2015-2016 STUDENT HANDBOOK CONNECTED ENGAGED

2015-2016 STUDENT HANDBOOK CONNECTED ENGAGED
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Enter the student success zone
2015-2016
CONNECTED
DIRECTED
ENGAGED
VALUED
NURTURED
FOCUSED
2015-2016 Important Dates
Fall Semester 2015
First day applications accepted for New and Former Students...................................................... March 1
Internet Registration.......................... By appointment – Check registration time in MySite>MyInfo>Appts.
INSTRUCTION BEGINS............................................................................................................ August 17
Labor Day Observance – classes not in session..................................................................... September 7
Last day to petition for Fall Graduation................................................................................... November 1
Veterans Day Observance – classes not in session................................................................ November 11
Thanksgiving Observance – classes not in session.........................................................November 26 – 29
Final Exams..................................................................................................................December 10 – 16
Winter Break....................................................................................................December 20 – January 18
See the online Schedule of Classes for all “drop” dates, P/NP, and refund deadlines.
Spring Semester 2016
First day applications accepted for New and Former Students............................................... September 1
Internet Registration.......................... By appointment – Check registration time in MySite>MyInfo>Appts.
INSTRUCTION BEGINS.......................................................................................................... January 19
Lincoln’s Day Observance – classes not in session.................................................................. February 12
Presidents’ Day Observance – classes not in session.............................................................. February 15
Last day to petition for Spring graduation.................................................................................... March 1
Spring Recess – classes not in session................................................................................March 20 – 26
Final Exams...........................................................................................................................May 17 – 23
Commencement – Saddleback College.......................................................................................... May 24
See the online Schedule of Classes for all “drop” dates, P/NP, and refund deadlines.
Summer Session 2016
First day applications accepted for New and Former Students.................................................. February 1
Internet Registration.......................... By appointment – Check registration time in MySite>MyInfo>Appts.
INSTRUCTION BEGINS.................................................................................................. May 31 – Aug 12
Memorial Day Observance – classes not in session........................................................................ May 25
Last day to petition for Summer graduation.....................................................................................July 1
Independence Day Observance – classes not in session....................................................................July 4
See the online Schedule of Classes for all “drop” dates, P/NP, and refund deadlines.
Saddleback College has made every reasonable effort to ensure that
the “important dates” published in the Student Handbook are accurate.
However, these dates are subject to change.
The Division of Counseling Services
Saddleback College
28000 Marguerite Parkway • Mission Viejo, CA 92692
(949) 582-4500
www.saddleback.edu
About Saddleback College
Saddleback College Programs for Students
Welcome to Saddleback........................................... 2
Associated Students............................................... 32
Did You Know?.......................................................... 3
Student Athletes.................................................... 33
Steps to Enrollment/Matriculation
Student Clubs........................................................ 34
Student Success & Support Program (SSSP)............ 4
Financial Aid.......................................................... 35
Important Decisions That Impact Your...................... 5
College Education
Grants/Scholarships.............................................. 36
Important College Policies
Using Your Saddleback College Online Tools............. 6
College Policies Affecting all Students..................... 37
Classes with Prerequisites or Limitations.................. 8
Student Rights and Responsibilities........................ 39
Matriculation Assessment and Placement................. 9
Parking On Campus............................................... 43
English as a Second Language (ESL)...................... 10
Campus Safety
Student Services
Safety on Campus.................................................. 44
Counseling Services............................................... 11
Safety Tips............................................................. 45
Academic Counseling............................................. 12
Campus Offices and Locations
Career Counseling Process..................................... 13
College Services..................................................... 46
Personal Counseling............................................... 14
Campus Locations and Phone Numbers................. 48
Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSPS)..15
Offices and Divisions....................... Inside Back Cover
Educational Degrees and Transfer
Educational Options in California............................ 16
Guide to California Higher Education...................... 17
Associate Degrees and Certificate Programs........... 18
The Associate Degrees........................................... 19
Associate Degree General Education Requirements 20
The Bachelor Degrees............................................ 21
CSU General Education Certification Requirements.22
IGETC Requirements.............................................. 23
Campus Map............................................ Back Cover
SPECIAL THANKS
The editors wish to extend a very special thank you to
Dr. Juan Avalos, Vice President for Student Services,
and Jerilyn Chuman, Dean, Counseling Services for
their unwavering support.
The 2015-2016 Student Handbook has been funded by
generous grants from:
The Saddleback College Foundation
ASSIST.................................................................. 24
CREDITS
Map of California Four-Year Public Universities....... 25
Writer/Editors:
Maryam Azary, Zina Boratynec, and Sarah Chang
Professors of Counseling & DSPS
The California State Universities............................. 26
The Universities of California.................................. 27
California Independent Colleges............................. 28
Transfer Information on the Internet....................... 29
Success Tools
Glossary of College Terms...................................... 30
Calculating Your Grade Point Average..................... 31
Table of Contents
SADDLEBACK COLLEGE
STUDENT HANDBOOK
Cover and Handbook Design:
Heather Siemon, Senior Graphic Designer
Deadlines or policies are subject to change. Every effort has been made
to ensure the accuracy of the information presented in this publication
at the time of printing. It is the individual student’s responsibility to be
aware of current college policy as stated in the college catalog.
© 2015 Saddleback College, All Rights Reserved.
1
About Saddleback College
Welcome to Saddleback College
Our number one priority is the success of all of our students. Whether
they are just beginning college or are well into their studies, our students
find that Saddleback College’s outstanding education and training
programs help them fulfill their goals and aspirations. Contained in the
pages of this student handbook you will find excellent information on
our wide variety of services for students, including counseling, financial
aid, transfer requirements, and job search assistance. Our faculty, staff
and administrators are fully committed to helping you succeed. In
addition, our counselors are a tremendous asset to Saddleback College
and provide students with one-on-one support to help them create their
academic plans or resolve personal issues.
To learn more about all of our academic programs, counseling services,
and clubs and activities, please visit our website at www.saddleback.edu.
We look forward to seeing you on campus and thank you for becoming a
member of our Saddleback College family!
Go Gauchos!
Tod A. Burnett, Ed.D.
President
A Letter from the ASG President
I have secretly been interested in joining ASG for a little while now but never
really had the time for it because I was taking so many classes. So now that I’m
finishing up I have more time at my disposal to become part of the leadership at
Saddleback. I would like to make a difference and leave something behind before
I transfer and contribute to making student life better in some way – even if it is
only minimal.
William Vassetti
Associated Student Government President, 2015-2016
Saddleback College Mission
Saddleback College enriches its students and the south Orange County community by providing a
comprehensive array of high-quality courses and programs that foster student learning and success in
the attainment of academic degrees and career technical certificates, transfer to four-year institutions,
improvement of basic skills, and lifelong learning.
2
BENEFITS TO STUDENTS:
• Guaranteed counseling appointments
•Priority tutoring services to improve
reading/writing
•Peer-to-peer mentoring with ASG and
Honors students
• Strategies to improve your college
and career success
For more information please
contact or visit:
www.saddleback.edu/avid
949.582.4455
AVID Campus Leadership
Team (ACLT)
Bruce Gilman, Ph.D.
bgilman@saddleback.edu
Michelle Duffy, Ed.D.
mduffy@saddleback.edu
Mariana DeSaracho, Ed.D.
mdesaracho@saddleback.edu
Mike Engels, M.A.
mengels@saddleback.edu
Emily Quinlan, J.D.
equinlan@saddleback.edu
•Connections with the Saddleback
College community
• Support towards your certificate,
degree, and/or transfer goals.
ALL STUDENTS MUST BE PELL ELIGIBLE AND ENROLL
IN AN AHE • COUNSELING 140 COURSE. FOR MORE
INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT THE AVID WEBSITE AT
WWW.SADDLEBACK.EDU/AVID
SEXUAL VIOLENCE EDUCATION AND PREVENTION POLICY
About Saddleback College
DID YOU KNOW?
The South Orange County Community College District is committed to creating and maintaining an environment
in which all persons who live, work, and learn in our campus community can be free of all forms of sexual
assault, sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and retaliation. Every member of the
campus community should be aware that sex offenses are prohibited by law as well as our district policy.
Sex offenses threaten the emotional, physical, and psychological well-being of our students, faculty, and staff
and endanger the safety of our community. Sex offenses violate the principles of our community and the values
that we hold most important. Therefore, sex offenses will not be tolerated and is prohibited on campus,
and sets forth the procedure for the investigation and resolution of complaints of harassment/violence
by or against any staff or faculty member or student within the District.
For more information, visit www.saddleback.edu/shc/sexual-assault-what-sexual-assault
Beginning Fall Semester 2015
Saddleback College will be a
SMOKE &
TOBACCO FREE
Need help kicking your habit?
Visit the Student Health Center in SSC-177 for free resources and support.
campus.
3
Steps to Enrollment/Matriculation
STUDENT SUCCESS & SUPPORT PROGRAM (SSSP)
SSSP Services
NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION is
completed online and provides
information about Saddleback College’s
student services, special programs, and
campus policies and procedures. The
orientation is mandatory for all students
required to complete the Matriculation
Process.
MATH AND ENGLISH PLACEMENT can
be accomplished by either taking the
Saddleback College assessment exams
or submitting alternative evidence for
evaluation. Math and English placement
is mandatory for all students required to
complete the Matriculation Process.
Assessment exams in Reading, English,
and Mathematics are taken at
Saddleback College and will provide
appropriate course placement. Information and appointment schedules are
available through your MySite, at the
Matriculation Office (949-582-4970),
or at www.saddleback.edu/matriculation
Alternative Evidence can be submitted in place of the assessment exams
by students who have completed and
passed a Saddleback College equivalent
Math and/or English course at another
college or university or have passed the
AP English and/or Calculus exams with a
3 or higher. Please see the Matriculation
website for the procedures to submit
Alternative Evidence.
www.saddleback.edu/matriculation
MATH AND ENGLISH PREREQUISITES
All courses that have a Math or English
prerequisite must be evaluated and
cleared by the Matriculation Office prior
to enrollment. Please see the “Classes
with a Prerequisite” page for more
information.
4
STUDENT ADVISEMENT & FIRST
SEMESTER ED PLAN is completed online
after the student completes the Assessment exams and/or the evaluation of
Alternative Evidence and has received
Math and English placement. Advisement helps students determine their
educational goal, plan a first semester
schedule, and create a First Semester
Educational Plan using My Academic
Plan (MAP). The Advisement and First
Semester Plan are mandatory for all
students required to complete the
Matriculation Process.
FOLLOW-UP SERVICES See a Counselor
for follow up counseling after the
semester begins to refine your
Educational Plan, and discuss your
goals. Students are required to complete
a Comprehensive Ed Plan and have it
approved by a counselor once they have
completed 15 degree-applicable units
or by the end of their third semester –
whichever comes first. Failure to do so
will delay your registration.
Attend workshops to: help with deciding
a major, completing academic plans, and
academic/progress probation.
STUDENT SUCCESS TAKE
RESPONSIBILITY for your success in
college. Be aware of deadlines and due
dates, instructors’ office hours, and the
many resources available at Saddleback
College to help you succeed in obtaining
your certificate, AA/AS/ADT degree or
transfer to a 4-Year institution. The most
successful student is the one who takes
responsibility for himself or herself.
MATRICULATION
A Process Leading
You to Student Success
1
NEW STUDENT
ORIENTATION
Online Orientation of Student
Services & Programs,
Campus Policies and Campus
Involvement.
2
ASSESSMENT OR
ALTERNATIVE EVIDENCE
Reading, English and
Mathematics Placement Exams,
Other California Community
College assessment scores,
or other College Transcripts
showing completion in
Math and English.
3
ADVISEMENT/ED PLAN
Online Student Advisement to
determine an educational goal
and prepare a First Semester
Educational Plan using My
Academic Plan (MAP).
STUDENT SUCCESS
Obtain a Certificate, AA/AS/ADT
Degree, or Transfer To a 4-Year
College or University
got map?
Starting Fall 2014, new students must have a reviewed
and approved Educational Plan (MAP) by the time they are
to enroll in their 16th unit or at the end of their third
semester, whichever comes first.
• Students who want a Saddleback College certificate, a two-year degree, or students who want to transfer to a four-year university must have a Comprehensive Ed Plan approved by a counselor.
• If you don’t have a major, attend an “Undeclared Majors Workshop,” conducted in counseling or enroll in a Counseling 140 or 160 class during your first semester. Students must have a major by the time they enroll in their second semester.
• Contact Saddleback College Counseling Office at (949) 582-4572 or go to
www.saddleback.edu/counseling
Remember, students who do not complete their
Comprehensive Educational Plan will lose their
“place in line for registration.”
6 YEAR RULE
Catalog Rights and Continuous Enrollment:
Because course requirements for degree and
certificate completion may change from one catalog
year to the next, students may establish “catalog
rights” when they first take classes at Saddleback.
Establishing catalog rights protects you from being
held for additional requirements that may be added
to a later catalog. The number of years allowed for
students to complete a certificate or degree program
and maintain catalog rights is no more than six years.
Students must maintain continuous enrollment in
order to keep catalog rights.
For additional information please refer to
Saddleback College Catalog,
www.saddleback.edu/course-catalog
Registration Blocks
CP Hold – Comprehensive Ed Plan
Starting Fall 2014, new students must have a Counselor
Approved Educational Plan (MAP) by the time they reach
their 15th degree applicable unit or at the end of their
third semester, whichever comes first. Failure to have a
Comprehensive Educational Plan will result in a CP Hold
and will be blocked from registration
PB Hold – First Time Probation
Students who are placed on Academic and/or Progress
Probation for the first time receive a First Time Probation
Hold (PB) that blocks all further registration until the hold
is cleared. First time probation students are required to
attend a Probation Workshop conducted by a counselor.
Students who are on Academic and/or Progress Probation for two consecutive terms will lose their registration
priority.
• Effective in Fall 2014, students not in good academic standing will receive a later registration date and time
in their next semester and continuously until they
reach good academic standing.
•
Students that are on academic probation for 2
consecutive semesters may lose eligibility for
Financial Aid.
Steps to Enrollment/Matriculation
IMPORTANT DECISIONS THAT
IMPACT YOUR COLLEGE EDUCATION
Get Awarded!!
(Degrees, Transfers, Certificates)
You may be attending Saddleback College in order to
transfer, obtain a two-year associate degree, and earn a
career technical Certificate of Achievement or Occupational Skills Award. Whatever your goal, be sure you get
the award that you have earned.
You must apply for your degree, certificate, certification,
or skills award. It is not given to you automatically. If you
are unsure which award to apply for, be sure to meet with
a counselor who will assist you.
At the beginning of the semester in which you are
completing your requirements, be sure to apply for your
award online in MySite. From the menu choose “Degree/
Certs/Transfer.” Be sure to apply before the following
deadlines: November 1 for Fall, March 1 for Spring, July 1
for Summer.
Upon completion, your award is posted on your official
Saddleback College transcript and you will receive a
diploma or certificate. Graduation is celebrated in May
each year.
Students earning a degree or certificate of achievement
in summer, fall or spring, may participate in the commencement ceremony.
5
Steps to Enrollment/Matriculation
USING YOUR SADDLEBACK COLLEGE ONLINE TOOLS
1.Open your Internet web browser and go to www.saddleback.edu
2.Click on the button link that reads MySite
3.Log-in with your Saddleback student ID number and PIN
If you do not know your student ID number or PIN you will need to show a photo ID
at the Admissions and Records Office (SSC 102) to obtain them!
1
• Click on the menu link that reads My Information
• Click on the menu link that reads Matriculation
• Click on the Online Orientation link to start the program
You must complete all six sections of the orientation and answer all 10 questions.
Average time for completion is about 1.5 hours.
2
7
Obtaining your Assessment and Placement results
• Click on the menu link that reads My Information
• Click on the menu link that reads Matriculation
• Click on the menu link that reads Assessment & Placement
3
Completing your Advisement & First Semester Ed Plan
• Click on the menu link that reads My Information
• Click on the menu link that reads Matriculation
• Click on the Online Advisement link to start the program
You will need to have your official placement resuts prior to starting the advisement.
Complete all sections of the advisement and then click on the First Semester Ed Plan
link from the Advisement completion page. Create your Ed Plan and add your placement courses and required courses to the plan. (You will finalize your Ed Plan with a
counselor prior to completing 15 units.)
*
NOTE: If you forget to click on the First Semester Ed Plan link at the end of
the Online Advisement, you can access it directly by clicking on the menu link
under My Academic Plan.
4
Viewing prerequisite evaluation & challenge/appeal results
5
View your registration appointment
6
6
Completing your Online Orientation
2
3
1
4
5
• Click on the menu link that reads My Information
• Click on the menu link that reads Matriculation
• Click on the menu link that reads Placement Info
• Click on the menu link that reads My Information
• Click on the menu link that reads Appointments
• Select the semester in the drop-down menu and your registration appointment
will be listed. If you DO NOT have an appointment posted, please check the
Admissions & Records website for the posting date
6
Creating a My Academic Plan (MAP)
• Click on the menu link that reads My Academic Plan
• Click on the menu link that reads New Plan
• To Review Plans, click on the menu link that reads My Plans
7
Register for classes
8
Student E-mail
• Click on the menu link that reads My Classes
• Click on the menu link that reads Register For Classes
• Click on the Add/Drop button in the term box you wish to enroll in
• Follow the on-screen instructions to add classes
• Pay for classes and print a copy of the receipt
• Click on the menu link that reads My E-mail
• Click on the menu link that reads Student E-mail
• Log-in and check your e-mail or forward it to a preferred e-mail address
8
WHAT IS BLACKBOARD?
It is the learning management system at
Saddleback College that allows instructors to post
and distribute course content to students, as well
as a place for instructor/student and student/student communication. The majority of instructors
use Blackboard as a tool for all or part of their
courses.
To access Blackboard
•Go to saddleback.blackboard.com
•Log in with your username and password
(If you don’t know your username and password, log into MySite to obtain this
information)
Blackboard Resources
•Blackboard Basics for Students
•Student Technical Support
If these links don’t work. Please use Blackboard
Basics for Students:
www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLptkUnLpaaakinO
_W3gDRALZuXUODwLZO
And for Student Technical Support use:
www.saddleback.edu/oe/student-technical-support
LEARNING RESOURCES
CENTER (LRC)
Steps to Enrollment/Matriculation
USING YOUR SADDLEBACK COLLEGE ONLINE TOOLS
The Learning Resource Center (LRC) is a newly
remodeled space that includes the library as well
as several resources to support student success –
tutoring services, the writing, reading, and language
labs, study rooms, and computer work stations.
This service is free of charge for all Saddleback
College students. If you are unable to stop by for
an in-person tutoring session, visit
www.saddleback.edu/tutoring/online-tutoring
for additional information about our online paper
center, online tutoring, and more!
STUDENT EMAIL
IMPORTANT NOTICE: Student email privileges are
designed solely for educational purposes. District policy
forbids personal, recreational or commercial use of
college computers, email and Internet services.
Upon enrolling in a course, students automatically
receive a college email account. User names are assigned automatically and accounts are continued with no
interruption in services so long as the student remains
enrolled in contiguous semesters.
Students’ assigned college email addresses may be found
on “MySite” at www.saddleback.edu. Click on “Email” in
the left-hand column.
Email addresses are available within 24 hours after
applying to the college.
Email accounts will be deleted approximately three
weeks after the start of the semester for students who
do not enroll in at least one class for that semester.
Accounts will be deleted along with any unread
messages.
EXAMPLE: If your name is Jane Deer, your assigned
student email address is jdeer0@saddleback.edu. Your
username is jdeer0
NOTE: All student email names always end in a number. Your default email
password is your PIN plus two zeros.
7
Steps to Enrollment/Matriculation
CLASSES WITH PREREQUISITES OR LIMITATIONS
Prerequisites/Corequisites/Limitation on
Enrollment/Recommended Preparation
Saddleback College is committed to helping students select
appropriate level courses in order to provide the greatest
chance for their academic success. Information relating to
prerequisites, corequisites, limitation on enrollment, and
recommended preparation is printed in bold as part of the
course descriptions in the catalog. Courses with a mandatory prerequisite have a padlock symbol printed on the
course details section in the schedule of classes.
Students are responsible for meeting or clearing the
prerequisite courses prior to registering for any course with
these restrictions.
Prerequisite:
Mastery of a certain body of knowledge is necessary
for students to be successful in the target course (the
course that has the prerequisite). Most commonly,
such knowledge is measured by successful completion
of the prerequisite course listed in the class schedule.
“Successful completion” is defined by a grade of A, B,
C or P in the prerequisite course. Grades that are not
acceptable are C-, D, F or NP.
Corequisite:
Concurrent (simultaneous) enrollment in a companion
course is required. The information presented, or the
practice gained in the corequisite course, is considered
necessary for success in the target course.
Limitation on Enrollment:
A condition of enrollment which limits how students
qualify for a particular program. Limitations apply
to courses that include public performance or intercollegiate competition where a tryout or audition is
necessary. Some courses require formal admission to
a particular program in order to enroll (e.g., Nursing,
EMT, Paramedic).
Recommended Preparation:
Certain course preparation is advised before students
enter the target course. These recommendations
indicate preparation that is considered advantageous,
but not essential, to success in the target course.
How to Clear a Prerequisite
Students can clear their prerequisite requirement by
completing one or more of the following:
1. Saddleback Course Completion
Complete the course(s) at Saddleback College with
a satisfactory grade of A, B, C or P.
Note: Grade of C- or lower is not satisfactory and
courses offered for “zero units” cannot be used to
satisfy a prerequisite.
