NOTICE OF MEETING

NOTICE OF MEETING
NOTICE OF MEETING
This notice is to confirm that the next regular meeting of
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
will be held on:
Monday, June 20, 2011
at 7:00 p.m.
in the Board Room of the Education Centre
156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario
The agenda and supporting documents for this meeting are attached to this notice.
If you would prefer to receive an electronic copy of the agenda package, please email
[email protected] .
Kathy Soule
Director of Education and
Secretary of the Board
Trustees:
Michael Brant
Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory
Thelma Goodfellow
Southeast Hastings
Lucille Kyle
North Hastings
Samuel J. J. Clements
Trenton/CFB Trenton
Mary Hall
Belleville, Vice-chair
Dave Patterson
Belleville/Thurlow
Indigo Christ
Student Trustee
Jennifer Cobb
North Prince Edward
Dwayne Inch
South Prince Edward
Jim Williams
Sidney/Frankford
Ally Martin
Student Trustee
PUBLIC MOTIONS AND REPORTS
June 20, 2011
Report
Approval of agenda
A-1 – Approval of minutes
of the regular meeting of
May 24, 2011
A-2 – Approval of minutes
of the special meeting of
June 7, 2011
A-3 – Approval of minutes
of the special meeting of
June 13, 2011
Report from Committee of
the Whole Board
B-1 – 2011-2012 Budget
(handout)
Info.
Decision
X
X
That the minutes of the regular meeting of May 24, 2011 be
approved.
X
That the minutes of the special meeting of June 7, 2011 be
approved.
X
That the minutes of the special meeting of June 13, 2011 be
approved.
Nothing to report.
X
X
B-2 – Board Policy No. 3-A
Delegations and
Presentations
X
B-3 – Borrowing Resolution
X
B-4 – Annual Accessibility
Plan
X
B-5 – Special Education
Plan
Motion
That the agenda be approved.
X
*see handout being distributed at the meeting.
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board approve
the changes to Board Policy No. 3-A Delegations and
Presentations, as contained in Board Report No. B-2, dated June
20, 2011.
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board, in order
to meet current 2011-2012 expenditures, approve the attached
resolution authorizing the borrowing of a sum of up to twelve
million dollars ($12,000,000) outstanding at any one time as
contained in Board Report No. B-3 dated June 20, 2011.
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board approve
the Annual Accessibility Plan for the period September 2011 to
August 2012 as contained in Board Report No. B-4, dated June
20, 2011.
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board approve
the amendments to the Special Education Plan 2010-2011 as
contained in Board Report No. B-5 dated June 20, 2011.
C-1 – Calendar of Events
X
For information only.
C-2 – Board and
Committee Meeting
Schedule 2011-2012
D-1 – Ministry of Education:
Approval of 2010-2011
School Year Calendar
Adjournment
X
For information only.
X
For information only.
BOARD MEETING
PUBLIC AGENDA
Regular meeting of June 20, 2011 – 7:00 p.m.
Board Room, Education Centre
Section
Item
A
Call to order
Board prayer
Delegations/presentations
1. Science and Technology recognition
2. Student Trustee recognition
th
3. 10 Annual Great Place awards
Approval of agenda
Report No.
Resp.
Verbal
Verbal
K. Soule
Chair
Verbal
Chair
15 minute recess
B
C
D
Election of the Board Chair
Subsequent elections, as necessary
Election of Ontario Public School Boards’ Association (OPSBA) representative
and alternate
Approval of minutes:
Regular Meeting - May 24, 2011
Special Meeting – June 7, 2011
Special Meeting – June 13, 2011
Business arising from the minutes
Report from Committee of the Whole Board
Recommendations
Report from Budget Committee
• 2011-2012 Budget
Report from Executive Committee
• Board Policy No. 3-A: Delegations and Presentations
Report from Operations and Finance
• Borrowing Resolution
• Annual Accessibility Plan
Report from Program and Human Resources Committee
• Special Education plan
Information
Calendar of events
Report from Chair (acting)
Report from Executive Committee
Report from Operations and Finance
Report from Program and Human Resources Committee
Reports from staff
• Board and Committee Meeting Schedule 2011-2012
Reports from Trustees – Board committees and events
Trustee proposals and queries
A-1
A-2
A-3
B-1
(handout)
M. Hall
B-2
M. Hall
B-3
B-4
D. Inch
D. Inch
B-5
T. Goodfellow
C-1
Verbal
Verbal
Verbal
Verbal
K. Soule
M. Hall
M. Hall
D. Inch
T. Goodfellow
C-2
Verbal
Verbal
K. Soule
All
All
D-1
K. Soule
Correspondence
Ministry of Education: Approval of 2011-2012 School Year Calendar
Condolence notes and cards
Adjournment
Handouts to be circulated
Next regular meeting: Monday, September 26, 2011 – 7:00 p.m.
Trustees
M. Brant, S. Clements, J. Cobb, T. Goodfellow, M. Hall (Vice-chair), D. Inch, L. Kyle, D. Patterson, J. Williams
Student Trustees: Indigo Christ, Ally Martin
- DRAFT HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES
May 24, 2011
Members present:
M. Brant, S. Clements, J. Cobb, T. Goodfellow, M. Hall, D. Inch, L. Kyle,
D. Patterson and J. Williams
Student Trustees:
C. Meyette and E. Tetzlaff
Regrets:
None
Absent:
None
Resource:
C. DeMille, K. Donnell, T. FitzGibbon, R. McGall, M. Norton, C. Portt,
J. Rogers, D. Rutherford, M. Savery-Whiteway, D. Tregenza
Guests:
None
Minutes:
P. Hoskin
Call to order
Vice-Chair Hall called the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m.
Board prayer
Trustee Clements said the Board prayer.
Delegations/presentations
There were no delegations or presentations.
A tribute was made to Chair Carl Pitman, who passed away on Monday, May 23, 2011 due to
complications from cancer. Vice-chair Hall reviewed Chair Pitman’s career in teaching, charity
and volunteer work, community participation and his history with Hastings and Prince Edward
District School Board. Carl provided leadership and vision to the Board through the
development of the first-ever 5-year system plan, known as Achievement in Motion for Student
Success or AIM, and again in 2011 with the development of the second 5-year plan.
Carl was well known for his sense of humour, caring approach and responsibility and was a firm
supporter of the Growing with Character attributes.
Several trustees added to the praise of Chair Pitman and his commitment to his family and
community. Photos of Chair Pitman participating in various activities with the board were
displayed.
Chair Pitman is survived by his wife Barbara, son Ron and daughter Christina. Details of the
visitation and funeral serviced were shared.
HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES May 24, 2011
Page 2
Approval of the revised agenda
Moved:
J. Williams
Seconded: D. Inch
That the revised agenda be approved with the addition of report from the Budget
Committee under Information.
Carried
Approval of minutes
Moved:
T. Goodfellow
Seconded: J. Cobb
That the minutes of the regular meeting of April 26, 2011 be approved as
corrected.
Carried
Business arising from the minutes
• None
.
Report from the Committee of the Whole Board
There were no recommendations from the Committee of the Whole.
Recommendations
Report from Executive Committee
Policy Review
Board Policy No. 3-I: Indemnification of Board Members
Moved:
T. Goodfellow
Seconded: D. Inch
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board approve the amendments
to Board Policy No. 3-I Indemnification of Board Members, as contained in Board
Report No. B-1 Appendix A, dated May, 24, 2011.
Trustee Goodfellow reviewed the changes that had been made to the policy. Clarification was
provided by Director Soule regarding liability insurance coverage for trustees.
Carried
Board Policy No. 11-F: Student Enrolment/School Capacity Committee
Moved:
T. Goodfellow
Seconded: S. Clements
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board approve the amendments
to Board Policy No. 11-F Student Enrolment/School Capacity Committee, as
contained in Board Report No. B-1 Appendix B, dated May, 24, 2011.
Trustee Goodfellow reviewed the policy, highlighting changes that had been made.
Carried
HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES May 24, 2011
Page 3
Report from Program and Human Resources Committee
Textbook/Novel Approval
Moved:
J. Cobb
Seconded: L. Kyle
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board approve the list of
Textbooks / Novels for use in schools as contained in Board Report No. B-2,
Appendix A, dated May 24, 2011.
Trustee Cobb advised that four titles had been brought forward of which three were approved
and one was held over for additional review by the committee.
Carried
Report from the Budget Committee
Moved:
D. Patterson
Seconded: T. Goodfellow
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board forward to Leona
Dombrowsky, Minister of Education the letter, outlining budget concerns, as
discussed at the Budget Committee Meeting of May 24, 2011.
