026-1103
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Building Environmental
Control (BEC)
Installation and Operation
Manual
Computer Process Controls, Inc.
1640 Airport Road Suite #104
Kennesaw, GA 31044
Phone (770) 425-2724
Fax (770) 425-9319
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
The information contained in this manual has been carefully checked and is believed
to be accurate. However, Computer Process Controls, Inc. assumes no responsibility
for any inaccuracies that may be contained herein. In no event will Computer Process
Controls, Inc. be liable for any direct, indirect, special, incidental, or consequential
damages resulting from any defect or omission in this manual, even if advised of the
possibility of such damages. In the interest of continued product development, Computer Process Controls, Inc. reserves the right to make improvements to this manual,
and the products described herein, at any time without notice or obligation.
Table of Revisions
Revision
Description
Page
REV 1.................. ADDED OPTION TO DEFINE FAN FAIL PROOF SIGNAL ........................................................................ 8-10
REV 1.................. SIXTEEN HOLIDAY DATES MAY NOW BE DEFINED (PREVIOUSLY 8)..................................................... 8-21
REV 1.................. ADDED SCHEDULE PROOFS SETUP SCREEN. ........................................................................................ 8-26
REV 1.................. ADDED I/O STATUS AND BYPASS SCREENS......................................................................................... 8-35
REV 1.................. ADDED I/O MODULE STATUS AND BYPASS SCREENS......................................................................... 8-36
REV 1.................. ADDED SCHEDULE PROOFS 1-24. ........................................................................................................ 8-42
REV 1.................. ADDED VARIABLE-SPEED FAN OUTPUTS (AHU 1 VS-AHU 6 VS). .................................................... 8-43
REV 1.................. ADDED FAHRENHEIT TO CELSIUS CONVERSION SCREEN ..................................................................... 8-45
REV 1.................. ADDED FAN FAILURE ALARM BYPASS SCREEN. ................................................................................. 10-4
REV 1.................. ADDED ALARM SETPOINT SHIFT FEATURE TO SENSOR CONTROL. ..................................................... 10-5
REV 1.................. ADDED IRLDS ALARM SUPPORT. ........................................................................................................ 10-6
REV 1.................. ADDED 485 ALARM FILTERING SCREEN ............................................................................................. 10-7
BEC I&O Manual
Table of Revisions • i
Table of Contents
1 INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................................................... 1-1
1.1. BEC ......................................................................................................................................................................... 1-1
1.2. MANUAL .................................................................................................................................................................. 1-1
2 HARDWARE OVERVIEW....................................................................................................................................... 2-1
2.1. INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................
2.1.1. Building Environmental Control....................................................................................................................
2.2. INPUT COMMUNICATION BOARDS ...........................................................................................................................
2.2.1. 16AI Board......................................................................................................................................................
2.3. OUTPUT COMMUNICATION BOARDS........................................................................................................................
2.3.1. 8RO Board ......................................................................................................................................................
2.3.2. 8RO Form C Board.........................................................................................................................................
2.3.3. 4AO Analog Output Board..............................................................................................................................
2.3.4. 8DO Digital Output Board .............................................................................................................................
2.4. SPECIAL PURPOSE COMMUNICATION BOARDS ........................................................................................................
2.4.1. 8IO Board .......................................................................................................................................................
2.5. 485 ALARM PANEL ..................................................................................................................................................
2.6. REMOTE COMMUNICATION......................................................................................................................................
2.6.1. RS232 Bus Amplifier .......................................................................................................................................
2.6.2. Modems ...........................................................................................................................................................
2.6.3. UltraSite™ ......................................................................................................................................................
2-1
2-1
2-2
2-2
2-3
2-3
2-3
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-4
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-6
2-6
3 HARDWARE MOUNTING....................................................................................................................................... 3-1
3.1. BUILDING ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL ...................................................................................................................
3.2. I/O BOARDS AND ENCLOSURES ...............................................................................................................................
3.2.1. 8IOs Without Enclosures Mounting................................................................................................................
3.3. 485 ALARM PANEL ..................................................................................................................................................
3.4. RS232 BUS AMPLIFIER............................................................................................................................................
3.5. TEMPERATURE SENSORS .........................................................................................................................................
3.5.1. Inside Temperature Sensor .............................................................................................................................
3.5.2. Outside (Ambient) Temperature Sensor..........................................................................................................
3.5.3. Insertion Temperature Probe..........................................................................................................................
3.6. HUMIDITY SENSORS AND HUMIDISTATS .................................................................................................................
3.7. DEW POINT SENSORS AND CONTROL SWITCHES ....................................................................................................
3.7.1. Dew Cell Dew Point Probe.............................................................................................................................
3.7.2. Dew Point Control Switch...............................................................................................................................
3.8. LIGHT LEVEL SENSOR .............................................................................................................................................
3.9. POWER MONITORS ...................................................................................................................................................
3.10. TRANSFORMERS .....................................................................................................................................................
3-1
3-1
3-3
3-4
3-4
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-5
3-6
3-6
3-6
3-6
3-6
3-6
3-6
4 THE REFLECS NETWORK .................................................................................................................................... 4-1
4.1.
4.2.
4.3.
4.4.
4.5.
4.6.
4.7.
4.8.
INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................
RS485 INPUT/OUTPUT (I/O) NETWORK (COM A AND D)......................................................................................
RS485 HOST NETWORK (COM B)..........................................................................................................................
RS232 REMOTE COMMUNICATION NETWORK (COM C)........................................................................................
LEGS AND SEGMENTS ..............................................................................................................................................
LEG AND SEGMENT WIRE LENGTH .........................................................................................................................
NUMBER OF DEVICES PER SEGMENT .......................................................................................................................
DAISY CHAINS .........................................................................................................................................................
BEC I&O Manual
4-1
4-1
4-1
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-2
4-2
Table of Contents • iii
4.9. STAR CONFIGURATIONS ...........................................................................................................................................
4.10. TERMINATING RESISTANCE JUMPERS (COM A, COM B, AND COM D ONLY) ...................................................
4.11. NETWORK DIP SWITCHES AND ROTARY DIALS (COM A AND D ONLY) ..............................................................
4.11.1. Baud Rate Dip Switches (COM A and D only) .............................................................................................
4.12. NETWORK SETTINGS ..............................................................................................................................................
4.12.1. Network Addresses ........................................................................................................................................
4.13. BAUD RATE DIP SWITCH SETTINGS ......................................................................................................................
4.13.1. COM A and D Networks................................................................................................................................
4.13.2. COM B Network ............................................................................................................................................
4.13.3. COM C Network............................................................................................................................................
4.14. FAIL-SAFE DIP SWITCH SETTINGS .........................................................................................................................
4-3
4-3
4-3
4-4
4-4
4-4
4-4
4-5
4-5
4-5
4-5
5 WIRING FOR NETWORK & POWER CONNECTIONS .................................................................................... 5-1
5.1. WIRING SPECIFICATIONS .........................................................................................................................................
5.2. COM A AND D WIRING ............................................................................................................................... ...........
5.3. COM B WIRING ............................................................................................................................... .......................
5.4. COM C WIRING ............................................................................................................................... .......................
5.5. SENSOR AND TRANSDUCER WIRING ........................................................................................................................
5.6. POWER CONNECTION WIRING .................................................................................................................................
5.6.1. Power Requirements .......................................................................................................................................
5.6.2. Power Transformers........................................................................................................................................
5-1
5-1
5-1
5-2
5-2
5-6
5-6
5-6
6 SOFTWARE OVERVIEW ........................................................................................................................................ 6-1
6.1. HEATING AND COOLING ..........................................................................................................................................
6.1.1. Single Set Point Strategy .................................................................................................................................
6.1.2. Separate Set Points Strategy ...........................................................................................................................
6.1.3. Night Set Back and Warm-Up .........................................................................................................................
6.1.4. Seasonal Lock-Out and Seasonal Set Point Shifts ..........................................................................................
6.1.5. Cool Termination ............................................................................................................................................
6.2. DEHUMIDIFICATION .................................................................................................................................................
6.2.1. Minimum Building Temperature .....................................................................................................................
6.2.2. Dehumidification Reheat Set Point .................................................................................................................
6.3. FAN CONTROL .........................................................................................................................................................
6.3.1. Single-Speed Fans ...........................................................................................................................................
6.3.2. Two-Speed Fans ..............................................................................................................................................
6.3.3. Variable-Speed Fans .......................................................................................................................................
6.4. BOILER CONTROL ....................................................................................................................................................
6.4.1. Override ON/OFF ...........................................................................................................................................
6.5. ANTI-SWEAT CONTROL ...........................................................................................................................................
6.6. SCHEDULES ..............................................................................................................................................................
6.6.1. Schedule Overrides .........................................................................................................................................
6.6.2. Schedule Priorities ..........................................................................................................................................
6.7. DEMAND CONTROL ..................................................................................................................................................
6.7.1. Demand Monitoring ........................................................................................................................................
6.7.2. Predicting Energy Consumption .....................................................................................................................
6.7.3. Load Shedding.................................................................................................................................................
6.8. SENSOR CONTROL....................................................................................................................................................
6.8.1. Output Control ................................................................................................................................................
6.8.2. Sensor Alarms .................................................................................................................................................
6.8.3. Unoccupied Settings........................................................................................................................................
6.8.4. Sensor Overrides .............................................................................................................................................
6.9. DIMMER CONTROL...................................................................................................................................................
6.10. INPUT/OUTPUT CONTROL ......................................................................................................................................
6.10.1. Cells and Modules.........................................................................................................................................
iv • Table of Contents
6-1
6-1
6-1
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-2
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-3
6-4
6-4
6-4
6-5
6-5
6-6
6-6
6-6
6-6
6-7
6-7
6-7
6-7
6-8
6-8
6-9
6-9
6-9
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
6.10.2. BEC I/O Module Descriptions .................................................................................................................... 6-11
7 SYSTEM CONFIGURATION GUIDE .................................................................................................................... 7-1
7.1.
7.2.
7.3.
7.4.
7.5.
7.6.
7.7.
7.8.
GENERAL .................................................................................................................................................................
HVAC SETUP ..........................................................................................................................................................
SET HEATING & COOLING SETPOINTS ....................................................................................................................
DEFINE SCHEDULES .................................................................................................................................................
SETUP ANTI-SWEAT ................................................................................................................................................
SETUP SENSORS .......................................................................................................................................................
SETUP DEMAND MONITORING.................................................................................................................................
IF IT IS NECESSARY TO BYPASS A SYSTEM SETTING .............................................................................................
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-1
7-2
7-2
7-2
7-2
8 SYSTEM SETUP ........................................................................................................................................................ 8-1
8.1. MAIN STATUS SCREEN ............................................................................................................................................ 8-2
8.2. LOG ON ................................................................................................................................................................... 8-3
8.3. MAIN MENU ............................................................................................................................................................ 8-3
8.4. HVAC MENU .......................................................................................................................................................... 8-4
8.4.1. Main Status Screen.......................................................................................................................................... 8-4
8.4.2. HVAC Setpoints Menu .................................................................................................................................... 8-4
8.4.3. Setup................................................................................................................................................................ 8-9
8.4.4. Manual Bypasses........................................................................................................................................... 8-16
8.4.5. Boiler Menu................................................................................................................................................... 8-17
8.5. SCHEDULES MENU ................................................................................................................................................. 8-19
8.5.1. Schedules Status ............................................................................................................................................ 8-19
8.5.2. Schedule Overrides ....................................................................................................................................... 8-20
8.5.3. Schedules....................................................................................................................................................... 8-20
8.5.4. Holidays ........................................................................................................................................................ 8-21
8.5.5. Light Level Sensor Setup & Control ............................................................................................................. 8-21
8.5.6. Maintenance Overrides................................................................................................................................. 8-22
8.5.7. Dimmer Control Menu .................................................................................................................................. 8-22
8.5.8. Dimmer Setpoints.......................................................................................................................................... 8-24
8.5.9. Schedule Proofs............................................................................................................................................. 8-26
8.6. ANTI-SWEAT CONTROL MENU .............................................................................................................................. 8-26
8.6.1. Anti-Sweat Status Menu ................................................................................................................................ 8-27
8.6.2. Anti-Sweat Setup ........................................................................................................................................... 8-28
8.6.3. Anti-Sweat Circuit Setpoints ......................................................................................................................... 8-28
8.6.4. Anti-Sweat Overrides .................................................................................................................................... 8-29
8.7. SENSOR CONTROL MENU ...................................................................................................................................... 8-29
8.7.1. Sensor Status Menu ....................................................................................................................................... 8-30
8.7.2. Sensor Setup .................................................................................................................................................. 8-31
8.7.3. Sensor Setpoints Menu .................................................................................................................................. 8-32
8.7.4. Sensor Alarms Menu ..................................................................................................................................... 8-34
8.7.5. Overrides Menu............................................................................................................................................. 8-34
8.7.6. Sensor Scheduling ......................................................................................................................................... 8-35
8.7.7. Input/Output Control..................................................................................................................................... 8-35
8.7.8. Analog Input Module Status.......................................................................................................................... 8-36
8.7.9. Analog Output Module Status ....................................................................................................................... 8-36
8.7.10. Digital Output Module Status ..................................................................................................................... 8-36
8.7.11. Analog Input Module Bypass ...................................................................................................................... 8-36
8.7.12. Analog Output Module Bypass ................................................................................................................... 8-37
8.7.13. Digital Output Module Bypass.................................................................................................................... 8-38
8.8. STATUS MENU ....................................................................................................................................................... 8-38
8.8.1. HVAC Status ................................................................................................................................................. 8-39
8.8.2. Input Status ................................................................................................................................................... 8-39
BEC I&O Manual
Table of Contents • v
8.8.3. Sensor Status Menu .......................................................................................................................................
8.8.4. Demand Status...............................................................................................................................................
8.8.5. Anti-Sweat Status Menu ................................................................................................................................
8.8.6. Schedules.......................................................................................................................................................
8.8.7. Boiler Status ..................................................................................................................................................
8.8.8. Dimmer Status ...............................................................................................................................................
8.9. CONFIGURATION MENU .........................................................................................................................................
8.9.1. Input Definition .............................................................................................................................................
8.9.2. Output Definition...........................................................................................................................................
8.9.3. System Information........................................................................................................................................
8.9.4. Temperature Display Format........................................................................................................................
8.9.5. D.P./Humidity Sensor Offsets........................................................................................................................
8.9.6. Communication .............................................................................................................................................
8.9.7. Host Network Menu.......................................................................................................................................
8.9.8. I/O Board Setup.............................................................................................................................................
8.9.9. Satellite Communications..............................................................................................................................
8.10. DEMAND CONTROL MENU ..................................................................................................................................
8.10.1. Demand Status.............................................................................................................................................
8.10.2. Demand Setpoints........................................................................................................................................
8.10.3. KW Sensor Select ........................................................................................................................................
8.10.4. KW Sensor Setup .........................................................................................................................................
8.10.5. Load Shed Status .........................................................................................................................................
8.10.6. Load Shed Setpoints Menu ..........................................................................................................................
8.10.7. Load Shed Setup Menu................................................................................................................................
8-39
8-39
8-40
8-40
8-40
8-40
8-41
8-41
8-43
8-44
8-45
8-46
8-46
8-47
8-48
8-50
8-50
8-50
8-51
8-51
8-52
8-53
8-54
8-56
9 LOGS AND GRAPHS ................................................................................................................................................ 9-1
9.1. AHU LOGS ..............................................................................................................................................................
9.1.1. Logs .................................................................................................................................................................
9.1.2. Run Times........................................................................................................................................................
9.1.3. Reset Run Times ..............................................................................................................................................
9.1.4. Graphs.............................................................................................................................................................
9.1.5. Log Interval .....................................................................................................................................................
9.2. ANTI-SWEAT DAILY LOGS ......................................................................................................................................
9.3. SENSOR LOGS MENU ...............................................................................................................................................
9.3.1. Interval ............................................................................................................................................................
9.3.2. Daily Min/Max Logs........................................................................................................................................
9.3.3. Daily ON Time/# ON Events ...........................................................................................................................
9.4. DEMAND LOGS MENU .............................................................................................................................................
9.4.1. Window Log.....................................................................................................................................................
9.4.2. Daily Log.........................................................................................................................................................
9.4.3. Monthly Log ....................................................................................................................................................
9.5. GRAPHS ....................................................................................................................................................................
9.5.1. Control Menu ..................................................................................................................................................
9.5.2. View Graph .....................................................................................................................................................
9-1
9-1
9-1
9-2
9-2
9-2
9-2
9-3
9-3
9-3
9-4
9-4
9-4
9-5
9-5
9-5
9-6
9-6
10 ALARMS.................................................................................................................................................................. 10-1
10.1.
10.2.
10.3.
10.4.
10.5.
10.6.
10.7.
10.8.
ALARM LOG .........................................................................................................................................................
HEAT/COOL ALARMS...........................................................................................................................................
ALARMS ...............................................................................................................................................................
FAN FAIL ALARM BYPASS ...................................................................................................................................
DIGITAL ALARMS ................................................................................................................................................
ANALOG ALARMS (ALL TYPES EXCEPT IRLDS)..................................................................................................
ANALOG ALARMS (IRLDS ONLY).......................................................................................................................
ALARM OVERRIDES .............................................................................................................................................
vi • Table of Contents
10-1
10-3
10-4
10-4
10-4
10-5
10-6
10-6
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
10.9. SEND TO 485 ALARM PANEL ............................................................................................................................... 10-7
10.10. ALARM SETPOINTS ............................................................................................................................................ 10-8
APPENDIX A–TROUBLESHOOTING GUIDE FOR THE BEC........................................................................... A-1
APPENDIX B–BEC TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS.......................................................................................... B-1
APPENDIX C–BEC FRONT PANEL SCREENS..................................................................................................... C-1
APPENDIX D–SENSOR HARDWARE/SOFTWARE SETUP TABLE ................................................................ D-1
INDEX............................................................................................................................................................................ I-1
BEC I&O Manual
Table of Contents • vii
1
Introduction
1.1.
BEC
The Building Environmental Control (BEC) (P/N 826-1000) is a microprocessor-based control system designed to
monitor and control all aspects of heating, air conditioning, and environmental conditions in medium to large buildings.
Up to six air handling units (AHUs), each with six cooling stages and eight heating stages, can be controlled by a single
BEC. AHU fans may be single-speed, two-speed, or variable-speed. The BEC can be programmed with environmental set
points that change based on the time of day, season, and occupancy of the building and control AHUs accordingly.
The BEC controls space humidity in a building by monitoring either dewpoint or relative humidity and activating stages
of cooling within an AHU. To control condensation on windows, the BEC may control up to eight anti-sweat heaters in
two different zones.
Schedules can be used to control loads such as indoor lighting or outdoor signs. The BEC contains 24 individual time
schedules that can be set as needed. Schedules may also be used by AHUs, sensors, and other components as a means of
changing operational settings during periods when the building is unoccupied.
Up to 64 sensor inputs and sensor-controlled outputs are available on the BEC to control and monitor items such as
exhaust fans, unit heaters, and satellite air conditioners. In conjunction with a light dimmer panel, the BEC may control the
light level within a building based upon the amount of outside light. The BEC can control up to four separate lighting zones.
The BEC may be configured to monitor and control the amount of power used by a building. The BEC predicts the
amount of power that the building will use based upon the rate of consumption and then sheds loads to keep the power
usage under the demand level. The BEC sheds loads by examining user-defined priority settings.
Like all REFLECS products available from CPC, the BEC keeps a historical log of alarms and inputs, and when
equipped with a modem, it may be configured to automatically dial a remote location whenever an alarm condition occurs.
Complete control of the BEC from a remote location may be achieved using UltraSite.
1.2.
Manual
This manual has been revised to give CPC customers better access to BEC information. This manual has been divided
into smaller sections that are arranged in an order that correlates with a typical BCU installation. The manual begins with
a hardware overview and hardware mounting instructions. The next two sections (4 & 5) include information that describes
how the REFLECS network operates and is configured. Section 6 is an overview of the software that is used by the BEC.
Section 7 presents an outline that can be used as a guide for users who have not installed a BEC system before. The system
navigation section of previous manuals has been broken into three new sections: Section 8, System Setup; Section 9, Logs
and Graphs; and Section 10, Alarms.
Appendix A is a guide to troubleshooting commonly experienced problems with the BEC for first time users. If you
are experiencing a problem, please refer to Appendix A before calling CPC’s technical support department. If your problem
is not addressed in Appendix A, contact CPC for additional help. Appendix B contains a table that lists the technical specifications of the BEC. Screen trees for the BEC are included in Appendix C.
BEC I&O Manual
Introduction • 1-1
2
2.1.
Hardware Overview
2.1.1.
Introduction
The Building Environmental Control primarily interacts with AHUs. In addition, the BEC provides extensive
load scheduling and power management features that allow
the user to develop HVAC and lighting schedules based on
building occupancy levels.
Computer Process Controls uses both an RS485 host
network, I/O network, and an RS232 remote communication network to monitor and manage all aspects of building
control.
Within the framework of each of these networks various components are required to monitor environmental
conditions and system performance; control system operation; and interact with remote communication packages.
The “brain” of any CPC network is the REFLECS controller. REFLECS is an acronym for (REF)rigeration,
(L)ighting, and (E)nvironmental (C)ontrol (S)ystem. The
following list categorizes the current REFLECS line of
controllers:
Environmental Control
• Building Control Unit (BCU)
• Building Environmental Control (BEC)
Data Logging
• Intelligent Data Logger (IDL)
Refrigeration Control
• Refrigeration Monitor and Control (RMC)
Building Environmental Control
All building control system components must be connected to the BEC for proper monitoring and control of the
system. The BEC has connections for I/O, host, and remote
communication components. Sensors, lights, and AHUs,
while not directly connected to the BEC, are accessed by
the controller through communication boards.
The BEC consists of a rugged steel enclosure containing a processor board and Power Interface Board (PIB).
The Processor Board (Figure 2-1) contains the LCD
screen, the main processor, and the memory chips that hold
all the code required to operate the BEC and the data entered at the front panel or through UltraSite. The Processor
Board is mounted on the door of the enclosure and is connected to the PIB with a ribbon cable. The PIB (Figure 22) contains all power and network connections required to
power the BEC and drive the network, and is attached to
the rear wall of the enclosure.
Installation of the BEC consists of mounting the unit in
an easily accessible location. All communication boards,
additional BECs, alarm panels, and remote communication
equipment must be wired to the BEC. A 120/208 volt power supply is required to provide power to the unit. The BEC
must be configured based on the HVAC components to be
controlled and the operational schedule of the building.
• Refrigeration Monitor and Case Control (RMCC)
CPC REFLECS controllers are designed to perform
three specific tasks: system control, system monitoring,
and data storage. Each controller—depending on its software package—is tailored to perform one or all of these
three tasks.
In general, a standard environmental control network
will consist of the following components:
1. BEC
2. Various input and output communication boards
3. 485 Alarm Panel
4. RS232 Bus Amplifier
5. Remote communication modem & UltraSite
6. Network wiring
7. Sensors and loads
The following sections provide an overview of the
function of each of these components.
BEC I&O Manual
Hardware Overview • 2-1
2.2.
10
9
Input Communication
Boards
8
1
2
7
To properly interact with any environmental control
system, the REFLECS requires constant, accurate system
information. CPC provides this information to the REFLECS through a series of input communication boards.
Except for boards designed to supply both input and output
functions, the 16AI Analog Input Board is the only input
board used by CPC.
2.2.1.
6
3
4
1
2
3
4
5
6
5
LEGEND
7 Ribbon Cable Connection to Power
LCD Screen Contrast Dial
Interface Board
Main Processor Chip
Ribbon Cable Connection to Keypad
8 RAM Battery
Flash Memory Chips
9 Clock Battery
Manufacture Date
10 Network Baud Rate Dip Switch
RAM Chips
16AI Board
The 16AI Analog Input Board (P/N 810-3011) is a general-purpose input board capable of receiving an input signal through any of 16 two-wire input connections. To
function, the 16AI must be connected through the RS485
I/O network to the REFLECS. When properly installed, the
board receives either digital or analog data from sensors
wired to any of the 16 input connections located on the
board. Input definition screens within the REFLECS allow
the user to define each input for building environmental
control.
A maximum of ten 16AIs may be connected to a
BEC through the RS485 COM A and D networks.
26502005
Figure 2-1 - REFLECS Processor Board
Within an environmental control system, the 16AI may
be connected to a watt-hour transducer, power monitor, and
temperature and humidity sensors.The 16AI Board is designed with several features that make it easy to install,
wire, and configure. These main user interface features are
shown in Figure 2-3.
Figure 2-3 - 16AI Analog Input Board
Figure 2-2 - Power Interface Board
2-2 • Hardware Overview
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
.
2.3.
Output Communication
Boards
When a REFLECS receives data from the 16AI board,
it interprets that information based on current stored set
points. System changes required as a result of this examination are then made through one of several output communication boards. CPC offers four different output boards for
environmental control: 1) 8RO, Relay Output Board, 2)
8RO FC, Form C Relay Output Board, 3) 4AO, Analog
Output Board, and 4) 8DO, Digital Output Board.
A maximum of twelve 8ROs and 8RO-FCs may be
connected to a BCU through the RS485 COM A and D
networks.
2.3.1.
8RO Board
The 8RO Relay Board (P/N 810-3002) is a general purpose board capable of supplying an output signal through
any of eight standard contact relays.
A maximum of fifteen 8ROs or 8RO-FCs may be
connected to a BEC through the RS485 COM A and D
networks.
To function, the 8RO board must be connected through
the RS485 I/O network to the REFLECS. When properly
installed, the 8RO receives an electrical impulse from the
REFLECS, which either opens or closes any of eight contact relays. Output definitions within the REFLECS allow
the user to configure the 8RO board to interact with any environmental control component.
Figure 2-4 - 8RO Relay Output Board
2.3.2.
8RO Form C Board
A maximum of fifteen 8ROs or 8RO-FCs may be
connected to a BEC through the RS485 COM A and D
networks.
The 8RO Relay Output Board with Form C contacts (P/N
810-3001) (Figure 2-5) is identical in function to the standard 8RO board, except that it uses relays with form C contacts and does not use fail-safe jumpers (wiring the contacts
as either normally open or normally closed creates the failsafe condition). The 8RO-FC is slightly larger than the
standard 8RO; therefore, use the mounting instructions for
the 8RO-FC provided in Section 3.2., I/O Boards and Enclosures.
The 8RO board is the direct link between the REFLECS
and environmental control component operation. Information gathered by the controller from the 16AI board or 8IO
board is checked against current stored set points. If differences in the received input data and the set point information are detected, a signal is either sent to the proper 8RO
relay, or an existing signal is discontinued. Through the use
of this relay signal, environmental control functions can be
properly maintained by a simple contact closure sequence
that is determined by the REFLECS.
Like the 16AI input board, the 8RO board is easily installed and operated within the CPC network environment
because of its straight forward design. Several of these features are shown in Figure 2-4
Figure 2-5 - 8RO-FC Relay Output Board with Form C Contacts
BEC I&O Manual
Hardware Overview • 2-3
2.3.3.
4AO Analog Output Board
A single 4AO may be connected to a REFLECS
through the RS485 COM A and D networks.
The 4AO Analog Output Board (Figure 2-6), is configured
with four analog output connections that provide a variable
voltage signal to any of four variable speed compressors
that may be controlled by a single RMCC.
Figure 2-7 - 8DO Digital Output Board
2.4.
Special Purpose
Communication Boards
Special purpose communication boards are boards that
either possess greater capabilities than standard input and
output boards, or combine the features of both input and
output boards into a single package.
2.4.1.
Figure 2-6 - 4AO Analog Output Board
2.3.4.
8DO Digital Output Board
Up to two 8DOs may be connected to a BEC through
the RS485 COM A and D networks.
The 8DO digital output board (Figure 2-7) is similar to
the 8RO board, except that instead of a relay that closes on
and off, each output generates either a high (12 V DC) or
low (0 V DC) signal. The 8DO has eight outputs which
may pulse up to 150 mA at 12 V DC. The 8DO’s primary
functions are to control anti-sweat heaters and light dimmer
panels.
2-4 • Hardware Overview
8IO Board
The 8IO combination input and output board (P/N 8103061) is a communication board designed to provide input
and output functions within the same board when space restrictions do not allow for installation of dedicated boards.
Like the 16AI and the 8RO, the 8IO must be connected to
the REFLECS to perform input retrieval and output transmission functions. The 8IO has input and form C relay output connections for monitoring of sensors and control of
loads. The 8IO has no memory capability or hand-held terminal jack for direct connection to the board. The 8IO is
shown in Figure 2-8.
When programming the REFLECS, the 8IO must
be listed as one 16AI board and one 8RO board. A maximum of nine 8IO boards can be connected to a single
BEC controller.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
1. Alarm reset.
2. Date and time adjustment.
3. Storage of twenty separate alarms.
4. Audible annunciation can be set to either pulsed or
continuous mode.
5. Interfaces with existing facility alarm system.
6. 25-pin parallel printer port.
Wiring of the alarm panel to the REFLECS is discussed
in Section 4.3., RS485 Host Network (COM B).
4
5
1
3
2
Figure 2-8 - 8IO Combination Input/Output Communication
Board
1 Date/Time Button
2 Screen Scroll Buttons
3 Alarm Reset Button
LEGEND
4 LED Power Indicator
5 LCD Alarm Screen
6 LED Alarm Indicator
Figure 2-9 - 485 Alarm Panel
2.5.
485 Alarm Panel
One of the most important requirements of any network
environment is its ability to notify personnel of system failures or possible problems. The REFLECS is designed with
sophisticated logging, graphing, notification, and alarming
features that put system data at the fingertips of the service
technician or store manager. However, no network is complete without the basic ability to provide annunciated
alarms in the event of a serious system problem.
CPC uses the 485 Alarm Panel (P/N 811-4850 or 8114855) (Figure 2-9) to accomplish this task. The 485 Alarm
Panel is linked to all REFLECS Controllers through the
RS485 COM B Host Network. Although the alarm panel
has many features that make it a powerful notification tool,
the primary and most important function of the alarm panel
is to receive signals from the REFLECS and deliver alarm
annunciation.
2.6.
Remote Communication
2.6.1.
RS232 Bus Amplifier
The RS232 Bus Amplifier (P/N 812-1800), shown in
Figure 2-10, is used to connect CPC controllers together as
an integrated communication system. Communication
problems sometimes associated with large control systems—such as limited cable lengths, data rate limitations,
and terminal and modem communication interference—are
eliminated through the use of the RS232 Bus Amplifier.
The REFLECS constantly compares real time system
conditions against user-defined alarm set points. When a
system reading falls outside of a set point, a signal is sent
to the alarm panel, which in turn, emits an alarm signal and
displays the alarm information on the notification screen.
Other features of the alarm panel provide the user with additional information and capabilities. Some of the alarm
panel’s features include:
BEC I&O Manual
Hardware Overview • 2-5
Figure 2-10 - RS232 Bus Amplifier
2.6.2.
Modems
To communicate with a site from a remote location, the
network must be connected to a modem directly, or through
the RS232 Bus Amplifier. CPC offers a standard data modem (P/N 370-9600) for use with the REFLECS network.
The REFLECS and CPC’s RS232 Remote Communication Network are designed to connect to and be compatible with most modems in use today.
2.6.3.
UltraSite™
Remote communication with a site controlled by the
REFLECS is accomplished using UltraSite (P/N 8053000), CPC’s remote communication software package.
UltraSite is a Microsoft® Windows™-based program that
uses animated graphics, icons, buttons, and tabular and
graphical data to display real-time conditions of a site.
UltraSite accesses a site controller through the on-site
modem, and, if present, the RS232 Bus Amplifier. All commands available through the front panel of the REFLECS
as well as some screens not available through the front panel may be accessed through UltraSite using pop-up dialog
boxes. Dialog boxes that appear in Ultra Site display the
same information as would appear on the screen of the controller. Changes made to set points in the dialog boxes of
UltraSite are immediately transferred to the unit. Individuals who have access to a laptop or a desktop computer may
find it easier to program the REFLECS—especially during
a start-up—using UltraSite. A comprehensive guide to
UltraSite (UltraSite User’s Guide) is available from CPC.
2-6 • Hardware Overview
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
3
Hardware Mounting
3.1.
Building Environmental
Control
Location
The operating environment of the BEC is -20° F
(-28.9° C) to 120° F (48.9° C), and 0% to 95% humidity—non-condensing.
The Building Environmental Control (BEC) is the main
controller of the CPC refrigeration control network. As
such, it is the component most accessed by store managers
and service technicians. The BEC should be located in an
easily accessible area, but away from customers and most
supermarket employees. Generally, the BEC is mounted in
a motor room where access can be controlled. The BEC
should be mounted in a location that can be limited in its
access. It is a good idea to keep the controller as close to I/
O boards as possible.
Mounting
The REFLECS is supplied with 4 mounting holes in the
rear panel of the enclosure. The mounting holes can be accessed without removing any of the boards inside the enclosure. Figure 3-1 shows the enclosure dimensions and
weight.
Figure 3-1 - BEC Mounting Dimensions
3.2.
I/O Boards and Enclosures
Location
The 16AI, 8RO, 8RO-FC, 8DO, 4AO, and 8IO boards
are usually installed within the refrigeration rack or the
condenser by the equipment manufacturer. Therefore, the
installer need only make the necessary connections between the REFLECS, the condenser boards, and the refrigerated cases.
In some instances, an installer may be required to
mount an I/O board. There are no restrictions on the location of these boards; however, for ease of network configuration, it is recommended that the boards be located
adjacent to the REFLECS. If the boards are not located near
the REFLECS, ensure the leg and segment length restrictions described in Section 4.6. are followed. I/O boards
may be mounted without an enclosure, but they should be
mounted in a location that is not easily accessible to avoid
tampering or damage.
Single Enclosure Mounting for I/O Boards
The Single enclosure is supplied with 4 mounting holes
in the rear panel of the enclosure. The mounting holes can
be accessed without removing any of the boards inside the
enclosure. Figure 3-2 shows the enclosure dimensions and
weight. Figure 3-6 shows mounting dimensions for the
16AI, 8RO, and the 8DO. Figure 3-7 shows mounting dimensions for the 8RO-FC.
BEC I&O Manual
Hardware Mounting • 3-1
8IO Weather Resistant Enclosure Mounting
The 8IO Combination Input/Output Board is generally
supplied with a weather resistant enclosure.
The weather resistant enclosure is supplied with 4
mounting holes on flanges at the top and bottom of the enclosure. The mounting holes can be accessed without removing any of the boards inside the enclosure. Figure 3-4
shows the enclosure dimensions and weight. Figure 3-8
provides mounting dimensions for the 8IO/ARTC.
Figure 3-2 - Single Enclosure Mounting Dimensions
Double Enclosure Mounting for I/O Boards
The Double enclosure is supplied with 4 mounting
holes in the rear panel of the enclosure. The mounting holes
can be accessed without removing any of the boards inside
the enclosure. Figure 3-3 shows the enclosure dimensions
and weight. Figure 3-6 shows mounting dimensions for the
16AI, 8RO, and the 8DO. Figure 3-7 shows mounting dimensions for the 8RO-FC.
Figure 3-4 - Weather Resistant Enclosure
16AI, 8RO, and 8DO Boards Without Enclosures
16AI, 8RO, and 8DO boards not supplied with an enclosure are supplied with a snap-track for easy installation.
The insulation sheet and I/O board must be removed from
the track before the track is mounted. The snap-track is
mounted using the .1875-inch mounting slots. Figure 3-5
shows this installation procedure. Figure 3-6 provides
mounting dimensions for the 16AI, 8RO, and the 8DO
boards.
Figure 3-3 - Double Enclosure Mounting Dimensions
3-2 • Hardware Mounting
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
1. REMOVE THE 16AI OR 8RO BOARD
AND THE INSULATOR FROM THE
SNAP-TRACK.
2. MOUNT THE SNAP-TRACK USING
THE .1875" SLOTS PROVIDED.
Figure 3-7 - 8RO-FC Mounting Dimensions
3. REINSTALL THE INSULATOR
IN THE SNAP-TRACK.
3.2.1.
8IOs Without Enclosures Mounting
8IO boards not supplied with an enclosure are supplied
with .500-inch long metal stand-off dowels that are pressed
into the mounting holes in the board. Figure 3-8 shows the
mounting dimensions for the 8IO and ARTC boards.
4. REINSTALL THE 16AI OR 8RO BOARD
IN THE SLOTS IN THE SNAP-TRACK.
26501040
Figure 3-5 - 4AO, 8RO, or 16AI Snap-Track Installation
Figure 3-6 - 16AI/8RO/8DO Mounting Dimensions
8RO Form C Boards Without Enclosures
Figure 3-8 - 8IO/ARTC Mounting Dimensions
The 8RO Form C board is slightly larger than the 16AI
and 8RO boards, and is not supplied with a snap-track. If
the 8RO-FC is supplied without an enclosure it is supplied
with .500-inch long metal stand-off dowels which are
pressed into the mounting holes in the board. Figure 3-7
shows the mounting dimensions for the 8RO-FC.
4AO Boards Without Enclosures Mounting
BEC I&O Manual
4AO boards not supplied with an enclosure are supplied
with a snap-track for easy installation. The insulation sheet
and I/O board must be removed from the track, and the
track mounted using the .1875-inch mounting slots. Figure
3-5 shows this installation procedure for 16AI and 8RO
boards. Installation for the 4AO board is identical. Figure
3-9 provides mounting dimensions for the 4AO board.
Hardware Mounting • 3-3
3.4.
RS232 Bus Amplifier
Location
Although there are no specific location requirements
for installation of the RS232 Bus Amplifier, it is recommended that the amplifier be located close to the bussed
CPC controllers to prevent data loss over long cable
lengths. It is also recommended that the bus amplifier be located adjacent to the modem and, if present, the local computer terminal to provide easy access to all components
necessary for building control.
Figure 3-9 - 4AO Mounting Dimensions
3.3.
485 Alarm Panel
Location
The 485 Alarm Panel is used to alert store personnel to
system problems that require immediate attention; therefore, it is important to mount the panel where it will be visible and easily accessible.
In some cases, location of the modem and local terminal will not allow location of the bus amplifier to both the
modem and local terminal and the CPC controllers. Since
data loss is possible when multiple CPC controllers transmit data over long cable lengths, it may be necessary to
connect the CPC controllers to a remote amplifier adjacent
to the controllers, and then connect the remote amplifier to
a main amplifier connected to the modem and local terminal. For complete information on operation of the RS232
Bus Amplifier, refer to 026-1401, RS232 Bus Amplifier Installation and Operation Manual.
Mounting
To mount the RS232 Bus Amplifier,
Mounting
1. Remove the 4 front panel screws.
The 485 Alarm Panel is supplied with 4 mounting holes
in the rear panel of the enclosure. The mounting holes can
be accessed without removing any of the boards inside the
enclosure. Figure 3-10 shows the enclosure dimensions
and weight.
2. Remove the front panel (with circuit board attached).
3. Mount the empty amplifier body, with the power
connection cut-out down.
4. Replace the front panel.
Figure 3-11 shows the enclosure dimensions and
weight.
Figure 3-11 - RS232 Bus Amplifier Mounting Dimensions
Figure 3-10 - 485 Alarm Panel Mounting Dimensions
3-4 • Hardware Mounting
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
3.5.
Temperature Sensors
3.5.1.
Inside Temperature Sensor
and clamp (P/N 303-1111) which may be mounted as
shown in Figure 3-13 (fasteners are not provided).
Location
Inside temperature sensors are supplied within a wallmounted enclosure for attachment to a standard switch
plate.
The temperature sensor should be located in a central
location—within the zone to be measured—away from
doors, windows, vents, heaters, and outside walls that
could affect temperature readings. The sensor should be between 4 and 6 feet from the floor.
Mounting
Mount the sensor using the screws provided as shown
in Figure 3-12.
Figure 3-13 - Outside Temperature Sensor with Cover and
Clamp
3.5.3.
Insertion Temperature Probe
Location
The 12-inch insertion temperature probe may be used to
monitor temperature in either the supply or return air ducts
of the AHU.
Mounting
The insertion probe may be mounted in any orientation
within the duct as long as the probe is in the air flow of the
duct. The probe housing should be secured using self-tapping screws. A 0.250” diameter hole is required for the
probe. Figure 3-14 shows the installation of the insertion
probe (self-tapping screws are not provided).
Figure 3-12 - Inside Temperature Sensor Mounting
3.5.2.
Outside (Ambient) Temperature
Sensor
Location
The outside or ambient temperature sensor should be
located on the north side of the building, preferably under
an eave to prevent sun-heated air from affecting the temperature of the sensor.
Mounting
The temperature sensor may be mounted using any
standard tubing clamp. CPC also offers an aluminum cover
Figure 3-14 - 12-Inch Insertion Probe Mounting
3.5.3.1. Supply and Return Air Sensors
In addition to the 12-inch insertion temperature probe,
CPC uses the same temperature sensor used for outside and
BEC I&O Manual
Hardware Mounting • 3-5
inside temperature to monitor supply and return air temperature. When used in this application, the sensors are supplied without enclosure covers. The sensors should be
mounted directly in the air stream of the supply or return air
duct. The sensors are not supplied with any mounting hardware for this application.
3.6.
Humidity Sensors and
Humidistats
Use the installation and operation instructions supplied
with these products for all mounting information.
3.7.
Dew Point Sensors and Control Switches
3.7.1.
Dew Cell Dew Point Probe
3.8.
Light Level Sensor
Location
The Light Level Sensor should be located facing north
(away from direct sunlight).
Mounting
The light level sensor is not supplied with mounting
hardware. The sensor should be mounted horizontally
through the knockout of a standard weather-resistant junction box. Figure 3-16 shows a typical mounting configuration.
Location
The Dew Cell Dew Point Probe should be located 4 to
6 feet from the floor with the probe pointing up. It is recommended that the Dew Cell Dew Point Probe be mounted
in an area where it will be exposed only to minimal
amounts of dust.
Mounting
Mount the probe using the standard switch cover supplied with the unit as shown in Figure 3-15.
Figure 3-16 - Light Level Sensor Typical Mounting
3.9.
Power Monitors
CPC uses standard off-the-shelf power monitors for
power monitoring. Installation instructions supplied with
monitoring units should be used for both the watt-hour
transducer and the transducer power supply.
3.10. Transformers
Figure 3-15 - Dew Cell Dew Point Probe Mounting
3.7.2.
Dew Point Control Switch
Transformers should be located within 10 feet of the
board it is powering, preferably within the board enclosure.
Use the installation instructions supplied with the transformer for specific mounting details.
Use the installation and operation instructions supplied
with this product for all mounting information.
3-6 • Hardware Mounting
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
4
The REFLECS Network
4.1.
Introduction
can be used to connect the board to either COM A or COM
D.
In addition to the primary loop arrangement, a single
star configuration may be connected to the loop. A more indepth explanation of CPC network wiring practices is provided in Section 5, Wiring for Network & Power Connections.
The REFLECS uses four separate networks:
1. The RS485 Input/Output (I/O) Network (COM
A) connects the controller to the input and output
communication boards.
2. The RS485 Host Bus Network (COM B) connects
multiple controllers to a 485 alarm panel.
3. The RS232 Remote Communication Network
(COM C) connects multiple controllers to a modem,
thus allowing remote communication.
4. The RS485 Input/Output (I/O) Network (COM
D) is an additional I/O network that connects the
controller to the input and output communication
boards.
The following sections provide an overview of the basic network components and their function. Wiring requirements for each of the networks is provided in Section 5,
Wiring for Network & Power Connections.
4.2.
RS485 Input/Output (I/O) Network (COM A and D)
The RS485 Input/Output (I/O) network connects all input and output communication boards together in an open
communication loop. This loop connects the REFLECS to
multiple input and output communication boards, and terminates at the last input or output board on the network.
The term “daisy-chain” is applied to this open loop arrangement.
Figure 4-1 - Network Loop Wiring Configurations
4.3.
RS485 Host Network (COM
B)
Similar to the I/O network loop, the host network,
shown in Figure 4-2, also uses an open loop configuration.
The primary function of the Host Network Loop is to allow
single or multiple REFLECS Controllers to be connected
together to one common 485 Alarm Panel. The Host Network is always labeled as COM B on the REFLECS. Input
and output boards cannot be connected directly to the host
network.
