bulletin in PDF Format

bulletin in PDF Format
www.scu.edu
U n d e r g r a d u at e B u l l e t i n
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053
408-554-4000
2 015 –16
S a n ta C l a r a U n i v e r s i t y
2015–16
Undergraduate Bulletin
S a n ta C l a r a U n i v e r s i t y
adjust art to
fit width of spine
Undergraduate Academic Calendar
2015–2016 Academic Year
& 2016 Summer Sessions
FALL QUARTER 2015
Monday, Sept. 21
Monday, Nov. 23 – Friday, Nov. 27
Friday, Dec. 4
Monday, Dec. 7 – Friday, Dec. 11
WINTER QUARTER 2016
Monday, Jan. 4
Monday, Jan. 18
Monday, Feb. 15
Friday, March 11
Monday, March 14 – Friday, March 18
SPRING QUARTER 2016
Monday, March 28
Tuesday, March 29
Monday, May 30
Friday, June 3
Monday, June 6 – Thursday, June 9
Saturday, June 11
Easter Holiday
Classes Begin
Memorial Day Holiday
Classes End
Final Examination Period
Commencement
Wednesday, July 20
Thursday, July 21 – Friday, July 22
Monday, July 25
Friday, Aug. 26
Monday, Aug. 29 – Tuesday, Aug. 30
Monday, Sept. 5
Santa Clara University prohibits discrimination and harassment
on the basis of race, color, religious creed, sex, gender, gender
expression, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, marital
status, registered domestic partner status, veteran status, age,
national origin or ancestry, physical or mental disability, medical
condition including genetic characteristics, genetic information,
or any other consideration made unlawful by federal, state,
or local laws in the administration of its educational policies,
admissions policies, scholarships and loan programs, athletics,
or employment-related policies, programs, and activities; or
other University-administered policies, programs, and activities.
Classes Begin
Academic Holiday
Classes End
Final Examination Period
Classes Begin
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Holiday
President’s Day Holiday
Classes End
Final Examination Period
SUMMER SESSIONS 2016
Thursday, June 16
Monday, July 4
Nondiscrimination Policy
Additionally, it is the University’s policy that there shall be no
discrimination or retaliation against employees or students who
raise issues of discrimination or potential discrimination or who
participate in the investigation of such issues. The University will
provide reasonable accommodations for the known physical or
mental limitations of an otherwise qualified individual with a
disability under the law.
Inquiries regarding equal opportunity policies, the filing of
grievances, or requests for a copy of the University’s grievance
procedures covering discrimination and harassment complaints
should be directed to:
Classes Begin – Session I
Independence Day Administrative
Holiday (classes are in session)
Classes End – Session I
Final Examination Period – Session I
Classes Begin – Session II
Classes End – Session II
Final Examination Period – Session II
Labor Day Holiday
Belinda Guthrie
EEO and Title IX Coordinator
Office of EEO and Title IX
Santa Clara University
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053-0851
408-554-4113
[email protected]
Other important dates are available on the more detailed academic calendar on the
University’s website at www.scu.edu/studentrecords/Academic-Calendar.cfm.
FL-11931 06/2015 3,100
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Santa Clara University
Undergraduate Bulletin
2015–2016 Academic Year
Note on the cover photograph:
This bronze Bronco created by artist David Spellerberg stands more than 10 feet off the ground and
is a reminder of SCU’s renewed focus on Bronco pride.
The statue’s location at a busy intersection between the Alpha Residential Learning Community, the
Learning Commons, and Benson Memorial Center emphasizes Santa Clara’s dedication to educating
the whole person. Alumnus and Regent Jack Previte ’70 conceived and spearheaded the project after
being impressed by another statue created by artist David Spellerberg, owner of Great American
Bronze Works Inc. Along with Previte, fellow donors Cyril G. Barbaccia, Joseph McCarthy ’71, and
Gary Filizetti ’67, and the Bronco Bench Foundation made the statue possible. According to Previte,
“This statue represents the spirit and the grace and the power that we want Santa Clara University
alumni and students to possess.”
PREFACE
The Undergraduate Bulletin contains the academic and administrative policies and
regulations that govern enrollment of undergraduate students at Santa Clara University.
Students are responsible for knowing all academic and administrative policies and regulations
affecting their program of study and for abiding by all such policies and regulations during
their period of enrollment at the University. Continued enrollment is subject to compliance
with the academic and administrative policies and regulations as described herein and
otherwise published by the University. Failure to understand the policies and regulations does
not relieve a student of his or her responsibility for adhering to the policies and regulations.
Students are governed by the applicable degree requirements of the University and the
Santa Clara Core Curriculum in the Undergraduate Bulletin and Core Curriculum Guide
in effect in their entry year as first-year students. Transfer students normally follow the
Undergraduate Bulletin and Core Curriculum Guide of their class cohort as determined by
the number of transfer units accepted toward the Santa Clara degree upon admission. All
students must fulfill the departmental or program major and minor degree requirements in
effect when they declare their major or minor program of study.
Santa Clara University reserves the right to make changes to degree program requirements,
academic and administrative policies and regulations, and course offerings published in the
Undergraduate Bulletin at any time without prior notice. The University strives to assure
the accuracy of the information in the Undergraduate Bulletin at the time of publication.
However, the University reserves the right to make corrections as necessary to the Bulletin.
The 2015–16 Undergraduate Bulletin was printed in June 2015 by the Office of the
Provost and covers policies and regulations in effect as of that date. The Undergraduate
Bulletin and other information about Santa Clara University can be found on the University’s
website at www.scu.edu.
i
Table of Contents
Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i
Chapter 1. Santa Clara University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
University Vision, Mission, and Fundamental Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Academic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Centers of Distinction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Student Body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Alumni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Chapter 2. Transformative Experiences and Learning Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
The Core Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
The Residential Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Campus Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Global Engagement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
SCU Study Abroad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Career Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Campus Recreation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Intercollegiate Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
SCU Presents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Center for Student Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Chartered Student Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Office for Multicultural Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
University Honors Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
LEAD Scholars Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Office of Fellowships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Peer Educator Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Domestic Public Sector Studies Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Academic Advising and Learning Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
iii
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The Writing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Information Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
International Students and Scholars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Disabilities Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
The Cowell Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Kids on Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Chapter 3. College of Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Undergraduate Degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Minors in the College of Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Academic Departments and Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Anthropology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Art and Art History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Chemistry and Biochemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Classics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Environmental Studies and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Ethnic Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
Individual Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Liberal Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
Mathematics and Computer Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Modern Languages and Literatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Political Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228
Public Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238
Religious Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
Sociology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259
Theatre and Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266
Women’s and Gender Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280
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Interdisciplinary Minors and Other Programs of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
Arabic, Islamic, and Middle Eastern Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289
Asian Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291
Biotechnology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Catholic Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294
International Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295
Latin American Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 297
Medieval and Renaissance Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300
Musical Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303
Pre-Health Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304
Pre-Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305
Pre-Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306
Urban Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308
Gerontology Certificate Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Chapter 4. Leavey School of Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Undergraduate Degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Bachelor of Science in Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310
Minors in the Leavey School of Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
General Business Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314
Centers, Institutes, and Special Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Accelerated Cooperative Education Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Leavey Scholars Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Food and Agribusiness Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Retail Management Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319
Academic Departments and Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325
Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330
Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334
Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338
Operations Management and Information Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342
Interdisciplinary Minors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
Entrepreneurship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348
International Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .349
Retail Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
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Chapter 5. School of Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Undergraduate Degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352
Bachelor of Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353
Minors in the School of Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354
Centers, Institutes, and Special Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Cooperative Education Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Center for Nanostructures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Frugal Innovation Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Combined Bachelor of Science and Master of Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 355
Academic Departments and Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
Applied Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356
Bioengineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357
Civil Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
Computer Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375
Electrical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
General Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 398
Mechanical Engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403
Interdisciplinary Minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413
Bioengineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 413
Chapter 6. University Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414
Aerospace Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414
Experiential Learning for Social Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416
LEAD Scholars Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418
Military Science Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 419
Science, Technology, and Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423
SCU Study Abroad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425
University Honors Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 428
Undergraduate Summer Sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429
Chapter 7. Admission of Undergraduate Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432
Admission of Entering First-year Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432
Admission of Transfer Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434
Admission of International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436
TABLE OF CONTENTS vii
Chapter 8. Academic and Administrative Policies and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . 438
Student Responsibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438
Academic Policies and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438
Degree Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438
Academic Program Policies and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 441
Registration Policies and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444
Grading Policies and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446
Academic Standing and Student Classification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449
Academic Credit Evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450
Non-Degree Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455
Academic Integrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456
Patent Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 458
Administrative Policies and Regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459
Clery Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459
Communication by the University to Undergraduate Students . . . . . . . . . . 459
Consensual Relations between Employees and Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459
Drug-Free Workplace and School Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 459
Student Records and Release of Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460
Nondiscrimination Policy and Title IX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 461
Student Conduct Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 462
Chapter 9. Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
Financial Responsibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
Financial Terms and Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 463
Santa Clara University Campus Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464
Study Abroad and Domestic Study Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467
Room and Board Charges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Santa Clara Scholarships and Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 468
Federal and California Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 471
Other Grants and Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472
Student Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473
Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473
Financial Aid Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 474
Cancellation of Financial Aid and Return of Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 478
Student Verification of Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479
viii TABLE OF CONTENTS
Billing and Payment Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479
Student Accounts and Billing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479
Payment Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480
Extended Payment Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480
Delinquent Payments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 480
Billing Disputes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481
Refund Payments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481
Tuition Insurance Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481
Educational Tax Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 481
Chapter 10. University Honor Societies and Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482
Honor Societies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482
University Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487
College of Arts and Sciences Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 488
Leavey School of Business Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 498
School of Engineering Awards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Appendices
Academic Accreditations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 503
Board of Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504
Board of Regents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 505
Santa Clara University Senior Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507
Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 544
Academic Department and Program Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 555
Santa Clara University Campus Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556
Nondiscrimination Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover
1
Santa Clara University
Located in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley, Santa Clara University is a comprehensive Jesuit, Catholic university with more than 8,800 students. Founded in 1851 by the
Society of Jesus, California’s oldest operating higher education institution offers a rigorous
undergraduate curriculum in arts and sciences, business, and engineering, plus nationally
recognized graduate and professional programs in business, law, engineering, education,
counseling psychology, pastoral ministries, and theology. The University boasts a diverse
community of scholars offering a values-oriented curriculum characterized by small class
sizes and a dedication to educating students for competence, conscience, and compassion.
The traditions of Jesuit education—educating the whole person for a life of service—run
deep in all of its curricular and co-curricular programs.
Santa Clara University is perennially ranked among the top comprehensive universities
by U.S. News & World Report and has one of the highest graduation rates for undergraduate
students among all comprehensive universities. The University has a national reputation for
its undergraduate program that features a distinctive core curriculum, an integrated learning
environment, and research opportunities for undergraduate students.
The University was established as Santa Clara College on the site of the Mission Santa
Clara de Asís, the eighth of the original 21 California missions. The college originally operated
as a preparatory school and did not offer collegiate courses until 1853. Following the Civil
War, enrollment increased, and by 1875 the size of the student body was 275. One-third of
the students were enrolled in the collegiate division; the remainder attended the college’s
preparatory and high school departments.
Santa Clara experienced slow and steady growth during its first 60 years, becoming
the University of Santa Clara in 1912, when the schools of engineering and law were added.
In 1925, the high school was separated from the University and took the name of Bellarmine
College Preparatory in 1928. The Leavey School of Business opened in 1926, and within
a decade, became one of the first business schools in the country to receive national
accreditation.
For 110 years, Santa Clara was an all-male school. In the fall of 1961, women were
accepted as undergraduates, and Santa Clara became the first coeducational Catholic
­university in California. The decision resulted in an admissions explosion—from 1,500
students to more than 5,000. The size of the faculty tripled, and the University began the
largest building program in school history, building eight residence halls, a student union,
and an athletic stadium. In 1985, the University adopted “Santa Clara University” as its
official name.
1
2 SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY
UNIVERSITY VISION, MISSION, AND FUNDAMENTAL VALUES
Santa Clara University has adopted three directional statements to describe the kind of
university it aspires to become (Strategic Vision), its core purpose and the constituencies it
serves (University Mission), and the beliefs that guide its actions (Fundamental Values).
Strategic Vision
Santa Clara University will educate citizens and leaders of competence, conscience,
and compassion, and cultivate knowledge and faith to build a more humane, just, and
­sustainable world.
University Mission
The University pursues its vision by creating an academic community that educates the
whole person within the Jesuit, Catholic tradition, making student learning our central
focus, continuously improving our curriculum and co-curriculum, strengthening our scholarship and creative work, and serving the communities of which we are a part in Silicon
Valley and around the world.
Student learning takes place at the undergraduate and graduate level in an educational
environment that integrates rigorous inquiry and scholarship, creative imagination, reflective
engagement with society, and a commitment to fashioning a more humane and just world.
As an academic community, we expand the boundaries of knowledge and insight
through teaching, research, artistic expression, and other forms of scholarship. It is primarily
through discovering, communicating, and applying knowledge that we exercise our institutional responsibility as a voice of reason and conscience in society.
We offer challenging academic programs and demonstrate a commitment to the development of:
• Undergraduate students who seek an education with a strong humanistic orientation
in a primarily residential setting
• Graduate students, many of them working professionals in Silicon Valley, who seek
advanced degree programs that prepare them to make significant contributions to
their fields
In addition to these core programs, we also provide a variety of continuing education
and professional development opportunities for non-matriculated students.
Fundamental Values
The University is committed to these core values, which guide us in carrying out our
mission and realizing our vision:
Academic Excellence. We seek an uncompromising standard of excellence in teaching,
learning, creativity, and scholarship within and across disciplines.
Search for Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. We prize scholarship and creative work that
advance human understanding, improve teaching and learning, and add to the betterment
of society by illuminating the most significant problems of the day and exploring the enduring mysteries of life. In this search, our commitment to academic freedom is unwavering.
Engaged Learning. We strive to integrate academic reflection and direct experience in the
classroom and the community, especially to understand and improve the lives of those with
the least education, power, and wealth.
SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY 3
Commitment to Students. As teachers and scholars, mentors and facilitators, we endeavor
to educate the whole person. We nurture and challenge students—intellectually, spiritually,
aesthetically, morally, socially, and physically—preparing them for leadership and service to
the common good in their professional, civic, and personal lives.
Service to Others. We promote throughout the University a culture of service—service
not only to those who study and work at Santa Clara but also to society in general and to its
most disadvantaged members as we work with and for others to build a more humane, just,
faith-filled, and sustainable world.
Community and Diversity. We cherish our diverse and inclusive community of students,
faculty, staff, administrators, and alumni, a community that is enriched by people of different backgrounds, respectful of the dignity of all its members, enlivened by open communication, and caring and just toward others.
Jesuit Distinctiveness. We treasure our Jesuit heritage and tradition, which incorporates
all of these core values. This tradition gives expression to our Jesuit educational mission and
Catholic identity while also welcoming and respecting other religious and philosophical
traditions, promoting the dialogue between faith and culture, and valuing opportunities to
deepen religious beliefs.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Santa Clara University offers undergraduate degrees leading to the bachelor of arts
(B.A.), bachelor of science (B.S.), and bachelor of science in commerce. The College of Arts
and Sciences offers the B.A. degree and the B.S. degree in 36 subject areas and includes the
graduate program in pastoral ministries, through which it offers the master of arts (M.A.)
degree in catechetics, pastoral liturgy, spirituality, and liturgical music. The Leavey School
of Business offers the B.S. degree in commerce with majors in seven subject areas. The
School of Engineering offers a B.S. degree with majors in seven subject areas. A variety of
interdisciplinary and discipline-based minors are also offered for undergraduates.
The School of Law offers programs leading to the degrees of juris doctor (J.D.) and
master of laws (LL.M.). J.D. students may earn certificates of specialization in high technology law, international law, and public interest and social justice law. A broad curriculum also
includes business and commercial law, taxation, criminal law and trial advocacy, environmental law, estate planning, labor law, health law, legal writing and research, as well as
opportunities for externships, clinical work, and professional skill development.
The Leavey School of Business offers graduate programs leading to the master of business administration (MBA) degree with coursework in accounting, economics, finance,
management, marketing, and operations management and information systems (OMIS).
The executive MBA program is an intensive 17-month program designed for seasoned
professionals. The business school also offers graduate programs leading to the master of
science in information systems (MSIS), entrepreneurship, or finance. In conjunction with
the law school, the business school also offers joint degree programs leading to a J.D./MBA
and J.D./MSIS.
The School of Engineering offers graduate programs leading to the master of science
(M.S.) degree in applied mathematics, bioengineering, civil engineering, computer science
and engineering, electrical engineering, engineering management, mechanical engineering,
software engineering, and sustainable energy; and the engineer’s degree in computer science
and engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering. The engineering
school also offers the doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in computer science and engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering.
4 SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY
The two departments in the School of Education and Counseling Psychology offer
c­redential and graduate programs. The Department of Education focuses on preparing
teachers and administrators for public and Catholic schools. It offers programs in teacher
preparation leading to credentials (i.e., California preliminary multiple-subject and singlesubject teaching credentials, and California Clear credential) and the master of arts in teaching (MAT) degree. Its programs in educational administration prepare public K–12
administrators (i.e., the Preliminary California Administrative Services credential and the
California Clear Administrative Services credential), and Catholic school leaders through
the certificate program in Catholic School Leadership. The department also offers a M.A.
program in interdisciplinary education (with emphases in curriculum and instruction;
­science, technology, environmental education, and mathematics (STEEM); and educational administration. The departments of Education and Counseling Psychology jointly
offer the certificate program in Alternative and Correctional Education. The Department of
Counseling Psychology offers two degree programs: M.A. in counseling psychology and
M.A. in counseling. The M.A. in counseling psychology can lead to state licensure for
­marriage and family therapists and/or licensed professional clinical counselors. The department includes emphasis programs in health, correctional, and Latino counseling.
The Jesuit School of Theology (JST) is one of only two Jesuit theological centers in the
United States operated by the Society of Jesus, as the order of Catholic priests is known. It
is one of only two Jesuit theological centers in the country that offer three ecclesiastical
degrees certified by the Vatican Congregation for Catholic Education, and it also offers four
advanced theological degrees certified by the Association of Theological Schools. In addition, JST offers a spiritual renewal program for clergy, religious, and lay people, and conducts an annual Instituto Hispano that offers a certificate program to advance Hispanic
leadership in the pastoral life of the church.
CENTERS OF DISTINCTION
Santa Clara University has three Centers of Distinction that serve as major points
of interaction between the University and local and global communities. Each center focuses
on a theme that is central to Santa Clara’s distinctive mission as a Jesuit university and offers
an educational environment integrating rigorous inquiry and scholarship, creative imagination, reflective engagement with society, and a commitment to fashioning a more humane
and just world. Each center engages faculty and students from different disciplines as well
as experts and leaders from the community through speakers, conferences, workshops, and
experiential learning opportunities.
Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship
The mission of the Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship is to accelerate global,
innovation-based entrepreneurship in service to humanity. Through an array of programs
including its signature Global Social Benefit Incubator (GSBI™), the Center engages an
international network of social enterprises, investment capital, and technical resources to
build the capacity of the global social entrepreneurship movement. As a Center of Distinction at Santa Clara University, the Center leverages its programs to inspire faculty and students with real-world case studies, distinctive curricula, and unique research opportunities,
advancing the University’s vision of creating a more just, humane, and sustainable world.
More information can be found at www.scu-social-entrepreneurship.org.
SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY 5
Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education
The Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education promotes and enhances the distinctively Jesuit,
Catholic tradition of education at Santa Clara University, with a view toward serving students, faculty, staff, and through them the larger community, both local and global. The
Ignatian Center achieves this mission chiefly through four signature programs:
• Bannan Institutes provide yearlong thematic programs including academic events
and scholarly activities that further the Jesuit, Catholic character of the University.
• Community-based learning places over 1,200 students each year with community
partners, frequently in connection with an academic course.
• Immersion programs offer students, during academic breaks, the opportunity to
­experience local, domestic, and international communities with little access to wealth,
power, and privilege.
• Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius provide opportunities for members of the community to encounter the spiritual sources of the Jesuit tradition.
Through these four programs, the Ignatian Center aspires to be recognized throughout
Silicon Valley and beyond as providing leadership for the integration of faith, justice, and
the intellectual life.
Markkula Center for Applied Ethics
The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics is one of the preeminent centers for research
and dialogue on ethical issues in critical areas of American life. The center works with faculty, staff, students, community leaders, and the public to address ethical issues more effectively in teaching, research, and action. The center’s focus areas are business, health care and
biotechnology, character education, government, global leadership, technology, and emerging
issues in ethics. Articles, cases, briefings, and dialogue in all fields of applied ethics are available
through the center.
FACULTY
Santa Clara University’s emphasis on a community of scholars and integrated education
attracts faculty members who are as committed to students’ intellectual and moral development as they are to pursuing their own scholarship. The University’s 530 full-time faculty
members include Fulbright professors, nationally recognized authors, groundbreaking ­scientists,
and distinguished economic theorists.
STUDENT BODY
Santa Clara University has a student population of 9,015, with 5,486 undergraduate
students and 3,529 graduate students. The undergraduate population has a male-to-female
ratio of 50-to-50, and about 45 percent of undergraduate students identify themselves as
persons of color. About 62 percent of undergraduates are from California, with the others
coming from throughout the United States and 44 countries. Seventy-four percent of
undergraduate students receive some kind of financial aid—scholarships, grants, or loans.
6 SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY
More than half (53%) of the undergraduate population live in University housing,
with 90 percent of first-year students and 70 percent of sophomores living on campus.
Students experience an average class size of 23, with 42 percent of classes having fewer than
20 students and only 1.6 percent of classes having 50 or more students. The student-tofaculty ratio is 12.16-to-1.
The University’s commitment to learning is expressed in the fact that 96.2 percent of
first-year students advance to the sophomore year, and the percentage of Santa Clara students
who graduate is among the highest in the country. The four-year graduation rate for entering
first-year students is 78 percent, with a five-year graduation rate of 84 percent and a six-year
graduation rate of 85.2 percent.
ALUMNI
Santa Clara University has over 94,000 alumni living in all 50 states and almost 100
countries. More than half of the alumni live in the San Francisco Bay Area, where many are
leaders in business, law, engineering, academia, and public service.
CAMPUS
The University is located on a 106-acre campus in the city of Santa Clara near the southern end of the San Francisco Bay in one of the world’s greatest cultural centers. More than
50 buildings on campus house 15 student residences, a main library, a law library, two student centers, the de Saisset Museum, extensive performing arts and athletic facilities, and a
recreation and fitness center.
Santa Clara’s campus has the advantage of being located in Silicon Valley—a region
known for its extraordinary visionaries, who have designed and created some of the most
significant scientific and technological advances of our age. Silicon Valley is more than
a location -- it is a mindset, and home to more than 2 million residents and 6,600 scienceand technology-related companies (not including San Francisco, which is located just an
hour away).
Santa Clara’s campus is well known for its beauty and mission-style architecture. Newly
opened in 2013, the brick-paved Abby Sobrato Mall leads visitors from the University’s
main entrance to the heart of campus—the Mission Santa Clara de Asís. The roses and
palm and olive trees of the Mission Gardens surround the historic Mission Church, which
was restored in 1928. The adjacent Adobe Lodge is the oldest building on campus. In 1981,
it was restored to its 1822 decor.
Academic Facilities
Amidst all this beauty and history are modern, world-class academic facilities. Students
study and thrive in places such as the Joanne E. Harrington Learning Commons, Sobrato
Family Technology Center, and Orradre Library where individuals and groups can study
in an inviting, light-filled, and open environment. Notably, the library features an Automated Retrieval System, a high-density storage area where up to 900,000 books and other
publications can be stored and retrieved using robotic-assisted technology.
Another example of Santa Clara’s excellent academic facilities is Lucas Hall, home of the
Leavey School of Business. This modern 85,000-square-foot building houses classrooms,
meeting rooms, offices, study spaces, and a café. Classrooms are equipped with state-ofthe‑art videoconferencing equipment as well as a multi-platform system to record faculty
lectures for later review by students. Vari Hall (formerly Arts & Sciences), adjacent to Lucas
Hall, is home to the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics as well as academic departments,
SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY 7
classrooms, and a 2,200-square-foot digital television studio, regarded as among the best
studios found on any campus nationwide.
Located near Vari Hall (formerly Arts & Sciences) is the Schott Admission and Enrollment Services Building, a welcome center for campus visitors and home to several University departments. Opened in 2012, the lobby of this green-certified structure includes
technology-infused exhibits that illustrate Santa Clara’s Jesuit mission. Among other green
features on campus are two solar-powered homes built in 2007 and 2009 for the U.S.
Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon. Both homes now serve as laboratories for solar
and sustainability technologies.
Student Life
Santa Clara has 10 on-campus residence halls, most with traditional double rooms and
large common bathrooms; others with suite arrangements conducive to more informal living.
Juniors and seniors can apply for townhouse-style living in the 138-unit University Villas
across from the main campus. Opened in 2012, Graham Hall is Santa Clara’s newest residence hall. The environmentally friendly building boasts 96 mini-suites, lounges, full kitchens,
and laundry facilities for every eight-room “neighborhood.” In addition, the residence
hall has two classrooms, a small theater, outdoor barbecue and picnic areas, and a large
courtyard.
The Robert F. Benson Memorial Center serves as a hub for campus life. The Benson
Center offers dining services and houses the campus bookstore, the campus post office, and
meeting rooms. The University’s main dining hall, The Marketplace, resembles an upscale
food court with numerous stations and options. For a more informal experience, The Bronco
is the Benson Center’s late-night venue, serving beverages and pub-style food.
Another hot-spot for student life, the Paul L. Locatelli, S.J., Student Activity Center,
includes a 6,000 square-foot gathering hall with a high ceiling that can accommodate
dances and concerts as well as pre- and postgame activities. Designed with environmental
sensitivity, the building is energy efficient and has daytime lighting controls and motion
sensors to maximize use of natural light. For fitness-minded students, the Pat Malley
­Fitness and Recreation Center features a 9,500-square-foot weight training and cardiovascular exercise room, three basketball courts, a swimming pool, and other facilities to support
the recreational and fitness needs of the campus community.
The campus includes many locations for quiet reflection such as the St. Clare Garden,
which features plants and flowers arranged into five groups to portray the stages of the saint’s
life. For campus members who want a more hands-on relationship with nature, the Forge
Garden, SCU’s half-acre organic garden, serves as a campus space for course research,
­service learning, and sustainable food production.
Athletics and the Arts
The importance of athletics to the University is evident everywhere on campus. Among
the newest additions to Santa Clara’s athletics facilities are the Stephen Schott Stadium,
home field for the men’s baseball team, and the state-of-the-art Stevens Soccer Training
Center funded by a gift from Mary and Mark Stevens. The gift from the Stevenses will also
allow Santa Clara to upgrade the stands in Stevens Stadium (formerly Buck Shaw Stadium),
home to the men’s and women’s soccer programs, and build a plaza that will celebrate
Bronco sports—its past, present, and future. The plaza will celebrate the history of Santa
Clara University football as well as the legacy and future of men’s and women’s soccer at
SCU. Bellomy Field, eight acres of well‑lit, grassy playing fields, provides space for club
and intramural sports such as rugby and field hockey. Adjacent to Bellomy Field is the
8 SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY
well-appointed women’s softball field, which opened in 2013. The Leavey Event Center
houses the University’s premier basketball ­facility. Over the years, the Leavey Event Center
has hosted nine West Coast Conference Basketball Championships.
The University recognizes the arts as an equally important part of life at Santa Clara
University. The new Edward M. Dowd Art and Art History Building (scheduled to open
in 2016) will house an integrated fine arts program that will be a destination and a center
for inspiration, innovation, and engagement in the arts and art history in Silicon Valley.
The de Saisset Museum, the University’s accredited museum of art and history, presents
changing art exhibitions throughout the year and serves as the caretaker of the University’s
California History Collection, which includes artifacts from the Native American, Mission,
and early Santa Clara College periods.
SCU Presents represents the University’s commitment to the performing arts on campus,
which include performances at venues such as the Louis B. Mayer Theatre, the Fess Parker
Studio Theatre, and the Music Recital Hall. The Mayer Theatre is Santa Clara University’s
premier theatrical venue, housing 500 intimate seats in either a flexible proscenium or
thrust-stage setting. The Fess Parker Studio Theatre has no fixed stage or seating. Its blackbox design, complete with movable catwalks, provides flexibility in an experimental setting.
The 250-seat Music Recital Hall provides a contemporary setting where students, faculty,
and guest artists offer a variety of performances.
2
Transformative Experiences
and Learning Resources
Santa Clara University is committed to the education of the whole person in the Jesuit
and Catholic tradition with a vision of developing men and women to be leaders of competence, conscience, and compassion. The undergraduate program is designed for students
who seek an education that integrates Jesuit values and learning that prepares them for 21st
century challenges in a primarily residential setting. Varied educational experiences encourage
students to value differing ways of knowing and being in the world, different forms of
knowledge within established disciplines, and new knowledge as well as that which preceded it.
Santa Clara’s concept of the “whole person” inevitably embraces our social nature. When
he inaugurated Santa Clara’s sesquicentennial year in 2000, Father Peter-Hans Kolvenbach,
then superior general of the Society of Jesus, noted that “Tomorrow’s ‘whole person’ cannot
be whole without an educated awareness of society and culture with which to contribute
socially, generously, in the real world.” Affirming that the Jesuit educational standard must
always “educate the whole person of solidarity for the real world,” he explained: “Students,
in the course of their formation, must let the gritty reality of this world into their lives, so
they can learn to feel it, think about it critically, respond to its suffering, and engage in it
constructively. They should learn to perceive, think, judge, choose, and act for the rights of
others, especially the disadvantaged and the oppressed.” Since then, Santa Clara University
has revised the Core Curriculum, begun implementing a new strategic plan, extended the
impact of its Centers of Excellence, and enhanced the University’s co-curricular programs,
all with the goal of educating students who will apply what they are learning to constructive
engagement with the gritty realities of the 21st century.
The Santa Clara undergraduate program offers courses and other learning experiences
whose content and patterns combine the acquisition and creation of knowledge with the
quest for meaning and purpose. Santa Clara’s learning environments encourage students to
make connections across the Core Curriculum, the academic major, elective courses, and
co-curricular experiences. Students are encouraged to relate their classroom learning with
out-of-classroom learning through community-based education, Residential Learning
Communities, Campus Ministry, a wide variety of student organizations, athletics and recreation, and other experiences. In a more general way, the undergraduate program nurtures
students’ ability to knit the intellectual, social, moral, spiritual, creative, and behavioral
aspects of life into a coherent and meaningful whole.
9
10 TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES
THE CORE CURRICULUM
A university expresses its most basic values in its Core Curriculum that is part of an
undergraduate education required of all students. Santa Clara’s Core Curriculum explicitly
integrates three traditions of higher education. As a Catholic university, it is rooted in the
tradition of pursuing an understanding of God through the free exercise of reason. As a
Jesuit university, it promotes a humanistic education that leads toward an ethical engagement with the world. As a comprehensive American university committed to liberal education, Santa Clara seeks to prepare its students for intelligent, responsible, and creative
citizenship. Reflecting these traditions, the Core Curriculum provides every undergraduate
with the common learning that all students need to become leaders of competence, conscience, and compassion.
The distinctiveness of a Santa Clara education emerges in the Core Curriculum, both in
its sense of purpose rooted in the University’s traditions and in its commitment to a breadth
of learning for the 21st century that complements and supports all majors. The Core
­Curriculum opens students to the study and practice of the arts, humanities, mathematics,
technology, natural sciences, and social sciences. It educates students for interdisciplinary
understanding and ethically informed participation in civic life.
Opportunities for experiential learning foster the development of compassion and attention to the ways human suffering can be alleviated. Reflecting the University’s founding
mission, the Core Curriculum includes a disciplined and critical reflection on the religious
dimensions of human existence. In addition, because the Core Curriculum continually
highlights the critical and compelling questions facing individuals and communities,
the Core Curriculum supports students both in making professional career choices and in
discerning their larger vocation—their life’s purpose in the world.
Learning Goals: What will students learn in the Core Curriculum?
Because a liberal education in the Jesuit tradition is oriented toward particular ends,
the Core Curriculum affirms a set of central learning goals. These goals are divided among
three broad categories—Knowledge, Habits of Mind and Heart, and Engagement with
the World.
Knowledge
To be prepared for well-informed engagement in society, students must comprehend the
forces that have shaped the world they have inherited and the ways the world is interpreted
and understood. They must also understand how they might transform the world for
the better. The Core Curriculum deepens students’ knowledge of the ideas and ways of
knowing that emerge from the arts, humanities, and natural and social sciences.
Global Cultures: The intertwined development of global ideas, institutions, religions,
and cultures, including Western cultures
Arts and Humanities: The production, interpretation, and social influence of the fine
and performing arts, history, languages, literatures, philosophy, and religion
Scientific Inquiry: The principles of scientific inquiry and how they are applied in the
natural and social sciences
Science and Technology: The formative influences, dynamics, social impacts, and ethical
consequences of scientific and technological development
TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES 11
Diversity: Diverse human experiences, identities, and cultures within local and global
societies, especially as formed by relations of power and privilege
Civic Life: The roles, rights, and responsibilities of citizens and institutions in societies
and in the world
Habits of Mind and Heart
To contribute to a rapidly changing, complex, and interdependent world, students must
develop ways of thinking, feeling, and acting that allow them to educate themselves for the
rest of their lives with passion and purpose. By attending to the cognitive and affective
dimensions of human experience, the Core Curriculum enables students to think more
deeply, imagine more freely, and communicate more clearly.
Critical Thinking: The ability to identify, reflect upon, evaluate, integrate, and apply
different types of information and knowledge to form independent judgments
Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning: Analytical and logical thinking and the
habit of drawing conclusions based on quantitative information
Complexity: An approach to understanding the world that appreciates ambiguity and
nuance as well as clarity and precision
Ethical Reasoning: Drawing on ethical traditions to assess the consequences of individual and institutional decisions
Religious Reflection: Questioning and clarifying beliefs through critical inquiry into
faith and the religious dimensions of human existence
Communication: Interacting effectively with different audiences, especially through
writing, speech, and a second language
Engagement with the World
To engage with the world in meaningful ways, students need opportunities to explore
and refine self-knowledge in relation to others. The Core Curriculum enhances students’
understanding of the integrity of their own lives and the dignity inherent in the lives of
­others, especially the impoverished, suffering, and marginalized.
Perspective: Seeking out the experience of different cultures and people, striving to view
the world through their eyes
Collaboration: The capacity to collaborate intellectually and creatively with diverse
people
Social Justice: Developing a disciplined sensibility toward the causes of human suffering
and misery, and a sense of responsibility for addressing them
Civic Engagement: Addressing major contemporary social issues, including environmental sustainability and peaceful resolution of conflict, by participating actively as an
informed citizen of society and the world
Each course in the Core Curriculum addresses at least three of the learning goals listed
above. Students have multiple opportunities to encounter, practice, and master each learning goal. In addition, specific learning objectives for each area of the Core Curriculum have
been developed by faculty Core Curriculum committees. These learning objectives are associated with particular learning goals and describe the knowledge, skills, and values students
will be able to demonstrate after completing the courses in the Core Curriculum.
12 TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES
The learning objectives are posted on the Core Curriculum website and published annually
in the Core Curriculum Guide.
The structure of the Core features two phases of coursework designed to foster developmental learning and curricular coherence. The first phase, Foundations, consists of six to
nine courses normally taken in the first year, introducing students to the processes and
expectations for university-level education:
• Critical Thinking & Writing 1 and 2
• Cultures & Ideas 1 and 2
• Second Language (level required varies by major)
• Mathematics (one course selected from a variety of choices)
• Religion, Theology & Culture 1
This phase helps students begin to set their own goals for learning, preparing them to
make thoughtful choices in the Core Curriculum, their majors, and co-curricular activities.
The second phase, Explorations, offers students the opportunity to choose among
courses that will expand and deepen their understanding of a broad range of subject areas
needed for effective participation in contemporary life. The 10 Explorations requirements—
Ethics; Civic Engagement; Diversity: U.S. Perspectives; Arts; Social Science; Natural Science;
Science, Technology & Society; Cultures & Ideas 3; Religion, Theology & Culture 2; and
Religion, Theology & Culture 3—include many courses that also satisfy requirements in
students’ majors.
Students in Arts and Sciences and Business satisfy their Core Foundation and Exploration
requirements with one course per Core area. Engineering students may satisfy more than one
Core requirement with one course when the course has been approved for those Core areas.
The Integrations requirements—Experiential Learning for Social Justice, Advanced
Writing, and Pathways—often are components embedded in other courses rather than
additional courses. Pathways foster integrative, intentional learning, complement the
majors, and encourage the application of knowledge to real problems in the world. Students
select one of 24 different Pathways before they attain junior status. Pathways allow students
to integrate their learning across at least two different disciplines by choosing one of the
following from a wide range of themes: American studies; applied ethics; beauty; children,
family, and society; cinema studies; democracy; design thinking; the digital age; food, hunger, poverty, and the environment; gender, globalization, and empire; gender, sexuality, and
the body; global health; human rights in a global world; Islamic studies; justice and the arts;
law and social justice; leading people, organizations, and social change; paradigm shifts;
politics and religion; public policy; race, place, and social inequalities; sustainability; values
in science and technology; and vocation. Students in the College of Arts and Sciences and
Leavey School of Business must complete four Pathway courses; students in the School of
Engineering must complete three Pathway courses. Beyond the coursework, all students
must earn a passing grade on a Pathway reflection essay.
Student progress through the structure of the Core Curriculum is not strictly sequential,
from Foundations through Explorations to Integrations. While some courses (e.g., Critical
Thinking & Writing 1 and 2; Cultures & Ideas 1, 2, and 3; and Religion, Theology &
Culture 1, 2, and 3) must be taken in sequence, all students have the opportunity to discover other sequences that are best for their individual undergraduate experience. At the
same time, all students engage in coursework designed to help them achieve the shared
set of learning objectives for each component of the Core Curriculum. Furthermore, the
TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES 13
Experiential Learning for Social Justice, Advanced Writing, and Pathways components of
the Core Curriculum help students experience requirements not only as individual courses
but as related educational activities that help structure and integrate their entire experience
of university study.
The Core Curriculum Guide provides more detailed information about each component
of the Core Curriculum, the learning goals and objectives associated with each component,
and the courses from which students may choose. An online version is available at
www.scu.edu/core. Students are encouraged to check their degree audit in eCampus regularly
to determine their progress in the Core Curriculum and their other academic requirements.
The Core Curriculum and the College of Arts and Sciences
Students in the College of Arts and Sciences should consult Chapter 3 for the requirements for their majors. There are no additional college-wide requirements beyond the
requirements for the Undergraduate Core Curriculum.
The Core Curriculum and the Leavey School of Business
Leavey School of Business requirements determine how students in the business school
satisfy some Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements—some Core Curriculum
requirements must be fulfilled with specific courses. Students in the Leavey School of Business
should consult Chapter 4 for the complete list of requirements for the majors and the
school. The Core Curriculum Guide provides additional information.
The Core Curriculum and the School of Engineering
Students in the School of Engineering satisfy their mathematics and natural science
requirement with courses required by their majors; their second language requirement is
met by Santa Clara’s entrance requirements. Some sections of Core courses in Social Science,
Diversity, Cultures & Ideas 3, and Religion, Theology & Culture 2 and 3 will allow engineering students to satisfy two requirements with one course, with the understanding that
other coursework for their majors will complete the acquisition of knowledge and skills
required in the Core. Engineering students will complete their Pathways with three courses.
Transfer Credit and the Core Curriculum
Transfer credit earned from courses completed after initial enrollment at Santa Clara
may not be used to fulfill Core Curriculum or other requirements.
Transfer credit earned from courses completed before enrollment at Santa Clara are governed by two sets of rules, one for students admitted as first-year students and another for
transfer students. All students must satisfy the following Core requirements at Santa Clara
University: Civic Engagement; Science, Technology & Society; a minimum of two Religion,
Theology & Culture courses; Advanced Writing; Experiential Learning for Social Justice;
and Pathways.
Students admitted as first-year students must also satisfy Critical Thinking & Writing
and ­Cultures & Ideas 1 and 2 with courses completed at Santa Clara University. In contrast,
students admitted as transfers are encouraged to complete Critical Thinking & Writing and
Cultures & Ideas 1 and 2 before their first quarter at Santa Clara. For transfer students only,
transfer credit for Critical Thinking & Writing may include exemptions granted at other
schools and credit granted through Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate
test scores. Information about possible substitutions for Critical Thinking & Writing and
Cultures & Ideas courses is available in the Registrar’s Office.
14 TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES
Transfer students who enter the University with fewer than 44 units must take all three
Religion, Theology & Culture courses in the required sequence. Students matriculating
with 44 or more units of transferable college credit, which does not include any Advanced
Placement or International Baccalaureate test credit, complete two courses from any two
of the following three categories, in any order: Religion, Theology & Culture 1, 2, or 3.
However, all students except Religious Studies majors and minors must complete 88 units
before enrolling in Religion, Theology & Culture 3 courses.
Transfer students must declare their Pathways by the end of their third quarter at SCU.
Transfer students in the College of Arts and Sciences and Leavey School of Business who
matriculate with fewer than 44 units must take four courses to fulfill the Pathways requirement. Transfer students in the College of Arts and Sciences and Leavey School of Business
who matriculate with more than 44 units must take three courses to fulfill the Pathways
requirement. All transfer students in the School of Engineering must take three courses
to fulfill the Pathways requirement. More detailed Pathway guidelines are available at
www.scu.edu/Pathways.
Students who transfer to Santa Clara University should consult Chapters 7 and 8 as well
as the chapters relevant to their school or college.
THE RESIDENTIAL EXPERIENCE
The undergraduate residence halls at Santa Clara University are home to eight Residential
Learning Communities established to foster integrated education within a community of
scholars. By creating a culture in which students connect their academic experiences with
their social and residential ones, the learning communities enhance the education of the
whole person and deepen the connection between learning and living as responsible members of a community.
All entering first-year students, whether or not they live on campus, become members of
one of eight theme-based Residential Learning Communities. Nonresident first-year students are given access to the residence hall in which their learning community is located so
that they can participate fully in its programs. In the theme-based learning communities,
resident directors and faculty directors coordinate the efforts of resident ministers and
­student staff to encourage high academic achievement, effective community living, and
individual development.
Students take at least one Core Foundations sequence in common with others in their
learning community, enriching coursework and promoting the formation of study groups.
Students also interact directly with faculty and staff and participate in theme-based
co-curricular and extracurricular activities both on and off campus. Residential Learning
Communities are primarily two-year communities, but some offer the opportunity for
­students to remain throughout their undergraduate careers.
University residence halls accommodate more than half of the undergraduate population
in coeducational communities with common lounge areas, study rooms, kitchen and laundry facilities, and other services. Most residence halls offer traditional double-occupancy
rooms with common bath facilities; some halls offer suites and apartment-style accommodations with bathrooms en suite. All residence hall rooms and suites are equipped with a
cable television connections, Ethernet, and wireless network service.
TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES 15
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Campus Ministry is comprised of people who are committed to spiritual and personal
growth. Its mission is to foster the spiritual life of our students.
• In support of the University’s mission to “development of the whole person,” Campus
Ministry offers a variety of programs and pastoral presence to support that development, particularly the spiritual and personal aspects.
• Campus Ministry provides a welcoming environment where faith may be explored,
discovered, and developed; a place where there is always someone to talk to about
anything; and a place where people meet for small groups, prayer, reflection, and
learning.
• More than 400 students attend weekly worship, and even more students are involved
in Campus Ministry programs. In addition to eight full-time campus ministers, there
are also resident ministers living in residence halls on campus.
What does Campus Ministry have to offer?
• Worship: Three Sunday liturgies in the Mission Church, daily noon Mass in the
Mission, University celebrations, prayer services, and ecumenical (Christian) and
­interfaith services throughout the year.
• Leadership opportunities: Campus Ministry offers paid internships in the areas of
Christian diversity, communications, faith formation, graduate students, interfaith
ministry, liturgy, prayer, and retreats. The internships encourage students to develop
their interest and skills in ministry.
• Retreats: Santa Clara students are offered a number of retreat experiences over the
course of the academic year. Offerings include a silent retreat, Search retreats, an
Ignatian retreat, and retreats for first-year students and seniors. Retreats are offered to
persons of all faiths.
• Reflection groups: Campus Ministry runs the Christian Life Community program,
which places students in small groups for weekly prayer and reflection. It also oversees
Interfaith dinner discussions, weekly Bible study, and RLC small groups.
• Faith formation: Campus Ministry offers several opportunities for students to learn,
reflect, and grow in regard to their faith through Scripture reflection, forums and
presentations, and Sacraments of Initiation.
• Social justice awareness and action: Campus Ministry provides students with a
variety of opportunities to respond to the Gospel call to actively live out a faith that
does justice. Some key focus areas include participation in the annual Ignatian Family
Teach-in for Justice; simple meals, action, education, and reflection about current
events.
Is Campus Ministry for everyone?
Yes! We welcome the participation of anyone interested in spiritual and personal growth,
regardless of faith tradition. This is a time for learning about yourself and our world, and we
hope we can accompany you in that exploration.
16 TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES
GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT
The University Strategic plan has prioritized global engagement and understanding. As
a result there are a number of programs throughout the university that offer students the
opportunity to engage with the world as part of their academic program. The Global
Engagement Office (GEO) provides leadership, coordination, strategic planning, and
resources for the internationalization of the campus. GEO offers programs and services that
enhance global learning at Santa Clara University, which includes the two largest global
programs at the University: the SCU Study Abroad program, and the International S­ tudents
& Scholars (ISS) program. In addition to these programs, GEO provides information on
diverse international programs throughout the University.
The ISS program supports the education and development of undergraduate and graduate international students to enable them to achieve excellence in their academic and professional goals. In addition, ISS promotes the understanding of diverse cultures and perspectives
throughout the University and provides support to international students of all kinds. ISS
also manages the F-1 and J-1 visa programs and provides support to students on visa-related
matters.
SCU STUDY ABROAD
As part of the SCU Study Abroad program, undergraduate students may apply to over
150 approved programs in over 60 locations with opportunities to study during fall, winter,
spring, and summer. Courses completed in approved SCU Study Abroad programs count
toward elective credit requirements for graduation and may fulfill major, minor, and Core
requirements with the prior approval from the department or the Core director. SCU Study
Abroad values diversity and inclusion and strongly encourages students from all backgrounds to apply for study abroad. For more information on the SCU Study Abroad
­program, see Chapter 6.
CAREER CENTER
The Career Center provides students with a variety of services and resources to encourage self-discovery, provide a meaningful vocational journey, and educate for the continuous
process of career and life development. Students explore their majors and career choices
with counselors to reflect on attributes such as personality, skills, interests, and values, and
learn to represent those attributes effectively on resumes, in cover letters, during interviews,
and throughout the life of their careers. The Career Center offers a variety of programs and
services each year, including career fairs, employer information sessions, classes and workshops on career strategies, resume writing and interview webinars, internship workshops,
mock interviews, and appointments with career counselors. A critical piece of educating for
life is on- and off-campus student employment positions, internships, cooperative education placements, and volunteer opportunities. Positions are posted through the Career
­Center’s BroncoLink online job listing and are accessible to students via eCampus. The
Career Center also disseminates information through its Web presence including Facebook,
BroncoLink, and LinkedIn. For undergraduate students interested in pursuing graduate
study, the Career Center offers a Resource Guide to Graduate School on its website.
TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES 17
CAMPUS RECREATION
Campus Recreation is committed to the Jesuit ideal of developing the whole person
through a broad range of recreational, educational, and competitive opportunities that seek
to enrich the lives of students, faculty, and staff. Informal recreation opportunities include
drop-in use of the weight and cardiovascular equipment and gymnasium in the Pat Malley
Fitness and Recreation Center, lap swimming in the Sullivan Aquatic Center, playing tennis
at the Degheri Tennis Center, and throwing a football on Bellomy Field. Noncredit lifetime
recreation fitness classes are also provided for an additional fee to all members. There are
three options to take classes: a daily drop-in, a nine-class punch card, or an unlimited pass.
During the first week of the quarter, all classes are free; beginning the second week, a pass is
needed to attend the nine weeks of classes. There are over 30 classes available per week.
Classes include yoga, Pilates, kickboxing, cycling, step aerobics, and many more. Organized
intramural sports leagues provide competitive opportunities in flag football, tennis, volleyball, badminton, basketball, soccer, table tennis, and softball against fellow current Santa
Clara students, faculty, and staff. The 18 competitive club sports, open only to students,
represent Santa Clara against teams from other colleges and universities. Current club sports
include boxing, cycling, equestrian, men’s ice hockey, men’s and women’s lacrosse, men’s and
women’s rugby, men’s and women’s ultimate Frisbee, men’s and women’s club volleyball,
paintball, sailing, Shotokan karate, swimming, triathlon, and women’s field hockey.
INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
Santa Clara University supports a broad intercollegiate athletic program and is a member
of Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and a founding member of the West Coast Conference (WCC). With 19 intercollegiate sports, the Broncos field
teams in men’s and women’s basketball, crew, cross country, golf, soccer, track and water
polo, men’s baseball, women’s softball and women’s volleyball.
As a program, Santa Clara has won 59 WCC titles across eight sports and has been to
the NCAA tournament 92 times with a total of 18 Final Four appearances.
The men’s and women’s soccer teams are perennially among the nation’s elite programs,
both having won national championships. Men’s soccer took home its national title in 1989
when current head coach, Cam Rast, was a star on the team. Jerry Smith has led the women’s
soccer team for over 28 years and has taken the team to 24 NCAA tournaments and 10 Final
Fours. In 2001, Smith led the Broncos all the way to the program’s national title.
Women’s volleyball has also emerged in recent years as one of the nation’s top programs.
In 2005, the Broncos volleyball team made an incredible run to the Final Four under
c­urrent head coach, John Wallace.
Men’s basketball has also had much success on the court. The team went to the final four
in 1952 and was home to former National Basketball Association (NBA) star, Kurt Rambis,
and current NBA player and two-time Most Valuable Player (MVP) winner, Steve Nash. As
a first-year student, Nash led Santa Clara back to the NCAA tournament for the first time
in five years and an upset of second-seeded Arizona. In all, Santa Clara went to the tournament three times in Nash’s four years on the Mission campus.
In 2011, Santa Clara men’s basketball returned to the postseason for the first time since
Nash graduated and took part in the CollegeInsider.com Tournament. The Broncos,
led by the nation’s top three-point shooter, Kevin Foster, went all the way to collect the
tournament title. The team then captured the College Basketball Invitational postseason
tournament in 2013.
18 TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES
The women’s basketball team has had success in the postseason as well, bringing home
the 1991 Women’s National Invitation Tournament (WNIT) championship.
Not to be outdone, Bronco baseball has had tremendous success with the high point
coming in 1962 when the team went all the way to Omaha and the College World Series
title game. The team featured eight future major league players, including three who went
straight from Santa Clara to the big leagues. In 2014, the Broncos advanced to the WCC
tournament, which was the first post-season appearance since 1997.
One of the most famous Santa Clara baseball players, Randy Winn, started as Steve
Nash’s backup at point guard on the basketball team. Winn played 13 seasons in the major
leagues including five for the San Francisco Giants.
With a long tradition of turning out professional baseball players, the Broncos have had
over 158 players taken in the major league baseball draft.
The Broncos also have some of the best athletic facilities in the country including
­Stephen Schott Stadium that opened in 2005, the Sullivan Aquatic Center that opened in
2008, the Degheri Tennis Center that opened in 1999, and the Leavey Center that was
renovated in 2002. New construction is underway at the softball stadium and the Stevens’
Soccer Center.
Santa Clara is one of the WCC’s top broad-based programs.
SCU PRESENTS
SCU Presents supports Santa Clara University students, faculty, and staff in the performing and visual arts by promoting the arts through a variety of programs, providing resources
to academic departments, and serving the University and local community by providing
a rich season of performance events. Performance events include a Visiting Artist series of
national and international artists.
SCU Presents Arts for Social Justice is a collaborative and interdisciplinary initiative
whose mission is to raise awareness about critical issues addressing the human condition
through the creation and participation in a wide variety of art forms, both on and off
campus, which fosters dialogue and action in the community.
SCU Presents also encourages and supports the creative expression of Silicon Valley
artists by providing performance space for local arts organizations.
CENTER FOR STUDENT LEADERSHIP
The Center for Student Leadership (CSL) is dedicated to providing high-quality leadership
education through leadership programs and student activities in an integrated academic
environment. Working with faculty, students, staff, alumni, and the greater community,
CSL will:
• Prepare students to be informed educated leaders in society who exhibit courage,
character, and respect for others
• Provide students with opportunities to discover their potential and examine their
personal values, opinions, and beliefs
• Encourage students to practice skills and competencies associated with effective leadership
• Advise student leaders and student organizations in group development organizational management, and program development
• Be an advocate for students’ interests and celebrate their contributions to University
life and the larger community
TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES 19
CSL enhances student potential and educates for leadership in the Jesuit tradition. The
staff of scholar practitioners provides programs and services that embrace the values of social
justice, citizenship, ethical decision making, service to others, and diversity.
CSL collaborates with faculty and staff throughout the University to deliver summer
orientation programming introducing new students and their families to the campus community, especially their Residential Learning Communities, supporting advising and registration for fall classes, and engaging new students in discussions of community values and
summer reading. Other programming throughout the academic year encourages students
to take advantage of rich academic and co-curricular opportunities and supports new students as they adjust to the demands and responsibilities of University life.
CHARTERED STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
The Activities Programming Board (APB) provides social events, programs, and leadership opportunities. Students may get involved with APB as a staff member or a volunteer
to plan concerts, comedy shows, speaking events, movies, and recreational trips for the
student body.
The Associated Student Government of Santa Clara University (ASG) is the undergraduate student government organization, which is divided into the executive, legislative,
and judicial branches. Positions are available on the executive cabinet, student senate,
­student judicial board, and University committees.
Into the Wild provides students of all skill levels with opportunities to get off campus
and explore California’s wilderness. Every week, Into the Wild organizes trips that include
hiking, backpacking, camping, rock climbing, kayaking, rafting, surfing, and more. Into the
Wild also aims to promote environmentally sustainable practices.
KSCU is a student-run, non-commercial radio station at 103.3 FM. The program format features primarily independent music, including indie rock, punk, ska, jazz, blues, and
reggae. Students may get involved with the radio station as a staff member or as a volunteer
DJ, office assistant, fundraiser, or sound technician.
The Multicultural Center (MCC) provides programming and support for students of
diverse ethnic backgrounds and for the campus community. The MCC is an umbrella organization for nine clubs, including the Asian Pacific Student Union (APSU), Japanese
Student Association (JSA), Barkada, Chinese Student Association (CSA), Igwebuike,
­
Intandesh, Ka Mana’o O Hawai’i, MEChA-El Frente, and the Vietnamese Student Association (VSA). Students may get involved with the MCC in a staff position and in volunteer
opportunities as a board member, club leader, or center assistant.
The Redwood is the University’s annual yearbook capturing the pictorial history of each
academic year. Students may get involved with the yearbook through staff positions and
volunteer roles in writing, design, photography, and management. Students at-large are
encouraged to participate by contributing photos and writings.
The Santa Clara is the University’s undergraduate weekly newspaper, serving as an
informative and entertaining student-run campus publication. Students may get involved
in a staff position or as a volunteer writer, photographer, or member of the business and
advertising staff.
The Santa Clara Community Action Program (SCCAP) is a community-based, volunteer service organization that promotes social awareness, leadership for social justice, and
compassion, and provides students with opportunities to apply their education to social
service. Program opportunities fit into four categories: education and mentoring,
20 TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES
empowerment, health and disabilities, and homelessness. Students may get involved
through staff leadership positions and volunteer opportunities.
The Santa Clara Review (SCR ) is the University’s biannual literary magazine and
draws submissions from students, faculty, staff, and artists outside the University community. The Review is committed to the development of student literary talent in editorial
knowledge and creative writing skills. Students may get involved with the magazine in several staff positions and with opportunities to volunteer in the areas of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art, and management.
OFFICE FOR MULTICULTURAL LEARNING
The mission of the Office for Multicultural Learning is to coordinate, collaborate, and
promote cross-campus programming and related initiatives for purposes of enhancing Santa
Clara University’s goals for diversity and inclusive excellence and providing a welcoming
campus climate.
The Office for Multicultural Learning serves as a campus-wide resource for information
about multicultural issues and diversity. It offers multicultural learning experiences that
educate the campus to respect and honor differences, promote dialogue and interactions
among individuals from different backgrounds, and support collaborative efforts between
the University and the local community.
UNIVERSITY HONORS PROGRAM
The University Honors Program provides a learning experience appropriate to students
of exceptional academic talent and imagination. The program offers small seminar-style
classes, especially in courses fulfilling the Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements.
Admission to the University Honors Program is by invitation or application and considers
the student’s academic record, standardized test scores, recommendations, and any other
information the student might provide about interests, goals, or experiences.
The program is organized as two distinct but related levels open to undergraduate students from arts and sciences, business, and engineering. Level I of the program accepts
first-year students for a curriculum organized around courses that satisfy Undergraduate
Core Curriculum requirements applying to students in every field. The University Honors
Program requires that all participants maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of
3.3 or higher, and Level I participants must successfully complete a minimum of six program courses within the first six quarters of enrollment. Most participants complete Level I
during their first year. Unless exempted by the director, Level I participants must fulfill
specific Foundations courses in the Core Curriculum—Critical Thinking & Writing; Cultures & Ideas; and Religion, Theology & Culture—through special class sections arranged
by the program. Participants are also strongly urged to satisfy Core Curriculum requirements such as mathematics, ethics, social sciences, natural sciences, advanced writing, and
advanced Religion, Theology & Culture with Honors Program sections.
Participants in Level I normally continue to Level II, in which they complete a minimum of four additional program courses including a senior thesis or project. Students who
have completed 32 or more units but not more than 88 units at Santa Clara may apply to
enter Level II by contacting the Honors Program Office. Students joining the program at
Level II complete six program courses including the thesis or senior project. Some Level II
courses, while not limited to program participants, offer academic opportunities especially
suitable for them. For both continuing and new participants, the thesis usually grows out of
TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES 21
a regular or independent study course taken in conjunction with the participant’s major,
minor, or Pathway. Successful completion of the program at Level II becomes part of a
student’s permanent record and appears on academic transcripts issued by the University.
Honors Program students have the opportunity to participate in the Honors Advisory
Council. The University Honors Program is allied with the Office of Student Fellowships,
which helps prepare students to compete for nationally competitive graduate fellowships
such as Rhodes, Marshall, Fulbright, Mitchell, Goldwater, Udall, Jack Kent Cooke, and
Gates Cambridge. A competitive annual award permits one Honors Program student to
spend his or her junior year at Mansfield College, Oxford University.
For information about courses offered through the University Honors Program, see
Chapter 6.
LEAD SCHOLARS PROGRAM
The LEAD (Leadership, Excellence, and Academic Development) Scholars Program
provides first-generation University students admitted to the program with a smooth transition to life at Santa Clara. The LEAD Scholars Program forms a community of undergraduate peers and faculty dedicated to rigorous academic achievement, student leadership,
community engagement and service. The program involves support as well as challenge
throughout the four years, with a special emphasis on the first-year experience. All LEAD
scholars participate in LEAD Week, which is scheduled for the week immediately preceding
the beginning of the fall term. Incoming first-year students take ENGL 1A and 2A together,
and well as two LEAD Seminars, which focus on optimizing the transition to college. Transfer students take an upper-division seminar, which focuses on opportunities and challenges
for transfer students. Other optional courses are also offered for the LEAD Scholars community, and students have access to a range of resources.
LEAD Scholars can also participate in the LEAD Council, a leadership group that provides programs, events, and other opportunities to serve the needs of the LEAD community. A range of social and academic programs are offered including alumni networking,
community building events and outreach to families. For more information about courses
offered by the LEAD Scholars Program, please refer to Chapter 6.
OFFICE OF FELLOWSHIPS
The Office of Fellowships at Santa Clara was established in 2005 to provide the central
management and administrative responsibility for advising students about a wide variety of
highly competitive external fellowships, scholarships, awards, and prizes requiring university nomination, endorsement, or review. The Office of Fellowships mentors and advises
students about their academic, service, and volunteer work in pursuit of the more than
25 named fellowships for which Santa Clara students are eligible (Rhodes, Marshall, Fulbright, Madison, Truman, and Jack Kent Cooke, for example) as well as provides direct
support for potential candidates in the application process.
The Office of Fellowships responds to two principles of Jesuit education. The first, cura
personalis, personal care, reflects a deep respect for the individual and that person’s potential.
The second, magis, “striving for the more,” calls on students to do their very best and always
to strive for personal excellence. The Office of Fellowships will help intellectually gifted
Santa Clara students to develop and to utilize their talents so that they have more to give
to others.
22 TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES
PEER EDUCATOR PROGRAM
Created in 1997 as an experiment in enhancing student learning, the Peer Educator
Program is designed to facilitate and enrich the learning supported by undergraduate
instruction at Santa Clara University. Peer Educators are students who help a faculty member with the administration of a class. More specifically, the Peer Educator Program aims to
• Enhance and enrich the learning experiences of peer educators through close collaboration with a faculty member
•Enhance and enrich learning in undergraduate courses, especially lower-division
­university and school core courses
• Contribute to the residential learning community initiative to increase awareness of
the close relationships between experiential and classroom learning and cultivate a
frame of mind conducive to lifelong learning
• Support faculty initiatives to develop and implement pedagogies that further other
goals of the program and of the university
DOMESTIC PUBLIC SECTOR STUDIES PROGRAMS
The Public Sector Studies Program at Santa Clara University offers an introduction to
the areas traditionally known as public policy, public administration, public affairs, and
urban planning. It is designed to provide a closer look at the creation, implementation, and
analysis of public policies, and the operation of government, public, and nonprofit organizations. The program also provides an excellent foundation for those who would like to
pursue graduate studies in public policy or public administration and an alternative perspective for students who wish to pursue public law.
Opportunities for Firsthand Study
Through the Public Sector Studies program in the Department of Political Science,
students have the opportunity to participate in public sector internships, the Washington
Semester Program, and the Panetta Institute’s Congressional Internship program. These
programs offer preparation and training for students interested in working at the city,
county, state, or federal level of government, in a public agency or nonprofit organization,
or considering graduate-level studies in related fields.
Internships
Perhaps the best way to understand is by doing—students participating in public sector
internships not only observe what happens in the “real world,” but they are able to take part
as well, gaining invaluable experience and knowledge. Placements in public sector internships have included the San Jose mayor’s and City Council members’ offices, district offices
of members of Congress and the California Legislature, government relations departments
of high-tech corporations, public law offices including the Santa Clara county Public
Defender and District Attorney, political campaigns, and nonprofit organizations. Many
students end their internships with excellent employment prospects.
The Washington Semester Program
In the Washington Semester Program, students combine coursework taken at American
University with hands-on experience via internships. In the past, SCU students have
interned at the White House, the Justice Department, the FBI, interest groups, broadcast
TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES 23
news stations, various nonprofit organizations, and offices of members of the U.S. House of
Representatives. The Washington Semester Program offers students the opportunity to live,
study, and work in our nation’s capital for one semester along with students from other
U.S. states and from countries abroad. Numerous programs of study are available, including
American Politics, Public Law, U.S. Foreign Policy, International Environment and Development, Economic Policy, Journalism, International Business and Trade, Peace and C
­ onflict
Resolution, and Contemporary Islam. Several programs include a three-week international
travel component along with study in Washington. Students participating in the Washington Semester Program earn 22.5 to 24 quarter credits for one semester of study. Grades and
units received at American University will count toward the student’s SCU grade point average and course requirements for the department and the University when appropriate.
The Panetta Institute’s Congressional Internship Program
The Leon and Sylvia Panetta Institute for Public Policy at California State University,
Monterey Bay, founded by Santa Clara political science alumnus Leon Panetta, offers an
opportunity for students to gain an inside look at the legislative branch of the U.S. federal
government and Washington politics. This Congressional internship begins with a twoweek course at California State University, Monterey Bay, where students work directly with
seasoned veterans examining the legislative process and its functions. The remaining twoand-a-half months of the internship are spent in Washington, D.C., working on Capitol
Hill in the office of a member of the California Congressional delegation. One exceptional
Santa Clara University student is chosen each year for this fully subsidized internship.
Eligibility
To be eligible to participate in one of these Public Sector Studies Programs, students
must have completed at least 88 quarter units of credit by the date that the program of study
begins, must not be on academic or disciplinary probation, and must be in good financial
standing with the University. Students must also meet grade point average and other eligibility requirements for the specific program.
For more information about the Public Sector Studies Program, visit the Public Sector
Studies Program at www.scu.edu/cas/polisci/publicsector.cfm or contact the director of the
Public Sector Studies Program.
ACADEMIC ADVISING AND LEARNING RESOURCES
The John B. Drahmann Academic Advising and Learning Resources Center coordinates
academic support services for undergraduate students. University advisors in the Drahmann
Center work closely with faculty and staff in the Residential Learning Communities, the
deans’ offices, the Cowell Center, the Career Center, the Office for Multicultural Learning,
and the Center for Student Leadership to ensure that academic advising and other academic
support services are integrated for the benefit of students.
Santa Clara University follows a developmental advising model based on a close studentfaculty advisor relationship intended to assist students with achieving their educational,
career, and personal goals through the use of the full range of institutional resources.
The Drahmann Center provides training for faculty advisors through new faculty advisor
workshops and ongoing training to keep faculty advisors current on University policies and
available resources. The Center also collaborates with other areas to enhance the advising
support for all students, such as providing support for the peer advising program in the
School of Business.
24 TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES
The Drahmann Learning Resources Center offers drop-in and group tutoring as well as
consultation and workshops on learning strategies, study skills, and time management. The
Center also provides advising outreach for first-year and undeclared students and collaborates with the LEAD Scholars Program to ensure that first-generation college students are
fully informed about the range of support services available to all students.
Pre-Health Sciences Advising (Advisor: Steven L. Fedder)
Santa Clara University has an excellent reputation for preparing students for careers in
the health sciences. Most incoming students tend to be focused on either allopathic medicine or dentistry, but a much broader spectrum of careers can be equally or more attractive
including osteopathic medicine, physical therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physician assistant,
nurse practitioner, public health professional, and others. A Santa Clara education provides
ample opportunity to acquire the academic foundations in natural science required by medical schools, and its broad liberal arts Core Curriculum also serves to develop the communication, personal interaction, and analytical skills needed both during medical school and
in one’s subsequent medical practice.
Although Santa Clara does not have a pre-med major, the courses prescribed by the
Council of Education of the American Medical Association can be incorporated into several
academic majors. In addition, many students become more skilled and competitive by
enrolling in two or three upper-division science courses, often but not exclusively in biochemistry, genetics, and human physiology, which are helpful in preparing for the Medical
College Admission Test (MCAT). The combination of Core Curriculum requirements with
the University’s focus on community involvement and issues of diversity will prepare students well for the newly revised MCAT 2015, with its greater emphasis on social, economic,
and psychological determinants of health. Students should visit the Pre-Health Advising
website at www.scu.edu/cas/prehealth and maintain regular contact with the pre-health sciences advisor throughout their undergraduate years for assistance with adjusting to college
academic rigor and social life; developing an appreciation of the wide array of available
health care careers; achieving balance between academics, social life, work, health community volunteering, and internships; selecting relevant entrance examinations; and applying
to graduate health-science programs.
Pre-Law Advising (Advisors: Brian Buckley, Lawrence Nelson, Terri Peretti,
Diana Morlang, Melissa Donegan)
Santa Clara University provides a wide range of opportunities for undergraduates to
build a strong pre-law foundation. Early in their undergraduate program, pre-law students
should consult not only with their major advisor but also with one of the designated pre-law
advisors. Consultation with a pre-law advisor familiarizes the student with the rigors of law
school, the practice of law, the burden of law school debt, and the means to best secure
employment as an attorney. Advisors will help formulate a program to prepare students for
the complexity of the application process, including preparation for the Law School
­Admission Test (LSAT). There is no specific major or curriculum required to qualify for law
school admission. Successful law school applicants come from a diversity of majors such as
anthropology, philosophy, communication, political science, physics, English, history, biology, and economics. However, to successfully prepare for the LSAT, students are advised to
select courses that deepen reading comprehension and promote logical reasoning. Law
school admissions officers generally recommend undergraduate preparation by selecting a
major that demands discipline, analytical ability, research skills, close reading of texts,
creativity, verbal skills, and precision in written and oral work. The departments of
­
TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES 25
Philosophy and Political Science offer a pre-law emphasis within the major (in philosophy,
it is also available within the minor). Elective courses also provide valuable training and
breadth of academic and analytical experience. Some elective courses strengthen specific
abilities, while others provide perspective on legal issues and topics. For recommended
­electives, see www.scu.edu/prelaw/.
Pre-Teaching Advising (Advisor: Carol Ann Gittens)
Santa Clara University is accredited by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing to offer professional preparation for prospective elementary school, middle school,
and senior high school teachers. The Department of Education in the School of Education
and Counseling Psychology offers graduate programs for the multiple-subject credential for
elementary grades and the single-subject credential for secondary grades, both with a crosscultural language and academic development emphasis. The teaching credential program at
SCU is combined with a Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree. Students interested in
teaching should consider completing an interdisciplinary minor in urban education offered
through the College of Arts and Sciences.
The Future Teachers Project (FTP), formerly known as the Eastside Future Teachers
Project, works with students from traditionally underrepresented groups throughout S­ ilicon
Valley and the greater Bay Area, who are interested in becoming teachers. Through innovative outreach and support programs, the goal is to develop leaders who will make an immediate impact on their communities. FTP scholars are generally recruited during high school
and once at SCU, are considered for the FTP scholarship, which contributes to undergraduate studies and the credential/MAT program. The FTP is managed through the
­Liberal Studies Program.
For more information, see Chapter 3, Liberal Studies Program.
THE WRITING CENTER
The HUB Writing Center (www.scu.edu/hub/) offers drop-in writing support to graduate
and undergraduate students as well as workshops in public speaking, revising and editing,
developing personal statements and cover letters, grammar basics, Pathway essay writing,
and workshops for students for whom English is not their native language. The writing
center also offers students the opportunity to become HUB writing partners and to participate in Independent Studies or research projects.
INFORMATION RESOURCES
Information Technology
Undergraduate students are supported with a variety of computing services at Santa
Clara University. Students will receive an SCU Network ID that provides access to multiple
accounts. Students also have access to a ubiquitous high speed campus, wired and wireless
network, as well as connection to the Internet via the University’s 10 GB connection.
Students may use the network to access their Gmail and Google Apps account, Camino
learning support system, SmartPrint, SCU ePortfolio, Zoom webconferencing, endpoint
protection/anti-virus software, and for wireless access. SCU email is used by the University
as one of the communication channels to send official notifications to undergraduate students, and is also used as a frequent communication tool between and among faculty and
students. Students are therefore urged to use their SCU email address as their primary
26 TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES
email. Students who opt to utilize other email services are advised to check their SCU email
periodically to avoid missing important communications.
Students have access to administrative information and services at all times through the
eCampus portal (ecampus.scu.edu). eCampus services include the ability to view class
schedule and course history; run degree progress reports; request enrollment verification;
enroll for classes (add, drop, swap); view exam schedules, grades, and unofficial transcripts;
request official transcripts; review financial accounts; and maintain personal information
such as addresses, phone numbers, alternate email addresses, and emergency contacts; and
enroll in Campus Alert, the University’s emergency notification system. Students who
­register for Campus Alert should keep their emergency contact information current in
­eCampus to ensure notifications are appropriately received.
The University provides over 150 PC and Mac workstations in the Learning Commons
with a variety of software packages to support both general computing needs and multimedia production. Technology help and assistance is available at the Information Technology
help desks in the Learning Commons approximately 18 hours per day, most days. Free
guest wireless access is also available for students visiting friends and family.
Information Security Office
The Information Security Office protects the University’s information assets and ensures
that students have access to all of the information resources they need. To protect their
private information, students are advised to change their eCampus and SCU Network ID
passwords once each quarter; designate a PIN on phone and other mobile devices; install
anti-virus software and keep it updated; and set up their computer operating system to
install automatic updates.
Media Services
Media Services offers a broad range of audio, digital video, Web, graphics, and multi­
media resources and services. All students have access to equipment and services for class
use, class-related projects, and co-curricular use. Media Services supports technology in
classrooms, conference rooms, and campus events spaces; the Camino Learning Management System, Zoom webconferencing, and Digication ePortfolio applications; multimedia
and digital video production; and SCU’s private cable TV system serving the residence halls.
University Library
Library resources, which can be accessed within the library and remotely, include an
online catalog (OSCAR), more than 200 general and subject-specific databases, research
guides for many subjects and some specific classes, “Ask a Librarian” 24/7 reference services,
and LINK+ interlibrary loan program.
The library’s collections have grown to more than 927,763 volumes, including approximately 15,877 e-books, and subscriptions to more than 133,237 magazines, journals, and
newspapers; over 1,500 are in electronic format. Because the library is a depository for
United States and California government documents, more than 600,000 government
documents are available online, in print, or in other physical formats. Additionally, the
library houses more than 900,000 microforms, hundreds of historical photographs, more
than 5,000 maps, and over 20,000 audio/visual items.
TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES 27
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS AND SCHOLARS
The International Students and Scholars Program provides assistance to undergraduate
and graduate international students with support related to visas, intercultural and academic adjustment, and general support for their transition to, and continued success in,
their studies on campus and in post-graduation employment.
DISABILITIES RESOURCES
The Disabilities Resources Office has been designated by the University to ensure access
for all undergraduate and graduate students with disabilities to all academic programs and
campus resources. The goal is to support students with medical, physical, psychological,
attention deficit, and learning disabilities to participate fully in campus life, its programs,
and activities. Emphasis is on growth and individual achievement through the provision of
academic accommodations, support services, self-advocacy skill training, and disabilityrelated educational programming for the campus community. Reasonable accommodations
are provided to minimize the effects of a student’s disability and to maximize the potential
for success. A student may voluntarily register with the Disability Resources Office by
completing the online registration form and providing documentation of his or her
­
­disability, after which proper accommodations will be determined and implemented by
the University.
THE COWELL CENTER
The Cowell Center promotes a holistic approach to students’ physical, emotional,
­ sychological, and/or interpersonal well-being. The Center’s counseling and medical staff
p
are available when students believe that their well-being is being compromised in any way.
Through Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), Student Health Services (SHS),
Santa Clara University Emergency Medical Services (SCU EMS), and Student Health
Insurance, the Cowell Center has a wealth of health and wellness resources to support
­students as they navigate the academic rigors at Santa Clara University.
Counseling and Psychological Services
Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is staffed with psychologists who strive to
promote, enhance, and support students’ emotional and interpersonal well-being through
a range of mental health services offered within a safe and confidential environment.
Individual counseling, couples counseling, group counseling, and psycho-educational
­
­programs are available. In counseling, students work on a wide range of psychosocial and
developmental issues such as depression, anxiety, interpersonal problems, disturbed sleep,
eating behaviors, acculturation, academic motivation, homesickness, family concerns, intimacy, and sexuality. All students are eligible for up to 10 counseling sessions per academic
year, the first six (6) sessions are free, with a nominal fee assessed for sessions seven (7)
through ten (10).
When CAPS is closed, an after-hours emergency and suicide crisis hotline (408-279-3312)
is available to students along with Santa Clara’s unique crisis webpage featured on Ulifeline
at www.ulifeline.org/scu/.
28 TRANSFORMATIVE EXPERIENCES AND LEARNING RESOURCES
Student Health Services
Student Health Services (SHS) is staffed with a physician, physician assistant, nurse
practitioners, registered nurses, and medical assistants. A psychiatrist, registered dietician,
and physical therapy assistant are available on a part-time basis. SHS provides high-quality
services such as primary medical care, physicals, diagnosis and treatment of illness and injuries, immunizations, gynecological examinations, a limited in-house pharmacy, and medical
referrals to specialists when needed. Medical visits to the Cowell Center, Student Health
Services, range from $10 to $50 per visit for all students. Visit fees are in addition to all
other nominal associated fees such as the cost of medications, lab/blood tests, and/or supplies. Visits to the Cowell Center, Counseling and Psychological Services, range in cost from
no charge to $100 per visit for all students. For further information, see the Cowell Center
website at www.scu.edu/cowell. When SHS is closed, an advice nurse is available by phone
for students both on campus (extension 4880) and off campus (408-554-4880). A volunteer student emergency medical group, SCU Emergency Medical Services (EMS), is also
available to take care of medical emergencies on campus. The health center is closed from
mid-June to mid-August.
SCU Emergency Medical Services
SCU Emergency Medical Services (EMS) is a student-run organization that is based out
of the Cowell Center. These students are known as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs)
and offer emergency medical services to SCU students from 5 p.m. to 8 a.m. every day
­during fall, winter, and spring quarters.
Student Health Insurance
All students are requested to complete a pre-entrance health history prior to arrival at the
University and are required to maintain health insurance coverage while enrolled at the
University. Students will be charged for University health insurance unless they complete an
online waiver verifying their own comparable insurance each academic year.
KIDS ON CAMPUS
Kids on Campus, the University childcare and preschool program for children between
6 weeks and 5 years of age, is available for faculty, staff, students, and alumni. The staff at
Kids on Campus provide a loving, creative, and safe learning environment designed to
enhance the physical, mental, and social growth of each child through a “learning through
play” philosophy.
3
College of Arts and Sciences
Dean: Debbie Tahmassebi
Associate Deans: Barbara M. Fraser, Stephen C. Lee
Senior Assistant Dean: Kathleen Villarruel Schneider
Assistant Dean: Rafael D. Ulate
The goals of the College of Arts and Sciences are to foster a learning community
committed to addressing the fundamental problems of society with a spirit of inquiry,
mutual respect, and intellectual excitement and to prepare students to understand and
appreciate a broad range of peoples and cultures so they may exercise moral leadership in a
pluralistic world. In this way, the College is central to Santa Clara’s Jesuit, liberal education.
With more than 1,500 courses in the humanities, arts, social sciences, and natural
sciences, the College offers an inclusive and welcoming academic environment providing:
•A common educational experience for all undergraduate students through the
University’s Core Curriculum
• Majors in 36 subject areas
• Departmental and interdisciplinary minor programs
• Opportunities for advanced study in a student’s particular area of interest
All undergraduate students at the University explore the sciences and liberal arts through
the University’s Core Curriculum that challenges them to develop open and critical thinking, to communicate effectively, to work with complex methods of inquiry, to understand
diverse cultures and peoples, and to appreciate the demands of ethical decision making.
Those who select majors or minors in the College have the opportunity to develop specialized knowledge and skills in areas of concentration that reflect their personal interests and
talents. Students are encouraged to use elective courses to pursue particular interests beyond
their chosen major. In addition to selecting individual courses, students have the opportunity to organize their electives around minors and emphases in many departmental and
interdisciplinary programs throughout the College.
The College of Arts and Sciences offers a variety of student-faculty research opportunities and ongoing mentoring relationships in which students work closely with faculty members in the creation of knowledge or original artistic works. These opportunities include
research assistantships throughout the College in the arts, humanities, and natural and
social sciences.
29
30 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES
The College of Arts and Sciences confers the degree of bachelor of arts in ancient studies,
art history, chemistry, classical languages and literatures (Greek and/or Latin), classical
studies, communication, English, French and Francophone studies, German studies,
history, individual studies, Italian studies, music, philosophy, religious studies, Spanish
studies, studio art, and theatre arts. The College also confers the bachelor of science in
anthropology, biochemistry, biology, chemistry, computer science (mathematics),
economics, engineering physics, environmental science, environmental studies, individual
studies, liberal studies, mathematics, physics, political science, psychology, public health
science, and sociology. In addition, companion majors are available in ethnic studies and
women’s and gender studies.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS
AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
To qualify, students must complete a minimum of 175 quarter units of credit, at least
60 of which must be upper-division, and satisfy the requirements of the Undergraduate
Core Curriculum and the major. There are no additional College requirements.
MINORS IN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
The College of Arts and Sciences offers minors in ancient studies, anthropology, art
history, biology, chemistry, classical languages and literatures (Latin or Greek), classical
studies, communication, computer science, creative writing, dance, economics, English,
ethnic studies, environmental studies, French and Francophone studies, German studies,
history, Italian studies, Japanese studies, mathematics, music, philosophy, physics, political
science, public health, religious studies, sociology, Spanish studies, studio art, theatre, and
women’s and gender studies. Descriptions of the minors and associated requirements can be
found in the appropriate department or program section of this chapter.
In addition, the College administers interdisciplinary minors in Arabic, Islamic, and
Middle Eastern studies; Asian studies; biotechnology; Catholic studies; Latin American
studies; Medieval and Renaissance studies; musical theatre; and urban education. Descriptions of the interdisciplinary minors and the associated requirements are provided in the
Interdisciplinary Minors and Other Programs of Study section at the end of this chapter.
ANTHROPOLOGY 31
DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Professor Emeritus: George D. Westermark
Professors: Mary Elaine Hegland, Lisa Kealhofer
Associate Professors: Michelle Bezanson (Department Chair), Luis Calero, S.J.
Assistant Professors: Mythri Jegathesan, Lee Panich
The Department of Anthropology offers a degree program leading to the bachelor of
science in anthropology. A solid undergraduate foundation in anthropology secures the
analytical skills needed to undertake professional degrees in anthropology, business, law,
public health, social services, or provides a foundation for embarking on a number of other
professional careers. The department also offers a minor, several emphases, and an honors
thesis option.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling the Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the
bachelor of science degree, students majoring in anthropology must complete the following
departmental requirements:
• ANTH 1, 2, 3
• SOCI 1
• ANTH 50 or ENVS 50 or POLI 50
• ANTH 110, 112, 114, 198
• Five upper-division courses selected from the following four categories: biological
(ANTH 130–139), archaeological (ANTH 140–149), cultural (ANTH 150–179),
or regional (ANTH 180–189). At least three of the four categories must be represented
in the student’s selection.
• An introductory statistics course
• Six anthropology seminars
Emphasis Programs in Anthropology
Anthropology majors have the option of completing a special emphasis program to
complement their majors. The emphasis is not a narrow specialization but reflects competence in the subfields of the discipline. Completion of a special emphasis program will be
noted on student transcripts with the approval of the department chair.
The emphasis in applied anthropology prepares students to use anthropological knowledge to address critical human issues in careers outside academia. Through coursework and
related internships, students will gain a better understanding of how anthropological knowledge and skills can be used in occupations related to health and medicine, international
development, environment, government, business, education, immigration, and poverty.
The emphasis in archaeology focuses on a deeper understanding of the human past and
how it is studied. This is a possible course of study for majors with an interest in employment in cultural resource management or graduate study in archaeology. The biological
emphasis provides in-depth training in the field of biological anthropology. Students will
acquire intellectual breadth and depth with regard to the interdisciplinary nature of anthropology and the biological and cultural interactions that have influenced human evolution
and modern human diversity.
32 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in anthropology:
• ANTH 1 or 2
• ANTH 3
• One additional lower-division anthropology course
• ANTH 110
• Two approved upper-division anthropology courses
• Four anthropology seminars
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. Introduction to
cultural groups, students are required to parBiological Anthropology
ticipate in off-campus Arrupe Partnerships.
Using an evolutionary framework, we exam- (4 units)
ine how past and current human variation is 4. Vanished People and
measured, our place in nature, human geLost Civilizations
netics, human and nonhuman primate biol“Popular
archaeology” is addressed by examogy and behavior, the primate and hominin
fossil record, and the origin and meaning of ining past societies, human migrations and
human biological and behavioral variation. cultural contacts, and ancient human behavStudents gain experience in biological an- ior and technologies. Ideas and assumptions
thropology methods, data analysis and inter- found in movies and other popular media
pretation, and the theoretical frameworks will be evaluated in light of current archaeothat guide our understanding of what it logical data and theory. (4 units)
means to be human. Laboratory 15 hours. 5. Popular Culture
(4 units)
and Bioanthropology
From King Kong to Clan of the Cave Bear,
2. Introduction to Archaeology
How do archaeologists understand the past? students examine popular culture interpretaThis course examines the methods, theories, tions of biological anthropology. After reand analytical techniques that archaeologists viewing the history of biological
use to study the past and interpret ancient anthropology, we analyze popular avenues
cultures. Selective survey of human cultures (film, cartoons, newspapers, fiction) through
over time in different regions of the world. which the public has been informed about
human variation, the human fossil record,
Laboratory 15 hours. (4 units)
primate behavior, and human genetics.
3. Introduction to Social
(4 units)
and Cultural Anthropology
11A. and 12A. Cultures &
This course provides an introduction to the
Ideas I and II
subject matter, research methods, and appliA
two-course
sequence
focusing on a major
cations of cultural anthropology. Its purpose
is to help students understand how different theme in human experience and culture over
human groups think and live, how they cope a significant period of time. Courses emphawith life’s demands and expectations, and size either broad global interconnections or
how they make sense of the world. In order the construction of Western culture in its
to gain additional experience with diverse global context. Courses may address measuring humanity, peace and violence, social
ANTHROPOLOGY 33
change in the Middle East, migration and
transnationalism, and other topics. Successful completion of C&I I (ANTH 11A) is a
prerequisite for C&I II (ANTH 12A).
(4 units each quarter)
function of myth, ritual, and symbols. Specific topics include religious leaders, interpretations of death and afterlife, traditional
curing, and religious movements and cults.
(4 units)
50.World Geography
This course explores world geography
through examination of contemporary global problems including poverty and inequality, political conflict, environmental crises,
and natural disasters. Special emphasis on
challenges of economic development in
Third World countries and on interconnections among diverse places and events. Also
listed as ENVS 50 and POLI 50. (4 units)
86.Native American Cultures
Students are introduced to selected issues in
the anthropological study of Native American cultures. Focus is on developments since
the onset of European colonization as well as
an examination of contemporary issues in
Native America. (4 units)
56.Anthropology of Religion
This course examines the relationship between religion, culture, personality, and social organization as well as theories on the
91.Lower-division Seminar
in Anthropology
Seminar for first-year students and sophomores on selected issues in anthropology. By
permission of the instructor only. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
110.Anthropological Theory
114.Senior Project
This course provides a historical survey of An in-depth writing intensive senior semithe development of different areas of anthro- nar in anthropology. Topic will change anpological theory. By exploring original and nually. Required for majors in anthropology.
secondary writings, students are able to un- Prerequisite: ANTH 112 with a grade of C–
derstand how theoretical frameworks differ or better, or special permission of the departfrom each other and how anthropology has ment chair. Students should take this class
evolved as a discipline. Required for majors winter quarter of their senior year. (5 units)
and minors in anthropology. Students should
take this class no later than winter quarter of 130.Primate Behavioral Ecology
This course focuses on the theoretical frametheir junior year. (5 units)
works that guide primate behavioral studies,
112.Anthropological Methods
including in-depth empirical exploration of
This course examines research procedures, adaptation, comparative primate behavior,
ethics, and theoretical issues associated with ecology, field studies, and classification. Critanthropological practice. Skills and methods ical evaluation of core concepts in primate
of (qualitative and quantitative) research de- behavioral ecology as well as data collection,
sign and analysis are explored in readings presentation, and interpretation in primate
and exercises. Required for majors in anthro- field studies are reviewed. (5 units)
pology. Prerequisites: ANTH 1, 2, 3, with
grades of C– or better, or special permission of
the department chair. Students should take
this class no later than spring quarter of their
junior year. (5 units)
34 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
132.Paleoanthropology
How do we know what we think we know
about human evolution? Students explore
this question by reading primary literature,
examining fossil and comparative data, and
exploring current technology for interpreting hominin evolution. Class reviews evolutionary theory and the varying applications
of paleoanthropological analysis to understanding past and present variation. (5 units)
137.Evolutionary Medicine
This course examines how evolution has impacted human health and addresses questions such as: How are biology and human
health related? How can an evolutionary
perspective help us treat diseases? Topics
from pregnancy to cancer and diet are examined through the lens of what we know
about both human evolution and evolutionary processes. (5 units)
133.Human Nutrition and Culture
Study of the biocultural interactions that
shape dietary patterns and nutritional status
of modern humans. Focus on the evolution
of the human diet and nutritional requirements; the basic principles of human nutrition and nutritional assessment; and the
social, technological, and political factors
that influence the nutritional health of
human societies today. (5 units)
140.Food, Culture, and
the Environment
Exploration of the history and impact that
food choices have made on human societies.
Several foods that have become staples in the
world today (e.g., sugar, pepper, and various
grains) have significantly affected the environment, patterns of land use, economy
(both local and global), cuisine, and the
meaning of meals and food sharing. Class
topics illustrate how food choices shape cultural groups and interaction, as well as how
they shape environmental change. (5 units)
134.Health, Disease, and Culture
This course emphasizes the study of health
and disease from biocultural and ecological
perspectives; the influence of culture on the
ways people explain and treat illness, stress,
and healing; and the complexities of health
care delivery in pluralistic societies. (5 units)
135.Human Development
and Sexuality
Examination of evolutionary and biocultural aspects of human growth, development,
and sexuality throughout the life cycle. Special emphasis on how various cultural, economic, and political factors influence norms
of sexual behavior in different societies.
(5 units)
136.Forensic Anthropology
Using physical remains to learn what we can
about the age, gender, and other characteristics of deceased people, including their nutrition, exposure to diseases, experience with
serious accidents, and causes of death.
(5 units)
142.Environmental Archaeology
How archaeologists use environmental data
to understand past human societies.
Discussion topics include issues of human
evolution, complexity, symbolism, social
interaction, and technology. Discussion of
the data and arguments offered for the role
of environments in creating and shaping
cultures—how environments and people
shape each other. (5 units)
145.Historical Ecology
This class investigates the historical relationships between cultures and their environments. Students learn various methods to
explore data, including historical documents, maps, and land use information,
to reconstruct the historical ecology of the
Santa Clara Valley. (5 units)
ANTHROPOLOGY 35
146.Anthropological Perspectives
on Colonial California
Examines the Spanish and Russian colonization of California, with particular emphasis
on their interactions with Native American
societies. Ethnohistorical, documentary, and
archaeological evidence will be used to explore European and Native American experiences in colonial California and the impact
of European colonialism on communities
today. (5 units)
147.Archaeology of Complex Societies
The world and people have changed radically in the last 10,000 years with the domestication of plants and animals and the
development of cities and states. We examine archaeological evidence in different regions of the world (after 12,000 BC) to
understand how and why these transformations occurred. (5 units)
148.Historical Archaeology
Introduction to the discipline of historical
archaeology focusing particularly on colonial and U.S. contexts. Explores the history
of underrepresented groups, from women
and children to slaves, and colonial or contact interactions. A wide range of data sources used by historical archaeologists to aid in
interpreting the past are explored. (5 units)
149.Virtual Santa Clara
Examination of public archaeology and museum studies in the digital age. Research on
the cultural history of the SCU campus and
the creation of content for online exhibits—
a “virtual museum”—focusing on Santa
Clara’s unique cultural heritage. (5 units)
150.Religion in Culture and Society
This course examines a wide range of religious beliefs, symbols, and practices that humans use to bring order and meaning into
their existence. It explores theoretical interpretations of religion, the universality of
myths and rituals, and the manner in which
religious traditions are integrated into the
fabric of daily lives and into international
politics. (5 units)
151.Law and Society
Current issues in the study of law and society. Exploration of legal systems at various
levels of societal complexity to understand
the basis for social control in all human societies. Courts, legal professions, and politics
are examined from a cross-cultural perspective. (5 units)
152.Political Anthropology
Cross-cultural examination of political behavior in a range of human societies and the
effects of social, cultural, and environmental
factors on political organization. Religion
and politics, the role of women in politics,
ethnic competition, secret societies, political
ritual and ceremony, and the effects of colonialism and economic change. Special emphasis on the relationship between local
communities and national governments.
(5 units)
153. Anthropology of Music
An intellectual history of ethnomusicology.
Approaches and theories from anthropology,
musicology, folklore, religious studies, linguistics, critical theory, and gender studies
will be explored in order to interrogate music’s relationship to culture, power, and practice. Also listed as MUSC 130. (5 units)
154.Environmental Anthropology
Survey of the theories and methods used to
examine the complex and dynamic interactions between humans and their physical
environment (past and present). An emphasis is placed on the relationships between
human cultural systems and ecological contexts by focusing on how humans use and
transform ecosystems and how such interactions shape social, political, and economic
institutions. Topics include political ecology,
environmental justice, ecotourism, and natural resource exploration. (5 units)
36 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
155.Conflict Resolution
Examines sources and responses to conflict
in varied social and cultural contexts. Emphasis on application of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration in different fields.
(5 units)
have returned. By critiquing corporate global control, cultural hegemony, and the illusion of unlimited economic growth, this
course provides an alternative view of environmental sustainability and global justice.
(5 units)
156.Anthropology of Muslim
Peoples and Practices
Examination of the variety of religious experiences, activities, and interpretations, and
the place of Islam in current social and political life such as community organization,
local-level politics, governments and political resistance, women’s roles and gender, and
contact with the West. Discussion about
underlying reasons for the resurgence of
Islam and effects for Muslim peoples and
­societies. (5 units)
170.Women, Gender, and Sexuality
Cross-cultural examination of the roles, statuses, sexuality, and gender constructions of
females and males through monographs,
films, and guest speakers. Exploration of factors affecting the lives of women and men,
such as domestic and public realms of activities, contested identities, political and economic factors, social change, religion, family,
and socialization. Also listed as WGST 187.
(5 units)
157.Family, Kin, and Culture
Examines the ways in which kinship and
family life can be organized; causes and consequences of different family patterns; and
how families differ across cultures, over time,
and among different groups in the United
States. Also listed as WGST 155. (5 units)
158.Applied Anthropology
Application of anthropological knowledge
to contemporary human problems. Topics
range from the introduction of new forms
of economy through international development to anthropologists’ work in refugee resettlement, environmental conservation,
public health, social justice movements, and
others. Also examined are the ethical dilemmas that emerge from applying anthropological techniques and data. (5 units)
159.Globalization and
Culture Change
This course examines the cultural and economic changes brought about by globalization. It prepares students for traveling abroad
and provides a reflective space for those who
172.Anthropology of Aging
Examination of aging and the elderly in a
range of human societies. Emphasis on social change, gender, and social and geographic mobility, as well as social, political,
and cultural differences in understanding
how the elderly adapt to, and cope with, the
modern world. (5 units)
180.Study of Selected Cultures
Examination of the social life, culture, and
institutions of geographic areas and culture
zones not otherwise covered in ANTH 181–
188 regional studies course series. (5 units)
181.Globalization and Culture
Change in the Pacific Islands
Examines the transformation of Pacific Island societies in response to globalization.
Change in island cultures, effects of urbanization, and the migration of diasporic communities are studied. Connections made
between Pacific Island areas of Micronesia,
Melanesia, and Polynesia, and other world
regions. (5 units)
ANTHROPOLOGY 37
184.Religion and Culture
in Latin America
This course studies the relationship between
culture and religion in Latin America, and
how they have influenced each other over
time. The class is designed in three stages.
First, it examines the pre-Columbian world
of religious beliefs and practices as embodied
in the Maya, Aztec, and Inca cultures. Secondly, it explores how three centuries of Iberian colonialism and Catholic hegemony
shaped the values, cultural traditions, and
institutions of the region as reflected in the
appearance of syncretistic forms of religion
of European, African, and indigenous roots.
Lastly, it studies the changes that have
­occurred in the last two centuries as the continent has gradually evolved from Catholic
control to religious pluralism. Special attention will be given to the impact of Vatican II
on the church in Latin America, the rise and
role of liberation theology, and the emergence of Evangelical and Pentecostal Protestantism. (5 units)
185.Peoples of Latin America
An overview of the environmental, cultural,
economic, and political diversity of Latin
America. Students study the region’s physical
geography, its pre-Columbian past, and the
impact of the European invasion on its native peoples. In addition, this course examines pressing regional problems of
widespread poverty, diminishing natural resources, and the relation between religion,
culture, and politics. (5 units)
186.Mesoamerican Prehistory
A survey of the prehistoric cultures of Mesoamerica from earliest human occupation to
European colonization. Examines the origins of agriculture, village life, and the rise
and fall of state-level societies through the
work of archaeologists and epigraphists.
Consideration given to the ecological
a­daptations, social organization, and belief
systems of the Aztecs, Toltecs, Maya, and the
inhabitants of Teotihuacan. Comparison of
Mesoamerican societies with ancient societies around the world. (5 units)
187.Middle East: Gender
and Sexuality
Examination through monographs, novels,
guest speakers, and films of the situations
and activities of Middle Eastern women in a
variety of geographical and class settings.
Topics include gender, sexuality and the
body, women in economic and political process, family and kinship, war, and revolution. Women and gender symbolism as
related to politics, development, social
change, and religious resurgence. Also listed
as WGST 120. (5 units)
188.Middle East: Culture and Change
Examination of people’s lives, social organization, and change in the Middle East
through archaeological evidence, ethnographies, film, and novels. Emphasis on political culture, the fate of tribal peoples and
peasants under modernizing nations,
women in society and gender symbolism,
contact with the West, Islam and religious
resurgence, and revolution. (5 units)
189.Issues in North American
Archaeology
How do and what do we know about the
pre-Columbian cultures of North America?
Students explore this question by reading
primary literature, examining archaeological
and comparative data, and exploring current
technology for interpreting archaeological
sites. This class reviews the various theories
and methods that have shaped both our
­understanding of the past in North America
and the techniques archaeologists use to
study the past. The types of questions we ask
drive the development and applications of
new analytical approaches and techniques,
which change the way we view Native
Americans and their past. (5 units)
38 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
190.Advanced Seminar
in Anthropology
Seminars for juniors and seniors on selected
topics in anthropology. By permission of the
instructor only. (5 units)
194.Peer Educator in Anthropology
Peer educators in anthropology work closely
with a faculty member to help students understand course material, think more deeply
about course material, benefit from collaborative learning, feel less anxious about testing situations, and/or help students enjoy
learning. By permission of the instructor only.
(1–2 units)
195.Field Course in
Anthropological Methods
On-site anthropological field research in any
of the subfields of anthropology. Practical
experience in the basic techniques of observation and field analyses. By permission of
the chair and instructor only. (5 units)
196.Archaeological Method
and Theory
Introduction to the techniques of discovery
and analysis that archaeologists have found
useful in research. Special attention to sampling techniques in survey and excavation.
Classification techniques for measuring parameters of prehistoric demography, diet,
craft specialization, and exchange. (5 units)
197.Field Course in Primate
Behavioral Ecology
On-site anthropological primatological field
research with practical experience in the
basic techniques of observation and field
data analysis. Special attention to community ecology, proposal writing, data collection, data analysis, and presentation.
Students conduct independent data collection to produce a completed scientific paper
for which they are the sole author. (5 units)
198.Research Practicum
Opportunity for students to work and conduct anthropological analyses in community
agencies, museums, government agencies,
and political or industrial organizations.