Trustee Patterson discussed the letter noting that it identifies trustee concern regarding the
financial health of the organization. It was suggested that copies of the letter should also be
sent to Andrew Davis, Director, Financial Analysis and Accountability and Didem Proulx,
Director of Education Finance Branch, from the Ministry of Education, Catherine Fife, President
of Ontario Public School Boards’ Association and Lou Rinaldi, MPP for Northumberland-Quinte
West. Superintendent Rutherford was thanked by trustees for the work he undertakes to
provide trustees with concise budget information.
Report from Staff
Board Policy No. C-3: Student Trustee Representation on Board
Moved:
J. Cobb
Seconded: L. Kyle
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board approve the amendment
to Board Policy No. 3-C: Student Representation on the Board, as contained in
Board Report B-3, dated May 24, 2011.
Director Soule noted that amendments to this policy reflect modifications to the eligibility
requirements of the regulation.
Carried
Appointment of Student Trustees
Moved:
D. Patterson
Seconded: J. Cobb
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board appoint Indigo Christ and
Ally Martin as student trustees and Cynthia Gau as alternate student trustee,
effective June 1, 2011 to May 31, 2012.
HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES May 24, 2011
Page 4
Student Trustee Tetzlaff introduced the incoming trustees, Indigo Christ from Moira Secondary
School, Aly Martin from Centennial Secondary School and alternate student trustee, Cynthia
Gau from Bayside Secondary School. Student Trustee Meyette offered her support of the new
trustees noting that they had attended the Student Trustee Association Annual General Meeting
in May.
Carried
Information
Calendar of events
The calendar was reviewed. Trustees were provided with a list of upcoming meetings, events
and graduation ceremonies. Director Soule added that a coffee break hosted by the
International Student Program will be held at the Education Centre on Wednesday, May 25 at
10:00 a.m. to support the Japanese relief effort. It was noted that an Audit Committee meeting
is scheduled for Thursday, June 9, 2011.
Trustees were asked to advise Pauline Hoskin which secondary school graduation ceremonies
they will be attending so principals can be advised.
Report from Executive Committee
Vice-Chair Hall reported on the following items from the Executive Committee meeting that took
place on May 2, 2011:
• Review of Board policies
• Governance training dates
• Review of agendas
Operations and Finance Committee
Trustee Inch reported on the following items from the Operations and Finance Committee
meeting that took place on May 9, 2011:
• Project update from D. Tregenza
• Board policy review
Program and Human Resources Committee
Trustee Goodfellow reported on the following items from the Program and Human Resources
Committee meeting that took place on May 16, 2011:
• Student Success program update
• Textbook/novel approvals
• Preliminary 2011-2012 elementary and secondary administrative assignments
• Board policy review
• Police protocol update
Reports from Staff
International Student Program
Director Soule provided trustees with an update on the International Student Program. This
program has been in place for 10 years, has gone through considerable change and has
provided a positive impact within our board. There are currently 126 students enrolled from a
number of different countries. During the 2010/11 school year, the International Student
Program will contribute approximately $200,000 to board revenue.
HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES May 24, 2011
Page 5
Administrative Assignments – report C-4
Superintendent McGall presented Report C-4 Preliminary 2010-2011 elementary and secondary
administrative assignments - #5 noting that this is an update due to the resignation of a principal
which resulted in adjustments.
Reports from Trustees – Board committees and events
Trustees provided updates on events they attended:
• Student art show at the Belleville Public Library
• “Willy Wonka” show at Prince Charles Public School Trenton
• Presentation by children’s author, Chris D’Souza, on Building Inclusive Schools
Report from Student Trustees:
• Trustee Meyette advised that she will be the valedictorian at the Quinte
Secondary School graduation
Trustee proposals and queries
• None
Correspondence
There was no correspondence.
Adjournment
The meeting was adjourned at 7:52 p.m.
_____________________________
Chair
______________________________
Secretary
- DRAFT HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES
June 7, 2011
Members present:
M. Brant, S. Clements, J. Cobb, T. Goodfellow, M. Hall, D. Inch, L. Kyle,
D. Patterson, J. Williams
Regrets:
None
Absent:
None
Resource:
C. DeMille, K. Donnell, T. FitzGibbon, R. McGall, M. Norton, C. Portt,
J. Rogers, D. Rutherford, M. Savery-Whiteway, D. Tregenza
Guests:
None
Minutes:
P. Hoskin
Call to order
Vice-Chair Hall called the meeting to order at 3:00 p.m.
Approval of the revised agenda
Moved:
J. Williams
Seconded:
D. Inch
That the revised agenda be approved.
Carried
Recommendations
Report from the Executive Committee
Replacement of the trustee representative from Centre Hastings
Moved:
S. Clements
Seconded: T. Goodfellow
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board advertise in local media
for a Trustee to represent the electoral districts of Municipality of Centre Hastings,
Marmora/Lake and Deloro Township, Madoc Township and Stirling-Rawdon
Township, as defined in the Education Act Part VII Section 221.1 Vacancies, and in
accordance with the timelines outlined in Board Report B-1 Appendix A, dated
June 7, 2011.
Trustee Clements commented that the Executive Committee decided to advertise for a trustee
representative for Central Hastings rather than ask the municipalities to hold an election.
Director Soule advised that each of the municipalities would be advised as early as tomorrow of
the process we would be following to fill the vacancy on the Board.
HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES JUNE 7, 2011
Page 2
The Director noted that the Education Act Part VII Section 221.1 Vacancies, stipulates that a
qualified person be appointed to fill the vacancy within 90 days. Board Policy No. 3-H Filling
Vacancies on the Board will be updated to align with the Education Act.
Carried
Information
Report from Executive Committee
Position of Chair for the period June 2011 to November 2011
Vice-chair Hall reviewed Report C-1 Selection of the chair. Director Soule noted that according
to Board Policy No. 3 By-Laws and Governance, the election must take place at a regular Board
meeting. The election will therefore occur at the regular meeting of June 20, 2011, after the
celebrations, agenda approval and recess.
Correspondence
There was no correspondence.
Adjournment
The meeting was adjourned at 3:10 p.m.
_____________________________
Chair
______________________________
Secretary
HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
SPECIAL PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES
June 13, 2011
Members present:
M. Brant, S. Clements, J. Cobb, T. Goodfellow, M. Hall, D. Inch, L. Kyle,
D. Patterson and J. Williams
Regrets:
None
Absent:
None
Resource:
C. DeMille, K. Donnell, T. FitzGibbon, R. McGall, M. Norton, C. Portt,
J. Rogers, D. Rutherford, M. Savery-Whiteway, D. Tregenza
Guests:
None
Minutes:
P. Hoskin, Administrative Assistant
Call to order
Vice-chair Hall called the meeting to order at 4:45 p.m.
Approval of the agenda
Moved:
D. Patterson
Seconded: D. Inch
That the agenda be approved.
Carried
Report from the Committee of the Whole Board
Ratification of the Association of Professional Student Services Personnel (APSSP)
tentative collective agreement.
Moved:
J. Cobb
Seconded: T. Goodfellow
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board ratify the first collective
agreement reached on June 3, 2011 with the Association of Professional Student
Services Personnel (APSSP), for the period of September 1, 2010 to August 31,
2012, as contained in Board Report No. B-1 dated June 13, 2011.
Carried
Recommendations
None.
Information
None.
HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
PUBLIC MEETING MINUTES JUNE 13, 2011
Correspondence
There was no correspondence.
Adjournment
The meeting was adjourned at 4:50 p.m.
_____________________________
Chair
______________________________
Secretary
Page 2
Board Report No. B-2
Page 1
June 20, 2011
Decision X
To:
Information
The Chair and Members of Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
From: M. Hall, Vice-chair, Executive Committee
Re:
Board Policy No. 3-A Delegations and Presentations
Purpose
To request that Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board approve changes to
Board Policy No. 3-A Delegations and Presentations as outlined in Appendix A.
Background
According to Procedure 110 Board Policy Development and Review, Board Policies are
required to be reviewed every three years to ensure they are still relevant and have been
implemented effectively.
Current situation
On January 10, 2011 the Executive Committee recommended that the Director of Education
be authorized to review the policies contained in Executive Committee Report C-2 and bring
recommendations forward to the Executive Committee for discussion.
Board Policy No. 3-A Delegations and Presentations was amended by both strikeout and
insertion of language to reflect the current practice and system plan.
Appendix:
Appendix A – Revised Board Policy No. 3-A Delegations and Presentations
Recommendation
Moved:
T. Goodfellow
Seconded: D. Inch
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board approve the changes
to Board Policy No. 3-A Delegations and Presentations, as contained in Board
Report No. B-2, dated June 20, 2011.
