REGULAR AGENDA REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN BOARD of DIRECTORS MEETING Wednesday,

REGULAR AGENDA REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN BOARD of DIRECTORS MEETING Wednesday,
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BOARD of DIRECTORS MEETING
Wednesday, May 21, 2014
4:00 p.m.
REGULAR AGENDA
A.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. Board of Directors – May 21, 2014
(Opportunity for Introduction of Late Items)
(Opportunity for Introduction of Late Items – In Camera Agenda)
RECOMMENDATION 1
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the Agenda of the May 21, 2014 regular meeting of the Board of Directors be
approved as presented.
B.
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
1. Board of Directors – May 7, 2014
RECOMMENDATION 2
Page 1
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the May 7, 2014 meeting of the Board of Directors be adopted as
circulated.
C.
DELEGATIONS
1. Agricultural Land Commission Application
HATFIELD, A. and RICHARDS, K. [File No. 14-0095-F-ALR]
[See Item E.4]
D.
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
1. Bylaw 2589 - Zoning Text Amendment [Agri-Tourism]
− Bylaw 2589, 2013
RECOMMENDATION 3
Page 6
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, Zoning Text
Amendment Bylaw No. 2589, 2013, which proposes to include Agricultural Land
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-2-
May 21, 2014
Commission (ALC) Agri-Tourism provisions into Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003, be
amended to include provisions which:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Clarify the duration of stay;
Prohibit the use of Park Model Recreation Vehicles in Agri-Tourism Campsites;
Allow kitchen facilities in Agri-Tourism Cabins;
Allow Agri-Tourism Accommodation in Electoral Area “B” within the ‘Westside’
boundary;
5. Allow Agri-Tourism Accommodation in all of Electoral Area “F”;
6. Clarify the minimum lot size requirements for Bed and Breakfast Use; and,
7. Clarify the requirements for Agri-Tourism Campsites; and further,
That Zoning Text Amendment Bylaw No. 2589, 2013, be amended as follows:
1. Amend Section B.1, definition of “Agri-Tourism Accommodation” to include the
phrase as follows: “Use of campsites and cabins for Agri-Tourism
Accommodation must be seasonal as defined by this bylaw”;
2. Amend Section B.1, definition of “Agri-Tourism Campsite” to include the phrase
as follows: “Park Model Recreation Vehicles are not permitted to be used within
Agri-Tourism Campsites”;
3. Amend Section B.1, definition of “Agri-Tourism Cabin” be amended to exclude
the phrase: “to contain a kitchen or”;
4. Amend Section B.3, by removing the phrase “within the Kingfisher Local Area
Plan boundary of Electoral Area “F” as shown on Schedule “I” of this bylaw.”;
5. Amend Section B.3, by adding the phrase “within the ‘Westside’ Boundary of
Electoral Area “B” as shown on Schedule “I” of this bylaw”;
6. Amend Section B.3 by replacing Section 301.3.c.i with the following:
“Agri-Tourism Campsite and Cabin units are not permitted on less than 4 ha, and
no more than five (5) Agri-Tourism Accommodation units are permitted on
parcels 4 ha up to 8 ha, and no more than ten (10) Agri-Tourism Accommodation
units are permitted on parcels 8 ha and greater.”;
7. Replace Section B.5 with the following: Add Division Eighteen – Schedule “I” –
Westside Area Boundary for Agri-Tourism Accommodation attached to this Bylaw
as Schedule “A”;
8. Replace Section B.6 with the following: Amend Division One, Section 102 –
Schedules by adding Schedule “I” – Westside Area Boundary for Agri-Tourism
Accommodation; and further,
That Zoning Text Amendment Bylaw No. 2589, 2013, be amended to include the
following:
1. Amend Division Thirteen – Campground Regulations – Schedule “D” of Zoning
Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 by adding the following to 1301.1 Application: d. The
provisions of this Schedule do not apply to Agri-Tourism Campsites with the
exception of the following Sections:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
1301.12 – Camping Sites
1301.21 – Water Supply
1301.22 – Sewerage Disposal
1301.26 – Garbage Disposal; and further,
That Zoning Text Amendment Bylaw No. 2589, 2013 be given Second Reading, as
amended, and be referred to Public Hearing.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-3-
May 21, 2014
2. Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw 1336, 2013
− Staff report dated May 5, 2014
RECOMMENDATION 4
Page 10
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013, as
amended, be accepted by the Regional District of North Okanagan.
E.
NEW BUSINESS
1. Bylaw 2543 – Greater Vernon Water Service Establishment Amendment
[Schon Springs]
− Bylaw 2543, 2014
RECOMMENDATION 5
Page 65
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, Greater Vernon
Water Service Establishment Bylaw Amendment No. 2543, 2014 (Schon Springs) be
given First, Second and Third Readings and forwarded for consent of the
participants; and further,
Following receipt of 2/3 consent pursuant to Section 802.(1)(b) of the Local
Government Act, Greater Vernon Water Service Establishment Bylaw Amendment
No. 2543, 2014 (Schon Springs) be referred to the Inspector of Municipalities for
Statutory Approval.
2. Bylaw 2628 – Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Projects Voting
Question
− Staff report dated April 29, 2014
− Bylaw 2628, 2014
RECOMMENDATION 6
Page 66
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon and Electoral Areas
“B” and “C”)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, Greater Vernon
Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Projects Voting Question Bylaw No. 2628, 2014
be given First, Second and Third Readings.
RECOMMENDATION 7
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon and Electoral Areas
“B” and “C” – 2/3 Majority)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, Greater Vernon
Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Projects Voting Question Bylaw No. 2628, 2014
be Adopted.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-4-
May 21, 2014
3. Bylaw 2629 – Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Projects Loan
Authorization
− Staff report dated April 29, 2014
− Bylaw 2629, 2014
RECOMMENDATION 8
Page 66
(Weighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, Greater Vernon
Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Loan Authorization Bylaw 2629, 2014 be given
First, Second and Third Readings; and further,
That Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Loan Authorization Bylaw
2629, 2014 be referred to the Inspector of Municipalities for Statutory Approval.
4. Agricultural Land Commission Application
HATFIELD, A. and RICHARDS, K. [File No. 14-0095-F-ALR]
− Staff report dated April 28, 2014
RECOMMENDATION 9
Page 74
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, the application
under Section 17(3) of the Agricultural Land Commission Act to include into the
Agricultural Land Reserve the non-ALR portion of the property legally described as
That Part NW ¼, Sec 27, Lying to the West of the Right Bank of the Shuswap River
as Shown on Plan B17102, Twp 18, R7, W6M, KDYD, Except Plan 34054 and
located at 1866 Enderby Mabel Lake Road be authorized for submission to the
Agricultural Land Commission.
5. Development Variance Permit Application
MABEL LAKE HOLIDAY CENTRE LTD. c/o T. Laursen [File No. 14-0010-F-DVP]
RECOMMENDATION 10
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, a Development
Variance Permit be issued for the property legally described as Lot B, DL 2415,
ODYD and Sec 14, Twp 19, R6 W6M, KDYD, Plan KAP45947 and located at 3501
Enderby Mabel Lake Road, Electoral Area “F” to allow a variance to Sections
1101.2.e.iii.c and 1101.2.f of the Regional District of North Okanagan Zoning Bylaw
No. 1888, 2003 by waiving the requirement to pave and curb a commercial parking
area subject to:
1) The dimensions and siting of the parking area on the land be in general
accordance with the site plans attached to the Planning Department report dated
April 16, 2014;
2) The parking area be provided with directional signs to provide traffic control,
graded to provide an even surface, drained so that no surface water accumulates
on the property or runs off onto neighbouring properties, kept free of weeds, and
be sufficiently gravelled and treated to suppress dust;
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-5-
May 21, 2014
3) A landscaping screen consisting of no less than a compact evergreen hedge not
less than 2 m in height be provided along the north and west side of the parking
area; and
4) A Section 219 Restrictive Covenant being registered on the title of the subject
property to restrict the use of the parking lot in conjunction with the proposed 260
slip marina located at the end of Large Road (Lease 346844).
6. Development Permit with Variances Application
GIESBRECHT, A. and N. [File No. 14-0080-F-DP / 14-0081-F-DVP]
RECOMMENDATION 11
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, a Development
Permit with Variances be issued for the property legally described as Parcel A
(KP86723) Blk 9, DL 526, KDYD, Plan 592 and located at 135 3rd Avenue, Electoral
Area “F” to allow variances to the following Sections of the Regional District of North
Okanagan Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003:
1) Section 1101.2.f by waiving the requirement to provide curbing on the west side
of the parking and loading areas located on the subject property;
2) Section 1501.2.a.iii by waiving the requirement to provide a landscaped buffer
along the west side of the subject property which fronts 3rd Avenue and is not
used for driveway access purposes;
3) Section 501.9.c by reducing the rear yard setback of a building from 7.5 m to
5.66 m;
4) Section 1101.3 by reducing the required number of commercial off-street parking
spaces from 16 to 10; and further,
That a Development Permit with Variances be issued for the property legally
described as Parcel A (KP86723) Blk 9, DL 526, KDYD, Plan 592 and located at 135
3rd Avenue, Electoral Area “F” subject to the following:
1) the dimensions and siting of the building addition and parking and loading area to
be constructed on the land be in general accordance with the site plan attached
to the Planning Department report dated April 17, 2014. A total of ten (10) angled
parking stalls are to be provided on the north side of the existing building. Access
to the parking stalls is to be gained from 3rd Avenue via a six (6) m wide
driveway aisle. One (1) loading area is to be provided on the west side of the
existing building. Access to the loading area is to be gained via the above noted
driveway aisle;
2) the form and character of the building addition to be constructed on the land be in
general accordance with the building elevations attached to the Planning
Department report dated April 17, 2014. With the exception of the south facing
wall, the exterior of the building is to be clad with painted metal siding;
3) cement or timber curbs be placed around the parking and loading areas
(excluding along 3rd Avenue);
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-6-
May 21, 2014
4) a 2 m wide landscape buffer be provided between the east and south sides of the
subject property and the adjacent residential zoned properties;
5) prior to issuance of a Building Permit, a Section 219 Restrictive Covenant be
registered on the title of the subject property to require that all construction meet
the Floodplain Setbacks and Flood Construction Levels of the Shuswap River
and to save harmless the Regional District from losses or damages that may be
caused due to flooding.
7. Development Variance Permit Application
TEALE, D. and D. [File No. 14-0078-C-DVP]
RECOMMENDATION 12
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, a Development
Variance Permit be issued for the property legally described as Lot 28, Sec 35, Twp
9, ODYD, Plan 291 Except Plans H14932 and 34140 and located at 940 Pottery
Road, Electoral Area “C” to permit a variance to Section 802.9.e of the Regional
District of North Okanagan Zoning Bylaw 1888, 2003 by reducing the side yard
setback of a two family dwelling from 4.5 m to 3.15 m as shown on the site plan and
building elevations attached to the Planning Department report dated April 22, 2014.
8. Waiver of Lot Frontage
BOUFFARD, G. and BECKER, D. c/o W.E. Maddox [File No. 14-0054-E-WVR]
RECOMMENDATION 13
(Part 26 – Special Voting – Includes Electoral Areas Only)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, the 10% minimum
frontage requirement of Section 803.7 of the RDNO Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 be
waived for the properties legally described as Lot 1, DL 3512, ODYD, Plan 28769
AND Lot 1, DL 3512, ODYD, Plan 24597 and located at 1022 and 940 Sugar Lake
Road, Electoral Area “E” by reducing the lot frontage of proposed Lot 1 from
approximately 146 m to 20 m as shown on the site plan attached to the Planning
Department report dated April 24, 2014.
9. Riparian Areas Regulations – Report from the Ombudsperson
− Executive Summary dated March 2014
RECOMMENDATION 14
Page 82
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, the report from the
Ombudsperson regarding riparian area regulations be sent to the Auditor General for
Local Government for comment on “value for money” with respect to the regulation.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-7-
May 21, 2014
10. Non-Commercial Blasting
RECOMMENDATION 15
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, a letter be written
to B.C. Mineral Exploration and Mining (MEM) seeking advice regarding oversight
and liabilities associated with non-commercial blasting.
11. Private Unmetered Fire Hydrant – 7961 Buchanan Road
RECOMMENDATION 16
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon and Electoral Areas
“B” and “C”)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, staff be directed
to report back to the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee on the number of private
hydrants that exist and the breakdown of costs.
12. Duteau Creek Watershed Assessment Response Plan
RECOMMENDATION 17
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon and Electoral Areas
“B” and “C”)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, the Duteau
Creek Watershed Assessment Response Plan 2014 attached to the report dated
April 22, 2014 regarding Duteau Creek Watershed Assessment Response Plan be
endorsed; and further,
That the Duteau Creek Watershed Assessment Response Plan 2014 be forwarded
to Interior Health for final endorsement.
13. Urban Development Institute Letter
RECOMMENDATION 18
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon and Electoral Areas
“B” and “C”)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, a letter be sent
to the Interior Health Authority and other recipients expressing similar opinions to
those raised by the Urban Development Institute in their letter dated April 17, 2014.
14. Capital Works – Greater Vernon Water Operations and Maintenance Contract
RECOMMENDATION 19
(Customized Stakeholder Vote – Includes Coldstream, Vernon and Electoral Areas
“B” and “C”)
That as recommended by the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee, Protocol No.
ENG-GVW-OP 09 – Capital Works Projects and Planning be circulated for review
and discussion between the jurisdictions; and further,
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
-8-
May 21, 2014
That staff report back on overhead costs for capital works completed within
jurisdictional boundaries.
15. White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Social Media Policy WVPRC-006
RECOMMENDATION 20
(Weighted Stakeholder Vote – Includes Lumby and Electoral Areas “D” and “E”)
That as recommended by the White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Advisory
Committee, WVPRC-006 White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Social Media
Policy, be approved; and further,
That staff be directed to review the use of social media within the White Valley Parks,
Recreation and Culture service by September 2014 in context of the WVPRC-006
White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Social Media Policy, and provide
recommendations for consideration during the 2015 budget deliberations.
F.
BUSINESS ARISING FROM DELEGATIONS
G.
REPORTS
1. Standing and Select Committees
RECOMMENDATION 21
Page 92
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That the minutes of the following meetings be received for information:
− Electoral Area Advisory Committee – Regular – May 8, 2014 (unadopted)
− Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – Regular – May 8, 2014 (unadopted)
2. External Committee Reports
3. Administrator’s Report
4. Chair’s Report
H.
IN CAMERA
RECOMMENDATION 22
(Unweighted Corporate Vote – Simple Majority)
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Board
of Directors convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in
accordance with Section 90(1)(e) and (k) of the Community Charter.
Board of Directors Agenda – Regular
I.
REPORT FROM IN CAMERA
J.
ADJOURNMENT
-9-
May 21, 2014
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item B.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the BOARD of DIRECTORS of the REGIONAL
DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District Office on
Wednesday, May 7, 2014.
Members: Director R. Fairbairn
Director S. Fowler
Director D. Dirk
Alt. Director E. Shipmaker
Director K. Acton
Director J. Brown
Alt. Director B. Spiers
Director J. Cunningham
Director C. Lord
Director M. O’Keefe
Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
Director E. Foisy
Director J. Pearase
Electoral Area “D”
City of Armstrong
District of Coldstream
City of Enderby
Village of Lumby
Township of Spallumcheen
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “E”
Electoral Area “F”
Staff:
General Manager, Planning and Building (Acting
Administrator)
General Manager, Finance
General Manager, Electoral Area Administration
General Manager, Engineering
Corporate Officer / Human Resources Manager
Community Development Coordinator
Community / Protective Services Manager
Temp. Senior Clerk (taking minutes)
R. Smailes
D. Sewell
L. Mellott
D. McTaggart
J. Byron
T. Nelson
R. Baker
L. Schrauwen
Also
Present:
Alt. Director S. Ghattas
Alt. Director J. Garlick
Councilor G. Kiss
Councilor M. Besso
K. Bertles
Media and Public
Vice Chair
Electoral Area “B”
District of Coldstream
District of Coldstream
District of Coldstream
Director, Financial Services, City of Vernon
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 4:00 p.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Board of Directors – May 7, 2014
Moved and seconded by Directors O’Keefe and Macnabb
That the Agenda of the May 7, 2014 regular meeting of the Board of Directors be approved with
the following additions:
– Item C.1 – Delegation – Terry Laursen, Mabel Lake Resort, Cooke Creek Incident
– Item E.8 – Cooke Creek [Kingfisher] Update
CARRIED
Page 1 of 104
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
-2-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item B.1
May 7, 2014
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Board of Directors – April 16, 2014
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Fowler
That the minutes of the April 16, 2014 meeting of the Board of Directors be adopted with the
following correction:
– Logging License Review resolution: moved and seconded by Directors “Foisy and
Cunningham”
CARRIED
Public Hearing [Bylaw 2619] – April 16, 2014
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Fleming
That the minutes of the April 16, 2014 Public Hearing [Bylaw 2619] of the Board of Directors be
adopted as circulated.
CARRIED
DELEGATIONS
Cooke Creek [Kingfisher] Incident
Terry Laursen, owner and resident, Mabel Lake Resort, provided an overview of the Cooke
Creek incident, that occurred on May 2, 2014, from the point of view of the residents that were
isolated on the other side of the washed out section of Mabel Lake Road. Terry Laursen
acknowledged Regional District of North Okanagan staff and the various agencies that were
involved in assisting the residents including having utilities restored and obtaining necessary
supplies in a timely manner.
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
Bylaw 2592 – Zoning Text Amendment [Secondary Suites]
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fleming
That Zoning Text Amendment Bylaw No. 2592, 2013 which proposes to amend the Regional
District of North Okanagan Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 to permit secondary suites within
single family dwellings on parcels in the Small Holding (S.H), Country Residential (C.R), NonUrban (N.U), and Large Holding (L.H) zones be given Second Reading and be referred to a
Public Hearing.
CARRIED
Greater Vernon Parks and Recreation – Restructure Bylaws
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Cunningham
That First, Second and Third Readings of Electoral Areas "B" and "C" Community Parks Service
Establishment Amendment Bylaw No. 2599, 2013 be rescinded.
CARRIED
Page 2 of 104
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
-3-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item B.1
May 7, 2014
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Cunningham
That First, Second and Third Readings of Greater Vernon Parks, Recreation and Culture
Service Conversion and Service Establishment Amendment Bylaw No. 2602, 2013 be
rescinded.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Cunningham
That First, Second and Third Readings of Disposition of DCC Park Lands to City of Vernon
Bylaw No. 2604, 2013 be rescinded.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Cunningham
That First, Second and Third Readings of Greater Vernon Parks, Recreation and Culture
Service Development Cost Charge Amendment Bylaw No. 2605, 2013 be rescinded.
CARRIED
NEW BUSINESS
Electoral Areas "B" and "C" Official Community Plan Regional Context Statement
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Fleming
That the Electoral Areas “B” and “C” Official Community Plan Regional Context Statement be
endorsed as consistent with the Regional Growth Strategy.
CARRIED
Bill 24 – 2014 Agricultural Land Commission Amendment Act
Moved and seconded by Directors Cunningham and Lord
That staff be directed to contact the Ministry of Agriculture and the Agricultural Land
Commission with the concerns that have been raised regarding Bill 24 – 2014 Agricultural Land
Commission Amendment Act, specifically the delegation of decision-making powers to local
panels and the lack of financial and political support of the Agricultural Land Commission; and
other challenges to local agriculture, specifically the lack of Provincial support for agriculture and
the ongoing impact of meat inspection regulations on smaller producers.
CARRIED
Free Transit for National Clean Air Day, June 4, 2014, during Canadian Environment
Week
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Brown
That the Board of Directors support the provision of free North Okanagan and University of
British Columbia Okanagan (UBCO) Connector Transit service on route numbers 60 and 61 on
National Clean Air Day, Wednesday, June 4, 2014, during Canadian Environment Week.
CARRIED
Moved and seconded by Directors Cunningham and Lord
That the Board of Directors support the provision of free North Okanagan and University of
British Columbia Okanagan (UBCO) Connector Transit service on route number 90 on National
Clean Air Day, Wednesday, June 4, 2014, during Canadian Environment Week.
CARRIED
Page 3 of 104
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
-4-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item B.1
May 7, 2014
Pat Duke Arena Dehumidifier Noise Abatement
Moved and seconded by Directors Acton and Foisy
That staff proceed with the installation of a ducting modification to the desiccant
dehumidification system of the Pat Duke Arena for noise abatement purposes, contingent upon
gas inspector approval; and further,
That an additional $1,700 for the Pat Duke Arena sound abatement project be approved in the
2014 Financial Plan, with funds to come from reserves.
CARRIED
Cherryville Community Club – Preschool Window Replacement
Moved and seconded by Directors Foisy and Acton
That staff be directed to work with the Cherryville Community Club to identify grant funding
available to replace windows in the preschool room at the Cherryville Community Hall.
CARRIED
2013 Financial Statements – Regional District of North Okanagan
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Fowler
That the 2013 Financial Statements be approved.
CARRIED
Sterile Insect Release Board – Nomination of Industry Representative
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fowler
That the Regional District of North Okanagan support the nomination of local grower, David
Dobernigg, as an Industry Representative for Zone three (3) of the Sterile Insect Release Board.
CARRIED
Cooke Creek [Kingfisher] Update
The Community / Protective Services Manager and the General Manager, Planning and
Building provided an update of the Cooke Creek incident that occurred on May 2, 2014.
REPORTS
Standing and Select Committees
Moved and seconded by Directors Dirk and Lord
That the minutes of the following meetings be received for information:
− Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – Special – April 24, 2014 (unadopted)
− Regional Growth Management Advisory Committee – Regular – April 16, 2014 (unadopted)
− White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee – Regular – April 14, 2014
(unadopted)
CARRIED
Page 4 of 104
Board of Directors Minutes – Regular
-5-
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item B.1
May 7, 2014
External Committee Reports
Directors provided updates for the following external committees:
− Southern Interior Beetle Action Coalition (SIBAC)
− Okanagan Basin Water Board (OBWB)
− Southern Interior Local Government Association (SILGA)
− Okanagan Regional Library (ORL)
Chair’s Report
−
−
Attended Jean Minguy Youth Academy Ceremony
Royal Bank Cup (RBC Cup) commences Saturday, May 10, 2014
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Directors Lord and O’Keefe
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Board of
Directors convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public in accordance
with Section 90(1)(c) and (k) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
The regular meeting of the Board of Directors adjourned to meet In Camera at 5:35 p.m.
The regular meeting of the Board of Directors reconvened at 7:00 p.m.
REPORT FROM IN CAMERA
Joint Job Evaluation Plan (JJEP)
That the Joint Job Evaluation Plan (JJEP) project, as set out in the Memorandum of
Understanding forming part of the 2011 Staff Terms of Employment Agreement, be concluded.
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 7:01 p.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Vice Chair
Rick Fairbairn
Corporate Officer
Jeanne Byron
Page 5 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2589
A bylaw to amend the text of Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 to include agri-tourism provisions of
the Agricultural Land Commission Act
WHEREAS pursuant to Section 903 [Zoning bylaws] of the Local Government Act, R.S.B.C.,
1996, Chapter 323, as amended, and Regulations passed pursuant thereto, the Board of the
Regional District of North Okanagan may, by Bylaw, divide the whole or part of the Regional
District into zones, name each zone, establish boundaries for the zones and regulate uses
within those zones;
AND WHEREAS the Board has created zones, named each zone, established boundaries for
these zones and regulated uses within those zones by Bylaw No. 1888, being the “Regional
District of North Okanagan Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003” and amendments thereto
AND WHEREAS, pursuant to Section 895 [Development approval procedures] of the Local
Government Act, the Board must, by bylaw, define procedures under which an owner of land
may apply for an amendment to a Zoning Bylaw and must consider every application for an
amendment to the bylaw;
AND WHEREAS the Board has enacted the “Regional District of North Okanagan Development
Application Procedures and Administrative Fees Bylaw No. 2315, 2008 and amendments
thereto” to establish procedures to amend an Official Community Plan, a Zoning Bylaw, or a
Rural Land Use Bylaw, or to issue a Permit:
AND WHEREAS the Board is desirous to amend the Zoning Bylaw to allow for Agri-Tourism
provisions of the Agricultural Land Commission Act;
NOW THEREFORE, the Board of Directors of the Regional District of North Okanagan, in open
meeting assembled, enacts as follows:
A. CITATION
This Bylaw may be cited as the “Zoning Bylaw Text Amendment No. 2589, 2013”.
B. AMENDMENTS
1. Amend Division Two – Interpretation by adding the following definitions:
“Agri-Tourism” means any agri-tourism activity defined under the Agricultural Land
Commission Act and related regulation or policy, as amended form time to time.
“Agri-Tourism Accommodation” means accommodation for short term rental to the
traveling public on an operating farm or ranch, which is accessory to and related to, the
principle farm use of the parcel. Typical uses include but are not limited to Bed and
Breakfast, Agri-Tourism Campsites and Agri-Tourism Cabins. The maximum length of stay
shall not exceed 30 days of accommodation of any one person during a calendar year.
Page 6 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.1
Page 2
“Agri-Tourism Accommodation Unit” means one (1) campsite, one (1) sleeping unit
within an Agri-Tourism Cabin, or one (1) bedroom within a dwelling used for Bed and
Breakfast purposes.
“Agri-Tourism Campsite” means an area that may be occupied by no more than one (1)
tent, holiday trailer, motor home, camper, or similar recreational vehicles for the
accommodation of agricultural tourists. Campsite space(s) shall be clearly identified by a
unique number of similar designations and shall not be used for year round storage.
“Agri-Tourism Cabin” means a detached building used for the accommodation of
agricultural tourists. The maximum gross floor area per tourist cabin shall not exceed 30m2,
not including attached washroom facilities. An Agri-Tourism Cabin is not permitted to
contain a kitchen or to be used as a residence or dwelling.
2. Amend Division Three – Basic Provisions, Section 301 of Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 by
removing Section 301.1.a.
3. Amend Division Three – Basic Provisions, Section 301 of Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 by
adding Section 301.3 as follows:
Notwithstanding the provisions of this bylaw, Agri-Tourism Accommodation is permitted
within Regional District Electoral Areas “D” and “E” and within the Kingfisher Local Area
Plan boundary of Electoral Area “F” as shown on Schedule “I” of this bylaw.
3.
Agri-Tourism Accommodation is subject to the following regulations:
a. Agri-Tourism Accommodation use must be accessory to the principle use.
b. All or part of the parcel on which the accommodation is located is classified as
‘farm’ by the BC Assessment Authority.
c. Agri-Tourism Accommodation units are not permitted on less than 4 ha, and no
more than five (5) units are permitted on parcels 4 ha up to 8 ha, and no more
than ten (10) units are permitted on parcels 8 ha and greater.
d. Agricultural Land Commission approval
Accommodation with more than 10 units.
is
required
for
Agri-Tourism
e. The total developed area for buildings, landscaping and access for the
accommodation is less than 5% of the parcel.
f.
No one person shall stay within an Agri-Tourism Accommodation Unit for more
than thirty (30) days in one (1) Calendar year.
4. Amend Division Eleven – Off-Street Parking – Schedule “B” of Zoning Bylaw No. 1888,
2003 by adding the following to 1101.3 Schedule of Parking Requirements in alphabetical
order:
Agri-Tourism Accommodation
1 per sleeping unit
5. Add Division Eighteen – Schedule “I” - Kingfisher Local Area Plan Boundary for AgriTourism Accommodation attached to this Bylaw as Schedule “A”.
Page 7 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.1
Page 3
6. Amend Division One, Section 102 – Schedules by adding Schedule I - Kingfisher Local
Area Plan Boundary for Tourism Accommodation.
Read a First and Second Time
this
Advertised on
this
This
day of
day of
, 2013
, 2013
Public Hearing held pursuant to the provisions of
Section 890 of the Local Government Act
this
day of
, 2013
Read a Third Time
this
day of
, 2013
Approved by Minister of Transportation and
Infrastructure
(Transportation Act s. 52(3))
this
day of
, 2013
ADOPTED
this
day of
, 2013
Chair
11
day of
December , 2013
Corporate Officer
Page 8 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.1
DIVISION EIGHTEEN – KINGFISHER LOCAL AREA PLAN BOUNDARY FOR
AGRI-TOURISM ACCOMMODATION
I
Schedule “A”
Attached to and forming part of Zoning Bylaw Text Amendment
No. 2589, 2013
day of
, 2013
Dated at Coldstream, BC, this
Corporate Officer
Regional District of North Okanagan Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003
Page 9 of 104
I1
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3045.12.00
TO:
Board of Directors
FROM:
Planning Department
DATE:
May 5, 2014
SUBJECT:
Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013
RECOMMENDATION:
That the Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013, as amended, be
accepted by the Regional District of North Okanagan.
DISCUSSION:
The Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO) Regional Growth Strategy (RGS) Bylaw No. 1336,
2013 received First and Second Reading on October 28, 2013 and notification was received by the
Regional District of North Okanagan (RDNO) on November 1, 2013 requesting acceptance of Bylaw
No. 1336. At the Regular Meeting of December 11, 2013, the Board of Directors passed the following
resolution:
“That the Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013 be accepted by
the Regional District of North Okanagan.”
The RDCO RGS was accepted by all adjacent regional districts and the District of Lake Country. The
City of Kelowna, District of West Kelowna and District of Peachland passed resolutions of nonacceptance of the RGS. The RDCO Board of Directors, after reviewing the comments of the nonaccepting member municipalities, rescinded the RGS Bylaw on January 16, 2014 in order to provide
the opportunity for RDCO to resolve outstanding concerns.
The RGS Steering Committee met on January 17, 2014 and January 30, 2014 to review the
comments and recommend amendments to the RGS that are supported by member municipalities
and the RDCO. All parties agreed to policy changes that replaced many "action" words (i.e. ensure,
explore, coordinate) to more neutral language such as promote, support and encourage. The
amended RGS was given Second Reading by the RDCO Board of Directors on April 28, 2014 and
referred to affected local governments for acceptance, including the RDNO.
Although the Board of Directors has accepted the October 28, 2013 version of the RGS, the amended
RGS required reconsideration by the Board of Directors of acceptance. Planning staff have reviewed
the draft amended RDCO RGS and have determined that this document is consistent with the policy
direction of the RDNO RGS and will not have a negative impact on the RDNO.
Page 10 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013
Report to Board of Directors – May 5, 2014
Page 2
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:
In 2000, the Board of Directors of the RDCO adopted their RGS. The key issues addressed within the
RGS, as were agreed by all regional partners, were:
 Housing
 Air quality
 Regional governance and
service delivery
 Environmental protection
 Transportation
 Water resources
 Economic development
Several initiatives were undertaken that support RGS policies since 2000, including regional issues
discussion papers addressing water resources, environmental protection, crown land tourism,
transportation and mobility, air quality, governance and services and aggregate supply.
On October 25, 2010, the RDCO Board of Directors approved the work plan to review the RGS,
including the assessment of trends that have affected the region since 2000. The authorized work
plan included the following steps:
 Identify, assess and evaluate current and emerging issues that affect the region’s growth pattern
and overall sustainability;
 Define a common vision for a desired regional future;
 Guide the pattern of regional development and investment decisions; and,
 Enhance communication, coordination and collaboration among regional partners and senior
levels of government.
The Regional Growth Management Advisory Committee was provided a staff report and the draft
RDCO RGS Bylaw on July 18, 2013 as information. At that time, staff had indicated that the RDNO’s
interests were unaffected by the draft Bylaw.
Regional District of Central Okanagan and Regional District North Okanagan Regional Growth
Strategy Policy Alignment:
The amended policies contained within the draft RDCO RGS are complementary to the RDNO RGS
and do not affect RDNO interests, although there are opportunities for continued inter-regional
collaboration on transportation, economic development, water resources, agriculture, ecosystems and
transportation.
LEGAL/STATUTORY PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS:
The RDCO has initiated the RGS 60 day acceptance process, as provided in Part 25, Section 857 of
the Local Government Act, which must be concluded prior to Third Reading. All affected local
governments, including the RDNO (Section 857(3)(b)), must accept the RGS prior to adoption. If an
affected local government fails to act within the period for acceptance, that local government is
deemed to have accepted the RGS. If an affected local government does not accept the RGS, then a
non-binding resolution process is initiated to resolve any outstanding concerns.
The RDNO Board of Directors has been provided the opportunity to accept the revised RDCO RGS
Bylaw No. 2409 which was given Second Reading on April 28, 2014, as specified within Section 857
of the Local Government Act, and has 60 days from that date to act.
Page 11 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013
Report to Board of Directors - May 5, 2014
Page 3
SUMMARY:
Planning staff have reviewed the revised Bylaw provided by Regional District of Central Okanagan
(RDCO) and have determined that amended Regional Growth Strategy (RGS) Bylaw No. 1336 is
consistent with the direction of the RDNO RGS Bylaw No. 2500, 2011 and the RDNO's interests are
unaffected.
Several areas within Bylaw No. 1336 were identified during the previous acceptance process for
potential collaboration or shared dialogue between the RDNO and RDCO on shared matters or
interests, including the Board of Directors top priority of economic development.
The Board of Directors may consider pursuing a dialogue with the RDCO and/or their municipal
partners regarding inter-regional economic development opportunities.
Planning staff recommend that the Board of Directors accept the amended RDCO RGS No. 1336.
Submitted by:
Approved For Inclusion:
Endorsed by:
Rob Smailes, MCIP, RPP
General Manager, Planning and Building
Page 12 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
Community Services
Planning Section
1450 K.L.O . Road
Kelowna, B.C . V1W 3Z4
Telephone: (250) 469-6227
Fax: (250) 762-7011
www.regionaldistrict.com
REG IO NA L D I STR IC T
o f C EN T RAL OKANAGAN
~m:~rniTWfEIDJ
April 30, 2014
Chair and Board
Regional District of North Okanagan
9848 Aberdeen Road
Goldstream, BC V1 B 2K9
MAY 0 1 2014
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF
NORTH OKANAGAN
Dear Chair and Directors:
Re:
Submission of the Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336,
2013 for Acceptance by Affected Local Governments
The Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013 received Second
reading at the Regional Board meeting on April 28, 2014. Pursuant to the Local Government
Act, Section 857, the Bylaw is being forwarded to your local government for consideration and
acceptance.
Under the provisions of the Local Government Act, affected local governments, which include
member municipalities and adjacent Regional Districts, have 60 days from the receipt of this
letter in which to consider acceptance of Bylaw No. 1336, 2013. At the conclusion of the 60
day period, Regional District staff will report to the Regional Board on the status of acceptance,
and if appropriate, present Bylaw No. 1336, 2013 for Third reading and Adoption.
Each affected local government is requested to respond to the Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw
No. 1336, 2013 by resolution. For information, Section 857 (4) of the Local Government Act
states that upon receipt of the Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013, each affected
local government must:
a) Review the Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013 in the
context of any Official Community Plans in its jurisdiction, both those that are current and
those in preparation, and in the context of any other matters that affect its jurisdiction;
and
b) Within 60 days of receipt of the referral, affected local governments are required to, by
resolution, either:
(i) Accept Bylaw No. 1336, 2013; or
(ii) Respond to the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Board indicating
specifically the sections or policies of Bylaw No. 1336, 2013 that your local
government will not accept.
Page 13 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
If a resolution is not brought forward at the end of the 60 day acceptance period, then according
to Section 857 of the Local Government Act, an affected local government is deemed to have
accepted the Regional Growth Strategy.
If you have any questions regarding the Regional Growth Strategy process, the formal
acceptance process or any matters associated with the Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No.
1336, 2013, please contact the undersigned at (250) 469-6227 or ron [email protected]
::?!flyA
~RoUr~k, l c1P
Manager of Planning
Enclosures: RDCO Resolution, April28, 2014
Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013
Cc
Robert Hobson, Chair, Central Okanaga n Regional Board
Brian Reardon, Chief Administrative Offi cer, RDCO
Chri s Radford, Director of Community Services, RDCO
M eggin Messe nger, Ministry of Community, Sport and Culture
Brent Mueller, Ministry of Community, Sport and Culture
H:\PLANNING\6430-Strategic_Pianning\40-Regiona l Growth Slrategy\Generai\RGS Update (20 10 to)\Work. Plan \Phase 3\Bylaw and Referral Process\RGS Draft Bylaw - Pending Board Approval\2014-03
Referrals\RONO Referral Letter.docx
Page 14 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF CENTRAL OKANAGAN
RESOLUTION
#80/14
THAT RDCO Regional Growth Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013 be given second reading as
amended;
AND FURTHER THAT Bylaw No. 1336 be referred to member municipalities and adjacent
regional districts for formal acceptance in accordance with Section 857 of the Local Government
Act.
CARRIED Unanimously
I, B. Reardon, Chief Administrative Officer of the Regional District of Central Okanagan, do hereby
certify that the above is a true and correct copy of a resolution which was adopted by the Regional
Board at its Regular Board meeting held the 28th day of April 2014.
Dated at Kelowna, B.C.
this 29th day of April 2014
Brian Reardon
Chief Administrative Officer
Page 15 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF CENTRAL OKANAGAN
BYLAW NO. 1336
A bylaw to adopt the Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy
WHEREAS the Local Government Act provides that a regional board may develop, adopt,
implement, monitor and review a regional growth strategy under Part 25 of the Act;
AND WHEREAS the Regional Board of the Regional District of Central Okanagan by resolution
dated October 25, 2010, initiated the review of "The Growth Management Strategy, Bylaw No.
851 , 2000", pursuant to section 854 of the Local Government Act;
AND WHEREAS the Regional Board adopted a Consultation Plan on December 13, 2010 to
provide opportunities for early and ongoing consultation in accordance with the Act, and during
the development of the Regional Growth Strategy the Board of Directors provided the
opportunity for consultation required by the Act;
NOW THEREFORE the Regional Board of the Regional District of Central Okanagan, in an
open meeting enacts as follows:
1. "RDCO Growth Management Strategy, Bylaw No. 851, 2000", is hereby repealed;
2. Pursuant to section 863(1) of the Local Government Act, Schedule "A" attached to and
forming part of this bylaw is hereby designated as the "Regional District of Central
Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy"; and,
3. This Bylaw may be cited as "Regional District of Central Okanagan Regional Growth
Strategy Bylaw No. 1336, 2013.
READ A FIRST TIME this
281h day of October, 2013
READ A SECOND TIME this
28th day of October, 2013
ACCEPTED, BY RESOLUTION, BY THE
District of Lake Country Council this
17'h day of December 2013
Regional District of Thompsen-Nicola Board this
12'h day of December 2013
Regional District of Kootenay Boundary Board this
28th day of November 2013
Regional District of North Okanagan Board this
11th day of December 2013
Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen Board this
19th day of December 2013
Bylaw No. 1336, 2013 ·
Page 1 of 2
Page 16 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
REFUSED, BY RESOLUTION, BY THE
City of Kelowna Council this
16th day of December 2013
District of West Kelowna Council this
1oth day of December 2013
District of Peachland Council this
1oth day of December 2013
RESCIND SECOND READING this
16th day of January 2014
RE-READ SECOND READING this
28th day of April 2014
ACCEPTED, BY RESOLUTION, BY THE
City of Kelowna Council this
day of
2014
District of West Kelowna Council this
day of
2014
District of Peachland Council this
day of
2014
District of Lake Country Council this
__ day of
2014
Regional District of Thompsen-Nicola Board this
__ day of
2014
Regional District of Kootenay Boundary Board this
day of
2014
Regional District of North Okanagan Board this
day of
2014
Regional District of Okanagan-Similkameen Board this
day of
2014
READ A THIRD TIME this
__ day of _ _ _ 2014
ADOPTED this
__ dayof _ _ _ 2014
DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE SERVICES
CHAIR
I hereby certify the foregoing to be a true and correct copy of RDCO Regional Growth Strategy
Bylaw No. 1336, 2013, as adopted by the Regional Board on the _ _ day of
2014
Dated at Kelowna, B.C. this
_ _ day of
2014
DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE SERVICES
Bylaw No. 1336, 2013
Page 2 of 2
Page 17 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
Regional District of Central Okanagan
Regional Growth Strategy
..Our Home, Our Future"
Schedul e 'A'
Bylaw No.1336, 2013
REGIO N AL DI S TRICT
ol CE N TR A L O KAN AG AN
Page 18 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
Acknowledgements
The Regional District of Central Okanagan (RDCO) recognizes and acknowledges the complex planning
environment that exists within the Central Okanagan and respected these planning processes as the Region
updated the Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy. The Regional District of Central Okanagan thanks the
planning staff, committee and working group members, member municipal councils and Board of Directors,
consultants, all residents, and those individuals who dedicated their time and expertise to make the project
possible.
Page 19 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
Table of Contents
1.0
INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................... 1
1.1
REGIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY ................................. . .......................................... ....... .................................. ... .... ... 1
1.2
STRUCTURE OF THE RGS . .. ....... .. ...... ... . .. . .. ................ ........ ....... .......... ... ......... ....... .. ..... .............................. . .......... 1
2.0
2.1
2.2
CONTEXT ................................................................................................................................................. 3
CENTRAL OKANAGAN DIRECTIVE ...... .. .. .... . .. ........ . ..................... ........... ........ .. ..... .. ....... .. ........ . ..... ... .... .... . ............... 3
REGIONAL OVERVIEW ......................... . ... ... ........ .. .... ............ .. .. ...... ............ .... ......................... .. .... . .. .. ... . ... .......... . . 4
2.2.1
2.2.2
3.0
3.1
3.2
REGIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY ............................................................................................................... 9
OUR REGIONAL VISION ... ...... . ........ .. ....... .. ........ .. ......... ............. ..... .... .. . .. . ....... ......... .................. ........ . ..... .. .... . ...... 9
REGIONAL ISSUE AREAS ..... ..... ..... .............................. . .............. . ..... .... .......... ....... . .... .. .... .. .... . ......... ........ .... ........... 9
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.3
3.2.4
3.2.5
3.2.6
3.2.7
3.2.8
3.2.9
3.2.10
4.0
4.1
Our Land .. ................................... ......... ................ ......... ................... ...... ..... ...... ............................ 10
Our Economy .......................... ..... ................................................. .. ................. .............................. 12
Our Water Resources ..... ......................................... ...... ........ ... ..................................................... 13
Our Health ........ .................. ... .. ... ... .. ... ........ ........ .. .. ....... ....... ..... ..... .......... .................. ............ .... ... 14
Our Food ................................. .... ..... .................... ... ...... .................. .. ..... .... ....... .. ...... .................... 15
Our Housing ........ ...... ................... ... ... .. ............................................................... .... ..... ... .... ... ....... 16
Our Climate .. ........... .................................. .................................................................. .... .... ... ....... 17
Our Ecosystems .... ....................................... .. .... ........................................... .. ... ... ......................... 18
Our·Transportation ............ .......... ....... .. ...... .. ... ... .... ......... ... ...... ..... ..... ... .... .. .. ..... .. ...... ......... ......... 19
Our Governance ........ ................ ........................... ... ................................................................. ..... 20
MONITORING AND EVALUATION ............................................................................................................21
IMPLEMENTA110NANDMONrTORING ......... .. ... .. . ... .. .. ... .. .. ............ ... .......... .... .. .... ...... . ................. ........ ...... ... ................ . 21
4.1.1
4.1.2
4.1.3
4.1.4
4.1.5
4.2
Demographics ... .. .......... ..... ............................................................................................................. 4
Employment Projections ... ........................................................... .... ........... ......... ... ...... ...... ............ 8
Update OCP Regional Context Statements .. ...... .............. ...... ........................................... .. ...... .... 21
Five year Action Plan ....... .... .. ........................... ............................................................................. 22
Implementation Agreements .......... .. ...... ............................................................. .. ................. ...... 22
RGS Monitoring and Evaluation ...... .... .. ........................................................................................ 22
Plan for Five -year Review.......... .... .. .... .... ...... ................... .. ...... ................ .......... .. ............. .. .......... 23
AMENDMENTS TO THE RGS ..... . .................................. ........ ............ ......... .......... .... .............................................. 23
4.2.1
4.2.2
Standard Amendments ........ .. ... ............... .. ... .. .......... .................... ......... ............ .. .. .. ...... .... .. ... ...... 23
Minor Amendments ......................................... ............... .............. ............ ............... ..................... 23
APPENDICES .......................................................................................................................................................... 25
APPENDIX A- MAPS ....................... .... ..... .. .. . ............................... ... .. ...... ..................... ...................... .... .... .. ........ ... .... . . 27
APPENDIX B- LIST OF RESEARCH PAPERS .. ....... .... . ..... ....... . .... .. .. .. .......................... ... ....................................................... 39
APPENDIX C- PERFORMANCE METRICS .................................................. . .... . ........ .. ........ . ............. .. .................... .. .. ......... 41
Source: Regional District of Central Okanagan
Page 20 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
List of Figures and Tables
Page
Figure
2.1
Regional District of Central Okanagan Services
3
2.2
Population Projections. BC Stats
7
2.3
Employment in the Central Okanagan by Industrv
8
Page
Table
2.1
Population Estimates for Age Groups, Census Years
6
2.2
Central Okanagan Migration Components of Population Growth 1996 to 2011
6
2.3
Central Okanagan Natural Increase Components of Population Growth 1996 to 2011
6
2.4
Population Estimates for Age Groups, Census Years. 1996-2011
7
2.5
Population Projections for Age Groups. 5 Years
7
Source: Regional District of Central Okanagan
Page 21 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
1 .0
I NTRO DUCTIO N
1.1
Reg io na l Grow th Strategy
The Regional Growth Strategy {RGS) is a long-range
planning tool to help regional districts and local
governments plan a coordinated future for their
communities while dealing with regional issues and
decisions that cross local political boundaries. The
strategy is a collective vision from the regional
partners for how they see the future in order to create
a region that promotes growth that is economically,
environmentally and socially healthy over a twenty
{20) year time horizon .
There are three criteria for the determination of
regional issues to be addressed through the RGS
Review and Update process:
•
Mandatory content: Provincial legislation
requires that the following issues be
addressed:
0
housing;
transportation;
0
0
regional district services;
0
parks and natural areas;
0
economic development; and,
reduction of greenhouse gas {GHG)
0
emissions.
•
Regional Board, Intergovernmental Agency
Committee
{lAC}
and
RGS
Steering
Committee direction: In addition to the
mandatory content, the Regional Board and
RGS Steering Committee helped to identify
important regional issues as they relate to the
local governments.
•
1.2
Cross boundary issues: Focus on issues that
cannot
be
addressed
by
one
local
government becau se the issue affects more
than one local government {and in some
cases, cross regional district boundaries) . For
example,
air
quality,
environmental
protection, watershed management and
economic development are issues that
transcend municipal boundaries.
Structure of the RGS
Joint Planning Approach and Agreement Among all
Parties:
The RGS represents a joint-planning approach to
addressing the growth issues that go beyond local
government boundaries.
This RGS update was a
co llaboration from the member municipalities, First
Nations and Provincial agencies that utilized the
consultations and research, as well the updated
Official Community Plans to provide a directional
document that allows each member municipality the
ability to choose how they will implement the future
direction into their land use decisions. Many agencies
and organizations contributed their expertise to this
RGS update including, but not limiting to, the School
District No. 23, Interior Health and the Agricultural
Land Commission .
The strategy is an agreement among governments and
agencies to work together on common issues to find
common solutions. The strategy reflects a shared
regional vision for the future, as well as goals and
policies necessary to achieve effective growth
management.
en
cu
~
~
cu
ffi
_g
-g
C"'C
E
-S
.s:::
~ --:;;
~ ~
~==n
~Transportauon §
fconomicDevelopment§
Climate. ~
~
+
RGS
§........ ::c:
s WaterResources
Pol icy Statements
Series of Maps
iiitf!fi&
Page 22 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
Source : Regional District of Central Okanag<
The RGS content:
Section 1
Introduction
Section 2
Regional Context: A profile of the
RDCO is provided as a baseline. This
provides both the qualitative and
quantitative groundwork for the review
of the RGS .
Section 3
Regional Growth Strategy: Ten issue
areas form the policy structure and each
issue area includes:
•
•
•
Section 4
Appendices
Goal- Overall long-term goal of
the issue area that reflects the
input and responds to the Region's
future opportunities and
challenges around growth
management;
Synopsis- Summarizes the issue
area within the regional context
based on the background
research; and,
Policies- The statements that help
achieve the issue area goal.
Monitoring and Evaluation: The
essential responsibility associated with
the implementation priorities, and
timing, monitoring and accountability
are documented.
Technical Appendices: provides
reference material to inform and
supplement the RGS Review and
Update. Information that is more
detailed can be obtained from the RDCO
Community Services Department.
iiii1!tili
Page 23 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
2.0
CONTEXT
2.1
Central Okanagan Directive
A regional district's primary role is determined by its
member jurisdictions. Regional districts act only in
response to the expressed needs, interests and
instructions of their members and address issues that
cross political boundaries. Regional districts serve
three primary roles with the relative importance of
each role varying from region to region:
•
To serve as the local government for their
unincorporated (electoral) areas;
•
To provide services to, and on behalf of,
different
combinations
of
member
municipalities and electoral areas; and,
To provide services to, and on behalf of, their
entire regions (i.e., all member jurisdictions).
•
wide services such as dog control, solid waste
collection and recycling, 9-1-1, Regional Parks and the
Emergency Response Plan for the Central Okanagan.
The illustration in Figure 2.1 shows the RDCO's
departments and responsibilities.
In 2010, the Regional Board adopted the Regional
District's Strategic Plan that sets priorities for the
Region. The Strategic Plan's intentions are for the
Regional District to focus energies and resources on:
•
•
•
The RDCO provides services to residents in the
Electoral Areas, including water, planning and solid
waste collection. The District also provides region
Establishing and promoting a v1s1on and
priorities for the broader, regional community;
Developing regional plans and strategies to
address joint issues; and,
Coordinating municipal efforts that are taken to
achieve joint services goals.
Figure 2.1: RDCO Services
Community Services
Corporate Services
Inspection and Fire Services
• RDCO Business Licenses
• Electoral Area Building Inspection &
Permits
• Electoral Area Paid On-call Fire
Departments
• Regional Rescue
•
•
•
•
•
•
Planning Services
• Regional Planning
• Electoral Area Planning
• Subdivision & Rezoning Applications
• Development and Variance Permits
• Official Community Plans
• Joe Rich Rural land Use Bylaw
• Environmental Planning
• Regional Growth Strategy
• Advisory Planning Commissions
•
•
•
Information Services
• Information Systems
• Geographic Information Systems
Environmental Services
• RDCO Water Systems
• Westside Regional Waste Water
Treatment Plant
• Mosquito Control
• Subdivision Services
• Regional Waste Reduction Office
• Solid Waste Management
Economic Development
Commission
•
•
•
•
•
Business Attraction
Business Retention
Business Facilitation
Public Information
Social Development Program
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Corporate Records
Board & Committee Meetings
Administrative Support
Board Support
Interagency Liaison
Communications & Intergovernmental
Affairs
Web Site an<;t Social Media
Freedom of Information Act
Elections, Referenda & Alternative
Approval Process
Bylaw Enforcement & Bylaw Adjudication
Program
Dog Control
Noise Bylaw
Smoke Control Bylaw
Untidy Premises
Insect & Weed Control
Sign Bylaw
Parks Services
Regional Parks
• Central Okanagan East Community Parks
• Central Okanagan West Community
Parks
• Joe Rich Community Hall
• Ellison Heritage School Community
Centre
• Killiney Hall
Police Services
• 911 Telecommunications Centre
• Crime Stoppers Program
• Victim Services Program
• Regional Crime Prevention Program
Page 24 of 104
Finance and Administration
Services
Financial Services
• Financial Plan/Budget
• Treasury/Fiscal Services
• Financial Reporting
• Asset Management
• Payroll
• Utility Billing and Collection
• Accounts Payable
• Accounts Receivable
• Regional Transit Services
Human Resources
• Staffing
• Wellness, Health & Safety
• Employee Relations
• Training and Development
• labour Relations
• Compensation and Benefits
Administration
• Public Reception Services
• Burning Permits
Purchasing and Fleet
• Manage RDCO Office Building
• Purchasing
• Fleet Services
REGIONAL DISTRICT
ol CENTRAL OKANAGAN
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
The Mission Statement created for the Strategic Plan
provides overall guidance to the Regional District and
is as follows:
"The Regional District of Central Okanagan will
provide effective and efficient services that meet
the needs of our citizens, in a manner that
nurtures growth, opportunities and prosperity,
while maintaining and enhancing the unique
Central Okanagan lifestyle and environment."
The Board identified priority areas to pursue in the
2010 Strategic Plan. The term "priority area" was used
to define a theme, topic or area of service that the
Board viewed as important for the Region and that
would best be addressed on a regional level. In 2012,
the Board reviewed priority areas of the Strategic Plan
and endorsed the following areas:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Growth Management;
Transportation;
Intergovernmental Affairs; and,
Hazard Management.
Regional Overview
The RDCO is situated on both sides of the mid-section
of Okanagan Lake. The Okanagan is characterized by
cool humid air and cloudy skies in the winter and by
dry air and bright skies in summer.
The warm
summers with fairly low humidity, as well as the
relatively mild winters provide an attractive
environment for agriculture and recreation.
Since the adoption of the initial RGS in the year 2000,
there have been a number of changes in the Central
Okanagan, some highlights include:
•
Steady growth in population, housing, and
employment (population grew by 20%);
•
•
Opening of UBC Okanagan in 2005;
Incorporation of the District of West Kelowna
on December 6, 2007;
Expansion of Kelowna International Airport and
improvements along the Highway 97 Corridor;
Replacement of the three-lane Okanagan Lake
Bridge with the five-lane W.R. Bennett Bridge in
2008;
Increased efficiency and expansion of public
transit;
Protection of key recreation and conservation
lands (e.g. Mission Creek Greenway);
Expansion of Kelowna General Hospital;
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
These priority areas provide the general directions for
the Region, while more defined roles and tasks are
defined through budgets, work plans and agreements.
2 .2
Source: Regional District of Central Okanagan
Increased density of settlement areas, bringing
about efficiencies in servicing and infrastructure
costs; and
Endorsement of a regional growth vision and
implementation through Regional Context
Statements in the municipalities' community
plans.
2. 2 .1
DEMOGRAPHICS
The total population for the Central Okanagan from
the 2011 Census was 179,839. Population growth in
the Central Okanagan has historically outpaced growth
in the province overall. This trend continued in the
period between Census counts, where it outpaced the
provincial average by 4% over the 5-year period from
2006 to 2011 (Table 2.1, on page 6). Additionally, over
the census period the Region showed the fourth
highest population growth in the country.
Population growth in the Region has been primarily
due to in-migration (Table 2.2, on page 6) . High
inflows of migrants have resulted in the population of
the Region doubling in the past 25 years from 89,730
in 1986 to 179,839 in 2011. The Region was one of the
highest growth areas in the province through the
1990s. The past several years have seen slower, but
steady growth. The average rate of population growth
from 2000 to 2011 has been 2.1% per annum
compared to 4.0% per annum in the 1990s.
Intra-provincial migration has historically been the
largest segment of migration to the Central Okanagan.
However, interprovincial migration has been an
increasingly significant migration component over the
past eight years.
The Region has experienced a
smaller but steady flow of international migration over
the past seven years as well.
Page 25 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
The RDCO has experienced a decline in the net natural
increase between 2001 and 2006, however in recent
years the trend is starting to increase as shown in
Table 2.3, on page 6. The Region is seeing a healthier,
active senior which is translating to an increa sing life
expectancy. There has also been an unprecedented
increa se in births. Projections predict that the net
natu ral increase will be a positive number over the
next 10 years .
The net natural increase could
accelerate over the next 20 years as the majority of
the 65 and over age category will reach the age of 85 .
indicates that growth in the Region will result from
positive net migration .
The Central Okanagan has been older than the
provincial population throughout the last twenty
years . Table 2.4 (on page 7) highlights the fact that
the proportion of the population aged 45 years and
over increased significantly from 1996 to 2006 by
1
43 .3% . This increase can be partly attributed to the
area's large retirement base. The Region is a popular
retirement centre, and the increase in the proportion
of retirees in the population will support more service
sector employment. Over the long term, the Region is
expected to continue to receive strong net inflows of
population. The age group 15 to 24 showed an
increase that could be influenced by the creation of
the UBC Okanagan campus in 2005, which had a
starting population of 2,800 students.
UBC-0
2
Enrolment in 2010 was 7,075 .
Population projection numbers for the Region are
expected to exceed 270,000 by 2036, an increase of
45% from 2011 (Table 2.5, on page 7). The net
population growth projection from 2011 to 2036
Source: Regional District of Central Okanagan
Source : District of West Kelowna
1 So urce : Statistics Ca nada, Cens us 1991, 1996, 2001 and 2006
2 Sou rce : UBCO Webpage, Facts and Figu res, accessed t>1a rch 7, 20 11
Page 26 of 104
Page 27 of 104
-28
119
-136
322
400
422
408
654
717
548
312
2001·0
2002·03
2003·04
2004·05
2005·06
2006·07
2007·08
2008·09
2009-10
2010-11
804
1,234
1,214
2,202
2,201
1,547
1,210
II
][
II
II
II
II
II
1,978
1,049
1,049
1,040
1,093
1,184
1,810
1,249
II
II
I~
2,165
2,831
2,971
3,949
3,793
3,779
2,859
3,089
1,487
2,154
1,545
1,505
2,938
II
II
2,319
Total Net
Migration
2,245
2,063
1,593
1,668
2,177
2,240
Intra-Provincial
(Net)
Source: BC Stats- http:llwww.bcstats.gov.bc.ca!StatisticsBySubject!Demography/Mobility.aspx
11
:11
II
II
1,280
829
-182
134
2000·01
II
-291
II
-271
72
128
1999·00
II
-179
Interprovincial
(Net)
1998·99
258
International
(Net)
1997·98
1996·97
Year
Table 2.2: Central Okanagan Migration Components of Population
Growth 1996 to 2011
Source: BC Slats, Census
First Nations (including IR7, IR9 and IR 10)
Electoral Areas..
Peachland
Lake Country
West Kelowna••
26,347
9,005
89,445
136,537
Kelowna
3,724,500
British Columbia
Central Okanagan
29,673
9,270
3,907,738
5,527
9,610
4,113,487
Table 2.1 Population Estimates, Census Years Source: BC Stats, Census
3.9%
21 .8%
7.0%
-80 .6%
26.3%
12.6%
Source: BC Slats
2010-11
2009-10
2008-09
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
2004-05
2003-04
2002-03
2001-02
2000-01
1999-00
1998-99
1997-98
1996-97
Year
o=JL
II
11
II
1,511
1,526
1,464
1,448
1,417
1,456
1,335
1,328
1,171
][ ~
1,147
1,065
I
1,637
1,534
~ JL 1.5!!..._
1,654
1,577
1,533
1,427
1,346
1,355
1,322
1,294
1,344
1,414
1,348
.
1,380
1,433
-
---
103
143
69
-71
-13
173
201
368
Table
2.3:
Central
Okanagan
Natural
Increase
Components of Population Growth 1996 to 2011,
5,742
11,708
4,400,057
e
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
!
1996
2001
Source: BC Slats
50000
100000
.!! 150000
.,~
200000 •
250000 •
300000
2011
2016
2021
2026
2031
2036
0"
,,.
I.,,
...
...
.
1001
12'!1
14'l<
Page 28 of 104
Under 5
5·14
15-24
25-34
Age Groups
35-49
Table 2.5: Population Projections for Age Groups, BC Stats
2006
12.7%
Figure 2.2: RDCO Population Projection, BC Stats
50-64
Source: BC Slats
65 plus
Total
-
Census Years
Percent Change
Table 2.4: Population Estimates for Age Groups, Census Years,
BC Stats and Census
e
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
2 .2 .2
E MPLOYM ENT P ROJ ECTION S
The Central Okanagan's economic diversity has been
its strength in the past and its future will depend on
continuing to enhance that diversity (Figure 2.2). The
traditional employment generators will still be
important in the future, but they will be
complemented by the growth of other industries such
as health care, education, research and development,
tourism, aerospace and high tech sectors. Most job
creation is coming from smaller business employers.
The trend towards smaller businesses may lead to
more interest in the clean, high tech/business parks,
office complexes and even home occupations; the
latter of which has seen significant growth in the
Central Okanagan in recent years.
Although unemployment has risen slightly in recent
years, the private sector identifies a concern that
succession planning, or the need for filling the void in
certain occupations, will be felt more dramatically as
the current workforce ages. There is a projection of a
reduced labour supply within the 25 - 49 age group .
The trend is one that is being faced across the country.
However, this region may experience a greater impact
due to the attraction of retirees to this area. It will be
important to attract and retain youth or young skilled
labour and professionals graduating from local
educational institutions by employers in both public
and private sectors. This will require the development
of strategies amongst member municipalities and
various partners to create communities and
employment opportunities that are attractive for the
long term . One example of a program in action
Source : Regional District of Central Okanagan
targeting the younger labour force is the work of the
Okanagan Young Professionals program. The EDC
helps support the program to help attract, assist and
retain talented professionals in their 20's and 30's to
the Okanagan Valley as this works toward filling the
employment opportunities in the Region.
Figure 2.3: Employment in the Central Okanagan by Industry, Census 2011
20.4
f'f)~hC¥frd
V\J ......~ .
~U' ) '-( f ,IUI
wtr : !~ J '>,j
t<.~U.- ;: ~G\~~
j.•\>-IN\0'1.
~(~ .....
I<X~J'l.$Wu
nl.f".( f "><l .. n"CI~.niK<V{~I~OlNtoH
Page 29 of 104
0t~l~(n
1\t>lc
u ..-.l'ls:v .: :n
GcoQo:hpto.!utrf
~o«t"'
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3.0
REGIONAL GROWTH STRATEGY
3.1
Our Regional Vision
In order to protect quality of life, the Region is committed to working together in creating and supporting
economic opportunities, addressing issues of environmental quality and planning for future services such as
transportation and water systems. The RGS Vision Statement describes the ideal outcome for the Region. This
vision sets out direction for the management of future growth with subsequent policies and actions for
implementation.
"The Central Okanagan is a region of urban and rural communities that are
interconnected, distinct, healthy, vibrant and welcoming.
The citizens,
businesses, First Nations Councils and local governments understand and accept
that they are individually and jointly responsible to effectively and efficiently
manage the Region's future growth that ensures the health and well-being of its
residents. Together and from this time forward, the citizens and governments of
the Central Okanagan will work in partnership to promote a complete healthy
region with a sustainable and diversified economy that provides a range of
economic opportunities while protecting the natural environment and water
resources for today's and tomorrow's residents."
3.2
Regional Issue Areas
Many of the regional issues of the RGS require cross jurisdictional collaboration in order to plan for the long term
growth in the Central Okanagan. The following issue areas and goals were identified through stakeholder and
public input to respond to the future challenges and opportunities in the Central Okanagan:
Issue Area
I
I
-- - --
-
--
Goal
Our Land
To manage the land base effectively to protect natural resources and limit urban
sprawl
Our Economy
To develop and enhance a positive business environment in the region to achieve
a dynamic, resilient and sustainable economy
Our Water Resources
To manage and protect water resources
Our Health
To contribute to the improvement of community health, safety and social wellbeing
Our Food
To support a regional food system that is healthy, resilient and sustainable
Our Housing
To improve the range of housing types and tenures to meet the social and
economic needs of the region
Our Climate
To minimize regional greenhouse gas emissions and respond to the impacts of
climate change
Our Ecosystems
Be responsible stewards of natural ecosystems to protect, enhance and restore
biodiversity in the region
Our Transportation
To enhance the regional transportation system to ensure that it is accessible,
affordable, and efficient
Our Governance
To respond to the needs of the region with an effective and efficient governance
service model
Mit!&
Page 30 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3 .2 .1
O U R L AND
Goal
To manage the land base effectively to
protect natural resources and limit
urban sprawl
.2
Proposals for new growth areas should consider
the impacts on existing services and facilities in
the community;
.3
Support the protection of the rural areas that
offer a rural lifestyle choice;
.4
Encourage access to and opportunity for
development of Crown resources and rural
land that provide economic opportunities that
contribute revenues to support community
social, health, education and transportation
services for the citizens of the Central
Okanagan while having minimal impacts to the
land, wildlife, and sensitive environmental
areas;
Synopsis
The Central Okanagan's land base is largely defined
by its mix of mountains, lakes, wetlands,
watercourses, forests, grasslands, vineyards and
orchards .
These features form the significant
surroundings that add to the character of the Region
and help define the Central Okanagan lifestyle.
Maintaining and managing the land base, both the
rural and urban lands, is essential to ensure the
preservation of the lifestyle that re sidents and
tourists value . There are several areas and lands
adjacent and outside the urban areas that provide
for drinking water sources, agriculture, recreation,
wildlife, and flora and fauna habitat as well as
opportunities for the forestry and mining industries.
Continued growth in this region will push
development to these areas; however, focusing
growth to areas of existing services can minimize
impact and effectively manage opportunities for
source water protection, protection of environment
and habitats as well as manage opportunities for
resource development.
Policies
.5
.6
Support the continued exchange of information
with provincial agencies on future land use
decisions that impact the interface of the
boundaries of crown land adjacent to
municipalities and regional districts and best
management practices for resource extraction
to minimize negative impacts in the Region
(e.g.,
truck
traffic,
environmental
considerations, land use conflicts, nuisances);
.7
Support urban and rural land uses that provide
affordable, effective and efficient services and
infrastructure that conserve land, water and
energy resources;
.8
Support the protection of ALR lands and land
uses
which
are
supportive
and/or
complimentary to agricultural use;
The Central Okanagan regional partners agree to:
.1
Support logical and sequential growth patterns
that minimize urban encroachment into rural
areas;
Support the protection of water supply on
crown land and/or rural areas for all water
users;
Source: Regional District of Central Okanagan
Page 31 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
.9
Promote the identified urban/village centres in
current community plans to provide a range of
amenities and services;
.10
Encourage the examination of future land use
designations that consider the Region's
aggregate resource based on the site suitability
checklist prepared in the Aggregate Supply and
Demand Update (2013};
.11
Encourage
cooperation
and
information
sharing with regional partners on hazard
identification and mapping programs to
provide better and more information on hazard
management;
.12 Encourage
cooperation
and
information
sharing with regional partners to identify data
and information necessary to improve hazard
and resiliency planning; and,
.13
Ensure there is an appropriate supply of land
used for economic opportunities, public
facilities and infrastructure and protection of
natural environment for the regions projected
population growth .
Source : District of West Ke/owna
Util&l
Page 32 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3.2.2
OUR ECONOMY
Goal
To develop and enhance a positive
business environment in the region to
achieve a dynamic, resilient and
sustainable economy
•
•
create jobs
improve residents' quality of life
•
foster a diverse and balanced economic
base;
•
help reduce the Region's GHG emissions;
and,
•
increase economic
regional prosperity.
Synopsis
The diversity of the Central Okanagan's economy has
historically been its strength. A healthy, strong and
diverse economy is one of the cornerstones of a
sustainable community. The Region's future will
depend on supporting the diversity along with
investment opportunities for new and upcoming
economic sectors that complement the existing
sectors.
Local governments have the ability to
influence investment climate and economic viability
in the Region and as such, working together will
enhance the Regions opportunities to compete
regionally, nationally and globally.
Attracting,
maintaining and promoting economic activity in this
region is important as it helps retain existing jobs
and creates a solid tax base.
As the Central
Okanagan endeavours to become a more sustainable
region and protect its quality of life, coordination
and collaborating efforts will help in creating,
supporting and enhancing economic opportunities
throughout the Region.
The growth strategy
provides an opportunity to encourage and support
development that enhances economic diversity for a
healthier local economy.
Policies
The Central Okanagan regional partners agree to:
.1
Support a comprehensive regional approach to
create an attractive investment climate for the
Region by working in partnership with the
province, local municipalities, First Nations and
economic development agencies;
.2
Encourage and support related economic
development initiatives that address the needs
and challenges in the Region;
.3
Support efforts in building a strong regional
economy to:
•
development
and
.4
Support each community's interest to develop
vital and dynamic communities with vibrant
town and village centres;
.5
Support economic plans that focus
retention, attraction and facilitation
business within the Region;
.6
Encourage cooperation with educational
institutions and the private sector to build a
profile of the Region as a knowledge
base/education centre;
.7
Encourage
cooperation
among
research
facilities,
educational
institutions,
local
governments and businesses technology to
explore opportunities in new economic sectors
and new investment in the form of human and
business capital;
.8
Support for the prov1s1ons in the housing
section are considered within the context of
economic development, as the diversity of
housing opportunities and affordable housing
options are important to support economic
development;
.9
Support effectively managing and protecting
the integrity of the Region's critical assets such
as the lakes, natural environment and
agricultural lands that promote attraction of
employment and investment;
on
of
.10 Promote reliable and efficient development
application processes and a commitment to
long term financial planning for servicing and
infrastructure (roads, sewer and water) that
attracts and retains business and private
investment and employment; and,
.11 Promote land development patterns
support a diverse regional economy.
that
promote and stimulate innovation;
ama
Page 33 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3 .2 .3
O UR WATER R ESOURCES
Goal
.3
Work with local governments, provincial
agencies to assess and mitigate the risks in
floodplains;
.4
Utilize best management practices to protect
and manage water resources, groundwater and
surface water, through integrated watershed
planning to improve water quality, and
adequate supply for the Region;
.5
Continue in partnership with the Okanagan
Basin Water Board (OBWB) and regional
partners to encourage valley wide cooperation
and coordination regarding the conservation of
water and protection of all water sources;
.6
Encourage the preparation of a water
management plan by the Okanagan Basin
Water Board on the Region's water supply in
response to the impacts of climate change and
future population growth; and,
.7
Encourage opportunities to utilize "on-site"
recycled water for landscaping and other uses
within new and redevelopment projects.
To manage and protect water
resources
Synopsis
Water is an essential resource for people, the
economy, and for the natural environment.
Okanagan Lake is the main central feature in the
Central Okanagan that provides a unique and
beautiful landscape as well as the basic sustenance
needed for a vibrant community and economy.
Water is a collective resource that is shared by
people and the environment and supports the
economy. Studies show that climate change will
impact water levels in the Region, which means
competition for water will increase. Considering the
importance water has in sustaining life and the
lifestyle residents value, it is important that we
continue to manage water resources effectively to
ensure the Region and the Okanagan Valley can
accommodate the needs for all users, including
plants and animals in the environment, now and in
the future .
Policies
The Central Okanagan regional partners agree to:
.1
Consider water resources in land use planning
decisions;
.2
Encourage the development of water source
protection plans to improve drinking water
quality, quantity and timing of flow of water
sources;
Source : District of West Kelowna
Page 34 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3 .2 .4
O UR HEALTH
Goal
To contribute to the improvement of
community health, safety and social
well-being
.4
Continue efforts to improve air quality by
supporting
the
Regional
Air
Quality
Management Plan;
.5
Promote community health and safety through
investments in education, recreation, health,
community development, social support, civic
design, environmental design, maintenance
and economic development;
.6
Encourage cooperation with Interior Health to
explore opportunities to develop healthy
community strategies;
.7
Support Interior Health in efforts to increase
public education and awareness around the
links between population health and land use
planning;
.8
Incorporate health and principles of a Healthy
Built Environment into the development of
comprehensive plans;
.9
Encourage joint use agreements with School
District No . 23 in projects, programs and
facilities to improve and maximize the use of
existing parks, facilities and community
services; and,
Synopsis
The Region is made up of various communities in
which people live, work and play and how local
governments design the communities is very
important to the health and well-being of its citizens.
The land use decisions that have created the current
land use patterns have directed and influenced
investment in infrastructure and transportation
systems, which in turn have contributed to impacts
on personal health . Historical land use decisions
have tended to suppo rt lower-density, automobileoriented and urban fringe development.
These
decisions and land use patterns have created our
travel behaviours, level of activity and have had an
impact on health through a person's level of physical
fitness,
pollution
exposure
and
community
interaction .
Growth management and careful
community design to encourage more physical
activity will help reduce the risk for developing
chronic conditions and see multiple benefits in the
· form of increased physical activity, less sedentary
time in cars, and less air pollution . Promoting a
healthy community and a corresponding healthy
lifestyle will make our regional community an
attractive place where people want to live, work and
play.
.10 Encourage cooperation with School District No .
23 to locate and design schools to be the focal
point of community life in the neighbourhoods
in which they are located.
Policies
The Central Okanagan regional partners agree to:
.1
Actively promote and support physical activity,
sense of place, social interaction and
neighbourliness as these encourage the growth
of the Region as a place that is safe, diverse
and inclusive;
.2
Support regional partners, including schools
and bu sinesses in strengthening healthy living
opportunities that focus on physical activity;
.3
Support active transportation initiatives of the
regional partners;
Source: District of West Kelowna
Page 35 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3.2.5
OUR FOOD
Goal
.4
Support appropriate water supply for the
agriculture industry through the continued
efforts to have efficient irrigation infrastructure
and
proper
functioning
and
healthy
watersheds;
.5
Encourage cooperation that considers the
potential to use public lands for community
gardens and/or creation of edible landscapes
to encourage grassroots civic agriculture within
urban areas;
.6
Promote the use of agriculture and ALR lands
for food production and ancillary agriculture
processing and retailing consistent with uses
outlined in the Agricultural Land Commission
Act and Regulation and,
.7
Protect the supply of agricultural land and
promote agricultural viability .
To support a regional food system
that is healthy, resilient and
sustainable
Synopsis
The Central Okanagan has strong agricultural roots
and this sector has been important in defining the
region and its growth pattern. With changes in
population, pressures of development, increased
climate impacts, water pressures, and more focus on
local food production for sustainability, these
changes have raised more awareness on food
systems
from
cultivating
and
planting
to
consumption to the compost heap, and back again.
Today, food policies appear on the agenda of dozens
of municipal governments across North America and
beyond.
Future planning can help ensure food
systems are adequately addressed in growth
management decisions.
Policies
The Central Okanagan regional partners agree to:
.1
Encourage cooperation with regional partners,
provincial ministries and stakeholders that
consider a regional agricultural strategy to
identify issues and the present and future
needs of the agricultural sector that will
contributes to the well being of all residents to
guide food security, economic opportunity and
the protection of agricultural land;
.2
Preserve and support sustainable agricultural
activities and land base that enhances local
agriculture through the strengthening of best
practices, support of local and regional food
systems and the expansion of local food
markets and agri-tourism;
.3
Source: Regional District of Central Okanagan
Encourage cooperation with the Agricultural
Land Commission and the Ministry of
Agriculture to promote consistency among
bylaws, policies, regulations, and decisions that
will be made regarding agriculture;
Page 36 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3 .2 .6 O UR HOU S ING
Goal
Policies
To improve the range of housing
opportunities to meet the social and
economic needs of the region
Synopsis
The Central Okanagan regional partners have been
actively addressing local housing needs (market and
non-market). Housing location, type, affordability,
and choice are important factors that affect long
term economic health and community sustainability.
Focusing new housing units to areas with existing
services can reduce infrastructure costs and support
public transit services, as well as more active,
healthier transportation choices such as walking and
biking.
Ensuring a diversity of housing options
irrespective of demographics, lifestyle interests or
financial situation allows people and families to live
and stay in the Okanagan Valley. The identified need
for more affordable housing for those who live and
work in the Region continues to be a concern. It is
important to consider land use decisions that focus
new residential developments in areas with existing
services, as this assists in housing affordability,
reducing reliance on vehicles in the Region, and
creates opportunities for residents to be closer to
work and recreation opportunities, which in turn
contributes to a healthier region.
The Central Okanagan regional partners agree to :
.1
Preserve and enhance existing neighbourhoods
through encouragement of a variety of housing
types, densities, choices and affordability;
.2
Encourage new residential units and retrofits of
older residential units to incorporate building
materials and products that reduce energy and
water consumption;
.3
Encourage new growth areas to include
sustainable community and neighbourhood
design practices that demonstrate housing
affordability/housing choices for the full
housing spectrum;
.4
Build capacity within the Region to advance
affordable housing initiatives and increase the
amount of transition and supportive housing in
the Region.
Source: Regional District of Central Okanagan
liil1tmi
Page 37 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3 .2. 7
O UR C LIMATE
Goal
To minimize regional greenhouse gas
emissions and respond to the impacts
of climate change
.3
Consider
GHG
reduction
and
climate
adaptation/mitigation in decision-making as
well as in planning policies and regulatory
measures;
.4
Reduce reliance upon fossil fuels by promoting
and
supporting
renewable
energy
infrastructure, such as solar power and
geothermal, and by purchasing energy supplied
by renewable sources.
Renewable energy
systems should be pursued in collaboration
with Provincial, Federal and private sector
programs;
.5
Encourage design
and
"retrofitting" of
neighbourhoods to reduce a person's travel
distance and frequency of trips, and increase
access to alternative modes of transportation;
.6
Encourage cooperation with regional partners,
provincial ministries and stakeholders on
initiatives that improve efforts to reduce GHG
emissions, improve energy conservation and
mitigate climate change impacts;
.7
Encourage mixed use compact communities
and facilitate the transformation of existing
neighbourhoods so that
residents can
conveniently and safely travel by bus or by
foot, bicycle and other forms of active
transportation to get to major community
destinations while ensuring the efficient
movement of goods and services; and,
.8
Encourage land use and transportation
infrastructure that improves the ability to
withstand climate change impacts and natural
hazard risks.
Synopsis
The changing climate will create a challenge as the
Region continues to see further climate change
impacts. To help address climate change, action is
required by local governments to ensure planning
decisions respond to reducing GHG emissions and
negative environmental impacts. Planning deci sions
determine land use development, transportation
patterns, building design, public infrastructure and
energy supply systems well into the future, and as
such will have significant influence on energy
consumption and levels of GHG emissions. The
current land use patterns, forecasted population
growth and identified residential projects in the
Region will make it ambitious to achieve the
provincial target of 33 % reduction in GHG emissions
by 2020. However, with refocusing around how the
Region manages growth, there is an opportunity to
achieve the target to reduce GHG emissions by 80%
by 2050 in the Region. Supporting the following
policies will help to reduce the impacts of climate
change in the Region identified above.
Policies
The Central Okanagan regional partners agree to :
.1
Work toward meeting the provincial target of
reducing GHG emissions by 80% from 2007
levels by 2050;
.2
Support the use of innovative approaches and
technologies to help conserve energy and thus
reduce GHG emissions;
Page 38 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3 . 2 .8
O UR E CO SYST EMS
Goal
Be responsible stewards of natural
ecosystems to protect, enhance and
restore biodiversity in the region
.3
Manage growth to m1n1m1ze disturbance to
habitat, watershed and natural drainage areas
and systems;
.4
Encourage collaboration with regional partners
on enhancing wildlife corridor linkages to
improve habitat connectivity that avoids
fragmentation and isolation of important
habitats;
.5
Encourage a mix of parkland and open space
that protect regionally significant ecosystems,
and natural and cultural attributes;
.6
Encourage and support coordinated efforts to
protect and enhance the Region's forests,
environmentally sensitive and significant areas;
.7
Protect natural environments, parks and water
systems, as these systems are essential to the
quality of life in the Okanagan that support
active and healthy lifestyles;
.8
Explore funding mechanisms to support
regionally significant natural areas, open space
and parkland acquisitions;
.9
Support the provisions of the Water Resources
section to be considered in context of all
discussions regarding the Region's ecosystems;
Synopsis
As population grows in the Region, the protection of
healthy ecosystems will become increasingly
complex and challenging. The Okanagan provides
unique habitat to various species of wildlife that are
found nowhere else in the country. There are more
than 1,597 identified species at risk in BC, including
48 species within the RDCO . The landscape is an
intricate balance of natural systems that provides
clean water, fresh air and an area that residents
highly value.
Numerous reports, strategies, and
plans have been created, discussed, and adopted
throughout the Regional District and across the
province on the environmental concerns related to
the ecosystem and it is necessary to understand and
protect the ecosystems for the health of the Region.
Although regional partners have a number of
initiatives underway to protect the environment,
there is a strong need for a regional and coordinated
approach
to
protection,
enhancement
and
restoration of the Region's ecosystems.
The
Region's natural ecosystems will continue to face
development pressures and it will be important for
the Region to manage growth to balance the human
need for resources, recreation, enjoyment and
aesthetics with the need to protect, conserve and
restore natural areas and biodiversity.
.10 Encourage cooperation with land trusts and
local conservation organizations to educate
landowners on species at risk;
.11 Support continued research on local species at
risk within the Region and share the
information;
.12 Encourage
Policies
The Central Okanagan regional partners agree to:
.1
Encourage cooperation for the management of
regional biodiversity practices as outlined in
the Okanagan Biodiversity Strategy;
.2
Encourage collaboration to adopt consistent
terminology, policies and actions that support
the
protection
and
conservation
of
environmental features and watersheds within
the Region;
collaboration
with
regional
partners, provincial ministries and stakeholders
to consider regional conservation, watershed
and
other ecosystem-based
plans
and
strategies that will update existing inventories;
.13 Support cooperation with regional partners on
environmental matters, particularly where
there
are
developments/issues
located
adjacent to political boundaries; and,
.14 Support cooperation on the maintenance and
update
of environmental
mapping for
terrestrial, foreshore and aquatic areas
throughout the Region on a regular basis.
Page 39 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3 .2 .9
O UR T RAN SPORTATION
Goal
b.
The promotion of programs and incentives
that increase sustainable transportation
choices and Transportation
Demand
Management Strategies; and,
c.
The support for the use of alternate-fueled
vehicles (e.g. electric vehicles);
To enhance the regional transportation
system to ensure that it is accessible,
affordable, and efficient
Synopsis
Land
use
influences
travel
patterns
and
transportation systems in turn influence land use
and development. Achieving the goals of the RGS
requires
the alignment of land
use and
transportation strategies. It is important to consider
shifting the Region's travel patterns away from auto
dependency toward moving people rather than
vehicles . Within a region consisting of multiple
jurisdictions, transportation that is accessible,
affordable, and efficient is not a goal each
jurisdiction can achieve in isolation. Everyday many
people travel throughout the Region and the entire
Okanagan Basin . Partners must work together to
effectively plan, coordinate, manage, and monitor
the Region's transportation system in order to
achieve sustainable transportation goals that are
defined in the individual plans and policies of the
local governments of the Central Okanagan.
Policies
.4
Support a regional integrated trail system for
active transportation that is appropriate for
commuting and/or exercise and recreational
uses that connects to rural areas, parks, public
facilities, and town/village centres;
.5
Support transit oriented development as well
as active transportation amenities in urban
land use designations;
.6
Place increased emphasis on sustainable
modes of transportation (walking, cycling,
transit) while maintaining efficient automobile,
commercial goods and emergency vehicle
mobility;
.7
Encourage new educational facilities to be
located central to their catchment area and
where they can be accessed by sustainable
modes of transportation;
.8
Prioritize funding for transit and nonmotorized
improvements, including projects such as
sidewalks, traffic calming, bike lanes, and
better transit service or access;
.9
Prioritize improvements for public buildings in
well-connected, compact urban areas (such as
schools, government buildings) for access for
pedestrians and cyclists, and the provision of
bicycle parking and end-of-trip facilities;
The Central Okanagan regional partners agree to :
.1
.2
.3
Support
the
Sustainable
Transportation
Partnership of the Central Okanagan as a
means of administering, governing and
coordinating
the
delivery
of
regional
transportation planning and services;
Encourage
collaboration
with
regional
partners,
neighbouring regional
districts,
provincial ministries, BC Transit, and federal
government
to
improve
inter-regional
transportation opportunities;
Maximize the efficiency of the regional
transportation system and reduce GHG
emissions through:
a.
.10 Encourage major employers to create and
support programs for active transportation
options; and,
.11 Collaborate with School District No. 23 to
provide safe routes to school, including
walking, cycling and transit options.
Providing active transportation options
and connect residents to facilities,
recreation and services throughout the
Central Okanagan and its neighbouring
communities and region;
Page 40 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
3 . 2 . 10
O UR G OVERNANC E
Goal
To respond to the needs of the region
with an effective and efficient
governance service model
.2
Encourage effective governance and service
delivery by being transparent, accountable and
accessible;
.3
Continue
to
build
and
enhance
communications and relationships with local
First Nations communities;
.4
Support opportunities for regional partners to
collaborate, communicate and coordinate on
matters of regional significance;
.5
Encourage collaboration among the regional
partners on long range land use, infrastructure
and financial planning based upon projected
growth, emerging priorities and the anticipated
needs of communities;
.6
Ensure the Region maintains effective services,
which meets the present and future user
demands; and,
.7
Support the assessment of the social and
economic benefits of arts, culture, tourism, and
recreation amenities in decision on land use.
Synopsis
The roles and services for a regional district are
determined by its member jurisdictions and regional
district's act only in response to the expressed
needs, interests and instructions of their members
and address issues that cross political boundaries.
The mission of a regional district is to help protect
the quality of life for all citizens in the region by
planning for the future. As the Region grows, there
needs to be a balance of local autonomy with
effective regional coordination in order to address
environmental, economic, transportation and quality
of life issues that cross local government boundaries.
Long range planning for the Region is necessary to
identify opportunities and build partnerships to
protect the health and safety of current citizens as
well as future generations that will live in the Region.
Policies
The Central Okanagan regional partners agree to:
.1
Encourage cooperation, collaboration and
partnerships among regional partners in the
delivery of effective and efficient public
services and/or enhance opportunities of
mutual
benefit
for
cost
sharing
on
procurement, delivery of services, and/or
capacity building on issues to ensure financial
and human resources are invested effectively;
Source : Regional District of Central Okanagan
Page 41 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
4 .0
MO NITORING AN D E VALUATION
4.1 Implementation and Monitoring
The RGS presents ten (10) goals and associated
policies that will assist in realizing the regional vision.
Implementing the goals and policies will depend on
cooperation and coordination among regional
partners, neighbouring regions, and other agencies.
The RGS provides a strategic guide to managing the
future growth in the Region. Once adopted, it will be
the responsibility of the regional partners to
implement the RGS by taking action consistent with
the RGS as set out in Section 3. The RGS Steering
Committee will need to coordinate the strategic
priorities around the Region and align the priorities
with the goals and policies of the RGS in order to set
out a plan of action for regional growth management.
The plan will be included in the RDCO annual
budgeting and work plan to outline tasks and budget
for RGS implementation to be endorsed by the
Regional Board.
Being accountable for progress towards achieving the
goals of this RGS requires a commitment to
implementation,
target-setting,
establishing
indicators, and monitoring. Undertaking projects to
implement this RGS will be subject to available
budgets, departmental work plans and in some cases
financial contributions from regional partners and/or
external agencies. Over the 20 year time horizon of
the RGS some projects may be funded solely through
the RDCO' s Regional Planning function, with no
additional costs to the regional partners, while other
projects may require financial contributions from the
regional partners .
Notwithstanding, the wording in this RGS refers to an
"agreement" by the RDCO and regional partners to
follow a course of action, neither the RDCO nor
individual regional partners will be bound to
undertake or participate in any projects identified in
this RGS. This is consistent with the direction of the
Local Government Act {LGA} {Section 865 {3}} that
states "a RGS does not commit or authorize a regional
district to proceed with projects specified in the
strategy."
With the regional partners working cooperatively, the
strategy outlines the following set of tasks on the
implementation of the RGS:
1.
2.
3.
Update OCP Regional Context Statements
Develop a five year action plan
Explore Implementation Agreements
Source : Regional District of Central Okanagan
4.
5.
4.1.1
Prepare a Monitoring and Evaluation Program
Plan for Five-year reviews
UPDATE O C P REGIONAL C ONTEXT
S TATEMENTS
After acceptance and adoption of the RGS, local
governments will be required to prepare an update to
their OCP to include a regional context statement.
The context statement sets out the relationship
between the RGS and the OCP and identifies how
municipal actions will contribute to achieving the RGS
goals and vision. Regional partners will continue to
work together so that regional context statements
achieve consistency between the RGS and local
government OCP's and so that actions specified in the
RGS are implemented. The updated regional context
statements are to be completed within two years of
the adoption of the RGS and must be submitted for
acceptance to the Regional District after a review of
the RGS.
Page 42 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
The RDCO and regional partners will work to ensure
OCP policies are consistent with the goals, objectives
and policies of the RGS. The process should lead to
consistency over time, recognizing the economic,
social and environmental benefits of healthy
community
development,
preservation
and
connection of natural features, and ongoing land use
planning
cooperation,
collaboration
and
harmonization with First Nations.
4.1.2 F IVE YEAR ACTION PLAN
The RGS is designed to be realized over a twenty year
period and implemented through implementation
agreements, regional context statements and through
budget discussions regarding regional planning
initiatives. The review of the RGS (2011} emphasized
that we are, individually and jointly, responsible for
the effective management of the future growth for the
region. To ensure the region responds to this call to
action, through a collaborative process, staff and
elected officials will develop a 5 year action plan to
outline the priority initiatives to implement the RGS.
The development of a detailed 5-Year Action Plan is
considered a key element of a RGS implementation in
order to address the challenges facing the region over
the next 20 years . The 5-year action plan will be the
framework for RGS implementation and based on the
regional initiatives identified within the RGS and by
the Regional Board.
4.1.3 IMPLEMENTATION AGREEMENTS
An implementation agreement (lA) is a partnership
agreement between a regional district and other levels
of government, their agencies or other bodies which
spells out the details of how certain aspects of a RGS
will be carried out. Implementation agreements are
an important tool designed to promote coordination
between local governments and provincial agencies.
Consideration of agreements in the Central Okanagan
should focus on measures to maintain water quantity
and
quality,
regional
transportation,
regional
environmental
coordination,
stronger
regional
economic development and providing accessible and
affordable housing. lA's can deal with a wide range of
matters making them an important tool for
coordinating local-provincial partnerships and actions.
The Agreements may be used to establish
commitments for infrastructure investments, joint
planning projects, responsibility and revenue-sharing
agreements, and policy development
4 .1.4 RGS MONITORING AND
EVALUATION
After adopting an RGS, the Regional District, as
directed in the LGA section 869, must establish a
program to monitor the implementation and progress
of the RGS. The effectiveness of the RGS is assessed
through a monitoring program.
The monitoring
program will be established within the first year after
RGS adoption. The Regional District and regional
partners will need to discuss and agree on a
monitoring program with identified performance
metrics.
The monitoring program is intended to
provide the foundation for ongoing monitoring and
evaluation of the strategy. It can be added to or
modified over time to better meet the needs of the
Board of Directors and regional partners. Monitoring
is important to ensure the Board and local
government partners have feedback on whether or
not the goals and policies of the RGS are being
achieved.
The program should include performance measures to
review the condition, trend or emerging questions
under the regional issue areas. A list of performance
measures is provided in the appendix for each regional
issue area. The measures will help track changes over
time relative to the baselines. Reviewing and tracking
the changes will allow the regional partners to work
toward the regional vision.
The monitoring program will include an annual report
and a review of the RGS every five years to reassess
the strategy and consider whether amendments are
necessary. The annual monitoring report will contain
a mixture of the measures outlined in Section 3. A key
aspect of the implementation of the RGS is the
commitment to designing and implementing a
practical plan for performance measurement,
monitoring and accountability.
Source : Regional District of Central Okanagan
iiif.tii!li
Page 43 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
4.1.5
PLAN FOR FIVE-YEAR REVIEW
The LGA provides for a five-year review opportunity
for Regional Growth Strategies. The review process
provides an opportunity to assess the strengths and
weaknesses
of the growth
strategy,
assess
performance and re-evaluate solutions to persistent
region-wide issues and responses undertaken. The
growth strategy five year review will be an inclusive
process involving the public, regional partners,
organizations and other authorities as listed in section
855 of the LGA. The review will respond to new
provincial policies and legislation, as well as to
initiatives, research, studies and plans developed
responding to the regional issues that will assist with
the Region as a whole working toward the RGS vision.
The review will also assess the Region's demographic
data, census data, and assessment of the identified
initiatives undertaken in RGS .
Analysis of land use, environmental, engineering,
transportation and financial issues should be
combined into the review process to allow the public
and decision-makers to have a more complete
understanding of growth impacts in the Region. This
comprehensive approach will consider all of the
various issues and trade-offs involved in planning and
environmental assessment considerations .
4.2
Amendments to the RGS
4.2.1
STANDARD AMENDMENTS
An amendment to the RGS, other than those
considered a minor amendment, is considered a
standard amendment and will follow the same process
that is required to adopt a RGS as set out in Part 25 of
the LGA.
4.2.2
MINOR AMENDMENTS
Recognizing that the RGS will require some flexibility
to respond to changing conditions in the Region, the
minor amendment process is intended to provide a
more streamlined amendment process for minor
changes, while ensuring that amendments that
substantially change the vision and direction of the
strategy remain subject to acceptance by all affected
local governments.
The LGA enables minor amendments where a process
has been established pursuant to section 857.1 that
includes the following:
Five-Year Reviews form the basis for regional and local
assessment of progress towards the Region's future
growth vision. The Five-Year Reviews should set out
short-term implementation strategies to provide for
adequate land, infrastructure and public facilities over
a minimum of five years, and to encourage maximum
utilization of existing infrastructure and development
opportunities prior to extending development into the
undeveloped greenfield areas of the Region.
•
criteria for determining whether a proposed
amendment is minor for the purposes of
allowing the process to apply;
•
a means for the views of affected local
governments respecting a proposed minor
amendment to be obtained and considered;
•
a means for providing notice to affected local
governments respecting a proposed minor
amendment;
•
a means for providing public consultation and
input into the proposed minor amendment;
and,
•
procedures for adopting the
amendment bylaw.
minor RGS
Criteria for Minor Amendments
Criteria under which a proposed amendment to the
RGS may be considered a minor amendment include
the following:
Source: Regional District of Central Okanagan
a)
RGS policy rev1s1ons or additions that do not
alter the intent, direction or implementation of
the Strategy;
b)
Housekeeping amendments to population,
dwelling unit and employment projections,
housing demand estimates, tables, figures,
grammar, numbering or mapping refinements
Page 44 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
that do not alter the intent of the Regional
Growth Strategy
o
Give 45 days' written notice to each
affected local government, including notice
that the proposed amendment has been
determined to be a minor amendment.
The notice shall include a summary of the
proposed amendment and any staff
reports,
other
relevant
supporting
documentation and the date, time and
place of the board meeting at which the
amending bylaw is to be considered for
first reading.
o
Consider the written comments provided
by the affected local governments prior to
giving first reading to the proposed
amendment bylaw.
Any proposal that does not meet the criteria set out
above would be considered a standard amendment
and will be required to follow the regular process as
outlined in the LGA, Part 25.
Minor Amendment Process
The process to initiate amendments to the RGS is by
resolution of the Board of Directors. Municipalities
and the Electoral Areas, by resolution, may request
amendments to the RGS. The Board of Directors will
not give first reading to a minor or standard
amendment bylaw until the regional partners have
been given the opportunity to formally comment on
the proposed amendment.
On receipt of a request from a member municipality or
an Electoral Area to amend the RGS, the request will
be provided to the Regional District, for review with
due consideration of sub-regional or regional impacts
on
infrastructure,
transportation,
land
use,
precedence and cumulative effects of broad
replication. The Regional District staff will provide
recommendations to the Board of Directors.
Once a request for a minor amendment has been
received, the process for review and adoption is as
follows:
•
Upon receiving a minor amendment request,
the RDCO staff will review the request.
•
RDCO staff will prepare a report for review by
the RDCO Board of Directors.
•
The RDCO Board of Directors will assess any
proposed amendment in terms of the minor
amendment criteria. The Board of Directors
may resolve, by an affirmative vote of 2/3 of
the board members present, to proceed with an
amendment request as a minor amendment.
•
Where the Board of Directors resolves to
proceed with an amendment request as a minor
amendment, the Board will:
o
•
At the time of consideration of first reading, the
Board of Directors will determine whether an
opportunity for the public to speak on the RGS
minor amendment bylaw is required.
•
If the first reading of any minor amendment
bylaw receives an affirmative vote from all
Board of Directors attending the meeting, then
the bylaw shall be adopted in accordance with
the procedures that apply to the adoption of a
RGS under section 791 of LGA and Region
District of Central Okanagan Regional Board
Procedure Bylaw No. 1278, 2010 or as
amended.
•
If any minor amendment bylaw does not
receive affirmative vote of all Board of Directors
attending the meeting, the bylaw shall be
adopted in accordance with the procedures
that apply to the adoption of a RGS under
section 857 of the LGA and Regional District of
Central Okanagan Regional Board Procedure
Bylaw No. 1278, 2010 or as amended.
Determine the appropriate form of public
consultation required in conjunction with
the proposed minor amendment.
Page 45 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
APPENDICES
Appendix
Contents
A
Maps
B
List of Research Papers
c
Performance Metrics
---------
2013 Central Okanaga n Reg ion al Growth Strategy
Page 46 of 104
Append ices 25
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
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2013 Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy
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Appendices 26
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Appendix A - Maps
Maps
Contents
A-1
RDCO - Political Boundaries
29
A-2
Extent of "private" (non-crown) lands
30
A-3
Provincial, Regional and Major Municipal Parks
31
A-4
Preliminary Constraint Areas
32
A-5
Regional Land Use Inventory
33
A-6
Agricultural Land Reserve
34
A-7
Biodiversity Strategy - Relative Biodiversity
35
A-8
Biodiversity Strategy - Conservation Ranking
36
A-9
Biodiversity Strategy - Habitat Connectivity
37
2013 Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy
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Appendix B - List of Research Papers
Beginning in 2011, the first phase of the RGS Review and Update assessed numerous documents, plans and studies in its
background data collection process. These documents include legislation, by-laws and policies, planning references and a
number of specific studies and plans throughout the Okanagan Valley and British Columbia.
The RGS Review and Update was an opportunity to coordinate and align community plans, policies, priorities and programs
among the local municipalities, provincial ministries and First Nations. In the last five years, local municipalities within the
Region have reviewed and updated their Official Community Plans to identify their visions for the long term well being of
the communities and plan for their own needs while ensuring the needs of the future generations are met. The RGS Review
and Update process analyzed information from local municipalities and First Nations to ensure that all policy directions and
consultations will be incorporated to lead the Region into a sustainable future.
The update of the RGS sets the direction for current and future regional decision making with the goal of a sustainable
future for the Region. The RGS document is built on the analysis of historical trends and the collection of current and
forecasted data. Community planners and consultants attempted to identify all the data required so that the Region and
communities can make informed choices and decisions about future growth and change in the Region. The need to review
the RGS is to ensure that the most current data is considered and to understand the trends related to issue identification.
In some cases, issue identification is achieved through the public consultation process, literature review, and analysis of
economic and statistical information. Best practices and lessons learned from other jurisdictions respecting planning and
environmental issues and growth management have been included where relevant.
Over the course of the RGS Review and Update process, the RDCO and regional partners completed and gathered
information from various studies, assessments, inventories and updated their Official Community Plans. This work has
been reviewed to understand broad planning scenarios in the Region and helps provide the necessary detail to set
directions and make decisions as required to provide. The following reports and studies completed for the RGS Review and
Update have helped enhance the research completed through the previous work:
RGS- Preliminary Consultation Process. EcoPian International, April 2011
Background and Issues Report. RDCO Planning Department, July 2011
Greenhouse Gas (GHG} Emissions Technical Report. Sustainability Solutions Group, October 2011
Regional GHG Emissions Model. Sustainability Solutions Group, October 2011
RGS Youth Survey. Linda Abbott-Simons, Consultant, December 2011
Regional Discussion Papers:
•
Economic Development- CTQ Consultants Ltd., Ecoscape Environmental Consultants Ltd., September 2012
•
Environment Protection- CTQ Consultants Ltd., Ecoscape Environmental Consultants Ltd., September 2012
•
Housing- Cityspaces Ltd., September 2012
•
Parks & Open Space- AECOM Consultants, GDH Solutions, September 2012
•
Transportation and Mobility- Acurere Consulting Inc, Silex Consulting Inc., September 2012
•
Water Resources, Lakes & Streams - CTQ Consultants Ltd., Ecoscape Environmental Consultants Ltd. Clarke
Geoscience Ltd. and Western Water Associates Ltd., September 2012
•
Aggregate Demand and Supply Update- EBA Consultants, October 2013
RGS Growth Options Consultation. Sustainability Solutions Group, November 2012
2013 Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy
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2013 Central Okanagan
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Appendices 40
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Appendix C - Performance Metrics
Performance metrics are an opportunity to highlight the realization s and challenges faced by the Central Okanagan region in
planning and managing for growth. The measures were selected in consultation with local governments, in order to track the
Central Okanagan progress. Measures help track changes over time and assess future changes relative to an established baseline.
Reviewing and tracking the changes in the measures allows the regional partners to gain knowledge and amend directions as
necessary to work toward the regional vision . The information gathered with the measures does not facilitate change as it merely
indicates past performance. The Region will be able to learn from the information to allow the Region to " correct its course" by
modifying and adjusting its policies and tasks as the Region moves forward.
The following table provides some performance metrics for the Central Okanagan. This list is not an exhaustive list as more work
and research will be done for the annual and 5 year reporting on the RGS .
Indicator Description
Why it is important
Data Source
Measuring population per land
area within defined OCP areas.
70% of RDCO is crown land.
Higher densities in urban areas are related to more efficient
services and less urban sprawl.
RDCO GIS- RGS
land inventory
Communities of the Central Okanagan encourage
development within municipalities and serviced areas of
the Region as opposed to dispersed development enclaves
on outlying crown land.
Census Data DA's
Measure the commercial floor
area and number of residential
units within designated urban
and village centres as per
OCPs.
Designated urban and village centres are places where
residents can work, shop and enjoy
cultural/educational/recreational amenities close to home.
A balance of amenities provides a range of services and
opportunities so that residents are less likely to need to
travel long distances for basic goods and services.
BC Assessment
Employment
Rate
Number of persons employed
(15 yrs and older) working
Employment rates indicate the strength of the local
economy. High rates of employment result in stability of
the community and social well being.
BC Stats
Business
Licences
Any person owning or
operating a business within the
Central Okanagan
Focus on support and retention of businesses in the Region
Regional
Partners
Central
Okanagan
Number of
firms
Industry Sector based on NAICS
Canada (North American
Industrial Classification
System)
Shows the Regions businesses according to type of
economic activity.
BC Stats
Household
Income
Average and Median
household income
Average and Median household income provides an
assessment of the net effect of economic and employment
strategies. Income levels are an indicator of the strength of
the local economy. Compare to provincial levels.
BC Stats
Income by
Source
This indicator measures the
percentage of total income
that comes from three
categories of income sources:
earnings, government transfers
and other money
Shows the portion of income from government sources or
investments could leave the economy open to vulnerability.
BC Stats
Indicator
Our Land
Population
Density
Composition of
urban and
village centres
RDCO GIS- Land
inventory
OCP - urban and
village centres
Our Economy
Appendices 41
2013 Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy
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Indicator
Indicator Description
Why it is important
Data Source
Building Permits
Number of building permits
issued for re sidential,
commercial, industrial and
institutional
Identify the level of building activity in the Region .
Regional
Partners
Total
employment by
sector
This indicator measures the
percentage of employed
people that are working in
each sector as an indication of
the employment diversity in
the Region.
This indicator shows the concentration of the labour force
in various employment sectors. A predominance of people
working in one secto r could mean the Region is more
econom ically vulnerable . Alternatively, employment
diversification increases resilience to economic downturns.
By looking at the changing proportions of employment in
each sector, thi s indicator can reveal how the underlying
economic health of the Region is changing.
BC Stats
Our Water Resources
Water
consumption
Total water consumption from
the water purveyor distribution
systems (litres/capita/day).
Water availability is a concern and with population growth
and associated development in the Central Okanagan, there
is a potential shortfall in supply relative to demand.
Regional
Partners
OBWB
Water Quality
Ratings
Groundwater (Monitoring
Wells) and Surface Water
Changes in water quality reflect the value we place on and
our ability to care for aquatic ecosystems. Changes in the
quality of water give us an idea of the success of
community efforts to protect water for drinking, swimming,
fish, etc. and to respond to factors that affect water quality
(e.g.: industrial discharges, sewage treatment methods,
development activities, resource extraction, etc.).
Regional
Partners
The number of plans in place indicates a willingness from
public agencies to be proactive in addressing issues
associated with growth, multiple stakeholders and limited
natural resources.
Regional
Partners
# of boil water advisory days
(total), by water utility; # of
water systems that meet
provincial and federal
standards
#of source water protection
plans implemented
Source Water
Protection
Our Health
Chronic
diseases
Number of peop le with chronic
disease admitted to KGH
Air Quality
Air Quality Exceeds the
Canada-Wide Standards
Interior Health
Air pollution has been shown to have detrimental effects on
human health- particularly to persons with respiratory
ailments.
Kelowna
Agreements between two or
more government entities that
set out term s and conditions
for use of public property or
facilities
Help communities and school districts work together to
develop joint use agreements in order to increase access to
recreational facilities on school grounds that provide
opportunities for various services that support health and
social well-being.
Regional
Partners
Tracks the success of the
protection of agricultural land
Preservation of land for agriculture is the first and most
important step in ensuring agricultural viability.
(for PM 2.5 & Ground level
Ozone)
Average concentrations
(seasonal Jan, Mar, Jun, Sept)
Joint Use
Agreements/
projects/
programs/
facilities
SD 23
Our Food
ALR exclusions
and inclusions
-
20 13 Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy
ALC
Append ices 42
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
Indicator
Indicator Description
Why it is important
Data Source
Agriculture
Farm Receipts
measures the total value of
gross farm receipts (in dollars)
Provides a measure of the economic health of the
agricultural sector based on financial returns to farm
operators and the area of land farmed.
Census
I
Our Housing
Housing Starts
the number of new units by
structural type
Illustrates economic health, as well as shows the range of
housing types being supported in the marketplace.
BC Stats
Mix of dwelling
units
housing mix in the Region
A diversity of housing types suggests greater choice for a
variety of lifestyles and budgets and supports improved
housing affordability
Census
Housing
affordability
Difference between median
income level and sales
price/rental of homes
Review the ability of individuals and families to afford
housing within the Region.
BC Stats
%of owner
households
spending 30%
or more of
gross income on
housing
measures the percentage of
owner households spending
30% or more of their gross
income on housing.
Paying more than 30% of gross household income often
places strain on both individuals and families. Understand
how the Region is fairing with affordability.
Census
%of renter
households
spending 30%
or more of
gross income on
housing
measures the percentage of
renter households spending
30% or more of their gross
income on housing.
Paying more than 30% of gross household income often
places strain on both individuals and families . Understand
how the Region is fairing with affordability.
Census
energy consumption and
greenhouse gas emissions from
community activities in onroad transportation, buildings
and solid waste
Province provides the report that measures the GHG
profiles to help local governments meet its Climate Action
initiatives.
Province
Annual and
cumulative area
of parkland and
protected areas
total amount and percentage
of total land area of parks and
protected natural areas
Parks and protected areas provide habitat and support
biological diversity. Where there is limited conservation
land, it is more likely to be intensively managed and
cultivated potentially at the expense of natural habitat,
processes or systems.
Regional
Partners
Environmentally
Sensitive Lands
the amount of terrestrial
environmentally sensitive
areas protected by park or
protected area
The Okanagan in particular represents a biodiversity
"hotspot" as it provides unique habitats to wildlife that are
found nowhere else in the country. There are more than
1,597 identified species at risk in BC, including 48 species
within the RDCO.
Regional
Partners
Municipal solid
waste disposal
per capita
annual amount of municipal
solid waste (MSW) disposed in
landfills or incinerated by
residential, commercial,
institutional, demolition, land
clearing or construction source
Demonstrate how well the Region is doing at reducing
waste and the impact on the environment.
RDCO
Our Climate
Community
Energy and
Emissions
Inventory
Our Ecosystem
Appendices 43
2013 Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy
Page 63 of 104
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May 21, 2014 - Item D.2
Indicator
Indicator Description
Why it is important
•
- Data Source
Reclaimed
wastewater
discharge
Annual volume of waste water
discharged to Okanagan Lake
from water reclamation plants
As population growth increases, potentially increase the
amount of waste water being discharged into the lake.
Understanding the volume and consider the effluent being
discharge will allow monitoring of water quality and identify
any potential issues.
MOE
# km of streets with pedestrian
and cycling facilities, # km of
cycling infrastructure, # km of
sidewalks
Providing safe t ransportation routes encourages an
alternative to vehicle t ravel
Regional
Pa rtners
Transit usage
Annual transit trips per
community/route
Transit usage illustrates our ability to operate a system that
attracts riders, to plan neighbourhoods that are readily
serviced by transit, and/or shows a societal shift from
dependence on the single occupant vehicle to public
transit.
Regional
Partners
Passenger
Vehicles Per
Capita
The number of vehicles per
capita is directly related to the
number of vehicles on the
road.
It provides indirect information regarding energy use, air
pollution and levels of investment in public road
infrastructure.
ICBC
Our Transportation
1Active
Transportation
Streets
I
Our Governance
Collaborative
Governance
Number of regional
partnership initiatives
Opport unities for the Regional partn ers to spread cost s and
benefits over a larger ben efitin g area in ord er to achi eve
greater economies and efficiencies.
RDCO
Com munity
Initiatives
#of community initiatives
supported by Regional District
or municipalities
Support initiatives that assist in implement ing the RGS.
Regional
Partn ers
H:\PLANN ING\6430·Strategic_Pianning\40-Regional Growth Strategy\Generai\RGS Update (2010 to)\Work Plan\Phase 3\Bylaw and Referra l Process\RGS Draft Bylaw - Pending Boa rd Approvai\RGS Bylaw No 1336 -
Schedu le A- Presented Ap ril 28, 2014 plus maps.docx
Appendi ces 44
2013 Central Okanagan Regional Growth Strategy
Page 64 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2543
A bylaw to amend the Regional Water Supply and Water Distribution Services
WHEREAS the Regional District of North Okanagan has adopted the "Regional District of North
Okanagan - Greater Vernon Regional Water Supply Local Service Establishment Bylaw No.
1262, 1994"; for the purpose of providing the local service of regional water supply and water
distribution services;
AND WHEREAS the Board wishes to amend the service area boundary of the Greater Vernon
Water Service;
AND WHEREAS the Board has obtained the required consent of at least 2/3 of the participants
of the original function, pursuant to Section 802(1)(b) of the Local Government Act;
NOW THEREFORE the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan in an open meeting
assembled, hereby ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:
CITATION
1. This By-law may be cited as the "Greater Vernon Water Service Establishment Bylaw
Amendment No. 2543, 2014 (Schon Springs)".
SCHEDULE AMENDMENT
2. Schedule "A" to Bylaw No. 1262, 1994 being Regional District of North Okanagan- Greater
Vernon Regional Water Supply Local Service Establishment Bylaw No. 1262, 1994 and
amendments thereto is hereby amended by adding the area outlined in black identified on
Schedule "A" attached to and forming part of this bylaw.
Read a First, Second and Third Time this
day of
2014.
Consent provided by the participants this
day of
2014.
Approved by the Inspector of Municipalities this
day of
2014.
ADOPTED this
day of
2014.
CHAIR
CORPORATE OFFICER
Page 65 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No: 3900/2628
TO:
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
FROM:
Engineering
DATE:
April 29, 2014
SUBJECT:
Bylaw 2628, 2014 being "Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water
Plan Projects Voting Question Bylaw No. 2628, 2014" and
Bylaw 2629, 2014 being "Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water
Plan Projects Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 2629, 2014"
RECOMMENDATION 1:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan
Projects Voting Question Bylaw No. 2628, 2014 be given First, Second and Third Readings.
RECOMMENDATION 2:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan
Projects Voting Question Bylaw No. 2629, 2014 be Adopted.
RECOMMENDATION 3:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan
Loan Authorization Bylaw 2629, 2014 be given First, Second and Third Readings; and further,
That Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Loan Authorization Bylaw 2629, 2014 be
referred to the Inspector of Municipalities for Statutory Approval.
BACKGROUND:
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors held on February 19th, 2014, the following resolution
was passed:
Page 66 of 104
File No.: 3900/2628 & 2629
Re: Bylaws 2628/2629
Dated: April29, 2014
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.2
Page 2 of 3
That staff be directed to proceed to Referendum to approve borrowing of up to
$70 Million dollars to fund Phase 1 of the 2012 Master Water Plan comprising the
following projects:
11
Water Supply and Treatment
1. Duteau Creek WTP - Stage 1, 110 ML/d
2. Aberdeen Dam Improvements- Raise Dam by 4 m
3. Domestic System Distribution Investments
4. Lavington System Separation
5. Twinning Transmission Main (Oversizing)
6. Okanagan Lake Pump Station
Total (2012 Cost Estimate)
2012 Cost Estimate
(Million)
$26.5
$6.41
$9.80
$19.5
$3.5
$2.6
$68.3
CARRIED."
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors held on March 19th, 2014, the following resolutions
were passed:
"That the Referendum Process for Greater Vernon Water Master Water Plan Borrowing
Referendum be endorsed.
"That Director Macnabb be appointed to act as Chair for all public meetings for the
Greater Vernon Water Master Water Plan Referendum Process."
DISCUSSION:
The Process endorsed by the Board of Directions for the Greater Vernon Water (GVW) Master Water
Plan Borrowing Referendum included the following Preliminary Schedule to process referendum
bylaws:
a) On or before May 8, 2014 - GVAC recommend to the BoD the wording of the
"referendum question" and referendum bylaw;
b) On or before May 16, 2014 - Approval of the referendum bylaw wording by the Board;
c) Send the referendum bylaw to Victoria for pre-approval;
d) June, July and August - development of detailed communication strategy for review
and endorsement by GVAC/BoD;
e) September to November - implementation of communication strategy to educate
public; and
f) November 15, 2014- Municipal Election to include referendum ballot.
The Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Projects Voting Question Bylaw No. 2628,
2014 and the Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Loan Authorization Bylaw 2629,
2014 are being presented to the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee to fulfill the requirements of the
preliminary schedule above. At the request of the Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural
Development (MoCSD) the bylaws will also be submitted for preliminary review before being
endorsed by the BoD. MoCSD has indicated that they should be able to have their preliminary review
completed by the BoD meeting scheduled for May 21, 2014. If these bylaws are endorsed by GVAC
and the bylaws are returned from the MoCSD with no or minor edits, staff will present to the BoD. If
Page 67 of 104
File No.: 3900/2628 & 2629
Re: Bylaws 2628/2629
Dated: April29, 2014
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.2
Page 3 of 3
amendments to the bylaws are recommended by the MoCSD the changes will be incorporated into
the Bylaws for the Board meeting to be held on May 21, 2014.
Staff note that the costs reflected in this report with regard to the Phase 1 projects of the 2012 Greater
Vernon Water Master Water Plan are based on 2012 dollars and do not reflect inflationary factors or
future economic conditions.
Public (elector) consent will be obtained for the debt financing through referendum, with the General
Voting Date on November 151h, 2014 held in conjunction with the municipal elections. Early voting
days will be determined. The voting question for the referendum is included in the bylaw proposed for
adoption (Attachment "A").
Attach: Bylaw 2628, 2014
Bylaw 2629, 2014
Approved for inclusion:
/z;)~
Rob Smailes, MCIP
AIAdministrator
Page 68 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2628
A bylaw to establish the question for other voting on the matter of borrowing
up to $70,000,000 to facilitate construction of Phase 1 projects of the 2012
Greater Vernon Water Master Water Plan with repayment of the debt over a
twenty (20) year term
WHEREAS the Board of Directors has enacted the "Regional District of North Okanagan Greater Vernon Regional Water Supply Local SeNice Establishment Bylaw No. 1262, 1994" for
the purpose of providing the local service of regional water supP.IY;
AND WHEREAS it is proposed to borrow up to seventy II io dollars ($70,000,000), with
repayment of a debt over a twenty (20) year term , to facilit e constr q_tlorJ of Phase 1 projects of
the 2012 Greater Vernon Water Master Water Plan with re~ yment of th debt over a twenty (20)
year term;
AND WHEREAS assent of the electors in the entire Greater Vernon Waters
i \ area is being
sought in accordance with Section 801 .2 (1 )(b) fttpP{oval by assept of the electQ(_s]~of the Local
Government Act for Bylaw 2628, cited as "Grea1'e \)'; rnon Wa er Phase 1 Master Water Plan
Projects Voting Question Bylaw No. 2628, 2014";
AND WHEREAS the Board wishes to establish the q estion to be used for other voting by
bylaw;
CITATION
1.
1 Master Water Plan
2.
"Ar ou in favour of he Regional District of North Okanagan adopting Bylaw No. 2629,
being "G e,.ater Veri) n Water 2012 Master Water Plan Phase 1 Loan Authorization
Bylaw NQ. 2629, ..201 " which authorizes the Regional District of North Okanagan to
borrow an a unt not to exceed SEVENTY MILLION DOLLARS ($70,000,000.00) for
the purpose of R ying the costs to plan, design and construct the Phase 1 projects of
the of 2012 Greater Vernon Water Master Water Plan.
Page 69 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item
E.22
Page
Bylaw No. 2628. 2014
BALLOT
3.
The Ballot to be used for the other voting shall be as per schedule "A" as attached to and
forming a part of this bylaw.
Read a First, Second and THIRD Time
this
day of
I
ADOPTED
this
day of
12014
Page 70 of 104
2014
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.2
SCHEDULE "A" to Bylaw 2628, 2014
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
GREATER VERNON WATER
2012 MASTER WATER PLAN
PHASE 1 LOAN AUTHORIZATION
BYLAW NO. 2629, 2014
QUESTION
"Are you in favour
Okanagan adopting Bylaw No. 2629,
Vernon Water 2012 Master Water Plan
Authorization Bylaw No. 2629,
Regional District of North Okana
not to exceed
SEVENTY
($70,000,000.00) for t
plan, design and co~strH
2012 Greater Vern
NO[]
Page 71 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW No. 2629
A bylaw to authorize the borrowing of up to $70,000,000 to facilitate
construction of Phase 1 projects of the 2012 Greater Vernon Water Master
Water Plan with repayment of the debt over a twenty (20) year term
WHEREAS pursuant to Section 823 [Regional district loan authorization bylaws] of the Local
Government Act, R.S.B.C., 1996, Chapter 323, and Section 179 [Loan authorization bylaws for
long term borrowing] of the Community Charter, S.B.C. , 2003, Cha
26, as amended, and
Regulations passed pursuant thereto, the Board of the Regional Di tri of North Okanagan may,
by a Loan Authorization Bylaw, borrow money for any purpo
of a capital nature to facilitate
construction of Greater Vernon Water Service projects rela ing 0 liase 1 projects of the 2012
Greater Vernon Water Master Water Plan;
AND WHEREAS this Bylaw relates to the Greater :v'e~on Water Servi
stablishing Bylaw,
established pursuant to Bylaw 1262, 1994 cited ra§l" Regional District o f!!JtJrth Okanagan Greater Vernon Regional Water Supply Local SerVice Establishment Bylaw o. 1262, 1994"
and amendments thereto to provide for acquiring n constructi , water supply and distribution
facilities and operating maintaining, repairing an replacing water supply and distribution
faci lities for the Greater Vernon Water su ply and distri utio 'system , amongst other things;
AND WHEREAS t~ participating area is all Qf the City of Vernon , District of Goldstream and
those portions of lect.oral Areas "8,. and "C" pf the Regional District of North Okanagan as
established in the ~wcmal Dj s ric · of.._North <S>ka~agan - Greater Vernon Regional Water
Supply Local Service Es a /~meat Bylaw No. 126~, 1994;
AND WHERE S fqursuant to Section 801.2 (1)(b) [Approval of the electors by voting] of the
Local Governmen Act ne required assent of the electors within the entire service area has
been obtained for I:)Qzrowing money for any purpose of a capital nature to facilitate construction
of Phase 1 projects or tlie 2012 Greater Vernon Water Master Water Plan with repayment of the
debt over a twenty (20) year term ;
NOW THEREFORE the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan, in open meeting
assembled, hereby ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:
CITATION
1.
This Bylaw may be cited as "Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan
Projects Loan Authorization Bylaw No. 2629, 2014".
Page 72 of 104
Bylaw No. 2629. 2014
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item
E.2
Page2
LOAN AUTHORIZATION
2.
The Regional District of North Okanagan is hereby empowered and authorized to borrow
upon the credit of the Regional District a sum of seventy million dollars ($70,000,000).
3.
The debt incurred in this Loan Authorization Bylaw relates specifically to the Greater
Vernon Water Service.
4.
This debt is being incurred to provide capital financing to facilitate the construction of
Greater Vernon Water Service projects relating to Phase 1 projects of the 2012 Greater
Vernon Water Master Water Plan.
5.
All of the debt being incurred in this Loan Authorization B. aw is for the sole purpose of
providing capital financing to facilitate the constructio~of Greater Vernon Water Service
projects relating to Phase 1 projects of the 2012 Greater e r:1on Water Master Water
Plan.
6.
m the benefitting pro e ies located within
The annual debt charges shall be recovered
the City of Vernon, District of Goldstream, nd Electoral Areas "B" and 'C f the Regional
District of North Okanagan.
7.
The maximum term for which a debenture debt may,~ e issued to secure the debt created
by this bylaw is for a term not to xceed twenty (20 years.
Jr
day of
' 2014
day of
' 2014
this
day of
' 2014
this
day of
' 2014
Corporate Officer
Page 73 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.4
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
MEMORANDUM
File No.: 14-0095-F-ALR
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Planning Department
DATE:
April 28, 2014
Agricultural Land Commission Inclusion application for Ann
Hatfield and Don Richards, 1866 Enderby Mabel Lake Road,
Electoral Area “F”
SUBJECT:
RECOMMENDATION:
That the application under Section 17(3) of the Agricultural Land Commission Act to include into
the Agricultural Land Reserve the non-ALR portion of the property legally described as That
Part NW ¼, Sec 27, Lying to the West of the Right Bank of the Shuswap River as Shown on
Plan B17102, Twp 18, R7, W6M, KDYD, Except Plan 34054 and located at 1866 Enderby
Mabel Lake Road be authorized for submission to the Agricultural Land Commission.
BACKGROUND:
On June 26, 2013, the Board of Directors supported an application for a one lot plus remainder
subdivision of the property located 1866 Enderby Mabel Lake Road subject to the inclusion of
the non-ALR portion of the property into the Agricultural Land Reserve. The proposal is shown
on the attached plan.
On November 28, 2013 the Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) issued Resolution #412/2013
(as attached) that conditionally approved the proposed subdivision subject to an ‘Inclusion’
application for the Commission to review and approve.
To comply with the above noted resolutions of the Board of Directors and the ALC, the owners
of the property have submitted an application to include the non-ALR portion of their property
into the ALR. The Planning Department recommends that the application be authorized for
submission to the ALC as it has already been approved in principle by the Board of Directors
and the ALC.
Prepared by:
Reviewed by:
Lynda Fraser
Planning Assistant (Temp)
Greg Routley
Deputy Planning Manager
Page 74 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.4
ELECTORAL AREA "F"
AGRICULTURAL LAND COMMISSION APPLICATION
SUBJECT PROPERTY MAP
File:
Applicant:
Location:
14-0095-F-ALR
Ann Hatfield and Keith Richards
1866 Enderby Mabel Lake Road
Page 75 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.4
Agricultural Land Commission
133-4940 Canada Way
Burnaby, British Columbia V5G 4K6
Tel: 604 660-7000
Fax: 604 660-7033
www.alc.gov.bc.ca
January 29, 2014
ALC File: #53323
Keith Richards and Ann Hatfield
1866 Mabel Lake Road
Enderby, BC VOE 1VS
Re:
Application to Subdivide Land in the Agricultural Land Reserve CALR)
Please find attached the Minutes of Resolution #412/2013 as it relates to the above noted
application. The Commission has also attached a sketch plan depicting the decision.
Please send two (2) paper prints of the final survey plans to this office. When the Commission
confirms that all conditions have been met, it will authorize the Registrar of Land Titles to accept
registration of the plan.
Further correspondence with respect to this application is to be directed to Ron Wallace.
Yours truly,
PROVINCIAL ~URAL LAND COMMISSION
Per:
\
L
Brian
Enclosures:
MiA tes of Resolution #412/2013
Sketch plan
cc: North Okanagan Regional District (File: 13-0068-F-ALR)
53323d1
6~ 370:)
\Mdvs'tol-'-
D.\1:\ i02\ lOll\.
Page 76 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.4
~
MINUTES OF THE PROVINCIAL AGRICULTURAL LAND COMMISSION
A meeting was held by the Provincial Agricultural Land Commission on November 28,
2013 at the offices of the Commission located at #133- 4940 Canada Way, Burnaby, B.C.
as it relates to Application #53323.
COMMISSION MEMBERS PRESENT:
Richard Bullock
Jennifer Dyson
Gordon Gillette
Sylvia Pranger
Bert Miles
Jim Johnson
Jerry Thibeault
Lucille Dempsey
Denise Dowswell
Jim Collins
Chair
Vice-Chair
Vice-Chair
Vice-Chair
Commissioner
Commissioner
Commissioner
Commissioner
Commissioner
Commissioner
COMMISSION STAFF PRESENT:
Ron Wallace
Brian Underhill
Colin Fry
PROPOSAL
Land Use Planner
Executive Director
Executive Director
(Submitted pursuant to section 21 (2) of the Agricultural Land Commission Act)
The proposal to subdivide the property by creating one 8.0 ha parcel and one 8.89 ha parcel
near a natural divide of landforms and soils. The proposed northern parcel (proposed Lot A)
would contain the existing driveway and buildings while the proposed south parcel (proposed
Lot B) would be vacant. A new driveway from Enderby Mabel Lake Road would be constructed
for proposed Lot B.
The owners have supplied an Agrologist Report prepared by Wayne A Blashill, P.Ag. which
rates the southerly (non-ALR) portion of the subject property as Class 5 with an improvement
rating of Class 3. The southern half of the ALR portion of the subject property is rated Class 7.
The northern half of the ALR portion of the subject property is rated as Class 5 with an
improvement rating of Class 3.
PROPERTY INFORMATION:
Owners:
Don Keith Richards and Ann Hatfield
Legal:
PID: 014-015-862
That Part NW % Section 27 Lying to the West of the Right Bank of Shuswap River
as shown on Plan B17102 Township 18 Range 7 West of the 61h Meridian Kamloops
Division Yale District Except Plan 34054
Location: 1866 Mabel Lake Road, Enderby, BC
Size:
17.4 ha (16.0 ha within the ALR)
Minutes of Resolution #4 12/201 3- ALC Application #53323
Page 77 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.4
Page 2 of 3
LEGISLATIVE CONTEXT FOR COMMISSION CONSIDERATION
Section 6 (Purposes of the commission) of the Agricultural Land Commission Act states:
6
The following are the
pu~poses
of the commission:
(a) to preserve agricultural land;
(b) to encourage farming on agricultural land in collaboration with other communities of
interest; and
(c) to encourage local governments, first nations, the government and its agents to enable
and accommodate farm use of agricultural land and uses compatible with agriculture in
their plans, bylaws and policies.
COMMISSION CONSIDERATION
After considering the information the Commission concluded as follows:
1.
The Agrologist Report (the "Report") prepared by Wayne A· Blashill, P.Ag . found that the
southern half of the ALR portion of the subject property is rated as Class 7 with an
improved rating of the same. The subclasses associated with this rating are identified as
topography, stoniness and shallow soil over bedrock outcroppings. The Report rates the
southerly (non-ALR) portion of the subject property as Class 5 with an improvement rating
of Class 3 with limitations associated with soil moisture deficiency and undesirable soil
structure. The northern half of the ALR portion of the subject property is rated as Class 5
with an improved rating of Class 3 with limitations associated with shallow soil over bedrock
and excess water.
Class 3 - Land in this class has limitations that require moderately intensive management
practices or moderately restrict the range of crops, or both.
Class 5 - Land in this class has limitations that restrict its capability to producing perennial
forage crops or other specially adapted crops.
Class 7 - Land in this class has no capability for arable or sustained natural grazing
The owner has indicated that a topographical divide exists between proposed Lots A and B
which prohibits using the parcel as one agricultural unit.
Conclusion:
The Commission acknowledges that the northern half of the property with an improved
rating of Class 3 has good capability for agriculture and that the steep and rocky
topography at about halfway up the property (i.e. the same place at which the owner
proposes to subdivide the property) limits the ability to farm the property as one unit.
Conclusion:
Given that the Report rates the southerly (non-ALR) portion of the subject property as Class
5 with an improvement rating of Class 3 and is identified as being capable of supporting
agriculture, the Commission requires the submission of an. inclusion application for this land
to be put into the ALR. It is further noted that inclusion of these lands would limit the
potential for future subdivision along the ALR boundary of proposed Lot B.
Minutes of Resolution #4 12/2013- ALC Application #53323
Page 78 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.4
Page 3 of 3
IT WAS
MOVED BY:
SECONDED BY:
Commissioner Dyson
Commissioner Thibeault
THAT the proposal to subdivide the subject property by creating one ±8.0 ha parcel and one
±8.89 ha parcel be conditionally approved.
AND THAT the final approval is subject to:
1. The subdivision be in substantial compliance with the plan submitted with the application;
2. The submission of a new application to include the non-ALR portion of proposed Lot B into
the ALR;
3. The subdivision plan must be completed within three (3) years from the date of this decision;
AND FINALLY THAT this decision does not relieve the owner or occupier of the responsibility to
comply with applicable Acts, regulations, bylaws of the local government, and decisions and
orders of any person or body having jurisdiction over the land under an enactment.
CARRIED
Resolution #412/2013
Minutes of Resolution #412/201 3- ALC Application #53323
Page 79 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.4
Provincial Agricultural Land Commission
Application #53323
Resolution #412/2013
~-~-·
sJbject property
~ :~::=
~
~~~~~ Approv ed for subdivision In the ALR
.I
Page 80 of 104
INon-ALR land to be Included Into ALR
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.4
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Page 81 of 104
'Dl\1\!)\0l'{
WNf£.
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.9
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
T
his investigation was initiated to examine how the provincial government has
administered the Riparian Areas Regulation (RAR) since it was enacted in 2005.1
This report illustrates how a gap between commitment and action can lead to
administrative unfairness.
Riparian areas include the trees and other vegetation that line the banks of streams.
These areas are essential to maintaining the health of streams, and, in turn, the
fish that live in them, such as salmon. The RAR, enacted under the Fish Protection
Act, ensures that in the 15 regional districts where it applies, riparian areas are
considered and protected in the development process.
Before a landowner or proponent can begin a development project within a
riparian assessment area, they must hire a qualified environmental professional
(QEP) to assess the site and determine the size of the streamside protection and
enhancement area (SPEA). The SPEA is the area bordering the stream within which
development is prohibited. The QEP must then provide the ministry with a written
report containing an opinion that the development will not harm fish or their
habitat. The ministry, in turn, notifies the local government and Fisheries and Oceans
Canada (DFO) that it has received the report. The RAR prohibits local government
from approving or allowing development until notification has been received from
the ministry.
The RAR uses a “professional reliance” model to meet its objectives. Under this
model, the ministry relies on the judgment and expertise of professionals to ensure
that riparian areas are adequate to protect fish habitat. The underlying philosophy
is that with QEPs doing the work on the ground, government resources focus on
oversight activities – monitoring, reporting and enforcement. The RAR is one of
many environmental protection and resource management programs in British
Columbia that use the professional reliance model. Our investigation highlights
the challenges of implementing this model in the RAR context. We found that
environmental protection programs such as the RAR must strike an appropriate
balance between professional reliance and effective governmental oversight to
work effectively.
Investigative Process
The public agency involved in this investigation is the Ministry of Forests, Lands and
Natural Resource Operations, which took over responsibility for administering the
RAR from the Ministry of Environment in 2010.
Our investigation included a review of provincial and federal legislation and
regulations, as well as meetings with staff at the ministries. We obtained and
reviewed extensive information provided by both ministries involved in the
investigation. We also met with and obtained input from the public, local
governments, professional associations, environmental organizations and other
interested stakeholders.
1
Throughout this report, unless otherwise specified, the term “ministry” refers to the provincial
government ministry having responsibility for the administration of the RAR. Until October 2010,
this was the Ministry of Environment. From October 2010 to March 2011, it was the Ministry of
Natural Resource Operations, and since March 2011, it has been the Ministry of Forests, Lands and
Natural Resource Operations.
Page 82 of 104
STRIKING A BALANCE
9
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.9
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Findings and Recommendations
This report includes 21 findings and 25 recommendations directed at the Ministry
of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations. This summary groups our
conclusions and recommendations into four broad categories: Regulatory
Authority, Oversight of the Professional Reliance Model, Oversight of Reports and
Development, and Public Information, Access and Complaints. Those who are
interested in the information leading to these conclusions and recommendations
are invited to read the relevant sections of the full report which provide a more
complete understanding of the context in which the recommendations have been
made.
Regulatory Authority
In the course of our investigation, it became clear that in order to ensure that the
ministry is able to effectively carry out its oversight role, regulatory change to the
RAR was necessary.
Local Government Compliance
The RAR can only be administered effectively if the Ministry of Forests, Lands and
Natural Resource Operations has the ability to ensure that local governments
are effectively protecting riparian areas. The ministry has indicated that it is
committed to supporting local governments in implementing the RAR. Although
the ministry has also taken steps to ensure local government compliance, some local
governments have not yet fully implemented the RAR.
Currently, the ministry cannot ensure local governments implement the RAR, or that
local governments implement the RAR in a way that allows the ministry to conduct
compliance monitoring.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations review, by October 1, 2014, local government implementation of
and compliance with the Riparian Areas Regulation and report publicly on the
results of that review. (R1)
•
I also recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations work with local governments to bring them into compliance
with the Riparian Areas Regulation (RAR). If the ministry is not able to achieve
full compliance of local governments with the RAR, the ministry should, by
October 1, 2015, develop a mechanism to allow the ministry to require local
government compliance with the RAR. (R2)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted these
recommendations.
Local Government Authority
Before 2011, the ministry and DFO allowed local governments to make minor
variations to the streamside protection and enhancement areas (SPEAs) defined
in an assessment report prepared by qualified environmental professionals
(QEPs).2 The British Columbia Court of Appeal found in its 2011 decision in
Yanke v. Salmon Arm (City) that there was no legal foundation in the RAR for local
governments to vary SPEAs established by QEPs.3
10
OFFICE OF THE
OMBUDSPERSON
2
Assessment reports are discussed further in the Monitoring QEP Compliance section of this report.
3
Yanke v. Salmon Arm (City), 2011 BCCA 309.
Page 83 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.9
The ministry has not updated the Riparian Areas Regulation Implementation
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Guidebook to accurately reflect the scope of local government power to vary
streamside protection and enhancement areas following the Court of Appeal’s
decision in Yanke v. Salmon Arm (City).
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations clarify the scope of the authority of local governments to vary
streamside protection and enhancement areas in accordance with the
Riparian Areas Regulation and, once it has done so, update the Riparian Areas
Regulation Implementation Guidebook. (R3)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
Authority to Review Reports
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations, with a staff that
includes biologists and other resource professionals, is in the best position to
review reports and determine whether a QEP has acted within his or her area of
expertise and has followed the assessment methods. However, in its 2011 decision in
Yanke v. Salmon Arm (City), the British Columbia Court of Appeal found that, contrary
to previous practice, the ministry does not have discretion to withhold or delay
notification to local government that it has received a report from a QEP concerning
a particular development.4 This decision raises serious questions about what the
ministry can do if it determines that a report is non-compliant with the RAR.
The ministry itself identified the problem arising from the Yanke decision, the
potential solution, and the negative consequences of doing nothing at all. However,
the ministry has not taken reasonable steps to amend the RAR to allow it to
postpone notification to local governments until its reviews of assessment reports
are complete, or to require QEPs to amend their reports to ensure compliance with
RAR assessment methods.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations take steps, on or before October 1, 2014, to have the Riparian Areas
Regulation (RAR) amended to allow the ministry to postpone notification to
local governments until its reviews of assessment reports are complete and any
required amendments to reports to ensure compliance with the RAR assessment
methods have been made. (R12)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
Oversight of the Professional Reliance Model
The use of professionals to prepare reports is the distinguishing feature of
a professional reliance model such as the RAR. Under the RAR, a qualified
environmental professional (QEP) must prepare an assessment report to determine
the size of and prescribe protective measures for the streamside protection and
enhancement area (SPEA).
An individual conducting an assessment under the RAR should be properly qualified,
trained and follow appropriate professional guidelines.
4
Yanke v. Salmon Arm (City), 2011 BCCA 309, paras 30–31. For a summary of the facts of the case, see
the Administration of the Riparian Areas Regulation section of this report.
Page 84 of 104
STRIKING A BALANCE
11
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.9
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Membership in a Professional Association
Under the RAR, an individual conducting an assessment must be a member in
good standing of a professional association. The ministry, however, has not taken
adequate steps to confirm that all persons acting as QEPs and submitting reports to
the ministry are registered and in good standing with an appropriate professional
association.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations develop a reliable process for confirming that, at the time an
assessment report is submitted, all QEPs involved in its preparation are
registered and in good standing with one of the appropriate professional
associations. (R4)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
Training and Professional Development
QEP knowledge of the RAR and its proper application is central to preparing a RAR
assessment. The ministry has not taken steps to ensure that individuals who are
eligible to conduct assessments under the RAR have successfully completed the RAR
training course.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations take steps to amend the Riparian Areas Regulation (RAR) to
ensure that successful completion of a training course is mandatory for all
individuals who are eligible to conduct assessments under the RAR and
that a list of individuals who have successfully completed the course is
publicly available. (R5)
•
I also recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations establish a process for regularly providing all individuals who
conduct assessments under the RAR with updates about changes to the RAR or
its administration. (R6)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
these recommendations.
Development of Professional Guidelines
Although the assessment methods explain the steps involved in conducting an
assessment under the RAR, they do not address how QEPs are expected to exercise
their professional judgment when doing so. The assessment methods set out in
the RAR provide insufficient guidance on conducting assessments and do not hold
individuals who are authorized to conduct assessments to an enforceable standard
of professional conduct.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations work with professional associations to draft professional guidelines
for use by individuals who conduct assessments under the Riparian Areas
Regulation that are designed to constitute an enforceable standard of
professional conduct. (R7)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
12
OFFICE OF THE
OMBUDSPERSON
Page 85 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.9
Oversight of Reports and Development
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Assessment Report Expiry Dates
Once a report is submitted, it remains on the ministry’s system indefinitely
and cannot be removed by the QEP or proponent. Assessment reports may be
completed without a clearly defined development plan many years in advance of
any development actually occurring. This means that the conditions at the site may
change in the time between the report being completed and the development
commencing. The ministry has not established any expiry date for assessment
reports.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations establish an expiry date for assessment reports. (R8)
•
I also recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations establish a process to ensure that ministry staff, Fisheries and
Oceans Canada (DFO) and local governments, qualified environmental
professionals (QEPs) and proponents involved in a project that requires an
assessment report are automatically notified when that assessment report
has expired. (R9)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
these recommendations.
Initial Review of Reports
Part of the ministry’s compliance monitoring process is to review assessment
reports. The ministry told us its goal is to gather information on QEP compliance and
identify issues of concern. This allows the ministry to better administer the RAR.
Until July 2009, the ministry reviewed every assessment report it received. In 2009,
the ministry determined that reviewing 20 per cent of reports submitted in each
region would be an appropriate rate of review. The ministry did not provide us
with a clear rationale for this decision. The ministry did not have information to
determine whether reviewing 20 per cent of assessment reports in each region was
adequate or appropriate. Having established this audit goal, though, the ministry
did not meet it.
The ministry has not ensured that each region meets the ministry’s goal of reviewing
20 per cent of the RAR assessment reports submitted each year. The ministry has
also failed to establish that even if complied with, this goal would reliably identify an
acceptable level of compliance by QEPs.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations review all of the Riparian Areas Regulation assessment reports
submitted to the ministry each year. (R10)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has not accepted
this recommendation.
Monitoring QEP Compliance
Under the professional reliance model, government allocates resources to monitor
the work done by professionals. The importance of ongoing monitoring of QEPs
is recognized in the ministry’s own documents. However, this monitoring is not a
priority in most regions. The monitoring that has been done has identified levels
of non-compliance that need follow-up to ensure that QEPs are working within the
requirements of the RAR.
STRIKING A BALANCE
Page 86 of 104
13
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.9
Since few assessment reports are being reviewed in most regions, the ministry is
missing opportunities to identify and respond to non-compliance. The ministry has
not ensured that processes are in place across all its regions to identify and address
non-compliance by QEPs.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations ensure adequate processes are in place and utilized in each
region to detect and follow up on concerns about non-compliance with the
Riparian Areas Regulation by a QEP identified through compliance monitoring
and, where necessary, to make a complaint to the QEP’s professional
association. (R11)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
In addition, the ministry needs to record and track its own responses to any noncompliance, as well as those of a local government and DFO. Information about
non-compliance gathered through monitoring is of little use if the ministry does not
know whether the non-compliance was ever adequately addressed. The ministry
does not record or track, in a centralized and accessible way, the information that
it does collect through compliance monitoring, including information on whether
non-compliance is referred to another public agency and, if it was, how the other
agency responded.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations develop a system that:
(A) tracks, in a centralized and accessible way, the results of
compliance monitoring
(B) records whether non-compliance is referred to another agency and,
if it is, how that agency responds to the non-compliance. (R15)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
Site Visits
Site visits are an essential part of the ministry’s oversight of the RAR. Site visits allow
the ministry to determine whether riparian areas are being protected. The ministry
developed a statistical framework for determining the number of sites to visit each
year. The ministry is not conducting the minimum number of site visits required
by its monitoring framework, and is therefore unable to meet its goal of being
90 per cent confident that non-compliance is no greater than 10 per cent.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations ensure all regional offices conduct a number of site visits each year
that is consistent with the ministry’s site visit framework, and if the goal of
90 per cent confidence that non-compliance is no greater than 10 per cent is
not met, take further steps to ensure compliance. (R13)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
Furthermore, some sites may never be subject to a visit by the ministry. The ministry
creates a list of potential sites to visit based on the reports submitted in the previous
calendar year. If development has not yet occurred at a site, however, it is removed
from the site visit list and is not considered for any future visits. The current process
used by the ministry for selecting sites to visit exempts sites where development has
not commenced at the time a site visit is scheduled.
14
OFFICE OF THE
OMBUDSPERSON
Page 87 of 104
•
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.9
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
develop a system of site monitoring that ensures all development sites that have
not yet been subject to a site visit remain eligible for selection for a site visit. (R14)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
Monitoring Proponent Compliance
Post-development reports are an effective and efficient way of both mitigating the
need for enforcement (by providing proponents with motivation to follow the QEP’s
recommendations) and providing local governments, DFO and the ministry with the
information necessary to take enforcement measures in cases of non-compliance.
During our investigation, we reviewed assessment reports submitted to the ministry.
QEPs had, in some cases, submitted a “post-development report,” certifying that the
development was complete and that the measures identified to protect the SPEA
had been followed. Unfortunately, this does not occur regularly. There is conflicting
information about whether post-development reports are required under the RAR,
and who might be responsible for doing them.
The ministry has not established adequate and consistent requirements for
monitoring proponent compliance with the RAR after an assessment report has
been accepted by the ministry.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations develop a process, under section 5(a) of the Riparian Areas
Regulation (RAR) for every development that triggers a RAR assessment, that:
(A) requires a post-development report be prepared by a QEP to show that the
measures set out in the assessment report have been properly implemented
(B) tracks whether a local government has given initial approval to the
development, whether development has started, and whether a
post‑development report has been submitted
(C) alerts the ministry when a post-development report has not been submitted
within a reasonable time after development is complete
(D)requires the ministry to take appropriate action if no post-development
report is submitted
(E) requires the ministry to review post-development reports that have been
submitted and take appropriate action where the post-development report
identifies non-compliance with the RAR. (R16)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Riparian Areas Regulation
Effectiveness monitoring is essential to determining the value of the RAR program in
protecting riparian areas, as it is used to determine whether the goals of a program
have been met. In the case of the RAR, this could mean examining whether the
SPEAs are sufficient to protect the ecology of a riparian area or whether the RAR’s
protections have led to revegetation of previously disturbed areas. The ministry does
not currently have a process in place for monitoring the effectiveness of the RAR in
protecting riparian areas.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations take steps to implement a program of regular effectiveness
monitoring in all regions subject to the Riparian Areas Regulation. (R25)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
Page 88 of 104
STRIKING A BALANCE
15
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.9
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Public Information, Access and Complaints
Provision of Information
The provision of adequate public information is central to the democratic principles
of openness and transparency. Information is a cornerstone of administrative
fairness as it allows the public to know and understand whether programs are
being operated in a fair and reasonable manner. Making information about
environmental protection programs available allows the public to have confidence
that the government is meeting its obligations as a steward of the environment and
British Columbia’s natural resources.
The public should be able to easily find out who is responsible for the RAR, and have
access to information about how the program is functioning.
The ministry did not adequately communicate the transfer of responsibility for
administration of the RAR in October 2010 and has still not ensured that public
information accurately reflects its responsibility for the RAR.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations, by June 30, 2014, update all its publicly available information to
accurately reflect the ministry’s responsibility for the Fish Protection Act and the
Riparian Areas Regulation. (R17)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
The ministry also has not ensured that public information about the RAR is
up to date.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations review, on an annual basis, all programs it is responsible for to
ensure that publicly available information is up to date and accurate. (R18)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
The ministry has not reported on the implementation or administration of the RAR
since it became responsible for administering the RAR in October 2010, and has not
made any reports public since that date.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations report publicly on an annual basis about its administration of
the Riparian Areas Regulation (RAR), including reporting on the activities
related to the RAR set out in the Intergovernmental Cooperation Agreement.
The 2014 annual report be accompanied by annual reports for each of the years
2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013. (R19)
•
I further recommended that, beginning in 2014, the Ministry of Forests, Lands
and Natural Resource Operations, in addition to reporting on the activities set
out in the Intergovernmental Cooperation Agreement, report publicly on an
annual basis about its administration of the Riparian Areas Regulation (RAR),
including:
(A) the number of notifications received and the number of assessments
reviewed by each region, the issues identified in those reviews and measures
taken to address any issues
16
OFFICE OF THE
OMBUDSPERSON
(B) steps taken by the ministry to monitor the compliance of qualified
environmental professionals (QEPs), proponents and local governments
with the RAR, the results of that monitoring, and measures taken to
improve compliance
Page 89 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.9
(C) steps taken by the ministry to monitor the effectiveness of the RAR, the
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
results of that monitoring, and measures taken to improve the effectiveness
of the RAR
(D)any regulatory or administrative changes affecting the RAR. (R20)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
these recommendations.
As part of the Intergovernmental Cooperation Agreement, the ministry also
committed to making assessment reports publicly available, searchable and
accessible. While the ministry has considered making its electronic notification
system accessible to the public it has not yet done so. Currently, the notification
system is accessible only by QEPs (with access limited to their own reports), local
governments and ministry employees. This is the case even though there is a model
provided by the Ministry of Environment’s EcoCat, a publicly accessible ecological
reports catalogue which contains similar reports.5
As the public does not have access to the reports, this limits the ministry’s ability to
rely on complaints from the public to learn about and respond to areas of concern.
Members of the public can find it difficult to raise concerns if they do not know what
is contained in a report.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations work with the Ministry of Environment to make Riparian Areas
Regulation assessment reports and their associated electronic mapping
files available to the public through EcoCat or a similar publicly accessible,
searchable electronic database by October 1, 2014. (R21)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
Concerns and Complaints
Complaints from the public can draw the ministry’s attention to issues or concerns
that may impact the effective administration of the RAR. While the ministry cannot
rely solely on complaints to trigger monitoring and enforcement, complaints can
make the ministry aware of a problem and the need to resolve it. An effective
complaints process requires clear procedures for receiving, responding to and
tracking complaints.
The ministry has not taken steps to develop a clearly documented and accessible
process that allows people to raise concerns or make complaints about the
operation of the RAR.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations establish a clearly documented and accessible process that allows
people to raise concerns or make complaints about the operation of the
Riparian Areas Regulation. (R22)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
this recommendation.
The ministry also does not have consistent and reliable data about the number of
RAR-related concerns or complaints it receives or how it has responded to those
complaints. Tracking, analyzing and reporting on RAR complaints are essential parts
of the fair administration of the RAR program, and are consistent with the ministry’s
5
Ministry of Environment, “EcoCat: The Ecological Reports Catalogue”
<http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/ecocat/>.
Page 90 of 104
STRIKING A BALANCE
17
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item E.9
existing protocol and its commitments under the Intergovernmental Cooperation
Agreement.
•
I recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations establish an electronic complaint tracking process that allows the
ministry to accurately track, analyze and respond to concerns and complaints
it receives about the Riparian Areas Regulation. (R23)
•
I also recommended that the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource
Operations publicly report regional data about concerns and complaints on an
annual basis. (R24)
The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has accepted
these recommendations.
Conclusion
When the RAR was originally enacted, the ministry and other stakeholders worked
hard to effectively implement the Regulation. These efforts show a genuine
willingness to create a program that protects and maintains fish habitat. In the
Intergovernmental Cooperation Agreement signed in 2008, the ministry committed
to take actions that, if carried out, would have enhanced the administration of
the RAR. Unfortunately, the initial activity that accompanied the development of the
RAR did not lead to an adequate and reasonable level of oversight by the ministry.
This report has resulted in 21 findings and 25 recommendations to improve
the ministry’s administration of the RAR. It will hopefully serve as an example
for other areas where professional reliance models are already in place or are
contemplated. The ministry has accepted and committed to implementing 24 of
the 25 recommendations.
In March 2014, Bill 18, the Water Sustainability Act was introduced. Bill 18 updates
and renames the Fish Protection Act to the Riparian Areas Protection Act. This reflects
the continued importance of protecting riparian areas.
_____
18
OFFICE OF THE
OMBUDSPERSON
Page 91 of 104
_____
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1a
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the ELECTORAL AREA ADVISORY COMMITTEE of the
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional District
Office on Thursday, May 8, 2014
Members: Director B. Fleming
Director R. Fairbairn
Director M. Macnabb
Director E. Foisy
Director J. Pearase
Electoral Area “B”
Electoral Area “D”
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “E”
Electoral Area “F”
Staff:
L. Mellott
R. Smailes
G. Routley
A. Kittel
L. Frank
J. DeGroot
C. Elley
General Manager, Electoral Area Administration
General Manager, Planning and Building
Deputy Planning Manager
Regional Growth Strategy Coordinator
Sustainability Coordinator
Executive Assistant, Planning and Building
Clerk (taking minutes)
Also
Present:
R. Morgan
Public
Regional Crime Prevention Coordinator
Chair
Vice Chair
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 2:00 p.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Regular Agenda – May 8, 2014
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fairbairn
That the Agenda of the May 8, 2014 Electoral Area Advisory Committee meeting be approved
as presented.