May be repeated for credit with approval of
the chair. Required for majors in anthropology. Students must receive approval from
their advisor prior to registration. Internship
placements must be completed prior to fall
quarter of senior year. Field schools and other
research experiences may substitute for internship placements with approval. Students
must enroll in the internship class during the
fall of their junior or senior year. (5 units)
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research
Intensive reading in areas not emphasized by
the department. Independent research on
specific topics not fully covered in departmental courses. May be repeated for credit
with approval of the chair. Written departmental approval necessary prior to registration. (5 units)
ART AND ART HISTORY 39
DEPARTMENT OF ART AND ART HISTORY
Professors Emeriti: Brigid Barton, Samuel R. Hernandez
Professors: R. Kelly Detweiler, Kathleen Maxwell
Associate Professors: Katherine Aoki (Department Chair), Blake de Maria, Don Fritz,
Katherine L. Morris, Andrea Pappas
Assistant Professors: Karen Fraser, Takeshi Moro, Ryan Reynolds, Tobias Wofford
Senior Lecturer: Francisco “Pancho” Jiménez
Lecturers: Renee Billingslea, Julie Hughes
The Department of Art and Art History offers a degree program leading to the bachelor
of arts in two undergraduate majors, art history and studio art, with courses in both disciplines
fostering a thorough understanding of the history and practice of art.
Department faculty encourage interdisciplinary connections with the Santa Clara community through course offerings that fulfill a wide range of College and Undergraduate
Core Curriculum requirements, as well as courses through the University Honors Program.
ART HISTORY
The art history major at Santa Clara is distinguished by excellent teaching and mentoring, challenging coursework, and opportunities for study abroad, peer educating, and student internships at local and Bay Area institutions. Moreover, we support, in conjunction
with our fully accredited campus museum, Explore with Me, a docent-training program for
our students. Advanced art history majors are encouraged to participate in our annual Art
History Symposium and the Art History Research Paper Competition. The art history
major features numerous opportunities for personal and professional growth to better
understand the meanings and purposes of the visual arts, including its historic development, roles in society, and relationships to other fields in the humanities. Students learn to
think critically and communicate clearly about works of art. The art history major develops
the following skills: knowledge acquisition, critical thinking, analysis of visual and textual
sources, advanced research and writing skills, and sophisticated oral presentations. These
intellectual skills enable art history majors to pursue a diversity of interests in a wide spectrum of fields and professions, including graduate work in art history.
STUDIO ART
Studio art majors develop comprehensive skills that help prepare them for graduate
study or careers in either the fine or commercial arts. Faculty members emphasize the development of conceptual and technical competence, as well as critical analysis of the student’s
own work and that of others. By graduation, every student develops a body of original artwork to be exhibited in a senior show in the department gallery. Students are required to
articulate an artist’s statement reflecting their own engagement with the creative process, in
conjunction with their senior show.
Studio art majors take three art history courses and are encouraged to take one or
more courses in 20th-century or contemporary art. The studio seminar is required for all
studio art majors and should be taken in the third year when possible. At the end of each
year, students are encouraged to submit their work to the Annual Student Art Exhibit,
which is judged by an outside professional in the field of art. The department also oversees
merit-based scholarships, which are usually given to outstanding students with junior status.
40 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS
In addition to fulfilling the Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor of arts degree, students majoring in art history (ARTH) or studio art (ARTS) must
complete the following departmental requirements:
Major in Art History
Students must complete 15 courses (13 ARTH and 2 ARTS):
• Four courses from ARTH 11A, 12A, 21-27
• Two lower- or upper-division ARTS courses
• ARTH 100 (preferably at the end of sophomore year)
• Five upper-division ARTH courses
• Two additional lower- or upper-division ARTH courses
• ARTH 196 (senior year)
Note: Only 4 units of ARTH 93/193, 98/198 may count toward the major. Studio art or
art history courses taken during a term of study abroad may be applied to no more than half of
the requirements for a major in art history. No more than three courses may be taken abroad to
fulfill the five upper-division ARTH course requirement. Students who wish to receive credit
toward a major or minor for studio art courses taken at affiliated study abroad programs must
be able to document their work for review by members of the department’s faculty.
Major in Studio Art
Students must complete 16 courses (13 ARTS and 3 ARTH):
• ARTS 30
• ARTS 74 or 174
• One two-dimensional foundation course from ARTS 32, 72, or 181
• One three-dimensional foundation course from ARTS 33, 63, 163, 64, or 164
• One course from ARTH 21-27 (ARTH 23 recommended)
• Seven additional ARTS courses (upper-division preferred, excluding ARTS 194)
• One lower- or upper-division ARTH course with a global emphasis
• One upper-division ARTH course with a modern or contemporary emphasis
(ARTH 185 recommended)
• ARTS 196A (recommended junior year)
• ARTS 196B (senior year)
Note: Studio art or art history courses taken during a term of study abroad may be applied
to no more than half of the requirements for a major in studio art. Only one ARTH course may
be taken abroad to fulfill the requirements for a major in studio art. Students who wish to receive
credit toward a major or minor for studio art courses taken at affiliated study abroad programs
must be able to document their work for review by members of the department’s faculty.
ART AND ART HISTORY 41
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINORS
Minor in Art History
Students must complete 7 courses (6 ARTH and 1 ARTS):
• Two courses from ARTH 11A, 12A, 21–27
• One studio ARTS course
• Three upper-division ARTH courses
• One additional lower- or upper-division ARTH course
Note: Only 4 units of ARTH 93/193, 98/198 may count toward the minor. Studio art or
art history courses taken during a term of study abroad may be applied to no more than half of
the requirements for a minor in art history. Only one upper-division course may be taken
abroad to fulfill the three upper-division ARTH course requirement. Students who wish to receive
credit toward a major or minor for studio art courses taken at affiliated study abroad programs
must be able to document their work for review by members of the department’s faculty.
Minor in Studio Art
Students must complete 7 courses (6 ARTS and 1 ARTH):
• One two-dimensional course from ARTS 30-72 (or approved upper-division
equivalent)
• One three-dimensional foundation course from ARTS 33, 63, 163, 64, or 164
• Four additional ARTS courses (upper-division preferred, excluding ARTS 194)
• One lower- or upper-division ARTH course
Note: Study abroad courses are not accepted for a minor in studio art.
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: ART HISTORY
11A and 12A. Cultures & Ideas I and II 21.Introduction to the Arts of
Ancient and Medieval Europe
A two-course sequence focusing on a major
theme in human experience and culture over A foundation course of the art history proa significant period of time. Courses empha- gram focusing on visual analysis and the ansize either broad global interconnections or cient and medieval world. Topics may
the construction of Western culture in its include the relationship between Greek art
global context. Courses may address art, and politics, Imperial Roman art, propaganpolitics, propaganda, and other topics. Suc- da, Pompeian wall painting, early Christian
cessful completion of ARTH 11A: C&I I is a art, the origins of Islam, and the function
prerequisite for ARTH 12A: C&I II. (4 units and culture of pilgrimage in the Middle
each quarter)
Ages. Not open to students who have taken
Art, Power, and Propaganda (ARTH 11A or
HNRS 11A). (4 units)
42 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
22.Art in the Age of Exploration:
Introduction to Early Modern
Europe
Few periods in the history of art inspire
greater reverence than the Renaissance. But
why? What renders objects such as Michelangelo’s David or Leonardo’s Mona Lisa to
become pop culture icons in the 21st century? This survey course of European visual
culture from approximately 1348 to 1648
seeks to answer this question through the
study of canonical works; artists such as Raphael, Titian, and Dürer; and artistic centers
including Venice, Florence, Rome, and
Paris. Other topics for discussion may include the patronage and production of art;
the visual construction of gender identity;
the relationship between art, science, and religion brought about by humanist study;
and the impact of global trade and exploration on the development of European visual
culture. Not open to students who have taken
Art, Power, and Propaganda (ARTH 12A or
HNRS 12A). (4 units)
region from the 7th century CE to the present day. Topics for discussion include early
mosque architecture, scientific developments in medieval Baghdad, the rise of the
Ottoman Empire, the garden city of Isfahan,
European colonialism in North Africa, and
contemporary art and architecture. Not open
to students who have taken ARTH 164. Fulfills the Studio Art program global emphasis
course requirement. (4 units)
23.Art and Revolution: Europe and the
United States, 18th–20th Centuries
Introduction to the visual culture of modern
Europe and the United States from Louis
XIV to the present. This course traces the
origins of modern art through political,
technological, and artistic revolutions, from
royal patronage to Pop, Neoclassicism to
Neo-dada, as well as Impressionism, Surrealism, and Abstract Expressionism. Fulfills the
Studio Art program modern or contemporary
emphasis course requirement. (4 units)
26.Buddhas, Buildings, and Beauties:
Theme and Style In Asian Art
How did forms of Buddhist imagery change
as the religion spread across the Silk Road?
How was architecture used to convey the
power and authority of the Mughal rulers in
India or high-ranking samurai in Japan?
How were standards of feminine beauty revealed in Japanese woodblock prints or Chinese court paintings? This survey of the
artistic cultures of India, China, and Japan
from the 3rd century BCE through the 19th
century will contemplate such issues, examining various media within the broader context of traditional Asian literature, politics,
philosophies, and religions. Other topics
may include Chinese tombs, literati aesthetics, Zen arts, garden design, and Rajput and
Rinpa painting styles. Fulfills the Studio Art
program global emphasis course requirement.
(4 units)
24.From Damascus to Dubai:
A Survey of the Visual Culture
of the Middle East
From the majesty of the Dome of the Rock
in Jerusalem to the awe inspiring heights of
the Abu Dubai skyline, few regions boast as
long and impressive a history of ambitious
art and architecture as the Middle East. Yet,
this region is likewise one of the most misunderstood. This survey course focuses on
the rich and diverse visual culture of the
25.Indigenous Visions: Introduction
to the Arts of the Americas
Introduction to the indigenous arts and architecture of North, South, and Central
America from prehistory to the present including the Olmec, Aztec, Inca, Native
American Great Plains, and Southwest.
Themes include indigenous concepts of
time and space; the vision quest; warfare and
blood sacrifice; art and the sacred. Lecture
and discussion, plus a visit to a local museum. Fulfills the Studio Art program global
emphasis course requirement. (4 units)
ART AND ART HISTORY 43
27.Introduction to the Arts of Africa
This is an introductory survey of African art
designed to provide foundational knowledge
in some of the major aesthetic/cultural complexes on the continent and their interaction
with the rest of the globe. Each culture will
be approached as a case study with an emphasis on cultures in sub-Saharan Africa.
Tensions between traditional and contemporary arts will be explored as well as theoretical approaches to the study, collection,
and display of non-Western art. Fulfills the
Studio Art program global emphasis course
requirement. Formerly ARTH 46. (4 units)
a touring style that uses questions and interactive conversation to relay information
about the objects on display. The program
provides a great opportunity for students to
gain professional experience working in the
arts, to learn to speak comfortably and confidently about art, and to develop and improve public speaking skills. In addition to
attending class sessions and completing
short assignments, each docent is required to
give three public tours as part of the course.
Students may enroll for up to two quarters to
receive both lower- and upper-division credit.
(2 units)
93.Explore with Me Docent Program
The Explore with Me Docent Program is a
museum internship in which students are
trained to give public docent tours of the
de Saisset Museum’s temporary exhibitions.
No previous knowledge of art history or experience with museums is required. As part
of the curriculum, students will learn the
necessary skills and information to provide
thoughtful and engaging tours. They will be
trained in Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS),
97.Special Topics
Occasional courses in selected art historical
topics. May be repeated for credit. (4 units)
98.Internship/Practicum
Individual projects in conjunction with professional visual arts agencies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Written proposal
must be approved by on-site supervisor, art
history faculty member, and department
chair. (2–4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: ART HISTORY
100.Art History Proseminar
106.Art and Architecture of the Roman
Republic and the Early Empire
“What is the history of art history? What
does it mean to think like an art historian?” Chronological survey of artistic developTo answer these questions we will examine ment in Republican and Imperial Rome.
the origins of the discipline and its current Related issues include the influence of Greek
methodologies. Close textual analysis with and Etruscan art, the relationship between
writing and discussion. Required of all art political ideology and public art programs,
history majors, preferably at the end of soph- and the impact of improved materials on
omore year. Prerequisites: Two ARTH cours- building design. (5 units)
es, one of which must be upper-division, or
permission of instructor. Formerly ARTH 110.Early Christian and Byzantine Art
Christian art and architecture from the cata190. (5 units)
combs in Rome through the early 14th cen104.Greek Art and Architecture
tury in Byzantium. Highlights include the
Examination of Greek art from the Archaic Constantinian monuments of Rome, Justhrough the Hellenistic periods. Develop- tinianic Ravenna and Constantinople, iconments in architecture, sculpture, vase paint- oclasm, and the Macedonian “Renaissance.”
ing, and wall painting will be addressed in (5 units)
their cultural context. (5 units)
44 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
112.The Art of the Book
Covers select developments in the illustrated
book between the 5th and 15th centuries
CE. Topics for discussion may include the
earliest preserved classical and religious codices, Anglo-Saxon manuscripts, Carolingian
and Ottonian manuscript illumination,
­Romanesque and Gothic manuscript illumination, and Byzantine manuscript illumination. (5 units)
114.Early Medieval Art
Art and architecture in Western Europe
from the early Middle Ages to circa AD
1000. Hiberno-Saxon, Carolingian, and
Ottonian art discussed in their respective
political, intellectual, and cultural contexts.
(5 units)
120.Keeping up with the Medici:
Fame and Family in Renaissance
Florence
What makes someone a “household name”?
Is it talent, beauty, connections, or simply
shrewd marketing? While fame, fortune,
and celebrity may seem like modern phenomena, the cult of personality was equally
prominent in Renaissance Florence. As is the
case today, money played a key role in the
arts. This course focuses on the ways in
which the Medici family, through their social, financial, and spiritual support, transformed the city of Florence from an Italian
commune with limited natural resources
into the center of the European culture. And
in doing so, transformed the notion of the
artist from that of mere craftsman to superstar. Additional topics of discussion include
the influence of the capitalist economics on
artistic production, domestic art perceptions
of the nude figure in religious paintings, the
relationship between art and science, and the
writings of Machiavelli. (5 units)
121.Venice and the Other
in Renaissance
Concentrates on the art and architecture of
the Venetian Republic from approximately
1400–1650 CE, specifically the visual culture produced by and/or associated with ethnic and social groups excluded from the
highest echelons of Venetian society. Areas of
inquiry include Muslim merchants living in
the city, construction of the Jewish ghetto,
Ethiopian servant community, courtesan
culture, convent life, the material culture of
exorcism, witchcraft, and dwarfism. Prerequisite: Upper-division status or permission of
instructor. (5 units)
122.Papal Rome: Power, Intrigue
and the Arts
As the leader of the Catholic Church, an
early modern pope was Europe’s most powerful spiritual leader. He was also one of
Europe’s most powerful political leaders.
­
This course examines the ways in the concerns of faith and politics, at times dependent, at times adversarial, but always in
direct exchange with one another, influenced
the visual culture of early modern Rome.
Special attention will be focused on the construction of St. Peter’s Basilica, the decoration of the Sistine Chapel and Vatican
apartments, cardinalate palaces, suburban
villa decoration, and the artistic reaction to
the Protestant Reformation. (5 units)
123. The Global Renaissance
The Renaissance has traditionally been
viewed as a period of artistic and cultural development associated almost exclusively
with the Italian peninsula in the 15th and
16th century. This same tradition privileges
“high art” - that is, painting, sculpture, and
architecture - over other forms of visual culture. This course seeks to reassess these notions by considering Italian Renaissance art
within the context of early modern globalism. This reexamination likewise mandates a
consideration of a broader spectrum of
­objects, including gemstones, glassware, and
textiles. Topics such as the relationship
ART AND ART HISTORY 45
b­ etween Michelangelo, Leonardo, and the
Ottoman architect Sinan; the collection of
Aztec feather paintings by the Medici family;
and the influence of Egyptian mosque architecture on Venetian palace design will be examined from an interdisciplinary perspective.
Fulfills the Studio Art program global emphasis course requirement. Not open to students who have taken The Global Renaissance
(ARTH 11A and 12A). Prerequisite: One
lower-division ARTH course (ARTH 22 or
24 suggested). (5 units)
128.The Glories of Baroque Rome:
Caravaggio, Artemisia, and
Bernini
This course focuses on the art and culture of
Rome in the early 17th century and specifically the three artists whose activity left a
lasting impact on the city we love today: the
“rebel” Caravaggio, the “other” Artemisia
Gentileschi, and the “genius” Gian Lorenzo
Bernini. An in-depth examination of the
lives and works of the three most dominant
personalities of the Roman Baroque period
provides the lens through which students
will examine the significant social, cultural,
spiritual, and artistic changes that took place
in the Counter-Reformation city. Topics for
discussion include the visual agenda of the
papacy, Caravaggio’s mythologies, Artemisia
Gentileschi and women artists, theatricality
in the work and writings of Bernini, and the
influence of Galileo upon the visual arts.
(5 units)
135.European Art: 1780–1880
Analysis of the culture and art of Europe
from the era of the French Revolution to the
end of the 19th century. This course will address the relationship between politics and
art, shifting class structures, and the increasing importance of the industrial revolution.
Painting, sculpture, architecture, and other
media will be covered. (5 units)
137.Modern Art in Europe:
1880–1940
The emergence of Modernism in Europe
from the 1880s to World War II. The major
movements of Expressionism, Cubism, and
Surrealism will be studied in the larger context of political, social, and economic
change. Painting, sculpture, architecture,
and other media will be covered. Fulfills the
Studio Art program modern or contemporary
emphasis course requirement. (5 units)
140.Photography in the United States
We live in a world densely populated by
photographs; how did that come about and
what purposes has photography served in
the U.S.? We will examine the social, political, and aesthetic aspects of American photography from its inception in the 1830s to
the present. Close readings of objects yield
insights into the creation and growth of popular and elite audiences for photography;
journalistic, ethnographic, and documentary photography; fashion and commercial
photography; photography as an artistic medium; the role of photography in discourses
of race, gender, class and nationalism; and
photography in relation to modernism,
postmodernism, and consumer culture. Fulfills the Studio Art program modern or contemporary emphasis course requirement.
Prerequisite: One ARTH course or permission of instructor. Formerly ARTH 186.
(5 units)
141.Tradition and Change in Native
American Art: California and
the Pacific Northwest
Visual culture of the native peoples of California and the Pacific Northwest, from prehistory to the present. Emphasis on the role
of the artist in society and on artistic responses to political and cultural change.
Topics include arts of status, shamanism,
World Renewal, Missions, tourism, and the
rise of the art market. (5 units)
46 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
142.Native American Art:
Special Topics
Sustained analysis of a specific time period
or genre of Native American art. Emphasis
on 20th-century/contemporary art. Topics
may include tourism/market forces, land
and cultural preservation, postcolonialism,
and gender identity. Research paper will be
required. Fulfills the Studio Art program
modern or contemporary emphasis course
­requirement. (5 units)
143.Women’s Work: American Women
in the Visual Arts
From colonial times to the ongoing feminist
revolution of the present, American women
made, sold, collected, and supported visual
art, and in so doing profoundly influenced
the development of the nation’s culture, art,
and art institutions. This course will examine American women’s roles in the visual arts
and the active interplay between issues embedded in art and “craft,” women’s self-fashioning and the art market, images of women,
and the impact of women’s studies and feminism on the study of the visual arts. Close
readings of images and objects spanning traditional and nontraditional media such as
painting, sculpture, photography, embroidery, and quilting produce insights into the
dynamic relationships between gender and
art, culture, and commerce in American history. Fulfills the Studio Art program modern
or contemporary emphasis course requirement. Prerequisite: One ARTH course or
WGST 50, or permission of instructor. Formerly ARTH 188. Also listed as WGST 156.
(5 units)
144.Race, Gender, and Nation
in 18th- and 19th-Century
American Art
What did visual and material arts from the
Colonial period to the Gilded Age (1880s)
look like and how did they function in colonial society and in a new, fast-growing
­nation? Close readings of objects illuminate
the relationships between art, gender, and
race; self-fashioning and social identity in
portraiture; the “West as America”; American national identity at home and abroad;
landscape painting; photography; representations of democracy, politics, and citizenship; representations of the Revolutionary
and Civil Wars; collectors and the creation
of art institutions; and an audience and market for art in the United States. Fulfills the
Studio Art program modern or contemporary
emphasis course requirement. Prerequisites:
ARTH 11A & 12A (C&I I and II), or one
other ARTH course, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
145.Perpetual Revolution: American
Art in the 20th-Century
The 20th Century was a period of turmoil
and growing international stature for the
U.S. How did artists deal with these events,
which saw several wars, including two World
Wars; the Great Depression, the growth of
labor unions, the Civil Rights Movement,
feminist reforms, etc.; and the encounter
with European modernist art? How were
these events shaped in turn shaped by art
and visual culture? Close readings of objects
illuminate the relationship of American
modern art to European modernism; race
and gender in American society, politics, and
American national identity; patrons and
dealers, including those of the Harlem Renaissance; the government as a patron for
the visual arts; and the founding of major
visual arts institutions and the solidifying of
an art audience in the United States. Fulfills
the Studio Art program modern or contemporary emphasis course requirement. Prerequisites: ARTH 11A & 12A (C&I I and II), or
one other ARTH course, or permission of
­instructor. (5 units)
146. African-American Art
A survey of African-American art from the
18th to the 21st century. With an emphasis
on case studies and movements throughout
this history, this course explores how black
artists in the United States have engaged
with key issues such as race, gender, sexuality, class, and ethnicity. The course is
ART AND ART HISTORY 47
designed to expose students to complex debates about representation and the role of
race and identity in American art. Fulfills the
Studio Art program modern or contemporary
emphasis course requirement. (5 units)
152.Arts of Ancient Mexico:
From Olmec to Aztec
Survey of the arts of the Mesoamerican region, from the 1500 BCE to the conquest of
1521 CE. Focus on Mesoamerican concepts
of time and space, the ritual calendar, warfare, blood sacrifice, shamanism, and the
ballgame. Fulfills the Studio Art program
global emphasis course requirement. Formerly
ARTH 151. (5 units)
160.East-West Encounters
in the Visual Arts
This course examines cross-cultural artistic
encounters between the Western world (Europe and the United States) and Asia (India,
China, and Japan) from the 16th through
the 20th centuries, focusing in particular on
Asian responses to the West. Topics may include the impact of Western realism on traditional Asian art forms, the role of
commodities and empire in artistic production, Japonisme and Chinoiserie in 19thcentury Europe and America, issues of
cultural identity in Asian modernism, and
post-World War II abstract art. Fulfills the
Studio Art program global emphasis course
requirement. Not open to students who have
taken Contact Zones: Arts East and West
(ARTH 11A & 12A). Prerequisite: One
lower-division ARTH course (ARTH 22, 23,
or 26 suggested). (5 units)
161.Photography in Japan
Exploration of Japanese photography from
its origins in the 1850s to today, examining
photography as an artistic medium and as a
central part of modern and contemporary
Japanese culture. Topics may include tourist
photography, ethnographic photography,
photography as propaganda, the development
of the Japanese photobook, and gender issues in contemporary photography. Fulfills
the Studio Art program modern or contemporary emphasis course requirement. Prerequisite: One lower-division ARTH course
(ARTH 23 or 26 suggested). (5 units)
162.Visual Culture of Modern Japan
This course examines the visual culture of
modern Japan circa 1850–1960, exploring
issues of national and cultural identity and
emphasizing in particular Japan’s reaction to
and engagement with the West. Topics may
include Japanese adaptation of foreign artistic techniques and styles, the development of
a national painting school, Japanese participation in World’s Fairs, and the role of art
in Japanese imperialism. Fulfills the Studio
Art program modern or contemporary emphasis course requirement. Prerequisite: One
lower-division ARTH course (ARTH 23 or
26 suggested). (5 units)
163.The Japanese Print
Ukiyo-e, or woodblock prints of the floating
world, were an inherent part of the thriving
urban culture of Edo-period Japan (1615–
1868). Characterized by their vivid colors
and lively designs, woodblock prints are perhaps the best known examples of Japanese
visual art in the West. This course examines
the genre within its cultural context, surveying not only traditional print subjects but
also considering the development of woodblock prints into the 20th century and their
relationship to other print media such as
photography and lithography. Topics may
include courtesan prints, Kabuki prints, the
landscapes of Hiroshige and Hokusai, erotic
prints, supernatural imagery, the creative
print movement, and collectors of prints in
the West. Fulfills the Studio Art program
global emphasis course requirement. Prerequisite: One lower-division ARTH course
(ARTH 26 suggested). (5 units)
48 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
164.Islamic Art, 600–1350 CE
Study of the art and architecture of the
­Islamic world with an emphasis on Jerusalem, Baghdad, Cairo, and Spain. Topics of
discussion include the origin of Islam,
mosque design and ornament, desert palaces, the Muslim reaction to classical antiquity,
1001 Arabian Nights, the transmission of
Arab science and medicine to the West,
manuscript illumination, and the decorative
arts. Fulfills the Studio Art program global
emphasis course requirement. Prerequisites:
Upper-division status and at least two other
ARTH courses. (5 units)
170. Art of the African Diaspora
An introduction to the art of the African
­Diaspora. The course uses visual culture as a
means to explore the history and impact of
the global spread of African peoples from
slavery until the present day. The course examines a range of artistic practices from the
visual culture of street festivals and Afro-­
Caribbean religions to the work of studiotrained artists of international repute. Fulfills
the Studio Art program global emphasis
course requirement. (5 units)
185.Post-Modern and
Contemporary Art
An overview of significant issues and movements in art since the 1960s. Primary focus
on art in the United States. Themes to be
addressed: artist in nature, body in performance, new media, feminism, gender and
sexuality, art in public places, censorship, art
and public activism, emergence of global
arts community. Fulfills the Studio Art program modern or contemporary emphasis
course requirement. Formerly ARTH 183.
(5 units)
193.Explore with Me Docent Program
The Explore with Me Docent Program is a
museum internship in which students are
trained to give public docent tours of the
de Saisset Museum’s temporary exhibitions.
No previous knowledge of art history or experience with museums is required. As part
of the curriculum, students will learn the
necessary skills and information to provide
thoughtful and engaging tours. They will be
trained in Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS),
a touring style that uses questions and interactive conversation to relay information
about the objects on display. The program
provides a great opportunity for students to
gain professional experience working in the
arts, to learn to speak comfortably and confidently about art, and to develop and improve public speaking skills. In addition to
attending class sessions and completing
short assignments, each docent is required to
give three public tours as part of the course.
Students may enroll for up to two quarters to
receive both lower- and upper-division credit.
Prerequisite: ARTH 93. (2 units)
194. Peer Educator in Art History
Peer educators in art history work closely
with a faculty member to help individual
students prepare for exams, conduct research, and master course content. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (1–2 units)
195.Art History Thesis
Students with a GPA of 3.5 or better in their
major may petition to write a thesis, typically in their senior year. The thesis will be
based on a research paper written for a previous upper-division course with the same instructor. Prerequisites: Senior status,
demonstrated excellence in the major field,
and permission of instructor. (5 units)
196.Senior Art History
Capstone Seminar
Advanced research in art history. Research
theme of the seminar will vary with instructor. Requirements include a lengthy research
paper and public presentation of that research. Restricted to art history majors.
Course should be taken in the senior year.
Prerequisite: ARTH 100. (5 units)
197.Special Topics
Occasional courses in selected art historical
topics. May be repeated for credit. (5 units)
ART AND ART HISTORY 49
198.Internship/Practicum
Individual projects in conjunction with professional visual arts agencies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Written proposal
must be approved by on-site supervisor, art
history faculty member, and department
chair. (2–5 units)
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research
Individual guided reading, research, and/or
writing on selected art historical topics. May
be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Course
outline, reading list, and schedule of instructor/student meetings must be approved by art
history faculty member and department chair
10 days prior to registration. (1–5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: STUDIO ART
30.Basic Drawing
contrast/variety, rhythm/repetition, emphaIntroduction to various drawing media and sis, continuity, balance, and proportion.
techniques. Covers the use of line and con- They will also explore elements of three-ditour, light and shadow, three-dimensional mensional design: space, line, plane, mass/
perspective, and composition. Includes the volume, value, texture, and color. Concepconcept of self-expression in traditional and tual strategies, techniques, and a variety of
contemporary drawing. Recommended as a materials are explored through lectures,
foundation course to be taken prior to other demonstrations, studio assignments, and
critiques. (4 units)
studio art courses. (4 units)
35.Basic Printmaking
32.Two-Dimensional Design
This course introduces the fundamental Fundamentals of printmaking as an art
theories and applications of two-dimension- form. Printmaking is the method of making
al design, essential to a wide range of art original images by printing from a handforms. The focus is on experimentation with made design onto fine art paper. Using a
compositional dynamics and elements of de- hand-cranked etching press, students will
sign including line, shape, value, color, tex- create art through basic printmaking techture, direction; and principles of design such niques, such as relief, drypoint intaglio, and
as balance, proportion, unity, rhythm, and the painterly medium of monotype. Previemphasis. Projects will be contextualized by ous experience in drawing recommended.
the analysis of historical and contemporary (4 units)
artists and the potential for visual communi- 43.Basic Painting
cation to transmit meaning. Conceptual
strategies, techniques, and a variety of mate- Introduction to painting, primarily with
rials are explored through lectures, demon- water-based acrylic paints. Through guided
strations, studio assignments, and critiques. projects, students will develop a language of
lines, shapes, colors, and composition to
(4 units)
­express their ideas visually. (4 units)
33.Three-Dimensional Design
46.Basic Watercolor
This is a foundation course in three-dimensional design. Through the study of three- Introduction to visual expression in the clasdimensional design principles and elements, sic medium of transparent watercolor. Asstudents will develop an understanding of signments will emphasize basic elements of
and an appreciation for the use of design shape, color, light, shadow, and composifundamentals. Through various hands-on tion. Previous experience in drawing recomprojects, students will explore principles mended. (4 units)
of three-dimensional design: harmony,
50 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
48. Basic Mixed Media Painting
This is a class in which some alternative materials and techniques are used to create final
art works. Some of the elements that are usually covered in this course are collage, appropriation, stencils, transfers, Xerox copies,
and assemblage. Some knowledge of paint
techniques is helpful but not an absolute necessity. Beginners are welcome. The advanced section assumes some experience and
familiarity with the techniques involved.
(4 units)
50.Introduction to Black and White
Film and Darkroom Photography
This course is for the lower-division student
interested in learning the fundamentals of
black-and-white photography as an art
form. Students will learn basic film camera
operation, film development, and darkroom
printing techniques. Assignments will stimulate visual awareness and individual creativity. A 35 mm film camera with manual
shutter speeds and aperture capabilities is
suggested. (4 units)
57.Digital Photography
For lower-division students who want to develop creativity, composition, lighting, and
other techniques with their digital cameras.
Camera function and features will be discussed. Photographic projects will be edited
and enhanced in Adobe Lightroom. Basic
use of Adobe Photoshop will be introduced.
Students must provide a digital camera with
manual shutter speeds and aperture capabilities. (4 units)
63.Basic Ceramic Sculpture
Fundamentals of visual expression in clay,
primarily through making ceramic sculpture.
Especially suitable for the lower-division student. Guided exploration of various handbuilding techniques and materials, including
firing and glazing. May also include other
techniques. (4 units)
64.Basic Sculpture
Fundamentals of making art in three-­
dimensional form, especially suitable for the
lower-division student. Creative exploration
of selected materials and techniques. Reductive, manipulative, mold making, and additive methods will be used as needed. Media
varies each quarter at instructor’s discretion.
(4 units)
71.Digital Print Making
Taught using a combination of lecture, discussion, and hands-on computer and traditional art practices. Activities include an
introduction to art-making computer technology as it applies to traditional printmaking techniques. Students will create original
designs on the computer, then hand-print
them onto paper using a traditional etching
press. Class presentations explore the societal
impact of technology on the arts from the
first printing press to computer output.
­Previous experience in printmaking or computer arts recommended. (4 units)
72. Introduction to Computer
Arts and Design Theory
Taught using a combination of lecture, discussion, and hands-on computer art practices, this course explores basic design theory
through various art-making methods on the
computer. Projects focus on experimentation with elements of design (including line,
shape, value, color, texture) and principles of
design (such as balance, proportion, unity,
rhythm, and emphasis). Class presentations
provide an overview of the computer technologies that contribute to current studio art
practices. (4 units)
ART AND ART HISTORY 51
74.Basic Computer Imaging
Hands-on introduction to computer imaging for the lower-division student. Fundamental instruction in raster and vector based
imaging software to manipulate photographs and create original imagery. Exploration of both fine art and commercial uses of
digital media. Recommended as a foundation
course to be taken prior to other computer art
courses. (4 units)
75.Basic Graphic Design
This course examines the fundamental theories and techniques of using computers as a
tool to accomplish graphic design objectives.
Topics include layout of type and graphics,
and page design for print medium. We will
also explore the impact of the computer medium upon the aesthetics of graphic design
and society. Class projects include exploration of both fine art and commercial uses of
digital media. Prerequisite: ARTS 74 or 174,
or permission instructor. (4 units)
97.Special Projects
For lower-division students who wish to
pursue an art topic not covered in the
­Bulletin, under the direction of a studio art
faculty member. Students will have group
meetings with the instructor to discuss their
progress. Open to majors or permission of
instructor. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: STUDIO ART
131.Life Drawing
143.Painting
Theory and practice of figure drawing. This class builds upon the painting skills
Emphasis on understanding the anatomy of developed in Basic Painting. Emphasis is
the human form as a resource for visual placed on developing a personal style
expression. May be repeated twice for credit. through long term projects. Basic Painting is
Prerequisite: ARTS 30 or permission of recommended as a prerequisite or permission
instructor. (5 units)
of instructor to enroll. May be repeated twice
for credit. (5 units)
133.Intermediate Drawing
Continuation of ARTS 30 with an emphasis 144.Advanced Painting
on the study of perspective and the anatomy Designed for the intermediate to advancedof light and shadow as they relate to draw- level painting student. Assignments help stuing three-dimensional forms. Prerequisite: dents develop conceptual and formal
ARTS 30 or permission of instructor. strategies to create a series of related works
(5 units)
that revolve around each student’s individual
artistic interests. Painting form and tech135.Printmaking
nique, as well as conceptual content and
Continuation and extension of ARTS 35. meaning, will be explored in depth, through
Elaboration and refinement of fundamental practice and discussion. Prerequisite: ARTS
printmaking techniques combined with 43 or 143, or permission of instructor.
more complex processes such as reduction (5 units)
relief cuts and chine collé. May be repeated
146.Watercolor
twice for credit. (5 units)
A continuation of the skills acquired in Basic
Watercolor with the emphasis on development of a personal approach to the medium.
Prerequisite: One course from ARTS 30, 43,
or 46, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
52 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
148.Mixed Media Painting
An intermediate-level course exploring the
theory and practice of combining painting
with other artistic elements to create
primarily two-dimensional works. With the
instructor’s supervision, projects may
incorporate unusual surfaces, small objects,
fragments of other artwork, or text. May be
repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: One
painting or drawing course. (5 units)
150.Introduction to Black and White
Film and Darkroom Photography
This course is for the upper-division student
interested in learning the fundamentals of
black-and-white photography as an art
form. Students will learn basic film camera
operation, film development, and darkroom
printing techniques. Assignments will stimulate visual awareness and individual creativity. A 35 mm film camera with manual
shutter speeds and aperture capabilities is
suggested. May be repeated twice for credit.
(5 units)
151.Exploring Society
through Photography
For the intermediate-level photography student interested in exploring social issues
through the use of photography. This course
has an emphasis on portrait photography
and ethics in photography. Students will also
engage with individuals in our community
creating a photo-based project. May be repeated twice for credit. Note: This course requires participation in community-based
learning (CBL) experiences off campus and
meets the ELSJ requirement. Prerequisite:
One course from ARTS 50, 57, 150, or 157,
or permission of instructor. (5 units)
154.Intermediate Film Photography
The art and craft of black-and-white photography beyond the basic level. Covers the
use of fiber-based papers and archival print
processing in the darkroom. Students will
also learn basic studio lighting techniques.
Includes discussion of photography as it relates to contemporary fine art theory and
practice. May be repeated twice for credit.
Prerequisite: ARTS 50 or 150, or permission
of instructor. (5 units)
155.Photography on Location
This course is designed for an intermediate
photography student interested in exploring
the physical world we live in through photographic field trips, and projects. Includes
discussion of contemporary photographic
concepts and practice, and visits to local art
museums and galleries. May be repeated
twice for credit. Prerequisite: One course
from ARTS 50, 57, 150, 151, or 157, or
permission of instructor. (5 units)
156. Photography and
Alternative Processes
This course provides intermediate- to advanced-level photography student an opportunity to learn alternative ways of making
photographs and photo-based art. Students
will learn and experiment with non-silver
photography processes such as Cyanotypes,
Vandyke, and Gum Bichromate. Alternative
cameras and nontraditional printing methods will also be introduced. Prerequisite:
One course from ARTS 50, 57, 150, or 157,
or permission of instructor. (5 units)
157.Digital Photography
For upper-division students who want to develop creativity, composition, lighting, and
other techniques with their digital cameras.
Camera function and features will be discussed. Photographic projects will be edited
and enhanced in Adobe Lightroom. Basic
use of Adobe Photoshop will be introduced.
Students must provide a digital camera with
manual shutter speeds and aperture capabilities. (5 units)
ART AND ART HISTORY 53
158.Intermediate Digital Photography
This course will provide all the skills necessary
to make fine art inkjet prints from digital files.
Students will learn intermediate techniques
in digital capture, processing of digital images using Adobe Photoshop, and output
using pigmented inkjet printers. Students
should have a digital SLR camera capable of
shooting in RAW format. May be repeated
twice for credit. Prerequisite: ARTS 57 or
157, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
163.Ceramic Sculpture
Continuation and extension of ARTS 63.
Fundamentals of visual expression in clay,
primarily through making ceramic sculpture. Also appropriate for the upper-division
student who wishes to explore various handbuilding techniques and materials, including
firing and glazing. Students will construct
projects of a slightly larger scale than ARTS
63 students. May be repeated twice for credit.
(5 units)
164.Sculpture
Continuation and extension of ARTS 64.
Also appropriate for the upper-division student who wants to learn the fundamentals of
sculpture as an art form. Creative exploration of selected materials and techniques.
Reductive, manipulative, mold making, and
additive methods will be used as needed.
Media varies each quarter at instructor’s discretion. May be repeated twice for credit.
(5 units)
165.Advanced Ceramics
Suitable for the intermediate and advanced
student. In-depth exploration of various
hand-building techniques for creating ceramic sculpture and related work. Includes
discussion of aesthetic issues in contemporary ceramic art. Emphasis will be on the
development of each student’s artistic and
technical interests and abilities, toward the
goal of creating an individual collection of
works. May be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: ARTS 63 or 163, or permission of
instructor. (5 units)
171.Printmaking with
a Digital Toolbox
Advanced projects in digital printmaking.
Students generate their designs using imaging software then create hand-pulled prints
using traditional printmaking methods such
as stencil, intaglio, lithography, and relief.
Prerequisite: One course from ARTS 35 or
74 or 174, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
173.Introduction to 3D Animation
& Modeling/Modeling &
Control Rigid Body Dynamics
Mathematical and physical principles of
motion of rigid bodies, including move­
ment, acceleration, inertia, and collision.
Modeling of rigid body dynamics for threedimensional graphic simulation; controlling
the motion of rigid bodies in robotic applications. May be repeated twice for credit.
Open to majors or permission of instructor.
Also listed as COEN 165. (5 units)
174.Computer Imaging
Continuation and extension of ARTS 74.
Students create original, digital artwork
through comprehensive assignments using
raster and vector-based software. May be
repeated twice for credit. (5 units)
175.Graphic Design
Continuation and extension of ARTS 75.
Students accomplish graphic design objectives through comprehensive projects. May
be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite:
One course from ARTS 74 or 75 or 174, or
permission of instructor. (5 units)
54 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
176.Advanced Computer Imaging
Designed for the intermediate- to advancedlevel digital imaging student. Assignments
help students develop conceptual and formal
strategies to create a series of related works
that center around each student’s individual
artistic interests. Raster- and vector-based
imaging techniques, as well as conceptual
content and meaning, will be explored
in depth through practice and discussion.
Prerequisite: ARTS 74 or 174, or permission
of instructor. (5 units)
177.Website Graphic Design
An intermediate course in the design process
of aesthetically developing websites. Theoretical discussions of user interface design
and the creation of graphical navigation systems. Students will focus on research, typography, layout, hierarchy, and branding to
visually communicate a concept developed
for Web media. Prerequisite: One course
from ARTS 74, 75, 174, or 175, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
178.Advanced Graphic Design
In-depth exploration of graphic design
through advanced projects. Students will
concentrate on the use of professional templates and guidelines to explore both the fine
art and commercial uses of digital media
within graphic design. Experimentation and
creative play through advanced applications
and practices. May be repeated twice for
credit. Prerequisite: ARTS 75 or 175, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
179.Introduction to Two-Dimensional
Animation
In-depth exploration of two-dimensional
animation and digital storytelling. Students
create storyboards, flipbooks, and vector/raster based animation. May be repeated
twice for credit. Prerequisite: One course
from ARTS 74, 75, 174, or 175, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
180.Advanced Graphic Design
Production
In-depth exploration of graphic design
through advanced projects. This class will
explore both the fine art and commercial
uses of digital media within graphic design.
Students will concentrate on engineering
professional templates to create complex
projects that focus on package design, interactive publications, and advanced design
materials. The class fosters experimentation
through advanced applications and practices. May be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: One course from ARTS 74, 75, 174,
or 175, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
181.Digital Illustration
and Design Theory
In-depth exploration of two-dimensional
design and practice through the use of vector-based software. This class covers basic
design theory, which is applicable and fundamental to all two-dimensional mediums.
Students will focus on complex illustration
practices and techniques specific to vectorbased software. Prerequisite: ARTS 74 or
174, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
194.Peer Educator in Studio Art
Peer educators in studio artwork closely with
a faculty member to help individual students
in studio arts courses with the proper use of
tools and materials, as well as mastering
course content. Peer educators will encourage students in their creative work in both
individual and collaborative activities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. (1–2 units)
196A. Studio Art Seminar
Exploration of and preparation for primarily
academic postgraduate options in studio art.
Includes portfolio and presentation development; artist statements and résumé writing;
photographing artwork; and field trips to
studios of artists, designers, and graduate
schools. Required for studio art majors, recommended in junior year. (5 units)
ART AND ART HISTORY 55
196B. Capstone Senior Exhibit
Senior studio art majors will sign up for an
independent study course with a faculty
member. The faculty member will advise
and direct the student through the process of
installation and presentation of their senior
exhibit. Students will work directly with the
instructor to design and edit their exhibits.
Grading considerations include quality of
the exhibition, the quality of the presentation (display, hanging, etc.), professional
conduct, and the associated artist statement.
Required for studio art majors. Must be taken
during the quarter of the senior exhibit, normally spring quarter. Prerequisite: ARTS
196A. (2 units)
197.Special Projects
This course is for advanced students who
wish to pursue an art project not covered by
courses in this Bulletin, under the direction
of a studio art faculty member. Students will
have group meetings to discuss progress with
one another and with faculty member. May
be repeated twice for credit. Open to majors
or permission of instructor. (1–5 units)
198.Internship/Practicum
Individual projects in conjunction with a
professional visual arts organization. May be
repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite: Written proposal must be approved by supervisory
studio art faculty member and department
chair. (1–5 units)
199.Directed Research/Creative Project
Tutorial work in studio art. May be repeated
for credit, but no more than 5 units will
count toward the major. Prerequisite: Course
outline and schedule of instructor/student
meetings must be approved by studio art faculty member and department chair 10 days
prior to registration. (1–5 units)
56 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY
Professors Emeriti: William R. Eisinger, Thomas N. Fast, John S. Mooring,
Dennis R. Parnell, S.J.
Professors: Elizabeth P. Dahlhoff (Department Chair), Janice Edgerly-Rooks,
Craig M. Stephens
Associate Professors: James L. Grainger, David C. Hess, Ángel L. Islas, Leilani M. Miller,
David L. Tauck, Justen Whittall
Assistant Professors: Jessica R. Lucas, Katherine Saxton
Lecturers: Dawn Hart, Teresa Ruscetti, Christelle Sabatier
The Department of Biology offers a program leading to the bachelor of science degree.
The major provides students a broad background in biology, while allowing the opportunity to explore particular areas of biology in greater depth. The biology major serves as a
strong foundation for graduate, medical, or professional studies, as well as for careers in
teaching, research, and business. Most courses emphasize laboratory or field work, and students are also encouraged to work with faculty on research projects. Minor degrees in biology and related disciplines (biotechnology, biomedical engineering, and environmental
studies) are available. The Biology Department also offers courses that satisfy the Natural
Science and Science, Technology & Society requirements of the Core Curriculum, which
are available to all University students who are curious about the nature of life. Numerous
study abroad opportunities in the life sciences, both for biology majors and non-majors, are
available through the Study Abroad office. Most faculty members involve students in their
research programs. Qualified students can obtain course credit for research by enrolling in
BIOL 195.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling the Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of science degree, students majoring in biology must complete the following departmental
requirements:
• BIOL 21, 22, 23, 24, 25
• CHEM 11, 12, 13, 31, and 32 (CHEM 33 suggested)
• PHYS 11, 12, 13 or PHYS 31, 32, 33
• MATH 11, 12
• BIOL 101
• Seven approved upper-division biology courses, including five with laboratory.
Five of the seven upper-division courses must be from one of three areas of emphasis: a)
biomedical sciences, b) cellular and molecular biology, or c) ecology and evolution. Students
who desire to approach their upper-division studies in a manner that is not well-represented
by these emphases may develop an integrative biology plan for upper-division coursework
by organizing a coherent series of courses with their academic advisor.
BIOLOGY 57
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in Biology:
• Successful completion of Biology 23 or Biology 25.
• Three upper-division biology courses, including two with a laboratory component.
Minors in Related Areas
Biotechnology Minor is designed for students interested in gaining insight into the science
underlying biotechnology, exploring its potential for the future, and obtaining practical
experience in laboratory techniques used in biotechnology research and its applications.
See the Interdisciplinary Minors and Other Programs of Study section at the end of this
chapter for details.
Environmental Studies Minor provides an opportunity for students to focus on environmental issues through a variety of academic approaches in the humanities, social and
natural sciences, engineering, and law. See the Department of Environmental Studies and
Sciences section in this chapter for details.
Biomedical Engineering Minor is designed primarily for science majors in the College
of Arts and Sciences. This minor could be a valuable asset for science majors interested in
biomedical research and/or health-related careers, including those completing prerequisites
for medical school and other health-related professional schools. See Chapter 5, School of
Engineering, for details.
Public Health Minor is designed for students interested in population-level analysis of
health issues, and the causes and consequences of disease. See the Public Health Program
section in this chapter for details.
PREPARATION IN BIOLOGY FOR ADMISSION TO
TEACHER TRAINING CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS
The State of California requires that students seeking a credential to teach biology in
California secondary schools must pass the California Subject Examination for Teachers
(CSET), a subject area competency examination. Students who are contemplating secondary school teaching in biology should consult with the coordinator in the Department of
Biology as early as possible. The secondary teaching credential requires the completion of an
approved credential program that can be completed as a fifth year of study and student
teaching, or internship.
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
3. Fitness Physiology L&L
addition to learning basic human physioloAlthough many people rarely engage in vig- gy, at the end of the course students should
orous exercise, as a species we evolved to per- be able to critique and design experiments,
form prolonged, strenuous activity. This understand and interpret reports of health
course surveys how exercise promotes a state and exercise news in the popular press, critiof wellness and explores both the immediate cally evaluate fitness claims made by adverresponses to exercise as well as how the body tisers, and recognize quackery. Laboratory
responds to long-term training programs. In 15 hours. (4 units)
58 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
5. Endangered Ecosystems L&L
An overview of earth’s ecosystems and the
major factors contributing to the loss of biodiversity. Three major themes: (1) general
ecological principles, especially focused on
the structure and function of ecosystems;
(2) factors contributing to the endangerment of ecosystems; and (3) the conservation of ecosystems and biodiversity. Global
environmental problems, including several
lectures highlighting current environmental
and conservation issues here in California
and within the San Francisco Bay Area. Laboratory 15 hours. Saturday field trips are
­required. (4 units)
6. Oceans L&L
Examination of major ocean ecosystems and
their inhabitants, with special attention paid
to issues of governmental policy, sustainability, and human impacts on marine ecosystems. Laboratory and field activities will
emphasize hands-on exploration of local
marine habitats. Laboratory 15 hours. Saturday field trips are required. (4 units)
18.Exploring Biotechnology L&L
Have you ever wondered about the science
behind CSI, “Frankenfoods,” human cloning, or how biofuels might help combat
global warming? This course will examine
the science underlying biotechnology: how
DNA, genes, and cells work, and how they
can be used in new technologies that affect
many areas of our lives, including medical
diagnosis and treatment, forensics, agriculture, and energy. We will discuss current developments in biotechnology and also
examine the controversies and ethical considerations that accompany them. Laboratory experiments will focus on hypothesis
testing and experimental design, and include
creating glow-in-the-dark bacteria, detecting
viruses, performing human genetic testing,
and testing common foods for genetic modification. Laboratory 15 hours. (4 units)
21.Introduction to Physiology
Introduction to the physiology of multi-cellular organisms. Course will investigate how
organisms are put together at the cellular
level and how multi-cellular organisms
maintain homeostasis despite a challenging
and changing environment. Course focuses
on four problems organisms have to solve:
transport; maintaining water and ion balance; obtaining and processing energy; information exchange. Concurrent enrollment
in a discussion section is mandatory. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, CHEM 11. (4 units)
22.Introduction to Evolution
and Ecology
Introduction to key concepts in evolution
and ecology, including Mendelian and population genetics, natural selection and adaptation, phylogenetics and biodiversity,
demography, and interactions among organisms and their environments. Concurrent
enrollment in a discussion section is mandatory. Prerequisites: BIOL 21 and completion
of, or concurrent enrollment in, CHEM 12.
(4 units)
23.Investigations in Evolution
and Ecology L&L
Introduction to experimental and statistical
approaches used in modern ecological and
evolutionary studies, with an emphasis on
experimental design, data analysis, interpretation, and presentation. Builds on concepts
presented in BIOL 22. Fieldwork and laboratory exercises (30 hours) will take advantage of the diversity of local terrestrial and
marine ecosystems. Prerequisites: BIOL 22
and completion of, or concurrent enrollment
in, CHEM 13. (5 units)
24.Introduction to Cellular
and Molecular Biology
An introduction to the cell and molecular
fundamentals necessary for life. Topics include macromolecular structure, enzyme
function, membrane structure and physiology, metabolism, bioenergetics, the cell
BIOLOGY 59
cycle, and DNA replication, transcription,
and translation. Concurrent enrollment in a
discussion section is mandatory. Prerequisites: BIOL 21 and completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, CHEM 31. (4 units)
25.Investigations in Cellular
and Molecular Biology L&L
An introduction to experimental methods
for studying the cellular and molecular basis
of life. Builds on the concepts covered in
BIOL 24. Topics include enzyme function
and kinetics, cell reproduction, Mendelian
and molecular genetics, and molecular biology. The topics are explored through laboratory work, with emphasis placed on the
analysis, interpretation, and presentation of
experimental data. Laboratory 30 hours.
Prerequisites: BIOL 24 and completion of, or
concurrent enrollment in, CHEM 32.
(5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
101.Biology Research Seminar
109.Genetics and Society
A forum for the exploration of research in Upper-division course designed for non-scithe life sciences. Invited scientists from a ence majors interested in exploring the interrange of universities, institutes, and the pri- play between the social, scientific, and
vate sector present their current research, technological dimensions of human genetand engage in discussion about this research ics. In addition to studying the nature of
with seminar participants. This course is in- DNA (the genetic material), students will
tended to give students direct interactions study the social and technological dimenwith research academics in a range of fields, sions of current topics in genetics, including
to make them aware of career opportunities the Human Genome Project, paternity testand to provide them with contacts in those ing, crime scene investigation, embryo testfields. Graded P/NP only. Prerequisite: ing to select specific genotypes, personalized
Successful completion of BIOL 23 or 25. medicine, evolution, etc. Fulfills the Science,
­
(2 units)
Technology & Society component of the
­Undergraduate Core Curriculum. Does not
104.Human Anatomy L&L
satisfy requirements of the Biology major.
An exploration of the structure, organiza- (5 units)
tion, and functional relationships of human
anatomical systems. (Laboratory dissections 110.Genetics L&L
use non-human vertebrates.) Laboratory Basic principles governing inheritance and
30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 25. (5 units)
gene expression in viruses, prokaryotes, and
eukaryotes. Emphasis on molecular aspects.
106.Health Consequences
Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 25.
of a Western Lifestyle
(5 units)
This course explores the impact of living in a
developed country on human health. Topics 113.Microbiology L&L
such as diabetes, obesity, heart disease, hy- An introduction to the biology of microorpertension, and cancer will be discussed at ganisms, with emphasis on the molecular
the molecular, cellular, physiological, and and cellular biology of bacteria, the diversity
population levels. Prerequisite: BIOL 25. of microbial life, and the roles of microorAlso listed as PHSC 124. (5 units)
ganisms in human health and disease. Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 25.
(5 units)
60 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
114.Immunology L&L
Principles, mechanisms, and techniques of
humoral and cellular aspects of the immune
response. Immediate and delayed hypersensitivity, tissue transplantation, tumor immunology, and immunodeficient states in
humans. Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite:
BIOL 25. (5 units)
115.Human Reproduction
and Development L&L
Detailed study of the development and
function of the male and female reproductive systems, gametogenesis, fertilization and
implantation, and the anatomy of the heart,
circulatory, nervous, and skeletal systems
during embryogenesis. Where appropriate,
the molecular mechanisms controlling the
determination of these developing systems
will be examined. Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 25. (5 units)
116.Medical Microbiology L&L
This course focuses on the interactions of
pathogenic microbes (bacteria, viruses,
fungi, prions, etc.) with their hosts. The
various strategies employed by the infectious
agents to subvert the immune system and
the various strategies used by the immune
system to combat the microbial invasion will
be examined, as will the co-evolution of
hosts and their pathogens and the natural
history of diseases. The laboratory component will expose students to clinical methodologies and scientific approaches to diagnose
and differentiate pathogenic microorganisms. Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite:
BIOL 25. (5 units)
117.Epidemiology L&L
This course provides an introduction to epidemiology, including assessment of health
and disease in populations, epidemiological
data analysis, disease transmission, and public health interventions. The course also exposes students to the epidemiology of
diseases and conditions of current public
health and clinical importance in the United
States and internationally. The laboratory
(computer lab) will provide students with
hands-on experience with epidemiologic
methods, study design, and data analysis.
Laboratory 30 hours. Also listed as PHSC
100. Prerequisite: BIOL 25. (5 units)
119.Biology of Stress
This course explores the impact of stress on
physiology, behavior, and health, using a
multidisciplinary approach. Topics include
defining and measuring stress, differences
between acute and chronic stress exposure,
effects of stress on physiological processes
and on the brain, how stress affects gene expression and neurogenesis, and relationships
between stress and disease. We will also discuss the social patterning of stress exposure
and the effects of social policies and interventions. Prerequisite: BIOL 24. (5 units)
120.Animal Physiology L&L
This course examines contrasting strategies
used by different animals to deal with variations in temperature, food, oxygen, and
water, and highlights the diversity of physiological adaptations in major animal groups,
especially those living in “extreme” habitats.
Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 25.
(5 units).
122.Neurobiology L&L
Study of the molecular basis of neurobiology: how the nervous system is structured,
how neurons form connections and relay
information between each other, and how
specific components of the nervous system
function together to perceive the environment around us. Laboratory 30 hours.
­Prerequisite: BIOL 25. (5 units)
124.Human Physiology L&L
Examining the physical and chemical basis
of human life, this course focuses on the
neural and endocrine control of physiologic
processes to maintain homeostasis. Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 25. (5 units)
BIOLOGY 61
128.Plant Development L&L
This course explores the processes of RNA
and protein regulation, epigenetics, and
“omics” based scientific approaches, phenomena that will be discussed within the
context of plant development. Similarities
and salient differences among and/or between plants, animals, and microbes will
be described as appropriate. Laboratory
30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 25. (5 units)
134.California Plant Diversity L&L
Surveys the major angiosperm families in
California, relies heavily on using taxonomic
keys to identify California plants to species,
and investigates evolutionary patterns characteristic of the California flora through a
combination of lab and substantial field
experiences. Laboratory and field work
­
30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 23. (5 units)
135.Biofuels
Human use of fossil fuels is contributing
greatly to global climate change. Could biologically based fuels be important climateneutral energy sources for the future? This
course will explore the biology and technology of diverse biofuels, their potential environmental benefits and pitfalls, and the
economic and political issues surrounding
them in the United States, Europe, and developing nations. Fulfills the Science, Technology & Society component of the
Undergraduate Core Curriculum. Does not
satisfy requirements of the Biology major.
(5 units)
145.Virology
Examines the biology of viruses including
their structure, evolutionary origins, classification, genetics, laboratory propagation and
diagnostic methods, viral pathogenesis, response of host cells to viral infection, and
salient aspects of the epidemiology of viral
diseases. The course will focus on viruses
that infect eukaryotic cells, emphasizing
­important viral groups that infect humans.
Prerequisite: BIOL 25. (5 units)
151.Restoration Ecology L&L
The science and practice of restoring degraded ecosystems, with an emphasis on plant
ecology. Through fieldwork in restoration
experiments and examination of literature
case studies, students will grapple with basic
questions: How do we decide what to restore? How do we restore it? And how do we
know if we’re finished? Emphasis on reading
and writing scientific papers, working with
data, and critically judging the success of restoration projects in meeting goals of biodiversity and ecosystem function. Laboratory
and field work 30 hours. Also listed as
ENVS 151. Prerequisite: BIOL 23. (5 units)
153.Conservation Science
Conservation is a scientific enterprise and
a social movement that seeks to protect nature, including Earth’s animals, plants, and
ecosystems. Conservation science applies
principles from ecology, population genetics, economics, political science, and other
natural and social sciences to manage and
protect the natural world. Conservation is all
too often seen as being at odds with human
well-being and economic development. This
course explores the scientific foundations of
conservation while highlighting strategies to
better connect conservation with the needs
of a growing human population. We will examine whether conservation can protect nature, not from people, but for people. Also
listed as ENVS 153. Prerequisite: BIOL 23.
(5 units)
156.General Ecology L&L
Quantitative study of the interrelationships
of organisms with their biotic and abiotic
environments. Emphasis on population dynamics, interspecific relationships, community structure, and ecosystem processes.
Laboratory and field work 30 hours, including one weekend field trip. Also listed as
ENVS 156. Prerequisites: BIOL 23 and
MATH 11. (5 units)
62 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
158.Biology of Insects L&L
An introduction to basic and applied aspects
of insect biology, with emphasis on evolution, morphology, physiology, and behavior
of insects and related arthropods. Also includes a review of important agricultural,
medical, forestry, and veterinary pests. Laboratory and field work 30 hours, including an
overnight field trip and optional trips to
nearby ecosystems. Prerequisite: BIOL 23.
(5 units)
160.Biostatistics L&L
A course in applied statistics for biologists
and environmental scientists planning to
conduct manipulative experiments. Students gain training in experimental design,
quantitative analysis, and hypothesis testing.
Theory and concepts are covered in lectures
and readings. Laboratory sessions provide
practical experience in computing statistical
procedures by hand and with statistical software. Examples used in lectures and lab assignments are derived from medical research,
physiology, genetics, ecology, and environmental risk assessment. Laboratory 30 hours.
Also listed as ENVS 110. Prerequisite:
BIOL 23. (5 units)
165.Animal Behavior L&L
Examination of the behavior of animals in
nature using an organizational scheme that
recognizes proximate, or immediate, causes
of behavior and evolutionary bases for behavior. Topics include physiological correlates of behavior, perception of natural
stimuli (light, sound, chemicals), and behavioral ecology of foraging, mating systems,
parent-offspring relationships, and social behavior. Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite:
BIOL 23. (5 units)
171.Ethical Issues in Biotechnology
and Genetics
An interdisciplinary consideration of contemporary biotechnology, and the ethical
implications inherent in the development
and use of such technology. Topics include
human cloning, stem cell research, human
genome project, genetic testing, gene therapy, genetically modified organisms, personalized medicine, clinical trials, and public
policy. BIOL 171 satisfies a biotechnology
minor requirement but NOT the ethics requirement. When taken concurrently with
BIOL 189, it satisfies an upper-division biology major requirement. It also fulfills the
third Religious Studies requirement. Prerequisite: BIOL 25. (5 units)
173.Evolution L&L
Examination of advanced concepts of modern evolutionary biology. Topics include the
evolutionary forces of microevolution, the
evolution of sex, adaptation, speciation,
human evolution, molecular evolution, and
macroevolutionary phenomena deciphered
from phylogenetic trees. Laboratory (30
hours) includes bench experiments, field
study and computational activities. Prerequisite: BIOL 25;. BIOL 110 recommended.
(5 units)
174.Cell Biology L&L
Study of the function of cellular organelles
and the signaling pathways that control cell
reproduction. Topics include a detailed discussion of the structure of cell membranes,
nuclear and chromosome structure, DNA
replication, the microtubule and microfilament cytoskeleton, mitosis, mechanisms of
cell motility, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis. Laboratory experiments focus on cell
cycle regulation and cell differentiation.
Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 25.
(5 units)
BIOLOGY 63
175.Molecular Biology L&L
An introduction to the maintenance and
flow of genetic information at the level of
protein-nucleic acid interactions. Lectures
focus on basic molecular biology concepts
and recombinant DNA technology. Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 25.
(5 units)
176.Biotechnology Laboratory—
Recombinant DNA Technology
or Systems Biology L&L
Research topics vary from year to year. Laboratory meets twice each week. Lectures discuss the scientific basis for the lab methods,
and their application in biomedical research
and the biotechnology industry. Laboratory
60 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 25 and at least
one upper-division cell and molecular biology
laboratory class. BIOL 175 recommended.
(5 units)
177.Biotechnology Laboratory—
Gene Expression and Protein
Purification L&L
Explores principles and techniques for expression and purification of recombinant
proteins. Laboratory meets twice each week
and will use techniques such as column
chromatography, mammalian tissue culture,
and various gene expression systems. Lectures discuss the theory behind the methods
used in lab, as well as their application in
basic and applied research. Laboratory
60 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 25 and at least
one upper-division cell and molecular biology
laboratory class. BIOL 175 recommended.
(5 units)
178.Bioinformatics L&L
Bioinformatics tools are important for storing, searching, and analyzing macromolecular sequences and structures. This course in
applied bioinformatics provides an in-depth
survey of modern bioinformatics tools. Students will become proficient at searching
GenBank, downloading and analyzing sequences, and working with metadata. Each
student will write an original computer program to complete an independent research
project. Software tools for functional and
evolutionary analysis of nucleic acids and
proteins will also be examined. Laboratory
30 hours. Prerequisite: BIOL 25. BIOL 175
recommended. (5 units)
179.Cancer Biology
Introduction to the molecular and cellular
basis of cancer. Introduction to the pathology of cancer. How basic processes such as cell
growth, cell cycle control, and cell death are
affected by molecular changes in oncogenes
and tumor-suppressor genes. Prerequisite:
BIOL 25. (5 units)
180.Marine Ecology L&L
Quantitative study of the ecology of marine
organisms, with an emphasis on population
dynamics, interspecific relationships, community structure, and ecosystem processes.
Also examines principles of oceanography,
biology, and ocean ecology, focusing on organisms and ecosystems of coastal California. Laboratory and field work 30 hours.
Prerequisite: BIOL 23. (5 units)
189.Topics in Cell and
Molecular Biology
Seminar dealing with contemporary research
in cellular and molecular biology and biotechnology. Students are required to lead
discussions and participate in critical analyses of recently published research articles.
BIOL 189 may be taken up to two times for
credit. Does NOT count as an upper-division
course toward a major or minor in biology,
but allows BIOL 171 to count as an upperdivision biology course for the biology major
or minor when BIOL 189 and BIOL 171
are taken during the same quarter. Prerequisites: BIOL 25 and concurrent enrollment in
BIOL 110, 113, 171, 174, or 175. (3 units)
64 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
191.Project Lab
Project lab is an intensive, research-oriented
course where students conduct projects directly related to ongoing studies in the professor’s laboratory. The class will use modern,
cutting edge research approaches and will
emphasize critical thinking, experimental
design, and scientific communication. Research topics vary from year to year. Laboratory 60 hours. Prerequisites: BIOL 25 and at
least one upper-division laboratory course.
(5 units)
195.Undergraduate Research
Experimental research project supervised by
Biology Department faculty. Five hours
of research per week is expected per unit.
Maximum of 3 units per quarter. Can be repeated for credit, with a maximum of 5 units
per academic year. Must be taken P/NP. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (1–5 units)
198.Internship and
Undergraduate Research
Students wishing to take either 198A or
198B should have a GPA of 3.0 or better in
biology and must present an outline of their
projected research to the chair not later than
the fifth week of the term preceding the start
of the project. Prerequisite: Departmental
and University permission. (1–5 units)
198A.Internship
Research in off-campus programs under the
direct guidance of cooperating research
scientists and faculty advisors. (1–5 units)
198B.Research
Supervised laboratory research culminating
in a written report suitable for publication.
Sustained for one year with credit given for
one term. Students completing a total of
5 units with a single instructor fulfill one
upper-division laboratory requirement toward
the major but do not satisfy an emphasis
requirement. (1–5 units)
199.Directed Reading and Research
Detailed investigation of a specific topic in
biology under the close direction of a faculty
member. Students wishing to take this
course should have a GPA of 3.0 or better in
biology and must present an outline of their
projected research to the department chair
no later than the fifth week of the term preceding the start of the project, which will
continue for one term only. Prerequisite:
Departmental and University permission.
­
(1–5 units)
CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 65
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY
Professors Emeriti: Lawrence C. Nathan, Robert J. Pfeiffer
Professors: Michael R. Carrasco (Department Chair), John C. Gilbert,
Patrick E. Hoggard, Dennis C. Jacobs, Deborah Tahmassebi, W. Atom Yee
Associate Professors: Linda S. Brunauer, Amelia Fuller, Brian J. McNelis,
Amy M. Shachter, Steven W. Suljak
Assistant Professors: Paul E. Abbyad, Grace Stokes (Clare Boothe Luce Professor),
Korin E. Wheeler
Senior Lecturer: Steven L. Fedder
Lecturer: Stephen Reaney
The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers three baccalaureate degrees: the
bachelor of science in chemistry, the bachelor of science in biochemistry, and the bachelor
of arts in chemistry. The curriculum is accredited by the American Chemical Society (ACS),
the professional organization for chemistry. The program prepares students for further work
in chemistry or biochemistry, either in graduate school or as professional chemists. In addition, a chemistry or biochemistry degree is excellent preparation for careers in medicine,
dentistry, law, engineering, business, and teaching. A minor in chemistry is also available.
All bachelor of science degrees provide graduates with the background necessary to
begin a career in chemistry or biochemistry at industrial and governmental laboratories, for
admission to institutions offering graduate degrees in chemistry and biochemistry, and for
admission to medical and dental schools as well as other professional programs in the health
professions. The chemistry major provides equal training in all the disciplines in chemistry,
and the biochemistry major combines training in chemistry with additional coursework in
cell and molecular biology. The bachelor of science-ACS certified degrees meet all recommended standards for chemists and biochemists as mandated by the ACS.
The bachelor of arts degree allows students the most freedom in choosing electives, and
therefore is an excellent program for pre-medical or pre-teaching students. Students with a
strong interest in the liberal arts or who wish to pursue subjects outside the standard science
curriculum will benefit from this degree. The bachelor of arts degree can be effectively combined with a pre-law or business curriculum to provide excellent preparation for law or
business careers in the technology sector.
Undergraduate research is a critical component of our degrees and most of our majors
conduct research in collaboration with faculty mentors. Research in the department has
been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research
Fund, the Dreyfus Foundation, and the Research Corporation. Majors in chemistry, biochemistry, biology, and public health science participate in faculty research projects through
CHEM 182, 183, and 184. In addition, advanced students have opportunities for parttime employment assisting faculty in laboratory and related teaching activities.
The chemistry and biochemistry curricula are designed to be flexible in the sequence of
upper-division coursework so as to allow students to participate in study abroad programs.
Students interested in study abroad should meet with a faculty advisor to plan the junior
and senior year courses as early as possible in their academic careers.
66 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of science or bachelor of arts degrees, students majoring in chemistry and biochemistry
must complete the following departmental requirements for each degree option:
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry
• CHEM 11, 12, 13, 15, 31, 32, 33
• CHEM 102, 111, 141, 151, 152, 154
• Three upper-division chemistry electives, not including CHEM 182
• Four quarters of CHEM 115
• MATH 11, 12, 13
• PHYS 11, 12, 13 or PHYS 31, 32, 33
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry—ACS Certified
• CHEM 11, 12, 13, 15, 31, 32, 33
• CHEM 102, 111, 141, 150, 151, 152, 154
• CHEM 183, 184
• Two upper-division chemistry electives, not including CHEM 182
• Four quarters of CHEM 115
• MATH 11, 12, 13
• PHYS 31, 32, 33
Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry
• CHEM 11, 12, 13, 15, 31, 32, 33
• CHEM 101, 111, 141, 142, 143, 150, 151 or 152
• Two additional upper-division chemistry electives, not including CHEM 182;
BIOL 110, 113, 174, or 176 may be taken to satisfy one of these two electives
• Four quarters of CHEM 115
• MATH 11, 12, 13
• PHYS 11, 12, 13 or PHYS 31, 32, 33
• BIOL 21, 24, 25, 175
Bachelor of Science in Biochemistry—ACS Certified
• CHEM 11, 12, 13, 15, 31, 32, 33
• CHEM 101, 111, 141, 142, 143, 150, 151 or 152, 154
• CHEM 183, 184
• Two additional upper-division chemistry electives; BIOL 110, 113, 174, or 176
may be taken to satisfy one of these two electives
• Four quarters of CHEM 115
• MATH 11, 12, 13
• PHYS 31, 32, 33
• BIOL 21, 24, 25, 175
CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 67
Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry
• CHEM 11, 12, 13, 15, 31, 32, 33
• CHEM 101 or 102, 111, 141, and 150 or 151 or 152
• Two additional upper-division chemistry electives, not including CHEM 182
• Upper-division lab requirement: 30 hours, which can be satisfied by CHEM 102,
143, 154, or 1 unit of CHEM 182
• Four quarters of CHEM 115
• MATH 11, 12, 13
• PHYS 11, 12, 13 or PHYS 31, 32, 33
Electives for all degrees can be fulfilled by taking any upper-division chemistry or
biochemistry class of 3 units or more, including CHEM 183 and 184.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in chemistry:
• CHEM 11, 12, 13, 31, 32, and 33
• 15 units of upper-division chemistry courses, not including CHEM 115 and
CHEM 182
PREPARATION IN CHEMISTRY FOR ADMISSION TO
TEACHER TRAINING CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS
The State of California requires that students seeking a credential to teach chemistry in
California secondary schools must pass the California Subject Examination for Teachers
(CSET), a subject area competency examination. The secondary teaching credential requires
the completion of an approved credential program that can be completed as a fifth year of
study and student teaching, or through an undergraduate summer program and internship.
Students who are contemplating secondary school teaching in chemistry should consult with
the coordinator in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry as early as possible.
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
Note: No course offered by the Department 5. Chemistry: An Experimental
of Chemistry and Biochemistry is subject to
Science
challenge, i.e., to fulfillment by a special A survey of modern chemical applications,
examination.
including applications to health, the environment, and consumer issues, and an intro1. Chemistry and the Environment
duction to the scientific method of inquiry.
A survey of the role of chemistry in major Laboratory 3 hours every other week. Canenvironmental issues such as global warming, not be taken by students with prior credit for
acid rain, ozone depletion, photochemical CHEM 11 or 19. (4 units)
smog, persistent organic pollutants, fossil fuel,
nuclear and renewable energy, recycling and
environmental fate of pollutants. Laboratory
3 hours every other week. Students with
prior credit for CHEM 11 can enroll only
on a pass/no pass (P/NP) basis. (4 units)
68 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
11.General Chemistry I
Topics include chemical properties and reactions, thermochemistry, stoichiometry,
quantitative problem-solving, and an introduction to ionic and covalent chemical
bonding. Laboratory 3 hours per week.
(5 units)
11H.General Chemistry I Honors
Accelerated treatment of CHEM 11 material and presentation of other topics not
­normally covered in general chemistry. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisites:
Grade of at least 3 on the Chemistry advanced placement test and either permission
of instructor or participation in the University Honors Program. (5 units)
12.General Chemistry II
Subjects include properties of solids, liquids,
and gases, properties of solutions, chemical
kinetics, properties of acids and bases, and
an introduction to chemical equilibria. Several lectures deal with special topics chosen
at the discretion of the instructor. Laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: A grade of
at least C– in CHEM 11 or 11H. (5 units)
12H.General Chemistry II Honors
Accelerated treatment of CHEM 12 material and other topics not normally covered in
general chemistry. Laboratory 3 hours per
week. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
and either a strong performance in CHEM
11 or 11H or at least a 4 on the Chemistry
advanced placement test. (5 units)
13.General Chemistry III
Topics include aqueous equilibrium, acidbase chemistry, chemical thermodynamics,
electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and statistical tools required for data analysis. The laboratory introduces quantitative methods of
analysis such as titration, spectroscopy, and
electrochemistry. Laboratory 4 hours per
week. Prerequisite: A grade of at least C– in
CHEM 12 or 12H. (5 units)
15.Introduction to Research
This course introduces students to opportunities for undergraduate research in the department. Departmental faculty present
their current research. Also, an overview of
typical tools used in pursuing scientific research projects is provided. Students interested in the chemistry or biochemistry major/
minor should ordinarily take this course before the end of their sophomore year. (1 unit)
19.Chemistry for Teachers
This laboratory-based course is designed to
teach the fundamental concepts of chemistry and is geared toward students who are
interested in becoming elementary or middle school teachers. The course focuses on
the following concepts: nature of matter,
atomic structure, chemical bonding, and
chemical reactions. While learning these
core concepts, students will experience what
it means to do science by developing their
experimentation skills as they participate in a
classroom scientific community. Laboratory
3 hours per week every other week. Cannot
be taken by students with prior credit for
CHEM 5 or 11. (4 units)
31.Organic Chemistry I
Topics include organic structure and conformations, stereochemistry, structure-reactivity
relationships, and the chemistry of alkyl halides and alkenes. Special emphasis is placed
on understanding reaction mechanisms.
Laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite:
CHEM 13. Additionally, students receiving
a grade lower than C– in CHEM 13 are
strongly urged to meet with their instructor
before continuing with CHEM 31. (5 units)
32.Organic Chemistry II
Topics include spectroscopy and the chemistry of alkynes, ethers, alcohols, and carbonyl
compounds. Laboratory 3 hours per week.
Prerequisite: CHEM 31. Additionally, students receiving a grade lower than a C– in
CHEM 31 are strongly urged to meet with
their instructor before continuing with
CHEM 32. (5 units)
CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 69
33.Organic Chemistry III
Topics include carbonyl condensation reactions, aromatic substitutions, amines, carbohydrates, and peptide and protein synthesis.
Other advanced topics may include pericyclic reactions and natural product synthesis.
Laboratory 3 hours per week. Prerequisite:
CHEM 32. Additionally, students receiving
a grade lower than a C– in CHEM 32 are
strongly urged to meet with their instructor
before continuing with CHEM 33. (5 units)
99.Independent Laboratory
Laboratory course, primarily for transfer students to make up lower-division laboratory
as needed for equivalency with CHEM 11,
12, 13, 31, 32, and/or 33. Prerequisite:
­Approval of department chair. (1 unit)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
Note: No course offered by the Department of stresses extensive reading of recent literature
Chemistry and Biochemistry is subject to in bioanalytical chemistry, critical evaluation
challenge, i.e., to fulfillment by a special ex- of published scientific papers, and developamination.
ment of skills in scientific writing. CHEM
112 satisfies the Advanced Writing require101.Bioinorganic Chemistry
ment. Prerequisite: CHEM 111 or consent of
Structure, properties, and reactivity of metal instructor. (5 units)
complexes and the function of metal ions in
biological processes. Prerequisite: CHEM 115.Chemistry and Biochemistry
Seminar
32. (5 units)
Active areas of research in university, indus102.Inorganic Chemistry
trial, and government laboratories, presentIntroduction to inorganic chemistry with ed by guest speakers. May be repeated for
emphasis on the nonmetals. Laboratory credit. Graded P/NP only. Pre- or co-requi3 hours per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 13. site: CHEM 33. (0.5 units)
(5 units)
130.Organic Syntheses
111.Instrumental Analysis
Modern synthetic methods applied to the
Principles and use of instrumentation. Focus preparation of structurally complex target
on electronics, spectroscopic methods, mass compounds, such as bioactive natural prodspectrometry, and chemical separations. ucts and pharmaceuticals. Extensive discusLaboratory 4 hours per week. Prerequisite: sion of synthetic planning, known as
CHEM 13. Pre- or co-requisite: CHEM 32. retrosynthetic analysis, emphasizing the
(5 units)
standard bond-forming methods learned in
CHEM 31–33. Offered in alternate years.
112.Bioanalytical Chemistry
Prerequisite: CHEM 33. (5 units)
A focused investigation of the application of
modern methods of analytical chemistry to 131.Bioorganic Chemistry
understanding biological systems at the mo- Chemical synthesis of carbohydrates, nucleic
lecular level. Topics depend on recent devel- acids, peptides, proteins, and reaction mechopments in bioanalytical research but may anisms of biological cofactors. Offered in alinclude sub-cellular analyses, proteomics, ternate years. Prerequisite: CHEM 33.
electrochemical methods, and nanoparticle- (5 units)
based approaches to analysis. The course
70 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
141.Biochemistry I
An introduction to structure/function relationships of biologically important molecules, enzymology, membrane biochemistry,
and selected aspects of the intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates. Pre- or co-requisite:
CHEM 33. (5 units)
142.Biochemistry II
Includes a study of various aspects of the intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates,
lipids, and amino acids, as well as nucleic
acid structure and function, protein synthesis, and subcellular sorting, and more advanced molecular physiology, including
membrane biochemistry, signal transduction, and hormone action. Prerequisite:
CHEM 141. (5 units)
143.Biochemical Techniques
A laboratory course emphasizing fundamental theory and practice in biochemical laboratory techniques, including preparation
and handling of reagents; isolation, purification, and characterization of biomolecules;
enzyme kinetics; spectrophotometric assays;
and electrophoretic techniques. Laboratory
8 hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 141
and consent of instructor. (3 units)
150.Biophysical Chemistry
Introduction to the physical behavior of biomolecules. Topics include transport properties, reaction kinetics, sedimentation,
electrophoresis, binding dynamics, and molecular motion. Prerequisites: MATH 13
and CHEM 33, or consent of instructor.
(5 units)
151.Spectroscopy
Fundamentals of quantum mechanics, including wave functions and probability;
­rotational, vibrational, and electronic transitions; atomic and molecular electronic structure; and magnetic resonance. Prerequisites:
MATH 13 and CHEM 33. (5 units)
152.Chemical Thermodynamics
Fundamental laws of thermodynamics, and
applications to ideal and real gas equations
of state, ideal and real solutions, phase equilibria, and electrochemistry. Prerequisites:
MATH 13 and CHEM 33. (5 units)
154.Physical Chemistry Laboratory
Experimental applications of thermodynamics, kinetics, spectroscopy, and other aspects of physical chemistry. Laboratory
8 hours per week. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in or have completed CHEM 151
or 152. (3 units)
182.Undergraduate Research
Experimental research project supervised by
chemistry and biochemistry faculty members. Each unit requires a minimum of
30 hours of laboratory work. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (1–3 units)
183.Senior Research Experience
Individual research under the supervision of
chemistry and biochemistry faculty members, culminating in a comprehensive progress report. Laboratory at least 9 hours per
week. Prerequisites: Senior standing in chemistry and consent of instructor. (3 units)
184.Capstone Research Experience
Continuation of individual research under
the supervision of a chemistry and biochemistry faculty member, culminating in a thesis
and oral presentation. Laboratory at least
9 hours per week. Prerequisites: CHEM 182
or 183, and consent of instructor. (3 units)
CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY 71
190.Special Topics in Chemistry
Special Topics courses covering advanced
topics in any of the five areas of study in
chemistry may be offered on an intermittent
basis. These courses may be offered as oncea-week seminars or follow more traditional
course schedules. The course units will vary
based on the number of course meetings per
quarter and the course workload. Possible
topics are organic mechanisms, transition
metals in organic synthesis, materials, nanotechnology, photochemistry, bioanalytical
chemistry, electrochemistry, environmental
chemistry, molecular physiology, and membrane biochemistry. This course may be repeated for credit if the topics vary. (2–5 units)
199.Independent Study
Directed study under the supervision of a
faculty member in an area or topic in chemistry or biochemistry not covered in regular
courses. Registration by permission of the professor directing the study only. (1–5 units)
72 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICS
Associate Professor Emerita: Helen E. Moritz
Professors: William S. Greenwalt, John R. Heath (Department Chair)
Associate Professors: Scott LaBarge, Michael C. McCarthy, S.J. (Edmund Campion, S.J.
Professor)
Assistant Professors: Carolynn E. Roncaglia, Daniel W. Turkeltaub
Classics in the broad sense is the study of all aspects of the life and culture of ancient
Greece and Rome in their Mediterranean context. The Department of Classics offers all
levels of ancient Greek and Latin as well as courses that explore the origins of Western literature,
history, art, mythology, philosophy, religion, and government and their enduring relevance
to our lives. Most courses in the department require no knowledge of an ancient language
and are open to any interested student. Latin or Greek may be taken to satisfy the second
language requirement. Because of the multidisciplinary nature of the field, classics provides
an ideal liberal arts curriculum that is an excellent background for careers in many areas.
Majors and minors are available in several programs in the Department of Classics:
classical languages and literatures (Latin or Greek; there is a major, but no minor, in Latin
and Greek), classical studies, and ancient studies.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of arts degree, students majoring in classics must complete the departmental requirements
for the option desired:
Bachelor of Arts in Classical Languages and Literatures
Major in Latin or Greek
• Nine upper-division courses in the language of concentration
• First-year proficiency in the other classical language
• CLAS 197A and CLAS 197B
Major in Latin and Greek
• Nine upper-division courses in the ancient languages, with at least six of these in a
single language
• CLAS 197A and CLAS 197B
Bachelor of Arts in Classical Studies
• Six classes in Latin or Greek, which may include the elementary sequence
• CLAS 65
• Two additional lower-division courses
• Two upper-division literature courses (one upper-division reading course in Greek or
Latin may be substituted)
• Two upper-division ancient history or political science courses
• One upper-division course in classical culture
• CLAS 197A and CLAS 197B
CLASSICS 73
Bachelor of Arts in Ancient Studies
• CLAS 60
• Four additional lower-division courses
• Seven upper-division courses, at least one from each of the three perspectives
• CLAS 197A and CLAS 197B
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINORS
Students must fulfill the requirements indicated for the minor program desired:
Minor in Classical Languages and Literatures
• Completion of 20 upper-division units in either Latin or Greek
Minor in Classical Studies
• Fulfillment of the second language requirement for the bachelor of arts in Latin
or Greek
• Two lower-division courses
• Two upper-division courses in literature, in the original or in translation
• One additional upper-division course in any perspective
Minor in Ancient Studies
• CLAS 60
• Two additional lower-division courses
• Four upper-division courses from at least two different perspectives
Approved Courses towards Major and Minor in Classical Studies
and Ancient Studies
Lower Division:
• CLAS 11A, 12A, 60, 63, 65, 67, 68, 75; ARTH 21; PHIL 51; SCTR 65
Upper Division (three perspectives):
• Literature: CLAS 141, 175, 180, 181, 184; ENGL 161
• History and Political Science: CLAS 108, 109, 110, 111, 113, 176, 185; POLI 111
• Classical Culture: CLAS 146, 177, 187, 188; ARTH 104, 106, 110; PHIL 131;
SCTR 100, 110
Other courses not listed above that are offered on classical topics in the Departments of
Art History, English, History, Philosophy, Political Science, and Religious Studies may also
count toward a degree in classics; consult with the Chair of Classics before enrolling.
74 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: LATIN
1. Elementary Latin I
2. Elementary Latin II
Introduction to vocabulary, forms, and Continuation of Latin I. (4 units)
grammar of classical Latin. Development of
the reading skills with supporting exercises 3. Elementary Latin III
in writing. No language laboratory. (4 units) Completion of elementary Latin. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: LATIN
101.Intermediate Latin
126.Cicero: Oratory and Rhetoric
A course for students who have finished Reading course in Latin. One or more exembasic Latin grammar. Students will review plars of Cicero’s rhetorical style or rhetorical
Latin forms and syntax while reading prose theory. Consideration of rhetorical form,
and poetry of increasing complexity. Stu- figures, and topoi. (5 units)
dents will be prepared to enroll in Latin
reading courses covering individual authors 127.Vergil: Aeneid
and genres. Offered in fall quarter only. Reading course in Latin. The epic poem on
the effort of founding Rome and the cost of
(5 units)
its greatness. Consideration of the tradition121.Caesar
al and innovative features of Vergil’s epic
Reading course in Latin. Representative se- style and purpose. Attention to epic meter.
lections from the Commentarii on the Gallic (5 units)
War and/or Bellum Civile. Consideration of
the adaptation of history to political ends. 130. Roman Elegy
Reading course in Latin. Representative se(5 units)
lections from the works of Tibullus, Proper122.Catullus
tius, and Ovid. Origins and development of
Reading course in Latin. Lyric poems, short the elegiac genre. (5 units)
epigrams, and longer mythological poems
131.Vergil: Eclogues and Georgics
by the late Republican. (5 units)
Reading course in Latin. Vergil’s earlier
123.Roman Comedy
works: pastoral poems set in an idealized
Reading course in Latin. One or more plays landscape and the didactic poem on the agby Plautus or Terence. Origins and nature of riculture and countryside of his native Italy.
Roman comedy. (5 units)
(5 units)
124.Ovid: Metamorphoses
Reading course in Latin. Selections from
Ovid’s epic compendium of mythology.
(5 units)
125.Cicero: Philosophical Works
Reading course in Latin. Consideration of
Cicero’s eclectic philosophy through a careful reading of one or more of his philosophical dialogues. (5 units)
132.Horace
Reading course in Latin. Selections from the
odes and epodes. Attention to the adaptation of Greek lyric forms and rhythms to the
Latin language. (5 units)
133.Livy
Reading course in Latin. Selections from the
Ab Urbe Condita—the history of Rome
from its semimythical founding through
monarchy, early Republic, and Punic Wars.
(5 units)
CLASSICS 75
134.Roman Letters
Reading course in Latin. Selections from
various authors: Cicero, Seneca, Pliny. Discussion of the epistle as literary genre, with
focus on the social and historical background
of the author. (5 units)
135.Medieval Latin
Major works of prose and poetry from the
fourth century to the Renaissance. St. Augustine’s Confessions; the histories of Gregory of Tours, Bede, and Einhard; Latin fables;
popular songs such as the Carmina Burana;
and the humanistic writings of Dante and
Petrarch. (5 units)
137.Special Topics in Latin Poetry
Occasional courses in selected authors or
genres for advanced students. Possible topics: Lucretius or satire. (5 units)
138.Special Topics in Latin Prose
Occasional courses in selected authors or
genres for advanced students. Possible topics: the Roman novel, Tacitus, or other
Roman historians. (5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: GREEK
21.Elementary Greek I
22.Elementary Greek II
Introduction to vocabulary, forms, and Continuation of Greek I. (4 units)
grammar of Attic Greek. Development of
reading skills with supporting exercises in 23.Elementary Greek III
Completion of Greek grammar. Introducwriting. No language laboratory. (4 units)
tion to reading Greek literature. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: GREEK
151.Lucian
154.Herodotus
Reading course in Greek. Selections from Reading course in Greek. Selections from
the author’s satirical treatments of mytholo- the Persian Wars. Herodotus’ achievements
gy, history, philosophy, and rhetoric and/or and limitations as the “Father of History.”
from the fantasy called A True Story. Lucian’s Peculiarities of the Ionic dialect. (5 units)
place in the Second Sophistic. (5 units)
155.Plato
152.Homer: Odyssey
Reading course in Greek. Careful reading
Reading course in Greek. Selected passages from one or more dialogues such as Apology,
demonstrating the fusion of the heroic and Crito, Phaedo, and Republic. Detailed study
the romantic in an epic of peacetime. Con- of dialogue mode of discourse; overview of
sideration of epic meter and conventions. Plato’s philosophy. (5 units)
(5 units)
156.Greek New Testament
153.Euripides
Reading course in Greek. Readings selected
Reading course in Greek. A complete tragic from the Koine Greek text of the New Testadrama. Attention to characterization, dra- ment with a concentration on the gospels or
matic structure, and poetry, and to Euripid- the epistles. Close reading of the text with a
es’ place in the history of tragedy. Metrical view to theological implications of the voreading of dialogue. (5 units)
cabulary. Introduction to primary research
tools. (5 units)
76 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
157. Hesiod
Reading course in Greek. Selected readings
from Hesiod’s two poems, Works and Days
and Theogony. (5 units)
161.Homer: Iliad
Reading course in Greek. Selected passages
illustrating the course and consequences of
the wrath of Achilles and the nature of the
hero. Consideration of epic meter and conventions. (5 units)
162.Sophocles
Reading course in Greek. A complete tragic
drama. Attention to characterization, dramatic structure, and poetry, and to the author’s particular contributions to the
development of the tragic form. Metrical
reading of the text. (5 units)
163.Aeschylus
Reading course in Greek. A complete tragic
drama. Attention to characterization, dramatic structure, and poetry, and to the author’s particular contributions to the
development of the tragic form. Metrical
reading of the text. (5 units)
164.Oratory
Reading course in Greek. Selections from a
representative Greek orator such as Demosthenes or Lysias. Consideration of classical
rhetorical forms and topoi. (5 units)
167.Special Topics in Greek Poetry
Occasional courses in selected authors or
genres for advanced students. Possible topics:
Lyric, Homeric Hymns, or Pindar. (5 units)
168.Special Topics in Greek Prose
Occasional courses in selected authors or
genres for advanced students. Possible topics: Thucydides or Xenophon. (5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: CLASSICS
11A. and 12A. Cultures &
already know by teaching you the basics of
Ideas I and II
English word formation and some common
A two-course sequence focusing on a major Greek and Latin morphemes. (2 units)
theme in human experience and culture over 42.Greek Heroes in Hollywood
a significant period of time. Courses emphasize either broad global interconnections or Movies have fascinated their audiences with
the construction of Western culture in its Greek myths for decades but are notorious
global context. Courses will address signifi- for playing fast and loose with the ancient
cant texts, ideas, issues, and events in their stories. This course examines the classical
historical context from a humanistic per- sources for, and some cinematic versions of,
spective. Classics topics include Barbarians classical figures such as Perseus or Heracles
and Savages, Gods and Mortals, and Heroes (topic varies). (2 units)
and Heroism. Successful completion of C&I I 60.Introduction to Ancient Studies
(CLAS 11A) is a prerequisite for C&I II
An exploration of the nature of political and
(CLAS 12A). (4 units each quarter)
religious authority; that is, the relationship
between the individual, the state, and the
41.Word Workshop: Scientific
divine—in three different ancient civilizaEtymology
English derives much of its everyday vocabu- tions. The primary “texts” for this investigalary from Latin and much of its scientific tion are the representative monuments of each
vocabulary from Greek. This class will help culture: the pyramids of Egypt (particularly
you build your vocabulary and acquire the the Old Kingdom), the Temple of Solomon
tools to figure out words that you do not in Jerusalem in the united monarchy, and
the roads of classical Rome. (4 units)
CLASSICS 77
63. Ancient Eros: Sex and Religion
in Ancient Greece
This course explores the various manifestations and significance of sex (“Bittersweet
Eros”), both the deity and the divinely-inspired passion, in ancient Greece. While this
course focuses on examining the socio-religious significance of Aphrodite and her son,
Eros (the Roman Cupid), it is also designed
to provoke an open conversation about responses to sex found in relevant contemporary religious expression. Assignments are
derived from Greek and Roman literature,
philosophy, historiography, and art, as well
as from contemporary magazines, scholarly
journals and books, religious documents,
and movies. Participation in class discussion
is mandatory for this seminar-style course.
(4 units)
67.Ancient Greek Religion
Consideration of the differing attitudes and
expectations of polytheisms and monotheisms, and of religious expression in the context of classical Greek cult and ritual.
Readings are drawn from a wide variety
of literary, historical, philosophical, and epigraphical texts. Also listed as HIST 16.
(4 units)
65.Classical Mythology
Principal gods and heroes of Greek and
Roman antiquity: their stories, significance,
and pictorial representations. Implications
of myth in society and possible origins of
myth. Important background for European
and English literature. (4 units)
75.Classics in Cinema
A survey of the classical world through selected dramatic films illustrating sequentially
the cultural and political history of ancient
Greece and Rome. Close viewings of popular films, with comparative reference to
sources and practice in the techniques of
film criticism. (4 units)
68.Ancient Roman Religion
Examination of religious practices, institutions, and beliefs of the ancient Romans.
Special consideration of interconnections in
Roman religiosity between the acts/beliefs of
individuals and the concerns of the state.
Concludes with philosophic mysticism,
magic, mystery religions, and Christianity.
Also listed as HIST 17. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: CLASSICS
108.Ancient Greece
110.Roman Republic
A survey of Hellenic history from the Bronze A political, military, social, and cultural reAge to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on view of the rise and fall of the most successthe rise and fall of the polis as an indepen- ful state the West has ever known. Also listed
dent social, cultural, and political commu- as HIST 110. (5 units)
nity. Also listed as HIST 108. (5 units)
111.Roman Empire
109.The Hellenistic Age
A political, social, and cultural survey of the
A cultural, social, and political review of Al- Roman Empire beginning with Augustus
exander the Great’s conquests and their Hel- and tracing changes in Rome from the delenistic ramifications through the reign of velopment of the Roman Empire as a world
Egypt’s Cleopatra VII. Also listed as HIST state to the development of Christianity as a
109. (5 units)
world religion. Also listed as HIST 111.
(5 units)
78 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
113.Democracy Under Siege: Ancient
Athens and Modern America
This course will trace the fate of the Athenian democracy after the Peloponnesian
War through the Hellenistic Age (circa 404
to 307 CE). It will cover the foreign and domestic policies of Athens through this period, and cover both the problems and the
opposition to democracy by non-democratic
polities as well as by those opponents of democracy who lived in Athens itself. Although the United States is a republic and
not a democracy in the Athenian mode
(which in fact, was the intent of our republic’s founders), the U.S. in the 21st century is
facing comparable opposition both domestically and in the realm of foreign affairs to
those which confronted the ancient Athenians. Parallels between the world of the 4th
century CE and 2012 will not only be noted,
they will be emphasized through readings
and class discussions. Also listed as HIST 132.
(5 units)
115. Numismatics
This course will study how the minting of
coins changed the western world politically,
sociologically, and economically. It will use
the minting of ancient coins to investigate
ancient economies and the political structures from which they emerged. Technical
aspects of the minting of coins will be addressed, as will the artistic achievements of
ancient engravers. (5 units)
141.Love and Relationships
in Classical Antiquity
An examination of the many forms of loving
and erotic relationships as they pertained to
the Greek and Roman quest for the best
human life. Readings in Euripides, Sappho,
Ovid, Plato, Aristotle, and many others
from genres of poetry, essays, letters, tragedy,
and philosophy. Also listed as PHIL 131D
and WGST 133. (5 units)
146.Age of Socrates
A study of Socrates as both a historical and
literary figure, with special attention to his
political and cultural context, and to our
three chief sources on him and his philosophical activities: Aristophanes, Plato, and
Xenophon. (5 units)
175.Topics in Classical Literature
Occasional courses or seminars in specialized
topics. Consult current course descriptions
for details. (5 units)
176.Topics in Ancient History
Occasional courses or seminars in specialized
topics. Consult current course descriptions
for details. (5 units)
177.Topics in Ancient Philosophy
Occasional courses or seminars in specialized
topics. Consult current course descriptions
for details. (5 units)
178.Topics in Classical Culture
Occasional courses or seminars in specialized
topics. Consult current course descriptions
for details. (5 units)
180.Ancient and Modern Laughter
Students will investigate the nature and psychosocial functions of laughter, with a particular eye to the Greek and Roman roots of
Western comedy. Readings will focus on comedic plays by Aristophanes, Plautus, and
Terence, supplemented with readings of ancient and modern humor theorists and psychologists. For each playwright, we will also
analyze one popular recent movie and other
modern analogs of humor and plot structures. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the material by collaborating
over the course of the term to write, costume, and perform original plays in imitation of the ancient playwrights. (5 units)
CLASSICS 79
181.Classical Tragedy
Representative works of the principal Greek
tragic playwrights: Aeschylus, Sophocles,
and Euripides. Features of the tragic genre,
its origins, and the conventions of its performance. Also listed as ENGL 110. (5 units)
NCX
184.Classical Mythology
in the Western Tradition
An exploration of some of the ways authors
from the classical period through the 20th
century have manipulated Greek myths for
their own poetic and political purposes.
Focus is on the legends surrounding the fall
of Troy, with particular attention paid to the
shifting character of perhaps the two most
protean figures in Greek mythology: Odysseus and Helen. Texts include selections
from Homer’s Iliad, Vergil’s Aeneid, and
Dante’s Inferno, and unexcerpted works by
Homer, Sophocles, Euripides, Gorgias and
Isocrates, Ovid, Seneca, Dictys and Dares,
Shakespeare, Tennyson, Giraudoux, modern
Greek poets, and the Coen brothers. Also
listed as ENGL 187. (5 units)
185.Gender in Antiquity
Investigation into the representation and the
reality of gender in social, economic, political, and religious contexts in the classical
world. Also listed as ENGL 186 and WGST
157. (5 units)
187.The Democratic Muse: Public Art
in Athens and the United States
This course will compare and contrast the
function of publicly funded art in the two
most celebrated Western democracies, classical Athens and the United States. After exploring the “meaning” of the Parthenon,
students will discuss the civic role and thematic significance of important (and usually
controversial) examples of Greek and American public art and examine what they have
to say about imperialism war, religion,
gender, and economic policy. In what way
can the arts promote a civil society? How is
art “good” for democracy, and vice versa?
Should a democracy fund the arts, and if so,
how? (5 units)
188. Justice: Ancient and Modern
This course explores classical Greek concepts
of justice both abstracted in philosophy and
dramas and as practiced in the classical
courtroom. Student debates about controversial modern American court cases will
demonstrate the relevance of these ancient
thoughts and practices to the complex issue
of how justice is defined and practiced today.