The REFLECS is configured to monitor and control
two separate RS485 input/output communication networks. These two networks are labeled as either COM A or
COM D. Each network is capable of supporting up to 31
separate input or output boards, plus the single REFLECS
controller. This means that a single REFLECS can monitor
or control up to sixty-one individual input or output boards.
Figure 4-1 shows the I/O network configurations.
The concept of a loop is critical to operation of the I/O
network. The REFLECS cannot properly interact with the
input and output boards unless the boards are connected
and identified within the confines of the loop. The I/O network is always identified as COM A or COM D on the controller. Input and output communication boards are
configured with a RS 485 network connection only, which
BEC I&O Manual
Figure 4-2 - RS485 Host Communication Network (COM B)
The REFLECS Network • 4-1
4.4.
RS232 Remote Communication Network (COM C)
The RS232 Remote Communication Network connects
single or multiple REFLECS Controllers to a modem to
provide remote access using a remote communication software package. In some configurations, an RS232 Bus Amplifier may be installed to improve transmission rates and
overall data quality. Like the host network, input and output boards cannot be connected directly to the remote communication network. Figure 4-3 shows a typical remote
communication network layout.
4.6.
Leg and Segment Wire
Length
A single segment connected to COM A, B, or D may
not exceed 4000 feet. Therefore, the combined length of all
legs in a single segment may not exceed 4000 feet. This
length restriction includes the length of legs in a single star
configuration described in Section 4.9., Star Configurations.
A single segment connected to COM C may not exceed
2500 feet.
4.7.
Number of Devices per Segment
A single segment may have no more than 32 devices. A
device is considered to be any controller, board, or alarm
panel and includes the “parent” controller. That is, a unit
with a single segment connected to COM A may have an
additional 31 devices connected to the segment. There are
restrictions to the number of each board type that may be
connected to the COM A and D networks.
Figure 4-3 - RS232 Remote Communication Network (COM C)
4.5.
Legs and Segments
A leg is defined as a cable running between two devices
such as two communication boards, or a REFLECS unit
and a communication board. A segment is defined as the total combined length of all legs connected to one REFLECS
power interface board output connection such as the COM
A or COM D connections. Figure 4-4 demonstrates the relationship between legs and segments.
Figure 4-4 - Relationship Between Legs and a Segment
4-2 • RS232 Remote Communication Network (COM C)
No more than fifteen 8ROs or 8RO-FCs, ten 16AIs,
four 4AO, and two 8DOs may be connected to both the
COM A and COM D networks at the same time. In addition, an 8IO board must be listed as one 16AI and one 8RO
and possibly a 4AO (see Section 8.9.8.2.).
4.8.
Daisy Chains
Except for the single star configuration described below, all devices in a segment must be connected in an open
loop or “daisy chain” configuration. A daisy chain must
start with the first device in the segment and continue to the
last device. Branching from a device in the middle of the
segment is prohibited. Figure 4-5 demonstrates correct and
incorrect daisy chain configurations.
Figure 4-5 - Correct and Incorrect Loop Configurations
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
4.9.
Star Configurations
DAISY CHAIN CONFIGURATION
Within a single segment, a single star branching from a
single device is allowable. A star is multiple devices connected to a single device within a segment. The device from
which the star extends is called the hub. The legs within a
star may not exceed 100 feet. No more than one star in a
single segment is permitted. Star configurations are not
permitted on the COM B, Host, and COM C, Remote Communication, networks. Figure 4-6 shows correct and incorrect star configurations.
SET TERMINATING JUMPERS:
UP
DOWN
DOWN
UP
26513088
Figure 4-7-Terminating Jumpers for a Daisy Chain
Configuration
Figure 4-6 - Correct and Incorrect Star Configurations
4.10. Terminating Resistance
Jumpers (COM A, COM B,
and COM D Only)
Each device that may be connected to a segment has a
set of terminating resistance jumpers (one jumper for each
wire lead). These jumpers are always labeled JU1, JU2, and
JU3 for COM A. COM B jumpers are always labeled JU4,
JU5, and JU6. COM D jumpers are always labeled JU9,
JU10, and JU11. The purpose of the jumpers is to indicate
the two ends, or termination points, of the segment. If a
segment contains a star, the hub of the star must be one of
the segment termination points. The other termination
point in the star configuration is the longest leg contained
in the network.
If a device is at either end of a segment (Figure 4-7), or
if the device is the hub of a star (Figure 4-8), the terminating resistance jumpers must be set in the up position. All
other devices in a segment should have their jumpers set to
the down position. No segment shall have more than two
devices with the terminating resistance jumpers in the up
position.
BEC I&O Manual
Figure 4-8-Jumper Settings for Star Network
4.11. Network Dip Switches and
Rotary Dials (COM A and D
only)
Each device that may be connected to a segment has either a network dip switch or rotary dials that provide a
unique identifier for each device on the network. Devices
on a segment may be numbered in any order; however,
gaps or omissions in the numbering sequence are not permitted. As an example, if a segment contains four devices,
then board addresses one, two, three, and four must be
used; one, two, three, and five would not be permitted.
When setting network dip switches and dials, both
COM A, COM B, and COM D must be considered together. If the last device on COM A is numbered five, then the
first device on COM D must be numbered six.
The REFLECS Network • 4-3
The REFLECS identifies the board types on the network; therefore, boards that are the same type are numbered together. For example, if a segment contains four
16AI boards and five 8RO boards, the 16AIs are numbered
one, two, three, and four; and the 8ROs are numbered one,
two, three, four, and five. Figure 4-9 provides a graphic
representation of board numbering. Actual dip switch and
rotary dial setup is described fully in Section 4.11.1., Baud
Rate Dip Switches (COM A and D only).
1 and 31; however, network restrictions limit the actual
number of boards that may reside on both the COM A and
COM D networks at one time. These restrictions are given
in Section 4.7., Number of Devices per Segment. Use Figure 4-10 to determine the switch settings for 16AI, 8RO,
and 8RO-FC boards.
If a pulse type input is connected to a 16AI Board with
software older than version E.02, it must be connected to
input one and rocker number eight on the board’s network
dip switch and must be configured to the ON or up position.
Figure 4-9 - Network Device Numbering
4.11.1. Baud Rate Dip Switches (COM A
and D only)
All networks (COM A, B, C, D) have specific baud rate
requirements; however, only COM A and COM D require
manual setting of the baud rate dip switch. Currently, the
baud rate dip switch in network components may be set at
either 4800, 9600, 19,200, and 38,400. Setting of the baud
rate is accomplished using switch S1 on the REFLECS processor board, the RS485 alarm panel board, and 4AO, 8RO,
and 8RO-FC output boards; and switch S3 on the 16AI input board. The COM B baud rate is preset on the REFLECS
and 485 Alarm Panel dip switch S1 at 4800. The 8IO board
automatically adjusts to the required baud rate.
4.12. Network Settings
For all boards, except 8IO and 8DO boards, the network
dip switch labeled S1 (or S3 for the 16AI board) is used to
set the unique board number of the unit and the baud rate.
The 8IO uses rotary dials to set the board number of the
unit and the baud rate is set internally at 9600.
Figure 4-10 - Network Address Settings for Dip Switch S1 or S3
on I/O Boards
Network Addresses for 8IO & 8DO Boards
The 8IO and 8DO boards use rotary dials to set the network address instead of dip switches. The rotary dial S1 is
used to define the output portion of the board. Therefore,
the board may only be defined as board 1 through 9. Likewise, dial S2 is used to define the input portion of the board
and may be set from 1 to 9.
LED Indicator Lights
Each board contains a green LED Power Indicator
Light. This light indicates whether or not the board is receiving power. It also indicates if the board is on-line with
the network by sending a pulsing signal.
4.12.1. Network Addresses
Board numbering is accomplished using the first five
rockers on dip switch S3 on the 16AI board, the first five
rockers on dip switch S1 on the 8RO and 8RO-FC boards,
and two rotary dials on the 8IO and 8DO boards.
Dip Switches
Each of the first five rockers of either S1 or S3 is given
a value which is twice as large as the value for the rocker to
the left of it. The first rocker is given a value of one. With
these five rockers, a board may be given any value between
4-4 • Network Settings
4.13. Baud Rate Dip Switch
Settings
The ARTC, 8IO, and 8RO-FC have a dip switch (S2)
which indicates the state of the relay (NC or NO). When the
relay is set normally closed, the appropriate LED relay indicator (1 through 8) is illuminated. Dip switch rockers 1
through 8 should be set to the up position if the relay is
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
4.13.1. COM A and D Networks
Boards using Form C contacts do not have fail-safe devices, since the contacts are wired for the position required
during power loss, but have a dip switch which illuminates
the LED relay indicator depending on the contact position.
The COM A and D networks may be set to either 4800,
9600, 19,200, or 38,400 baud. Positions one and two of the
dip switch located on the processor board of the RMCC are
used to set the baud rate. A different baud rate setting may
not be set for the COM A and D networks.
The 8RO has both a fail-safe dip switch (S2) to force
the contacts open or closed if the network fails, and a jumper for each output (JU4 through JU11) that forces the contact open or closed during a power loss. Figure 4-12 shows
the possible settings for the dip switch and jumpers.
wired normally closed and down if the relay is wired normally open.
Positions six and seven on dip switch S1 of the 4AO,
8RO, and 8RO-FC, and switch S3 of the 16AI, are used to
set the baud rate for the communication boards. This baud
rate should match the setting for the RMCC. Figure 4-11
shows the possible baud rate settings and dip switch positions for the COM A and D networks.
COM B
BAUD RATE
(PRESET AT 4800)
COM A AND D
BAUD RATE
COM A AND D
BAUD RATE
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
8
REFLECS PROCESSOR
BOARD
4AO, 8RO, AND 8RO-FC
(SWITCH S1)
16AI (SWITCH S3)
9600
4800
19200
38400
Figure 4-12 - 8RO Board Fail-Safe Dip Switch and Jumper
Settings
26501045
Figure 4-11 - Baud Rate Dip Switch Settings
8IO Baud Rates
Baud rate settings for the 8IO board are automatically
adjusted by the board based on the baud rate setting of the
RMCC. The 8IO can communicate at baud rate settings between 4800 and 38,400.
The ARTC, 8IO, and 8RO-FC have a dip switch (S2)
which indicates the state of the relay (NC or NO). When the
relay is set normally closed, the appropriate LED relay indicator (one through eight) is illuminated. Dip switch rockers one through eight should be set to the up position if the
relay is wired normally closed and down if the relay is
wired normally open.
4.13.2. COM B Network
The COM B baud rate is preset on the RMCC and 485
Alarm Panel dip switch S1 at 4800 since the 485 alarm panel can only communicate at 4800 baud.
4.13.3. COM C Network
The COM C baud rate setting is established within the
remote communications screens in the RMCC and is related to the speed of the modem being used at the supermarket. The RMCC can communicate at 300, 1200, 2400, and
9600 baud. It is recommended that a baud rate of 9600 be
used for remote communication.
4.14. Fail-Safe Dip Switch Settings
CPC uses two fail-safe devices on its output boards: a
dip switch and jumpers. These two devices are used to provide fail-safe operation of equipment in the event of either
power loss or network communication loss. The use of
these devices differs depending on the board or controller.
BEC I&O Manual
The REFLECS Network • 4-5
5
Wiring for Network &
Power Connections
This section describes how to wire the CPC refrigeration control system. Information is provided for the REFLECS and all sensors, alarm panels, modems, loads, and
output functions.
Any communications (network) connections between
the PIB and a remote board are made through the communications port (Figure 5-1).
5.2.
Connect the three-wire COM A/COM D network cable
to the REFLECS and I/O board 485 network connections as
shown in Figure 5-1.
POWER INTERFACE BOARD
TB1
+A
5.1.
Wiring Specifications
COM A and D Wiring
RS485
0V
COMA
TB2
-A
+B
POWER
IN
RS485
0V
POWER
ON
-B
COMB
COMC
GND NEU HOT
COMD
POWER
All CPC I/O and host bus communication components
(COM A and D, and COM B) have been designed to conform to RS485 standards. Remote communication components (COM C) have been designed to conform to RS232
standards. When wiring CPC components together, it is
necessary to follow the rules and requirements specified in
this section to ensure proper communication between network devices and effective control of building equipment.
Unless noted, all information in this section pertains to
COM A, B, C, and D networks. Information provided in
this section conforms to these requirements.
Network wiring must meet or exceed the following
specifications:
N E T
AC1 0V AC2
+485
16AI/8RO/8IO/ARTC
0V
-485
OTHER
BOARDS
COMMUNICATION
PORT
26513032
26513032
Figure 5-1 - COM A Network Connections
5.3.
COM B Wiring
RS485 (COM A, B, and D)
• Belden part number 8641 (for plenum installations:
82641 or 88641)
Connect the three-wire COM B network cable to the
REFLECS controllers and 485 Alarm Panel as shown in
Figure 5-2.
• 18 - 24 AWG wire
• Shielded twisted pair
• 120 ± 50 ohm nominal impedance
• 31 pF/ft or lower maximum capacitance between
signal wires
• 59 pF/ft or lower maximum capacitance between
signal and shield
Figure 5-2 - COM B Network Connections
RS232 (COM C)
• Belden part number 8771
• 22 AWG wire
• Shielded
• 23 pF/ft or lower maximum capacitance between
signal wires
• 41 pF/ft or lower maximum capacitance between
signal and shield
BEC I&O Manual
Wiring for Network & Power Connections • 5-1
5.4.
COM C Wiring
5.5.
Connect the three-wire COM C network cable to the
REFLECS controllers and modem as shown in Figure 5-3.
Sensor and Transducer Wiring
All sensors and transducers must be wired to either a
16AI or 8IO. Supply and return air temperature sensors—
regardless of type—used to control an AHU must be connected to the 16AI or 8IO. Sensors used to measure light
level, humidity, etc. may be connected to the 16AI and 8IO
also.
If a transducer, probe, or sensor requires power, set the
dip switch that corresponds to the point number where the
transducer, probe, or sensor is connected to the down position.
Table 5-1 describes how to wire specific sensors and
transducers to various board types.
Figure 5-3 - COM C Network Connection
P/N
Various
Sensor
Temp Sensors
and Probes
Connect to
Input Point
by Board
Type
Wiring
16AI-Any
Available Point
8IO-Any Available Input Point
ARTC-Any
Temp or Aux
Input
1. Connect one lead to the odd numbered terminal and the other lead to the even numbered
terminal (polarity insensitive).
2. Set input dip switch up.
Various
Digital Sensors
(Klixons, Sail
Switches, etc.)
16AI-Any
Available Point
8IO-Any Available Input Point
ARTC-An Aux
Input
1. Connect one lead to the odd
numbered terminal and the
other lead to the even numbered terminal (polarity insensitive).
2. Set input dip switch up.
Table 5-1 - Sensor Wiring
5-2 • Wiring for Network & Power Connections
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
P/N
800-1100
800-1200
800-1500
Sensor
Pressure Transducers (Eclipse)
100, 200, 500
lb. ratings
Connect to
Input Point
by Board
Type
16AI-Any
Available Point
8IO-Any Available Input Point
ARTC-An Aux
Input
Wiring
1. Connect RED power wire
to +5VDC supply on
input board.
2. Connect WHITE signal
wire to even numbered
terminal.
3. Connect BLACK ground
wire to odd numbered terminal.
4. Connect the bare
SHIELD wire to odd
numbered terminal.
5. Set input dip switch
down.
800-0100
800-0200
800-0500
Pressure Transducers (Standard) 100, 200,
500 lb. ratings
16AI-Any
Available Point
8IO-Any Available Input Point
ARTC-An Aux
Input
1. Connect RED wire to
+12VDC source on input
board.
2. Connect WHITE signal
wire to even numbered
terminal.
3. Connect BLACK ground
wire to odd numbered
terminal.
4. Connect the bare
SHIELD wire to odd
numbered terminal.
5. Set input dip switch
down.
203-5750
Relative Humidity Sensor
16AI-Any
Available Point
8IO-Any Available Input Point
ARTC-An Aux
Input
1. Wire the “P” sensor terminal to 12VDC supply on board.
2. Wire the “GND” sensor terminal to odd numbered terminal.
3. Wire the “OUT” sensor terminal to even numbered terminal.
4. Jumper sensor terminal “N” to sensor terminal “GND”.
5. Set input dip switch down.
Table 5-1 - Sensor Wiring
BEC I&O Manual
Wiring for Network & Power Connections • 5-3
P/N
206-0002
Sensor
Light Level
Connect to
Input Point
by Board
Type
16AI-Any
Available Point
8IO-Any Available Input Point
ARTC-An Aux
Input
Wiring
1. Wire GREEN
ground wire to odd
numbered terminal.
2. Wire YELLOW
and RED signal
wires to even
numbered terminal.
3. Wire the POWER
wire to a +12VDC
source on input
board.
4. Set input dip
switch down.
207-0100
Analog Liquid
Level
16AI-Any
Available Point
8IO-Any Available Input Point
1. Connect RED power
wire to +12VDC
source on input
board.
2. Connect BLACK
ground wire to odd
numbered terminal.
3. Connect GREEN signal wire to even numbered terminal.
4. Set input dip switch
down.
16AI-Any
Available Point
8IO-Any Available Input Point
1. Wire BLACK
ground wire from
“GND” sensor terminal to odd numbered board
terminal.
2. Wire GREEN signal wire from “SIGNAL” sensor
terminal to even
numbered board terminal.
3. Wire RED power
wire from
“POWER” sensor
terminal to +12VDC
terminal on board.
*5((16,*1$/
TO ODD #
TERMINAL
TO EVEN #
TERMINAL
6
=
123
TO +12VDC
ON BOARD
POWER
GND
SIGNAL
Refrigerant
Level Transducer (Hansen
Probe)
RED (POWER)
207-1000
4. Set input dip switch
down.
Table 5-1 - Sensor Wiring
5-4 • Wiring for Network & Power Connections
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
P/N
203-1902
Sensor
Dew Point
Probe
Connect to
Input Point
by Board
Type
16AI-Any
Available Point
8IO-Any Available Input Point
ARTC-An Aux
Input
Wiring
1. Connect the WHITE and GREEN wires
to AC1 and AC2 power terminals.
2. Connect BLACK ground wire to odd
numbered board terminal.
3. Connect RED signal wire to even numbered board terminal.
4. Set input dip switch up.
550-2500
KW Transducer
550-2550
16AI (E.02 and
Above)-Any
Available Point
4-20 mA Output to Input Board
16AIs Below v.
E.02-Pulse
Accumulator
Must be Connected to Point 1
8IO-Any Available Input Point
ARTC-An Aux
Input
1. Wire positive transducer terminal to positive 24VDC supply.
2. Wire negative transducer terminal to odd numbered input terminal.
3. Wire negative 24VDC supply to even numbered input terminal.
4. Place 250Ω resistor across odd and even numbered input terminals.
5. Set input dip switch down.
Pulse Accumulator Output to Input Board
1. If the input board is an 8IO or a 16AI version E.02
or greater, connect the two KWH terminals to the
input point (polarity insensitive)
2. If the input board is a 16AI version less than E.02,
connect the KWH terminals to board point 1. Set
input switch #1 DOWN, and set network switch
#8 UP.
3. Set input dip switch up.
Table 5-1 - Sensor Wiring
BEC I&O Manual
Wiring for Network & Power Connections • 5-5
5.6.
Power Connection Wiring
5.6.1.
Power Requirements
Each board used with the BEC has specific power requirements. These requirements determine how many
boards may be wired to each transformer. Power requirements for each board on the RMCC network are listed in
Table 5-2.
16AI
8RO
4AO
8DO
8IO
485 Alarm
amps
0.25
0.75
0.5
1.5
0.75
0.1 / 0.05
VA
5.0
15.0
10.0
18
18
12
V AC
24
24
24
24
24
120 / 208
YES
YES
YES
YES
NO
N/A
Center Tap
Used
Table 5-2 - Power Requirements
5.6.2.
Power Transformers
Transformers for powering the input and output boards
should be wired according to Figure 5-5 and Figure 5-6
depending on the number and type of boards being powered.
Three-board, six-board, and ten-board refer to the number of 8RO boards that may be powered by one transformer. When 16AI, 4AO, and 8IO boards are powered by a
three-board transformer, the transformer may actually be
able to power more or less than three boards. The same is
true for six and ten-board transformers. Total VAs must be
matched for proper selection of a transformer.
ThreeBoard
P/N
Power
Rating
EX: Two 8IOs (18.0 VA each), and one 4AO
(10.0 VA) boards are to be powered by one
transformer
( 2 × 18VA ) + ( 1 × 10VA ) = 46VA
2.
Use a transformer that has a power rating
higher than the total calculated VA (see Figure 5-4).
640-0043
640-0045
640-0048
56 VA
100 VA
175 VA
10
1
8
2
6
4
5
PINOUT
10
Determine what the total VA is for the boards
that will be powered by the transformer.
TenBoard
Figure 5-4-Power Ratings for CPC Transformers
To select a power transformer for a board or a series of
boards:
1.
Six-Board
8
6
AC1
0V
AC2
8
6
AC1
0V
AC2
1
1
2
2
4
10
110 VAC
5
FOR 110 VAC POWER SOURCE
4
208 VAC
5
FOR 208 VAC POWER SOURCE
26513001
EX: Three board transformer (56 VA) is sufficient
(56 VA is greater than 46 VA.)
5-6 • Wiring for Network & Power Connections
Figure 5-5 - Wiring for 640-0043, Three Board, and 640-0045,
Six Board Transformer
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Figure 5-6 - Wiring for 640-0048, Ten Board Transformer
5.6.2.1. Wiring the 16AI, 8RO, 4AO, or 8DO
The 16AI, 8RO, 4AO, and 8DO all require the use of a
center tap. The number of boards that need power will determine the transformer size that is required. (see Section
5.6.2., Power Transformers). It is important that the transformer size match the board’s power requirement.
Figure 5-7 diagrams the wiring for three 16AIs, 8ROs,
4AOs, or 8DOs, or any combination of the four board
types. These boards all use a center tap configuration for
grounding.
Figure 5-7-Wiring for Three 16AIs, 8ROs, 4AOs, or 8DOs or
Any Combination of
5.6.2.2. Wiring the 8IO Board
The 8IO board can be wired for power in three different
ways:
BEC I&O Manual
1.
By itself with one transformer for power
(Figure 5-8)
2.
In combination with a or multiple 16AI, 8RO,
4AO, or 8DO boards (Figure 5-9)
3.
On a 24 V AC line with the ground in the sys-
Wiring for Network & Power Connections • 5-7
tem on either side of the power line or with no
ground in the system at all (Figure 5-10).
Figure 5-8-Single 8IO Board Wired to One Transformer
When the 8IO board is used by itself, it is satisfactory
to wire the board with no grounding on either side of the 24
V AC power supply. Connect an Earth Ground to 0 V terminal of the 8IO’s power connection.
Figure 5-9-8IO Board Wired in Combination with A or Multiple
16AI, 8RO, 4AO, 8DO
When the 8IO board is wired in conjunction with other
boards, the 8IO board is not grounded through the other
board’s center tap. A separate Earth ground should be run
from the 0 V terminal of the 8IO’s power connection.
5-8 • Wiring for Network & Power Connections
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
When the 8IO is wired alone, either or neither side of
the power supply may be grounded however, a separate
Earth ground should be made off of the center terminal of
the power connection.
Figure 5-10-One 8IO with a Ground on Either Side of the Power
Supply and One 8IO with no Ground in the System
BEC I&O Manual
Wiring for Network & Power Connections • 5-9
6
Software Overview
This section will explain the frequently used control
functions within the BEC.
6.1.
Heating and Cooling
The BEC controller has the capability of controlling up
to eight heat stages (configured as either reclaim or auxiliary heat stages) and six cooling stages.
When the control temperature rises above the heating
dead band or falls below the cooling dead band, the most
recently activated stage of heat or cool will be turned off.
The BEC waits an amount of time equal to the specified delay between stages. If the control temperature remains
above the heating dead band or below the cooling dead
band, the second most recently activated stage of heat or
cool will be deactivated. Further stages would be deactivated in the same manner.
Figure 6-1 and Figure 6-2 show how an AHU with
three cooling stages and three heating stages would operate
under the single set point strategy.
To control AHU heat and cool stages, the BEC monitors input data from up to four AHU temperature sensors.
The temperature readings from these sensors are combined
into a single control temperature using a user-defined strategy. The control temperature is then compared with the
heating and cooling temperature set points defined for the
AHU. If the control temperature value is below the heating
set point, the BEC will initiate a stage of heat in the AHU.
If the control temperature is above the cooling set point, the
BEC will initiate a stage of cool.
Different heating and cooling set points may be specified for day and night times. The set points may also be
raised or lowered upon closure of pre-defined inputs.
Heating and cooling stage control may be handled in either of two ways based on the defined set point strategy.
The first strategy uses a single set point. The second strategy involves multiple set points.
6.1.1.
Single Set Point Strategy
Figure 6-1 - Diagram of Heating Operation under Single Set
Point Strategy
In a single set point strategy, there is one set point for
heating and one set point for cooling. The heating and cooling set point each have a user-defined dead band, which is
a zone equally above and below the set point within which
the temperature level is considered to be acceptable. The
BEC will initiate a stage of heat when the temperature falls
below the heating set point dead band, or it will initiate a
stage of cool when the temperature rises above the cooling
set point dead band.
Once the first stage is activated, the BEC will wait an
amount of time equal to the specified delay between stages
before comparing the control temperatures again. If the
control temperature remains below the heat set point dead
band or above the cool set point dead band, the BEC will
call for a second stage of heating or cooling. Stages will
continue to be activated in this manner until there are no
more available stages or until the control temperature
moves to within the dead band.
All active stages of heat or cool will remain ON until
the control temperature rises above the heating dead band
or below the cooling dead band. When the control temperature is within the dead band, no stages of heat may be
turned on or off.
BEC I&O Manual
Figure 6-2 - Diagram of Cooling Operation under Single Set
Point Strategy
6.1.2.
Separate Set Points Strategy
In the separate set points strategy, each stage of heat
and cool may be given its own individual cut-on and cutoff set point. A stage of heat will activate when the control
Software Overview • 6-1
temperature falls below its cut-on heat set point and deactivate when the temperature rises above its cut-off heat set
point. A stage of cool will activate when the control temperature rises above the cut-on cool set point and deactivate
when the temperature falls below its cut-off cool set point.
Delays may be specified for both cut-on and cut-off set
points.
6.1.3.
Night Set Back and Warm-Up
AHUs (or specific stages of AHUs, if a separate set
points strategy is being followed) may be programmed
with lower heating and cooling set points during the
evening hours. If enabled, the night set back occurs every
evening for a user-defined time period. When the time period is over, the set points return to the normal daytime setting.
If desired, a warm-up period may be programmed to occur before night set back mode deactivates. If warm-up is
enabled, the heating and cooling set points slowly rise from
the night settings to the day settings. As a result, when night
set back mode is terminated, the building temperature will
be at or near the desired temperature.
6.1.4.
Seasonal Lock-Out and Seasonal
Set Point Shifts
A BEC is capable of locking out heating and cooling
stages or shifting heating and cooling set points based on
the reading of an outside temperature sensor.
If a Seasonal Lock-Out is enabled on a BEC, the system
will keep heat stages off when the outside temperature is
above the Winter/Summer Switch-Over Set Point. Similarly, cool stages will be locked off when the outside temperature is above the Winter/Summer Switch-Over Set Point.
Seasonal Lock-Out does not apply to dehumidification; if
cooling stages are called to be ON for dehumidification,
they will activate regardless of the seasonal lock-out setting.
As an alternative to Seasonal Lock-Out, a heating and
cooling set point shift may be configured. During Seasonal
Set Point Shifts, the heating and cooling set points are shifted by a defined amount when the outside temperature rises
above the Winter/Summer Switch-Over Set Point.
6.1.5.
6.2.
Dehumidification
In addition to heat and cool control, the BEC may also
control the humidity level. The BEC controls humidity by
activating AHU cool stages based upon the humidity or
dewpoint value read by the AHU. Humidistats or humidity
sensors may be used to monitor inside relative humidity.
Inside dewpoint may also be measured by either a dewpoint
sensor or a combination of a humidity sensor and a temperature sensor.
The humidity or dewpoint measurement is compared to
the AHU’s dehumidification set point. The set point may
be assigned different values for day and night times, and
may be given a dead band value, which is a humidity or
dewpoint equally above and below the set point within
which the humidity is considered to be acceptable. If the
humidity or dewpoint reading is above the dehumidification dead band, the BEC initiates a stage of cool in the
AHU.
After the first stage of cool is activated, the BEC waits
an amount of time equal to the specified delay between
stages. The BEC then compares the humidity levels again.
If the humidity level is still within or above the dead band,
the BEC will call for the second stage of cool. Stages of
cool will be activated until there are no more outputs defined for cool, or until the humidity level falls below the
dead band.
When the humidity level falls below the dead band, the
most recently activated cooling stage will deactivate. The
BEC will wait an amount of time equal to the specified delay between stages and then compare humidity levels
again. If the humidity level remains below the dead band,
the second most recently activated cooling stage will deactivate. Further cooling stages will deactivate in the same
manner
Figure 6-3 shows how an AHU with three available dehumidification stages would operate.
Cool Termination
Each cooling stage may be wired with a temperature
sensor to monitor the coil air temperature. Each stage also
has a cool termination set point that will deactivate the
stage when the coil air temperature drops too low. This feature is designed to prevent the coil air temperature from
dropping below freezing during cooling mode.
6-2 • Software Overview
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
off, and after a programmable time delay, the AHU resumes normal dehumidification.
6.3.
Fan Control
The BEC can control three different types of AHU fans.
However, only one fan can be controlled per AHU. The fan
types include: single-speed, two-speed, and variable-speed.
Controls for all fans are similar in that they can be configured differently for day and night operation.
6.3.1.
Single-Speed Fans
Single-speed fans may operate in either Always On or
Auto mode. When Always On mode is selected, the AHU
fan will remain on even when no heating or cooling stage
is active. In Auto mode, the AHU fan will be active only
when a heating or cooling stage is active.
Figure 6-3 - Diagram of Humidity Control
6.2.1.
Minimum Building Temperature
Running too many cool stages during dehumidification
may cause the building temperature to fall too low. To prevent over-cooling during dehumidification, a minimum
building temperature set point may be defined. By specifying a minimum building temperature, cool stages will be
locked OFF if the temperature falls below the minimum
temperature set point.
6.2.2.
Dehumidification Reheat Set
Point
During single set point operation, when an AHU is in
dehumidification mode and the temperature drops below
the heating set point, the AHU will cycle on stages of heat
in an attempt to raise the building temperature above the
heating set point dead band. When this occurs, cooling and
heating stages will be operating at the same time. If desired,
an AHU may be programmed to handle dehumidification
and heating in a way that does not require as much conflict
between cooling and heating stages. This is done by enabling the dehumidification reheat set point.
When enabled, the summer cooling set point and dead
band becomes the Dehumidification Reheat set point and
dead band. If during dehumidification the temperature
drops below the Dehumidification Reheat set point’s dead
band value, all cooling stages except Stage One cycle OFF.
After a programmable time delay, all reclaim heat stages
are cycled ON.
The AHU operates in this fashion until the humidity
falls to an acceptable level or until the temperature rises
above the Dehumidification Reheat set point dead band. If
the humidity drops below the set point dead band, the call
for dehumidification ends and the AHU returns to normal
heating and cooling. If the temperature rises above the Reheat set point dead band, the reclaim heat stages are cycled
BEC I&O Manual
6.3.2.
Two-Speed Fans
Two-speed fans may operate in either Always On or
Auto mode. In Always On mode, when no heating or cooling stage is active, the fan operates at a constant, user-specified default speed (either LOW or HIGH). In Auto mode,
the fan is only active when a heating or cooling stage is active.
Regardless of what mode the AHU fans operate in, the
fans are active when a stage is active. Each heating and
cooling stage has a specified fan speed setting; the fan will
operate at the highest fan speed setting of all active levels.
For example, if cooling stages one and two are active and
have fan speeds set to LOW, the fan will operate at low
speed. If cool stage three activates and has a fan speed setting of HIGH, the fan will operate at high speed.
6.3.3.
Variable-Speed Fans
Variable-speed fans may operate in either Always On
or Auto mode. In Always On mode, the AHU fan operates
at the default minimum speed percentage when no stages
are active. In Auto mode, the AHU fan is active only when
a heating or cooling stage is active.
The speed of a variable-speed fan during heating, cooling, or dehumidification mode may be determined by either
of two methods: stages or supply-return differential.
6.3.3.1. Stages
Each stage of heating and cooling may be programmed
with its own individual fan speed. The fans operate at a
speed equal to the highest speed setting of all the active
stages.
6.3.3.2. Differential
In the differential mode of operation, fan speed is determined by the speed setting defined for each additional
stage, as it is in Stages mode. However, the speed of the fan
may be altered slightly by the difference between the tem-
Software Overview • 6-3
perature of the supply air and the temperature of the return
air. Differential mode will not decrease a fan’s speed below
the defined Minimum Fan Speed, nor will it increase a
fan’s speed above 100%.
vary linearly with an outside temperature sensor readings.
During warmer outside temperatures, the boiler set point
will be lower, and during colder outside temperatures, the
boiler set point will be higher.
As stages with different speeds activate and deactivate,
the differential being added to the current fan speed carries
over to the new speed setting. For example, suppose a fan
is operating at 36% because the highest active stage has a
30% setting and Differential Mode is adding 6% to the fan
speed. If a second stage comes on with a 60% fan speed setting, the fan would operate at 66% as long as Differential
Mode still called for a 6% fan speed increase. Control of
the fans works differently for heating and cooling modes.
In order to define the range of outside temperature values and the corresponding water temperature or pressure
set points, four values must be specified:
Differential for Cooling
When the outside temperature is equal to or below the
minimum outside temp, the specified maximum boiler
temp/pressure value becomes the boiler set point. Likewise, when the outside temperature is equal to or greater
than the maximum outside temp, the minimum boiler temp/
pressure value will be used. When the outside temperature
falls between the minimum and maximum outside temperature set point, the boiler set point is determined by the outside temperature’s proximity to the min and max values. A
graph of the set point algorithm is shown in Figure 6-4.
If operating in cooling mode, the difference between
the return air and the supply air temperatures is compared
to the user-defined differential set point for cooling. The
difference between the return and supply air temperature
and the set point is the number of percentage points that
will be added to the fan speed. It is possible to have negative values, which decrease the fan speed.
1.
maximum boiler temp/pressure
2.
minimum outside temp
3.
minimum boiler temp/pressure
4.
maximum outside temp
RETURN AIR minus SUPPLY AIR minus DIFF.
SET POINT FOR COOLING = % added to fan speed.
Differential for Heating
If operating in heating mode, the difference between the
supply air and the return air temperatures is compared to
the user-defined differential set point for heating. The difference between the supply and return air temperature and
the set point is the number of percentage points that will be
added to the fan speed. It is possible to have negative values, which decrease the fan speed.
SUPPLY AIR minus RETURN AIR minus DIFF.
SET POINT FOR COOLING = % added to fan speed.
Figure 6-4 - Graph Showing Boiler Control Algorithm
Operation
6.4.1.
Differential During Dehumidification
Override ON/OFF
During dehumidification, it is possible to have heating
and cooling stages occurring simultaneously. When this
happens in variable-speed fan AHUs operating in differential mode, the AHU will use the heating mode algorithm for
control (supply air-return air).
During especially hot or cold outside conditions, override set points may be defined to override the boiler heaters
ON and OFF. When an Override OFF set point is defined,
the boiler will completely disable heating when the outside
temperature is equal to or above the OFF set point. When
an Override ON set point is defined, the boiler heat will always be on when the outside temperature is equal to or below the ON set point.
6.4.
6.5.
Boiler Control
The BEC is capable of controlling up to two boilers,
each with its own temperature or pressure sensor and heating output.
The water temperature or boiler pressure set point used
to control a boiler is not a constant value. Boiler set points
6-4 • Software Overview
Anti-Sweat Control
The BEC is capable of controlling anti-sweat heaters to
keep condensation off glass door cases. The BEC may control up to two anti-sweat circuits, each of which may be
connected to a zone of up to eight heaters. No more than
eight heaters may be controlled by a single BEC.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
The BEC controls an anti-sweat circuit by measuring
dewpoint, either by reading the value from a circuit’s dewpoint sensor or by calculating it from a circuit’s temperature and relative humidity sensors. The circuit’s dewpoint
temperature is compared to two user-defined values: All
Off and All On.
If the circuit’s dewpoint is lower than the All Off set
point, all the anti-sweat heaters will remain off. If the circuit’s dewpoint is higher than the All On set point, all the
anti-sweat heaters will be on. If the dewpoint falls between
the All Off and All On set points, the anti-sweat heaters
will pulse on and off for a percentage of a user-defined time
window (1-999 seconds). The percentage of time in which
the heaters will be on depends upon where the circuit’s
dewpoint falls between the range of dewpoints formed by
the All Off and All On set points. The percentage is figured
by using the following equation:
Figure 6-5 illustrates the operation of an anti-sweat circuit with a time window of 10 seconds, an All Off dewpoint
of 20° F, and an All On dewpoint of 70° F. If a dewpoint of
45° F is measured in the circuit, the anti-sweat heaters will
operate at 50%. This is because the 45° F dewpoint is directly between the All On and All Off set point. The heaters, therefore, will be on for five seconds (50% x 10 sec.)
and off for five seconds. A measured dewpoint of 30° F
will result in the heaters being on 20% of the time.
6.6.
Schedules
A schedule is a group of dates and times that designates
when a building is occupied or unoccupied or when a particular system or component should be activated and deactivated. All HVAC, lighting, and sensor functions may be
controlled using a schedule. Each of the BEC’s 24 schedules is composed of 16 separate ON and OFF operation
times. These ON and OFF operation times are called
events. Events determine when the system will be active or
inactive. Only systems assigned to the schedule will be affected.
An event consists of three elements: a time, a day or a
group of days, and a function (either ON or OFF). An event
may be configured to occur at any time on individual days
of the week, weekdays, weekends, or all days of the week.
Up to eight holidays and two special event dates may be defined, which may be used by all schedules.
Once schedules have been defined, specific components or systems may be set to follow a schedule by entering the desired schedule number at the setup screen. When
a schedule is turned ON or OFF, all corresponding outputs
connected to the schedule are likewise turned ON or OFF.
When sensors are connected to schedules, the ON or OFF
state of the schedules represents the occupied or unoccupied state of the sensor, which may be used to override
alarm generation or output control (see Section 6.8.3., Unoccupied Settings).
6.6.1.
Schedule Overrides
Schedules may be overridden in one of three ways:
manual overrides, maintenance overrides, or light sensor
overrides.
6.6.1.1. Manual Overrides
Manual overrides are performed by the user from the
BEC front panel, from UltraSite, or by a contact closure. In
a manual override, any or all schedules may be overridden
ON or OFF for either a fixed or an indefinite amount of
time.
6.6.1.2. Maintenance Overrides
Maintenance overrides are scheduled by the user from
the BEC front panel or from UltraSite. ON and OFF overrides may be programmed to occur on a specific day or at a
specific time period within the year.
Figure 6-5 - Illustration of Anti-Sweat Control
6.6.1.3. Light Sensor Overrides
Each anti-sweat heater may be configured to override
OFF when a contact closure is detected. Anti-sweat heaters
may also be overridden manually from the BEC front panel
or from UltraSite.
Light sensor overrides may be configured to occur automatically based upon the light level reading of a linear or
digital light sensor. When the measured light level falls below a cut-in set point or above a cut-out set point, any or all
schedules may be overridden ON or OFF.
BEC I&O Manual
Software Overview • 6-5
6.6.2.
Schedule Priorities
With all the possible events and overrides that may determine a schedule’s on/off status, schedules may sometimes receive conflicting orders, such as two overlapping
overrides or two conflicting events. To resolve such conflicts, each type of override and event has a pre-defined priority level. The priority level for each override and event is
listed below:
1.
Manual Overrides
2.
External-Input Schedule Overrides
3.
Maintenance Overrides
4.
Light Level Sensor Overrides
5.
All Holidays Event
6.
Holiday 1-16 and Special Events A-B
7.
Day/Time Daily Events
Lower priority numbers represent higher priority levels. Manual Overrides, for example, are unaffected by all
other types of overrides and events.
Priority levels one through three also take priority over
calls for load shedding by the BEC’s Demand Control algorithm. Overridden schedules may not be shed until the
override is terminated.
6.7.
Demand Control
Power companies supply power to consumers at a fixed
rate per kilowatt hour until a pre-defined level of energy
consumption is reached. This level is called the Demand
Limit. When the demand limit is exceeded, the rate is greatly increased as a penalty for high power demand by the
consumer. Generally—once the demand limit is exceeded—the increased rate is charged for the remainder of the
year.
To determine if a consumer has reached the demand
limit, the power company arbitrarily monitors a consumer’s energy consumption for a fixed period of time. That is,
the consumer knows how long the monitoring will last, but
does not know when it will take place. This monitoring period is called the Demand Window.
To help ensure that the demand limit is not reached, the
BEC monitors the power being supplied and builds two
separate calculated demand windows every minute. Although the BEC is incapable of determining when the power company will monitor demand, the use of these
calculated windows allows the BEC to constantly make a
reasonable estimate of when the demand limit may be exceeded.
defined loads to reduce energy consumption. This cycle of
reading current demand, predicting energy consumption
within a calculated demand window, and shedding loads if
the demand limit is likely to be exceeded continues as long
as Demand Control is enabled by some specified input
command.
The BEC has two separate circuits to monitor and control demand. Circuit 1 is capable of monitoring power usage, predicting demand, and shedding loads. Circuit 2 may
only be used to monitor power usage, and cannot take any
actions to control demand.
In basic terms, demand control and load shedding are
performed in the following sequence.
6.7.1.
Demand Monitoring
The BEC either monitors power using an analog kW
transducer, or monitors energy consumption using a digital
watt-hour transducer. Once every minute—using data from
the transducer—the BEC calculates average power over
the previous minute and provides this information to the
Demand Control algorithm.
6.7.2.
Predicting Energy Consumption
Each kilowatt (kW) reading is provided to the Demand
Control algorithm and is used to build two separate calculated demand windows, which reasonably reflect the actual
Demand Window used by the power company if monitoring were being performed at that moment in time.
Because the BEC cannot predict when the power company will actually monitor for demand, the BEC must make
two calculations, and combine these calculations with a
specified demand monitoring duration (the demand window). This duration is supplied by the power company and
is, therefore, a known constant.
To monitor demand, the BEC must build a calculated
demand window that is equal in duration to the actual demand window the power company will use in sufficient
time to make a prediction about likely future demand and
enable load shedding.
To do this, the BEC builds a portion of the demand window using actual stored average power data. This portion is
added to a predicted portion of the demand window which
is based on the last stored kilowatt reading. By building a
calculated window that is a combination of actual and predicted consumption data, the BEC can make a reasonable
estimate of demand in sufficient time to enable load shedding if the demand limit is likely to be exceeded. Figure 66 shows how calculated demand windows are built.
If the BEC determines that the current level of energy
consumption is such that the demand limit is likely to be
exceeded, the BEC begins to shut down—or shed—user-
6-6 • Software Overview
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Users may view the current demand status from the Demand Status screen. Information displayed on this screen
includes the ON/OFF status of demand, a summation of the
times the BEC has been in demand, current demand set
points, current power usage, peak power usage, power use
in the past hour, and power total for the day.
The current status for available kW, predicted kW, kW
set points, and the required and requested kW for proper
demand operation are displayed in the Load Shed Status
screen. This screen is also displayed if a particular component is in shed.
6.8.
Sensor Control
The BEC’s sensor control capabilities provide a way of
performing a wide variety of building control functions. Up
to 64 sensors may be monitored and controlled by the BEC.
These sensors include: temperature, pressure, humidity,
dewpoint, digital, linear, refrigerant leak, or liquid level
sensors. Each of the BEC’s sensor inputs has a corresponding output, which can be controlled by the sensor’s input
value or by a combination of the sensor’s input value and
other sensor values.
