Short-Circuit Current Rating (Calculations and Marking) 2008 SPD

Short-Circuit Current Rating (Calculations and Marking) 2008 SPD
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
Short-Circuit Current Rating (SCCR)
The 2008 NEC® has a new definition of “Short-Circuit Current Rating” (SCCR).
Previously there was no definition of short-circuit current rating (sometimes
referred to as “withstand rating”), although it was referenced in several
sections on the marking and proper application of various types of equipment.
Because the term is referenced in multiple locations of the Code, it was
necessary to add a definition to Article 100 of the NEC®.
Article 100 Definitions
Short-Circuit Current Rating. The prospective symmetrical fault current at
a nominal voltage to which an apparatus or system is able to be connected
without sustaining damage exceeding defined acceptance criteria.
Figure 2
What is Short-Circuit Current Rating?
Short-Circuit Current Rating (SCCR) is the maximum short-circuit current a
component or assembly can safely withstand when protected by a specific
overcurrent protective device(s) or for a specified time. Adequate short-circuit
current rating is required per NEC® 110.10.
AWG
Class J Fuse
Wire Range Max. Amp
2-6
400A
2-14
200A
2-14
175A
Resulting
SCCR
200kA
50kA
100kA
This power distribution block, protected with Class
J fuses, is rated for use on a circuit capable of
delivering no more than the SCCR kA shown (kA
rms sym. or DC amps 600V maximum).
Figure 1
Figure 1 illustrates a Power Distribution Block (PDB) that has a default SCCR
of 10kA per UL 508A SB4 Table SB4.1. However, this PDB has been
combination tested and UL Listed with higher SCCRs when in combination
with specific types and maximum amp rating current-limiting fuses. The label is
marked with a 200kA SCCR when protected by 400A or less Class J fuses
and the conductors on the lineside and loadside are in the range of 2 to
6AWG.
When analyzing assemblies for short-circuit current rating, the interrupting
rating of overcurrent protective devices and the short-circuit current rating of
all other components affect the overall equipment/assembly short-circuit
current rating. For instance, the short-circuit current rating of an industrial
control panel typically can not be greater than the lowest interrupting rating of
any fuse or circuit breaker, or the lowest short-circuit current rating of all other
components in the enclosure.
Why is Short-Circuit Current Rating Important?
Short-circuit current ratings provide the level of fault current that a component
or piece of equipment can safely withstand (based on a shock hazard or a fire
hazard external to the enclosure). Without knowing the available fault current
and short-circuit current rating, it is impossible to determine if components or
equipment can be safely installed.
Specification and installation of new equipment with higher short-circuit current
ratings, such as 200,000 amps, makes it easy to meet the requirements of the
NEC®. In addition, when equipment is later moved within a facility or from
plant to plant, equipment with the highest ratings can be moved without
worrying about unsafe situations that might arise from placing the equipment
in a new location where the available short-circuit current is higher than the
old location and now above the rating of the equipment.
“Short-circuit current rating” is not the same as “interrupting rating” and the two
must not be confused. Interrupting rating is the maximum short-circuit current
an overcurrent protective device can safely interrupt under standard test
conditions; it does not ensure protection of the circuit components or
equipment. Adequate interrupting rating is required per NEC® 110.9. The fuse
in Figure 2 has a UL Listed interrupting rating of 300kA @ 600Vac or less.
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
87
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
SCCR Marking Requirements & Compliance
What are the Short-Circuit Current Rating Marking
Requirements?
The NEC® has requirements for certain components and equipment to be
marked with their short-circuit current rating. The important sections of the
Code that require the marking of the short-circuit current rating include the
following areas.
Meter Disconnect Switches: 230.82(3) permits a meter disconnect switch
(rated up to 600V) ahead of the service disconnecting means, provided the
meter disconnect switch has a short-circuit current rating adequate for the
available short-circuit current.
Industrial Control Panels: 409.110 requires that an industrial control panel
be marked with its short-circuit current rating (see Figure 3).
Motor Controllers: 430.8 requires that motor controllers be marked with their
short-circuit current rating. There are three exceptions:
• For fractional horsepower motor controllers
• Two horsepower or less general-purpose motor controllers, and
• Where the short-circuit current rating is marked on the assembly
How to Assure Compliance?
To assure proper application, the designer, installer and inspector must assure
that the marked short-circuit current rating of a component or equipment is not
exceeded by the calculated available fault current.
In order to assure compliance it is necessary to:
1. Determine the available short-circuit current or fault current at the point of
installation of the component or equipment.
2. Assure the component or equipment marked short-circuit current rating (see
Figure 3 for example) is equal to or greater than the available fault current.
Figure 3 (Courtesy IAEI)
Industrial Machinery Electrical Panel: 670.3(A) requires the nameplate on
industrial machinery to include the short-circuit current rating of the machine
industrial control panel. In previous editions of the NEC® (2002 Edition) and
NFPA 79 (2002 Edition), the industrial machine nameplate was required to
include only the interrupting rating of the machine overcurrent protective
device, if furnished. This marking was misleading as it did not represent the
short-circuit current rating of the machine industrial control panel, but could be
misinterpreted as such.
Figure 4 illustrates compliance of short-circuit ratings from a system
perspective. Any installation where the component or equipment marked shortcircuit current rating is less than the available fault current is a lack of
compliance, a safety hazard, and violation of 110.10. In these cases, the
equipment cannot be installed until the component or equipment short-circuit
current rating is sufficient or the fault current is reduced to an acceptable level.
Interior of modern industrial machinery panel.
Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Equipment with Multimotor and
Combination Loads: 440.4(B) requires the nameplate of this equipment to be
marked with its short-circuit current rating. There are three exceptions for
which this requirement does not apply:
• One and two family dwellings
• Cord and attachment-plug connected equipment, or
• Equipment on a 60A or less branch circuit
So for most commercial and industrial applications, air conditioning and
refrigeration equipment with multimotor and combination loads must have the
short-circuit current rating marked on the nameplate.
88
Figure 4 (Courtesy NJATC)
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
Determining Assembly SCCR: “Two Sweep” Method & Procedures
How to Determine Assembly SCCR
For components, the Short-Circuit Current Rating (SCCR) is typically
determined by product testing. For assemblies, the marking can be
determined through the equipment product listing standard or by an approved
method. With the release of the UL 508A, UL Standard for Safety for Industrial
Control Panels, an industry-approved method is now available. UL 508A,
Supplement SB, provides an analytical method to determine the short-circuit
current rating of an industrial control panel. This method is based upon the
“weakest link” approach. In other words, the assembly marked short-circuit
current rating is limited to the lowest rated component short-circuit current
rating or the lowest rated overcurrent protective device interrupting rating.
Since testing is not required with this method, it is typically the preferred
method to use in determining the assembly SCCR.
There are two basic concepts that must be understood and identified before
analyzing the assembly SCCR per UL 508A, Supplement SB. The first is
power circuit vs. control circuit. The second is branch circuit vs. feeder circuit.
The differences and importance of these concepts are detailed below:
• Per UL 508A: a power circuit is defined as the conductors and
components of branch and feeder circuits. A branch and feeder circuit
carries main line power current to loads such as motors, lighting, heating,
appliances and general use receptacles. A control circuit is a circuit that
carries the electric signals directing the performance of a controller, and
which does not carry the main power current. Only devices in power
circuits and overcurrent devices protecting control circuits affect the
assembly SCCR.