(5 units)
197A. Capstone I
Bi-weekly seminar on various topics, combined with initial research for senior thesis:
identification of a coherent topic of thesis,
development of a detailed outline, and preparation of an annotated bibliography, conducted under the active direction of a
member of the classics faculty. Prerequisites:
For senior classics majors only; permission of
instructor and department chair required.
(3 units)
197B.Capstone II
Continuation of seminar in addition to supervised completion of the final draft, public
oral presentation, and defense of the senior
thesis. Prerequisites: CLAS 197A. For senior
classics majors only; permission of instructor
and department chair required. (3 units)
199.Directed Reading/Research
Individually designed programs of reading
or research, in Latin, Greek, or classics (i.e.,
literature in translation or culture). Prerequisites: Available to advanced students. Permission of instructor and department chair
required. (5 units)
80 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNICATION
Professors Emeriti: Don C. Dodson, Emile McAnany
Professors: Laura Ellingson, Charles H. Raphael, Paul A. Soukup, S.J. (Pedro Arrupe,
S.J. Professor and Department Chair), SunWolf, Michael Whalen (Knight Ridder/
San Jose Mercury News Professor)
Associate Professors: Christine M. Bachen, Hsin-I Cheng, Rohit Chopra,
Stephen C. Lee, Yahia Mahamdi
Assistant Professors: Justin Boren, Sreela Sarkar
Senior Lecturers: Barbara Kelley, Gordon Young
Lecturers: Katharine Heintz, Andrew W. Ishak
The Department of Communication offers a program of studies leading to a bachelor of
arts in communication. The major prepares students for a wide variety of graduate studies
and for careers in the communication industry. An academic minor is also available. Students
explore the theories, research methods, responsibilities, institutional structures, and effects
of mass communication, interpersonal communication, and computer-mediated communication. The major also integrates theory with practice. We help students to apply their
knowledge of the communication process to create their own speeches, films, television
programs, journalism, Web content, and communication and marketing campaigns. Many
of our students go directly to work in these fields after graduation.
Because the communication field requires students to have a broad liberal arts education,
students integrate courses in the Department of Communication with courses in other
departments. Often, students complete a minor or take a number of courses in related disciplines. To encourage students to explore global studies, the department accepts up to two
approved study abroad courses toward completion of the communication course requirements, usually as upper-division electives. All junior and senior students are encouraged to
complete an internship at an off-campus media organization or other communicationrelated institution. Internships may be counted for course credit as a department elective.
In their senior years, all communication majors synthesize their learning in the department by completing a scholarly thesis (on any aspect of communication) or an applied
capstone project (in journalism, digital filmmaking, or public relations). Theses and
­capstone projects, which typically embody students’ most advanced work, are suitable for
submission as part of applications for graduate school and jobs.
Students interested in communication, including nonmajors, enjoy a wealth of co-­
curricular opportunities. All students are encouraged to participate in one of the studentrun campus media, including the student newspaper, radio station, and yearbook. Practicum
courses allow students to gain academic credit for working in student media. Santa Clara
Debate, one of the oldest forensic programs in continuous operation on the West Coast,
provides a challenging and rigorous co-curricular activity designed to develop public speaking skills, critical thinking, and public policy analysis. Policy debate participants are eligible
to apply for merit scholarships.
All courses taken to fulfill requirements for the major or minor must be four or five
units and must be taken for a letter grade, not on a pass/no pass basis. Practicum courses,
numbered 190 through 195, do not count toward fulfillment of the communication major
or minor.
COMMUNICATION 81
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the Bachelor
of Arts degree, students majoring in communication must complete the following departmental requirements:
• COMM 1
• COMM 2 or 2GL
• COMM 12
• COMM 20
• COMM 30
• COMM 40 or 40EL
• Two upper-division communication theory courses (signified by the letter “A” in
the course number)
• One upper-division communication applied course (signified by the letter “B” in
the course number)
• Two additional approved elective upper-division communication courses
• COMM 110
• COMM 111 or 111G
• COMM 196 or 197
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in communication:
• COMM 1 or 2
• Two approved upper-division communication courses
• Three additional approved communication courses (any combination of upper-division
or lower-division courses)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. Introduction to Interpersonal
2. Introduction to Media Studies
Communication
An examination of mass communication
An overview of the communication process, and society, focusing on media industries,
issues, and theories explaining behaviors in the production of content, and audiences.
human relationships, with an emphasis on Considers different types of media; theoretilinking our perceptions, thoughts, and feel- cal perspectives related to the role of media
ings to those of our communication part- in society; and ethical and regulatory issues
ners. Topics typically include the power of pertaining to media practice. (4 units)
language, nonverbal communication, deception, persuasive communication, gender
differences in communication, small group
communication, and intercultural communication. (4 units)
82 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
2GL. Introduction to Global
Media Studies
An examination of the relationship between
media and society in a global world, focusing on media industries, production, and
audiences within and across different national contexts. Considers different types of
media; theoretical perspectives on media and
global society; and ethical and regulatory issues pertaining to media practice in various
media markets and settings. (4 units)
12.Technology and Communication
Examination of the relationship between
communication technology and society, in
the past, present, and future. Hands-on
work with the computer and Internet as
tools for research and communication.
(4 units)
20.Public Speaking
This course is designed to provide students
with basic theories and skills that are essential to effective public speaking. Topics include audience analysis, organization,
persuasion, credibility, and delivery. Students can apply these skills in a variety of
public speaking situations, whether in future
communication in college courses or in nonacademic settings. Each student will also
learn to analyze, criticize, and evaluate the
speaking of others. (4 units)
30. Introduction to
Digital Filmmaking
Designed to help students learn the art and
practice of digital filmmaking. Through a
combination of lectures, labs, shooting, and
editing exercises, students are introduced to
the concepts and processes involved in producing a short documentary and a short fictional film. In addition to attendance in
class, all students are required to attend production labs. Concurrent enrollment in lab
required. (5 units)
40.Introduction to Journalism
Introduction to the theories and techniques
of journalism with emphasis on the role of
journalism in a democracy, news values and
ethics, reporting and writing techniques,
and discussion and readings on the future of
journalism. Includes weekly lab, which may
be either in class or online at a flexible time,
at the instructor’s discretion. (5 units)
40EL.Introduction to Journalism:
Diversity and Community
Introduction to the theories and techniques
of journalism with emphasis on covering diverse, multiracial communities fairly and accurately, the role of journalism in a
democracy, news values and ethics, reporting
and writing techniques, and discussion. Student work may be published in online news
media outlets. Includes weekly lab and interaction within the community. Also listed as
ETHN 60. Note: This course requires participation in community-based learning experiences off campus. (5 units)
COMMUNICATION 83
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
Note: Theory courses are designated with the 101B.Interviewing
letter “A” and application courses with the Fundamental principles and techniques of
letter “B.”
interpersonal interviewing. Collecting narratives from people about their experiences
100A. The Science of Happiness
and ways they make sense of events in their
When we get what we want, why doesn’t relationships with other people. Advanced
that always make us happy? Our relation- principles of gathering scholarly data
ships are embedded in the pursuit or loss of through face-to-face interviews, using a varihappiness. This course is an interdisciplinary ety of interviewing formats and tools. Superreview of research and theories that explain vised field work, developing interview
our experiences of happiness. Topics include protocols, interviewing real-world populathe transient nature of happiness, our brain’s tions, recording and collecting responses,
biological happiness system, the effects of and organizing data. Emphasis on compastragic or fortunate events, blind spots, sionate listening skills. Topics will vary.
­counterfactual thinking/future-thinking/ ­Prerequisite: COMM 111. (5 units)
presentism, the science of laughter, and the
communication roles of complaints versus 102A.Persuasion
gratitude. We will look at how happiness is What is the difference between attempting
affected by winning or by losing, as well as to change someone’s attitude, belief, or bewhy predicting our future happiness (when havior? This course examines theories and
we choose mates, careers, and material ac- research about persuasion, social influence,
quisitions) is often flawed. Students will gain and compliance gaining, including the dyan understanding of what might (or might namics of successfully resisting persuasion
not) bring them and those they care about attempts. We will focus on interpersonal
sustained happiness as a result of the deci- persuasion in social settings (our roles as
sions they make throughout their lives. friends, daughters/sons, parents, romantic
(5 units)
partners, co-workers, teammates, and leaders). The course will cover credibility, social
101A. Vocation and Gender: Seeking
proof, influence in groups, persuasive lanMeaning in Work and Life
guage, compliance gaining techniques, and
An interdisciplinary examination of voca- how subtle persuasion tactics influence our
tion, understood as both a meaningful career buying, eating, and health choices. Prerequiand life outside of work. Incorporates theo- site: Any one of the following: COMM 1,
retical and empirical methods of the disci- PSYC 1, PSYC 2, or SOCI 1. (5 units)
plines of communication and Women’s
Studies to provide a rich set of tools with 103A. Communication and Conflict
which to make discerning decisions on per- A review of theories, perspectives, and resonal vocation. The course provides a frame- search on communication and conflict in
work for considering personal life choices various contexts (families, friendships, rowithin the context of cultural norms and for mances, business relationships). Specific
analysis of how individuals and groups topics will include getting what you want,
engage in interpersonal, organizational, saving face, realigning power imbalances,
­
and mediated communication surrounding miscommunication, styles and tactics, negowork/life issues. Also listed as WGST 160. tiation, third-party interventions, and trans(5 units)
forming conflicts. Development of
communication skills for managing conflict
84 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
productively in interpersonal, organizational,
and intercultural contexts. Prerequisite: Any
one of the following: COMM 1, PSYC 1,
PSYC 2, or SOCI 1. (5 units)
104A. Group Communication
Theories and research about the communication dynamics in a variety of relational
groups. Topics include childhood groups,
gaining entry to groups, being excluded
from groups, group hate, social loafing, leadership styles, facilitating groups, task versus
social goals, communication roles of members, effects of gender and diversity, moral
values of members, and the resolution of
group conflicts. Specific groups will include
social peer groups, cliques, gangs, small work
groups, super-task groups, problem-solving
groups, teams, and decision-making groups
(including juries). In addition to theory,
practical skills for handling group challenges
and member conflict will be offered. Prerequisite: Any one of the following: COMM 1,
PSYC 1, PSYC 2, or SOCI 1. (5 units)
105A. Multicultural Folktales
and Storytelling
Across time and around the world, people
have told stories to teach, entertain, persuade, and carry a culture’s history. This
course studies oral literature, including fairy
tales, trickster tales, urban legends, ghostlore, hero/heroine journeys, and wisdom
stories. Explores the values, gender roles,
norms, beliefs, sense of justice, spirituality,
and diverse worldviews embedded in every
tale. Students will study, critically think
about, and perform world folktales—developing a personal creative voice, while learning to appreciate folktales as rich
multicultural bridges for understanding
other people. Every student will learn taletelling skills that can be applied to enrich the
lives of others, in careers and community.
(5 units)
106A. Gender, Health, and Sexuality
Covers the fundamentals of health communication theory and research with a focus on
how health is socially constructed at the intersections of biology, medical technology,
and communication. Explores how gender
identity, sexual orientation, and sexual identity produce and are produced by cultural
gender norms as they manifest in embodiment, sexual expression, and experiences of
health and illness. Also listed as WGST 140.
Prerequisite: Any one of the following:
COMM 1, PSYC 1, PSYC 2, or SOCI 1.
(5 units)
107A. Intercultural Communication
This course introduces key research in intercultural communication within and between co-cultural groups in the United
States. We will critically examine similarities
and differences in communicative styles, historical contexts, and values. Prerequisite: Any
one of the following: COMM 1, COMM 2
or 2GL, PSYC 1, PSYC 2, or SOCI 1. Note:
This course requires participation in community-based learning experiences off campus.
(5 units)
108A. Communication and Gender
Explores gendered patterns of socialization,
interaction, and language. Goes beyond essentializing female and male modes of communicating to consider ways in which
masculinity, femininity, ethnicity, class, age,
sexuality, and disability intersect in interpersonal, family, organizational, and public
communication, as well as in feminist and
men’s movements. Also listed as WGST 161.
Prerequisite: COMM 1, ANTH 3, or c­ onsent
of instructor. (5 units)
109A. Friendships and Romances
This seminar-style course will examine theories, concepts, and research that explain the
relational dynamics in our friendships and
romances. Using a communication focus
and examining published studies and theories, topics will include childhood and adult
friendships, cliques, toxic friends, women
COMMUNICATION 85
and men as platonic friends, flirting, dating,
courting, maintaining intimacy, emotional
communication, the bioneurology of love,
rejection, and relational endings (losing,
leaving, and letting go). Counts as a University Honors Program course, but enrollment
is not limited to Honors Program students.
Prerequisite: Any one of the following:
COMM 1, PSYC 1, PSYC 2, or SOCI 1.
(5 units)
110.Quantitative Research Methods
Provides students with an overview of communication as a social science and of methods for analyzing communication content,
media audiences, and interpersonal communication practices. Topics include the fundamentals of research design, ethics,
measurement, sampling, data analysis, and
statistics. Students analyze research studies
and learn the fundamentals of writing a literature review and generating scientific predictions based on existing research. Through
hands-on assignments, students gain experience in concept measurement, research design, and data analysis. Prerequisites:
COMM 1 and COMM 2 or 2GL. (5 units)
and how we define our relationships with
our research participants. Students will explore topics related to femininity, masculinity, and/or sexuality using ethnographic,
interviewing, and textual analysis methods
informed by feminist theory and the politics
of social justice. Also listed as WGST 102.
Prerequisites: COMM 1 and COMM 2 or
2GL. (5 units)
120A. Environmental Communication
This course introduces students to tools for
analyzing and engaging in public communication about the environment. Students
draw on communication theory and research to understand strategies used in contemporary environmental debates and to
participate in campaigns. Special attention is
given to how mass media news and entertainment can represent environmental issues
responsibly. Final projects involve designing
environmental communication campaigns
and products. Counts toward the environmental studies and environmental science
majors. (5 units)
111.Qualitative Research Methods
Provides students with an understanding of
qualitative methods used in communication
research on messages, contexts, and impacts.
Explores qualitative methods such as audience ethnography, participant observation,
focus groups, textual analysis, in-depth interviewing, and institutional analysis. Students will engage in exercises on design and
application of qualitative methods and analyze the data gathered. Prerequisites: COMM
1 and COMM 2 or 2GL. (5 units)
121A. Diversity and Media
Addresses the theory and practice of the relationships between cultural diversity, power,
identity, and media production, representation, and use. Examination of how different
groups historically have been marginalized
in public representation and how these images have been, and are being, challenged.
Course requirements include research into
individual experiences of public images.
Focus on the United States, especially California. Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL or
consent of instructor. Also listed as ETHN
162. (5 units)
111G.Feminist Methods
This course explores feminist research methods in communication and other social sciences as they intersect with women’s and
gender studies. Through lectures and workshops, students will explore how theories
and politics shape the kinds of research questions we ask, the types of materials we use,
122A. Media and Advocacy
The important role of media in our daily
lives is clear: We use media for all types of
information, for entertainment and cultural
awareness, and for self-discovery and identity formation. But it is less clear whose responsibility it is to ensure that the impact of
media is a positive one for individuals and
86 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
society. This class will explore the dynamic
interplay between media industries, the government, and advocacy organizations as they
struggle to craft policy and practices that are
profitable and socially beneficial. We will examine issues of the media’s role in social
equality, childhood obesity, interpersonal violence, teen pregnancy, and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates, and discuss the
roles of corporate responsibility, individual
responsibility, and government responsibility in crafting sound public policy. (5 units)
123A. Media and Youth
This course considers the youth media culture that has become a pivotal part of the
experience of childhood and adolescence.
Students examine the content of popular
media aimed at young people and the media
industries that produce this content. Also
explored are patterns of media usage
throughout childhood and adolescence, the
ways that media are integrated into family
life, and how educational and entertainment
media content shapes children’s knowledge,
attitudes, behaviors, and identities. Topics
include educational media effects, media violence, gender and racial/ethnic stereotyping, advertising effects, and media literacy
efforts. Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL or
consent of instructor. (5 units)
124B.Information Campaigns
Examines the principles of design, implementation, and evaluation of information
campaigns created to produce social change
in such areas as health, the environment, or
civic education. Emphasizes problem analysis, audience analysis, message design, and
evaluation. Students examine actual campaigns (e.g., anti-smoking efforts, teen pregnancy, and drug campaigns) and design their
own campaigns focusing on a relevant social
problem. Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL or
consent of instructor. (5 units)
125A. Media Audience Studies
The audience plays a critical role in our understanding of mass communication. How
do media scholars and practitioners conceptualize and study media audiences? How do
individuals and groups use media, interpret
media messages, and integrate media experiences into their lives? The course will address
these questions, looking at a variety of media
and media content (e.g., news and entertainment content of books, film, TV, Internet)
and do so with different characteristics of
audiences in mind. We shall see, for example, how audience responses are shaped by
factors such as ethnicity, gender, age, or
by the context in which the medium and
its message is experienced. Prerequisite:
COMM 2 or 2GL or consent of instructor.
(5 units)
127A. Media and Social Movements
This course looks at the relationship between violence and communication from
three angles: (1) violence as communication,
(2) violence as a failure of communication,
and (3) problems with representing violence;
and includes a range of philosophical and
disciplinary perspectives on violence and
communication, including media and communication, social theory, and visual culture.
This course has a strong global and international focus: the contexts covered include
the Holocaust, the Partition of India, and
9/11. Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL.
(5 units)
128B. Dialogue and Deliberation
How can we address differences and resolve
conflicts fairly and effectively? This course
introduces students to the role of dialogue
and deliberation in creating healthier and
more democratic organizations, workplaces,
and societies. Students learn a range of
­research-based approaches to handling difference and conflict, and develop communicative skills used by effective individuals,
professionals, and citizens in real-world situations. Projects include taking part in formal
dialogues and deliberations on current
COMMUNICATION 87
issues, both as participants and moderators,
and designing ways for institutions to involve stakeholders and the public in conflict
resolution and policy development. (5 units)
130B.Global Screenwriting
This course is designed to introduce you to
the wonderful and creative world of global
screenwriting and how it has impacted traditional Hollywood storytelling. Students are
asked to answer multiple questions: Does a
uniform visual style exist? Does just one dramatic paradigm exist? Are all films about
protagonists and antagonists? Students complete a script treatment, narrative outline,
two drafts of a short screenplay, and analyses
of published screenplays. Prerequisites:
CTW 1 and 2. (5 units)
131B.Short Fiction Production
This course is designed to immerse students
in the craft and aesthetics of fiction filmmaking. Students work in groups to develop,
produce, and edit their own short films
based on selected scripts they either write or
acquire from student screenwriters. The
course also functions as a forum where students explore the film styles of classical and
contemporary filmmakers through readings
and screenings so that they are grounded in
film language and inspired to develop their
own film styles. Students are required to attend a production lab and outside film
screenings. Prerequisite: COMM 30. (5
units)
132B.Short Documentary Production
In this course, students are introduced to the
basic theories and techniques of the documentary mode of filmmaking and are
trained to develop, produce, and edit (in
groups) their own short documentaries. Students also explore (through readings, screenings, and discussions) the techniques and
styles adopted by documentary filmmakers
from all over the world and are encouraged
to use them as sources of inspiration as
they develop their own documentary
styles. Students are required to attend a
­production lab and outside film screenings.
Prerequisite: COMM 30. (5 units)
133B.Expanded Cinema Production
As a medium, film/video is constantly evolving both in form and in content. This course
considers the shift from traditional cinema
to new frontiers of interactive, performative,
and new media. A fusion between visual art,
new technologies, and the moving image
will redefine the relationship of the spectator
to the film. Environments will be created
through the combined use of image, sound,
and physical elements, which will immerse
the viewer on emotional, intellectual, and
physical levels. Students will have an opportunity to shoot on film, which offers a classic
way to learn the art of filmmaking through
understanding exposure, lighting, and coverage. This course will expand your consciousness as you step into the world by
blurring boundaries between mediums and
working individually and collaboratively.
Preference given to communication majors
and minors. Prerequisite: COMM 30.
(5 units)
134B.Master Shot/Studio Production
The principles and aesthetics of filmmaking
within the confines of a studio/sound stage
are examined. The fluid master shot, multiple camera shooting, studio lighting, and
audio are just some of the techniques that
are explored. Students work in small groups
to produce a short film, television show, or
musical production. All students are required to attend a production lab and possible outside screenings. Preference given to
communication majors and minors. May
be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite:
COMM 30. (5 units)
135B.Editing and Cinematography
The principles and aesthetics of editing and
cinematography are examined in great detail. In cinematography, students learn the
fundamental principles of lighting techniques in studio and on location and will be
88 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
trained in economy lighting, which relies on
minimal equipment, as well as key lighting
theories. In editing, students practice the key
techniques and styles of editing, including
montage, parallel cutting, and ellipsis, while
also studying guiding theories of editing. All
students are required to attend a production
lab and outside screenings. Preference given
to communication majors and minors. May
be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite:
COMM 30. (5 units)
136A. Genre, Auteur, and
Narrative Strategies
Why do movies and television shows look
and sound the way they do? Why do specific
directors/writers tell audio visual stories and
adopt personal stylistic signatures? What is
authorship in film and television? What
makes a comedy a comedy and a Western a
Western? This course examines the historical
roots and cultural implications of telling stories with moving pictures in certain genres or
by specific filmmakers. Film/television theory and criticism is used as a means of examining the nature of visual narrative styles and
auteurship. May be repeated as topics vary.
All students are required to attend outside
film/video screenings. Prerequisite: COMM 2
or 2GL. (5 units)
137A. American Film History/Theory
Explores the development of the American
film industry from the perspective of its
modes of production, filmic styles, cinema
movements, and audiences. This evolution
is examined within the context of political,
economic, and cultural changes of the past
century. May be repeated as topics vary. All
students are required to attend outside film/
video screenings. Prerequisite: COMM 2 or
2GL. (5 units)
138A. Television History/Theory
This course explores the evolution of the
television industry in the U.S. and around
the world. The development of television is
examined in the context of political, economic, and cultural changes of the past
century. The course investigates the changing modes of television production as well as
the impact of other media technologies on
television content, style, and audiences. May
be repeated as topics vary. All students are
required to attend outside film/video screenings. Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL.
(5 units)
139A. Global Documentary
This course traces the evolution of documentary filmmaking from its inception by
the Lumiere Brothers in the late 1800s to
today’s nonfiction filmmakers who use this
mode of representation in a variety of innovative ways, including advocacy, poetry, historical
documentation,
exploration,
reflexivity, and experimentation. The key
moments in the history of the nonfiction
film, its main theories, along with the various styles of documentary filmmaking, are
explored in depth. Prerequisite: COMM 2 or
2GL or consent of the instructor. (5 units)
141B.Advanced Journalism
Advanced news reporting and writing. Emphasis on strategies for public affairs reporting, beat coverage, media ethics, and source
development. Includes weekly beat assignments, an enterprise feature, and an immersion journalism project. Arrupe Partnerships
participation required. Prerequisite: COMM
40 or 40EL or consent of the instructor for
non-communication majors. (5 units)
142B.Online/Digital Journalism
Focuses on journalism’s efforts to deliver
news that can reach, include, and engage the
public across multiple digital platforms. In
this fast-paced course, students study online
news practices and ideas under development, evaluating digital tools, sites, and
models. Students will plan, report, write,
and produce in various digital media formats
that may include text, audio slideshows,
long-form audio stories, and their own portfolio website. Emphasis on improving journalism skills. Prerequisite: COMM 40 or
40EL. (5 units)
COMMUNICATION 89
143B.Special Topics in Journalism
Sports, features, lifestyle, science, editorial
writing, etc. Course focus shifts as instructor
and topics change each quarter. Students
may repeat course for credit. Prerequisite:
COMM 40 or 40EL. (5 units)
144B.Broadcast Journalism
Students research, write, shoot, edit, and report radio or television news. Students produce news packages and larger news
programs. At times, the course mimics a
news day from production planning to the
actual newscast. At other times, the course
replicates the television magazine model of
production. All students are required to attend a weekly production lab. Prerequisites:
COMM 30 and COMM 40 or 40EL.
(5 units)
145B. Legal Journalism
This course focuses on legal journalism and
legal affairs reporting. Students will learn to
report and write about current legal topics
and courtroom decisions, and how they affect the lives of ordinary citizens. In addition, students will learn how the civil and
criminal justice systems work and how to
access public records. May be repeated as
topics vary. Prerequisites: COMM 40 or consent of instructor. (5 units)
146B.Magazine Journalism
Includes story development, market analysis, long-form journalism, investigative reporting techniques, query efforts, and
sophisticated writing approaches for magazines. Prerequisites: CTW 1 and 2 and
COMM 40 or 40EL or consent of instructor
for non-communication majors. (5 units)
147A. Theory of News
Introduction to the history of mass media
news in the U.S. Analysis of forces that shape
journalism today and how to identify their
influence in news reports. Theories of journalism’s role in the democratic process. Ethical dilemmas posed by contemporary news.
(5 units)
148B.Multicultural Journalism
This course involves learning about and interacting with multicultural audiences, the
subjects of interest to them, the sources who
animate the stories about those subjects, and
the products of those stories. Emphasis will
be on journalistic reporting and writing,
media critique, and oral history. Prerequisite:
COMM 40 or 40EL. (5 units)
149A. Political News
Focused primarily on the analysis of ongoing
campaign coverage, the course will also examine historical and comparative aspects of
politics in the media. Regular consumption
of media coverage of politics required. Prerequisites: CTW 1 and 2. (5 units)
149B.Science News: How to Report
If you’re curious about the world and how
things work, science writing can put you in
the middle of the action. This course will
focus on hot topics such as sexuality, identity, health, and environmental sciences. Science writing is in high demand in journalism,
marketing, and other disciplines. Learn how
to identify important news, report on research and key participants, and show audiences why science should matter to them.
This course welcomes both humanities and
science majors to explore news developments and their underlying research, as well
as identify the social, ethical, and legal issues
raised by science. Students will analyze other
work and write their own. Prerequisites:
CTW 1 and 2. (5 units)
150B.Public Relations Theories
and Principles
This course explores the theories and concepts of public relations and business communication today, including program
planning, development, execution, and
measurement of media relations, traditional
PR tactics, and new online digital channels
and tools. Communication theory, business
planning, effective presentation, writing,
critical thinking, integrated marketing communications, fundamentals of business, and
90 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
business ethics are emphasized. Guest lecturers from corporate America and business
practice exercises provide real-world experience in applying theories and concepts. Prerequisites: COMM 2 or 2GL and COMM
40 or 40EL. (5 units)
151A. Organizational Communication
This course provides students with an introduction to the principles of communication
in organizations. Specifically, the class will
explore the role of communication in achieving organizational and individual goals, theory and practice of communication in
organizations, and techniques to enhance
understanding among individuals in organizations. A variety of organizations will be
explored including corporations, small businesses, nonprofits, and social/fraternal organizations.
Practical
application
of
contemporary theories will provide students
with the skills needed for successful communication in their current and future organizations. Topics will include the role of
organizational culture, conflict management, work/life balance, human resource
management, stress, globalization, and the
role of social justice in the contemporary organization. Prerequisite: COMM 1. (5 units)
152B.Public Relations Strategies
and Practices
This advanced course in public relations
deepens students’ understanding of strategies, processes, procedures, and practices
that build two-way relationships with a
broad range of constituencies. The course
prepares students to practice public relations
in many contexts, including political discourse; motivating groups to support social
justice; explaining the value of products or
services; and providing tightly targeted audiences with highly specialized technical or
business information. A heavy emphasis is
placed on learning to define, develop, and
implement public relations objectives, strategies, and tactics. Guest lecturers and a realworld class project round out the learning
experience. Prerequisites: COMM 2 or 2GL
and COMM 40 or 40EL. COMM 150B is
recommended, but not required. (5 units)
161B.Communication Media and
Technology in Education
In North America, we tend to associate communication media with entertainment or
business. This course explores alternative
uses of communication, particularly as applied to education. Examines theory and
practice in distance education (radio schools,
satellite service), instructional television
fixed service (ITFS) in local schools, and interactive video computer-assisted education.
Examination of current implementations of
the technologies. Class project will consist
of designing and implementing (as far as
possible) some educational use of communication (for example, an instructional show
or a Web application). Prerequisite: COMM
12 or consent of instructor. (5 units)
162B.Visual Cultural Communication
Students use photography to explore questions about how to represent diverse cultures
and identities. Students advance their digital
photography skills while reflecting on the
ethics of representing others and themselves,
informed by readings on cultural theory
and visual communication theory. In their
final projects, students create and share images from local communities in online exhibits. Prior knowledge of digital
photography and creation of online content
are helpful, but not required. (5 units)
163A. Internet Communities
and Communication
Examines cyberspace as home to many types
of collectives from groups on social network
sites to employees of corporations, religious
groups to online fan sites, cyberactivists to
citizens of as-yet-unborn nations. Premised
on the understanding that communication
and community have been fundamentally
linked in history, this course examines communication practices in a range of Internet
communities with a focus on (1) the shaping
COMMUNICATION 91
of ethnic, religious, and national identities
online; (2) the dynamics of transnational
communities; and (3) the logic of technological and communication networks on the
World Wide Web and Internet. Addresses
the philosophical implications of communication practices among Internet communities for notions of identity. Prerequisite:
COMM 2 or 2GL. (5 units)
164A. Race, Gender, and Public Health
in the News
When the news formula is, “Lose weight, get
more energy, and have better sex,” do our
communities thrive? This course examines
the news media’s role in the public health
sphere as part of an increasingly diverse society. Do self-help and medical trend stories
worsen inequalities in health and life expectancy across race, ethnicity, gender, or sexual
orientation? In this course, we will study the
influence of existing news coverage on the
discourse about science, public health, and
our bodies, and explore new ways to investigate the landscape of health opportunities in
a community. Also listed as WGST 116.
­Prerequisites: CTW 1 and 2. (5 units)
168A. Race, Gender, and Politics
in the News
Journalism aims to serve democracy by informing the public about important issues,
lifting up seldom-heard voices, and encouraging participation by all. This course examines the news media’s role in the political
sphere as part of an increasingly diverse society. How does news media influence our
perceptions about race and gender, particularly in the political realm? How well do
journalists report on proposals, policies, and
practices that influence people differently according to race or gender? This course explores these questions and more. Also listed
as WGST 117. Prerequisites: CTW 1 and 2
or COMM 40 or 40EL. (5 units)
169A. Special Topics in
Communication Technology
This course focuses on the intersection of
communication theory/research and issues
of technology. May be repeated for credit as
topics vary. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (5 units)
170A. Communication Law
An introduction to communication law and
regulation. Emphasis on first amendment
rights to freedom of speech and information
gathering, as well as the law of defamation,
privacy, copyright, obscenity, harms to the
public, and telecommunications regulation.
Students gain experience in applying the law
by preparing and delivering legal arguments
in a moot court exercise. (5 units)
171A. The Business of Media
A critical examination of how media industries work. The class will explore issues such
as historic and new financial models, power
structures, relationships between media producers and distributors, emerging media
markets, audience economics, and the role
of government regulation and policy. The
course will focus on some of the following
industries: Hollywood film and television,
journalism, and online media. (5 units)
172A. Communication and Sport
Communication is a critical component of
watching and playing sports, and at the same
time, sports is a lens through which we view
different aspects of our cultures and interactions. This course examines sports as a component of our culture, investigating issues of
race, gender, and power; the connection between spectator sports and media; and communication’s role in sports participation,
including topics such as leadership, motivation, cohesion, and teamwork. Students will
gain a better understanding of selected communication principles and discover new
ways to talk about sports. (5 units)
92 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
173B. Sports Media Production
Introduces students to the production of
sports programming. Includes producing,
interactive elements, graphics and photographs, shooting, editing, announcing, and
reporting for live sports programming as
well as recorded interviews and reports. Students will produce content for multiple
media, including television, the World Wide
Web, and arena scoreboards. Some experience with cameras, audio, production, reporting, graphics, and/or editing is
recommended. Production will occur on
campus in cooperation with Santa Clara’s
Department of Athletics. (5 units)
174A. Introduction to Sports
Leadership
This course is an overview of the academic
pursuit of leadership as it pertains to the
sports industry. Students will be presented
with classical and contemporary perspectives
on leadership and be challenged to evaluate
the role of leadership in organizations and
daily life. After successful completion of this
course, students will be able to articulate and
evaluate both classical and contemporary
leadership theories; analyze leadership styles
from the most frequently used perspectives
in the field today; recognize the impact of
sports organizations on local, regional, national, and world communities; identify and
discuss the changing landscape of sports organizations and the role leadership is playing
in that transformation; communicate a personal leadership philosophy; and formulate a
professional growth plan as a leader. (5 units)
175A. Theology of Communication
Do the practices of communication have
any consequences for theology? We know
that St. Paul claims that “faith comes from
hearing” and that Christian theology has
taken communicative expression seriously
throughout the centuries. This course examines how theology has used communication,
how it has evaluated communication, how
communication contributes to theology,
and how new communication technologies
have a contemporary impact on theological
and religious practices. Examines a variety of
communication expressions (art, music, poetry, television programs, films, websites) as
religious expressions; students will create
their own theological expression using some
contemporary medium. (5 units)
176A. Biology of Human
Communication
This course examines the ways in which
human communication affects, and is affected by, processes that occur in our bodies.
This course starts by exploring the basic
anatomy of the human body as it relates to
communication, including the brain, nervous system, facial musculature, endocrine
system, cardiovascular system, and the immune system. From there, this course explores how those body systems are implicated
in a range of communicative phenomena,
including emotion, conflict, stress, burnout,
interpersonal relationships, social structure,
organizational culture, relationship satisfaction, and sexual behavior. Finally, this course
explores the impact of innovative healthcare
treatments that utilize communication interventions, including providing social support, human affection, and organizational
development. (5 units)
179A. The Internet, Faith,
and Globalization
From online shrines to religious e-commerce, historical accounts of religion online
to forums for discussing religious practice,
the Internet has transformed numerous aspects of faith. This course examines the central role of the Internet in shaping Hindu,
Muslim, Sikh, Christian, Jewish, Zoroastrian, and other religious beliefs, practices, and
identities in a global era. It focuses on three
overlapping objectives: (1) how the Internet
reflects various, often competing, narratives
of religious identity; (2) how these narratives
are similar to and different from offline expressions of faith; and (3) how faith online
can be understood in terms of opportunities
provided and challenges posed by
COMMUNICATION 93
globalization. Prerequisites: COMM 2 or
COMM 2 GL, COMM 12, or permission of
instructor. (5 units)
180A. Global Audiences
Explores how the globalization of TV and
Internet news, and entertainment and film
have had an impact on audiences in different
cultures. Examines the available research and
theory on audience exposure and impact
from a cultural, value, and social perspective,
and how cultural and political movements
and/or government policy grow in reaction
to the invasion of a culture’s symbolic space
by global media messages. Prerequisite:
COMM 2 or 2GL. (5 units)
181A. Global Media Industries
Examination of how media industries have
been transformed into global businesses and
how technologies of distribution by cable,
satellites, and the Internet have brought almost all people into a global symbolic space;
theories of political economy and audience
reception are applied. Exploration of how
groups and governments have responded to
the phenomenon and what they do to protect their cultural and political sovereignty.
Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL. (5 units)
182A. Global News Issues
Explores the changes that have taken place
in news coverage on a global basis in the last
decade, especially television and Internet
news; how government policies of control of
information have changed in reaction to
new technologies of information distribution; and how internal politics may be affected by international media attention.
Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL. (5 units)
183A. Communication, Development,
and Social Change
How does communication content and
technology solve problems of global poverty
and social change? This course addresses the
theories, policies, and practices that help
­explain the success or failure of new com­
munication technologies in helping the
disenfranchised achieve a better life for
themselves. Hands-on work with real cases
will give students a chance to think through
the complicated process of social change.
Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL. (5 units)
184A. Postcolonial Identity
and Communication
Paying careful attention to the meaning of
the term “postcolonial” in different historical
and geographical contexts, this course undertakes a critical analysis of media representations of national and cultural identity in
postcolonial societies in Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Evaluates the ways in which
media constructions of national identity intersect with understandings of gender, race,
religion, and ethnicity. A key focus area of
the course is the experience of diasporic
postcolonial communities as represented in
media. Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL.
(5 units)
185A. New Media and Communication
This course examines the dynamics of communication in new media networks and forums, covering the overlapping categories of
social networks, social media, blogs, microblogs, portals, and collective knowledge initiatives such as Wikipedia. We will analyze
communication practices in new media with
a focus on the following four areas: (1) convergence and links between forms of media
and technology, such as mobile phones,
computers, and books; (2) changing conceptions of self and community; (3) emerging
of paradigms of creative collaboration and
artistic and intellectual production; and (4)
posed challenges about privacy, copyright,
and intellectual ownership. We will examine
these areas from a global perspective, keeping in mind both the global nature of new
media networks and communities, and the
particular trajectories of new media communicative practices in different global contexts. In this regard, we will also address the
social, ethical, and political consequences of
the “digital divide” between those who are
94 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
networked and connected in this world and
those who lack access to it. Prerequisite:
COMM 2 or 2GL. (5 units)
186B.Global Interpersonal
Communication
This course explores ways to reflect on, connect, and communicate study abroad experiences. Special focus on developing
intercultural communications competence
in interpersonal, socioeconomic, historical,
and geopolitical contexts. Students will produce Web-based educational material derived from academic research and study
abroad experience. Prerequisite: Prior experience studying outside the U.S. during college,
including immersion trips or study abroad
programs. (5 units)
187A. Cinema in the Age
of Globalization
This course explores how national cinemas
and individual filmmakers have responded
to American global film hegemony. Counter
cinema is seen not only as a mode of artistic
self-expression, but also as a cultural practice
whose role is crucial in shaping national cultures. Of particular interest is the development of film traditions such as neorealism,
the French New Wave, Third Cinema, exilic/diasporic cinema, and other film movements that have emerged as an alternative to
Hollywood’s commercial cinema. Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL or consent of the instructor. (5 units)
188A. The Fantastic in Film
and Literature
This course investigates how filmmakers and
writers from around the world have pushed
the boundaries of realism to achieve narrative and cinematic styles in storytelling that
are loosely referred to as “the fantastic.”
Some of the genres studied in this course include fantasy, magical realism, surrealism,
science fiction, the gothic, and cyberpunk.
Prerequisite: COMM 2 or 2GL or consent of
the instructor. (5 units)
189A. Communication, Citizenship,
and Globalization in Asia
Citizenship is about membership. It includes
processes of inclusions and exclusions. With
abundant transnational business, treaties,
and marriages, the selecting process is complicated by various local and global relations
formed in the past to present. We will explore this process in the Asian region from
historical, sociopolitical, cultural, and economic perspectives. We will wrestle with
questions such as: Is citizenship an individual or collective matter? Is citizenship a universal concept? Is it useful? What does it
mean to be a citizen in various Asian nations? You will work on a project on how
citizenship is communicated in a nationstate of your interest. (5 units)
190.Journalism Practicum
For writers and editors of The Santa Clara.
Students review the student newspaper,
offer practical advice, and gain experience in
journalism. The Santa Clara staff members
assist in teaching students skills in news,
sports, feature writing and reporting, and
techniques of design and production. Class
members meet once a week and are expected
to spend at least three hours a week in newspaper work. (1–2 units)
191.Independent Filmmaking
Practicum
This course helps emerging filmmakers, artists, and designers in all disciplines; entrepreneurs; students focusing on marketing,
public relations, and journalism; and film
lovers to advance their skills in the art and
business of filmmaking and media. Students
produce real-world short projects: fiction,
commercial, and documentary. The practicum is designed to give students hands-on
experience in producing, directing, cinematography, production design, editing, sound,
music, acting, and screenwriting. Students
will also help organize the Genesis student
film festival. Prerequisite: COMM 30 or
consent of instructor. (1–2 units)
COMMUNICATION 95
192.Online Journalism Practicum
Designed to get students involved with journalism via digital media. Students report,
write, edit, broadcast, and promote news,
arts, and entertainment content. Work may
air on KSCU, in The Santa Clara student
newspaper, websites, or the practicum blog.
Students will also learn the basics of digital
recording and receive a basic introduction
to studio production and new media.
(1–2 units)
193.Yearbook Practicum
For editors and principal staff members of
the University’s yearbook, The Redwood.
Principles of photojournalism, magazine
graphic design, and book production. The
Redwood staff members assist in teaching
students skills in reporting, writing, production, and design. Class members meet once a
week and are expected to spend at least three
hours a week in yearbook work. (1–2 units)
194.Forensics Practicum
Supervised activity in forensics. Includes
competition in debate and various speaking
events: persuasive, expository, extemporaneous, impromptu speaking, and oral interpretation. Field trips required. (2 units)
194P. Peer Educator
This course is offered for students who assist
in teaching courses in the department for
academic credit rather than pay. (1–2 units)
195. Sports Media
Production Practicum
Students gain practice in the production of
sports programming. Includes producing,
interactive elements, graphics and photographs, shooting, editing, announcing, and
reporting for live sports programming as
well as recorded interviews and reports. Students will produce content for multiple
media, including television, the World
Wide Web, and arena scoreboards. Some
experience with cameras, audio, production,
reporting, graphics, and/or editing recommended. Production will occur on campus
in cooperation with Santa Clara’s Department of Athletics. (1–2 units)
196.Senior Capstone
Digital Filmmaking Capstone
Students enrolled in this capstone work in
small production teams to produce 12–15
minute films. The type or style of these projects (fiction, documentary, or studio-based)
is determined by which upper-division production courses the team members have
taken. Heavy emphasis on preproduction
planning, script development, audience assessment, division of labor, budgets, and
building a collaborative vision for the project. Students also write an extended essay
that integrates their production practices
with film theory. Prerequisites: All lower-division courses required for communication
majors and required upper-division courses as
determined by the instructor. (5 units)
Journalism Capstone
The goal of the journalism capstone project
is to produce a 3,500-word magazine piece
of publishable quality on a significant community issue. (Students may choose to produce their finished piece in video format, by
permission of instructor.) Students will submit a written story proposal, including a preliminary list of sources and projected
reporting strategy, perform a comprehensive
literature search, and thoroughly research
the story via interviews, archival research,
and first-hand observation. Students will be
required to edit their peer’s work throughout
the quarter as well as submit multiple drafts
of the final project. Prerequisites: All lowerdivision courses required for communication
majors and required upper-division courses as
determined by the instructor. (5 units)
96 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Public Relations Capstone
This capstone focuses on the application of
communication, business, and core academic concepts and theories to the practical aspects of business, corporate communications,
and public relations including the basic
skills, planning/execution process, and the
roles of the various functions that compose
public relations within a corporate or business entity. Topics include integrated marketing
communications,
branding,
marketing mainstream media, and citizen’s
journalism. Business ethics and social responsibility are heavily emphasized. Prerequisites: All lower-division courses required for
communication majors and required upperdivision courses as determined by the instructor. (5 units)
197.Senior Thesis
This course leads students through a major
communication research project, including
defining research questions, conducting a
literature review, gathering and analyzing
data, and public presentation of findings.
Most sections are focused on a common
theme or topic defined by the instructor.
Prerequisites: All lower-division courses required for communication majors and required upper-division courses as determined
by the instructor. (5 units)
198.Internship
A forum where students can learn how they
can best apply classroom instruction to their
career objectives through academically supported work experience. Internships at Santa
Clara University are closely monitored for
appropriateness and practical application.
Internships should encourage career skills
and professional growth; they should not be
just another job. Internships are an important and integral part of the communication
craft and serve to introduce the student to
the range of opportunities afforded a degree
in the discipline. Students are expected to
represent the University in a professional
manner and to act responsibly with the client and the assignments. (1–5 units)
199.Directed Research/Creative Project
Students arrange to work with a faculty
member for directed reading or a research
project in communication theory, research,
ethics, etc. Creative projects may also be arranged in television, print, or another applied area. Prerequisites: Written proposal,
course meeting schedule, and readings must
be approved by instructor and chair prior to
registration. (1–5 units)
ECONOMICS 97
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
Professors Emeriti: Henry G. Demmert, Thomas Russell, Thaddeus J. Whalen Jr.
Professors: Mario L. Belotti (W.M. Keck Foundation Professor), Alexander J. Field
(Michel and Mary Orradre Professor), John M. Heineke, Kris J. Mitchener
(Robert and Susan Finocchio Professor), William A. Sundstrom
Associate Professors: Linda Kamas (Department Chair), Michael Kevane, Serguei Maliar,
Helen Popper, Dongsoo Shin
Assistant Professors: Christian Helmers, John Ifcher, Thuy Lan Nguyen,
Gonçalo Alves Pina, Teny Shapiro
Lecturer: Adina Ardelean
As one of the social sciences, economics studies how the choices we make as individuals—as consumers and producers, as savers and investors, as managers and employees, as
citizens and voters—combine to determine how society uses its scarce resources to produce
and distribute goods and services. This practical discipline provides insights into important
issues such as the determinants of wealth and poverty; unemployment, inflation, international trade, and economic growth; and success and failure in the marketplace. The rigorous, systematic analysis that the study of economics brings to bear on these and other
real-world issues provides excellent preparation for careers in both the private and the public
sectors, as well as for graduate study in economics, business, public policy, and law.
­Economics graduates pursue varied careers in business, law, banking and finance, government service, education, and private consulting. Students considering graduate study in
economics leading to a master’s or doctoral degree are strongly encouraged to meet with
their advisor as early as possible to plan an appropriate course of study.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum and College of Arts and
Sciences requirements for the bachelor of science degree, students majoring in economics
must complete the following departmental requirements:
• ECON 1 or 1E, 2, and 3
• MATH 11 and 12, or MATH 30 and 31
• OMIS 40 or MATH 122 or MATH 8
• ECON 41 and 42
• ECON 113, 114, 115, and 181 or 182
• Five upper-division economics electives, at least two of which must be completed
after ECON 113 and 115
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students with a minor in economics through the College of Arts and Sciences must
complete the following requirements:
• ECON 1, 2, 3, 113, and 115
• Two additional upper-division economics courses
• MATH 11 or 30
98 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS CONCENTRATION
Economics majors desiring a concentration in mathematical economics must complete
the following requirements in addition to the regular requirements for the major:
• All of the following courses: MATH 11, 12, 13, 14, 22, 53 (MATH 122 and 123 are
strongly recommended)
• Three out of the following courses: ECON 170, 171, 172, or 174 (these courses also
count as electives required for the major)
Note: Students completing the mathematical economics concentration take MATH 11 and
12 instead of MATH 30 and 31.
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. Principles of Microeconomics
3H. International Economics,
Development, and Growth
Introduction to microeconomics and its applications to business decisions and public Honors section. Analysis of international
policy. Topics include supply, demand, and trade theory and policy, balance-of-­payments
the coordinating role of prices in a market adjustments and exchange-rate regimes, and
economy; the behavior of business firms, in- economic development. Must be in the
cluding output and pricing decisions; com- ­
University Honors Program or Leavey
petition and monopoly; and government ­
Scholars Program, or have permission of
policies and regulations affecting markets. instructor. Prerequisite: ECON 2. (4 units)
(4 units)
41.Data Analysis and Econometrics
1E. Principles of Microeconomics
Introduction to statistical methods for anaSpecial section of ECON 1 emphasizing en- lyzing economic data. Emphasis on applicavironmental applications of economics. In- tions of multiple regression and establishing
troduction to microeconomics and its causality in observational data. Prerequisites:
applications to business decisions and public ECON 1 and 2, MATH 11 or 30, and
policy. Topics include supply, demand, and MATH 8 or OMIS 40 or equivalent;
the coordinating role of prices in a market ­Economics majors only, or by permission of
economy; the behavior of business firms, in- instructor. Must enroll simultaneously in
cluding output and pricing decisions; com- ECON 42. (4 units)
petition and monopoly; government policies
42.Data Analysis Applications
and regulations affecting markets. (4 units)
Hands-on course in obtaining and analyzing
2. Principles of Macroeconomics
data using statistical software. Prerequisites:
Determinants of national income and prod- ECON 1 and 2, MATH 11 or 30, and
uct in the long run and short run; inflation, MATH 8 or OMIS 40 or equivalent;
unemployment, and business cycles; mone- ­Economics majors only, or by permission of
tary and fiscal policies; and economic instructor. Must enroll simultaneously in
growth. Prerequisite: ECON 1. (4 units)
ECON 41. (2 units)
3. International Economics,
Development, and Growth
Analysis of international trade theory and
policy, balance-of-payments adjustments
and exchange-rate regimes, and economic
development. Prerequisite: ECON 2. (4 units)
ECONOMICS 99
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
Prerequisites: Unless otherwise noted, ECON 120.Economics of the Public Sector
1, 2, and 3 are required for all upper-division Microeconomic analysis of the role of goveconomics courses.
ernment in the market economy. Supply of
public goods and services, government’s role
101.Resources, Food,
in controlling externalities and regulating
and the Environment
private industry, and the economics of the
Exploration of the relationship among food political process. (5 units)
production, resource use, and the environment. Topics include biotechnology, the 122.Money and Banking
green revolution, resource depletion, envi- Theoretical, institutional, and historical apronmental degradation, and food safety. proach to the study of money and banking,
­Prerequisites: None. (5 units)
with particular emphasis on the relationship
between the monetary and banking system
111.Economics of the Environment
and the rest of the economy. (5 units)
Economic analysis of environmental issues
and government policies for environmental 126.Economics and Law
protection. Applications to important envi- Economic analysis of law and legal instituronmental issues, such as global climate tions focusing on the common law areas of
change, water and air pollution, hazardous property, contracts, and torts. (5 units)
wastes, biodiversity, and endangered species.
129.Economic Development
Prerequisite: ECON 1. (5 units)
Causes and consequences of economic
113.Intermediate Microeconomics I
growth and poverty in less developed counTheory of rational individual choice and its tries; analysis of the role of government poliapplications to decision making, consumer cies in economic development. (5 units)
demand, and social welfare; and economics
of uncertainty and information. Additional 134.African Economic Development
prerequisite: MATH 11 or 30. (5 units)
Examination of the economic development
of sub-Saharan African countries, with par114.Intermediate Microeconomics II
ticular emphasis on the relationships beTheory of the firm; determination of price tween economic growth and their social,
and quantity by profit-maximizing firms political, and economic structures. (5 units)
under different market structures; strategic
behavior; general equilibrium; market fail- 135.Gender Issues in the
Developing World
ure and government policies. Additional
prerequisite: ECON 113, MATH 11 or 30. Explores the gendered nature of poverty in
(5 units)
the developing world, with special focus on
sub-Saharan Africa, using applied statistical
115.Intermediate Macroeconomics
analysis, and economic theory. Also listed
Macroeconomic analysis, emphasizing mod- as WGST 121. Additional prerequisite:
ern economic models for explaining output, ECON 41and 42 or OMIS 41 or permisemployment, and inflation in the short and sion of instructor. (5 units)
long run. Macroeconomic policymaking,
including fiscal and monetary policy.
­Additional prerequisite: MATH 11 or 30.
(5 units)
100 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
136.20th-Century Economic History
The development of the U.S. economy during the 20th century. Topics include the
causes and consequences of economic
growth, the Great Depression, the rise of
government regulation, the changing role of
women in the workforce, and the increasing
internationalization of markets during the
postwar period. Additional prerequisite:
ECON 115. (5 units)
160.The Economics of
Poverty and Inequality
Examines theories and evidence regarding
poverty and economic inequality in the
United States. Evaluates alternative public
policies aimed at combating poverty. (5 units)
137.World Economic History
Development of Western and non-Western
economies since the late 19th century. Topics include globalization and economic integration, convergence and divergence in
economic growth across countries, international monetary systems, and the impact of
alternative policies and institutional regimes
on economic performance. (5 units)
165. Economics and Justice
Study of theories of economic justice with
applications to economic issues and policy.
Alternative theories to be considered include
utilitarian, libertarian, welfare-economic,
egalitarian, feminist, and religious moral
perspectives. Topics include poverty and income distribution; economic inequality and
mobility by class, gender, and race; the role
of the government in promoting justice;
­effects of globalization; and justice under
different economic systems. Additional prerequisite: ECON 113. (5 units)
138.History of Economic Thought
Origins and evolution of economic ideas in
their historical and philosophical context.
Emphasis on the theories of Adam Smith,
David Ricardo, and Karl Marx, as well as the
emergence of modern microeconomics and
macroeconomics in the 19th and 20th centuries. (5 units)
166.Race, Ethnicity, and Gender
in the U.S. Economy
Analysis of current and historical differences
in economic status by race, ethnicity, and
gender; theory and evidence of discrimination; role of government policies. Additional
prerequisite: ECON 173 or ECON 41 and
42. (5 units)
139.American Economic History
Study of growth and institutional change in
the U.S. economy since colonial times. Topics include early industrialization, the economics of slavery, and the rise of large
business enterprises and labor unions.
(5 units)
170.Mathematical Economics:
Static Optimization
The standard classical models of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory are generalized and reformulated as mathematical
systems. The primary goal of the course is to
extract empirically testable propositions that
would permit testing model veracity. Linear
algebra and the tools of calculus including
power series, the implicit function theorem,
envelope theorems, and duality are used as
the basis of analysis. Additional prerequisites:
MATH 11, 12, and ECON 113 or 114 or
permission of instructor. (5 units)
150.Labor Economics
Study of labor productivity, incomes, and
employment, and how these are affected by
labor organizations and labor legislation.
Additional prerequisites: ECON 113 and
OMIS 41 or ECON 41 and 42. (5 units)
ECONOMICS 101
171.Mathematical Economics:
Dynamic Optimization
The course will discuss the mathematical
tools needed to analyze dynamic situations in
economics. Applications to optimal decisionmaking over time with respect to natural resource allocations, manufacturing and storage
paths, consumption/investment decisions, and
stability of economic systems are discussed.
Topics include optimal control, dynamic programming and calculus of variations. Additional prerequisites: MATH 11, 12, and ECON
113 or 114 or permission of instructor. (5 units)
172.Game Theory
This course introduces game theoretical
concepts and tools. Theoretical topics include Nash equilibrium, Subgame perfection, Bayesian-Nash equilibrium, Harsanyi
transformation, commitment, and Perfect
Bayesian Equilibrium. Applications to topics such as oligopoly, strategic investment,
and agency theory are discussed. Additional
prerequisites: MATH 11, 12, and ECON 113
or 114 or permission of instructor. (5 units)
173. Applied Econometrics
Statistical analysis of cross-section and panel
data, with economic applications. Topics include identification of causal effects using
panel methods, instrumental variables, and
quasi-experimental techniques; models with
binary outcomes; variable selection. Handson analysis of data using statistical software.
Additional prerequisites: ECON 41, 42,
113, and 114. (5 units)
174.Applied Time Series Analysis
Methods to forecast and interpret hypotheses about time-varying economic variables.
Topics include stationary and non-stationary series; characterizing time series in tractable ways; separating regular (trend and
seasonal) and irregular parts of a time series;
and examining identification and estimation
strategies. Synthesize, present, and evaluate
time series analysis to assess credibility.
­Additional prerequisites: ECON 173 or
ECON 41 and 42 and ECON 115. (5 units)
181.International Trade
Analysis of the theories of international trade
and strategic interactions; assessment of
the empirical patterns of trade; analysis
of the political economy of protection,
and applications to policies guiding international competition. Additional prerequisite:
ECON 113. (5 units)
182.International Finance and
Open Economy Macroeconomics
Analysis of the monetary aspects of international economics, including the balance
of payments, exchange rates and foreign exchange markets, speculative attacks and
­currency crises, and the implications of international trade and capital flows for macroeconomic activity and policy. Additional
prerequisite: ECON 115. (5 units)
185.Economics of Innovation
and Intellectual Property
The economic determinants and consequences of innovation. Topics include research and development, joint ventures,
patents and other intellectual property, university-industry and government-industry
collaboration, and the relationship between
antitrust and other regulatory policies
and technological advances. Additional
­prerequisite: ECON 114. (5 units)
190.Economics Seminar
Seminar on contemporary economic theories and problems. Admission by invitation
only. (5 units)
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research
Independent projects undertaken by upperdivision students with a faculty sponsor. Independent studies are normally permitted
only under special circumstances. Prerequisite: Written proposal must be approved by
instructor and chair at least one week prior to
registration. (1–5 units)
102 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH
Professors Emeriti: James P. Degnan, Francis X. Duggan, Christiaan T. Lievestro,
Charles T. Phipps, S.J., Fred D. White
Professors: Terry L. Beers (Associate Chair), Phyllis R. Brown, Michelle Burnham
(Department Chair), Julianna Chang (Associate Chair), Diane E. Dreher,
Eileen Razzari Elrod, Ronald T. Hansen (Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J. Professor),
John C. Hawley
Associate Professors: Mary Judith Dunbar, Marilyn J. Edelstein, Andrew J. Garavel, S. J.,
Juan Velasco
Assistant Professors: Cruz Medina, Theodore J. Rynes, S.J., Tricia Serviss, Julia Voss
Acting Assistant Professor: Amy Lueck
Senior Lecturers: Simone J. Billings, Sherry Booth, Stephen Carroll, Susan Frisbie,
Kirk Glaser, Cynthia Mahamdi, Claudia Mon Pere McIsaac, Robert Michalski,
Tim Myers, Aparajita Nanda, Donald Riccomini, Cory Wade
Lecturers: Theresa Conefrey, Melissa Donegan, Denise Krane, Michael Lasley,
Robin Tremblay-McGaw
The Department of English affords students a rich undergraduate education in the liberal arts centered on literature, cultural studies, and the art of writing. Critical or creative
writing projects are integral to every course in the English major. Students and faculty in the
English Department discuss and write about British, American, and global literatures, new
media, and film. A range of theoretical approaches are used, sometimes with a focus on
visual rhetoric and cultural studies. The department also offers the Creative Writing Program, which provides students with a coherent course of study in the writing of poetry,
fiction, and creative nonfiction. The English major prepares students to read and write critically, to bring intellectual flexibility to academic and professional problems, and to enter the
work force as individuals with trained skills in analysis and self-expression.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling the Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor of arts degree, students majoring in English must complete the following departmental
requirements:
• Three foundation courses: ENGL 14, 15, and 16
• Two historically grounded literary or cultural studies courses; at least one of these
courses must be from a period before 1800
• A three-course concentration in literary/cultural studies; at least two of these courses
must be upper-division
• A three-course concentration in writing (professional writing and new media, or
­creative writing); at least two of these courses must be upper-division
•Among the courses in the literary/cultural studies concentration or the writing
­concentration, at least one course must be from the following list: 102, 103, 105,
106EL, 108, 120, 121, 123, 124, 125, 128, 129, 133, 134, 138, 140, 141, 146, 147,
148, 149, 150EL, 152, 153, 154, 155, 159, 161, 162, 164, 165, 169, 174, 177, 180,
184, 186, 187, 188, or a course approved by the chair to meet learning outcomes in
the application of theoretical perspectives.
ENGLISH 103
• One upper-division course in theory, or gender/sexuality, or ethnic/global studies.
(This course may also be used to meet another requirement.)
• One senior seminar
Each student’s plan of study should be discussed well in advance with an assigned advisor.
To this end, the student should write a memorandum of understanding to be agreed upon
with the advisor.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Minor in English
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in English:
• Three foundation courses: ENGL 14, 15, and 16
• Five English electives; four of which must be upper-division courses
Minor in Creative Writing
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in creative writing:
• Two introductory courses: ENGL 71 and 72
• Two practicum courses: ENGL 91 and 191
• Three electives from the following list: ENGL 73, 126, 127, 170, 171, 172, 173, 175
• One additional advanced course: ENGL 171 or 172
PREPARATION IN ENGLISH FOR ADMISSION TO
TEACHER TRAINING CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS
The State of California requires that students seeking a credential to teach English in
California secondary schools must pass a subject-area examination in English. The teaching
credential itself requires the completion of an approved credential program, which can be
completed as a fifth year with student teaching, or through a summer program and internship in conjunction with the undergraduate pre-teaching program. Students who are contemplating secondary school teaching in English should consult with the coordinator in the
Department of English as early as possible.
104 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
Note: Authors and topics listed in the follow- the construction of Western culture in its
ing course descriptions are typical rather than global context. Courses may address crossdefinitive. They are not necessarily included cultural contact; nature and imagination;
in a specific course every time it is offered, and and other topics. Successful completion of
others not listed here may be included. Some C&I I (ENGL 11A) is a prerequisite for
courses are offered every year; all, ordinarily, C&I II (ENGL 12A). (4 units each quarter)
are offered at least once every two years.
14.Introduction to Literary
1A. and 2A. Critical Thinking
History and Interpretation
& Writing I and II
Literature and our understanding of it are
A two-course themed sequence featuring constantly changing. This course surveys castudy and practice of academic discourse, nonical and marginalized works in cultural
with emphasis on critical reading and writing, and historical context. It examines the way
composing processes, and rhetorical situation. texts shape and reference each other, and
The second course will feature more advanced the consequences of technological change.
study and practice of academic discourse, Readings are chosen from literatures availwith additional emphasis on information lit- able in English in various genres and periods.
eracy and skills related to developing and Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A. (4 units)
organizing longer and more complex documents. Themes address a variety of contem- 15.Introduction to Cultural Studies
and Literary Theory
porary topics. Successful completion of CTW
I (ENGL 1A) is a prerequisite for CTW II Exploration of ways to think about the relationships among literature, culture, and soci(ENGL 2A). (4 units each quarter)
ety. Students will experiment with techniques
1H. and 2H. Critical Thinking &
of reading, interpretation, and intervention,
Writing I and II—Honors with particular emphasis on those methods
A two-course, themed sequence for students drawn from critical theory, studies in coloin the Honors program featuring study and nialism, cultural anthropology, feminism,
practice of academic discourse, with empha- semiotics, gay/lesbian studies, historicism,
sis on critical reading and writing, compos- and psychoanalytic theory. Prerequisites:
ing processes, and rhetorical situation. The ENGL 1A and 2A. (4 units)
second course will feature more advanced
study and practice of academic discourse, 16.Introduction to Writing
and Digital Publication
with additional emphasis on information literacy and skills related to developing and Introduction to current scholarship and
organizing longer and more complex docu- major issues in writing studies, including
ments. Students work intensively on their digital literacy and publication. Readings
writing as they study and analyze short will cover such topics as: civic discourse and
works of nonfiction and fiction. Students rhetorics of social justice; composition and
write primarily expository prose, occasional- multiliteracies; argumentation and logic; visual rhetoric and principles of design. Parly researched. (4 units each quarter) NCX
ticipants will publish their coursework in an
11A. and 12A. Cultures &
electronic portfolio. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A
Ideas I and II
and 2A. (4 units)
A two-course sequence focusing on a major
theme in human experience and culture over
a significant period of time. Courses emphasize either broad global interconnections or
ENGLISH 105
21.Introduction to Poetry
An introduction to the study of poetry
through close reading and various kinds of
writing, this course works toward a better
understanding of the complex effects of poetry and the challenging work of literary
criticism and theory. The main goals—
greater understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of poetry—will be achieved
through the practice of critical analysis.
(4 units) NCX
25.Reading Film
Introduction to key texts and concepts in the
study of film, including prominent movements and figures in cinema, the language of
film form, essential terms and concepts in
film history and criticism, and the technological, economic, and institutional history
of the film industry. (4 units)
31. and 32. Survey of American
Literature I and II
Historical survey of American literature
from its beginnings to the present. (4 units)
35.African-American Literature
Introduction to African-American literatures.
Also listed as ETHN 36. (4 units)
36.Chicano Literature
Introduction to Mexican American oral and
written traditions. (4 units)
37.Native American Literature
Introduction to the study of Native American
oral and written traditions, including contemporary works. (4 units)
38.Asian-American Literature
Introduction to Asian-American literatures.
(4 units)
39.Multicultural Literature
of the United States
Short stories, film, autobiography, and
poetry from many cultural communities in
the United States. Also listed as ETHN 70
and WGST 16. (4 units)
41., 42., and 43. Survey of English
Literature I, II,
and III
Chronological survey of English literature
from Beowulf to the present. (4 units)
54.Shakespeare
Readings in selected major plays. Combines
writing instruction with a close reading of
literary texts to serve as subjects and stimuli
for writing. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A.
(4 units) NCX
66.Radical Imagination
Survey of the fiction, poetry, speeches, songs,
drama, and film belonging to the large and
often neglected tradition of political radicalism in the United States. (4 units)
67.U.S. Gay and Lesbian Literature
Development of gay and lesbian literature in
the United States from the mid-19th century to the present. Texts may include novels,
short stories, poetry, and drama. Also listed
as WGST 34. (4 units)
68.Literature and Women
Introduction to the study of literature by
and about women, with special attention to
questions of gender in their social and historical contexts. Also listed as WGST 56.
(4 units)
69.Literature by Women
Writers of Color
A study of U.S. women of color writing in
the context of their respective cultural and
social histories. Analysis of the interplay of
racial images. Also listed as WGST 15.
(4 units)
71.Fiction Writing
Introduction to the writing of fiction. (4 units)
NCX
72.Poetry Writing
Introduction to the writing of poetry. (4 units)
NCX
106 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
73.Life Writing
Introduction to reading contemporary models of life writing and writing memoir, autobiography, and dramatic nonfiction in a
workshop setting. (4 units) NCX
include significant reading, writing, or public speaking components. Students must be
enrolled in BIOL 171 (Ethical Issues in
­Biotechnology and Genetics) to enroll in this
wrap-around writing course. (4 units)
77.Business Communication
in Online Environments
Instruction and practice in adapting classical
writing techniques to the requirements of
the online world, with an emphasis on defining and understanding usability requirements
for audience, content, format, interactivity,
and graphics. Recommended for business
majors and technical writers. Prerequisites:
ENGL 1A and 2A. (4 units) NCX
79.Writing about Literature
and Culture
Instruction and practice in writing critically
about selected literary and cultural texts.
Topics vary from section to section. Combines writing instruction with a close reading of texts, which serve as subjects and
stimuli for writing. May be taken more
than once when topics differ. Prerequisites:
ENGL 1A and 2A. (4 units) NCX
78. Writing about Biotech Ethics
This course aims to help students develop
strategic reading, thinking, writing, and
speaking habits that will substantially improve their performance in BIOL 171 and
in future science courses (and jobs) that
91.Practicum
Reading, viewing and critiquing poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and art for publication in
the Santa Clara Review, facilitated by student editors and faculty advisor. Students are
graded P/NP only. May be repeated for
credit. Cross listed with ENGL 191.
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
100.Literature and Democracy
103.History of the English Language
Studies of selected authors, works, and Origin, structure, and development of the
genres associated with the effort to extend English language. Special attention to the
political, social, and economic democracy. morphology and syntax of Old English.
Possible major authors include Langston (5 units)
Hughes, Michael Gold, Meridel LeSueur,
Tillie Olsen, Kenneth Fearing, Upton Sin- 104.Teaching English
as a Second Language
clair, Emma Goldman, Frank Norris, Nelson Algren, Richard Wright, Dorothy Introduction to theories of instruction; survey of methods and materials used in the
Allison, Thomas King, and others. (5 units)
teaching of English to speakers of other lan101.Linguistics
guages. (5 units)
General survey of the science of linguistics:
phonology, morphology, syntax, grammar, 105.Literacy and Social Justice
Examines how people learn to read and
and usage. (5 units)
write in a variety of multicultural contexts.
102.Theories of Modern Grammar
Explores theories about literacy and cultural
Analysis of the basic problems of describing identity, and literacy and social inequality.
grammatical structure: traditional, structural, Readings include studies of workplace literaand transformational-generative grammars. cy, literacy variation across cultures in the
(5 units)
U.S., and gender and literacy. (5 units)
ENGLISH 107
106.Advanced Writing
Builds on learning in Critical Thinking &
Writing courses to deepen familiarity with
the values, genres, and conventions relevant
to students’ major fields of study by providing additional study of and practice in rhetorical theory, composing processes, critical
thinking, and information literacy. Assignments will encourage increased sophistication in critical reading and writing with a
purpose, including addressing diverse audiences through a range of styles and voices as
appropriate for particular disciplines. (5 units)
107.Life Stories and Film
An examination of life stories, theoretical
texts, and films. Final project is an original
film proposal and trailer. (5 units)
108.Writing About Medicine
Analysis of medical issues, ethics, and controversies. This course provides good preparation for students who are interested in
careers in medicine and related health care
fields. Assignments consist of multimodal
writing that may include essays, digital stories, or website development. Students will
research divergent perspectives, learn to disseminate information to lay audiences, and
explain and support their stances. Computer
and website expertise are not essential but
will be part of the learning experience.
­Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A. (5 units)
109.Literature and Performance
Also listed as THTR 172. For course description see THTR 172. (5 units)
110.Classical Tragedy
Also listed as CLAS 181. For course description see CLAS 181. (5 units) NCX
112.Topics in Theatre and Drama
Also listed as THTR 112 or 113. For course
description see THTR 112 or 113. (5 units)
113.Studies in British Drama
A study of British drama. Authors vary each
term. May focus on periods, movements,
themes, or issues. May be taken more than
once when topics differ. Also listed as THTR
111. (5 units)
116.Shakespeare’s Tragedies
An exploration of the great tragedies of
Shakespeare’s maturity: Hamlet, Othello,
Macbeth, and King Lear, with special attention to the theatrical, religious, moral, gender, and political dimensions of Shakespeare’s
tragedies. Also listed as THTR 116. (5 units)
117.Shakespeare’s Comedies
An exploration of a selected number of
Shakespeare’s comedies from his early, middle, and late periods, with particular attention to the social and sexual roles of men and
women. Also listed as THTR 117. (5 units)
118.Shakespeare Studies
An exploration of a selection of Shakespeare’s
plays with particular attention to an important topic chosen for focus and specified in
the course description subtitle—for example, Shakespeare and Classical Traditions,
Shakespeare and Gender, Shakespeare and
Justice, Shakespeare’s Histories, Shakespeare’s Tragicomedies, Shakespeare and
Film. May be taken more than once when
topics differ. Also listed as THTR 118.
(5 units)
120.Studies in Comparative Cinema
Comparative study of selected works, in
translation if not in English, from more than
one linguistic and/or national category, organized by theme, genre, or time period.
May be taken more than once when topics
differ. (5 units)
121.Studies in American Film
Study of selected American films. May focus
on periods, movements, and issues such as
surrealism in film, the American city in film,
utopias, and dystopias in film. (5 units)
108 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
122.Studies in Film, Gender,
and Sexuality
Interdisciplinary study of film with a focus
of gender and sexuality. Topics may include,
but are not limited to, feminist and queer
film theory, women filmmakers, lesbian/gay
cinema, and constructions of gender in popular film. May be taken more than once
when topics differ. Also listed as WGST 134.
(5 units)
123.Studies in the History
of Literary Theory
Exploration of some major ideas and debates
in literary theory and criticism, as these have
developed over time, e.g., whether and how
literature is good for individuals and/or society, how writers create their works and readers read them. (5 units)
124.Studies in Contemporary
Literary and Cultural Theory
Exploration of one or more major movements in recent literary and cultural theory,
such as Marxism, feminism, deconstruction,
reader response, New Historicism, cultural
studies, postcolonial theory, narrative theory.
(5 units)
125.Feminist Literary
Theory and Criticism
Study of 20th-century feminist literary theory and criticism. Examination of influences
of gender on reading and writing literature.
Also listed as WGST 163. (5 units)
126.Creative Writing and
Social Justice
This course will explore the intersections of
creative writing, social justice, and vocation
with special attention to issues of poverty
and homelessness. Students will read and
write creative prose and poetry, have a brief
community placement, and learn from several guest speakers. (5 units)
127.Writing Genre Fiction
Introduction to and practice in planning
and drafting works of genre fiction (historical, science fiction, magical realism, fantasy)
for an adult or young adult audience.
(5 units) NCX
128.Studies in the Literature of the
Middle Eastern and Islamic World
Exploration of selected texts of the Middle
Eastern and Islamic world. Authors may include Elias Khoury, Laila Lalami, Liana
Badr, Leila Abouleta, Orhan Pamuk, Amos
Oz, and others. (5 units)
129.California Literature
Literature written by Californians and/or
about California. Authors may include
Steinbeck, Jeffers, Ginsberg, Didion, and
Snyder. (5 units)
130.Studies in AfricanAmerican Literature
Study of selected works in African-American
literature. May be taken more than once
when topics differ. (5 units)
131.Studies in Early
American Literature
Study of selected works from the beginnings
of American literary history up to the 19th
century. Writers, genres, and topics vary
each term. Works may include journals, poetry, slave narratives, sermons, letters, legends, autobiographies, essays, and early
fiction. May focus on periods and issues
such as the literature of cultural contact and
European settlement, Puritanism, the Enlightenment, and the American Revolution.
May be taken more than once when topics
differ. (5 units)
132.Studies in 19th-Century
American Literature
Study of selected American works from the
19th century. Writers, genres, and topics vary
each term. May focus on periods, movements,
and issues such as American romanticism,
transcendentalism, realism and naturalism,
ENGLISH 109
regionalism, magazine writing, the rise of
women writers, and literature of social protest (abolition and suffrage). May include
fiction (short stories, novels, and sketches),
plays, poetry, essays, slave narratives, and autobiographies. May be taken more than once
when topics differ. (5 units)
133.Studies in Modern
American Literature
Study of selected American works from the
early part of the 20th century. Writers and
genres vary each term. May focus on periods, movements, and issues such as American expatriate literature, novels of social
conscience, the modern poetic sequence, the
Harlem Renaissance, modernism, magazine
fiction, or regional poetry. Works may include fiction (short stories, novels, sketches),
plays, poetry, essays, and autobiographies.
May be taken more than once when topics
differ. (5 units)
134.Studies in Contemporary
American Literature
Study of selected works by contemporary
American writers. Writers, genres, and topics
vary each term. May focus on periods, movements, and themes such as multiethnic literatures, contemporary women novelists,
postmodernism, the Beat generation, literature and politics, literature of the 1960s, or
experiments in poetic and narrative form.
Genres may include poetry, novels, short
stories, essays, plays, and/or autobiographies.
May be taken more than once when topics
differ. (5 units)
135.Studies in American Fiction
Study of selected American fiction. Authors
vary each term. May focus on periods, movements, themes, or issues. May be taken more
than once when topics differ. (5 units)
137.Studies in American Poetry
Study of selected American poetry. Authors
vary each term. May focus on periods, movements, themes, or issues. May be taken more
than once when topics differ. (5 units)
138.Internet Culture and
Information Society
Introduction to major issues raised by Internet-mediated community and sociability,
including the proliferation of subcultures
and countercultures. (5 units)
139.Special Topics in
American Literature
Advanced study of an issue, theme, or genre
in American literature that crosses historical
periods. Topics change each term. May be
taken more than once when topics differ.
(5 units) NCX
140.Studies in Chicano Literature
Studies in Chicano literary traditions. May
be taken more than once when topics differ.
(5 units)
141.Studies in Medieval Literature
Medieval literature in its political, religious,
historical, social, and cultural contexts. May
be taken more than once when topics differ.
(5 units)
142. Chaucer
A study of selected major works by Chaucer.
(5 units)
143.Studies in Renaissance Literature
Renaissance literature in its political, religious, historical, social, and cultural contexts. May be taken more than once when
topics differ. (5 units)
145.Milton
A study of Milton’s major poetry and prose
in the light of recent criticism. (5 units)
146.17th- and 18th-Century
Literature
The literature of England and Ireland from
1660 to 1798, excluding the novel. Authors
may include Congreve, Dryden, Swift, Pope,
Finch, Montagu, Johnson, Boswell, and
Wollstonecraft. (5 units)
110 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
147.Romantic Movement
The literature of England from 1798 to
1832. Authors may include Blake, Burns,
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, the Shelleys,
and Keats. (5 units)
155.Studies in AsianAmerican Literature
Study of selected works in Asian-American
literature. May be taken more than once
when topics differ. (5 units)
148.Victorian Literature
The literature of England from 1833 to
1902. Authors may include Carlyle, the
Brontés, Tennyson, the Brownings, Newman,
Ruskin, Arnold, and Hopkins. (5 units)
156.Studies in Gay and Lesbian
Cultural Studies
Interdisciplinary study of gay and lesbian
cultures and critical theory. May be taken
more than once when topics differ. Also listed as WGST 136. (5 units)
149.Modern British Literature
Twentieth-century poetry and prose. Authors
may include Owen, Hardy, Conrad, Yeats,
Joyce, Lawrence, Eliot, and Woolf. (5 units)
150.Studies in Contemporary
Literature
British, American, and world poetry, fiction,
and drama since World War II. Authors may
include Cheever, Leavitt, Amis, Duong Thu
Huong, Carey, and Kincaid. May be taken
more than once when topics differ. (5 units)
151.Studies in British Fiction
The study of selected British fiction. Authors
vary each term. May focus on periods, movements, themes, or issues. May be taken more
than once when topics differ. (5 units)
152.Studies in Women, Literature,
and Theory
Study of literatures by and about women
in explicitly theoretical contexts. May be repeated for credit when topics differ. Also
listed as WGST 166. (5 units)
153.Studies in Global Gay
and Lesbian Cultures
Interdisciplinary study of gay and lesbian
cultures and critical theory. May be taken
more than once when topics differ. Also listed as WGST 122. (5 units)
154.Environmental Literature
Study of the natural world and its meanings
and representations in language and culture.
(5 units)
157.Studies in Postcolonial and
Commonwealth Literature
and Theory
Literature written with a postcolonial emphasis since 1945 in former European colonies (e.g., India, Nigeria, Jamaica, Australia,
Morocco, Egypt, Brazil, Colombia). Some
writings from postcolonial theorists, such as
Frantz Fanon and Edward Said. May be
taken more than once when topics differ.
(5 units)
158.Studies in Native
American Literature
Study of selected works in Native American
literature. Course may focus on particular
authors (Leslie Marmon Silko, Louise ­Erdrich,
James Welch), particular tribal or regional
literatures, genres (autobiography, poetry,
novel), or topics (trickster discourse, landscape, historical representation). (5 units)
159.Studies in Indian Subcontinental
and Diasporic Literature
Study of selected readings in the contemporary literature of South Asia: literature in
English and in translation. Course may
focus on particular authors (Tagore, Roy,
Devi, Ghosh), particular regions or genres
(Bengal, Kashmir; diasporic memoirs), or
topics (religion; Bollywood). May be taken
more than once when topics differ. (5 units)
ENGLISH 111
160.Children’s Literature
Study of the theory and practice of children’s
literature with special attention to the history of children’s literature, the debate over the
kinds of texts best suited for teaching reading, and multiculturalism. (5 units)
161.The Bible as Literature
Literary genres of the Bible (myth, history,
wisdom, prophecy, gospel) studied in translations from the Hebrew and Greek against
the background of Mesopotamian, Babylonian, Egyptian, Hellenistic, and Roman cultures. (5 units)
162.Studies in Comparative Literature
Comparative study of selected works, in
translation if not written in English, from
more than one linguistic and/or national
category, organized by theme, genre, or time
period. May be taken more than once when
topics differ. (5 units)
164.Studies in Caribbean Literature
Study of selected readings in the contemporary literature of the Caribbean, including
Anglophone, and/or Hispanophone and
Francophone literature in translation, or a
combination of the three. Course may focus
on particular authors (Lamming, Naipaul,
Cesaire, Ponte), particular regions or genres
(Trinidad and Jamaica, Cuba; experimental
fiction, family chronicles), or topics (U.S.
intervention, relations with England). May
be taken more than once when topics differ.
Also listed as WGST 129. (5 units)
165.Studies in African Literature
Study of selected readings in the contemporary literature of Africa: literature in English
and in translation. Course may focus on particular authors (Ngugi, Achebe, Coetzee,
Salih), particular regions or genres (West Africa, children as protagonists), or topics
(women in society, hunger). May be taken
more than once when topics differ. (5 units)
166.Pan-African Literature
Readings in the literature of the black diaspora. Writers from Africa, the Caribbean,
and the United States. (5 units)
167.Modern Fiction
Selected works of continental, English, and
American fiction that are peculiarly modern
in sensibility or style. (5 units)
168.Studies in Women and Literature
Studies in literature by and about women.
Authors, genres, historical periods, and
themes change from year to year. May be repeated for credit by permission of department chair. Also listed as WGST 167.
(5 units)
169.Non-English Literature
in Translation
Non-English literature in translation. Areas
and topics vary from year to year. (5 units)
170.Writing for Children
and Young Adults
Workshop in writing and illustrating children’s
and young adults’ books. (5 units) NCX
171.Advanced Fiction Writing
Writing fiction, with emphasis on the short
story. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 71. (5 units) NCX
172.Advanced Poetry Writing
Workshop in the writing of poetry. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 72.
(5 units) NCX
173.Screenwriting
An introduction to the fundamentals and
format of screenplay writing. Critical analysis of characterization and narrative structure
in contemporary movies, as well as workshops in the writing of film treatments, outlines, and scripts. May be repeated for credit.
Also listed as THTR 173. Prerequisite:
ENGL 71 or permission of the instructor.
(5 units) NCX
112 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
174.Nonfiction Writing
Study of and extensive practice in reading
and writing nonfiction. Stress on analysis
and rhetorical reading and writing skills, as
well as the process of revising students’ own
writing. Readings and writing will be organized around a topic, such as travel writing,
nature writing, or science and the environment. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A. (5 units) NCX
175.Creative Nonfiction
Development of skills in the elements of creative nonfiction, such as narration, character
development, persona, and voice. Focus is
on one or more modes of creative nonfiction, such as landscape writing, popular culture, literary journalism, profile, and
memoir. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A.
(5 units) NCX
176.Intensive Writing
Extension of instruction in explanatory and
exploratory academic writing principles introduced in prior courses. Activities include
readings and intensive writing in a variety of
topics across the curriculum with emphasis
on revision of student writing through
drafts, peer, and instructor review. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A. (5 units) NCX
177.Argumentation
Argumentative and persuasive writing, ideal
for students planning careers in business,
politics, or law. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and
2A. (5 units) NCX
178.Technical Writing
Instruction in the writing of formal reports,
procedures, proposals, and journalistic pieces, such as brochures and feature articles. Attention given to techniques of information
gathering (including conducting interviews
and surveys), document design, and editing.
Open to students of all majors. Ideal for
those planning careers in health care, the sciences, or industry. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A
and 2A. (5 units) NCX
179.Practical Business Rhetoric
Instruction in various strategies for crafting
an appropriate and attractive business personality through résumés and cover letters,
job interviews, informal public speaking,
email, and other correspondence. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A. Priority given to
juniors and seniors. Sophomores by permission of instructor. (5 units) NCX
180.Writing for Teachers
Prepares prospective teachers at all school
levels for their responsibilities in the instruction of writing. One method employed will
be close, intensive work with each student’s
own expository prose. A second method will
be to investigate controversies in English
education and composition studies. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A. (5 units) NCX
181.Applied Engineering
Communications I
The first of a required three-course sequence
in advanced writing for senior engineering
majors. This course is taught only in fall.
Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A. Enrollment
by permission of instructor. (2 units)
182A. Applied Engineering
Communications IIA
The second of a required three-course sequence in advanced writing for senior engineering majors. This course is taught only in
winter. Prerequisite: ENGL 181. Enrollment
by permission of instructor. (1 unit)
182B.Applied Engineering
Communications IIB
The third of a required three-course sequence in advanced writing for senior engineering majors. This course is taught only in
spring. Fulfills the Advanced Writing requirement for the senior engineering major.
Prerequisites: ENGL 181. Enrollment by
permission of instructor. (1 unit)
ENGLISH 113
183.Writing for Business
A course in applied business rhetoric in
which, individually and collaboratively, students will produce the kind of writing they
can expect to encounter in the workplace,
from résumés and email, to quantitative and
qualitative analyses, collaterals and executive
summaries, formal reports and evaluations,
etc., culminating in the development and
delivery of an actual community service
project designed to further Santa Clara’s mission. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A. Priority given to juniors and seniors. Sophomores
by permission of instructor. (5 units) NCX
184. Writing for Publication
Study of, and extensive practice in, reading
and writing professional nonfiction. This
course emphasizes the changing forms of
professional writing—from public relations
and advertising to blogs, websites, print, and
television—in the age of the Internet. Students will create their own blog, learn basic
reporting skills, develop their narrative abilities, edit copy, and learn how to construct a
career as a full- or part-time professional
writer. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and 2A. (5 units)
185.Grants, Proposals, and Reports
Study of and practice in the professional
writing of grants, proposals, and reports.
Analysis of subject matter, length, purpose,
information sources, number and kind of
readers, and the circumstances that lead to
preparation. Prerequisites: ENGL 1A and
2A. (5 units) NCX
186.Gender in Antiquity
Investigation into the representation and the
reality of women’s lives in ancient Greece or
Rome. Focus varies from year to year. May
be repeated for credit when topics differ.
Also listed as CLAS 185. (5 units)
187.Classical Mythology in
the Western Tradition
Also listed as CLAS 184. For course description see CLAS 184. (5 units)
189.Studies in Literature and Religion
Exploration and analysis of central connections between religious and ethical questions, concerns, topics, and movements and
their literary expressions in different social,
cultural, individual, historical, geographical,
and/or political contexts. May be repeated
for credit when topics differ. (5 units)
190.Senior Seminar
Special topics in English, American, or comparative literature for senior English majors.
Enrollment by permission of instructor.
(5 units) NCX
191.Practicum
Reading, viewing and critiquing poetry, fiction, non-fiction, and art for publication in
the Santa Clara Review, facilitated by student editors and faculty advisor. Students are
graded P/NP only. May be repeated for
credit. Cross listed with ENGL 91.
191A. Practicum for Writing Tutors
Instruction in how to foster an effective relationship between tutors and student clients.
Course focus includes composition and
teaching-learning theory, best practices in
tutoring, the tutor-student relationship, how
to engage students in the learning process,
how cultural and linguistic backgrounds affect writing and tutoring processes, and how
students’ support needs vary by discipline
and writing tasks. (5 units)
191B.Practicum for
Tutor Certification
Students who have completed at least 30
hours in the writing center may apply for
certification. In addition to positive performance evaluations, students seeking certification will complete a special project.
Students are graded P/NP only. (3 units)
114 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
192.American Theatre from
the Black Perspective
Also listed as THTR 161. For course description see THTR 161. (5 units)
193.Advanced Playwriting
Also listed as THTR 171. For course description see THTR 171. May be repeated for
credit when topics differ. (5 units) NCX
193W. Playwriting
Also listed as THTR 170. For course description see THTR 170. May be repeated for
credit when topics differ. (5 units) NCX
194.Peer Educator in English
Peer educators are invited by faculty to work
closely with them, facilitating learning in a
lower-division course. May be repeated for
credit by permission of the instructor.
(2 units)
195.Dramaturgy
Also listed as THTR 185. For course description see THTR 185. (5 units)
196.Writing in the Community
In this class, fiction writers and poets facilitate creative writing workshops at placements and agencies served by the Arrupe
Center. Permission of instructor required.
(5 units) NCX
197.Special Topics
Major authors, genres, literary or theoretical
movements, or themes. May be repeated for
credit when topics differ. (5 units)
198.Writing Internship
Work-study program for students of superior writing ability who gain course credit by
supervised writing on newspapers, magazines, or for government or private agencies.
Enrollment is by permission or invitation of
the instructor and department chair. May be
repeated once for credit. Students are graded
P/NP only. (1–5 units) NCX
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research
In special circumstances and with permission of the department chair, a student may
request a course in directed reading or writing from an instructor. May not be taken in
a subject listed in this Bulletin. (5 units)
NCX
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES 115
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES
Professors: Lisa Kealhofer, Michelle Marvier
Associate Professors: Leslie Gray, Iris Stewart-Frey (Department Chair and
Clare Boothe Luce Professor)
Assistant Professors: Christopher Bacon, Virginia Matzek, Hari Mix
Senior Lecturer: John Farnsworth
The Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences offers interdisciplinary
programs of study leading to a bachelor of science in environmental science or environmental
studies. A minor in environmental studies is also available. These programs provide students
with the intellectual foundation they will need in addressing crucial environmental
challenges of the 21st century such as human population growth, urban sprawl, deforestation,
global climate change, waste disposal, air and water pollution, loss of biodiversity, and the
need for renewable energy.
Environmental studies and sciences programs are enriched by colloquia, including
biweekly seminars, featuring presentations on environmental topics by journalists, politicians, business people, scientists, and other scholars. Majors in environmental science and
environmental studies are expected to apply their knowledge outside the classroom by
­completing an approved internship or research experience, culminating in ENVS 198,
Environmental Proseminar.
Environmental studies and sciences students are encouraged to study abroad. Courses
such as Natural History of Baja include one week of immersion travel during University
breaks. In addition, many summer and academic year courses taken through approved
study abroad programs will count toward the requirements of the environmental studies
and sciences majors and minors.
Each student works with a faculty advisor, who helps integrate the classroom curriculum
with the student’s plans for future study and/or work in environmental fields.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS
Major in Environmental Science
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum and College of Arts and
Sciences requirements for the bachelor of science degree, students majoring in environmental
science must complete the following departmental requirements:
• ENVS 21, 22, 23, 101, 122, 198
• BIOL 160/ENVS 110
• ENVS 115 or 116
• CHEM 11, 12, 13
• MATH 11
• ECON 1
• ANTH 50/ENVS 50/POLI 50
• ENVS 79 or PHIL 9
• Select one of the following course series: BIOL 21, 22, 23 or CHEM 31, 32 or
PHYS 11, 12, 13 (PHYS 31, 32, 33 can be substituted)
116 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
• One course from ANTH 140, ANTH 154, CENG 124/ENVS 124, COMM 120A,
ECON 111, ENVS 120, ENVS 128, ENVS 146, ENVS 147, ENVS 149/POLI
146, ENVS 150, ENVS 155, ENVS 158/PSYC 158, ETHN 156, ENVS 167
• Attend 10 approved Environmental Studies and Sciences environmental colloquia
Environmental science majors shall select a concentration in Applied Ecology or in
Water, Energy, and Technology. Alternatively, students may work with their advisors to
design an individualized plan of study.
Applied Ecology concentration
• BIOL 21, 22, 23
• Four courses, at least one of which must include a laboratory component, from
ANTH 145, ENVS 132, BIOL 151/ENVS 151, BIOL 153/ENVS 153, BIOL 156/
ENVS 156, BIOL 157/ENVS 141, BIOL 158, ENVS 144, ENVS 160
Water, Energy, and Technology concentration
• CHEM 31, 32 or PHYS 11, 12, 13 or PHYS 31, 32, 33
• Four courses, at least one of which must include a laboratory component, from
BIOL 135/ENVS 135, CENG 119, CENG 139, CENG 140, CENG 143, CENG
160, CENG 161, CENG 163, ENVS 80, ENVS 145, ENVS 148, ENVS 160,
ENVS 165, ENVS 166, ENVS 185
Major in Environmental Studies
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum and College of Arts and
Sciences requirements for the bachelor of science degree, students majoring in environmental
studies must complete the following departmental requirements:
• ENVS 21, 22, 23, 101, 122, 198
• ECON 1
• ANTH 50/ENVS 50/POLI 50
• ENVS 79 or PHIL 9
• One course from ANTH 112, BIOL 160/ENVS 110, COMM 110, ECON 61,
HIST 100, OMIS 40, POLI 100, POLI 101, PSYC 40, SOCI 120
• ENVS 115 or 116
• One course from BIOL 151/ENVS 151, BIOL 153/ENVS 153, ENGR 60, ENVS
80, ENVS 145, ENVS 148, ENVS 160, ENVS 165, ENVS 166, ENVS 185
• Attend 10 approved Environmental Studies and Sciences environmental colloquia
Environmental studies majors shall select one of the following concentrations:
Green Business; Environmental Policy, Law, and Politics; Sustainable Development; or
Environmental Humanities. Alternatively, students may work with their advisors to design
an individualized plan of study.
Green Business concentration
• Three courses from ECON 101, ECON 111, ECON 120, MGMT 172, MKTG
189, OMIS 108E, ENVS 167
• One course from any other environmental studies concentration
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES 117
Environmental Policy, Law, and Politics concentration
• Three courses from CENG 124/ENVS 124, COMM 120A, ENVS 120, ENVS 128,
ENVS 150, ENVS 155, ENVS 158/PSYC 158, ETHN 156, PHSC 142, POLI 123,
POLI 167
• One course from any other environmental studies concentration
Sustainable Development concentration
• Three courses from ANTH 140, ANTH 154, ENVS 132, BIOL 157/ENVS 141,
ENVS 128, ENVS 144, ENVS 146, ENVS 147, ENVS 149/POLI 146, ENVS 150,
ENVS 155, ENVS 167
• One course from any other environmental studies concentration
Environmental Humanities concentration
• Three courses from ANTH 145, COMM 120A, ENGL 154/ENVS 154, ENVS 131,
ENVS 142, ENVS 158/PSYC 158, HIST 85, TESP 152
• One course from any other environmental studies concentration
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Minor in Environmental Studies
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in environmental studies:
• ENVS 21, 22, 23
• One course from ANTH 112, ANTH 145, BIOL 160/ENVS 110, CENG 160,
COMM 110, ECON 61, ENVS 115, ENVS 116, HIST 100, OMIS 40, POLI 100,
POLI 101, PSYC 40, SOCI 120
• One course from CENG 124/ENVS 124, COMM 120A, ENVS 120, ENVS 122/
POLI 157, ENVS 128, ENVS 147, ETHN 156, POLI 123
• One course from ENVS 79, PHIL 9, RSOC 140, TESP 84, TESP 152, TESP 173,
TESP 192
• Three additional courses from the lists above or ANTH 50/ENVS 50/POLI 50,
ANTH 140, ANTH 154, ENVS 132, BIOL 151/ENVS 151, BIOL 153/ENVS 153,
BIOL 156/ENVS 156, BIOL 157/ENVS 141, CENG 119, CENG 139, CENG
140, CENG 143, CENG 160, CENG 161, CENG 163, ECON 101, ECON 111,
ENGL 154/ENVS 154, ENGR 60, ENVS 20, ENVS 80, ENVS 95, ENVS 131,
ENVS 142, ENVS 144, ENVS 145, ENVS 146, ENVS 148, ENVS 149/POLI 146,
ENVS 155, ENVS 158/PSYC 158, ENVS 160, ENVS 165, ENVS 166, ENVS
167, ENVS 185, ENVS 195, ENVS 196, ENVS 197, ENVS 199, MGMT 172,
MKTG 189, OMIS 108E, PHSC 142
• Attend six approved Environmental Studies and Sciences environmental colloquia or
complete ENVS 140
118 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES:
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES
1A. and 2A. Critical Thinking
climatic processes, variability, and global cli& Writing I and II
mate change will be highlighted, and popuA two-course, themed sequence featuring lation pressures on water resources will be
study and practice of academic discourse, analyzed. Concepts will be reinforced by
with emphasis on critical reading and writ- field projects and through comparative case
ing, composing processes, and rhetorical sit- studies from California and beyond. Laborauation. The second course will feature more tory 15 hours. (4 units)
advanced study and practice of academic 21.Introduction to Applied Ecology L&L
discourse, with additional emphasis on information literacy and skills related to devel- This course presents an introduction to enoping and organizing longer and more vironmental issues, seen through the lens of
complex documents. Topics may include the the biological sciences. Basic scientific conrhetoric surrounding current environmental cepts at different scales of biological organiissues, and environmental criticism with a zation, from genes to ecosystems, are
variety of media. Successful completion of illustrated by their application to contempoCTW I (ENVS 1A) is a prerequisite for rary environmental questions. In lecture,
students are expected to think critically, read
CTW II (ENVS 2A). (4 units each quarter)
widely, and participate in group discussions.
11A. and 12A. Cultures &
In laboratory and field exercises, the emphaIdeas I and II
sis is on applying the scientific method
A two-course sequence focusing on a major and analyzing data. Laboratory 15 hours.
theme in human experience and culture over Saturday field trip required. (4 units)
a significant period of time. Courses empha- 22.Introduction to
size either broad global interconnections or
Environmental Studies
the construction of Western culture in its
global context. Themes may include nature, This course presents an overview of environimagination, and environment in myth, art, mental studies as an interdisciplinary acaliterature, music, drama, story, philosophy, demic field focused on society-nature
and sacred text. Successful completion of relationships. It draws from multiple social
C&I I (ENVS 11A) is a prerequisite for scientific disciplines, including geography,
C&I II (ENVS 12A). (4 units each quarter) political economy, and sociology to pose environmental questions, understand the root
20.The Water Wars of California L&L
causes of problems, and analyze potential
In California, the average person uses about solutions at local, national, and global scales.
230 gallons of water a day while most of the After considering several environmental narpopulation is concentrated in areas that re- ratives and reviewing the key events, influenceive less than 20 inches of rainfall per year. tial scholarly works, social movements,
This course will use the history of water re- politics, and policy changes that contributed
source use and abuse in the state of Califor- to the rise of different environmentalisms,
nia as a backdrop for investigating the this course analyzes the social dimensions of
interplay of hydrology, climate, and human several case studies. These cases include clipopulation growth. Students will examine mate change, food security, biodiversity loss,
factors that affect the supply, distribution, industrial pollution, and green innovation.
demand, and quality of fresh water in the In the third section, learners consider the
state of California. The important roles of personal and collective dimensions of social
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES 119
change, environmental citizenship, and
governance interrogating the ethics and
­
leadership models of organizations and individuals active in solving environmental
problems. (4 units)
23. Introduction to Earth Systems L&L
This course will investigate the workings and
complexities of the Earth system, including
the interactions, synergies, and feedbacks
that link the geologic, oceanic, hydrologic,
and climate system. Building on basic physical and chemical principles, students will
study how continents, soils, oceans, freshwater reservoirs, and the atmosphere formed,
which processes are taking place to change
them, and how they are affected by human
action. Understanding of the concepts will
be deepened by laboratory activities and a
field trip. Laboratory 15 hours. (4 units)
50.World Geography
Provides an understanding of world geography through an appreciation of contemporary global problems in different world
regions. Broad topics that will be covered
include globalization, demographic trends,
economic development and underdevelopment, human-environment interactions,
changing cultures, and geopolitics. These
topics will illustrate the distribution of political, cultural, socioeconomic, and physical
processes and features around the world and
will be covered at local, regional, and global
scales. Also listed as ANTH 50 and POLI 50.
(4 units)
79.Environmental Thought
Using an ecocritical approach, this course
examines primary and secondary sources related to the evolution of environmental
thought in modern times. The work of seminal thinkers from within the conservation
movement, environmental philosophy, and
environmental sciences will be explored, as
well as the social and economic influences in
post-World War II America that created
the modern environmental movement.
(4 units) NCX
80.Energy and the Environment
From oil spills to coal mine accidents, from
foreign policy impacts to climate change, energy has been a top news story. This course
explores the basics of traditional fossil fuel
energy production and alternative energy
sources including natural gas, nuclear, biomass, wind, solar, hydropower, and fuel cells.
