10l9268
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
User’s Guide
IBM
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
User’s Guide
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the general
information under Appendix G, “Notices” on page 187.
First Edition (June 1998)
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any country where such provisions are
inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS
PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED,
INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS
FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in
certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.
This publication could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made
to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may
make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at
any time.
This publication was developed for products and services offered in the United States of America. IBM may
not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries, and the information
is subject to change without notice. Consult your local IBM representative for information on the products,
services, and features available in your area.
Requests for technical information about IBM products should be made to your IBM reseller or IBM marketing
representative.
 Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1994, 1998. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users — Documentation related to restricted rights — Use, duplication or disclosure
is subject to restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
About This Book . . . . . .
Who Should Read This Book
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Chapter 1. Netfinity Product Description
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Chapter 2. Starting Netfinity
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Netfinity Service Manager . . . . . . . . . . .
Netfinity Service Descriptions . . . . . . . . .
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Alert Manager
Critical File Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DMI Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ECC Memory Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Predictive Failure Analysis . . . . . . . . .
RAID Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Security Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Serial Connection Control . . . . . . . . . .
Software Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Information Tool . . . . . . . . . .
System Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Partition Access . . . . . . . . . . .
System Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Delaying Netfinity Startup on OS/2 Systems
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
The Alert Log
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Alert Text . . . . . . . .
Type of Alert . . . . . .
Severity
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Application ID . . . . .
Application Alert Type
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System Name . . . . . .
Time of Alert . . . . . .
Date of Alert
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System Unique ID . . .
Alert Log Views . . . . . .
Alert Manager Functions .
Delete . . . . . . . . . . .
Print
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Print to File . . . . . . .
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
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Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Refresh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Actions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Help
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Exit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Netfinity Alert Actions . . . . . . . .
Alert Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating New Alert Profiles . . .
Editing Alert Profiles . . . . . . .
Deleting Alert Profiles . . . . . . .
Predefined Alert Profiles . . . . . . .
Binding Profiles to Actions
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Binding Actions to Individual Alerts
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Chapter 4. Critical File Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring System Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
OS/2 System Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows 3.1, Windows for Workgroups, and Windows 95
System Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Windows NT System Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NetWare System Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring Other Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monitoring for File Creation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 5. DMI Browser . . . . . . . . . . .
What is DMI?
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How Does DMI Work? . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DMI Components
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Netfinity DMI Component Instrumentation
DMI Service Layer . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Management Applications . . . . . . . . .
Using the DMI Browser
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Viewing DMI Component Information . . .
Viewing Group Information . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Attribute Information . . . . . . . .
Changing Attribute Information
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Receiving Notification of Problems or Errors
Chapter 6. ECC Memory Setup
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Chapter 7. Predictive Failure Analysis
The Predictive Failure Analysis Window
The PFA Options for Drive Window . .
Detailed Disk Drive Information
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Predictive Failure Analysis Options .
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Chapter 8. RAID Manager . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Manager Window Options . . . . . . . .
Changing the Viewing Scale . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Virtual Drives Representation
Changing the Enclosure Configuration . . .
Refreshing RAID Information . . . . . . . .
Viewing RAID Information . . . . . . . . . . .
Viewing Enclosure Information . . . . . . .
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Viewing Physical Device Information
Viewing General Adapter Information . . .
Viewing Adapter-Specific Information . . .
Viewing Virtual Drive Information . . . . .
RAID Device Management . . . . . . . . . . . .
RAID Adapter Configuration Backup . . . . .
RAID Virtual Drive Management . . . . . . . .
Initializing Virtual Drives . . . . . . . . . . .
Scrubbing Virtual Drives . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 9. Security Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Incoming User ID/Password Combinations . .
Deleting an Incoming User ID/Password Combination
Security Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Security Access Alerts
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Access Granted Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Public Access Granted Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Access Denied Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Restart Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Restart Initiated Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Restart Request Rejected Alert . . . . . . . .
Chapter 10. Serial Connection Control
Modem Configuration . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Remote Access . . . . . . . . .
Initialization String Guidelines . . . . .
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Contents
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Chapter 11. Software Inventory . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Software Inventory Dictionary File . . . . . . . .
Loading a Dictionary File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating a New Dictionary File . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing the Dictionary File . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding a Product Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Editing a Product Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performing a Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Full Dictionary Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Search by Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selected Product Search . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Search by Product Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Generating Reports and Exporting Data . . . . . . . .
Print to File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Print to Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Export to Database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating a NetView Distribution Manager Inventory
Importing Software Dictionaries . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Application Keywords . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Chapter 12. System Information Tool
System Information Tool Features . .
Using System Information Tool . . . .
Protecting Confidential System Data .
Chapter 13. System Monitor . . . .
The System Monitor Service Window
Monitor Pop-Up Menus . . . . . . .
System Monitor Notebooks . . . . .
Setting Thresholds . . . . . . . . .
Monitor Settings . . . . . . . . . .
Attribute Monitors
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Attribute Monitor Thresholds . .
Attribute Monitor Settings . . . .
IBM PC Server 720 Monitors
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Chapter 14. System Partition Access
Copy from Partition . . . . . . . . . .
Copy to Partition
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Delete Directory . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Rename Directory
Delete File . . . .
Rename File
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Delete Partition
Backup Partition
Restore Partition
Make Directory
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Chapter 15. System Profile
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Appendix A. Installation Configurations
Stand-Alone Operation . . . . . . . . . . .
Passive Client Operation . . . . . . . . . .
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Active Client Operation
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Appendix D. RAID Alerts . . . . . . . . .
RAID Physical Disk Drive State is Online .
RAID Physical Disk Drive State is Standby
RAID Physical Disk Drive State is Defunct
RAID System Disk Drive State is Online .
RAID System Disk Drive State is Critical .
RAID System Disk Drive State is Offline .
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Appendix E. Netfinity Command Line Operations . . . .
Alert Manager Command Line Operations . . . . . . . . . .
Adding GENALERT Alert Descriptions to the NMVT.INI
File
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System Information Tool Command Line Operations . . . .
ECC Memory Setup Command Line Operations . . . . . . .
Starting and Stopping Service Base Programs Remotely . .
Starting Service Base Programs Remotely . . . . . . . . .
Stopping Service Base Programs Remotely
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Service Connection Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
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Appendix B. Supported PFA Hard Disk Drives
Appendix C. Supported RAID Adapters
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Power On Error Detect . . . . . . . . . . .
Predictive Failure Analysis . . . . . . . . .
Critical File Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . .
File Changed Alert . . . . . . . . . . . .
File Deleted Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . .
File Created Alert
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Process Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Process Terminated Alert . . . . . . . .
Process Started Alert . . . . . . . . . . .
Process Failed to Start Alert . . . . . .
Remote System Manager . . . . . . . . . .
System Online Notification Alert . . .
System Offline Notification Alert . . .
Security Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Access Granted Alert . . . . . . . . . .
Public Access Granted Alert . . . . . .
System Access Denied Alert . . . . . .
System Restart Initiated Alert . . . . .
System Restart Request Rejected Alert
Service Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Service Start Request Alert . . . . . . .
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Service Start Request Rejected Alert
System Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Upper-Range Threshold Error Alert
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Upper-Range Threshold Warning Alert
Lower-Range Threshold Warning Alert
Lower-Range Threshold Error Alert
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Threshold Return To Normal Alert . .
Physical RAID Device Online Alert . .
Physical RAID Device Standby Alert .
Physical RAID Device Dead Alert . . .
Logical RAID Device Online Alert . .
Logical RAID Device Critical Alert . .
Logical RAID Device Offline Alert . .
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Appendix G. Notices
Trademarks . . . . . .
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Appendix H. Index
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About This Book
This book provides detailed information on how to use each of the
services included with Client Services for Netfinity Manager. For
information on how to install and configure Client Services for
Netfinity Manager, see Client Services for Netfinity Manager Quick
Beginnings.
Who Should Read This Book
This book is for anyone who will be using Client Services for
Netfinity Manager for local hardware systems management. It can
also be used for quick reference by users of individual services.
However, detailed online helps are available for all Netfinity
services.
You should have general knowledge of your operating system.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
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Chapter 1. Netfinity Product Description
Netfinity is a family of distributed applications designed to enhance
the system monitoring and management capabilities of a network.
Netfinity has a flexible, modular design that allows for a variety of
system-specific configurations. You can install only those program
files that are necessary for the individual system’s designated
function within a network environment or as a stand-alone system.
Netfinity’s modularity also enables you to update and add new
services without reinstalling the base product. Netfinity combines
the power and flexibility you want today with the expandability
you’ll need in years to come.
Client Services for Netfinity Manager enables your network
administrator to effectively monitor and manage systems remotely
without interrupting any work. Running the Netfinity programs in
the background does not interfere with work being done on the
system. However, it enables your network administrator to monitor
the status of systems in the network, anticipating and correcting
problems before they become serious.
Client Services for Netfinity Manager also includes the Serial
Connection Control service. With this service, an Netfinity Manager
can remotely access and manage your system using your system’s
modem. Now, you don't even have to be attached to a network for
your systems administrator to monitor, manage, and troubleshoot
your system. Just configure the Serial Connection Control service,
and a Netfinity Manager can dial into your system and access any
of the Netfinity services that they are permitted access to by the
Security Manager service, just as if they were accessing your system
over a network.
You can also use Client Services for Netfinity Manager to manage
and monitor your own system, regardless of whether it is attached
to a LAN or not. Client Services for Netfinity Manager features
several installation configurations that provide users with varying
degrees of access to their own system’s Netfinity services.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
1
Depending on the hardware configuration of your system and the
installation configuration selected during installation, some or all of
the following Netfinity Services will be available for use on your
system:
Alert Manager
Critical File Monitor
Security Manager
Serial Connection Control
Software Inventory
System Information Tool
System Monitor
User Profile
ECC Memory Setup (requires ECC memory)
System Partition Access (requires a System Partition)
Predictive Failure Analysis (requires a PFA-enabled hard disk
drive)
Ÿ RAID Manager (requires a RAID adapter)
Ÿ DMI Browser (requires DMI Service Layer)
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Instruction on how to use each of these services is provided in this
book.
2
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Chapter 2. Starting Netfinity
To start Netfinity:
1. Open the Netfinity folder or program group.
During installation of the Client Services for Netfinity Manager,
a Netfinity folder (OS/2 and Windows 95 only) or a Netfinity
program group (Windows and Windows NT only) was added to
your desktop. The Netfinity folder or program group contains
the Netfinity Service Manager object.
Figure 1. The Netfinity Folder
Note: In your Netfinity folder or program group is a document
titled Read Me First, which contains information about
Netfinity that might not be covered in your
documentation. The Netfinity folder also contains the
Network Driver Configuration object, which allows you
to reconfigure your network protocols and system
keywords.
2. Start the Netfinity Service Manager.
To start the Netfinity Service Manager, use mouse button 1 to
double-click on the Netfinity Service Manager object.
Netfinity Service Manager
All Netfinity services that are supported by your system can be
started from the Netfinity Service Manager window. The services
that are available for use depend on the installation configuration
you selected during installation (see Appendix A, “Installation
Configurations” on page 149).
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
3
Figure 2. Netfinity Service Manager. The services shown are installed when
the “Active Client Installation” installation configuration is selected.
To start any Netfinity service that appears in your Service Manager
window, double-click on the icon for that service.
Netfinity Service Descriptions
Each Netfinity service consists of a base program and a graphical
user interface (GUI). The service base programs enable the
individual services to be accessed remotely by the Netfinity
Manager, but do not allow for local access. The service GUIs, when
functioning along with their respective base program, enable the
local user to access the service.
Some services are available only on systems with certain system
configurations. These services are:
Ÿ DMI Browser (requires an installed and functional DMI Service
Layer)
Ÿ ECC Memory Setup (requires ECC memory)
Ÿ Predictive Failure Analysis (requires a PFA-enabled hard disk
drive)
Ÿ RAID Manager (requires a RAID hard disk drive subsystem)
4
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Ÿ System Partition Access (requires a built-in System Partition)
Brief descriptions of each of the Netfinity services follow. Complete
instructions on how to use each of these services can be found in
the service-specific chapters of this book.
Alert Manager
The Alert Manager is an extendable facility that allows receiving
and processing of application-generated alerts. A variety of actions
can be taken in response to alerts, including logging alerts, notifying
the user, forwarding the alert to another system, executing a
program, playing a WAV file (available only on multimedia
systems), generating an SNMP alert message, dialing out to a digital
pager service (available only on systems that have a modem), or
taking an application-defined action. Actions are user-definable,
using a highly flexible action management interface.
Also, an extensive, detailed log is kept of all alerts received by the
Alert Manager. Logged information available from the log includes
date and time the alert was received, type and severity of the alert,
the ID of the application that generated the alert, as well as any text
that was generated and any action taken by the Alert Manager.
Individual or multiple alerts can be selected from the log and
printed for later reference, or deleted once problems are corrected.
This service is available for both stand-alone and network use.
Critical File Monitor
Critical File Monitor enables you to be warned whenever critical
system files on your system are deleted or altered. Critical File
Monitor makes it simple for you to generate Netfinity alerts when
an important System File (such as the CONFIG.SYS file) changes
date, time, size, or when it is deleted or created . Critical File
Monitor can also be used to monitor any other files that reside on a
Netfinity system.
DMI Browser
DMI Browser enables you to examine information about the
DMI-compliant hardware and software products installed in or
attached to your system.
Chapter 2. Starting Netfinity
5
ECC Memory Setup
The ECC Memory Setup allows for monitoring of ECC memory
single-bit errors, and can automatically “scrub,” or correct, the ECC
memory when errors are detected. Also, you can keep a running
count of single-bit errors, and can set a single-bit error threshold
that will cause a nonmaskable interrupt (NMI) if the ECC single-bit
error threshold is exceeded. This service is available for both
stand-alone and network use by any system that has ECC memory.
Predictive Failure Analysis
The Predictive Failure Analysis (PFA) service enables you to
continually monitor and manage PFA-enabled hard disk drives. A
PFA-enable hard disk drive features hardware designed to help
detect drive problems and predict drive failures before they occur,
thus enabling you to avoid data loss and system downtime.
RAID Manager
The RAID Manager service enables you to monitor, manage, and
configure an assortment of Redundant Arrays of Independent Disk
(RAID) adapters and arrays without requiring you to take the RAID
system offline to perform maintenance. Use the RAID Manager to
gather data about your system’s RAID array and RAID adapter,
rebuild failing drives, add (or remove) logical drives, perform data
integrity tests, and many other RAID system tasks. This service is
available for both stand alone and network use by any system that
has a supported RAID adapter.
Security Manager
The Security Manager can prevent unauthorized access to some or
all of your Netfinity services. It uses incoming user ID and
password combinations, and is available for network use only.
Note: If your system is configured for network operations (that is,
you selected the Active Client or Passive Client installation
configuration), several program names that you may not
recognize will appear in your Security Manager. These
programs are support programs for remote system
management. If you have any questions about setting
6
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
incoming user ID and password combinations on these
services, see your network administrator.
Serial Connection Control
The Serial Connection Control service enables remote Netfinity
Managers to access your system through a phone line and modem.
With the Serial Connection Control service, you don't have to be
attached to a network to benefit from Netfinity’s outstanding remote
system access, monitoring, and management capabilities.
Note: Your system must have a properly installed and configured
modem that supports at least 9600 baud for the Serial
Connection Control service to function.
Software Inventory
Enables you to create and manage software product dictionaries that
can be used to easily maintain an inventory of all application
programs installed on your system.
System Information Tool
The System Information Tool enables you to quickly and
conveniently access detailed information on the hardware and
software configurations of your system. System Information Tool
gathers information about almost any computer; however, the most
detail is provided when this service is used with IBM computers.
This service is available for both stand-alone and network use.
System Monitor
The System Monitor provides a convenient method of charting and
monitoring the activity of a number of components in a system,
including processor usage, disk space used, and ECC memory
errors. These convenient monitors are detachable and scalable,
enabling you to keep only the monitors you need available at all
times. You can use System Monitor’s Threshold Manager to set
threshold levels for any of the monitored components. When
exceeded, these thresholds will generate user-configured alerts.
Data is continually collected from the time the system starts. A
sophisticated data-handling technique is used to weigh the
Chapter 2. Starting Netfinity
7
individual values, average concurrent samples, and post single
values that accurately reflect long-term system activity. This
technique allows you to maintain system activity records without
creating enormous data files. This service is available for both
stand-alone and network use.
System Partition Access
The System Partition Access allows for greatly simplified System
Partition file handling, both locally and remotely. Individual files
and entire directories can be renamed or deleted from the System
Partition. Individual files can be renamed, deleted, or copied into
the System Partition. Also, the entire partition can be backed-up,
restored, or deleted. This service is available for both stand alone
and network use by any system that has a System Partition.
System Profile
The System Profile provides a convenient notebook of pertinent data
about a particular user or system. It features many predefined
fields for extensive user-specific data, including name, address,
office number and location, and phone number. System Profile also
includes many predefined fields for system-specific data that might
not be available to System Information Tool, including model and
serial numbers and date of purchase. Finally, there are many
user-definable “miscellaneous” fields that can be used to hold any
data the user or administrator requires.
Delaying Netfinity Startup on OS/2 Systems
In some cases, it might be necessary for you to delay the automatic
startup of the Netfinity Network Interface (NETFBASE.EXE) in
order to allow other time-sensitive applications to start up correctly
or to allow your system to fully configure itself prior to beginning
network operations. NETFBASE.EXE includes a parameter (WAIT)
that enables you to specify the number of seconds that
NETFBASE.EXE will wait before starting.
During Netfinity installation, the Netfinity Network Interface object
is placed in the Startup folder. To configure Netfinity to wait a
specified number of seconds before starting:
8
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
1. Shut down the Netfinity Network Interface if it is running.
2. Open the Startup folder.
3. Using mouse button 2, click on the Netfinity Network Interface
object. This will open the Netfinity Network Interface context
menu.
4. Select Settings to open the Netfinity Network Interface Settings
notebook.
5. Type in the Parameters field
WAIT:x
where x is the number of seconds that you want the Netfinity
Network Interface to wait before starting.
6. Close the Netfinity Network Interface Settings notebook.
With the WAIT parameter set to x, whenever you start your system,
the Netfinity Network Interface will wait x seconds before starting.
Note: This feature is available only on systems that are running
OS/2.
Chapter 2. Starting Netfinity
9
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
Netfinity Alert Manager enables your system to receive and
automatically respond to alerts generated by other Netfinity
services. Using a variety of alert-specific information (including the
severity of the alert, the name of the Netfinity service that generated
the alert, the type of alert, and the network address of the system
that generated the alert), Netfinity alerts are categorized into alert
profiles. Profiles can be bound to one or more Alert Manager
actions (such as logging the alert or executing a command). Once a
profile is bound to an action, the action will be performed whenever
an alert that fits the profile is received.
Netfinity Alert Manager includes actions that do the following:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
10
Log the alert to a file
Display the alert in a pop-up window
Forward the alert to another workstation
Execute a command
Execute a minimized command
Send a simple network management protocol (SNMP) version of the
alert (not available for local use on systems running Windows
3.1 or Windows 95.)
Send a mapped SNMP version of the alert (similar to the
standard SNMP version of the alert, but featuring specific
Enterprise ID values for each of the various alert types; not
available for local use on systems running Windows 3.1 or
Windows 95)
Play a waveform (WAV) sound file (requires multimedia
support)
Send a message to a digital pager through a modem (requires
modem attached to system)
Send the alert information to an alphanumeric pager through a
modem (requires modem attached to system)
Send the alert to another user using TCP/IP SENDMAIL
(available only on systems running OS/2; requires TCP/IP for
OS/2 2.0 or later)
Send an email version of the alert using Vendor Independent
Messaging (VIM) (requires VIM support)
Send a messaging application programming interface (MAPI) version
of the alert (requires MAPI support)
Export the alert information to a Netfinity database
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
Ÿ Export the alert information to a Lotus Notes database
Ÿ Generate a Desktop Management Interface (DMI) event and
send it to the DMI Service Layer (requires DMI support)
Ÿ Display the alert on PC Server 720 front panel (available only on
IBM PC Server 720 systems)
Ÿ Add an error condition to the system
Ÿ Remove the error condition from the system
Note: Error conditions are used by the Netfinity Manager to
help quickly identify remote systems that have reported a
problem. For information about error conditions, see the
Netfinity Manager User’s Guide or your network
administrator.
Figure 3. Alert Manager Service
Alert Manager performs two essential systems management
functions:
1. Maintains a log of all received and logged alerts that can be
viewed with configurable filters.
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
11
The Alert Log lists all alerts that are currently recorded in the
Alert Log file. The Alert Log can be configured to display:
Ÿ All logged alerts
Ÿ Alerts that were received and logged within a specified time
or date range
Ÿ Alerts that were received and logged and that fit specified
alert profiles
Ÿ Alerts that were received within a specified time or date
range and that fit specified alert profiles.
Note: Only alerts that have been received and entered into the
Alert Log using the Add the alert to log file alert action
will appear in the Alerts in Log field. For information on
this and other alert actions, see “Netfinity Alert Actions”
on page 19.
For information on configuring the Alert Log views, see “Alert
Log Views” on page 15. For information on alert profiles, see
“Alert Profiles” on page 29.
2. Automatically responds to the alerts it receives with
user-specified actions.
You can use Alert Manager manager to select one or more alert
profiles and bind them to one of Alert Manager’ alert actions.
Once one or more profiles are bound to an alert action, this
action will automatically execute whenever an alert is received
that fits a profile to which it is bound. For information on alert
profiles, see “Alert Profiles” on page 29. For information on
binding alert profiles to alert actions, see “Binding Profiles to
Actions” on page 38.
The Alert Log
The Alert Log window is the first window that you see when you
start the Alert Manager service. Any alerts that have been logged
using the Add alert to log file action, appear in the Alerts in Log
field in the bottom half of the Alert Log window.
12
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Select an alert from the Alerts in Log to display information about
the alert in the upper half of the Alert Log window.
Note: You can select multiple alerts for the purposes of deleting
multiple files or printing reports, but only the currently
highlighted alert in the log will have its alert-specific
information displayed at the top of the screen.
Information displayed about the selected alert includes:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Alert Text
Type of Alert
Severity
Application ID
Application Alert Type
System Received From
System Name
Time of Alert
Date of Alert
System Unique ID
Alert Text
The Alert Text includes the name of the alert, as well as any textual
commentary included by the application that generated the alert.
Type of Alert
This is the application-specified alert type. A Type of Alert consists
of an alert sender ID followed by an alert type value. The alert
sender ID describes the nature of the device that generated the alert,
and the alert type value describes the content of the alert itself.
The possible alert sender IDs are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
System
DASD
Network
Operating System
Application
Device
Security
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
13
An alert sender might also be unspecified, in which case an alert
sender ID will not be displayed.
The possible alert type values are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Failure
Error
Warning
Information
An alert type can also be unspecified, in which case an alert type
value will not be displayed.
Severity
The alert Severity is a value from 0 to 7, with 0 being the most
severe. For example, an alert Severity of 0 could be assigned to a
disk failure, while a value of 7 could simply represent a system
going offline at the end of a day. Alert Severity is determined by
the application that generates the alert.
Application ID
The Application ID is the name of the application that sent the
specified alert to the log.
Application Alert Type
The Application Alert Type is a numeric value assigned to an
individual alert by the application that generated it. This value is
often used by the application that generated the alert.
Received From
The Received From value is the network address of the system that
generated the alert. The Received From value could be the local
system or a remote system that has been instructed to relay alerts to
the local error log.
System Name
The System Name value is the name of the system that generated
the alert. This name is specified by the user during Netfinity
installation.
14
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Time of Alert
The Time of Alert is the time of day when the alert was generated
and logged.
Date of Alert
The Date of Alert is the calendar date on which the alert was
generated.
System Unique ID
The System Unique ID is a random 16 character identification string
that is assigned to the system when Netfinity is installed. It is
stored in the NFUNIQUE.ID file in the Netfinity directory of the
system that generated the alert. The System Unique ID is primarily
used for the identification and management of systems that
frequently change network addresses (such as when DHCP is used).
Alert Log Views
You can configure Alert Manager to filter the alerts that will be
visible in the Alerts in Log field. The current Alert Log View is
shown beside the Alert Log Views button. The available Alert Log
Views are:
Ÿ Log shows all alerts
All alerts contained in the Alert Log are shown in the Alerts in
Log field.
Ÿ Log is currently viewed by time
The alerts shown in the Alerts in Log field have occurred within
a specified time frame.