Figure 6-6 - Calculated Demand Window
6.8.1.
6.7.3.
A sensor’s input value may be used as the control value
for an output, or it may be combined with up to three other
sensor values. Sensor values may be combined into a control value in the following ways:
Load Shedding
Load shedding is the temporary reduction of the power
demand in a facility by shutting off specified loads. A load
is any heat stage, cool stage, sensor, or schedule.
Once the BEC determines that load shedding must take
place, it uses defined set points to determine which loads
may be shed and in what order. Each load available for
shed has a load shed priority. This determines the order in
which loads will be deactivated during a call for load shed.
The BEC takes the difference between the predicted demand and the demand set point to determine the amount—
in kilowatts—that must be shed. By examining the kW requirement for each load in a priority level, the BEC finds
an acceptable combination of sheddable loads to achieve
the shed amount. Loads are shed at 20 second intervals.
Loads may come out of shed if the predicted kW stays below the demand limit for two minutes. Loads are released
from shed at 20 second intervals according to the defined
priority. The shed cycle consists of determining what loads
to shed, shedding them, and releasing them from shed.
Alarms and notices are generated when the system exceeds the demand set points. The BEC can send an alarm to
the alarm log, close a set of alarm contacts, send a message
to the 485 alarm box, and/or dial out the alarm message.
Notices are simply logged. High demand alarm set points
may be defined to initiate alarms when the set point is exceeded. Alarm delays may also be defined. When the system reaches the high demand alarm set point, the system
will wait this defined period of time before activating the
alarm or notice.
BEC I&O Manual
Output Control
• ONE (one sensor) - the sensor reading is used as the
control value.
• AVG (average) - the control value is the average of
itself and up to three other sensors.
• MAX (maximum) - the control value is the maximum
of itself and up to three other sensors.
• MIN (minimum) - the control value is the minimum
of itself and up to three other sensors.
The controlled output is assigned cut-in and cut-out set
points. When the control value rises above the cut-in set
point, the BEC waits for an amount of time equal to the
specified cut-in delay, after which the output turns on.
When the value falls below the cut-out set point, the BEC
waits for an amount of time equal to the specified cut-out
delay, after which the output turns off.
The sensor output may be specified to remain ON for a
minimum amount of time regardless of the cut-out set
point.
6.8.2.
Sensor Alarms
Sensors may be configured to generate alarms or notices based on user-defined set points. An alarm is a high-level warning that will appear in the BEC Alarm Log and may
be accompanied by a contact closure for on-site operation
Software Overview • 6-7
of a bell, light, horn, or other warning device. An alarm
may also initiate an alarm dial-out sequence and/or the activation of the 485 Alarm Annunciator Panel. A notice is a
low-level warning that will only appear in the BEC Alarm
Log. No dial-out or other external warnings may be activated by a notice.
Both analog and digital sensors may be configured to
generate two types of alarms. Analog alarms are based on
sensor inputs, whether they be analog values or contact
openings and closures. Digital alarms are based on a sensor’s operational properties, such as runtime, number of activations, etc.
6.8.2.1. Analog Alarm Set Points
In analog alarm control, the BEC reads the analog value
and compares it to four different set points: the Alarm High
set point, the Alarm Low set point, the Notice High set
point, and the Notice Low set point. Alarms or notices will
be generated when the value is higher than one of the high
set points or lower than one of the low set points.
Each of the set points may be programmed with an
alarm delay that forces the BEC to wait a specific amount
of time before generating an alarm.
6.8.2.2. Digital Alarm Set Points
In digital alarm control, the BEC may be configured to
generate an alarm based on the operation of the sensor. Up
to four conditions may be specified as set points, two of
which will generate an alarm, and two of which will generate a notice. The conditions that may be used are listed below.
Unless otherwise specified, the comparisons below
may be used for digital sensors only.
• Last ON duration > min - an alarm will be generated
whenever the last on duration is greater than a specified number of minutes.
• Last ON duration > hrs - as above, except minutes
instead of hours may be specified.
• Last OFF duration > min - an alarm will be generated whenever the last off duration is greater than a
specified number of minutes.
• Last ON duration > hrs - as above, except minutes
instead of hours may be specified.
• Accumulated # of ON events > # of events - an alarm
will be generated whenever the total number of ON
events exceeds a specified number.
• Accumulated # of ON events X 1000 > # of events as above, but the set point value is multiplied by
1000.
• # of ON events per interval > # of events - an alarm
will be generated whenever the total number of ON
events within an event interval exceeds a specified
6-8 • Software Overview
number.
• Accumulated ON time > hrs - an alarm will be generated whenever the ON time of a sensor exceeds a
specified number of hours.
• Accumulated ON time > min - as above, except minutes instead of hours may be specified.
• Maximum minus Minimum Value during an interval
> value - an alarm will be generated if the difference
between the maximum recorded value and the minimum recorded value during an event interval is
greater than a specified number. This may be specified for analog sensors only.
• Maximum minus Minimum Value during an interval
< value - an alarm will be generated if the difference
between the maximum recorded value and the minimum recorded value during an event interval is less
than a specified number. This may be specified for
analog sensors only.
Some of the alarm set point types listed below are dependent upon event intervals. A sensor’s event interval is
defined by the user and signifies an interval of time during
which the alarm condition will be applied to the behavior
of the sensor.
6.8.3.
Unoccupied Settings
During unoccupied building times, sensor control may
be changed in a number of ways:
• Set points that control sensor outputs may be changed
to an alternate set of set points,
• Set points may be shifted up or down during unoccupied hours,
• Alarm generation may be disabled during unoccupied
hours, or
• Output control may be turned off altogether.
A sensor may use unoccupied settings only if the unoccupied time period for the sensor is specified. This may be
done in either of two ways. First, the sensor may be connected to an existing schedule; the unoccupied settings will
be used whenever the schedule is OFF. Second, an unoccupied time period may be specified in the Sensor Control
menu of the BEC.
6.8.4.
Sensor Overrides
Up to 16 inputs may be specified as sensor override inputs. A sensor may be configured to override whenever a
contact closure is detected on one or more of the override
inputs. Sensor overrides may take either of two forms: output overrides and alarm overrides.
6.8.4.1. Output Overrides
An output override affects a sensor’s controlled output.
Each sensor may be configured with three sensor override
inputs that override OFF and one sensor override input that
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
overrides ON. When one or more of the OFF inputs close,
the sensor output will deactivate. When the ON input activates, the sensor output will activate. An ON or OFF duration must be specified for each input.
6.8.4.2. Alarm Overrides
An alarm override affects a sensor’s ability to generate
alarms. OFF overrides will disable alarm generation.
Alarm overrides may occur in a number of ways.
Overrides may be set to follow one of the 24 BEC
schedules. When an alarm override is assigned to a schedule, alarm generation will be overridden OFF when the
schedule is OFF.
Alarm overrides may be assigned to a sensor override
input. When a contact closure is received on an assigned input, alarm generation will be disabled.
The sensor’s unoccupied schedule may also be used to
override alarms. If desired, sensor alarms may be overridden during the unoccupied time period.
Alarm overrides may be set to mirror output overrides.
If desired, when an output is overridden by any of the methods mentioned in Section 6.8.4.1., Output Overrides, the
sensor alarms will also be overridden.
6.9.
Dimmer Control
The BEC is capable of operating in conjunction with a
dimmer panel to control inside light levels for up to four
lighting zones. Under normal daytime operation, the BEC
may read the value from an outside light level sensor and
determine the appropriate inside light level based on a comparison to a set point range defined by the user. If the BEC
determines that the inside light level needs to be raised or
lowered, the BEC then commands the dimmer panel via the
8DO board to raise or lower.
Each lighting zone has two outputs on an 8DO: one to
raise the light level and one to lower the light level. The
8DO changes the dimmer panel’s light level by pulsing 12
V DC signals until the light level is correct. The BEC uses
either an inside light sensor or an output on the dimmer to
monitor the inside light level and assure that the zone is receiving the correct amount of light.
Light level set points can be specified for night time
hours or occupancy. When the outside light level falls below a user-defined set point, the BEC will adjust the interior lights to maintain a constant light level. When the
outside light level rises above the night time set point, the
BEC will adjust to the daytime setting. When a building is
unoccupied, a zone’s inside light level can be set to maintain a constant level that is independent of the amount of
outside light.
Dimmer controls for a zone or all zones may be overridden using the BEC front panel or UltraSite. When a
manual override is enabled, the inside light level will
BEC I&O Manual
change to the defined light level and remain there until the
override is disabled.
6.10. Input/Output Control
Input and Output Modules are not programmable
from the BEC front panel. I/O Modules may only be
programmed using UltraSite version 1.31 or greater.
For specific I/O Module programming instructions, see
the UltraSite User’s Guide BEC Supplement (P/N 0261003BEC).
Input/Output, or I/O Control, is a method of controlling
refrigeration and building control components using userconfigured modules that both interpret and manipulate data
from input components, and monitor and control mechanical equipment.
The traditional approach to component control is
through the use of applications. Applications are boilerplate programs that provide the user with a fill-in-the-blank
method of controlling common building functions. Such
systems are flexible only in that the existing inputs, outputs, settings, and set points are configured by the user; the
ability to manipulate and customize the control framework
is nonexistent when using the applications approach.
Most standard AHU control, sensor control, and lighting schedule control functions still use the applications approach. These common control functions require the ability
to simultaneously control many components with similar
or different set points.
While applications are a quick, easy-to-understand way
to control conditions within a building, they do suffer from
a lack of flexibility. Many of today’s building control environments require a greater degree of latitude that allows for
complex overriding and scheduling features not available
with the traditional applications approach.
I/O Control, while sacrificing the boilerplate ease of applications, provides the user with the ability to completely
customize control of mechanical components.
6.10.1. Cells and Modules
I/O Control is best defined as the process of reading a
sensor value, comparing the value to a set of user-defined
set points, and activating or deactivating a load based on
the comparison. Unfortunately, control of large systems requires multiple layers of set points that have different priorities and control many loads. To simplify this complex
array of set points, the BEC uses the concept of cells and
modules.
Cells are groups of set points that share common functions or priorities, such as Override or Proof set points.
While different types of cells perform different functions in
different applications, all cells are basically alike in their
Software Overview • 6-9
operation. A cell reads one or more input values, applies
these values to the cell’s settings and set points, and exports
one or more resultant values as outputs. Depending upon
the set function of the cell, the cell’s outputs may then be
used as inputs for other cells or modules, or they may be
used to drive physical devices.
The number of cells used within the BEC’s I/O modules
is fixed and comprises the various controlling features of
the BEC, such as Alarming, Logging, Overrides, Bypassing, etc. The arrangement of these cells may not be
changed. The user may choose to use certain cells and not
others, but may not add, delete, or rearrange features in the
BEC.
Various cells that share a common bond such as manipulating a sensor value or providing a control command to a
physical relay are grouped together within a Module. A
module may be used alone or combined with other modules. Unlike cells, modules may be connected in many different ways depending on the needs of the user.
Figure 6-7 provides an example of the relationship between set points, cells, and modules. Set points—such as
the limiting, cut-in, and cut-out set points shown—are organized into cells. These cells use their set points, along
with the cell’s inputs, to perform certain functions that generate output values. These cells, along with other cells, fit
into the fixed structure of a module, where each cells’ functions work together. The module may then be connected
via its inputs and outputs to other sensors, output devices,
and I/O modules in a variety of control applications.
6(732,176
High Limit = 150
Low Limit =0
Occ. Cut In = 30
Occ. Cut Out=20
Unoc. Cut In = 25
Unoc. Cut Out=15
&(//6
Cut In/Cut Out
Limiter
High Limit = 150
Low Limit = 0
Occ. Cut In = 30
Occ. Cut Out = 20
Unoc. Cut In = 25
Unoc. Cut Out = 15
02'8/(6
Analog Input Module
,QSXWV
&XW,Q&XW2XW
$9&RPELQHU
$OW&RPE
2YHUULGH
&RPPDQG
/LPLWHU
/LPLWLQJ
$QDORJ,QSXW
)LOWHU
9DOXH
&RXQWHU
&RXQW
6XVSHQG
&RXQW
&RXQW7ULSSHG
5HVHW&RXQW
$ODU P
3URFHVV$ODUP
$ODU P
1RWLFH
'LVDEOHUV
1RWLFH
2FFXSLHG
&21752/$33/,&$7,216
AV INPUT 1
AV OUTPUT 1
8
DV OUTPUT 1
CONTROL
VALVE
AV INPUT 2
26512029
Figure 6-7 - Relationship Between Set Points, Cells, and
Modules
The BEC uses three kinds of modules: Analog Output
Modules, Analog Input Modules, and Digital Output Mod-
6-10 • Software Overview
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
ules. In general, the cells grouped within the Analog Input
and Digital Output Modules are those cells that are necessary to combine several analog or digital values into a single control value that may be used by physical devices or
other modules. The cells grouped within the Analog Output
Module are those cells that control an output using a
closed-loop PID control method.
6.10.1.1. Programming Cells and Modules
In UltraSite, set points for BEC I/O Modules are
grouped together in their respective cells. Modules, therefore, may be easily programmed cell by cell.
Up to 24 separate Analog Input Modules, 16 separate
Digital Output Modules, and 8 Analog Output Modules
may be configured within the BEC. Although the user may
not change which cells fall within the two types of modules, users may often customize a module’s functions by
disabling certain cells.
6.10.1.2. Module Inputs and Outputs
The inputs used to drive I/O Modules may come from
external I/O board inputs and outputs, other I/O Module
outputs, or a number of BEC internal values, including:
AHU control, sensor control, anti-sweat control, boiler
control, dimmer control, and schedule control inputs. Most
module inputs can also be set up as constant analog or digital values.
Digital inputs and outputs of I/O modules may be any
of three states: OFF, ON, or NONE. The NONE state in
most respects is interpreted to be the same as OFF, except
NONE represents “don’t care” rather than “off”. In certain
input combining strategies, a NONE input will be ignored,
whereas an OFF input will be read as an input value.
An example of this is the Analog Input Module’s
“First” strategy, which passes the first of four defined inputs along to a module’s output. If Input #1 of a module is
NONE, the First strategy will skip Input #1 and use the value of Input #2. If Input #1 is zero or OFF, the First strategy
would use the value of Input #1.
Some digital I/O outputs may also be configured with
user-specified definitions of ON and OFF. For example, instead of having an output be either ON or OFF, a user may
configure the output be ON/NONE, NONE/OFF, or even
OFF/ON.
6.10.2. BEC I/O Module Descriptions
6.10.2.1. Analog Input Module
General Description
The primary purpose of the Analog Input Module is to
combine up to four analog inputs (from either analog sensors or Analog Output Modules) into a single analog output
value. This value may then be sent to other modules or
physical devices, and it may also be compared to cut in/cut
out set points to generate a digital signal. Secondarily, the
Analog Input Module generates alarms and notices, and
BEC I&O Manual
Software Overview • 6-11
processes override commands. A diagram of the Analog Input Module is shown in Figure 6-8.
Analog Input Module
,QSXW9DOXH
&XW,Q&XW2XW
$9&RPELQHU
Input
In 1
In 2
In 3
In 4
AV
Out
Out
Occup
Occ Setpts
Unocc Setpts
$OW&RPELQHU
Use Alt Comb
DV
DV
2YHUULGH
Comb Type
Alt Comb
In
Command
(on, off, normal)
Type
(timed, fixed)
OV time
AV
/LPLWHU
Limiting
Out
In
Out
&RPPDQG
DV
/LPLWLQJ
DV
High/Low Limits
$QDORJ,QSXW
9DOXH
AV
)LOWHU
Out
In
AV
AV
Ratio
Period
&RXQWHU
Count
Suspend
Trip
Reset
DV
5HVHW&RXQW
DV
AV
$ODUP
1RWLFH
'LVDEOHUV
&RXQW
In
6XVSHQG
&RXQW
3URFHVV$ODUP
DV
Input
Disable Alarm
Disable Notice
Alarm
Initial Count Value
Trip Set Point
Reset Type
Count Increment
AV
&RXQW7ULSSHG
DV
$ODU P
DV
1RWLFH
Notice
DV
Occup
2FFXSLHG
Occ Setpts
Unocc Setpts
DV
26512020
Figure 6-8 - Analog Input Module
Inputs
Input Value 1-4 (In1-In4)
Up to four analog inputs may combined in an Analog
Input Module.
Alt Combiner (Use Alt Comb)
The Analog Input Module allows for a user to specify
two different input combination strategies: a primary combination type, and an alternate combination type. The module reads the state of the Alt Combiner input to determine
which combination method to use.
Suspend Count and Reset Count
output goes from OFF to ON. There are two inputs that manipulate the module’s Counter cell. The Suspend Count input, while ON, prevents the Counter cell from counting ON
transitions. The Reset Count input supplies a digital signal
that resets the Counter cell to its user-specified initial value.
Alarm Disable and Notice Disable
The Alarm Disable and Notice Disable inputs affect the
Analog Input Module’s ability to generate alarms and notices. When the alarm disable input is HIGH, the Analog
Input Module’s Process Alarm cell will not be able to activate the alarm output. Likewise, when Notice Disable is
high, the Notice output will not be allowed to activate.
The Analog Input Module has a cell (called the Counter
cell) that counts the number of times the Digital Command
6-12 • Software Overview
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Occupied (Occup)
The state of this input tells the Analog Input Module
that the building is either occupied or unoccupied.
Cells
Analog Value Combiner (AVCombiner)
The AVCombiner cell’s function is to read up to four
input values, combine these values into a single value
(based on the combination strategy), and send the combined value to the Limiter cell.
Two different combination strategies may be specified
by the user: a primary combination strategy and an alternate combination strategy. The primary combination strategy will be used whenever the Use Alt Comb input is OFF.
When the Use Alt Comb input is HIGH, the alternate combination will be used. If an alternate combination strategy
is not desired, only the primary combination strategy needs
to be defined.
Limiter
The Limiter cell simply applies a user-defined set of
high and low limits to the value leaving the AVCombiner
cell. If the combined value is greater than the specified high
limit value, the Limiter cell will block the combined value
from the rest of the module and replace it with the high limit value. Likewise, when the combined value is lower than
the low limit value, the low limit value will be substituted.
This limited analog value is passed on to the Filter cell.
The Limiter cell also commands a digital output, called
the Limiting output. This output is ON when the Limiter
cell is enabled and OFF when the Limiter cell is disabled.
Filter
The Filter cell’s primary function is to slow the rate of
change of the combined input. The filter reads the difference between the current input value and the input’s value
x seconds ago, where x = a user-specified amount of time
(called the “period”). The difference between these two
values is multiplied by the filter ratio, which is a percentage
between 0% and 100%. The result of this multiplication is
the filtered output value. Note that if the filter ratio is at
100%, or if the Filter cell is disabled, the input is not modified by the Filter cell.
The Filter output value is the final Analog Input Module Value. This value is also sent to the Process Alarm cell
and the Cut In/Cut Out cell for use in alarm generation and
digital output control.
Process Alarm
The Process Alarm cell reads the Analog Input Module
Value from the Filter cell and compares it to the notice and
alarm set points defined by the user. When an alarm condition is detected, the Process Alarm cell sends digital values
to the Alarm or Notice outputs and sends an alarm message
to the BEC Alarm Log.
BEC I&O Manual
Different set points may be specified for occupied or
unoccupied building states. The Process Alarm cell reads
the digital state of the Occup input to determine which set
of set points to use (HIGH=occupied, LOW=unoccupied).
If the input exceeds a high set point or falls below a low
set point for an amount of time greater than the specified
delay period, the corresponding Alarm or Notice Output
will turn ON.
The Alarm Disable and Notice Disable inputs, when
HIGH, force the Alarm and Notice Outputs OFF.
Cut In/Cut Out
The Cut In/Cut Out cell’s function is to read the Analog
Input Module Value from the Filter cell, compare it to a set
of user-specified cut-in and cut-out set points, and turn an
output ON or OFF based on the results of the set point comparison.
Users may specify different cut-in and cut-out set
points for occupied and unoccupied building states. The
cell uses the occupied set points when the Occupancy input
reads HIGH and the unoccupied set points when the Occupancy input reads LOW.
The Cut In/Cut Out cell’s digital signal is sent to the
Override cell.
Override
The primary purpose of the Override cell is to provide
a method of overriding the Digital Command output to a
user-specified value instead of the value dictated by the Cut
In/Cut Out cell. Unlike other Analog Input Module cells,
the Override cell may be accessed from the BEC front panel without using UltraSite. The BEC’s Analog Input Module Bypass screen is shown below.
ANALOG INPUT MODULE 01 BYPASS
Name
:AV INPUT 01
Enable :YES
Command :OFF
Type:NORMAL
Time
:0005 minutes
12:00
Ov State:NORMAL
Time Left:---- sec
=PREV =NEXT ->=SET
0=MENU
Figure 6-9 - Analog Input Module Bypass Screen
The Override cell may override the Digital Command
output ON, OFF, or NONE. The override may be either
fixed or timed. A fixed override remains overridden until
the user deactivates the override using the Analog Input
Module Bypass Screen. A timed override remains in effect
until a user-specified time period elapses or until the user
cancels the override.
Counter
The Count cell simply increments the Count output value every time the digital Command output turns ON. The
initial value of the Count output is entered by the user, as
well as the amount the Count output is increased every time
an ON is detected.
Software Overview • 6-13
Counting may be suspended via the Suspend Count input. While this input is ON, the Counter will not increment
the Count output regardless of the state of the Command
output.
If desired, the Count cell may also be configured to turn
on a digital output whenever the Count value exceeds a
user-specified Trip Setpoint. This digital output, called the
Count Tripped output, may be connected to a relay on an
alarming device, or it may be used as an input for another
I/O Module.
6.10.2.2. Digital Output Module
General Description
The Count output value is reset by sending a signal to
the Reset Count input. The user specifies whether the count
will be reset when the Reset Count is ON, OFF, or transitioning from ON to OFF. When the appropriate type of signal is read from the Reset Count output, the Count output
reverts to the initial value specified by the user.
The primary purpose of a Digital Output Module is to
combine up to four digital values into a single digital value,
which may drive a physical relay or be used as an input for
other modules. In addition, the Digital Output Module may
be configured to count the number of Output transitions,
and it may be set up to detect proof failures. The Digital
Output Module is shown in Figure 6-10.
Digital Output Module
,QSXW9DOXH
DV
'9&RPELQHU
Trigger
In 1
In 2
In 3
In 4
Out
Out
In
2XWSXW
Out
DV
Command
(on, off, normal)
Type
(timed, fixed)
OV time
Pulse Width
Timer
$OW&RPELQHU
DV
&RPPDQG
2YHUULGH
2QH6KRW
Use Alt Comb
DV
&RXQWHU
Comb Type
Alt Comb
Invert Output
In
&RXQW
6XVSHQG
&RXQW
Count
AV
Suspend
DV
&RXQW7ULSSHG
DV
Trip
5HVHW&RXQW
DV
Reset
DV
6FKHGLI
2FFXSLHG
DV
Logic In
Sched In
Out
Initial Count
Trip SP
Reset Type
Counter Increment
$OW6FKHGXOH
DV
Use Alt Sch
Comb Type
Alt Comb
Invert Output
DV
6HOHFW
0LQ2Q2II
In
3URRI ,QSXW
In1
Out
In2
Min On/Off Times
Min On/Off Delays
3URRI
Out
Desired
Actual
3URRI 2XWSXW
Fail
DV
Delay
Latch Time
DV
Figure 6-10 - Digital Output Module
Inputs
Suspend Count and Reset Count
Input Value 1 - 4 (In1-In4)
The Digital Input Module has a cell (called the Counter
cell) that counts the number of times the Output goes from
OFF to ON. There are two inputs that manipulate the mod-
Up to four digital inputs may be combined in a Digital
Output Module.
6-14 • Software Overview
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
ule’s Counter cell. The Suspend Count input, while ON,
prevents the Counter cell from counting ON transitions.
The Reset Count input supplies a digital signal that resets
the Counter cell to its user-specified initial value.
Occupied (Occup)
The state of this input tells the Digital Output Module
that the building is either occupied (ON) or unoccupied
(OFF).
from the DVCombiner cell with the Occup input. The result is then sent to the Min On/Off cell.
While the Schedif cell’s function is similar to the DVCombiner cell’s function, their combination strategies are
not similar. The Schedif cell’s combination strategies are
specially made for occupancy-driven control, and are not as
logic-based as the DVCombiner strategies.
The Digital Output Module allows for a user to specify
two different input combination strategies: a primary combination type and an alternate combination type. The module reads the state of the Alt Combiner input to determine
which combination method to use.
Two different combination strategies may be specified
by the user: a primary combination strategy and an alternate combination strategy. The primary combination strategy will be used whenever the Use Alt Comb input is
LOW. When the Use Alt Comb input is HIGH, the alternate combination will be used. If an alternate combination
strategy is not desired, only the primary combination strategy needs to be defined.
Alt Schedule (Use Alt Sched Comb)
Min On/Off
After the module’s Digital Inputs are combined in the
DVCombiner, the Digital Input Module allows the user the
option of combining the resulting value with the value of
the Occupied (Occup) input. Two different combination
strategies may be chosen: a primary combination type, and
an alternate combination type. The module reads the state
of the Alt Schedule input to determine which combination
method to use.
The Min On/Off cell gives users a method of assuring
that the Digital Output Module’s Command Output remains ON for a minimum amount of time and/or OFF for a
minimum amount of time—regardless of the input value
read from the Schedif cell.
Alt Combiner (Use Alt Comb)
Proof Input
The Digital Output Module issues a command (called a
proof failure command) as a result of comparing the final
control value issued by the module with a digital value
called the Proof Input. The Proof Input is most often
hooked to the physical device being controlled by the Digital Output Module’s Output, so that the BEC has a means
of assuring that the device is being properly activated and
deactivated.
Cells
Digital Value Combiner (DVCombiner)
The DVCombiner cell’s function is to read up to four
digital input signals, combine these signals into one value
(based on the combination strategy), and send the combined value to the Schedif cell.
Two different combination strategies may be specified
by the user: a primary combination strategy and an alternate combination strategy. The primary combination strategy will be used whenever the Alt Combiner input is LOW.
When the Alt Combiner input is HIGH, the alternate combination will be used. If an alternate combination strategy
is not desired, only the primary combination strategy needs
to be defined.
Schedule Interface Combiner (Schedif)
The Schedif cell gives users a method of modifying the
combined value of the Digital Inputs based upon the occupied or unoccupied state of the building. Using a user-defined strategy, the Schedif cell combines the input value
BEC I&O Manual
Every time a change of state is detected in the input value, the Min On/Off cell begins to actively measure the
length of time the input remains in its current state. If the
input switches from ON to OFF before a user-specified
Minimum On duration is reached, the output signal being
sent from the Min On/Off cell will not reflect the input’s
change of state; it will remain ON until the Minimum On
duration has passed. If the input is still OFF when the duration is over, the output will switch OFF.
The reverse is true with the Minimum Off duration. If
the input signal switches ON before the Minimum Off duration is reached, the output signal from the Min On/Off
cell will remain OFF until the duration has passed.
One Shot
Some applications for the Digital Output Module require digital pulses instead of ON/OFF logic. The One Shot
cell, when enabled, reads the ON/OFF output from the Min
On/Off cell and sends a digital pulse whenever a user-defined transition type is detected. The pulse width of the One
Shot cell’s pulse is defined by the user, as is whether the
pulse is a Momentary OFF, Momentary ON, or Change of
State pulse.
If the One Shot cell is not enabled, the output value will
pass the input value on to the Override cell without modification.
Override
The primary purpose of the Override cell is to provide
a method of overriding the Digital Output Module Output
to a user-specified value instead of the value dictated by the
One Shot cell. Unlike other Digital Output Module cells,
the Override cell may be accessed from the BEC front pan-
Software Overview • 6-15
el without using UltraSite. The BEC’s Digital Output Module Bypass screen is shown below.
DIGITAL OUTPUT MODULE 01 BYPASS
Name
:DV OUTPUT 01
Enable :YES
Command :OFF
Type:NORMAL
Time
:0005 minutes
Ov State:UNKNOWN
=PREV <- -> SET
12:00
Time Left:0000 sec
0=MENU
Figure 6-11 - Digital Output Module Bypass Screen
The Override cell may override the Digital Command
output to ON, OFF, or NONE. The override may be either
fixed or timed. A fixed override remains overridden until
the user deactivates the override using the Digital Output
Module Bypass Screen. A timed override remains in effect
until a user-specified time period elapses or until the user
cancels the override.
Counter
The Count cell simply increments the Count output value every time the Command Output turns ON. The initial
value of the Count output is entered by the user, as well as
the amount the Count output is incremented every time an
ON is detected.
If desired, the Count cell may also be configured to turn
on a digital output whenever the Count value exceeds a
user-specified Trip Setpoint. This digital output, called the
Count Tripped output, may be connected to a relay on an
alarming device, or it may be used as an input for another
I/O Module.
Proof
The Proof cell compares the Select cell’s output value
to an external digital input and turns on the Proof Fail Output when the two inputs are not the same for a specified
amount of time. The most common application of this cell
is to connect the Proof input to the external device being
controlled by the Command Output, so that the Proof Fail
Output may be used as an indicator of device failure.
In order for the Proof Fail Output to be activated, the
two inputs must be different for an amount of time equal to
the user-specified delay.
6.10.2.3. Analog Output Module
The Analog Output Module’s main function is to read
the value of an analog input, compare the value to a set
point, and generate a single analog output value. This output value is represented in three different forms: a single
analog value from 0% to 100%, up to eight digital stage
outputs, and a digital pulse width modulation output.
The output value(s) are generated by a PID Control cell,
which takes into account both the input’s instantaneous
value and its rate and direction of change. In many ways,
the PID Control algorithm is similar to the PID algorithm
used by Pressure Control in the RMCC, except the Analog
Output Module is designed to be used in a wider array of
applications.
A diagram of the Analog Output Module is shown in
Figure 6-12.
The Count output value is reset by sending a signal to
the Reset Count input. The user specifies whether the count
will be reset when the Reset Count is ON, OFF, or transitioning from ON to OFF. When the appropriate type of signal is read from the Reset Count output, the Count output
reverts to the initial value specified by the user.
Counting may be suspended via the Suspend Count input. While this input is ON, the Counter will not increment
the Count output regardless of the state of the Command
output.
Select
The Select cell’s primary function is to send either of
two values to the Proof cell: the output value from the Min
On/Off cell, or the final Command Output value from the
Override cell.
In most cases, the final Command Output value would
be used for proof checking, since this Output will be mirroring the Proof input. However, for relays or modules that
are controlled by digital pulses (supplied by the One Shot
cell), the pulse from the output will not match the Proof input. In these cases, the logical signal from the Min On/Off
cell may be used as the Proof value.
6-16 • Software Overview
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Analog Output Module
2FF63
AV
In 1
In
Out
8QRF63
AV
)LOWHU
6HOHFW
$QDORJ3,'3:0
In 2
AV
2YHUULGH
Ratio
Period
2FFXSLHG
DV
Out
In
Occup
Out
Command
(on, off, normal)
Type
(timed, fixed)
OV time
Occ Fallback
Unoc Fallback
Output during Failure
/RRS2XWSXW
AV
$QDORJ
3,'6HWSRLQW
AV
AV
6HWSW)ORDW
)ORDW
AV
SP In
AV
Out
Input
Float
AV
3,'
AV
Setpoint
Input
Out
AV
Direct Acting
PID Gains
Output @ setpoint
Min/Max Output
DV
Delays
Num Stages
Type
'LUHFW$FWLQJ
DV
2XWSXW
Stage 1
Stage 2
Stage 3
Stage 4
Stage 5
Stage 6
Stage 7
Stage 8
Float Hi/Lo
Output Range
&RQWURO9DOXH
'LJLWDO6WDJH
6HTXHQFHU
3:0
'LJLWDO3:0
2XWSXW
In
Out
DV
Period
Range
26512022
Figure 6-12 - Analog Output Module
Inputs
Control Value
The Control In value is the primary signal the Analog
Output Module uses in PID control.
Float
The Float Control input provides an analog value to the
Analog Output Module’s Setpoint Float cell, which is used
to adjust, or “float,” the PID setpoint value.
Occupied (Occup)
The state of this input tells the Analog Output Module
that the building is either occupied or unoccupied.
Occupied Setpoint/Unoccupied Setpoint (Occ SP/
Unoc SP)
The Occ SP and Unoc SP values are the PID set point
values used during occupied and unoccupied building
times. These set points may be fixed values specified by the
user, or they may be inputs from sources within or outside
the BEC.
BEC I&O Manual
The Analog Output Module uses either the Occ SP or
the Unoc SP as the control set point based upon the status
of the Occup input (ON=occupied, OFF=unoccupied).
Direct Acting
The Direct Acting input determines how the output of
the Analog Output Module changes in relation to the input.
When the Direct Acting output is ON, the output value will
move in the same direction as the input value; in other
words, when the input value increases, the output value increases. When the Direct Acting input is OFF, the output
value will move in the opposite direction as the input value.
The primary purpose of the Direct Acting input is to allow a single Analog Output Module to control both cooling
(typically requiring direct action) and heating (typically requiring reverse action) with a single input and output.
Cells
Select
The Select cell’s primary function is to select either the
Occ SP or Unoc SP analog signals to be used as the Analog
Output Module’s PID Setpoint. To perform this function,
Software Overview • 6-17
the Select cell reads the value of the Occup input; if this
value is HIGH, the Select cell sends the Occ SP analog signal to the Setpt Reset cell. If the Occup value is LOW, the
Select cell sends the Unoc SP analog signal to the Setpt
Float cell.
Control values in between the Low and High values, the
PID set point modification varies linearly.
Because the Occ SP and Unoc SP values may be supplied by external analog signals—and because the Analog
Output Module requires a set point value to function correctly—the Select value may be programmed with “fallback” set points, which are used if the set point values
become corrupted.
As an added safety measure, the Analog Output Module
may be programmed to supply a fixed numerical value that
will be used as the PID Output in case the set point or control input(s) become corrupted.
Setpt Float
The Setpt Float cell provides users with a method of
raising and lowering the PID Setpoint based on the value of
the Float Control input. This cell is primarily designed for
heating and cooling applications, such as modifying space
temperature set points based on outside air temperature
sensor values.
Figure 6-13 - Example of a Setpt Float cell
The output value of the Setpt Float cell is the final PID
Setpoint value that will be used by the PID Control cell.
PID Control
To set up the Setpt Float cell, users must supply three
set point values: a High Float Value, a Low Float Value,
and an Output Range.
The PID Control cell uses a PID algorithm to compare
the Control Value with the PID Setpoint values. From this
comparison, an analog output representing a 0% - 100%
data range is generated. The PID control cell repeats this
command sequence in a constant loop every few seconds.
The Output Range is the maximum amount that the PID
Setpoint may vary. An Output Range of 4, for example,
means that the PID Setpoint input being read from the Select cell may only be increased by 2 or decreased by 2.
The 0% - 100% output from the PID Control cell is
passed along to the Filter cell. Users have the option of bypassing PID altogether, in which case the Control Value is
passed unaltered to the Filter cell.
The High Float Value and Low Float Value form a
range of values that determines what portion of the Output
Range is applied to the final PID Setpoint. For the example
shown in Figure 6-13, a Setpt Float cell is set with a High
Float Value of 100, a Low Float Value of 0, and an Output
Range of 4. Consequently, when the Float Control input is
at 100, the PID Setpoint is modified by +2. When the Float
Control is 0, the PID set point is modified -2. For all Float
Filter
The Filter cell’s primary function is to slow the rate of
change of the PID cell’s output. The filter reads the difference between the current value and the value x seconds ago,
where x = a user-specified amount of time (called the “period”). The difference between these two values is multiplied by the filter ratio, which is a percentage between 0%
and 100%. The result of this multiplication is the output
value. Note that if the filter ratio is at 100%, or if the Filter
cell is disabled, the input is not modified by the Filter cell.
The Filter output value is sent to the Override cell.
Override
The primary purpose of the Override cell is to provide
a method of overriding the analog output going to the Sequencer and PWM cells to a user-specified value instead of
the value dictated by the Filter cell. Unlike other Analog
Output Module cells, the Override cell may be accessed
from the BEC front panel without using UltraSite. The
BEC’s Analog Input Module Bypass screen is shown in
Figure 6-14.
6-18 • Software Overview
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
ANALOG OUTPUT MODULE 01 BYPASS
Name
:AV OUTPUT 01
Enable :YES
Value
:000.0
Type:NORMAL
Time
:0005 minutes
12:00
Ov State:NORMAL
Time Left:---- sec
=PREV =NEXT ->=SET
0=MENU
Figure 6-14 - Analog Output Module Bypass Screen
The Override cell may override the output to any value
between 0% and 100%. The override may be either fixed or
timed. A fixed override remains overridden until the user
deactivates the override using the Analog Output Module
Bypass Screen. A timed override remains in effect until a
user-specified time period elapses or until the user cancels
the override.
The output from the Override cell is the final Analog
PID/PWM Loop Output. This value is also sent to the Sequencer and PWM cells.
Sequencer
The Sequencer cell simply activates a certain percentage of the Digital Stage 1-8 Outputs based on the percentage of the PID output. For example, if the PID output is
50%, the Sequencer cell will activate 50% of the total defined outputs. The Sequencer cell always rounds the PID
value down; in other words, if there are four stages defined
in a Sequencer cell and the output is 74%, the Sequencer
cell will treat the output value as 50% and only activate two
stages. If the output then climbed above 75%, however, a
third stage would come on.
If desired, delays may be specified for stage activation
and deactivation. Also, the definitions of ON and OFF may
be defined as either ON, OFF, or NONE. In other words,
when the Sequencer cell calls for an output to be ON or
OFF, the actual output can be configured to be NONE/
OFF, ON/NONE, or even OFF/ON.
PWM
The PWM cell (short for Pulse Width Modulation) converts the PID output percentage to a periodic ON pulse. The
period of time over which the pulse takes place is called the
Output Time. The PWM cell turns the PWM output ON for
a percentage of the Output Time equal to the PID percentage. For example, if the PID output is 60% and the Output
Time is 10 minutes, the PWM output would be ON for six
minutes and OFF for four minutes. After the Output Time
has passed, the PWM starts over again with the new PID
percentage.
BEC I&O Manual
Software Overview • 6-19
7
System Configuration Guide
This guide can be used for the general configuration of a BEC system. The System Configuration Guide presents
the steps for general configuration of a BEC in a chronological order. Some steps of this guide can be skipped if the BEC
is not to perform the functions defined. Before attempting to program the BEC, decide what functions the BEC will perform
and then identify what sections are pertinent to the configuration.
7.1.
7.2.
General
1.
Define the total number of boards (by type) that will be connected to the BEC network—Section 8.9.8.2.,
Number of I/O Boards
2.
Define the Set Point strategy to be used—Section 8.4.3.1., Strategy
3.
Assign a Schedule to a Zone—Section 8.4.3.1., Strategy
4.
Define the Fail-Safe Mode—Section 8.4.3.1., Strategy
5.
Define how the fan will fail—Section 8.4.3.1., Strategy
HVAC Setup
1.
Define the strategy for HVAC control—Section 8.4.3.1., Strategy
2.
Define the number of AHUs that the BEC will control—Section 8.4.3.1., Strategy
3.
Setup fans
4.
7.3.
7.4.
1.
Define the type of fan used—Section 8.4.3.2., Fans
2.
Define how the fan will be used during the day and night—Section 8.4.3.2., Fans
3.
Specify the schedule to be used (Day/Night)—Section 8.4.3.2., Fans
Define number of reclaim heat, auxiliary heat, and cool stages that will be used—Section 8.4.3.5., Heat-Cool
Setup
Set Heating & Cooling Setpoints
1.
Define how reclaim heat, auxiliary heat, and cool stages will be used during dehumidification—Section
8.4.3.5., Heat-Cool Setup
2.
Define the mode of operation—Section 8.4.3.5., Heat-Cool Setup
3.
Define how the control temp will be calculated—Section 8.4.3.5., Heat-Cool Setup
4.
Define the seasonal setpoints shift—Section 8.4.3.5., Heat-Cool Setup
5.
Determine whether night set back will be used and if a warm up period will accompany it—Section 8.4.3.5.,
Heat-Cool Setup
6.
Define the time at which warm up will begin if used—Section 8.4.3.5., Heat-Cool Setup
Define Schedules
1.
Set normal operating schedules—Section 8.5.3., Schedules
2.
Set holiday schedules—Section 8.5.4., Holidays
BEC I&O Manual
System Configuration Guide • 7-1
7.5.
7.6.
7.7.
7.8.
Setup Anti-Sweat
1.
Define Dewpoint/Humidity Offsets—Section 8.6.2.1., Dewpoint/Humidity Offsets
2.
Setup Anti-Sweat Outputs—Section 8.6.2.2., Anti-Sweat Outputs Setup
3.
Define Anti-Sweat Circuit Setpoints—Section 8.6.3., Anti-Sweat Circuit Setpoints
Setup Sensors
1.
Sensor Setup—Section 8.7.2., Sensor Setup
2.
Define Sensors—Section 8.7.3.1., Sensor Definition
Setup Demand Monitoring
1.
Set Demand Set Points—Section 8.10.2., Demand Setpoints
2.
Set AHU Load Shed Setpoints—Section 8.10.7.1., AHU Load Shed Setup
3.
Set Sensor Load Shed Setpoints—Section 8.10.7.2., Sensor Load Shed Setup
4.
Set Schedule Load Shed Setpoints—Section 8.10.7.3., Schedule Load Shed Setup
5.
Define kW requirements for the AHU (both heating and cooling)—Section 8.10.7.1., AHU Load Shed Setup
6.
Setup Sensor Load Shed—Section 8.10.6.2., Sensor Load Shed Setpoints
7.
Setup Schedule Load Shed Setup—Section 8.10.7.3., Schedule Load Shed Setup & Section 8.10.6.3.,
Schedule Load Shed Setpoints
If It Is Necessary To Bypass a System Setting
1.
Sensor Output Overrides—Section 8.7.5.1., Output Overrides
2.
Schedule Overrides—Section 8.5.2., Schedule Overrides
3.
Light Level Sensor Overrides—Section 8.5.5., Light Level Sensor Setup & Control
4.
Override Lighting Zone—Section 8.5.8., Dimmer Setpoints
5.
Maintenance Overrides—Section 8.5.6., Maintenance Overrides
6.
Anti-Sweat Overrides—Section 8.6.4., Anti-Sweat Overrides
7-2 • System Configuration Guide
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8 System Setup
Data Fields
Data fields where entry is required by the BEC user are
shaded on the screen graphics.
Section 8, System Setup, provides a system description
for every screen programmed in the BEC. With over 150
accessible screens, navigation through the BEC can be
complex. The following descriptions provide information
necessary to access any screen, what data entries are required, how those data are entered, what data ranges are acceptable for each field, and any default settings when
applicable. The screens and instructions were prepared for
BEC software versions 4.01 and above; therefore, some of
these instructions may not apply to earlier software versions.
An overall layout of the BEC screens is provided in Appendix C of this manual.
To help ease the use of this section, the general layout
of the section and the icons used are described below.
Page Layout
A main heading entry is provided for each screen found
in the BEC. For Menu Screens such as the Main or Pressure
Control menu screens, the screen graphic is accompanied
by a quick reference table that provides page numbers for
the options listed at that menu screen.
Data Ranges and Default Settings
Data ranges for data fields—the information supplied
in the help prompt lines—are displayed in brackets and
bold type [-99° – 99°] either at the heading for the particular field description, or—when a heading does not exist—
within the body of the description. Suggested or default
values for a particular entry are always shown in brackets
and bold type immediately following the data range [-99°
– 99°] [-15.5 °].
Alternate Screen Entries
Alternate screens are displayed for Standard and Case
Control Circuit setup as well as for the multiple case control types. If a screen description does not match the screen
on the BEC front panel, ensure that the description is not
for a different hardware or setup function.
Screen Messages
If a field is displaying the message “NDF”, a sensor or
setpoint has not been defined. The message “NON” indicates that the BEC is not detecting a sensor reading.
In addition to the screen graphic, key graphics are provided that show the exact key sequence necessary to access
a particular screen. Although most of these buttons are selfexplanatory, several require further discussion.
