EK-AO525-TD
MicroVAX 3100
Model 40 and Model 80
Customer Technical Information
Order Number: EK-A0525-TD.001
October 1991
This manual describes technical information about the MicroVAX 3100
Model 40 and Model 80 systems. It also gives a list of the console
commands, and specifications for the system unit and internal SCSI
devices.
Revision Information:
Digital Equipment Corporation
Maynard, Massachusetts
This is a new manual.
October 1991
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be
construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation. Digital Equipment Corporation
assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
The software described in this document is furnished under a license and may be used or copied
only in accordance with the terms of such license.
No responsibility is assumed for the use or reliability of software on equipment that is not
supplied by Digital Equipment Corporation or its affiliated companies.
Restricted Rights: Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to
restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer
Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013.
© Digital Equipment Corporation 1991.
All Rights Reserved.
The postpaid Reader’s Comments forms at the end of this document request your critical
evaluation to assist in preparing future documentation.
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: MicroVAX, RX, ThinWire, VAX,
VAXcluster, VAX DOCUMENT, VMS, VT, and the DIGITAL logo.
This document was prepared using VAX DOCUMENT, Version 2.0.
Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vii
1 System Description
1.1
1.1.1
1.2
1.2.1
1.3
1.4
1.4.1
1.4.2
Model 40 System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 40 VAX Architecture Support . . .
Model 80 System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 80 VAX Architecture Support . . .
Internal Mass Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . .
Communications Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Asynchronous Communications Devices .
Synchronous Communications Devices . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
1–1
1–3
1–4
1–5
1–7
1–8
1–8
1–8
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
2–2
2–3
2–4
2–5
2–6
2–6
2–7
2–8
2–8
2–9
2–10
2 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.3.1
2.3.2
2.3.3
2.3.4
2.3.5
2.3.6
2.4
2.5
Returning to Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Alternative Console Port . . . . . .
Console Security Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Security Password . . . . . . .
Enabling the Console Security Feature
Logging in to Privileged Console Mode
Changing the Security Password . . . . .
Disabling the Console Security Feature
Exiting from Privileged Console Mode .
Setting the Default Boot Device . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Default Recovery Action . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
iii
3 Console Commands
3.1
BOOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2
CONTINUE . . . . . . . . .
3.3
DEPOSIT . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4
EXAMINE . . . . . . . . . .
3.5
FIND . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6
HALT . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7
HELP . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.8
INITIALIZE . . . . . . . . .
3.9
LOGIN . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.10
REPEAT . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.11
SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.11.1
SET BFLG . . . . . . .
3.11.2
SET BOOT . . . . . . .
3.11.3
SET DIAGENV . . .
3.11.4
SET FBOOT . . . . . .
3.11.5
SET KBD . . . . . . . .
3.11.6
SET HALT . . . . . . .
3.11.7
SET MOP . . . . . . . .
3.11.8
SET PSE . . . . . . . .
3.11.9
SET PSWD . . . . . .
3.11.10
SET RADIX . . . . . .
3.11.11
SET SCSI . . . . . . . .
3.11.12
SET TRIG . . . . . . .
3.12
SHOW . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.12.1
SHOW BFLG . . . . .
3.12.2
SHOW BOOT . . . . .
3.12.3
SHOW CONFIG . . .
3.12.4
SHOW DEVICE . . .
3.12.5
SHOW DIAGENV .
3.12.6
SHOW ERROR . . .
3.12.7
SHOW ESTAT . . . .
3.12.8
SHOW ETHERNET
3.12.9
SHOW FBOOT . . . .
3.12.10
SHOW HALT . . . . .
3.12.11
SHOW K[BD] . . . . .
3.12.12
SHOW MEM . . . . .
3.12.13
SHOW MOP . . . . . .
3.12.14
SHOW PSE . . . . . .
3.12.15
SHOW RADIX . . . .
3.12.16
SHOW SCSI . . . . . .
3.12.17
SHOW TRIG . . . . .
iv
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
3–1
3–2
3–2
3–6
3–7
3–7
3–7
3–8
3–9
3–10
3–10
3–10
3–12
3–12
3–13
3–13
3–13
3–14
3–15
3–15
3–17
3–17
3–17
3–18
3–18
3–19
3–19
3–20
3–20
3–21
3–21
3–22
3–22
3–22
3–22
3–22
3–23
3–24
3–24
3–25
3–25
3.12.18
SHOW VER
3.13
TEST . . . . . . . .
3.14
UNJAM . . . . . .
3.15
X (transfer) . . .
3.16
! (comment) . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
3–25
3–25
3–26
3–26
3–27
System Unit Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Internal SCSI Device Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
4–1
4–6
4 Hardware Specifications
4.1
4.2
Index
Figures
3–1
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
Help Display . . . . . . . . .
SHOW CONFIG Display
SHOW DEVICE Display
SHOW ERROR Display .
SHOW MEM Display . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
3–8
3–19
3–20
3–21
3–23
.........
.........
.........
1–7
1–8
1–8
Tables
1–1
1–2
1–3
1–4
2–1
2–2
3–1
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–6
3–7
3–8
Supported Internal Mass Storage Devices . . . . . .
Supported Asynchronous Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Supported Synchronous Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Synchronous Communications Option Cable Part
Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alternative Default Boot Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default Recovery Actions and Associated Values .
DEPOSIT Command Qualifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Address Mnemonics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Memory Addressing Mnemonics . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Examples of Memory Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Initial Values of Processor Registers . . . . . . . . . .
Boot Flags Used by VMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Environment Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
FBOOT Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
1–8
2–9
2–10
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–6
3–9
3–11
3–13
3–13
v
3–9
3–10
3–11
3–12
3–13
4–1
4–2
4–3
4–4
4–5
4–6
4–7
4–8
4–9
4–10
vi
Halt Action Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Network Listener Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Security Feature Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Radix Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Remote Trigger Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Specifications: Model 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Specifications: Model 80 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Unit Metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Storage Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Operating Conditions and Nonoperating
Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RZ23L, RZ24, and RZ25 Hard Disk Drive Specifications
TZ30 Tape Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TZK10 QIC Tape Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RX26 Diskette Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RRD42 Compact Disc Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
3–14
3–14
3–15
3–17
3–18
4–2
4–3
4–4
4–4
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
4–4
4–6
4–7
4–8
4–8
4–9
Preface
This manual describes technical information about the MicroVAX™ 3100
Model 40 and Model 80 systems. It also gives a list of the console commands,
and specifications for the system unit and internal SCSI devices.
Audience
This manual is intended for experienced users, for example, system
programmers or system managers.
Structure of This Manual
This manual is divided into four chapters and an index:
•
Chapter 1 describes technical information about the Model 40 and the
Model 80 systems.
•
Chapter 2 describes the console security feature and how to set system
defaults.
•
Chapter 3 describes the console commands.
•
Chapter 4 gives specifications for the system unit and for internal SCSI
devices.
Additional Information
See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 40 and Model 80 Operator Information manual
for the list of associated and related documents.
vii
Conventions
The following conventions are used in this manual:
viii
Convention
Description
MONOSPACE
Text displayed on the screen is shown in monospace type.
boldface type
Boldface type in examples indicates user input. Boldface type in text
indicates the first instance of terms defined either in the text, in the
glossary, or both.
italic type
Italic type emphasizes important information, indicates variables,
and indicates complete titles of manuals.
nn nnn.nnn nn
A space character separates digits in numerals with 5 or more digits.
For example, 10 000 equals ten thousand.
n.nn
A period in numerals signals the decimal point indicator. For
example, 1.75 equals one and three-fourths.
UPPERCASE
Words in uppercase indicate a command.
lowercase
In format descriptions, words in lowercase indicate parameters or
arguments to be specified by the user.
|
In command syntax descriptions, a vertical bar | separates similar
options, one of which you can choose.
Note
A note contains information of special importance to the reader.
Ctrl/x
Ctrl/x indicates that you hold down the Ctrl key while you press
another key or mouse button (indicated here by x).
x
A lowercase italic x indicates the generic use of a letter. For
example, xxx indicates any combination of three alphabetic
characters.
n
A lowercase italic n indicates the generic use of a number. For
example, 19nn indicates a 4-digit number in which the last 2 digits
are unknown.
{}
In format descriptions, braces indicate required elements. You must
choose one of the elements.
[]
In format descriptions, brackets indicate optional elements. You can
choose none, one, or all of the options.
1
System Description
This chapter gives a technical description of the MicroVAX 3100 Model 40
and Model 80. Externally, both models are identical; internally, there are
significant differences. This chapter includes information on the following:
•
Model 40 system
•
Model 80 system
•
Internal mass storage devices
•
Communications devices
1.1 Model 40 System
The Model 40 system uses the KA45 central processing unit (CPU) module.
The KA45 CPU module is based on system on a chip (SOC) silicon technology.
The KA45 CPU module contains the following components:
•
DC222 (SOC) processor, which includes an internal floating point unit and
cache memory
•
The DC7201 S-chip, which is the primary interface between the CDAL bus
and all memory, video, and input/output circuits
•
8M bytes of onboard random-access memory (RAM) with parity checking
•
Support for up to 24M bytes of additional parity RAM
•
256K bytes of read-only memory (ROM), containing the boot and diagnostic
firmware for the system
•
32K bytes of ROM, containing the boot and diagnostic firmware for the
onboard options
•
32-byte network address ROM
•
Time-of-year clock, which includes 50 bytes of nonvolatile RAM
System Description 1–1
•
Three DEC423 asynchronous data-leads-only ports that use modified
modular jack (MMJ) connectors
•
One asynchronous modem control port (DB25 connector)
•
IEEE 802.3 Ethernet controller for standard or ThinWire™ Ethernet
•
SCSI controller
•
Support for asynchronous communications options, which provide either
8 or 16 additional DEC423 ports, or 8 additional asynchronous modem
control ports
•
Support for a synchronous communications option, which provides two
additional synchronous ports
1–2 System Description
1.1.1 Model 40 VAX Architecture Support
The KA45 CPU module in the Model 40 system supports the following VAX™
data types:
•
byte, word, longword, quadword
•
character string
•
variable-length bit field
•
f_floating point, d_floating point, and g_floating point
The operating system uses software emulation to support other VAX data
types.
The KA45 CPU module supports the following VAX instructions:
•
integer and logical
•
address
•
variable-length bit field
•
control
•
procedure call
•
miscellaneous
•
queue
•
character string instructions:
•
CMPC3/CMPC5
•
LOCC
•
MOVC3/MOVC5
•
SCANC
•
SKPC
•
SPANC
•
Operating system support
•
f_floating point, d_floating point, and g_floating point
The operating system uses software emulation to support other VAX
instructions.
System Description 1–3
1.2 Model 80 System
The Model 80 system uses the KA47 CPU module. The KA47 CPU module
is the primary component in the Model 80 system. The KA47 CPU module
contains the following components:
•
DC595 processor chip
•
DC598 clock chip
•
DC596 floating point accelerator chip
•
S-chip
•
256K bytes of second level write-through cache memory
•
Gate arrays DC7201 and DC7203
•
Basic system memory (8M bytes of RAM consisting of two MS44-AA
memory modules)
•
Support for up to 72M bytes of RAM
•
256K bytes of ROM (boot and diagnostic firmware for the system)
•
32-byte network address ROM
•
Time-of-year clock, which includes 50 bytes of nonvolatile RAM
•
Three DEC423 synchronous data-only ports (MMJ connectors)
•
One asynchronous modem control port (DB25 connector)
•
Ethernet controller for standard or ThinWire Ethernet
•
SCSI controller
•
Support for optional asynchronous communications devices, which provide
either 8 or 16 additional DEC423 ports, or 8 additional asynchronous
modem control ports
•
Support for optional synchronous communications devices, which provide
two additional synchronous ports
1–4 System Description
1.2.1 Model 80 VAX Architecture Support
The KA47 CPU module supports the following VAX data types:
•
byte, word, longword, quadword
•
character string
•
variable-length bit field
•
absolute queues
•
self-relative queues
•
f_floating point, d_floating point, and g_floating point
The operating system uses software emulation to support other VAX data
types.
The KA47 CPU module supports the following VAX instructions:
•
integer, arithmetic and logical
•
address
•
variable-length bit field
•
control
•
procedure call
•
miscellaneous
•
queue
•
character string instructions:
•
MOVC3/MOVC5
•
CMPC3/CMPC5
•
LOCC
•
SCANC
•
SKPC
•
SPANC
•
Operating system support
•
f_floating point, d_floating point, and g_floating point
System Description 1–5
The DC595 processor chip provides special microcode assistance to aid the
macrocode emulation of the following instruction groups:
•
Character string (other than those mentioned previously)
•
Decimal string
•
CRC
•
EDITPC
The operating system uses software emulation to support other VAX
instructions.
1–6 System Description
1.3 Internal Mass Storage Devices
Table 1–1 shows the internal mass storage devices that are supported by the
Model 40 and the Model 80 systems.
Table 1–1 Supported Internal Mass Storage Devices
Device
Size (inches)
Capacity (bytes)
Description
RZ23L
3.5
121M
Hard disk drive
RZ24
3.5
209M
Hard disk drive
RZ25
3.5
426M
Hard disk drive
TZ30
5.25
95M
Tape drive
TZK10
5.25
320M or 525M
Tape drive
RX™26
3.5
1.44M or 2.88M
Diskette drive
RRD42
5.25
600M
CDROM drive
Both systems support a maximum of five internal SCSI devices, only two of
which can be removable media devices. In both systems, an RZ24 disk contains
factory installed software (FIS). Chapter 4 gives the specifications for each
internal SCSI device.
System Description 1–7
1.4 Communications Devices
The Model 40 and Model 80 systems support asynchronous and synchronous
communications devices.
1.4.1 Asynchronous Communications Devices
Table 1–2 lists the asynchronous devices supported by Model 40 and Model 80
systems.
Table 1–2 Supported Asynchronous Devices
Device
Description
DHW42-AA
Eight-line DEC423 asynchronous option
DHW42-BA
Sixteen-line DEC423 asynchronous option
DHW42-CA
Eight-line EIA-232 modem asynchronous option
DHW42-UP
Eight-line to 16-line upgrade of the DEC423 asynchronous
option
1.4.2 Synchronous Communications Devices
Table 1–3 lists the synchronous devices supported by the Model 40 and Model
80 systems.
Table 1–3 Supported Synchronous Devices
Device
Description
DSW42-AA
Two-line EIA-232/V.24 synchronous module
If you order a different synchronous option cable, you can use different
interface standards with the synchronous communications module. Table 1–4
lists each standard and the part number of the corresponding option cable.
Table 1–4 Synchronous Communications Option Cable Part Numbers
Standard
Option Cable Part Number
EIA-232/V.24
BC19D-02
EIA-423/V.10
BC19E-02
EIA-422/V.11
BC19B-02
1–8 System Description
2
Console Security Feature and System
Defaults
This chapter describes how to set system defaults and how to use the console
security feature. It includes information on the following:
•
Returning to console mode
•
Using the alternative console port
•
Console security feature
•
Setting the default boot device
•
Setting the default recovery action
Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–1
2.1 Returning to Console Mode
To use the procedures described in this chapter, the system must be in console
mode. Before returning to console mode, you must shut down the operating
system software if it is running. See the operating system documentation for
information on the shutdown procedures. To return to console mode, follow
these steps:
1. Shut down the operating system software if it is running.
2. Press the halt button on the back of the system unit. The system responds
with the console prompt (>>>) when it is in console mode.
1
B
1
A
0
0
RE_EN06325A_91
1
Halt Button
2–2 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
2.2 Using the Alternative Console Port
MicroVAX 3100 systems provide an alternative console port through MMJ port
3. You can use this alternative console port in the same way as you would use
the standard console port, MMJ port 1. However, the alternative console port
does allow you to halt the system by pressing the break key on the keyboard,
a feature not available when you use the standard console port. To enable the
alternative console port, follow these steps:
1. Set the on/off switch on the system unit to the off (O) position.
2. Connect a terminal to MMJ port 3.
3. Set the break/enable switch to the up position.
The break enable LED lights when you set the switch to the up position.
4. Set the on/off switch on the system unit to the on ( | ) position.
The system recognizes the position of the switch only when you set the
power switch to the on ( | ) position.
B
1
A
0
0
1
2
RE_EN06493A_91
1
MMJ Port 3
2
Break Enable Switch
Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–3
2.3 Console Security Feature
The console security feature allows you to disable most of the system console
commands. When you set the security password, privileged users, who know
the security password, can use the full range of console commands. However,
unprivileged users can use only the following commands:
•
LOGIN—Use this command with the security password to become a
privileged user.