Respectfully submitted,
Mary Hall
Vice-chair
Kathy Soule
Director of Education and Secretary of the Board
Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Board Report No. B-2
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
BOARD OPERATIONS
POLICY NO. 3-A
Adopted
Last Revised
Review Date
October 23, 2006
May 26, 2008June 20,
2011
May, 2011June 2014
DELEGATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS
1. OBJECTIVE
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board shall hear delegations and presentations as provided
for in the procedures outlined below.
2.
DEFINITIONS
Delegation—A person or group of persons officially elected or appointed to represent another or others
to address the Board or committee of the Board to make a request or influence a decision.
Presentation—The sharing of information before the Board or a committee of the Board by a person or
group of persons external to the Board after submitting a request to appear for this purpose.
3.
PROCEDURE
3.1
A person or persons presenting or a delegation wishing to appear before the Board, at a regularly
scheduled closed session or public meeting of the full Board or a standing committee of the Board,
may request to do so by contacting the director’s office.
3.2
The person or persons presenting or a delegation shall submit to the director a completed Form
F003-1 Request for Delegations and Presentations for inclusion in the agenda of the Board or
standing committee. The form must be submitted no later than five business days prior to the
meeting. Failure to do so shall result in deferral until such material is made available. Any
additional material will be distributed to the Board or a committee only with the prior approval of the
chair of the Board or the chair of the standing committee.
3.3
No more than two persons shall be designated to be speakers for the delegation or presentation
and no other member of the delegation or presentation shall address the Board or committee
except by request of a trustee and with the permission of the chair of the Board or standing
committee.
3.4
At a closed meeting of the Board, persons presenting or delegations will be heard at approximately
6:00 p.m.
3.5
At a public meeting of the Board, persons presenting or delegations shall be heard at
approximately 7:00 p.m.
3.6
At a closed or public session of a committee meeting, persons or delegations shall be heard at a
time to be determined by the chair of the committee.
3.7
The duration of any person’s or delegation’s presentation shall not be more than fifteen minutes in
total.
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
Policy Handbook
Page 2 of 23
Board Report No. B-2
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Board Operations
Board Policy No. 3
3.8
Any specific recommendation for action suggested by a person or delegation shall not be voted
upon at the same meeting in which that person or delegation appears before the Board but may be
referred by the chair to an appropriate standing committee or member of staff for study and report
to the Board or standing committee of the Board.
3.9
The Board reserves the right, at its sole discretion, to limit the number of delegations or
presentations at any regularly scheduled closed or public meeting of the Board or standing
committee of the Board.
3.10 The Board or committee, by motion, may choose, also at its sole discretion, to receive a person or
delegation without the prior notice outlined in this section.
Legal References:
Education Act, section 207 Access to Meetings and Records
Board References:


Board Policy No. 2 - Governance By-Laws and Standing Rules
Form F003-1 - Request for Delegations and Presentations
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
Policy Handbook
Page 3 of 23
Board Report No. B-2
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
FORM F003-1
Adopted
Last Revised
Review Date
October 23, 2006
May 26, 2008June
20, 2011
May, 2011June
2014
REQUEST FOR DELEGATIONS AND
PRESENTATIONS
Please provide the following information no later than the end of business on the Tuesday beforefive
business days prior to the meeting date.
Person(s) requesting:
On behalf of: (organization)
For the board/committee meeting of:
(name and date of meeting)
Subject/title:
Written outline (attach extra pages if needed):
List of attachments to be included in the board agenda package (attach to this request):
NOTE: Additional materials brought to the meeting will be handed out at the chair’s discretion.
Authority to speak: (if applicable)
Name of presiding officer
Signature of presiding officer
Signature of requesting person
Equipment required:
(i.e. mic, projector, VCR/DVD, TV, etc.)
Special set-up required:
(table, bulletin board, etc.)
Please specify length of time required: __________
Please note that the presentation shall not exceed 15 min.
Mailing address:
Telephone:
RETURN TO:
Fax:
Director’s Office, The Education Centre
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario, K8N 1N9
Phone: 613-966-1170 Ext. 2201
FAX: 613-962-1048
Date received: _______________
Revision Dates
Board Report No. B-3
Page 1
June 20, 2011
Decision
To:
X
Information
The Chair and Members of the Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
From: Dwayne Inch, Chair, Operations and Finance Committee
Dave Rutherford, Superintendent of Business Services
Re:
Borrowing Resolution
Purpose
To approve a borrowing resolution in order to meet the 2011-2012 expenditures of the board.
Background
From time to time the board finds it necessary to borrow funds to meet the current expenditures
of the board until the current revenues have been received. An operating line of credit is
established which states that the loan must not exceed a given limit at any time. The limit is the
estimated maximum borrowing the board may require at any one time.
Current situation
Based on an analysis of the 2010-2011 cash flow it is recommended that the borrowing limit
remain at $12,000,000 for the 2011-2012 fiscal year.
Appendices
Appendix A – Borrowing Resolution for the period commencing September 1, 2011 and ending
on August 31, 2012.
Recommendation
Moved:
Seconded:
S. Clements
T. Goodfellow
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board, in order to meet current
2011-2012 expenditures, approve the attached resolution authorizing the
borrowing of a sum of up to twelve million dollars ($12,000,000) outstanding at any
one time as contained in Board Report No. B-3 dated June 20, 2011.
Respectfully submitted,
Dwayne Inch
Chair, Operations and Finance Committee
Dave Rutherford
Superintendent of Business Services
Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Board Report No. B-3
Page 2
June 20, 2011
Appendix A
RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE BORROWING OF MONEY TO MEET CURRENT
EXPENDITURES OF HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD (the
[email protected])
A.
In accordance with Section 243 (1) of the Education Act (R.S.O. 1990) (the [email protected]), the
board considers it necessary to borrow the amount of up to $12,000,000 to meet, until
current revenues are received, the current expenditures of the Board for the period
commencing on September 1, 2011 and ending on August 31, 2012 (the [email protected]).
B.
Pursuant to subsection 243 (3) of the Act, the total amount borrowed pursuant to this
resolution together with the total of any similar borrowings is not to exceed the
unreceived balance of the estimated revenues of the Board for the period.
C.
The total amount previously borrowed by the Board pursuant to Section 243 that has not
been repaid is $3,803,512,79.
D.
The amount borrowed for current expenditures is within the board=s Debt and Financial
Obligation Limit as established by the Ministry of Education and Training from time to
time.
RESOLVED THAT:
1.
The Chairman or Vice-Chairman and the Treasurer are authorized on behalf of the board
to borrow from time to time by way of promissory note or bankers= acceptance from
CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMMERCE ([email protected]) a sum or sums not exceeding in
the aggregate of $12,000,000.00 to meet, until current revenues are received, the
current expenditures of the board for the period (including the amounts required for the
purposes mentioned in Section 243 (1) and 243 (2) of the Act) and to give to CIBC
promissory notes or bankers= acceptances, as the case may be, sealed with the
corporate seal of the board and signed by the Chairman or Vice Chairman and the
Treasurer for the sums borrowed plus interest at a rate to be agreed upon from time to
time with CIBC;
2.
The interest charged, on all sums borrowed pursuant to this resolution plus any related
charges, is not to exceed the interest that would be payable at the prime lending rate of
the chartered banks listed in Schedule 1 of the Bank Act (Canada) on the date of
borrowing;
3.
The Treasurer is authorized and directed to apply in payment of all sums borrowed plus
interest, all of the moneys collected or received in respect of the current revenues of the
board;
4.
The Treasurer is authorized and directed to deliver to CIBC from time to time upon
request a statement showing (a) the total amount of unpaid previous borrowings of the
board for current expenditures together with debt charges, if any, and (b) the uncollected
balance of the estimated revenues for the current year or, where the estimates have not
been adopted, the estimated revenues of the previous year less any current revenue
already collected.
Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Board Report No. B-3
Page 3
June 20, 2011
We hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and complete copy of a resolution of the board in
the Province of Ontario, duly passed at a meeting of the board and that this resolution is in full
force and effect.
DATED this _____________ day of ________________, ________.
WITNESS the corporate seal
(Seal)
___________________________________
Chair
___________________________________
Secretary
Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Board Report No. B-4
Page 1
June 20, 2011
Decision X
To:
Information
The Chair and Members of the Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
From: Dwayne Inch, Chair, Operations and Finance Committee
Don Tregenza, Controller of Facility Services
Dave Rutherford, Superintendent of Business Services
Re:
Annual Accessibility Plan for the period September 2011 to August 2012
Purpose
To approve the board’s Annual Accessibility Plan for the period September 2011 to August
2012.
Background
The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (2005) (AODA) and the Ontarians with
Disabilities Act (2001) (ODA) requires school boards to prepare annual plans to address
barriers to persons with disabilities. The plan has had several revisions since it was first
published in 2005 and is accessible by link on the board’s main website and the Facility
Services website.
Current situation
The Accessibility Advisory Committee met recently to review and update the plan.
