Operation Manual Diagnostic

Operation Manual Diagnostic
Gas Chromatography (Diagnostic)
Operation Manual
GC3420A
PLEASE READ THIS MANUAL CAREFULLY BEFORE OPERATION
3, Hagavish st. Israel 58817
Tel: 972 3 5595252, Fax: 972 3 5594529
MRC.VER.01-8.13
[email protected]
CONTENTS
1.
INTRODUCTION...................................................................................................................1
2
ELECTRONIC
3.
CORE TESTS.........................................................................................................................9
4
BACKGROUND TESTS AND AUTOMATIC TESTS......................................................18
5
EXTENDED TESTS .............................................................................................................49
6
STARTING AND EXITING TESTS, DISPLAYING AND PRINTING RESULTS ........54
7
TROUBLE SHOOTIHG
8
FUNCTIONAL PROBLEMS...............................................................................................57
PROCEDURES ........................................................................................4
PROCEDURES.....................................................................56
1.
INTRODUCTION
All of the information needed to troubleshoot and repair the electronic and chromatographic parts
of 34 Series GC’s can be found in this section. The work can be done safely and accurately by a
person with no experience in electronic service,but only if all warnings are read and understood
and all procedures are carefully followed. FOR YOUR OWN SAFETY, AND TO AVOID
UNNECESSARY AND COSTLY REPAIRS, READ AND UNDERSTAND ALL OF THE
INFORMATION ON THIS PAGE BEFORE ATTEMPTING ANY TROUBLESHOOTING
OR REPAIRS. More information on the theory and use of the diagnostic system can be found in
paragraphs 1.1, 1.2, and 2.
Many safety precautions and common troubleshooting procedures are required frequently in this
section. These procedures will NOT be repeated each time they are needed, so it is essential that
you be sufficiently familiar with them to refer to the proper paragraphs as necessary. A summary is
provided in Table 1(page 2). Fold it out from the manual so that you can refer to it frequently as
you go through the diagnostics. In addition to the Quick Reference Manual, the last page of this
section can also be folded out to provide a convenient reference to electronic hardware locations
referenced herein.
Be sure you THOROUGHLY understand all of the cautions and warnings in Table 1, and in
paragraph 2.1 before proceeding. Skim over the Common Procedures and Always Check lists in
Table 1 and in paragraphs 2.2 and 2.3, so you will know where to find this information when you
need it.
The Automatic tests should always be run before doing anything else, regardless of whether you
are just doing a routine "confidence check" or you suspect some electronic or chromatographic
malfunction. Press [SHIFT] [INSTR TEST] anytime the GC is not in RUN to initiate the tests. If
the message TEST OK is displayed, but you still believe that there is something wrong, go to
Troubleshooting Procedures, paragraph 7. For more information on the use of Automatic tests,
refer to paragraphs 1.2 and 2.4.
If a FAULT message is displayed ,at the end of the Automatic tests, go to Automatic Tests,
paragraph 4,and find the displayed fault in the numerical listing. After checking that the expected
symptoms described match the behavior of your instrument, follow the procedure shown for that
fault. Disregard "E" code error messages, such as "Exx", as they are for service center repair only.
If the Automatic tests fail to run properly, or the GC is not responding normally to keyboard
entries, cold start the instrument (para.2.2). If this does not solve your problem, do the Core Tests
described in paragraph 3.
Read and go through the Final Checks of paragraph 2.5 before concluding your repairs.
1
TARLE 1 REFERENCE TO CONMMON DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES
AND DIAGNOSTIC CAUTIONS AND WARNINGS
Using Diagnostics: ref. paragraphs 1.2 and 2.4

DID YOU PRESS SHIFT INSTR TEST AFTER YOU NOTICED AN ERROR?

Displayed fault consistent with symptoms?

Fix first fault displayed before starting others?

Repeat test each time something is changed?
Common Procedures:

Safety precautions (2.1)

Removing, replacing, and adjusting the high voltage cover (2.2)

Removal and replacement of printed circuit boards (2.2)

Fuse replacement (2.2)

Connecting/disconnecting cables (2.2)

Cold starting the instrument (2.2)
Always check: ref. paragraph 2.3

Required hardware installed?

Dirty connector contacts?

Proper cable connections?

Air intakes open?

Shorting on pc boards?

Connector cams closed?
Final Checks:
(ref. paragraph 2.5)
NOTE
Refer to Quick Reference Manual or paragraph 9 for electronic
hardware locations.
2
1.1
General Description of Diagnostics
This paragraph provides an overview of the Capabilities and use of the diagnostic system.
Continue on to Automatic Test Description, paragraph 1.2 for the routine confidence check
procedure. The remaining portions of this section are needed only if a problem is encountered.
Read them in the order indicated as you carry out the troubleshooting and repair procedures.
All of the electronic circuitry is covered by the diagnostic system. The GC itself is used as a test
instrument, eliminating the need for special test equipment such as voltmeters and oscilloscopes.
Any repairs which may be required are accomp1ished by replacing modules, such as printed
circuit boards, heaters, fuses, and temperature sensors, using on1y common hand tools. A kit of
spare modules is not required for this process, although it will speed repair and may sometimes
speed diagnosis of a problem. Most electronic prob1ems can be diagnosed and repaired within
minutes if a rep1acement modu1e is available.
The diagnostic procedures are based on a "core expansion" technique, in which each function
tested requires only its own dedicated circuitry and previously tested circuitry to operate properly.
The core circuitry consists of the power supp1y, CPU, instrument bus, and keyboard/display,
which are tested in that order. Each remaining function (temperature Control, FID e1ectronics, etc.)
is implemented entirely on a single pc board, making it easy to localize a problem once the core is
working.
Use the diagnostic features in the intended sequence only, observing all of the conditions detai1ed
in this section. Deviation from the proper procedure may produce misleading or erroneous
conclusions.
The diagnostic tests are divided into four categories: core, automatic, extended, and background.
Core tests verify operation of the core circuitry. These tests are normally used only when the
instrument is completely unresponsive or intermittent.
Automatic tests are run by the internal microprocessor without operator assistance. They are
initiated automatically on cold start or manually from the keyboard and run in less than a minute.
Operating conditions are disturbed on1y momentari1y, so the tests may be run any time the
instrument is not in RUN. It is recommended that the automatic tests be run daily as a confidence
check on the instrument operation.
Extended tests are not included with the automatic tests because they either disturb the instrument
operating conditions or require operator interaction. These tests are individually requested from a
displayed menu after the automatic tests have been run.
Background tests run continuously during normal operation. They ensure safe operating
conditions and overall instrument integrity. The results of these tests are reported along with
various operational errors through the use of the blinking STATUS light (reference paragraph 5.1
of the Operation section). Press [STATUS] to display the initial fault message. Press [ENTER] to
display additional fault messages. A list of the background fau1ts and the corresponding
procedures can be found in paragraph 4.1 of this section.
If a hazardous condition is detected by any test, the GC will take the necessary action to minimize
the danger. Other (non-hazardous) faults will be displayed and normal operation can continue if
the operator chooses, e.g., in the event of a failure in the diagnostic system or in an unused feature.
1.2
Automatic Test Description
The Automatic tests form the heart of the diagnostic system in the 34 series GC's. They can be run
as a confidence check anytime the instrument is not in RUN. The GC will still be READΥ at the
end of the tests if it was READΥ before the tests were started. These tests should always be run
before starting the Troubleshooting procedures, even if you think the problem is not electronic,
because many of the procedures are based upon the results of the Automatic tests. If you cannot
run the Automatic tests because the display is blank or the keyboard is not working properly, go
directly to Electronic Procedures, paragraph 2, and do the Core Tests according to the directions
there.
The Automatic tests, along with the automatic portion of the core tests, are normally initiated by
pressing [SHIFT] [INSTE TEST]. They are also initiated automatically whenever the instrument is
cold started (see para.2.2). To avoid accidental disturbance of a chromatographic run, the tests
cannot be started when the GC is in RUN. Press [RESET] if necessary to take the GC out of
RUN. When the instrument is waiting for another entry from the operator, any OPERATIONS key
can be pressed to leave the test mode and start the operation selected.
When the Automatic tests are started, the disp1ay will go blank for a few seconds whi1e the
microprocessor and other core circuitries are being tested. Various test messages and patterns will
be displayed, and the printer/plotter (if present) will print a test pattern. The detector electronics,
temperature controls, and options are also being checked at this time. Relays, solenoids, and
motors are turned on and off, causing a variety of noises, and the chart recorder pen should move.
The tests take less than a minute (depending on the hardware installed), and the message "TESTS
OK" should be displayed upon completion. If any FAULT messages appear, or if mo messages
appear with in 60 seconds, go directly to Electronic Procedures, paragraph 2 unless the word
"ADVISORY" appears in the display.
An ADVISORY message may also be displayed, indicating that some test could not be run or a
control setting may be out of adjustment, rather than indicating a hardware malfunction. The
meanings of ADVISORY messages are listed in the numerical tabulation of faults in paragraph 4,
Press [>] to see if there are any other messages.
If you have a printer/plotter installed, a permanent record of the results of diagnostic tests can be
obtained by pressing [SHIFT] [REPORT].
If the diagnostics have not found any prob1ems, but you believe that there is something wrong
anyway, go to Troubleshooting Procedures, paragraph7.
2
ELECTRONIC
PROCEDURES
This paragraph describes the procedures needed for troubleshooting and repair of the electronic
circuitry in 34 Series GC's. Important safety information is included, along with background
information which will be used in the actual diagnostic procedures. Be sure that you understand
the information in this paragraph and the proceeding paragraphs before attempting any
electronic troubleshooting or repair.
A1though the diagnostics have been designed for use by someone with no experience in electronic
maintenance, some procedures are given that describe the use of simple test equipment. Use the
alternative procedures if the appropriate test equipment is not available. Similarly, most repairs
can be simply accomplished with only a been described for the benefit of those users who have
access to a trained technician, Contact your the local dealer person for any repairs which cannot be
handled by your own facilities.
2.1 Safety Precautions
Many of the diagnostic procedures in this section can be safely done with the instrument running.
However, a few safety precautions should be observed. The instrument shou1d never be
operated with any side or rear panels removed. In addition to exposing the operator to
dangerous voltages, the cooling air for the instrument would be lost. Always turn off the power
and unplug the GC before removing these panels.
4
The Power supply, Temperature Control, and Autosampler/External Events PCB's are located
under the high voltage cover at the rear of the electronics compartment. To gain access to these
boards and other components mounted at the rear of the Mother PCB, the high voltage cover must
be removed. See paragraph 2.2 for procedure.
To avoid personal injury and damage to the instrument, always observe the WARNINGS and
CAUTIONS of Table 1. Keep that page folded out from the manual and refer to it frequently when
working on the electronics or removing panels, boards, or covers.
2.2 Common Procedures Referenced By Diagnostics

Removing the High Voltage Cover
Turn off and unplug instrument per cautions and warnings in Table 1. Remove screw and lock
washer holding high voltage cover. Lift up and remove cover. Interlock switch (S1) will
immediately move to OFF. If cables/boards beneath cover are removed, reroute/reconnect by
referring to cabling connections in the appropriate section of this manual. Close yellow
connector cams after reinstalling boards.

Replacing the High Voltage Cover
When reinstalling high voltage cover, make sure tab on cover is fully depressing interlock
switch (S1) on Power Supply PCB.

High Voltage Cover Adjustment Procedure
Observe warnings in Table 1. If tab on high vo1tage cover does not fully depress interlock
switch (S1), there will be no line voltage or power to heaters, motors, etc. If you have run an
instrument test, Fault 10 (safety Interlock switch Open) will be displayed.
To actuate S1, fully depress S1 by holding the cover down while tightening the cover's hold
down screw. If S1 cannot be activated, remove cover and check for broken or distorted switch
or leaf spring.

Removal and Replacement of Printed Circuit Boards
Removal: Observe warnings and cautions in Table 1. Disconnect cables from pc board. Turn
yellow connector cam clockwise 90°to release board.
Ease pc board straight up and out of plastic guide slots in cabinet. Do not touch edge
connectors if possible. Place pcb in clean envelope when not in instrument.
Installation: Install pc board by inserting into card guide on the right and then lowering into
the connector on the left. Never force board into cabinet and be sure that all cables are out of
the way before inserting board. Close connector cam. Reconnect any cables to board. Look to
be sure connectors mate.
Note: Before insta11img a new CPU PCB, remove the tag under the battery clip.
NOTE: Plastic cover strips are locked into unused board connectors. DO not open unused
connectors unless a pcb is to be installed. Then, remove plastic strip before inserting pc board.
If an optional pc board is removed for an extended period, put a plastic cover strip in the
connector to keep toe contacts clean.

Fuse Replacement
5
Turn off the power before replacing any fuses, and unplug the instrument before replacing
fuses on the rear panel or under the high voltage cover. Many of the fuses in the GC are
mounted in spring clips on the printed circuit boards. To remove them, insert the blade of a
small screwdriver (or simi1ar tool) under the meta1 end cap of the fuse from the outside end
and pry up. See Figure 1. When replacing a fuse, center it between the c1ips so it is not
resting on the indentations on the outside ends of the clips.
When replacing fuses, trial and error can sometimes be eliminated by checking the old fuse
with an ohmmeter, if one is avai1able. The resistance measured between the ends caps should
be less than 100 ohms if the fuse is good. Note that it is often impossible to tell if a fuse is
good just by looking at it.

Connecting/Disconnecting Cables
Use care when connecting and disconnecting cables, making sure that both halves of the
connector are properly aligned. Refer to the cabling figures in the appropriate sections of this
manual to avoid connecting a cable to the wrong connector.
The flat ribbon cable which goes between the Mother PCB, Keyboard/Display PCB, and the
printer/plotter is disconnected by pushing outward on the locking tabs to 1ift the plug from
the socket. Be sure the plug is firmly seated and the locking tabs are holding it after replacing
the cable.

Cold Starting the Instrument
It may occasionally be necessary to cold start the instrument. This is done by turning off the
instrument with the main power switch and setting the battery switch(S1 on the CPU PCB,
see QRM or para.9) to OFF. Wait 5 seconds and turn the power back on. The microprocessor
will re-initialize the instrument, replacing all method and configuration parameters which
were entered by the user with their preset va1ues. The battery switch may then be turned back
on if desired.
2.3
Always Check the Following
Several operational errors and hardware faults can be responsible for many unpredictable
problems. The following items are always suspect and should be checked as appropriate
when any problem occurs.

Required Hardware Installed?
All of the required hardware for the desired functions must be installed. Each printed circuit
board must be installed in the proper slot on the Mother PCB, and the yellow connector cams
must be in the closed position. The diagnostics will check only those options which it can
sense, so no faults will be found on optional boards whose connector cams are open.
6

Dirty Connector Contacts?
Dirt or corrosion on the pc board edge connector contacts or the mating connector on the
Mother PCB can cause poor electrical contact and faulty operation. Remove pcb and wipe off
contacts. Brush or blow any loose material out of mating connector. If there is a visible
accumulation of material on pcb contacts, clean them with isopropyl alcohol. They can also
be polished gently with a pencil eraser, but great care must be taken to avoid removing the
soft gold plating on the contacts.

Proper Cable Connections?
Cables must all be seated firmly in proper mating connectors. Wiggling cables gently can
sometimes reveal a loose connection. Attach ground wires to chassis with screw and lock
washer.

Air Intakes Unobstructed?
The electronic circuits require a flow of cooling air to operate reliably. Be sure that the air
intake slot on the bottom of the electronics compartment are not obstructed and all rear and
side panels are in place. Cooling fan on rear panel must be running, and its exhaust must not
be obstructed.