2. Alternative Evidence/College Transcripts
Provide Matriculation (if courses have a Math or
English prerequisite) or the appropriate division offices
(if courses have other prerequisites) with transcripts
from another accredited college or university. Such
transcripts must demonstrate satisfactory completion
8
of the prerequisite course – that is, completion of the
course with a grade of A, B, C, P or CR.
Note: Grade of C- or lower is not satisfactory.
3. Saddleback Assessment Exams
Earn the appropriate score on the English assessment
exam, or earn the appropriate score on the math assessment exam. Note: only Alternative Evidence may
be used to place into ENG 1B; MATH 3B, 3C, 26 or 24.
4. Other California Community College Assessment
Exams
Provide evidence of completion of an assessment
exam administered at another California community
college. In some cases, students may clear prerequisites in English and mathematics if they have received
the appropriate score on the MDTP math assessment
exam and recommended course placement on the
English assessment exam. Students must have the
Matriculation Office evaluate their assessment exams
for acceptance.
5. AP Exams
Provide Matriculation (Literature/Language, Composition or Calculus AP) or the appropriate division offices
(other than math or English exams) with the original
College Board test results.
Note: A satisfactory score of 3 or higher is required on
AP exams for prerequisite clearance.
Prerequisite Evaluation Procedures
Math and/or English Prerequisites
1. Complete the Saddleback College Math and English
Evaluation Form. The form is available in the
Matriculation Office or online at
www.saddleback.edu/matriculation
2. Attach a copy (official or unofficial) of your previous
college coursework, California community college
assessment results, or AP score report. Unofficial
copies must include the student’s name, college name,
and the course with a final grade. Incomplete courses
cannot be used.
3. Fax (949) 582-4789, email (scmatric@saddleback.edu)
or drop off all documentation to the Matriculation
Office (Village 8-5).
Prerequisites Other than Math or English
For all other prerequisites, please contact the division office
where the course originates for their evaluation procedures.
Please see www.saddleback.edu/academics for division
office contact information.
Evaluation Processing
Given the large amount of prerequisite evaluations, please
allow a minimum of five working days for evaluations to be
processed. Students should submit evaluations a minimum
of two weeks prior to their registration date to avoid
enrollment delays. Specific information regarding procedures, time lines, and transcript evaluation notification is
available in the Matriculation Office or online at
www.saddleback.edu/matriculation
Reading and English Placement Procedures
Mathematics Placement Procedures
1. Students who have completed the reading and English
assessment exams will find their placement results in
MySite under My Information > Matriculation > Assessment and Placement. The Placement Letter displays a
reading and English placement recommendation.
2. If a student believes that the placement recommendation
is not indicative of his/her abilities, the student may appeal their placement by taking the Writing Sample Appeal.
3. Students may retake the reading and English sections of
the placement exam after a 3 month waiting period.
There are four different levels of math assessment exams
provided through Saddleback College’s Matriculation Office.
Students should evaluate their own skill level to determine
which math assessment exam is most appropriate for them.
Sample test questions can be found online at
www.saddleback.edu/matriculation
1. Students who have completed the math assessment
exam will find their placement results in MySite under
My Information > Matriculation > Assessment and Placement. The Placement Letter displays a math placement
recommendation.
2. If the student believes that the placement recommendation is not indicative of his/her abilities, the student has
the option to take a different level test and/or appeal their
placement with the Math Department.
3. Students may retake the same math test level after 3
months have passed.
Reading Placements
English 70: Reasoning and College Reading. IGETC approved!
English 180: Speed Reading and Comprehension training
English 340: Reading and Writing Skills for College
English 345: Building Basic Reading Skills
Note: English 70 has an English 1A Prerequisite. Please review
your reading course placement with your counselor to insure
you are taking the correct reading course.
English Placements
English 1A: Principles of Composition I (transfer level)
English 200: Fundamentals of Composition
English 300: Beginning Writing
Math Test Levels and Placements
Test Level 1: Math 351, 353
Test Level 2: No Placement or Math 353, 205, 253
Test Level 3: No Placement or Math 205, 253, 7, 8, 10, 112, 124, 11
Test Level 4: No Placement or Math 2, 3A
Steps to Enrollment/Matriculation
MATRICULATION ASSESSMENT AND PLACEMENT
Writing Sample Appeal
The Writing Sample allows the student to appeal their English
placement recommendation of English 200 or 300 if they
believe the initial placement does not indicate their current
English proficiency. The Writing Sample Appeal requires you
to construct a clear and persuasive response to a specific
prompt. After carefully reading the provided passage, you will
respond to the topic by writing an essay that is controlled
by a central idea (your thesis) and specifically developed.
The Writing Sample is a Final Appeal given by appointment
only at the Matriculation Office.
SPS courses are offered through the DSPS department. These courses
are designed for students who may benefit from more specialized
instruction prior to transitioning to the next English/Math course
sequence. Placement is provided by Saddleback College, another
accredited college or counselor/specialist recommendation.
Math Placement Appeal
A student who desires placement in a higher level mathematics course than resulted from the usual assessment process
may complete an “Appeal Petition” in the Mathematics,
Science, and Engineering Division Office, SM 334. An Appeals
Committee will meet to review the Appeal Petition and
supporting documents within five working days. If the appeal
is approved the student will be allowed to enroll in the higher
level course. If the appeal is denied, the student will not be
eligible for the higher level course and will be dropped if prior
enrollment was allowed.
9
Steps to Enrollment/Matriculation
ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (ESL )
COURSE SEQUENCE
Course # Course Name
Core Class Prerequisite
Co-requisite Units Hours
Pre-College Level
ESL 350*
Essential Academic Skills
✓
ESL 340 or 345
6
6
Advanced 2
ESL 354
Vocabulary Skills for College
3
3
ESL 355
ESL Reading for College: American Literature
3
3
ESL 356
Academic Success Strategies for ESL Students
3
3
ESL 357
Grammar Review for College
3
3
ESL 358
Listening and Notetaking Skills for College
3
3
ESL 359
American Language and Culture
through Film
3
3
ESL 340
Advanced Multi-Skills
ESL 342
Advanced Conversation
3
3
ESL 343
Advanced Pronunciation
3
3
ESL 344
Idioms and Expressions
3
3
ESL 345
Advanced Writing I
3
3
ESL 346
Advanced Writing for Work
3
3
ESL 347
Advanced Grammar Review
3
3
ESL 330
Intermediate Multi-Skills I
✓ ESL 331
Intermediate Multi-Skills II
✓ ESL 332
Intermediate Conversation
3
3
ESL 333
Intermediate Pronunciation
3
3
ESL 335
Intermediate Reading and Writing I
ESL 321 or 325
3
3
ESL 336
Intermediate Writing II
ESL 330 or 335
3
3
ESL 902
Advanced 1
✓
ESL 331 or 336
ESL 802
ESL 901
66
Intermediate
ESL 801
66
66
Beginning
ESL 320
Beginning Multi-Skills I
✓ 66
ESL 321
Beginning Multi-Skills II
✓ ESL 322
Beginning Conversation
3
3
ESL 323
Beginning Pronunciation
3
3
ESL 325
Beginning Reading and Writing
3
3
66
Please note: ESL titles printed in RED above are the “core” courses for each level
English as a Second Language Placement Procedures:
1. The ESL test will result in one of the ESL course placement recommendations listed above.
2. If a student believes that the placement recommendation is not indicative of his/her abilities, the student may
take the ESL Writing Sample Appeal or wait 3 months to take the ESL test again.
3. Dates and times for the ESL test are available in the Matriculation Office (Village 8-5) or on the Matriculation
website www.saddleback.edu/matriculation
10
Your enrollment at Saddleback College entitles you to receive
the following services from Counseling Services and
Transfer, Career and Special Programs divisions
at Saddleback College.
Academic Counseling
Workshops
Counselors are available to discuss and help you plan
your educational program, to advise you about schedule
planning, additional dropping courses, and MAP.
Successful students see a Counselor at least once a
semester.
Various workshops are offered throughout the year. How
to Decide on a Major, How to Apply to the UC and/or CSU,
How to Write a Personal Statement are just some of the
many useful workshops offered. Visit the Counseling
Department or Transfer Center for dates and times of
up-coming workshops.
Career Counseling
Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions
a person can make. Career Counseling professionals are
available to assist you in choosing a career that will match
your interests, skills, values, and personality.
Personal Counseling
We all have our share of problems. Sometimes these
problems interfere with our ability to do well in college,
sometimes they interfere with our ability to continue in
class, and sometimes they interfere with our emotional
well-being. Personal counseling is available from
professional Counselors who may help you find solutions
to your problems.
Counseling Services:
www.saddleback.edu/counseling
To schedule appointment call: (949) 582-4572
or visit the website
Location: SSC 167
Transfer Center:
www.saddleback.edu/transfer
To schedule appointment call: (949) 582-4328
Location: SSC 225B
Email: sctco@saddleback.edu
Disabled Students Programs
and Services:
www.saddleback.edu/dsps
To schedule appointment call: (949) 582-4885
Video Phone: (949) 482-4430
Locations: SSC 113
Fax: (949) 347-1526
Student Services
COUNSELING SERVICES
My Academic Plan – MAP Your Future!
MAP or My Academic Plan is a computerized academic
planning program that allows students to develop a
comprehensive semester-by-semester academic plan for
their specific educational goal. The Counseling Services
Division encourages students to use MAP prior to meeting
with a counselor and registering for classes. Visit MAP in
MySite at www.saddleback.edu
Extended Opportunity Program
& Services and CARE:
www.saddleback.edu/eops
To schedule appointment call: (949) 582-4620
Location: SSC 126
Fax: (949) 364-6949
Email: sceops@saddleback.edu
Career and Re-Entry Center:
www.saddleback.edu/career
To schedule appointment call: (949) 582-4575
Location: SSC 140
Veterans Education & Transition
Services:
www.saddleback.edu/vets
To schedule appointment call: (949) 582-4252
Location: SSC 207
Email: vetsoutreach@saddleback.edu
11
Student Services
ACADEMIC COUNSELING
What Courses Do I Take?
Selecting courses for the first semester can be frustrating
and difficult. Here are some suggestions you may find
helpful:
Decide how many units you want to take.
Make a list of possible courses, which might include:
• Career Planning, College Orientation or Educational
Planning courses such as Counseling 1, 140, 160,
or Women’s Studies 120
• Basic Skills courses: It is important to begin with
any basic skills courses in Mathematics, Reading or
English. These courses do NOT transfer to four-year
colleges and universities. However, these courses are
the building blocks to develop skills in order to be a
successful college student.
• General Education courses: All students working
towards a college degree need these courses. You
will find lists of courses required for the Saddleback
College Associate Degree (non-transfer) as well as
those for the California State University and the
University of California in this handbook.
(see Pages 20, 22 and 23).
• Major Preparation courses: Courses that you are
required to take at Saddleback College for an
Associate Degree or an Associate Degree for Transfer
are listed in the Saddleback College Catalog. For
Transfer major requirement see www.assist.org
• Personal Interest and Exploration: Many students enjoy
taking an introductory course in a major they are considering or courses they have always wanted to take
such as music, art, computer programs, etc.
Beginning fall 2014 all students seeking an academic goal
such as a certificate, AA/AS, ADT or transfer are required
to have a comprehensive educational plan by the time they
reach 15 degree applicable units or their third semester.
To determine needed coursework students must go to
their MySite page and click on My Academic Plan (MAP).
You can obtain step-by-step instructions on how to identify
courses required for the goal and semester by semester
course planning tips.
Review each course you have selected to make sure you
have any required prerequisites. All prerequisites are being
enforced.
After the semester begins, make an appointment with a
counselor so that you can do some long-range academic
planning. Counselors will help you explore majors, careers,
and programs of study during your appointment. Multiple
appointments can be made if needed.
Time Management
When deciding how many units to take, it is very important to plan time for reading, studying, and preparing for those
classes. No time is given “in class” for study. You are expected to be ready for each class before the class period begins.
The recommended formula to determine expected amount of TOTAL TIME required for success in a class is as follows:
Schedule 2-3 hours per unit, per week for studying.
Example:
3 unit class –
In-class time = 3 hours per week
Study time = 6 hours per week
(3 units x 2 hrs/unit study = 6 hours)
TOTAL TIME: 9 HOURS PER WEEK FOR A 3-UNIT CLASS
If you take 12 units, total time to budget is 36 hours per week.
That is why 12 units is considered full-time-student status.
You may take as little as .5 units or as many as 19 units during a single semester. To take more than 19 units (not including work experience or independent study) you are required to obtain special permission from the Counseling Division. You
must have a cumulative 3.0 grade point average to gain permission to enroll in more than 19 units.
College Units
• A college “unit” is a term used to define the time
value of a course, or a “unit” of time involved in
class instruction.
• A one-unit class typically requires one hour of
instruction per week for a 16-18-week semester.
Lab units are calculated differently.
• A three-unit class requires three hours of instruction
per week for a 16-18-week semester.
12
Managing Work and School
Recommended combination:
Work
School
5-15 hours per week............... 12-15 units
20 hours per week.................... 9-12 units
30 hours per week...................... 6-9 units
40 hours per week...................... 3-6 units
Do not overload yourself when you register for classes.
Design a course load that is reasonable for your level
of energy and motivation.
1
Self Assessment:
(Finding out who you are and what you want)
• What are your skills, interests, values and personality?
• What is your idea of work and a career?
Useful Websites and Resources:
www.cacareercafe.com
www.cacareerzone.org
www.cacareerbriefs.com
www.onetcenter.org/sites.html
• What do you want your career to be?
2
Exploration:
(Finding out more about the world of work and education)
3
Complete Career Exploration Profiles:
www.onetonline.org
www.bls.gov/ooh
• Investigate possible career fields and talk to people who work in careers
that interest you.
Complete one or more of the
following classes:
• Use internships, volunteer jobs, and part-time work to sample jobs and
careers that interest you.
COUN 1 – Academic Planning
COUN 140 – Educational & Vocational Planning
COUN 160 – Career & Vocational Exploration
WS 120 – Women & Careers
• Research majors and careers that match your self-assessment.
Decision Making:
(Analyzing the information)
• Begin to define your specific career goals.
• Make tentative career decisions.
Student Services
CAREER COUNSELING PROCESS
The Career Planning Process is a lifelong process that is fluid rather than chronological.
One stage does not necessarily need to be completed to move to the tasks of another stage,
and you may move back and forth between two or more stages at any given time.
Make an Academic and/or Career
Counseling Appt. – Visit Counseling Services:
www.saddleback.edu/counseling
Visit Career & Guidance Services:
www.saddleback.edu/career/decision-making-stage
• Set short and long term goals that allow you to reach your chosen career.
• If not comfortable in the decision – return back to Exploration Stage.
4
Educational Planning:
(Developing a Plan for Success)
MAP – My Academic Plan
www.saddleback.edu/counseling/my-academic-plan
• Researching two year and four year college programs that will allow you
to reach your career goals.
Saddleback College Catalog
www.saddleback.edu/cc
• Establish a plan that allows you to complete your education and training
in a time frame that works for you.
Transfer Information
www.assist.org
www.aiccu.edu
www.csumentor.edu
www.universityofcalifornia.edu
Job and Career Search:
Student Employment
www.saddleback.edu/jobs
• Decide on the amount of time you are willing to attend college or program.
5
(Looking for a job)
• Develop a job search plan of action.
• Establish and use job search resources and contacts.
• Overcome barriers and keep motivated.
• Manage your career with an up-to-date cover letter and resume.
Off Campus Resources
www.bestjobsusa.com
www.job-hunt.org
www.snagajob.com
www.indeed.com
13
Student Services
PERSONAL COUNSELING
College offers many new experiences and challenges. This can be an exciting time in your life – it can also be a stressful
time if you, or someone you know, feels overwhelmed. Sometimes problems interfere with our emotional well-being.
As a result, our ability to continue with classes or do well in college will diminish.
Personal Counseling is available on campus from trained counselors and psychologists who can help you find solutions.
These services are free to all currently enrolled students. All counseling appointments are confidential. Our program
offers short-term counseling, as well as crisis intervention counseling. The Counseling Program welcomes students of
all cultural and ethnic groups, ages, lifestyles, and diverse value systems.
COUNSELING SERVICES
(949) 582-4572
SSC 167
M-Th 8 am - 7 pm
F 8 am - Noon
Generalist Counselors may help
students with:
• Individual counseling
• Personal growth
• Maximizing potentials
• Relationship problems
• Values clarification
• Stress management
• Referrals to other agencies
or practitioners
Students can also meet with a
counselor from the TCSP Division.
HELP A STRESSED
STUDENT
At – Risk training has been adopted
by the Counseling Services Division
to help support students’ mental
health and maintain a healthy environment on our college campus.
To take the course, go to:
www.saddleback.edu/counseling/
help-stressed-student
The goal of this program is to
significantly increase the number of
individuals on our campus who are
trained to identify, address, and refer
students exhibiting signs of psychological distress including depression,
anxiety, and thoughts of suicide.
HEALTH CENTER
(949) 582-4606
SSC 177
M-Th 8 am - 7 pm
F 8 am - 3 pm
Advanced graduate school interns
under the direct supervision of a
licensed clinical psychologist will
provide:
• Individual Therapy
• Couples Therapy
• Family Therapy
• Drug & Alcohol Prevention &
Intervention
• Group Support
• Psychological Testing
• ADHD Testing
REMEMBER, COUNSELING WORKS!
www.211oc.org
2-1-1 Orange County offers a comprehensive information and referral system linking Orange County
residents to community health and human services and support. Callers seeking assistance can
dial 211 (toll-free) 24 hours-a-day and be connected to trained, multilingual Information and
Referral specialists.
Simply put, 2-1-1 is to health and human services what 9-1-1 is to emergency services. 2-1-1 Orange County also serves
as a crucial public information system during local emergencies such as earthquake, fire or other disaster.
IN THE EVENT OF A CRISIS, IMMEDIATELY CONTACT THE
CRISIS INTERVENTION TEAM (CIT):
Student Health Center................................ (949) 582-4606
Counseling Services.................................... (949) 582-4572
Campus Safety or Campus Police............. (949) 582-4444 or 911
14
DSPS is committed to providing quality support services
and specialized instruction to students with verified
disabilities which enables them to access and participate
in all programs at Saddleback College. Visit us at
www.saddleback.edu/dsps
What is a Disability?
A disability is a physical or mental condition which limits
one or more major life activities, having a record of such
a condition, or being regarded as having such a condition.
Disabilities include: Mobility, Learning, Speech, Hearing,
Visual, Acquired Brain Injury, Developmental, Psychological,
and Other disabilities such as ADHD and Autism Spectrum
Disorders.
Applying for DSPS
Students must fill out an application in the DSPS Office
to determine eligibility for services. Please bring copies
of any educational, psychological, therapeutic, or professional documentation, including scores from assessment
or diagnostic reports. This information is needed to verify
your disability and to authorize appropriate accommodations. Students with disabilities who do not have recent
and complete assessment results must complete either the
California Community College Eligibility Process or provide
sufficient documentation which establishes objective disability verification. Students must self-identify and give
reasonable notice to DSPS in order to verify their disability
and receive authorized accommodations. PLEASE complete your DSPS Application as soon as you receive your
Saddleback College student ID number.
Learning Disability Assessment: Testing is provided for
students who suspect that they may have a learning disability or who were previously assessed, but have outdated
testing. Students who qualify for services will be authorized
academic adjustments that relate to their educational
limitations.
High Tech Center and Alternate Media: Specialized
computer hardware and software are available to assist
students with access to computer information. Alternate
Media services are provided to those students who have
difficulty accessing and utilizing print and digital media.
Special Services Classes: Special Services classes utilize
specialized basic skills instruction and facilitate success
in regular classes. These classes are listed under Special
Services in the college catalog and class schedule.
Adapted Kinesiology Classes: Classes provide an opportunity for adults with physical and health-related disabilities to improve their strength, coordination, stamina and
mobility. Classes are individualized to address student
needs.
Counseling: Counseling services are provided by professional counselors specifically trained to assist adults
dealing with disability-related issues and to help them
reach their academic, career and personal goals. We
encourage all eligible students to use DSPS counselors to
plan appropriate course selections and support services
prior to enrollment each semester at Saddleback College.
Student Services
DISABLED STUDENTS PROGRAMS AND SERVICES
DSPS
Suspension of Services
DSPS services may be suspended if you fail to meet one
or more of these requirements:
1. Responsible use of services and adhere to written
procedures adopted by DSPS including the college
code of conduct.
2. Fail to meet measurable progress towards your goals
established in your Student Educational Contract.
3. Fail to meet academic standards established by the
college and/or district.
You have the right to appeal suspension of services within
10 days of notification. A copy of the Student Responsibilities, located on your DSPS application, may be obtained in
SSC 113.
Location and Hours
DSPS Office is located in the SSC 113. Phone (949) 5824885 (voice), (949) 582-4833 (TDD) or (949) 482-4430
(videophone). Any questions related to disability discrimination or academic adjustment should be directed to the
DSPS Counselor/Coordinator or the campus ADA/504
Officer. A copy of Saddleback College’s Academic Adjustment Procedure may be obtained in DSPS or in the office
of the Vice President for Student Services (AGB 127).
15
Educational Degrees and Transfer
EDUCATIONAL OPTIONS IN CALIFORNIA
DOCTORATE DEGREE
10 UCs
23 CSUs
Selected campuses may
offer the Ed.D.
112 CALIFORNIA
COMMUNITY COLLEGES
MASTERS DEGREE
BACHELORS DEGREE
ASSOCIATE DEGREE
VOCATIONAL CERTIFICATE
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
G.E.D.
Vocational Certificate
Major courses only – number of units required varies. A series of special major courses, all
related to a particular occupational skill. Offered by community colleges, university extension
programs, and private educational organizations. Can be helpful in obtaining or upgrading
employment.
Associate Degree
Major courses plus general education and electives, 60 units required. Usually referred to as
AA or AS (Associate in Arts or Science) Degrees. Normally requires two years of full-time study
but may take longer. Associate degrees are offered by community colleges, and at Saddleback
College courses numbered 1-299 count towards AA/AS degrees.
Bachelor’s Degree
Major courses plus general education and electives, approximately 120-132 total units required.
Usually referred to as BS (Bachelor of Science) or BA (Bachelor of Arts) Degrees. Normally
requires 4-5 years of full-time study. Students may complete the Freshman and Sophomore years
(lower-division courses) at a community college and then transfer to a four-year university for
Junior and Senior years (upper-division courses). Saddleback College courses numbered 1-199
transfer to CSU and courses numbered 1-99 transfer to UC (with some exceptions).
Master’s Degree
Bachelor’s Degree plus graduate courses in specialized area. Bachelor’s Degree units (120-132)
plus 36-56 units, depending on major. Usually referred to as MS (Master of Science) or MA
(Master of Arts) Degrees. Normally requires two additional years of full-time study after
completion of a Bachelor’s Degree.
Doctorate Degree
Advanced training beyond a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree. Units vary, depending on field of
study. Usually referred to as Ph.D. (Doctor of Philosophy) or Ed.D. (Doctor of Education).
It usually takes 4-5 years of full-time study beyond a Bachelor’s Degree.
16
Upper 33.3% of California High School
Seniors based on:
(1) High School GPA in grades 10-12,
excluding P.E. and military science
courses; and
(2) ACT or SAT I score;
(3) Required pattern of courses.
Students need 60 CSU-transferable
units with a minimum GPA of 2.0
(higher for some campuses). Completion
of all lower division major preparation
and at least 30 units of CSU General
Education courses is essential especially
for transfer to selective majors and
campuses. Saddleback College courses
numbered 1–199 are certified as CSUtransferable.
See: www.CSUmentor.edu
16 on semester system; 6 on quarter
system; 1 on (4-1-4) system.
Bachelor’s, Master’s, Some Doctorate
Programs
Residents of California –
Approximately $6,700/year.
Non-Residents –
Approximately $16,000/year.
$55 application fee, first campus –
includes alternate campus.
$55 per campus application fee for
international.
Upper 12.5% of California High School
graduates based on:
(1) High School GPA in required a-g
courses; and
(2) ACT or SAT I score.
(3) Three specific SAT II subject tests
are required: writing, math, a third
test in science, foreign language,
English literature or social studies.
Students need 60 UC-transferable
units with a minimum GPA of 2.4
(higher for most campuses). Completion
of all lower division major preparation
and general education courses is
considered essential especially for
selective majors and campuses.
Saddleback College courses numbered
1–99 are certified as UC-transferable.
Eight campuses on the quarter system.
UC Berkeley and UC Merced are on the
semester system.
Bachelor’s, Master’s, Doctorates, and
Professional (law, medicine, dentistry,
etc.)
Residents of California –
Approximately $13,300/year.
Non-Residents –
Approximately $36,000/year.
$70 application fee first campus;
$70 each additional campus.
$80 application fee for non-resident/
international.
ADMISSION
REQUIREMENTS
TRANSFER
ACADEMIC
CALENDAR
DEGREES
AWARDED
TUITION / FEES
FINANCIAL AID
(subject to change)
Associates, Bachelors, Masters,
Doctorates, Professional (varies from
campus to campus).
Variable – See individual college catalog
Vanguard ..........................$29,980*
Chapman University ..........$48,000*
Loyola Marymount ............$40,680*
USC ..................................$47,562*
Azuza Pacific ....................$32,516*
*2014-15 (annual tuition fees only)
Residents of California – $46 per unit.*
Non-Residents – $190 per unit* #
Foreign students – $257 per unit*, plus
an application fee of $54#
Non-Residents and Foreign students must
also pay the $46 per-unit tuition.
* Subject to change
# At Saddleback College and subject to change
Refer to individual college catalog.
Variable units and other transfer
admission requirements.
1100 Eleventh Street, Suite 10
Sacramento, CA 95814
(916) 446-7626
See: www.aiccu.edu
Colleges and Universities (AICCU)
Refer to individual college catalog or
request information on the independent
California colleges and universities from:
Association of Independent California
75
INDEPENDENT CALIFORNIA
COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
Associate Degrees
Vocational Certificates
Transfer Programs
Refer to individual college catalog.
High School Diploma
or
High School Equivalency
or
18 years of age at time of admission
or
High School Juniors and Seniors with
approval of Principal and parent.
112
THE CALIFORNIA COMMUNITY
COLLEGES (CCC)
Scholarships, grants, loans and work-study employment are the principal forms of financial aid. Nearly all are awarded on the basis of financial need.
A limited number of honorary scholarships awarded on the basis of academic achievement are available. Application for financial aid is separate from application for admission.
See: www.ucop.edu
23
10
CAMPUSES:
FRESHMEN
THE CALIFORNIA
STATE UNIVERSITY (CSU)
THE UNIVERSITY OF
CALIFORNIA (UC)
SYSTEM:
Educational Degrees and Transfer
GUIDE TO CALIFORNIA HIGHER EDUCATION
NOTE: The information provided is subject to change.
17
Educational Degrees and Transfer
ASSOCIATE DEGREES AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
Program
AA ASCert
Accounting
Accounting
••
Computerized Accounting ••
Specialist Tax Preparation
••
Administrative Assistant
••
American Sign Language
••
Anthropology
•T
Arabic
•
Architectural Drafting
••
Art
•
Studio Arts
T
Art History
T
Astronomy
•
Automotive Technology
Alternative Fuel Vehicle Specialist ••
Automotive Chassis Specialist
••
Automotive Engine Performance ••
Specialist
Automotive Engine Service ••
Specialist
General Automotive Technician
••
Biology
•
Business
Business Administration
• T
Business Leadership
••
Business Management
•
Entrepreneurship * ••
Global Business
••
Marketing
••
Professional Retailing
••
Retail Management
••
Human Resources Management *
Project Management *
Chemistry
•
Child Development
Early Childhood Education T
Early Childhood Teacher ••
Elementary Teacher Education
T
Infant Toddler Teacher
•
Master Teacher
•
School Age Care & Recreation
•
Site Supervisor
•
Associate Teacher *
Chinese
•
Cinema/Television/Radio
Cinema *
••
CTVR-Critical Studies *
••
Post Production *
••
Radio *
••
Screen Acting/Voice Performance * ••
Television *
••
Communication Studies
T
Computer and Information Management
Applications Developer ••
E-Commerce Specialist
••
Network Administrator ••
Software Specialist
••
Web Designer
••
Webmaster
••
Information Security: Security *
Office and Computer Skills *
See Saddleback College Catalog for full
descriptions of programs.
AA
AS
Cert
T # *
18
Associate in Arts Degree
Associate in Science Degree
Certificate of Achievement –
Vocational Program (18 units or more)
Associate Degree for Transfer
Certificate of Completion – (non-credit ESL only)
Occupational Skills Award –
Vocational Program (6-17.9 units)
Program
AA ASCert
Program
AA ASCert
Human Services
Computer Maintenance Technology ••
Alcohol and Drug Studies
••
Computer Science
•
Community-Based Corrections
••
Construction Inspection
••
Human Services Generalist
••
Consumer Services
Mental Health Worker ••
••
Cosmetology
Humanities •
•
Cosmetician *
Interior Design
Interiors Merchandising •
Culinary Arts
Interior Design Assistant •
Advanced Culinary Arts
••
Interior Design Professional
Basic Culinary Arts
••
••
Catering ••
International Language
Italian Dance
•
•
Japanese •
Drafting Technology
••
Journalism
T••
Ecological Restoration •
Kinesiology •T
Economics
•
Athletic Training *
Education (see Child Development)
Coaching *
Yoga Teacher Training *
Electronic Technology
Analog and Digital Circuit ••
Landscape Design
••
Electronic Technology
General Landscape Design *
Digital Electronic Technology
••
Liberal Studies
•
General Electronic Technology
••
Marine Science Technology
Basic Analog and Digital Electronics *
Marine Science Technician
••
Emergency Medical Technician *
Seamanship
••
Engineering •
Mathematics
• T
English Medical Assistant
English
T
Administrative Medical Assistant •
English Literature
•
Clinical Medical Assistant
•
Comprehensive Medical Assistant •
English as a Second Language
Medical Insurance Billing *
ESL Beginning Level #
ESL Intermediate Level Pre-College #
Medical Lab Technology ••
ESL Advanced Level #
Music •
Environmental Studies •
Natural Sciences
Sustainability Studies *
(see Astronomy/Biology/Chemistry/Geology/
Ethnic Studies
Oceanography/Physical Science/Physics) •
Family and Consumer Sciences
Nursing
••
Registered Nurse ••
Fashion Design
Licensed Vocational Nurse to • •
Fashion Design ••
Registered Nurse Advanced
Advanced Fashion Design and
•
Placement Option
Apparel Manufacturing
Licensed Vocational Nurse to •
Accessory Design *
Registered Nurse (30–Unit Option)
Basic Costume Construction and Sourcing *
Nutrition
••
Fashion Technology *
Sustainable Fashion and Social
Oceanography
•
Entrepreneurship *
Paramedic
••
Fashion Merchandising
Philosophy
T
•
Fashion Merchandising
••
Phlebotomist/Laboratory Assistant *
Visual Fashion Merchandising
••
Photography
•
Event Planner *
Fashion Stylist *
Physical Education (see Kinesiology)
Fine and Applied Arts Physical Science
•
•
Physics Foods
• T
••
Political Science
French •T
•
Psychology T
General Education (IGETC or CSU-GE) •
Radio/Television/Film
General Studies
•
(see Cinema/Television/Radio)
Geography
• T
Rapid
Digital Manufacturing ••
Geology
•T
Real Estate
German
•
Real Estate Appraisal
••
Gerontology
•
Real Estate Escrow
••
Real Estate Sales/Broker Graphics
••
Computer Graphics
••
Social Sciences
•
Graphic Communications
••
Sociology T
Graphic Design
••
Spanish
•
Illustration/Animation
••
Theatre Arts
T
Health Information Technology
••
TA Entertainment and •
Health Sciences •
Theatre Technology
History
TA Performance and Acting
•T
•
Scenic Art and Painting *
Horticulture
••
TA Technical Theatre
•
General Horticulture *
Travel and Tourism
Plant Identification *
••
Women’s and Gender Studies
Human Development •
•
MAJOR
Total units
vary by major.
At least 18 units
are required.
GENERAL
EDUCATION
COURSES
Between 23 to 39
units required. Designed
to allow students to
experience courses in
a variety of academic
disciplines
ELECTIVES
Electives give students the opportunity
to explore a wide variety of
subjects or to focus more on
an area of special interest.
Units may vary.
Designed for students who do NOT wish to transfer
to a CSU or UC campus
Associate in Arts Degree
Associate in Science Degree
To earn an Associate in Arts Degree (non-transfer) from
Saddleback College, a student would complete the
Saddleback College General Education requirements
shown on Pg. 20 and the requirements for a major. Major
requirements can by met by completing an Associate
Degree program listed in the Saddleback College Catalog.
To earn an Associate in Science Degree (non-transfer)
from Saddleback College, a student would complete the
Saddleback College General Education requirements shown
on Pg. 20 and the requirements for a major. A minimum of
60 units is required. Major requirements can by met by:
a) completing an Associate Degree program in one of
the Natural Sciences (Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry,
Computer Science, Geology or Physics) or Engineering
as listed in the Saddleback College Catalog, or by
b) completing an occupational (certificate) program
described in the Saddleback College Catalog.
A minimum of 60 units is required with an overall
grade-point average of 2.0 for all units attempted.
Note: Saddleback College courses numbered 1-299
count toward the Associate Degree.
Educational Degrees and Transfer
THE ASSOCIATE DEGREES
Career Technical Education (CTE) Transitions Program for High School
& Regional Occupational Program (ROP) Students
Saddleback College maintains faculty-approved formal
course articulation agreements with local CTE Transitions
high school and ROP districts including: Capistrano
Unified School District, Laguna Beach Unified School
District, Saddleback Valley Unified School District,
Capistrano-Laguna Beach ROP and Coastline ROP.
Courses with articulation agreements that follow the
California Career Statewide Pathways Templates in the
areas including: Accounting, Architecture, Automotive
Technology, Business, Child Development, Cinema-TVRadio, Computer Information Management, Computer
Maintenance Technology, Drafting, Fashion, Food &
Nutrition, Graphic Design, Horticulture, Interior Design
and Theatre Arts. For a complete listing, see the CTE
website at www.saddleback.edu/cte
Students who complete a CTE Transitions articulated
class offered through a partnering high school or ROP
district, and receive a grade of A or B, will be eligible
to have Credit by Exam units for the corresponding
Saddleback College class posted to their official
transcript. Eligible students should make an appointment
with a Saddleback College counselor once they are
enrolled at the college. The counselor will verify their
Articulation Certificate and/or high school transcript,
assist them in completing a CTE Transitions Petition
form and submit the form to the Admissions and Records
Office for processing. Contact the Counseling Department
for further information.
19
SADDLEBACK COLLEGE
2015-2016 ASSOCIATE DEGREE – GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
These requirements are for students who do not wish to transfer to the CSU or UC
I. CORE REQUIREMENTS
1. LANGUAGE AND RATIONALITY
A. Written Communication
II. BREADTH REQUIREMENTS
C IP N
ENG 1A or 1AH – Grade of “C” or better required
B. Oral Communication
C IP N
Complete ONE course from the following
with a grade of “C” or better:
SP 1, 5 (formerly 105); BUS 102
2. MATHEMATICS COMPETENCY
C IP N
Complete Option A or Option B
Option A: Completion with a grade of “C” or
better of any mathematics course currently offered
within the Mathematics Department, other than
MATH 351 or 353.
Option B: Evidence of one of the following:
1. A score of 3 or above on the College Board
Advanced Placement Exam
2. 530 or above on the Mathematics section
of the SAT
3. 23 or above on the ACT Mathematics Test
4. 520 or above on the College Board Math
Achievement Test.
3. READING COMPETENCY
C IP N
Complete Option A or Option B
Option A: Completion, with a grade of “C”
or better: ENG 1B or 1BH, 70 (formerly 170),
180, 190, or 340^ (formerly 220).
^ Units earned for ENG 340 do not apply to the
associate degree.
Option B: Evidence of one of the following:
1. 400 or above on the critical reading section of
the SAT
2. 19 or above on the ACT English Test
3. A score of 35-39 percentile on the Comprehension section of the Nelson-Denny Reading Test,
Form H or equivalent.
4. A placement of ENG 70 (formerly 170) based on
CTEP.
4. INFORMATION COMPETENCY
C IP N
Complete ONE course from the following
with a grade of “C” or better:
ANTH 2, 3, 4*, 6, 8
BUS 102
CD 7 (formerly 107)
CIM 1, 10
CIMW 115
DANC 64
ENG 1B or 1BH, 70 (formerly 170)
ENV 1, 18
ES (formerly CCS) 1*, 2*, 3*, 10*
FCS 115
FN 50
HIST 4, 5, 12, 16, 17, 32
LIB 2 (formerly 102), 100, 101
N 176
PSYC 1, 2, 7
SP 1, 2, 3
Note: Courses used to fulfill any competency requirement
may also apply to our course or breadth requirements.
1. FINE ARTS AND HUMANITIES
A. The Arts, Music, Theatre
C IP N
Complete ONE course from the following:
ARCH 12 (formerly 112)
ART 4
ARTH 20, 21, 22, 23, 24*, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29
CTVR 2, 3 (formerly CA 30), 7* (formerly CA 27),
9 (formerly CA 29)
DANC 64 (formerly PE/TA 64), 74* (formerly 174)
FA 27
FASH 144
GD 1
HORT 115
ID 110, 122, 125
MUS 1, 20, 23*, 24, 25, 26, 27*, 28, 29
PHOT 25
SP 32/TA 32
TA 20, 22, 25, 26, 110*
B. Literature, Philosophy, History,
Religion, Foreign Language
C IP N
Complete ONE course from the following:
ACCT 120
BUS 116
CD 7‡ (formerly 107), 117*
COUN 1, 140, 150, 151, 160
FCS 115, 142
FASH 141 (formerly FCS 140)
FN 50, 64
HLTH 1, 3
HS 170, 175
N 161, 165
PSYC 5, 7‡, 33
SOC 126
SPS 115, 205
WS 120
‡ Course may be listed in more than one area,
but shall not be certified in more than one area.
B. Critical Thinking
ANTH 1 and 1L
Students are advised to complete the ANTH 1 lab within
one (1) year of the lecture component
ASTR 20 and 25
BIO 3A (formerly 1A), 3B (formerly 1B), 11, 15, 19/ENV 19,
BIO 20, 31, 113
CHEM 1A, 3, 108
ENV 18, 24
GEOG 1 and 1L
GEOL 1, 20, 23/ENV 23
HORT 20
MS 4, 20
PHYS 2A, 4A, 20
C IP N
CD 120
ENG 1B or 1BH, 70 (formerly 170) – Both courses also apply
for the Reading Competency requirement.
PHIL 12
SP 2, 3
5. PHYSICAL FITNESS ASSESSMENT
C IP N
Complete ONE course from the following:
KNES 107 (formerly PE 107)
KNEA 107– For disabled students (formerly APE/PESS 107)
6.
IN THE UNITED STATES
* CULTURES
REQUIREMENT
C
IP N
One course completed in the Fine Arts and Humanities
or in the Social and Behavioral Sciences that is marked
with an asterisk ( ) will satisfy this requirement.
Nursing Equivalency – Completion of the Nursing
Program meets the Cultures in the U.S. requirement.
*
Requirements are subject to change.
The Articulation Office 6/2015
For graduation, a minimum GPA of 2.0 in all units attempted at Saddleback College and an overall GPA of 2.0 in all units
attempted is required. At least 12 units must be completed at Saddleback College. Completion of either CSU General
Education Certification Requirement or the Intersegmental General Education Transfer curriculum may substitute for the
Saddleback College general education requirements. Associate Degree for Transfers (ADT) require CSU GE or IGETC. See the
current Saddleback College catalog for further information on catalog rights. Students who maintain continuous enrollment
from 2008-2009 or earlier, and have completed MATH 251 with a “C” or better, will have satisfied the math competency.
Counselor’s Signature: _________________________ Date: ______________
C IP N
4. LIFE SKILLS/CRITICAL THINKING
C IP N
Complete ONE course from A or B:
A. Life Skills
C IP N
C IP N
20
B. American Institutions
HIST 7, 8, 16, 17, 22 or PS 1
Complete ONE course, with a laboratory,
from the following:
Student Name: _________________________________ ID No. ______________
ANTH 2, 3, 4*, 5, 7*, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 17, 21
BUS 1
CD 7‡ (formerly 107), 15 (formerly 105), 117*
ECON 2, 4 (formerly 1), 11, 20
ENV 1
ES (formerly CCS) 1*, 2*, 3*, 10*
GEOG 2, 3, 38
HIST 12, 19, 20*/SOC 20*, 21*, 27, 28, 30, 32, 33*, 61,
62, 63, 70, 71, 72, 74, 75, 80/PS 80, 81*
HS 100, 120, 131*, 186
JRN 1/CTVR 1
PS 4, 10H, 11, 12, 14
PSYC 1, 7‡, 16*, 21
SOC 1, 2, 6*, 10, 15, 21, 25
SP 8, 20*
WS 10, 40
‡ Course may be listed in more than one area,
but shall not be certified in more than one area.
Complete ONE course from the following:
ARAB 1, 2, 3, 4, 21
CHI 1, 2, 21
ENG 3, 4, 5, 15A, 15B, 17A, 17B, 18, 19, 20, 21A,
21B, 23A*, 24*, 25, 27A, 27B, 27E, 44, 50, 52,
142 (formerly 42)
FR 1, 2, 3, 4
GER 1, 2, 3, 4
HIST 4, 5
HUM 1, 3, 10A, 10B, 21, 22, 25
ITA 1, 2, 3, 4, 21
JA 1, 2, 21
KOR 1, 2, 3, 4, 21
PHIL 1, 10, 14, 15
PORT 1, 2, 3, 4, 21
PRSN 1, 2, 3, 4
SL 1 (formerly 32), 2 (formerly 33), 3 (formerly 34),
4 (formerly 35), 101*
SPAN 1 (or 1A and 1B), 2, 3, 4, 20A, 20B, 21A, 21B, 21C*
SP 30/TA 30
2. NATURAL SCIENCES
3. SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
A. Social/Behavioral Science
C IP N
Complete ONE course from the following:
III. MAJOR
A minimum of 60 units is required for the degree.
A major requires 18 or more units (refer to the
Certificates and Degrees section in the catalog).
Legend
C ........ Completed
IP ........ In Progress
N ........ Need
Total units completed:
Units in progress:
Units needed:
CSU/ UC
4-Year University
Junior/Senior
Saddleback College
Freshman/Sophomore
UPPER
DIVISION
G.E.
(varies)
UPPER
DIVISION
MAJOR
COURSES
GENERAL
EDUCATION
COURSES
LOWER
DIVISION MAJOR
PREPARATION
High-unit majors
must consult a
counselor
www.assist.org
Minimum 60 transferable units
are required to transfer to a UC or CSU.
ELECTIVES,
MINOR,
DOUBLE
MAJOR
Min. units
for BA/BS 120
ELECTIVES
(If needed)
Students who receive a
Certificate of Achievement by
completing CSU/GE or IGETC
may be eligible for an Associate
degree. See the college
catalog or meet with your
Saddleback College counselor.