Students will explore the energy demands of
the United States relative to other countries
and seek to piece together the multifaceted
puzzle of energy production, storage, and
transmission, as well as conservation and efficiency. Students will gain an understanding
of the vast array of societal and environmental impacts of our energy demands, while
defining opportunities and challenges for
the future. (4 units)
95.Sustainable Living Undergraduate
Research Project (SLURP)
This course is designed to promote a culture
of sustainability within the residential learning communities of the modern university.
Students engage in intensive research over
the course of the academic year and will
compile and present their results during the
spring quarter. Enrollment is limited to residents of the SLURP floor in the CyPhi Residential Learning Community. (2 units in
each of two academic quarters) NCX
120 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES:
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES
101.Capstone Seminar
focus on methods of generating, querying,
A guided group and individual research analyzing, and displaying GIS data utilizing
course that each year is aimed at a different industry standard software. Theories and
environmental topic of global significance. concepts will be covered during lecture. StuPast topics have included the regulation of dents will address spatial questions during
biotechnology, using ecosystem services to lab. Possible topics include urban planning,
create financial incentives for conservation, environmental justice, pollution, natural rethe social equity and biological effectiveness source protection, and habitat conservation
of private land conservation, and the nation- issues. Each student will propose and carry
al choices facing China with respect to agri- out a GIS project of his or her own chooscultural policy. The course begins with ing. Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite:
lectures so that students gain a foundational ENVS 21 or 23 recommended. (5 units)
background for the quarter’s research topic. 116. Introduction to GIS
Students write individual and group papers,
give oral presentations, and develop project Geographic Information Systems (GIS) can
management skills. Some students pursue be used to overlay different kinds of spatial
their research after the course, even to the data to create maps and address a wide varipoint of publication. Prerequisites: Senior ety of “spatial” questions. The class will focus
class standing; ENVS 21, 22, and 23; and on methods of generating, querying, analyzing, and displaying GIS data utilizing indusENVS 110, 115, or 116. (5 units) NCX
try standard software. Prerequisite: ENVS 21
110.Statistics for Environmental
or 23 recommended. (5 units)
Science L&L
117.Intermediate GIS
A course in applied statistics for environmental scientists. Students gain training in This course will use a project-based apexperimental design, quantitative analysis, proach to understanding and applying interand hypothesis testing. Theory and concepts mediate GIS tools with an emphasis on
are covered in lectures and readings. Labora- environmental problem solving. Class matetory sessions provide practical experience rial will include practice for the ESRI
using statistical software. Examples used in ­ArcGIS desktop associate exam. Prerequisite:
lectures and lab assignments are derived ENVS 116. (5 units)
from medical research, public health, and 120.Introduction to Environmental
environmental risk assessment. Laboratory
Law and Regulation in the
30 hours. Also listed as BIOL 160. PrerequiUnited States
site: BIOL 23 or ENVS 21. (5 units)
Introduction to the U.S. legal system’s approach to environmental protection. Topics
115.GIS in Environmental
include the roles of legislatures and environScience L&L
Are negative environmental impacts dispro- mental agencies at the federal, state, and
portionally affecting disadvantaged commu- local levels; the independent role of the judinities? Where is the best place for habitat ciary in establishing environmental law; and
conservation? These and other “spatial” specific statutes, such as the Clean Air Act.
questions can be investigated with Geo- Students evaluate questions of federalism,
graphic Information Systems (GIS), a type uses of economic incentives, and relationof analysis and software, which we will learn ships between environmental protection and
in this course. The class and laboratory will economic growth. Prerequisite: ENVS 22
recommended. (5 units)
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES 121
122.Environmental Politics and Policy
This course examines environmental politics, policy, and governance in the last half
century. Part one reviews major environmental legislation in the United States, including the Endangered Species Act, Clean
Water Act, Clean Air Act, and policy responses to global warming. In part two,
learners step back to interrogate the power
dynamics, social movements, legal battles,
and struggles over meaning and representation that accompany significant social
change. The final section examines the rise
of global environmental governance highlighting the role of nonprofit organizations,
civil societies, and corporate firms as voluntary environmental regulation moves from
the margins to the mainstream. A concluding discussion identifies avenues for civic
engagement, accountability, and environmental citizenship. Learners will gain insight
into the policymaking processes by participating in simulation games, reading and research assignments, developing tools to
assess policy outcomes, and finding strategies to identify political opportunities. Also
listed as POLI 157. Prerequisite: ENVS 22
or ENVS 79 or POLI 1. (5 units)
124. Water Law and Policy
Introduction to the legal and regulatory concepts related to water. Examines rights, policies, and laws, including issues related to
water supply and access (water transfers/
water markets, riparian and appropriative
doctrines), flood control, water pollution
and quality (the Clean Water Act, EPA standards, in stream flows for fish), and on-site
storm water management/flood control. A
focus on California water law and policy is
complemented with some national and international case studies. Also listed as CENG
124. Prerequisite: ENVS 22 recommended.
(5 units)
128.Urban and Environmental
Planning
An introduction to environmental planning
in the urban environment. Topics will include land use and zoning, greenbuilding,
water, wastewater, stormwater, open space,
and transportation/walkability. The course
will also introduce the regulatory tools and
legislation, including NEPA and CEQA,
that motivate environmental planning.
­Prerequisite: ENVS 22 and ENVS 23 or
­permission of instructor. (5 units)
131.Environmental Education
Environmental education plays a fundamental role in our attempts to make human
systems more sustainable. An introduction
to the study and practice of environmental
education. Surveys philosophies, theories,
and methods of environmental education
with a special emphasis on techniques for
engaging K–12 students in outdoor settings
to maximize learning of environmental concepts and to improve the students’ understanding of their personal connections to
nature. Introduces creative ways that we—as
current or future teachers, parents, or mentors—can use active study of and interactions with the outdoor environment to
engage young people in the study of environmental systems and basic biological,
chemical, and physical sciences. A portion of
the course will be taught in field-based settings. Students will participate in servicelearning projects that will give them practical
experience planning and leading environmental education lessons. Especially valuable for future teachers. Prerequisite: ENVS
21, 22, 23, or BIOL 23. (5 units) NCX
122 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
132.Agroecology L&L
The goal of agroecology is to reduce the
negative impact of farming while meeting
the food needs of the world. Examines in a
holistic framework the ecological principles
and processes that govern agroecosystem
productivity and stability. A wide variety of
agricultural management practices and designs are assessed and discussed in terms of
their capacity to sustain long-term production. Students will also learn research methods
that explore the resilience and sustainability
of agroecosystems. One required weekend
field trip. Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisite:
BIOL 23, or both ENVS 21 and 23.
(5 units)
140.Sustainability Outreach
Students in this course will develop a deeper
understanding of the concept of sustainability, examining issues using sustainability as a
lens. Students will learn how social, economic, and environmental dimensions of sustainability relate to and support each other
in theory and practice. Students will participate in an outreach program designed to facilitate sustainable development on campus
and/or in the community. (1 unit) NCX
141.Environmental Biology
in the Tropics
This summer course examines tropical biology and ecology and their relationship to issues of sustainable development. The course
includes 1.5 weeks of instruction at SCU
and 3.5 weeks of field study in Costa Rica.
Particular emphasis on tropical ecology,
community ecology, reforestation and restoration ecology, sustainable agriculture and
fair trade, and ecotourism. Taught in conjunction with ANTH 197. Enrollment by
application via International Programs.
Prerequisite: ANTH 1 or BIOL 23 or
­
ENVS 21. (5 units) NCX
142.Writing Natural History
Engages students in ecocritical reading and
writing about the natural history of Baja
California Sur. The on-campus portion of
the course prepares students to engage in
first-hand explorations of the environment
in and around the Sea of Cortez. During the
on-site portion of the course, students will
compile extensive field notes in preparation
for the composition of their own natural histories. Must be concurrently enrolled in
ENVS 144. Prerequisites: CTW 1 and 2.
Enrollment by application only. Travel fees
required. (5 units) NCX
144.Natural History of Baja
Examines the natural history, biology, and
ecology of desert and coastal ecosystems in
Baja California Sur. Meets once a week in
the winter quarter and over spring break in
the Sierra La Laguna (Cape Region) and Isla
Espiritu Santo (La Paz Bay), Baja California
Sur, Mexico. Students will become familiar
with desert, oak scrub, riparian, thorn forest,
beach, mangrove, coral reef, and rocky intertidal habitats; develop field observation and
species identification skills; and explore challenges of sustainable development of this
fragile ecosystem. Must be concurrently enrolled in ENVS 142. Prerequisite: BIOL 23
or ENVS 21. Enrollment by application only.
Travel fees required. (5 units)
145.Environmental Technology
A survey course covering a variety of environmentally conscious technologies. Addresses “bleeding edge” as well as more
traditional technologies that enhance both
human welfare and environmental quality in
both the developed and developing countries. Students will concentrate on environmentally conscious technologies used in the
general areas of air quality, biotic systems,
climate, energy, land, population, transportation, waste, and water. The class culminates with the development of a life cycle
analysis for a consumer product. Prerequisite: ENVS 23 or by permission of instructor.
(5 units)
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES 123
146.Agriculture, Environment, and
Development: Latin America
Offers a cross-disciplinary examination of
the prospects for “sustainable development”
in rural areas of Latin America. Students will
use diverse points of view to look at interactions between poverty, development, and
environmental degradation. While there is
no single, universally accepted definition of
sustainable development, a central goal of
this course is that each student will come
away with the ability to understand the key
elements that distinguish different discourses on this subject. Prerequisite: ENVS 22
recommended. (5 units)
147.International Environment
and Development
Examines the intersection of environment
and development in the developing world.
Students will explore meanings and measures of development as well as international
institutions that influence development and
environmental policy. Conceptual frameworks for addressing human-environmental
relationships, including globalization, famine and hunger, sustainable development,
population-poverty interactions, and gender
will be explored. Specific topics to be covered include deforestation, water use, conservation and development, oil extraction,
and urbanization. Prerequisite: ENVS 22 or
by permission of instructor. (5 units)
148.Solar Revolution
Solar energy is more than just photovoltaic
(PV) arrays on a roof. Learn about different
types of PV technologies as well as passive
solar design, and concentrated solar thermal
(making power at the level of a conventional
power plant!). Find out the key technological, environmental, and economic issues,
and what it would take to employ solar energy to greatly decrease our reliability on fossil fuels. Students will use the United States
as well as numerous examples in developed
and developing countries as case studies.
Prerequisite: ENVS 21, 22, 23, or 80.
(5 units)
149.African Environment
and Development
Students will gain an in-depth understanding of Africa’s diversity and dynamism, considering how people and environments have
interacted through space and time. We will
examine Africa’s social, cultural, economic,
political, and environmental systems to understand Africa’s trajectory of development.
Also listed as POLI 146. (5 units)
150.Political Ecology
Explores political ecology as a field of study
and as a critical tool to analyze environmental issues. Focuses on going beyond simplified explanations about environmental
problems, tracing environmental change to
broader political, economic, and cultural issues. Topics explored will include land degradation, conservation through parks and
reserves, land use conflicts, science and
power, social movements, urban pollution,
and public health. Course readings include
case studies from across the globe to examine
how political ecology research engages issues
and how it offers critical insights needed to
address environmental problems. Challenges students to critically examine their own
interpretations and understandings of today’s most important environmental issues.
Prerequisite: ENVS 22 or by permission of
instructor. (5 units)
151.Restoration Ecology L&L
The science and practice of restoring degraded ecosystems, with an emphasis on plant
ecology. Through fieldwork on restoration
experiments, conversations with managers,
and examination of literature case studies,
students will grapple with basic questions:
How do we decide what to restore? How do
we restore it? And how do we know if we’re
finished? Emphasis on reading and writing
scientific papers, understanding data analysis, writing a restoration plan, and judging
the success of restoration projects in meeting
goals of biodiversity and ecosystem function.
Laboratory and field work 30 hours,
124 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
including a weekend field trip. Also listed as
BIOL 151. Prerequisite: BIOL 23, or both
ENVS 21 and 23. (5 units)
153.Conservation Science
Conservation is a scientific enterprise and a
social movement that seeks to protect nature, including Earth’s animals, plants, and
ecosystems. Conservation science applies
principles from ecology, population genetics, economics, political science, and other
natural and social sciences to manage and
protect the natural world. Conservation is all
too often seen as being at odds with human
well-being and economic development. This
course explores the scientific foundations of
conservation while highlighting strategies to
better connect conservation with the needs
of a growing human population. We will examine whether conservation can protect nature, not from people, but for people. Also
listed as BIOL 153. Prerequisite: BIOL 23,
or both ENVS 21 and 23. (5 units)
155.Environmental and Food Justice
This course unites two vibrant fields for academic study and arenas for social, political,
and ecological action. Environmental justice
as a principle affirms the right of all people
to healthy livable communities. Environmental injustice occurs when environmental
benefits and burdens are unevenly distributed along the lines of identity, including race,
class, and/or nationality. Food justice research addresses inequalities in food access
and studies the patterns, causes, and solutions associated with increasing hunger and
obesity among eaters and the accumulation
of environmental costs in agricultural landscapes. After reviewing several seminal studies in environmental and food justice, this
class delves into case studies in California
and Central America. Learners will conduct
a major research project, participate in teambased collaborations, and engage local communities as part of this course. Prerequisite:
ENVS 22 or ENVS 79. (5 units)
156.General Ecology L&L
Quantitative study of the interrelationships
of organisms with their biotic and abiotic
environments. Emphasis on population dynamics, interspecific relationships, community structure, and ecosystem processes.
Laboratory and field work 30 hours, including one weekend field trip. Also listed as
BIOL 156. Prerequisites: BIOL 23. (5 units)
158.Conservation Psychology
Many environmental problems (e.g., global
warming, pollution, biodiversity loss, and
resource depletion) are caused by human behavior, and changing this behavior is necessary in order to solve them. Topics include
psychological reasons (emotions, thoughts,
values, motivations, social context) why people behave in environmentally sustainable or
unsustainable ways, and how psychology
can be used to develop policies and other interventions to help promote sustainable behavior. Also listed as PSYC 158. Prerequisites:
PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43, or permission of the
instructor. (5 units)
160.Water Resources L&L
This course covers fundamental concepts in
hydrology and water resources management,
such as precipitation, runoff, and infiltration, flow in streams and aquifers, floods and
droughts, water budgets, water delivery systems and stream restoration, water cycling,
use, treatment, pollution, and conservation.
Interactions between water and human societies, ecosystems, agriculture, natural resources, and climate are explored through
domestic and international case studies. The
concepts are reinforced through indoor and
outdoor class and laboratory exercises and
fieldtrips. Laboratory 30 hours. Prerequisites: ENVS 21 or 23, or by permission of
instructor. (5 units)
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND SCIENCES 125
165. Climate Science and Solutions
Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the physical processes involved in climate change, as well as its socioeconomic
consequences. The course also explores the
strengths and weaknesses of policies and
other tools used to mitigate or adapt to climate change. Prerequisite: ENVS 23 or by
permission of instructor. (5 units)
166.Climate Change: Past to Future
Human-caused changes to the climate system are now widely accepted and expected
to have great effects on physical, ecological
and human systems, from increasing weather extremes to sea level rise to the mass extinction of half of Earth’s species. We will
explore the mechanisms responsible for both
remarkable climate stability and catastrophic
change in three units: (1) foundational aspects of the climate system such as Earth’s
energy balance, greenhouse effect, carbon
cycle, and circulation of the oceans and atmosphere, (2) origin and evolution of the
climate system in Earth history, and (3) impacts and vulnerabilities associated with
modern climate change. In labs, students
will develop and apply quantitative, conceptual, and spatial skills by modeling Earth’s
radiative balance, producing and interpreting geochemical records of the carbon and
water cycles, forecasting climate change with
climate models, and evaluating climate stabilization strategies. Prerequisites: ENVS 23
required, CHEM 13 and ENVS 116 recommended. (5 units)
167.Innovation for Climate Justice
Confronting climate disruption threatens to
roll back progress in economic and sustainable development, especially for less developed regions. This course introduces climate
justice as an ethical framework for understanding the unequal distribution of climaterelated harms on the poor. The geography of
climate change impacts are explored and
students will evaluate innovation and entrepreneurship as climate adaptation strategies,
with a particular focus on sustainable solutions. (5 units)
185. Garbology
This class follows the path of our waste
products as they are landfilled, burned, treated, recycled, reused, dumped on minority
communities, or shipped abroad. Building
on basic chemical and biological principles,
we explore the ultimate fate of organic and
inorganic waste. We look to the past and to
other societies to better understand how we
got to this throw-away society and what we
can learn from past practices and other cultures. We explore sustainable solutions including new efforts to reduce our waste
such as “extended producer responsibility,”
design-for-disassembly, green chemistry, and
zero waste. Students will also learn how to
utilize the “life cycle analysis” approach as a
basis for those daily decisions such as paper
versus plastic. Prerequisite: ENVS 23. (5 units)
195.Sustainable Living Undergraduate
Research Project (SLURP)
This research-based course is designed to
promote a culture of sustainability within
the residential communities of Santa Clara
University. Students will engage in intensive
research over the course of winter and spring
quarters and will compile and present their
results during the spring quarter. (2 units in
each of two academic quarters) NCX
196.Special Topics in
Environmental Studies
Course content and topics vary depending
on the professor. (Variable units) NCX
197.Special Topics in
Environmental Science
Course content and topics vary depending
on the professor. (Variable units) NCX
126 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
198.Environmental Proseminar
A seminar course for graduating seniors, intended to permit reflection on an internship
or research experience and foster the further
development of professional skills. Prior to
enrolling, students must complete 100 hours
of work in one of the following two options:
(1) an approved off-campus environmental
internship (see your academic adviser for approval before initiating the internship), or
(2) approved environmental research with
SCU faculty (ENVS 199A or 199B) or as
part of a study abroad program. Students
pursuing option 1 enroll for 5 units; those
pursuing option 2 enroll for 2 units. Students are graded P/NP only. Prerequisites:
Completion of 100 hours of approved internship or research and senior class standing.
(2 or 5 units) NCX
199.Directed Reading or Research
Students wishing to enroll in 199A or 199B
should meet with the faculty supervisor no
later than the fifth week of the term preceding the start of the project. Prerequisite: A
written description of the proposed project
must be presented to the department chair for
approval. (1–5 units) NCX
199A. Directed Reading in
Environmental Science
or Environmental Studies
Detailed investigation based on directed
readings on advanced environmental topics,
under the close supervision of a faculty
member. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair and instructor before registration.
(1–5 units) NCX
199B.Directed Environmental
Research
Supervised laboratory, field, or other research
under the guidance of a faculty member.
The goal should be a written report suitable
for publication or a conference presentation.
Prerequisite: Permission of department chair
and instructor before registration. (1–5 units)
NCX
ETHNIC STUDIES 127
ETHNIC STUDIES PROGRAM
Associate Professors: Ramón D. Chacón (Program Director), James S. Lai,
Anna Sampaio
Assistant Professor: Anthony Q. Hazard Jr.
The Ethnic Studies Program provides a critical analysis of historical and contemporary
formations of race, ethnicity, class, and gender. In the pursuit of social justice, it challenges
dominant views of racial and ethnic groups that lead to inequalities. Ethnic studies focuses
on the roles and experiences of African Americans, Asian/Pacific Islander Americans,
­Latinas/Latinos, and Native Americans within the framework of the United States and
within transnational frameworks.
As an academic program, ethnic studies fosters interdisciplinary inquiry. The faculty
comprise a community of expert scholars of critical race and ethnic studies, while serving as
teachers, mentors, and role models for undergraduate students. Ethnic studies strives to
make connections between University learning, racial and ethnic communities, and social
change, and encourages a reflective engagement with society and a commitment to fashioning a more humane and just world. The Ethnic Studies Program serves as a resource for
students, faculty, and staff across the University who are interested in examining race and
ethnicity and its intersections with class, gender, citizenship, and nationality. The program
offers both a companion major and a minor in ethnic studies: a student must declare a
primary major in another discipline as well as companion major in ethnic studies. The
companion major is designed to complement a student’s primary major by broadening the
field of study to include an academic focus on race/ethnicity. It enhances a student’s employment opportunities in business, education, law, medicine, social work, and government. For
those considering graduate school, the companion major and minor provide a foundation
for graduate studies particularly for those who seek to become university professors and
researchers with a specialization in a variety of issues and policies impacting U.S. racial and
ethnic communities.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum and primary major requirements, students with a companion major in ethnic studies must complete the following
requirements:
• ETHN 5
• Two courses from ETHN 10, 20, 30, 40
• One of the following breadth electives: ANTH 86, 90; DANC 62; ENGL 35, 36,
37, 38, 39, 69; ETHN 35, 36, 50, 51, 55, 60, 65, 70, 95, 96; MUSC 20; RSOC 88;
THTR 14, 65
• Four upper-division courses from ETHN 112, 120, 121, 122, 123, 125, 126, 135,
141, 142, 149, 152, 153, 154, 155, 157, 160, 161, 162, 163, 178, 185, 197, 198,
199
• Three upper-division courses from ANTH 146; ARTH 141; COMM 107, 121,
164A, 168A; LBST 106; ENGL 130, 134, 139, 140, 155, 158, 166; HIST 153, 178,
180, 185; SPAN 133; DANC 162; MUSC 132, 134; POLI 153, 195; RSOC 139,
164, 184; SOCI 132, 150, 153, 175, 180; THTR 161, 189
128 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
• Capstone requirement including two courses:
– A methods course in the primary major
– ETHN 198 or 199, a community internship, creative project, or directed reading
in which the student simultaneously works on a research paper or project under
the direction of an ethnic studies core or affiliated faculty. Provides opportunities
for students to apply their understanding of methods in their primary major to a
project explicitly in ethnic studies.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in ethnic studies:
• ETHN 5
• Two courses from ETHN 10, 20, 30, 40
• Three upper-division courses in an area of specialization (i.e., African-American studies,
Asian-American studies, Chicana/Chicano studies, or comparative ethnic studies)
• ETHN 198 or 199
Departmental Courses Applicable to the Minor
Note: For descriptions, see the listings of the relevant departments. Students should consult
with the director of the Ethnic Studies Program to determine the applicability of courses taken
at other institutions or in study abroad programs.
• ANTH 86, 90, 146
• ARTH 141
• COMM 107, 121
• DANC 62/162
• ENGL 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 69, 130, 134, 139, 140, 155, 158, 166
• HIST 153, 178, 180, 185
• LBST 106
• MUSC 20, 132
• SPAN 133
• POLI 153, 195
• PSYC 189
• RSOC 88, 139, 164, 184
• SOCI 132, 153, 175, 150, 180
• THTR 14, 65, 161, 189
ETHNIC STUDIES 129
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
5. Introduction to the Study of Race
30.Introduction to Africanand Ethnicity in the United States
American Studies
Focuses on immigration and intercultural Students will engage in major debates about
race relations for the major cultures of color the history, politics, and cultures of commuin the United States: African American, nities of African descent living in the United
Asian American, Latina/o, and Native States. Students will examine texts at the cutAmerican. Discussions of each group his- ting edge of interdisciplinary scholarship in
torically in relationship to each other and the African-American studies in order to explore
dominant culture. Through critical readings, the key themes of origins, power, commuclass discussions, and films, students will nity, identity, and expression that are central
have the opportunity to develop a solid in- to understanding race-related issues. In additercultural foundation for understanding tion, students will create innovative research
race and cultural diversity in United States. projects to help develop positions about the
Course is a basis for classes offered by all fac- ideology of race, the dynamics of group conulty in the Ethnic Studies Program particu- sciousness, and the significance of collective
larly the introductory-level courses. The action, self-determination, and aesthetics to
course also serves as an introduction to the the African-American experience. (4 units)
minor in the Ethnic Studies Program. (4 units)
35.African-American Women Writers
10.Introduction to Native
Focuses on women writers of the Harlem
American Studies
Renaissance and the intersections of gender,
Interdisciplinary exploration of the diverse race, and class. Examines paradigms that
cultural life of Native Americans. Topics in- lead to racial inequity and social injustice,
clude Native history, politics, economics, and themes of gender empowerment, misceeducation, health, entertainment and recre- genation, colorism, passing, sexuality, and
ation, identity, law and government, art, lit- motherhood. Using poetry, short stories,
erature, performance, and religion. Explores plays, and film, examines how these women
key debates within Native American studies engaged in acts of resistance as they sought
in relation to identity and identification re- to rescue themselves from negative stereogarding gender, sexuality, race, class, and types and redefine themselves in the new
­ethnicity. (4 units)
world. Also listed as WGST 14. (4 units)
20.Introduction to Chicana/o
and Latina/o Studies
Since 1996 Latinas/os have constituted the
largest (and fastest growing) racial/ethnic minority population in U.S. Despite the significance of this population, most non-­Latinas/os
have little knowledge of the history, challenges,
and important contributions made by this
complex population. This class will begin to
remedy that gap in knowledge by introducing students to the history and contemporary struggles of Chicanas/os and Latinas/os
in the U.S., focusing particular attention on
the experiences of the three largest groups of
Latinas/os today: Mexican Americans, Puerto
Ricans, and Cuban Americans. (4 units)
36.African-American Literature
Also listed as ENGL 35. For course description see ENGL 35. (4 units)
40.Introduction to AsianAmerican Studies
Multidisciplinary survey of Asian Americans
including Asian cultural heritage, immigration, and the formation of Asian-American
communities. Examines worldviews and values, religious beliefs, family and kinship, language, and contemporary community issues
of identity, sex roles, stereotyping, employment, and education. (4 units)
130 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
50.Introduction to FilipinoAmerican Studies
Explores mainstream representations of the
Filipino-American community. Twentiethcentury works written by and about Filipino-Americans, with an emphasis on four
relevant themes: the legacy of Spanish Colonialism and American Imperialism; U.S.
politics and the history of Filipino-American
activism and resistance; problems of identity
as it relates to class, gender/sexuality, mixed
heritages, and generational differences; and
Filipino-Americans and popular culture.
(4 units)
that has traditionally defined U.S. racial
politics in local and state-level politics. The
result, in some instances, has been interracial
competition and conflict at these levels. The
necessary elements needed to build and to
sustain multiracial coalitions along with
what the political future holds for these minority groups will be addressed. Also listed as
POLI 55. (4 units)
51.Introduction to the South Asian
Experience in the United States
This course addresses mainstream representations of the South Asian American community. Students will read 20th-century
works, written by and about South Asian
Americans, with an emphasis on the following relevant themes: the history of South
Asian immigrants to the United States; U.S.
politics and the history of South Asian
American activism and resistance; problems
of identity as it relates to class, gender/sexuality, mixed heritages, and generational differences; South Asian Americans and
popular culture; and the future of South
Asian Americans in the United States and
the reverse brain drain to India. (4 units)
65.Drama of Diversity
Also listed as THTR 65. For course description see THTR 65. (4 units)
55.Cross-Racial Electoral Politics
Examination of the historical and contemporary political movements among the
major minority groups in the United States
since the 1960s. The origins and goals of the
Black Power movement, the Chicano/a
movement, the Asian-American movement,
and the Native American movement will be
focused on during the quarter. Each of these
movements embodies similar and different
trails with regard to their respective group’s
quest for political power and elected representation. Due to contemporary immigration trends, Latinos and Asian Americans
have challenged the black-white paradigm
60.Introduction to Journalism:
Diversity and Community
Also listed as COMM 40EL. For course
description see COMM 40EL. (5 units)
70.Multicultural Literature
of the United States
Also listed as ENGL 39 and WGST 16. For
course description see ENGL 39. (4 units)
95.African-American
Independent Filmmakers
This class provides an in-depth analysis and
historical overview of independent AfricanAmerican filmmakers who made significant
contributions to the genre of film. We will
examine how African-American filmmakers
used film as a medium to heighten the consciousness of their audience, combat negative stereotypes, give voice to marginalized
or underrepresented groups, and raise social
awareness about issues affecting their diverse
communities. Using film and text, we will
read, discuss, and write about paradigms
that lead to inequity and injustice. Specifically, we will examine the intersection of
gender, race, and class, and note how these
dynamics are illustrated in the cinema of
­African Americans. We will also understand
how African-American filmmakers were able
to rise above adversity and hone and sustain
their art, while confronting their myriad
­oppressions. (4 units)
ETHNIC STUDIES 131
96.Race, Class, and Culture
through Film
Explores how filmmakers who are concerned
about racism portray the politics, history,
and culture of people of African descent.
­Examines how this medium can humanize
subjects who are often objectified and
exploited and give voice to communities
­
whose perspectives and opinions have been
historically excluded from mainstream discourses. Considers how films can interrogate
the physical, cultural, and sometimes,
psychological brutality of racist practices, as
well as the ways that racism intersects with
other forms of marginalization related to
class, gender, sexuality, and citizenship. The
content, production, and distribution of
these cinematic portraits illuminate the political philosophies, hybrid cultures, and
emancipating collective action of black communities. Integrates students in faculty
­research by involving students in a documentary film project about the relationship
between the social movements for African
liberation and black power. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
112.Native Peoples of the
(2) a life-cycle analysis of families with a speUnited States and Mexico
cialized focus on gender roles and relations.
Examination of the national policies, ideolo- (5 units)
gies, and attitudes that have shaped the lives 122.Chicana/Chicano Communities
of indigenous peoples living along the U.S.Mexico border. Issues include cultural Examination of the development of the
social, cultural, political, and economic
­survival, cultural change, national and indi- ­
vidual identity, gender relations, legal and structures that shape Chicana/Chicano
political problems, and intercultural communities in the United States. Themes
include the evolution of barrios, the histori­relations. (5 units)
cal and contemporary impact of Mexican
120.Mexican Immigration
land grants, ghettoization, education, gangs,
to the United States
employment, and the political economy.
Examination of the process of Mexican im- (5 units)
migration to the United States since 1910 123. The Chicana/Chicano Experience
with a focus on the role of Mexican immigrant labor in California agribusiness. An An examination of the major issues in the
analysis of reasons for Mexican immigration Chicana/Chicano experience dealing with
and the responses of the United States to historical and contemporary topics. Themes
such immigration. Special focus on Mexican such as race, identity and culture, immigrafarm laborers, the various movements to or- tion, community, family, gender, gangs, hisganize them, and on Cesar Chavez and the torical interpretations and the Chicana/
Chicano movement will be examined. PoliUnited Farm Workers (UFW). (5 units)
tics and socioeconomic conditions including
121.Chicana/Chicano Families
the farmworker movement and educational
and Gender Roles
concerns will be addressed. (5 units)
An examination of Chicana/Chicano fami- 125.Latinas/os in the United States
lies in the United States. Addresses two general areas in family research: (1) the historical Examination of the experience of Latinas/os
development of Mexican immigrant families in the United States, focusing on people of
and subsequent generations of communities Mexican, Central American (El Salvador,
and families of Mexican Americans, and Guatemala, and Nicaragua), and Caribbean
(Puerto Rico, Cuba, and the Dominican
132 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Republic) descent. The countries of origin,
immigration, settlement patterns, comparative issues, and the condition of Latinas/os in
the United States will be explained. Course
content addresses both historical and contemporary issues. (5 units)
126.Latina/o Immigrant Detention
and Incorporation in the Age
of Terrorism
This class will examine shifts in immigration
politics with specific focus on the largest
population of immigrants in the U.S.,
namely Latinas/os. In the course of this examination, we will pay particular attention
to changes occurring after 1996 and the increasing scrutiny of both documented and
undocumented immigrants that has led to
surges in the numbers of immigrants detained, apprehended, incarcerated, and deported. We will be mindful of the gendered,
class, and racialized dynamics at work in the
development and execution of new immigration policy, and we will examine the effect of these shifts on concepts of citizenship.
In the end, the course will compel students
to consider the moral, political, and legal implications of an immigration policy focused
disproportionately on enforcement and
challenge them to find comprehensive alternatives. (5 units)
129.Mexican Popular
Catholicism and Gender
From the perspective of the sociology of religion, this course contextualizes the lives of
Chicanas/Mexicanas in Mexican popular
Catholic tradition, practices, and belief system with particular attention to race, class,
gender, and sexuality. This course repositions feminist analysis from a brief acknowledgement of the influence of Mexican
popular Catholicism in the lives of Chicanas/
Mexicanas to a much more encompassing
critical analysis of exactly how Catholicism
influences women’s everyday experiences.
Through the use of case studies and secondary research, students will explore the creative and complex ways Chicanas/Mexicanas
participate in the workforce, in politics, in
public life, and at home as people of faith.
Also listed as RSOC 139 and WGST 152.
(5 units)
132.The History of Hip-Hop
As Chuck D of Public Enemy once said,
“Rap both dictates and reflects.” This course
will examine the historical contexts and diasporic flows that have shaped (and been
shaped by) one the most important cultural
forms on the planet. We will examine the
multicultural roots/routes of rap and hiphop from its West African bardic traditions
to Caribbean and African-American oral traditions; study the development of rap as a
musical genre extending from soul, funk,
and disco styles; analyze the musical and verbal traits of rap music as exemplary of an
urban street/hip-hop aesthetic; discuss its
influence on musical technology (i.e., sampling) and cultural influences in the mainstream; investigate concepts of authenticity
as well as philosophical and political ideologies; review controversies and debates concerning rap music’s articulations of race,
gender, and sexuality; and examine the global impact of hip-hop culture. Musical examples and video documentaries will be used in
conjunction with class lectures, discussion,
and presentations by guest artists. Also listed
as MUSC 132. (5 units)
135.African Americans in
Postwar Film
This course examines the presence of African Americans in mainstream Hollywood
films during the postwar period. How did
Hollywood representations of African
Americans change after World War II? What
shifts and continuities occurred during the
postwar period? And how did those changes
reflect the ebbs and flows of civil rights activism through the 1970s? The goal of this
course is to gain a deeper understanding of
broader social and historical change by engaging the politics of race through a core aspect of American popular culture. Also listed
as HIST 185. (5 units)
ETHNIC STUDIES 133
141.Asian-American Women
An examination of Asian-American women
from a historical and contemporary framework within U.S. society. Focuses on the
struggle for identity and adjustment in
the first generation and the conflicts with
subsequent generations of Asian-American
women. Analyzes two major themes: (1) the
interplay of gender identity formation and
conflict, both in the family and in the paid
labor force; and (2) the development of individual and collective survival strategies. Also
listed as WGST 111. (5 units)
142.Asian-American Communities
An examination of selected topics affecting
Asian Americans in the United States. Issues
include the changing nature of communities, community institutions, anti-Asian violence, occupational glass ceilings, higher
education, political mobilization, gender relations, identity formation, and the new patterns of Asian immigration. (5 units)
149.Civil Rights and Anti-Colonial
Movements
This course examines the connections between two historical developments often
treated separately: the U.S. civil rights struggle and African anti-colonial movements. By
placing these two movements in a transnational framework, the course explores the
global challenge to the racialized world order
of the 19th and early 20th century. How did
the civil rights struggle gain momentum in
the aftermath of World War II? What was
the longer history and role of “black nationalism” and Pan-Africanism in the transnational struggle? What were the connections
between the civil rights movement and contemporary independence movements in
­Africa and Asia? One of the central goals of
the course is to show how we can expand our
understanding of U.S. history by reaching
beyond the interaction between the U.S.
government and other nation-states to examine political and cultural change. Also
listed as HIST 153. (5 units)
150.Urban Education
and Multiculturalism
This course takes a critical multicultural approach to understanding urban education,
encouraging a connection between theory
and personal experience and observations.
With a focus on schools in large urban contexts, this course centralizes the experiences
of low-income, students of color. Race and
class will be two critical lenses with which we
will examine (1) the historical context of
educational inequality, (2) current issues of
educational inequity, and (3) the movement
towards educational justice. Students should
leave the course with a stronger understanding of the social and historical foundations
of U.S. education. (5 units)
152.Multiracial Identities
This course focuses on multiracial identity
constructs in African-American and AsianAmerican literature. Using journey as a metaphor, the course seeks to define “movement”
and “place” in contexts where physical, spiritual, voluntary, or forced journeys contribute to the transformative possibilities of race,
class, gender, and identity. (5 units)
153.Minority Politics in
the United States
Also listed as POLI 153. For course description see POLI 153. (5 units)
154.Women of Color in
the United States
Explores the historical and present-day issues for women of color in the U.S. inclusive
but not limited to key topics such as sexuality, family, work, media, and activism. Students will examine the impact of racism,
sexism, and classism on African-American,
Asian-American, Latina, Native American,
and white American women in the U.S.
Using an interdisciplinary approach, students will also investigate their shared experiences as well as their differences. Also listed as
WGST 112. (5 units)
134 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
155.Racism in the United States
Multidisciplinary study of racism in the
United States. Its historical manifestations
from the arrival of Europeans in North
America to contemporary times; its psychological dimensions (prejudice, stereotypes,
discrimination); and its place in the U.S.
political economy. Emphasis on African
­
Americans, but includes discussion of ­Native
Americans, Chicanos/as, and Asian Americans.
(5 units)
157.Race, Gender, Class, and
the College Experience
How do we understand our experiences in
college? Explores student experiences in
higher education by using lenses that focus
on race, gender, and class. Activities, self-reflection, lecture, and discussion will be used
to explore student identity, the history of
higher education, college access and retention, campus climate, and student development. Also listed as WGST 114. (5 units)
160.Documentary Making
for Social Justice
This creative course provides students the
opportunity to write, dissect, and produce
their own 10-minute documentaries that are
committed to social justice. In addition to
producing their own films, students will examine how documentary filmmakers use
film as a medium to heighten the consciousness of their audience, combat negative stereotypes, give voice to marginalized or
underrepresented groups, and raise social
awareness about issues affecting their diverse
communities. Reading film as “text”—complete with their own arguments, aesthetic
concerns, social, political, and historical influences—we will understand how documentaries are used to illumine disparities or
confront issues of inequity and injustice.
Specifically, we will examine the intersection
of gender, race, class, spirituality, and sexuality, and note how these dynamics function
in film to enlighten our global community.
Writers in this course will be moved from
idea to script and, ultimately, film. (5 units)
161.Creating Diverse College-Going
Communities
In this course, students will develop an understanding of diversity issues in college access, reflect on their own experiences, utilize
this knowledge to develop workshop curriculum to enhance college-going, and then
implement this curriculum in high school
classrooms as a community-based learning
opportunity. This course introduces students to the background of colleges and universities in the United States, (including
history, institutional types, and diverse student representation), then explores the many
factors that influence college access and experiences in college (including class, race,
gender, first generation college student status, financial aid and admissions processes).
Students will reflect on their own college application and selection process and their experiences in college. Using this knowledge,
students will engage in community-based
learning (CBL) in which they provide college-related tutoring, mentoring, and workshops for high school students. (5 units)
162.Diversity and the Media
This course focuses on the complex, changing, dynamic, and powerful relationships
between dominant and underrepresented
groups in society, the mass media, and
broader social contexts; and discusses media
representations of social groups, contexts of
media production, and media use among
underrepresented groups. The concepts of
hegemony, power, social construction, and
intersectionality are vital for understanding
these relationships, and vital for the course.
The course connects to the field of cultural
studies in that it focuses on the everyday uses
of symbolic forms and aims to make students aware of, and sensitive to, some of the
dynamics connected with media images,
symbolic power, and the production of
meaning in today’s world. Students are encouraged to formulate, question, and put
into context, their own versions of reality.
Also listed as COMM 121A. (5 units)
ETHNIC STUDIES 135
163.Multiracial Communities
in Central California
This course will examine the process of racialization in various communities throughout California and uncover how various
ethno-racial groups within these communities live, work, and thrive together in their
specific locales. This course will begin by interrogating definitions of community, spatial geography, political economy, as well as
attempting to understand social attitudes
about race and racism. Then we will examine various cities as case studies to understand the different ways multiracial
communities formed. The end goal is to understand the nuances of how multiracial
communities, both urban and rural, developed and inscribed meaning onto the geography of California. (5 units)
the Nazi regime in Germany, and addressing
the claims of civil rights and anti-colonial
activists, the United States became a composite site of the tensions that defined a
democratic society struggling with ongoing
racism. This reading seminar explores these
tensions, which were exacerbated by the rise
of anti-racist perspectives in the anthropological and biological sciences just preceding
the war. The assigned readings and discussions engage these phenomena in order to
properly explore the significance of “race” in
the World War II era. Also listed as
HIST 178. (5 units)
164.Popular Music, Race and
American Culture
Also listed as MUSC 134. For course description see MUSC 134. (5 units)
194.Peer Educator in Ethnic Studies
Peer educators in ethnic studies work closely
with a faculty member to help students in an
ethnic studies course understand course material, think more deeply about course material, benefit from collaborative learning,
and/or to help students enjoy learning.
­Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.
(2 units)
170.Immigrant Businesses
in the United States
Also listed as SOCI 150. For course description see SOCI 150. (5 units)
171.Immigrant Communities
Also listed as SOCI 180. For course description see SOCI 180. (5 units)
178.Race and World War II
World War II stands as one of the most explosive moments in U.S. and global history
in the 20th century because of the myriad
ways the conflict influenced the postwar
world. The United States emerged from the
war as the premiere global superpower in
terms of combined military, diplomatic, and
financial supremacy. However, the United
States found itself under increased scrutiny
due to its history and maintenance of structural or institutionalized racism. In the midst
of military and ideological conflict against
185.Seminar in U.S. Politics:
Racial and Ethnic Politics
Also listed as POLI 195. For course description see POLI 195. (5 units)
197.Special Topics in Ethnic Studies
(1–5 units)
198.Internship
(2–5 units)
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research or Internship
A capstone senior project representing a
student’s specialization in ethnic studies.
­
Prerequisite: Written approval by the director
of the Ethnic Studies Program prior to registration. (2–5 units)
136 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY
Professors Emeriti: Dorothea French, Steven M. Gelber, George F. Giacomini Jr.,
Mary McDougall Gordon, Jo Burr Margadant, Gerald L. McKevitt, S.J.
(University Historian and Ignacio Ellacuria, S.J., University Professor for Jesuit
Studies), Timothy J. O’Keefe, Peter O’M. Pierson, Sita Anantha Raman
Professors: Barbara A. Molony (Walter E. Schmidt, S.J. Professor), Robert M. Senkewicz,
David E. Skinner, Nancy C. Unger
Associate Professors: Naomi J. Andrews, Arthur F. Liebscher, S.J. (Department Chair),
Paul P. Mariani, S.J., Amy E. Randall, Thomas Turley
Assistant Professors: Matthew L. Newsom Kerr, Harry N.K. Odamtten
Courtesy Appointments: William S. Greenwalt (Professor of Classics), Ramón D. Chacón
(Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies), Anthony Q. Hazard Jr. (Assistant Professor
of Ethnic Studies)
The major program in history provides students with an understanding of the human
experience through the analysis of evidence derived from both the recent and more distant
past. As history majors, students learn essential skills, understand the breadth and similarities of the human experience, and acquire specific geographical and thematic knowledge. A
degree in history provides excellent preparation for careers in education, journalism, media,
government, law, business, and international affairs—all of which are careers that utilize the
history major’s expertise in discovering, organizing, and analyzing the forces that shape the
contemporary world.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling University Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor of
arts degree, students majoring in history will complete 13 history courses distributed in the
following manner:
• Four lower-division courses, which may include HIST 11A and 12A
• Nine upper-division courses, encompassing:
– HIST 100
– HIST 101S
–Seven other upper-division courses, including a designated seminar course taken
after the student has completed both HIST 101S and 115 quarter units
• From among the student’s lower- and upper-division courses (excluding HIST 100
and 101S), at least one course from four of the following five fields: Global History,
the Americas (United States and/or Latin America), Europe, East/South Asia, Africa/
West Asia
• An optional senior project (HIST 197), which is essential to be eligible for Honors in
History, may be taken as one of the required upper-division courses
HISTORY 137
Honors in History
History majors may be selected for graduation with Honors in History provided they
have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in their history courses and complete a senior
project (HIST 197) in a manner approved by the faculty honors committee.
Students may also qualify for Phi Alpha Theta, the international honor society in history,
Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Sigma Nu, and other academic honor societies, as well as the honors
at graduation. For more details, see Chapters 8 and 10.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in history:
• Seven history department courses, at least four of which must be upper-division
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: CULTURES & IDEAS
11A. and 12A. Cultures &
the construction of Western culture in its
Ideas I and II
global context. Courses may address such
A two-course sequence focusing on a major topics as civilization and the city; exploratheme in human experience and culture over tions, migrations, and nations; and empires
a significant period of time. Courses empha- and rights. Successful completion of C&I I
size either broad global interconnections or (HIST 11A) is a prerequisite for C&I II
(HIST 12A). (4 units each quarter)
REQUIRED UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
100.Historical Interpretation
101S. Historical Writing
An investigation of the diverse methods his- Researching and writing history papers.
torians use to examine the past. Required of R­equired of all majors as a prerequisite for
all majors as a prerequisite for HIST 197. HIST 197. For history majors and minors;
For history majors or with permission of the majors will be given priority. Recommended
instructor. (5 units)
to be taken in the sophomore or junior year.
(5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: GLOBAL HISTORY
102.Ethnic Cleansing and
104.World History Until 1492
Genocide in the 20th Century
An overview of the great civilizations of the
This course will explore the mass murder of world prior to the Columbian Exchange, fopopulations defined by ethnicity, nationality, cusing on the geographical, cultural, ecoand race in the 20th century. (5 units)
nomic, and political features of the complex
societies in East Asia, Southeast Asia, South
Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, the
Americas, and Oceania. Survey of the foundations of each region. Patterns of connection and interdependence in world history.
(5 units)
138 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
105.Modern World History
Examination of the significant events, relationships, and ideas that have shaped the
development of a transformed international
system during the past 300 years. Focus is on
a few themes rather than a chronological
survey of different regions or cultures. Major
themes include the scientific and industrial
revolutions, new technologies, nationalism
and imperialism, effects of new technologies, anti-colonialism, neo-imperialism, and
the new world disorder. (5 units)
historical memory, and the literary and historical recovery of its importance in the 20th
and 21st centuries. (5 units)
112.The Haitian Revolution in
World History and Memory
Between 1789 and 1804, the French Caribbean colony of Saint-Domingue was the site
of the most profound and violent realization
of the revolutionary spirit sweeping the Atlantic in the “age of democratic revolutions.”
This era is usually associated with the French
and American revolutions, both key events
in the history of democracy and the rhetorical development of human rights as an agenda in the West. However, both stopped short
of the most radical realization of the promises of the age of Enlightenment, particularly
with regard to slavery and the racial discrimination that went along with it. The slave
revolt on Saint-Domingue and the Haitian
revolution, by contrast, witnessed the fullest
realization of these promises in the form of
the only successful slave revolt in human history. The events on Hispaniola took place at
the nexus of world historical forces of globalization through commerce, cross-cultural
encounter, racial mixing, and the dispersal of
radical Enlightenment ideas and their realization in the form of revolution. As a result
of the powerful currents of human history
that flowed through the region, the Haitian
revolution has proved to be an enduring
source of both fear and creativity in the history of race relations, slavery, and abolition,
and the forging of a new world identity for
the descendants of the once enslaved populations of the island. This course will examine the history of the revolutionary years
in Haiti, its near erasure from Western
123.History of Plagues, Epidemics,
and Infections
An exploration of scientific, social, cultural,
political, and ethical contexts in the history
of infectious diseases and epidemics. Particular attention is given to how the social framing of epidemiological thought has shaped
responses by societies, how public health is
an intrinsically political matter, and how we
can envision the place played by social justice perspectives in fashioning global public
health. (5 units)
116S. Sex and Gender in the
Age of High Imperialism
An examination of the role of sexuality and
gender in the global expansion of European
hegemony in the 19th and 20th centuries.
Explores these themes through literature,
historical scholarship, and film. Also listed as
WGST 124. (5 units)
143S. Women in Political Revolutions
Comparative, global history seminar that focuses on the political, economic, social, and
military leadership of women in several
types of revolutionary movements, both violent and nonviolent. Examples are taken
from many cultures around the world from
the 19th to the 21st centuries. Also listed as
WGST 125. (5 units)
145.Islam in the Modern World
Comparative study of contemporary Islam.
The study of origins and basic doctrines of
Islam and its development in the modern
world. Main focus will be on Islam’s interaction with different cultures, emphasizing
political implications of the rise of revivalism. (5 units)
153.Civil Rights and Anti-Colonial
Movements
Also listed as ETHN 149. For course description see ETHN 149. (5 units)
HISTORY 139
197.Senior Project
A topical course designed to give seniors the
opportunity to write an in-depth original
research paper under the guidance of a
faculty specialist chosen by the student. For
senior history majors only. Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HIST 100 and
101S. (5 units)
199.Directed Reading/ Research
Directed reading and research in source materials and secondary works dealing with selected historical problems in world and
comparative history. Prerequisite: Permission
of department chair and instructor. (5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: UNITED STATES HISTORY
84.United States Women’s History
96A. Colonization, Revolution, and
Civil War: The United States,
Examination of the rich history of the
Origins to 1877
changing social, economic, political, and intellectual life of women in the United States. A survey of the history of the United States
Focuses on issues of gender, race, class, geo- from European colonization to Reconstrucgraphic setting, and ethnicity. Primary and tion. Political, economic, social, and intellecsecondary sources will be used to examine tual aspects of America’s first 250 years.
women’s self-conceptions and self-identifica- (4 units)
tions, as well as gender constructs and prescribed roles. Also listed as WGST 57. (4 units) 96B. Globalization, Reform, and
War: The United States, 1877
85.United States Environmental
to Present
History
A survey of the history of the United States
Study of American environmental history from Reconstruction to the present. Politifrom the pre-Columbian period to the pres- cal, economic, social, and intellectual aspects
ent. Examines the interactions in history of America in an era of industrialization,
­between the physical environment and eco- ­
international involvement, and domestic
nomics, politics, gender, race, ethnicity, and change. (4 units)
religions. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: UNITED STATES HISTORY
153.Civil Rights and Anti-Colonial
172.The Civil War Era
Movements
A study of the major aspects of the antebelAlso listed as ETHN 149. For course descrip- lum period, the Civil War, and the problems
tion see ETHN 149. (5 units)
of Reconstruction: the abolitionists, the rise
of the Republican Party, the conduct of the
170.The American Revolution
war, the role of the free African American,
Intensive study of the origins, progress, and constitutional readjustment, and the rise of
culmination of the American Revolution to the new South. (5 units)
1800. (5 units)
173.United States 1920–1960:
171.The New Nation
From Flappers to Beatniks
Social and political reforms, expansion, and This course charts American history from
changes, sectional, and national politics of the Roaring Twenties through the Great
the United States between 1800 and 1850. ­Depression, New Deal, World War II, and
(5 units)
Cold War. Emphasis will be given to politics,
economics, race, ethnicity, gender, and international relations. (5 units)
140 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
177.Gays and Lesbians in
United States History
Examination of the significance of gay men
and lesbians across the broad sweep of
American history, beginning with pre-­
Columbian Native Americans and concluding with the modern era. Religious,
intellectual, economic, political, and social
ramifications will all be examined. Also listed
as WGST 138. (5 units)
178.Race and World War II
Also listed as ETHN 178. For course description see ETHN 178. (5 units)
180.Native Americans of
the United States
Native American history from colonial times
to the present from the perspective of native
peoples. The focus is on selected Indian peoples in each historical period with an emphasis on native responses to changing historical
circumstances, the continuity of Native
American cultures, and Indian relations with
the U.S. government in the 19th and 20th
centuries. Topics include colonialism, Native
Americans and environments, regional, and
tribal histories. (5 units)
181.United States Women Since 1900
Examination of the rich history of the
changing social, economic, political, and intellectual life of American women from
1900. Issues of gender, race, class, geographic setting, and ethnicity will merit appropriate attention. Primary and secondary sources
used to examine women’s self-conceptions
and self-identifications, as well as gender
constructs and prescribed roles. Women’s
role in the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era,
World War I, the Depression, and World
War II will be followed by extensive coverage
of the transitions created/endured by American women from the postwar period to
today including the rise of feminism and its
ongoing challenges. Also listed as WGST 173.
(5 units)
182.Sex and Family in
American History
History of sex and the family from the 17th
to 20th century. Impact of social and economic change on sexuality, courtship,
­marriage, and child rearing. Cultural construction of gender roles and sexual roles.
Also listed as WGST 174. (5 units)
184.American Historical Geography
Introduction to the physical and cultural geography of the United States with a special
emphasis on California. Texts, maps, and
discussions will be used to explore how
America’s geography is not just the stage for
American history but an integral player in
that history. (5 units)
185.African Americans
in Postwar Film
Also listed as ETHN 135. For course description see ETHN 135. (5 units)
186.California
Survey of the state’s history: its Native American origins, Spanish invasion and missionization, Mexican period, U.S. conquest,
gold rush, and development to the present.
(5 units)
187.The American West:
Diverse Peoples, Diverse Places
A study of the importance of the trans-­
Mississippi West in America’s multicultural
history with an emphasis on the 19th century. Particular attention is given to a study
of myth and reality in westward expansion,
the effect of the western migration movement on family and race as experienced by
Native Americans, Asian Americans, African
Americans, and Mexican Americans. The
course explores economic and social factors
that have shaped the different regions that
constitute the West. It also studies the shifting role of race in the American imagination
as manifested in popular Western literature,
art, and film. (5 units)
HISTORY 141
188S. The Making of Modern
America: The Progressive Era
This seminar examines the progressives
(1880–1920), a group of reformers who
struggled to more equitably redistribute the
wealth and power of the newly industrialized, urbanized America, achieving mixed
results. The impact of this crucial period of
reform on politics, gender, class, business,
the environment, leisure, and foreign affairs
will be examined in order to illuminate current political and social views and actions.
Students are evaluated on their informed
participation and a research paper. (5 units)
189.Special Topics in
United States History
Courses offered occasionally on subjects outside the standard curriculum in modern
United States history. (5 units)
191S. Seminar in United States
History
Original research and group discussions of
selected problems and periods. (5 units)
197.Senior Project
A topical course designed to give seniors the
opportunity to write an in-depth original
research paper under the guidance of a
­faculty specialist chosen by the student. For
senior history majors only. Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HIST 100 and
­
101S. (5 units)
199.Directed Reading/ Research
Directed reading and research in source materials and secondary works dealing with selected historical problems in U.S. history.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair
and instructor. (5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: EUROPEAN HISTORY
16.Ancient Greek Religion
94. Europe
Also listed as CLAS 67. For course descrip- A thematic approach to European history,
tion see CLAS 67. (4 units)
from Early Modern to the present. (4 units)
17.Ancient Roman Religion
Also listed as CLAS 68. For course description see CLAS 68. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: EUROPEAN HISTORY
108.Ancient Greece
115S. Gender, Race, and Citizenship
in the Atlantic World
Also listed as CLAS 108. For course description see CLAS 108. (5 units)
This course charts the dynamics of contestation and reform that shaped the politics of
109.The Hellenistic Age
gender and racial equality in the modern AtAlso listed as CLAS 109. For course descrip- lantic world through close examination of
tion see CLAS 109. (5 units)
ideas of autonomy and citizenship from the
18th to the 20th century. Focuses on specific
110.Roman Republic
reform movements and revolutionary moAlso listed as CLAS 110. For course descrip- ments in regard to women’s rights, slave
tion see CLAS 110. (5 units)
emancipation, and colonialism in Europe,
the United States, and the European colonial
111.Roman Empire
empires. Also listed as WGST 169. (5 units)
Also listed as CLAS 111. For course description see CLAS 111. (5 units)
142 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
117.State and Church in the
Middle Ages, 1000–1450
This course examines the struggles between
state and church that formed modern Western political institutions. Topics include the
rise of royal and papal theocracy, the emergence of the idea of limited government, the
foundation of representative institutions and
modern legal institutions, and the origins of
the modern state. (5 units)
118.Representation, Rights, and
Democracy, 1050–1792
This course charts the development of modern democracy from its roots in the Middle
Ages to its implementation during the
American and French revolutions, with a
major emphasis on the tension of political
theory and practice in its formation. Topics
include the evolution of representation and
citizenship and the place of social, economic, racial, and gendered forces in the formation. (5 units)
125.History of the Senses
An exploration of the natural and social history of sensory perception in the modern
Western world. Special attention is devoted
to critically investigating the ways societies
have organized the meanings and abilities of
sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch.
(5 units)
126.Conflicts in Medieval Christianity
This course is an examination of the religious tensions and conflicts that helped
form later medieval Christianity. It treats
heresies, the Inquisition, developing notions
of orthodoxy and authority, the warrior
Christianity of the Crusades, mendicancy
and urban attitudes toward Christian perfection, the new monasticism, the development
of a new personal approach to religion, lay
tensions with the clergy, and the climate of
reformation that spread through Europe.
(5 units)
127.The World of St. Francis
An examination of the religious, social, and
economic background that produced Francis of Assisi, one of the most revolutionary
figures of the late Middle Ages. Students will
focus on the on shifts in religious perception
and new notions of religious perfection gaining popularity in Francis’ time, Francis’ personal motivations, and the struggle the
medieval church experienced attempting to
integrate Francis and his followers into its
structure. (5 units)
128.Victorian London
This course explores the social and cultural
history of London from the 1830s to 1900.
Particular emphasis is placed on the strong
contrast that Victorian London offered between imperial splendor and grinding
­misery. Students will examine Victorian perception and experiences of London poverty,
filth, prostitution, and assorted vices, as well
as art, culture, entertainment, and social reform movements. (5 units)
130A. French Enlightenment and
Revolutions in Global Context
This course surveys the history of France
from the Enlightenment through the late19th century with particular emphasis on
France’s empire and transnational connections. Particular areas of emphasis include
the development of French nation identity;
the Revolution’s key role in the development
of democracy and republican political institutions and language; and Enlightenment
ideas of religious tolerance and human
rights. (5 units)
130B.Late Modern France
and the World
This course surveys the history of France
from the founding of the Third Republic in
1870 to the present day with particular emphasis on republican universalism, French
overseas imperialism, the Dreyfus Affair, the
struggle for women’s equality, the role and
experience of France in the two World Wars,
and late-20th century patterns of decolonization and migration. (5 units)
HISTORY 143
131.War and Democracy in the United
Kingdom during World War I
World War I gave birth to a range of difficult
questions regarding the relationship between
democratic ideals and how societies organize
for modern conflicts, setting a strong pattern
for the 20th century and continuing to possess strong resonances for today. What
strains and opportunities does war place
upon democratic societies? Does modern
patriotism enable or distort the aspirations
of free societies? What forces propel individuals to assist or resist modern war making?
This course encourages students to think of
war as not an activity solely directed by generals and politicians, but rather a social and
cultural event that is formed and negotiated
by citizens, workers, and parents. This course
places the World War I battlefront in the
context of British imperial history, and especially examines how four years of fighting
shaped Britain’s modern national and civic
identity. Readings and materials cover the
significance of the home front in many
forms including the propaganda machine,
the Irish problem, public school tradition,
industrial organization and trade union activity, and the women’s vote campaign. Civic
groups organized by peace protesters, conscientious objectors, suffragists, and striking
workers will be explored alongside groups
such as national service advocates, Empire
leagues, Boys Scouts, and civil preparedness
organizations. (5 units)
132.Democracy Under Siege: Ancient
Athens and Modern America
Also listed as CLAS 113. For course description see CLAS 113. (5 units)
133.History of Sexuality
Study of the history of sexuality in modern
Europe. Examination of topics such as the
politics of prostitution, abortion, and pornography; changing sexual norms and practices; the invention of homosexuality and
heterosexuality; professional and state involvement in the supervision and regulation
of sexualities; intersections of sexuality with
gender, ethnicity and race, nationality, class,
and religion; connections between sexuality
and imperialism; sexual communities and
movements. Also listed as WGST 137. (5 units)
134.Reformers and Revolutionaries
in Tsarist Russia
Examination of politics, society, and culture
in the Russian Empire from the reign of
Peter the Great to the fall of the Romanov
Dynasty in 1917. Themes include state
building and modernization; peasant rebellion and the institution of serfdom; the nobility and its discontents; imperial expansion
and the multiethnic Empire; the Orthodox
Church and popular religion; aristocratic revolt and the Russian revolutionary intelligentsia; Alexander II and the Great Reforms;
the growth of radicalism; industrialization
and social change; the Revolution of 1905;
and the crisis of the Old Regime. (5 units)
136. Gender and National Identity
in 20th-Century Eastern and
Western Europe
An exploration of the ways in which social
anxieties and ideas about gender, race, nationality, class, and sexuality shaped political,
economic, social, and cultural developments
in Eastern and Western Europe in the
20th century. Topics include: challenges to
bourgeois society in pre-war Europe; World
War I in a raced and gendered world; the
threat of the Soviet East and gender and
sexual “disorder” in the 1920s; gender and
anti-colonialism in India; the rise of fascism
and its intersections with racism, sexuality,
and misogyny; World War II and the Holocaust; communism and anti-Semitism in
Czechoslovakia; gender and culture in postWorld War II Europe; the battle for Algerian
independence and the politics of decolonization; the 1968 revolutions in Eastern and
Western Europe; the feminist and gay and
lesbian liberation movements; masculinity
and labor in Thatcher-era Britain; race, gender, and national identity in a postcolonial
144 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
and post-Communist Europe; the gendering of communism; ethnic cleansing and the
collapse of the Eastern bloc. Also listed as
WGST 172. (5 units)
137.The Soviet Experiment
An examination of the Soviet experiment to
build the first self-proclaimed socialist government in history. Emphasis on political
and economic policies, cultural practices,
everyday life, and the evolution of social
identities and roles, taking into account gender, regional, and national differences. (5 units)
139.Special Topics in
European History
Courses offered occasionally on subjects
outside the standard curriculum in modern
Europe. (5 units)
192S. Seminar in European History
Original research and group discussions of
selected problems and periods. (5 units)
197.Senior Project
A topical course designed to give seniors the
opportunity to write an in-depth original
research paper under the guidance of a
faculty specialist chosen by the student. For
senior history majors only. Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HIST 100 and
101S. (5 units)
199.Directed Reading/ Research
Directed reading and research in source materials and secondary works dealing with
­selected historical problems in European history. Prerequisite: Permission of department
chair and instructor. (5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES:
AFRICAN, WEST ASIAN, MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY
91.Africa in World History
97.West Asia and the Middle East
Historical survey of the origins and develop- A survey of the cultural, religious, economic,
ment of African cultures from ancient times and political development of western Asia
to the onset of European colonialism in the and northeastern Africa up to 1900 CE.
20th century. Focus on selected civilizations (4 units)
and societies. Patterns of African social, economic, and political life. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES:
AFRICAN, WEST ASIAN, MIDDLE EASTERN HISTORY
140. Life History Approaches to
accounts of free blacks and African slaves in
Atlantic-African Worlds
Europe and the Americas, the experiences of
This course will explore writings by African- African royalty abroad, and African contriborn individuals during the Atlantic period. butions to the birth of African-American
It will focus on how they describe their expe- culture and the emergence of “Creole” socirience of slavery and colonialism in Africa, eties in the New World. (5 units)
their perceptions of and experiences in the 141.Politics and Development
Western World, as well as African-American
in Independent Africa
perceptions of and experiences in Africa.
The themes we will explore will include, African economic, social, and political probbut not limited to, colonialism, slave captivity lems after independence. Major ideologies
narratives, autobiographical and biographical and international conflict. (5 units)
HISTORY 145
142.Modern West Asia
and North Africa
An examination of the political, economic,
and religious forces that helped to shape the
contemporary nation-state system of western Asia and northern Africa. Analysis of the
consequences of European expansion and
colonialism, Zionism, Arab nationalism,
and pan-Arabism and the development of
political Islam in both regional and global
­affairs. (5 units)
exchanges, ethnic/racial transformations,
travel tropes, and discourses on Pan-African
identity that characterized the Back-to-­
Africa Movement in various locations of the
Atlantic World. It will introduce students to
a historiography of Black intellectuals, individuals, and groups who look to Africa as
not only an ancestral homeland, but as a site
of Christian evangelization, trade, pursuit of
freedom and happiness, as well as social
­justice. (5 units)
144S. Islam in Africa
Examination of the history and contemporary role of Islam in Africa. The principal
topics are the development of Islamic ideas
and institutions, the impact of Islam on
­African cultures, the role of Islam in contemporary political and economic development,
and the interaction between African and
non-African organizations and governments. (5 units)
193S. Seminar in Africa
and Middle East
Original research and group discussion of
selected problems and periods. (5 units)
149.Special Topics in African
or Middle Eastern History
Courses offered occasionally on subjects outside the standard curriculum in African or
Middle Eastern history. (5 units)
157.Black Americans in Africa:
Caribbean, United States, and
Brazilian Perspectives
This course examines the dynamic and
­sustained relationship between Africa and
the African Diaspora through the multiple
lenses of U.S. Blacks, West Indian, AfroBrazilian, Afro-European, and Afro-Cuban
missions, travel, migration, and repatriation
to various locations in Africa. The course
entails a consideration of the religious
­
197.Senior Project
A topical course designed to give seniors the
opportunity to write an in-depth original
research paper under the guidance of a faculty specialist chosen by the student. For senior history majors only. Prerequisites:
Successful completion of HIST 100 and101S.
(5 units)
199.Directed Reading/ Research
Directed reading and research in source materials and secondary works dealing with selected historical problems in African history.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair
and instructor. (5 units)
146 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: EAST ASIAN,
SOUTH ASIAN, AND INDIAN OCEAN HISTORY
55.Southeast Asia
region and with other regions using concepts
Historical survey of the civilizations of borrowed from anthropology, cultural studMalaysia, Indonesia, Burma, Thailand, ies, economics, and political science. Partic­
Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, and the Philip- ular focus on China, Japan, and Korea.
pines from their origins to the present day. (4 units)
The focus will be on societies, cultures, reli- 93.South Asia and the Indian Ocean
gions, colonialism, nationalism, and postA survey of the dynamic development of
modern socioeconomic issues. (4 units)
India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri
92.Modern East Asia
Lanka, and the Indian Ocean. Using multiAn examination of the emergence of modern disciplinary concepts, the course focuses on
nations from the rich and diverse cultures of the subcontinent’s rich and unique mosaic
the Pacific and their mutual transformations of social, religious, cultural, economic, and
since 1600. Analyzes linkages within the environmental systems against the backdrop
of dramatic political events. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: EAST ASIAN,
SOUTH ASIAN, AND INDIAN OCEAN HISTORY
146A. Medieval and Early
147A. Premodern China to 1600
Modern Japan
Chinese civilization from the earliest times
From the early medieval period through the to the early modern global encounter with
middle of the 19th century, Japan developed the West. Includes Shang oracle bones, Emas a blend of indigenous cultures, religions, peror Qin Shi Huang and his terracotta
and institutions and continental (Chinese army, the origins of the Great Wall and the
and Korean) civilization and later European Silk Road, Genghis Khan and the Mongol
and American ideologies and imperialism. conquest, Tang empresses, Marco Polo,
This course examines culture, ideas, reli- Zheng He and his expedition to Africa, the
gions, society/economy, and global interac- glories of the Ming dynasty, and Jesuit mistions. (5 units)
sionaries. Topics also include the evolution
of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism;
146B. Modern Japan in the World
development of political institutions; analyAn examination of Japanese history in its sis of the pre-industrial economic experiglobal context since 1600, with emphases on ence; and state-society relations. (5 units)
its 19th century “economic miracle;” problems faced by a rapidly modernizing and 147B. Modern China
globalizing society; questions of national se- Social, political, economic, and cultural decurity and imperialism; reconstructing gen- velopment of China from the 17th to
der, personhood, and rights of Japanese men 21st centuries. Topics include China’s state
and women at several key moments in formation from monarchy to socialism; cul“modern” society; social and political move- tural history from Confucianism to individments such as suffrage and labor; war and ualism; issues of poverty and population;
reconstruction; and diaspora, both of people intellectual and cultural changes and the role
and ideas. (5 units)
of the West in these changes; and the indigenous forces shaping China’s modern evolution. (5 units)
HISTORY 147
148. China and the Chinese Diaspora
This course explores the Chinese diaspora
(overseas Chinese) both as emigrants from a
China which currently has a population of
1.4 billion, and as immigrants to various
Chinese communities throughout the
world: the Americas, Europe, and East and
Southeast Asia. Overseas Chinese currently
number 15 million people, making it one of
the largest groups of migrants in the world.
The course will situate the successive waves
of Chinese migration in their economic, social, and political contexts. While the course
is primarily historical, we will also use interdisciplinary methodologies from political
science, economics, sociology, and anthropology. (5 units)
150. Gender and Sexuality
in East Asia
The historical study of women and men is
necessarily the historical study of gendered
societies. While there are important linkages
among China, Japan, and Korea—for example, shared religious traditions, the varied
experiences of imperialism, the central role
of women and the construction of gender in
modernity, and the physical movement of
women and men among the three countries—there are also significant differences.
This course will explore changes over time in
sexualities, work experiences, civic culture,
the gendered state, and marriage and family
in the three countries. Also listed as WGST
126. (5 units)
151.Imperialism in East Asia
This course examines the cultural, social, political, and economic effects of imperialism
in East Asia. Imperialism took varied forms,
depending on the interests of the imperialist
country and the conditions in the country
under imperialism. Readings will use both
literary and historical sources. (5 units)
152.History of Christianity in China
The history of Christianity in China from
the seventh century to the present. We will
explore the earliest evidence of Christianity
in China, the Franciscan missions to the
Mongols, the arrival of the Jesuits, the
­Chinese rites controversy, the persecution of
Christianity, the rise of Protestant missions,
and the explosive growth of Christianity in
China today. We will also explore issues of
church-state conflict, religious debate and
conversion, and the complex interplay between foreign missions and Chinese developments. (5 units)
154. Modern India
This course explores the history of India
after the Portuguese arrival to the present.
Themes include economic development and
trade; imperialism; Hindu socioeconomic
reform and its relevance to women and the
caste system; Muslim awakening and modernization; Indian nationalism; Gandhi,
Nehru, and Jinnah; economic development
and environment; national cohesion; and
communalism. (5 units)
159.Special Topics in Asian History
Courses offered occasionally on subjects
outside the standard curriculum in Asian
history. (5 units)
195S. Seminar in Asian History
Original research and group discussion of
selected problems and periods. (5 units)
197.Senior Project
A topical course designed to give seniors the
opportunity to write an in-depth original
research paper under the guidance of a faculty specialist chosen by the student. For
senior history majors only. Prerequisites:
­
Successful completion of HIST 100 and
­
101S. (5 units)
199.Directed Reading/ Research
Directed reading and research in source materials and secondary works dealing with selected historical problems in Asian history.
Prerequisites: Permission of department chair
and instructor. (5 units)
148 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
64.Central America
95.Modern Latin America
Survey of Central America from indepen- A survey of the modern experience of the
dence to the present. Focus on three Central major nations of Latin America, with emAmerican countries: Nicaragua, Guatemala, phasis on economic and commercial relaand El Salvador. Emphasis on recent devel- tionships, populism, the international
opments; social, economic, and political dimensions of authoritarianism, national
problems (militarism, dictatorship); and self-determination, and the context of recent
the nature of U.S. policy vis-à-vis Central democratic movements. (4 units)
America. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY
161.Modern Mexico
166.Latin America: Empires
Mexico since the Benito Juárez regime to the A survey of the comparative experience of
present. Emphasis on the Porfiriato, the the original migrants, European colonizers,
1910 Revolution and its institutionalization, and resulting juncture of cultures and histoand the development of the modern state. ries from the initial settlement through the
(5 units)
native empires, establishment of the European colonies, the Enlightenment, and the
162.Argentina
birth of new nations. (5 units)
A historical examination of the peoples,
events, regional situations, and transoceanic 169.Special Topics in
Latin American History
relationships that have shaped Argentina
and southern South America. (5 units)
Courses offered occasionally on subjects outside the standard curriculum in Latin Amer163.Cuba and the Caribbean
ican history. (5 units)
A survey from the colonial period to the
present of three Caribbean nations: Cuba, 196S. Seminar in Latin
American History
the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico.
Emphasis on 20th-century developments; Original research and group discussion of
social, economic, and political issues (dicta- selected problems and periods. (5 units)
torship, revolution, social stratification); and
the role of U.S. policy vis-à-vis Cuba and the 197.Senior Project
A topical course designed to give seniors the
Caribbean. (5 units)
opportunity to write an in-depth original
164S. The Catholic Church
research paper under the guidance of a facin Latin America
ulty specialist chosen by the student. For seReadings, discussion, and research focused nior history majors only. Prerequisites:
on the historical place, social role, and reli- Successful completion of HIST 100 and
gious significance of the Catholic Church in 101S. (5 units)
Latin America, with attention to churchstate issues, liberation theology, and the im- 199.Directed Reading/Research
pact of the Church in nations affected by Directed reading and research in source madevelopment, globalization, and poverty. terials and secondary works dealing with selected historical problems in world and
(5 units)
comparative history. Prerequisites: Permission of department chair and instructor.
(5 units)
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES 149
INDIVIDUAL STUDIES PROGRAM
Director: Jean J. Pedersen
The Individual Studies Program (ISP) major has been established to meet the needs
of students who wish to design a course of studies with a multidisciplinary perspective.
Students who want to pursue an ISP major should begin by scheduling a meeting with the
program director to obtain a list of instructions regarding administrative details.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of arts or bachelor of science degrees, students majoring in ISP must complete the following
departmental requirements:
• Be a full-time student at Santa Clara for at least one year
• Have fewer than 111 quarter units of academic work completed at the time of
application
• Have a minimum 3.0 grade point average
• Submit a Petition for Admission to the ISP director for review and approval.
The petition should include:
– A clear, logical, and conceptually refined description of the proposed program
–A well-developed argument, supported by appropriate evidence, showing that
no existing academic major can meet the student’s educational objectives
– A plan of study listing courses, seminars, internships, etc., that meets the student’s
educational objectives and fulfills the requirements of the Undergraduate Core
Curriculum
150 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LIBERAL STUDIES PROGRAM
Professor Emerita: Eleanor W. Willemsen
Professors: Barbara Burns (Director), Timothy C. Urdan
Associate Professors: Carol Ann Gittens, Brett Johnson Solomon
Senior Lecturer: Elizabeth Day
The Liberal Studies Program offers a degree program leading to the bachelor of science
in liberal studies. The liberal studies major is designed for undergraduates interested in a
career working with children in a school or community-based setting. There are two emphases available within liberal studies: Pre-teaching and child studies, each of them leading to a
B.S. degree. The pre-teaching emphasis provides a broad liberal arts background related to
the elementary school curriculum, as well as a set of courses designed to introduce future
teachers to the research foundations of best practices in education, child development, and
issues and policies related to the schools. The child studies emphasis is designed for students
interested in careers focusing on children such as, social work, counseling, family law, directing childcare programs, speech and language pathology, occupational therapy, or leading
nonprofit agencies that provide community services to children and families. Students with
a B.S. in liberal studies in the pre-teaching emphasis are prepared to go on to postgraduate
studies related to their career goals such as teacher credential programs. Students with a B.S.
in liberal studies in the child studies emphasis are prepared to go on to postgraduate programs such as master’s degree programs in psychology, social work, or other fields. Advisors
in liberal studies can provide information about teaching credential programs for the preteaching emphasis and graduate study programs for the child studies emphasis students.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of science degree, students majoring in liberal studies must complete the following program
requirements:
Requirements for Pre-Teaching Emphasis:
• LBST 66,LBST 70, LBST 75, LBST 80, LBST 100, LBST 106, LBST 109, LBST
138, LBST 184, LBST 197, LBST 198A or 198B, ANTH 3 or SOCI 1, BIOL 3,
5, 6 or ENVS 131, CHEM 19, ENGL 160, HIST 96A or HIST 96B, HIST 104,
HIST 105, HIST 184, MATH 8, MATH 44, MATH 45, PHYS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or
ENVS 23, POLI 1, PSYC 2, PSYC 134, PSYC 185
• Four (4) units of MUSC, THTR, or DANC
Requirements for Child Studies Emphasis:
• LBST 70, LBST 75, LBST 80, LBST 100, LBST 107, LBST 108, LBST 138, LBST
195, ANTH 3 or SOCI 1, ENGL 160, MATH 8, POLI 1, PSYC 2, PSYC 65, PSYC
155, PSYC 172, PSYC 185, SOCI 30, SOCI 153, SOCI 157, SOCI 165
• Two (2) science courses from the PHYS, BIOL, CHEM courses listed for Pre-Teaching
emphasis
LIBERAL STUDIES 151
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. Careers in Child Studies
70.Community Health Education
This course is an opportunity to discover This course explores the environmental, ecohow a background in child studies can help nomic, political, and social factors influencyou fulfill your possible career goals. Profes- ing health on a local and national level, with
sionals from a variety of fields related to so- an emphasis on how health literacy could be
cial work, psychology, teaching, medicine, integrated into the K–12 curriculum and
child advocacy, law, public health, govern- parent education. (4 units)
ment, human services, daycare, and community services will provide a glimpse into 75.Technology and Education
what it takes to be successful in these dy- This course explores the relationship benamic and challenging fields. Students in- tween technology, society, and education.
vestigate a career of their choice based on Students investigate the appropriate role of
their interests, aptitudes, skills, and strengths, technology in educational reform, evaluate
and work towards developing a media and the personal impact of social media on stuprint ad campaign relating the assets of a dents, and propose solutions to the pressing
strong child studies background with their educational needs of our society. Interactive
and engaging discussions and team projects
chosen interest. (2 units)
highlight the dynamic quality of these issues.
66. Movement Education
(4 units)
Learn the movement concepts and skill
themes central to any physical education 80.Information Literacy
program for children. Develop sound in- This course in information literacy will instructional approaches for teaching physical troduce students to a wide variety of dataeducation, dance, and athletics, and for cre- bases and Internet sources useful in preparing
ating kinesthetic lesson plans to teach all lessons, papers, presentations, grant propos­academic subjects. Exploration of develop- als, and informing oneself generally about a
mentally appropriate themes and activities topic. Students will also be taught to regard
that foster the interaction of physical, social, these sources of information as unequal in
cognitive, and motor learning; will learn value and how to assess the value to place on
movement analysis techniques. Teaching a particular source. These skills will be used
simulations and working with children. in preparing a course project. This course is a
prerequisite for LBST 100. (4 units)
Movement lab included. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
100.Research in Social Sciences
relationship between a research problem, the
Provides an introduction to educational re- exploration of that problem, and the infersearch design as it informs hypothesis testing ences that can be drawn from empirical inand theory development. Nurtures students’ quiry. Students will learn how to judge the
skills at reading and understanding educa- reliability and critique the validity of research
tional research. Though the emphasis will be on such things as learning and cognition,
placed on being a consumer of research rath- curriculum and instruction, child developer than a producer, in order to fully under- ment, reading and literacy, etc., using genstand empirical findings it is essential that eral social science design principles. Writing
one understands the process of scientific in- for academic audiences is also a course objecquiry. Surveys quantitative and qualitative tive. Prerequisite: LBST 80. (5 units)
research methods, and emphasizes the
152 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
105.Mindful Leadership
This course offers students an opportunity
to collaborate with elementary educators,
teaching mindfulness and leadership strategies to students in a classroom setting. Students will investigate the relationship
between mindfulness, leadership, socialemotional learning, and achievement.
106.Urban Education
and Multiculturalism
Surveys some of the historical, cultural, economic, educational, moral, and political
forces, which confront urban educators with
a view toward understanding the impact of
these forces on teaching and learning. Students in this course will be exposed to academic and community resources. They will
be given an opportunity to become active
members of an urban school community,
study theories of urban school practices, and
reflect on both. Note: This course requires
participation in community-based learning
experiences off campus. (5 units)
107.Children, Family, and Community
This course provides students with a theoretical understanding of the ecological
model, and how diverse human experiences
impact the systems that influence a young
child’s development (birth to age eight). The
family-centered approach, diversity, and
community-based learning will be the foundation for students to explore issues such as
independence and interdependence, discipline, attachment, coping with separation,
child-abuse, conflict resolution, problem
solving, and gender issues. Note: This course
requires participation in community-based
learning experiences off campus. (5 units)
108.Youth, Family, and Community
Leadership and Advocacy
Through various conversations with local
community leaders, this course explores relevant current issues facing youth, teens, and
families in our community. Students explore
successful services, leadership strategies, and
related challenges within nonprofit and governmental agencies in addressing such issues
as violence, gangs, drug abuse, suicide, and
teen pregnancy. LBST 107 recommended.
(5 units)
109.Children, Art, and Society
An investigation of the role of art and creativity in human development, and the personal and societal impact of providing access
to high quality arts experiences in all schools.
Topics include methods for developing critical and integrative thinking through handson, non-machine mitigated arts experiences,
curriculum design in the arts, contemporary
legislation and advocacy efforts on behalf of
the arts, and the role of the arts in identity
formation, cultural expression, and issues of
justice. This course culminates with global
perspectives and movements in arts education addressing politics, peace, diplomacy,
the environment, and other major concerns
of our time. (5 units)
138.Exceptional Child
Introduction to childhood mental retardation, learning disabilities, behavior disorders,
communication (speech and language) disorders, hearing impairments, physical and
health impairments, severe handicaps, and
the gifted and talented. The impact of these
differences in comparison with typical development is addressed. Note: This course requires participation in community-based
learning experiences off campus. (5 units)
LIBERAL STUDIES 153
156. Advocacy for Children
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of child advocacy. The
focus is on professions that serve children,
including teaching, social work, counseling,
child psychology, family law, and nonprofit
agencies that provide community services to
children and families. Course will include
discussions, team projects, and a weekly
community placement. (5 units)
184.Children’s Literacy & Diversity
This course provides an introduction to the
developmental and learning processes involved when children become readers. Students will learn to develop and demonstrate
instructional strategies that foster a holistic
view of learning to read and write—to emphasize connections among all areas of the
curriculum and the interrelatedness of
knowledge and the mutually reinforcing
skills of reading, writing, listening, speaking,
viewing, and representing visually. Note:
This course requires participation in community-based learning experiences off campus.
(5 units)
195.Senior Seminar: Child Studies
This child-studies senior seminar capstone
course is designed to provide future professionals with the research skills, resources,
and support that they need to be thoughtful,
balanced, and successful contributors to the
community. Through discernment regarding specific issues/topics that impact children and families, students will utilize
information literacy and research methodology skills to conduct university-level research
that will result in a major paper and/or
­project. Prerequisites: LBST 80 and 100.
(5 units)
196.Future Teachers Project Seminar
A one-unit seminar addressing education
and the teaching profession for students participating in the Future Teachers Project.
May be repeated for credit. (1 unit)
197.Senior Seminar: Pre-Teaching
This pre-teaching senior-seminar capstone
course is designed to provide future teachers
with the research skills, resources, and support that they need to be thoughtful, balanced, and successful teachers. Through
discernment regarding specific issues/topics
that impact teachers, students, or schools,
students will utilize information literacy and
research methodology skills to conduct university-level research that will result in a
major paper and/or project. Prerequisites:
LBST 80 and 100. (5 units)
198A. Elementary Teaching Practicum
and Social Foundations
This course focuses on understanding the
role of school in the broader context of society. Awareness of the challenges facing education will be examined with the objective of
critically evaluating and developing reasoned
opinions that address the question: “What is
to be done?” Through deliberating on a chosen topic, students create a short documentary that provides policy recommendations,
strategies, and proposals to improve the current state of education. (5 units)
198B.Secondary Teaching Practicum
and Social Foundations
This course focuses on understanding the
role of school in the broader context of society. Awareness of the challenges facing education will be examined with the objective of
critically evaluating and developing reasoned
opinions that address the question: “What is
to be done?” Through deliberating on a chosen topic, students create a short documentary that provides policy recommendations,
strategies, and proposals to improve the current state of education. (5 units)
154 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE
Professors: Gerald L. Alexanderson (Michael and Elizabeth Valeriote Professor),
José Barría, Daniel N. Ostrov, Jean J. Pedersen, Edward F. Schaefer,
Richard A. Scott, Dennis C. Smolarski, S.J.
Associate Professors: Glenn D. Appleby (Department Chair), Robert A. Bekes,
Frank A. Farris, Leonard F. Klosinski, S. Tamsen McGinley,
Nicholas Q. Tran, Byron L. Walden
Assistant Professors: Nicolette Meshkat, George Mohler
Senior Lecturer: Laurie Poe
Lecturers: Corey Irving, Natalie Linnell, Mary Long, Mona Musa, Maribeth Oscamou
The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers major programs leading
to the bachelor of science in mathematics or the bachelor of science in computer science
(mathematics), as well as required and elective courses for students majoring in other fields.
Either major may be pursued with any of three principal goals: preparation for graduate
studies leading to advanced degrees in pure mathematics, applied mathematics, computer
science, statistics, operations research, or other fields; preparation for secondary school
teaching of mathematics or computer science; or preparation for a research career in business, industry, or government. The major in mathematics may be taken with an emphasis
in applied mathematics, financial mathematics, mathematical economics, or mathematics
education. The emphasis in mathematics education is designed to prepare majors to take
the California Subject Examination for Teachers (CSET). The major in computer science
may be taken with an emphasis in cryptography and security. Minors in mathematics or
computer science are also available.
The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science maintains a program for the
discovery, encouragement, and development of talent in mathematics or computer science
among undergraduates. This program includes special sections, seminars, individual conferences, and directed study guided by selected faculty members. Students are also encouraged
to participate actively in research projects directed by faculty.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of science degree, students majoring in mathematics and computer science (mathematics)
must complete the following departmental requirements for the respective degree:
Major in Mathematics
• CSCI 10 (or demonstrated equivalent proficiency in computer programming)
• MATH 11, 12, 13, 14, 22, 51, 52, and 53
• PHYS 31 and 32, with the associated laboratory section for PHYS 32. Students with
a special interest in the application of mathematics in the social sciences or economics may substitute ECON 170 or 173 for PHYS 32. Students planning to teach in
secondary schools may substitute, with approval of the department chair, PHYS 11
and 12 for PHYS 31 and 32.
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 155
• Seven approved 5-unit upper-division courses in mathematics or computer science,
which must include at least one course in analysis (MATH 102, 105, or 153), at least
one course in algebra (MATH 103 or 111), and at least one course selected from
geometry (MATH 101, 113, or 174), or from discrete mathematics (MATH 176 or
177), or from applied mathematics (MATH 122, 125, 144, 155, 165, or 166)
Students planning to undertake graduate studies in pure mathematics should plan to
take MATH 105, 111, 112, 113, 153, and 154. Students planning to undertake graduate
studies in applied mathematics should complete the emphasis in applied mathematics and
take MATH 105, 144, 153, 154, and 155.
Emphasis in Applied Mathematics
Complete the requirements for a bachelor of science in mathematics with the following
specifications:
• MATH 102, 122, 123, and 166
• Two courses from MATH 125, 144, 155, 165, 178, CSCI 164, or an approved
alternative 5-unit upper-division mathematics (but not computer science) course
Emphasis in Data Science
Complete the requirements for a bachelor of science degree in mathematics with the
following specifications and additions:
• MATH 122, 123
• CSCI 10, 60, 61, 183
• COEN 178
•Two courses from CSCI 163, 164; CSCI/MATH 165, 166; COEN 166, 169;
ECON 174
Emphasis in Financial Mathematics
Complete the requirements for a bachelor of science degree in mathematics with the
following specifications and additions:
• MATH 102, 122, 123, 125, 144, 166
• BUSN 70
• ACTG 11, 12
• FNCE 121, 124
Emphasis in Mathematical Economics
Complete the requirements for a bachelor of science degree in mathematics with the
following specifications and additions:
• MATH 102, 122, 123, 166
• ECON 113
• Three courses from MATH 125, ECON 170–174
156 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Emphasis in Mathematics Education
Complete the requirements for a bachelor of science degree in mathematics with the
following specifications and additions:
• MATH 101, 102, 111, 122, 123 (or 8), 170, 175 (or 178)
• EDUC 198B
Students are strongly recommended to complete the urban education minor.
Major in Computer Science (Mathematics)
• MATH 11, 12, 13, 14, 51, 52, 53
• CSCI 10, 60, 61
• PHYS 31 and 32 with the associated laboratory section for PHYS 32
• COEN 20 and 20L, COEN (or ELEN) 21 and 21L
• CSCI 163 and one course from CSCI 161, 166, or 167
• Two upper-division courses from MATH 144, 176, 177; CSCI 161, 162, 164, 165,
166, 167, 168, 169, 181, 182, 196, 197.
• Two 5-unit upper-division MATH courses, except MATH 144, 165, 166, 176, 177.
(Although not required, MATH 122 is highly recommended.)
• COEN 177 and 177L and one other approved 4- or 5-unit COEN upper-division
course
• One additional approved 4- or 5-unit upper-division course from COEN, CSCI, or
MATH 144, 176 or 177
Students are encouraged to select one of the following areas of focus to guide their
choices of upper-division courses:
• Foundations: CSCI 161, MATH 176 and 177, COEN 173
• Numerical Computation: MATH 144, CSCI 165 and 166, COEN 145
• Software: CSCI 161 and 169, COEN 174, COEN 176 or 178
• Graduate School Preparation: CSCI 166, MATH 176 and 177, COEN 175
• Another area of focus developed in conjunction with the department
Emphasis in Cryptography and Security
Complete the requirements for a bachelor of science in computer science (mathematics)
with the following specifications:
• MATH 178
• CSCI 181
• COEN 146 and 152
• MATH 122 and COEN 150/250 are highly recommended
For the major in either mathematics or computer science (mathematics), at least four of
the required upper-division courses in the major must be taken at Santa Clara. A single
upper-division course in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science may not
be used to satisfy requirements for two majors or minors.
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 157
Emphasis in Data Science
Complete the requirements for a bachelor of science degree in computer science with the
following specifications and additions:
• MATH 122, 123
• CSCI 10, 60, 61, 183
• COEN 178
•Two courses from CSCI 163, 164; CSCI/MATH 165, 166; COEN 166, 169;
ECON 174
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINORS
Minor in Mathematics
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in mathematics:
• MATH 11, 12, 13, 14, and either 52 or 53
• Three approved 5-unit upper-division mathematics courses with no more than one
course selected from MATH 165 and 166. In place of MATH 165 or 166, a student
may select an upper-division computer science course.
Minor in Computer Science
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in computer science:
• CSCI 10, 60, and 61
• MATH 12 or 51
• COEN 20 and 20L, COEN 21 and 21L
• Three approved 5-unit upper-division computer science courses. In place of an upperdivision computer science course, a student may select from MATH 144, 176, or 177.
PREPARATION IN MATHEMATICS FOR ADMISSION
TO TEACHER TRAINING CREDENTIAL PROGRAMS
The State of California requires that students seeking a credential to teach mathematics
or computer science in California secondary schools must pass the California Subject
Examination for Teachers (CSET), a subject area competency examination. The secondary
teaching credential additionally requires the completion of an approved credential program,
which can be completed as a fifth year of study and student teaching, or through an undergraduate summer program internship. Students who are contemplating secondary school
teaching in mathematics or computer science should consult with the coordinator in the
Department of Mathematics and Computer Science as early as possible.
158 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: MATHEMATICS
4. The Nature of Mathematics
history, networks, hardware. CSCI 10 may
For students majoring in arts and humani- not be taken for credit if the student has
ties. Topics chosen from set theory, logic, received credit for COEN 10 or a similar
counting techniques, number systems, introductory programming course. Prereqgraph theory, financial management, voting uisite: MATH 11 (may be taken concurrently)
methods, and other suitable areas. Material or permission of the instructor. Co-requisite:
will generally be presented in a setting that CSCI 10L. (4 units)
allows students to participate in the discov- 11.Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
ery and development of important mathematical ideas. Emphasis on problem solving Limits and differentiation. Methods and applications of differentiation. Ordinarily, only
and doing mathematics. (4 units)
one of MATH 11 or 30 may be taken for
6. Finite Mathematics
credit. Note: MATH 11 is not a suitable prefor Social Science
requisite for MATH 31 without additional
Introduction to finite mathematics with ap- preparation. Prerequisite: High school trigoplications to the social sciences. Sets and set nometry and either Calculus Readiness Exam
operations, Venn diagrams, trees, permuta- or MATH 9. If MATH 9 is taken, a grade of
tions, combinations, probability (including C– or higher is strongly recommended before
conditional probability and Bernoulli pro- taking MATH 11. (4 units)
cesses), discrete random variables, probability 12.Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
distributions, and expected value. (4 units)
Further applications of differentiation. Inte8. Introduction to Statistics
gration and the fundamental theorem of
Elementary topics in statistics, including de- ­calculus. Methods and applications of intescriptive statistics, regression, probability, gration. Only one of MATH 12 or 31 may
random variables and distributions, the cen- be taken for credit. Note: MATH 30 is not a
tral limit theorem, confidence intervals and suitable prerequisite for MATH 12 without
hypothesis testing for one population and additional preparation. Prerequisite: MATH
for two populations, goodness of fit, and 11 or equivalent. A grade of C– or higher in
MATH 11 is strongly recommended before
contingency tables. (4 units)
taking MATH 12. (4 units)
9.Precalculus
College algebra and trigonometry for stu- 13.Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
dents intending to take calculus. Does not Infinite series, vectors, vector functions,
fulfill the Undergraduate Core Curriculum quadric surfaces. Prerequisite: MATH 12 or
equivalent. A grade of C– or higher in
requirement in mathematics. (4 units)
MATH 12 is strongly recommended before
10.Introduction to Computer
taking MATH 13. (4 units)
Programming and Computer Science
Introduction to computer programming 14.Calculus and Analytic Geometry IV
and computer science. Basic programming Curvilinear coordinate systems, partial destructures, conditionals, loops, functions, rivatives, multiple integrals, vector calculus.
arrays. Topics relating to the applications of Prerequisite: MATH 13 or equivalent.
and social impact of computing, including A grade of C– or higher in MATH 13 is
privacy, artificial intelligence, computation strongly recommended before taking MATH
in physics, psychology, and biology. Discus- 14. (4 units)
sion of cryptography, computation through
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 159
22.Differential Equations
Explicit solution techniques for first order
differential equations and higher order linear
differential equations. Use of numerical, series, and Laplace transform methods. Applications. Only one of MATH 22 or AMTH
106 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite:
MATH 14. (4 units)
30.Calculus for Business I
Differentiation and its applications to business, including marginal cost and profit,
maximization of revenue, profit, utility, and
cost minimization. Natural logarithms and
exponential functions and their applications,
including compound interest and elasticity
of demand. Study of the theory of the derivative normally included in MATH 11,
except trigonometric functions not included
here. Ordinarily, only one of MATH 11 or
30 may be taken for credit. Note: MATH 30
is not a suitable prerequisite for MATH 12
without additional preparation. Prerequisite:
Calculus Readiness Exam or MATH 9.
If MATH 9 is taken, a grade of C– or higher
is strongly recommended before taking
MATH 30. (4 units)
31.Calculus for Business II
Integration and its applications to business,
including consumer surplus and present
value of future income. Functions of several
variables and their derivatives; Emphasis
throughout the sequence on mathematical
modeling, the formulation of practical problems in mathematical terms. Only one of
MATH 12 or 31 may be taken for credit.
Note: MATH 11 is not a suitable prerequisite for MATH 31 without additional preparation. Prerequisite: MATH 30 or equivalent.
A grade of C– or higher in MATH 30
is strongly recommended before taking
MATH 31. (4 units)
44.Mathematics for
Elementary Teachers I
Problem solving and logical thinking approach to whole numbers: their nature,
counting, place value, computational operations, properties, and patterns. Intuitive
two-dimensional geometry and measurement, especially metric. Note: This course
requires participation in community-based
learning experiences off campus. (4 units)
NCX
45.Mathematics for
Elementary Teachers II
Problem solving and logical thinking approach to fractional numbers, integers, rational numbers, and real numbers: their nature,
computational operations, properties, and
patterns. Intuitive three-dimensional geometry and measurement, especially metric.
Functions, relations, and graphs. Prerequisite: MATH 44. (4 units) NCX
51.Discrete Mathematics
Logic, methods of proof, sets, functions,
modular arithmetic, cardinality, induction,
elementary combinatorial analysis, recursion, and relations. Also listed as COEN 19.
(4 units)
52.Introduction to Abstract Algebra
Groups, homomorphisms, isomorphisms,
quotient groups, fields, integral domains;
applications to number theory. Prerequisite:
MATH 51 or permission of the instructor.
(4 units)
53.Linear Algebra
Vector spaces, linear transformations, algebra of matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and inner products. Prerequisite:
MATH 13. (4 units)
90.Lower-Division Seminars
Basic techniques of problem solving. Topics
in algebra, geometry, and analysis. (1–4 units)
160 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: MATHEMATICS
Note: Although CSCI 10 is not explicitly listed 105.Theory of Functions
as a formal prerequisite, some upper-division
of a Complex Variable
courses suggested for computer science (math- Analytic functions. Cauchy integral theoematics) majors may presuppose the ability to rems, power series, conformal mapping. Riewrite computer programs in some language. mann surfaces. Offered in alternate years.
A number of upper-division courses do not (5 units)
have specific prerequisites. Students planning
to enroll should be aware, however, that all 111.Abstract Algebra I
upper-division courses in mathematics require Topics from the theory of groups. Offered in
some level of maturity in mathematics. Those alternate years. Prerequisites: MATH 52
without a reasonable background in lower- and 53. (5 units)
division courses are advised to check with in112.Abstract Algebra II
structors before enrolling.
Rings and ideals, algebraic extensions of
100.Writing in the
fields, and the Galois theory. Offered in alMathematical Sciences
ternate years. Prerequisite: MATH 111.
An introduction to writing and research in (5 units)
mathematics. Techniques in formulating research problems, standard proof methods, 113.Topology
and proof writing. Practice in mathematical Topological spaces and continuous funcexposition for a variety of audiences. Strongly tions. Separability and compactness. Introrecommended for mathematics and com- duction to covering spaces or combinatorial
puter science majors beginning their upper- topology. Offered in alternate years. Prereqdivision coursework. MATH 100 may not uisite: MATH 52, 53, or 102. (5 units)
be taken to fulfill any mathematics or computer science upper-division requirements 122.Probability and Statistics I
for students majoring or minoring in math- Sample spaces; conditional probability; inematics or computer science. Offered in dependence; random variables; discrete and
­alternate years. (5 units)
continuous probability distributions; expectation; moment-generating functions; weak
101.A Survey of Geometry
law of large numbers; central limit theorem.
Topics from advanced Euclidean, projective, Prerequisite: MATH 14. (5 units)
and non-Euclidean geometries. Symmetry.
123.Probability and Statistics II
Offered in alternate years. (5 units)
Confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.
