B.Ed 3 Autumn Semester 2015

B.Ed 3 Autumn Semester 2015

Bachelor of Education

Year Three, Semester Five

Course Handbook

Autumn 2015

Welcome from the Dean of Education/ Fáilte ó Dhéan an Oideachais

Dear Student,

On behalf of my colleagues I extend a warm welcome back to B.Ed 3, Faculty of Education at

Mary Immaculate College. Tá súil agam gur bhain tú taitneamh as laethanta gealla an tsamhraidh.

During Year 3 of the B.Ed programme you will follow a core programme which focuses on the Student as Researcher. Emphasis is placed upon recognising and developing the potential contribution primary school teachers can play in educational change by actively engaging with educational research. To begin this journey you will be introduced to educational research methods and ethics in

Semester 5. This module will also play an integral part in helping you formulate the research design for your

Undergraduate Dissertation (if selected). While you will continue to build upon concepts and knowledge developed in first and second year, early childhood is a particular curricular focus during B.Ed 3 and you will undertake a designated Infant school placement towards the end of Semester 6. This autumn you will begin your first Education Elective and your second Liberal Arts Elective module. Through the selection of electives you will begin your path towards either a specialism or a multidisciplinary B.Ed. By the end of this academic year, you will have completed all the mandatory curricular elements of your programme. As you are aware, Part Two of the

Programme, attainment on which final QCA is based, includes Years 2, 3, and 4. The weighting of the Programme increases from 1 to 2 for Semesters 6, 7 and 8. To date your constructive feedback to us has contributed to the rescheduling and revision of the approaches taken in some modules. If you have any feedback in relation to this academic year, please engage with your academic co-ordinator and BE.d Course Leader, Dr John O’Shea.

The Faculty is also involved in the provision of many other programmes. This year sees the second cohort of students beginning the Professional Master of Education which is a two year teaching qualification for graduates who already possess a Level 8 degree and who wish to pursue primary school teaching. The Faculty contributes to an extensive range of postgraduate programmes in SEN, ICT, Mentoring and Teacher Development,

Early Childhood Studies, Adult and Continuing Education, Masters in Education (by Research and Thesis) and

Structured PhD in Education. We have also an Education Preparatory Programme for Mature Learners, which is aimed at adult learners who wish to gain access to the BEd programme. Táthar ag leanúint ar aghaidh i mbliana lenár gclár iarchéime nuálaíoch, M. Oid. san Oideachas Lán-Ghaeilge. Is é seo an chéad chlár iarchéime i bPoblacht na hÉireann le freastal go sonrach ar oideoirí tumoideachais agus ar ghairmithe eile a bhíonn ag obair i réimse an oideachais lán-Ghaeilge. Our Professional Diploma in Education (Further Education, Level 8) has been accredited by the Teaching Council, and our revised Certificate in Religious Education has been approved by the Council for

Catechetics.

Our lecturers are very approachable and are dedicated to providing you with a top quality educational experience. Please engage with them and with your fellow students to enrich your own learning and to broaden your understanding of what it means to be a teacher. Participate in the life of the College, join clubs and societies, and enjoy the many sporting, social, cultural, and personal development opportunities available to you.

In closing, I wish you well in your studies and I hope that your time at Mary Immaculate College will prove both enjoyable and rewarding. Guím gach rath ort i rith na bliana,

Professor Teresa O’Doherty, Dean of Education.

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INDEX

Introduction from the Dean

Index

Faculty of Education – A Brief Overview

Mission Statement of the Faculty of Education

Overview of B.Ed 3 Programme

Study Abroad/International Placement

Elective Specialisms and Multidisciplinary Route

Undergraduate Dissertation Option

Progression within the Programme

Programme Specific Regulations

Academic Integrity Policy

Lecture and Tutorial Attendance

Module Assessment Guidelines

Key Faculty of Education Contacts

Staff of the Faculty of Education

Bachelor of Education 3 Autumn Semester Modules

Course Outline: Core Education Modules

Course Outline: Education Electives 1

Course Outline: Liberal Arts Electives 2

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11

12

14

22

24

8

9

7

7

61

118

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7

4

5

2

3

PAGE NUMBER

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FACULTY OF EDUCATION – A BRIEF OVERVIEW

The academic work of the College is divided into two faculties: the Faculty of Education and the Faculty of

Arts, both of which contribute to the BEd Programme. The Faculty of Education at Mary Immaculate College is proud of its tradition of teacher education and of the high standards achieved by graduates since its establishment in 1898. The Faculty is one of the largest education faculties in Ireland, with a staff of more than 65 full-time academic staff and a further 50 associate members. The Faculty is strongly studentcentred and is committed to excellence in its teaching and research.

The Faculty offers programmes at certificate, diploma, undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Our flagship undergraduate honours programmes include the following:

BEd , which is a full-time four-year programme and is the professional qualification required for teachers in primary schools.

BEd in Education and Psychology , this four-year full-time programme prepares graduates to be recognised primary school teachers while also holding a degree in Psychology, which is recognised by the Psychological

Society of Ireland.

BA in Early Childhood Care and Education , which focuses on the development of educarers, professional leaders in the provision of care and education for children from birth to six years in a variety of educational settings.

The Faculty also offers a number of postgraduate programmes. The academic year 2015/16 heralds the introduction of the Professional Master of Education (Primary Teaching) which is a new two year teaching qualification for graduates who already possess a Level 8 degree and who wish to pursue primary school teaching. In addition, a suite of postgraduate and masters programmes is available. The Faculty also provides a range of postgraduate research options and the numbers of students engaging in masters and doctoral studies by research and thesis within the Faculty continue to grow. The research work of the

Centre for Research in Education and Teacher Education (CREaTE), Centre for Early-Childhood Research at Mary Immaculate College (Ceramic), the Curriculum Development Unit and the Centre for Transforming

Education through Dialogue reflect the commitment of Faculty to researching aspects of curricular interest, but also issues of equity and justice within education on local, national and international levels.

Faculty members cover a wide range of expertise and professional interests. Many are qualified primary teachers and bring to their students a wealth of professional knowledge and experience. An internationally recognised standard of excellence has been achieved in the areas of professional development, curriculum design and educational research. The Faculty of Education has close links with many of the primary schools in Limerick city and the wider mid-west region. These connections facilitate an on-going professional relationship between the Faculty and the schools. The Faculty is greatly facilitated by the schools and teachers who make their classes available to student teachers for school placements, a crucial aspect of

Mary Immaculate College’s BEd programme.

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MISSION STATEMENT OF THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION

To foster the social, emotional and intellectual development of our students; to promote and enhance their well-being during their time in college, and to provide opportunities for them to access a range of cultural activities.

To encourage students to aspire to standards of excellence in their professional lives compatible with their individual potential.

To promote reflective, creative, open-minded, sensitive, competent and committed practice among teachers in the national primary schools system. To empower such teachers to deal not alone with pupils and inschool colleagues but with parents, local communities, colleagues generally, other professionals.

To engender in our graduates a commitment to the full, social, emotional, intellectual development, and cultural diversity of the children they teach so that as citizens of the future they are competent, assured and caring members of society.

To promote and develop educational research and the application of existing research for the benefit of schools and of the community.

To promote among our graduates an openness to research and methodological innovation and to help them to foster a sense of ongoing professional and personal development.

To engender in students and graduates a positive, critical attitude to change in their professional lives and the capacity to develop skills and competences to deal with changing needs and demands.

To promote and develop educational thought and practice for the benefit of the community, both local and national.

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OVERVIEW OF THE B.ED 3 PROGRAMME

The conceptual framework of the overall B.Ed programme (of which a brief overview was provided in the

B.Ed 1 Handbook) demonstrates a dynamic programme that challenges what it means to be a learner, a teacher, a researcher, and a leader and how, collectively, these understandings become embedded in the everyday realities of all those working together in a 21 st

century teacher education programme. In B.Ed 3, the focus is upon the Student as Researcher, which emphasises not only the importance of research for educational change but also recognises the active engagement of primary school teachers in educational research. In Semester 5 you will be introduced to research methods in education, which provides an opportunity for you to develop an understanding of the interrelated connections between theory, practice and research across classrooms, schools, communities and broader society. It encourages you to look for opportunities, embedded within an ethical framework, for systematic, relevant and robust inquiry. In

Semester 5 you will also begin your first Elective modules in Education and continue with your Liberal Arts

Electives. Early childhood is a particular curricular focus during B.Ed 3 and you will undertake a designated

Infant school placement towards the end of Semester 6 (SP5). School Placement 5 is combination of observation and teaching in an infant classroom and will provide an opportunity for you to become familiar with learning support systems in the school, with particular reference to the infant classroom. Since you will have completed all the mandatory curricular elements of your programme, two SEN modules and five electives at this point, the level of curricular and theoretical understanding and expertise expected in this placement are demanding. The modules in B.Ed 3 are as follows:

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Semester 5

Student as Researcher

Early Childhood Education – curriculum, research and pedagogy

STeM 6: Teaching Mathematics and

Science

Research Methods - Ethical Foundations for Teaching and Research

Creative Arts 3

Assessment for and of Learning

Liberal Arts Elective 2

Education Elective 1

Religious Education Option

3

6

6

3

6

3*

ECTS

3

3

Semester 6

Student as Researcher

Schools and Society 3: Historical,

Philosophical and Sociological

Perspectives

Early Primary Education and Advanced

Educational Methods

Inclusive Education for Children with

Special Educational Needs 2

Liberal Arts Elective 3

Education Elective 2

Tréimshe Foghlama sa Ghaeltacht 2

School Placement 5

Religious Education Option

ECTS

3

3

3

6

6

0

6

3*

*As this is an optional educational module, students choose one of the three assessment options: audit, pass/fail or graded. If the graded assessment option is chosen, credits awarded will contribute to the student’s QCA.

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Study Abroad/International Placement

The B.Ed programme offers students the opportunity to study abroad in Semester 5. The College has established partnerships with a number of premier Colleges and Universities worldwide and strongly encourages student mobility. Student mobility offers opportunities for significant academic, social and personal development. Exchanges are open to all students who have attained a QCA of 2.8 or above by the end of Semester 4. Students who have applied to study abroad during Semester 5 will be graded on a pass/fail basis for all selected modules in their host College/University. This means that upon successfully passing all modules, their QCA at the end of Semester 4 will be carried forward to Semester 6. Please contact: Richard Bowles, Co-ordinator of international placements, if you have any queries in relation to the

Study Abroad/International Placement.

Elective Specialisms and Multidisciplinary Route

Students begin their first Education Elective and second Liberal Arts Elective in Semester 5. Students have been allocated and informed of their first Education Elective and must attend and complete this Elective.

Should you register incorrectly for an elective that has not been allocated to you or to an oversubscribed elective, your name will be removed from that list and you will be registered for your allocated elective by the College. Failure to register for the correct elective may result in disciplinary action.

Student may choose to exit their chosen Education Elective specialism after Semester 5 and may then follow the Multidisciplinary route.

Undergraduate Dissertation Option

Students undertaking particular Elective Specialisms in either Education or Liberal Arts or who are taking the

Multidisciplinary route may be offered the opportunity to undertake an Undergraduate Dissertation

(completed and graded in Semester 8). The Undergraduate Dissertation option is equivalent to two taught modules. Students must indicate their preference to undertake the Undergraduate Dissertation by Week 7

(Semester 5). It is important to note that students choosing this option must also successfully complete the

Research Methods Module. Students who do not achieve C3 or higher in the Research Method Module will be subject to critical review. If you have any queries in relation to the Undergraduate Dissertation, please contact: Des Carswell, Co-ordinator of and tutor on the research methods and undergraduate dissertation modules for the B.Ed programme.

Progression within the Programme

In developing the programme, a focus has been maintained on ensuring progression within the programme in terms of students’ learning and self-development and the understanding, knowledge and skills required to meet the learning and teaching needs of children in today’s schools. Clear links are maintained between theoretical input and student teachers’ school placements. Students must successfully complete all modules in order to progress to the next academic year of the programme.

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Programme Specific Regulations

3.9 Mary Immaculate College

3.9.1 Bachelor of Education and Bachelor of Education in Education and Psychology

3.9.1.1 A student who fails a school placement module shall be awarded an F grade or, in the case of Pass/Fail registration, an N grade.

3.9.1.2 The compensating fail grades D1 and D2 shall not be awarded for school placement modules.

3.9.1.3.1

3.9.1.3.2

3.9.1.3.3

Save in exceptional circumstances, where a student fails a school placement, s/he shall be afforded only one further opportunity to repeat that placement.

A student who fails a school placement module (i.e. who fails the first attempt and also fails the repeat attempt) will normally have their enrolment on their current programme of study terminated.

A student who fails a school placement module (i.e. who fails the first attempt and also fails the repeat attempt) in years 1, 2, 3 or 4 will be eligible for consideration, at the discretion of the relevant Examination Board, for an exit award or transfer to an appropriate exit programme, as listed below. The award type will depend on the number of credits accumulated by the student.

• Certificate in Education Studies (Minor Award (Level 7) [≥60 + <120 ECTS])

3.9.1.3.4

3.9.1.4

• Diploma in Education Studies (Minor Award (Level 7) [≥120 + <180 ECTS])

• BA Education Studies (Major Award (Level 7) [≥180 + <240 ECTS])

• BA Hons. Education Studies (Major Award (Level 8) [≥240 ECTS. The ECTS requirements for students registered on the three-year Level 8 Bachelor of Education programme is ≥180

ECTS.])

A student who is eligible for an exit award may take the appropriate award based on accumulated credits or may link in to approved modules in an attempt to fulfil the requirements for the next higher award. The approved modules will be determined following consultation between the student, the relevant Dean(s) and the Vice President

Academic Affairs.

Students who are due to start professional placement in the Spring semester of years 1, 2 and 3 of the programmes are subject to critical review. A student who has failed more than four modules or whose residual QCA following the Autumn semester is less than 2.00 will not be allowed to progress to the Spring semester and will be required to repeat the

Autumn semester prior to progressing to the Spring semester.

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3.9.1.5.1

3.9.1.5.2

3.9.1.5.3

3.9.1.6.1

3.9.1.6.2

3.9.1.7.1

3.9.1.7.2

3.9.1.8.1

3.9.1.8.2

3.9.1.9.1

Students who receive an F grade in the oral Irish component of the following modules shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:

An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 2

• Language and Literacy 5

Where the student has passed the other elements of the module, s/he repeats the oral Irish component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.

The compensating fail grades D1 and D2 shall not be awarded for the oral Irish component of the module.

Students who receive an F grade in the Scríobh na Gaeilge component of the following modules shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:

An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 2

• Language and Literacy 5

Where the student has passed the other element(s) of the module, s/he repeats the Scríobh

na Gaeilge component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.

Students who receive an F grade in the Múineadh na Gaeilge component of the following modules shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:

An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 3

• Language and Literacy 4

Where the student has passed the other element(s) of the module, s/he repeats the

Múineadh na Gaeilge component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.

Students who receive an F grade in the Teanga Scríofa na Gaeilge component of the following module shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:

An Ghaeilge agus Múineadh na Gaeilge 3

Where the student has passed the other elements of the module, s/he repeats the Teanga

Scríofa na Gaeilge component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.

Students who receive an F grade in the English component of the following modules shall be awarded an F grade both in that component of the module and in the overall module:

• Language and Literacy 4

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3.9.1.9.2

3.9.1.10.1

3.9.1.10.2

3.9.1.10.3

3.9.1.11.1

3.9.1.11.2

• Language and Literacy 5

Where the student has passed the other element(s) of the module, s/he repeats the English component only. The student is capped on the repeat of the module at grade C3.

To progress into the final year of their programme, students are required by the end of Year

3 of the programme to obtain an average quality point value (QPV) of at least 2.00 in the areas of English, Gaeilge and Mathematics in each of the three module groupings listed below:

1. Language and Literacy 1; Language and Literacy 2; Language and Literacy 3;

Language and Literacy 4; Language and Literacy 5

2. An Ghaeilge agus Muineadh na Gaeilge 1; An Ghaeilge agus Muineadh na Gaeilge 2;

An Ghaeilge agus Muineadh na Gaeilge 3; Language and Literacy 4; Language and

Literacy 5

STEM 1; STEM 2; STEM 4; STEM 5 3.

A student who does not obtain the minimum average QPV required in Mathematics following annual repeats in Year 2 but who is otherwise eligible to progress may do so and may link in on a capped basis to relevant modules in the following academic year to obtain the average minimum QPV of 2.00 in that module grouping.

A student who is not eligible to progress following the annual repeats in Year 3 on account of not having attained the minimum average QPV required in one or more of the English,

Gaeilge or

Mathematics groupings but who otherwise satisfies the general progression regulations may link in to relevant module/s in the following academic year subject to the current academic regulations whereby a maximum of two modules can be taken on a link-in basis in each semester.

The award and award classification shall be made on the basis of performance of candidates in part 2 only, commencing with Semester 3. For the BEd programme only, semesters 3 to 5 shall be assigned a relative weighting of 1 and semesters 6 to 8 shall be assigned a relative weighting of 2.

An absolute QPV of 2.60 across school placement modules SP4, SP5, SP6 and SP7 is required for the award of a first or second class honours degree.

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Mary Immaculate College Academic Integrity Policy

Preamble

Academic Integrity refers to honesty and responsibility in academic practice and scholarship. It values ethical academic behaviour and the avoidance of plagiarism, cheating, fraudulent representation of academic work and other dishonesty in academic endeavours.

1.0 Academic Dishonesty

1.1 Academic dishonesty includes:

- falsely representing the work of others as one’s own in an assignment.

- copying of ideas or work of fellow students.

- copying from published works, in assignments, without proper acknowledgement, i.e. plagiarism.

- using co-authoring assistance in individual academic work, including the commissioning or purchasing of essay writing services, i.e syndication.

- using technical assistance in assignments where it has not been authorised, e.g. using translation software in a translation assignment.

- signing attendance records on behalf of a classmate.

- fabricating results or research findings in an assignment.

- using false information to gain extensions to deadlines or i-grades.

- cheating in examinations by copying or using unauthorised materials.

- misrepresenting achievements on application forms.

2.0 Plagiarism

2.1 Plagiarism is defined as the use of either published or unpublished writing, ideas or works without proper acknowledgement.

2.2 Plagiarism is a form of academic dishonesty where, either intentionally or unintentionally, ideas or works are falsely presented as being those of the author for her/his benefit. It can include:

- the use of a part of a text without quotation marks and citation.

- the use of a part of a text, with minor paraphrase, without citation.

- the use of an image without citation or permission.

- the use of music without citation or permission.

- the use of computer code, mathematical work, research results, spreadsheets without citation or permission.

- the re-use of one’s own work from a previous assignment without citation.

2.3 All writing, ideas or works quoted or paraphrased in an academic assignment in MIC must be attributed and acknowledged to the original source through proper citation.

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2.4 To avoid plagiarism when quoting or paraphrasing, ideas or works must be referenced using the referencing system appropriate to the module under assessment or disciplinary area

1

.

2.5 Module and Programme Coordinators will provide guidance to students regarding the required referencing system for a given module or programme.

2.6 Written assignments will normally be submitted to the MIC plagiarism detection software and will be checked against and stored in the standard repository of the software. Students may submit only once to the plagiarism detection software for any one assignment.

3.0 Acceptable use of MIC teaching and assessment materials

3.1 Assignments are the property of MIC and may not be made publicly available (e.g. online) without consent.

3.2 Recording of lectures on personal devices is not permitted, unless by special arrangement.

3.3 Lectures captured on livestreaming facilities, which are password protected, cannot be shared with anyone who is not registered for a given module.

3.4 Teaching materials made available for download in electronic format by MIC lecturers may not be shared with anyone who is not registered for a given module.

4.0 Acceptable use of ICT and digital identities

4.1 When using MIC computers or network, films, music, books and other published works subject to copyright must not be downloaded.

4.2 Software licensed to MIC must not be downloaded to private devices or shared outside of MIC network, unless by prior agreement.

4.3 Digital identities should be respected and identity credentials should never be shared. Using the email or

VLE identity of another (e.g. if not logged out on a device) is considered a theft of digital identity.

4.4 MIC’s Policy for Responsible Computing must be adhered to at all times.

5.0 Data protection

5.1 Assignments that involve the gathering and storing of personal data, including images, must adhere to the MIC data protection policy.

6.0 Sanction

6.1 In accordance with MIC’s Code of Conduct, it is a serious disciplinary offence to engage in academic cheating in any form whatsoever.

6.2 Section 4.2 of the MIC Code of Conduct states that “The College Discipline Committee shall be entitled to impose penalties including suspension or expulsion where, in its view, the gravity of the complaint or offence or the College disciplinary record of the offender shall so warrant”.

1

Harvard, APA and numeric footnote systems are used in MIC, depending on the module or programme.

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Normally, the penalty for cheating is suspension for 12 months. A repeat of such conduct shall warrant expulsion.

Lecture and Tutorial Attendance

Attendance at lectures and tutorials is mandatory. Lecturers reserve the right to administer attendance checks at all/some lectures and tutorials. Except in exceptional circumstances and with the prior approval of both the academic year co-ordinator and lecturer, students must attend their assigned group lecture or tutorial. Lecturers reserve the right to refuse admittance to lectures/tutorials and/or mark a student absent if they do not attend their designated lecture/tutorial. Up to 10% of marks in a module may be deducted for poor attendance at lectures. In the case of tutorials (except in exceptional circumstances), 10% of marks will be deducted for poor attendance.

Important: Students are required to familiarise themselves with the Code of Conduct and to adhere to same

(see http://www.mic.ul.ie/adminservices/studentservices/Pages/StudentHandbook.aspx for further information).

Module Assessment Guidelines

Students are responsible for familiarising themselves with the assessment arrangements for each module.

Where modules are assessed by examination, it is the responsibility of the student to register and present for the examination (see http://www.mic.ul.ie/adminservices/studentservices/Pages/StudentHandbook.aspx for further information).

In the case of coursework, students are responsible for ensuring that coursework adhers to the module assessment guidelines, that it is completed on time, and submitted on the designated date. Students are strongly advised to keep an electronic copy of all coursework. Except in exceptional circumstances, extensions will not be granted for coursework submission deadlines.

Penalty for Late Submission of Coursework: Except in exceptional circumstances, 10% of marks in a module will be deducted for late submission of coursework.

Repeat Assessment Procedures: Where Coursework is the repeat assessment (including both F and I -

Grades) students will be notified of the repeat assessment and the repeat assessment guidelines by email. It is the responsibility of the individual student to comply with the repeat assessment guidelines which includes submission deadlines.

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KEY FACULTY OF EDUCATION CONTACTS

Dean of Education

Professor Teresa O Doherty

Contact: [email protected]

Office: 304a

(061) 204995

Assistant Dean of Education

Dr Angela Canny

Contact: [email protected]

Office: 311

(061) 204598

Course Leader and BEd III co-ordinator

Dr. John O’Shea

Contact: [email protected]

Office: R224

(061) 774713

Director of School Placement

Neil Ó Conaill

Contact: [email protected]

Office: 306

(061) 204519

Fintan Breen

Education Office Manager

Education Office

Contact: [email protected]

Office: (061) 204906

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Faculty of Education Office

Room 307 (Foundation Building)

Phone: 061-204906

Counter service to students is available:

Monday from 10.00 a.m. – 12.00 p.m. and 2.00 p.m. – 4.00 p.m

Tuesday – Friday from 10.00 a.m. – 12.30 p.m. and 2.00 p.m. – 4.00 p.m

Whom should I contact?

If you have a general query please email the Education Office at [email protected]

. You may also go to the Education Office, Third Floor, Main Building, if you have a general query.

If you have a concern or query in relation to general academic issues, please contact Dr Angela Canny. You can make an appointment to see her by email or via the Education Office.

If your concern specifically refers to School Placement, please contact the SP Office and/or Director of SP

(061 204358/061 204924).

If you have a concern relating to examinations / repeats / link-ins etc. please contact the Assistant Dean, Dr

Angela Canny.

Please give your mobile phone number to the Education Office or other members of staff when communicating with them, as if a matter is urgent, this will enable them to contact you directly.

Contacting Lecturers

You can find contact details for all academic staff on the College website http://www.mic.ul.ie/welcome/Pages/staffdirectory.aspx.

Initial contact with a lecturer should be made by email and if required, the lecturer will arrange a meeting with you. Please remember that lecturers are very often in schools or engaged in other work, so it is important that you contact them by telephone or email.

You are reminded that all communication should be conducted in a courteous manner.

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Dean of Education

Teresa O'Doherty, B.Ed.,

M.Ed.(NUI), Dip. Religious

Studies(MIC), Ph.D.(UL)

Assistant Dean of Education

Angela Canny, B.Soc.Sc.,

M.Soc.Sc.(UCD),

Ph.D.(Warwick)

Director of Continuing

Professional Development

Cathal de Paor, B.A.(NUI),

Grad.Dip.in Ed.(UL),

M.Ed.(UL), M.A. in Classical

Irish(NUI), Ph.D.

STAFF OF THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Director of the Curriculum

Development Unit

Eucharia McCarthy,

B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(UL)

Director of School

Placement

Neil Ó Conaill, B.Ed.(NUI),

M.Ed.(Nottingham) [email protected]

[email protected]

There are five academic departments within the Faculty of Education:

Department of Arts Education and Physical Education

Department of Reflective Pedagogy and Early Childhood Studies

Department of Learning, Society, and Religious Education

Department of Language, Literacy and Mathematics Education

Department of Special Education

(061)204995

(061)204598

(061)204950

(061)204508

(061)204519

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Department of Arts Education and Physical Education

Acting Head of Department

Déirdre Ní Chróinín, B.A., Ph.D.(UL) M.A. in

Academic Practice(UL)

Drama

Michael Finneran, B.Ed.(DCU), M.A, [email protected]

[email protected]

Ph.D.(Warwick)*

Dorothy Morrissey, B.Ed., M.A.(NUI), Grad Dip in

Drama in Education(Thomond), Grad Dip in

Dance(UL), Cert in Community Dance

Leadership(Laban Guild), Ph.D (Univ. of Bristol)

Margaret O'Keeffe, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(DCU), LLSM*

Co-ordinator of the access programme

Music Education

Gwen Moore, B.Mus.Ed.(TCD), M.A. in Music

Ed.(UL), GRIAM, ALCM, Ph.D.(Univ. of London) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Ailbhe Kenny, B.Ed., M.Ed.(DCU), Ph.D.(Cambridge)

Visual Arts Education

Tanya Power, NDD, M.A.(NUI)

Anne-Marie Morrin, B.A., H.Dip. Art and Design

Education (NCEA), M.A.(UL)

Sinead Dinneen, Dip.in Fine Art Sculpture(LSAD),

H.Dip.(Art and Design Education), B.A.(WIT), M.A. in

Interactive Media(UL)

Niall Quinn, Visual Arts Technician, Dip. in Fine

Arts(NCEA)

Physical Education

Deirdre Ní Chróinín, B.A., Ph.D.(UL), M.A. in

Academic Practice(UL)

Richard Bowles, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Sc.(Leicester) PhD.

(UL) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Co-ordinator of international placements and AEE

Elaine Murtagh, B.A., PGCE, Ph.D.(Univ. of Ulster)* [email protected]

(061)204553

(061)204976

(061)204521

(061)204526

(061)204945

(061)774721

(061)204388

(061)204552

(061)204936

(061)204350

(061)204553

(061)204912

(061)204569

17

Department of Reflective Pedagogy and Early Childhood Studies

Head of Department

Emer Ring, B.Ed.(Carysfort College of Ed.), PG Dip. in Special Ed.(DCU), BL, (Univ. of London),

M.Ed.(DCU), PG Cert. in Autism (Children)(DCU),

M.Ed.(Autism)(Univ. of Birmingham), Diploma in

Irish(NUIG), Ph.D.(DCU) [email protected]

Early Childhood Care and Education

Deirdre Breathnach, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(UL)

Jennifer Pope, B.A. Early Childhood Studies,

Ph.D.(UCC)

Lisha O'Sullivan, B.A. Early Childhood Studies(UCC),

M.A. Non-directive Play Therapy (Univ. of York)*

Des Carswell, B.Sc.(UCD and Vrije Univ.

Amsterdam), Masters in European Social Policy

Analysis (UCD) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Co-ordinator of and tutor on the research methods and undergraduate dissertation modules for the

B.Ed. programme

Mary Moloney, Cert. in Psychology(NUIM),

Diploma in Nursery Management(UCD), M.Ed. in

Early Childhood Care and Education(MIC),

Ph.D.(MIC)

Educational Methodology

Teresa McElhinney, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

ICT in Education

Brendan Barry, B.A.(TCD), Grad.Dip.Ed.(MIC),

M.Sc.(DCU)

Rory McGann, B.Ed, M.Ed. ICT(UL), Grad. Dip. Ed.

Lead. (NUIM), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL)

Edward Corry, B.A. (NUIG), Higher Diploma in

Education (NUIG); Higher Diploma in Systems

Analysis and Design (NUIG); B.E. (NUIG); Ph.D.

(NUIG) [email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204571

(061)204565

(061)204581

(061)204566

(061)204961

(061) 204316

(061) 204542

(061)204941

(061)204520

(061)204986

18

Microteaching

Kathleen Horgan, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(TCD),

Ph.D.(NUI)

School Placement

Eamonn Mitchell, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL) [email protected]

[email protected]

Department of Learning, Society, and Religious Education

Head of Department

Carol O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL), M.A.(NUI),

Ed.D.(DCU)

Psychology of Education

[email protected]

[email protected]

Suzanne Parkinson, B.Ed., B.Sc., M.SC. in

Developmental and Educational Psychology, Ed.D.(Ed.

Psych).

Marie Ryan, B.Ed. (Ed & Psych), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL),

MAEP (UCD) [email protected]

[email protected]

Claire Griffin, B.Ed. (Ed & Psych), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL),

MAEP (UCD)

History of Education and Policy of Education

Teresa O'Doherty, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI), Dip. Religious

Studies(MIC), Ph.D.(UL)

Eilís O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.A.(UL), Ph.D.(UL)

Co-ordinator of M.Ed in Educational Leadership and

Management

[email protected]

[email protected]

Margaret Nohilly, B.Ed, M.St., D.Ed (DCU)

Philosophy of Education

Tony Bonfield, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI), TEFL Cert.(MIC),

Ed.D. (Univ. Of Sheffield)

Aislinn O Donnell, B.A.(TCD), M.A.(UCD),

Ph.D.(Warwick)

Sociology of Education

Angela Canny, B.Soc.Sc., M.Soc.Sc.(UCD),

Ph.D.(Warwick) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204328

(061)204518

(061)204928

(061)204958

(061)204372

(061)204701

(061)204995

(061)204384

(061)774744

(061)204970

(061)204354

(061)204598

19

Sandra Ryan, B.Ed.(NUI), M.A., Ph.D.(Western

Michigan)

Religious Education

Patricia Kieran, B.Rel.Sc.(Mater Dei), M.Th.,

Ph.D.(London)

Daniel O’Connell, Dip.Phil., B.D.(NUIM), Grad.Dip. in

Holistic Dev.(All Hallows), M.Ed., Ph.D.(Boston College)

Maurice Harmon, Dip. Phil, B.D., H.Dip. in Pastoral

Studies, (Maynooth), M.A.(Fordham University)

Educational Disadvantage

Sandra Ryan, B.Ed.(NUI), M.A., Ph.D.(Western

Michigan)

Transforming Education Through Dialogue

Ann Higgins, B.Ed., Dip. Remedial Ed., Ph.D.(UL)

Ruth Bourke, B.A.(UL), M.Ed.(Adult Ed)(UL)

Social, Environmental and Scientific Education

Anne Dolan, B.Ed., M.A., Dip.Adult Comm.Ed.(NUI),

Ed.D.(Sheffield Hallam)

(Pedagogy of Geography)

Eileen O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UCC), Ph.D.(UCC)

(Pedagogy of History)

Maeve Liston, B.Sc., Ph.D.(UL)

(Science Education)

Anne O’Dwyer B.Sc (UL), Phd, UL

(Science Education)

Miriam Hamilton, B.A., Post-Grad Dip in Co-operative

Learning, (TCD), M.Ed (MIC), PhD (MIC)

(Science Education)

Development and Intercultural Education

Brighid Golden B.Ed., M.Ed (Birmingham)

Social, Personal and Health Education

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

20

(061)204984

(061)204965

(061)204966

(061)204720

(061)204984

(061)204979

(061)774715

(061)204983

(061)204975

(061)204726

(061)204346

(061)774754

(061)204991

Carol O’Sullivan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL) M.A.(NUI),

Ed.D.(DCU)

MA in Educational Psychology

Siobhán O’Sullivan, B.Sc in Ed. (UL), H.Dip.Psych.(NUI),

M.Sc.(Univ.Coll.London)

Programme Leader

Claire Griffin, B.Ed. (Ed & Psych), Grad. Dip. SEN(UL),

MAEP (UCD

Department Administrator

Josephine Frahill [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Department of Language, Literacy and Mathematics Education

Head of Department

Seán de Brún, N.T., B.A., HDE, M.Ed., Dip.Cat.(NUI) [email protected]

Gaeilge

Seán de Brún, N.T., B.A., HDE, M.Ed., Dip.Cat.(NUI) [email protected]

Roibeárd Ó Cathasaigh, B.A., M.A., HDE(NUI)

Eilís Ní Dheá, B.A., M.A., HDE, Ph.D.(NUI)

Martina Ní Fhatharta, B.Oid., M.Oid.(UL)

English

Áine Cregan, B.Ed., M.Ed.(NUI), Ed.D.(Harvard)

Martin Gleeson, N.T., B.A.(NUI), M.Ed.(TCD), Ph.D.(UL)

Fiodhna Gardiner-Hyland B.Ed. (MIC); MA in Ed., (MIC);

PhD, (Univ. of Leicester)

Mathematics Education

Aisling Leavy, B.Sc.(NUI), Grad.Dip.Ed.(DCU), M.A.in

Ed.(Calif. State), Ph.D.(Ariz. State)

Mairéad Hourigan, B.Sc., M.Sc., Ph.D.(UL)

John O’Shea, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL), Ph.D.(UL)

Noreen O’Loughlin, B.Ed., M.Ed., Grad. Dip. Comp, Dip.

Bus. St., Grad. Dip. Mant St., Ph.D. (University of Bristol) [email protected]

(061)204928

(061)204536

(061)774701

(061)204366

(061)204329

(061)204329 [email protected]

(061)204342 [email protected]

(061)204359 [email protected]

(061)204555 [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204902

(061)204971

061204766 [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204978

(061)204504

(061)774713

(061)204357

21

Modhanna Múinte na Gaeilge

Seán Ó Cathalláin, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(OU), Ph.D.(Stirling)

TJ Ó Ceallaigh, B.Oid.(UL), M.Oid. (UCC) Dioplóma

Iarchéime san Oideachas Gairmiúil(NUIG), Ph.D.(UCC)

Siobhán Ní Mhurchú, B.Ed.(NUI), M.A.(Ed)(UWE, Bristol)

Department of Special Education

Head of Department

Patricia Daly, B.A., HDE (NUI), M.A., Ph.D.(Ohio State)

Margaret Egan, B.Ed.(TCD), M.Ed.(UL), Ph.D.(UCC)

Stella Long, B.Ed., M.Ed.(UL), Dip.Soc.Studies(NUI) [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204371

(061)204325

(061)204973

(061)204309

(061)204337

(061)204580

Eucharia McCarthy, B.Ed.(NUI), M.Ed.(UL)*

Johanna Fitzgerald, M.A.(IOE, London) [email protected]

[email protected]

Trevor O’Brien, B.Ed.(DCU), M.Ed., Advanced Diploma in

Applied Educational Studies(Hull), Dip Social Studies(UCC) [email protected]

(061)204508

(061)204517

(061)774780

Professional Services Staff

Education Office Manager

Fintan Breen

Education Office

Marie Quaid

Caroline Ní Chadhain*

Zeta Penny

Helen Heffernan

Nora O’Donoghue

Paula Treacy

Perry Meskell

Rose Higgins [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204906

(061)204310

(061)204358

(061)204924

(061)204923

(061)204923

(061)204925

(061)204551

(061)204551

22

Deirdre Cussen* [email protected]

(061)204545

Hellen Gallagher [email protected]

(061)774725

Sheila O'Callaghan

Mairead Horan

Josephine Frahill

* Indicates that the Faculty Member is currently on leave

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

(061)204549

(061)204563

(061)204366

23

BACHELOR OF EDUCATION 3 – Autumn Semester Modules

Module

Code Core Education Modules

AUTUMN SEMESTER

EDU352 Early Childhood Education – curriculum, research and pedagogy

EDU301 STeM 6: Teaching Mathematics and Science

EDU302 Research Methods – Ethical Foundations for Teaching and Research

EDU303 Creative Arts 3

EDU304 Assessment for and of Learning

See below Liberal Arts Elective 2

EDE302-

EDE313 Education Elective 1

EDU205 or

EDU206 Religious Education Option

Module

Code Education Elective 1 Modules

AUTUMN SEMESTER

EDE 302 The Psychology of Relationships at School

EDE 304 Early Childhood Studies 1

EDE 305 Choral Music Leadership

EDE 306 Advanced Teaching and Learning in Physical Education

EDE 307 Special Education: Strategies for Learning and Teaching

EDE 308 Visual Art and Visual Art Education 1

EDE 310 Language and Literacy Development in Education 1

Credits Semester

3

3

3

3

6

6

6

3 5

6

6

6

6

Credits Semester

6 5

6

6

6

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

24

EDE 311 DEIS 1: Teaching in a DEIS School

EDE312 Sharing Faith in Religious Education

EDE 315 Irish Sign Language (ISL)

EDE 316 Teaching Geography Creatively

EDE 318 Science All Around Us 1: Chemistry

Module

Code Liberal Arts 2 Elective Modules

TL4715

AUTUMN SEMESTER

Teaching English as an Additional Language

GA4715 An Ghaelige 1 Sochaí na hÉireann

GE4715 German Erasmus Placement

GE4725 Intermediate German Language 2

GY4743 Economic Geography: Globalisation and Uneven Development

HI4737

IS4715

USA: 1945-Present

Vikings and Normans in Medieval Ireland AD 900-1300*

MC4714 Sociology of Media

MH4715 Mathematics: Measure

MU4712 Introduction to Music 2

RS4715 Christian Anthropology in Modern Culture

6

6

6

6

6

Credits Semester

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

5

25

Core Education Modules

26

Module EDU 352: Early Childhood Education – Curriculum, Research and Pedagogy

Autumn Semester 2015-2016

RATIONALE:

The rationale for this module is to cultivate students’ awareness of the ‘whole child perspective’ in the context of early childhood education as well as the critical importance of early childhood education in the field of education. The purpose of the module is to develop students’ knowledge and understanding of curriculum, pedagogy and research in early childhood education.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

1 Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

 identify and critique the guiding principles of curricular models for young children;

 appraise the ideological, substantial and pedagogical continuity between Aistear, the Early

Childhood Curriculum Framework (2009), Síolta, the National Quality Framework for Early

Childhood Education (2006) and the Primary School Curriculum (1999);

 compare and contrast national and international curricular models;

 critically locate the value of early years research as a vehicle for developing creative and innovative approaches to achieving curricular objectives;

Value the role of play in young children’s learning and holistic development

2 Affective: Attitude and Values

 develop an in-depth understanding and appreciation of the ‘whole-child’ perspective in evaluating curricula, pedagogy and research in the area of early childhood studies;

 appreciate an understanding of the transition from pre-school to primary school and the impact of this transition on the child.

3 Psychomotor: Skills and Capabilities

If applicable

 demonstrate the critical interrogation of early years research as a mechanism for exploring creative and innovative approaches to early childhood education;

 demonstrate skills and capabilities in implementing a creative and innovative emergent early years curriculum;

27

MODULE CONTENT:

Exploration of the concept of curriculum as it relates to early childhood education; articulation of the guiding principles of curricular models for young children; interrogation of these principles in curricular models nationally and internationally such as Aistear (Ireland), TeWhariki (New Zealand), the Early Years Foundation

Stage (UK), Early Childhood Education and Care (Finland) and Reggio Emilia (Italy); the application of sound pedagogical practice that recognises the role of play and the need for a balanced approach to be adopted between child-initiated and adult-initiated activity; understanding the links between Aistear, Síolta (National

Quality Framework) and the Primary School Curriculum; exploration of the issues involved in the transition process from early childhood settings to the primary school classroom; exploration of the components of quality in the context of early childhood education with particular reference to Ireland’s National Quality

Framework for Early Childhood Education; critical analysis of a broad range of research in early childhood education and its implications for practice and investigation of the concept of early intervention and the evidence base for its effectiveness.

UNRAVELLING THE CONTENT:

Focus of Study

Methodology

Concept of curriculum in the early years - “the whole child approach” Lectures – 2 hours per

Sound pedagogical practice – historical and philosophical perspectives to include components of quality

Guiding principles for teaching and learning in the early years to include the concept of play and learning and how quality impacts on the learning outcome

Curricular Models, Quality Standards – their genesis and the issue of continuity throughout the educational continuum week throughout the semester for each cohort.

Tutorials – I hour per week per cohort where guided reflection will tease out the issues covered in

Critical analysis of early childhood research initiatives and findings and the implications for practice

Early intervention and the evidence base for its effectiveness lectures and will be directed towards the final assessment of the module

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

This module will be assessed through the submission of one written assignment (1500 – 1800 words) at the end of the semester. Students are asked to comply with the guidelines outlined below –

 Format by using Font 12, Times New Roman and double spacing only.

 All sheets to be numbered and stapled together using a prescribed cover sheet with word count clearly stated.

 Bibliography/ Reference section must accompany each assignment and is not included in the word count.

 Plastic pockets or covers will not be accepted.

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

In the event of a repeat, the student will submit a written assignment of 2,000 words in length on a prescribed topic that reflects the module content.

28

STAFF:

Dr. Florence Dinneen (Extern)

Shirley Heaney (Extern)

Name Title Office

Office Hour/s

Office Telephone Email

Module Co-ordinators:

Dr. Florence

Dinneen

Lecturer in

Early

Years

Education

Off campus N/A [email protected]

Shirley

Heaney

Lecturer in

Early

Years

Education

Off campus N/A [email protected]

STUDY RESOURCES:

1. Department of Education and Science (1999): Ready to Learn - A White Paper on Early Childhood

Education. Dublin: The Stationery Office.

2.

Centre for Early Childhood Development and Education (CEDCE) (2004): Insights on Quality - A

National Review of Policy, Practice and research relating to Quality in Early Childhood Care and

Education in Ireland 1990 - 2004. Dublin: CEDCE.

3. Centre for Early Childhood Development and Education (CECDE) (2006) Síolta: The National Quality

Framework for Early Childhood Education, Dublin: CECDE.

4. Clark A, Moss P and Kjorholt A. T. (2005) Beyond Listening: Children’s Perspectives on Early Childhood,

London: The Policy Press.

5. Claxton, G (2008): What’s the Point of School: Rediscovering the Heart of Education? London: One

World Publications.

6. Department for Education and Skills (DfES) (2004) The Effective Provision of Pre-School Education

(EPPE) Project, Nottingham: DfES

7. Department of Health and Children (2000): National Children’s Strategy: Our Children, their Lives.

Dublin, Stationary Office.

8. Edwards, E, Gandini, L and G. Forman. (1998) The Hundred Languages of Children: The Reggio Emilia

Approach – Advanced Reflections, New York: Ablex Publishing Corporation

9. Hall, K., Cuneen, M., Murphy, R., Ridgway, A., Cunningham, D. and Horgan, M. (2010) Loris Malaguzzi

and the Reggio Emilia Experience, London: Continuum International Publishing Group Ltd.

29

10. Lee, W. and M. Carr. (2012) Learning Stories: Constructing Learner Identities in Early Education,

London: Sage Publications

11. MacNaughton, G. and Williams, G. (2008) Techniques for Teaching Young Children,

3 rd

ed., Frenchs Forest: Pearson Education Australia.

12. Ministry of Education (MOE) Early Childhood Curriculum - TeWhäriki, Wellington: Learning Media.

13. National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) (1999) The Primary School Curriculum,

Dublin: NCCA.

14. National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) (2004) The National

Framework for Early Learning, Dublin: NCCA.

15. National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) (2009) Aistear: The Early

Childhood Curriculum Framework, Dublin: NCCA.

16. National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES) (2004) National

Curriculum Guidelines on Early Childhood Education and Care in Finland, Helsinki: STAKES.

SUPPLEMENTARY RESOURCES

1. Centre for Early Childhood Development and Education (CEDCE) (2004) Talking about Quality-Report of a

Consultation Process on Quality in Early Childhood Care and Education, Dublin: CECDE.

2. Moloney, M. and McCarthy, E. (2010) A Framework for Action for the Inclusion of Children with Special

Educational Needs in Early Childhood Settings, Limerick: Curriculum Development Unit.

3. Nutbrown, C. and Clough P. (2010) Inclusion in the Early Years, 2 nd

ed., London: Sage.

4. Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) (2012) Starting Strong III: A Quality

Toolbox for Early Childhood Education and Care, Paris: OECD.

5. Quigley, U., Moloney, M. and McCarthy, E. (2007) What Difference – Working Effectively with Children

who have Special Needs in Early Years Settings, Limerick: Curriculum Development Unit.

6. Thornton, L. and Brunton, P. (2010) Understanding the Reggio Approach, 2 nd

ed., London: Routledge.

7. Walsh, G., Sproule, L., McGuinness, C., Trew, K., Rafferty, H. and Sheehy, N. (2006) ‘An appropriate curriculum for 4-5-year-old children in Northern Ireland: comparing play-based and formal approaches’,

Early Years, 26 (2), 201-221.

8. Yelland, N. (ed.) (2005) Critical Issues in Early Childhood Education, Maidenhead: Open University Press.

LECTURERS’ RECOMMENDED READING

1. Abbott, L. and Moylett, H. (2003) Early Education Transformed: New Millennium Series, London:

RoutledgeFalmer.

30

2. Alexander, R. (ed.) 2010) Children, their World, their Education: Final report and

recommendations of the Cambridge Primary Review, Abingdon: Routledge.

3. Broadhead, P., Howard, J and Elizabeth Wood (eds.) (2010) Play and Learning in the Early Years,

London: Sage.

4. Brooker, L. and Edwards, S. (eds.) (2010) Engaging Play, Berkshire: Open University Press.

5. Carr, M. (2009) Assessment in Early Childhood Settings: Learning Stories, London: Sage.

6. Daly, Mary Catherine (2004) Developing the Whole Child: The Importance of The Emotional,

Social, Moral and Spiritual in Early Years Education and Care, Wales: The Edwin Mellen Press.

7. Dowling, M. (2001) Young Children’s Personal, Social and Emotional Development, London: Paul

Chapman Publishing Ltd.

8. Drake, J. (2010) Planning for Children’s Play and Learning: Meeting children’s needs in the later

stages of the EYFS, Abingdon: Routledge.

9. Educational Research Centre. (1998). Early Start Preschool Programme: Final Evaluation Report.

Dublin: Educational Research Centre.

10. Hayes, N. and Kernan, M. (2008) Engaging Young Children: A Nurturing Pedagogy, Dublin, Gill &

Macmillan.

11. MacNaughton, G. and Williams, G. (2009) Teaching Young Children: Choices in Theory and

Practice, 2nd ed., Berkshire: Open University Press.

12. Moyles, J. (1995) Just Playing?: The Role and Status of Play in Early Childhood Education,

Buckingham: Open University Press.

13. Penn, H. (2005) Understanding Early Childhood: Issues and Controversies, Berkshire: Open

University Press.

14. Pringle, M.K. (1996) The Needs of Children, (3

rd

ed.) London: Routledge.

15. Special Education Support Service (SESS) (2008) Signposts. Cork: SESS.

16. Sylva, K., Melhuish, E. et al (2010) Early Childhood Matters: Evidence from the Effective Pre-

school and Primary Education project, Abingdon: Routledge.

17. Weir, S, Milis, L. and Ryan, C. (2002a). Final Evaluation Report on the Breaking the Cycle Scheme in Urban Schools: Dublin: Educational Research Centre.

18. Weir, S, Milis, L. and Ryan, C. (2002b). Final Evaluation Report on the Breaking the Cycle Scheme in Rural Schools. Dublin: Educational Research Centre.

19. Whitebread, D. (ed.) (2003) Teaching and Learning in the Early Years, London: RoutledgeFalmer.

31

EDU 301

STeM 6: Teaching Mathematics and Science

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education 3: Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 3

INTRODUCTION:

Mathematics

In this course, Mathematics and Pedagogy of Data and Probability, a developmental approach to teaching stochastical concepts across the primary school curriculum will be presented. This approach draws from situated perspectives on learning wherein mathematical activity models the activity within the discipline of statistics. This leads to increased links with statistical literacy and media awareness of the representation of these concepts. Critical to this course is the use of and engagement in real world investigations, involving statistical and probabilistic analysis, to support the development of understanding of processes and their application in the classroom. Hence the predominant learning approach is inquiry-based learning wherein the inquiry is rooted predominantly within scientific contexts explored in the science professional and pedagogical module components. Video case studies play an important role in demonstrating how real world investigations can be designed, implemented and analysed in primary classrooms.

Science

The Science Professional and Pedagogical component of this module will concentrate on developing a strong knowledge base in the subject area and strengthen the conceptual understanding in science in order for the students to be able to teach scientific concepts in a meaningful manner. It will provide participants with an opportunity to become confident in the teaching of science, integrating skills in mathematics through their participation in the practical component of the module. The practical activities require the participants to engage in the inquiry/analytical approach to learning. When classroom practice is being used as a vehicle for course delivery, children’s prior knowledge and misconceptions will be examined and strategies to change these misunderstandings will be practiced in order to develop the child’s understanding of the topic. The lectures will cover the children’s scientific knowledge, understanding and misunderstandings in science at different stages in their cognitive development, incorporating teaching strategies to provoke discussion and argumentation and to stimulate scientific and mathematical thinking, promoting cognitive development in primary pupils and also to challenge and develop the students’ ideas and restructure their understanding

(and misunderstandings) in science and mathematics.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

Develop awareness of approaches to posing appropriate data questions in various contexts

Demonstrate fluency in using appropriate data collection/organisation strategies

Explore and investigate multiple forms of data representation and evaluate the appropriateness of specific representations for different data types

Develop conceptual understanding of the various measures of spread (range), centre (mean, mode,

 median)

Discriminate between and critique summary measures of data in terms of their appropriateness and fit with the investigation

Investigate and identify the sources of pupil misconceptions and errors in both statistical and probability concepts

32

Show conceptual understanding of the various measures of likelihood e.g. theoretical probability, in contexts that are both simple random events (e.g. toss coin, die, pick one counter from a bag)and two

independent events (e.g. toss two coins, dice, toss a coin and a die)

Design pedagogical tasks to develop pupil understanding of the relationship between theoretical probability and observed relative frequency

Discern and design experiments to illustrate fair and unfair activities

Demonstrate a strong conceptual understanding of different topics in science.

Develop an understanding of the relationship between content and process in the context of teaching science.

Develop an awareness of the important role science lessons have in developing children’s literacy and numeracy skills.

Design and implement a wide variety of activities to develop a pupil’s understanding of the key

Scientific Process Skills.

Demonstrate a wide variety of teaching strategies to encourage creativity and higher order thinking in the primary science classroom when carrying out fair test activities.

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

MATHEMATICS

WEEK

1

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

Introduction to the course

Mathematics and Statistics

The cycle of statistical investigation

2

3

Designing statistical investigations

Gathering data

Samples and populations

Types of data

Representing distributions of data

6

7

4

5

8

9

Analyzing data distributions

Measures of central tendency

Comparing distributions of data

Describing likelihoods

Misconceptions around probability

Comparing and Explaining likelihoods

33

10

11

Ordering Likelihoods

In-class Assignment

12 Sampling and probability: Law of large numbers

Overview of course

SCIENCE

Scientific Investigations and Scientific Inquiry.

Scientific process skills (prediction, estimating, measuring, data collection, manipulation of data, recording data, organising and displaying data, arriving at conclusions).

Problem Solving in Primary Science.

Fair and unfair activities in both science and mathematics.

The main concepts of Biology and Physics to provide a comprehensive understanding and background knowledge in order to teach science.

Biology and Ecology in Primary Science (Human Biology, Plant Biology, Woodland and Terrestrial

Ecology).

Teaching about Forces, Electricity in Primary Science.

Design and Making Activities.

Toys & Science.

Literature & Science.

Teaching Science in the early years.

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

MATHEMATICS

The mathematics education component of the module is assessed by means of in-class assignment which will take place during mathematics education sessions in week 11 (35% of Module). Students will be given a title for the assignment a number of weeks prior. The assignment will be developed from lecture material/notes, available handouts, lecture-based activities, and required readings from the Van De Walle textbook in addition to other readings identified during the lectures.

In the event that a student fails the module, the repeat assessment procedure for the mathematics education component of the module is course work (worth 100%).

SCIENCE

The science education component of the module is assessed by carrying out coursework i.e. group assessment and presentation due Week 10 & 11 (65% of Module).

All assignments must be submitted with the appropriate cover sheet

Annual Repeat: Course Work in Science

FEEDBACK: Feedback on your course work will be provided to you in lectures and via moodle on Weeks 12.

Attendance and participation in sessions is a requirement of the course. Attendance is required due to the emphasis on hands-on experiences. Attendance will be recorded weekly. Email notification of absences is not accepted. 10% of marks in the module will be deducted for poor attendance.

34

Absence due to illness: If you receive a cert from a doctor outside the college medical centre, a copy of the doctor certificate must be handed to the relevant lecturer during the lecture the week following the absence. If you receive a cert from the college medical centre, you must still inform the lecturer during the session following the absence. The cert will be sent directly to the lecturers at the end of semester.

Otherwise you will be marked absence. Please do not send emails in relation to doctor certificates.

Absences due to sports: Absences due to sports are only accepted in the case where the student is representing the college in a competition. Documentary evidence of this will be required. Absences for training are not permitted. You must still inform the lecturer during the session following the absence.

Please do not send emails in relation to matches.

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

The following are grade descriptors for the mathematics education component of the module:

Grade Descriptor

A

Excellent

A comprehensive, focused and concise response to the assignment tasks, consistently demonstrating

• an extensive and detailed knowledge of the mathematics content

• an extensive and detailed knowledge of the mathematics pedagogy

• an extensive and detailed knowledge of childrens’ potential misconceptions and errors

• extensive evidence of application of knowledge from required course readings

B

C

D

Very Good A thorough and well organised response to the assignment tasks, demonstrating

• a broad knowledge of the mathematics content

• a broad knowledge of the mathematics pedagogy

• a broad knowledge of childrens’ potential misconceptions and errors

• substantial evidence of application of knowledge from required course readings

Good An adequate and competent response to the assignment tasks, demonstrating

• adequate but not complete knowledge of the mathematics content

• adequate but not complete knowledge of the mathematics pedagogy

• gaps and misconceptions relating to some important mathematics content and/or pedagogical knowledge

• adequate knowledge of childrens’ potential misconceptions and errors

• some evidence of application of knowledge from required course readings

Satisfactory An acceptable response to the assignment tasks with

35

F Unacceptable A response to the assignment tasks which is unacceptable, with

• a failure to demonstrate adequate knowledge of the mathematics content

• a failure to demonstrate adequate knowledge of the mathematics pedagogy

• a failure to demonstrate basic knowledge of childrens’ potential misconceptions and errors

• no evidence of application of knowledge from required course readings

The following are grade descriptors for the Science education component of the module:

Grade Grade Subject Content Knowledge of Design of age Design of science Knowledge&

Descriptors: Knowledge &

Conceptual

Understanding

Science pedagogy appropriate science activities activities aligning with the pedagogical principles of the primary application of inquiry skills and the constructivist approach to teaching curriculum

A1

A2

Outstanding

Performance

(First honours)

Excellent

Performance

B1

(First honours)

Very Good

Performance

• basic grasp of the mathematics content knowledge, somewhat lacking in breadth and depth

• basic grasp of the mathematics pedagogy, somewhat lacking in breadth and depth

• gaps and misconceptions relating to some important mathematics content and/or pedagogical knowledge

• basic knowledge of childrens’ potential misconceptions and errors

• minimal evidence of application of knowledge from required course readings

36

B2

B3

C1

C2

C3

D1

D2

F

(Honours 2.1)

Good

Performance

(Honours 2.1)

Competent

Performance

(Honours 2.2)

Satisfactory

Performance

(Honours 2.2)

Acceptable

Performance

(Third honours)

Minimally

Acceptable

(Third honours)

Weak

Performance

(compensating

fail)

Poor

Performance

(compensating

fail)

Fail (no

compensation

allowed)

37

LECTURERS:

Name Title Office Hour/s Office Contact information

Dr.

Mairéad

Hourigan

Dr. Aisling

Leavy

Lecturer in

Mathematics

Education

Lecturer in

Mathematics

Education

Monday

11:30-

12:30am

Monday

11:30-

12:30am

Friday:

12.00-1.00

R123

Foundation

Building

R124

Foundation

Building

[email protected]

[email protected]

aisling_leavy

Dr. Miriam

Hamilton

Lecturer in

Science

Education

Course Coordinator

M105 [email protected]

Dr. Anne

O’ Dwyer

Lecturer in

Science

Education

Course Coordinator

Friday:

12.00-1.00

M105 [email protected]

FEEDBACK:

Students can ask questions in relation to the course generally from lecturers before/after sessions or during office hours.

READING LIST:

Readings are aligned with course topics and are sourced from the course textbook. It is important to note that the readings supplement the course content and provide background on the mathematical topics.

However, the readings are not a substitute for attendance at lectures.

A number of articles from practitioner journals will be identified over the course of the semester. These will be mandatory reading. These readings are:

Assigned textbook chapters

Beckmann, S. (2007). Mathematics for elementary school teachers with Activity Manual. Chapter 15:

Statistics. Boston, MA: Pearson/Addison Wesley.

Beckmann, S. (2007). Mathematics for elementary school teachers with Activity Manual. Chapter 16: probability. Boston, MA: Pearson/Addison Wesley.

38

Van De Walle , J. (2013) Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally. Chapter

21: Developing concepts of Data Analysis. Pearson International Edition. 8 th

edition. Boston: Pearson

/Allyn and Bacon.

Van De Walle , J. (2013) Elementary and Middle School Mathematics: Teaching Developmentally. Chapter

22: Exploring concepts of probability. Pearson International Edition. 8 th

edition. Boston: Pearson /Allyn and Bacon.

Practitioner readings

Leavy, A., Hourigan, M. & A. McMahon (2012). Children as Data Detectives. Intouch, 125, 56-57.

Leavy, A., Hourigan, M. & A. McMahon (2012). Counting creatures: Exploring Data with Infants. Intouch,

128, 44-45.

Hourigan, M. Leavy, A., & A. McMahon (2012). Crime Scene Investigation in the Classroom. Intouch, 127,

44-45.

Leavy, A., McMahon A. & M. Hourigan (2012). Comparing Means. Intouch, 126, 44-45.

Friel, S. (1998). Teaching statistics: What’s average? In The Teaching and Learning of School Algorithms pp. 208-217.

Leavy, A. & Hourigan, M. (2014). Identifying the Mystery Player: Comparing Body Measurement Data of the Irish Soccer and Rugby Teams. Intouch, 52-53.

Leavy, A.M., Friel, S., & Mamer, J. (2009). It’s a Fird! Can You Compute a Median of Categorical Data?

Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, 14(6), 344-352.

Leavy, A. and Hourigan , M. (2015). Motivating Inquiry in Statistics and Probability in the Primary

Classroom. Teaching Statistics, 27(2), 41-47. DOI: 10.1111/test.12062 [Access through the library ejournal system]

Hourigan, M. and Leavy, A. (2015, Early view). What do the Stats Tell Us? Engaging Elementary Children in Probabilistic Reasoning Based on Analysis of Data. Teaching Statistics. DOI: 10.1111/test.12084

[Access through the library e-journal system]

Mandatory Key Science texts:

1.

Harlen, W. (2004). The teaching of science in primary schools 4 th

ed. London : David Fulton

2.

Cross, A. and Bowden, A. (2009). Essential Primary Science. England, Berkshire: Open University

Press, Mc Graw-Hill Educational.

3.

Loxley, P., Dawes, L., Nicholls, L. and Dore, B. (2010). Teaching Primary Science. Promoting

Enjoyment and Developing Understanding. England, Essex: Pearson Education Limited.

Supplementary Science Resources:

1.

DES (1999). The Science Curriculum. Dublin: Stationery Office

2.

DES (1999). Science Curriculum – Teacher Guidelines. Dublin: Stationery Office

3.

Allen, M. (2010). Misconceptions in Primary Science. England: Open University Press, Mc Graw-Hill Educational.

Lecturers may make notes available relating to weekly lectures in both components of the course. These notes are intended as a brief overview of the content covered during the session; they are not intended as a summary of the lecture nor are they intended as a substitute for attendance at lectures (attendance is a requirement). Hence, you are advised to take detailed notes during all lectures. These notes are available to all students via moodle.

URL: Moodle.mic.ul.ie

Mathematics Access Key: polya

39

Module EDU302

Research Methods-Ethical Foundations for Teaching and Research

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education (Yr 3)

INTRODUCTION:

This module provides an opportunity for students to develop an understanding of the interrelated and irreducible connections between theory, practice and research across classrooms, schools, communities and broader society and through critical engagement with historical, sociological, philosophical and psychological epistemologies. It helps students become novice researchers and it encourages them to continue looking for opportunities for systematic, relevant and robust inquiry throughout the remainder of their programme of study, particularly with reference to the possibilities and potential of a final year research project, and later in their teaching career.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Explain the key features of major educational research paradigms and compare their relevance for particular research projects

Identify a research design pertaining to a particular research question and develop an integrated research design proposal based on a particular question and embedded questions

Apply rigorous and relevant literature search and review approaches for a particular research topic

Select best ethical principles and practices for human participants’ research with a particular research context, setting and sample

Affective: Attitude and Values

Discuss how and on what basis positions and arguments about paradigmatic affiliations to qualitative, quantitative and complementary research or hermeneutical research and protocols are constructed and elaborated

Question a reflexive understanding of their own assumptions, orientations and subjective understandings of a particular research topic

Demonstrate an openness to considering and objectively assessing competing theoretical positions

 and methods

Show ability to engage in open and mutually respectful critical debate with fellow students

Psychomotor: Skills and Capabilities

Demonstrate competence in the skills of searching, selecting and reviewing written, oral and electronic literature and discourse data

Make clear and well supported analytical arguments in oral and written form

Engage in critical oral debates and provide standpoints concerning various topics on the module

Devise and write a clearly structured, grammatically accurate and well-presented analytical research proposal for the module assignment

40

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, there may be some minor changes to the lecture schedule below.

WEEK TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

1 What is Research?

Qualitative or Quantitative or both?

4

5

2

3

The Classroom as a Research Site

Thinking Design – the Big Picture

Developing a Research Question # 1: Policy Analysis

Developing a Research Question # 1: Reviewing the Literature

8

9

6

7

Developing A Proposal

Qualitative Data Collection

Quantitative Data Collection

Data Analysis 1

10

11

Data Analysis 2

Reflexivity and the location of self in Educational Research

12 Finalising a Proposal

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

Please note that tutorials commence in week 3.

FEEDBACK:

Group clarification/feedback is available to all students on an on-going basis throughout the semester where relevant. Individual clarification/feedback is available by appointment.

ASSESSMENT:

The module will be assessed by coursework.

Students are required to design a piece of research in the field of primary education and present this in proposal format.

Weighting: 100%

Word Count: 1500 - 1800 words (excluding appendices)

Submission Date: Thursday 26 th

November

Where:

Hard Copy to Education Office during Regular Opening Hours

Soft copies to Moodle and Turnitin

41

B1

B2

B3

Guidelines for each component of the assessment will be presented during week 1 lectures and made available on Moodle thereafter. Directions regarding submission of soft copies to Moodle and Turnitin will be provided during week 1 lectures and located on Moodle thereafter.

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

Grade Descriptors

A1

A2

Exceptional - consistently and notably meets criteria.

Excellent, but not exceptional – usually and extensively meets criteria.

Wide reading; excellent analysis – regularly and competently meets criteria.

Wide reading; good analysis – regularly and competently meets criteria.

criteria.

Evidence of good reading, but limited analysis – frequently and adequately meets

C1

C2

C3

D1

Knowledgeable, but generally un-analytical – frequently and adequately meets criteria.

Reasonably knowledgeable – occasionally meets criteria.

Without most of the above.

Limited knowledge; no analysis – minimally meets criteria.

D2

Without any of the above.

F

Severely incomplete or plagiarised.

Assessment Criteria

Demonstration of the use of literature and policy in rationalising the importance of the research question and embedded questions (the ‘Rationale’ section of the proposal)

Knowledge, understanding and application of the following to a specific research question.

Paradigm

Sampling

Site

Ethics

Data Collection Instruments

Data Analysis

Triangulation

Validity and Reliability

Reflexivity

Demonstration of the use of the methodological literature in the application of the

10%

30%

30%

42

following to a specific research question.

Paradigm

Sampling

Ethics

Data Collection Instruments

Data Analysis

Triangulation

Validity and Reliability

Reflexivity

Inclusion and quality of the supporting documentation (appendices)

Literature Input Tables

Policy Timeline

Ethical Documentation – letter of introduction, information sheets, consent/assent forms etc.

Data Collection Instruments (Interview questions, questionnaire, reflective diary template, lesson plan template as is relevant to the research design.

STAFF:

Name Title Contact Office Telephone Email

30%

Des Carswell Lecturer Contact for

Appointment

M101 4961 [email protected]

Dr Angela

Canny

Assistant

Dean of

Education

Contact for

Appointment

R115 4598 [email protected]

READING LIST:

Primary Readings

1. Cohen, L., Mannion, L. and Morrison, K. (2011) Research Methods in Education: London: Routledge.

2. Hays, D. and Singh, A. (2012) Qualitative Inquiry in Clinical and Educational Settings, London: The

Guildford Press.

3. Punch, K. (2009) Introduction to Research Methods in Education, London: Sage.

4. Silverman, D. (2005) Doing Qualitative Research: A Practical Handbook, London: Sage.

5. Wellington, J. and Szczerbinski, M. (2007) Research Methods for the Social Sciences, London:

Continuum.

Supplementary Readings

1. Altrichter, H., Posch, P. and Somekh, B. (2007) Teachers Investigate their Work: An Introduction to the

Methods of Actions Research, London: Routledge.

2. Bassey, M. (1999) Case Study Research in Educational Settings, Buckingham: Open University Press.

3. Creswell, J. (2008) Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative and Mixed Methods Approaches,

Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

43

Module EDU303, Creative Arts 3

Autumn Semester, 2015

Bachelor of Education 3; Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology 3

This module will advance students’ understanding of artistic forms, genres and processes in music, visual art and drama. Students will critically reflect upon and enquire into their own practice through engagement in making, performing and responding to each art form. Through research and practice, students will be challenged to synthesise the relationship of practice to theory in the arts and arts education. They will be required to select and implement advanced pedagogical skills relevant to arts education in planning and assessment. This module will also explore and critique the role of the arts in Irish primary schools, local communities and society. Teaching will be conducted in small-group settings.

Independent group work will be a core component of this module.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

Respond critically to and evaluate the philosophical and methodological principles that underpin their professional practice in arts education.

Demonstrate an understanding of the broad range of practical and pedagogical issues and challenges surrounding arts education in Irish primary schools.

Select and implement advanced pedagogical skills relevant to arts education in planning and assessing successful arts education work in classrooms.

Critique the importance of the arts within local communities, society and situate classroom practice within these contexts.

Evaluate and question the status and location of the arts in educational systems.

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the module.

WEEK

1

2-11

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

Drama or visual art and music. Presentation of course outline; assigning students to small working groups; choosing a stimulus towards the creation of artistic work encompassing music, drama and visual art.

Drama or visual art and music. Critical engagement in the processes of creating, performing and responding in each of the art forms; exploring the relationship of

44

12 these processes to classroom practice, community arts practices and artistic practices in broader contexts.

Presentation of work created by the students in response to a stimulus and involving each of the art forms: visual art, music and drama.

.

FEEDBACK:

Feedback on the processes of creating and performing will be integral to each workshop/class.

ASSESSMENT:

The module assessment process will involve creating and presenting a piece of artistic work:

1. In week 1, students will be assigned to working groups of five (approx.).

2. Students will work in these groups for the duration of the module and for the assessment.

3. Each group will choose an appropriate stimulus/inspiration from which to develop its piece of artistic work (See list of possible stimuli below).

4. This piece of artistic work must use elements of each of the art forms: music, visual art and drama (it is not necessary, however, to give equal weighting to each art form).

5. The completed piece of artistic work may be presented live, on video, using multi-media or using a combination of live and multi-media approaches.

6. Each group will present its piece of artistic work in class in week 12; a group (collective) grade will be awarded for this work on the basis of the following criteria:

Clarity of focus and artistic purpose

Selection and use of compositional techniques

Structure of piece of artistic work

Engagement of audience

Sense of ensemble/group commitment to the piece of artistic work

Indicative grade descriptors corresponding to each grade:

A1/A2: All criteria addressed to a high level

B1/B2: All criteria clearly addressed

B3/C1: All criteria adequately addressed

C2/C3: Most criteria adequately addressed

D1/D2: Few criteria adequately addressed

F: Few or no criteria adequately addressed

45

In exceptional circumstances, module tutors reserve the right to award a lower grade than that of the group to an individual student.

Because of the practical and experiential nature of EDU303, attendance at all classes is compulsory. Under academic regulations, 10% of the module grade may be deducted for lack of attendance and participation.

All students are required to familiarise themselves with the Student Handbook, particularly the section

concerning cheating; including syndication.

Possible stimuli (this list is not exhaustive):

Story

Poem

Excerpt from a larger literary work

Work of visual art (e.g. sculpture, painting etc.)

Film or film excerpt

Character (from film, literature, work of art, history, imagined)

Object (real or imagined)

Cultural event (e.g. visual art exhibition, theatrical performance)

Historical event

Place/space (real or imagined)

Song

Piece of music

Excerpt from larger musical work

Found sounds

Sound effects

Sounds related to a given theme e.g. machines.

Repeat assessment:

The repeat assessment procedure for the module will require the completion of an academic essay to be submitted in August 2016.

STAFF:

Name Title Office Telephone Email

Dorothy Morrissey

Lecturer in drama education (module

coordinator)

Dr SG13 204521 [email protected]

46

Ailbhe Kenny

Lecturer in music education

Dr

Tanya Power

Lecturer in visual art education

Ms

Anne Marie Morrin

Ms

Lecturer in visual art education

Kevin O’Connor

Teaching fellow in drama education

Mr

Joanna Parkes

Part-time lecturer in drama education

Ms

Máiréad

Ní Chondúin

Part-time lecturer in music education

Ms

Geraldine Cotter

Part-time lecturer in music education

Ms

Karen Vaughan

Part-time lecturer in music education

Ms

Julie Brazil

Lecturer in visual art education

Dr

Niall Quinn

Visual art technician

Mr

C106

G50

L106

G41

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

G25

774721

204388

204522

204751

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

204530

47 [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A [email protected] [email protected]

READING LIST:

Core Readings:

Bamford, A. (ed.) (2006) The Wow Factor: Global Research Compendium on the Impact of the Arts in

Education. Munster: Waxmann.

Bresler, L. and Marme Thompson, C. (eds.) (2002) The Arts in Children’s Lives; Context, Culture and

Curriculum. Dordrecht: Klumer Academic Publishers.

Craft, A., Cremin, T. and Burnard, P. (eds.) (2007) Creative Learning 3-11 and How We Document It: What,

How and Why? London: Trentham Books.

Additional Readings:

Glover, J.( 2000) Children Composing 4-14. Routledge: London.

Murphy. P. and O’Keeffe, M. (2006) Discovering Drama: Theory and Practice for the Primary School. Dublin:

Gill & MacMillan.

Torres Pereira de, T. and Mason, R. (2008) International Dialogues about Visual Culture, Education and Art.

Bristol : Intellect.

Supplementary Readings:

Ackroyd, J. and Boulton, J. (2001) Drama Lessons for Five to Eleven-year-olds. London: David Fulton

Publishers Ltd.

Golomb, C. (2004) The Child’s Creation of the Pictorial World. Hillsdale, NJ and London: Lawrence Erlbaum

Associates.

Pitts, S. (2005) Valuing Musical Participation. Aldershot: Ashgate.

48

Module EDU304: Assessment for and of Learning

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

RATIONALE:

This module integrates the theory and practice of educational assessment. Students will critique a broad range of assessment procedures and tools and have ‘hands-on’ experience of application, interpretation and reporting of assessment data. Students will explore different methods for communicating assessment information to parents and will have an opportunity to practice these skills. Students will critically explore the ways in which assessment is used in educational decision making, Irish legislative and policy context and will consider the centrality of assessment to effective teaching.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be enabled to:

Gather, analyse and interpret data on pupils’ behaviour using an array of observational methodologies

Engage in miscue analysis of an oral reading excerpt to identify the child’s strengths and needs in reading

Create a Precision Teaching intervention probe to support pre-determined reading needs of a child.

Critique and create teacher-designed tasks/tests with due attention to assessment purpose, reliability and validity

Understand variation between standardised tests in terms of purpose; i.e. achievement, aptitude, diagnostic and in terms of scores; i.e. criterion-referenced, norm-referenced

Critique standardised tests in terms of reliability and validity demonstrating and understanding of the purpose and limitations of standardised testing

Analyse, triangulate and interpret standardised test data accurately in order to establish learning strengths and areas for development, demonstrating an in-depth understanding of the following; normal distribution curve, standardised scores, measurement error etc.

Critique the process of self and peer assessment and to critique the application of self and peer assessment tools in practice.

Design, evaluate and review for effectiveness a rubric i.e. a coherent set of criteria for pupils’ work that includes descriptions of levels of performance quality on the criteria.

Become strengths-based educators by developing their understanding and skills on how to identify pupils’ talents and strengths; to consider how to apply pupils’ various strengths in the process of acquiring academic abilities, communication abilities, problem-solving abilities and personal excellence.

Accurately and effectively describe, reflect upon and critically analyse the role of assessment in education, in light of key academic sources in the area

49

MODULE CONTENT:

Week

1

Lecture 1

Introduction & course overview

2

Observations and assessment

3

Miscue analysis (Running records)

4

Teacher designed tasks and tests (Design)

5

6

Standardised testing

Formative Assessment &

Assessment for Learning

7

Developmental, Literacy &

8

9

10

Numeracy Milestones

(Early Years)

Developmental, Literacy & Open–Ended Assessment Methods

Numeracy Standards

(School Age)

Strength-Based Assessment Communicating Assessment Results

Portfolio Preparation:

Student self-directed learning

Lecture 2

Assessment in Ireland 2014: National and International policy context

Behavioural Assessment

Precision Teaching in Educational

Assessment and Intervention

Teacher designed tasks and tests

(Marking – Rubrics)

Standardised testing

Peer Learning and Student Self-

Assessment

MIC Graduation

Portfolio Preparation:

Student self- directed learning

Portfolio submission

11

Assessment policy and practice in Ireland 2014

Assessment and school self-evaluation

12

Exploring perspectives on assessment

Debate Preparation: Student selfdirected learning

13

Essay Completion:

Student self-directed learning

Essay Completion:

Student self- directed learning

Essay submission

Tutorials

50

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

Assessment Type % Mark

Allocation

Submission Date

1. Assessment Portfolio

Eight portfolio tasks (6% each)

Digital-recording of a parent-teacher meeting

(Task 9 & 10 = 12%)

2. Essay

60%

End of Week 10

(Date/time to be confirmed)

40% End of Week 13

(Date/time to be confirmed)

See Assessment Guidelines document for further details (Available on Moodle to download)

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

Attendance and Participation at Lectures/Tutorials

Students are expected to attend all lectures and tutorials and engage in any required readings or

preparatory work prior to class.

Students displaying poor attendance or engagement at lectures/tutorials can be deducted up to 10% of marks.

Penalty for Late Submission of Coursework

Students are required to contact their tutorial lecturer as soon as possible in the case of late submission of coursework. Students may be deducted up to 10% for late submission of coursework, unless supported by a medical certificate, or similar.

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

60% Portfolio

40% Essay

**Please note: Repeat portfolio and essay requirements will differ from those originally assigned.

51

FEEDBACK:

Queries, opinions and questions are welcomed during lectures and tutorials in particular. If you wish to speak to lecturers outside of lecture time, please arrange a time via email.

Students are provided with detailed grading rubrics for all of their assessment tasks (included in Assessment

Guidelines document). Students are encouraged to use these rubrics for self-assessment and peer-

assessment prior to submission of their final portfolio and essay.

Students are encouraged to seek feedback on their assignments and will be provided with the opportunity to view their evaluative grading rubrics upon request in order to inform future learning. These grading rubrics will only become available once module grades have been issued as per college regulations.

STAFF:

Name Title Office

Office

Hour/s

Office Telephon e

Email

Dr.

Suzanne

Parkinso n

Educational &

Developmental

Psychologist &

Lecturer in

Educational

Psychology

By appointment

SG12 Ext: 4712 [email protected]

e

Claire

Griffin

Educational

Psychologist &

Lecturer in

Educational

Psychology

By appointment

G52 Ext: 4701 [email protected]

Marie

Ryan

Educational

Psychologist &

Lecturer in

Educational

Psychology

By appointment

R107 Ext: 4372 [email protected]

Moodle:

Module Name: EDU304/EPS300 Assessment

Enrolment key: assessment

52

READING LIST:

Primary Readings

1. Alberra Inc. (2013). Creating Strength-Based Classroom & Schools: A Practice Guide for Classrooms

and Schools, US: Alberra Publications.

2. Beaty, J. J. (2013). Observing Development of the Young Child (8 th

Ed). Upper Saddle River, NJ:

Merrill. (Chapters 1 & 2 uploaded on Moodle page)

3. Bennett, R. E. (2011). Formative assessment: a critical review. Assessment in Education: Principles,

Policy & Practice, 18(1), 5-25.

4. Brookhart. S.M. (2013). How to Create and Use Rubrics for Formative Assessment & Grading,

Baltimore: ASCD Publications.

5. Burke, K. (2006). From Standards to Rubrics in Six Steps: Tools for Assessing Student Learning.

Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press

6. Frey, N. & Fisher, D. (2011). The Formative Assessment Action Plan: Practical Steps to More

Successful Teaching and Learning, Baltimore. ASCD Publications.

7. Harlen, W., Crick, R. D., Broadfoot, P., Daugherty, R., Gardner, J., James, M., & Stobart, G. (2002). A

systematic review of the impact of summative assessment and tests on students’ motivation for

learning. EPPI-Centre, University of London.

8. Looney, A. (2006). Assessment in the Republic of Ireland. Assessment in Education, 13(3), 345-353.

9. O’ Leary, M. (2006). Towards a balanced assessment system for Irish Primary and Secondary schools.

Oideas. 52, 7- 24.

10. Popham, W. J., (2014). Classroom assessment: What teachers need to know. Pearson/Allyn and

Bacon. (Chapters 3, 4 , 5 & 10)

11. Swaffield, S. (Ed.). (2008). Unlocking assessment: Understanding for reflection and application.

Routledge. (Chapters 1,2,4 7 & 8)

12. Wall, E. (2009). A decade of evolution of assessment policy and practice in Irish primary education.

Paper presented at the AERA Annual Meeting, San Diego, April 2009.

Supplementary Readings

1. Andrade, H. G., (2000). Using rubrics to promote thinking and learning. Educational Leadership, 57,

5, 13-18.

2. Black, P. (2004). Working inside the black box: Assessment for learning in the classroom. Granada

Learning.

3. Black, P., & Wiliam, D. (1998). Inside the black box: Raising standards through classroom assessment.

Granada Learning.

4. Black, P., Harrison, C., Hodgen, J., Marshall, B., & Serret, N. (2011). Can teachers’ summative assessments produce dependable results and also enhance classroom learning?. Assessment in

Education: Principles, Policy & Practice, 18(4), 451-469.

5. Christenson, S., Reschly, A., Wylie C. (2012). Handbook of Research on Student Engagement, New

York: Springer.

6. Clarke, S., Hattie, J. & Timperley, H. (2004). Unlocking Formative Assessment. Practical Strategies for

Enhancing Student Learning, New Zealand: Hodder, Moa Beckett.

7. Darling-Hammond, L. & Bransford, J. (2005). Preparing Teachers for a Changing World. What

teachers should learn and be able to do. San Fransico: Jossey-Bass Wiley.

8. Hattie, J., & Timperley, H. (2007). The power of feedback. Review of educational research, 77(1), 81-

112.

53

9. Looney, A. (2014). Assessment and the Reform of Education Systems. InDesigning Assessment for

Quality Learning (pp. 233-247). Springer Netherlands.

10. McCashen, W. (2005). The Strengths Approach. Victoria: St. Luke’s Innovative Resources.

11. Mertler, C. A. (2007). Interpreting standardized test scores: Strategies for data-driven instructional

decision making. Sage Publications.

12. Petty, G. (2009). Evidence-Based Teaching. A Practical Approach. Nashville: Nelson Thomas Ltd.

13. Popham, W. J., (2012). The Role of Rubrics in Testing and Teaching. Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

14. Shernoff, D. (2013). Optimal Learning Environments to Promote Student Engagement, New York:

Springer.

15. Stevens, D., Levi, A. & Walvoord, B. (2012). Introduction to Rubrics: An Assessment Tool to Save

Grading Time, Convey Effective Feedback and Promote Student Learning, US: Stylus Publishing.

16. Wiliam, D. (2011). Embedded Formative Assessment, US: Solution Tree Press.

Resources

1. National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (2007). Assessment in the Primary School:

Guidelines for Schools. Dublin: Author.

2. National Educational Psychological Service (2010). Behavioural, Emotional and Social Difficulties: A

Continuum of Support – Guidelines for Teachers. Dublin: Author.

3. Department for Education and Skills (2011). Miscue Analysis. Retrieved online August 15, 2014 at: http://rwp.excellencegateway.org.uk/resource/Diagnostic+assessment%3A+literacy%3A+materials+ for+assessing+reading+using+miscue+analysis/pdf/

4. John Taylor's Freebies (2014). Precision Teaching Resources and Phrase Fluency Practice. Retrieved

August 15, 2014, from http://www.johnandgwyn.co.uk/probe.html

5. NEPS (2012). Teaching Sight Vocabulary and Improving Reading Fluency: A precision teaching

approach.

Retrieved August 15, 2014, from http://www.education.ie/en/Education-

Staff/Information/NEPS-Literacy-Resource/NEPS-Resource-Precision-Teaching-Approach.pdf

6. Worksheet genius (2014). Retrieved August 15, 2014 from: http://worksheetgenius.com/index.php

7. Smart, C. & Smart, P. (2009). SNIP Precision Teaching Pack. Retrieved September 1, 2014, from http://www.snip-newsletter.co.uk/downloads.php

and http://www.snipnewsletter.co.uk/pdfs/downloads/precision_teaching.pdf

54

Module

EDU 205

Title

Christian Religious Education (CRE) 1

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education (Yr 2/3): Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology (Yr.

2/3)

INTRODUCTION:

This module will prepare students to teach Religious Education in Christian primary schools in Ireland.

It will overview the nature and purpose of Christian Religious Education and introduce students to

Christian Religious Education programmes and methodologies (Junior Infants to Second Class) used in

Irish Primary Schools.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

Understand the nature and purpose of Christian Religious Education (CRE)

Identify some main teachings, liturgical seasons and festivals in the Christian tradition

Critique methodologies for CRE in the Grow in Love and Follow Me programmes

Analyse Thomas Groome’s Shared Christian Praxis as a key pedagogy of CRE

Understand the importance of sacred story, prayer, meditation and social justice within CRE.

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

Week 1

Lecture 1: Introduction to Christian RE

Tutorial 1: Christian RE in Ireland

Week 2

Week 3

Tutorial 2 The National RE Curriculum in

Catholic Primary Schools

Lecture 2: Christianity and Religious Education

(Bishop Brendan Leahy)

Tutorial 3 Grow in Love 2015

55

Week 4

Week 5

Week 6

Week

Week 8

Week 9

Week 10

Lecture 3: Meditating with Children, (Noel

Keating Coordinator Christian Meditation

Ireland )

Tutorial 4: Praying with Children

Lecture 4: Tom Groome’s Shared Christian

Praxis

Tutorial 5: Exploring Bible Stories with Children

Lecture 5: Sacred Space and Prayer

Tutorial 6: Field work

Lecture 6: Protestant Schools and the

Follow

Me

Programme

Lecture 7: Planning for Successful Christian RE

Lecture 8: Teaching children about key doctrines of the Christian Faith

Lecture 9: Social Justice and Christian RE -

Ruby Bridges

Lecture 10: Preparing for School Placement

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

FEEDBACK:

Contact lecturer through e-mail and/or weekly drop- in session in lecturers office(LG 9) on Monday from

11.30 to 1.00.

56

ASSESSMENT:

Portfolio 100% 1,500 to 1,800 words.

Coursework to be handed into Education Office in Week 11, 17 th

November.

Repeat assessment: Course work 100% 1,500- 1,800 words.

All A Grades: Exceptional degree of familiarity with and comprehension of key concepts, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Portfolio exhibits excellent evidence of appreciation of the complexity of

CRE and students’ work is imaginative and analytical in a manner which integrates key concepts and methodologies with students’ own personal, professional and academic experience. Evidence of sustained, personal and informed critical response to assessment task.

All B Grades: High degree of familiarity with and comprehension of key concepts, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Portfolio provides very good evidence of students’ appreciation of the complexity of questions posed in CRE and students’ work is nuanced, well-articulated, structured and expressed. Portfolio exhibits evidence of sustained personal and informed critical response to assessment task.

All C Grades: Familiarity with and comprehension of some key CRE concepts, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Portfolio provides some evidence of independent reading. Students’ personal opinion is sometimes substantiated by reference to CRE literature. Some evidence of critical response to assessment task.

All D Grades: Basic recall of some general ideas presented during lectures/tutorials and in the required reading. Students’ portfolio provides evidence of reading of a small number of set texts and basic attempt is made to express personal response to ideas, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Portfolio narrates some relevant ideas pertinent to the assessment task.

All F Grades: Unfamiliarity with and misunderstanding of key concepts, theorists , programmes and methodologies. Little or no evidence of independent research and reading. Failure to complete or respond to the set assessment task. No evidence of sustained personal or critical response to questions posed.

STAFF:

Name Title Contact Office Telephone Email

Patricia

Kieran

Dr. 11.30-1.00

Mondays

LG8

LG8 061 204965 [email protected]

57

READING LIST:

Core Texts:

Mahon, E., & O’Connell, D. (2015) Grow in Love Junior Infants and Senior Infants, Dublin: Veritas

Publications.

Hyland, M., Series Editor.(1996—2005) The Alive-O Programme/ Beo Go Deo, Dublin: Veritas.

Wilkinson, J. Series Editor. (2002-10) Follow Me Series - Stepping Out!, Moving on! Log On!, On Line!,

Follow me Series Dublin.

Supplementary reading:

Congregation for Catholic Education. (2013) Education to Intercultural Dialogue in Catholic Schools.

Groome, Thomas H. Will There Be Faith? Dublin, Veritas, 2011. Chapter 9 “Life to Faith to Life: The

Movements, Putting the Approach to Work”, 299-338.

Groome, T.H. (1980) Christian Religious Education: Sharing our Story and Vision, San Francisco: Harper &

Row.

Hession, A. (2015) Catholic Primary RE in a Pluralist Environment, Dublin: Veritas.

John Paul II. (1994) Catechism of the Catholic Church, Dublin: Veritas.

Kieran, P. & Hession, A. (2008) Exploring Religious Education: Catholic Religious Education in an Intercultural

Europe, Dublin: Veritas.

Renehan, C. (2014) Openness with Roots: Education in Religion in Irish Primary Schools. Netherlands:

Springer.

Irish Bishops’ Conference. (2010) Share the Good News: National Directory for Catechesis, Dublin: Veritas.

58

Module EDU206

Multi-Denominational Religious Education (MDRE)

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education (Yr 3): Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology (Yr. 3)

INTRODUCTION:

This module is designed to provide students with an understanding of the historical background, philosophical rationale and methodological approaches of Religious Education programmes used to teach in Multi‐denominational schools in Ireland. Learners will critically evaluate a range of teaching and learning strategies which acknowledge and promote respect for a range of religious and convictional (atheist, humanist, secular etc.) world views.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

Demonstrate an understanding of the complex nature, history and purpose of Multidenominational Religious Education

Comprehend and evaluate the different programmes used to teach Ethical Education and

Religious Education in Multi-denominational schools

Appreciate and evaluate a variety of approaches and methodologies which foster an inclusive approach to teaching and learning from and about religions and beliefs in equality based schools

Appreciate the challenges inherent in multi-denominational education

and celebrate difference within the context of human rights

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

WEEK

1

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

No lectures

2 Introduction to the module

Background to Educate Together

3

4

5

Development of Learn Together Curriculum

Intercultural Education

Challenges facing Multi-denominational Education

Moral and Spiritual Strand

- Junior and Senior Infants

- First and Second Class

59

6

7

8

9

10

Moral and Spiritual Strand

- Third and Fourth Class

- Fifth and sixth Class

Current Issues in Multi-denominational Education

Reading week – no lectures

Equality and Justice Strand:

- Junior and Senior Infants

- First and Second Class

Equality and Justice Strand

- Third and Fourth Class

- Fifth and sixth Class

Planning for MDRE

Community National Schools

11

12

Goodness Me Goodness You Programme

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

FEEDBACK:

The module lecturer will be available via email and at the end of each lecture for informal feedback and assistance regarding the requirements of the module.

ASSESSMENT:

Portfolio 100% 1,500 to 1,800 words.

Coursework to be handed into Education Office in Week 11, 17 th

November.

Repeat assessment: Course work 100% 1,500- 1,800 words.

All A Grades: Exceptional degree of familiarity with and comprehension of key concepts, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Portfolio exhibits excellent evidence of appreciation of the complexity of

MDRE and students’ work is imaginative and analytical in a manner which integrates key concepts and methodologies with students’ own personal, professional and academic experience. Evidence of sustained, personal and informed critical response to assessment task.

All B Grades: High degree of familiarity with and comprehension of key concepts, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Portfolio provides very good evidence of students’ appreciation of the complexity of questions posed in MDRE and students’ work is nuanced, well-articulated, structured and expressed.

Portfolio exhibits evidence of sustained personal and informed critical response to assessment task.

All C Grades: Familiarity with and comprehension of some key MDRE concepts, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Portfolio provides some evidence of independent reading. Students’ personal opinion is

60

sometimes substantiated by reference to MDRE literature. Some evidence of critical response to assessment task.

All D Grades: Basic recall of some general ideas presented during lectures/tutorials and in the required reading. Students’ portfolio provides evidence of reading of a small number of set texts and basic attempt is made to express personal response to ideas, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Portfolio narrates some relevant ideas pertinent to the assessment task.

All F Grades: Unfamiliarity with and misunderstanding of key concepts, theorists, programmes and methodologies. Little or no evidence of independent research and reading. Failure to complete or respond to the set assessment task. No evidence of sustained personal or critical response to questions posed.

STAFF:

Name Title Contact Office Telephone Email

Lorraine

Cullivan

Patricia

Kieran

Ms.

Dr. 11.30-1.00

Mondays

LG8 n/a

LG8 n/a

061 204965

[email protected]

cu.ie

[email protected]

READING LIST:

Key Sources

1. Educate Together. (2004) Learn Together: Ethical Education Curriculum, Dublin: Educate

Together.

2. Moloney, C. (2011) Goodness Me Goodness You: Religion Programme, Dublin: VEC.

Supplementary sources

1. Dermody, A., Ward, F. and Kelly, E. (2010) Signposts: Lessons for Living, Dublin: Original writing.

2. DeVries, R. and Zan, B. (1994) Moral Classrooms, Moral Children, New York: Teachers

College Press.

3. Freire, P. (1972) Pedagogy of the Oppressed, London: Sheed and Ward.

4. Hyland, A. (June 2010) ‘The Patronage of Primary Schools’ , Education Matters

5. Keast, J. (ed).( 2007) Religious Diversity and Intercultural Education: A Reference Book for

Schools, Strasbourg: Council of Europe Publishing.

6. Lipman, M. (1998) Philosophy goes to School, US: Temple University Press.

7. Lipman, M. (2003) Thinking in Education, Cambridge: University Press.

8. Mc Gowan, D .(ed). (2007) Parenting Beyond Belief: on Raising Caring Ethical Kids without

Religion. New York: Amacon.

9. NCCA (2005) Intercultural Education in the Primary School, Dublin: Department of Education and Science.

10. Palmer, P. J. (1999) The Active Life: A Spirituality of Work, Creativity, and Caring, San

Francisco, Calif.: Jossey-Bass.

61

11. Sandel, M. J. (2009) Justice: What's the Right Thing to Do? 1st ed. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

12. Wright, A. (2000) Spirituality and Education Master Classes in Education Series, London:

Routledge Falmer.

62

Education Elective 1 Modules

63

Module – EDE302

The Psychology of Relationships in School

Autumn Semester 2014-2015

Bachelor of Education 3

-

________________________________________________________________________________________

______

Overview

Strand A of this module will focus on pupil-teacher relationships from a psychological perspective.

The module will introduce important aspects of

social cognition

as they apply to classroom relationships, including impression formation and identity management. Interpersonal attraction, social

power

and

teacher authority

will also be examined, particularly as they apply to teacher liking and classroom management.

Strand B of this module will explore how classroom relationships and dialogue contributes to children’s intellectual development. Participants will examine classroom talk and build the knowledge and skills to foster effective exploratory talk that moves beyond information sharing and classroom control purposes to serve as an essential educational tool for guiding development of understanding and for jointly constructing knowledge. The role of group-work, teacher feedback,

whole-class discussion and dialogic inquiry will receive particular attention. Participants will be

encouraged to critique current research and reflect on their own practice through video-feedback and peer-assessment.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On completion of this module, students will be enabled to:

Demonstrate an understanding of key concepts in social cognition

Identify a range of psychological processes which underpin interpersonal liking and social power

Recognise the important contribution of a teacher’s interpersonal skills to the management of pupil behaviour

Compare and contrast the key foundational theoretical perspectives of interactional learning i.e. Piagetian & Vygotskian theory

Demonstrate an ability to distinguish between and to demonstrate the interrelationships between the key concepts pertaining to interactional learning

Critically reflect on group-work experiences by drawing upon psychological theory

Appreciate how their own interpersonal skills can impact on their ability to manage classrooms and promote pupil wellbeing

Recognise the importance, the complexity and the potential of interactional learning in the classroom

Become aware of their own group-working capacities and become equipped with the knowledge and skills to function more effectively as part of a group

64

Design and implement a lesson which incorporates the principles of dialogic teaching and effective group working

Gather, analyse and interpret data in order to evaluate a lesson on the basis of the principles of dialogic teaching and effective group working

8

9

10

11

12

Stand B

WEEK

1

2

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

Strand A

WEEK TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

1 Introduction, Assessment, Course Outline

2

3

Social Cognition

Social Cognition

6

7

4

5

Social Cognition

Interpersonal Attraction

Interpersonal Attraction

Social Power

Social Power

Social Power

Teacher Authority

Teacher Authority

Teacher Authority

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

Introduction, Assessment, Course Outline

The role of relationships on pupils learning and school experience

65

3

4

9

10

11

12

7

8

5

6

Socio-cognitive and socio-cultural views of learning; Piaget & Vygotsky

Asymmetrical Interactions; Dialogic Talk, Inter-mental Development Zone

Symmetrical Interactions; Types of Talk

Learning in a dialogic classroom - types of Talk

Group work

Psychology and groups

Psychology and groups

Feedback and learning

Teacher expectations and Group-work

Technology and the dialogic classroom

Subjects specific approaches.

66

Week Date

6

5

4

3

2

1

7

8

19th October

19th October

20th October

26th October

27th October

9

2nd November

2nd November

3rd November

10 9th November

9th November

10th November

11 16th November

16th November

17th November

7th September

7th September

8th September

14th September

14th September

15th September

21st September

21st September

22nd September

28th September

28th September

29th September

5th October

5th October

6th October

12th October

12th October

13th October

MODULE STRUCTURE

The Psychology of Relationships at School

Day and Time

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Monday 16:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

Lecturer

MR

EW

EW

EW

EW

MR

MR

EW

MR

MR

EW

MR

MR

MR

EW

EW

MR

EW

MR

EW

EW

Bank Holiday

MR

MR

MR

EW

MR

EW

EW

MR

EW

EW

67

Lecture No. vii viii

8

9 ix vi

7

5

6

4 iv v ii

3 iii

1

2 i

14 xiii xiv

12

13 xii

15 xv xvi

10 x xi

11

12 23rd November

23rd November

24th November

MODULE ASSESSMENT

Assessment Type

Monday 16:00-17:00

Monday 17:00-18:00

Tuesday 9:00-10:00

MR

MR

EW

16

17 xvii

% Mark

Allocation

Submission Date

1.

Based on Strand A

Exam (45%)

In-class assignments (5%)

50%

N/A

2. Based on Strand B

Portfolio

o Task 1: Peer task: Short Paper o Task 2: Group task: Concept Map o Task 3: Psychological Reflection

50% End of Week 14

(Date/time to be confirmed)

See Assessment Guidelines document for further details (Available on Moodle to download)

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

Attendance and Participation at Lectures/Tutorials

Students are expected to attend all lectures and tutorials and engage in any required readings or

preparatory work prior to class.

Students displaying poor attendance or engagement at lectures/tutorials can be deducted up to

10% of marks.

Penalty for Late Submission of Coursework

Students are required to contact their tutorial lecturer as soon as possible in the case of late submission of coursework. Students may be deducted up to 10% for late submission of

coursework, unless supported by a medical certificate, or similar.

Repeat Assessment

100% Examination

68

FEEDBACK:

Queries, opinions and questions are welcomed during lectures and tutorials in particular. If you wish to speak to lecturers outside of lecture time, please arrange a time via email.

LECTURE NOTES

Lecture notes relating to weekly lectures will be made available in both components of the course through the college’s online learning system: Moodle. Additional Reading may also be provided via

Moodle.

STAFF:

Name Title Contact Office Telephone Email

Prof.

Eugene

Wall

Vice-

President of

Academic

Affairs

Lecturer

[email protected]

[email protected]

Dr. Neil

Kenny

READING LIST

REQUIRED READING

Alexander, R. J. (2006). Towards dialogic teaching: Rethinking classroom talk. Cambridge: Dialogos.

Blatchford, P. (2014). Effective Group Work in Primary School Classrooms. P. Kutnick (Ed.). Springer.

Baines, E., Blatchford, P., Kutnick, P., Ota, C., & Berdondini, L. (2008). Promoting effective group work in the

primary classroom: A handbook for teachers and practitioners. Routledge.

Gillies, R. M., Ashman, A. F., & Terwel, J. (Eds.). (2008). The teacher's role in implementing cooperative

learning in the classroom (Vol. 8). New York: Springer.

Howe, C. (2009). Peer groups and children's development (Vol. 14). John Wiley & Sons.

Howe, C., & Mercer, N. (2007). Children's social development, peer interaction and classroom learning.

http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-files/Education/documents/2007/12/14/learning.pdf

Johnson, D. W., & Johnson, F. (2003). Joining together: Group theory and research. Boston, MA.

International Journal of Educational Research, Volume 39, Issues 1–2, 2003 (Special Issue)

Littleton, K., & Howe, C. (Eds.). (2010). Educational dialogues: understanding and promoting productive

interaction. Routledge.

69

Long, M., Wood, C., Littleton, K., Passenger, T., Sheehy, K. (2011). The Psychology of Education. Oxon:

Routledge Falmer

Chapter 8

Mercer, N., & Littleton, K. (2007). Dialogue and the development of children's thinking: A sociocultural

approach. Routledge.

Chapters 1-5

Mercer, N., & Hodgkinson, S. (Eds.). (2008). Exploring talk in school: Inspired by the work of Douglas Barnes.

Sage.

***Additional reading will be assigned***

70

Module EDE 304

Linking Theoretical Perspectives in Early Childhood Education to

Practice

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education (Yr): Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology (Yr)

INTRODUCTION:

This module will provide students with the opportunity to examine theoretical perspectives specific to early childhood education in depth and to link these perspectives with practice in the field. The purpose of the module is to enable students to understand the relationship between theoretical perspectives and practice and to apply theoretical perspectives to their practice.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to: demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the seminal thinkers in early childhood education, theories of childhood and the epistemological basis of current policy documents. Through analysis, synthesis and evaluation students will apply this knowledge to their practice in early childhood education. appreciate the values embedded in the discourse of early childhood education through tracing its historical development in terms of theoretical backgrounds and appreciate the origins of the values that should be embodied in practice.

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

WEEK TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

4

5

6

1

2

3

3

Module Rationale, Overview, Introduction and Assessment

Tracing the Development of Our Understanding of Childhood and Children

The Contributions of Jean Jacques Rousseau (1712-1778) and

Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi (1746-1827) to Early Years Education in the 21 st

Century.

Is Friedrich Froebel (1782-1852) still relevant for our Practice as Early Years

Educators?

Steiner-Waldorf Principles in the Early Years.

A DEIS Initiative in the 19 th

Century?

Desks are for Listening: John Dewey (1859-1952)

71

C2

C3

D1

7

8

9

10

A Teacher who is unable to Observe is unable to teach: Maria Montessori (1870-

1952)

The Child has a Hundred Languages: Loris Malaguzzi (1920-1994)

Exploring Aistear: The Early Childhood Curriculum Framework (National Council for

Curriculum and Assessment, 2009) from a Philosophical Perspective.

Including Diverse Learners in the Early Years: The Contribution of History and

Philosophy to Practice.

A1

A2

B1

B2

B3

11

12

Revisiting my Image of Children and Childhood

Exploring Inspection from a Historical and Philosophical Perspective

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

FEEDBACK:

Ongoing during tutorials, where there will be group presentations and discussions throughout the Semester.

ASSESSMENT:

Paired Oral Powerpoint Presentation

Analyse the impact of the seminal thinkers and philosophers on the Inspection Framework (Department of

Education and Skills, 2015) for early years education in Ireland. Suggest the associated implications for your practice as a primary school teacher in the future.

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

Individual Oral Powerpoint Presentation

Grade Descriptors

C1

Exceptional - consistently and notably meets criteria.

Excellent, but not exceptional – usually and extensively meets criteria.

Wide reading; excellent analysis – regularly and competently meets criteria.

Wide reading; good analysis – regularly and competently meets criteria.

Evidence of good reading, but limited analysis – frequently and adequately meets criteria.

Knowledgeable, but generally un-analytical – frequently and adequately meets criteria.

Reasonably knowledgeable – occasionally meets criteria.

Limited knowledge; no analysis – minimally meets criteria.

Without most of the above.

72

D2

F

Without any of the above.

Severely incomplete or plagiarised.

Assessment Criteria

Knowledge and understanding of the work of the seminal thinkers and philosophers studied in the module in relation to early years education.

Knowledge and understanding of the historical development of early years education in Ireland.

Knowledge and understanding of the Inspection Framework (Department of Education and Skills,

2015) for early years education in Ireland.

Analysis of the impact of the seminal thinkers and philosophers on the Inspection Framework

(Department of Education and Skills, 2015) for early years education in Ireland

Identification of the associated implications of the impact of the seminal thinkers and philosophers on the Inspection Framework (Department of Education and Skills, 2015) for your practice as a primary school teacher in the future.

Evidence of Collaboration.

Relevant References.

Presentation and Organisation.

STAFF:

Name Title Contact Office Telephone Email

Emer Ring

Dr./Head of

Department

Friday 11.30-

13.30 hours in Office

M100 061 204571 [email protected]

READING LIST:

1. Brühlmeier, A (2010) Head, Heart and Hand, translated by Mitchell, M., Cambridge: Sophia Books.

2. Dewey, J. (1990) The School and Society. The Child and the Curriculum, Chicago: The University of

Chicago.

3. Edwards, C., Gandini, L. and Forman, G. (eds) (2012) The Hundred Languages of Children (3 rd

ed.),

Oxford: PRAEGER.

4. Gardner, H. (1993) Multiple Intelligences, New York: Basic Books.

5. Montessori, M. (1964) The Montessori Method, New York: Schocken Books.

6. Rousseau, J.J. (1979) Emile or An Education, NY: Basic Books.

7. National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) (1999) The Primary School Curriculum,

Dublin: NCCA.

8. National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) (2009) Aistear: The Early

9. Childhood Curriculum Framework, Dublin: NCCA.

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10. Sorin, R. (2005) Changing Images of Childhood: Reconceptualising Early Childhood Practice,

International Journal of Transitions in Childhood, Vol. 1, pp. 12-21.

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Module EDE305: Choral Music Leadership

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

RATIONALE:

This module seeks to develop students’ choral leadership skills. It aims to give students the skills, knowledge, understanding and confidence to direct choral singing in the primary school and wider community.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive:

Apply choral music education philosophy and theory to the practice of choral leadership

Identify suitable approaches, techniques and repertoire for choral conducting

Affective:

Value the process of music-making in choral membership

Display confidence and competence in choral leadership

Psychomotor:

Select and perform musical repertoire suitable for school choirs

Demonstrate proficiency in choral conducting techniques

MODULE CONTENT:

This specialist module is delivered through lectures, workshops, visiting experts, fieldwork and direct choral participation. Theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of choral music education are explored in conjunction with the situated learning experience of choral membership. Students develop skills in conducting, rehearsal technique, interpretation, effective warm-ups, vocal training and score analysis. Exposure to a wide range of repertoire from a broad spread of musical genres is provided where students are encouraged to build choral portfolios for future use. Students are encouraged to learn through direct choral membership while also given opportunities to lead choral groups as part of the module. The module promotes student-directed learning through independent practice, research and reflection by means of self, peer and video feedback on choral direction. Through a focus on practical hands-on choral experiences the module aims to create confident and innovative choral leaders for schools and communities.

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

WEEK TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

1

2 - 12

Introduction to choral music leadership

Choral conducting skills, techniques, composition and repertoire

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4 - 11

12

Choir placement and membership

Choral Performance

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

Coursework (65%):

Choral leadership placement review. Submission Week 12 (50%).

Choral concert review. Submission Week 8 (15%).

Practical (35%):

Composition for children’s choir. Submission Week 6 (25%).

Choral membership and performance (10%).

N.B. Assessment details and indicative grade descriptors are provided for each piece of assessment in separate documents on Moodle.

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

Essay: The essay will entail a consideration of the main issues involved in choral conducting for the primary school with reference to current research, literature and practice.

FEEDBACK:

Feedback will be integral to each workshop/class. Specific feedback on the composition will be provided on drafts in week 5. Further feedback will be provided at the students’ request.

STAFF:

Name Title Office Telephone Email

Dr Ailbhe Kenny

Lecturer in

Music

Education

C106 774721 [email protected]

READING LIST:

Primary Readings

Durrant, C. 2003. Choral conducting: philosophy and practice. New York : Routledge

Rao D. 1994. We Will Sing! Choral Music Experience for Classroom Choirs. New York: Boosey

& Hawkes

Philips, K. 1996. Teaching Kids to Sing. New York: Schirmer

Supplementary Readings

Kodaly, Z. 1882-1967. Choral method: let us sing correctly. London : Boosey & Hawkes

Campbell, S. P. 2010. Songs in Their Heads: Music and its Meaning in Children's Lives. Second

Edition, New York: Oxford University Press

Roe, P. 1983. Choral music education.

London : Prentice-Hall

76

Module EDE 306:

Advanced Teaching & Learning in Physical Education

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education Year 3

RATIONALE:

This elective module examines the use of curriculum models in the teaching of games in primary school physical education.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Identify and evaluate a variety of approaches and methodologies to design and deliver developmentally-appropriate pedagogical practices in physical education (age 4-12).

Apply principles of teaching and learning across a variety of content areas.

Plan and implement a range of curriculum models for teaching physical education with consideration for planning and organisation of learning

Devise, implement and evaluate strategies relating to the provision of feedback and assessment.

Affective: Attitude and Values

Appreciate the role of the teacher in supporting children’s learning in physical activity contexts.

Understand and appreciate a variety of approaches to teaching physical education in primary school contexts

Psychomotor: Skills and Capabilities

Develop students’ confidence in, and understanding of, technical and tactical games-based skills

MODULE CONTENT:

This module is focused on the development of pedagogical content knowledge in physical education using four games types: invasion games, strike and field games, net games, target games.

Curriculum-based models including Games-Centred Approaches (GCA), Co-operative learning, Sport

Education, and Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility will be used to explore the pedagogy of teaching the games strand. The planning, implementation and assessment of and for learning will be examined for each model.

77

Students will engage in learning activities through lecture, activity-based learning and independent learning

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

WEEK TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

1

2

Sport education

Sport education

3

4

5

6

Game-centred approaches

Game-centred approaches

Game-centred approaches

Game-centred approaches

7

8

9

10

11

12

GRADUATION

Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility

Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility

Cooperative learning

Cooperative learning

Game play

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

The module is assessed by means of an individual assignment.

Select one approach to teaching games from the module content of EDE306.

Drawing on your experience of participation and teaching make an argument in favour of adopting this approach to teaching games in primary school physical education.

In supporting your argument ensure that you a) demonstrate understanding of the approach using relevant literature and examples, b) evaluate the benefits and drawbacks of this approach compared to others, c) critically examine the impact on individual participants d) consider implementation strategies in the primary school

Word count: 3500 (+/- 10%)

Submission date: Class time on Friday of Week 12.

78

All assignments must be submitted with the appropriate cover sheet (available on Moodle)

Penalty for Late Submission of Coursework: Except in exceptional circumstances, 10% will be deducted for late submission of coursework.

The repeat assessment is a written exam in August 2016.

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

Assignment Grading Rubric

0-20 21-40 41-60 61-80 81-90

Responses are weak or absent and do not demonstrate an understanding of the issues or work undertaken in the lectures and practical activities of

EDE306.

Poorly developed responses that lack logic and coherence.

Limited knowledge of the topic, limited attempt made to incorporate a balance of theory and practice.

Lacks consideration of how the ideas can be implemented in the primary school.

No apparent access to nominated course reading materials or references to the relevant literature.

Limited responses and reflections that demonstrate a narrow understanding of the work undertaken in the lectures and practical activities of

EDE306. The major issues in the course are understood to a basic and naive level.

Limited attempt made to incorporate a balance of theory and practice

Limited attempt made to illustrate how the ideas can be implemented in the primary school.

Limited reference to the relevant literature

.

1 - 3

Moderate responses and reflections that demonstrate a general understanding of the work undertaken in the lectures and practical activities of

EDE306. The major issues are beginning to be understood.

So me attempt made to

 incorporate a balance of theory and practice

Adequate illustration given on how the ideas can be implemented in the primary school

.

Use of nominated course reading materials is apparent and these are sensibly incorporated.

4 - 7

Good responses and reflections that demonstrate a solid understanding of the issues and work undertaken in the lectures and practical activities of

EDE306.

Substantial knowledge of the topic and balance between theory and practice evident.

Good illustration as to how the ideas can be implemented in the primary school.

Evidence of some reading beyond the nominated course materials is apparent and these are used to support responses.

Excellent responses and reflections that demonstrate a deep understanding of the issues and work undertaken in the lectures and practical activities of

EDE306.

In-depth knowledge of the topic and balance between theory and practice and links illustrated between the two.

Comprehensiv e illustration as to how the ideas can be implemented in the primary school.

Evidence of reading beyond the nominated course materials is apparent and these are expertly used to support responses.

8 - 10

Communication

Writing is incomprehensible or marred with errors in

Writing is verbose or inconsistent with some errors in paragraphing, sentence structure, grammar and spelling.

Writing is succinct and articulate with flawless paragraphing, sentence structure, grammar and spelling. Referencing is

79

Grade

A1

A2

B1

B2

Award

Equivalent

1 st

1 st

2.1

2.1

B3

C1

C2

C3

2.2

2.2

3 rd

Hons

3 rd

Hons

D1 Compensating

Fail

QPV Mark awarded

4.0 90-100

3.6 84-89

3.2 79-83

3.0 74-78

2.8 69-73

2.6 64-68

2.4 59-63

2.0 54-58

1.6 44-53 paragraphing, sentence structure, grammar and spelling.

Referencing is poor or absent.

Referencing is provided but contains some errors or inconsistencies.

correct and consistent.

Comments:

Total mark

80

D2 Compensating

Fail

F Fail

ATTENDANCE

1.2 30-53

0 0-29

Because of the practical and experiential nature of the classes provided as part of module EDE306, attendance at all classes is compulsory. For this reason, you will be required to sign-in to all classes in the module.

Absence from four (4) or more hours of class across the entire module, without appropriate certification

(Doctor, Counsellor or Chaplaincy certificate), will result in the student receiving an F grade on the whole module. Failing the module will result in it having to be retaken at annual repeats in August 2015.

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that all certificates concerning absences are presented to the class lecturer at the first class immediately after the absence. If you do not do this, your absence will not be accounted for.

FEEDBACK:

Students will be given the opportunity to seek feedback on issues relating to the assessment portfolio in Week 8. They can also apply to receive feedback in Week 1 of spring semester.

STAFF:

Name Title Office Office Telephone Email

Office

Hour/s

Déirdre Ní

Chróinín

Lecturer in

Physical

Education

Friday 11am Tn104 4553

READING LIST:

Primary Readings

[email protected]

Lund, J., & Tannehill, D. (2014). Standards-based physical education curriculum development.

New York: Jones & Bartlett Publishers (chapters).

Mitchell, Stephen A, Griffin, Linda, Oslin, Judith (2003) Sport foundations for elementary

physical education: a tactical games approach Champaign: Human Kinetics

81

Siedentop, Daryl Complete guide to sport education Champaign: Human Kinetics

Light, Richard (2012) Game sense: pedagogy for performance, participation and enjoyment

Abingdon: Routledge

Supplementary Readings

Armour, K. (2011) Sport Pedagogy: An introduction for Teaching and Coaching, Essex: Pearson

Graham, G. (2001) Teaching Children Physical Education: Becoming a Master Teacher.

Champaign : Human Kinetics.

Pickup, I. and Price, L. (2007) Teaching PE in the Primary School. London: Continuum.

Thomas, K., Lee, A. and Thomas, J. (2003) Physical Education Methods for Elementary

Teachers. Champaign: Human Kinetics.

82

EDE307: SEN 1: Strategies for Teaching and Learning

Autumn Semester, 2015 - 2016

Bachelor of Education 3

This module is one of three electives comprising a specialism in Special Education in the B. Ed. Programme.

The focus of this module will be on teacher planning for working with children with special educational needs and learning difficulties. General strategies for building new skill repertoires will be examined including task analysis, the use of targeted visual supports and errorless learning. Strategies for developing maintenance and generalisation of skills will be examined. The module will present strategies for teaching and evaluating social and emotional skills to children with learning difficulties and special educational needs.

Approaches to facilitate successful transition into, and out of, the primary school will be studied. The focus will be on meaningful inclusion of all children in all aspects of the primary school curriculum.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

 List strategies for evaluating and teaching new skills to children with SEN and learning difficulties.

 Suggest ways to plan for maintenance and generalisation of skills to relevant untaught situations.

 Identify strategies for promoting successful transition into and out of the primary school for children with learning difficulties and special educational needs.

 Identify principles of good practice in teaching and evaluating social and emotional skills to children with learning difficulties and special educational needs.

 Identify methods of teaching academic, social and behavioural strategies to children with learning difficulties, special educational needs and/or exceptional abilities.

 Recognise the importance of using peer groups for teaching social and play skills.

 Appreciate the value of parental input in teaching children with SEN and learning difficulties functional and applied skills.

MODULE CONTENT:

This module will be delivered in the form of one two hour lecture each week and one two hour tutorial with each group every other week (Week 1 Group A, Week 2 Group B and so on).

See Below.

WK DATES LECTURE – TOPIC DATES TUTORIALS

4.00pm to 6.00pm

MONDAY – T313

9.00am to 11.00am

FRIDAY – T201

83

1

2

3

4

5

Sept 7 th

Sept 14

Sept 21 th st

Introduction to your Specialism/Elective

Co-Teaching

Dr. P. Daly

T. O’ Brien

S. Long

Learning Styles

T. O’Brien

Social Skills

Dr. M. Egan

Sept 28 th

Visual Supports

S. Long

Oct 5 th

PALS

J. Fitzgerald

6

7

Oct 12 th

EXAM @ 5pm

Content - Weeks 1-4

T. O’Brien

Dr. P. Daly

Oct 19 th

APE

T. O’Brien

8

Oct

26 th

Bank Holiday

9

10

Nov 2 rd

Nov 9 th

Play and SEN

T. O’Brien

Strategies for generalisation maintenance

Dr. P. Daly

84

Sept 11 th Co-teaching Tutorial

GROUP A

S. Long

Sept 18 th Co-teaching Tutorial

GROUP B

S. Long

Sept 25 th

Social Skills Tutorial

GROUP A

Dr. M. Egan

Oct 2nd Social Skills Tutorial

GROUP B

Dr. M. Egan

Oct 9 th

Literacy Resources

J. Fitzgerald/

Dr. F. Tynan

NO TUTORIAL Oct 16 th

Oct 23rd

GRADUATION

Oct 30th Task Analysis Workshop

GROUP A – T.301

GROUP B - T.304

T. O’Brien

Dr. F. Tynan

Nov 6 th

Nov 13 th

ICT -Clicker 6 -

LAB T.304

E. McCarthy

ICT -Clicker 6 -

LAB T.304

E. McCarthy

A1

A2

B1

11

12

Nov 16th

Transition for pupils for students with SEN

J. Fitzgerald

Nov 20 th NO TUTORIAL

Nov 23rd

Wrap up session –

Evaluations / Assessment

T. O’Brien

Nov 25 th

NO TUTORIAL

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

Assessment will be divided into two, 30% and 70% and both will be Objective test format.

1. The first portion of the Assessment will take place in Week 6 worth 30%.

2. The final portion of the Assessment will be at the time and location scheduled by the college in exam week. This will be worth 70%.

3. The repeat exam will follow the same format with two papers consisting of 30% and 70% respectively.

You are advised to plan and prepare for the assessments by attending all lectures, keeping detailed and organised notes and reading materials as requested.

NB: All exam information will be conveyed by means of this Course Outline and any announcements made to the entire cohort. Please note that in the interest of equity no communication about exams will be entered into by any course lecturer with individual students.

Attendance will be taken in various classes throughout the semester. Up to 10% of marks available may be deducted at the discretion of the course tutor for poor attendance/participation.

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

FEEDBACK:

Students will be invited to give feedback on the course in Weeks 5 and 12. Students will receive feedback on their assessment from Week 6; collective feedback and individual marks will be available to students.

Feedback will also be available to students on the terminal exam; please email the course co-ordinator for an appointment.

Grade Descriptors

Exceptional - consistently and notably meets criteria.

Excellent, but not exceptional – usually and extensively meets criteria.

Very good analysis and understanding – regularly and competently meets criteria.

85

B2

B3

C1

C2

C3

D1

D2

Good analysis and understanding – regularly and competently meets criteria.

Satisfactory analysis and understadning – frequently and adequately meets criteria.

Knowledgeable, but generally un-analytical – adequately meets criteria.

Reasonably knowledge and understanding – occasionally meets criteria.

Limited knowledge and understanding – minimally meets criteria.

Without most of the above.

Without any of the above.

F

Assessment Criteria

Severely incomplete or plagiarised.

To illustrate

Knowledge and understanding for evaluating and teaching new skills to children with SEN and learning difficulties.

 Knowledge and understanding of planning for maintenance and generalisation of skills to relevant untaught situation

 Knowledge and understanding of strategies for promoting successful transition into and out of the primary school for children with learning difficulties and special educational needs.

 Knowledge and understanding of principles of good practice in teaching and evaluating social and emotional skills to children with learning difficulties and special educational needs.

Knowledge and understanding of methods of teaching academic, social and behavioural strategies to children with learning difficulties, special educational needs and/or exceptional abilities.

 Knowledge and understanding of the importance of using peer groups for teaching social and play skills

 An appreciation of the value of parental input in teaching children with SEN and learning difficulties functional and applied skills.

86

STAFF

Name

Dr. Patricia Daly

Trevor O Brien

Stella Long

Dr. Margaret Egan

Johanna Fitzgerald

Eucharia McCarthy

Dr. Fionnuala Tynan

Mairead Horan

(Department Administrator)

Office Telephone

303 061-204309

[email protected]

R113

N105

R110

N38

308

M107

302A

061-204780

061-204580

061-204337

061-204517

061-204508

061-204563

061- 204557

Email

[email protected] [email protected] [email protected] [email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected] [email protected]

Students with queries on any aspect of the course are encouraged to email the course co-ordinator, Trevor

O’ Brien at [email protected]

Appointments can be made by email.

87

READING:

Doherty, U., Egan, M., Daly, Patricia., Coady, M., Holland, M., Kelleher, D., Long, S., McCarthy, E., and S.

O’Sullivan (2011). STRANDS: Strategies for Teachers to Respond Actively to the Needs of Children with Down

Syndrome-Meeting the Special educational Needs of Children with General Learning Disabilities in Primary

Schools, Limerick: Curriculum Development Unit-Mary Immaculate College.

Ling, John (2010). Social Stories for Kids in Conflict. UK: Speechmark.

Mitchell, D. (2008). What Really Works in Special Education: using Evidence-based Teaching Strategies.

London: Routledge.

National Council for Special Education (NCSE). (2011) Evidence of Best Practice Models and Outcomes in the

Education of Children with Emotional Disturbance/ Behavioural Difficulties: An International Review. Dublin,

Stationery Office.

National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (2007). Guidelines for Teachers of Students with MODERATE

General Learning Disabilities, Dublin: Stationery Office.

National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (2007). Guidelines for Teachers of Students with MILD

General Learning Disabilities, Dublin: Stationery Office.

Snell, M.E., and Brown, F. (2011). Instruction of Students with Severe Disabilities (7 th

Ed.). New York: Pearson.

Westling, D.L., and Fox, L. (2009). Teaching Students with Severe Disabilities (4 th

Ed.). Columbus, Ohio:

Merrill.

Westwood, P. (2013). Inclusive and Adaptive Teaching Routledge: New York.

88

Visual Art Education

EDE 308 Elective in Education, Autumn Semester 2015

Title: Visual Art and Visual Art Education: Environmental Art

RATIONALE:

Visual Art and Visual Art Education module is a primary module in Visual Arts. The module provides opportunities for experiential and practical learning in and through Visual Art. Students will be offered opportunities to develop skills, concepts and techniques that are applicable to the contemporary art classroom.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

 Apply critical viewpoints of art theory into practice in Visual Art and Visual Art Education.

 Engage in a reflective and reflexive self-directed project.

 Recognise and value the wider social, cultural context in which Visual Art and Visual Art Education exists.

 Critically construct a personal rationale of Visual Art practice.

 Engage in Visual Art processes and techniques with the view of exhibiting in a public art exhibition.

MODULE CONTENT:

The emphasis of this module is on the exploration of visual ideas and the acquisition of skills and techniques through process led discoveries. Students will be encouraged to make meaningful connections to their own personnel rationale of visual art and the wider social, cultural and educational context of which Visual Art is an integral part. Students will have opportunities to work autonomously to develop their personal vision for arts education as well as interacting with peers to develop collaborative partnerships, share ideas and experiences.

Students will also be provided with opportunities to work collaboratively with Creative Geography Elective focusing on the theme Environmental and Sustainable Art.

Mode of delivery will include face-to-face small group lectures and workshops. Teaching and learning strategies will include specific approaches with its own guidelines and theoretical underpinnings (active learning strategies, practical engagements with the arts, pair and group work as well as working collaboratively, enquiry based learning, independent research, and relevant site-specific visits e.g. galleries, field trips)

WEEK

1

2

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS (This may change over the course of the semester)

Introduction to Visual Art Elective and Environmental Art

Visual Notebook methods and Art Theory

89

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Art Practice and Ideas based on Environmental Art to be submitted on the Tuesday session

Art Practice and Creative Geography Elective collaboration – All research to date based on elected theme to be present on Tuesday of week 4

Art Elective to work with Creative Geography Lecturer

Textiles, Sculpture, Installation art practice

Textiles, Sculpture, Installation art practice

Art Theory

Art Theory - Visit to Mark Dion Exhibition (Friday morning)

10

11

12

Presentation of ideas for collaboration assessment

Art Practice – Independent art work – research and making

Exhibition and assessment

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

FEEDBACK:

Feedback will be provided during lecturers and workshops and at designated times subject to requirement.

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

Coursework assignment (100% of module grade)

Reflective Portfolio of work to include - A reflective notebook 80% (moleskin A5 size) and a collaborative assessment piece 20%

The reflective notebook should contain visual and written documentation of your research and exploration of your chosen theme based on Environmental Art and the inter-relationship between art, and visual art education. (Exploratory test pieces, art works, photographs, digital medium etc. can be documented in the notebooks and/or submitted with reflective notebook)

Collaborative assessment 20% –Submitted by collaborating students (groups of 4 or 6) is a piece of assessment where

Visual Art Electives and Creative Geography Electives work collectively on a concept which originates from the reflective

notebook. (The assessment piece can be in the form of or a combination of a presentation, visual essay, art work) A

Visual Art elective ‘closed Facebook page’ MIC Art Elective Autumn 2015 has been set up to enable open dialogue between all partners involved (as part of your assessment you will need to register and have at least 10 entries made)

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

The reflective notebooks are graded on your accomplishment in (me) Theme and rationale (ii) development of

ideas and the (iii) presentation of visual art research. The marking scheme is presented below.

Theme & rationale

Choice of the theme based on environmental issues which enables emergent theme (s) and provides a strong visual rationale for doing so.

Specific and convincing use of relevant readings and visual resources.

90

Development of ideas

Development and progression of researched ideas

Demonstrates an understanding of subject specific content knowledge, skills, techniques and processes

Displays use of originality and creativity in the development of ideas.

Presentation of Visual art research

High level of clarity in structure and presentation.

Demonstrates the use of mastery of art skills and medium.

Use of presentation skills in the translating of art concepts.

Collaborative Piece

Demonstration of understanding of core concepts covered during elective

 incorporation of geographical concepts through artistic design

Demonstration of possibilities of using environmental art in the classroom

 levels of collaboration between geographical and artistic design are evident

Submission Date

The Reflective Portfolio submission is in week 12 of the autumn semester.

Repeat Examination

The repeat examination will take the form of a Portfolio. The Portfolio details will be circulated to students prior to the examination date.

For archival and administration purposes, the Visual Art Education area may need to retain some samples of students’ coursework.

STAFF:

Name Title Contact Office Telephone Email

Anne Marie Morrin

Visual Art

Tanya Power

Visual Art

Niall Quinn

Anne Dolan

Tech

Learning,

Society and

Religious

Education

Prime Texts:

email email email email

L106

G50

G25

M103

061204522

061204388

061204530

061204983

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

[email protected]

Efland, Arthur D. (1990) A History of Art Education: Intellectual and social currents in teaching the visual arts,

New York: Teachers College Press.

Eisner, Elliot W. (1998) The Enlightened Eye: Qualitative inquiry and the enhancement of Educational Practice.

Upper Saddle River: N, J.Merill.

91

Gage, John, (2000) Colour and meaning: art, science and symbolism London: Thomas and Hudson.

Gombrich, E.H. (1995) The Story of Art, 16

th

Edition, London: Phaidon Press.

Herne, S., Cox, S., and Watts, R. (2009) Readings in Primary Education, Intellect Books.

Hetland, L., Winner, E., Veenema, S., and Sheridan, K.M. (2007) Studio Thinking: The real benefits of visual art

education, New York: Teachers College Press.

Hickman, Richard (2005) Why we Make Art and Why it is Taught, Bristol: Intellect.

Hughes Robert (1991) The Shock of the New: Art and the century of change, London: Thomas and Hudson.

Mizeoff, Nicholas ed. (1998) The Visual Culture Reader, London: Routledge.

92

Module EDE 310

Introduction to Literacy Leadership in the Primary School

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education 2015 / 16

INTRODUCTION:

This module will prepare participants for the role of Literacy Leader within the primary school system. To this end participants will require a thorough understanding of the trajectory of children’s literacy development and the pedagogical knowledge to promote effective, coherent instructional practice throughout the primary school. Participants will be enabled to benefit from the experience of teachers in a range of primary schools settings who are currently engaged in research regarding effective literacy instruction and the dissemination of same within their individual school settings.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Articulate the theoretical principles underpinning effective instructional literacy practice

Identify the stages of development of children’s reading, writing and spelling development

Develop a range of motivational approaches to promote children’s reading and writing development

Apply a range of appropriate Assessment for Learning and Assessment of Learning instruments to identify patterns of strengths and weaknesses in children’s literacy

Affective: Attitude and Values

development

Interpret assessment data and engage in collaborative planning with parents and teachers

Differentiate the English Language Curriculum to promote inclusive practice

Understand the role of the Literacy Leader in the promotion of effective literacy instruction designed to support diverse learners in the primary school

Promote high expectations among teachers and children with regard to literacy development throughout the school

Promote coherent system wide effective approaches to literacy instruction throughout the school

93

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas will be addressed over the duration of the course.

WEEK TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

1

2

Balanced Integrated Literacy Instruction

Guiding Principles for Instructional Improvement and Student Achievement

5

6

3

4

Essential Elements of Fostering and Teaching Reading Comprehension

Promoting the Dialogic Classroom Through Collaborative Construction of Knowledge

Integrating Digital Technology into Literacy Instruction 1 – Vocabulary Development

Integrating Digital Technology into Literacy Instruction 2 – SEN / ELL

7

8

9

10

11

12

Teaching Writing Effectively: Research-Based Best Practice

Understanding and Supporting Children’s Spelling Development

Motivating Children to Read – Opening Windows of Wonder

Essential Elements of Support for Children with Dyslexia

Assessment of Children’s Literacy Development

Effective Whole School Planning to Promote Children’s Literacy Development

FEEDBACK:

Queries, opinions and questions are welcomed during lectures while individual feedback on assignments may be arranged by request.

ASSESSMENT:

Essay 40% (to be submitted in Week 6)

Course Work 60% (to be submitted in Week 12)

Assessment Criteria

1. Understanding of the task and key concepts/issues involved:

Discusses application to key language and literacy issues, as introduced throughout the semester and highlights application and relevance to their upcoming School Placement 3.

2. Depth of analysis and/or critique in response to the task:

A critical perspective and analysis is evident, including a developing philosophical approach, in analyzing conceptions of teaching language and literacy.

94

3. Appropriate use of professional and/or research literature to support presentation:

Quality up-to-date academic sources are used to support and inform the course work (Minimum of 4) which may include academic books, journal articles and appropriate online resources.

4. Structure and Organization of the Presentation:

The course work is structured and organised coherently.

5. Presentation according to appropriate academic conventions:

There is clarity, consistency and appropriateness of conventions for quoting and paraphrasing, attributing sources of information and accompanying resources and citing relevant texts according to the Harvard referencing system.

Repeat Assessment Course Work (100%)

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

STAFF:

Name Title Contact Office Telephone Email

Dr. Martin

Gleeson

Lecturer in

English

Language

Office Hours

Monday

10.00 -12.30

G47 061.204971 [email protected]

READING LIST:

Primary Readings:

L’Alier, S., Elish-Piper, L. & Bean, R.M. (2010) What Matters for Elementary Literacy

Coaching? Guiding Principles for Instructional Improvement and Student Achievement.

Newark, D.E.: International Reading Association.

Mc Kenna, M.C.& Walpole, S. (2008) The Literacy Coaching Challenge – Models and

Methods for Grades K-8. New York: The Guildford Press.

Pearson, P.D. & Taylor, B.M. (2011) Catching Schools: An Action Guide to Schoolwide

Reading Improvement. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Sadder, M. & Nidus, G. (2009) The Literacy Coach’s Game Plan: Making Teacher

Collaboration, Student Learning and School Improvement a Reality. Newark, D.E.:

International Reading Association.

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Supplementary Readings:

Afflerbach, Peter. (2012) Understanding and Using Reading Assessment K-12 (2nd edition).

Newark:DE. International Reading Association.

Block, C.C. and Mangieri, J. (2009) Exemplary Literacy Teachers: What Schools Can Do to

Promote Success for all Students (2nd ed.) New York: Guildford Press.

Culham, Ruth. (2014) The Writing Thief: Using Mentor Texts to Teach the Craft of Writing.

Newark:DE. International Reading Association.

Gersten, R., Baker, S.K., Shanahan, T., Linan-Thompson, S., Collins, P., & Scarcella, R. (2007)

Effective Literacy and English Language Instruction for English Learners in the Elementary

Grades: A Practice Guide (NCEE 2007-4011). Washington, DC: National Center for Education

Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of

Education.

Graham, S., MacArthur, C.A., and Fitzgerald, J. (Eds.) (2013). Best Practices in Writing

Instruction. New York: The Guildford Press.

Guofang, L. & Edwards, P.A. (2010) Best Practices in ELL Instruction. New York: The Guilford

Press.

Kennedy,E., Dunphy, E., Dwyer, B. et.al. (2012) Literacy in Early Childhood and Primary

Education (3-8 years). Dublin: NCCA

Integrate Ireland Language and Training (2006) Up and Away: A Resource Book for English

Language Support in Primary Schools. Dublin: IILT.

Integrate Ireland Language and Training (2007) Together Towards Inclusion: Toolkit for

Diversity in the Primary School. Dublin: IILT.

NCCA (National Council for Curriculum and Assessment) (2007) Assessment in the Primary

School Curriculum: Guidelines for Schools. Dublin. The Stationery Office.

Walpole, S., Mc.Kenna, M.C. & Philippakos, Z.A. (2011) Differentiated Reading Instruction in

Grades 4&5. New York: The Guilford Press.

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Module EDE 311

Teaching in a DEIS School

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education (3)

INTRODUCTION:

This module will develop students’ awareness of the factors underlying educational inequalities. There will be a very specific focus on schools in a DEIS

2

context where supports such as Home School Community

Liaison (HSCL) scheme and School Completion Programme (SCP) and other initiatives not encountered in the mainstream school are in place. The correlation between socio economic deficits and poor educational outcomes will be made explicit and will allow the students to explore, both theoretically and practically, the multiple roles necessary to support children’s learning.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

 explore and evaluate theoretical frameworks of educational disadvantage and demonstrate an understanding of the complexity of educational disadvantage and contributing factors

 examine the concepts of social inclusion/exclusion – the context, correlates and consequences of socio-economic disadvantage and be familiar with research on home and school processes

 analyse their role as teacher in supporting children’s learning in the disadvantaged context and as an agent of social change

 develop awareness of the culture of the Travelling Community and interpret issues of interculturalism in this context

 demonstrate an awareness of their own and pupils’ self esteem and understand how to promote self esteem in the DEIS context

 complete a practical placement in a DEIS school and plan and deliver an appropriate programme of work for pupils.

Affective: Attitude and Values

 reflect on and examine their perceptions of and their attitudes to disadvantaged schools, pupils and families

 understand the central role of the teacher in combatting educational disadvantage

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

Theoretical frameworks of educational disadvantage and contributing factors; context, correlates and consequences of socio-economic disadvantage; teacher’s role as an agent of social change; the importance of self esteem for teachers and learners; issues of interculturalism, particularly as they relate to the Traveller community; overview of parent involvement and educational partnership practices. Placement in DEIS school and interactive workshop activities.

2

Delivering Equality of Opportunity in Schools - Department of Education and Skills strategy for supporting schools in areas of designated disadvantage.

97

FEEDBACK:

By appointment with the lecturer.

ASSESSMENT:

Portfolio Assessment (85%) – due week 12

In-class presentation (15%) – week 12

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

Grade Criteria

A1

A2

B1

B2

B3

C1

Outstanding/Excellent: A thorough, well-structured, focused and comprehensive response to the assessment task, consistently demonstrating

-

Evidence of detailed and deep understanding and mastery of of subject matter, and critical interpretation and evaluation of reading material and other subject matter.

-

Ability to respond to questions in novel and relevant manner

-

An exceptional ability to organise, analyse and present arguments supported by evidence, citation or quotation.

-

Excellent capacity to structure essay with clarity and with clear line of enquiry and coherent argument.

-

Consistent demonstration of critical, creative, analytical and logical thinking

-

Evidence of critical insight.

-

Excellent presentation (grammar, spelling) with minimal to no errors

-

Appropriate referencing for all sources.

Very Good/Good: A thorough, well-organised response to the assessment task, demonstrating

-

A comprehensive knowledge of subject matter

-

Evidence of substantial reading and research for the assessment task and the ability to apply that reading to the task

-

Very good ability to structure essay and provide a clear line of enquiry and coherent argument

-

Effective grasp of ideas

-

Consistent demonstration of critical, creative, analytical and logical thinking.

-

Some evidence of critical insight

-

Very good presentation (grammar, spelling) with minimal to no errors.

-

Appropriate referencing for all sources

Competent/Satisfactory: An adequate and competent response to the assessment task demonstrating

-

Good understanding of the subject matter

-

Evidence of reading and familiarity with key ideas and literature

-

Ability to apply knowledge in response to the question, albeit with some errors or omissions

-

Ability to present arguments, albeit with tendency to make statements and limited capacity to critically appraise material, and insufficiently supported by evidence, quotation or citation

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C2

C3

D1

-

Some capacity to express ideas and to engage in critical thought

-

Clear and focused structure

-

Good presentation with limited errors

-

Appropriate referencing with minimal errors

Acceptable/Minimally Acceptable: An acceptable response to the assessment task demonstrating

-

A basic understanding of subject matter and some familiarity with the relevant literature.

-

Some ability to respond to the question but showing limited or basic capacity in this regard

-

Limited critical awareness or interpretation of material.

-

Limited ability to present argument with tendency to make statements.

-

Limited use of quotation, citation or evidence.

-

Some capacity to structure the essay but with problems with presentation of clear line of enquiry or focus.

-

Minor errors and some major errors in presentation though broadly satisfactory

Weak/Poor: A response that fails to meet minimal acceptable standards although it demonstrates

D2

F

-

Limited engagement with subject matter and very minimal familiarity with literature

-

Some effort to respond to the question

-

Ability to address only certain elements of the task and lacking coherent and focused response

-

Considerable difficulties with structuring essay, keeping focus and a clear line of enquiry, and showing comprehension of the assessment task.

-

Tendency to make statements rather than provide arguments

-

Problematic and poor presentation with minor and major errors (spelling, grammar) in presentation, use of paragraphs, and difficulty in referencing correctly.

Fail: A response that fails to meet the most minimal standards required in the assessment, showing

-

Little to no understanding of subject matter or evidence of reading

-

Little evidence of thought, evaluation or critique.

-

Disorganised and muddled presentation of ideas, that is incoherent and contains multiple errors.

-

Little to no capacity to use citation, evidence or quotation

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

Course work.

STAFF:

Name Title Office Telephon e

Email

Dr. Sandra

Ryan

Lecturer in Education

(Sociology and Educational

Disadvantage)

M111 204984 [email protected]

99

READING LIST:

Primary Readings

1. Kellaghan, T., et al. (1995). Educational Disadvantage in Ireland. Dublin: Educational Research

Centre/Department of Education and Science/Combat Poverty Agency.

2. Department of Education and Science. (2005). DEIS (Delivering Equality of Opportunity in Schools). An

Action Plan for Educational Inclusion. Dublin: Author.

3. Lareau, A. (2011). Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race and Family Life (2nd. Ed.). Berkley and Los

Angeles, CA: University of California Press.

Supplementary Readings

1. Bowles, S. and Gintis, H. (2002). “The Inheritance of Inequality”, Journal of Economic Perspectives, Vol.

16, pp. 3-30.

2. Byrne, D., & Smyth, E. (2010). No Way Back? The Dynamics of Early School Leaving. Dublin: The Liffey

Press in association with ESRI.

3. Cox, T. (Ed.). (2001). Combating Educational Disadvantage: Meeting the Needs of Vulnerable Children.

London: Falmer Press.

4. Darmody, M., Thornton, M., & McCoy, S. (2013). “Reasons for persistent absenteeism among Irish primary school pupils.” ESRI Research Bulletin 2013/2/5. Dublin: ESRI.

5. Hourigan, N. (Ed.) (2011). Understanding Limerick: Social Exclusion and Change. Cork: Cork University

Press.

6. Humphreys, E., McCafferty, D., & Higgins, A. (2012). How Are Our Kids? Experiences and Needs of

Children and Families in Limerick City with Particular Emphasis on Limerick’s Regeneration Areas.

Summary Report. Limerick.

7. Kellaghan, T., Sloane, K., Alvarez, B., & Bloom, B.S. (1993). The Home Environment and School

Learning: Promoting Parental Involvement in the Education of Children. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.

8. Kellaghan, T. (2001). “Towards a Definition of Educational Disadvantage,” Irish Journal of Education, xxxii, pp. 3-22.

9. O’Neill, C. (1992). Telling it Like it Is. Dublin: Combat Poverty Agency.

10. O’Sullivan, D. (2005). “Disadvantage: Texts, Pastiche, Consensus and Intervention,” (Ch. 9) in

Cultural Politics and Irish Education Since the 1950s: Policy Paradigms and Power. Dublin: Institute of Public Administration.

11. Sharkey, P., & Elwert, F. (2011). “The legacy of disadvantage: Multigenerational neighborhood effects on cognitive ability,” American Journal of Sociology, 116(6), 1934-1981.

100

Module EDE 312: Sharing Faith in Religious Education

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education 5

INTRODUCTION:

This module will s tudents will study the work of Thomas Groome, a major theorist in Religious

Education, and his contemporary, holistic Shared Christian Praxis approach to teaching Christian beliefs and values. In this way, they will become familiar with the different aspects of the subject, learning from a tradition, learning about a tradition and being formed in a tradition.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Understand the nature and purpose of Christian Religious Education

Analyse the work of Thomas Groome and his contribution to Christian Religious Education

Distinguish the different aspects of Christian Religious Education

Display an ability to teach Christian Religious Education rooted in a model of Shared Christian

Praxis

Design Christian Religious Education lessons rooted in Shared Christian Praxis

Affective: Attitude and Values

Appreciate the contribution of Christian Religious Education to the person and to society

Reflect on the place of Christian Religious Education in contemporary Ireland

Explore their attitudes and values in relation to the teaching of Christian Religious Education

Demonstrate leadership potential in Religious Education

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

WEEK TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

1 Grow in Love – theological foundations

101

4

5

2

3

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

What is Christian Religious Education

Shared Christian Praxis

Let’s Look

Let’s Learn

Let’s Live

Graduation

School Visit

Context of CRE: challenges and possibilities

Jesus Christ – model teacher?

Intercultural Religious Education

Issues for Christian Religious Education into the future

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

FEEDBACK:

Feedback will be given to students after their class presentations and on their class design before final submission.

ASSESSMENT:

Grade Marking Criteria

A1 – A2

Excellence shown in: interpreting the question; grasping and analysing the material critically; developing the argument and points made; organising and structuring the material; clarity and appropriate use of readings. Evidence of a critical mind at work capable of original/independent thought.

B1 – B2 Comprehensiveness shown with regard to the above points. Clearly superior work.

B3

Very good regarding many of the above points but some important aspect(s) missing e.g content affected by structure, needing more clarity.

C1 – C2 Good with regard to the above points. Research/reading was adequate but not extensive and there was room for more analysis as well as greater evidence of critical skills. Only minor grammatical/format and presentation errors.

C3 Acceptable. Minimal research. Argument not as clear or well-developed as it could have been.

Insufficient evidence of reflection and/or understanding of key issues. Possibly poor presentation of the work. Limited application/integration, clarity or cohesion.

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D1 - D2 Fails to demonstrate a satisfactory grasp of relevant basic material; inadequate argument. Does not express ideas clearly. Excessive dependency on undigested material from other sources.

Serious grammatical and style errors.

F Very weak; completely inadequate sentence construction/fluency; hardly any understanding of the subject; no argument; no evidence of serious attempt to engage with basic material.

Submission of portfolio: summary of readings, class presentations and design of class for new religious education programme.

Task 1 As a group, perpare 1 of the required readings to engage the class for 30 minutes

Task 2

(20 marks)

Summarise and review two chapters

(20 marks)

Task 3

Task 4

Hand in short reflection papers (200 words) on readings (number to be decided)

(10 marks)

Prepare one class lesson in Religious Education

(50)

Task 1

Prepare the reading to engage the class for 30 minutes

Always begin with some sort of reflection or meditation o Engage our interest in the theme o Give us to access the core ideas in the chapter o Help us explore the implications of this material

Clarity – 5 marks

Participation – 5 marks

Overall cohesion – 5 mark

Creativity – 5 marks

Task 2

Review any two readings from Module Content,

For each chapter:

1. Summarise the chapter, reconstruct the argument, what are the main ideas put forward, what is it all about?

103

2. Critique the chapter – did the author communicate his/her point, why or why not? Did you find the chapter persuasive, would you agree with what was said in it – why or why not?

How might it have been improved?

3. Are there any implications drawn from the chapter for your own work as a teacher in the area of Religious Education or any other subject? Explain

The response to each chapter needs to be double spaced, Times New Roman font 12. The length should be one page per point per chapter, so for every chapter, there will be three pages – one page summary, one page critique and one page of implications, roughly.

For each chapter: accuracy of summary 3 marks; quality of critique 3 marks; depth of reflection regarding implications 3 marks and overall clarity 1 mark

Task 3

For each group presentation by students, you need to submit to lecturer, on the day, a one page reflection paper: make two points – things you agree with; one point – something you disagree with and articulate one question the reading gives rise to regarding Religious Education in Ireland. In the paper, include the name of the chapter and your own name and student ID.

10 marks – 2 marks for each paper (this will be finalised when the number of groups is known)

Task 4

As a group, prepare a lesson in keeping with the new religious education programme, Grow in Love.

It can be for either 3 rd

or 4 th

class. It needs to have three parts: Let’s Look, Let’s Learn, Let’s Live – the material for the lessons can be gained from the new curriculum in Religious Education.

50 marks

10 marks for overall cohesion between the different parts

10 marks for theological introduction: what image of God is being offered to children?

10 marks for creativity

10 marks for access to religious tradition

10 marks for answering the question: This is a good lesson because…

ALL FOUR TASKS NEED TO BE COMPLETED IN ORDER TO PASS THE COURSE

ATTENDENCE AND PARTICIPATION IS REQUIRED AND YOU MAY LOSE UP TO 10% FOR NON

ATTENTENCE OR PARTICIPATION

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

Course work

104

STAFF:

Name

Dr. Daniel

O’Connell

Title Contact Office Telephone Email

Co-ordinator of Religious

Education

R117 061 204966 [email protected]

READING LIST:

Primary Readings

1. Groome, T.H. (2011) Will There be Faith? 1 st

Edition, Dublin: Veritas.

2. Irish Episcopal Conference (2011) Share the Good News: National Directory of Catechesis in

Ireland, Dublin: Veritas.

Supplementary Readings

Beaudoin, T. (2005) The Theological Anthropology of Thomas Groome. Religious Education 100

(2):127-138. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/00344080590932427

Boeve, L. (2012). ‘Religious education in a post-secular and post-Christian context’. Journal of

Beliefs and Values, 33, 143-156.

Boys, M. (1989) Educating in Faith: Maps and Visions, 1st ed. San Francisco: Harper & Row.

Catholic Church, (2013) Educating for Intercultural Dialogue in Catholic Schools http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/ccatheduc/documents/rc_con_ccatheduc_doc_2013102

8_dialogo-interculturale_en.html

Duffy

, E., ed. (2012) Catholic Primary Education, Facing New Challenges

Groome, T. (1998) Educating for Life: a Spiritual Vision for every Teacher and Parent. Allen, Tex.: T.

More.

Groome, T.H., & Daly Horell, H. (2003) Horizons & Hopes: the Future of Religious Education,

Mahwah, N.J.: Paulist Press.

Groome, T., (1991) Sharing Faith: a Comprehensive Approach to Religious Education and Pastoral

Ministry: the Way of Shared Praxis, San Francisco, HarperSanFrancisco.

________. (2002) ‘Religious Education and Catechesis - No Divorce, for the Children's Sake.’ The

Furrow 53 (11):587-596.

Kieran, P. & Anne Hession. (2005). Children, Catholicism and Religious Education. Dublin: Veritas.

__________eds. (2002) Exploring Religious Education, Catholic Religious Education in an

Intercultural Europe, Dublin: Veritas.

Hay, D. with Nye, R. (2006) The Spirit of the Child, Revised ed., London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Lane, D. (2008) Challenges facing Religious Education in Contemporary Ireland, Dublin: Veritas.

Nye, R. (2009) Children's Spirituality: What It Is and Why It Matters, London: Church house publishing.

105

O’Connell, D. (2008) Educating Religiously Towards a Public Spirituality, Boston: Boston College,

PhD Dissertation accessed at: http://dcollections.bc.edu/R/?func=dbin-jumpfull&object_id=71359&local_base=GEN01

Mahon, E. & O’Connell (2015) Grow in Love Junior Infants Primary 1, Dublin: Veritas.

_______________(2015) Grow in Love Senior Infants Primary 2, Dublin: Veritas.

Tilley, T.W. (2010) Faith: What It Is and What It Isn't, Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books.

Tuohy, D. (2013) Denominational Education and Politics, Ireland in a European Context, Dublin:

Veritas.

Watson, B. & Thomson, P. (2007) The Effective Teaching of Religious Education, Harlow, England:

Pearson Longman.

106

Module EDE 315

Title: Irish Sign Language (ISL)

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education (Yr): Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology (Yr)

INTRODUCTION:

This module will introduce students to the process of Irish Sign Language (ISL) learning and assessment.

The course is split into a lecture component and ISL tutorial. The lectures will cover areas around deaf culture and ISL history and will involve guest lectures and group work through online ISL learning which will supplement the ISL tutorials. During tutorial sessions students learn ISL through classroom interaction.

Tutorials are delivered according to the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) for languages.

The aim of the tutorials is to bring students to CEFR level A1 receptive and productive ISL skills. There are three aspects of the tutorial experience: 1) learner involvement; 2) learner interaction; and 3) learner ISL use. Students will focus on developing and generating A1 productive, receptive and interactive skills using familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases in ISL and ISL alphabet. The CEFR ‘Can do statement’ for

A1 basic user will guide students on the level of ISL competency required to reach A1 level. This is available on Moodle. Throughout the course students will engage in writing a reflective portfolio, undertake a written assignment and participate in a language test. At the end of the module, students will have developed a deep awareness of the value of learning ISL.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Cognitive

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

Apply productive language skills: an ability to engage a series of phrases and sentences to describe in simple terms different topics outlined in CEFR themes selected for this module. Students will be able to 1) produce messages in ISL; 2) produce basic ISL comments on topics covered in class e.g.

CEFR themes.

Practice interactive skills: 1) request and respond to requests for information on topics and activities; 2) manage short social conversations.

Show receptive language skills: 1) understand signed video/DVD clips of basic ISL signed at a moderate pace; 2) identify specific and main points of information on signed video/DVD clips; 3) understand announcements, greetings, short personal information and the main points of short, simple communication.

Demonstrate understanding of: 1) the main points of ISL history and deaf culture; 2) the role of ISL in educating deaf children.

Affective

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

Recognise the importance of continuous development in the use of receptive, productive and interactive ISL skills.

Demonstrate an appreciation of ISL history, deaf culture and ISL in educating deaf children.

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

107

WEEK

1

2

3

4

5

6

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

ISL. Lecture: Introduction to ISL Module. Course outline, CEFR, learning outcomes and assessment, ISL alphabet and online demonstration.

ISL tutorials: CEFR themes. ISL finger-spelling, personal identification, family, siblings, parents and children

ISL lecture: Guest lecture. Lecture on ISL history and deaf culture, online learning and group work.

ISL tutorial: CEFR themes. Revision, ISL finger-spelling, weather, daily life.

ISL lecture: Guest lecture/ Lecture on ISL history and deaf culture. online learning and group work

ISL tutorial: CEFR themes. Revision. Education- students, school, college etc. Country of origin. Fingerspelling. ISL verbs.

ISL lecture: Guest lecture/Lecture on ISL history, online learning and group work.

ISL tutorial: CEFR themes. Revision. Family Tree. ISL verbs.

ISL lecture: Guest lecture/Lecture on ISL history, online learning.

ISL tutorial: CEFR themes. Revision. Leisure time and entertainment. ISL verbs.

Group work

ISL lecture: Guest lecture/Lecture on ISL history, online learning.

ISL tutorial: CEFR themes. Revision. ISL verbs. Travel

.

Group work.

7

8

9

10

ISL lecture: Guest lecture/Lecture on ISL history, online learning.

NO CLASS. GRADUATION DAY.

NO LECTURE. BANK HOLIDAY.

ISL tutorial: CEFR themes. Revision. ISL verbs. Group work

ISL lecture: Guest lecture/Lecture on ISL history, online learning.

ISL tutorial: CEFR themes. Revision. ISL verbs. Group work.

ISL lecture: Guest lecture/Lecture on ISL history, online learning.

ISL tutorial: CEFR themes. Revision. ISL verbs. Group work

11

12

ISL lecture: Guest lecture/Lecture on ISL history, online learning.

ISL tutorial: CEFR themes. Revision. ISL verbs. Group work

ISL lecture: Guest lecture/Lecture on ISL history, online learning.

ISL tutorial: CEFR themes. Revision. ISL verbs. Group work

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group indicated.

FEEDBACK:

Students will receive continuous feedback on ISL skills throughout the course.

ASSESSMENT:

There are 2 parts to the assessment of this module based on topic covered in class.

Part One: Essay (75%)

Students undertake a written essay (3,500 words). Essays must be submitted at 4pm on Friday, 28 th

November 2015.

Part Two: ISL Language test (25%)

Students will undertake a language test (2 minutes duration). The aim of this test is to assess the students’ productive and receptive skills to CEFR level A1. The test will take place around week 15 and 16 and will be recorded on video for assessment purposes only.

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Irish Sign Language Test Indicative Grade Descriptor:

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. The following is a breakdown of guided learning hours to reach fluency under CEFR:

A1

A2 180-200 Hours, 90-96 Hours over 12 weeks, 7.5-8 Hours per week.

B1

B2

C1

350-400 Hours

500-600 Hours

700-800 Hours

C2 1,000-1200 Hours

Interactive spoken language exam under CEFR: Can do statements for A1 proficiency

CEFR global scale for A1 basic user: Can understand and use familiar everyday expressions and very basic phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs of a concrete type. Can introduce him/herself and others and can ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has. Can interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.

Can do statement for CEFR A1 ISL proficiency

Understanding

I can understand when someone signs very slowly to me about basic personal identifiers such as name, date of birth, place of residence, country and county of origin, school etc.

I can understand familiar names and very simple ISL verbs and sentences

I can understand questions and instructions when someone signs slowly and clearly

Signing

I can use simple ISL phrases to describe where I live and people I know

I can introduce myself in ISL and the introductions of other people

I can compose a brief message or discuss a topic in ISL that are familiar to me

Repeat assessment is an essay

All students are required to familiarise themselves with the Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning honesty, including syndication.

STAFF:

Name

Noel O’ Connell

READING LIST:

Title

Dr

Email

[email protected]

Main reading materials:

Crean, E. (1997). Breaking the silence: the education of the deaf in Ireland 1816-1996. Dublin: Irish Deaf

Society Publications.

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Leeson, L., & Saaed, J. I. (2012). Irish Sign Language: A cognitive account. Edinburgh: University of

Edinburgh Press.

Mathews. E. S. (2011). Mainstreaming of Deaf Education in the Republic of Ireland: Language, Power,

Resistance, Unpublished PhD Theses, National University of Ireland, Maynooth.

Mitchell, R. E., & Karchmer, M. A. (2004). Chasing the Mythical Ten Percent: Parental Hearing Status of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students in the United States. Sign Language Studies, Volume 4, Number 2, pp. 138-

163.

Ó Baoill, Dónall P., & Matthews, P. A. (2000). The Irish deaf community, Volume 2, The structure of Irish sign

language. Institiúid Teangeolaíochta Éireann.

O’Connell, N.P., & Deegan, J. (2014). ‘Behind the teacher's back’: an ethnographic study of deaf people's schooling experiences in the Republic of Ireland. Irish Educational Studies, 33:3, 229-247.

O’Connell, N.P. (2015). A tale of two schools: educating Catholic female deaf children in Ireland, 1846–1946.

History of Education: Journal of the History of Education Society.

Spencer, P. E., & Marschark, M. (2011). The Oxford handbook of deaf studies, language, and education. New

York; Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Bilingual education for deaf children (Seminar) (1997: Dublin, Ireland) "Bilingual education for deaf children": best option for the future?: St. Patrick's College, Drumcondra, Dublin; Saturday 22nd March 1997.

110

Teaching Geography Creatively

EDE 316: Elective in Education, Autumn Semester 2015

RATIONALE:

Creativity is central to geography, just as it is to every subject in the curriculum. Teachers who specialise in primary geography often do not think of themselves as being particularly creative. As we proceed through the twenty-first century towards a future that is increasingly punctuated by uncertainty, there are good reasons why we need to help children to develop flexible and responsive modes of thinking. By recognising the creative potential of geography student teachers will be able to design and deliver geography lessons in an innovative manner drawing on a range of creative approaches. This module will assist students to reflect on how creativity and geography intersect in children’s lives and why creativity is vital in sustaining all our futures.

Much of the philosophy underpinning geography teaching is informed by enquiry, constructivism and problem based learning. In order to effectively employ enquiry based learning in the classroom creative teaching approaches are required. Rather than teaching to the text book, student teachers are encouraged to design and deliver creative strategies and resources for teaching geography. This module will also allow students to combine their geography lessons with a range of arts based curricular areas for their integrated planning which is a requirement for school placement. In light of increasing environmental issues in our society today, there will be a specific focus on visual and environmental art.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

 examine the importance of creativity in teaching in general and geography/education for sustainability in particular

 develop a range of creative strategies for teaching geography/education for sustainability to all classes in primary schools

 understand the potential of geography to develop creative capacity both with themselves as teachers and with children in the classroom.

 acknowledge the power of creativity in the classroom in general and geography teaching in particular

 undertake environmental art with children

 appreciate their own potential as creative teachers.

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MODULE CONTENT:

This module provides student teachers with an opportunity to experience geography through a creative lens. Through a range of practical strategies for use in the classroom, students will have an opportunity to reflect on the principles underpinning a creative approach to geography and education for sustainability. With an emphasis on promoting creativity as a key element to developing young children’s knowledge, students will also have an opportunity to explore their own personal creative potential. The course contains a strong focus on visual imagery through environmental art.

Mode of delivery will include face-to-face small group lectures and workshops. Teaching and learning strategies will include creative methodologies such as art, story-telling, poetry and outdoor learning and related theoretical underpinnings (active learning strategies, practical engagements with the arts, pair and group work as well as working collaboratively, enquiry based learning, independent research, and relevant site-specific visits e.g. galleries, field trips). Students will also be provided with opportunities to work collaboratively with students from the Visual Art elective with a particular focus on environmental art.

WEEK

1

2

3

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

Introduction to Teaching Geography Creatively and Environmental Art

What is creativity?

Using natural landscape as an inspiration

Learning about landscape through creative geography

Ideas based on Environmental Art to be submitted on the Tuesday session

4

5

6

7

Art Practice and Creative Geography Elective collaboration – All research to date based on elected theme to be presented on Tuesday of week 4

Geography elective students to work with art Lecturer

Developing a sense of place through photographs

Education for Sustainability: nature which inspires creativity

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8

9

Animation and video

Working with story, poetry and text

10

11

12

Visit to Mark Dion Exhibition (Friday morning)

Presentation of ideas for collaboration assessment

In class presentations

Exhibition and assessment

Please note: there will be a requirement to participate in some field trips\exhibitions will take place outside of class time.

FEEDBACK:

Feedback will be provided during lecturers and workshops and at designated times subject to requirement.

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

Coursework assignment (100% of module grade)

Portfolio of work to include - A reflective journal/scrapbook 80% (A3 size) and a collaborative assessment piece 20%

The reflective journal should contain visual and written documentation of your research in teaching geography creatively. This will include your ideas about Environmental Art and the inter-relationship between visual art education, education for sustainability and geography. A range of creative approaches to teaching geography can be considered. Concept maps, flow charts, images, sketches, newspaper articles, personal reflections, interviews with children or teachers can be documented in your reflective journals.

Collaborative assessment 20% –Submitted by collaborating students (groups of 4 or 6) is a piece of assessment where Creative Geography Electives and Visual Art Electives work collectively on an concept which originates from concepts covered during the course. (The assessment piece can be in

the form of or a combination of a presentation, visual essay, art work). A Visual Art elective

Facebook page MIC Art Elective Autumn 2015 has been set up to enable open dialogue between all partners involved (as part of your assessment you will need to register and have at least 10 entries made)

113

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

The reflective journals are graded on your accomplishment in (i) Geographical Concept Knowledge(ii) Creative

Approaches and the (iii) Overall Presentation. The marking scheme is presented below.

Geographical Conceptual Knowledge

Choice of the theme based on environmental issues which enables emergent theme (s) and provides a strong visual rationale for doing so.

Specific and convincing use of relevant readings and visual resources.

Development and progression of researched ideas

Demonstrates an understanding of subject specific content knowledge, skills, techniques and processes

Creative approaches

Displays use of originality and creativity in the development of ideas.

Demonstrates an understanding of the potential of creativity

Showcases personal examples of creativity experienced during the course

Overall Presentation

High level of clarity in structure and presentation.

Collaborative Piece

Demonstration of understanding of core concepts covered during elective

Incorporation of geographical concepts through artistic design

Demonstration of possibilities of using environmental art in the classroom

Levels of collaboration between geographical and artistic design are evident

Submission Date

The Elective Journal submission is in week 12 of the autumn semester.

Repeat Examination

The repeat examination will take the form of an essay. The essay details will be circulated to students prior to the examination date.

STAFF:

Name Title Contact Office Telephone Email

Anne Dolan

Primary geography email M3 06120928 [email protected]

114

Anne Marie

Morrin

Visual Art email L106 061204522 [email protected]

ul.ie

Prime Texts

Articles from the Journal Primary Geography

1. Craft. A. (2011) Creativity and Education Futures: Learning in a digital age. Stoke-on Trent.

Trentham.

2. Dolan, A. M. (2014) You, Me and Diversity: Picturebooks for teaching development and

intercultural education. London:Trentham Books/IOE Press

3. Mackintosh, M. and Kent, G. (2014) The Everyday Guide to Primary Geography : Art

Sheffield:Geographical Association.

4. Tanner, J. and Whittle, J. (2013) The Everyday Guide to Primary Geography : Story

Sheffield:Geographical Association.

5. Scoffham, S. and Barnes, J. (2011) 'Happiness matters: towards a pedagogy of happiness and well-being', Curriculum Journal, 22(4), 535-548.

6. Scoffham, S. (2013) Teaching Geography Creatively, Oxford: Routledge.

115

Module EDE318

Elective 1: Science All Around Us 1: Chemistry

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

Bachelor of Education (Yr 3): Bachelor of Education in Education & Psychology (Yr3)

INTRODUCTION:

The overall aim of this module is to provide teachers the opportunity to develop the practical skills and competencies required to deliver the subject matter in the Primary School Curriculum. This module will further develop the students’ knowledge base in science and in particular chemistry, as they relate to the Strand: Materials on the Primary Science Curriculum, on successful completion of the compulsory Stem 3 and Stem 6 Modules.

The module sets out to develop the students’ understanding and ability to apply cognitive theory in the development of appropriate instructional models in the teaching of Science. The module aims to strengthen the students’ conceptual understanding in science, in order for the students to be able to teach concepts in chemistry that are covered in the Primary Science Curriculum. The module will also include the study of contemporary issues in chemistry and how to teach these issues to primary pupils.

The students will develop an understanding of children’s ideas and thought processes on the topic of materials. Strategies to develop or reconstruct their conceptions and misconceptions in this area will be explored. The lectures will cover the children’s scientific knowledge, understanding and misunderstandings in key concepts in chemistry at different stages in their cognitive development, incorporating teaching strategies to provoke discussion and argumentation and to stimulate scientific thinking, promoting cognitive development in primary pupils and also to challenge and develop the students’ ideas and restructure their understanding (and misunderstandings) in science and in particular chemistry.

The module will place a strong emphasis on integration, i.e. how science and in particular the concepts in chemistry can be integrated with all other subject areas in the Primary Curriculum and provide the students with strategies on how to develop the child’s literacy and numeracy skills through the teaching of main the concepts of chemistry on the Primary Science Curriculum.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

Develop a strong understanding of the following; The constitution of matter: Elements and compounds; Atomic theory of matter; Classification of elements; States of matter; Kinetic theory of matter; Changes of state; Physical and chemical changes; The concept of pH;

Chemistry of water; Chemical bonding; Properties of materials; Solubility; Transformation of materials by physical processing; Separation techniques.

Devise investigations of the properties and composition of various materials appropriate to the different levels in primary schools.

Examine common misconceptions held by children in the area of materials, selecting and practicing appropriate analogies and intervention strategies to develop a greater understanding in these areas.

116

Demonstrate a wide variety of teaching strategies to encourage creativity and higher order thinking in the primary science classroom.

Apply the science knowledge they have learned to innovative interesting everyday topics for primary pupils for example Science of Gases, Science of Food, Forensics Science and

Biochemistry.

Integrate the topic on the Strand Units: Properties and Characteristics of Materials and

Materials and Change with other aspects of the primary curriculum.

MODULE CONTENT:

The following areas may be addressed over the duration of the course. Due to bank holidays and other events impacting on scheduling, all topics may not be covered and are subject to change.

NB: For logistical reasons you are requested to attend lectures only at the time and in the group

indicated.

WEEK

1

2

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

(ONE HOUR)

Course Outline and Assessment-

Nature of Science

Theme-Materials in the home

TITLE/CONTENT/AREAS

(TWO HOURS )

Kitchen Chemistry

Materials in the home

3

4

5

6

Theme-Water

Theme-Food Science

Theme-Gases in our world

Water

Food Science

Gases in our world

Teaching Visiting Class

7

8

9

Devising Learning Intentions Success

Criteria for visiting class

Structured Feedback and De-brief

Theme- Compounds and mixtures

Theme-Chemistry and Exercise

Graduation

Separating Substances

Chemistry and Exercise

10

11

Theme-Forensic Science

Exploring ICT and Primary Science

Resources

Nature of Science

Forensic Science

Guest Lecture

12

Module Assessment(Teaching Visiting Class)

FEEDBACK:

Feedback on your course work will be provided to you in lecture on week 7 and via moodle in subsequent weeks.

ASSESSMENT:

1. Course work: Paired assessment and presentation due week 12 (100% of Module)

The activity will be prepared and delivered as a team teaching activity.

Each individual will be assessed using the assessment criteria below.

117

All assessment criteria are equally weighted.

All assignments must be submitted with the appropriate cover sheet.

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Coursework Guidelines in the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

Grade Grade

Descriptors

Coherence and quality of planning

Management of the Learning

Environment

Subject Content

& Pedagogical

Knowledge

Effectiveness of Teaching

Strategies

Quality assessment of/for learning

A1

A2

B1

B2

B3

C1

C2

C3

D1

D2

F

NG

Outstanding

Performance

(First honours)

Excellent

Performance

(First honours)

Very Good

Performance

(Honours 2.1)

Good

Performance

(Honours 2.1)

Competent

Performance

(Honours 2.2)

Satisfactory

Performance

(Honours 2.2)

Acceptable

Performance

(Third honours)

Minimally

Acceptable (Third

honours)

Weak

Performance

(compensating

fail)

Poor

Performance

(compensating

fail)

Fail (no

compensation

allowed)

Fail (no

compensation

allowed)

118

G

I

Audit

Certified illness/immediate family bereavement

Annual Repeat: Course Work in Science

2. Attendance and participation at lectures and workshops is compulsory (10% deducted from overall grade of module if attendance or participation is unsatisfactory)

You must produce a certificate if you miss a lecture. Attendance will be recorded weekly.

STAFF:

Email notification of absences is not accepted.

Name Title Contact Office Telephone Email

Dr. Miriam

Hamilton

Lecturer in Science

Education

Course Co-ordinator

Friday:

12.00-1.00

M105 061-

774754 miriam.[email protected]

Dr. Anne O’

Dwyer

Lecturer in Science

Education

Course Co-ordinator

Friday:

12.00-1.00

M105 061-

204346 [email protected]

READING LIST:

4.

Allen, M. (2010). Misconceptions in Primary Science. England: Open University Press, Mc Graw-Hill

Educational.

5.

Cleave, V. (1989), Chemistry for Every Kid, Wiley, New York.

6.

Cross, A. and Bowden, A. (2009). Essential Primary Science. England, Berkshire: Open

University Press, Mc Graw-Hill Educational.

7.

Harlen, W. (2004). The teaching of science in primary schools 4 th

ed. London : David Fulton

8.

Kind, V. (2004), Beyond Appearances, Students’ misconceptions about basic chemical ideas,

Durham, available online at: http://www.rsc.org/images/Misconceptions_update_tcm18-

188603.pdf

[accessed Sept 2015].

9.

Loxley, P., Dawes, L., Nicholls, L. and Dore, B. (2010). Teaching Primary Science. Promoting

Enjoyment and Developing Understanding. England, Essex: Pearson Education Limited.

10.

DES (1999). The Science Curriculum. Dublin: Stationery Office

11.

DES (1999). Science Curriculum – Teacher Guidelines. Dublin: Stationery Office.

12.

Parker, S. (1990), Simple Chemistry, Kingfisher, UK.

119

Liberal Arts 2 Elective Modules

120

Module TL4715

Title of Module: Teaching English as an Additional Language

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

RATIONALE:

This module offers core competencies in response to the needs of primary school pupils for whom English is an additional language. It overviews the core theories of language learning, materials design and differentiation in the context of language learning, as well as surveying the grammar of the English language and how it can best be explored with young learners.

This course provides an understanding of the core theories and principles of how languages are learnt and the range of methodologies that are available within an eclectic approach. It also entails a rigorous analysis of the grammatical system of the English language. Specifically, the programme covers an overview of the evolution of language teaching methodologies from Grammar Translation, Audio-Lingualism, the Direct

Method, Communicative Language Teaching to more Humanistic approaches and Eclecticism. It evaluates strategies for language skills development and vocabulary teaching in the context of Teaching English as an

Additional Language in Ireland. It provides an overview of the core areas of English grammar and how to deal with corrections in oral and written production. The module will also explore the fundamentals of the phonetics and phonology so as to enhance phonological diagnostic competencies in relation to young learners. It also examines the challenges of differentiation in Teaching English as an Additional Language in a

Primary Education context using contextualised materials and inquiry-based approaches.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

To build an awareness of the cognitive processes of learning a language and to apply the most suitable methodology to a given teaching and learning context.

To explore the core concepts of the English language as a grammatical, phonological and semantic system and to promote an analytical approach to language in use, both in spoken and written form.

To develop student teachers’ use and understanding of basic concepts for the analysis and description of language and language use in the classroom and apply this knowledge to planning and teaching.

To raise a discerning awareness of the available material and resources for learners and to enable teachers to easily adapt or design authentic materials for their individual learners’ specific needs.

To equip student teachers with a critical awareness of how to differentiate within mainsteam classes where there is a student for whom English is not a first language.

MODULE CONTENT:

Lecture Topic

A: one-hour lecture; B: double lecture

121

Week 1:

Week 2:

Week 3

Week 4

Week 5

A: Introduction to Teaching English as an Additional Language Module and its assessments

B: Overview of language teaching methodologies 1

A: Overview of language teaching methodologies 2

B: Language awareness 1 – word classes

A: Language awareness 2 – word classes

B: Teaching new vocabulary

A: Approaches to teaching grammar

B: Language awareness 3 – tenses

A: Language awareness 4 - tenses

B: Phonology and Pronunciation 1

Week 6

Week 7

A: Phonology and Pronunciation 2

B: Using Authentic Materials and other resources

A: Error Correction and Assessment

B: EAL learner profile and classroom support:

Integrate Ireland Language and Training (IILT) Up and Away;

CEFR Framework; Proficiency benchmarks; European Language

Portfolio

Week 8

Week 9

A: Teaching young learners, using games, roleplays

B: Productive skills – approaches to teaching Speaking

A: Receptive skills – approaches to developing listening skills

B: Approaches to developing reading and writing skills

Week 10 A: Oral Presentations on TEAL case study assignment

B: Oral Presentations on TEAL case study assignment

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

Assessment will be through a mix of online assignments on Moodle and a group oral presentation based on a practice-based case study. Online grammar quizzes will run over fixed periods (usually two weeks) and will have an automated deadline. Discussion fora will be set up within Moodle whereby students will work in small groups to discuss practice-based cases or problems. Wikis (collaborative writing spaces) will be set up on Moodle whereby students will work in small groups to address questions around TEAL resources and materials. At the end of the semester, groups will present their findings on the TEAL case study.

Group assessment is a key part of the assessment strategy on this module. Note, however, that marking will be on an individual basis for all group work:

Discussion fora – marks will be allocated to individuals based on their posts, according to the agreed marking criteria.

Wikis – An overall mark will be given for the final wiki page but individuals will get a percentage of this based on a group rating process. Group rating process: individuals in each group will complete a group weighting form in which they will be asked to rate the other participants’ contributions from 1 – 5. If an individual has an average rating of 5, they get 100% of the overall mark for the wiki. If an individual has a low rating due to low participation in the task, e.g. If a student gets an average rating of 1 out of 5, they will only get 20% of the overall mark. This mechanism ensures fairness.

Group oral presentation – groups will work on a TEAL case study and will present their recommendations at the end of semester. A group weighting form will be used (see above) to ensure fairness in the marking of this assignment.

Assessment Detail Deadline

122

20% Online Grammar Quizzes

20% Group wiki on vocabulary teaching

30% discussion fora

Four online grammar quizzes

Working in groups, write an online wiki on vocabulary teaching resources for TEAL

Three discussion fora, in groups, topics: vocabulary teaching lesson evaluation grammar teaching lesson evaluation

Developing speaking skills

TBC – see Moodle course page

TBC – see Moodle course page

TBC – see Moodle course page

10% Group wiki on pronunciation materials

20% Oral presentation on a TEAL case study

Working in groups, create a portfolio of materials for teaching pronunciation

In groups, work on a case study of a learner and present a syllabus strategy

TBC – see Moodle course page

TBC – see Moodle course page

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

Repeat assessment will be through online and take-home tasks. Paper-based work will be submitted to the Arts Office by the specified deadline. All students are required to familiarise themselves with

Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

FEEDBACK:

Written feedback will be provided on all course tasks, in some cases this will be within Moodle and in other cases, it will be by email. Students are also welcome to meet with course lecturers for further face-to-face feedback.

123

STAFF:

Name Title Office

Office

Hour/s

Telephon e

Email

Anne

O’Keeffe

Margaret

Healy

Senior Lecturer in English

Language

Teaching/Direct or of Teaching and Learning

Lecturer in

English

Language

Teaching

G15

L110a

(061)

204957

(061)

204596

[email protected]

[email protected]

e

READING LIST:

Primary Readings:

1. Integrate Ireland Language and Training 2006. Up and Away: a resource book for English Language

Support in Primary Schools. Dublin: Integrate Ireland Language and Training.

2. Harmer, J. 2001. The Practice of English Language Teaching. London: Longman.

3. Carter, R. and McCarthy, M. 2006. The Cambridge Grammar of English. Cambridge: Cambridge

University of Press.

4. Burns, A. and Richards, J. (Eds) 2011. Cambridge Guide to Pedagogy and Practice in Language

Teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University of Press.

5. Carter, R. and D. Nunan (Eds.) 2001. The Cambridge Guide to Teaching English to speakers of Other

Languages. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

6. Carter, R., McCarthy, M., Mark, G. and O’Keeffe, A. 2011. English Grammar Today. Cambridge:

Cambridge University of Press.

7. McCarthy, M., O’Keeffe, A. and Walsh, S. 2009. The Vocabulary Matrix: understanding, learning,

teaching. London: Heinle: Cengage Learning.

Supplementary Texts:

1. Edge, J. 1993. Essentials of English Language Teaching. London: Longman Key Series

2. Scrivener, J. 1994. Learning Teaching. Oxford: Heinemann.

3. Parrott, M. 2000. Grammar for English Language Teachers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

4. Swan, M. 2005. Practical English Usage. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

5. Celce-Murcia, M. 1997. Teaching Pronunciation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

124

GA 4715 An Ghaeilge i sochaí na hÉireann

Seimeastar an Fhómhair , 2015-2016

RÉASÚNAÍOCHT

Feasacht na mac léinn maidir le teangacha agus feidhmeanna teangacha a ardú. Tuiscint a thabhairt do mhic léinn i leith na Gaeilge mar cheann de theangacha an domhain. Eolas a thabhairt do mhic léinn ar áit agus ar chomhthéacs na Gaeilge i sochaí na hÉireann. Léargas a thabhairt do mhic léinn ar ionad agus ar fheidhm na

Gaeilge sa saol poiblí in Éirinn. Mic léinn a spreagadh le machnamh a dhéanamh ar bhuncheisteanna sochtheangeolaíochta. Staidéar a dhéanamh ar logainmneacha agus ar ainmneacha pearsanta na hÉireann idir chiall, chúlra, bhunú, bhéarlú agus seachadadh agus ar thábhacht an dinnseanchais sa lá atá inniu ann.

Forbairt a dhéanamh ar scileanna teanga agus scileanna cumarsáide na mac léinn ó thaobh labhairt agus scríobh na Gaeilge.

TORTHAÍ FOGHLAMA

Ar chríochnú an mhodúil seo ba cheart go mbeadh: eolas ag mic léinn ar theangacha an domhain ó thaobh líon, finte agus aicmí de eolas ag mic léinn ar shaintréithe na Gaeilge ó thaobh comhréire agus foghraíochta de cur amach ag mic léinn ar straitéisí an stáit i leith chothú na Gaeilge sa phobal tuiscint ag mic léinn ar bhunchoincheapa na sochtheangeolaíochta cur amach ag mic léinn ar phleanáil teanga léargas ag mic léinn ar fheidhm na Gaeilge sa dlí, sna meáin agus sa chóras oideachais tuiscint ag mic léinn ar chúlra logainmneacha agus ainmneacha pearsanta in Éirinn, cúrsaí polaitíochta, sóisialta agus teanga san áireamh eolas ag mic léinn ar bhéarlú logainmneacha agus ainmneacha na hÉireann tuiscint ag mic léinn ar sheachadadh ainmneacha ó ghlúin go glúin, agus na hathruithe a leanann dá bharr an bunfhoclóir a bhaineann le teangeolaíocht agus le léann na n-ainmneacha ar eolas ag mic léinn go dtiocfadh feabhas ar chumas cainte agus cumas cumarsáide an mhic léinn

ÁBHAR AN MHODÚIL

Cad is teanga ann, Gaeilge i measc theangacha an domhain, saintréithe na Gaeilge, áit agus comhthéacs na

Gaeilge i sochaí na hÉireann, straitéisí an stáit don Ghaeilge sa phobal, iompú teanga, cothú teanga, buanú teanga, pleanáil teanga le tagairt ar leith don dlí, do na meáin chumarsáide agus don chóras oideachais.

Logainmneacha i gcoitinne, ciall agus tuiscintí an fhocail ‘dinnseanchas,’ le béim ar an tírdhreach,agus ar an gcóras ainmnithe. Seachadadh, polaitíocht agus cúlra sóisialta na logainmneacha. Feidhmeanna agus stádas na topografaíochta in Éirinn. Forbairt na n-ainmneacha pearsanta, idir ainmneacha baiste,sloinnte agus cúrsaí armais. Béarlú na n-ainmneacha agus na logainmneacha.

Forbairt a dhéanamh ar scileanna teanga agus scileanna cumarsáide na mac léinn ó thaobh labhairt agus scríobh na Gaeilge.

MEASÚNÓIREACHT

125

An Modúl ar fad

Tinreamh, Dúthracht +

Rannpháirtíocht

Tionscadal Seimineáir

Aiste Thaighde

Páipéar Ceann Cúrsa

Iomlán

Tionscadal Seimineáir

Ábhar , Foinsí + Taighde

Samplaí + Nualácht

Cruinneas+ Saibhreas Gaeilge

10%

20%

30%

40%

100%

10%

5%

5%

Aiste Thaighde

Aontóidh an mac léinn teideal nó téama dá rogha féin bunaithe ar ghné éigin de logainmneacha nó den

Ghaeilge sa sochaí le Liam nó le Máire faoi S 6 agus é le leagan isteach i S 12.

Tionscadal Seimineáir

Taighde + cur i láthair ar Shloinnte na hÉireann

i S 11 a chuirfear i láthair é.

Obair ghrúpa, ceathrar i ngach grúpa a bheas i gceist.

An rogha sloinne le clárú le léachtóir an mhodúil.

Bíodh mic léinn ar an eolas agus ar a n-airdeall faoi chaimiléireacht agus faoi bhradscríbhneoireacht.

ATRIAIL

Ábhar an mhodúíl ar fad ar pháipéar Scrúdaithe

AISEOLAS

Teagmháil rialta le foireann na Roinne

Foireann

Ainm Tideal Uaireanta

Oifige

Máire Ní

Neachtai n

Liam Ó

Páircín

An Dr.

Oifig

L68

R121

Guthán

061-

204947

061-

204969

LEABHARLIOSTA:

1. Delap, B. 2007. Ar an taifead: Fís, fuaim agus taifead. Cois Life

Ríomhphost

[email protected]

.ul.ie

[email protected]

2. Flanagan, D, L. 1994. Irish Place Names.Gill & MacMillan

126

3. McCloskey, J. 2001 Guthanna in Éag: an mairfidh an Ghaeilge beo? = Voices silenced: has Irish a

future. Cois Life.

4. Mac Mathúna, L. 1990. Ár dTimpeallacht Logainmneacha Inniu agus Amárach. Coiscéim.

5. Mac Murchaidh, C., 2004. Who needs Irish;: reflections on the importance of the Irish Language

today. Veritas.

6. McKay, P. 1999. A Dictionary of Ulster Place-Names. Cló Ollscoil na Banríona

7. Nic Pháidín,C. agus Ó Cearnaigh, S.,2008. A New View of the Irish Language, Cois Life.

8. Ó Droighneáin, 1966. M. An Sloinnteoir Gaeilge & An tAinmneoir. Coiscéim

9. Ó hIfearnáin,T. agus Ní Neachtain, M. 2012 An tSochtheangeolaíocht: Feidhm agus Tuairisc. Cois Life.

10. Ó Corráin, D., Maguire, F.,1981. Gaelic Persona Names. Academic Press.

11. Ó Maolfabhail, A. 2005. Ó Lyon go Dún Lúiche. Clódhanna Teoranta.

12. Ó Murchú, H., 2008 More Facts about Irish. Coiste na hÉireann do Theangacha Neamhfhorleathna.

.

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Module GE4725: Intermediate German 2

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

RATIONALE:

This module focuses on German language learning based on Leaving Certificate German knowledge. It supports students in establishing a firm basis in the German language, focusing on grammatical correctness and communicative skills. The module is particularly recommended for students who wish to teach German in primary schools.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Upon successful completion of this module, students should have raised their grammatical accuracy in both spoken and written German to B1 level [Common European

Framework of Reference for Languages]. improved their oral communication skills developed a fundamental language awareness

Affective: Attitude and Values

Upon successful completion of this module, students should have developed a fundamental inter-cultural and language awareness.

Psychomotor: Skills and Capabilities

Not applicable

MODULE CONTENT:

German Language course based on the textbook “em-Brückenkurs“, chapter 1-5. See http://www.hueber.de/em-neu/ .

Topics and Grammar:

1. Work and Leisure time, Subjunctive II and final clauses

2. Family, Modal verbs and reflexive verbs

3. Celebrations, Temporal conjunctions, temporal prepositions

4. School, Past and verbs demanding prefixes

5. Eating and Drinking, Text grammar and the passive

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

Continuous assessment throughout the course. In-class assessment in week 12. (For breakdown of marks see individual course descriptions.)

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All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

Mood of repetition: written examination

FEEDBACK:

Individual feedback will be provided during office hours and by appointment.

STAFF:

Name Title Office

Office

Hour/s

Office Telephone Email

Helmut

Grugger

Aneka

Meier

Lecturer

Lektorin

Wednesday,

11.00-11.45 tbc

C107

G65a

77-4779

20-4338

[email protected]e

[email protected]

READING LIST:

Primary Readings

Course book:Perlmann-Balme, M. et al., 2008. em neu, Lektion 1-5. Kursbuch und Arbeitsbuch. Würzburg:

Hueber

Supplementary Readings

Hering, A. et al., 2002. em Übungsgrammatik. Würzburg: Hueber.

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Module GY4743 - Economic Geography: Globalisation and Uneven

Development

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

RATIONALE:

We live in an unequal world characterised by a high degree of unevenness in the spatial distribution of economic activity. This unevenness is evident in the way in which both the production and the consumption of goods and services are highly concentrated in certain places, while being largely absent from other localities. According to the World Bank, half of the world’s production fits within one and a half percent of its land area. At the same time the geography of economic activity is subject to on-going and sometimes dramatic change over time: some places that were once prosperous are now struggling economically, while other, formerly “backward”, places have experienced major economic “booms”. This module will help to elucidate patterns of development and underdevelopment, and the problems that are created for localities, regions and nations by the increasingly fluid geography of economic activity.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Understand debates about contemporary globalisation and technological change, and their links to spatial patterns of economic activity at the international, regional and local scales

Critically evaluate some of the main theoretical and conceptual frameworks used by geographers to elucidate the processes of uneven development

Present an integrated analysis of issues in economic geography, by synthesizing material from lectures, field studies and independent reading

MODULE CONTENT:

The topics to be covered in the module will normally include the following. The coverage of particular topics will vary from year to year.

Approaches to the study of economic geography

Characteristics and development of the capitalist system of production

Technological change and its spatial impacts

Transnational corporations, foreign direct investment and economic globalisation

De-industrialisation and the growth of the service economy

The transformation of work and employment

New information and communication technologies and the changing geographies of services

Innovation, industrial clusters and the knowledge economy

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MODULE ASSESSMENT:

Tutorial attendance and participation: 5 per cent

In term essay (2,000 to 3,000 words): 25 per cent

Final examination (two hours): 75 per cent

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

Formal examination worth 100% in the September repeats

FEEDBACK:

Individualised written feedback on coursework is provided to each student. Corrections and detailed comments are also provided on all exam scripts (available on Viewing Day).

STAFF:

Office Telephone Email Name Title Office

Hour/s

Des McCafferty

Prof. TBA

READING LIST:

204 204317 [email protected]

Primary Readings

1. Coe, N., Kelly, P. and Yeung, H. W-C. (2007) Economic Geography: A Contemporary Introduction.

Oxford: Blackwell.

2. Dicken, P. (2011) Global Shift: Mapping the Changing Contours of the World Economy, 6 th

ed.

London: Sage.

3. Mackinnon, D. & Cumbers, A. (2011) An Introduction to Economic Geography: Globalization, Uneven

Development and Place, 2 nd

ed. Harlow: Pearson – Prentice Hall.

4. Sokol, M. (2011) Economic Geographies of Globalization: A Short Introduction. Cheltenham: Edward

Elgar.

5. Wood, A. and Roberts, S. (2011) Economic Geography. Places, Networks and Flows. London:

Routledge.

Supplementary Readings

1. Knox. P. Agnew, J. and McCarthy, L. (2003) The Geography of the World Economy, 4 th

ed. London:

Hodder Education.

2. Stutz, F.P. and Warf, B. (2007) The World Economy, 5 th

ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson –

Prentice Hall.

3. In addition to the above, students will be required to read a number of journal articles in advance of, and for discussion at, tutorials.

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Module HI4737: Contemporary United States 1945-present

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

RATIONALE:

From the prosperous fifties through the turbulent sixties, the recessionary seventies and reactionary eighties, post-World War 2 America has been a dominant power in the world. Since the ending of the Cold

War in 1989, America is regarded as the only superpower. This course will chart the main events and issues that shaped the United States during this period. Political, social and cultural aspects will be examined as well as America’s role in the wider world. The overarching issues of race, class and gender will be explored and key and historical moments such as Mc Carthyism, Cuba, Black power, Vietnam, and Watergate will be critically evaluated.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

On completion of this module, students will be able to:

Cognitive: Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis, Evaluation

Identify key movements and significant historical moments in late 20 th

century United States history.

Describe the main changes in the political, social, cultural, and economic arenas during the period.

Assess and appraise primary source documents.

Discuss the main arguments, opinions and assertions of historians.

Analyse and critically evaluate the current scholarly writing on key issues.

Construct, develop and sustain an historical argument based on evidence.

Affective: Attitude and Values

Differentiate between left and right ideological positions.

Acknowledge differences between historical and current thinking on key issues such as race and gender.

Challenge and question the assertions of historians.

Psychomotor: Skills and Capabilities

Not applicable

MODULE CONTENT:

The lectures will address the following key areas:

The aftermath of war.

The Cold War begins -- Containment and Korea.

Mc Carthyism at home.

“They liked Ike” -- America under Eisenhower.

Kennedy, Camelot and Cuba.

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L.B.J. and The Great Society.

Civil rights and Black power.

Vietnam.

The counterculture of the sixties -- the politics of protest.

Nixon -- the Imperial Presidency abroad.

Nixon -- Watergate.

Ford and Carter -- The interlude.

“It seemed like nothing happened.”

Revolution of the Right -- Reagan.

The “teflon presidency.”

The end of the Cold War.

Liberalism regained?

Conclusions.

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

1. 30%- Film Review: Invasion of the Body Snatchers or Good night and Good Luck (Due week 5:

Hardcopy to be handed in to Arts Office and electronic copy to be submitted to Turnitin by Monday

October 6th by 4pm). Review guidelines are available in my lecturenotes folder.

( \\lecturenotes\bromellu )

2. 20%- Reading Responses: Each student will write two short (1-page, double-spaced, 1" margins,

12pt. font) critical responses to selected assigned readings. Readings will be available in my lecturenotes folder. (Due weeks 8 and 10 on Thursday 30th October and Thursday 13th November:

To be emailed to [email protected]

in Arts Office with Hi4737 reading response 1 or 2

in the subject line)

3. 50% - Research paper on a topic of choice based on one monograph and at least 2 contemporary

journal articles.(3000 words max) Each student will choose one book from the reading list (or another book, both to be agreed with lecturer) which focuses on a theme or issue in America between 1960 and 1990 (e.g. L.B.J. the Great Society, civil rights, Vietnam, women’s rights, Nixon,

Watergate. You might also choose a book and articles that deal with areas not always focused on in the textbooks such as art or music, for example.) The articles will also focus on the same or similar theme or issue and will have been published between 1990 and 2013 to reflect contemporary scholarly thinking. The articles need not necessarily be from History journals. I do not want summaries of the book or of the articles. You should look for key points that the book and articles make and assess whether they agree with the accepted view of this era or whether they contradict or challenge all or part of it. You should also state whether they contradict each other. You should examine the sources used by the authors and state whether you think they were good choices. Most importantly, you must analyse the authors’ conclusions and key findings and say whether you agree with them or not and why. (Due: Hardcopy to be handed in to Arts Office–on Tuesday December

16th by 4pm)

Please note that for every day your paper is late, you will be docked one letter grade; B1 will drop to C1

for example. This will be the case for every assignment.

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

133

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

100% exam

FEEDBACK:

History Department Feedback sheet on hardcopy written assignments. Electronic comments on email assignments.

STAFF:

Name Title Office

Office

Hour/s

Office Telephone Email

Dr. Úna Ní

Bhroiméil

Lecturer By appointment

L105 Ext 4380 [email protected]

READING LIST:

Primary Readings

Paul Boyer, Promises to keep: The United States since World War 11, 3 rd

edition (Boston MA: Wadsworth,

2004)

Supplementary Readings

A full reading list is available in my lecturenotes folder. ( \\lecturenotes\bromellu )

134

Module MC4714: SOCIOLOGY OF THE MEDIA

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

LECTURERS: Professor Michael J. Breen

Dr. Tony Langlois

T206 LECTURE LOCATION:

Course Description

This module introduces students to issues of media sociology such as the role of the mass media in the social construction of reality; the forces that shape content; minority issues in media; the media audience; and media producers. The primary objective of the course is to help students become critical consumers of mass media products. In practice the course this semester will focus on media content, media producers, media audiences, and media effects.

Moodle

The College’s virtual Learning Environment, Moodle, will be used interactively in this course.

Core Text (purchase required)

• Devereux, E. (2013). Understanding the Media (3 rd

edition). London :Sage.

Other Texts (purchase optional)

• Patterson, Thomas E. (2013). Informing the News. New York: Vintage Press.

• Shoemaker, P. J. and Reese, S. D. (1996) Mediating the message: Theories of influences on mass media content. White Plains, N.Y: Longman

Required Readings

The primary textbooks are listed above. In addition, a secondary bibliography will be distributed via

Moodle and additional readings will be posted on Moodle.

Lectures

There is one lecture each week on Monday from 11 -12 and a double lecture on Thursday from 2-4.

Students are expected to be punctual for lectures and a prompt start can facilitate a timely finish!

The Monday lecture will focus on a series of guided readings which students will be expected to have read before class. The Thursday lecture will focus on the course core and will follow the core text with readings assigned each week. There will be additional material references from the secondary bibliography.

Students are required to attend all lectures each week. Much emphasis will be placed on student involvement. You are expected to read any required material thoroughly before coming to lectures and you should come to class ready to show evidence of original and critical thought on the subject at hand.

135

Summary of Grading for the Course

Media Diary

Content Analysis

Terminal Essay

General participation

Moodle Discussion

Due 3pm Friday of Week 4

Due 3pm Friday of Week 8

15%

25%

Due 3pm Thursday of Week 13 40%

10%

10%

Total: 100%

NOTE: You must pass each section, i.e. a minimum of 40% in each section, to pass overall; failure

in any section will result in overall failure. As the media industry operates strictly to deadlines, no extension will be given and deadlines are to be regarded as absolute. To this end, material will not be accepted after a deadline and such material will be graded 0%, thus resulting in an overall

F.

Examinations & Grading

The media diary will take the form of an individual diary which details all media content3 consumed by the student for a one week (Mon-Fri) period in an Excel spreadsheet. Each diary will be accompanied by a brief review of the listed content. The diary and the review must be typed and the review should not exceed 600 words. The deadline is 3pm Friday of Week 4.

The content analysis assignment is a substantial portion of the final grade. Students are free to choose their own specific area for analysis. The analysis will be based on one week of media content drawn from a daily newspaper source. The analysis should be in the region of 1000 words excluding tables and figures. It must be typed and conform to either APA or modified Harvard style. The grade awarded for the content analysis may be subject to oral interview. The deadline is 3pm Friday of Week 8.

The terminal essay will be in the last week of term. The format will be of a general essay type. There will be choice. Essays must encompass lecture material, prescribed reading, and recommended reading. The essay will also seek evidence of critical reflection. Essay titles will be announced in Week 9. The deadline is 3pm

Thursday of Week 13.

As an aid to critical reflection, (a required component of the terminal essay grade) there will be a series of discussion threads on the Moodle site. Every student is expected to contribute regularly to these threads.

Equally, students are expected to take an active role in class discussions.

Students who fail the course will be required to take the autumn repeat examination. This will be a 100% examination on which the student’s final result will be based, i.e., coursework during the year cannot contribute to a repeat examination.

3

Media content here refers to the classic seven mass media: books, newspapers, radio, television, magazines, film, and sound recordings.

136

Module MH 4715: Measure

Autumn Semester, 2015-2016

RATIONALE:

In this module, fundamental ideas for measuring length, area and volume are discussed. Mathematical tools such as functions, differentiation and integration will be studied so that they can be used to find numerical values of measures of length, area and volume.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

Cognitive: On completion of this module, students will be able to:

demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main mathematical ideas involved in measuring lengths, areas and volumes; use the concept of function and apply differentiation and integration techniques to solve problems (eg determine tangent lines, calculate areas and volumes, etc).

Affective: Not applicable

Psychomotor: Not applicable

MODULE CONTENT:

functions and their graphs; sine and cosine; natural logarithm and exponential function; tangent lines and slope; derivatives of functions; differentiation rules; antiderivatives; measuring areas; Riemann sums; integration; Fundamental Theorem of Calculus; measuring volumes; Cavalieri's Principle; measuring lengths; parametric curves.

MODULE ASSESSMENT:

10% for attendance and homework submission (1% per week)

24% for the mid-semester written exam

66% for the end-of-semester written exam (2 hours)

All students are required to familiarise themselves with Appendix Three (Coursework Guidelines) of the

Student Handbook, particularly the section concerning cheating.

REPEAT ASSESSMENT:

100% for the annual written repeat exam in August (2.5 hours)

FEEDBACK:

Homework is discussed, and feedback is given, in the tutorials.

137

STAFF:

Name Title Office Hour/s Office Telephone

Norbert

Hoffmann

Dr By appointment, or just knock at my door!

READING LIST:

Primary Readings

1 Lang, S. (2002). Short Calculus. New York. Springer.

G 22 061

77-4776

Email

[email protected]

2 Priestley, W.M. (1979). Calculus: An Historical Approach. New York. Springer.

3 Hsiang, W.Y. (1995). A Concise Introduction to Calculus. Singapore. World Scientific.

Supplementary Readings

1 Edwards, C.H. Jr. (1979). The Historical Development of the Calculus. New York. Springer.

2 Weiss, S. (1977). Elementary College Mathematics. Boston. Prindle, Weber & Schmidt.

3 Gowers, T. (2002). Mathematics: a very short introduction. Oxford. Oxford University Press.

138

Module Code: MU4712

Module Title: Introduction to Music II

Student Year

: B.Ed Arts Elective (Semester 5)

Course Title:

Music

Semester Offered:

Autumn

Contact Hours

: 3 hours per week

Lecture Format

: Lectures and occasional tutorial

Course Aims and Objectives:

To give the student an understanding of the rudiments and language of music with a course of ear training and keyboard harmony.

Course Syllabus:

The construction of intervals, scales, modes and chords; the theory of figured bass as a system of writing and analysing chord progressions; the bass line as a foundation for understanding tonal harmony; the elements of melodic construction in classical music; simple textures in piano and vocal music; the skills necessary for aural dictation and analysis of simple melodies and harmonic progressions; definitions of technical terms; the skills necessary for singing a melody from sight; common rhythmic patterns in a variety of metres; case studies in music history.

Course Learning Outcomes:

On successful completion of this module the student should be able to: compose a short piece of music for piano and voice notate from aural dictation a minor-key melody and minor-key harmonic progression analyse the chords in a short tonal extract using figured bass and roman numerals write definitions of technical terms create musical examples that demonstrate technical definitions transpose minor-key melodies transfer music from short to open score and vice versa notate chords and their inversions sing a simple minor-key melody from sight identify intervals by ear conduct basic patterns identify cadences write a chord progression incorporating a modulation to a related key

Reading List (Required Reading):

TAYLOR: E.: The AB Guide to Music Theory, vols. 1 and 2 (London: Associated Board, 1989)

Reading List (Recommended Reading):

PISTON, W. & DEVOTO, M.: Harmony (London: Gollancz, 3rd ed., 1987)

139

Description of teaching resources and equipment used for course delivery:

PowerPoint, Local Area Network, Sound Systems, Anthologies, Internet, Musical Instruments, Scores

Method of assessment:

A student’s grade in this module is determined by his/her performance in the following:

Two in-class examinations in weeks 6 & 12 (50% X 2)

Repeat Assessment: Autumn Repeat: Examination (100%)

How the assessment relates to the learning outcomes above:

The modes of assessment are designed to direct and enhance student learning, and to determine whether or not students have acquired the understanding of content and developed the skills specified in the learning outcomes.

Detail the grading/marking criteria:

The student’s grade is based on: (i) demonstrated understanding of the topics covered; (ii) ability to apply theoretical frameworks, key concepts and methods of analysis where relevant; and (iii) evidence of independent reading and research on module content.

Please indicate if you provide any formal/informal feedback to students in relation to their assessment:

Both formal and informal feedback on in-term assessed coursework is routinely provided to all students.

Feedback on final examinations is provided on request.

Please indicate if you engage in any form of reflective practice with your students:

Aspects of module delivery are discussed throughout the semester.

Please indicate if you engage in any formal/informal student evaluation of your course:

Formal and informal student evaluations of teaching are undertaken

Lecturers:

Dr. Gareth Cox (G.26) [email protected]

Ex 204588

140

Dr. Michael Murphy (M112) [email protected]

Ex 204335

Dr. Paul Collins (G27) [email protected]

Ex 204361

Office Hours: By appointment or after relevant lectures/tutorials

141

Christian Anthropology in Modern Culture

B Ed Elective in Theology & Religious Studies

Student Year :

Lectures:

Tutorials:

B Ed Year 3, Autumn Semester 2014

Prof Eamonn Conway

To be advised

Contact Hours: (per week

)

Teaching Formats:

3 hours inc tutorials

Lectures, Presentations, Book Reports,.

Module Aims and Objectives:

To enable students to gain an in-depth knowledge of Christian Anthropology in contemporary society with particular regard to the influences of consumerism and technology.

Module Learning Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of this module, the student should be able to:

Outline the key themes in Christian anthrology and in the Christian vision of the human person.

Formulate an in-depth analysis and critique and evaluation of selected themes in consumerism and technology from a Christian anthroplogical perspective.

Discuss and debate key moral and ethical issues concerning consumerism and technology as they affect people in society today.

Reading List (most reading material will be available on MOODLE)

KEY TEXT (please purchase)

John Sachs, The Christian Vision of Humanity, Minnesota: Liturgical Press, 1991.

142

On Contemporary Culture

(a) Key Readings

1. Pope Francis, Evangelii Gaudium (available free on-line)

2. William T Cavanaugh, Being Consumed: Economics and Christian Desire, Cambridge: Eerdmans, 2008

(consider purchasing)

3. Tom Beaudoin, Consuming Faith: integrating who we are with what we buy, Lanham: Sheed and

Ward 2003.

4. Vincent Miller, Consuming Religion: Christian Faith and Practice in a Consumer Culture, London:

Continuum, 2004 [See ‘consumer desires’ and ‘religious desires ‘ in the index; also pp 116 – 130]

5. Rowan Williams, Lost Icons: Reflections on Cultural Bereavement, Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 2000,

Chapter 1

6. Michael Kelly, Trading Paces. From Rat Race to Hen Run, Dublin: O’Brien Press 2008.

(b) Additional Readings

1. Maureen Junker-Kenny and Miklos Tomka, (Eds) “Faith in a Society of Instant Gratification”,

Concilium, London: SCM Press, 1999/4. Especially the articles by Bauman and Tomka.

2. Michael A Gonzalez, Shopping: Christian Explorations of Daily Living, Minneapolis: Fortress, 2010

3. John F Kavanaugh, Following Christ in a Consumer Culture, Maryknoll: Orbis, 1981

On Christian Anthropology and Christian Understanding of Desire

1. St Augustine, City of God, esp Part V, Book 19.

2. St. Augustine, On the Morals of the Catholic Church esp pghs 4-10; 13; and 18.

3. Rik Van Nieuwenhove, An Introduction to Medieval Theology, Cambridge University Press, 2012 (esp indexed references to ‘desire’)

Background Reading

1. Jean Baudrillard, The Consumer Society: Myths and Structures, London: Sage, 1998

2. Eamonn Conway, “The Commodification of Religion and the Implications for theology - Reflections from the Irish Experience”, Bulletin ET Vol 17 (2006/1) Special Issue

3. Eamonn Conway, “God in the Workplace –challenges for third-level chaplaincy”, The Furrow, May

2012, 274 – 281.

143

Grading/marking criteria:

Grade Characteristics of typical answer

A1

Relevant and precise treatment of the subject matter, showing a comprehensive and in-depth understanding of the issues. Evidence of considerable reading, and good critical reasoning. Answer is well structured, and general standard of writing is very high. As good as can reasonably be expected.

Marks Range Classification

75 - 100

A2 Most of the qualities of an A1 answer are present, though not to the same degree. In particular, there is not quite the same depth or breadth of coverage.

70 - 75

B1

B2

B3

C1

C2

C3

D1

Superior, but not exceptional, answer, reflecting considerable effort. Plenty of material, which is well written up, but does not demonstrate as deep/critical an understanding as students in the A range. Does not

“make the material her own”.

65 – 70

Shows more evidence of reading than a B3 student, but arguments not as well constructed as with a B1 answer.

Overall though, a very good answer to the question.

60 - 65

The modal (“common or garden”) grade. Answer addresses the question in a competent fashion, showing a good grasp of concepts, but is based mainly on material covered in lectures and practicals/tutorials, rather than on independent reading

55 – 60

Addresses the question, but same some errors in understanding and no evidence of any reading.

Even less precise answer than at C1, where some good points are undermined by many inaccuracies. Confused on some of the key concepts.

50 – 55

45 – 50

Very ‘thin’ answer. Student typically does not write very much, and what is written reveals little more than general knowledge of the topic.

40 - 45

Weak answer considered not good enough to be awarded a pass. This will often be because of the a failure to adequately address the question set, i.e. not enough

35 – 40

First Class Honours

Q.C.A >/= 3.4

Second Class Honours

Grade 1

QCA >/= 3.00

Second Class Honours

Grade 2

Q.C.A >/=2.6

Third Class Honours

Q.C.A. >/=2.00

.

144

D2

F relevant material.

Very weak answer. Contains little of relevance, and many errors/misunderstandings. Demonstrates an understanding of what the questions is about, but little else.

30 - 35

Answer reveals little evidence of engagement with the module as a whole, and therefore does not merit the award of any modular credit. Student will have to take assessments in the module again, either at the annual repeat examinations in September, or by repeating the year

0 – 30

Fail

Q.C.A. less than 2.0

Compensating Fail

Methods of Assessment

: See separate Sheet.

Please note:

Course work submitted after the due date will be penalised.

Students who fail the module will be required to undertake a written repeat examination for 100% of the marks. An I Grade examination paper will be provided for those exempted from aspects of the module assessment.

Additional Course Information:

Students are required to attend all lectures and tutorials, and avoidable absences will be penalised.

145

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