Revisions have been made and once approved by the Board at its meeting of June 20,
2011, links on the board’s and Facility Services websites will be updated with the new plan.
Appendices
Appendix A - Annual Accessibility Plan for the period September 2011 to August 2012.
Recommendation
Moved:
M. Hall
Seconded:
D. Patterson
That Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board approve the Annual
Accessibility Plan for the period September 2011 to August 2012 as contained
in Board Report No. B-4, dated June 20, 2011.
Respectfully submitted,
Dwayne Inch
Chair, Operations and Finance Committee
Don Tregenza
Controller of Facility Services
Dave Rutherford
Superintendent of Business Services
Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN
for the period
September 2011 ‐ August 2012
Submitted by the
Accessibility Advisory Committee
and approved by
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
at its Board meeting of June 20, 2011
CONTACT: Don Tregenza, Controller of Facility Services
Chair of Accessibility Advisory Committee
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
Facility Services @ William R. Kirk School
224 Palmer Road, Belleville, Ontario, K8P 4E1
613‐966‐1170, Ext. 2250 / 1‐800‐267‐4350
Published by Grace Saunders, Facility Services
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
TABLE OF CONTENTS
ITEM
SECTION
PAGE
TABLE OF CONTENTS
2
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
3
1.0
Purpose
4
2.0
Objectives
4
3.0
Description of Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
4
4.0
Commitment to Accessibility Planning
5
5.0
Universal Design Philosophy
5
6.0
Committee members
6
7.0
Consultation with Persons with Disabilities
7
8.0
Recent Barrier Removal Initiatives Major Projects Completed in 2010-2011
9.0
Preventing New Barriers
8
10.0
Barrier Identification Methodologies
9
11.0
Barriers Identified
10-11
12.0
Barriers to be Addressed in 2011-2012
12-13
13.0
Board Review
14
14.0
Community Input
14
15.0
Committee Review and Monitoring Process
14
16.0
Communication of the Plan
14
17.0
APPENDIX A - Barriers Removed in Prior Years
15-22
18.0
APPENDIX B - Building Accessibility Chart as of September 2011
Future Needs & Completed Projects
23-25
APPENDIX C - Names of Outside Agencies Involved with Special
Education
26-31
19.0
20.0
GLOSSARY
7-8
32
2
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) became law on June 13, 2005.
The Annual Accessibility Plan describes the measures that Hastings and Prince Edward
District School Board has taken in the past and plans to take during the period 2011-2012 to
identify, remove and prevent barriers for people with disabilities.
The purpose of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005 (AODA) and the
Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001 (ODA) is to improve opportunities for people with
disabilities and to provide for their involvement in the identification, removal and prevention of
barriers to their full participation in the life of the province. To this end, the Acts require
school boards to prepare an annual accessibility plan to consult with people with disabilities
in the preparation of this plan and to make the plan public.
The AODA provides an enhanced emphasis on required actions to meet the needs of
persons with disabilities. The AODA, once fully implemented, will include regulations with
respect to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Customer Service
Transportation
Information and Communications
Employment
The Built Environment
The first standard for Customer Service is now law. Public sector organizations were required
by law to comply with the standard by January 1, 2010. All Hastings and Prince Edward
District School Board employees and trustees received and completed their Customer
Service training by February 2010.
The Transportation, Information and Communication and Employment regulations were
enacted June 7, 2011. School board obligations under the regulations include accessibility
awareness training for all employees by January 1, 2013.
The Built Environment standard has been developed by the province and is now being
circulated for public review. It is expected that the standard will be enacted over the next
year. School boards will have obligations including improved accessibility implemented over
a prescribed time period.
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board is committed to the continual improvement
of accessibility to school board facilities, policies, programs, practices and services for
students, staff, parents, guardians, volunteers and members of the community with
disabilities.
3
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
1.0
PURPOSE
The plan describes the measures that Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board has
taken in the past and the measures that will be taken during the 2011-2012 school year to
identify, remove and prevent barriers for people with disabilities who work in, use or attend
school board facilities and services.
2.0
OBJECTIVES
The plan:
1. Describes the process by which Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
will identify, remove and prevent barriers for people with disabilities.
2. Reviews efforts of Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board to remove and
prevent barriers for people with disabilities during the past year.
3. Identifies policies, procedures, programs, practices and services that Hastings and
Prince Edward District School Board will review in the coming year to identify barriers
for people with disabilities.
4. Describes the measures Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board will take
in the coming year to identify, remove and prevent barriers for people with disabilities.
5. Describes how Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board will make this
accessibility plan available to the public.
3.0
DESCRIPTION OF HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD
DISTRICT SCHOOL BOARD
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board was formally established in 1998 as a
result of the amalgamation of the former Hastings County Board of Education and Prince
Edward County Board of Education.
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board serves more than 16,000 students each
day at 46 elementary and 8 secondary schools. Supporting student achievement is the goal
of approximately 1,900 teaching and support staff who, in addition to the contributions of
caring volunteers and community partners, provide the best opportunity for students to learn.
The District covers a wide geographical area of 7,221 square kilometres bordered by
Maynooth to the north, Deseronto the east, Prince Edward County to the south and Quinte
West to the west.
All students regardless of special talents or challenging needs, have the opportunity to
become successful when attending schools which offer accessible programs, settings and
services.
4
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
4.0
COMMITMENT TO ACCESSIBILITY PLANNING
The original plan was prepared in consultation with Senior Administration and Trustees of the
Board. The Board and Senior Administration continue to approve the plan annually.
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board continues to commit to:
! the Accessibility Advisory Committee (AAC) meeting annually to review the plan.
! consulting with people with disabilities in the development and review of the plan.
! ensuring school board policies and procedures are consistent with the principles
of accessibility.
! improving access to facilities, policies, programs, practices and services for
students, staff, parents, guardians, volunteers and members of the community.
The Director of Education has authorized the AAC to prepare and annually update an
accessibility plan that will enable Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board to meet
these commitments.
5.0
UNIVERSAL DESIGN PHILOSOPHY
Through the Ontario Ministry of Education document, the Expert Panel Report on Special
Education: Education for All, 2004, school boards in Ontario were directed to follow a
Universal Design for Learning (UDL) model.
Universal Design for Learning was inspired by work in architecture on the planning of
buildings with a view to accessibility for people with physical disabilities (Turnbull et al.,
2002). Architects observed that the added improvements facilitated access for all users, not
just people with physical disabilities. An access ramp, for instance, provides a person using a
wheelchair with easier access to a building, but it also makes it easier for a parent with a
child’s stroller, a traveller with a baggage trolley, or someone using a walker.
Eventually, researchers in other fields noted that specialized technology meant for a target
population is also useful for others. The notion that assistance targeted at a specific group
can help everyone, bolstered by recent research on inclusion and new technologies, has now
made its way into the field of education.
Universal design ensures that the classroom and other learning environments are as usable
as possible for students, regardless of their age, ability, or situation.
The principle of universal design guides decisions made by Hastings and Prince Edward
District School Board in accessibility planning.
Universal Design for Learning principles:
• equitable use
• appropriately designed space
• flexibility
• simplicity
• safety
• different modes of perception
5
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
6.0
ACCESSIBILITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS
NAME
REPRESENTING
Deborah Allen
Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) - HPEDSB
Laurence Bédard
Student Senator - HPEDSB
Susan CarletonMaines
Ontario Principals Council (OPC) - HPEDSB
Matthew Charles
Elementary Teachers Federation Organization (ETFO)
Vision Teacher, Special Education Services - HPEDSB
Karen Chow
President, Hastings and Prince Edward Occasional Teacher Local
(HAPE-OTL)
Kerry Donnell
Communications Officer - HPEDSB
Mary Hall
Vice-Chair of Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
(HPEDSB)
Sandra Hill
Association of Professional Student Services Personnel (APSSP) HPEDSB, Special Education Services
Tom Johnston
Health & Safety Officer - HPEDSB
Kelvin MacQuarrie
Information and Technology Services
Administrative Support Group (ASG) - HPEDSB
Gillian McCurdy
Safe Workplace Coordinator - HPEDSB
Ally Martin
Student Senator - HPEDSB
Jennifer Meade
Ontario Secondary School Teachers Federation (OSSTF) - HPEDSB
Cathy Portt
Assistant Superintendent of Education, Special Education Services HPEDSB
Neil Purcell
Elementary Teachers Federation Organization (ETFO)
Coordinator and Resource Teacher (Hearing) - HPEDSB
Sandy Smith
Community Engagement Coordinator - HPEDSB
Kathy Soule
Director of Education - HPEDSB
Don Tregenza
Chair of Accessibility Advisory Committee
Controller of Facility Services - HPEDSB
Jennifer Vincent
Manager Disability Services - Loyalist College
Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) - HPEDSB
Steve Wowk
Tri-Board Student Transportation Services
6
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
7.0
CONSULTATION WITH PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
In maintaining the plan, the Accessibility Advisory Committee invites advice from persons with
disabilities. In selection of members of the committee, organizations are asked to appoint
representatives with disabilities where possible.