CARRIED
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Electoral Area Advisory Committee – April 3, 2014
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Pearase
That the minutes of the April 3, 2014 Electoral Area Advisory Committee Meeting be adopted as
circulated.
CARRIED
Page 92 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1a
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-2-
May 8, 2014
DELEGATIONS
Vernon / North Okanagan Safe Communities Unit
The Regional Crime Prevention Coordinator provided an update on activities he has undertaken
over the past month.
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Foisy
That the report dated April 28, 2014 from the Vernon / North Okanagan Detachment – Safe
Communities Unit be received for information.
CARRIED
Mabel Lake Holiday Centre Ltd. c/o T. Laursen
Development Variance Permit Application

Terry Laursen of the Mabel Lake Holiday Centre Ltd. spoke in favour of the application
regarding the parking lot for the new marina.
A. and N. Giesbrecht
Development Permit with Variances Application


Noreen Giesbrecht spoke regarding the IHA septic requirements. It was suggested to follow
up with the building inspector to see if the building permit could be issued without IHA
approval.
One written submission was received from Abbie Wellington of 6909 Highway 97A who
expressed concerns regarding keeping the alley way and fire lane clear of any vehicles.
D. and D. Teale
Development Variance Permit Application

Dennis Teale spoke in favour of the application.
G. Bouffard and D. Becker c/o W.E. Maddox
Waiver of Lot Frontage

Ginnette Bouffard and Doug Becker spoke in favour of the application.
NEW BUSINESS
Agriculture Land Commission Application
A. Hatfield and K. Richards (File No.: 14-0095-F-ALR)
Moved and seconded by Directors Pearase and Fairbairn
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the application under Section 17(3) of the
Agricultural Land Commission Act to include into the Agricultural Land Reserve the non-ALR
portion of the property legally described as That Part NW ¼, Sec 27, Lying to the West of the
Right Bank of the Shuswap River as Shown on Plan B17102, Twp 18, R7, W6M, KDYD, Except
Plan 34054 and located at 1866 Enderby Mabel Lake Road be authorized for submission to the
Agricultural Land Commission.
CARRIED
Page 93 of 104
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1a
-3-
May 8, 2014
Development Variance Permit Application
Mabel Lake Holiday Centre Ltd. c/o T. Laursen (File No.: 14-0010-F-DVP)
Moved and seconded by Directors Pearase and Foisy
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that upon consideration of input from adjacent
landowners, a Development Variance Permit be issued for the property legally described as Lot
B, DL 2415, ODYD and Sec 14, Twp 19, R6 W6M, KDYD, Plan KAP45947 and located at 3501
Enderby Mabel Lake Road, Electoral Area “F” to allow a variance to Sections 1101.2.e.iii.c and
1101.2.f of the Regional District of North Okanagan Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 by waiving
the requirement to pave and curb a commercial parking area subject to:
1) The dimensions and siting of the parking area on the land be in general accordance with the
site plans attached to the Planning Department report dated April 16, 2014;
2) The parking area be provided with directional signs to provide traffic control, graded to
provide an even surface, drained so that no surface water accumulates on the property or
runs off onto neighbouring properties, kept free of weeds, and be sufficiently gravelled and
treated to suppress dust;
3) A landscaping screen consisting of no less than a compact evergreen hedge not less than 2
m in height be provided along the north and west side of the parking area; and
4) A Section 219 Restrictive Covenant being registered on the title of the subject property to
restrict the use of the parking lot in conjunction with the proposed 260 slip marina located at
the end of Large Road (Lease 346844).
CARRIED
Development Permit with Variances Application
A. and N. Giesbrecht (File No.: 14-0080-F-DP / 14-0081-F-DVP)
Moved and seconded by Directors Pearase and Fairbairn
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that upon consideration of input from adjacent
landowners, a Development Permit with Variances be issued for the property legally described
as Parcel A (KP86723) Blk 9, DL 526, KDYD, Plan 592 and located at 135 3rd Avenue,
Electoral Area “F” to allow variances to the following Sections of the Regional District of North
Okanagan Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003:
1) Section 1101.2.f by waiving the requirement to provide curbing on the west side of the
parking and loading areas located on the subject property;
2) Section 1501.2.a.iii by waiving the requirement to provide a landscaped buffer along the
west side of the subject property which fronts 3rd Avenue and is not used for driveway
access purposes; and further,
3) Section 501.9.c by reducing the rear yard setback of a building from 7.5 m to 5.66 m;
4) Section 1101.3 by reducing the required number of commercial off-street parking spaces
from 16 to 10; and further
Page 94 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1a
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-4-
May 8, 2014
That a Development Permit with Variances be issued for the property legally described as
Parcel A (KP86723) Blk 9, DL 526, KDYD, Plan 592 and located at 135 3rd Avenue, Electoral
Area “F” subject to the following:
1) the dimensions and siting of the building addition and parking and loading area to be
constructed on the land be in general accordance with the site plan attached to the Planning
Department report dated April 17, 2014. A total of ten (10) angled parking stalls are to be
provided on the north side of the existing building. Access to the parking stalls is to be
gained from 3rd Avenue via a six (6) metre wide driveway aisle. One (1) loading area is to
be provided on the west side of the existing building. Access to the loading area is to be
gained via the above noted driveway aisle;
2) the form and character of the building addition to be constructed on the land be in general
accordance with the building elevations attached to the Planning Department report dated
April 17, 2014. With the exception of the south facing wall, the exterior of the building is to
be clad with painted metal siding;
3) cement or timber curbs be placed around the parking and loading areas (excluding along 3rd
Avenue);
4) a 2 m wide landscape buffer be provided between the east and south sides of the subject
property and the adjacent residential zoned properties;
5) prior to issuance of a Building Permit, a Section 219 Restrictive Covenant be registered on
the title of the subject property to require that all construction meet the Floodplain Setbacks
and Flood Construction Levels of the Shuswap River and to save harmless the Regional
District from losses or damages that may be caused due to flooding.
CARRIED
Opposed: Director Macnabb
Development Variance Permit Application
D. and D. Teale (File No.: 14-0078-C-DVP)
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Pearase
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that upon consideration of input from adjacent
landowners, a Development Variance Permit be issued for the property legally described as Lot
28, Sec 35, Twp 9, ODYD, Plan 291 Except Plans H14932 and 34140 and located at 940
Pottery Road, Electoral Area “C” to permit a variance to Section 802.9.e of the Regional District
of North Okanagan Zoning Bylaw 1888, 2003 by reducing the side yard setback of a two family
dwelling from 4.5 m to 3.15 m as shown on the site plan and building elevations attached to the
Planning Department report dated April 22, 2014.
CARRIED
Page 95 of 104
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1a
-5-
May 8, 2014
Waiver of Lot Frontage
G. Bouffard and D. Becker c/o W.E. Maddox (File No.: 14-0054-E-WVR)
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Foisy
That the memorandum from the Planning Department dated April 24, 2014 regarding Waiver of
Lot Frontage Application for the properties legally described as Lot 1, DL 3512, ODYD, Plan
28769 AND Lot 1, DL 3512, ODYD Plan 24597 and located at 1022 and 940 Sugar Lake Road,
Electoral Area “E” be received for information; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the 10% minimum frontage requirement
of Section 803.7 of the RDNO Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 be waived for the properties legally
described as Lot 1, DL 3512, ODYD, Plan 28769 AND Lot 1, DL 3512, ODYD, Plan 24597 and
located at 1022 and 940 Sugar Lake Road, Electoral Area “E” by reducing the lot frontage of
proposed Lot 1 from approximately 146 metres to 20 metres as shown on the site plan attached
to the Planning Department report dated April 24, 2014.
CARRIED
Zoning Text Amendment Bylaw No. 2589, 2013 [Agri-Tourism]
Moved and seconded by Directors Foisy and Fairbairn
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, that Zoning Text Amendment Bylaw No.
2589, 2013, which proposes to include Agricultural Land Commission (ALC) Agri-Tourism
provisions into Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003, be amended to include provisions which:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Clarify the duration of stay;
Prohibit the use of Park Model Recreation Vehicles in Agri-Tourism Campsites;
Allow kitchen facilities in Agri-Tourism Cabins
Allow Agri-Tourism Accommodation in Electoral Area “B” within the ‘Westside’ boundary;
Allow Agri-Tourism Accommodation in all of Electoral Area “F”;
Clarify the minimum lot size requirements for Bed and Breakfast Use; and,
Clarify the requirements for Agri-Tourism Campsites; and further,
That Zoning Text Amendment Bylaw No. 2589, 2013, be amended as follows:
1. Amend Section B.1, definition of “Agri-Tourism Accommodation” to include the phrase as
follows: “Use of campsites and cabins for Agri-Tourism Accommodation must be seasonal
as defined by this bylaw”;
2. Amend Section B.1, definition of “Agri-Tourism Campsite” to include the phrase as follows:
“Park Model Recreation Vehicles are not permitted to be used within Agri-Tourism
Campsites”;
3. Amend Section B.1, definition of “Agri-Tourism Cabin” be amended to exclude the phrase:
“to contain a kitchen or”;
4. Amend Section B.3, by removing the phrase “within the Kingfisher Local Area Plan
boundary of Electoral Area “F” as shown on Schedule “I” of this bylaw.”;
5. Amend Section B.3, by adding the phrase “within the ‘Westside’ Boundary of Electoral Area
“B” as shown on Schedule “I” of this bylaw”;
Page 96 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1a
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-6-
May 8, 2014
6. Amend Section B.3 by replacing Section 301.3.c.i with the following:
“Agri-Tourism Campsite and Cabin units are not permitted on less than 4 ha, and no more
than five (5) Agri-Tourism Accommodation units are permitted on parcels 4 ha up to 8 ha,
and no more than ten (10) Agri-Tourism Accommodation units are permitted on parcels 8 ha
and greater.”;
7. Replace Section B.5 with the following: Add Division Eighteen – Schedule “I” – Westside
Area Boundary for Agri-Tourism Accommodation attached to this Bylaw as Schedule “A”;
8. Replace Section B.6 with the following: Amend Division One, Section 102 – Schedules by
adding Schedule “I” – Westside Area Boundary for Agri-Tourism Accommodation; and
further,
That Zoning Text Amendment Bylaw No. 2589, 2013, be amended to include the following:
1. Amend Division Thirteen – Campground Regulations – Schedule “D” of Zoning Bylaw No.
1888, 2003 by adding the following to 1301.1 Application: d. The provisions of this Schedule
do not apply to Agri-Tourism Campsites with the exception of the following Sections:
i.
ii.
iii.
iv.
1301.12 – Camping Sites
1301.21 – Water Supply
1301.22 – Sewerage Disposal
1301.26 – Garbage Disposal; and further,
That Zoning Text Amendment Bylaw No. 2589, 2013 be given Second Reading, as amended,
and be referred to Public Hearing.
CARRIED
Riparian Areas Regulations – Report from the Ombudsperson
The Committee was provided with an overview of the report from the Ombudsperson regarding
riparian areas regulations.
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Pearase
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the report from the Ombudsperson
regarding riparian area regulations be sent to Auditor General for Local Government for
comment on “value for money” with respect to the regulation.
CARRIED
Bylaw 2620 - Soil Removal and Deposit
The Committee was provided with an update on Soil Removal and Deposit Bylaw No. 2620,
2014.
Medical Marihuana
The Committee was provided with an update on Medical Marihuana. Aspects of the draft Bylaw
were discussed.
Page 97 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1a
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-7-
May 8, 2014
Non-Commercial Blasting
Discussion ensued regarding oversight and liabilities for blasting.
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fairbairn
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that a letter be written to B.C. Mineral
Exploration and Mining (MEM) regarding non-commercial blasting seeking advice regarding
oversight and liabilities associated with non-commercial blasting.
CARRIED
Seasonal Boat Patrols
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Foisy
That the arrangement between the Ministry of Justice, RCMP “E” Division and the RDNO for the
provision of seasonal boat patrols be discontinued for 2014; and further,
That the General Manager, Electoral Area Administration explore other options for seasonal
patrols on or near Mabel, Mara and Sugar Lakes, and the Shuswap River.
CARRIED
Annexation Application - 10 Properties (Pleasant Valley Road and Silver Star Road)
The Committee was advised that the Annexation Impact Study (Phase II) is almost complete.
Bylaw 2545 - Greater Vernon Water Use and Regulation
Bylaw 2651 - Cross Connection Control Regulation
Bylaw 2627 - Municipal Ticket Information Amendment
This item was deferred until the June 5, 2014 Electoral Area Advisory Committee meeting.
REPORTS
Advisory Planning Commission Meetings
Moved and seconded by Directors Fairbairn and Foisy
That the minutes of the following Advisory Planning Commission meetings be received for
information:


Electoral Area “C” APC – April 30, 2014
Electoral Area “F” APC – April 28, 2014
CARRIED
Building Statistical Report
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Foisy
That the March 2014 Building Statistical Report be received for information
Page 98 of 104
CARRIED
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1a
-8-
May 8, 2014
General Manager’s Report
The General Manager, Electoral Area Administration provided an update on the following
matters:
o
o
o
o
o
Rural Lumby Internet
 $200,000 grant provided by Ministry of Open Government and Citizens’ Services
 $50,000 grant from SIDIT
 Will be working with a community group to develop the RFP
Greater Vernon Parks, Recreation and Culture
 Working Team is reviewing / tweaking previous bylaws
RCMP
 Further to our request, Superintendent Burgess has confirmed that the RCMP
quarterly reports will be presented during the “Regular” meeting. Next delegation is
scheduled for June 5th.
Building Inspection Service
 CAOs meeting tomorrow morning (May 9, 2014)
SILGA Convention
 Good presenters / topics
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fairbairn
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Electoral
Area Advisory Committee convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public
in accordance with Sections 90(1)(g) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
The regular meeting of the Electoral Area Advisory Committee adjourned to meet In Camera at
4:30 p.m.
The regular meeting of the Electoral Area Advisory Committee reconvened at 4:38 p.m.
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 4:38 pm.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Bob Fleming
Corporate Officer
Jeanne Byron
Page 99 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1b
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the GREATER VERNON ADVISORY COMMITTEE of
the REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN held in the Boardroom at the Regional
District Office on Thursday, May 8, 2014
Members:
Director J. Cunningham
Councillor G. Kiss
Alternate Director B. Spiers
Director M. O’Keefe
Alt. Director J. Garlick
Director B. Fleming
Director M. Macnabb
T. Osborn
B. Turanski
City of Vernon
(Chair)
District of Coldstream
(Vice Chair)
City of Vernon
City of Vernon
District of Coldstream
Electoral Area "B"
Electoral Area "C"
Agricultural Representative
School District 22 Representative
Staff:
D. McTaggart
D. Sewell
L. Mellott
General Manager, Engineering
General Manager, Finance
General
Manager,
Electoral
Area
Administration
Corporate
Officer/Human
Resources
Manager
Manager – Greater Vernon Water
Community Development Coordinator
Parks Planner
Water Quality Manager
Executive Assistant Engineering (taking
minutes)
J. Byron
Z. Marcolin
T. Nelson
K. Pinkoski
R. Clark
P. Juniper
Also Present: Director D. Dirk
Councillor M. Besso
Director R. Fairbairn
W. Pearce
R. Dickinson
M. Baker
Councillor P. McClean
J. Kidston
District of Coldstream
District of Coldstream
Electoral Area “D” (Board Vice-Chair)
Chief Administrative Officer, City of
Vernon
Director, Engineering & GIS, City of
Vernon
Director of Engineering Services, District
of Coldstream
District of Coldstream
Alt. Agricultural Representative
Media and Public
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The meeting was called to order at 8:01 a.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee – May 8, 2014
Moved and seconded by Director Macnabb and Agricultural Representative Osborn
Page 100 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1b
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-2-
May 8, 2014
That the Agenda of the May 8, 2014 Greater Vernon Advisory Committee meeting be approved
with the following additions:
−
Item E.7 – Urban Development Institute Letter
−
Item E.8 – Drinking Water Week
Moved by Director Macnabb and Alternate Director Spiers
That the item – Capital Works – Greater Vernon Water Operations & Maintenance Contract be
brought out of In-Camera and added as Item E.9 of the Regular Meeting Agenda.
−
Item E.9 – Capital Works – Greater Vernon Water Operations & Maintenance Contract
CARRIED
Opposed: Director O’Keefe
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Fleming
That the following minutes of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee meetings be adopted as
circulated:
− April 3, 2014 - Regular
− April 24, 2014 – Special
CARRIED
NEW BUSINESS
Greater Vernon Water Service Establishment Bylaw Amendment No. 2543, 2014 (Schon
Springs)
Moved and seconded by Director Macnabb and Alt. Director Spiers
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Bylaw 2543, being the Greater Vernon Water
Service Establishment Bylaw Amendment No. 2543, 2014 (Schon Springs) be given first,
second and third Reading and forwarded for consent of the participants; and further
Following receipt of 2/3 consent pursuant to Section 802.(1)(b) of the Local Government Act
Bylaw 2543, being the Greater Vernon Water Service Establishment Bylaw Amendment No.
2543, 2014 (Schon Springs) be referred to the Inspector of Municipalities for statutory approval.
CARRIED
Bylaw 2628, 2014 being Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Projects Voting
Question Bylaw No. 2628, 2014 and
Bylaw 2629, 2014 being Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Projects Loan
Authorization Bylaw No. 2629, 2014
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fleming
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master
Water Plan Projects Voting Question Bylaw No. 2628, 2014 be given First, Second and Third
Readings.
CARRIED
Opposed: Councillor Kiss
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BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1b
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-3-
May 8, 2014
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fleming
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master
Water Plan Projects Voting Question Bylaw No. 2628, 2014 be Adopted.
CARRIED
Opposed: Councillor Kiss
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Macnabb
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master
Water Plan Loan Authorization Bylaw 2629, 2014 be given First, Second and Third Readings;
and further,
That Greater Vernon Water Phase 1 Master Water Plan Loan Authorization Bylaw 2629, 2014
be referred to the Inspector of Municipalities for Statutory Approval.
CARRIED
Opposed: Councillor Kiss
Private Unmetered Fire Hydrant – 7961 Buchanan Road
The Committee discussed the request received from Barb Mitchell, Highlands Golf to donate the
private fire hydrant to Greater Vernon Water.
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Alternate Director Garlick
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, staff be directed to report back to the
Committee on the number of private hydrants that exist and the breakdown of costs.
CARRIED
Kalavista Lagoon
The Committee discussed the letter dated April 23, 2014 from the District of Coldstream
regarding the request for water licence application to pump water from Kalamalka Lake into the
Kalavista Lagoon.
Water Sustainability Act (WSA) Bill 18 - 2014
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director Fleming
That the report dated April 17, 2014 regarding the Water Sustainability Act (WSA) Bill 18-2014
be received for information.
CARRIED
Duteau Creek Watershed Assessment Response Plan
Moved and seconded by Director Macnabb and Alternate Director Garlick
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, the Duteau Creek Watershed Assessment
Response Plan 2014 attached to the report dated April 22, 2014 regarding Duteau Creek
Watershed Assessment Response Plan be endorsed by the Board of Directors: and further
That the Duteau Creek Watershed Assessment Response Plan 2014 be forwarded to Interior
Health for final endorsement.
CARRIED
Page 102 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1b
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-4-
May 8, 2014
Urban Development Institute Letter
The Committee discussed the letter dated April 17, 2014 sent to Interior Health from the Urban
Development Institute. This letter identified concerns about Interior Health’s plan to publish the
current status of the water systems in the Okanagan Valley in such a manner as to suggest that
many are inadequate and unsafe.
Moved and seconded by Alternate Director Garlick and Director O’Keefe
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that a letter be sent to the Interior Health
Authority and other recipients expressing similar opinions to those raised by the Urban
Development Institute in their letter dated April 17, 2014.
CARRIED
Drinking Water Week – May 4 – 10, 2014
Tours have been scheduled of the Duteau Creek Water Treatment Plant for Drinking Water
Week. It was noted that in future, information about the Mission Hill Water Treatment Plant will
be prominently included.
Capital Works – Greater Vernon Water Operations & Maintenance Contract
The General Manager Finance provided an overview of the financial challenges relating to the
overhead costs related to capital works for Greater Vernon Water and the interpretation of the
Greater Vernon Water Utility Operations and Maintenance Contract regarding the responsibility
for capital works completed within jurisdictional boundaries.
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Fleming
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors, Protocol No. ENG-GVW-OP 09 – Capital
Works Projects and Planning be circulated for review and discussion between the jurisdictions;
and further
That staff report back on overhead costs for capital works completed within jurisdictional
boundaries.
CARRIED
REPORTS
The Parks Planner provided an update regarding the Community Sports Field and Athletics
Facility. He advised that the Civil Tender has been issued and is scheduled to close May 29,
2014.
IN CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Director Macnabb and Alternate Director Garlick
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Greater
Vernon Advisory Committee convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the
public in accordance with Section 90(1)(e) and (g) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
The Regular meeting of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee adjourned to meet In Camera
at 10:17 a.m.
Page 103 of 104
BOARD of DIRECTORS - REGULAR AGENDA
May 21, 2014 - Item G.1b
Greater Vernon Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-5-
May 8, 2014
The Regular meeting of the Greater Vernon Advisory Committee meeting reconvened at 11:29
a.m.
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 11:29 a.m.
CERTIFIED CORRECT
Chair
Juliette Cunningham
Corporate Officer
Jeanne Byron
Page 104 of 104
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