:
ENT
- Data Entry. The Data Entry button means that
data, such as circuit numbers, may be required before
#
pressing the
button. These data vary from screen to
screen and a description of the data is provided when necessary.
2 - Follow-On Keystroke. When a subscripted number appears next to a key graphic, it means that the key
should be pressed that number of times to reach the desired
screen. In some instances, a subscripted number may be
followed by a + symbol:
2+. This means that the key
may need to be pressed an additional time to reach the desired screen.
Help Prompt Lines
Most BEC screens contain a help prompt line at the bottom of the screen that provides the user with information
about navigation and field data ranges. Within this section,
the help prompt line shown is always the line that is displayed when the cursor is off the screen. Generally, the
prompt line changes when the cursor is moved to a data entry field.
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-1
8.1.
Main Status Screen
If a heating stage is defined as operational, an “R” (for
reclaim) or an “A” (for auxiliary) will appear before the appropriate number. The field below each number will display “ON” if the stage is on or “..” if the stage is off. If a
heating stage is being bypassed on or off, an asterisk will
appear before the field (“*ON” for bypass on, “*..” for bypass off).
The Main Status screen is the default screen that appears when no user is logged in to the system. After the unit
is turned on, the unit goes through a software check and
then displays this screen. From the Main Status screen, the
RIGHT and LEFT arrow keys may be used to view Sensor
Status screens for sensors 1-64. See Section 8.7.1.1. for a
complete description of sensor status.
AHU #
The AHU number and name appears on the first line of
the Main Status screen.
Temp/Hum/D.P.
The AHU may have up to four temperature sensors.
The current reading of each of these sensors is shown next
to the respective number on the second line of the main status screen. If a sensor is not being used, a dash will appear
in the field. The field will display “NDF” if the sensor is not
defined, and “NON” if no reading is being detected.
An AHU may also have a sensor to monitor humidity or
dewpoint. This may be either a humidity sensor, dewpoint
cell, humidistat, or a humidity sensor that combines with an
outside temperature sensor to calculate dewpoint. The current humidity or dewpoint sensor value is displayed in the
HUM or D.P field on the second line of the main status
screen. The field will display “NDF” if the sensor is not defined, and “NON” if no reading is being detected.
Outs Temp
The Outs Temp field on the third line of the Main Status
screen displays the value of the outside (or ambient) temperature sensor. The field will display “NDF” if the sensor
is not defined, and “NON” if no reading is being detected.
Heat
The fourth and fifth lines of the Main Status screen
show the operating status of the AHU’s eight heating stages. If using a Single Set Point Strategy, the Winter Heating
set point, defined in Section 8.4.2., HVAC Setpoints
Menu, is displayed in parentheses. If using a Separate Set
Point Strategy, the heating set point for the next stage to be
activated, defined in Section 8.4.2.5., Heat-Cool (Separate
Setpoint), is shown in parentheses.
8-2 • Main Status Screen
When a heating stage with a defined ON or OFF delay
activates or deactivates, the Main Status Screen signifies
the stage is operating in the delay period by flashing the status field. Therefore, if an inactive stage is called to activate,
that stage’s status field will show a blinking “..” during the
stage’s ON delay period. Similarly, an active stage called
to deactivate will show a blinking “ON” during the OFF
delay period.
Cool
The sixth and seventh lines of the Main Status screen
show the operating status of the AHU’s six cooling stages.
If using a Single Set Point Strategy, the Summer Cooling
set point, defined in Section 8.4.2., HVAC Setpoints
Menu, is displayed in parentheses. If using a Separate Set
Point Strategy, the cooling set point for the next stage to be
activated is defined in Section 8.4.2.5., Heat-Cool (Separate Setpoint), is displayed in parentheses.
If a cooling stage is defined as operational, a “C” will
appear before the appropriate number. The field below
each number will display “ON” if the stage is on or “..” if
the stage is off. If a heating stage is being bypassed on or
off, an asterisk will appear before the field (“*ON” for bypass on, “*..” for bypass off).
When a cooling stage with a defined ON or OFF delay
activates or deactivates, the Main Status Screen signifies
the stage is operating in the delay period by flashing the status field. Therefore, if an inactive stage is called to activate,
that stage’s status field will show a blinking “..” during the
stage’s ON delay period. Similarly, an active stage called
to deactivate will show a blinking “ON” during the OFF
delay period.
Fans
The Fans field displays the current status of the AHU
fans. If the fans are defined as single-speed, this field will
display either ON or OFF. If the fans are defined as variable-speed, this field will display either a percentage or
OFF. If the fans are two speed, the field will display either
OFF, HI for high speed, or LO for low speed.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.2.
Log On
Default
Password
Level
The BEC requires a password for users to view and
modify system settings. This ensures security of system
settings. Passwords also determine the access level of the
user.
New passwords may be added to replace the default
passwords at the System Information screen (see Section
8.9.3.1., Names, Dates, and Passwords).
Actions Allowed
1
100 (default)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2
200
Level 100 actions, plus
• Adjust set points
• Bypass and override devices
• Perform setup functions
3
300
Level 200 actions, plus
• Set input and output definitions
• Communications setup
4
400
Level 300 actions, plus
• Use Quick Setup presets
• Clear Alarm Logs
To view the Log On screen, press the Enter key. To log
on to the system, enter the appropriate password in the
Password field and press Enter.
View Status Screens
View set points/setup data
View logs/graphs
Override anti-sweat heaters
Reset host network
Set device numbers
Acknowledge and reset
alarms
Table 8-1 - Password Levels and Available Tasks
8.3.
Main Menu
Item
RMCC I&O Manual
Description
Page
1
Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning
8-4
2
Schedules
8-19
3
Anti-Sweat
8-26
4
Sensor Control
8-29
5
Status
8-38
6
Graphs
8-41
7
Configuration
8-41
8
Demand Control
8-50
9
Alarms
10-1
System Setup • 8-3
8.4.
HVAC Menu
Item
8.4.1.
Page
1
Status
8-4
2
Setpoints Menu
8-4
3
Setup
4
Bypass
5
Logging Menu
6
Boiler Menu
8-9
8-16
9-1
8-17
Main Status Screen
is identical to the Main Status Screen mentioned in Section
8.1., except that sensor status screens may not be viewed.
Pressing the UP and DOWN arrow keys scrolls through
status screens for all defined AHUs.
The Status screens display the current readings of each
AHU’s temperature and humidity sensors and the operating status of the heating stages, cooling stages, and fans. It
8.4.2.
Description
See Section 8.1., Main Status Screen for a functional
description of the data on this screen.
HVAC Setpoints Menu
Single Set Point Strategy
-
Item
Description
Page
1
Heat-Cool
8-5
2
Misc. Setpoints
8-6
3
Alarms
10-1
Separate Set Point Strategy
Item
Description
Page
1
Heat-Cool
8-7
2
Dehumidification
8-6
3
Misc. Setpoints
8-9
4
Alarms
10-1
There are two different AHU set point strategies: Single
Set Point and Separate Set Point. Depending upon which
strategy is specified in Section 8.4.3.1., Strategy, either of
two different menus will appear when the HVAC Setpoints
Menu is chosen.
8-4 • HVAC Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.4.2.1.
Heat-Cool (Single Setpoint)
Set Points
Setpoint) for more about dehumidification operation.
:
-
-
-
ENT
Night Set Back
#
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
-
All set points related to heating, cooling, and dehumidification are set using the Heat-Cool options.
Winter Heat Setpoint [-50° – 200° F] [65° F] and
Dead Band [0° – 99° F] [2° F]
The Winter Heat Setpoint is the temperature the BEC
tries to maintain in the building during the winter season.
The dead band is a range of temperatures above and below
the Winter Heat Setpoint within which the temperature is
considered to be acceptable. When the temperature falls below the heat set point minus one-half the dead band, the
BEC cycles on heating stages until the temperature rises
back into the dead band. When the temperature rises above
the heat set point plus one-half the dead band, the heat stages will cycle off. See Section 8.4.2., HVAC Setpoints
Menu for more about single set point operation.
Summer Cool Setpoint [-50° – 200° F] [70° F] and
Dead Band [0° – 99° F] [2° F]
In order for this screen to appear, the Use Night Set
Back field must be set to YES in Heat-Cool Setup Screen 1
on page 14.
The Night Set Back screen allows users to specify different heating, cooling, and dehumidification set points
during the night hours specified in the Strategy Setup
screen on page 9. The set points and their respective dead
bands work exactly like the day set points as explained in
Set Points on page 5.
Aux Heat Use [Yes/No] [Yes]
If desired, auxiliary heat may be disabled during night
hours. To disable auxiliary heat stages during the night
hours, enter NO in the Aux Heat Use field; otherwise, enter
YES.
The Summer Cool Setpoint is the temperature the BEC
tries to maintain in the building during the summer season.
The dead band is a range of temperatures above and below
the Summer Cool Setpoint within which the temperature is
considered to be acceptable. When the temperature rises
above the cool set point plus one-half the dead band, the
BEC cycles on cooling stages until the temperature falls
back into the dead band. When the temperature falls below
the cool set point minus one-half the dead band, the cool
stages will cycle off. See Section 8.4.2., HVAC Setpoints
Menu for more about single set point operation.
Dehum Set Point [0 – 100%] [70%] and Dead Band
[0 – 99%] [10%]
The Dehumidification Set Point is the maximum humidity level the BEC tries to maintain. The dead band is a
range of humidities above and below the Dehumidification
Set Point within which the humidity is considered to be acceptable. When the humidity rises above the Dehumidification Set Point plus one-half the dead band, the BEC cycles
on cooling stages until the temperature falls back into the
dead band. When the humidity falls below the set point minus one-half the dead band, the BEC cycles off the cooling
stages. See Section 8.4.2.2., Dehumidification (Single
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-5
8.4.2.2.
Dehumidification (Single Setpoint)
Minimum Store Temperature [-50° – 100° F]
[60° F]
:
-
-
ENT
-
#
-
2
Activating cooling stages during dehumidification may
have a secondary effect: lower building temperature. The
Minimum Store Temperature prevents the temperature
from dropping too low during dehumidification. If the
building temperature falls below the Minimum Store Temperature set point, dehumidification is locked out.
Enable Dehum Reheat Setpt [Yes/No] [No]
The Dehumidification Set Points screen contains set
points and options related to special operations of the
BEC’s dehumidification mode.
Delay Between Stages [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
When in dehumidification mode, the BEC activates and
deactivates cool stages one at a time. The delay between
stage activations and deactivations (in minutes) is specified
in this field. Enter a value between 0 and 240 minutes.
8.4.2.3.
Dehum Reheat Time Delay [0 – 240 min.] [1 min.]
When YES is selected for the Enable Dehumidificaiton
Reheat Set Point, this value is the number of minutes the
BEC will wait before activating all reclaim heat stages. See
Section 6.2.2., Dehumidification Reheat Set Point, for
more.
Stages Delays
:
-
The Enable Dehumidification Reheat Set Point feature
provides users with a method of keeping heating and cooling stages from working against each other during dehumidification. See Section 6.2.2., Dehumidification Reheat
Set Point, for more information. Enter YES or NO in this
field.
-
ENT
-
#
-
3
In this screen—and any following screens, if necessary—each stage may be given an on and off delay. After a
call for activation or deactivation of a stage, the BEC must
wait the specified on or off delay before turning the stage
on or off.
For each stage listed under Stage #, specify an on delay
in the ON field and an off delay in the OFF field. The values must be between 0 and 240 minutes.
If necessary, a second screen for stage delays may be
accessed by pressing the DOWN arrow key.
8.4.2.4.
Miscellaneous Setpoints
:
-
-
-
ENT
Set points for terminating auxiliary heat based on ambient temperatures and for controlling outside air dampers
may be specified in Misc. Setpoints.
#
Term. Aux. Heat If Temp Outside More Than [-50°
– 99° F] [None]
Specifying a temperature value in this field will disable
use of auxiliary heating stages when the ambient temperature sensor reads a value higher than the set point. Entering
(N)one in this field disables this function.
8-6 • HVAC Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Open Outside Air Damper If [-50° – 99° F] [None]
the air damper will open.
The BEC is capable of controlling outside air dampers
based on ambient temperature sensor readings. During the
winter season, the outside air damper uses the set point entered in the During Heat Season field; when the outside air
temperature is higher than the set point, the air damper will
open. During the summer season, the outside air damper
uses the set point entered in the During Cool Season field;
when the outside air temperature is lower than the set point,
Air dampers may not be controlled by a BEC unless the
AHU’s Damper Permit contact is closed. See Section
8.9.1., Input Definition, for information on how to set up
Damper Permit inputs for AHUs.
8.4.2.5.
Heat-Cool (Separate Setpoint)
Set Points
Off Delay field.
:
-
To use air damper control, specify temperature values
in the Outside Air Damper fields. Enter (N)one if no air
damper control is necessary.
-
-
ENT
#
By default, a heating stage’s cut off set point is ten degrees higher than its default cut on set point. A cooling
stage’s cut off set point is five degrees lower than its default
cut on set point.
Night Set Back
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
-
1+
The Heat-Cool Set Points screen contains all set point
and delay fields necessary for configuring all AHU heating
and cooling stages.
Stage #
The heating or cooling stage numbers and types are displayed in the column under “Stage #”.
Cut On [-50° – 99° F] [see description] and Delay
[0 – 240 min.] [5 min.]
In order for this screen to appear, the Use Night Set
Back field must be set to YES in the Main Setup Screen 2
on page 14.
When the AHU’s control temperature is above a heating stage’s cut-on temperature set point or below a cooling
stage’s cut-on temperature set point, the stage is activated.
Before activation, the BEC must wait an amount of time
equal to the specified Cut On Delay value. Enter a temperature value in the Cut On field and a time in the Cut On Delay field.
The Night Set Back screen allows users to specify different heating and cooling set points during the night hours
specified in Section 8.4.3.1., Strategy. The set points work
exactly like the day set points as explained in Section
8.4.2.7., Miscellaneous Setpoints. All heating and cooling
stages use the same delays specified in Section 8.4.2.7.
during night set back mode.
By default, the first stage of heating has a cut on set
point of 65°, and each subsequent heating stage’s set point
is one degree higher than the previous stage. For cooling
stages, the first stage’s cut on set point is 80°, and each subsequent cooling stage is one degree lower than the previous
stage.
Use? [Yes/No] [Yes]
When YES is entered in a stage’s Use field, the stage
may be activated during night set back. When NO is entered in the Use field, the stage will be locked off during
night set back mode.
Cut Off [-50° – 99° F] [see description] and Delay
[0 – 240 min.] [5 min.]
When the AHU’s control temperature is below a heating stage’s cut-off temperature set point or above a cooling
stage’s cut-off temperature set point, the stage is deactivated. Before deactivation, the BEC must wait an amount of
time equal to the specified Cut Off Delay value. Enter a
temperature value in the Cut Off field and a time in the Cut
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-7
8.4.2.6.
Dehumidification (Separate Setpoint)
Without Night Set Back
With Night Set Back
:
-
-
-
:
ENT
#
-
-
-
ENT
#
The Dehumidification Setup screen shown here appears
when the Use Night Set Back field in the Main Setup
Screen 2 (see page 14) is set to NO. If night set back is being used, refer to the Dehumidification Setup screen described in Section 8.4.2.7., Miscellaneous Setpoints.
The Dehumidification Setup screen shown here appears
when the Use Night Set Back field in the Main Setup
Screen 2 (see page 14), is set to YES. If night set back is not
being used, refer to the Dehumidification Setup screen described in the Without Night Set Back section (see page 8).
Setpoint [0 – 100%] [70%] and Dead Band [0 –
99%] [10%]
Day/Night [Yes/No] [Yes]
The Dehumidification Set Point is the humidity level
the BEC tries to maintain. The dead band is a range of humidities above and below the Dehumidification Set Point
within which the humidity is considered to be acceptable.
When the humidity rises above the Dehumidification Set
Point plus one-half the dead band, the BEC cycles on cooling stages until the temperature falls back into the dead
band. When the humidity falls below the set point minus
one-half the dead band, the BEC cycles off the cooling
stages. See Section 6.2., Dehumidification, for more about
dehumidification operation.
The Day and Night fields may be specified with either
YES or NO values. Entering YES in the Day or Night field
will enable dehumidification mode during the day or night.
Entering NO in the Day or Night field will lock out dehumidification mode during the day or night.
Different set points and dead bands may be specified
for day and night hours. The night time period is specified
in the Day Starts/Day Ends fields in the Strategy Setup
screen (see page 9). The set points and dead bands work in
exactly the same way as the dehumidification set points and
dead bands described in the Without Night Set Back section (see page 8).
Delay Between Stages [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
Delay Between Stages [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
When in dehumidification mode, the BEC activates and
deactivates cool stages one at a time. The delay between
stage activations and deactivations (in minutes) is specified
in this field.
When in dehumidification mode, the BEC activates and
deactivates cool stages one at a time. The delay between
stage activations and deactivations (in minutes) is specified
in this field.
Minimum Store Temperature [-50° – 99° F] [60° F]
Minimum Store Temperature [-50° – 99° F] [60° F]
Activating cooling stages during dehumidification may
have a secondary effect: lower building temperature. The
Minimum Store Temperature prevents the temperature
from dropping too low during dehumidification. If the
building temperature falls below the Minimum Store Temperature set point, dehumidification is locked out.
Activating cooling stages during dehumidification may
have a secondary effect: lower building temperature. The
Minimum Store Temperature prevents the temperature
from dropping too low during dehumidification. If the
building temperature falls below the Minimum Store Temperature set point, dehumidification is locked out.
8-8 • HVAC Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.4.2.7.
Miscellaneous Setpoints
This screen is identical to the one described in Section
8.4.2.4., Miscellaneous Setpoints.
:
-
8.4.3.
-
-
ENT
#
Setup
Item
-
8.4.3.1.
Page
1
Strategy
2
Fans
8-10
8-9
3
Heat-Cool Setup
8-11
4
Override Setup
8-15
5
Scheduling
8-15
6
Quick Setup
8-16
Strategy
Strategy Setup
-
Description
-
Number of AHUs [1 – 6] [1]
Enter the total number of AHUs in this field. The BEC
may control up to six AHUs.
Winter/Summer Switch Over [-50° – 99° F] [45° F]
Single/Separate Setpoints
The Single/Separate S.P. field determines whether the
AHU will follow the single set point or the separate set
point method of operation.
In the Single Setpoint Strategy, there is a single set
point for heating and a single set point for cooling; stages
are activated and deactivated in sequence. In the Separate
Setpoint Strategy, there is a cut-on and cut-off temperature
set point for each heating and cooling stage. See Section
6.1.1., Single Set Point Strategy, and Section 6.1.2., Separate Set Points Strategy, for more information.
RMCC I&O Manual
The BEC determines whether to operate in summer or
winter mode by analyzing the outside temperature. If the
temperature is above the Winter/Summer Switch Over set
point, the BEC operates in summer mode. If the temperature is below the Winter/Summer Switch Over set point,
the BEC operates in winter mode. There is a fixed 2° dead
band around the set point.
The seasonal status determined by the Winter/Summer
Switch Over set point is used by the BEC to shift set points
or to execute seasonal lockouts of heating or cooling operations. See Main Setup Screen 2 on page 14 for more information.
Day Start/End [00:00 – 23:59] [08:00/22:00]
The Day Start and Day End fields form a period of time
that the BEC interprets as “daytime” for the purposes of
night set back mode and other time-dependent AHU functions. If night set back mode is being used, Day Start and
Day End fields must be entered.
System Setup • 8-9
To specify Day Start and Day End times, enter the times
in 24-hour format.
External S.P. Shift Reset Time [00:00 – 23:59]
[00:00]
The BEC may be configured to shift the heating and
cooling set points based on contact closures from external
devices. Six such inputs may be set up in the BEC’s input
definitions: SP +1, SP +2, SP +4, SP -1, SP -2, and SP -4.
The first three inputs, when closed, raise each set point one,
two, or four degrees respectively. The last three lower the
set points one, two, or four degrees.
switch and/or jumper settings.
Note: Fail-Safe Mode will only work with standard
16AI and 8RO input and output boards. 8IO combination input/output boards will not operate in
fail-safe mode.
Fan Fail Setup
-
-
-
2
The External S.P. Shift Reset Time deactivates and resets all external set point shift inputs every day at the specified time. This prevents the possibility of a closure being
activated, forgotten about, and left closed for a long period
of time.
Enter the desired time in 24-hour format in the External
S.P. Shift Reset Time field.
Fail-Safe Setup
-
-
Fan Fail Input when Fan is ON [(O)PEN/(C)LOSED]
[O]
A fan proof checking device sends the proof status of a
fan to the BEC by sending a digital signal. Depending upon
the proof checking device being used, the signal that signifies a failure may be either OPEN or CLOSED. By default,
an OPEN signifies a fan failure. To change this, enter
(C)losed in this field.
-
This field applies to the inputs FAN 1 FAIL through
FAN 6 FAIL, which are defined in Section 8.9.1., Input
Definition.
When an AHU’s temperature sensor or 16AI board
fails, the AHU loses all or part of the input necessary to
control environmental conditions. If desired, all AHU heating and cooling outputs may enter a fail-safe state upon
sensor or board failure. To enable this feature, enter (Y)es
in the Enable Fail Safe Mode field.
The on/off status of a heating or cooling output during
fail-safe mode is determined by the output board’s fail-safe
8.4.3.2.
If the BEC detects a fan failure from a fan proof input,
it must be told whether to disable the fan or to keep making
attempts to activate it. When (N)o is selected in the Enable
Fans During Fan Fail field, the BEC will not attempt to operate the fan when the fan proof input is FALSE. When
(Y)es is selected, the BEC will continue to call for fan activation and deactivation normally regardless of the fan
proof status.
Fans
Fan Setup
:
-
Enable Fans During Fan Fail [(Y)ES/(N)O] [N]
-
-
ENT
#
Setup data for AHU fans are entered in the Fan Setup
screens. The setup screens vary slightly for single-, variable-, and two-speed fans; however, the first screen described here is common to all types of fans.
Fan Type [Single, Two-Speed, Variable-Speed]
[Single]
There are three types of AHU fans: single-speed, twospeed, and variable-speed. Specify the appropriate fan type
in the Fan Type field.
8-10 • HVAC Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Current
The Current field displays either “DAY” or “NIGHT”,
indicating whether the AHU fan is currently operating in
day or night mode.
Day/Night [Auto/Always On] [Auto]
AHU fans may operate in either of two modes: Always
On or Auto. In Always On mode, the fan will run constantly. In Auto mode, the fan will only run when a heating or
cooling stage is active.
AHU fans may be configured to operate differently dur-
8.4.3.3.
ing the day and night hours. Specify the desired daytime
and nighttime modes in the Day and Night fields.
Day Start/Day End Schedule Number [00 – 24] [00]
To determine when daytimes and nighttimes are, AHU
fans may be configured to follow an existing schedule. If a
schedule number is entered in the Day Start/Day End
Schedule Number field, the fans will operate in day mode
when the schedule is on and in night mode when the schedule is off. If no schedule is being used, the fans will use the
Day Start/Day End times specified in Strategy Setup on
page 8-9.
Two-Speed Fan Setup
Setup Screen 2
Setup Screen 3
:
-
-
-
:
ENT
#
-
-
-
-
ENT
#
-
2
This screen is the second fan setup screen, which appears when TWO-SPEED is specified in the Fan Type field
in the Fan Setup screen (page 10), and the DOWN arrow
key is pressed.
Day/Night Default Speed [Auto/Always On] [Auto]
This screen is the third fan setup screen, which appears
when TWO-SPEED is specified in the Fan Type field in the
Fan Setup screen (page 10), and the DOWN arrow key is
pressed twice.
The Day and Night fields display the day and night
modes of operation chosen in the Fan Setup screen (page
10). If Always On is chosen as one of the modes, a default
speed for the fan may be specified in the Default Speed
field. The Default Speed will be the speed of the fan when
no heating or cooling stages are active. Users may specify
either LOW or HIGH.
Since Auto mode requires no default speed, N/A appears in the Default Speed field if Auto mode is specified.
Switch Fan Speed on Failure [Yes/No] [No]
Normally, the high-speed fan relay will come on when
high-speed is called for, and the low-speed fan relay will
come on when low-speed is called for. If desired, the BEC
may activate both relays on a call for low-speed or highspeed.
A two-speed fan has two fan fail proofs: one for the
high-speed fan and one for the low-speed fan. When the
Switch Fan Speed on Failure feature is enabled, the BEC
will respond to fan failures by switching to the other stage.
Therefore, if the low speed fails, the BEC will use the highspeed fan in its place, and vice-versa.
RMCC I&O Manual
Hi and Low Relays On [Yes/No] [No]
Enter YES in the Hi and Lo Relays On for Low Speed
field to make both relays activate on a call for low-speed
fans. Enter YES in the Hi and Lo Relays On for High Speed
field to make both relays activate on a call for high-speed.
Always Start Fan On High Speed [Yes/No] [No]
When an idle fan receives a call to begin operating, its
initial speed is determined by whether it is called on to operate at low or high speed. By entering YES in the Always
Start Fan On High Speed field, the fan may be ordered to
always begin operating at high speed.
System Setup • 8-11
Setup Screen 4
speed for each stage may be specified as either L for lowspeed fan or H for high-speed fan. Different speeds may be
specified for day and night modes of operation.
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
-
3
This screen is the fourth fan setup screen, which appears when TWO-SPEED is specified in the Fan Type field
in the Fan Setup screen (page 10), and the DOWN arrow
key is pressed three times.
Heat/Cool [(H)igh/(L)ow] [Low]
The numbers below HEAT and COOL in this screen
represent the eight possible heating stages and six possible
cooling stages. In the column below each stage is the fan
speed that will be activated when the stage is on. The fan
8.4.3.4.
The speed setting fields below DEH in this screen represent the fan speed during dehumidification. Fan speed
may be slowed during dehumidification by forcing the fan
to operate at LOW speed. Choosing L will force the fan to
run at low speed during dehumidification mode; choosing
“don’t care” will allow the fan speed to be determined by
the settings of the active stages.
Variable-Speed Fan Setup
Setup Screen 2
at which the fan will operate when no heating or cooling
stage is active.
:
-
When a single stage is activated, the AHU fan will run
at the speed specified in the stage’s heat or cool field. When
multiple stages are on, the BEC looks at all active stages’
fan speed settings and operates the fan at the highest setting. For example, if three heating stages were active and
all three had low-speed settings, the fan would operate at
low speed. If a fourth stage were activated that had a highspeed setting, the fan would begin operating at high speed.
Deh [1-Don’t Care/2-Force Low] [Don’t Care]
-
-
ENT
#
-
This screen is the second fan setup screen, which appears when VS SPEED is specified in the Fan Type field in
the Fan Setup screen (page 10), and the DOWN arrow key
is pressed.
Mode of Operation [Stages/Diffr] [Stages]
Variable-speed fans may operate in either of two
modes: stages and differential mode. When Stages is selected, the fan speed is determined by the defined fan speed
settings of each heating and cooling stage. When Differential is selected, the fan speed is determined by the differential between the supply and return air temperature sensors.
See Section 6.3., Fan Control, for more information.
Differential Setpoint in Cooling Mode [0 – 32] [10]
When Differential is selected as the variable-speed
fan’s mode of operation, the Differential Setpoint in Cooling Mode is the desired differential between the return and
supply air temperature sensors during cooling. If the differential is greater than the set point, the fan speed will increase; if the differential is smaller than the set point, the
fan speed will decrease. See Section 6.3.3.2., Differential,
for more information.
Differential Setpoint in Heating Mode [0 – 32] [10]
When Differential is selected as the variable-speed
fan’s mode of operation, the Differential Setpoint in Heating Mode is the desired differential between the supply and
return air temperature sensors during heating. If the differential is greater than the set point, the fan speed will increase; if the differential is smaller than the set point, the
fan speed will decrease. See Section 6.3.3.2., Differential,
for more information.
Minimum VS% [0 – 100%] [20%]
The Minimum Variable Speed percentage is the lowest
possible speed at which the fan can operate when active.
Default VS% [0 – 100%] [20%]
If the fan has been set up as Always On in the Fan Setup
screen (page 10), the Default VS% is the speed percentage
8-12 • HVAC Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Setup Screen 3
for the stage. When multiple heating or cooling stages are
on, the BEC looks at the defined speed percentages for all
active stages and operates the fan at the highest setting.
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
-
2
If, for example, two cooling stages are on with fan
speed settings of 20% and 40% respectively, the fan will
operate at 40% speed. If a third stage were to come on with
a 60% speed setting, the fan would operate at 60%.
Dehum Slow Down [0 – 100%] [0%]
This screen is the third fan setup screen, which appears
when VS SPEED is specified in the Fan Type field in the
Fan Setup screen (page 10), and the DOWN arrow key is
pressed twice.
Heat/Cool% [0 – 100%] [0%]
The numbers 1-8 under HEAT % and 1-6 under COOL
% represent the AHU’s eight heating and six cooling stages. The field beneath each number is where fan speed percentages are specified.
When a single heating or cooling stage is on, the variable-speed fan will operate at the speed percentage defined
8.4.3.5.
For example, if a cooling stage with a 30% fan speed
setting is activated during dehumidification mode and the
Dehum Slow Down percentage is set at 10%, the fan will
operate at 20% speed. If a second cooling stage with a 50%
fan speed were to come on, the fan speed would rise to
40%.
Heat-Cool Setup
Main Setup Screen 1
-
-
this field. No more than six cool stages may be set up.
Available for Dehum [0 – 6] [0]
:
-
Fan speed during dehumidification is calculated as normal using the individual heating and cooling stage fan
speed settings. A Dehum Slow Down percentage may be
specified to slow the fan down during dehumidification.
When a percentage greater than zero is entered in the Dehum Slow Down field, the Dehum Slow Down percentage
is subtracted from the normal fan speed during dehumidification.
ENT
#
The number entered in the Available for Dehum field
will be the number of cooling stages the BEC may use during dehumidification.
Humidity Control Source [options] [AHU Humidity]
Specific AHU setup information such as the number of
heating and cooling stages, the type of humidity sensor,
seasonal lockouts, and night set back enabling is entered in
the Heat-Cool Setup screens. This is the first of two Main
Setup screens.
# of Recl. Heat Stages [0 – 8] [0]
The number of reclaim heat stages in the AHU is specified in this field. No more than eight heat stages, whether
they be reclaim or auxiliary, may be set up.
# of Aux. Heat Stages [0 – 8] [0]
The number of auxiliary heat stages in the AHU is specified in this field. No more than eight heat stages, whether
they be reclaim or auxiliary, may be set up.
# of Cool Stages [0 – 6] [0]
The sensor or combination of sensors that the AHU
uses to read dewpoint or humidity is specified in the Humidity Control Source field. Users may choose from the
following sensor types:
•
(0) AHU Humidity - the sensor is a relative humidity
sensor.
•
(1) AHU Humidistat - the sensor is a humidistat,
which opens and closes at a specified humidity level.
•
(2) AHU Dewpt Cell - the sensor is a dewpoint cell.
•
(3) AHU Dewpt Calc - the BEC uses a relative humidity sensor on the AHU and the control temperature calculated by the AHU’s temperature sensors to
calculate a dewpoint value.
•
(4) ASC1 Humidity - the AHU uses the relative humidity sensor defined for anti-sweat circuit one.
The number of cool stages in the AHU is specified in
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-13
•
(5) ASC2 Humidity - the AHU uses the relative humidity sensor defined for anti-sweat circuit two.
•
(6) ASC1 Dewpoint - the AHU uses the dewpoint
cell defined for anti-sweat circuit one.
•
(7) ASC2 Dewpoint - the AHU uses the dewpoint
cell defined for anti-sweat circuit two.
late a control temperature that may be used in heating and
cooling control. Users may choose between four sensor
combination strategies:
•
(O)NE - when only one temperature sensor is being
used, select (O)ne.
•
(A)VG - the sensor values are averaged to yield the
control temperature.
•
MA(X) - the highest sensor value is used as the control temperature.
•
MI(N) - the lowest sensor value is used as the control temperature.
Reclaim Heat During Dehum [Yes/No] [No]
By entering (Y)es in the Reclaim Heat During Dehum
field, users may lock out the use of reclaim heating stages
during dehumidification.
Auxiliary Heat During Dehum [Yes/No] [No]
By entering (Y)es in the Auxiliary Heat During Dehum
field, users may lock out the use of auxiliary heating stages
during dehumidification.
Main Setup Screen 2
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
-
Seasonal Setpoints Shift [-20° – 20°] [N/A]
If Auto is selected under the Mode of Operation field, a
set point shift value from -20 to +20 may be entered in the
Seasonal Setpoints Shift field. When the outside temperature sensor’s reading is above the Winter/Summer Switch
Over set point defined in the Strategy Setup screen on page
9, the value specified in the Seasonal Setpoints Shift is added to both the heating and cooling set points.
Use Night Set Back [Yes/No] [No]
When (Y)es is entered in the Use Night Set Back field,
different heating and cooling set points may be chosen for
day and night operation. Entering (N)o will cause the BEC
to use normal day settings during night operation.
Specific AHU setup information such as the number of
heating and cooling stages, the type of humidity sensor,
seasonal lockouts, and night set back enabling is entered in
the Heat-Cool Setup screens. This is the second of two
Main Setup screens.
Mode of Operation [Auto/Seasonal Lockout] [Seasonal Lockout]
The Mode of Operation field determines how the BEC
will react to detected changes in seasons. Users may select
either of two different options:
•
•
Use Warm Up [Yes/No] [No]
In normal night set back operations, the BEC’s heating
and cooling set points are shifted down when Night Set
Back mode begins and returned to normal when Night Set
Back ends. When the Warm Up feature is being used, rather than switching immediately from night set points to day
set points, the BEC will gradually increment the building
temperature set points during the final hours of Night Set
Back mode. As a result, when night set back mode terminates, the building temperature will be closer to the desired
daytime temperature.
Seasonal Lockout - during winter-like conditions,
cooling mode is locked out; during summer-like
conditions, heating mode is locked out.
To enable the Warm Up feature, enter (Y)es in the Use
Warm Up field.
Auto - regardless of seasonal conditions, the BEC
will activate heating during summer and cooling
during winter as necessary. Heating and cooling set
points may be shifted
When the Warm Up feature is enabled, the BEC will
begin incrementing the set points at the time specified in
the Start Warm Up field. The time must be specified in 24hour format and must be during the night set back period.
Start Warm Up [00:00 – 23:59] [00:00]
The BEC determines summer and winter by comparing
the outside temperature to the Winter/Summer Switch
Over set point defined in the Strategy Setup screen on page
9.
Control Temp Calculated As [options] [AVG]
The BEC may be set up with up to six temperature sensors to monitor the inside temperature of an area. The BEC
must be told how to combine these sensor values to calcu-
8-14 • HVAC Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.4.3.6.
Override Setup
External Overrides/Bypasses
-
-
Cool Termination
-
External override delays and bypass on/off times are
configured in this screen. Overrides and bypasses must also
be specified with board and point addresses in Section
8.9.1., Input Definition.
Override 1–3 [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
When any of the three defined override inputs relay a
contact closure to the BEC, all AHUs are forced off for a
duration of time equal to the override’s specified delay.
Specify a delay for each defined override input.
External Bypass [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
Two external bypass inputs may be defined: one that
bypasses heating stages for all AHUs ON for a fixed
amount of time, and one that bypasses cooling for all AHUs
ON for a fixed amount of time. To enable external bypasses, a bypass duration must be defined in the External Bypass Heating and External Bypass Cooling fields.
8.4.3.7.
-
-
To prevent moisture from freezing on cooling stage
coils, Cool Termination set points may be defined for all
AHUs. When a coil air temperature sensor reads a temperature below the Cool Termination set point defined for the
AHU, all cooling stages within the AHU deactivate.
Coil Air Temperature sensors must be given board and
point addresses in the FRZSTAT fields in Section 8.9.1.,
Input Definition.
By default, the Cool Termination set points are preset at
32° F. If different temperature set points are desired, enter
a value between -50 and 99 degrees Fahrenheit.
If necessary, Cool Termination set points for AHUs 5
and 6 are available on a second screen. To access this
screen, press the DOWN arrow key.
Scheduling
ON. See Section 8.5.3., Schedules, for information on how
to define schedules.
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
Heat All Off [Yes/No] [No]
Entering (Y)es in this field bypasses all heat stages off
during unoccupied mode.
Heat Aux Off [Yes/No] [No]
Entering (Y)es in this field disables all auxiliary heat
stages during unoccupied mode.
Heating, cooling, and dehumidification bypasses during unoccupied hours are configured using the Unoccupied
Mode screen.
Use Schedule # [0 - 24] [0]
The BEC uses schedules to determine what times the
building will be unoccupied. When the schedule number is
defined in the Use Schedule Number field, the selected
AHU will operate in unoccupied mode when the schedule
is OFF and operate in occupied mode when the schedule is
RMCC I&O Manual
Heat Set Point Shift [-50° – 99° F] [0° F]
If desired, the heating set point(s) may be raised or lowered during unoccupied hours. To enable Heat Set Point
Shift, enter a value in this field.
Cool All Off [Yes/No] [No]
Entering (Y)es in this field bypasses all cool stages off
during unoccupied mode.
System Setup • 8-15
Cool S.P. Shift [-50° – 99° F] [0° F]
Dehum Off [Yes/No] [No]
If desired, the cooling set point(s) may be raised or lowered during unoccupied hours. To enable Cool Set Point
Shift, enter a value in this field.
Entering (Y)es in this field prevents the AHU from entering dehumidification mode during unoccupied hours.
8.4.3.8.
-
Quick Setup
WARNING: Quick Setups change the BEC’s unit ID,
baud rate, and passwords; if a Quick Setup is selected
without knowledge of the passwords, users will be unable to make further changes to the BEC.
-
The Quick Setup menu is a customized list of presets
tailored for specific building types. These presets should
not be used unless otherwise instructed by CPC.
8.4.4.
Manual Bypasses
8.4.4.1.
Heating Bypasses
Bypass Duration [Fixed/Timed] [Fixed]
:
-
-
ENT
#
The durations of the bypasses are entered in this field.
Two kinds of durations may be specified: fixed or timed.
When (F)ixed is selected, the bypass will remain on until the user manually terminates the bypass by entering
(N)orm in the Bypass Command field.
When a time duration is entered in the Bypass Duration
field, the bypass will operate for the specified number of
hours and minutes.
Manual bypasses of AHU heating stages may be ordered using this screen.
The numbers 1-8 signify the eight possible AHU heating stages. The two fields directly below each number are
the Bypass Command field and the Bypass Duration field.
Bypass Command [options]
In the Bypass Command field, bypasses may be activated and deactivated. Either of three commands may be entered here:
•
(N)ORM - the stage will operate normally (no bypass).
•
(O)N - the stage will bypass ON for an amount of
time specified in the field directly below.
•
OF(F) - the stage will bypass OFF for an amount of
time specified in the field directly below.
8-16 • HVAC Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.4.4.2.
Cooling/Fan Bypasses
Cooling Stage Bypasses [options]
:
-
-
ENT
#
-
Bypassing cooling stages works exactly the same for
cooling stages as it does for heating stages. See Section
8.4.4.1., Heating Bypasses, for instructions.
Fan Bypass [options]
Manual bypasses of AHU cooling stages and fans may
be ordered using this screen.
8.4.5.
Unlike heating and cooling bypasses, fans may only be
bypassed on and off manually; timed bypasses may not be
ordered. When a bypass (O)n or Of(f) is entered in either
the Hi or Low fields, the fan high or fan low outputs are bypassed on or off until a user deactivates the bypass by entering (N)orm.
Boiler Menu
Item
-
8.4.5.1.
Description
Page
1
Boiler Status
8-17
2
Boiler Setpoints
8-18
3
Boiler Setup
8-18
4
Boiler Offset
8-19
Boiler Status
field. The field will read NDF if the sensor has not been defined, or NON if no sensor reading is being received.
-
-
Outside Temp
The current reading of the outside temperature sensor is
displayed in the Outside Temp field. The field will read
NDF if the sensor has not been defined, or NON if no reading is being received.
Setpts
In this screen, a boiler’s status and set points may be
viewed. The status screen shown above is for a boiler controlled by temperature; pressure-controlled boilers will
have slightly different status screens.
Boiler Output
The status of the boiler output will appear in the Boiler
Output field as either ON or OFF.
Boiler Water Temp/Boiler Pressure
These two lines display the water temperature or pressure set points defined for the boiler in Section 8.4.5.2.,
Boiler Setpoints.
Output ON if Boiler Water Temp/Pressure <=
This set point is automatically calculated based upon
the current outside temperature and where it falls in the
range of outside temperatures specified in Section 8.4.5.2.,
Boiler Setpoints. The set point is the calculated desired water temperature or pressure; when the actual water temperature falls below the set point, the output is turned on.
The current reading of the boiler’s water temperature or
pressure sensor is displayed in the Boiler Water Temp
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-17
8.4.5.2.
Boiler Setpoints
ter a value from -10 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit in the Outside
High Temp field.
-
Ovrd. OFF if Outside Temp >= [-10° – 140° F]
[(N)ONE]
-
When the outside temperature equals or exceeds the
temperature listed in this field, the output will turn off. The
output will remain off until the temperature falls below the
temperature setting in the Ovrd. OFF if Outside Temp >=
field.
All the set points necessary to control boiler temperature are entered using the Setpoints screen. The screen
shown above is the screen displayed for temperature-controlled boilers; the Setpoints screen for pressure-controlled
boilers differs slightly.
Boiler temperature or pressure is controlled by specifying high and low water temperature set points that correspond to the outside temperature sensor reading. See
Section 6.4., Boiler Control, for more information.
Boiler Water Temp/Pressure @ Outside High
Temp of [see description]
When the outside temperature equals or exceeds the
value entered in the Outside High Temp field, the temperature or pressure specified in the Boiler Water Temp/Pressure set point will become the boiler set point.
Specify a value between 80-200 degrees Fahrenheit or
-1 to 500 lbs. in the Boiler Water Temp/Pressure field. En-
8.4.5.3.
-
Boiler Water Temp/Pressure @ Outside Low
Temp of [see description]
When the outside temperature equals or falls below the
value entered in the Outside Low Temp field, the temperature or pressure specified in the Boiler Water Temp/Pressure set point will become the boiler set point.
Specify a value between 80-200 degrees Fahrenheit or
-1 to 500 lbs. in the Boiler Water Temp/Pressure field. Enter a value from -10 to 65 degrees Fahrenheit in the Outside
High Temp field.
Ovrd. ON if Outside Temp >= [-40° – 65° F]
[(N)ONE]
When the outside temperature equals or falls below the
temperature listed in this field, the output will turn on and
remain on until the temperature falls below the Ovrd. ON
if Outside Temp field.
Boiler Setup
-
Choosing a temperature or a pressure sensor in the Boiler Input Type field determines whether the set points in
Section 8.4.5.2., Boiler Setpoints, may be entered as temperature set points or pressure set points.
The Boiler Setup screen is where the boilers’ control
sensors are configured. Four different types of sensors may
be entered in the Boiler Input Type field:
•
(T)emp - temperature sensor.
•
(1)00 lb. - 100 lb. pressure transducer.
•
(2)00 lb. - 200 lb. pressure transducer.
•
(5)00 lb. - 500 lb. pressure transducer.
8-18 • HVAC Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.4.5.4.
-
Boiler Offset
-
8.5.
Depending upon whether a temperature or pressure
sensor was defined as the boiler control sensor in Section
8.4.5.3., Boiler Setup, the Boiler Offset screen will display
either a Water Temperature Offset field or a Pressure Offset field. If a boiler sensor is known to consistently read a
value higher or lower than the actual temperature or pressure, an offset value may be specified in this field. Enter a
value from -99° to 99° Fahrenheit in this field.
Schedules Menu
Item
8.5.1.
Description
Page
1
Schedules Status
8-19
2
Schedule Overrides
8-20
3
Schedules (Defining)
8-20
4
Holidays Schedules
8-21
5
Light Sensor Setup
8-21
6
Maintenance Overrides
8-22
7
Dimmer Control
8-22
8
Schedule Proofs
8-26
Schedules Status
•
LLS. OFF - the schedule is being overridden OFF
by a light level sensor override. See Section 8.5.5.,
Light Level Sensor Setup & Control, for more information.
