52
bookmarks file 52
migration 45, 46
client 49
coexistence option 46
considerations 45
procedure 48
utility 47
models, hardware 13
multi-user Windows server 11
multiple server environments 11
example
LAN network 4
N
chbootptab script (RS/6000) 34
client
migration 49
coexistence with V1R3 13
configuration
printing to an AIX printer 41
user and group management 41
D
DHCP
boot method 8
configuration file 36
configuring (RS/6000)
25
H
hardware types, models, and
series 13
how to
set up BootP relay (RS/6000)
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1999
35
Netscape Communicator
installation 31
migrating address book 52
migrating bookmarks 52
Network Station
memory requirements 16
new features in Version 2 Release
1 12
NFS 10
NSMAdmin group
adding users to 41
NVRAM
boot method 9
configuring (RS/6000) 29
P
printer
configuring (RS/6000)
verifying operation
(RS/6000) 43
41
R
remote rebooting 51
routing (RS/6000) 41
RS/6000
/etc/bootptab file 33
adding a BootP device 26
chbootptab script 34
configuration information 23
configuration information
table 24
configuring DHCP 25
configuring NVRAM 29
installing other components 30
network settings 16
server hard-disk space
requirements 16
server memory requirements 16
setting up routing 41
setting up server routing 41
v2nsconf script 40
verifying printer operation 43
S
separation of servers 11
series, hardware 13
servers
configuration 18, 19, 20, 21, 22
type of installation
Authentication 22
Base-Code server 19
Single-Server 18
Terminal-Configuration 20
User-Configuration 21
SNMP agent 3
59
T
taking advantage of multiple server
environments 11
TCP/IP networks
3
TFTP 10
type, hardware
13
U
understanding the IBM Network
Station 1
upgrading IBM Network Station
Manager 45
V
v2nsconf script (RS/6000)
40
W
WinCenter
11
Windows applications on the
Network Station 11
WinFrame
11
X
X11 protocol
60
11
Installing IBM Network Station Manager for RS/6000
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