Massey University Council Meeting papers - Part I

Massey University Council Meeting papers - Part I

MEETING OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

FRIDAY 3 MAY 2013 commencing at 11.00 am to be held in

THE SEMINAR SUITE (5B14)

LEVEL B, BLOCK H

WELLINGTON CAMPUS

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

A meeting of Massey University Council will be held in the Executive Suite

(5B14), Level B, Block 5, Wellington Campus

on

Friday 3 May 2013 commencing at 11.00am

AGENDA- PART I

Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act

1987

Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This means that if a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed unless non-disclosure can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That is, non-disclosure of information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part II or Finance Section matters are not seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such matters are not mentioned outside Council (or its relevant Committee).

All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information included under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for the minutes of those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the Registrar for decision on disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose Part II or Finance Section matters.

Interest: Declaration and Disqualification

In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or indirect pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a member of the staff of the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the Council (or Committee) then as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their knowledge they:

(a) must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);

(b) must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the Council (or

Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides otherwise.

Page 1 of 5

Index

Number

Item

G

HI

Paper

Number

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Welcome

1.2 Apologies

1.3 Declaration of Interest/ Register of Interest

1.4 Meeting Agenda Review

1.5 Minutes of Council meetings – Part I - Meeting held on 1 March 2013

C13/32

1.6 Matters Arising

1.7 Follow-up Schedule as at 3 May 2013

1.8 Council Agenda Plan as at 3 May 2013

2.0 KEY REPORTS

2.1 Chancellor’s Report - Part I

2.1.1 Chancellor’s Report - oral

2.1.2 Constitution of the Massey University Council Notice 2013

2.1.3 Membership on Council

2.1.3.1 Outcome of Massey University Council Elections for

three student members on Council – to be distributed

under separate cover

2.1.3.2 Ministerial Appointments - oral

2.2 Vice-Chancellor’s Report – Part I

2.2.1 Vice-Chancellor’s Report

2.2.2 Financial Report for the three months ending 31 March

2013

C13/33

C13/34

C13/35

C13/36

3.0 DECISION ITEMS

3.1 Fee Setting Principles and Process

E

F

B

C

D

A

JK

L

M

4.0 COMMITTEE, ASSOCIATED ENTITIES AND OTHER REPORTS

4.1 Academic Board Reports

4.1.1 Academic Board meeting held on 20 March 2013

4.1.2 Academic Board meeting held on 24 April 2013 - to be tabled

5.0 INFORMATION/BACKGROUND ITEMS

Nil

6.0 MOVING INTO PART II

6.1 Exclusion of the Public

C13/37

C13/38

C13/39

Page 2 of 5

THE CHANCELLOR WILL MOVE THAT, EXCLUDING

• Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

• Ms Rose Anne MacLeod, Assistant Vice-Chancellor – Finance, Strategy and

Information Technology

• Mr James Gardiner, Director of Communications

• Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF

ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED FROM

THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE FOLLOWING

MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE; THE

COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE

CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.

Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act 1987.

Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.

Item Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

Item 7.1

C13/40

Confirmation of Minutes

Item 7.2

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 1 March 2013

Matters Arising These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 1 March 2013

Item 7.3

Follow-up Schedule as at 3 May 2013

Item 8.1.1

Chancellor’s Report

Item 8.1.2

C13/41

Membership on Council – Council

Appointees

Item 8.2.1

C13/42

Preliminary Report on Massey 2012 PBRF

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 1 March 2013 and before

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

Item 8.2.2

C13/43

Vice-Chancellor’s 2013 Objectives: Period

January – March 2013

Item 8.2.3

C13/44

Financial Report for the three months ended

31 March 2013

Item 8.2.4

C13/45

Quarterly Performance Report

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Page 3 of 5

Item

Item 8.2.5

C13/46

Debtors Report as at 31 March 2013

Item 8.2.6

C13/47

Enrolment Update

Item 9.1

C13/48

Business Case: Building X Formally

Business Studies East

Item 9.2

C13/49

Business Case: World Class Web Presence –

Phase Two

Item 9.3

C13/50

Property Divestment: Hokowhitu Campus

Item 9.4

C13/51

Massey University Veterinary 50-year

Anniversary Medals

Item 9.5

C13/52

Conferment of Honorary Degrees

Item 10.1.1

C13/57

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 15 April 2013

Item 10.1.2

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 3 May 2013

Item 10.1.3

C13/53

Risk Management Report

Item 10.2.1

C13/54

Academic Board Report – meeting held on

20 March 2013

Item 10.2.2

C13/55

Academic Board Report – meeting held on

24 April 2013

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Page 4 of 5

Item

Item 10.3.1

C13/56

New Zealand School of Music Annual Report

2012

Item 10.3.2

C13/58

Agri One Limited Annual Report 2012

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

AND

Item 11.0

Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the privileged part of the meeting.

Page 5 of 5

C13/32 – May

Part I

MINUTES OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

A MEETING OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE UNIVERSITY

HOUSE MEETING ROOM, UNIVERSITY HOUSE, MANAWATU CAMPUS

On

FRIDAY 1 MARCH 2013 AT 11.15am

PART I

PRESENT:

Dr Russ Ballard (Chancellor), Ms Fiona Coote, Ms Kura Denness,

Associate Professor Grant Duncan, Mr Chris Kelly, (Pro Chancellor),

Hon Steve Maharey (Vice-Chancellor), Dr Alison Paterson Ms Tiri Porter,

Professor Tony Signal, Mr Ralph Springett, Mr Ben Thorpe,

Mr Bruce Ullrich, Mr Ben Vanderkolk and Professor Cynthia White

IN ATTENDANCE: Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar

Mr James Gardiner, Director Communications

Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act

1987

Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This means that if a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed unless non-disclosure can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or

Committee) meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That is, non-disclosure of information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the

Official Information Act 1982. Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part

II or Finance Section matters are not seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such matters are not mentioned outside Council (or its relevant Committee).

All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information included under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for the minutes of those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the

Registrar for decision on disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose

Part II or Finance Section matters.

Interest: Declaration and Disqualification

In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or indirect pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a member of the staff of the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the

Page 1 of 10

C13/32 – May

Part I

Council (or Committee) then as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their knowledge they:

(a) Must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);

(b) Must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the

Council (or Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides otherwise.

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 WELCOME

The Chancellor opened the meeting at 11.15am welcoming those present including new

Ministerial Appointee to Council Michael Ahie. He also welcomed Prof Tony Signal back after his sabbatical in Canada. The Chancellor noted that there would be an official welcome for Mr Ahie and the newly elected student members at the 3 May 2013 Council meeting.

The Chancellor also noted that this was potentially the last meeting for student members Tiri

Porter, Ralph Springett and Ben Thorpe.

1.2 APOLOGIES

Apologies were received and noted from Ms Lesley Whyte and from Professor Tony Signal for the site visit.

The Vice-Chancellor noted that Assistant Vice-Chancellor Finance, Strategy and

Information Technology Ms MacLeod was unable to attend the meeting.

1.3 DECLARATION OF INTEREST

The Chancellor noted the Interests Register and called for any further declarations of which there were none. Members were asked to provide updated information for the Register to the

Executive Secretary.

1.4 MEETING AGENDA REVIEW

Part II Agenda:

Item 12.1: Agricultural Services: Site visit: This item was taken at the beginning of Part II immediately prior to the site visit.

Item 10.6: Performance Review Committee Report: This item was taken as the last item on the agenda. The Chancellor noted that the Vice-Chancellor asked that his employees remain for this item if they wished to do so.

There we no late items for Part I or Part II.

Page 2 of 10

C13/32 – May

Part I

1.5 C13/01

CONFIRMATION OF PART I MINUTES - MEETING HELD ON 7 DECEMBER

2012

RESOLVED THAT THE MINUTES OF THE MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

MEETING HELD ON FRIDAY 7 DECEMBER 2012 (PART I) BE RECEIVED AND

CONFIRMED, WITH THE FOLLOWING AMENDMENT:

Page 6 of 12: 3.2.2: Student Election Statute: Additional bullet point to read:

Discussion and agreement that the General Student position on Council be changed to the Internal Student position on Council.

AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD

CHANCELLOR/ULLRICH

Carried

1.6 MATTERS ARISING

Page 6 of 12: 3.2.2: Student Election Statute: Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations and

University Registrar Mr Morriss noted that Council’s agreement to request approval from the Minister of Tertiary Education for a more flexible student membership clause that aligned with the legislation, meant that the description of the three student positions on

Council now needed to be included in the Council Statute: Election of Student Members on the Council.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL CONFIRM THAT THE COUNCIL STATUTE:

ELECTION OF STUDENT MEMBERS ON THE COUNCIL PROVIDES FOR THE

STUDENT MEMBERSHIP ON COUNCIL AS FOLLOWS: i. ONE INTERNAL STUDENT POSITION: ELECTED FROM THOSE

STUDENTS WHO IDENTIFY AS INTERNAL STUDENTS ON THE

CURRENT ROLL; ii. ONE DISTANCE STUDENT POSITION: ELECTED FROM THOSE

STUDENTS WHO IDENTIFY AS DISTANCE STUDENTS ON THE

CURRENT ROLL; AND iii.

ONE MĀORI STUDENT POSITION: ELECTED FROM THOSE STUDENTS

WHO IDENTIFY AS MĀORI STUDENTS ON THE CURRENT ROLL

SPRINGETT/SIGNAL

Carried

1.7 FOLLOW-UP SCHEDULE AS AT 1 MARCH 2013

Ongoing Issues

No 1: Consistencies in Policies of the University and Wholly Owned Subsidiaries: It was planned that this be reported at the 5 July 2013 Council meeting.

Page 3 of 10

C13/32 – May

Part I

1.8 COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – UPDATE FOR 1 MARCH 2013

It was noted that the Staff Forum had not been included on the Agenda Plan as Governance

Committee members met with a smaller group of Tertiary Education Union members and reported back to Council.

2.0 KEY REPORTS

2.1 CHANCELLOR’S REPORTS

2.1.1 CHANCELLOR’S REPORT – oral

The Chancellor reported that since the 7 December 2012 Council meeting he had attended a variety of meetings and events. These included the following:

• Attending meetings of Council’s Honorary Awards Committee and Performance Review

Committee.

• Continuing his bi-weekly calls to the Vice-Chancellor.

He noted that the Induction session for new Council members Michael Ahie (Ministerial

Appointee) and the three student members for which the elections had just begun was to take place on 2 May 2013 and invited current members should they wish to have a refresher session.

2.2 VICE-CHANCELLOR’S REPORTS

2.2.1 C13/02

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S REPORT – PART I

The Vice-Chancellor spoke to his report highlighting various items. He noted the Assistant

Vice-Chancellor Research and Enterprise Professor Heywood would report on the outcomes of the Performance Based research Fund (PBRF) audit at the 3 May 2013 Council meeting.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL RECEIVE THE PART I VICE-CHANCELLOR’S

REPORT

CHANCELLOR

Carried

2.2.2 C13/03

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 31 DECEMBER

2012 - PART I

The Vice-Chancellor spoke to the report and signaled that once the year-end accounts had been audited the operating surplus may be slightly higher than budget.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL RECEIVE THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE

TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2012

CHANCELLOR

Carried

Page 4 of 10

C13/32 – May

Part I

3.0 DECISION ITEMS

3.1 COUNCIL POLICY APPROVAL

3.1.1 C13/04

PAYMENTS TO COUNCIL MEMBERS POLICY 2012

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE PAYMENT TO COUNCIL MEMBERS

POLICY FOR 2013 (C13/04)

SCOTT/ULLRICH

Carried

3.2 UNIVERSITY POLICY APPROVAL

3.2.1 C13/05

HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY

The Audit and Risk Committee recommended that Council approve the Health and Safety

Policy noting the considerable improvement on the current Policy. There was however discussion around additional items that would be taken into account in the next review of the

Policy.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY

(C13/05)

DENNESS/COOTE

Carried

3.3 COUNCIL COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE

3.3.1 C13/06

AUDIT AND RISK COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE 2013

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE AUDIT AND RISK COMMITTEE

TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR 2013

DENNESS/SPRINGETT

Carried

3.3.2 C13/07

PERFORMANCE REVIEW COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE 2013

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE PERFORMANCE REVIEW

COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR 2013

VANDERKOLK/KELLY

Carried

Page 5 of 10

C13/32 – May

Part I

It was noted that there was one unfilled position on the Committee and that this member needed to be a lay member of Council.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPOINT MR MICHAEL AHIE TO THE PERFORMANCE

REVIEW COMMITTEE FOR 2013

CHANCELLOR/VANDERKOLK

Carried

3.3.3 C13/08

DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE AND MEMBERSHIP 2012

It was noted that a review of the Disciplinary Committee Terms of Reference was to be untaken and that the reviewed Terms of Reference would be tabled for approval at the 6

September 2013 Council meeting.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL CONFIRM THE DISCIPLINARY COMMITTEE TERMS

OF REFERENCE AND MEMBERSHIP FOR 2013

SCOTT/SIGNAL

Carried

3.4 SPECIFIC DELEGATIONS

3.4.1 C13/09

CONFERRING OF DEGREES AND AWARDING OF DIPLOMAS AND

CERTIFICATES – GRADUATION CEREMONIES 2013

RESOLVED THAT THE CHANCELLOR, OR HIS NOMINEE, BE AUTHORISED TO

CONFER DEGREES AND AWARD DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES AT THE

FORTHCOMING MASSEY UNIVERSITY GRADUATION CEREMONIES TO BE

HELD ON

• 16, 17 & 18 APRIL 2013 IN AUCKLAND;

• 13, 14 & 15 MAY 2013 IN PALMERSTON NORTH;

• 30 MAY 2013 IN WELLINGTON; AND

• 29 NOVEMBER 2013 IN PALMERSTON NORTH

TO THOSE REPORTED AS HAVING SUCCESSFULLY COMPLETED THE

PRESCRIBED COURSES OF STUDY

WHYTE/VANDERKOLK

Carried

Page 6 of 10

C13/32 – May

Part I

3.4.2 C13/10

APPROVAL OF ANNUAL ACCOUNTS 2013 – DELEGATION TO AUDIT AND

RISK COMMITTEE

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL DELEGATE THE AUTHORITY TO THE AUDIT AND

RISK COMMITTEE OF COUNCIL TO APPROVE THE ANNUAL ACCOUNTS FOR

2012

PATERSON/ULLRICH

Carried

4.0 COMMITTEE, ASSOCIATED ENTITIES AND OTHER REPORTS

4.1 C13/11

ACADEMIC BOARD MEETING HELD ON 20 FEBRUARY 2013 – PART I

Paper C13/24 Report form the Academic Board Meeting (Part I): 20 February 2013 was tabled.

Academic Board Appointee to Council and Academic Board Chair Professor Signal spoke to the report noting the academic discussion the Board had engaged in on ways to extend the reach and impact of higher education for Māori.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL RECEIVE THE ACADEMIC BOARD REPORT – PART

I - OF THE MEETING HELD ON 20 FEBRUARY 2013

CHANCELLOR

Carried

4.2 C13/12

TRACKING COUNCIL DECISIONS AND DELEGATIONS – PART 1

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL NOTE THE PART I TRACKING COUNCIL DECISIONS

AND DELEGATIONS REPORT AS AT 1 MARCH 2013

CHANCELLOR

Carried

5.0 INFORMATION/BACKGROUND ITEMS

There were no Information/Background items in Part I of the meeting.