•
MNT. ON/OFF - the schedule is being overridden
ON or OFF by a scheduled maintenance override.
See Section 8.5.6., Maintenance Overrides, for
more information.
•
EXTRN. ON - the schedule is being overridden ON
by an external override input.
-
The Schedules Status screen displays the status of four
schedules at a time, the numbers of which are displayed in
the Sched # field. To the right of each schedule, the status
is shown in the Status field. The Status messages that may
appear are listed below:
•
ON - the schedule is currently ON.
•
OFF - the schedule is currently OFF.
•
OVRD ON/OFF - the schedule is being overridden
ON or OFF by either a manual or an external override. See Section 8.5.2., Schedule Overrides, for
more information about manual overrides.
RMCC I&O Manual
If a schedule is being manually or externally overridden
(that is, if OVRD ON or OVRD OFF appears in the schedule’s Status field), the duration of the override is shown in
the Override Time field. If the duration is fixed, the field
will read FIXED; if the duration is timed, the time remaining in the override will appear in this field (in minute:second format). Otherwise, NONE will appear in the Override
Time field.
The UP and DOWN arrow keys scroll the display up
and down, allowing other schedules to be viewed.
System Setup • 8-19
8.5.2.
Schedule Overrides
the override by entering (N)ormal in the Type field. Timed
overrides last for a period of time equal to the number of
minutes and seconds entered in the Type field.
-
To begin a fixed override, enter (F)ixed in the Type
field. To begin a timed override, enter an override duration
in hour:minute format.
Schedules may be overridden ON or OFF using manual
overrides. Specify either O(N) or OF(F) in the On/Off field.
Digital
Fixed and timed manual and external overrides may be
configured and executed using this screen.
Manual
To manually override a schedule, two parameters need
to be specified: the override type and the on/off status.
Override types may be either fixed or timed. Fixed
overrides remain active indefinitely until a user terminates
8.5.3.
A schedule may be configured with external override
inputs that, when closed, overrides the schedule ON for a
specified period of time. To specify an external override
duration, enter a number of minutes from 0 to 240 in the
schedule’s Ext. Delay field.
External override inputs are set up in Section 8.9.1., Input Definition.
Schedules
Time [00:00 – 23:59] [NONE]
:
-
-
ENT
#
The time of day in which the event will take place is entered in the Time field. The time must be specified in
24-hour format.
Day [options] [WKD]
The day or group of days in which the event will take
place is entered in this field. The possible day settings
that may be used are listed below:
A schedule is a group of dates and times that designates
when a building is occupied and unoccupied or when a particular system or component should be activated and deactivated. All HVAC, lighting, and sensor functions may be
controlled using a schedule. Each of the BEC’s 24 schedules is composed of 16 separate ON and OFF operation
times (events). These events determine when the system
will be active or inactive. Only systems assigned to the
schedule will be affected.
•
(M)ON, (T)UE, (W)ED, T(H)U, F(R)I, (S)AT,
S(U)N - individual days of the week.
•
M-(F) - Monday through Friday.
•
W(K)D - all weekdays.
•
(E) Weekend - all weekends.
•
(1) - (8) - Holidays 1 through 8, as defined in Section 8.5.4., Holidays.
Schedule #XX:
•
(9) - All defined Holidays.
A name may be entered for the schedule in the field to
the right of the schedule number. If desired, enter a name
(15 characters max) in this field.
•
(A) - Special Event A, as defined in Section 8.5.4.,
Holidays.
•
(B) - Special Event B, as defined in Section 8.5.4.,
Holidays.
Evnt
The number underneath the Evnt column signifies the
number of the event (1-16). To the right are the three fields
where event parameters are specified: Time, Day, and
Function.
8-20 • Schedules Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Func [Off/On] [Off]
play to the event screens for other schedules.
The Func field determines whether the schedule will
turn off or on when the event takes place. Enter either
OF(F) or O(N) in the Func field.
Pressing the UP and DOWN arrow keys scrolls the dis-
8.5.4.
Holidays
Up to sixteen holidays and two special dates usable by
all BEC schedules may be configured in the Holidays
screens. The first screen displays holidays 1-8 and special
days A and B. To define holidays 9-16, press the DOWN
arrow key to scroll to the next screen.
-
The names the BEC uses for holidays (HD1-HD16) and
special event dates (SP-A and SP-B) are listed under the
TYPE column. To define a holiday date, enter the desired
month and day in the holiday’s Definition field. When
specifying a special event date, enter the desired month,
day, and year.
8.5.5.
Light Level Sensor Setup & Control
8.5.5.1.
Light Sensor Setup
Gain [-999 – 999] [175]
-
Linear light level sensors must be provided with a gain
value. The sensor’s gain value should be given in the light
level sensor’s installation manual. Enter the gain value in
the Gain field.
Offset [-99.999 – 99.999 V] [0 V]
Schedule overrides may be configured to occur automatically based upon the light level reading of a linear or
digital light sensor. When the measured light level falls below a cut-in set point or above a cut-out set point, any or all
schedules may be overridden ON or OFF.
In cases where a light level sensor is known to read
higher or lower values than the actual light level, an offset
value may be specified. The number of foot-candles entered in the Offset field will be automatically added to the
light level sensor’s reading.
To enable light sensor overrides, schedules must be assigned to the light sensor in the Light Sensor Assignment
screen. See Section 8.5.5.2., Light Sensor Assignment.
Type [Linear/Digital] [Linear]
The light sensor type is specified in the Type field. Enter “L” if the light sensor is linear and “D” if the light sensor is digital.
Currently
The Currently field shows the current light sensor value. If the sensor is linear, the Currently field will display
the value in foot-candles. If the sensor is digital, the Currently field will display OPEN or CLOSED.
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-21
8.5.5.2.
-
Light Sensor Assignment
abled and disabled. To set up a light sensor override for the
schedule, enter (Y)ES in the Use field. If a light level sensor override is not desired for this schedule, enter (N)O.
-
Cut In [0 – 999 fc] [20 fc]
The Cut In value is the light level at which the override
turns on. If the sensor reading equals or is below the Cut In
set point, the light level sensor override activates. Specify
a foot-candle value, (O)pen, or (C)losed in the Cut In field.
Cut Out [0 – 999 fc] [30 fc]
Light level sensor overrides for BEC schedules are set
up using the Light Sensor Assignment screen.
Use [Yes/No] [No]
The Use field is where light sensor overrides are en-
8.5.6.
The Cut Out value is the light level at which the override turns off. If the sensor reading equals or exceeds the
Cut Out set point, the light level sensor override deactivates. Specify a foot-candle value, (O)pen, or (C)losed in
the Cut Out field.
Maintenance Overrides
Override [Off/On] [Off]
:
-
-
ENT
#
To have the maintenance override turn OFF the schedule, enter OF(F). To have the maintenance override turn
ON the schedule, enter O(N).
From [00:00 – 23:59] [NONE]
The date and time the maintenance override will begin
is entered in the From field. Specify the month and day in
the Date field and the time, in 24-hour format, in the Time
field.
Using the Maintenance Override screens, schedules
may be configured to override OFF during specified periods of the year. To configure a maintenance override in a
schedule, three items of information must be entered: the
From date and time, the To date and time, and whether the
maintenance override will be an ON or OFF override.
8.5.7.
Until [00:00 – 23:59] [NONE]
The date and time the maintenance override will end is
entered in the Until field. Specify the month and day in the
Date field and the time, in 24-hour format, in the Time
field.
Dimmer Control Menu
Item
-
8-22 • Schedules Menu
Description
Page
1
Dimmer Status
8-23
2
Dimmer Select Type
8-23
3
Dimmer Setup
8-24
4
Dimmer Setpoints
8-24
5
Occupied Night Setpoints
8-25
6
Unoccupied Setpoints
8-25
7
Override
8-26
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.5.7.1.
-
Dimmer Status
rent reading of the inside light level sensor, in foot-candles.
The dimmer output shows the percentage of dimmer operation as read from the dimmer panel. This field will read
NDEF if the inside light level sensor or dimmer output is
undefined, and NONE if no reading is being received.
-
Light Level Deadband
The Light Level Deadband shows the dead band set
point entered in the Dimmer Setpoints screen. See Section
8.5.8., Dimmer Setpoints for more information.
The status screen displays all sensor readings and set
points related to dimmer control, including outside and inside light levels, dimmer output percentages, and requested
light levels.
Outside Light Level
Calculated Light Level Setup
The BEC determines what the inside light level should
be based upon the outside light level and the set points entered in Section 8.5.8., Dimmer Setpoints. The appropriate
inside light level calculated by the BEC is shown in this
field, in foot-candles.
The Outside Light Level field shows the current reading of the outside light level sensor, in foot-candles. This
field will read NDEF if the outside light level sensor is undefined, and NONE if no reading is being received for the
sensor.
Zone State
Inside Light Level/Dimmer Output
Dimmer State
This field will read either Inside Light Level or Dimmer
Output, depending upon which input type is set up in Section 8.5.7.2., Dimmer Select Type. The field shows the cur-
The Dimmer State field shows whether the zone’s light
level is currently being raised, lowered, or is holding
steady.
8.5.7.2.
-
The Zone State field shows whether the zone is operating in Occupied, Occupied Night, Unoccupied, or Override
Mode.
Dimmer Select Type
dimmer is currently operating. When adjusting the dimmer, the BEC will use the dimmer
output percentage to estimate the indoor light
level. If a dimmer output is being used, enter
(D)IMMER OUTPUT in this field.
-
Dimmer Select Type screens for other lighting zones
may be accessed from this screen by pressing the UP and
DOWN arrow keys.
In order for a dimmer panel to accurately adjust inside
light levels to the desired luminance, the BEC must have a
means of determining the inside light level. This may be
done in either of two ways.
1.
A light level sensor can directly measure the
amount of inside light, in foot-candles. If an
indoor light sensor is being used, enter
(L)IGHT LEVEL in this field.
2.
If an inside light level sensor is unavailable,
an output from the dimmer panel may be used
to relay the percentage at which the circuit’s
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-23
8.5.7.3.
-
Dimmer Setup
-
put Definitions screen (see Section 8.9.1., Input Definition). Enter the sensor number in the Outside Light Level
Sensor field.
Zone Light Level Sensor [1 – 64] [0]
The light level sensor or dimmer output used to signify
the zone’s light level must be defined as one of the 64 BEC
sensors (SENSOR#1-SENSOR#64) in the Input Definitions screen (see Section 8.9.1., Input Definition). Enter
the sensor number in the Zone Light Level Sensor field.
Sensor board and point locations, and other dimmer
configuration data are entered using this screen.
Name [15 characters max]
If desired, a name may be assigned to the selected light
zone.
Zone Enable [Yes/No] [No]
To enable dimmer control in this lighting zone, enter
(Y)ES in this field; otherwise, enter (N)O.
Outside Light Level Sensor [1 – 64] [0]
The outside light level sensor must be defined as one of
the 64 BEC sensors (SENSOR#1-SENSOR#64) in the In-
8.5.8.
Light Panel Update Interval [1 – 60 sec.] [20 sec.]
After the BEC checks the outside light level and makes
any necessary adjustments to the dimmer, the BEC waits
for an amount of time equal to the Light Panel Update Interval before making another check. Enter a number of seconds from 1-60 in the Light Panel Update Interval field.
Pulse Width [1 – 100 tenths of a second] [5 tenths
of a second]
The BEC adjusts dimmer settings by sending a series of
12 V DC digital pulses to the dimmer panel. The desired
width of the pulse is entered in the Pulse Width field. Specify a value from 1 to 100 tenths of a second.
Dimmer Setpoints
the Light Level or Dimmer Output field becomes the indoor light level set point.
-
-
Specify a light level value, in foot-candles, or enter a
percentage from 0-100% in the Light Level field. Specify
an outside maximum light level from 0-9999 foot-candles
in the Outside Max Light field.
By default, the BEC is set at a light level of 40 fc or a
dimmer output of 100% for an outside maximum light of
100 fc.
All the set points necessary to control inside and outside
lighting levels are entered using the Setpoints screen. The
screen shown above is the screen displayed for light levelcontrolled dimmers; the Setpoints screen for dimmer-output-controlled dimmers differs slightly.
The inside light level is controlled by specifying high
and low light level or dimmer output set points that correspond to the outside light sensor reading. See Section 6.9.,
Dimmer Control, for more information.
Light Level/Dimmer Output @ Outside Max Light
of [see description]
When the outside light level equals or exceeds the value
entered in the Outside Max Light field, the value entered in
8-24 • Schedules Menu
Light Level/Dimmer Output @ Outside Min Light
of [see description]
When the outside light level equals or falls below the
value entered in the Outside Min Light field, the value entered in the Light Level or Dimmer Output field becomes
the indoor light level set point.
Specify a light level value, in foot-candles, or enter a
percentage from 0-100% in the Light Level field. Specify
an outside maximum light level from 0-9999 foot-candles
in the Outside Min Light field.
By default, the BEC is set at a light level of 20 fc or a
dimmer output of 80% for an outside minimum light of 50
fc.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Light Level Deadband [0 – 999 fc or 0 – 40%] [2 fc
or 6%]
The Light Level Deadband is a range of values above
8.5.8.1.
and below the indoor light level set point within which the
luminance is considered to be acceptable. See Section 6.9.,
Dimmer Control, for a definition of dead band.
Occupied Night Setpoints
will have a slightly different screen.
-
Alternate set points may be defined for occupied night
operation. Building occupancy times are set up in Section
8.5.8.2., Unoccupied Settings. Night, as it applies to dimmer control, is defined as an outside light level sensor value
at below the value specified in the If Outside Light At or
Below field. Any foot-candle value from 0-9999 may be
entered in this field.
-
The screen shown above is for zones controlled by indoor light level sensors; dimmer-output-controlled zones
8.5.8.2.
When the outside light level is at or below the Outside
Light set point, the indoor light level for the selected zone
will be fixed at the value specified in the Light Level or
Dimmer Output field.
Unoccupied Settings
Occupied Starts/Ends [00:00 – 23:59] [00:00]
-
-
The times in which the dimmer control will begin and
end occupied mode may be specified in the Occupied Starts
and Occupied Ends fields. The dimmer control will operate
in unoccupied mode during the hours not within this time
period.
If a schedule is defined in the Use Schedule # field, the
ON/OFF status of the schedule takes priority over the Occupied Starts/Ends times.
The screen shown above is for zones controlled by indoor light level sensors; dimmer-output-controlled zones
will have a slightly different screen.
Unoccupied Light Level/Dimmer Output [0 – 999
fc or 60 – 100%] [20 fc or 60%]
During unoccupied hours, the light level or dimmer output remains fixed at the value specified in the Unoccupied
Light Level or Unoccupied Dimmer Output field.
Use Schedule # [0 – 24] [0]
Occupied and unoccupied status may be linked to a
schedule. To link dimmer control to a schedule, enter the
schedule number in the Use Schedule Number field.
Occupied when Sched is ON [Yes/No] [Yes]
If a schedule is defined in the Use Schedule # field, entering (Y)es will cause the dimmer control to use occupied
settings when the schedule is ON and unoccupied settings
when the schedule is OFF. Entering (N)o will tell the dimmer control to use occupied settings when the schedule is
OFF and unoccupied settings when the schedule is ON.
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-25
8.5.8.3.
-
8.5.9.
Lighting Zone Override
The screen shown is for zones controlled by indoor
light level sensors; dimmer-output-controlled zones will
have a slightly different screen.
-
A lighting zone may be overridden with a constant light
level or dimmer output value. To override a zone, enter
(Y)es in the Override Enable field, and enter a light level or
dimmer output value in the Light Level or Dimmer Output
field. The lighting zone will remain fixed at the override
value until a user terminates the override by entering (N)o
in the Override Enable field.
Schedule Proofs
field to generate proof failure alarms. Enter (N) to generate
proof failure notices.
:
-
-
ENT
#
Delay Time [0 – 32676 sec] [5 sec]
The Delay Time is the amount of time a schedule proof
must indicate a failure before the BEC generates an alarm.
The delay time period begins when the proof first reads
FAIL. If during this time the input returns to OK, the proof
alarm will be cancelled. If the failure continues past the delay time, an alarm will be generated.
Proof alarming for each of the 24 schedule proof inputs
(SCHED1 PRF — SCHED24 PRF as defined in Section
8.9.1., Input Definition) is set up in the Schedule Proofs
screens.
When choosing “Schedule Proofs” from the main
menu, users must enter the desired schedule number. Users
may use the UP and DOWN arrow keys to access the
Schedule Proofs screens for other schedules.
Alarm/Notice [(A)LM/(N)TC][A]
When a schedule proof device indicates a failure, the
BEC will generate either an alarm or a notice, depending
upon the value of the Alarm/Notice field. Enter (A) in this
8.6.
Latch Time [0 – 32767 sec] [10 sec]
The BEC will clear a schedule proof failure only after
the proof checking device sends an OK signal for an
amount of time equal to the Latch Time field value. If the
proof checking device returns to FAIL during the Latch
Time period, the proof failure will not be cleared.
Proof Input when Schedule is ON [(O)PEN/
(C)LOSED] [O]
A schedule proof checking device may signify a failure
by sending either an OPEN or a CLOSED signal to the
BEC, depending on the device being used. Specify whether
OPEN or CLOSED will signify a failure by entering either
Anti-Sweat Control Menu
Item
8-26 • Anti-Sweat Control Menu
Description
Page
1
Anti-Sweat Status
8-27
2
Anti-Sweat Setup
8-28
3
Anti-Sweat Circuit Setpoints
8-28
4
Daily Logs
5
Anti-Sweat Overrides
9-1
8-29
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.6.1.
Anti-Sweat Status Menu
Item
-
8.6.1.1.
Description
Page
1
Dewpoint Status
8-27
2
Anti-Sweat Output Status
8-27
Dewpoint Status Screen
Anti-Sweat Circuit Setpoints, are displayed.
Percent ON during All OFF/All ON
-
-
The Percent ON During ALL OFF and Percent ON
During ALL ON set points, specified in Section 8.6.3.,
Anti-Sweat Circuit Setpoints, are displayed in these two
fields.
%On Time
Dewpoint
The current dewpoint sensor reading or calculation is
shown in the Dewpoint field. To the right of this value, the
All On and All Off set points, specified in Section 8.6.3.,
8.6.1.2.
-
The current ON percentage at which the selected circuit’s anti-sweat heaters are operating is displayed in the
Current field. The average ON time percentage for the antisweat circuit during the entire day is displayed in the Today
field.
Output Status
-
For example, if a heater is operating at 50% during an
interval of four seconds, the Status field for that heater will
show ON for two seconds and OFF for two seconds. Every
time the Status field changes, the Time Left field will reset
to two seconds and count down to zero.
If a heater is being overridden ON or OFF by a manual
or external bypass, an asterisk will appear to the right of the
Status field. The Time Left field will display “BPSS” for
manual bypasses and the time left in minutes for external
bypasses.
The real-time status of anti-sweat heater operation is
shown in the Anti-Sweat Output Status Screen. Anti-sweat
heaters operate by measuring dewpoint, comparing the
dewpoint value to the anti-sweat set points, and pulsing the
heaters on and off for a percentage of the on/off interval,
defined in Section 8.6.2.2., Anti-Sweat Outputs Setup.
The fields in the Anti-Sweat Status Screen show the current
status of the pulse (either ON or OFF) and the time remaining before the next status switch.
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-27
8.6.2.
Anti-Sweat Setup
8.6.2.1.
-
Dewpoint/Humidity Offsets
Anti-sweat circuits are controlled by dewpoint. Dewpoint in an anti-sweat circuit’s area may be determined either by a dewpoint cell or by a relative humidity sensor
used in conjunction with a temperature sensor. If the dewpoint cell or relative humidity sensor is known to read high
or low, offsets may be specified in the Dewpoint Offset and
Humidity Offset fields to correctly calibrate the sensors.
Users may enter a value from -20% to 20% or from -20° to
20°.
-
8.6.2.2.
Anti-Sweat Outputs Setup
Name [15 characters max]
-
-
In the field to the right of the anti-sweat heater number,
a heater name may be entered.
Circuit # [1 – 2] [0]
There are two separate anti-sweat circuits. Each circuit
has its own dewpoint sensor and set points. Enter a one for
Circuit 1 or a two for Circuit 2. Unused heaters should have
a zero in this field.
8DO [(Y)es/(N)o] [(N)o]
Setup data such as heater interval times, names, and
board and circuit assignments are entered in the Anti-Sweat
Outputs Setup screen.
ON/OFF Interval [1 – 999 sec.] [10 sec.]
All anti-sweat circuits pulse heaters ON for a percentage of a defined time interval. This interval is entered in the
ON/OFF Interval field. If an 8DO board is being used, the
value should be less than 240 seconds.
8.6.3.
All anti-sweat heaters, whether they are connected to
an 8DO or an 8RO, must be given a board and point
number in the Output Definitions screen (see Section
8.9.2.).
CPC recommends anti-sweat heaters be operated by
8DO Digital Output boards. If a heater is connected to an
8DO board, enter (Y)es in the 8DO field; otherwise, enter
(N)o.
Anti-Sweat Circuit Setpoints
-
Anti-sweat circuits are controlled by comparing a measured or calculated dewpoint value to a range of dewpoints
defined in the Anti-Sweat Circuit Setpoints screen. See
Section 6.5., Anti-Sweat Control, for a complete explanation of anti-sweat control.
Dewpoint All OFF/All ON [-20° – 99° F/-20° – 99° F]
[25° F/65° F]
The Dewpoint All OFF set point is the minimum dewpoint below which the anti-sweat circuit’s heaters will remain OFF at all times. The Dewpoint All ON set point is
the maximum dewpoint above which the anti-sweat cir-
8-28 • Anti-Sweat Control Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
cuit’s heaters will remain ON at all times. Between these
dewpoint values, the anti-sweat circuit will pulse ON and
OFF for a percentage of the time interval defined in Section 8.6.2., Anti-Sweat Setup.
Percent On During All ON [70 – 100%] [100%]
By default, anti-sweat circuits operate at 100% when
the dewpoint is above the Dewpoint All ON set point. If desired, a lower value for All ON may be specified.
Percent On During All OFF [0 – 30%] [0%]
By default, anti-sweat circuits operate at 0% when the
dewpoint is below the Dewpoint All OFF set point. If desired, a lower value for All OFF may be specified.
8.6.4.
Anti-Sweat Overrides
Screen Override
Users may order a manual bypass by entering ON or
OFF in the heater’s Screen Override field. When bypassed
in this manner, the anti-sweat heater will remain ON or
OFF until a user terminates the bypass by entering NORM
in the heater’s Screen Override field.
-
Input OVR Time Min [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
Manual and external anti-sweat heater bypasses are
configured at the Anti-Sweat Overrides screen.
Name
The name defined for the anti-sweat heater is shown in
the Name field next to the number.
8.7.
Anti-sweat heaters may also be overridden OFF by
closing an external input. When this input is closed, the
heater will remain OFF for as long as the output is closed
or for an amount of time equal to the Input OVR Time Min,
whichever is greater. Enter the minimum amount of time
the heater will remain OFF in this field.
Anti-sweat override inputs must be configured in the
Input Definition screen (see Section 8.9.1.). They are listed
in the Input Definitions screen as inputs ASC#1 OVRD
through ASC#8 OVRD.
Sensor Control Menu
Item
RMCC I&O Manual
Description
Page
1
Sensor Status
8-30
2
Sensor Setup
8-31
3
Sensor Setpoints
8-32
4
Alarms
10-1
5
Overrides
8-34
6
Scheduling
8-35
7
Logs
8
Input/Output Control
9-1
8-35
System Setup • 8-29
8.7.1.
Sensor Status Menu
Status
The current sensor readings, sensor-controlled outputs,
and output control set points are shown in the Status screen.
-
Summary
Other sensor information, such as total run times and
high/low readings, may be viewed in the Summary screen.
Accumulated Status
Real-time status of sensors and sensor-controlled outputs, sensor summary information, and accumulated statistics regarding sensor operation are available from the
Status Menu options.
8.7.1.1.
The accumulated ON time and the accumulated number
of ON events may be viewed and cleared in the Accumulated Status screen.
Sensor Status
Inp
-
The Inp field shows the current sensor reading. This
may be a numerical value, “OPEN”, or “CLOSED”. Undefined inputs will be shown as a dash, and defined inputs
that are not reading values will be shown as “NONE”.
-
Out
The Out field shows the current state of the sensor’s
controlled output. This may read either “ON” or “OFF”.
On-Off
The current sensor readings, sensor-controlled outputs,
and output control set points are shown in the Status screen.
Name
The name of the sensor is shown in the Name field, to
the right of the sensor number.
8.7.1.2.
The On and Off fields show the cut-in and cut-out set
points used by the sensor’s controlled output. These set
points are defined in Section 8.7.3.2., Sensor Control Setpoints.
Sensor Summary
Input/Output
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
The Input and Output fields display the current sensor
reading and the current sensor-controlled output status respectively.
Unocc
Other sensor information, such as total run times and
high/low readings, may be viewed in the Summary screen.
The Unocc field shows whether the sensor is operating
under unoccupied settings. This will read as either YES or
NO. Unoccupied settings are defined in Section 8.7.3.3.,
Unoccupied Settings, and in Section 8.7.6., Sensor Scheduling.
Tdy ON Time; Tdy ON Evnts
The Tdy ON Time field shows how long the controlled
8-30 • Sensor Control Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
output has been active in the current day. The Tdy ON
Evnts field shows how many times the controlled output
has been turned ON in the current day.
Last ON; OFF Times
The Last ON and Last OFF times show the duration of
the last ON and OFF events for the controlled output. This
includes the amount of time the output has been in its current state. For example, if a sensor-controlled output that
has been on for three hours shuts off, the Last ON field will
show 3 hours and the Last OFF time will begin displaying
the current amount of time the output has been OFF (starting from zero). If the output turned on again two seconds
later, the Last OFF timer would stop at two seconds, and
the Last ON time would begin recording the current ON
time.
Today High; Low
The Today High and Today Low fields show the highest and lowest sensor readings recorded for the current day.
Yesterday High; Low
The Yesterday High and Yesterday Low fields show
the highest and lowest sensor readings recorded from the
previous day.
Alarm Logged
If an alarm has been logged for this particular sensor,
“YES” will appear in this field. Otherwise, the Alarm
Logged field will read “NO”.
Alarm Override
If alarms are currently being overridden for this particular sensor, “YES” will appear in this field. Otherwise, the
Alarm Logged field will read “NO”.
8.7.1.3.
Accumulated Status
:
-
8.7.2.
-
-
ENT
The accumulated ON time and the number of ON
events may be viewed and cleared in the Accumulated Status screen.
#
Press “T” to reset the accumulated ON time or “E” to
reset the accumulated ON events.
Sensor Setup
Table 8-2 shows all the possible sensor types that may be
defined for a BEC.
:
-
-
ENT
#
If a 100, 200, or 500 pound pressure transducer is selected as the sensor type, a third field will appear on the
Sensor Setup screen. The third field will identify whether
the 100, 200, or 500 pound pressure transducer is a standard or Eclipse pressure transducer. The default for this
field is the Eclipse pressure transducer.
The name and type of each sensor is defined in the Sensor Setup screen.
Name [15 characters max]
If desired, a name may be entered for the sensor in the
Name field.
Type
The type of sensor must be specified in the Type field.
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-31
Input Type
(T)emp
Description
Temperature Sensor
(L)inear
Generic Sensor
(1)00
100 Pound Pressure Transducer
(2)00
200 Pound Pressure Transducer
(5)00
500 Pound Pressure Transducer
(D)ig
Non-voltage Digital Sensor
(R)fleak
Refrigerant Leak Detector
L(Q)Lev
Liquid Level Transducer
(H)um
Humidity Sensor
Dew(P)nt
Dewpoint Sensor
(I)RLDS
CPC Infrared Leak Detector
Table 8-2 - Sensor Types
8.7.3.
Sensor Setpoints Menu
Item
-
8.7.3.1.
Page
1
Sensor Definition
8-32
2
Sensor Control Setpoints
8-33
3
Unoccupied Setpoints
8-34
Sensor Definition
:
-
Description
-
-
ENT
on the Sensor Definition screen right above the Offset field.
The gain is equal to maximum value to be read divided by
the sum of the maximum sensor voltage and the offset.
#
The gain for IRLDS sensors defaults at 250, which is
the gain necessary to read the IRLDS output voltages correctly.
Offset [-999 – 999] [0]
Offsets, engineering units, logging intervals, and other
settings necessary for the definition of sensors may be set
in the Definition menu.
The screen shown is for non-linear type sensors; linear
type sensors and IRLDS sensors will have a slightly different screen.
Gain [-999 – 999] [0 for Linear, 250 for IRLDS]
If the sensor was set up as a Linear sensor in the Sensor
Setup screen (see Section 8.7.2.), the Gain field will appear
8-32 • Sensor Control Menu
If a sensor is known to read higher or lower than the
correct measurement, an offset may be specified to compensate.
The offset is equal to the minimum value to be read minus the minimum sensor voltage.
Curr. VDC and Curr. PPM (IRLDS only)
Curr VDC and Curr PPM are read-only fields that show
how the BEC is translating the voltage coming into the
IRLDS’s input into a PPM concentration. The value shown
in the Curr VDC is multiplied by the Gain and added to the
Offset to yield the value of Curr PPM.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
The purpose of these fields is simply to make the process of adjusting gain and offsets for IRLDS sensors easier.
Eng. Unit [5 characters max.] [dep. on sensor
type]
The engineering unit of the sensor value may be specified in the Eng. Unit field. Specifying a unit is optional; the
BEC does not need a specified unit to read the sensor value
properly. The string entered in the Eng. Unit field is shown
in status screens and data logs alongside the sensor values
solely for the purpose of making the values easier to read.
By default, the BEC enters a unit in this field depending
upon the sensor type defined in Section 8.7.2., Sensor Setup. If a different unit is desired, enter it (5 characters max)
in the Eng. Unit field.
Event Interval [0 – 9999 min.] [100 min.]
Some digital sensor alarms require an event interval to
be specified. An event interval is a period of time in which
the BEC counts ON and OFF events, maximum values, and
8.7.3.2.
Use Unoccupied Schedule [Yes/No] [No]
A sensor may follow a schedule when determining occupied and unoccupied building times. Unoccupied schedules are defined in Section 8.7.6., Sensor Scheduling.
If using an unoccupied schedule, enter (Y)es in the
field; otherwise, enter (N)o.
Logging Interval [00:00:00 – 99:99:99] [00:00:00]
The Log Interval is the amount of time between data log
entries. When the BEC records data into the Data Log, it
waits the amount of time specified in the Log Interval field
before taking another record.
Enter the desired Log Interval in hour:minute:second
format.
Sensor Control Setpoints
:
-
minimum values for the purposes of generating alarms. See
Section 10.5., Digital Alarms, for more information on
these types of alarms.
-
-
ENT
#
Up to three sensors may be combined with the current
sensor. Enter the sensor number of the desired sensors to be
combined in the three fields following the field displaying
the current sensor number.
Current Values (for all types except IRLDS and
Linear)
The current calculated control value is displayed in the
first field. The current status of the selected sensors are displayed in the four fields directly after the “of”, underneath
their respective sensor numbers.
Set points used in sensor-controlled output operation
are defined using the Control Setpoints menu.
Use _____ of Sens [options] [ONE]
The control method defined in the Use _____ of Sens
field determines how to combine the values from up to four
sensors. This combined or control value is then compared
to defined set points and commands to determine the operational status of an output. Users may choose from the following four control methods:
•
(O)NE - The BEC uses the selected sensor’s value
as the control value.
•
(A)VG - The BEC calculates the control value using
the average reading of one or more sensors.
•
MA(X) - The BEC calculates the control value using
the maximum sensor reading of one or more sensors.
•
MI(N) - The BEC calculates the control value using
the minimum sensor reading of one or more sensors.
RMCC I&O Manual
Min time ON [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
When the Cut-In set point has been reached and the
controlled output is activated, the output must remain on
for the Minimum ON Time regardless of the Cut-Out set
point. To define a Minimum ON Time, enter a value in the
Min time ON field.
Cut On/Cut Off [-50 – 999] [NONE]
Sensor Cut-On and Cut-Off set points may be defined
as specific values for analog input sensors or simply as contact closed or contact open for digital input sensors in the
Cut On and Cut Off fields respectively. The Cut-In set
point is the value at which the controlled output will turn on
and the Cut-Out set point is the value at which the controlled output will turn off. There is a 1° dead band around
each set point.
Cut On/Cut Off Delay [0 – 9999 sec.] [0 sec.]
The Cut On and Cut Off Delays are specified measurements of time the BEC must wait before activating or deactivating the controlled output. To activate a time delay for
System Setup • 8-33
the specified sensor, enter the desired time in the Delay
fields for the Cut On and Cut Off set points. Delays may be
8.7.3.3.
Unoccupied Settings
:
-
defined between 0 and 9999 seconds.
-
-
ENT
first field. The current status of the selected sensors are displayed in the four fields directly after the “of”, underneath
their respective sensor numbers.
#
Turn Output OFF during UNOCCUPIED [Yes/No]
[No]
If desired, the sensor-controlled output may be turned
OFF when the sensor is operating in unoccupied mode by
entering (Y)es in the Turn Output OFF during UNOCCUPIED field.
Sensor-controlled outputs may be configured to operate
differently under unoccupied settings. Set points for unoccupied mode are entered in the Unoccupied Setpoints
screen.
Current Values (for all sensor types except IRLDS
and Linear)
Cut On/Cut Off [-50 – 999] [NONE]
Sensor-controlled outputs may be configured with different Cut On and Cut Off set points and delays. See Section 8.7.3.2., Sensor Control Setpoints for more
information about these values.
The current calculated control value is displayed in the
8.7.4.
Sensor Alarms Menu
Item
-
8.7.5.
Description
Page
1
Analog Alarms
10-5
2
Digital Alarms
10-4
Overrides Menu
Item
-
8-34 • Sensor Control Menu
Description
Page
1
Output Overrides
8-35
2
Alarm Override
10-6
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.7.5.1.
Output Overrides
OFF Using Input [see description]
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
Using the Output Overrides screen, users may configure three inputs to override a sensor-controlled output OFF
and one input to override a sensor-controlled output ON.
Durations for these overrides may also be specified here.
Before sensor override inputs may be used, they must
be configured in the Input Definition screen (see Section
8.9.1.). These inputs are listed in Input Definitions as
SENSOVRD01 to SENSOVRD16.
8.7.6.
The BEC may be configured with up to 16 inputs that
may be used to override sensor outputs. When a contact
closure is detected from one of these inputs, all sensors
connected to the input will override OFF for the duration
entered in the Duration field.
To configure the selected sensor to override when one
of these inputs closes, enter the desired input number from
1 to 16, and enter a duration from 0 to 9999 seconds in the
Duration field. Up to three sensor override inputs may be
set up for a single sensor.
ON Using Input [see description]
One sensor override input may be used to override the
sensor’s output ON. Enter the desired input number from 1
to 16, and enter a duration from 0 to 9999 seconds in the
Duration field.
Sensor Scheduling
specifying start and end times.
:
-
-
ENT
#
To use a schedule for defining unoccupied times, enter
the desired schedule number in the Use Schedule # field.
The sensor will use unoccupied settings when the schedule
is OFF.
Alternately, the hours in which the unoccupied settings
start and end may be entered in the Unoccupied Starts and
Unoccupied Ends fields. When these times are defined, unoccupied mode will start and end at the same times every
day.
Unoccupied times for each sensor may be specified using the Schedules screen. When a sensor operates in unoccupied mode, it uses the unoccupied set points defined in
Section 8.7.3.3., Unoccupied Settings. Unoccupied hours
are defined in either of two ways: by using a schedule or by
8.7.7.
When both a schedule and the start/end times are defined, the schedule will always take priority when time
conflicts occur.
Input/Output Control
-
RMCC I&O Manual
Item
Description
Page
1
Analog Input Module Status
8-36
2
Analog Output Module Status
8-36
3
Digital Output Module Status
8-36
4
Analog Input Module Bypass
8-36
5
Analog Output Module Bypass
8-37
6
Digital Output Module Bypass
8-38
System Setup • 8-35
8.7.8.
-
Analog Input Module Status
-
ANALOG INPUT MODULE 1 STATUS
12:00
Name
:AV INPUT 01
Command :NONE
Value
:NONE
Alarm
:NONE
Notice :NONE
Count
:NONE
Count Tripped:NONE
=PREV =NEXT ->=SET
0=MENU
8.7.9.
-
Users may view the real-time status of an Analog Input
Module’s outputs in the Analog Input Module Status
screen. The Value and Count outputs will appear as analog
values, while the Command, Alarm, Notice, and Count
Tripped inputs will appear as either OFF, ON, or NONE.
To view the status of other Analog Input Modules,
press the UP and DOWN arrow keys.
Analog Output Module Status
-
ANALOG OUTPUT MODULE 1 STATUS
Name
:AV INPUT 01
PID Output :NONE
PID Setpt. :NONE
PWM Output :NONE
12:00
Stages:
.. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
=PREV =NEXT ->=SET
0=MENU
Users may view the real-time status of an Analog Output Module’s outputs in the Analog Output Module Status
screen. The PID Output will appear as a value between 0%
and 100%, the PID Setpoint will appear as an analog value,
and the PWM Output will appear as either ON, OFF, or
NONE, depending upon the current state.
The Stages fields at the bottom of the screen show the
status of Stage 1 through Stage 8 of the Analog Output
Module’s Sequencer outputs. Each field will read either
“..” for OFF or “ON” for ON. If a field is blinking, the stage
is currently in the interstage delay period between transition changes.
To view the status of other Analog Output Module Status screens, press the UP and DOWN arrow keys.
8.7.10. Digital Output Module Status
-
-
DIGITAL OUTPUT MODULE 1 STATUS
Name
:DV OUTPUT 01
Command :NONE
Proof
:NONE
Count
:NONE
Count Tripped:NONE
=PREV
=NEXT
->=SET
12:00
Users may view the real-time status of a Digital Output
Module’s outputs in the Digital Output Module Status
screen. The Command, Proof, and Count Tripped output
values will appear as either ON, OFF, or NONE. The Count
value will appear as an analog value.
To view the status of other Digital Output Module Status screens, press the UP and DOWN arrow keys.
0=MENU
8.7.11. Analog Input Module Bypass
The Command output of the Analog Input Module may
be overridden using this screen.
-
-
ANALOG INPUT MODULE 01 BYPASS
Name
:AV INPUT 01
Enable :NO
Command :OFF
Type:NORMAL
Time
:0005 minutes
12:00
Ov State:NORMAL
Time Left:---- sec
=PREV =NEXT ->=SET
0=MENU
Name [15 characters max] [AV INPUT {module
number}]
If desired, enter a name for the analog input module in
the Name field.
Enable [Yes, No] [N]
The Enable field allows users to turn an individual Analog Input Module on or off without having to use Ultra-
8-36 • Sensor Control Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
entered in the Time field (see below). This override
may also be terminated by selecting “Normal” in
the Command field.
Site. Entering Yes in this field enables the current module;
entering No in this field turns off the module.
Command [OFF, ON, NONE] [OFF]
The value to which the Command output will be overridden is entered in the Command field.
Type [Fixed, Timed, Normal] [Normal]
In the Type field, users may choose the type of override. There are three override types to choose from:
•
Normal - Choosing “Normal” in the Type field ends
a fixed or timed override already in progress.
•
Fixed - The output will be overridden to the value
chosen in the Command field until the user returns
to this field and selects “Normal”.
•
Timed - The output will be overridden to the value
chosen in the Command field for the amount of time
Time [0 – 68 min.] [5 min.]
The value entered in the Time field will be the number
of minutes a timed override will last.
Ov State
The Ov State is a read-only field that shows the current
state of the Command override (either Fixed, Timed, or
Normal).
Time Left
The Time Left field is a read-only field showing the
amount of time left in a timed override. When no timed
override is being carried out, the Time Left field will display a row of dashes.
8.7.12. Analog Output Module Bypass
-
•
Fixed - The output will be overridden to the value
chosen in the Value field until the user returns to
this field and selects “Normal”.
•
Timed - The output will be overridden to the value
chosen in the Value field for the amount of time entered in the Time field (see below). This override
may also be terminated by selecting “Normal” in
the Command field.
-
ANALOG OUTPUT MODULE 01 BYPASS
Name
:AV OUTPUT 01
Enable :NO
Value
:000
Type:NORMAL
Time
:0005 minutes
12:00
Ov State:UNKNOWN
Time Left:00000 sec
=PREV =NEXT ->=SET
0=MENU
The Value output of the Analog Output Module may be
overridden using this screen.
Name [15 characters max] [AV OUTPUT {module
number}]
If desired, enter a name for the analog output module in
the Name field.
Enable [Yes, No] [N]
The Enable field allows users to turn an individual Analog Output Module on or off without having to use UltraSite. Entering Yes in this field enables the current module;
entering No in this field turns off the module.
Time [0 – 68 min.] [5 min.]
The value entered in the Time field will be the number
of minutes a timed override will last.
Ov State
The Ov State is a read-only field that shows the current
state of the Value override (either Fixed, Timed, or Normal).
Time Left
The Time Left field is a read-only field showing the
amount of time left in a timed override. When no timed
override is being carried out, the Time Left field will display a row of dashes.
Value [0 – 100] [0]
The value to which the Value output will be overridden
is entered in the Command field.
Type [Fixed, Timed, Normal] [Normal]
In the Type field, users may choose the type of override. There are three override types to choose from:
•
Normal - Choosing “Normal” in the Type field ends
a fixed or timed override already in progress.
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-37
8.7.13. Digital Output Module Bypass
Type [Fixed, Timed, Normal] [Normal]
-
-
DIGITAL OUTPUT MODULE 01 BYPASS
12:00
Name
:DV OUTPUT 01
Enable :NO
Command :OFF
Type: NORMAL
Time
:0005 minutes
Ov State:UNKNOWN Time Left:00000 sec
=PREV =NEXT ->=SET
0=MENU
In the Type field, users may choose the type of override. There are three override types to choose from:
•
Normal - Choosing “Normal” in the Type field ends
a fixed or timed override already in progress.
•
Fixed - The output will be overridden to the value
chosen in the Value field until the user returns to
this field and selects “Normal”.
•
Timed - The output will be overridden to the value
chosen in the Value field for the amount of time entered in the Time field (see below). This override
may also be terminated by selecting “Normal” in
the Type field.
The Value output of the Analog Output Module may be
overridden using this screen.
Name [15 characters max] [DV OUTPUT {module
number}]
If desired, enter a name for the digital output module in
the Name field.
Enable [Yes, No] [N]
Time [0 – 68 min.] [5 min.]
The value entered in the Time field will be the number
of minutes a timed override will last.
Ov State
The Enable field allows users to turn an individual Digital Output Module on or off without having to use UltraSite. Entering Yes in this field enables the current module;
entering No in this field turns off the module.
The Ov State is a read-only field that shows the current
state of the Command override (either Fixed, Timed, or
Normal).
Command [OFF, ON, NONE] [OFF]
Time Left
The value to which the Command output will be overridden is entered in the Command field.
The Time Left field is a read-only field showing the
amount of time left in a timed override. When no timed
override is being carried out, the Time Left field will display a row of dashes.
8.8.
Status Menu
Item
1
8-38 • Status Menu
Description
HVAC Status
Page
8-39
2
Input Status
8-39
3
Sensor Status Menu
8-39
4
Demand Status
8-39
5
Anti-Sweat Status Menu
8-40
6
Schedules Status
8-40
7
Boiler Status
8-40
8
Dimmer Status
8-40
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.8.1.
HVAC Status
This screen is identical to the Main Status screen. See
Section 8.1., Main Status Screen, for more information.
-
8.8.2.
Input Status
The Input Status screen displays the current status of all
inputs connected to the 16AI or 8IO board and programmed within the BEC. Each status display is based on
the sensor type. For linear sensors, the status screen displays the actual or raw value of the sensor in millivolts regardless of any offsets that are in place.
-
8.8.3.
Sensor Status Menu
This menu and the options within are identical to the
Sensor Status Menu shown in Section 8.7.1., Sensor Status
Menu. For more information on this menu and the menu
options, refer to Section 8.7.1.
-
8.8.4.
Demand Status
This screen is identical to the Demand Status screen explained in Section 8.10.1.
-
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-39
8.8.5.
Anti-Sweat Status Menu
This menu and the options within are identical to the
Anti-Sweat Status menu shown in Section 8.6.1., AntiSweat Status Menu. For more information on this menu
and the menu options, refer to Section 8.6.1.
-
8.8.6.
Schedules
This screen is identical to the Schedule Status screen
explained in Section 8.5.1.
-
8.8.7.
Boiler Status
This menu and the options within are identical to the
Boiler Status menu shown in Section 8.4.5.1., Boiler Status. For more information on this menu and the menu options, refer to Section 8.4.5.1.
-
8.8.8.
Dimmer Status
This screen is identical to the Dimmer Status screen explained in Section 8.5.7.1., Dimmer Status.
-
8-40 • Status Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.9.
Configuration Menu
Item
8.9.1.
Description
Page
1
Input Definition
8-41
2
Output Definition
8-43
3
System Information
8-44
4
Dewpoint/Humidity Sensors
8-46
5
Communications
8-46
6
Host Network
8-47
7
I/O Board Setup
8-48
8
Satellite Communications
8-50
Input Definition
Bd
The network address of an input communication board
is defined by the network dip switch on the 16AI board or
rotary dials on the 8IO board. The number entered in the
Board Number field is used by the BEC in conjunction with
the Point address defined below to locate the selected sensor.
-
Pt
All inputs connected to the 16AI or 8IO boards are configured at the Input Definitions screen. Each input is identified according to its board and point address.
Each input sensor is physically connected to a specific
point on an input communication board. The point numbers
are printed on the board above the input connections. This
point address is used by the BEC in conjunction with the
board address to locate the selected sensor.
Table 8-3 shows the specific inputs in the order they appear within the Input Definitions screens.
Input
Name
Input Description
AHU 1-6
TMP1-4
AHUs #1-#6, temperature sensors one through four.
HUMID 1-6
Humidity sensors for AHUs one through six
OUTS. TMP
Outside temperature sensor
FAN 1 FAILFAN 6 FAIL
Fan proof inputs for AHUs one through six. The proof fail signal may be either OPEN or CLOSED depending upon the value of the Fan Fail Input when Fan Is On field (see Fan Fail Setup, Section Fan Fail Setup).
PHASE LOSS
A contact closure from the phase loss monitor will cause the BEC to turn off all loads.
HEAT BYP.
A contact closure bypasses all heat stages OFF.
COOL BYP.
A contact closure bypasses all cool stages OFF.
DAMP1PERMT
through
DAMP6PERMT
When closed, air dampers are permitted to open for AHUs one through six.
Table 8-3 - List of BEC Input Definitions
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-41
Input
Name
Input Description
AHU OVRD 1 AHU OVRD 3
AHU override inputs one through three
SP +1
Raises set points by 1
SP +2
Raises set points by 2
SP +4
Raises set points by 4
SP -1
Lowers set points by 1
SP -2
Lowers set points by 2
SP -4
Lowers set points by 4
VS1 INVALM VS6 INVALM
Variable speed fan inverter alarms for AHUs one through six
BOILER 1 &
BOILER 2
Boiler temperature or pressure sensor
FRZSTAT1-1
through
FRZSTAT6-6
Coil air termination temperature sensors for cool stages 1 through 6 for all AHUs. The first number corresponds to the AHU number, and the second corresponds to the cool stage. FRZSTAT 2-5, for example,
would be stage 5 on AHU #2.
SUPPL AHU1SUPPL AHU6
Supply air sensors for AHUs one through six
RETRN AHU1RETRN AHU6
Return air sensors for AHUs one through six
SENSOR 01SENSOR 64
Sensors one through 64
SENS OVRD1SENSOVRD16
Sensor override inputs one through 16
SCHED1 OVRSCHED24OVR
Schedule override inputs one through 24
LIGHT SENS
Outside light level sensor
KW SENSOR1KW SENSOR2
Kilowatt transducer for power monitoring circuits one and two
ASC HUM 1ASC HUM 2
Humidity sensors for anti-sweat control circuits one and two
ASC TEMP1ASC TEMP2
Temp sensors for anti-sweat control circuits one and two
ASC#1 OVRDASC#8 OVRD
Override inputs for anti-sweat heaters one through eight
SCHED1 PRFSCHED24 PRF
Proof failure input for schedules 1 through 24. The proof fail signal may be OPEN or CLOSED depending
upon the value of the Proof Input when Schedule is ON field (Section 8.5.9., Schedule Proofs).
Table 8-3 - List of BEC Input Definitions
8-42 • Configuration Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.9.2.
Output Definition
Bd
The network address of an output communication
board is defined by the network dip switch on the 8RO
boards or rotary dials on the 8IO board. The number entered in the Board Number field is used by the BEC in conjunction with the Point address defined below to locate the
selected output.
-
Pt
All outputs connected to the 8RO, 8RO Form C, 8DO,
4AO or 8IO boards are configured at the Output Definitions screen. Each output is identified according to its
board and point address.
Each output is physically connected to a specific point
on an output communication board. The point numbers are
printed on the board above the output connections. This
point address is used by the BEC in conjunction with the
board address to locate the selected output.
Table 8-4 shows the specific outputs as they appear in
the Output Definitions screens.
Output
Name
Output Definition
AHU1-6 CL.1-6
Cool stages one through six for AHUs one through six
AHU1-6 FAN H
High speed fan, AHUs one through six. If using a single-speed fan, connect the fan to this output.
AHU1-6 FAN L
Low speed fan, AHUs one through six
AHU1-6 HT.1-8
Heat stages one through eight for AHUs one through six
AIR DAMP. 1-6
Air dampers for AHUs one through six
ALARM
External alarm device
SEN CTL 01SEN CTL 64
Sensor-controlled outputs 1-64
SCHEDULE1SCHEDULE24
Schedules 1-24
ANTI-SWT 1ANTI-SWT 8
Anti-sweat heaters one through eight
VS1 ALARMVS6 ALARM
Variable-speed fan inverter failure alarms for AHUs one through six
DEMAND 1DEMAND 2
Demand relays one and two
INV1 RESETINV6 RESET
Inverter resets for variable-speed fans on AHUs one through six
BOIL 1-BOIL2
Boiler outputs for boilers one and two
RAISE 1RAISE 4
Sends raise light level commands to dimmer panel for dimmer circuits one through four
LOWER 1LOWER 4
Sends lower light level commands to dimmer panel for dimmer circuits one through four
AHU 1 VS AHU 6 VS
Variable-speed fans for AHUs 1 through 6.
Table 8-4 - List of BEC Output Definitions
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-43
8.9.3.
System Information
8.9.3.1.
Names, Dates, and Passwords
-
General information such as defining BEC identifiers,
the power-up self-test, summer and winter start dates, and
user passwords is defined at the BEC System Information
screens. The System Information screen is the first of two
screens where such information is entered.
Unit Name [25 characters max]
The Unit Name is a user-defined identifier that is used
to identify the specific BEC on modification and status
screens within UltraSite™. Enter a unique name in the Unit
Name field.
Date/Time/Day
The BEC contains a real-time clock that is used when
logging information to the various logging screens. It is important that the system date and time be accurate. Many
BEC applications use the system date and time to record
important information. To set this clock, enter the current
date and time in the Date and Time fields. The BEC will automatically set the day for the entered date.
Passwords
The BEC system requires a password for all users to enter into and modify the system. There are four levels of access to the BEC. A detailed description of each access level
is given in Table 8-1, Section 8.2., Log On. To change the
passwords, enter the desired password in each password
level field. This value may be changed at any time to any
six digit character string. After a new password is defined,
it may be used to log into the system at the corresponding
access level.
a low-level warning that alerts users of abnormal facility or
control system conditions. A notice creates an entry in the
BEC Alarm Log. An alarm is a high-level warning that also
alerts users of abnormal facility or control system conditions. An alarm will appear in the BEC Alarm Log and may
be accompanied by a contact closure for on-site operation
of a bell, light, horn, etc. An alarm may also initiate an
alarm dialout sequence and/or the activation of the 485
Alarm Annunciator Panel.
To activate an alarm or notice during a system power
failure, enter the desired alarm type in the Power Fail
Alarm/Notice field.
Record Logons [Yes/No] [No]
The Record Logons feature configures the BEC to
record the password level of users logging into the controller. When Record Logons is activated, the BEC will send a
notice to the BEC Alarm Log each time a user logs onto the
BEC from the front panel or through a remote connection.
Included in the log entry is the date, time, and password
level.
To activate the Record Logons feature, select (Y)es in
the Record Logons field.
Power-up Self-Test [Yes/No] [Yes]
A power-up self-test—also called a Cyclic Redundancy
Check (CRC)—is a self-diagnostics test the controller performs during system start-up. This test validates that the
program running in the REFLECS controller has not been
corrupted. The CRC test searches the entire operating program and validates that the current values are the same as
were originally uploaded. This test takes approximately
one minute to complete.
To initiate a power-up self-test every time the system is
restarted, select (Y)ES in the Power-up Self-Test field.
Should the CRC test fail, contact the CPC Technical
Support Department (1-800-829-2724) for further information.
Choose a different password for each level of access.
If all passwords are the same, users will only be able
to log in at 100-level access.
Power Fail Alarm/Notice [Yes/No] [No]
The BEC can be set to generate a notice or an alarm
when there is a power failure within the system. A notice is
8-44 • Configuration Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.9.3.2.
Dialout and Daylight Savings Time Settings
Dialout field.
Daylight Savings Mode [options] [Automatic]
-
-
When the current time changes to standard time or to
daylight savings time, the BEC’s clock should be modified
accordingly. Time changes occur twice a year in most areas. Methods for defining how the system will change its
settings for daylight savings time are defined in the Daylight Savings Mode field.
Phone Numbers
Phone numbers to be called when an alarm is generated
are defined in the Phone Numbers fields. Phone numbers
for daytime dialouts as well as nighttime dialouts must be
defined in these fields to activate the remote dialout function.
When an alarm is generated, and after the dialout delay,
the dialout sequence begins. If the remote line is busy or
there is no answer, the system will dial the first number six
times, waiting five minutes before each attempt, until a
connection is made. If no connection is made, the system
will dial the second phone number six times, waiting five
minutes before each attempt. If there is still no connection,
the system will generate an additional alarm in the BEC
Alarm Log and cease dialout.
The clock may be configured to change according to the
standard USA Daylight Savings Time dates, according to a
user-defined date, or for areas that do not participate in daylight savings time, the clock may be left unmodified.
To define how the system clock will be changed for
daylight savings, select the appropriate method in the Daylight Savings Mode field. Choosing Automatic will initiate
DST changes on April 7 and October 29 of each year.
Choosing Manual will initiate DST changes on the dates
specified in the Dst Manual Set Start and Dst Manual Set
End fields. Choosing None will disable DST mode.
Dst Manual Set Start/Dst Manual Set End
Delay Before Dialout [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
If the Manual method is chosen in the Daylight Savings
Mode field, the BEC will modify the system time on the
specified dates. BEC system settings will be changed to
daylight savings time starting on the date defined in the Dst
Manual Set Start field, and will return to standard time on
the date defined in the Dst Manual Set End field. System
time changes at approximately 2:00 a.m.on the dates specified.
Before the BEC may make an alarm dialout, it must
wait for an amount of time specified in the Delay Before
Because the defined dates are specific for each year, the
Date fields must be updated each year by the user.
To define the phone numbers, enter the available phone
numbers in the Phone Numbers fields.
8.9.4.
-
Temperature Display Format
-
3
The Temperature Display Format determines how temperatures will be displayed on all screens throughout the
BEC. To display degrees Fahrenheit, press “0”. To display
degrees in Centigrade, press “1”.
If the system is changed to display temperatures in Centigrade, all defaults will be displayed in Centigrade.
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-45
8.9.5.
D.P./Humidity Sensor Offsets
Offsets [-99 – 99] [0]
If an AHU humidity or dewpoint sensor is known to
read higher or lower than the actual humidity or dewpoint,
an offset may be specified. Values entered in the Offsets
fields are added to the sensor readings.
-
Humidity Sensor Type [0 – 5 V / 4 – 20 mA] [0 – 5 V]
Humidity sensor types, and offsets for humidity and
dewpoint sensors for AHUs one through six are set up using the D.P./Humidity Sensors Setup screen.
8.9.6.
8.9.6.1.
The BEC accepts readings from two different types of
humidity sensors: 0-5 V sensors and 4-20 mA sensors.
AHU humidity sensors must be one of these two types. Enter “0” for 0-5 V or “4” for 4-20 mA in the Humidity Sensor
Type field.
Communication
Communications Setup
-
work. The baud rate should be set according to the type network modem used with the remote network. The BEC is
capable of operating at baud rates of 300, 1200, 2400, and
9600 with 9600 being the preferred rate. Refer to the modem user’s manual for specific baud rate information.
Parity/Data Bits [options] [N 8]
The remote communication capability within the BEC
allows the user to communicate with a site from a remote
location. Remote communication with a site controlled by
the BEC is accomplished using UltraSite™, CPC’s remote
communication software package. To utilize this BEC
function, the network must be connected to a modem directly, or through the RS232 Bus Amplifier.
Remote communication network settings are defined at
the Communications Setup screens. This screen is the first
of two screens.
Unit #
The Unit Number for each BEC is the number UltraSite
uses to determine the specific BEC controller from which
information is being received. No two REFLECS controllers may have the same Unit number.
For the specified BEC to communicate properly with
the remote communication software, the Unit Number
must be entered in the Unit # field.
Baud Rate [options] [9600 bps]
Most standard Hayes compatible modems with a baud
rate of at least 9600 will operate properly with the BEC net-
8-46 • Configuration Menu
The following two fields represent the Parity and Data
Bits values. The BEC automatically calculates the appropriate settings required for the remote network to communicate properly according to the specified baud rate
settings. Refer to the modem user’s manual for specific
Parity and Data Bits information.
Initialization String [see description]
Modems are initiated by receiving an attention code
followed by the appropriate command or set of commands
the modem should implement. This command set, or initialization string, is different for most modem vendors. The
initialization string for the modem operating within the remote network is defined in the Initialization String field.
The BEC stores modem settings for several frequently
used types of modems. Initialization strings for these modems may be copied to the Initialization String field at the
Modem Initialization screen (see Section 8.9.6.2.).
Send Now/Init Response
To program the modem, initialize the modem by sending the initialization string to the modem in the Send Now
field. The modem’s response will be displayed in the Response field. The modem should initialize within approximately five seconds after the string is sent. An OK response
or a replica of the string is returned to the screen if the modem is properly defined. If a No Response is returned,
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
check the wiring, re-send the string, then refer to the troubleshooting guide in the modem user’s manual for suggestions.
Reset at Midnight [Yes/No] [No]
form the BEC’s remote communication functions, send the
string to program the modem on a regular basis. To automatically send the string every night at midnight, select
(Y)es in the Reset at Midnight field.
To ensure the modem is properly programmed to per-
8.9.6.2.
Modem Initialization Screen
BEC stores communication settings for modems frequently
used with BEC. The following modem types are available:
-
1. Regular
-
2. 24/9600 ASB
3. 24/9600 V42
CPC supplies a standard 9600 baud modem for use with
the BEC RS232 COM C network; however, most standard
modems with a baud rate of at least 9600 are sufficient. The
8.9.7.
To copy the stored initialization strings for one of the
listed modem types to the Communications Setup screen,
enter the corresponding number in the Patterns: Number to
Copy field. Refer to the modem user’s manual to determine
the correct modem type. The stored initialization string for
the selected modem type is displayed in the Current field.
Host Network Menu
One of the most important requirements of any network
environment is the BEC’s ability to notify personnel of system failures or possible problems. The host, or alarm, network takes all alarms from multiple units in the system and
sends them to a 485 Alarm Panel. CPC uses the 485 Alarm
Panel to receive signals from the BEC and to deliver annunciated alarms in the event of a serious system problem.
-
BEC Units are defined to a host or alarm network at the
Host Network screens. The status of the host network is
displayed and it may be reset at these screens.
8.9.7.1.
Online Status
Host Net State
-
-
The status of the host network is displayed in the Host
Net State field. If the network is defined properly on each
controller, this field should read OK. If the network is improperly configured, this field will read Reconfigure. If the
network is reset OFF, the field will read OFF.
If the field reads Reconfigure, there is a problem with
the configuration of the hardware. For more information
about hardware configuration, see Section 2, Hardware
Overview.
The Online Status screen displays the status of the Host
Network. No modifications to the network may be made at
this screen.
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-47
Number Offline
The BEC calculates the number of defined units currently offline and displays this calculation in the Number
Offline field. The status of the unit the user is currently
logged into is not included in these calculations.
8.9.7.2.
Set Device Numbers
type always begins with the number 1.
-
To define a device number for the current BEC, enter
the appropriate device number in the Device # field. BEC
unit numbers should be assigned in numerical order starting with one.
-
Alarm If Another Device Fails [Yes/No] [No]
To activate an alarm if a controller stops communicating, select (Y)es in the Alarm If Another Device Fails field.
Test Host Net for New Devices [Yes/No] [No]
This Controller is Device #
Each BEC must have a defined device number when
more than one BEC is being used. No two BECs may have
the same device number. If other non-BEC REFLECS controllers are connected to the host network, each must be
identified as well. Device numbering for each REFLECS
8.9.7.3.
-
The BEC is capable of searching for any new device defined to the host network. To activate this feature, select
(Y)es in the Test Host Net for New Devices field. After all
REFLECS controllers have been wired and configured, test
each host net for new devices.
Reset
-
The host network is by default not active within the
BEC. If one or more BECs are connected to a 485 Alarm
Panel, then the host network should be reset ON at the Reset screen.
To reset the host network ON within the current BEC,
select “2” for Reset ON at the Reset screen.
Do not select Reset if a 485 Alarm Panel is not connected to the BEC through the COM B Host Network.
8.9.8.
I/O Board Setup
-
8-48 • Configuration Menu
The Board Network connects all input and output communication boards together with the controller using two
separate RS485 input/output communication network connections. These input and output communication boards
are defined to the Board Network at the I/O Network
screens. The status of each board is also displayed and the
network may also be reset from these screens.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.9.8.1.
Online Status
I/O Bus State
-
The status of the I/O Board Network is displayed in the
I/O Bus State field. This field reflects if the network is ON
or OFF. Networks may be reset ON or OFF at the Reset
screen (see Section 8.9.8.3.).
-
Number Offline
The Online Status screen displays the status of the
Board Network. No modifications to the network may be
made at this screen.
8.9.8.2.
-
Number of I/O Boards
BEC, enter this number in the corresponding fields at the
Set Device Numbers screen. Defining these numbers allows the BEC to calculate the number of boards within the
system. By default, this screen will display the maximum
number of 8RO, 16AI, 8DO, and 4AO boards the BEC may
use, and it displays the current number of boards defined.
-
Each BEC supports up to fifteen 8RO Boards, up to ten
16AI Boards, up to two 8DO boards, and up to four 4AO
Boards. To define the number of boards connected to the
8.9.8.3.
-
The status of all boards connected to the Board Network are displayed in the Number Offline field. A “1” under the specified board indicates the board is on-line. A
period “.” under the specified board indicates the board is
offline. A space under the specified board indicates the
board is not defined within the system. The BEC calculates
the number of defined boards currently offline and displays
this calculation in the Number Offline field.
When setting up an 8IO in this screen, count the 8IO as
one 16AI, one 8RO. If the 8IO’s analog outputs are to be
used, the 8IO must also be setup as an additional 4AO
board. If the 8IO’s analog outputs are not being used, the
jumper (JU4) (see Section 2.4.1., 8IO Board) on the 8IO
that enables the analog outputs may be removed and then
set up as a 16AI and an 8RO.
Reset
-
The I/O Board Network is disabled at the Reset screen.
If this network is disabled, the BEC may no longer control
functions associated with the unit. After the network is reset OFF, it may also be reset ON at the Reset screen.
To turn off the I/O Board Network, enter “1” for OFF
at the Reset screen. To reset the network ON, enter “2” for
Reset ON at the Reset screen.
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-49
8.9.9.
Satellite Communications
The BEC has the ability to communicate via satellite.
The BEC’s Satellite Communication feature is configured
at the Satellite Communication screen.
-
8.10.
To enable the BEC Satellite Communication feature,
enter (Y)es in the Enable Satellite Mode field. If the satellite feature is activated, users may enter the appropriate disconnect message in the Disconnect Message field.
Demand Control Menu
Item
Description
Page
1
Demand Status
8-50
2
Demand Setpoints
8-51
3
KW Sensor Select
8-51
4
KW Sensor Setup
8-52
5
Alarm Setpoints
10-8
6
Load Shed Status
8-53
7
Load Shed Setpoints
8-54
8
Load Shed Setup
8-56
9
Logs
9-1
8.10.1. Demand Status
DOWN arrow key. Note that since Circuit #2 is for monitoring only, no Demand, Timer, or Set Point will be shown.
-
Demand
When the BEC is in demand, an ON will appear in the
Demand field. When the BEC is not in demand, an OFF
will appear in the Demand field.
Timer
The Demand Status screen displays the current status of
demand control within the BEC. Information displayed on
this screen includes the ON/OFF status of demand, a summation of the times the BEC has been in demand, the current demand limit set point, current power usage, peak
power usage, power use in the past hour, and power total
for the day.
Circuit #1 will be displayed when the Demand Status
menu option is selected. To view Circuit #2, press the
A timer within the BEC calculates the number of hours
and minutes the BEC has been in demand during the last
24-hour time period. The timer resets every night at midnight and the cumulative demand time is cleared.
Set Point
The demand limit set point determines if the BEC
should go into demand. This set point is defined for summer and for winter at the Demand Set Points screen (see
Section 8.10.2.). The current demand limit set point controlling demand control within the BEC is displayed in the
Set Point field.
Current Power Usage
The current kW reading provided by the kW transducer
or watt-hour transducer is displayed in the Current Power
Usage field.
Peak Power Today
The peak power is the highest value of kW measured by
the kW or watt-hour transducer during a specified period of
time. The peak power for the day is displayed in the Peak
Power Today field along with the time of its occurrence.
This measurement may help determine the time of day to
minimize active loads to help reduce power consumption.
KWHs Used This Hr
The kW measurement for the previous hour is displayed in the KWHs Used This Hr field
Total KWHs Today
The total kW usage for the day is displayed in the Total
KWHs Today field.
8.10.2. Demand Setpoints
winter may be defined.
-
Enter the appropriate demand limit set points for summer and winter in kilowatts in the Demand Set Point Summer and Winter fields.
Window Time Period [0 – 9999 kW] [1000 kW]
The BEC requires demand settings to initiate and perform demand control. These settings are defined in the Demand Set Points screen.
Demand Set Point Summer/Winter [0 – 9999 kW]
[1000 kW]
The Demand Limit set point is a pre-defined level of
energy consumption at which a power company greatly increases its rates. Separate set points for summer and for
To determine if the demand limit set point is being exceeded, power companies monitor energy consumption for
a fixed period of time. This duration is called the Demand
Window. Enter the demand window used by the power
company in the Window Time Period field.
Load Shed Enable/Disable Time [00:01 – 24:00]
[00:00 (undefined)]
Load shedding may be enabled for a specific period of
each day. Define where this period begins in the Enable
field and where the period ends in the Disable field. If both
are left undefined (at 00:00), load shedding will be enabled
at all hours.
8.10.3. KW Sensor Select
-
RMCC I&O Manual
Kilowatt sensors for each circuit may be set up as either
linear sensors or digital sensors. Enter (L)inear or (K)W
Digital in the Circuit #1 and Circuit #2 fields.
System Setup • 8-51
8.10.4. KW Sensor Setup
8.10.4.1.
Linear Sensor
outputs must be specified. Enter the minimum and maximum voltages in these fields. Refer to the sensor’s installation manual for the minimum and maximum values.
-
Power at Maximum [0 – 3200 kW] [500 kW]
The Power at Maximum value is the kW value that,
when measured by the sensor, will emit a voltage to the
BEC equal to the value defined in the Maximum Voltage.
Linear kilowatt sensor information necessary for the
BEC to make an accurate power usage reading is configured at the KW Sensor Setup screen. Digital kilowatt sensors are configured in Section 8.10.4.2., Digital Sensor
Minimum/Maximum Voltage [0 – 6 V] [1/5 V]
Linear kilowatt sensors signify the measured power usage by emitting a voltage. In order for the BEC to read that
voltage, the minimum and maximum voltages of the sensor
8.10.4.2.
The BEC assumes that a sensor output equal to the Minimum Voltage field value represents a KW measurement of
zero. Therefore, once the Power at Maximum, Minimum
Voltage, and Maximum Voltage fields are defined, the
BEC becomes capable of translating voltages between the
Minimum and Maximum Voltages as KW values between
zero and the Power at Maximum value.
Logging Interval [0 – 60 min.] [15 min.]
Enter the logging interval the BEC will use to send kW
readings to the Demand Status log.
Digital Sensor
-
Digital kilowatt sensor information necessary for the
BEC to make an accurate power usage reading is configured at the KW Sensor Setup screen. Linear kilowatt sensors are configured in Section 8.10.4.1., Linear Sensor
Watt-Hours per Pulse [0 – 9999 kW] [0 kW]
A digital kW sensor measures watt-hours by reading a
pulse supplied by a power company, which represents a
fixed number of watt-hours. The BEC uses the watt-hour
information to calculate a kW value for use by the Demand
Control algorithm. Enter the number of watt-hours represented by a single pulse.
Logging Interval [0 – 60 min.] [15 min.]
Enter the logging interval the BEC will use to send kW
readings to the Demand Status log.
8-52 • Demand Control Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.10.5. Load Shed Status
8.10.5.1.
Main Status
values will be included in this total.
Shed Now
-
The Shed Now field displays the amount of kW currently being shed.
Predicted
The Predicted field displays the predicted energy consumption based on the predictive calculations performed
by the demand control algorithm.
The Main Status screen shows demand control and load
shedding data for the entire system. Specific load shedding
status screens for AHUs, sensors, and schedules may be
viewed by pressing the DOWN arrow key.
Current
Demand Setpt
The Demand Setpt field shows the demand set point
specified in Section 8.10.2., Demand Setpoints.
Shed Required
The Current field displays the current kW reading being
supplied by the kilowatt sensor.
The Shed Required is the amount of kW that must be
shed to keep the power consumption under the demand set
point.
Max Shed
Shed Mode
The maximum number of kW which may be shed in the
entire system is shown in the Max Shed field. Only loads
that have priority levels higher than zero and specified kW
The Shed Mode field is an indicator of load shedding
activity. It is used by CPC for observational and troubleshooting purposes.
8.10.5.2.
AHU Load Shed Status
The load shed status of AHUs one through six is shown
in the Load Shed Status-AHUs screen.
-
-
RMCC I&O Manual
If an AHU is currently in load shed, the corresponding
AHU Status field will display the lowest number stages that
has been shed. That is, if cooling stages one and two have
been shed, then a one will be shown in the status field.
System Setup • 8-53
8.10.5.3.
Sensor Load Shed Status
The load shed status of sensors 1-64 is shown in the
Load Shed Status-Sensors screens.
-
-
Each row of eight fields corresponds to eight sensors. If
a sensor is currently in load shed, a “1” will appear in the
sensor’s status field. Therefore, if sensors two and eight
were shed, the row marked Sensors 1-8 would read “0 1 0
0 0 0 0 1”.
2+
Additional Sensor Status fields are available in the second screen. Press the DOWN arrow key to access this
screen.
8.10.5.4.
Schedule Load Shed Status
The load shed status of schedules 1-24 is shown in the
Load Shed Status-Schedules screens.
-
-
Each row of eight fields corresponds to eight schedules.
If a schedule is currently in load shed, a “1” will appear in
the schedule’s status field. Therefore, if schedules two and
eight were shed, the row marked Schedules 1-8 would read
“0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1”.
4
8.10.6. Load Shed Setpoints Menu
The Load Shed Setpoints menu contains all options
necessary to set load shedding set points for AHUs, sensors, and schedules. Set points include shedding priorities,
min and max shed values, shed durations, and intervals between sheds.
-
8.10.6.1.
AHU Load Shed Setpoints
Load shed set points for AHUs are specified in this
screen.
-
-
Priority [0 – 16] [0]
For each AHU, a load shed priority must be defined.
There are 16 levels of priorities to choose from, one being
the lowest, and 16 being the highest. Specifying a priority
level of zero will disable load shedding for the selected
AHU.
When the demand control algorithm sheds loads, it be-
8-54 • Demand Control Menu
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
gins by shedding loads with high priority numbers. As the
need for shedding increases, loads with lower priority levels are shed.
Max Shed Value set point is reached, the AHU will not be
allowed to shed.
Shed Duration [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
The priority level set in this field is applied to all stages
within the AHU. Stages are shed from highest stage to lowest stage based upon the number of kW needed to shed. A
stages kW rating is defined in Section 8.10.7.1., AHU
Load Shed Setup.
The Shed Duration set point is the maximum amount of
time an AHU may remain in shed. When the AHU has been
shed for an amount of time equal to the Shed Duration, the
AHU will reactivate.
Min Shed Value [0° – 9999° F] [0° F]
Enter a value in the Shed Duration field. Entering a zero
will allow the AHU to be shed for as long as necessary.
When the AHU temperature control value drops below
the set point specified in the Min Shed Value field, the
AHU will come out of shed. If the AHU is not in shed when
the Min Shed Value set point is reached, the AHU will not
be allowed to shed.
Interval Between Sheds [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
Max Shed Value [0° – 9999° F] [0° F]
After an AHU has come out of load shedding, the BEC
must wait for an amount of time equal to the Interval Between Sheds before it may call upon the AHU to be shed
again.
When the AHU temperature control value exceeds the
set point specified in the Max Shed Value field, the AHU
will come out of shed. If the AHU is not in shed when the
Enter a value in the Interval Between Sheds field. Entering a zero will allow the AHU to be shed at any time necessary.
8.10.6.2.
Sensor Load Shed Setpoints
Max Shed Value [0 – 9999] [0]
-
-
When the sensor control value exceeds the set point
specified in the Max Shed Value field, the sensor will come
out of shed. If the sensor is not in shed when the Max Shed
Value set point is reached, the sensor will not be allowed to
shed.
Shed Duration [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
Load shed set points for sensors are specified in this
screen.
The Shed Duration set point is the maximum amount of
time a sensor may remain in shed. When the sensor has
been shed for an amount of time equal to the Shed Duration, the sensor output will be allowed to reactivate.
Priority [0 – 16] [0]
Enter a value in the Shed Duration field. Entering a zero
will allow the sensor to be shed for as long as necessary.
For each sensor, a load shed priority must be defined.
There are 16 levels of priorities to choose from, one being
the lowest, 16 being the highest. When the demand control
algorithm sheds loads, it begins by shedding loads with
high priority numbers. As the need for shedding increases,
loads with lower priority levels are shed first.
Interval Between Sheds [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
Sensors that have the same priority level are prioritized
based on the KW ratings specified in Section 8.10.7.2.,
Sensor Load Shed Setup.
Enter a value in the Interval Between Sheds field. Entering a zero will allow the sensor to be shed at any time
necessary.
After a sensor has come out of load shedding, the BEC
must wait for an amount of time equal to the Interval Between Sheds before it may call upon the sensor to be shed
again.
Min Shed Value [0 – 9999] [0]
When the sensor control value drops below the set point
specified in the Min Shed Value field, the sensor will come
out of shed. If the sensor is not in shed when the Min Shed
Value set point is reached, the sensor will not be allowed to
shed.
RMCC I&O Manual
System Setup • 8-55
8.10.6.3.
-
Schedule Load Shed Setpoints
Schedules that have the same priority level are prioritized based on the KW ratings specified in Section
8.10.7.3., Schedule Load Shed Setup.
-
Shed Duration [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
The Shed Duration set point is the maximum amount of
time a schedule may remain in shed. When the schedule has
been shed for an amount of time equal to the Shed Duration, the schedule will be allowed to reactivate.
Load shed set points for schedules are specified in this
screen.
Priority [0 – 16] [0]
For each schedule, a load shed priority must be defined.
There are 16 levels of priorities to choose from, one being
the lowest, 16 being the highest. When the demand control
algorithm sheds loads, it begins by shedding loads with
high priority numbers. As the need for shedding increases,
loads with lower priority levels are shed.
Enter a value in the Shed Duration field. Entering a zero
will allow the schedule to be shed for as long as necessary.
Interval Between Sheds [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
After a schedule has come out of load shedding, the
BEC must wait for an amount of time equal to the Interval
Between Sheds before it may call upon the schedule to be
shed again.
Enter a value in the Interval Between Sheds field. Entering a zero will allow the schedule to be shed at any time
necessary.
8.10.7. Load Shed Setup Menu
The Load Shed Setup Menu contains all options necessary to define kilowatt ratings for AHU stages, individual
sensors, and schedules. Kilowatt ratings are used by the demand control algorithm in determining how many kWs
may be saved by shedding, and which loads among a single
priority level will be shed first.
-
8.10.7.1.
-
AHU Load Shed Setup
-
8-56 • Demand Control Menu
The AHU Load Shed Setup screen is where kilowatt requirements for each heating and cooling stage within an
AHU are defined. For each defined stage, specify a kW value from 0 to 240.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
8.10.7.2.
-
The Sensor Load Shed Setup screen is where kilowatt
requirements for each sensor output are defined. For each
defined sensor output, specify a kW value from 0 to 240.
-
8.10.7.3.
-
Sensor Load Shed Setup
Pressing the UP and DOWN arrow keys scrolls through
the entire list of sensors from 1 to 64. DOWN scrolls forward, and UP scrolls backward.
Schedule Load Shed Setup
-
RMCC I&O Manual
The Schedule Load Shed Setup screen is where kilowatt requirements for each sensor are defined. For each defined schedule, specify a kW value from 0 to 240.
Pressing the UP and DOWN arrow keys scrolls through
the entire list of schedules from 1 to 24. DOWN scrolls forward, and UP scrolls backward.
System Setup • 8-57
9 Logs and Graphs
9.1.
AHU Logs
Item
-
9.1.1.
-
-
Logs
9-1
2
Run Times
9-1
3
Reset Run Times
9-2
4
Graphs
9-2
5
Log Interval
9-2
ENT
When Logs is selected from the Logging Menu, the first
screen that comes up will display data from the five most
recent logging periods. The logging times are shown in the
leftmost column; the date during which the logs were taken
is shown to the left of the current time in the upper right
hand corner of the screen.
#
To scroll through previous logs in reverse chronological order, press the DOWN arrow key. Pressing the UP arrow key scrolls through the logs in chronological order.
When the top or bottom of the Data Log is reached, users
may wrap around to the other side of the Data Log by continuing to press UP or DOWN.
Run Times
Heater Run Times
:
-
1
by the logging interval specified in Section 9.1.5., Log Interval.
The Logs screen displays the logged sensor values for
the AHU’s four temperature sensors, the AHU’s humidity
or dewpoint sensor, and the outside temperature sensor.
The time at which the BEC logs these values is determined
9.1.2.
Page
Logs
:
-
Description
-
-
ENT
#
Run times may be cleared by selecting the Reset Run
Times command from the Logging Menu (see Section
9.1.3., Reset Run Times).
Cool & Fans Run Times
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
-
The Heater Run Times screen shows the total run time
of the BEC, the total run time of each AHU heating stage,
and the percentage of total BEC run time during which the
heating stage has been on.
The run times of AHU cooling stages and fans are accessible in the Cool & Fans Run Times screen (see page
9-1).
BEC I&O Manual
The Cool & Fans Run Times screen shows the total run
time of the BEC, the total run time of each AHU cooling
stage, high fan, and low fan outputs, and the percentage of
System Navigation • 9-1
total BEC run time during which the heating stage or fan
has been on.
9.1.3.
-
9.1.4.
-
9.1.5.
-
Run times may be cleared by selecting the Reset Run
Times command from the Logging Menu (see Section
9.1.3., Reset Run Times).
Reset Run Times
-
When Reset Run Times is selected from the Logging
Menu, the system prompts users to press ENTER to proceed. Pressing ENTER resets all run time data in the Run
Times screens (see Section 9.1.2.) to zero. Pressing any
other key will exit to the Logging Menu without resetting
the run times.
Graphs
-
This menu and the options within it are identical to the
Graphs menu explained in Section 9.5., Graphs. For information on how to graph data logs, refer to Section 9.5.
Log Interval
-
The Log Interval is the amount of time between data log
entries. When the BEC records data into the Data Log, it
waits the amount of time specified in the Log Interval field
before taking another record. This log interval is applied to
all AHU-related logs.
Enter the desired Log Interval in hour:minute:second
format.
9.2.
Anti-Sweat Daily Logs
-
The BEC keeps a record of anti-sweat circuit operation
and displays the daily statistics in the Daily Logs screen.
Each row corresponds to a set of statistics for anti-sweat
circuits one and two. The month and day when the statistics
were taken is shown under the Date column.
%ON
The average ON time percentage for circuits one and
two are shown in the 1-%ON and 2-%ON fields.
9-2 • Anti-Sweat Daily Logs
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Max/Min (DP)
The highest and lowest daily dewpoint values for circuits one and two are shown in the Max/Min (DP) fields.
9.3.
Pressing the DOWN arrow key scrolls through the daily
logs in reverse chronological order; pressing the UP arrow
key scrolls through the daily logs in chronological order.
Sensor Logs Menu
Item
-
9.3.1.
Page
1
Interval
9-3
2
Daily Min/Max (non-digital only)
9-3
3
Daily ON Time / # ON Events
9-4
Interval
:
-
Description
-
-
ENT
#
The Interval Log is a list of logged sensor values recorded at even time intervals equal to the Logging Interval
defined in Section 8.9.1., Input Definition. Each row corresponds to a date, time, and sensor reading.
Pressing the DOWN arrow key scrolls through previous logs in reverse chronological order. Pressing the UP arrow key scrolls through previous logs in chronological
order.
9.3.2.
Daily Min/Max Logs
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
At the end of every day, the BEC takes the highest and
lowest sensor reading recorded for that day and lists these
values in the Daily Min/Max Log. For each date shown in
the Date column, the minimum and the maximum values
are listed along with the time they occurred.
Pressing the DOWN arrow key scrolls through previous logs in reverse chronological order. Pressing the UP arrow key scrolls through previous logs in chronological
order.
BEC I&O Manual
System Navigation • 9-3
9.3.3.
Daily ON Time/# ON Events
If a sensor is controlling an output, the total daily number of activations and the total daily ON time of the output
is recorded in the Daily ON time/# ON Events Log at the
end of each day. For each date shown in the Date column,
the number of ON events and the total daily ON time is displayed.
:
-
-
-
ENT
#
Pressing the DOWN arrow key scrolls through previous logs in reverse chronological order. Pressing the UP arrow key scrolls through previous logs in chronological
order.
9.4.
Demand Logs Menu
M
-
Z
Monthly Demand Logs. These screens display the calculated kW readings for a specified period of time.
9
Window Demand Log
The Window Demand Log displays the summary of
kW usage over the defined demand window.
Daily Demand Log
There are various logging screens that display the demand control information logged by the BEC. Options include Window Demand Logs, Daily Demand Logs, and
9.4.1.
The Daily Demand Log displays the summary of kW
usage during previous 24 hour periods. KW usage for up to
48 days may be logged in the Daily Demand Log.
Monthly Demand Log
The Monthly Demand Log displays the summary of
kW usage for the current month.
Window Log
Demand
M
-
Z
9
:
-
-
:
ENT
#
-
ENT
#
Demand is the average rate of energy consumption during the defined Demand Window. The Demand field displays the sum of kW for each interval over the total number
of intervals.
KW-peak
The Window Demand Log screen displays a summary
of the kW usage during the defined Demand Window. The
date and time of each log are also displayed.
9-4 • Demand Logs Menu
The peak power is the highest value of kW measured by
the kW or watt-hour transducer during a specified period of
time. The kW-Peak field displays the highest kW measured
by the transducer during the defined Demand Window.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
9.4.2.
Daily Log
Demand
M
-
Z
9
:
-
-
ENT
#
Demand is the average rate of energy consumption during the specified 24 hour period. The Demand field displays the highest average rate over the specified 24 hours
and displays the time of the occurrence.
KW-Peak
The Daily Demand Log displays a summary of the kW
usage during previous 24 hour periods. KW usage for up to
48 days may be logged in the Daily Demand Log. The date
and total kW hours used in the window during the 24 hour
period are listed.
9.4.3.
The peak power is the highest value of kW measured by
a kW or watt-hour transducer during a specified period of
time. The kW-Peak field displays the highest kW measured
by the transducer during the specified 24 hours and displays the time of the occurrence.
Shed
The Shed field displays the cumulative number of hours
the BEC was in shed during the specified 24 hours.
Monthly Log
Demand
M
-
Z
9
:
-
-
ENT
#
Demand is the average rate of energy consumption during the specified month. The Demand field displays the
highest average rate over the specified month and displays
the time of the occurrence.
KW-Peak
The Monthly Demand Log displays a summary of the
KW usage during previous months for up to 24 months.
The date and total KW hours used in the window during the
specified month are also listed.
9.5.
The peak power is the highest value of kW measured by
a kW or watt-hour transducer during a specified period of
time. The kW-Peak field displays the highest kW measured
by the transducer during the specified month and displays
the time of the occurrence.
Graphs
BEC Graphs menu displays the four different types of
graphs that may be generated:
•Ahu Temps - AHU temperature sensors. When
this option is selected, the BEC prompts users
to specify the desired AHU and temperature
sensor.
•Humidity - AHU humidity sensors. When this
option is selected, the BEC prompts users to
specify the desired AHU.
At the Graphs menu, Data Log entries for AHU temperatures, AHU humidities, outside temperatures, and other
sensors may be used to generate graphs to graphically display operational data over a defined period of time. The
BEC I&O Manual
•Outside Temp - the outside temperature sensor.
•Sensors - BEC sensors. When this option is selected, the BEC prompts users to specify the
desired sensor number (1-64).
System Navigation • 9-5
9.5.1.
Control Menu
When the desired graph data is specified, the BEC will
begin generating the graph. This may take up to one
minute. While the graph is being generated, the BEC displays a list of control options that may be used when the
graph appears on the screen:
9.5.2.
•
-> <- Scroll - the LEFT and RIGHT arrow keys
scroll the graph to the left and right.
•
C Go to Current - pressing C at any point in the
graph will revert the display back to the beginning
of the graph, where the most current data is displayed.
•
Z Zoom in, Zoom Out - pressing Z toggles the display in and out of zoom mode. Zooming in will display one hour’s worth of data in a single graph
display; zooming out will display ten hours worth of
readings on a single graph display.
•
0 Menu - pressing “0” returns the user to the
Graphs menu.
View Graph
The View Graph screen displays the requested compiled graph. Controls mentioned in Section 9.5.1., Control
Menu, such as scrolling, zooming, and exiting to the main
menu, are active in this screen.
9-6 • Graphs
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
10 Alarms
10.1.
M
Z
Alarm Log
9
The BEC Alarm Log is similar to other BEC logs in that
it records specific occurrences within the BEC according to
the user-defined logging interval and stores the information
for later review. Specifically, the BEC Alarm Log displays
all problems occurring in the BEC at any given time.
Alarm/Notice Indicator
The BEC Alarm Log displays all notices and alarms
generated within the BEC. This log may contain a total of
125 logged alarms or notices. Alarms are displayed in order
of occurrence with the most current alarm at the top of the
first page.
Location
Each BEC Alarm Log Entry consists of five parts: a
date, a time, an alarm/notice indicator, a location, and a description.
Description
Notice/Alarm
Message
Alarm/Notice Indicators appear immediately after the
time in an alarm log. A notice is represented by an “N” prefix, and an alarm is represented by an “A” prefix.
The alarm location, which appears after the alarm/notice indicator, shows where the alarm took place. The specific AHU, sensor, schedule, or other element will be listed
here.
The following is a table of descriptions for each alarm
that may appear in the BEC Alarm Log.