Suggestions received since implementation of the plan include:
1)
reduce height of water fountains
2)
install audio enhancement equipment in board public meeting rooms
3)
improve access to automatic door opener buttons
4)
ensure chair lifts are in good repair
5)
improve accessibility signage
6)
improve training for self advocacy
7)
ensure consistency of educational assistant staffing
8)
continue emphasis on anti-bullying programs
9)
ensure clarity in fire safety plans for evacuation of persons using wheelchairs
10)
provide accessibility to school offices such as lower counter heights
11)
assist persons with disabilities to strive for independence
12)
provide sufficient door access widths
8.0
RECENT BARRIER REMOVAL INITIATIVES
During the last several years, there have been a number of informal initiatives to identify, remove
and prevent barriers to people with disabilities. An itemized list of barriers that were removed in the
past is included in Appendix A. More recent projects are listed in the table below.
The board through its Special Education Plan has addressed access for students with disabilities
through modifications and accommodations of programs and services.
Schools have been facilitated with the inclusion of automatic door openers on major school interior
and exterior doorways, elevators in most secondary schools with multiple stories, ramps for school
front and rear access points, accessible washrooms, audio and visual emergency alarm systems,
and tactile and high-contrast signage, etc.
Attitudinal barriers for people with disabilities are being addressed through staff and student inservice about diversity, inclusive schools, re-writing diversity policy / procedures and examining
other policies and procedures for barriers to accessibility.
Architectural features that incorporate principles of universal design have been incorporated into
building construction where possible. Current renovations to existing buildings have accessibility
for people with disabilities addressed in the plans wherever possible.
In 2010-2011, the board spent in excess of $100,000 to complete the numerous projects noted
below to address physical and architectural barriers.
7
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
The following major projects were completed in 2010-2011.
MAJOR PROJECTS COMPLETED IN 2010-2011
PROJECTS COMPLETED UP TO THIS PERIOD:
DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT
Automatic door openers
Centennial Secondary School
Bayside Secondary School
Foxboro Public School
Pagers and training provided to hard of hearing
students in secondary schools.
Provided in secondary schools with hard of
hearing students to alert them during
emergency situations.
Major renovations and additions including
features such as:
Athol-South Marysburgh Public School
Prince Charles School (Belleville)
Sir John A. Macdonald School
York River Public School
-
accessible washrooms
accessible parking
accessible front entrances
offices renovated to provide lower height
access
9.0
PREVENTING NEW BARRIERS
In accordance with the AODA, 2005 and ODA, 2001, all school board programs, policies, practices
and services, from this point forward, will be subject to the guiding principles of inclusionary
practice. The board will strive to create an environment that is accessible to all people regardless
of age or ability. Through the annual accessibility planning process, the board’s programming,
policies and practices will be assessed to ensure continuous improvement in accessibility.
8
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
10.0
BARRIER IDENTIFICATION METHODOLOGIES
To prepare the original plan, the activities of the AAC included:
BARRIER IDENTIFICATION METHODOLOGIES
METHODOLOGY
DESCRIPTION
Presentation to Senior Administration
Opportunity for input and feedback and creation of an
administrative working committee.
Presentation to Trustees of the Board
Draft plan prepared by working committee and presented
to Trustees.
Advisory committee established
Advisory committee including representatives from
employee groups, committees such as SEAC, was
established and met to review and finalize draft plan.
Community consultations
Committee presentation to SEAC.
Stakeholders communication and
presentations to employees
Describe the AAC composition and initiatives for coming
year.
Plan feedback
The AAC will seek stakeholders’ input to the plan and
revise the plan as necessary.
9
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
11.0
BARRIERS IDENTIFIED
In its initial review, the Accessibility Advisory Committee (AAC) identified many barriers. Over the
next several years, in consultation with persons with disabilities, the AAC will focus on the following:
BARRIERS IDENTIFIED
TYPE OF BARRIER
ARCHITECTURAL
ATTITUDINAL
DESCRIPTION OF BARRIER
STRATEGY FOR ITS REMOVAL OR PREVENTION
Reception counters at several schools are not at
eye level for wheelchair users.
Re-configure reception counters.
Wheelchair access required at various buildings.
Install wheel chair ramps, elevators and chair
lifts at specific locations. Investigate portable
stage lift.
Inaccessible washrooms in various schools.
Re-model washrooms.
Many switches, buttons and water fountains are
too high for wheel chair access.
Relocate switches, buttons and water
fountains to a lower height.
Protruding objects, eg. water fountains, fire
extinguishers, doors opening into hallway and
steps that are not a standard height and width
can create problem for visually impaired walking
with cane.
Remodel water fountains that are protruding
from wall, recess newly installed fountains,
and provide consistency of height and width
when installing steps.
Access to handrails on both sides of stairs.
Remodel to ensure consistency of handrails.
Awareness or lack of knowledge of disabilities
(eg. hearing, vision, mental health).
Provide information and education and
direction on how to get help.
Students, staff and parents have identified
bullying and social isolation as a minor concern
in schools.
Continue with existing programs such as
Equity and Inclusivity program, Safe School
legislation, Safe Workplace legislation and
School Climate Survey. Explore other
possibilities for disability sensitivity and
awareness programming and provide direction
on how to get help.
Awareness of needs and achievements of all
students. After school activities and clubs may
seem they do not welcome students with
disabilities. Students may be nervous to be
involved due to their disability.
Involve students with disabilities in extracurricular and out of school learning activities
and student council and award ceremonies.
Lack of knowledge or awareness on how to
advocate for oneself.
Develop self advocacy skills. Ensure
awareness of accessibility link on the board’s
web site:
http://www.hpedsb.on.ca/ec/accessibility/Accessibility.html
and Director’s Comments mailbox:
http://www.hpedsb.on.ca/feedback/thoughts.cfm
to encourage communication and receive
suggestions re accessibility.
Children with medical conditions and other
disabilities face challenges when participating in
school and field trips.
10
Provide information on programs to inform and
assist with resources to ensure inclusionary
practices. When planning or developing school
or field trips, ensure students with medical and
other disabilities are considered.
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
BARRIERS IDENTIFIED
TYPE OF BARRIER
DESCRIPTION OF BARRIER
STRATEGY FOR ITS REMOVAL OR PREVENTION
COMMUNICATION
People who are deaf and hard of hearing cannot
detect audio fire alarms.
Investigate visual emergency notification
system and install. Provide pagers as
needed.
People who are deaf and hard of hearing have
difficulty participating in meetings.
Install audio enhancement equipment and/or
provide an interpreter.
Identification of facilities.
Develop procedure and provide tactile and
high contrast signage with universal symbols.
Locate signs in accessible positions.
Awareness of access to buildings.
Practice fire drills.
Fire Safety Plans need to be updated to show
accessible egress.
Post on board website and communicate
through newsletters. Include plans for students
with disabilities. Schools need to consult with
local fire chief for approval of accessibility
features in fire safety plan.
Announcements cannot be heard in all locations.
Repair or install and ensure PA systems are
functional in all locations. Install visual
indicators for lockdowns. Provide pagers as
needed.
INFORMATION
Many forms and records are only available in
print. Student information and brochures are
sometimes difficult to obtain in alternative
formats.
Make all forms available on the Board’s Web
site, on disk, or in other formats, including
braille.
PHYSICAL
Interior and exterior doors of several schools are
very heavy and may be difficult to open for a
wheelchair user or someone with limited
strength. Door widths are sometimes too narrow
for wheelchair access.
Install automatic door openers or change the
doors to a lighter weight model. Ensure
opener operators are easy to use. Ensure
door widths comply with building code.
Some gyms, stages and auditoriums have steps
which may prevent persons with disabilities from
participating.
Adapt practices to include persons with
disabilities, ie. - present all awards in front of
stage.
Lack of awareness of accessibility issues and
who is responsible to address employee, student
or community concerns.
Clarify procedure for raising and addressing
barrier issues.
Board policies and procedures need to be
reviewed to ensure compliance with the ODA,
human rights legislation and harassment policy.
Establish an advisory committee to review
policies to ensure compliance.
TECHNOLOGICAL
Availability of specialized equipment and
assistive technology for staff and students with
identified disabilities.
Procedure 215 Special Equipment Amount
(SEA) & Resource Guide provides information
on funding for equipment for students with
Special Education needs. Need to establish
board procedure for staff.
TRANSPORTATION
Students with disabilities need to be able to
access transportation that accommodates their
needs.
Provide transportation options such as
wheelchair accessible cabs and buses.