102.Advanced Calculus
Maximum likelihood estimation. Analysis of
Vector calculus, functions of several vari- variance (ANOVA) and analysis of categoriables, elliptic integrals, line integrals, Stokes’s cal data. Simple and multiple linear regrestheorem, and the divergence theorem. sion. Optional topics may include
­Prerequisites: MATH 14 and 53. (5 units)
sufficiency, the Rao-Blackwell theorem, logistic regression, and nonparametric statis103.Advanced Linear Algebra
tics. Applications. Prerequisites: MATH 53
Abstract vector spaces, dimensionality, linear or permission of instructor and MATH 122.
transformations, isomorphisms, matrix (5 units)
a­
lgebra, eigenspaces and diagonalization,
­Cayley-Hamilton Theorem, canonical
forms, unitary and Hermitian operators, applications. Prerequisite: MATH 53. (5 units)
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 161
125.Mathematical Finance
Introduction to Ito calculus and stochastic
differential equations. Discrete lattice models. Models for the movement of stock and
bond prices using Brownian motion and
Poisson processes. Pricing models for equity
and bond options via Black-Scholes and its
variants. Optimal portfolio allocation. Solution techniques will include Monte Carlo
and finite difference methods. Prerequisite:
MATH 53 or permission of instructor and
MATH 122 or AMTH 108. (5 units)
154.Intermediate Analysis II
Continuation of MATH 153. Offered in
alternate years. Prerequisite: MATH 153.
(5 units)
133.Logic and Foundations
Deductive theories. Theories and models.
Consistency, completeness, decidability.
Theory of models. Cardinality of models.
Some related topics of metamathematics
and foundations. Open to upper-division
science and mathematics students and to
philosophy majors having sufficient logical
background. Offered on demand. (5 units)
165.Linear Programming
Algebraic background. Transportation problem. General simplex methods. Linear programming and theory of games. Numerical
methods. Offered in alternate years. Also
listed as CSCI 165. (5 units)
134.Set Theory
Naive set theory. Cardinal and ordinal arithmetic. Axiom of choice and continuum hypothesis. Axiomatic set theory. Offered on
demand. (5 units)
144.Partial Differential Equations
Linear partial differential equations with applications in physics and engineering, including wave (hyperbolic), heat (parabolic),
and Laplace (elliptic) equations. Solutions
on bounded and unbounded domains using
Fourier series and Fourier transforms. Introduction to nonlinear partial differential
equations. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: MATH 14. Recommended: MATH
22 or AMTH 106. (5 units)
153.Intermediate Analysis I
Rigorous investigation of the real number
system. Concepts of limit, continuity, differentiability of functions of one real variable,
uniform convergence, and theorems of differential and integral calculus. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: MATH 102 or
105 or permission of the instructor. (5 units)
155.Ordinary Differential Equations
Solutions to systems of linear differential
equations. Behavior of nonlinear autonomous two-dimensional systems. Uniqueness
and existence of solutions. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: MATH 53 or permission of instructor. (5 units)
166.Numerical Analysis
Numerical algorithms and techniques for
solving mathematical problems. Linear systems, integration, approximation of functions, solution of nonlinear equations.
Analysis of errors involved in the various
methods. Direct methods and iterative
methods. Also listed as CSCI 166. Prerequisites: The ability to program in some scientific
language, and MATH 53, or permission of
the instructor. (5 units)
170.Development of Mathematics
A selection of mathematical concepts with
their historical context. Offered in alternate
years. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing
in a science major. (5 units)
172.Problem Solving
Use of induction, analogy, and other techniques in solving mathematical problems.
Offered in alternate years. (5 units)
174.Differential Geometry
Introduction to curves and surfaces. FrenetSerret formulas, Gauss’ Theorema Egregium,
Gauss-Bonnet theorem (as time permits).
Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite:
MATH 53. (5 units)
162 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
175.Theory of Numbers
Fundamental theorems on divisibility,
primes, congruences. Number theoretic
functions. Diophantine equations. Quadratic residues. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: MATH 52. (5 units)
190.Upper-Division Seminars
Advanced topics in algebra, geometry, or
analysis. Research projects. May be repeated
for credit. (1–5 units)
192.Undergraduate Research
Research project supervised by a faculty
176.Combinatorics
member in the department. Prerequisite:
Permutations and combinations, generating Permission of the professor directing the
functions, recursion relations, inclusion-­ research must be secured before registering for
exclusion, Pólya counting theorem, and a this course. (1–5 units)
selection of topics from combinatorial
­geometry, graph enumeration, and algebraic 197.Advanced Topics
Areas of mathematics not ordinarily covered
combinatorics. (5 units)
in regularly scheduled courses, often areas of
177.Graph Theory
current interest. May be repeated for credit.
Selected topics from planarity, connected- (5 units)
ness, trees (enumeration), digraphs, graph
algorithms, and networks. Offered in alter- 198.Internship/Practicum
Guided study related to off-campus practical
nate years. (5 units)
work experience in mathematics or statistics.
178.Cryptography
Enrollment restricted to majors or minors of
History, classical cryptosystems, stream ci- the department. Prerequisite: Approval of a
phers, AES, RSA, discrete log over finite faculty sponsor. (1–5 units)
fields and elliptic curves, stream ciphers,
and signatures. Offered in alternate years. 199.Independent Study
Reading and investigation for superior stu(5 units)
dents under the direction of a staff member.
This can be used only to extend, not to duplicate, the content of other courses. May be
repeated for credit. (1–5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: COMPUTER SCIENCE
3. Introduction to Computing
10.Introduction to Computer Science
and Applications
Introduction to computer science and proAn overview course providing multiple per- gramming: overview of hardware and softspectives on computing. Students will learn ware organization; structured programming
the structures of computer programming techniques using C++; elementary algowithout writing code, gain high-level under- rithms and data structures; abstract data
standing of important computing systems types; the ethical and societal dimensions of
such as the Internet and databases, and dis- computers and technology. Primarily (but
cuss the impact of technology on society. not exclusively) for majors in computer sci(4 units)
ence, mathematics, and physical sciences.
CSCI 10 may not be taken for credit if the
student has received credit for COEN 10 or
a similar introductory programming course.
Prerequisite: MATH 11 (may be taken concurrently). (4 units)
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 163
60.Object-Oriented Programming
Object-oriented programming techniques
using C++: abstract data types and objects;
encapsulation; inheritance; polymorphism;
the Standard Template Library; the five
phases of software development (specification, design, implementation, analysis, and
testing). Prerequisite: CSCI 10 or an equivalent introductory course in a scientific language. (4 units)
61.Data Structures
Specification, implementations, and analysis
of basic data structures (stacks, queues,
graphs, hash tables, binary trees) and their
applications in sorting and searching algorithms. Prerequisite: CSCI 60. CSCI 61 and
COEN 12 cannot both be taken for credit.
(4 units)
90.Lower-Division Seminars
Basic techniques of problem solving. Topics
in computer science. (1–4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: COMPUTER SCIENCE
Note: Although CSCI 10 is not explicitly 162.Theory of Automata
listed as a formal prerequisite, some upperand Languages II
division courses suggested for computer science Continuation of CSCI 161. Offered on de(mathematics) majors may presuppose the mand. Prerequisite: CSCI 161. (5 units)
ability to write computer programs in some
language. A number of upper-division cours- 163.Theory of Algorithms
es do not have specific prerequisites. Students Introduction to techniques of design and
planning to enroll should be aware, however, analysis of algorithms: asymptotic notations
that all upper-division courses in computer and running times of recursive algorithms;
science require some level of maturity in com- design strategies: brute-force, divide and
puter science and mathematics. Those with- conquer, decrease and conquer, transform
out a reasonable background in lower-division and conquer, dynamic programming, greedy
courses are advised to check with instructors technique. Intractability: P and NP, approxibefore enrolling.
mation algorithms. Also listed as COEN
179. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or 52, or
161.Theory of Automata
equivalent, and CSCI 61 or equivalent.
and Languages I
(5 units)
Classification of automata, formal languages, and grammars. Chomsky hierarchy. Rep- 164.Computer Simulation
resentation of automata and grammars, Techniques for generation of probability disBNF. Deterministic and nondeterministic tributions. Monte Carlo methods for physifinite state automata. Regular expressions cal systems. Applications of computer
and languages. Push-down automata. Con- models, for example, queuing, scheduling,
text-free languages. Context-sensitive gram- simulation of physical or human systems.
mars and linear bounded automata. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: The
Recursively enumerable languages. Turing ability to program in some scientific lanmachines; normal forms; undecidability. Of- guage. MATH 122 recommended but not
fered in alternate years. Prerequisites: MATH required. (5 units) NCX
52 and CSCI 61 or equivalent. (5 units)
164 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
165.Linear Programming
Algebraic background. Transportation problem. General simplex methods. Linear programming and theory of games. Numerical
methods. Offered in alternate years. Also
listed as MATH 165. (5 units)
166.Numerical Analysis
Numerical algorithms and techniques for
solving mathematical problems. Linear systems, integration, approximation of functions, solution of nonlinear equations.
Analysis of errors involved in the various
methods. Direct methods and iterative
methods. Also listed as MATH 166. Prerequisites: The ability to program in some scientific language, and MATH 53 or permission
of the instructor. (5 units)
167.Switching Theory
and Boolean Algebra
Switching algebra and Boolean algebra.
Minimization via Karnaugh maps and
Quine-McCluskey, state compatibility, and
equivalence. Machine minimization. Faults.
State identification, finite memory, definiteness, information losslessness. Offered on
demand. (5 units)
168.Computer Graphics
Systematic and comprehensive overview of
interactive computer graphics, such as mathematical techniques for picture transformations and curve and surface approximations.
Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: The
ability to program in some scientific language. MATH 53 recommended but not required. (5 units)
169.Programming Languages
Comparative study of major classes of programming languages. Introduction to theoretical definitions of languages and run-time
concerns, with emphasis on good points and
deficiencies of various languages and on
using the appropriate language for a given
task. Programs written in several languages
(e.g., LISP, FORTRAN-2003, C, C++,
MPI). Offered in alternate years. (5 units)
181.Applied Cryptography
Key management, hash functions, stream
ciphers, web of trust, time stamping, secret
sharing, quantum cryptography, running
time analysis, cryptanalytic techniques.
Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite:
­
MATH 178. (5 units)
182.Digital Steganography
History and applications. Techniques: substitution, transform domain, distortion, statistical, cover. Evaluation: benchmarking,
statistical analysis. Attacks: distortion, counterfeiting, detection. Theory: perfect and
computational security. Offered on demand.
(5 units)
183.Data Science
Data manipulation, analysis, and visualization. Statistical modeling, dimension reduction and techniques of supervised and
unsupervised learning. Big data software
technologies. Prerequisites: The ability to
program in some scientific language and
MATH 122, or permission of the instructor.
(5 units)
190.Upper-Division Seminars
Advanced topics in computer science.
Research projects. May be repeated for
credit. (1–5 units)
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER SCIENCE 165
192.Undergraduate Research
Research project supervised by a faculty
member in the department. Permission of
the professor directing the research must be secured before registering for this course.
(1–5 units)
197.Advanced Topics
Areas of computer science not ordinarily
covered in regularly scheduled courses, often
areas of current interest. May be repeated for
credit. (5 units)
198.Internship/Practicum
Guided study related to off-campus practical
work experience in computer science. Enrollment restricted to majors or minors of
the department. Prerequisite: Approval of a
faculty sponsor. (1–5 units)
199.Independent Study
Reading and investigation for superior students under the direction of a faculty member. This can be used only to extend, not to
duplicate, the content of other courses. May
be repeated for credit. (1–5 units)
166 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
Professor Emeritus: Francisco Jiménez
Professors: Rose Marie Beebe, Catherine R. Montfort
Associate Professors: Jimia Boutouba, Josef Hellebrandt, Jill Pellettieri
(Department Chair), Tonia Caterina Riviello, Gudrun Tabbert-Jones
Assistant Professor: Alberto Ribas-Casasayas
Senior Lecturers: Irene Bubula-Phillips, Gloria Elsa Li, Lucia Varona
Lecturers: Maria Bauluz, Marie Bertola, Lucile Couplan-Cashman, Stephanie Daffer,
Yujie Ge, Jennifer Lisses, Yoshiko Miyakoshi, Irena Stefanova, Nina Tanti
The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures offers courses in Arabic, C
­ hinese,
French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish, as well as degree programs leading to the
bachelor of arts in French and Francophone Studies, German Studies, Italian Studies, or
Spanish Studies. Honors programs are available for French and German majors. In addition, the department offers minors in French and Francophone studies, German studies,
Italian studies, Japanese studies, and Spanish studies. The courses are designed to help students achieve proficiency in both the oral and written language and to provide them with
an understanding of the experiences, values, and traditions of those peoples whose languages are studied. Courses range from beginning language to linguistics, from an introduction to literary texts to advanced courses in literature and culture. All courses are open to any
student with the requisite preparation.
A few courses in literature and culture offered by the department are taught in English
and are open to all students. Some of these courses may be used as credit toward a major or
minor in French and Francophone studies, a major or minor in German studies, or a minor
in Japanese studies. However, these courses in English will not fulfill the Undergraduate
Core Curriculum foreign language requirement. Students may fulfill their second language
Core Curriculum requirement by successfully completing a proficiency examination in a
modern foreign language at the level for their program of study.
Students who have never studied the language in which they wish to enroll, or who have
studied that language for one year in high school, should register for Elementary Language
1. Those who wish to continue in a language that they have studied for two years in high
school should enter Elementary Language 2. Students with three or more years of study in
a single language, those who wish to continue language study beyond the second language
requirement, or those who feel following the formula would place them in a higher- or
lower-level course than their background warrants should consult a member of the appropriate language faculty for placement advice. Students having the necessary proficiency, as
demonstrated by an interview with a member of the language faculty, may enroll in highernumbered courses than those of the placement formula. Once proficiency has been established, lower-division students may enroll in upper-division courses with the permission of
the instructor. Such courses will be counted as fulfilling major or minor requirements.
Courses numbered 1 through 102 are not open to challenge; for courses numbered
above 102, consult the individual listing. For more information about placement and/or
proficiency, please visit the department’s website. Study abroad is a valuable enhancement
of the undergraduate experience and is particularly recommended for students pursuing a
major or minor in a foreign language. Both the Office of International Programs and the
student’s foreign language advisor should be consulted to ensure appropriate integration of
the work done abroad into the student’s program of study.
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 167
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of arts degree, students majoring in modern languages and literatures must complete the
following departmental requirements for their specific major:
Major in French and Francophone Studies
• FREN 100 and 101, or department-approved substitutes
• At least one course in French or Francophone literature
• Remaining electives in French or Francophone studies to total 40 quarter upperdivision units chosen with the approval of the student’s major advisor. At least 20 of
these units must be taken at SCU or taught by SCU faculty.
Major in German Studies
• GERM 100 and 101, or department-approved substitutes
• Remaining electives in German language, literature, and culture to total 40 quarter
upper-division units. At least 20 of these units must be taken at SCU or taught by
SCU faculty.
Major in Italian Studies
• ITAL 100 and 101, or department-approved substitutes
• Remaining electives in Italian language and literature to total 40 quarter upper-division
units, chosen with the student’s faculty advisor. At least 20 of these units must be
taken at SCU or taught by SCU faculty.
Major in Spanish Studies
• SPAN 100 and 101, or department-approved substitutes
• SPAN 175
• At least one survey course (but not more than three) from SPAN 120, 121, 130, 131
• One course in Latin American literature or culture
• One course in Spanish Peninsular literature or culture
• Remaining electives in Spanish language, literature and culture to total 40 quarter
units of upper-division work, chosen with the approval of the Spanish advisor.
At least 20 of these units must be taken at SCU or taught by SCU faculty.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINORS
Students must fulfill the following requirements for the specific minor in modern
languages and literatures:
Minor in French and Francophone Studies
• FREN 100 and 101, or department-approved substitutes
• At least one course in French or Francophone literature
•Remaining electives to total at least 19 quarter units of upper-division work in
French. At least 10 of these units must be taken at SCU or taught by SCU faculty.
168 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Minor in German Studies
• GERM 100 and 101, or department-approved substitutes
•Remaining electives to total at least 19 quarter units of upper-division work in
German. At least 10 of these units must be taken at SCU or taught by SCU faculty.
Minor in Italian Studies
• ITAL 100 and 101, or department-approved substitutes
• Remaining electives to total at least 19 quarter units of upper-division work in Italian.
At least 10 of these units must be taken at SCU or taught by SCU faculty.
Minor in Japanese Studies
• JAPN 100, 101, and 102, or department-approved substitutes
•Remaining electives to total at least 19 quarter units of upper-division work in
Japanese. At least 10 of these units must be taken at SCU or taught by SCU faculty.
Minor in Spanish Studies
• SPAN 100 and 101, or department-approved substitutes
• At least one course in Hispanic literature or culture
•Remaining electives to total at least 19 quarter units of upper-division work in
Spanish. At least 10 of these units must be taken at SCU or taught by SCU faculty.
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: ARABIC STUDIES
1. Elementary Arabic I
course are exposed to authentic reading and
This course introduces students to Modern listening materials that are of more depth
Standard Arabic (MSA) and the cultures of and length than those used in Arabic 1.
the Arabic-speaking world. Through the ­Prerequisite: ARAB 1 or equivalent. (4 units)
four basic skills of listening, speaking, read- 3. Elementary Arabic III
ing, writing, as well as cultural knowledge,
students will acquire basic knowledge and A continuation of Elementary Arabic II in
understanding in the writing system; sounds which students will acquire additional voand pronunciation of Arabic letters; Arabic cabulary, a more advanced understanding of
grammar; writing and reading basic sentenc- Arabic grammar, and will write and read
es; and building a list of vocabulary in MSA more complex materials with comprehension of case system and sentence structure.
and Colloquial Arabic. (4 units)
MSA through Al-Kitaab series textbooks
2. Elementary Arabic II
will be used to allow students to acquire adA continuation of Elementary Arabic 1 de- ditional knowledge and understanding in
signed for students to acquire additional vo- the structure of the Arabic language. Stucabulary, the rules of Arabic grammar, and dents in this course are exposed to authentic
reading more complex materials. MSA reading and listening materials through lecthrough Al-Kitaab series textbooks will be tures, discussions, exercises, and communiused to allow students to acquire additional cative language activities. Prerequisite: ARAB
knowledge and understanding in many areas 2 or equivalent. (4 units)
of the Arabic language. Students in this
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 169
21.Intermediate Arabic I
Focuses on reading and discussion of texts
dealing with the literature, arts, geography,
history, and culture of the Arabic-speaking
world. Review of the linguistic functions
and grammar structures of first-year Arabic.
The teaching/learning process in this level is
proficiency-oriented where emphasis is
placed on the functional usage of Arabic.
Prerequisite: ARAB 3 or equivalent. (4 units)
23.Intermediate Arabic III
Continuation of Intermediate Arabic II with
focus on grammatical and linguistic structure in texts dealing with the literature, arts,
geography, history, and culture of the Arabic-speaking world. The teaching/learning
process in this level is proficiency-oriented
where emphasis is placed on the functional
usage of Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 22 or
equivalent. (4 units)
22.Intermediate Arabic II
Continuation of Intermediate Arabic I with
focus on building additional vocabulary,
using Arabic-English dictionary, reading and
discussion of Arabic texts dealing with the
literature, arts, geography, history, and culture of the Arabic-speaking world. The
teaching/learning process in this level is proficiency-oriented where emphasis is placed
on the functional usage of Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 21 or equivalent. (4 units)
50.Intermediate Arabic Conversation
This course focuses on the spoken Arabic
dialect of the Levant (Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Palestine) as one of the major Arabic dialects spoken and understood in the
Arab world. The course is a combination of
lecture, discussion, exercises, and communicative language activities. It aims to develop
conversational skills focusing on the use of
topic-structured drills and activities that are
appropriate to the context in which the language will be spoken. Representative examples of colloquial literature, plays, songs, and
TV series will be introduced. Colloquial
­Arabic will be the primary language of instruction. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: ARABIC STUDIES
137.Arabic Culture and Identity
194.Peer Educator in Arabic
This course will introduce the students to Peer educators are invited by faculty to work
the major aspects of Arabic and Islamic cul- closely with them, facilitating learning in a
ture in the context of the complex history of lower-division course. May be repeated for
the Arabic world. It will include coverage of credit by permission of the instructor.
religious and ethnic diversity, language, the (2 units)
Arabic family structure, values traditions,
and customs. Arabic literatures and poetry 199.Directed Reading
from the classical period to the present will Individually designed programs of advanced
be introduced. The Arabic visual and per- readings. Written permission of the instructor
forming arts, music, food, and clothing will and department chair is required in advance
be covered. This course is open to all upper- of registration. (1–5 units)
division students who are interested in learning about Arabs and their culture. This
course is taught in English; knowledge of
Arabic is desirable but not required. Course
does not fulfill University Core foreign language requirement. (5 units)
170 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: CHINESE STUDIES
1. Elementary Chinese I
21.Intermediate Chinese I
Designed for those having no previous study The first course in a three-part review of
of Mandarin Chinese. A proficiency-based the fundamentals of spoken and written
course emphasizing communicative language Mandarin Chinese. Progressive readings and
skills (understanding, speaking, reading, and exercises in conversation and composition.
writing). Development of an understanding Development of an understanding of
of Chinese culture. (4 units)
­Chinese culture. Prerequisite: CHIN 3 or
equivalent. (4 units)
2. Elementary Chinese II
The second in a series of three courses, 22.Intermediate Chinese II
CHIN 2 emphasizes the development of Continuation of the review of Chinese
communicative language skills (understand- structure, together with progressive developing, speaking, reading, and writing). Devel- ment of all Chinese skills. Broadening apopment of an understanding of Chinese preciation of Chinese culture through
culture. Prerequisite: CHIN 1, or two years reading and discussion. Prerequisite: CHIN
of high school Chinese, or equivalent. (4 units) 21 or equivalent. (4 units)
3. Elementary Chinese III
CHIN 3 completes first-year Chinese. This
course emphasizes the development of communicative language skills (understanding,
speaking, reading, and writing). Development of an understanding of Chinese culture.
Prerequisite: CHIN 2 or equivalent. (4 units)
23.Intermediate Chinese III
Completion of intermediate Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 22 or equivalent. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: CHINESE STUDIES
100.Advanced Chinese I
102.Advanced Chinese III
This course is aimed at expanding the stu- This course completes the advanced Chinese
dent’s vocabulary in written and spoken series and is aimed at expanding the vocabuChinese, and developing the ability to com- lary in written and spoken Chinese and deprehend and use complex grammatical veloping an ability to comprehend and use
structures with ease. Course conducted in complex grammatical structures with ease.
Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 23 or equiva- Course conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite:
lent. (5 units)
CHIN 101 or equivalent. (5 units)
101.Advanced Chinese II
The second in a series of three courses,
CHIN 101 is aimed at expanding vocabulary in written and spoken Chinese, and developing the ability to comprehend and use
complex grammatical structures with ease.
Course conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite:
CHIN 100 or equivalent. (5 units)
127.Chinese History and Culture
This course introduces students to key aspects of China’s history and culture. This
course explores the legacies of various dynasties and significant historical events and figures in chronological order; and introduces
traditional Chinese ideology, traditions and
values, arts and crafts, folk customs, etc.
Course conducted in Chinese. Prerequisite:
Two years of Chinese language or equivalent.
(5 units)
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 171
137.Modern Chinese Culture
This course introduces students to the culture in modern China through literature
(fiction and other reading matter), popular
music, and film with an emphasis on business etiquette and culture in China. All readings are in English. No Chinese language is
required, though students with Chinese language background are encouraged to work
with Chinese sources if they wish. This
course does not fulfill the University Core
foreign language requirement. Prerequisite:
None. (5 units)
194.Peer Educator in Chinese
Peer educators are invited by faculty to work
closely with them, facilitating learning in a
lower-division course. May be repeated for
credit by permission of the instructor.
(2 units)
197.Special Topic
Variable topics in culture, literature, and
film. May be retaken for credit. (5 units)
NCX
198.Directed Study
Individually designed programs of advanced
study. Restricted to seniors who find themselves in special circumstances (i.e., Asian
Studies or International Studies minors).
May be taken only once. Courses exempted
from challenge may not be taken as directed
study. Written course outline must be approved by instructor and department chair in
advance of registration. (1–3 units)
199.Directed Reading
Individually designed programs of advanced
readings. Written permission of the instructor
and department chair is required in advance
of registration. (1–5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE STUDIES
1. Elementary French I
3. Elementary French III
The first in a series of three courses, FREN 1 This course completes the elementary
is intended for students who have had no French series. Like its preceding courses,
prior experience with French. It emphasizes FREN 3 emphasizes the development of
the development of communicative lan- communicative language skills and cultural
guage skills and cultural understanding. This understanding. This proficiency-based
proficiency-based course follows the text course follows the text Horizons and reHorizons and requires active performance in quires active performance in class. Offered
class. Offered only in Fall. Course conduct- only in spring. Course conducted in French.
ed in French. Prerequisite: None. (4 units)
Prerequisite: FREN 2 or equivalent. (4 units)
2. Elementary French II
The second in a series of three courses,
FREN 2 continues the development of
communicative language skills and cultural
understanding acquired in FREN I. This
proficiency-based course follows the text
Horizons and requires active participation in
class. Offered only in winter. Course conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 1, or
two years of high school French, or equivalent. (4 units)
21.Intermediate French I
The first of two courses reviewing the fundamentals of spoken and written French.
Readings in original prose, with an appreciation of French and Francophone cultures.
Requires participation in a one-hour conversation group once a week. Offered only in
fall. Prerequisite: FREN 3 or equivalent.
Course conducted in French. (4 units)
172 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
22.Intermediate French II
Continuation of the review of the fundamentals of spoken and written French. Further appreciation of French and Francophone
cultures through readings and discussions.
Requires participation in a one-hour conversation group once a week. Offered only in
winter. Course conducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 21 or equivalent. (4 units)
50.Intermediate French Conversation
A course concentrating on development of a
student’s ability to speak and understand
various French accents. Film viewing each
week. Recommended for students going
abroad. Course includes French-speaking
field trips and discussions with French visitors. No auditors. Prerequisite: FREN 22 or
equivalent. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE STUDIES
100.Advanced French I
104.French Translation
This course provides students with a system- The theory and practice of translation from
atic review of the fundamental structures of French to English, and from English to
French grammar and emphasizes the devel- French. Course conducted in French. Preopment of oral communication, cultural lit- requisite: FREN 100 or equivalent. (5 units)
eracy and analytic skills through different
genres of cultural expression. In this course, 106.Advanced French Conversation
students will gain a deeper insight into Recommended for students who will study
French thought, history and culture. An es- or work in France. Intensive oral work stresssential course for studying abroad. Course ing self-expression and discussion skills. Topconducted in French. Prerequisite: FREN 22 ics will be chosen from contemporary
readings and cross-cultural comparisons will
or equivalent. (5 units) NCX
be made with American society. No audi101.Advanced French II
tors. Prerequisite: FREN 100 or equivalent
Introduction to literary analysis in poetry, and permission of the instructor. Limited to
prose, and drama. Required of all majors 12 students. (5 units)
and minors. (May be taken concurrently
with certain other upper-division courses.) 108.French Business
Culture and Institutions
Course conducted in French. Prerequisite:
Basic French business terminology and pracFREN 100 or equivalent. (5 units)
tices. Business letter writing emphasized. Ex102.Advanced French III
amination of French business institutions
Variable topics in specific fields. (Studies (agriculture, finance, advertising, transportaabroad; units vary based on program)
tion, etc.). Special emphasis on understanding the underlying cultural mores that make
103.Advanced French Composition
French business different from U.S. busiDevelopment of concrete writing skills for a ness. Course conducted in French. (5 units)
variety of writing tasks, such as “explication
de textes,” “compte-rendu critique,” and 110.Introduction to French
Culture and Civilization
“essai argumentatif.” The correct use of syntax and lexicon, as well as the progression of Cultural, political, economic, artistic, educaideas will be stressed. Continuous writing tional, and social aspects of France. Course
assignments based on readings and a final conducted in French. (5 units)
essay are required. Course conducted in
French. Prerequisite: FREN 100 or equivalent. (5 units)
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 173
111.Introduction to Francophone
Studies
Cultural, political, economic, educational,
and social aspects of the Francophone world.
Exploration through literary works and films
of issues involving nationalism, race, gender,
identity, and alienation. Geographic areas
include the Caribbean, North Africa, subSaharan Africa, and Vietnam. Course conducted in French. (5 units)
113.Black African/Caribbean
Women Writers
An introduction to literature written by
black African/Caribbean women writers.
Through literature (interviews, personal testimonies, novels, autobiography) and film
(documentaries, movies), students will witness the changing faces of black Africa, from
colonial times to the present, as seen through
the eyes of women. Course conducted in
French. Also listed as WGST 123. (5 units)
114.Literatures and Cultures
of the Maghreb
This course focuses on works by Francophone writers and filmmakers from North
Africa (Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria). We shall
examine the historical and aesthetic evolution of this literary and filmic production,
and how it reflects on the colonial past and
the postcolonial condition. Other topics include the way these writers and filmmakers
seek to construct identities in the wake of
profound cultural changes brought about by
colonization, decolonization, immigration,
and globalization, and how they expose the
power conflicts along the lines of class, gender, race, ethnicity, and national belonging.
Attention will also be devoted to the discursive strategies and filmmaking practices that
they elaborate to address these issues in a resistant, subversive, and direct criticism.
Course conducted in French. (5 units)
115.Major Works of
French Literature I
Readings in French literature from its beginnings in the Moyen Age to the end of the
18th century. Rotated topics include the
theme of love, the comic, the writer’s relationship to societies, the emerging genre of
the theatre, etc. Course conducted in French.
(5 units)
116.Major Works of
French Literature II
Readings in French literature of the 19th
and 20th centuries. Rotated topics include
drama, the novel, literature and the arts, experimentation (literary and dramatic), etc.
Course conducted in French. May be taken
independently of FREN 115. (5 units)
117. French Orientalism:
Representation of Otherness
in Literature, Cinema, and
Visual Arts
This course examines differing constructions
of the Oriental “Other” as it took shape in
French literary and non-literary representations from the 18th to the 21st century. We
will analyze how politics and ideology inform the construction and reproduction of
knowledge about the “Other” as well as the
complex interactions between race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, exoticism, and the various subject-object positions occupied by the
observer, traveler, writer/voyeur. We will also
analyze how these French writers, painters,
photographers, travelers, and filmmakers
have used alterity as a mirror for self-reflection, as a tool to critique sociopolitical practices, and as the locus of a threat to cultural
homogeneity and national identity. This
course will engage theories of Orientalism,
identity and difference, and colonialism and
postcolonialism. Selected literary texts, paintings and films include works by ­Montesquieu,
Pierre Loti, Théophile ­
Gautier, Flaubert,
Delacroix, Matisse, Albert Camus, Allegret,
and Coline Serreau. (5 units)
174 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
120.Moyen Age
Epic, lyric, and courtly literature of medieval
France: Roland, l’amour courtois and the
Troubadours, Chrétien de Troyes, Tristan et
Iseut, Artur, the early theatre. Course conducted in French. (5 units)
170.20th Century I: Mémoires
et Souvenirs
Writings of la belle époque and entre deux
guerres (Proust, Gide, Apollinaire, Dada,
surrealism, etc.). Course conducted in
French. (5 units)
130.Humanism and the Renaissance
La Renaissance: readings in Rabelais, the
Pléiade poets, and Montaigne. Course conducted in French. (5 units)
171.20th Century II:
The Existentialist Hero
The engagée literature, the anti-theatre, the
new novel, and current directions (Anouilh,
Sartre, Camus, Ionesco, Robbe-Grillet,
Tournier, etc.). Course conducted in French.
(5 units)
140.Le Grand Siècle: Theatre
in the Age of Louis XIV
Stress on classical tragedy and comedy in
France, with special emphasis on the social
and political context in which these genres
were produced. Additional materials will be
drawn from other writers of the 17th century such as Descartes, Pascal, Mme de La
­Fayette, and La Fontaine. Course conducted
in French. (5 units) NCX
150.The French Enlightenment
Exploration of the major philosophical, literary, and artistic movements in France between the years 1715 (Louis XIV’s death)
and 1789 (the French Revolution), with an
emphasis on their uneasy relationship to the
social, political, and religious institutions
of pre-revolutionary France. Texts by
Montesquieu, Voltaire, Mme de Charrière,
Mme de Graffigny, Rousseau, and others.
Course conducted in French. (5 units)
160.19th Century I: Romantic
and Romantique
Romantic literature: prose and poetry
(Chateaubriand, Stendhal, Lamartine, Hugo,
Balzac, Vigny, etc.). Course conducted in
French. (5 units)
161.19th Century II: Le réel
et le symbolique
Realist, naturalist, and symbolist literature
(Baudelaire, Flaubert, Mallarmé, etc.). Course
conducted in French. (5 units)
172.Cinéma
An examination of the evolution of style and
theme in French cinema from its birth in
1895 to the present. Study of films by major
directors (Renoir, Pagnol, Cocteau, Truffaut,
Malle, Beineix, Diane Kurys). Main themes
of French culture illustrated in the films.
Course conducted in French. (5 units)
173. Immigration, Race, and Identity
in Contemporary France
This course explores the experience of immigrants and their children to France as portrayed by authors and filmmakers from
different origins. It centers on the historical
and political circumstances that form the
context of this artistic production and examines the theoretical problems involved in
analyzing questions of immigration, marginalization, race, gender, ethnicity, and national identity in France. Course conducted in
French. Prerequisite: FREN 101 or equivalent. (5 units)
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 175
182.Women in French Literature:
Authors and Characters
Literary analysis of the woman question formulated through the works of important
French writers, both female and male, from
the Middle Ages to the 21st century. Provides information on French women writers’
contributions with, as background, information on French women’s roles and experiences throughout the ages. Special attention
will be given to the continuity among
women writers and to the impact of their
minority status upon their writing. Readings
set against the backdrop of the Monarchy,
the French Revolution of 1789, the Napoleonic regime, the Franco-Prussian war, and
the two World Wars will point out to an
emerging feminist awareness that found expression in both literature and political activism. Course conducted in French. Also listed
as WGST 176. (5 units)
183.20th- and 21st-Century
French Women Writers
The varied literary contributions of French
and Francophone writers such as Colette,
Simone de Beauvoir, Marguerite Duras,
Elisabeth Badinter, Gabrielle Roy, Mariama
Bâ; their differing perceptions of the traditional stereotypes of women and perspectives related to social class. Consideration of
whether feminine literature has unique qualities. Course conducted in French. Also listed
as WGST 177. (5 units)
185.French Applied Linguistics
Aspects of modern French linguistics (phonology, phonetics, morphology, syntax).
Contrastive analysis. Course conducted in
French. (5 units) NCX
186.Politics of Love
Students will focus on the theme of love
(from Tristan and Iseult’s passionate love to
the modern concept of love and marriage)
and study how different literary movements
have adapted love stories to reflect their values and their visions of the world. Why do
these cultural representations and social constructions of the gendered human body and
sexuality often show off the social insertion
of the hero and the exclusion of feminine
characters? In other words, what are the social, sexual, political consequences of the
power games present in the love stories read
this quarter? Course conducted in French.
(5 units)
194.Peer Educator in French
Peer educators are invited by faculty to work
closely with them, facilitating learning in a
lower-division course. May be repeated for
credit by permission of the instructor.
(2 units)
197.Special Topics
Variable topics in culture, literature, and
film. May be retaken for credit. (5 units)
NCX
198.Directed Study
Individually designed programs of advanced
study. Normally restricted to seniors who are
declared French and Francophone studies
majors or minors and who find themselves
in special circumstances. May be taken only
once. Courses exempted from challenge may
not be taken as directed study. Written course
outline must be approved by instructor and
department chair in advance of registration.
(1–3 units)
199.Directed Reading
Individually designed programs of advanced
readings. Written permission of the instructor
and department chair is required in advance
of registration. (1–5 units)
176 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LITERATURE AND CULTURE IN TRANSLATION
Note: The following three courses are litera- 174.French and Francophone
ture and culture in translation courses taught
French Novels and Films: Culture,
in English and cannot be used to fulfill the
Gender, and Social Classes
Undergraduate Core Curriculum second lan- Covers both classic French and Francophone
guage requirement. One course may be novels (including novels from black Africa,
counted toward the French and Francophone the Caribbean, and Vietnam), and films
studies major or minor.
based on the same texts. The goals are (1) to
introduce students to French and Franco112.Human Rights in France,
phone culture through analysis of significant
Black Africa, and the Caribbean
texts and through the lens of films, and (2)
Provides a framework on France and its co- to develop critical skills of interpretation aplonial empire and presents important male plicable to all disciplines. Conducted in
writings during the colonial period, and English but contains a French component for
deals with texts written by women writers in French and Francophone studies majors and
a recent past. Focuses on cultural identity minors. Also listed as WGST 175. (5 units)
and human rights, yet special attention will
be given to the ways in which self-represen- 184.20th-Century French Women
tation is achieved by the female writing subWriters in Translation
ject. Conducted in English but contains a The varied literary contributions of French
French component for French and Franco- and Francophone writers. Readings selected
phone studies majors and minors. (5 units)
mainly from writers of the second half of the
20th century. Consideration of whether
feminine literature has unique qualities.
Conducted in English but contains a French
component for French and Francophone
studies majors and minors. Also listed as
WGST 178. (5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: GERMAN STUDIES
1. Elementary German I
3. Elementary German III
Designed for those having no previous study GERM 3 completes first-year German. This
of German. A proficiency-based course em- course emphasizes the development of comphasizing communicative language skills municative language skills (understanding,
(understanding, speaking, reading, and writ- speaking, reading, and writing). Developing). Cultural information on German- ment of an understanding of Germanspeaking countries. (4 units)
speaking countries. Prerequisite: GERM 2 or
equivalent. (4 units)
2. Elementary German II
The second in a series of three courses, 5. German for Reading Knowledge
GERM 2 emphasizes the development of Alternate to GERM 3 leading to the reading
communicative language skills (understand- of scholarly articles in various fields of study.
ing, speaking, reading, and writing). Devel- Prerequisite: GERM 2 or equivalent. (4 units)
opment of an understanding of the cultures
of German-speaking countries. Prerequisite:
GERM 1, or two years of high school
­German, or equivalent. (4 units)
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 177
21.Intermediate German I
Review of German grammar, short stories,
or essays on culture and civilization. Progressive exercises in conversation. Prerequisite:
GERM 3 or 5 or equivalent. (4 units)
22.Intermediate German II
Continuation of GERM 21. Accelerated
readings, conversation, and writing. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: GERMAN STUDIES
100.Advanced German I
111.Contemporary German
Civilization
Advanced reading, composition, and conversation. Emphasis on conversation and Geography, culture, education, politics, and
career-oriented language. Required of all mi- the economy in the German-speaking counnors. Prerequisite: GERM 22 or equivalent. tries since 1945. Prerequisite: GERM 100 or
(5 units)
equivalent. (5 units)
101.Advanced German II
Reading of literary texts, composition, and
discussion. Required of all minors. Completion or equivalent knowledge admits
­students to higher-numbered courses. Prerequisite: GERM 100 or equivalent. (5 units)
106.Advanced German Conversation
Advanced work stressing the development
of self-expression in German. Prerequisite:
GERM 22 or equivalent. (5 units)
108.German Business Culture
and Institutions
Introduction to the language of business
German. Insights into Germany’s place in
the global economy. The topics, language,
and skill-building exercises offer an excellent
preparation for students who, after two years
of college-level German, plan to pursue careers in international companies and institutions. At the same time, the materials are
appropriate for German majors or minors
who want to gain insight into contemporary
German culture and civilization. (5 units)
110.History of German Civilization
Cultural history of the German-speaking
countries from earliest times to 1945.
Prerequisite: GERM 100 or equivalent.
(5 units)
112.Germany in the Media
How do Germans and Americans view
­Germany? This course highlights the role of
the media in portraying Germany’s image
inside and outside of Germany. It examines
how print and electronic media in both
countries present selected themes and topics
in the following categories: arts, economy,
education, politics, and the sciences; and
how the media shape public opinion about
Germany. (5 units)
113. German Film: From Fassbinder
to Faith Akin
This course introduces students to German
cinema from the 1970s to the present.
Through films such as The Marriage of
Maria Braun, Run Lola Run, Nowhere in
Africa, Good Bye, Lenin!, and Gegen die
Wand, students gain insights into the cultural, social, and political history of modern
Germany. Prerequisite: GERM 22 or equivalent. (5 units)
130.The Classical Age
Major works by Goethe and Schiller. (5 units)
140.19th-Century Romanticism
Philosophy of the Romantics. German fairy
tale. Selected works by Kleist, Eichendorff,
Heine, and Wagner. (5 units)
178 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
141.19th-Century Realism
Works by Büchner, Hebbel, Fontane, Marx,
and Hauptmann. (5 units)
150.20th-Century Novel
Works by Kafka, Hesse, Thomas Mann,
Christa Wolf, Böll, and others. (5 units)
151.20th-Century Drama
Plays by Brecht, Borchert, Frisch, and
Dürrenmatt, and Brecht’s theoretical writings.
(5 units)
160.The German Novelle
Characteristic features of the Novelle as opposed to Roman and Erzählung. Examples
from Theodor Storm to Thomas Mann.
(5 units)
161.Survey of Lyric Poetry
Introduction to the analysis of poetry.
­Numerous examples from all German literary periods beginning with 1600. (5 units)
174.German Novels and Films
Various topics will be covered. (5 units)
182.Women in German Literature:
Authors and Characters
Works by and about German women.
Authors studied include Droste-Hulshof,
Böll, Wolf, Handke, Kaschnitz, Wander,
and others. Also listed as WGST 179. (5 units)
183.20th-Century German
Women Authors and Artists
A selection from contributions by German
women writers and film producers from the
second half of the 20th century. (5 units)
194.Peer Educator in German
Peer educators are invited by faculty to work
closely with them, facilitating learning in a
lower-division course. May be repeated for
credit by permission of the instructor.
(2 units)
197.Special Topics
Variable topics in culture and literature. May
be retaken for credit. (5 units) NCX
198.Directed Study
Individually designed programs of advanced
study. Normally restricted to seniors who are
declared German studies majors or minors
and who find themselves in special circumstances. May be taken only once. Courses
exempted from challenge may not be taken
as directed study. Written course outline must
be approved by instructor and department
chair in advance of registration. (1–3 units)
199.Directed Reading
Individually designed programs of advanced
readings. Written permission of the instructor
and department chair is required in advance
of registration. (1–5 units) NCX
LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION
Note: Literature in translation courses are
taught in English and cannot be used to
fulfill the second language requirement. One
course may be counted toward the German
studies minor.
115.German Literature in
English Translation
Reading and analysis of masterpieces of
German literature written between 1750
and 1970. Selection dependent upon
available translations. (5 units) NCX
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 179
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: ITALIAN STUDIES
1. Elementary Italian I
3. Elementary Italian III
Designed for those having no previous study ITAL 3 completes first-year Italian. This
of Italian. A proficiency-based course em- course emphasizes the development of comphasizing the development of communica- municative language skills (understanding,
tive language skills (understanding, speaking, speaking, reading, and writing). Developreading, and writing). Development of an ment of an understanding of Italian culture.
understanding of Italian culture. (4 units)
Prerequisite: ITAL 2 or equivalent. (4 units)
2. Elementary Italian II
The second in a series of three courses, ITAL
2 emphasizes the development of communicative language skills (understanding, speaking, reading, and writing). Development of
an understanding of Italian culture. Prerequisite: ITAL 1, or two years of high school
Italian, or equivalent. (4 units)
21.Intermediate Italian I
Review of fundamentals of spoken and written Italian. Progressive readings reflecting
Italian culture and values. Progressive exercises in conversation and composition. Prerequisite: ITAL 3 or equivalent. (4 units)
22.Intermediate Italian II
Continuation of ITAL 21. Prerequisite:
ITAL 21 or equivalent. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: ITALIAN STUDIES
100.Advanced Italian I
106.Advanced Italian Conversation
Composition, reading, and conversation. Advanced work stressing the development
Required of all majors and minors. Prerequi- of self-expression in Italian. Prerequisites:
site: ITAL 22. (5 units)
ITAL 101 or equivalent, and permission of
the instructor. (5 units) NCX
101.Advanced Italian II
Continuation of ITAL 100. Required of all 110.Italian Civilization I
majors and minors. Prerequisite: ITAL 100 Fundamental aspects of Italian history,
or equivalent. (5 units)
art, and culture from their origins to the
Seicento. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equiva102. Advanced Italian III
lent. (5 units) NCX
This course is designed to further develop
students’ proficiency in listening, speaking, 111.Italian Civilization II
reading, and writing at an advanced level, Continuation of ITAL 110. May be taken
and to deepen cultural perspectives on the independently. From the Settecento to the
Italian-speaking world. This course includes present. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivaadvanced composition and communication, lent. (5 units)
grammar review, and analysis of literary
texts, media, and cinema. Prerequisite: ITAL
101 or equivalent. (5 units)
180 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
113.Cinema e Cultura
A cultural portrait of modern Italy as reflected
in its cinema. Films by Roberto Rossellini,
Luchino Visconti, Vittorio De Sica,
Michelangelo Antonioni, Federico Fellini,
Francesco Rosi, Bernardo Bertolucci,
Massimo Troisi, Ettore Scola, Mario
Monicelli, and Marco Bellocchio illustrate
cultural and intellectual change in the 20th
century. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent. (5 units)
120.Survey of Italian Literature I
From its origin to the Seicento. Prerequisite:
ITAL 101 or equivalent. (5 units)
121.Survey of Italian Literature II
From the Settecento to the present. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent. (5 units)
125.Colloquium: Italian
Literature and Culture
Topic varies. Study and discussion of selected themes in Italian literature and culture.
May be retaken for credit. Prerequisite:
ITAL 101 or equivalent. (5 units) NCX
130.Dante, La Divina Commedia I
Inferno and Purgatorio. Prerequisite: ITAL
101 or equivalent. (5 units)
131.Dante, La Divina Commedia II
Purgatorio and Paradiso. Prerequisite: ITAL
101 or equivalent. (5 units)
140.Duecento, Trecento
Emphasis on Dante’s minor works, Petrarch’s
poetry, and Boccaccio’s Decameron. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent. (5 units)
150.Quattrocento, Cinquecento
(Rinascimento)
Important trends in the literary masterpieces
of the Renaissance. Significant works of Ariosto, Tasso, Leonardo, Machiavelli, Lorenzo
de Medici, Poliziano, Castiglione. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent. (5 units)
160.Settecento
Salient works of Vico, Goldoni, Parini, and
Alfieri. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent.
(5 units)
170.Ottocento, I Promessi Sposi
Discussion of the works of Foscolo, Leopardi, Manzoni’s poetry. Carducci, Pascoli, and
Verga. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent.
(5 units)
180.Novecento Italian Literature
of the 20th Century
Main trends in poetry, drama, and the novel
from Pirandello to the present. Prerequisite:
ITAL 101 or equivalent. (5 units)
182.20th-Century Italian
Women Writers
Critical analysis of major works by leading
women writers and the changing role of
women in 20th-century Italian society:
Grazia Deledda, Sibilla Aleramo, Elsa
Morante, Natalia Ginzburg, Maria Bellonci,
Laudomia Bonanni, Lalla Romano, Milena
Milani, Francesca Sanvitale, Romana Petri,
Isabella Bossi Fedrigotti, and Gina Lagorio.
Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent.
Also listed as WGST 185. (5 units)
183.Women in Italian Cinema:
The Impact of Globalization
Focus is on the films with a global viewpoint
of numerous Italian film directors. Examination of Italian masterpieces (including blackand-white films of the 40s and 50s) with
special focus on the changing aspects of
global society and their impact on individuals, especially women. Films by women directors whose work may give a contrasting
vision of globalization and its enabling and
challenging aspects. Prerequisite: ITAL 101
or equivalent. (5 units)
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 181
194.Peer Educator in Italian
Peer educators are invited by faculty to work
closely with them, facilitating learning in a
lower-division course. May be repeated for
credit by permission of the instructor.
(2 units)
197.Special Topics
Variable topics in culture, literature, and
film. May be retaken for credit. (5 units)
NCX
198.Directed Study
Individually designed programs of advanced
study. Normally restricted to seniors who are
declared Italian studies majors or minors and
who find themselves in special circumstances. May be taken only once. Courses exempted from challenge may not be taken as
directed study. Written course outline must
be approved by instructor and department
chair in advance of registration. Prerequisite:
ITAL 101 or equivalent. (1–3 units)
199.Directed Reading
Individually designed programs of advanced
readings. For seniors only. Written permission of the instructor and department chair is
required in advance of registration. Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent. (1–5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: JAPANESE STUDIES
1. Elementary Japanese I
3. Elementary Japanese III
Designed for those having no previous study This class continues instruction in basic
of Japanese. A proficiency-based course em- communication skills in Japanese. An oral
phasizing the development of communica- teaching approach is taken to develop profitive language skills (understanding, speaking, ciency in comprehending and using elemenreading, and writing). Development of an tary vocabulary and grammatical structures.
understanding of Japanese culture. (4 units)
New Chinese characters continue to be introduced, and reading and writing practiced.
2. Elementary Japanese II
Prerequisite: JAPN 2 or equivalent. (4 units)
Continuation of JAPN 1. An oral teaching
approach is taken to further develop profi- 21.Intermediate Japanese I
ciency in comprehending and using elemen- New grammatical structures and additional
tary vocabulary and grammatical structures. written characters. Progressive exercises to
Some ability to write Hiragana and Katakana develop facility in conversation, reading, and
is expected. Students will begin reading texts composition. Prerequisite: JAPN 3 or equivin Japanese and learning Chinese characters alent. (4 units)
(kanji). We will learn 56 new kanji. Pertinent aspects of Japanese culture are also dis- 22.Intermediate Japanese II
cussed. Prerequisite: JAPN 1 or equivalent. Continuation of JAPN 21. Prerequisite:
JAPN 21 or equivalent. (4 units)
(4 units)
23.Intermediate Japanese III
Completion of intermediate Japanese. Prerequisite: JAPN 22 or equivalent. (4 units)
182 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: JAPANESE STUDIES
100.Advanced Japanese I
194.Peer Educator in Japanese
Continued practice in using complex gram- Peer educators are invited by faculty to work
matical structures. Reading and discussion closely with them, facilitating learning in a
of topics taken from a variety of sources. Pre- lower-division course. May be repeated for
requisite: JAPN 23 or equivalent. (5 units)
credit by permission of the instructor.
(2 units)
101.Advanced Japanese II
Continuation of JAPN 100. Prerequisite: 198.Directed Study
JAPN 100 or equivalent. (5 units)
Individually designed programs of advanced
study. Normally restricted to seniors who are
102.Advanced Japanese III
declared Japanese studies minors and who
Completion of advanced Japanese. Prerequi- find themselves in special circumstances.
site: JAPN 101 or equivalent. (5 units)
May be taken only once. Courses exempted
from challenge may not be taken as directed
113.Readings in Japanese I
study. Written course outline must be apReadings and discussions in Japanese of se- proved by instructor and department chair in
lected sociological, literary, and journalistic advance of registration. (1–3 units)
texts. Prerequisite: JAPN 102 or equivalent.
199.Directed Reading
(5 units)
Individually designed programs of advanced
114.Readings in Japanese II
readings. Written permission of instructor
Continuation of JAPN 113. Prerequisite: and department chair required in advance of
JAPN 113 or equivalent. (5 units)
registration. (1–5 units) NCX
115.Readings in Japanese III
Completion of readings in Japanese. Prerequisite: JAPN 114 or equivalent. (5 units)
LITERATURE AND CULTURE TAUGHT IN ENGLISH
Note: The following course is a literature and flower arrangement, and Japanese cooking.
culture course taught in English and cannot Japanese values will concentrate on such key
be used to fulfill the Undergraduate Core concepts as seniority rules, the virtue of
Curriculum second language requirement. modesty, private versus public stance, BushiOne course (5 units) may be counted toward do (the way of the warrior), arranged marthe Japanese studies minor.
riage, and child-rearing practices. Japanese
communication will focus on ambiguity, si137.Japanese Culture
lence, dual meanings of inner and outer
An introduction to Japanese customs, values, groups, and calligraphy. Prerequisite: None.
and communication styles. Japanese cus- (5 units)
toms will include basic protocol for getting
to know Japanese people, the tea ceremony,
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 183
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: SPANISH STUDIES
1. Elementary Spanish I
All students enrolled in SPAN 21EL will
Designed for those having no previous study be automatically enrolled in SPAN 97
of Spanish. A proficiency-based course em- (Community-Based Learning Practicum) at
phasizing the development of communica- the end of the first week of class. Course
tive language skills (understanding, speaking, conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3
reading, and writing). Development of an or three years of high school Spanish. (4 units)
understanding of Hispanic culture. (4 units) 22.Intermediate Spanish II
2. Elementary Spanish II
The second in a series of three courses,
SPAN 2 emphasizes the development of
communicative language skills (understanding, speaking, reading, and writing). Development of an understanding of Hispanic
culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 1, or two years of
high school Spanish, or equivalent. (4 units)
A continuation of Spanish 21, further develops oral and written communication skills
through the study of culture, grammar, vocabulary, and authentic literature and media.
Authentic communicative activities are emphasized inside the classroom. Course conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 21 or
equivalent. (4 units)
3. Elementary Spanish III
SPAN 3 completes first-year Spanish. This
course emphasizes the development of communicative language skills (understanding,
speaking, reading, and writing). Development of an understanding of Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 2 or equivalent.
(4 units)
22EL.Intermediate Spanish II—
Experiential Learning
Continuation of Spanish 21EL, further develops oral and written communication
skills through the study of culture, grammar,
vocabulary, and authentic literature and
media. Authentic communicative activities
are emphasized inside the classroom and
through community-based learning outside
of the classroom. All sections of SPAN 22EL
contain an integrated Experiential Learning
component, using a reflective communitybased learning placement. All students enrolled in SPAN 22EL will be automatically
enrolled in SPAN 97 (Community-Based
Learning Practicum) at the end of the first
week of class. Course conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 21, 21EL, or equivalent.
(4 units)
21.Intermediate Spanish I
First in a three-part review of the fundamentals of spoken and written Spanish. Progressive readings and exercises in conversation
and composition. Development of an understanding of Hispanic culture. Course
conducted in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 3
or three years of high school Spanish. Does
not fulfill the Experiential Learning component of Core 2009. (4 units)
21EL.Intermediate Spanish I—
Experiential Learning
First in a three-part review of the fundamentals of spoken and written Spanish. Progressive readings and exercises in conversation
and composition. Development of an understanding of Hispanic culture. All sections
of SPAN 21EL contain an integrated Experiential Learning component, using a reflective community-based learning placement.
23.Intermediate Spanish III
Completes the intermediate sequence. Further develops skills of Spanish, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Develops an appreciation of Hispanic values
and civilization along with continued progress in the language. Course conducted in
Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 22 or equivalent. (4 units)
184 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
23EL.Intermediate Spanish III—
Experiential Learning
Completes the intermediate sequence. Further develops skills of Spanish, including listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Special attention is given to developing an
appreciation of Hispanic values and civilization along with making continued progress
in the language. All sections of SPAN 23EL
contain an integrated Experiential Learning
component, using a reflective communitybased learning placement. All students enrolled in SPAN 23EL will be automatically
enrolled in SPAN 97 (Community-Based
Learning Practicum) at the end of the first
week of class. Course conducted in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 22, 22EL, or equivalent.
(4 units)
97.Community-Based
Learning Practicum
For students concurrently enrolled in SPAN
21EL, 22EL, or 23EL, an Experiential
Learning for Social Justice component, an
integrated, reflective, community-based
learning placement. Includes eight weeks of
participatory work in a community agency.
Requirements: Two hours per week at agency
site over course of the placement. (1 unit)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: SPANISH STUDIES
100.Advanced Spanish I
107.Advanced Spanish Composition
Continued development of all Spanish skills Intensive systematic development of the
at an advanced level. Special attention to forms of discourse in Spanish. (5 units)
composition. Systematic introduction to lit- NCX
erary analysis. Required of all majors and
minors. Prerequisite: SPAN 23 or equiva- 108.Spanish for Advanced
Spanish Speakers
lent. (5 units)
Native and near-native oral/aural proficien101.Advanced Spanish II
cy. A course for native and near-native speakContinued development of all Spanish skills ers who learned Spanish in a home
and completion of the introduction to liter- environment and/or were residents in a
ary analysis begun in SPAN 100. Required Spanish-speaking country, but who may not
of all majors and minors. Prerequisite: SPAN have had formal training in the language.
100 or equivalent. (5 units)
Emphasis on cultural exploration and the
grammatical problems of such speakers. SpeNote: Admission to the following upper- cial emphasis given to improvement of writdivision courses requires completion of ten expression, grammar, and orthography.
SPAN 100 and 101 or evidence of equivalent Prerequisite: At least four years of high school
preparation.
Spanish or completion of Intermediate
S­
panish at the university level. (5 units)
102.Advanced Spanish III
NCX
Advanced reading, composition, and conversation. (Studies abroad; units vary based
on program)
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 185
110.Advanced Spanish Conversation
A course designed to enhance advanced students’ command of spoken Spanish through
discussion of cultural, social, and contemporary political issues. As a result, students will
see their vocabulary increase and will thus be
able to expand their use of more advanced
grammatical structures. (5 units) NCX
112.Mexican Culture
Although Mexico is a neighboring country,
bordering California itself, its image in
America is profoundly deformed and simplified. Through a selection of readings and
films, the course offers an introductory review of Mexican history, contemporary social and political developments, and fine arts
and music, with particular attention to cultural values. Most readings in Spanish, films
in Spanish with English subtitles. Prerequisite: SPAN 100 or equivalent. (5 units)
113.The Revolution in
Mexican Culture
Readings and analysis of the works of
­Mexican writers and artists that interpret the
Mexican Revolution of 1910 and reflect
Mexican culture. (5 units)
114. Culture and Society of
the U.S.‑Mexico Border
A study of social and cultural aspects of the
U.S.-Mexico border. This course discusses
topics such as labor, environmental, immigration, and women’s issues, but with attention also to current discourse on the border
in cultural critique and the arts. By the end
of the course, students will be expected to
have developed a more coherent and sophisticated view of the border region than that
generally purported by commercial media
outlets. Prerequisite: SPAN 100 or equivalent. Recommended prerequisite: SPAN 101
or equivalent. (5 units)
120.Major Works of
Spanish Literature I
Readings in Spanish literature from the early
forms of Spanish literature to the end of the
17th century. (5 units)
121.Major Works of
Spanish Literature II
Readings in Spanish literature of the 18th
and 19th centuries. Continuation of SPAN
120. May be taken separately. (5 units)
122.The Spanish Picaresque Novel
A study of the development of the Spanish
picaresque novel and its influence on other
European literatures. Key works, analyzed
from a socio-historical perspective, include
Lazarillo de Tormes (1554), El Guzmán de
Alfarache (1599), and El Buscón (1626).
(5 units)
123.Siglo de Oro Drama
A study of the Spanish comedia of the Siglo
de Oro. Particular emphasis on the impact
of Lope de Vega and the creation of a national theatre. Literary analysis of the comedias of the most representative Spanish
dramatists of the period: Calderón de la
Barca, Rojas Zorilla, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz
de Alarcón, Guillén de Castro, and Lope de
Vega. (5 units)
124.Realism in the 19th-Century
Spanish Novel
A study of the decline of Romanticism and
the evolution of the Realist movement in
19th-century Spain. Special emphasis on the
novels of Alarcón, Galdós, and Blasco
Ibáñez. (5 units)
125.Colloquium: Spanish
Literature and Culture
Topic varies. Study and discussion of selected themes in Spanish Peninsular literature
and culture. May be retaken for credit.
(5 units) NCX
186 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
130.Survey of Latin American
139. Haunted Literature: Ghosts
Literature I
and the Talking Dead in
Latin‑American Narrative
Latin American literature from the pre-­
Columbian period to 1888. (5 units)
Ghosts hauntings, the talking dead, and the
persistence of something absent are recur131.Survey of Latin American
rent tropes in the Latin American cultural
Literature II
imagination. Through a selection of fiction,
Latin American literature from 1888 to film, and critical writings, this course will
present. (5 units) NCX
examine the recurrence and significance of
this imagery in contemporary narrative
133.Mexican American Literature
genres. Discussions may include the followReading, analysis, and discussion of Mexican ing writers and film directors: María Luisa
American literature in its historical context. Bombal, Juan Rulfo, Julio Cortázar,
Emphasis on the novel and short story. Gioconda Belli, Tomás Eloy Martínez,
(5 units) NCX
Guillermo del Toro, and Alejandro González
Iñárritu. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or the
135.Colloquium: Latin American
equivalent. Recommended prerequisite: One
Literature and Culture
survey course in Latin American Literature.
Topic varies. Reading and discussion of se- (5 units)
lected themes in Latin American literature
and culture. May be retaken for credit. 140.Modern Latin American
Literature I
(5 units) NCX
Reading, analysis, and discussion of the
136.Contemporary Latin American
works of major Latin American writers
Short Story
of the early 20th century (e.g., Gallegos,
Examination of the Latin American short Barrios, Prado, and Romero). (5 units)
story from Quiroga to the present. Representative works reflecting the diverse cultural 141.Modern Latin American
Literature II
backgrounds and ideologies of the authors.
(5 units)
Reading, analysis, and discussion of the
works of major Latin American writers of
137.Latin American Cultures
the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
and Civilizations
­Emphasis on the novel. (5 units)
Exploration of the basic factors that have
molded and continue to shape the diverse 145.Mid-20th-Century Latin
American Literature
lives and institutions of contemporary
Spanish-speaking peoples of the Americas. Reading, analysis, and discussion of the
(5 units)
works of major Latin American writers from
1946 to 1962. Carpentier, Yáñez, Fuentes,
138. Hispanic Poetry
and others. (5 units)
An introduction to poetic expression in the
Spanish language. The course will involve an
overview of Spanish meter and rhyme followed by the study of classical forms (love,
mystical, and satirical poetry), as well as contemporary periods and forms (Romanticism,
modernismo, the Vanguards, revolutionary,
and experiential poetry). Prerequisite: SPAN
101 or equivalent. (5 units)
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 187
147.Cinema, Politics, and Society
in Latin America
The course aims to introduce the students to
current political and social issues in Latin
America through exposition to and discussion of some relevant commercial or independent films of recent decades. Textbook
material and additional readings from journalistic, literary, or academic contexts will
further expand on the themes exposed in
each film. Prerequisite: SPAN 100 or the
equivalent. (5 units)
148.20th-Century Latin American
Women Writers
Reading, analysis, and discussion of novels
and short fiction by major Latin American
women writers of the 20th century (e.g.,
Bombal, Garro, Poniatowska, Allende,
Valenzuela, and others). (5 units)
149.Contacts, Clashes, Border
Crossings: Hybridity and
Liminality in Latin American
Cinema
Using film studies, border studies, and Latin
American studies, students will study the
processes of hybridity, liminality, and mestizaje in Latin American culture and film.
The course will be taught in English to accommodate non-bilingual speakers. (5 units)
150.20th-Century Spanish Literature I
Major writers of Spain from 1898 to 1936.
Particular emphasis on the Generation of
1898. (5 units)
151.20th-Century Spanish Literature II
A look at some of the best expressions of literary protest during the Franco regime.
Reading, analysis, and discussion of works
by Camilo José Cela, Ana María Matute,
Ramón Sender, and Antonio Buero Vallejo.
(5 units)
165.Cervantes: Don Quijote
Cervantes’ masterpiece, as a reflection of
Spanish society during the Spanish Empire,
an exemplar of Baroque art, and a synthesis
and culmination of narrative prose. (5 units)
175.History of the Spanish Language
A study of the evolution of the Spanish language from its roots on the Iberian Peninsula
to its spread throughout the world. From a
linguistic perspective. Special attention will
be paid to social and political factors that
have helped to shape the language in its
modern forms. (5 units)
176.Spanish Applied Linguistics II
Detailed scientific analysis of the morphology and syntax of modern Spanish. Contrastive analysis within the Spanish structure
system and between the Spanish and English
structure systems. Required of all prospective teachers of Spanish. Prerequisite:
SPAN 175. (5 units)
178.Teaching Methods in Spanish
Practical and theoretical insights into the
dynamics of teaching and learning Spanish
at the secondary and postsecondary level.
(5 units) NCX
179.Technology for Teaching
and Learning Spanish
Preparation for the prospective Spanish
teacher in the design, use, and evaluation of
traditional and current technologies for
teaching Spanish language and cultures.
(5 units) NCX
194.Peer Educator in Spanish
Peer educators are invited by faculty to work
closely with them, facilitating learning in a
lower-division course. May be repeated for
credit by permission of the instructor.
(2 units)
188 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
195.Spanish Translation I
Skills and strategies involved in the art of
translation. A variety of texts (general, historical, cultural, technical, etc.) illustrate the
different modes and nuances of translation.
Students assigned special translation projects. May be retaken for credit but will only
be accepted once toward the Spanish studies
major or minor. Prerequisites: SPAN 101
and permission of the instructor. (5 units)
NCX
197.Special Topics
Variable topics in specific fields. (Studies
abroad; units vary based on program)
198.Directed Study
Individually designed programs of advanced
study. Normally restricted to seniors who are
declared Spanish studies majors or minors
and who find themselves in special circumstances. May be taken only once. Courses
exempted from challenge may not be taken
as directed study. Written course outline must
be approved by instructor and department
chair in advance of registration. (1–3 units)
199.Directed Reading
Individually designed programs of advanced
readings. Prerequisite: Written permission of
the instructor and department chair is required in advance of registration. (1–5 units)
NCX
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: MODERN LITERATURE AND CULTURE
Note: Knowledge of a foreign language is not
necessary for the following comparative
course. It cannot be used to fulfill a major or
minor requirement in a foreign language or
to fulfill the second language requirement.
180.International Cinema
An interdisciplinary course treating film as a
medium of cultural expression in China,
England (or Australia or Canada), France,
Germany, Italy, Japan, Latin America,
Russia, and Spain. (5 units)
MUSIC 189
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC
Professor Emeritus: Lynn R. Shurtleff
Professors: Hans Boepple (Department Chair), Teresa McCollough
Associate Professor: Nancy Wait-Kromm
Assistant Professors: Bruno Ruviaro, Christina Zanfagna
Lecturer: Scot Hanna-Weir
The Department of Music offers a degree program leading to the bachelor of arts in
music as well as a minor in music. A minor in musical theatre is available in conjunction
with the Department of Theatre and Dance. The Department of Music is committed to the
education of the whole person: intellectual, emotional, physical, and spiritual. The overarching goal of the department is to provide a stimulating artistic and intellectual environment that fosters individual expression and creativity through the study of music and
performance within the context of liberal arts studies in a Jesuit university. The Department
of Music’s curriculum is designed to provide students of diverse backgrounds with the skills
necessary to comprehend, perform, and appreciate music’s role in human history and its
power to enhance the lives of all people. Because individual study and performance is essential
to the expression and acquisition of music as a language and art form, private instruction and
membership in all departmental music ensembles are available to all Santa Clara students.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements, students majoring in music must complete the department’s lower-division core requirements and choose
one of three upper-division emphases. Students must choose an emphasis after they have
completed their lower-division requirements.
Lower-Division Core
• MUSC 1, 2, 3
• MUSC 1A, 2A, 3A
• MUSC 8
• MUSC 9
• Minimum of three quarters of private instruction
• Minimum of three quarters in an approved departmental ensemble
• Music at Noon: All majors and minors must complete one quarter of MUSC 16/116
Upper-Division Emphases
Theory/Composition Emphasis
• MUSC 104
• MUSC 104A
• MUSC 105
• MUSC 156
• Two Culture and Context courses
• One upper-division elective course
• Minimum of three quarters of private instruction in composition
• Minimum of three quarters of an approved departmental ensemble
190 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Performance Emphasis
• MUSC 104
• MUSC 104A
• MUSC 156
• Two Culture and Context courses
• One upper-division elective course
• Minimum of six quarters of private instruction
• Minimum of three quarters in an approved departmental ensemble
Culture and Context Emphasis
• MUSC 130
• MUSC 131
• Three Culture and Context courses
• One upper-division elective course
• Minimum of three quarters in an approved departmental ensemble
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in music:
Music Skills/Literacy courses
• Two courses from the Music Theory sequence
• Two courses from the Musicianship sequence
Note: Students may take a Placement Exam to test into a course that is appropriate for
their skill level, but must still complete two courses from both the Theory and Musicianship
sequences.
• MUSC 8
• MUSC 9
Culture and Context courses
• One Culture and Context course
Experience courses
• Performance ensembles: A minimum of three quarters in any approved departmental
ensemble
• Private instruction: A minimum of two quarters from any of the following: 60/160,
61/161, 62/162, or MUSC 30, 31, 34, 35, 35A, 36, or 37
• Music at Noon: All majors and minors must complete one quarter of MUSC 16/116
Elective courses
• One upper-division elective course
Note: All upper-division 5-unit courses satisfy the elective requirement for music majors
and minors.
MUSIC 191
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. Music Theory I
3A. Musicianship III
Beginning course in a comprehensive theory Continuing course to develop aural skills
sequence; covers notation, scales, intervals, through solfège and rhythmic training, keychords, rhythm, and meter. Required for board harmony, improvisation, and dictamusical theatre minor. Prerequisite: None. tion. This course is recommended to be
Majors and minors with extensive theory taken in conjunction with MUSC 3. Prereqbackground are recommended to take the uisite: MUSC 1A or permission of instructor.
Theory Placement Exam. (4 units)
(4 units)
1A. Musicianship I
Entry-level course to develop aural skills
through solfège and rhythmic training, keyboard harmony, improvisation, and dictation. Prerequisite: None. This course is
recommended to be taken in conjunction
with MUSC 1. Majors and minors with extensive theoretical and/or instrumental or
vocal training are recommended to take the
Musicianship Placement Exam. (4 units)
2. Music Theory II
Continuation of Music Theory sequence.
Introduction to basic common practice harmonic progressions: triad relationships, part
writing, figured bass, and harmonic dictation. Prerequisite: MUSC 1 or permission of
instructor. (4 units)
2A. Musicianship II
Continuing course to develop aural skills
through solfège and rhythmic training, keyboard harmony, improvisation, and dictation. This course is recommended to be
taken in conjunction with MUSC 2. Prerequisite: MUSC 1A or permission of instructor.
(4 units)
3. Music Theory III
Continuation of Music Theory sequence.
Further instruction in common practice harmony; figured bass and part-writing; dominant and diminished seventh chords and
resolutions; harmonic dictation and some
score analysis. Prerequisite: MUSC 2 or permission of instructor. (4 units)
8. Introduction to Listening
This course offers an introduction to different musical cultures, elements, forms, and
techniques through listening, lecture, and
performance activities. Designed for both
majors and nonmajors, this course focuses
on strategies for listening to, and writing
about, music from a global perspective.
(4 units)
9. Introduction to Electronic Music
This course combines elements of history,
theory, and practice of electronic music. The
computer becomes the instrument through
which students explore new ways of manipulating and organizing sound. Designed for
both majors and nonmajors, this course creates a space for discussion and critical listening of different types of electronic music
(contemporary, popular, and experimental),
culminating in a final creative project by
each participant. No previous computer
music experience required. (4 units)
11A. and 12A. Cultures &
Ideas I and II
A two-course sequence focusing on a major
theme in human experience and culture over
a significant period of time. Courses emphasize either broad global interconnections or
the construction of Western culture in its
global context. Courses may address music
and language; the ways people around the
world have cultivated music and used music
to cultivate other aspects of themselves and
their societies; and other topics. Successful
completion of C&I I (MUSC 11A) is a prerequisite for C&I II (MUSC 12A). (4 units
each quarter)
192 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
16/116. Music at Noon
This class is organized around the Music at
Noon series of concerts and performances.
The weekly series brings the opportunity to
experience live performances of music from
all parts of the world by artists of local, national, and international renown. Students
are required to attend all performances and
write a reflective paper that summarizes their
individual experience. Required class for
music majors and minors. (1 unit)
30.Beginning Piano Class
Introductory instruction in piano in a classroom setting. Class limited to 16 students.
Can be substituted for one quarter of private
instruction. (4 units)
31.Intermediate Piano Class
Intermediate classroom piano instruction.
Class limited to 16 students. Prerequisite:
MUSC 30 or permission of instructor. Can
be substituted for one quarter of private
instruction. (4 units)
34.Beginning Voice Class
Study and application of basic vocal techniques to develop singing facility. Practical
experience in performing. May be repeated
for credit. Required for musical theatre
minor. Can be substituted for one quarter of
private instruction. (4 units)
35.Intermediate Voice Class
Continuation of MUSC 34, focusing on
more advanced approaches to vocal technique, repertoire, and performance. May be
repeated for credit. Prerequisite: MUSC 34
or permission of instructor. (4 units)
35A. Advanced Voice Class
This course is designed as the culminating
class in the three-course sequence of a full
year of vocal study. Students will continue to
use and refine the techniques and performance skills developed in MUSC 34 and
35, with emphasis on repertoire and advanced techniques in language, musicianship, and acting. An off-campus performance
component is part of this class. Prerequisite:
MUSC 35 or permission of instructor.
(4 units)
36.Beginning Guitar Class
Examination of essential elements required
to play guitar in the classical style, including
fundamental principles of technique, sightreading, pedagogic repertoire, history, and
literature. May be repeated for credit. Can be
substituted for one quarter of private instruction. (4 units)
37.Beginning Composition Class
This course explores personal expression
through the creation of original music. Students explore the music and acoustical properties of sound while developing the creative
and technical skills necessary to complete a
finished musical piece. Focus is on the issue
of attaining a personal “voice” rather than
developing a specific style in which to work,
and musical improvisation will play a role in
enhancing the student’s ability to be spontaneous as well as thoughtful in creating a
piece of music. Can be substituted for one
quarter of private instruction. (4 units)
MUSIC 193
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
104.Music Theory IV/Advanced
110.Instrumentation/Arranging
Harmonic Language
An exploration of orchestration and arrangContinuation of Music Theory sequence. ing for all instruments. Prerequisite: MUSC
Introduction to chromatic harmony: sec- 2 or permission of instructor. Meets the elecondary dominant chords, altered chords, tive requirement for music majors and
tonicizing and modulation, score analysis, ­minors. (5 units)
harmonic dictation, and creative application
of four-part writing using non-harmonic 111.Counterpoint
tones. Prerequisite: MUSC 3 or permission Detailed study and creation of two-part conof instructor. Meets the elective requirement trapuntal music in the 16th-century Renaissance and 18th-century Baroque styles.
for music majors and minors. (5 units)
Prerequisite: MUSC 104 or permission of
104A. Musicianship IV
instructor. Meets the elective requirement for
A continuing course to develop aural skills music majors and minors. (5 units)
through solfège and rhythmic training, keyboard harmony, improvisation, and dicta- 113.Form and Analysis
tion. This course is recommended to be taken Study of the relationship in Western music
in conjunction with MUSC 104. Prerequisite: between shape/form/structure and harmonMUSC 3A or permission of instructor. Meets ic/melodic/thematic content. Music from
the elective requirement for music majors with 1650–1950 will be analyzed in order to
achieve this goal, focusing on the primary
a cultures and context emphasis. (5 units)
structures used throughout and since the
105. Theory/Composition Seminar
Common Practice period. Prerequisite:
This course is an extension and culmination MUSC 2 or permission of instructor. Meets
of previous theoretical and musicianship the elective requirement for music majors and
training. With an emphasis on solidifying minors. (5 units)
high-level music skills, this seminar offers an
in-depth analysis of elements of musical lan- 115.Experimental Sound Design
guage post-1900. Materials explored (such This course is about creating sounds on the
as extended harmony, melodic chromati- computer from scratch. How to simulate the
cism, advanced rhythmic techniques, tim- sound of wind? How to mimic a cricket
bre, texture) will be applied in compositional chirping or a bird singing? How to create
and improvisational activities. Prerequisite: your own synthesizer or simulate the sound
MUSC 104 or permission of instructor. of an acoustic guitar? Beyond familiar
Meets the elective requirement for music ma- sounds, how many others are still waiting to
be “discovered”? Can you create a sound that
jors and minors. (5 units)
no one ever heard before? Using the power109.Lyric Diction
ful SuperCollider language in a hands-on
This course provides singers and actors with class environment, students will learn the
a vital introduction to the fundamentals of basics of various digital synthesis techniques
accurate pronunciation in English, French, and explore their creative applications in
German, Latin, and Italian language, with electronic music composition and in other
an emphasis on lyric (sung) diction. Pronun- fields. Meets the elective requirement for
ciation and comprehension of the Interna- music majors and minors. (5 units)
tional Phonetic Alphabet is taught. Required
for musical theatre minors, lyric track. Meets
the elective requirement for music majors and
minors. (5 units)
194 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
117.20th-Century Music Theory
Study of structures and systems used from
the late-19th century through mid-20th
century including atonality and serialism.
Prerequisite: MUSC 104 or permission of
instructor. Meets the elective requirement for
music majors and minors. (5 units)
118.Directed Study in Pedagogy
A teaching practicum in which junior or senior music majors work with a music faculty
member in a classroom, studio, or ensemble
framework to assist in the planning and execution of a course. Music majors only.
(1 unit)
119.Music, Technology, and Society
How does music change in response to technology, and how does technology affect
music making? This course examines how
technology in music and the arts reflects and
informs societal and cultural change. The
course explores the ways in which music
production, consumption, and distribution
inform and are informed by digital technology. Assignments include readings and critical analysis, as well as composing pieces and
collaborating on creative projects that explore the topics presented in class. Open to
all students by instructor permission. Meets
the elective requirement for music majors and
minors. (5 units)
120.Junior Recital
Intended for music majors and minors;
30 to 45 minute winter quarter performance
of solo repertoire in a variety of styles. Must
be sponsored by student’s SCU private instructor, approved by the department, and
preceded by a recital hearing. (1 unit)
121.Senior Recital
Intended for music majors and minors; 45
to 60 minute spring quarter performance of
solo repertoire in a variety of styles. Must be
sponsored by student’s SCU private instructor, approved by the department, and preceded by a recital hearing. (2 units)
130.Anthropology of Music
An intellectual history of ethnomusicology.
Approaches and theories from anthropology,
musicology, folklore, religious studies, linguistics, critical theory, and gender studies
will be explored in order to interrogate music’s relationship to culture, power, and practice. Meets the elective and Culture and
Context requirement for majors and minors.
Also listed as ANTH 153. (5 units)
131.Music Research and Writing
This course is an introduction to research
methods in music scholarship. Students will
engage in local fieldwork-based projects and
learn techniques for documenting, interpreting, and writing about musical cultures.
Meets the elective and Culture and Context
requirement for majors and minors. (5 units)
132.The History of Hip-Hop
This course will examine the historical contexts and diasporic flows that have shaped
(and have been shaped by) hip-hop music.
Topics explored will include the multicultural roots of hip-hop from West African
bardic traditions to Jamaican sound system
culture to African-American oral practices.
Meets the elective and Culture and Context
requirement for majors and minors. Also
listed as ETHN 132. (5 units)
134.Popular Music, Race,
and American Culture
A cultural history of blues-based American
popular music from minstrelsy to disco. Emphasis will be placed on the development of
a wide range of musical styles, such as ragtime, classic blues, swing, rhythm and blues,
rock and roll, soul, and funk. Major themes
include the impact of the music industry, the
commercialization of black music, race and
gender politics, social movements, and technology. Meets the elective and Culture and
Context requirement for majors and minors.
Also listed as ETHN 164. (5 units)
MUSIC 195
136.Music of Africa
This course focuses on the history, musical
characteristics, and sociopolitical, economic,
and cultural roles of selected musical traditions from across Africa. Major themes
­include nationalism, resistance, and urbanization. Meets the elective and Culture and
Context requirement for majors and minors.
(5 units)
139.Flamenco History & Performance
This course will cover the musical and social
history of flamenco, from its roots in India
along the “gypsy” trails through North Africa, Asia, and Europe. Students will examine
how this dynamic art form grew out of the
cultural legacy of the “gitanos” (gypsies) in
Andalusia, Spain and learn about flamenco
song forms, dances, and rhythms. Meets the
elective requirement for majors and minors.
(5 units)
156.Improvisation
This class will explore the process of creating
music through interactive activities designed
to awaken students’ imagination and expand/deepen their understanding of music
as an art form. The class community itself
will be an improvising performance ensemble.
Prerequisites: Theory I and/or Musicianship
I; or commensurate experience and permission of the instructor. Meets the elective requirement for music majors and minors.
(5 units)
157.Laptop Orchestra
Computer-mediated music ensemble and
learning environment for experimental electronic music composition and performance
practice. The course is interdisciplinary by
nature, exploring the intersections of music,
computer science, interaction design, composition, and live performance, with a particular emphasis on the development of
musical creativity making use of cuttingedge technology. Classes will consist mostly
of hands-on exercises leading to the creation
and performance of new electronic pieces to
be presented in a public concert at the end of
the quarter. No music background is required. Meets the elective requirement for
music majors and minors. (2 units)
189.Sacred Music and the Church
This course examines the interplay between
church doctrine, musical style, and the
power of social, political, and cultural forces,
primarily through the genre of the mass.
Gregorian chant, sacred concert music,
modern service music, and non-western
music traditions will be studied. Meets the
elective requirement for all music majors and
minors. (5 units)
190.Music of the Middle Ages
Survey of Western music from approximately 800–1450. Works to be studied include
chant, motets, and various sacred and secular music of the medieval period. Meets the
elective and Culture and Context requirement for majors and minors. (5 units)
191.Music of the Renaissance
Survey of Western music from approximately 1450–1600. Study of the development of
polyphony through the great sacred and
secular works of the period. Meets the elective and Culture and Context requirement
for majors and minors. (5 units)
192.Music of the Baroque Period
Survey of Western music from approximately 1600–1750, including study of the great
works of J.S. Bach, Handel, and others.
Meets the elective and Culture and Context
requirement for majors and minors. (5 units)
193.Music of the Classical Period
Survey of Western music from approximately 1750–1827, including the study of
the great works of Haydn, Mozart, and
Beethoven. Meets the elective and Culture
and Context requirement for majors and minors. (5 units)
196 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
194.Music of the Romantic Period
Survey of Western music of the 19th century, including the great works of Beethoven,
Brahms, Wagner, and others. Meets the elective and Culture and Context requirement
for majors and minors. (5 units)
195.Early 20th Century Music
Survey of Western music from Debussy to
World War II, including Strauss, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, and others. Meets the elective and Culture and Context requirement
for majors and minors. (5 units)
196.Music Since 1945
Survey of Western music from 1945 to the
present, including the rise of technology in
music and cross-cultural trends of the late
20th and early 21st centuries. Meets the elective and Culture and Context requirement
for majors and minors. (5 units)
197.Senior Honors Project
This course is designed to allow senior music
majors and minors an opportunity to pursue
in-depth musical studies within the parameters
of a project or thesis in one of the f­ollowing
areas: music history/ethnomusicology, composition/music theory, or performance studies. This project is administered solely by the
Department of Music as a course offering,
and is separate from the University Honors
program. (5 units)
PERFORMING ENSEMBLE COURSES
Note: These ensemble courses meet the instructor for voice part assignment. Fulfills
ensemble requirement for music majors and the ensemble requirement for music majors
minors, and may be repeated for credit. and music minors. (2 units)
Students should enroll with the appropriate
lower- or upper-division course number, 43/143. Chamber Singers
An 18–24 voice mixed ensemble of highly
depending on their status.
select advanced singers. Repertoire includes
40/140. University Orchestra
a variety of sophisticated chamber choral
Preparation and concert performance of music from the Renaissance to the present
major works of orchestral literature. By audi- day. By audition only. Open to all SCU stution only. Open to all SCU students with per- dents with permission of instructor. Fulfills
mission of instructor. This course fulfills the the ensemble requirement for music majors
ensemble requirement for music majors and and music minors. (2 units)
music minors. (2 units)
45/145. Jazz Band
42/142. Concert Choir
Preparation and performance of jazz literaA mixed ensemble of select singers that per- ture for large ensemble. By audition only.
forms a wide variety of a cappella and ac- Fulfills the ensemble requirement for music
companied secular and sacred choral music majors and music minors. (1 unit)
from every period in music history through
the present day. Emphasis is on a compre- 46/146. Jazz Combo Workshop
hensive survey of choral literature through Focus on jazz improvisation, techniques,
performance, as well as development of cho- and theory in small group performance. By
ral tone, blend, diction, and sight singing audition only. Fulfills the ensemble requireskills. Open to all SCU students with permis- ment for music majors and music minors.
sion of instructor. No audition required—see (0.5 units)
MUSIC 197
52/152. World Percussion Ensemble
African/Latin American influenced percussion and rhythms applied to traditional and
nontraditional instruments, movement, and
voice in an ensemble setting. Open to all students. Fulfills the ensemble requirement for
music majors and music minors. (1 unit)
53/153. Songs and Scenes Onstage
Students prepare both solo and ensemble
operatic excerpts in a workshop setting.
Technical, stylistic, and dramatic preparation employing music reading skills, ornamentation, gesture, and choreography.
Public performance in a black box setting
presented at the end of the quarter. Formerly
Opera Workshop. By audition only. (2 units)
54/154. Wind Symphony
Study and performance of symphonic band
literature in a wide variety of styles. Fulfills
the ensemble requirement for music majors
and minors. Open to all SCU students with
instructor permission. (2 units)
55/155. New Music Ensemble
Study and performance of a variety of works
written in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Fulfills the ensemble requirement for music
majors and music minors. Open to all SCU
students with instructor permission. (2 units)
PRIVATE INSTRUCTION
The Department of Music offers private instruction in composition, conducting, and
vocal and instrumental studies. Please contact the department office for further information
on specific areas of interest.
Note: Private instrumental, composition, and vocal lessons are available to all Santa Clara
students. Students may enroll in 1-hour (1 unit), 45-minute (0.75 units), or 30-minute
(0.5 units) lessons depending upon their status as a major, minor, or elective student. A full description of the private instruction protocols is available at www.scu.edu/music. Nine private lessons are
given each quarter. All students taking lessons are required to participate in an end-of-quarter jury
hearing. Private lessons may be repeated for credit and are open to nonmajors on a space-available
basis. Priority registration is given to music majors, minors, musical theatre minors, and students
enrolled in departmental ensembles or preparing for a junior or senior recital.
198 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY
Professors Emeriti: James W. Felt, S.J., William J. Prior
Professors: Philip J. Kain, Michael Meyer
Associate Professors: Christopher B. Kulp, Scott LaBarge, Lawrence Nelson,
William A. Parent, Mark A. Ravizza, S.J., Shannon Vallor (Department Chair)
Assistant Professor: Erick Ramirez
Acting Assistant Professor: Meilin M. Chinn
Lecturers: Brian Buckley, Justin Remhof
The Department of Philosophy offers a degree program leading to the bachelor of arts
in philosophy. Philosophy inquires directly into the relation of human beings to the world:
what we are, how we know, what values are, how we live. Worth pursuing for its own sake,
philosophical inquiry also promotes analytical thinking and precise expression and, thus, is
excellent undergraduate preparation for a number of professional careers in areas such as
law, government, finance, media, writing, and computer programming. To qualify for ­honors
in philosophy, the major ordinarily must have a 3.5 grade point average in philosophy
courses and complete PHIL 197 with a grade of A– or better.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of arts degree, students majoring in philosophy must complete the following departmental
requirements:
• Two lower-division courses from PHIL 2–10, 11A, 12A, 60–89
• PHIL 25 or 27
• PHIL 51, 52, 53, and 90
•Two courses from different historical periods: PHIL 131 (ancient), PHIL 132
(medieval), PHIL 133 (modern), and PHIL 135, 136, 137, 139 (contemporary), or
PHIL 134, 139
• One course from PHIL 120–129
• One course from PHIL 125 or 140–149
• Four additional upper-division courses from PHIL 109–199
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in philosophy:
• PHIL 25 or 27
• PHIL 51 and 52
• Four approved upper-division courses; PHIL 53 may be substituted for one upperdivision course
Emphasis in Pre-Law
The pre-law emphasis in philosophy is intended to help provide the skills of analytic
reasoning and conceptual investigation necessary for the study of law. Philosophical research
hones the techniques of careful argumentation and logically disciplined reasoning essential
PHILOSOPHY 199
to the legal analysis of cases and statutes. Also, emphasis on ethics courses will help prepare
students for the study and analysis of normative issues. The pre-law emphasis may be taken
as part of a philosophy major or minor. Requirements for the pre-law emphasis include:
• One course from PHIL 25, 27, 29, or 152
• One course from PHIL 111, 113, 114, or 154
• One course from PHIL 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 80, 109, 110, 112, 114, 115, 118,
119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 129, 136, 142, 146 or 180A
• Two additional courses from those in the three lists above
Emphasis in Ethics
The ethics emphasis in philosophy is intended to provide students with a broad understanding of ethical theory and the conceptual analysis of moral problems, including matters
of social justice central to the Jesuit educational mission, and thus with the ability to reflect
on their own ethical decisions and on their role as morally responsible members of the
human community. The ethics emphasis may be taken as part of the philosophy major or
minor. Requirements for the ethics emphasis include:
• One lower-division ethics class from PHIL 2–10
• Two ethical theory courses from PHIL 120–129
• Two courses from PHIL 109–119, 154, 180A
An ethics course taught in another department may be substituted with the permission
of the chair of the Department of Philosophy.
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: ETHICS
2. Introduction to Ethics
4A.Ethics and Gender
Consideration of the traditional theoretical Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Emquestions posed in moral philosophy: stan- phasis on ethical principles and theories, as
dards that determine the morality of an ac- well as the application of these two issues estion, the motives and consequences of an sentially intertwined with concepts of sex
act, the good life. Authors studied may in- and gender as they apply to both men and
clude Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Bentham, women. Special attention to gender theory
Mill, Kant. (4 units)
and feminism. Topics studied may include
pornography, sexuality, heterosexual/homo3A.Ethics in the Digital Age
sexual marriage and family life, domestic viEthical dimensions of the digital revolution, olence and rape, abortion and reproduction,
including (but not limited to) privacy, intel- fashion and appearance, gender discriminalectual property, hacking and cyber-crime, tion, sex-based affirmative action, and sexual
virtual identities and virtual worlds, and harassment. Also listed as WGST 58. (4 units)
computer games. Normative inquiry into
the use of computers. Topics may include
information privacy, peer-to-peer file sharing, end-user copying, software as intellectual property, hacking, online communities,
safety-critical software, verification, and encryption. (4 units)
200 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
4B.Ethics and Gender in Film
Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Emphasis on ethical principles and theories as
they relate to concepts of gender and sex applicable to both males and females. In addition to written texts about ethics and gender,
both dramatic and documentary films will
be studied to illustrate how gender is both
experienced by men and women and portrayed in the lived world. Topics studied may
include sexuality and sexual orientation,
male and female gender roles, heterosexual/
homosexual marriage and family life, sexual
violence, transsexuality, abortion and reproduction, and gender discrimination. Films
studied may include Southern Comfort, Boys
Don’t Cry, Daddy and Papa, Sliding Doors,
The Brandon Teena Story, If These Walls
Could Talk, The Laramie Project, and Juno.
(4 units)
5. Ethics in Society
Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Special attention to general ethical principles
and to the practical application of these principles to current ethical issues in society.
Topics may include the concepts of freedom,
obligation, value, rights, justice, virtue, and
moral responsibility, as applied to issues like
abortion, punishment, economic distribution, racial and sexual discrimination, sexuality, political obligation, nuclear war, and
pornography. (4 units)
5A. Ethics and Marginalized Persons
Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Emphasis on ethical principles and the application of these theories to persons who are gay,
disabled, elderly, and poor. Special attention
to recognition, voice, authenticity, dialogue,
and place as basic needs of personhood. Subjects raised will target marginalization and
the damage it does to persons. Topics studied may include difference, shame, fear,
loneliness, desire for accommodation, invisibility, justice, and discrimination. (4 units)
6. Ethics in Business
Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Special attention to general ethical principles
and the application of these principles to
current moral issues in business. Topics may
include truth in advertising, corporate social
responsibility, affirmative action, capitalism,
government regulation, quality of work-life,
environmental and resource issues, and ethical codes of conduct. Students who take
MGMT 6 or MGMT 6H may not take this
course for credit. (4 units)
7. Ethics in Medicine
Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Special attention to general ethical principles
and the application of these principles to
current moral issues in medicine and the
health sciences. Topics may include the definition of death, informed consent, the just
distribution of health care, euthanasia and
assisted suicide, genetic manipulation, assisted reproduction, research involving
human subjects, decisions to forgo life-sustaining medical treatment, truth-telling, and
organ transplants. (4 units)
8. Ethics in Politics
Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Emphasis on moral issues in political theory.
Possible topics include the concepts of rights,
justice, dignity, equality, personhood, desert,
retributivism, and utility. Issues discussed
may include alienation, individualism, community, discrimination, capital punishment,
sexual equality, civil disobedience, revolution, and world hunger. (4 units)
9. Ethics and the Environment
Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Emphasis on moral issues and the environment.
Topics include animal rights, anthropocentrism, cost-benefit analysis, human rights,
interspecies justice, land (use and value),
population control, rights (of future generations and natural objects), values (moral and
aesthetic) and preferences, wildlife protection, and wilderness. (4 units)
PHILOSOPHY 201
10.Ethics and the Law
Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Emphasis on moral issues and concepts in contemporary legal debates such as the rule of
law, the duty to aid, the relationship between
law and ethics, freedom of speech, the right
to die, criminally charging minors as adults,
the legalization of drugs, obscenity and indecency, the moral justification for punishment, including capital punishment, and
state regulation of marriage. (4 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: CULTURES & IDEAS
11A. and 12A. Cultures &
Ideas I and II
A two-course sequence focusing on a major
theme in philosophy and culture over a significant period of time. Courses may address
autonomy, personhood, community, justice,
human dignity, law, the self, religion, cosmology, and other topics. Successful completion of C&I I (PHIL 11A) is a prerequisite for
C&I II (PHIL 12A). (4 units each quarter)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSE: INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY
20.Introduction to Philosophy
An introduction to philosophical questions
and methods. Problems studied may include: the nature of mind, the nature of reality, the existence of God, the possibility of
free will, the sources and scope of human
knowledge, the process of inquiry, and the
meaning of life. (4 units)
202 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: LOGIC AND REASONING
25.Informal Logic
29.Reasoning and Interpretation in Law
Introduction to the art of logical reasoning. Introduction to basic concepts in logic and
Emphasis on the ability to recognize com- argumentation as well as to methods of reamon fallacies of argumentation. (4 units)
soning, argumentation, and interpretation
that commonly appear in American law. Ex27.Introduction to Formal Logic
amination of arguments; deduction and inIntroduction to the study of deductive infer- duction; varieties of meaning; definitions
ence, including traditional and modern and their purposes; informal fallacies; catetechniques. (4 units)
gorical syllogisms; ordinary language arguments; enthymemes; analogy in legal and
moral reasoning; causality; probability; statistical reasoning; authority; causality; precedent and stare decision; interpretations and
reasoning from statutory rules; reasoning
from case law; nature and legitimacy of judicial adjudication; methods for analyzing
cases; explanatory and justifying reasons;
conflict and legal rules. (4 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY
51.History of Philosophy:
53.History of Philosophy:
Classical and Medieval
Modern and Contemporary
Beginnings of Western philosophy. Repre- Introduction to the closer roots of modern
sentative philosophers of the Greek and me- philosophy, from the critical revolution of
dieval traditions, with attention to their Kant to some of the dominant currents of
historical milieu and their relevance to con- the 20th century. Prerequisite: PHIL 52
temporary thought. (4 units)
strongly recommended. (4 units)
52.History of Philosophy:
Early Modern
Principal fashioners of the modern mind.
17th- and 18th-century philosophers studied in the historical context of their times
with attention to their impact on the present. (4 units)
PHILOSOPHY 203
LOWER-DIVISION COURSE: DIVERSITY AND
EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE
70.Philosophy and Disability
class, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and
Examines the nature and meaning of disabil- race. Students will be exposed to these issues
ity: what it is like living with disability (one’s by reading scholarly and nonfiction texts,
own or others’); the legal, social, and ethical doing research, viewing films, and working
aspects of disability (particularly on justice with disabled persons in the community
and individual and personal treatment of through the Arrupe partnerships for comdisabled persons); and the intersections of munity-based learning. (4 units)
disability with other social categories such as
LOWER-DIVISION COURSE: SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY
80.Science, Technology, and Society
among science, technology, and modern culAn investigation of the philosophical questions ture. Special attention may be given to the
surrounding the social impact of science and social and ethical implications of specific
technology, exploring issues such as techno- technologies such as robotics, nanotechnollogical determinism, the impact of technolo- ogy, neuroimaging, and/or technologies for
gy on moral life, and the complex relationship digital communication. (4 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSE: METAPHYSICS AND EPISTEMOLOGY
90.Knowledge and Reality
reality. Required of all philosophy majors.
Introduces two central areas of philoso- Prior completion of PHIL 52 recommended
phy—epistemology and metaphysics— and normally taken during the sophomore
through the study of several fundamental year. (4 units)
problems in those areas. Problems that may Note: The normal prerequisite for all philosobe studied include the existence of God, the phy upper-division courses is upper-division
relation between mind and body, freedom of standing.
the will, the nature and possibility of knowledge, and the relation between language and
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: ETHICS
109.Environmental Ethics
110.Ethics and Biomedical Science
Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Inves- Examination of ethical concepts and probtigation of environmental issues from the lems encountered in the practice of medipoint of view of classical ethical perspectives cine and other health professions as well as
and consideration of how questions about the conduct of biomedical science. Subjects
the moral value of the environment provide studied may include the protection of
new challenges to such classical theories. human and animal subjects involved in sciTopics may include animal rights, human entific research, stem cell research and clinirights, the rights of future generations, the cal investigation, public support for
rights of nature, anthropocentrism, interspe- biomedical research, the proper character
cies justice, land (use and value), wilderness, and scope of the clinician-patient relationand values and preferences. (5 units)
ship, informed consent, truth-telling,
204 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
confidentiality of medical information, the
duty to warn third parties of familial genetic
risks and of threats posed by mentally
disturbed patients, genetic testing and
­
screening, abortion, the right to refuse lifesustaining medical treatment, surrogate decision making for the incompetent,
physician assisted suicide, euthanasia, allocation of scarce medical resources, the definition of death, organ transplantation, and
justice in providing access to basic health
care services. (5 units)
111.Bioethics and the Law
Bioethics (normative ethics as applied to
medicine and the health care professions, the
life sciences, and biotechnology) is partially
constituted by legal norms and values. Exploration of the evolving relationship between law and bioethics, as well as the
substantive law and ethics of selected topics
by studying course cases and bioethical texts.
Topics studied may include the definition of
death, informed consent, the physician-patient relationship, euthanasia/assisted suicide
and the law of criminal homicide, advance
directives for health care, confidentiality, involuntary civil commitment for mental illness, regulation of research involving human
subjects, the use of nonhuman animals in
biomedical research, the legal and moral status of prenatal humans, parental control
over the medical care of minor children, tort
law and medical practice, and state licensure
of health care professionals. (5 units)
112.Ethics in Management
Formal inquiry into applied ethics. Emphasis on moral issues encountered by managers. Topics may include the role of ethical
principles in business and ethical dilemmas
raised by the management and administration of business organizations, such as conflicts of interest, organizational politics,
commercial bribery, whistle-blowing, labormanagement conflicts, and consumerism.
(5 units)
113.Ethics and Constitutional Law
Exploration of how the constitutional rights
and interests of individuals and groups of
individuals can be understood and justified
by moral and social/political philosophy.
Particular constitutional subjects to be studied may include the Fourth Amendment
(search and seizure), obscenity and pornography, equal protection, gender discrimination, freedom of speech, freedom of
association, free exercise of religion, State establishment of religion, discrimination
against gays and lesbians, privacy and personal autonomy, privacy and reproductive
freedom, and substantive due process. Readings typically consist of Supreme Court
cases. (5 units)
114.Ethics and Criminal Law
Examination of the moral and conceptual
foundations of contemporary criminal law.
Topics studied may include ethical justifications of punishment (utilitarianism, retributivism), sentencing and proportionality, the
nature of criminal acts and the guilty mind
(mens rea), degrees of culpability, mental capacity for mens rea, causation, justification
and excuse, types of criminal homicide and
the death penalty, women’s rights and feticide laws, the right of self-defense/defense of
others, necessity, duress, the insanity defense,
trying juveniles as adults, attributions of
criminality (attempt, complicity, conspiracy), plea bargaining and justice, applicability
of theories of justice to criminal behavior,
constitutional and moral rights of suspects
and convicts, and the criminal liability of
corporations. (5 units)
115.Feminism and Ethics
Exploration of theories of feminism, patriarchy, and gender, and of ethics as applied to
the contemporary experience and social situation of women. Topics may include equality, affirmative action, comparable worth,
pornography, sexuality, reproductive technologies, maternal-fetal relations, rape and
PHILOSOPHY 205
domestic violence, female body image, cosmetic surgery, “alternative” families, militarism, and environmentalism. Also listed as
WGST 184. (5 units)
116.Ethics, Authenticity,
Freedom, and Vocation
An inquiry into the moral ideal of being an
authentic self, the meaning and moral significance of freedom, and the relation of
these to vocation understood as an individual’s choice of major projects in the world and
fundamental values, as response to the multiple calls of that which is outside of the self,
and as the common experience of being
summoned by a specific person seeking help
or attention and of having to respond to this
summons. The central premise of the course
is that anyone who asks the classic questions
of vocation (What am I good at doing?
What am I passionate about doing? What
are my values? Where do I find meaning of
life? Where do I and the needs of the world
and other persons intersect?) should reflect
systematically on what it means to be an authentic self and what it means to be an agent
with freedom of choice, as well as on the
basic moral values that attach to authentic
freedom. (5 units)
118.Ethics and Warfare
Historical and contemporary approaches to the
ethical issues that arise in warfare. (5 units)
119.Special Topics in Applied Ethics
Selected philosophical problems in applied
ethics studied at an advanced level. (5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: ETHICAL THEORY
120.Ethical Theory
123.Marx and Ethics
Examination of major philosophers or issues Examination of Marx’s ethical thought in
in moral and social philosophy. Topics may the context of traditional ethical theory (Arinclude dignity, moral rights and obliga- istotle, Kant) and in relationship to his potions, justice, moral relativism, virtue, the litical views and philosophy of history.
good, and happiness. (5 units)
Topics may include alienation, the human
essence, the individual, community, needs,
121.Classic Issues in Ethics
freedom, equality, rights, and justice. (5 units)
Exploration of the fundamental questions of
ethics through close study of some of the 124.Virtue Ethics
great works of moral philosophy, such as Exploration of various basic issues in ethics,
Plato’s Republic, Aristotle’s Nicomachean such as friendship, courage, or compassion,
Ethics, Kant’s Groundwork, and Mill’s Utili- from the point of view of virtues or (moral)
tarianism. (5 units)
character. Close study of classic authors—for
example, Aristotle—as well as contemporary
122.Political Philosophy and Ethics
writers on virtue ethics. (5 units)
Moral issues in political philosophy, especially traditional ethical justifications for political authority. Topics may include theories
of political authorization and contract theory, rights, liberty, equality, justice, community, revolution, civil disobedience, and
others. Specific variations include 122A
(Classical and Modern) and 122B (Contemporary). (5 units)
206 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
125.Moral Epistemology
An investigation into the intersection of ethics and epistemology. This course is principally concerned with (1) the nature of ethics
and (2) the nature and possibility of moral
knowledge. Issues to be discussed may
­include cognitivism and noncognitivism in
ethics, moral relativism, moral realism,
moral intuitionism, and moral skepticism.
Prerequisites: PHIL 90 and one ethics course,
or permission of instructor. (5 units)
129.Special Topics in Ethical Theory
Selected philosophical problems in ethical
theory studied at an advanced level. (5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY
130.Chinese Philosophy
133H (Great Debates). Prerequisite: PHIL
Study of major philosophical traditions of 52 for 133A, F, and G; PHIL 53 for 133B–E
China, including Confucianism, Daoism, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
Mohism, Legalism, and Buddhism. Areas of 134.Skepticism
emphasis may include topics in ethics, social
and political philosophy, and aesthetics, Study of the problem of skepticism from its
­including the cultivation of self and commu- origin in ancient Greece to the present day.
nity, proper governance, liberation, cosmol- Considers both skeptical positions and views
critical of skepticism. Readings may include
ogy, and the arts.
Sextus Empiricus, Descartes, Hume, and
131.Ancient Philosophy
Wittgenstein. Prerequisite: PHIL 51 or 52
Study of one major philosopher or philo- or permission of instructor. (5 units)
sophical issue (such as substance, causation, 135.Existentialism
or virtue) from the ancient period. Specific
variations include 131A (Socrates—also list- Survey of existentialism, its analysis of the
ed as CLAS 146), 131B (Plato), 131C basic structures of human existence, particu­(Aristotle), and 131D (Love and Relation- larly freedom and the experience of living in
ships in Classical Antiquity—also listed as a broken—even absurd—world, and its
major thinkers, such as Kierkegaard, DostoWGST 133 and CLAS 141). (5 units)
evsky, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Camus, Sartre,
132.Medieval Philosophy
and de Beauvoir. Prerequisite: PHIL 53 or
Study of one major philosopher or philo- permission of instructor. (5 units)
sophical issue (such as universals, existence 136.The Analytic Tradition
and the nature of God, or free will) from the
medieval period. Specific variations include Examination of the major currents in 20th132A (Augustine) and 132B (Aquinas). century Anglo-American philosophy. Phi­Prerequisite: PHIL 51 or permission of in- losophers studied may include Frege, Russell,
Carnap, Moore, Wittgenstein, and Austin;
structor. (5 units)
movements may include logical positivism
133.Modern Philosophy
and ordinary-language philosophy. PrereqStudy of one major philosopher or issue uisites: PHIL 90, PHIL 27 recommended; or
(such as mind and body, skepticism permission of instructor. (5 units)
and knowledge, or causation) from the 137.Contemporary
modern period. Specific variations include
European Philosophy
133A (Hume), 133B (Kant), 133C (Hegel),
Selected
topics from 20th-century continen133D (Nietzsche), 133E (Kierkegaard),
tal
philosophy.
(5 units)
133F (Spinoza), 133G (Descartes), and
PHILOSOPHY 207
138.Phenomenology
An introduction to the 20th-century phenomenological tradition of philosophy, addressing the foundational works of Husserl,
Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty as well as
contemporary developments in the field.
(5 units)
139.Special Topics in the
History of Philosophy
Selected philosophical problems in history
of philosophy studied at an advanced level.
(5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: METAPHYSICS AND EPISTEMOLOGY
140.Philosophy of Science
144.Philosophy of Mind
Exploration of selected philosophic ques- Examination of issues relating to the existions that arise in contemporary science, es- tence and nature of mind and its relation to
pecially physics. Topics include the nature of body. Prerequisite: PHIL 90 or permission of
scientific knowing, the roles of theory and instructor. Specific variations include: 144A
experiment in scientific progress, the sense in (Philosophy of Mind); 144B (Philosophy of
which theoretical entities like quarks and Mind: Emotions); and 144C (Philosophy of
electrons can be said to be “real,” and the Mind: Mental Illness). (5 units)
paradoxes of quantum mechanics. Special
attention will also be given to the complex 145.Wittgenstein
relationship between science and society, A study of the philosophy of the 20th-century
and the role of values in scientific inquiry. philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein, focusing
Prerequisite: PHIL 90 or permission of on his logical theory, metaphysics, and epistemology, from Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus
­instructor. (5 units)
to Philosophical Investigations. Prerequisite:
141.Metaphysics: Mind and Reality
PHIL 90 or permission of instructor. (5 units)
Examination of major issues in metaphysics.
Topics may include the nature and possibil- 146.Philosophy of Language
ity of metaphysics, free will and determin- Examines the natures of meaning, commuism, the mind/body problem, personal nication, and language itself, as well as how
identity, and metaphysical issues arising in language and thought relate to the world.
science. Prerequisites: PHIL 25 or 27 and 90 (5 units)
or permission of instructor. (5 units)
149.Special Topics in Metaphysics
and Epistemology
142.Problems of Knowledge
Selected
philosophical problems in metaExamination of major issues in the theory of
knowledge. Topics may include justification physics and/or epistemology studied at an
of belief, a priori knowledge, perception, and advanced level. Prerequisite: PHIL 90 or
theories of truth. Prerequisites: PHIL 90 or permission of instructor. (5 units)
permission of instructor. (5 units)
143.The Problem of Free Will
Philosophical investigation of the free-will
problem. Discussion of concepts of freedom, fate, causation, and God. Prerequisite:
PHIL 90 or permission of instructor. (5 units)
208 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: OTHER
150.Philosophy of Religion
155.Philosophy of Art
Philosophical inquiry, based on both classi- Philosophical examination of the historical
cal and contemporary views, as to whether development of the aesthetic concepts of
the existence of God can be rationally dem- taste and beauty. (5 units)
onstrated, whether it is compatible with evil,
how human beings relate to God, the nature 180A. University Ethics Bowl Team
of faith, and the nature of religious language. Participation in the Santa Clara University
Ethics Bowl Team, including in-depth week(5 units)
ly analyses of cases in applied ethics, culmi151.Philosophy and Film
nating in a regional or national debate.
This course focuses on the aesthetic and Students will be required to study backethical dimensions of English language ground facts, key definitions, relevant moral
films, from the silent era to the present. We principles, and methods of applying those
will discuss at least some of the following principles to answer questions about the aptopics: What makes a film, screenplay, or plied ethics cases. Field trips required.
novel, “good”? This will include discussion (5 units, may be repeated as PHIL 180B for
of the aesthetic and ethical values that con- 1 unit)
tribute to the quality of film and literature.
What is the role of artistic intention in un- 197.Senior Research Thesis
derstanding and evaluating film (including Creation of a carefully researched and scholthe “auteur theory” account of cinematic arly paper, under the active direction of a
creation and the “intentional fallacy”). What selected member of the department’s staff.
role do various types of interpretation and Of particular value to senior students who
genre play in understanding and evaluating intend to pursue graduate studies. Prerequithe quality of film and literature? What, if sites: Previous arrangement with instructor
any, is the proper place of various types of and department chair. (5 units)
censorship, from the “production code” of
the 1930s to the Motion Picture Association 199.Directed Research
of America (MPAA) rating system in place Tutorial work with demanding requirements
for advanced students in particular problem
today? (5 units)
areas not otherwise accessible through cours152.Intermediate Logic
es. Prerequisites: Previous arrangement with
Study of various topics in modern symbolic the instructor and department chair.
logic. Prerequisite: PHIL 27 or permission of (2–5 units)
instructor and department chair. (5 units)
154.Philosophy of Law
Proper limits and uses of the criminal law in
regulating human behavior. (5 units)
PHYSICS 209
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS
Professor Emeritus: William T. Duffy Jr.
Professors: Richard P. Barber Jr., Betty A. Young (Department Chair and
Lee and Seymour Graff Professor II)
Associate Professors: John T. Birmingham, Philip R. Kesten, Guy Ramon,
Christopher P. Weber
Lecturer: Kristin Kulas
The Department of Physics offers major programs of lecture and laboratory instruction
leading to the bachelor of science in physics, the bachelor of science in physics with a biophysics emphasis, and the bachelor of science in engineering physics. The department also
provides an academic minor in physics and required and elective courses for students majoring in other fields.
The usual career goal of a physics major is professional scientific employment in industry
or government, by a university, or in a secondary school teaching physical science. The
undergraduate major program in physics is appropriate preparation for graduate study in
physics, astronomy and astrophysics, biophysics, environmental science, geological science
and geophysics, medical physics and medicine, patent law, oceanography, and other fields.
The physics major with a biophysics emphasis (newly implemented in 2015–2016) provides a solid preparation for graduate studies and for nearly all of the postgraduate opportunities open to traditional physics majors. Students who complete the biophysics emphasis
will have additional opportunities in medicine, the life sciences, and related industries.
The engineering physics major is particularly appropriate for the applied science student
who intends to do research and development, and/or attend graduate school in physics,
applied physics, or various engineering disciplines. The engineering physics major covers a
broad spectrum of courses in mathematics, engineering, and physics. This program emphasizes, to a greater extent than the traditional engineering major, the physics fundamentals
that are applicable to new technologies as well as to the more established ones.
Research in the department currently is funded by the National Science Foundation,
NASA, and the Department of Energy. Majors in physics and engineering physics participate in faculty research projects through PHYS 198 (Undergraduate Physics Research).
Advanced students also have opportunities for part-time employment assisting faculty in
laboratory and related teaching activities.
A student whose GPA is below a 2.5 must obtain approval from the department chair to
declare a Physics or Engineering Physics major.
210 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of science degree in physics, students majoring in physics or engineering physics must
­complete the following departmental requirements:
Major in Physics
• CHEM 11
• MATH 11, 12, 13, 14,
• MATH 22 or AMTH 106
• PHYS 31, 32 or PHYS 11, 12
• PHYS 33, 34, 70, 103, 111, 112, 120, 121, 122, 151
• One lower-division elective chosen from CHEM 12, BIOL 21, MECH 15, CSCI 10,
COEN 10, COEN 11, COEN 44, COEN 45
• Three upper-division electives, at least one being a laboratory course (L), chosen from
PHYS 104, 113(L), 116, 123(L), 161, 162, 171
Emphasis in Biophysics (Major in Physics)
• BIOL 21, 24, 25
• CHEM 11, 12, 13, 31, 32 (33 recommended)
• MATH 11, 12, 13, 14
• MATH 22 or AMTH 106
• PHYS 31, 32 or PHYS 11, 12
• PHYS 33, 34, 70, 103, 111, 120, 171
• PHYS 121 or CHEM 151
• Two upper-division electives chosen from PHYS 112, 113(L), 116, 122, 123(L),
151(L); BIOL 122(L), 124(L) or 129, 175(L); CHEM 141, 143(L), 150, 154(L);
BIOE 154, 155, 161(L), 162(L), 163(L), 167, 168, 172(L)
Note: CHEM 33 is required for pre-health. CHEM 141 and a course in statistics (MATH 8
or BIOL 160L are recommended for pre-health).
Major in Engineering Physics
• CHEM 11, 12
• MATH 11, 12, 13, 14
• AMTH 106 or MATH 22
• One course chosen from CSCI 10, COEN 10, 11, 44, or 45
• PHYS 31, 32, 33, 34, 70, 103, 111, 112, 121
• One upper-division physics elective chosen from PHYS 104, 113, 116, 122, or 151
• PHYS 120 or MECH 121
PHYSICS 211
• At least four courses chosen from MECH 15; MECH 143 or ELEN 123; ELEN
110, 115; COEN 21 or ELEN 21; MECH 122 or 132 or 266
• An approved cluster of technical courses (typically five) in one of several emphasis
areas including computational, electronics, materials science, solid state, and mechanical
Note: PHYS 116 is taught as a capstone and, although not required, is highly recommended
for engineering physics majors. MATH 53 is recommended for both majors. PHYS 151 fulfills
the third Core Writing requirement. The combination of PHYS 103 and PHYS 192 fulfills the
STS Core requirement.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in physics:
• PHYS 31, 32, 33, 34
• Four approved upper-division courses, excluding PHYS 190, 192, 198, 199
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. Hands-On Physics!
3. Introduction to Astronomy:
The Universe
How do scientists know what they “know?”
Notions of scientific theory and experimen- An introduction to astronomy with a partation are reviewed. Error analysis and in- ticular focus on the origin and evolution of
strumentation are emphasized. Includes the universe, galaxies, and stars. Topics instudent-designed, peer-reviewed group proj- clude a brief history of the science of astronects. (4 units)
omy, telescopes and observational methods,
gravitation, spectra and the sun, black holes,
2. Introduction to Astronomy:
nebulae, the big bang, and the expansion
The Solar System
and ultimate fate of the universe. Special emAn introduction to astronomy with a par- phasis is given to theories of the cosmos
ticular focus on the origin and evolution of from Stonehenge to the present. Students
the solar system, planets, and their satellites. should be familiar with arithmetic and basic
Topics include a brief history of the science algebra. Evening observational lab meets five
of astronomy, telescopes and observational times during the quarter. (4 units)
methods, gravitation, spectra and the sun,
asteroids, comets, astrobiology, and searches 4. The Physics of Dance
for new planetary bodies and extraterrestrial An exploration of the connection between
life. Special emphasis is given to the Earth as the art of dance and the science of motion
a planet, with comparisons to Mars and with both lecture/discussion sessions and
Venus. Students should be familiar with movement laboratories. Topics include
arithmetic and basic algebra. Evening obser- mass, force, equilibrium, acceleration, enervational lab meets five times during the gy, momentum, torque, rotation, and anguquarter. (4 units)
lar momentum. Movement laboratory
combines personal experience of movement
with scientific measurements and analysis, in
other words: “dance it” and “measure it.”
This is a lab science course, not a dance technique course. Also listed as DANC 4. (4 units)
212 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
5. The Physics of Star Trek
Examines the physics and other science depicted in the Star Trek television shows
and movies. Topics include Newton’s and
Einstein’s physics, the Standard Model of
particle physics, and the physics that underlies inertial dampers, transporter beams,
warp drive, and time travel. Considers the
impact on society of interplanetary and intergalactic travel, including the relationship
between the space program and the advance
of technology, the political ramifications of
mankind’s race to space, and the implication
of the discovery of extraterrestrial life on religion and faith. (4 units)
8. Introduction to Space Sciences
An introduction to space exploration and
how observations from space have influenced our knowledge of Earth and of the
other planets in our solar system. This is synthesized within the context of the field of
astrobiology, an interdisciplinary study of
the origin of the Universe, and the evolution
and future of life on Earth. (4 units)
9. Introduction to Earth Science
Overview of geology and its significance to
man. Earthquakes, volcanism, plate tectonics and continental drift, rocks and minerals,
geologic hazards, and mineral resources.
Emphasis on basic geologic principles and
the role of geology in today’s world. Lab.
(4 units)
11.General Physics I
One-dimensional motion. Vectors. Two-dimensional motion. Newtonian laws of motion. Law of gravitation. Planetary motion.
Work. Kinetic and potential energy. Linear
momentum and impulse. Torque and rotational motion. Rotational energy and momentum. Equilibrium. Elastic deformation
of solids. Density and pressure of fluids.
­Bernoulli’s principle. Buoyant forces. Surface tension. Lab. Prerequisite: MATH 11,
12, 13, or 14 or permission of the instructor.
The PHYS 31/32/33 sequence and the PHYS
11/12/13 sequence cannot both be taken for
credit. (5 units)
12.General Physics II
Temperature. Thermal expansion of solids
and liquids. Thermal energy. Heat transfer.
Specific heat. Mechanical equivalent of heat.
Work and heat. Laws of thermodynamics.
Kinetic theory of gases. Ideal gas law. Entropy. Vibration and wave motion. Hooke’s
Law. Sound. Electric charges, fields, and potential. Gauss’s Law. Ohm’s Law. Potential
difference. Electric potential. Capacitors.
Electric current. Resistance and resistivity.
Electric energy and power. Kirchhoff’s
Rules. RC circuits. Magnetic fields and forces. Ampere’s Law. Induced EMF. Faraday’s
Law. Lenz’s Law. Self-inductance. Lab. Prerequisite: PHYS 11. The PHYS 31/32/33
sequence and the PHYS 11/12/13 sequence
cannot both be taken for credit. (5 units)
13.General Physics III
RCL series circuit. Power in an AC circuit.
Resonance. Transformers. Optics: reflection,
refraction, mirrors, and lenses. Total internal
reflection. Diffraction. Young’s double slit
interference. Polarization. Optical Instruments. Relativity. Wave-particle duality.
Photoelectric effect. X-rays. Pair production
and annihilation. Bohr Atom. Spectra. Uncertainty principle. Quantum numbers. Radioactivity. Nuclear particles and reactions.
Subnuclear particles. Lab. Prerequisite:
PHYS 12. The PHYS 31/32/33 sequence
and the PHYS 11/12/13 sequence cannot
both be taken for credit. (5 units)
19.General Physics for Teachers
A primarily conceptual general physics
course designed for future teachers. Topics
covered include scientific inquiry, mechanics, gravitation, properties of matter, heat,
sound, electricity and magnetism, light, relativity, atomic and nuclear physics, and
­astronomy. (4 units)
PHYSICS 213
31.Physics for Scientists and Engineers I
Measurement. Vectors. Straight-line kinematics. Kinematics in two dimensions. Laws
of inertia, mass conservation, and momentum conservation. Center-of-mass and reference frames. Force. Newtonian mechanics
and its applications. Work and kinetic energy. Potential energy and energy conservation. Rotational dynamics. Statics. Includes
weekly laboratory. Prerequisite: MATH 11,
12, 13, or 14. The PHYS 31/32/33 sequence
and the PHYS 11/12/13 sequence cannot
both be taken for credit. (5 units)
32.Physics for Scientists
and Engineers II
Simple harmonic motion. Gravitation.
­Kepler’s Laws. Fluids. Waves. Sound. Interference, diffraction, and polarization. Thermodynamics. Includes weekly laboratory.
Prerequisites: MATH 12, 13, or 14 and
PHYS 31. (MATH 12 may be taken concurrently.) The PHYS 31/32/33 sequence and
the PHYS 11/12/13 sequence cannot both be
taken for credit. (5 units)
33.Physics for Scientists
and Engineers III
Electrostatics. Gauss’s Law. Potential. Capacitance. Electric current. Resistance. Kirchhoff’s
rules. DC circuits. AC circuits. Magnetic force.
Ampere’s Law. Electro­magnetic ­induction.
Includes weekly laboratory. Prerequisites:
MATH 12, 13, or 14 and PHYS 32.
(MATH 13 may be taken concurrently.) The
PHYS 31/32/33 sequence and the PHYS
11/12/13 sequence cannot both be taken for
credit. (5 units)
34.Physics for Scientists
and Engineers IV
Special relativity. Historical development
of modern physics: black body radiation,
photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, Xrays, Bohr atom, DeBroglie wavelength,
Heisenberg uncertainty principle. Quantum
waves and particles. Schrödinger equation.
Nuclear structure and decay. Particle physics.
Introduction to semiconductors. I­ncludes
weekly laboratory. Prerequisite: PHYS 33.
(5 units)
70.Electronic Circuits for Scientists
Linear electric circuits. DC analysis, network theorems, phasor AC analysis. Diode
circuits. Physics of p-n junction. Junction
diodes, field-effect devices, bipolar junction
transistors. Elementary amplifiers. Smallsignal device models. Logic gates, digital integrated circuits, Boolean algebra, registers,
counters, memory. Operational amplifier
circuits. Linear amplifier bias circuits.
Includes weekly laboratory. Prerequisite:
­
PHYS 33. (5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
103.Numerical Methods in Physics
104.Analytical Mechanics
Basic elements of programming in Calculus of variations. Hamilton’s principle.
MATLAB®. Ordinary and partial differen- Lagrangian and Hamiltonian approaches to
tial equations. Fourier transforms and spec- classical dynamics. Central force motion.
tral analysis. Linear regression and curve Noninertial reference frames. Dynamics of
fitting. Numerical integration. Stochastic rigid bodies. Selected topics in classical dymethods. Selected applications include plan- namics such as coupled oscillators, special
etary motion, diffusion, Laplace and Poisson relativity, and chaos theory. Prerequisites:
equations and waves. Weekly computer PHYS 31 and MATH 22 or AMTH 106.
lab. Prerequisite: MATH 22 or AMTH 106. (5 units)
(5 units)
214 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
111.Electromagnetic Theory I
Review of vector calculus. Dirac delta function. Electrostatic fields. Work and energy.
Laplace and Poisson equations. Separation
of variables. Fourier’s trick. Legendre equation. Multipole expansion. Computational
problems. Prerequisites: PHYS 33 and
MATH 22 or AMTH 106. Co-requisite:
PHYS 103. (5 units)
112.Electromagnetic Theory II
Magnetostatics. Induced electromotive forces. Maxwell’s equations. Energy and momentum
in
electrodynamics.
Electromagnetic stress tensor. Electromagnetic waves. Potential formulation. Computational problems. Dipole radiation.
Prerequisite: PHYS 111. (5 units)
113.Advanced Electromagnetism
and Optics
Geometric optics. Polarization and optically
active media. Interferometry. Optical signal
and noise in detection and communication.
Interaction of light with metals, dielectrics,
and atoms. Thermal radiation. Laser operation. Prerequisite: PHYS 112. (5 units)
116.Physics of Solids
Crystal structure. Phonons. Free electron
theory of metals. Band theory of solids.
Semiconductors. Electrical and thermal
transport properties of materials. Magnetism. Superconductivity. Topics from current research literature. PHYS 116 is taught
as a capstone course. Prerequisites: PHYS
120, PHYS 121, and senior standing.
(5 units)
120.Thermal Physics
Laws of thermodynamics with applications
to ideal and non-ideal systems. Elementary
kinetic theory of gases. Entropy. Classical
and quantum statistical mechanics. Selected
topics from magnetism and low-temperature physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 34 and
PHYS 103. Recommended: PHYS 121.
(5 units)
121.Quantum Mechanics I
The Schrödinger equation. The wave-function and its interpretation. One dimensional
potentials. Harmonic oscillator. Methods in
linear algebra including matrix operations,
unitary transformations and rotations, eigenvalue problems and diagonalization. Hilbert space, observables, operators, and Dirac
notation. The hydrogen atom. Prerequisites:
PHYS 34 and PHYS 103. (5 units)
122.Quantum Mechanics II
Angular momentum and spin. Electrons in
EM field. Addition of angular momenta.
Identical particles. Time-independent perturbation theory. Fine and hyperfine structure. Time-dependent perturbation theory
and its application to light-matter interaction. Fermi’s golden rule. Prerequisite:
PHYS 121. (5 units)
123.Quantum Mechanics III
Variational principle. WKB approximation.
Scattering theory. Quantum paradoxes. Introduction to quantum computation: qubits, quantum gates and circuits, quantum
teleportation, quantum algorithms, error
correction codes. Quantum computer implementations. Includes weekly laboratory.
Prerequisite: PHYS 122. (5 units)
141.Modern Topics in Physics
A selection of current topics in physics
research. (5 units)
151.Advanced Laboratory
Laboratory-based experiments in the areas of
atomic, nuclear, and quantum physics. Emphasis on in-depth understanding of underlying physics, experimental techniques, data
analysis, and dissemination of results. D
­ esign
and implementation of independent tabletop project. Introduction to LabVIEW™.
Written and oral presentations. Prerequisite:
Senior standing. (5 units)
PHYSICS 215
161. Introduction to Astrophysics
A survey of astronomy for science majors focused on the physics and mathematics that
astronomers use to interpret observations of
planets, stars, and galaxies. Topics include
the kinematics of objects in the solar system,
the nature of stars and their evolution, and
the evolution and formation of galaxies. Prerequisite: PHYS 33. PHYS 34 recommended
but not required. (5 units)
162.Cosmology
A survey of cosmology for science majors.
Much of course will focus on the properties
of an idealized, perfectly smooth, model universe. Topics include the formation of galaxies and clusters in an evolving universe, the
Benchmark Model of the universe, Dark
Matter and Dark Energy, the Cosmic
­Microwave Background and its fluctuation
spectrum, recent results from such experiments as WMAP and Planck, Big Bang nucleosynthesis, and problems with the
standard Big Bang models and inflation
theory. Prerequisites: PHYS 34 or PHYS
161. Knowledge of calculus through differential equations is assumed. (5 units)
171. Biophysics
Diffusion and dissipation in cells. Friction
and inertia in biological systems. Entropic
and chemical forces. Macromolecules. Molecular machines. Ion pumps. Nerve impulses. Prerequisite: PHYS 33. (5 units)
190.Senior Seminar
Advanced topics in selected areas of physics.
Enrollment by permission of instructor.
(2 units)
192.Physics and Society
Physics research that has a significant societal
impact presented by invited speakers from
academia, the private sector, and government laboratories. Students participate in
discussions and write reflection papers.
­Prerequisite: PHYS 34. (1 unit)
198.Undergraduate Physics Research
Departmental work under close professorial
direction on research in progress. Permission
of the professor directing the research must
be secured before registering for this course.
(1–5 units)
199.Directed Reading in Physics
Detailed investigation of some area or topic
in physics not covered in the regular courses;
supervised by a faculty member. Permission
of the professor directing the study must
be secured before registering for this course.
(1–5 units)
216 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Professor Emerita: Janet A. Flammang
Professors: Jane L. Curry, Dennis R. Gordon (Department Chair), Eric O. Hanson
(Patrick A. Donohoe, S.J. Professor), Timothy J. Lukes, Peter I. Minowitz,
Terri L. Peretti, William J. Stover
Associate Professors: Elsa Y. Chen, Gregory P. Corning, James S. Lai, Farid D. Senzai
Assistant Professors: Anne E. Baker, Naomi Levy
Senior Lecturer: Diana Morlang
Lecturer: Kenneth Faulve-Montojo
The Department of Political Science offers a degree program leading to the bachelor of
science in political science. The department introduces students to the analysis of political
behavior, values, institutions, and governments. It also offers preparation for various graduate
and professional studies and for careers in public service.
The department makes available opportunities to participate in a variety of programs
that combine practical field experience and academic credit. It assists students in arranging
academic credit for internships in local politics. Students may work for government agencies, legislative or judicial bodies, political parties, or politically related groups. The department regularly offers courses that combine local internships with classroom work. On the
national level, Santa Clara is a member school of American University’s Washington, D.C.,
program, in which students receive credit for internships and intensive seminars at the
nation’s capital. Santa Clara also participates in the Panetta Institute’s Congressional Internship Program, which fully subsidizes students who study and intern with the California
Congressional delegation on Capitol Hill. On the international level, the department
encourages student participation in the numerous University-operated and approved study
abroad programs, especially those with internships. See the Domestic Public Sector Studies
Programs section in Chapter 2 for additional details on public sector programs.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of science degree, students majoring in political science must complete the following departmental requirements:
• Two mathematics courses from the following: MATH 6 and 8, MATH 6 and 11,
MATH 8 and 11, MATH 11 and 12, MATH 30 and 31, or other approved combination
• POLI 1; 2 or 3; 25; 30; 40 (ECON 1 may be substituted for POLI 40); and 99.
•Seven upper-division courses in political science, including one lecture course
from each of the following five areas: United States politics, comparative politics,
international relations, political philosophy, and applied quantitative methods
­(Environmental Science and Environmental Policy majors may substitute ENVS
110 for POLI 101); a sixth upper-division course from any of these subfields; and a
political science seminar taken after achieving senior status or with the permission of
the instructor.
POLITICAL SCIENCE 217
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in political science:
• Any three lower-division political science courses (POLI 1, 2 or 3, 25, 30, 40, 45,
50, 55, 99)
• Any three upper-division 5-unit political science courses
• One additional upper- or lower-division political science course
HONORS PROGRAM
The political science honors program enhances the regular major by providing a more
specialized course of study to prepare highly qualified students for graduate study. All majors
who are not seniors and who have completed at least two of the lower-division sequence of
courses (1, 2 or 3, 25, 30, 40, 99) with a grade point average of 3.0 or better are eligible to
apply. A maximum of 15 students from each class are admitted. Admission is determined
on the basis of coursework, recommendations, and a personal interview with the faculty
director. Honors students are expected to participate in various department-sponsored
events, and a representative from the program has full voting status in the deliberations of
the department faculty. Participants in the program must complete a senior thesis, fulfill one
of three supplemental curriculum requirements (a minor or a second major, ECON 1 and
2, or language 21 and 22), and take a highly active role in department affairs.
OPTIONAL EMPHASES
Political science majors may select an emphasis in pre-law, public sector studies, or international relations, which will be noted on the student’s transcript. Recommended courses
for completing the three emphasis options are available on the department’s website.
Emphasis in Public Sector Studies
The public sector emphasis is a specialized area of concentration within the political
­science major allowing students to focus their coursework toward public sector studies. The
emphasis is designed to provide a closer look at the creation, implementation, and analysis
of public policies, and the operation of governments and public organizations. The public
sector emphasis provides an excellent foundation for those who would like to pursue careers
or graduate studies in public policy, public administration, public affairs, urban planning,
and law. Requirements for the public sector emphasis include a variety of courses
both inside and outside of the political science department. For the most up-to-date information about the public sector emphasis, see http://www.scu.edu/cas/politicalscience/
academicinformation/.
• ECON 1 and 2
• POLI 167 with a grade of C or better
• Upper-division POLI internship: POLI 198A, 198B, 198, or equivalent, including
Washington Semester Program internships
• Upper-division POLI course for public sector: POLI 152, 153, 154, 158, 159, 160,
161, 162, 163, 165, 166, 168
218 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
• Two additional lower-division courses from POLI 45; ACTG 11, 12, 20; BUSN 71;
CENG 5; COMM 2, 20; ECON 3; ELSJ 50; ENVS 10, 11, 12, 20; MGMT 6;
PHIL 8, 9, 10; PHSC 1, 2; SOCI 33, 65; RSOC 49; or others as approved
• Two additional upper-division courses (outside of the political science department)
from ANTH 151; BIOL 171; COMM 120A, 124B, 162A; ECON 111, 113, 114,
115, 120, 126, 127, 129, 136, 137, 150, 155, 156, 160, 166, 173, 181, 182, 185,
190; EDUC 106; ENGL 185; ENVS 115, 120, 122, 147, 162; HIST 176; MGMT
169, 171; PHIL 109, 111, 113, 119; PSYC 134; SOCI 132, 137, 138, 140, 153,
159, 160, 161, 165, 170, 172, 176, 180; or selected courses from the Washington
Semester Program or others as approved by the program director
Emphasis in International Relations
The international relations emphasis allows students to focus on the international system
and the interaction of national and non-national actors on the global stage. Sample topics
addressed by the international relations emphasis include international organizations; transnational movements; conflict resolution, peace, and reconciliation; military-strategic issues;
international political economy; human rights; development and economic justice; and
global sustainability.
Requirements for the international relations emphasis include a variety of courses both
inside and outside of the political science department. For the most up-to-date information
about the international relations emphasis, see http://www.scu.edu/cas/politicalscience/
academicinformation/.
• Senior seminar: POLI 196 (International Relations) or POLI 192 (Comparative Politics)
• Two additional upper-division POLI five-unit international relations classes from
POLI 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128. One may count for
upper-division elective
•One lower- or upper-division international relations-related course outside the
­department from ECON 3, 129ES, 129BF, 137, 181, 182; ENVS 147; GERM 111;
HIST 105,107,124, 131, 135, 138, 141, 142, 144S, 145, 151, 154B, 155, 163;
TESP 159, 162, 182R; SOCI 133, 134; RSOC 38; or other courses as approved by
the program director
• One off-campus academic experience with an international component: Study Abroad,
Washington Semester Program, Arrupe/Kolvenbach internship or community-based
learning, or local internship
Emphasis in Pre-Law
Political science is one of the most common majors for pre-law students. After all, political science is the closest of all majors to the institutions and values with which law deals. The
primary study of law is the state, and so too for political science. Additionally, the demands
of political science courses (reading of complex texts, independent research, frequent class
presentations, and demanding writing assignments) strengthen the analytical and communications skills that the practice of law requires.
Requirements for the pre-law emphasis include a variety of courses from both inside and
outside of the political science department. At most, six courses are required: three within
the political science department and three from outside the political science department,
although many of these courses fulfill other Core and political science major requirements.
POLITICAL SCIENCE 219
For the most up-to-date information about the pre-law emphasis and specific courses, see
http://www.scu.edu/cas/politicalscience/academicinformation/.
• Three courses from List A: POLI 45, 124, 125, 127, 159, 160, 161, 167, 168, 169P,
171, 185P/195P; POLI 198A or B (internship classes must be approved by the
pre‑law program director)
• One course from List B: PHIL 10, 29, 111, 113, 114, 154; ECON 126; PSYC 155;
COMM 170A; ANTH 151; SOCI 159, 160, 176; TESP 114; ELSJ 50; ENVS 120
• One course from List C: PHIL 25; ENGL 79, 176, 177
• One additional course from either List B or List C
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. Introduction to U.S. Politics
sections include an interactive computer
Critical analysis of U.S. political values, in- simulation to apply conflict resolution prinstitutions, and processes. The U.S. political ciples. (4 units)
tradition, the Constitution, the presidency, 30.Introduction to Political Philosophy
Congress, the bureaucracy, Supreme Court,
elections, political parties, interest groups, An exploration of some of the principal
mass media, political opinion and participa- themes and questions of political philosophy
tion, domestic policies, and foreign policy through the writings of authors such as
Plato, Machiavelli, Marx, and Mill. Promiare examined in depth. (4 units)
nent themes include theory and practice,
2. Introduction to
individual liberty, morality and politics, freeComparative Politics
dom, obligation, and justice. (4 units)
Government and politics in several states. 40.Politics of U.S. Economic Policies
Emphasis on the development of analytical
abilities and critical skills in the evaluation of Covers basic concepts in microeconomics,
political culture, processes, and institutions. macroeconomics, and international economics in order to demonstrate the relation(4 units)
ship between the science of economics and
3. Introduction to World Politics
the politics of U.S. economic policies. Case
Compares the political cultures, processes, studies such as poverty issues, agricultural
and institutions of China, India, and Mexi- policies, and immigration and international
co. The student fulfills an Arrupe Placement trade dynamics will demonstrate how ecowith an immigrant client from a Confucian, nomic and political issues, as well as domesSouth Asian, or Latin American country. tic and international policies, are interrelated.
Note: This course requires participation in (4 units)
community-based learning (CBL) experiences 45.Criminal Justice System
off campus. (4 units)
Basic understanding of the U.S. criminal
25.Introduction to
justice system: police, courts, probation, imInternational Relations
prisonment, parole, and relations with other
Conceptual models used to analyze interna- governmental agencies. Goals, successes, and
tional relations, contemporary problems of failures of the system, and possible remedies.
world politics, and the methods states em- (4 units)
ploy to provide peace and security. Some
220 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
50.World Geography
Provides an understanding of world geography through an appreciation of contemporary global problems in different world
regions. Broad topics that will be covered
include globalization, demographic trends,
economic development and underdevelopment, human-environment interactions,
changing cultures, and geopolitics. These
topics will illustrate the distribution of political, cultural, socioeconomic, and physical
processes and features around the world and
will be covered at different scales: local, regional, and global. Also listed as ANTH 50
and ENVS 50. (4 units)
55.Cross-Racial Electoral Politics
Examination of the historical and contemporary political movements among the
major minority groups in the United States
since the 1960s. The origins and goals of the
Black Power movement, the Chicano/a
movement, the Asian-American movement,
and the Native American movement will be
focused on during the quarter. Each of these
movements embodies similar and different
trails with regard to their respective group’s
quest for political power and elected representation. Due to the contemporary immigration trends, Latinos and Asian Americans
have challenged the black-white paradigm
that has traditionally defined U.S. racial
politics in local- and state-level politics. The
result, in some instances, has been interracial
competition and conflict at these levels. The
necessary elements needed to build and to
sustain multiracial coalitions along with
what the political future holds for these minority groups will be addressed. Also listed as
ETHN 55. (5 units)
99.Political Science Research
This course provides the necessary tools to
understand, critically evaluate, and perform
political science research. Students will learn
how to conduct a literature review, produce
an annotated bibliography, and propose a
theoretically informed research design. Topics include case selection; measurement of
variables; hypothesis testing; qualitative research methods including interviews, content analysis, and ethnography; survey
research; and interpretation and presentation of charts and tables. (4 units)
Note: Upper-division courses in each area
below have required prerequisites as noted in
each section. In special cases, the instructor of a
particular course may make an exception to the
requirements. It is recommended that majors
complete POLI 99 before undertaking upperdivision course work in Political Science.
UPPER-DIVISION COURSE: APPLIED QUANTITATIVE METHODS
Note: POLI 99 is a required prerequisite for
POLI 101.
101.Applied Quantitative Methods
An applied introduction to statistical techniques that are especially relevant to data
from the social sciences. (5 units)
POLITICAL SCIENCE 221
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
Note: POLI 30 is a required prerequisite for 112.History of Political Philosophy II:
upper-division political philosophy courses.
Liberalism and Its Roots
Western
political thought from Machiavelli
105.Special Topics in
through the origins of liberalism in the writPolitical Philosophy
ings of Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau.
Selected topics in political philosophy. (5 units) (5 units)
107.American Political Thought
Selected topics and themes in the history of
American political thought. (5 units)
111.History of Political Philosophy I:
Greek and Christian
Development of Western political thought
from its Greek origins in the work of Plato
and Aristotle through the work of Aquinas.
(5 units)
113.History of Political Philosophy III:
Post-Liberal Theories
Writers and themes in 19th- and 20thcentury political thought including Marx,
Nietzsche, Freud, and Lenin. (5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Note: POLI 25 is a required prerequisite for 117.International Humanitarian
upper-division international relations courses.
Action
Explores the role of intergovernmental orga116A. Model United Nations Prep
nizations (IGOs) and nongovernmental orModel United Nations (UN) is a simulation ganizations (NGOs) in the humanitarian
program in which students participate in crises around the globe. Activities include
mock sessions of the United Nations. POLI research and conflict resolution simulation.
116A is a preparatory course for the Model By acting as members of international orgaUN conference in spring quarter. Students nizations involved in human tragedy, stuwill learn about the principles of interna- dents experience simulated civic engagement
tional law and conflict resolution. (2 units)
on an international level and analyze the
global community’s Responsibility to Pro116B.Model United Nations:
tect doctrine. They come to understand and
International Conflict
act in an aid system where many organizaSimulation
tions face constraints and opportunities to
Simulated United Nations sessions, repre- effect change in countries suffering and resenting member-nations, debating and pre- covering from conflict and humanitarian
paring resolutions, and engaging in other disaster. (3 units)
aspects of diplomacy. Prerequisite: POLI
116A. (2 units)
118.The Cold War
Case study of the critical conflict of the 20th
century to understand the interaction of foreign and domestic politics, the development
of current international politics, and the
ways in which political ideology and conflict
influence people and nations. (5 units)
222 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
119.The European Union
Evolution of European political, social, and
economic integration in the postwar period.
Emphasis on the institutions and politics of
the European Union since the Maastrict
treaty, and current issues of European integration, such as the addition of new members, monetary union, and internal
democratization. (5 units)
124.Law, Security, and Force
An examination of traditional international
legal principles involving the use of force in
self-defense with case studies to understand
how the justification of armed conflict is
changing. Discussion of the international
community’s adjustment to the evolving nature of sovereignty, increasing globalization,
and national defense. (5 units)
120.Mass Media, Information
Technology, and International
Politics
Use of computer-based simulations and
multimedia sources to understand international negotiation and foreign policy decision making. (5 units)
125.International Law
Sources, nature, and function of international law in world politics. Special attention
to the subjects of international law, international transactions, and the rules of war.
Viewpoints presented from Western and
non-Western perspectives. (5 units)
121.International Political Economy
An introduction to the politics and institutions of the world economy. Topics include
competing theories of international political
economy (IPE); regionalism and globalization; the international trading and financial
systems; multinational corporations; development and debt. (5 units)
126.International Organization
International organization in world affairs.
Political, economic, and social role of the
United Nations, regional organizations, specialized agencies, and nonstate transnational
actors. (5 units)
122.East Asian International Relations
An overview of the political, economic, and
security dimensions of international relations in Northeast Asia with a focus on the
foreign policies of China, Japan, and the
United States. Prerequisite: POLI 2 or 25.
(5 units)
123.Global Environmental Politics
Explores the political, social, scientific, and
economic challenges in the pursuit of a just
and sustainable global environment. Case
studies are drawn from around the world
with a focus on national, intergovernmental,
and nongovernmental actors and social
f­orces. (5 units)
127.Special Topics in
International Relations
Selected topics in international relations.
(5 units)
128.U.S. Foreign Policy
Aims, formulation, and implementation
of U.S. foreign policy since World War II,
focusing on diplomacy, war, security, and
trade. (5 units)
POLITICAL SCIENCE 223
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: COMPARATIVE POLITICS
Note: Either POLI 2 or 3 is a required 136.Politics in Central America
prerequisite for upper-division comparative
and the Caribbean
politics courses.
Political cultures, processes, and institutions
of selected Central American and Caribbean
131.The Military and Politics
states. Governmental organization, sustainCase study of wars in Vietnam to under- able development, diplomacy, and social
stand civil-military relations, the causes of change. (5 units)
military intervention, legitimacy-building
efforts, and withdrawal from politics. 137.Politics in South America
Political cultures, processes, and institutions
(5 units)
of selected South American states. Govern132.Transnational
mental organization, sustainable development,
Political Movements
diplomacy, and social change. (5 units)
Examines the various forms and dynamics of
organizations, activists, and movements that 139.Religion and Politics in
the Developing World
engage in collective action to transform institutional policies and practices across na- A comparison of the relationships between
tion-state boundaries. Explores how social religion and politics in Asia, Latin America,
movements, international protests, and and the Middle East. Emphasis on the curNGOs interact with nation-state govern- rent political influence of traditional organiments as well as economic and cultural insti- zation and belief. (5 units)
tutions and why certain communities engage 140.Politics in Less-Developed
in transnational political contention. DeCountries
signed to be a collective learning experience
Multidisciplinary
study of the problems and
in which students examine and interrogate
scholarship about social movements, global- politics of political development in Latin
ization, and identity in transnational per- America, Africa, and/or Asia. Case studies of
communist and capitalist approaches to pospective. (5 units)
litical development. Impact of international
politics on internal development. (5 units)
133.Political Parties,
Elections, and Policy
142.Politics in the Middle East
An examination of how parties and elections Designed to give students an understanding
mobilize people, what determines election of the complexities of Middle East politics,
victories, and how parties and elections af- the importance of the region to the world,
fect state and national government policies. and the role history and religion have played
A focus on United States politics in contrast in the political and social development of the
to the processes in democracies in Western various countries in the region. (5 units)
and Eastern Europe. Students will be engaged in an on-campus simulation of an 143.Democracy and
election. (5 units)
Democracy Building
Designed to give students an understanding
134.Race and Ethnicity in the
of theories of democracy and how democraPolitics of Developed States
cies are built out of military defeat (GermaAn examination of the role of and attempts ny and Iraq) and internal change either
to deal with racial/ethnic identity and con- by leaders relinquishing power or popular
flict in the politics of the United States, uprising. Course includes reports of particiSouth Africa, the former Soviet Union, pants about decision making in democratiz­Yugoslavia, and Western Europe. (5 units)
ing processes. (5 units)
224 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
144.European Politics
An examination of European politics in the
postwar era through political parties and institutions. Evaluation of current challenges
facing European governments such as immigration, changing welfare states, regional diversity, and an expanding European Union,
using national comparisons. (5 units)
145.Politics of Former
Communist States
An examination of transitions of the diverse
states of the former Soviet Union and East
Europe, with a focus on differences in transitions, progress toward democracy, and the
impact on people’s attitudes and lives. Students will work with their peers from these
countries. (5 units)
146.African Environment
and Development
Examines how history, politics, and policies
have shaped the contemporary political, social, and cultural dimensions of development and environmental challenges in
sub-Saharan Africa. Special topics include
the politics of natural resource use, the causes
of hunger and famine, problems of conservation and environment, environmental
health and gender, and development. Also
listed as ENVS 149. (5 units)
148.Politics in China
Origins of revolution in modern China, the
politics of social and economic modernization in China since 1949, the problems of
bureaucratization, political participation, and
the succession to Deng Xiaoping. (5 units)
149.Special Topics in
Comparative Politics
Selected topics in comparative politics.
(5 units)
149L. Special Topics in Comparative
Politics: British Politics
This is an introductory course on contemporary British politics offered in London. The overall objective of the course is to
provide students in a systematic fashion with
the basic understanding of the British system
of government and political process, as well
as the socio-historical processes that have
shaped modern Britain. Topics to be discussed include the Monarchy, the Parliament, political parties, the Prime Minister,
political ideology, and political culture.
Throughout the course, comparisons with
American politics and society will be made
as a point of reference to provide a better
framework for understanding British politics.
Prerequisite: None. (5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: UNITED STATES POLITICS
Note: POLI 1 is a required prerequisite for ethics and reforms, and the power of Conupper-division U.S. politics courses.
gress relative to the president and the bureaucracy. (5 units)
150.The Presidency
Analysis of the presidency as it has evolved 152.Political Participation
throughout U.S. history. Comparison of An examination of who participates in U.S.
presidential powers with those of Congress, politics and the various forms of political
the courts, the bureaucracy, the press, politi- participation. Elections, political parties, incal parties, and the public. (5 units)
terest groups, community organizing, and
political protest. (5 units)
151.The Congress
History, structure, and policies of Congress.
Congressional elections and theories of representation, the committee system and congressional norms, lobbying, congressional
POLITICAL SCIENCE 225
153.Minority Politics
in the United States
Survey course with a focus on the historical
and contemporary struggles of minority
groups in the United States. The following
minority groups are analyzed comparatively
within a political and institutional context:
African Americans, Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans, minority women,
gays, and the disabled. This course examines
various issues including theories of race, ethnicity, gender, and class to understand how
these variables serve as a basis for identification and political mobilization in American
politics. Also listed as ETHN 153. (5 units)
154.Women and Politics
A consideration of the various ways women
have changed “politics as usual.” Examination of the status of women today, varieties
of feminist thought, women as voters and as
an interest group, women in public office,
and public policy issues. Also listed as WGST
180. (5 units)
155.Political Psychology
This course serves as an introduction to the
interdisciplinary field of political psychology,
which applies theoretical ideas from psychology to understand political processes. Political psychology tends to focus on how politics
works at the individual (micro) level. This
course will focus on the psychological roots
of public opinion and the political behavior
of ordinary citizens through an application
of psychological theories about personality,
learning, cognition, emotion, social influence, and group dynamics to individuals’
political attitudes and behaviors. (5 units)
156.Politics and Mass Media
An examination of the politics of the mass
media, interactions between politicians and
the media, the effects of mass media, and social media on political life and public opinion, concerns of racial and ethnic minorities,
and the ethics of media work. (5 units)
157.Environmental Politics and Policy
This course examines environmental politics, policy, and governance in the last half
century. Part one of this course reviews
major environmental legislation in the United States including the Endangered Species
Act, Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, and
policy responses to global warming. In part
two, learners step back to interrogate the
power dynamics, social movements, legal
battles, and struggles over meaning and representation that accompany significant social
change. The final section examines the rise
of global environmental governance highlighting the role of nonprofit organizations,
civil societies, and corporate firms as voluntary environmental regulation moves from
the margins to the mainstream. A concluding discussion identifies avenues for civic
engagement, accountability, and environmental citizenship. Learners will gain insight
into the policymaking processes by participating in simulation games, reading and research assignments, developing tools to
assess policy outcomes, and finding strategies to identify political opportunities. Prerequisite: ENVS 22 recommended. Also listed
as ENVS 122. (5 units)
158.Housing and Homelessness Policy
Substantive in-depth study of U.S. housing
and homelessness policies. This course explores causes and correlates of homelessness
such as poverty, unemployment, drug/alcohol addiction, mental illness, crime, disorder, HIV/AIDS, and lack of affordable
housing. Note: This course requires participation in community-based learning (CBL)
experiences off campus. (5 units)
159.The Constitution and Liberty
Constitutional law doctrines and decisions
regarding civil, economic, and political liberties. Topics include free speech and association, freedom of the press, religious freedom,
economic liberties and property rights, and
privacy rights. (5 units)
226 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
160.The Constitution and Equality
Constitutional law doctrines and decisions
regarding the 14th Amendment’s guarantee
of equal protection. Topics include race discrimination (particularly school desegregation and affirmative action), sex
discrimination, discrimination against the
poor, and discrimination based on sexual
orientation. (5 units)
161.Law and Politics in
the United States
Examination of the U.S. legal system. Topics
include legal culture, the adversary system
and its alternatives, system participants (litigants, lawyers, and judges), judicial selection, and legal versus political influences on
judicial decision making. Special attention
to the question of the capacity of courts to
serve as agents of social change. (5 units)
162.Urban Politics
Examination of political processes in the
U.S. city. Special attention to the structures
and institutions of urban political power and
the changing forms of political action. Discussion of the historical development of
urban social life, political cultures, racial/ethnic and class communities, political economy, and urban planning. (5 units)
163.State and Local Politics
A consideration of the politics and processes
of state and local governments, with particular attention given to California state, county, and municipal politics. Topics include
federalism, executives, legislatures, courts,
interest groups, parties, elections, financing,
and issues such as education, welfare, criminal justice, transportation, housing, and
urban growth. (5 units)
164.Studies in Public Policy
Selected topics and problems in public policy as viewed from a political insider’s perspective. Taught by a political practitioner.
(2 units)
165.Public Administration
Administration of public policies in terms
of broad questions of democratic theory.
Organizational theory, public employees,
­
budget making, policy evaluation, and public finance. (5 units)
166.California Politics
An examination of the structures and processes of California politics: the state’s constitution, legislature, governor, courts, and
executive agencies. Special attention to
­democratic dilemmas of citizen participation (elections, ballot initiatives), legislative
gridlock (redistricting, budget), and crucial
policies (education, health and welfare, immigration, criminal justice, energy, and environment). (5 units)
167.Making Public Policy
An examination of the nature of U.S. public
policy and policy analysis through the use of
texts and case studies. Stages of policy development (how an idea becomes a policy,
agenda setting, implementation, analysis,
and evaluation). Ethical issues in public
­policy. (5 units)
168.Special Topics in Public Policy
Substantive in-depth study of selected issues
in U.S. public policy such as health care,
criminal justice, housing, and homelessness.
Emphasis on the intersection of policy areas.
Arrupe placement required. (5 units)
169.Special Topics in U.S. Politics
Selected topics in U.S. politics. (5 units)
171.Women and Law
Examines the legal status and rights of
women in the United States through an intersectional lens. Principles such as equality,
essentialism, privacy, and equal protection
will be examined as will contemporary law
and policy issues such as employment discrimination, sexual harassment, domestic
violence, rape, reproductive justice, and
family law. Also listed as WGST 118. (5 units)
POLITICAL SCIENCE 227
172.Money and Politics
In politics, money talks. In this course, we
will consider whether political money and
the involvement of monied-interests in politics serve to advance or undermine democratic elections, political equality, freedom of
speech, representation, and the production
of sound public policies. (5 units)
180.Honors Research Projects
Independent research and writing on a
­selected topic or problem. Enrollment restricted to students in the Political Science
Honors Program. (5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: SENIOR SEMINARS
190.Seminar in Research Methods
195.Seminar in U.S. Politics
Plan and conduct political science research Selected topics in U.S. politics. Also listed as
on selected topics such as political commu- ETHN 185. (5 units)
nication and socialization. (5 units)
196.Seminar in
192.Seminar in Comparative Politics
International Relations
Selected topics in comparative politics in Selected aspects of international political
various states and regions. (5 units)
behavior. (5 units)
193.Seminar in Political Philosophy
Selected topics in political philosophy. (5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: INTERNSHIPS AND INDEPENDENT STUDY
198.Public Service Internships
198EL. Public Sector Study
and Internship
Directed internships in government agencies, legislative bodies, political parties, or Directed internships in local government
interest groups, public or government affairs agencies, legislative bodies, political parties,
departments of corporations, or nonprofit interest groups, public or government affairs
organizations. Open to qualified juniors or departments of corporations, or nonprofit
seniors with permission of the instructor. organizations, integrated with classroom
(Variable units)
analyses of professions in public sector, frequent guest speakers, and research projects.
198A and B. Public Sector Study
Open to qualified juniors and seniors. Note:
and Internship
This course requires participation in commuDirected internships in local government nity-based learning (CBL) experiences off
agencies, legislative bodies, political parties, campus. (5 units)
interest groups, public or government affairs
departments of corporations, or nonprofit 199.Directed Reading
organizations, integrated with classroom Independent study. Intensive work in areas
analyses of professions in public sector, fre- not fully covered in upper-division courses.
quent guest speakers, and research projects. Prerequisite: A written outline of the proOpen to qualified juniors and seniors. posed course, with required forms and all nec(5 units)
essary signatures, must be submitted at least
one week prior to registration. (1–5 units)
228 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
Professors Emeriti: Roland C. Lowe, Marvin L. Schroth, Eleanor W. Willemsen
Professors: Jerry M. Burger, Lucia Albino Gilbert, Tracey L. Kahan, Robert Numan,
Thomas G. Plante (Augustin Cardinal Bea, S.J., University Professor),
Kieran T. Sullivan (Department Chair), Timothy C. Urdan
Associate Professors: Matthew C. Bell, Patricia M. Simone
Assistant Professor: Yekaterina Bezrukova
Acting Assistant Professor: Kathryn Bruchmann
The Department of Psychology offers a degree program leading to the bachelor of
science in psychology. Psychology is the study of behavior, emotion, and thought using the
scientific method. At the undergraduate level, the study of psychology is part of a liberal
education. A major in psychology lays the groundwork for various advanced studies,
including the pursuit of graduate degrees needed for the professional practice of psychology.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of science degree, students majoring in psychology must complete the following departmental requirements:
• PSYC 1, 2, 40, 43
• MATH 6 and 8 or MATH 11 and 8
• One course from PSYC 165, 166, 167
• One course from PSYC 172, 185, 196
• One course from PSYC 115, 117, 157
• One course from PSYC 150, 160
• One course from PSYC 120, 130, 131
• One advanced topics course from PSYC 111, 116, 118, 132, 133, 136, 151, 161,
168, 171, 178, or 199A
• Three additional approved upper-division psychology courses
Emphasis in Psychobiology
In addition to the bachelor of science and departmental requirements, students who
wish to study neuroscience may elect the psychobiology concentration, which requires
­completing the following courses in addition to requirements for the major:
• MATH 11, 12
• CHEM 11, 12, 13, 31, 32
• BIOL 21, 22, 23, 24, 25
Emphasis in Gerontology
In addition to the bachelor of science and departmental requirements, students who
wish to study the process of aging should inquire about the gerontology certificate program.
For additional information, contact Dr. Patricia Simone, Director of Gerontology, at
[email protected]
PSYCHOLOGY 229
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. General Psychology I
50.Ways of Knowing
The scientific study of behavior. Topics in- Personal experience, the scientific method,
clude the physiological basis of behavior, journalistic techniques, anthropological obsensation and perception, learning, memory, servation methods, intuition, and faith (relimotivation, and emotion. Other topics may gious, paranormal) are just a few of the ways
include language, problem solving, intelli- of knowing that people use. This course exgence, sleep and dreaming, and conscious- plores each of these ways of knowing with
ness. Prerequisites: None. (4 units)
the goal of answering the following questions: What are the strengths of each way of
1H. Honors Colloquium
knowing? What are the limitations? Which
The honors version of PSYC 1. Restricted to method of inquiry is best for answering difstudents in the University Honors Program. ferent types of questions? Prerequisites:
(4 units)
None. (4 units)
2. General Psychology II
The scientific study of behavior. Topics
include human development, personality,
abnormal psychology, clinical intervention,
and social psychology. Other topics may
include psychological assessment, crosscultural psychology, and psychological
adjustment. Prerequisites: None. (4 units)
2H. Honors Colloquium
The honors version of PSYC 2. Restricted to
students in the University Honors Program.
(4 units)
40.Statistical Data Analysis
An introduction to statistical methods used
in psychological research. Prerequisites:
Declared psychology major and MATH 8, or
permission of instructor. (4 units)
43.Research Methods in Psychology
Investigation of methods of psychological
research and issues involved in the collection
of data. Exercises require designing research
projects, collecting data, and writing professional reports. Prerequisites: PSYC 1 or 2
and 40, or permission of instructor. (4 units)
65.Foundations of
Behavioral Neuroscience
A basic introduction to brain structure and
function. The course has standard lecture
hours, but integrates hands-on laboratory
experiential exercises during the class sessions. Meets the Core Natural Science requirement. Prerequisites: None. (4 units)
230 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
102.Writing in Psychology
111.Advanced Topics in Motivation
Development of writing, reading, critical Seminar exploring theories and research in
thinking, and literature search skills within motivation and emotion. Students will read,
traditional formats for communicating discuss, and critically analyze current empirischolarship in psychology. Covers the use of cal research and review articles in these areas.
the American Psychological Association Topics emphasized will include cultural and
(APA) style for experimental reports and lit- individual variation in motivation and emoerature reviews. In addition to developing tion, development of motivation and emocommunication skills, assignments empha- tion, and the social, cognitive, and biological
size how to interpret experimental findings bases of motivation and emotion. Meets the
and evaluate support for hypotheses. Other Psychology Advanced Topics requirement.
assignments will require students to synthe- Prerequisites: Senior standing, PSYC 112,
size findings from several published studies and all lower-division psychology requireand draw conclusions about a body of re- ments, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
search. Prerequisites: ENGL 1 and ENGL 2,
PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43, or permission of 112.Motivation and Emotion
Scientific study of the various motivational
­instructor. (5 units)
and emotional processes of people and high105.Statistics and
er animals. Biological drives, psychological
Experimental Design II
survival needs, altered states of consciousAdvanced topics in theory and methods of ness, social motives, and theories of emostatistical analysis and experimental design. tion. Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43,
Complex analysis of variance and multiple or permission of instructor. (5 units)
correlation and regression are typically
­covered. Prerequisite: By permission of the 114.Ethics in Psychology
The role of ethical behavior and decision
instructor only. (5 units)
making in the field of psychology and relat110.Advanced Research Methods
ed behavioral, medical, and social sciences.
Students will learn the major research de- Topics include approaches to moral issues
signs used in psychology and how to under- and related to competence; integrity; professtand statistical results that come out of sional, scientific, and social responsibility;
those designs. These include experimental respect for others’ rights and dignity; and
designs, multiple linear and nonlinear re- concern for others’ welfare. Prerequisite:
gression, nonparametric analyses, multivari- PSYC 1 or 2, or permission of instructor.
ate ANOVA used with experimental designs, (5 units).
structural equation modeling, and small N
designs. Students will learn how to read re- 115.Abnormal Psychology
search reports using these designs, how The study of psychology and human behavto understand statistical results obtained ior in understanding the etiology, nature,
from the designs, and how to communicate development, and treatment of mental disthose results in passages that would belong orders. Topics include models of abnormal
in an APA-style report. The emphasis is on behavior, research, diagnosis, assessment,
understanding the designs and results rather and treatment of emotional and behavioral
than on doing the analyses oneself. Prerequi- disorders, such as affective disorders, personsites: PSYC 1 or 2 and 43, or permission of ality disorders, sexual disorders, substance
abuse disorders, and childhood disorders.
instructor. (5 units)
Prerequisite: PSYC 1 or 2, or permission of
instructor. (5 units)
PSYCHOLOGY 231
116. Advanced Topics in
Abnormal Psychology
Advanced topics in abnormal psychology involves the discipline and principles of abnormal psychology in understanding the
etiology, nature, development, and treatment of behavior and emotional problems
and issues. Class topics include the history of
abnormal psychology, theoretical models, assessment and intervention approaches, specialization, consultation, ethics, and current
trends in the field. The course is designed for
senior psychology majors interested in a career in abnormal psychology or related fields.
Meets the Psychology Advanced Topics requirement. Prerequisites: Senior standing,
lower-division psychology major requirements, and PSYC 115 preferred, but not required, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
117.Health Psychology
Health psychology involves the discipline
and principles of psychology and human behavior in understanding how the mind and
body interact in health and disease. Topics
include health promotion and primary prevention of illness, health enhancing and
health damaging behaviors, psychosomatic
illness, stress and coping, pain management,
and a variety of specific behavior-related
medical illnesses (e.g., heart disease, eating
disorders, cancer, and AIDS). Prerequisite:
PSYC 1 or 2, or permission of instructor.
(5 units)
118.Advanced Topics in
Health Psychology
Seminar examines contemporary topics in
health psychology. Original research, current
trends, and special focus on ongoing research and applied programs will be highlighted. Meets the Psychology Advanced
Topics requirement. Prerequisites: Senior
standing, PSYC 117, and all lower-division
psychology requirements preferred, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
119.Psychology of Death,
Dying, and Loss
An introduction to theory, research, and
practice on the psychology of death and
dying. Students explore the implications of
death, dying, and loss in their lives. Topics
include death in today’s health care system,
the psychology of grieving and coping with
loss, life-threatening illness, caregiving, as
well as social, cultural, and ethical issues related to death in contemporary society. Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40, 43, or permission
of instructor. (5 units)
120.Perception
A theoretical and empirical investigation of
human perceptual processes, with an emphasis on visual perception. Topics include
psychophysiology of vision; perceiving visual
space (shape, contrast, orientation, distance,
depth, and motion); color perception; perceptual illusions; imagining versus perceiving; effects of knowledge on perception; and
perception in “novel” environments. Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43, or permission
of instructor. (5 units)
130.Psychology of Learning
A scientific investigation of learning and behavior. Both experimental and related theoretical developments are considered, as well
as the application of the basic principles of
learning. Students will become familiar with
the theory and methods underlying research
in learning. Covers Pavlovian and operant
conditioning, including topics such as stimulus control, schedules of reinforcement,
choice, and punishment. Prerequisites:
PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43. (5 units)
232 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
131.Cognitive Psychology
A theoretical, empirical, and experiential investigation of human information processing. Topics include the history of cognitive
psychology and the following research areas:
pattern perception, attention, working
memory, long-term memory, memory distortions, imagery, language processes, and
problem solving. Emphasizes contemporary
theory and research, including recent developments in cognitive neuroscience. Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43, or permission
of instructor. (5 units)
132.Advanced Topics in Learning
Seminar examines contemporary topics in
learning theory and research. Original research, current trends, and special focus on
ongoing research and applied programs will
be highlighted. Meets the Psychology Advanced Topics requirement. Prerequisites: Senior standing and all lower-division psychology
requirements. Recommended but not required:
PSYC 130. (5 units)
133.Advanced Topics in
Cognitive Psychology
Seminar explores contemporary theories
and research in cognitive psychology and
cognitive neuroscience. Class topics include
consciousness, attention, memory, metacognition, and the relationship between imagery and perception. Meets the Psychology
Advanced Topics Requirement. Prerequisites:
Senior standing, lower-division major requirements, or permission of instructor.
R­ecommended, but not required: Completion
of PSYC 120, 131, or 166. (5 units)
134.Psychology of Education
The role of educational psychology is to understand and improve educational practice
through the study of learning and teaching.
Students enrolled in this course will be exposed to a variety of topics that relate to the
study of learning and teaching. Such topics
include cognitive development and language; personal, moral, and social development; learner differences and learner needs;
culture and community; behavioral views of
learning; motivation in learning and teaching; creating learning environments and
evaluation, measurement, and success. Students in this course will gain their knowledge in several contexts including reading,
community-based learning, lecture discussion, and group work. (5 units)
135.Psychology of Sleep and Dreaming
A theoretical, empirical, and experiential exploration of sleep, sleep disorders, and
dreaming. Considers physiological, cognitive, neurocognitive, and functional approaches. Topics include psychophysiology
of sleep and dreaming; purported functions
of sleep and dreaming; personal and public
health consequences of sleep disorders, sleep
deprivation, and sleep debt; continuity in
mental processes across the sleep/wake cycle;
memory for dreams; approaches to working
with dreams; and consciousness and dreaming, including lucid dreaming. Prerequisites:
PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43, or permission of
­instructor. (5 units)
136.Advanced Topics in
Educational Psychology
Seminar exploring theories and research in
educational psychology. Students will read,
discuss, and critically analyze current empirical research and review articles in educational psychology. Topics emphasized will
include motivation, learning, assessment,
and individual and cultural differences as
they pertain to education. Meets the Psychology Advanced Topics requirement. Prerequisites: Senior standing, PSYC 134, and all
lower-division psychology requirements, or
permission of instructor. (5 units)
PSYCHOLOGY 233
137. Psycholinguistics
This course will examine human language
(arguably our most impressive and unique
skill as a species) as it is studied from a psychological perspective. The study of language in psycholinguistics in an attempt to
understand how we develop this skill, how
we put it to use, and what the consequences
are when it breaks down. This course will
cover major perspectives and controversies
in the field, a variety of experimental techniques that are used to test theories and
­investigate language use, and how psycholinguistic research can be interpreted critically
and related to both our everyday experience
and to pathology. Prerequisites: PSYC 1 and
2, PSYC 43 or permission of instructor.
(5 units)
139.Psychology of Consciousness
Once banned from the psychological vernacular in Western psychology, the psychological study of consciousness is thriving
today. In this class, we will use experiential,
theoretical, and empirical “tools” to investigate the psychology of consciousness. Our
class discussions of the text will begin with
how consciousness is currently defined and
studied by psychologists. Next, we’ll consider the psychophysiology of consciousness
and additional research tools offered by neuroscience. Then we will explore a number of
ways in which “alternate” states of consciousness are produced: via drugs, hypnosis, sleep
and dreaming, meditation, and sensory deprivation. Three core questions will frame
our discussions: “What cognitive skills seem
to be essential for consciousness? Can neuroscience explain consciousness (otherwise
known as “the hard problem”)? and What is
consciousness for? Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2,
40, and 43, or permission of instructor.
(5 units)
144.Psychological Assessment
Principles and issues related to testing and
measurement in psychology. Topics include
test construction, reliability, validity, and the
professional and ethical use of psychological
tests and test scores. Prerequisites: PSYC 1,
2, 40, and 43, or permission of instructor.
(5 units)
150.Social Psychology
The scientific investigation of how people
influence each other. Students will learn social psychological theories about the causes
of human behavior, as well as how these
theories can be scientifically tested and applied to solve real-world problems. Topics
include social cognition, the self, attitude
change, conformity, compliance, group processes, helping, stereotyping, prejudice, discrimination, intergroup relations, aggression,
and attraction. Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40,
and 43, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
151.Advanced Topics in
Social Psychology
Seminar examines contemporary topics in
social psychology. Original research, current
trends, and special focus on ongoing research and applied programs will be highlighted. Meets the Psychology Advanced
Topics requirement. Prerequisites: Senior
standing, PSYC 150, and all lower-division
psychology requirements, or permission of
­instructor. (5 units)
153.Psychology of Close Relationships
The scientific investigation of close relationships, drawing from clinical psychology and
social psychology. Topics include research
methodologies for studying close relationships; theories of attraction, love, and
­marriage; the developmental process of relationships; and interventions for distressed
relationships. Prerequisite: PSYC 1 or 2, or
permission of instructor. Recommended, but
not required: PSYC 40 and 43. (5 units)
234 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
155.Psychology and Law
Explores relevance for law of psychological
principles and findings, as well as laws pertaining to practice. Topics include eyewitness testimony, legal insanity, jury dynamics,
expert testimony, and family law issues. This
course is open to nonmajors. Prerequisite:
PSYC 1 or 2, or permission of instructor.
(5 units)
156.Managing Diverse Workforce
The goal of this course is to raise awareness
of important differences and provide students with the knowledge needed to be productive in a more diverse workplace. This
will be facilitated by discussion of prejudice,
stereotypes, and approaches to acculturation
and integration in organizations. Meets the
Core Diversity requirement. Prerequisites:
None. (5 units)
157.Industrial/Organizational
Psychology
An introduction to the broad field of
Industrial/Organizational (I/O) psychology,
which includes science and practice related
to personnel selection and placement, training, and development; organizational development; occupational health and safety;
work motivation; and other areas concerned
with human behavior in organizational contexts. Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43,
or permission of instructor. (5 units)
158.Conservation Psychology
Many environmental problems (e.g., global
warming, pollution, biodiversity loss, and
resource depletion), are caused by human
behavior, and changing this behavior is necessary in order to solve them. Topics include
psychological reasons (emotions, thoughts,
values, motivations, and social context) why
people behave in environmentally sustainable or unsustainable ways, and how psychology can be used to develop policies and
other interventions to help promote sustainable behavior. Also listed as ENVS 158.
­Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43, or
­permission of instructor. (5 units)
159.Psychology of Religion
and Spirituality
The course highlights the relationship between psychology and religion, particularly
how psychology can deepen the understanding of religious experience, spirituality, religious beliefs, and practices. Topics include
prayer and meditation, religion and health,
pastoral psychology, religion and psychotherapy, faith and imagination, and how religion and spirituality contribute to positive
psychology. It also aims to inform the understanding of religion, spirituality, faith, and
religious practice through science and empirical research. Prerequisite: PSYC 1 or 2, or
permission of instructor. (5 units)
160.Personality
The study of individual differences and personality processes. Discussion of major theories of personality. Presentation of current
research topics in personality and methods
for assessing individual differences and other
personality constructs. Prerequisites: PSYC
1, 2, 40, and 43, or permission of instructor.
(5 units)
161.Advanced Topics in Industrial/
Organizational Psychology
Seminar examines contemporary topics in
I/O psychology. Original research, current
trends, and special focus on ongoing research and applied programs will be highlighted. Meets the Psychology Advanced
Topics requirement. Prerequisites: Senior
standing, PSYC 157, and all lower-division
psychology requirements, or permission of
­instructor. (5 units)
162.Cross-Cultural Psychology
Study of psychology from various cultural
perspectives with a view to identifying patterns of behavior that are universal and those
that are culturally specific. The course looks
at the extent to which American research
findings apply to other societies. Also examines issues that arise in cross-cultural
­encounters. Prerequisites: PSYC 1 and 2, or
permission of instructor. (5 units)
PSYCHOLOGY 235
164.Autism
This course will explore autism from three
perspectives. First, Foundations covers diagnostic criteria for autism, assessment, epidemiology, history, and failures in assessment
of determinants (e.g., refrigerator mothers,
vaccines) and treatments (e.g., facilitated
communication). Second, Biology covers
genetic inheritance, neuropathology (e.g.,
white matter abnormalities), opioid excess
theory, and biological treatments (e.g., pharmacology, nutrition, brain-based treatments). Finally, Behavior covers the basics of
applied behavior analysis (e.g., using PECS),
working with families, and outcome assessment. (5 units)
165.Physiological Psychology
Emphasis on the neuroanatomical, neurochemical, and neurophysiological correlates
of motivation, emotion, learning, and memory. Neural regulation of sleep and arousal,
mechanisms of drug action, and neuropathology are also reviewed. Prerequisites:
PSYC 1, 40, and 43, or permission of
­instructor. (5 units)
166.Human Neuropsychology
Study of human brain function from an experimental perspective. Addresses questions
such as: What are the brain mechanisms that
lie at the basis of perception and memory, of
speech and thought, of movement and action? What happens to these processes when
individual parts of the brain are destroyed by
disease? Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40, and
43, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
167.Psychopharmacology
Examination of the effects of various drugs
(such as nicotine and alcohol) and abnormal
neurochemical states (such as schizophrenia
and depression) on mental functioning and
behavior. Topics include the effects of various drugs on the brain and the biochemical
basis of human neurosis and psychosis.
­Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43, or
­permission of instructor. (5 units)
168.Advanced Topics in Neuroscience
An integration from various sub-disciplines
in psychology with an emphasis on the brain
and behavior. Topics include neural development from fetus to early childhood, neural
basis of psychopathologies (e.g., schizophrenia and depression), cognitive functions
(memory, attention, and learning), and personality and related disorders. Meets the
Psychology Advanced Topics requirement.
­
Prerequisites: Senior standing, PSYC 1, 40,
43, and any two upper-division psychology
courses, or permission of instructor. Recommended, but not required: PSYC 165, 166,
or 167. (5 units)
170.History and Systems of Psychology
Origin and development of modern psychological approaches. Psychoanalysis, behaviorism, Gestalt, humanism, and existentialism. Emphasis on conceptual issues. Focuses
on selected topics viewed from the multiple
conceptual frameworks and sub-disciplinary
perspectives that characterize psychology’s
history. Prerequisite: PSYC 1 or 2, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
171.Advanced Topics of
History of Psychology
This advanced topics course includes readings and discussions from a textbook on the
history of psychology, and from original papers written by the psychologists we read
about. Students will write their senior papers
in this course on any approved (by instructor) topic in psychology, tracing the history
of how it has been conceptualized, researched, and written about over a period of
at least 50 (in many cases 150 to 200) years.
Students will be assigned to lead discussions
on certain days, everyone will submit reading notes (in a brief format), and we will
have papers orally presented during the last
week. This course begins with philosophical
and scientific ideas from the 18th and 19th
centuries and then moves into the formal
history of our discipline. Meets the
236 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Psychology Advanced Topics requirement.
Prerequisites: At least two upper-division psychology classes and senior standing. If all seniors seeking a place are enrolled and seats are
available, juniors may enroll. (5 units)
172.Adolescent Development
A focus on development during the second
decade of life, from puberty through early
adulthood. Topics include physical, intellectual, and social development; identity; sexuality; changing social contexts; and life
transitions. Prerequisite: PSYC 1 or 2, or
permission of instructor. (5 units)
178.Advanced Topics in
Developmental Psychology
Seminar examines contemporary topics in
developmental psychology. Original research, current trends, and special focus on
ongoing research and applied programs will
be highlighted. Focus of seminar can be children and adolescent development or young
adult development. Meets the Psychology
­Advanced Topics requirement. Prerequisites:
Senior standing, PSYC 172 or 185, and all
lower-division psychology classes. (5 units)
182.Psychology of Gender
Examines how gender identity is developed
and how gender influences the development
of children, adolescents, and adults. Topics
include gender identity, parenting, sexual
orientation development, sex roles, and similarities and differences between the genders
in treatment, expectations, and opportunities. Prerequisite: PSYC 1 or 2, or permission
of instructor. (5 units)
185.Developmental Psychology
An upper-division survey of child development, including infancy, early childhood,
middle childhood, and a brief introduction
to adolescent issues. Major developmental
theories and methods of studying development are introduced. Principle findings regarding social-emotional, cognitive, and
physical development in the different stages
of childhood are included, as well as findings
about the impact on development of the societal context in which development occurs.
Prerequisite: PSYC 1 or 2. Open to majors in
other fields who are required to or wish to
study child development, or permission of
­instructor. (5 units)
188.Adult Development
Young adulthood through middle age. Stages and transitions in adult life, the concept of
life crisis, and the interplay of situations and
personality. Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40,
and 43, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
190.Clinical Psychology
The discipline and principles of clinical psychology in understanding the etiology, nature, development, and treatment of
behavioral, emotional, and relational problems. Topics include the history of clinical
psychology, theoretical models, assessment
and intervention approaches, specialization,
ethics, and current trends. Prerequisites:
PSYC 1 or 2, PSCY 115 preferred but not
required, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
193.Psychology of Religion
and Spirituality
The discipline and principles of psychology
and human behavior in understanding religion and spirituality. Topics include empirical research and theory on religious and
spiritual behavior and transformation from
the various religious, spiritual, and historical
wisdom traditions. Contemplative practices
and spiritual tools from the various religious/
spiritual wisdom traditions for psychological
and physical health will be highlighted. A
spiritual formation project will help students
experience a hands-on activity to examine
their own spiritual formation and development. This course is inclusive in that no particular religious/spiritual tradition or any
tradition affiliation is assumed or required,
and also highlights evidence-based empirical
approaches. Prerequisites: PSYC 1 or 2, and
a RTC 1 class. (5 units)
PSYCHOLOGY 237
195.Research Practicum
Advanced methodological issues taught primarily through direct involvement in an experimental research project. Activities
include reviewing the literature, formulating
a research question, developing a design and
procedure, collecting and analyzing data,
and writing a professional research report.
Prerequisites: Two upper-division psychology
courses. Restricted to psychology majors only
or by permission of instructor. (5 units)
196.Psychology of Aging
Development in later life. Topics include
theories of aging and development; cognition, perceptual, and social changes in aging;
mental health issues in the elderly; and abnormal aging, such as Alzheimer’s disease.
Prerequisites: PSYC 1, 2, 40, and 43, or
­permission of instructor. (5 units)
197.Psychology Labs
Psychology labs will vary by topic and are associated with various courses offered
throughout the year. (1 unit)
198.Internship/Practicum
Clinical experience in community agencies.
Selected readings. Open to upper-division
students with a GPA of 3.0 or higher who
have received permission from a faculty sponsor. (2–5 units)
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research
Independent projects undertaken by upperdivision students with a faculty sponsor. To
receive course credit, the student must submit a formal written proposal and have it
approved by the sponsoring faculty member
and the department chair. The proposal
must be submitted before the end of the previous quarter and must meet University requirements for independent study credit.
(1–5 units)
199A. Advanced Topics for Directed
Reading/Directed Research
Advanced topic independent projects undertaken by upper-division students with a
faculty sponsor. To receive course credit, the
student must submit a formal written proposal and have it approved by the sponsoring faculty member and the department
chair. The proposal must be submitted before the end of the previous quarter and
must meet University requirements for independent study credit and requirements for a
psychology Advanced Topic course. Meets
the Psychology Advanced Topics requirement.
Prerequisites: Senior standing, lower-division
psychology requirements, or permission of
­instructor. (5 units)
238 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM
Director: Craig M. Stephens
The Public Health Program in the College of Arts and Sciences offers the bachelor of
science degree in public health science. The program also offers a minor degree in public
health, and manages the Global Health Pathway of the University Core.
The public health science (PHS) major is an interdisciplinary degree focused on the
health of human populations and individuals. Students will gain a solid foundation in biology and chemistry to understand the functioning of the human body in health and disease.
The major further explores the influences of environmental and social factors on human
health through required and elective public health courses, as well as relevant courses in the
social sciences and humanities. Through the senior capstone and mandatory internship,
PHS majors engage in health-focused service and research projects that apply their education to real-world public health problems, and integrate learning across disciplines. Students
are encouraged to study abroad to gain perspective on global health issues.
Public health science majors will be well-prepared for careers, graduate education, or
professional training in public health or health-related professions, including medicine and
nursing. There are many career options in the field of public health, including healthcare
administration, planning, and public policy; epidemiology and disease surveillance; clinical
research and clinical trials management; health-related education and social work; health
and science communication; and basic research.
Students intending to pursue a medical degree, or postgraduate training in other healthrelated professions, should contact the University pre-health advisor to discuss prerequisites
for admission to such programs. Many require a full year of physics coursework (e.g., PHYS
11–13 or 31–33) and completion of the organic chemistry series (CHEM 33) in addition
to the requirements for the public health science major.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling the Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of science degree, public health science majors must complete the following courses:
• PHSC 1, 2, 100, 139, 150, 190
• BIOL 21, 22, 24, 25
• CHEM 11, 12, 13, 31, 32
• Two introductory social science courses chosen from ANTH 1, ANTH 3, ANTH
50, ECON 1, ENVS 50, POLI 1, POLI 25, POLI 50, PSYC 1, PSYC 2, SOCI 1,
SOCI 33
• MATH 11, 12
• One statistics course chosen from MATH 8, ANTH 112, BIOL 160, COMM 110,
ECON 61, ENVS 110, OMIS 40, POLI 100, PSYC 40, or SOCI 120.
• One public health elective: Any PHSC course other than the required courses listed
above.
• Two biomedical, electives, at least one with a lab component, chosen from BIOL 106/
PHSC 124, 110 (lab), 111(lab), 113 (lab), 114 (lab), 115 (lab), 116 (lab), 119, 124
(lab), 127, 129, 145, 160 (lab), CHEM 141, or PHSC 101.
PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM 239
• Two social science or humanities electives chosen from ANTH 112, ANTH 133,
ANTH 134, ANTH 135, ANTH 137, ANTH 140, ANTH 150, ANTH 170,
COMM 164A, COMM 176A, ECON 101, ECON 129, ECON 130, ECON 134,
ECON 135, ECON 160, ENVS 116, ENVS 146, ENVS 147, ENVS 149, ETHN
156, HIST 123, POLI 140, POLI 146, POLI 158, POLI 165, POLI 167, PSYC
114, PSYC 115 or 115EL, PSYC 117 or 117EL, PSYC 150, PSYC 167, PSYC 172,
PSYC 185 or 185EL, PSYC 196, SOCI 132, SOCI 134, SOCI 138, SOCI 157,
SOCI 165, SOCI 172, TESP 157, RSOC 170
Internship Requirement
The PHS major requires students to complete at least 100 hours of public health-related
internship work. Internships must be approved in advance by the Director of the Public
Health Program. Internships can be done on a part-time or full-time basis, during the
­academic year or summer. Students may receive course credit for volunteer internships. For
guidance on internships, contact one of the Public Health Program faculty.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
The interdisciplinary public health minor provides an introduction to the field of public
health and is particularly useful for students interested in careers related to medicine, health
care, community health, social work, education, or public policy. The minor establishes a
sound scientific foundation to understand the functioning of the human body in health and
disease and to appreciate the mechanisms by which diseases arise and spread in populations.
Students also develop a foundation in the social sciences and statistical methods. Upperdivision courses address the influences of biological, environmental, cultural, economic,
and historical factors on human health. Students are encouraged to study abroad, if possible, to gain perspective on global health issues. The Public Health Program is evolving and
students are encouraged to petition the Director of the Public Health Program to consider
new relevant courses developed at Santa Clara and partner institutions abroad in addition
to the electives described below.
Public Health Courses
• PHSC 1, 2, 150, and at least one additional PHSC course
• One statistics course chosen from MATH 8, ANTH 112, BIOL 160, COMM 110,
ECON 61, ENVS 110, OMIS 40, POLI 100, PSYC 40, or SOCI 120
Natural Science Courses
• BIOL 21
• CHEM 11
240 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Upper-Division Elective Courses
• At least three courses from the following list, including courses from at least two
departments: ANTH 112, ANTH 133, ANTH 134, ANTH 135, ANTH 137,
ANTH 140, ANTH 150, ANTH 170, BIOL 108, BIOL 110, BIOL 111, BIOL
113, BIOL 114, BIOL 115, BIOL 116, BIOL 119, BIOL 124, BIOL 127, BIOL
129, BIOL 145, BIOL 160, COMM 164A, COMM 176A, ECON 101, ECON
129, ECON 130, ECON 134, ECON 135, ECON 160, ENVS 116, ENVS 146,
ENVS 147, ENVS 149, ETHN 156, HIST 123, POLI 140, POLI 146, POLI 158,
POLI 165, POLI 167, PSYC 114, PSYC 115 or 115EL, PSYC 117 or 117EL, PSYC
150, PSYC 167, PSYC 172, PSYC 185 or 185EL, PSYC 196, SOCI 132, SOCI 134,
SOCI 138, SOCI 157, SOCI 165, SOCI 172, TESP 157, RSOC 170
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. Human Health and Disease
justifications of public health interventions,
Examination of human health and disease. genetic screening of newborns conducted by
Topics include common infectious and the State, prenatal genetic diagnosis, genomchronic diseases, how diseases arise in indi- ic medicine, mandatory vaccinations for
viduals and populations, how diseases are children and others, parental responsibility
studied, and how health is promoted at the for their children’s health and welfare, public
policy and law regarding the use of tobacco,
individual and community levels. (4 units)
alcohol, and other drugs, the allocation of
2. The American Health System
vital organs for transplantation, health disThis course examines the fundamental as- parities related to race and other social catepects of the U.S. health system including gories, the legal and administrative regulation
organization, delivery, financing, cost, ac- of pain management, harm reduction (such
cess, and quality. The focus will be on the as needle exchange), health promotion and
current system, but significant attention will behavior modification, and defensive medibe given to its historical roots and to alterna- cine. Also listed as PHIL 7B. (4 units).
tive approaches implemented in other devel- 11.Women’s Health
oped countries. Potential policy reforms and
the interface of the health care system with This course examines how women’s health
public health will also be discussed. (4 units) over the life course is influenced by biological, psychological, social, and cultural expe3. Global Health
riences. Topics include menarche and
Interdisciplinary investigation of basic con- pubertal development, reproductive health
cepts in public health in a global context, and rights, menopausal transition, mental
including social and environmental determi- health, and violence. Current, historical, and
nants of health, health indicators and the cross-cultural examples are discussed.
global burden of disease, and relationships (4 units)
between health status, education, and pov- 21.Health and Aging
erty. The course is appropriate for students
Analysis of the human aging process, and
from any major. (4 units)
the biological, medical, social, and ethical is7. Public Health and Ethics
sues associated with aging. Topics include
Examination of the ethical and conceptual theories of aging, diseases and various health
foundations of public health. Topics studied care issues associated with aging, and end-ofmay include ethical theory and ethical life issues. (4 units)
PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM 241
28.Human Sexuality
Integrates the biological foundations of
human sexuality with psychological and social aspects of sexuality. Topics include the
anatomy, physiology, and neurobiology of
sex, gender and sexual orientation, sexually
transmitted diseases, conception and pregnancy, contraception and abortion, and sexual dysfunctions. Also listed as WGST 33.
(4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
100.Epidemiology
124.Health Consequences
of a Western Lifestyle
Introduction to epidemiology, including
measurement of population health status, This course explores the impact of living in a
analysis of disease occurrence and transmis- developed country on human health. Topics
sion at the population level, and develop- such as diabetes, obesity, heart disease, hyment and assessment of public health pertension, and cancer will be discussed at
interventions aimed at improving the health the molecular, cellular, physiological, and
of communities and populations. Prerequi- population levels. Prerequisite: BIOL 25
site: BIOL 24. Also listed as BIOL 117. (5 units)
(5 units)
131. Community Health
101.Nutrition
This course examines key health indicators
This course focuses both on how the body and patterns seen in individuals, families,
processes food and on how the resulting nu- neighborhoods, schools, and communities.
trients affect human physiology. In addition Students will explore social, environmental,
to exploring topics of particular interest to political, cultural, and behavioral factors that
college students including eating disorders, contribute to health disparities linked to raideal body weight, nutritional supplements, cial, ethnic, socioeconomic, and geographic
and the influence of nutrition on athletic differences. The course will also examine the
performance, this course also considers the design, implementation, and evaluation of
global impacts of poor nutrition on public social and behavioral interventions and
health. Prerequisite: BIOL 24. (5 units)
health policies to improve community
health. (5 units)
111. Health Education and Promotion
This course examines fundamental concepts 135. Human Development
and Sexuality
of health education and promotion in a variety of public health contexts. Major theo- Examination of evolutionary, biocultural asretical approaches and models related to pects of human growth, development, and
behavior change, social influence, commu- sexuality throughout the life cycle. Special
nication strategies, and community-based emphasis on how various cultural, economchange are discussed, as well as multifactorial ic, and political factors influence norms of
determinants of health and health-related sexual behavior in different societies. Fulfills
behaviors. An overview of different research the Science, Technology and Society requiremethodologies for health program design, ment. Also listed as ANTH 135. (5 units)
implementation, and evaluation is provided.
(5 units)
242 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
139. Experiential Learning
in Public Health
This course will examine work in diverse
areas of public health through discussion
and reflection, with particular attention on
vocational discernment and personal and
professional development. Enrollment
should precede or accompany the required
internship for the PHS major. Prerequisites:
PHSC 1; enrollment by permission of
instructor. P/NP grading. (2 units)
142. Environment and Health
This course will help students gain a better
understanding of environmental factors that
affect human health. Topics covered include
population growth and urbanization,
human ecology, pesticides and environmental toxins, air and water pollution, waste generation and management, and climate
change. Particular emphasis will be placed
on how these issues affect the global poor.
(5 units)
150. Evidence-Based Public Health
This course focuses on the application of scientific reasoning and epidemiological analysis to public health research and program
planning. On the research side, strategies for
formulating appropriate research questions,
designing studies, collecting and analyzing
data, and interpreting and communicating
results will be emphasized. Approaches for
converting evidence into action will also be
covered, including needs assessments, program development and implementation,
and evaluation strategies. Students will gain
hands-on experience in collecting, analyzing
and interpreting, and acting upon empirical
evidence in public health. An overview of
major theoretical approaches and models related to behavior change, social influence,
communication strategies, and communitybased change will also be covered. Prerequisite: PHSC 1. (5 units)
160.Substance Abuse and Addiction
This course explores the nature and consequences of alcohol and drug addiction from
biological, psychological, and public health
perspectives. Students will study common
drugs of addiction, the underlying causes of
addiction, and treatment strategies. Societal
impacts and responses to substance abuse
and addiction will be examined in depth.
(5 units)
170. Public Health in El Salvador
This course focuses on health care and public health in El Salvador, and provides students with an opportunity to integrate
academic study and direct immersion with
people living in poor communities, where
the clinics that will serve as praxis sites are
located. The course will examine major
health problems in El Salvador, why these
health issues exist, and how they are being
handled (or not) by medical and public
health approaches. (5 units)
172.Management of Health Care
Organizations
Explores the sociological and practical issues
of operations, financing, and management
in organizations providing services for people with health problems (organizations
such as nursing homes and hospitals) or
people with infirmities (organizations such
as senior care centers and assisted living
­facilities). Also listed as SOCI 172. (5 units)
190. Public Health Science Capstone
Integrative course organized around a different public health theme each quarter. Includes lectures, readings, guest speakers, and
discussion, culminating in student research
projects and presentations. The course is intentionally interdisciplinary, demanding
that students address public health issues
from diverse scientific and cultural perspectives, and employ a variety of analytical
tools. Prerequisite: PHSC 1. Pre- or co-requisite: PHSC 100 or 150, or permission of
instructor. (5 units)
PUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM 243
196.Peer Health Education
Provides students with current information
on a variety of health topics, including general wellness, alcohol and substance abuse,
nutrition, eating disorders, stress, mental
health, sexual health, and sexual assault.
Basic listening, counseling, group facilitation, public speaking, and presentation skills
are developed and nurtured. Students are
challenged to grow as leaders, peer counselors, and educators. Upon completion of this
course, students are eligible to become a
member of the Peer Health Education
(PHE) Program. Enrollment by permission
of instructor. (2 units)
197. Public Health Internship
Under the guidance of a qualified public
health professional, students will complete a
directed off-campus internship in publichealth related activities or research. Open to
public health science majors with permission
of faculty advisor or the director of the Public
Health Program. Prerequisite: PHSC 1. May
be repeated for a limit of no more than
5 units. P/NP grading. (1-5 units)
198.Peer Health Educator Practicum
This course is for students who have already
completed training as peer health educators
through PHSC 196 and who will be actively
involved in the Peer Health Education Program during the enrolled quarter. Enrollment by permission of instructor. (1 unit)
244 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Professors Emeriti: Michael Buckley, S.J., Denise Carmody,
Anne Marie Mongoven, O.P.
Professors: Paul G. Crowley, S.J. (Santa Clara Jesuit Community Professor),
Diane E. Jonte-Pace, Gary A. Macy (Director, Graduate Program in
Pastoral Ministries, Department Chair, and John Nobili, S.J. Professor),
Frederick J. Parrella, David J. Pinault, John David Pleins
Associate Professors: James B. Bennett, David B. Gray, Teresia Hinga, Akiba Lerner,
Michael C. McCarthy, S.J. (Edmund Campion, S.J. Professor),
Catherine M. Murphy, Ana Maria Pineda, R.S.M., James W. Reites, S.J.,
Philip Boo Riley, Francis R. Smith, S.J.
Assistant Professors: Socorro Castañeda-Liles, Roberto Mata, Thao Nguyen, S.J.,
Oliver Putz
Senior Lecturers: Margaret R. McLean, Sarita Tamayo-Moraga
Lecturers: William Dohar, Jean Molesky-Poz
The Department of Religious Studies offers a degree program leading to the bachelor of
arts in religious studies. The department also offers a minor program for those who wish to
concentrate in theological and religious studies. In keeping with the University’s commitment to the Catholic faith tradition, the department offers a variety of courses in Scripture,
History, and Catholic theology. Faithful to the Jesuit tradition of liberal education and
engagement with other religions, the department offers a wide breadth of courses in various
religious traditions and methodologies for the study of religion. The department also offers
courses as part of the Undergraduate Core Curriculum, at both lower-division and upperdivision levels. Courses are clustered in three areas: Theology, Ethics, and Spirituality
(TESP); Scripture and Tradition (SCTR); and Religion and Society (RSOC).
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of arts degree, students majoring in religious studies must complete the following departmental
requirements:
• Three lower-division courses, one from each of the three areas (scripture and tradition;
theology, ethics, and spirituality; and religion and society)
• Seven approved upper-division courses, including three designated religious studies
seminars, with one in each of the three areas
• RELS 90 (Theories and Methods)
• RELS 197A and RELS 197B, a year-long capstone seminar
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in religious studies:
• One introductory-level religious studies course (1–19)
• Two intermediate-level courses (20–99)
• Four approved advanced-level courses (100–199), one of which must be a religious
studies seminar. Of the seven courses, at least one must be from each the three areas
(scripture and tradition; theology, ethics, and spirituality; and religion and society).
RELIGIOUS STUDIES 245
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: SCRIPTURE AND TRADITION (SCTR)
11.Controversies in Religion:
26.Gender in Early Christianity
Ancient and Modern
The history of early Christianity is often
The course critically explores ancient and portrayed as a history of, by, and about men,
modern debates about Western religion, es- despite clear indications that women played
pecially questions of war, violence, suffering, a prominent role in the early church. Introhuman purpose, and the relation of science duces the construction of gender in antiquito religion. (4 units)
ty, Jewish and Greco-Roman laws and
customs, the biblical canon, and other
15. Texting God
Christian texts. Contemporary feminist perThis course explores how people express spectives will inform the discussion. Also
their beliefs and how the technologies they listed as WGST 46. (4 units)
use shape what they say. Focusing on Jewish,
Christian, and Muslim “texts” (oral and 27.Historical Jesus
written), this course examines how commu- A study of the sources, problems, and methnities determine what counts as scripture, ods in the various “quests” for Jesus of Nazathe core beliefs they inscribe in them, the reth. Each phase of the quest in the 19th and
mechanisms they develop for adapting 20th centuries, from Reimarus to the Jesus
them, and the conflicts that erupt when in- Seminar. Students will assess historical-crititerpretations collide. This course also exam- cal criteria and apply these criteria to the
ines how the media (through which scripture sources in a term paper in order to construct
was disseminated) shaped spirituality, and their own versions of a “life” of Jesus. (4 units)
asks how current technologies are altering
our experiences of text, of scripture, and of 30.New Testament
Explores the historical and religious backour relationships with God. (4 units)
ground of the New Testament period and
19.Religions of the Book
concentrates on the origin and purpose of
This course offers an introduction to Juda- the New Testament writings and the overall
ism, Christianity, and Islam with a study of meaning of the individual books. (4 units)
their central texts, traditions and practices.
We begin the course with a paradox: reli- 33.New Testament Narratives
and Cinema
gion, that which in its literal sense “binds” or
“fastens together,” is also that which often Exploration of the stories that emerged with
violently divides our world. As we examine the Jesus event, their historicity, and their
the sacred texts of Jews, Christians, and role in forming the early Christian commuMuslims (Hebrew Bible, New Testament, nities. No previous knowledge of Christianity
and Qur’an), and various methods of inter- is needed. (4 units)
preting them, our focus will remain on what
is shared and what characteristically distin- 35.Science versus the Bible:
The Genesis Debates
guishes between the monotheistic faiths.
Exploration of the continuing debate over
(4 units)
the biblical stories of creation and the flood
23.Christ in the Four Gospels
in relation to the sciences of human evoluDeals with the historical ministry of Jesus, tion, geology, and mythology. One focus is
his resurrection, and how his disciples and on historical developments in America and
the church of the New Testament period in- England in the 17th to 19th centuries. The
terpreted Jesus’ teaching and developed their role of fundamentalist Christianity in the
beliefs about Christ. Concentrates on the public school system today. (4 units)
Gospel portrayal of Jesus Christ. (4 units)
246 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
39.Biblical Women and Power
Hero, villain, prophet, deviant—these are
some of the power roles embodied by
women in the Bible. Explores the exercise of
power by biblical women in actual and figurative situations, in culturally positive and
negative ways. Attention will be given to the
continuing impact of such traditions for
gender socialization in our world today.
Also listed as WGST 47. (4 units)
41.Biblical Hebrew I
Introduction to the vocabulary and grammatical forms of Biblical Hebrew. (4 units)
42.Biblical Hebrew II
Completion of the grammatical forms of
Biblical Hebrew. (4 units)
43.Biblical Hebrew III
Introduction to the readings of various
genres of Biblical Hebrew literature and
ancient Hebrew inscriptions. (4 units)
65.Early Christianity
A selective survey of the history of the
Christian church from its beginnings
through the fifth century. Examines the origins of Christianity within Judaism and the
Greco-Roman world, and studies how it
moved from a marginal apocalyptic sect in
Judaism to the exclusive religion of the
Roman Empire. Also investigates some of
the practical outcomes of Christian belief in
the way it was lived. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: SCRIPTURE AND TRADITION (SCTR)
100.Biblical Poetry and Ancient Myth
141.Advanced Hebrew I
Comparative study of the poetry and myths Advanced grammar review and reading of
of ancient Israel and the ancient world. Fo- select biblical narratives and poetic texts.
cuses on the Psalms, the Song of Songs, and (5 units)
the Book of Job. Examines a number of
Mesopotamian, Canaanite, and Egyptian 142.Advanced Hebrew II
myths. Discusses the methodological prob- Extended reading of biblical Hebrew narratives and poetic texts. (5 units)
lem of mythic interpretation. (5 units)
110.Gods, Heroes, and Monsters:
Myth and Bible
Explores the debates about the meaning of
myth in relation to the Bible and other ancient texts, with special attention to diverging theories of myth, role of the male hero,
violence, feminist interpretations, problem
of suffering, the relation of religion and science, etc. (5 units)
128.Human Suffering and Hope
Explores issues of human suffering, justice,
and belief in light of the biblical Book of Job.
Best for students interested in the creative
arts, fiction writing, or community service.
(5 units)
143.Advanced Hebrew III
Continuation of extended reading of biblical
Hebrew narratives and poetic texts. (5 units)
157.The Bible and Empire
Explores the political impact of empires on
biblical texts in their initial composition and
codification and their subsequent interpretation. Analyzes the ways that imperial interests are both embedded in and critiqued by
biblical texts. Examines how biblical interpretations figure into the international and
ethical debates that characterize the contemporary postcolonial world, with attention to
race, ethnicity, and gender. Offers students
the chance to reflect on their own ethics and
beliefs through a topic that is both global
and historically informed. Also listed as
WGST 153. (5 units)
RELIGIOUS STUDIES 247
158.Postcolonial Perspectives
on the New Testament
Introduces students to postcolonial critical
theory and uses it to explore the political
contexts of New Testament texts, raising
new questions about the ethical implications
of how we read these texts today. Also listed
as WGST 147. (5 units)
162.Violence and Nonviolence
in Scripture
An examination of the biblical mandates for
and against the use of violence in God’s
name. This course will probe the historical
and ethical foundations of pursuing or renouncing violence as evidenced in Jewish
and Christian scriptures. Of particular concern will be the weighing of these various
moral imperatives in light of the social questions we face today. (5 units)
165.Gender and Sex in
Biblical Interpretations
Opens the Bible to critical readings from
feminist and queer theory. It examines the
original contexts of contested passages (creation, the destruction of Sodom, the role
of women in early Christianity) as well as
subsequent interpretation, and exposes the
insights and ethical challenges that gender
studies pose to these classic texts. Also listed
as WGST 148. (5 units)
170.Darwin and God
This course reviews the ongoing debate over
the relation between Darwin’s evolutionary
ideas and religious belief, and specifically
considers the discovery that religion and ethics have evolved. (5 units)
175. Redeeming Economics
Explores Jewish and Christian economic
practices in the Bible and in the history of
biblical interpretation. Beginning with the
Sinai covenant and the prophetic and wisdom traditions, it probes the economic contexts of emerging beliefs and practices, and
then traces how these traditions were reshaped in the Roman Empire, the middle
ages, and the Protestant Reformation. It
then turns to Karl Marx and contemporary
Catholic social teaching, framing each in
terms of biblical traditions and the economic context of the modern world. (5 units)
198.Practicum
(1–5 units)
199.Directed Reading and Research
For religious studies majors only. (1–5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES:
THEOLOGY, ETHICS, AND SPIRITUALITY (TESP)
2. Magicians, Athletes, and God
4. The Christian Tradition
An introduction to Catholic Christianity’s A theological examination of the Christian
notion of transcendence using fantasy litera- tradition covering such topics as religious exture to describe and inspect the selected perience and the meaning of God; Jesus in
Christian truth claims about reality: a per- the Gospels; the development and history of
sonal God, grace, sin, doctrine, ritual, sacred the Christian churches; and the relevance of
texts, and the nature and role of authority. Christianity in the 21st century global
The course makes use of narratives to dis- world. (4 units)
close the foundational concepts in Christian
discourse. (4 units)
248 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
40.Exploring Judaism
Provides a basic introduction to the essential
terms, traditions, religious trends, ideas, and
history that have defined Judaism historically and continue to inform contemporary
debates over the meaning of Judaism in the
modern world. Covers a variety of voices
and traditions within the centuries old-discussion of what it means to be part of the
Jewish people and what Judaism means as a
way of life. (4 units)
43.Catholic Social Thought
Focuses on the evolution of Catholic social
thought, methodologies being applied to address social questions in the modern world,
formation of the public conscience, responsibility toward the common good, and
Christian engagement in the process of social transformation. (4 units)
45.Christian Ethics
Focus on the moral implications of the
Christian commitment, formulation of the
principles of a Christian ethic, and their application to areas of contemporary life (e.g.,
to wealth and poverty, violence and nonviolence, bioethics and interpersonal relations).
(4 units)
46.Faith, Justice, and Poverty
Who is my neighbor, and how are we to be
community? This course examines biblical
theologies of social responsibility and solidarity, selected Christian social movements
concerned with care for the other, and major
theologians and ethicists on poverty and justice. (4 units)
50.Catholic Theology: Foundations
An examination of the fundamental theological issues of Catholicism such as the experience of God, revelation and faith, the
historical foundations of the tradition, the
mystery of Jesus, grace, sin and redemption,
the Church sacraments, and religious pluralism, etc. (4 units)
60.Hispanic Popular Religion
Study of the popular expressions of faith of
the Hispanic people, exploring their theological underpinnings. Includes both classroom and field experience. (4 units)
62.Medical Ethics in Christian
Perspective
Introduction to the field of biomedical ethics, with special attention to the guidance
and challenges that a Christian perspective
provides. Examination of ethical principles
and their application to current topics with
attention to how conflicting approaches can
all claim to be “Christian.” (4 units)
65.U.S. Hispanic Theology
Acquaints students with the historical development of Hispanic theology in the United
States. Attention will be given to the works
of representative U.S. Hispanic theologians
and to the themes and concerns that these
works address. (4 units)
71.Mysticism in Catholicism
An introduction to mysticism in the
Catholic tradition and its relationship to
both theology and spirituality. Special attention to the origins of the term within
Catholicism, issues of gender, the relationship between hierarchy and a personal
­relationship with God, and historical controversies and discussions surrounding the
possibility of union with God. (4 units)
72.Darwin, God, and the Poets
This course uses Darwinian and religious
poetry to explore the relation between religion and science. The course asks: What is
the relation between belief and evolution?
How have poets responded to the deep
­questions raised by Darwin and his ideas?
(4 units)
RELIGIOUS STUDIES 249
77.Encounters of Religion
and Globalization
Religions encounter one another all the
time, with varying results—dialogue, conversion, syncretism, and wars. This course
examines the dynamics and venues for these
encounters today, focusing on the communities and organizations that make Silicon
Valley’s diverse religious landscape. (4 units)
79.Women in Christian Tradition
History as written mostly by men has obscured the important role that women have
played in Christian tradition. This course
will investigate the official and unofficial positions women have held in the Christian
church as well as read works by particular
Christian women in an attempt to restore
the women to their rightful place in Christian history. Also listed as WGST 48. (4
units)
82.Witches, Saints, and Heretics:
Religious Outsiders
Survey of the experience of religious exclusion across the realms of magic, holiness, and
heterodoxy. While anchored in the premodern Christian tradition, the course also explores more contemporary phenomena,
persons, and movements. (4 units)
83. Dialogues Between Science
and Religion
Explores and dialogues with the distinct
methods and ways of thinking in theology
and science. Examines how the interpretations of the scientific (cosmology, biology,
and ecology) and the theological worldviews
of the 21st century relate to the questions
concerning God, origins of the universe,
evolution, creativity, human experience, and
ecology. (4 units)
86.Spirituality and Engineering
Reflects on and compares the methods and
practice of the engineering sciences and theology, especially spirituality. Both affect the
way we live, both endeavor to transform the
world. (4 units)
88.Hope and Prophetic Politics
Focuses on Abraham Joshua Heschel and
Martin Luther King Jr., two religious intellectuals whose lives and works draw on this
tradition to raise and address questions basic
to any discussion of the role of religion in
public life. Through readings of Obama and
student-directed “hope projects,” we will
also focus on contemporary examples of
what it means to both think and live in
hope. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES:
THEOLOGY, ETHICS, AND SPIRITUALITY (TESP)
106.Christian Symbol and Ritual
the lenses of Christian theology and ethics.
Investigates the role of symbol and ritual in Social-scientific, legal, public policy, and auhuman experience and then applies the in- tobiographical sources will be used to frame
sights from that study to an investigation of the phenomenon of human trafficking; and
Christian symbols and rituals. The class will theological/ethical categories such as human
not only study rituals but also visit, partici- dignity and freedom, sin and redemption,
pate, and analyze rituals from various neighbor love, and solidarity will be used to
illuminate and assess its dimensions. Special
Christian traditions. (5 units)
attention will be given to the question of
108. Human Trafficking and
human agency as well to social, political, culChristian Ethics
tural, and gender-based analyses as these imThis course will examine the global phenom- pact and shape an adequate response to
enon of human trafficking—specifically sex human trafficking. (5 units)
trafficking and forced labor trafficking—using
250 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
109.Hispanic Spirituality: Guadalupe
One of the most popular Marian devotions
for Hispanic people (of primarily Mexican
descent) is that of Our Lady of Guadalupe.
Study of the history and tradition of Guadalupe, exploring its religious and spiritual significance in both the past and the present.
(5 units)
111.Latin American
Liberation Theology
In many parts of the world, people are murdered for their faith. The facts of martyrdom
are important to document, to study, and
reflect upon in order to evaluate the intertwining of faith and political realities. Focuses on the significance of one martyr,
Archbishop Oscar Romero of El Salvador,
whose life and death exemplify the consequence of socially conscious faith. (5 units)
118.Clare of Assisi and
Ignatius of Loyola
Explores with depth and clarity, Clare of
­Assisi, patroness of Santa Clara University,
and Ignatius of Loyola, founder of the
Jesuits. Inquiring into medieval, modern,
and contemporary worldviews, this course
considers how their distinct legacies remain
lights for us. Facilitates students’ understanding of their spirituality, vocation, and
work in the world. (5 units)
119.Theology, Sex, and Relationships
This course will explore the ethics of romantic and sexual relationships, including
friendship, dating, intimacy, and the phenomenon of “hooking up” in contemporary
campus culture. We will engage theological,
philosophical, and social science sources,
with the aim of developing a “theology of
relationship” that reflects our best insights
about our deepest human and religious
identity. (5 units)
121. Church and the Future
Examines several theories about what the
Roman Catholic Church might look like in
the future. We will also look at the effects of
globalization, mandatory celibacy, and the
unfulfilled legacy of Vatican II. Given the
faith-conviction that the Church will not
fail, what might it look like in 2040?
(5 units)
124.Theology of Marriage
An examination of human relationships, intimacy, sexuality, and marriage through the
social sciences, philosophy, and theology,
and exploration of human love in the unconditional commitment to spouse as the
expression of divine love. (5 units)
131.Feminist Theologies
Through the analysis of a selected sample of
feminist theological voices and themes, explores the phenomenon of feminist theologies in their emerging unity and diversity.
Focuses on themes of inclusion, exclusion,
and representation, which have also been
major catalysts in the emergence of diverse
feminist theologies. Also listed as WGST
149. (5 units)
133.Trinitarian Theology:
East and West
Explores classical and contemporary approaches and challenges to the existence and
experience of God. Focuses on the Christian
experience of God, and examines the
Christian understanding of God as Trinity.
(5 units)
137.Theology of Death
An examination of the experience of death
and the meaning of Christian hope in light
of the death and Resurrection of Jesus; the
meaning of the Christian symbols of judgment, heaven, hell, and the end of history.
(5 units)
RELIGIOUS STUDIES 251
138.Contemporary Theology
of Paul Tillich
An examination of the philosophical and
theological thought of one of the great 20thcentury Protestant theologians, with special
emphasis on his theology of culture, and his
effort to reinterpret the Christian message
for contemporary people. (5 units)
157.Ethics in the Health Professions
Introduction to the major issues in biomedical ethics. Basic principles of biomedical ethics, genetic interventions and reproductive
technologies, euthanasia, professional responsibilities, confidentiality, and public
policy issues regarding the system of delivery
of health care. (5 units)
143.Theology and Ethics
of Thomas Aquinas
A study of the life, thought, and ethics of
Aquinas. Basic topics to be discussed include
the existence of God, human nature, and
human participation in society. (5 units)
158.Immigration and Ethics
Undertakes an interdisciplinary examination
of contemporary immigration with a primary focus on the U.S. context. Social scientific, theological, and philosophical texts,
along with Arrupe placement experiences,
illuminate ethical assessments of immigration policies and practices. (5 units)
151.Issues in Theology and Science
Explores how theology and science arrive at
views of the world and the basis of conversation between theology and science. Theoretical applications drawn by exploring
Galileo, Darwin, evolution, cosmological
theory, and ecological theology. (5 units)
153.Catholic Themes in Literature
Investigates a Catholic vision through novels
and other literature either written by
Catholics or using Catholic themes. Extensive reading, writing of reflective essays, and
class discussion. (5 units)
156.Christian Ethics and HIV/AIDS
Examines different dimensions of the AIDS
pandemic in light of sources and methods in
Christian ethics, including theological anthropology, sexual ethics, virtue ethics, fundamental moral theology, and social ethics.
Covers related topics including social stigma,
the role sexism and poverty play in contemporary transmission rates, and different theoretical proposals and practical responses.
(5 units)
159.Ethics of War and Peace
Examination of the history of moral deliberation about war and peace in Western religious traditions, as well as contemporary,
theological, and philosophical analyses of
the diverse moral principles that those traditions have generated. Studies the application
of theological and moral reasoning to contemporary wars. (5 units)
163.Christianity and Politics
An ethical investigation into the relationship
between Christianity and the political order
and into the contemporary experience of
this relationship, drawing on Scripture,
Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, and Calvin.
­
A special focus on contemporary issues of
Christianity and political ethics. (5 units)
164. Religious Ethics in Business
This course is an introduction to religious
ethics in a business setting. Discussions include how one might live their religious ethics at work without compartmentalizing
their faith tradition when religious faith or
ethics conflict with business ethics. Cases
may include: deception in advertising and
marketing; flawed products; affirmative action; environment and pollution; discrimination; workplace issues. (5 units)
252 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
165.Romero and the
Salvadoran Martyrs
The age of martyrs is not a relic of the past
but a reality of our own times. In many parts
of the world, people are being murdered for
their faith. This course will focus on the life
of the martyr, Archbishop Oscar Romero of
El Salvador, and other Salvadoran men and
women whose life and death exemplify the
consequence of a socially conscious faith.
(5 units)
184.Jesus Across Cultures
An exploration and study of selected significant and diverse interpretations of Jesus of
Nazareth, and of the historical and cultural
contexts that have shaped images and theologies of Jesus Christ (or Christologies).
­Approaches include biblical, Asian, African,
Latin American, and feminist interpretations. The aim is critical exposure to the
cross-cultural diversity of understandings of
Jesus within Christianity itself. (5 units)
175.Women’s Theologies
from the Margins
Women of diverse cultural communities enrich theology by voicing their lived experience from global and local perspectives.
Course explores the theological works of
African-American, Asian-American, and
U.S. Latina women in their historical and
cultural contexts. Also listed as WGST 151.
(5 units)
185.Foundations of Faith
A careful and critical reading of Karl Rahner’s theology, with focus on his understandings of the human person, grace, and Christ
within the context of Catholic faith. (5 units)
176.Nature, Humanity, Spirituality
Nature and the human soul within the
­Universe Story. An inquiry into the pervasive longing for meaning; human development and spirituality within an evolutionary
framework; cultivating wholeness and community in a fragmented world. This course
gives students the tools and processes to
think theologically, to access their personal
lives, and to develop a practical spirituality,
which attends to their experience in the ongoing relationship among and between the
Absolute Mystery, the human community,
and the rest of creation. (5 units)
183.Ignatian Spirituality
An exploration of the historical background,
sources, theology, and practice of Ignatian
spirituality in the Spiritual Exercises of St.
Ignatius of Loyola and other Jesuit documents, and a comparison of Ignatian methods of meditation and contemplation with
other traditions of spirituality, Christian and
non-Christian. (5 units)
187.Christ and Catholic Theology
A study of contemporary Catholic Christology approached as Christology “from
below.” Initial consideration of some fundamental theological concepts and then Jesus
Christ as a historical figure and object of
faith. Course pivots around Jesus’ proclamation of the “Kingdom of God” and considers
his history through the resurrection. (5 units)
192. Religion and the Ecological Crisis
Explores the relationship of religion to the
anthropogenic ecological crisis, in particular
in regards to biodiversity loss, climate
change, and adequate religious responses.
Divided into three parts, the course will first
offer a scientific introduction into the ecological crisis; then secondly, analyze how different religious traditions conceive of nature
and humanity; and finally, engage contemporary religious environmental activism and
its ethical foundations. (5 units)
198.Practicum
(1–5 units)
199.Directed Reading and Research
For religious studies majors only. (1–5 units)
RELIGIOUS STUDIES 253
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: RELIGION AND SOCIETY (RSOC)
7. South Asian Religious Traditions
19.Egyptian Religious Traditions
Introduction to the major religious tradi- An investigation of the ways in which
tions of India and neighbors: Hinduism, Egyptian culture has been shaped by the reBuddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, and Islam; his- ligious traditions of ancient pharaonic polytorical development of each faith; what is theism, Coptic Christianity, and Islam.
distinctive in each tradition; and particular Attention to the influence of pharaonic reliattention to the ways in which these tradi- gion on Coptic Christian and Egyptian
tions have influenced each other. (4 units)
Muslim ritual practices, including how these
are reflected in the writings of contemporary
9. Ways of Understanding Religions
Egyptian Muslim authors. (4 units)
Introduces the categories by which religion
is formally studied. Explores distinct per- 33.Maya Spirituality
spectives or ways of thinking about religion Introduces the spirituality of the Maya, and
(e.g., psychological, phenomenological, an- its roots in Mesoamerican culture. Course
thropological, theological, and sociological); focuses on the contemporary public reemeralso considers a variety of religious data gence of ancient practices, with attention to
(e.g., symbols, myths, rituals, theologies, and Maya participation in evangelical religions,
modern communities). (4 units)
and enculturated Catholicism. (4 units)
10.Asian Religious Traditions
This course will introduce students to the
history, major teachings, and practices of the
major Asian Religious traditions of South,
Central, East, and Southeast Asia, namely
Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism,
Confucianism, Daoism, and Shintoism. It
will do so from a historical perspective, and
will also explore the development of key
theological and religious/philosophical doctrines as well as the associated practices.
(4 units)
12.Latinos and Lived Religion
in the United States
This course introduces students to the ethnic and religious diversity among Latinas
and Latinos living in the United States. Students will be exposed to the ways in which
Latinos appropriate Christian, Indigenous,
and Afro-Latino religions in their everyday
lives. (4 units)
38.Religion and Culture: Africa
Introduces the study of religion from the social perspective of how religion shapes
African cultures and is thoroughly shaped by
them in turn. Examines texts, history, ritual
practices, and modern forms of engagement
with the world. (4 units)
46.African Religions
Examination of African history and its many
cultures through the lens of key religious
ideas, practices, and cosmologies. The power
of history, geography, and political domination over the shaping of religion is matched
by the power of religion as a medium of cultural expressiveness and political resistance.
(4 units)
49.Religion, Politics, and Civil Society
What should be the relationship between
religion, politics, and civil society? Some
people think that particular religious tradition should play no part; others believe that
it should. This course considers these arguments as well as exploring the interplay between religion, political behavior, and civil
engagement, not only in the United States
but around the world. (4 units)
254 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
51.Religion in America
Traces the development, character, and impact of religion in America from the precolonial era to the present. Course readings and
discussions will center on the relationship
between religion and the development of
American culture. Includes Native American
traditions; slavery and religion; the rise of
revivalism; gender; religion and war; immigration; and modern pluralism, etc. (4 units)
54.Comparative Religion
and Social Theory
A survey of recent social theory as it bears on
the comparative study of religious traditions.
Theorists might include Durkheim, Weber,
Malinowski, Freud, Alfred Schutz, Jan
Patocka, Peter Berger, Robert Bellah,
Clifford Geertz, Jurgen Habermas, and
Niklas Luhmann. (4 units)
67.Film and Judaism
Uses a variety of readings and films to explore the ideas and experiences that have
shaped Jews and Judaism in the modern period. Topics include Enlightenment and
emancipation, Hasidism and secularism,
Zionism and socialism, immigration and assimilation, anti-Semitism and the Holocaust,
denominationalism, feminism, Jewish
Renewal, and the future. (4 units)
81.Islam
Introduction to the Islamic tradition focusing on the dialectic between normative theology and popular devotion. Readings
include the Quran, Sufi literature, and devotional poetry. Discussion of Quranic concerns in the Sunni and Shia traditions,
ecstatic mysticism, Islamic law, and contemporary issues relating to the status of women,
Westernization, and modernity. (4 units)
85.Hinduism
Exploration of the historical development,
theologies, symbols, rituals, scriptures, social
institutions, and 20th-century politics of
Hinduism, primarily in India. Main focus
on the interaction of religion and culture.
(4 units)
86.Buddhism
Exploration of the whole Buddhist tradition, including Indian origins, Theravada
traditions of Southeast Asia, Mahayana traditions of Central and East Asia, and Buddhism in the West. Emphasis on cultural
impact of religion, Buddhist philosophy and
practice, and modernizing tradition. (4 units)
87.Buddhism and Film
Explores the portrayal of Buddhism in contemporary global cinema. Covers key teachings of Buddhist religious traditions, and
provides an introduction to the field of film
studies, with particular focus on the skills
needed to write critically about film.
(4 units)
88.Chinese Religions
Focuses on the historical development of
Chinese religions—Confucianism, Daoism,
and Buddhism—and their philosophies, as
well as the interface between folk religion,
society, and political institutions in traditional and modern China. (4 units)
90. Theories and Methods
A survey of various approaches to the study
of religion, scripture, and the theological
­disciplines, focusing on hermeneutical (interpretation) theories in each of these approaches. The course involves in-depth
reading, discussion, and application of hermeneutical methods to religious, ethical and
theological texts, rituals and liturgies, and
art, architecture, and music. (4 units)
RELIGIOUS STUDIES 255
91.Native Spiritual Traditions
Introduction to Native American spiritual
traditions in the Americas. Examines myth,
the diversity of ceremonial practices, and the
historical and political contexts in which native peoples have manifested and adapted
their religious ways, with an emphasis on
their recent reaffirmation of indigenous traditions. (4 units)
99.Sociology of Religion
Using early and American Christianity as examples, this class examines how various social forces shape the religious beliefs and
practices of people of faith. In particular it
draws on a number of sociological perspectives, looking both at their historical and
philosophical underpinnings and at what
they can tell us about religious growth, faith
in the modern world, and religiously inspired social action. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: RELIGION AND SOCIETY (RSOC)
106.Zen in Theory and Practice
115.Tibetan Buddhism:
A Cultural History
Explores the Chan/Zen traditions of East
Asian Buddhism from the historical, theo- Provides an overview of Tibetan religious
retical, and practical perspectives. Students history and the fundamental beliefs and
will explore the history and teachings of the practices of Tibetan religious traditions. FoZen traditions, and then will learn how to cuses on devotional traditions centering
undertake Zen meditative practice. The around saints, sophisticated systems of medfocus will be on bringing the teachings and itation and ritual, and the experience of
tradition to life by experiencing them and women in Tibetan Buddhist traditions. Also
learning about the way that practice itself explores visual media such as iconography
drives changes in theory. (5 units)
and cinema. (5 units)
111.Inventing Religion in America
Explores the spiritual creativity that stands at
the center of the American experience and
asks what characteristics facilitated such religious diversity. Looks at beliefs and practices, and also historical contexts. Includes
Mormons, Christian Science, Jehovah’s
Witnesses, the Nation of Islam, Scientology,
and Heaven’s Gate, etc. (5 units)
113.Buddhism in America
Following a survey of Buddhist teachings
and the history of the transmission of Buddhism to America, this course explores the
diverse array of Buddhist groups in Silicon
Valley. (5 units)
119.Media and Religion
Examines the religious, theological, and ethical issues and perspectives raised by various
media: print, visual, audio, multimedia, and
virtual. Special attention will be given to the
nature of their relationship and the religious
and spiritual issues currently present in their
interface. (5 units)
121.Representing Religion
in World Cinema
Examines films from various cultures and
the ways religion is portrayed, stereotyped,
and represented in them. Investigates both
sacred texts and traditions of specific religions and the ways film enhances, provokes,
or misrepresents various religious themes
and motifs. (5 units)
256 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
[email protected] Valley
Is something unique happening in Silicon
Valley’s religious landscape? This seminar addresses that question through different perspectives on the Valley’s culture; scholarly
approaches to the Buddhist, Catholic, and
Muslim experiences in America; and interactions with local congregations. (5 units)
130.East Asian Buddhism
Explores in depth the major traditions of
East Asian Buddhism. Following a brief survey of their teachings and history, this course
focuses on several traditions (Chan/Zen,
Pure Land Buddhism, and Soka Gakkai)
that are represented in the Silicon Valley
area, and examines in depth the practices advocated by these traditions, as well as the
­social implications of these practices. (5 units)
131.Tantra in Theory and Practice
Examines the development and global
spread of tantric traditions. Beginning with
South Asia, explores the development of the
body-oriented tantric movement and its institutionalization in Hindu and Buddhist
religious contexts. Explores spread of tantra
throughout Asia and the West, and transformation of tantric traditions in Western cultural contexts. (5 units)
134.Religion and Secularism
Is the new atheism—and by extension,
therefore, philosophy—in some genuine
sense a religious tradition? This course will
explore the meaning and sources of the socalled “new atheists” (C. Hitchens, R.
Dawkins, S. Harris, D. Dennett). We will
see that the conflict between the new atheists
and the religions has a long varied history
with the new atheists representing one
strand of philosophy. We will flesh out this
particular philosophical sub-history, as well
as alternative views of the religions that develop and exist alongside the stridently atheistic, materialist forms of philosophy. (5 units)
135.Architects of Solidarity
Starting with the Jesuit claim of education
for “solidarity for the real world,” students
explore the rhetorics of solidarity in different
intellectual and faith traditions and how
these rhetorics frame issues such as poverty,
intolerance, suffering, and globalization to
inspire and justify action on behalf of others.
Course requirements include field work
with local organizations whose missions include solidarity across religious, economic,
ethnic, or geographic differences. (5 units)
136.Religion in Latin America
Develops intellectual tools to explore with
depth and clarity the recent religious pluralism in Latin America and the Caribbean.
Examines distinct historical legacies; sociocultural contexts; political and economic
processes; and the role that faith, belief, and
“conversion” play in people’s lives and cultures. (5 units)
139.Mexican Popular
Catholicism and Gender
From a sociology of religion perspective, this
course explores the historical roots and contemporary manifestations of Mexican popular Catholicism in the U.S. and Mexico with
a special focus on women’s contributions.
Also listed as ETHN 129 and WGST 152.
(5 units)
140.Animals, Environment,
and World Religion
An investigation of the resources offered by
world religions for addressing current crises
related to the status of animals and the natural environment. Attention will be given to
traditional views of human-animal relations
as reflected in various scriptures, as well as
the work of contemporary thinkers who
offer new perspectives on environmental
theology and issues such as animal suffering.
(5 units)
RELIGIOUS STUDIES 257
149.Science, Religion, and
Global Warming
Explores religious responses to the problems
and ethical dilemmas of global warming.
Special attention will be paid to world religions’ historical relationship with the environment and how contemporary religious,
social, and ethical perspectives generate debate on the science of climate change.
(5 units)
154.The Islamic Jesus
Investigation of various understandings of
Jesus in Islam, beginning with an introduction to Islamic theology and Qur’anic
Christology, emphasizing Muslim scriptural
understandings of Jesus as a prophet and
healer, followed by representations of Jesus
in Sufi mysticism, medieval Islamic folklore,
and modern Arabic literature, with consideration of how Jesus can play a role in MuslimChristian dialogue. (5 units)
157.Religious Traditions and
Contemporary Moral Issues
Explores selected moral issues and analyzes
responses given to these issues by the selected
religious traditions. Issues to be analyzed will
include those pertaining to human life (e.g.,
euthanasia, HIV/AIDS), human sexuality
(e.g., marriage), and global issues (e.g., war,
environmental degradation, and poverty).
The central approach will be to compare and
contrast Western responses with responses
from other cultural and religious systems in
order to highlight points of difference,
points of similarity, and common ground.
(5 units)
159.Longings for Immortality
A chance to read the core texts that formed
visions of the afterlife in Western though,
including Gilgamesh, selections from
Homer, Hesiod, Plato, Cicero, Vergil,
Hebrew and Christian scriptures, the
Qur’an, Dante, and Galileo. Then, turning
to the world around us, we’ll explore some of
the refractions of these visions in contemporary film and literature and writings about
cyberspace. Along the journey, we’ll ponder
the implications of personal survival and
death—both for the individual and society.
(5 units)
168.Gender and Judaism
Explores ideas and images of Jewish “femininity,” “masculinity,” and “queerness” generated by Jewish and non-Jewish cultures
throughout history to the present. Considers
the political/economic, religious, and other
cultural dimensions of these images and
ideas. Also listed as WGST 145. (5 units)
170.Religion, Gender,
and Globalization
Using feminist ethics as a framework, this
course examines the ethical issues at the intersection of religion and globalization and
unpacks the implications of this intersection
for women. Focuses on the human rights of
women and examines ways in which globalization has affected, supported, or undermined the human rights of women and the
role of religion in their lives. Also listed as
WGST 146. (5 units)
174.Jewish Philosophy:
Athens and Jerusalem
“Athens” represents the philosophical world;
“Jerusalem” the world of faith. An introduction to the history and major themes within
modern Jewish thought. Topics investigated
include secularism, capitalism, Romanticism, Marxism, critical theory, postmodernism, feminism, political theory, and
prophetic politics as articulated in Judaism’s
encounter with modernity. These topics are
united by Judaism’s struggle to achieve a universal vision of hope for human redemption
and liberation. (5 units)
258 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
182.Shia Islam in the
Contemporary World
An investigation of Shia theory, the historical origins of Shiism (especially the Twelver
and Zaydi denominations), and Shia-Sunni
relations in the contemporary Islamic world.
Particular emphasis on issues of ritual and
communal identity in Pakistan, India,
Yemen, and diaspora communities in North
America. (5 units)
184.Race and Religion
in the United States
Begins with an examination of the living
situation of people of African descent in the
United States, as well as an analysis of their
social context—economic, educational, and
political aspects. Considerations are then
given to the effects the Christian message has
had in this situation. (5 units)
188.Religion and Violence
Examines the historical and contemporary
relationships between religious ideologies
and personal and institutional practices of
coercion, force, and destruction. (5 units)
190.Islam: Reformation
and Modernity
Comparative study of contemporary Islam.
Beginning with the study of origins and
basic doctrines of Islam, this course will study
its development to the modern world. Main
focus will be on Islam’s interaction with different cultures, emphasizing political implications of the rise of revivalism. (5 units)
191.Religions of Colonized Peoples
The aim of this course is to analyze from an
insider perspective the role of religion both
in the process of colonizing Africa as well as
in the process of resistance to colonization.
This will include an examination of the role
of religion in the African struggle against political oppression, economic injustices, racism, and cultural imperialism. Students will
then critically analyze the social-political
­implications of religion in their own contexts. (5 units)
194.Modern Religious Thought
An advanced inquiry into the development
of religious thought in the modern era.
Modern religious thinkers have had to confront and deal with two related problems:
the alienation of many people from traditional religions and the rise of atheistic forms
of thought and life associated with the
Western philosophical tradition. Special attention will be paid to the relation of Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment
philosophers and philosophical movements
to developments in religious thinking. Figures to be considered will include Kant,
Schleiermacher, Barth, Rahner, Nishitani,
and Milbank. (5 units)
198.Practicum
(1–5 units)
199.Directed Reading and Research
For religious studies majors only. (1–5 units)
SOCIOLOGY 259
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY
Professors: Marilyn Fernandez, Alma M. Garcia, John C. Gilbert
(Interim Department Chair), Charles H. Powers
Associate Professors: Laura Nichols
Assistant Professors: Patrick Lopez-Aguado, Laura Robinson
The Department of Sociology offers a degree leading to a bachelor of science in sociology.
A solid undergraduate foundation in sociology secures the analytical skills needed to undertake professional degree programs in sociology, business, law, and social services or to
embark on a number of careers from management to research. A minor in sociology is available. Honors thesis options also are offered to qualified majors.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum requirements for the bachelor
of science degree, students majoring in sociology must complete the following departmental
requirements:
• SOCI 1
• ANTH 3
• SOCI 118, 119, and 120
• SOCI 121 or 122
• Five other approved upper-division courses in sociology (at least two each from two
of four clusters: criminology/criminal justice, immigrant communities, inequalities,
organization/institutions)
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in sociology:
• SOCI 1, 33, 117
• Three other approved upper-division sociology courses excluding SOCI 118, 119,
120, 121, and 122
260 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. Principles of Sociology
49.Computers, the Internet,
and Society
Introduction to the field of sociology. Emphasis on the major sociological perspectives Examines the impact new media and comand the basic elements of sociological analy- puter technologies have had on society as
sis. Introductory exposure to research meth- well as the role of individuals, groups, and
odology. (4 units)
societies on the development of this technology. Looks at the transforming or potentially
11A. and 12A. Cultures &
transforming effects of communication
Ideas I and II
technology on civic engagement. PrerequiA two-course sequence focusing on a major site: Completion of social science requirement
theme in human experience and culture over in the Core. (4 units)
a significant period of time. Courses emphasize either broad global interconnections or 65.Crime and Delinquency
the construction of Western culture in its Broad survey of major issues surrounding
global context. Course one will cover disrup- the causes and nature of, and solutions to,
tion of global cultures in the context of social the problem of crime and delinquency in the
and economic history and course two will United States. (4 units)
cover emerging global cultures in the age of
the Internet. Successful completion of C&I I 91.Lower-Division Seminar
in Sociology
(SOCI 11A) is a prerequisite for C&I II
Seminar
for first-year students and sopho(SOCI 12A). (4 units each quarter)
mores on selected issues in sociology. By per30.Self, Community, and Society
mission of the instructor and sociology chair
Exploration of a specific topic related to the only. May be repeated once for credit if topic
self, community, and society. Use of socio- changes. (4 units)
logical theories, research, community-based
learning, and civic engagement activities to
help students analyze and explore the role of
the individual in influencing community
and society as well as how the individual is
shaped by these entities. (4 units)
33.Social Problems in
the United States
Overview of contemporary social problems
in the United States from a sociological perspective, with a major emphasis on the ways
race, class, and gender shape the development of specific social problems and the
public policies offered to address them. Topics may include the economy, poverty,
homelessness, and social inequality. (4 units)
SOCIOLOGY 261
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: THEORY, METHODS, AND CAPSTONES
117.Sociology’s Analytical Frameworks
120. Survey Research and
and Conceptual Approaches
Statistical Analysis
Considers sociology as an integrated and co- Application of quantitative research designs
herent discipline by reviewing the develop- and statistics to empirically examine socioment of different analytical frameworks logically relevant research questions, with atwhich, when considered together, convey tention to the scientific reasoning behind
much of the conceptual power and rich his- quantitative methodology. Statistical analytory of the discipline. Required of all sociol- ses conducted using a statistical package
ogy minors. Does not fulfill the SOCI 119 such as SPSS. Prerequisites: SOCI 1 and
requirement for the major. (5 units)
concurrent enrollment in SOCI 119.
(5 units) NCX
118.Qualitative Methods
Provides students with an understanding of 121.Research Capstone
qualitative methods for social research by fo- Collaborative research project conducted
cusing on (1) classical and contemporary under the direction of a faculty member. Sosociological works employing qualitative ciology majors only. Prerequisites: SOCI
methods; and (2) a selection of qualitative 118, 119, and 120. (5 units) NCX
methods and techniques in sociology. Students gain hands-on experience by produc- 122.Applied Capstone
ing a series of qualitative research projects. Demonstrates the application of sociological
Prerequisites: SOCI 119 and 120. (5 units) research and insights to the challenges of
modern business, human service, and public
NCX
sector organizations. Practice components
119.Sociological Theory
bring students into contact with people who
Provides an overview of sociological theory are incorporating sociology to improve the
stressing the role of theory in the scientific functioning of their organizations and to inmethod. Required of all majors. Does not form policymaking. Sociology majors only.
fulfill the SOCI 117 requirement for the Prerequisites: SOCI 118, 119, and 120.
minor. Prerequisites: SOCI 1 and concurrent (5 units) NCX
enrollment in SOCI 120. (5 units) NCX
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES:
CRIMINOLOGY/CRIMINAL JUSTICE CLUSTER
158.Sociology of Deviance
159.Sociology of Crime
Examines noncriminal violation of social Examines criminal behavior on the aggrenorms from a variety of sociological perspec- gate level, and its effects in the United States
tives. Topics typically include eating disor- and other societies. Topics typically include
ders, relationship abuse, child abuse, sexual sexual assault and domestic violence, homiharassment, substance abuse, and homosex- cide, global terrorism, corporate, and politiuality. Theoretical emphasis on classical and cal crime. Theoretical emphasis on classical
contemporary critical theory, including fem- and contemporary critical and social justice
inist, critical race, and queer perspectives. perspectives. (5 units)
(5 units)
262 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
160.Sociology of Law
Survey of classical and contemporary sociological theories of law and society. Topics
typically include the social construction of
law; law and capitalism; law and social solidarity; gender, race, and class inequality and
the law; and private/public divisions and the
law. (5 units)
161.Sociology of Criminal
Justice Systems
Examines criminal justice systems in the
United States and other countries from a
comparative perspective. Topics typically
include law enforcement, the courts, corrections (prisons and probation), and juvenile
criminal justice systems. Theoretical emphasis on classical and contemporary critical and
social justice perspectives. (5 units)
162.Gender and Justice
Topics relevant to gender and justice related
to criminology and criminal justice systems,
with a particular emphasis on the experiences of women and justice. (5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: IMMIGRANT COMMUNITIES CLUSTER
137.Social Change
150.Immigrant Businesses
in the United States
Examines significant trends and issues in
contemporary United States society and in Immigrant businesses represent a growing
the world with an emphasis on social change sector within the United States economy
as it relates to migration. Introduces utility and contribute to social, political, and culof sociological concepts, principles, theories, tural changes in the United States. Examines
and applications for understanding social the development and significance of immichange. (5 units)
grant business owners and the communities
within which their businesses are located.
138.Populations of India,
Also listed as ETHN 170. (5 units)
China, and the United States
Using India, China, and the United States as 180.Immigrant Communities
case studies, students will understand the Explores the impact of immigration to the
historical and current trends in global popu- United States, particularly the effect of the
lation growth, as well as the critical social, immigration reform law of 1965 that resultcultural, economic, and environmental fac- ed in large increases in immigration to the
tors that impact and are impacted by popu- United States, particularly from Latin Amerlation change. They will also critically learn ica and Asia. This wave of immigrants and
about the methods used to derive demo- their United States.-born children has siggraphic data that are available to educate and nificantly changed the fabric of American
aid in the process of informed decision mak- society. Examines case studies of immigrants
ing. (5 units)
and the second generation from Cuba,
Mexico, Nicaragua, Vietnam, and Haiti
using a comparative sociological perspective.
Also listed as ETHN 171. (5 units)
SOCIOLOGY 263
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: INEQUALITIES CLUSTER
132.Social Stratification
153.Race, Class, and Gender
in the United States
Explores analysis of the principal lines of social cleavage within United States. society. Examines the sociological nature of the inEmphasizes the racial, sexual, ethnic, occu- tersectionality of race/ethnicity, social class,
pational, and class divisions prevalent in the and gender by focusing on the interrelationcontemporary world and current policy re- ships among social institutions, power relasponses. (5 units)
tionships, and cultural patterns. May also
focus on the impact of popular culture on
134.Globalization and Inequality
the social construction of social identities.
Encompasses overview of globalization as a Also listed as WGST 115. (5 units)
long-term historical process. Focus on the
impact in the developing world; on people 165.Human Services
moving from the developing to the devel- Provides an introduction to the field of
oped world; the displacement of some and human services. Topics include the connecnew opportunities for others during differ- tions between societal understanding of soent periods of globalization; and the long- cial problems, programs, and policies; work
term implications of privilege and and management issues in public and nonmarginality that globalization has produced. profit human service agencies; human serExamination of case material based on Latin vices in a multicultural context; and
American, African, and Asian historical ex- opportunities to learn through communityperiences; exploration of theoretical models based placements serving marginalized
of high rates of poverty in the developing ­communities and from human service proworld; and practical steps to reduce margin- fessionals. (5 units)
alization on a global scale. (5 units)
175.Race and Inequality
135. Women and Social Change
Examines the racial/ethnic inequality that
in Latin America
African, Asian, Hispanic, and Native AmeriExamination of the relationship between cans and other groups experience in contemgender and the process of national and inter- porary United States society. This course
national factors related to social change in covers theories of race and ethnicity, examLatin America. Emphasis on selected case ines empirical research on a range of topics
studies such as Mexico, Guatemala, Bolivia, (poverty, social class, assimilation, identity,
and El Salvador. Also listed as WGST 128. segregation, stereotyping), and explores the
(5 units)
meaning and consequences for racial/ethnic
inequality in the future. (5 units)
140.Urban Society and Social Conflict
Involves critical inquiry into urban sociology
and theoretical and practical exposure to
urban issues. Explores unresolved paradox in
how we understand urban life; role of structural and cultural conditions in creating or
adding to urban problems; and issues such as
poverty, immigration, housing, and the political economy of urban America. (5 units)
264 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: ORGANIZATIONS/INSTITUTIONS CLUSTER
127.Group Dynamics
157.Sociology of Family
Explores the structure and social processes Examines how family forms have changed
that occur in small and large groups. Con- over time in the United States, including the
cepts such as power and prestige, leadership, macro causes and consequences of different
communication networks, collaboration family structures and role expectations.
and conflict, game theory, and distributive ­Patterns and dynamics of dating, family forjustice are examined. (5 units)
mation, child-rearing, divorce, and extended
family support systems are also covered.
148.Stakeholder Diversity in
Also listed as WGST 182. (5 units)
Contemporary American
Organizations
163.Sociology of Work and Occupation
Offers a serious exploration of both the ethi- Examines ideological and institutional charcal and practical challenges posed by the acteristics of modern industrial society and
­diversity of stakeholder interests in organiza- some of its basic problems, such as alientions. Critical reflection on the implications ation, affluence and work motivation modof client-centered approaches to organiza- els, primary group influences, and leadership
tional activity for people working in organi- behavior. (5 units)
zations, and also for structure, culture,
communication, and process in those orga- 164.Collective Behavior
nizations. Requires a community-based Involves analytical study of collective behavlearning placement working alongside and/ ior principles: typology of crowds, mass beor in the service of persons who are margin- havior, and the characteristics of publics.
Includes an introduction to social movealized in the local community. (5 units)
ments. (5 units)
149.Business, Technology, and Society
Examines the impact business and society 172.Management of Health Care
Organizations
have had on the development of science/
technology and the transforming or poten- Explores the sociological and practical issues
tially transforming effects of changing sci- of operations, financing, and management
ence/technology on business and society. in organizations providing services for people with health problems (organizations
(5 units)
such as nursing homes and hospitals) or
152.Women and Men in the Workplace people with infirmities (organizations such
Examines the status and roles of men and as senior care centers and assisted living
women in the labor force. How gender dif- ­facilities). (5 units)
ferences are developed through socialization
and some of the consequences of these differences: tokenism, sexual harassment, the
“glass ceiling,” and the dual-career family.
Includes strategies to address gender inequality in the workplace. Also listed as
WGST 181. (5 units)
SOCIOLOGY 265
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: OUTWARD BOUND
125.Honors Thesis
Students spend the majority of class time off
Ordinarily requires an overall GPA of 3.3, a campus and then reflect on their experiences
GPA of 3.5 in the major, completion of through meetings with a faculty member and
SOCI 121, and approval of a thesis proposal papers. May be repeated once for credit, under
defining a topic, outlining a theoretically certain circumstances and with the approval
driven research design, and having a timeta- of the sociology chair. Written departmental
ble for conducting various stages of the re- approval necessary in the quarter prior to regissearch. May be taken only with special tration. Prerequisites: An overall GPA of 2.7 or
permission of the sociology chair. (5 units)
permission of the sociology chair. (5 units)
195.Silicon Valley Notebook
Provides Sociology seniors, who have successfully completed Sociology 121, the opportunity to improve the professional quality
of their research capstone papers for possible
inclusion in the department’s journal. Prerequisites: SOCI 121 and recommendation
of SOCI 121 faculty. (5 units)
198.Internship
Presents an opportunity for students to employ
sociological insights in human service/community, government, or business organizations.
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research
Involves intensive reading in areas not emphasized by the department. Independent
research on specific topics not fully covered
in departmental courses. May be repeated
once for credit, under certain circumstances
and with the approval of the sociology chair.
Written departmental approval necessary in
the quarter prior to registration. (5 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: OTHER
133.Politics and Society in
176.Elder Law
Developing Societies
A survey of public policy issues particularly
Explores social and political change in the affecting the elderly. Includes consideration
Third World. Content includes relationship of the legal aspects of death and dying, involbetween economic and social development untary commitment, guardianship and conand the emergence of democratic, authori- servatorship, age discrimination, public
tarian, or revolutionary regimes in Africa, benefit programs, and nursing homes. (5 units)
Asia, and Latin America. Emphasis is on
ways in which the international system in- 190.Advanced Seminars in Sociology
fluences development through investigation Seminars for juniors and seniors on selected
of theories of interdependence, dependency, issues in sociology or current problems of
social relevance. May be repeated once for
and neoimperialism. (5 units)
credit if topic changes. (5 units)
168.Political Sociology
194.Peer Educators
Involves analysis of power relations in the Peer educators in sociology work closely
United States and examination of different with a faculty member to help students in a
dimensions of power. Particular emphasis is course understand course material, think
on the development of social protest move- more deeply about course material, benefit
ments. (5 units)
from collaborative learning, feel less anxious
about testing situations and/or to help
students enjoy learning. Enrollment is by
­
permission of the instructor. (1–2 units)
266 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE AND DANCE
Professor Emeritus: Frederick P. Tollini, S.J.
Professors: Aldo Billingslea, Barbara Fraser, Barbara Murray
Associate Professors: Jerald R. Enos, Kimberly M. Hill, David J. Popalisky
(Department Chair), Michael Zampelli, S.J. (Paul L. Locatelli, S.J. Professor)
Assistant Professor: Courtney Mohler
Senior Lecturers: Derek Duarte, Kristin Kusanovich, David Sword
Lecturers: Karyn Connell, Pauline Locsin-Kanter, Patt Ness
The Department of Theatre and Dance celebrates the creativity of the human spirit,
offering a well-rounded education that leads to a bachelor of arts degree in theatre arts with
emphases in either theatre or dance. The department also offers minors in theatre, dance,
and musical theater (an interdisciplinary minor offered in collaboration with the Department
of Music). The program emphasizes academic rigor, artistic discipline, and creative expression. All students work closely with faculty and staff mentors. Majors fulfill all requirements
set forth by the Undergraduate Core Curriculum, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the
Department of Theatre and Dance.
Theatre and dance are distinct but related areas of emphasis. While each has its own set
of disciplinary standards and academic requirements, students in each emphasis share some
common courses (e.g., Introduction to Performance Collaboration, Defining the Performing
Artist, etc.)
The theatre emphasis offers coordinated courses in acting, design, theatre history, dramatic literature, technical production, directing, and playwriting. Students with this
emphasis will have a broad foundation in theatrical practice and may choose to focus their
study in any of the aforementioned areas. The dance emphasis focuses on modern dance
and choreography and provides additional training in ballet and jazz. Majors, in either
emphasis, will complete their program with a senior project that demonstrates their proficiency in a chosen area.
All students are encouraged to be creative in taking responsibility for their undergraduate education, working with advisors and mentors to plan programs that marry courses in
their focus areas to other disciplines. Since courses in theatre and dance provide students
with invaluable experience in collaboration, critical thinking, organizational management,
and effective communication skills, they may profitably combine a major in theatre arts
with a major (or minor) in almost any other discipline—especially, English, music, communication, art, psychology, political science, history, or business. Students also combine
their theatre arts major with various education credential programs.
A degree in theatre arts prepares students for a variety of career options. Some students
pursue graduate study in specialized focus areas so as to become professional theatre or
dance artists and teachers. Others pursue careers in professional theatre or dance companies
immediately after graduation. Still others venture into the world of film, television, arts
administration, education, and religious ministry. Many have used their performing arts
experience to pursue careers in law, medicine, management, and marketing and
development.
The performance season, sponsored by the department, includes four faculty-directed
plays and two dance concerts, in addition to student-directed plays and dance recitals.
­Participation in these productions is open to all members of the University community—
students, faculty, and staff. Guest artists periodically direct, design, choreograph, and/or
perform in productions with SCU students.
THEATRE AND DANCE 267
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling undergraduate Core Curriculum and College of Arts and Sciences
requirements for the bachelor of arts degree, students majoring in theatre arts must complete
the following departmental requirements:
Emphasis in Theatre
• THTR 9, 10, 24 , and 30
• THTR 41A, 42B
• One course from THTR 31, 32, 33
• THTR 185
• One course from THTR 112, 113, 116, 117, 118, 161, 167
• DANC 159 or 189
• Three approved 5-unit upper-division theatre or dance electives
• 4 units of THTR 39/139
• Senior Project may be fulfilled by one of the following courses: THTR 192, 195, 196,
197 (*see description below)
Emphasis in Dance
• THTR 9, 10 and 30
• DANC 48 (prerequisite: DANC 47 or permission of instructor)
• DANC 49
• One course each in Ballet and Jazz (one at level III)
• DANC 67
• DANC 143 and 146
• Two courses from DANC 140, 141, 142, 145, 147, or 148
• DANC 162 or 166
• DANC 159 or 189
• 2 units of THTR 39/139
• Senior Project may be fulfilled by one of the following courses: DANC 192 or 193
(*see description below)
*Senior Project: The Senior Project provides majors with the opportunity to demonstrate their progress in meeting the learning objectives established by the department. In this
capstone course, students will prepare and present a final project in an area of their choosing
(e.g., acting, design, directing, playwriting, history, literature, dance choreography, performance art, etc.) The Senior Project, demonstrating both effective leadership and collaboration, must include each of the following elements: public presentation, reflection on process
(through journaling, etc.) and assessment of progress in addressing department learning
goals, and culminating oral presentation.
268 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINORS
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in theatre or dance:
MINOR IN THEATRE
• THTR 10, 8 or 24 , 30
• One course from THTR 41A or 42B
• Four 5-unit upper-division theatre and dance electives
• 2 units of THTR 39/139
MINOR IN DANCE
• THTR 10
• DANC 48 (prerequisite: DANC 47 or permission of instructor)
• DANC 49
• One course each in Ballet and Jazz (one at level III)
• DANC 143 and 146
• One course from DANC 140, 141, 142, 145, 147, or 148
• One 5-unit upper-division theatre and dance elective
• 2 units of THTR 39/139
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: THEATRE
7. Improv
9. Defining the Performing Artist
Designed for majors and nonmajors, Im- Being in tune as a performing artist means
prov seeks to expand the participant’s capa- being aware of the connection between
bility for spontaneity, flexibility of thought, body, mind, and spirit. Topics include discreativity, communication, and teamwork cussion of professional résumés, head shots,
through the use of theatre games and specifi- auditions, and career choices. Also, the imcally structured improvisation exercises. No plications of being a performing artist, body
previous acting experience is necessary for image and awareness, self-esteem, lifestyle/
this course. Every level of performer or non- health choices, nutrition and diet, and stress
performer will have something to contribute management strategies. (4 units)
and learn from this experience. Topics such
as the impact of status on relationships, non- 10.Introduction to Performance
Collaboration
verbal communication, staying positive,
building on ideas offered by others, and de- This course focuses on the collaborative proveloping narratives will be explored through- cess leading to a group-produced play or creative performance piece. The class includes
out this class. (4 units)
exploration of creativity and performance
8. Acting for Nonmajors
through acting, dance skills, text, and conThrough standard theatre games, exercises, cept analysis. Participants will be exposed to
monologues, and scenes, students will ex- all elements of theatrical experience and colplore, via Stanislavski’s “method of physical laborative expectations of the discipline.
action,” basic principles of the acting craft. (4 units)
(4 units)
THEATRE AND DANCE 269
11A. and 12A. Cultures &
Ideas I and II
A two-course sequence focusing on a major
theme in human experience and culture over
a significant period of time. Courses emphasize either broad global interconnections or
the construction of Western culture in its
global context. Courses may address creativity and the use of space, the performing arts
as reflections and constructions of culture,
and other topics. Successful completion of
C&I I (THTR 11A) is a prerequisite for
C&I II (THTR 12A). (4 units each quarter)
14.Chicana/o and Native
American Theatre
An exploration of Chicana/o and Native
American plays, artists, and companies in
the 20th and 21st centuries. Includes analyses of cultural, economic, political, and gender issues as articulated through the lens of
theatre. (4 units)
21.Voice I: Voice, Speech,
and Presentation Skills
Using physical exercises, breath work,
speech, and resonance exercises, students
will expand their knowledge of the mechanics of speech and increase their vocal potential and health onstage or in any public
speaking environment. Required for theatre
emphasis majors. Priority given to theatre
arts majors/minors. (4 units)
24. Acting
Foundation of the acting curriculum; theatre games, open scenes, monologues, and
scenes are used to explore and acquire a
comprehensive process by which to create
and sustain a truthful, imaginative, and
physical character on stage. Stanislavsky’s
“method of physical action” and Uta Hagen’s
“10 Questions” are explored. Application of
the concepts of “objective, actions, and qualities of action” are applied to scripted material. Students rehearse and perform scenes
from American playwrights. Priority given to
theatre arts majors/minors. (4 units)
28.Theatre to Go
The development and production of a 40
to 45 minute play from various genres. Topics may include children’s theatre, Shakespeare, social justice, and documentary
theatre. Plays will be taken out into the community for performance. Projects may be
extended into a second quarter, in which
case students may re-enroll for additional
units. (2–4 units)
29.Rehearsal and Performance
Active participation in the preparation and
performance of departmental productions as
actors, assistants to the director, dancers, and
choreographers. Individual design/technical
assignments. May be repeated for a total of
8 units. Prerequisite: Approval of director of
production. (2 units)
30.Introduction to Design
Explores the role of design as a part of the
production process. Includes a study of the
elements and principles of design as they
apply to scenic, lighting, and costume design. Also included: design development and
the role of each designer in the production.
(4 units)
31.Introduction to Production
Overview of the organization, concepts, terminology, and skills involved in technical
theatre. Hands-on work in the scene shop.
(4 units)
32.Costume Construction
Introduction to making costumes: fabric/
textile studies, sewing techniques, dyeing
and ornamentation, and costume crafts.
(4 units)
33.Stage Lighting
Principles and practice. Color, instrumentation, basic electricity, and electronics. Elementary design theory and practice. (4 units)
270 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
36.Scene Painting
Introduction into the styles, techniques, and
application of scenic art as it relates to the
theatre. This includes color theory, light and
shadow, and the interpreting of a painter’s
elevation and/or scenic research for the stage.
Projects include wood graining, stone, marble, and foliage. Enrollment in upper division of Scene Painting (THTR 136) is based
on completion of the lower division or skill
level of the student. The advanced level will
deal with historical Trompe’L’Oeil and Grisaille techniques of painting when painting
architectural reliefs, fabric/drapery, and ornamentation. Offered in alternate years.
(4 units)
37.Graphics and Rendering
for Theatre Design
Introduction to graphic representation as
applied to scenic design. Theatre-specific
graphic conventions used in ground plans,
sections, and elevations. Drafting, orthographic projection, mechanical perspective.
Offered in alternate years. (4 units)
38.Makeup for Stage
Basic principles of makeup for the stage.
Youth, old age, and special problems.
(2 units)
39.Production Workshop
Training in development of technical skills
for stage production. Directed work in scenery and costume construction, lighting,
sound, and stage management. May be repeated for a total of 8 units. Not applicable
to paid work hours or to laboratory hours
connected with stagecraft courses. (2 units)
41A.Critical Perspectives
in Performance A
Explores the dynamic relationships among
theatrical space, acting styles, dramatic texts,
and audience reception. This course will engage these perspectives with a special focus
on performing faith, staging power, and dramatizing identity. (4 units)
42B. Critical Perspectives
in Performance B
Explores the dynamic relationships among
theatrical space, acting styles, dramatic texts,
and audience reception. This course will engage these perspectives with a special focus
on staging spectacle, characterizing style,
and playing on the global stage. (4 units)
44.Modern American Theatre History:
Censorship, Arts Funding, and
Theatre Unions
Relationship between the theatre arts and
society. Through the study of significant cultural history as well as theatre literature, this
course tackles important social justice issues
involving censorship, arts funding, theatre
unions, and the shaping of American values.
(4 units)
65.Drama of Diversity
Addresses issues of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality through the lens of American theatre by several groups outside of the
dominant culture including, but not limited
to, works from the African-American, AsianAmerican, Chicana/o, Native American,
and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender
(LGBT) perspectives. Also listed as ETHN
65. (4 units)
66.People’s Theatre
Understanding and appreciation of a form
of theatre called People’s Theatre, a type of
theatre and a process of creating a play based
on interviewing marginalized people to gain
perspective on social justice issues that are of
concern to them. Students will have a handson experience of creating a short people’s
theatre piece and having it performed as a
reading in front of an audience. (4 units)
THEATRE AND DANCE 271
68.Special Topics:
Playwrights Workshop
Workshop focuses on the development of a
script or performance piece centered on a
particular chosen theme. May include research, interviews, improv, and script development. (1–4 units)
80.Musical Theatre
Production Workshop
Gives students the opportunity to perform
in a musical theatre production workshop
that covers the study of songs and scenes
from a wide variety of musicals. The class
presents an original musical review at the
end of the quarter. Offered in alternate years.
Prerequisites for majors and minors: THTR
21, THTR 24 or MUSC 34, DANC 40
or 46. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: THEATRE
111.British Drama
122.Acting Styles II: Acting
for the Camera
Also listed as ENGL 113. For course description see ENGL 113. (5 units)
Specific techniques of acting in commercials, television, industrials, and film. Per112.Special Topics: Theatre
form scenes in front of the camera to achieve
and Performance
understanding of the differences and simiIn-depth exploration of specific genres, larities of acting in this media and theatre.
periods, playwrights, or themes. (5 units)
Prerequisite: THTR 10 and 24. (5 units)
113. Seminar: Theatre and
Performance
In-depth exploration of a specific genre,
period, playwright, or theme. (5 units)
116.Shakespeare’s Tragedies
Also listed as ENGL 116. For course description see ENGL 116. (5 units)
117.Shakespeare’s Comedies
Also listed as ENGL 117. For course description see ENGL 117. (5 units)
118.Shakespeare Studies
Also listed as ENGL 118. For course description see ENGL 118. (5 units)
120.Acting Styles I: Shakespeare
Techniques for performing the works of
William Shakespeare and other Elizabethan
playwrights. Learn scansion and perform
sonnets, monologues, and scenes from plays.
Prerequisite: THTR 10 and 24. (5 units)
123.Acting Styles III: Musical Theatre
Study of the techniques of acting in this special genre including phrasing, interpretation
of lyrics, and auditioning. Prerequisites:
THTR 10, 24, or MUSC 34, or permission
of instructor. (5 units)
124.Acting Styles IV: Scene Study
with Dialects
Building on the skill sets obtained in Voice I
and Acting I or II, students will continue to
deepen the application of their acting and
vocal techniques in the study of texts that
require a region-specific sound. Students will
learn to research and reproduce at least four
major dialects used on the stage and screen.
Combined with vocal flexibility work, students will apply their dialect research to at
least four different monologues or scenes.
Prerequisites: THTR 10 and 24. (5 units)
272 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
125.Acting Styles V: Special Topics
A scene study course that may include auditioning, specific playwrights, or styles—
Chekhov, Ibsen, Greek, Absurdist, Brecht,
Meisner, or other styles depending on departmental needs or instructor expertise.
Prerequisite: THTR 10 and 24, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
134.Costume Design
Principles of costume design for the stage.
Application of design elements to convey
character and production concepts. Period
research, style, and rendering techniques.
Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite:
THTR 30 or permission of instructor.
(5 units)
128.Theatre to Go
For course description see THTR 28.
(2–5 units)
136.Scene Painting
For course description see THTR 36. (5 units)
129.Rehearsal and Performance
For course description see THTR 29. (2 units)
130.Technical Design
The process of taking scenery from designer
drawings to actual set pieces. Transformation
of scene designs to carpenter drawings, standard building methods, stage machinery solutions, and budget-regulated design
options. Offered in alternate years. (5 units)
131.Sound Design
Principles of the use of sound in theatre production. Emphasis on practical applications
and equipment use. Digital audio and playback automation. Offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite: THTR 30 or permission of
­instructor. (5 units)
132.Lighting Design
Application of lighting skills to production
design. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: THTR 33 or permission of instructor.
(5 units)
133.Scene Design
Application of graphic skills to scenic design.
Styles, scene painting technique, set décor.
Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite:
THTR 30 or permission of instructor.
(5 units)
137.Pattern Drafting and Draping
Drafting and draping techniques for a basic
bodice, skirt, sleeve, and collars, and techniques for developing variations. Emphasis
on drafting period garments. Offered in
­alternate years. Prerequisite: THTR 32 or
permission of instructor. (5 units)
138.Production Management
Designed to acquaint students with the
complexities of managing productions from
the audition process to final performance.
Directing, lighting, scenic production, sound,
cueing, budgets, and personnel management are aspects that will be touched upon
in class. Offered in alternate years. (5 units)
139.Production Workshop
For course description see THTR 39. (2 units)
151.Fashion, Politics,
and Issues of Gender
Historical exploration of fashion not merely
as a matter of personal taste, but as a sight for
examining the interconnections among
power, politics, gender, and ethnicity. The
course will consider the role of fashion in
constructing gender and ethnic identities,
social and political structures, and fomenting revolution. Also listed as WGST 183.
(5 units)
THEATRE AND DANCE 273
161.American Theatre from
the Black Perspective
An exploration of the contributions black
artists have made to enrich the American
theatre as playwrights, actors, designers, and
directors. Also listed as ENGL 192. (5 units)
165.History of American
Musical Theatre
A cultural look at musical theatre as an
American art form, which has its roots in
vaudeville, burlesque, and minstrel shows.
Offered in alternate years. (5 units)
167.Gender and Performance
Exploration of issues of gender and sexuality
as they are performed in theatre, music,
dance, and contemporary performance art.
Also listed as WGST 139. (5 units)
168.Special Topics:
Playwrights Workshop
Workshop focuses on the development of a
script or performance piece centered on a
particular chosen theme. May include research, interviews, improv, and script development. (1–5 units)
170.Playwriting
Critical analysis of dramatic structure for the
playwright. Scenarios, character studies,
writing of original plays. Also listed as ENGL
193W. (5 units)
171.Advanced Playwriting
Continuation of THTR 170. Also listed as
ENGL 193. (5 units)
172.Literature and Performance
Adapting literature (poems, novels, short
stories, diaries, etc.) for the stage, and writing complete scripts for performance and
production. Theories of both narrative and
dramatic structures. Also listed as ENGL
109. (5 units)
173.Screenwriting
Also listed as ENGL 173. For course description see ENGL 173. (5 units)
180.Musical Theatre
Production Workshop
For course description see THTR 80. (5 units)
185.Dramaturgy
Play analysis in the context of theatrical
genres and historic period cultures. Also listed as ENGL 195. (5 units)
186.Stage Directing
Basic course in the problems, techniques,
and theory of directing plays for the live theatre. Prerequisites: THTR 10 and 185.
(5 units)
190.New Playwrights Festival
In this workshop course, we will engage with
the process of moving a play from “the page
to the stage.” Students will first engage with
a series of generative and analytic dramaturgical exercises. Then, working with student
actors and directors in a collaborative rehearsal period, students will interact with
their play in motion, gaining information of
further entry into the work. The class culminates in a festival of staged readings. Prerequisites: THTR 170 and permission of
instructor. (5 units)
192. Senior Project: Performance
Showcases performance in theatre. May be
fulfilled through performance in a department production with the required journal,
reflection and evaluation of process and
project in light of department learning goals.
May also be satisfied through a collaboratively produced performance piece following
the same guidelines. Prerequisite: Must be
registered with a faculty advisor. (2–5 units)
194.Peer Educator in Theatre
Students will assist instructors in theatre
classes. Prerequisite: Mandatory training
workshop. (1–2 units)
274 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
195.Senior Project: Design/Technical
Students serve as designers for sets, costumes, lights, or sound, or as technical directors for a departmental production.
Prerequisite: Approval of design faculty.
(5 units)
198.Practicum
Reserved for projects with recognized institutions outside the University. Prerequisite:
Written proposal must be approved by instructor and department chair one week prior
to registration. (1–5 units)
196.Senior Project: Directing
Project in directing. A short play, fully
staged. Prerequisites: THTR 24, 30, 41, 42,
43, 185, 186. Successful completion of stage
crew assignments that include run crew for
two departmental productions, and stage
manager for a one-act play or departmental
play. Permission of the head of the directing
program. (5 units)
199.Independent Study/Directed
Reading/Directed Research
Two areas of directed study: creative projects
in directing, choreography, technical production, design, playwriting, administration, or directed reading and/or research.
Prerequisite: Written proposal must be approved by the instructor and department
chair one week prior to registration.
(2–5 units)
197.Senior Thesis
A senior thesis in history/literature/dramaturgy. Written for the advisor in consultation
with other committee members. Upon completion of the thesis, an oral defense will take
place before a selected committee. Prerequisite: Faculty approval. (5 units)
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES: DANCE
4. The Physics of Dance
29.Rehearsal and Performance
Explores the connection between the art of Active participation in the preparation and
dance and the science of motion with both performance of departmental productions as
lecture/discussion sessions and movement actors, assistants to the director, dancers, and
laboratories. Topics include mass, force, choreographers. Individual design/technical
equilibrium, acceleration, energy, momen- assignments. May be repeated for a total of
tum, torque, rotation, and angular momen- 8 units. Prerequisite: Approval of director of
tum. Movement laboratory will combine production. (2 units)
personal experience of movement with scientific measurements and analysis, in other 38.Movement for Athletes
words: “dance it”—“measure it.” This is a Focuses on flexibility, agility, body awarelab science course, not a dance technique ness, and strength building. Class exercises
will draw from Pilates’ core strengthening
course. Also listed as PHYS 4. (4 units)
mat work, introductory ballet barre, and
center work to enhance balance and coordination. (2 units)
THEATRE AND DANCE 275
39.Hip-Hop
Introductory course to street dance style performed to hip-hop music. Introduces the
body to strong isolated movement, coordination, and dance combinations that will
include floorwork. (2 units)
40.Jazz Dance I
Introductory course in jazz dance with no
previous training required. Introduces body
isolation, rhythmic awareness, movement
coordination, and jazz styles through performance of dance combinations in the styles of
theatre jazz, hip-hop, and lyrical dance.
(2 units)
41.Jazz Dance II
Continuation of jazz fundamentals introduced in DANC 40 with emphasis on learning and retaining longer combinations
through more challenging dance technique
offered in styles of theatre jazz, hip-hop, and
lyrical dance. (2 units)
42.Jazz Dance III
Continued study of jazz dance at an intermediate level with emphasis on technique,
flexibility, balance, control, muscle tone, and
retaining long combinations in a variety of
jazz styles. This course will prepare the dancer for continuation into the advanced level
of jazz. Students choreograph final projects.
(4 units)
43.Ballet I
Introductory course in ballet with no previous experience necessary. Develops individual strength, flexibility, and coordination
through classical ballet technique. Includes
barre and floor combinations. (2 units)
44.Ballet II
Continuation of ballet fundamentals introduced in DANC 43 with emphasis on discipline, coordination, and developing practical
performing skills in classical ballet technique. Includes barre and floor combinations. (2 units)
45.Ballet III
Continued study of ballet at intermediate
level, encouraging technical and performing
proficiency. Focus on correct alignment and
developing artistic expression. Includes barre
exercises and intermediate-level floor combinations. (4 units)
46.Modern Dance I
Introductory course in modern dance with
no previous training required. Introduces
the expressive potential of dance through
modern dance technique. Emphasis on flexibility, strength, and alignment practiced
through standing and floor exercises. Movement improvisation explores qualities of
motion. (2 units)
47.Modern Dance II
Continuation of modern dance fundamentals introduced in DANC 46 with emphasis
on technique, flexibility, coordination, and
creativity. (2 units)
48.Modern Dance III
Continued study of modern dance at an intermediate level. Emphasis on release techniques, rhythmic precision, and spatial
principles through extended combinations
and movement improvisation. (4 units)
49.Dance Composition
Traditional approaches to compositional
problems of form and design, time and
rhythm, and energy flow and force in dance
as an art form. (4 units)
50.Tap I
Introductory course in tap dance with no
previous training required. Develops better
coordination, rhythm, and timing. Strengthens the feet and legs. Basic tap terminology
and steps. (2 units)
276 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
51.Tap II
Continuation of tap fundamentals introduced in DANC 50. Increasing rhythm and
coordination through intermediate level
steps and technique. Learn tap steps and
apply them to the art of performance.
(2 units)
52.Afro-Haitian Dance
Introductory course in Afro-Haitian dance
with no previous training required. Basic
technique class that introduces the subtleties
of the dance, proper body placement, and
the rhythmic structure between the dance
and the music. Offered in alternate years.
(2 units)
54.Mexican Folklorico Dance
Introductory course in Mexican folklorico
dance with no previous training required.
Course introduces steps and moves from
various regional forms of dance from Mexico including Azteca, Quebradita, Danzon,
and Salsa Mexican style; plus a very structured form of exercise for footwork called
“tecnica” drills to enable the dancer to pick
up more intricate and challenging material.
Offered in alternate years. (2 units)
55.Musical Theatre Dance Styles
Exploration of musical theatre dance styles.
Based on theatre jazz technique, consisting
of warm-ups, across the floor progressions
and combinations from musical theatre.
This course will introduce the musical theatre performer to auditions through mock
audition technique. Offered in alternate
years. (4 units)
56.Pilates Private Instruction
Pilates is the latest technology for conditioning the human body. Pilates is excellent for
building a deep internal strength and an integrated, aligned body for anyone with an
active lifestyle, as well as for injury prevention and recovery. One-on-one Pilates instruction using the Reformer and another
apparatus. Prerequisite: Permission of
i­nstructor. (1 unit)
57.Dance to Go
The development and production of creative dances designed for outreach. Focus on
improvisation and sharing the art of dance
through interactive performance. Touring
production. (2–4 units)
58.Pilates Mat Class
Pilates mat classes, based on the pioneering
work of Joseph Pilates, are designed to condition the body. Mat classes focus on alignment and breathing. Strengthens the core of
the body while freeing up the joints to aid in
flexibility, improving posture, and all around
quality of life. Prerequisite: Permission of
­instructor. (2 units)
59.Teaching the Performing Arts
Immersion course in artistic process, practices, principles, pedagogies, and public policy. This course covers the fundamentals of
teaching dance, theatre, music, and art to
children in public and private settings with a
focus on marginalized communities, and is
important preparation for any student considering teaching at any point in his/her career. Note: This course requires participation
in community-based learning (CBL) experiences off campus. (4 units)
61.Charisma
Charisma is a student-directed, faculty mentored exploration of spirituality, as revealed
through the performing arts. Students begin
this process in retreat, dedicating time
throughout fall quarter for reflection and
discovery through their collective creative
work. The Charisma experience culminates
in an early winter quarter performance. Prerequisite: Auditions are held the preceding
spring quarter. (2 units)
THEATRE AND DANCE 277
62.African-American Dance History
Exploration of African-American dance’s
contribution to U.S. culture from slavery
through the present. How minstrel stereotypes, jazz dance sources, black concert
dance, and hip-hop reflect racial and social
realties in America. Offered in alternate
years. (4 units)
66.Women in Dance History
Introduction to significant European and
American women dance artists from the
1830s to the present with a focus on their
achievements as dancers, choreographers,
critics, and scholars within their social context. Views dance through feminist theoretical perspectives to address issues of power,
agency, and personal expression in ballet,
modern, jazz, and ethnic dance forms. Offered in alternate years. Also listed as WGST
62. (4 units)
67.Dance History
Survey of Western concert dance that explores the Italian and French origins of ballet
through the 20th-century emergence of
modern and jazz dance, and culminates with
the new directions of postmodern dance late
in that century. Investigates the key contributing artists, significant developments, and
overall growth of dance as a performing art
integrated into the changing society to
which it belongs. (4 units)
68.Cultures on the Move: Theatre and
Dance as Dialogue of Transition
Explores the historical circumstances of migration to the United States by populations
and cultures from West Africa and China as
well as the Cherokee nation within the United States. Focuses on how performance traditions, especially dance, functioned to
process the inevitable conflicts, struggles,
and ultimate transformations into blended
cultures. Considers the legacy and current
vitality of these cultural migrations in the
present. (4 units)
69.Walk Across California
This course will create learning experiences
that draw upon interactions with the diverse
California human and natural environments
by walking across California from San Francisco to Yosemite National Park immediately
following spring quarter. Both written and
aesthetic reflections through various art
forms will enhance students’ understanding
of human and environmental sustainability
and social injustices in contemporary society. The class will nurture a “sense of wonder” and focus on sustainability,
environmental justice, and social activism
addressed through scheduled talks with
community members including farmers, activists, teachers, park rangers, artists, shop
owners, and Native Americans. (4 units)
278 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: DANCE
129.Rehearsal and Performance
147.Advanced Modern Dance II
For course description see DANC 29. (2 units) Continuation of DANC 146. Emphasis,
through improvisation and combinations,
138.Movement for Athletes
on the temporal component of dance:
For course description see DANC 38. (2 units) rhythm, tempo, time signatures, and polyrhythms. (5 units)
140.Advanced Ballet I
Advanced level study of classical ballet with 148.Advanced Modern Dance III
focus on American and European styles. In- Continuation of DANC 146 and DANC
cludes ballet barre exercises, center adagio, 147. Focus on modern dance styles: lyrical,
and allegro combinations at intermediate/ classical, eclectic, and pedestrian. Emphasis
advanced level. (5 units)
on developing a clear, personal performance
style and movement analysis skills. (5 units)
141.Advanced Ballet II
149.Dance Outreach
Continuation of DANC 140. (5 units)
A performance of original creative student
142.Advanced Jazz Dance I
work both on and off campus as a represenBuilds from an assumed intermediate level tative of the department. Certain outreach
of jazz dance technique. Emphasis on per- venues will be coordinated with the Arrupe
sonal style and performance techniques in Center. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
advanced jazz dance combinations. This (2–5 units)
course prepares the dancer for expectations
155.Musical Theatre Dance Styles
in the professional industry. (5 units)
For course description see DANC 55. (5 units)
143.Choreography
Emphasis on the creative process, dynamics, 156.Pilates Private Instruction
phrasing, and thematic development For course description see DANC 56. (1 unit)
through choreographing and performing an
original group dance. Exploration of aesthet- 157.Dance to Go
ic and stylistic approaches to choreography. For course description see DANC 57.
Prerequisite: DANC 49 or equivalent. (2–5 units)
(5 units)
158.Pilates Mat Class
145.Advanced Jazz Dance II
For course description see DANC 58. (2 units)
Continuation of DANC 142. Emphasis on
fluency of the various styles of dance on a 159.Teaching the Performing Arts
pre-professional level. Designed for the more For course description see DANC 59. (5 units)
serious dancer. Will have the opportunity to
meet and network with industry profession- 161.Charisma
For course description see DANC 61. (2 units)
als. (5 units)
146.Advanced Modern Dance I
Intermediate/advanced level study of modern dance technique. Emphasis on release
principles, breath control, phrasing, clarity
of line, and movement qualities. Improvisation and extended combinations develop
performance commitment. (5 units)
162.African-American Dance History
For course description see DANC 62. (5 units)
166.Women in Dance History
For course description see DANC 66. (5 units)
THEATRE AND DANCE 279
169.Walk Across California
For course description see DANC 69. (5 units)
189.Social Justice and the Arts
Explores the dynamics of theatre and dance
in the context of social justice in local, national, and international settings. The course
will host visiting guest artists and include
off-campus experiences. This is a research
and discovery opportunity. May be repeated
once for credit with permission of instructor.
Note: This course requires participation in
community-based learning (CBL) experiences off campus. (5 units)
192.Senior Project: Performance
Showcases performance in dance. May be
fulfilled through performance in a department production with the required journal,
reflection and evaluation of process and
project in light of department learning goals.
May also be satisfied through a collaboratively produced performance piece following
the same guidelines. Prerequisite: Must be
supervised by a faculty advisor. (5 units)
193.Senior Project: Dance
A recital for theatre majors, with dance emphasis, showcasing their performance abilities. Prerequisite: Approval of dance faculty.
(5 units)
194.Peer Educator in Dance
Students will assist instructors in dance classes.
Prerequisite: Mandatory training workshop.
(1–2 units)
198.Dance Practicum
Reserved for projects/internships with recognized institutions outside of the University.
Prerequisite: Written proposal must be approved by the instructor and the department
chair one week prior to registration.
(1–5 units)
199.Independent Study
Various areas of directed study: creative projects in directing, choreography, technical
production, design, playwriting, administration, teaching assistants, focused participation in a special project, or directed reading
and/or research. Prerequisite: Written proposal must be approved by the instructor and
department chair one week prior to registration. (2–5 units)
280 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES PROGRAM
Professors: Laura Ellingson, Eileen Razzari Elrod
Associate Professor: Linda Garber (Director)
Assistant Professor: Sharmila Lodhia
The Women’s and Gender Studies Program brings together scholars and scholarship on
women and gender, areas that have come to occupy an increasingly important place in a
number of disciplines in the last quarter century. Areas of inquiry include the participation
of women in social and cultural production; the construction of gender and its role as a
constitutive element of social, political, economic, and legal structures; feminist theory; and
the development of ideas about femininities, masculinities, and sexualities. Gender is examined as it intersects with class, sexuality, ethnicity, disability, age, and nationality. The program organizes several public events throughout the year focused on gender issues, including
lectures, symposia, films, and informal gatherings. Many of these programs are produced in
collaboration with other academic departments, student groups, and the University’s centers of distinction.
The Women’s and Gender Studies Program provides an integrated, interdisciplinary
approach to understanding the social and cultural constructions of gender that shape the
experiences of women and men in society. The curriculum offers a solid foundation in
women’s and gender studies, facilitating graduate study and careers involving gender justice
concerns and preparing students for leadership roles in diverse workplaces and communities. Women’s and Gender Studies offers a minor and a companion major; a student must
declare a primary major in another discipline (e.g., history, biology, or English) and a second
companion major in women’s and gender studies.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling University Core Curriculum and primary major requirements,
students with a companion major in women’s and gender studies must complete the following requirements:
Ten courses, at least five of which must be upper-division:
• One of the following Principles of WGST course or sequence:
– WGST 1 and 2
– WGST 11A and 12A
– WGST 50
– WGST 51
– WGST 112/ETHN 154
– WGST 114/ETHN 157
– WGST 115/SOCI 153
– WGST 169/HIST 115S
– WGST 172/HIST 135
WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES 281
• One of the following:
– WGST 101 (Feminist Theory) (advised in the junior year)
– WGST 163/ENGL 125 (Feminist Literary Theory and Criticism) (advised in the
junior year)
• Both of the following are required:
– WGST 102/COMM 111G (Feminist Methods) (advised in the junior year)
– WGST 190 (Senior Seminar) (senior year)
• Six additional courses from among the offerings in WGST and cross-listed courses
(students cannot count their Principles course for this requirement).
• Emphasis requirement: In consultation with the director, students will develop an
area of concentration within the requirements linking at least three of the six courses
into an area of interest.
Note: Courses taken to satisfy the University Core Curriculum or primary major requirements may also count toward the major.
• Co-curricular requirement: Attend two events per year sponsored or co-sponsored
by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program and prepare a one- to two-page reflective analysis of each event, due in the program office within a week of the event.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must fulfill the following requirements for a minor in women’s and gender
studies:
Six courses, at least three of which must be upper division:
• One of the following Principles of WGST course or sequence:
– WGST 1 and 2
– WGST 11A and 12A
– WGST 50
– WGST 51
– WGST 112/ETHN 154
– WGST 114/ETHN 157
– WGST 115/SOCI 153
– WGST 169/HIST 115S
– WGST 172/HIST 135
• One of the following:
– WGST 101 (Feminist Theory) (advised in the junior year)
– WGST 163/ENGL 125 (Feminist Literary Theory and Criticism)
– WGST 102/COMM 111G (Feminist Methods) (advised in the junior year)
• The following course is required:
– WGST 190 (Senior seminar) (senior year)
282 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
• Three additional courses from among offerings in WGST and cross-listed courses
(students cannot count their Principles course for this requirement).
Note: Courses taken to satisfy the University Core Curriculum or primary major requirements may also count toward the minor.
• Co-curricular requirement: Attend two events per year sponsored or co-sponsored
by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program and prepare a one- to two-page reflective analysis of each event, due in the program office within a week of the event.
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1A. and 2A. Critical Thinking
50.Introduction to Women’s
& Writing I and II
and Gender Studies
A two-course sequence, focusing on a major Examines gender in the lives of women and
theme, featuring study and practice of aca- men, using an interdisciplinary approach to
demic discourse, with emphasis on critical analyze the effects of societal institutions and
reading and writing, composing processes, processes. Particular attention is paid to the
and rhetorical situation. The second course development and dynamics of gender inwill feature more advanced study and prac- equality; intersections of gender, race, class,
tice of academic discourse, with additional and sexuality; and the social construction of
emphasis on information literacy and skills gender. (4 units)
related to developing and organizing longer
and more complex documents. Successful 51. Introduction to LGBTQ Studies
completion of CTW I (WGST 1A) is a pre- Covers a variety of topics focusing on the
requisite for CTW 11 (WGST 2A). (4 units areas of history, media, politics, literature
and the arts, emphasizing the diverse nature
each quarter)
of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer
11A. and 12A. Cultures &
(LGBTQ) communities and issues. Course
Ideas I and II
materials address sexual identity as it interA two-course sequence focusing on a major sects with gender, class, race, ethnicity, distheme in human experience and culture over ability, and nation. (4 units)
a significant period of time. Courses emphasize either broad global interconnections or 76.Violence Against Women
the construction of Western culture in its Interdisciplinary study of U.S.-based women
global context. Courses may address ways in the context of the institutionalization of
women’s lives in diverse global regions are violence and its impact across civic life. Areas
shaped by the political, economic, and social of violence research such as campus, domesstructures that surround them; perspectives tic, sexual assault, harassment, and stalking
on representation, citizenship and rights, will be addressed in the context of the interbodies and sexuality; and other topics. Suc- sections of race, class, gender, and sexuality.
cessful completion of C&I I (WGST 11A) is (4 units)
a prerequisite for C&I II (WGST 12A).
(4 units each quarter)
WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES 283
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES
101.Feminist Theory
190.Senior Seminar
Examines historical and contemporary femi- Seminar focused on critical questions within
nist theories with the goal of understanding the interdisciplinary field of women’s and
the multiplicity of feminist frameworks for gender studies. Course will consider connecthinking about sex, gender, and oppression. tions between the field and feminist politics/
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or permis- activism in the larger community. Restricted
sion by WGST department chair. (5 units)
to seniors with a major or minor in women’s
and gender studies. (5 units)
102.Feminist Methods
Also listed as COMM 111G. For course 198.Internship
description see COMM 111G. (5 units)
Directed internship in local organizations
addressing gender and/or sexuality issues.
103. Topics in Women’s and
Open to qualified WGST majors and minors
Gender Studies
with permission of instructor. (1–5 units)
Explores a variety of current issues in
199.Directed Reading/Research
Women’s and Gender Studies. (5 units)
Independent projects undertaken by upper104. Beauty, Culture, and Society
division students with a faculty sponsor.
in a Global Age
To receive credit, the student must submit a
Explores dominant standards of beauty formal written proposal and have it apacross diverse cultures and societies. Begin- proved by the sponsoring faculty member
ning with an analysis of the historical origins and the program director. Written proposal
of the display of raced and gender bodies, must be submitted before the end of the previthis course will identify linkages between ous quarter and must meet University rebeauty and ideas about racial superiority, eu- quirements for independent study credit.
genics, hygiene, and the logics and instru- (1–5 units)
mentalities of colonialism. After situating
the analysis of bodies and beauty within a
historical context, subsequent units will examine contemporary issues such as beauty
contests, colorism, the hair trade, plastic surgery, and the beauty industrial complex.
Readings and assignments will highlight the
lived impact of hegemonic beauty ideals on
women in diverse regional contexts. (5 units)
118.Women and Law
Examines the legal status and rights of
women in the United States through an intersectional lens. Principles such as equality,
essentialism, privacy, and equal protection
will be examined as will contemporary law
and policy issues such as employment discrimination, sexual harassment, domestic
violence, rape, reproductive justice, and
family law. Also listed as POLI 171. (5 units)
284 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES
120.Middle East: Gender
155.Family, Kin, and Culture
and Sexuality
Also listed as ANTH 157. For course descripAlso listed as ANTH 187. For course descrip- tion see ANTH 157.
tion see ANTH 187.
187.Women, Gender, and Sexuality
Also listed as ANTH 170. For course description see ANTH 170.
ART AND ART HISTORY COURSES
156.Women’s Work: American Women
in the Visual Arts
Also listed as ARTH 143. For course description see ARTH 143.
CLASSICS COURSES
133.Love and Relationships
157.Gender in Antiquity
in Classical Antiquity
Also listed as CLAS 185. For course descripAlso listed as CLAS 141 and PHIL 131D. tion see CLAS 185.
For course description see CLAS 141.
COMMUNICATION COURSES
116.Race, Gender, and Public Health
140.Gender, Health, and Sexuality
in the News
Also listed as COMM 106A. For course
Also listed as COMM 164A. For course description see COMM 106A.
description see COMM 164A.
160.Vocation and Gender: Seeking
117.Race, Gender, and Politics
Meaning in Work and Life
in the News
Also listed as COMM 101A. For course
Also listed as COMM 168A. For course description see COMM 101A.
description see COMM 168A.
161.Communication and Gender
Also listed as COMM 108A. For course
description see COMM 108A.
DANCE COURSES
62.Women in Dance History
Also listed as DANC 66. For course description see DANC 66.
162.Women in Dance History
Also listed as DANC 166. For course description see DANC 166.
WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES 285
ECONOMICS COURSES
121.Gender Issues in the
Developing World
Also listed as ECON 135. For course description see ECON 135.
ENGLISH COURSES
14.African-American Literature
136.Studies in Gay and Lesbian
Cultural Studies
Also listed as ENGL 35. For course description see ENGL 35.
Also listed as ENGL 156. For course description see ENGL 156.
15.Literature by Women Writers
of Color
154.Literature and Religion: Women
Poets, Spirituality, and Justice
Also listed as ENGL 69. For course description see ENGL 69.
Also listed as ENGL 189G. See CourseAvail
for course description when listed as
16.Multicultural Literature
ENGL 189G.
of the United States
Also listed as ENGL 39 and ETHN 70. For 163.Feminist Literary
Theory and Criticism
course description see ENGL 39.
Also listed as ENGL 125. For course descrip34.U.S. Gay and Lesbian Literature
tion see ENGL 125.
Also listed as ENGL 67. For course descrip164.Studies in 19th-Century
tion see ENGL 67.
American Literature
56.Literature and Women
Also listed as ENGL 132G. See CourseAvail
Also listed as ENGL 68. For course descrip- for description when listed as ENGL 132G.
tion see ENGL 68.
165.Studies in American Fiction
110.Studies in Native American
Also listed as ENGL 135G. See CourseAvail
Literature Women Writers
for description when listed as ENGL 135G.
Also listed as ENGL 158G. See CourseAvail
for description when listed as ENGL 158G. 166.Studies in Women, Literature,
and Theory
122.Studies in Global
Also listed as ENGL 152. For course descripGay and Lesbian Cultures
tion see ENGL 152.
Also listed as ENGL 153. For course descrip167.Studies in Women and Literature
tion see ENGL 153.
Also listed as ENGL 168. For course descrip129.Studies in Caribbean Literature
tion see ENGL 168.
Also listed as ENGL 164. For course descrip186.Studies in Contemporary
tion see ENGL 164.
American Literature
134.Studies in Film, Gender, and
Also listed as ENGL 134G. For course
Sexuality
description see ENGL 134G.
Also listed as ENGL 122. For course description see ENGL 122.
286 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
ETHNIC STUDIES COURSES
111.Asian-American Women
114.Race, Gender, Class, and
the College Experience
Also listed as ETHN 141. For course description see ETHN 141.
Also listed as ETHN 157. For course description see ETHN 157.
112.Women of Color
in the United States
Also listed as ETHN 154. For course description see ETHN 154.
HISTORY COURSES
57.United States Women’s History
169.Gender, Race, and Citizenship
in the Atlantic World
Also listed as HIST 84. For course description see HIST 84.
Also listed as HIST 115S. For course description see HIST 115.
124.Sex and Gender in the
Age of High Imperialism
172.Gender and National Identity
in 20th-Century Eastern and
Also listed as HIST 116S. For course descripWestern Europe
tion see HIST 116S.
Also listed as HIST 136. For course descrip125.Women in Political Revolutions
tion see HIST 136.
Also listed as HIST 143S. For course descrip173.United States Women Since 1900
tion see HIST 143S.
Also listed as HIST 181. For course descrip126.Gender and Sexuality in East Asia
tion see HIST 181.
Also listed as HIST 150. For course descrip174.Sex and Family in
tion see HIST 150.
American History
137.History of Sexuality
Also listed as HIST 182. For course descripAlso listed as HIST 133. For course descrip- tion see HIST 182.
tion see HIST 133.
138.Gays and Lesbians in
United States History
Also listed as HIST 177. For course description see HIST 177.
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE COURSES
123.Black African/Caribbean
175.French and Francophone
Women Writers
French Novels and Films: Culture,
Gender, and Social Classes
Also listed as FREN 113. For course description see FREN 113.
Also listed as FREN 174. For course description see FREN 174.
WOMEN’S AND GENDER STUDIES 287
176.Women in French Literature:
Authors and Characters
Also listed as FREN 182. For course description see FREN 182.
179.Women in German Literature:
Authors and Characters
Also listed as GERM 182. For course description see GERM 182.
177.20th- and 21st-Century French
Women Writers
Also listed as FREN 183. For course description see FREN 183.
185.20th-Century Italian
Women Writers
Also listed as ITAL 182. For course description see ITAL 182.
178.20th-Century French Women
Writers in Translation
Also listed as FREN 184. For course description see FREN 184.
PHILOSOPHY COURSES
58.Ethics and Gender
184.Feminism and Ethics
Also listed as PHIL 4A. For course descrip- Also listed as PHIL 115. For course description see PHIL 4A.
tion see PHIL 115.
133.Love and Relationships
in Classical Antiquity
Also listed as CLAS 141 and PHIL 131D.
For course description see CLAS 141.
POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES
118.Women and Law (this topic only)
180.Women and Politics
Also listed as POLI 169D. For course descrip- Also listed as POLI 154. For course description see WGST 118.
tion see POLI 154.
127.Special Topics in
International Relations
Also listed as POLI 127. For course description see POLI 127.
PUBLIC HEALTH COURSES
33.Human Sexuality
Also listed as PHSC 28. For course description see PHSC 28.
288 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
RELIGIOUS STUDIES COURSES
46.Gender in Early Christianity
148.Gender and Sex in
Biblical Interpretation
Also listed as SCTR 26. For course description see SCTR 26.
Also listed as SCTR 165. For course description see SCTR 165.
47.Biblical Women and Power
Also listed as SCTR 39. For course descrip- 149.Feminist Theologies
tion see SCTR 39.
Also listed as TESP 131. For course description see TESP 131.
48.Women in Christian Tradition
Also listed as TESP 79. For course descrip- 151.Women’s Theologies
from the Margins
tion see TESP 79.
Also listed as TESP 175. For course descrip145.Gender and Judaism
tion see TESP 175.
Also listed as RSOC 168. For course descrip152.Mexican Popular
tion see RSOC 168.
Catholicism and Gender
146.Religion, Gender,
Also listed as ETHN 129 and RSOC 139.
and Globalization
For course description see ETHN 129 or
Also listed as RSOC 170. For course descrip- RSOC 139.
tion see RSOC 170.
153.The Bible and Empire
147.Postcolonial Perspectives
Also listed as SCTR 157. For course descripon the New Testament
tion see SCTR 157.
Also listed as SCTR 158. For course description see SCTR 158.
SOCIOLOGY COURSES
115.Race, Class, and Gender
181.Women and Men in the Workplace
in the United States
Also listed as SOCI 152. For course descripAlso listed as SOCI 153. For course descrip- tion see SOCI 152.
tion see SOCI 153.
182.Sociology of Family
128.Women and Social Change
Also listed as SOCI 157. For course descripin Latin America
tion see SOCI 157.
Also listed as SOCI 135. For course description see SOCI 135.
THEATRE COURSES
139.Gender and Performance
183.Fashion, Politics,
and Issues of Gender
Also listed as THTR 167. For course description see THTR 167.
Also listed as THTR 151. For course description see THTR 151
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 289
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND
OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY
ARABIC, ISLAMIC, AND MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES
Director: David Pinault
The interdisciplinary minor in Arabic, Islamic, and Middle Eastern Studies (AIMES)
provides an introduction to the various cultures, peoples, and religions—Muslim, Jewish,
and Christian—of the Middle East, as well as the diverse forms of Islamic practice in
Muslim societies throughout the world. This program also encourages the study of diaspora
and immigrant communities where Islamic and Middle Eastern populations constitute a
religious or ethnic minority.
Students enrolled in this minor have the opportunity to sample a variety of methodologies and academic disciplines—including anthropology, art history, literary criticism, history, political science, and religious studies—that address the Middle East in particular and
the Islamic world at large.
The AIMES interdisciplinary minor is ideal for students who want to develop the intellectual resources for thoughtful and informed engagement with current issues in the Middle
East and the Islamic world. AIMES is also well suited for students considering work with
overseas aid organizations, government and military service, international business, or graduate programs in international studies.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must complete a total of nine courses—six culture courses and three Arabic
language courses—for a minor in AIMES. Details concerning these requirements are as
follows:
Culture Courses
Students must take a total of six culture courses relating to AIMES (two lower-level and
four upper-level) from at least three different departments. No more than two courses may
be counted for AIMES credit from the department in which a student majors. A maximum
of three courses for AIMES credit may be taken from any one department.
Arabic Language
Three quarters of Arabic are required. Students with prior knowledge of a relevant language may take a test that certifies that they have fulfilled this requirement.
Senior Project
In lieu of one of the six required courses in Middle Eastern and Islamic cultures, students
may elect to do an independent study/reading course on a project in consultation with a
member of the AIMES Faculty Advisory Council. This project may entail fieldwork with
local Islamic and diaspora Middle Eastern communities in the Bay area.
Students enrolled in the AIMES minor are strongly encouraged to participate in SCUapproved study abroad programs that pertain to Arabic, Islamic, and Middle Eastern studies. Before enrolling in any such program, students should check with the director and
faculty members of the AIMES minor as well as the International Programs Office.
290 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES
ANTH 187. Middle East: Gender and Sexuality
ANTH 156. Anthropology of Muslim Peoples and Practices
ANTH 188. Middle East: Culture and Change
ART HISTORY COURSES
ARTH 24. From Damascus to Dubai: A Survey of the Visual Culture of the Middle East
ARTH 121. Venice and the Other in the Renaissance
ARTH 164. Islamic Art, 600–1350 CE
ENGLISH COURSES
ENGL 128. Studies in the Literature of the Middle Eastern and Islamic World
HISTORY COURSES
HIST 97. West Asia and the Middle East
HIST 142. Modern West Asia and North Africa
HIST 144S. Islam in Africa
HIST 145. Islam in the Modern World
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
ARAB 1. Elementary Arabic I
ARAB 2. Elementary Arabic II
ARAB 3. Elementary Arabic III
ARAB 21. Intermediate Arabic I
ARAB 22. Intermediate Arabic II
ARAB 23. Intermediate Arabic III
ARAB 50. Intermediate Arabic Conversation
ARAB 137. Arabic Culture and Identity
ARAB 199. Directed Reading
FREN 114. Literatures and Cultures of the Maghreb
FREN 173. Immigration, Race, and Identity in Contemporary France
POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES
POLI 139. Religion and Politics in the Developing World
POLI 142. Politics in the Middle East
RELIGIOUS STUDIES COURSES
RSOC 7. South Asian Religious Traditions
RSOC 19. Egyptian Religious Traditions
RSOC 81. Islam
RSOC 154. The Islamic Jesus
RSOC 182. Shia Islam in the Contemporary World
RSOC 190. Islam: Reformation and Modernity
SCTR 19. Religions of the Book
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 291
ASIAN STUDIES
Director: Gregory P. Corning
The Asian studies minor is designed to provide an introduction to the cultures and languages of Asia. Courses in several disciplines enable students to sample different dimensions
of Asian cultures as well as focus on a specific area of interest.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must complete the following requirements for a minor in Asian studies:
Culture Courses
• Two lower-division courses and four upper-division courses (maximum of two upperdivision courses from a student’s major and three in any one department) selected
from the list of approved courses
•Culture courses include approved offerings in disciplines including art history,
history, political science, and religious studies
Language Courses
• Completion of the third course of the first-year, college-level sequence in an Asian
language (Japanese and Chinese are offered) or demonstration of an equivalent
level of proficiency by passing a language proficiency examination supervised by the
Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
• Non-native speakers of English may satisfy this requirement by presenting professionally recognized documentation of proficiency in an Asian language
Field Project
• A field project approved by the program director
Students are encouraged to ask instructors in Asian studies courses about Arrupe placements or other ways they might complete a field project as part of a course. The program
director can also help students design projects that suit their interests and means.
The Asian Studies Program strongly urges its students to spend a summer, quarter,
or year in one of the many University-approved study abroad programs in Asia. Many of
these programs offer internship or volunteer opportunities that satisfy the field project
requirement.
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES: ASIAN STUDIES
ASIA 199. Directed Reading/
consult with the program director to deterDirected Research
mine the applicability of these courses, as well
Note: In addition to the courses listed below, as study abroad courses, to the minor.
many departments offer occasional special
topics, directed reading, and seminar courses
on Asian studies topics. Students should
292 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
ART HISTORY COURSES
ARTH 11A. Cultures & Ideas I (East meets West in Visual Culture II)
ARTH 12A. Cultures & Ideas II (East meets West in Visual Culture II)
ARTH 26. Buddhas, Buildings, and Beauties: Theme and Style in Asian Art
ARTH 160. East-West Encounters in the Visual Arts
ARTH 161. Photography in Japan
ARTH 162. Visual Culture of Modern Japan
ARTH 163. The Japanese Print
COMMUNICATION COURSES
COMM 189. Communication, Citizenship, and Globalization in Asia
HISTORY COURSES
HIST 11A. Cultures & Ideas I (Across the Pacific I)
HIST 12A. Cultures & Ideas II (Across the Pacific II)
HIST 55. Introduction to Southeast Asia
HIST 92. Modern East Asia
HIST 93. Introduction to the History of South Asia and the Indian Ocean
HIST 146A. Medieval and Early Modern Japan
HIST 146B. Modern Japan in the World
HIST 147A. Premodern China in the World to AD 1600
HIST 147B. Modern China in the World, 17th Century to Present Day
HIST 148. China and the Chinese Diaspora
HIST 150. Gender and Sexuality in East Asia
HIST 151. Imperialism in East Asia
HIST 152. History of Christianity in China
HIST 154. Modern India
HIST 159. Special Topics in Asian History
HIST 195S. Seminar in Asian History
HIST 197. Senior Project
HIST 199. Directed Reading/Directed Research
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES COURSES
CHIN 1–3. Elementary Chinese I, II, III
CHIN 21–23. Intermediate Chinese I, II, III
CHIN 100–102. Advanced Chinese I, II, III
CHIN 127. Chinese History and Culture
CHIN 137. Modern Chinese Culture
CHIN 194. Peer Educator in Chinese
CHIN 197. Special Topics
CHIN 198. Directed Study
CHIN 199. Directed Reading
JAPN 1–3. Elementary Japanese I, II, III
JAPN 21–23. Intermediate Japanese I, II, III
JAPN 100–102. Advanced Japanese I, II, III
JAPN 113–115. Readings in Japanese I, II, III
JAPN 137. Japanese Culture
JAPN 194. Peer Educator In Japanese
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 293
JAPN 198. Directed Study
JAPN 199. Directed Reading
POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES
POLI 3. Introduction to World Politics
POLI 122. East Asian International Relations
POLI 139. Religion and Politics in the Developing World
POLI 148. Politics in China
POLI 196. Seminar in International Relations: East Asia and the World Economy
POLI 199. Directed Reading
RELIGIOUS STUDIES COURSES
RSOC 7. South Asian Religious Traditions
RSOC 10. Asian Religious Traditions
RSOC 85. Hinduism
RSOC 86. Buddhism
RSOC 87. Buddhism and Film
RSOC 88. Chinese Religions
RSOC 106. Zen in Theory and Practice
RSOC 115. Tibetan Buddhism: A Cultural History
RSOC 130. East Asian Buddhism
RSOC 199. Directed Reading and Research
BIOTECHNOLOGY
Director: David Hess
Biotechnology is revolutionizing the practice of medicine and agriculture and is having
an impact on fields as diverse as human reproduction, forensics, manufacturing, and pollution control. The minor in biotechnology is designed for students interested in gaining
insight into the scientific background of biotechnology, exploring its potential for the
future, and obtaining practical experience in laboratory techniques used in biotechnology
research and its applications. This course of study is most useful for students contemplating
careers in the biotechnology industry and students who plan to pursue advanced degrees in
related areas such as molecular biology, cell biology, or biochemistry. The minor will be
most easily completed by students majoring in biology, public health science, or chemistry
and biochemistry; other majors should consult with their advisors and begin the course
of study as early as possible in order to complete the requirements in a timely manner.
Twelve courses are required for the minor, at least seven of which must have laboratory
components.
In addition to coursework, students are required to complete a research internship at a
biotechnology company, a research institute, or an academic laboratory focusing on an area
relevant to biotechnology (i.e., cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics,
microbiology, or genomics). Internships must be approved in advance by the director. The
minimum length of the internship is 10 weeks of full-time work or 400 hours total time if
done on a part-time basis. Students must prepare a written report on the project upon
completion to be evaluated by the director.
294 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must complete the following requirements for a minor in biotechnology:
Scientific Foundations of Biotechnology
• BIOL 21, 24, 25, 175
• CHEM 11, 12, 31, 32
Ethical Issues
• BIOL 171
Advanced Laboratory Skills
• BIOL 176, 177, or CHEM 143
Contemporary Topics in Biotechnology and Related Fields
• BIOL 189
One Elective Course
• BIOL 110, 113, 174, or CHEM 141
CATHOLIC STUDIES
Director: Michael C. McCarthy, S.J.
The minor in Catholic studies, open to students from all departments, is an interdisciplinary program for the study of the intellectual tradition of the Catholic faith. The minor
is designed for intensive study of Catholicism as a faith embedded in many cultures and for
the critical retrieval of the Catholic intellectual tradition through dialogue with contemporary thought under the rubrics of a variety of academic disciplines. Catholic studies minors
are assigned a faculty mentor who guides them through the program. In conjunction with
the Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education, the Catholic Studies program sponsors intellectual, cultural, social, and religious opportunities for both students and faculty.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must complete the following requirements for a minor in Catholic studies:
Foundational Courses
• Two courses in Catholic theology from offerings in the Department of Religious Studies
• One approved course from the Cultures & Ideas series (or equivalent)
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 295
Faith and Culture Courses
• One specialized course in Catholic history
• One course in Catholic literature
• One specialized course in philosophy or an upper-division course in theology
• Two approved elective courses in the study of Catholic societies or cultures
The Colloquium
During sophomore, junior, and senior years, students may participate in a 2-unit interdisciplinary colloquium. The colloquium meets one quarter each year for discussion of a
range of relevant topics pertinent to the Catholic intellectual tradition. The colloquium is
open to all Santa Clara students, but first priority is given to Catholic studies minors.
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
Director: Susan M. Popko
Students who pursue the international studies minor may examine global themes, trends
in globalization or intercultural communication, or use the minor to add a global dimension or context to their major. The minor offers students the opportunity to pursue one of
two emphases: (1) the Global Thematic emphasis in which students concentrate their
coursework on themes related to international or cross-cultural studies, or (2) the Area
Studies emphasis in which students concentrate their coursework on selected geographic
areas (Africa, Europe, or Latin America).
The Global Thematic emphasis offers students the opportunity to examine broad international issues that transcend a single nation or geographic area. In the Global Thematic
emphasis, the student has the opportunity to focus on a topic such as poverty and development, global health, international law, international human rights, peace and conflict resolution, cross-cultural communication, international social justice in the arts, technology
and globalization, the global dimensions of natural and physical sciences, diplomacy, gender
and society, etc. Such subjects require systematic approaches distinct from the examination
of single-nation or area studies. Some of the most compelling Global Thematic emphasis
topics in recent years have included international law, global issues of sustainability, international women’s rights, and community arts in the global context.
The Area Studies emphasis may include a focus on Africa, Europe, or Latin America.
The Area Studies emphasis offers an interdisciplinary introduction to the cultures, languages, politics, and global challenges facing the region. The Area Studies emphasis with a
focus on Africa also includes study of the African diaspora and related issues of slavery,
colonialism, and globalization.
296 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
For the minor in international studies, students must complete the equivalent of four
foundation courses, a capstone course, plus an emphasis courses in either global thematic or
area studies as follows:
Foundation Courses
• Foreign Language: Two upper-division courses in a foreign language related to the
chosen Global Thematic or Area Studies emphasis or the equivalent, as demonstrated
through successful examination through the Department of Modern Languages and
Literatures
• Social Science: Two relevant courses in anthropology, communication, political
science, or sociology; one of which must be ANTH 3, COMM 107A, POLI 2, POLI
25, SOCI 133, or SOCI 134
Capstone Course
A minimum of 20 contact hours in a class, academic internship, or community-based
learning experience abroad. The course must include academic oversight and assessment.
This requirement may be fulfilled by a minimum of one quarter study abroad related to the
chosen Area Studies or Global Thematic emphasis. Students should communicate with the
associate provost for International Programs to request approval for alternative capstone
courses.
Global Thematic Emphasis Courses
In addition to the foundation courses, students pursuing the Global Thematic emphasis
must complete three courses, at least two of which must be upper division and no more
than one of which may be in the student’s academic major. Students develop their own
theme and present a detailed proposal to the International Studies Committee for approval
usually no later than the first quarter of their junior year. Students planning to incorporate
academic work from a study abroad program should obtain approval prior to departure.
Area Studies Emphasis Courses
In addition to the foundation courses, students pursuing the Area Studies emphasis must
complete three courses, at least two of which must be upper division and no more than one
of which may be in the student’s academic major. Other courses may be approved with the
permission of the associate provost for International Programs.
• Area Studies—Africa: ECON 134, 135; ENGL 35, 130, 157, 164, 165, 166;
HIST 104, 107, 141, 142, 143, 144, 149, 157, 193; FREN 111, 112, 113; POLI
146; RSOC 19, 22L, 46, 81, 170, 191; TESP 131, 184
• Area Studies—Europe: COMM 199 (appropriate topic only); ENGL 149, 155,
168; 131, 132, 134, 136, 139, 192; FREN 108, 110, 111, 116, 170, 171, 172, 182,
183; GERM 110, 111, 150, 151, 160, 182, 183; INTL 110, 119; ITAL 113, 180,
182; SPAN 125, 150, 151; PHIL 119,129, 133, 144, 145; POLI 119, 132, 133,
134, 143, 144, 145
• Area Studies—Latin America: ANTH 185, HIST 64, 161, 162, 163, 164, 169,
196; POLI 124, 136, 136A, 137, 140, 196; SOCI 134, 135; SPAN 112, 130, 131,
135, 140, 141, 145, 146, 148
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 297
LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
Director: Alma M. Garcia
The interdisciplinary minor in Latin American Studies (LAS) provides students with
an understanding of the culture, society, and history of the nations of the Spanish- and
Portuguese-speaking peoples in Latin America. The minor provides breadth and depth in
the study of Latin America. It requires two foundational courses that offer an overall view
of the major historical periods in Latin America, and offers specialized courses dealing with
specific countries or themes. The minor prepares students to understand the connections
between Latin America and Latin American immigrant communities in the United States
and other parts of the world, and helps students gain an understanding of discipline specific
or interdisciplinary research methods and the analytical tools to investigate and analyze
issues in Latin America. The minor serves as a foundation for graduate studies in Latin
America Studies and other disciplines including anthropology, history, political science, and
sociology. It provides an innovative opportunity for students seeking careers in business,
government, international marketing, law, and nonprofit organizations.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must complete the following requirements for a minor in Latin American studies: seven courses, with at least four upper-division courses from at least three departments.
No more than two courses can be from the department in which a student majors. Two of
the required courses are foundational courses that provide students with a comprehensive
understanding of Latin America as a world region. Each of the foundation courses covers a
major historical period.
Foundational Course I
Serves as an introduction to Latin American culture and civilization from the Native
American experiences, through the Spanish Conquest, to the independence of Latin
American nations. Note: The director may add new courses that fulfill this requirement.
Students must select one of the following courses:
• ANTH 185. Peoples of Latin America
• ANTH 186. Mesoamerican Prehistory
• HIST 166. Latin America: Empires
• SPAN 130. Survey of Latin American Literature I
Foundational Course II
Serves as an introduction to Latin American culture and civilization by focusing on the
formation in the 19th century of nation states and the forces shaping 20th and 21st century
experiences. Note: The director may add new courses that fulfill this requirement.
Students must select one of the following courses:
• HIST 95. Introduction to the History of Modern Latin America
• POLI 137. Politics in South America
• SPAN 131. Survey of Latin American Literature II
• SPAN 137. Latin American Cultures and Civilizations
298 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Language Requirement
Successful completion of SPAN 100 or 101, or equivalent Spanish or Portuguese language
proficiency demonstrated by passing an examination given by the Department of Modern
Languages and Literatures, or successful completion of one upper-division course in Latin
American literature and culture taught in Spanish. Note: SPAN 100 and 101 do not count
towards the seven required courses for the LAS minor.
Electives
Four electives (at least three of which must be upper-division) selected from three different departments. Only two electives can be from a student’s major. In lieu of one of the
electives, juniors and seniors can design an independent study with the approval of the
director of Latin American Studies and an affiliated faculty member. The courses that may
be used to fulfill this requirement are:
ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES
ANTH 184. Religion and Culture in Latin America
ANTH 185. Peoples of Latin America
ANTH 186. Mesoamerican Prehistory
ANTH 189. Ancient North America
ART HISTORY COURSES
ARTH 152. Arts of Ancient Mexico: From Olmec to Aztec
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
ENVS 141. Environmental Biology in the Tropics
ENVS 144. Natural History of Baja
ENVS 146. Agriculture, Environment, and Development: Latin America
HISTORY COURSES
HIST 64. Central America
HIST 95. Introduction to the History of Modern Latin America
HIST 161. Modern Mexico
HIST 162. Argentina
HIST 163. Cuba and the Caribbean
HIST 164. Seminar: The Catholic Church in Latin America
HIST 166. Latin America: Empires
HIST 169. Special Topics in Latin American History
HIST 196. Seminar in Latin American History
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 299
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES COURSES
SPAN 112. Mexican Culture
SPAN 113. The Revolution in Mexican Culture
SPAN 130. Survey of Latin American Literature I
SPAN 131. Survey of Latin American Literature II
SPAN 135. Colloquium: Latin American Literature and Culture
SPAN 136. Contemporary Latin American Short Story
SPAN 137. Latin American Cultures and Civilizations
SPAN 140. Modern Latin American Literature I
SPAN 141. Modern Latin American Literature II
SPAN 145. Mid-20th-Century Latin American Literature
SPAN 147. Cinema and the Novel in Contemporary Latin America
SPAN 148. 20th-Century Latin American Women Writers
SPAN 149. C
ontacts, Clashes, Border Crossings: Hybridity and Liminality in Latin
American Cinema
POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES
POLI 136. Politics in Central America and the Caribbean
POLI 136A. The Political Structures and Processes in El Salvador and Central America
POLI 137. Politics in South America
RELIGIOUS STUDIES COURSES
RSOC 33. Maya Spirituality
RSOC 136. Religion in Latin America
RSOC 139. Mexican Popular Catholicism and Gender
TESP 60. Hispanic Popular Religion
TESP 65. U.S. Hispanic Theology
TESP 109. Hispanic Spirituality: Guadalupe
TESP 111. Latin American Liberation Theology
TESP 165. Romero and the Salvadoran Martyrs
SOCIOLOGY COURSES
SOCI 135. Women and Social Change in Latin America
LATINOS LIVING OUTSIDE OF LATIN AMERICA REQUIREMENT
Students are required to complete one of the following courses.
Note: This requirement can also be fulfilled with a seminar/senior thesis course or an
independent study course. The director may add new courses that fulfill this requirement.
300 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
ENGL 36. Chicano Literature
ENGL 140. Studies in Chicano Literature
ETHN 20. Introduction to Latina/o Studies
ETHN 112. Native Peoples of the United States and Mexico
ETHN 120. Mexican Immigration to the United States
ETHN 121. Chicana/Chicano Families and Gender Roles
ETHN 122. Chicana/Chicano Communities
ETHN 125. Latinas/os in the United States
ETHN 126. Latina/o Immigrant Detention and Incorporation in the Age of Terrorism
RSOC 12. Latinos and Lived Religion in the United States
SPAN 133. Mexican American Literature
TESP 60. Hispanic Popular Religion
TESP 65. U.S. Hispanic Theology
TESP 109. Hispanic Spirituality: Guadalupe
RSOC 139. Mexican Popular Catholicism and Gender
THTR 14. Chicana/o and Native American Theatre
Students are strongly encouraged to focus on Latin American/Latino peoples and cultures for the experiential learning requirement in the new Core Curriculum. Students are
encouraged to participate in a study abroad program in Latin America. Courses taken in
these programs may be accepted as requirements for the minor. Students must meet with
the director of the Latin American Studies program before enrolling in Latin American
study abroad programs.
MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES
Director: Phyllis Brown
The minor in Medieval and Renaissance studies offers students from all departments a
cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary program of study in Europe’s Middle Ages and
Renaissance. These periods lay on the edge of modernity, when the distinctive characteristics of the contemporary world began to form and when major new connections were made
between Europe and Africa, the Middle East, East Asia, and the Americas. Study of these
periods from many different points of view affords an opportunity to gain valuable perspectives on the ways that Medieval and Renaissance persons, events, and institutions helped to
shape the modern world. Completion of the minor is noted on the student’s transcript, and
students receive a certificate acknowledging their accomplishment.
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 301
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must complete the following requirements for a minor in Medieval and
Renaissance studies:
• Seven courses selected from three different departments with a maximum of three
lower-division courses
• One of the upper-division courses must require an interdisciplinary research paper
based on source materials and secondary works dealing with a topic rooted in the
Medieval and/or Renaissance periods. The research paper requirement may be fulfilled by enrolling in MRST 199 under the supervision of an affiliated faculty member and the program director.
•The study of French, German, Greek, Italian, Latin, and/or Spanish is strongly
recommended but not required. Students should consult with the program director to
determine the cluster of courses best suited to their personal interests and preparation.
MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES COURSES
199.Independent Study
Directed reading and research in source materials and secondary works dealing with selected problems rooted in the Medieval and/
or Renaissance periods, culminating in an
interdisciplinary paper. Prerequisite: Permission of program director and instructor.
(2–5 units)
Note: In addition to the courses listed below, certain sections of Cultures & Ideas 11A and
12A may be applied to the minor. Many departments offer occasional special topics, directed
reading/directed research, and seminar courses on Medieval and Renaissance topics. Students
should consult with the program director to determine the applicability of these, as well as of
courses taken at other institutions or while studying abroad, to the minor.
ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES
ANTH 146. Anthropological Perspectives on Colonial California
ART HISTORY COURSES
ARTH 22. Introduction to the Arts of Early Modern Europe
ARTH 110. Early Christian and Byzantine Art
ARTH 114. Early Medieval Art
ARTH 120. 15th-Century Florentine Art
ARTH 121. Venice and the Other in the Renaissance
ARTH 122. The Art of Early Modern Rome
ARTH 128. 17th-Century Italian Painting and Sculpture
ARTH 164. Islamic Art, 600–1350 CE
CLASSICS COURSES
CLAS 135. Medieval Latin
302 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
ENGLISH COURSES
ENGL 41. Survey of English Literature I
ENGL 54. Shakespeare
ENGL 116. Shakespeare’s Tragedies
ENGL 117. Shakespeare’s Comedies
ENGL 118. Shakespeare Studies
ENGL 141. Studies in Medieval Literature
ENGL 142. Chaucer
ENGL 143. Studies in Renaissance Literature
ENGL 190. Senior Seminars (on Medieval and Renaissance topics)
HISTORY COURSES
HIST 91. Africa in World History
HIST 104. World History until 1492
HIST 117. State and Church in the Middle Ages, 1000–1450
HIST 118. Representation, Rights, and Democracy, 1050–1792
HIST 126. Conflicts in Medieval Christianity
HIST 127. The World of St. Francis
HIST 146A. Medieval and Early Modern Japan
HIST 147A. Premodern China in the World to AD 1600
HIST 166. Latin America: Empires
MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES COURSES
FREN 115. Major Works of French Literature I
FREN 120. Moyen Age
FREN 130. Humanism and the Renaissance
ITAL 110. Italian Civilization I
ITAL 120. Survey of Italian Literature I
ITAL 130. Dante, La Divina Commedia I
ITAL 131. Dante, La Divina Commedia II
ITAL 140. Duecento, Trecento
ITAL 150. Quattrocento, Cinquecento (Rinascimento)
SPAN 120. Major Works of Spanish Literature I
SPAN 122. The Spanish Picaresque Novel
SPAN 123. Siglo de Oro Drama
SPAN 130. Survey of Latin American Literature I
SPAN 165. Cervantes: Don Quijote
MUSIC COURSES
MUSC 190. Music of the Middle Ages
MUSC 191. Music of the Renaissance
MUSC 42/142. Concert Choir (Performance)
MUSC 43/143. Chamber Singers (Performance)
PHILOSOPHY COURSES
PHIL 132. Medieval Philosophy
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 303
RELIGIOUS STUDIES COURSES
SCTR 26 NEW Gender in Early Christianity
SCTR 65. Early Christianity
TESP 79. Women in Christian Tradition
TESP 82. Witches, Saints, and Heretics: Religious Outsiders
TESP 118. Clare of Assisi and Ignatius of Loyola
TESP 143. Theology and Ethics of Thomas Aquinas
THEATRE COURSES
THTR 112. Special Topics in Theatre and Drama
THTR 113. Special Topics in Theatre and Drama (Seminar)
THTR 116. Shakespeare’s Tragedies
THTR 117. Shakespeare’s Comedies
THTR 118. Shakespeare Studies
THTR 120. Acting Styles I: Shakespeare
WOMEN AND GENDER STUDIES
WGST 48. Gender in Early Christianity
MUSICAL THEATRE
Director: Barbara Murray
The musical theatre minor offers experience and training in music, theatre, and dance as
well as aspects of the visual arts and literature. Musical theatre is prominent in America as
art, entertainment, social commentary, and civic engagement; it therefore plays a part in
Jesuit education of the whole person for the service of others. The objectives of this program
include entry-level proficiency for a career in performance, enhancement in teaching, or
further training in graduate school; audition techniques; performance of acting, singing,
and theatrical dance; and knowledge of the cultural history and various forms of musical
theatre. The student may pursue and declare one of two tracks: American musical theatre or
lyric theatre (opera/operetta).
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
• Theory: MUSC 1 and 1A
• Singing: MUSC 34 and three quarters of on-campus private voice instruction
• Acting: THTR 24, 123
• Dance: DANC 40 and 43 for American track; DANC 40 and 46 (or higher level
dependent upon proficiency) for lyric theatre track
• Students in American theatre option: DANC 55 or 155, THTR 165 and 80 or 180
• Students in lyric theatre option: MUSC 109, 153, and 194
304 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
PRE-HEALTH SCIENCES
Advisor: Steven L. Fedder
Santa Clara University has an excellent reputation for preparing students for careers in
the health sciences. Most incoming students tend to be focused on either allopathic medicine or dentistry, but a much broader spectrum of careers can be equally or more attractive
including osteopathic medicine, physical therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physician assistant,
nurse practitioner, public health professional, and others. A Santa Clara education provides
ample opportunity to acquire the academic foundations in natural science required by medical schools, and its broad liberal arts Core Curriculum also serves to develop the communication, personal interaction, and analytical skills needed both during medical school and
in one’s subsequent medical practice.
Although Santa Clara does not have a pre-med major, the courses prescribed by the
Council of Education of the American Medical Association can be incorporated into several
academic majors.
Most medical schools require:
• One year of general chemistry (CHEM 11, 12, and 13)
• One year of organic chemistry (CHEM 31, 32, and 33)
• One year of biology (BIOL 21, 24, and 25)
• One year of physics (PHYS 11, 12, and 13 or PHYS 31, 32, and 33)
• One year of mathematics, typically calculus (MATH 11 and 12), and a statistics
course
In addition, many students become more skilled and competitive by enrolling in two or
three upper-division science courses, often but not exclusively in biochemistry, genetics, and
human physiology, which are helpful in preparing for the Medical College Admission Test
(MCAT). The combination of Core Curriculum requirements with the University’s focus
on community involvement and issues of diversity will prepare students well for the newly
revised MCAT 2015, with its greater emphasis on social, economic, and psychological
determinants of health. The choice of academic major is much less important than completing the coursework above; however, many pre-health students select a natural science
major such as biology, biochemistry, chemistry, or public health science. Students should
thoroughly examine the Pre-Health Advising website at www.scu.edu/cas/prehealth, and
should maintain regular contact with the pre-health sciences advisor throughout their
undergraduate years for assistance with adjusting to college academic rigor and social life;
developing an appreciation of the wide array of available health care careers; achieving a
balance between academics, social life, work, health community volunteering, and internships; selecting the relevant entrance examinations; and applying to graduate health science
programs.
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 305
PRE-LAW
Advisors: Brian Buckley, Lawrence Nelson, Terri Peretti, Diana Morlang,
Melissa Donegan
Santa Clara University provides a wide range of opportunities for undergraduates to build
a strong pre-law foundation. Early in their undergraduate program, pre-law students should
consult not only with their major advisor but also with one of the designated pre-law advisors.
Consultation with a pre-law advisor familiarizes the student with the rigors of law school, the
practice of law, the burden of law school debt, and the means to best secure employment as
an attorney. Advisors will help formulate a program to prepare students for the complexity of
the application process, including preparation for the Law School Admission Test (LSAT).
There is no specific major or curriculum required to qualify for law school admission. Successful law school applicants come from a diversity of majors such as anthropology, philosophy, communication, political science, physics, English, history, biology, and economics.
However, to successfully prepare for the LSAT, students are advised to select courses that
deepen reading comprehension and promote logical reasoning. Law school admissions officers generally recommend undergraduate preparation by selecting a major that demands discipline, analytical ability, research skills, close reading of texts, creativity, verbal skills, and
precision in written and oral work. The departments of Philosophy and Political Science offer
a pre-law emphasis within the major (in philosophy, it is also available within the minor).
Elective courses also provide valuable training and breadth of academic and analytical experience. Some elective courses strengthen specific abilities, while others provide perspective on
legal issues and topics. Possible electives include, but are not limited to, the following:
COMMUNICATION COURSES
COMM 20. Public Speaking
COMM 170A. Communication Law
ECONOMICS COURSES
ECON 126. Economics and Law
ENGLISH COURSES
ENGL 174. Nonfiction Writing
ENGL 177. Argumentation
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES COURSES
ENVS 120. Introduction to Environmental Law and Regulation in the United States
ENVS 122. Environmental Politics and Policy
PHILOSOPHY COURSES
PHIL 10. Ethical Issues in the Law
PHIL 25. Informal Logic
PHIL 111. Bioethics and the Law
PHIL 113. Ethics and Constitutional Law
PHIL 119. Special Topics in Applied Ethics: The Moral and Legal Status
of Prenatal Humans
PHIL 154. Philosophy of Law
306 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES
POLI 45. Criminal Justice System
POLI 125. International Law
POLI 159. The Constitution and Liberty
POLI 160. The Constitution and Equality
POLI 161. Law and Politics in the United States
PSYCHOLOGY COURSES
PSYC 155. Psychology and Law
SOCIOLOGY COURSES
SOCI 159. Sociology of Crime
SOCI 160. Sociology of Law
SOCI 161. Sociology of Criminal Justice Systems
THEATRE COURSES
THTR 8. Acting for Nonmajors
THTR 21. Voice I: Voice, Speech, and Presentation Skills
PRE-TEACHING
Director: Carol Ann Gittens
Santa Clara University is accredited by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing to offer professional preparation for prospective elementary school, middle school,
and senior high school teachers. The Department of Education in the School of Education
and Counseling Psychology offers graduate programs for the multiple-subject credential for
elementary grades and the single-subject credential for secondary grades, both with a crosscultural language and academic development emphasis. The teaching credential program at
SCU is combined with a Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree. Students interested in
teaching should consider completing an interdisciplinary minor in urban education offered
through the College of Arts and Sciences.
The Future Teachers Project (FTP), formerly known as the Eastside Future Teachers
Project, works with students from traditionally underrepresented groups throughout Silicon
Valley and the greater Bay Area, who are interested in becoming teachers. Through innovative outreach and support programs, the goal is to develop leaders who will make an immediate impact on their communities. FTP scholars are generally recruited during high school
and once at SCU, are considered for the FTP scholarship, which contributes to undergraduate studies and the credential/MAT program. The FTP is managed through the
Liberal Studies Program.
Preparation for Multiple-Subject Credential
Students interested in a career in elementary school teaching should fulfill the requirements of the liberal studies major with a pre-teaching emphasis in the College of Arts and
Sciences. Those requirements can be found in Chapter 3, College of Arts and Sciences.
Students must demonstrate the subject matter competency component for the multiplesubject credential by passing the California Subject Examination for Teachers (CSET) for
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 307
Multiple Subjects. While students may sit for the examination whether or not they majored
in liberal studies, both the examination and the liberal studies degree requirements are
closely aligned with the state of California’s elementary curriculum framework. Therefore,
Santa Clara strongly recommends that students interested in being elementary school teachers major in liberal studies. An undergraduate minor in urban education is recommended
for those students electing not to complete the liberal studies major. Students must also
demonstrate basic educational skills by completing the Writing Skills exam that can be
added to the CSET or by passing the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST).
Preparation for Single-Subject Credential
Students interested in a career in secondary school teaching in a particular subject matter
area should fulfill the requirements of the academic major of their intended teaching specialization. California teaching credentials are available in the following subject areas: agriculture, art, biological sciences, business, chemistry, English, geosciences, health science,
home economics, industrial and technology education, mathematics, music, physical education, physics, general sciences, social science, world language (English language development), and world languages other than English. Students must demonstrate specific subject
matter competency by passing the CSET in the subject area they desire to teach. Completing an undergraduate major in this subject area is not required but it is highly recommended. An undergraduate minor in urban education is also recommended. Students must
also demonstrate basic educational skills by passing the CBEST.
Selected California state credential coursework or examination requirements may be
waived by successful completion of one or more specific undergraduate courses on the provisions and principles of the United States Constitution, such as POLI 1, HIST 96A, or
HIST 96B.
Requirements for Multiple-Subject and Single-Subject Credentials
The minimum requirements for the multiple-subject or single-subject teaching credential
include:
• A bachelor’s degree in a subject area from an accredited institution
• Demonstrated knowledge of the United States Constitution by completion of undergraduate coursework or passage of an approved examination
•Demonstrated basic educational skills (see sections above for specific program
requirements)
•Completion of an approved program of professional education, including field
experience achieved through student teaching or internship
• Completion of a state-approved subject matter preparation program or passage of the
CSET, a subject-area competency examination, in the area one plans to teach
•For multiple-subject credential candidates only: Demonstrated knowledge of the
various methods of teaching reading by passing the Reading Instruction Competence
Assessment (RICA) examination
308 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
Fifth-Year Teaching Credential Program
The multiple-subject or single-subject teaching credential can be completed as part of
the Masters of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program. This program requires a fifth year of study
following the bachelor’s degree and qualifies the student for a preliminary teaching credential. The MAT program includes graduate coursework in educational foundations, curriculum design, teaching methods, and supervised student teaching. Students seeking additional
information regarding the MAT program with a multiple-subject or single-subject teaching
credential should contact the Graduate Department of Education in the School of Education and Counseling Psychology.
URBAN EDUCATION
Director: Carol Ann Gittens
The interdisciplinary minor in urban education provides Santa Clara undergraduate
students seeking to become elementary or secondary teachers with the basics in educational
theory, urban school observation and reflective experiences, Constitutional history of the
United States, and the sociological and psychological foundations of education. The urban
education minor has two distinctive components. First, the minor contains foundational
courses necessary for a career in education. Second, the minor focuses on societal problems
such as poverty, crime, and prejudice, and how these issues impact today’s youth and families. Through the urban education minor, students will critically evaluate the modern social
challenges facing teachers and policymakers who struggle daily with how to strengthen the
educational experience for children. This minor is recommended for students from diverse
majors who are interested in careers that involve working directly with children and families
from multicultural and multifaceted backgrounds. Students majoring in liberal studies may
not minor in urban education.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students must complete the following requirements for a minor in urban education:
• POLI 1 or HIST 96A or HIST 96B
• LBST 70, 106, 138, 198A/B
• PSYC 134
• PSYC 185 or PSYC 172
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINORS AND OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 309
GERONTOLOGY CERTIFICATE PROGRAM
Director: Patricia M. Simone
Gerontology is the study of adults over 65 and of the aging process. Majors from any
field may enhance their credentials and their ability to work with this population through
the gerontology certificate program. Students examine influences on the roles and quality of
life of aged adults as well as physical and psychological aspects of aging. Courses investigate
perceptions about aging and aged adults in various societies and how the experiences of
older people differ according to culture, ethnicity, class, and gender. Students complete a
practicum that gives them experience working with aged adults. Completion of the gerontology certificate program is noted on a student’s transcript and with a certificate acknowledging their achievement.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CERTIFICATE
Students must complete the following requirements to receive a certificate in
gerontology:
• One lower-division course from the following: SOCI 1 (Introduction to Sociology),
ANTH 3 (Introduction to Anthropology), PSYC 1 or PSYC 2 (Introduction to
­Psychology), or PHSC 21 (Health and Aging).
•Four upper-division courses from the following (one must be ANTH 172 or
PSYC 196): ANTH 172 (Anthropology of Aging), PSYC 196 (Psychology of Aging),
PSYC 117 (Health Psychology), PSYC 119 (Death and Dying), SOCI 172 (Management of Health Care Organizations), SOCI 138 (Populations of India, China, and
the U.S.), SOCI 148 (Stakeholder Diversity in Contemporary American Organizations), TESP 157 (Ethics in Health Professions), or any gerontology-related course
with approval of the director
•A gerontology-related practicum approved by the director (typically completed
during your senior year)
4
Leavey School of Business
Dean: Caryn Beck-Dudley
Senior Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Business Programs: Jo-Anne Shibles
The Leavey School of Business offers professional business education within the larger
context of academic excellence in the Jesuit educational tradition. The school provides
undergraduate students with both the technical skills necessary for success in business and
the ethical, global, and humanistic perspectives that are hallmarks of a liberal arts education.
The undergraduate program strives for a mix of theory and practice and emphasizes the
development of leadership skills.
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES
The Leavey School of Business confers the degree of bachelor of science in commerce
with majors in accounting, accounting and information systems, economics, finance, management, marketing, and management information systems. The school also offers a minor
in management information systems and interdisciplinary minors in entrepreneurship,
international business, and retail studies.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE
To qualify for the degree of bachelor of science in commerce, students must complete a
minimum of 175 quarter-units of credit (of which at least 60 must be in upper-division
courses) and satisfy the requirements of the Undergraduate Core Curriculum, the Leavey
School of Business curriculum, and the departmental major.
The School of Business strictly enforces prerequisites. Having all students come into
courses with the same requisite knowledge and skills ensures equity, a common starting
point, and is intended to increase the likelihood of student success. Prerequisite requirements must be successfully completed or in progress prior to enrollment in the course that
requires the prerequisite.
Undergraduate Core Curriculum
Critical Thinking & Writing
• Critical Thinking & Writing 1 and 2 from list of approved courses
Cultures & Ideas
• Cultures & Ideas 1 and 2 from list of approved courses
• Cultures & Ideas 3 with MGMT 80 when the course is taken on the SCU campus.
When MGMT 80 is not taken on the SCU campus, students choose from a list of
approved courses.
310
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 311
Second Language
Native English-speaking students fulfill this requirement in one of three ways:
• Successful completion of the second course of the first-year, college-level sequence in
a classical or modern foreign language
• Demonstration of an equivalent level of proficiency by passing a language proficiency
examination supervised by the departments of Classics or Modern Languages and
Literatures
• Obtaining a minimum score of 4 on the Advanced Placement Examination in a
classical or modern foreign language
• International Baccalaureate and International A level exams
Students for whom English is not their native language may satisfy this requirement by
submitting a petition to the chair of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
and the director of the Core Curriculum with professionally recognized documentation of
proficiency in a language other than English. Such documentation includes but is not limited
to a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) examination score of 213 computerized
or 550 paper and pencil examination.
Mathematics
Two mathematics courses:
• MATH 30 and 31 or MATH 11 and 12
Most business students take the calculus for business courses: MATH 30 and 31.
Students who plan to take additional math should consider taking the calculus and analytic
geometry courses: MATH 11 and 12.
Religion, Theology & Culture
• Religion, Theology & Culture 1 from list of approved courses
• Religion, Theology & Culture 2 from list of approved courses
• Religion, Theology & Culture 3 from list of approved courses
Ethics
• One business ethics course: MGMT 6 or PHIL 6
Civic Engagement
• MGMT 162 and MGMT 6 or PHIL 6
Diversity
• One course from list of approved courses
Arts
• One course from list of approved courses
Social Science
• ECON 1
312 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Natural Science (with lab)
• One course from list of approved courses
Science, Technology, and Society
• OMIS 34
Students who are considering a major in accounting should take ACTG 134 to satisfy
the Science, Technology, and Society requirement.
Students who declare a major or a minor in management information systems will take
OMIS 30 or OMIS 31, which will satisfy the information systems requirement in the
business core, and may choose a course to satisfy Science, Technology, and Society from the
list of approved courses.
Experiential Learning for Social Justice
• One course from list of approved courses
Advanced Writing
• BUSN 179
Pathways
• At least 16 units (usually four courses) from list of approved courses in one Pathway
of the student’s choice
Leavey School of Business Core Curriculum: Lower Division
Introduction to Business
Two courses:
• BUSN 70 (to be completed as a first-year student unless you are an internal or external
transfer student)
• OMIS 15 or 17
Business Law
• BUSN 85
Economics
Three courses:
• ECON 1, 2, and 3
Accounting
Two courses:
• ACTG 11 and 12
Students should take ACTG 11 in the fall or winter quarter of their sophomore year and
ACTG 12 in the subsequent winter or spring quarter.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 313
Data Analysis
Two courses:
• OMIS 40 and 41 or OMIS 40 and ECON 41 and 42 (for economics majors)
Information Systems
• OMIS 34
Students who are considering a major in accounting should take ACTG 134 to satisfy
the information systems requirement.
Students who declare a major or a minor in management information systems will take
OMIS 30 or OMIS 31, which will satisfy the information systems requirement in the
business core, and must choose a course to satisfy Science, Technology, and Society from the
list of approved courses.
Leavey School of Business Core Curriculum: Upper Division
Common Core of Knowledge
Four courses:
• FNCE 121
• MGMT 160
• MKTG 181
• OMIS 108
Capstone Course
One course (to be taken during the senior year):
• MGMT 162
MINORS IN THE LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Departmental Minors
The Department of Operations Management and Information Systems offers a minor
in management information systems, and the Department of Economics offers a minor in
economics through the College of Arts and Sciences. Descriptions of these two minors and
associated requirements can be found in the respective department sections of this chapter.
Interdisciplinary Minors
The Leavey School of Business administers three interdisciplinary minors open to
business students and nonbusiness students: entrepreneurship, international business, and
retail studies. Descriptions of these minors and associated requirements can be found in the
Interdisciplinary Minors section at the end of this chapter.
314 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
GENERAL BUSINESS COURSES
70.Contemporary Business Issues
and immerses students into the region’s natAn introduction to the nature, forms, and ural and social environments via day-long
objectives of the contemporary business firm weekend excursions. Assignments include
and its relation to the environment in which keeping a weekly journal, weekly readings,
small and large group discussions, writing a
it operates. (4 units)
short paper, and a group project. Prerequi71.Foundations of Leadership
sites: Business, engineering, or Pathways stuPresents an introduction to specific practices dent in one of the following Pathways:
of effective leadership through a series of Leading People, Organizations, and Social
speakers, directed readings, and reflective Change; Food, Hunger, Poverty, and Enviwriting assignments. Prerequisite: First-year ronment; or Sustainability. (2 units)
or sophomore business student. (2 units)
133. CLASP Alaska Immersion Trip:
Climate Change and Renewable
72.Business Leadership Skills
Energy
Designed to continue learning from BUSN
This
course
is designed to provide students
71 by focusing on leadership skills specific to
a business environment. Course integrates with a sustainability-focused immersion exgroup discussion, selected readings, experi- perience in the business environment of reential learning, and reflective engagement newable energy. Alaska provides a unique
experiences. Prerequisites: BUSN 71 and opportunity to witness the effects of climate
first-year or sophomore business student. change and examine the tension that exists
in energy acquisition from fossil fuels and/or
(2 units)
renewable sources. Santa Clara University
85. Business Law
has partnered with the city of Galena and
This course is designed to give the student Hero Projects to provide undergraduate stuan overview of the primary substantive areas dents an opportunity to work with villagers
affecting business transactions including the in Alaska to bring renewable energy solulaw of contracts, torts, employment, and tions to rural communities. Students will
crimes. It is intended to make the student return to SCU having conducted a feasibiliaware of fundamental legal principles and ty study/market analysis, gather data to
their application in the business context. begin innovating for social benefit, be exPrerequisites: BUSN 70 and completion of posed to a marginalized culture and environ45 units, or permission of instructor. (4 units) ment, and gain an understanding of the
relationship between cultural traditions, eco132. Contemplative Leadership and
nomic developments, producing sustainable
Sustainability Program (CLASP)
energy in a rural setting, and caring for the
This course is designed to provide students environment. Successful completion of the
opportunities to learn and rehearse contem- course and the immersion trip qualifies for
plative leadership practices and explore the ELSJ credit. (2 units)
relationship between personal values, business, and sustainability. CLASP introduces 145.Entrepreneurship Practicum
students to issues of sustainability in indus- An opportunity for select students to apply
try, provides face-to-face encounters with their entrepreneurial skills in emerging comprofessionals and companies/organizations panies through a structured placement in a
already “doing the work” of sustainability, Silicon Valley internship. (2–5 units)
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 315
150.Feeding the World
In this course, students examine the global
system for the production and distribution
of food, assess the ability of the system to satisfy the human demand for food, and evaluate the impact of the system on the natural
environment. Students will employ tools
from statistics, operations, and economics to
describe, analyze, and forecast imbalances
between food supply and food demand.
Through a term project, students use their
new skills to examine the food system in a
developing nation experiencing chronic
hunger. (5 units)
151A. and B. Food, Hunger, Poverty,
Environment Immersion
This course is designed to help students
meet their social justice-oriented experiential
learning requirements while learning about
issues related to food production and consumption, hunger, poverty, and the environment. The course blends short lectures,
guided discussions and reflections, and a 12to 14-day immersion in a selected country
interacting with local people of diverse backgrounds for experiential active learning. The
goal is to increase students’ understanding of
the role of business in the developing world
and to explore the role of business in alleviating poverty through economic development
and the pursuit of social justice. Both quarters are required to participate in the immersion program. (1 unit spring, 2 units fall)
170.Contemporary Business
for Nonmajors
This course is specifically designed for upper-division (junior and senior), nonbusiness majors who are interested in learning
about business firms and their relation to
both the global and local environment in
which they operate. Course will use a business simulation as a key learning method, in
addition to lectures and small group discussion. This course is not open to students who
have completed BUSN 70. Prerequisite:
Must have completed 87.5 units or more.
(5 units)
173.Leadership Experience
This course is designed to provide an opportunity to reflect upon formative leadership
experiences and develop an authentic leadership identity based upon core values and
strengths. To guide reflection, the course incorporates a variety of assessment instruments, group discussions, guest speakers,
readings, and personal writing assignments.
Students are challenged to analyze and reflect upon their leadership experiences, listen
to and learn from the leadership experiences
of others, write and share their personal leadership story, identify their unique areas of
leadership competency and strength, and
craft a personal vision of leadership to strive
for after graduation. Prerequisites: A business
major with junior or senior standing.
(2 units)
179. Communication in Business
Students will learn to communicate effectively in a business context, including producing quantitative and qualitative analyses
and evaluations; and creating professional
multimedia projects, proposals, and presentations. Students will also develop skills in
formal and informal business writing and
discourse (briefings, reports, letters, emails,
news briefs, memos, interviews, social
media, infographics, etc.). The course will
culminate in the design, development, and
delivery of a group project that bridges
SCU’s mission with the needs of a Silicon
Valley organization, presented to an internal
and external panel of industry experts. Prerequisites: CTW 1 & 2 and OMIS 40. Must
have completed at least 60 units. (5 units)
316 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
180. Presentations in Business
This course is an advanced seminar designed
to explore presentation techniques that
shape business environments. A central purpose of the class is to cultivate professional
presentation skills expected in the global
workplace while recognizing how behavior,
both informal and formal, can reflect on career development. Thus, through various
communication media and platforms, such
as pitch-the-product exercises, tele-presence
presentations, and small group podcasts, this
class will build effective and real world business presentation skills. Prerequisite: BUSN
179, ENG 179, or ENG 183. (5 units)
182. Global Experience Practicum
Opportunity for business students to study
global business issues in specific countries or
regions around the world. The practicum
includes selected readings, several special lectures on topics related to the target country
or region, and an in-country learning session, typically two weeks after the end of
spring quarter. Each practicum is led by a
Leavey School of Business faculty member,
who travels with the students to the country
to lead integration sessions, guide discussions, and generally enhance the student’s
learning experience. (2 units)
188.Field Studies: NPI Small Business
Improvement Project
The purpose of this course is to engage undergraduate business students in further development of the Neighborhood Prosperity
Initiative (NPI) through direct engagement
with a local neighborhood. Students will be
involved in conducting an analysis of a local
business or organization to assist in developing a partnership for the economic well-being of the community. The purpose of this
partnership is to provide opportunities for
undergraduate business students to contribute to the economic growth and well-being
of a local neighborhood in a sustained
(multi-year) and ethical way that promotes
student learning and positive benefit for the
community partner(s). Course fulfills the
ELSJ Core requirement. Note: This course
requires participation in community-based
learning (CBL) experiences off campus.
(2 units)
189.Low Income Tax Clinic (LITC):
Ethics and Practice of Offers in
Compromise (OIC)
This course is designed to develop and refine
students problem-solving skills, and cultivate practical wisdom through the application of legal doctrine and theory to the
dynamics of individual client interaction.
Students will gain experience in the tax practice and procedure involved in personal income tax collections. The focus of the LITC
is to provide students with the skills necessary to exercise professional judgment in the
representation of real clients. Throughout
the course, students will be expected to critically analyze the facts of their client’s case,
apply relevant legal theory and doctrine in
client interviewing and counseling, communicate effectively, orally and in writing, and
exercise professional judgment. Prerequisites:
ACTG 11, junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
195A. and B. The Global Fellow
Experience
This course is designed for students involved
in the Global Fellows program. The introductory course introduces students to the
macro issues and challenges faced by the underserved populations of the world and provides a context for evaluating the global costs
of injustice. Through the framework of business and organizational operations, students
develop the tools to evaluate best practices as
applied to living a civic life. Students will be
exposed to academic research, guest speakers, interactive exercises, and readings in
preparation for their summer fellowship,
where the course learning will be applied to
a work experience. The reflection course segment is designed for students who spent
time during the summer as Global Fellows.
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMMERCE 317
The primary goal of the course is to allow
each student to reflect upon their experience
and deepen their lessons learned. The secondary goal is to have the Global Fellows
share their experience with the SCU community, thus bringing awareness of global
issues to a wider audience. In certain cases, the
reflection segment course will fulfill the core requirement for ELSJ. Must be a Global Fellows
participant. (2 units for each course segment)
196.Leadership Practicum
Opportunity for business students to obtain
advanced experience in leading, facilitating,
directing, evaluating, and advising within a
Leavey School of Business school-wide or
interdisciplinary project, class, or initiative.
This practicum generally includes selected
readings, reflective engagement activity, personal leadership assessment, and writing assignments. Requires approval of the assistant
dean. (1–5 units)
197A/B.Business/Engineering Project
Collaboration
This practicum gives business students an
opportunity to work with senior-level engineering students on engineering design projects. This is an excellent opportunity for
cross-functional learning in a team environment and for business students to practice
the activities they learned in previous business school courses. This practicum provides
exposure to technology and valuable experience in product development, innovation,
and entrepreneurship. The student will perform a business analysis of the project and
assist in producing a business plan, which
may involve assessing the project for commercialization, defining and characterizing
the market, and exploring any intellectual
property issues. Must be a Leavey School of
Business junior or senior to enroll. (2 units
per quarter: winter and spring quarters)
198.Internship/Practicum
Opportunity for upper-division students—
typically involved with school-wide or interdisciplinary programs, projects, or
initiatives—to work and study in or with
for-profit and nonprofit organizations. This
practicum generally includes selected readings, a reflective engagement activity, and a
written report. Requires approval of the assistant dean or dean. May be included as fulfilling a requirement for a major only with
permission of that department chair.
(1–5 units)
318 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
CENTERS, INSTITUTES, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Accelerated Cooperative Education Program
The Accelerated Cooperative Education (ACE) program offers a unique, challenging,
and rewarding experience for business students. Participants receive a program of workshops
designed to build, strengthen, and enhance their professional development and leadership
skills, introductions to ACE business partner companies for a paid summer internship,
mentoring by senior executives, and fast-track admission to the Santa Clara MBA program.
Students are selected into this program through an application process.
Leavey Scholars Program
The Leavey Scholars Program offers special opportunities for undergraduate business
students who have established a record of excellence in their Santa Clara studies. Leavey
Scholars are invited to enroll in honors sections of selected business courses that are especially
rigorous and academically challenging. Successful completion of the program warrants the
designation “Leavey Scholar” on the student’s transcript.
Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship
The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship (CIE) provides networking, educational, and advisory services for members of the Santa Clara University community and
drives entrepreneurship curricula through the moderation of the Entrepreneurship Leadership Team. The CIE coordinates the minor in entrepreneurship and the Undergraduate
Entrepreneurship Program, which offers students the opportunity to develop their knowledge, skills, and experience in entrepreneurship through curricular and co-curricular activities. The program features internship opportunities at Silicon Valley startups and offers a
variety of events and enrichment activities including a speaker series, partnerships on campus, and Global Entrepreneurship Week. In addition, the CIE provides students with business plan review and coaching both on an ad-hoc basis and also through its quarterly Office
Hours for Entrepreneurs series, networking mixers, field trips, and Silicon Valley event
attendance opportunities. The annual Outstanding Student Entrepreneur Award is given at
the end of the year and recognizes the graduating student who has made the greatest contribution to the entrepreneurship program. The CIE also serves as sponsoring advisors of the
Santa Clara Entrepreneur Organization (SCEO), a student club that provides a forum for
learning outside the classroom. The CIE Advisory Board includes distinguished alumni
entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, venture attorneys and accountants, corporate executives,
and the deans of the schools of business, engineering, and law, and the college of arts and
sciences.
Food and Agribusiness Institute
The Food and Agribusiness Institute (FAI) offers undergraduate and graduate courses on
topics related to the food industry. At the undergraduate level, the FAI sponsors the Food,
Hunger, Poverty, and Environment Pathway. At the graduate level, the FAI sponsors a specialization in food and agribusiness for students pursuing the MBA degree. Enrichment
programs offer students the opportunity to enhance their educational experience through
internships, field trips, and a mentor program. The immersion and field experiences organized by the FAI expose students to the rich diversity of the food industry through domestic
and international travel. The FAI also hosts events, lectures, food industry research, conferences, and programs for the campus and for the food and agribusiness community.
CENTERS, INSTITUTES, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS 319
Retail Management Institute
The Retail Studies Program offered by the Retail Management Institute is an interdisciplinary minor open to all undergraduates. The minor provides students with a strong business background for a leadership role in the retail industry in fields such as buying and
planning, e-commerce, Internet marketing, store management, global sourcing, and information technology. The institute facilitates internships with retail organizations and mentoring
sessions for students with industry leaders. It brings leading executives to speak at campus
events about cutting edge issues that impact consumers, retailers, and society at large.
Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative
Launched in January 2012, the Leavey School of Business Neighborhood Prosperity
Initiative (NPI) provides opportunities for students to contribute to and learn from businesses, individuals, and organizations in low-income neighborhoods in the San Jose area
about issues of economic prosperity. NPI is part of SCU’s larger place-based initiative, the
SCU Thriving Neighbors Initiative, which actively promotes strategic ties between Santa
Clara University and the Greater Washington Community of San Jose in order to advance
the prosperity and education of both SCU students and neighborhood students as whole
persons in whole communities. The primary components of NPI are the Field Studies
course (BUSN 188) and the NPI Fellows program, which places students in paid internships in local nonprofit organizations during winter and spring quarters.
320 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
DEPARTMENT OF ACCOUNTING
Professors: Yongtae Kim (Department Chair), Susan Parker
Associate Professors: Michael Calegari, Michael J. Eames (Robert and Barbara McCullough
Professor), Haidan Li, Siqi Li, Suzanne M. Luttman, Jane A. Ou, James F. Sepe,
Neal L. Ushman
The Department of Accounting strives to provide high-quality accounting instruction,
conduct research that contributes to the understanding of accounting issues, and provide
superior service to students and alumni, the profession, the University, and the business
community. In addition to the major in accounting, the Accounting and Operations
Management and Information Systems departments offer a joint major in accounting and
information systems.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJORS
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum and Leavey School of Business
requirements for the bachelor of science in commerce, students majoring in accounting or
accounting and information systems must complete the following departmental
requirements:
Major in Accounting
• ACTG 20, 130, 131, 132, 134, 135, 136, and 138
Note: Accounting majors may use ACTG 134 to satisfy both the information systems
requirement in the Leavey School of Business curriculum and the Science, Technology & Society
requirement in the 2009 University Core.
Major in Accounting and Information Systems
• ACTG 20, 130, 131, 132, 135, 136, and 138
• OMIS 30 or 31
• OMIS 105, 106, and 150
• One course from OMIS 107, 111, 113, 135, 137
Accounting and information systems majors may use either OMIS 30 or 31 to satisfy
the information systems requirement in the Leavey School of Business curriculum.
ACCOUNTING 321
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
5. Personal Financial Planning
12.Introduction to
Managerial Accounting
Overview of the tools and information necessary for personal business decision making. Introduction to the role of financial inforIncludes analysis of financial services, credit mation in the decision making of business
and borrowing, taxes, compensation plan- managers. The objective is to investigate the
ning, consumer purchases, housing deci- use of business data in typical managerial
sions, the time value of money, savings, and functions such as planning, control, and
investments. (4 units)
making operational decisions. Prerequisite:
ACTG 11. (4 units)
11.Introduction to
Financial Accounting
20.Recording Financial Transactions
Overview of the role of financial informa- Insight into the basic principles and metion in economic decision making. Includes chanics behind the preparation of financial
topics such as the dissemination of account- statements. Focus is on the accounting
ing information and its impact on capital
markets, and the analysis of corporate an- model, accrual versus cash accounting, and
nual reports. Coverage of financial state- the accounting processing cycle. Prerequiments and their use in determining sites: ACTG 11 and must have 70 completed
profitability and the financial condition of a units or department’s permission prior to enbusiness entity. Prerequisites: Must be a sec- rollment. Course may not be taken before
ond-year student and have completed BUSN spring quarter of the sophomore year. For fall
70 or 170. Seniors who have not completed and winter enrollment, students must be conBUSN 70 may take this class with department currently enrolled in ACTG 130. (2 units)
permission on a space-available basis. (4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
130.Intermediate Financial
131.Intermediate Financial
Accounting I
Accounting II
An in-depth study of the concepts underly- Intensive analysis of generally accepted acing external financial reporting, along with counting principles as applied to accounting
expanded coverage of basic financial state- for liabilities, stockholders’ equity, and the
ments. Detailed analysis of the measurement statement of cash flows. Accounting for
and reporting of current assets, operational ­income taxes, pensions, leases, and the reassets, and investments, including the treat- porting of corporate earnings per share.
ment of related revenues and expenses. Sig- ­Prerequisite: Open to business majors only.
nificant attention is given to income ACTG 130. (5 units)
statement presentation and revenue recogni- 132.Advanced Financial Accounting
tion. Prerequisites: Open to business majors The main subject is accounting for business
only. ACTG 12 and 20 and must have 96 combinations, and the consolidation of ficompleted units or department’s permission nancial statements of a parent company and
prior to enrollment. (ACTG 20 may be taken its subsidiaries. A broad spectrum of financial
concurrently.) (5 units)
reporting issues in the context of consolidated financial statements is examined. The
course also covers partnership accounting
and other advanced financial accounting
topics. Prerequisite: Open to business majors
only. ACTG 131. (5 units)
322 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
134.Accounting Information Systems
Introduction to procedures by which accounting data is captured, processed, and
communicated in computerized information systems. The course describes the ways
that accounting information systems are designed, used, and maintained by accounting
professionals with an emphasis on the internal controls over such systems. Prerequisites:
Open to business majors only. ACTG 11 and
12 (may be taken concurrently). (5 units)
135.Auditing
Introduction to the basic concepts of auditing. Discussion of applicable regulations, the
audit risk model, and client risk assessment.
Focus is on an overview of the audit process.
Auditors’ professional and ethical responsibilities, sampling, and historical cases will
also be discussed. Prerequisite: Open to business majors only. ACTG 131. (ACTG 131
may be taken concurrently.) (5 units)
136.Cost Accounting
Analysis of cost accounting with a strategic
emphasis. Selected topics include process
costing, activity-based costing, variance
analysis, joint cost allocations, and the Theory of Constraints. Prerequisite: Open to
business majors only. ACTG 130. (5 units)
138.Tax Planning and
Business Decisions
A basic introduction to the tax treatment of
transactions and events affecting both individuals and businesses and the conceptual
framework underlying taxation. Includes issues of importance for successful tax planning with an emphasis on income and
expense recognition, individual taxation,
and property transactions. Assumes no prior
knowledge of the tax law. Prerequisites: Open
to business majors only. ACTG 11 and 12
(may be taken concurrently). (5 units)
140.Government and
Nonprofit Accounting
Accounting and reporting requirements
used by government and not-for-profit
(NPO) entities. For governmental accounting, the class focuses on the categorization of
the major government fund types and the
terminology associated with Governmental
Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Generally Accepted Accounting Principles
(GAAP). For NPO accounting, the class focuses on the provisions of FAS 116 and FAS
117. Recommended for students taking the
Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Exam.
Prerequisites: Open to business majors only.
ACTG 131. (3 units)
142. Business Law for Accountants
Legal theory and mechanisms designed to
facilitate commercial transactions within our
society. Areas covered include those dealing
with integral aspects of business transactions: business organizations; contract and
sales law; commercial paper; and secured
transactions. Recommended for students taking the CPA Exam. Prerequisite: ACTG
131. Restricted to junior- and senior-declared
accounting majors. (5 units)
143.International Financial Reporting
Standards and FASB Updates
An in-depth study of the major differences
that exist between International Financial
Reporting Standards and U.S. GAAP. The
course will also provide an update for students
on the content of Financial Accounting
Standards Board (FASB) pronouncements
that have been issued in the prior year. Prerequisites: Open to business majors only.
ACTG 130 and 131. (3 units)
ACCOUNTING 323
144. Accounting Ethics
This course is designed with a particular
focus on the roles and ethical responsibilities
of the accounting, auditing, and tax professions; ethical behavior by management; and
the legal guidelines that address behavior in
a business setting. Prerequisites: Open to
business majors only. ACTG 11 and 12, and
either PHIL 6 or MGMT 6. (5 units)
151.Financial Statement Analysis
Provides a framework for analyzing financial
statements and develops skills useful in evaluating company performance, liquidity, solvency, and valuation in the context of the
company’s strategy and competitive environment from a user perspective. Prerequisites:
Open to business majors only. ACTG 11 and
FNCE 121 or 121S. (5 units)
148.Taxation of Business Entities
An advanced tax course covering the income
tax treatment of transactions involving various types of business entities. Topics include
the taxation of corporate entities (both C
and S corporations) as well as partnerships.
Addresses tax issues related to estates and
trusts. Includes calculation of current and
deferred taxes and the study of common tax
issues arising in multinational transactions.
Prerequisites: Open to business majors only.
ACTG 131 and 138. (5 units)
152.International Accounting
and Financial Reporting
Understanding similarities and differences in
financial reporting practices globally is vital
for all organizations involved in international business. The course takes a user perspective to international financial reporting. It
examines economic and social factors that
affect financial reporting practices, classifies
global patterns in financial reporting, and
studies the effect of the diversity in financial
reporting on corporate investment and financing decisions. Technical issues covered
include accounting for foreign currency
transactions, accounting for the effects of inflation, international transfer pricing, and
international financial statement analysis.
Prerequisites: Open to business majors only.
ACTG 130 and MGMT 80. (5 units)
150. Financial Fraud:
Detection and Investigation
Forensic accounting deals with the application of accounting methods to legal problems, and comprises investigative accounting
and litigation support activities. Investigative
accounting (usually referred to as fraud accounting) refers to the role of the accountant
in determining the existence and extent of
asset misappropriation and/or financial
statement fraud. Litigation support activities
include those professional services provided
by accountants to attorneys in support of
civil or criminal litigation. In addition to examining both aspects of forensic accounting,
the legal system and the role of the forensic
accountant as an expert witness will be discussed. Prerequisite: Open to business majors
only. ACTG 131. (5 units)
161.Junior Contemporary
Business Seminar Series I
A series of seminars covering topics pertinent to those pursuing a professional accounting career. Students are required to
attend sessions with the course instructor,
attend seminars sponsored by the Department of Accounting, or choose additional
acceptable seminars and presentations offered throughout the University. Prerequisites: Open to accounting and accounting and
information systems majors only. ACTG 12
and 20. (ACTG 20 may be taken concurrently.) (2 units)
324 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
162.Junior Contemporary
Seminar Series II
A series of seminars covering topics pertinent to those pursuing a professional accounting career. Students are required to
attend sessions with the course instructor,
attend seminars sponsored by the Department of Accounting, or choose additional
acceptable seminars and presentations offered throughout the University. Prerequisites: Open to accounting and accounting and
information systems majors only. ACTG 12
and 20. (ACTG 20 may be taken concurrently.) (2 units)
171.Senior Contemporary
Business Seminar Series I
A series of seminars covering topics pertinent to those pursuing a professional accounting career. Students are required to
attend sessions with the course instructor,
attend seminars sponsored by the Department of Accounting, or choose additional
acceptable seminars and presentations offered throughout the University. Prerequisite: Open only to senior-declared accounting
and accounting and information systems
­majors. (2 units)
172.Senior Contemporary
Business Seminar Series II
A series of seminars covering topics pertinent to those pursuing a professional accounting career. Students are required to
attend sessions with the course instructor,
attend seminars sponsored by the Department of Accounting, or choose additional
acceptable seminars and presentations offered throughout the University. Prerequisite: Open only to senior-declared accounting
and accounting and information systems
­majors. (2 units)
191.Peer Educator in Accounting
Work closely with the department to help
students in core accounting classes, understand course material, think more deeply
about the material, and feel less anxious
about testing situations. Prerequisites: Declared
accounting major and permission of instructor and chair required prior to enrollment.
(1 or 2 units)
194.Accounting Case Analysis
A practicum in which students form teams,
research accounting issues, present the results of their research, and explain their research recommendations before a panel of
judges. This course may be repeated for
credit. Prerequisite: Enrollment is by permission of the department chair. (1 or 2 units)
197.Special Topics in Accounting
Offered occasionally to introduce new topics
not covered by existing electives. Consult
quarterly schedule of classes for description.
Prerequisite: ACTG 131. (2–5 units)
198.Accounting Internship
Opportunity for upper-division students to
work in local accounting or corporate firms.
Two written reports and the employer’s evaluation of the student’s work will be required.
This course may be repeated for credit
­depending on nature of assignment. Prerequisites: Declared accounting major and permission of instructor and chair. (2–5 units
per quarter, up to a maximum of 10 units)
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research
Independent projects undertaken by upperdivision students with a faculty sponsor.
­Prerequisites: Declared accounting major
and permission of instructor and chair.
(1–5 units)
ECONOMICS 325
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
Professors Emeriti: Henry G. Demmert, Thomas Russell, Thaddeus J. Whalen Jr.
Professors: Mario L. Belotti (W.M. Keck Foundation Professor), Alexander J. Field
(Michel and Mary Orradre Professor), John M. Heineke, Kris J. Mitchener
(Robert and Susan Finocchio Professor), William A. Sundstrom
Associate Professors: Linda Kamas (Department Chair), Michael Kevane, Serguei Maliar,
Helen Popper, Dongsoo Shin
Assistant Professors: Christian Helmers, John Ifcher, Thuy Lan Nguyen,
Gonçalo Alves Pina, Teny Shapiro
Lecturer: Adina Ardelean
As one of the social sciences, economics studies how the choices we make as individuals—
as consumers and producers, as savers and investors, as managers and employees, as citizens
and voters—combine to determine how society uses its scarce resources to produce and
distribute goods and services. This practical discipline provides insights into important
issues such as the determinants of wealth and poverty; unemployment, inflation, international trade, and economic growth; and success and failure in the marketplace. The rigorous, systematic analysis that the study of economics brings to bear on these and other
real-world issues provides excellent preparation for careers in both the private and the public
sectors, as well as for graduate study in economics, business, public policy, and law. Economics
graduates pursue varied careers in business, law, banking and finance, government service,
education, and private consulting. Students considering graduate study in economics leading
to a master’s or doctoral degree are strongly encouraged to meet with their advisor as early
as possible to plan an appropriate course of study.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum and Leavey School of Business
requirements for the bachelor of science in commerce degree, students majoring in economics
must complete the following departmental requirements:
• ECON 41 and 42 (satisfies OMIS 41 requirement in the Leavey School of Business
core)
• ECON 113, 114, 115, and 181 or 182
• Three upper-division economics electives, at least two of which must be completed
after ECON 113 and 115
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MINOR
Students with a minor in economics through the College of Arts and Sciences must
complete the following requirements:
• ECON 1, 2, 3, 113 , and 115
• Two additional upper-division economics courses
• MATH 11 or 30
326 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS CONCENTRATION
Economics majors desiring a concentration in mathematical economics must complete
the following requirements in addition to the regular requirements for the major:
• All of the following courses: MATH 11, 12, 13, 14, 22, 53 (MATH 122 and 123
strongly recommended)
• Three out of the following courses: ECON 170, 171, 172, or 174 (these courses also
count as electives required for the major)
Note: Students completing the mathematical economics concentration take MATH 11 and
12 instead of MATH 30 and 31.
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
1. Principles of Microeconomics
3H. International Economics,
Development, and Growth
Introduction to microeconomics and its applications to business decisions and public Honors section. Analysis of international
policy. Topics include supply, demand, and trade theory and policy, balance-of-paythe coordinating role of prices in a market ments adjustments and exchange-rate reeconomy; the behavior of business firms, in- gimes, and economic development. Must be
cluding output and pricing decisions; com- in the University Honors or Leavey Scholars
petition and monopoly; government policies Program, or have permission of instructor.
and regulations affecting markets. (4 units)
Prerequisite: ECON 2. (4 units)
1E. Principles of Microeconomics
Special section of ECON 1 emphasizing environmental applications of economics. Introduction to microeconomics and its
applications to business decisions and public
policy. Topics include supply, demand, and
the coordinating role of prices in a market
economy; the behavior of business firms, including output and pricing decisions; competition and monopoly; government policies
and regulations affecting markets. (4 units)
2. Principles of Macroeconomics
Determinants of national income and product in the long run and short run; inflation,
unemployment, and business cycles; monetary and fiscal policies; and economic
growth. Prerequisite: ECON 1. (4 units)
3. International Economics,
Development, and Growth
Analysis of international trade theory and
policy, balance-of-payments adjustments
and exchange-rate regimes, and economic
development. Prerequisite: ECON 2. (4 units)
41.Data Analysis and Econometrics
Introduction to statistical methods for analyzing economic data. Emphasis on applications of multiple regression and establishing
causality in observational data. Prerequisites:
ECON 1 and 2, MATH 11 or 30, and
MATH 8 or OMIS 40 or equivalent; Economics majors only, or by permission of instructor. Must enroll simultaneously in
ECON 42. (4 units)
42.Data Analysis Applications
Hands-on course in obtaining and analyzing
data using statistical software. Prerequisites:
ECON 1 and 2, MATH 11 or 30, and
MATH 8 or OMIS 40 or equivalent;
­Economics majors only, or by permission of
instructor. Must enroll simultaneously in
ECON 41. (2 units)
ECONOMICS 327
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
Prerequisites: Unless otherwise noted, ECON 120.Economics of the Public Sector
1, 2, and 3 are required for all upper-division Microeconomic analysis of the role of goveconomics courses.
ernment in the market economy. Supply of
public goods and services, government’s role
101.Resources, Food,
in controlling externalities and regulating
and the Environment
private industry, and the economics of the
Exploration of the relationship among food political process. (5 units)
production, resource use, and the environment. Topics include biotechnology, the 122.Money and Banking
green revolution, resource depletion, envi- Theoretical, institutional, and historical apronmental degradation, and food safety. proach to the study of money and banking,
­Prerequisites: None. (5 units)
with particular emphasis on the relationship
between the monetary and banking system
111.Economics of the Environment
and the rest of the economy. (5 units)
Economic analysis of environmental issues
and government policies for environmental 126.Economics and Law
protection. Applications to important envi- Economic analysis of law and legal instituronmental issues, such as global climate tions focusing on the common law areas of
change, water and air pollution, hazardous property, contracts, and torts. (5 units)
wastes, biodiversity, and endangered species.
129.Economic Development
Prerequisite: ECON 1. (5 units)
Causes and consequences of economic
113.Intermediate Microeconomics I
growth and poverty in less developed counTheory of rational individual choice and its tries; analysis of the role of government poliapplications to decision making, consumer cies in economic development. (5 units)
demand, and social welfare; economics of
uncertainty and information. Additional 134.African Economic Development
prerequisite: MATH 11 or 30. (5 units)
Examination of the economic development
of sub-Saharan African countries, with par114.Intermediate Microeconomics II
ticular emphasis on the relationships beTheory of the firm; determination of price tween economic growth and their social,
and quantity by profit-maximizing firms political, and economic structures. (5 units)
under different market structures; strategic
behavior; general equilibrium; market fail- 135.Gender Issues in the
Developing World
ure and government policies. Additional
prerequisite: ECON 113, MATH 11 or 30. Explores the gendered nature of poverty in
(5 units)
the developing world, with special focus on
sub-Saharan Africa, using applied statistical
115.Intermediate Macroeconomics
analysis, and economic theory. Also listed
Macroeconomic analysis, emphasizing mod- as WGST 121. Additional prerequisite:
ern economic models for explaining output, ECON 41and 42 or OMIS 41 or permission
employment, and inflation in the short and of instructor. (5 units)
long run. Macroeconomic policymaking,
including fiscal and monetary policy.
­Additional prerequisite: MATH 11 or 30.
(5 units)
328 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
136.20th-Century Economic History
The development of the U.S. economy during the 20th century. Topics include the
causes and consequences of economic
growth, the Great Depression, the rise of
government regulation, the changing role of
women in the workforce, and the increasing
internationalization of markets during the
postwar period. Additional prerequisite:
ECON 115. (5 units)
137.World Economic History
Development of Western and non-Western
economies since the late 19th century. Topics include globalization and economic integration, convergence and divergence in
economic growth across countries, international monetary systems, and the impact of
alternative policies and institutional regimes
on economic performance. (5 units)
138.History of Economic Thought
Origins and evolution of economic ideas in
their historical and philosophical context.
Emphasis on the theories of Adam Smith,
David Ricardo, and Karl Marx, as well as the
emergence of modern microeconomics and
macroeconomics in the 19th and 20th
­centuries. (5 units)
139.American Economic History
Study of growth and institutional change in
the U.S. economy since colonial times. Topics include early industrialization, the economics of slavery, and the rise of large
business enterprises and labor unions.
(5 units)
150.Labor Economics
Study of labor productivity, incomes and
employment, and how these are affected by
labor organizations and labor legislation.
Additional prerequisites: ECON 113 and
OMIS 41 or ECON 41 and 42. (5 units)
160.The Economics of Poverty
and Inequality
Examines theories and evidence regarding
poverty and economic inequality in the
United States. Evaluates alternative public
policies aimed at combating poverty.
(5 units)
165. Economics and Justice
Study of theories of economic justice with
applications to economic issues and policy.
Alternative theories to be considered include
utilitarian, libertarian, welfare-economic,
egalitarian, feminist, and religious moral
perspectives. Topics include poverty and income distribution; economic inequality and
mobility by class, gender, and race; the role
of the government in promoting justice; effects of globalization; and justice under different economic systems. Additional
prerequisite: ECON 113. (5 units)
166.Race, Ethnicity, and Gender
in the U.S. Economy
Analysis of current and historical differences
in economic status by race, ethnicity, and
gender; theory and evidence of discrimination; role of government policies. Additional
prerequisite: ECON 173 or ECON 41 and
42. (5 units)
170.Mathematical Economics:
Static Optimization
The standard classical models of microeconomic and macroeconomic theory are generalized and reformulated as mathematical
systems. The primary goal of the course is to
extract empirically testable propositions that
would permit testing model veracity. Linear
algebra and the tools of calculus including
power series, the implicit function theorem,
envelope theorems, and duality are used as
the basis of analysis. Additional prerequisites:
MATH 11, 12, and ECON 113 or 114, or
permission of instructor. (5 units)
ECONOMICS 329
171.Mathematical Economics:
Dynamic Optimization
The course will discuss the mathematical
tools needed to analyze dynamic situations
in economics. Applications to optimal decision-making over time with respect to natural ­resource allocations, manufacturing and
storage paths, consumption/investment decisions, and stability of economic systems are
discussed. Topics include optimal control,
dynamic programming, and calculus of variations. Additional prerequisites: MATH 11,
12, and ECON 113 or 114, or permission of
instructor. (5 units)
172.Game Theory
This course introduces game theoretical
concepts and tools. Theoretical topics include Nash equilibrium, Sub-game perfection, Bayesian-Nash equilibrium, Harsanyi
transformation, commitment, and Perfect
Bayesian Equilibrium. Applications to topics
such as oligopoly, strategic investment, and
agency theory are discussed. Additional prerequisites: MATH 11, 12, and ECON 113
or 114, or permission of instructor. (5 units)
173. Applied Econometrics
Statistical analysis of cross-section and panel
data, with economic applications. Topics include identification of causal effects using
panel methods, instrumental variables, and
quasi-experimental techniques; models with
binary outcomes; variable selection. Handson analysis of data using statistical software.
Additional prerequisites: ECON 41, 42,
113, and 114. (5 units)
174.Applied Time Series Analysis
Methods to forecast and interpret hypotheses about time-varying economic variables.
Topics include stationary and non-stationary series; characterizing time series in tractable ways; separating regular (trend and
seasonal) and irregular parts of a time series;
and examining identification and estimation
strategies. Synthesize, present, and evaluate
time series analysis to assess credibility.
­Additional prerequisites: ECON 173 or
ECON 41 and 42 and ECON 115. (5 units)
181.International Trade
Analysis of the theories of international trade
and strategic interactions; assessment of
the empirical patterns of trade; analysis of
the political economy of protection, and
applications to policies guiding international
competition.
Additional
prerequisite:
ECON 113. (5 units)
182.International Finance and
Open Economy Macroeconomics
Analysis of the monetary aspects of international economics, including the balance of
payments, exchange rates and foreign exchange markets, speculative attacks and currency crises, and the implications of
international trade and capital flows for
macroeconomic activity and policy. Additional prerequisite: ECON 115. (5 units)
185.Economics of Innovation
and Intellectual Property
The economic determinants and consequences of innovation. Topics include research and development, joint ventures,
patents and other intellectual property, university-industry and government-industry
collaboration, and the relationship between
antitrust and other regulatory policies and
technological advances. Additional prerequisite: ECON 114. (5 units)
190.Economics Seminar
Seminar on contemporary economic theories
and problems. Admission by invitation only.
(5 units)
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research
Independent projects undertaken by upperdivision students with a faculty sponsor. Independent studies are normally permitted
only under special circumstances. Prerequisite: Written proposal must be approved by
instructor and chair at least one week prior to
registration. (1–5 units)
330 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
Professors: Sanjiv Das (William and Janice Terry Professor), Hoje Jo (Gerald and
Bonita Wilkinson Professor), Atulya Sarin, Hersh Shefrin (Mario L. Belotti
Professor), Meir Statman (Glenn Klimek Professor)
Associate Professors: George Chacko (Department Chair), Robert Hendershott, Carrie Pan
Assistant Professors: Ye Cai, Seoyoung Kim, Samuel Lee
Professors of Practice: Sumit Agarwal, Donald Davis, Andy Kim, Wendy Ku,
Joseph Ori, Steven Wade
Finance is at the center of well-managed businesses, from high-technology companies to
mutual fund companies. Development of knowledge and managerial skills in the corporate
and investment settings are the major goals of the finance program. Graduates with a degree
in finance pursue careers as corporate financial officers, traders, investment managers, financial
analysts, financial planners, investment bankers, stockbrokers, regulators, and other specialties. Corporate finance officers manage the assets and value of corporations. They examine
which new products and investments will be profitable, analyze the most cost-effective ways
to produce them, and determine where to get the money needed to fund new ventures.
Personal financial planners and stockbrokers help people make wise investments by selecting
good stocks and assembling efficient portfolios. Students in finance also learn how to understand and analyze information from capital markets, engage in mergers and acquisitions,
and undertake investments in new ventures, real estate, and international markets.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum and Leavey School of Business
requirements for the bachelor of science in commerce degree, students majoring in finance
must complete the following departmental requirements:
• FNCE 124 and 125
• Four upper-division finance electives
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
115.Quantitative Methods for Finance
116.Mathematical Finance
Teaches finance majors the most important Introduction to Ito calculus and stochastic
quantitative tools they will need for the fi- differential equations; discrete lattice modnance curriculum. The students will (1) els; models for the movement of stock and
learn important concepts, techniques, and bond prices using Brownian motion and
tools in mathematics and statistics relevant Poisson processes; pricing models for equity
for modern finance; (2) understand where and bond options via Black-Scholes and its
these tools are applied in practice; and (3) variants; optimal portfolio allocation. Solulearn widely used software to implement tion techniques will include Monte Carlo
these techniques. The goal of this course is to and finite difference methods. Offered in
ensure that finance majors reach a baseline alternate years. Prerequisites: FNCE 115
level of competence in quantitative meth- and 121. (5 units)
ods, and is especially intended for those students who fear math yet have a desire to
come to grips with it. Prerequisites: ACTG
11 and 12 and OMIS 40. (5 units)
FINANCE 331
121.Financial Management
Introduction to the basic concepts of financial risk and return, the valuation of uncertain future cash flows, working capital and
fixed asset management, and cost of capital.
Topics include time value of money, financial analysis and forecasting, valuing corporate securities (stocks and bonds), cash
management, capital budgeting, short- and
long-term financing, and dividend policy.
Prerequisites: OMIS 40, ACTG 11 and 12,
and proficiency with spreadsheets. (5 units)
121S. Financial Management
Introduction to the basic concepts of financial risk and return, the valuation of uncertain future cash flows, working capital and
fixed asset management, and cost of capital.
Topics include time value of money, financial analysis and forecasting, valuing corporate securities (stocks and bonds), cash
management, capital budgeting, short- and
long-term financing, and dividend policy.
Prerequisites: Restricted to students in the
Leavey Scholars Program. OMIS 40, ACTG
11 and 12, and proficiency with spreadsheets.
(5 units)
124.Investments
Introduction to the nature and functions of
securities markets and financial instruments.
The formulation of investment goals and
policies, trading strategies, and portfolio
management. Coverage of security analysis
and valuation, evaluating portfolio performance, diversification, alternative investments. Prerequisite: FNCE 121 or 121S.
(5 units)
125.Corporate Financial Policy
In-depth examination of the interrelationships
between corporate investment and financing
decisions and their impact on a firm’s pattern
of cash flows, return, and risk. Special emphasis on the development of analytical
techniques and skills for analyzing performance reflected in financial statements. Case
studies are used. Prerequisites: FNCE 121 or
121S, and FNCE 124. (5 units)
126.Money and Capital Markets
Examines the role and function of financial
institutions, financial flows, and interest rate
structures in the money and capital markets.
Viewed primarily from the perspective of a
corporate issuer, explores the mechanisms by
which value is created by financial markets,
the roles of players in the system, the securities in each market, the flows of information,
and the design and incentive features that
manage risk in a practical manner. Common
themes and concepts will be developed by
the exploration of a new market in each
class, examining issuer’s funding alternatives,
and incorporating current news events.
­Prerequisites: FNCE 121 or 121S, FNCE
124, and FNCE 125. (5 units)
128.Real Estate Finance
Exploration of the real estate market, including investments in residential and commercial real estate by individuals, partnerships,
and trusts. Emphasis is on the valuation and
cash flow analysis of these projects and
an understanding of financing alternatives.
Prerequisites: FNCE 121 or 121S, and
FNCE 124. (5 units)
130.Ethics in Finance
Exploration of the ethical dimension of financial markets. Topics include insider trading, moral hazard, agency, adverse selection,
and financial market regulations concerning
disclosure, price manipulation, suitability,
trading interruptions, margin requirements,
and short-sale restrictions. Prerequisites:
FNCE 121 or 121S, and FNCE 124.
(5 units)
332 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
135.Applied Portfolio Management
Designed to provide a highly rigorous and
analytic framework for applied work in investments and portfolio management. Students who master the course material will
acquire the analytical tools and financial
theory necessary to make rational investment decisions and understand the paradigms by which investment portfolios are
managed. The coursework involves an analysis of contemporary theories and techniques in portfolio management available to
professional portfolio managers. Significant
literature that emphasizes the role of the
modern portfolio manager in achieving
­diversification and client investment goals is
reviewed and evaluated. Prerequisites: FNCE
121 or 121S, 124, and OMIS 40 and 41.
(5 units)
141.New Venture Finance
Describes the financing environment for
young companies and studies how the private equity market functions. Students will
learn how investment funds are structured,
investment contracts are written, and understand the economics of different private equity models work. Prerequisites: FNCE 121
or 121S, and FNCE 124. (5 units)
143.Entrepreneurial Finance
Covers topics that are directly relevant to entrepreneurs, defined broadly to include all
early employees in addition to founders,
who are evaluating, communicating, and
implementing new business opportunities.
This course focuses on the start-up phase
with an emphasis on venture-backed companies. The three main sections of the course
are: Types of Businesses (primarily lecture
and project-based), Financial Models (primarily project-based), and Investment
Terms (primarily lecture-based). Types of
Businesses covers the three types of
entrepreneur: lifestyle entrepreneurs, wealthbuilding entrepreneurs, and innovating entrepreneurs, along economic foundations
that distinguish the three types of entrepreneurship. Financial Models covers the creation and uses of financial projection:
revenue, costs, and profits/losses. Investment
Terms covers the way investments in startup companies are generally structured. In all
three sections, we will discuss the human
biases that often distort entrepreneurial efforts, along with strategies to recognize and
avoid the more costly. Prerequisites: FNCE
121 or 121S, and FNCE 124. (5 units)
146.Introduction to Risk Management
Introduction to financial risk management
through its major components: credit, market, operational, legal, and reputational. Also
addresses technology tools to manage risk
and the role data governance and environmental policy play in risk management. Students who master the material will acquire
an understanding of the major areas of risk
exposure that all organizations, both public
and private, face in operating in today’s complex global marketplace. Prerequisites:
FNCE 121 or 121S, and FNCE 124.
(5 units)
148.Risk Management and Insurance
Survey of general principles of risk management. Risk management uses many tools to
avoid, reduce, or offset the financial penalty
of risks. The course will cover types of insurance, financial instruments used to “insure”
a portfolio, credit default swaps, etc. The
course will address the risk management
function across the firm. The role of the
chief financial officer (CFO) or vice president of finance as the risk management officer will be examined. Prerequisites: FNCE
121 or 121S, and FNCE 124. (5 units)
FINANCE 333
151.International Finance
Examination of the functioning of the international monetary system, foreign exchange
markets, and the financial problems of business firms operating internationally. Topics
covered include hedging exchange rates
and interest rates, international investment
and financing, financial markets, banking,
and financial management. Prerequisites:
FNCE 121 or 121S, and FNCE 124.
(5 units)
163.Investment Practice
The practice of portfolio management using
a portion of the University’s endowment
fund to acquire real-life investment experience. Various investment objectives will be
explored, including derivatives to protect
current positions, fixed income, and equity
investments. The course meets over three
quarters. Students must earn 6 units in
order for the course to count toward the
major. Prerequisites: FNCE 121 or 121S,
FNCE 124, and instructor approval.
(2 units)
170.Business Valuation
Practical valuation tools for valuing a company and its securities. Valuation techniques
covered include discounted cash-flow analysis, estimated cost of capital (cost of equity,
cost of debt, and weighted average cost
of capital), market multiples, free-cash
flow, and pro-forma models. Prerequisites:
FNCE 121 or 121S, and FNCE 124.
(5 units)
174.Mergers and Acquisitions
A study of corporate governance and corporate restructurings. Emphasis on how corporate ownership, control, and organizational
structures affect firm value. Other topics
may include valuing merger candidates,
agency theory, and takeover regulation. This
course generally places a heavy emphasis on
case projects and/or class presentations. Prerequisites: FNCE 121, 124, and 125.
(5 units)
180.Open Book Management
Open book management is a system that
places finance and accounting at the center
of management processes for decision making and monitoring. The course uses simulation techniques to teach students how to
create a corporate culture around the principles of open book management, particularly
the treatment of agency conflicts and the use
of effective business processes. Prerequisites:
FNCE 121 or 121S, FNCE 124, and
FNCE 125. (5 units)
198.Internship/Practicum
Opportunity for selected upper-division students to work in companies and nonprofit
organizations. Prerequisites: Finance major,
junior or senior standing, and permission of
instructor and chair required one week prior
to registration. Anything less than 5 units
will not count toward major requirements.
(1–5 units)
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research
Independent projects undertaken by upperdivision students with a faculty sponsor. Independent studies are normally permitted
only under special circumstances. Prerequisites: Declared finance major, junior or senior
standing, and a written proposal must be approved by instructor and chair one week prior
to registration. (1–5 units)
334 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
DEPARTMENT OF MANAGEMENT
Professor Emeritus: Dennis J. Moberg
Professors: Gregory Baker (Naumes Family Professor), David F. Caldwell
(Stephen and Patricia Schott Professor), André L. Delbecq (J. Thomas and
Kathleen L. McCarthy University Professor), Terri Griffith (Department Chair),
James L. Koch (Jan and Bill Terry Professor of Management), Barry Z. Posner
(Michael Accolti, S.J. Professorship for Leadership), Manuel G. Velasquez
(Charles J. Dirksen Professor of Business Ethics)
Associate Professors: James L. Hall, Tammy L. Madsen, Jennifer Woolley
Assistant Professors: Robert Eberhart, Sanjay Jain, Peter Jennings, Kevyan Kashkooli,
Nydia MacGregor
Lecturers: Sandy Piderit, Wan Yan
The Management Department’s curriculum emphasizes rigorous analysis and managerial
application. Courses are offered in organizational behavior, human resource management,
managerial communication, team management, leadership, entrepreneurship, negotiation,
and family business management. Additional courses in strategic management, business and
public policy, business ethics, and international management provide a general management
perspective. Management majors are those who want to develop balanced general management
skills and/ or prepare for project management careers. Students in other majors who aspire to
supervisory or managerial positions will find several of the department electives useful.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR
In addition to fulfilling Undergraduate Core Curriculum and Leavey School of Business
requirements for the bachelor of science in commerce degree, students majoring in
management must complete the following departmental requirements:
• MGMT 174
• Four courses selected from MGMT, 164, 165, 166, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 175,
179, 197, 198, and 199
LOWER-DIVISION COURSES
6. Business Ethics
6H. Business Ethics
A normative inquiry into the ethical issues Honors section. A normative inquiry into
that arise in business and how they should be the ethical issues that arise in business and
managed. Attention is given to current how they should be managed. Attention is
moral issues in business, to ethical theories given to current moral issues in business, to
and their implications for these issues, and to ethical theories and their implications for
the managerial implications. Topics may in- these issues, and to the managerial implications.
clude truth in advertising, corporate social Topics may include truth in advertising, corresponsibility, affirmative action, govern- porate social responsibility, affirmative acment regulation of business, quality of work- tion, government regulation of business,
life, environmental and resource issues, and quality of work-life, environmental and reethical codes of conduct. Students who take source issues, and ethical codes of conduct.
PHIL 6 may not take this course for credit. Students who take PHIL 6 may not take this
(4 units)
course for credit. Prerequisite: Enrollment restricted to students in the University Honors
or Leavey Scholars programs. (4 units)
MANAGEMENT 335
8. Business Ethics in Practice
This course provides students with hands-on
experience in a nonprofit organization to
prepare them for future work and servicebased learning engagements. Students will
work with, and observe, employees in a nonprofit organization to gain an understanding
of the value of the organization’s daily work
activities and its contribution to society. The
course will help students recognize the benefits of lifelong responsible citizenship and
civic engagement. Students will participate
in a minimum of two seven-hour Saturday
assignment days and nine regular Tuesday/
Thursday sessions. Prerequisite: MGMT 6
or 6H or PHIL 6 or 112. Note: To participate in this experiential learning course, the
student must have private transportation to
travel to a construction site in Santa Clara
County. (2 units)
80.Global and Cultural
Environment of Business
An examination of the basic conceptual vocabulary and theories regarding the economic, political, and social influences on
international business today. Topics may include international trade, financial systems,
political institutions, cultural factors, corporate structure, and market entry. Students
who take this class may not receive credit
for MGMT 80L taken in the Santa Clara
London Program, or any equivalent course
taken in a study abroad program. Prerequisites: BUSN 70 or 170, and ECON 3.
(4 units)
UPPER-DIVISION COURSES
160. Management of Organizations
162.Strategic Analysis—
The Business Capstone
Introduction to organization theory and
practice with an emphasis on organizational Focuses on the processes by which managers
behavior, inclusive of the contexts of the in- position their businesses or assets to maxidividual, the group, and the organization mize long-term profits in the face of unceras a whole. Prerequisite: Students must have tainty, rapid change, and competition.
completed 60 units. (5 units)
Covers various frameworks for analyzing an
industry’s structure and a firm’s competitive
160S. Management of Organizations
position, and for developing a coherent, viaIntroduction to organization theory and ble, and defensible firm strategy. Requires
practice with an emphasis on organizational students to integrate and extend the knowlbehavior, inclusive of the contexts of the in- edge and skills that they have developed
dividual, the group, and the organization as throughout their coursework (i.e., marketa whole. Prerequisites: Open only to students ing, finance, economics, organizational bein the Leavey Scholars Program. Students havior, ethics, information systems, statistical
must have completed 60 units. (5 units)
analysis, operations management, accounting, etc.) into a “total” business perspective.
Prerequisites: ECON 41 and 42 or OMIS
41; FNCE 121 or 121S; MGMT 80, 160,
or 160S; MKTG 181 or 181S; and senior
standing. (5 units)
336 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
162S. Strategic Analysis—
The Business Capstone
Focuses on the processes by which managers
position their businesses or assets to maximize long-term profits in the face of uncertainty, rapid change, and competition.
Covers various frameworks for analyzing an
industry’s structure and a firm’s competitive
position and for developing a coherent, viable, and defensible firm strategy. Requires
students to integrate and extend the knowledge and skills that they have developed
throughout their coursework (i.e., marketing, finance, economics, organizational behavior, ethics, information systems, statistical
analysis, operations management, accounting, etc.) into a “total” business perspective.
Enrollment restricted to students in the Leavey
Scholars Program. Prerequisites: ECON 41
and 42 or OMIS 41; FNCE 121 or 121S;
MGMT 80, 160, or 160S; MKTG 181 or
181S, senior standing, and a minimum
3.5 cumulative GPA. (5 units)
164.Introduction to Entrepreneurship
The practice of business innovation and entrepreneurship with an emphasis on assessing needs, developing products or services,
and communicating ideas. Prerequisites:
ACTG 11 and MKTG 181. (5 units)
165.Building a Business
Extends notions of entrepreneurship to
building a viable business by focusing on developing business plans and identifying opportunities for growth. Prerequisite: MGMT
164. (5 units)
166.Human Resource Management
Comprehensive review of the role and functions of human resource management departments in business organizations, with
particular emphasis on selection and placement, training and development, and compensation systems. Prerequisite: MGMT
160 or 160S, or permission of instructor.
(5 units)
169.Business and Public Policy
The impact of public policy on business and
how businesses adapt to and influence public policies. Includes ideology, corporate social responsibility, government regulations,
and business political activity. Lectures/discussions; case analyses. (5 units)
170.International Management
The international framework for trade and
international investment, a critical discussion of the idea of globalization, the design
and staffing of multinational organizational
structures, and multinational strategies.
­Prerequisite: MGMT 80. (MGMT 160 or
160S recommended.) (5 units)
171.Managerial Communication
Interpersonal and small-group communication. Negotiating behavior. Oral and written
communication. Integrates theory and skillbuilding through reading, case analysis, and
practice. Prerequisite: MGMT 160 or 160S,
or permission of instructor. (5 units)
172. Social Entrepreneurship
This course focuses on emerging models of
enterprise at the interface of the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. It examines theories of change and the dynamics of social
innovation and develops both conceptual
and practical tools for creating high performance organizations that are capable of addressing seemingly intractable problems in a
financially sustainable manner. Analysis of
exemplary social business ventures, including alumni cases from the Global Social
Benefit Incubator, will illustrate how the discipline of business planning can contribute
the development of social ventures that are
economically viable at scale. Students will
apply this knowledge to the writing and
analysis of a case on an actual social business.
Prerequisite: Students must have completed
87.5 units. (5 units)
MANAGEMENT 337
173. Resources, Food, and
the Environment
Exploration of relationship among food production, resource use, and the environment.
Topics include biotechnology, the green revolution, resource depletion, environmental
degradation, and food safety. Also listed as
ECON 101. (5 units)
174.Social Psychology of Leadership
A conceptual framework for understanding
leadership and opportunities for developing
leadership skills. This interactive course requires personal reflection into leadership experiences and fieldwork with executives.
Note: This course is required for those completing the Leadership Studies Certificate
Program. Prerequisite: Students must have
completed 87.5 units. (5 units)
175.Managing Family Businesses
Issues include managerial and ownership
succession, conflicts between family and
nonfamily members, and conflicts between
family and business cultures. Students will
apply organizational behavior concepts to
family business issues and develop a useful
framework for analyzing and anticipating
those issues. Class design incorporates cases,
videos, and guest speakers. Prerequisite:
MGMT 160 or 160S. (5 units)
179.Project Management
Students will learn how to plan and manage
a project. The course covers methods for creating a work breakdown structure and project schedule; estimating a project’s budget;
and managing a project’s quality, schedule,
and financial targets. Course activities include a project management computer simulation, and a directed team project that
connects the students with a practicing project manager for applying the methods
learned. Much of the course materials will be
the based on the Project Management Institute’s (PMI) Body of Knowledge, which is
used for PMI certification. This course can
be a first step toward certification. Prerequisite: MGMT 160 or 160S, or permission of
the instructor. (5 units)
197.Special Topics in Management
Offered occasionally to introduce new topics
not covered by existing electives. Topics generally reflect the research interests of the faculty teaching the course. Prerequisite:
MGMT 160 or 160S. (5 units)
198.Internship/Practicum
Opportunity for selected upper-division students to work in local organizations. Prerequisites: MGMT 160 or 160S, and two courses
from the following list: MGMT 166, 169,
170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177. Students must have completed 60 units and have
the approval of the undergraduate committee
one week prior to registration. (1–5 units)
198E. Entrepreneurship Internship
An extended opportunity for students accepted into the entrepreneurship minor program to apply their entrepreneurial
knowledge and skills in emerging or growing
companies through a structured placement
in Silicon Valley. Prerequisites: MGMT 164
or BUSN 144 and must have a declared entrepreneurship minor. MGMT 165 may be
taken concurrently. (5 units)
199.Directed Reading/
Directed Research
Independent projects undertaken by upperdivision students with a faculty sponsor.
­Prerequisites: MGMT 160 or 160S, and a
written proposal must be approved by instructor and chair one week prior to registration. (1–5 units)
338 LEAVEY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
DEPARTMENT OF MARKETING
Professor Emerita: Karen F. A. Fox
Professors: Dale D. Achabal (L.J. Skaggs Professor, Department Co-Chair),
Albert V. Bruno (W.T. Cleary Professor), Kirthi Kalyanam (J.C. Penney Professor),
Shelby H. McIntyre (Department Co-Chair), Edward F. McQuarrie
Associate Professors: Xiaojing Dong, J. Michael Munson
Assistant Professors: Desmond Lo, Kumar Sarangee, Savannah Wei Shi
Lecturer: Gail Kirby
Marketing operates at the cutting edge of a well-managed organization. Development
of students’ decision-making and managerial skills are the major objectives of the Department
of Marketing program, with special emphases in innovation, high technology, retailing, and
digital marketing. Marketing links a business to its markets and customers and acts as the eyes
and the ears for a firm, helping managers identify emerging market opportunities and anticipating customer needs and wants. It is also the firm’s voice, handling communications with
customers and deciding on advertising, sales, and social media messages. Finally, strategic
marketing addresses competitive threats and opportunities, guiding a firm’s efforts to deliver
superior value. Because customer analysis and competitive advantage are so crucial to business
success, a degree in marketing provides a solid foundation for a general management career
leading to executive responsibilities. It can also provide the basis for a more focused career
in such areas as advert