• Per UL 508A: a branch circuit is defined as the conductors and
components following the final branch circuit overcurrent protective device
protecting a load. A feeder circuit is the conductors and circuitry on the
supply side of the branch circuit overcurrent protective device(s). In some
cases, as will be discussed later; current-limiting devices in the feeder
circuit can be used to increase the SCCR of branch circuit
components. In addition, larger spacings are required for components
used in feeder circuits versus when used in branch circuits. This is
especially important for power distribution and terminal blocks, if used in
feeder circuits.
Using the “Two Sweep” Method Based on UL 508A
After all the power circuit components and overcurrent devices protecting
control circuits have been identified, the “Two Sweep” method based on UL
508A can be used to determine the assembly Short-Circuit Current Rating
(SCCR). The purpose of performing two sweeps in this method is to assure
that the overcurrent protective device interrupting rating (or SCCR for some
devices) are never increased by an upstream overcurrent protective device.
UL 508A requirements strictly prohibit any overcurrent protective device
interrupting rating (or SCCR for some devices) from being raised beyond the
marked interrupting rating by an upstream overcurrent protective device.
Hence series rating of overcurrent devices is prohibited.
Sweep 1: The Component Protection Sweep
The first sweep reviews all components in the branch, feeder, sub-feeder and
supply circuits, and determines the component with the lowest SCCR.
Sweep 2: The Overcurrent Protection Sweep
The second sweep reviews all overcurrent protection devices in the branch,
feeder and supply circuits, and determines the lowest interrupting rating (or
short-circuit current rating for some devices).
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
The lowest rating from Sweep 1 and Sweep 2 identifies the assembly SCCR.
Because this method determines the assembly SCCR, it may be referred to as
the “FIND IT.”
Note: It is necessary to complete both Sweeps and all Steps to determine
an assembly’s SCCR marking. If an assembly SCCR marking is
inadequate, then see the “FIX IT” portion at the end of this section for
suggestions on how to increase an assembly’s marked SCCR.
Procedures for the “Two Sweep” Method
Each sweep of this method is broken down into steps. Sweep 1 has five steps
and Sweep 2 has three steps. The following shows the procedure for
completing the steps of both sweeps.
Sweep 1: Verifying assembly component SCCRs
Step 1: Determine the component SCCR for each branch circuit:
• Identify all component short-circuit current ratings and any special
conditions that exist to utilize the ratings by one of the following methods:
1. The SCCR based on the default ratings per UL 508A Table SB4.1
(see Table SCCR1 - Default SCCR Ratings).
2. The SCCR marked on the component or instruction sheet provided with
the component.
3. The SCCR based on testing with a specific overcurrent protective device
and/or combination of components in accordance with product standards
and documented by the manufacturer. Example: a motor controller may
have an SCCR of 100kA with a 30A Class J fuse, but only 5kA with a
30A circuit breaker.
• Take and apply the lowest SCCR of any component used in a branch
circuit as the SCCR for that branch circuit. Repeat this for each branch
circuit in the assembly.
• Note the lowest branch circuit SCCR for every branch circuit in the
assembly or panel.
Step 2: Determine the component SCCR for each feeder circuit
(includes supply, feeders and sub-feeders):
• Identify all component SCCRs and any special conditions that exist to
utilize the ratings by one of the following methods:
1. The SCCR based on the default ratings per UL 508A Table SB4.1
(see Table SCCR1 - Default SCCR Ratings).
2. The SCCR marked on the component or instruction sheet provided
with the component.
3. The SCCR based on testing with a specific overcurrent protective device
and/or combination of components in accordance with product standards
and documented by the manufacturer. Example: a power distribution
block may have an SCCR of 100kA with a 200A Class J fuse, but only
10kA with a 200A circuit breaker.
• Take and apply the lowest SCCR of any component used in the feeder
circuit as the SCCR of the feeder circuit.
• Note the lowest feeder circuit SCCR.
89
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
Determining Assembly SCCR “Two Sweep” Method Procedures
Step 3: If using a 10kVA or less power transformer in a feeder circuit,
modify the transformer circuit SCCR, if possible, as follows:
• For 10kVA or less power transformers that are in a feeder circuit,
determine if the SCCR of the downstream circuits can be increased by
applying the following procedure:
Step 5: Determine the assembly SCCR for Sweep 1
• Determine the Sweep 1 assembly SCCR by utilizing the lowest rated
branch or feeder circuit SCCR.
End of Sweep 1
1. On the transformer secondary, verify the SCCR of each component and
the interrupting ratings of all overcurrent protective devices.
2. Identify the lowest component SCCR or overcurrent protective device
interrupting rating.
3. If the lowest component SCCR or overcurrent protective device
interrupting rating is 5kA or greater, apply the transformer’s primary
overcurrent protective device interrupting rating to the entire transformer
circuit. Otherwise apply the lowest downstream component SCCR or
overcurrent protective device interrupting rating to the transformer circuit.
• For 5kVA or less power transformers with 120V secondary in the feeder
circuit, determine if the SCCR of the downstream circuits can be increased
by applying the following:
1. On the transformer secondary, verify the SCCR of each component and
the interrupting ratings of all overcurrent protective devices.
2. Identify the lowest component SCCR or overcurrent protective device
interrupting rating.
3. If the lowest component SCCR or overcurrent protective device
interrupting rating is 2kA or greater, apply the transformer’s primary
overcurrent protective device interrupting rating to the entire transformer
circuit. Otherwise apply the lowest downstream component SCCR or
overcurrent protective device interrupting rating to the transformer circuit.
Step 4: If using a current-limiting overcurrent protective device in the
feeder circuit, modify branch circuit component SCCRs (other than branch
circuit overcurrent protection devices such as fuses, circuit breakers,
instantaneous trip circuit breakers or motor circuit protectors - MCPs - and
self-protected combination starters), if possible, as follows:
• If current-limiting overcurrent protective devices are used in the feeder
circuit use the following procedure:
1. Determine the peak let-through value of the current-limiting overcurrent
protective devices.
a)If the overcurrent protective device is a current-limiting fuse,
determine the peak let-through umbrella value dictated by the product
standard for the fuse class and amp rating utilized at the level of fault
current desired (50, 100, 200kA). See Table SCCR2 - UL Umbrella
Limits at Rated Voltage (based on UL 508A Table SB4.2).
b)If the overcurrent protective device is a current-limiting circuit
breaker, manufacturer’s let-through curves can be used to
determine the peak let-through value. A current-limiting circuit breaker
must be listed and marked as current-limiting. It is important to note,
that unlike the fuse industry, UL 489 for molded case circuit breakers
does not have specific industry maximum short-circuit let-through
limits established for each circuit breaker frame size and amp rating.
So the degree of current limitation for the same frame size and amp
rating circuit breaker can vary from one manufacturer to another.
2. Ensure that the peak let-through value is less than any of the SCCRs
determined in Step 1.
3. If condition “2” above is met, apply a short-circuit current rating to
branch circuits fed by the feeder based upon the value of fault current
used to determine the peak let-through value of the current-limiting overcurrent protective device.
90
Sweep 2: Verify assembly overcurrent protective device interrupting rating
(or SCCR for some devices).
Step 1: Determine the interrupting ratings (or SCCR) of all the overcurrent
protective devices used in feeder (includes supply, feeders and sub-feeders)
and branch circuits, as well as those devices protecting control circuits.
Step 2: Determine the lowest overcurrent protective device interrupting rating
or SCCR.
Step 3: Compare the lowest overcurrent protective device interrupting
rating or SCCR with the component SCCRs from Sweep 1, Step 5. The
lowest rating encountered is the assembly SCCR.