Attempt to minimize interruption to classes.
POLICY /
PRACTICE
11
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
12.0
BARRIERS TO BE ADDRESSED IN 2011-2012
The Accessibility Advisory Committee has identified the following barriers to be addressed by priority:
BARRIERS TO BE ADDRESSED IN 2011-2012
BARRIER
ARCHITECTURAL
Renovation Plan to
existing buildings.
ATTITUDINAL
Increase awareness
about disabilities and
inclusionary practices.
ATTITUDINAL
Identify bullying and
social isolation as
problem in schools
COMMUNICATION/
INFORMATION
Most school board
forms, records and
student information
brochures only
available in print format
COMMUNICATION/
INFORMATION
Signage identification of
facilities.
OBJECTIVE
INDICATORS OF SUCCESS
TIMING
RESPONSIBILITY
Ensure renovations
to existing facilities
are accessible for
all people with
exceptionalities.
Consult with facilities planning
and re-design. Completed
renovations are accessible.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
Facility Services
Better understand
how to
accommodate
those with various
types of disabilities
eg. students, staff,
parents
Equity and Inclusivity Awareness
workshops and materials
prepared and communicated.
Awareness of ways to
accommodate persons with
physical & non-physical
disabilities. Equity and Inclusivity
Procedures. Safe School Climate
Survey data. Inclusive Education
Symposium.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
System
Increase
awareness that
bullying and social
isolation is not
acceptable
Continue with existing programs
such as Growing with Character.
Explore other possibilities for
exceptionality, sensitivity and
awareness programming for
classmates. Incidents of bullying
have decreased in the school
environment and schools are
more inclusive.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
All schools and
assigned
Superintendent
Provide non-print,
alternative formats
for school board
forms, records and
student information
brochures.
Produce non-print format for
school board forms, records and
student information brochures.
Forms, records and student
information brochures available in
non-print format or other formats
upon request. eg. - Web site,
large print.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
ITS and
Communications
Officer
Develop procedure
and provide tactile
and high contrast
signage with
universal symbols.
Locate signs in
accessible
positions.
Staff and students with disabilities
able to communicate, move about
school, and be made aware of
announcements.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
Facility Services
Spec Ed Services
12
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
BARRIERS TO BE ADDRESSED IN 2011-2012
BARRIER
COMMUNICATION/
INFORMATION
Staff and students not
always able to hear
announcements and
emergency information.
PHYSICAL
OBJECTIVE
Inaccessible
washrooms in various
buildings.
PHYSICAL
Fire safety plans
showing accessibility
features on floor plans.
PHYSICAL
Access to playground
equipment for students
and caregivers
POLICIES
Board policies and
procedures need to be
reviewed to ensure
compliance with the
AODA and ODA.
TECHNOLOGICAL
Lack of procedure re
specialized equipment
for staff.
TRANSPORTATION
Access to board and
school activities can be
restricted.
TIMING
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
RESPONSIBILITY
Information and
Technology
Services
Repair or install
and ensure PA
systems are
functional in all
locations. Install
visual indicators for
lockdowns.
Provide pagers as
needed.
Staff and students in all areas of
building can obtain
announcements.
Reconfigure school
reception areas
Consult with architect and
contractor to remodel station.
Persons in wheelchairs will be
able to speak to school
receptionist at eye level at
counter.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
Facility Services
Ensure washrooms
in designated
locations are
accessible.
Consult with architect and
contractor to remodel washrooms.
Washrooms are accessible in
designated locations.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
Facility Services
Ensure all staff and
students aware of
locations that are
accessible in case
of emergency.
Consult with fire chief and health
& safety officer to determine.
Floor plans include accessibility
features.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
Health & Safety
Officer, Fire Chief
and Facility
Services
Consider need for
accessible
playground
equipment.
Consult with playground suppliers
and schools to determine
availability and needs.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
Facility Services
Ensure all board
policies are
inclusive and
address
accessibility issues
Establish committee to review
policies to ensure compliance.
Policy and procedures meet
legislative requirements including
a specific procedure to state the
board’s commitment to address
barriers to persons with
disabilities.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
Director of
Education
Develop a
procedure re
funding for
specialized
equipment for staff.
Staff with disabilities will have
improved access to workplace
when provided with specialized
equipment.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
Information and
Technology
Services, Human
Resources
Services,
Health & Safety
Officer
Students with
disabilities need
access that
accommodates
their needs.
Provide means to allow access to
board activities. Persons with
disabilities have access to all
school and board events.
Review and
report by Sept.
2012
School, Tri-Board
Transportation
Student Services
and Special
Education
Services
School reception
stations are too high for
wheelchair users
PHYSICAL
INDICATORS OF SUCCESS
Schools
13
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
13.0
BOARD REVIEW
The accessibility plan will continue to be updated on an annual basis with new barriers being
identified and eliminated as time and funding permits. The Accessibility Advisory Committee with
representation from all employee groups, departments, the Special Education Advisory Committee
and outside organizations will continue to provide direction to address accessibility issues with the
approval of the Board of Trustees.
14.0
COMMUNITY INPUT
The Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) consists of various community organizations
representing persons with disabilities and is established through a public consultation process.
SEAC was consulted by the AAC to provide broad-based input prior to the establishment and
approval of the original plan by the Board of Trustees.
Representation was invited from all employee groups and from Special Education Services, the
Parent Involvement Committee and Tri-Board Transportation Student Services.
15.0
COMMITTEE REVIEW AND MONITORING PROCESS
The Accessibility Advisory Committee will meet annually to review progress of the plan. Throughout
the year, evaluation of the effectiveness in implementing barrier removal and prevention strategies
will be ongoing in preparation for subsequent years of accessibility planning.
16.0
COMMUNICATION OF THE PLAN
The ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN for the period September 2011 - August 2012
is posted on the board’s website at www.hpedsb.on.ca.
CONTACT:
Don Tregenza, Controller of Facility Services
Chair of the Accessibility Advisory Committee
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
Facility Services located @ William R. Kirk School
224 Palmer Road, Belleville, ON., K8P 4E1
613-966-1170, Ext. 2250
[email protected]
14
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
17.0 APPENDIX A
BARRIERS REMOVED IN PRIOR YEARS
BARRIER TYPE
LOCATION
DESCRIPTION OF BARRIER
ATTITUDINAL
all schools
To reduce harassment and increase understanding and
acceptance of students with disabilities, the following
programs have been used:
• Bully-proofing Your School (book resource in use in many
schools);
• Don’t Laugh at Me;
• How to Hug a Porcupine;
• Respect Program;
• Franklin Fellowship Club (developed by the Early
Intervention Team at Queen Victoria P.S.);
• CYC Programs such as The Bully-Free Classroom;
• Living Colour, I Care CST;
• Creative Conflict Resolution Training;
• Peer Proofing;
• Stirling Silver Program;
• OPP Bearhug Band;
• Dealing with Aggressive At-Risk Children;
• Cool Solutions - Peer Counselling;
• VIP; Social Skills Program (primary).
ATTITUDINAL
all schools
In the Health & Physical Education document, there is
discussion regarding using the IEP to develop a program for
students with disabilities. There is a reference in the Grade 7
Healthy Living Curriculum under Personal Safety and Injury
Prevention that states “identify people and resources that
can support someone experiencing harassment”.
There is a reference in the Grade 8 Healthy Living
Curriculum under Living Skills that reads “demonstrate
respectful behaviour towards the feelings and ideas of
others”.
ATTITUDINAL
any school
as required
Child and Youth Counsellors; CAVEAT; SALEP; Alternate
Programs, to assist students in developing strategies and
behaviours to deal more effectively with school, societal, and
peer expectations and to increase student tolerance of
others with differences.
COMMUNICATION
all schools
Special Education website, PRIM and other resources to
assist ISEHs and ISRTs as they work with teachers in
programming for students with disabilities; partnerships with
outside agencies.
COMMUNICATION
any school
as required
Braille materials and books on tape for blind students to
access the curriculum; orientation and mobility training for
blind students; itinerant teacher of the blind; educational
assistant support for the blind; coloured overlays.
15
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
17.0 APPENDIX A
BARRIERS REMOVED IN PRIOR YEARS
BARRIER TYPE
LOCATION
DESCRIPTION OF BARRIER
COMMUNICATION
any school
as required
Interpreters for the deaf supplied to assist in communication
for school related meetings and events; TTY service for
deaf citizens to have telephone access if required; FM and
sound field systems to assist student focussing on
curriculum; itinerant teacher of the deaf; interpretingeducational assistant support; sound field system.
COMMUNICATION
specific school sites
INFORMATION
All secondary schools
PHYSICAL
Athol Central
Boys washrooms converted. Wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
Bancroft P.S.
Air conditioning units in the special education room have
been installed.
PHYSICAL
Bancroft P.S.
Washrooms converted. Elevators installed. Ramps
installed. Wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
Bancroft P.S.
Seminar rooms have been modified to accommodate
Special Education staff.
PHYSICAL
Bayside P.S.
Ramp at front entrance installed. Bayside Upper is
wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
Bayside S.S.
Washrooms converted. Ramps installed. Elevator installed.
Wheelchair accessible. Special Education area renovations.
Magnetic hold openers installed on fire doors.
PHYSICAL
Bird’s Creek P.S.
PHYSICAL
Breadner Elementary
School
PHYSICAL
Centennial S.S.
Washrooms converted. Ramps, elevator and automatic
door openers installed. Wheelchair accessible. Chair lift
installed for stage. Magnetic hold openers installed on fire
doors.
PHYSICAL
Centennial S.S.
Main entrance ramped and handicapped door openers
installed. Handicapped door openers installed on north
entrance doors.
“Writing With Symbols” program; assistive technology;
educational assistants; social stories; communication
supports.
For the learning disabled: Inspiration, Dragon Naturally
Speaking, Kurzweill 3000, Essential Skills, etc., software
with scanners and printers in the resource room to assist
learning disabled students with written communication and
organization skills; Educational assistant support for scribing
and to reinforce communication, organization and work
completion skills.
Washrooms converted. Ramps installed. Wheelchair
accessible. Magnetic hold openers installed on fire doors.
Washrooms converted. Ramps installed. Chair lift installed.
Automatic door openers installed. Wheelchair accessible.
16
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
17.0 APPENDIX A
BARRIERS REMOVED IN PRIOR YEARS
BARRIER TYPE
LOCATION
DESCRIPTION OF BARRIER
PHYSICAL
Centre Hastings S.S.
Washrooms converted - accessible washroom renovations.
Ramps and elevators installed. Wheelchair accessible.
Enhanced chairlift agreements - chairlift moved to Quinte
Secondary School. Handicapped door openers installed on
north and west entrances.
PHYSICAL
Centre Hastings S.S.
Kirk rooms 142 and 143 have been renovated with
additional storage cupboards, electrical receptacles, new
counter tops, wall and door, etc. Accessible work stations
installed.
PHYSICAL
C.M.L. Snider School
Washrooms converted. Ramps and chair lift installed.
Wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
C.M.L. Snider School
Access in multi-purpose room improved. Work stations
modified.
Washrooms converted.
PHYSICAL
Coe Hill School
Washrooms converted. Ramps installed. Wheelchair
accessible.
PHYSICAL
Deseronto P.S.
Washrooms converted. Chair lift installed, front entrance
ramped and handicapped door openers installed.
PHYSICAL
Earl Prentice P.S.
Ramps installed. Washrooms converted. Wheelchair
accessible.
PHYSICAL
Education Centre
Kirk cafeteria kitchen has been enlarged.
PHYSICAL
Education Centre
Elevator installed. Handicapped washrooms installed.
PHYSICAL
Foxboro P.S.
Washroom converted and ramps installed. Wheelchair
accessible.
PHYSICAL
Frankford P.S.
Washrooms converted in building addition. Wheelchair
accessible in addition only.
PHYSICAL
Frankford P.S.
Chair lift installed to basement.
PHYSICAL
Frankford P.S.
Ramps have been installed at fire exit doors in the open
area and east entrance.
PHYSICAL
Frankford P.S.
Concrete ramps on east side installed. Handicapped door
openers installed at front entrance. Handicapped washroom
installed.
PHYSICAL
Harmony P.S.
Washrooms converted. Wheelchair accessible. Magnetic
hold-open devices installed.
PHYSICAL
Harry J. Clarke P.S.
Handicapped door openers on main entrance installed.
Handicapped ramp on south doors installed.
PHYSICAL
Harry J. Clarke P.S.
Washrooms converted. Ramps, elevators, automatic door
openers installed - wheelchair accessible.
17
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
17.0 APPENDIX A
BARRIERS REMOVED IN PRIOR YEARS
BARRIER TYPE
LOCATION
DESCRIPTION OF BARRIER
PHYSICAL
Harry J. Clarke P.S.
Sir Winston Churchill
site
PHYSICAL
Hermon P.S.
Wheelchair accessible. Handicapped washroom installed in
township library. Handicapped door opener installed on
library entrance door.
PHYSICAL
Hillcrest School
Sunken area in open area has been filled in and walls
installed with glass in top half. Carpet/tile has been replaced
in open area. Handicapped ramps have been installed at
two fire exit doors and ramp has been remodelled at south
west entrance. Automatic doors have been installed on the
front entrance and west entrance for wheelchairs. Entire
area has been painted. Shelving, storage cupboards,
bulletin boards have been installed. Storage room has been
converted into a teacher work room. Automatic door
openers on washroom doors have been installed.
PHYSICAL
Kente P.S.
Doorway between special education room and computer lab
installed. Computer tables modified with power and data
cabling for special education students. Handicapped
washroom installed.
PHYSICAL
Madoc P.S.
Asphalt ramp has been installed at main entrance.
PHYSICAL
Madoc P.S.
Window and door between Kirk rooms 21 and 21A have
been installed. Windows in corridor walls in Kirk rooms 22
and 21A have been installed.
PHYSICAL
Madoc P.S.
Handicapped washroom modified to accommodate change
table.
PHYSICAL
Madoc P.S.
Washrooms converted. Ramps installed. Wheelchair
accessible.
PHYSICAL
Madoc Township P.S.
Washrooms converted. Wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
Madoc Township P.S.
Handicapped washroom created. Grab bars installed.
Asphalt ramps at front and west entrances installed.
PHYSICAL
Marmora Senior P.S.
Washrooms converted. Ramps, chair lift, automatic door
openers installed. Wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
Marmora Senior P.S.
IMD / IDD resource area has been upgraded with kitchen
cupboards and sinks. Automatic door openers have been
installed at the west entrance.
PHYSICAL
Marmora Senior P.S.
Auto door openers on north doors and library doors
installed. Landing and ramp at north entrance installed.
Asphalt at bottom of ramp installed.
PHYSICAL
Marmora Senior P.S.
Auto door openers on west entrance installed. Cupboards
and sinks in the resource room modified.
Totally accessible after washrooms converted, wheelchair
ramp, door openers installed.
18
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
17.0 APPENDIX A
BARRIERS REMOVED IN PRIOR YEARS
BARRIER TYPE
LOCATION
DESCRIPTION OF BARRIER
PHYSICAL
MassassagaRednersville P.S.
PHYSICAL
Maynooth P.S.
Wheelchair accessible. Washrooms converted.
Handicapped washroom installed.
PHYSICAL
Moira S.S.
Renovations have been made in Kirk room 151.
PHYSICAL
Moira S.S.
Washrooms converted. 1st floor wheelchair accessible.
Handicapped door openers installed on main entrance.
PHYSICAL
North Hastings H.S.
Upper and lower cupboards in room 130 have been
replaced complete with electrical and plumbing upgrades.
PHYSICAL
North Hastings H.S.
Washrooms converted. Ramps, elevators, chair lift and
automatic door openers installed. Wheelchair accessible.
Magnetic hold openers on fire doors.
PHYSICAL
North Hastings H.S.
Main entrance doors, automatic door openers and ramp
installed.
PHYSICAL
North Hastings H.S.
Ramp installed at the bus loading entrance doors.
PHYSICAL
North Hastings Senior
Elementary School
PHYSICAL
North Trenton P.S.
PHYSICAL
Park Dale School
PHYSICAL
Pinecrest Memorial
Elementary School
A withdrawal room has been created in the JK Room.
PHYSICAL
Pinecrest Memorial
Elementary School
Washrooms converted and ramps installed - wheelchair
accessible. Automatic door openers installed on main
entrance.
PHYSICAL
Prince Charles School
(B)
Washrooms converted and ramps installed - wheelchair
accessible.
PHYSICAL
Prince Charles School
(B)
Automatic door opener installed.
PHYSICAL
Prince Charles Public
School (T)
Washrooms converted, ramps and chair lift installed wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
Prince Edward
Collegiate Institute
Washrooms converted. Wheelchair accessible. Chair lift
onto stage installed.
Washrooms converted, ramps and chair lift installed.
Wheelchair accessible.
Ramps installed. Wheelchair accessible. Automatic door
openers.
Washrooms converted and ramps installed. Wheelchair
accessible.
Automatic door openers on the main entrance, cafeterias
and library have been installed. Magnetic hold open arms
on the corridor fire doors have been installed. Washrooms
converted. Elevator and chair lift installed. Wheelchair
accessible.
19
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
17.0 APPENDIX A
BARRIERS REMOVED IN PRIOR YEARS
BARRIER TYPE
LOCATION
DESCRIPTION OF BARRIER
PHYSICAL
Prince of Wales P.S.