•
BOOT—Use this command without parameters to boot the operating
system.
•
CONTINUE—Use this command to return to the operating system after
pressing the halt button.
Chapter 3 describes the console commands.
The following subsections describe how to do the following:
•
Set the security password
•
Enable the console security feature
•
Log in to privileged console mode
•
Change the security password
•
Disable the security password
•
Exit from privileged console mode
2–4 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
2.3.1 Setting the Security Password
The console security feature is disabled when you receive the system. To set
the security password on the system, follow these steps:
1. Enter the following command at the console prompt (>>>):
>>> SET PSWD
The system responds with the following prompt:
PSWD1 >>>
Note
•
The security password must be a string of exactly 16
hexadecimal characters (0 to 9 and A to F).
•
Write down the security password and store it in a safe place.
If you forget the security password, you must call your Digital
Services representative to disable the console security feature.
2. Enter a security password and press Return.
The system does not display the security password as you type it. The
system responds with the following prompt:
PSWD2 >>>
3. Verify the security password by entering it a second time.
The system does not display the security password as you type it. If you
enter the same security password at each prompt, the system saves the
security password in nonvolatile memory. The system does not lose the
security password when you turn off the system.
If the second security password does not match the first, the system
responds with the following error message:
?31 ILL PSWD
>>>
4. Repeat steps 1 to 3 if you see an error message.
Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–5
2.3.2 Enabling the Console Security Feature
When you have set the security password, you must enable the console security
feature. To enable the console security feature, enter the following command at
the console prompt:
>>> SET PSE 1
The system responds with the following display when you have enabled the
console security feature:
PSE = 00000001
2.3.3 Logging in to Privileged Console Mode
When the console security feature is enabled, you must enter the security
password to log in to privileged console mode. In privileged console mode you
can use the full range of console commands. To log in to privileged console
mode, follow these steps:
Note
You must set the security password before following these steps (see
Section 2.3.1).
1. Enter the following command:
>>> LOGIN
The system responds with the following prompt:
PSWD0 >>>
2. Enter the security password and press Return.
The system does not display the security password as you type it. If you
enter the correct security password, the system returns you to the console
prompt and you become a privileged user. You can now use the full range
of console commands.
If you enter an incorrect security password, the system responds with the
following error message:
?31 ILL PSWD
>>>
3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 if an error message is displayed.
2–6 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
2.3.4 Changing the Security Password
You must be a privileged user to change the security password. To change the
security password, follow these steps:
1. Follow the procedure in Section 2.3.3 using the current security password
to log in to the system.
2. Enter the following command:
>>> SET PSWD
The system responds with the following prompt:
PSWD0 >>>
3. Enter the current security password and press Return.
The system does not display the security password as you type it. The
system responds with the following prompt:
PSWD1 >>>
4. Enter a new security password and press Return.
The system does not display the security password as you type it. The
system then responds with the following prompt:
PSWD2 >>>
5. Verify the new security password by entering it a second time.
The system does not display the security password as you type it. If you
enter the correct, current security password at the PSWD0 >>> prompt,
and correctly enter the new security password a second time, the system
saves the new security password in nonvolatile memory. The system does
not lose the new security password when you turn off the system.
If you incorrectly enter the current password or incorrectly enter the new
security password a second time, the system responds with the following
error message:
?31 ILL PSWD
>>>
6. Repeat steps 1 to 5 if an error message is displayed.
Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–7
2.3.5 Disabling the Console Security Feature
When you disable the console security feature, all users can use the full range
of console commands. To disable the console security feature, follow these
steps:
1. Follow the procedure in Section 2.3.3 using the current security password
to log in to the system.
2. Enter the following command:
>>> SET PSE 0
2.3.6 Exiting from Privileged Console Mode
When you exit from privileged console mode, privileged users must enter the
LOGIN command with the correct password before they can use the full range
of console commands. To exit from privileged console mode, enter one of the
following commands:
•
BOOT (with any supplied parameters)
•
CONTINUE
•
HALT
•
START
Chapter 3 describes each of these commands.
2–8 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
2.4 Setting the Default Boot Device
When the system is shipped, it is set to boot from the system disk, DKA300.
This RZ-series disk holds the factory installed software (FIS).
You can set the system to boot from a different default boot device that holds
the operating system software. Table 2–1 shows the alternative default boot
devices and their associated VMS™ device names.
Table 2–1 Alternative Default Boot Devices
Device
VMS Device Name
Hard disk (SCSI ID 0 to 7)
DKAx001
Network (the system boots from a remote system)
ESA0
Tape drive (SCSI ID 0 to 7)
MKAx001
Compact disc (SCSI ID 0 to 7)
DKAx001
1
x represents the SCSI ID of that device.
To set an alternative default boot device, enter the SET BOOT command using
the VMS device name of the alternative default boot device. For example, to
set the system to boot over the network, enter the following command:
>>> SET BOOT ESA0
The system responds with the following display when you have set ESA0 as
the default boot device:
BOOT = ESA0
Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–9
2.5 Setting the Default Recovery Action
There are three default recovery actions. You can change the default recovery
action by entering the SET HALT command and the value associated with the
action you want to set. Table 2–2 shows the three default recovery actions
and their associated values. When the system is shipped, the default recovery
action is set to halt.
Table 2–2 Default Recovery Actions and Associated Values
Recovery
Action
Associated
Value
Restart
1
The system tries to restart the operating system. If it
fails to restart the operating system, it tries to boot.
If the system fails to boot, it halts.
Boot
2
The system tries to boot. If it fails to boot, it halts.
Halt
3
The system halts and displays the console prompt.
Result
To set an alternative default recovery action, enter the SET HALT command
using the value associated with the recovery action you want to set. For
example, to set the system to halt, enter the following command:
>>> SET HALT 3
The system responds with the following display when you have set the default
recovery action to 3.
HALT = 00000003
2–10 Console Security Feature and System Defaults
3
Console Commands
This chapter describes the console commands that you can enter when the
system is in console mode. The system displays the console prompt (>>>) when
it is in console mode. If the system is running the operating system software,
see Chapter 2 for information on returning the system to console mode.
If the console security feature is enabled and a security password is set, you
must log in to privileged console mode before using most of these commands.
See Chapter 2 for information on the console security feature.
The following sections describe all the console commands, give the command
format, and describe the significance of each parameter.
3.1 BOOT
Passes control to the virtual machine bootstrap (VMB) program, which resides
on the system ROM. The format of this command is as follows:
B[OOT] [/[R5:]<bflg>] <ddau>
where:
•
R5: represents a register, through which the hexadecimal value
represented by <bflg> is passed to the VMB.
•
<bflg> is the boot flag value.
•
<ddau> is the name of the boot device. It passes to the VMB in register
R0.
The Ethernet network boot device name is ESA0; SCSI boot device names
have the following format:
ddcull
where:
dd is the device mnemonic
c is the controller destination (always A)
Console Commands 3–1
u is the SCSI ID value of the boot device
ll is the logical unit number
The console program accepts device names in lowercase characters, but it
is recommended that you use uppercase characters. You can specify more
than one boot device, and you can type a colon at the end of the device
names as shown in the command format. You can specify up to two devices
on the command line. You must separate device names by typing either a
space or a comma.
If the nonvolatile RAM (NVR) contains a default boot device name, the console
program passes the descriptor for this device to the VMB. The VMB then boots
the system from the specified device.
If you do not specify a device name or qualifiers or both in the command, the
system attempts to boot from the default boot device specified in the NVR. If
the default boot device is not defined ({NULL}), the console program passes
a descriptor for device ESA0 to the VMB program. This triggers the VMB
program to boot the system over the network.
3.2 CONTINUE
Allows you to exit from console mode and enter (or reenter) program mode (the
operating system). The format of this command is as follows:
C[ONTINUE]
The address to which control passes is one of the following:
•
The address stored in the program counter when the system went into
console mode.
•
The address that the user specifies using the DEPOSIT command.
3.3 DEPOSIT
Transfers the specified data to the specified address. The format of this
command is as follows:
D[EPOSIT] [{/B | /W | /L | /Q | /A}] [{/P | /V | /I}] [/G] [/U] [/N:<n>]
[{<addr> | <sym> | + | - | * | @} [<datum>]]
where:
•
/B /W /L /Q /A /P /V /I /G /U /N:<n> are deposit command qualifiers
(see Table 3–1).