Shorting on PC Boards?
Visually inspect the printed circuit boards:
a. Remove any bits of wire, solder, or other foreign material which could cause a short
between the conductors.
b. Check any integrated circuits which are mounted in sockets to see if there are pins
which are folded under the device or are otherwise not making proper contact. Use a screwdriver
to pry the IC out of its socket, and straighten the pin, if necessary.

2.4
Connector Cam Closed?
Check that yellow connector cam is in closed position.
Using Diagnostics
The "core expansion" technique used with 34 Series GC diagnostics requires that the tests be
done in a strict order. For the results of a specific test to be valid, all of the previous tests must
have passed. The test results are displayed in this order, and the listing of the fau1t messages in
this section also follows this order. It is essentia1 that the first fau1t encountered in this
sequence be corrected before going to other problems, because the later faults may disappear or
be altered when the basic problem is fixed.
For example, the 15 volt power supply is used by various circuits in the instrument. A failure in
the supply will cause many fault indications in the detectors, temperature control, and options,
even though these circuits have no problems. Note that the fau1t displays reflect the conditions
that existed when the tests were first run. If a problem is corrected, the displays will not change
until the tests are run again. Always correct the first problem 1isted, and then rerun the tests.
Continue with the first fault (if any) encountered in this rerun of the test.
If the keyboard and display are responding normally, the core circuitry is almost certainly alright.
In this case, the strict order of testing may be modified to allow use of the Automatic tests without
first doing the core tests. However, if the Automatic test results seem to be inconsistent or
questionable, go through the core tests to see if there is a subtle problem there. Cold start (see
paragraph 2.2) may be required to restore proper operation if the instrument has somehow gotten
into an illegal state where it cannot execute the commands entered at the keyboard.
All of the tests for the hardware installed are run each time the tests are requested, even if a test
fails which would invalidate subsequent tests. This allows faults in the diagnostic system to be
7
detected. If the symptoms which should accompany a displayed fault are not observed, and the
instrument seems to be working properly, the diagnostic hardware may have failed. Normal
operation can continue without repairing the instrument until it is desired to restore the diagnostic
function. Likewise, faults need not be corrected immediately if they affect only a function which is
not in use, such as a detector attenuator in a setup without a chart recorder.
The results obtained from the diagnostic system may sometimes vary if the diagnostics are run
several times. If the faults displayed correspond to problems which have been encountered in
operation, the circuitry may be intermittent, and the procedures listed for diagnosis and repair
should be followed. A single occurrence of a fault message which does not correspond to any
operational problem was probably caused by a momentary "glitch" and can be ignored. Sometimes,
the variations in results are caused by changes in the operating conditions, such as ambient or
internal temperatures, line voltage disturbances, or instrument parameters. Try varying any
condit1ons which are under your control, and note any correlation between failures and observable
conditions. The Background tests may be of assistance here, since they log the time of occurrence
of a fault.
The entries in the diagnostic tables in this section consist of four parts. First is the indication of the
fault, such as a fault message that appears on the display or a diagnostic LED indicator. Next is the
meaning of the fault as detected by the GC. The symptoms which could be expected to accompany
the fault are then listed. Followed by the necessary repair procedures (including further diagnostic
procedures, if needed). Before doing any repairs, check the validity of the instrument's fault
diagnosis by comparing the expected symptoms with the actual behavior of the GC. When several
consecutive fault indications share some parts of the above information, they are listed as group.
Be sure to read the text at the beginning of the entry which applies to all of the faults in the
group as well as the specific information for the fault you are looking for.
Before you conclude the repair procedures described in the tables, always read paragraph 2.5,
Final Checks and instructions After Completing Diagnostics. There you will find information
on returning faulty pc boards, ways to verify that your repairs are complete and appropriate, and
other concluding instructions.
The diagnostic tables are divided into three parts: Core tests, Automatic tests, and Extended tests.
The core tests can be found in paragraph 3, the Background tests in paragraph 4.1, the Automatic
tests in paragraph 4.2, and the Extended tests in paragraph 5. Proceed to the beginning of the
appropriate paragraph, where you will find further instructions for those specific tests.
2.5
Final Checks and Instructions After Completing Diagnostics
When the repairs have been completed, verify that the right pc boards have been replaced by
temporarily putting the defection pc boards back into the instrument. The original symptoms
should return. If they do not, see the comments on intermittent fault indications in paragraph 2.4
simply moving things around and turning the power off and on frequently clears this type of fault,
leading to the incorrect conclusion that replacement of a particu1ar module was responsible for the
repair. It is also a good idea to do the core tests as well as the Automatic tests after a repair has
been made, even if the repair was in an area covered by the Automatic tests. Before returning to
normal operation, be sure that everything has been restored to its proper operating
condition:
8
2.5.1
Returning Defective Printed Circuit Boards
Replacement boards, as well as the boards in service kits, are packed in special shipping boxes.
Use these boxes when sending defective boards back to the local dealer.
Follow the
directions included with the shipping box.
Do not attempt to repair any printed circuit boards which you may want the local dealer in the
future or which you may decide to return for credit. Boards which have been damaged by a
customer will not be accepted for return credit.
3.
CORE TESTS
The core tests should be run if the instrument is unresponsive or erratic, if the automatic tests give
erroneous results, or if a repair has just been made. The power supply, microprocessor, display,
and keyboard are tested in that order. Start from the beginning and do all of the tests until your
problem is solved
Since the keyboard and display may not be working, most of the test results are indicated by
LED’s on the printed circuit boards. The normal state for each of these indicators is listed at the
beginning of a paragraph, followed by a description of the associated problem, additional
diagnostic procedures (if needed), and a repair procedure. If the indicator is in its normal state, the
remainder of the paragraph may be skipped, including any subparagraphs within it.
3.1
|
Power supply PC Board: +5V supply, Power Line voltage, Control Circu1ts
Turn instrument ON. Observe the LED indicators on CR1 on the Power Supply PCB from above
as much as possible, without removing the high voltage cover.(See Quick Reference Manual.)The
LED's may vary in brightness, and the glow from the dimmer ones may not be visible in high
ambient light when viewed from the side of the LED. If all 4 LED's are ON, there are no faults in
paragraph 3.1. Continue to paragraph 3.2.
3.1.1
"+5V FUSE OK" (CR1A) LED Not Lit
9
If the +5V FUSE OK LED on CR1 is not lit(see Quick Reference Manual), power is not reaching
the regulator circuit on the Power supply PCB. The instrument will be completely inoperative.
For an overview of the procedures described in this paragraph, see Figure2. check off the boxes
provided in the figure as you complete each step described in the text.
Step 1: Verify that the power cord is pluoged into a live outlet and the power switch is ON. Check
whether the cooling fan on the rear panel is running. If it is not, skip ahead to Step 6.
If it is, continue on to step 2.
NOTE
Refer to the Quick Reference Manual or paragraph 9 for
electronic hardware locations.
Step 2: Replace fuse F1 on the Mother PCB with a 10A, 250V ceramic fuse (see Quick
Reference Manual for location.) Check the connections at E1 and E2 on the Mother PCB. for
orrosion, damage, or looseness. Call the local dealer if there is a problem. Clean the Power Supply
PCB card edge contacts (see paragraph 2.3).If the "+5V Fuse OK"(CR1A) now lights normally when
the power is turned on, your problem is solved. If not, continue on to step 3.
Step 3:
Remove the Power Supply PCB and open the yellow connector cams of the remaining
plug-in pc boards. Disconnect the plug from J30 on the Mother PCB. Replace fuse F1. If a
voltmeter is available, turn on the power and measure the voltage at TP5 on the Mother PCB with
the meter negative lead on TP2. If the voltage is less than 10 volts DC replace the Mother PCB. If
it is at least 10 volts if a meter is not availab1e, continue on to step 4.
Step 4:
Reinstall the Power supply PCB only. If the "+5V Fuse 0K" LED (CR1A) does not
remain lit when the power is turned on, skip ahead to step 5.
If the LED remains lit, turn off the power and close the yellow connector cam for the
CPU PCB. If the"+5V Fuse OK" LED (CR1A) does not remain lit for at least 30
seconds when power is turned back on, the CPU PC Board is defective. If the CPU is
not defective, continue to connect and test the remaining plug-in boards one at a time
in this manner until a defective board is found.
If no defective boards are found, disconnect the flat ribbon cable from the
keyboard/Display PCB at J80 (see Quick Reference Manual) and from the
PCL/ADC PCB at J61 (if printer/plotter installed). (See Quick Reference Manual.)
Reconnect the cable first at J30 on the Mother PCB, then at J80 on the
Keyboard/Display PCB, and finally at J61 on the PCL/ADC PCB, following the
above procedure each time, to find a defective cable, keyboard/Display, or
printer/plotter.
Replace the pc board, cable, or printer that was found to be defective. Replace F1
(10A, 250V ceramic), close all open connector cams, and reconnect all of the flat
ribbon cable connectors.
Step 5:
(From the beginning of step4 only--CR1A does not remain lit.) Replace the Power
Supply PCB and fuse F1. If the "+5V Fuse OK" LED (CR1A) still does not remain
lit when power is applied, the original Power Supply PCB was probably good.
Replace the Mother PCB.
Close all of the connector cams, reconnect the flat ribbon cable at J30 on the Mother
PCB, and replace fuse F1 (if necessary) before returning to normal operation.
10
Step 6:
(From step 1 only--fan not running.) Checks fuse F101 on the rear panel (see Figure
2 in the Installation section for location). If it is blown, skip ahead to Step 7. If not,
check that there are plugs securely fastened to J27, J28, and J29 on the Mother PCB
(see Quick Reference Manual), and that the fan has a power cable attached to it. If
these checks do not solve the problem, call the local dealer.
Step 7:
Replace fuse F101 with the proper type [7A, 250V slow blow for 110/120 VAC line,
or 4A, 250V slow blow for 220/240 VAC line]. If the fan does not keep running after
the power is turned on, F101 has blown again. Call the local dealer. Otherwise, the
problem should be solved.
3.1.2
"+5V OK"
(CR1B)
Not Lit
11
The +5V power supply voltage is not in tolerance if this LED is not lit. The instrument may be
erratic or inoperative.
Be sure rear cooling fan is running, its air flow is not blocked, and the side and rear panels are in
place. If the +5V regulator has overheated and shut down due to lack of air flow, it should return
to normal operation in a few minutes when cooling is restored.
This fault can also be caused by a severe drop in line voltage (typically below 65% of the nominal
value). Contact the local dealer if you need help in correcting a line voltage problem.
NOTE
Refer to the Quick Reference Manual or paragraph 9 for
electronic hardware
locations.
Turn off power, open the yellow connector cams for all plug--in boards except the Power Supply
PCB. Disconnect J30 on the Mother PCB. Turn power back on. If CR1B is still not lit, replace the
Power Supply PCB.
If the "+5V OK" LED (CR1B) is now glowing, turn off power and close the yellow connector cam
for the CPU PCB. lf the LED does not light when the power is turned back on, the CPU PC Board
is defective. If the CPU is not defective, continue to connect and test the remaining plug-in boards
one at a time in this manner until a defective board is found.
If no defective boards are found, disconnect the flat ribbon cable from the Keyboard/Display PCB
at J80 and from the PCL/ADC PCB at J61 (if printer/plotter installed). Reconnect the cable first at
J30 on the Mother PCB, then at J8O on the Keyboard/Display, and finally at J61 on the PCL/ADC
PCB, following the above procedure each time, to find a defective cable, Keyboard/Display, or
printer/plotter, respectively.
Replace the pc board, cable, or printer that was found to be defective. Close all open connector
cams, and reconnect all of the flat ribbon cable connectors.
3.1.3
"Line Voltage OK " (CR1D) LED Not Lit
The ac power line voltage is below 90% of its nominal value. Operation of the instrument will be
inhibited until the voltage is brought above this threshold.
The transformer tap select switch, S1, on the Mother PCB may be in the wrong position. See
paragraph 4.1 in the Installation section for details on setting this switch.
3.1.4
" s y s t e m
R u n "
( C R 1 C )
L E D
N o t
L i t
The microprocessor is being held in a reset condition, inhibiting operation, when this LED is not
lit. This indicator should be off only when the +5V supply or the line voltage is out of
tolerance(CR1B or CR1D not lit).Turn off the instrument and open the connector cams for all pc
boards which are installed, except for the Power Supply PCB, and disconnect the plug from J30
on the Mother PCB, Turn the power back ON. If CR1C is still off, replace the Power Supply PCB.
12
NOTE
Refer to the Quick Reference Manual or paragraph 9 for
electronic hardware locations.
If the "System Run" LED (CR1C) is now glowing, turn off the power and close the yellow
connector cam for the CPU PCB. If the LED does not light when the power is turned back on, the
CPU PC Board is defective. If the CPU is not defective, continue to connect and test the remaining
plug-in boards one at a time in this manner until a defective board is found.
If no defective boards are found, disconnect the flat ribbon Cable from the Keyboard/Display PCB
at J80 and from the PCL/ADC PCB at J61 (if printer/plotter installed). Reconnect the cable first at
J30 on the Mother PCB, then at J80 on the Keyboard/Display, and finally at J61 on the PCL/ADC
PCB, following the above procedure each time, to find a defective cable, Keyboard/Display, or
printer/plotter.
Replace the pc board, cable, or printer that was found to be defective. Close all open connector
cams, and reconnect all of the flat ribbon cable connectors.
3.2
CPU: Microprocessor, RAM and ROM Memories, Associated Circuitry, and
Instrument Bus
Fault tested in this paragraph will generally prevent the instrument from operation at all, but they
may also cause erratic or intermittent operation.
The CPU tests are initiated by pressing [SHIFT][INSTRUMENT TEST](if the GC is responding
to keyboard entries) or by cold-starting the instrument. If the results obtained by pressing [SHIFT]
[INSTRUMENT TEST] are not satisfactory, repeat the test from cold start, (see paragraph 2.2 for
a description of the cold start procedure).
a. Press [SHIFT][INSTR TEST] and simultaneously look at CR1 and CR2 LED's on the
CPU PCB
1.
or
2.
b. Cold start the instrument and simultaneously look at CR1 and CR2 LED's on the CPU
PCB.
Both LED's should blink "ON" momentarily when the test begins (if the test is initiated
from cold start) and then turn off for approximately 2 to 5 seconds, after which they will
turn on and remain on. If CR1 and CR2 follow this pattern, the CPU is working, so you
should go directly to paragraph 3.3.
3.
Any other behavior indicates a fault, which can be identified in this section. Paragraphs
3.2.1 through 3.2.5 deal with 5 deviations from the proper pattern. Follow the procedure in
the first paragraph whose heading corresponds to the behavior of the LED's which you
observed.
To ensure the validity of these tests, be certain that all 4 LED indicators, CR1A through
CR1D, on the Power Supply PCB are lit, as described in paragraph 3.1.
NOTE
Refer to the Quick Reference Manual or paragraph 9 for
electronic hardware locations.
3.2.1
CR1 and/or CR2 (CPU PCB) Fail to Blink ON at Co1d Start
13
If either or both indicators CR1 and CR2 on the CPU PCB fail to blink ON momentarily at cold
start, the indicators or their drive circuits are faulty. If there are no other fault indications, and the
instrument operates norma11y, it is not harmful to continue operation.
The CPU PCB must be replaced to restore the operation of these indicators.
3.2.2
CR1 and/or CR2 (CPU PCB) Fail to Turn OFF
If either or both indicators CR1 and CR2 fail to turn OFF, the CPU PCB is malfunctioning and
must be replaced.
3.2.3
"CPU OK"(CR1) LED Dose Not Light Within 5 Seconds
If CR1 fails to light within 5 seconds, the CPU PCB is malfunctioning and must be replaced.
Various codes may appear on the display during the test which can help a serviceman localize the
problem on the board. Make a note of any displays which appear, and return them with the board.
3.2.4
"BUS OK" (CR2) LED Remains OFF After "CPU OK" (CR1) Lights
If CR2 remains OFF after CR1 lights, the CPU PCB cannot transmit and receive data correctly
over the instrument bus.
For an overview of the procedure described in this paragraph, see Figure 3 Check off the boxes
provided in the figure as you complete each step described in the text.
Step 1:
Turn off instrument power and open the yellow cam connectors for all of the pc
boards which are installed, except for the Power Supply PCB and the CPU PCB.
Cold start the instrument and look to see if CR2 "Bus OK" light comes on normally.
If it does not, skip to Step 2. If it does come on, turn off instrument power and close
one of the open connector cams. Cold start the instrument (see para.2.2) and look to
see if CR2 LED still lights. Continue this way through the remaining printed circuit
boards until one is found which prevents the LED from turning on. Replace that pc
board.
Step 2:
If the "BUS OK" LED did not come on after opening the connector cams, turn off
instrument power and unplug the connector from J30 on the Mother PCB. Cold start
the instrument ( para. 2.2). If CR2 LED begins to blink after CR1 LED lights, skip to
step 3. If CR2 LED remains off, there is either a fault on the CPU PCB (most
probable) or a short on the instrument bus (less probable). The Mother PCB, Power
Supply PCB, and CPU PC Boards should be examined visually for foreign material
which might cause a short, If visual examination does not find the problem, replace
the CPU PCB and then the Power Supply PCB Consult the local dealer if this does
not correct the problem.
Step 3:
If the "BUS OK" LED began blinking with J30 disconnected, turn off the power,
reconnect J30, and disconnect the flat cable from the PCL/ADC PCB at J61 (if
printer/plotter installed).Cold start the instrument. If the "Bus OK" LED remains
OFF, skip ahead to step 4. If it begins to blink or turns on continuously, replace either
the entire printer/plotter assembly or (if the facilities allow) the plotter's PCL/ADC
PCB (P/N 03-917602-00). If CR2 is blinking, go to paragraph 3.3.
Step 4:
If the LED is still OFF, turn off the power and disconnect the flat cable from the
Keyboard/Display PCB at J80.Cold start the instrument. If the "BUS OK"LED
(CR2) now begins to blink when the "CPU OK" LED turns on, the
Keyboard/Display PCB is defective and must be replaced. If the LED remains OFF,
the flat cable (P/N 03-917816-00 or 03-917817-00, if P/P installed) must be
replaced.
14
3.2.5
“BUS OK” (CR2) LED Blink after “CPU Ok” (CR1) LED Turns ON
If the CR2 LED blinks after CR l LED turns on, the CPU is not able to communicate with the
Keyboard/Display controller.
Step 1:
Turn off instrument power and open the yellow connector cams for all of the pc
boards which are installed, except for the Power Supply PCB and the CPU PCB.
Cold start the instrument and see if the "BUS OK" LED comes on normally. If it
does not, skip to Step 2. If it does, turn off the power and close one of the open
board locks. Cold start the instrument and see if the "Bus OK" LED still turns on
after the "CPU OK" LED turns on. Continue in this way through the remaining
15
printed circuit boards until one is found which prevents the LED from remaining lit.
Replace that pc board.
NOTE
Refer to the Quick Reference Manual or paragraph 9 for
electronic hardware locations.
Step 2:
If the "BUS OK" LED did not operate normally with the connector cams open, turn
off the power and disconnect the flat cable from the PCL/ADC PCB at J61 (if
printer/plotter installed). Cold start the instrument, If the "BUS OK" LED now
comes on continuously after the "CPU OK"LED turns on, replace either the
complete printer/plotter or (if the faci1ities allow) the plotter's PCL/ADC printed
circuit board (P/N 03-917602-00).
If the "BUS OK" LED is still not operating normally, there is a fault in the
Keyboard/Display PCB (P/N 03-917708-00) or the flat cable. These must be
replaced individually to determine which one is bad.
3.3
Display: Alphanumeric Display and LED Indicators on Keyboard
The display test is initiated by pressing [SHIFT][INSTR TEST] (if the GC is responding to
keyboard entries) or by cold-starting the instrument, If the results obtained by pressing
[SHIFT][INSTR TEST]are not satisfactory, repeat the test from cold start. See paragraph 2.2 for a
description of the cold start procedure.
The display and the LED's should turn off for a few seconds during the CPU tests. After both
LED’s on the CPU PCB have turned on (see paragraph 3.2), the words DISPLAY TEST should be
displayed for one second. Segment A (see Figure 4) should then light up in all 32 character
positions, followed by segments B, C, D, E, F, G, L, I, K, H, M, J, N, and the decimal point. All of
the segments in the left-most character position should then turn on. With all remaining characters
off. The remaining characters will then be turned on one at a time form left to right
FIGURE 4 SEGMENT LOCATIONS WITHIN A DISPLAY CHARACTER
16
The keyboard LED’s should remain off until the display segment test described above begins after
the DISPLAY TEST message. All 12 of the keyboard LED‘s should be 1it throughout the duration
of the segment test. They will then be turned on one at a time during the segment test in the
following sequence: READY,NOT READY,REMOTE CONTROL RUN, BUILD/MODIFY,
STATUS, METHOD 1, METHOD 2, METHOD 3, METHOD 4, RACK TABLE, and
SEQUENCE TABLE.
Any deviation from the specified sequences indicates a fault in the Keyboard/Display PC Board,
which should then be replaced
3.4 Keyboard
If any key gives an improper response or no response at all, the Keycode Echo Test(paragraph
5)shout d be run,if possible. Four keys are required to initiate the Keycode Echo Test: SHIFT,
GC CONFIGURE/INSTR TEST, ENTER, and 4/YES. If any of these keys fail to respond,use
this section to isolate the problem to the Keyboard/Display PCB or the keyboard touch panel. If
these keys respond improperly, the problem is probably in the Keyboard/Display PCB, which
should be replaced.
The following procedure can be used to identify the cause of a completely unresponsive key; Figure
5 gives an overview of the procedure. Check off the boxes provided in the figure as you complete
the steps described in the text.
Step 1: Enable the keyboard audible response feature by cold starting the instrument. Do not
press any keys. If the keyboard “beep” does not sound within 5 seconds of cold start,skip ahead
to Step 2. If the beep does sound without any keys having been pressed, turn off instrument power
and disconnect the keyboard touch panel from the Keyboard/Display PCB at J81.Turn instrument
power back on and listen for the beep. If the beep still sounds, the Keyboard/Display PC Board is
defective and must be replaced. If no beep is heard , the keyboard touch panel(P /N
03-917803-00)must be replaced. Contact the local dealer.
Step 2: If the instrument did not generate a beep without pressing any key,press a key which was
not responding. If no beep is heard, skip to Step 3.If the beep sounds, press the same key again. If
the beep does not sound the second time, replace the Keyboard/Display PC Board. If the keyboard
continues to respond with a beep each time a key is pressed,no problem is indicated in this
section. The CPU and Display Tests (paragraphs 3.2 and 3.3) should be repeated.
Step 3: If the first key tested did not produce a beep, try pressing other keys on the keyboard. If
none of them respond, replace the keyboard/Display PCB. If some of the keys are working,the
problem could be in either the pc board or the keyboard touch panel. First, try replacing the
Keyboard/Display PC8.f there is still no response, the old Keyboard/Display PCB gas probably
good. The keyboard touch panel must be replaced. Contact the local dealer.
17
STEP 1
 COLD START
 BEEP SOUNDS?
NO
YES —DISCONNECT J81
—COLD START
—BEEP SOUNDS?
YES —REPLACE KEYBOARD/DISPLAY PCB
NO
—REPLACE KEYBOARD TOUCH PANEL
STEP 2