This SCCR is then marked on the assembly. If this SCCR is not sufficiently
high enough, there are “FIX IT” solutions at the end of this section that can be
investigated to achieve a higher SCCR marking.
End of Sweep 2
Table: SCCR1 - Default SCCR Ratings (UL 508A Table SB4.1)
Component
Bus bars
Circuit breaker (including GFCI type)
Current meters
Current shunt
Fuse holder
Industrial control equipment
a. Auxiliary devices (overload relay)
b. Switches (other than mercury tube type)
c. Mercury tube switches rated:
• Over 60 amps or over 250 volts
• 25 volts or less, 60 amps or less and over 5kVA
• 250 volts or less and 2kVA or less
Motor controller, rated in horsepower (kW)
a. 0-50 (0-37.5)
b. 51-200 (38-149)
c. 201-400 (150-298)
d. 401-600 (299-447)
e. 601-900 (448-671)
f. 901-1500 (672-1193)
Meter socket base
Miniature or miscellaneous fuse
Receptacle (GFCI type)
Receptacle (other than GFCI)
Supplementary protector
Switch unit
Terminal block or power distribution block
Default
SCCR (kA)
10
5
*
10
10
5
5
5
3.5
1
5**
10**
18**
20**
42**
85**
10
10***
2
10
0.2
5
10
* A SCCR is not required when connected via a current transformer or current
shunt. A directly connected current meter shall have a marked SCCR.
** Standard fault current rating for motor controller rated within specified
horsepower range.
*** The use of a miniature fuse is limited to 125 volt circuits.
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
Verify Assembly Assembly Overcurrent Protective Devices
Table: SCCR2 - UL Umbrella Limits at Rated Voltage (UL 508A Table SB4.2)
Fuse Amp
Between threshold & 50kA
I t x 10
Ip x 10 (kA)
I t x 10
Ip x 10 (kA)
I t x 103
Ip x 103 (kA)
Class CC
15
20
30
15
20
30
60
30
60
100
200
400
600
30
60
100
200
400
600
1
3
6
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
50
60
70
80
90
100
110
125
150
175
200
225
250
300
350
400
450
500
600
700
800
1000
1200
2
2
7
—
—
—
—
10
40
100
400
1200
3000
50
200
500
1600
5200
10000
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
3.5
–
–
–
–
15
–
–
–
40
–
–
–
–
150
–
–
–
–
550
–
–
1,000
–
1,500
–
3,500
3
3
6
—
—
—
—
6
10
14
18
33
45
11
20
22
32
50
65
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
5.0
–
–
–
–
7
–
–
–
9
–
–
–
–
13
–
–
–
–
22
–
–
29
–
37
–
50
2
3
7
3.8
5
7
25
10
40
100
400
1200
3000
50
200
500
1600
5000
10000
0.4
0.6
1
1.5
2
2.5
2.7
3.5
6
8.5
9
11
15
25
30
38
40
50
75
88
115
150
175
225
300
400
550
600
800
1,000
1,200
1,500
3,500
3,500
3
4
7.5
4
5
7
10.5
10
12
16
22
35
50
11
21
25
40
60
80
0.8
1.3
2
3
4
4.5
5.5
7
7
7.2
7.6
8
9
10
11
12
12
12
13
14
15
16
21
22
24
27
28
32
37
37
45
50
65
65
3
3
7
—
—
—
—
11
50
100
400
1600
4000
50
200
500
2000
6000
12000
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
3.5
–
–
–
–
15
–
–
–
40
–
–
–
–
150
–
–
–
–
550
–
–
1,000
–
1,500
–
4,000
4
5
12
—
—
—
—
12
16
20
30
50
70
14
26
32
50
75
100
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
9
–
–
–
–
12
–
–
–
15
–
–
–
–
20
–
–
–
–
35
–
–
46
–
65
–
80
Class RK5
Class T
300V
3
2
3
200kA
Rating
Class RK1
3
100kA
Fuse Type
Class G
2
3
2
Note: These values are UL umbrella limits. Intermediate values shown in the 100kA column for Class J and T fuses are included per UL 248, but have not yet been added to
UL 508A Supplement SB.
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
91
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
Verify Assembly Assembly Overcurrent Protective Devices
Table: SCCR2 - UL Umbrella Limits at Rated Voltage (UL 508A Table SB4.2) (continued)
Fuse Type
Fuse Amp
Rating
Class T & J
600V
1
3
6
Class L
Between threshold & 50kA
I2t x 103
Ip x 103 (kA)
–
–
–
–
–
–
100kA
I2t x 103
Ip x 103 (kA)
0.8
1
1.2
1.5
200kA
I2t x 103
Ip x 103 (kA)
–
–
–
–
2
2.3
–
–
10
–
–
3
3.3
–
–
15
–
–
4
4
–
–
20
–
–
5
5
–
–
25
–
–
5.5
6
–
–
30
7
6
7
7.5
7
12
35
–
–
12
7.5
–
–
40
–
–
17
8
–
–
45
–
–
18
8.5
–
–
50
–
–
22
9
–
–
60
30
8
30
10
30
16
70
–
–
50
12
–
–
80
–
–
60
13
–
–
90
–
–
75
14
–
–
100
60
12
80
14
80
20
110
–
–
100
15
–
–
125
–
–
150
16
–
–
150
–
–
175
17
–
–
175
–
–
225
19
–
–
200
200
16
300
20
300
30
225
–
–
350
23
–
–
250
–
–
450
24
–
–
300
–
–
600
26
–
–
350
–
–
800
29
–
–
400
1,000
25
1,100
30
1,100
45
450
–
–
1,500
36
–
–
500
–
–
2,000
42
–
–
600
2,500
35
2,500
45
2,500
70
700*
–
–
3,500*
50*
–
–
800*
800
1200
1600
2000
2500
3000
4000
5000
6000
4,000*
10000
12000
22000
35000
—
—
—
—
—
50*
80
80
100
110
—
—
—
—
—
4,000*
10000
12000
22000
35000
75000
100000
150000
350000
350000
55*
80
80
100
120
165
175
220
—
—
4,000*
10000
15000
30000
40000
75000
100000
150000
350000
500000
75*
80
120
150
165
180
200
250
300
350
*Value applies to Class T fuses
Note: These values are UL umbrella limits. Intermediate values shown in the 100kA column for Class J and T fuses are included per UL 248, but have not yet been added to
UL 508A Supplement SB.
92
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
About Umbrella Limits
What is a Fuse Umbrella Limit?
UL / CSA / ANCE Fuse Standards set maximum Ip and I2t let-through limits for
short-circuit current performance of current-limiting fuses. The limits vary by
fuse class, amp rating and available short-circuit current. To receive a
listing, a commercially available current-limiting fuse must be tested and
evaluated under short-circuit current tests per the applicable standard and
witnessed by a National Recognized Testing Laboratory (NRTL). One
evaluation criteria of the testing is that the fuse’s Ip and I2t let-through
measured during the short-circuit tests can not exceed the Standard’s
“umbrella limits” for Ip and I2t let-through established for that fuse class, amp
rating, and available short-circuit current*. See Table: SCCR2 - UL Umbrella
Limits at Rated Voltage on the preceding pages for the umbrella limits applicable to most of the current-limiting fuses.
*NOTE: These tests are done at the fuse’s rated voltage, with only one fuse in the
circuit and by controlled closing of the test circuit so that the fuse “starts to arc”
between 60 and 90 degrees on the voltage wave. These test conditions are the most
severe for fuse interruption. In addition, current-limiting fuses are required to have
periodic NRTL witnessed follow-up testing in the same manner. The fuses for NRTL
witnessed follow-up testing are pulled from inventory.
Calculate Assembly SCCR with
Ease & Confidence
What is an umbrella fuse?
An umbrella fuse is a special fuse that is designed to have short-circuit current
Ip and I2t let-through that are at least equal to or greater than the UL / CSA /
ANCE Fuse Standard limit. Umbrella fuses are not intended as commercially
available fuses.
UL has a specific standard for these devices, which is UL248-16 Test Limiters.
UL uses the term “test limiters” for what we refer to as umbrella fuses.
UL 248-16 states:
“…test limiters are calibrated to specific limits of peak let-through current
and clearing I2t at 250, 300, 480, or 600Vac. Test limiters are non-renewable
and current-limiting, with test current ratings up to 200,000 A. They are
calibrated to maximum peak let-through current and clearing I2t limits for the
fuses specified in this Standard and are used for withstand testing of
equipment designed to accept those fuses.”
Umbrella fuses are used for test purposes in qualifying a combination
short-circuit current rating with a specific component. For instance, a
controller manufacturer wants the controller to be marked with a 100,000A
SCCR at 600V when protected by 60A Class J fuses. The NRTL witnessed
tests would be with 60A Class J umbrella fuses in combination with the
controller on a test circuit of 100,000A at 600V. If the results satisfy the UL 508
Industrial Control Standard evaluation criteria, the controller can be labeled
with a 100,000A, 600V SCCR when protected by Class J fuses 60A (or less).
Another use of umbrella fuses is for series rated fuse/circuit breaker
panelboard and switchboard combinations. For more information on series
ratings see the section on Series Rating: Protecting Circuit Breakers.
However, UL 508A Supplement SB4 does not permit series rated
combinations for use in establishing the SCCR for industrial control panels.
Therefore, the interrupting rating of overcurrent devices cannot be raised by
another upstream overcurrent device.
Enhanced Cooper Bussmann® OSCAR™ Software
Speeds Code & Standards Compliance
The new Cooper Bussmann® OSCAR™ Version 2.0 SCCR (Short-Circuit
Current Rating) compliance software easily guides you through entering your
electrical panel’s components and calculates an assembly SCCR. This award
winning, online, essential design tool allows you to comply quickly and
accurately with 2008 NEC® and UL 508A Supplement SB for assembly SCCR
marking requirements:
• Industrial Control Panels [409.110]
• Industrial Machinery Electrical Panels [670.3(A)]
• HVAC Equipment [440.4(B)]
New Project Management Features:
•
•
•
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Simplify your panel design and project organization
Save and edit existing panel designs
Save multiple panels under a single project
Copy existing panels to new projects
New Intuitive Navigation:
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Display your one-line diagram
Select from pre-loaded circuit templates
Identify the “weakest link” component automatically
Print reports and one-line diagrams for required SCCR documentation
Utilize mouse-over tips to enhance your design
Design with Confidence:
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Logic updated to current UL requirements
Extensive 55,000+ component database
Search by partial part number or device rating
Custom device option allows for entering specialized component rating
information
For more information, visit: www.cooperbussmann.com/OSCAR.
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
93
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
Example Using the “Two Sweep” Method: “FIND IT”
“FIND IT”
The following example will illustrate the procedures previously outlined for the
two sweep method to determine the assembly SCCR. It may be helpful to
periodically refer back to the procedures for the two sweep method while
going through this example. The example is based on the industrial control
panel shown in Figure 5 and 6. Figure 5 shows the graphical representation of
the industrial control panel while Figure 6 is the one-line diagram for the
industrial control panel. The ratings for each power circuit component are
detailed in Figure 6. This example illustrates how each sweep and their steps
are performed and documented in the tables. After both sweeps and all steps
have been completed, the result identifies the assembly SCCR (“FIND IT”).
Later, methods are outlined to increase the assembly SCCR (“FIX IT”).
Figure 5
Industrial Control Panel Circuit and Device Descriptions
Circuit
Number
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
94
Device
Descriptions
Molded case circuit breaker protecting an IEC contactor
Self-protected starter protecting an IEC contactor (additional components may be required)
Instantaneous trip circuit breaker (MCP) protecting an IEC starter (special assembly conditions required)
Molded case circuit breaker protecting an IEC starter
Class CC fused switch protecting an IEC starter
Class CC fused switch protecting variable frequency drive and contactor
Molded case circuit breaker and GFCI receptacle
Molded case circuit breaker protecting power transformer
Power distribution block
Class J fused switch
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
Example Using the “Two Sweep” Method: “FIND IT”
Note: It is important to record the voltage ratings for
all components and overcurrent protective devices.
The assembly is marked based upon the lowest or
most restrictive device voltage rating. If there are
devices with slash voltage ratings (such as
480/277V), these are more limiting than straight or
full voltage ratings (such as 480V). Assemblies with
480/277V devices are suitable for only 480/277V
solidly grounded wye systems. These assemblies
cannot be applied on 480V ungrounded, resistance
grounded or corner grounded systems. (See the
section on Slash Voltage Ratings for more
information.)
Figure 6 – One-line Diagram of Industrial Control Panel
Industrial Control Panel Circuit Descriptions and Ratings
Circuit Number
1
Circuit Type
Branch
2
Branch
3
Branch
4
Branch
5
Branch
6
Branch
7
Branch
8
Sub-Feeder
9
10
Feeder
Supply
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Device Descriptions
Molded case circuit breaker: IR = 14kA @ 480/277V
IEC contactor: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
Self-protected starter with lineside terminal kit: SCCR = 65kA @ 480/277V
IEC contactor: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
Instantaneous trip circuit breaker (MCP): unmarked IR
IEC Starter: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
Molded case circuit breaker: IR = 14kA @ 480V
IEC starter: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
Cooper Bussmann® Class CC Compact Circuit Protector (CCP): SCCR = 200kA @ 600V
Cooper Bussmann® LP-CC Fuses: IR = 200kA @ 600V
IEC starter: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
Cooper Bussmann Class CC Compact Circuit Protector (CCP): SCCR = 200kA @ 600V
Cooper Bussmann LP-CC Fuses: IR = 200kA @ 600V
Variable Frequency Drive: SCCR = 5kA @ 480V
IEC contactor: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
Molded case circuit breaker: IR = 10kA @ 120V
GFCI Receptacle: unmarked SCCR
Molded case circuit breaker: IR = 14kA @ 480/277V
3kVA 480V-120V secondary power transformer (does not affect SCCR)
Power distribution block: unmarked SCCR
Cooper Bussmann® 100A Class J fused switch: SCCR = 200kA @ 600V
Cooper Bussmann® 100A LPJ fuses: IR = 300kA @ 600V
95
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
“Two Sweep” Method: Sweep 1, Step 1 - Branch Circuit Components
Sweep 1: Verifying assembly component SCCRs
Step1: Determine lowest rated component in each branch circuit.
Note: Determine SCCRs for components only.
Interrupting rating or SCCR of overcurrent protective devices is ignored in
this step.
Branch Circuit 1
• IEC contactor: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
• Higher combination rating with a circuit breaker does not exist
• SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
Branch Circuit 2
• IEC contactor: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
• Combination rating with self-protected starter
(only with same manufacturer) = 65kA @ 480/277V
• SCCR = 65kA @ 480/277V
96
Branch Circuit 3
• IEC Starter: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
• Combination rating with MCP
(only with same manufacturer) = 65kA @ 480V
• SCCR = 65kA @ 480V
Branch Circuit 4
• IEC starter: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
• Combination rating with circuit breaker
(only with same manufacturer) = 25kA @ 480V
• SCCR = 25kA @ 480V
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
“Two Sweep” Method: Sweep 1, Step 1 - Branch Circuit Components
Branch Circuit 5
• IEC starter: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
• Combination rating with Class CC fuses = 100kA @ 600V
• SCCR = 100kA @ 600V
Branch Circuit 7
• GFCI Receptacle: unmarked SCCR
(2kA per Table SCCR1-Default SCCR Ratings)
• Higher combination rating with circuit breaker does not exist
• SCCR = 2kA @ 120V (does not affect panel voltage rating)
Branch Circuit 6
• Variable Frequency Drive: SCCR = 5kA @ 480V
• IEC contactor: SCCR = 5kA @ 600V
• Combination rating with Class CC fuses:
- 200kA @ 600V for variable frequency drive
- 100kA @ 600V for IEC contactor
• SCCR = 100kA @ 600V
Sweep 1 - Step 1 Summary
• Lowest SCCR of Step 1 is 2kA @ 480/277V
Results of Sweep 1, Step 1: SCCR = 2kA @ 480/277V
Branch Circuit 1
Branch Circuit 2
Branch Circuit 3
Branch Circuit 4
Branch Circuit 5
Branch Circuit 6
Branch Circuit 7
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8
Feeder Circuit 9
Supply Circuit 10
Assessment
SCCR Revisions
Sweep 1-Step 1
Sweep 1-Step 2 Sweep 1-Step 3 Sweep 1-Step 4
(Branch)
(Feeder)
(Trans)
(C-L OCPDs)
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
SCCR
5kA
600V
65kA
480/277V
65kA
480V
25kA
480V
100kA
600V
100kA
600V
2kA
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Sweep 1 Results
Sweep 1-Step 5
SCCR
Voltage
Sweep 2-Steps 1& 2
(Overcurrent Device)
IR/SCCR
Voltage
Note: Red cells in table denote limiting components and voltages for each step.
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
97
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
“Two Sweep” Method: Sweep 1, Step 2 - Feeder Circuit Components
Sweep 1: Verifying assembly component SCCRs
Step 2: Determine the component SCCR for each feeder, sub-feeder
and supply circuit.
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8
• This is a transformer circuit and is covered by Sweep 1, Step 3
Feeder Circuit 9
• Power distribution block (PDB): unmarked SCCR
(10kA per Table SCCR1 - Default SCCR Ratings)
• SCCR = 10kA @ 600V
Note: PDB must have proper spacings for feeder application per UL 508A.
Supply Circuit 10
• Cooper Bussmann® 100A Class J fused switch: SCCR = 200kA @ 600V
• SCCR = 200kA @ 600V
Sweep 1 - Step 2 Summary
• Lowest SCCR of Step 2 is 10kA @ 600V
• Lowest SCCR of Step 1 or Step 2 is 2kA @ 480/277V
Results of Sweep 1, Step 2: SCCR = 2kA @ 480/277V
Branch Circuit 1
Branch Circuit 2
Branch Circuit 3
Branch Circuit 4
Branch Circuit 5
Branch Circuit 6
Branch Circuit 7
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8
Feeder Circuit 9
Supply Circuit 10
Assessment
SCCR Revisions
Sweep 1-Step 1
Sweep 1-Step 2 Sweep 1-Step 3 Sweep 1-Step 4
(Branch)
(Feeder)
(Trans)
(C-L OCPDs)
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
SCCR
5kA
600V
–
–
65kA
480/277V
–
–
65kA
480V
–
–
25kA
480V
–
–
100kA
600V
–
–
100kA
600V
–
–
2kA
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
10kA
600V
–
–
200kA
600V
Sweep 1 Results
Sweep 1-Step 5
SCCR
Voltage
Sweep 2-Steps 1& 2
(Overcurrent Device)
IR/SCCR
Voltage
Note: Red cells in table denote limiting components and voltages for each step.
98
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
“Two Sweep” Method: Sweep 1, Step 3 - Components/Transformers
Sweep 1: Verifying assembly component SCCRs
Step 3: Determine if 10kVA or smaller power transformers in the feeder,
sub-feeder or supply circuit are able to raise branch circuit component SCCRs
(circuit breaker and GFCI receptacle):
SCCR Now 14kA
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8
• Sub-feeder transformer is 3kVA with 120V secondary and can be used to
raise the secondary components. Follow procedure for 5kVA or smaller
transformers.
• Since all secondary components have an interrupting rating/SCCR (circuit
breaker IR = 10kA) or SCCR (GFCI receptacle SCCR = 2kA) of 2kA or
higher, the interrupting rating rating of the transformer primary overcurrent
protective device (Sub-Feeder Circuit 8) can be assigned to the entire
Branch Circuit 7 (circuit breaker and GFCI receptacle).
• Revised Branch Circuit 7 SCCR = 14kA
Sweep 1 - Step 3 Summary
• Branch Circuit 7 was raised to 14kA
• However, Branch Circuit 1 is still the limiting SCCR factor
Results of Sweep 1, Step 3: SCCR = 5kA @ 480/277V
Branch Circuit 1
Branch Circuit 2
Branch Circuit 3
Branch Circuit 4
Branch Circuit 5
Branch Circuit 6
Branch Circuit 7
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8
Feeder Circuit 9
Supply Circuit 10
Assessment
SCCR Revisions
Sweep 1-Step 1
Sweep 1-Step 2 Sweep 1-Step 3 Sweep 1-Step 4
(Branch)
(Feeder)
(Trans)
(C-L OCPDs)
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
SCCR
5kA
600V
–
–
–
65kA
480/277V
–
–
–
65kA
480V
–
–
–
25kA
480V
–
–
–
100kA
600V
–
–
–
100kA
600V
–
–
_
2kA
–
–
–
14kA
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
10kA
600V
–
–
–
200kA
600V
–
Sweep 1 Results
Sweep 1-Step 5
SCCR
Voltage
Sweep 2-Steps 1& 2
(Overcurrent Device)
IR/SCCR
Voltage
Note: Red cells in table denote limiting components and voltages for each step.
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
99
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
“Two Sweep” Method: Sweep 1, Step 4 - Current-Limiting Overcurrent Devices
Sweep 1: Verifying assembly component SCCRs
Step 4: Determine if current-limiting overcurrent protective devices
(C-L OCPDs) are used in the feeder, sub-feeder or supply circuit that can
raise branch circuit component ratings (other than devices that provide
branch circuit overcurrent protection).
100A Class J Fuses
Fault Current
Peak
Values of:
Let-through =
50kA
12kA
100kA
14kA
200kA
20kA
Note: Since the 100A Class J fuse peak let-through of 20kA at a fault
current of 200kA is less than the SCCR of Step 1 for Branch Circuits 2
through 6, the SCCR is raised to 200kA. The SCCR of components in
Feeder Circuit 9, Sub-Feeder Circuit 8 or Supply Circuit 10 cannot be
raised per UL 508A.
Supply Circuit 10
The 100A Class J fuse in Supply Circuit 10 is a current-limiting device. Use
Table SCCR2 - UL Umbrella Limits at Rated Voltage to identify the
peak let-through values:
• Compare the peak let-through values with result of Step 1 and increase
branch circuit component ratings where possible.
Sweep 1 - Step 4 Summary
• Branch Circuit 1 SCCR cannot be raised
• Increased SCCR of Branch Circuits 2 through 6 to 200kA
• Branch Circuit 7 SCCR cannot be raised in this step because it was raised
by Step 3
Results of Sweep 1, Step 4: SCCR = 5kA @ 480/277V
Branch Circuit 1
Branch Circuit 2
Branch Circuit 3
Branch Circuit 4
Branch Circuit 5
Branch Circuit 6
Branch Circuit 7
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8
Feeder Circuit 9
Supply Circuit 10
Assessment
SCCR Revisions
Sweep 1-Step 1
Sweep 1-Step 2 Sweep 1-Step 3 Sweep 1-Step 4
(Branch)
(Feeder)
(Trans)
(C-L OCPDs)
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
SCCR
5kA
600V
–
–
–
–
65kA
480/277V
–
–
–
200kA
65kA
480V
–
–
–
200kA
25kA
480V
–
–
–
200kA
100kA
600V
–
–
–
200kA
100kA
600V
–
–
_
200kA
2kA
–
–
–
14kA
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
10kA
600V
–
–
–
–
200kA
600V
–
–
Sweep 1 Results
Sweep 1-Step 5
SCCR
Voltage
Sweep 2-Steps 1& 2
(Overcurrent Device)
IR/SCCR
Voltage
Note: Red cells in table denote limiting components and voltages for each step.
100
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
“Two Sweep” Method: Sweep 1, Step 5 - Results of Entire Sweep 1
Sweep 1: Verifying assembly component SCCRs
Step 5: Determine the lowest branch or feeder circuit component SCCR
based on all steps in Sweep 1 and retain for Sweep 2.
• Lowest SCCR resulted from Branch Circuit 1 in Step 1
• Branch Circuit 2 limited voltage in Step 1
• Sweep 1 Lowest SCCR = 5kA @ 480/277V
Note: Sweep 2 must still be completed to determine SCCR marking.
Figure 7 – Results of Sweep 1, Steps 1 through 5
Sweep 1 - Step 5 Summary
After completing all five steps in Sweep 1, the resulting SCCR based upon the
components, remains at a low 5kA @ 480/277V because of the 5kA rated
contactor in Branch Circuit 1 and the slash voltage rating of the contactor in
Branch Circuit 2 (when protected by a slash voltage rated self protected motor
starter). See figure 7.
Results of Sweep 1, Step 5: SCCR = 5kA @ 480/277V
Branch Circuit 1
Branch Circuit 2
Branch Circuit 3
Branch Circuit 4
Branch Circuit 5
Branch Circuit 6
Branch Circuit 7
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8
Feeder Circuit 9
Supply Circuit 10
Assessment
SCCR Revisions
Sweep 1-Step 1
Sweep 1-Step 2 Sweep 1-Step 3 Sweep 1-Step 4
(Branch)
(Feeder)
(Trans)
(C-L OCPDs)
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
SCCR
5kA
600V
–
–
–
–
65kA
480/277V
–
–
–
200kA
65kA
480V
–
–
–
200kA
25kA
480V
–
–
–
200kA
100kA
600V
–
–
–
200kA
100kA
600V
–
–
_
200kA
2kA
–
–
–
14kA
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
10kA
600V
–
–
–
–
200kA
600V
–
–
Sweep 1 Results
Sweep 1-Step 5
SCCR
5kA
200kA
200kA
200kA
200kA
200kA
14kA
–
10kA
200kA
Voltage
600V
480/277V
480V
480V
600V
600V
–
–
600V
600V
Sweep 2-Steps 1& 2
(Overcurrent Device)
IR/SCCR
Voltage
Note: Red cells in table denote limiting components and voltages for each step
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
101
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
“Two Sweep” Method: Sweep 2, Step 1 - Overcurrent Protective Device IR or SCCR
Sweep 2: Verifying assembly SCCR based upon overcurrent
protective device interrupting rating (or SCCR for some devices).
Step 1: Determine overcurrent protective device interrupting rating or SCCR*:
Branch Circuit 1
• Molded case circuit breaker
• IR = 14kA @ 480/277V
Branch Circuit 4
• Molded case circuit breaker
• IR = 14kA @ 480V
Branch Circuit 2
• Self-protected starter
• SCCR = 65kA @ 480/277V
*Note: Self-protected starters are not rated with an interrupting
rating. So for this Step 1, its SCCR is used.
Branch Circuit 5
• Cooper Bussmann® LP-CC fuses
•
Branch Circuit 3
• MCP – Combination rating with IEC Starter (same manufacturer)
• SCCR = 65kA @ 480V
*Note: Per UL 508A, in order to assure proper application in
industrial control panels, the MCP must be procedure described to
verify use as part of a listed combination motor controller and the
corresponding SCCR.
102
IR = 200kA @ 600V
Branch Circuit 6
• Cooper Bussmann® LP-CC fuses
• IR = 200kA @ 600V
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
“Two Sweep” Method: Sweep 2, Step 2 - Lowest IR or SCCR
Sweep 2: Verifying assembly overcurrent protective device interrupting
rating or SCCR.
Step 2: Determine lowest overcurrent protective device interrupting rating or
SCCR.
Feeder Circuit 9
• No overcurrent protective device in this circuit
Branch Circuit 7
• Molded case circuit breaker analyzed in Sweep1, Step 3
• IR = 10kA, but raised to 14kA due to transformer and interrupting rating
of Sub-Feeder Circuit 8 molded case circuit breaker
Supply Circuit 10
• Cooper Bussmann® 100A LPJ fuses
• IR = 300kA @ 600V
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8
• Molded case circuit breaker
• IR = 14kA @ 480/277V
Sweep 2 - Step 1 & Step 2 Summary
• The lowest interrupting rating or SCCR of this Step is 14kA @ 480/277V
Figure 8 – Results of Sweep 2 – Steps 1 & 2
Results of Sweep 2, Steps 1 & 2: SCCR = 14kA @ 480/277V (Sweep 2, Step 2 Only)
Branch Circuit 1
Branch Circuit 2
Branch Circuit 3
Branch Circuit 4
Branch Circuit 5
Branch Circuit 6
Branch Circuit 7
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8
Feeder Circuit 9
Supply Circuit 10
Assessment
SCCR Revisions
Sweep 1-Step 1
Sweep 1-Step 2 Sweep 1-Step 3 Sweep 1-Step 4
(Branch)
(Feeder)
(Trans)
(C-L OCPDs)
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
SCCR
5kA
600V
–
–
–
–
65kA
480/277V
–
–
–
200kA
65kA
480V
–
–
–
200kA
25kA
480V
–
–
–
200kA
100kA
600V
–
–
–
200kA
100kA
600V
–
–
_
200kA
2kA
–
–
–
14kA
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
10kA
600V
–
_
–
–
200kA
600V
–
–
Sweep 1 Results
Sweep 1-Step 5
SCCR
5kA
200kA
200kA
200kA
200kA
200kA
14kA
–
10kA
200kA
Voltage
600V
480/277V
480V
480V
600V
600V
–
–
600V
600V
Sweep 2-Steps 1& 2
(Overcurrent Device)
IR/SCCR
Voltage
14kA
480/277V
65kA
480/277V
65kA
480V
14kA
480V
200kA
600V
200kA
600V
–
–
14kA
480/277V
–
–
300kA
600V
Note: Red cells in table denote limiting components and voltages for each step.
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
103
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
“Two Sweep” Method: Sweep 2, Step 3 - Final Assembly SCCR
Sweep 2: Verifying assembly SCCRs based upon
overcurrent protective device interrupting rating or SCCR.
Step 3: Determine final assembly SCCR based upon results of Sweep 1
(component SCCR) and Sweep 2 (overcurrent protective device interrupting
rating or SCCR).
• Sweep 1 lowest SCCR = 5kA @ 480/277V
• Sweep 2 lowest IR or SCCR = 14kA @ 480/277V
• Resulting assembly SCCR = 5kA @ 480/277 (see Figure 9)
P la s tic s P ro c e ss in g M ac h in e
S N 23 5 6Y U P 7 7
S e ria l N um b er
C urren t
La rges t M oto r H .P .
M ax O C P D evice
V o lta ge
P h ase & Freq ..
87 A m peres
25 H o rse p ow e r
1 00 A m p e re
48 0 /2 7 7 v olts
3 ph a se , 4 w ire, 6 0 H z
S h o rt-C irc uit
C u rren t R a tin g
5 ,0 0 0 A m p e re s R M S
D ia gram N um b ers
C M 12.1 T H R U C M 12.5
Q u a lity M ac h in e T o o l
S o m ew h e re, U S A
Example of assembly SCCR label marking based on the
“2 Sweep” method.
Figure 9 – Results of Sweep 2 – Step 3
Sweep 2 - Step 3 Summary
• The lowest SCCR of both Sweep 1 and Sweep 2 is 5kA @ 480/277V
• The 5kA SCCR is based on the contactor in Branch Circuit 1, analyzed in
Sweep 1 - Step 1
• The 480/277 slash voltage rating is from multiple components in
Sweep 1 - Steps 1 and 5, and Sweep 2, Steps 1, 2 and 3
• The Assembly SCCR is 5kA @ 480/277V
Note: The assembly would have to be marked with 5kA SCCR and
480/277V. Assemblies with 480/277V devices are suitable for only
480/277V solidly grounded wye systems. These assemblies cannot
be applied on 480V ungrounded, resistance grounded or corner
grounded systems. See the section on Slash Voltage Ratings for
more information.)
Results of Sweep 2, Step 3: Assembly SCCR = 5kA, Voltage = 480/277V
Branch Circuit 1
Branch Circuit 2
Branch Circuit 3
Branch Circuit 4
Branch Circuit 5
Branch Circuit 6
Branch Circuit 7
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8
Feeder Circuit 9
Supply Circuit 10
Assessment
SCCR Revisions
Sweep 1-Step 1
Sweep 1-Step 2 Sweep 1-Step 3 Sweep 1-Step 4
(Branch)
(Feeder)
(Trans)
(C-L OCPDs)
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
Voltage
SCCR
SCCR
5kA
600V
–
–
–
–
65kA
480/277V
–
–
–
200kA
65kA
480V
–
–
–
200kA
25kA
480V
–
–
–
200kA
100kA
600V
–
–
–
200kA
100kA
600V
–
–
_
200kA
2kA
–
–
–
14kA
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
10kA
600V
–
_
–
–
200kA
600V
–
–
Sweep 1 Results
Sweep 1-Step 5
SCCR
5kA
200kA
200kA
200kA
200kA
200kA
14kA
–
10kA
200kA
Voltage
600V
480/277V
480V
480V
600V
600V
–
–
600V
600V
Sweep 2 Final
Sweep 2-Steps 1, 2 & 3
(Overcurrent Device)
IR/SCCR
Voltage
14kA
480/277V
65kA
480/277V
65kA
480V
14kA
480V
200kA
600V
200kA
600V
–
–
14kA
480/277V
–
–
300kA
600V
Note: Red cells in table denote limiting components and voltages for each step.
104
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
Example: Increasing Assembly SCCR - “FIX IT”
“FIX IT”
What follows are methods to increase, or “FIX,” a low assembly SCCR using
the appropriate overcurrent protective devices with higher interrupting
ratings and components with higher SCCRs.
To increase the assembly SCCR, identify the “weak links” and determine
alternatives that can be used to increase the SCCR. While industrial control
panels are only required to be marked with an SCCR, many OEMs and
Industrials are finding that SCCR ratings of 65kA, 100kA, or higher with full
voltage ratings (480V in lieu of 480/277V) are often needed to assure safety
for the initial installation and flexibility for future changes to the system or
moving the assembly to another location. The process to “FIX” these “weak
links” is detailed below in order to meet the installation needs of OEMs and
Industrials.
“Weak Link” 1
Branch Circuit 1: SCCR = 5kA and Slash Voltage
Rating
“Weak Link” 2
Feeder Circuit 9: SCCR = 10kA
The next “weak link” is the unmarked power distribution block. The easy
solution to this is to find a power distribution block that has a high SCCR when
protected by a specific overcurrent device upstream. Since the overcurrent
device upstream is a Class J fuse, the solution would be to use a Cooper
Bussmann® high SCCR power distribution block or terminal block. This is
important to note, as most power distribution blocks and terminal blocks
require a current-limiting fuse to achieve a SCCR higher than 10kA. In
addition, since the power distribution block is in the feeder circuit, feeder
circuit spacings are also required per UL 508A. The Cooper Bussmann PDB
(open style) or PDBFS (enclosed style) Series of power distribution blocks are
Listed to UL 1953 assuring compliance with feeder circuit spacing
requirements in UL 508A and are UL Listed with high SCCR ratings with Class
J fuses as shown in Figure 11.
The first “weak link” from the previous “Two Sweep” example is the IEC
contactor (5kA SCCR) and the slash rated circuit breaker (480/277V) from
Branch Circuit 1. This can be a common issue where circuit breakers are used
in branch circuits. As shown in Figure 10, not only does the circuit breaker
have a low interrupting rating (14kA) and slash voltage rating (480/277V), but
the other circuit components, such as the IEC contactor (5kA), can additionally
limit the SCCR since higher combination ratings are not available.
The “FIX IT” is to find a fully rated overcurrent device with a high interrupting
rating and a high SCCR combination rating with the IEC contactor. A solution
is to change the circuit breaker to the Cooper Bussmann® Compact Circuit
Protector (CCP) with Class CC fuses. The Class CC CCP is rated 600V and
200kA. Since the Class CC CCP utilizes Class CC fuses, and since the IEC
contactor in this example had a combination rating of 100kA with Class CC
fuses, the SCCR is now 100kA. An additional benefit of the CCP can be space
savings when compared to typical lighting and industrial style circuit breakers.
Figure 11
High SCCR PDBs
Often the power distribution block is the”weak link” holding assembly SCCR
low. Using high SCCR PDBs protected with Class J fuses can deliver a higher
combination SCCR. The following table shows the possible SCCRs.
This power distribution block is rated for use on a circuit capable of delivering
no more than the SCCR kA shown (kA rms sym. or DC amps 600V
maximum). For other SCCR options, see Data Sheet 1049.
AWG
Class J Fuse
Wire Range Max. Amp
2-6
400A
2-14
200A
2-14
175A
Figure 10
Resulting
SCCR
200kA
50kA
100kA
Note: SCCR of the Cooper Bussmann®
PDBFS is only 10kA with a circuit breaker.
The Cooper Bussmann® CCP with Class CC fuses can easily increase SCCR
by replacing low IR and slash rated molded case circuit breakers.
Figure 12
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
105
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
Example: Increasing Assembly SCCR - “FIX IT”
“Weak Link” 3
Branch Circuit 4: SCCR = 14kA and Sub-Feeder
Circuit 8 – SCCR = 14kA and Slash Voltage Rating
The next “weak link” is the 14kA circuit breaker in Branch Circuit 4 and the
14kA slash rated (480/277V) circuit breaker in Sub-Feeder Circuit 8. There are
two possible solutions for this, either increase the interrupting rating of both
circuit breakers and change to a full or straight voltage rated circuit breaker in
Sub-Feeder Circuit 8 (this will increase the cost and may require changing to a
larger industrial style circuit breaker) or change to the Cooper Bussmann®
CCP as shown in “Weak Link 1.” The most economical solution is to change
the circuit breaker to the Cooper Bussmann CCP with Class CC fuses. In
Branch Circuit 4, this change increases the interrupting rating to 200kA as well
as increasing the rating of the IEC starter to 100kA through the use of Class
CC fuses so that Branch Circuit 4 is now rated 100kA. The change to SubFeeder Circuit 8 not only increased the interrupting rating to 200kA, but also
improved the voltage rating from 480/277V (limits the assembly) to 600V (not
limited).
“Weak Link” 5
Branch Circuit 2, 3 & 4: Manufacturer Limitation
In motor circuits, when mechanical overcurrent protective devices are selected
the assembly typically has SCCR or voltage rating limitations as shown
previously. These devices can additionally lock the user into a single
manufacturer. For instance, the self-protected starter and contactor in Branch
Circuit 2 requires the same manufacturer to be selected if higher combination
short-circuit current ratings are desired. The MCP and magnetic starter in
Branch Circuit 3 must be from the same manufacturer to be a listed
combination as required by the NEC®. The circuit breaker and magnetic starter
in Branch Circuit 4 must be from the same manufacturer and a high
interrupting rated circuit breaker must be selected to achieve a high
combination short-circuit current rating. This greatly decreases flexibility for the
user and can adversely increase component cost. In contrast, where fusible
devices are used in motor circuits, high combination ratings with multiple
manufacturers are possible increasing flexibility and reducing cost.
Figure 13
Figure 15
“Weak Link” 4
Branch Circuit 2: Slash Voltage Ratings
“FIX IT” Summary
The next “weak link” is the slash voltage rating in Branch Circuit 2. While the
self-protected starter is compact in size and has a relatively high SCCR
(65kA), it typically comes with a slash voltage rating. The solution is to either
add an overcurrent device with a high interrupting rating ahead of the selfprotected starter or change to the CCP with Class CC fuses and a magnetic
starter. The most economical solution to achieve a high SCCR and full voltage
rating is to change to the CCP with Class CC fuses and a magnetic starter.
With this change the circuit is rated 100kA @ 600V.
The Figure 16 shows how all
the “weak links” have been
changed and now the panel
has a high assembly SCCR
with a full voltage rating.
P la s tic s P ro c e ss in g M ac h in e
S e ria l N um b er
C urren t
La rges t M oto r H .P .
M ax O C P D evice
V o lta ge
P h ase & Freq ..
S h o rt-C irc uit
C u rren t R a tin g
D ia gram N um b ers
S N 23 5 6Y U P 7 7
87 A m peres
25 H o rse p ow e r
1 00 A m p e re
600 Volts
3 ph a se , 4 w ire, 6 0 H z
100,0 0 0 A m p e re s R M S
C M 12.1 T H R U C M 12.5
Q u a lity M ac h in e T o o l
S o m ew h e re, U S A
Figure 14
Figure 16
106
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
Industrial Control Panels - SCCR
Increasing Assembly SCCR: “FIX IT” - Typical “Weak Links”
Typical “Weak Links” and Improving SCCR
The following table highlights the typical “weak links” in industrial control
panels and provides Cooper Bussmann solutions, along with the added
benefits that these solutions can provide for a design.
“Weak Link”
UL 1077 Supplementary Protectors
Assembly Limiting Factor:
• Some may have an interrupting rating of 5kA to
10kA. Default rating is 200A if unmarked.
• Not permitted for feeder or branch circuit
protection.
UL 489 Instantaneous Trip Circuit Breaker
Assembly Limiting Factor:
• SCCR is dependent upon combination rating when
used with a listed combination motor controller.
Default rating can be as low as 5kA. Varies by
manufacturer.
Power Distribution Block in Feeder Circuit
Assembly Limiting Factor:
• If the power distribution block is not marked with a
combination SCCR the default rating of 10kA must
be used.
• For feeder circuit applications, power distribution
blocks must have feeder spacings per UL 508A.
Molded Case Circuit Breakers with Low
Interrupting Ratings
Assembly Limiting Factor:
• Typically have interrupting ratings of 10kA to 14kA.
• Higher interrupting ratings are available at
increased cost.
Type E Self Protected Combination Starter
Assembly Limiting Factor:
• Slash voltage rating limits the application options
for the assembly to only a solidly grounded wye
system.
• Line-to-ground interrupting capability is limited.
• SCCR at 600/347V is typically limited.
Additional Resources on SCCR
Cooper Bussmann offers tools to assist with the proper application of
short-circuit current ratings including:
Simplified Guide to SCCR: basic understanding of short-circuit
current ratings and tools to determine the “weakest link” for industrial
control panels.
OSCAR™: Online Short-Circuit Current per UL 508A Rating
Compliance Software. Used to determine and document the shortcircuit current ratings of industrial control panels. Go online to
www.cooperbussmann.com/oscar for more information.
©2008 Cooper Bussmann
This is an example of how Cooper Bussmann can help “FIND” the “weakest
link” and “FIX” the “weakest link.” Cooper Bussmann will provide the most
versatile and reliable design for any overcurrent protection need.
“FIX IT”
Increase the Interrupting Rating:
• Use Cooper Bussmann® current-limiting fuses and the
CCP (Class CC or CUBEFuse®) or fuse holder to
achieve higher SCCRs by replacing the low interrupting
rated UL 1077 supplementary protector with modern current-limiting fuses with high IRs of up to 300kA.
Increase the Interrupting Rating:
• Use Cooper Bussmann current-limiting fuses and the
CCP (Class CC or CUBEFuse) or fuse holder to achieve
higher short-circuit current ratings by replacing the low
SCCR combination rated instantaneous trip circuit
breaker with modern current-limiting fuses with high
interrupting ratings of up to 300kA.
Use PDB and PDBFS Series of Power
Distribution Blocks with High SCCR:
• Cooper Bussmann has introduced a line of power
distribution blocks Listed to UL 1953 with high SCCRs
up to 200kA when protected by Class J fuses. By
replacing a low rated power distribution block with the
Cooper Bussmann® PDBs or PDBFS, a panel can
achieve the high ratings and proper spacings
needed.
Increase the Interrupting Rating:
• Use Cooper Bussmann current-limiting fuses and the
CCP (Class CC or CUBEFuse) or fuse holder to achieve
higher short-circuit current ratings by replacing the low
interrupting rated circuit breaker with modern currentlimiting fuses with high interrupting ratings of up to
300kA.
Use Device With Straight Voltage Rating:
• Use Cooper Bussmann current-limiting fuses and the
CCP (Class CC or CUBEFuse) or fuse holder with high
SCCR combination and straight voltage rated motor
starter to allow for installation on any type of
system grounding.
Short-Circuit Calculator Program: free software download to
calculate the available fault current at different points within the
electrical distribution system.
For more information on the above, go to: www.cooperbussmann.com.
107
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