3–2 Console Commands
If you do not specify a size or address qualifier, the console program uses
the size and address qualifier of the previous memory-specific command. If
you specify conflicting qualifiers, the console program ignores the command
and generates an error message. The effects of the miscellaneous qualifiers
are not valid outside the command in which they are specified.
Note
The /U (unprotect) qualifier allows access to almost any address. If
you do not use the /U qualifier, you can access address locations in
the range 2000.0000 to 3FFF.FFFF (excluding the TOY clock). The /U
qualifier is intended for use only by firmware developers.
•
<addr> is the hexadecimal address into which you want to deposit the
data.
•
<sym> is a mnemonic that represents the address into which you want to
deposit data (see Table 3–2).
•
+ - * @ are operators that you can use for relative memory addressing (see
Table 3–3).
•
<datum> is the value you want to deposit in the address location you
specify.
Table 3–1 DEPOSIT Command Qualifiers
Qualifier Type
Size
Address
Miscellaneous
/B (byte)
/V (virtual memory)
/N:<n> (repeat count)
/W (word)
/P (physical memory)
/U (unprotect)
/L (longword)
/I (internal register)
/Q (quadword)
/G (general purpose
register)
/A (ASCII)
Console Commands 3–3
Table 3–2 Memory Address Mnemonics
Mnemonic
IPR Number
Type1
Description
KSP
0
RW
Kernel stack pointer
ESP
1
RW
Executive stack pointer
SSP
2
RW
Supervisor stack pointer
USP
3
RW
User stack pointer
ISP
4
RW
Interrupt stack pointer
P0BR
8
RW
P0 base register
P0LR
9
RW
P0 length register
P1BR
10
RW
P1 base register
P1LR
11
RW
P1 length register
SBR
12
RW
System base register
SLR
13
RW
System length register
PCBB
16
RW
Process control block base
SCBB
17
RW
System control block base
IPL
18
RW
Interrupt priority level
ASTLVL
19
RW
AST level
SIRR
20
W
Software interrupt request
SISR
21
RW
Software interrupt summary
ICCS
24
RW
Interval clock control
NICR
25
W
Next interval count (not implemented)
ICR
26
R
Interval count (not implemented)
TODR
27
RW
Time of year (not implemented)
CCR
37
RW
Cache control
MSER
39
RW
Memory system error register
SAVPC
42
R
Console saved PC
SAVPSL
43
R
Console saved PSL
MAPEN
56
RW
Memory management enable
TBIA
57
W
Translation buffer invalidate all
TBIS
58
W
Translation buffer invalidate single
1
R indicates read; W indicates write.
(continued on next page)
3–4 Console Commands
Table 3–2 (Cont.) Memory Address Mnemonics
Mnemonic
IPR Number
Type1
Description
SID
62
R
System identification
TBCHK
63
W
64 to 127
1
Translation buffer check
Reserved
R indicates read; W indicates write.
Table 3–3 Memory Addressing Mnemonics
Symbol
Addressing Method Description
*
The memory address specified by the most recent DEPOSIT or
EXAMINE command.
+
The memory address immediately following the address specified by the
most recent DEPOSIT or EXAMINE command. For physical or virtual
memory address, the address specified is the address of the most recent
DEPOSIT or EXAMINE command plus the size that the most recently
specified size qualifier indicates (1 for byte, 2 for word, 4 for longword.)
-
The memory address immediately before the address specified by the
most recent DEPOSIT or EXAMINE command. For physical or virtual
memory address, the address specified is the address of the most recent
DEPOSIT or EXAMINE command minus the size that the most recently
specified size qualifier indicates (1 for byte, 2 for word, 4 for longword).
@
Indirect addressing. The format is @<address>, where <address> is a
hexadecimal address used as a pointer to another address. If you do not
specify an address, the address that the command uses is the address
used by the most recent memory referencing command.
Table 3–4 shows some examples of memory addressing.
Console Commands 3–5
Table 3–4 Examples of Memory Addressing
Example
Description
DEPOSIT R0 200
Stores the value 200 in the register R0.
DEPOSIT/P @R0 200
Stores the value 200 in the address pointed to by the
register R0. The /P qualifier specifies that the value in the
R0 register is a physical address reference.
DEPOSIT/V @R0 200
Stores the value 200 in the address pointed to by the
register R0. The /V qualifier specifies that the value in the
R0 register is a virtual address reference.
DEPOSIT @ 200
Stores the value 200 in the address specified by the most
recent memory referencing command.
3.4 EXAMINE
Displays, in hexadecimal format, the contents of the specified address. The
format of this command is as follows:
E[XAMINE] [{/B | /W | /L | /Q | /A}] [{/P | /V | /I}] [/G] [/U] [/N:<n>]
[{<addr> | <sym> | + | - | * | @} [<datum>]]
where:
•
/B /W /L /Q /A /P /V /I /G /U /N:<n> are qualifiers. The EXAMINE
command uses the same set of qualifiers as the DEPOSIT command (see
Table 3–1).
•
<addr> is the hexadecimal address into which you want to deposit the
data.
•
<sym> is a mnemonic that represents the address that you want to
examine. The EXAMINE command uses the same mnemonics as the
DEPOSIT command (see Table 3–2).
•
+ - * @ are operators that you can use for relative memory addressing. The
EXAMINE command uses the same operators for memory addressing as
the DEPOSIT command (see Table 3–3).
•
<datum> is the value you want to deposit in the address location you
specify.
3–6 Console Commands
3.5 FIND
Forces the console program to search the main RAM memory (starting at
physical address zero) for the following:
•
A page-aligned 128K-byte segment of main memory
•
A restart parameter block (RPB)
If the console program finds a 128K-byte memory segment or an RPB, the
console program places the starting address of the segment or RPB, plus
512, in the stack pointer (SP) register. If the console program does not find a
memory segment or RPB, the console program issues an error message. The
format of this command is as follows:
F[IND][/MEMORY | /RPB
where:
•
/MEMORY is a qualifier that specifies a search for a 128K-byte, pagealigned segment of memory.
•
/RPB is a qualifier that specifies a search for an RPB.
The FIND command searches for an RPB if you do not enter a qualifier.
3.6 HALT
Displays a halt message followed by the console prompt. The format of this
command is as follows:
H[ALT]
3.7 HELP
Displays a list of the console commands that the system supports. The format
of this command is as follows:
HE[LP] or ?
Figure 3–1 shows the help display.
Console Commands 3–7
Figure 3–1 Help Display
BOOT [/[R5:]<bflg>] <ddau>
CONTINUE
DEPOSIT [{/B|/W|/L|/Q|/A}] [{/P|/V|/I}] [/G] [/U] [/N:<n>]
[{<addr>|<sym>|+|-|*|@} [<datum>]]
EXAMINE [{/B|/W|/L|/Q|/A}] [{/P|/V|/I}] [/G] [/U] [/N:<n>]
[{<addr>|<sym>|+|-|*|@}]
FIND [{/MEMORY|/RPB}]
HALT
HELP
INITIALIZE
LOGIN
REPEAT <cmd>
SET BOOT <ddau>
SET BFLG <bflg>
SET DIAGENV <1-3>
SET FBOOT <0-1>
SET HALT <1-3>
SET KBD <0-15>
SET MOP <0-1>
SET PSE <0-1>
SET PSWD
SET SCSI <0-7>
SET TRIG <0-1>
SHOW { BOOT|BFLG|CONFIG|DEV|DIAGENV|FBOOT|ETHER|ERROR|
ESTAT|HALT|KBD|MEM|MOP|PSE|SCSI|TRIG|VER}
START <addr>
TEST [/UTIL] <devnam|devnbr>
UNJAM
X <addr> <cnt> ...
?
3.8 INITIALIZE
Performs a processor initialization sequence. The format of this command is as
follows:
I[NITIALIZE]
Table 3–5 gives the values of the registers that the processor initialization
sequence sets.
3–8 Console Commands
Table 3–5 Initial Values of Processor Registers
Register
Value
PSL
041F.0000
ASTLVL
4
SISR
0
ICCS
0
MAPEN
0
The processor initialization sequence also sets registers R0 to R13 to 0, the
interrupt stack pointer (ISP) to 200, and the program counter (PC) to 200.
3.9 LOGIN
Allows you to put the system in privileged console mode. When the console
security feature is enabled (see Section 3.11.8), and you put the system in
console mode, the system operates in unprivileged console mode. You can
access only a subset of the console commands. To access the full range of
console commands, you must use this command. The format of this command
is as follows:
LO[gin]
When you enter the command, the system prompts you for a password as
follows:
PSWD0 >>
You must enter the current console security password. If you do not enter the
correct password, the system displays the error message, ILL PSWD. When
you enter the console security password, the system operates in privileged
console mode. In this mode, you can use all the console commands. The system
exits from privileged console mode when you enter one of the following console
commands:
•
BOOT
•
CONTINUE
•
HALT
•
START
Console Commands 3–9
3.10 REPEAT
Allows you to specify a command that you want to repeat continuously. The
format of this command is as follows:
R[EPEAT] <cmd>
where:
•
<cmd> is the command that you want to repeat. You can repeat only the
following commands:
•
DEPOSIT
•
EXAMINE
•
TEST
To stop a REPEAT command, press Ctrl/C.
3.11 SET
Sets the console NVR parameter to the specified value. The format of this
command is as follows:
SE[T]<parameter-name><value>[<value>]
The following subsections describe the SET commands.
3.11.1 SET BFLG
Sets the default boot flags. The format of this command is as follows:
SE[T] BF[LG] <bflg>
where:
•
<bflg> is a hexadecimal number up to eight characters long. The boot flag
is placed in register R5. The console program does not check the validity
of the hexadecimal number you enter. Table 3–6 shows the valid boot flags
for VMS systems.
3–10 Console Commands
Table 3–6 Boot Flags Used by VMS
Flag
Definition
00000001
RPB$V_CONV—Conversational boot. At various points in the
system boot procedure, the bootstrap code requests parameters and
other input from the console terminal. If the DIAG is also on, the
diagnostic supervisor then goes into MENU mode and prompts the
user for devices to test.
00000002
RPB$V_DEBUG—Debug. If this flag is set, VMS maps the code for
the XDELTA debugger into the system page tables of the operating
system.
00000004
RPB$V_INIBPT—Initial breakpoint. If RPB$V_DEBUG is set, VMS
executes a BPT instruction immediately after enabling mapping.
00000008
RPB$V_BBLOCK—This skips the files-11 boot and performs only
the boot block type boot.
00000010
RPB$V_DIAG—Diagnostic boot. The secondary bootstrap is an
image called [SYSMAINT]DIAGBOOT.EXE.
00000020
RPB$V_BOOBPT—Bootstrap breakpoint. Stops the primary and
secondary bootstraps with a breakpoint instruction before testing
the memory.
00000040
RPB$V_HEADER—Image header. Takes the transfer address of
the secondary bootstrap image from that file’s image header. If
RPB$V_HEADER is not set, transfers control to the first byte of the
secondary boot file.
00000080
RPB$V_NOTEST—Memory test inhibit. Sets a bit in the PFN bit
map for each page of memory present. Does not test the memory.
00000100
RPB$V_SOLICT—File name. Prompts for the name of a secondary
bootstrap file.
00000200
RPB$V_HALT—Halt before transfer. Executes a halt instruction
before transferring control to the secondary bootstrap.
00000400
RPB$V_NOPFND—No PFN deletion (not implemented); intended
to inform the VMB not to read a file from the boot device that
identifies bad or reserved memory pages, so that the VMB does not
mark these pages as valid in the PFN bitmap.
00000800
RPB$V_MPM—Specifies that multiport memory is to be used for the
total executive memory requirement. No local memory is to be used.
This is for tightly-coupled multiprocessing. If the DIAG is also on,
then the diagnostic supervisor goes into AUTOTEST mode.
(continued on next page)
Console Commands 3–11
Table 3–6 (Cont.) Boot Flags Used by VMS
Flag
Definition
00001000
RPB$V_PFILE (overlays RPB$V_USEMPM)—File name. Prompts
for the name of the parameters file on a network bootstrap
operation.
00002000
RPB$V_MEMTEST—Specifies that a more extensive algorithm must
be used when testing main memory for hardware nonrecoverable
(RDS) errors.
00004000
RPB$V_FINDTEST—Requests use of MA780 memory if the MS780
is insufficient for booting. Used for 11/782 installations.
00008000
RPB$V_AUTOTEST—Used by diagnostic supervisor.
00010000
RPB$V_CRDTEST—Requests pages with CRD errors to be removed
from the bitmap.
X0000000
RPB$V_TOPSYS—The X position specifies the top-level directory
number for system disks with multiple systems.
3.11.2 SET BOOT
Sets the default boot device. The format of this command is as follows:
SE[T] BO[OT] <ddau>
•
<ddau> is the boot device name. This parameter must be a valid boot
device name that the BOOT command accepts (see Section 3.1).
When you enter a period (.) as a value, the console program resets the boot
device. If you enter the SHOW BOOT command, the system responds with the
following display:
BOOT = {NULL}
If you enter a BOOT command when the default boot device is reset, the
system attempts to boot from the network (boot device ESA0).
3.11.3 SET DIAGENV
Sets the diagnostic environment. The format of this command is as follows:
SE[T] DI[AGENV] <1-3>
where:
•
<1-3> represents a number in the range 1 to 3 that you enter to set the
diagnostic environment (see Table 3–7).
3–12 Console Commands
Table 3–7 Diagnostic Environment Values
<1-3>
Description
1
Customer environment. This is the default test environment.
2 and 3
Reserved for Digital use only.
3.11.4 SET FBOOT
Sets the diagnostic startup mode. The format of this command is as follows:
SE[T] F[BOOT] <0-1>
The parameter <0-1> is a number in the range 0 to 1 that determines the type
of diagnostic startup (see Table 3–8).
Table 3–8 FBOOT Values
<0-1>
Description
0
Normal diagnostic startup tests
1
Fast diagnostic startup tests
Note
Minimal diagnostic testing is performed during a fast diagnostic
startup operation.
3.11.5 SET KBD
This command is not applicable to MicroVAX 3100 systems.
3.11.6 SET HALT
Sets the default recovery action, that is, the action that the console program
takes when you turn on the system or following an error. The format of this
command is as follows:
SE[T] H[ALT] <1-3>
where:
•
<1-3> represents a number in the range 1 to 3 that you enter to set the
default halt action (see Table 3–9).
Console Commands 3–13
Table 3–9 Halt Action Values
Value
Halt Action
Meaning
1
Restart
The system tries to restart the operating
system. If it fails to restart the
operating system, it tries to boot. If
the system fails to boot, it halts.
2
Boot
The system tries to boot. If it fails to
boot, it halts.
3
Halt
The system halts and displays the
console prompt. This is the default
value.
3.11.7 SET MOP
Enables or disables the network listener. The format of this command is as
follows:
SE[T] MO[P] <0-1>
where:
•
<0-1> represents a number in the range 0 to 1 that you enter to set the
network listener condition (see Table 3–10).
Table 3–10 Network Listener Values
Value
Description
0
Disabled
1
Enabled (default)
Note
For remote triggering and remote console connection, you must set the
MOP and TRIG values to 1, console security must be enabled (PSE =
1), and you must have a valid password set up.
3–14 Console Commands
3.11.8 SET PSE
Allows you to enable or disable the console security feature of the system. The
format of this command is as follows:
SE[T] PSE <0-1>
where:
•
<0-1> represents a number in the range 0 to 1 that you enter to enable or
disable the console security feature (see Table 3–11).
Table 3–11 Console Security Feature Values
Value
Description
0
Disabled
1
Enabled
Note
For remote triggering and remote console connection, you must set the
MOP and TRIG values to 1, console security must be enabled (PSE =
1), and you must have a valid password set up.
When the console security feature is enabled, only a subset of the console
commands are available to the user. These commands are listed in Section 2.3.
To enable the complete set of console commands once the console security
feature is enabled, you must use the LOGIN command (see Section 3.9).
3.11.9 SET PSWD
Allows you to set or change the console security password. The console security
password is used for:
•
Remote trigger verification—When the password is set, the network
listener must verify the password before processing a remote trigger
request to boot the system.
•
Putting the system in privileged console mode—When the password is
set, you must use the LOGIN command and enter the correct password to
access the full range of console commands.
Console Commands 3–15
Note
For remote triggering and remote console connection, you must set the
MOP and TRIG values to 1, console security must be enabled (PSE =
1), and you must have a valid password set up.
The format of this command is as follows:
SE[T] PSW[D]
When you are entering the console security password for the first time, the
system prompts you for the password, then asks you for confirmation of the
password as follows:
PSWD1 >>>
PSWD2 >>>
The password you enter must be exactly sixteen hexadecimal characters.