PRESS BAD KEY
BEEP SOUNDS?
NO
YES —PRESS AGAIN
—BEEP SOUNDS?
NO—REPLACE KEYBOARD/DISPLAY PCB
YES —NO PROBLEM HERE
—CHECK CPU AND DISPLAY
STEP 3
 PRESS OTHER KEYS
 ANY RESPONSE?
NO—REPLACE KEYBOARD/DISPLAY PCB
YES—REPLACE KEYBOARD/DISPLAY PCB FIRST
—REPLACE KEYBOARD TOUCH PANEL, IF NECESSARY
FIGURE 5
UNRESPONSIVE KEY TEST (para.3.4)
4
BACKGROUND TESTS AND AUTOMATIC TESTS
Background tests continuously monitor the operating conditions of the Instrument. If a problem
is found, the SATAUS light will blink. Press [STATUS] to display the first fault message, and then
press [ENTER] to Display any additional fault messages. The normal Status displays will appear
after all of the fault messages have been displayed. Continuing To press [ENTER] will return the
display to the first background fault message.
Automatic tests are run without operator assistance. They are initiated automatically on cold start
or from the keyboard by pressing [SHIFT] [INSTR TEST] Automatic tests are run in less than a
minute and operating conditions are disturbed only momentarily. It is Recommended that the
18
automatic tests be run daily as a confidence check on instrument operation.
4.1 Background Tests
The background test faults messages are either transient or latched Transient messages disappear
as soon as the instrument stops detecting the fault, and the STATUS light stops blinking. Latched
messages Continue to be displayed, and the STATUS light continue to blink, even If the condition
disappears by itself.
Pressing [RESET] clears all of the background test fault messages and Stops the STATUS light
from blinking. Any functions which have been disabled as a result of detecting the faults are
turned back on. If a fault is still present however, the indication will generally come back on as
soon as it is detected. (The exceptions to this rule are noted in the list of background faults below.).
As long as [RESET] is not pressed, the fault messages will continue to be the first displays seen
when [STATUS] is pressed. The results of the background tests, along with the results of the
Automatic and Extended tests, can be printed on the printer/plotter by pressing
[SHIFT][REPORT].
Some of the background faults represent simple operational problems, such as inconsistent
method parameters or an extinguished detector flame. If the information provided in the list of
faults below is not sufficient to solve the problem, refer to the appropriate section of this manual.
Other background fault messages indicate hardware malfuncti0ns. Follow the instructions below
for all of the faults which are displayed, and make a note of the fault numbers for future reference.
The Automatic tests (para. 4.2) and the extended tests (para. 5) will help in correcting most of
these problems.
Background faults may sometimes be generated by transient conditions such as power line
disturbances. Fault messages which occur rarely and do not correspond to any observed
operational problems can safely be ignored.
Background Faults
Fault 1: Illegal method (transient)
The current method is not consistent with the hardware present or with the configuration table
entries. Since illegal methods cannot build, the error must have been caused by a change in a table
entry or in the hardware installed. Press [ENTER] to display the remaining background faults and
the instrument status for help in finding the inconsistent entries.
Fault 2 through 7: Hardware change (transient)
A change has been detected in the configuration of the electronics installed in the instrument. Be
sure that the desired printed circuit boards are installed and all switches are in the proper positions.
The location of the change is indicated by the fault number as shown below:
Fault 2: Injector (switch S2, S3, or S4, as appropriate, on the Temperature Control PC
Board)
Fault 3: Detector A
Fault 4: Detector B
Fault 5: External Events
Fault 6: AutoSampler
Fault 7: Printer/plotter
Fault8:
Inject switch stuck closed (transient)
The inject switch was held down for the entire duration of a run. This can be caused by
19
overtightening the injector nut. See the entry for Fault 248 in paragraph 4.2 for more information,
Be sure that the GC can be taken out of RUN by pressing[RESET] and put back into RUN by
pressing the inject switch before continuing operation.
Fault 9: Power supply failure (latched)
One of the system power supplies went out of tolerance. If the fault is still present, many other
faults will result. Run the diagnostics.
Faults 10 and 11: Memory error (latched)
An error was found in the program memory (Fault10)or the read/ write memory(Fault 11) of the
instrument. If these faults are persistent, erratic operation or random failures may occur Run the
diagnostics. Run the Destructive RAM test in paragraph 5 if Fault 11 persists.
Fault 12: RAM battery low or off (latched)
The battery which maintains instrument memory when power is off is either low or turned off at
S1 on the CPU PCB. See the entry for Fault 201 in paragraph 4.2 for information on correcting
the problem.
Once this fault has beers of eared by pressing [RESET], it wi11 not be Displayed again until the
Automatic tests are run, so the STATUS light will not blink continuously until a new battery is
installed. Press [SHIFT] [INSTR TEST] to run the Automatic tests after replacing the battery, and
the test will be enabled again.
Fault 13: Power fail occurred (latched)
As power to the instrument was interrupted, either by a power failure Or by turning off the main
power switch.
Faults 14 through 17: Temperature setpoint above limit (transient)
A temperature setpoint in the current method for one of the heated Zone is greater than the limit
entered in the configuration table. One of the entries must be changed before the method can be
activated. The zone having the illegal entry is specified by the fault number:
Fault 14: Injector
Fault 15: Column
Fault 16: Auxiliary
Fault 17: Detector
Fault18: Temperature Control ADC fault (latched)
The analog-to-digital converter used to measure temperatures failed. Because of the danger of
thermal runaway,the AC power for the heaters (and other devices)is turned off. The Temperature
Control PGB is probably defective. Run the d1agnostics.
Fault 19 and 20: Primary fuse blown (transient)
Either fuse F2(Fault 19)or fuse F3(Fault 20)on the Mother PCB is blown. If both of these faults
occur together, it is more likely that the main power contactor is open for some reason .See if any
other background faults are displayed which turn off the AC power. Also, see if the high voltage
cover is depressing .the interlock snitch properly. Running the Automatic tests described in
para.4.2 will provide more information on the source of the problem and repair procedures.
20
Fault 21: Column oven fan rotor overheated (latched)
The fan motor can overheat because of a defect in the motor or fan, or because of a lack cooling
air around the motor. Run the Automatic tests,and see the entry for Fault 247 in para4.2.
When this fault is detected, the column oven vents are closed and the heaters are turned off to
allow the motor to cool. Operation can be restored by pressing [RESET]. If the motor has cooled
sufficiently, the Automatic tests may not detect the fault.
Fault 22: Heated zone overheated (latched)
One of the heated zones has a temperature reading above 429 degrees. The main power contactor
is turned off to prevent further heating. Check the Status displays to see which zone is overheated,
assuming that it has not had time to cook since the fault was detected. Run the Automatic tests and
see the entry for Fault 207 in paragraph 4.2 to find the source of the problem. To ensure safe
operation,be sure that there is no problem remaining before pressing[RESET] to return to normal
operation.
Faults 23 through 26: Thermal runaway (latched)
One of heated zones has continued to heat above 250 degrees even though the instrument has tried
to turn the heater off. The main power contactor is turned off to prevent further heating. Run the
Automatic tests described in Section 15 to find the source of the problem. If no problem is found,
press [RESET] to return to normal operation for a few minutes, watching for any abnormal
behavior. Run the Automatic tests again after the instrument has warmed up to see if the problem
has returned. To ensure safe operation, be sure that there is no problem remaining before
continuing normal operation.
The specific zone which has run away can be found from the following list:
Fault 23: Column
Fault 24: Injector
Fault 25: Auxiliary
Fault 26: Detector
Faults 27 through 31: Temperature sensor probe fault (latched)
The instrument has detected a shorted (or partially shorted) temperature sensor probe. Power to the
affected zone (see the fault list below) is turned off. Pressing [RESET] will turn the zone back on
and clear the fault message.
NOTE: These faults will also be displayed if a probe simulator is used on a zone that has not been
turned off in the GC Configure table.
Faults 27 through 31: (cont.)
Run the Automatic tests described in para.4.2. If that does not locate the problem, disconnect the
probe from its connector on the temperature Control PCB and replace it with a probe simulator
plug. The temperature reading for the zone should now be between -15 and +15 degrees. If it is
not, replace the Temperature Control PCB. If it is, the temperature sensor probe is faulty, and the
entire probe, harness for that zone must be replaced.
Fault 27:
Fault 28:
Fault 29:
Fault 30:
Fault 31:
Column.
Replace column oven .robe harness with 03-917813-00
Injector
Auxiliary
Detector
Pneumatics
21
Faults 32 through 36: Temperature control ADC overage (latched)
The analog-to-digital converter used to measure temperatures read an overage value. Power to the
affected zone (see the fault list below) is turned off. If one of these faults occurs in conjunction
with. Fault 22; follow the instructions for Fault 22. Press [RESET] to turn the zone back on and
clear the fault message.
Run the Automatic tests. If that does not locate the problem, disconnect the probe from its
connector on Temperature Control PCB and replace it with a probe simulator plug. The
temperature reading for the zone should now be between -15 and +15 degrees. If it is not, replace
the Temperature Control PCB. If it is, the temperature sensor probe is faulty, and the entire probe
harness for that zone must be replaced..
Fault 32: Column
Fault 33: Injector
Fault 34: Auxiliary
Fault 35: Detector
Fault 36: Pneumatics
Fault 37: Power line ground fault (latched)
The polarization or the power line connection is reversed, or the ground connection through the
power cord is missing. Normal chromatographic functions are not affected, but the risk of
electrical shock is increased for certain maintenance operations and in case of some component
failures.
If the instrument is wired for 220V operation with a non-polarized line p1ug, reverse the p1ug in
the wall outlet. If this does not correct the problem, or if the cord is equipped with a polarized plug,
try another wall outlet or have an electrician check the outlet for proper polarization and
grounding.
Once this fault has been cleared by pressing [RESET], it will not be displayed again until the
Automatic tests are run, so the STATUS light will not blink continuously while the fault remains.
After the problem has been corrected,press [SHIFT] [INSTR TEST] to verify proper operation,
and the background test will be enabled again.
Fault 38: Main power contactor open (transient)
AC power is turned off to the heaters,motors, and solenoids. Check for any other background
faults which could cause this condition, and make sure that the high voltage cover is fully
depressing the interlock switch. Pressing [SHIFT] [INSTR TEST] to run the Automatic tests
should identify the cause of this fault.
Fault 39: Cryogenic coolant timer elapsed (transient)
The cryogenic coolant timer which was set in the GC Configure table has elapsed. Press RESET to
re-enable the coolant and restart the timer.
Fault 40: Detector A A/D converter fault (latched)
The analog-to-digital converter used for autozero, Status displays, and diagnostics for Detector A
failed. Some of these functions may not operate properly. Run the Automatic tests to verify the
problem. Replace the Detector A PCB to correct the problem.
Fault 41: Detector A ignitor fuse blown(transient)
The ignitor coil will not heat to light the flame. See the entry for Fault 289 in paragraph 4.2.
This test is performed only when [IGNITE A] is pressed, so the display will be turned on or off
only when the key is pressed.
Fault 42: Detector A ignitor relay fault (latched)
The ignitor coil will not heat to light the flame. See the entry for Fault 290 in paragraph 4.2.
Fault 43: Detector A polarizer fault (latched)
22
The polarizing voltage is out of tolerance. Run the Automatic tests to determine the cause of this
problem.
Fault 44: Detector A TCD filament temperature limited (transient)
The instantaneous filament protection circuit has reduced the bridge voltage to prevent an
excessive filament temperature rise. This may occur in normal operation when a large sample
concentration, such as a solvent peak, is present in the cell. The only problem which this creates is
reduced height and area of the overloaded peak. If quantitative results are required for the affected
peak, a smaller sample must be injected, or the detector operating conditions must be changed.
Refer to the TCD detector section for more information on selecting TCD operating conditions.
Fault 45: Detector A TCD carrier gas not flowing (latched)
This fault is detected only when Helium carrier gas has been selected in the configuration table. It
is reported when either a large cell imbalance or an abnormally high cell temperature has been
detected continuously for three minutes. Power to the cell is turned off to prevent oxidation of the
filaments until the fault display is cleared by pressing [RESET].
One cause of this fault is a loss of carrier gas through both sides of the bridge. Check for
obstructions in the gas lines. And be sure that the appropriate valves are open and the gas supply is
not depleted.
The other cause is a large bridge imbalance. Check for a missing or perforated septum,a broken
column,or a 1eaking connection. Balance the bridge with the TCD balance control to bring the
baseline value within range of the autozero correction.
Fault 46: Detector A autozero exceeded (transient)
The detector background could not be canceled well enough. The background level may exceed
the range the autozero (1300or 160 mv on the most sensitive range, depending on the detector
type), or the background signal may be too noisy or unstable for the autozero to track. If neither of
these conditions is true, run the Automatic tests to check for a hardware fault.
This fault may be reported during initial conditioning when background noise is exceptionally
large, particularly with an ECD or FPD detector or a new column.
Fault 47: Detector A flame extinguished (transient)
The background level normal for the detector flame or faulty TSD bead was below the minimum
normal value for an operating detector. This condition is checked only once per run when the
instrument goes into the STABILZEZ state, so lighting or extinguishing the flame will not be
reflected in this fault message immediately.
Fault 48: Detector A TCD out of balance (transient)
The autozero correction is above 70% of its maximum available range. The TCD balance control
should be adjusted to return the baseline value closer to zero for optimum noise performance and
to ensure that the autozero correction will be able to compensate for further drift in the cell.
Fault 49: Detector A ECD switched to test mode (transient)
Switch S3 on the ECD PC board is in the TEST position. See the troubleshooting procedures in