Ÿ Log is currently viewed by profile
The alerts shown in the Alerts in Log field fit selected alert
profiles.
Ÿ Log is currently viewed by time and profile
The alerts shown in the Alerts in Log fit selected alert profiles
and have occurred within a specified time frame.
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
15
Note: Only alerts that have been received and entered into the Alert
Log using the Add the alert to log file alert action will appear
in the Alerts in Log field. For information on this and other
alert actions, see “Netfinity Alert Actions” on page 19.
To change the Alert Log view:
1. Select Alert Log Views.
This opens the View Alert Log window (see Figure 4).
Figure 4. The View Alert Log window.
2. Enable (or disable) Alert Log view filters.
There are two Alert Log view filters:
Ÿ View by Time and Date
Ÿ View by Profiles
To enable the View by Time and Date filter:
a. Select the radio button that describes the time and date
range for alerts that will appear in the Alerts in Log field.
The available selections are:
Ÿ Last Hour
16
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Only alerts logged in the last hour will appear in the
Alerts in Log field.
Ÿ Last (1—48) Hours
Only alerts logged within the number of hours that you
specify will appear in the Alerts in Log field.
Ÿ Time Range
Only alerts logged within the time range specified in the
Start Time and End Time fields, on the date specified in
the Start Date field, will appear in the Alerts in Log
field.
Ÿ Date Range
Only alerts logged within the date range specified in the
Start Date and End Date fields will appear in the Alerts
in Log field.
b. Select Enable.
To enable the View by Profiles filter:
a. Select one or more alert profiles from the Inactive Profiles
field.
Select only the alert profiles that correspond to the alerts
that you want to appear in the Alerts in Log field.
b. Select Activate.
Selected alert profiles are removed from the Inactive
Profiles field and appear in the Active Profiles field.
c. Select and remove any unwanted alert profiles from the
Active Profiles field.
If there are any alert profiles contained in the Active
Profiles field, select them and then select Deactivate to
remove them from the Active Profiles field. They then
appear in the Inactive Profiles filed.
d. Select Enable.
Alert log entries that correspond to one or more of the selected
profiles will appear in the Alerts in Log field.
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
17
3. Select OK to save these changes and close the View Alert Log
window.
To close this window without saving any changes, select Cancel.
To disable the View by Time and Date filter or the View by Profiles
filter, deselect Enable in the filter’s button group.
Alert Manager Functions
Alert Manager functions are activated from push buttons in the
Alert Manager window. These buttons are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Delete
Print
Print to File
Profiles
Refresh
Actions
Help
Exit
Information on each of the Alert Manager functions follows.
Delete
Select Delete to delete any selected alerts from the Alert Log. To
use this function, select the alerts that you want to discard from the
Alert Log and select Delete.
Print
Select Print to print a hardcopy of all selected alerts (and all specific
alert information for the selected alerts) within the Alert Log.
Print to File
Select Print to File to save all selected alerts to a user-specified file.
Profiles
18
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Select Profiles to configure, edit, or delete alert profiles. For
detailed instructions on how to create, edit, or delete profiles, see
“Alert Profiles” on page 29.
Refresh
Select Refresh to add any alerts that have been generated since the
Alert Log window was displayed.
Actions
Select Actions to bind alert actions to any configured alert profiles.
Alert actions can also be configured to respond to individual alerts
that are not included in an Alert Manager alert profile. For
instructions on how to bind alert actions to alert profiles, see
“Binding Profiles to Actions” on page 38. For instructions on how
to configure an alert action to respond to an alert that is not part of
an alert profile, see “Binding Actions to Individual Alerts” on
page 41. For information on alert actions, see “Netfinity Alert
Actions.”
Help
Select Help to access the online help for Alert Manager. Detailed
information is available for all of Alert Manager’s functions.
Exit
Select Exit to exit Alert Manager.
Netfinity Alert Actions
Alert Manager includes alert actions that do the following:
Ÿ Add the alert to log file
Puts the alert into the Alert Log. This alert action does not
require that you provide additional information.
Ÿ Display the alert in a pop-up window
Displays a small window with all alert-specific information.
This alert action does not require that you provide additional
information.
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
19
Ÿ Forward the alert to another workstation
Sends the alert to another user over a specified network. Once
received, the alert is treated as though it were generated locally.
When configuring this action, you must specify the following
parameters:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Network Type
The network type that will be used to forward the
alert. The network type must be entered as
NETBIOS, TCPIP, IPX, or SERIPC (for serial
connections).
Note: To forward an alert to a remote system using
SERIPC (a serial connection), the serial
connection must be active. This alert action
will forward the alert to a remote system
using SERIPC only if a serial connection to the
remote system exists. To forward alerts to
remote systems using a serial connection that
is not currently active, use the “Send alert to
remote system through serial connection” alert
action.
<P2>: Network Address
The network type-specific address used by the
remote system to which the alert will be forwarded.
If you are unsure of the remote system’s network type or
network address, see your network administrator.
Ÿ Execute a command
Executes a single command. When configuring this action, you
must specify the following parameter:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Command Line
The command that will be executed on the system.
This action includes special command strings (or macros) that
enable you to imbed alert-specific data in the command. This
20
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
data can then be used by the application that is started by the
command line. These macros are:
Macro
Imbedded Information
%TXT
Alert text
%TIM
Alert time
%DAT
Alert date
%SEV
Alert severity
%SND
Alert sender (for example, “NETBIOS::USER1”)
%TYP
Alert type
%APP
Alert application ID
%AT
Alert application-specific type
%SYS
System Name
%P1–%P9
Alert-specific text strings that are imbedded in
the Alert Text. The content of these parameters
is dependent on the alert itself. For more
information, see Appendix F, “Netfinity Alerts”
on page 165.
Ÿ Execute a minimized command
Executes a single, minimized command. When configuring this
action, you must specify the following parameter:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Command Line
The command that will be executed on the system.
This action includes special command strings (or macros) that
enable you to imbed alert-specific data in the command. This
data can then be used by the application that is started by the
command line. These macros are:
Macro
Imbedded Information
%TXT
Alert text
%TIM
Alert time
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
21
%DAT
Alert date
%SEV
Alert severity
%SND
Alert sender (for example, “NETBIOS::USER1”)
%TYP
Alert type
%APP
Alert application ID
%AT
Alert application-specific type
%SYS
System Name
%P1–%P9
Alert-specific text strings that are imbedded in
the Alert Text. The content of these parameters
is dependent on the alert itself. For more
information, see Appendix F, “Netfinity Alerts”
on page 165.
Ÿ Send SNMP Alert through TCP/IP
Uses an SNMP agent to generate an SNMP version of the alert.
When configuring this action, you must specify the following
parameter:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Community String
The community string name used by SNMP
applications in your network.
Notes:
1. This action requires IBM TCP/IP for OS/2 version 2.0 or
later in an OS/2 environment.
2. This action is not available for local use on systems running
Windows 3.1 or Windows 95.
3. Netfinity’s management information base (MIB) file for use
with SNMP management applications is found on the
Netfinity CD in the SNMP_MIB directory. It is named
NETFIN.MIB. For information on how to use NETFIN.MIB
with your SNMP-based systems management software, see
the documentation that was supplied with your SNMP
agent or with your systems management product.
22
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
4. Netfinity’s management information base (MIB) file for use
with OS/2 SNMP management applications is found on the
Netfinity CD in the SNMP_MIB directory. It is named
MIB2.TBL. You can append this file to your existing
MIB2.TBL file, or replace your MIB2.TBL with this file.
Ÿ Map Alert to SNMP Trap
Uses an SNMP agent to generate an SNMP trap featuring an
Enterprise OID value for use by SNMP-based management
applications. When configuring this action, you must specify
the following parameter:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Community String
The community string name used by SNMP
applications in your network.
Notes:
1. This action requires IBM TCP/IP for OS/2 version 2.0 or
later.
2. This action is not available for local use on systems running
Windows 3.1 or Windows 95.
3. Netfinity’s management information base (MIB) file for use
with SNMP management applications is found on the
Netfinity CD in the SNMP_MIB directory. It is named
NETFIN.MIB. For information on how to use NETFIN.MIB
with your SNMP-based systems management software, see
the documentation that was supplied with your SNMP
agent or with your systems management product.
4. Netfinity’s management information base (MIB) file for use
with OS/2 SNMP management applications is found on the
Netfinity CD in the SNMP_MIB directory. It is named
MIB2.TBL. You can append this file to your existing
MIB2.TBL file, or replace your MIB2.TBL with this file.
Ÿ Play a WAV file (requires multimedia support)
Plays a specified waveform (WAV) audio file in response to the
alert. When configuring this action, you must specify the
following parameter:
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
23
Parameter Description
<P1>: Waveform file name
The fully-qualified filename of the waveform that
will be played in response to the alert.
Ÿ Activate a numeric pager using a modem (requires a 100%
Hayes-compatible modem attached to the system)
Uses a modem attached to the system to dial out to a digital
pager service. After the modem connects to the pager service, it
will send all numeric data entered in the Digital Pager Display
field. If your digital pager service requires that you press the
pound sign (#) to send a page, be sure to type the # in the
Digital Pager Display field after the numeric data. When
configuring this action, you must specify the following
parameters:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Modem COM port
The COM port that the modem is configured to use.
The COM port must be entered as COMx, where x is
the number of the COM port.
<P2>: Pager number
The telephone number that will be dialed by the
modem to transmit the information to the pager.
<P3>: Digital pager display
The numeric data that will be displayed on the
pager.
Note: Depending on your paging service, you might need to
increase the amount of time that this alert action waits
after dialing the telephone number in field <P2> before it
transmits the numeric data in field <P3>. To increase the
amount of time that will pass before the numeric data is
transmitted, add one or more commas (“,”) to the end of
the telephone number in field <P2>. Each comma will
cause the modem to wait two seconds before transmitting
the numeric data.
24
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Ÿ Send alert to alphanumeric pager through TAP using a modem
(requires a 100% Hayes-compatible modem attached to the
system)
Uses a modem attached to the system to dial out to an
alphanumeric pager service. After the modem connects to the
alphanumeric pager service, it will send all alert information.
Parameter Description
<P1>: Modem COM port
The COM port that the modem is configured to use.
The COM port must be entered as COMx, where x is
the number of the COM port.
<P2>: TAP access number
The telephone number that will be dialed by the
modem to transmit the information to the pager.
<P3>: Pager ID
The identification number of the pager to which the
data will be sent.
<P4>: Additional text to send
Any additional text that you want to send along with
the alert data. This parameter is optional.
Notes:
1. This action will work only with pager services that use the
telocator alphanumeric protocol (TAP).
2. You must provide your pager’s Pager ID.
Ÿ Send alert as TCP/IP mail (available only on systems running
OS/2; requires TCP/IP for OS/2 2.0 or later)
Uses the TCP/IP SENDMAIL program to send the Netfinity
alert as a note to a specified email address. When configuring
this action, you must specify the following parameters:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Target user ID
The TCP/IP ID of the system to which the alert will
be sent.
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
25
<P2>: Target host address
The TCP/IP host address of the target user’s system.
Ÿ Send alert as TCP/IP Web mail (available only on systems
running OS/2; requires TCP/IP for OS/2 2.0 or later)
Uses the TCP/IP SENDMAIL program to send the Netfinity
alert as a note to a specified email address. The alert text will
be marked up with HTML tags. When configuring this action,
you must specify the following parameters:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Target user ID
The TCP/IP ID of the system to which the alert will
be sent.
<P2>: Target host address
The TCP/IP host address of the target user’s system.
Ÿ Send to E-Mail via VIM interface (requires VIM support)
Uses the Vendor Independent Messaging (VIM) interface to
generate a VIM-version of the alert that can be sent to any
properly configured system that is 32-bit VIM-compliant, such
as Lotus Notes.
The requirements for a system running Lotus Notes are identical
to the requirements for a system to export data to a Lotus Notes
database. For more information, see see “Lotus Notes Database
Support” in Netfinity Manager Quick Beginnings.
When configuring this action, you must specify the following
parameters:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Mail System Password
The password that must be used to enable access to
the VIM mail system.
<P2>: E-Mail Address
The email address of the system to which the alert
information will be sent.
Ÿ Send to E-Mail via MAPI interface (requires MAPI support)
26
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Uses the MAPI interface to generate a MAPI-version of the alert
that can be sent to any system that is MAPI-compliant. When
configuring this action, you must specify the following
parameters:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Mail System Password
The password that must be used to enable access to
the VIM mail system.
<P2>: E-Mail Address
The email address of the system to which the alert
information will be sent.
<P3>: Profile Name
Some MAPI-compliant applications require a Profile
Name to properly process MAPI data. If the
MAPI-compliant application to which this alert will
be sent requires a Profile Name, type it in this field.
If your MAPI-compliant application does not require
a Profile Name, leave this field blank.
Ÿ Send DMI Event through DMI Service Layer (requires DMI
support)
Converts the alert into a DMI event, which is then forwarded to
the DMI Service Layer. Once it is received by the DMI Service
Layer, it can be used by other DMI-compliant management
applications. This alert action does not require that you provide
additional information.
Ÿ Display on PC Server 720 Front Panel (available only on IBM PC
Server 720 systems)
Displays the alert-specific information on the PC Server 720’s
front panel LED screen. This alert action does not require that
you provide additional information.
Ÿ Set error condition for sending system
Adds an Error Condition to the sending system’s Error
Condition log. A system’s Error Condition log is accessed with
the Netfinity Manager’s Remote System Manager service. Error
conditions are used by the Netfinity Manager to help quickly
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
27
identify remote systems that have reported a problem. When
configuring this action, you must specify the following
parameter:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Error Condition
The name that will be used to identify this error
condition in the Error Condition log.
For information about error conditions, see the Netfinity Manager
User’s Guide or your network administrator.
Ÿ Clear error condition for sending system
Removes a previously generated Error Condition from the
sending system’s Error Condition log. When configuring this
action, you must specify the following parameter:
Parameter Description
<P1>: Error Condition
The name of the error condition that will be removed
from the Error Condition log.
p.For information about error conditions, see the Netfinity
Manager User’s Guide or your network administrator.
Ÿ Remove the error condition from the system
Removes a previously generated Error Condition from the
system’s Error Condition log. A system’s Error Condition log is
accessed with the Netfinity Manager’s Remote System Manager
service. Error conditions are used by the Netfinity Manager to
help quickly identify remote systems that have reported a
problem. For information about error conditions, see the
Netfinity Manager User’s Guide or your network administrator.
Ÿ Send alert to remote system through serial connection
Uses a previously defined serial connection to send the alert to a
Netfinity system that can be accessed using Netfinity’s Serial
Connection Control service (see Chapter 10, “Serial Connection
Control” on page 87). When configuring this action, you must
specify the following parameter:
28
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Parameter Description
<P1>: Connection Name
The name of serial connection as defined in Serial
Connection Control.
Ÿ Send alert to host via APPC
Converts the Netfinity alert to a network management vector
transport (NMVT) alert for use by host-based management
applications (such as NetView for MVS). This alert action does
not require that you provide additional information.
Notes:
The NMVT.INI file, found in the Netfinity directory,
contains alert descriptions that map standard Netfinity alerts
to NMVT-style alerts that can then be properly passed to a
host system using APPC and the “Send alert to host via
APPC” alert action. If you define new Netfinity alerts
(using, for example, Netfinity’s GENALERT command), you
must make changes to this file for the alerts to be converted
properly. For more information, see “Adding GENALERT
Alert Descriptions to the NMVT.INI File” on page 157.
Ÿ Add event to Windows NT Event Log (available only on
systems running Windows NT)
This action adds information about the alert to the Windows NT
Event Log. This alert action does not require that you provide
additional information.
Ÿ Forward alert to FFST/2 (available only on systems running
OS/2)
This action sends a version of the Netfinity alert to FFST/2.
This alert action does not require that you provide additional
information.
Alert Profiles
Alert profiles are simple filters that enable you to better manage
alerts received by your system. Using alert-specific information a
profile describes a class, or set of classes, of alerts. With alert
profiles you can classify alerts by service or application, by
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
29
responsible person, or simply by urgency. Alert profiles can be
bound to Alert Manager actions, enabling you to react automatically
to alerts generated by Netfinity systems in your network. Alert
profiles can also be used to filter the type of alerts that are shown in
the Alert Log (see “Alert Log Views” on page 15).
Netfinity Alert Manager comes with many predefined alert profiles
that will meet the needs of most users. Using these predefined alert
profiles, you will be able to quickly and easily configure Alert
Manager to respond and react to received alerts automatically. See
“Predefined Alert Profiles” on page 34 for more information on
Netfinity’s predefined alert profiles.
Select Profiles from the Alert Log window to open the Alert Profiles
window (see Figure 5). The Alert Profiles window displays a list of
all available profiles. You can select individual profiles for editing
or deleting, or create completely new profiles.
Ÿ To create a new alert profile, see “Creating New Alert Profiles”
on page 31.
Ÿ To edit an alert profile, see “Editing Alert Profiles” on page 34.
Ÿ To delete an alert profile, see “Deleting Alert Profiles” on
page 34.
Figure 5. The Alert Profiles window.
30
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Creating New Alert Profiles
To create a new alert profile:
1. Select New.
This opens the Profile Editor window (see Figure 6). Use the
Profile Editor to specify the alert-specific information (called
alert conditions) that will determine whether a received alert fits
the alert profile.
Figure 6. The Profile Editor window.
2. Set the Alert Conditions
When creating an alert profile action, you must first specify the
alert conditions that must be met for the received alert to fit a
specific alert profile. As alerts are received, the Alert Manager
checks each of these conditions to see if they meet the
specifications for a defined alert profile. If all alert conditions
are met, the alert fits the alert profile. If an alert fits an alert
profile, any actions that are bound to that profile will be
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
31
executed. For instructions on how to bind alert actions to alert
profiles, see “Binding Profiles to Actions” on page 38.
There are five alert conditions that are used by the Alert
Manager to determine whether an alert fits an alert profile. For
an alert to fit an alert profile, it must meet all of the alert
conditions for the action. These five alert conditions are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Alert Type
Severity
Application ID
Application Alert Type
Sender ID
To specify the alert conditions for this alert profile:
a. Select an Alert Type.
The Alert Type is a brief description of the generated alert.
It describes the nature of the alert (unknown, failure, error,
warning, information), and can also contain a general
description of the source of the alert (system, disk, network,
operating system, application, device, or security).
To check incoming alerts for specific Alert Types, select one
or more Alert Types from the selection list. If you do not
want to check for specific Alert Types, select the Any check
box above the selection list.
b. Select a Severity.
The Severity is a number from 0 through 7 that indicates
how serious a generated alert is. A severity of 0 represents
a very serious alert, while a severity of 7 is relatively minor.
To check incoming alerts for specific Severity values, select
one or more Severity values from the selection list. If you
do not want to screen for specific Severity values, select the
Any check box above the selection list.
c. Select an Application ID.
The Application ID is the alphanumeric identifier of the
application that generated the alert.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
To check incoming alerts for specific Application IDs, you
can choose one or more from the Application ID selection
list. If an Application ID that you require is not available
from the list, you can add it to the list by typing the ID in
the entry field above the selection list and pressing Enter. If
you do not want to check for specific Application IDs, select
the Any check box above the selection list.
d. Select an Application Alert Type.
The Application Alert Type is a numeric value assigned to
an individual alert by the application that generated it. This
value is often used by the application itself.
To check incoming alerts for specific Application Alert
Types, you can choose one or more from the Application
Alert Type selection list. If an Application Alert Type that
you require is not available from the list, you can add it to
the list by typing it in the entry field above the selection list
and pressing Enter. If you do not want to check for specific
Application Alert Types, select the Any check box above the
selection list.
e. Select a Sender ID.
The Sender ID is the network address of the system that
generated the alert.
To check incoming alerts for specific Sender IDs, you can
choose one or more from the Sender ID selection list. If a
Sender ID that you require is not available from the list, you
can add it to the list by typing it in the entry field above the
selection list and pressing Enter. If you do not want to
check for specific Sender IDs, select the Any check box
above the selection list.
3. Name the alert profile.
This is the name that will appear in the Alert Profile window
Profile List field. Type in the Profile Name field a name for the
Alert Profile. This name can be up to 64 characters long.
4. Save the Alert Profile.
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
33
Select Save to save the Alert Profile. This Alert Profile will now
appear in the Alert Profile window Profile List field.
Select Cancel to close this window without saving any alert profile
information.
Editing Alert Profiles
To edit a previously defined alert profile:
1. Select from the Profile List the name of the alert profile you
want to edit.
2. Select Edit.
This opens the Profile Editor window (see Figure 6 on page 31).
3. Change alert conditions, if necessary.
If you are editing this alert profile to alter the alert conditions
that must be met for the received alert to fit the alert profile,
select the appropriate new Alert Type, Severity, Application ID,
Application Alert Type, or Sender ID values as necessary.
4. Change the profile name, if necessary.
If you want to rename this alert profile, type in the Profile
Name field the new profile name.
5. Save this alert profile.
Select Save to save the changes you've made to this alert profile.
Select Cancel to close this window without changing any alert
profile information.
Deleting Alert Profiles
To delete an alert profile, select an alert profile from the Profile List
field, and then select Delete.
Predefined Alert Profiles
Alert Manager includes many predefined alert profiles. A list of
predefined alert profiles that will be installed on all Netfinity
34
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
systems, and a brief description nature of the alert-specific
information that fits the profile, follows:
Profile Name
Alert Description
Power-On Error Detect Error Alerts
POST error detected by Power-On Error Detect
on a Netfinity system.
Power-On Error Detect Information Alerts
System Partition access during startup detected
by Power-On Error Detect on a Netfinity
system.
Predictive Failure Analysis Alerts
Imminent failure of a PFA-enabled hard disk
drive reported by Predictive Failure Analysis.
File Changed Alerts
Critical File Monitor detected that a monitored
file has been changed.
File Deleted Alerts Critical File Monitor detected that a monitored
file has been deleted.
File Created Alerts Critical File Monitor detected that a monitored
file has been created.
Process Terminated Alerts
Process Manager detected that a monitored
process has ended.
Process Started Alerts
Process Manager detected that a monitored
process has started.
Process Failed to Start Alerts
Process Manager detected that a monitored
process has failed to start.
System Online Alerts
Remote System Manager has reported that a
specific remote system is online and functional.
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
35
System Offline Alerts
Remote System Manager has reported that a
specific remote system is offline or
unreachable.
Access Granted Alerts
Security Manager allowed a remote user that
provided a User ID/Password combination
access to the system.
Public Access Granted Alerts
Security Manager has allowed a remote user
Public access to the system.
System Access Denied Alerts
Security Manager has denied a remote user
access to the system.
System Restart Initiated Alerts
Security Manager has detected and permitted a
system restart request by a remote user.
System Restart Rejected Alerts
Security Manager has detected and rejected a
system restart request by a remote user.
Service Start Request Alerts
Service Manager has allowed use of a Netfinity
service by a remote user.
Service Start Rejected Alerts
Service Manager has denied use of a Netfinity
service by a remote user.
Threshold Error Alerts
A System Monitor error threshold condition
has been met.
Threshold Warning Alerts
A System Monitor warning threshold condition
has been met.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Threshold Return to Normal Alerts
A previously registered System Monitor
warning or error threshold condition has
returned to normal.
Physical RAID Device Online Alerts
A physical RAID device attached to the system
has changed state to Online.
Physical RAID Device Standby Alerts
A physical RAID device attached to the system
has changed state to Standby.
Physical RAID Device Dead Alerts
A physical RAID device attached to the system
has changed state to Dead.
Logical RAID Device Online Alerts
A logical RAID device attached to the system
has changed state to Online.
Logical RAID Device Critical Alerts
A logical RAID device attached to the system
has changed state to Critical.
Logical RAID Device Offline Alerts
A logical RAID device attached to the system
has changed state to Offline.
Physical RAID Drive PFA Alerts
A physical RAID device attached to the system
has reported the imminent failure of a
PFA-enabled hard disk drive in the RAID
array.
Severity 0 Alerts
A severity 0 alert has been received.
Severity 1 Alerts
A severity 1 alert has been received.
Severity 2 Alerts
A severity 2 alert has been received.
Severity 3 Alerts
A severity 3 alert has been received.
Severity 4 Alerts
A severity 4 alert has been received.
Severity 5 Alerts
A severity 5 alert has been received.
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
37
Severity 6 Alerts
A severity 6 alert has been received.
Severity 7 Alerts
A severity 7 alert has been received.