Note
The password is not displayed on the screen.
When you want to change the console security password, you must put
the system in privileged console mode, using the LOGIN command (see
Section 3.9).
When the system is in privileged console mode, you can use the SET PSWD
command to change the password. The system prompts you for the current
password, a new password, and confirmation of the new password as follows:
PSWD0 >>>
PSWD1 >>>
PSWD2 >>>
Note
If you forget the password, you must contact your digital services
representative.
3–16 Console Commands
3.11.10 SET RADIX
Sets the default input radix. The format of this command is as follows:
SE[T] R[ADIX] <value>
The parameter <value> determines the radix type (see Table 3–12).
Table 3–12 Radix Values
Value
Description
0
Default RADIX for the associated command
10
Decimal
16
Hexadecimal
Note
You can use the introducers %X and %D on the command line at
any time to change the default radix. These introducers inform the
console program that the next value is of the radix that the introducer
specifies. %X specifies hexadecimal; %D specifies decimal.
3.11.11 SET SCSI
Sets the SCSI ID of the SCSI controller. The format of this command is as
follows:
SE[T] S[CSI] <0-7>
where:
•
<0-7> is a number in the range 0 to 7 that is the ID you want to assign to
the SCSI controller. The SCSI ID of the SCSI controller is set to 6 before
the system is shipped.
3.11.12 SET TRIG
Enables or disables the remote trigger utility. When the remote trigger utility
is enabled, a remote system can force the local system to boot from the local
system’s default boot device. The format of this command is as follows:
SE[T] T[RIG] <0-1>
Console Commands 3–17
where:
•
<0-1> is a number in the range 0 to 1 that determines the remote trigger
condition (see Table 3–13).
Table 3–13 Remote Trigger Values
Value
Description
0
Disabled
1
Enabled
Note
For remote triggering and remote console connection, you must set the
MOP and TRIG values to 1, console security must be enabled (PSE =
1), and you must have a valid password set up.
3.12 SHOW
Displays the value of the console NVR parameter you specify. The format of
this command is as follows:
SH[OW]<parameter-name>
where:
•
<parameter-name> is the NVR parameter that you want to view. See the
following subsections for more information.
3.12.1 SHOW BFLG
Displays the default boot flags. The format of this command is as follows:
SH[OW] BF[LG]
The following is an example of the display that this command produces when
no default boot flags are set:
BFLG = 00000000
3–18 Console Commands
3.12.2 SHOW BOOT
Displays the default boot device. The format of this command is as follows:
SH[OW] BO[OT]
The following is an example of the display that this command produces:
BOOT = DKA200
3.12.3 SHOW CONFIG
Displays the system configuration. The format of this command is as follows:
SH[OW] CONF[IG]
The command displays information about devices that the firmware has tested.
It also displays the device errors that the most recent device test detected.
Figure 3–2 is an example of the display that the SHOW CONFIG command
produces.
Figure 3–2 SHOW CONFIG Display
KA45-A V1.0
08-00-2B-16-44-48
8MB
DEVNBR DEVNAM
------ --------1
NVR
3
DZ
4
CACHE
5
MEM
6
7
8
9
10
FPU
IT
SYS
NI
SCSI
12
COMM
14
ASYNC
INFO
-------------------------------------OK
OK
OK
1
2
3
4
OK
8MB = SY=8MB, S0/1=0MB, S2/3=0MB, S4/5=0MB
OK
OK
OK
OK
OK
3-RZ23L 6-INITR
OK
DSW42 2 CHANNEL V3.0
DHW41/2
V1.5
1
Basic CPU Module Memory
2
Memory Expansion Increment 1 (Connectors 1H and 1L)
3
Memory Expansion Increment 2 (Connectors 2H and 2L)
4
Memory Expansion Increment 3 (Connectors 3H and 3L)
Console Commands 3–19
3.12.4 SHOW DEVICE
Displays the current status of the Ethernet and SCSI devices in the system.
The format of this command is as follows:
SH[OW] DE[VICE]
The display includes the Ethernet address and information about the SCSI
devices connected to the SCSI bus. Figure 3–3 is an example of the display
that the SHOW DEVICE command produces.
Figure 3–3 SHOW DEVICE Display
1
2
3
4
VMS/VMB ADDR DEVTYPE NUMBYTES
------- ---- ------- -------ESA0
08-00-2B-16-44-48
DKA300
A/3/0 DISK
......
..HostID.. A/6 INITR
5
RX/FX
----FX
WP
--
6
DEVNAM
------
7
8
REV
--
RZ23L 1F25
1
VMS/VMB Device Name
2
Ethernet or SCSI Address of the Device
3
Device Type— For example disk drive (DISK) or tape drive (TAPE)
4
Number of Megabytes
5
Media Type—Removable (RX) or fixed (FX)
6
Write Protected
7
Option Name
8
Revision Number
3.12.5 SHOW DIAGENV
Displays the current diagnostic environment. The format of this command is
as follows:
SH[OW] DI[AGENV]
Table 3–7 gives the values, and the meaning of each value. The following is an
example of the display that this command produces:
DIAGENV = 2
3–20 Console Commands
3.12.6 SHOW ERROR
Displays the errors that the most recent self-test or system exerciser test
detected. The format of this command is as follows:
SH[OW] ER[ROR]
Figure 3–4 is an example of the display that the SHOW ERROR command
produces for a system exerciser test.
Figure 3–4 SHOW ERROR Display
1
2
3
4
5
? 000 1
NVR 0003
?? 130 10 SCSI 0018
130 000E 00000003 00120012 00180000 FFFF001B 00000000 00000000 FFFFFFFF6
1
A question mark (?) indicates a soft error, that is, an error that you do
not have to correct before you boot the system. Two question marks (??)
indicate a hard error, that is, an error that you must correct before you
boot the system.
2
The FRU number of the failing device.
3
The Device Number
4
The Device Mnemonic
5
A Device Specific Error Code
6
Additional error information about the preceding error.
3.12.7 SHOW ESTAT
Displays a set of summary screens associated with the most recent system
exerciser test. The format of this command is as follows:
SH[OW] ES[TAT]
If the system exerciser test hangs or halts, you can use this command to
determine the status of the system before it hangs or halts.
Console Commands 3–21
3.12.8 SHOW ETHERNET
Displays the hardware Ethernet address. The format of this command is as
follows:
SH[OW] ET[HERNET]
The following is an example of the display that this command produces:
ETHERNET = 08-00-2B-26-45-AD
When the Ethernet address is not valid, the console program displays the
following:
ETHERNET = XX-XX-XX-XX-XX-XX
3.12.9 SHOW FBOOT
Displays the current diagnostic startup type. The format of this command is as
follows:
SH[OW] F[BOOT]
Table 3–8 gives the values, and the description of each value.
3.12.10 SHOW HALT
Displays the current status of the halt action flag. The format of this command
is as follows:
SH[OW] H[ALT]
Table 3–9 gives the values and the corresponding halt action. The following is
an example of the display that this command produces:
HALT = 00000002
3.12.11 SHOW K[BD]
This command is not applicable to MicroVAX 3100 systems.
3.12.12 SHOW MEM
Displays information about the memory in the system. The format of this
command is as follows:
SH[OW] ME[M]
Figure 3–5 is an example of the display that the SHOW MEM command
produces.
3–22 Console Commands
Figure 3–5 SHOW MEM Display
MEM_TOP = 00800000 1
MEM_BOT = 00000000 2
MEM_NOT_AVAIL
-----------------007C3600:007fffff 3
1
The total amount of memory in the system, including the console data
structures.
2
The first address of a 256K-byte block of contiguous memory, generally
used by the VMB.
3
This line and subsequent lines show the address ranges of the memory
areas that are not available to the operating system. These memory areas
include the memory area that is reserved for the console program.
3.12.13 SHOW MOP
Displays the status of the network listener flag. The format of this command is
as follows:
SH[OW] MO[P]
Table 3–10 gives the values and the meaning of each MOP value. The following
is an example of the display that this command produces:
Console Commands 3–23
UTC
AccurTDF
BytesRx
BytesTx
FramesRx
FramesTx
McBytsRx
McFrmsRx
FrmDefer
Frm1Coll
FrmMColl
TerXsCol
TerCarCk
TerShCkt
TerOpCkt
TerFrLng
TerNoDef
RerFCSEr
RerFrmEr
RerFrLng
UnknDest
DataOvrn
SyBuffUn
UsBuffUn
HrtBtErr
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
00000000E0D8BAE0
10000000000186A0
0000000000000000
0000000000000078
0000000000000000
0000000000000002
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000000
0000000000000001
MOP = 00000001
3.12.14 SHOW PSE
Displays the condition of the console security feature of the system. The format
of the command is as follows:
SH[OW] PSE
Table 3–11 gives the values and a description of each value.
3.12.15 SHOW RADIX
Displays the current default radix value. The format of this command is as
follows:
SH[OW] R[ADIX]
Table 3–12 shows the values and the meaning of each value.
3–24 Console Commands
3.12.16 SHOW SCSI
Displays the current SCSI ID that the firmware assigns to the system’s SCSI
controller. The format of this command is as follows:
SH[OW] S[CSI]
The normal SCSI ID of the system’s SCSI controller is 6 when the system
is shipped. The following is an example of the display that this command
produces:
SCSI = 00000006
3.12.17 SHOW TRIG
Displays the status of the remote trigger flag. The format of this command is
as follows:
SH[OW] TR[IG]
Table 3–13 gives the values and a description of each value. The following is
an example of the display that this command produces:
TRIGGER = 00000000
3.12.18 SHOW VER
Displays the version number of the firmware.
SH[OW] VER
3.13 TEST
Allows you to invoke the diagnostic tests, extended tests, and utilities. The
format of this command is as follows:
T[EST] [/UTIL] <devnam | devnbr>
where:
•
/UT[IL] is a qualifier that invokes a utility
•
<devnam> is the device name
•
<devnbr> is the device number
Console Commands 3–25
3.14 UNJAM
Provides a system reset. The format of this command is as follows:
U[NJAM]
The firmware returns all the devices to known, initial states. All registers and
logic states are set to 0.
3.15 X (transfer)
Note
This command is intended for use by host software that communicates
with the system through a console device connected to MMJ port 0 or
MMJ port 3. Do not enter this command at the console prompt.
Transfers binary data to and from physical memory. The format of this
command is as follows:
X<address><count><CR><checksum><data_stream><checksum>
where:
•
<address> is the physical address (in hexadecimal format), to which or
from which the data is transferred.
•
<count> is the number of bytes to transfer. It is an 8-bit hexadecimal
number. When the high order bit of this parameter is 1, the data is
transferred from physical memory to the console device. When the high
order bit of this parameter is 0, the data is transferred from the console
device to physical memory.
•
<CR> is a carriage return.
•
<checksum> is the two’s complement of the command string.
•
<data_stream> is the returned data.
•
<checksum> is the two’s complement of the data stream.
3–26 Console Commands
3.16 ! (comment)
Note
You use this command when writing host software that communicates
with the system through a console device connected to MMJ port 0 or
MMJ port 3.
Prefixes a comment. The format of this command is as follows:
! <comment>
where:
•
<comment> is the comment text.
You can place the exclamation point (!) anywhere on a command line. The
console program ignores all text after an exclamation point (!).
Console Commands 3–27
4
Hardware Specifications
This chapter lists the hardware specifications of the following:
•
System unit
•
Internal SCSI device
4.1 System Unit Specifications
The following tables list the specifications for the Model 40 and Model 80
systems.
Hardware Specifications 4–1
Table 4–1 System Specifications: Model 40
Subject
Description
Processor
KA45.
Boot and diagnostic
firmware ROM
256K bytes.
Options ROM
32K bytes.
DRAM memory
8M bytes, expandable to 32M bytes. The first 8M bytes are on the
system module.
Hard disk
RZ23L, RZ24, or RZ25 (the system supports a maximum of three
devices).
Tape drive
TZ30, TZK10.
Diskette drive
RX26.
Compact disc drive
RRD42.
Terminals
Supports the VT™ series.
Interfaces
One SCSI port, one ThinWire Ethernet port1 , one standard Ethernet
port1 , three DEC423 MMJ ports, one modem port. Optional: 8 or
16 additional asynchronous DEC423 MMJ ports or 8 additional
asynchronous modem ports, 2 additional synchronous ports.
Input voltage
Automatically adjusting ac input. Range: 100 volts (V) ac to 120 V ac
or 220 V ac to 240 V ac.
Maximum inrush
current
32 Amperes (A)
Maximum running
current
1.2 A at 110 V ac, 0.6 A at 220 V ac.
Steady state current
1.0 A at 110 V ac, 0.5 A at 220 V ac.
Maximum power
consumption
120 Watts (W).
Frequency
49 hertz (Hz) to 61 Hz.
1
Both Ethernet types cannot be used simultaneously.
4–2 Hardware Specifications
Table 4–2 System Specifications: Model 80
Subject
Description
Processor
KA47.
Boot and diagnostic
firmware ROM
256K bytes.
Options ROM
32K bytes
DRAM memory
8M bytes, expandable to 72M bytes, all on MS44 memory options.
Hard disk
RZ23L, RZ24, or RZ25, (the system supports a maximum of five devices).
Tape drive
TZ30, TZK10.
Diskette drive
RX26.
Compact disc drive
RRD42.
Terminals
Supports the VT series.
Interfaces
One SCSI port, one ThinWire Ethernet port1 , one standard Ethernet
port1 , three MMJ ports, one modem port. Optional: 8 or 16 additional
asynchronous DEC423 MMJ ports or 8 additional asynchronous modem
ports, 2 additional synchronous ports.
Input voltage
Automatically adjusting ac input. Range: 100 V ac to 120 V ac or 220 V ac
to 240 V ac.
Maximum inrush
current
32 Amperes (A)
Maximum running
current
1.2 A at 110 V ac, 0.6 A at 220 V ac.
Steady state
current
1.0 A at 110 V ac, 0.5 A at 220 V ac.
Maximum power
consumption
120 Watts (W).
Frequency
49 Hz to 61 Hz.
1
Both Ethernet types cannot be used simultaneously.
Hardware Specifications 4–3
Table 4–3 System Unit Metrics
System Unit
Weight1
kg (lb)
Height
cm (in)
Width
cm (in)
Depth
cm (in)
Model 30
11.4 (25)
10.03 (4.07)
46.38 (18.26)
40.00 (15.75)
1
Depends on configuration
Table 4–4 System Storage Conditions
Storage Condition
Range or Value
Temperature range
5°C to 50°C (41°F to 122°F )
Relative humidity
10% to 95% at 66°C (noncondensing)
Altitude
0 m to 2400 m (0 ft to 8000 ft)
Maximum wet bulb temperature
32°C (90°F)
Minimum dew point
2°C (36°F)
Table 4–5 System Operating Conditions and Nonoperating Conditions
Operating Conditions
Range or Value
Temperature range
10°C (50°F) to 32°C (90°F) with TZ30 tape drive;
otherwise 10°C (50°F) to 40°C (104°F)
Temperature change rate
11°C (20°F) per hour maximum
Relative humidity
10% to 90% noncondensing
Maximum wet bulb temperature
28°C (82°F)
Minimum dew point
2°C (36°F)
Altitude
2400 m (8000 ft) at 36°C (96°F)
(continued on next page)
4–4 Hardware Specifications
Table 4–5 (Cont.) System Operating Conditions and Nonoperating Conditions
Nonoperating Conditions
Temperature range
–40°C (–40°F) to 66°C (151°F)
Relative humidity
10% to 95% at 66°C (151°F)
Altitude
4900 m (16 000 ft)
Maximum wet bulb temperature
28°C (82°F)
Minimum dew point
2°C (36°F)
Hardware Specifications 4–5
4.2 Internal SCSI Device Specifications
Digital’s hardware and software are fully compatible with the SCSI-1
specifications and adhere to all the mandatory features of revision 10d of
the ANSI SCSI-2 specification draft.
The following tables list the specifications for the internal SCSI devices.
Table 4–6 RZ23L, RZ24, and RZ25 Hard Disk Drive Specifications
Formatted Storage Capacity
RZ23L
RZ24
RZ25
Per drive (M bytes)
121
209
426
Blocks per track
39
38
48 to 74
Blocks per drive
237 588
409 792
832 031
Buffer size (Kbytes)
64
64
60
Performance
RZ23L
RZ24
RZ25
Transfer rate to or from
media (M bytes/second)
1.5
1.5
2.1 to 3.2
Data transfer rate
(M bytes/second)
1.13
1.13
2.33
Transfer rate to or from
buffer, asynchronous
(M bytes/second)
3
3
3
Transfer rate to or from
buffer, synchronous
(M bytes/second)
4
4
4
19
16
14
35 ms
35 ms
28 ms
Average latency
(milliseconds)
8.8
8.6
6.8
Average access (milliseconds)
26.8
24.6
20.8
Average seek time
(milliseconds)
Maximum seek time,
full stroke (milliseconds)
(continued on next page)
4–6 Hardware Specifications
Table 4–6 (Cont.) RZ23L, RZ24, and RZ25 Hard Disk Drive Specifications
Functional Specifications
RZ23L
RZ24
RZ25
Recording density (bits/inch)
36 250
31 800
38 834
Track density
(tracks per inch)
1850
1700
1760
Area density
(M bytes per square inch)
67.06
54.06
68.28
Read/write heads
4
8
9
Disks
2
4
5
CF
ZBR2
1
Recording mode
CF
Power
RZ23L
RZ24
RZ25
Maximum seeking (W)
3.8
6.6
14
Typical seeking (W)
3.6
6.6
10
Maximum starting (W)
14.5
27.5
34.5
1
Continuous frequency
2
Zone bit recording
Table 4–7 TZ30 Tape Drive Specifications
Subject
Description
Mode of operation
Streaming
Media
12.77 mm (0.5 in) unformatted magnetic tape
Bit density
2624 bits/cm (6667 bits/in)
Number of tracks
22
Transfer rate (at host)
62.5K bits/s
Tape speed
190 cm/s (75 in/s)
Track format
Multiple track serpentine recording
Cartridge capacity
95M bytes, formatted (approx)
Hardware Specifications 4–7
Table 4–8 TZK10 QIC Tape Drive Specifications
Subject
Description
Mode of operation
Streaming.
Media
DC6320, DC6525, or Digital approved equivalent.
See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 40 and Model 80
Operator Information manual.
Track width: write
0.1778 mm +0.0000, -0.0127 mm (0.0070 in +0.0000,
-0.0005 in).
Track width: read
0.1270 mm +0.0127, -0.0000 mm (0.0050 in +0.0005,
-0.0000 in).
Bit density
16K bits/in.
Number of tracks
26.
Transfer rate
200K bytes/s at average streaming mode, 1.5M bytes
/s at SCSI maximum.
Tape speed
305 cm/s (120 in/s).
Track format
Multiple track serpentine recording.
Cartridge capacity
320M/525M bytes, formatted (approx). depending on
the QIC tape used
Table 4–9 RX26 Diskette Drive Specifications
Subject
Description
Diskette size
9 cm (3.5 in)
Diskettes per diskette drive
1
Number of read/write heads
2
Data capacity (formatted)
1.44M bytes—high density (HD) diskettes
Number of bytes per sector
512
Number of sectors per track
18 (HD diskettes)
2.88M bytes—extra density (ED) diskettes
36 (ED diskettes)
Number of cylinders
80
Number of tracks per cylinder
2
Transfer rate
500K bits/s (HD diskettes)
1M bits/s (ED diskettes)
4–8 Hardware Specifications
Table 4–10 RRD42 Compact Disc Drive Specifications
Subject
Description
Acceptable discs
CDROM mode-1 data discs
CDROM mode-2 data discs
Disc capacity
540M bytes
Rotation speed: innermost track
530 r/min at CLV = 1.4 m/s
Rotation speed: outermost track
200 r/min at CLV = 1.2 m/s
Sustained data transfer rate
150K bytes/s
Burst data transfer rate
1.5M bytes/s
Access time: full stroke
650 ms
Access time: average
380 ms
Hardware Specifications 4–9
Index
B
BOOT command, 3–1
Boot device
setting, 3–12
viewing, 3–19
Boot flags
setting, 3–10
viewing, 3–18
C
! command, 3–27
Comment command, 3–27
Configuration
viewing, 3–19
Console command
!, 3–27
BOOT, 3–1
CONTINUE, 3–2
DEPOSIT, 3–2
EXAMINE, 3–6
FIND, 3–7
HALT, 3–7
HELP, 3–7
INITIALIZE, 3–8
LOGIN, 3–9
REPEAT, 3–10
SET, 3–10
SET FBOOT, 3–13
SHOW, 3–18
SHOW BFLG, 3–18
TEST, 3–25
UNJAM, 3–26
Console command (cont’d)
X, 3–26
Console security
setting, 3–15
Console security condition
viewing, 3–24
Console security feature
values, 3–15
CONTINUE command, 3–2
D
DEPOSIT command, 3–2
Device descriptor, 3–2
Device status
viewing, 3–20
Diagnostic test environment
setting, 3–12
viewing, 3–20
Diagnostic test environments, 3–12
Dimensions
system unit, 4–4
E
Error information
viewing, 3–21
Ethernet address
format of, 3–22
viewing, 3–22
EXAMINE command, 3–6
Index–1
F
N
Fast boot flag
setting, 3–13
viewing, 3–22
FIND command, 3–7
Firmware version
viewing, 3–25
Network listener status
setting, 3–14
values, 3–14
viewing, 3–23
Nonoperating conditions
system specifications, 4–5
H
O
Halt action flag
setting, 3–13
values, 3–13
viewing, 3–22
HALT command, 3–7
Hardware specifications
RRD42 compact disc drive, 4–8
RX26 diskette drive, 4–8
RZ23L hard disk drive, 4–6
RZ24 hard disk drive, 4–6
RZ25 hard disk drive, 4–6
system unit, 4–1
TZ30 tape drive, 4–7
TZK10 QIC tape drive, 4–7
HELP command, 3–7
Operating conditions
system specifications, 4–4
I
INITIALIZE command, 3–8
L
LOGIN command, 3–9
M
Memory addressing
mnemonics, 3–3
operators, 3–5
qualifiers for, 3–2
typical examples, 3–5
Memory configuration
viewing, 3–22
Index–2
P
Password
changing, 3–15
entering, 3–15
Primary bootstrap program
function of, 3–1
R
Radix
setting, 3–17
values, 3–17
viewing, 3–24
Remote trigger utility
setting, 3–17
values, 3–18
viewing, 3–25
REPEAT command, 3–10
Restart parameter block
See RPB
RPB
finding, 3–7
RRD42 compact disc drive
hardware specifications, 4–8
RX26 diskette drive
hardware specifications, 4–8
RZ23L hard disk drive
hardware specifications, 4–6
RZ24 hard disk drive
hardware specifications, 4–6
RZ25 hard disk drive
hardware specifications, 4–6
S
SCSI controller ID
setting, 3–17
values, 3–17
viewing, 3–25
SET BOOT command, 3–12
SET BOOT FLAGS command, 3–10
SET DIAGENV command, 3–12
SET FBOOT command, 3–13
SET HALT command, 3–13
SET MOP command, 3–14
SET PSE command, 3–15
SET PSWD command, 3–15
SET RADIX command, 3–17
SET SCSI command, 3–17
SET TRIG command, 3–17
SHOW BFLG command, 3–18
SHOW BOOT command, 3–19
SHOW CONFIG command, 3–19
SHOW DEVICE command, 3–20
SHOW DIAGENV command, 3–20
SHOW ERROR command, 3–21
SHOW ESTAT command, 3–21
SHOW ETHERNET command, 3–22
SHOW FBOOT command, 3–22
SHOW HALT command, 3–22
SHOW KBD command, 3–22
SHOW MEM command, 3–22
SHOW MOP command, 3–23
SHOW PSE command, 3–24
SHOW RADIX command, 3–24
SHOW SCSI command, 3–25
SHOW TRIG command, 3–25
SHOW VER command, 3–25
Storage Conditions
system unit, 4–4
System configuration
viewing, 3–19
System Errors
viewing, 3–21
System initialization
processor values, 3–8
System specifications
nonoperating conditions, 4–5
operating conditions, 4–4
System status
viewing, 3–21
System unit
dimensions, 4–4
hardware specifications, 4–1
storage conditions, 4–4
T
TEST command, 3–25
Transfer command, 3–26
TZ30 tape drive
hardware specifications, 4–7
TZK10 QIC tape drive
hardware specifications, 4–7
U
UNJAM command, 3–26
V
VAX instructions
support of, 1–5
Virtual machine boot
See VMB
VMB
function of
X
X command, 3–26
Index–3
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement