Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (PDF 977KB)

Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (PDF 977KB)
Annual Security and Fire Safety Report
This annual report reflects the period of January 1 through December 31, 2014.
Policy for Reporting the Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics
The Miami University Police prepares this report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime
Statistics Act. The statistics disclosed in this report are gathered from the local law enforcement agencies surrounding our campuses;
the offices of Residence Life, Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution, Business Services, the Women's Center; and the Division of
Student Affairs. The report is prepared in cooperation with each of those offices. Each entity provides updated information on their
policies and procedures and their educational efforts and programs to comply with the Act.
All policy statements and procedures contained within this report apply to all Miami University campus locations unless otherwise
specified in each section.
Fire Safety Report
This report of fire safety policies, procedures, and fire statistics is Miami University's response to the Higher Education Act: Fire Safety
Report. Learn about the policies regarding fire safety education and training programs provided to students and employees as well as
rules on portable electrical appliances, smoking and open flames in residence halls. This information on fire safety also includes
emergency procedures for evacuation and a list of contacts for reporting a fire. The statistics include a description of each on-campus
housing facility fire safety system as well as the number of fire drills held annually. Pertinent safety issues for students in off-campus
housing include landlord/tenant responsibilities, Oxford City housing codes, and fire prevention strategies.
Each year, email notification of this website is made to all faculty, staff, and enrolled students. Written notification is provided to
prospective students and employees. Copies of the report may be obtained from University Police, 513-529-2225.
Crime Statistics
In compliance with the Campus Security Act, we are sharing the following crime-related statistics.
Miami Crime Statistics
These figures include reports of crimes occurring on campus, non-campus buildings or properties, and public property. These
geographic areas are defined as follows:
Campus
1. Any building or property owned or controlled by Miami within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by Miami in
direct support of, or in manner related to, Miami's education purposes, including residence halls; and
2. Any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the area identified in paragraph (1), that is owned by Miami but
controlled by another person, is frequently used by students, and supports institutional purposes (such as food or other retail vendor).
Non-campus building or property
1. Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by Miami; or
2. Any building or property owned or controlled by Miami that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, Miami's educational purposes,
is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of Miami.
Public property
1. All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks, and parking facilities, that is within the campus, or immediately
adjacent to and accessible from campus.
This information from Miami University is provided as part of our commitment to campus safety and in compliance with the Student
Right to Know and Campus Security Act as amended by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics
Act.
Oxford Campus Report
Campus Security Act Reporting, 2012–2014
CRIME
MURDER / NON-NEGLIGENT
MANSLAUGHTER
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER
SEX OFFENSES - RAPE, SODOMY, SEXUAL
ASSAULT W/OBJECT, FONDLING
RESIDENTIAL
YEAR
FACILITIES
NONTOTAL
UNFOUNDED
CAMPUS
PUBLIC
ON
CRIMES
PROPERTY PROPERTY
CAMPUS
B
A
2014
0
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
-
2012
0
0
0
0
-
2014
0
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
-
2012
0
0
0
0
-
2014
10
14
4
0
2
2013
16
18
2
0
-
2012
11
17
1
0
-
SEX OFFENSES - NON FORCIBLE (INCEST &
STATUTORY RAPE)
ROBBERY
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT
BURGLARY
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT
ARSON
2014
0
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
-
2012
0
0
0
0
-
2014
0
0
0
0
1
2013
0
0
0
0
-
2012
0
0
0
0
-
2014
0
3
0
0
0
2013
1
1
3
1
-
2012
0
4
2
1
-
2014
7
24
9
0
0
2013
3
31
5
0
-
2012
5
13
17
0
-
2014
0
2
0
1
1
2013
0
1
0
0
-
2012
0
1
1
0
-
2014
0
1
0
0
0
2013
2
3
1
0
-
2012
0
0
4
0
-
Hate Crimes—Hate crimes are crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or
perceived race (RA), religion (RE), sexual orientation (SO), gender (G), gender identity (GI), ethnicity (E), national origin (NO) or
disability (D). In 2012, one incident of property damage occurred in residential facilities that was motivated by hate of sexual orientation.
In 2013 and 2014, no hate crimes reported.
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 for the Oxford Campus
CRIME
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
TOTAL
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
2014
0
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
DATING VIOLENCE
STALKING
2014
2
6
0
0
0
2013
1
2
0
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
2014
6
11
0
0
0
2013
0
2
0
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
Arrests for the Oxford Campus
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
TOTAL
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
2014
0
0
0
0
0
2013
0
1
0
0
-
2012
0
0
0
1
-
2014
29
46
0
1
0
2013
45
74
0
4
-
2012
43
76
7
4
-
2014
9
127
4
10
0
2013
9
96
3
24
-
2012
9
108
3
15
-
Disciplinary Actions for the Oxford Campus
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
TOTAL
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
2014
0
0
0
0
0
2013
0
0
0
0
-
2012
0
0
0
0
-
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
2014
25
28
0
0
0
2013
18
18
0
0
-
2012
16
16
0
0
-
2014
396
398
0
0
0
2013
321
322
3
1
-
2012
389
392
1
0
-
A Non-Campus Property—Non-Campus is (1) any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially
recognized by Miami; or (2) any building or property owned or controlled by Miami that is used in direct support of or in relation to,
Miami's educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of
Miami. The Oxford campus has both types of non-campus property. Buildings owned and controlled by student organizations include
fraternity houses. Non-contiguous buildings used by Miami in direct support of its educational purposes.
B Unfounded crimes. If a reported crime is investigated by law enforcement authorities and found to be false or baseless, the crime is
unfounded and should not be included in your institution's statistics. Only sworn or commissioned law enforcement personnel may
unfound a crime.
Statistics listed in the "Residential Facilities" column are also counted in the "On Campus" column. The law requires institutions to
break out the number of on-campus crimes that occur in residential facilities.
Hamilton Campus Report
Campus Security Act Reporting, 2012–2014
CRIME
MURDER / NON-NEGLIGENT
MANSLAUGHTER
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER
SEX OFFENSES - RAPE, SODOMY, SEXUAL
ASSAULT W/OBJECT, FONDLING
NONRESIDENTIAL
UNFOUNDED
ON
CAMPUS
PUBLIC
YEAR FACILITIES
CRIMES
CAMPUS PROPERTY PROPERTY
A
C
B
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
SEX OFFENSES - NON FORCIBLE (INCEST &
STATUTORY RAPE)
ROBBERY
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT
BURGLARY
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT
ARSON
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
1
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
2
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
Hate Crimes—Hate crimes are crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or
perceived race (RA), religion (RE), sexual orientation (SO), gender (G), gender identity (GI), ethnicity (E), national origin (NO) or
disability (D). No hate crimes were reported in 2012, 2013, or 2014.
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 for the Hamilton Campus
CRIME
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
DATING VIOLENCE
STALKING
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
1
0
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
Arrests for the Hamilton Campus
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
1
0
1
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
Disciplinary Actions for the Hamilton Campus
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
A The Hamilton Campus has no residential facilities.
B Non-Campus Property—Non-Campus is (1) any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially
recognized by Miami; or (2) any building or property owned or controlled by Miami that is used in direct support of or in relation to,
Miami's educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of
Miami. The Hamilton campus has no buildings owned or controlled by student organizations. The Hamilton Campus has noncontiguous buildings used by Miami-Hamilton in direct support of its educational purposes.
C Unfounded crimes. If a reported crime is investigated by law enforcement authorities and found to be false or baseless, the crime is
“unfounded” and should not be included in your institution’s statistics. Only sworn or commissioned law enforcement personnel may
“unfound” a crime.
Statistics listed in the "Residential Facilities" column are also counted in the "On Campus" column. The law requires institutions to
break out the number of on-campus crimes that occur in residential facilities.
Middletown Campus Report
Campus Security Act Reporting, 2012–2014
CRIME
MURDER / NON-NEGLIGENT
MANSLAUGHTER
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER
SEX OFFENSES - RAPE, SODOMY, SEXUAL
ASSAULT W/OBJECT, FONDLING
NONRESIDENTIAL
UNFOUNDED
ON
CAMPUS
PUBLIC
YEAR FACILITIES
CRIMES
CAMPUS PROPERTY PROPERTY
A
C
B
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
1
0
0
0
2013
-
1
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
SEX OFFENSES - NON FORCIBLE (INCEST &
STATUTORY RAPE)
ROBBERY
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT
BURGLARY
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT
ARSON
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
1
0
0
0
2013
-
1
0
0
-
2012
-
2
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
1
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
Hate Crimes—Hate crimes are crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or
perceived race (RA), religion (RE), sexual orientation (SO), gender (G), gender identity (GI), ethnicity (E), national origin (NO) or
disability (D). No hate crimes were reported in 2012, 2013, or 2014.
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 for the Middletown Campus
CRIME
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
1
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
DATING VIOLENCE
STALKING
2014
-
1
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
2014
-
1
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
Arrests for the Middletown Campus
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
Disciplinary Actions for the Middletown
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
DRUG LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
LIQUOR LAW
2014
-
0
0
0
0
2013
-
0
0
0
-
2012
-
0
0
0
-
A The Middletown campus has no residential facilities.
B Non-Campus Property—Non-Campus is (1) any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially
recognized by Miami; or (2) any building or property owned or controlled by Miami that is used in direct support of or in relation to,
Miami's educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of
Miami. The Middletown campus has no buildings owned or controlled by student organizations. The Middletown Campus has noncontiguous buildings used by Miami-Middletown in direct support of its educational purposes.
C Unfounded crimes. If a reported crime is investigated by law enforcement authorities and found to be false or baseless, the crime is
“unfounded” and should not be included in your institution’s statistics. Only sworn or commissioned law enforcement personnel may
“unfound” a crime.
Statistics listed in the "Residential Facilities" column are also counted in the "On Campus" column. The law requires institutions to
break out the number of on-campus crimes that occur in residential facilities.
Luxembourg Campus Report
Campus Security Act Reporting, 2012–2014
CRIME
MURDER / NON-NEGLIGENT
MANSLAUGHTER
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER
SEX OFFENSES - RAPE, SODOMY, SEXUAL
ASSAULT W/OBJECT, FONDLING
SEX OFFENSES - NON FORCIBLE (INCEST &
STATUTORY RAPE)
NONRESIDENTIAL
UNFOUNDED
ON
CAMPUS
PUBLIC
YEAR FACILITIES
CRIMES
CAMPUS PROPERTY PROPERTY
A
C
B
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
ROBBERY
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT
BURGLARY
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT
ARSON
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
Hate Crimes—Hate crimes are crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or
perceived race (RA), religion (RE), sexual orientation (SO), gender (G), gender identity (GI), ethnicity (E), national origin (NO) or
disability (D). No hate crimes were reported in 2012, 2013, or 2014.
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 for the Luxembourg Campus
CRIME
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
DATING VIOLENCE
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
STALKING
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
Arrests for the Luxembourg Campus
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
Disciplinary Actions for the Luxembourg Campus
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
A The Luxembourg campus has no residential facilities for students. The campus does provide faculty housing in the villa.
B Non-Campus Property—Non-Campus is (1) any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially
recognized by Miami; or (2) any building or property owned or controlled by Miami that is used in direct support of or in relation to,
Miami's educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of
Miami. The Luxembourg campus has no "Non-Campus" buildings or property.
C Unfounded crimes. If a reported crime is investigated by law enforcement authorities and found to be false or baseless, the crime is
“unfounded” and should not be included in your institution’s statistics. Only sworn or commissioned law enforcement personnel may
“unfound” a crime.
Statistics listed in the "Residential Facilities" column are also counted in the "On Campus" column. The law requires institutions to
break out the number of on-campus crimes that occur in residential facilities.
Voice of America Learning Center Report
Campus Security Act Reporting, 2012–2014
CRIME
MURDER / NON-NEGLIGENT
MANSLAUGHTER
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER
SEX OFFENSES - RAPE, SODOMY, SEXUAL
ASSAULT W/OBJECT, FONDLING
SEX OFFENSES - NON FORCIBLE (INCEST &
STATUTORY RAPE)
ROBBERY
YEAR
NONRESIDENTIAL
UNFOUNDED
ON
CAMPUS
PUBLIC
FACILITIES
CRIMES
CAMPUS PROPERTY PROPERTY
A
C
B
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT
BURGLARY
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT
ARSON
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
Hate Crimes—Hate crimes are crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or
perceived race (RA), religion (RE), sexual orientation (SO), gender (G), gender identity (GI), ethnicity (E), national origin (NO) or
disability (D). No hate crimes were reported in 2012, 2013, or 2014.
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 for the Voice of America Learning Center
Campus
CRIME
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
DATING VIOLENCE
STALKING
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
Arrests for the Voice of America Learning Center Campus
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
1
-
0
-
2012
-
3
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
Disciplinary Actions for the Voice of America Learning Center Campus
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
A The Voice of America Learning Center has no residential facilities.
B Non-Campus Property—Non-Campus is (1) any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially
recognized by Miami; or (2) any building or property owned or controlled by Miami that is used in direct support of or in relation to,
Miami's educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of
Miami. The Voice of America Learning Center has no "Non-Campus" building or property.
C Unfounded crimes. If a reported crime is investigated by law enforcement authorities and found to be false or baseless, the crime is
“unfounded” and should not be included in your institution’s statistics. Only sworn or commissioned law enforcement personnel may
“unfound” a crime.
Statistics listed in the "Residential Facilities" column are also counted in the "On Campus" column. The law requires institutions to
break out the number of on-campus crimes that occur in residential facilities.
Greentree Health Science Academy Report
Campus Security Act Reporting, 2012–2014
CRIME
MURDER / NON-NEGLIGENT
MANSLAUGHTER
NEGLIGENT MANSLAUGHTER
SEX OFFENSES - RAPE, SODOMY, SEXUAL
ASSAULT W/OBJECT, FONDLING
SEX OFFENSES - NON FORCIBLE (INCEST &
STATUTORY RAPE)
ROBBERY
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT
NONRESIDENTIAL
UNFOUNDED
ON
CAMPUS
PUBLIC
YEAR FACILITIES
CRIMES
CAMPUS PROPERTY PROPERTY
A
C
B
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
BURGLARY
MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT
ARSON
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
Hate Crimes—Hate crimes are crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or
perceived race (RA), religion (RE), sexual orientation (SO), gender (G), gender identity (GI), ethnicity (E), national origin (NO) or
disability (D). No hate crimes were reported in 2012, 2013, or 2014.
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 for Greentree Health Science Academy
CRIME
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
DATING VIOLENCE
STALKING
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
N/A
-
-
-
-
-
Arrests for the Greentree Health Science Academy
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
Disciplinary Actions for the Greentree Health Science Academy
VIOLATIONS
WEAPONS LAW
DRUG LAW
LIQUOR LAW
YEAR
RESIDENTIAL
NON-CAMPUS
UNFOUNDED
PUBLIC
FACILITIES ON CAMPUS
PROPERTY
CRIMES
PROPERTY
A
B
C
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
2014
-
0
-
0
0
2013
-
0
-
0
-
2012
-
0
-
0
-
A The Greentree Health Science Academy has no residential facilities.
B Non-Campus Property—Non-Campus is (1) any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially
recognized by Miami; or (2) any building or property owned or controlled by Miami that is used in direct support of or in relation to,
Miami's educational purposes, is frequently used by students, and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of
Miami. The Greentree Health Science Academy has no "Non-Campus" buildings or property.
C Unfounded crimes. If a reported crime is investigated by law enforcement authorities and found to be false or baseless, the crime is
“unfounded” and should not be included in your institution’s statistics. Only sworn or commissioned law enforcement personnel may
“unfound” a crime.
Statistics listed in the "Residential Facilities" column are also counted in the "On Campus" column. The law requires institutions to
break out the number of on-campus crimes that occur in residential facilities.
Reporting A Crime
The university expects all students, faculty, staff, and guests to immediately report any suspected criminal activity to law enforcement. If
you suspect or have knowledge of criminal activity occurring on University property or involving University personnel or students, please
call the Miami University Police Department at 513-529-2222 (in an emergency, please dial 911 immediately). Reports should be made
if the victim elects to or is unable to make such a report.
IN THE EVENT OF EMERGENCY, CALL 911
Non-Emergencies
OXFORD CAMPUS
On Campus--Miami University Police, Police Services Center, 4945 Oxford-Trenton Rd., 513-529-2222
Off Campus--Oxford City Police, 513-523-4321
HAMILTON CAMPUS
Hamilton Police, 513-868-5811
Campus Security, 513-785-3222
Miami University Police, Police Services Center, 4945 Oxford-Trenton Rd., 513-529-2222
MIDDLETOWN CAMPUS
Middletown Police, 513-425-7700
Campus Security, 513-727-3333
Miami University Police, Police Services Center, 4945 Oxford-Trenton Rd., 513-529-2222
VOICE OF AMERICA LEARNING CENTER
West Chester Police, 513-777-2231
Campus Security, 513-895-8862
Miami University Police, Police Services Center, 4945 Oxford-Trenton Rd., 513-529-2222
GREENTREE HEALTH SCIENCE ACADEMY
Middletown Police, 513-425-7700
No campus police department or security office
Miami University Police, Police Services Center, 4945 Oxford-Trenton Rd., 513-529-2222
LUXEMBOURG CAMPUS
No campus police department or security office
Contact Police Grand-Ducale, Luxembourg, +352 4997-1
Crimes should be reported to the appropriate campus police or security department listed above for the purpose of making timely
warning notices to the community and for disclosure in the annual crime statistics. Dispatchers or officers are available at the police
telephone numbers 24 hours a day to answer your calls. In response to a call, MUPD will take the required action, either dispatching an
officer or asking the victim to report to MUPD headquarters to file an incident report.
Other Resources Available at Each Campus
OXFORD CAMPUS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution, 9 Warfield Hall, 513-529-1417
Dean of Students, 110 Warfield Hall, 513-529-1877
Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, 104 Health Services Center, 513-529-1870
Vice President for Student Affairs, 110 Warfield Hall, 513-529-4631
Director of the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity, Hannah House, 513-529-7157
Director of Intercollegiate Athletics, 230 Millett Hall, 513-529-3113
Director of the Women's Center, 206 MacMillan Hall, 513-529-1510
HAMILTON CAMPUS
•
•
•
•
•
•
Dean of the Regional Campuses, 202 Mosler Hall, 513-785-3200
Director of Business Services, 100 Mosler Hall, 513-785-3171
Director of Athletics and Recreational Sports, 104 Athletics, 513-785-3112
Sr. Regional Associate Dean of Students, 202 Mosler Hall, 513-785-3128
Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, 104 Health Services Center, 513-529-1870
Campus Security (Securitas), 513-785-3222
MIDDLETOWN CAMPUS
•
•
•
•
•
•
Dean of the Regional Campuses, 116 Johnston Hall, 513-727-3211
Director of Business Services, 116 Johnston Hall, 513-727-3350
Director of Athletics, Johnston Hall, 513-727-3200
Sr. Regional Associate Dean of Students, 135 Johnston Hall, 513-727-3326
Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, 104 Health Services Center, 513-529-1870
Campus Security (Securitas), 513-727-3333
VOICE OF AMERICA LEARNING CENTER
•
•
•
Director of Learning Center, 513-895-8865
Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, 104 Health Services Center, 513-529-1870
Campus Security (Securitas), 513-895-8862
GREENTREE HEALTH SCIENCE ACADEMY
•
•
•
Dean of the Regional Campuses, 116 Johnston Hall, 513-727-3211
Sr. Regional Associate Dean of Students, 135 Johnston Hall, 513-727-3326
Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, 104 Health Services Center, 513-529-1870
LUXEMBOURG CAMPUS
•
Dean of Dolibois European Center, Chateau de Differdange, Luxembourg, 011-352-582222-1
Dispatchers or officers are available at the police telephone numbers 24 hours a day to answer your calls. In response to a call, MUPD
will take the required action, either dispatching an officer or asking the victim to report to MUPD headquarters to file an incident report
Confidentiality
The University does not have procedures for voluntary confidential reporting of crime statistics. Violations of law will be referred to law
enforcement agencies. Crimes reported to counselors at the Student Counseling Services, the Psychology Clinic, or to a physician or
nurse at the Health Services Center are confidential by law. Some off-campus reports may also be legally confidential (for example, to
clergy, the Community Counseling and Crisis Center, and McCullough-Hyde Hospital). Crimes reported to the above are not included in
the annual crime statistics report.
Miami University will preserve students confidentiality to the extent possible and allowed by law. A person may speak confidentially with
certain persons in legally protected roles including:
•
Counselors at Student Counseling Service
•
•
•
Medical staff at the Student Health Center
Off-campus with clergy, counselors, physicians
Women Helping Women at 513-381-5610 or toll free at 877-889-5610
In addition, the University sponsors several awareness campaigns throughout the academic year including Take Back the Night, The
Clothesline Project, and Walk a Mile in her Shoes. These events offer an opportunity for victims of sexual assault, domestic violence,
dating violence, and stalking to share experiences in a private setting.
Clery Reporting
The degree to which confidentiality can be protected when a report is made to someone other than those identified above depends
upon whether or not the individual to whom the offense is reported is legally required to report this information to law
enforcement. Ohio law and University policy requires those with knowledge of a felony to report it to law enforcement. Miami
employees including Resident Assistants and professional residence life staff are required to report sex-based offenses (including
sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking) to the Miami University Police who will, in turn, report it to the Sexual
Assault Response Coordinator. Reporting to the Miami University Police or other law enforcement does not require the victim to file
criminal charges.
Public Records
Police reports are open for inspection and copying under Ohio's Public Records Act. The extent to which Miami University can protect
the identity of victims of sex-based offenses contained in police reports is not absolute; however the University uses its best efforts to
protect the identity of the victim and the intimate details of the report. The identity of an uncharged suspect may be withheld.
Crimes Involving Miami Students
The Miami University Police Department (MUPD) incident reports involving students accused of misconduct are forwarded to the Office
of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution for review and potential action, as appropriate. MUPD officers have the authority to issue
citations and make arrests involving criminal activity that occurs on campus, as deemed appropriate. MUPD will investigate a report
when it is deemed appropriate.
Additional information obtained via the investigation will also be forwarded to the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution. If
assistance is required from any of the local police departments listed above, MUPD will contact the appropriate unit.
Timely Warnings
Campus Crime Alert
In the event that a crime occurs, on campus or on the public property surrounding campus, that, in the judgment of the Miami University
Police constitutes an on-going serious or continuing threat to the campus community, a Crime Alert will be issued. The purpose of a
Campus Crime Alert are to enable persons to protect themselves, to heighten safety awareness and to seek information that will lead to
an arrest and conviction of the perpetrator when violent crimes against persons or major crimes against property have occurred. Every
attempt will be made to distribute a Crime Alert soon after the incident is reported; however, the release of the Crime Alert is subject to
the availability of facts concerning the incident.
Crime Alerts are usually distributed for the following Uniformed Crime Reporting Program (UCR)/National Incident Based Reporting
System (NIBRS) classifications: arson, criminal homicide, and robbery. Cases of aggravated assault and sex offenses are considered
on a case-by-case basis, depending on the facts of the case and the information known by MUPD. For example, if an assault occurs
between two students who have a disagreement, there may be no on-going threat to other Miami community members and a Crime
Alert would not be distributed. In cases involving sexual assault, they are often reported long after the incident occurred, thus there is
no ability to distribute a “timely” warning notice to the community. Sex offenses and burglaries will be considered on a case-by-case
basis depending on when and where the incident occurred, when it was reported, and the amount of information known by the Miami
University Police Department. The Miami University Police Chief or designee reviews all reports to determine if there is an on-going
threat to the community and if the distribution of a Crime Alert is warranted. Crime Alerts may also be posted for other crime
classifications, as deemed appropriate.
On the Oxford campus, the Chief of Police or a designee is responsible for preparing and distributing the Crime Alert via blast email.
University communications may also send an alert working with the Miami Police Department. Crime alerts are posted on the Miami
University Police website (http://www.miamioh.edu/police) and distributed to students, faculty, and staff via an email blast.
The Dean of the Regional campuses or a designee is responsible for preparing and distributing the Crime Alert via email blast to its
faculty, staff and students on the Hamilton campus, Middletown campus, Voice of America Learning Center and Greentree Health
Science Academy. The Dean of the Luxembourg campus or a designee is responsible for preparing and distributing the Crime Alert via
email blast to its faculty, staff and students on that campus.
The victim's name and other personally identifying information will NOT be included in any Emergency Notification or Crime
Alert. See additional information below.
Emergency Notification v. Timely Warning
If there is an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees occurring on campus, Miami will follow its Emergency
Notification Procedures (http://miamioh.edu/campus-safety/annual-report/emergency.html). No Crime Alert based on the same
circumstance will be issued. However, follow-up information will be disseminated to the community as needed.
Publicly Available Record-keeping
The University does not publish the name of crime victims nor house identifiable information regarding victims in the Miami University
Police Department’s daily crime log or in Campus Crime Alerts or Emergency Notifications. Ohio law and University policy require
those not in a legally protected role with knowledge of a felony to report it to law enforcement. Miami personnel, including Resident
Assistants and professional residence life staff, are required to report Title IX Offenses to the Miami University Police who will, in turn,
report it to the Deputy Coordinator. Reporting to the Miami University Police or other law enforcement does not require the
victim/survivor to pursue criminal charges.
Police reports are open for inspection and copying under Ohio's Public Records Act. The extent to which Miami University can protect
the identity of a victim/survivor contained in police reports is not absolute; however the University uses its best efforts to protect the
identity of the Title IX victim/survivor and the intimate details of the report. Ohio law specifically permits the University to withhold the
identity of an uncharged suspect.
FERPA
In addition, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) protects students' educational records, including reports made to
the Deputy Coordinator and disciplinary complaints made to the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution. FERPA prohibits the
University from releasing these records to persons outside the institution without the student's consent except in response to a lawful
subpoena or as otherwise required by law. However, if the student-offender is found responsible for violating the Code of Student
Conduct-Sexual Misconduct or in some cases physical or mental abuse or harm, the University may release the following information to
anyone:
•
•
•
Name of the student-offender (but not the identity of the victim/survivor)
Code of Student Conduct violation (e.g., Section 103)
Sanctions imposed as a result of the disciplinary proceeding
Emergency Notification and Response
In the event of an emergency, contact Miami University Police at 911 to initiate the emergency
messaging system.
Emergency Response Procedures
The Office of Environmental Health and Safety, the University Police, and the University News and Communications Office receive
information from various offices and departments on campus. If the Miami Police or one of these offices confirms that there is an
immediate threat to the health or safety of some or all of the members of the campus community, the Police and University News and
Communications Office will determine the content of the message and either or both entities will use some or all of the methods
described below to communicate to the campus community or appropriate segment of the campus community.
The emergency messaging system may be initiated from on-campus and from remote locations. Miami will, without delay and taking
into account the safety of the community, determine the content of the emergency message and initiate the emergency messaging
system, unless issuing a message will, in the judgment of the Miami University Police or other responsible authorities, compromise
efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency situation.
For guidance on response to a variety of potential dangers, access Emergency Procedures (http://miamioh.edu/campussafety/emergency-procedures/index.html).
For more information and guidance on Emergency Preparedness and Response at Miami University Regionals please
seehttp://www.regionals.miamioh.edu/emergency/hamilton.htm for the Hamilton
Campus,http://www.regionals.miamioh.edu/emergency/middletown.htm for the Middletown Campus,
andhttp://www.regionals.miamioh.edu/emergency/voalc.htm for the Voice of America Learning Center.
Emergency Notification System—Notification of an Immediate Threat
Miami University maintains multiple systems for alerting the Miami community about campus emergencies and will use some or all of
those systems, depending on the circumstances. The university has contracted with Omnilert's e2Campus system to provide
emergency notification services to the university community via cell phone text messages and email. These notices also post to the
university homepage, portal, and police page. The Miami Emergency Text Messaging System is available to all Miami University
students, faculty, and staff. Their emails are automatically registered in the system.
To receive the text message option of this service, individuals must update their account through the University Police at
http://www.miamioh.edu/ens.
Emergency messaging will primarily be used only for those situations that pose an immediate threat to the health or safety of students
or employees on campus or for the closing of an entire campus or cancellation of classes (i.e., severe weather, chemical spills, fires,
and crimes). Messages about criminal activity generally will not be sent using these systems unless it is decided there is an imminent
threat of danger. In those cases where a crime has been reported and University Police determine that although there is no immediate
threat the crime represents a serious or ongoing threat to the campus community, a Crime Alert will be issued, as described
above. The victim's name and other personally identifying information will NOT be included in any Emergency Notification or
Crime Alert.
The emergency notification system is provided in addition to existing emergency notification procedures and does not replace or
eliminate any other emergency notification system (e.g., fire alarms, tornado sirens).
Miami will generally provide follow-up information to the community as appropriate via the university's website portal and/or text
message. Miami also provides information to parents via the Parents Office, which may choose to send e-mails and/or post information
on the Parents Office website, depending on circumstances.
Additional Communication
In the event of a significant on-campus emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of
students, faculty, or staff, the university will also post information on its homepage (http://www.miamioh.edu). The university has
access to an off-campus back-up server in the event the university’s computing services fail during an emergency.
In addition, in the case of an emergency the university can activate an alert service on its telephone system to send notice to all
administrative phones on one or all campuses. The university may also elect to alert the media (ie. local TV or radio stations) or use
listservs to deliver information. All Miami University Police vehicles are equipped with bullhorns.
Miami's University News and Communications Office is charged with notifying the media in the event of an emergency. Updated
information will be posted to the university’s website and provided to the media.
Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures
The Dean of Students and Miami Police Chief co-chair the Miami Institutional Response Team (IRT) which serves as the
interdisciplinary response team when there is concern that a student may pose a risk of substantial harm to the student or to others or
to property. The IRT consists of representatives of various campus offices, any one of whom may receive information about a
potentially distressed student or immediate safety concern. The IRT then works collaboratively to collate the available information about
a student and/or situation to determine the most appropriate intervention. The IRT is also charged with responding to incidents that may
present a risk of substantial disruption to the university community. The Miami University Police are responsible for determining whether
there is a significant emergency or dangerous situation on campus. An Employee IRT co-chaired by the Director of Academic
Personnel Services and the Associate Vice President for Human Resources meets to be similarly prepared for risks or emergencies
involving staff or faculty.
Miami Police Officers and members of the IRT have received training in the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Miami has
also established a Crisis Management Team (CMT) to carry out its crisis management plan. Among preparations developed to respond
in a disaster are large-scale power generators, communications via several means, a computer server off site in case Miami's is nonfunctioning, and police training in numerous dangerous situations. When a serious incident occurs that represents an immediate threat
to the campus the Miami University Police and Oxford Fire Department and Emergency Medical Services are typically the first
responders and will work together as needed to respond to an incident. Depending on the nature of the threat, other local or state, and
federal agencies may be involved in responding.
The IRT and its Care Team meet monthly during the academic year and also meet on an as-needed basis throughout the year. The
Office of Environmental Health and Safety coordinates at least one joint IRT and CMT announced or unannounced drill and exercise
per year and conducts follow-through activities designed for the assessment and evaluation of emergency plans and capabilities.
Emergency Drills, Testing and Evacuation Procedures
Evacuation drills are coordinated by the Office of Environmental Health and Safety each semester for all residence hall facilities on the
Oxford campus. A fire safety drill using simulated smoke is conducted for first-year residents. A second drill is coordinated each
semester for all residence halls. Thus, the emergency response and evacuation procedures are tested at least twice each year and, for
some of the buildings, up to four times per year. Evacuation routes are posted in each residence hall. First-year students also receive
on-line training regarding fire safety and building evacuation. Students learn the locations of the emergency exits in the buildings and
are provided guidance about the direction they should travel when exiting each facility for a short-term building evacuation. Designated
locations for long-term evacuations are affected by time of day, location of the building being evacuated, the availability of the various
designated emergency gathering locations on campus, and other factors such as the location and nature of the threat. The Miami
Police, Student Affairs staff and housing staff on the scene will communicate information to students regarding the developing situation
or any evacuation status changes.
The purpose of evacuation drills is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in case of an emergency. Miami uses online training and drills to educate and train occupants on issues specific to their residence hall. During the drill, occupants 'practice' drill
procedures and familiarize themselves with the location of exits and the sound of the fire alarm. In addition to educating the occupants
of each building about the evacuation procedures during the drills, the process also provides the University an opportunity to test the
operation of fire alarm system components.
Evacuation drills for residence halls are monitored by Environmental Health and Safety Office and Student Affairs staff.
Recommendations for improvements may be submitted to the appropriate departments/offices for consideration. Miami has protocols
for assisting people with different disabilities for safe evacuation. Protocols can be found on Miami's Emergency website
(http://miamioh.edu/campus-safety/emergency-procedures/index.html).
Miami also conducts regular announced tests of its emergency text messaging system in conjunction with publicized information about
registering for the service.
Students receive information about evacuation and shelter-in-place procedures during their first floor meetings and during other
educational sessions that they can participate in throughout the year. Student Affairs residential staff members are trained in these
procedures as well and act as an on-going resource for the students living in residential facilities.
For guidance on response to a variety of potential dangers, access Emergency website (http://miamioh.edu/campus-safety/emergencyprocedures/index.html)
For more information and guidance on Emergency Preparedness and Response at Miami University Regionals please
seehttp://www.regionals.miamioh.edu/emergency/hamilton.htm for the Hamilton
Campus,http://www.regionals.miamioh.edu/emergency/middletown.htm for the Middletown Campus,
andhttp://www.regionals.miamioh.edu/emergency/voalc.htm for the Voice of America Learning Center.
Annual Publication
General information about the University's response and evacuation procedures is publicized each year as part of its Campus Safety
Report, which is published as part of its compliance with the Clery Act.
Missing Student Policy
Any person who believes an Oxford campus student is missing should immediately notify the Miami University Police Department at
513-529-2222. In the event another University office receives a report of a missing Oxford campus student, that office is responsible for
immediately notifying the Miami University Police. The Miami University Police Department will make the determination as to whether a
student is missing. Upon receiving a report and determining that the student has been missing for 24 hours or more, the Miami
University Police will notify the contact person designated to be notified in the event that the student is determined to be missing, and
institution officials will notify the Oxford Police Department within 24 hours.
Student Emergency Contact Information
All students are required to provide the university with a telephone number (cellular phone or land line) at which they may be reached
during the academic year and for any summer terms in which they are enrolled. All students are required to provide the university with
emergency contact information including the name, address, and phone number (including a cell phone number if available) of a parent,
guardian, spouse, domestic partner, or other person to contact in the event of an emergency.
Students who do not reside on campus are required to provide the university with the street address of the residence in which they are
physically residing during the academic year and any summer terms in which they are enrolled.
In addition to registering a general emergency contact, Miami students living on campus have the option to provide the University with a
confidential contact to be notified in the event the student is determined to be missing for more than 24 hours. A student may register
the confidential contact during the course registration process on a secure university website. A missing student’s confidential contact
information will be accessible by campus officials and may be shared with law enforcement in the course of the investigation. In
addition, the university will notify the parents/guardians of any student who is under the age of 18 years and not emancipated if the
student is determined to be missing for 24 hours.
Building Security, Access, and Maintenance
Oxford Campus
During business hours, most facilities except residences are open to students, parents, employees, contractors, guests, and invitees.
Residence hall exterior and interior doors are locked 24/7 with access via residents' ID cards. In the case of periods of extended
closing, the university will admit only those with prior approval to the halls.
Other campus facilities have specified hours of operation and are secured at closing times. Faculty and staff may enter their
office/academic buildings after hours via electronic codes on their ID cards. Emergencies may necessitate changes or alterations to any
posted schedules.
University police officers actively patrol the campus. Shrubbery and trees are regularly trimmed to maintain a safe and attractive
landscape. All campus lighting is numbered to ensure accurate reporting and rapid repair of non-functioning lights. At least annually, a
committee of staff and students tours the campus to determine where additional lighting may be needed. For more information, visit the
Miami University Police web page on Safety Tips and Resources (http://miamioh.edu/police/safety-tipsresources/lightingcallboxes/index.html).
Hamilton Campus
The Hamilton campus has no residential facilities. Academic buildings are open during class hours and are typically secured by 10:30
p.m. The campus is patrolled 24/7 by Securitas, a private security company hired by the University. For more information, visit
www.regionals.miamioh.edu/security.
Middletown Campus
The Middletown campus has no residential facilities. Academic buildings are open during class hours and are typically secured by
10:30 p.m. The campus is patrolled 24/7 by Securitas, a private security company hired by the University. For more information, visit
www.regionals.miamioh.edu/security.
Voice of America Learning Center
The Voice of America campus has no residential facilities. Academic buildings are open during class hours and are typically secured by
10:30 p.m. when classes are in session. The campus is patrolled Monday through Thursday, 5 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. by Securitas, a
private security company hired by the University. For more information, visit www.regionals.miamioh.edu/security.
Greentree Health Science Academy
The Greentree Health Science Academy campus has no residential facilities. The building is accessible only by the front entrance and
accessible to registered students, faculty and staff by their key card. Visitors and those without key cards must be buzzed into a
reception area and sign in and out. The campus is patrolled regularly by local police.
Luxembourg Campus
The Luxembourg campus has no residential facilities. Academic buildings are open during class hours and are typically closed by 10
p.m. Monday–Thursday and 5 p.m. on Friday when class are in session. Campus is closed to students on weekends. The campus is
patrolled regularly by local police.
University Police Authority and Jurisdiction
The Miami University Police is located in the Police Services Center, 4945 Oxford-Trenton Road (SR 73), near Ditmer Parking Lot.
Miami University Police officers are fully sworn and armed law enforcement officers empowered to investigate alleged criminal activity,
search and arrest as authorized by law, and use necessary and reasonable force to enforce the law and protect persons and property.
They evaluate reported crimes, conduct investigations, and effect arrests.
Miami University Police enforce all state and local laws, including underage drinking, controlled substances, and rape or other forms of
sexual assault. They are responsible for enforcing laws on all university-owned property and work cooperatively with the Oxford police
and other local law enforcement agencies. Mutual aid agreements are in place with several local law enforcement agencies and can be
found on the Police Department's website by accessing www.miamioh.edu/police/community-policing/mutual-aid-agreements. When a
major crime occurs, the police chief of either jurisdiction may request assistance of the other police department.
The Miami University Police also work cooperatively with the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution to enforce Miami's Code
of Student Conduct.
Regional campus (Hamilton, Middletown, and Voice of America Learning Center) security is provided by contracted security personnel
who are not sworn police officers and do not have arrest authority. The Hamilton City Police Department has law enforcement authority
at the Hamilton campus, the Middletown City Police Department has law enforcement authority at the Middletown campus and
Greentree Health Science Academy, the West Chester Police Department has law enforcement authority at the Voice of America
Learning Center, and the Police Grand-Ducale, Luxembourg has law enforcement authority at the Luxembourg campus.
All persons are encouraged to promptly and accurately report criminal activity to police.
Criminal Activity Non Campus
The University does not own any non-campus residences of recognized student, fraternity, or sorority organizations. The City of Oxford
has law enforcement responsibility for privately owned non-campus fraternities and sororities. The City of Oxford and the University do,
however, have a mutual aid agreement. As a result, Miami police officers may assist the Oxford Police Department with non-campus
incidents. Oxford Police also communicate with University officials when non-campus student organizations are engaged in noncampus criminal incidents. In accordance with the Code of Student Conduct, Miami University will address non-campus conduct when
the behavior or the presence of the individual or student organization, in the University's sole judgment, impairs, interferes, or obstructs
the mission, processes, or functions of the University.
Campus Crime Prevention and Security Awareness
Programs
The Miami University Police patrol the Oxford campus 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, using cars, bikes, and officers on foot. Campus
Security (Securitas) patrols the Hamilton and Middletown campuses 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, on foot and in vehicles. Campus
Security (Securitas) patrols the Voice of America Learning Center Monday through Thursday, 6 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. on foot.
Emergency phones have been placed in locations throughout the campuses. Police encourage all members of the community and
visitors to report safety concerns to police.
The University Police distribute throughout the Oxford campus flyers promoting personal safety and alerting people to specific crimes or
problems. The Institutional Response Team distributes safety awareness information online, miamioh.edu/emergency, and in printed
materials, to students and employees. The Business Services and Student Affairs offices do the same thing for the Hamilton and
Middletown campuses.
The University Police has a team of officers dedicated to community relations and crime prevention that coordinates numerous security
awareness programs for the campus community, specifically to encourage students and employees to be responsible for their own
security and the security of others. Paper information, such as flyers and pamphlets, are distributed regularly from the station, through
campus mail, and at fairs to provide crime prevention tips and information.
The following security awareness and crime prevention programs were provided by Miami University Police during calendar year 2014:
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Alcohol Safety/Awareness related programs for students. Seven sessions conducted upon request
Drug Abuse Education related program for students. One session conducted upon request
New Student Orientation that provided general safety awareness, crime prevention, alcohol rules, and fire safety information to
students. Information provided annually during seven sessions of orientation
• General safety awareness and crime prevention information provided to current students upon request during eighteen sessions
• Workplace Safety that provided general safety awareness to staff. One sessions conducted upon request
• International Student Orientation that provided general safety awareness and crime prevention information to international students.
Information provided annually during three sessions of orientation
• Self Defense Training was provided to students and staff. Fourteen sessions for students was conducted upon request
• Campus Safety Day that provided general safety awareness, crime prevention information, and emergency information to current
students. This program was conducted once
• Fire Safety Fair that provided general fire safety information to student and staff. This program was conducted annually during four
sessions.
Additional information regarding emergency preparedness and procedures, including what to do in the event of an active shooter is
available at www.miamioh.edu/campus-safety/emergency-procedures. Also, three videos on personal safety are available for check-out
from King Library, and the department also loans engravers, provides property logs, and videotapes possessions. All services are
provided at no charge. Fire safety policies, procedures, and statistics can be found at http://miamioh.edu/campus-safety/annualreport/fire-safety/index.html and http://miamioh.edu/campus-safety/annual-report/fire-statistics/index.html.
Resources and Victims' Assistance Available to Students and
Employees
Miami has developed a Title IX Protocol for Students and a Title IX Protocol for Employees. These documents provide information
about existing counseling, health, mental health, victim advocacy, legal assistance, visa and Immigration assistance and other services
for victims with Miami and in the community. The Title IX Protocol for Students is available in English, Spanish and Chinese. Each
year, the President sends an email to all employees notifying them of the Title IX Protocol for Employees.
The Title IX Coordinator (for employees), Ms. Kenya Ash ([email protected], 513- 529-7157) and the Sexual Assault Response
Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinator (for students), Ms. Rebecca Getson ([email protected], 513-529-1870) provide
victims with written notification regarding available assistance in changing academic, living, transportation and working situations. This
information is also included in the written Title IX Protocols for Students and Employees.
Safety Programs
These tips can help to ensure your safety:
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Update your registration with the Miami Emergency Notification System (www.miamioh.edu/ens) to receive emergency text
notification in situations on campus that pose immediate danger.
• Use the BCRTA SafeRide (formerly Nighttime Door-to-Door) service.
-Oxford campus, (513) 785-5237 or toll-free (855)42-BCRTA (operates from 11 p.m. until 3 a.m. M–Sat. and until 1 a.m. Sun)
-Hamilton campus, 513-785-3222 (campus security)
-Middletown campus, 513-727-3333 (campus security)
• Use the free Miami bus system run by BCRTA (operates until 1 a.m. Sun-Th and until 3 a.m. F-Sat).
You can also take advantage of the following resources promoting safety and awareness:
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Miami Police provides presentations to small groups on a variety of safety topics and engraves and videotapes personal property.
Call 513-529-2222.
Miami Police provides a variety of crime prevention tips (http://miamioh.edu/police/safety-tips-resources/crimeprevention/index.html),
ranging from traveling alone to facts concerning Rohypnol.
Miami Police offers a 12-hour Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) training to women. Cost is $30, which includes the RAD manual,
certificates, and supplies. Call 513-529-2222.
Men Against Rape and Sexual Assault (MARS) addresses rape as a men’s issue. Male students meet in small, all-men’s groups to
discuss how men can make a difference. Call John Ward, Student Counseling Service, at 513-529-4634 for information on
scheduling a session or joining the group.
Code of Student Conduct
The Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution is responsible for administering the Code of Student Conduct (see The Student
Handbook), which applies to students on all Miami campuses. The Code outlines the rights and responsibilities of students, behaviors
prohibited on and off campus, possible sanctions, and the procedural rights of students and student organizations.
This code applies to all undergraduate students, graduate students, fraternities and sororities, and student organizations of Miami
University. The Code of Student Conduct primarily prohibits misconduct on University premises (buildings or grounds owned, leased,
operated, controlled, or supervised by the University, including the Miami University Dolibois European Center, the Miami University
Hamilton campus, the Miami University Middletown campus, the Voice of America Learning Center, and the Greentree Health Science
Academy), but may address off-campus conduct when the behavior or the presence of the individual, in the University's sole judgment,
impairs, obstructs, or interferes with the mission, processes, or functions of Miami University. Students should be aware that Miami
University reserves the right to review and take disciplinary action based on conduct occurring off campus or between academic
periods.
The standard of evidence used to determine responsibility is a "preponderance" of evidence. A preponderance of the evidence is the
evidence that has the most convincing force; the greater weight of credible evidence. We consider all the testimony presented at the
hearing (including the incident report, statements from the accused and the victim, if applicable, and statements of witnesses) and then
look at each charge individually. A student is found responsible for violating the Code of Student Conduct if he or she admits to it or if
the evidence indicates that the person is responsible. A Student Conduct Hearing is an educational meeting - not a legal proceeding.
This standard of evidence essentially asks, "Is it more likely than not that our policy was violated?" If a student breaks a law that also
violates the University standards of conduct, that student may be held accountable by both civil authorities and the University. The
University may, at its sole discretion, elect to pursue disciplinary action against the student at the same time as criminal proceedings,
even if criminal charges involving the same incident are not complete, have been dismissed, or were reduced.
On Jan. 1, 1974, the Ohio Campus Disruption Act, which was originally introduced as House Bill 1219, became part of the Ohio
Revised Code. House Bill 1219 contained sections that pertain to "control of campus violence." The initiation of a 1219 proceeding
against a student does not prohibit the University from taking University disciplinary action against that same student under the Student
Conduct Regulations for the same conduct that gave rise to the 1219 proceeding. A student arrested for any of the 33 enumerated
offenses in House Bill 1219 will automatically be subject to disciplinary procedures.
Any person, agency, organization or entity may make a complaint to the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution alleging a
violation of the Code of Student Conduct. In addition, criminal acts such as sexual assault, assault, burglary, robbery, murder, and
motor vehicle theft may also be reported to the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution, which will contact the University Police.
The Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution is located in Room 9 Warfield Hall and can be reached at 513-529-1417.
Disclosure of Disciplinary Actions
To Victim of an Alleged Sex-Based Offense
Both the accuser and the accused will be simultaneously informed, in writing, of the outcome of any institutional proceeding that arises
from an allegation of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking. The accuser and the accused will also be informed
of the procedures to appeal the results of the disciplinary proceeding; of any changes to the results that occurs prior to the time that
such results become final; and when such results become final.
To Victims of an Alleged Perpetrator of a Crime of Violence
Upon request, the victim of an alleged perpetrator of an alleged crime of violence will be advised of the final results (whether the
accused was found responsible and if so, the sanction imposed) of the disciplinary proceeding.
To All Others
If the accused student: 1) is an alleged perpetrator of a crime of violence or non-forcible sex offense; and 2) has been found
responsible for violating the Code of Student Conduct, the University may release the following information to anyone:
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name of the student
the Code of Student Conduct violation (e.g., Section 103)
the final results of the disciplinary proceedings
THE UNIVERSITY WILL NOT RELEASE THE NAME OF THE VICTIM OR THE NAME OF ANY OTHER STUDENT-WITNESS IN A
STUDENT CONDUCT HEARING WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT OF THAT STUDENT OR AS OTHERWISE
PERMITTED BY LAW.
If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of such crime or offense, the next of kin of such victim will be treated as the alleged victim
for the purpose of this policy.
Alcohol, Drug, and Substance Abuse Policies
The following information is provided in response to the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (Public Law
101-226), which require that the university show that it has adopted and implemented a program to prevent the illicit use of drugs and
the abuse of alcohol by students and employees. The university must certify that it is in compliance with this law in order to receive any
Federal funds. The law requires, in part, the annual distribution of the following descriptive statements to each university student and
employee. There is no distinction between full-time and part-time or permanent and temporary students and employees.
The unlawful possession, use, consumption or distribution of drugs and/or alcohol by students or employees on university property or
as a part of any university activity is prohibited. Violators will be prosecuted in accordance with applicable laws and ordinances and will
be subject as well to disciplinary actions by the university, in conformance with the Miami University Information and Policy
Manual [PDF 1.8MB] and/or sections 2.1.E, 2.1.F, 2.2.E, and 4.4 of The Student Handbook [PDF 2.1MB] included in the sections
below. Sanctions for violations may include suspension, and/or termination/dismissal, as well as compulsory attendance at drug/alcohol
education programs or other appropriate disciplinary measures.
For Students
Despite the fact that alcohol use is illegal for most college undergraduates, alcohol continues to be widely used on and around most
college campuses today. Miami is no exception. Miami's growing concern about the use and abuse of alcohol led to the adoption of
mandatory penalties for alcohol violations.
Legal and Responsible Use of Alcohol
The right to consume alcoholic beverages is limited through laws that establish minimum drinking ages, drinking and driving laws, and
so on. The possession or use of alcohol by anyone under 21 years of age in a public place or a place open to the public is illegal and
individuals in violation will be subject to sanctions by the University. The sale of alcohol to anyone under the legal age to purchase will
also be subject to sanctions by the University. Organizations or groups violating alcohol/substance policies or laws may also be subject
to sanctions by the University. Miami University also has established policies on alcohol use on campus and by campus groups and
strictly enforces them. It is incumbent on students to become knowledgeable regarding these policies, whether for individual decisionmaking or for planning programs and events for student organizations.
The Student Code of Conduct
Intoxication (105A)
Any student who is intoxicated or exhibits negative behavior associated with intoxication after using alcohol is in violation of this policy.
Prohibited Use of Alcohol (105B)
Alcohol may be consumed and/or possessed only by those of legal drinking age and only in authorized locations. On-campus use of
alcoholic beverages is restricted in accordance with applicable city and state laws, both in residence halls and in designated facilities.
Students are not permitted to have kegs or beer balls of alcoholic beverages or parties with alcohol in residence hall rooms. Underage
possession, consumption, consumption in unauthorized locations, or furnishing of alcoholic beverages to any person under legal age to
drink such beverages is prohibited.
Sanctions may be imposed singly or in combination on individuals, student organizations, and fraternities or sororities. A student may
be suspended or dismissed for a single violation. Multiple violations or additional violations of the Code of Student Conduct may result
in more severe sanctions.
No sanction will be imposed until all appeals are completed (see Chapter 4 Appeals). Failure to complete a sanction will result in
a hold on the student’s ability to register for subsequent semesters or to change a class schedule. Students are permitted to drop and
withdraw as provided in The Student Handbook [PDF 1.8MB]. Student organizations and fraternities and sororities will not be reinstated
until all sanctions are completed.
Students should be aware that disciplinary records may be reviewed by others within the University and may have adverse
consequences for those seeking the second-year residency exemption and/or enrollment in study-abroad opportunities.
Penalties for Alcohol Violations
Intoxication or Negative Behavior Involving the Use of Alcohol
Any student who is intoxicated or exhibits negative behavior after using alcohol is in violation of this policy.
Minimum Penalties:
First Offense. The minimum penalty for a first offense is mandatory attendance at a four-hour substance abuse education program and
a minimum fee of $200 to the student for the program as well as mandatory participation in a comprehensive substance abuse
assessment and a minimum fee of $250 to the student for the assessment. Further intervention and an opportunity to participate in
group sessions may be recommended by the counselor. There will be no additional fee to the student for participation in the group
sessions at the Student Counseling Service.
Second Offense. Suspension from the University, either immediately or at the close of the current semester/term, for a minimum of
either fall or spring semester and may also include summer and/or winter term. (Note that a student may not be suspended solely for
either summer and/ or winter term.)
If a student is suspended as a result of alcohol violations and subsequently returns to Miami University, another violation of the alcohol
policy may result in dismissal. Registration for subsequent semesters will be withheld until the student complies with the penalties
assessed for the first offense. If a student has been officially found to have committed an alcohol offense and two calendar years have
elapsed without a subsequent finding for such an offense, a prior offense will be considered in determining the current penalty but the
minimum penalty is not mandatory. For multiple violations of the Student Conduct Regulations, additional penalties may be warranted
and imposed in accordance with normal University disciplinary procedures.
Good Samaritan Policy - In the event the student incurs an alcohol violation during the twelve- month period following the Good
Samaritan report, the prior file may be reviewed as part of the sanctioning process but will not be counted as a prior alcohol offense for
the purpose of imposing mandatory minimum sanctions.
Prohibited Use of Alcohol
Minimum Penalties:
First Offense. The minimum penalty for a first offense is required attendance at a two-hour substance abuse program designed to
acquaint students with their civil and legal responsibilities as well as the personal and career implications of alcohol and other
substance abuse. There will be a minimum fee of $150 to the student for the program.
Second Offense. The minimum penalty for a second offense is mandatory participation in a comprehensive substance abuse
assessment and a minimum fee of $250 to the student for the assessment. Further intervention and an opportunity to participate in
group sessions may be recommended by the counselor. There will be no additional fee to the student for participation in the group
sessions at the Student Counseling Service.
Third Offense. Suspension from the University, either immediately or at the close of the current semester/term, for a minimum of either
fall or spring semester and may also include summer and/or winter term. (Note that a student may not be suspended solely for either
summer and/ or winter term.)
If a student is suspended as a result of alcohol violations and subsequently returns to Miami University, another violation of the alcohol
policy may result in dismissal. Registration for subsequent semesters will be withheld until the student complies with the penalties
assessed for the first or second offenses. If a student has been officially found to have committed an alcohol offense and two calendar
years have elapsed without a subsequent finding for such an offense, a prior offense will be considered in determining the current
penalty, but the minimum penalty is not mandatory. For multiple violations of the Student Conduct Regulations, additional penalties may
be warranted and imposed in accordance with normal University disciplinary procedures.
Multiple Alcohol Violations Involving Prohibited Use of Alcohol and Intoxication
The minimum penalty for any combination of three alcohol violations is suspension from the University; either immediately or at the
close of the semester/term for a minimum of either fall or spring semester and may also include summer and/or winter term. (Note that
a student may not be suspended solely for either summer and/or winter term.)
Drug Use
The use, offer for sale, sale, distribution, possession, or manufacture of any controlled substance or drug except as expressly permitted
by law is prohibited. The use, offer for sale, sale, distribution, possession, or manufacture of chemicals, products, or materials for the
purpose of use as an intoxicant (such as glue or paint) except as expressly permitted by law is also prohibited. Possession of drug
paraphernalia is also prohibited. Such laws are strictly enforced by the Miami University Police Department. Violators are subject to
University disciplinary action, criminal prosecution, fine and/or imprisonment.
Prohibited Use of Drugs (106A)
The use, offer for sale, sale, distribution, possession, or manufacture of any controlled substance or drug except as expressly permitted
by law is prohibited. The use, offer for sale, sale, distribution, possession, or manufacture of chemicals, products, or materials for the
purpose of use as an intoxicant except as expressly permitted by law is also prohibited. Examples of prohibited behavior include huffing
or sniffing glue or paint and the use of nitrous oxide (whip-its).
Possession of Drug Paraphernalia (106B)
Possession of drug paraphernalia is also prohibited. Drug paraphernalia as it applies in this section means any equipment, product, or
material of any kind that is used in propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing,
processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, storing, containing, concealing, injecting, ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise
introducing into the human body a controlled substance.
Alcohol and Other Drug Education
Miami University encourages education as the first step in assisting students to take responsibility for their behavior and to understand
the consequences of current and future behavior as it relates to drug and alcohol use.
Miami University requires all first-year students to participate in AlcoholEdu, an online educational program, prior to coming to campus.
AlcoholEdu is a population-based prevention strategy (as defined by the National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism) to
educate students about alcohol use, abuse and protective factors to minimize high-risk alcohol behaviors. In addition, Miami makes
available the CHOICES educational programs for high-risk student populations, such as Greek organization members and student
athletes. In addition, the Office of Student Wellness conducts awareness campaigns during National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness
Week.
When students are sanctioned for violations, Miami University mandates one of two education programs, the Alternatives Program and
the Chemical Abuse Education Program.
The Alternatives Program is a two-hour program that focuses on decision-making and responsible actions around alcohol use. The
Chemical Abuse Education Program (CAEP), which is a four-hour program, focuses more specifically on drug use, abuse, and
dependence. The primary focus of each program is to help students gain a broader knowledge regarding alcohol and other drug use by
providing factual information about alcohol and other drug use and the negative consequences that may result from chemical use. Each
program encourages abstinence and informs students of the health risks involved with continued use or abuse of alcohol or other
drugs. These education programs also help students examine attitudes and influences, both internal and external, which affect their
choices regarding chemical use.
Such programs support Miami's drug-free policy and employees and students are informed of Miami's drug-free policy and its
implications. Employees are offered smoking cessation programs and, through an employee assistance program, counseling on alcohol
or drug abuse, among other benefits.
Counseling, Treatment and Rehabilitation Services
Substance Use Assessment
When a student is charged with a second Code 105B or 106B violation, or first Code 105A or 106A violation the student is referred for a
substance use assessment (see Code of Student Conduct Handbook for details about code violations). The Student Counseling
Service (SCS) works in conjunction with the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution to provide these assessments to full-time
Miami University students. The recommendations resulting from the substance use assessment are strictly confidential and not a part of
the student's academic record. Students need to plan to spend 60-90 minutes, to complete the assessment. Students are charged
$250.00 for the substance use assessment, which appears on the student’s bursar account. Alcohol/drug assessments do not have to
be completed at SCS. Students may contact SCS at (513) 529-4634 for either scheduling a substance use assessment or to get a list
of private community practioners and drug and alcohol treatment facilities.
Once an appointment is made, the student is expected to attend. If the student does not come to the appointment, she/he will be
charged a $25.00 no-show fee and will not be permitted to reschedule their appointment with SCS and will be required to schedule their
substance use assessment with a private community provider or drug and alcohol treatment facility.
Group Counseling
Transformations Group
This group is for students contemplating making changes in their alcohol/drug use. This is a five session psycho-educational
group. Members will examine their substance use and how it impacts their academics, relationships, personal goals. Students may be
self referred to group, or referred by the court system, parents, or Miami University. Upon court approval, this group can be used to
fulfill 10 hours of substance use education. Any information disclosed in group about the misuse of legal or illegal substance use is
strictly confidential.
Life Choices Group
This group is for students who have concerns about substance use (alcohol, marijuana, etc.) and have committed to making changes in
their drug/alcohol use. This is a therapy group that runs for an entire semester. The focus is on identifying how substance use
influences daily life and functioning. The group will also discuss how substance use may be interfering with personal goals,
relationships, etc. Any information disclosed in group about the misuse of legal or illegal substance use is strictly confidential.
AA Meetings Near Campus
Every Monday night at 8:00 PM there is an open Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meeting in United Campus Ministries, 16 South Campus
Ave. Oxford, OH.
Medication Assisted Treatment of Addiction
Students that have problems with alcohol or drugs may have difficulty staying sober. The staff psychiatrist at Miami University
prescribes many different medications to assist in recovery including Naltrexone (Vivitrol, Revia), Buprenorphine/Naloxone (Suboxone,
Zubsolv ), Disulfuram (Antabuse), and Varencycline (Chantix). These medications can assist with recovery from substances including
alcohol, pain pills, heroin, and nicotine.
The Psychology Department
Operates a fee-for-service clinic located in the Psychology Building (room 39). Sessions are $25.00 each. Therapists are students in
the doctoral program in clinical psychology at Miami University. If the fee poses a hardship, you are encouraged to speak to the
therapist with whom you meet to discuss this issue. Appointments may be scheduled in the Psychology Clinic by calling the clinic
directly at 513-529-2423.
24-Hour Crisis Hotline (513-523-4146)
The Community Counseling and Crisis Center (CCCC) has a 24-hour crisis service that is staffed by paraprofessionals. This 24-hour
hotline is available to assist callers who are facing a wide variety of concerns. CCCC employs a staff of professional counselors
including licensed social workers. CCCC operates on a sliding scale fee, thus it is possible that a lower fee may be negotiated. You can
schedule an appointment at CCCC by calling 513-523-4149 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The office is located at 110 S.
College Avenue, Oxford, OH 45056.
For Employees
Drug-Free Workplace – from the Miami University Information and Policy Manual
Purpose
Miami University is dedicated to providing a safe, healthy, and efficient work place for its employees and for the entire University
community. Therefore, Miami University recognizes that one of its most important obligations to its employees and students is to
maintain a completely alcohol- and drug-free workplace.
Policy
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
The illegal use of drugs or alcohol in the workplace or on University property or as part of any University activity is strictly
prohibited.
Employees may not be under the influence of drugs or alcohol in the workplace.
The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of a controlled substance on University property or as
part of any University activity is strictly prohibited.
Students and employees must notify Miami University of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring on University
property no later than five (5) days after such conviction.
Any student who violates any portion of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action, including suspension or dismissal, under
theCode of Student Conduct. Any employee who violates any portion of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action up to and
including discharge under the appropriate disciplinary procedures.
The University reserves the right to include completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program as a disciplinary sanction.
For a description of the applicable legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law for the unlawful possession, use, or distribution
of illicit drugs and alcohol, the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol or a description of drug
and alcohol counseling, treatment, rehabilitation, or reentry programs that are available to employees or students, please consult
Miami’s annual publication, Your Right to Know.
Drug Testing
(policy effective 1-9-2014 per President Hodge)
Miami University is dedicated to providing a safe, healthy, and efficient work place for its employees and for the entire University
community. As a result, Miami University recognizes that one of its most important obligations is to maintain a drug and alcohol-free
workplace. Reasonable Cause and Post-Accident drug and alcohol testing may only be conducted pursuant to properly adopted workplace rules or a collective bargaining agreement. Employees are encouraged to take advantage of the University’s employee
assistance program (EAP) for substance abuse issues.
Counseling, Treatment and Rehabilitation Services
24-Hour Crisis Hotline (513-523-4146)
The Community Counseling and Crisis Center (CCCC) has a 24-hour crisis service that is staffed by paraprofessionals. This 24-hour
hotline is available to assist callers who are facing a wide variety of concerns. CCCC employs a staff of professional counselors
including licensed social workers. CCCC operates on a sliding scale fee, thus it is possible that a lower fee may be negotiated. You can
schedule an appointment at CCCC by calling 513-523-4149 between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The office is located at 110 S.
College Avenue, Oxford, OH 45056.
Employee Assistance Programs
Employees covered under Miami's group life insurance policy issued by Liberty Mutual are eligible for two employee assistance
programs (EAP).
MyLibertyAssist
Online: www.bensingerdupont.com/MLA (password: MLASSIST)
Telephone: 1-877-695-2789 (1-877MYLBRTY)
Life Services
Access: http://lm.bdalifeservices.com (Username: mllife)
Laws
The following is a description of some of the applicable legal sanctions under federal, state, and local laws for the unlawful possession,
use, or distribution of illicit drugs, including alcohol, as of June 1, 2005. This list is not intended to be an exhaustive list of all offenses
involving drugs and alcohol, and this material should not be relied upon as legal advice or guidance regarding these offenses.
Federal Law
Federal law prohibits, among other things, the manufacturing, distributing, selling and possession of controlled substances as outlined
in 21 United States Code, Sections 801 through 971. Depending on the amount, first offense maximum penalties for trafficking
marijuana range from five years' imprisonment and a fine of $250,000 to imprisonment for life and a fine of $4 million. Again, depending
on the amount, first offense maximum penalties for trafficking other controlled substances (e.g. methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine,
cocaine base, PCP, LSD, fentanyl and fentanyl analogue) range from five years to life imprisonment and fines range from $2 to $4
million. First offense penalties and sanctions for the illegal possession of small amounts of controlled substance range from up to one
year in prison or a fine of at least $1,000.
State Law
Ohio Revised Code (ORC) Section 2925.02 provides that no person shall knowingly corrupt another with drugs by inducing or forcing
them to use a controlled substance.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Mandatory imprisonment from 6 months to 10 years, depending upon amount and type of drug
involved and history of previous drug abuse offenses.
ORC 2925.03 provides that no person shall knowingly "traffick" in controlled or illicit substances, including marijuana. Trafficking
includes selling, offering to sell, delivering, distributing, preparing, cultivating, and manufacturing of controlled substances.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Mandatory fines range from $100 to $20,000, depending on offense and drug involved. Mandatory
jail sentences range from 6 months to 10 years.
ORC 2925.11 provides that no person shall knowingly obtain, possess, or use a controlled substance.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Drug abuse involving amounts of marijuana less than 100 grams carries a penalty of $100. Other
violations involving marijuana result in mandatory jail terms of not more than 8 years and mandatory fines of $15,000. Drug abuse
offenses involving other drugs may result in jail terms of up to 10 years and fines of $20,000.
ORC 2925.12 provides that no person shall make obtain, possess, or use drug abuse instruments.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: A first offence can carry a jail term of up to 90 days and fines of $750.
ORC 2925.14 provides that no person shall knowingly use, possess with purpose to use, sell, manufacture or advertise drug
paraphernalia.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Depending upon the facts, imprisonment up to 6 months and fines up to $1,000.
ORC 2925.31 provides, except for lawful research, clinical, medical, dental, or veterinary purposes, no person with intent to induce
intoxication or similar effect, shall obtain, possess, or use a harmful intoxicant.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Up to $1,000 and 6 months in jail. ORC 2925.37 provides that no person shall knowingly possess,
make, sell, or deliver counterfeit controlled substances.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Depending upon the facts, the penalty can be up to 180 days in jail and a $1,000 fine, but
aggravating circumstances can cause the offense to become a felony of the fourth degree with prison terms between 6-18 months
and a fine up to $5,000. State law, alcohol ORC 4301.63 provides that no person under the age of 21 years shall purchase beer
or intoxicating liquor.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: A fine of not less than $25 nor more than $100 may be imposed. The court may order that the fine
be paid by the performance of public work at a reasonable hourly rate established by the court and shall designate the time within
which the public work shall be completed.
ORC 4301.631 provides that no underage person can purchase low alcohol beverages, that no person may furnish low alcohol
beverages to an underage person, and that no person shall allow underage persons to consume low alcohol beverages on his/her
property.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Punishments for violating ORC 4301.631 range from fines of $25 to $250 and imprisonment up to
30 days.
ORC 4301.633 provides that no person shall knowingly furnish any false information as to the name, age, or other identification of any
person under 21 years of age for the purpose of obtaining beer or intoxicating liquor for a person under 21 years of age, by purchase or
as a gift.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months
and a $1,000 fine.
ORC 4301.634 provides that no person under the age of 21 years shall knowingly show or give false information concerning his name,
age, or other identification for the purpose of purchasing or otherwise obtaining beer or intoxicating liquor in any place in this state
where beer or intoxicating liquor is sold under a permit issued by the department of liquor control.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months
and a $1,000 fine.
ORC 4301.64 prohibits the consumption of any beer or intoxicating liquor in a motor vehicle.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor of the fourth degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 30
days and a $250 fine.
ORC 4301.69(A) prohibits selling beer or intoxicating liquor to a person under the age of 21 years, or buying it for or furnishing it to such
a person.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a fine of not
less than $500 and no more than $1,000.
ORC 4301.69(E) provides that no underage person shall knowingly possess or consume any beer or intoxicating liquor, in any public or
private place, unless he is accompanied by a parent, spouse, or legal guardian, who is not an underage person, or unless the beer or
intoxicating liquor is given for medical or religious purposes.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months
and a $1,000 fine.
ORC 4511.19 prohibits any person from driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol and/or any drug of abuse.
PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months
and a $1,000 fine, in addition to license suspension. Penalties for repeat offenders can result in up to 5 years in prison.
Local Law
The City of Oxford, the City of Hamilton, the City of Middletown, and West Chester Township enforce all the state criminal statutes cited
above. In addition, each of these cities list some additional sanctions for alcohol and other drug use, including without limitation,
prohibitions against: driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs; possession and consumption of alcohol while underage; providing
alcohol to underage persons; having an open container of alcohol in public places; possession of a controlled substance; purchasing
and consuming low-alcohol beverages by underage persons, using false representations by underage persons to obtain alcohol;
permitting the consumption of alcohol by underage persons at a person's property (including hotel rooms), and hosting a party where
alcohol or drug abuse occurs.
Sexual Assault and Interpersonal Violence
Prevention, Education, and Resources
Miami University takes safety of our students seriously. Miami strives to create an environment and culture that is safe for all community
members and is respectful of all individuals. Sexual and interpersonal violence prevention and response is crucial to creating a safe,
supportive, and healthy environment for students, faculty, and staff. This programming includes such topics as sexual assault, domestic
violence, dating violence, and stalking. Our programming starts with orientation in early summer for incoming students and their parents
and extends into the first semester and beyond.
Prior to the Start of School
All first-time incoming students on all campuses are required to take Haven: Understanding Sexual Assault. This online education
program is designed to use a population-level approach to educate all students on the issues associated with sexual assault and
relationship violence, taking into account their unique perspectives and experiences. Students are required to complete this program by
the first day of classes. To ensure all students complete the program, a hold is placed on their second semester registration.
All Residence Life Staff, including professional staff and resident assistants, receive training not only on responding to sexual and
interpersonal violence but also on what resources are available for prevention, education, risk reduction, and awareness.
Orientation
For at least nine years, incoming students and families at orientation have seen two presentations focused on relevant student issues
and concerns, including such topics as alcohol, sexual assault and interpersonal violence issues, inclusion, and respect. Both new
students and their families see a student-created presentation and a Community Expectations presentation facilitated by the Dean of
Students office and the Miami University Police, after which incoming students participate in peer discussions and parents/families have
a question and answer session with the Dean of Students staff member. Both the student-created and staff-presented sessions engage
new students and their families in conversations about alcohol and sexual and interpersonal violence and personal responsibility, in
order to help all students avoid unsafe situations. New students also attend debriefings with staff and SOULS (Student Orientation
Undergraduate Leaders) on related topics relevant to college transitions. Since 2012, each new student also receives a wallet-sized
emergency contact card, which lists the phone numbers, emails, and/or websites for university and community resources (e.g., local
rape crisis/domestic violence hotline, local hospital, university Student Counseling Service, university police).
In 2014, the Dean of Students office updated the Community Expectations presentation, which educates parents and students
regarding sexual and interpersonal violence and alcohol. This section now includes more specific information regarding the Office of
Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution, Title IX requirements, protocol for addressing and reporting offenses, consequences for
violations, and statistics about campus-related crimes. In addition, every student and family received a handout regarding Title IX,
confidential resources, non-confidential resources, prevention, education, and student organizations dedicated to preventing sexual and
interpersonal violence.Miami Police, the Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, and/or other administrators are on hand to answer
questions regarding community expectations and safety. Student Orientation Undergraduate Leaders (SOULs) continue to facilitate
small group discussions with new students after the Community Expectations session, and all new students continue to receive
emergency contact cards with important contact numbers. Our efforts are designed make it clear that the University takes sexual and
interpersonal violence seriously and promise to treat those who report such crimes with respect and dignity.
Start of the School Year
Personal safety and responsibility are among reminders mentioned in the Dean of Students’ letter that is disseminated to all students
before classes start each semester.
Programming is available upon request to student groups, classes, residence hall corridors, organizations, classes, and others
throughout the year.
For off-campus students, volunteer employees and town residents perform walkabouts before classes start, personally delivering
information that includes topics of safety and alcohol.
Miami University Police Department brings together multiple resources and support services in the form of a Campus Safety Fair in
September. This fair is open to all students, faculty, and staff.
Residence Hall Resources
Residence hall safety begins with the existence of resident advisors (RAs) on duty, electronic door locks, an escort policy, outside
doors being alarmed and programmed to sound if they are propped open.
1) All residence life staff, including RAs and professional staff, receives information and training on sexual and interpersonal violence
awareness, response, and resources, Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity (OEEO), and Title IX and Clery Act reporting obligations.
The Behind Closed Doors activity involves a number of scenarios related to these issues, and staff from Miami University Police
Department,Student Counseling Services, and the Sexual Assault Response Coordinator assists in this training.
2) All staff and students received electronic information that includes information about sexual and interpersonal violence prevention as
well as how to file a complaint and what to expect from the university.
3) RAs speak with students in their corridors at the start of every year about issues of campus safety (e.g., “if you see something, say
something”, not walking alone) and resources availability.
4) 2,962 first year students went through the fire safety fairs held this year, at which Miami University Police Department has one of the
stations where students stop to hear more information about all types of safety information regarding safety, resources, and services
were made available to all students participating in the fair.
5) At least one, and often more, bulletin boards in each of the 42 residence halls provide information on safety regarding alcohol and/or
sexual and interpersonal violence awareness and prevention.
6) The Residence Hall Association has done its annual lighting/walking check this fall. A small group of students/staff accompanied the
residence life director and representatives from physical facilities.
7) When RAs are on duty and safety issues or concerns are brought to their attention they are trained to respond safely and effectively
to all reports, including incidents of sexual and interpersonal violence.
Ongoing Programming
Miami provides a variety of prevention programming including: prevention, awareness, advocacy, risk reduction, bystander, initiatives,
campaigns, and others. By offering a variety of programs, Miami strives to create an environment and culture that is safe for all
community members and is respectful of all individuals as we work together to respond to and prevent sexual and interpersonal
violence.
Campus Wide-Initiatives
As part of our ongoing programming, Miami has several ongoing campus wide-initiatives that unify programs, departments, and
campuses.
It’s On Us
•
•
•
Launching in the spring of 2015, Miami is joining with national and state efforts partnering in the It’s On Us campaign.
It’s On Us is a cultural movement aimed at fundamentally shifting the way we think about sexual assault.
It’s On Us is a rallying cry inviting everyone to step up and realize that the solution begins with us. It’s a declaration that sexual
assault is not only a crime committed by a perpetrator against a victim, but a societal problem in which all of us have a role to play.
We are reframing sexual assault in a way that inspires everyone to see it as their responsibility to do something, big or small, to
prevent it. We are asking everyone to create an environment, be it a residence hall, a party, a club, or a sports team, or the
greater college campus, where sexual assault is unacceptable and survivors are supported.
I Am Miami
•
•
•
Based on Miami’s Code of Love and Honor, “I am Miami” is the phrase we use to define the culture to which we aspire and who
we are as Miamians. Our students are encouraged to reflect on the important individual choices they make at Miami, choices that
extend far beyond academics (and academic integrity) and into other dimensions of wellness and personal responsibility that have
huge implications for both their short term safety and their long run success.
Born of the Task Force for the Prevention of Sexual Assault, I Am Miami defines Miami as a community that cares for each other
and our community.
This University Campaign is designed to provide an opportunity for every member of the community to discuss and embrace a
culture of respect, inclusion, care, and personal responsibility.
Step Up!
•
•
The Division of Student Affairs, through the Office of Student Wellness, has begun offering bystander intervention training to
student groups including Greek organizations to make students aware of the importance of safely and effectively intervening when
they see dangerous or unacceptable behavior.
Miami is in the process of rolling out Step Up!, which is based on a national program adopted by more than 120 colleges and
universities nationwide. It has demonstrated success in helping students feel empowered to act and giving them a specific process
and resources to intervene in a safe, early, effective way in situations that could endanger the health and safety of others. Miami
has already received emails and correspondence from students who have shared powerful stories about using what they’ve
learned in earlier training sessions to help someone. Pilot training programs have been conducted with Greek student
organizations and athletes, with requests now coming in from other student organizations and classes to present StepUp!
Peer Education
HAWKS Peer Health Educators
•
Miami’s Health Advocates for Wellness Knowledge and Skills (HAWKS) Peer Health Educators – provide programing on healthy
relationships, safe sex, sexual and interpersonal violence and other wellness topics throughout the year. The mission of HAWKS
is to actively engage students to consider important issues related to their health and wellness by presenting factual, relevant
information that encourages them to honestly, realistically, and thoroughly reflect on their lifestyle and to help them make free and
healthy choices. Requested programming includes: “Sex in the Basement,” “Sexperts,” Understanding Sexual and Interpersonal
Violence,” and “Can I Kiss You: Date Safe Project.”
MARS
•
Men Against Rape and Sexual Assault (MARS) is a student organization which began in the 2001-2002 school year to address
rape as a men's issue. They are a group of men from many different areas of campus life who share a common belief. MARS
states violence against women, specifically sexual violence, has negative implications for all of society regardless of gender and
sexual violence against women is also a men’s issue. MARS main goals are to educate men on the seriousness of the issue, and
inform them of ways to prevent it.
WAVES
•
Women Against Violence and Sexual Assault (WAVES) is a group of women with a goal to promote awareness and education to
the Miami community surrounding rape, sexual assault, and sexual violence. That goal is accomplished through large and small
campus events, peer programming, and victim support. We strive to challenge the Miami community to consider the effects of
sexual and interpersonal violence on both an individual level and on our scholastic community. In working towards that end,
WAVES is concerned with promoting gender equality, autonomy, integrity, and an awareness of cultural bias that perpetrate the
acceptance of this crime. WAVES also aims to provide a refuge and resources to those who have previously been affected by
sexual and interpersonal violence.
Advocacy and Awareness
•
•
•
The Miami Women’s Center, in addition to providing a welcoming, safe space for all genders and a space for learning about
women's and gender issues, offers many resources and programming. Annually, the Women’s Center raises awareness and
education through The Clothesline Project. The Women’s Center provides a protocol for interns to respond to calls or walk-ins
related to sexual and interpersonal violence, for the last two years this intern protocol has been reviewed by the Sexual Assault
Response Coordinator.
Miami University Police will speak to student corridors or groups about personal safety and offer fee-based self-defense classes.
Miami Men and Masculinities Committee focuses on raising awareness and creating discussion regarding healthy masculine
identities. This committee has sponsored town hall meetings on campus with invited speakers to discuss identity development and
challenge hegemonic masculinities.
Clothesline Project
•
Address the issue of violence against women. It is a vehicle for individuals affected by violence to express and empower
themselves by decorating a shirt. They then hang the shirt on a clothesline to be viewed by others as testimony to the problem of
violence against women. This event is part of Domestic Violence Awareness month and Sponsored by the Women’s Center.
Walk A Mile in Her Shoes
•
International Men's March to Stop Rape, Sexual Assault & Gender Violence. A Walk a Mile in Her Shoes Event is an opportunity
for all genders to raise awareness in their community about the serious causes, effects and remediation to violence. This event
typically occurs once an academic year, either in April as part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month or October as part of Domestic
Violence Awareness Month.
Take Back the Night
•
Take Back the Night is a march against rape and sexual assault meant to empower the women of Miami University. Before the
march, The F Word facilitates Speakouts which allow students, faculty, staff, and community members to share their story (if they
wish) in a small group setting. This event occurs once per academic year and is sponsored by The F Word.
Warm and Fuzzy
•
Warm and Fuzzy is a social marketing awareness campaign about what makes relationships good and how to identify red flags.
This campaign is sponsored by HAWKS.
Denim Day
•
Denim Day occurs in Sexual Assault awareness month where individuals are encouraged to wear denim to raise awareness that it
doesn’t matter what someone is wearing, sexual assault is a crime and never the fault of the victim
One Billion Rising
•
For the first time in 2014, Miami University WAVES sponsored One Billion Rising, a global call to survivors of violence and those
who love them, on the Oxford Campus. On this day, WAVES provided information and awareness materials to the community
regarding sexual and interpersonal violence.
Targeted Audiences
Athletics
•
•
Intercollegiate athletics provides sexual and interpersonal violence awareness, prevention, and risk reduction sections within our
KNH112 class for freshmen student-athletes, led by Dr. John Ward (adviser for MARS - Men Against Rape and Sexual Assault)
and Rebecca Getson (adviser for WAVES - Women Against Violence and Sexual Assault).
Every team meets with MARS and WAVES annually for more specific programming geared toward that team’s specific needs, be
it alcohol education, identifying risk-taking behaviors, counseling, etc.
•
•
Every team meets with our NCAA compliance staff at the beginning of the year for NCAA rules education, and we also provide
education on resources regarding where to go and who they can talk to, both confidential and non-confidential.
The athletic academic support staff office displays materials for sexual and interpersonal violence awareness and resources in the
lobby area for student-athletes and staff.
Greek
•
•
Greek sororities and fraternities must adhere to adapted risk management strategies including that “No fraternity, sorority, or
council will tolerate nor condone any form of sexist or sexually abusive behavior on the part of its members, whether physical,
mental, or emotional. This is to include any actions that are demeaning to women or men, such as verbal harassment. The
chapters and councils will not tolerate sexual assault in any form.” All chapters must educate and instruct their members on the
risk management policy and face fines or other sanctions if they violate the policy.
In 2014, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Student Sexual Assault presented information at the Greek President/Risk
Management training regarding Title IX response, resources, and investigations.
Sexual Assault Prevention, Risk Reduction, and Awareness Programs
Miami University engages in comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming intended to respond to and prevent sexual
assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking that:
•
Is culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responds to community needs, and is informed
by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome
• Considers environmental risk and protective factors as they occur to the individual, relationship, institutional, community, and
societal levels
Educational programming consists of primary prevention and awareness programs for all incoming students and new employees and
ongoing awareness and prevention campaigns for students and employees that:
•
•
Identify sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking as prohibited conduct.
Define using definitions provided by the Department of Education, state law, and/or Code of Conduct, what behavior and actions
constitute consent to sexual activity in the State of Ohio and explain consent using the Student Code of Conduct.
• Provide a description of safe and positive options for bystander intervention. Bystander intervention means safe, effective, and
positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of harm,
including sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of
potential harm, evaluating the situation and options, and deciding what intervention is appropriate.
• Describe risk-reduction options. Risk reduction means options designed to decrease perpetration and bystander inaction, and to
increase empowerment for victims in order to promote safety and to help individuals and communities address conditions that
facilitate violence.
• Raise awareness of the prohibitive behavior and/or consent and healthy relationships. Awareness programs are those programs
that raise awareness of the various offenses, behaviors, and/or prosocial behaviors in regards to prevalence, statistics, normative
information, options, resources, services, or other areas of interest/concern.
• Encourage primary prevention. Primary prevention programs are designed to prevent an offense from occurring. Such
programs could include information regarding consent, healthy relationships, and positive prosocial behavior.
• Connect with Miami’s ongoing prevention awareness campaign. The ongoing prevention awareness campaign is a unifying,
continuing theme with the goal of preventing and raising awareness of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and
stalking; Miami’s campaign was discussed and developed in 2013 and 2014, with implementation of the ongoing campaign in fall
2014.
Miami University has developed an annual educational campaign consisting of presentations that include distribution of education
materials to new students; participating in and presenting information and materials during new employee orientation.
[Abbreviations for prohibitive behaviors in tables: SA- Sexual Assault; DoV- Domestic Violence; DaV- Dating Violence; SStalking; C- Consent; HR- Healthy Relationships; B- Bystander]
Employee Programs: Miami University offered the following primary prevention and awareness
program for all new employees in 2014–15
DATE
PROGRAM
LOCATION
PROHIBITIVE
BEHAVIOR
COVERED
PROSOCIAL
BEHAVIOR
REINFORCED
01/23/14
McGuffey Hall
SA, DoV,
DaV, S
C
01/24/14
McGuffey Hall
SA
C
05/20/14
Shriver Center
SA, DoV,
DaV, S
C
07/25/14
McGuffey Hall
SA, DoV,
DaV, S
C
08/07/14
Etheridge Hall
SA
C
08/13/14
Farmer School
of Business
SA, DoV,
DaV, S
C
Residence Life Resident Assistants Training—
Behind Closed Doors
08/18/14
Residence Hall
SA
C
HAWKS Training for Sexual and Interpersonal
Violence Education
09/24/14
Health Services
Center
SA, DoV,
DaV, S
C, HR
February 14,
June 28, August
13 and 20,
and September
22, 2014
Armstrong
Student Center;
Various; Farmer
School of
Business;
Housing/Dining
SA, DoV,
DaV, S
-
April 21 and 24,
September 17,
and October 7,
2014
MUPD and
Enrollment
Management
and Student
Success
SA, DoV,
DaV, S
-
Resident Assistant New Hire Training
Behind Closed Doors
SOUL Training
Residence Life Professional Staff Training
Residence Life Professional Staff Training—
Behind Closed Doors
Residence Life Resident Assistants Training
MUPIM 3.6: Policy for Preventing Harassment
and Discrimination Training
Duty to Report
Council of Academic Deans Title IX Reporting
Obligations
09/17/14
Oxford Campus
SA, DoV,
DaV, S
-
Employee Programs: Miami University offered the following ongoing awareness and prevention
programs for employees in 2014
DATE
PROGRAM
LOCATION
PROHIBITIVE
BEHAVIOR
COVERED
PROSOCIAL
BEHAVIOR
REINFORCED
April 21 and
24, 2014
Gross
Center
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
-
OESCR Officer Training—Part 1 for Sexual
Misconduct
Various
Warfield
Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
OESCR Officer Training—Part 2 for Physical or
Other Mental Abuse or Harm
Various
Warfield
Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
November 5
and 6, 2014
Middletown
and
Hamilton
Campus
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
08/25/14
Millett Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
-
Diversity Training
HAVEN Online Education
Presentation/Discussion
Athletic Team Coaches Training
New Student Programs: Miami University offered the following primary prevention and awareness
programs for all incoming students in 2014
PROGRAM
Orientation—Community
Expectations
Miami University Hamilton
Orientation Information Fair
DATE
LOCATION
PROHIBITIVE
BEHAVIOR
COVERED
PROSOCIAL
BEHAVIOR
REINFORCED
June 2014
Armstrong
Student Center
SA, DoV, DaV, S
C
July 2014
Hamilton
Campus
SA, DoV, DaV, S
-
Miami University Middletown
Orientation Information Fair
HAVEN: Understanding
Sexual Assault
July 2014
Middletown
Campus
SA, DoV, DaV, S
-
Pre-matriculation
(July/August)
Online
SA, DoV, DaV, S
C, HR, B
Student Programs: Miami University offered the following ongoing awareness and prevention
programs for students in 2014
LOCATION
PROHIBITIVE
BEHAVIOR
COVERED
Various—December
2013/January 2014
Shriver—Heritage
Room
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
05/05/14
Women's
Basketball
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
03/19/14
Women's Cross
Country/Track
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
04/28/14
Women's Field
Hockey
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
04/21/14
Women's Soccer
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
04/25/14
Women's
Softball
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
04/28/14
Women's
Skating
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
04/24/14
Women's
Swimming
& Diving
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
04/28/14
Women's Tennis
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
DATE
PROGRAM
Title IX Education and
Awareness Program
(Havighurst Residence Hall)
WAVES—Sexual and
Interpersonal Violence
Presentation
PROSOCIAL
BEHAVIOR
REINFORCED
05/08/14
Women's
Volleyball
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
04/12/14
McGuffey Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
-
03/18/14
Stoddard/Elliott
Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C, HR
02/05/14
Tabling Event
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
-
02/06/14
Gross Center
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
-
02/14/14
Central Quad
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
-
03/20/14
Armstrong
Student
Center
SA
C, HR
04/23/14
Central Quad
SA
-
08/28/14
Upham Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
09/15/14
Slant Walk
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
-
09/18/14
Armstrong
Student Center
SA
C
Criminology Course
Presentation
09/23/14
Upham Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
RAINN Day
09/25/14
Central Quad
SA
C
October 1, 2, and 3, 2014
Central Quad
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
-
Women and Gender
Studies: Sexual Assault
Awareness
Coffee House Lecture
Academic Success and
Wellness Day
Board of Trustees
One Billion Rising
Dear Sister, Author Lisa
Factora Borchers Visit
Denim Day
Air Force ROTC Briefing
WAVES Wellness Table
Campus Safety Fair
Clothesline Project
Walking Theatre Project
Discussion Group
10/09/14
Art Building
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
DV Awareness: What Can
You Do
10/15/14
Johnston Hall
DoV, DaV
C
Walk-A-Mile Awareness
Event
10/17/14
Cook Field
SA, DoV, DaV
C
Intro to Women Studies, SIV
Education
10/21/14
Benton Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C, HR
Sexual Assault Awareness
Teach In
10/22/14
Cook Field
SA, DoV, DaV
C
"Sin by Silence" Film
Screening
10/22/14
King Library
DoV, DaV
-
Domestic Violence/Intimate
Partner Violence Panel,
Miami University Hamilton
10/27/14
Wilks Conference
Center
DoV, DaV
-
"Black and Blue" Book
Discussion
10/29/14
King Library
DoV, DaV
-
11/06/14
Culler Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
11/18/14
Presser Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C
11/20/14
Armstrong
Student Center
SA
C
02/12/14
Swing Hall
SA
C, HR
02/12/14
Scott Hall
SA
C, HR
03/16/14
Dorsey Hall
SA
C, HR
04/01/14
Thomson Hall
SA
C, HR
03/05/14
Bishop Hall
SA
C, HR
Native American Women
Miami University Marching
Band SIV and Harassment
Reporting
RAINN DAY Display
Sex in the Basement Peer
Education
Step Up! Bystander
Education Program
03/19/14
Mary Lyon Hall
SA
C, HR
04/13/14
Richard Hall
SA
C, HR
09/16/14
1st year hall
SA
C, HR
09/21/14
1st year hall
SA
C, HR
09/28/14
1st year hall
SA
C, HR
10/13/14
1st year hall
SA
C, HR
10/21/14
1st year hall
SA
C, HR
10/29/14
Sophomore hall
SA
C, HR
11/04/14
1st year hall
SA
C, HR
11/17/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR
11/17/14
1st year hall
SA
C, HR
11/18/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR
11/19/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR
11/20/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR
04/06/14
Oxford Campus
SA
C, HR, B
04/21/14
Upham Hall
SA
C, HR, B
10/20/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR, B
10/20/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/20/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/21/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR, B
10/21/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/21/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/22/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR, B
10/22/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/22/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/23/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR, B
10/24/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR, B
11/03/14
KNH 112
SA
C, HR, B
11/11/14
EDL 151
SA
C, HR, B
11/11/14
Sigma Nu
Fraternity
SA
C, HR, B
11/23/14
Student
Athletes
SA
C, HR, B
11/12/14
1st year hall
(Men)
SA
C, HR, B
10/20/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR, B
10/21/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR, B
10/22/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR, B
10/23/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR, B
10/24/14
EDL 110
SA
C, HR, B
11/11/14
EDL 151
SA
C, HR, B
11/12/14
1st year hall
(Men)
SA
C, HR, B
11/03/14
KNH 112
SA
C, HR, B
11/11/14
Sigma Nu
Fraternity
SA
C, HR, B
11/23/14
Student Athletes
SA
C, HR, B
10/20/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/20/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/21/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/22/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/22/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
10/21/14
UNI 101
SA
C, HR, B
Sex and Alcohol
03/19/14
Dorsey Hall
SA
C
Sexual Assault
03/19/14
Dorsey Hall
SA
C
04/10/14
Richard Hall
-
HR
04/30/14
McBride Hall
-
HR
04/06/14
Richard Hall
SA
C
11/12/14
Tappan Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C, B
Healthy Relationships
Personal Safety and
Accountability
11/20/14
Softball Team
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C, HR, B
11/21/14
Men's Track
Team
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C, HR, B
09/15/14
Sophomore hall
-
C, HR
09/18/14
1st year hall
-
C, HR
February 25, 27, and 28,
March 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11,
12, and 18, and April 7
and 8, 2014
McGuffey Hall and
Farmer School
of Business
-
C, B
Two programs each:
February 24, March 1, 8,
and 15, and April 9, 2014
McGuffey Hall and
Farmer School
of Business
-
C, B
10/19/14
Women's Center
SA
C
February 27 and 28 and
March 1, 2014
McGuffey Hall
SA, DoV, DaV,
S
C, HR
Sexual and Interpersonal
Violence—HAWKS Peer
Education
Sexperts Peer Education
Program
CHOICES—For New Greek
Members
Safer Sex
Vagina Monologues
Online Resources
Miami maintains advice, resources, and reports related to sexual and interpersonal violence and other personal crimes on Campus
Safety and Security, which has several links to emergency information, definitions, statistics, an acquaintance rape resource guide, and
more.
Included in Miami University’s mobile app, the Just In Case App provides information to students who are concerned about themselves
or a friend who might be at risk. This app is s customized for Miami and offers strategies for how to approach or interact with a friend
who you might be concerned about, as well as emergency information and resources in the area. The app can be downloaded if you go
to http://codu.co/aca32c on your smart phone.
Miami University Police Department maintains Promises to Victims of Crime, including the promise to treat sexual assault victims with
courtesy and dignity and spell out what happens when they report a crime.
Every year Miami reviews and updates the Title IX Protocol, formerly Sex-Based Offense Protocol. This Protocol is designed to provide
a guide for the University’s response efforts, including an explanation of confidentiality, adjudication, definitions, accommodations, and
etc.
Links to online resources:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Office of Student Wellness Sexual and Interpersonal Violence (http://miamioh.edu/student-life/student-wellness/sexual-relationalabuse/index.html)
Sexual and Interpersonal Violence, Safety and Security (http://www.miamioh.edu/campus-safety/sexual-assault/)
Title IX Protocol (http://www.miamioh.edu/campus-safety/sexual-assault/protocol/)
Student Counseling Services (http://miamioh.edu/student-life/student-counseling-service/)
Women’s Center (http://miamioh.edu/student-life/womens-center/)
Miami University Police Department (http://www.units.miamioh.edu/police/)
Staff and Faculty Assistance
University officials who have significant responsibility for student and campus activities are designated as Campus Security Authorities.
They are responsible for reporting of a crime of which they become aware, including sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence,
and stalking, to the Miami University Police Department immediately.
Miami’s Institutional Response Team (IRT) meets to plan and test safe practices for students and employees. The IRT alerts the
community to personal crimes including sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.
A variety of faculty teaches gender studies courses.
Title IX Efforts
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal law prohibiting discrimination on the basis of sex in higher education. Sex
discrimination includes sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.
Coordinators
Title IX Coordinator
•
The University’s Title IX Coordinator is Ms. Kenya D. Ash, Director of the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity, Hanna House,
Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056. Ms. Ash may be reached at 513-529-7157 or [email protected]
Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Student Sexual Assault
•
Ms. Rebecca Getson, Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, is the University’s Deputy Title IX Coordinator for matters related to
sexual violence. This includes sexual misconduct, sexual violence and sexual coercion of students. Ms. Getson may be reached
at 104 Health Services Center, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056, 513-529-1870 or [email protected]
Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Athletics
•
Ms. Jennifer A. Gilbert, Associate Athletic Director / Senior Woman Administrator / Director of NCAA Compliance is the
University’s Deputy Title IX Coordinator for matters related to equality of treatment and opportunity in Intercollegiate Athletics. This
includes athletic financial assistance, accommodation of interest and abilities and equity of athletic program benefits. Ms. Gilbert
may be reached at Millett Assembly Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056, 513-529-3113 or [email protected]
Task Force
Miami created a Task Force for the Prevention of Sexual Assault that was charged with soliciting input and crafting steps to be taken to
address climate related issues connected with sexual assault & violence. This Task Force issued several recommendations that are
now being utilized to enhance sexual assault awareness, prevention and response efforts; including the creation of a standing
Committee on Prevention and Response to Sexual Assault that will start meeting this fall.
Response Training
Title IX Coordinators, Deputies, and Investigators receive regular training to maintain expertise and continuing education.
All Residence Life Staff, including professional staff and resident assistants, receive training on duty to report for Clery and Title IX
purposes and supporting survivors of sexual and interpersonal violence.
Miami University Student Orientation Undergraduate Leaders (SOULs) receive yearly training prior to Orientation to appropriately
address, report, and lead discussions regarding sexual and interpersonal violence.
The university’s hearing board officers and members receive specialized training on sexual and interpersonal violence (including sexual
assault/misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking).
Supportive Services
Miami’s Student Counseling Services in Oxford and Counseling Services on the regionals provides confidential support for victims of
assault, including emergency counseling available 24 hours a day through Miami University Police dispatch.
In 2014, Miami University and Women Helping Women created and signed a Memorandum of Understanding to improve services,
support, and education in relationship to sexual and interpersonal violence. Women Helping Women provides confidential support for
survivors of sexual assault.
Student Health Services provides confidential outpatient care all eligible students. Services include general medicine and injury care,
gynecology, immunizations, laboratory and pharmacy. The goal of Student Health Services is to provide both medical care and
education that supports a healthy college experience.
Miami University, the City of Oxford, Miami University Police, and Oxford Police annually review and sign a Law Enforcement Mutual
Assistance Agreement.
Safety-Related Transportation
We remind students throughout the year to take action to return them home safely from uptown Oxford and beyond.
Miami's BCRTA SafeRide provides a safe escort for persons travelling alone during evening hours, operating until 3 a.m. Monday–
Saturday nights and until 1 a.m. Sunday night. Students can call BCRTA at (513) 785-5237 or toll-free (855) 42-BCRTA for this service.
Sexual Offender Registration
Under Ohio's Sex Offender Registration and Notification (SORN) law, responsibility for registration of sexual predators has been
assigned to the sheriff's office. For information concerning the presence of registered sex offenders, visit the Butler County Sheriff's
Office athttp://www.butlersheriff.org/general-info/sex-offender-info/.
Title IX Protocol – Students (Formerly Sex-Based Offense Protocol)
I. Introduction
Miami University is committed to maintaining a healthy and safe learning, living, and working environment and to creating an
environment that promotes responsibility, dignity, and respect in matters of sexual and interpersonal conduct. Sexual assault, sexual
misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking (Title IX offenses) are strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated. Any
person, regardless of gender, can be a victim/survivor. This Protocol applies to both on-campus and off-campus conduct, academic,
educational, co-curricular, athletic, study abroad, and other University programs. Title IX offenses include criminal offenses, such as
rape, fondling, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking as well as violations of the Code of Student Conduct—Interpersonal
Violence (Section 103).
By providing resources for prevention, education, support, investigation, and a fair disciplinary process, Miami University seeks to
eliminate all Title IX offenses. The University is dedicated to preventing Title IX offenses by providing:
•
Education and prevention programming informing the community about the risks and myths that contribute to violence, bystander
training, and a variety of awareness and prevention programming/education.
• Assistance and support, including interim support measures and accommodations.
• Processes for reliable and impartial investigation and adjudication that includes appropriate disciplinary sanctions for those who
commit Title IX offenses including suspension and dismissal.
• When a Title IX offense does occur, the University will take appropriate steps to prevent its recurrence and remedy the
discriminatory effect on the reporter (and victim/survivor if different from the reporter) and others, as appropriate.
Miami's Protocol is designed to comply with applicable state and federal laws. Miami University reserves the right to modify or deviate
from this Protocol when, in the sole judgment of the University, circumstances warrant, in order to protect the rights of the involved
parties or to comply with the law.
This Protocol describes how the University typically responds to reports of Title IX offenses involving students. It also:
•
•
•
Provides guidance for students who have been the victim/survivor of a Title IX offense.
Outlines the University's student disciplinary response to alleged conduct violations.
Identifies the relevant places within the University responsible for the Protocol and programs associated with it.
Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Student Sexual Assault
•
Ms. Rebecca Getson, Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, is the University’s Deputy Title IX Coordinator for matters related to
sexual violence. This includes sexual misconduct, sexual violence and sexual coercion of students. Ms. Getson may be reached
at 104 Health Services Center, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056, 513-529-1870 or [email protected]
Ms. Getson will help students:
o Access medical and mental health treatment.
o Report the offense to the police.
o Report the offense to the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity (OEEO) for investigation and/or to the Office of Ethics and
Student Conflict Resolution (OESCR) for disciplinary action.
o Access victim/survivor support resources.
o
Assist the victim/survivor in obtaining a University no contact order, a court-issued restraining order, or other lawful order of
protection.
Title IX Coordinator
•
The University’s Title IX Coordinator is Ms. Kenya D. Ash, Director of the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity, Hanna House,
Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056. Ms. Ash may be reached at 513-529-7157 or [email protected]
Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Athletics
•
Ms. Jennifer A. Gilbert, Associate Athletic Director / Senior Woman Administrator / Director of NCAA Compliance is the
University’s Deputy Title IX Coordinator for matters related to equality of treatment and opportunity in Intercollegiate Athletics. This
includes athletic financial assistance, accommodation of interest and abilities and equity of athletic program benefits. Ms. Gilbert
may be reached at Millett Assembly Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056, 513-529-3113 or [email protected]
Miami University encourages students who have been the victim/survivor of a Title IX offense to pursue criminal charges against the
person or persons they believe to have committed the crime. A criminal charge and a University investigation or disciplinary complaint
may be pursued at the same time. Students may request a University investigation and/or file a disciplinary complaint with or without
pursuing criminal charges. Victim/survivor support and resources are available regardless of criminal charges, University investigations
or University disciplinary action.
Retaliation against any person(s) who reports a crime, brings a disciplinary complaint, pursues legal action, or participates in an
investigation or is a witness in any investigation or proceeding is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated. Students who retaliate will
face University disciplinary action.
II. Definitions
A. Title IX offense (See Appendix A for definition and Appendix B for a list of Ohio Criminal
Offenses meeting these definitions)
•
•
•
•
Sex Offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the
victim is incapable of giving consent. These offenses include Rape, Fondling, Incest, and Statutory Rape.
Domestic Violence
Dating Violence
Stalking
B. Code of Student Conduct—Interpersonal Violence (Section 103A)
Sexual Misconduct
Any sexual conduct directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person's will; or where the victim does not give
consent.
Consent
Consent is when a person agrees or gives permission to another person to engage in certain sexual acts.
What is consent?
•
•
•
•
•
•
Consent is a knowing and voluntary verbal or non-verbal agreement between both parties to participate in each and every sexual
act.
Consent to one form of sexual activity does not imply consent to other or all forms of sexual activity.
Conduct will be considered "non-consensual" if no clear consent, verbal or non-verbal, is given. The absence of “no” does not
mean “yes.”
A person has the right to change their mind at any time. In other words, consent can be withdrawn at any point, as long as the
person clearly informs the other party of the withdrawal.
Taking drugs or consuming alcohol does not relieve the obligation to obtain consent.
A person is not required to physically or otherwise resist an aggressor.
Effective Consent
•
•
Effective consent can be given by words or actions so long as the words or actions create a mutual understanding between both
parties regarding the conditions of the sexual activity--ask, "do both of us understand and agree regarding the who, what, where,
when, why, and how this sexual activity will take place?"
When someone affirmatively demonstrates that (1) they do not want to have sex, (2) they want to stop any sort of the sexual acts,
or (3) they do not want to go any further, the other party must stop completely. Continued pressure after that point can be
coercive.
Consent in Relationships
•
•
•
Current or past sexual relationships or current or past dating relationships are not sufficient grounds to constitute consent.
Regardless of past experiences with other partners or your current partner, consent must be obtained.
Consent can never be assumed, even in the context of a relationship. You have the right to say "no" and you have the right to
change your mind any time.
By law, a person cannot legally give consent (no matter what they might say), when:
•
•
•
The person is severely intoxicated due to alcohol or drugs, incapacitated, or unconscious.
The person is physically or mentally disabled or incapacitated.
The person was coerced due to force, threat of force, or deception or when the person was beaten, threatened, isolated, or
intimidated.
Examples of Sexual Misconduct include, but are not limited to:
•
•
•
•
Non-consensual sexual intercourse, defined as any sexual penetration, however slight, with any body part or object by any
person upon any person without consent.
Non-consensual sexual contact, defined as any intentional sexual touching with any body part or object by any person upon any
person without consent.
Sexual exploitation, defined as taking non-consensual, unjust or abusive sexual advantage of another. Examples include, but are
not limited, to non-consensual video or audio-taping of sexual activity, going beyond the boundaries of consent (such as knowingly
allowing another to surreptitiously watch otherwise consensual sexual activity) and engaging in non-consensual voyeurism.
Indecent exposure, defined as the exposure of the private or intimate parts of the body in a lewd manner in public or in private
premises when the accused may be readily observed.
Dating Violence, Domestic Violence or Stalking
•
•
•
Dating Violence- Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with
the victim.
Domestic Violence- An act of violence committed by a spouse or intimate partner of the victim or a person who is cohabitating as
a spouse or intimate partner or person similarly situated, or by a parent with whom the victim shares a child in common.
Stalking- Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the
person’s safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress.
III. Confidentiality
Miami University will preserve student confidentiality to the extent possible and allowed by law.
A. Confidential Reporting
A person may speak confidentially with certain persons in legally protected roles including the following:
•
•
Women Helping Women (rape crisis counselors are available 24 hours a day at 513-381-5610 or toll-free at 877-889-5610).
Counselors at Miami's Student Counseling Service (513-529-4634); after hours emergencies by calling the Miami University Police
at 513-529-2222 or 911 and asking for the on-call counselor.
• Medical staff at Miami's Student Health Center (513-529-3000).
• Off-campus with clergy, counselors, and physicians, including McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital (513-523-2111), where a
Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) is available.
A confidential report will not result in a report to law enforcement or a University investigation. It will not be reported to the Deputy
Coordinator, or to the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution, or to the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity.
In addition, the University sponsors several educational and awareness campaigns throughout the academic year, including Take Back
the Night; The Clothesline Project, and Walk a Mile. Other events may be deemed confidential upon needs of the community with
request to the Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Coordinator. These events offer an opportunity for victims/survivors to share experiences
in a private setting and are not be treated as reports.
B. Non-Confidential Reporting
Ohio law and University policy require those not in a legally protected role with knowledge of a felony to report it to law enforcement.
Miami personnel, including Resident Assistants and professional residence life staff, are required to report Title IX offenses to the Miami
University Police who will, in turn, report it to the Deputy Coordinator. Reporting to the Miami University Police or other law enforcement
does not require the victim/survivor to pursue criminal charges.
Title IX Coordinators
The reporter (and victim/survivor if different from the reporter) may request confidentiality. The University takes such requests seriously;
however such requests may severely limit the University's ability to investigate and take reasonable action in response to a report. In
such cases, the Deputy Coordinator and the University's Title IX Coordinator, Ms. Kenya Ash, will evaluate the request for
confidentiality in the context of the University's commitment to provide a reasonably safe and non-discriminatory environment.
In order to evaluate a request for confidentiality, the Deputy Coordinator and the Title IX Coordinator may conduct a preliminary review
into the alleged offense and weigh the request against the following factors:
•
Seriousness of the alleged offense (including whether the offense involved the use of a weapon, other illegal activity, illegal drug
or intoxicant, multiple accused persons, etc.).
• Whether there have been other complaints/reports made regarding the accused (e.g. a history of arrests, a record of misconduct
at Miami or other institutions).
• Accused right to access the complaint/report including the reporter and/or victim/survivor's identity.
• Applicability of any laws requiring disclosure.
• Availability of other information to support the alleged offense.
• Whether the circumstances suggest there is an increased risk of the accused committing additional Title IX offenses (e.g. a
pattern of behavior).
• Whether the alleged perpetrator has threatened the victim/survivor or others.
• Safety of the reporter and victim/survivor.
If the reporter (and victim/survivor if different from the reporter) insists that their privacy be protected and that their name or other
identifiable information not be disclosed to the accused, the Deputy Coordinator will advise the reporter/victim/survivor of the
University's limited ability to respond. An accused has a right to know the name of the reporter (and victim/survivor if different from the
reporter) and information regarding the nature of the allegations in order to respond to the report; thus the University may not be able to
investigate and maintain the confidentiality of the reporter (and victim/survivor if different from the reporter). The University may take
other steps to limit the effects of the misconduct.
Police Reports
Police reports are open for inspection and copying under Ohio's Public Records Act. The extent to which Miami University can protect
the identity of a victim/survivor contained in police reports is not absolute; however the University uses its best efforts to protect the
identity of the Title IX victim/survivor and the intimate details of the report. Ohio law specifically permits the University to withhold the
identity of an uncharged suspect.
A student arrested for particular offenses may be subjected to a “1219” proceeding. “1219” refers to the section of law in which the
violation is described. The initiation of a “1219” proceeding against a student does not prohibit the University from taking University
disciplinary action against the same student under the Code for the same conduct that gave rise to the “1219” proceeding. More
information about “1219” procedures are in the Student Code of Conduct.
FERPA
In addition, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) protects students' educational records, including reports made to
the Deputy Coordinator and Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity and disciplinary complaints made to the Office of Ethics and
Student Conflict Resolution. FERPA prohibits the University from releasing these records to persons outside the institution without the
student's consent except in response to a lawful subpoena or as otherwise required by law. However, if the student-offender is found
responsible for violating the Code of Student Conduct-Interpersonal Violence or in some cases Physical or Mental Abuse or Harm, the
University may release the following information to anyone:
•
•
•
Name of the student-offender (but not the identity of the victim/survivor)
Code of Student Conduct violation (e.g., Section 103A)
Sanctions imposed as a result of the disciplinary proceedings
IV. Crime Alerts/Emergency Notification
If a report of a Title IX offense reveals there is an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees on campus or that
an on-going serious or continuing threat to the campus community exists, an Emergency Notification or a Campus Crime Alert will be
issued. The purpose of a Campus Crime Alert is to enable persons to protect themselves, heighten safety awareness, and seek
information that will lead to an arrest and conviction of the perpetrator. The victim's/survivor's name and other personally
identifying information will NOT be included in any Emergency Notification or Crime Alert.
For more information on the Clery Act, Campus Crime Alerts, and Emergency Notifications, go to http://miamioh.edu/campussafety/annual-report/index.html.
Reports of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking are included in the Annual Security and Fire Safety
Report/Crime Statistics at http://miamioh.edu/campus-safety/crime-stats/index.html.
V. Resources and Support Services
Miami University provides a number of resources and support services to any student who has been the victim/survivor of a Title IX
offense. Students are encouraged to seek support and obtain medical attention.
A. Medical and Counseling Resources
1. Medical Treatment
A person who has been the victim/survivor of an offense is urged to seek appropriate medical evaluation immediately, ideally within 96
hours (4 full days) of the incident.
For life-threatening conditions, call 911 (9-911 from a campus phone) or go to the nearest hospital emergency department. In Oxford,
McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital has a trained Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) who can help. Most area hospitals have a
Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) that will respond.
2. Medical—Legal Evidence Collection
A person who has experienced sexual assault or sexual misconduct is encouraged to request collection of medical/legal evidence.
Prompt collection of physical evidence is essential should a person later decide to pursue criminal prosecution and/or a civil action.
Collection of evidence may involve interaction with police and a police report.
If the sexual assault or sexual misconduct occurred within 96 hours (4 full days), a free and confidential exam can be administered at
local hospitals. The sooner the sexual assault or sexual misconduct is reported, the more likely evidence will still be present. "Date
rape" drugs, including rohypnol and GHB, may still be present in the victim/survivor's system and should be tested for if the
victim/survivor believes they may have been drugged. To help preserve evidence, the victim/survivor is encouraged to put any soiled
clothes in a paper (not plastic) bag, and to refrain from the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Bathing or douching
Washing hands or face
Urinating
Drinking any liquids
Smoking, eating, or brushing teeth (including mouthwash and flossing)
If an individual is uncertain about whether or not they want to report what has occurred, they can still have evidence collected. In cases
of sexual assault or severe injuries, the police will be called to the hospital. The survivor can decide whether or not to speak with the
police at that time to officially report what has happened.
While evidence may be collected anonymously (i.e., without the survivor's name attached to it) and/or when there is no report made to
police, these cases are handled differently. A discussion about the merit of collecting evidence "anonymously" and in instances where
the survivor does not want to report should be discussed with medical personnel and/or an advocate.
Questions about evidence collection can be directed to Women Helping Women to at 513-381-5610 or 877-889-5610 or the Sexual
Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) at McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital.
Medical-Legal Evidence Collection for Domestic Violence, Dating Violence and/or Stalking
A person who has experienced domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking is encouraged to request collection of medical-legal
evidence. Prompt collection of physical evidence is essential should a person later decide to pursue criminal prosecution and/or a civil
action. Collection of evidence may involve interaction with police and a police report.
A person who has experienced domestic violence or dating violence should seek prompt medical care and documentation of any
injuries. To help preserve evidence, the victim is encouraged to put any soiled cloths in a paper (not plastic) bag, and to refrain from the
following:
•
•
•
•
Bathing or douching
Washing hands or face
Urinating
Drinking any liquids
• Smoking, eating, or brushing teeth (including mouthwash and flossing)
A person who has experienced stalking should retain all communications from their stalker including email, voice-mail, text-messages,
social media communication, etc.
3. Confidential Counseling/Advocacy Resources
Counselors at a variety of agencies both on and off campus can help a person decide what steps to take, such as seeking medical
attention, preserving evidence, obtaining counseling, and reporting to authorities. Information, support and advice are available for
anyone who wishes to discuss issues related to Title IX offenses, whether or not a Title IX offense has actually occurred, whether or not
the person seeking information has been a victim/survivor of a Title IX offense, has been accused of a Title IX offense, or is a witness
or other affected person.
On Campus*
•
•
•
•
Oxford Campus Student Counseling Service, 513-529-4634 (normal business hours)
Hamilton Campus Counseling, 513-785-3211
Middletown Campus Counseling, 513-727-3431
On-call University counselors (through University police dispatcher), 513-529-2222
* Professional staff members who are legally obligated to maintain confidentiality work at these offices. Meeting with one of these staff
members does not begin the reporting process (see Section VI).
These medical and counseling services are also available to accused students and witnesses.
Off Campus Victim/Survivor Advocacy
Crisis intervention is available to victims/survivors 24 hours a day by calling the independent Women Helping Women at 513-381-5610
or toll-free at 877-889-5610. Women Helping Women advocates for and supports victims/survivors of all genders.
Domestic violence, dating violence and stalking - Dove House, YMCA Hamilton, 244 Dayton St., Hamilton, OH at 1-800-618-6523.
B. Interim Support Measures and Accommodations
Miami University provides a number of interim support services, upon request, to students who have been victims/survivors of Title IX
offenses. Students may, upon request, obtain interim support services, such as changing academic, residential, working, and
transportation circumstances from the Deputy Coordinator. No police report, disciplinary complaint or investigation need occur
before this option is available. The Deputy Coordinator will exercise discretion and sensitivity about sharing the identity of
the victim/survivor when arranging for interim support services. A victim/survivor can access these services at any time, even
if the student initially declined the service.
These services include the following:
•
Providing the victim/survivor with a temporary safe space within the University residence halls (available to Oxford residential
students).
• Changing residence hall assignments so that parties do not share the same residence or dining hall (available to Oxford
residential students).
• Changing class assignments so that the parties do not share the same classes (available to instructional staff and students).
• Providing academic support services including tutoring.
• Changing the students' work situation(s).
• Transportation/parking options.
• Prohibiting any contact between the parties.
• Assisting the victim/survivor in obtaining a University no-contact order or a court-issued restraining order or other lawful order of
protection.
To access interim support services, contact Ms. Rebecca Getson at 104 Health Services Center, 421 S. Campus Avenue, Oxford,
Ohio, 45056, [email protected] or 513-529-1870. She is available during regular business hours throughout the year to meet with
students who need information or guidance about Title IX offenses. Students will become aware of support, medical services, and
reporting options.
C. Immigrants or International Student Visa Information
There are certain legal protections available to immigrants or international students in the form of Visas, particularly the U visa and the
T visa. The U visa provides temporary legal status and work eligibility for victim/survivors of certain crimes (including domestic violence,
sexual assault, human trafficking, involuntary servitude, and other offenses). The T visa provides victim/survivors of human trafficking
and immediate family members with temporary legal status and work eligibility. These visas can be applied for when agreeing to assist
law enforcement, unless an individual meets one of the exceptions. Additional information is available through the U.S. Department of
Homeland Security U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services: www.uscis.gov. For assistance, with this or other immigrant status
questions, please contact Women Helping Women, 513-381-5610 or toll-free at 877-889-5610, or Legal Aid Society of Southwest Ohio,
513-241-9400 or toll-free 1-800-582-2682.
D. Legal Assistance
Legal Aid Society of Southwest Ohio, 513-241-9400 or toll-free 1-800-582-2682. The Legal Aid Society of Southwest Ohio provides
legal services to those struggling to recover from domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Legal services include restraining
orders, child support, custody, divorce, visitation restrictions, visa adjustments, and division of debts and property.
E. Protection Orders
Women Helping Women (513-381-5610), the Miami University Police Department, (911(emergency) or 513-529-2222), and the Deputy
Coordinator (513-529-1870) are all available to assist the student in obtaining a University no-contact order or a court-issued restraining
order or other lawful order of protection.
After a protection order is issued, the protected party should provide a copy of the court order to the Deputy Coordinator or the Dean of
Students Office, 110 Warfield Hall, Miami University, Oxford and the Miami University Police Department. Students on the regional
campuses should provide a copy of the court order to the Deputy Coordinator or the Regional Campus Sr. Associate Dean of Students
and campus security-Securitas. Any violation of the court order should be promptly reported to the police.
VI. Making a Report
A. Making a Report
Students who have been the victim/survivor of a Title IX offense are encouraged to promptly report the incident to the police and/or the
Deputy Coordinator. If the victim/survivor is incapacitated, for any reason, and unable to report, a report should be made on behalf of
the victim/survivor. Reports may be made by victims/survivors or others on their behalf. The Miami University Police will promptly inform
Ms. Rebecca Getson, Deputy Coordinator, at 104 Health Services Center, 421 S. Campus Avenue, Oxford, Ohio
45056,[email protected] or 513-529-1870 and vice versa.
Note: If a person is dealing with a stalker or domestic/dating violence situation, it is important to take precautions when accessing any
kind of support. In some circumstances, stalkers and/or abusers may access phone or computer records. When possible, people in
these situations may want to use public computers or phones to seek out information. It is also good to safeguard your information by
frequently changing passwords to random, unpredictable ones. It may also be helpful to think about steps that can be taken to keep
information away from individuals (e.g., keeping things with a friend or getting mail at a different address).
B. Limited Amnesty
While the University does not condone underage drinking or violation of other University policies, it considers reporting sexual
misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking to be of paramount importance. To encourage reporting and adjudication of
sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, Miami University extends limited amnesty to students who have
been victims/survivors of a Title IX offense. The University will generally not seek to hold the student responsible for a violation of the
law (e.g., underage drinking) or the Code of Student Conduct during the period immediately surrounding the sexual misconduct,
domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.
C. Reporting to the Police
For a Title IX offense that occurred on campus, contact the Miami University Police Department directly at 911 (or 9-911 from a
campus phone) or 513-529-2222 (non-emergency) to file a police report. Miami University Police officers will respond quickly, with
sensitivity and compassion (See Promises to Victims of Crime at http://miamioh.edu/police/services/victimservices/index.html).
To report an offense that occurred off-campus, contact the local police in the area the offense occurred or call 911 (emergency). Upon
request, the Miami University Police will assist victims/survivors in obtaining protection or restraining orders.
Upon request, the Miami University Police, the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution or the Deputy Coordinator, will assist
students in notifying the Oxford Police or other appropriate police department of an off-campus offense.
In general, non-consensual sexual conduct may constitute a crime. While Miami has published a definition of consent for Student
Conduct (see Section II above), Ohio law does not define consent, Ohio provides the following as non-consent*:
•
•
•
•
•
•
If the offender substantially impairs the victim's judgment or control by administering any drug, intoxicant or controlled substance
to the other person surreptitiously or by force, threat of force or deception.
The victim's ability to judge the nature of or control their own conduct is substantially impaired.
The victim is coerced.
The offender uses force or threat of force.
The victim is unaware the act is being committed (e.g. unconscious).
The victim's ability to consent is substantially impaired because of a mental or physical condition or because of advanced age.
* This is a non-exhaustive list and is not intended to provide legal advice. Persons should consult with law enforcement and prosecutors
for advice.
Title IX offenses reported to the Miami University Police are shared with Rebecca Getson, the Deputy Title IX Coordinator and offenses
reported to Ms. Getson will be reported to the Miami University Police if the alleged offense occurred on campus and to the appropriate
law enforcement unit if the offense occurred off campus. The Miami University Police, the Deputy Coordinator and the Oxford Police
Department share information about sex-based offenses on a need-to-know basis under an Information Sharing Agreement that may
be found athttp://miamioh.edu/_files/documents/police/Mutual_Aid_OPD_MUPD_Info_Sharing_508.pdf (102 KB).
Please note, a delay in reporting to police could weaken or result in a loss of evidence used to determine whether an individual is
responsible for an offense. Individuals may have up to 20 years to file a sexual assault report with the police.
D. Report to the Deputy Coordinator
Victims/Survivors and others may elect to report the offense directly to Ms. Rebecca Getson, the Deputy Coordinator, at 104 Health
Services Center, 421 S. Campus Avenue, Oxford, Ohio 45056, 513-529-1870 or [email protected] Upon request, she will:
•
Assist the student in immediately attending to any medical needs. The Deputy Coordinator can arrange for a professional staff
member to accompany the student to the hospital if requested by the student.
• Assist the student in contacting a support person such as a friend or parent if desired.
• Assist the student in obtaining a University no contact order or a court-issued restraining order or other lawful order of protection.
• Provide information on medical and psychological resources available.
• Provide a temporary safe space within the University residence halls (available to Oxford students).
• Change residence hall assignments so that the parties do not share the same residence hall (available to Oxford residential
students).
• Change class assignments so that the parties do not share the same classes (available to instructional staff and students).
• Provide academic support services including tutoring.
• Change working conditions.
• Provide transportation/parking options.
• Assist the student in filing a complaint with the Miami University Police if on- campus and Oxford Police or other appropriate police
department if off-campus. The Deputy Coordinator is required by law to notify appropriate law enforcement authorities of any
sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking reported to her.
• Inform the student of the right to pursue a disciplinary complaint against an accused student with the Office of Ethics and Student
Conflict Resolution. If the accused is someone other than a student (e.g., a University employee, vendor, contractor or
subcontractor), the Deputy Coordinator will inform the student of the right to pursue a complaint using the appropriate University
process. The University's disciplinary processes address a much broader range of offenses than the criminal law.
• Inform the student of the option to have the matter investigated by the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity and provide periodic
updates on the status of any investigation.
• If the accused is a student at another college or university, the Deputy Coordinator will assist the student in reporting the conduct
to the accused's home school.
Reporters (and the victim/survivor if different from the reporter) may request confidentiality. The University takes such requests
seriously; however, such requests may severely limit the University's ability to investigate and take reasonable action in response to a
report. In such cases, the Deputy Coordinator, in consultation with the Title IX Coordinator, will evaluate the request for confidentiality in
the context of the University's commitment to provide a reasonably safe and non-discriminatory environment.
In order to evaluate a request for confidentiality, the Deputy Coordinator, in consultation with the University's Title IX Coordinator, Ms.
Kenya Ash, Director of the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity, Hanna House, 513-529-7157 or [email protected], may conduct
a preliminary review into the alleged violation (see Section VIII. Investigation by the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity).
If the reporter (or victim/survivor if different from the reporter) insists that their privacy be protected and that their name or other
identifiable information not be disclosed to the accused, the Deputy Coordinator will advise the reporter and/or victim/survivor of the
University's limited ability to respond to the report. An accused has a right to know the name of the reporter (and victim/survivor if
different from the reporter) and information regarding the nature of the allegations in order to defend against the report; thus the
University may not be able to both investigate a report and maintain the confidentiality of the reporter (and victim/survivor if different
from the reporter). The University may take other steps to limit the effects of the alleged harassment or discrimination and prevent its
recurrence.
VII. Filing a Disciplinary Complaint with the Office of Ethics and
Student Conflict Resolution
If the accused is a Miami student, an individual may file a disciplinary complaint with the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict
Resolution (OESCR), at 11 Warfield Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056 or 513-529-1417. Criminal investigations/prosecutions
do not determine whether a violation of the Code of Student Conduct has occurred. Disciplinary action generally cannot begin without
disclosing the victim/survivor's identity. The University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if the University believes there is
sufficient information to proceed without the participation of the victim/survivor.
Students can file a disciplinary complaint with OESCR without pursuing criminal charges or a Title IX investigation with the Office of
Equity and Equal Opportunity. The purpose of these disciplinary proceedings is to provide a prompt, fair and impartial investigation and
resolution of the complaint(s). Disciplinary complaints may be filed with the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution at any time
the accused is a student at Miami University.
Summary Suspensions—An accused student may be summarily suspended from campus pending the final outcome of the
disciplinary proceedings. Summary suspension hearings are typically held within the first 48 hours of the filing of a disciplinary
complaint. Summary suspensions may prohibit the student from all or part of university property and activities or permit the student to
remain only under specified conditions (e.g., no-contact orders). See the Code of Student Conduct for full details on Summary
Suspensions without Prior Notice or Hearing and Summary Suspension With Notice and Hearing.
Disciplinary Hearings—Disciplinary hearings for Title IX offenses will be held before a trained Administrative Hearing Panel (two
faculty and one staff member). The hearings are designed to provide a prompt, fair and impartial investigation and resolution of the
complaint. The hearings are conducted by people who receive annual training on issues related to Title IX offenses and on conducting
a hearing process that protects the safety of students and promotes accountability.
Both the complainant and the accused are entitled to the same opportunity to file a written statement, to submit information and to
present relevant witnesses. Both the complainant and the accused are entitled to access information that will be used at the hearing, to
present relevant witnesses and other information and to have others present, including an advisor of their choice, during the hearing,
and to appeal. Confidential medical/counseling records and information regarding the victim's/survivor's sexual history with others will
not be provided to the accused and is not admissible at any disciplinary proceeding without the victim/survivor's written consent. The
questioning of the parties will be conducted through the Administrative Hearing Panel.
The University will accommodate concerns for personal safety, well-being, and/ or concerns regarding confrontation among the
complainant (and the victim/survivor if different from the complainant), the accused student(s) and other witnesses by providing
separate facilities, by using a visual screen or permitting participation by video phone, closed circuit TV, video conferencing, written
statement or other means.
Both the complainant and the accused will be simultaneously informed in writing of the outcome of each stage of the disciplinary
proceedings and of their right to appeal.
Expectations for Complainants and Accused Persons
Standard of Review—The standard of review used to determine responsibility is a “preponderance” standard. This determination is
based on the greater weight of the information and does not require a standard beyond a reasonable doubt. The policies, procedures,
and sanctions outlined in the Code of Student Conduct apply to all violations of the Code of Student Conduct. The Code of Student
Conduct can be found in the Student Handbook on the University’s website at http://miamioh.edu/student-life/oescr/code-ofconduct/index.html.
Disciplinary Sanctions—Sanctions against a student who has violated the Interpersonal Violence section of the Code of Student
Conduct include suspension and dismissal and vary depending on the severity of the violation and the accused conduct history. The
recommended sanction for Title IX offenses is often dismissal. Other sanctions include suspension, expulsion from campus housing,
educational intervention, no-contact orders, and restrictions from participating in intercollegiate athletics or extracurricular activities.
Appeal Process—Both the complainant and accused have the right to appeal on the basis of alleged procedural error, new information
and/or inappropriate sanction using the appeal process in the Code of Student Conduct.
Interests of the Accused—It must be recognized that the accused person in a University investigation has legal and other rights, and
that complaints in which each of the parties are members of the campus community are the most ethically and legally complex. A
presumption of responsibility should not be made as the result of any allegations. In the event that a student is accused of a Title IX
offense and a disciplinary complaint is filed, the accused will be encouraged to seek advice from a member of the University community
and is entitled to the same information as the complainant. Counseling and/or support are available to the accused student through the
University’s Student Counseling Service. An accused student has a right to know the name of the reporter (and victim/survivor if
different from the reporter) and information regarding the nature of the allegations in order to respond to the complaint; thus the
University may not be able to pursue discipline and maintain the confidentiality of the reporter (and victim/survivor if different from the
reporter). The University may take other steps to limit the effects of the alleged harassment or discrimination and prevent its recurrence.
Timeline—The University is committed to addressing all complaints of sexual misconduct and/or physical or mental abuse or harm in a
prompt and equitable manner. Upon receipt of a complaint, the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution will generally conduct
its initial review and assessment within one week, the University uses its best efforts to resolve all complaints within 60 calendar days.
This timeline may be extended based upon the complexity, severity and extent of the misconduct or for good cause. The timeline may
also be affected by the winter or spring break period and summer or winter terms. The timeline does not include appeals.
See the Code of Student Conduct for full details on the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution process.
VIII. Investigation by the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity
In the event the student chooses not to file a disciplinary complaint or prefers to have the matter investigated by the University through
the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity (OEEO), the Deputy Coordinator will seek the victim/survivor’s consent to investigate the
report. If the student consents to the investigation, the OEEO will investigate as provided in Miami's Policy Prohibiting Harassment and
Discrimination (http://www.units.muohio.edu/oeeo/employment-recruitment/resources-search-committees/policy-prohibitingharassment-and-discrimination).
An investigation will not begin without the consent of the student unless the Deputy Coordinator in consultation with the Title IX
Coordinator determines circumstances warrant an investigation. The request for confidentiality will be evaluated in the context of the
University’s obligation to provide a safe and nondiscriminatory environment for all students.
In order to evaluate a request for confidentiality, the Deputy Coordinator and the Title IX Coordinator may conduct a preliminary review
into the alleged offense and weigh the request against the following factors:
•
Seriousness of the alleged offense (including whether the offense involved the use of a weapon, other illegal activity, illegal drug
or intoxicant, multiple accused persons, etc).
• Whether there have been other complaints/reports made regarding the accused (e.g. a history of arrests, a record of misconduct
at Miami or other institutions).
• Accused right to access the complaint/report including the reporter and/or victim/survivor’s identity.
• Applicability of any laws requiring disclosure.
• Availability of other information to support the alleged offense.
• Whether the circumstances suggest there is an increased risk of the accused committing additional Title IX offenses (e.g. a
pattern of behavior).
• Whether the alleged perpetrator has threatened the victim/survivor or others.
• Safety of the reporter and victim/survivor.
If the victim/survivor insists that their privacy be protected and that their name or other identifiable information not be disclosed to the
accused, the Deputy Coordinator will advise the victim/survivor of the University’s limited ability to respond to the report. An accused
has a right to know the name of the reporter (and victim/survivor if different from the reporter) and information regarding the nature of
the allegations in order to defend against the report; thus the University may not be able to both investigate the report and maintain the
confidentiality of the reporter (and victim/survivor if different from the reporter).
The University may take other steps to limit the effects of the alleged assault and prevent its recurrence.
If the victim/survivor has consented to an investigation, the investigator from the OEEO will meet with the reporter to discuss the
investigation and review the details of the allegation and to explain the subsequent steps involved in a Title IX investigation.
Immediate Response. The OEEO investigator, working with the Deputy Coordinator, may initiate an immediate response to separate
the reporter (and/or victim/survivor if different from reporter) and accused from engaging each other in common areas, residence halls,
campus buildings, and student activities. The Deputy Coordinator will outline options to change academic, living, working, and/or
transportation situations if those changes are requested by the accuser or accused and are reasonably available. The Deputy
Coordinator has the discretion to remove a party from a hostile living situation.
A. Investigation
The investigator will review the report. If the report alleges potential criminal conduct and the police have not been notified, the
investigator will notify the University Police and the Deputy Coordinator, Rebecca Getson.
The investigator will contact all parties and witnesses to establish interview times and locations. Contact between the parties will be
limited to necessity. During this stage of investigation, both the reporter (and/or victim/survivor if different from the reporter) and the
accused have the right to be accompanied by an advisor, including an attorney or advocate.
The OEEO investigation is designed to provide a prompt, fair and impartial investigation of the report. The investigation is conducted by
persons who receive annual training on issues related to Title IX offenses and on conducting an investigation that protects the safety of
students and promotes accountability.
Both the reporter (and the victim/survivor if different from the reporter) and the accused are entitled to the same opportunity to file a
written statement, to submit information and to present relevant witnesses. Confidential medical/counseling records and information
regarding the victim/survivor’s sexual history with others will not be provided to the accused without the written consent of the
victim/survivor.
The purpose of the investigation is to ascertain to a reasonable cause whether a Title IX offense occurred and what responses need to
occur. The standard of review used to determine responsibility on campus is a “preponderance” standard. This determination is based
on the greater weight of the information and does not require a standard beyond a reasonable doubt. At the conclusion of the
investigation, the investigator will prepare a written report of the findings of the investigation.
During any stage of the investigation, if the investigator reasonably suspects that the accused poses an imminent threat of harm or
disruption to the campus community, the investigator will notify the Miami University Police, the Deputy Coordinator, and the Dean of
Students, who may initiate the summary suspension process under the Code of Student Conduct to immediately remove the accused
from campus and/or impose other restrictions.
B. Remedial Action
If the investigation finds by the preponderance standard that a Title IX offense did occur, the University will take immediate steps to
eliminate any hostile environment that has been created, prevent any further Title IX offenses and prevent retaliation. Additional
remedial action including counseling, no-contact orders, and/or required education/training may also be provided. Following the
investigation under Miami’s Policy Prohibiting Harassment and Discrimination, disciplinary action against the accused may be initiated
by either the victim/survivor or by the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity.
IX. Retaliation
Any retaliatory action or conduct taken by any person against a person who has sought relief under this Protocol is strictly prohibited
and will be regarded as a distinct violation of the University's Policy Prohibiting Harassment and Discrimination and/or a violation of the
Code of Student Conduct if the person engaged in retaliatory action is a student.
X. Legal Options
In addition to University disciplinary action, a person who engages in a Title IX offense may be the subject of criminal prosecution
and/or civil litigation. A police report must be made for criminal prosecution to be considered by the local prosecuting attorney. The
chances of successful prosecution are greater if the report is timely and is supported by the collection of medical and/or legal evidence.
The Legal Aid Society of Southwest Ohio, 513-241-9400 or toll-free 1-800-582-2682, provides legal services to those struggling to
recover from domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
Complaints may also be filed with the United States Department of Education Office for Civil Rights or by consulting an attorney at the
person's own expense. See http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/howto.html.
XI. Education and Prevention
The Division of Student Affairs creates, supports, and evaluates education and support programs aimed at the eradication of Title IX
offenses involving members of the Miami student community. To support these programs, the Deputy Coordinator will coordinate Title
IX offense education, awareness, and prevention programs. Through this commitment, the Division of Student Affairs shall educate
students about the following:
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•
•
•
Title IX Protocol and the University's commitment to enforce it.
Steps to minimize individual risk of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking.
Process and responsibility for reporting Title IX offenses.
Awareness and resources for students who have been victim/survivors of Title IX offenses and for those accused of Title IX
offenses.
• How to be a knowledgeable and supportive peer presence, including bystander intervention education.
• On-going wellness promotion programs that address issues including but not limited to sexual health and wellness, drug and
alcohol education.
Miami University requires all new incoming students to complete an online education program, Haven-Understanding Sexual Assault,
through the education technology company Everfi. Haven uses a population-level approach to educate all students on the issues
associated with sexual assault and relationship violence, taking into account their unique perspectives and experiences, providing:
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•
•
•
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Key definitions and statistics.
Reflective and personalized content.
Bystander skills and confidence-building strategies.
Campus-specific policies, procedures and resources.
Rich data summaries to inform future programming.
The Miami University Police foster a safe campus environment by doing the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Providing safety and security patrols as part of regular University police/regional campus security responsibilities.
Including Title IX Protocol information on its website and directly to victim/survivors who elect to file a police report.
Accurately maintaining and reporting statistics of Title IX offenses as required by the Jeanne Clery Campus Security Act.
Working with Facilities Management to provide adequate lighting on campus.
Working with Telecommunications to provide sufficient emergency phones on campus.
Other information sources including the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Annual Security and Fire Safety Report
Sexual Assault
o If It Happens to You or Someone You Know
o Acquaintance Rape Resource Guide
No-Hate Initiative
No-Hazing Policy
Drug Free Policy
Office of Student Wellness
Appendix A—Title IX Offense Definitions
Sex Offenses
Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of
giving consent.
•
•
•
•
Rape—The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex
organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
Fondling—The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of
the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her
temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
Incest—Nonforcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is
prohibited by law.
Statutory Rape—Nonforcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
Domestic Violence
A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by:
•
•
•
•
•
A current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim.
A person with whom the victim shares a child in common.
A person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner.
A person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence occurred.
Any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person's acts under the domestic or family violence
laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.
Dating Violence
Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.
•
The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party's statement and with consideration of the
length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the
relationship.
For the purpose of this definition—
•
•
Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or threat of such abuse.
Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
Stalking
Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:
•
•
Fear for the person's safety or the safety of others; or
Suffer substantial emotional distress.
For the purpose of this definition—
•
•
•
Course of conduct means two or more acts, including but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third
parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a
person, or interferes with a person's property.
Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or
other professional treatment or counseling.
"Reasonable person" means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.
Appendix B—Ohio Criminal Offenses
Sex Offenses
Ohio Revised Code 2907.02 – Rape
Ohio Revised Code 2907.03 – Sexual Battery
Ohio Revised Code 2907.05 – Gross Sexual Imposition
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses
Ohio Revised Code 2907.03 – Sexual Battery
Ohio Revised Code 2907.04 – Unlawful Sexual Conduct w/a Minor
Domestic Violence
Ohio Revised Code 2919.25 – Domestic Violence
Dating Violence
Ohio Revised Code 2903.11 – Felonious Assault
Ohio Revised Code 2903.12 – Aggravated Assault
Ohio Revised Code 2903.13 – Assault
Ohio Revised Code 2903.14 – Negligent Assault
Ohio Revised Code 2905.01 – Kidnapping
Ohio Revised Code 2905.02 – Abduction
Ohio Revised Code 2905.03 – Unlawful Restraint
Ohio Revised Code 2917.11 – Disorderly Conduct
Stalking
Ohio Revised Code 2903.21 – Aggravated Menacing
Ohio Revised Code 2903.211 – Menacing by Stalking
Ohio Revised Code 2903.22 – Menacing
Ohio Revised Code 2917.21 – Telecommunications Harassment
Title IX Protocol - Employees
Sexual Misconduct and Interpersonal Violence Protocol:
A Guide for Miami Faculty and Staff
I. Introduction
Miami University is committed to maintaining a healthy and safe working environment and to creating an environment that promotes
responsibility, dignity, and respect in all matters. Unfortunately, faculty and staff may be victims of sexual assault, domestic violence,
dating violence or stalking (Title IX offenses). In the vast majority of instances, the alleged perpetrator is not associated with our
University; however, it is possible for these offenses to occur on campus or for the alleged perpetrator to be a visitor, guest,
vendor/contractor, employee or student at Miami. Although most victims/survivors are women, men also can be victims. This Protocol is
designed to provide information on the resources and support available to an employee when the employee is a victim of a Title IX
offense, even if the offense occurred off campus. This Protocol also provides information on how to file a report if the offense occurred
on campus or the alleged perpetrator is a visitor, guest, vendor/contractor, is employed by or enrolled at Miami. Miami’s Protocol is
separate and distinct from the criminal process and is available to faculty and staff even if no police report has been made.
The Protocol is designed to comply with applicable state and federal laws. The University has the right to modify or deviate from this
Protocol when, in the sole judgment of the University, circumstances warrant, in order to protect the rights of the involved parties, or to
comply with the law.
In this Protocol, you will find information on:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Definitions of Title IX Offenses
Making a Police Report
Confidentiality – persons with whom you can speak confidentially
Medical, Counseling and Other Resources – including the importance of preserving evidence.
University Support Services
Making a Report for Investigation and Remedial Action – describes the University’s investigation process and remediation process
if the alleged perpetrator is a visitor, guest, vendor/contractor, employee, or student at Miami or if the offense occurred on campus.
Retaliation
Campus Crime Alerts and Emergency Notification
Legal Options
Ms. Kenya Ash serves as the Director of the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity and as the University’s Title IX Coordinator (the
Coordinator) for matters related to Title IX offenses. Questions regarding this Protocol may be directed to Ms. Ash at Hanna House,
Spring Street, Oxford, Ohio 45056, 513-529-7157 or [email protected]
II. Definitions of Title IX Offenses and Consent
See Appendix A for definitions and Appendix B for a list of Ohio Criminal Offenses meeting these definitions
•
•
•
•
•
Sex Assault Offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances
where the victim is incapable of giving consent. These offenses include Rape, Fondling, Incest, and Statutory Rape.
Domestic Violence
Dating Violence
Stalking
Consent
III. Making a Police Report
Miami University encourages employees who have been the victim/survivor of a Title IX offense to pursue criminal charges against the
person or persons they believe to have committed the crime. A criminal charge and a University investigation may be pursued at the
same time. In addition, if the offense occurred on campus or the alleged perpetrator is believed to be a visitor, guest, vendor/contractor,
employee, or is a student at Miami, a victim-survivor may request a University investigation with or without pursuing criminal charges.
Victim-survivor support and resources are available regardless of police reports, criminal charges or University investigations.
IN THE EVENT OF EMERGENCY, CALL 911
On-campus emergency phone numbers:
•
•
•
Miami University Police – 513-529-2222
Hamilton Campus Security – 513-785-3222
Middletown Campus Security – 513-727-3333
Off-campus emergency phone numbers:
•
•
•
Oxford Police Department – Emergency 911 or 513-523-4321
Hamilton Police – 513-868-5811
Middletown Police – 513-425-7700
Employees are encouraged to report information regarding any incident of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence or stalking
to the police and the University. Please note, a delay in reporting to police could weaken evidence or result in a loss of evidence used
to determine whether an individual is responsible for an offense. Individuals may have up to 20 years to file a sexual assault report with
the police.
Note: If a person is dealing with a stalker or domestic/dating violence situation, it is important to take precautions when accessing any
kind of support. In some circumstances, stalkers and/or abusers may access phone or computer records. When possible, people in
these situations may want to use public computers or phones to seek out information. It is also good to safeguard your information by
frequently changing passwords to random, unpredictable ones. It may also be helpful to think about steps that can be taken to keep
information away from individuals (e.g., keeping things with a friend or getting mail at a different address).
IV. Confidential Reporting and Support
A person may speak confidentially with persons authorized by law to keep these matters confidential:
On-Campus
•
Miami University Employee Health Clinic – 513-529-3000; and
Off-Campus
•
•
Women Helping Women (rape crisis counselors are available 24 hours a day at 513-381-5610 or toll-free at 877-889-5610).
McCullough Hyde Memorial Hospital – 513-523-2111 where a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) is available.
•
Butler County Crisis Consultation and Intervention – Monday-Friday-513-881-7180 or 1-844-4-CRISIS (1-844-427-4747);
Nights, weekends and holidays – Oxford/Hamilton-513-523-4146; Hamilton/WestChester-513-894-7002 and Middletown-513-4245498.
• Dove House Shelter – 24 hr. Crisis Hotline 800-618-6523.
• Legal Assistance – The Legal Aid Society of Southwest Ohio provides legal services to those struggling to recover from domestic
violence, sexual assault, and stalking. Legal services include restraining orders, child support, custody, divorce, visitation
restrictions, visa adjustments, and division of debts and property. To contact the Legal Aid Society of Southwest Ohio, call 513241-9400 or toll-free 1-800-582-2682.
A report to a confidential resource does not result in a report to the police or to the University.
V. Medical, Counseling and Other Confidential Resources—Including
the Importance of Preserving Evidence
Medical Treatment
A person who has been the victim/survivor of an offense is urged to seek appropriate medical evaluation immediately, ideally within 96
hours of the incident.
For life-threatening conditions, call 911 (9-911 from a campus phone) or go to the nearest hospital emergency department. In Oxford,
McCullough Hyde Memorial Hospital has a trained Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) who can help.
Medical—Legal Evidence Collection
A person who has experienced sexual assault or sexual misconduct is encouraged to request collection of medical/legal evidence.
Prompt collection of physical evidence is essential should a person later decide to pursue criminal prosecution and/or a civil action.
Collection of evidence may involve interaction with police and a police report.
If the sexual assault or sexual misconduct occurred within 96 hours, a free and confidential exam can be administered at local
hospitals. The sooner the sexual assault or sexual misconduct is reported, the more likely evidence will still be present. “Date rape”
drugs, including rohypnol and GHB, may still be present in the victim/survivor’s system and should be tested for if the victim/survivor
believes s/he may have been drugged. To help preserve evidence, the victim/survivor is encouraged to put any soiled clothes in a
paper (not plastic) bag, and to refrain from the following:
•
•
•
•
•
Bathing or douching
Washing hands or face
Urinating
Drinking any liquids
Smoking, eating, or brushing teeth (including mouthwash and flossing)
Even if an individual is uncertain about whether or not they want to report what has occurred, evidence should still be collected. In
cases of sexual assault or severe injuries, the police will be called to the hospital. The victim/survivor can decide whether or not to
speak with the police at that time to report what has happened.
While evidence may be collected anonymously (i.e., without the victim/survivor's name attached to it) and/or when there is no report
made to police, these cases are handled differently. A discussion about the merit of collecting evidence “anonymously” and in instances
where the victim/survivor does not want to report should be discussed with medical personnel and/or an advocate.
Questions about evidence collection can be directed to Women Helping Women at 513-381-5610 or 877-889-5610 or the Sexual
Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) at McCullough Hyde Memorial Hospital.
Medical—Evidence Collection for Domestic Violence, Dating Violence and/or Stalking
A person who has experienced domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking is encouraged to request collection of medical-legal
evidence. Prompt collection of physical evidence is essential should a person later decide to pursue criminal prosecution and/or a civil
action. Collection of evidence may involve interaction with police and a police report.
A person who has experienced domestic violence or dating violence should seek prompt medical care and documentation of any
injuries. To help preserve evidence, the victim is encouraged to put any soiled cloths in a paper (not plastic) bag, and to refrain from the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
Bathing or douching
Washing hands or face
Urinating
Drinking any liquids
Smoking, eating, or brushing teeth (including mouthwash and flossing)
A person who has experienced stalking should retain all communications from their stalker including email, voice-mail, and textmessages.
Counseling Resources
Counselors at a variety of off-campus agencies can help a person decide what steps to take, such as seeking medical attention,
preserving evidence, obtaining counseling and reporting to authorities.
Crisis intervention is available to victim/survivors 24 hours a day by calling the independent Women Helping Women at 513-381-5610
or toll-free at 877-889-5610.
Additional Support Services
a.
b.
c.
d.
Protection Orders—Women Helping Women, 513-381-5610, the Miami University Police Department, 911(emergency) or 513529-2222, and the Coordinator, 513-529-7157, are all available to assist the employee in obtaining a University no-contact order
or a court-issued restraining order or other lawful order of protection.
After a protection order is issued, the protected party is strongly encouraged to provide a copy of the order to the Human
Resources/Academic Personnel Office, Roudebush Hall, Miami University, Oxford and the Miami University Police Department.
Employees on the regional campuses should provide a copy of the order to the Regional Campus Sr. Director of Administration,
Mr. Chris Connell, and campus security, Securitas. Any violation of the order should be immediately reported to the police.
Immigration and Visa Information—There are certain legal protections available to immigrants in the form of visas, particularly
the U visa and the T visa. The U visa provides temporary legal status and work eligibility for victim/survivors of certain crimes
(including domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, involuntary servitude, and other offenses). The T visa provides
victim/survivors of human trafficking and immediate family members with temporary legal status and work eligibility. These visas
can be applied for when agreeing to assist law enforcement, unless an individual meets one of the exceptions. Additional
information is available through the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration
Services: www.uscis.gov. For assistance, with this or other immigrant status questions, please contact Women Helping Women,
513-381-5610 or toll-free at 877-889-5610, or Legal Aid Society of Southwest Ohio, 513-241-9400 or toll-free 1-800-582-2682.
Employee Assistance Program—Online: www.bensingerdupont.com/MLA (password: MLASSIST), Telephone: 1-877-695-2789
(1-877MYLBRTY). Beneficiary Services including counseling, financial, legal assistance and family services are available.
VI. University Support Services (Not Confidential)
Miami University provides a number of support services, upon request, to any employee who is the victim-survivor of a Title IX Offense.
Employees may, upon request, obtain support services such as changing working conditions and transportation circumstances from the
Coordinator. No police report or investigation needs to occur before support is available. These services include the following:
•
Assist the employee in immediately attending to any medical needs. The Coordinator can arrange for a professional staff member
to accompany the employee to the hospital, if requested by the employee.
• Assist the employee in contacting a support person such as a friend or family member, if desired.
• Assist the employee in obtaining a University no-contact order or a court-issued restraining order or other lawful order of
protection.
• Provide information on medical and psychological resources available.
• Change working conditions.
• Provide transportation/parking options.
• Arranging for a voluntary leave of absence (using sick leave, FMLA, or personal leave as appropriate).
• Assist the employee in filing a complaint with the Miami University Police if on-campus and Oxford Police or other appropriate
police department if off-campus. The Coordinator is required by law to notify appropriate law enforcement authorities of any sexual
assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking reported to her.
• Inform the employee of the option to have the matter investigated by the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity and provide
periodic updates on the status of any investigation.
• Other support services upon request and if reasonable available.
To obtain support services, contact Ms. Kenya Ash at Hannah House, Spring Street, Oxford, Ohio, 45056, [email protected] or 513529-7157. She is available during regular business hours throughout the year.
Discretion and sensitivity about sharing the identity of the victim/survivor and circumstances of the offense will be used when
arranging for support services. A victim/survivor can request these services at any time, even if the employee initially
declined the service.
VII. Making a Report for Investigation
If the offense occurred on campus or the alleged perpetrator is believed to be a visitor, guest, vendor/contractor, employee or student
at Miami, a report should be made to the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity, Ms. Kenya Ash, Director and Title IX Coordinator, at
Hanna House, Spring Street, Oxford Ohio, 513-529-7157, or [email protected] for investigation and remedial action. Reports may
be made by the victim/survivor or others on their behalf. If the victim/survivor is incapacitated, for any reason and unable to report, a
report should be made on behalf of the victim/survivor.
Reporters (and the victim/survivor if different from the reporter) may request that their identity not be revealed. The University takes
such requests seriously; however, such requests may severely limit the University’s ability to investigate and take reasonable action in
response to a report. In such cases, Ms. Ash, the Title IX Coordinator and the investigator will evaluate the request for confidentiality in
the context of the University’s commitment to provide a reasonably safe and non-discriminatory environment.
In order to evaluate a request for confidentiality, a preliminary review may be conducted into the alleged violation. The request will be
weighed against the following factors:
•
•
The seriousness of the alleged violation.
The circumstances suggest there is an increased risk of the alleged perpetrator committing additional acts of sexual assault or
other Title IX offenses.
• Whether there have been other reports made regarding the alleged perpetrator, including a history of arrests or a record of sexual
misconduct at prior institutions.
• Whether the alleged perpetrator has threatened the victim/survivor or others.
• Whether the sexual assault or other Title IX offense was conducted by multiple persons.
• Whether the circumstances suggest there is an increased risk of future acts under similar circumstances (e.g., a pattern of
behavior).
• Whether the sexual assault or other Title IX offense involved the use of a weapon.
• The accused’s right to access the victim/survivor’s identity.
If the reporter (or alleged victim if different from the reporter) insists that their privacy be protected and that their name or other
identifiable information not be disclosed to the accused, the Coordinator will advise the reporter (and the alleged victim if different from
the reporter) of the University’s limited ability to respond to the report. A person accused of a Title IX offense has the right to know the
name of the reporter (and alleged victim if different from the reporter) and information regarding the nature of the allegations in order to
respond to the report; thus the University may not be able to both investigate a report and protect the identity of the reporter (and
alleged victim if different from the reporter). The University may take other steps to limit the effects of the alleged harassment or
discrimination and prevent its recurrence.
Investigation by Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity
If the reporter (and alleged victim if different from the reporter) consents to the investigation or the University determines that an
investigation is required after weighing the factors above, the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity (OEEO), will conduct the
investigation in accordance with Miami’s Policy Prohibiting Harassment and Discrimination
(http://www.units.miamioh.edu/oeeo/harassment-discrimination).
The investigator from the OEEO will meet with the reporter (and alleged victim if different from the reporter) to discuss the investigation
and review the details of the allegations and to explain the subsequent steps involved in a Title IX investigation.
Immediate Response. The Coordinator may initiate an immediate response to separate the reporter (and alleged victim if different from
the reporter) and accused from engaging each other on campus and in University-sponsored activities.
Investigation
The investigator will review the report. If the report alleges potential criminal conduct and the police have not been notified, the
investigator will notify the University Police and the Title IX Coordinator.
The investigator will inform both parties of the respective time and place of the OEEO interviews of the parties and any witnesses.
Contact between the parties will be limited to necessity. During this stage of investigation, both the complainant and the accused have
the right to be accompanied by an advisor, including an attorney.
The OEEO investigation is designed to provide a prompt, fair and impartial investigation of the report. The investigation is conducted by
persons who receive annual training on issues related to Title IX offenses and on conducting an investigation that protects the safety of
faculty, staff and students and promotes accountability. The reporter (and the alleged victim if different from the reporter) and the
accused have the right to object to the assignment of an investigator on the grounds of bias.
Both the reporter (and the alleged victim if different from the reporter) and the accused are entitled to the same opportunity to file a
written statement, to submit information and to present relevant witnesses. Confidential medical/counseling records and information
regarding the alleged victim’s sexual history with others will not be provided to the accused.
The purpose of the investigation is to ascertain to a reasonable cause whether a Title IX offense occurred and what responses need to
occur. The standard of review used to determine responsibility on campus is a “preponderance” standard. This determination is based
on the greater weight of the information and does not require a standard beyond a reasonable doubt. At the conclusion of the
investigation, the investigator will prepare a written report of the findings of the investigation.
During any stage of the investigation, if the investigator reasonably suspects that the accused poses an imminent threat of harm or
disruption to the campus community, the investigator will notify the Miami University Police, the Coordinator and the appropriate
administrative personnel, who may initiate the summary suspension process to immediately remove the accused from campus and/or
impose other restrictions.
For the full policy go to http://www.units.miamioh.edu/oeeo/sites/edu.oeeo/files/2014-2015%20MUPIM%203.6_0.pdf
Remedial Action
If the OEEO investigation finds by the preponderance of evidence standard that a Title IX offense did occur, the University will take
immediate steps to eliminate any hostile environment that has been created, prevent any further Title IX offenses and prevent
retaliation. Additional remedial action including counseling, no-contact orders, and/or required education/training may also be provided.
Following the investigation under Miami’s Policy Prohibiting Harassment and Discrimination, disciplinary action against the accused
may be initiated by either the victim-survivor or by the Office of Equity and Equal Opportunity. Sanctions include education, suspension
and termination of employment. Sanctions may be issued individually, or a combination of sanctions may be imposed. The
determination of sanctions is based upon a number of factors, including: the harm suffered by the complainant; any ongoing risk to
either the complainant or the community posed by accused; the impact of the violation on the community, its members, or its property;
any previous conduct violations; and any mitigating or aggravating circumstances including whether the conduct was motivated by bias
(e.g. the complainant was selected on the basis of his or her race, color, ethnicity, national origin, religion, age, disability or other
protected class.)
VIII. Retaliation
Retaliation against any person(s) who reports a crime, pursues legal action, or participates in a University investigation or is a witness
in any investigation or proceeding is strictly prohibited and will be regarded as a distinct violation of the University’s Policy Prohibiting
Harassment and Discrimination. Retaliation will not be tolerated. Employees who retaliate face University disciplinary action up to and
including dismissal.
IX. Crime Alerts/Emergency Notification
If a report of a Title IX Offense reveals there is an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees on campus or that
an on-going serious or continuing threat to the campus community exists, an Emergency Notification or a Campus Crime Alert will be
issued. The purpose of a Campus Crime Alert is to enable persons to protect themselves, heighten safety awareness, and seek
information that will lead to an arrest and conviction of the perpetrator. The victim's/survivor's name and other personally
identifying information will NOT be included in any Emergency Notification or Crime Alert.
For more information on the Clery Act, Campus Crime Alerts, and Emergency Notifications, go to http://www.miamioh.edu/campussafety/annual-report/index.html.
Reports of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking are included in the Annual Security and Fire Safety
Report/Crime Statistics at http://www.miamioh.edu/campus-safety/crime-stats/index.html.
X. Legal Options
A person who engages in a Title IX offense may be the subject of criminal prosecution and/or civil litigation. A police report must be
made for criminal prosecution to be considered by the local prosecuting attorney. The chances of successful prosecution are greater if
the report is timely and is supported by the collection of medical and/or legal evidence.
The Legal Aid Society of Southwest Ohio, 513-241-9400 or toll-free 1-800-582-2682, provides comprehensive legal services to those
struggling to recover from domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
Complaints may also be filed with the United States Department of Education Office for Civil Rights or by consulting an attorney at the
person's own expense. See http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/howto.html.
Appendix A - Definitions
Sex Offenses
Any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of
giving consent.
•
•
•
•
Rape—The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex
organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
Fondling—The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of
the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her
temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
Incest—Nonforcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is
prohibited by law.
Statutory Rape—Nonforcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
Domestic Violence
A felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by:
•
•
•
•
•
A current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim.
A person with whom the victim shares a child in common.
A person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner.
A person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence occurred. or
Any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person's acts under the domestic or family violence
laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred
Dating Violence
Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.
•
The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party's statement and with consideration of the
length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the
relationship.
For the purpose of this definition—
•
•
Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or threat of such abuse.
Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
Stalking
Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:
•
•
Fear for the person's safety or the safety of others; or
Suffer substantial emotional distress
For the purpose of this definition—
•
•
•
Course of conduct means two or more acts, including but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third
parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a
person, or interferes with a person's property.
Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or
other professional treatment or counseling.
"Reasonable person" means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.
Consent
In general, non-consensual sexual conduct may constitute a crime. While Ohio law does not define consent, it provides the following is
not consent*:
•
If the offender substantially impairs the victim’s judgment or control by administering any drug, intoxicant or controlled substance
to the other person surreptitiously or by force, threat of force or deception.
• The victim’s ability to judge the nature of or control their own conduct is substantially impaired.
• The victim is coerced.
• The offender uses force or threat of force.
• The victim is unaware the act is being committed (e.g., is unconscious).
• The victim’s ability to consent is substantially impaired because of a mental or physical condition or because of advanced age.
* This is a non-exhaustive list and is not intended to provide legal advice. Persons should consult with law enforcement and prosecutors
for advice.
University Policy requires consent for sexual conduct. Consent must be voluntary. An individual cannot consent who is substantially
impaired by any drug or intoxicant; or who has been compelled by force, threat of force, or deception; or if the accused substantially
impairs the victim/survivor’s judgment or control by administering any drug, intoxicant or controlled substance to the other person
surreptitiously or by force, threat of force or deception; or who is unaware that the act is being committed; or whose ability to consent is
impaired because of a mental or physical condition; or who is coerced by supervisory or disciplinary authority. Consent may be
withdrawn at any time. Prior sexual activity or relationship does not, in and of itself, constitute consent.
Preponderance of the Information
The standard used to determine a violation of Miami’s Policy Prohibiting Harassment and Discrimination is a “preponderance” standard.
The standard is met by the information that has the most convincing force; the greater weight of credible information. The University
considers all the information provided during the investigation. This standard essentially asks, “Is it more likely than not that the Policy
Prohibiting Harassment and Discrimination was violated?”
Appendix B—Ohio Criminal Offenses
Sex Offenses
Ohio Revised Code 2907.02 – Rape
Ohio Revised Code 2907.03 – Sexual Battery
Ohio Revised Code 2907.05 – Gross Sexual Imposition
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses
Ohio Revised Code 2907.03 – Sexual Battery
Ohio Revised Code 2907.04 – Unlawful Sexual Conduct w/a Minor
Domestic Violence
Ohio Revised Code 2919.25 – Domestic Violence
Dating Violence
Ohio Revised Code 2903.11 – Felonious Assault
Ohio Revised Code 2903.12 – Aggravated Assault
Ohio Revised Code 2903.13 – Assault
Ohio Revised Code 2903.14 – Negligent Assault
Ohio Revised Code 2905.01 – Kidnapping
Ohio Revised Code 2905.02 – Abduction
Ohio Revised Code 2905.03 – Unlawful Restraint
Ohio Revised Code 2917.11 – Disorderly Conduct
Stalking
Ohio Revised Code 2903.21 – Aggravated Menacing
Ohio Revised Code 2903.211 – Menacing by Stalking
Ohio Revised Code 2903.22 – Menacing
Ohio Revised Code 2917.21 – Telecommunications Harassment
Fire Safety
Fire Safety in Residence Halls
Miami takes a number of precautions to protect the safety of students living in residence halls. Learn about the policies regarding fire
safety education and training programs provided to students and employees as well as rules on portable electrical appliances, smoking
and open flames in residence halls. This information on fire safety also includes emergency procedures for evacuation and a list of
contacts for reporting a fire.
Residence hall fires on university campuses are not uncommon. Miami University has been fortunate in avoiding a residence hall fire
that has caused injury or serious damage. However, because the possibility for such fires exists, Miami has taken a number of
precautions to protect the approximately 7,100 students who live in our 41 residence halls.
Future Improvements
Miami University has implemented a 20-year plan to renovate residential hall facilities, which includes upgrading fire alarm and
suppression systems.
Equipment
•
•
•
•
•
All residence halls are equipped with a fire alarm system. All alarm systems function and undergo rigorous testing and
documentation each year. Fire safety specialists activate the alarm systems annually and inspect and clean the system components
on an annual basis.
All of Miami's residence halls have state-of-the-art "smart" systems, which provide total smoke detection throughout a building—
every janitor's closet, every room, every hallway, all common areas. Furthermore, the "smart" systems provide fire officials with an
exact location (down to the room #) of the smoke's source.
Fire extinguishers (ABC type) are located in residence halls and spaced in accordance with the Ohio Fire Code.
All Miami residence hall rooms have flame-retardant mattresses and window shades. Public areas have carpets and drapery that
meet maximum flammability standards. No Miami residence hall is more than four stories, and most are three stories.
All residence halls are equipped with "Knox Security Key Boxes." These high security boxes contain building master keys for use by
the firefighters who come into a residence hall. The boxes are opened by a key that is on each fire truck. The sub master keys in
these "Knox Boxes" enable firefighters to quickly unlock all student room and building doors in order to maximize evacuation and
rescue or to fight an active fire.
Education
•
•
Miami's fire safety specialists offer smoke drills where a corridor is filled with "safe smoke" to simulate the disorienting effects of
smoke in residence hall fire situations. Beginning in fall 2002, this program became mandatory for first-year students. In addition to
the smoke drill, first-year residents are required to complete an online fire safety course.
Miami has an unannounced fire drill program in all of its residence halls.
Restrictions
•
•
•
Miami restricts the use of any item that produces an open flame or heating surface in residence hall student rooms. Candles,
incense, and hot plates are among the restricted items.
Miami discourages, but does not prohibit, the use of halogen lamps in residence hall sleeping rooms. The use of protective coverings
on such lamps is strongly encouraged.
All residence halls are non-smoking buildings. This includes all student rooms.
Student Housing Policies and Rules
Portable Electrical Appliances, Smoking, and Open Flames
The following policies are from The Student Handbook (PDF).
3.3.B Appliances and Electrical Wiring
Television sets with self-contained antennas, VCRs, DVD players, radios, CD players, electrical razors, clocks, hair dryers, lamps,
heating pads, personal computers, and fans are permitted in student rooms providing their use does not disturb the other occupants of
the building and that their state of repair is not a fire hazard. Students are encouraged to use surge protectors with electronic equipment
such as computers. Microwaves are permitted in rooms (one per room); compact refrigerators must be rented from Housing, Dining,
and Guest Services. Microwaves cannot exceed 700 watts.
Safety and insurance standards require that certain restrictions be placed on the use of other electrical appliances in residence halls.
•
Popcorn poppers, hot plates, grills, skillets, coffee pots, and toasters may be used in kitchenettes or other designated areas, but
not in student rooms; no other cooking devices are permissible.
Sun lamps, dehumidifiers, and gas appliances may not be used.
Personal air conditioners are not permitted under any circumstances. Students may request and rent window-mounted air
conditioners from the University.
Tampering, altering, or rewiring electrical outlets (including telephones) is a fire and safety hazard and is prohibited. The use of
personally owned electric irons is limited to laundry rooms.
•
•
•
3.3.D Candles and Incense
The burning of candles, incense, or other substances producing open flame is strictly prohibited in residence halls at all times.
4.10 Tobacco-Free Environment
In order to promote the health of our students, faculty, staff and visitors, all Miami University campuses are designated Tobacco-Free
Environments. Smoking is defined as the burning of tobacco or any other material in any type of smoking equipment, including, but not
restricted to, cigarettes, cigars, or pipes.
Tobacco use is prohibited in all Miami University-owned facilities and on the grounds of any University-owned property. This includes all
buildings owned or controlled by Miami University, shelters, indoor and outdoor athletic facilities, indoor and outdoor theatres, bridges,
walkways, sidewalks, residence halls, parking lots and garages. Tobacco use is prohibited on sidewalks that adjoin University property.
Tobacco use is also prohibited in any vehicle or equipment owned, leased or operated by Miami University.
Miami University actively promotes and provides smoking cessation assistance and nicotine replacement therapy to students, faculty,
and staff, as well as their benefit-eligible spouses and domestic partners. Many services are provided at no cost or a reduced cost.
Interested employees should see Employee Health & Well-Being. Interested students should contact the Student Health Service.
Violations
Faculty, staff and students violating this policy are subject to University disciplinary action. Violators may also be subject to prosecution
for violation of Ohio's Smoking Ban (Ohio Revised Code Chapter 3794). Visitors who violate this policy may be denied access to Miami
University campuses and may ultimately be subject to arrest for criminal trespass.
Emergency Fire and Evacuation Procedures
Fire alarms alert community members of potential hazards and community members are required to heed their warning and evacuate
buildings immediately upon hearing a fire alarm in a facility. Community members should familiarize themselves with the exits in each
building.
1. Activate fire alarm if you discover fire or smoke.
2. Call 911 and provide information on the following:
• Name
• Building
• Floor or room number
3. Do one of the following:
If
Then
The fire is small.
If you are trained, use a fire
extinguisher.
The fire is beyond control
or involved potentially
explosive materials.
Follow the next steps to
evacuate the building.
4. Close doors and windows as you leave. Leave lights on.
5. Walk, do not run, to the nearest stairway and proceed to ground level.
DO NOT USE ELEVATORS. When a fire alarm is activated, most elevators stop automatically. If you are caught in an elevator, push
the emergency phone button.
6. Feel doors before opening. If a door is hot, do not open. Backtrack to an alternate evacuation route.
7. Alert other building occupants by loudly knocking on doors and yelling "FIRE" on your way out.
8. If you encounter smoke, stay low. Crawl if necessary.
9. Continue the evacuation if the alarm sound stops, and warn others who may attempt to enter the building.
10. Move to a safe location and leave clear access for emergency personnel. Do not return to the building until instructed by a safety
official.
11. Someone familiar with the situation and who knows the area involved should meet the fire department. Immediately inform them if
someone may be inside the building. If your building is damaged, evacuate and attempt to secure building against re-entry.
If clothing is on fire:
1. Stop, drop, and roll. Do not run.
2. Smother flames by wrapping in a blanket, rug, coat, etc.
If you become trapped in a building:
1. Find a room with a window. Enter and close the door.
2. If smoke begins to enter around the door, seal with rags, tape, or other material.
3. Call 911. If no phone is available, signal from a window.
4. Shout at regular intervals to alert emergency personnel of your location.
Reporting
If you find signs of an extinguished fire (i.e., non-emergency), you should report it to one of the following:
•
•
•
Miami University Police Department, 513-529-2222
University Fire Marshall, 513-529-2804
Oxford Fire Chief, 513-523-6324.
Fire Safety in Off-Campus Housing
Pertinent safety issues for students in off-campus housing include landlord/tenant responsibilities, Oxford City housing codes, and fire
prevention strategies. Choose from among the topics below for information on fire safety in off-campus housing:
Reporting
If you find signs of an extinguished fire (i.e., non-emergency), you should report it to one of the following:
Miami University Police Department, 513-529-2222
University Fire Marshall, 513-529-2804
Oxford Fire Chief, 513-523-6324.
Fire Safety Tips
Smoke Detectors
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All rental properties shall be equipped with a smoke detector in every room used for sleeping (OCO Section PM-308.1).
Install smoke detectors on every level of your home, including the basement, and outside each sleeping area.
Test detectors every month, following the manufacturer's directions, and replace batteries once a year, or whenever a detector
"chirps" to signal low battery power.
Never "borrow" a smoke detector's battery for another use—a disabled detector can't save your life.
Replace detectors that are more than 10 years old.
Smoking and Safety
•
•
•
•
Careless smoking is the leading cause of fire deaths in North America.
Smoking in bed or when you are drowsy could be deadly.
Provide smokers with large, deep non-tip ashtrays and soak butts with water before discarding them.
Before going to bed or leaving home after someone has been smoking, check under and around cushions and upholstered
furniture for smoldering cigarettes.
Cooking Safety
•
•
•
•
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Never leave cooking unattended.
Keep cooking areas clear of combustibles and wear clothes with short, rolled-up or tight-fitting sleeves when you cook.
Turn pot handles inward on the stove where you can't bump them.
If grease catches fire in a pan, slide a lid over the pan to smother the flames and turn off the heat. Leave the lid on until cool.
NEVER throw water on steaming or burning grease.
Cool a Burn
•
•
•
•
Run cool water over a burn for 10 to 15 minutes.
Never put butter or any grease on a burn.
Never use ice.
If the burned skin blisters or is charred, see a doctor immediately.
Space Heaters
•
•
Keep portable heaters and space heaters at least 3 feet (1 meter) from anything that can burn.
Keep children and pets away from heaters, and never leave heaters on when you leave home or go to bed.
Use Electricity Safely
•
•
•
•
Do not overload extension cords or run them under rugs.
If an electrical appliance smokes or has an unusual smell, unplug it immediately, then have it serviced before using it again.
Replace any electrical cord that is cracked or frayed.
Don't tamper with your fuse box or use improper-size fuses.
When Not to Fight a Fire
•
•
•
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The fire is spreading beyond the spot where it started.
You can't fight the fire with your back to an escape exit.
The fire can block your only escape.
You don't have adequate fire-fighting equipment.
How to Use a Fire Extinguisher
All rental units shall be supplied with a fire extinguisher in or near the kitchen. (OCO Section PM-705.4.1)
1.
2.
3.
4.
Pull the pin.
Aim the extinguisher nozzle at the base of the flames.
Squeeze the trigger while holding the extinguisher upright.
Sweep the extinguisher from side to side to cover the area of the fire.
Safety Checklist
This information does not constitute legal advice.
Doors
Wide angled peepholes, sturdy construction
Door Locks
Dead bolt locks? Handle locks? Do they turn easily? Can you be assured the landlord re-keyed/replaced them since the last tenant?
Windows
Have locks? Screens?
House Number
Clearly displayed
Smoke Detectors
Are there any? Do they work properly?
Exterior Entrance
Well-lit, free of shrubbery, no dark spots
Landlord Responsibilities
This information does not constitute legal advice.
According to Chapter 5321, Ohio Revised Code (Landlords and Tenants), as the landlord of a rental property, you have the
responsibility to do the following:
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•
•
•
•
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•
•
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Keep the building safe and sanitary by complying with local housing, health and safety codes.
Make repairs to keep the building fit and habitable.
Keep hallways, stairs and other common areas safe and sanitary.
Keep in good working order all electrical, plumbing, heating, and ventilation systems and fixtures.
Provide garbage cans and arrange for pickup, if the landlord owns four or more units in the same building.
Provide running water and reasonable amounts of hot water and heat unless hot water and heat are supplied by an installation
under the exclusive control of the tenant and supplied by a direct public utility connection.
Exterminate any insects, rodents, or other pests on the premises.
Not abuse the right of access.
Give at least 24 hours notice, unless it is an emergency, before entering a tenant's unit and enter only at reasonable times.
Landlord agrees to enter only after knocking, to leave the premises in as good a condition as when entered, to clean and remove
all dirt or debris that result from the performance of maintenance and repairs, and to lock the premises when leaving unless
otherwise requested by tenant(s).
Evict tenant when informed by a law enforcement officer of drug activity by the tenant, a member of the tenant's household, or a
guest of the tenant occurring in or otherwise connected with the tenant's premises.
Additional landlord responsibilities under Oxford City Code include the
following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All rental properties for which a permit is required shall be equipped with a smoke detector in every room used for sleeping. (OCO
Sec. PM-308.1)
All rental units shall be supplied with a fire extinguisher in or near the kitchen. (OCO Sec. PM-705.4.1)
Landlord must number interior rooming units of every rooming house, lodging house, or fraternity house of more than 3 units, in a
conspicuous manner. (OCO Sec. PM-304.3)
Premises shall be kept free from weed or plant growth in excess of 10 inches. (OCO Sec. PM-303.4)
Exterior wood and metal surfaces, including all trim, shall be kept free from peeling, flaking, and chipped paint; in good condition.
(OCO Sec. PM-304.2)
Each structure shall have its assigned street number displayed in a position readable from the public way; at least 3 inches high
with ½ inch wide strokes. (OCO Sec. PM-304.3)
From May 15 to October 15, every door, window, and other outside opening utilized for ventilation in a dwelling shall have
approved tightly fitting screen. Screen doors shall have a self-closing device. (OCO Sec. PM-304.15)
Owner must have a permit from the City of Oxford to rent any dwelling to any person other than a member of their own family.
(OCO Sec. PM-308.0)
Every habitable space shall have at least one openable window. (OCO Sec. PM-404.1)
•
•
All plumbing fixtures shall be kept in working order, free from leaks, obstructions, and defects. (OCO Sec. PM-505.1)
Water heaters shall be maintained capable of providing adequate water to be drawn at every required sink, lavatory, bathtub,
shower and laundry facility at a temperature of not less than 120 degrees Fahrenheit. (OCO Sec. PM-506.4)
Tenant Responsibilities
This information does not constitute legal advice.
According to Chapter 5321, Ohio Revised Code (Landlords and Tenants), as the tenant of a rental property, you have the responsibility
to do the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
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Keep the premises that you occupy safe and sanitary.
Dispose of rubbish in the proper manner.
Keep the plumbing fixtures as clean as their condition permits.
Use electrical and plumbing fixtures properly.
Comply with local housing, health, and safety codes.
Refrain from activity that causes damage to the premises and keep guests from doing the same.
Maintain appliances supplied by the landlord in good working order.
Conduct yourself in a manner that does not disturb any neighbors, and require guests and family members to do the same.
Comply with state or municipal drug laws in connection with the premises and require household members and guests to do
likewise.
Permit the landlord to enter the dwelling unit if the request is reasonable and proper notice is given.
Inspections
This information does not constitute legal advice.
All rental units require an annual permit and are inspected at least every two years. Your unit could be scheduled for an inspection
during the time you are living there.
No person shall rent or lease a dwelling unit, except to a member of his or her family, without a dwelling unit rental permit issued by the
Code Official in the name of the owner or operator for the specific dwelling unit.
All dwellings, dwelling units, rooming houses, lodging houses, rooming units, fraternity houses, and premises requiring a rental permit
shall be inspected on a regular and systematic basis.
If your dwelling unit is scheduled for a routine inspection, the Code Official must be given access to your dwelling at all reasonable
times.
In the event that a formal, written complaint is filed with the Building and Inspection Division, an inspection shall be conducted within 5
days. Notice shall be given to the owner, the occupant, or the owner's agent 24 hours in advance of any such inspection except in an
emergency situation or in those cases where the owner, agent, or occupant consents to inspection or when the premises is open and
accessible to inspection.
For a more detailed description of the inspection process, please contact the Code Enforcement Officer at 513-524-5239 or visit the
Inspections Office at 101 East High Street.
Occupancy Permits
This information does not constitute legal advice.
All rental properties in Oxford are required to have an up-to-date permit. The permit shall be protected and displayed in a conspicuous
place at all times and will state the maximum occupancy permitted as well as the name of the designated agent.
Oxford's Zoning Code limits occupancy of a rental dwelling unit to no more than four unrelated people.
There are a variety of exceptions to the "four person rule" depending, among other things, on the type of dwelling.
Before signing a lease for more than four people, call the Inspections Department at 524-5209 to verify the unit limit of the specific unit.
Every owner of a dwelling not residing on the premises shall appoint and designate an agent to act in his behalf. An individual may act
as his or her own agent. The agent shall be a resident of Butler County, Ohio, or a resident of any township, in Ohio or Indiana, that
adjoins Oxford Township, Butler County, Ohio. Make sure you know who your landlord's agent is; they are required to have one.
Landlord Relations
This information does not constitute legal advice.
The relationship between renter and the landlord does not have to be tense and wrought with difficulty. Each needs the other to survive.
Partners do better than enemies. Attitude and approach are keys to success. Humans have a tendency to respond to people in the
same way they are being treated. Rudeness gets one very little in the long run.
Tip 1: Politeness and respect go a long way in building a positive
relationship. It is hard to respond nicely or positively to a demanding
person.
•
•
•
Be sure you know the name of the owner as well as the agent (if there is one).
How would they like to be addressed? Mr., Ms., Mrs., by first name?
Don't be presumptuous and use a first name if you haven't been asked to do so.
Tip 2: Know how the communication system works. They all differ.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Who should you call for repairs, problems, and concerns?
In an emergency?
In a non-emergency?
Who will be responsible for responding to your concern?
How long should you expect a response to take?
Does anything ever need to be in writing?
Tip 3: Keep a telephone/visit log that records EVERY concern/complaint
to the landlord/agent. The log should include the following information:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Date of call
Time of day of call
Which roommate called—It can be useful for the same person to call about the same problem. (When different people call, the
stories get confused.)
Name of the person you talked to
Exactly what was reported in the call
The response to your question about when the problem will be addressed
Tip 4: Know what type of repair you need done.
•
•
•
•
•
Is it dangerous?
Is it costing you or the landlord money?
Is it cosmetic?
Would it just be nice?
If you can identify the kind of problem it is, that will assist the landlord in determining how soon it NEEDS to be handled. Everyone
thinks their problem is most important.
Tip 5: Report things that are wrong as quickly as possible.
•
Don't wait until the problem has existed for several days/weeks. Something little is a lot easier to fix than something that has
grown bigger than it needed to be.
Tip 6: Patience is a virtue.
•
•
•
Remember you are not the ONLY customer.
Be reasonable in what you expect about how soon the problem can be corrected.
If you are not satisfied with how it is being handled, call again.
•
ATTITUDE always matters - no matter how many times you call.
Tip 7: Carry out your end of the bargain. Know the specifics of the lease
and any house rules.
•
•
•
•
•
Respect the property.
Take good care of the residence and grounds.
Keep music and noise at a reasonable level for others in the area.
Follow the rules. There is no reason to think you are an exception.
Make ALL payments on time.
Landlord Tenant Act
This information does not constitute legal advice.
The City of Oxford—Fair Housing provides a summary of the Ohio Landlord Tenant Act in a downloadable brochure (PDF). The full law
in the Ohio Revised Code is linked below within a summary provided by the City of Oxford.
Facts
The Ohio Tenant-Landlord Bill, effective November 4, 1974, applies to most landlord-tenant relations and governs most rental
agreements whether written or oral.
None of the rights, remedies, or obligations that the tenant or the landlord may have under this law may be taken away by any written or
oral agreement. The Ohio Tenant-Landlord law does not apply to condominiums, prisons, jails, workhouses, halfway houses, hospitals,
resident homes, agricultural labor camps, tourist homes, hotels, motels, some boarding schools, dormitories, orphanages, some farm
residences and trailer courts. Ohio does have a law that outlines responsibilities and rights of Trailer Park operators and tenants.
(Chapter 3733, Ohio Revised Code)
Fire Statistics
These statistics include a description of each on-campus housing facility fire safety system as well as the number of fire drills held
annually.
Oxford Campus 2012–2014
TOTAL
FIRES
IN
BUILDING
RESIDENTIAL FACILITY
& (ADDRESS)
FIRE
#
CAUSE
# INJURIES
REQUIRING
MEDICAL
FACILITY
TREATMENT
RELATED
DEATHS
VALUE OF
PROPERTY
DAMAGE
ANDERSON HALL
(701 S. OAK ST.)
E
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
BEECHWOOD HALL
(231 WESTERN DR.)
F
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
BISHOP HALL
(300 E. SPRING ST.)
C
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
BLANCHARD HOUSE
(805 S.CAMPUS AVE.)
0
0
N/A
BRANDON HALL
1
(385 TALLAWANDA RD.)
1
N/A
N/A
N/A
Unintentional
0
Confined to microwave
interior
0
$100-999
CLAWSON HALL
(440 WESTERN
COLLEGE DR.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
COLLINS HALL
(31 N. FISHER DR.)
G
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
DENNISON HALL
(21 N. FISHER DR.)
G
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
DODDS HALL
(600 S. MAPLE ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
DORSEY HALL
(900 E. HIGH ST.)
G
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
ELLIOTT HALL
(101 IRVIN DR.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
EMERSON HALL
(699 S. MAPLE AVE.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
ETHERIDGE HALL
(601 S. MAPLE AVE.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
FISHER HALL
(801 S. CAMPUS AVE.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
FLOWER HALL
(5347 BONHAM RD.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
HAHNE HALL
(5357 BONHAM RD.)
1
1
Intentional
Confined to hallway
0
0
$0-99
HAMILTON HALL
(401 S. OAK ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
HAVIGHURST HALL
(350 WESTERN
COLLEGE DR.)
1
1
Intentional
0
Confined to trash can
0
$100–999
HEPBURN HALL
0
(355 TALLAWANDA RD.)
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
HILLCREST HALL
(301 WESTERN DR.)
F
0
LOGAN LODGE
(800 S. OAK ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
MACCRACKEN HALL
(500 CENTER DR.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
MAPLESTREET
STATION HALL
(521 S. MAPLE ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
MARY LYON HALL
(500 WESTERN
COLLEGE DR.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
MCBRIDE HALL
(11 N. FISHER DR.)
G
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
MCFARLAND HALL
0
(325 TALLAWANDA RD.)
E
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
MCKEE HALL
(600 WESTERN
COLLEGE DR.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
MIAMI INN
(100 N. PATTERSON
AVE.)
D
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
MINNICH HALL
(400 S. MAPLE AVE.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
MORRIS HALL
(651 S. MAPLE AVE).
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
OGDEN HALL
(401 E. HIGH ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
PEABODY HALL
(701 WESTERN
COLLEGE DR.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
PINES LODGE
(803 S. CAMPUS AVE.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
PORTER HALL
(601 S. OAK ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
REID HALL
(806 S. OAK ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
RICHARD HALL
(501 S. OAK ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
SCOTT HALL
(500 S. MAPLE ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
STANTON HALL
(700 S. MAPLE ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
STODDARD HALL
(201 IRVIN DR.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
STONEBRIDGE HALL
(230 WESTERN DR.)
F
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
SWING HALL
0
(105 TALLAWANDA RD.)
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
1
1
Unintentional
Confired to stove,
beneath pan
0
0
$0-99
TAPPAN HALL
(650 S. PATTERSON
AVE.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
THOMSON HALL
(425 WESTERN
COLLEGE DR.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
WELLS HALL
(301 E. SPRING ST.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
WILSON HALL
(21 S. FISHER DR.)
0
0
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
SYMMES HALL
(500 N. FISHER DR.)
G
TALLAWANDA HALL
(804 S. OAK ST.)
Oxford Campus Fire Safety Data 2014
RESIDENTIAL
FACILITY
FIRE
ALARM
PARTIAL
FULL
MONITORIN
SPRINKLE SPRINKLE
G
R SYSTEM R SYSTEM
DONE ON
A
B
SITE
(BY MUPD)
ANDERSON HALL X
E
SMOKE
DETECTIO
N
PORTABLE
FIRE
EXTINGUISHE
RS
EVACUATION
PLANS/PLACAR
DS
#
EVACUATIO
N
(FIRE)
DRILLS
x
X
33
X
3
BEECHWOODS
HALLG
X
x
X
24
X
3
BISHOP HALL
C
X
X
X
15
X
4
BLANCHARD
HOUSE
X
BRANDON HALL
X
7
X
4
X
X
27
X
4
CLAWSON HALL X
X
22
X
4
X
X
22
X
1
DENNISON HALL X
G
X
26
X
1
X
27
X
4
X
31
X
1
COLLINS HALL
G
X
DODDS HALL
X
DORSEY HALL
G
X
ELLIOTT HALL
X
X
X
5
X
4
EMERSON HALL
X
X
X
23
X
4
ETHERIDGE HALL X
H
X
X
27
X
4
X
X
10
X
4
X
FISHER HALL
X
FLOWER HALL
X
X
23
X
4
HAHNE HALL
X
X
27
X
4
HAMILTON HALL X
X
21
X
4
X
38
X
4
X
42
X
4
X
X
24
X
3
X
X
12
X
4
X
42
X
4
X
27
X
4
X
13
X
4
HAVIGHURST HAL X
L
HEPBURN HALL
X
HILLCREST HALL X
F
LOGAN LODGE
X
X
MACCRACKEN HA X
LL
MAPLESTREET
STATION HALL
H
X
MARY LYON HALL X
X
MCBRIDE HALL
G
X
MCFARLAND
HALL
E
X
MCKEE HALL
X
23
X
1
X
X
28
X
3
X
X
X
14
X
4
MIAMI INN
D
X
X
X
13
X
4
MINNICH HALL
X
X
38
X
4
MORRIS HALL
X
X
24
X
4
OGDEN HALL
X
X
11
X
4
PEABODY HALL
X
X
X
26
X
4
PINES LODGE
X
X
X
7
X
4
PORTER HALL
X
X
X
26
X
4
REID HALL
X
X
X
7
X
4
RICHARD HALL
X
X
31
X
4
SCOTT HALL
X
X
35
X
4
STANTON HALL
X
X
30
X
4
X
X
4
X
4
X
X
24
X
3
STODDARD HALL X
X
STONEBRIDGE
HALL
F
X
SWING HALL
X
X
21
X
4
SYMMES HALL
G
X
X
24
X
1
TALLAWANDA
HALL
X
X
X
7
X
4
TAPPAN HALL
X
X
X
29
X
4
THOMSON HALL
X
X
30
X
4
WELLS HALL
X
X
22
X
4
WILSON HALL
X
X
15
X
4
A Partial Sprinkler System: Sprinklers in the common areas only
B Full Sprinkler System: Sprinklers in the common areas and individual rooms
C Bishop Hall closed Fall 2012, reopened Fall 2013
D Miami Inn opened Fall 2012
E Anderson Hall and McFarland Hall closed Fall 2013, reopened Fall 2014
F Beechwoods Hall, Hillcrest Hall, and Stonebridge Hall opened Fall 2014
G Collins Hall, Dennison Hall, Dorsey Hall, McBride Hall, Symmes Hall closed Fall 2014.
H Etheridge Hall and Maple Street Station opened Fall 2013
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