Description
Accum Hrs ON>
A sensor output has accumulated ON time greater than the number of hours specified in the alarm or
notice set point. See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Accum Min ON>
A sensor output has accumulated ON time grater than the number of minutes specified in the alarm
or notice set point. See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Bad Checksum
A problem has been detected on the I/O Network.
Bad Message
A problem has been detected on the I/O Network.
Demand High
The power usage measured by Circuit #1 has exceeded the Demand Setpoint. See Section 8.10.2.,
Demand Setpoints.
Device ONLINE
A defined communication board that was previously not responding has come back on line.
Dialout Unsuccessful
A user-defined dialout sequence has failed.
Events Accum>
The accumulated number of ON events for a sensor output has exceeded the alarm or notice set point.
See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Events x1000>
The accumulated number of ON events for a sensor output has exceeded the alarm or notice set point
multiplied by 1000. See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Fan Fail AHU
The fan proof input for the specified AHU is reading FALSE. This may signify a fan failure.
FPanel Login
User has logged into the system at the front panel at Level 1, 2, 3, or 4 access.
High Humid AHU
The high alarm value for an AHU’s humidity sensor or dewpoint cell has been exceeded for the userdefined alarm delay duration (see Dehum/Fan Alarms, page 10-3).
High Sensor
The high alarm value for a sensor defined as any type other than (1), (2), or (5) has been exceeded for
the user-defined alarm delay duration (see Section 10.6., Analog Alarms (all types except IRLDS)).
BEC I&O Manual
System Navigation • 10-1
Notice/Alarm
Message
Description
High Temp AHU
The high alarm value for the AHU control temperature value has been exceeded for the user-defined
alarm delay duration (see Heat/Cool Alarms, Section 10.2.).
High Xducer
The high alarm value for a transducer or a sensor defined as either (1), (2), or (5) has been exceeded
for the user-defined alarm delay duration.
Host Net Down
The BEC cannot connect to the 485 Alarm box or to other REFLECS controllers on the Host Bus
COM B network.
Hrs OFF Dur>
A sensor output has been OFF for a number of hours exceeding the alarm or notice set point. See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Hrs ON Dur>
A sensor output has been ON for a number of hours exceeding the alarm or notice set point. See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Low Sensor
The value for a sensor other than (1), (2), or (5) has fallen below its low alarm or notice set point for
the user-defined alarm delay duration (see Section 10.6., Analog Alarms (all types except IRLDS)).
Low Temp AHU
The value for an AHU control temperature has fallen below its low alarm or notice set point for the
user-defined alarm delay duration (see Heat/Cool Alarms, Section 10.2.).
Low Xducer
The value for a transducer or a sensor defined as either (1), (2), or (5) has fallen below its low alarm
or notice set point for the user-defined alarm delay duration.
Max-Min/Interval >
The difference between a sensor’s high and low values during an event interval has exceeded the sensor’s max-min set point. See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Max-Min/Interval <
The difference between a sensor’s high and low values during an event interval was less than the sensor’s max-min set point. See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Mins ON Dur >
A sensor output has been ON for a number of minutes greater than the alarm or notice set point value.
See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Mins OFF Dur >
A sensor output has been OFF for a number of minutes greater than the alarm or notice set point value.
See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Missed Token
A problem has occurred on the I/O Network.
No Response
A defined communication board cannot be located.
ON Events/Int >
During an event interval, a sensor output has turned ON a number of times greater than the alarm or
notice set point. See Section 10.5., Digital Alarms.
Phase Fail
A contact closure has been detected at an input defined as a phase loss device (PHASE LOSS) (see
Section 8.9.1., Input Definition).
Phase Restored
A open contact has been detected at an input defined as a phase loss device (PHASE LOSS) (see Section 8.9.1., Input Definition).
Power Failed
Power loss detected at the unit.
Power Restored
Power restored at the unit.
Remote Login
User has logged into the system from a remote location.
Reset
BEC has been reset without a power loss.
Sensor Short
A short has been detected at a sensor input connection (SENS01 - SENS64) (see Section 8.9.1., Input
Definition).
Sensor Open
An open circuit has been detected at a sensor input connection (SENS01 - SENS64) (see Section
8.9.1., Input Definition).
VS FAIL
A variable-speed fan inverter proof is shorted (reading FALSE). This may signify that the inverter
has failed.
Xducer Short
A short has been detected at a transducer input connection.
Xducer Open
An open circuit has been detected at a transducer input connection.
Unacknowledged alarms are alarms that are active and
must be reset or cleared to silence. Active alarms are signified by an asterisk appearing after the alarm/notice indica-
10-2 • Alarm Log
tor. When alarms are reset, all alarm dialouts are
discontinued and the alarms are maintained within the BEC
Alarm Log as acknowledged alarms. When alarms are re-
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
set, the asterisks that mark alarm entries as unacknowledged are cleared. To reset all alarms, press “9”.
Clearing alarms will silence all alarms and remove all
log entries from the BEC Alarm Log. To clear alarms, press
“R”. Since selecting this option removes all previous alarm
10.2.
records, a prompt will appear asking for confirmation of
the command. Pressing “Y” will clear all alarm log entries;
pressing any other key will return the display to the Alarm
Log screen.
Heat/Cool Alarms
- - -
Alarm and notice set points and delays related to dehumidification and fan alarms are specified using this screen.
:
ENT
Dehumidification [see description]
#
Alarm and notice set points may be entered as (N)ONE
(for no alarms), a humidity or dewpoint from -50 to 999
(for analog sensors), or as (O)PEN or (C)LOSED (for digital sensors). Delays, which are amounts of time the BEC
must wait before generating an alarm, may be set as any
number between 0 and 240 minutes.
Alarm and notice set points and delays related to heating and cooling alarms are specified using this screen.
Heat/Cool Setpoints/Delays [see description]
Alarm and notice set points may be entered as (N)ONE
(for no alarms), a temperature from -50 to 999 (for analog
sensors), or as (O)PEN or (C)LOSED (for digital sensors).
Delays, which are amounts of time the BEC must wait before generating an alarm, may be set as any number between 0 and 240 minutes.
Whenever the AHU’s control temperature reading is
below a heating notice set point or above a cooling notice
set point for a number of minutes equal to the set point’s
alarm delay, a notice will be generated. A notice is a lowlevel warning written into the BEC Alarm Log.
Whenever the AHU’s control temperature reading is
below a heating alarm set point or above a cooling alarm set
point for a number of minutes equal to the set point’s alarm
delay, an alarm will be generated. An alarm is a high-level
warning written into the BEC Alarm Log that may be accompanied by on-site operation of a bell, light, horn, or other warning device. Alarms may also initiate a modem
dialout sequence and/or the activation of a 485 Alarm Annunciator Panel.
Dehum/Fan Alarms
- - -
BEC I&O Manual
:
ENT
#
-
Whenever the AHU’s humidity or dewpoint reading is
above a dehumidification notice set point for a number of
minutes equal to the set point’s alarm delay, a notice will
be generated. A notice is a low-level warning written into
the BEC Alarm Log.
Whenever the AHU’s humidity or dewpoint reading is
above a dehumidification alarm set point for a number of
minutes equal to the set point’s alarm delay, an alarm will
be generated. An alarm is a high-level warning written into
the BEC Alarm Log that may be accompanied by on-site
operation of a bell, light, horn, or other warning device.
Alarms may also initiate a modem dialout sequence and/or
the activation of a 485 Alarm Annunciator Panel.
Fans [see description]
Fan failure inputs must be specified in the Sensor Type
field as either a digital closure (DIG) or as a pressure sensor
(PRS). The alarm set point may be set as (N)one (for no
alarms), a pressure value from -50 to 999 (for pressure sensors), or as (O)PEN or (C)LOSED (for digital sensors). Delays may be set as any amount of time between 0 and 240
seconds.
Whenever the AHU’s fan failure input exceeds the
alarm set point for an amount of time equal to the set
point’s delay, an alarm will be generated. An alarm is a
high-level warning written into the BEC Alarm Log that
may be accompanied by on-site operation of a bell, light,
horn, or other warning device. Alarms may also initiate a
modem dialout sequence and/or the activation of a 485
Alarm Annunciator Panel.
System Navigation • 10-3
10.3.
Alarms
:
- - 10.4.
The Separate Set Points Alarms screens are identical to
the ones described in Heat/Cool Alarms and Dehum/Fan
Alarms on page 10-3.
ENT
#
Fan Fail Alarm Bypass
- -
notices to be generated until after the time period specified
in the Time field.
:
ENT
#
-
2
The fan fail alarm bypass will continue until the specified type period has elapsed, or until the user manually ends
the bypass by selecting NORMAL in this field.
Time [0 – 1092 min] [60 min]
Fan failure alarms and notices may be bypassed for a
fixed period of time using the Fan Fail Alarm Bypass
screen.
The duration of the bypass is entered in the Time field.
After entering the desired number of minutes, begin the bypass by moving the cursor to the Fan Failure Alarm field
and selecting DISABLE-TIMED.
Time Remaining
Fan Failure Alarm [NORMAL/DISABLE-TIMED]
[NORMAL]
When a bypass is active, the Time Remaining field
shows the amount of time left before the bypass ends.
The Fan Failure Alarm field is used to begin the fan
failure alarm bypass. When DISABLE-TIMED is entered
in this field, the BEC will not permit fan failure alarms or
Bypass State
10.5.
The Bypass State shows if a fan failure alarm bypass is
currently active. If a bypass is active, this field will display
TIMED. Otherwise, this field will display NORMAL.
Digital Alarms
- - -
There are twelve condition equations that may be entered
in the Alarm/Notice Type field:
:
ENT
#
Digital alarms are generated by comparing a number of
digital transitions to a user-defined value using a pre-defined comparison equation. Two alarm conditions and two
notice conditions may be set up in this fashion.
•
(0) None - No alarm.
•
(1) Last ON Duration > min - an alarm or notice
will be generated when the sensor turns the controlled output ON for more than the specified value
in minutes.
•
(2) Last OFF Duration > min - an alarm or notice
will be generated when the sensor turns the controlled output OFF for more than the specified value
in minutes.
•
(3) Accumulated # of ON events > VALUE - an
alarm or notice will be generated when the total
number of times the sensor-controlled output turns
ON is greater than the set point.
•
(4) Accumulated # of ON events > VALUE x 1000 an alarm or notice will be generated when the total
number of times the sensor-controlled output turns
ON is greater than the set point times 1000.
Alarm/Notice Types [options] [NONE]
Alarm and notice types are selected and entered in the
first column of fields. The second column, rightmost on the
screen, is where the comparison set point value is entered.
10-4 • Alarms
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
•
(5) # of ON events per interval > VALUE - an alarm
or notice will be generated if the total number of ON
events during the sensor’s Event Interval (see Section 8.7.3.1., Sensor Definition) is greater than the
set point.
•
(6) Accumulated ON time > hrs - an alarm or notice
will be generated if the accumulated run time of the
sensor-controlled output is greater than the specified value in hours.
•
(7) - Accumulated ON time > min - an alarm or notice will be generated if the accumulated run time of
the sensor-controlled output is greater than the specified value in minutes.
•
(8) - Last ON duration > hrs - an alarm or notice
will be generated when the sensor turns the controlled output ON for more than the specified value
in hours.
•
(9) - Last OFF duration > hrs - an alarm or notice
will be generated when the sensor turns the controlled output OFF for more than the specified value
in hours.
10.6.
•
(A) - Max-Min for interval > VALUE (analog sensors only) - an alarm or notice will be generated
when, during the course of an Event Interval (see
Section 8.7.3.1., Sensor Definition), the difference
between the highest recorded sensor reading and the
lowest recorded sensor reading is greater than the
set point.
•
(B) - Max-Min for interval < VALUE (analog sensors only) - an alarm or notice will be generated
when, during the course of an Event Interval (see
Section 8.7.3.1., Sensor Definition), the difference
between the highest recorded sensor reading and the
lowest recorded sensor reading is less than the set
point.
A notice creates an entry in the BEC Alarm Log and initiates no other signal. An alarm is a high-level warning that
will appear in the BEC Alarm Log and may be accompanied by a contact closure for on-site operation of a bell,
light, horn, etc. An alarm may also initiate an alarm dialout
sequence and/or the activation of the 485 Alarm Annunciator Panel.
Analog Alarms (all types except IRLDS)
- - -
:
ENT
#
nal. An alarm is a high-level warning that will appear in the
BEC Alarm Log and may be accompanied by a contact closure for on-site operation of a bell, light, horn, etc. An
alarm may also initiate an alarm dialout sequence and/or
the activation of the 485 Alarm Annunciator Panel.
When the BEC generates an alarm or a notice, it must
wait the specified time delay before activating the alarm sequence.
Alarm Control within the BEC includes the generation
of alarms or notices when specific control values exceed HI
and LO alarm set points. When the current sensor reading
exceeds the user-defined HI and LO alarm set points, an
alarm or notice will be generated. These sensor alarm set
points are defined at the Analog Alarm Setpoints screen.
The Analog Alarms screen for the IRLDS is slightly
different. See Section 10.7., Analog Alarms (IRLDS
only).
Alarms/Notices [-9999 – 9999, (O)PEN, (C)LOSED]
[NONE] and Alarm/Notice Delays [0 – 240 min] [0
min]
When control values are received by the BEC from the
specified sensors, they may be compared to the user-defined High and Low alarm set points to determine if the
BEC should generate an alarm or notice. A notice creates
an entry in the BEC Alarm Log and initiates no other sig-
BEC I&O Manual
To define sensor alarm set points and time delays, enter
the appropriate High and Low set points and time delays in
the appropriate High and Low fields. To generate an alarm
when the control value exceeds the alarm set points, define
the set points in the Alarms fields. To generate a notice
when the control value exceeds the alarm set points, define
the set points in the Notices fields. Sensor alarm set points
may be defined as specific values for analog sensor inputs
or simply as CLOSED or OPEN for digital input sensors.
Alarm Setpt Shift When Unocc [-99 – 99] [0]
If desired, the alarm and notice set points may be shifted up or down during unoccupied building times. The BEC
adds the value of the Hi Alarm, Lo Alarm, Hi Notice, and
Lo Notice set points when the sensor’s defined schedule input (see Section 8.7.3.1., Sensor Definition) sends an unoccupied signal.
To shift the set points up during unoccupied mode, enter a positive Alarm Setpt Shift value. To shift them down,
enter a negative Alarm Setpt Shift value.
System Navigation • 10-5
10.7.
Analog Alarms (IRLDS only)
- - -
:
1.
There are no Lo Alarm and Lo Notice alarm set points.
2.
The IRLDS is capable of generating Fault Alarms.
ENT
#
Refer to Section 10.6. for alarm and notice set point
programming information.
Fault Alarm [(E)NABLED/(D)ISABLE] [E]
The Analog Alarms screen for the IRLDS sensor type
is slightly different than the Analog Alarms screen for all
other sensor types (as described in Section 10.6., Analog
Alarms (all types except IRLDS). The two differences are:
10.8.
The IRLDS sends a 5 V DC signal whenever a zone’s
tube is blocked or when a system fault occurs. When the
Fault Alarm is enabled, the BEC will generate a system
fault alarm whenever the sensor voltage climbs above 4.95
V.
To activate the Fault Alarm feature, select “E”-Enable
in this field. Otherwise, select “D”-Disable.
Alarm Overrides
Override Input [0 – 16] [0]
- - -
:
ENT
#
Sensor alarm overrides may be linked to one of the 16
sensor override inputs. When an input number from 1 to 16
is entered, alarms will be overridden when the input closes.
Delay [0 – 9999 sec.] [0 sec.]
When a closed sensor override input opens, the BEC
continues to override sensor alarms for an amount of time
equal to the Delay before enabling sensor alarms. If a delay
is desired, enter an amount of time in the Delay field.
Using the Alarm Overrides screen, sensor alarms may
be configured to override upon a contact closure or upon
activation of a schedule. Also, sensor alarm overrides may
be made to follow output overrides at this screen.
Override Schedule [1 – 24] [0]
Sensor alarm overrides may follow a BEC schedule.
When an override schedule number from 1 to 24 is entered,
alarms will be overridden when the schedule is ON and enabled when the schedule is OFF.
10-6 • Analog Alarms (IRLDS only)
Override During Unoccupied [Yes/No] [No]
If the sensor is currently linked to an unoccupied schedule, sensor alarms may be configured to be overridden during unoccupied mode. Enter “Y” for Yes in the Override
During Unoccupied field to override alarms during unoccupied mode.
Override When Output Overridden [Yes/No] [No]
Entering “Y”es in the Override When Output Overridden field automatically overrides the sensor alarms whenever the sensor-controlled output is overridden. For more
information about output overrides, see Section 8.7.5.1.,
Output Overrides.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
10.9.
Send to 485 Alarm Panel
- -
Alarms and notices are defined by filter group in Table
10-1. The Send to 485 Alarm Panel screen allows for definition of which alarms and notices will be sent to the 485
Alarm Panel. All alarms default as YES and are sent to the
485 panel unless they are set so that the controller does not
send an alarm group.
2
Alarm Filtering Group
Alarm/Notice
Messages
Alarm Filtering Group
Alarm/Notice
Messages
SYSTEM ALMS
Setpts Corrupt
Emergency Off
Reset
Restore Error
Remote Login
Fpanel Login
NETWORK ALMS
Missed Token
No Response
Bad Message
Bad Checksum
POWER ALMS
Curtailment On
Curtailment Off
Power Failed
Power Restored
Phase Fail
Demand High
DIGITAL ALMS
SENS HI ALMS
High Sensor
High Xducer
SENS LO ALMS
Low Sensor
Low Xducer
Mins On Dur >
Mins OFF Dur >
Events Accum >
Events x 1000 >
ON Events/Int >
Accum Hrs ON
Accum Min ON >
Hrs ON Dur >
Hrs OFF Dur >
Max-Min Int >
Max-Min Int <
SENS FAIL ALMS
Sensor Short
Sensor Open
Xducer Short
Xducer Open
PROOF ALMS
Fan Fail AHU
VS Fail
AHU ALMS
Low Temp AHU
High Temp AHU
High Humid AHU
MISC ALMS
All Lights On
Table 10-1-Alarms/Notices by Group
BEC I&O Manual
System Navigation • 10-7
10.10. Alarm Setpoints
-
or acknowledged at the BEC Alarms screen (see Section
10).
Delay [0 – 240 min.] [0 min.]
The Time Delay is the specified duration the BEC must
wait before generating an alarm or notice. Enter a delay in
the Delay field.
Alarm-Notice [options] [Disabled]
A demand alarm or notice is a warning that signifies an
abnormal kW reading within the BEC. When the current
kW reading exceeds the user-defined High Demand Alarm
set point, an alarm or notice will be generated.
High Demand Alarm [0 – 9999 kW] [0 kW]
The BEC will send an alarm or notice when the selected
circuit’s kW reading exceeds the High Demand Alarm set
point.
Enter the High Demand Alarm set point in the High Demand Alarm field. Alarms may be viewed, archived, and/
10-8 • Alarm Setpoints
In the alarm-notice field, high demand conditions may
be configured to produce an alarm, a notice, or no warnings
at all.
An alarm appears in an alarm log and may be accompanied by a contact closure for on-site operation of a bell,
light, horn, etc. and may also be accompanied by an alarm
dialout sequence and/or activation of the 485 Alarm Annunciator Panel. A notice creates an entry in an alarm log
and initiates no other signal.
Enter a “1” to generate demand alarms, a “2” to generate notices, or a “0” to disable demand warnings.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Appendix A–Troubleshooting Guide for the BEC
Problem
No front display
Possible Cause(s)
Remedy
• Screen Saver is running
• Touch any key to light screen
• No main power
• Open unit and make sure power is on (S1 on PIB) and the screen’s
ribbon cable is securely connected to both boards, adjust the contrast
• Contrast is set too low
• The screen’s ribbon cable is
disconnected
• A fuse is blown
• Check L1 and L2 for rated voltage (connector TB6 on PIB board)
• Check or replace fuse to main controller
• Swap power interface boards
BEC starts but will not control devices
• I/O boards are offline
• Check that I/O board is defined within the BEC (Section 8.9.8.1.)
• BEC not programmed correctly
• Check that network switches are set correctly (Section 4.13.)
• Check that terminating jumpers are set correctly (Section 4.10.)
• Reset board by cycling power
• Check the power supply on board
• Check the network wiring
• Swap boards if necessary
All sensors read open
• I/O boards are offline
• Check that I/O board is defined within the BEC (Section 8.9.8.1.)
• BEC not programmed correctly
• Check that network switches are set correctly (Section 4.13.)
• Check that terminating jumpers are set correctly (Section 4.10.)
• Reset board by cycling power
• Check the power supply on board
• Check the network wiring
• Swap boards if necessary
Temperature sensor not reading properly
• Input switch not set properly
• Check that input dip switch is in the up position (Section 5.5.)
• Check that Temp sensor is relaying the correct resistance, replace
Temp sensor if necessary
BEC will not communicate with 485
Alarm Panel
• Host network is not activated
• Reset the host network within the BEC
• Switch on BEC processor is
not set properly
• Make sure S1 on the processor board has dip switches 1 and 5 in
the up position
• Network wiring is not correct
• Check the host network wiring (Section 4.3.)
BEC will not communicate remotely
• Baud rate is not set correctly
• Check that baud rate is set properly
• Parity and Data Bits are not set
correctly
• Check that parity is set to none and data bits are set to 8 under
remote communication
• Incorrect modem string in
BEC
• Call CPC for brand/type specific modem string to use
• Check that the modem cable is wired to COM C on the PIB
• Wiring is incorrect on COM C
BEC resets
• Low voltage
• Faulty power interface board
• Faulty processor board
• Power Spikes
• Check L1 and L2 for rated voltage, connector TB6 on PIB board. If
low voltage, try plugging in a zip cord and plugging into a wall
outlet. DO NOT leave this as permanent installation.
• Swap PIB board with another rack to see if the problem persists.
Replace original board if necessary.
• Swap processor boards. Take caution in handling the board due to
the potential to lose the existing program. Call CPC’s technical
support for help in this procedure—1(800)829-2724.
If you have other problems or need additional suggestions for correcting your problems call CPC’s technical support at
1(800)829-2724.
BCU I&O Manual
A-1
Appendix B–BEC Technical Specifications
Component
Technical Specification
Dimensions
10" Wide x 12 1/4" High x 4 1/8" Deep
Weight
Approx. 7.0 lbs.
Operating Environment
Temperature: -20° F to 120° F; Humidity: 0-95% non-condensing
Display Panel
40 column x 8 line, back lit LCD
Power Input
120 V AC / 208 V AC Selectable, 48 Watts Maximum
Keypad
Full Alpha/Numeric Keypad With Directional Arrows
Communications
Three RS485 (COM A, COM B & COM D) Networks
One RS485 (COM C) Networks
Battery Backup
10 Year Life With Minimum 24 hours and Memory Backup Minimum 6 weeks
BEC I&O Manual
B-1
Appendix C–BEC Front Panel Screens
--HVAC SETPOINTS MENU-1.Heat-Cool
3.Alarms
2.Misc. Setpoints
SELECT NUMBER
12:00
0=MENU
--HVAC SETUP MENU-12:00
1.Strategy
4.Override Setup
2.Fans
5.Scheduling
3.Heat-Cool Setup
6.Quick Setup
SELECT
SELECT NUMBER
NUMBER
SEE HVAC SET
POINTS SCREENS
(SINGLE AND SEPARATE)
=PREV
=NEXT
O=MENU
0=MENU
SEE FOLLOWING
PAGE FOR HVAC
SETUP SCREENS
HEATING BYPASS AHU #1
1
2
3
4
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
FIXED FIXED FIXED FIXED
7
8
NORM
NORM
FIXED FIXED
5
NORM
FIXED
12:00
6
NORM
FIXED
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
0=MENU
COOLING BYPASS AHU #1
1
2
3
4
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
FIXED FIXED FIXED FIXED
FAN BYPASS
HI
LOW
NORM
NORM
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
12:00
6
NORM
FIXED
5
NORM
FIXED
0=MENU
0=MENU
BEC --LOGGING MENU-1.Logs
4.Graphs
2.Run Times
5.Log Interval
3.Reset Run Times
SELECT
NUMBER
SELECT NUMBER
12:00
BEC -- BOILER MENU -1.Status
2.Setpoints
3.Setup
4.Offset
0=MENU
0=MENU
SEE FOLLOWING PAGE
FOR HVAC LOGGING
SCREENS
0=MENU
SELECT
SELECT NUMBER
NUMBER
BOILER #1 STATUS
12:00
Boiler Output
: OFF
Boiler Water temp : NDF
Outside temp
: NDF
Setpts: 120 @ 60 outside;Ovrd OFF:NON
Setpts: 180 @
0 outside;Ovrd ON :NON
Output ON if boiler water temp <= NON
=TOGGLE
BOILER; TEMPS=DEG
0=MENU
SELECT
NUMBER
0=MENU
BOILER #1 SETPOINTS
Boiler Water temp
@ Outside high temp of
Ovrd. OFF if outside temp >=
Boiler Water temp
@ Outside low temp of
Ovrd. ON if outside temp <=
=TOGGLE
BOILER; TEMPS=DEG
SELECT
NUMBER
12:00
: 120
: 060
: NON
: 180
: 000
: NON
0=MENU
0=MENU
BOILER #2 STATUS
12:00
Boiler Output
: OFF
Boiler Water temp : NDF
Outside temp
: NDF
Setpts: 120 @ 60 outside;Ovrd OFF:NON
Setpts: 180 @
0 outside;Ovrd ON :NON
Output ON if boiler water temp <= NON
=TOGGLE
BOILER; TEMPS=DEG
0=MENU
SELECT
NUMBER
0=MENU
BOILER #2 SETPOINTS
Boiler Water temp
@ Outside high temp of
Ovrd. OFF if outside temp >=
Boiler Water temp
@ Outside low temp of
Ovrd. ON if outside temp <=
=TOGGLE
BOILER; TEMPS=DEG
SELECT
NUMBER
:
:
:
:
:
:
HVAC SET POINT SCREENS
(SINGLE SET POINT STRATEGY)
--HVAC SETPOINTS MENU-1.Heat-Cool
3.Alarms
2.Misc. Setpoints
SELECT NUMBER
BEC --SETPOINTS-- AHU #1
12:00
WINTER SETPOINT
SUMMER SETPOINT
HEAT S.P. 065
COOL S.P. 070
Dead Band 02
Dead Band 02
DEHUM. S.P. 070 %% Dead band 10
=PREV,
=NEXT, <--> SET
0=MENU
BEC -NIGHT SET BACK- AHU #1
12:00
HEAT S.P. 065
COOL S.P. 070
Dead Band 02
Dead Band 02
Aux. Heat Use YES
DEHUM. S.P.
070
%% Dead Band 10
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- ->
SELECT
BEC --DEHUM-AHU #1
Delay between Stages: 000
Minimum Store Temperature
Enable Dehum Reheat Setpt
Dehum Reheat Time Delay:
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- ->
SELECT
0=MENU
BEC --STAGES DELAYS-- AHU
Stage #
ON OFF
Stage
RECL 1 005 005
RECL
RECL 3 005 005
RECL
AUXIL 5 005 005
AUXIL
AUXIL 7 005 005
AUXIL
COOL 1 001 001
COOL
=PREV,NUMBER
<-->SET
SELECT
BEC --STAGES
Stage #
ON
COOL 3 001
COOL 5 001
DELAYS-- AHU
OFF
Stage
001
COOL
001
COOL
=PREV,NUMBER
<-->SET
SELECT
12:00
m
060
NO
001 m
#1
#
2
4
6
8
2
0=MENU
0=MENU
BEC -ALARMS- AHU #1
DEHUMIDFICATION
Alarm S.P. NON
Delay
Notice S.P. NON
Delay
FANS
Sensor type DIG
Alarm S.P. 000
Delay
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
12:00
003
003
003
003
0=MENU
0=MENU
12:00
003
003
030
0=MENU
BEC
--SETPOINTS-AHU #1
Stage # CUT ON DELAY CUT OFF
RECL 1
065
005
075
RECL 2
066
005
076
RECL 3
067
005
077
RECL 4
068
005
078
AUXIL 5
069
005
079
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
BEC
--SETPOINTS-AHU #1
Stage # CUT ON DELAY CUT OFF
AUXIL 6
070
005
080
AUXIL 7
071
005
081
AUXIL 8
072
005
082
COOL 1
080
001
075
COOL 2
079
001
074
=PREV,
=NEXT,
<->
SET
SELECT NUMBER
BEC
Stage
COOL
COOL
COOL
COOL
--SETPOINTS-CUT ON DELAY
078
001
077
001
076
001
075
001
#
3
4
5
6
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT,
SELECT
AHU #1
CUT OFF
073
072
071
070
<- -> SET
12:00
DELAY
005
005
005
005
005
0=MENU
0=MENU
12:00
DELAY
005
005
005
001
001
0=MENU
BOILER #2 SETUP
Boiler input type:
=TOGGLE
BOILER
SELECT
NUMBER
0=MENU
0=MENU
12:00
Temp
0=MENU
0=MENU
BOILER #1 OFFSET
Water Temperature Offset : 000
=TOGGLE
BOILER
SELECT
NUMBER
12:00
0=MENU
0=MENU
BOILER #2 OFFSET
Water Temperature Offset : 000
=TOGGLE
BOILER
SELECT
NUMBER
12:00
0=MENU
0=MENU
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
OR
BEC --DEHUM. SETP.-- AHU #1
0=MENU
0=MENU
12:00
Setpoint 070
Dead Band 10
Delay between Stages 000
Minimum store temp. 060
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
0=MENU
BEC --MISC. SETP-- AHU #1
12:00
Term. aux. heat if temp outside
More than NON
Open outside air damper if
1. T> NON
During Heat Season
2. T< NON
During Cool Season
=PREV,NUMBER
<--> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
0=MENU
BEC -- ALARMS -- AHU #1
HEAT
Alarm S.P. NON
Delay
Notice S.P. NON
Delay
COOL
Alarm S.P. NON
Delay
Notice S.P. NON
Delay
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
BEC -ALARMS- AHU #1
DEHUMIDFICATION
Alarm S.P. NON
Delay
Notice S.P. NON
Delay
FANS
Sensor type DIG
Alarm S.P. 000
Delay
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
12:00
003
003
003
003
0=MENU
0=MENU
12:00
003
003
030
0=MENU
0=MENU
0=MENU
#1
12:00
#
ON OFF
4 001 001
6 001 001
BEC --NIGHT SET BACK-- AHU #1 12:00
Stage # USE?
CUT ON CUT OFF
AUXIL 6 YES
070
080
AUXI 7 YES
071
081
AUXIL 8 YES
072
082
COOL 1 YES
080
075
COOL 2 YES
079
074
=PREV,
=NEXT,
<->
SET
0=MENU
SELECT NUMBER
0=MENU
--NIGHT SET BACK-# USE?
CUT ON
3 YES
078
4 YES
077
5 YES
076
6 YES
075
BEC --DEHUM. SETP.-- AHU #1
12:00
DAY YES
NIGHT YES
S.P. 070 %%
! S.P. 070 %%
Dead band 10
! Dead band 10
Delay between Stages 000 m
Minimum store temp 060
12:00
DELAY
001
001
001
001
BEC --NIGHT SET BACK-- AHU #1 12:00
Stage # USE?
CUT ON CUT OFF
RECL 1 YES
065
075
RECL 2 YES
066
076
RECL 3 YES
067
077
RECL 4 YES
068
078
AUXIL 5 YES
069
079
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
BEC
Stage
COOL
COOL
COOL
COOL
BEC I&O Manual
=TOGGLE
BOILER
SELECT
NUMBER
SELECT NUMBER
BEC -- ALARMS -- AHU #1
HEAT
Alarm S.P. NON
Delay
Notice S.P. NON
Delay
COOL
Alarm S.P. NON
Delay
Notice S.P. NON
Delay
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
12:00
ON OFF
005 005
005 005
005 005
005 005
001 001
0=MENU
0=MENU
0=MENU
12:00
Temp
--HVAC SETPOINTS MENU-12:00
1.Heat-Cool
3.Misc. Setpoints
2.Dehum.
4.Alarms
0=MENU
0=MENU
0=MENU
0=MENU
0=MENU
HVAC SET POINT SCREENS
(SEPARATE SET POINT STRATEGY)
12:00
BEC --MISC. SETP-- AHU #1
12:00
Term. aux. heat if temp outside
More than NON
Open outside air damper if
1. T> NON
During Heat Season
2. T< NON
During Cool Season
=PREV,NUMBER
<--> SET
SELECT
12:00
120
060
NON
180
000
NON
0=MENU
0=MENU
BOILER #1 SETUP
Boiler input type:
12:00
AHU #1 12:00
CUT OFF
073
072
071
070
C-1
HVAC SETUP
MENU
VARIABLE-SPEED
FAN SCREENS
--HVAC SETUP MENU-12:00
1.Strategy
4.Override Setup
2.Fans
5.Scheduling
3.Heat-Cool Setup
6.Quick Setup
SELECT
SELECT NUMBER
NUMBER
BEC -- STRATEGY -12:00
SINGLE S.P.
Number of AHU's 1
Winter/Summer switch over 045
Day Start
08:00
Day End
22:00
External S.P. Shift Reset Time 00:00
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- ->SET
0=MENU
SELECT
0=MENU
-- FAIL SAFE SETUP -12:00
Enable Fail Safe Mode : NO
If option is enabled and temperature
sensor or 16AI board fail, Heat and
Cool outputs will go to Fail Safe State.
(Not applicable to 8IO or CIO Boards).
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- ->SET
0=MENU
SELECT
0=MENU
BEC -FAN SETUP- AHU #1
12:00
FAN TYPE:SINGLE SPEED
CURRENT:DAY
DAY
NIGHT
AUTO
AUTO
Day Start/Day End Schedule Number:00
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
0=MENU
BEC
BEC -- FAN FAIL SETUP -12:00
Fan Fail Input when Fan is ON: OPEN
Enable Fans During Fan Fail: NO
No - Fans will be disabled.
Yes - Fans remain on during fan fail.
=PREV,NUMBER
<- ->SET
SELECT
0=MENU
SEE
VARIABLE-SPEED
AND TWO-SPEED
FAN SETUP
(SINGLE-SPEED
SHOWN HERE)
BEC -FAN SETUPFAN TYPE:VS FAN
DAY
AUTO
Day Start/Day End
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <SELECT
O=MENU
0=MENU
BEC -- MAIN SETUP -AHU #1
12:00
# of Recl. Heat Stages 0
# of Aux. Heat Stages 0
# of Cool Stages 0 Avail. for Dehum. 0
Humidity Contrl Source: AHU HUMIDITY
Reclaim Heat during dehum. NO
Auxil. Heat during dehum.
NO
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
0=MENU
BEC -EXTERNAL OVERRIDES-BYPASS 12:00
OVERRIDE 1
Delay 000
OVERRIDE 2
Delay 000
OVERRIDE 3
Delay 000
External BYPASS Heating ON for 000 Min
External BYPASS Cooling ON for 000 Min
=PREV, =NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
BEC -- MAIN SETUP -- AHU #1
12:00
Mode of operation SEASONAL LOCKOUT
Control Temp. Calculated as: AVG
Seasonal Setpoints Shift:
N/A
Use Night Set Back NO
Use Warm UP NO
Start Warm up After 00:00
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
0=MENU
BEC -COOL TERMINATION12:00
Terminate if Coil Air Temp.below ...
(Each Cool Stage has separate T input)
AHU 1 : 032
(FRZSTAT1-1....6 Inputs)
AHU 2 : 032
(FRZSTAT2-1....6 Inputs)
AHU 3 : 032
(FRZSTAT3-1....6 Inputs)
AHU 4 : 032
(FRZSTAT4-1....6 Inputs)
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
0=MENU
BEC -UNOCCUPIED MODE- AHU #1
12:00
Use Schedule 00
(if 0 - ignore all)
HEAT
COOL
1. All OFF - NO
1. All OFF - NO
2. Aux. OFF - NO
2. S.P. Shift 000
3. S.P. shift:000
3. Dehum OFF- NO
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
0=MENU
Quick Setup
1.Setup A
2.Setup B
3.Setup C
4.Setup D
5.Setup E
SELECT
SELECT NUMBER
NUMBER
0=MENU
0=MENU
12:00
CURRENT:DAY
NIGHT
AUTO
Schedule Number:00
-> SET
0=MENU
0=MENU
BEC -FAN SETUP- AHU #1
12:00
FAN TYPE:TWO SPEED
CURRENT:DAY
DAY
NIGHT
AUTO
AUTO
Day Start/Day End Schedule Number:00
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
0=MENU
BEC -VS FAN- SETUP AHU #1
12:00
Mode of operation : STAGES
Minimum VS% : 020
Default VS% : 020
Diff. Setpoint in Cooling Mode: 10
Diff. Setpoint in Heating Mode: 10
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
0=MENU
BEC -2 SPEED FAN SETUP- AHU #1 12:00
DAY:AUTO
Default Speed:N/A
NIGHT:AUTO
Default Speed:N/A
Switch Fan Speed on Failure:NO
BEC -VS FANHEAT
1
2
3
4
000 000 000 000
COOL
1
2
3
4
000 000 000 000
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
AHU #1
AHU #1
%
5
6
000 000
%
5
6
000 000
12:00
7
8
000 000
Dehum
Slow down
000
0=MENU
0=MENU
BEC -COOL TERMINATION12:00
Terminate if Coil Air Temp.below ...
(Each Cool Stage had separate T input)
AHU 5 : 032
(FRZSTAT5-1....6 Inputs)
AHU 6 : 032
(FRZSTAT6-1....6 Inputs)
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
TWO-SPEED
FAN SCREENS
=PREV, =NEXT
0=MENU
BEC -2 SPEED FAN SETUP- AHU #1 12:00
Hi and Lo Relays On for Low Speed :NO
Hi and Lo Relays On for High Speed:NO
Always Start Fan On High Speed:NO
=PREV, =NEXT
0=MENU
BEC -2 SPEED FANHEAT
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
1
DAY
L L L L L L L L
L
NIGHT
L L L L L L L L
L
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
AHU #1
COOL
2 3 4 5 6
L L L L L
L L L L L
12:00
DEH
.
.
0=MENU
HVAC LOGGING
MENU
BEC --LOGGING MENU-1.Logs
4.Graphs
2.Run Times
5.Log Interval
3.Reset Run Times
SELECT
SELECT NUMBER
NUMBER
BEC --LOGS-- AHU #1
TIME TEMP1 2 3
4
00:00 NDF NDF NDF NDF
00:00 NDF NDF NDF NDF
00:00 NDF NDF NDF NDF
00:00 NDF NDF NDF NDF
00:00 NDF NDF NDF NDF
=PREV PAGE
SELECT
NUMBER=NEXT PAGE
00/00
12:00
HUM OUTS TEMP
NDF NDF
NDF NDF
NDF NDF
NDF NDF
NDF NDF
0=MENU
BEC --HEATER RUN TIMES- AHU #1
Total run time: 00000 hours
1 00000 hrs ( 0%) 2 00000 hrs
3 00000 hrs ( 0%) 4 00000 hrs
5 00000 hrs ( 0%) 6 00000 hrs
7 00000 hrs ( 0%) 8 00000 hrs
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
SELECT
COOL & FANS
Total time:
1 00000 hrs
3 00000 hrs
5 00000 hrs
RUN TIMES- AHU #1
00000 hours
( 0%) 2 00000 hrs
( 0%) 4 00000 hrs
( 0%) 6 00000 hrs
High Fan 00000 hrs
Low Fan 00000 hrs
=PREV NUMBER
SELECT
0=MENU
0=MENU
12:00
( 0%)
( 0%)
( 0%)
( 0%)
0=MENU
12:00
12:00
Clearing RUN TIMES
Push ENT to Proceed
BEC --GRAPHS MENU-12:00
1.Ahu Temps
3.Outside Temp.
2.Humidity
4.Sensors
SELECT NUMBER
12:00
( 0%)
( 0%)
( 0%)
( 0%)
( 0%)
0=MENU
0=MENU
GRAPH CONTROLS
-> <- Scroll
C - Go to current
Z - Zoom out, Zoom in
0 - Menu
-- PLEASE WAIT -MAKE SELECTION
0
mx=0
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT,
SELECT
12:00
Overd.tim
NONE
NONE
NONE
NONE
0=MENU
0=MENU
BEC -- SCHEDULE OVERRIDES
--MANUAL-SCHEDULE(01..04) TYPE ON/OFF
SCHEDULE1
NONE
OFF
SCHEDULE2
NONE
OFF
SCHEDULE3
NONE
OFF
SCHEDULE4
NONE
OFF
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
-- 12:00
:-DIGITAL:EXT.DELAY
: 000
: 000
: 000
: 000
0=MENU
0=MENU
BEC SCHEDULE#01:SCHEDULE1
EVNT TIME DAY FUNC EVNT TIME
1 NONE WKD OFF
5 NONE
2 NONE WKD OFF
6 NONE
3 NONE WKD OFF
7 NONE
4 NONE WKD OFF
8 NONE
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
BEC SCHEDULE#01:SCHEDULE1
EVNT TIME DAY FUNC EVNT TIME
9 NONE WKD OFF 13 NONE
10 NONE WKD OFF 14 NONE
11 NONE WKD OFF 15 NONE
12 NONE WKD OFF 16 NONE
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
C-2
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
12:00
0=MENU
int=0:03:00
15/03 12:00
BEC -LIGHT SENSORType: LIN
Currently: 00000
-FOR LINEAR SENSOR ONLYGain:
0175
Offset: 00.000 V
12:00
MENU -12:00
5. Light Sensor
6. Maintenance Ovrd.
7. Dimmer Control
8. Schedule Proofs
SELECT NUMBER
BEC - SCHEDULE STATUS Sched #01..04
STATUS
SCHEDULE1
OFF
SCHEDULE2
OFF
SCHEDULE3
OFF
SCHEDULE4
OFF
12:00
mn=0
0
15/03 11:57
BEC -- SCHEDULE
1. Status
2. Overrides
3. Schedules
4. Holidays
BEC --LOG INTERVAL-ENTER LOG INTERVAL
00:00:00
0=MENU
DAY
WKD
WKD
WKD
WKD
12:00
FUNC
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
0=MENU
0=MENU
BEC -- DEFINE HOLIDAYS -12:00
TYPE DEFINITION
TYPE DEFINITION
HD1 NONE
HD6 NONE
HD2 NONE
HD7 NONE
HD3 NONE
HD8 NONE
HD4 NONE
SP-A 00/00/00
HD5 NONE
SP-B 00/00/00
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
0=MENU
DAY
WKD
WKD
WKD
WKD
12:00
FUNC
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
0=MENU
BEC -- DEFINE HOLIDAYS -12:00
TYPE DEFINITION
TYPE DEFINITION
HD9
NONE
HD13 NONE
HD10 NONE
HD14 NONE
HD11 NONE
HD15 NONE
HD12 NONE
HD16 NONE
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
0=MENU
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT,
SELECT
<- -> SET
BEC -LIGHT SENSORSched #01..04
USE?
SCHEDULE1
NO
SCHEDULE2
NO
SCHEDULE3
NO
SCHEDULE4
NO
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT,
SELECT
Cut In
020
020
020
020
<- -> SET
0=MENU
0=MENU
12:00
Cut Out
030
030
030
030
0=MENU
-SCHEDULE MAINTENANCE OVERRIDESchedule #01 SCHEDULE1
Override:
OFF
From - Date: NONE
Time: NONE
Until - Date: NONE
Time: NONE
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
12:00
0=MENU
0=MENU
DIMMER CONTROL MENU
12:00
1.Status
5.Occ Night Setpoints
2.Select Type
6.Unocc Setpoints
3.Setup
7.Override
4.Setpoints
SELECT
SELECT NUMBER
NUMBER
0=MENU
0=MENU
PROOFS SCHEDULE#01: SCHEDULE 1
12:00
Alarm/Notice: ALM Delay Time: 00005 s
Latch Time: 00010 s
Proof Input when Schedule is on: CLOSED
Current proof Input: NDEF
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <--> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
0=MENU
SEE FOLLOWING PAGE
FOR DIMMER CONTROL
SCREENS
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
DIMMER CONTROL
1.Status
2.Select Type
3.Setup
4.Setpoints
MENU
12:00
5.Occ Night Setpoints
6.Unocc Setpoints
7.Override
SELECT NUMBER
LT ZONE #1 STATUS LT ZONE #1
Outside light level : NDEF fc
Inside light level : NDEF fc
Light level deadband :
2 fc
Calc Light level setp: NONE fc
Zone state : Disabled
Dimmer state: Disabled
=PREV LT
ZONE =NEXT LT ZONE
SELECT
NUMBER
12:00
0=MENU
LT ZONE #1 SELECT TYPE
Name: LT ZONE #1
Control based on: LIGHT LEVEL
=PREV LT
ZONE =NEXT LT ZONE
SELECT
NUMBER
12:00
0=MENU
LT ZONE #1 SETUP
Name: LT ZONE #1
Zone enable: NO
Outside light level sensor #: 00
Zone light level sensor # : 00
Light Panel update interval : 20
Pulse width (tenths secs) :005
=PREV LT
ZONE =NEXT LT ZONE
0=MENU
SELECT
NUMBER
0=MENU
LT ZONE #1 SETPOINTS
12:00
Name: LT ZONE #1
Light level: 040
@ Outside maximum light of: 0100
Light level: 020
@ Outside minimum light of: 0050
Light level deadband: 002
=PREV LT
ZONE =NEXT LT ZONE
0=MENU
SELECT
NUMBER
BEC --ANTI-SWEAT CONTROL-1.Status
4.Daily Logs
2.Setup
5.Overrides
3.Setpoints
SELECT NUMBER
--ANTI-SWEAT STATUS-1.Dewpoint Status
2.Output Status
SELECT NUMBER
12:00
0=MENU
-- ANTI-SWEAT SETUP -1.Dewpoint/Humidity Offsets
2.Output Setup
12:00
SELECT NUMBER
0=MENU
ANTI-SWEAT CIRCUIT #1 STATUS
Dewpoint: NDFF (ALL ON: 65 ALL OFF: 25)
Percent ON during ALL OFF : 0
ALL ON : 100
Current---Today
% ON Time:
100
0
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
0=MENU
SELECT
DEWPOINT/HUMIDITY OFFSETS
Circuit 1 Dewpoint Offset:
Humidity Offset:
Circuit 2 Dewpoint Offset:
Humidity Offset:
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
ANTI-SWEAT OUTPUTS STATUS
# Name
Status
1.
OFF
2.
OFF
3.
OFF
4.
OFF
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
SELECT
ANTI-SWEAT OUTPUTS SETUP
12:00
ON/OFF Interval: 010sec (use<240 if 8D0)
# Name
Circuit # 8D0?
1.
0
NO
2.
0
NO
3.
0
NO
4.
0
NO
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
12:00
Time Left
000s
000s
000s
000s
0=MENU
LT ZONE #1 OCC NIGHT SETPOINTS
12:00
Name: LT ZONE #1
If Outside light at or below: 0050
Then light Level: 020
(Setp not used when Unocc or Ovrd)
=PREV NUMBER
LT ZONE =NEXT LT ZONE
SELECT
0=MENU
LT ZONE #1 UNOCCUPIED SETPOINTS 12:00
Name: LT ZONE #1
Unocc Light level: 020
Use Schedule #: 00
Occupied when Sched is ON: YES
Occupied Starts/Ends: 00:00 00:00
(Start/End is lower priority than Sched)
=PREV NUMBER
LT ZONE =NEXT LT ZONE
SELECT
0=MENU
LT ZONE #1 OVERRIDE
Name: LT ZONE #1
Override enable: NO
Light level: 040
=PREV LT
ZONE =NEXT LT ZONE
SELECT
NUMBER
0=MENU
12:00
0=MENU
ANTI-SWEAT CIRCUIT #1 SETPOINTS
Dewpoint - ALL OFF
: 025F
ALL ON
: 065F
Percent On during ALL OFF : 000
ALL ON : 100
=PREV NUMBER
CIRCUIT =NEXT CIRCUIT
SELECT
12:00
0=MENU
ANTI-SWEAT DAILY LOGS # 1 OF 48
12:00
DATE 1-%ON MAX/MIN(DP) 2-%ON MAX/MIN(DP)
00/00 000
0 100
000
0 100
00/00 000
0 100
000
0 100
00/00 000
0 100
000
0 100
00/00 000
0 100
000
0 100
00/00 000
0 100
000
0 100
=PREV PAGE
0=MENU
SELECT
NUMBER=NEXT PAGE
ANTI-SWEAT OVERRIDES
Screen
# Name
Override
1.
NORM
2.
NORM
3.
NORM
4.
NORM
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
;
;
;
;
;
;
12:00
Input OVR
Time min
000
000
000
000
0=MENU
12:00
000
000
000
000
F
%
F
%
0=MENU
BEC --SENSOR MAIN MENU-12:00
1.Status
5.Overrides
2.Setup
6.Scheduling
3.Setpoints
7.Logs
4.Alarms
8.I/O Control
SELECT NUMBER
SENSOR STATUS MENU
1.Status
2.Summary
3.Accumulated Status
12:00
SELECT NUMBER
-SENSOR STATUS
# Name
01 SENSOR #1
02 SENSOR #2
03 SENSOR #3
04 SENSOR #4
05 SENSOR #5
=PREV, =NEXT,
0=MENU
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT,
SELECT
<- ->
12:00
0=MENU
SENSOR SETPOINTS MENU
1.Definition
2.Control Setpoints
3.Unoccupied Setpoints
SELECT NUMBER
12:00
0=MENU
--SENSOR ALARMS MENU-1.Analog (Input) Alarms
2.Digital (Output) Alarms
12:00
SELECT NUMBER
0=MENU
--SENSOR OVERRIDES MENU-1.Output Overrides
2.Alarm Override
SELECT NUMBER
12:00
0=MENU
-DEFINE SENSOR UNOCCUPIED- #01 12:00
Name : SENSOR #1
Use Schedule #
: 00 OR
(Unocc. if Schedule is OFF.
Overrides Unocc. Starts/Ends.)
Unoccupied Starts : 00:00
Unoccupied Ends : 00:00
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
SENSOR LOGS MENU
12:00
1.Interval
2.Daily Min / Max (non-Digital only)
3.Daily ON Time / # ON Events
SELECT NUMBER
0=MENU
12:00
0=MENU
0=MENU
-ALARM DEFINITION- #01
12:00
Name: SENSOR #1
Hi Alarm: NONE
Lo Alarm: NONE
Delay:000 min
Hi Notice NONE
Lo Notice NONE
Delay:000 min
Alarm Setpt Shift When Unocc: 00
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
-SENSOR OUTPUT OVERRIDES- 01
12:00
Name SENSOR #1
Duration:
OFF using input: SENSOVRD00
0000
SENSOVRD00
0000
SENSOVRD00
0000
ON using input: SENSOVRD00
0000
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
-LOGS- #01 SENSOR #1
0
Date
Time
Val (Deg )
00/00
00:00:00
0
00/00
00:00:00
0
00/00
00:00:00
0
00/00
00:00:00
0
00/00
00:00:00
0
=PREV PAGE
SELECT
NUMBER=NEXT PAGE
0=MENU
ANALOG INPUT MODULE 1 STATUS
12:00
Name
:AV INPUT 01
Command :NONE
Value :NONE
Alarm :NONE
NOTICE :NONE
Count :NONE
Count Tripped:NONE
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
0=MENU
SELECT
SENSOR SUMMARY #01 SENSOR #1
12:00
Input: Output:
Unocc: NO
Tdy ON Time;TDY ON Evnts:0 sec ;0
Last ON; OFF Times: 0 sec
; 76.1 hrs
Today High; Low :
;
Yesterday Hi; Low :
;
Alarm Logged; Alm Orvd: NO ; NO
=PREV PAGE, =NEXT PAGE,
0=MENU
- SENSOR CONTROL - # 01
12:00
SENSOR #1
Use ONE of Sens:
01 00 00 00
Current Values : 00 of NDF 00 00 00
Minimum time ON: 000 min
Cut In : NONE
Delay: 0000
Cut Out: NONE
Delay: 0000
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
-ALARM DEFINITIONName SENSOR #1
Alarm Type :
NONE
Alarm Type :
NONE
Notice Type:
NONE
Notice Type:
NONE
-ALARM OVERRIDES- #
01
12:00
Name: SENSOR #1
Override Schedule: 00
Override Input: SENSOVRD00. Delay: 0000
Override During Unoccupied: NO
Override When Output Overriden : NO
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
-LOGS- #01 SENSOR #1
0
Date MIN
AT
MAX
00/00
0 00:00
0
00/00
0 00:00
0
00/00
0 00:00
0
00/00
0 00:00
0
00/00
0 00:00
0
=PREV PAGE
SELECT
NUMBER=NEXT PAGE
12:00
AT
00:00
00:00
00:00
00:00
00:00
0=MENU
ANALOG OUTPUT MODULE 1 STATUS
12:00
Name
:AV OUTPUT 01
PID Output :NONE
PID Setpt. :NONE
PWM Output :NONE
Stages: .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
0=MENU
SELECT
OUT
SENSOR #01 ACCUMULATED STATUS
Name : SENSOR #1
Accumulated ON Time : 0 sec
(Enter 'T' to reset)
Accumulated ON Events : 0
(Enter 'E' to reset)
=PREV PAGE, =NEXT PAGE,
12:00
0=MENU
- SENSOR CONTROL - # 01
12:00
- UNOCCUPIED MODE SETTINGS Name: SENSOR #1
Current Values: NDF of NDF 000 000 000
Turn Output OFF during UNOCCUPIED : NO
Cut In : NONE
Delay: 0000
Cut Out: NONE
Delay: 0000
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
01
12:00
0000
0000
0000
0000
0=MENU
12:00
INPUT/OUTPUT CONTROL
1. Analog In Status
2. Analog Out Status
3. Digital Out Status
4. Analog In Bypass
5. Analog Out Bypass
6. Digital Out Bypass
SELECT NUMBER
- SENSOR DEFINITION - #01
12:00
Name : SENSOR #1
Offset: 0000
Eng. Unit: deg F
Event Interval
: 0100 min
Use Unoccupied Schedule: NO
Logging Interval
: 00:00:00
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
INP
-
12:00
ON-OFF
- SENSOR SETUP Name: SENSOR #1
Type: Temp
0=MENU
-LOGS- #01 SENSOR #1
0
12:00
Date # ON EVENTS ON TIME (min)
00/00
0
0
00/00
0
0
00/00
0
0
00/00
0
0
00/00
0
0
=PREV PAGE
0=MENU
SELECT
NUMBER=NEXT PAGE
DIGITAL OUTPUT MODULE 1 STATUS
Name
:DV OUTPUT 01
Command
:NONE
Proof
:NONE
Count
:NONE
Count Tripped:NONE
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
SELECT
12:00
0=MENU
ANALOG INPUT MODULE 01 BYPASS
12:00
Name
:AV INPUT 01
Enable
:NO
Command
:OFF
Type:NORMAL
Time
:0005 minutes
Ov State:NORMAL
Time Left:-----sec
=PREV,NUMBER
<--> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
ANALOG OUTPUT MODULE 01 BYPASS
12:00
Name
:AV OUTPUT 01
Enable :NO
Value
:000.0
Type:NORMAL
Time
:0005 minutes
Ov State:UNKNOWN Time Left:00000 sec
=PREV,NUMBER
<--> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
DIGITAL OUTPUT MODULE 01 BYPASS
12:00
Name
:DV OUTPUT 01
Enable :NO
Command :OFF
Type:NORMAL
Time
:0005 minutes
Ov State:UNKNOWN Time Left:00000 sec
=PREV,NUMBER
<--> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
BEC I&O Manual
C-3
BEC --STATUS MENU-1.HVAC
5.Anti-Sweat
2.Input
6.Schedules
3.Sensor
7.Boiler
4.Demand
8.Dimmer
SELECT NUMBER
SENSOR STATUS MENU
1.Status
2.Summary
3.Accumulated Status
SELECT NUMBER
-SENSOR STATUS
# Name
01 SENSOR #1
02 SENSOR #2
03 SENSOR #3
04 SENSOR #4
05 SENSOR #5
=PREV PAGE =NEXT
12:00
0=MENU
INP OUT
PAGE
12:00
0=MENU
DEMAND STATUS CIRCUIT #1
Demand : ON
Timer : 06:00
Current Power Usage :
Peak Power Today
:
KWHs Used This Hour :
Total KWHs Today
:
=
TOGGLE
CIRCUIT
SELECT NUMBER
12:00
Setpt :
0 KW
0000 KW
0 KW @ 00:00
00000.0
00000.0
0=MENU
12:00
ON-OFF
SELECT NUMBER
12:00
0=MENU
BEC - SCHEDULE STATUS Sched #01..04
STATUS
SCHEDULE1
OFF
SCHEDULE2
OFF
SCHEDULE3
OFF
SCHEDULE4
OFF
12:00
Overd.tim
NONE
NONE
NONE
NONE
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT,
SELECT
0=MENU
BOILER #1 STATUS
12:00
Boiler Output
: OFF
Boiler pressure : NDF
Outside temp
: NDF
Setpts: 10 lbs @ 60 out;Ovrd OFF:NON
Setpts: 50 lbs @ 0 out;Ovrd ON :NON
Output ON if boiler water temp <= NON
=TOGGLE
BOILER; TEMPS=DEG
0=MENU
SELECT
NUMBER
0=MENU
ANTI-SWEAT OUTPUTS STATUS
# Name
Status
1.
OFF
2.
OFF
3.
OFF
4.
OFF
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
SELECT
SELECT NUMBER
0=MENU
mx=0
0
15/03 11:57
BEC -CONFIGURATION1-Input Definition
2-Output Definition
3-System Information
4-D.P./Hum. Sensors
SELECT NUMBER
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT <- -> SET
SELECT
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT <- -> SET
SELECT
0=MENU
0=MENU
DEFINITIONS12:00
Bd Pt Output
Bd Pt
00 00 AHU1 CL. 2 00 00
00 00 AHU1 CL. 4 00 00
00 00 AHU1 CL. 6 00 00
00 00 AHU1 FAN L 00 00
0=MENU
BEC Ver: 4.00AX03 SYSTEM INFO
12:00
Unit Name: CPC ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL
Date: 03/14/96 Time: 12:00 Day: THU
Passwords: #1: 100
#3: 300
#2: 200
#4: 400
Power Fail Alarm/Notice N
Record Logons:NO PowerUp Self-Test:YES
=PREV, =NEXT <- -> SET
0=MENU
BEC -SYSTEM INFORMATION12:00
Phone Number #1:
#2:
Delay Before Dial Out 000 m
DAYLIGHT SAVINGS MODE: AUTOMATIC (USA)
DST MANUAL SET START : 04/07/91
DST MANUAL SET END : 10/29/91
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
SEND TO 485 ALARM PANEL
SYSTEM
ALMS :YES POWER
SENS HI ALMS :YES SENS LO
SENS FAIL ALMS :YES DIGITAL
NETWORK ALMS :YES AHU
PROOF
ALMS :YES MISC
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
BEC -SYSTEM INFORMATIONTemperature Display Format
FAHRENHEIT OR CELSIUS: DEG F
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
C-4
12:00
ALMS:YES
ALMS:YES
ALMS:YES
ALMS:YES
ALMS:YES
0=MENU
0=MENU
BEC --GRAPHS MENU-12:00
1.Ahu Temps
3.Outside Temp.
2.Humidity
4.Sensors
12:00
0
BEC -OUTPUT
Output
AHU1 CL. 1
AHU1 CL. 3
AHU1 CL. 5
AHU1 FAN H
12:00
12:00
Time Left
000s
000s
000s
000s
0=MENU
0=MENU
GRAPH CONTROLS
-> <- Scroll
C - Go to current
Z - Zoom out, Zoom in
0 - Menu
-- PLEASE WAIT -MAKE SELECTION
BEC -INPUT DEFINITIONS12:00
Input
Bd Pt Input
Bd Pt
AHU 1 TMP 1 00 00 AHU 1 TMP 2 00 00
AHU 1 TMP 3 00 00 AHU 1 TMP 4 00 00
AHU 2 TMP 1 00 00 AHU 2 TMP 2 00 00
AHU 2 TMP 3 00 00 AHU 2 TMP 4 00 00
LT ZONE #1 STATUS LT ZONE #1
Outside light level : NONE fc
Inside light level : NONE fc
Light level deadband :
2 fc
Calc Light level setp: NONE fc
Zone state : Disabled
Dimmer state: Disabled
=PREV LT
ZONE =NEXT LT ZONE
SELECT
NUMBER
ANTI-SWEAT CIRCUIT #1 STATUS
Dewpoint: NDFF (ALL ON: 65 ALL OFF: 25)
Percent ON during ALL OFF : 0
ALL ON : 100
Current---Today
% ON Time:
100
0
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
0=MENU
SELECT
SENSOR SUMMARY #01 SENSOR #1
12:00
Input: Output:
Unocc: NO
Tdy ON Time;TDY ON Evnts:0 sec ;0
Last ON; OFF Times: 0 sec
; 76.1 hrs
Today High; Low :
;
Yesterday Hi; Low :
;
Alarm Logged; Alm Orvd: NO ; NO
=PREV PAGE =NEXT PAGE
0=MENU
SENSOR #01 ACCUMULATED STATUS
Name : SENSOR #1
Accumulated ON Time : 0 sec
(Enter 'T' to reset)
Accumulated ON Events : 0
(Enter 'E' to reset)
=PREV PAGE =NEXT PAGE
--ANTI-SWEAT STATUS-1.Dewpoint Status
2.Output Status
12:00
0=MENU
mn=0
int=0:03:00
15/03 12:00
12:00
5-Communications
6-Host Network
7-I/O Board Setup
8-Sat. Comm.
0=MENU
-D.P./HUMIDITY SENSORS SETUP12:00
D.P/HUMIDITY
Offsets
Offsets
AHU 1 : 000
AHU 4 : 000
AHU 2 : 000
AHU 5 : 000
AHU 3 : 000
AHU 6 : 000
HUMIDITY SENSOR TYPE 0-5V
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
-COMMUNICATIONS SETUP12:00
UNIT #: 01
Baud Rate 9600 N 8
Generic Modem String: AT&FE0S0=1&D2
Init String: AT&C1&Q
(For Help Go to the Next screen)
Send Now: NO
Reset at Midnight: N
Init Response:
=PREV, =NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
-MODEM INITIALIZATION STRING- 12:00
Current: AT&C1&W
Patterns: Number to Copy -->
3
1.Regular:
AT&C1&W
2.24/9600 ASB: AT&C1&K0&Q6S95=60&W
3.24/9600 V42: AT&C1&K0S36=3S95=60&W
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
HOST NETWORK MENU 1-ONLINE Status
3-Reset
2-Set Device #'s
12:00
I/O BOARD MENU 1-ONLINE Status
2-Set Device #'s
3-Reset
12:00
0=Menu
0=Menu
Host Net State : OFF
Number Offline : 0
I/O Bus State : ON
12:00
Number Offline : 0
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
8ROs 1
16AIs 1
4AOs
8DOs
HOST BUS DEVICES
12:00
This Controller is Device # 1
:
Alarm If Another Device Fails (N):
Test Host Net for New Devices (N):
I/O BOARD DEVICE NUMBERS
Number 8RO Boards(MAX 15,
Number 16AI Boards(MAX 10,
Number 4AO Boards(MAX 4,
Number 8DO Boards(MAX 2,
0=MENU
12:00
12:00
HOST NETWORK
1) OFF 2) Reset (ON)
NOW
NOW
NOW
NOW
-SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONEnable Satellite Mode: N
Disconnect Message NO CARRIER
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
SELECT
12:00
0=MENU
12:00
0):
0):
0):
0):
12:00
I/O BOARD NETWORK
1) OFF 2) Reset (ON)
0=MENU
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
DEMAND CONTROL
1.Demand Status
2.Demand Setpts
3.KW Sensor Select
4.KW Sensor Setup
5.Alarm Setpts
SELECT NUMBER
DEMAND STATUS CIRCUIT #1
12:00
Demand : ON
Timer : 06:00
Setpt :
0 KW
Current Power Usage : 0000 KW
Peak Power Today
:
0 KW @ 00:00
KWHs Used This Hour : 00000.0
Total KWHs Today
: 00000.0
= TOGGLE
CIRCUIT
0=MENU
SELECT
NUMBER
DEMAND SETPOINTS CIRCUIT #1
Demand Setpoint Summer :
Winter :
Window Time Period
:
Load Shed Enable Time :
Disable Time :
DEMAND STATUS CIRCUIT #2
DEMAND SETPOINTS CIRCUIT #2
12:00
NOTICE !!!
CIRCUIT 2 IS FOR MONITORING ONLY
Current Power Usage
Peak Power Today
KWHs Used This Hour
Total KWHs Today
= TOGGLE
CIRCUIT
SELECT
NUMBER
12:00
: 0000 KW
:
0 KW @ 00:00
: 00000.0
: 00000.0
0=MENU
= TOGGLE
CIRCUIT
SELECT
NUMBER
= TOGGLE
CIRCUIT
SELECT
NUMBER
12:00
0000 KW
0000 KW
15 min
0000
0000
0=MENU
KW SENSOR SELECT
12:00
Circuit #1 : LIN
Circuit #2 : LIN
(Point #1 on 16AI board allows only
Digital KW sensor)
=PREV,NUMBER
<- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
12:00
6.Load Shed Status
7.Load Shed Setpts
8.Load Shed Setup
9.Logs
LINEAR KW SENSOR CIRCUIT #2
Minimum Voltage : 1.000
Maximum Voltage : 5.000
Power at Maximum : 500.0
Logging Interval :
15
= TOGGLE CIRCUIT
0=MENU
V
V
KW
min
0=MENU
OR
DIGITAL KW SENSOR CIRCUIT #1
Watt-Hours per Pulse :
0000
Logging Interval :
15 min
0=MENU
= TOGGLE CIRCUIT
0=MENU
ALARM SETPOINTS CIRCUIT #1
High Demand Alarm : 0000 KW
Delay : 000 min
Alarm-Notice : Disabled
= TOGGLE
CIRCUIT
SELECT
NUMBER
ALARM SETPOINTS CIRCUIT #2
High Demand Alarm : 0000 KW
Delay : 000 min
Alarm-Notice : Disabled
= TOGGLE
CIRCUIT
SELECT
NUMBER
12:00
0=MENU
12:00
0=MENU
LOAD SHED STATUS
12:00
Current : 0000KW Predicted
: 3058KW
Max Shed :
0KW Demand Setpt :
0KW
Shed Now :
0KW Shed Required: 3058KW
Shed Mode
: 02
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
SELECT
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
SELECT
LOAD SHED STATUS
Sensors 1-8
Sensors 9-16
Sensors 17-24
Sensors 25-32
Sensors 33-40
Sensors 41-48
=PREV,
=NEXT
SELECT NUMBER
PAGE01 OF 25 BEC ALARMS
00/00 00:00 N
00/00 00:00 N
00/00 00:00 N
00/00 00:00 N
00/00 00:00 N
(-)SWITCH
9=RESET (R)ESET ALL
SELECT
NUMBER
BEC I&O Manual
12:00
0=MENU
0=MENU
LOAD SHED STATUS - AHUS
12:00
AHU #1 : 0
AHU #4 : 0
AHU #2 : 0
AHU #5 : 0
AHU #3 : 0
AHU #6 : 0
0=MENU
:
:
:
:
:
:
SELECT NUMBER
LOAD SHED SETPOINTS
Priority
:
Min Shed Value :
Max Shed Value :
Shed Duration
Interval between
=PREV,NUMBER
<- ->=SET
SELECT
0=MENU
AHU #1
00
0000
0000
: 000 min
Sheds : 000 min
0=MENU
LOAD SHED SETUP MENU
1.AHUs
2.Sensors
3.Schedules
SELECT NUMBER
LOAD SHED SETUP AHU #1
Kw required for each stage
HT1 HT2 HT3 HT4 HT5 HT6 HT7
000 000 000 000 000 000 000
CL1 CL2 CL3 CL4 CL5 CL6
000 000 000 000 000 000
=PREV NUMBER
SELECT
SENSOR LOAD SHED SETUP
# Name
KW Usage
01 SENSOR #1
000
02 SENSOR #2
000
03 SENSOR #3
000
04 SENSOR #4
000
05 SENSOR #5
000
=PREV,
=NEXT,
<->
SET
SELECT NUMBER
LOAD SHED STATUS - SENSORS
12:00
Sensors 49-56 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sensors 57-64 : 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
SCHEDULE LOAD SHED SETPOINTS
12:00
Schedule : 01 SCHEDULE 1
Priority : 00
Shed Duration
: 000 min
Interval between Sheds : 000 min
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT
SELECT
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
SCHEDULE LOAD SHED SETUP
# Name
KW Usage
01 SCHEDULE1
000
02 SCHEDULE2
000
03 SCHEDULE3
000
04 SCHEDULE4
000
05 SCHEDULE5
000
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
SELECT
=PREV
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
12:00
12:00
SENSOR LOAD SHED SETPOINTS
12:00
Sensor
: 01 SENSOR #01
Priority
: 00
Min Shed Value : 0000
Max Shed Value : 0000
Shed Duration :
: 000 min
Interval between Sheds : 000 min
=PREV,NUMBER
=NEXT, <- -> SET
0=MENU
SELECT
LOAD SHED STATUS Schedules 1-8
Schedules 9-16
Schedules 17-24
SENSORS
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0
LOAD SHED SETPOINTS
1.AHUs
2.Sensors
3.Schedules
0=MENU
0=MENU
SCHEDULES
: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
0=MENU
12:00
DEMAND LOGS
1.Window
2.Daily
3.Monthly
0=MENU
SELECT NUMBER
12:00
HT8
000
0=MENU
12:00
0=MENU
12:00
0=MENU
WINDOW
Date
00/00
00/00
00/00
00/00
00/00
=PREV
12:00
LOG
# 1 of
Time
DEMAND
00:00
0000
00:00
0000
00:00
0000
00:00
0000
00:00
0000
PAGE =NEXT PAGE
0=MENU
1344
12:00
KW-PEAK
0000
0000
0000
0000
0000
0=MENU
DAILY LOG
DATE KWH
00/00 000000
00/00 000000
00/00 000000
00/00 000000
00/00 000000
=PREV PAGE
#01 of 48
12:00
DEMAND
KW-PEAK
SHED
0000(0000) 0000(0000) 00:00
0000(0000) 0000(0000) 00:00
0000(0000) 0000(0000) 00:00
0000(0000) 0000(0000) 00:00
0000(0000) 0000(0000) 00:00
=NEXT PAGE
0=MENU
MONTHLY LOG
MONTH KWH
00/00 000000
00/00 000000
00/00 000000
00/00 000000
00/00 000000
=PREV PAGE
#01 of 24
12:00
DEMAND
KW-PEAK
0000(0000 00) 0000(0000 00)
0000(0000 00) 0000(0000 00)
0000(0000 00) 0000(0000 00)
0000(0000 00) 0000(0000 00)
0000(0000 00) 0000(0000 00)
=NEXT PAGE
0=MENU
12:00
0
0
0
0=MENU
C-5
Appendix D–Sensor Hardware/Software Setup Table
How to Use This Table
The following table lists all sensors commonly used in
an RMCC setup by both name and part number. The table
divides sensor setup for each sensor into five different
steps, each of which is represented by a column in the table.
The columns are as follows:
•
•
Voltage to Sensor - the voltage, if any, required to
power the sensor.
•
Type - the sensor type that must be selected when
setting up the sensor in the sensor software.
•
Typical Settings - This column contains typical
alarm set points, sensor cut-on and cut-off set
points, and alarm delay values for each sensor type.
If the sensor type is linear, the Gain and Offset values are also included in this column.
•
Wiring - wiring instructions and specifications.
Input Dip Switch - the position of the 16AI or 8IO
dip switch rocker that corresponds to the input point
to which the sensor will be connected.
P/N
203-1902
Sensor
Input
Dip
Switch
Voltage
to
Sensor
Type
Typical
Settings
If set up as linear,
Gain = -58.4
Offset = -1523
Wiring
Dew Point Probe
Down
24 VAC
(D)ewpt
or (L)inear
Temp Probe
Up
N/A
(T)emp
809-1100
809-1101
809-1105
809-1106
IRLDS to BEC
Down
Supplied
by IRLDS
(I)RLDS
or (L)inear
If set up as linear,
Gain=250
Offset=0
Alarm at 100 ppm
Output number on IRLDS to even
number on 16AI
Common on IRLDS to odd number on 16AI
NOTE: Individual commons
MUST be wired for each point.
809-1100
809-1101
809-1105
809-1106
IRLDS to BEC
Down
Supplied
by IRLDS
(L)inear
Gain=1000
Offset=0
Alarm at 4960 mV
Output number on IRLDS to even
number on 16AI
Common on IRLDS to odd number on 16AI
NOTE: Individual commons
MUST be wired for each point.
206-0002
Light Level
Down
12 VDC
(L)inear
Gain=175
Offset=0
On @ 20
Off @ 30
Black to +12V on 16AI (PWR)
Green to odd no. on input (GND)
Yellow and red to even no. on input (SIG)
800-1100
800-1200
800-1500
Pressure Transducers (Eclipse)
Down
5 VDC
(1)00,
(2)00, or
(5)00
Alarm at 20 lbs
above setpoint with
60 min delay
Red to +5V on 16AI (PWR)
Black and Shield to odd no. on input (GND)
White to even number on input
(SIG)
NOTE: Transducer type must be
set to ECLIPSE under Transducer Setup.
203-5750
Relative Humidity
Down
12 VDC
(H)um
BEC I&O Manual
Green to AC1
White to AC2
Black to odd number input (GND)
Red to even number input (SIG)
Two wires to input (polarity insensitive)
Red to +12V on 16AI (PWR)
Black to odd number on input
(GND)
White to even number on input
(SIG) marked “out” on sensor
Jumper N to G at sensor
D-1
Index
Numerics
16AI Analog Input Board
Mounting in Enclosure 3-1
Mounting Without Enclosure 3-2
Overview 2-2
power requirements 5-6
485 Alarm Panel 6-8
Location 3-4
Mounting 3-4
Overview 2-5
power requirements 5-6
sending notices to 8-44
4AO Analog Output Board
mounting without enclosures 3-3
network restrictions 2-4
Overview 2-4
software setup 8-49
8DO Digital Output Board 6-9
definition 2-4
location 3-1
mounting without enclosure 3-2
8IO Board
software setup 8-49
8IO Combination Input/Output Board
Baud Rate Dip Switch Settings
4-5
Limitations on Transformer Wiring 5-6
Mounting in Enclosure 3-1
Mounting in Weather-Resistant
Enclosure 3-2
Mounting Without Enclosure 3-3
Network Restrictions 2-4
Overview 2-4
power requirements 5-6
8RO Form C Board
software setup 8-49
8RO Form C Relay Output Board
Baud Rate Dip Switch Settings
4-5
Mounting in Enclosure 3-1
Mounting Without Enclosure 3-3
Overview 2-3
8RO Relay Board
software setup 8-49
8RO Relay Output Board
Mounting in Enclosure 3-1
Mounting Without Enclosure 3-2
Overview 2-3
power requirements 5-6
BCU I&O Manual
A
Advanced Rooftop Controller (for
more see RTC)
AHU Fans 6-3
manual bypass 8-17
single-speed 6-3
two-speed 6-3
variable-speed 6-3
differential control 6-3
stages control 6-3
AHUs
cooling 6-1
dehumidification 6-2
external bypass 8-15
heating 6-1
log intervals 9-2
logging 9-1
manual bypassing
cooling 8-17
fans 8-17
heating 8-16
offsets
humidity and dewpoint sensors 8-46
outside air dampers 8-7
overrides 8-15
run times
cooling 9-1
fans 9-1
heating 9-1
set points
alarms
dehumidification 10-3
fans 10-3
heating/cooling 10-3
cool termination 6-2, 8-15
cooling
separate strategy 8-7
single strategy 8-5
cut-on and cut-off delays 62, 8-7
dehumidification 8-5, 8-8
dehumidification reheat 6-3,
8-6
time delay 8-6
delay between stages 6-1, 86
heating
separate strategy 8-7
single strategy 8-5
minimum building temperature 6-3, 8-6
night set back 6-2
enabling 8-14
separate strategy 8-7
single strategy 8-5
raising and lowering using
input closures 6-1
seasonal lock-out 6-2, 8-14
separate strategy 6-1
single strategy 6-1
stage delays 8-6
terminate auxiliary heat 8-6
warm-up 6-2, 8-14
winter/summer switch-over
8-9
setup 8-9–8-16
control temperature strategy
8-14
day start/end 8-9
defining number of AHUs 89
dewpoint sensor 8-13
disabling heat during dehum
8-14
enabling fans during fan fail
8-10
external set point shift reset
time 8-10
fail-safe 8-10
fans 8-10–8-13
single-speed 8-10
two-speed 8-10–8-12
variable-speed 8-10, 812–8-13
humidity sensor 8-13
number of stages 8-13
Quick Setup 8-16
seasonal set point shift 8-14
unoccupied mode 8-15, 8-16
Air Dampers. See AHUs, Air Dampers.
Alarm Dialout
delay 8-45
phone numbers 8-45
setting baud rate 8-46
Alarm Log 6-8, 10-1–10-3
Alarm Panel. See 485 Alarm Panel.
Alarms
analog sensor 10-5
digital sensor 10-4
power failure 8-44
set points
AHUs 10-3–??
Analog Input Module. See I/O Control, Analog Input Module
Analog Output Module. See I/O Control, Analog Output Module.
Anti-Sweat 6-4
All Off set point 6-5
All On set point 6-5
logs 9-2
offsets 8-28
overrides 6-5, 8-29
set points 8-28
setup 8-28
time window 6-5
I-1
B
BCU, See Building Control Unit
Boilers 8-17–8-19
offsets 8-19
set points 8-18
setup 8-18
Building Control Unit 2-1
Operating Environment 3-1
Building Environmental Control 1-1
defining unit number 8-46
mounting 3-1
Bus Amplifier. See RS232 Bus Amplifier.
C
COM A Network. See RS485 Input/
Output Network.
COM B Network. See RS485 Host
Bus Network.
COM C Network. See RS232 Remote
Communication Network.
COM D Network. See RS485 Input/
Output Network.
Cooling
bypassing
external 8-15
manual 8-17
coil air temperature 8-15
set point strategy
separate 6-1, 8-9
single 6-1, 8-9
unoccupied mode 8-15
CRC Test. See Cyclic Redundancy
Check.
Cyclic Redundancy Check 8-44
D
Daylight Savings Time
setup 8-45
Dehumidification 6-2
minimum building temperature
6-3
reheat set point 6-3
Demand Control 6-6
alarm set points 10-8
alarms 6-7
demand monitoring 6-6
I-2
demand windows 6-6
load shedding 6-6, 6-7
set points 6-7
AHUs 8-54–8-55
schedules 8-56
sensors 8-55
setup
AHUs 8-56
schedules 8-57
sensors 8-57
shed cycle 6-7
logs
daily 9-5
monthly 9-5
window 9-4
predicting energy consumption
6-6
set points 8-51
demand 8-51
demand window time 8-51
load shed enable/disable
times 8-51
setup
kW sensors 8-51–8-52
Dialout. See Alarm Dialout.
Digital Output Module. See I/O Control, Digital Output Modules.
Digital States
definition of NONE 6-11
Dimmer Control 6-9, 8-22–8-26
defining type 8-23
dimmer output 6-9
inside light level sensor 6-9
manual overrides 6-9
night set points 6-9
outside light level sensor 6-9
overrides 8-26
set points 8-24
occupied night 8-25
unoccupied 8-25
setup 8-24
unoccupied set points 6-9
Dimmer Panel 6-9
Dip Switches
baud rate settings 4-4
network settings 4-3
E
Enclosures for I/O Boards 3-1
Environmental Control Network
Components 2-1
F
Fans. See AHU Fans.
G
Graphs 9-2, 9-5–9-6
Guide for System Configuration 7-1
Bypassing a System Setting 7-2
Define Inputs 7-1
H
Hardware Mounting
485 Alarm Panel 3-4
Dew Point Sensors and Control
Switches 3-6
I/O Boards and Enclosures 3-1
Light Level Sensors 3-6
Power Monitors 3-6
RS232 Bus Amplifier 3-4
Temperature Sensors 3-5
Insertion Probe 3-5
Inside 3-5
Outside 3-5
Supply and Return Air Sensors 3-5
Transformers 3-6
Hardware Overview 2-1
485 Alarm Panel 2-5
Input Communication Boards 22
16AI Board 2-2
Output Communication Boards
2-3
8RO Board 2-3
8RO Form C Board 2-3
Remote Communication 2-5
RS232 Bus Amplifier 2-5
Special Purpose Communication
Boards 2-4
8IO Board 2-4
Advanced Rooftop Controller (ARTC) 2-5
Heating
bypassing
external 8-15
manual 8-16
set point strategy
separate 6-1, 8-9
single 6-1, 8-9
unoccupied mode 8-15
Host Network. See RS485 Host Bus
Network.
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
I
I/O Boards
Enclosures 3-1
Power Requirements 5-6
Snap-Track Installation 3-3
I/O Control 6-9–6-19
Analog Input Module 6-11–6-14
cells 6-13
Analog Value Combiner 6-13
Counter 6-13
Cut In/Cut Out 6-13
Filter 6-13
Limiter 6-13
Override 6-13
Process Alarm 6-13
inputs 6-12
Alarm Disable 6-12, 613
Alt Combiner 6-12, 613
Notice Disable 6-12, 613
Occupied 6-13
Reset Count 6-12, 6-14
Suspend Count 6-12, 614
overriding 6-13
Analog Output Module 6-16–619
cells 6-17
Filter 6-18
Override 6-18
PID Control 6-18
Select 6-17
Sequencer 6-19
Setpoint Float 6-18
fallback set points 6-18
floating set points 6-18
inputs 6-17
Control Value 6-17, 618
Direct Acting 6-17
Float 6-17, 6-18
Occupied 6-17
Occupied Setpoint 617, 6-18
Unoccupied Setpoint 617, 6-18
output when in failure 6-18
overriding 6-18
PWM (pulse width modulation) 6-19
defined 6-9
Digital Output Module 6-14–616
cells 6-15
Counter 6-16
Digital Value Combiner
6-15
Minimum On/Off 6-15
One Shot 6-15
BCU I&O Manual
Override 6-15
Proof 6-16
Schedule Interface 6-15
Select 6-16
inputs 6-14
Alt Combiner 6-15
Alt Schedule 6-15
Digital Inputs 6-14
Occupied 6-15
Proof 6-15, 6-16
Reset Count 6-14, 6-16
Suspend Count 6-14, 616
Use Alternate Logic
Combination
6-15
modules
inputs and outputs 6-11
Input Definition 8-41–8-42
M
Installing Hardware. See Hardware
Mounting 3-1
N
Introduction
Hardware Overview 2-1
NONE (digital state) 6-11
Modem
initialization strings 8-46
parity/data bits 8-46
setting baud rate 8-46
setup initialization strings 8-47
Modems
Types Supplied 2-6
Modules
inputs and outputs 6-11
Mounting Hardware 3-1
Mounting Hardware. See also Hardware Mounting
O
J
Jumpers
Fail-Safe Settings on 8RO 4-5
terminating resistance settings 43
terminating resistance settings
with star configurations
4-3
L
LED Indicator Lights 4-4
Logging On 8-3
Logs
AHU humidity 9-1
AHU temperature 9-1
anti-sweat 9-2
Demand
daily 9-5
monthly 9-5
window 9-4
intervals
AHU 9-2
sensors 8-33
sensors 9-3–9-4
daily min/max 9-3
daily ON time/events 9-4
interval 9-3
Output Definition 8-43
P
Passwords 8-3
logging logons 8-44
setting 8-44
PID Control
analog output modules 6-18
Power Interface Board (PIB) Features
2-2
Power-up Self Test. See Cyclic Redundancy Check
Processor Board Features 2-2
Pulse Width Modulation
analog output modules 6-19
R
REFLECS Controllers
Standard Types 2-1
REFLECS Networks
Baud Rate Dip Switch Settings
4-5
Fail-Safe and Relay Dip Switch
Settings
I-3
Output Boards 4-5
REFLECS, Definition of 2-1
Remote Communication. See UltraSite.
Rotary Dials
network settings 4-3
settings for 8IO 4-4
RS232 Bus Amplifier 8-46
Location 3-4
Mounting 3-4
Overview 2-5
RS232 Network
Wiring 5-2
RS232 Remote Communication Network 4-1
wiring 4-2
RS485 Host Bus Network 4-1
wiring 4-1
RS485 Host Network 8-47–8-48
device setup 8-48
resetting 8-48
Wiring 5-1
RS485 Input/Output Network 4-1
resetting 8-49
Wiring 5-1
wiring 4-1
RTC
Baud Rate Dip Switch Settings
4-5
Run Times
cooling 9-1
fans 9-1
heating 9-1
resetting 9-2
S
Satellite Communications 8-50
Schedules 6-5
defining events 8-20–8-21
events 6-5
holidays 6-5, 8-21
overrides 6-5
digital 8-20
light level sensor 8-21–8-22
light sensor 6-5
maintenance 6-5, 8-22
manual 6-5, 8-20
sensor control using 6-5
special event dates 6-5
special events 8-21
Self-Test 8-44
Sensor Control
I-4
set points
controlled outputs 8-33
Sensors 6-7
alarms 6-7, 8-34–10-5
analog 10-5
analog set points 6-8
digital 10-4
digital set points 6-8
combining values 6-7
control strategy 8-33–8-34
controlled outputs 6-7
cut-in set points 6-7
cut-out set points 6-7
minimum time on 6-7
Dew Cell Dewpoint Probe
Location 3-6
Mounting 3-6
Dewpoint Control Switch
Installation 3-6
event intervals 8-33
Humidistats
Installation 3-6
Humidity
Installation 3-6
Inside Temperature
Location 3-5
Mounting 3-5
Light Level
Location 3-6
Mounting 3-6
logging interval 8-33
logs 9-3–9-4
daily min/max 9-3
daily ON time/events 9-4
interval 9-3
offsets 8-32
Outside Temperature
Location 3-5
Mounting 3-5
overrides 6-8
alarm 6-9, 10-6
output 6-8, 8-35
Return Air Temperature
Location 3-5
Mounting 3-5
return air temperature 6-4
scheduling 8-35
sensor types 8-31
set points 8-32–8-34
unoccupied mode 8-34
Supply Air Temperature
Location 3-5
Mounting 3-5
supply air temperature 6-4
Supply and Return Air
Mounting 3-5
units 8-33
unoccupied schedules 8-33
unoccupied settings 6-8
defining unoccupied times
6-8
Wiring to 16AI or 8IO 5-2
Snap-Track Installation for I/O
Boards 3-3
Software 6-1
Special Purpose Communication
Boards (8IO & ARTC) 2-4
Status Screens
Anti-Sweat Status 8-27, 8-40
Boiler Status 8-17, 8-40
Demand Status 8-39, 8-50
Dimmer Status 8-23, 8-40
Host Network 8-47
Input Status 8-39
Load Shed 8-53–8-54
AHUs 8-53
schedules 8-54
sensors 8-54
Main Status 8-2, 8-4, 8-39
Online Status 8-49
Schedule Status 8-19, 8-40
Sensor Status 8-30–8-31, 8-39
System Configuration Guide 7-1
Bypass a System Setting 7-2
Define Inputs 7-1
System Settings
date, time, and day 8-44
T
Terminating Resistance Jumpers. See
Jumpers.
Transformers
Wiring Six Board 5-6
Wiring Ten Board 5-7
Wiring Three Board 5-6
U
UltraSite Overview 2-6
UltraSite™ 8-46
Units, Engineering 8-45
W
Wiring
COM A and D 5-1
COM B 5-1
COM C 5-2
daisy-chains 4-2
devices per segment 4-2
legs and segments 4-2
Power Connections 5-6
026-1103 Rev 1 01-05-98
Power Requirements 5-6
Transformers 5-6
Power Requirements for I/O
Boards 5-6
Sensors and Transducers 5-2
Specifications 5-1
star configurations 4-3
Transformers 5-6
wire lengths 4-2
BCU I&O Manual
I-5
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement