Parks and Rec Comprehensive Plan

Parks and Rec Comprehensive Plan

MASON COUNTY PARKS AND

TRAILS COMPREHENSIVE

PLAN 2013

Mason County Facilities, Parks and Trails

411 North 5

th

Street

2100 E. Johns Prairie Road

Shelton, WA 98584

OAKLAND BAY COUNTY PARK

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Several people were instrumental in the development of this Parks and Recreation

Comprehensive Plan. We would like to acknowledge all of those individuals who gave their time, support and assistance in developing this Comprehensive Parks Plan.

COMPREHENSIVE PARK PLAN UPDATE

CITIZEN ADVISORY GROUP

Monte Ritter

(Park Advisory Board Member)

Kendy Meyers (

Park Advisory Board Member)

Ed Lucas

John Lake

Chad Collins

Bob Simmons

Greg Huffman

Becky Penoyar

Don Peppin

Vern Rutter

Jason Maiuri

Tom Pearson

Susan Rabago

John E. Johnson

Denny Hamilton

Kevin Franeberger

Maureen Beckstead

PARKS AND TRAILS ADVISORY BOARD

Frank Benavente - Chairperson

Monte Ritter

Linda Woytowich

Kendy Meyer

Susan Baker

Julie Henning

Michael Siptroth

Andrew Kinney

MASON COUNTY FACILITIES, PARKS AND TRAILS DEPARTMENT STAFF

John Keates, Director

RaeGene Churchill, Facilities Scheduler

Heidi Bailey, Senior Accounting Technician

Carl Olson, Maintenance II

Jesse Weston, Maintenance I

Joseph Glaser, Seasonal Maintenance

William Ells, Maintenance I

Jeff Canaday, Seasonal Maintenance

MASON COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS

Commissioner Lynda Ring Erickson, Chair

Commissioner Tim Sheldon

Commissioner Steve Bloomfield

Prepared by:

AjO Consulting

Arvilla Ohlde, Belfair, WA

In Association with:

MIG, Inc., Portland, Oregon

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ABLE OF CONTENT

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Acknowledgements

Executive Summary

Chapter

Page

Chapter 1 – Mission Statement, Introduction, County Profile ........................... 1

Chapter 2 – Goals and Objectives .................................................................. 6

Chapter 3 – Public Involvement/Citizen Input .............................................. 10

Chapter 4 – Inventory/Park Map .................................................................. 15

Chapter 5 – Demand and Needs Analysis .................................................... 29

Chapter 6 – Recommendations/Prioritization ............................................... 58

Chapter 7 – Funding/Capital Improvement Plan........................................... 68

Appendix A ................................................................................................... 83

1. Park Descriptions/Park Concept Plans

2.

Cost Estimate of Planning and Development

Appendix B ................................................................................................. 138

1. Public Involvement/ Community Questionnaire

2. Recreation and Conservation Office/Self-Certification

3. RCO Level of Service Summary/Local Agencies

4. Mason County Park Advisory Board 2012 Minutes

5. Mason County Adopting Resolution

Appendix B-1: CD – Public Questionnaire Open-ended Answers

Community Workshops: Notes

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XECUTIVE SUMMAR

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he Mason County Department of Facilities, Parks and Trails acknowledges the importance of quality of life issues, healthy lifestyles, and the need for recreational opportunities in Mason

County. Because parks, trails, and other outdoor recreational facilities play an important role in increasing physical activity and promoting health, proper parks and facility planning is essential.

Planning, combined with an increasing demand for recreational facilities in Mason County, dictates the need for an updated Parks and Recreation Comprehensive Plan.

This plan updates the previous plan completed in 2006. The plan is intended to lay the groundwork for the future of the Mason County Facilities, Parks and Trails system. The plan has inventoried existing parks and identifies current and future park needs and has explored potential park acquisition, development and improvements.

Mason County is projected to grow to 81,423 by 2018, with continued growth through 2025. The plan has identified the County’s park and facility deficits and recommends strategies in response and address demands from future growth.

To help create a document that would encompass the desires of Mason County’s citizens, the Board of

County Commissioners appointed the Parks and Trails Advisory Board to work with citizen representatives who served as advisors on the Mason County Citizen Advisory Group (CAG) during this planning process.

Citizen input was also received as a result of citizen outreach and through the county-wide questionnaire.

Staff and volunteers distributed copies of the survey to citizens through the Mason County web-site, community service organizations, schools, library patrons and through news articles in the Shelton-Mason

County Journal. Staff also visited county-wide community groups and hosted three public workshops, one in Shelton, one in Belfair and one with students at the Shelton High School.

As a result, this Mason County Parks and Recreation Comprehensive Plan reflects the priorities as voiced by public input, survey respondents, the Citizen Advisory Group, the Park and Trails Advisory Board, and County staff. The plan contains chapters addressing the County’s goals, objectives and defined indicators for parks and recreational facilities. It highlights intergovernmental coordination with other local, state, and federal organizations. The Plan provides an inventory and description of its existing park facilities with an overview of the operations of the Facilities, Parks and Trails Department. The Plan provides extensive discussion on levels- of -service standards and strategies with an explanation of prioritization methods, the results of the community questionnaire and listing of project funding opportunities. The Appendix includes site master plan and park descriptions with current and funding cost estimates with general recommendations regarding potential funding options and sources over the next planning period.

This plan is designed to act as a planning tool for parks and park-related facilities through 2018 and beyond. This plan update will also allow Mason County to be eligible for the Recreation and Conservation

Office (RCO) match grant programs. The plan has placed a high priority in seeking and securing grants, donations, partnerships, and other creative funding mechanisms. This updated plan will help ensure

Mason County maintains and implements identified recommendations that provide benefit to the citizens and visitors of Mason County.

MISSION STATEMENT, INTRODUCTION, COUNTY PROFILE

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MISSION STATEMENT

Provide a diverse system of safe, attractive, and professionally maintained parks, trails and recreation opportunities designed to enhance the quality of life for all who reside in and visit Mason County.

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INTRODUCTION

ealthier lifestyles through physical activity are becoming an important component of people's lives. The Let’s Move: America’s Move to Raise a Healthier Generation of Kids

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is the President’s challenge to set active lifestyle goals and be involved in regular physical activity.

Further, the U.S. Healthy Peoples Initiative and the Healthier US programs through the Department of Health and Human Services also places strong emphasis on increasing physical activity. These programs suggest regular physical activity and the reduction of sedentary activities that promote health, psychological well being, and a healthy body weight. The adult obesity rate in Mason County is 29.9% and Mason County is ranked 35 th

out of 39 counties with regard to health ranking. As

Americans increase their level of physical activity, there is, in turn, an increased demand for healthier leisure-time activities, including parks and outdoor recreation. As more and more people participate in outdoor activities, the increased pressure on existing parks and recreational facilities may endanger the environmental qualities that residents and nonresidents are attracted to in the first place. Consequently, there is a need to provide for increasing recreational demand while at the same time improving quality of life, enhancing property values and protecting natural resources for future generations.

The National Park and Recreation Association (NPRA) actively promotes parks and recreation to enhance the quality of life for all people. In line with the values of NPRA, Mason County believes that parks and recreation organizations can:

◆ Enhance human potential by providing facilities, services and programs that meet the emotional, social and physical needs of communities;

◆ Articulate environmental values through ecologically responsible management and environmental education programs;

◆ Promote individual and community wellness that enhances the quality of life for all citizens;

◆ Utilize holistic approaches to promote cultural understanding, economic development, family public health and safety, by working in coalitions and partnerships with allied organizations; and

◆ Facilitate and promote the development of grassroots, self-help initiatives in communities across the country.

Planning for parks and recreation also addresses the County’s need for capital investments in public lands and recreation resources, contributes to individual and social development including a healthy, active populace, improves the health and well-being of children, youth and families, and ensures stewardship and protection for our nation’s natural resources.

The Mason County Parks and Recreation Comprehensive Plan will serve as a guide in the development of parks and outdoor recreation and will enable the County to satisfy the planning requirements of

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Sponsored by the USDA, Whitehouse, HHS, US Education and the Department of the Interior (www.letsmove.gov)

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 1 Page 1

the Growth Management Act (GMA) (RCW 36.70A.020). Local agencies, such as Mason County, are required to update their Parks and Recreation Comprehensive Plans every six years. The act establishes a number of requirements for local comprehensive planning. It identifies specific goals that the comprehensive plans are to achieve, prescribes the elements each plan is to contain, establishes requirements for regulations, mandates the “urban growth area,” and requires local governments to demonstrate how they will pay for the improvements and facilities called for in their plans. The act requires extensive public participation in the planning process.

This plan will also provide a document that can be used to solicit a variety of grant sources, including the Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO) with grant categories under the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program account (WWRP), the Boating Facilities Program (BFP), The Non-Highway and

Off Road Vehicle Program (NOVA) and the federal Land and Water Conservation Funding (LWCF) through the Department of the Interior. Completion and adoption of this plan will provide Mason

County with grant eligibility from 2013 to 2018 with the RCO. The RCO also requires public and/or community input as part of the planning process.

To facilitate community input, the Mason County Board of Commissioners appointed an eightmember Parks and Recreation Trails Advisory Board to work with County staff and a seventeen member Citizen Advisory Group to work throughout the update process. In an effort to maximize community input, citizens were invited to monthly Park Advisory Board meetings and Mason County conducted three public workshops. One workshop was held April 16 th

School, the second was held April 30 th

at the Shelton Choice High held April 23 rd

in Shelton at the Commissioners Chambers and the third was

at the North Mason Timberland Library in Belfair. Staff engaged workshop participants in a dialogue that would help create a better understanding of the community’s needs, desires and vision for parks in Mason County. Results from those workshops have been incorporated into this plan. Citizens were also welcomed to attend the open public meetings of the Citizen Advisory Group

(CAG) with meeting notes provided to the public for additional suggestions, advice and input in the planning process.

A County Parks Questionnaire survey was also developed and distributed to citizens and visitors of

Mason County. Surveys were distributed county-wide and presented in the Shelton-Mason County

Journal. Mason County staff, volunteers, Park Board members and the Citizen Advisory Group distributed the surveys to strategic points throughout the County. The survey was also posted on the

County’s web-site from April until early June where citizens could complete the survey and submit it online. This survey was provided in both English and Spanish for County-wide distribution. The survey gauged the citizen’s attitudes, opinions, and feelings on several important issues relating to parks and natural areas including existing and future facilities, maintenance, funding, improvements, and acquisition.

The plan also contains a capital-improvements element that recommends selected park and trail improvements from 2013 to 2018 and lists potential park improvements beyond the planning period from 2018 to 2025.

The recommendations in the capital improvements element were derived from the data collected from the Parks And Trails Advisory Board, Citizen Advisory Group, public meetings, the survey results, and staff input.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 1 Page 2

The efforts and dedication of many people should be recognized in the development of this plan.

Some of these individuals are listed as acknowledgements and includes staff, citizens, appointed and elected participants in the planning process.

The following comprehensive plan is the result of hours of staff and volunteer time in preparation, drafting, working with the public, tabulating survey results and guiding the plan through the formal adoption process. We believe that the community has provided invaluable information and insight for park planning in Mason County. This document is now the primary parks planning tool for Mason

County. It establishes specific policies and strategies for all County parks related to land acquisition, facility and program development, funding, and management. This plan is intended to:

◆ Articulate the County’s Vision and Mission Statement for Mason County parks, facilities, trails and outdoor recreation;

◆ Provide an inventory of all parks within the County;

◆ Analyze recreational trends in Mason County as acquired through the Mason County Parks questionnaire and community workshops;

◆ Describe the methods for inviting citizen participation in the planning process and summarizes the key issues and recommendations that citizens provided; and

◆ Discuss future development plans for existing parks, possible new additions to the park system, and the protection of park resources through policies and ordinances.

COULTER CREEK

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ason County was named for Charles H. Mason, territorial secretary and governor. Mason

County is one of the 39 counties in Washington and the City of Shelton is the County seat.

Mason County is situated along the southwestern portion of Puget Sound and encompasses roughly

961 square miles. The County borders with Jefferson County to the north, Gray’s Harbor County to the west and southwest, Thurston County to the southeast, Pierce County to the east, and Kitsap

County to the northeast. Mason County remains predominately a rural County despite urban spillover from both Thurston and Kitsap Counties. The City of Shelton, the only incorporated area in Mason

County, includes approximately 4.77 square miles, or less than one percent of the County’s total land area. There are two Urban Growth Areas in Mason County which are the Allyn UGA and the Belfair

UGA in the northern area of Mason County. Two Native American Tribes, the Skokomish Tribe and the

Squaxin Island Tribe have reservations within the boundaries of Mason County.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 1 Page 3

Three geological provinces combine to form Mason County. They include the Puget Sound lowland, the Olympic Mountains, and the Black Hills. Additionally, seven watersheds exist within Mason

County. They include Case Inlet, Chehalis, Lower Hood Canal, Oakland Bay, Skokomish, Trotten-Little

Skookum, and West Hood Canal. Mason County also includes over 350 miles of shoreline and nearly

100 freshwater lakes. The larger of these bodies are Lake Cushman, Mason Lake, Lake Limerick,

Isabella Lake, Timberlakes and Spencer Lake. Hood Canal and Puget Sound account for most of Mason

County’s 90 square miles of water. Two-thirds of Hood Canal runs through Mason County. One fork of the Skokomish feeds Lake Cushman and the hydroelectric power plant at Potlatch (built by the City of Tacoma). Other notable rivers in Mason County are the Satsop and Hamma Hamma.

Mason County’s rich natural resources and open spaces dominate the County’s landscape. Combined national, state, and private forests currently account for over 80% of the County’s land. Mineral deposits support 18 operating surface mines. Agriculture and aquaculture areas contribute both to the County’s beauty and its economy. Mason County also includes substantial open space. Open space within the County hosts wildlife habitat, undeveloped natural areas, and many developed park and recreation sites. These open space areas include over 100 sites managed by federal, state, county, municipal and private interests. Within Mason County, designated long-term commercial forest lands,

National park lands and National Forest lands are not available for development. Those three classifications combined, account for approximately 56.8% of the land within Mason County.

TRUMAN GLICK PARK

Mason County’s climate can be characterized as moderate-maritime, influenced by the Pacific

Ocean, yet sheltered by the Olympic Mountains. Average temperatures range from a high or 77° F. in

July to 33° F. in January. The average daily temperature in Mason County is 51° F. The County receives an average of 66 inches of precipitation annually, with average monthly rainfalls ranging from a low in July of 0.9 inches, to a high of 10.4 inches in January. There is an average of 136 sunny days with 161 days of precipitation.

The marine shorelines in Mason County cover about 217 linear miles including the inner shores of inlets, embayments, and estuaries.

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Elevations in the County range from 6,400 feet above mean sea level (MSL) in the foothills of the Olympic Mountains, to sea level along the coastline of Puget Sound and Hood Canal. Additionally, the communities in Mason County that are low-lying and located adjacent to South Puget Sound and Hood Canal could be affected by sea level rise. Climate change happens on scales ranging from decades to centuries. Sea levels in Puget Sound are projected to rise between 3.0 inches and 22.0 inches by Year 2050 (Mote, 2008). All of these fluctuations can have an impact on ecological conditions in the shoreline environment.

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Mason County Shoreline Inventory and Characterization Report - June 2011 Draft

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Appendix B - Addressing Sea Level Rise in Shoreline Master Programs

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 1 Page 4

Mason County’s 2012 population is 60,699 and is expected to grow to as many as 81,423 by 2018 and to 95,437 people by the year 2025. In fact, seasonal population is higher when tourism is at its peak.

The population can increase by 30-35% during the height of the season.

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Historically, the bulk of

Mason County’s population growth has occurred in the unincorporated areas of the County. The City of Shelton and the Urban Growth Areas of Allyn and Belfair, however, are expected to attract a larger share of Mason County’s population growth in the future. An example is the proposed Shelton

Hills Development which estimates 1,600 new single family residents in the City of Shelton.

With growth rates hovering around 2.5 percent, the last couple of years reflected the shift seen nationwide and statewide in the economy. Total nonfarm employment has declined since peaking at

14,640 in 2007. The 2010 data shows nonfarm jobs averaged 13,170. The past calendar year started out with double digit unemployment and slumping nonfarm payrolls. The detail shows no sector escaped this downturn as job losses in goods and services were the norm during this national, state and local recession. While recession is no longer the word du jour, the recovery is shaping up to be slow and uneven at best. Three important employment points note that:

◆ “Goods-producing” employment in 2010 accounted for 2,140 jobs in Mason County, with 770 of those in the natural resources, mining and construction sector and with 1,370 counted in manufacturing employment. The goods sector continues to disappoint, as both construction and manufacturing employment levels are below 2000 levels.

◆ Employment in the “services-providing” sectors accounted for 11,040 jobs in 2010. With its close proximity to neighboring counties and their population centers, the affordable cost of living, matched with the desirable surroundings, the County has upped its servicesproviding employment to meet demand. But growth during the slowdown has been hard to come by, even with a beneficial geographic location.

◆ The “catch-all” is the “all other services” sector, which accounted for 3,070 paychecks in

2010. It follows “government” at 5,280, dropping from the largest source of employment in the County. With the largest employer tag, comes the burden of most vulnerable as this sector is certain to lose jobs in the future.

After posting an annual average decade-high unemployment rate of 8.6 percent in 2003, the rate continued to drop to 5.8 in 2006 and 2007. Unfortunately, that trend has come to a stop as the 2008 rate jumped to 7.0 percent, then to 10.7 in 2009 and to 11.1 in 2010. The beginning of 2011 began to see a hold but with no promise that this current year would be the bounce-back year.

Natural resource industries currently support Mason County’s economy and are expected to be important in the future. The County is highly specialized in the production of forest and aquaculture commodities. This specialization focuses on both raw materials and value-added products in these industries. Heavy construction and government service also anchor the County’s economy.

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Mason County Comprehensive Plan April 1996 (updated 2005) Land Use Section

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 1 Page 5

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

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GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

T he following goals and objectives represent Mason County’s vision for the guidance of parks and recreation during the next six years.

MISSION STATEMENT

Mission Statement: Provide a diverse system of safe, attractive, and professionally maintained parks, trails, and recreation opportunities designed to enhance the quality of life for all who reside in and visit Mason County

Goals and Objectives Indicators

1. Administrative Goal

Quality professional personnel guided by innovative strategies to acquire, build, operate and maintain the community and regional parks, special use areas, natural areas and a County-wide trail system to effectively serve the

County in the realization of this plan.

Director

1.1-The Mason County Parks

Department leadership is effectively linked with and responsive to the citizens.

Staff Objectives

1.2-Superior and accessible customer services are provided to the public and all departments in a professional, informative and timely manner.

Security

2.2-The parks and trails system strives for the highest quality of recreation facilities and promotes a sense of security and well being.

Project Planning

3.2-Engagement of Mason County

By 2018, assessments by an ad hoc planning advisory group verify that most activities included in the comprehensive plan have been successfully completed.

By the conclusion of 2018, feedback obtained from individuals and citizen groups indicates a high level of satisfaction with

MCPR management.

By the end of 2018, survey data and information obtained from interviews with those who use MCPR facilities and services show a high level of satisfaction with the available facilities and with services provided.

By 2018, results of at least

50 random interviews conducted with users of

MCPR facilities indicate a high sense of well being and adequate personal security.

By the end of 2017,

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Means of Verification

Assessment Report on file in Director’s

Office

Assumptions

Funding is provided as budgeted

Documented feedback from citizen groups on file in Director’s Office

Survey data and summaries of interviews on file in

Director’s Office

Summary notes from interviews on file in

Director’s Office

The director is not assigned additional, non

Parks and Recreation duties

Staffing levels are not reduced;

Budgets are adequate.

Local economic circumstances remain stable or improve

Survey notes and Citizen participation in

Chapter 2 Page 6

Goals and Objectives residents in planning and stewardship of park and trail resources increases public awareness and use of the park and trail system.

Project Implementation

3.3-Facilities are developed to meet as many identified needs as possible at community and regional park sites.

Community Relations

3.4-Citizen planning committees and stewardship programs which identify conceptual short- and long-term use, management and maintenance procedures and are developed and supported.

Future Projects

3.5-Creative approaches are applied in investigating and pursuing potential resources for providing future parks, trails and recreation facilities.

Coordination

3.6-Cooperation, coordination and communication with appropriate public and private agencies, organizations and individuals are promoted as part of continuing efforts to maximize public recreational opportunities, minimize duplication, and enhance service to the entire community.

Indicators random surveys of parks and trails as well as reports by coaches of teams using athletic facilities show an increase in use by the public.

By 2018, at least three of the needs identified through the Parks and

Trails Survey conducted in

2012 and identified by the advisory board as doable priorities have been completed.

By 2018, recommendations obtained from committee meetings and stemming from input of those involved in stewardship programs are considered, prioritized and implemented.

By 2018, at least three new resources have been utilized to provide funding and/or support for parks, trails, and recreation facilities.

By June, 2013, all stakeholders engaged in planning for and supporting the development of public recreational opportunities have developed a mutual understanding of short- and medium-term priorities and have outline steps to enhance service to the citizens of and visitors to the County.

Means of Verification reports on file in

Director’s Office.

Project reports and minutes of Advisory

Board meetings.

Project reports and minutes of Advisory

Board meetings

Records of resource allocations on file in

Director’s Office

Agreed short- and medium-term priorities and action steps on file in the

Director’s Office

Assumptions planning, use and additional development of the trail system

Reliable funding sources

Committees meet regularly

Donors have funds and are interested in supporting the development of parks and facilities

Existing partner agencies continue to support parks and recreation efforts

4. Benefits Goal

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 2 Page 7

Goals and Objectives Indicators

4.1-The Mason County Parks and

Trails Department actively promotes the individual, community, health, economic cultural and environmental benefits of parks and recreation services and facilities for all residents of and visitors to Mason

County.

Multiple Use

4.2-The system of parks, trails, recreation facilities and natural areas are resource effective and distributed community-wide to provide multiple benefits to the

Mason County citizens and visitor.

By 2015, the MCPR has completed the development of promotional materials and activities geared toward engaging and informing individuals and communities of the benefits of parks and recreation services and facilities.

By 2018, the development of parks and recreation facilities and natural areas developed in the 6-year plan period reflect expenditures and developments that are distributed among the three commissioner districts.

By the end of 2013, a master plan identifying potential off street links between parks, open spaces, public facilities and areas of interest is drafted

Trails/ Pedestrian Linkage

4.3- A regional system of connected, coordinated linkages to major recreational areas, public facilities, cultural/environmental features, parks, open spaces, via trails, paths, bicycle routes and other travel corridors that separate vehicular traffic and non-vehicular traffic identified, investigated and developed where feasible.

Natural Resource Areas

4.4- Actions to preserve natural areas, protect fish and wildlife habitat corridors, conserve land, provide appropriate public access and offer environmental education opportunities are promoted.

Water Access

4.5- Opportunities for water access and activities are provided throughout the County.

Cultural

4.6-Cultural and historic resources are preserved and promoted

By the end of 2013, strategies and materials for promoting the preservation of natural areas, protecting fish and wildlife habitat and for providing access and educational opportunities are drafted and reviewed by representatives of the public.

By 2014, potential areas for providing access to water bodies are identified and a committee established to visit and assess each.

By 2015, as a matter of policy, new park, trail and

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Means of Verification

Materials on file in the Director’s Office

Parks & Recreation budgets, development plans, meeting minutes on file in the Directors

Office

Off Street Corridor

Master Plan draft on file in Director’s

Office

Strategies and materials on file in

Director’s Office

Maps and committee reports on file in

Directors Office

Signage and maps in parks and on trails

Assumptions

Continued cooperation with local cultural entities e.g. Native

American, Hispanic and

Asian

Needs adequate appropriation to fund projects

Public support and ongoing use of off street trails and where right of way is obtained

No major pollution events

Some of the current potential access areas are available

Vandalism is minimized

Chapter 2 Page 8

Goals and Objectives wherever they exist in parks and on trails throughout the County.

Athletics

4.7 Youth and adult athletic recreation facilities are provided throughout the County.

Indicators natural areas that may have potentially important cultural or historical significance are identified and plans made to preserve them.

By the end of 2018, based on priorities identified through public surveys and other forms of input at least two new recreational areas are identified and developed.

Means of Verification call attention to sites of cultural or historical importance.

Plans, maps and documents on file in the Directors Office

Assumptions

Grant funding is available to augment county funds

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 2 Page 9

PUBLIC INVOLVEMEN CITIZEN INPUT

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Introduction

Public involvement in the update to the Mason County Parks and Recreation Comprehensive Plan included the Mason County Commissioners’ selection of seventeen local residents who volunteered to assist with the update of the park and recreation plan. The “Citizens Advisory Group” (CAG) brought their time, talents, commitment and input into the completion of the final draft presented to the

Mason County Park Advisory Board for adoption by the Mason County Commissioners.

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NORTH MASON COMMUNITY WORKSHOP

he Mason County Park Advisory Board regular public meetings with briefing on status, progress and review of chapters, surveys and documents presented for concurrence and approval. held the their

In addition to advisory and board public meetings, Mason County presented a series of news updates through local newspapers, a radio station and as a

“Spotlight on Park” through the Mason

County Outdoors publication. Citizens informed of the current planning process provided details of upcoming public meetings, workshops, the opportunity involvement in the community survey and up-dated continual information placed on the Mason

County Parks Department web page with a link to the survey at http://www.co.mason.wa.us/parks/index.php

. were and for

The two community outreach opportunities included the Community Questionnaire Survey and the county-wide Community Workshops. Presented is input and findings from each of these public outreach programs.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 3 Page 10

Mason County Facilities, Parks and Trails Department Questionnaire

Introduction

This report summarizes comments from the three Community Workshops and the finding of the

Community Questionnaire survey for the current planning effort. The questionnaire summary of results were assembled by MIG, Inc. in support of planning services performed by AjO Consulting and in conjunction with the Mason County Facilities, Parks and Trails staff, citizen committee members and community leaders. The questionnaire addressed community needs and priorities for the future of parks, facilities and open space in Mason County. It provided one of several opportunities for the community at large to have their ideas, opinions and concerns included in the park system comprehensive planning process.

Methodology

The questionnaire was designed for the web and presented online via a link from the Parks

Department’s website. A printed version of the questionnaire was also available in both English and

Spanish at select locations throughout the County or by contacting the Department office. The questionnaire was available from April to early June 2012.

This style of questionnaire is accessible to the community at large and respondents self select, therefore results cannot be considered a random sample. Results from a non-random sample are, by nature, not scientifically accurate as a randomly-distributed survey would be. However, as a practical point, MIG has found that results between non-random questionnaires and random sample surveys in parks and recreation have been closely aligned and provide useful and relevant information about public input for planning purposes. Advantages of this type of outreach tool include accessibility, adaptability and convenience.

Nearly 600 respondents answered the questionnaire, which as a response rate for Mason County indicate an outstanding level of interest and participation on the part of the citizens. This level of response surpasses response rates for similar exercises MIG has developed for much larger populations.

Key Findings

There were no limits on who could participate in this questionnaire. To clarify the potential results, several questions were asked about the respondents including age, gender, and two questions to identify residence locations throughout Mason County. Several themes emerged from the initial analysis of the community questionnaire results.

Park and trail needs expressed through this questionnaire emphasized multi-use trails, with emphasis on connections between north and south areas of the County and to County destinations (parks, schools etc.) Hiking and nature trails were also noted favorably.

Respondents indicated significant interest in increased fitness and wellness and recreational opportunities through trails for hiking, biking and wildlife viewing.

Water access opportunities were reflected as a continued priority for respondents, while acquiring additional park land did not seem to be as important as maintaining existing recreational facilities.

The respondents did show significant willingness to provide funding support for the acquisition and development of walking and biking trails and bike routes.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 3 Page 11

Summary of Results:

Having the questionnaire form translated to Spanish increased efforts to reach the Hispanic population of Mason County. Results are presented in tabular form with highlights bulleted below questions answered. The complete survey public input to the questionnaire is presented in Appendix

B.

Mason County Facilities, Parks & Trails Department Community Workshops

Three Community Workshops were held in April 2012 throughout Mason County. One of the workshops was held at the Shelton Choice High School, which provided important and insightful input and perspective from youth.

The three workshops presented a series of questions of citizens and for their observations regarding

“What has Changed?” in Mason County over the past six years. The citizens focused on localized issues, demographics, as well as losses and gains in recreational and park opportunities for the community at large.

The second discussion centered on “What is needed?” which included programs, facilities, lands, natural open space as well as leadership.

The final workshop question dealt with their “Dreams” which offered their vision for the parks and recreation department as well as possibilities over the next six to twenty years, with final input into what they desire to see in their County park system.

Individual summaries of each workshop are attached in Appendix B: Public Involvement/Community

Questionnaire.

The citizens provided the following input at each of the workshops that relate to the four categories of the Mason County Park and Recreation Goals.

Goal 1: Administration:

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Population higher

◆ 16% retired and 16% teens

◆ Sewer system in Belfair. Will bring growth & more demand for parks

Pro-active management ahead of population push

◆ MCTC Transit Center closed for repair

◆ High gas prices

N e e d d s

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Recreation programs

◆ More funding

◆ Environmental (beach rangers) in Union

WORKSHOP AT SHELTON HIGH SCHOOL

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Goal 2: Maintenance and Renovation:

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◆Sandhill lower fields are good

◆Caretaking at Sandhill has gone down (tunnel/scotch broom)

◆Parks have declined

◆Trails are less convenient (not safe)

D r e

◆Low maintenance

a m s-

◆ Jacoby Park Dock & Improvement

Goal 3: Projects and Planning:

C h a n g e

e s -

New Race Track/Motor Sports Park

◆ Need to address the built environment for health/economy

◆ Youth sports decreased because of family needs & economy

◆ Young adults? Where are they in recreation?

Gym time hard to get.

◆ Bowling alley gone

◆ Subway is 24 hours

N e

◆ Indoor basketball

e

d s

-

-

Soccer and football fields (maybe at Sandhill)

Dirt Bike BMX

◆ Public swimming pool/aquatic center

◆ All weather fields

◆ Shooting range

◆ Walled/rugged terrain exercise par-course/obstacle course/paintball/zip-line

◆ Boat Ramp Shorecrest/Jacoby Park

D r e a m s -

Outdoor swimming pool

◆ Dog park

◆ RV Parks

Goal 4: Benefits:

◆ Fairground Event Center “new”

C h a n g e s -

◆Growing Guatemalan community in north

◆More for kids

◆More for girls in sports

◆Among the least healthy Counties (WA) 36 th

out of 39

◆Trails needs: equestrian/walk/bike etc.

◆Trails are served first?

◆Increase need for kayaking

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 3 Page 13

N e

e d s

-

-

More nature trails/trails for various users

◆ Place for camping

◆ Gym for gymnastics, boxing, classes

◆ Skate land/skateboarding facility

◆ Communication with other organizations for planning

◆ Small scale music & arts event

D r e a m s -

◆ Indoor skate park for year-round use/skate land

◆ Boxing/MMA Gym/music studio/indoor recreation center

◆ Better movie theater

◆ Safe routes to homes and schools

Key Findings and Summary of Community Workshops

Input from the citizens was realistic and understood the current economic limitations. Their conversations centered around the continue need for recreational opportunities that provided benefit to the youth in the communities but also address the growing need for access to water and expansion of trails. Water access was reflected in a number of opportunities identified which ranged from shoreline access to both freshwater and saltwater. They expressed their dream of water opportunities that included an aquatic complex either indoor or outdoor.

Trails and safe routes to schools were stressed and they were concerned about safety with walking and traveling along busy highways. Separated and linking trails were identified as both a need but also a dream.

Outdoor activities were stressed and ranged from new to renovated sports fields, an additional skate park as well as working with citizen and non-profit groups that help to provide stewardship or volunteer assistance to improve park sites.

Many expressed the changes that have occurred over the past six years with a diminishing economy and limited funding but were observant to point out the changes in population demographic, the potential for accelerated growth in the Belfair area but the continual demand for positive opportunities for youth through programs or facilities at existing outdoor parks but also potentially new indoor facilities.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 3 Page 14

INVENTORY

C

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EXISTING FACILITIES

I n order to manage the most effective and efficient park system, the existing inventory is defined by different types of parks. Each classification provides for a specific type of recreation experience and opportunity. The parks and recreation system provides benefits that affect property values, tourism, health and fitness, community cohesion, clean water/air and provides overall value to quality of life.

The following collection of inventory data provides a view of the system for understanding of the dynamics of the Mason County Park and Trails Department. Table 4.1 summarizes parks owned and managed by the Department. Currently, Mason County owns and manages 23 sites with 956.96 acres of developed and undeveloped park property. The park system offers a wide range of active and passive recreational opportunities including ball fields, picnic areas, walking, biking and water trails, boat launches, natural area and wildlife habitat open spaces.

Table 4.1 Existing Mason County Parks

PARK

Coulter Creek

Decker Creek

Foothills County Park – (2 sites Neighborhood Park & Natural Open Space)

Harstine Island Park

Harvey Rendsland Jiggs Lake Park

Hunter Park , Clifton Lane, Belfair

Jacoby/Shorecrest

Latimer’s Landing Boat Launch & Latimer’s Overflow Parking (2 sites)

Mason County Recreation Area

Mason County Skate Park #1

Mason Lake County Park

Menards Landing (Boat Launch)

Oakland Bay Historical Park

Phillips Lake Park

Sandhill County Park

Sunset Bluff Park

Truman Glick Memorial Park

Union Boat Ramp

Union Park

Walker Park

Watson Wildwood View Park

TOTAL ACREAGE

ACRES

40.00

0.50

17.36

7.40

81.87

0.40

30.00

36.00

55.00

500.00

80.00

6.90

15.00

0.15

2.80

5.00

35.46

0.16

1.92

5.04

36.00

956.96

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 15

Mason County has four classifications of parks, which include:

◆Neighborhood Parks

◆Community Parks

◆Regional Parks

◆Natural Areas

Table 4.2 summarizes the parks by classification, listing the total number of acres and sites.

In Appendix B, detailed descriptions of each of the County’s parks are listed by recommended classification with details of existing conditions, inventory and future capital needs.

Table 4.2 Summary Existing Parks

Park Type

Neighborhood Parks

Acres

12.07

Total

Number of Sites

3

Community Parks

Regional Parks

Natural Open Space

TOTAL

180.12

151.87

612.90

956.96

13

3

4

23

Neighborhood Parks:

Neighborhood Parks serve a ½-mile distance to most citizens and provide a local destination for nearby communities. They are used for non-supervised play and typically accommodate a variety of activities including children’s playgrounds, picnic tables, open grass for passive use, outdoor basketball court and restrooms.

Table 4.3 Neighborhood Parks

Neighborhood Parks

Inventory

Foothills Park

Hunter Park

10.00 C x

0.15 C x

Union Park

TOTAL Acreage

Neighborhood Parks

1.92 C x x x x

12.07

x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 16

Community Parks:

Community parks are designed to serve as a focal point for community-wide or sub-urban/rural areas of the County. They are smaller than regional parks and often include unique or specific uses with special features. They allow for an active recreation with fields, lighting, parking and vehicle traffic.

The Mason County Community Parks offer playgrounds, picnic areas, passive use areas, trails, boat launches, restrooms and ball fields. Table 4.4 lists the Community Parks in Mason County and the facilities at each park.

Table 4.4 Community Parks

Community Parks

Quick Inventory

Coulter Creek

Harvey Rendsland Park

Jacoby/Shorecrest Park

Latimer’s Landing Boat

Launch & Parking

Mason Co Skatepark #1

Mason Lake Park

Menards Landing (launch)

Phillips Lake Park

55.00

15.00 C

2.80 C x

5.00 C

0.50 C x

17.36 C x x

7.40 C x x

* x x

0.40 C x x x x x x x x x x x x x

Sunset Bluff Park

Truman Glick Park

36.00 C

35.46 C x x x x x x x x x

Union Boat Ramp 0.16 C

Walker Park 5.04 C x

TOTAL Acreage

Community Parks

215.12

C = Mason County Ownership

*

= Hand Carry Launch Only x x

* x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 17

Regional Parks:

Regional Parks have significant acreage and serve the entire County population. These parks allow for recreational use, with special features that may have a unique offering focusing on active and passive recreation. In Mason County there are three major regional parks: Mason County Recreation

Area (MCRA) near Shelton in south-county, the Oakland Bay Park is north Shelton and south of Belfair and Sandhill Park near Belfair in the north. Table 4.5 lists the regional parks and facilities, which are:

Table 4.5 Regional Parks

Regional Parks

Quick

Inventory

Mason County

Recreation Area

Oakland Bay Park

40.00 C x

81.87 C

Sandhill Park 30.00 C x

TOTAL Acreage

Regional Parks

151.87

C = County Ownership x x x x x x x x x x x x x x

Natural Open Space Areas:

Natural open space parks can vary in size and function and can include significant acreage. They are defined as land or water left primarily in its natural state. Left generally undeveloped they provide habitat value or serve as preservation areas for protected habitat and species. Waterfront parks are linked to the adopted Shoreline Master Plan. Passive recreation includes hiking, bird watching, boating, fishing, picnicking, beachcombing, wildlife viewing and other activities. Table 4.6 lists the four County Natural Open Space Parks and features.

Table 4.6 Natural Open Space

Natural Open

Space

Parks Quick

Inventory

Decker Creek

Foothills Park

500.00 C

70.00 C

Harstine Island Park 6.90 C

Watson Wildwood 36.00 C

TOTAL Natural

Open Space

612.90

C = County Ownership x X x x x x x x

X x

X

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 18

County Recreation Facilities:

Mason County offers a variety of recreation and sport facilities within its parks which adds opportunities and experiences for citizens and visitors to the County. Listed below in Table 4.7 are the major facilities maintained by the Facilities, Parks & Trails Department:

Table 4.7 Facility Inventory Summary

Facility/Feature/

Structure

Amount

Facility/Feature/

Structure

Amount

Basketball Court 3

Nature Area 7

Picnic Shelter 3

Barbecues

65

Picnicking 11

Ball fields

14

Playgrounds 5

Batting Cages

2

4

Restrooms 11

Boat Launch

Fishing

Hand Carry Boat Launch

7

6

Skatepark

Walking/Jogging

1

6

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 19

State, Federal, Shelton, County, Special District and State Recreation Resources:

There are a number of other governmental agencies which own and manage park property in Mason

County. Figure 4.8 shows the various landowners, acreage or number of sites, and park amenities at each park location. There are over 5,000 acres of parkland owned and managed by other government agencies within the boundaries of Mason County.

Table 4.8

Other Mason County Parkland

Facility/Owner

South Mason Soccer Park

Belfair State Park

Harstine Island State Park

Hoodsport Trails

Hope Island

Jarrell Cove

Acres Amenities Available

Private-Non Profit Sports Club

10.4

6 soccer fields, plus modified-field area for small side games/restroom and concession. Built/maintained by

South Mason County Youth Soccer Club

Washington State Parks

65.00

Camping, 118 tent sites, 47 utility sites, trails, trailer dump facility, recreation and picnic area, 3,780-ft. tidelands

310 Undeveloped, 3,100 ft. of tidelands

80 Natural area with trails

106 Undeveloped, 8,540 ft. of tidelands; boat access only

106

Camping, 22 tent sites, group site, picnic area, marine pump station, 2 docks with 500 ft. of moorage, 14 mooring buoys, 3,500 ft. of tidelands, trails

193.75 Undeveloped, no development plans

0 4,100 ft. of tidelands for public use, no amenities

Lake Isabella

Lilliwaup Tideland

McMicken Island 11.45

Undeveloped, 1,660 ft. of tidelands, boater destination. Could be developed in the future with 5-8 camping sites and composting toilet. Boat access only

Potlach State Park

Schafer State Park

Stretch Point

Twanoh State Park

57

119

4.2

Camping, 39 serviced sites, 40 standard sites, 3 primitive sites, underwater park, trailer dump, 9,570 ft. of tidelands

Group camping for 100, Day use campsites for 100 max, picnic and BBQ, day use, trailer dump

Natural area, day use, 5 mooring buoys no development plans, 610 ft. of tidelands

182

Camping, 30 tent sites, 9 utility sites, primitive sites,

3,167 ft. of tidelands

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 20

Highway 101

Isabella Lake

Island Lake

Lake Limerick

Lost Lake

Maggie Lake

Nahwatzel Lake

North Bay

Oakland Bay

Panhandle Lake

Panther Lake

Facility/Owner Acres Amenities Available

Washington State Fish and Wildlife

0.5 Boat launch, 15 parking spaces Aldrich Lake

Benson Lake

Cady Lake

Clara Lake

Cushman Lake

Decker Creek

Devereaux Lake

Haven Lake

Phillips Lake

Sherwood Creek

Skokomish Wildlife Area

Skokomish River/Smith

Spencer Lake

78.8 Boat launch, beach access, 100 parking spaces 1 toilet

1.6 Boat launch, 10 parking spaces, porta-potty

9 Boat launch, 30 parking spaces, 1 toilet

44 Boat launch, 100 parking spaces, 1 toilet (Kokanee)

2.3 Water Access on Satsop River, no developed facilities

1.3 Boat launch, beach access, 40 parking spaces, 1 toilet

4.1

Boat launch, 10 parking spaces, 1 toilet /County PW

ROW: Agreement for Use of Land to WDFW

Undeveloped access on the Skokomish River

1.6 Boat launch, 20 parking spaces, 1 toilet

1 Boat launch, 1 toilet

0.5 Boat launch, beach, 30 parking spaces, 1 toilet

1.3 Boat launch, 40 parking spaces, 1 toilet

1.3 Boat launch, 10 parking spaces, 1 toilet

1.0 Water access, undeveloped

2.3 Shellfish /Puget Sound, 15 parking spaces, 1 toilet

2 Walk-in only, 1 toilet

20 Undeveloped

3.8 Boat Launch, 30 parking spaces, 1 toilet

1

Boat launch, beach, parking for 40 vehicles, 2 toilets, co-managed with Mason County

102 Undeveloped water access on Case Inlet

45 George Adams Hatchery along the river

104

30.6 ft. of riverfront, shore access, 20 parking spaces,

1 toilet

2 Boat launch, beach, 50 parking spaces, 1 toilet

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 21

Acres Amenities Available

Facility/Owner

Tahuya River

Tee Lake

Acres Amenities Available

Washington State Fish and Wildlife

2.9 4,400 ft. of riverfront, 10 parking spaces

Theler Wetland Trails

Trails End Lake (Pricket)

Twin lake

3.6 Boat launch, 20 parking spaces

135

Partnership with WDFW/4 separate trails, Exhibit

Center, Native Plant Demonstration Garden

0.5 Boat launch, parking for 30 vehicles, 1 toilet

3.6 Boat launch, 15 parking spaces

Union River Access #1

Union River Estuary

Union River Wetlands

Wildberry Lake

Wooten Lake

0.5

Parking, Hood Canal/Union River Access waterfowl access

61.8 8,098 ft. of riverfront, 10 parking spaces,

215

Parking, Duck Blinds/water fowl hunting, hand boat launch

10 Undeveloped

1 Boat launch, 60 parking spaces, 1 toilet.

Aldrich Lake Camp

Washington State Department of Natural Resources

24

1,700 ft. of waterfront, hand boat launch, picnic area, day use, fishing, 16 parking spaces

Camp Spillman

Effendahl Pass Staging Area

Howell Lake

Kamenga Campground

Mission Creek Trailhead

Robbins Lake

Tahuya River Horse Camp

10

800 ft. waterfront, 10 campsites, 1 group site, toilet, covered picnic area

5

Staging area, 6 picnic sites, self-contained RV's permitted, toilets, 1 covered picnic area, Effendahl

Pass 4x4 Trailhead

Day use only, hand boat launch, toilets, picnic area, and 20 parking spaces

4x4 trailhead, toilet, 6 campsites, 8 RV areas, 8 tent sites, picnic tables and fire rings

1 Staging area for motorized trial access

1.1

12

175 ft. waterfront, hand boat launch, picnic area, toilets, day use only

1,600-ft. waterfront, 11 campsites, 1 group campsite, toilets, water, 20-horse corral

Day use only, picnic, toilet, fishing, hand boat launch Twin lakes

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 22

Acres Amenities Available

Facility/Owner Acres Amenities Available

Washington State Department of Natural Resources

Melbourne Lake 1,000 ft. waterfront, day use only, walk-in, toilets

Lilliwaup Creek Campground

Public Tidelands: 24, 33, 43, 44, 46-48.

500-ft. waterfront, day use only, walk-in

Water access, selected clamming, oysters, crabbing, fishing

Eagle Creek Tidelands Access, clamming, crabbing

Rendsland Creek Tidelands Access, clamming

Skokomish Tribal Nation

Skokomish Park at Lake Cushman 600

3-boat launches, 41,500’ fresh-waterfront, 100 parking sites, 50 tent camp sites, 30 trailer sites, 2 primitive camp sites, group camping, group shelter, picnic sites/shelter, 3 toilets.

Skokomish Light Saltwater Park

(transfer from Tacoma City Light)

1

Park and Lake Kokanee boat launches/restrooms for public use.

City of Shelton Parks and Recreation

Brewer Park

Callanan Park

City Park

0.3 Picnic area, mature vegetation, on-street parking

6.9

Ball field, play equipment, restroom, natural area, basketball court, restrooms, informal trails, basketball court

1.75 Undeveloped

Huff and Puff Trail 5.0

2 miles walking/jogging trail with exercise stations on wooded property, 20 parking spaces at trailhead

Johnson Park

Kneeland Park

0.5 Basketball court, mature trees, 10 parking spaces

3.9

Large play area, restroom, group picnic shelter, horseshoes, open play area, landscaping, street-parking for 25 vehicles

Loop Field

Overlook Park

Pine St. Ramp

4

2 tennis courts, ball field, athletic field, play structure, jogging trail, group picnic area, restroom, 100 parking spaces

1.03

Historic marker overlooking downtown, Oakland Bay and mills with temporary parking

0.4 Unimproved boat launch on Oakland Bay

Sixth Street Park 0.14

Park closed for future rehabilitation in partnership with community/neighbors. Tentative reopening June 2013.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 23

Facility/Owner

Allyn Waterfront Park

Acres

Port of Allyn

2

Amenities Available

400 ft. of waterfront, moorage, dock, picnic, gazebo,

20 parking spots, playground, boat launch, pump out.

Allyn Kayak Park

North Shore Ramp Belfair

Dewatto River Campground

Ingvold Grunvold Waterfront Park

Hoodsport Community Trail

Sanderson Field

Oakland Bay Marina

Belfair Elementary

Sandhill Elementary

Hood Canal School District

Pioneer Primary

Pioneer Intermediate/Middle

Grapeview Elementary

Southside Elementary

Bordeaux

Evergreen Elementary

3 300’ beach, hand launch, viewing, picnicking

1.2

150-ft. waterfront, boat launch, dock, beach, 20 parking spaces

Port of Dewatto

1

Camping, 60 campsites, 37 with electricity, no sewage dump, no garbage facilities, no running water, 4 toilets, trails, picnic area, fishing

Port of Hoodsport

2 Dock, beach access, tidelands, restroom

Walking trail, wildlife viewing, interpretive signs

Port of Shelton

1,170 Airfield, fairground (67 acres)

Boat moorage and launch, pump-out, parking

Mason County Public Schools

Playground

Playground

2 baseball backstops, 1 football field, playground, track, 30 parking spaces, plans to build a new K-8 school.

Playground, track, athletic field, covered basketball backstop

Playground, baseball field, 2 play fields, covered, basketball backstop, tetherball poles

Playground

1 baseball field

Playground

Playground

Mountain View Elementary One open multi-use field.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 24

Facility/Owner Acres Amenities Available

Shelton High School

Mary K. Knight District

Oakland Bay Junior High

Mason County Public Schools

5 tennis courts, 1 baseball field, 4 practice football/soccer field combinations, 1 football field,

1 swimming pool, 1 diving well, 1 track

2 baseball fields, 1 football field, playground

5 football/soccer fields, 1 landscaped courtyard

Olympic Middle Multi-use Field, Basketball hoops

Hawkins Middle Playground, athletic field

North Mason High School

2 baseball fields, 2 tennis courts, football field, soccer field, playground, track

Department of the Interior/ Olympic National Park

Olympic Nat. Park- Staircase Camp 1 Picnic area, 50 campsites, 60 parking spaces

USDA / Olympic National Forest

Big Creek Campground 6

Loop campground with 78 campsites, no reservations, trail access to Mt. Ellinor and intersects with Big Creek

Loop

Browns Creek Campground

Hamma Hamma Campground

Lower Lena Lake Campground

Upper Lena Creek Campground

1

Browns Creek Nature Loop Trail, campsites RV’s under

21’ max, vault toilet (3), potable water, along south fork of Skokomish River and confluence of Browns

Creek.

5

14 single sites, vault toilet, potable water, tents, trailers and RV’s.

6 40 campsites, hike in, vault toilet

7

13 single sites, vault toilet, potable water, RV’s max

21’; climbing, fishing, and picnicking.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 25

M

EXISTING OPERATIONS / PARK MAINTENANCE

ason County currently operates 23 parks with a variety of recreation facilities totaling

956.96 acres. These parks range from natural areas to intensive use areas, such as a skate park and two regional baseball-softball facilities. At the present time, Mason

County does not offer any department-sponsored recreation programs or special events at any of its parks. These structured recreation programs are offered by local youth sports associations, nonprofit organizations or by the Shelton Metropolitan Park District.

Commissioner

District 1

FACILITIES DIVISION

Facilities Maintenance III

Facilities Maintenance II

Facilities Maintenance II

Facilities Custodian I

Facilities Custodian I

Facilities Custodian I

Citizens

Commissioner

District 2

Director of Facilities,

Parks and Trails

ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT

Program support

Technician

Facilities Coordinator

Park Attendants/Hosts

Commissioner

District 3

Parks & Trails

Advisory Board

PARKS & TRAILS

DIVISION

Park & Trails Maintenance II

Park & Trails Maintenance I

Park & Trails Maintenance I

Park & Trails Part-Time

Seasonal Help

Volunteers &

Service

Organizations

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 26

T he Mason County Facilities, Parks and Trails Department is separated into divisions providing administration, park maintenance and operations and facility services. The general administration includes the Senior Accounting Technician, Facility Scheduler and the

Department Director. This division is responsible for general customer service, facilities scheduling, payroll, accounts payable, accounts receivable, general administration, park planning, grant administration, park development, and special projects. The park division provides maintenance and operation of all the County parks. Park staff in this division includes one Park Maintenance II and two

Park Maintenance I full-time maintenance employees. The previous chart illustrates the current organizational structure of Mason County Facilities, Parks and Trails Department.

The Facilities, Parks & Trails Department administrative offices are located at Mason County

Recreation Area (MCRA). The maintenance staff also stages all operations from the MCRA in the course of performing their daily operations and maintenance. Staff travel long distances throughout the County to maintain parks at various locations. In the southern area of the County is Truman-Glick

Park, located west of Matlock while on the north area of the County near Tahuya is Menard’s landing and Harvey Rendsland Jiggs Lake Park. These two locations require the most travel time but fortunately they are low-maintenance park facilities.

Mason County Facilities, Parks and Trails Department also employs seasonal employees in addition to caretakers and park host attendants. The caretakers are located at Walker Park, MCRA, and Sandhill

Park. Park caretakers at some locations live in on-site housing supplied by Mason County. They are responsible for general customer service and light maintenance including restroom cleanup and litter control. However, the greatest benefit they provide is site security.

County park hosts are currently at Foothills Park, Truman Glick

Park and Mason Lake Park. The park hosts are responsible for security, opening and closing park facilities, and general clean-up during their contractual period. Park hosts are invaluable to the County because of the geographic dispersion of Mason County’s park system.

Administrative and Maintenance objectives encourage the promotion of professional staff that is effective and responsive in sustaining quality services and exploring opportunities to enhance the benefits and function of the park system.

JACOBY/SHORECREST PARK

Goal 1 and Goal 2 Identify the need to have quality staff that effectively serves the County park system.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 27

Project and Planning Goals promote citizen engagement in stewardship objectives in the park plan address the need to develop facilities that reduce maintenance costs with established maintenance standards for efficiency and safety with realistic multi-year plans that can be implemented and funded.

Goal 3 summarizes this effort which is to “Plan, acquire and develop parks, trails and recreation facilities which provide public opportunities that maximize identified needs, minimize duplication and enhance recommended park services throughout Mason County.”

The Benefits Goal

actively promotes the individual, community, health, economic cultural and environmental benefits of parks and recreation services and facilities for all residents of and visitors to Mason County.

The Mason County Facilities, Parks and Trails 2012 budget total for Parks and Trails (Fund 145/

$487,597 (2%)) and Facilities and Grounds (Fund 055 /$1,034,872 (4%)) or a total of 6% of the total

Mason County General Fund Budget.

Through annual appropriation, the Mason County Facilities, Parks and Trails Department can receive through the annual budget process, capital funding through the Mason County Real Estate Excise Tax funding (REET). As described in detail in Chapter 7, (REET) is an optional tax of the property’s sale price. One-half of one percent for REET #1 can be used for capital acquisition and the second half of one percent which is REET #2, can be used for capital development only. The 2012 Mason County

Real Estate Excise Tax (REET #1) actual received is $251,106 and actual received for REET #2 is

$828,332.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 4 Page 28

DEMAND AND NEEDS ANALYSIS

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DEMAND AND NEEDS ANALYSIS

Introduction:

T

he purpose of the Needs Analysis is to evaluate, quantify and understand both the facility and recreational demand and identify the existing and future needs for providing parkland, facilities, open spaces from now and into the future. The definition of needs includes both preservation of existing services/resources as well as the needs into the future. The current update, presented here, reflects the needs, desires and recommended priorities that set the foundation for the next 15-20 years.

The 2013 determination of the need for park, facilities, and open space is based on public input and the community’s vision for the County system. Interpreting that vision for Mason County involved multiple tasks, including identification of existing park and facility inventory, public involvement, review of trends, geographic analysis, identified data and use demand and calculations with application of standards for analysis.

Standards are based on the National Recreation and Park Association’s (NRPA) guidelines. Adequate land is at a minimum based on a “core” system of parklands, with “adjunct” parklands that reflect

Mason County as compared to other demands identified in local park and recreational systems throughout the Pacific Northwest. This plan assesses the recreational demands of Mason County starting with the national and state standards and trends, past levels of service standards, public involvement that identified County-wide needs.

Scope and Purpose:

The NRPA also defines a classification system of parks which include neighborhood parks, community parks, regional parks and natural open space.

Parks vary in size, function, and service area depending on the classification. The NRPA has also developed demand standards as a guideline for the number of parks facilities needed per population.

Levels of Service (LOS) are quantifiable measures of the amount of public facilities that are provided to the County.

Typically, LOS measures are expressed as of facility capacity to demand. For the

County Parks and Recreation

Comprehensive Plan, LOS is expressed in of parkland or facilities per 1,000 people. ratios

Mason acres

TRUMAN GLICK PARK

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 29

SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS AND PROJECTIONS:

Mason County was seconded fastest growing County in state in 2006. The total population of Mason

County is currently is 60,699. The Office of Fiscal Management (OFM) predicts population projections under the Growth Management Act (GMA) to accommodate growth over the next 20 years. The GMA estimated growth predictions of .5% annual growth is significantly lower than the actual 1.15% total increase since 2000.

This report uses 60,699 as the population for level of service analysis, and 81,426 for 2018 with the

2025 future population estimate of 95,437 to calculate the demand standards. The persons-persquare-mile in Mason County is 63.3 as compared to the average population per square mile in

Washington State of 101. The male and female distribution is approximately 50% each which reflects the overall State ratio. The percentage of people 19 years of age or younger is 22.8% which is lower than the state average of 30%. The percentage of the population between the ages of 20-39 is 21.0%;

40-59 is 29.1%, and the remaining 25.8% are 60 and above.

5

Table 5.1

Population Forecast

2012 2018 2025

Mason County 60,699 81,423 95,437

Source: Washington State OFM

Existing and Proposed Level of Service:

This Chapter provides an in-depth look at parkland and facilities currently provided in Mason County.

On an overall basis of parkland ratio to population or Existing Level-of-Service (ELOS), Mason County currently manages 956.96 acres of parkland with an exiting park ratio (ELOS) of 15.77 acres per 1,000 people. If Mason County grows as projected

6

and develops the proposed parks described in this plan, the ratio of parks per population or Proposed Level-of-Service (PLOS) will improve 65% by 2018 and

70% by 2025 meeting future population LOS demand.

Over the past six years, Mason County has aggressively changed their ratio of parks per 1,000 with acquisition of prime natural open space partnering with non-profit conservation groups and by securing matching grant funding. Into the future, retention of parkland acreage and recreation facilities will need to be maintained to keep pace with the population growth and retain existing acres per 1,000 population into the future.

Facility Demand and Needs Analysis:

The demand and needs analysis is detailed in sections 5.1 and 5.2 for parkland and facilities. The process includes inventory reviews to determine the existing need (what the citizens want/identify) and future demand (calculations/comparisons). Development of the statement of “need” is dependent on local values, financial resources and desired level of service (LOS). This analysis represents a combination of results from the 2012 Mason County Facilities, Parks and Trails

Community Questionnaire

7

, Community Workshops and state and national standards and trends related to existing inventory, as well as current and future population which forms a statistical standard to meet demand.

5

2010 U.S. Census Mason County WA; by age. [under 10 yrs-10.9%/ 10-19: 11.9%/ 20-29:10.9%/30-39:11.2%40-49:13.0%/50-

59:16.1 %/60-69:13.7%/70-79:8.0%/80 and older 4.1%]

6

Belfair improvements and population expansion with residential development like Shelton Hills future growth throughout the County will relate to the growth and needs demands anticipated.

7

Appendix B provides the full Community Questionnaire report.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 30

As one indicator of the public input with regard to “need” is from the Community Questionnaire an overall question was asked that, “If you had $100.00 to spend on parks and recreation in Mason

County, how would you allocate it amongst the following functions?” 473 responded to this question which provides insight into the community priorities. The largest average allocations were for acquisition or development of trails and improvements to existing parks and playgrounds. Water access continues to reflect the community priorities as was seen in the past planning period.

New Park Acquisition,

$12.00

How would you spend $100.00 on Parks?

New Athletic Facilities,

$8.00

New Deveopment of

Parks & Facilities,

$10.00

Improve/Maintain

Existing Parks &

Playgrounds $20.00

Walking/Bike Trails/

Routes Acquire &

Develop

$21.00

Development of

Waterfront Parks to

Improve Water Access

$15,00

Other, $14.00

POPULATION ALLOCATIONS/Baseline Criteria:

Numerical level of service standards for parks and facilities are a traditional methodology that was originally advocated by the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA). The LOS method is used nationally and in the Washington Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation (SCORP 2010) planning process. The NRPA population ratio guidelines establish an overall parkland/open space guideline of 10 acres per 1,000 population (NRPA 1983, 1996). Additionally, it also provides guidelines for park types (e.g. neighborhood, community, regional and natural open space) as well as recreation facilities (e.g. sports fields, playground etc.)

Table 5.2 NRPA Guideline Standards for Population

Park Type Guideline

Neighborhood Park 1-2 acres/1,000

Community Park

Regional

5-8 acres /1,000

5-10 acres/1,000

Natural Open Space

Recreation Facilities

Baseball/Softball Fields

Playgrounds

Variable

1 field/5,000

1 playground/3,000

Soccer Fields

Tennis Courts

Trails (miles)

1 field/10,000

1 court/2,000

0.5 miles/1,000

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 31

PARK GEOGRAPHIC LEVEL-OF-SERVICE/RCO

8

Enhanced Criteria:

The distribution of parks in various areas throughout the County creates a more balanced system of parks and facilities county-wide. The geographic method of planning and identification of “service areas” relies on (GIS) mapping of existing parks and the associated distance and time of travel.

Parkland and facilities within the service area will have access to the parks and facilities while those outside the area of travel distance are identified as lacking opportunities. The use of the service area identification provides analysis of gaps in the parkland system. NRPA also recommends service areas for park type and both location and percent of population served will be used in the analysis of the needs for Mason County.

Table 5.3: NRPA Service Area Guideline Recommendations

Service Area

Range

Neighborhood

Park

Community

Park

Regional

Park

Natural Open

Space

Recommended ½-mile 1-mile 15-miles County-wide

Acceptable ½ -mile 2-miles 20-miles County-wide

Minimum 1-mile 3-miles 25-miles County-wide

RECREATION AND CONSERVATION OFFICE (RCO) STATEWIDE LEVEL-OF-SERVICE

RECOMMENDATIONS:

The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO) proposed a LOS planning tool to help assess the provision of and need for park and recreation facilities. The RCO proposed two preliminary

LOS planning tools: one for state agencies and one for local agencies. These preliminary LOS tools were presented as a proposal not as a mandate, in a 2008 Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor

Recreation Plan (SCORP) document entitled, Defining and Measuring Success: The Roles of State

Government in Outdoor Recreation. As an additional testing process, existing sources of data and information will be used to assess baseline conditions on a random selection of county outdoor recreational facilities, using the proposed LOS tools. As stated by the RCO, the preliminary local agency LOS tool “reflects public input that as just one indicator of need is not enough to adequately

capture the complex nature of determining and providing access and recreation opportunities.” The tool is intended to meet the needs of communities and counties of differing sizes and varied planning capabilities; it includes three sets of guidelines of which the first two measurements are the traditional NRPA population allocation and park geographic LOS service area indicators. The

RCO/SCORP identified guidelines include:

1. Baseline Criteria (Population Allocations -Table 5.2): Per capita participation (in outdoor

recreation activities) indicators.

2. Enhanced Criteria (Park Geographic LOS - Table 5.3): GIS-based travel distance/population

density indicators.

3. “In-Depth” Criteria: Function-related indicators.

9

Quantity Criteria

Quality Criteria

Distribution and Access Criteria

8

(RCO) Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office

9

The needs assessment will use one or all three as an indicator to address a specific planning need and/or may assess all applicable function-related indicators to inform the entire planning process. RCO Level of Service Summary Assessment attached in Appendix B.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 32

NATIONAL TRENDS FOR LOCAL RECREATION PLANNING:

In 2004 the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) developed a list of trends which will have the greatest impact on local agencies planning for recreation facilities. National trends, the perception of the environment, socio-economics, technology and urban and rural development will affect the need for and the use of park and recreation facilities. Pertinent NRPA trends that will affect Mason County’s planning efforts for developing and maintaining parks, facilities and open space are as follows:

 A greater need for walking and biking on trails, sidewalks, within parks and along streets, and utility corridors.

 Pressure to increase park capacity and infrastructure of existing parks and concern for adequate maintenance.

 Protective measures for open space.

 Preventive recreation, that is, recreation as an antidote for social problems.

 Recreation for groups limited by income, physical disability, language, or cultural barriers.

 Collaboration among program and facility providers, partnering and cooperation between public, private, and non-profit sectors, especially social service agencies.

5.1 PARKLAND AND NATURAL OPEN SPACE

Analysis of the needs defines and serves as a guideline of the types of parks and recreation facilities which are grouped in the following two sections. These sections identify existing and future need for funding and administration of the Mason County system. The sections are:

5.1 Parkland and Open Space

5.1.A Neighborhood Parks

5.1.B Community Parks

5.1.C Regional Parks

5.1.D Natural Open Space

5.2 Recreation Facilities

5.2.A Sports Fields

5.2.B Trails

5.2.C Children’s Play Areas

5.2.D Other:

5.2.D-1: Shooting Sports

5.2.D-2: Boat Ramps and Docks

5.2.D-3: Group Picnic Areas

5.2.D-4: Basketball Court/Outdoor Pad

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 33

The 2006 Mason County Comprehensive Park and Recreation Comprehensive Plan identified existing parks and open space, as well as current deficiency and future need. The NRPA definitions of parkland will be used in this report which reflects the definitions used in the November 2010 RCO

10

Statewide LOS Recommendations Report. The following table provides the defined parkland inventory and the existing need.

Table 5.4: Service Area Guide of Acres per Population Allocation

Park Classification

Existing

Acres

Mason County

LOS

*

Current (2013)

Deficiency and

Need

Future (2018)

Deficiency/Need

NRPA/RCO

Guideline

Neighborhood Park 12.07 .33 Acres/1,000 7.3/20 Acres 19/32

Total Acres

1 Acre/1,000

Community Park

Regional Park

180.12 3.0 Acres/1,000 0/188 Acres

151.87 3.5 Acres/1,000 60/212Acres

64/244

Total Acres

5 Acre/1,000

106/285

Total Acres

5 Acres/1,000

Natural/Open Space 612.90 10 Acres/1,000 0/607 Acres 200/814

Total Acres

No Standard

TOTAL 956.96

*

Existing Level-Of-Service: Table 5.5 through Table 5.8

5.1A: NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS:

Neighborhood parks are typically developed on a County-wide basis, located near residents to provide an important and convenient access to visit a park in localized neighborhoods. Neighborhood parks are not as efficient to maintain and operate as larger community parks. However, they can be maintained by volunteers or local non-profit community groups.

There are three neighborhood parks consisting of 12.7 acres in the Mason County planning area.

These include:

◆ Foothills Park

◆ Hunter Park

◆ Union Park

Service Area

The acceptable service area

Neighborhood Parks is ½mile to 1-mile radius from local residents. Mason

County has 1-mile service area for Neighborhood Parks. for

FOOTHILLS PARK

10

(RCO) Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 34

Public Input/Trends

2012 Mason County Community Questionnaire results/survey input:

◆ Neighborhood Parks with fields, courts, play and picnic areas ranked third and fourth (31% and 30%) when asked what additional facilities were needed in Mason County Parks (Q-8)

◆ 71% of respondents on the community questionnaire stated the benefits of parks, recreation and open space was to “provide opportunities to enjoy nature/outdoors” (Q-6).

◆ When asked by geographic areas “what additional facilities are needed”, the south indicated preference for basic park features and competitive sport facilities as a higher need (Q-8).

2012 Community Workshops:

◆ The north-end workshops indicated that there was a need for an environmental marine-life program e.g. “beach rangers.”

◆ They also noted that a small scale “music and arts events” on the north-end would be a great addition for the community.

◆ Hunter Parks was noted as serving a valuable need for the north-end citizens that commute through use of public transit. This park serves as a Mason County Transit stop with a route that connects riders from Mason County to the Bremerton ferry and connections to the greater Seattle Metro bus system regionally.

◆ Some of the “dreams” for the north-end residents included the creation of a “zip-line” park or development of a “water splash park.”

Trends:

◆ The Neighborhood Parks located near residents provide the opportunity to get outside, be active and play at a park that is within close proximity to their homes.

◆ In some localized areas throughout the County a Neighborhood Park or playground site are popular as they are relatively inexpensive to build and can serve specific communities.

◆ However, on a per acres basis, Neighborhood Parks are very expensive to maintain and provides limited services, especially if they are located within an area that lacks easy access.

Determination of Need and Demand Standard for Neighborhood Parks:

Mason County has a current LOS that provides neighborhood park benefit to three communities. The addition of 7.3 acres to the existing inventory of 12.7 acres (22.7 total acres address the existing need) divided by the 2018 population (81,423) and multiplied by 1,000 then 14 additional acres are needed in six years and five more acres by 2025 (32 total acres) to address the need. For the County, as the population grows, the value of Neighborhood Parks added along pathways and trail access points or as entrances to natural open space areas may become a more effective option to providing neighborhood parks. The Foothills Park is an example of a Neighborhood Park located in an area that provides benefit to the local neighborhoods. Three additional sites could be added that serve as trail or natural open space entrance or access sites.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 35

Recommended Demand Standard:

Neighborhood Parks

Table 5.5

Existing inventory

Present sites

Present demand standard

Recommended demand standard

Proposed acreage 2018

12.7 acres

3 sites

0.20 acres/1,000 population

.33 acres/1,000 population

27 acres

Additional acreage needed by 2018 14 acres (27 total acres)

Additional acreage needed by 2025 19 acres (32.0 total acres)

Observations Regarding Neighborhood Parks:

◆ Sustaining and relying on General Fund tax supported funding is potentially not sustainable into the future.

◆ The three Mason County small parks should be maintained through local non-profit or community support or neighborhood associations.

◆ The Neighborhood Parks are spread all over the County and require costly travel time for maintenance.

◆ Neighborhood Parks can serve as connection sites for residents using public transportation through the Mason County Transit system to regional locations.

5.1.B COMMUNITY PARKS:

Mason County Community Parks provide fairly even coverage throughout the County. There continues to be some gaps, including the western and northern portions of the County which are currently served with Neighborhood Parks. Community Parks are generally smaller than 20 acres (although

Truman Glick Park is 35 acres) and provide a variety of amenities that make them popular.

Historically, many of the types of park features typically requested by the public are found in a standard community park. These include picnic facilities, passive areas, sports fields, walking paths, boat launches, and fishing opportunities. Community

Parks are generally very popular, experience moderate to high use, and are generally maintenance-friendly. In

Mason County, Community

Parks provide parking, restrooms, picnicking areas, play areas, and in a number of cases, waterfront access and boat launches.

LATIMER’S LANDING BOAT LAUNCH

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 36

There are twelve community parks consisting of 180.12 acres in the Mason County planning area.

These include:

◆ Coulter Creek

◆ Harvey Rendsland Park

◆ Jacoby/Shorecrest Park

◆ Latimer’s Landing Boat Launch & Park

◆ Mason County Skatepark #1

◆ Mason Lake Park

◆ Menards Landing

◆ Phillips Lake Park

◆ Sunset Bluff Park

◆ Truman Glick Park

◆ Union Boat Ramp

◆ Walker Park ce area is reco mme nded at betw een

1-3 mile radiu s. The GIS service area mapping depicts the County service area of 5-miles for Community Parks. The

GIS map shows that the southern central part of the County is currently not being served by

County/Community Park function, but this area also includes the Shelton Metropolitan District with local park service areas.

Mason County has a combined total of some 350 miles of shoreline and in excess of 100 freshwater lakes. While blessed with an abundance of land that fronts both fresh and saltwater, public access to this shoreline is limited due to physical constraints and private property restrictions.

Serv ice

Area

:

The

Com muni ty

Park servi

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 37

WALKER PARK

Because survey results identified public access to shorelines and water as a priority, strategies to increase this access should be pursued. Those strategies may include:

◆ The purchase of waterfront properties

◆ The purchase of easements or licenses

◆ The conversion of road ends with limited park development that provide water access from public rights-of-way road ends to park sites

◆ Acquisition through transfer or exchange of properties

◆ Acceptance of donations

◆ Creation of partnerships with non-profit organizations to acquire property and facilitate shoreline and water access

◆ Acquisition of access as a condition of development approval

Public Input/Park Trends:

2012 Mason County Community Questionnaire results/survey input:

◆ Respondents in the community questionnaire when asked an assortment of additional facilities that should be “added” ranked the need for a spray park for children as their second choice out of a total choice of four options (30%) (Q-9).

◆ 28% of the respondents, which was tied for the 2 improve health and wellness. nd

, 3 rd

and 4 th

choices, indicated that they think that the benefits of parks, recreation and open space are most important to

◆ Opportunities to enjoy nature/outdoors and improving health and wellness were more popular in the south when asked why parks, recreation and open space were important to them.

◆ Additionally open-ended responses could be added and the frequent responses that were listed included “picnic, outdoor, access, range, sports, bike, soccer” as types of special facilities they suggest. (Q-9 other)

◆ The highest interest in use of water access sites reflects what was also stated in the 2006 as of public importance (Q-10) with 41% listing “beach”, 34% listing “water to cool off” and “boat ramp” as the top three water access needs.

2012 Community Workshops:

◆ The north end community workshop stressed the need for a skateboarding facility.

◆ Citizens attending the community workshop in Shelton indicated there was a high priority of those in attendance that there is the need for a “Shorecrest Boat Ramp/Jacoby Park and they stated that their vision was to have a Jacoby Park Dock with site improvements.

Trends:

◆ Kansas State University researcher Andrew Kaczynski’s 2010 research shows children living within a half-mile of a park or playground were five times more likely to be a healthy weight, rather than overweight, as compared to children who didn’t have a park with a playground nearby.

◆ Community Parks provide a wider range of opportunities for activities and serve a larger multi-service area in many communities.

◆ It is known that youth need to have greater opportunities to experience the outdoors and research has shown that kids are spending less time outdoors than they did 20-years ago.

◆ The Centers for Disease Control recommends that children and adolescents participate in at least 60 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity most days of the week.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 38

WALKER PARK

Determination of Need and Demand Standard for Community Parks:

Based on the demand standard of one Community Park within a 5-10 mile radius of most residents, up to four additional park sites would be recommended for acquisition in Mason County. The average size of a community park is approximately 15-17 acres, which equates to a need of 64 additional acres by 2018 and 106 additional acres by 2025.

As the following table indicates, as the population grows the County needs approximately 70-100 acres of additional community park property to meet the geographic and population need into the future. The addition of 64 acres to the existing inventory of 180.12 acres (244 acres by 2018) divided by the 2018 population (81,423) and multiplied by 1,000, gives a recommended demand standard of

3.0 acres per 1,000 people.

Recommended Demand Standard

Community Parks

Table 5.6

Existing inventory 180.12 acres

Present sites

Present demand standard

12 sites

2.96 acres/1,000 population

Recommended demand standard

Proposed 2018 inventory

Additional acreage needed by 2018

3.0 acres/1,000 population

285 acres

64 acres (Total 244 acres)

Additional acreage needed by 2025 42 acres (Total 286 acres)

Observations Regarding Community Parks:

Identifying the need for four additional Community Parks is one benefit resulting from planning analysis, community input, and survey results. Other benefits include:

◆ Filling gaps in existing levels of service.

◆ Planning for park acquisition or development that provides water access or swimming.

◆ Designing areas for new Community Parks that emphasize active use, fields, sports courts, picnicking, and open grass fields.

◆ Planning for multi-use paths and trails, and other fitness-related facilities.

◆ Developing master site plans for selected Community Parks.

Geographically there is the need for a community park in the southwest area of the County, preferably with freshwater access. One park would be sufficient in the southwest area of the County due to its population density, even though the five-ten-mile radius analysis could support two sites in that area. No County parks are located in the general area of Star Lake, Lost Lake, Lake Harvey, or

Lake Nahwatzel and Cloquallum Road where another park could be located.

Future park locations to address need could include partnering with Green Diamond Resources to acquire property in the area of Lake Nahwatzel and working with Washington State Parks to Acquire property that the Parks and Recreation Commission may decide is surplus or donate Lake Isabella.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 39

5.1.C REGIONAL PARKS:

Regional Parks provide outdoor recreation facilities with regional significance. They are generally over 200+ acres and can serve several communities with natural habitat sites and outdoor recreation opportunities. Facilities at regional parks can include recreation sport facilities, boating, camping, water access and trail use.

Mason County has three regional parks totaling 151.87 acres within the planning area. These include:

◆ Mason County

Recreation Area

◆ Oakland Bay County Park

◆ Sandhill County Park

The Mason County Recreation

Area (MCRA) has seven baseballsoftball fields used for multiple youth and adult ball leagues.

Shelton High School uses these fields and over the season various tournaments are scheduled throughout the summer. In 2012, with matching grant funds, fields

#2 and #3 were converted to synthetic infields that dramatically improved field playability, reduced maintenance costs, reduce rainouts and also saved water. Another matching grant for fields #6 and #7 is currently submitted for

OAKLAND BAY COUNTY PARK

matching grant funds for infield renovation to convert these fields to turf.

At Sandhill Park, in 2006 and 2008 fields #4-7 and #3 were renovated to bring them up to standard play and triple the play for t-ball through majors. The improved fields now extend seasonal play. As a first priority, this plan recommends renovating existing fields over development of new. The current 2012 matching grant was submitted to the RCO for improvements to fields #1 and #2 to replace infields, installation of new outfield irrigation and turf, with new and improved backstops, dugouts and ADA access.

The Oakland Bay Regional Park is 81.87 acres and was purchased in 2005 in cooperation with the

Capital Land Trust. Through matching RCO grants, the park has been developed with passive recreation, wildlife viewing areas, environmental education and interpretation and recreational trails. The access road improvements provide an improved park entry road with a staging area, bus turnaround and sanitary facilities. Oakland Bay is listed on the Washington Water Trails Association points of interest for water access. Oakland Bay Park has been a focal point for volunteer partnerships for restoration and site improvements from the Mason County 4-H, the Shelton and

Pioneer School Districts, the Squaxin Tribe, the Cascade Land Conservancy, Audubon Society and the

South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement group. The historic homestead has an old home built in the

1890’s. In 2012, this site was listed on the Washington Heritage of Registered Historic Places. A

Conservation Easement with the Capital Land Trust limits further development in the park. The conservation easement defines buffer zones along Oakland Bay and Malaney Creek to facilitate environmental protection of the park.

Another regionally significant private-nonprofit site is the South Mason Soccer Park which was built and maintained by the South Mason Youth Soccer Club. It is 10.4 acres with six soccer fields. There is

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 40

a mod-field area for small side games. SMSP is not included in the County LOS calculations but is referenced as a significant regional facility to meet the demand and need for recreational soccer use. (Section 5.2.A). The North Mason area is also in need of additional soccer facilities. Currently soccer is played using modified-fields on North Mason school facilities.

Service Area:

Regional parks provide a variety of recreation amenities and are located within a fifteen mile radius or within one hour driving time to most residence. Regional parks attract citizens and visitors from a regional service area. In Mason County, the service area for regional parks has been established as a

15-mile radius around the park site and, in many cases, beyond.

Public Input/Park Trends:

2012 Mason County Community Questionnaire results/survey input:

◆ Over 70% of the respondents indicated that providing opportunities to enjoy nature and the outdoors was among their top priorities.

◆ The number of respondents under 25 years of age is impressive for a park and recreation questionnaire, as this group is very difficult to reach (Q-2). This age group reflects current involvement in sports listed on Q-16 indicating annual magnitude of participation at 5.97 for baseball and 3.83 for softball. They also ranked these sports mid-range (12 &

18 out of 29 options) in current participation.

◆ Protecting the natural environment and historic and cultural sites appear to be more important to respondents from the north end (33% vs. 23%) of Mason County when asked what the “most important benefits” of parks are to them are.

2012 Community Workshops:

◆ There was a high degree of interest at all the community workshops to see the potential creation of a “community pool/aquatic center (indoor and outdoor), or a “water splash park” or “swim opportunities e.g. like waterpark in Renton,” with an innovative suggestion to work with the Squaxin Tribe for a water park/partnership option.” They also commented on beach swimming with a suggestion to create a “Lake Nahwatzel swim hole” (other comments included the Simpson Mason Lake site and swimming at Lake

Isabella).

◆ All the citizens attending the three community workshops stressed the need for indoor facilities. They pointed out the need for a facility that provided recreation opportunities that include “boxing/MMA Gym/music studios” or “gym for gymnastics” as well as options for “more active athletics-community gym”, “recreation program for youth”.

They quantified these needs with identified changes over the past planning period which included “Young adults-where are they in recreation?) or there is an increased need for

“more recreation for kids” as there are “more girls in sports” and that “Mason County is one of the least healthy counties in Washington state, ranking 35 th

out of 39 counties”

◆ Youth indicated that there is a priority need for a shooting range, and a walled/rugged terrain exercise/par-course.

◆ The north-end community workshop pointed out the need for additional soccer and football fields; possibly located at Sandhill.

◆ It was stated that as a dream, citizen in the north county would like to see more partnerships for field restoration with the park department and the school districts.

Suggestions included “improved drainage on school sports fields (HS and MS)”

◆ The citizens attending the workshop in Shelton pointed out the need for a “new”

Fairground/Event Center.

◆ They also envisioned the potential of creating “RV Parks” at regional facilities.

Trends:

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 41

◆ As population density increases, Community Parks will serve residents with a variety of functions, which include organized active recreation, spectator events and passive recreational opportunities.

◆ Counties are primary providers of County/Community and Regional Parks which are more efficient to maintain on a per-acre basis than the smaller Neighborhood Parks.

◆ Increased cost for vehicle travel and long auto-trips will create a demand for local Regional

Park opportunities that provide less travel and localized access to regional facilities and trails.

Determination of Need and Demand Standard for Regional Parks:

Public input revealed existing and future needs by respondents. These include trails, paths, water access, swimming areas, sports fields and even a shooting range. It was indentified in 2016 that additional recreational lands would be needed to meet the future needs and it estimated that 208 additional acres would be needed by 2013. The regional parkland inventory today is below the former acreage recommendation of 3.5 acres per 1,000 population (LOS 3.5/1,000). To meet this identified need, the County could acquire property suitable for the development of a regional park by purchasing it, or by transferring from other government agency, or by partnering with local private interests.

As most of the waterfront areas, whether saltwater or freshwater, are already developed, finding affordable and suitable land for a Regional Park may prove to be challenging. One possible option would be to begin discussions with Washington State Parks regarding selected undeveloped state parks in Mason County or current existing parks such as Schafer State Park or Lake Isabella.

By 2018, a total of 285 acres of regional park sites will be needed in Mason County, representing an addition of 106 acres to the current inventory. This additional parkland could provide a needed regional park site inclusive of the amenities desired by County residents. The park would serve the entire County and would enhance recreation opportunities for County residents and visitors. By 2012 with population growth and geographic needs throughout the County 334 total acres of regional parkland will be needed.

Recommended Demand:

Regional Parks

Table 5.7

Present inventory 151.87 acres

Present sites

Present ratio

3 sites

2.5 acres / 1,000 population

Recommended Demand Standard

Proposed 2018 inventory

3.5 acres / 1,000 population

285acres

Additional acreage needed by 2018 106 need / 285 Total acres

Additional acreage needed by 2025 182 need / 334 Total acres

5.1.D NATURAL OPEN SPACE:

Mason County recognizes that natural areas and open space are a vital component of the health and well-being of the County and provide natural resources for habitat protection. Preserving and protecting these properties is essential to retaining the abundance of recreational opportunities in the region. Mason County desires to work with interested organizations to achieve this goal. The

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 42

County can also partner with non-profit organizations such as the Trust for Public Land, the

Conservation District and Capital Land Trust to retain natural areas and open space.

Currently, Mason County owns and manages four sites as Natural Open Space. These sites include

◆ Decker Creek

◆ Foothills Park

◆ Harstine Island Park

◆ Watson Wildwood Park

Mason County, which is a rural area, is fortunate to have a great deal of natural areas/open space.

Currently, in addition to inventory owned by the County, there is a significant amount of natural areas and open space owned by Washington State Parks, Department of Natural Resources (Tahuya

State Forest), the National Park Service (Olympic National Park) and the US Department of

Agriculture (Olympic National Forest). Green Diamond Resources and the Manke Company are owners of private natural areas, much of which are managed for timber resources. The Theler Wetlands and associated Salmon Center near Belfair are also a very popular destination of statewide significance.

Washington State Parks has several tracts of land that provide significant open space, including

Harstine Island (310 acres), Hope Island (106 acres), and Lake Isabella (193 acres), and are currently studying the long-range plans and use for some of their parks/natural areas.

Service Area:

The NRPA guidelines do not

WATSON WILDWOOD VIEW PARK

specifically define the service area for Natural Open Space parks. These sites provide opportunities to reserve and protect natural area that have unique natural features, historical significance and/or provide habitat areas that need to have protection and preservation with the need for minimal improvements. Natural

Open Space parks provide benefit and value to the entire

County and active recreational use is minimized and secondary to the protection and preservation of the natural features. Trails, wildlife viewing and educational learning are primary recreational opportunities in natural open space parks.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 43

Public Input and Trends:

2012 Mason County Community Questionnaire results/survey input:

◆ 25% of the respondents listed the benefits of parks, recreation and open space was to

“protect our natural environment” (Q-6) and looking at this question geographically northern Mason County and the southern areas of the County reflected nearly the same priorities for protections (33% north / 23% south).

◆ 73% of all respondents in both the north and the south indicated that they felt that the benefits of parks, recreation and open space (Q-6) were to “provide opportunities to enjoy nature/outdoors.”

◆ When ask what additional park and recreation facilities were needed in Mason County (Q-

8) the respondents’ listed additional natural areas lowest (26%)

2012 Community Workshops:

◆ The community workshop attendees pointed out that the County, as a “conservation interest, purchase the Bay Shore Golf Course as a natural open space park.”

Trends:

◆ Research continues to confirm that well tended natural resources attract businesses.

◆ Using parks, greenways and trails to connect to each other and to natural, recreational and heritage assets are discovering new economic development and revitalization opportunities.

11

◆ Key to the creation and implementation of a plan is the identification of natural spaces for trails and to list trail linkages throughout the County.

◆ Regulatory laws regarding natural open space areas and habitat protection are guided by: the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water

Act, the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, the National Forest Management

Act, and the Northwest Forest Plan. While there are additional regulatory laws, these provide some idea of the regulatory climate.

◆ Partnerships with organizations such as the Capital Land Trust, the Trust for Public Lands and the Conservation District will continue to be very important for Mason County to acquire and preserve natural open space in the future.

Determination of Demand Standards for Natural Areas /Open Space.

Mason County is expected to grow in the next twelve years so it is important to preserve the rural character of the County to the greatest degree possible. The County currently owns 612.9 acres of natural areas and open space, which equates to a current demand standard of 10 acres per 1,000 population.

It is recommended that the County acquire up to 200 acres of natural areas and open space land through partnerships or property transfers by the year 2018. Some of this property may even be appropriate for development of trail corridors, as Mason County does not currently own any suitable land options for regional trails. These trail corridors could provide linkages between parks or facilities. With the addition of 200 acres, a demand standard of 10 acres per 1,000 population is established based on a potential of 814 acres of natural areas/open space.

11

Using Conservation to Fuel Sustainable Communities and 21 st

Century Economies/2008 NRPA Congress: Secretary Michael

DiBerardinis, PA. Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 44

Recommended Demand Standard:

Natural Open Space

Table 5.8

Present inventory

Present demand standard

Recommended demand standard

612.9 acres

10 acres / 1,000 population

10 acres / 1,000 population

Proposed 2018 inventory

Additional acreage needed by 2018

814 acres

200 acres (814 Total acres)

Additional acreage needed by 2025 & total acreage 341 acres (954 Total acres)

Observations regarding Natural Areas and Open Space.

◆ Mason County’s inventory of natural areas and open space should continue to increase over the next six years to meet the County’s needs.

◆ It is recommended that the County continue to work to procure natural areas and open space to preserve environmentally sensitive areas (e.g. hillsides, riparian areas, common hiking and access areas with trails, waterfront property) to retain its rural character.

◆ Collaboration with adjoining private enterprise, public agencies and private non-profit conservation trusts will be instrumental to maintaining and increasing natural area, open space, wildlife habitats and corridor connections to state and federal lands in Mason

County.

◆ The County should also pursue state and federal matching grants in partnership with public and private parties to preserve and secure natural areas and open spaces.

◆ Approve Conservation Futures property tax levy to provide a reliable and predictable source of funds to help acquire interests in open space, habitat areas, wetlands, farm, agricultural and timberlands for conservation. A portion of the tax levy can be dedicated to the cost of maintaining and operating the properties.

5.2 RECREATION FACILITIES:

On the following pages, specific needs for recreation facilities are presented. The assessed need reflects existing inventory, public input and priority interest from national or state trends.

The categories of recreation facilities include:

5.2.A: Sports Fields

5.2.B: Trails

5.2.C: Children’s Play Areas

5.2.D: Other recreation facilities:

5.2.D-1: Shooting Sports

5.2.D-2: Boat Ramps & Docks

5.2.D-3: Group Picnic Areas

5.2.D-4: Basketball Court/Outdoor Pad

Establishing the recreation facility needs was determined through several analytical approaches, including public input through the questionnaire survey, comments received at community workshops and input of the Parks and Trails Advisory Board.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 45

5.2.A SPORTS FIELDS:

Sports fields with competitive play generally require more staff time and a higher level of maintenance than other facilities, especially during the playing season. The placement of synthetic turf on the infields at MCRA has diminished maintenance costs and increased playability of the fields during wet weather conditions. The baseball fields are used for play ranging from Little League

Baseball (60-ft. bases) to full size baseball fields (90-ft. bases). If a field was not sufficient for organized practice or game play, the field was not included the current inventory. Softball fields include adult softball fields and fields used for competitive girls’ fastpitch or in softball leagues.

Mason County does not have soccer fields but works cooperatively with local schools districts and the private nonprofit soccer association in the provision of soccer play throughout the County.

The following table lists the inventory of sports fields for

Mason County, the City of

Shelton, area school districts and private nonprofits:

Table 5.9

MASON COUNTY RECREATION AREA (MCRA)

Mason County Shelton/Schools/Private

Sites Existing Inventory

Baseball fields

Softball/Baseball

Soccer Fields

Baseball fields

Softball/Baseball

Soccer Fields

LOS Guidelines

Baseball fields

Softball/Baseball

Soccer Fields

Sites

2

12

0

2/60,000

12/5000

NRPA

1/5,000

1/5000

1/10,000

2

7

15

12

4/60,000

19/60,000

15/60,000

12

Shelton and North Mason High Schools, Pioneer and Hawkins Middle Schools and Shelton Youth Soccer Club

Association.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 46

Service Area:

The recommended NRPA service area guidelines for sports fields is within one-mile radius for residents around the County, school and private sports fields.

Public Input/Trends:

2012 Mason County Community Questionnaire results/survey input:

◆ When asked (Q-15) to provide insight into how the County can improve the system or specific facilities, many ideas were offered with 45% of the respondents offering suggestions frequently mentioned with significance include “field” along with

“kids/children”

◆ When asked (Q-16 & 17) what recreational activity are you involved in or what would you desire to do, baseball, softball and soccer ranked in the mid-range levels.

◆ Respondents were asked to indicated a dollar amount to allocate to various spending categories (Q-18) and the largest average allocations were for improvements to existing parks and playgrounds while the lowest allocation was to construct new athletic facilities

(i.e. fields, courts etc.). This response is reflective of other communities during this current economic crisis. The citizens seem to want to take care of what they have rather than to invest in new facilities at this time.

2012 Community Workshops:

◆ The student workshop pointed out the need for additional “all-weather fields.”

◆ The north-end citizens stated that there needs to be a partnership between the County and school district for “field restoration” the “refurbishment of the lower field at Hawkins

Middle School” and “improved drainage on school sports fields.” There was group support for a priority of need for additional “soccer and football fields” with a suggestion that this could happen at Sandhill Park.

Trends:

◆ Team and individual sports are popular at the statewide level as reflected in the 2008 RCO

SCORP.

◆ New sections of the 2011 Sports Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA) report demonstrates that children participating in active lifestyles outside of a team are more likely to end up participating in Team Sports at some point in their life as there is a correlation to general physical fitness and an enjoyment of any type of play centered around physical motion/activity, and part is a result of exposure to a diverse mix of activities.

◆ By being physically active on a regular basis, playing sports such as soccer, youth may be able to avoid or delay health problems associated with obesity and related conditions.

◆ According to the Sports Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA), the 2010 US Trends in

Team Sports Report indicated that after two years of negative participation growth for most of the mainstream Team Sports, this past year they saw a turnaround in participation for sports like tackle football, soccer, basketball and baseball. While working from a small base in some cases, niche sports like lacrosse, rugby, track and field and disc golf are seeing double digit increases in participation.

◆ SGMA also states that younger teens are a main driver for some of the double digit participation increases as they are gravitating to organized sports programs which will bode well for many of the local recreational oriented programs that are established throughout the country. As they state, “Recreation programs need to turn part of their attention to these early teens, to bring them back to Team Sports in some cases or keep them playing after their elementary school years.”

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 47

Demand Standard for Sports Fields:

The demand standard applicable to this plan requires that a team should have sufficient field space to play games and practices each week. Based on the current inventory, sports fields appear to be adequate but this will not be sustained into the future. This is especially true since the recent placement of all-weather synthetic turf at two of the MCRA fields and renovations at Sandhill County Park.

These renovations provide consistent and increased play on the fields.

Since acquiring land to develop new fields is extremely expensive and adds to an already heavy parks maintenance schedule. The County should continue to secure matching

SANDHILL COIUNTY PARK BALLFIELDS

grant funds for renovation and additional all-weather playing surfaces to the sports fields at both MCRA and Sandhill to increase games and play at both sites. Future field lighting on selected fields will also increase available playing time and accommodate future demands.

To improve the County’s field inventory in the future, partnerships could be formed with local school districts, community groups and non-profit organizations to improve fields that are currently below game or practice standards.

To stay current with expected population increases in the County, two additional fields will be needed by 2018 or expanded use with all-weather turf or field lighting improvements should be implemented as recommended. Options for increased sports field inventory may be address if the

City of Shelton, Shelton Hills Residential development comes to fruition as the site will provide 375 acres of public recreation and open space and a future sports park.

With regard to Soccer Fields, in Mason County, the southern soccer fields are owned by the South

Mason County Youth Soccer Club and are not part of the inventory under Mason County Parks. The non-profit Club has six fields. The NRPA standard is one field for 10,000 population. Based on the current population there is a need for six soccer fields County-wide. On a geographic basis the six fields in the southern part of Mason County meets the current need.

When the population grows, by 2015 there will be a need for eight fields and by 2025 there will be a need for nine to ten fields. There are currently 91 teams (nearly 950 players) playing 458 games (2 games average per week) for three seasons each year. The need for soccer fields in north Mason

County still remains a need when meeting the demand geographically. The additional fields needed by 2018 (2 fields) could be provided in the North Mason area to address the future demand and by

2025 the demand for 3.5 more fields could be met with additional fields in the Shelton area. There is also a very active Hispanic adult regional league in Mason County.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 48

Recommended Demand Standard

Sports Fields

Table 5.10

Present inventory

Present ratio

Recommended demand standard

Proposed 2018 inventory

14 fields

1 field / 2,306 population

1 field / 2,306 population

16 fields*

Additional fields needed by 2018 2 fields*

* = Add two fields or renovate existing fields with lighting or synthetic turf to increase seasonal play.

Observations:

◆ Youth leagues are continuing to grow, thus increasing demand for practice space and fields suitable for games.

◆ Youth leagues are struggling throughout the County with limited resources and growing demand.

◆ Local schools may have existing fields that could be improved to an acceptable standard or land that could be developed for new fields.

◆ Based on available information, there will be more demand as the County continues to grow.

◆ One option is investigating the installation of sports field lighting on existing fields to increase use, especially in the fall season.

◆ The Youth Soccer Association currently provides the soccer needs for the county. If the

Association discontinues providing soccer, the demand and need will have to be addressed by Mason County Parks or a future not for profit sports association.

5.2.A TRAILS:

When the 1996 Mason Park Plan was updated the level of service or need standard was not provided or calculated for pathways or trails. The Mason County Parks and Trails Advisory Board worked with the Department of Community Development and completed the Mason County Master Trails Plan, A

Framework for Countywide Trail Development. Copies of the trails plan are available on the Mason

County Web Site (www.co.mason.wa.us) http://www.co.mason.wa.us)/

.

The 2007 adopted plan developed policies and general guidelines relating to trails and address issues with goals that identified actual trails for development with recommended potential trail routes, corridors, and on-ground trail standards. There are various types of trails available for public use.

These include significant Regional Trails, Multiple-Use Trails, Local Trails, Bike Routes and Water

Trails, all of which are available at some level of use or development throughout Mason County.

Significant Regional Trails in Mason County include the Department of Natural Resources Tahuya

State Forest Trails, the Theler Wetlands Trail in Belfair, the Port of Hoodsport (former State Park)

Trails, and Olympic National Forest and Park trailheads access points.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 49

Multiple-Use Regional Trails are generally non-motorized and serve bicyclists, walkers, joggers,

skaters, equestrians, and even cross country skiers and snowshoers depending on the trail surfacing.

In the case of Mason County, possible trail connections to communities, parks, points of interest, neighboring counties, the Olympic National Forest, and Olympic National Park should be investigated. Listed below are suggested multi-use regional trails that were included as options for future trails in the Community Questionnaire (Q-13):

◆ Shelton to Belfair Trail

◆ Shelton to MCRA Park Trail

◆ North Bay Trail – Allyn to tip of

Case Inlet

◆ Mason Lake Park to Twanoh State

Park

◆ Kennedy Creek Salmon Trail

Extension

◆ Camp Govey Trail

◆ Menards Landing to Harvey

Rendsland Park Trail

Currently, the County has a very small inventory of local trails. Local Trails are categorized as trails that are developed primarily within County park properties or do not have any geographic connections that are common with Regional Trails.

Local trails generally are single or double track

OAKLAND BAY PARK

trails with dirt, gravel, or chipped wood surface. Trail use depends on the site, but would primarily be non-motorized. The current inventories of local trails are listed below with a listing of opportunities for potential development of local trails in the following parks and County property:

Existing:

◆ Truman Glick Park (1-mile)

◆ Oakland Bay Park (1.5-miles)

◆ Coulter Creek (3/4 mile)

Potential Development:

◆ Foothills Park (create connection to State Parks Hoodsport Trail)

◆ Harvey Rendsland Park

◆ Sunset Bluff

◆ Watson Wildwood Park

◆ Mason Lake Park

Favorite Bicycle Routes to ride in Mason County include the Harstine Island Loop (9.4 miles), the

Mason Lake Loop (24 miles), and the Skokomish Valley Road (11 miles), the Kamilche-Bloomfield-Old

Olympic Highway Loop (12 miles) and the Grapeview Loop Road (7.8 miles)

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 50

Water Trails are becoming increasingly popular and access to and from the water is critical to their

development. You can put your canoe or kayak in a various Mason County Parks along the Washington

Water Trails route. Access points available are at

Walker Park, Jacoby/Shorecrest, Oakland Bay

Park, Union Boat Launch, Latimer’s Landing,

Allyn Waterfront and Menards Landing to name a few. Mason County has developed policies for various parks that allow water trail users and at some sites, the option of camping overnight with prior approval from the Parks, Trails, and

Facilities Department. The County should work cooperatively with organizations like the

Washington Water Trails Association

13

to develop additional safe water access points along Mason

County shorelines for non-motorized watercraft.

In terms of maintenance, trails do not require the intensive maintenance that sports complexes and

SUNSET BLUFF

active recreation sites require. There is still maintenance required, therefore, forming partnerships with other governments, organizations, and non-profit groups helps defer maintenance and development costs.

Service Area: Regional Trails and Multiple-Use Trails have the same service area as that of Regional

Parks (15 miles radius). They serve the entire County and also draw users from outside of the County.

Following the demand standards established for Community Parks, local trails should be located within a 5-mile service area, but also draw users from the entire of the County.

Public Input and Trends:

2012 Mason County Community Questionnaire results/survey input:

◆ Trails were the most needed facility indicated across the County. (Q-8) This reflects the greater U.S. as trails are the most universally desired recreation facility.

◆The response of 54% indicating that trails (for cycling, walking, hiking) are the most important additional park and recreation facilities needed, reflects similar responses from the citizens in 2006.

◆When asked to write additional response to Q9 “facilities to be added to the park system” the most responses received were with regard to “trails.”

◆Nearly all respondents (93%) Q-11 indicated the reason to develop more trails was for exercise, recreation and to experience nature.

◆Q-12 asked for more specificity about the type of trails. Paved trails and nature trails are the top two types of trails needed. In looking at the question geographically, long trails were more popular in the north (28% to 20%) and exercise trails were more popular in the south (24% to 12%).

◆When asked Q-13 what trail was most important to them, across all respondents, the

Shelton to Belfair Trail and the Shelton to MCRA Park trails were the most popular planned or proposed trail. When looking geographically to this question, connecting

Shelton and Belfair were equally important to both the north and the south. With regard to “other’ trail choices, northern residents were most interested in the North Bay Trail.

13

Washington State’s Cascadia Marine Trail is one of the premier water trails for non-motorized boaters in the United States.

The water trail extends the length and width of Puget Sound from the state capital in Olympia to the Canadian Border.

Suitable for day or multi-day trips, the Cascadia Marine Trail has over 55 campsites to visit. People can boat to the campsites from many public and private launch sites and shoreline trailheads.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 51

2012 Community Workshops:

◆ The citizen at the community workshop in Shelton stated the need for “safe routes from home to schools and/or recreation centers and parks.”

◆ They also pointed out the need for a “partnership with WDOT for walking in Belfair (unsafe shoulder) along Highway 3.

◆ Their vision included a “Portage Trail-Hood Canal to Case Inlet waterway” and support for a

“Shelton to Belfair Trail.”

◆ The north-end workshops pointed out that there needs to be more partnerships formed with the Boy Scouts and Girls Scouts for involvement in parks and trail development.

◆ Citizens expressed the need for multi-use trails (“trails for various users”) or “bike trails.”

Trends:

◆ Trails Lead to a "Fit" Community: With the emphasis on health and fitness in today's society, trails are becoming just as important as streets and sidewalks in our communities.

14

◆ There is an interest in developing trails in existing County parks, county-owned property, and on privately-owned lands.

◆ The community questionnaire stressed that it is a “priority to unify the County with a path” (Q-13).

Determination of Demand Standard for Regional

Trails: Mason County currently does not have demand

standards for multi-use Regional Trails as these types of trails have not yet been developed. A demand standard of 0.47 miles per 1,000 population is recommended in this plan. This translates to a total of 38 miles of trail that would be needed to meet the anticipated population demand in 2018 and beyond.

This figure is based on a projected population of 81,423. This recommended demand standard was determined by averaging the standards of Skagit and Jefferson Counties for Regional Trails and the anticipated number of miles to establish an adequate Regional Trail System in Mason County.

Applying this standard to the current population of 60,699 indicates the County has a current deficiency of 28 miles of Regional Trails and a future need for 38 miles by 2018 and 45 miles by 2025.

Recommended Demand Standard

Regional Trails

Table 5.11

Present inventory 0 miles

Present ratio

Recommended demand standard

N/A

.47 miles / 1,000 population

Proposed 2018 inventory

Total miles needed by 2018

Total miles needed by 2025

38 miles

38 miles

45 miles

14 By Randy Martin Trailscape.net

Hosted by: American Trails Association

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 52

The adopted Mason County Master Trails Plan provides the guidelines and policies to develop trails in

Mason County. The development and implementation of a comprehensive Master Trails Plan will be vital as growth demands affect the potential level of need for trails. The Master Plan also serves to provide opportunities for funding partnerships to complete the trails needed throughout the County.

Observations:

◆ Citizens through the community input stressed a high importance of trail development primarily for exercise/recreation and to provide the opportunities for recreation.

Therefore, trails are a high priority and the development of and funding for trails

Countywide needs to be continued over the next planning period.

◆ Securing matching grant funds is an opportunity to match local dedicated funds to provide trail needs.

◆ As described there are a variety of types of trails e.g. natural trails, water trails, multi-use trails, bicycle trails for off-road and shared use with vehicles. Trail development has varied costs for development. The natural and soft-surface trails are less expensive where the fully developed shared use on public roads and highways cost more to develop using defined highway development standards.

5.2.C CHILDREN’S PLAY AREAS:

Children’s playground equipment is maintained under the Playground Safety Standards with guidelines from the American Society of Testing Materials and the Consumer Product Safety

Commission. Mason County park maintenance staff is trained and certified under the National

Recreation and Park Association (NRPA)

National Playground Safety Training Program.

Playground equipment must be inspected regularly for safety issues, making sure that each playground meets current safety standards and meets the requirements of the

Americans with Disability Act (ADA) for access.

In Mason County, the continued priority should be renovating and or replacing playgrounds at existing play areas to meet current standards.

Mason County Parks currently has playground equipment located at five County park facilities (Table 5.12).

Service Area:

The service area for children’s play areas is the same as that of a neighborhood park, or

½-mile to 1-mile radius from local residents.

Public Input and Trends:

UNION PARK

◆ The community questionnaire reflected (Q-3) that a large percent of respondents were families with children. 224 (38%) of respondents indicated at least one household member under 20. This is almost exactly the number of families with related children younger than

18 reported in the 2010 Census (38.8%).

◆ Over 70% of respondents indicated that “providing opportunities to enjoy nature” and the

“outdoors” was among their top priorities. (Q-6)

◆ 31% of the responses, when asked what “additional facilities are needed” (Q-8) indicated that basic park features (play areas, picnic areas, etc) were needed.

◆Just over 30% of respondents indicated that a “water spray park” (Q-9) would be a good addition to the park system.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 53

2012 Community Workshops:

◆The citizens attending the community workshops pointed out that Mason County was among the least healthy counties in Washington State. It ranks 35 th

out of 39 counties.

◆At the North Mason workshop it was noted that the population has increased and there are more kids in the community. The citizens attending the Shelton workshop pointed out that with the “sewer system in Belfair, it will bring growth and more demand for parks.”

Citizens also stated that covered sites would address use when it rains.

Trends:

◆ Low-income families generally have less access to opportunities for physical activity. At the same time, many low-income rural communities lack access to sidewalks, parks and recreation facilities; all are possible barriers to leisure time physical activity.

15

◆ “1 of 3 children is obese or overweight before their 5 generation ago.

16 th

birthday.” Obesity now affects 17% of all children and adolescents in the United States-triple the rate from just one

◆ The Outdoor Industry Association (outdoor product providers) continues to advocate for communities in which all kids have places to play within walking distance from their homes.

17

Determination of Demand Standard for Children’s Play Areas

The County currently has a demand standard of 0.33 per 1,000 population which reflects the

Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO) recommended standard per population. Using the current inventory of five play areas and the population of 60,699 residents, the current ratio would be 1 play area per 12,062 population. Applying the current standard to the current population indicates the

County should have 20 play areas, a current shortfall of 15. Since Mason County currently owns 23 parks, this standard would appear to be unreasonably high as not all of the parks have appropriate space for play areas therefore adjustment or partnerships with local community organizations or school districts could provide for the retention of the demand need for playgrounds countywide.

Listed below is the current inventory of play areas at Mason County parks:

Mason County Play Areas:

Table 5.12

# Areas Type Name and or Owner

1

1

1

1

1

5

Playground

Playground

Playground

Playground

Playground

Total Play Areas

MCRA – Mason County

Walker Park – Mason County

Union Park – Mason County

Foothills Park – Mason County

Truman Glick Park - Mason County

15

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion CDC

16

2012 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

17 OIA State of the Industry Report, 2006 / www.outdoorindustry.org

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 54

This plan is recommending a standard of 1 play area per 4,071 people, which is based on the 2018 projected population of 81,423 residents. Additional play areas could be located at Shorecrest Park,

Latimer’s Landing (if expanded), Mason Lake Park and Phillips Lake Park. Currently Sandhill

Elementary has a playground that can serve as a partnership site for this area of the County. The five playgrounds are located primarily in the southern areas of the County. There is a need for a children’s play area in the northern portions of the County. Since 2006 there has been an effort to renovate and replace aged and unsafe playground equipment throughout the park system which is of critical importance to children’s safety.

Recommended Demand Standard:

Children’s Play Areas

Table 5.13

Present inventory 5

Present ratio

Recommended demand standard

1/12,140 population

1/ 4,0

71 population

Proposed 2018 inventory 22 play areas

Additional play areas needed by 2025 26 play areas

For safety, children’s play areas need to be designed with areas for toddlers up to five years old, a site for 6-12 years old, and a play area for those 12 and above as required under guidelines and recommendations of the National Playground Safety Inspection Guidelines through NRPA. Standards for Mason County playgrounds should follow the recommendations set by the Washington Counties

Risk Pool. All play areas need to meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

5.2.D

OTHER RECREATION FACILITIES:

5.2.D-1: SHOOTING SPORTS: Mason County Parks does not have a shooting range within their system

but there are two ranges in Mason County. The Bremerton Trap and Skeet Club is located north of

Belfair across from the Kitsap Airport and the Mason County Sportsmen’s Association range is located in Shelton at the Business Park. The student community workshop stressed the need for a “shooting range” and opportunities for “competition in shooting events/programs.” An outdoor shooting range

(Q-18a) in the open ended question was listed most often as an identified need. In Q-16 & 17

“shooting sports (archery, rifle, pistol)” ranked 6th out of 28 choices of currently involved in and 4 th out of 29 of those that respondents would desire to participate in. In the community questionnaire, shooting sports and hunting rank higher compared to other communities. Shooting/archery range ranked 1 st

when asked (Q-9) what special facilities should be added to the park system (34%). Most recently as a recreational activity, there has been a wave of interest in archery in the rural states in the northwest.

18

Archery skills is an interest project for Girl Scouts Skill Building and youth camps and ranges have see a recent up-tick of interest in archery. Study of the feasibility of creating or partnering to provide increased opportunities for shooting sports should be of focus over the next planning period. The Recreation and Conservation Office offers grants funds for development and operation ranges under the Firearms and Archery Range Recreation Program (FARR).

18

The Archery Trade Association CEO Jay McAninch statement: “most recent positive reaction to archery with the 2012

Olympics and the popularity of the “Hunger Games” books and movie." The ATA partners with the Nation Archery in

Schools Program which is in 47 states as PE education.”

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 55

5.2.D-2: BOAT LAUNCHES: Currently there are four boat launches and six hand-carry boat launch

sites managed throughout Mason County by the

County parks system. Based on the needs assessment, public input and the Mason County

Shoreline Master Plan, water access continues to be of critical importance to Mason County. Water access facilities (boat ramps, piers, beaches, etc) ranked 2 nd

in the community questionnaire

(Q-8) as what respondents thought were the needed facilities in the Mason County Park system (38%).The need for water access will continue to be one of the highest priorities countywide over the next 15 to 20 years. Nearly

40% of respondents in the community questionnaire (Q-10) indicated that they were likely to use boater access through the use of a ramp or by way of a hand launch.

SHORECREST/JACOBY BOAT LAUNCH

The community workshop pointed out the need for an improved County boat launch at Jacoby

Park/Shorecrest Park and in Union. They also stated that access is important as there is an “increase need for kayaking”. Opportunities to secure and develop access to public waterfront points for public use for boating, swimming and fishing will remain of vital importance.

5.2.D-3: GROUP PICNIC AREAS: Mason County Parks provides three sites with picnic shelters and

eleven places for the public to picnic with family and friends. Simple picnic shelters create opportunities for shared-use with pedestrians and bicyclists or serve as a trailhead point of entrance for hikers and wildlife viewing areas. They can serve a dual purpose as interpretive centers or a waypoint that extends a children’s play area. Group picnic shelters can provide opportunities for groups to rent a facility for a gathering and can provide a revenue return that helps offset maintenance costs at rural or larger community or regional park sites. 31% of the responses when asked what additional facilities are needed in the community questionnaire (Q-8) indicated that basic park features (play areas, picnic areas, etc) were most needed.

Partnerships with local service organizations, the Boy Scouts of

America, or specialized work crews can help fund the cost of the construction of additional sites located throughout the countywide park system. Looking for future locations and project sites should be of importance over the next planning period. Suggested locations for shelters are

Harvey Rendsland Jiggs Lake Park, Mason

Lake Park and at Sunset Bluff.

WALKER PARK GROUP PICNIC SHELTER

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 56

5.2.D-4: BASKETBALL COURT OUTDOOR PAD: Currently Mason County Parks has three basketball

courts within the park system located at various park sites. Basketball courts or the placement of an outdoor pad are of value for resident that are located within the radius of need for neighborhood parks (within ½-mile – 1-mile radius) or community parks (1-3 mile radius). When asked what additional facilities were needed (Q-8) 31% of the responses indicated that basic park features (play areas, picnic areas, etc) were needed. The community workshops pointed out that “youth sports have decreased because of family needs and the downturn in the economy.” The basic basketball court pad and hoop provide the opportunity for citizens to enjoy a friendly game of basketball. On a national scale, interest in basketball has remained somewhat constant for the last 20 years. When the need for additional neighborhood, community or regional parks is anticipated, designs that include a basketball court or pad would be recommended to meet the identified need.

UNION PARK BASKETBALL COURT

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 5 Page 57

RECOMMENDATIONS/PRIORITIZATION

C

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6

RECOMMENDATION / PRIORITIZATION

Introduction:

T his Chapter of the Parks and Recreation Comprehensive Park discusses a summary of the recommendations for parks and facilities for managing and implementation, in order to accomplish the outcomes, guidelines and standards adopted in the Mason County Plan.

Recommendations are listed in the following categories:

1. Parkland & Natural Open Space

2. Recreation Facilities

3. Administration & Operations and Maintenance

6.1. PARKLAND & NATURAL OPEN SPACE

Overall concept:

The ideal park system is made up of various types of parks and facilities to serve the community as discussed in Chapter 5: Demand and Needs Analysis. Each type serves a basic function, but collectively the entire system serves the needs of the County. Knowing the interconnection, Mason

County can develop an efficient and cost effective park system that meets most of the needs for the citizens. Also by providing design standards for each park type it helps to easily understand how the park is developed, maintained and used.

Attaining the basic system of parklands provides for neighborhood and community parks with regional and natural open space park sites. It is achieved by addressing the need of new site acquisitions and/or expanding and modifying existing parks and facilities.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 6 Page 58

6.1.A: NEIGHBORHOOD PARKS:

Assessed Need:

Based on the demand and needs analysis in Chapter 5, three additional neighborhood parks totaling

15 acres will be needed by 2018 and a total of 26 acres by 2025.

Recommendations:

Map Neighborhood Parks Acres

Action/Comments

[Appendix A Describes Specific Recommendations]

Foothills Park 10.00 Renovations/restroom/turf

Hunter Park

Union Park

Future Need

0.15 Partnership projects

1.92 Renovation/Relocations

Northern UGA

North Mason County

5.00 Allyn Waterfront

5.00 Belfair

Southwest Area

5.00 Star Lake

Develop neighborhood parks in the following geographic areas to meet the future demand at:

◆Allyn area

◆Star Lake area

◆Timberlands area

◆Lake Limerick area

◆Mason Lake

◆Belfair area

◆ Hoodsport

◆ Tahuya Peninsula

◆ Victor area

Implementation Policies:

Site Selection Criteria

Neighborhood parks in Mason County serve a 1-mile service area. If at all possible it should be easy access to local roads. Optimum size for neighborhood parks is not less than five acres, with flat usable areas located central to the neighborhood service area.

Design & Development Recommendations

Facilities that are appropriate to neighborhood parks include playgrounds, open play areas, basketball and tennis courts, picnic areas and shelters, trails and trail connectors.

Summary of Recommendations

◆ Three additional sites could be added that serve as trail or natural open space entrance or access sites.

◆ Continue to work with public or private landowners to provide land or locations to meet the future need for three more neighborhood parks by 2018.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 6 Page 59

6.1.B: COMMUNITY PARKS:

Assessed Need:

Based on the demand and needs analysis in Chapter 5, four additional Community parks with an overall need of 70-acres by 2018 and a total of 334 acres by 2025.

Recommendations:

Develop Community parks in underserved areas to meet the future demand:

Map Community Parks Acres

Action/Comments

[Appendix B Describes Specific

Recommendations]

Coulter Creek

Harvey Rendsland

Jacoby/Shorecrest

Latimer’s Landing

Skatepark #1

Mason Lake Park

Menard’s Landing

Phillips Lake

Sunset Bluff

Truman Glick

Union Boat Ramp

Walker Park

Future Need

west southwest north

55.00 Develop

15.00 Develop

2.82 Renovate/Improve

5.00 Developed

0.50 New or additional park

17.36 Improve with play area

7.40 Developed Trailhead to Rendsland Jiggs

0.40 Developed

71.00 Develop

35.46 Developed

0.16 Improve

5.04 Developed

15.00 Schafer State Park

15.00 Lake Isabella

15.00 Acquire/water access

southwest

15.00 Acquire/water access

◆ The largest deficit is located in the west and southwest section of Mason County.

◆ Securing a possible future park near Star Lake, Lost Lake, Lake Nahwatzel or Cloquallum Road would address the Community park need.

◆ A park that provides swimming access would be most beneficial-addressing both the acreage deficit and water access needs.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 6 Page 60

Implementation Policies:

Site Selection Criteria

Geographically there is the need for a community park in the southwest area of the County, preferably with freshwater access. One park would be sufficient in the southwest area of the

County due to its population density, even though the five-ten-mile radius analysis could support two sites in that area. (See GIS Map X)

Future park locations to address need could include partnering with Green Diamond Resources to acquire property on Lake Nahwatzel and working with Washington State Parks to acquire property that the Parks and Recreation Commission may decide is surplus.

Design & Development Recommendations

Facilities that are appropriate to Community parks include development of water access for boating and swimming. They provide opportunities for facilities such as BMX tracks, a skatepark, swimming facilities and performing arts venues.

Summary of Recommendations

◆Filling gaps in existing levels of service.

◆Planning for park acquisition or development that provides water access or swimming.

◆Designing areas for new Community Parks that emphasize active use, fields, sports courts, picnicking, and open grass fields.

◆Planning for multi-use paths and trails, and other fitness-related facilities.

◆Developing master site plans for selected Community Parks.

6.1.C: REGIONAL PARKS:

Assessed Need:

By 2018, a total of 285 acres of regional park sites will be needed in Mason County, representing an addition of 133 acres to the current inventory. By 2025 182 additional acres will be needed to meet the population demand for a total of 334 acres of Regional parkland.

Recommendations:

Develop regional parks in the following geographic areas to meet the future demand at:

◆ Continue to pursue the “potential” option of securing parts of Lake Isabella State Park. It would be in the best interest of the County to retain this 190-acre park site under public ownership

◆ Schafer State Park also is an ideal option for expansion of the regional park needs for Mason

County through a partnership or agreement with State Parks.

Map Regional Parks

Mason County Recreation Area

Oakland Bay Park

Sandhill Park

Acres

40.0

Action/Comments

[Appendix B Describes Specific Recommendations]

Field lights/turf infields (site is at maximum land capacity)

81.87 Developed in 2012

30.00 Additional 10-15 acres for expansion

Implem entatio n

Policies

:

Site

Selecti on

Criteri

Future Need

Southwest

55

Passive/active/water access/trails Simpson

Recreation Park/Mason Lake 55 acres a

There are deficits in

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 6 Page 61

Mason County based on a standard that residents reside within fifteen miles or within one hour driving time to a Regional park facility. The value of Regional parks is that they serve the entire County and provide opportunities that enhance recreation opportunities for County residents and visitors.

Facilities that are appropriate to Regional parks include natural historic and cultural areas, active sports fields and recreation facilities with skatepark, tennis courts, RV

Design & Development Recommendations camping, regional trail connection, group picnic areas, performing arts and festival activities.

Summary of Recommendations

◆ To meet this identified need, the County could acquire property suitable for the development of a regional park by purchasing it, or by transferring from other government agency, or by partnering with local private interests.

◆ Finding affordable and suitable land for a Regional Park may prove to be challenging.

◆ Possible option would be to begin discussions with public and private landowners regarding partnerships or acquiring selected undeveloped lands in Mason County.

◆ This additional parkland could provide a needed regional park site inclusive of the amenities desired by County residents.

◆ The potential addition of 133-400 acres of natural areas during the planning horizon could come from property transfers, donations, or partnership agreements.

◆ The public input stressed the need to address maintaining existing sites and stressed the need to address the operation and maintenance costs for any new park land additions.

6.1.D: NATURAL OPEN SPACE:

Assessed Need:

It is recommended that the County acquire up to 200 acres of natural areas and open space land through partnerships or property transfers by the year 2018. With the addition of 200 acres, a demand standard of 10 acres per 1,000 population is established based on a potential of 814 acres of natural areas/open space.

Recommendations:

Develop natural open space meets the future demand:

Natural Open Space Acres

Action/Comments

[Appendix A Describes Specific Recommendations]

Decker Creek 500.0 Remain natural without development

Foothills Park

Harstine Island Park

Watson Wildwood

70.0

6.90

36.0

Undetermined future needs

Theatre Group

Passive Development

Future Need

Natural Open Space

200.0

Habitat/trails/natural recreation use at Kennedy Creek with 30-40 acres.

◆ State Parks has also taken a close look at Harstine Island State Park (310 acres), so as an example Mason County could continue to discussion on potential surplus public lands to meet the natural open space needs of the County.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 6 Page 62

Implementation Policies:

Site Selection Criteria

Natural Open Space parks provide natural areas and open space which is a vital component of the health and well-being of the County and provides natural resources for habitat protection.

Sites should be selected that will preserve and protect properties that retain the abundance of out-of-doors recreational opportunities in the region.

Design & Development Recommendations

Selected property may even be appropriate for development of trail corridors, as Mason

County does not currently own any suitable land options for regional trails. These trail corridors could provide linkages between parks or facilities.

Summary of Recommendations

◆ Mason County’s inventory of natural areas and open space should continue to increase over the next six years to meet the County’s needs.

◆ It is recommended that the County continue to work to procure natural areas and open space to preserve environmentally sensitive areas (e.g. hillsides, riparian areas, common hiking and access areas with trails, waterfront property) to retain its rural character.

◆ Approve Conservation Futures property tax levy to provide a reliable and predictable source of funds to help acquire interests in open space, habitat areas, wetlands, farm, agricultural and timberlands for conservation. A portion of the tax levy can be dedicated to the cost of maintaining and operating the properties.

◆ Collaboration with adjoining private enterprise, public agencies and private non-profit conservation trusts will be instrumental to maintaining and increasing natural area, open space, wildlife habitats and corridor connections to state and federal lands in Mason

County.

◆ The County should also pursue state and federal matching grants in partnership with public and private parties to preserve and secure natural areas and open spaces.

6.2: RECREATION FACILITIES

6.2.A: SPORTS FIELDS: (baseball, softball, soccer etc.):

Assessed Need: Based on the demand and needs assessment in Chapter 5, two additional fields will be needed by 2018 or expanded use with allweather turf or lighting improvements should be implemented as recommended.

Recommendations:

◆ Local schools may have existing fields that could be improved to an acceptable standard or land that could be developed for new fields.

◆ One option is investigating the installation of sports field lighting on existing fields to increase use, especially in the fall season.

◆ Continue to explore opportunities to renovation infields with all-weather turf to expand play and field lighting to extend games.

Mason County Recreation Area (MCRA)

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 6 Page 63

6.2.B: TRAILS:

Assessed Need: A demand standard of 0.47 miles per 1,000 population translates to a total need of 38 miles of trails by 2018 and 45 miles of trails by 2015. Trails were one of the most desired park and recreation facility priorities identified Countywide in the 2012 Community Questionnaire survey and public requests at the community workshops.

Recommendations:

◆ Implement and develop trails as guided through the adopted Mason County Master Trails Plan.

◆ Mason County will need to acquire property to develop regional and multi-use trails into the future. This can be done through trail corridor acquisition, partnerships and other means such as easements.

◆ Working in partnership with the County Public Works Department, Port of Shelton and State

Department of Transportation as well as the Mason County Health Department will be vital and critical to providing opportunities through complete streets, trails and facilities to make a positive impact on improved health for the citizens on a County-wide basis.

◆ Part of the completed trails plan should include potential cross county courses, bicycle routes and frontage road routes throughout Mason County. All bicycle routes should be designated by signage, and be striped as bike lands if the road in question has the necessary right-of-way width and is free of on street parking. These bike lane projects should be implemented whenever their respective roadways are resurfaced.

◆ All types of trails are critical recreation facilities that need to be address over the next planning period and into the future. These include Multiple-Use Regional Trails, Local Trails, trail links to new large residential development projects (e.g. Shelton Hills to MCRA),Bicycle

Routes and Water Trails.

◆ To meet this deficit, selected Park Master Site Plans will need to incorporate trails into the development of parks.

◆ As identified through public input, the Shelton to Belfair Trail needs to be the first priority trail development for the County.

6.2.C: CHILDREN’S PLAY AREAS:

Assessed Need: Applying the current standard of 0.33 per 1,000 to the current population, the

County has a need for 20 play areas which indicates a current shortfall of 15 play areas County-wide.

Recommendations:

◆ There is a need for children’s play areas in the northern portions of the County.

◆ Additional play areas could be located at Shorecrest

Park, Latimer’s Landing, Mason Lake Park, Phillips Lake

Park, Sunset Bluff and Sandhill Park.

◆ Continue efforts to retain new and recently replaced playground equipment throughout the park system as monitoring is of critical importance to children’s safety.

Design playground with areas for toddlers, 6-12 year olds and for those 12 and beyond as required under the National

Playground Safety Inspection Guidelines.

FOOTHILLS PARK

◆ All play areas need to meet the National Playground Safety with annual site inspection.

◆ All play areas need to be in compliance with the American with Disabilities Act (ADA).

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 6 Page 64

6.2.D-1: SHOOTING SPORTS:

Assessed Need: Mason County does not have a public shooting range (archery, rifle, and pistol) in the park system. This recreational sport was identified as a need and ranked #1 in the community questionnaire when asked “what special facilities should be added.” Public interest has gown recently with the 2012 Olympics’ and there is a wave of interest in archery in the northwest.

Recommendations:

◆ Study of the feasibility of creating or partnering to provide increased opportunities for shooting sports should be of focus over the next planning period. Identifying a site location will be critically important to the future project.

◆ Matching grant funds are available for the development and operation of shooting ranges from the Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO) through the Firearm and Archery

Ranges Funds (FARR) program.

6.2.D-2: BOAT LAUNCHES:

Assessed Need: Based on the needs assessment, public input and the Mason County Shoreline Master

Plan, water access continues to be of critical importance to Mason County. Water access facilities

(boat ramps, piers, beaches, etc) ranked 2 nd

in the community questionnaire

Recommendations:

◆ Opportunities to secure and develop land and access to public waterfront points for public use for boating, swimming and fishing will remain of vital importance over the next planning period.

◆ Continue to look for waterfront access points for acquisition or development along all fresh and saltwater edges.

◆ Research matching grant funding to acquire and develop water access for boating and recreational activities and sporting needs.

◆ Continue to expand the water trails, working with the public and private partners to secure additional water access sites.

◆ Secure public road right-of-ways for park access points to the water and shorelines throughout the County.

6.2.D-3: GROUP PICNIC AREAS:

Assessed Need: 31% of the responses, when asked what additional facilities are needed in the community questionnaire (Q-8), indicated that basic park features (play areas, picnic areas, etc) were most needed.

Recommendations:

◆ Looking for future locations and project sites should be of importance over the next planning period (e.g. Harvey Rendsland, Sunset Bluff and Mason Lake).

◆ Partner with local service organizations to help fund the construction.

◆ In designing renovation and new neighborhood and community parks, the inclusion of group picnic areas, shelters and facilities should be a part of the design elements.

6.2.D-4: BASKETBALL COURT OUTDOOR PAD:

Assessed Need: Basketball courts or outdoor sports pads provide value to resident located near neighborhood parks (within ½-mile – 1-mile radius) or community parks (1-3 mile radius). Citizens indicated that when asked what additional facilities were “needed” (Q-8), 31% indicated that basic park features (play areas, picnic areas, etc) were needed.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 6 Page 65

Recommendations:

◆ When the need for additional neighborhood, community or regional parks is anticipated, designs that include a basketball court or pad should be included as a recreation facility.

6.3. ADMINISTRATION & OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

ADMINISTRATION / Director

Recommended Work tasks:

◆ Create and facilitate a unified Department whereby all staff is linked through a central mission.

◆ Empower and lead Department personnel to professional success.

◆ Respond to the needs and concerns of the County issues.

◆ Ensure financial integrity of the Department by encouraging cost savings while sustaining quality services.

◆ Pursue additional funding sources to meet plan outcomes.

◆ Encourage community support through a positive and responsive vision and increased awareness of County parks, trails and recreational opportunities.

◆ Encourage staff training and educational opportunities to facilitate professional development.

◆ Strive for efficiency in the provision of department-wide operations.

ADMINISTRATION / Department Staff

Recommended Work tasks:

◆ Coordinate staff efforts to maintain and enhance parks.

◆ Assist and participate in volunteer programs, stewardship groups or local organizations for development and enhancement.

◆ Explore opportunities to enhance or generate resources that benefit the functions and maintenance needs of the Department system.

◆ Research department sustainability through options such as the creation of a county

Metropolitan Park District.

ADMINISTRATION / Park Finance

Recommended Work tasks:

◆ Explore the creation of a Mason County Parks Foundation.

◆ Develop funding partnerships with public and private sources to assist in efforts for park acquisition, development, programs, and maintenance.

◆ Work with organizations that promote private investment in public park acquisition and development.

◆ Seek funding for new recreation facilities and improvements to existing facilities through a variety of fund sources including, but not limited to: donations, user fees, grants (public and private), capital reserves, REET (real estate excise tax), special district contributions, bonds, levies, and partnerships.

19

,

◆ Explore implementation and use of Conservation Futures funding for natural open space acquisition and maintenance.

◆ Identify opportunities to generate revenue through recreation facility fees and program fees.

◆ Develop recreation facilities which reduce maintenance costs, such as synthetic turf fields.

19

i.e. Metropolitan Park District (MPD)

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 6 Page 66

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE / Maintenance and Renovation

Recommended Work tasks:

◆ Establish maintenance standards for all parks, trails, and recreation facilities.

◆ Encourage the efficiency of maintenance operations.

◆ Standardize signs, equipment, materials and other amenities where feasible.

◆ Maximize the skills and abilities of Department personnel through training and resource support.

◆ Reduce replacement costs and extend the usefulness of equipment and recreation facilities through preventative maintenance.

◆ Consider privatizing services as needed, as feasible for budget savings and increased efficiency.

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE / Park Use: Security and Safety

Recommended Work tasks:

◆ Design park, trail, and recreational facilities that meet all applicable safety standards and discourage unwanted activities.

◆ Educate users about acceptable behavior through appropriate signs, regulations, and public programs.

◆ Consider proper visibility, safety, and effective maintenance in design and development.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 6 Page 67

FUNDUING/CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN

C

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7

T

FUNDING/CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN

PROJECTS & COST ESTIMATES

FUNDING SOURCES

his Chapter of the Comprehensive Plan identifies strategies for funding proposed specific improvements. It identifies existing funding sources and projects potential revenue for the next six years. Project priorities were used to select and prioritize projects through the process of completing the analysis of the park system inventory in Chapter 3 and an assessment of the park, trail and open space needs in Chapter 5. The cost of meeting those needs far exceeds the existing financial capabilities. The summary of this planning process is show in the six-year capital improvement plan identified in Table 7.1. Appendix B contains recommended capital improvement project information for each park and facility recommended for improvement.

7.1: PROJECT PRIORITIES:

The project guide criteria used to identify for recommendation with rank and schedule individual park projects included:

◆ The site’s current level of deferred improvements or safety concerns.

◆ The type of project (see below).

◆ Results of the 2012 survey.

◆ Availability of funding, grants, and cooperative agreements.

◆ Projected or current level of use. (higher use or potential use = higher ranking).

◆ Potential for active involvement of citizen groups, non-profit organizations, and other agencies.

SANDHILL PARK

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 68

The priority by project type is as follows:

1. Improvement to existing developed sites (redevelopment, renovation, and replacement)

2. ADA projects at all parks

3. Development that meet existing deficits in service or needs identified during public outreach

4. Development of existing undeveloped sites

5. Acquisition of new sites that serve geographic equity needs

6. Development of new sites that serve or meet geographic equity needs

The 2012 County Community questionnaire survey indicated the following priorities as the most needed parks and recreation facilities in Mason County, which are:

1. Trails for cycling, walking, and hiking

2. Trails for exercise, recreation, experience nature.

3. Water access (beach, place to play, boat ramp, pier, ramps.)

4. Paved trails for walking, biking etc.

5. Shooting/archery range

6. Water spray park

7. Basic park features (play area, picnic areas etc.)

8. Competitive sport facilities (fields, courts etc.)

9. Nature Areas

10. Hunting, gardening, dog walking/park

COULTER CREEK

When asked “how would you spend $100.00 on parks?” The top three answers were:

1. Acquisition or development of walking and biking trails and bike routes

2. Improvements/maintenance of existing parks and playgrounds

3. Development of waterfront parks to improve water access.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 69

The following priorities, which are of equal value per level of priority, are recommended for capital projects:

HIGH PRIORITY

Continue to acquire and develop waterfront and water access sites (e.g. Walker

Park, Jacoby Park, Union Boat Launch and freshwater lakes)

Plan for and develop a linking countywide trail system (regional connection and identified trail priorities)

 Upgrade County-owned sports fields for extended play and efficient maintenance

 Plan for and develop habitat, conservation and natural open space areas, sites and access

MEDIUM PRIORITY

 Plan for and develop skatepark in Belfair area

 Identify sites for playground, group picnic shelters and restroom/concessions

 Research and develop County water spray park facility

 Research and develop shooting range

 Continue to secure and develop community parks

LOW/FUTURE PRIORITY

 Expand water access sites at Menards Landing

 Secure funding to Latimers Landing Overflow Parking improvement

 Develop Watson Wildwood Park Site

 Complete expansion of Sandhill park and fields

 Acquire 27 additional acres at Oakland Bay Park

LATIMER’S LANDING

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 70

7.2: CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PLAN

The funding strategies for implementing the recommendations outlined in Chapter 6 are identified in

Table 7.1. The proposed project, estimated costs and potential revenue sources provide the identified sources to fund the Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) from 2013 to 2018 and beyond.

Key to funding the CIP is to understand that the total project costs are from a combination of funding sources which include grants, general fund budgets, real estate excise taxes and /or even general obligation bonds to list a few. Section 7.3 of this chapter provides funding options potentially available from a variety of sources that range from federal funding to local sources.

Over time, it is important to remember that priorities change, new funding sources become available and unfortunately legislative action can eliminate or shift funding sources. It is also important to understand that opportunities for the ability to acquire land or the option to develop a project can arise and change the proposed project list. Under the Washington State Growth Management Act

(GMA), the County reviews the CIP on an annual basis and can make adjustments with the adoption of the annual budget.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 71

Table 7.1: All project budgets are stated in 2013 dollars

Project 2013 2014 2015

MCRA turf on infields #6 and #7, backstops, asphalt

$600,000 $0 $0

MCRA Park Irrigation

(Outfield & Interior)

MCRA renovate infields on

#1, #4, and #5

$0

$10,000

$0

$0

$517,950

$0

MCRA new restroom concession building

$0 $0 $0

MCRA lights on fields #2,

#3, Batting Cage Repair

MCRA Improvements,

Parking and Master Plan

MCRA Spray Park

Truman Glick Park

Improvements

Foothills Park Site Plan

Foothills Park Picnic

Shelter, Open Area Field

Improvements, Site

Upgrades, Nature Trail

Menards Landing Water

Access and Vault Toilet

Union Park Restroom

Renovation

Trails Development

Shelton to Belfair Trail

Planning

Shelton to Belfair Trail

$75,000

$75,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$50,000

$50,000

$0

$0

$20,000

$0

$0

$30,000

$0

$0

$0

$50,000

$50,000

$0

$300,000

$0

$0

$0

$50,000

$0

$0

$8,000

$0

$0

$0

North Bay Trail

SW Area Community Park

Study

$0

$0

$900,000

$0

$0

$0

2016

$0

$0

$0

2017

$0

$0

$0

2018

$0

Beyond 2018

$0

Funding Options

WWRP, REET II

$0

$0

$0

$0

YAF, REET II,

Fundraising

REET II

$180,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$493,030

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$50,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$100,000

$368,940

$50,000

$0

$1,000,000

$0

$50,000

$0

$0

$50,000

$0

$1,000,000

$0

$0

$0

$496,300

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0 REET II

$0

WWRP, YAF, REET II,

Fundraising

$0

$600,000

YAF, REET II,

Sponsorship

WWRP, REET II

$183,000 REET II

$0 REET II, Fundraising

$0 REET II, Fundraising

$0

WWRP Water Access,

REET II

$0 REET II, Fundraising

$50,000

Bond, REET I,

Fundraising

$0 REET I, Fundraising

$10,000,000

WWRP Trails, Bond,

REET I

$0

TIP CAP, REET I, Bond,

Fundraise

$0 REET II

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 72

Project

Belfair/North Mason Area

Skatepark

Shelton/South Mason

Area Skatepark

Oakland Bay Park

Acquisition - 27 acres

Oakland Bay Park Phase

II - Interpretative

Components

Oakland Bay Historical

Home Renovation

Mason Lake Park

Restroom Upgrades and

Improvements

Mason Lake Park Picnic

Shelter

Mason Lake Park Play

Equipment

Jacoby Park Planning

Jacoby Park Boat ramp, pier, gangway, parking

Jacoby Park Play Area,

Picnic, and Site

Improvements

Sandhill Park fields #2 and

#3 Renovation

2013

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$60,000

$0

$0

$0

2014

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$850,000

$0

$712,740

Sandhill Park Expansion $0 $0

Sandhill Park Play

Equipment

$0 $50,000

North Mason School

District Soccer Field

(Partnership Program)

$0 $0

Walker Park beach access improvement

Walker Park

Improvements, picnic shelter, Removal of

Basketball Court

Union Boat Launch

Renovation

$5,000

$111,250

$357,200

$0

$0

$828,000

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

2015

$300,000

2016

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$143,125

$75,000

$40,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

2017

$0

$0

$0

$75,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

2018

$0

Beyond 2018 Funding Options

$0

REET II, WWRP, YAF,

Fundraise

$0

$425,000

$0

$0

$500,000

REET II, WWRP, YAF,

Fundraise

$0

SRFB, LWCF, REET I,

WWRP

$500,000

WWRP, REET II,

Fundraise

$0

Historic Renovation

Grant

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0 REET II, BFP

$0 REET II, Donations

$0 REET II, Donations

$0 REET II, BFP

REET II, BFP

$0

$0

$0

$0

$1,333,333

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$200,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0 REET II, Fund raise

$0

REET II, WWRP, YAF,

Donations

$1,769,394

REET II, WWRP, YAF,

Donations

$0 REET II, Fund Raise

$0

REET II, WWRP Local

Parks, School District,

Donations

$0 REET II

$0

$0

$0

DRAFT

$0

$0

$0

$298,090

$0

$0

$0

REET II

REET II, BFP

Chapter 7 Page 73

Project

Watson Wildwood Park

Site Plan

Watson Wildwood Park

Development

Rendsland Park Phase I

Site Development

Rendsland Park Phase II

Site Development

Latimer’s Landing

Connector Trail

Latimer’s Landing

Improvements

Phillips Lake Park

Amenities

Water Spray Park

Development

Sunset Bluff Park Site

Plan

2013

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

2014

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$10,000

2015

$40,000

$0

$234,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

2016

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

2017

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

2018

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

Beyond 2018

$0

$500,000 REET II, WWRP, LWCF

$0

$200,000

$150,000

$131,500

$0

Funding Options

REET II

REET II, Fund Raise

REET II, Fund Raise

REET II, BFP

REET II, BFP

REET II

Sunset Bluff Development

Coulter Creek Park

Boardwalk and View Area

Maintenance Equipment,

Tractors, Mowing Decks

TOTALS

$0

$35,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$500,000

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0 REET II, WWRP

$0

REET II, Donations, In

Kind

$750,000

WWRP WA, WWRP LP,

REET II

$0 WWRP LP-WA, REET II $0 $0 $0 $300,000 $0 $0

$0

$1,428,450

$150,000

$3,650,740

$150,000

$2,933,283

$0

$1,781,155

$0

$1,643,940

$0

$2,469,390 $15,333,894

$0 REET I & II

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 74

7.3: FUNDING SOURCES

Detail Description of Grant and Funding Sources for Acquisition and Development:

County’s annual general government expenditures are derived from the combination of general fund, special revenue, capital projects funds and debt service. The following is a listing of suggestions for possible sources of funds for capital facility projects or sources of matching grants for implementation of current and future recommendations.

Capital projects can secure matching grant funds from a variety of sources, which include local taxes and County funding, as well as state and federal capital fund programs which are listed below in detail.

General Fund: This source primarily funds general operations and maintenance. Capital projects are

occasionally funded from these sources when the capacity exists, usually via a transfer of funds to the Capital Improvement Program Fund (CIP).

Real Estate Excise Tax (REET): Tax imposed at the time of a real estate sale. There are two

components of the tax, the first quarter of one percent of the sale to be used for acquisition and development projects and the second quarter of one percent (development projects only) of the property’s sale price. Cities and counties that are not levying the optional half-cent sales tax under

RCW 82.14.030(2) have the option of levying an additional one-half percent real estate excise tax.

These receipts are not designated for capital projects. They are general fund revenue for city operating expenditures. Only two cities, Asotin and Clarkston, have chosen to do this. From a financial standpoint, the optional half-cent sales tax will probably bring in more revenue than this additional one-half percent real estate excise tax. Many cities and counties as a priority dedicate the revenues to be used for park and recreation capital purposes. This tax does not require the vote of the people. Because this revenue source has a dedicated purpose, it must be accounted for separately in a capital projects fund. Those cities and counties that are planning under GMA and levying both REET 1 and REET 2 need to keep track of each of these revenues separately because the uses to which they may be put are different. RCW 82.46.030(2) and RCW 82.46.035(4) . Revenue from this fund should be estimated conservatively, as the real estate market can be volatile.

Washington State The principle revenue source for Washington State is the sales and use tax. It is an

important funding source for cities and counties, second only to the property tax. Almost half of the state’s taxes for the general fund are from the imposed sales tax of 6.5 percent. Local governments have a number of different optional sales and use taxes, which also represent a substantial support for the local general fund budget. The cities and counties can levy basic sales and use tax of 0.5 percent and can add an optional tax of up to an additional 0.5 percent for a total of 1.0 percent.

Several additional local options are allowed for transit, public facilities and criminal justice purposes, including sales and use tax of up to 1.2 percent levied by a public facilities district for

20 financing acquisition, operation and maintenance of public facilities district for financing acquisition, operation and maintenance of public facilities including parks and recreation facilities.

21

Special Excise Tax: This tax is levied as a special excise tax of 2% on lodging as allowed under RCW

Chapter 82.08. The funds collected are placed in the “Tourism Activities Fund” to be used solely for tourist promotion, acquisition and operation of tourism-related facilities or all other uses authorized under RCW Chapter 67.28.

General Obligation Bonds: These are voter-approved or Councilmatic bonds with the assessment

placed on real property. The money can only be used for capital improvements not maintenance.

This property tax is levied for a specified period of time (usually 20-30 years). Passage of a voter-

20

82.14.048

21

82.14.048

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 75

ratified bond requires a 60%, majority vote, while Councilmatic bonds require only a majority of the elected City Council or Board of Commissioners. One disadvantage of using this type of levy may be the interest costs.

Voter approved Utility Tax Increase: Citizen voted increases in utility taxes are an option as a parks

and recreation Facilities Funding Measure. The funds can provide an on-going funding source of dollars dedicated to specific capital funding projects, e.g. City of Olympia measure of 3% provides

$2,000,000 annually for park capital projects which includes trails.

Growth Impact Fees: Park Growth Impact Fees are fees imposed on new development to mitigate

the impact of new development on the city or County park system. Impact fees can be used only for parkland acquisition and/or development. Cities and counties planning under the Growth

Management Act, in title RCW 82.02.050 (2) can impose, collect and use impact fees.

Certificate of Participation (COP): This is a lease-purchase approach where a city or county COP’s to

a lending institution and does not require a public vote. The governing body then pays the loan off from revenue produced by the facility or from its general operating budget. The lending institution holds title to the property until the COP’s are repaid.

HUD Block Grants: Grants from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development are

available for a wide variety of park projects (5% of total). With existing lower income areas in the city and county, park improvements and facility upgrades can benefit from Community Development

Block Grants. Grants can fund up to 100% of the project. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) access projects for parks and playgrounds are eligible for this funding.

Donations: The donation of labor, land or cash by service agencies, private groups, or individuals is a

popular way to raise small amounts of money or reduce the cost of capital development of a park.

Under RCW 35.21.278, the community service organizations and associations providing service in the local area can provide, without regard for public bid, design plans, improvements to a park or public square, installing equipment or artworks, or providing maintenance services for the facility as a community or neighborhood project. Within one year, the cost cannot exceed $25,000 or $2.00 per resident. The contracting association may use volunteers in the project.

Life Estates: This is an agreement between a landowner and the city or county where the

government buys or receives, through donation, a piece of land and they then give the owner the right to live on the site after it is sold for the lifetime of the owner.

Private Grants and Foundations: Private grants and foundations provide funds for a wide range of

projects. In many instances the foundations are required to provide the grant funds through a nonprofit entity. The City and County can establish a non-profit “Parks Foundation” with the purpose of securing capital funds from private foundations and trusts.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 76

COUNTY FUNDING/LEGISLATIVE OPTIONS:

Conservation Futures: Conservation Futures are a useful tool for counties to preserve land of public

interest for future generations in both the unincorporated and incorporated areas of the County.

RCW 8.34.230 allows a property tax levy to provide a reliable and predictable source of funds to help acquire interests in open space, habitat areas, wetlands, farm, agricultural and timberlands for conservation. However, some counties have purchased Regional Parks and sites for trail use as well.

A portion of the funds from the Conservation Futures tax levy can be dedicated to the cost of maintaining and operating the property.

STATE FUNDING:

Washington State provides various grants for public recreation acquisition and development through the Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO), the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) and

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Washington State Department of Ecology

(ECY) programs.

Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO): The Recreation and Conservation Funding Board (RCFB) administers several grant programs for recreation and habitat conservation purposes. Depending on the program, eligible project applicants can include municipal subdivisions of the state (cities, towns and counties, or port, utility, park and recreation, and school districts), Native American tribes, state agencies and in some cases, federal agencies and nonprofit organizations. To be considered for funding assistance, most grant programs require that the proposed project will be operated and maintained in perpetuity for the purpose for which funding is sought. Most grant programs also require that sponsors complete a systematic planning process prior to seeking RCFB funding. Grants are awarded by the RCFB Board based on a public, competitive process which weighs the merits of proposed projects against established program criteria. http://www.rco.wa.gov/

The grant categories include:

Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program (WWRP): Funds the acquisition and development of conservation and recreation lands. The Outdoor Recreation Account of the WWRP provides matching grant funds for local and state park projects, which include active parks, playgrounds, sports fields, water access sites, trails, natural areas, urban wildlife habitat and farmland preservation. The RCO accepts grant applications by May 1 st

of each even year. The successfully scored projects are presented to the Governor, who recommends them to the legislature for capital funding the following year.

Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account (ALEA) Grant Program: This grant-in-aid supports the purchase, improvement, or protection of aquatic lands for public purposes, and for providing and improving access to such lands. It is guided by concepts originally developed by Department of

Natural Resources, including re-establishment of naturally self-sustaining ecological functions related to aquatic lands, providing or restoring public access to the water, and increasing public awareness of aquatic lands as a finite natural resource and irreplaceable public heritage.

Youth Athletic Facilities (YAF): The program was approved by Washington voters as part of

Referendum 48, which provides funding for the Seattle Seahawks stadium. The purpose is for acquiring, developing, equipping, maintaining, and improving youth and community athletic facilities. Eligible grant recipients are cities, counties and qualified non-profit organizations. Grant recipients must provide at least 50% matching funds in either cash or in-kind contributions. An initial

$10-million was contributed by the Seattle Seahawks “team affiliate” sources for the grant program.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 77

Firearms and Archery Range Recreation Program (FARR): This funding is used to acquire, develop and renovate public and private non-profit firearm range and archery training and practice facilities.

To qualify for funding, ranges must be open on a regular basis to law enforcement personnel, hunter safety education classes, and the general public. Grant recipients must provide matching funds in either cash or in-kind contributions. Funding comes from $3.00 for each concealed pistol license fee.

Acquisition, development, renovation projects, capital equipment purchase, safety and environmental improvements, noise abatement and liability protection are all funded through this grant program.

Salmon Recovery Grant Program: Funding is for protection and/or restoration of salmon habitat. It also supports feasibility assessments for future projects and other activities. Applicants must provide at least 15% matching funds in either cash or in-kind contributions. State funding has been provided through fund shifts from other funding accounts and general obligation bonds. Federal funds are appropriated through the Department of Commerce, National Marine Fisheries (NMFS). Working with the Watershed Resource Area (WRIA) 16/17 as lead agency, projects and funding can be identified for various salmon habitat projects.

Washington State Department of Commerce:

Building of the Arts: Building for the Arts awards grants to 501c3 nonprofit performing arts, art museums, and cultural organizations to defray up to 20 percent of eligible capital costs for the acquisition, construction and or major renovation of capital facilities. This is a reimbursement-style grant, and operating costs are ineligible.

Direct Appropriation: Direct appropriations are placed in the state budget by the Governor or legislature. The Department of Commerce Capital Programs has no role in the selection of grant recipients. These types of grants may be used by designated local governments, tribes, and nonprofit organizations throughout the state to acquire or construct a variety of capital projects. Each project funded under these programs stimulates the state and local economies by providing constructionrelated employment and associated revenues.

Humanities Washington: Humanities Washington supports public programs that have as their primary purpose the presentation of insights gained from the humanities. Humanities Washington offers two types of grants. Quick Grants are available year-round to small or rural organizations for program planning or implementation. Project Grants are usually awarded twice a year through a competitive grant process for larger projects.

FEDERAL FUNDING:

On the Federal level, Congress appropriates funds through a variety of programs that may provide potential funding sources for various capital projects. These include the Environmental Protection

Act, Land and Water Conservation Fund Account, Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program

(RTCA), Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Economic Development Funding (EDI), Community

Block Grant HUD, Environmental Protection Act with Brownfield’s clean-up funding, United States

Department of Agriculture low interest loans and through direct Congressional Appropriation (see specifics regarding each grant below). Links to government grant sources can be found at firstgov.com and grants.gov.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 78

Congressional Grants for Neighborhood Initiatives: are received annually and are by invitation only

through your congressional Representative or U.S. Senator. The FY 2013 invitations will come out in the spring and are administered under the Homes and Communities Division of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

FY 2013 Congressional Appropriation: Annually, U.S. Senators and House Members accept letters of

proposals and applications for appropriation requests. Project descriptions and letters of request for appropriation are due March 1 st

.

The Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF): Program funds come through Congressional

appropriation in recreation resources including, but not limited to parks, trails, wildlife lands and other lands and facilities desirable for individual active participation. Grant recipients must provide at least 50% matching funds in either cash or in-kind contributions. A portion of the Federal revenue is derived from sale or lease of off-shore oil and gas resources and is re-appropriated to projects through the U.S.Congress to the Department of the Interior under the National Park Service (NPS).

The program is administered in Washington State by the RCO. Sites purchased or developed with

LWCF funds are deed protected for outdoor recreation purposes and are defined through the use of

“6f” federal map delineation.

Surface Transportation Act (MAP-21)

In early July 2012, the Surface Transportation Act (MAP-21) was signed into law by the President.

MAP-21 contains 600-plus pages. Key things to know specifically are how it impacts existing federal support for walking and bicycling. The two big changes are:

 Combining/Streamlining of Existing Programs; and,

 Less Funding and More Competition.

Under previous law, popular programs such as Transportation Enhancements (TE), Safe Routes to

Schools, and the Recreation Trails Program (RTP) were funded as stand-alone programs, which meant they each received dedicated annual funding. MAP-2 eliminates these stand alone programs and creates a new funding category called Transportation Alternatives (TA). TE, Safe Routes to Schools, and RTP projects are now rolled into the TA category within MAP-21. Additionally, many other projects, including expansive environmental mitigation and limited road construction projects, are also included under TA and will now compete for these same funds. The problem is that funding for

TE, Safe Routes to School and RTP has historically totaled approximately $1.2 billion per year. MAP-

21 cuts overall funding for consolidated Transportation Alternatives category by a third, so that only approximately $800 million will be annually available. TE and Safe Routes to Schools remain eligible for funding, but they must now compete against each other as well as a multitude of other programs for much less money. The states will be distributing TA funds but retains discretion over the types of projects it will fund-meaning that states may “opt-out” of using 50% of their TA funding for projects such as trails and bike paths.

National Recreation Trails Program (RTP): The National Recreational Trails Program (NRTP)

provides funds to rehabilitate and maintain recreational trails and facilities that provide a backcountry experience. Eligible Projects: Maintenance of recreational trails, development of trailside and trail-head facilities, construction of new trails, operation of environmental education and trails safety programs. Revenue Source: Federal gasoline taxes attributed to recreational nonhighway uses. The program is administered by the U.S. Department of Transportation through the

Federal Highway Administration and in Washington State by the RCO.

The Boating Infrastructure Grant Program (BIG): This federal program provides funding for

recreational transient boating facilities, targeting the needs of recreational boats 25-feet and larger.

This program is administered through the RCO.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 79

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development: Brownfield’s Economic Development

Initiative (BEDI): The BEDI program provides funding to local governments to be used in conjunction with Section 108 loan guarantees to finance redevelopment of Brownfield’s sites. Information about the program is available at: http//www.hud.gov/offices/cpd/economicdevelopment/programs/bedi/index.dfm

Environmental Protection Agency: Brownfield’s Cleanup Revolving Loan Fund Pilots: The BCRLF program allows states and local governments to receive loan funds for environmental clean-up of

Brownfield’s. The purpose of the program is to enable states and local governments to make low interest loans to facilitate the clean-up and re-development of Brownfield’s properties. Contact: www.epa.gov/swerosps/bf/rlflst.htm or check for additional grants at http//www.epa.gov/owow/funding/governments.html

National Endowment for the Arts Grant: In working with the Washington State Arts Commission,

grants are available in January. Sign up notification from [email protected]

National Endowment for the Humanities: /The NEH is an independent grant-making federal agency dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation and public programs in the humanities.

View grant opportunities at http://www.neh.gov

National Tree Trust: National Tree Trust provides trees through two programs: America’s Tree Ways

and Community Tree Planting. These programs require trees to be planted by volunteers on public lands. Additionally, the America’s Tree Way program requires a Minimum of 100 seedlings be planted along public highways.

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA): EPA offers Low Impact Development Storm Water

Management Grants (LID) providing financial assistance through the Washington State Department of

Ecology Water Quality Program http//www.ecy.w.gov One of the most effective ways to manage storm water-runoff pollution is to Minimize how much run-off occurs in the first place. LID-designed sites have fewer impervious surfaces and use vegetation, healthy soils, small-scale storage and dispersion/infiltration techniques to manage storm water. This grant program began as a pilot in

2006. If successful and federal funds continue to support the program, park improvements such as shoreline enhancements, parking roadway and walkway replacement with pervious surfaces would all meet the criteria of the LID grant goals. An example of a successful LID waterfront park grant recipient is Lions Field Park located in the City of Bremerton which was an original LWCF federally funded development project. Contact: http//www.epa.gov/swerosps/bf/rlflst.htm

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD): Housing and Urban Development

(HUD) Economic Development Funding (EDI) program administers the Community Development Block

Grant Program (CDBG) provides block grants to eligible local governments. Approximately $100million of CDBG funds are utilized annually for park and recreation projects which often are initiated along with more comprehensive community redevelopment initiatives.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 80

In addition to the capital facilities plan project, grant funding is available from a variety of sources for community recreation programs. Special health and youth related grant information can be obtained from the National Center for Disease Control, U.S. Department of Education, U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Office of Juvenile

Justice and Delinquency Prevention and U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Nutrition Service.

PRIVATE FUNDING:

Donations: The donation of labor, land or cash by service agencies, private clubs, corporations or

individuals is a popular way to raise small amounts of money for specific projects. The private funds are critical to show commitment of non-government dollars and as a positive result can elevate the standing of the grant proposal. Such service agencies as the Kiwanis and Rotary often fund small project improvements in partnership or provide the donated labor match to bring the project to fruition. Environmental groups such as the Trust for Public Lands or Cascade Land Conservancy organize and in partnership provide volunteer labor for habitat restoration which can serve as a value for consideration toward the local match requirement on specific grants. Principle property tax payers in the city and County area such as Safeway or Kroger Foods are sources of local contributions for civic and environmental benefits. As a partnership opportunity they should be contacted, provided with collateral project information and approached with regard to an initial request for partnership support funding. As with all grant programs, grant agencies are looking to local communities to work with local advocates, sponsors and private partners to bring the project to a funding level. Community advocates can elevate the level of project scores in a competitive funding cycle. In some grant programs, grants require private partnerships as a condition of application.

Corporate Funding: Example: The Nick “Let’s Just Play Giveaway”: Nickelodeon is a unique grant-

giving program that brings much needed dollars to enhance recreation. A community nominates a project and each month 20 winners receive a grant which includes funding to build playgrounds.

Contact [email protected]

FOUNDATIONS & GRANTS

Private grants and foundations: Many private foundations provide money for a wide range of

projects. Grants are available for children, cultural enrichment and heritage preservation. In many cases, foundations require grant requests from non-profit 501c3 organizations. On all phases of park projects, staff should work with or create a partnership with private non-profit organizations and seek opportunities to secure grant funds from private non-profit foundations. There are over 100 IRS

990 non-profits listed in the Shelton and Mason County area.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter 7 Page 81

FACILITY INVENTORY WORKSHEETS

A

PPENDI

X

A-1

FACILITY INVENTORY WORKSHEETS

INTRODUCTION

This appendix section of the Comprehensive Park and Trails Plan provides history and describes conditions and planned development for each of the Mason County Parks.

PLANNING CONCEPT

Collectively the ideal park system for Mason County is one that provides a variety of various park types offering certain types of recreation and open space opportunities. Each park separately may serve a basic function, but together they provide a network of needs for the entire community. The

Mason County park system is centered on the ideal that local areas across the county should have the ability to be served by regional or natural open space areas or have the opportunity to enjoy community parks and neighborhood parks that provides both passive and active recreational opportunities.

The parks and open space areas defined in this plan are intended to achieve a number of purposes that reflect the Mission Statement to:

Provide a diverse system of safe, attractive, and professionally maintained parks, trails and recreation opportunities designed to enhance the quality of life for all who reside in and visit Mason County.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-1 Page 82

PARK SITE INDEX:

Alphabetical / Existing Parks

Type

Community Park

Park Name

Coulter Creek

Natural Open Space Decker Creek

Neighborhood Park (10)

Natural Open Space (70)

Foothills County Park

Natural Open Space Harstine Island Park

Community Park Harvey Rendsland/Jiggs Lake Park

Neighborhood Park

Community Park

Community Park

Regional Park

Community Park

Community Park

Community Park

Regional Park

Community Park

Regional Park

Community Park

Community Park

Community Park

Neighborhood Park

Community Park

Natural Open Space

Hunter Park

Jacoby/Shorecrest

Latimer’s Landing

Mason County Recreation Area

Mason County Skate Park #1

Mason Lake County Park

Menards Landing (Boat Launch)

Oakland Bay Historical Park

Phillips Lake Park

Sandhill County Park

Sunset Bluff Park

Truman Glick Memorial Park

Union Boat Ramp

Union Park

Walker Park

Watson Wildwood View Park

TOTAL

Acreage

55.00

500.00

80.00

30.00

36.00

35.46

0.16

1.92

5.04

36.00

956.96

6.90

15.00

0.15

2.80

5.00

40.00

0.50

17.36

7.40

81.87

0.40

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-1 Page 83

Section A-1:

The following individual park descriptions provide the basic elements of the each park with history, planned development, site improvements with a site photo and/or aerial location map. These facility inventory sheets are described for the following parks:

◆ Coulter Creek

◆ Decker Creek

◆ Harstine Island Park

◆ Harvey Rendsland/Jiggs Lake Park

Hunter Park

◆ Jacoby/Shorecrest

◆ Mason County Skate Park #1

◆ Menards Landing (Boat Launch)

◆ Oakland Bay Historical Park

◆ Phillips Lake Park

◆ Sunset Bluff

◆ Watson Wildwood View Park

Section A-2:

Additionally an in-depth analysis was completed on the following parks by Robert W. Droll and

Associates. The Park Master Plan description includes vicinity and location maps, quantified assessment of existing park conditions, current and proposed improvements, capital funding cost estimates and identified capital funding amount and sources previously secured either for acquisition or development or for both acquisition and development of the park site. These Master Site Plans were completed for the following park sites:

◆ Foothills County Park

◆ Latimer’s Landing

◆ Mason County Recreation Area

◆ Mason Lake County Park

◆ Sandhill County Park

◆ Truman Glick Memorial Park

◆ Union Boat Ramp

Union Park

◆ Walker Park

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-1 Page 84

PARK DESCRIPTIONS/CONCEPT PLANS

A

PPENDI

X

A-2

Coulter Creek

COMMUNITY PARK

Location: Tip of Case Inlet on Northbay County Road

Size: 55.0 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction Mason County

Status: Developed

Existing facilities at site: None

Planned Improvements: Fishing

Water Access

Trails

Wildlife Viewing

Natural Areas

Picnicking

Restroom

ADA

Passive

Dogs Allowed

Comments: Purchased in 2012 with matching grant funds from the Recreation and Conservation Office.

State Matching Grant: #10-1601 WWRP-WA

Park Development Planning (2013-2018 Projects)

1. Boardwalk Trail Development

2. Wildlife Viewing Platform

Site Location Map and Photo

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT A ppendix A-2 Page

85

Decker Creek

NATURAL OPEN SPACE

Location: West Mason County

Size: 500.00 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Mason County

Status: Undeveloped

Existing facilities at site: None

Planned Improvements: None Planned (2013-2018)

Comments:

Purchased from Green Diamond Resource Company in 2010.

State Matching Grants: 06-1943 WWRP-RP-ACQ and 06-2151 SAL-PRG-FED

Site Location Map and Photo

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 86

Harstine Island Park

NATURAL OPEN SPACE

Location: 2411 Harstine Island Road N, Shelton

Size: 6.9 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Mason County

Status: Undeveloped

Existing facilities at site: None

Planned Improvements: None Planned (2013-2018)

Comments:

Purchased in December 2002.

Harstine Island Park could possibly be leased to a group desiring to develop the Harstine Island Theater at the park site. Washington State Parks owns a 300-acre park that is located adjacent to Harstine Island Park. At the present time, Harstine Island Park is all natural and has not been developed.

Site Location Aerial Photo

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 87

Harvey Rendsland Jiggs Lake Park

COMMUNITY PARK

Location: 10991 NE Belfair Tahuya Road, Tahuya

Size: 15.0 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Mason County

Status: Undeveloped

Existing facilities at site: Entry Road/Water Access

Planned Improvements: Picnicking

Parking

Trails

Additional Parking

Access Parking

Signage

Picnic Shelter

Comments:

Transferred from Washington State Parks in 2008.

This Park was transferred from Washington State Parks to Mason County. Currently undeveloped, the park consists of 8 acres and includes approximately 1,900 ft. of waterfront access to Jiggs Lake. The Master Plan with costs estimates in complete.

Park Development Planning

(2013-2018 Projects)

Site Location Photos

1. Expanded Parking

2. Secondary Parking

3. Trails

4. Improved Entry Road

5. Vault Toilet

6. Picnic Shelter

7. Picnic Areas

8. Improved Lake Access

9. Signage

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 88

Hunter Park

NEIGHBORHOOD PARK

Location: Clifton Lane and Old Belfair Highway, Belfair

Size: 0.15 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Mason County

Status: Developed as bus stop area

Existing facilities at site: ADA

Passive

Bench

Bus Stop

Planned Improvements: No County Capital Plans: (2013-2018)

Private project funding for Bus Shelter

Comments:

Acquired in 1996.

Smaller park located in Belfair that includes a major connecting regional route system from Mason County

Transit. Connections to Bremerton/Seattle Ferry provide access to the greater Seattle services. The site has a bus stop, benches and a small amount of open space. In 2012 volunteers and private donors provided a new public art piece at the Park. The piece, titled “Beginning Again Once More” was created by artist James Kelsy.

Site Location Photo

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 89

Jacoby/Shorecrest

COMMUNITY PARK

Location: E 120 Shorecrest Parkway, Shelton

Size: 2.80 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Mason County

Status: Developed Regional Active Sports Park

Existing facilities at site: Boat Launch

Fishing

Passive

Parking

Planned Improvements: Boat Launch

Fishing

Passive

Parking

Comments:

Deeded to County on May 18, 1959 by Lillian Peterson, Marie Bloom, Retta Hultgren, Emerson and Evelyn White.

Park located along Hammersley Inlet. Park includes beach access, boat launch, and picnic tables. The Master

Plan is complete with project cost estimates for the Park.

Park Development Planning (2013-2018 Projects)

1. Renovated Boat Launch

2. New Gangway, Dock and Pier

3. Added Parking

4. Play Area

5. Picnic Shelter

6. Restroom or Portable Toilet

7. Picnic Tables

Site Location Photos

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 90

Mason County Skate Park #1

COMMUNITY PARK

Location: N 3301 Shelton Springs Road, Shelton

Size: 0.50 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Shelton School District leased to Mason County

Status: Developed Regional Active Sports Park

Existing facilities at site: Skateboarding

Picnicking

Passive

Restroom

ADA

Parking

Planned Improvements: None

Comments:

Property leased to Mason County from Shelton School District.

Modular skate ramps located on Shelton School District property adjacent to the Wal-Mart store. The

County has leased the property from the school district and developed the skatepark.

Park Development Planning (2013-2018 Projects)

1. Investigate New Skatepark Site

2. Belfair Skatepark

Site Location Photos

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 91

Menards Landing (Boat Launch)

COMMUNITY PARK

Location: 18931 NE North Shore Road, Tahuya

Size: 7.4 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Mason County

Status: Developed

Existing facilities at site: Hand carry boat launch

Fishing

Picnicking

Walking and Jogging

Barbecues

Picnic Shelter

Restroom

Passive Use

Parking

Planned Improvements: Possible Trailhead for trail to Harvey Rendsland Park

Comments:

Transferred to Mason County when Port of Tahuya dissolved. Site improvements have been done in partnership with the Washington Water Trails Association.

State Matching Grants: 89-033 ALEA ACQ and 07-1406 RTP

This park was recently transferred from the Port of Tahuya to Mason County. This small park provides beach access, includes picnic areas and a gazebo. Includes a portable toilet and access to adjacent DNR tidelands.

Small boat launch for kayaks or canoes.

Park Development Planning (2013-2018 Projects)

1. Vault Toilet (near trailhead)

2. Improved Water Access Ramp

3. Trailhead On New Property Access and Street

4. Low Impact Asphalt Surfacing in Park

Site Location Photos

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 92

Oakland Bay Historical Park

REGIONAL PARK

Location: Agate Road, Shelton

Size: 81.87 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Mason County

Status: Developed Phases and Natural Areas

Existing facilities at site: Walking/Jogging

Picnicking

Parking

Planned Improvements: Wildlife Viewing

Interpretation

Trails Parking Signage

Passive Use

Comments:

Purchased from Phyliss Bierge in April 2005. In 2012 Oakland Bay Park with the Malaney-O’Neill historic home was listed on the Washington Heritage Register of Historic Places.

State Matching Grants: 09-1396 LWCF

Oakland Bay Park was purchased in a partnership arrangement with the Capital Land Trust. The park has waterfront access to Oakland Bay and is the site of an old homestead. The homestead area includes a turn of the century home and orchard area. The park is mostly timberland with a gravel road accessing the home.

Park Development Planning (2013-2018 Projects)

1. Phase I Development:

◆ Remodeled Exterior Of Home

◆ Bird Watching Platform

◆ Environmental Education Area/Shelter

◆ Interpretative Information Areas

◆ Path To View Point/Platform

Site Location Photos

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 93

Phillips Lake Park

COMMUNITY PARK

Location: 50 E Phillips Lake Loop Road, Shelton

Size: 0.40 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Mason County

Status: Developed Water Access

Existing facilities at site: Boat Launch

Fishing

Restroom

Parking

Planned Improvements: None

Comments:

Deeded to County on August 19, 1951 by Edward Clifford for $1.00.

Small park on Phillips Lake that includes a boat launch, restroom, and parking. The park is adjacent to a boat launch owned by Washington State Fish and Wildlife.

Park Development Planning (2013-2018 Projects)

1. Picnic Tables Pads (3)

2. Picnic Tables

3. Park Benches (3)

4. Signage

5. Tree Thinning

Site Location Photos

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 94

Sunset Bluff

COMMUNITY PARK

Location: End of Sunset Road, Shelton

Size: 36.00 Acres / 1,599 linear feet shoreline

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Mason County

Status: Undeveloped Natural Open Space

Existing facilities at site: Fishing

Water Access

Nature Areas

Passive

Parking

Planned Improvements: Trails

Picnicking

ADA

Parking

Interpretation

Restroom

Comments:

Purchased from Trust for Public Lands in 2012.

State Matching Grants: Phase I #10-1061 LWCF

Park Development Planning (2013-2018 Projects)

1. Complete Park Master Plan

2. Access Path and Trail to Beach

3. Information Signage

Site Location Photos

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 95

Watson Wildwood View Park

NEIGHBORHOOD PARK

Location: Highway 302, Victor

Size: 36.00 Acres

Ownership/Deed Restriction: Mason County

Status: Undeveloped

Existing facilities at site: Natural Open Space

Planned Improvements: Parking

Trails

Picnicking

Comments:

Land donated in memory of John Houghton Watson and Alma Katherine Lowe Watson from their children John, Alan and Katherine Wilson on May 8, 2000.

Watson Wildwood Park is located in Victor and is completely natural consisting of 36 acres of timberland.

Park Development Planning (2013-2018 Projects)

1. Access Road and Parking

2. Vault Toilet

3. Trails

4. Signage

5. Viewpoint

6. Picnic Area

Site Location Photo

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 96

Plan Cost Estimates Compiled by Robert W. Droll, Landscape Architect, PS

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Park Name

Foothills County Park

Latimer's Landing

Mason County Recreation Area

Mason Lake County Park

Sandhill County Park

Truman Glick Memorial Park

Union Boat Ramp

Union Park

Walker Park

Total Improvements

Project

Development

Park Name

$468,780

$131,500

$3,358,700

$143,125

$2,491,135

$183,000

$1,185,200

$368,940

$409,340

$8,739,720

Foothills County Park

Latimer's Landing

Mason County Recreation Area

Mason Lake County Park

Sandhill County Park

Truman Glick Memorial Park

Union Boat Ramp

Union Park

Walker Park

Total

360.456.3813

Mason County, WA

Renovation Master Plan New Facilities New Trails

$95,700

$1,000

$1,971,480

$143,125

$721,740

$60,600

$307,200

$368,940

$248,340

$3,918,125

$30,000

$0

$20,000

$0

$0

$0

$50,000

$0

$35,000

$135,000

$242,280 $100,800

$130,500

$1,295,220

$0

$1,762,195

$32,400

$828,000

$0

$72,000

$0

$7,200

$90,000

$0

$0 $0

$126,000 $0

$4,416,595 $270,000

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

A ppendix A-2 Page

97

Address

Parcel llumber

Size

Ownership/Deed Restriction

Status

Development Costs

Comments

241 II Foothills Park Road, Hoods port

42210-40-60000

80.0 acres total: 10.0 acres Neighborhood Park/ 70.0 acres llatural Open Space

Mas on County

Developed/llatural Area

$476,580

Foothills County Park has been Mason County owned since 1937, and was dedicated for park use on August 2, 1982. Dogs are currently allowed.

EXISTING FACILITIES

0

@)

Basketball Court

&

Hoops

Concrete Paths

Natural A re as

Restroom

Platform/Stage Structure

Playground Equipment

Parking Area

Picnic Table

Crushed Rock Roads

Park Host Area

Fie Id Perimeter Fence

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

()

0

Project Development Costs

Renovation: $103,500

Master Pian: $30 ,000

New Facilities: $242,280

New Trails: $100,000

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

Vicinity Map

Planning Year Horizon

2012-2018

2019-2025

2026-2032

DRAFT

'

, _

~~

---~ if

..

....

.

.

.

:::.~>·

Location Map

Funding Source

RCO/Mason County

A ppendix A-2 Page

98

Basketball Court & Restroom Multi-Use Field & Playground Shelter Structure

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS

Maintenance/ Operations Amenities

Signage for nature trails

Park entry sign

Reseed/sod turf in multi-use field

Delineate parking area

Pathway from play area to restroom

New platform/stage structure

New picnic tables

New irrigation system for turf

Renovate restrooms

RCO HISTORY

Funding Year RCO Project# Amt Awarded Elements in Grant

········--·-··--·--························t·························-·····-·····-·t··-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-t··········································································-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·············· · ·················

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:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::r:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::r::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::r:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 99

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Foothills County Park

Item

1

RENOVATION

Replace park entry sign

Renovate & delineate parking area

Lawn renovation

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Renovation Total

Item Total

$95,700

$79,750

$15,950

unit quantity unit cost

$1,000 ls

$67,500 each

$11,250 sf

1

1

6,000

$1,000

$45,000

$1

Mason County, WA

subtotal

$1,000

$45,000

$7,500

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$0

$22,500

$3,750

$53,500 $26,250

$30,000 ls $1 $30,000 $30,000

2

MASTER PLAN

Master plan

Master Plan Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Master Plan Total

$30,000

$0

$30,000

$30,000 $0

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

A ppendix A-2 Page

100

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Foothills County Park

3

NEW FACILITIES

Nature trail signage

Shelter/stage structure

Pathway from shelter to restroom

Irrigation system

Picnic tables

New Facilities Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

New Facilities Total

$3,750 each

$90,000 each

$2,400 sy

$87,750 sf

$18,000 each

1

40

78,000

4

5

$201,900

$40,380

$242,280

4

NEW TRAILS

Nature trail development

New Trails Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

$84,000 lf

$84,000

$16,800

$3,500

New Trails Total $100,800

$500

$60,000

$40

$1

$3,000

$16

$2,500

$60,000

$1,600

$58,500

$12,000

$134,600

$56,000

$56,000

Mason County, WA

$1,250

$30,000

$800

$29,250

$6,000

$67,300

$28,000

$28,000

Project Development Total

$468,780

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 101

Address

Parcel Number

Size

Ownership/Deed Restriction

Status

Development Costs

Comments

Launch: 51 E Harstine Bridge Road, Shelton/ Parking: 3291 Pickering Road, Shelton

22004-41-60040, 22004-41-00040, 22004-41-60090

3.0 acres total: 1.0 acre Boat Ramp/ 2.0 acres Parking Area

Mason County

Developed

$139,500

Latimer's Landing was purchased on July 18, 1968 for $6,869. 77.

EXISTING FACILITIES

····························-··················-··············-··············-..

··-····················-r·······························c·.;·~·iiffi·~;·············-·················

Amenities r········-iiii"O"ii·······T·········F'Aiii········T········P'ii.oii·········

·---------------·----------------------------------------------·--·················-·····················4--------------------------+-----------------------·---~-----------·---------------·

Boat Launch

0

Fishing Area

Pier

Dock

Gangway

0

0

0

0

Portable Toilet

0

Picnick1 ng Areas

ADA Paths (Crushed Rock)

Parking Lot

0

0

0

Project Development Costs

Renovation: S9,000

Master Plan: SO

New Facilities: S130,500

New Trails: SO

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

Vicinity Map

Planning Year Horizon

2012·2018

2019-2025

20 26 ·20 32

DRAFT

Location Map

Funding Source

RCO /Mason County

A ppendix A-2 Page

102

Parking Area Day Use Park Boat Launch

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS

Maintenance/ Operations Amenities

Information kiosk

Portable toilet enclosure

No Parking sign for striped a re a

Park entry sign

Develop beach access

Garbage control

RCO H ISTORY

Funding Year RCO Project# Amt Awarded Elements in Grant

··········································-i·························-·····-····---.}·--·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-i---·······································································-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-································

19 9 6

20 0 8 i

!

96-3380

071334A i

!

$0.CD

$363,75 0.00 i

!

R oads/park i n~ boat l a u nc h r amp, l::aat, i mproved restroom, li g h t i n~ dred g i n~

Acq ui re 234 ac r es o f p r oper ty , adde:J to ex i st in g 0 59 ac r es s i gnage, ut ili t i e;

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···········································t··-·····-·····-·····-····--·····-·····-t···-·········································t·········-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-····················································-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-·····-····················

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::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::t:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::t::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::t:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

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==-=l=========l=========:~=r~=

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Chapter A-2 Page 103 Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Latimer's Landing

Item

1

RENOVATION

Replace park entry sign

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Renovation Total

2

MASTER PLAN

Item Total unit quantity unit cost

$1,000 ls

$1,000

1 $1,000

Mason County, WA

subtotal

$1,000

$1,000

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$0

3

NEW FACILITIES

Information kiosk

Portable toilet enclosure

No parking sign for striped area

Beach access

New Facilities Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

New Facilities Total

4

NEW TRAILS

$1,000

$15,000 ls

$18,000 ls

$750 ls

$75,000 ls

$108,750

$21,750

$130,500

1

1

1

1

$10,000

$12,000

$500

$50,000

$10,000

$12,000

$500

$50,000

$72,500

$5,000

$6,000

$250

$25,000

$36,250

Project Development Total

$131,500

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

A ppendix A-2 Page

104

Address

Parcel number

Size

Ownership/Deed Restriction

Status

Dev e Io pm e nt Cos ts

Comments

E 2100 Johns Prairie Road, Shelton

32005-40-60010

40.0 acres

Mas on County

Developed Regional Active Sports Park

$6,903,300

Mason County Recreation Area was given to Mason County by the Port of Sheltondedicated on September 15, 1978.

EXISTING FACILITIES

···----······----······----······----····-·----···---------------------------------------------r·---··----·--···----·----···-·c·;;·iiii"i"tToil __ .. ________________________ _

Amenities

··-···-···-···-···-···-································-·······································-···-I···-···-···-···-·-·-···+···-···-···-···-···-··+···························

Ball Fields (baseball/softball) - Natural Turf (5) r-···-··-ciilii·o·-···-T··· FA1i1·········;·········iiiiiiii········

!

O

!

Ball Fields (baseball) - Synthetic Turf (2)

Playground

0

0

Restroom/Caretaker's Residence

Parking Lot

Picnicking Areas

ADA Paths

Batting Cages

Concessions Area

Storage Bui Id i ng

Irrigation

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Project Development Costs

Renovation: $3,667,680

Master Plan: $30 ,ooo

New Facilities: $3,133620

New Trails: 72,000

Vicinity Map

Planning Year Horizon

2012-2018

2019 -20 25

2026 -20 32

Location Map

Funding Source

RCD/Mason county

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Appendix A-2 Page 105

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Appendix A-2 Page 106

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Mason County Recreation Area (MCRA)

Item

1

RENOVATION

Refill playground engineered wood fiber

Paint dugouts

Re-side & Paint pump house

Renovate damaged field turf

Permanently attach park furniture

Renovate/replace water fountain irrigation system - outfields irrigation system - park core

Renovate parking lot

Renovate field fence fabric

Replace dugout trim board & add flashing

Replace field numbering

Renovate/expand restroom

Renovate batting cages

Pave hardscape adjacent to ballfields

Install curb around playground

Install synthetic turf rings for practice areas

Convert infields to synthetic turf / renovations

Replace park entry sign

Item Total unit quantity unit cost

$2,700 cf

$21,000 each

$5,250 ls

$22,500 each

$7,500 ls

$12,000 ls

$450,450

$67,500

$75,000 ls ls ls

$15,000 ls

$31,500 each

$5,250 each

$180,000 ls

$75,000 ls

$60,000 ls

$11,250 lf

$0 each

500,500

60,000

1

1

14

7

1

1

1

250

$600,000 each

$1,000 ls

5

1

1

30

14

1

2

1

$200,000

$1,000

$60

$1,000

$3,500

$3,000

$5,000

$8,000

$1

$1

$50,000

$10,000

$1,500

$500

$120,000

$50,000

$40,000

$30

Mason County, WA

subtotal

$1,800

$14,000

$3,500

$15,000

$5,000

$8,000

$300,300

$45,000

$50,000

$10,000

$21,000

$3,500

$120,000

$50,000

$40,000

$7,500

$0

$400,000

$1,000

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$900

$7,000

$1,750

$7,500

$2,500

$4,000

$150,150

$22,500

$25,000

$5,000

$10,500

$1,750

$60,000

$25,000

$20,000

$3,750

$0

$200,000

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Appendix A-2 Page 107

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Mason County Recreation Area (MCRA

Item Item Total unit quantity

unit cost

1

RENOVATION

New kiosk

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Renovation Total

2

MASTER PLAN

Master plan

Master Plan Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Master Plan Total

3

NEW FACILITIES

Wayfinding signage

Canopy over bleachers

Fields Lights for Fields 2 & 3

Fence adjacent to pump house

Sprayground

Picnic Shelter

Project Development Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

New Facilities Total

ls

$1,642,900

$328,580

$1,971,480

$20,000 ls

$20,000

$0

$20,000

$3,000 ls

$0 each

$400,000 each

$1,350 lf

$600,000 ls

$75,000 ls ls

$1,079,350

$215,870

$1,295,220

subtotal

1

1 $20,000

1 $2,000

2

30

1

1

1

$150,000

$30

$400,000

$50,000

Mason County, WA

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$0

$1,800

$20,000

$20,000

$2,000

$0

$300,000

$900

$400,000

$50,000

$0

$752,900

$0

$900

$0

$1,000

$0

$150,000

$450

$200,000

$25,000

$0

$376,450

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 108

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Mason County Recreation Area (MCRA)

Item

NEW TRAILS

4 Perimeter Trail Development

New Trails Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

New Trails Total

Project Development Total

Mason County, WA

Item Total

$60,000 lf

$60,000

$12,000

$72,000

$3,358,700

unit quantity

4,000

unit cost

$10

subtotal

$40,000

$40,000

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$20,000

$20,000

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 109

Address

Parcel Humber

Size

Ownership/Deed Restriction

Status

Development Costs

Comments

E 6011 Mas on Lake Drive W, Grapeview

22234-21-60010' 22233-51-00131

17.36 acres

Mas on County

Developed Waterfront Park

$159,375

Mason Lake County Park was deeded on August 20, 1951 by W.C. Madding for $1.00.

EXISTING FACILITIES

·······-···········-·······-··-·····--~~-~·~-~~-;~-~----···········-·······-··-·······-·r······-···········-·······-·c-~·~·ii1·11·~~---···········-···········-··

1----

---clilil_o _______ T _______ r"AWi _____

---r-----

-P'iiii_li ___ -----

···-···········-···········-·······--B~-~-t--L·~·~-~-~h···········-·······-··-·······-··-··

··-······· cs -········+-·······-··-·······-··+·····-···········-······

Fi s hing Ar e a

Natu r e A r ea s

Restrooms

Parking Lots ( main

& ove r flow)

Picnic k ing Area

0

0

0

0

0

Project Development Costs

Renovation: S159 , 3 7 5

Master Pian: S O

New Facilities: SO

New Tr a il s : SO

Vicinity Map

Planning Year Horizon

2012 ·2018

2019 2025

2026 2032

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Location Map

Funding Source

RCO / Mason count y

Appendix A-2 Page 110

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 111

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Mason Lake County Park

Item

1

RENOVATION

Log removal

Replace park entry sign

Renovate restrooms

Renovate/replace information kiosk

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Renovation Total

2

MASTER PLAN

Item Total

$7,500.00 ls

$2,000.00 ls

$105,000.00 ls

$12,000.00 ls

$114,500.00

$28,625.00

$143,125.00 unit quantity unit cost

1

2

5,000.00

1,000.00

1 70,000.00

1 8,000.00

Mason County, WA

subtotal

5,000.00

2,000.00

70,000.00

8,000.00

5,000.00

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

2,500.00

35,000.00

4,000.00

2,500.00

3

NEW FACILITIES

4

NEW TRAILS

Project Development Total

$143,125.00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Appendix A-2 Page 112

Ad dress

Parcel Number

Size

Ownership/Deed Restriction

Status

Development Costs

Comments

NE 1000 Sandhill Road, Belfair

12330-14-60000

30.00 acres

Mason County

Developed Regional Active Sports Park

$2,498,935

Sandhill County Park was deed to the County on May 4, 1982 by the Department of

Natural Resources (DNRJ.

O

Fields 1-3

O

Fields 4-7

EXISTING FACILITIES

------------------------------------------~~:-:·;~-;-~~------------------------------------------i---------------------------------c-~-~~i"i_i_i_~-~-------------------------------

Ball Fields

Restroom/Concessions Building

Picnicking Areas

Walking/Jogging Paths

ADA Pathways

Parking Lot

Ca re taker's Residence

Tunnel

Utility Building

Fencing

Bleachers

Dugouts

00 (3)

0

0

0

0

00

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Q (l,2)

0

0

0

0

0

Project Development Costs

Renovation: $729540

Master Plan: SO

New Facilities: Sl, 762,195

New Trails: $7 ,200

Vicinity Map

Planning Year Horizon

2012·2018

2019-2025

2026 ·2032

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Location Map

Funding Source

RCO/Mason County

Appendix A-2 Page 113

Field 3 Approach Dugout Field 3

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS

Maintena nee/ Operations

Amenities

Ball field renovation (fields 1 a

21

Park entry sign

Repair tunnel access

Field 1- Replace stairs, backstop, infield

Field 2- New backstop

Field 3- Replace outfield

Fie Ids 1,2,3- New bleachers, outfields, fencing

Develop stronger link between fields 1,2,3

Improve drainage- multiple fields

Play Area Equipment

New Multi-Purpose Synthetic Field w/ Lights p

Weed control

Grafitti removal

Dugouts level with surrounding grade

Gopher control

RCO HISTORY

Funding Year RCO Project# Amt Awarded Elements in Grant

-------------------------------------------+---------------------------------------+---------------------------------------------i-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1998 l

96-1215D

!

$000

!

Renovate 2 ballUlld s, de v e l op / expand 1 bal l Ulld, new rffi t ro o m

-----------------------------------------··:·-----------------------------------·-·:··-----------------------------------------··:··---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

__________________

'.:?.?~

________________

L_ ________

?

_ '.

_ _ ~!.'..~~ -----------L---------!

~~: _ ?.?.?

_ ~~ ------------L-----------------------~~ ~'.?~~!: -~ ?.~!'.

_ ~'.?.

___

~~ ".".

_ ?.~~!'.:'.'.~?.: _ ~ ~~: ~ : _ '.?

_ ~ :~'.?.: _ '.'.:: ?.!.

?

_~ ~ ~ -~ ~'.

~ ~ ~~ ----------------------------

2014

; i

12-1396D

;

!

In ProgrESs

;

!

Renovate 2 Gilds replace inUlld, outUlld turf & irrig a ti o n, backstops, du g outs, ADA pathwa y s

-------------------------------------------+---------------------------------------+---------------------------------------------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------+---------------------------------------+---------------------------------------------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

: !

=

!

-------------------------------------------+---------------------------------------+---------------------------------------------+-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

: : !

-------------------------------------------:--·······-----------------------------·:····-----------------------------------------:-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

= :

=

-------------------------------------------t---------------------------------------t---------------------------------------------t-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-------------------------------------------.l---------------------------------------.l---------------------------------------------l-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

;

:

;

:

;

!

-------------------------------------------.:.·--------------------------------------..:.·--------------------------------------------l.-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

: ! !

-------------------------------------------t---------------------------------------t---------------------------------------------t-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Appendix A-2 Page 114

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Sandhill County Park

Item

1

RENOVATION

Replace stairs (field 1)

Replace backstop (fields 1 & 2)

Replace/renovate infield (field 1)

Replace/renovate outfield (fields 1-3)

Replace/renovate stands & bleachers

Replace perimeter fencing

Replace park entry sign

Improve drainage (fields 1-3)

Repair tunnel access

Dugouts- level with surrounding grade

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Renovation Total

2

MASTER PLAN

Item Total

$12,000.00 each

$105,000.00 each

$52,500.00 each

$157,500.00 each

$22,500.00 ls

$11,250.00 lf

$1,000.00 ls

$157,500.00 each

$75,000.00 ls

$7,200.00 each

$601,450.00

$120,290.00

$721,740.00 unit quantity unit cost

1

3

1

1

2

300

1

3

1

6

$8,000.00

$35,000.00

$35,000.00

$35,000.00

$15,000.00

$25.00

$1,000.00

$35,000.00

$50,000.00

$800.00

subtotal

$8,000.00

$70,000.00

$35,000.00

$105,000.00

$15,000.00

$7,500.00

$1,000.00

$105,000.00

$50,000.00

$4,800.00

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$4,000.00

$35,000.00

$17,500.00

$52,500.00

$7,500.00

$3,750.00

$52,500.00

$25,000.00

$2,400.00

$8,000.00

Mason County, WA

$4,000.00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Appendix A-2 Page 115

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Sandhill County Park

3

NEW FACILITIES

Synthetic Football/Soccer Field with

Illumination

Dugouts- level with surrounding grade

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Renovation Total

4

NEW TRAILS

Nature Trail Development

New Trails Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

New Trails Total

$1,602,110.40 ls

$7,200.00 each

$1,609,310.40

$152,884.49

$1,762,194.89

$6,000.00 lf

$6,000.00

$1,200.00

$7,200.00

1 $1,213,720.00 $1,213,720.00

6

400

$800.00

$10.00

Mason County, WA

$4,800.00

$4,800.00

$4,000.00

$4,000.00

$388,390.40

$2,400.00

$2,400.00

$2,000.00

$2,000.00

Project Development Total

$2,491,134.89

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 116

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Sandhill County Park - Synthetic Multipurpose Field

Item

Synthetic Multipurpose Field

clearing & grubbing construction staking temporary fencing temporary erosion control mass grading & compaction excavation, including offsite haul

Subsurface drainage trench excavation & offsite haul geotexitle fabric

4" slotted pipe trench backfill type 2 drywell

6" permeable base aggregate

2" permeable top aggregate concrete curb edge nailer fine grading-base course fine grading-top course field illumination

Item Total

$44,352.00 acre

$10,560.00 ls

$2,112.00 lf

$5,385.60 sf

$105,600.00 cy

$46,200.00 cy

unit quantity

800

102,000

4

1

10,000

1

unit cost

$8,000.00

$8,000.00

$2.00

$0.04

$8.00

$35,000.00

subtotal

$33,600.00

$8,000.00

$1,600.00

$4,080.00

$80,000.00

$35,000.00

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 32%

$10,752.00

$2,560.00

$512.00

$1,305.60

$25,600.00

$11,200.00

$6,600.00 cy

$48,906.00 sy

$61,248.00 lf

$8,910.00 cy

$63,360.00 each

$160,380.00 ton

$53,460.00 ton

$32,208.00 lf

$17,714.40 lf

$16,038.00 sf

$16,038.00 sf

$264,000.00 sf

200

11,400

5,800

150

4

2,700

900

1,220

1,220

81,000

81,000

1

$25.00 $5,000.00

$3.25

$8.00

$45.00

$12,000.00

$45.00

$45.00

$37,050.00

$46,400.00

$6,750.00

$48,000.00

$121,500.00

$40,500.00

$20.00

$11.00

$0.15

$0.15

$24,400.00

$13,420.00

$12,150.00

$12,150.00

$200,000.00 $200,000.00

Mason County, WA

$1,600.00

$11,856.00

$14,848.00

$2,160.00

$15,360.00

$38,880.00

$12,960.00

$7,808.00

$4,294.40

$3,888.00

$3,888.00

$64,000.00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 117

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Sandhill County Park - Synthetic Multipurpose Field

Synthetic Multipurpose Field

synthetic turf-2.5" csbc concrete walk concrete stairs seeding erosion control trim & clean-up

$588,060.00 sf

$8,910.00 sf

$14,572.80 sy

$8,778.00 sy

$9,424.80 sf

$2,692.80 sf

$6,600.00 ls

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

$1,602,110.40

$152,200.49

81,000

150

480

190

102,000

102,000

1

Renovation Total $1,754,310.89

Mason County, WA

$5.50

$45.00

$23.00

$35.00

$0.07

$0.02

$5,000.00

$445,500.00

$6,750.00

$11,040.00

$6,650.00

$7,140.00

$2,040.00

$5,000.00

$1,213,720.00

$142,560.00

$2,160.00

$3,532.80

$2,128.00

$2,284.80

$652.80

$1,600.00

$388,390.40

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 118

Address

Parcel !lumber

Size

Ownership/Deed Restriction

Status

Development Costs

Comments

W 1291 Ford Road, Matlock

62004-33-60000

35.46 acres

Mas on County

Developed

$190,800

Truman Glick Memorial Park was donated to Mason County, deeded on August 17 , 1978.

EXISTING FACILITIES

·······-······-····-·······-··-·······-··-·······-···········-···········-·······-··--······-·r······-···········-·······-·c:;;·ii·ii·i:i"O"·ii·-···········-···········-··

Amenities r-·······G"ii"ii·o···-···r--··-··ri.iil··-······r······P"oii"R"·····-·

···-··········--···········-·······-p1~·~·i·~-·3;;·~it~·;·········-·······-··-····-··-··-·······-······ a -···········-·······-··-·······-··-r······-··-········-······

Gl

Crushed Roc k Drive

Barbe cu es

Playground

Decker Creek Bridge

Restroom

Horseshoes Area

Nature A r eas

Walking/Jogging Trails

Parking A r ea

Op en Field

Park Entrance

Utility Buildings

@

0

0

0

!()

0 i;i

0

Q

0

Project Development Costs

Renovation: $68,400

Master Plan: SO

New Facilities: $32,400

New Trails: $90,000

Vicinity Map

Planning Year Horizon

2012·2018

2019-2025

2026·2032

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Location Map

Funding Source

RCO/Mason County

Appendix A-2 Page 119

Field & Shelter Memorial Marker Decker Creek Bridge

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS

Maintenance/ Operations Amenities

More prominant memorial marker

Park entrance sign

Develop trails with signage f'lew picninc tables

Redevelop horse shoe areas (41

Weed control- lawn at park entrance & CR trails

New paint- entrance gate

Pressure wash bridge

Pressure wash restroom & utility building roofs

More wood chips for playground area

Shelter level with surrounding grade

RCO H I STORY

Funding Year RCO Project# Amt Awarded Elements in Grant

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • ••••••••••••• .;. •••••••• • ••••• • •••••••••• • •••••••••••• • ••••• • .j. •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • ••••••••••••• • ••••••••••• • ••••• • ••••••••••••••••••••••• • ••••• • • •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • ••

20 09

!

08 10670

!

$0.00

!

I m p r o v e t ra il s, A D A acc es s, p l a y e qu i p men t , s ma l l p i cn i c s i t e , s i g n a ge

···········································+·······································+·············································+···················································································································································· · ··· ·· ··· · ··· · ··· ·· ······

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Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Appendix A-2 Page 120

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Mason County, WA

Truman Glick Memorial Park

Item

1

RENOVATION

Renovate horse shoe pits

Replace park entry sign

Refill playground wood chips

Shelter pad- level with surrounding grade

Re-paint entrance gate

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Renovation Total

2

MASTER PLAN

$50,500.00

$10,100.00

$60,600.00

Item Total unit

$30,000.00 each

$1,000.00

$2,700.00

$15,000.00

$1,800.00 ls cf ls ls

quantity unit cost

4 $5,000.00

1 $1,000.00

30 $60.00

1 $10,000.00

1 $1,200.00

subtotal

$20,000.00

$1,000.00

$1,800.00

$10,000.00

$1,200.00

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$10,000.00

$900.00

$5,000.00

$600.00

$34,000.00 $16,500.00

3

NEW FACILITIES

New picnic tables

Prominent memorial marker

New Facilities Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

New Facilities Total

$15,000.00 each

$12,000.00 ls

$27,000.00

$5,400.00

$32,400.00

4 $2,500.00

1 $8,000.00

$10,000.00

$8,000.00

$18,000.00

$5,000.00

$4,000.00

$9,000.00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Appendix A-2 Page 121

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Truman Glick Memorial Park

4

NEW TRAILS

interpretive trails and signage

New Trails Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

New Trails Total

Project Development Total

$75,000.00 ls

$75,000.00

$15,000.00

$90,000.00

$183,000.00

1 $50,000.00

Mason County, WA

$50,000.00

$50,000.00

$25,000.00

$25,000.00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 122

Address

Parcel llumber

Size

Ownership/Deed Restriction

Status

Denlopment Costs

Comments

E 5093 State Route 106, Union

00000-00-00000

0.16 acres

Mas on County

Denloped Water Access

$1,193,000 llo information.

EXISTING FACILITIES

·····--···········-·······-··-·······-··-·····---··········-···········-·······---·······-··r········-···········-·······-·c:;;-·ii·.-.-1·i1·;;"·-···········-···········--

Am en iti

···-···········-···········-·······-·ii~·;t·-i:·~·~-~-~h···········-·······-··-·······-··-··

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00·0

-···-··T·-··-··i'iiii·-·····-r-····-p-

··-···········-·········•·-·······-··-·······-··-•······-··· o

·ii······-·

···-······

Fishing Area

Parking Area (limited)

P or t ab le T o ilet

Access Drive

0

0

0

0

Project Development Costs

Ren ova ti on: $315 ,ooo

Master Pian: $50 ,000

New F a cilities: $828,000

New Trails: So

Vicinity Map

Planning Year Horizon

2012·2018

2019·2025

2026·2032

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Location Map

Funding Source

RC D/ Mason county

Appendix A-2 Page 123

Access Drive Boat Launch Concrete Launch

Amenities

Pier/ Dock

Gangway

New launch

Pave access drive

Improved parking

San-i-can enclosure

New park entry sign

PROPOSED IMPROVEMENTS

Maintenance/ Operations

..

RCO HISTORY

Funding Year RCO Project# Amt Awarded Elements in Grant

2012

!

11-1054P

!

$ 61,250.00

!

Arch1te:;ture/engineenng, construc t ion drawings, & permitting for beat launch

::::::::::::::::::~~:~~:::::::::::::::r::::::::::~~;.~~!:!:~:::::::::::r::::::::::!~:~'.?.

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:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::r:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::r::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::r:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 124

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Union Boat Ramp

Item

1

RENOVATION

Renovate boat launch

Pave access drive

Replace park entry sign

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Renovation Total

Item Total

$180,000.00

$75,000.00 ls

$1,000.00 ls

unit quantity unit cost

1 $120,000.00

1 $50,000.00

1 $1,000.00

subtotal

$120,000.00

$50,000.00

$1,000.00

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$60,000.00

$25,000.00

$256,000.00

$51,200.00

$307,200.00

$171,000.00

Mason County, WA

$85,000.00

$50,000.00 ls $1.00 $50,000.00 $50,000.00

2

MASTER PLAN

master plan

Master Plan Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Master Plan Total

$50,000.00

$0.00

$50,000.00

$50,000.00 $0.00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Appendix A-2 Page 125

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Union Boat Ramp

3

NEW FACILITIES

Portable toilet enclosure

Pier / Dock

Gangway

New Facilities Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

New Facilities Total

$15,000.00 each

$600,000.00 ls

$75,000.00 ls

$690,000.00

$138,000.00

$828,000.00

1 $10,000.00

1 $400,000.00

1 $50,000.00

4

NEW TRAILS

$10,000.00

$400,000.00

$50,000.00

$460,000.00

Mason County, WA

$5,000.00

$200,000.00

$25,000.00

$230,000.00

Project Development Total

$1,185,200.00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 126

Ad dress

Parcel Number

Size

Ownership/Deed Restriction

Status

Development Costs

Comments

E 61 Port Townsend Street, Union

32232-32-60010, 32232-52-03021

1.92 acres

Mason County

Developed Community Park

$376,740

Union Park was deeded to the County on September

14, 1990 by Mural and Delmer

Fassio for

$1.00.

EXISTING FACILITIES

··················································---·····················································-r-···········--·-·····---········c:·~-~d-i"i°i"~~······················---·······

Am en i ti es r··---·····c;-o·o·o···-····T······---Fii.lii·-·····-·T···---··Pa·o·li······--·

-······----····--·-······-·························--·-·····--················--···············--·-·····--

······················--·-·-I············--·-·············~----··············--·-·····

Ba ll F ie l d

0

P 1 c n i ck in g A r e a s

0

Res t r o om 0

P la y A r ea

P1 en i c She l t e r

0

0

B ar be cu es

0

Basketba ll Cou r t 0

P a r kin g Area

0

C r ushed Rock Pat h ways

S to ne p l ant e rs

Fe n c i n g

0

0

0

Project Development Costs

Rennati01: $376 , 740

Master Pin: $0

New Facilities: $0

New

Trails:

$0

Vicinity Map

Planning Year Horizon

2012·2018

201 9 -2025

2026-2032

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Location Map

Funding Source

RCO/Maso1 C1U1ty

Appendix A-2 Page 127

i

I

17

I

!

-·······-·-······-···-······-···-···················-········-···-······-············-··········-··········-·--·-·············

i

·-··········-

·

·-··-···-···-··-···

-

····· ······-·

j i

Union Park

Basketball Court & Restroom

Play Area

Picnic Shelter

PROPOSED IMPRO V EMENTS

Maintenance/ Operations

Amenities

Resurface basketball court

Replace split rail fence

New park entrance sign

Renovate Restroom

Renovate ballfield

Grafitti removal

Weed control- lawn

Power wash picnic tables

Pressure wash building roofs

More wood chips for play area

Shelter level with surrounding grade

...

Funding Year RCO Proje c t # A mt Awarded

RCO HISTORY

Elements in Grant

'

-----------·---------------------------------------------········ · ···-···· · ······-···

:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::j::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::t:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::J:::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: : :::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::: : :::::::: : :::::::::::: : :::: : :::::::: :: :: : ::::::

-------------------------------------------t---------------------------------------+---------------------------------------------+-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------·-------------------

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····································--·-··l ------·--·--··-·---·-··--·--·-----··---l------··----·--·--·--·--··-··--·--·--··-·----l---·--·------·--·--·--·--··-··--·--·--·--·-·----------··-·--------·--·--·--·---····--··-·---·-··--··-·-----··-----·--·--··-·---·-··--·--·--·--·· --------··---·· ···--·-i ! !

·-·························-············-··t·-··-··-·····-·····-·····--····-····--·+··-·-···--····-·-···-·····-··-··-·····-···-··+····-···················-········-···-·-············-······--·-·····-··-··-·····-·····-···-·-····--·····-·-··--·····-·····-·····-·····-···-····· ······-· ·· ··-···· · ··· · ··-···

··········································· 1 ··-·····-·····-·····-····--·····-·····-1···-·····-···································r·········-·····-····--···········-·····-·····-·····-········-·······················--··················-·····-·····-·····-····---··----···------····-· ···-···· · ·········-

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Appendix A-2 Page 128

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Union Park

Item

1

RENOVATION

Resurface basketball court

Replace park entry sign

Replace split rail fence

Renovate ballfield & amenities

Re-paint restroom building

Renovate restroom

Refill playground wood chips

Shelter pad- level with surrounding grade

Grafitti removal/facility clean-up

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Renovation Total

Item Total

$30,000.00 ls

$1,000.00 ls

$7,500.00 lf

$112,500.00 ls

$52,500.00 ls

$90,000.00 ls

$2,700.00 cf

$3,750.00 ls

$7,500.00 ls

unit quantity unit cost

1 $20,000.00

1 $1,000.00

200 $25.00

1 $75,000.00

1 $35,000.00

1 $60,000.00

30 $60.00

1 $2,500.00

1 $5,000.00

subtotal

$20,000.00

$1,000.00

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$10,000.00

$5,000.00

$75,000.00

$35,000.00

$60,000.00

$1,800.00

$2,500.00

$5,000.00

$2,500.00

$37,500.00

$17,500.00

$30,000.00

$900.00

$1,250.00

$2,500.00

$307,450.00

$61,490.00

$368,940.00

$205,300.00

Mason County, WA

$102,150.00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT

Appendix A-2 Page 129

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Union Park

2

MASTER PLAN

3

NEW FACILITIES

4

NEW TRAILS

Project Development Total

$368,940.00

Mason County, WA

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 130

Address

Parcel Number

Size

Ownership/Deed Restriction

Status

Development Costs

Comments

SE 2400 Walker Park Road, Shelton

32021-43-60040

5.04 acres

Mason County

Developed Community Park

$417,140

Walker Park was deeded to the County on November 2, 1916 by Puget Mill.

EXISTING FACILITIES

··········································································································T·······························c:·iin-·iii"i:i·iin-································

Amenities r·

GOOD i

"""i'iilFi········T·······POOR

·---------·········--------··········------·-···········-------·········---------·········--------·········4--------··········--------··~······---------·········-----~---·········--------········

H a nd Ca r r y B oa t Lau n ch

0 i

F i sh ing A r e a

0

P ic n i c Sh el te r

P i c ni ckin g Areas

Barbee ues

0

0

0

Pa ssi ve U se A r ea s

P l ay A r e a

0

0

Res t rooms

Wa l k 1ng/ Jogg1 n g Paths

Pa r k in g Are a

C ar e t aker"s R es id ence

B ri d ge s

0

0

0

0

0

Project Oevelopment Costs

Renovation: $256, 140

Master Plan: $35 , 000

New Facilities: $126 , 000

New Trails: $0

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

Vicinity Map

Planning Year Horizon

2012·2018

2019·2025

2026·2032

DRAFT

Location Map

Funding Source

RCO/Mason County

Appendix A-2 Page 131

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 132

Walker Park

Item

1

RENOVATION

Replace park entry sign

Renovate/ replace kiosk

Refill playground wood chips

Re-paint shelter

Renovate restrooms

Reconfigure entrances

Eliminate basketball court

Utility shack- new roof & siding

Replace chain link fence with new barrier

Renovation Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Renovation Total

2

MASTER PLAN

master plan

Master Plan Subtotal

Design & Construction Administration

Master Plan Total

Item Total

$1,000.00 ls

$12,000.00 ls

$2,700.00 cf

$3,000.00 ls

$90,000.00 ls

$45,000.00 ls

$11,250.00 ls

$12,000.00 ls

$30,000.00 lf

unit quantity unit cost

1 $1,000.00

1 $8,000.00

30 $60.00

1 $2,000.00

1 $60,000.00

1 $30,000.00

1 $7,500.00

1 $8,000.00

500 $40.00

subtotal

$1,000.00

mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$8,000.00

$1,800.00

$2,000.00

$4,000.00

$900.00

$1,000.00

$60,000.00

$30,000.00

$7,500.00

$8,000.00

$20,000.00

$30,000.00

$15,000.00

$3,750.00

$4,000.00

$10,000.00

$206,950.00

$41,390.00

$248,340.00

$138,300.00 $68,650.00

$35,000.00 ls

$35,000.00

$0.00

$35,000.00

1 $35,000.00 $35,000.00

$35,000.00 $0.00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 133

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan Costs

Walker Park

Item Item Total unit quantity

3 ls

4

NEW FACILITIES

Interpretive signage

Picnic shelter

New Facilities Subtotal

ls

Design & Construction Administration

New Facilities Total

NEW TRAILS

$3,750.00

$90,000.00

$11,250.00

$105,000.00

$21,000.00

$126,000.00

1

1

1

unit cost subtotal

$2,500.00 $2,500.00

$60,000.00 $60,000.00

$7,500.00 $7,500.00

$70,000.00

Mason County, WA mobilization, contingency, taxes & escalation @ 50%

$1,250.00

$30,000.00

$3,750.00

$35,000.00

Project Development Total

$409,340.00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan DRAFT Chapter A-2 Page 134

PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT/COMMUNITY QUESTIONNAIRE

A

PPENDI

X

B-1

Results

Number of Responses: 594

Questionnaire available online at http://www.co.mason.wa.us/parks/index.php

From March 27 – June 20, 2012

Many questions offered respondents the option to choose two or three answers for a single question: these responses are presented as total counts of selection for each item as well as the percentage of the total respondents to select that item from each list.Muliple answered questions are marked with an asterisk

*

Results are presented in the order that they appeared in the questionnaire.

Question 1:

Do you own real estate in Mason County or are you a Mason County resident? If so, which of the following

best describes your situation?

Answer Count Percentage

Homeowner with permanent year-round residency (1)

22

426 72%

Homeowner with weekend or seasonal use (2)

Renting a residence (3)

Other

23

48

22

4%

8%

4%

No answer/Non Completed 75 13%

Nearly all of the respondents are year-round residents of Mason County.

Based on 2010 Census data, the responses under-represent renters (22.5 percent of occupied households).

“Other” responses included youth who live with their parents as well as a number of regular visitors and a small number of people who work in Mason County.

22

Number in parentheses represents the order of the questions in the survey e.g. “Homeowner” is question #1.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 135

Answer

Ages 10-14

Ages 15-19

Ages 20-24

Ages 25-34

Ages 35-44

Ages 45-54

Ages 55-64

Question 2:

What is your age?

Count

8

31

9

53

102

104

118

Percentage

1%

5%

2%

9%

17%

18%

20%

Census 2010

6%

6%

5%

11%

11%

15%

16%

Ages 65-74

Ages 75+

96

31

16%

5%

11%

8%

No answer 42 7% N/A

The age profile of respondents is similar to the Census 2010 percentages but with slightly higher percentages of adults (which is common in this type of questionnaire).

The number of respondents under 25 is impressive for a park and recreation questionnaire, as this group is very difficult to reach.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 136

Question 3:

Other than yourself, how many persons living in your household are:

Answer

Under Age 10

Ages 10-14

Ages 15-19

Number of Responses

119

104

93

Percentage

20%

18%

16%

Ages 20-24

Ages 25-34

Ages 35-44

Ages 45-54

40

76

111

100

7%

13%

19%

17%

Ages 55-64

Ages 65-73

125

86

21%

14%

Ages 75+ 34 6%

The number of household members reported results in an average household size of 2.89 people per respondent household, very close to the average family size in the 2010 Census data (2.87) and slightly higher than the average household size in the census (2.45).

224 (38%) of respondents indicated at least one household member under 20. This is almost exactly the number of families with related children fewer than 18 reported in the 2010 Census (38.8%).

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 137

Answer

Allyn

Arcadia

Belfair

Dayton

Grapeview

Hoodsport

Kamilche

Lilliwaup

Matlock

Shelton

Tahuya

Union

Victor

Question 4:

What community do you live in?

Count

27

18

60

13

22

19

9

4

1

251

26

13

3

Percentage

5%

3%

10%

2%

4%

3%

2%

1%

0%

42%

4%

2%

1%

Other 83 14%

No answer/Non completed 45 11%

The responses can also be broken down roughly into two areas of the County, with a northern area including

Allyn, Belfair, Grapeview, Tahuya and Victor. The southern area would include the remaining indicated communities.

Other responses include small communities inside of Mason County and some nearby cities and towns. A full list is appended to this summary.

Based on 2010 data for Census Designated Places (CDPs) within Mason County approximately 37% of residents live in the northern portion of the County and 63% live in the south.

Question 5:

Answer

What is your gender?

Count Percentage

Female

Male

284

273

No answer/Non completed 37

An even split in gender speaks to good representation of the results and effective outreach.

Survey efforts typically skew heavily toward females.

48%

46%

6%

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 138

Question 6:

*

Which of the following benefits of parks, recreation and open space are most important to you? Choose

your two most important benefits.

Answer Count Percentage

Provide opportunities to enjoy nature/outdoors (1)

23

423 71%

Improve health and wellness (2)

Protect our natural environment (3)

Promote Mason County as a recreation destination (6)

164

150

132

28%

25%

22%

Enhance community image and sense of place (5) 96 16%

Protect historic and cultural sites (4) 49 8%

Over 70% of respondents indicated that providing opportunities to enjoy nature and the outdoors was among their top priorities.

The next four responses are closely clustered; considered a second tier of importance.

Protecting historic and cultural sites was selected by the smallest number of respondents.

Breaking down the respondents by age groups revealed essentially the same distribution of responses.

Question 6: By Geographic Area North South Other

Provide opportunities to enjoy nature/outdoors

Improve health and wellness

Protect our natural environment

64%

26%

33%

74%

31%

23%

73%

17%

22%

Protect historic and cultural sites

Enhance community image and sense of place

28%

14%

19%

17%

29%

14%

Promote Mason County as a recreation destination 7% 9% 10%

When looking at this question across the two geographic areas, the order and grouping of responses stays essentially the same.

Protecting the natural environment and historic and cultural sites appear to be more important to respondents from the north end of Mason County.

Opportunities to enjoy nature/outdoors and improving health and wellness were more popular in the south.

Respondents from “Other” communities were less interested in improving health and wellness than those who were identified as living in either the north or south communities.

23

Number in parentheses represents the order of the questions in the survey e.g. “enjoy nature” is question #1.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 139

Question 7:

How would you rate your overall satisfaction with the level of park, open space and facility maintenance

in Mason County?

Answer Count Percentage

Unsatisfied (1)

Unsatisfied – Neutral (2)

27

62

5%

10%

Neutral (3)

Neutral – Very Satisfied (4)

Very Satisfied (5)

Don't know (6)

185

169

71

20

31%

28%

12%

3%

No answer/Non completed 60 10%

While the largest group of responses was neutral about the current level of maintenance, the opinion of respondents is generally positive, with 40% on the satisfied side of neutral.

Relatively few (15% total) were on the negative side of the scale.

Responses were essentially the same across the north and south of the County.

Question 8:

What additional park and recreation facilities are needed in Mason County?

Answer Count Percentage

Trails (for cycling, walking, hiking) (4)

Water access facilities (boat ramps, piers, beaches, etc.) (5)

318

224

54%

38%

Basic park features (play areas, picnic areas, etc.) (2)

Competitive sport facilities (fields, courts, etc.) (1)

184

177

31%

30%

Natural areas (3) 153 26%

Trails were the most needed facility indicated across the County.

Across the US, trails are the most universally desired recreation facility.

 The remaining choices were all selected but with a slightly different emphases in the north and south communities.

Responses were similar to 2006 citizen input results.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 140

Question 8: By Geographic Area

Trails (for cycling, walking, hiking)

Water access facilities

(boat ramps, piers, beaches, etc.)

Basic park features (play areas, picnic areas, etc.)

North

62%

48%

South Other

51%

35%

53%

35%

28% 33% 29%

Competitive sport facilities (fields, courts, etc.) 23% 32% 39%

Natural areas 33% 25% 19%

Trails, water access and natural areas were indicated more often by residents living in north County communities.

Basic park features and competitive sport facilities were indicated more frequently in the southern communities.

Breaking down the respondents by age groups revealed essentially the same distribution of responses.

Question 9:

Which, if any, of the following special facilities should be added to the Mason County park system?

Answer

Shooting / archery range (2)

Water spray park for children (4)

Off-leash dog park (3)

Count

202

176

129

Percentage

34%

30%

22%

Skateboard/BMX park or facility (1) 78 13%

Other 120 20%

This question included a small assortment of additional facilities and was added to the questionnaire based on expressed community interest, to allow respondents to express support.

Over 30 percent of respondents indicated that some shooting facility (the type of facility is discussed in question

9a) or a water spray park should be added to the park system.

Just over 20% indicated an off-leash dog park would be a good addition.

Question 9 also allowed for listing of “other” responses which are listed and a complete list is appended to this summary. The responses were varied but included a large number of specific trail types (mountain bike, dirt trails, walking/biking).

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 141

To simplify this broad list of open-ended responses, a “word cloud” has been created, visualizing each word in the responses with the size of the word proportional to the number of times it was mentioned across responses.

This “word cloud” allows for a quick look at the most significant terms.

Question 9 “Other” Responses (Appendix B list of written responses)

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 142

Question 9a:

What type of shooting / archery range would you like to see added to the Mason County park system?

Answer Count Percentage

Answer 171 29%

No answer 423 71%

Nearly all (171 out of 202) of the respondents that indicated a Shooting/Archery Range should be added to the system (question 9) followed up with an answer to this question.

The most frequently requested type of shooting facility by respondents is an outdoor range with many respondents indicating multiple uses from long guns to pistols and archery.

The full list of 171 responses is appended to this summary.

To simplify this list of open ended responses, a “word cloud” has been created visualizing each word from the responses.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 143

Question 10:

*

What type(s) of water access are you most likely to use?

Answer

Beach (5)

Count

245

A place to play and cool off in the water (6)

Boat ramp (1)

Fishing/crabbing pier (3)

Shellfish harvesting site (4)

201

166

90

78

Percentage

41%

34%

28%

15%

13%

Deep water for swimming (7) 77 13%

Hand launch site for small boats (2) 67 11%

Water access for people (beach, a place to cool off) was the most popular response. 75% in top-two indicates that water access to pools and beaches are important.

The high interest in use of water access sites reflects what was also stated in 2006 as of public importance.

 Using water access for fishing, crabbing and deep water for swimming was indicated as equal in value.

Nearly 30% of respondents indicated that they were likely to use boater access by use of a ramp launch.

Question 11:

*

What are the primary reasons to develop more trails in Mason County?

Answer (# choices)

Exercise (4)

Recreation (5)

Experience nature (2)

Count

251

246

238

Percentage

42%

41%

40%

Increase non-motorized transportation options (1)

Improve safe-routes for children to schools (3)

116

63

20%

11%

No additional trails are needed (6) 40 7%

Nearly all respondents (93%) indicated reasons to develop more trails in Mason County (exercise. Recreation and to experience nature)

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 144

Question 12:

*

What type of trails/pathways should have the highest priority in Mason County?

Answer

Paved trails for walking, biking, etc. (5)

Count

211

Percentage

36%

Nature trails (2) 207 35%

Trails that link with other existing trails (6)

Trail corridors that link local communities with regional destinations (1)

132

127

22%

21%

Trails that extend long distances (5+ miles) (3) 123 21%

Exercise trails (4) 127 21%

This question (Q-12) follows up question 11 and provides more specificity about the type of trails needed.

Paved trails and nature trails are the top two types of trails needed.

The remaining types of trails were tied.

Looking at the geographic distribution of responses, long trails were more popular in the north (28% to 20%) and exercise trails were more popular in the south (24% to 12%).

Question 13:

Which of the following proposed or planned trails is most important to you?

Answer

Shelton to Belfair Trail (1)

24

Count

106

Percentage

18%

Shelton to MCRA Park Trail (7)

North Bay Trail - Allyn to tip of Case Inlet (2)

93

52

16%

9%

Mason Lake Park to Twanoh State Park (4)

Kennedy Creek Salmon Trail Extension (3)

Camp Govey Trail (6)

Menards Landing to Harvey Rendsland Park Trail (5)

Other

No answer/Non completed

45

43

28

17

31

179

8%

7%

5%

3%

5%

31%

24

Number in parentheses represents the order of list in questionnaire e.g. “Shelton to Belfair” is trail #1.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 145

Question 13 asked about specific trails that have been identified on a general basis throughout Mason County.

Those listed may not be representative of all options or desires by the public. The answers provided may not have recognized where the public does want their trails or that long trails are not desired trails. The percentage of responses are very close in count and percentages but do provide some insight into route desires.

Across all respondents, the Shelton to Belfair Trail and the Shelton to MCRA Park Trail were the most popular planned or proposed trails.

Respondents from the north and south of Mason County responded very differently to this question.

Question 13 by Geographic Area

North South Other

No

Answer

Grand

Total

Shelton to Belfair Trail 20% 19% 17% 9% 18%

Shelton to MCRA Park Trail 1% 25% 8% 4% 16%

North Bay Trail - Allyn to tip of Case Inlet

Mason Lake Park to Twanoh State Park

Kennedy Creek Salmon Trail Extension

29%

15%

2%

2%

5%

9%

6%

7%

12%

0%

0%

2%

9%

8%

7%

Camp Govey Trail

Menards Landing to Harvey Rendsland Park Trail

Other

0%

11%

3%

8%

0%

7%

2%

1%

6%

0%

0%

2%

5%

3%

5%

(blank) 19% 25% 40% 82% 30%

Respondents from the north part of the County divided their interest amongst several trails.

Northern residents were most interested in the North Bay Trail.

Other trails that were more important in the north than in the south were: Mason Lake Park to Twanoh State Park and Menards Landing to Harvey Rendsland Park Trail.

The Shelton to Belfair trail was equally popular with respondents from the north and south. Unify the County with a path is a priority.

In addition, the Shelton to MCRA Park Trail was much more popular with respondents from the south end of the

County and connecting Shelton and Belfair equally important.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 146

Question 14:

*

If you seldom use or do not use Mason County parks or facilities, what are your reasons?

Answer

Don’t know what’s available (8)

25

Lack of facilities (3)

Don’t know where they are (7)

Too far away; not conveniently located (5)

Feel unsafe (2)

Not interested/No time (1)

Poorly maintained (4)

Count

123

121

94

83

48

43

34

Percentage

21%

20%

16%

14%

8%

7%

6%

Too crowded (9) 19 3%

Do not have transportation (6) 7 1%

The top answers: lack of knowledge, lack of facilities and not knowing park locations paints a clear picture of why people are not using Mason County parks.

The typical top answer in other communities is “not interested/no time” which falls in the bottom tier of responses in Mason County indicating a high level of interest which differs from surveys in other communities.

Maintenance, crowding, safety and transportation do not appear to be significant issues for respondents.

Question 15:

If you could improve one thing about County parks, what would it be?

Answer Count Percentage

Answer 266 45%

No answer 328 55%

Many ideas were offered that provide insight into how the County can improve the system or specific facilities.

This question was asked in an open-ended format, allowing any response to be written in.

45% of respondents took this opportunity to suggest anything that was important to them. It is not uncommon for respondents to skip this type of question if they do not have a specific idea.

The full list of responses is appended to this report.

To simplify this list of open-ended responses, a word cloud has been created visualizing each word from the responses.

Trails once again rises to the top of specific mentions (similar to question 9).

Other frequently mentioned words with some significance (parks, and county come up in many different ways) include: fields, kids/children, access and maintenance.

25

Number in parentheses represents the order of the questions in the survey e.g. “No time” is question #1.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 147

Question 15 “Word Cloud” of Open-ended Responses

Question 16:

*

What activities have you done in the past 2 years? Please check the box that most closely represents how often you participate at any location, when the activity is in season.

Question 17:

*

Check the 5 activities you would like to do most. Assume you have the time, money, and transportation to do whichever 5 activities you want.

The results of questions 16 and 17 are presented together to show the relationship between the responses. The first column is an average number of times the average respondent participates in the activity in a year, calculated by weighting the responses to question 16, showing the magnitude of participation. The second column is the ranked order of these activities based on the question 16 responses (current participation) and the third is the ranked order based on responses to question 17 (desired or preferred participation). The final column indicates the movement in rank order from question 16 to question 17, the movement on these lists gives a rough idea of how much more or less people would like to be doing the activity.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 148

Question 16 and 17, Sorted by Current Participation (Q16)

Results

Walking for Pleasure

Average

Participation

(Annual)

30.31

Q16 Rank

(current)

1

Q17 Rank

(desired)

1

Shift in

Rank

Gardening

Dog Walking/Dog Park

Bird Watching/Feeding

Jogging/Running

Shooting Sports

(Archery, rifle, pistol)

Fishing

23.22

14.09

12.24

10.02

9.08

2

3

4

5

6

6

11

14

17

4

0

-4

-8

-10

-12

2

Boating (Power)

Swimming (Beach, River)

Hiking/Backpacking

Playground (Visit/Play)

6.96

6.76

6.28

6.26

6.25

7

8

9

10

11

3

8

12

6

18

4

0

-3

4

-7

Bicycling for Pleasure

Baseball

Swimming (Pool)

Soccer

Hunting

6.11

5.97

5.81

5.13

4.74

12

13

14

15

16

5

19

13

22

15

7

-6

1

-7

1

Picnicking 3.96 17 10 7

Softball

Camping (Tent/RV)

Basketball

Bicycling (Mountain)

Bicycling (Commute/Road)

3.83

3.66

3.19

3.17

3.15

16

19

20

21

22

15

2

26

19

25

1

17

-6

2

-3

Dirt Bike/ATV/ORV Riding

Canoeing/Kayaking

Bicycling (BMX)

Football

2.84

2.77

2.53

2.43

23

24

25

26

16

9

27

27

7

15

-2

-1

Horseback Riding

Walking for pleasure is the top activity in Mason County (both currently and preferred) this is almost always the top response in recreation questionnaires.

2.35 27 23 4

Gardening is a typically popular result but ranks higher here than in most communities.

Shooting sports and hunting rank higher compared to other communities.

While skateboarding ranks lowest on this list, the number of respondents within the typical age range (under 14) is also low.

A cluster of activities that are highly desired or have a positive shift in rank involve enjoying the outdoors (which is consistent with other responses) including: Fishing, Boating, Hiking and Shooting sports

Many of the desired activities also relate to paths and trails: walking (which is the top preferred activity as well), biking, horseback, hiking, bird watching etc.

Camping and Canoeing/Kayaking do not rank highly, but have a big positive shift in ranking indicating that respondents would like to do more of these activities.

Respondent interest in canoeing, kayaking and boating reflects previous answers indicating a high need for water access sites.

Respondent interest in canoeing and kayaking and boating reflects previous answers indicating a high need for water access sites.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 149

Question 16 and 17, Sorted by Desired Participation (Q17)

Results

Walking for Pleasure

Average

Participation

(Annual)

30.31

Q16 Rank

(current)

1

Q17 Rank

(desired)

1

Camping (Tent/RV)

Fishing

Shooting Sports

(Archery, rifle, pistol)

Bicycling for Pleasure

Gardening

3.66

6.96

9.08

6.11

23.22

19

7

6

12

2

2

3

4

5

6

Hiking/Backpacking

Boating (Power)

Canoeing/Kayaking

6.26

6.76

2.77

10

8

24

6

8

9

Picnicking

Dog Walking/Dog Park

Swimming (Beach, River)

Swimming (Pool)

Bird Watching/Feeding

Hunting

Dirt Bike/ATV/ORV Riding

Jogging/Running

Playground (Visit/Play)

Baseball

Bicycling (Mountain)

Softball

Soccer

Horseback Riding

Bicycling (Commute/Road)

Basketball

Bicycling (BMX)

Football

Skateboarding

3.96

14.09

6.28

5.81

12.24

4.74

2.84

10.02

6.25

5.97

3.17

3.83

5.13

2.35

3.15

3.19

2.53

2.43

1.17

17

3

9

14

4

16

23

5

11

13

21

18

15

27

22

20

25

26

28

22

23

25

26

27

27

29

16

17

18

19

19

21

10

11

12

13

14

15

Shift in

Rank

0

17

4

2

-7

4

-3

-6

-2

-1

-1

7

-12

-7

-6

2

-3

7

-4

4

0

15

7

-8

-3

1

-10

1

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 150

Question 18:

If you had $100 to spend on parks and recreation in Mason County, how would you allocate it amongst the following functions (The number of responses to this question is 473)

Function Average Allocation

Acquisition or development of walking and biking trails and bike routes

Improvements/maintenance of existing parks and playgrounds

$21

$20

Development of waterfront parks to improve water access

Acquisition of new park land or natural areas

Development of new outdoor parks and recreation facilities (i.e. playgrounds, shelters, etc.)

Construction of new athletic facilities (i.e. fields, courts, etc.)

$15

$12

$10

$8

Other $14

This question allowed respondents to indicate a dollar amount to allocate across various spending categories, providing insight into the priorities.

The largest average allocations were for acquisition or development of trails and improvements to maintaining of existing parks and playgrounds.

Development of waterfront parks in at #3 and acquisition of new park land or natural areas formed a second tier.

Construction of new facilities was the lowest average allocation.

New Park

Acquisition,

$12.00

How would you spend $100.00 on Parks?

New Athletic

Facilities, $8.00

New Deveopment of Parks &

Facilities,

$10.00

Improve/Maintain

Existing Parks &

Playgrounds

$20.00

Walking/Bike

Trails/ Routes

Acquire &

Develop

$21.00

Other, $14.00

Development of

Waterfront Parks to Improve Water

Access $15,00

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 151

Answer

Question 18a:

Please describe your "Other" response here:

Count Percentage

Answer

No answer

92

502

15.49%

84.51%

Non completed 0 0

“Other” responses included many of the special facilities noted elsewhere in the questionnaire including:

◆ Shooting facility

◆ Trails/outdoor activities

◆ Pool

◆ Restrooms

A full list is appended to this summary on CD

To simplify this list of open-ended responses, a word cloud has been created visualizing each word from the responses

Question 19 [Other]:

Would you be willing to volunteer to enhance park and recreation in Mason County? If yes, please provide your name and contact information. (This information they provided will be kept separate from

responses)

111 respondents provided contact information indicating they would like to volunteer. This information has been provided to Mason County for follow-up efforts.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-1 Page 152

RCO SELF-CERTIFICATION

A

PPENDI

X

B-2

Name and ado tion date of documents submitted in fulfillment of this re

Check or

Initial Each to Certify

Completion

Plan Element Certification

1. Goals, objectives: The attached plan supports our project with broad statements of intent (goals)

and

measures that describe when these intents will be attained (objectives). Goals may include a hi her level of service .

2. Inventory:

The plan includes a description of the service area's facilities, lands, programs, and their condition.

(This may be done in a uantitative format, or in a ualitative/narrative format.)

3. Public involvement: The planning process gave the public ample opportunity to be involved in . plan development and ado tion.

4a.

Demand and need analysis: In the plans:

• An analysis defines priorities, as appropriate, for acquisition, development, preservation, enhancement, management , etc., and explains why these actions are needed .

• The process used in developing the analysis assessed community desires for parks, recreation, open space, and/or habitat, as appropriate, in a manner appropriate for the service area (personal observation, informal talks, formal surve (s), worksho s, etc.).

4b. Level of Service assessment (optional): An assessment of the criterion appropriate to your community. Possibly establish a higher level of service as a Ian oal (above) .

5. Capital Improvement Program: The plans includes a capital improvement/facility program that lists land acquisition , development, and renovation projects by year of anticipated implementation; include funding source. The program includes any ca ital ro · ect submitted to RCFB for fundin .

6. Adoption: The plans and process has received formal governing body approval

(that is, city/county department head

,

district ranger, regional manager/ supervisor, etc., as appropriate).

Attach resolution, letter, or other ado tion instrument.

Document and Page

Number

Location of

Information

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-2 Page 153

RCO LEVEL OF SERVICE/LOCAL AGENCIES

A

PPENDI

X

B-3

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-3 Page 154

Quantity Criteria

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Quantity Criteria

Number of Parks and Recreation Facilities

Percent difference between existing quantity or per capita average of parks and recreation facilities and the desired quantity or per capita avera q e.

Facilities that Support Active Recreation

Opportunities

Percent of facilities that support or encourage active (muscle-powered) recreation o oo ortunities

Facility Capacity

Percent of demand met b y existin q facilities

<10%

11-20% 21-30% 31-40% >41%

>60% 51-60% 41-50% 31-40% <30%

'

>75% 61-75%

46-60% 30-45%

<30%

Quality Criteria

Agency-Based Assessm

e

nt

Percentage of facilities that are fully functional for their s ecific desi n and safet uidelines

Public Satisfaction

Percentage of population satisfied with the condition, quantity, or distribution of existing active ark and recreation facilities

>80% 61-80% 41-60% 20-40% <20%

>65% 51-65% 36-50% 25-35% <25%

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-3 Page 155

Level of Service Summary

Local Agencies

~ 1~~

(,;:; .. i~ ~ · i~)~ '.

~~ ~

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T t ; i t;~~ ~ -~

:;

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i~~ ~ .

;

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[ .

~ !A~ ] l ~~~

-

~ ~ ~ l ~ ~ ~~~ 1

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Quantity Criteria

Number of Parks and Recreation Facilities

Percent difference between existing quantity or per capita average of parks and recreation facilities and the desired quantity or per capita avera e

Facilities that Support Active Recreation

Opportunities

Percent of facilities that support or encourage active (muscle-powered) recreation opportunities

<10% 11-20% 21-30% 31-40%

>41%

>60% 51-60% 41-50%

31-40% <30%

Facility Capacity

Percent of demand met by existing facilities

>75% 61-75% 46-60% 30-45% <30%

Quality Criteria

Agency-Based Assessment

Percentage of facilities that are fully functional for their specific design and safety guidelines

>80% 61-80% 41-60% 20-40%

<20%

Public Satisfaction

Percentage of population satisfied with the condition, quantity, or distribution of existing active ark and recreation facilities

Distribution and Access Criteria

>65% 51-65% 36-50% 25-35% <25%

Population within Service Areas

Percentage of population within the following services areas (considering barriers to access):

0.5 mile of a neighborhood park/trail

5 miles of a community park/trail

25 miles of a re ional ark/trail

Access

Percentage of parks and recreation facilities that may be accessed safely via foot, bicycle, or public trans ortation

>75% 61-75% 46-60% 30-45% <30%

>80% 61-80%

41-60% 20-40% <20%

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-3 Page 156

PARK & TRAILS ADVISORY BOARD MINUTES

A

PPENDI

X

B-4

PARKS AND TRAILS ADVISORY BOARD

MEETING MINUTES

November 8, 2012 – 6:00 P.M.

MCRA Park

Shelton, WA 98584

CALL TO ORDER AND ATTENDANCE

Meeting called to order at 6:10

Staff Present: John Keates. Members present: Andrew Kinney, Susan Baker, Linda Woytowich, Monty Ritter.

Members absent: Frank Benavente, Michael Siptroth, Kendy Meyer, Julie Henning. Consultant: Arvilla Ohlde.

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

None

MINUTES

Motion was made by Monte Ritter to accept the August 2012 meeting minutes as presented. Motion was seconded by Andrew Kinney. The motion passed 4 – 0.

AGENDA

A motion was made by Andrew Kinney to accept the agenda as presented. Monte Ritter seconded the motion. The motion passed 4 -0.

INFORMATION AGENDA

The contents of the information agenda were reviewed and there were no questions or concerns.

BUSINESS AGENDA

Parks Plan Update: The latest draft of the parks plan update was presented by Arvilla Ohlde. The Citizens Advisory

Committee has been meeting monthly since early 2012 and has provided general comments and suggestions in getting the park plan to the final draft stage. The Park Board and Arvilla and Keates reviewed the final draft of the park plan. The parks board had selected suggestions for changes, but nothing major. Arvilla indicated she would implement the changes that were suggested by the parks board.

Monte Ritter made a motion to accept the Park Plan draft and forward the plan along to the County Commissioners for consideration of adoption. Andrew Kinney seconded the motion. The motion passed 4 – 0.

CORRESPONDENCE / GOOD OF THE ORDER

None

ADJOURNMENT

A motion was made by Linda Woytowich to adjourn the meeting. Susan Baker seconded the motion. The motion passed 4 – 0. The meeting was adjourned at 7:50 pm.

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT

Appendix B-4 Page 157

MASON COUNTY ADOPTING RESOLUTION

A

PPENDI

X

B-5

INSERT MASON

COUNTY

ADOPTING

RESOLUTION

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT Appendix B-5

Page

158

CD-PUBLIC QUESTIONNAIRE/WORKSHOP NOTES

A

PPENDI

X

C

INSERT CD POCKET

& WORKSHOP

NOTES

Mason County Parks & Trails Comprehensive Plan

DRAFT Appendix C

Page

159

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