Bachelor’s Degree
Preparation for the Bachelor’s Degree at Saddleback College is made up of lower-division General Education requirements and preparation courses in a major. Some students take elective courses in subjects in which they have an interest.
General Education Certification includes courses in the arts, humanities, the natural sciences, English, social sciences
and mathematics. There are two major General Education Certification patterns:
CSU General Education Certification (see Pg. 22)
Primarily used for the California State University System and some private colleges and universities in California.
Educational Degrees and Transfer
THE BACHELOR DEGREES
Note: Only Saddleback College courses numbered 1-199 are certified as transferable courses to the CSU.
IGETC – Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (see Pg. 23)
Used for the University of California. Can also be used for CSU and some private colleges and universities.
Note: Only Saddleback College courses numbered 1-99 are certified as transferable courses to the UC.
Preparation for the major includes lower-division courses taken at Saddleback College that prepares you for upperdivision course work in your major at the university.
TAG – Transfer Admission
Guarantee
Special agreements now make
it easier for students to transfer
to certain California universities.
We currently have this type of
agreement with UC Davis, UC
Irvine, UC Merced, UC Riverside,
UC Santa Barbara and UC
Santa Cruz. Please visit a
counselor at the Transfer Center
or Counseling Department for
further information.
uctap.universityofcalifornia.edu
Honors Program
Associate Degree for Transfer (CSU)
Students who complete the
Honors Program are eligible for
preferential admission consideration at a variety of colleges
and universities.
Contact the Honors Program
at (949) 582-4853 or visit
www.saddleback.edu/honors
for further information. Counselors in the Transfer Center are
also available to answer Honors
Program questions.
For the California State University, under
Senate Bill 1440, the CSU shall grant a
student priority admission to his or her local
CSU campus, and to a program or major
that is similar to his or her community
college major or area of emphasis, as
determined by the CSU campus to which the
student is admitted. All this can be done by
completing a specific Associate in Arts or
Associate in Science degree at Saddleback
College. Please contact the Transfer Center
or Counseling Department for further
information. www.adegreewithaguarantee.com
21
22
ENG 1A or 1AH
AP Exam
C
IP
AP Exam
AP Exam
C
C
C
C
IP
IP
IP
IP
N
N
N
N
N
N
‡ Course may be listed in more than one area, but
shall not be certified in more than one area.
Underlined courses are no longer being offered at
Saddleback College.
C
IP
C ...........Completed
IP ..........In Progress
N ..........Need
Legend
ARAB 1 [F90], 1A [F90], 1B [F90], 2 [F90], 3 [S07], 4 [S07], 21
CHI 1 [F89], 1A [F89], 1B [F89], 2 [F89], 3 [F07], 4 [F07], 21
ENG 3, 4, 5, 7, 15A, 15B, 17A, 17B, 18, 19, 20, 21A, 21B, 21C, 21D, 21E,
23A, 23B, 24, 25, 27A, 27B, 27C, 27D, 27E, 27F, 29, 31 (formerly 131A),
31B, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 40, 41, 44, 46, 47, 48, 50, 52, 54, 56, 131A,
131B, 132, 134, 135, 136, 142 (formerly 42)
FR 1*, 1A*, 1B*, 2*, 3, 4, 10, 20 (prior to F07), ^21
GER 1*, 1A*, 1B*, 2*, 3, 4, 10, 21
HEBR 1 [F89], 1A [F89], 1B [F89], 2 [F89], 3 [F09], 4 [F09], 21
HIST 4 [F93], 5 [F93]
HUM 1, 2 [F12], 3, 4, 5, 10A, 10B, 21, 22, 25, 30AH, 30BH, 30CH, 31AH,
31BH, 31CH
IDS 1, 2, 3, 5
ITA 1*, 1A*, 1B*, 2*, 3, 4, 10, 21
JA 1 [F89], 1A [F89], 1B [F89], 2 [F89], ^3, ^4, 10 [F90], 21
KOR 1 [F09] , 1A, 1B, 2 [F09], 3, 4, 21 [F96]
LAT 1 [F90], 1A [F90], 1B [F90], 2 [F90]
PHIL 1, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15
PORT 1, 2, 3, 4, 21
PRSN 1, 2, 3, 4
RUS 1 [F90], 1A [F90], 1B [F90], 2 [F90]
SL 1 [F93] (formerly 32), 2 (formerly 33), 3 (formerly 34),
4 (formerly 35)
SPAN 1* (or 1A* and 1B*), 2*, 3, 4, 10, 20A (formerly 20), 20B, 21A, 21B, 21C
SP 30, 31
TA 30, 31
AP Exam
* Beginning Fall 1988
^ Reinstated
C2 HUMANITIES
ARCH 12 (formerly 112)
ART 1, 4
ARTH 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29
CTVR 2, 3 (formerly CA 30), 5, 7 (formerly CA 27), 9 (formerly CA 29)
DANC 64 (formerly PE/TA 64)
FA 20, 27
FASH 144 [F93] (formerly CT 144)
GD 1
HORT 115 [F12]
ID 110, 122, 125
MUS 1, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29 [F90], 31, 32, 33, 34, 35,
40, 47, 49, 90, 91
PHOT 25
SP 32
TA 10, 11, 20, 21 (prior to F93), 22, 25, 26, 32, 110
AP Exam
N
5/2015
Counselor Name:
Date:
Student Name: __________________________________________________ ID No. _____________________________
MATH 2, 3A or 3AH, 3B, 3C, 4B, 5, 6A, 6B, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 24, 26, 112,
122, 124, 128
PSYC 44 [F12]
NOTE: An intermediate algebra course (MATH 122) completed
AP Exam
prior to Fall 1988 will meet this requirement.
Complete ONE course with a grade of “C” or better.
B4 MATHEMATICS
One science course MUST have a laboratory.
♦ Denotes laboratory courses.
B3 LABORATORY COURSE
# Lab designation beginning Fall 2007
ANTH 1, 1 and 1L♦, 10A♦, 16♦ (formerly 110A)
BIO 3A♦ (1A♦ prior to F03, 5♦ prior to F94), 3B♦ (1B♦ prior to F03,
2♦ prior to F94), 3C♦ [S07], 6♦ (prior to F95), 11♦, 12♦, 15♦, 16♦, 18♦,
19♦, 20♦, 22 (formerly 41), 24, 28 [F13], 30, 31♦, 40, 43, 113♦ [F03]
ENV 18♦, 19♦, #24♦
HORT 20♦
MS 3♦
PSYC 3* [F10]
B2 BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE
^ Retroactive
ASTR 1♦, 20, 20 and 25♦, 21, 45, 145♦
CHEM 1A♦, 1B♦, 2A♦, 2B♦, 3♦, 8♦, 12A♦, 12B♦, 20♦, 108♦, 120♦
ENV 23♦ [F89], 120♦
GEOG 1, 1 and 1L♦, 20
GEOL 1♦, 2♦, 3, 4, 5♦, 6♦ [S07], 7, 20♦, 21, 23♦ [F89]
MS 1♦, 4♦, 20♦
PHYS 2A♦, 2B♦ [^F91], 3A♦, 4A♦, 4B♦ [^F91], 4C♦ [S07], 20♦, 21♦
B1 PHYSICAL SCIENCE
AT LEAST 9 UNITS ARE REQUIRED IN AREAS B1 THROUGH B4
Complete ONE course from Area B1 and ONE course from Area B2.
One course MUST have a laboratory.
Complete ONE Math course from Area B4 with a grade of “C” or better.
AREA B: SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY AND QUANTITATIVE REASONING
ENG 1B or 1BH, 70 (formerly 170)
PHIL 12
SP 2, 3
Complete ONE of the following:
A3 CRITICAL THINKING
IP
N
C
IP
C
IP
N
N
Requirements are subject to change | Verify information at www.assist.org
BUS 116 [F02]
CD 7‡ (formerly 107)
COUN 140, 145, 150, 151, 160, 162, 163, 165
FASH 141 (formerly CFR/FCS 140)
FCS 115, 140 (prior to F07),142 [F97]
FN 50, 64
HLTH 1, 3, HLTH/HSC 105; HSC 120
HS 175 [F95]
IDS 107
KNES/KNEA (For PE or PESS see www.ASSIST.org) The following courses are
accepted beginning F09 unless indicated otherwise: 107 [F06], or select
one from KNES 1 [F06], 2 [F06], 3 [F06], 4 [F06], 5 [F06], 6 [F06], 7 [F06],
8 [F06], 9 [F06], 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28 [F06], 29
[F06], 30, 41, 45, 50 [F06], 63, 70, 71, 72, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 90
[F06], 93 [F06], 94 [F06], or DANC 63 (formerly PE/TA 63); or KNEA 1 [F06],
2, 4, 6, 107 [F06], 151/HSC 151
N 161, 165
PSYC 5‡ [F05], 7‡ [F05], 33‡
SPS 100, 110
WS 30, 100, 120, 135
3 UNITS ARE REQUIRED TO COMPLETE AREA E
A maximum of 2 units of KNES/PE activity courses are permitted.
AREA E: LIFE LONG UNDERSTANDING AND SELF-DEVELOPMENT
D1 Anthropology–ANTH 2, 3, 5 [F08], 6, 8, 9, 10, 13 [S07], 14 [F03],
15 [F13]; ENV/SOC 22; ENV 36; HD 7, 15; HIST 26, 74 (prior to F90);
HS 100 (prior to F86), 120 (prior to F86); SOC 100 (prior to F88)
D2 Economics–ECON 2, 4 (formerly 1), 20 (MGT 100 prior to F86);
ENV 20 [F90], 36 [F96]; HD 15; HIST 26, 74; HS 100 (prior to F86),
120 (prior to F86); PS 9
D3 Ethnic Studies–ANTH 4, 7 [S07]; ENV 20, 21; ES (formerly CCS) 1, 2, 3,
10; HD 15; HIST 20, 26 (prior to S89), 33 [F01], 74, 81; HS 100 (prior to
F86), 120 (prior to F86); MGT 100 (prior to F88); PSYC 16# (formerly 116)
[F93]; SOC 4, 5‡ [F04], 6, 20, 100 (prior to S88)
D4 Gender Studies–ANTH 21; ENV 35; HD 7, 15; HIST 21, 26; HS 120 (prior
to F86); PS 9, 21; PSYC 21; SOC 21, 100 (prior to F88); WS 10, 21, 31, 40
D5 Geography–GEOG 2, 3, 38; HIST 26, 74; HS 100 (prior to F86); PS 9;
SOC 100 (prior to F88)
D6 History– HD 15; HIST 7, 8, 9, 10 [S07], 11, 12, 15 [S07], 16, 17, 18,
19, 22, 25, 27, 28, 30, 31, 32, 40, 41, 60, 62 [F03], 63 [F03], 70, 71,
72, 74; HS 100 (prior to F86)
D7 Interdisciplinary, Social/Behavioral Science–ANTH 17 [F13], 20/SP 20
(formerly 109); CTVR/JRN 1 [F05]; ECON/ENV 6; ENV 1; HIST 29, HIST/
PS 61 (prior to F10), HIST 74, HIST 75/PS 75, 80; PS/ECON 11; PSYC/
SOC 30; SP 109
D8 Political Science–PS 1, 2, 4, 10 [S07], 10H, 12, 14, PS/ECON 11 (prior
to F09), PS 17
D9 Psychology–CD 7‡ (formerly 107), PSYC 1, 2, 3* (prior to F12), 4, 5‡
[F05], 7‡, 16# (formerly 116) [S07], 33 [S07], 37 [S07]
D0 Sociology–CD 15 (formerly 105), SOC 1, 2**, 5**‡, 10, 15, 25 [F05],
120 (prior to F88)
** Retroactive Fall 1991
AP Exam
# PSYC 16 (formerly 116) either D3 [F93] or D9 [S07]
This CSU requirement can be met prior to transfer by completing PS 1 from
Area D8 AND one U.S. History course in Area D6 selected from: HIST 7, 8, 16, 17, or 22.
Courses taken to meet this requirement can also be used for 6 of the 9 units required in Area D.
CSU GRADUATION REQUIREMENT IN U.S. HISTORY,
CONSTITUTION AND AMETRICAN IDEALS:
C
SP 1 or 5 (formerly 105)
IP
A2 WRITTEN COMMUNICATION
C
C1 ARTS
C
A1 ORAL COMMUNICATION
N
3 COURSES TOTALING A MINIMUM OF 9 UNITS REQUIRED IN AREA A
Complete ONE course in Areas A1, A2, and A3 with a grade of “C” or better.
IP
AREA D: SOCIAL SCIENCES
AT LEAST 3 COURSES TOTALING A MINIMUM OF 9 UNITS REQUIRED
Courses are to be selected from Area D1 through D0 in at least TWO areas.
AREA C: ARTS AND HUMANITIES
AT LEAST 3 COURSES TOTALING A MINIMUM OF 9 UNITS REQUIRED
Complete ONE course from Area C1 and ONE course from Area C2.
Complete a THIRD course from either area.
AREA A: ENGLISH LANGUAGE, COMMUNICATION
AND CRITICAL THINKING
SADDLEBACK COLLEGE
2015-2016 CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY GENERAL EDUCATION CERTIFICATION
SADDLEBACK COLLEGE
2015-2016 IGETC – INTERSEGMENTAL GENERAL EDUCATION TRANSFER CURRICULUM
C IP
C IP
C IP
N
N
N
A MINIMUM OF 7 UNITS ARE REQUIRED
C. LABORATORY REQUIREMENT
Counselor Name:
C IP
C IP
C IP
C ...........Completed
IP ..........In Progress
N ..........Need
N
N
N
AREA 6: LANGUAGE OTHER THAN ENGLISH
UC REQUIREMENTS ONLY
Proficiency equal to two years of study in one foreign language in
high school with grades of “C” or better. (An official copy of the
high school transcript must be on file in Admissions and Records),
or select one course from the following:
ARAB 1 [F02], 2 [F05], 3 [F07], 4 [F07]
CHI 1, 1B, 2 [F05], 3 [F07], 4 [F07]
FR 1, 1B, 2 [F05], 3 [F05], 4 [F05]
GER 1, 1A & 1B, 2 [F05], 3 [F05], 4 [F05]
HEBR 1, 1A & 1B, 2 [F05], 3 [F09], 4 [F09]
ITA 1, 1B, 2 [F05], 3 [F05], 4 [F05]
JA 1, 1A & 1B, 2 [F05], 3 [F07], 4 [F07]
KOR 1 [F09], 2 [F09], 3, 4
PORT 1 [F12], 2 [F12], 3, 4
PRSN 1, 2 [F05], 3, 4
SL 1(formerly 32 prior to F98), 2 [F05], 3 (formerly 34) [F05],
4 (formerly 35) [F05]
SPAN 1, 2 [F05], 3 [F05], 4 [F05], 6 [F05]
or see a counselor for other options.
IP
C IP
N
N
C
U.S. HISTORY, CONSTITUTION, AMERICAN IDEALS
NOT PART OF IGETC: CSU GRADUATION REQUIREMENT ONLY
HIST 7*, 8*, 16*, 17*, or 22* (one course) AND
PS 1
IMPORTANT INFORMATION AND FOOTNOTES
Application of the above courses to Area 4, as well as to the CSU American Ideals
requirement, is at the discretion of the CSU campus.
All courses on IGETC must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.
Grades of “C–” are not acceptable.
Students wishing to use a course to meet an IGETC requirement must
be sure that the course is on the IGETC list during the academic year
when it is taken.
UC
CSU
*
Course may be listed in more than one area, but shall not be certified in more than
one area.
** UC credit may be limited. (1) No credit given for an introductory course if taken
after a more advanced college course, e.g., BIO 20 or GEOL 20, and (2) credit may
be limited for courses with overlapping content, e.g., HIST 7, 8, 16, 17, 22, or
MATH 2, 7, 8.
‡
Cross-referenced course.
Underlined courses are no longer being offered at Saddleback College.
AP Exam: IGETC credit can be granted for AP Exam scores of 3, 4, or 5. See the college
catalog for additional information.
Total transferable units completed (60 units needed):
Units needed:
Transferable units in progress:
Grade Point Average:
Requirements are subject to change | Verify information at www.assist.org
Date:
Student Name: _________________________________________________ ID No. _____________________________
One science course MUST have a laboratory.
♦ Denotes laboratory courses.
Legend
ANTH 1, 1 and 1L♦ [F98]
BIO 2♦, 3A♦ (1A prior to F03), 3B♦ (1B prior to F03), 3C♦ [S07],
5♦ (prior to F93), 6♦ (prior to F94), 11♦ [F93], 15♦ [S07], 18♦ [F99],
19♦ [S05], 20♦**, 28 [F13], 30, 31♦, 40, 43 [S07]
ENV 18♦ [F99], 19♦ [S05], 24♦ [S07]
HORT 20♦ [F14]
PSYC 3* [F10]
AP Exam
B. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE: ONE COURSE REQUIRED
ASTR 1♦ (prior to F94), 20, 20 and 25♦, 21‡ [F01], 45 [F01]
CHEM 1A♦**, 1B♦**, 3♦**, 12A♦ [S07], 12B♦ [S07]
ENV 23♦‡
GEOG 1, 1 and 1L♦ [F99]
GEOL 1♦, 2♦, 3 [S05], 4 [S04], 5♦, 6♦ [S07], 7 [S04], 20♦**, 21‡ [F01], 23♦‡
MS 4♦, 20♦
PHYS 2A♦**, 2B♦**, 3A♦ [F00], 4A♦**, 4B♦**, 4C♦** [S07], 20♦** AP Exam
A. PHYSICAL SCIENCE: ONE COURSE REQUIRED
Select ONE course from the Physical Sciences and ONE course from the Biological
Sciences. One course MUST include a lab (denoted with a ♦).
AREA 5: PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
ANTH 2, 3 [F03], 4 [S07], 5 [F08], 6 [F03], 7 [S07], 8 [F02], 9, 10 [F98],
13 [S07], 14 [F03],15, 20**‡ [F98], 21 [F92]
CD 7 (formerly CDES 7), 15 (formerly CDES 15)
CTVR 1* (formerly CA 1) [S07]
ECON 2, 4 (formerly 1), 6* [F96], 11‡ [F00], 20** [F94]
ENV 1 [F01], 6* [F96]
ES (formerly CCS) 1 [F96], 2 [F96], 3, 10 [F98]
GEOG 2, 3, 38 [F10]
HD 7‡
HIST 7** [F96], 8** [F96], 9 [S07], 10 [S07], 11 [S07], 12 [F02], 15 [S07],
16**, 17**, 18, 19, 20‡, 21 [F92], 22**, 25 [S07], 27 [F98], 28 [F98],
29, 30*, 32 [S07], 33 [F01], 40*, 41*, 60, 61*‡ [F92], 62 [F03], 63 [F03],
70*, 71*, 72* [F01], 74 [F98], 75*‡, 80‡ [F00], 81 [F94]
JRN 1* [S07]
PS 1, 2, 4, 10 [S07], 10H, 11‡ [F00], 12, 14, 21 [F98], 61*‡ [F92], 75*‡,
80‡ [F00]
PSYC 1, 2, 3* (prior to F12), 4, 5 [S06], 7, 16 [S07], 21 [F92], 30‡, 33 [S07],
37 [S07]
SOC 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 [F96], 10 [S05], 15 [F07], 20‡, 21 [F92], 25 [S06], 30‡
SP 20**‡ [F98]
WS 10 [F92], 21 [F95], 31, 40 [F95]
AP Exam
AT LEAST 3 COURSES TOTALING A MINIMUM OF 9 UNITS REQUIRED
Courses from two different subjects required
C IP N
AREA 4: SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
May be used for General Education Certification for the University of California and/or the California State University
AP Exam
AREA 1: ENGLISH COMMUNICATION
A. ENGLISH COMPOSITION
ENG 1A or 1AH
Complete ONE of the following:
B. CRITICAL THINKING/COMPOSITION
ENG 1B or 1BH – Completed Summer 1992 or after.
Because of the content of this course, it is highly unlikely
that courses taken at an institution other than a California
community college will apply.
ENG 70
C. ORAL COMMUNICATION
AREA 2: MATHEMATICAL CONCEPTS
SP 1 – REQUIRED FOR CSU TRANSFER ONLY
Select any ONE course:
A MINIMUM OF 3 UNITS REQUIRED
AREA 3: ARTS AND HUMANITIES
MATH 2**, 3A** or 3AH, 3B, 3C (formerly 4A), 4B, 6A, 6B, 7**, 8**, 9, 10,
11**, 24, 26
PSYC 44 [F12]
AP Exam
N
N
AT LEAST 3 COURSES TOTALING A MINIMUM OF 9 UNITS REQUIRED
C IP
C IP
Select ONE course from the Arts and ONE course from the Humanities.
Select a THIRD course from either area.
A. ARTS: ONE COURSE REQUIRED
ARCH 12 [S07]
ART 4
ARTH 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29
CTVR 2, 3 (formerly CA 30) [F94], 5, 7, 9 (formerly CA 29) [S07]
DANC 64 (formerly PE/TA 64) [F96]
FA 20 [F94], 27
GD 1
MUS 20, 21 [F94], 23 [F94], 24, 25, 26, 27 [F94], 28 [F94], 29 [F94]
PHOT 25 [F94]
TA 20, 21, 25, 26
AP Exam
B. HUMANITIES: ONE COURSE REQUIRED
ARAB 2 [F10], 3 [S07], 4 [S07], 21 [^F95]
CHI 2 [F10], 3 [F07], 4 [F07], 21 [F95]
ENG 15A, 15B, 17A, 17B, 18, 19, 20, 21A, 21B, 21C [F95], 21D [F95],
21E [F95], 23A [F95], 23B [F95], 24 [F95], 25, 27A, 27B, 27C, 27D,
27E, 27F, 31 [F02], 35 [F92], 44 [F95], 46, 47, 50, 52 [F97], 54 [F95]
FR 2 [F10], 3, 4, 20 [F95-F07], ^21
GER 2 [F10], 3, 4, 21 [F95]
HEBR 2 [F10], 3 [F09], 4 [F09], 21 [F95]
HIST 4, 5, 18, 30*,40*, 41*, 60, 61*‡ (prior to F95), 70*, 71*, 72* [F01], 75*‡
HUM 1, 2 [F12], 3, 4, 10A, 10B, 21 [F94], 22 [F94], 30AH, 30BH, 30CH,
31AH, 31BH, 31CH
IDS 1 [F94], 2 [F94]
ITA 2 [F10], 3, 4, 21 [F95]
JA 2 [F10], ^3, ^4, 21 [F95]
KOR 2 [F09], 3, 4, 21 [F95]
PHIL 1, 3, 4, 10, 14, 15
PORT 2, 3, 4, 21 [F95]
PRSN 2 [F10], 3 [F05], 4 [F05]
PS 61*‡ (prior to F95), 75*‡
SL 2 [F10], 3 (formerly 34) [F98], 4 (formerly 35) [F98]
SPAN 2 [F10], 3, 4 , 20A (formerly 20) [F01], 20B [F01],
21A (formerly 21) [F01], 21B [F01], 21C [F09]
^ Reinstated
AP Exam
5/2015
23
Educational Degrees and Transfer
ASSIST
QUESTIONS?
Does Psychology 5 meet a CSU General Education Certification requirement?
How many lower division mathematics courses are required at Cal State Fullerton in Engineering?
What are the lower division major preparation courses for an English major at UCI?
ANSWERS
If you are planning to transfer from a community college to a University of California (UC) or a California State University
campus (CSU), ASSIST can help you to:
1. Determine if courses are transferable.
2. See if a course meets a requirement of the CSU General Education Certification requirements or IGETC.
3. Find out what courses at Saddleback College meet major preparation requirements at many CSU and UC campuses.
Note: Not all universities have all of the transfer information available on ASSIST. If any item is shown in light gray text,
then that information is not available for the university selected. Please see a counselor for more information.
HOW TO USE ASSIST
1. VISIT ASSIST AT
www.assist.org
2. SELECT AN INSTITUTION: Select “Saddleback College.”
3. SELECT ACADEMIC YEAR TO QUERY: Select appropriate academic year.
4. AGREEMENTS WITH OTHER CAMPUSES: Select a UC or CSU campus.
5. SELECT THE TYPE OF TRANSFER INFORMATION YOU WANT:
UC TRANSFERABLE COURSES – Displays all Saddleback courses that are transferable to the UC from
that college.
CSU TRANSFERABLE COURSES – Displays all Saddleback courses that are transferable to the CSU from
that college.
CSU GE-BREATH CERTIFICATION COURSES – Displays all of the Saddleback courses that meet CSU
general education.
IGETC FOR UC AND CSU – Displays all of the Saddleback courses that meet IGETC general education courses.
6. PRINT THE INFORMATION: Click on the gold PRINT button on the top left of the screen.
7. SEE A COUNSELOR: Students are advised to contact a counselor for more information and for details regarding
other transfer agreements and options not available on ASSIST. Counselors have up-to-date information often not
available on ASSIST. Stop by Counseling Department in SSC 167 (949) 582-4572 or the Transfer Center SSC 225B
(949) 582-4328 to schedule an appointment.
24
University of California* – 10 Campuses
California State University* – 23 Campuses
1 University of California, Berkeley (1868) • (510) 642-6000
Semester Enrollment 36,204 • www.berkeley.edu
1 California Maritime Academy (1929) • (707) 654-1330
Semester Enrollment 1,046 • www.csum.edu
2 University of California, Davis (1908) • (530) 752-1011
Quarter Enrollment 35,415 • www.ucdavis.edu
2 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo (1901)
(805) 756-2311 • Quarter Enrollment 20,186 • www.calpoly.edu
3 California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (1938)
(909) 869-3210 • Quarter Enroll. 22,156 • www.csupomona.edu
3 University of California, Irvine (1965) • (949) 824-5011
Quarter Enrollment 30,757 • www.uci.edu
4 University of California, Los Angeles (1919) • (310) 825-4321
Quarter Enrollment 43,239 • www.ucla.edu
5 University of California, Merced (2004) • (209) 228-4400
Semester Enrollment 6,268 • www.ucmerced.edu
6 University of California, Riverside (1954) • (951) 827-1012
Quarter Enrollment 21,297 • www.ucr.edu
7 University of California, San Diego (1964) • (858) 534-2230
Quarter Enrollment 31,502 • www.ucsd.edu
8 University of California, Santa Barbara (1944) • (805) 893-8000
Quarter Enrollment 22,225 • www.ucsb.edu
9 University of California, Santa Cruz (1965) • (831) 459-0111
Quarter Enrollment 17,866 • www.ucsc.edu
10
University of California, San Francisco, is a graduate/professional
institution requiring pre‑professional preparation or graduate
standing for admission. (415) 476-9000 Post Grad 4,636
www.ucsf.edu
4 California State University, Bakersfield (1965) • (661) 664-2011
Quarter Enrollment 8,720 • www.csub.edu
5 California State University, Channel Islands (2002) • (805) 437-8400
Semester Enrollment 5,140 • www.csuci.edu
6 California State University, Chico (1887) • (530) 898-4636
Semester Enrollment 17,287 • www.csuchico.edu
7 California State University, Dominguez Hills (1960) • (310) 243-3300
Semester Enrollment 14,670 • www.csudh.edu
8 California State University, East Bay (1957) (formerly CSU Hayward)
(510) 885-3000 • Quarter Enrollment 14,526 • www.csueastbay.edu
9 California State University, Fresno (1911) • (559) 278-4240
Semester Enrollment 23,179 • www.csufresno.edu
10 California State University, Fullerton (1957) • (657) 278-2300
Semester Enrollment 38,128 • www.fullerton.edu
11 California State University, Long Beach (1949) • (562) 985-4111
Semester Enrollment 35,586 • www.csulb.edu
12 California State University, Los Angeles (1947) • (323) 343-3000
Quarter Enrollment 23,258 • www.calstatela.edu
13 California State University, Monterey Bay (1995) • (831) 582-3330
Semester Enrollment 6,631 • www.csumb.edu
14 California State University, Northridge (1958) • (818) 677-1200
Semester Enrollment 38,310 • www.csun.edu
19
Educational Degrees and Transfer
CALIFORNIA FOUR-YEAR PUBLIC UNIVERSITIES
15 California State University, Sacramento (1947) • (916) 278-6011
Semester Enrollment 28,811 • www.csus.edu
16 California State University, San Bernardino (1960) • (909) 537-5000
Quarter Enrollment 18,398 • www.csusb.edu
6
2
23
1
21
10
17 California State University, San Marcos (1989) • (760) 750-4000
Semester Enrollment 10,610 • www.csusm.edu
15
18 California State University, Stanislaus (1957) • (209) 667-3122
4-1-4 Enrollment 8,917 • www.csustan.edu
1
19 Humboldt State University (1913) • (707) 826-3011
Semester Enrollment 8,293 • www.humboldt.edu
8
22
18
20 San Diego State University (1897) • (619) 594-5000
Semester Enrollment 32,576 • www.sdsu.edu
5
9
13
21 San Francisco State University (1899) • (415) 338-1111
Semester Enrollment 29,905 • www.sfsu.edu
22 San Jose State University (1857) • (408) 924-1000
Semester Enrollment 32,713 • www.sjsu.edu
9
2
4
8
5
* Enrollment figures subject to change
14
4
16
3
6
12
7
11
3
23 Sonoma State University (1960) • (707) 664-2880
Semester Enrollment 9,120 • www.sonoma.edu
10
✪ 17
7
✪ Saddleback College
www.saddleback.edu
20
25
Educational Degrees and Transfer
THE CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITIES
The California State University system (CSU) is the largest
system of four-year public higher education in the United
States. Its 23 campuses extend from Arcata in the north
(Humbolt State University) to San Diego in the south
(San Diego State University). For every first-time freshman student admitted, two community college transfer
students are admitted. Since the CSU began in 1961, it
has awarded almost two million degrees.
The CSU historically has played a critical role in preparing
students to enter the job market. The system prepares 60
percent of the teachers in the state and more graduates
in business, engineering, agriculture, communications,
health, education, and public administration than all other
California universities and colleges combined. Altogether,
about half of all of the Bachelor’s degrees awarded in
California are from a CSU campus.
Upper-division transfer applicants must earn a minimum
2.0 grade point average (GPA) in 60 transferable units.
Within those 60 transferable units, transfer applicants
must complete at least 30 transferable semester units
of General Education (GE) courses with a grade of “C”
or better to include the following CSU GE requirements in
Oral Communication (A-1), Written Communication (A-2),
Critical Thinking (A-3), and Mathematics/Quantitative
Reasoning (B-4). When choosing General Education courses, most CSU transfer applicants follow either the CSU
General Education Certification course pattern or the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC).
Some majors may be impacted at some campuses. In
such cases, campuses use supplementary criteria to
screen applications such as GPA, required lower-division
major coursework, or test scores. For information on
Saddleback College lower-division major coursework,
please visit www.assist.org
For the California State University under the law SB1440,
the CSU shall grant a student priority admission to his or
her local CSU campus and to a program or major that is
similar to his or her community college major or area of
emphasis, as determined by the CSU campus to which the
student is admitted. All this can be done by completing a
specific Associate in Arts/Associate in Science – Transfer
degree at Saddleback College. Please contact the Transfer
Center (SSC 225B) or Counseling Department (SSC 167)
for further information.
Homepage: www.calstate.edu
Transfer Information: www.csumentor.edu
Application: secure.csumentor.edu/AdmissionApp
Impaction Information: www.calstate.edu/sas/impactionsearch
Saddleback College’s 2014
Transfer Ranking to the
California State University
from Orange County
26
CSU Fullerton
#1
CSU Long Beach
#2
CSU San Marcos
#3
Cal Poly Pomona State
#4
CSU Dominquez Hills
#5
In just over a century, the University of California (UC)
has built an international reputation for academic excellence. Whether you want a broad liberal arts education,
preparation for graduation study, or training for a particular profession, the University of California probably has a
program to meet your needs.
The University of California includes world-famous campuses such as UC Berkeley and UCLA. The UC campuses
are primarily research and theoretical institutions providing
transfer students with the skills to pursue graduate-level
degrees. At most campuses, undergraduate majors are
offered by academic units called colleges, such as the
College of Letters and Science, College of Engineering,
or College of Natural Sciences. At UC San Diego, each of
the six colleges has a distinct academic philosophy. UC
Santa Cruz has eight colleges, each a small community
with unique intellectual interests and social traditions.
Upper-division transfer applicants must earn a minimum
2.4 grade point average (GPA) in 60 transferable units.
Within those 60 transferable units, transfer courses must
include the following UC General Education requirements
as outlined in the Intersegmental General Education
Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) in English Composition (1-A),
Critical Thinking/Composition (1-B), and Mathematical
Concepts (2). When choosing general education courses,
most UC transfer students follow the Intersegmental
General Edu-cation Transfer Curriculum (IGETC). However,
students pursuing a high-unit major may choose not to
complete IGETC in order to complete their lower-division
major coursework before transfer. Some majors may be
impacted at some campuses. In such cases, campuses
may screen for admissions based on additional criteria
such as GPA or required lower-division major coursework.
For information on Saddleback lower-division major coursework, please visit www.assist.org and the Transfer Center
(SSC 225B).
Homepage: www.universityofcalifornia.edu
Transfer Information: admission.universityofcalifornia.edu
Application: admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/how-to-apply/apply-online
Transfer Admission Guarantee: admission.universityofcalifornia.edu/transfer/guarantee
Educational Degrees and Transfer
THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
Saddleback College’s 2014
Transfer Ranking to the
University of California
from Orange County
UC Irvine
#1
UCLA#2
UC San Diego
#3
UC Berkeley
#4
UC Santa Barbara
#5
27
Educational Degrees and Transfer
CALIFORNIA INDEPENDENT COLLEGES
Visit www.aiccu.edu
California’s independent colleges and universities represent an established tradition of higher education in California.
The first institutions opened their doors in 1851. Yet each of the 75 colleges and universities have their own unique
character and strengths.
Programs for the Adult Learner: edfair.org
75 Campuses – over 100 locations
• Two- and Four-Year Specialized Schools in the Arts and Sciences
• Traditional Liberal Arts Colleges
• Small Comprehensive Universities
• Major Research Universities
• Free-Standing Graduate and Professional Schools
• Campuses for Working Adults
The Students
320,000 Students equals 22% of California’s Four-Year Undergraduate Students
176,000 Undergraduate Students / 144,000 Graduate Students
• 38% Transfer Students
• 48% Undergraduate Ethnic Minority Students
• 15% International Students
• Average Campus Student/Faculty Ratio – 12:1
Annual Financial Aid
• $137 Billion from the Independent Colleges and Universities
• $288 Million from State and Federal Governments (Cal Grant aid)
• 86% of the Students Receive Financial Aid – $15,000 Average Student Financial Aid Package
Degrees Awarded
• Approximately 20% of California’s Bachelor’s Degrees
• Approximately 50% of California’s Master’s and Doctorate Degrees
• Approximately 61% of California’s Professional Degrees
There are 75 fully accredited independent colleges and universities affiliated with the Association of Independent
California Colleges and Universities (AICCU) providing a host of options at the undergraduate, graduate, and professional
levels. Independent colleges are often flexible in admissions policies and in awarding previous college credit. They invite
interested students to make an appointment with their Office of Admissions in order to discuss transfer opportunities on
a personal basis.
28
www.assist.org
What is ASSIST?
If you are planning to transfer from a community college to a University of California or a California State University,
ASSIST can help! ASSIST is the official California statewide database listing a selection of campus-approved transfer
agreements, general education requirements, and information on UC and CSU transferable courses. Students are also
advised to contact a Saddleback College counselor for more information, and for details regarding other transfer agreements and options not available on ASSIST for your transfer college choice.
www.csumentor.edu
What is CSUMentor?
CSUMentor provides students with a simpler, friendlier way to plan their transfer to a California State University. CSUMentor can help you select a CSU campus, plan to meet CSU entrance and academic requirements, apply online for
admissions and financial aid, understand financial aid eligibility and opportunities, and establish an electronic communications link between the student and CSU campus(es). A wealth of information about all 23 CSU campuses is available
at CSUMentor.
admission.universityofcalifornia.edu
Visit this site for information about UC Admissions. This site will answer your questions about transferring, financial aid,
campus fit and more. The UC Application is accessible through this site.
www.aiccu.edu
What is AICCU – Association of Independent California
Colleges and Universities?
California’s independent colleges and universities represent a long tradition of higher education in California. The first
institution opened in 1851. Today, each of the AICCU’s 75 colleges and universities have their own unique character and
strengths. Here, you will get a comprehensive look at each of these independent colleges, information and facts, and
transfer information to AICCU colleges such as Chapman University, Mills College, Concordia University, University of
San Diego, Westmont College, and Pepperdine University.
www.californiacolleges.edu
Educational Degrees and Transfer
TRANSFER INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET
What is californiacolleges.edu?
CaliforniaColleges.edu has been developed in collaboration with the California State University (CSU), University of
California (UC), California Community Colleges (CCC), Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities
(AICCU), and the California Department of Education to allow students to obtain information about higher education
opportunities in California. The site aims to become the portal for all colleges and universities in the state. The site
provides two major functions: college exploration, and guidance and counseling.
www.saddleback.edu/transfer
Saddleback College Transfer Center Home Page
Here you will find web pages filled with information for the Saddleback College student interested in transferring.
These pages cover all aspects of transferring such as major preparation, degrees, eligibility, transfer guarantee
programs, GPA, and more! All of the links you need to transfer are included. Visit this site created just for Saddleback
College students!
• California Virtual Campus: www.cvc.edu
• Western Undergraduate Exchange (Reduced Tuition Program): www.wiche.edu/wue
• College Navigator – Explore Colleges and Majors in the U.S. (some schools not accredited):
www.nces.ed.gov/collegenavigator
• List of U.S. Colleges & Universities: www.utexas.edu/world/univ
• Search Colleges & Universities worldwide (some schools not accredited): www.university-world.com
• What can I do with a major in…?: www.saddleback.edu/uploads/career/static/majors
• Study Abroad: www.studyabroad.com
• Princeton Review College Search: www.princetonreview.com/college/default.asp
• Major Resource Kits: www.udel.edu/CSC/students/major_resource_kits
• College Board: www.collegeboard.org
29
Success Tools
GLOSSARY OF COLLEGE TERMS
Advanced Placement (AP)
A College Board examination program
through which students who score
3 or higher may be awarded credit
toward graduation or credit toward
general education or breadth requirements. Official copies ordered from
College Board must be on file and
one semester must be completed
at Saddleback College to receive AP
credit. See the Saddleback College
catalog for details.
Advisement
An online session that helps students
determine their educational goal, plan
a first semester schedule, and prepare
a First Semester Ed Plan.
Articulation Agreement
A written agreement that lists courses
at one college which are equivalent to
courses at another college.
Assessment and Placement
Assessment exams determine the
students current skill level in reading, English, mathematics, and ESL
(English as a Second Language) which
provides students with appropriate
course placement.
Associate Degree
A degree granted by community colleges upon completion of 60 units
of college work, including general
education, major requirements, and
electives.
Catalog
A book published by a college describing all of the courses and giving
requirements for all majors. The
Saddleback College catalog is for
sale in the bookstore or online at
www.saddleback.edu/cc
Certificate
An occupational certificate is granted
upon completion of a prescribed list
of courses in a field leading to employment, usually about 18-30 units.
Certification
The process a community college
uses to verify to a California State University or a University of California
campus that a transfer student has
completed the lower-division general
education requirements. Saddleback
will certify completion of either
30
IGETC or the CSU General Education
patterns and award a Certificate of
Completion in General Education.
Corequisite
Concurrent (simultaneous) enrollment
in a companion course is required.
Full-time Student
A student taking 12 or more units in
one semester.
General Education
A pattern of coursework covering
communication skills, natural sciences, social sciences, arts, humanities, and mathematics that all colleges require to qualify for a degree.
The pattern will vary from college to
college.
Grade Point Average (GPA)
A measure of academic achievement
obtained by dividing a student’s total
grade points by the number of units
attempted. See Pg. 31 for calculating
GPA.
Guaranteed Transfer
A special agreement between a community college student and a participating four-year college that either
guarantees transfer admission or
gives priority to a transfer application.
IGETC
A general education plan which community college students can use to
fulfill lower-division general education
requirements for either the UC or CSU
system.
Lower-Division Courses
Courses at the freshman or sophomore level of college. Community
colleges offer lower-division courses.
Major
A planned series of courses in one
particular field designed to develop
special skills or expertise.
Matriculation
Matriculation is a process designed
to assist students in achieving their
educational goals at Saddleback
College. The Matriculation process
begins with three critical steps:
Orientation; Assessment in Reading,
English and Math; and Advisement
with a First Semester Ed Plan.
Orientation
An online presentation designed to
explain college policies, programs,
and services.
Prerequisite
A requirement that must be met before enrolling in a particular course.
Probation
A student is placed on probation for
two reasons:
1. Falling below a 2.0 (“C”) grade
point average.
2. Failing to successfully complete
half or more of the units originally
attempted.
Recommended Preparation
A condition of enrollment that a student is advised, but not required, to
meet before enrolling in a particular
course.
Residency
To be classified as a legal resident of
California for tuition purposes, a
student must meet certain requirements, including living in the state for
at least one year. The Admissions and
Records Office verifies residency.
Semester
One half of the academic year, usually
16-18 weeks long.
Transcript
An official record of your work at a
college. Saddleback College transcripts can be obtained at the Admissions and Records Office.
Transfer Courses
Courses from a community college
which are accepted by four-year
colleges and universities. Check the
catalog to be sure a course transfers
to the appropriate college.
Unit
A college unit (or credit) usually
means one hour of lecture per week
for a semester. Many Saddleback
College courses are three units, meaning that they meet for three hours of
lecture per week. An Associate Degree
requires 60 units.
How to Figure Your Grade Point Average
The most common grading system is the 4.0 grade point system. This is the system Saddleback College uses.
Following is the value chart to help determine your GPA:
Grade Point Value Per Unit
The following grades are not part of the GPA computation:
A = 4 grade points
P = Pass: Zero grade points, no units attempted, but counts for units
completed
B= 3 grade points
NP= No Pass: Zero grade points, no units attempted, no units completed
C = 2 grade points
W = Withdrawal: Zero grade points, no units attempted, no units completed
D= 1 grade point
I = Incomplete: Zero grade points, no units attempted
F = 0 grade points
IP = In Progress: Zero grade points, no units attempted
RD
=
Report
Delayed:
Zero grade points, no units attempted
R=
Repeated
Course: Zero grade points, credit and grade may replace previously
recorded course.
Success Tools
CALCULATING YOUR GRADE POINT AVERAGE
Your GPA is often very important since it may influence your admission to a college or university, chances for a particular
job, eligibility to obtain an Associate Degree, or your eligibility for financial aid.
Computing the GPA – the Steps
1. Multiply the grade points by the number of semester units per course. (For example: For a 3-unit class, an “A”
grade earns 4 grade points per unit: 4 grade points x 3 semester units = 12 grade points.)
2. Add to find the total number of units attempted for the semester.
3. Add to find the total number of grade points earned.
4. Use the following formula to determine your GPA: GPA = (Total Earned Grade Points) ÷ (Total Units Attempted)
AN EXAMPLE: FALL SEMESTER
Course
Units Attempted (UA)
English 1A
4
Psychology 1
3
Math 251
5
Counseling 140
Speech 1
3
Totals:
Grade
Units Completed (UC)
Grade Points (GP)
A
C
B
P
D
4
3
5
3
3
16.0
6.0
15.0
0.0
3.0
1518
40.0
GPA for the semester: 40 ÷ 15 = 2.66
Final Exams
The “Final Exam Schedule” is available online.
The link can be found at www.saddleback.edu/cs
During summer session final exams are given during the
last week of scheduled classes.
31
Saddleback College Programs for Students
32
ASSOCIATED STUDENTS
All persons enrolled at Saddleback College are automatically members of the Associated Students of Saddleback
College (ASSC), but are only considered “active” members
upon payment of the Associated Student Body membership fee and validation on the student photo identification
card.
The ASSC’s governing board is called the Associated
Student Government (ASG). Participation in the ASG offers
students a unique opportunity to explore and develop leadership potential while providing services and a comprehensive activities program for Saddleback students. Additionally, Student Government members represent the ASSC
on various district and college governance committees to
provide student input into the decision-making process.
The ASG President, Vice President and Board Members are
elected by a vote of the general student body during the
Spring emester preceding the new school year.
Typically, the ASG organizes a variety of programs and
events to enhance student life, including hosting guest
speakers, entertainment, and educational forums related
to student, college, and/or community-related topics.
Included among typical programs and activities are AIDS
awareness, Red Cross Blood Drives, Multi-Cultural Experiences, and many other educational, entertaining, and/or
social activities.
The Associated Student Government’s various committees
hold regularly scheduled meetings throughout Fall and
Spring semesters. Meetings are typically held in SSC 211.
For further information, visit us on the Web at:
www.saddleback.edu/asg
Associated Student Government
Student Activities Fee “ASB Stamp”
Sales of the ASB stamps form part of the the ASG budget.
The Associated Student Body (ASB) Gaucho stamp can
be purchased for the Fall and Spring Semesters during
registration or in person in SSC 210. Benefits of the “ASB
Stamp” include:
1. No-cost entry to various athletic events for the specific term of purchase. (Exceptions: state playoffs and
championship events; reduced prices for cardholders)
2. Reduced prices for Fine Arts presentations
3. Reduced prices for items purchased at the Cafeteria,
Village Cafe, and Coffee carts.
4. Reduced prices for movie and amusement park tickets
(purchases made in SSC 210)
5. Discounts at a variety of local businesses via Fund
Card booklet.
ASG funds provide financial assistance for campus activities such as athletic teams and support services, drama
productions, journalism programs, fine arts productions,
scholarship ceremony, commencement ceremony and
career fair, among others.
All students who wish to receive ASG travel funds or
those participating in the following should purchase an
ASB stamp at the beginning of each semester: in-season
college athletic teams, student managers and trainers of
such teams, Forensics team, Pep Squad, Concert Choir,
Orchestra, student drama productions, Lariat staff, or
Associated Student Government.
Student Photo IDs
All students may take a one-time permanent Student Photo ID. Student ID cards are required to use the college
library and for college transactions. Photo IDs are taken year-round in the Admissions and Records Office, SSC 102,
during normal business hours. Drivers license, passport or other photo must be presented.There is a charge for
replacement cards.
How do you get started?
• Apply to Saddleback College and complete the Matriculation Process.
• Meet with your respective coach. Contact information can be found on our college athletics website at
www.saddlebackgauchos.com
• Make an appointment with an Athletic Counselor to review eligibility policy, establish a Student Educational Plan,
and discuss your academic, personal, and career goals.
• It is crucial to select a major as soon as possible. If you are having trouble with this step, some great courses to
assist you in this process are Counseling 140, 160, and 1.
Eligibility Basics:
During intercollegiate competition at Saddleback College
• You must be ACTIVELY enrolled in 12 units, of which 9 must be academic/degree applicable.
• Before the beginning of your second season, you must complete at least 24 units, of which 18 must be academic/
degree applicable, with at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average.
• If you are transferring in to Saddleback from another California Community College, you must establish residency
by completing 12 units, only 8 of which may be completed during the summer session.
• Remember, meeting these standards is the bare minimum and will likely not lead to gaining eligibility to transfer and
compete at the “next level.”
In order to gain eligibility to win an athletic scholarship and compete at the four-year level:
• There are wide differences in the eligibility policy of NCAA Division I, Division II, Division III, and NAIA institutions.
You should discuss your goals with your athletic counselor to fully understand your eligibility obligations.
• You must first be defined by the NCAA Eligibility Center (www.ncaaclearinghouse.net) as a qualifier or a non-qualifier
and as an amateur or professional.
• Then set an appointment at (949) 582-4572 and come in to see your athletic counselor with:
> A list of possible transfer institutions
> Your information from the NCAA Eligibility Center
> A list of possible careers that you may be interested in pursuing
> All transcripts from previous coursework including high school and college
> All questions that you have about your journey ahead
> Above all, check with your athletic counselor before making any changes to your academic status such as
dropping or adding courses.
Remember that competing in intercollegiate athletics is a privilege, not a right. Not only must you earn the
privilege, but you must be proud to have made it into the Cardinal and Gold!
Saddleback College Programs for Students
STUDENT ATHLETES AT SADDLEBACK COLLEGE
33
Saddleback College Programs for Students
34
STUDENT CLUBS
How to Charter a Club
Any five interested students and a faculty or staff advisor
may charter an interest club on campus. The process is
overseen by the Student Development Office.
Visit www.saddleback.edu/clubs for more information.
Clubs
The following organizations have been chartered by the
Associated Student Government. If there is a club you
wish to learn more about, or if you would like to start a
new one, call or come into the Student Development 0ffice
(SSC 210) or ICC (SSC 211B) at (949) 582-4616.
ALPHA GAMMA SIGMA
GAY-STRAIGHT ALLIANCE
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
GENDER STUDIES
ANIMÉ CLUB
GEOLOGY CLUB
ANTHROPOLOGY CLUB
HILLEL
APPRECIATION OF PHILIPINO
AMERICAN CULTURE
HONORS CLUB
ARABIC CLUB
ART CLUB
ASTRONOMY AND PHYSICS CLUB
AVALON RISING
BEST BUDDIES
BAHA’I CLUB
BIOLOGICAL SOCIETY
BLACK STUDENT UNION
INTERIOR DESIGN CLUB
INTERNATIONAL CLUB
JOURNALISM CLUB
LATIN-AMERICAN FILM CLUB
LATTER-DAY SAINTS CLUB
MATH CLUB
MODEL UNITED NATIONS
MUSIC MOVEMENT
BUDDHISTS FOR WORLD PEACE
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR
WOMEN
BUSINESS CLUB
PERSIAN CULTURE CLUB
CALIFORNIA NURSING STUDENTS’
ASSOC.
PHI THETA KAPPA INTERNATIONAL
HONOR SOCIETY
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
PHYSICS CLUB
CAMPUS GREEN
POETRY CLUB
CHEMISTRY CLUB
PROGRESSIVE BOOK CLUB
CHICANO/LATINO STUDENT
STUDIES ASSOC.
POLITICAL THEORIES CLUB
CHRISTIAN STUDENTS CLUB
PSI BETA NATIONAL HONOR
SOCIETY
CLASS ACTION
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
S.T.A.G.E.
COMPUTER SCIENCE SOCIETY
SADDLEBACK SYMPHONY
DANCE COLLECTIVE
SALSA/LATIN DANCE CLUB
DEMOCRATIC CLUB
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
EASTERN ARTS CLUB
SNOWBOARD AND SKI CLUB
ENGLISH SOCIETY
SPANISH CLUB
ENVIRONMENTAL
AWARENESS
SPDI: STUDENTS FOR PROGRESS
AND DEVELOPMENT IN IRAN
FASHION CLUB
STUDENT FILM MAKERS
FOODS AND NUTRITION CLUB
WOMEN’S STUDIES ASSOC.
The Financial Assistance and Scholarship Office is in the
Student Services Center, 106.
Saddleback College administers a comprehensive student
financial aid program to assist students in meeting college
costs. The amount of financial aid awarded varies from
student to student, depending on the individual’s need and
resources. Financial Aid is intended to help students who
might not otherwise be able to attend college. Although
the primary responsibility for meeting college costs rests
with the student and his or her family, it is recognized that
many families have limited resources and are unable to
meet the cost of a college education. Federal and state
financial aid programs have been established to provide
assistance to students with documented financial need.
The application process for financial aid begins with the
completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA) which is available in January 1 for the Following
fall semester (apply online at www.fafsa.gov).
In addition to having financial need students must meet
the following conditions:
• Must be enrolled in an eligible program of study
leading to completion of an AA/AS degree, transfer requirements or eligible certificate program
• Maintain satisfactory academic progress;
• Be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen
• Certify compliance with selective service registration requirements
• Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any grant made under any Title IV program
• Have a social security number
• Have a high school diploma, or GED*
*Effective July 1, 2012, we are no longer offering the Ability to
Benefit test. Students without a High School diploma or GED
who passed the Ability to Benefit test or completed 6 college
credits towards a degree or a certificate prior to July 1, 2012
are still eligible to continue receiving aid in future years.
The amount of financial aid awarded varies from student to student, depending on the individual’s need and
resources. Student budgets include educational expenses,
such as tuition, fees, books, supplies, housing, food, transportation, child-care and personal expenses.
Financial aid recipients must adhere to the standards of
progress of the financial aid programs.
Federal Pell Grants
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity
Grants (FSEOG *)
This federally funded grant is available to Pell Grant eligible
students who demonstrate exceptional financial need.
The Federal Work Study Program (FWS*)
This federally funded program provides employment
opportunities to students with financial need. Students
awarded FWS receive an allocation of funds earned
through part-time jobs on campus. FWS provides an
excellent “learning process’’ through on-the-job training.
Students are employed a maximum of ten hours per week
while school is in session.
*FSEOG and FWS funds are limited and early application is
strongly advised.
The William D. Ford Direct Loan Program provides loans
to students to be used for educational expenses.
Freshman students may borrow up to $3,500 per year and
sophomores (those who have completed 30 units) may
borrow up to $4,500 per year in subsidized loans. Based
on need additional unsubsidized loans are also available.
California State Programs
Board of Governors Waiver (BOGW)
A State program for California residents to waive the
enrollment fees at community colleges. There are several
ways to qualify for a BOGW:
The student demonstrates financial need according to
federal methodology based on completion of the Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA);
OR
The student or the student’s family, is receiving CalWORKs,
formerly TANF/AFDC, or Supplemental
Security Income (SSI), or General Assistance/General
Relief, or the student is a disabled veteran or a dependent of a deceased or disabled veteran as certified by the
California Department of Veterans Affairs, or the student
is a recipient or the child of a recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, or the student is a dependent of a
victim of the 9/11/01 terrorist attack, or the student is a
dependent of deceased law enforcement/fire suppression
personnel killed in the line of duty.
OR
The student meets specific income criteria based on family
size as set by the State of California.
Saddleback College Programs for Students
FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SCHOLARSHIP OFFICE
This grant is a federally funded program designed to be
the foundation of financial aid for undergraduates who
demonstrate need. The amount of the PELL Grant is based
on the cost of attendance, minus the expected calculated
family contribution and the student’s enrollment status at
the time of payment. Award amounts vary according to
eligibility and enrollment. Please check with the Financial
Aid Office or visit the website for the maximum and minimum PELL award amounts. PELL Grants are limited to 12
semesters.
35
Saddleback College Programs for Students
Cal Grants
Dream Act/AB540 Eligibility
Cal Grant Programs are available to California Residents
who qualify. United States citizens, permanent residents or
eligible non-citizens may apply for Cal Grant, via the
Federal Application for Student Aid (FAFSA). Beginning
January 15, 2013 AB-540 students may apply via the
California Dream Act Application. The deadline to apply is
March 2nd Each year for all California College Students
(maximum opportunity). If you miss the March 2nd
deadline AND you plan to attend a community college in
the fall, you have until September 2nd (limited number of
grants available). Be aware there is also a GPA submission requirement. The college electronically transmits GPA
verifications for certain students. For detailed information
go to www.csac.gov. Students must be actively enrolled in
at least 6 units to receive Cal Grant Benefits.
Cal Grant A assists low- and middle-income students with
tuition/fee costs at four-year colleges and universities.
Grant recipients are selected on the basis of financial need
and grade point average. For students who qualify for a Cal
Grant A and want to attend a public community college
first, the Student Aid Commission will hold the tuition/fee
award on reserve until they transfer to a four-year school,
provided they continue to qualify.
Cal Grant B provides a living allowance and tuition/fee
help for low-income students. Cal Grant B may be used
at community colleges, as well as at four-year schools.
Cal Grant C helps vocational school students with tuition
and training costs. Recipients must be enrolled in a
vocational program at a community college, independent
college or vocational school, in a program of study from
four months to two years in length.
Chafee Grant program is available to former foster youth.
Awards are $5,000 per year. Apply using the FAFSA and the
separate Chafee Grant application. For more information
please visit www.chafee.csac.ca.gov
Several types of state and institutional aid are available to
AB 540 students as a result of the California Dream Act
such as BOG Fee Waiver or Cal Grant. Please go to
www.saddleback.edu/fao/california-dream-act to read
more about it.
The deadline for a Cal Grant is March 2!
Students can earn thousands of dollars in grants.
Contact the Student Financial Assistance & Scholarship
Office for more information.
36
Scholarships
In addition, the college administers a variety of scholarship programs. Information about the College Scholarship
Program can be obtained in the Financial Aid Office or visit
www.saddleback.edu/fao/scholarship-information.
Important Financial Aid Information
The first Friday in July – The first priority deadline for financial aid at Saddleback College. Turn in all required financial
aid documentation by this date to be sure to receive your
financial aid at the beginning of the fall semester. This is
required for all eligible students to receive their financial
aid Pell awards by the first week of the fall semester. For
more information about the financial aid programs at
Saddleback College and our office hours, visit our website
at: www.saddleback.edu/fao/ For further information and
for help with the financial aid application process, come
into the Fi
For Financial Aid Students
The Saddleback Card
• A simplified disbursement of your eligible financial
aid funds.
• The one card that can simplify your finances while
in school. Financial services created by students
for students!!!
• With your Saddleback Card, there’s choice and
convenience of 24/7 online banking and free
checking with the Higher One Account. Choose
the purchasing power of Debit MasterCard.
The Student Financial Assistance
& Scholarship Office
Funding your Bright Future!
Grading Policy
Course Repetition
In section 55023 of the California Administrative Code
(Title V), the State Legislature mandated a grading policy
for all California Community Colleges. In compliance
with this mandate, the South Orange County Community
College District Board of Trustees approved Board Policy
5300, titled Grading Policy (see the Saddleback College
Catalog for details).
State regulations govern the number of times a student may
repeat a course within a community college district. Regulations are subject to change.
ACADEMIC RECORD SYMBOLS
AND GRADE POINT AVERAGE
Evaluative Symbol
Grade Point Value
A...................................... 4
B...................................... 3
C...................................... 2
D...................................... 1
F...................................... 0
P – Pass (at least satisfactory:
units awarded not counted in GPA)
NP – No Pass (less than satisfactory or failing: units
not counted in GPA)
I –Incomplete
W – Withdrawal from class.
Pass/No Pass (P/NP)
(Formerly Credit/No Credit)
Students have the option to be evaluated on a Pass/No
Pass grading basis except in courses not approved for such
grading. These courses are designated in the College Catalog. Students must declare the Pass/No Pass option within
the first 30 percent of the class. Once chosen, this option
may not be reversed after the deadline to choose the P/NP
option. Students may choose the Pass/No Pass option
online through the MySite web portal. Nursing courses
may not be taken for Pass/No Pass grade, unless no other
grading option is available.
Courses in which there is a single satisfactory standard of
performance may be evaluated only on a Pass/No Pass
grading basis. Such courses will be so designated in the
College Catalog.
A Pass “P” grade is defined as satisfactory (“C” or better)
and units are awarded. However, no grade points are
assigned and the grade is not used to compute the grade
point average.
A No Pass “NP” grade is defined as less than satisfactory
(“D” or “F”) and no units are earned nor is the grade used
to compute the grade point average.
NOTE: In lieu of the traditional letter grade, the “P/NP”
option is offered so that students may explore subject
areas of interest outside of their assumed competence or
known abilities without being over-concerned with a grade
or jeopardizing their grade point average.
Before you decide to take a course Pass/No Pass, we
suggest you discuss the implications with a counselor.
Four-year universities vary widely in their policies regarding
acceptances of P/NP grades.
Repetition to Alleviate Previously Earned
Substandard Grade.
1. To alleviate a substandard grade in calculating the
GPA from a non-repeatable course, the student should
re-enroll in the same course at Saddleback College
or take an equivalent course at Irvine Valley College.
The student must ensure that the IVC course taken is
deemed equivalent prior to enrolling in it by consulting
with a counselor at Saddleback College. Students are
limited to a maximum of three enrollments in a course
to complete it with a satisfactory grade.
2. A student may request to have the substandard grade
disregarded in the computation of their GPA by submitting a Request for Transcript Repeat Notation to the
Office of Admissions and Records. The form is available
to download from the Admissions and Records website
at www.saddleback.edu/admissions/forms-and-petitions
The previously recorded course and grade will remain
on the student’s transcript and the transcript will show
which course was excluded for purposes of grade point
calculation. Only the most recent course grade earned
will be used in calculating the student’s grade point
average. A maximum of the first two previous grades per
course may be disregarded in computing the student’s
grade point average. All previous work will remain on the
student’s transcript to ensure a true and complete
academic history.
Important College Policies
COLLEGE POLICIES AFFECTING ALL STUDENTS
Repetition for Courses with a Passing Grade
Students receiving a passing grade (A, B, C, P, or CR) in
a course designated as “non-repeatable” may not re-enroll
in a course except in limited circumstances. Exceptions are
considered only by petition. Consult the Office of Admissions and Records in SSC 102 or online at
www.saddleback.edu/admissions for information about the
petition process.
Please refer to the college catalog for additional information.
Probation
First Time Probation
Students whose GPA falls below a 2.0 or are on Progress Probation for the first time will receive a PB Hold.
This requires the student to attend a Probation Workshop
conducted by a counselor. Students who are on Probation
or Progress Probation for two consecutive terms jeopardize
their registration dates.
Academic Probation
A student who has attempted at least 12 semester units at
Saddleback College is placed on academic probation when
the earned grade point average in all units attempted is less
than 2.0.
37
Important College Policies
Progress Probation
A student who has enrolled in at least 12 semester units at
Saddleback College is placed on progress probation when
the percentage of units in which he or she has enrolled
and for which entries of “W,” “I” and “NP” are recorded
reaches or exceeds 50 percent.
It is the responsibility of a student who has been placed on
academic or progress probation to confer with a counselor
regarding the probationary status and/or to use services
provided by the college including basic skills courses,
tutoring services and faculty conferences. The college
reserves the right to require special counseling and regulation of the student’s program on the basis of his or her
achievement.
Removal From Probation
First Time Probation (PB)
A student that finds themselves on probation (academic
or progress) for the first time must attend a Probation
Workshop in order to remove the hold and be eligible to
register on their assigned date.
Academic Probation (JA)
A student on academic probation for a grade-point deficiency shall be removed from probation when the student’s
cumulative grade point average is 2.0 or higher.
Progress Probation (JP)
A student on progress probation because of an excess of
units of which entries “W,” “I” and “NP” are recorded shall
be removed from probation when the percentage of units
in this category drops below 50 percent.
Dismissal From College
A student whose cumulative grade point average falls
below 1.75 in three consecutive semesters shall be subject
to dismissal. A student who has been placed on progress
probation shall be subject to dismissal if the percentage
of units in which the student has been enrolled, for which
entries of “W”, “I” and “NP” are recorded in three
consecutive semesters or exceeds 50 percent.
A combination of low scholarship and continued progress
probation for three consecutive semesters may also result
in dismissal.
Readmission After Dismissal
Students who have been dismissed from Saddleback
College may apply for readmission after one semester of
non-attendance by following the petition procedure in the
Admissions and Records Office. Students who are readmitted and fail to maintain a grade point average of 1.75 or
higher during the semester following readmission shall be
subject to permanent dismissal.
38
Academic Renewal
Students may petition to have their academic record
reviewed for academic renewal of substandard academic
performance in consecutive terms under the following
conditions:
• Students must have achieved a grade point average of
2.5 with a minimum of 30 semester units at regionally
accredited colleges or universities subsequent to the
substandard work in question.
• Students must not have requested or have been granted
academic renewal within the SOCCCD.
• Only work completed three years or more before the
date of petition may qualify for academic renewal.
• Previous substandard work will be disregarded only by
the term, not the individual course; that is, all courses
completed in a given term will be disregarded, including
those for which the student received a passing grade.
• Only substandard semesters (below 2.0) may be
considered for renewal.
• A maximum of two semesters of full-time work or 30
units of part-time work may be disregarded.
• Academic renewal may not be granted for a semester
containing coursework used as a requirement for a
degree, certificate, or skills award to the student within
the SOCCCD.
The procedures are as follows:
1. A petition must be filed in the Office of Admissions
and Records.
2. Accompanying the petition must be evidence that (a)
previous work in question was substandard (less than
C or the equivalent), and (b) the previous substandard
work does not reflect the student’s current performance
or capabilities.
3. The Registrar of Admissions, Records, and Enrollment
Services is the designated authority for approval of
academic renewal.
Academic renewal actions are irreversible. When academic
renewal procedures permit previously recorded substandard coursework to be disregarded in the computation of
a student’s grade point average, the student’s permanent
academic record should contain an accurate record of all
coursework to ensure a complete academic history.
Academic renewal procedures shall not conflict with the
District’s obligation to retain and destroy records or with
the instructor’s ability to determine a student’s final grade.
Rules and Regulations for
Student Behavior
(Reference Board Policy 5401)
Saddleback College students are responsible for regulating
their own conduct and for respecting the rights and privileges of others in accordance with the Code of Conduct
set by the District Board of Trustees (Administrative Regulation 5401). Saddleback students are expected to conduct
themselves in a manner compatible with the function of
the college as an educational institution and respect and
obey all civil and criminal laws. Failure to show respect for
the standards as set forth by Saddleback College is cause
for disciplinary action.
Code of Conduct
In compliance with California Education Code Section
66300 and in keeping with the above, the following regulations have been established.
Students may be disciplined for one or more of the following causes related to college activity or attendance:
A. Disruptive behavior, willful disobedience, habitual profanity or vulgarity, or the open defiance of the authority
of, district or personnel.
B. Assault, battery, or any threat of force or violence upon
a student, district or personnel, or an authorized
visitor.
C. Willful misconduct resulting in injury or death to a
student or district personnel or an authorized visitor, or
willful misconduct resulting in damage, defacing, theft,
or other injury to any real or personal property owned
by the District, or district personnel, or students in attendance at the colleges or programs of the District.
D. The unlawful use, sale, or possession on district property or presence on district property while under the
influence of any controlled substance or any poison
classified as such by state or federal law.
E. Smoking in an area where smoking has been prohibited
by law or by policy of the Board of Trustees or administrative regulation.
F. Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene conduct on
district property or at district-sponsored functions.
G. Sexual assault (as defined in Board Policy 5404) on
any student or employee of the District, on campus
or off campus grounds or facilities maintained by the
District.
H. The possession or use of any firearms, explosives, dangerous chemicals, deadly weapons, or other potentially
harmful implements or substances while on district
property or at a district-sponsored function without the
prior authorization of the disciplinary officer.
I. The obstruction or disruption, on or off campus, of any
educational or administrative process or function of
the District.
J. Physical abuse, on or off campus property, of the
person or property of any member of the campus
community or of members of his or her family or the
threat of such physical abuse when related to a district
program or activity.
K. Misrepresentation of oneself or of an organization as
an agent of the District.
L. Soliciting or assisting another to do any act which
would subject a student to discipline.
M. Use, possession, or distribution of alcoholic beverages
and/or illegal narcotics/drugs on district premises, or
at district-sponsored events, or appearance on districtproperty or at district sponsored events while under the
influence of alcohol or illegal narcotics/drugs unless
otherwise provided by law and district policy.
N. Unauthorized recording, dissemination, and publication
of academic presentations or materials. This prohibition applies to a recording made in any medium.
O. Actions of force or threat of force to injure, intimidate,
oppress or threaten because of the other person’s
race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, disability,
gender, or sexual orientation, or because of the perception that the other person has one or more of these
characteristics.
P. Academic dishonesty, including, but not limited to,
falsification, plagiarism, cheating or fabrication which
compromises the integrity of an assignment, a college
record or a program.
a. Falsification involves any conduct in academic work,
records or programs that is intended to deceive,
including, but not limited to, the following acts:
1. forging signatures on official documents
such as admissions cards and financial aid
applications.
2. changing or attempting to change official
academic records without proper sanction.
3. misrepresenting or falsifying successful
completion prerequisites.
4. providing false information, such as immigration materials, during the admission or
matriculation process.
5. falsifying one’s identification or falsely using
another identification.
6. logging in or otherwise gaining access to a
computer, computer network or protected web
site using the password or identity of another.
7. citation of data or information not actually in
the source indicated.
8. including in a reference list of works cited a
text or other information source which was not
used in constructing the essay, paper or other
academic exercise.
Important College Policies
STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES
39
Important College Policies
40
9. submission in a paper, lab report or other
academic exercise of falsified, invented, or
fictitious data or evidence, or deliberate and
knowing concealment or distortion of the true
nature, origin, or function of such data or
evidence.
10. submitting as the student’s own work any academic exercises (e.g., written work, printing,
sculpture, etc.) prepared totally or in part by
another.
11. taking a test for someone else or permitting
someone else to take a test for a student.
b. Plagiarism is any conduct in academic work or
programs involving misrepresentation of someone
else’s words, ideas or data as one’s original work,
including, but not limited to, the following:
1. intentionally representing as one’s own work
the work, words, ideas or arrangement of
ideas, research, formulae, diagrams, statistics,
or evidence of another.
2. taking sole credit for ideas and/or written work
that resulted from a collaboration with others.
3. paraphrasing or quoting material without citing
the source.
4. submitting as one’s own a copy of or the actual
work of another person, either in part or in
entirety, without appropriate citation (e.g.,
term-paper mill or Internet-derived products).
5. sharing computer files and programs or written
papers and then submitting individual copies
of the results as one’s own individual work.
6. submitting substantially the same material in
more than one course without prior authorization from each instructor involved.
7. modifying another’s work and representing it
as one’s own work.
c. Cheating is the use of any unauthorized materials
or information in academic work, records or programs, the intentional failure to follow express
directives in academic work, records or programs,
and/or assisting others to do the same including,
but not limited to, the following:
1. knowingly procuring, providing, or accepting
unauthorized examination materials or study
aids.
2. completing, in part or in total, any examination
or assignment for another person.
3. knowingly allowing any examination or assignment to be completed, in part or in total, for
himself or herself by another (e.g., take-home
exams or on-line assignments which have been
completed by someone other than the student).
4. copying from another student’s test, paper, lab
report or other academic assignment.
5. copying another student’s test answers.
6. copying, or allowing another student to copy,
a computer file that contains another student’s
assignment, homework lab reports, or computer
programs and submitting it, in part or in its
entirety, as one’s own.
7. using unauthorized sources of information such
as crib sheets, answers stored in a calculator, or
unauthorized electronic devices.
8. storing answers in electronic devices and allowing
other students to use the information without the
consent of the instructor.
9. employing aids excluded by the instructor in
undertaking course work.
10.looking at another student’s exam during a test.
11.using texts or other reference materials (including
dictionaries) when not authorized to do so.
12.knowingly gaining access to unauthorized data.
13.altering graded class assignments or examinations
and then resubmitting them for regrading or reconsideration without the knowledge and consent of
the instructor.
Q. Contravention of Copyright Laws.
R. Violation of District Board Policies and Administrative
Regulations.
Victims of Sexual Assault
Any student, faculty, or staff member who is a victim of
a sexual assault at or on the grounds of the South Orange
County Community College District, or upon grounds or
facilities maintained by the District, or upon grounds or
facilities maintained by affiliated student organizations,
shall receive treatment and information set forth in
Administrative Regulation 5404 (California Education
Code, Section 67385).
For a copy of Sexual Assault Education, Victim Survival Guide
and Campus Reporting Protocol see the Vice President for
Student Services in Room AGB 126, or the Director of
Student Health Services in Room SSC 177 or go online at:
www.saddleback.edu/shc/sexual-assault
Removal From Class by Instructor
An instructor may remove a student from class for the day
of the incident and the next class meeting for any of the
causes set forth in the South Orange County Community
College District Student Code of Conduct, which includes
cheating, plagiarism, class disruption, etc. The instructor
shall immediately report the removal to the Vice President
for Student Services. The Vice President will take the
appropriate actions, including any necessary parent
conferences if the student is a minor. During the period
of suspension, the student shall not be returned to the
class from which he or she was removed without the
concurrence of the instructor (Administrative Regulation
5401 (IV) and the California Education Code, Section
76032).
In matters of alleged academic dishonesty, the responsibility for initiating disciplinary proceedings rests with
the instructor and the instructor’s academic division. The
Vice President for Student Services will provide assistance
if the student or the instructor so requests, or if such
action is deemed necessary by the Vice President for
Student Services. The following disciplinary actions and
procedures are not meant to be a comprehensive list, but
are guidelines. Students should be notified, verbally or in
writing, with regard to unacceptable behavior and potential
disciplinary action. The faculty member is advised to file a
written report with the Vice President for Student Services.
For matters requiring mild discipline:
• The student is given a verbal or written warning about
unacceptable behavior.
• The student is moved to another seat and warned.
• The student is advised that all future work will be
closely monitored.
Stronger Disciplinary Actions
• Assign additional work, or have the student rewrite
the assignment, or take another version of the test,
paper, etc. This must be completed by the student,
or the faculty member may move to a stronger disciplinary action.
• Lower the grade on the assignment or test.
• Give the student a zero or an “F” on that assignment
or exam. If there is an option to drop the lowest grade,
the option will not apply in this case.
• Request that the Vice President for Student Services
further discipline the student, including suspension
and expulsion from the institution.
Grade Grievance Policy
(Reference Board Policy 5505 and accompanying forms.)
By law, the instructor is solely responsible for the grades
assigned; no instructor may be directed to change a grade
except in certain narrow circumstances authorized by
California Education Code, Section 76224 (a).
When grades are given for any course of instruction taught
in a community college district, the grade given to each
student shall be the grade determined by the instructor
of the course, and the determination of the student’s
grade by the instructor, in the absence of mistake, fraud,
bad faith or incompetence, shall be final.
Prior to filing a grade grievance, an attempt must be made
by the student to resolve the matter on an informal basis.
The student is expected to contact his/her instructor
directly to discuss their differences. Most differences will
be resolved at this level. This contact should be conducted
directly with the instructor whenever possible, with all
pertinent issues well defined so they may be discussed
as confidentially and objectively as possible.
If the problem cannot be resolved at this level, the following procedures are to be used.
Step 1. Any student who believes he or she has a grade
grievance shall file a written, signed Statement
of Grievance form stating the basis for the grade
grievance with the appropriate dean or designee
no later than 45 days after the student knew or
should have known of the grade in the course.
The Statement of Grievance must be filed whether
or not the student has initiated efforts at informal
resolution, if the student wishes the grievance to
become official.
Step 2. After the written Statement of Grievance form has
been filed, a request for a grievance hearing shall
be filed with the appropriate dean or designee on a
Request for Grievance Hearing form within 30 days
after filing the Statement of Grievance. Within 20
days following receipt of the Request for Grievance
hearing the student will be notified in writing of
the status of the request for a hearing. If a hearing
is to occur, all parties will be notified of the date,
time and location of the grievance hearing 10 days
prior to the grievance hearing. The decision of the
Grievance Hearing Panel shall be final.
Step 3. In the event of an appeal to the Grievance Hearing
Panel decision, the College President’s decision
shall be in writing and shall be final.
The protocol for grade grievance is very specific. For the
complete criteria and procedure to file a grievance, forms
and appeal process, refer to the College website; Administration: Office of Instruction or Office of the Vice President
for Student Services.
Important College Policies
Recommended Range of Sanctions
and Disciplinary Actions
Gender Equity Grievance Procedure
– Title IX
Notice
Saddleback College does not discriminate on the basis of
handicap, sex, race, color, or national or ethnic origin in
administration of (1) educational policies, (2) personnel
practices, and (3) college programs. The college, by law,
cannot engage in any such discriminatory activity. Complaint procedures exist for students, employees and job
applicants. Information can be obtained from the Office
of Human Resources for job applicants and employees.
The Office of Student Services maintains complaint procedure information for students. Any question regarding
discrimination and sexual harassment may be directed to
the Director of Human Resources.
Any questions regarding the access of handicapped persons to programs and services should be directed to the
504/ADA Coordinator (referring to the Americans with
Disabilities Act), Saddleback College, 28000 Marguerite
Parkway, Mission Viejo, CA 92692 (949) 582‑4885 or
(949) 582-4566.
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Important College Policies
Section 504/Americans with
Disabilities Act Complaint/
Grievance Procedure
Students with disabilities have the same legal entitlement
as any other student. The Americans with Disabilities Act
and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibit
discrimination on the basis of disability in any program
or activity offered by Saddleback College. It is the policy
of Saddleback College to offer programs and activities
which are accessible to students with disabilities. Any
individual who believes he/she has been subjected to
discrimination on the basis of a disability may file a
written complaint in the office of the Vice President for
Student Services (AGB 126).
Any student with a verified disability who believes they
have received an unacceptable response or have been denied an authorized accommodation is encouraged to speak
with a Counselor/Specialist or the Coordinator of DSPS
(SSC 113, (949) 582-4885) and/or complete an Academic
Adjustment Grievance form. The Academic Adjustment
Grievance form and a copy of the procedures for filing a
Section 504/ADA Complaint regarding discrimination are
available in DSPS or the office of the Vice President for
Student Services. The Vice President for Student Services
currently serves as the campus Section 504/ADA Officer
(949) 582-4566, Saddleback College, 28000 Marguerite
Pkwy, Mission Viejo, CA 92692.
Copies of complete Board Policy Rules and Regulations for
Student Behavior are available in the Student Development
Office (SSC 210) or the Office of the Vice President for
Student Services.
Alcohol and Drug Enforcement
Policies and Education
The South Orange County Community College District and
California State law prohibit the unlawful possession, use,
distribution, manufacture or dispensing of illicit drugs
and alcohol by students on college property or as part of
any college activity. [California Ed. Code, Section 76033
(a) and South Orange County Community College District
Board Policy and Administrative Regulation 5401 – Code
of Conduct]
The Federal Controlled Substance Act provides penalties
of up to 15 years’ imprisonment and fines up to $25,000
for unlawful distribution or possession with intent to distribute narcotics. For unlawful possession of a controlled
substance, a person is subject to up to one year of imprisonment and fines up to $5,000. Any person who unlawfully
distributes a controlled substance to a person under 21
years of age may be punished by up to twice the term of
imprisonment and fine otherwise authorized by law.
Smoke Free District
It is the policy of the South Orange County Community
College District to maintain a smoke free/tobacco free
environment for all district sites. The use of cigarette and/
or all tobacco products is prohibited within any District
facility and/or on any property.
This administrative regulation pertains to students, faculty,
staff, administrators, visitors, and the general public
attending events at any site within the district. Additionally,
this policy shall apply to all District facilities or properties,
owned or leased, regardless of location; and all state and
auxiliary vehicles.
The following guidelines shall apply:
1. Smoking and the use of all tobacco products is prohibited in all District buildings and on all District property.
2. District owned or rented vehicles transporting students
and staff for instructional/extra-curricular activities are
considered non-smoking areas.
3. As new related medical research and information
becomes available, this Administrative Regulation and
corresponding Board Policy will be reviewed by the
Student Health Centers and the Employee Wellness
Program and distributed as appropriate.
4. The Student Health Centers will serve as referral
agencies and provide guidance for students and staff
as requested.
5. A district committee composed of representatives from
the colleges and the district will review the regulations
periodically.
Tobacco products include, but are not limited to, the burning of any type of cigar, cigarette or pipe. In addition, the
use of electronic cigarettes (vapor) and smokeless/chewing tobacco are also prohibited. Tobacco products shall
not be commercially sold or distributed in any manner on
any district site. This includes free samples distributed by
vendors. Advertising and sponsorship of events by tobacco
companies is also prohibited.
Violators of this regulation may be subject to a citation.
Crime Statistics
Saddleback College crime statistics are available at the
Saddleback College Police Department. Contact Campus
Police at (949) 582-4585 or Ext. 4585 from any campus
phone or visit www.saddleback.edu/police
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Parking Permit
• You will need to purchase a parking permit to park your
vehicle at Saddleback College. Permits are required any
time you park on campus.
• Visitors can park in any white stall (student) on campus
after purchasing a daily parking permit at any of the
seven permit dispensers located on campus, or in any
metered space on campus for a fee. Maximum time
limit for the metered areas is two hours. All meters
accept only dollar bills, coin, or credit card.
• Metered stalls are for visitors and casual short-term
users of the campus. If you wish to use a metered
stall, you must pay the meter.
Your parking permit must be properly displayed in your
vehicle at all times when you are parked on campus. It
is to be placed on the lower portion of the driver’s side
windshield. Tickets will not be voided for improperly
displayed permits.
• If you lose your permit, a replacement can be purchased from the Campus Police.
• If your permit is stolen, you should report any theft
to Campus Police. You will be asked to show proof of
purchase of a permit and sign an affidavit under penalty of perjury that it has been stolen. Only then will a
replacement be issued by the Campus Parking Office.
• If you are participating in a college-sponsored field trip
you may leave your car on campus while you are gone.
Contact Campus Police for the proper parking location
and fill out an Overnight Registration Form.
details of the appeal process are available at the
Campus Parking Office.
Accidents and Special
Circumstances
• In the case of accidents or damage to your car, contact
Campus Police immediately. An officer will respond.
• If your vehicle is disabled and you have to leave it overnight on campus, you will need to contact the Campus
Police Office, They will provide an overnight parking
authorization for your vehicle.
• If you have locked your keys inside your vehicle, contact
Campus Police, and an officer will be dispatched to
unlock your vehicle for you. However, there is one
exception: Vehicles with electronic locking systems
cannot be opened by the Campus Police staff. You will
have to contact a locksmith.
Motorcycles
• All motorized vehicles must have a valid permit to park
on campus, including motorcycles or mopeds. Motorcycle permits are only available at Campus Police.
Important College Policies
PARKING ON CAMPUS
Parking Fees
The Board of Trustees annually determines the cost of
purchasing parking permits by employees and students
and the fees charged to park in metered areas. Please
consult the college web page for more detailed cost and
purchasing information.
Handicapped Parking
• If you have a disability and a California access/handicapped placard from the DMV, you must display a
Saddleback permit as well as the DMV Placard.
• You may obtain a temporary medical parking permit
at the Student Health Center. A medical parking permit
will be issued to you once a Saddleback College doctor
has approved your request.
Parking Tickets
• If you believe that you received a parking ticket unjustly
or in error you may request a review online at:
www.paymycite.com/saddleback. Within 21 days, the
results of the review will be mailed to you. Please understand that California law prohibits anyone, including
the officer issuing the ticket, from voiding the ticket.
• If you still feel that you should not be held liable for
the ticket, you may request a hearing in person with
a Hearing Examiner. However, to do this, you must
first pay the parking ticket and complete a request
for an in-person hearing at the Campus Parking Office.
If the hearing examiner finds in your favor you will be
refunded the ticket amount. Finally, if still unsatisfied,
you have a right to appeal the hearing examiner’s decision to the Orange County Municipal Court. Complete
43
Campus Safety
SAFETY ON CAMPUS
Saddleback College seeks to offer the safest possible
campus environment for students. However, students are
encouraged to follow a few common-sense guidelines applicable to being in any public place, particularly at night:
• Try to walk with other people to and from your car,
or keep other people in view. The college also provides
free security Escort Services through the Campus
Police Department.
• Be sure to lock your car. Leave windows open only
about an inch for ventilation. Don’t leave valuables on
the seat where they are visible.
• Be alert to your surroundings, and project that alertness by keeping your head up and walking in a purposeful manner.
• Stay on the lighted main walkways through campus.
Additional lighting has been added throughout the
campus for increased night visibility.
• Hold firmly to purses and bags.
• Trust your gut-level instincts.
• Report any suspicious activity or persons to Campus
Police at (949) 582-4585 or Ext. 4585 from any
campus phone.
Pets on Campus
No animals and/or pets of any kind are allowed within the
boundaries of the college. This restriction also applies to
animals and/or pets confined in any vehicle parked within
college boundaries.
NOTE: This policy does not apply to the use of a guide dog,
signal dog or service dog specially trained for assisting a
person with a verified disability. To bring guide dogs
in training on campus, you must contact the Chief of
Campus Police Department (582-4585).
Free Service for your Safety!
Emergency or Police Service
Use the yellow call boxes located in Lots # 1, 1A, 1B, 4A, 5A, 7,
9N, 9S, 10N, 10S, 12, 13, 14 to contact Campus Police.
Security Escort
Call (949) 582-4585
or
ext. 4585 from any campus phone
Disaster Preparedness Information
General Information
1. To contact Campus Police 24 hours a day call:
• (949) 582-4585 or
• Ext. 4585 for non-emergency calls or
• Ext. 4444 for emergency calls from any campus phone.
2. When calling 911 from a campus phone, you must dial
9-911 to reach the outside line.
During An Emergency
1. Remain in the classroom with your instructor until your
class has been instructed to evacuate.
2. Acknowledge ALL campus alarms. When you hear the
alarm, calmly exit the building you are in and NEVER enter
a building when the alarm is sounding. A campus official
will alert all students when it is safe to enter the building.
Should an earthquake occur:
Duck, Cover and Hold.
Do not run out of the building.
Stay away from glass while indoors.
Remain calm and stay with your class.
If you are not in a building, seek out an open area and
stay away from glass.
4. Should a fire occur:
Stay with your instructor, and evacuate the building
together.
5. If you are the first to witness a fire, immediately sound
the fire alarm. Evacuate the building if you are unable to
contain a small fire. Contact Campus Police as soon as
possible at Ext. 4444 and report any fire that occurs on
campus.
3.
Building evacuation routes and areas are posted with the EMERGENCY PROCEDURES flip chart in every classroom on
campus. Contact Campus Police if you have any additional questions or concerns. Together we can keep our campus safe.
44
Taking Stress Seriously
For many young adults, college is the best time of life. These critical years of adjustment can also be undermined by
depression, anxiety, substance abuse and eating disorders. Researchers are finding that many mental illnesses are traced
to trauma, whose damage surfaces in times of stress and change, such as the college years. It is essential that stress –
in ourselves or in someone about whom we care – should be taken and treated seriously.
If you or someone you know has an urgent emergency situation and notices any of the following symptoms, please contact
one of the on-campus resources for assistance. WHEN IN CRISIS you do not need a pre-scheduled appointment to see a
counselor.