paragraph 8.11 for the use of this switch. It must be in the NORM position for proper operation
whenever the cell is connected.
Fault 50: Detector A TSD bead power off(transient)
The DETECTOR section in the active method has been set to turn bead current off. Change that
entry to clear the fault and to resume normal operation.
Fault 51: Detector A TCD bridge power off (transient)
The DETECTOR section in the active method has been set to turn the cell voltage off. Change that
entry to clear the fault and to resume normal operation.
23
Fault 52: Detector B A/D converter fault (latched)
(See Fault 40)
Fault 53. Detector B ignitor fuse blown (transient)
(See Fault 41)
Fault 54: Detector D ignitor relay fault (latched)
(See Fault 42)
Fault 55: Detector B polarizer fault (latched)
(See Fault 43)
Fault 56: Detector B TCD filament temperature 7imited (transient)
(See Fault44)
Fault 57: Detector B TCD carrier gas not flowing (latched)
(See Fault 45)
Fault 58: Detector B autozero exceeded (transient)
(See Fault 46)
Fault 59: Detector B flame extinguished (transient)
(See Fault 47)
Fault 60: Detector B TCD out of balance (transient)
(See Fault 48)
Fault 61: Detector B ECD switched to test mode (transient)
(See Fault 49)
Fault 62: Detector B TSD bead power off( transient)
(See Fault 50)
Fault 63: Detector B TCD bridge power off (transient)
(See Fault 51)
Fault 64: Serial Interface switched to test mode (transient)
Switch S1 and/or switch S2 on the Serial Interface PC Board is in the TEST position. Both
switches must be in the NORM position for communication with a data system. When they are
in the TEST position the Automatic tests (para.4.2) will check the line drivers and receivers on the
Serial Interface PCB.
Faint 65: Data system disconnected (transient)
Communication to the data system connected through the Serial Interface PCB has been
interrupted. This test is enabled by turning on the instrument power or running automatic tests
while a data system is connected. The fault wi11 then be displayed as soon as the GC tries to
communicate with the data system after the cable has been disconnected or the data system has
been turned off. If the fault display is cleared by pressing[RESET],it will not be displayed again
until communication has been reestablished with the data system and then broken again·
Fault 78: Pressure A/D converter fault (latched)
The analog-to-digital converter used to measure column head pressures Failed. Pressure readings
will be inaccurate. Replace the External Events PCB to correct the problem.
Fault 79: External Events 24VAC fuse blown (transient)
The fuse for the 24VAC power which supplies the External Event relays is browns Refer to the
entry for Fault 411 in paragraph 4.2 to correct the problem
.
Fault 80: Printer/plotter power supply failure (latched)
The printer/plotter power supply is not within its voltage tolerance. This will be indicated by the
STATUS LED on the PCL/ADC PC8 being off. Verify that the power cable is plugged into J69 on
the Printer/Plotter Power Supply PCB. Check if the green LFD FUSE OK indicator is lit. If it is,
the power supply has failed .Replace the printer assembly.
If the green LED FUSE OK indicator is not lit, then fuse F1 on the Printer/Plotter Power Supply
PCB is blown. Replace fuse F1 (2A, 250V, slow blow).If the fuse blows again: replace the printer
assembly.
24
Fault 81: Printer communication failure (latched)
The command/data protocol was violated by the GC or the printer/plotter. This will be indicated
by distorted peaks because of lost data. The fault is self-correcting and no action is taken.
Fault 82: Printer paper out (transient)
The paper supply in the printer is exhausted. Replace the paper per instructions in the Quick
Reference Manual.
Fault 83: Buffer overflow in GC (latched)
The signal was changing too fast for the plotter to keep up with the ADC data rate and caused a
buffer overflow in the GC. This will be indicated by distorted or missing peaks because of lost
data. The specifications call for a maximum of 10 full scale peaks in a row of 0.7 seconds peak
width at half height or 1 Hz noise at 10% full scale plotted continuously without distortion.
Reduce the number of peaks in a row or reduce the amplitude or frequency of the noise.
Fault 84: Command not taken (latched)
The GC sent a command to the printer and the printer did not accept the command within 10
seconds. This will be indicated by missing peaks or an incomplete printout. If this fault is detected,
the GC will reset the printer and try to resume normal operation. Printing will be aborted and
plotting will be continued after the reset. If any error is detected after the reset, the printer/plotter
will be logged out of service. This fault will be cleared at the start of the next run.
Fault 85: Data not returned (latched)
The GC was expecting ADC data from the printer and data was not received within 6 seconds.
This will be indicated by missing peaks or an incomplete printout. If this fault is detected, the GC
will reset the printer and try to resume normal operation. Printing will be aborted and plotting will
be continued after the reset, if any error is detected after the reset, the printer/plotter will be logged
out of service. This fault will be cleared at the start of the next run.
Fault 86: Left edge sensor failure (1atched)
The plotter's thermal head is under full power against the left stop, usually accompanied by an
audible groaning noise from the motor. Run the Automatic tests.
Fault 87: ADC failed to calibrate (latched)
Offset or reference errors in the plotter ADC were greater than the range for internal calibration.
Run the Automatic tests.
Fault 88: Zero pen range exceeded (transient)
The +/- 3 Chart range was exceeded in attempting to zero the baseline. This will be indicated by
the plot not returning to baseline when the Zero Pen function is requested. See the Special Uses of
Keys section for additional information on Zero Pen.
Fault 89: AC test timer bad (latched)
The internal timer used to check for presence of AC voltages failed. Normal chromatographic
functions are not affected. To restore the operation of the diagnostic tests, replace the CPU PCB.
Background Faults 90-107 are for the 8035 AutoSampler Only
Faults 90-91: 8035 A/S Stepper Motor Control Faults
The stepper motor control or drive circuitry is not operating properly.
The solution is to replace the 8035 AutoSampler PCB.
Fault 90: 8035 A/S Stepper Motor Controller Communication Error
The stepper motor controller is not responding properly or not at all.
Fault 91: 8035 A/S Stepper Motor Controller Timeout
25
The stepper motor controller is taking too long to execute a Command.
Fault 92: Both Carriage Position Sensors are activated
Both of the carriage positions are sensed to be true at the same time. This could mean either one of
the carriage sensors is connected improperly or not working at all. Refer to para.8.4.
Fault 93: Stepper Motor Controller RAM/RCM Checksum Failure
The controller sensed an internal hard ware failure. The solution is to replace the 8035 Auto
Sampler PCB.
Fault 94: Syringe Home Position Sensor Fault
The syringe zero position was not sensed at the right time. The solution is to press RESET to clear
the fault. The instrument should have automatically reset the syringe zero position if the
instrument knows this position. The instrument will know this position if Instrument Test was run
the last tire the zero position was changed.
If the fault returns, reset the syringe zero position as described in Figure 2-4, 10 u1 Syringe
Installation, in the 8035 Operator’s Manual and run Instrument Test, then rerun the automated
method. If the fault returns,refer to para.8.4.
Fault 95: Carriage Position Not Sensed
The carriage should be sensed at one of two known positions and neither position was sensed。One
of the sensors is not operating or there was interference in the carriage motion. Press RESET to cl
ear fault and repeat the automated method. If fault reoccurs, refer to para. 8.4.
Fault 96: Carriage Not at Home Position
The occurs if the carriage should be at the home position and the OCI open/closed position is
sensed. The optical sensor at the OCI open/-closed position may not be connected properly.
Refer to para. 8.4.
Fault 97: Carriage Not at the OCI Open/Closed Position
This will occur if the carriage should be at the OCI open/closed position and this position is not
sensed. Refer to para. 8.4.
Fault 98: Carriage Jammed at the OCI Open/Closed Position
This fault occurs when Instrument Test is run without the 8035 A/S cable connected to P900.
With the 8035 AutoSampler connected to P900, this fault means the carriage is sensed to be stud at
the OCI open/closed position or the optical sensor is not connected properly. Refer to pare. 8.4.
Fault 99: Carriage Jammed at the Home Position
The carriage should have moved from the home position and it did not or the home position sensor
is wired improperly. Refer to pare.8.4.
Fault 100: Carriage Nose Position Not Reached
The carriage should have moved to the home position and it did not get there. The home position
sensor could be wired improperly or there could be some interference in the carriage motion.
Refer to para.8.4.
Fault 101: Carriage OCI Open/Closed Position Not Reached
The carriage should have moved to the OCI open/closed position but did not. This could happen if
the syringe is jammed in the OCI or there was other interference in the carriage motion. Refer to
para.8.4.
Fault 102: Syringe Home Position Not Reached
The syringe zero position was not reached properly. This could be due to some interference in the
26
syringe motion. Refer to para. 8.4.
Fault 103: Syringe Jammed at the Home Position
The syringe tried to move up from the syringe zero position and the home sensor is still active.
This will occur if the syringe motor can’t move the syringe up due to interference or if the optical
sensor at the home position is connected improperly. Refer to para.8.4.
Fault 104: Syringe Home Position Not Sensed
This will occur whenever the syringe should be at the zero position in the sensor and it is not. The
solution is to manually reset the syringe zero position as described in Figure 2-5 or 2-6 in the
Installation section. If the fault returns, refer to para.8 .4.
Fault 105: Carriage OCI Open/Closed Position Timing Error
Carriage was not sensed at the OCI open/closed position when it should have been. This could be
due to interference in the carriage motion.
Syringe carriage OCI open/closed position was sensed at the wrong time or not sensed at the right
time,i.e., carriage moved improperly. This could be due to interference in carriage motion. See
para.8.4.
Fault 106: Controller Received Invalid Data from the Instrument
This may be a problem with the GC or the 8035 A/S PCB. See pare. 8.4.
Fault 107: One or More Stepper Motor Phase Drive Circuits Stuck “On” Stepper motor drive
circuitry not working properly. Replace the 8035 AutoSampler PCB.
Faults 108 and 109: Thermal runaway
One of the heated zones has continued to heat above 250 degrees even though the instrument has
tried to turn the heater off. The main power contactor is turned off to prevent further heating. Run
tie Automatic tests described in Section 15 to find the source of the problem. If no problem is
found, press [RESET] to return to normal operation for a few minutes, watching for any abnormal
behavior. Run the Automatic tests again after the instrument has warmed up to see if the problem
has returned. To ensure safe operation,be sure that there is no problem remaining before
continuing normal operation.
Fault 108:
Fault 109:
Injector B
Detector B
Faults 110 and 111: Temperature sensor probe fault
The GC has detected a shorted (or partially shorted) temperature sensor probe. Power to the
affected zone (see list below) is turned off. Pressing [RESET] turns the zone back on and clears
the fault message.
NOTE: These faults will also be displayed if a probe simulator is used on a zone that has not been
turned off in the GC Configure table.
Run the Automatic tests described in para.1.2. If that does not locate the problem, disconnect the
probe from its connector on the Temp. Control PCB and replace it with a probe simulator plug.
The temperature reading for the zone should now be between -15 and +15 degrees. If it is not,
replace the Temp. Control PCB. If it is, the temperature sensor probe is faulty, and the entire probe
harness for that zone must be replaced.
Faults 110 and 111: Temperature sensor probe fault (cont . )
Fault 110: Injector B
Fault 111: Detector B
27
Faults 112 and 113: Temperature control ADC overrange
The analog-to-digital converter used to measure temperatures read an overrange value. Power to
the affected zone (see the fault list below) is turned off. If one of these fault is occurs in
conjunction with Fault 22, follow the instruction for Fault 22. Press [RESET] to turn the Zone
back on and clear the fault message.
Run the Automatic tests. If that does not locate the problem, disconnect the probe from its
connector on the Temperature Control PCB and replace it with a probe simulator plug. The
temperature reading for the zone should now be between -15 and +15 degrees. If it is not, replace
the Temperature Control PCB. If it is, the temperature sensor probe is faulty, and the entire probe
harness for that zone must be Replace.
Fault 112: Injector B
Fault 113: Detector B
Faults 114 and 115: Temperature setpoint above limit
A temperature setpoint in the current method for one of the heated Zones is greater than the limit
entered in the configuration table. One of the entries must be changed before the method can be
activated. The zone having the illegal entry is specified by the fault number:
Fault 114: Injector B
Fault 115: Detector B
Fault 116: Injector B hardware change
A change has been detected in the configuration of Injector B. Check the position of S4 on the
Temperature Control PC Board.
Fault 117: Pneumatic heater runaway
The heated has continued to heat above 60 degrees even though the instrument has tried to turn the
heater off. The main power contactor is turned off to prevent further heating. Run the Automatic
tests described in Section 15 to find the source of the problem. If no problem is found, press
[RESET] to return to normal operation for a few minutes, watching for any abnormal behavior.
Run the Automatic tests again after the instrument has warmed up to see if the problem has
returned. To ensure safe operation,be sure that there is no problem. remaining before continuing
normal operation.
4.2 Automatic Tests
The results of all of the automatic tests are reported by numbered messages on the front panel
display. The DISPLAY CONTROL keys can be used to view all of faults which were found, but
only the lowest-numbered fault indication should be considered reliable. Find that fault number in
the list below, and follow the procedures for it. Refer to the printed circuit board figure in the
Quick Reference Manual or paragraph 9 for electronic hardware locations.
Faults 250-310 apply to Detector A. Faults 312-372 apply to Detector B.
If a printer/plotter is installed, the test pattern, Figure 6, will be printed. If the pattern does not
look right, see Troubleshooting Procedures, paragraph 7. If the Automatic Test results are
inconsistent or questionable, do the core tests described in paragraph 3.
28
FIGURE 6
PRINTER/PEOTTER TEST PATTERN
Fault 201
Fault 201 indicates low battery voltage for memory protection when the power is OFF Instrument
operating conditions and stored methods may be lost during a power failure or when the
instrument is turned off.
There are three possible causes for Fault 201:
1. RAM Battery switch (S1 on the CPU PCB) is in the OFF position. If this is the case, return
S1 to the ON position.
2. The battery holder is making poor contact with the battery (BT 1 on the CPU PCB). Using
the eraser end of a pencil, rotate the battery in its holder. (This may be safely done
without removing pc boards or turning off power). In severe cases of corrosion or
contamination, it may be necessary to remove the battery from its holder and clean both the
battery and the contacts of the holder.
3. Battery BT l on the CPU PCB is weak or dead. Replace the battery with an equivalent type
or contact the local dealer. Install the new battery with the “+”mark facing away from the
board.
4. The nickel-cadmium batteries used with the In-Board Data Handling option are discharged.
Allow the GC to remain turned on for several hours arid retest.
Fault 202
Fault 202 indicates ac test timer malfunction. The diagnostics which check fuses, relays, and the
ac power controls on the Temperature Control and External Events PCB’s wil1 not operate
correctly. No other instrument functions are affected. To restore these diagnostic functions replace
the CPU PCB.
Faults 203 and 204
Faults 203 and 204 indicate that fuses F1 (Fault 204) and F2 (Fault 203) on the Power Supply
PCB are blown. If both of these faults occur together, the +15V and-15V power supplies will be
disabled, inhibiting the operation of detectors, temperature control, and other functions. If only
one fuse is blown, either power supply may go out of tolerance intermittently, resulting in erratic
operations.
29
NOTE
Refer to the Quick Reference Manual or paragraph 9 for electronic hardware locations.
It is also possible that power is not reaching the Mother PCB from the transformer. Be sure that
J24 on the Mother PCB is making good contact with its mating plug.
Step 1:
Turn off the instrument power and replace the blown fuses or fuses. If the
replacements also blown, turn off the Power and open the yellow connector cams for
all of the pc boards which are installed, except the ones for the Power Supply and
CPU PCB's. Replace the fuses and turn on the power. If the fuses have not blown after
30 seconds of operation,skip to Step 3. If the fuses have blown, the Power Supply
PCB must be replaced,unless a printer/plotter is installed.
Step 2:
If a printer/ p1otter is instal1ed, turn off the power and disconnect it at J61 on the
PCL/ADC PC Board. Replace the fuses and turn on the power. If the fuses no 1onger
blow replace the entire printer/ plotter assembly or (if facilities allow) the PCL/ADC
PCB. If the fuses continue to blow, replace the Power Supply PCB.
Step 3:
(From Step 1 only.) If the fuses did not blow with the connector cams open, turn off
the rawer and close one of the open connector cams. Turn the power back on and see
if the fuses hold for at least 30 seconds. Continue in this manner through the
remaining connector cams until one is found which causes the fuse to blow. Replace
that pcb.
Be sure that all cables, connector cams, and fuses are restored to their normal
conditions before proceeding.
Faults 205 and 206
Faults 205 and 206 indicate that either the +15V Supply (Fault 205) or -15V supply (Fault 206) is
out tolerance. The operation of detectors,temperature control, and other functions will be
inhibited.
Step 1:
Turn off the power and open the yellow connector cams for the pc boards which are
instal1ed,except the ones for the Power Supply aid CPU PCB’s. Turn the power back on
and run the Automatic tests. If Faults 205 and 206 no longer appear,skip ahead to Step
3. If the fault is still present, the Power Supply PCB must be replaced, unless a
printer/plotter is installed.
Step 2:
If a printer/plotter is installed, turn off the power and disconnect cable at J61 on the
PCL/ADC PCB. If the fault does not return when the tests are run, replace the entire
printer/plotter assemble or (if facilities allow) the PCL/ADC PCB. If the fault is still
present, replace the Power Supply PCB.
Step 3:
(From Step 1 only.) If the fault were not present with the connector cams open,turn off
the power and close one of the open connector cams. Turn the power back on and see if
the fault returns when the tests are run. Continuo in this manner through the remaining
open connector cams until one is found which causes the fault appear. Replace that pcb.
Be sure that all connectors,connector cams,and fuses are restored to their normal
30
conditions before proceeding.
Faults 207-210
Main contactor is turned off. AC power is not being supplied to heaters, motors, or solenoid
valves.
Faults 207: Column Detectors, Injectors, Auxiliary Oven Over 430℃ or pneumatic Oven Over
75℃.
Step 1:
The specific zone which is overheated, if found by examining the temperature of the
zones using STATUS. If no zone registers 423℃ or higher and the instrument has a
pneumatic heater, then go to Step 2. Otherwise, go to Step 3.
Step 2:
Remove the high voltage cover. Install a probe simulator plug (P/N 03-917846-00) on
J74 0n the Temperature control PC Board. Replace the high voltage cover. Rerun the
Automatic Tests. If Fault 207 is still present, then there is a fault on the Temperature
Control PCB and it should be replaced. If Fault 207 is no longer present, than the
pneumatic heater and probe assembly is defective and should be replaced.
Fault 207 (Cont.)
Step 3:
Remove the high voltage cover. Unplug the heater and probe connector corresponding to
the overheated zone (J70, J71, 72, J73, J78, or J79 on the Temperature Control PCB),
and replace it with the probe simulator plug. Replace the high voltage cover,p1ug in
the GC,and turn on the power. The temperature reading zone should be between -15℃
and+ 15℃. If it is not, not, reconnect the heater and probe connector that was removed
and put the high voltage cover back on.
Step 4: Allow the instrument to cool with the power off for at least one hour. Turn on the power
and check the temperature of the fu1ty zone. If it is still above 422℃, the temperature
sensor for that zone is defective, and the heater/probe assembly should be replaced.
For detectors,refer to the appropriate para. in the specific detector section of this manual.
For column oven replace column oven probe harness assembly with 03-917813-00
Step 5:
If the temperature reading has fallen below 425℃, a thermal runaway has occurred.
Because of the redundant protection system in the instrument,at least two independent
faults must have occurred simultaneously on the CPU and. Temperature Control PCB’s.
A1though these may be found using test procedures in this manual,the local dealer
should be contacted due to the hazardous nature of this problem and the possibility of
damage to other parts of the system.
Fault 208: +150VDC or -15VDC power Supply Fault Detected
Correct Fault 205 or 206 in this section first if it is present. If not, replace the Power Supply PCB.
If that does not cure the problem, the Temperature Control PCB or CPU PCB may have to be
replaced.
Fault 209: Contactor Drive Circuit Fault
Replace the Temperature Control PCB.
Fault 210: Safety Interlock Switch (S1 no Power Supply PCB) Open
Be sure the high voltage cover is properly installed over the rear of the electronics compartment,
31
with the tab on the cover depressing the lever of the interlock switch (S1). If the cover is on and
the fault remains, depress the interlock switch lever manually with a screwdriver or other
convenient tool. If the instrument now operates normally (contactor clicks "ON”, column oven
fan runs, diagnostics pass), fol1ow the procedure described in paragraph 2.2 for adjusting the tab
on the high voltage cover. Otherwise, replace the Power Supply PCB. If that does not solve the
problem, replace the Temperature Control PCB.
Faults 211 and 212: Main Contactor Does Not Turn OFF Properly
Normal chromatographic functions are not affected, but the bui1t-in protection against thermal
runaway caused by other faults may not work.
Because of the hazard involved, all heaters are turned off when this fault is detected. Operation
can be restored by pressing. RESET to clear the fault display, but the protection against
overheating will be impaired.
Correct both of these faults by replacing the Temperature Control PCB.
Faults 213 and 214: Contactor Stuck “ON”
Normal chromatographic functions are not affected, but the built-in protection against thermal
runway caused by other fault may not work.
Because of the hazard involved, all heaters are turned off when this fault is detected. Operation
can be restored by pressing RESET to clear the fault display,but the protection against
overheating will be impaired.
Correct both of these facets by replacing the bother PCB
Faults 215:
The polarization of the power line connection is reversed, or the ground connection through the
power cord is missing. Normal chromatographic functions are not affected,but the risk of
electrical shock is increased for certain maintenance operations and in case of some component
failures.
Because of the hazard involved, all devices operated directly from 1ine voltages (heaters, motors,
etc.) are disabled when this fault is detected. Operation can be restored by pressing RESET to
clear the fault display, but the risk of e1ectrical shock will be increased. Detection of this fault by
the Background tests wil1 be inhibited if the fault is cleared by pressing RESET.
If the instrument is wired for 220V operation with a non-polarized line p1ug, reverse the p1ug in
the wal1 outlet. If this does not correct the problem, or if the cord is equipped with a polarized
p1ug, try another wall outlet or have an electrician check the outlet for proper polarization and
grounding.
Fault 216: Fuse F2 on Mother PCB Blown
I20 VAC power from the transformer is not reaching the Temperature Control PCB. Heaters,
motors, and solenoids will be co-operative.
NOTE
Refer to the Quick Reference Manual or paragraph 9 for electronic
Hardware locations.
Fault 216(Cont.):
32
Step 1:
Remove F2 (5A, 250V) and see if it is actually blown (using an ohmmeter, if
avai1able). If it is blown, skip to Step 2.
If the fuse is not blown, check that there are cables securely connected at J27 and J29
on the Mother PCB, and the proper plug for the line voltage being used is installed at
J28 on the Mother PCB. If those are in order, the problem is probably on the Mother
PCB. Replace ace the Mother PCB. If that does not help, have a serviceman check the
instrument.
Step 2:
If F2 is blown, disconnect the 120 VAC loads as fol1ows:
a.
Remove the External Events PCB.
b.
Remove the Temperature Control PCB
c.
Replace the blown fuse F2
d. Remove F3 on the Mother PCB
e.
Disconnect cables from J22 and J26 on the Mother PCB
f.
Disconnect cables from J75 and J76 (if present) on the Temperature Control PCB
g.
On a 34 Series Temperature Control PCB, disconnect the cable from J70, install a
probe simulator plug on J70, and move S2 to the OCI position.
If F2 does not blow when power is applied, the applied, skip to step 3. The fuse must be
checked visually or with an ohmmeter, since the diagnostics will not work
properly with the Temperature Control PCB dose not help, call the local dealer.
Step 3: If F2 does not blow, reinstall the Temperature Control PCB only. If the fuse now blow
when power is applied, replace nab the Temperature Control PCB. Otherwise, go to Step
4.
Step 4: Reconnect were disconnected in Step 2, one at a time, using the following procedure to
isolate the defective load.
1. Reconnect the 1oad. (A list of the loads being tested and the means of reconnecting them
follows.)
2. Put on the high voltage cover and turn instrument on.
3. Set up the GC operating conditions. (e.g. temperatures, etc.) So the load under test wil1 be
turned on.
Fault 216(Cont.):
4. Run diagnostics to see if the fuse has blown. If it has, the load which was just
connected is defective. Replace the defective load and the fuse. Otherwise, go on
to the next load.
Loads Being Tested
Pneumatic heater:J74. This device is chassis-mounted and normally requires Service.
Auxiliary heater: J70, Temperature Control PCB (Replace Auxiliary Heater)
Injector Coolant: J75, Temperature Control PCB [Replace LN2 Valve Assy., P/N
03-917187-00 or LCO2 Valve Assy., P/N 03-917185-00]
Injector heaters: On the Temperature Control PCB, move switches S2 to STD if it was
originally in STD. Replace 34Series injector harnesses with 03-917811-00.
Column coolant: J26, Mother PCB
[Replace LN2 Valve Assy., P/N 03-917186-00 or LCO2,valve Assy.,P/N
03-917186-00
Column fan/column vents motor: J22, Mother PCB
Step 5: If a defective load has still not been fond, reinstall the AutoSampler/External Events
PCB. Disconnect the inject module from the External Events PCB at P601 and
33
disconnect any devices driven by the External Event relays if 120V operation has
been selected by the jumper plug on J101. Reconnect each of these devices one by
one, following the procedure descried in Step 4, to determine which one is defective.
Reinstall F3 on the Mother PCB and be sure that all cables and switch S2 on the
Temperature Control PCB are in their original configuration before proceeding.
Fuse F3 on Mother PCB Blown or Fuse F102 on Rear Panel Blown (ref. Figure 2 in
the Installation section)
Fault 217:
Power line vo1tage is not reaching the Temperature Control PCB Heaters and other line-operated
devices will not function.
NOTE
Refer to the Quick Reference Manual or paragraph 9 for
electronic hardware locations. Refer to Figure 2 in the installation
section for fuse F102 location.
Fault 217 (Cont.):
Step 1:
Remove F3 (6A, 250V for 120 VAC GC’s, 3A, 250V for 240 VAC GC’s, and
F102 (15A.250V. ceramic for 120 VAC GC’s, 10A.250V. ceramic for 240
VAC
GC’s and see if either one is actually blown (using an ohmmeter if available).
If either fuse is blown skip to Step 2.
If neither fuse is blown,check that there is a cable securely connected at J21 on the
Mother PCB. If this is in order,the problem is probably on the Mother PCB or a loose
connection in the wiring harness. Have a serviceman check the instrument if replacing
the Mother PCB does not help.
Step 2: If one of the fuses was blown,replace the blown fuse.(Replace both if it is not known
which one is blown.) Check the setting of SI on the Temperature Control PCB to be
sure that the right line voltage has been selected. Examine the heater coils inside the
column oven. If the wire is broken or touching the column oven at any point besides
the support insulators, replace the heater. If neither of these procedures fixes your
problem, continue.
Step 3:
Disconnect the 1oads powered directly from the AC line as follows:
a.
Remove the detector heater cable from J71 on the Temperature Control PCB and
replace it with a probe simulator plug (P/N 03-917846-00).
b.
Replace blown fuse F3 or F102.
c.
d.
Move the appropriate switch on the Temperature Control PCB to STD if it was
in the OCI position. S2
Unplug the column oven heater cable from J19 or J20 on the Mother PCB by
pressing down the lock tab on the top of the connector, noting which connector,
nothing which connect it was plugged into.
e.
Reinstall the Temperature Control PCB.
f.
Remove the AutoSampler/External Events PCB, if present.
g.
Replace the high voltage cover, turn on the power, and run the automatic tests by
pressing [SHIFT] [INSTRTEST]. If F102 blows, there is probably a short on the
Mother PCB. If F3 blows, the problem is probably on the Temperature Control
PCB. These can be replaced one at a time to isolate and correct the problem.
34
Fault 217(cont.):
Step4:
Reconnect loads that were disconnected in Step 3, one at a time, using the procedure
below to isolate defective load(s).
1. Reconnect the load. (A list of the loads being tested and the means of reconnecting
them follows the procedure.) Be sure to connect the injectors to their proper location
on the Temperature Control PCB.
2. Put on the high voltage cover end turn instrument on.
3. Set up the GC operating conditions (e.g., temperatures, etc.) so the load under test
will be turn on.
4. Run diagnostics to see if the fuse has blown. If the fuse is blown the load that was
just connected is defective. Replace the defective load and the fuse. Otherwise, go
on the the next load.
Loads Being Tested
Detector heaters:
3410
J71, Temp. Control PCB
: Ion Oven Harness Assy., 03-917857-00 for 120 VAC GC’s; 03-917858-00
for 240 VAC GC's. TCO Heater and Probe Assy., 03-917812-00.
Injector beakers:
3410
: J72 (only if S2 on the Temp. Control PCB was originally in the OCI position).
Set S2 to the OCI position. For 120 VAC GC’s,replace the OCI Heater/Probe Assy.,
03-917307-00. For 240 VAC GC's replace OCI Heater/Probe Assy., 03-917307-01.
Column oven heater: J19 or J20, Mother PCB. Be sure to connect plug to connector it originally
came from,corresponding to the line voltage in use.
Fault 217(Cont.):
Step 5:
If a defective load still has not been found,unplug any device which might be plugged
into the rear accessory outlet (if an AutoSampler is in use). Disconnect any devices
being driven from the external events relays,if 120/240V operation has been selected
by the jumper p1ug on J101 on the AutoSampler/External Events PCB. Reinstall the
AutoSampler/External Events PCB. Reconnect each of the devices removed in this
step, one by one, following the procedure in Step 4,to determine which one is
defective.
Be sure that all cables and switches are in their original configuration before
proceeding.
Faints 218-220: Temperature Control Analog-to-Digital Converter Failure
Temperatures cannot be measured or controlled accurately. Because of the hazard involved, all
devices operated directly from line voltage are disabled when these faults are detected.
Operation can be restored by pressing RESET to clear the fault display, but the instrument will
shut down again if the faults are detected in the Background tests during normal operation.
Replace the Temperature Control PCB to correct any of these faults.
Faults
221-229: An AC Power Control For a Heater, Coolant Valve, or Motor is Stuck "ON"
35
Because of the hazard involved,all devices operated directly from line voltage are disabled when
voltage are disabled when these faults are detected. Operation can be restored by pressing RESET,
but one of the temperature-controlled zones may go beyond its normal range. Do not run the
instrument in this condition unless you are absolutely sure that the faulty control is for an unused
zone(such as a coolant valve or auxiliary heater) or that the fault indication is erroneous.
If the problem is in the column oven control ( as indicated by a column temperature which rises
above its setpoint in normal operation),the fault may be either on the Temperature Control PCB or
on the Mother PCB. To isolate the problem, replace the column oven probe cable at J73 on the
Temperature Control PCB with a probe simulator plug. If this eliminates the fault display when
diagnostics are run, replace Mother PCB. If not, replace the Temperature Control PCB.
If the fault is not in the column oven control, replace the Temperature Control PCB to correct the
fault.
Note that this problem may be intermittent. In this case, it wil1 be worse when the instrument is
hot. Avoid false conclusions by allowing the instrument to remain at its normal operating
conditions for some time and then running the diagnostic tests before reaching any final
conclusions.
Faults 230-245
AC power control for heater, cool ant valve, or fan motor stuck "OFF" or intermittent. Devices
whose control are "OFF" wil1 not function at all, while intermittent controls may result in slow
heating, poor temperature stability, or intermittent operation.
Special control (injector coolant,pneumatics heater ) wil1 not be checked unless they are installed.
Faults in controls for options (auxiliary heater,column/injector coolant) will always be reported,
But need not be repaired if the option is not in use.
The solution for all these fault is to replace the Temp. Control PCB.
Fault 230:
Fault 231:
Fault 232:
Fault 233:
Fault 234:
Fault 235:
Fault 236:
Fault 237:
Fault 238:
Fault 239:
Fault 240:
Fault 241:
Fault 242:
Fault 243:
Fault 244:
Fault 245:
Column Heater Off
Column Heater Intermittent
Column Oven Fan Off
Column Oven Fan Intermittent
Injector A Heater Off
Injector A Heater Intermittent
Detector A Heater Off
Detector A Heater Intermittent
Auxiliary Heater off
Auxiliary Heater Intermittent
Column/injector Coolant valve off
Column/injector Coolant valve Intermittent
Injector coolant valve off (only if two vales present)
Injector coolant valve Intermittent (only if two vales present)
Pneumatics Heater Off
Pneumatics Heater Intermittent
Fault 246: Column Oven Vent Control Faulty
Some part of the control system (motor, 1imit switches, or control e1ectronics) is defective.
Column oven temperature control may not work properly. Run the "Column Oven Vents" extended
test (See para.5) to isolate the defective part.
Fault 247: Column Oven a Fan motor Overheated
36
The column oven fan wil1 stop running and the GC will turn off power to all of its heaters.
Normal operation of the heaters can be restored by pressing RESET to clear the fault display, but
they wi1l be disabled again as soon as the background tests discover the condition. When the fan
motor cools the fault indication will disappear.
Check first for cooling air flow. Fan on rear panel should be running and unobstructed. Rear and
side panels must always be in place during operation.
The fan motor will overheat if the rotor is stalled. Be sure fan blade is not touching any part of
the column oven. If the fan still does not turn freely, the motor bearings are bad and the motor
must be replaced.
Fault 247(Cont.):
When the column oven temperature is set well above ambient, the vents at the rear of the oven
should be tightly closed. The intake vent can be seen through the perforations in the top of the
instrument, beneath the detector cover. The exhaust vent can be seen by temporarily removing the
right side panel. Be sure column oven was set at an elevated temperature before turning off power
and removing side panel.
If the fault appears while the fan is stil1 running replace the Temperature Control PCB. If the fault
remains with the fan motor completely cool, replace the fan motor.
Fault 248: Inject Switch Closed
The inject switch is being held down for some reason. The GC will go back into run immediately
at the end of if RESET is pushed. This condition is usually caused by overtightening the injector
nut. Loosen it and see if anything else is holding the mechanism down.
If the fault remains when the switch actuator is completely free,there is a problem in the switch,
the injector harness, or the Temp. Control PCB, or the cable. Disconnect the switch from the
harness. If the fault goes away, replace the switch. Otherwise, disconnect the injector harness
from the Temp. Control PCB and install a spare Probe Simulator p1ug. (Note that all four
connectors along the top of the board must have harnesses or Probe Simulators on them.) If this
cures the problem, replace the injector harness. Otherwise, replace the Temp. Control PCB.
Fault 249: Factory Use Only
Faults 250-252:
Detector A: Analog-to-digital converter fault.
The microprocessor cannot read some detector voltages. Autozero may not work, displayed values
of TSD bias or FPD high voltage may be wrong, and the remaining detector diagnostics may be
invalid.
Replace the Detector pc board to correct the problem.
Fault 253: Detector A: TCD analog-to-digital converter fault
Bridge current and voltage cannot be read accurately. Displayed current values may be wrong, “no
flow” detection may work incorrectly and diagnostic tests will be invalid. Replace the TCD PC
Board to correct the problem.
Fault 254, Advisory: Detector A: Detector too noisy to check
The detector signal is too noisy or unstable for some of the subsequent tests to be valid. The noise
may be coming from the detector, rather than the electronics. Disconnect the signal cable and run
the test again. If the fault persists, replace the detector pc board. Otherwise correct the
chromatographic conditions which are causing the noise or drift.
37
Fault 255: Detector A: Detector supply voltage won't turn off
The FID polarizer, TSD bead current, ECD pulsar, FPD photomultiplier supply, or TCD bridge
supply cannot be turned off. Normal operation will not be affected, but voltages will still be
present when the detector has been turned off. Some protection features may be defeated.
Replace the detector pc board.
Fault 256,Advisory: Detector A:FID/TSD balance misadjusted
The zero-signal level on the chart recorder will shift when changing ranges. Small adjustment
errors will not produce any other undesirable effects. See the fol1owing paragraph for the balance
adjustment procedure. This indication can also be caused by an extremely large detector
background signal if the detector is connected. Disconnect the signal cable and run the test again
to be sure that the detector is not affecting the reading.
0
FID Balance
The FID balance potentiometer (R17) is adjusted through the hole in the top of the metal can at the
top of the FID PCB. Adjust the balance if the detector exhibits the fol1owing symptoms:
Autozero the FID range 12. Turn autozero OFF. Change to ranges 10, 9, and 8. If the
baseline moves more than 3 to 5%, you may want to adjust the balance to maintain a
constant baseline throughout the ranges.
1.
Cap the FID electrometer input (cap P/N 58-039000-00). Wait a few minutes until the
e1ectrometer settles. (Capping input is best, but not required.)
2.
Turn FID detector ON in the GC Configure table.
3.
Set range to 10-8. Turn autozero on (YES).Wait until the GC goes to READY.
4.
Advance to the autozero display in the DETECTOR section. “A/Z” after the mV reading
indicates that autozero is enabled.
5.
Slowly turn the FID/TSD balance potentiometer CCW until a reading of .01 mV is just
obtained. Do not set the display for 0.0 mV. Set it only to .01 mV while coming down from a
higher value.
Note: The display will update faster is you repetitively press REST while adjusting the
potentiometer.
6.
Reconnect the signal cable, wait for the electrometer to settle, and run Instrument Test.
If the balance cannot be corrected by the adjustment procedure replace the pc board.
Faults 257-261: Detector A: Detector ranges inaccurate
Detector output signal values were not the expected values for ranges found from the fo11owing
table.
Fault
257/319
258/320
259/321
260/322
FID/TSD
12
11
10
9
FPD
10
9
8
SFPD
1
10
100
38
ECD
1
10
TCD
.05
.5
5
261/323
8
Peak amplitudes should be wrong for the faulty ranges.
If all of the ranges for tire detector in use fail the test the real problem may be in the internal signal
source used for the tests (which is the autozero bucking source). In this case, the fault indications.
Can be ignored if the ranges appear to be working properly. Replace the detector pcb to correct
any of these faults.
Faults 262-278: Detector A: Autozero fault
Autozero may not work at all,it may be noisy or erratic, or it may work only over limited ranges
of signal values, defending on the specific fault or combination of faults.
Replace the detector pct to restore proper autozero operation.
Faults 279-286: Detector A: Chart recorder attenuator fault
Chart recorder attenuation value is incorrect for the following:
Fault
Attenuation
Fault
279/341
1&64
283/345
280/342
2&128
284/346
281/343
4&256
285/347
282/344
8&512
286/348
Attenuation
16&1024
32
64(64-1024 if 1-32 okay)
infinity
Note that these faults affect the chart recorder (1mv). Output only. The printer/plotter is not
affected.
Attenuation errors can be caused by a faulty load or short circuit-on the chart recorder output.
Disconnect any cable connected to this output and rerun the test. If the fault persists, replace the
detector pcb to restore the attenuator function.
Fault 287: Detector A: No AC voltage for FID polarizer supply
The FID polarization voltage will be zero, leading to small or inverted peaks. If this fault is not
accompanied by fault 288/350, there is a diagnostic system failure which can be corrected by
replacing the detector pcb.
Fault 287: Detector A: No AC voltage far FID polarizer supply (cont.)
The AC power from the transformer could be interrupted at J24 on the Mother PCB or at the
detector card edge connector. Be sure that the cable on J24 is securely connected, and clean the
card edge contacts as described in paragraph 2.3.
Fault 288: Detector A: Detector power supply failure
FID: polarizing voltage incorrect
FPD/SFPD: -300 to 900 voltage photomultiplier tube supply failure
ECD: -50 volt pulser supply failure
Peaks may be inverted, missing, or the wrong height, and the signal may be noisy or drifting.
Detector supply voltage errors can be paused by shorts in the ignitor cable(FID), pulser
cable(ECD), or high voltage cable (FPD), or in the detector assembly. Disconnect cable from
detector and run INSTR TEST. If tea fault no longer appears, replace the ignitor probe arm if the
detector is an FID, or call the local dealer to find the short in the ECD or FPD assembly.
If Fault 288/350 is still present, disconnect the cable at the detector pc board. If he fault disappears
when the test is run again, replace the cable. If this fault remains, replace the detector pc board.
39
Fault 289: Detector A: Ignitor fuse bad
AC voltage is not available for the flame ignitor coil. The coil will not glow when the appropriate
IGITE key is pressed.
Disconnect the ignitor for cable at J83 (FID PC Board) or J94 (FPD PC Board) and replace fuse
F1 on the detector pcb (5A, 250v, slow blow).Turn on the GC and press the appropriate IGNITE
key for 10 seconds. Run the tests again. If the fault is still present, replace the detector pc board. If
not reconnect the cable to the pc board without having the other end connected. Press the
appropriate IGNITE key for 10 second, and then run the test again. Replace the cable if the test
fails. If not, repeat the procedure after connecting the cable to the probe arm (FID) or the detector
(FPD). If the test fails, replace the FID probe arm or the FPD flame tower. Be sure the blown fuse
has been replace before returning to normal operation.
Fault 290: Detector A: Ignitor relay bad
There is no voltage supplied to the ignitor coil when [IGNITE A] or [IGNITE B] is pressed, so the
coil will not glow. Replace the detector pc board.
Fault 291: Detector A: Ignitor relay won't tern off
The ignitor coil will be turned on all of the time, resulting in a large background signal and a noisy
baseline. Replace the detector pc board.
Fault 292: Detector A: ECD pulser supply fuse bad
No pulses will be generated,and there will be no signal output.
Replace fuse F1 on the ECD PC Board (1/4 A, 250V, slow blow) and rerun the test. If the fuse
blows again, replace the ECD PC Board.
Fault 293: Detector A: TSD bead current supply fuse bad
No heating power will be supplied to the bead, and there will be no signal output.
Replace fuse F2 on the FID/TSD PC Board (2A, 250V,slow blow). A bead might rarely develop a
fault which could cause the fuse to blow, so replace the bead also if possible. Set the bead current
to your normal operating value and rerun the test. If the fuse still blows, replace the FID/TSD PC
Board.
Fault 294,Advisory: Detector A: TSD bead open
This is the normal response if the pc board is being tested with no bead connected. The remaining
tests wil1 still be valid, and no corrective action needs to be taken. The performance of the
electronics under operating load conditions can be tested by connecting a bead.
If a bead is connected, it has an abnormally high resistance, and is probably open. Replace the
bead.
Fault 295: Detector A: TSD bead shorted
Normal sensitivity will probably not be attainable even at the highest bead currents.
Disconnect the TSD bead cable at J84 on the FFDITSD PC Board and reran the test. If the fault is
stil1 present, replace the FID/TSD PC Board. If not, reconnect the cable to the pc board with the
other end of the cable not connected. If the fault returns when the test is run reps ace the cable.
40
Otherwise reconnect the cable to the bead probe. If the fault returns when the test is run, replace
the bead.
Faults 296-299: Detector A: TSD bead supply fault
The measured bead current does not correspond to the tested setpoint values. There may be no
signal at all, or the bead current may not vary correctly as the setpoint is adjusted.
Replace the FID/TSD PC Board.
Fault 300: Detector A: TCD signal polarity switch bad
The TCD output signal polarity will not change when requested from the front panel. Replace the
TCD PC Board.
Fault 301: Detector A: TCD bridge power supply fuse bad
There will be no bridge current regardless of filament temperature setpoint.
Disconnect the TCD bridge cable from the pc board at J105, and replace Fuse Fl on the TCD PCB
(1A, 250V, s1ow blow).Turn on the instrument and enter your normal TCD operating parameters.
If Fault 301/363 appears again when you run the test, replace the TCD PC Board. If not, replace
the TCD cell.
Fault 302, Advisory: Detector A: TCD bridge power supply control checks not valid
The filament temperature protection circuit is limiting the output voltage, making Faults
303-307/365-369 invalid. This is caused by a high resistance in the bridge, which is normal if the
bridge is not connected. To check for Faults 303-307/365-369, connect a detector which has
helium carrier gas flowing through it to the TCD pc board.
This Advisory may also occur when nitrogen carrier gas is in use or there is no gas flow through
the bridge. In this case, only Faults 306/368 and 307/369 are likely to be affected. If none of the
lower-numbered fault are present, the power supply circuits are probably working properly. A
more complete test can be done as noted in the previous paragraph, if desired.
Faults 303-307: Detector A: TCD bridge power supply inaccurate
Some or all filament temperature settings will be inaccurate or unstable, resulting in improper
sensitivity, no signal output, or drift and noise.
Replace the TCD PCB Board.
Fault 308, Advisory:
Detector A: SFPD square root zero inaccurate
The linear range of the output will be decreased, be missing or distorted, and small peaks may be
missing or distorted.
This problem is normally caused by a misadjustment of the Square Root Zero control on the FPD
PC Board. See the FPD detector section for a description of the adjustment procedure.
If this advisory cannot be corrected by the appropriate adjustment, replace the FPD PC Board.
Fault 309: Detector A: SFPD square root output out of tolerance
The scale factor for the square root output of the SFPD is inaccurate. Peaks will be the wrong
height or missing altogether. Replace the FPD PC Board.
41
Fault 310,Advisory: Detector A: Attenuation not checked
Attenuation could not be checked because the FPD was in square-root output mode. Move S2 on
the FPD PC Board from the SFPD position to the FPD position and rerun the test to check the
attenuator.
Fault 311: Detector A: Not used
Faults 312-314: Detector B: Analog-to-digital converter fault. See Faults 250-252.
Fault 315: Detector B: TCD analog-to-digital converter fault. See Fault 253.
Fault 316, Advisory: Detector B: Detector too noisy to check. See Fault 254.
Fault 317: Detector B: Detector supply voltage won’t turn off. See Fault 255.
Fault 318, Advisory: Detector B: FID/TSD balance misadjusted. See Fault 256.
Faults 319-323: Detector B: Detector ranges inaccurate. See Fau1ts 257-261.
Faults 324-.340: Detector B: Autozero fault. See Faults 262-278.
Faults 341-348: Detector B: Chart recorder attenuator fault. See Fau1ts 279-289.
Fault 349: Detector B: No AC voltage for FID polarizer supply. See Fault 287.
Fault 350: Detector B: Detector poser supply failure. See Fault 288.
Fault 351: Detector B: Ignitor fuse bad. See Fault 289.
Faults352: Detector B: Ignitor relay bad. See Fault 290.
Fault 353: Detector B: Ignitor relay won’t turn off. See Fault 291.
Fault 354: Detector B: ECD pulser supply fuse bad. See Fault 292.
Fault 355: Detector B: TSD bead current supply fuse bad. See Fault 293.
Fault 356, Advisory: Detector B: TSD bead open. See Fault 294.
Fault 357: Detector B: TSD bead shorted. See Fault 295
.
Fault 358-361: Detector B: TSD bead supply fault. See Faults 296-299.
Fault 362: Detector B: TCD signal polarity switch bad. See Fault 300.
Fault 363: Detector B: TCD bridge power supply, fuse bad. See Fault 301.
Fault 364, Advisory: Detector B: TCD bridge power supply control checks not valid.
See Fault 302.
Faults 365-369: Detector B: TCD bridge power supply inaccurate. See Faults 303-307
Fault 370, Advisory: Detector B: SFPD square root zero inaccurate. See Fault 308.
Fault 371: Detector B: SFPD square root output out of tolerance. See Fault 309.
Fault 372, Advisory: Detector B: Attenuation not checked. See Fault 310
42
Fault 373: Detector B: Not used
Faults 374-410: 8034 AutoSampler Faults.
Fault 374, Advisory: Autosampler Safety Interlock open.
Fault 374 usually indicates that the Autosampler cable is not plugged into P601. All Autosampler
functions operated directly from line voltage are disabled when this fault is detected. To test the
Autosampler PCB with the cable disconnected, go to Step 1. If the fault is present with the cable
securely connected to P601, go to Step 2.
Step 1: To test the Autosampler PCB with the Autosampler disconnected, move the TEST/NORM
switch on the AutoSampler PCB to the TEST position. Rerun the diagnostics. If the
fau1t is still present, the AutoSampler PCB is defective and must be replaced. The
switch must be returned to the NORM position before the Autosampler can be used.
Step 2: Move the TEST/NORM switch on the AutoSampler PCB to the TEST position. Rerun
the diagnostics. If the fau1t is still present, replace the Autosampler PCB. If the fault is
no longer present, a problem exists in the AutoSampler cable connector wiring. Contact
the local dealer.
Fault 375: Autosampler Hardware is disabled.
The instrument is unable to enable the A/S option. The solution is to replace the pcb.
Fault 376: AutoSampler AC Power Disable Fault
This fault indicates that the safety interlock circuitry is not functioning properly. Because of the
hazard involved, the A/S PCB should be replaced immediately when this fault is encountered.
Faults 377-388: Autosampler AC Power Controls stuck"0n"
Indicates that one or more of the AC power controls for the valves, solenoids, or rack advance
motor is stuck "on.” The solution for all of these faults is to replace the A/S PCB.
Fault 377: Unknown AC Power Control Stuck “On”
Fault 378: Dipper Down Solenoid stuck "0n”
Fault 379: Sample Volume 2 Solenoid stuck “On”.
This Condition could damage the Sample Volume solenoid.
Fault 380: Sample Volume 1 solenoid Stuck “0n”
This Condition could damage the Sample Volume Solenoid.
Fault 381: Plunger Back Solenoid stuck "0n”
Fault 382: Vent solenoid stuck "0n"
Fault 383: Plunger Forward Solenoid Stuck "On"
Fault 384: Disposa1 Arm Back Solenoid Stuck "On"
This Condition could damage the disposal solenoid.
Fault 385: Rack Motor Forward Stuck "On"
Fault 386: Syringe Carriage Forward Solenoid Stuck "On"
Fault 387: Pressure Solenoid Stuck "On"
43
Fault 388: Recorder Power Stuck "On"
Faults 389-410: Autosampler AC Power Controls Intermittent or Stuck “Off"
AC power control for the Solenoids or motor are stuck "off” or are intermittent. Devices that are
stuck “off” will not function at all. Intermittent control will result in erratic mechanical motion,
noisy solenoids, or intermittent operation.
The solution for all of these faults is to replace the A/S PCB.
Fault 389: Dipper Down Solenoid Off
Fault 390: Dipper Down Solenoid Intermittent
Fault 391: Sample Volume 2 solenoid Off
Fault 392: Sample Volume 2 solenoid Intermittent
Fault 393: Sample Volume 1 solenoid Off
Fault 394: Sample Volume 1 Solenoid Intermittent
Fault 395: Plunger Back Solenoid Off
Fault 396: Plunger Back Solenoid Intermittent
Fault 397: Vent solenoid Off
Fault 398: Vent solenoid Intermittent
Fault 399: Plunger Forward Solenoid Off
Fault 400: Plunger Forward Solenoid Intermittent
Fault 401: Disposal Arm Solenoid Off
Fault 402: Disposal Arm Solenoid Intermittent
Fault 403: Motor Forward Off
Fault 404: Motor Forward Intermittent
Fault 405: Barrel Forward Solenoid Off
Fault 406: Barrel Forward solenoid Intermittent
Fault 407: Pressure Solenoid Off
Fault 408: Pressure Solenoid Intermittent。
Fault 409: Recorder Power Triac Off
Fault 410: Recorder Power Triac Intermittent
Fault 411: External Events 24 VAC Fuse Bad
44
Fault 411 indicates that the 24 VAC fuse is open or that 24 VAC is missing. If the External Events
board is configured for 24 VAC (plug 03-917841-00 24 VAC plugged into J101 on the bottom of
the PCB) then all valves and solenoids connected to TB1 will not function. If the External Events
is not being used or the External Events is configured to use 120 volts AC or 120/240 volts AC,
then the instrument can be run temporarily with this fault.
If the 24 volts AC is being used, turn the instrument off. Remove the high voltage cover. Check
the 24 volt AC fuse on the AutoSampler/External Events PCB (see figure in Quick Reference
Manual or para.9). If the fuse is OK and the solenoids connected to TB1 function norma11y, then
the fault is with the diagnostic circuit. The instrument can be run temporarily with this fault. If the
fuse is OK, but the solenoids connected to TB1 do not function properly, then probably a bad
connection exists between the A/S PCB and the Mother PCB, or a loose connection at J24 on the
Mother PCB or the transformer is bad, or a shorted winding. Call the local dealer.
If the 24 VAC fuse is bad, disconnect all the solenoids from TB1.Install a new fuse. Put the high
voltage cover back on. Turn on the instrument. Rerun the Automatic Tests. If Fault 411 is still
present, the board has a short and should be replaced.
If Fault 411 is not present, perform the following procedure to isolate the faulty part:
1. Turn the instrument off and remove the high voltage cover.
2. Reconnect one of the solenoids to TB1.
3. Install the high voltage cover, turn the instrument on.
4. Enter method parameters to turn the event on for 30 seconds for the solenoid just connected.
Press [START] and allow the instrument to run long enough to turn on the solenoid. Press
[RESET]. Rerun the Automatic Tests.
5. If Fault 411 is present, the solenoid just connected is faulty. The solenoid should be replaced.
Replace the fuse.
6. If Fault 411 is not present, repeat the procedure reconnecting an additiona1 solenoid each time
through the procedure until the faulty solenoid is found.
If all of the solenoids are reconnected without finding a faulty solenoid, check the solenoid wires
for nicks in the insulation that might short to chassis. Also check that the total load does not
exceed 60 watts.
Faults 412-414: Pressure ADC Faults
These faults indicate that the pressure ADC, multiplexer, or channel select latch is faulty. Pressure
readings will be inaccurate. The solution to these faults is to replace the Autosampler/Externa1
Events PCB.
Faults 415-416∶ Pressure Transducer Faults
These faults indicate that the Pressure Transducer PCB is not operating correctly. Pressure
45
readings will be inaccurate. The pressure transducer PCB is located in the pneumatics
compartment. First check that the cable between the A/S External Events PCB and the Pressure
Transducer PCB is connected to both ends. If the cable is properly connected, then replace the
Pressure Transducer PCB.
Fault 417-421: Communication to Printer/Plotter Failure
The display indicates PRINTER BUSY when a printer function is executed.
The flat ribbon cable (P/N 03-917817-00) or printer/plotter is defective. If a replacement
PCL/ADC PCB is available, replace the board. If not, replace the printer assembly. If replacing the
pcb or the printer assembly doesn’t fix the problem, replace the cable. If the problem still exists,
call the local dealer.
Fault 422: Memory Error on PCL/ADC PCB
The display indicates PRINTER BUSY when a printer function is executed. The STATUS LED on
the PCL/ADC PCB is off.
Either the 8155 RAM memory or the 8051 code memory is defective. If a replacement PCL/ADC
PCB is available, replace the board. If not, replace the printer assembly.
Fault 423: ROM Version Mismatch
The display indicates PRINTER BUSY when a printer function is executed.
The 8051 is the wrong version for the instrument. Call the local dealer to resolve the version
conflict.
Fault 424: Printer/Plotter Power Supply Failure
The display indicates PRINTER BUSY When a printer function is executed. The STATUS LED
on the PCL/ADC PCB is off.
The printer/plotter power supply is not within its voltage tolerance. Verify that the power cable is
plugged into J69 on the Printer/Plotter Power Supply PCB. Check if the green LED FUSE OK
indicator is lit. If it is, the power supply has failed. Replace the printer assembly.
If the green LED FUSE OK indicator is not 1it, the fuse on the Printer/Plotter Power Supply (F1)
is blown. Replace fuse F1 (2A, 250V slow blow). If the fuse blows again, replace the printer
assembly.
Fault 425: Left Edge Sensor Failure
46
The display indicates PRINTER BUSY when a printer function is executed. The STATUS LED on
the PCL/ADC PCB is off.
The left edge sensor was found to be non-functional when the thermal print head tried to find the
home position. Verify that the left edge sensor switch is plugged into J67 on the Printer/Plotter
Power Supply PCB. Verify that the thermal print head moves when the instrument is turned ON or
RESET is pressed. If the thermal print head is at its end of travel, a groaning sound will be heard,
indicating the belt is slipping. Verify that the thermal print head is not to the left of the left edge
sensor arm. If the above actions do not correct the problem, replace the printer assembly.
If the thermal print head does not move, check if the head position motor is plugged into J68 on
the Printer/Plotter Power Supply PCB. Verify that belt is intact and connected to thermal print
head. If the above actions do not correct the problem, replace the printer assembly.
Fault 426: ADC Fai1ed to Ca1ibrate
The display indicates PRINTER BUSY when a printer function is executed. The STATUS LED on
the PCL/ADC PCB is off.
The offset or reference errors in the printer/plotter ADC fell outside the range for self calibration.
Verify that the analog signal cable is installed in J62 on the PCL/ADC PCB and in J15 on the
Mother PCB. If the cable is installed correctly, then the ADC has failed. If a replacement
PCL/ADC PCB is available, replace the board. If not, replace the printer assembly.
Fault 427: serial Internal Loopback Failure
This fau1t number is displayed when either the outputs or inputs of the UART are faulty. Replace
the Seria1 Interface PC Board to correct this failure.
Fault 429: Control Station A Failure
This fault appears when 1) there is a faulty control station connected to Channel A, or
2) there is a faulty Serial Interface PCB.
If Control station A is NOT connected to the instrument, there is a fault on the Serial Interface
PCB. Replace the Serial Interface PCB.
If Control station A is connected to the instrument,
1. Disconnect Control Station A and rerun Instrument Test.
a. If Fault 429 is no longer displayed, there is a possible control station short. Replace the control
station.
b. If Fault 429 is displayed, there is a fault on the Serial Interface PC Board. Replace the Serial
Interface PCB.
Fault 430: Control Station B Failure
47
See Fault 429.
48
5
EXTENDED TESTS
Extended Tests are not included with Automatic Tests because they either disturb the instrument’s
operating conditions or require operator interaction. To avoid actuating valves or destroying
methods inadvertently, read the description of each test before initiating it. Four tests are provided
to check the column oven cooling vents, External Event AC relays, front panel keyboard, and
instrument memory.
5.1 Initiating Extended Tests
Extended tests can be run only after the Automatic Tests have been completed. To enter into
Extended Tests, press [SHIFT][INSTR TEST] and wait for the Automatic Tests to conclude.
a.
If the display shows TESTS OK, press [ENTER].
b. If a fault number appears, press [ENTER] until the display shows RETURN TO TEST MENU?
NO. Press [YES][ENTER]. (Pressing [NO][ENTER] returns you to the beginning of the
Automatic faults.)
A similar procedure is used to advance through the Extended Tests by pressing [ENTER]
unti1 the desired test is offered or the display shows RETURN TO TEST MENU? NO.
5.2 Vent Tests
After you have entered into Extended Tests, the initial display will be VENT TEST? NO. Press
[ENTER] to advance to the next test. Press [YES][ENTER] to test the column oven vent system.
Note that the column oven temperature will drop briefly during this test; a few minutes may be
required for stabilization after the test. If the system is good, the display will read TESTS OK. If a
problem exists, the display will show one of the following fault codes:
Fault 901: AC test timer bad.
The remaining vent tests will not be valid, but normal chromatographic operation is
not affected. Replace the CPU PCB to restore the diagnostic functions.
Fault 902: Vent motor control won’t turn off.
The motor will try to continue to rotate after it reaches the fully open or closed
position. Replace the Temperature Control PC Board.
Fault 903: Vent motor bad.
Neither limit switch can be activated by running the motor. If the motor turns during
this test, either the Temperature Control PCB has failed or both 1imit switches are
bad.
Faults 904 and 905: Vent open control defective.
Proper AC voltage is not being applied to the motor to open the vents. Replace the
Temperature Control PCB.
49
Fault 906: Vent open control won’t turn off.
The motor will try to continue to rotate after it reaches the fully open position.
Replace the Temperature Control PCB.
Fault 907: Vent open limit switch bad.
Check the mechanism to see if the switch is actually being depressed. Replace the
switch or correct the mechanical problem. If the switch is good, replace the
Temperature Control PCB.
Fault 908: Intermittent vent open limit switch or control.
Rerun the test to determine where the problem lies.
Faults 909 and 910: Vent close contro1 defective.
Proper AC voltage is not being applied to the motor to close the vents. Replace the
Temperature Control PCB.
Fault 911: Vent close control won’t turn off.
The motor will try to continue to rotate after it reaches the fully closed position.
Replace the Temperature Control PCB.
Fault 912: Vent close limit switch bad.
Check the mechanism to see if the switch is actually being depressed. Replace the
switch or correct the mechanical problem. If the switch is good, replace the
Temperature Control PCB.
Fau1t 913: Intermittent vent close limit switch or Control.
Rerun the test to determine where the problem lies.
5.3
Relay Tests
The next Extended Test to choose from is RELAY TEST? N0. Press [ENTER] to advance to the
next test or [YES] [ENTER] to test the External Event AC relays. If a problem exists, the display
will show one of the following codes. All of the failures except Fault 801 are corrected by
replacing the Externa1 Events PCB.
Fault 801: AC test timer bad.
The remaining relay tests will not be valid, but normal chromatographic operation is
not affected. Replace the CPU PCB to restore the diagnostic functions.
Fau1t 802: One (or more) of the AC relays won’t turn off. If none of the relays which are in use
appear to be affected, operation may continue until the External Events PCB is
replaced to cure the problem.
Fault 803: Event relay #1 won’t turn off.
see Fault 802.
Fault 804: Event relay #1 intermittent.
The AC control for relay #1 is not turning on continuously. The device which it is
operating may not function at all or may be only partially activated. Replace the
External Events PCB, or temporarily switch to an unused relay.
50
Fault 805: Event relay #1 won’t turn on.
The device operated by relay will not be activated when Event #1 is turned on. Replace
the External Events PCB, or temporarily switch to an unused relay.
Fault 806: Event relay #2 won’t turn off. See Fault 802.
Fault 807: Event relay #2 intermittent. See Fault 804.
Fault 808: Event relay #2 won’t turn off. See Fault 805.
Fault 809: Event relay #3 won’t turn off. See Fault 802.
Fault 810: Event relay #3 intermittent. See Fault 804.
Fault 811: Event relay #3 won’t turn off. See Fault 805.
Fault 812: Event relay #4 won’t turn off. See Fault 802.
Fault 813: Event relay #4 intermittent. See Fault 804.
Fault 814: Event relay #4 won’t turn off. See Fault 805.
5.4 Key Echo Tests
the third Extended Test to choose from is KEY ECHO? NO. Press [ENTER] to advance to the
next test or [YES] [ENTER] to activate keyboard tests. If some of the keys on the keyboard seem
to be responding improperly or not at all, this test can help to isolate the problem. The following
are the correct codes which should appear on the display when each key is pressed. If any other
code is displayed or there is no response at all, there is a fault with the keyboard touch panel or the
Keyboard Display PCB, assuming all other Core Tests were good.
5.4 Key Echo Tests (cont.)
All keys marked with an asterisk (*) require that the related optional hardware be installed before
responding to this test.
To terminate the Key Echo Test and return to the Test Menu, press [RESET].
If a single key fails to respond, the fault is in the keyboard touch panel. If 16 or more keys have
failed, or if any keys respond with the wrong codes, the fault is probably in the Keyboard Display
PCB. Failure of an intermediate number of keys could be caused by a fault in either the PCB or
the touch panel. Contact the local dealer for assistance in repairing the problems.
GC CONTROL KEYS
o START
o GC CONFIGURE
o INSTR TEST
o IGNITE A
o IGNITE B
o COL OVEN ON
o COL OVEN OFF
o *(PLOTTER) START
o *FEED PAPER
o *(PLOTTER) STOP
o *ZERO PEN
o ATTENUATION DET A (UP)
o ATTENUATION DET A( DOWN)
o ATTENUATION DET B (UP)
o ATTENUATION DET B (DOWN)
1B
0B
8B
F2
72
08
88
F1
71
07
87
10
00
40
20
Only while being depressed
Only while being depressed
Only while being depressed
51
OPERATIONS Keys
o BUILD/MODIFY
o ACTIVE LINE
o STATUS
o ACTIVATE
o *PRINT
o *REPORT
o COPY
o LOCK /UNLOCK
o TUNE
o DELETE PROGRAM
o DELETE SECTION/TABLE
AUTOMATION CONTROL Keys
o *RACK TABLE
o *(RACK TABLE) SUSPEND
o *SEQUENCE TABLE
o *(SEQUENCE TABLE)
SUSPEND
METHODS Keys
o METHOD1
0A
o METHOD2
1A
o METHOD3
2A
o METHOD4
3A
o COLUMN
18
o INJECTOR
28
o DETECTOR
48
o *PLOTTER
17
o *AUTOSAMPLER
27
o *RELAY
47
0D
8D
0C
1D
1C
9C
2D
AD
2C
4D
4C
2E
AE
1E
9E
DATA HANDLING Keys (In-Board Data Handling Only)
o INTEGRATION
05
o TIME EVENTS
25
o PEAK TABLE
45
DISPLAY CONTROL Keys
ENTRY Keys
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
0/OFF
1/SINGLE
2/MULTI
3
4/YES
5/NO
6
7/A
42
43
23
13
46
26
16
49
52
o
o
o
o
o
o
8/B
9
CE
ALPHA ENTRY
A-Z
Z-A
29
19
09
06 (In-Board Data Handling Only)
03 (In-Board Data Handling Only)
02 (In-Board Data Handling Only)
SHIFT, PROMPT, and HELP Keys
o
o
o
SHIFT
PROMPT
HELP
No response, except in connection with other keys, as listed
F4
Only while being depressed
74
Only while being depressed
5.5 Destructive RAM Tests
The Destructive RAM test is the last of the Extended Tests. Press [ENTER] to conclude these tests
or press [YES] [ENTER] to test the main RAM memory.
This test is used to find "soft” errors in the instrument memory which cause improper operation
but are not caught in the Core tests. The test can a1so be initiated by cold starting the instrument
with TP6 on the CPU PCB connected to ground (TP2) if the test cannot be started in the normal
way.
The fault display is divided into 18 characters. Only the first two fields of 4 digits are of concern
during the Destructive RAM tests. However, the last two digits (at the far right) are the test clock,
which advances time every 1.6 seconds.
If no fault is found, only the first 4 digits and last 2 digits will be displayed. This test will run
continuously until the main power is switched off and back on to do a cold start. Since some “soft”
or random faults may happen occasionally, this test could be run for hours until an error is found.
Room temperature and other environmental changes may make a marginal device fail
occasionally.
As soon as an error is detected, its address will be displayed in the second 4-digit field and held
until the second error is found, which could be as soon as the next test, or less than half a second.
Any error address and the remaining four groups of 2-digit codes should be recorded and
returned with the faulty CPU PC Board.
An example of a RAM fault could be:
0010
CYCLES
D001
ADDRESS
E8
00
E1
B0
TEST INFORMATION
07
CLOCK
Nine cycles went by before this error was found. The chip, and thus the CPU PC Board, still
should be considered faulty.
53
6
STARTING AND EXITING TESTS, DISPLAYING AND PRINTING RESULTS
Initiating Automatic Tests
Tests may be run any time the instrument is not in RUN. Press [SHIFT] [INSTR TEST] to start the
automatic tests. Within a minute, the message TESTS OK will be displayed, or the first fault
message will appear. Any remaining fault messages can be seen by using the display control keys
or ENTER.
Exiting Tests
It is possible to exit from a test only after it has run to completion. This can be done either by
proceeding to the next test (see Initiating Extended Tests) or by returning to normal GC
functions. Any OPERATIONS key can be pressed to go back to normal operation whenever the
instrument is prompting the user for the next test selection. The fault messages generated by a
particular test can no longer be displayed after exiting from the that test, but they can still be
printed if a printer/plotter is installed. (See Printing the Results of Tests.)
Initiating Extended Tests
Extended tests can be run only after the Automatic tests have been run by pressing [SHIFT]
[INSTR TEST]. A prompt offering the first extended test (vents) is displayed by pressing [ENTER]
whenever the TESTS OK message is displayed, or by pressing [YES] [ENTER] whenever the
message RETURN TO TEST MENU? is displayed. The test is started by pressing [YES] [ENTER]
in response to the prompt. Pressing only [ENTER] moves the display on to the next test.
Initiating Extended Tests (cont.)
After a particular test selection has been bypassed or run, the only way to return to that test is to
start over from the Automatic tests by pressing [SHIFT] [INSTR TEST].
Printing and Clearing the Results of Tests
The results of the Automatic or Extended tests are cleared prior to running the tests each time, so
the fault messages reflect only the latest pass through the test. Pressing [RESET] clears all of the
fault messages, including those detected by the Background tests. (see Appendix C for information
on the Background tests.)
54
After any test has been run, the results can be printed on the printer/plotter by pressing [SHIFT]
[REPORT]. The latest results of all of the Automatic, Extended, and Background tests will be
printed.
Using the Blinking STATUS Light to Display Background Fault Messages
A blinking STATUS light indicates that the instrument has detected a fault condition during
normal operation. Press [STATUS] to display the initial fault message, and then press [ENTER] to
display additional fault messages. Note that these messages are completely separate from the
automatic tests described in para.4.2. Refer to para.4.1 for a complete listing of the background
fault messages and information on the Background tests.
55
7
TROUBLE SHOOTIHG
PROCEDURES
There are only two reasons that you should be reading this section:
1. You are observing a functional problem (temperature zone, Auto Sampler, etc.) that is out of
control or not functioning but no fault messages have appeared on the display.
2. Everything seems to be operating normally but chromatographic performance is not meeting
expectations.
If neither of the above statements are true, please return to paragraph 1.2, Automatic Test
Description, and perform those tests. If, however, either of the statements are true, take the time to
be sure that the system is set up properly, i.e., methods correct, hardware properly installed, cables
connected, etc. Many chromatographic malfunctions that are observed are often found to be
"cockpit” errors. That is, either the method wasn’t built correctly or the hardware was not
configured to do the expected analysis. Therefore, reassess the setup and the method. Only then
shou1d you proceed with troubleshooting. Also, it has to be assumed that regular preventative
maintenance has been performed on the sensitive components such as septa or filters. The user
must be the best judge of servicing based on the environment that the instrument is in, the
frequency of use, and applicable regulatory standards.
Another assumption is that all components are standard and unmodified. All configurations must
be standard, as ordered from the factory.
If you are convinced that the method is built correctly, and all the hardware is proper for the
specific analysis intended, proceed with this Troubleshooting section. Refer to paragraph 8,
Functional Problems, for symptom 1, and refer to paragraph 8.10, Chromatographic
Interpretations, for symptom2. Each section is intended as a quick guide for the most 1ikely
problem. If the repair is not self explanatory there will be references to other paragraphs or other
manuals. If you experience difficulties or are unsure of safety precautions (there are lethal voltages
under covers attached with screws), please call a trained serviceman or your nearest the local
dealer representative.
This Troubleshooting Procedure is intended to be a guide to the most obvious problems and cannot
be considered as a complete coverage of every possible combination of faults.
The following list of drawings will assist you in identifying and locating components called out in
the following troubleshooting sections.
Manual Section/Figure(s)
View/Description
Introduction, Figures 1,2
Basic Instrument
Introduction, Figure 2
Column Oven
Megabore Manual, 03-914062-00
Injector, 1045
On-Column Capillary Injector Manual,
03-914003-00, Figures 1-2, 2-2
Injector, 1097/98
Printer/Plotter, Quick Reference Manual
Printer/Plotter
Installation, Figure 5
Chart Recorder
Automation Control
Auto sampler
4270 Integrator (External Data 4270 Integrator systems tabbed section)
56
8
FUNCTIONAL PROBLEMS
The following is a list of functional problems that can be observed without any special test
equipment. Most corrective actions are self explanatory from the list of possible causes. However,
if more explanation is needed, there will frequently be more direct instructions listed in the
adjacent column to assist in the troubleshooting or repair procedure.
Functional Problem
Paragraph
General Thermal Zone
8.1
Specific Thermal Zones
8.2
o
Column Oven
o Universal Injector Oven/Auxiliary Oven
o Detector Oven
External Events/Valve Control
8.5
Printer/Plotter
8.6
Data System/Control Station
8.7
Miscellaneous Troubleshooting
8.8
o
Inject Switch
o Remote Control
o
Ignitor (FID, FPD)
Pressure Transducer
8.9
Split Ratio Transducer
8.10
Chromatographic Interpretations
8.11
8.1
General Thermal Zone (Including Subambient)
Refer to Table 2 for General Thermal Zone Troubleshooting.
8.2 Specific Thermal Zones
Always read paragraph 8.1 before continuing with any specific thermal troubleshooting.
Refer to Table 3 for Column Oven Troubleshooting, Table 4 for Universal Injector Oven/Auxiliary
Oven Troubleshooting, and Table 5 for Detector Oven Troubleshooting.
57
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