All Alerts
An alert has been received.
Many additional alert profiles will be installed if your system uses
specific software or communications products (such as
Communications Manager or LAN Server).
To create new alert profiles, see “Creating New Alert Profiles” on
page 31. To edit an existing alert profile, see “Editing Alert
Profiles” on page 34.
Binding Profiles to Actions
To enable Alert Manager to automatically respond to received alerts,
you must bind alert profiles to alert actions. Once an alert profile is
bound to an alert action, the alert action will be performed
automatically whenever Alert Manager receives an alert that fits the
profile. Multiple profiles can be bound to individual alert actions,
and an individual alert profile can be bound to multiple alert
actions.
To bind an alert profile to an alert action:
1. Select Actions from the Alert Log window.
This opens the Alert Action window (see Figure 7 on page 39).
This window contains a list of all currently configured alert
actions.
38
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Figure 7. The Alert Actions window.
2. Select New.
This opens the Action Editor window (see Figure 8).
Figure 8. The Action Editor window.
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
39
3. Select Profiles from the Bind To... pull-down menu. This
switches the Action Editor window to the Profiles view.
4. Bind one or more alert profiles to an alert action.
To bind alert profiles to an alert action, you must first select the
profiles that will trigger the action, and then select the alert
action and provide any necessary defining information.
a. Select one or more alert profiles to bind to an action.
All currently available and unused alert profiles are listed in
the Other Profiles field. Select one or more alert profiles
from this list, and then select Trigger By. All selected
profiles will then appear in the Triggering Profiles field.
Received alerts that fit any of the profiles listed in the
Triggering Profiles field will cause Alert Manager manager
to perform an alert action.
Note: To remove alert profiles from the Triggering Profiles
field, select the profiles that you want to remove and
then select Do Not Trigger By. Selected profiles are
then moved to the Other Profiles field.
b. Select an alert action.
Use the spin buttons at the right of the Action field to see
the available alert actions.
c. Enter additional information, if necessary.
Some alert actions will require you to provide additional
information (to whom alerts should be sent, what command
to execute, and so on). If additional information is required,
the parameter will be displayed in the Action field group as
<P#>, where # is the number of the parameter. An Action
Definition parameter field appears for each required
parameter, along with a brief description of the information
that is required. Enter the necessary information in each
field.
5. Label this action.
Type in the Action Label field a brief description of this alert
profile and alert action combination. This description can be up
to 32 characters. When you finish binding the alert profiles and
40
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
the alert action, the Action Label will appear before the name
alert action in the Available Actions field in the Alert Actions
window.
6. Finish binding the alert profiles to the selected alert action.
Select Save to finish binding the alert profiles to the selected
action. The Action Editor window will close, and the Action
Label, followed by the name of the alert action that you selected,
appears in the Available Actions field in the Alert Actions
window.
Select Cancel to close this window without saving any information.
Binding Actions to Individual Alerts
To enable Alert Manager to automatically respond to individual
alerts that are not part of a defined Alert Profile, you must bind the
desired action to specific specific alert conditions. Once an alert
profile is bound to specific alert conditions, the alert action will be
performed automatically whenever Alert Manager receives an alert
that contains all of the specified conditions.
Configuring an action is a two-step process. First, you must set the
Alert Conditions that Alert Manager will look for. Then, you must
set an Action Definition to define what action the Alert Manager
will take in response to the received alert. Detailed descriptions of
this process follow.
1. Select Actions from the Alert Log window.
This opens the Alert Action window (see Figure 7 on page 39).
This window contains a list of all currently configured alert
actions.
2. Select New from the Alert Actions window.
This opens the Action Editor window.
3. Select Alert Conditions from the Bind To... pull-down menu.
4. Set the Alert Conditions
When defining an action, you must first specify the Alert
Conditions that must be met for the Alert Manager to execute a
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
41
defined action. As alerts are received, the Alert Manager checks
each of these conditions to see if they meet the specifications for
a defined action. If all Alert Conditions are met, the defined
action is executed.
There are five Alert Conditions that are used by the Alert
Manager to determine appropriate action responses. For an
alert to trigger an action, the alert must meet all of the alert
conditions for the action. These five alert conditions are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Alert Type
Severity
Application ID
Application Alert Type
Sender ID
To specify the Alert Conditions:
a. Select an Alert Type.
The Alert Type is a brief description of the generated alert.
It describes the nature of the alert (unknown, failure, error,
warning, information), and can also contain a general
description of the source of the alert (system, disk, network,
operating system, application, device, or security).
To screen incoming alerts for specific Alert Types, select one
or more Alert Types from the selection list. If you do not
want to screen for specific Alert Types, select the Any check
box above the selection list.
42
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
b. Select a Severity.
The Severity is a number from 0 through 7 that indicates
how serious a generated alert is. A severity of 0 represents
a very serious alert, while a severity of 7 is relatively minor.
To screen incoming alerts for specific Severity values, select
one or more Severity values from the selection list. If you
do not want to screen for specific Severity values, select the
Any check box above the selection list.
c. Select an Application ID.
The Application ID is the alphanumeric identifier of the
application that generated the alert.
To screen incoming alerts for specific Application IDs, you
can choose one or more from the Application ID selection
list. If an Application ID that you require is not available
from the list, you can add it to the list by entering the ID in
the entry field above the selection list and pressing Enter. If
you do not want to screen for specific Application IDs,
select the Any check box above the selection list.
d. Select an Application Alert Type.
The Application Alert Type is a numeric value assigned to
an individual alert by the application that generated it. This
value is often used by the application itself.
To screen incoming alerts for specific Application Alert
Types, you can choose one or more from the Application
Alert Type selection list. If an Application Alert Type that
you require is not available from the list, you can add it to
the list by entering it in the entry field above the selection
list and pressing Enter. If you do not want to screen for
specific Application Alert Types, select the Any check box
above the selection list.
e. Select a Sender ID.
The Sender ID is the network address of the system that
generated the alert.
To screen incoming alerts for specific Sender IDs, you can
choose one or more from the Sender ID selection list. If a
Chapter 3. Alert Manager
43
Sender ID that you require is not available from the list, you
can add it to the list by entering it in the entry field above
the selection list and pressing Enter. If you do not want to
screen for specific Sender IDs, select the Any check box
above the selection list.
5. Set an Action Definition.
You must select a specific action, and supply any necessary
information for the completion of the action.
a. Select an Action.
An action is a program that is executed in response to an
alert that meets the Alert Conditions that you have
specified. Use the spin buttons at the right of the Action
field to see the available action handlers.
b. Enter additional information, if necessary.
If additional information is required, the parameter will be
displayed in the Action field as <P#>, where # is the
number of the parameter. An Action Definition parameter
field appears for each required parameter, along with a brief
description of the information that is required. Enter the
appropriate information in each field.
6. Save the defined action.
Once all Alert Conditions and Action Definition information has
been entered, select Save to save the configured action. This
action will now appear in the Available Actions field of the
Alert Actions window. After you select Save, the Alert
Manager window closes automatically.
44
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Chapter 4. Critical File Monitor
Critical File Monitor can warn you whenever critical system files on
the systems in your network are deleted or altered. The Critical File
Monitor service makes it simple for you to generate Netfinity alerts
when an important system file (such as the CONFIG.SYS file)
changes date, time, size, is deleted (when it was present previously),
or is created (when it was not present previously). Critical File
Monitor can also be used to monitor any other files that reside on a
Netfinity system.
Figure 9. Critical File Monitor
Monitoring System Files
The system files that can be monitored by the Critical File Monitor
are operating-system-specific. The name of the operating system
that is in use by the system that you are accessing appears in the
title area of the System Files field group. The names of the system
files that can be monitored appear beside the check boxes.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
45
Notes:
1. You can use Critical File Monitor to monitor any file on the
system. The system files that appear at the top of the Critical
File Monitor window are important files that you would be
most likely to want to monitor. To monitor other files, see
“Monitoring Other Files” on page 47.
2. Files located on network drives cannot be monitored.
OS/2 System Files
The OS/2 system files that appear in the System File field group
are:
Ÿ CONFIG.SYS
Ÿ STARTUP.CMD
Ÿ AUTOEXEC.BAT
Windows 3.1, Windows for Workgroups, and Windows
95 System Files
The Windows system files that appear in the System File field group
are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
CONFIG.SYS
AUTOEXEC.BAT
WIN.INI
SYSTEM.INI
Windows NT System Files
The Windows NT system files that appear in the System File field
group are:
Ÿ WIN.INI
Ÿ SYSTEM.INI
46
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
NetWare System Files
The NetWare system files that appear in the System File field group
are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
AUTOEXEC.NCF
STARTUP.NCF
VOL$LOG.ERR
SYS$LOG.ERR
To monitor one or more system files:
1. Select the system files that you want to monitor.
Select the check boxes beside the names of the system files that
you want to monitor. A check mark appears in the box.
2. Select a Severity.
Each system file in the System File field group has a Severity
field beside its name. Use the spin buttons to select a Severity
value for each of the system files that you want to monitor.
This severity value will be assigned to the Netfinity alert that
will be generated if the system file is created, deleted, or
changed. You can choose a severity value from 0 (most severe)
to 7 (least severe).
3. Select Save to save the Critical File Monitor settings.
To close Critical File Monitor without saving any changes, select
Cancel.
Monitoring Other Files
Critical File Monitor can monitor any file on the Netfinity system
that you are accessing. The Additional Monitored Files field
contains a list of all other files that are currently being monitored.
To select a file to monitor:
1. Select (monitor another file) from the Additional Monitored
Files field (see Figure 9 on page 45).
This will open the Monitor window (see Figure 10 on page 48).
Chapter 4. Critical File Monitor
47
Figure 10. Critical File Monitor — Monitor window
2. Select from the Drive list the drive letter that contains the file
that you want to monitor.
3. Select from the Directory field the directory that contains the file
that you want to monitor.
4. Select from the File list the name of the file that you want to
monitor.
5. Use the spin buttons beside the Severity field to set the Severity
of the alert that will be generated if the selected file is altered or
deleted.
6. Select Monitor to initiate the monitoring process on the selected
file.
To close the Critical File Monitor service without saving any
changes, select Cancel.
Note: Critical File Monitor can be set to alert you if a specific file
that does not exist on the system is created. For more
information, see “Monitoring for File Creation” on page 49.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Monitoring for File Creation
Critical File Monitor can also generate alerts when specified files are
created. To configure the Critical File Monitor to generate an alert
in this case:
1. Select from the Drive field the letter of the disk drive that you
want to monitor for file creation.
2. Type in the Monitor Filename field the fully qualified path and
name of the file that you want to monitor.
For example, if you want the Critical File Monitor to generate an
alert if a file named ERROR.LOG appears in the directory
named PROGRAM, you would type in the Monitor Filename
field
PROGRAM\ERROR.LOG
3. Use the spin buttons beside the Severity field to set the Severity
of the alert that will be generated if the file is created.
4. Select Monitor to initiate the monitoring process on the
specified file.
Chapter 4. Critical File Monitor
49
Chapter 5. DMI Browser
You can use the Netfinity Desktop Management Interface (DMI)
Browser Service to examine information about the DMI-compliant
hardware and software products (called DMI components) installed
in or attached to the system.
You can use the DMI Browser to:
Ÿ View information about DMI components
Ÿ Receive notification of problems or errors with products from
the DMI Service Layer
Ÿ View the log of problems or errors concerning DMI components
Notes:
1. This service is available only on systems that have the DMI
Service Layer installed and operational. DMI Service Layers are
available for most of the operating systems that are supported
by Netfinity. If a DMI Service Layer is not installed and
operational on your system when you install Netfinity, neither
the DMI Browser nor the Netfinity-specific DMI components
will be installed on your system. If you install a DMI Service
Layer after you install Netfinity, you must reinstall Netfinity in
order to install and use Netfinity's DMI Component
Instrumentation.
2. The Netfinity DMI Browser service is a special version of the
DMI Browser that comes with the DMI Service Layer. Some
functions that are available with the DMI Browser are not
available in Netfinity’s DMI Browser service.
What is DMI?
The Desktop Management Interface (DMI) is an industry standard
that simplifies management of hardware and software products
attached to, or installed in, a computer system. The computer
system can be a standalone desktop system, a node on a network, or
a network server. DMI is designed to work across desktop
operating systems, environments, hardware platforms, and
architectures.
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 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
DMI provides a way to provide or obtain, in a standardized format,
information about hardware and software products. Once this data
is obtained, desktop and network software applications can use that
data to manage those computer products. As DMI technology
evolves, installation and management of products in desktop
computers will become easier, and desktop computers will become
easier to manage in a network.
How Does DMI Work?
The complete DMI structure consists of three separate elements:
Ÿ DMI components
Ÿ DMI Service Layer
Ÿ DMI-compliant management applications
DMI Components
Each DMI component contains information about the product with
which it is associated. This information is organized into
product-specific groups. This information is contained in a
Management Information File (MIF). The MIF describes the
manageable attributes of the DMI component or product.
Each group contains a variety of group-specific attributes. The
attributes that are found within a group are entirely dependent on
the group itself. For example, the Component ID group for a
software product might include the following attributes:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Manufacturer
Product
Version
Serial Number
Installation
Verify
However, the attributes found in the Processor group included in a
PC system’s component might contain these attributes:
Ÿ Type
Ÿ Processor Family
Ÿ Version Information
Chapter 5. DMI Browser
51
Ÿ Maximum Speed
Ÿ Current Speed
Ÿ Processor Upgrade
Each of a group's attributes is fully defined by a series of data items.
The items available for a group vary according to the type of
product, but most attributes include the following data items:
ID
Type
Access
The attribute's ID is a sequential number
unique to the attribute's group.
The data type can be one of eight defined by
DMI. These data types are:
Ÿ Integer
Ÿ 64-Bit Integer
Ÿ Counter
Ÿ 64-Bit Counter
Ÿ Gauge
Ÿ Display String
Ÿ Octet String
Ÿ Date
The ways in which this attribute's data can be
accessed. Access values can be:
Ÿ Read-Only
Ÿ Read-Write
Ÿ Write-Only
Note: Attributes that have Read-Write or
Write-Only access values can have
certain other attributes changed. For
more information, see “Changing
Attribute Information” on page 57.
Name
Value
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
The name of the attribute is derived from DMI
standards or is provided by the manufacturer.
A value is a specific occurrence of an attribute.
For example, an attribute value of 2.1 could be
provided for the version number of an
application. In a few cases, a value is
read-only and will never change. The value
can be specified directly in the MIF file.
However, most values will change over time.
Updating usually occurs automatically,
managed by programs supplied by the
manufacturer of the component.
Description
A value can also be an enumeration value
(ENUM), indexing into a table of possible
values defined in the MIF file.
The description of the component is technical
information supplied by the manufacturer.
Netfinity DMI Component Instrumentation
The Netfinity DMI Component Instrumentation provides DMI-based
management applications with information from Netfinity's Remote
System Manager, System Monitors, and System Information Tool.
The MIF files required by DMI-based management applications are
installed as part of Netfinity's DMI Instrumentation when Netfinity
is installed.
Notes:
1. If a DMI Service Layer is not installed and operational on your
system when you install Netfinity, neither the DMI Browser nor
the Netfinity-specific DMI components will be installed on your
system.
2. DMI-based Netfinity data is available to other DMI-based
application only when the Netfinity Support Program is
running.
DMI Service Layer
The DMI Service Layer is a program that gathers and organizes the
DMI component information into a standardized format. Once this
data has been organized and is available, a DMI-compliant
component agent (Netfinity’s DMI Browser service, for example) can
access the DMI service layer and request information about any of
the DMI components.
Note: Your system must have the DMI Service Layer installed and
operational for Netfinity’s DMI Browser to function.
Chapter 5. DMI Browser
53
The DMI Service Layer gathers configuration information from the
installed MIF files, builds a database, and, upon request, passes the
information to management applications. Management applications
are programs that are capable of receiving data from the DMI
Service Layer and providing this data for desktop or network
management purposes.
In addition to gathering and configuring the MIF data, the DMI
Service Layer also collects information about problems or errors that
the various DMI components have encountered. You can use the
Netfinity DMI Browser to receive notification of problems or errors
concerning your DMI components and to view a log of problems or
errors concerning your DMI components.
The Netfinity DMI Browser works with the following DMI Service
Layers:
Operating System
Supported DMI Service Layer
OS/2 Warp 3.0 or later
IBM SystemView Agent version 1.4.2 or
later
Windows NT 3.51 with Service Pak 5 or later
IBM SystemView Agent version 1.3.2 for
WIN32, Intel DMI Service Provider 2.0
Windows 95
IBM SystemView Agent version 1.3.2 for
WIN32, Intel DMI Service Provider 2.0
Windows 3.1
Intel DMI SDK version 2.0 or later
Management Applications
A management application is any DMI-compliant
systems-management application that is capable of interfacing with
the DMI Service Layer in order to gather and make use of the DMI
component information.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Using the DMI Browser
The Netfinity DMI Browser service enables you to:
Ÿ View information about DMI components, groups, and
attributes of installed DMI-compliant products
Ÿ Receive notification of problems or errors with your products
from the DMI Service Layer
Ÿ View the log of problems or errors concerning your DMI
components
The DMI Browser functions can be accessed by selecting menu
choices from the menu bar, or by selecting the function’s
corresponding objects from the fast-path icon bar.
The menu bar includes the following functions:
Ÿ Options: View the event log or exit the DMI Browser service.
Ÿ Information: Display version information for the Service Layer
and copyright notices for the DMI Browser.
Chapter 5. DMI Browser
55
Figure 11. The DMI Browser window
For quickest operation, use the mouse to select the menu bar icon
that you want. The alternative is to select a menu choice and then
select a choice from the menu that drops down. If you are unsure
about the meaning of an icon, just move the mouse pointer over it.
A brief explanation of the icon will appear at the bottom of the
window.
Viewing DMI Component Information
Using mouse button 1, double-click on the DMI component that you
want to open. This will open the Component Information window.
When you are finished, select Close to close the Component
Information window.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Viewing Group Information
To view information about one of a DMI component’s individual
groups:
1. Using mouse button 1, click on the plus sign (+) beside the DMI
component that contains the group data that you want to view.
2. Using mouse button 1, double-click on the name of the group
that you want to view. This will open a window that contains a
list of the group’s attributes.
Viewing Attribute Information
To view information about one attribute of a single group:
1. Using mouse button 1, click on the plus sign (+) beside the DMI
component that contains the group data that you want to view.
2. Using mouse button 1, double-click on the name of the group
that you want to view. This will open a window that contains a
list of the group’s attributes.
3. Using mouse button 1, double-click on the name of the attribute
that you want to view. This will open the Attribute Information
window.
Changing Attribute Information
You can configure attributes that have Access values of Read-Write
or Write Only. To change attribute information:
1. Using mouse button 1, double-click on the specific attribute that
you want to change. This will open the Attribute information
window.
2. Enter the new Attribute information. Note that not all Attribute
information items can be changed.
3. Select Apply to change the attribute information.
If you decide not to make a change, select Reset to restore the
attribute information to its last-saved value.
Select Cancel to close this window without saving any changes.
Chapter 5. DMI Browser
57
Receiving Notification of Problems or Errors
Upon request, the Service Layer notifies management applications of
the occurrence of a problem or error. These problem and error
messages are called events. The events are then stored in the Event
Log, where they can be examined later to help rectify the problem
or error.
The DMI Browser service automatically receives notification of DMI
component events from the DMI Service Layer. If an event message
is received by the DMI Browser service, a telephone object appears
in the DMI Browser icon bar. Select the telephone icon (or select
View event log... from the Options pull-down menu) to open the
DMI Browser Event Log.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Chapter 6. ECC Memory Setup
You can use the Netfinity ECC Memory Setup to monitor and
manage ECC memory. Options are:
Ÿ Single-Bit Error Scrubbing
Ÿ Single-Bit Error Counting
Ÿ Single-Bit Error Threshold Nonmaskable Interrupt (NMI)
Figure 12. ECC Memory Setup
To configure the ECC Memory Setup:
1. Select the actions that you want ECC Memory Setup to perform.
Ÿ Activate the Single-Bit Error Scrubbing option to
automatically correct any single-bit errors that might occur.
Selecting this option might cause slight performance delays
on some systems, but ensures greater data integrity. Check
your system documentation for more information.
Ÿ Activate the Single-Bit Error Counting option to keep a
running count of all ECC memory errors that occur.
Ÿ Activate the Single-Bit Error Threshold NMI option to cause
a nonmaskable interrupt (NMI) if the number of single-bit
errors exceeds the user-specified threshold.
Note: If an NMI occurs, it might halt your system.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
59
2. Change the Single-Bit Error Count, if desired.
The Single-Bit Error Count field displays the number of
single-bit errors that have been detected by the ECC Memory
Setup during the current session.
Note: The single-bit error count is for the current session only.
The count is reset to 0 when the computer is restarted.
To carry a count over from a previous session, you must
enter the error count manually from the configuration
screen.
3. Set a Single-Bit Error Threshold value if you have chosen the
Single-Bit Error Threshold NMI option.
The Single-Bit Error Threshold field displays the number of
ECC single-bit errors that will be allowed before a nonmaskable
interrupt (NMI) will be triggered.
Note: An NMI will occur only if the Single-Bit Threshold NMI
option is activated.
4. Select Save when you are satisfied with the selections you have
made.
5. Select Exit when you have finished configuring ECC Memory
Setup.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Chapter 7. Predictive Failure Analysis
Use the Predictive Failure Analysis (PFA) service to monitor all
PFA-enabled disk drives installed locally on your system. With this
service, you will instantly be notified when a PFA-message is
generated by a PFA-enabled drive. Also, you can configure this
service to automatically generate a Netfinity Alert when a PFA
message is received.
Note: PFA-messages generated by PFA-enabled disk drives that are
in use as part of a RAID array cannot be detected by the
Predictive Failure Analysis service. However, PFA-messages
can be monitored and reported by using the System Monitor
service’s attribute monitors for the PFA-enabled disk drive.
For more information, see “Attribute Monitors” on page 135.
The Predictive Failure Analysis Window
Each PFA-enabled physical drive is represented by an object in the
Predictive Failure Analysis window. Predictive Failure Analysis
service uses two objects to help you quickly determine the status of
each disk drive. These objects are:
Object
Description
Solid disk drive
Normal: The drive has not reported any
predictive failure analysis messages.
Shattered disk drive
Warning: The drive has reported one or
more predictive failure analysis messages
and might be failing.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
61
Figure 13. The Predictive Failure Analysis service. The PFA Drive shown
represents a drive that has not reported any predictive failure analysis
messages.
Information that will help you identify the drive is listed beside its
icon. This information includes:
Ÿ Adapter
The Adapter is the value of the adapter card that the disk drive
is connected to.
When Predictive Failure Analysis detects PFA-enabled hard disk
drives in your system, it also scans your system for SCSI hard
disk drive controllers. The Adapter value is the number of the
SCSI adapter to which the PFA-enabled hard disk drive is
attached. For example, if your system has two SCSI hard disk
drive adapters installed, and each SCSI adapter has one
PFA-enabled disk drive attached, you will two PFA-enabled
disk drive objects in the PFA Service window. The first
PFA-drive object would have an Adapter value of 1, because it
is the first SCSI hard disk drive adapter detected by Predictive
Failure Analysis. The second PFA-drive object would have an
Adapter value of 2, because it is the second SCSI hard disk
drive adapter detected by Predictive Failure Analysis.
Ÿ PUN and LUN
The physical unit number (PUN) and logical unit number (LUN)
are values assigned to the hard disk drive to uniquely identify it
within a system.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Note: If an individual physical drive is partitioned into two or
more logical drives, each logical drive will have the same
PUN, LUN, and physical drive value.
Ÿ Physical Drive value
The Physical Drive value is a numeric value assigned to each
hard disk drive in your system. These values begin with 0 and
increase with each additional hard disk drive installed (for
example, if you have two hard drives in your system, their
Physical Drive values will be 0 and 1).
Ÿ Logical Drive values
The Logical Drive value is a letter assigned to each hard disk
drive or partition you create on a hard disk drive. For example,
if you have a 1 GB* drive, and you divide this drive into 5
partitions of 200 MB each, they will have Logical Drive values
of C, D, E, F, and G. However, each Logical Drive will share
the same PUN, LUN, and Physical Drive values.
Ÿ Size
The Size value is the capacity of the physical drive.
Note: Size does not represent space remaining on the individual
drive.
To obtain more detailed information on an individual PFA-enabled
drive, or to configure Predictive Failure Analysis service options for
an individual drive, select the drive from the Predictive Failure
Analysis window. This will open the PFA Options for Drive
window (see Figure 14 on page 64).
The PFA Options for Drive Window
Use the PFA Options for Drive window to view additional
information about the selected PFA-enabled drive, and to configure
Predictive Failure Analysis service options specific to the selected
drive.
*
When referring to hard-disk-drive capacity, GB means 1 000 000 000 bytes; total user-accessible capacity may vary depending
on operating environment.
Chapter 7. Predictive Failure Analysis
63
Figure 14. The PFA Options for Drive window
Detailed Disk Drive Information
The PFA Options for Drive window duplicates the drive-specific
information from the Predictive Failure Analysis window, and also
provides the following additional information:
Ÿ Vendor ID
The Vendor ID is the name of the drive manufacturer reported
by the disk drive.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Ÿ Product ID
The Product ID is the drive-specific product number reported by
the disk drive.
Ÿ Product Revision
The Product Revision is the product revision level reported by
the disk drive.
Ÿ Status
The Status shows the most recent information reported by the
disk drive. If a PFA message has been generated by the disk
drive, the Status data will show the day, date, and time at
which the PFA message was generated.
Predictive Failure Analysis Options
In addition to providing detailed drive information, the PFA
Options for Drive window enables you to:
Ÿ Configure Predictive Failure Analysis’ alert generation options
for this drive.
Ÿ Simulate a Predictive Failure Analysis warning message for this
drive.
Ÿ Reset the drive from “Warning” status to “Normal” status.
Generating Alerts
Select the Generate Alert check box to enable Predictive Failure
Analysis to generate a Netfinity alert whenever this disk drive
generates a Predictive Failure Analysis message. You can customize
some of the alert-specific information.
Ÿ Alert Text
The standard Alert Text that will appear in the generated alert
appears in the center of the window. If you would like to add
information to this text, type it in the Additional text for alert
log field.
Chapter 7. Predictive Failure Analysis
65
Ÿ Severity
Use the spin buttons beside the Severity field to set the alert
severity value. This value can be an integer from 0 (most
severe) to 7 (least severe).
Simulating a Predictive Failure Analysis Message
To simulate a Predictive Failure Analysis failure warning message
for this drive, select Simulate. The Predictive Failure Analysis
service will behave exactly as if an actual warning message had
been received (it will change the drive status in the Predictive
Failure Analysis window and in the PFA Options for Drive window,
and will generate an alert if Alert Generation is selected).
However, both the Status reported in the PFA Options for Drive
window and the Alert Text will state that the PFA message was
simulated and was not caused by a real PFA message.
Resetting a Drive’s Status
Select Reset to change the drive’s status from “Warning” to
“Normal.”
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Chapter 8. RAID Manager
RAID (redundant array of independent disks) is a technology whereby
several physical storage devices are grouped into an array that
appears to the operating system as one or more physical drives.
Using RAID technology, you can configure the RAID array drives
into a variety of data configurations. These configurations (called
RAID levels) provide varying levels of data-integrity protection and
storage capacity. Some RAID levels provide greater data integrity
through the use of data mirroring.
Ordinarily, you must take your RAID system offline in order to
perform most RAID management tasks. However, with Netfinity’s
RAID Manager service, you can easily gather information about
your system’s RAID adapter, physical drives in the array, and
virtual drives that are defined by the array. You can also perform a
variety of important RAID management tasks quickly and easily.
These tasks include:
Ÿ Scrubbing virtual drives
Ÿ Formatting and rebuilding RAID physical devices
Ÿ Gathering data about all RAID adapters, devices, virtual drives,
and enclosures
Notes:
1. Irresponsible use of RAID Manager can seriously harm your
system and its data. Use RAID Manager only if you are familiar
with RAID arrays and RAID systems management.
2. RAID Manager is not designed to operate simultaneously with
other RAID management utilities. Running other RAID
management utilities while running RAID Manager may cause
your system to become unstable.
3. This service is available for use only on systems that have a
supported RAID adapter installed. For a list of supported RAID
adapters, see Appendix C, “Supported RAID Adapters” on
page 152.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
67
Figure 15. The RAID Manager service
RAID Manager Window Options
The RAID Manager window shows a graphical representation of
your RAID system enclosure, RAID adapters, and logical disk
drives. You can:
Ÿ Change the scale of the graphical representations
Ÿ Change the number of virtual drives that are shown in each
column
Ÿ Change the enclosure configuration
Ÿ Refresh the current information
Changing the Viewing Scale
To change the scale of the graphics shown in the RAID Manager
window:
1. Select Viewing Scale from the Options pull-down menu.
2. Use the spin buttons to select a scale for the RAID Manager
graphics.
3. Select OK to apply this change.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
The RAID Manager graphics are resized according to the scale you
have specified.
Changing the Virtual Drives Representation
To change the number of virtual drives shown per column:
1. Select Virtual Drive Representation from the Options
pull-down menu.
2. Use the spin buttons to select the number of virtual drives that
will be shown in each column.
3. Select OK to apply this change.
The number of virtual drives in each column will be adjusted
according to the value you selected.
Changing the Enclosure Configuration
Select Enclosure Configuration from the Options pull-down menu
to open the Enclosure Configuration window (see Figure 16 on
page 70). From this window, you can:
Ÿ Add an enclosure
Ÿ Delete an enclosure
Ÿ Configure the bank and adapter configuration for your
enclosures
Ÿ Configure the device numbers for each bank in your enclosures
Chapter 8. RAID Manager
69
Figure 16. The Enclosure Configuration window
Adding an Enclosure
To add an enclosure:
1. Select Enclosure Configuration from the Options pull-down
menu in the RAID Manager window.
This opens the Enclosure Configuration window.
2. Select Add Enclosure from the Options pull-down menu in the
Enclosure Configuration window.
This opens the Select Enclosure window (see Figure 17 on
page 71).
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Figure 17. The Select Enclosure window
3. Select the name of the enclosure you want to add.
4. Select OK.
Deleting an Enclosure
To delete an enclosure:
1. Select Enclosure Configuration from the Options pull-down
menu in the RAID Manager window.
This opens the Enclosure Configuration window.
2. Using mouse button 2, select the enclosure that you want to
delete.
Chapter 8. RAID Manager
71
This opens a context menu for the elected enclosure.
3. Select Delete Enclosure from the context menu.
Configuring RAID
To specify which RAID adapter controls which bank of RAID drives
in your enclosure:
1. Select Enclosure Configuration from the Options pull-down
menu in the RAID Manager window.
This opens the Enclosure Configuration window.
2. Use the spin buttons beside each Bank field to specify which
adapter and channel controls the bank.
3. When you have finished configuring the enclosure bank, close
the Enclosure Configuration window to save your new settings.
Configuring RAID Bank Device Numbers
To specify the device numbers for each RAID device in a selected
bank:
1. Select Enclosure Configuration from the Options pull-down
menu in the RAID Manager window.
This opens the Enclosure Configuration window.
2. Select the Bank field for the bank that contains the devices for
which you want to specify a device number configuration.
3. Select Configure Device Numbers from the Options pull-down
menu.
This opens the Device Number Configuration window (see
Figure 18 on page 73).
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Figure 18. The Device Number Configuration window
4. Use the spin buttons associated with each device in the bank to
specify a device number for that device.
5. When you have finished configuring the device numbers, close
the Device Number Configuration window to save your new
settings.
Refreshing RAID Information
Select Refresh from the Options pull-down menu to update all
information displayed in the RAID Manager window.
Viewing RAID Information
You can use RAID Manager to view general information on your
RAID system’s devices, including the RAID enclosure, physical
RAID devices, RAID adapters, and logical RAID drives.
Viewing Enclosure Information
Use RAID Manager to quickly gather information about any RAID
enclosures attached to this system. Available information includes:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Enclosure model
Enclosure manufacturer
Number of RAID adapters
Enclosure function
Chapter 8. RAID Manager
73
To view information about a RAID enclosure:
1. Use mouse button 2 to select the enclosure that you want to
examine. This opens the enclosure’s context menu.
2. Select View Enclosure from the enclosure’s context menu.
Select OK to close the Enclosure Information window.
Viewing Physical Device Information
Use RAID Manager to gather a variety of information about the
physical devices that are part of your RAID array. Available
information includes:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Device status
Device number
Channel number
Device type
Device size
Sectors
Manufacturer
Model, version
Serial number
To view information about a physical RAID device:
1. Use mouse button 2 to select the device that you want to
examine. This opens the adapter’s context menu.
2. Select View Device from the device’s context menu.
Select OK to close the Standard Device Information window.
Viewing General Adapter Information
Use RAID Manager to quickly gather information about any
installed RAID adapters. Available information includes:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
74
Adapter identifier
Slot
Buses available
Configured devices
Device I/O
Host bus
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Adapter status
Manufacturer
Model
Serial number (if available)
To view information about a RAID adapter:
1. Use mouse button 2 to select the adapter that you want to
examine. This opens the adapter’s context menu.
2. Select View Adapter.
3. Select General Info.
Select OK to close the Adapter Information window.
Viewing Adapter-Specific Information
Use RAID Manager to quickly gather more detailed information
about any installed RAID adapters. Available adapter-specific
information includes:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Stripe size
Rebuild control
Parity storage
Read Ahead
To view adapter-specific information:
1. Use mouse button 2 to select the adapter that you want to
examine. This opens the adapter’s context menu.
2. Select View Adapter.
3. Select Specific Info.
Select OK to close the Adapter-Specific Information window.
Viewing Virtual Drive Information
Use RAID Manager to quickly gather information about any virtual
drives defined by your RAID adapters. Available information
includes:
Ÿ Virtual drive number
Ÿ Virtual drive size
Chapter 8. RAID Manager
75
Ÿ Virtual drive status
Ÿ Virtual drive RAID level
Ÿ Virtual drive write policy
To view information about a virtual drive:
1. Use mouse button 2 to select the virtual drive that you want to
examine. This opens the virtual drive’s context menu.
2. Select View Virtual Drive Information.
Select OK to close the Virtual Drive Information window.
RAID Device Management
Use RAID Manager to manage the storage devices that make up
your RAID array. Use RAID Manager to:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Add a device
Remove a device
Replace a device
Rebuild a device
Rebuild to another device
Stop a device
Set a device to standby
Set a device to Hot Spare
To perform any of these RAID device management functions, use
mouse button 2 to select the RAID device from the RAID Manager
window, and then select the RAID Management function from the
selected device’s pop-up menu.
RAID Adapter Configuration Backup
You can use RAID Manager to back up the configuration of your
RAID adapter. To back up your RAID adapter configuration:
1. Use mouse button 2 to select the adapter you want to back up.
2. Select Backup Configuration from the adapter’s context menu.
3. Insert a blank, formatted diskette and select OK.
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RAID Virtual Drive Management
Use RAID Manager to alter a variety of virtual drive parameters.
The following logical drive management options are available:
Ÿ Initialize virtual drives
Ÿ Scrub virtual drives
Initializing Virtual Drives
Select Initialize to write binary zeroes to all bits on the logical drive
and recompute proper parity information. This operation is
required for RAID Level 1 and RAID LEvel 5 virtual drives.
Note: This feature is not available on RAID systems running
NetWare.
Scrubbing Virtual Drives
Select Scrub to recompute the parity information on a RAID Level 1
or RAID Level 5 virtual drive. The data on the drive is not
changed.
Chapter 8. RAID Manager
77
Chapter 9. Security Manager
The Netfinity Security Manager is designed to limit remote access to
some or all of the Netfinity services installed on your system.
Irresponsible or careless use of the Netfinity services can lead to
data loss or system damage. To avoid this, you might want to limit
remote access to some or all of these services on your system.
Note: The following Netfinity services pose the most potential risk
if used irresponsibly:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Remote System Manager
System Partition Access
File Transfer
Remote Session
Process Manager
RAID Manager
These services are not available for use with Client Services
for Netfinity Manager, and therefore instructions on how to
use these services do not appear in this book. However, a
remote Netfinity Manager can use these services when
accessing your system.
The Netfinity Security Manager uses a User ID/Password
combination to determine security clearance on a system. Incoming
User ID/Password combinations determine which of your Netfinity
services are available to a remote user that is using Netfinity
Manager to access your system.
Security Manager features a default incoming User ID/Password
feature. It is called the <PUBLIC> setting, and automatically allows
access to any services that you select. For more information on the
<PUBLIC> incoming User ID/Password, see “Setting Incoming User
ID/Password Combinations” on page 79.
Once you have established incoming and outgoing User
ID/Password combinations on your system, security operates
passively. When a remote user uses Netfinity Manager to attempt
to gain access to your system, the remote user’s outgoing User
ID/Password combination is automatically checked against any
incoming User ID/Password combinations you have configured. If
78
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
the outgoing and incoming User ID/Password combinations match,
the remote user is granted access to your system.
Netfinity Security Manager generates alerts to help you maintain a
record of who has accessed or attempted to access your system. For
more information on the alerts generated by the Security Manager,
see “Security Alerts” on page 82.
Setting Incoming User ID/Password
Combinations
If the Security Manager has not been preconfigured, there will be a
User ID called <PUBLIC>. This is a general-security-access default
setting. It allows any system using the <default> outgoing User
ID/Password combination to access all Netfinity services on your
system.
If a remote system user attempts to use the Remote System Manager
Login System action to access your system and fails to match a
corresponding incoming User ID/Password combination, the user
will be given access to any services in your <PUBLIC>
configuration.
Initially, all Netfinity services are available for <PUBLIC> access. To
edit the list of services available from the <PUBLIC> User
ID/Password combination:
1. Double-click on Edit/Display Incoming Passwords to open the
Incoming Passwords window.
2. Select <PUBLIC> from the User ID selection list.
3. Deselect the services you do not want available for public
access.
4. Deselect the Security Manager Access check box to restrict
public access to Security Manager.
5. Select Set to save your configuration.
Note: If you do not have a <PUBLIC> default configured as part of
your incoming User ID/Password security configuration, only
Chapter 9. Security Manager
79
users with valid outgoing User ID/Password combinations
will be able to access the Netfinity services on your system.
If an invalid User ID/Password combination is used when a
user attempts to access your system, an alert is generated by
the Security Manager. However, if you maintain a
<PUBLIC> default on your system, users who attempt to
access your system using an invalid outgoing User
ID/Password combination will automatically be granted
access to your <PUBLIC> services. This will also generate an
alert. For more information on alerts generated by the
Security Manager, see “Security Alerts” on page 82.
Figure 19. Incoming User ID/Password Configuration
To set a new incoming User ID/Password combination, and
determine access to services:
1. Start Security Manager.
2. Select Edit/Display Incoming Passwords.
3. Enter a User ID.
Enter the User ID that you are allowing access. You may select
an ID from the User ID selection list, or enter a new ID in the
entry field.
4. Enter a password.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Type in the Password field a password that, when used in
combination with the User ID you have specified, will allow
access to all selected Netfinity services. The password must be
from 1 to 8 characters in length. This password will not be
displayed.
5. Verify the password.
Type in the Password Verify field the same password that you
typed in the Password field. These two passwords must match
to successfully create an incoming User ID/Password
combination.
6. Select the accessible services.
Select one or more services from the Services selection list. The
selected services will be available to users who provide the User
ID and password you have entered in the corresponding fields.
7. Determine access to the Security Manager.
Select the Security Manager Access check box to allow access to
your Security Manager.
Note: Allowing access to the Security Manager enables the
remote system to alter your incoming and outgoing User
ID/Password combinations, and will also enable the
Remote System Manager’s Restart System action on your
system. This will enable the remote user to restart your
system on demand.
8. Save your incoming security configuration
Select Set to save your configuration.
Deleting an Incoming User ID/Password
Combination
To delete a previously set User ID/Password combination:
1. Start Security Manager.
2. Select Edit/Display Incoming Passwords.
3. Select the User ID you want to delete.
Chapter 9. Security Manager
81
4. Select Delete. The User ID and its corresponding password are
then deleted from your incoming User ID/Password
combination configuration.
Security Alerts
Security Manager automatically generates a variety of alerts in
response to access attempts. These alerts are provided to aid you in
tracking which users are accessing what systems, as well as to
provide a record of users who have attempted to access others
systems using invalid User ID/Password combinations. Alerts are
also generated when a remote Netfinity Manager attempts
(successfully or unsuccessfully) to use Remote System Manager’s
System Restart action to restart your system.
These alerts are received by the Netfinity Alert Manager, which can
then be configured to take specific actions in response to these
alerts. For more information on alerts, see “The Alert Log” on
page 12.
Each of the alerts generated by Security Manager contains additional
macro parameter strings imbedded in the alert’s Alert Text. These
parameter strings are described beneath each alert’s description.
Security Access Alerts
The Security Manager can generate three alerts in response to
specific security access conditions. These alerts are:
Ÿ Access Granted Alert
Generated when Security Manager allows non-public access to a
remote user.
Ÿ Public Access Granted Alert
Generated when Security Manager allows public access to one
or more services to a remote user.
Ÿ System Access Denied Alert
Generated when Security Manager denies access to the system
to a remote user.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Detailed descriptions of the contents of each of these alerts follows.
Access Granted Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Security Manager
service when access to one or more
services is granted to a remote user that
has used a UserID/Password combination
to gain access.
Alert Text
User ID '%P1' from Address '%P2' on
Network '%P3' has been granted system
access
Type of Alert
Security Information
Severity
7
Application ID
SecMgr
Application Alert Type
20
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
User ID requesting system access
%P2
Network Address of system requesting access
%P3
Network Type of system requesting access
If you have not altered the default configuration for your Alert
Manager, this alert will not trigger an action. However, you can
create a new action response to this specific alert.
Public Access Granted Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Security Manager
service when Public access to one or
more services is granted to a remote user.
Alert Text
User ID '%P1' from Address '%P2' on
Network '%P3' has been granted public
system access
Type of Alert
Security Information
Severity
6
Chapter 9. Security Manager
83
Application ID
SecMgr
Application Alert Type
21
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
User ID requesting system access
%P2
Network Address of system requesting access
%P3
Network Type of system requesting access
If you have not altered the default configuration for the Alert
Manager, this alert will not trigger an action. However, you can
create a new action response to this specific alert.
System Access Denied Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Security Manager
service when access to the system is
denied to a remote user.
Alert Text
Logon attempt by User ID '%P1' from
Address '%P2' on Network '%P3' has
been rejected
Type of Alert
Security Warning
Severity
5
Application ID
SecMgr
Application Alert Type
22
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
User ID requesting system access
%P2
Network Address of system requesting access
%P3
Network Type of system requesting access
If you have not altered the default configuration for the Alert
Manager, this alert will be added to the Alert Manager’s log file.
You can create additional action responses to this specific alert.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
System Restart Alerts
The Security Manager can generate two alerts in response to System
Restart attempts. These alerts are:
Ÿ System Restart Initiated Alert
Ÿ System Restart Request Rejected Alert
Detailed descriptions of the contents of each of these alerts follows.
System Restart Initiated Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Security Manager
service when a remote Netfinity Manager
uses the Remote System Manager’s
Restart System option to restart your
system.
Alert Text
System Restart initiated by User ID '%P1'
from Address '%P2' on Network '%P3'.
Type of Alert
Security Information
Severity
5
Application ID
SecMgr
Application Alert Type
41
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
User ID requesting system restart
%P2
Network Address of system requesting restart
%P3
Network Type of system requesting restart
If you have not altered the default configuration for the Alert
Manager, this alert will be added to the Alert Manager’s log file.
You can create additional action responses to this specific alert.
System Restart Request Rejected Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Security Manager
service when a remote Netfinity Manager
attempts to use the Remote System
Manager’s Restart System option to
Chapter 9. Security Manager
85
restart your system, but does not have
adequate security access to do so.
Alert Text
System Restart request by User ID '%P1'
from Address '%P2' on Network '%P3'
rejected rejected.
Type of Alert
Security Error
Severity
3
Application ID
SecMgr
Application Alert Type
40
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
User ID requesting system restart
%P2
Network Address of system requesting restart
%P3
Network Type of system requesting restart
If you have not altered the default configuration for the Alert
Manager, this alert will be added to the Alert Manager’s log file and
will generate a pop-up window notifying you of the System Restart
attempt. You can create additional action responses to this specific
alert.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Chapter 10. Serial Connection Control
The Netfinity Serial Connection Control service enables a Netfinity
Manager to access and manage your system by dialing in to your
system’s modem. Once properly configured, the Serial Connection
Control service will enable remote Netfinity Manager users to access
and manage your system just as if they were attached to a LAN.
Note: Your system must have a properly installed and configured
modem that supports at least 9600 baud for the Serial
Connection Control service to function.
Figure 20. The Serial Connection Control service
Modem Configuration
Before you can use the Serial Connection Control service to enable
remote access of your system through your modem, you must
ensure that your modem is properly configured.
To configure your system’s modem:
1. Select Modem Settings from the Serial Connection Control
window.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
87
This will open the Netfinity Modem Settings window (see
Figure 21 on page 88).
2. Select the COM Port for the modem that you are configuring.
Use the spin buttons beside the COM Port field to select the
modem’s COM port.
3. Select a Modem Name, or type in a new one.
Select from the Modem Name field the name of your system’s
modem, or type in a new one. Netfinity comes preconfigured
with settings for some popular modem types. However, if your
modem is not listed in the Modem Name field, or if you do not
know what kind of modem your system has, select Default. If
your modem does not function properly when using the
Default settings, see “Initialization String Guidelines” on
page 90.
Note: Selecting a preconfigured Modem Name or Default will
automatically fill in the other modem configuration
information.
Figure 21. Serial Connection Control — The Netfinity Modem Settings window
4. Type in the proper Initialization String for your system’s
modem.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
If you selected one of the preconfigured Modem Names, this
field will be filled in for you. However, you might need to edit
this field if Netfinity did not come with preconfigured settings
for your modem. If you need more information, see
“Initialization String Guidelines” on page 90.
5. Type in the proper Hangup String for your system’s modem.
The Hangup String field contains the command that will be sent
to the modem to instruct it to close the connection to the phone
line. A default hangup string is provided by Serial Connection
Control. This string will function properly on most modems. If
your modem does not respond correctly to the default hangup
string, see the documentation that came with your modem for
more information.
6. Select Add/Change/Use to save these settings and enable this
modem to be used by the Serial Connection Control service.
Enabling Remote Access
Once you have configured your modem for use with Serial
Connection Control, you must grant access to your system to your
network administrator or other authorized users. Authorized users
can then use Serial Connection Control to access your system. To
grant access to your system:
1. Set the Serial Connection Control service to AutoAnswer mode.
2. Use Security Manager to configure a User ID/Password
combination for the authorized user to use when logging on to
your system.
For information on how to configure a User ID/Password
combination to enable remote access to your system, see “Setting
Incoming User ID/Password Combinations” on page 79.
To set the Serial Connection Control service to AutoAnswer mode:
1. Start the Netfinity Serial Connection Control service.
Open the Serial Connection Control object.
2. Select AutoAnswer from the Serial Connection Control
window’s Name field.
Chapter 10. Serial Connection Control
89
The AutoAnswer setting will enable the Serial Connection
Control service to automatically answer incoming phone calls
through the modem. Once it has answered the telephone, it will
attempt to establish a link with the calling system.
3. Set the Serial Connection Control User ID and Password.
Type in the User ID and Password fields the user ID and
password that a remote system, using Serial Connection Control,
must provide in order to gain access to your system using Serial
Connection Control.
4. Select Start.
Once you select Start, the Serial Connection Control service will
begin waiting for an incoming call. Once “Waiting for call”
appears in the Serial Connection Control window status field,
you can select Exit. Serial Connection Control will continue to
wait in the background for incoming calls.
Note: If you want the Serial Connection Control service to
automatically start and begin waiting for incoming calls
when Netfinity is started, select AutoAnswer, and then
select the Auto Start check box.
Initialization String Guidelines
Although most modems share similar initialization string codes,
there are differences from modem to modem. Therefore, it is very
difficult to provide appropriate initialization strings for all modems.
In some cases you might need to create your own initialization
string for your modem. If you do, consult the documentation that
comes with your modem for the appropriate initialization string
codes.
Ÿ Required Initialization Codes
For a modem to operate correctly with the Netfinity Serial
Connection Control service, the initialization string must
configure the modem as follows:
– Command echoing OFF
– Online character echoing OFF
– Result codes ENABLED
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
– Verbal result codes ENABLED
– All codes and connect messages with BUSY and DT
detection
– Protocol ind added - LAPM/MNP/NONE V42bis/MNP5
– Normal CD operations
– DTR ON-OFF hangup, disable AA and return to command
mode
– CTS hardware flow control
– RTS control of received data to computer
– Queued and nondestructive break, no escape state
– Auto-answer off
Example: The initialization string for a U.S. Robotics Sportster
modem using only the settings required for correct operation
would be:
EðF1QðV1X4&A3&C1&D2&H1&R2&Y3Sð=ð
Ÿ Additional Initialization Codes
In addition to the required initialization codes, you can optimize
the operation of the Netfinity Serial Connection Control service
by configuring your modem with the following settings:
–
–
–
–
Speaker ON until carrier detected
Software flow control disabled
Auto-error control
Variable data rate
Example: The initialization string for a U.S. Robotics Sportster
modem using all the required and additional settings would be:
EðF1M1QðV1X4&A3&C1&D2&H1&Ið&K1&M4&
Nð&R2&Y3Sð=ð
Chapter 10. Serial Connection Control
91
Chapter 11. Software Inventory
You can use Software Inventory to quickly and easily scan any
Netfinity system for the presence of installed software products. Its
flexible scanning methods can be used to search for specific
products, types of products (for example, word processors or
graphics viewers), or to compile a record of all recognized software
on a system. Reports can be printed to a file, sent to your printer,
or exported to a Netfinity database.
System Inventory comes complete with a dictionary file with many
predefined software product profiles (called product definitions), so
you can start keeping track of the software installed on your
networked systems right away.
Software Inventory is designed with a simple graphical interface
that enables you to add or edit product definitions quickly and
easily. Products can be defined and identified by the presence of
specified file names (including files that are of a specific size or that
were created on specific date, enabling you to search for only certain
versions of software) or by the presence of a SYSLEVEL file.
Software Inventory is designed to work with other IBM and
non-IBM systems management software applications. Software
Inventory provides a mechanism to integrate a workstation’s
existing software inventory information into the NetView
Distribution Manager/6000 or NetView DM for NetWare software
distribution database, if the appropriate NetView DM agent
software is installed on the workstation. This is accomplished by
the creation of the NetView DM FNDSWINV software change
history import file, which contains a listing of the NVDM change
object names that where discovered on that workstation by the
Software Inventory service.
Software Inventory also provides a software dictionary import
function for existing QSoft dictionary files (used by IBM's Network
Door/2 product), NetView DM inventory list files (used by the
INVSCAN utility), SPAudit dictionaries (a publicly available
dictionary, used with the Software Publishers Association SPAudit
tool. This dictionary can be obtained on the World Wide Web at
http://www.spa.org), and other Software Inventory dictionaries
92
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
(enabling you to easily combine multiple Software Inventory
dictionaries).
Software Inventory can also be used in conjunction with the Remote
System Manager. With Software Inventory, you can assign
keywords to specific applications. If an application that has a
defined application keyword is found during a dictionary search,
the application keyword can be added to the list of other keywords
that are currently defined for this system. Once an application
keyword has been added to the list of system keywords, a Netfinity
Manager can use the Remote System Manager discovery feature to
add only systems that have specified application keywords to a
system group. For example, using an application keyword a
Netfinity Manager could create a group that contains only systems
that have a specific word processor program that needs upgrading.
For more information on keyword assignment and the discovery
process, see Netfinity Manager User's Guide or consult your network
administrator..
Figure 22. The Software Inventory service
Chapter 11. Software Inventory
93
The Software Inventory Dictionary File
Software Inventory uses a software product data file (called the
dictionary file) to determine the presence of a software product on a
system. The dictionary file contains the names of many software
products and matching attributes. Matching attributes are
characteristics of the software product that enable Software
Inventory to identify the software product when the specified
attributes are found. Software Inventory uses two kinds of
matching attributes:
Ÿ File names (can include file size and file date)
Ÿ SYSLEVEL files (can include SysID and Component ID)
As Software Inventory searches your hard disk drives, it checks for
the presence of specified files or SYSLEVEL files. If it finds a
SYSLEVEL file or other file that is defined as a matching attribute in
the loaded dictionary file, it reports the product as installed on the
system.
Loading a Dictionary File
To load a Software Inventory dictionary file:
1. Select Open... from the Dictionary pull-down menu in the
Software Inventory window.
This opens the Open Existing Dictionary... window.
2. Type in the Open filename field the fully qualified path and file
name of the dictionary file that you want to open, or select from
the appropriate fields the drive and directory that contain the
dictionary file, and then select the dictionary file name.
3. Select OK.
Creating a New Dictionary File
To create a new dictionary file:
1. Select New... from the Dictionary pull-down menu in the
Software Inventory window.
This opens the New Dictionary... window.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
2. Type in the Save as filename field the name of the new
dictionary file.
3. Select from the Drive and Directory fields the drive and
directory where the new dictionary file will be created.
4. Select OK.
Editing the Dictionary File
To edit the currently loaded Software Inventory dictionary file,
select Edit... from the Dictionary pull-down menu. This opens the
Edit Dictionary window (see Figure 23 on page 96). From this
window, you can:
Ÿ Change the dictionary description.
The dictionary file description appears at the bottom of the
Software Inventory window and can be used to help you
identify the contents of the currently loaded dictionary file. The
description is for your use only, and can be anything at all.
To change the dictionary file description, type in the
Description field the new description for the dictionary file and
then select Exit.
Chapter 11. Software Inventory
95
Figure 23. The Edit Dictionary window
Ÿ Add a Product Definition.
For information on how to add a product definition, see
“Adding a Product Definition.”
Ÿ Edit a Product Definition.
For information on how to edit a product definition, see
“Editing a Product Definition” on page 108.
Ÿ Delete a Product Definition.
To delete a product definition form the dictionary file, select the
product definition from the Product Definitions selection list,
and then select Delete.
Adding a Product Definition
Select Add to add a new product definition to the currently loaded
Software Inventory dictionary file. This opens the New Product
Definition Type window (see Figure 24 on page 97). Product
definitions can be added based on either of two criteria:
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Ÿ Product defined by one or more required files
Select Product defined by one or more required files to
configure a Software Inventory product definition that will
determine whether a product is installed on a system by
checking for one or more files of your choosing. In addition to
the name of the file or files that Software Inventory will search
for, you can specify minimum (or maximum) file size and exact
date or date ranges for the file.
To add a product definition by defining one or more required
files, see “File-List Product Definitions.”
Ÿ Product defined by SYSLEVEL file
Select Product defined by SYSLEVEL file to configure a
Software Inventory product definition that will determine
whether a product is installed on a system by checking for a
specified SYSLEVEL file. In addition to the name of the
SYSLEVEL file, you can specify a SysID Value or Component
ID.
To add a product definition by requiring the presence of a
specified SYSLEVEL file, see “SYSLEVEL File Product
Definitions” on page 103.
Figure 24. The New Product Definition Type window
File-List Product Definitions
A file-list product definition enables Software Inventory to search
your system's drives for specific files that are found in specific
products. If the files are found, then the Software Inventory service
will report that the software package that contains the files is
installed on the system.
Chapter 11. Software Inventory
97
To add a file list product definition to the currently loaded Software
Inventory dictionary file:
1. Select Edit from the Dictionary pull-down menu in the Software
Inventory window.
2. Select Add from the Edit Dictionary window.
3. Select Product defined by one or more required files from the
New Product Definition Type window, and then select OK to
open the Add File List Product Definition window (see
Figure 25).
Figure 25. The Add File List Product Definition window
4. Fill in the product data fields and select a Product Type.
This information will appear in the Software Inventory window
and in any reports Software Inventory generates when the
product is found during a search. The Product Type can also be
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
used by the Software Inventory service when Search by Product
Type searches are performed. For more information on Search
by Product Type searches, see “Search by Product Type” on
page 110.
The product data fields include:
Ÿ Product Name
This is the name of the software product.
Ÿ Vendor Name
This is the name of the manufacturer of the software
product.
Ÿ Description
This is a brief description of the software product.
Ÿ Product Type
This is a brief description of what function the software
product performs. The selections available are:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Default
Network
Communications
Word Processing
Desktop Publishing
Database
Mail
Server
Spreadsheet
Financial
Entertainment
Multimedia
Graphics Viewer/Editor
Education
Operating System
Software Development
Presentation Graphics
System Management
Documentation
CAD/CAM
Chapter 11. Software Inventory
99
Ÿ Version
This is the software product version number.
Ÿ Revision
This is the software product revision number.
Ÿ NetView DM Change Object (NetView DM users only)
This is the NetView Distribution Manager change object that
will be added to the workstation’s installation history. It
does not have to match an existing change object in the
NetView DM server’s database, but it should follow your
naming conventions for change objects. After the invocation
of Software Inventory on a workstation, this change object
name will be added to your NetView DM catalog if it does
not already exist.
Note: This data is used only for the Update NetView DM
Inventory function. For more information on the
NetView DM Change Object, see “Updating a
NetView Distribution Manager Inventory” on
page 113, or see your NetView DM documentation.
Ÿ NetView DM Location Token (NetView DM users only)
This is the NetView Distribution Manager location token
string for use with the software product you are defining.
This is commonly used to denote where the application is
installed on the workstation. For example, if you are
creating a product definition for Netfinity, you would enter
a location token of NETFINDIR. The maximum length
allowed is 11 characters. This field is optional.
Note: This data is used only for the Update NetView DM
Inventory function. For more information on the
NetView DM Change Object, see “Updating a
NetView Distribution Manager Inventory” on
page 113 or your NetView documentation.
Ÿ Application Keyword
The application keyword, when used in conjunction with
the Remote System Manager, enables a Netfinity Manager to
discover only systems that have specified applications
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
installed on them. For more information on using
application keywords, see “Using Application Keywords” on
page 115.
Although you do not need to fill in all of these fields, fill in as
many as possible in order to maximize the information available
to you when a product is found by the Software Inventory
service.
5. Specify the Matching Attributes
Matching Attributes are the data items used by the Software
Inventory service in order to detect whether the software
product you are defining is installed on a system. Because you
are creating a File List Product Definition, the Matching
Attributes will be one (or more) specified files. You can Add,
Edit, or Delete files from the Matching Attributes field.
To add a file:
Ÿ If you have the product that you are defining on your
system:
a. Select Use Files.
b. Select the Drive and Directory where the files that
Software Inventory will search for are located. Then,
select a File and select OK.
This will add the selected file to the Matching
Attributes field, and then reopen the Use File for
Matching File window so you can add other files from
this directory. When you have finished adding files,
select Cancel.
c. Optional: In order to differentiate between different
releases or versions of an individual product, you might
need to specify that particular files were created on or
after a specific date, or that the file is a certain size or
within a range of sizes. If you want Software Inventory
to look for files that are a specified size or within a
range of sizes, or that were created on a specific day or
during a specific date range, select the file from the
Matching Attributes field and then select Edit to open
the Edit Matching File window (see Figure 26 on
Chapter 11. Software Inventory
101
page 102). Specify the File Size and File Date
information, and then select Save to continue.
Figure 26. The Edit Matching File window
d. Select Create to save this Product Definition to the
currently loaded Software Inventory dictionary file.
Ÿ If you do not have the product that you are defining on
your system:
a. Select Add to open the Add Matching File window.
b. Type in the File Name, File Size data (optional), and
File Date data (optional).
In order to differentiate between different releases or
versions of an individual product, you might need to
specify that a particular file was created on or after a
specific date, or that the file is of a certain size or within
a certain range of sizes. If you want Software Inventory
to look for files that are a specified size or within a
range of sizes, or that were created on a specific day or
during a specific date range, specify the File Size and
File Date information.
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c. Select Save to add this file to the Matching Attributes
list.
Repeat this process until you have added as many
Matching Attributes as you want.
d. Select Create to save this Product Definition to the
currently loaded Software Inventory dictionary file.
SYSLEVEL File Product Definitions
A SYSLEVEL file product definition enables Software Inventory to
search your system's drives for a specific SYSLEVEL file that is
found in a specific product. If the SYSLEVEL file is found, then the
Software Inventory service will report that the software package that
contains the SYSLEVEL is installed on the system.
To add a SYSLEVEL file list product definition to the currently
loaded Software Inventory dictionary file:
1. Select Edit from the Dictionary pull-down menu in the Software
Inventory window.
2. Select Add from the Edit Dictionary window.
3. Select Product defined by SYSLEVEL file from the New
Product Definition Type window, and then select OK to open
the Add SYSLEVEL Product Definition window (see Figure 27
on page 104).
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103
Figure 27. The Add SYSLEVEL Product Definition window
4. Fill in the product data fields and select a Product Type. This
information will appear in the Software Inventory window and
in any reports Software Inventory generates when the product is
found during a search. The Product Type can also be used by
the Software Inventory service when Search by Product Type
searches are performed. For more information on Search by
Product Type searches, see “Search by Product Type” on
page 110.
The product data fields include:
Ÿ Product Name
This is the name of the software product.
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Ÿ Vendor Name
This is the name of the manufacturer of the software
product.
Ÿ Description
This is a brief description of the software product.
Ÿ Product Type
This is a brief description of what function the software
product performs. The selections available are:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Default
Network
Communications
Word Processing
Desktop Publishing
Database
Mail
Server
Spreadsheet
Financial
Entertainment
Multimedia
Graphics Viewer/Editor
Education
Operating System
Software Development
Presentation Graphics
System Management
Documentation
CAD/CAM
Ÿ NetView DM Change Object (NetView DM users only)
This is the NetView Distribution Manager change object that
will be added to the workstation’s install history. It does
not have to match an existing change object in the NetView
DM server’s database, but it should follow your naming
conventions for change objects. After the invocation of
Software Inventory on a workstation, this change object
Chapter 11. Software Inventory
105
name will be added to your NetView DM catalog if it does
not already exist.
Note: This data is used only for the Update NetView DM
Inventory function. For more information on the
NetView DM Change Object, see “Updating a
NetView Distribution Manager Inventory” on
page 113, or see your NetView DM documentation.
Ÿ NetView DM Location Token (NetView DM users only)
This is the NetView Distribution Manager location token
string for use with the software product you are defining.
This is commonly used to denote where the application is
installed on the workstation. For example, if you are
creating a product definition for Netfinity, you would enter
a location token of NETFINDIR. The maximum length
allowed is 11 characters. This field is optional.
Note: This data is used only for the Update NetView DM
Inventory function. For more information on the
NetView DM Change Object, see “Updating a
NetView Distribution Manager Inventory” on
page 113, or see your NetView DM documentation.
Ÿ Application Keyword
The application keyword, when used in conjunction with
the Remote System Manager, enables a Netfinity Manager to
discover only systems that have specified applications
installed on them. For more information on using
application keywords, see “Using Application Keywords” on
page 115.
Although you do not need to fill in all of these fields, fill in as
many as possible in order to maximize the information available
to you when a product is found by the Software Inventory
service.
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5. Specify the Matching Attributes
Matching Attributes are the data items used by the Software
Inventory service in order to detect whether the software
product you are defining is installed on a system. Because you
are creating a SYSLEVEL File Product Definition, the Matching
Attributes will be the SYSLEVEL file name, the SysID, and the
Component ID.
To add Matching Attributes for a SYSLEVEL file:
Ÿ If you have the SYSLEVEL file for the product you are
defining on your system:
a. Select Use File.
b. Select the Drive and Directory where the SYSLEVEL file
is located, select the SYSLEVEL File and then select OK.
c. Select Create to save this Product Definition to the
currently loaded Software Inventory dictionary file.
Ÿ If you do not have the SYSLEVEL for the product you are
defining on your system:
a. Type in the File Name field the three character file
name extension for the product's SYSLEVEL file.
b. If possible, type in the SysID Value and the Component
ID.
Note: These values are stored in the SYSLEVEL file, and
can be difficult to obtain without the SYSLEVEL
file itself.
c. Select Create to save this Product Definition to the
currently loaded Software Inventory dictionary file.
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107
Editing a Product Definition
Software Inventory dictionary file product definitions can be edited
in much the same as they are added. To edit a product definition:
1. Select Edit from the Dictionary pull-down menu in the Software
Inventory window.
2. Select from the Product Definitions field the name of the
product whose definition you want to edit, and then select Edit.
Ÿ If the selected product definition is a File List Product
Definition, the Edit File List Product Definition window
opens.
Ÿ If the selected product definition is a SYSLEVEL File
Product Definition, the Edit SYSLEVEL Product Definition
window opens.
3. Edit the product information and Matching Attributes as
needed.
The process used to edit the product information and Matching
Attributes is the same as that used when adding a new product
definition. See “File-List Product Definitions” on page 97 and
“SYSLEVEL File Product Definitions” on page 103 for more
information.
4. Select Save to save the changes to this product definition.
Performing a Search
Software Inventory can perform three types of software searches on
the system. The three kinds of searches are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Full Dictionary Search
Search by Drive
Selected Product Search
Search by Product Type
Full Dictionary Search
Software Inventory’s Full Dictionary Search enables you to search
for any software product that is defined in the currently loaded
Software Inventory dictionary file. Depending on the speed of your
system, the number of files on your system, the products installed
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on your system, and the number of products defined in the
currently loaded Software Inventory dictionary file, the Full
Dictionary Search can take from just seconds to several minutes to
complete. Once the search is complete, results will be displayed in
the Software Inventory window.
To perform a Full Dictionary Search, select Full Dictionary Search
from the Inventory pull-down menu in the Software Inventory
window.
For information on generating reports or exporting this information
to a database, see “Generating Reports and Exporting Data” on
page 112.
Search by Drive
Software Inventory enables you to perform full dictionary searches
on specified hard disk drives. If you want to search to for products
only on one disk drive on a system, select Search by Drive... from
the Inventory pull-down menu in the Software Inventory window,
and then select the letter of the disk drive you want to search.
Software Inventory will then search for any products defined in the
currently loaded Software Inventory dictionary on only the specified
disk drive.
Once the search is complete, results will be displayed in the
Software Inventory window. For information on generating reports
or exporting this information to a database, see “Generating Reports
and Exporting Data” on page 112.
Selected Product Search
In some cases, you might want to search for specific software
products on your networked systems. To search for one or more
specific products:
1. Select Selected Product Search... from the Inventory pull-down
menu in the Software Inventory window.
This opens the Selective Inventory window (see Figure 28 on
page 110).
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109
Figure 28. The Selective Inventory window
2. Select from the Available Product Definitions window the
names of all products that you want to search for.
3. Select OK to begin the search for the selected products.
Once the search is complete, results will be displayed in the
Software Inventory window. For information on generating reports
or exporting this information to a database, see “Generating Reports
and Exporting Data” on page 112.
Search by Product Type
When defining products for use with the Software Inventory
dictionary file, you can specify a Product Type. This is a brief
description of the product’s main function. For example, Netfinity’s
Product Type is Systems Management. Software Inventory enables
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you to search your networked systems for all products of the same
Product Type.
To search only for specified Product Types:
1. Select Search by Product Type from the Inventory pull-down
menu in the Software Inventory window.
This opens the Search by Product Type window.
Figure 29. The Search by Product Type window
2. Select from the Product Type list one or more product types.
3. Select OK to initiate your search.
Once the search is complete, results will be displayed in the
Software Inventory window. For information on generating reports
or exporting this information to a database, see “Generating Reports
and Exporting Data” on page 112.
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Generating Reports and Exporting Data
The information gathered by Software Inventory can be:
Ÿ Printed to a file
Ÿ Printed to a printer
Ÿ Exported to a Netfinity database
Print to File
To save the information gathered by Software Inventory to a file:
1. Initiate a Software Inventory search.
2. When the search is complete, select Print to File from the
Inventory pull-down menu.
3. Name the file, select a drive and directory to which it will be
saved, and then select OK.
Print to Printer
To print the information gathered by Software Inventory on a
printer attached to your system:
1. Initiate a Software Inventory search.
2. When the search is complete, select Print to Printer from the
Inventory pull-down menu.
The information is then sent to the default printer attached to your
system.
Export to Database
To export the information gathered by Software inventory to a
Netfinity database, or to save the data to a supported database
format file:
1. Initiate a Software Inventory search.
2. When the search is complete, select Export to Database... from
the Inventory pull-down menu.
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3. Select the type of database export you want to perform (export
the data to an attached database, or save the data to a database
file).
4. Select OK to export or save the data.
Updating a NetView Distribution Manager
Inventory
You can use Software Inventory to create the NetView Distribution
Manager (NetView DM) software inventory import file. If your
system is running NetView DM agent software, select Update
NetView DM Inventory... from the Inventory pull-down menu.
Software Manager will scan the currently loaded dictionary file for
any product definitions that include an NetView DM Change Object
and add them to the NetView DM software inventory import file
(FNDSWINV). The location token information will be written into
the NetView DM agent software base path into a file called
FNDTKINV.
This enables a user-written exit routine to then invoke the
appropriate NetView DM INV and NetView DM UPDTG
commands to move the data in this import file into that
workstation’s NetView DM software change history database.
Note: This choice is only available if NetView DM agent software is
installed and running on the system.
Importing Software Dictionaries
Software Inventory provides a software dictionary import function
for existing QSoft dictionary files (used by IBM's Network Door/2
product), NetView DM inventory list files (used by the INVSCAN
utility), SPAudit dictionaries (a publicly available dictionary, used
with the Software Publishers Association SPAudit tool. This
dictionary can be obtained on the World Wide Web at
http://www.spa.org), and other Software Inventory dictionaries
(enabling you to easily combine multiple Software Inventory
dictionaries).
Chapter 11. Software Inventory
113
To import a software dictionary file:
1. Open the Software Inventory dictionary file to which new data
will be imported.
To open a Software Inventory dictionary file, select Open... from
the Dictionary pull-down menu, select a dictionary file, and then
select OK.
2. Select an import function from the Dictionary pull-down menu.
The following software dictionary import functions are
available:
Ÿ Import from Software Inventory Dictionary...
Select Import from Software Inventory Dictionary... to
import all data from another Software Inventory dictionary
file into the currently loaded Software Inventory dictionary
file.
Ÿ Import from SPAudit Dictionary...
Select Import from SPAudit Dictionary... to import all data
from an SPAudit dictionary file into the currently loaded
Software Inventory dictionary file.
Ÿ Import from QSoft Dictionary...
Select Import from QSoft Dictionary... to import all data
from a QSoft dictionary file into the currently loaded
Software Inventory dictionary file.
Ÿ Import from Dictionary...
Select Import from NetView DM Inventory List... to import
all data from a NetView DM Inventory List into the
currently loaded Software Inventory dictionary file.
Notes:
1. Depending on the speed of your system and the size of the
dictionary file you are importing, import functions can take a
considerable amount of time to complete.
2. Import functions import all data in the file you select, including
entries that could already exist in the loaded Software Inventory
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dictionary file. Importing identical product definitions will
result in multiple, identical entries for products in your
dictionary file and will also result in single products being
discovered multiple times. To remove identical entries from
your Software Inventory dictionary file, edit the dictionary file
using the Software Inventory dictionary edit function (for more
information see “Editing the Dictionary File” on page 95).
Using Application Keywords
Software Inventory enables you to add application keywords to
specific software applications. Once defined, these keywords can
then be used by Remote System Manager to create system groups
that contain only systems that have specified applications installed.
To add an application keyword to a product definition in your
Software Inventory dictionary file:
1. Load a Software Inventory dictionary file.
To load a dictionary file select Open from the Dictionary
pull-down menu, select the dictionary file you want to load, and
then select OK.
2. Edit the Software Inventory dictionary file.
Select Edit... from the Dictionary pull-down menu to edit the
currently loaded dictionary file.
3. Edit the Product Definition.
Select the product to which you will assign an application
keyword from the Product Definitions field and then select
Edit.
4. Assign an application keyword.
Type in the Application Keyword field the keyword that will be
used to identify this product. The application keyword can be
up to 12 characters long.
5. Select Save to save this information to the dictionary file.
Products with application keywords that are discovered on a system
following a dictionary search will have the application keyword
Chapter 11. Software Inventory
115
displayed along with other software product information in the
Software Inventory window following the dictionary search. Once a
product that has an application keyword defined is discovered on a
system, the application keyword can be added to the system’s
keyword list. To update the system keyword list with application
keywords for discovered and defined products, select Update
Application Keywords from the Inventory pull-down menu.
Notes:
1. To differentiate application keywords from other system
keywords, the application keyword will has the characters APP:
added to the beginning of the application keyword. Remote
System Manager system groups that use the application
keyword as part of the group’s system discovery criteria must
include APP: as well as the text that is entered in the
Application Keyword field to successfully discover the system.
For example, if a product definition uses the application
keyword SOFTWARE, the keyword that must be used by
Remote System Manager to discover systems using the product
that is defined using this application keyword would be
APP:SOFTWARE.
2. The Update Application Keywords function adds only
application keywords that are currently displayed in the
Software Inventory window to the system’s keyword list. If you
add an application keyword to the product definition of an
application that is installed on your system, the application
keyword will not be added to the keyword list until you
perform another dictionary search and then select Update
Application Keywords.
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Chapter 12. System Information Tool
System Information Tool is designed to gather and display a broad
variety of information about the hardware and software
configuration of your system. System Information Tool is primarily
designed for use on IBM systems, but many features will function
on systems from other manufacturers.
System Information Tool Features
The System Information Tool gathers hardware and software
configuration information. This information can be viewed online
or directed to a file or printer.
Note: System Information Tool supports export of collected data to
a Netfinity database. However, database export can be
performed only by the Netfinity Manager. No database
export functions are available for local use on systems
running Client Services for Netfinity Manager.
Depending on your system’s hardware, software, or operating
system configuration, System Information Tool provides information
on some or all of the the following system features:
Ÿ Pentium processor information, including automatic detection
of flawed Pentium processors
Ÿ Micro Channel, EISA, and PCI adapter identity, with
configuration information available on many common adapters
Ÿ Drive information, including file-system type, available space on
the disk drive, disk drive size, and partition layout
Ÿ Error log display and interpretation
Ÿ Keyboard information
Ÿ Memory configuration, including total physical memory,
installed single inline memory module identification, and
supported memory upgrades
Ÿ Mouse type and settings
Ÿ Operating system information, including version, DOS support,
session limits, current task list, and CONFIG.SYS information
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
117
Ÿ Model and microprocessor information, including model name,
processor type and speed, and BIOS date
Ÿ Parallel and serial port configuration
Ÿ Video system information, including adapter type, screen
resolution, and video display identification
Ÿ Printer configuration, including data on installed printer drivers
Ÿ SCSI, ESDI, IDE/ST506, or other disk adapter information,
including devices attached, device sizes, and adapter data
Ÿ System security features, including power-on password and
secondary security features
Ÿ RAID subsystems
Ÿ VPD data
Ÿ PCMCIA devices
Ÿ Plug and Play configuration
Ÿ Network (NDIS) devices and data (available only on systems
running OS/2)
Figure 30. System Information Tool
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Using System Information Tool
To display information gathered by System Information Tool, select
the object or name of the component from the System Information
Tool window. This action opens a window that contains more
specific information regarding the component you selected.
If more information is available, one or more words or objects
within the new window will be highlighted. You may then select
another object or topic to open a window with more device-specific
information. If there is no further information available, no
highlighted items will appear within the window.
System Information Tool provides you with three options for
generating output of the gathered and displayed data. To access
these options, select the File pull-down menu at the top of the
System Information Tool window, and then do the following:
Ÿ Select Print All System Data To File to generate a textual report
of all of the system configuration data which has been collected
by the System Information Tool, and then save the report to a
user-selected file. You are given a standard file window to
select the file name.
Ÿ Select Print All System Data To Printer to generate a textual
report of all of the system configuration data that has been
collected by the System Information Tool, and then send the
report to the default printer.
Ÿ Select Generate History File to create a binary file that contains
all of the information displayed in the program as well as the
current time and date. The history file can be viewed later by
using the /F command-line parameter when starting the System
Information Tool from a command-line. For more information
on System Information Tool’s command-line functions, see
“System Information Tool Command Line Operations” on
page 158.
Chapter 12. System Information Tool
119
Protecting Confidential System Data
In addition to extensive hardware configuration information System
Information Tool gathers detailed operating system information.
The data collected is operating system-dependent, and typically
includes the contents of the system’s CONFIG.SYS or
AUTOEXEC.BAT files. Depending on your system’s configuration,
these files might contain confidential information. For example,
your CONFIG.SYS file might contain the following command, used
to logon to a network-accessible disk drive:
LOGON MY_USER_ID /D:MY_DRIVE /P:MY_PASSWORD
To automatically protect sensitive or confidential system data, create
an ASCII file named SIKEYWD.INI in your Netfinity directory. This
file should contain one or more alphanumeric strings. If this file is
present, System Information Tool will automatically replace all
alphanumeric characters (other than the keyword itself) that are on
any line that contains one of the keywords specified in the
SIKEYWD.INI file with asterisks.
Using the previous example, if your SIKEYWD.INI file contains the
keyword LOGON the CONFIG.SYS information shown above would
appear to the user as
LOGON\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\
Notes:
1. The SIKEYWD.INI file can contain as many keywords as
needed. Keywords must be separated by a space.
2. SIKEYWD.INI string entries are case-sensitive. Only strings that
exactly match the SIKEYWD.INI entries will be replaced in the
System Information Tool data.
3. Because of the additional processing that must be done, adding
keywords to the SIKEYWD.INI file can degrade System
Information Tool performance. Users should add keywords to
the SIKEYWD.INI file with care.
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Chapter 13. System Monitor
The System Monitor provides a convenient method of charting and
monitoring the activity of a number of components in your system.
Standard features include:
Ÿ Continuous monitoring of systems, including:
– Locked memory use
– Virtual memory use
– Microprocessor use
– DASD space available and space remaining
– DASD use
– TCP/IP protocol functions
– Processes running
– Threads running
– Pentium processor computations
– RAID device attributes
– Read/write errors (Netfinity Manager only)
Ÿ Detachable, scalable, and user-configurable monitors
Ÿ User-definable thresholds that will generate Netfinity alerts
when exceeded
Ÿ Alerts that are generated when previously exceeded threshold
return to an acceptable or normal state
Ÿ Choice of line-graph, text, and real-time graphic representations
of system activity
Note: System Monitor supports export of collected data to a
Netfinity database. However, database export can be
performed only by the Netfinity Manager. No database
export functions are available for local use on systems
running Client Services for Netfinity Manager.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
121
Figure 31. System Monitor Service
Note: System Monitor uses a data-handling technique that allows
for both long-term, system activity profiles and short-term,
high-resolution system activity monitoring.
As samples of system activity are taken, they are stored and
displayed. However, after a number of samples have been
taken, their individual values are weighed, several concurrent
samples are averaged, and they are posted as a single,
long-term value.
Primarily, this is done to prevent System Monitor data files
from taking up a large amount of space on a system. This
data-handling technique also allows for a more reasonable
measurement of average long-term system load values
without sacrificing short-term monitoring abilities. This
data-handling technique accounts for the initial “spiking” you
may see on line graphs when the System Monitor is started.
If you do not need records of a monitor’s previous activity, or
do not want to use disk drive space to maintain these
records, you can use the System Monitor’s Record Data
option to disable record keeping.
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The System Monitor Service Window
When the System Monitor service is started, all monitors currently
set to be visible appear on your display, along with the System
Monitor Service window.
Figure 32. The System Monitor Service window
The System Monitor Service window controls the service as a whole.
If the System Monitor Service window is closed, all of the monitors
will close as well.
Use the choices in the System Monitor Service window’s Windows
pull-down menu to:
Ÿ Show monitors that are available
Select Show Monitors to open the Select Visible Monitors
window. Use this window to select which of the System
Monitors you want to be visible on your Desktop.
Figure 33. The Select Visible Monitors window
To select the monitors that will be visible on the Desktop:
Chapter 13. System Monitor
123
1. Select the monitors that you want to have visible on the
Desktop.
To select all available monitors, click on Select All. If all
monitors are currently selected and you want to deselect all
monitors, click on Deselect All.
There is no enforced limit to the number of monitors that
can be active at one time. However, due to system
restraints, a default maximum of 50 monitors can be
displayed at a time. The maximum number of monitors
visible can be changed by setting a system environment
variable as follows:
SET NF_MAX_MON_DISP=n
where n is an integer greater than zero. The manner in
which the environment variable is set depends on your
operating system.
– To set this environment variable on an OS/2 or
Windows 95 system, add the variable to your
CONFIG.SYS file and then restart your system.
– On NT systems:
a. Open the Windows NT Control Panel, then
double-click on System.
b. Click on the Environment tab.
c. Click anywhere in the System Environment
Variables field.
d. Type in the Variable field
NF_MAX_MON_DISP
e. Type in the Value field the n value (an integer
greater than zero).
f. Select Set.
g. Select Apply.
h. Select OK.
i. Shutdown and restart the Netfinity Support
Program.
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Note: If you increase the number of monitors that can be
displayed at a time, you system could run out of
resources. To prevent this problem, display only as
many monitors as needed.
2. If any monitors are selected that you do not want to be
visible on the Desktop, deselect them.
3. Select Accept to display or hide monitors as appropriate.
Ÿ Bring specific monitors to the foreground
Select the name of the monitor you want to bring to the
foreground. If a monitor is not currently hidden, you can select
the monitor’s name to bring it to the foreground. If a monitor is
hidden, its name will be grayed out. Hidden monitors cannot
be brought to the foreground.
Monitor Pop-Up Menus
Each monitor has a number of monitor-specific options that can be
accessed from the monitor’s pop-up menu. To open a monitor’s
pop-up menu, use mouse button 2, and click on the monitor. This
opens the monitor’s pop-up menu. Use the selections in individual
monitor’s pop-up menu to:
Ÿ Configure System Monitor thresholds
Select Thresholds to open the Thresholds page of the individual
monitor’s notebook. For more information see “Setting
Thresholds” on page 128.
Ÿ Change System Monitor settings
Select Settings to open the Settings page of the individual
monitor’s notebook. For more information see “Monitor
Settings” on page 131.
Chapter 13. System Monitor
125
Ÿ Change the System Monitor that is displayed
Select View to choose the appearance of monitor that will is
displayed. The available monitor types are:
– Line Graph
– Real Time
– Text Display
For more information on the available monitor types see
“Changing Monitor Views” on page 132.
Ÿ Bring the Main Window to the foreground
Select Main Window to bring the System Monitor Service
window to the foreground.
Ÿ Enable or disable recording of data
Select Record Data to enable System Monitor to keep records of
this monitor’s previous activity. If this option is not selected,
monitor data is not saved and line-graph monitors are not
available. Disabling this option on monitors that you do not use
frequently, or from which you do not need long-term data, can
help you save space on your disk drive.
Ÿ Access online help
Select Help to access System Monitor’s online help facility.
Ÿ Move
Select Move to move the selected monitor around the Desktop.
When you have moved the selected monitor to the new location,
click again to drop it. Monitors can also be moved by dragging
the monitor to a new location.
Ÿ Size the monitor
Select Size to resize the selected monitor. After you select Size,
move the mouse until the window outline is the size that you
want the selected monitor to be. Then, click again to resize the
monitor. You can also resize monitors by dragging the sides or
corners of the monitor windows.
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Note: If you make a monitor too small for the monitor’s text to
be shown fully, the text will disappear. However, this
has no effect on the monitor’s function.
Ÿ Hide the monitor
Select Hide to make the selected monitor invisible. The monitor
will continue to function and collect data, but it will not be seen
on the Desktop. To make a monitor that you have hidden
visible again, you must open the System Monitor Service
window, and then select Show Monitors... to open the Select
Visible Monitors window. For more information on the Show
Visible Monitors window see “The System Monitor Service
Window” on page 123.
System Monitor Notebooks
Use each monitor’s System Monitor notebook to:
Ÿ Set thresholds at which alerts will be generated.
For more information on setting thresholds, see “Setting
Thresholds” on page 128.
Ÿ Configure monitor-specific settings. For more information on
configuring monitor settings, see “Monitor Settings” on
page 131.
To open the System Monitor notebook:
1. Open the individual monitor’s context menu (using mouse
button 2, click on the monitor).
2. Select Open.
3. Select the page of the notebook you want to open:
Ÿ Select Thresholds to open the notebook to the Thresholds
page.
Ÿ Select Settings to open the notebook to the Settings page.
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Setting Thresholds
The Thresholds page of the System Monitor notebook enables you to
set threshold values for this monitored system component. If the
monitored value of this system component falls outside of the
configured threshold values, the System Monitor will generate a
Netfinity alert. You can also configure System Monitor to generate
an alert when a previously exceeded threshold has returned to a
normal or acceptable state.
System Monitor also automatically monitors any redundant arrays of
independent disks (RAID) subsystems that may be present on your
system. You can monitor RAID subsystems and other
attribute-based devices with System Monitor’s Attribute Monitors.
For more information on Attribute Monitors, see “Attribute
Monitors” on page 135.
System Monitor will automatically generate alerts if a RAID system
malfunction is detected. For more information on RAID alerts, see
Appendix D, “RAID Alerts” on page 153.
Figure 34. The System Monitor Notebook Threshold Page
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
To create (or edit) a threshold for this system component:
1. Open the System Monitor notebook to the Threshold page.
Using mouse-button 2, click on the monitor for which you will
create the threshold. Then, select Open, and then Thresholds
from the monitor’s pop-up menu.
2. Name the threshold (or select the Threshold Name to be edited).
Type the name of the threshold in the Threshold Name field. If
you are editing an existing threshold, select the threshold from
the Threshold Name selection list.
3. Set the threshold’s duration.
Type a number and select a unit of measurement (for example,
“seconds”) to create a duration value. This will specify the
length of time that the monitor’s threshold value must be
exceeded before an alert is generated.
4. Set the resend delay.
Type a number and select a unit of measurement (for example,
“seconds”) to create a resend delay value. This will specify the
length of time that the System Monitor will wait, after sending
an alert, before resending a duplicate alert if the threshold Value
continues to be violated.
5. Set the threshold’s values.
Enter one or more threshold Values for this monitor. You can
set up to four different threshold Values, each of which will
generate a different Netfinity alert.
Ÿ Error if above or equal to
The threshold value entered in the Error if above or equal
to field is the minimum value that will trigger an alert. If
the parameter being monitored is greater than or equal to
this value, System Monitor will generate and “Error” alert
type. The threshold value must be less than or equal to the
maximum value for this system component (for example,
100.0 for CPU Utilization or 214.0 for the space on a 214 MB
logical drive), and must be greater than or equal to the
Warning if above or equal to, Warning if below or equal
Chapter 13. System Monitor
129
to, and Error if below or equal to Values (if any). If the
entered value does not conform to these requirements,
System Monitor will “beep” and reject the entered value.
Ÿ Warning if above or equal to
The threshold value entered in the Warning if above or
equal to field is the minimum value that will trigger an
alert. If the parameter being monitored is greater than or
equal to this value, System Monitor will generate and
“Warning” alert type. The threshold value must be less
than or equal to the maximum value for this system
component (for example, 100.0 for the CPU monitor), less
than or equal to the value (if any) assigned for Error if
above or equal to, and must be greater than or equal to the
assigned values (if any) for Warning if below or equal to
and Error if below or equal to. If the entered value does
not conform to these requirements, System Monitor will
“beep” and reject the entered value.
Ÿ Warning if below or equal to
The threshold value entered in the Warning if below or
equal to field is the maximum value that will trigger an
alert. If the parameter being monitored is less than or equal
to this value, System Monitor will generate and “Warning”
alert type. The threshold value must be less than or equal
to the maximum value for this system component (for
example, 100.0 for the CPU monitor), less than or equal to
the value (if any) assigned for Error if above or equal to
and Warning if above or equal to, and must be greater than
or equal to the assigned value (if any) for Error if below or
equal to. If the entered value does not conform to these
requirements, System Monitor will “beep” and reject the
entered value.
Ÿ Error if below or equal to
The threshold value entered in the Error if below or equal
to field is the maximum value that will trigger an alert. If
the parameter being monitored is less than or equal to this
value, System Monitor will generate and “Error” alert type.
The threshold value must be less than or equal to the
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
maximum value for this system component (for example,
100.0 for the CPU monitor), and less than or equal to the
values (if any) assigned for Error if above or equal to,
Warning if above or equal to, and Warning if below or
equal to. If the entered value does not conform to these
requirements, System Monitor will “beep” and reject the
entered value.
6. Set the threshold’s severity
A default severity is provided for each of the threshold Values.
You can adjust these values by selecting the spin buttons at the
right of the field.
7. Select Notify (optional).
Select Notify to cause a pop-up window to appear on this
system whenever this threshold is exceeded. If you do not
select Notify, the threshold will be saved and will be active, but
a pop-up window will not automatically inform you if the
threshold is exceeded.
8. Select Alert on return to normal (optional).
Select Alert on return to normal to configure System Monitor to
generate an alert with the user-specified severity when a
threshold value that was previously exceeded returns to an
acceptable value.
9. Save the threshold.
If you have been configuring a new threshold, select Create to
save these threshold values. If you have been editing a
previously configured threshold, select Change to save the new
threshold values.
Monitor Settings
Use the Settings page of the System Monitor notebook to enable of
disable the title bar for this monitor, select the type of monitor that
is displayed, to configure the line-graph settings for this monitor, to
set the background and colors used in the real-time monitor view,
or to select a font for use with this monitor.
Chapter 13. System Monitor
131
Figure 35. The System Monitor Notebook Settings Page.
Enabling and Disabling the Title Bar (available on OS/2 systems only)
Select the Enable Title Bar check box to activate a title bar on this
monitor. This title bar shows the name of the monitor (for example,
“CPU Utilization Monitor”). If you do not want a title bar on this
monitor, deselect the Enable Title Bar check box.
To save the new Settings, close the notebook by double-clicking in
the upper-left corner.
Changing Monitor Views
Select the type of monitor that will be displayed from the View
button group. The available monitor types are:
Ÿ Line graph
Select Line graph to display a “heartbeat-style” chart of this
system component’s activity using user-specified Line-Graph
Settings to determine the length of the graph and the units in
which it is measured. For more information on line-graph
monitors, see “Configuring Line-Graph Settings” on page 133.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Note: If you have disabled the Record Data option (found in
the monitor’s pop-up menu), line-graph monitors will not
be available.
Ÿ Real time
Select Real time to display a graphic representation of this
system component’s current status. The real time monitor that
is displayed depends on what system component it is meant to
represent. For example, the CPU monitor uses a
speedometer-style real time monitor to show percentage of CPU
utilization, while hard disk drive Space Used monitors use a
cylinder to depict how “full” the disk drive is.
Ÿ Text display
Select Text display to display a textual readout of the system
component’s current activity, without any graphical
representation.
To save the new Settings, close the notebook by double-clicking in
the upper left corner.
Configuring Line-Graph Settings
Use the selections available in the Line graph settings field group to
configure this component’s line-graph monitor. This field group
enables you to:
Ÿ Set the Line-Graph Scale
Use the Scale fields to configure the length of time graphed
when viewing this monitor’s line graph. Enter a number in the
first Scale field, and then use the spin buttons to the right of the
second Scale to select the unit of time that the line graph will
use to graph component activity. The available units of time
are:
–
–
–
–
–
Seconds
Minutes
Hours
Days
Weeks
Ÿ Enable/disable line-graph fill
Chapter 13. System Monitor
133
Select Fill graph if you want to fill in this monitor’s line-graph
with a specified color. If Fill Graph is not selected, the line
graph will show only a white line against the dark background.
If you select Fill graph, you can then select from the Fill color
field the color with which the line graph will be filled.
Ÿ Select the line-graph fill color
Use the spin buttons at the right side of the Fill color field to
select the color with which the line graph will be filled.
To save the new Settings, close the notebook by double-clicking in
the upper left corner.
Configuring Real-Time Settings
Use the selections available in the Real-time settings field group to
configure this component’s real-time monitor. This field group
enables you to:
Ÿ Select a background texture (available on OS/2 systems only)
Use the spin buttons at the right side of the Background texture
field to select a bit map for use as a background texture for this
monitor window.
Ÿ Select the filled color
Use the spin buttons at the right side of the Filled Color field to
select the color that will be used for the foreground of the
real-time monitor.
Ÿ Select the empty color
Use the spin buttons at the right side of the Empty Color field
to select the color that will be used for the background part of
the real-time monitor.
To save the new Settings, close the notebook by double-clicking in
the upper left corner.
Configuring Font Settings
Use the selections available in the Font field group to select the font
and font color for use with all text in all views for this monitor.
This field group enables you to:
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Ÿ Select a font
Use the spin buttons at the right side of the font Name field to
select the font that will be used for text in each of this
component’s views.
Ÿ Select a font color (available on OS/2 systems only)
Use the spin buttons at the right side of the Color field to select
the color of the font that will be used for text in each of this
component’s views.
To save the new Settings, close the notebook by double-clicking in
the upper left corner.
Attribute Monitors
Attribute Monitors are used where a numerical value is
meaningless. For example, the current status of a RAID device is
expressed as a descriptive word (Online, Offline, or Defunct), rather
than as a numeric value. Attribute Monitors enable you to view the
current status of such a device, and to assign thresholds based on
changes in state. Attribute monitors can also have a variety of
settings assigned to them.
Note: Attribute monitors are similar to, but not the same as, the
RAID alerts described in Appendix D, “RAID Alerts” on
page 153. RAID alerts are automatically generated by
Netfinity whenever a RAID device changes state, but offer no
simple way for you to visually check the current state of a
RAID device. Attribute monitors enable to you visually
monitor the current state of any RAID device and to create
additional thresholds for these devices, if necessary.
Attribute Monitor Thresholds
Attribute monitor thresholds are set from the Attribute Monitor
notebook’s Threshold page. To open the notebook, using mouse
button 2 to click on the monitor for which you want to set a
threshold to open the monitor’s context menu, select Open, and
then select Thresholds.
To configure a threshold for an Attribute Monitor:
Chapter 13. System Monitor
135
1. Select the attribute that you want to monitor.
Each Attribute Monitor will contain one or more attributes that
can be monitored. The names of these attributes are determined
by the type of device. Select from the Attribute to Monitor
field the name of the attribute that you will monitor.
2. Name the threshold.
Type in the Threshold Name filed a name for this threshold and
then press Enter.
3. Set the threshold’s duration.
Type a number and select a unit of measurement (for example,
“seconds”) to create a duration value. This value specifies the
length of time after the monitored attribute changes state before
the alert is generated.
4. Set the resend delay.
Type a number and select a unit of measurement (for example,
“seconds”) to create a resend delay value. This value specifies
the length of time that the System Monitor will wait, after
sending an alert, before resending a duplicate alert if the
attribute’s state remains unchanged.
5. Select a violating state.
Select from the State field the name of the state which, if
reported by the the monitored Attribute, will generate an alert.
6. Select a severity value.
Select a Severity for the alert that will be generated if the
specified State is reported.
7. Specify an Application Alert Type value.
The Application Alert Type is a four digit numeric value
assigned to the generated alert. It can be used by the Alert
Manager to differentiate this alert from other alerts for Alert
Action responses. Type in the Application Alert Type field a
four digit value to be used when this monitor’s alert is
generated.
8. Select an Alert Type.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
The Alert Type is a descriptive term assigned to the generated
alert. It can be used by the Alert Manager to differentiate this
alert from other alerts for Alert Action responses, and helps to
describe the nature of the problem that caused the alert to be
generated. Select from the Alert Type list an Alert Type to be
used when when this monitor’s alert is generated.
9. Select Notify (optional).
Select Notify to cause a pop-up window to appear on this
system whenever the violating state is reported. If you do not
select Notify, the threshold will be saved and will be active, but
a pop-up window will not automatically inform you if the
violating state is reported.
10. Select Create to save these threshold values. If you have been
editing a previously configured threshold, select Change to save
the new threshold values.
Attribute Monitor Settings
Attribute Monitor settings are set from the Attribute Monitor
notebook’s Settings page. To open the notebook, use mouse button
2 to click on the monitor for which you want to set a threshold.
From the monitor’s context menu, select Open, and then select
Settings.
Use the Attribute Monitor's Settings notebook to:
Ÿ Enable or disable the title bar (available on OS/2 systems only)
Select the Enable Title Bar check box to activate a title bar on
this monitor. This title bar shows the name of the monitor. If
you do not want a title bar, deselect the Enable Title Bar check
box.
Ÿ Enable or disable bit maps (available on OS/2 systems only)
When the Enable Bit Maps check box is selected, a small icon
will appear before each monitored attribute. This icon will
indicate the attribute’s current state.
Ÿ Change the monitor’s view
The following views are available for the Attribute Monitor:
Chapter 13. System Monitor
137
– Attribute History
The Attribute History view shows the state reported by the
attribute monitor over a specified period of time.
– Real Time
The Real Time view shows only the current state of the
monitored device.
Ÿ Change the monitor’s font
Use the selections available in the Font field group to select the
font and font color for use with all text in all views for this
monitor. This field group enables you to:
– Select a font
Use the spin buttons at the right side of the Font field to
select the font that will be used for text in each of this
component’s views.
– Select a font color (available on OS/2 systems only)
Use the spin buttons at the right side of the Color field to
select the color of the font that will be used for text in each
of this component’s views.
To save the new Settings, close the notebook by double-clicking in
the upper-left corner.
IBM PC Server 720 Monitors
Netfinity also includes several additional monitors that are
specifically designed for use with the IBM PC Server 720. If
Netfinity is installed on an IBM PC Server 720, you can use
additional monitors that enable you to keep track of the:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
138
Power supply temperature (Celsius/Fahrenheit)
System temperature (Celsius/Fahrenheit)
Planar temperature (Celsius/Fahrenheit)
Power supply voltage (+5v, +12v, -12V, and +3.3c)
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Chapter 14. System Partition Access
The Netfinity System Partition Access allows for greatly simplified
System Partition file handling on IBM computers. This service
features:
Ÿ Extensive file-level manipulation
Ÿ Initial machine load (IML) image updating
Ÿ Adapter description program (ADP), adapter description file
(ADF), and diagnostic (DGS) updating
Ÿ Set Configuration program updating
Ÿ User-confirmation security to prevent accidental deletion of the
System Partition
The System Partition is a section of the hard drive on some IBM
systems that contains the system’s power-on self test (POST), basic
input/output system (BIOS), and some system utility programs. If
you are not using an IBM system that has a System Partition, you
will not have access to, or a need for, this service.
Note: System Partition Access cannot access or manage the System
Partitions on enhanced small device interface (ESDI) systems.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
139
Netfinity System Partition Access offers a variety of System Partition
file-manipulation actions. Available actions are:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Copy from partition
Copy to partition
Delete directory
Rename directory
Delete file
Rename file
Partition backup
Partition restore
Delete partition
Make directory
Quit
The following sections provide detailed information on each
available action.
Figure 36. System Partition Access Service
140
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Copy from Partition
You can use the Copy from Partition option to copy a specific file
from within your System Partition to a selected directory on a local
drive. To use this function:
1. If you have multiple System Partitions, select from the System
Partition field the partition you want to access.
2. Select the System Partition directory you want to copy a file
from by selecting the appropriate directory in the System
Partition Directory field. When you have selected the directory,
all files contained in that directory will be displayed in the
System Partition File name field.
3. Select from the System Partition File name field the file that you
want to copy.
4. Select a destination drive for the file. Select the arrow at the
right side of the Logical drive field to display a list of all
available drives. Select one of these drives as the file
destination.
5. Select a destination directory for the file. All directories present
on the selected logical drive are displayed in the Logical Drive
Directory field. Select one of these directories. All files located
in this directory will then be displayed in the Logical Drive File
name field.
6. Select Copy from Partition to copy the selected System Partition
file to the selected destination.
Copy to Partition
You can use the Copy to Partition option to copy a specific file from
a local drive to your System Partition. To use this function:
1. If you have multiple System Partitions, select from the System
Partition field the partition you want to access.
2. Select the System Partition directory you want to copy a file to
by selecting the appropriate directory in the System Partition
Directory field. When you have selected the directory, all files
Chapter 14. System Partition Access
141
contained in that directory will be displayed in System Partition
File name field.
3. Select the source drive for the file. Select the arrow at the right
side of the Logical drive field to display a list of all available
drives. Select one of these drives as the source drive.
4. Select the source directory for the file. All directories present on
the selected logical drive are displayed in the Logical Drive
Directory field. Select one of these directories. All files located
in this directory will then be displayed in the Logical Drive File
name field.
5. Select from the Logical Drive File field the file that you want to
copy.
6. Select Copy to Partition to copy the selected file to the System
Partition.
Delete Directory
You can use the Delete Directory option to delete a directory from
your System Partition. To use this function:
1. If you have multiple System Partitions, select from the System
Partition field the partition you want to access.
2. Select from the System Partition Directory field the System
Partition directory you want to delete. Double-click on the
directory name to open the directory.
3. Select Delete Directory to delete the selected directory from
your system. To prevent accidental directory deletion, you must
confirm this choice.
Note: The directory that you are deleting must be empty before the
Netfinity System Partition Access will allow you to delete it.
For information on deleting System Partition files, see “Delete
File” on page 143.
Rename Directory
You can use the Rename Directory option to select a new name for a
directory within your System Partition. To use this function:
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
1. If you have multiple System Partitions, select from the System
Partition field the partition you want to access.
2. Select the System Partition directory you want to rename.
Double-click on the directory name to open the directory.
3. Select Rename Directory. The System Partition Access will ask
you to enter the new name for the selected directory.
4. Enter the new directory name and press Enter. System Partition
Access will rename the directory.
Delete File
You can use the Delete File option to delete individual files from
within your System Partition. To use this function:
1. If you have multiple System Partitions, select from the System
Partition field the partition you want to access.
2. Select from the System Partition Directory field the System
Partition directory that contains the file you want to delete.
When you have selected the directory, all files contained in that
directory will be displayed in the System Partition File field.
3. Select from the System Partition File name field the file you
want to delete.
4. Select Delete File. System Partition Access will then delete the
selected file.
Rename File
You can use the Rename File option to rename individual files
within your System Partition. To use this function:
1. If you have multiple System Partitions, select from the System
Partition field the partition you want to access.
2. Select from the System Partition Directory field the System
Partition directory that contains the file you want to rename.
When you have selected the directory, all files contained in that
directory will be displayed in the System Partition File name
field.
Chapter 14. System Partition Access
143
3. Select from the System Partition File name field the file you
want to rename.
4. Select Rename File. System Partition Access will then ask you
what you want to rename the file. Enter the new name for the
file and press Enter. The file is now renamed.
Delete Partition
Attention:
Deleting the System Partition on a system that requires a System
Partition can render the system inoperative. Do not use the Delete
Partition option unless you are certain that your system will
function properly after the System Partition has been deleted.
You can use the Delete Partition option to remove a selected System
Partition (displayed in the System Partition field) from your
selected Logical Drive. When you have selected this option, System
Partition Access will ask you to confirm that you want to delete the
partition. To continue, select OK and the selected System Partition
(as well as all directories and files within the partition) will be
deleted.
Backup Partition
You can use the Backup Partition option to copy the System
Partition to a file on any logical drive. To use this function:
1. If you have multiple System Partitions, select from the System
Partition field the partition you want to access.
2. Select a destination drive for the System Partition backup file to
be written to. Select the arrow at the right side of the Logical
drive field to display all available logical drives, and then select
the appropriate drive.
3. Select a destination directory. Directories present on the
selected logical drive are displayed in the Logical Drive
Directory field.
4. Select Partition Backup to write a file of the selected System
Partition to your specified destination.
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Restore Partition
You can use the Restore Partition option to restore your System
Partition using backup diskettes or files created with the Backup
Partition function. To use this function:
1. Select the source drive where the System Partition backup file is
located. Select the arrow at the right side of the Logical drive
field to display all available logical drives, and then select the
appropriate drive..
2. Select the source directory where the backup file is located. All
directories present on the selected logical drive are displayed in
the Logical Drive Directory field. Select one of these directories.
All files located in this directory will then be displayed in the
Logical Drive File name field. Select the backup file that you
want to use from the Logical Drive File name field.
3. Select Restore Partition to copy your backup file to the System
Partition.
Make Directory
You can use the Make Directory option to add a directory to the
selected System Partition (displayed in the System Partition field).
After you have selected this option, System Partition Access will ask
you to provide a name for the new directory.
Quit
Select Quit to exit System Partition Access.
Chapter 14. System Partition Access
145
Chapter 15. System Profile
System Profile provides you with an easy-to-organize repository for
a variety of system- and user-specific information that might not be
readily available otherwise. The System Profile service comes with
many predefined fields to help simplify organization and entry of
this data. The System Profile service also features many
user-definable fields to help you customize the System Profile to
meet your individual needs.
System Profile’s data can be saved to an ASCII file. The
combination of System Information Tool’s sophisticated hardware
information gathering abilities with System Profile’s extensive
selection of system- and user-specific data fields results in an
extraordinarily flexible and useful system-inventorying and
information facility.
Note: System Profile supports export of collected data to a Netfinity
database. However, database export can be performed only
by the Netfinity Manager. No database export functions are
available for local use on systems running Client Services for
Netfinity Manager.
Figure 37. The System Profile service window.
146
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
The System Profile service window is made up of five sections, each
of which consists of two or more pages and is devoted to a specific
type of system- or user-specific information. Each section is
identified by its own tab. These sections are:
Ÿ System
The System section of the System Profile service contains
predefined fields to help you organize the information specific
to your computer, display, printer, and modem.
Ÿ User
The User section of the System Profile service contains
predefined fields to help you organize the information specific
to a system’s primary user including name, phone number,
home address, and emergency contact.
Ÿ Location
The Location section of the System Profile service contains
predefined fields to help you organize the information specific
to the system’s physical location, including office number,
building number, site name, city, and country.
Ÿ Contacts
The Contacts section of the System Profile service contains
predefined fields to help you organize the information regarding
various ways of contacting the system’s primary user (telephone
number, fax number, Email address, and so on) and other
personnel associated with the primary user (for example,
manager, secretary, and so on).
Ÿ Miscellaneous
The Miscellaneous section of the System Profile service contains
undefined fields that you can use to store additional
information, such as nicknames and birthdays.
To enter and save data in the System Profile service:
1. Enter the data you want to save in the appropriate fields.
Select a field and type in the appropriate data. To change
pages, select one of the small arrows at the lower right corner of
Chapter 15. System Profile
147
the page (select the right-pointing arrow to advance one page,
and the left-pointing arrow to go back one page). To change
sections, select the section’s tab from the right side of the service
window. You do not need to fill in all of the available fields.
2. Close the System Profile service.
When you have finished entering information, double-click on
the upper-left corner of the System Profile service to save your
information and close the service window.
Select Undo to reset the current page’s fields to their last saved
values. Selecting Undo will not have any affect on the other pages
in the service window.
To close the service window without saving any changes, select
Close Without Saving from the Options pull-down menu.
Other actions available from the Options pull-down menu are:
Ÿ Refresh
Select Refresh to update the information that is displayed in the
System Profile service window. Changes can be made to the
service window’s contents by other users while you are viewing
it; selecting Refresh will update the data displayed in the
System Profile service window’s fields.
Ÿ Save to File
Select Save To File to save all information contained in the
System Profile service to an ASCII text file.
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Appendix A. Installation Configurations
When installing the Client Services for Netfinity Manager, you can
choose one of three installation configurations. Each of these
configurations installs a specific group of Netfinity services on your
system.
Stand-Alone Operation
This installation configuration installs base programs and interfaces
for:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Netfinity Service Manager
System Information Tool
System Profile
System Monitor
Alert Manager
Critical File Monitor
Software Inventory
Also, the following services are installed if they are supported by
your system:
Ÿ ECC Memory Setup (requires ECC memory)
Ÿ System Partition Access (requires a System Partition)
Ÿ Predictive Failure Analysis (requires a PFA-enabled hard disk
drive)
Ÿ RAID Manager (requires a RAID adapter)
Ÿ DMI Browser (requires DMI Service Layer)
Passive Client Operation
This installation configuration installs:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Netfinity Service Manager
Network Communications drivers
Alert Manager
Security Manager
Serial Connection Control
All base programs for Netfinity services supported by your
system
Note: Passive Client Operation is designed specifically for the
remote management and access of Passive Client systems by
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
149
a Netfinity Remote System Manager. Aside from the Alert
Manager, Security Manager, and Serial Connection Control,
local access to the Client Services for Netfinity Manager is not
available.
Active Client Operation
This installation configuration installs the following for remote
system management:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Netfinity Service Manager
Network Communications drivers
Alert Manager base program and user interface
All base programs for Netfinity services supported by your
system
The following programs are installed to support local system
management:
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Netfinity Service Manager
System Information Tool
System Profile
System Monitor
Alert Manager
Security Manager
Serial Connection Control
Critical File Monitor
The following services are also installed if they are supported by
your system:
Ÿ ECC Memory Setup (requires ECC memory)
Ÿ System Partition Access (requires a System Partition)
Ÿ Predictive Failure Analysis (requires a PFA-enabled hard disk
drive)
Ÿ RAID Manager (requires a RAID adapter)
Ÿ DMI Browser (requires DMI Service Layer)
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Appendix B. Supported PFA Hard Disk Drives
The following PFA-enabled hard disk drives are supported by
Predictive Failure Analysis. Only the listed hard disk drives can be
monitored or managed by the Predictive Failure Analysis service. If
one of these drives is not present in your system when Netfinity is
installed, the service will not be installed.
Ÿ IBM Type 0664 Hard Disk Drive
Ÿ IBM Type 0663 Hard Disk Drive
Ÿ IBM Type 0662 Hard Disk Drive
Ÿ IBM Type DPES-31080 Hard Disk Drive (product revision 531Q
only)
Ÿ IBM Type DFHS Hard Disk Drive
Ÿ IBM Type DFMS Hard Disk Drive
Ÿ IBM Type XP31 Hard Disk Drive
Ÿ IBM Type XP32 Hard Disk Drive
Ÿ IBM Type XP34 Hard Disk Drive
Ÿ IBM Type DORS-3216DW Hard Disk Drive
Ÿ IBM Type FIREBALL12805 Hard Disk Drive (product revision
630N or later)
In addition to these hard disk drives, Netfinity Manager and Client
Services for Netfinity Manager for OS/2 or Windows NT support
PFA-enabled hard disk drives that conform to the self-monitoring
analysis and reporting technology (SMART) standard. Support for
SMART hard disk drives is available only on systems running
Netfinity Manager or Client Services for Netfinity for OS/2 or
Windows NT.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
151
Appendix C. Supported RAID Adapters
The following RAID adapters are supported:
Ÿ IBM RAID Adapter
Ÿ IBM SCSI-2 Fast/Wide-Streaming RAID Adapter/A
Ÿ IBM SCSI-2 Fast PCI-Bus RAID Adapter
Ÿ IBM PC ServeRAID Adapter
Ÿ IBM PC ServeRAID PCI Adapter
Ÿ IBM PC ServeRAID PCI II Adapter
152
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
Appendix D. RAID Alerts
A RAID adapter (RAID means redundant array of independent disks)
attaches to multiple physical disk drives, and enables you to treat
these drives as up to eight system (or logical) drives. Although the
System Monitor service does not display a monitor if a RAID system
is present, it does monitor the status of all disk drives that are
attached to the RAID adapter to ensure that they are online and
functioning correctly.
The RAID adapter will detect when physical drives or system drive
become active or inactive. This is called a drive’s state.
System drives report one of three states. These states are:
Ÿ Online
Ÿ Critical
Ÿ Offline
Note: The Critical state can only be reported by RAID level 1, 2, 3,
or 4 system disk drives. RAID level 0 system disk drives
cannot report a Critical state. All RAID level 0 disk drives
are either Online or Offline. For more information on RAID
levels, see your RAID adapter documentation.
Physical drives report one of three states. These states are:
Ÿ Online
Ÿ Standby
Ÿ Defunct
RAID alerts are generated only when the RAID disk drive changes
state. It the state remains unchanged, additional alerts will not be
generated.
The alert text of all RAID alerts generated by System Monitor follow
this format:
Alert: RAID Device state Attribute typeandlocation
in subsystem set to state
where state is the state reported by the drive., typeandlocation is the
type of RAID disk drive (Physical or System) and its designated
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
153
location (System Drive number or Physical Bay number), and
subsystem is the name of the RAID subsystem reporting the state
change.
The alert-specific information for each RAID alert follows.
RAID Physical Disk Drive State is Online
Description
Generated when a physical drive changes
state from Standby or Defunct to Online.
Alert Type
Information
Severity
3
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
130
RAID Physical Disk Drive State is Standby
Description
Generated when a physical drive changes
state from Online or Defunct to Standby.
Alert Type
Error
Severity
2
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
130
RAID Physical Disk Drive State is Defunct
154
Description
Generated when a physical drive changes
state from Online or Standby to Defunct.
Alert Type
Failure
Severity
0
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
130
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
RAID System Disk Drive State is Online
Description
Generated when a system drive changes
state from Critical or Offline to Online.
Alert Type
Information
Severity
3
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
131
RAID System Disk Drive State is Critical
Description
Generated when a system drive changes
state from Online or Offline to Critical.
Alert Type
Warning
Severity
2
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
131
RAID System Disk Drive State is Offline
Description
Generated when a system drive changes
state from Critical or Online to Offline.
Alert Type
Failure
Severity
0
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
131
Note: If a RAID physical disk drive generates an alert message, you
will generally receive alert messages from all system drives
that are associated with that physical drive.
Appendix D. RAID Alerts
155
Several of Netfinity’s services can be accessed from your system’s
command line. The following sections describe how these services
can be accessed from a command line, as well as the various
parameters associated with their use.
Alert Manager Command Line Operations
The Alert Manager service does not have any command line
operations. However, GENALERT.EXE is a program that causes an
alert to be generated within your system. This alert may have a
number of user-specified parameters, described below.
Note: If you want alerts generated using GENALERT to be
forwarded to a host system using the “Send alert to host via
APPC” alert action, see “Adding GENALERT Alert
Descriptions to the NMVT.INI File” on page 157.
The command-line format for GENALERT.EXE is:
GENALERT /T:"text" /APP:id_name
/SEV:ð..7 /TYPE:sssttt /ATYPE:hexnum
where:
/T:"text"
Defines the text message describing the alert. The
quotation marks are required.
/APP:id_name
Defines the application ID for the alert (1—8
characters)
/SEV:0...7
Defines the priority or severity of the alert
(0=highest priority, 7=lowest priority).
/TYPE:sssttt
Defines the standard type of alert.
The sss field describes the ID of the alert:
UNK - Unknown
SYS - System
DSK - Disk or DASD
NET - Network
OS_ - Operating System
APP - Application
DEV - Device
SEC - Security
156
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
The ttt field describes the class of the alert:
UNK - Unknown
FLT - Fault or Failure
ERR - Error
WRN - Warning
INF - Information
/ATYPE:hexnum
Defines the application-specific alert type as a
hexadecimal value. Values range from 0000 to
FFFF.
Adding GENALERT Alert Descriptions to the
NMVT.INI File
The NMVT.INI file, found in the Netfinity directory, contains alert
descriptions that map standard Netfinity alerts to NMVT-style alerts
that can then be properly passed to a host system using advanced
program-to-program communications (APPC) and the “Send alert to
host via APPC” alert action. However, because alerts generated
using the GENALERT command are configured and defined by the
user, they are not included in this file. As a result, if you do not
add entries to the NMVT.INI file for GENALERT alerts, the “Send
alert to host via APPC” alert action will not have the data it needs
to build the NMVT (including alert description, failure causes,
recommended actions, and so forth) and will be unable to pass this
information to the host.
To enable a system to pass GENALERT-created alert information to
the host, you must add an entry to the NMVT.INI file located in the
Netfinity directory of the system generating the alert. This entry,
like all other entries in the NMVT.INI file, must consist of
information about the Netfinity alert (including application name,
alert type, and alert severity) followed by configuration data for the
NMVT that will be sent to the host.
For example, generate an alert using the following GENALERT
command:
GENALERT /T:"Virus Detected" /APP:ANTVIR /SEV:ð
/TYPE:SECWRN /ATYPE:ðððC
Appendix E. Netfinity Command Line Operations
157
In order for this alert to be properly forwarded to the host, you
must edit the NMVT.INI file and include an entry specifically
created to translate the Netfinity alert information into
NMVT-specific information. For example:
APP:ANTVIR TYPE:SECWRN SEV:ð ATYPE:ðððC GTYPE:ð1
DESC:Cðð7 CAUSE:67ðð USER:7199:1ð26 FAIL:ð5ð1:18ðð31ð3
Once this entry is added to the NMVT.INI file, the Alert Manager
will be able to use the “Send alert to host via APPC” alert action to
convert this alert into an NMVT and forward it to the host system.
System Information Tool Command Line
Operations
The System Information Tool can be started from a command line,
and supports five command line parameters. The command line
format for System Information Tool is:
SINFG3ð /P:filename /H:filename
/F:history filename /NOLOGO /B
The command line parameters are as follows:
158
/P: filename
This parameter is used to generate a report of all the
information collected by the program. A logical
printer name like LPT1 can be substituted for a file
name, which will send the report to a printer. The
program logo screen will be displayed while the
information is being gathered, and the program will
terminate after the report has been generated.
/H: filename
This parameter is used to generate a binary history
file that contains all of the information detected by
the program, as well as the time and date that the
report was generated. This file can then be used as
an input source using the /F command-line
parameter. The program logo screen will be
displayed while the information is being gathered,
and the program will terminate after the file is
generated.
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
/F: history filename
This parameter causes the program to use a
previously generated history file as the source for
information gathering, rather use than the physical
system the program is being executed on. You can
use this option to view a history file from another
system.
/NOLOGO
When this parameter is used, the program logo will
not be displayed. This parameter can be used in
conjunction with any of the other parameters.
/B
This parameter causes the program to bypass all
warning and informational messages while the
program is starting. This could be used for
unattended system startups. This parameter can be
used in conjunction with any of the other
parameters.
Appendix E. Netfinity Command Line Operations
159
ECC Memory Setup Command Line Operations
All functions of the ECC Memory Setup can also be accessed from
your OS/2 command line, using ECCMEM.EXE.
Note: ECCMEM.EXE is available for use only on systems running
OS/2.
The command line format for ECCMEM.EXE is:
ECCMEM /INIT /SCRUB:ON or OFF /THRESH:ON or OFF
/COUNT:ON or OFF /QUIET /COUNTVAL:number
/THRESHVAL:number
where:
/INIT
Causes the ECC memory to be initialized
to the saved settings
/SCRUBON or OFFñ
Enables or disables single-bit error
scrubbing
/THRESH:ON or OFFñ
Enables or disables single-bit error
threshold nonmaskable interrupt (NMI)
/COUNT:ON or OFFñ
Enables or disables single-bit error
counting
/QUIET
Causes ECCMEM.EXE to generate no
textual output
/COUNTVAL:number
Sets the single-bit error count to a given
value
/THRESHVAL:numberñ
Sets the single-bit error threshold to a
given value
ñ These options update the saved settings to the value provided.
When the system is restarted, the saved settings will configure the
ECC memory.
Starting and Stopping Service Base Programs
Remotely
160
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
You can use the Netfinity STRTBASE.EXE and STOPBASE.EXE
command-line programs to remotely start or stop the base program
of most Netfinity services.
Note: STRTBASE.EXE and STOPBASE.EXE can start and stop the
base programs only for individual Netfinity services. These
programs cannot be used to remotely start or stop the
Netfinity Network Interface, the Netfinity Support Program,
or any base program that is started by the Netfinity Network
Interface or the Netfinity Support Program (these include the
base programs for Alert Manager, Power-On Error Detect,
System Monitor, and Serial Connection Control). One of
these programs must be running on the remote system for
STRTBASE.EXE or STOPBASE.EXE to function properly.
Starting Service Base Programs Remotely
From your system, use STRTBASE.EXE to start a Netfinity service’s
base program on a remote system. The command line format for
STRTBASE.EXE is:
STRTBASE \N:networktype::networkaddress
\BASE:servicebase [\BATCH] [\?]
Variable
Definition
networktype
Name of the protocol to be used to send
the message (for example, TCPIP)
networkaddress
Protocol-specific address of the remote
system on which the base program will
be started (for example,
user.network.com)
servicebase
The service connection name of the
program base to be started on the remote
system. For a list of the service
connection names that must be used with
this command, see “Service Connection
Names” on page 163.
BATCH
Program runs with no output. When
STRTBASE.EXE is run in BATCH mode, a
file named SYSNAME.OUT that contains
Appendix E. Netfinity Command Line Operations
161
the remote system’s name is created in
the same directory as STRTBASE.EXE
?
Displays command line help.
Stopping Service Base Programs Remotely
From your system, use STOPBASE.EXE to stop a Netfinity service’s
base program on a remote system. The command line format for
STOPBASE.EXE is:
STOPBASE \N:networktype::networkaddress
\BASE:servicebase [\BATCH] [\?]
162
Variable
Definition
networktype
Name of the protocol to be used to send
the message (for example, TCPIP)
networkaddress
Protocol-specific address of the remote
system on which the base program will
be stopped (for example,
user.network.com)
servicebase
The service connection name of the
program base to be stopped on the
remote system. For a list of the service
connection names that must be used with
this command, see “Service Connection
Names” on page 163.
BATCH
Program runs with no output. When
STOPBASE.EXE is run in BATCH mode, a
file named SYSNAME.OUT that contains
the remote system’s name is created in
the same directory as STOPBASE.EXE
?
Displays command line help.
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Service Connection Names
A list of the service connection names that must be used with the
STRTBASE.EXE and STOPBASE.EXE programs follows.
Service Connection Name
Service Name
CFMBase
Critical File Monitor
ProcMgr
Process Manager
ECCMemory
ECC Memory Setup
Gatherer3.0
System Information Tool
(Version 3.0 or later)
Gatherer
System Information Tool (all
other versions)
PFAServiceBase
Predictive Failure Analysis
ScreenID
Screen View
DMIBrowserBase
DMI Browser
RAID_BASE
RAID Manager
RCSHD
Remote Session
SoftInvB
Software Inventory
FileBase
File Transfer
PartionBase
System Partition Access
SCH_BASE_NODE
Event Scheduler
ProfileBase
System Profile
CAPMGT
Capacity Management
RWCService
Remote Workstation Control
DiagMgr
System Diagnostic Manager
SCFMgr
Service Configuration Manager
ServiceProcessorBase
Service Processor Manager
UpdateConnector
Update Connector Manager
(interface)
Appendix E. Netfinity Command Line Operations
163
UpdateConnectorClient
164
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Update Connector Manager
(interface or client)
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
All Netfinity Alerts include the time and date at which the Alert
was generated. The other information depends on which service
generated the Alert and the circumstances that caused the Alert to
be generated.
Some Alerts have values that can be assigned by the user. This
often applies to Severity values, although there are some exceptions.
In this case, the Alert information will be signified with a variable,
and a note below the alert data will provide any clarification
necessary.
Some alerts support macro parameter strings. These strings
(%P1–%P9) can be passed through to and used by other programs.
Each alert and its alert-specific information are listed beneath the
heading of the service that generates the alert.
Power On Error Detect
Explanation
Generated by the Power-On Error Detect
service when a Power-On Error is
detected on a remote system. The
Power-On Error Detect will generate this
alert only if the service’s Generate Alert
on Error option is enabled.
Alert Text
Netfinity Power-On Error Detect Alert
Type of Alert
Failure
Severity
4
Application ID
Power-On Error Detect
Application Alert Type
0201
This alert does not support additional parameter strings.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
165
Predictive Failure Analysis
Explanation
Generated by the Predictive Failure
Analysis service when the service receives
notification from a PFA-enabled hard disk
drive that a drive failure will occur within
24 hours. The Predictive Failure Analysis
service will generate this alert only if the
service’s Generate Alert option is
enabled.
Alert Text
Predictive Failure Analysis has detected
an imminent failure on PUN w, LUN x
hard drive. Back up physical drive y and
call your service provider for a
replacement.
Type of Alert
Disk Failure
Severity
z
Application ID
PFA
Application Alert Type
0000
This alert does not support additional parameter strings.
Notes:
1. The Alert Text variables w, x, and y are determined by the
Predictive Failure Analysis service, and represent the PUN,
LUN, and drive letter assigned to the failing PFA-enabled hard
disk drive, respectively.
2. You can add additional text to this alert. For more information,
see “The PFA Options for Drive Window” on page 63.
3. You can specify the Severity variable z. For more information,
see “The PFA Options for Drive Window” on page 63.
166
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Critical File Monitor
Alerts generated by the Critical File Monitor follow.
File Changed Alert
Explanation
Generated by Critical File Monitor when a
monitored file changes size, date, or time.
Alert Text
The following file has changed: 'filename'.
Type of Alert
Application Warning
Severity
x
Application ID
MonCritF
Application Alert Type
0
This alert does not support additional parameter strings.
Notes:
1. The Alert Text variable filename is the name of the file that has
changed.
2. You can set the Severity variable x. The default Severity value
for this alert is 3.
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
167
File Deleted Alert
Explanation
Generated by Critical File Monitor when a
monitored file is deleted.
Alert Text
The following file has been deleted:
'filename'.
Type of Alert
Warning
Severity
x
Application ID
MonCritF
Application Alert Type
1
This alert does not support additional parameter strings.
Notes:
1. The Alert Text variable filename is the name of the file that has
been deleted.
2. You can set the Severity variable x. The default Severity value
for this alert is 3.
File Created Alert
Explanation
Generated by Critical File Monitor when a
monitored file is created.
Alert Text
The following file has been created:
'filename'.
Type of Alert
Warning
Severity
x
Application ID
MonCritF
Application Alert Type
2
This alert does not support additional parameter strings.
168
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Notes:
1. The Alert Text variable filename is the name of the file that has
been created.
2. You can set the Severity variable x. The default Severity value
for this alert is 3.
Process Manager
Alerts generated by Process Manager follow.
Process Terminated Alert
Explanation
Generated by Process Manager when a
monitored process is stopped.
Alert Text
Process '%P1' has terminated.
Type of Alert
Application Information
Severity
x
Application ID
ProcMgr
Application Alert Type
0901
Notes:
1. This alert supports the following macro parameter string:
%P1
Name of the process that has been terminated.
2. You can set the Severity variable x.
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
169
Process Started Alert
Explanation
Generated by Process Manager when a
monitored process is started.
Alert Text
Process '%P1' has started.
Type of Alert
Application Information
Severity
x
Application ID
ProcMgr
Application Alert Type
0900
Notes:
1. This alert supports the following macro parameter string:
%P1
Name of the process that has been started.
2. You can set the Severity variable x.
Process Failed to Start Alert
Explanation
Generated by Process Manager when a
monitored process fails to start within a
specified time of system startup.
Alert Text
Process '%P1' has failed to start.
Type of Alert
Application Information
Severity
x
Application ID
ProcMgr
Application Alert Type
0902
Notes:
1. This alert supports the following macro parameter string:
%P1
Name of the process that has failed to start.
2. You can set the Severity variable x.
170
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Remote System Manager
Alerts generated by the Remote System Manager follow.
System Online Notification Alert
Explanation
Generated when the Remote System
Manager receives notification from a
remote system that the system is online
and reachable. The Remote System
Manager service will generate this alert
only if the service’s System Notifications:
Notify When Online option has been
enabled for a system within a system
group.
Alert Text
Alert Text: System '%P1' (Address '%P2'
on Network '%P3') is active and online.
Type of Alert
System Information
Severity
x
Application ID
NetMgr
Application Alert Type
000A
Notes:
1. This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
System Name of active system. This is set to indicate
the system that has come online.
%P2
Network Address of active system. This is set to
indicate the system that has come online.
%P3
Network Type of active system.
2. You can set the Severity variable x.
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
171
System Offline Notification Alert
Explanation
Generated when the Remote System
Manager is incapable of reaching a
remote system. The Remote System
Manager service will generate this alert
only if the service’s System Notifications:
Notify When Offline option has been
enabled for a system within a system
group.
Alert Text
Alert Text: System '%P1' (Address '%P2'
on Network '%P3') is offline or
unreachable.
Type of Alert
System Information
Severity
x
Application ID
NetMgr
Application Alert Type
000B
Notes:
1. This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
System Name of inactive system. This is set to
indicate the system that has gone offline.
%P2
Network Address of inactive system. This is set to
indicate the system that has gone offline.
%P3
Network Type of inactive system.
2. You can set the Severity variable x.
172
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Security Manager
Access Granted Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Security Manager
service when access to one or more
services is granted to a remote user who
has used a UserID/Password combination
to gain access.
Alert Text
User ID '%P1' from Address '%P2' on
Network '%P3' has been granted system
access.
Type of Alert
Security Information
Severity
7
Application ID
SecMgr
Application Alert Type
14
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
User ID requesting system access
%P2
Network Address of system requesting access
%P3
Network Type of system requesting access
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
173
Public Access Granted Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Security Manager
service when Public access to one or more
services is granted to a remote user.
Alert Text
User ID '%P1' from Address '%P2' on
Network '%P3' has been granted public
system access.
Type of Alert
Security Information
Severity
6
Application ID
SecMgr
Application Alert Type
15
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
User ID requesting system access
%P2
Network Address of system requesting access
%P3
Network Type of system requesting access
System Access Denied Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Security Manager
service when access to the system is
denied to a remote user.
Alert Text
Logon attempt by User ID '%P1' from
Address '%P2' on Network '%P3' has
been rejected.
Type of Alert
Security Warning
Severity
5
Application ID
SecMgr
Application Alert Type
16
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
174
%P1
User ID requesting system access
%P2
Network Address of system requesting access
%P3
Network Type of system requesting access
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
System Restart Initiated Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Security Manager
service when a remote Netfinity Manager
uses the Remote System Manager’s
Restart System option to restart your
system.
Alert Text
System Restart initiated by User ID '%P1'
from Address '%P2' on Network '%P3'.
Type of Alert
Security Information
Severity
5
Application ID
SecMgr
Application Alert Type
41
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
User ID requesting system restart
%P2
Network Address of system requesting restart
%P3
Network Type of system requesting restart
System Restart Request Rejected Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Security Manager
service when a remote Netfinity Manager
attempts to use the Remote System
Manager’s Restart System option to
restart your system, but does not have
adequate security access to do so.
Alert Text
System Restart request by User ID '%P1'
from Address '%P2' on Network '%P3'
rejected.
Type of Alert
Security Error
Severity
3
Application ID
SecMgr
Application Alert Type
40
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
175
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
User ID requesting system restart
%P2
Network Address of system requesting restart
%P3
Network Type of system requesting restart
Service Manager
Alerts generated by the Service Manager follow.
Service Start Request Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Service Manager when
a remote Netfinity Manager attempts to
use one of your Netfinity services.
Alert Text
User ID '%P1' from Address '%P2' on
Network '%P3' requested start of '%P4'
service.
Type of Alert
Security Information
Severity
7
Application ID
SvcMgr
Application Alert Type
0900
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
176
%P1
User ID requesting service start
%P2
Network Address of system requesting service
start
%P3
Network Type of system requesting service start
%P4
Name of service requested to be started
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Service Start Request Rejected Alert
Explanation
Generated by the Service Manager when
a remote Netfinity Manager’s request to
use one of your Netfinity services is
rejected.
Alert Text
User ID '%P1' from Address '%P2' on
Network '%P3' request to start '%P4
rejected.'
Type of Alert
Security Warning
Severity
5
Application ID
SvcMgr
Application Alert Type
0901
Note: This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
User ID requesting service start
%P2
Network Address of system requesting service
start
%P3
Network Type of system requesting service start
%P4
Name of service requested to be started
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
177
System Monitor
Alerts generated by System Monitor follow.
Upper-Range Threshold Error Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when the value of a monitored system
component exceeds the upper-range Error
value for greater than the specified time.
Alert Text
Error Alert %P1: Monitor '%P2' has been
above or equal to %P3 for %P4.
Type of Alert
Error
Severity
x
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
0000
Notes:
1. This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
Name of the threshold
%P2
Name of the monitor
%P3
Threshold value
%P4
Duration of threshold violation
2. You can set the Severity variable x. The default value for this
variable is 3.
178
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Upper-Range Threshold Warning Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when the value of a monitored system
component exceeds the upper-range
Warning value for greater than the
specified time.
Alert Text
Warning Alert %P1: Monitor '%P2' has
been above or equal to %P3 for %P4.
Type of Alert
Warning
Severity
x
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
0000
Notes:
1. This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
Name of the threshold
%P2
Name of the monitor
%P3
Threshold value
%P4
Duration of threshold violation
2. You can set the Severity variable x. The default value for this
variable is 4.
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
179
Lower-Range Threshold Warning Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when the value of a monitored system
component falls below the lower-range
Warning value for greater than the
specified time.
Alert Text
Warning Alert %P1: Monitor '%P2' has
been below or equal to %P3 for %P4.
Type of Alert
Warning
Severity
x
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
0000
Notes:
1. This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
Name of the threshold
%P2
Name of the monitor
%P3
Threshold value
%P4
Duration of threshold violation
2. You can set the Severity variable x. The default value for this
variable is 4.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Lower-Range Threshold Error Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when the value of a monitored system
component falls below the lower-range
Error value for greater than the specified
time.
Alert Text
Error Alert %P1: Monitor '%P2' has been
below or equal to %P3 for %P4.
Type of Alert
Error
Severity
x
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
0000
Notes:
1. This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
Name of the threshold
%P2
Name of the monitor
%P3
Threshold value
%P4
Duration of threshold violation
2. You can set the Severity variable x. The default value for this
variable is 2.
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
181
Threshold Return To Normal Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when the value of a monitored system
component returns from a threshold
exception state to a specified “normal”
state or range.
Alert Text
Informational Alert %P1: Monitor '%P2'
has returned to normal.
Type of Alert
Error
Severity
x
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
10
Notes:
1. This alert supports the following macro parameter strings:
%P1
Name of the threshold
%P2
Name of the monitor
2. You can set the Severity variable x. The default value for this
variable is 6.
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Physical RAID Device Online Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when a physical RAID drive changes state
to Online.
Alert Text
RAID Device Online: Attribute Physical
Drive x in y set to online.
Type of Alert
Information
Severity
3
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
130
Notes:
1. Alert Text variable x is the physical drive’s designated location
(Physical Bay number), and y is the name of the RAID
subsystem reporting the state change.
2. This alert will be generated only by systems that have a
supported RAID adapter (see Appendix C, “Supported RAID
Adapters” on page 152).
Physical RAID Device Standby Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when a physical RAID drive changes state
to Standby.
Alert Text
RAID Device Standby: Attribute Physical
Drive x in y set to standby.
Type of Alert
Information
Severity
2
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
130
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
183
Notes:
1. Alert Text variable x is the physical drive’s designated location
(Physical Bay number), and y is the name of the RAID
subsystem reporting the state change.
2. This alert will be generated only by systems that have a
supported RAID adapter (see Appendix C, “Supported RAID
Adapters” on page 152).
Physical RAID Device Dead Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when a physical RAID drive changes state
to Dead.
Alert Text
RAID Device Dead: Attribute Physical
Drive x in y set to dead.
Type of Alert
Failure
Severity
0
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
130
Notes:
1. Alert Text variable x is the physical drive’s designated location
(Physical Bay number), and y is the name of the RAID
subsystem reporting the state change.
2. This alert will be generated only by systems that have a
supported RAID adapter (see Appendix C, “Supported RAID
Adapters” on page 152).
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Logical RAID Device Online Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when a logical RAID system drive
changes state to Online.
Alert Text
RAID Device Online: Attribute System
Drive x in y set to online.
Type of Alert
Information
Severity
3
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
131
Notes:
1. Alert Text variable x is the system drive’s designated location
(System Drive number), and y is the name of the RAID
subsystem reporting the state change.
2. This alert will be generated only by systems that have a
supported RAID adapter (see Appendix C, “Supported RAID
Adapters” on page 152).
Logical RAID Device Critical Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when a logical RAID system drive
changes state to Critical.
Alert Text
RAID Device Critical: Attribute System
Drive x in y set to critical.
Type of Alert
Warning
Severity
2
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
131
Appendix F. Netfinity Alerts
185
Notes:
1. Alert Text variable x is the system drive’s designated location
(System Drive number), and y is the name of the RAID
subsystem reporting the state change.
2. This alert will be generated only by systems that have a
supported RAID adapter (see Appendix C, “Supported RAID
Adapters” on page 152).
Logical RAID Device Offline Alert
Explanation
Generated by the System Monitor service
when a logical RAID system drive
changes state to Offline.
Alert Text
RAID Device Offline: Attribute System
Drive x in y set to offline.
Type of Alert
Failure
Severity
0
Application ID
MonitorB
Application Alert Type
131
Notes:
1. Alert Text variable x is the system drive’s designated location
(System Drive number), and y is the name of the RAID
subsystem reporting the state change.
2. This alert will be generated only by systems that have a
supported RAID adapter (see Appendix C, “Supported RAID
Adapters” on page 152).
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Appendix G. Notices
References in this publication to IBM products, programs, or
services do not imply that IBM intends to make these available in all
countries in which IBM operates. Any reference to an IBM product,
program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that
IBM product, program, or service may be used. Subject to IBM’s
valid intellectual property or other legally protectable rights, any
functionally equivalent product, program, or service may be used
instead of the IBM product, program, or service. The evaluation
and verification of operation in conjunction with other products,
except those expressly designated by IBM, are the responsibility of
the user.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering
subject matter in this document. The furnishing of this document
does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license
inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
500 Columbus Avenue
Thornwood, NY 10594
U.S.A.
Licensees of this program who wish to have information about it for
the purpose of enabling: (i) the exchange of information between
independently created programs and other programs (including this
one) and (ii) the mutual use of the information which has been
exchanged, should contact IBM Corporation, Department 80D, P.O.
Box 12195, 3039 Cornwallis, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709,
U.S.A. Such information may be available, subject to appropriate
terms and conditions, including in some cases, payment of a fee.
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
187
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of the IBM Corporation in the
United States or other countries or both:
IBM
Micro Channel
OS/2
PS/2
Netfinity
NetView
Predictive Failure Analysis
SystemView
The following terms are trademarks of other companies:
cc:Mail
DMI
IPX
Lotus Notes
NetWare
Novell
Sportster
cc:Mail, Inc. division of Lotus
Development Corporation
Desktop Management Task
Force
Novell, Incorporated
Lotus Development Corporation
Novell, Incorporated
Novell, Incorporated
U. S. Robotics
Microsoft, Windows, and Windows NT are registered trademarks of
Microsoft Corporation.
Pentium is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation.
Tivoli is a trademark of Tivoli Systems.
Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or
service marks of others.
188
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
Appendix H. Index
A
access, restricting 79
alert actions 19
alert conditions 31, 41
alert information 12
Alert Log
alert information 12
Alert Log views 15
deleting alerts in 18
printing alerts 18
printing alerts to a file 18
refreshing 19
Alert Manager
actions 19
alert actions 19
alert conditions 31
alert profiles 29
binding profiles and
actions 38
command line
operations 156
description 10
dialing out to a pager 24
functions 18
GENALERT.EXE 156
management information base
(MIB) 23
MIB2.TBL 23
NETFIN.MIB 23
predefined alert profiles 34
profiles 19
security alerts 82
setting action definitions 44
specifying alert
conditions 42
with pagers 24
 Copyright IBM Corp. 1994, 1998
alert profiles
binding to actions 38
creating 31
deleting 34
description 29
editing 34
setting alert conditions 31
alert sender IDs 13
alert type values 14
alerts
GENALERT.EXE 156
generating 156
application keywords 115
C
command line operations 156
ECCMEM.EXE 160
GENALERT.EXE 156
SINFG30.EXE 158
STOPBASE.EXE 161
STRTBASE.EXE 161
Critical File Monitor
description 45
monitoring for file
creation 49
monitoring for non-existent
files 49
monitoring other files 47
monitoring system files 45
NetWare system files 47
OS/2 system files 46
Windows 95 system files 46
Windows NT system files 46
Windows system files 46
189
D
data handling 122
delaying Netfinity startup on
OS/2 systems 8
Desktop Management Interface
(DMI) 50
dialing out to a pager 24
dictionary files 94
adding product
definitions 96
creating a new 94
deleting product
definitions 96
description 94
editing 95
editing product
definitions 108
file-list product
definitions 97
loading 94
SYSLEVEL product
definitions 103
directories
DMI 50
defined 50
how it works 51
DMI Browser
attribute information,
changing 57
attribute information,
viewing 57
component information,
viewing 56
DMI defined 50
error log, viewing 58
error notification 58
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Client Services for Netfinity Manager
DMI Browser (continued)
group information,
viewing 57
how DMI works 51
problem notification 58
using the DMI browser 55
E
ECC Memory Setup
actions 59
command line
operations 160
configuration 59
description 59
ECCMEM.EXE 160
Exit 60
nonmaskable interrupts
triggering NMI 60
ECCMEM.EXE
parameters 160
59
G
GENALERT.EXE
command line format 156
description 156
forwarding GENALERT alerts
to a host system 157
parameters 156
generating alerts 156
H
history files
119
I
P
incoming user id/passwords
<PUBLIC> setting 79
deleting 81
restricting public access 79
setting 80
initialization string
guidelines 90
installation configurations 149
active client operation 150
passive client operation 149
stand-alone operation 149
pager dialout 24
passwords 79
predefined alert profiles 34
Predictive Failure Analysis
adapter information 62
description 61
drive information 62, 64
drive size 63
generating alerts 65
logical drive information 63
object descriptions 61
options 63, 65
PFA options for drive 63
physical drive
information 63
predictive failure analysis
window 61
product ID 65
product revision 65
PUN and LUN 62
resetting 66
simulating messages 66
size information 63
status 65
vendor ID 64
product definitions 96
adding 96
editing 108
file-list definitions 97
SYSLEVEL definitions 103
M
management information base
(MIB) 23
MIB2.TBL 23
modem configuration 87
N
NETFIN.MIB 23
Netfinity
command line
operations 156
delaying starting on OS/2
systems 8
description 1
service manager 3
starting 3
NMVT.INI 157
nonmaskable interrupts 59
R
RAID Alerts
153
Appendix H. Index
191
RAID Manager
adapter configuration
backup 76
adapter-specific
information 75
changing the viewing
scale 68
description 67
device management 76
enclosure information 73
general adapter
information 74
physical device
information 74
viewing RAID
information 73
virtual drive information 75
virtual drive management 77
window options 68
Remote Session
Remote System Manager
restricting remote access 79
S
Screen View
scrubbing 59
security alerts 82
Security Manager
<PUBLIC> user
id/password 79
deleting user
id/passwords 81
description 78
restricting public access
security alerts 82
setting incoming user
id/passwords 80
192
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
79
Serial Connection Control
description 87
enabling remote access 89
initialization string
guidelines 90
modem configuration 87
serial management 89
service connection names 163
Service Manager
starting 3
setting incoming user
id/passwords 80
severity, description 14
SIKEYWD.INI 120
SINFG30.EXE
parameters 158
single bit errors 59
Software Inventory
adding product
definitions 96
application keywords,
using 115
description 92
dictionary file,
description 94
dictionary file, editing 95
dictionary file, loading 94
dictionary file, new 94
editing product
definitions 108
exporting data 112
file-list product
definitions 97
full dictionary search 108
generating reports 112
importing software
dictionaries 113
Software Inventory (continued)
matching attributes 94
performing a search 108
printing reports to a
printer 112
printing reports to file 112
product definitions,
deleting 96
search by drive 109
search by product type 110
selected product search 109
SYSLEVEL product
definitions 103
updating NetView DM
inventory 113
starting Netfinity 3
starting service base programs
remotely 161
STOPBASE.EXE 161
stopping service base programs
remotely 161
STRTBASE.EXE 161
System Information Tool
command line
operations 158
description 117
generating history files 119
information provided 117
printing textual reports 119
protecting confidential system
data 120
saving system data 119
SIKEYWD.INI 120
SINFG30.EXE 158
using 119
System Monitor
attribute monitor
thresholds 135, 137
attribute monitors 135
changing monitors 132
closing 123
configuring font settings 134
configuring line-graph
settings 133
configuring monitors 131
configuring real time
settings 134
context menus 125
data handling technique 122
description 121
enabling/disabling title
bars 132
exiting 123
fill 133
generating alerts 128
hiding 127
line graph monitors 132
line-graphs 131
main window 123
monitor types, selecting 126
moving 126
notebooks 127
notify check box 131
pop-up menus 125
RAID alerts 128
RAID monitors 135
real time monitors 133
recording data 126
scale 133
Select Visible Monitors
window 123
Appendix H. Index
193
System Monitor (continued)
setting thresholds 128
settings 131
sizing 126
System Monitor Service
window 123
text monitors 133
thresholds 128
using 123
values, descriptions 129
view 126, 132
Windows pull-down
menu 123
System Partition Access
actions 140
and ESDI systems 139
backing up the partition 144
copying partitions 141
copying to partition 141
deleting directories 142
deleting files 143
deleting the partition 144
description 139
making a new directory 145
renaming directories 142
renaming files 143
restoring the partition 145
system partitions 139
System Profile
description 146
entering data 147
refreshing 148
saving data 148
sections 147
service window contents 147
194
Client Services for Netfinity Manager
V
values, alert type
14
IBM

Part Number: 10L9268
Printed in U.S.A.
1ðL9268
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