• Extreme sadness or depression
• Death of a loved one, family member or friend
• Extreme panic or anxiety
• Experience of a traumatic event
• Thoughts of self-harm or suicide
• Experience of odd, bizarre or intrusive thoughts
Campus Safety
SAFETY TIPS
• Thoughts of harming someone else
Quick tips to reduce stress while in college
• Include a minimum of 20 minutes of aerobic exercise.
• Eat well-balanced meals, more whole grains, nuts,
fruits and vegetables. Substitute fruits for desserts.
• Avoid caffeine. The substance may aggravate anxiety,
insomnia, nervousness and trembling.
• Reduce refined sugar. Excess sugar cause frequent
fluctuation in blood glucose levels, adding stress to
the body’s physiological functioning.
• Reduce alcohol and drugs. These substances may add
to headaches, swelling, decrease coping mechanisms,
and add to depression.
• Get at least 7 hours of sleep nightly.
• Spend time each day with at least one relaxation
technique – imagery, daydreaming, prayer, yoga
or meditation.
• Take a warm bath or shower.
• Go for a walk.
• Get in touch! Hug someone, hold hands, or
stroke a pet. Physical contact is a great way to
relieve stress.
• Keep your space and consequently your mind
organized.
• Go to class.
• Keep up with coursework (the rule of thumb is two
hours of study per one hour in class).
• Get involved with campus activities.
• Maintain communication with your family.
• Take advantage of campus resources and choose a
career path.
• Form healthy relationships.
• Talk to someone about your problems (family member,
friend, college counselor).
• Get to know your professors.
Sexual Violence Education and Prevention Policy
Saddleback College provides sexual violence prevention information to students during on-campus orientations and
posts this information on the campus Internet Web site www.saddleback.edu (follow links: Students > Student Services >
Student Health Center > Sexual Assault). This site contains valuable information on how to avoid rape, what to do in risky
situations and what to do in case of sexual assault. Copies of the “Sexual Violence Education, Victim Survival Guide and
Campus Reporting Protocol” are available in the Office of the Vice President for Student Services (AGB Room 126) and in
the Student Health Center (SSC Room 177).
California Education Code, Section 67385
If you are victim of sexual assault on campus, seek assistance immediately.
Go directly to the Student Health Center at SSC 177, call (949) 582-4606
or call Campus Police at (949) 582-4444.
45
Campus Offices and Locations
COLLEGE SERVICES
Admissions and Records
Child Development Center
You may apply to the college using the online application at
www.saddleback.edu/admissions – After applying, you will be
assigned a registration time during which you may enroll in
classes online through MySite, the student web portal containing the college online services for students. The Admissions and
Records Office can assist you with transcript requests, application
for degrees, certifications, and occupational certificates as well
as many other enrollment-related services.
The college Child Development Center offers services for children
who are a minimum of 18 months of age and may remain in the
program up to their entrance into kindergarten. Priority is given
to children of Saddleback College students carrying six or more
units, then to faculty and staff. Families from the community
are also invited to enroll their children. Interested parents are
encouraged to call for information. The Center adjoins Parking
Lot 1A, near the Avery entrance to the campus.
www.saddleback.edu/cdc/child-development-center
(949) 582-4555 • SSC 102
Bookstore
(949) 582-4715 • SSC 134
The Bookstore offers a wide variety of texts and general books,
supplies, software, gifts, and Saddleback College clothing. During
the first week of each semester the Bookstore has extended
hours, which are posted near the Bookstore entrance.
Cafeteria
(949) 582-4659 • SSC 213
The college cafeteria is located on the second floor of the Student
Services Center, with elevator access for students with disabilities.
In addition, there is the Village Cafe, plus coffee carts and vending
machines are located throughout the campus.
CalWORKs
(949) 582-4207 • SSC 126
Saddleback College CalWORKs program is designed to help
students develop the necessary skills, knowledge and experience
that will make them more marketable for employment after earning a certificate and/or college degree. Students are provided with
services such as: academic, personal, career counseling and workstudy. For office hours or more information, call the CalWORKs
office (949) 582-4207.
www.saddleback.edu/eops/calworks
Career and Re-Entry Center
(949) 582-4575 • SSC 139-140
www.saddleback.edu/career
Career Guidance Services offers services and materials to assist
with making career decisions, researching career demographics,
and assist with courses that offer self-assessment and career
exploration. The area offers career exploration workshops,
individual sessions, EDD assistance, hosts career counseling
and much more. Educational and occupational information is
available in the computer lab and library. Personality and career
assessments are available whether you are in a class, working with
a counselor or merely exploring. Free resources are available but
may require fees for assessments www.saddleback.edu/cgs
Re-Entry Services helps men and women who are transitioning
to college, changing careers, or finding a new direction in their
lives. The Re-Entry Center provides guidance and referrals to
on and off campus resources and services. It offers one-on-one
appointments, information sessions, support groups, and events.
The program is particularly committed to expanding student
awareness of opportunities for those who are underrepresented
or overcoming life barriers as they reenter the college setting.
Incoming students and alumni have certain appointment
restrictions as current active students have priority with the
Re-Entry Specialist. For more information, please visit:
www.saddleback.edu/reentry
46
(949) 582-4582 • CDC (lower campus)
Counseling Department
(949) 582-4572 • SSC 167
Counselors are available to assist students with course selection,
preparation for transfer, a degree or employment, making career
decisions, and resolving personal problems that interfere with
success in college. Counselors are available for appointments,
or on a walk-in basis. www.saddleback.edu/counseling
DSPS (Disabled Students Programs
and Services)
(949) 582-4885/TDD 582-4833 • SSC 113
DSPS provides support and instruction for students with
disabilities. Support includes services such as counseling,
interpreters for the deaf, mobility orientation, registration help,
alternate media production and learning disability assessment.
www.saddleback.edu/dsps
EOPS / CARE
582-4620 • SSC 126
Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS): EOPS is
an outreach and retention program designed to assist lowincome and educationally disadvantaged students in achieving
a college education. EOPS-eligible students may receive priority
registration, EOPS book service, academic, personal and career
counseling, and assistance in transferring to a four-year university.
Interested students should apply at the EOPS office in the Student
Services Center. www.saddleback.edu/eops
Cooperative Agencies Resources for Education (CARE): As a
supplement program of EOPS, CARE provides educational
support services for EOPS eligible students who are single heads
of households receiving CalWORKs (California Work Opportunity
and Responsibility to Kids). More information is available at the
EOPS office. www.saddleback.edu/eops/care-program
Financial Assistance/Scholarships
(949) 582-4860 • SSC 106
Various types of financial assistance, including federal, state
and institutional programs, are available to students attending
Saddleback College. Types of assistance may include grants,
loans, scholarships or work-study. For information and applications, contact the Student Financial Assistance & Scholarship
Office. www.saddleback.edu/fao
Health Center
(949) 582-4606 • SSC 177
The Student Health Center provides students with acute, episodic,
short-term physical and psychological health care. Appointments
are scheduled with registered nurses, physicians, psychologists,
and mental health intern therapists by telephone or by visiting the
health center in SSC Room 177. www.saddleback.edu/shc
Recreation Room
Saddleback College does not offer on-campus housing. However,
listings of off-campus rentals are posted on a housing bulletin
board located on the balcony outside the Recreation Room in the
Student Services Center.
The Recreation Room, located across the hall from the Student
Lounge, can be used by ASB stamp holders. Benefits include
the use of pool and ping-pong tables, TV and DVD privileges.
International Student Office
(949) 582-4870 • SSC 208
(949) 582-4299 • SSC 211
(949) 582-4637 • SSC 107
The International Student Office provides services and support
to all nonresident international students that have been granted
an F-1 student visa. Assistance is provided with admission to the
college, registration, completing their program, as well as ongoing
workshops and individual counseling is provided to students to
maintain their status according to the Student and Exchange
Visitor Services guidelines, adjust to living in the United States,
and access campus resources for overall student success.
www.saddleback.edu/iso
Job Search Services
(949) 582-4278 • BGS 205
Students interested in job search, resume writing, and interview
resources can utilize many self-directed tools on this site. Gaucho
Jobs is the official online employment system for internships,
job postings, and job fair announcements. Students can join the
‘Saddleback College Career Network’ group on LinkedIn to start
networking with professionals. www.saddleback.edu/jobs
Learning Resource Center (Tutoring)
(949) 582-4519 • LRC 212
LRC Tutoring provides free tutoring for Saddleback students.
Services include one-on-one tutoring, small groups, and drop-in
math and science tutoring. www.saddleback.edu/tutoring
(949) 582-4299 • SSC 211
Student Payment Office
The Student Payment Office accepts payments for college fees,
processes refunds, disburses certain financial aid checks and
debit cards, processes payment deferrals, and posts fees and
fines. This office also audits and corrects student accounts as
necessary. To check on your student account or for details on
the services provided by this office, refer to our web site at
www.saddleback.edu/spo or call.
Transfer Center
582-4328 • SSC 225B
The Transfer Center provides information and assistance to
students preparing to transfer to a four-year university. Appointments with representatives from four-year universities and colleges
are available, and the Transfer Center will help students select a
transfer institution, prepare transfer applications, and meet deadlines. Come by the Transfer Center to attend a workshop, schedule
an individual counseling appointment, or for Transfer Express
counseling. www.saddleback.edu/transfer
Facebook: Saddleback College Transfer Center
Twitter: @sctransferctr
Veterans Education and
Transition Services (VETS)
582-4252 • SSC 207
The Saddleback College Library prpovides a book collection of
over 34,000 volumes, eBook collection of over 61,000 volumes,
magazines and journals, local and national newspapers, DVDs,
online databases and an extensive reserve textbook collection,
over 950 titles. Remote access to the library databases is
available to enrolled students. Librarians are available to assist
students with research, teach library workshops, and teach credit
courses on campus and through distance education. Computers
with internet access are available on the second and third floor for
research, email, word processing and other applications.
Visit www.saddleback.edu/library for library hours, workshops
and other services.
Saddleback College is committed to easing the transition process
and providing opportunities for success to our United States
military Veterans. The VETS Program directly provides support
services and acts as a bridge to external support services for
student Veterans, active military personnel, and their loved
ones. VETS Program services include but are not limited to: new
student guidance, Veterans counseling, scholarship assistance,
a link to the Veterans club, Veterans Outreach, and a venue for
community-building. Saddleback College also offers a “Boots to
Books” course each year that integrates Veterans specific topics
into the curriculum of Counseling 140 (3 units; CSU-transferable).
The VETS Program hosts events aimed at reintegration into
civilian and college life. For more information visit our website
at www.saddleback.edu/vets or email us at vetsoutreach@
saddleback.edu.
LRC Tutoring Computer Skills Lab
Veterans Office
This is a staffed computer center that is part of LRC Tutoring.
Staff assistance is available for Microsoft Office programs,
Internet use, and email. Printing is available with a copy card.
The Veterans Office administers Veterans Administration (VA)
education benefits for all veterans and their family members
who qualify for benefits under the various VA education benefit
programs. Qualifying students are encouraged to take advantage
of their VA entitlement. The Veterans Office also assists activeduty military students who are using any of the various Military
Tuition Assistance (MTA) programs, and military spouses using
the Military Spouse Career Advancement Account (MyCAA)
program. For details on any of these education programs, refer
to our website at www.saddleback.edu/va or call.
Library Services
(949) 582-4314 • Library/LRC
(949) 582-4441 • LRC 258
Matriculation
(949) 582-4970 • Village 8-5
Matriculation is a process designed to assist students in achieving
their educational goals at Saddleback College. The Matriculation
process consists of three steps: Orientation; Assessment in
reading, English and math; and Advisement with First Semester
Ed Plan. Matriculation also handles all math and English
prerequisite evaluations of courses taken at other schools.
Visit us at www.saddleback.edu/matriculation
Campus Offices and Locations
Housing Information
(949) 582-4871 • SSC 208
47
Campus Offices and Locations
48
CAMPUS LOCATIONS AND PHONE NUMBERS
All phone numbers are in (949) area code
Admissions and Records Office........................................................ SSC 102................................................................... 582-4555
Alumni Association.......................................................................... AGB 131................................................................... 582-4479
Associated Student Government (ASG)............................................ SSC 210................................................................... 582-4616
Athletics......................................................................................... PE 420..................................................................... 582-4547
Bookstore....................................................................................... SSC – 1st Floor......................................................... 582-4715/4716
Bus Transportation and Schedule Information................................. Orange County Transit District.................................. 636-RIDE
Cafeteria......................................................................................... SSC 213B................................................................ 582-4659
CalWORKs....................................................................................... SSC 126................................................................... 582-4207
Campus Police................................................................................ Campus Police Station, Village.................................. 582-4585
Campus Tours................................................................................. AGB 125................................................................... 582-4218
CARE.............................................................................................. SSC 126................................................................... 582-4620
Career Guidance Services................................................................ Career & Re-Entry Center (SSC 140)......................... 582-4575
Child Development Center............................................................... Lower Campus.......................................................... 582-4582
Clubs and Organizations................................................................. SSC 210................................................................... 582-4616
College Information......................................................................... SSC Lobby................................................................ 582-4500
Counseling...................................................................................... SSC 167................................................................... 582-4572
Disabled Students Programs and Services (DSPS)........................... SSC 113................................................................... 582-4885
Ethnic Studies................................................................................. BGS 314.................................................................. 582-4733
Enrollment Information................................................................... Admissions and Records Office (SSC 102)................ 582-4555
Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS)..................... SSC 126................................................................... 582-4620
Financial Assistance & Scholarship Office........................................ SSC 106................................................................... 582-4860
Foundation Office............................................................................ AGB 131................................................................... 582-4479
Graduation Evaluation/UC and CSU Certification............................. Admissions and Records (SSC 102).......................... 582-4555
Honors Program............................................................................. LRC 114................................................................... 582-4853
Housing Information Bulletin Board................................................. SSC Patio – 2nd Floor............................................... 582-4299
Information Management Center (IMC Lab)..................................... BGS 248.................................................................. 582-4783
International Student Office............................................................ SSC 107................................................................... 582-4637
Job/Career Search Services............................................................ BGS 205.................................................................. 582-4278
KSBR (Saddleback College Radio Station 88.5 FM).......................... LRC 132................................................................... 582-4358
Language Lab................................................................................. LRC 202................................................................... 582-4534
Lariat (campus newspaper)............................................................. LRC 116................................................................... 582-4688
Learning Resource Center Tutoring.................................................. LRC 212................................................................... 582-4519
Library............................................................................................ LRC – 3rd Floor......................................................... 582-4314
Learning Resources......................................................................... LRC – 2nd Floor........................................................ 582-4314
Lost and Found............................................................................... Campus Police Station, Village.................................. 582-4585
LRC Tutoring Computer Skills Lab................................................... LRC 212................................................................... 582-4441
Matriculation Services..................................................................... VIL 8-5..................................................................... 582-4970
Outreach......................................................................................... AGB 125................................................................... 582-4218
Parking and Traffic Information....................................................... Campus Police Station, Village.................................. 582-4585
Reading Lab.................................................................................... LRC 215................................................................... 582-4539
Re-Entry Services............................................................................ Career & Re-Entry Center (SSC 140C)....................... 582-4575
Student Government (ASG).............................................................. SSC 210................................................................... 582-4616
Student Health Center..................................................................... SSC 177................................................................... 582-4606
Student Payment Office (student fees/fines/refunds)....................... SSC 208................................................................... 582-4870
Theatre Ticket Office....................................................................... FA 124..................................................................... 582-4656
Transcripts and Records.................................................................. Admissions and Records Office (SSC 102)................ 582-4555
Transfer Center............................................................................... SSC 225B................................................................ 582-4328
Tutoring Services............................................................................ LRC 212................................................................... 582-4519
VETS Center (Support for Veterans)................................................. SSC 207................................................................... 582-4252
Veterans Office................................................................................ SSC 208................................................................... 582-4871
Video Phone for the Deaf ................................................................ SSC 113................................................................... 582-4430
Withdrawal From College................................................................. Admissions and Records Office (SSC 102)................ 582-4555
Writing Center................................................................................. LRC 210................................................................... 582-4784
Administrative Offices
All phone numbers are in (949) area code
Office of the President
President – Dr. Tod A. Burnett
AGB 103 • 582-4722
Public Marketing/Communications
Director – Jennie McCue
AGB 110 • 582-4320
Office of administrative services
Vice President – Carol Hilton
AGB 124 • 582-4437
Student health center
Director – Jeanne Harris-Caldwell
SSC 177 • 582-4606
Office of Instruction
Vice President – Dr. Kathy Werle
AGB 133 • 582-4795
SADDLEBACK COLLEGE FOUNDATION
Director – Dr. Donald L. Rickner
AGB 123 • 582-4479
Office of Student Services
Vice President – Dr. Juan Avalos
AGB 126 • 582-4566
Student Development
Director – Audra DiPadova
SSC 210 • 582-4616
Admissions and records office
Dean (Acting) – Christian Alvarado
SSC 102 • 582-4555
Student Financial Assistance Programs SSC 106 • 582-4860
Director (Acting) – Ruth Higgins
learning assistanceLRC 212 • 582-4605
Director – Christina Hinkle
Student Payment Office
Vice President – Carol Hilton
AGB 131 • 582-4870
Planning, research, and accreditation
Director (Acting) – Dr. Nicole Ortega
Veterans Office
Vice President – Carol Hilton
AGB 131 • 582-4871
AGB 103 • 582-4565
Academic Divisions
Advanced TECHNOLOGY & APPLIED SCIENCE TAS 207 • 582-4541
Dean – Anthony Teng
COMMUNITY EDUCATION, Emeritus
INSTITUTE, AND K-12 PARTNERSHIPS Lower Campus • 582-4646
Dean – Dr. Estella Castillo-Garrison
582-4326
Director – Leslie A. Humphrey
582-4272
Director – Dan Predoehl
582-4835
COUNSELING Services
Dean (Acting) – Dr. Georgina Guy
economic And workforce Development
& Business Science
Dean – John J. Jaramillo
Director – Isreal S. Dominguez
SSC 167 • 582-4572
BGS 226 • 582-4773
KINESIOLOGY & Athletics
Dean/Athletic Director – Tony Lipold
Assistant Athletic Director – Jerry Hannula
Kinesiology
Athletics
PE 422 • 582-4545
PE 420 • 582-4547
LIBERAL ARTSLRC 344 • 582-4788
Dean – Dr. Kevin O’Connor
MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE & ENGINEERING Dean – Dr. Christopher McDonald
SM 334 • 582-4820
ONLINE EDUCATION & LEARNING RESOURCES BGS 249 • 582-4397
Dean (Acting) – Dr. Marina Aminy
SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCESbgs 314 • 582-4733
Dean – Dr. Cadence Wynter
FINE ARTS & MEDIA TECHNOLOGYFA 124 • 582-4747
Dean – Bart McHenry
transfer, career, and Special programs SSC 140G • 582-4418
Dean – Terence Nelson
HEALTH SCIENCES & Human ServicesHS 236 • 582-4701
Dean– Donna Rane-Szostak
Assistant Dean/Director of Nursing – Tamera Rice
Jerilyn Chuman started at Saddleback College in 1979 as Re-Entry Center
Director. She became Dean of Counseling Services & Special Programs in 1990
and has served in her current role as Dean of the Counseling Services Division for
25 years. When she became Dean, the college’s student enrollment was 18,000
students. Over the decades, the number of students relying on services provided by
Counseling Services has risen steadily, and the number of staff on her team to serve
those students has more than doubled. She set her standards high and challenged
her staff to attain excellence.
Dean Chuman has dedicated her life to serving thousands of Saddleback College
students with integrity, tireless energy, compassion, and commitment. Saddleback
College has been the beneficiary of her wise counsel, deep understanding of
community college students’ lives and creative vision. She has played a leading
role in developing and facilitating an integrated and holistic learning and counseling
environment. Her passion and commitment to students led to the creation of the first
Student Handbook developed in 1983. She has continued to promote and support
the yearly revision and production of this invaluable and award winning document
for Saddleback College’s students ever since. As Dean Chuman retires and starts
a new chapter in her life, the Student Handbook Committee would like to dedicate
the 2015-2016 Student Handbook to her and recognize her unwavering and tireless
effort at providing excellent quality and service to Saddleback College students.
LOT
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➤
Saddleback College Campus Map
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BGS������������� Business/General Studies
CHLD CTR���� Child Dev. Center
CP��������������� Campus Police
FA���������������� Fine Arts Complex
FMO������������ Facilities & Maintenance
GRNHS�������� Horticulture Greenhouse
HS��������������� Health Sciences
LRC������������� Learning Resource Center
McKinney Theatre is located in FA 300
PE���������������� Physical Education
PG��������������� Public Golf
RO��������������� Representative Offices
SA��������������� Special Annex
SM�������������� Science & Mathematics
SSC������������� Student Services Center
Studio Theatre is located in FA 300
TAS�������������� Technology & Applied Sci.
VIL��������������� “Village” Classrooms
W���������������� “W” Building (Comm. Arts)
WH�������������� Warehouse
LOT 1A
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DAILY PARKING PERMIT
DISPENSER ($5.00/DAY)
AVERY
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YP
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HANDICAPPED PARKING
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MOTORCYCLE PARKING
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STUDENT PARKING
PARKING LOT CLOSURE
❂
South Orange County Community College District Board of Trustees:
Dr. Barbara J. Jay, Timothy Jemal, David B. Lang, Marcia Milchiker, Nancy M. Padberg, T.J. Prendergast, III, Dr. James R. Wright,
Gary L. Poertner, Chancellor SADDLEBACK COLLEGE: Dr. Tod Burnett, President
VETERAN’S MEMORIAL
BOOKSTORE
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