6.0 MOVING INTO PART II

EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

THE CHANCELLOR MOVED THAT, EXCLUDING

• Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar

• Mr James Gardner, Director Communications

Page 7 of 10

C13/32 – May

Part I

• Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF

ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED

FROM THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE

FOLLOWING MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE;

THE COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE

CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.

Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act

1987.

Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.

Item

Item 7.1

C13/13

Confirmation of Minutes

Item 7.2

Matters Arising

Item 7.2.1

C13/17

Debtors Report: Understanding Student Debt

Item 7.3

Follow-up Schedule as at 1 March 2013

Item 8.1.1

Chancellor’s Report

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 7 December 2012

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 2 December 2011

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 7 December 2012 and before

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

Item 8.1.2

C13/14

Council Evaluation 2012

Item 8.2.1

C13/16

Financial Report for the twelve months ended

31 December 2012

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

Item 8.2.2

C13/18

Human Resources Report: Workforce

Shaping

Item 9.1

C13/20

Road to 2020

Item 9.2

C13/21

Proof of Concept: On-Campus Student

Accommodation Village at Albany

Item 9.3

C13/19

Property Divestment Update: Hokowhitu

Campus

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Page 8 of 10

Item

Item 9.4

C13/29

Buckle Street Property Lease Update

C13/32 – May

Part I

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

Item 9.5

C13/30

Naming of Albany Campus Science

Laboratories

Item 9.6

C13/31

Proposed Additional Veterinary Graduation

2013

Item 9.7

C13/15

Massey University Human Ethics

Committee: Northern – Vice-Chancellor’s

Nominee

Item 10.1.1

C13/22

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 7 December 2012

Item 10.1.2

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 1 March 2013

Item 10.2

C13/23

Honorary Awards Committee Report – meeting held on 12 February 2013

Item 10.3

C13/24

Academic Board Report – meeting held on

20 February 2013

Item 10.4

C13/25

Report on the Progress of Massey University

Foundation

Item 10.5

C13/26

Tracking Council Decisions and Delegation –

Part II

Item 10.6

C13/27

Performance Review Committee Report – meeting held on 7 February 2013

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

Page 9 of 10

C13/32 – May

Part I

Item

Item 12.1

C13/28

Agricultural Services: Site Visit Briefing

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

AND

Item 11.0

Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the privileged part of the meeting.

CHANCELLOR

Carried

12.0 ITEMS MOVED FROM PART II TO PART I

The following decisions were moved from Part II into Part I

9.1 THE ROAD TO 2020

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE ROAD TO 2020 – 2013

UPDATE (C13/19) AND NOTE PLANS TO RELEASE THE CONTENT OF THE

PAPER TO STAFF THROUGH THE VICE-CHANCELLOR’S ENGAGEMENT

WITH STAFF

9.5 NAMING OF NEW ALBANY CAMPUS SCIENCE LABORATORIES

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE NAMING OF THE NEW

SCIENCE LABORATORIES ON THE ALBANY CAMPUS THE IAN WATSON

LABORATORIES AND NOTE THAT THIS WILL BE RELEASED INTO PART I

AFTER THE VICE-CHANCELLOR HAS DISCUSSED WITH IAN WATSON

9.6 PROPOSED ADDITIONAL VETERINARY GRADUATION 2013

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL:

1. DISCUSS AND DECIDE WHETHER TO HOLD AN ADDITIONAL

SPECIAL GRADUATION CEREMONY IN DECEMBER 2013 FOR

VETERINARY GRADUATES AS PART OF THE 50 YEARS OF

VETERINARY EDUCATION CELEBRATIONS AT MASSEY

UNIVERSITY;

2. SHOULD COUNCIL AGREE TO THE ADDITIONAL GRADUATION

CEREMONY THAT THIS BE HELD ON 12 DECEMBER 2013;

3. THAT THE CHANCELLOR, OR NOMINEE, BE AUTHORISED TO

CONFER DEGREES AND AWARD DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES

AT THE 12 DECEMBER 2013 GRADUATION CEREMONY; AND

4. NOTE THAT THIS DOES NOT SET A PRECEDENT FOR OTHER

SPECIAL GRADUATION CEREMONIES

Signature: _______________________________________

Date

: __________________

Page 10 of 10

C13 –

May

Part I

Council Follow-up Schedule Part I – 3 May 2013

From last meeting

Note:

bracketed italics are completed actions

Item Outcome

1. Disciplinary Committee

• The Disciplinary Committee of Terms of Reference have not been reviewed since 2005. Need to ensure they meet the needs of the University.

Action

• AVC (Operations) & University

Registrar to review Terms of Reference and Membership criteria

Item

1. Consistencies in Policies of the University and

Wholly Owned

Subsidiaries

Council Follow-up Schedule Part I – 3 May 2013

Ongoing Issues

Note: bracketed italics are completed actions

Outcome

• It was noted that wholly owned subsidiaries have their own policies and that this could result in risks resulting from inconsistencies with Massey

University’s policies e.g. Health and Safety Policy.

Action

• Vice-Chancellor and Assistant Vice-

Chancellor & University Registrar were to take the matter of risks related to inconsistencies between wholly owned subsidiary policies and Massey policies to the Boards of Massey’s wholly owned subsidiaries.

• Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University

Registrar Mr Morriss noted that he would report on this issue at the 2

December 2011 Council meeting.

• This was deferred to the 2 March 2012 meeting.

• Report to be given at a 5 July 2013

Council meeting.

Milestone dates

• 6 September

2013

Milestone dates

• 2 March

2012 Council meeting

• 5 July 2013

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Discussions

Site visits

Friday 1 March (Manawatu)

COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2013

Function: Close off of previous year; Establishing parameters for new year; Strategy approval for the current year

• VC scene setting

• Approve Road to 2020

• Preparation for graduations and Honorary

Awards

• Annual Accounts for previous year (delegation)

• Review of Council performance

Friday 3 May (Wellington)

Function: Consolidation of business for current year

• Monitoring progress re enrolments

• Induction of new members

External Relations

Farms (adjacent to Turitea Campus)

TEC Strategies and Priorities – Chair TEC

Student Forum – deferred until student members in place

No site visit

Key Reports

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• VC scene setting 2013

• Financial Reports

• Workforce Shaping

Decision

Items

• 2012 Annual Accounts delegation to A&R

Committee

• Conferring of Degrees & Awarding of Diplomas and Certificates at graduation ceremonies delegation

• Terms of Reference- Council Committees

• Policies as per schedule

Committee,

Associated

Entities and

Other

• Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

• Massey University Foundation Report

• Academic Board Reports

• Performance Review Committee Report

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Review of Council Evaluation 2012

• Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

VC Report including CoRE reporting to

Council

Financial Report

Quarterly Performance Reports

Aged Debtors Report

• Student Fee Setting Process and Principles

(Domestic and International)

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Policies as per schedule

• Audit & Risk Report Committee – including

Risk Management Report commentary

• Academic Board Reports

• NZSM Annual Report 2012

• Agri One Limited Annual Report 2012

Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate

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Friday 5 July (Manawatu)

Function: Strategy planning for the following year; Approval of International Fees

• Approve International Student Fees

Strategies to climb the QS rankings

Milson Flight Centre

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Reports

• Performance Review Report

• International Student Fees 2014 – (AVC

Academic and International in person)

• Governance Committee Terms of Reference

• Policies as per schedule

• Audit & Risk Committee Report

• Academic Board Reports

• Academic Board Chair’s Report (in person)

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Māori Protocols Review Report

• Massey Ventures Ltd Annual Report 2012 and visit from Chair

• Massey University Foundation Annual Report

2012

Page 1 of 3

Strategic

Discussions

College of Health: strategies (Pro Vice-Chancellor

College of Health)

Site Visits Campus site visit (detail tbc)

Key Reports

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Report

• Quarterly Performance Reports

• Performance Review Report

Decision

Items

Friday 6 September (Albany)

Function: Approval of Investment Plan and

Domestic Fees

• Approve Investment Plan

• Approve Domestic Student Fees

• Establish Council agenda plan and schedule for following year

• Investment Plan 2013-2015

• Domestic Student Fees 2014

• Draft Agenda Plan 2014

• Draft Meeting Schedule 2014

• Policies as per schedule

Committee,

Associated

Entities and

Other

• Audit & Risk Committee Report–including

Risk Management Report commentary

• Academic Board Reports including Chair

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Research Strategy Framework Report (AVC

RE in person)

• Massey Foundation – Chair’s visit

• Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations

• Disciplinary Committee Review

Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate

Friday 4 October (Manawatu)

Function: Budget review

• Review Operating and Capital Budget for following year

• Insurance Renewal – delegate authority to approve

Institute of Education strategies (Director, Institute of

Education )

School of Sport and Exercise

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Report

• Performance Review Report

• 2014 University Operating and Capital

Budget

• Policies as per schedule

• Audit & Risk Committee Report

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Research Strategy Annual Report 2012

• Notice of Intention for Chancellor and Pro

Chancellor

• Council Graduation Schedule 2014

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Friday 6 December (Manawatu)

Function: Budget approval & Final Decisions

for current year and prep for following year

• Approve Operating and Capital Budget for following year

• Election of Chancellor and Pro-Chancellor

• Committee membership established

• Farewell to leaving Council members

-IP Commercialisation (tbc: MVL and Bio Centre

Chairs/CEOs)

PN Campus site visit ( detail tbc)

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Report

• Quarterly Performance Reports

• Performance Review Report

• Aged Debtors Report

• Road to 2020

• 2014 University Operating and Capital Budget

• Renewal of Insurance 2014-report delegation

• NZ School Music SCI 2014

• MVL SCI 2014

• Student Bad Debts

• Council Committee membership

• Review Guidelines for Conduct of Council and

Council Committees meetings

• Review Council Code of Conduct

• Election of Chancellor and Pro Chancellor

• Policies as per schedule

• Audit & Risk Report Committee – including

Risk Management Report commentary

• Academic Board Reports

• Academic Board Chair Report (in person)

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Council Evaluation 2013

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Page 3 of 3

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Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

CONSTITUTION OF THE MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL NOTICE 2013

3 May 2013

At the 7 December 2012 Council meeting Council agreed to seek Ministerial approval for an amendment to the Constitution of the Massey University Council as follows:

At least 1, but not more than 3, persons who must be appointed following an election

(conducted in accordance with statutes made by council) by the students enrolled at

Massey University

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations and University Registrar Mr Morriss made the request through the Tertiary Education Commission and on 2 April 2013 the Minister of Tertiary

Education Hon Steven Joyce notified the Chancellor that the requested change to the mechanism for determining student representation on the Council, in line with 2011 amendment to section 171 of the Education Act 1989. In addition the reference to the

Education Amendment Act 1989 had been replaced by reference to the Education Act 1989

(section 4).

Please find attached Constitution of the Massey University Council Notice 2013.

Recommendation

It is recommended that Council note the Constitution of the Massey University Council

Notice 2013

Stuart Morriss

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations and University Registrar

22 April 2013

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Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

OUTCOME OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL ELECTIONS FOR THREE

STUDENT MEMBERS ON COUNCIL

3 May 2013

The nomination and election process for the one-year terms for three student member positions on Council – one Internal student, one Distance student and one

Māori student – is complete and the results are as follows:

Internal student: Rebekah Walker

Distance student: Ralph Springett

Māori student:

Nitika Erueti-Satish

Recommendation

It is recommended that Council note the following members are elected to Council for a oneyear term commencing on 26 April 2013:

Internal student: Rebekah Walker

Distance student: Ralph Springett

Māori student:

Nitika Erueti-Satish

Stuart Morriss

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations and University Registrar

24 April 2013

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Part I

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S OFFICE

To:

From:

Date:

Subject:

Members of Council

Vice-Chancellor

18 April 2013

Vice-Chancellor’s Part I Report to Council

Period: late February to mid-April 2013

Purpose:

This report is presented to update Council on key achievements, highlights and major issues arising over the period late February to mid-April 2013 and also seeks to give Council a flavour of the breadth and depth of University–associated activities. The report gathers together strategic items provided by college and service lines, the Vice-Chancellor’s elog and diary. Further detail is provided in the appendices to this report.

1.0 Topical Issues

1.1 Readers of the

Manawatū Standard will have noticed an article on March 2 predicting that

Massey students will face significant fee increases in 2014. This is not the case. The

University has been asking to be able to lift its fees in areas where we lag significantly behind the average across the sector. This lag was created when the decision was made to freeze fees some years ago. Massey is seeking only to pull its fees into line with other universities.

Last year we were given indications that common sense would prevail and we would be allowed to make some adjustments – but the wheels of change sometimes move slowly.

1.2 Performance-Based Research Fund update

The results of PBRF became public on April 11. Overall, the University can be pleased with scorecard it achieved. Please refer to Appendix I for further details.

There is (as always) work to be done between now and the next round and this will begin in the immediate future. The aim is to build the PBRF into the research strategy of the

University so that it becomes part of everyday activity and that we ensure continual improvement.

The University does not receive the individual scores for those who submitted an Evidence

Portfolio. Scores have been provided to staff. It is, however, important that more detail is sought by staff as part of their drive to improve in the years ahead. Without this information it will be difficult for staff to identify where improvements can be made.

Once again, I want to thank everyone involved in the 2012 round – both academic and professional staff. My impression is that the University was as well prepared as it could have been and that a foundation was laid for an even better result next time.

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2.0 Key Strategic Issues and Positioning

2.1 VC’s February All Staff Meetings:

2013 Communication, Coordination and Consolidation

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A good deal of the last week of February was taken up with meetings to discuss the year ahead. Thank you to the staff that were able to come to the all staff meetings on each campus.

Over the year ahead we will continue to advance our overall plan with as much energy as possible. Each year we have chosen a few words that capture the key themes of the year.

For 2013 the key words are Communication (tell our stories inside and outside the

University), Coordination (make sure that as we change all activities are joined up),

Consolidate (optimise outcomes from the many changes taking place).

There is a very busy programme of action attached to each of the seven big goals for the

University. It is important that we all know what it going on so I have asked staff to please take the time to catch up with what was said, either by watching the Albany presentation available mediasite via http://webcast.massey.ac.nz/mediasite/SilverlightPlayer/Default.aspx?peid=0eef6751380845 edb2b04a09168262d11d, or by looking through the text version (see item 2.2 below for the link).

There are now seven big goals. Over the past year the Internationalisation goal has grown in importance and deserves to be given greater prominence. Indeed, I can see a time that the goal may lead us to being designated New Zealand’s “Gateway” University. That is, we will be seen as the university that acts as the gateway between New Zealand and the rest of the globe.

Apart from the general staff meetings, I have met with many smaller groups and have been impressed by the level of activity and enthusiasm. There is a great deal more going on than is contained in the Road to 2020 plan. That is as it should be. The plan is a framework for us to work within – much more can be done.

We have been on the Road to 2020 for four years now. The Council has asked that we refresh our thinking this year and look specifically at major initiatives that can be taken.

Kerry Jaques and his team in the Office of Strategy Management will be organising a programme of consultation that will give everyone a chance to have a say about the direction of the University. Please have your say when the opportunity arises. We are all in this together and the more we share an understanding of what we are trying to achieve the better.

2.2

2013 update of The Road to 2020

As discussed in item 2.1 above, the updated version of the strategic plan is now available on the intranet (via http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/fms/About%20Massey/Documents/Defining-road-to-

2020.pdf), as is a University profile. Please make use of both – the first to guide thinking and the later for external audiences. As has been said before – we are driven by our purpose and it is taking us in the right direction.

One of the ways change is being encouraged is through the Strategic Innovations and

Consolidation Funds. These have been heavily subscribed this year – which is great to see.

The deadline for applications was at the end of March so the SLT now has to discuss each one and make a decision. This will be done as quickly as possible.

2.3 Recent launches

2.3.1 Institute of Education

Thank you to everyone involved in the launch of the Institute of Education in February. The launch was in Palmerston North so I dropped in to see the Institute staff based at Albany – everyone was looking forward to what the year will bring. Change is always a challenge, but the institute was a sound decision and we are all looking forward to seeing it succeed.

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2.3.2 College of Health

The College Health had its Wellington launch in February and

Manawatū launch in April. A mix of Massey and local health sector people enthusiastically gave their support to this new

“defining” part of Massey University. Please refer to Appendix II for further details, and to item 7.1 below for details on the arrival of Professor Paul McDonald, the new Pro Vice-

Chancellor of the College of Health. Professor McDonald delivered a lecture after the

Manawatū launch that strongly made the case for the approach to health that will be taken by the College. Albany next.

2.3.3 University Archives

The new premises for our Archives also opened on the Manawatū campus in February. It was great to see our history made so accessible to scholars, alumni and other interested parties.

2.4 Research update

2.4.1 Massey staff have submitted 149 applications to the Marsden Fund this year. That is an enormous effort. Thank you to everyone involved.

2.4.2 Warehousing of 2012 research outputs

Early March saw the launch of the 2013 annual research programme to warehouse research outputs from 2012. All research active staff are required to complete the warehousing and preliminary verification of research publications (both text/non text) and associated evidence of contribution to the research environment (CRE) and peer esteem (PE) for 2012.

The Symplectic Elements portal will be open for the logging of this information up to 1 June

2013 at which point the portal for 2012 data will be closed for analysis and formal audit.

Guidance for all staff is available at http://symplectic.massey.ac.nz

2.5

If anyone has any queries, these can be directed to the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research and Enterprise), Professor Brigid Heywood, or the project co-ordinator, Doug Franz.

Teaching and Learning update

2.5.1 Student Success strategy update

The quality improvement investigation into student engagement over the Summer School has progressed. Data have been collected from a number of sources and is now in the process of being collated. The data will be analysed to identify patterns of student engagement in Summer School compared to other semesters (single and double) and identify the factors influencing student success and engagement.

Progress is being made on the implementation of the Student Success strategy. The

Teaching and Learning Committee have approved, in principle, the establishment of a new

Student Engagement and Success subcommittee to guide the implementation, integration and alignment of student engagement and success activities in accordance with the strategy.

The Student Engagement Project continues in 2013. The focus for 2013 will be ongoing monitoring of students throughout the semester both at a paper level and across papers for identified cohorts. A pre-semester phone call to new distance students in priority groups was piloted in February. The focus of the phone calls was on readiness for study and to ensure that students are aware of what distance study is like and what is expected of them. Early feedback suggests this was a valuable exercise. A summary report is currently being prepared.

2.6 Internationalisation update

2.6.1 International students were welcomed to Massey University at the end of February. Some 90 nationalities make up the international student body and the mood was very positive.

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2.6.2 Further to my March report, work is under way for the August/September intake for targeted programmes in the Colleges of Business and Sciences. A Spring intake is well suited to the

Asian markets who receive their final semester results in July and August, and North

American and European markets when the Fall semester starts.

2.6.3 Singapore graduates and developing opportunities

A staff member recently returned from lecturing (Bachelor of Food Technology (Hons)) in

Singapore and has reported that the Massey-trained students are now establishing themselves through the food industry in the region. Several employers he met have commented enthusiastically about our graduates and say they wish to continue to engage with Massey University for new ideas and development of new products. Some companies have funded the students into higher postgraduate academic qualifications supervised by

Massey staff, while with other companies we have begun to discuss possible product development and testing.

Also refer to section 4.0 Internationalisation below.

2.7 Connections update

̶ Massey brand campaign

The development of the 2013 Massey brand campaign is well under way. This year’s campaign will have a strong focus around the Albany campus, with a larger proportion being spent in the Auckland market and the new television commercial featuring the Albany campus. Filming took place on March 12. The campaign will be fully integrated and will feature not only traditional media, but will also be executed through public relations, social media, web, recruitment elements. The campaign will be launched at the end of April.

Also refer to section 5.0 Connections and Responsibility below.

2.8 Agrifood update

All activity is focused on implementing the Massey agrifood strategy (launched December

2012). This means supporting core business in relation to agrifood business as well as identifying new strategic projects where there is the potential for the University to earn revenue and/or demonstrate thought leadership. The outcome is enhancing our reputation – as the national leader in agrifood business and as one of a small group of institutions with the capability and credibility to operate internationally.

The focus of Professor Claire Massey, Director of Agrifood Business, has been on five interrelated activities: capability building within the university, building networks and partnerships, delivering quality products, improving access to the University’s expertise and making our expertise more visible through a communication and media strategy. Much of this occurs through working with others in the development and/or delivery of their own plans.

Examples of activities over the first quarter include:

• Chairing the newly-established Advisory Board for the Food Pilot Plant to support the

Plant in its delivery of its contractual obligations to its part funder (Ministry of Business,

Innovation and Employment).

• Participating in the governance group for the Global Food Safety Project.

• Chairing the Agrifood Business Coordinating Group. The focus is on identifying the main ways in which Massey can deliver on the overall objective (ie growing the agrifood economy) while earning revenue, demonstrating thought leadership and enhancing our reputation. The coordinating group also plays a key role as a clearing house for existing strategic initiatives in the agrifood business space eg. AgriOne, the Global Food Safety

Alliance and the AgriFood Innovation Hub.

• Leading a Massey Project team (from the College of Sciences and the College of

Business) which was asked to provide the technical support for an application by NZX to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. The Massey component of the project is $350,000 and it is anticipated that it will take 15 months to complete.

• Advising on the development of the Fairfax Drought Series – as series of pieces by researchers from across the University on the impact of the drought.

• Representing the University in a tour of five European institutions with strengths in food and/or health (February).

• Working with new Business Development Managers in Hawke’s Bay and Taranaki to support events that will connect the business in their region with the University. Also

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continuing to liaise with local economic development agencies in the

Manawatū and

Wellington.

2.9 Sustainability theme update

2.9.1 An initial audit of sustainability activities in the Colleges, collected at the end of 2012, has been collated and a report prepared for SLT. The report notes that there is a great deal of variation in the activities of Colleges in relation to sustainability. Partly in response to the variation of responsiveness to this theme a Consolidation SIF grant was applied for and awarded. The ‘Consolidating Sustainability’ SIF will move forward on two fronts. Firstly, a

Sustainability Project Officer will be employed to build institutional mechanisms for embedding sustainability into the activities of the university through the LiFE index. Secondly a Living Lab Project Manager will be employed to consolidate and develop further opportunities to engage with external partners through the mechanism of the Living Lab.

Living lab initiatives have been further developed in relation to the agreement with the

Palmerston North City Council and a student scholarship has enabled a study of the barriers and opportunities for sustainable dwellings in Palmerston North. In addition planning is underway for the visit of Dr Rob Wilson, Director of the Centre for Knowledge, Innovation,

Technology and Enterprise (KITE), Newcastle University, UK for a visit to Massey in early

May.

2.9.2 Examples of other initiatives in this area include:

• Innovative River Solutions Workshop: Solution to Pollution

The first River Solutions workshop was attended by more than 100 delegates representing a range of institutions and groups, including: Greater Wellington, Waikato,

Hawkes Bay, Taranaki and Horizons Regional Councils, Auckland Council,

Manawatū

District Council, Department of Conservation, Ministry for the Environment, Federated

Farmers, NZ Landcare Trust, Fish and Game, NIWA, Landcare Research, Green Party,

DairyNZ, Water and Environmental Care Association, Save our River Trust.

International speakers included Professor Angela Arthington (Australian Rivers Institute,

Griffith University), Dr Mike Stewardson (University of Melbourne), Prof Mark Macklin

(Centre for Catchment and Coastal Research, Aberystwyth University), Dr David

Rassam (CSIRO Land and Water). Of prominence from New Zealand were Professor

Gary Brierley (University of Auckland) and Dr Kit Rutherford (NIWA), as well as Helen

Marr (Perception Planning) and Graham Sevicke-Jones (Greater Wellington Regional

Council). Presentations approved for release by authors will be posted in pdf format on the River Solutions website: www.massey.ac.nz/rivers. Associate Professor Russell

Death and Dr Ian Fuller, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, are working on a White

Paper based on content and discussion at the workshop.

• Fertilizer and Lime Research Centre Workshop: Accurate and Efficient Use of Nutrients

on Farms

The 26th Annual Workshop held by the Fertilizer and Lime Research Centre was a very well attended and productive event. The organisers continued with the sustainable farming theme from the past several years. Collaboration with the recently formed

Precision Agriculture Association of New Zealand provided a focus for presentations on the final day. Seventy six papers were presented in the three-day programme. There were 270 delegates representing New Zealand universities, crown research institutions, the fertiliser industry, private consultancies, regional councils and national policymakers. There were also keynote papers given by speakers from Australia, the United

Kingdom, the United States and Germany. Proceedings are published on-line and serve as a permanent record of the knowledge and perspectives at the time.

2.10 Innovation theme update

Professor Ted Zorn, Pro Vice-Chancellor College of Business, has agreed to chair the

Innovation Steering Group, following Professor Gaven Martin. Professor Zorn drafted terms of reference for the group, which are being revised after discussion. It was agreed that a major innovation forum will be held in 2013 on the Albany campus, probably linked with the

Vice-Chancellor’s Symposium. A working group has been formed to develop a strategy for engaging the whole campus. Conversations are being held with Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED) regarding a possible memorandum of understanding

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focused on the idea of Albany being designated an innovation precinct or hub. Professor

Brigid Heywood, Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research and Enterprise), has proposed the idea of a Student Enterprise Club for the Albany campus, and is preparing a paper to present to the steering group for discussion. Finally, a Strategic Innovation Fund proposal is being prepared to launch a cross-college innovation and entrepreneurship paper.

2.11 Creative theme update

Extensive outreach continued in support of the strategic theme of creativity. As part of the

Value of Design project, the College of Creative Arts consulted with SCION, the Riddet

Institute, New Zealand Trade and Enterprise’s Better By Design programme, the Canterbury

District Health Board, NZ Post, Grow Wellington, the Wellington City Council, Auckland

Tourism, Events and Economic Development, AUT, the Designers Institute of New Zealand and the Office of Disability Issues. The project’s leader, Associate Professor Chris

Bennewith, spoke about the project at the United Kingdom Design Council ’ s Responsive

State forum in London, chaired by Lord Michael Bichard. The Value of Design project is proving to be a catalyst in the creativity space and is providing valuable insights for the scoping of a project concerning the nature of the creative university, which is now underway.

2.12

New Zealand School of Music

Changes are taking place across the University including at the New Zealand School of

Music, which is a joint venture between Massey and Victoria universities.

Last year the decision was taken to establish a board made up of the vice-chancellors from the universities and other senior staff. Previously the school had been under the direction of a board made up of external appointments. It was felt that the joint venture partners needed to be more directly involved in the school.

In Massey’s case, we are keen to support a distinct contribution that contributes to the school’s reputation as the pre-eminent centre for music in New Zealand. Based at our creative campus in Wellington and innovative campus at Albany, the school adds a great deal to what we are trying to achieve.

The universities have an excellent relationship so we are looking forward to this next phase in the development of the school.

3.0 Celebrating Excellence – Awards and Recognition

3.1 Massey University receives the Randstad Award

One of the University’s big goals is to “…ensure an exceptional and distinctive learning

3.2

experience at Massey for all students”. So it was great to learn that Massey was ranked number five of New Zealand’s most attractive employers in the annual Randstad Awards – an international survey conducted across 14 nations. Perhaps more importantly, Massey was the winner of the education section. Please refer to Appendix III for further details.

The Randstad Awards are based on a survey of 7000 people from around New Zealand who will be reflecting on the reputation of Massey. Congratulations to everyone within the

University and our network of partners – this is where our reputation comes from.

Do the awards mean that we have achieved our goal? Not in the least. I am sure all of us can think of ways Massey can improve. In fact, constant improvement should be our aim.

Bachelor of Nursing accreditation

Congratulations to the staff of the Nursing Programme. In early April they received a glowing report of the Bachelor of Nursing following a site accreditation visit by a monitoring team from the Nursing Council of New Zealand. Note they did outstandingly well in PBRF as well.

3.3 Massey University Defining Excellence Awards 2013

Massey University’s Defining Excellence Awards 2013 went extremely well again this year.

They were held at the Auckland Museum in March and showcased an impressive cast of teachers, researchers and alumni. Please refer to Appendix IV for further details.

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I was particularly struck by the atmosphere at the Defining Awards event. Throughout the evening people were engaged in deep discussion and took time to get around the room to make links. Massey is creating a wave of excitement among our external partners and they are very keen to talk about working with the University.

Thanks to Cas Carter, Denise Armstrong (External Relations) and all other staff involved with the Defining event.

3.4 Massey University Distinguished Professor

I am delighted to announce that Massey University has bestowed the award of Distinguished

Professor on three of our most eminent professorial staff:

- Professor Anne Noble from the College of Creative Arts (Wellington)

- Professor Harjinder Singh from the College of Sciences (

Manawatū)

- Professor Paul Spoonley from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences (Albany)

The award is for academic staff who have achieved positions of outstanding eminence internationally within their fields. I am sure you will agree that in each of these cases, the award is richly deserved. Congratulations to them. Please refer to Appendix V for further details.

3.5 50 Years not out: Professor Emeritus Glynnis Cropp

Professor Cropp has shaped an impressive teaching and research platform in French

Studies at Massey over half a century. This year marks her 50th year as part of the Massey community. She arrived as a French language scholar in 1963.

Her research in Medieval French literature has been internationally acclaimed. In 2011 she was appointed Officer of the Palmes Academiques - France’s oldest existing award - for lifetime achievement in French education.

Professor Cropp was recognised in the New Year honours list for her services to research in the humanities. She is now an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

Though she officially retired in 2001, she continued to teach until 2010 and retains a close relationship with the School of Humanities as an Honorary Research Associate. A morning tea was held recently to celebrate Professor Cropp’s 50-year connection with Massey.

Professor Cropp’s enthusiasm and commitment to languages at Massey over 50 years is outstanding.

3.6 Congratulations to our staff, students and alumni whose expertise and excellence has been recognised in the following ways:

3.6.1 Dr Leonel Alvarado, senior lecturer in Spanish, School of Humanities, was awarded second prize in Latin America's most prestigious poetry competition, the Casa de las Americas

Poetry Award.

3.6.2 Professor of Childhood Education Claire McLachlan, of the Institute of Education, launched the second edition of her book Early Childhood Curriculum: planning, assessment and

implementation at the Early Childhood Education Symposium on February 22. The book, cowritten with Professor Marilyn Fleer and Associate Professor Susan Edwards, was first released in 2010 and has become one of the leading texts on early childhood education.

3.6.3 Dr Jing Chi, School of Economics and Finance, was awarded the College of Business

Richard Buchanan Teaching Excellence Award.

3.6.4 Associate Professor Marjan van den Belt, Director of Ecological Economics Research New

Zealand, participated at the United Nations regular workshop on reporting and assessment of the marine environment in Brisbane in February. The invitation and funding came from the

Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Trade. Please refer to Appendix VI for further details.

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3.6.5 Head of School of Fine Arts Associate Professor Heather Galbraith has been selected as judge of The Parkin Prize, a prestigious $20,000 national drawing award.

3.6.6 Pauline Dickinson, SHORE and Whariki Research Centre within the School of Public Health awarded funding to do a Literature Review by the Alcohol and Drug Community Support

Trust.

3.6.7 Professor Sally Casswell, SHORE and Whariki Research Centre, was part of a successful application to the United Kingdom Medical Research Council for a project titled The UK

Centre for Tobacco and Alcohol Studies.

3.6.8 Dr Jean Gilmour, School of Nursing, was selected by the Health Research Council as a panel member for the Canadian Institute of Health, public health funding round.

3.6.9 Helen Moewaka Barnes, SHORE and Whariki Research Centre, participated as a member of the Families Committee Expert Advisory Group, Wellington.

3.6.10 Dr Alistair Carr, Institute of Food Nutrition and Human Health, has secured funding for two new PhD projects investigating iron bioavailability as a function of processing and ingredient interactions in goat milk based infant formula as part of a $2 million dollar Ministry of

Business, Innovation and Employment awarded project headed by Industrial Research

Limited.

3.6.11 Distinguished Professor Paul Spoonley, Research Director, College of Humanities and Social

Sciences, was appointed to the Sociology Unit Standards Review Panel, New Zealand

Qualifications Authority.

3.6.12 Professor David Johnston, School of Psychology, has been appointed chair of the Scientific

Committee for Integrated Research on Disaster Risk.

3.6.13 Associate Professor Robin Peace, Regional Director Wellington, College of Humanities and

Social Sciences, as Director of eSocSci Hui Rangahau Tahi (engaged social science), is overseeing the initial launch of the new New Zealand Social Sciences website ‘eSocSci’.

3.6.14 Dr Tatiana Tairi, School of Psychology, has been admitted to Associate Fellow status with the British Psychological Society, in recognition of experience and contribution to the field of psychology.

3.6.15 Professor Jim Jones, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, has been appointed to the Marsden Fund Engineering Panel.

3.6.16 Two Massey academics have a joined a think tank set up by philanthropist Sir Owen Glenn to address child abuse and domestic violence. They are School of Psychology head

Associate Professor Mandy Morgan and Dr Te Kani Kingi, director of Te Mata o Te Tau, the

Academy for Maori Research and Scholarship.

3.6.17 Jo Aleh, Bachelor of Information Science student, was a finalist in the Westpac New Zealand

Team of the Year.

3.6.18 Peter Vullings, Bachelor of Engineering (H ons) graduate, won the Innovate Manawatū awards and entered into the BioCommerce Centre's market validation programme.

3.6.19 Patrick McDonald, Bachelor of Design (Hons) graduate, won the 2013 Storylines Gavin

Bishop Award.

3.6.20 Gordon Robinson, Bachelor of Design (Hons) graduate, won the Red Dot Design Concept award.

3.6.21 Lisa Carrington, Bachelor of Arts student, was a finalist in the High Performance Sport New

Zealand Sportswoman of the Year.

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3.6.22 Mavis Mullins, Master of Business Administration graduate and former University Council member, has been made chair of the Atihau Whanganui Incorporation and is the first woman to hold the position.

3.6.23 Hamish Bond, Graduate Diploma in Business Studies and Bachelor of Business Studies graduate, won the 2012 Halberg award as well as (with rowing partner Eric Murray) the

Westpac New Zealand Team of the Year.

3.6.24 Mary Fisher, Certificate for Teacher Aides graduate, was a finalist in the Halberg Disability

Sport Foundation Disabled Sportsperson of the Year.

3.6.25 Arthur Eustace, past Academic Registrar, was awarded the Lion Foundation Lifetime

Achievement award at the Halberg Awards.

3.6.26 Recent Bachelor of Design graduate Patrick McDonald was the winner of the prestigious

2013 Storylines Gavin Bishop Award. Two other students, Siobahn Clark and Sarah

Harmon, and fixed-term staff member Matt Katz, were runners-up. This award aims to encourage the publication of new and exciting high-quality picture books from New Zealand illustrators. The work was carried out during a project in the applied learning paper 222:425

Studio Practice Illustration with Dr Mike McAuley and Tamara Kan. According to Gavin

Bishop, “Many of the entries this year came from tertiary institutions where illustration courses are offered. The work reflects a high standard of teaching and if this award continues to be supported by these teachers, it will go from strength to strength. The future of children’s picture book art in New Zealand is in very good hands".

3.6.27 Hannah Wood, a Food Technology graduate on the 2012 Fonterra Graduate Training

Programme intake, won the Oral presentation prize for her FGTP project at the student presentations this month.

3.6.28 Food Technology PhD student Hayley Stewart is the winner of the 2013 Zonta

Manawatū

Women in Science and Technology Scholarship, sponsored by the Graduate Women

Manawatū Charitable Trust. Hayley has won $5000 to attend and present at an international conference of her choice.

3.6.29 Jo Aleh, Bachelor of Information Science student, was a finalist in the Westpac New Zealand

Team of the Year.

3.6.30 Lisa Carrington, Bachelor of Arts student, was a finalist in the High Performance Sport New

Zealand Sportswoman of the year.

3.6.31 Bridget Kershaw, Agricultural Science student, received the Murray King Memorial

Scholarship.

3.6.32 Matthias Hipp, Bachelor of Agricultural Commerce student, received one of 56 Dairy NZ scholarships.

3.6.33 Bojian Zhong, PhD (Science) candidate, was awarded the 2012 Chinese Government Award for outstanding self-financed students abroad.

3.6.34 Massey students did very well at the recent New Zealand Track and Field Championships, as follows:

Portia Bing, Bachellor of Business Studies student, won the women's 200m final.

Nick Southgate, Certificate of Proficiency (Science) student, won the pole vault.

Jodan Peters, Bachelor of Sport and Exercise student, won the under-20 men's triple jump with a 13.58m jump as well as first equal in the under-20 high jump.

Ben Langton Burnell, Bachelor of Agricultural Commerce student, qualified for the World

University Games in javelin.

Phillip Wyatt, Bachelor of Business Studies student, won the men's triple jump.

3.6.35 Hamish Bond, Graduate Diploma in Business Studies and Bachelor of Business Studies graduate, won 2012 Halberg award as well as the Westpac New Zealand Team of the Year.

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3.6.36 Ms Mary Fisher, Certificate for Teacher Aides graduate, was a finalist in the Halberg

Disability Sport foundation Disabled Sportsperson of the Year.

3.6.37 Mr Peter Vullings, Bachelor of Engineering (Hons), won the Innovate

Manawatū Awards and entered into the BioCommerce Centre market validation programme.

3.6.38 Mr Gordon Robinson, Bachelor of Design (Hons), won the Red Dot Design Concept award.

3.6.39 Emeritus Professor Neil Bruere, founding member of Massey University’s Veterinary Science

Facility, received the lifetime service award from the International Sheep Veterinary

Association.

4.0 Internationalisation

4.1 Opportunities for international students to experience New Zealand’s culture and improve their English are among goals outlined in a memorandum of understanding signed in January with Guangzhou Medical University at Massey's Albany campus.

The agreement focuses on students studying towards a Bachelor of Business Studies, majoring in marketing. Guangzhou Medical University, established in 1958, encompasses five schools situated across four campuses and is in the top 50 Chinese medical universities.

The agreement outlines common interests and the potential mutual benefits from collaboration and cooperation in areas including marketing activities and student exchanges through Massey’s 2+2 Pathway Programme. This programme involves cohorts of students studying for two years in their home country and then moving to New Zealand for two years to complete their degrees at Massey University.

4.2 A Chinese animal agriculture specialist with a longstanding relationship with Massey

University has been made an honorary professor in the Institute of Veterinary, Animal and

Biomedical Sciences. Professor Runlin Ma is professor and principle investigator at the

Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in

Beijing.

His relationship with Massey began in 2005 with the signing of a tripartite agreement between Peking University, Shihezi University and Massey for joint research on pasture irrigation, soil testing and sheep breeding. It was renewed last September.

It has led to Massey scientists being involved in the development of the entire sheep flock in

China. In addition, Massey has ambitions of being a major contributor to the World Sheep

Centre development project in China.

4.3 Professor James Chapman, Institute of Education, met with Knowledge Plus, staff from Kho

Kaen University, the Educational Counsellor at the New Zealand Embassy, and staff from the

Thai Ministry of Education to strengthen international connections in Bangkok, Thailand in

February.

4.4 Dr Ian de Terte, School of Psychology, is collaborating with staff from the Middle East

Technical University, and Geological Nuclear Sciences New Zealand, on the relationship between psychological resilience and earthquake preparedness research.

4.5 Associate Professor Glenn Banks, School of People, Environment and Planning, was an invited contributor to the Pacific Forum’s Pacific Plan review process. Associate Professor

Banks participated in meetings answering questions and discussing issues around the

Pacific Islands development, resource extraction and regional aid architecture.

4.6 Professor Geoff Jones and Professor Steve Haslett, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, are currently completing the final report on small area estimation of poverty and malnutrition for the World Food Programme in Cambodia, with assistance from Alison Sefton. The public launch in conjunction with the Cambodian government, United Nations World Food

Programme, and UNICEF is contracted for late April. Professor Haslett has also completed a

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visit to Pakistan and produced a report, again for the programme, on the feasibility of using small area estimation techniques to provide accurate local estimates of poverty and malnutrition in Pakistan. Both studies have provided information that will facilitate more efficient targeting of several hundred million dollars of food aid over the next five years.

4.7 Associate Professor Rachel Page and Dan Wadsworth, both from the Institute of Food

Nutrition and Human Health, and Dr Lee Stoner, School of Sport and Exercise, continued collaboration with University of Georgia (Professor Mike Tarrant) and College of Creative Arts at Massey, over the Global Health and Sustainability paper being offered.

4.8 The Centre for Ergonomics, Occupational Safety and Health are:

• Hosting three international research visitors: Professor Peter Hasle, Allborg University,

Denmark; Laura Kvorning, National Research Centre for working environment, Denmark, and Kjerstin Vogel, Royal University, Sweden.

• Hosting of a Loughborough University Professional Studies research student for the

Massey University Research Fund project on hypohydration and complex cognition (in collaboration with Schools of Sport and Exercise, Psychology and Aviation).

4.9 Professor Jim Arrowsmith and Associate Professor Jane Parker, School of Management, were commissioned by the International Labour Organisation to undertake a comparative study of redundancy provisions in 10 Pacific nation states. Their report, entitled The

Regulation of Redundancy in Papua New Guinea (PNG) and the South Pacific, focuses on regional practice concerning the process for determining redundancy and the extent and form of compensation. The organisation continues to provide technical support to a tripartite working group led by PNG's Department of Labour and Industrial Relations in order to develop a new employment law, and the report is a primary source material for the group's work in the area of redundancy.

5.0 Connections and Responsibility

5.1

Finance 2013

Finance 2013 with the Minister of Finance, Bill English, was a major success in late

February. The event was oversubscribed, Mr English spoke well of Massey, the room was full of people we are seeking to engage with and funding was made available by the

Auckland Chamber of Commerce for scholarships for finance students. Well done to all involved. Please refer to Appendix VII for further details.

5.2 Thank you to the Central Districts Field Days team. This event is spread over three days and represents a huge effort by many staff and students. The Massey stand looked great and was well patronised.

One of the best things I heard recently was at Central Field Days. Members of the local

Chamber of Commerce attended an Alumni Function and said many positive things about the direction of Massey University. There is no doubt that our commitment to change is being noticed and appreciated.

5.3 Connections has been a strong theme in the College of Creative Arts with a number of initiatives undertaken including:

The college ran a New Opportunities Evening that was well attended by representatives from external agencies and businesses keen to work with us. The evening showcased some of the exciting new developments at the College of Creative Arts, including Open Lab (our student design studio); Fab Lab Wellington (our new digital fabrication facility); government funded design scholarships to undertake innovative research and development projects with industry; and the latest cutting edge facilities and equipment in our new building. The event was directed towards the small business, startup and entrepreneurial community within Wellington. A number of contacts for future business were created as a result.

SCION took part in a workshop with college researchers with the aim of identifying specific research projects to be undertaken throughout the year. A number of postgraduate and staff research opportunities are being initiated as a result.

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5.4

5.5

5.6

5.7

5.8

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Visual Communication Design students who designed Stick with the Pack youth safety campaign for the Wellington City Council and New Zealand Police received coverage in the Dominion Post. The campaign arose from work in the college’s ‘Design and

Business’ undergraduate paper.

Refer also to item 2.8 (above) for engagement around the Creative theme.

The Centre of Ergonomics, Occupational Safety and Health co-hosted the successful

International Conference on Understanding Small Enterprises (USE2013) – From USE to

Action: Creating healthy working lives in healthy businesses, Nelson 19-22 Feb 2013. There were 100 participants from 23 countries. Two journal special issues are planned: Safety

Science and Small Enterprise Research.

The School of Nursing has established a unique strategic relationship with the Chief Nurse,

Ministry of Health for education. For the first time in New Zealand Associate Professor

Annette Huntington has negotiated for a postgraduate nursing student to work with the chief

Nurse’s team to develop expertise in the area of health policy and government processes.

This opportunity builds on our close relationship with senior government nursing bodies.

The Centre for Ergonomics, Occupational Safety and Health is:

• Meeting with Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment about efficacy of national policy instruments to improve workplace health and safety.

• Meeting with the Independent Taskforce for Workplace Health and Safety, providing expert academic advice.

The first Startup Weekend event of the year took place at the College of Creative Arts building in Wellington in February. Massey and the College of Business are national sponsors for the event and I had the opportunity to speak to the 90-plus participants to encourage them to continue developing their business knowledge (with Massey, of course!) in order to enable their businesses the best chance of success. Senior lecturer Dr Martina

Battisti, School of Management, was a participant. Her Fresh Share team came second and won the People’s Choice Award.

The Fin-Ed Centre is working with Women in Super, a non-profit network of women associated with the superannuation industry, on a financial literacy education programme.

The network will sponsor teachers on the Fin-Ed Centre’s “Your Pathway to Financial

Success”’ course and a one-day workshop on ‘How to present and facilitate seminars of financial information’. The initiative was launched with a presentation by Fin-Ed Centre director Dr Pushpa Wood in March, in Wellington.

With the purpose of reinforcing strong strategic connections and taking the opportunity to present the University’s point of view, I meet with, talk and interface with various people and groups around New Zealand and overseas. The following are by way of example:

• Regular interview with Jamie MacKay for Radio Sport’s The Farming Show.

• Meeting to discuss Massey’s role in the Foodbowl pilot plant located near to the

Auckland International Airport at Mangere.

• Attended a BioCommerce Board meeting, Palmerston North (February).

• Hosted a visit from David Smol, chief executive of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Enterprise.

• Attended a lunch hosted by Council member Dr Alison Patterson for business leaders in the Auckland area.

• Attended a Wellington Employers’ Chamber of Commerce policy council meeting.

• Spoke at Finance 2013 in Auckland with Hon Bill English as keynote speaker.

• Address to the Year 13 cohort at Rangitoto College.

• Participated in a seminar on the public sector.

• Interview with Global Research Alliance.

• Attended New Zealand School of Music board of directors meeting.

• Interview with Charles Landry author of The Art of Creative City Making.

• Discussion about the Alma Baker Trust.

• Spoke at the Central Districts Field Days alumni function.

• Hosted a visit to Manawatū campus by Peter Miskimmin and Dave Knowles from Sport

New Zealand.

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• Meeting with the Palmerston North City Council to discuss our memorandum of understanding.

• Introduced the Massey University Discovery award at the Ballance Farm Environment

Awards for the Horizons Region.

• Visit by the Royal Charters Surveyors Accreditation Panel who are assessing our property and construction programmes.

• Visit by the Defence Force and the Ministry of Culture and Heritage to the Wellington campus. We had a useful conversation about the developments taking place at the front of the Wellington campus. We will all have to work together as the National War

Memorial development takes shape.

• As part of the SLT Albany engagement day we hosted a visit by David Smol, chief executive of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment.

• Attended the Defining Excellence Awards (Massey’s version of the Oscars).

• Attended the Innovation Lecture on Albany campus that was organised by Dr Anne de

Bruin. The speaker, Sir Richard Taylor of Weta Workshop, spoke to a packed theatre about his life and times. Sir Richard is a passionate advocate of the need to promote creativity and innovation. His message was very well received by an enthusiastic audience.

• Meeting with Paul McIlroy the chief executive of UCoL.

• Interview with Jamie MacKay for Radio Sport’s The Farming Show (March, April).

• Speech to the Higher Education Summit 2013, Auckland.

• Speech to the New Generation Learning Spaces Conference, Melbourne.

• Meet with Massey partner KPMG.

• Attended the AgriFood Innovation Governance Board meeting.

• Interview with Nick Jones of the New Zealand Herald about campus developments at

Albany.

• Attended a State dinner for His Majesty Hassanai Bolkiah, Sultan of Brunei, hosted by the Governor General Sir Jerry and Lady Mateparae.

• Meeting with Gerard Quinn, chief executive of Grow Wellington and Adrian Gregor,

General Manager, Science and Technology.

• Attended an AgriOne board meeting.

• Attended an Academic Quality Agency board meeting.

• Interview with MASSIVE magazine.

• Meeting with the National Health Committee to discuss collaboration.

• Speech to the New Zealand Vocational Education and Training Research Forum.

• Meeting with John Brakenridge, New Zealand Merino.

• Attended the Territorial Forces Employer Support Council – National Employers Awards

2013.

• Meeting with Jono Naylor, Mayor of Palmerston North and Sherly Bryant, General

Manager, City Futures.

• Speech to the Sport NZ conference, Wellington.

• Attended the Sport and Recreation Sector Awards, Wellington.

6.0 Generating Income and Financial

6.1 Examples of income generation initiatives linked to our core teaching and research strengths include:

6.1.1 An anonymous donation of $50,000 has been gifted to a Massey literacy programme. The donation was made to the Massey University Foundation to pay for a literacy programme aimed at helping children who have difficulty reading.

Professor of Educational Psychology James Chapman, of the Institute of Education, says the programme is a joint effort between a Massey PhD graduate and institute staff. The programme, based in Auckland, involves assessing children who have reading difficulties and finding ways of helping them.

“Literacy is such an ongoing problem facing New Zealand,” Professor Chapman says. “The continuing poor state of literacy among a significant number of children and adults is draining the country's potential. For New Zealand to keep up with the world, and for everyone in New

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Zealand to have the basic tools for participating in the economy, we must do something different to improve the literacy abilities of children and adults. Throwing more money into doing the same thing will not solve this corrosive problem.” He says the donation will cover a significant amount of the programme’s costs.

6.1.2 The International Study Tours division of Professional and Continuing Education had seven different groups participating in programmes in February:

• Korea Aerospace University

• Nagoya University of Foreign Studies (NUFS)

• Ritsumeikan University’s – Department of Economics

• Nagasaki Junshin Catholic University

• Kyoto Sangyo University

• Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University

6.1.3 Max Schleser, Institute of Communication Design, worked with a recent School of Design graduate, Zara Mann, to produce a 25-minute commercial video for a website. The purpose of “Ease Your Back” is to educate people on new ways of protecting their backs through their posture.

6.1.4 Inaugural Ergonomics and Occupational Safety and Health Continuing Professional

Development short course: Change Strategies for Occupational Health and Safety

Practitioners was run by Professor Per Langaa Jensen and Dr Kirsten Olsen, College of

Health.

6.1.5 Two-day evaluation training (Ministry of Health-funded) was undertaken for 23 participants in

Christchurch in February by College of Health staff.

6.1.6 The Centre for Educational Development signed off a contract with the Hanoi Overseas

Study and Training Company for work with the lower secondary sector in Vietnam. This was completed just before the Christmas break. The aim of the contract is for participants to come to

Manawatū for a short course.

6.1.7 School of Nursing’s short course development is has completed a programme for Capital

Coast District Health Board and has now been approached by a Wairarapa primary health organisation to discuss the possibility of repeating this programme for health workers in that region

6.1.8 Associate Professor Marjan van den Belt, director of Ecological Economics Research New

Zealand, has been contracted by Auckland Council for $25,000 to develop and facilitate five workshops to assist with the integration among multiple departments of the Auckland Council to support implementation of the National Freshwater Policy Statement. This new project is a spinoff of our on-going Sustainable Pathways 2 and Integrated Freshwater Solutions programmes.

6.1.9 Massey University has won a three-year contract to provide governance development programmes for Treasury’s Crown Ownership Monitoring Unit. The Crown Director

Development programme, which was custom designed for the unit, includes inductions for newly-appointed directors, networking functions, and a series of master classes on topical governance issues. The programme will be jointly delivered by Massey’s Executive

Education team and the Boardroom Practice Ltd.

6.1.10 Professor Christoph Schumacher, School of Economics and Finance, has provided forecasts of banking sector profitability for the second time in KPMG’s annual Financial Institutions

Performance Survey. The research and analysis is part of the agreement between KPMG and the Auckland Knowledge Exchange Hub.

6.1.11 Financial: Procurement Programme update:

Examples of gains from procurement initiatives include:

• The Multi-Function Devices Print Devices Project has been successfully completed with a reduction from 1500 devices to approximately 580 devices, with estimated savings of

$450,000 per annum.

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• Stationery (OfficeMax) savings for 2012 have been confirmed at $242,546.

7.0 Enabling Excellence

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7.1 Professor Paul McDonald, Pro Vice-Chancellor, College of Health

The College of Health has been moving forward this month with the arrival of Professor Paul

McDonald. Professor McDonald has been welcomed to Albany and

Manawatū campuses.

The College of Health is one of the products of the academic reform process and will be a flagship for change at Massey. Change across everything we do will continue – as it must.

Our environment demands change and we need to respond in ways that we define as appropriate for a university like Massey. Please also refer to item 2.3.2 above for further details on the launch of the college.

7.2 I am pleased to announce the appointment of Dr Malakai Koloamatangi as the University’s

Director of Pasifika. Please refer to Appendix VIII for further details.

7.3 Dr Julia Rayner has recently been appointed as manager of Massey’s Graduate Research

School. She brings to the role considerable experience of working with doctoral students and has spent the past 4 years within the Centre for Teaching and Learning on the

Manawatū campus. There she worked as a learning consultant with the specific remit of advising postgraduate students.

7.4

Albany update

7.4.1 The momentum of activities at Albany campus will continue over the next few months, with the schedule of moves as part of the Albany Campus Space Reallocation Project having been set. This project will enable staff, students and services to be better located to support future development of the campus, and to accommodate recent changes including the establishment of the College of Health, the establishment of the Institute of Education within the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and changes in the College of Sciences.

The project is now under way, with parts of the School of Engineering and Advanced

Technology having already moved into the Albany village, and work required for the arrival of the new College of Health Pro Vice-Chancellor, is well advanced. The project team will be actively engaging with each group affected by the moves over the following months as the project progresses.

The current schedule and timing of moves can be found on the intranet under Staffroom

News - Schedule set for Albany relocations.

7.4.2 I visited the engineers based at Albany in February. A group of staff have shifted into the

Albany Village centre and were very busy getting ready for the arrival of students. I was shown two engineering projects being developed by staff with direct commercial applications.

In fact they were waiting for clients to visit.

The centre provides a great opportunity to showcase what the School of Engineering and

Advanced Technology has to offer. Once again this is an area of focus for the University given, the Government’s plan to produce more engineers.

7.5 Highlights of meetings I have had with Massey staff and associated groups included:

• Welcomed students to the international students’ orientation for semester one at

Manawatū.

• Spoke at the opening of the University’s new Ar chives facility, Manawatū.

• Filmed for a video clip on teaching.

• Massey University Press discussion (this is focused on a paper that will go to the wider group looking at the possibility of a Massey Press in the near future).

• Albany Orientation welcome.

• Attended SLT sub-committees (February, March, April).

• Attended Academic Board (February, March).

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• Preliminary discussions on this year’s Vice-Chancellor’s Symposium.

• Manawatū welcome (it’s called a “High Tea” this year).

• Regular catch-up meeting with the Chancellor Dr Russ Ballard.

• Opening address at the College of Health launch at Wellington (others to follow).

• Meeting with the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations and University Registrar’s team.

• Attended Tenders Board (February).

• Presented All Staff meetings at Manawatū, Wellington and Albany campuses (February).

• Attended the Albany Innovation forum.

• A strategy meeting for the 2016 Rio Olympic Games (thinking ahead).

• Joined the College of Business retreat.

• Video recording for promotion of the new video wall technology.

• Audit and Risk committee of Council (March).

• First Council meeting for 2013 (March).

• Planning for a Professor Emeritus function.

• AgriFood Business discussion.

• Meeting with the Finance, Strategy and Information Technology team.

• Meeting with the Pro Vice-Chancellors.

• Preparation for the 2020 consultation process.

• Meeting with the Academic and International team

• Meeting to discuss recruitment and enrolment.

• Filming for TV commercial.

• SLT met on Te Kuratini Marae at the Wellington campus in March and used the opportunity to practice their reo. We also sang a reasonable version of the University waiata.

• The SLT Engagement Day on Albany campus was very useful. Staff gathered to hear a very long and interesting list of activities underway on the campus. A student forum reminded us that the small things count as much as the big things. Students noted, for example, that it was too often difficult to get into computer labs when they needed to.

Promises were made to look into all issues raised in the week ahead.

• Attended the Defining Excellence Awards.

• Chaired Tenders Board (March).

• Meeting to progress plans for distance education (thanks to those who have been suggesting new names for the distance area).

• In March the Albany campus was buzzing while the new Massey University television commercial was being shot. The star of the show was the Hulme F1 supercar. Massey staff such as Professor Tony Parker (design), Professor Christoph Schumacher (finance) and Associated Professor Johan Potgieter (engineering) have a strong interest in the car and it certainly captured the attention of everyone within earshot. The ad is due to air this month.

• The opening of the Watson Science Labs, located by Student Central, was a major step forward for the campus and sciences at Albany. Dr The Right Hon Lockwood Smith spoke very highly of the University and key figures like Sir Neil Waters, Professor

Anderson and Prof Ian Watson (after whom the building was named). The Labs are state of the art and in operation already.

• Distinguished Professor Selection committee.

• Meet with the College of Health Executive.

• Met with attendees on the Emerging Managers Programme.

• Spoke to the 2013 Career Advisers Update Day, Albany campus.

• SLT What’s Happening and What’s Happening Albany – What’s Happening is the SLT look at the week ahead, What’s Happening Albany is the Senior Team at Albany looking at the week ahead. I hope to start a similar meeting at Wellington soon.

• Attended the Combined Unions meeting.

• Meetings related to the Road to 2025 consultation process.

• Further work on the Massey University television ad.

• The University welcome for Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Health Professor Paul

McDonald.

• Chaired SLT What’s Happening and What’s Happening Albany meetings.

• Chaired the Assistant Vice-Chancellors’ team meeting.

• Regular Meeting with the Chancellor Dr Russ Ballard.

• Manawatū Professorial meeting (April).

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• Strategic Innovation Fund meeting (note that this year a cut-off date was set which means there are a lot of applications to get through – this will be done as quickly as possible).

• Presentation of Teaching Excellence Awards.

• Manawatū launch of the College of Health.

• Student Presidents Meeting.

These meetings with staff are very useful. I actively seek meetings but am also pleased to be invited to discuss any of the issues the University is dealing with.

7.6 There are a lot of issues being advanced through SLT at the moment, these include:

Managerial Leadership Competency Framework; Emerging Managers Programme; Health and safety; ACC audit status; Business case – World Class Web Presence – phase two;

Massey University involvement in the Integrated Data Infrastructure project; Code of

Responsible Research Conduct and Procedures for dealing with Misconduct in Research;

Major Capital Projects report: Quarter four, 2012; monthly portfolio update papers (for

February) from Assistant Vice-Chancellors (Research and Enterprise; External Relations;

Academic and International; Finance, Strategy and Information Technology; Operations and

University Registrar; People and Organisational Development; Māori and Pasifika), and Pro

Vice-Chancellors (Business; Health; Humanities and Social Sciences; Creative Arts;

Sciences).

Further explanation on these items is provided in the SLT web reports available via the

University Management-Senior Leadership Team webpage http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/about-massey/university-management/universitymanagement/university-management_home.cfm.

7.7 Massey has again passed the ACC Audit for its safety management systems and practices. As part of ensuring an excellent environment for teaching and learning the

University safety systems are subject to external audit by ACC every two years. The 2013 audit found the University safety systems reflects; consolidation of good practice relative to

the Australian and New Zealand Standard 4801: Occupational Health and Safety

Management Systems. The safety audit covers; employer commitment to safety, planning and evaluation, hazard management, information and training, incident reporting, employee participation, emergency planning, and protection of employees from on-site work undertaken by contractors. The audit is verified by workplace observation along with focus group interviews with employees and management.

8.0 Opportunities/Threats

8.1 Further to item 2.1 above (All Staff Meetings: 2013 Communication, Coordination and

Consolidation), I have been urging staff throughout the University to take time at this early stage of the year to talk through plans. It would be useful for everybody to be involved in these discussions because everybody has a role to play in taking the University forward.

8.2 As mentioned in item 1.1 (above) the Performance-Based Research Fund results are due.

Staff across the University have worked hard to ensure that the excellent work of our researchers can be appropriately acknowledged. This activity has also been undertaken across the sector. We know wait to see how individuals have fared and how the overall sector has performed – noting that it is the latter that will dictate Massey’s position within the fund.

9.0

Overall sense/feel of the place

9.1 I have been asked by many people outside the University if we are busy at this time of the year. I let them know that modern universities never really stop. This was clearly demonstrated in February by the number of staff and students involved in Summer School examinations.

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As you will note throughout my report the knowledge and expertise of Massey staff continues to be recognised and sought after.

I have been told by a number of staff that the changes in college and department groupings and locations have introduced new dynamics and refreshing new conversations have started.

All in all – this report demonstrates a busy and progressive University in action.

Appendices attached:

Appendix I: What an amazing result (Ref. item 1.2)

Appendix II: Colourful launch to College of Health (Ref. item 2.3.2)

Appendix III: Massey ranked top five in NZ employers (Ref. item 3.1)

Appendix IV: Alumni awards honour Luxton for service (Ref. item 3.3)

Appendix V: Massey’s three new Distinguished Professors (Ref. item 3.4)

Appendix VI: Massey academic in UN think tank on ocean health (Ref. item 3.6.4)

Appendix VII: Big business community turnout for Finance 2013 (Ref. item 5.1)

Appendix VIII: Pacific politics specialist appointed to key role (Ref. item 7.2)

Steve Maharey

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What an amazing result

Appendix I

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No we were not ranked first (a matter of some discussion!) and we are not the largest but Massey secured the second highest level of improvement in a Tertiary Education Organisation (TEO) in the results for the 2012 Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF) announced last week. Massey is to be congratulated for achieving further significant improvement in its research quality profile with an aggregated quality score of 4.31 (2003 (3.74), 2006 (3.89)) – well above the sector average (8.7%).

AUT, who secured the highest level of institutional improvement, were recognised for a significant increase in fundable evidence portfolios (EPs) which they have achieved as part of their recent growth agenda. For the 2012 Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) assessment of our research we submitted staff to 96% of the subject areas (42) for assessment which speaks to the breadth and depth of our academic authority. More than 50% of our units evidenced a greater than 10% improvement in their aggregated quality score which is another powerful indicator of our commitment to developing and sustaining research excellence.

Well over 50% of our researchers were assessed by the independent subject experts to meet or exceed national/international benchmarks for excellence with a 47% increase in the number of

Massey academic staff being rated at the highest level in their chosen field. Massey’s great results reflect the on-going maturation of our research community (14 units were ranked in the top three and we increased our percentage of A rated researchers by 40% with A/B assessments being awarded to

47.5 % of our submitted EPs), our ability to attract new talent (over 60 % of our new staff appointed in the last six years were rated A/B) and the nurturing of early career researchers (7.3% of Massey funded EPs were submitted by new and emerging researchers). This is an amazing achievement in a very competitive environment and is a just reward for all of the hard work and focused effort that

Massey staff invested in preparing their Evidence Portfolios.

The success of Nursing (1), Health Studies (2) and Sport and Exercise Science (3) provides a strong statement of support for our new College of Health. Design (2) and Visual Arts (2) re-asserted their dominance as the leading research lead units in New Zealand with the highest proportion of A/B rated researchers and largest researcher cohort of any NZ TEO. Our core strengths in Agri-Science were underpinned by continuing excellence in Veterinary Sciences (1) and Agricultural Sciences (3) and very strong performances in fundamental sciences - Physics (2), Chemistry (3). The depth and quality of our capacity in Social Sciences was acknowledged with excellent results for Architecture and Planning (1), Maori Knowledge Development (3), Human Geography (3), Political Sciences (3), and Anthropology And Archaeology (3) profiling breadth and depth.

A more detailed analysis will follow over the coming weeks but Massey can be confident that we are well placed going forward to 2018. Out of 27 institutional submissions to the TEC Massey ranked fourth highest number of the “A” scores, third highest number of “B” scores, third highest number of

Funded EPs, third highest total scores (weighted according to funding weights: A=5, B=3, C=1). We also know what we have to do to move this forward going towards 2018. We must address the fact that a significant percentage of EPs did not show improvement or in fact dropped their rating, that a major fall in Higher Research Degree Student numbers has impacted adversely on our aggregated funding and that we must address the ratio of Tier 1/Tier 2 published outputs which is a major contributor to defining national/international excellence.

These excellent results are the product of great commitment on the part of our academic staff and all the staff who support the research effort at Massey. This a solid consistent performance in a year when we formally approved our first Research Strategy and provides a good platform from which to nurture, build and grow our agenda for research excellence. Massey has already achieved 5 stars for research quality from the independent international QS ranking system. The publication of the 2012

PBRF results consolidates that rating and highlights the domains of academic excellence that underpin both our teaching and research programmes. We have much to celebrate. In reporting this success, I offer my personal congratulation to one and all.

Professor Brigid Heywood

AVC Research and Enterprise

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College of Health heads of school with Health Minister Tony Ryall and Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey. From left, Associate Professor Annette Huntington (School of Nursing), Professor Steve La Grow (School of Health and Social Services), Professor Emeritus Sir Mason Durie, Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic and

International) and College of Health Acting Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor Ingrid Day, Mr Ryall, Mr Maharey,

Professor Jeroen Douwes (Centre for Public Health), Professor Richard Archer (Institute of Food, Nutrition and

Human Health), Professor Steve Stannard (School of Sport and Exercise) and College of Sciences Pro Vice-

Chancellor Professor Robert Anderson.

Colourful launch to College of Health

Massey’s aspiration to become internationally known for its focus on preventing illness and promoting wellbeing was colourfully expressed at the official launch to its new College of Health.

Staff and students from disciplines represented within the college, including food and nutrition as well as sport and exercise, were on hand to show invited guests the results of their research and offer practical demonstrations with health check ups and servings of healthy ‘super’ foods.

Earlier, after unveiling a sign with Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey ahead of the official launch on the

Wellington campus, Health Minister Tony Ryall told guests that a multidisciplinary team approach rather than each discipline practicing in isolation, was one of the mega trends in health research and practice.

“The fact your college brings together so many disciplines under one roof in the spirit of cooperation is testament to the fact that you’re on to where the future is going,” he said.

The college has 310 fulltime staff and 2000 students and brings together specialists from public health, Māori and Pasifika health, sport and exercise, rehabilitation, nursing, social work and social policy, food and nutrition, occupational health and medical laboratory science.

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Key instigator of the college, Professor Emeritus Sir Mason Durie, expressed confidence that the college’s strong, collective and distributed leadership and multidisciplinary approach will effectively address health risks and challenges. Before his retirement last year last year, Sir Mason, who was the University’s former Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Assistant Vice-Chancellor Maori and Pasifika, was the driving force for the initiative. The college was brought to fruition by his commitment to improving public health – specifically Māori health.

“There is a commitment to prevention, a commitment to having lifestyles that are going to ensure the next generation of New Zealanders are well, and there is strong leadership from people who have high expertise in a range of disciplines,” he said.

Combined these disciplines have formed “what looks to me a strong college that will make a difference to New Zealand’s health and contribute to the global millennium health goals the United

Nations established in 2000.”

Mr Maharey, who also spoke at the opening, said the university has specialists constantly striving to find solutions to the big health issues.

“They will work together to create a world where most of the illnesses we have today no longer exist.

Where illnesses like asthma, obesity and diabetes are as foreign to us as polio is today.”

Professor Paul McDonald, an internationally acclaimed public health specialist, was last year appointed as the college’s Pro Vice-Chancellor. He joins Massey in March.

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Massey ranked top five in NZ employers

Alan Davis with Education Sector Award from Randstad.

Massey University has been ranked number five of New Zealand's most attractive employer brands in the annual Randstad Awards, an international survey conducted across 14 countries. It was also the education sector winner.

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The New Zealand awards were presented in Auckland last night, with Air New Zealand topping the list, followed by New Zealand Customs Service, the Department of Conservation and Television New

Zealand. Massey was the highest ranked educational institute, ahead of AUT University (10th),

Victoria University of Wellington (12th), and the University of Auckland (13th).

Research company ICMA International conducts the survey, asking 160,000 respondents to rate employers by 17 factors including the financial health of the organisation, its management and leadership, job security, career progression opportunities, good learning and development opportunities, work-life balance, environmental and social awareness, salaries and benefits, workplace culture and whether it offers quality products and services.

Massey Assistant Vice-Chancellor (People and Organisational Development) Alan Davis received the award on the University's behalf. Mr Davis says the award reflects recognition from a wide spectrum of New Zealanders. "It tells us that the Massey story is cutting through and really resonating with people, that the stories are being heard and believed – the stories of our world-class academics, defining the big issues; brilliant minds discovering breakthrough solutions; and the people who support them, all doing really meaningful work. It tells us that people want to be a part of what we may take for granted.

"It means that Massey is a genuine New Zealand brand that is widely recognised and liked – a

University of and for New Zealand. Massey is connecting in new and relevant ways with New

Zealanders and with the things that matter to New Zealand – and the world. All of us at Massey can feel justifiably proud to work at a place that is attractive to others and we should all feel a renewed sense of commitment to making Massey a truly great place to work."

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Randstad Award 2013

2013 New Zealand winners

On March 21st, Randstad New Zealand hosted the annual global Randstad Award event at

Auckland's prestigious Pullman Hotel.

This prestigious event is held every year in 14 countries across the world, and recognises the most attractive employers in each country based on the results of the largest independent survey.

Congratulations to our overall winner for the third year in a row - Air New Zealand. Below is the list of the top 20 employer brands in New Zealand in 2013.

As a New Zealand employer, cultivating a unique employer branding proposition is essential to highlighting and enhancing your talent attraction strategy. With a strong employer brand, your business will naturally attract and retain top talent which will effectively drive profit and innovation within your organisation.

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John Luxton

Alumni awards honour Luxton for service

A dairy industry leader and former high-ranking politician, an international mental health specialist, a former top biosecurity official, and the head of one of New Zealand's fast-growing IT companies are the recipients of this year's Massey University Distinguished Alumni awards.

The four Massey graduates have qualifications in agricultural science, nursing, veterinary science and information sciences respectively. Two of them studied at the

Manawatū campus, one was a distance student and, for the first time, an award has gone to a graduate of the Albany campus, which is now 20 years old.

The awards are being presented on Wednesday in Auckland at the fourth annual Defining Excellence

Awards, where Massey combines acknowledgement for its top research and teaching staff with plaudits for graduates who have achieved major success in their professions or industries or made outstanding community contributions.

The Hon John Luxton QSO, former MP and current chair of Dairy NZ, receives the supreme honour – the Sir Geoffrey Peren Medal. Named after Massey’s founding principal, the award recognises a graduate who has reached the highest level of achievement in business or professional life, or who has been of significant service to the University, community or nation.

Mr Luxton served 15 years as MP for Matamata from 1986 to 2002, with nine years as minister across a dozen portfolios, in cluding Housing, Commerce, Industry, Energy, Fisheries, Māori Affairs,

Police, Lands, Customs, Biosecurity and Agriculture. He was responsible for a number of significant policy and legislative changes in New Zealand, including the foundation policy work that led to the formation of Fonterra and the deregulation of producer boards.

In addition to serving as a director of Wallace Corporation and Tatua Co-op Dairy company, Mr

Luxton serves on the boards of the Royal New Zealand Ballet, the Massey University Foundation and

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the Morrinsvile Art Gallery Trust. He is co-Chair of the Waikato River Authority, charged with cleaning up the river; the Constitutional Advisory Panel; and Landcare Research.

Dr Frances Hughes ONZM receives the Distinguished Service Award. A mental health nursing specialist with international expertise, she has been instrumental in the professional development of mental health nursing in New Zealand and abroad, and worked through the aftermath of 9/11, the

Boxing Day tsunami, Canterbury earthquakes and Hurricane Sandy.

Dr Hughes’ career includes roles as Chief Advisor (Nursing) and Principal Advisor (Mental Health) at the Ministry of Health, World Health Organisation consultant for Pacific Mental Health, and

Commandant-Colonel of the Royal New Zealand Army Nursing Corps. She was the first nurse to be awarded the Harkness Fellowship in Health Care Policy and received a Fulbright Senior Scholar

Award to undertake research in post-disaster lessons as they apply to health professionals. She is currently the Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer for the Department of Health in Queensland.

Dr Barry O’Neil is the recipient of the Distinguished Achievement Award. A trained vet and former

Deputy Director General of MAF Biosecurity New Zealand, Dr O’Neil has been at the forefront of biosecurity and animal welfare for 35 years.

He was elected President of the World Organization for Animal Health from 2006 to 2009, served as the New Zealand delegate from 1994 until he left MAF and also served as the Regional President for

Asia, the Far East and Oceania.

Dr O’Neil has led the ongoing transformation of New Zealand’s biosecurity system, seeing off biodiversity scares including the painted apple moth and the hoax foot and mouth disease on

Waiheke Island. Now a biosecurity consultant, he is currently focused on the kiwifruit PSA incursion.

David Kelly, chief executive of Zeald is the recipient of the Distinguished Young Alumni Award, and the first recipient to graduate from the Albany campus. Zeald was founded in 2000 by Mr Kelly, his brother and his cousin, and is one of New Zealand’s fastest growing companies, employing over 70 people and transforming into a website design, online marketing and e-business consultancy powerhouse.

Mr Kelly completed a bachelor of information sciences at Massey, and the Zeald team spent five years based at the ecentre, Massey’s business incubation centre, developing their business acumen and making use of the resources at their disposal. The business continues to grow with new sales offices in Christchurch and Sydney due to open later this year.

Awards for Teaching and Research Excellence

Awards for Teaching and Research Excellence are also presented to Massey staff at the Defining

Excellence Awards. These recognise leadership and contributions to academic research through national and international collaborations. Awards were presented to:

Teaching Support Award: Ken Cage

Teaching Excellence Awards: Dr Elizabeth Gray, Dr Zoe Jordens, Liz Norman, Amanda Yates

Research Excellence – Early Career Medals: Dr Sarah-Jayne Paine, Dr Max Schleser, Dr Karen

Stockin

Research Supervisor: Professor John O’Neill

Research Team: Health and Aging Research Team

Individual Research: Professor Nigel French

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Massey's three new Distinguished

Professors

Appendix V

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Distinguished Professor Anne Noble

Distinguished Professor Paul Spoonley Distinguished Professor Harjinder Singh

Photographer Anne Noble, food scientist Harjinder Singh and sociologist Paul Spoonley have been awarded the title of Massey University Distinguished Professors.

The award is the highest academic title the University offers and is normally bestowed on up to 15 professors who have achieved "outstanding international eminence in their fields". They were confirmed in writing by Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey last week and took effect from March 18.

Formal presentations will be made later this year.

Wellington-based Distinguished Professor Noble is the College of Creative Arts principal research adviser and she is the first woman from Massey and the first academic from her college to hold the title.

Recognised as an influential figure in New Zealand photography, her work ranges from a 1982 essay exploring the Whanganui River to the contemplative life of nuns, to photographs of her daughter

Ruby and an exploration of the notion of the Antarctic. Her contribution to international contemporary photography is recognised with representation in many gallery collections worldwide, notably the

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Musee du Quai Branley in Paris, the National Gallery of Australia in Canberra and the Queensland

Art Gallery's international collection of contemporary art. Her work has also been exhibited at Te

Papa and all other major New Zealand museum collections.

In 2000 she received Public Good Science Funding from the Ministry of Research Science and

Technology and had a retrospective exhibition and accompanying book published reflecting on her photographic work over the previous 20 years. The exhibition Anne Noble: States of Grace toured

New Zealand’s main public art galleries for two years 2001-2003.

Since 2001 she has been researching and photographing in Antarctica and, in 2008, she was the only international recipient of a United States National Science Foundation Polar Artists and Writers award. She has also been awarded six Creative New Zealand grants in the past 15 years.

In 2003 she was awarded the Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to photography in New Zealand; in 2006 she helped secure a top ranking in the Performance-Based Research Fund, earning the University a rating of being the number one design institution in New Zealand; and in

2009 she was awarded the Massey University Individual Research Medal, Massey’s highest award for research, and also received the New Zealand Arts Foundation Laureate Award, which recognises a moment in the artists’ career that will allow them to have their next great success.

“It’s a surprise and wonderful recognition for our disciplines, and reflects the value of art and design to New Zealand culture and society, alongside the sciences, social sciences and humanities," she says. "I’m honoured to have been included in that group of esteemed professors, and it’s fantastic for all women academics.”

Distinguished Professor Singh, from Manawatū, is co-director of the Riddet Institute, a Masseyhosted centre of research excellence, one of seven funded by the Government. Its focus is on food and health innovation. His current research programme involves understanding structures, interactions, and functions of food colloids. He also holds an industry-endowed Chair in Dairy

Science and Technology at Massey.

Last year he and fellow Riddet co-director Distinguished Professor Paul Moughan were jointly awarded the Prime Minister’s Science Prize of $500,000, New Zealand’s most valuable award for scientific achievement. Since 2003 the pair have been instrumental in securing more than $40 million in research funding for the institute.

Professor Singh’s expertise in food protein structures and how they interact in food systems is worldrenown. He has published more than 300 research papers in international journals, presented more than 60 keynote addresses at international and national conferences and holds 10 patents. He has received numerous awards, including the Marschall Rhodia International Dairy Science Award (2001) by the American Dairy Science Association; the William C. Haines Dairy Science Award by the

California Dairy Research Foundation (USA) in 2008; the Massey University Research Medal in

2008. In 2011, he received the JC Andrews Award by the New Zealand Institute of Food Science and

Technology (the Institute's most prestigious award) and New Zealand Association of Scientists’

Shorland Medal.

He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand, a Fellow of the International Academic of Food

Science and Technology, a member of the editorial boards of the International Dairy Journal, the Journal of Food Science, Food Research International, Dairy Science and Technology, Food

Hydrocolloids and Research Advances in Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

“I feel privileged and honoured to receive this recognition and would like to thank Massey University for acknowledging my contributions and services. I would also like to acknowledge the contributions from my colleagues, graduate students and postdoctoral researchers from around the world. I could not have achieved this success without their inspiration and dedication. A major highlight of my career has been the opportunity to work with Professor Paul Moughan to establish the Riddet

Institute, with the strong support from Massey University.”

Distinguished Professor Spoonley is the College of Humanities and Social Sciences research director and Auckland regional director. He says he is elated to be awarded the title. “It’s such an honour to be recognised by the University in this way."

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He joined Massey in 1979, attracted by its reputation for being hands-on. He taught in the Sociology programme, with a major focus on distance education. “In the social sciences, we have developed a reputation of dealing with real world communities and issues, and that is enormously satisfying. In the last 20 years, this has been reflected in our external research funding. I think it is one of the privileges of the work that we do that we can continue to do research in areas that are exciting for us but which are also really important to the communities in which we live.”

In 2010, he was awarded a Royal Society of New Zealand Science and Technology medal in recognition of his academic scholarship, leadership and public contribution to cultural understanding.

He was a Fulbright Senior Scholar at the University of California Berkeley the same year and, in

2011, made a Fellow of the Royal Society.

Professor Spoonley is the project leader for the Foundation for Research, Science and Technologyfunded Integration of Immigrants Programme, which received $3 million to examine the economic settlement of immigrants in Auckland and another $800,0

00 for a study called Ngā Tāngata Oho

Mairangi, on the future population shape of New Zealand. He is a social commentator on ethnic and race relations’ issues.

He has published 28 books on sociology, biculturalism, racism, ethnic relations and international migration. His most recent books published are Welcome to Our World?: Immigration and Reshaping

of New Zealand and Diverse Nations, Diverse Responses: Approaches to Social Cohesion in

Immigrant Societies, both published last year.

The selection process for distinguished professors involves nomination by a pro vice-chancellor (one of the heads of the five colleges) at the Vice-Chancellor's invitation. A selection committee is then convened and chaired by the Vice-Chancellor. There are now nine distinguished professors. The other six are: Bill Tunmer from the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Gaven Martin,

Paul Moughan, David Penny, Paul Rainey and Peter Schwerdtfeger from the College of Sciences.

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(left to right) Geoffroy Lamarche (NIWA), Peter Harris (Geoscience Australia), Associate Professor

Marjan van den Belt (Ecological Economics Research New Zealand at Massey University), and Julie

Hall (NIWA).

Massey academic in UN think tank on ocean health

A Massey University economic ecologist has provided expertise in planning a global assessment of the state of the world’s oceans being undertaken by the United Nations.

Associate Professor Marjan van den Belt was part of team of four from New Zealand, including scientists from the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA). They joined experts for a workshop in Australia to fill in a framework provided by the United Nations for estimating the state of the marine environment in the Pacific, as part of a global study.

“Oceans cover 71 per cent of the earth’s surface and hold 97 per cent of the planet’s water. They are inextricably linked with socio-economic and cultural wellbeing of humanity. Yet the state of this vast and shared resource remains un-assessed to date,” says Dr van den Belt, Director of Ecological

Economics Research New Zealand at Manawat ū.

The workshop, in Brisbane, was co-hosted by the Australian Government and the New Zealand

Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Trade, to coordinate a Pacific Ocean contribution to this global process.

Titled the World Ocean Assessment, it will investigate biodiversity and the impact of oil, mining, shipping and fishing industries. It is due to be ready by the end of 2014 and will include the input from several hundred experts globally. Participants at the Pacific Oceans workshop identified knowledge gaps, particularly the socio-economic impact and valuation of marine ecosystems and resources.

Dr van den Belt says she hopes the assessment will take an integrated approach using the ecosystem services model, which looks at the benefits humans derive from oceans as well as

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Part I assessing the impact of human dependence on the Earth’s ecosystems. This approach provides a broad, coherent picture of marine health and human factors contributing to it, against the backdrop of concern about issues such as the decline of marine species, increasing acidification of seawater and the threat to marine ecosystems such as coral reefs.

Ecological Economics Research New Zealand, part of the College of Humanities and Social

Sciences, focuses on researching and applying models for sustainability at the interface of economics and ecology. It has undertaken sustainability projects in partnership with the Auckland

Council, Environment Waikato, and the Greater Wellington Regional Council, as well as a freshwater solutions project funded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment with iwi, regional council and local authorities and stakeholders in the Manawatü.

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Finance Minister Bill English and Massey University Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey at Finance 2013

Big business community turnout for

Finance 2013

The Auckland business community turned out in force to hear Finance Minister Bill English give his first major address of the year at Finance 2013 today.

The annual event, which is co-hosted by Massey University and the Auckland Chamber of

Commerce, is now in its fourth year and has become a key business event.

Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey welcomed guests, saying Finance 2013 represented a partnership between Auckland business and Massey knowledge that had an important role to play in generating economic growth for New Zealand. Increasingly, Massey was engaging in conversations with business groups, local and central government and communities to find solutions to social and economic challenges, he said.

Mr English acknowledged the efforts the university and the chamber have made to build closer relationships between businesspeople and academics.

“We’re a country where there isn’t enough interchange between business, academia and politics,” he said. “Massey has made an outstanding effort with this kind of event and in other high profile ways of connecting with its communities.”

Mr English used his speech to outline the government’s plan to grow the New Zealand economy including investments in roads, rail and ultra-fast broadband, as well as 14,000 new apprenticeships, and the Christchurch rebuild. He expressed the government’s desire to push on with the sale of minority shareholdings in its energy companies and Air New Zealand – the Supreme Court decision on

Māori water rights was pending at the time of the speech.

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He also discussed the Reserve Bank’s upcoming public consultation on new tools to create financial stability. These included the policy of Open Bank Resolution (OBR), a mechanism designed to quickly spread the losses of a failing bank across shareholders and creditors.

“This is an important mechanism, and will reduce the likelihood of taxpayers having to bail out a failing bank,” Mr English said. “In my view, we should do as much as we can to reduce these risks to taxpayers, and hand more of the costs and incentives back to the financial system. Banks and other lenders will then take more care if they face all the consequences of their decisions.”

Associate Professor David Tripe, director of Massey University’s Centre for Financial Services and

Markets, used the question time to ask the Finance Minister if the Government had fully considered the impact of OBR on small depositors.

“When we look at what other countries are doing, they are considering some sort of protection for bank creditors, including depositor insurance and depositor preference so depositors get paid out in advance of other bank creditors,” Dr Tripe said.

At the conclusion of the event chamber board member Ted van Arkel thanked the guests for attending and announced: “As a result of the Finance 2013 partnership, the Auckland Chamber of

Commerce will be presenting $1000 awards for the top finance and economics first-year students for this academic year in Albany. A great incentive for any student to succeed.”

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Pacific politics specialist appointed to key role

Dr Malakai Koloamatangi and Assistant Vice-Chancellor

(Māori and Pasifika) Dr Selwyn Katene.

Massey University's new Pasifika director is a specialist in Pacific politics and economic development.

Dr Malakai Koloamatangi was this afternoon welcomed at the Albany campus, where he will be based. Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey welcomed the appointment, saying it is critical to growing the

Pasifika student body and developing relevant programmes.

"Massey University's strategy is to recognise our responsibilities in the Pacific through an updated

[email protected] plan and dedicated support for research that offers economic, health and sociocultural benefits for Pacific peoples, all under the umbrella of the new trans-college Pasifika research consortium," Mr Maharey says. "We want to grow our numbers of Pasifika students and continue to develop programmes that are relevant and valuable."

Assistant Vice-C hancellor (Māori and Pasifika) Dr Selwyn Katene says Dr Koloamatangi brings a wealth of experience in national and international Pasifika development and will be able to build on the relationships the University has with Pasifika communities. “He will also have the scope to forge academic pathways and to champion the [email protected] plan,” Dr Katene says.

Dr Koloamatangi was born in Tonga and grew up in Auckland. He has a Bachelor of Arts, Master of

Arts and PhD all from the University of Auckland. His thesis was entitled Constitutionalism, Culture and Democracy: Tongan Politics Between 1991 and 1996. His research interests include democratisation, democratic theory and practice, international political economy, Pacific politics and economic development and the universality of ideas.

For the past decade he was acting director of the Macmillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies at the

University of Canterbury.

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As well as continuing to implement the strategy, the main role for Dr Koloamatangi will be to encourage more Pasifika people to take part in university life and to promote research based on

Pacific Island values, ethics and priorities. “It will be an honour to be at the forefront of a University that supports the development and care of Pasifika staff, students and research,” he says. His parents moved to New Zealand from Tonga in search of better education and opportunities for him and his siblings. “I was the first one in my family to go to university, and it will be a privilege to watch and nurture other Pasifika students to be able to do the same.”

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MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2013

3 May 2013

P

URPOSE

This report summarises the University’s financial results for the three months ended 31 March

2013.

D

ISCUSSION

Income Statement (Appendix 1)

The University’s operating surplus for the quarter ended 31 March 2013 is $15.2M, falling below budget for the same period by $1.4M. EFTS income is below target by $2.7M YTD, partly offset by expenditure savings of $1.4M. The full year operating surplus is expected to reach budget. Note that this report has been prepared prior to the PBRF results being known, and hence any changes are not included in the forecasts.

EFTS Related Income

Government funding is in line with budget and at this stage is expected to meet the full year target. Any further funding changes will be advised as the Performance Linked Funding and

Performance Based Research Funding results are released during the year.

Student fee income is $2.6M lower than budget YTD but is expected to increase when semester two enrolments are finalised and the effect of targeted marketing and recruitment initiatives is realised.

Other Income lines overall are close to budget YTD and forecast.

EFTS Related Expenses

EFTS related costs are $1.4M lower than budget YTD mainly in salary costs with smaller variances arising across other expense lines. At this stage minimal savings are anticipated as managers plan to utilise their baseline expenditure budgets to meet service delivery commitments.

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Contracts & Trading Contribution

Contracts and Trading includes funding for CoRES and the National Centre for Tertiary

Teaching Excellence, overseas & other teaching contracts, research grants, consultancy and trading activities.

Contract and Trading surplus is $0.2M below budget YTD and a slight reduction has been forecast although these activities generally remain close to budget due to the nature of the revenue streams.

Balance Sheet (Appendix 2)

The University Equity as at 31 March 2013 is $1.6M lower than budget due to the operating surplus running behind budget. The full year forecast remains close to budget as revenue targets are met.

Working Capital is being managed within the treasury framework guidelines with $1.08 of current assets for every $1.00 of current liabilities.

Variances between the cash & cash equivalents, current and non-current other financial assets net off and reflect a treasury management policy designed to maximise returns on cash holdings.

Debtors turnover remains at 27 days and within the credit policy target of 30 days.

Cash Flow Statement (Appendix 3)

Cash and cash equivalents are $2.7M lower than budget at the end of March, although this is offset by $3.4M held in other financial assets. The combined cash position including long term investments remains in line with the treasury policy.

Net operating cash flows for the quarter are $7.3M lower than budget due to a short fall in student fee receipts that are down on budget and also the previous year. This risk has been identified earlier and discussed under the student fees section.

Net cash flows from investing are $5.9M higher than budget as a result of changes in the mix of cash and term investments held as discussed earlier.

Capital Expenditure (Appendix 4)

A summary of recurrent capital expenditure for the three months ending 31 March 2013 is included in the table below:

Group 1 (Recurrent)

2013

FY Budget YTD Actual

($000)

2013

($000)

26,172 6,533

2013

FY Forecast

($000)

26,172

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R

ECOMMENDATIONS

It is recommended that Massey University Council:

1. Receive the financial report for the three months ended 31 March 2013.

Rose Anne MacLeod

Assistant Vice-Chancellor

(Finance, Strategy & Information Technology)

18 April 2013

Appendices

1. Income Statement

2. Balance Sheet

3. Statement of Cash Flows

4. Capital Expenditure Report

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EFTS Related Income

Government Grant

EFTS Related Government Grants

TEOC Income

Total Government Grants

Student Fee Income

Domestic Student Fees

International Student Fees

Non Tuition Fees

Total Student Fees

Other Income

Interest Income

Trust Income

Total EFTS Income

Appendix 1

University Income Statement

For the Three Months Ended 31 March 2013

YTD YTD YTD

ACTUAL

($000)

BUDGET

($000)

VARIANCE

($000)

36,906

8,991

45,896

21,208

11,773

8,538

41,519

7,685

957

444

96,502

36,905

8,985

45,890

22,637

12,690

8,751

44,078

7,526

1,046

610

99,151

(1,429)

(917)

(213)

(2,559)

159

(88)

(166)

6

6

(2,649)

2013 FY

BUDGET

($000)

146,774

35,940

182,714

84,544

49,383

17,144

151,070

25,315

4,184

3,143

366,425

2013 FY

FORECAST

($000)

146,774

35,958

182,731

84,544

49,383

17,144

151,070

25,315

4,184

3,143

366,443

EFTS Related Costs

Salaries

Other Staff Related Costs

Asset Related Costs

Other Direct Costs

Depreciation

Interest

Trust Costs

Total EFTS Costs

EFTS Contribution

Contract & Trading Related Income

Research Income

Consultancy Income

Teaching & Conference Income

Trading & Other Income

Total Contract & Trading Income

47,434

3,946

5,597

12,986

11,072

256

565

81,855

14,646

10,825

1,089

1,852

3,941

17,707

48,679

3,771

5,867

13,108

11,194

278

366

83,262

15,889

14,818

1,270

1,274

3,070

20,431

1,245

(175)

270

122

122

21

(199)

1,406

(1,242)

(3,993)

(181)

579

871

(2,724)

206,523

18,497

28,374

59,036

47,321

1,111

2,026

362,887

3,538

57,319

4,949

4,998

16,024

83,290

3,622

57,319

4,949

4,998

16,024

83,290

205,045

18,420

28,399

60,497

47,322

1,111

2,026

362,820

Contract & Trading Related Costs

Staff Related Costs

Asset Related Costs

Other Direct Costs

Total Contract & Trading Costs

Contract & Trading Contribution

Total Trading Operating Surplus

7,581

720

8,823

17,125

582

15,228

7,908

677

11,107

19,692

739

16,628

327

(43)

2,284

2,567

(157)

(1,399)

30,770

2,688

46,590

80,048

3,243

6,781

30,765

2,688

46,669

80,122

3,168

6,791

Page 4 of 7

Appendix 2

University Balance Sheet

As at 31 March 2013

YTD

Actual

($000)

YTD

Budget

($000)

YTD

Variance

($000)

ASSETS

Current Assets

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Prepayments

Trade and Other Receivables

Inventories

Biological Assets

Other Financial Assets

Non Current Assets Held for Sale

Total Current Assets

Non Current Assets

Trade and Other Receivables

Other Financial Assets

Biological Assets

Property, Plant & Equipment

Total Non Current Assets

Total Assets

LIABILITY AND EQUITY

Current Liabilities

Accounts Payable and Accruals

Borrowings

Provision for Employee Entitlement

Receipts in Advance

Total Current Liability

Non Current Liability

Borrowings

Provision for Employee Entitlements

Receipts in Advance

Total Non Current Liabilities

Total Liabilities

Public Equity

Capital & Reserves

Revaluations/ Other

Surplus/(Deficit)

Total University Equity

Total Liabilities and Public Equity

39,278

4,475

44,387

1,444

3,540

71,240

205

164,569

41,926

3,917

44,000

1,400

3,400

69,740

465

164,848

710

41,935

636

948,487

991,768

1,156,337

125

40,000

661

948,330

989,116

1,153,964

22,451

461

16,403

112,431

151,746

20,539

459

16,500

111,000

148,498

14,506

34,510

1,506

50,522

202,268

938,841

15,228

954,069

14,509

34,500

839

49,848

198,346

938,990

-

16,628

955,618

1,156,337 1,153,964

C13/36 – May

Part I

2013 FY

Budget

($000)

2013 FY

Forecast

($000)

(2,648)

558

387

44

140

1,500

(260)

(279)

24,789

8,500

23,000

1,500

3,400

21,740

465

83,394

30,689

9,000

23,000

1,500

3,400

21,165

465

89,219

585

1,935

(25)

157

2,652

2,373

125

40,000

670

952,517

993,312

1,076,706

710

41,935

670

954,615

997,930

1,087,149

1,912

2

(97)

1,431

3,248

(3)

10

667

674

3,922

(149)

-

(1,400)

(1,549)

2,373

26,645

663

16,000

49,000

92,308

28,551

618

16,000

54,000

99,169

13,834

31,500

793

46,127

138,435

14,509

34,500

839

49,848

149,017

938,990

(7,500)

6,781

938,271

938,841

(7,500)

6,791

938,132

1,076,706 1,087,149

Page 5 of 7

C13/36 – May

Part I

Appendix 3

University Cash Flow Statement

For the Three Months Ended 31 March 2013

YTD

Actual

($000)

YTD

Budget

($000)

YTD

Variance

($000)

Cash Flows from Operating Activities:

Cash was provided from:

Government Grants Receipts

Student Fees Receipts

Other Income Receipts

Interest

Trust Funds Receipts

46,280

84,439

31,984

407

476

163,586

Cash was applied to:

Payments to Employees and Suppliers

Interest Paid

99,687

254

99,941

63,645 Net Cash Flows From Operating Activities:

Cash Flows from Investing Activities:

Cash was provided from:

Withdrawal from Investments

Sale of Fixed Assets

1,800

1,800

-

Cash was applied to:

Purchase of Investments

Capital Expenditure

45,685

12,330

70,909

2,150

800

2,950

50,000

15,012

58,015

(56,215)

65,012

(62,062) Net Cash Flows From Investing Activities:

Cash Flows from Financing Activities:

45,750

90,624

30,903

770

221

168,268

97,106

253

97,359

Cash was provided from:

Loans Repaid

Loans Raised

Capital Injection

Cash was applied to:

Loan/ Vested to Massey Subsidiary

Loans Repaid

-

-

-

-

378

159

537

-

-

-

-

-

159

159

(350)

(800)

(1,150)

4,315

2,682

6,997

5,847

(378)

-

(378)

-

-

-

-

530

(6,185)

1,081

(363)

255

(4,682)

(2,581)

(1)

(2,582)

(7,264)

2013 FY

Budget

($000)

2013 FY

Forecast

($000)

182,995

150,715

98,490

3,589

1,427

437,216

185,123

144,406

105,481

3,226

1,210

439,446

382,435

1,033

383,468

385,254

1,034

386,288

53,748 53,158

87,150

4,300

91,450

91,875

4,300

96,175

87,000

66,030

85,685

64,348

153,030 150,033

(61,580) (53,858)

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

618

618

378

618

996

Net Cash Flows From Financing Activities:

NET INCREASE/(DECREASE) IN CASH

Cash Brought Forward

Ending Cash Carried Forward

(537)

6,893

32,385

39,278

(159)

8,688

33,239

41,927

(378)

(1,795)

(854)

(2,649)

(618)

(8,450)

(996)

(1,696)

33,239 32,385

24,789 30,689

Page 6 of 7

Appendix 4

Capital Expenditure Report

For the Three Months Ended 31 March 2013

C13/36 – May

Part I

Page 7 of 7

C13/37 – May

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

FEES SETTING PRINCIPLES AND PROCESS

3 MAY 2013

1.0

2.0

3.0

Purpose

The purpose of this document is to:

1. outline the process and timeline for setting next year’s domestic, international and nontuition fees

2. present minor amendments to the Fees Setting Principles for approval by Council.

Outline of the Fees Setting Process

The process for setting 2014 fees for domestic and international students will follow a similar path to previous years, namely:

• Fee benchmarking exercises undertaken in relation to international, domestic and nontuition fees (March-April)

• Principles for setting fees to be agreed by Council at the May meeting (3 May 2013)

• Recommendations relating to international, domestic and non-tuition fees considered by

SLT in May (13 May 2013)

• International and non-tuition fees decision paper considered by Council at the July meeting (5 July 2013).

In relation to the setting of domestic tuition fees, the Annual Maximum Fee Movement (AMFM)

Policy places restrictions on the maximum percentage that domestic tuition fees can be raised. Massey University (indeed all universities) have raised their fees to the extent of the maxima each year and the value of the AMFM has been relatively consistent over the past three years (5% in 2010, 4% in 2011, 4% in 2012).

It is therefore anticipated that a recommendation regarding Domestic Tuition Fees can also be considered at the July Council meeting, pending confirmation of the exact value of the AMFM

Policy by the Ministry of Education at the end of July / early August.

Fees Setting Principles

The set of principles to guide fees setting were approved by Council in 2012 (C12/38 – May

Part I). The principles have been developed over a number of years and minor updates are normally made on an annual basis.

Page 1 of 4

3.1

3.2

C13/37 – May

Part I

An important feature of the principles is that students are engaged with throughout the fees setting process. This is occurring via meetings between the Assistant Vice-Chancellor f) g) h)

(Academic & International) and the Students’ Association Presidents.

Current Principles for Fees Setting as Approved by Council in 2012

It is recommended that fee setting for 2013 be guided by the same principles as last year, namely: a) Fees set are aligned with the advancement of University strategy as outlined in

Massey University Defining – the Road to 2020; b) c)

The areas that will be funded by, and benefits gained from, increases in fees will be made clear;

The University’s market position, i.e. relativity of fees with other universities, will be considered in setting fees, which for domestic fees may require consideration of d) e)

AMFM exemption application for some programmes;

Fees set are consistent with the budget priorities and fiscal projects as outlined in the

University’s 2012 Budget Policy Statement and designed to ensure the University’s financial sustainability;

The Students’ Associations, on behalf of all students, and other relevant student bodies, will continue to be consulted in the process leading up to the recommendation by Management to Council of stated fees for the ensuing year;

Fees set will consider the impact of fees on student affordability;

Fees will be set in accordance with current Government policy;

The rationale for the fees set will be transparent and will endeavour to demonstrate i) j) value for learners;

The process of fee setting will recognise that there are differential costs and potential benefits to the individual and the University of study for different types of course; and

The structure of the University’s fees will be consistent with the goals of the Fee

Strategy Review i.e. that fees structures be administratively straight forward and practical.

Amended Principles for Fees Setting (changes highlighted)

It is recommended that fee setting for 2014 be guided by the principles that have been established in previous years, namely: a) b)

Fees set are aligned with the advancement of University strategy as outlined in

Massey University Defining – the Road to 2020;

The areas that will be funded by, and benefits gained from, increases in fees will be c) d) e) f) g) made clear;

The University’s market position, i.e. relativity of fees with other universities, will be considered in setting fees, which for domestic fees may require consideration of an

Annual Maximum Fee Movement (AMFM) exception application; appropriate benchmarking will inform the setting of international fees;

Fees set are consistent with the budget priorities and fiscal projects as outlined in the

University’s 2013 Budget Policy Statement and designed to ensure the University’s financial sustainability;

The Students’ Associations, on behalf of all students, and other relevant student bodies, will continue to be consulted in the process leading up to the recommendation by Management to Council of stated fees for the ensuing year;

Fees set will consider the impact of fees on student affordability;

Fees will be set in accordance with current Government policy;

Page 2 of 4

4.0

5.0

5.1

5.2

5.3

6.0 h) i) j)

C13/37 – May

Part I

The rationale for the fees set will be transparent and will endeavour to demonstrate value for learners;

The process of fee setting will recognise that there are differential costs and potential benefits to the individual and the University of study for different types of course; and

The structure of the University’s fees will be consistent with the goals of the Fee

Strategy Review i.e. that fees structures be administratively straight forward and practical.

Consultation

The Fees Setting Process and Principles were discussed and endorsed by the Fees Working

Group at their meeting on 12 March 2013. The Fees Working Group includes the College

Business Managers and representatives from Finance, Student Administration, ITS, the Office of Strategy Management and the Office of the AVCAI.

The Process and Principles were discussed with representatives of the Students’ Association

Presidents on 11/12 April 2013. The only question raised was whether increases in international tuition fees were expected to compensate for shortfalls in domestic fees. It was noted that international fees were informed by benchmarking and market tolerances.

Consequently, increases in international fees had been relatively consistent across the New

Zealand universities and this pattern was not expected to change.

The paper and recommendations were considered by SLT at their meeting on 15 April 2013.

Implications of Decision

Financial Implications and Treasury Comment

Financial Implications

Treaty of Waitangi Implications

Treaty of Waitangi Implications

Equity and Operational Implications

No

No 

People Implications (Staff/Student/Other) No

Cultural & Ethnic Implications (Māori/Pasifika/New Migrant/Other) No 

Equity Implications

Gender Implications

Disability Implications

Information Technology Implications

Library Implications

Teaching Implications

Research Implications

International Implications

Other (state____________________________)

No 

No 

No 

No

No 

No

No 

No 

No 

Implementation

Overall responsibility for implementation of the fees setting process rests with the AVCAI.

Page 3 of 4

C13/37 – May

Recommendations

Part I

7.0

It is recommended that Council:

1. Note the process and timeline for setting international, domestic and non-tuition fees for 2013

2. Approve the amended Fees Setting Principles as set out in Section 3.2.

Professor Ingrid Day

Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic & International)

Page 4 of 4

C13/38 – May

Part I

The Chancellor

Massey University Council

Dear Chancellor,

Report from the Academic Board Meeting (Part 1): 20 March 2013

At the Academic Board meeting held on Wednesday 20 March 2013 in Part I of the meeting the following items are referred to Council for information.

1. Advice on Matters of Academic Policy

There was no advice on matters of academic policy to be reported.

2. Information to Council with Respect to Major Academic Directions

There were no matters with respect to major academic directions to be reported.

3. Report of Academic Approvals Made Under Delegation

College of Health College Board Terms of Reference

These were the initial Terms of Reference for the new College of Health College

Board and they were approved under the delegated authority of Council with a name change to Interim College of Health College Board Terms of Reference. It was also agreed that they would be reviewed before the end of 2013 and amended in 2014 as necessary.

Further discussion included, but was not limited to, the following:

• It was considered unusual to have the majority of staff as ex-officio members and not elected members. While it was noted that College structures varied and that the makeup of College Boards reflected the individual colleges the principle of a majority of elected members was considered to be important in the membership of the College Boards.

• The method of carrying out the elections had not been made explicit. College of Health Executive Group member Professor Stannard noted that the College itself was new and such detail was not yet able to be provided. This could however be reported to the Board when the elections took place.

• To adequately represent the views of Māori it was suggested that membership be for a Māori member and that if the views of Pasifika and migrant communities were considered significant there be another position allocated.

Page 1 of 2

C13/38 – May

Part I

The Academic Board’s concerns about the composition of the Board membership, including the balance between ex-officio and elected members, and M āori membership, and operational matters around election procedures were to be taken into account by the College of Health College Board at the time of the review of the

Interim College of Health College Board Terms of Reference

College of Humanities and Social Sciences College Board Terms of Reference

4.

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences College Board Terms of Reference were approved under the delegated authority of Council. There was a minor change that clarified the delegation of the College Board to approve programme level amendments (non-CUAP).

Sub-Committee Matters

Teaching and Learning Committee Annual Report 2012

Chair of the Teaching and Learning Committee Professor Day tabled the Teaching and Learning Committee Annual Report 2012. This is available to Council members upon request.

5. Items of Early Notice

There are not matters for early notice to report in Part I of the meeting.

6. For Information

Call for Nominations for New Zealand Council for Educational Research Electoral

College

The nomination and election process for the New Zealand Council for Educational

Research Electoral College is underway and will be concluded no later than 26 April

2013.

Report on CUAP Round Two 2012

A report which lists CUAP decisions on approvals forwarded by the Acadmeic Board to CUAP for Round Two 2012 was tabled.

Conferring of Degrees and awarding of Diplomas and Certificates

Degrees were conferred and diplomas and certificates awarded under the delegated authority of Council.

Professor Tony Signal

Chair, Academic Board

Page 2 of 2

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