Washrooms converted, ramps installed - wheelchair
accessible.
PHYSICAL
Prince of Wales P.S.
Automatic door openers on primary washroom doors both
boys and girls have been installed. Hold open arms on the
hall doors at the top of ramp have been installed.
PHYSICAL
Prince of Wales P.S.
The computer lab / library has been modified.
PHYSICAL
Queen Elizabeth
School (B)
Handicapped automatic door openers on main entrance
installed. Washrooms converted, ramps installed.
Wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
Queen Elizabeth
School (P)
Renovations have been made for a dwarf student. As well,
a larger door has been installed on the washroom off the
library and the kindergarten washroom door has been
modified.
PHYSICAL
Queen Elizabeth
School (P)
Washrooms converted, ramps and automatic door openers
installed on main entrance. Wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
Queen Elizabeth
School (P)
Handicapped washroom in open area modified.
PHYSICAL
Queen Elizabeth
Public School (T)
Washrooms converted and ramps installed - wheelchair
accessible.
PHYSICAL
Queen Elizabeth
Public School (T)
Handicapped door openers have been installed on the main
entrance doors and boys washroom door. Magnetic hold
openers on fire doors.
PHYSICAL
Quinte Secondary
School
Exhaust fan has been installed over the stove in Kirk
classroom #114.
PHYSICAL
Quinte Secondary
School
Washrooms converted. Ramps, elevators and automatic
door openers installed. Wheelchair accessible. Magnetic
hold openers install on fire doors.
PHYSICAL
S. H. Connor School
PHYSICAL
Secondary and
Elementary schools
Elevators to permit access to most areas of the buildings
(BSS, CSS, CHSS, NHHS, PECI, QSS, THS). Washroom
modifications and automatic door openers in several schools
(CSS, CHHS, THS, NHHS, PECI). Occupational therapy in
certain cases for students requiring it in school to increase
student mobility. Educational assistant support for personal
care, to increase student independence. Garavanta chairlift
in several sites.
PHYSICAL
Secondary schools
Handicapped accessible science labs at CHSS, CSS, MSS,
NHHS, PECI, QSS,
Washrooms converted and ramps installed - wheelchair
accessible
20
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
17.0 APPENDIX A
BARRIERS REMOVED IN PRIOR YEARS
BARRIER TYPE
LOCATION
DESCRIPTION OF BARRIER
PHYSICAL
Sir John A.
Macdonald School
PHYSICAL
Sir Mackenzie Bowell
P.S.
Ramp installed to portable.
PHYSICAL
Sir Mackenzie Bowell
P.S.
Washrooms converted and ramps installed - wheelchair
accessible. Handicapped door openers installed on west
entrance and boys washroom.
PHYSICAL
Sir Mackenzie Bowell
P.S.
Handicapped door openers have been installed on the east
entrance doors with keypad.
PHYSICAL
Sir Mackenzie Bowell
P.S.
Wheelchair walkway installed from portable to school.
PHYSICAL
Sophiasburgh Central
School
Wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
South Marysburgh
Central School
Washrooms converted - girls only.
PHYSICAL
Stirling Junior P.S.
Washrooms converted and stair climber installed. 1st floor
wheelchair accessible. Magnetic hold-open devices
installed.
PHYSICAL
Stirling Primary
School
PHYSICAL
Stirling Senior P.S.
Kirk room 105 has been renovated. A wall and door, basin,
and grab bars have been installed. A second lower hand rail
on the stairs has been installed.
PHYSICAL
Stirling Senior P.S.
Washrooms converted.
PHYSICAL
Stirling Senior P.S.
Handrails by staff modified. Washroom toilets modified.
PHYSICAL
Susanna Moodie
Elementary School
Handicapped washroom created. Installed handicapped
door openers on south entrance.
Magnetic hold-open devices installed.
PHYSICAL
Susanna Moodie
Elementary School
Washrooms converted and ramps installed - wheelchair
accessible. Handicapped door openers installed on south
main entrance.
PHYSICAL
Trenton H.S.
Kirk room #110 has been expanded into room #108 and
upper cupboards have been installed.
PHYSICAL
Trenton H.S.
Washrooms converted. Chair lift installed. Wheelchair
accessible.
Washrooms converted and ramps installed - wheelchair
accessible. Handicapped door opener installed at west
entrance. Magnetic hold openers installed on fire doors.
Washrooms converted. Ramps and chair lift installed wheelchair accessible.
21
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
17.0 APPENDIX A
BARRIERS REMOVED IN PRIOR YEARS
BARRIER TYPE
LOCATION
DESCRIPTION OF BARRIER
PHYSICAL
Trenton H.S.
PHYSICAL
Tweed-Hungerford
Senior Public School
PHYSICAL
Tyendinaga P.S.
Handicapped washroom created.
PHYSICAL
Tyendinaga P.S.
Ramps and chair lift installed. Walkway / ramp resurfaced at
front entrance. Wheelchair accessible.
PHYSICAL
V. P. Carswell
Elementary School
Washrooms converted - wheelchair accessible. Automatic
door openers on front entrance.
PHYSICAL
William R. Kirk School
Washrooms converted. Automatic door openers installed wheelchair accessible.
Steps converted to ramp at King St. doors. Elevator was
installed. Magnetic hold openers installed on fire doors.
Handicapped washroom installed.
Washrooms converted - wheelchair accessible.
Handicapped door openers install on north entrance and on
library door. Handicapped washroom installed.
22
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
18.0 APPENDIX B
Buttons, switches
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
U
r
r
r
U
r
r
r
U
r
r
r
U
U
r
U
Bancroft
closing June 2011
Bayside SS
U
U
U
U
Bayside Upper
Bayside Annex
r
r
Bird’s Creek
U
U
Breadner
U
U
U
CML Snider
U
U
U
Centennial
U
U
U
CHSS
U
U
U
Coe Hill
U
U
College St.
r
r
Deseronto
U
U
Earl Prentice
U
Foxboro
U
r
U
r
r
r
r
r
U
U
r
U
r
U
r
r
r
U
U
r
r
r
Frankford
U
U
U
r
U
r
Harmony
U
r
r
r
r
Harry J. Clarke
U
U
U
U
U
r
Harry J. Clarke Sir Winston Churchill site
U
U
U
U
U
Hermon
U
U
r
r
r
r
U
U
23
r
Stair Climbers
Parking
Auto Door Openers
Signage
Athol-South Marysburgh
Chair Lifts
UCompleted projects
Elevators
r Future needs
Ramps
SCHOOL
Washrooms Converted or
Handicapped Washroom
installed
BUILDING ACCESSIBILITY CHART AS OF SEPTEMBER 2011
FUTURE NEEDS & COMPLETED PROJECTS
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
18.0 APPENDIX B
Kente
U
Madoc
U
Madoc Township
U
Marmora Sr.
U
Massassaga Rednersville
U
Maynooth
U
U
Moira SS
U
r
r
NHHS
U
U
U
N.H.Senior Elementary
renamed York River
U
U
North Trenton
r
Park Dale
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
U
U
r
r
r
U
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
U
r
r
r
U
U
r
U
r
U
r
r
r
r
U
U
r
r
r
U
U
r
r
r
r
Pinecrest
U
U
U
r
r
r
Prince Charles (B)
U
U
U
r
r
r
Prince Charles (T)
U
U
U
r
r
r
r
PECI
U
U
U
U
r
r
r
Prince of Wales
U
U
U
r
r
r
Queen Elizabeth (B)
U
U
U
r
r
r
Queen Elizabeth (P)
U
U
U
r
r
r
Queen Elizabeth (T)
U
U
U
r
r
r
r Future needs
UCompleted projects
Chair Lifts
U
SCHOOL
U
U
U
U
24
Stair Climbers
r
Buttons, switches
U
Parking
Elevators
U
Signage
Ramps
Hillcrest
Auto Door Openers
Washrooms Converted or
Handicapped Washroom
installed
BUILDING ACCESSIBILITY CHART AS OF SEPTEMBER 2011
FUTURE NEEDS & COMPLETED PROJECTS
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
18.0 APPENDIX B
Elevators
Auto Door Openers
Signage
Parking
Buttons, switches
r
r
r
r
r
r
r
Quinte SS
U
U
U
U
r
r
r
S.H.Connor
U
U
r
r
r
r
Sir John A Macdonald
U
U
U
r
r
r
U
U
r
r
r
r
Stirling Junior
U
r
r
r
r
r
Stirling Primary
U
U
r
r
r
r
Stirling Senior
U
r
r
r
r
r
Susanna Moodie
U
U
U
r
r
r
Trenton High School
U
U
U
U
U
r
Tweed Hungerford
U
r
U
r
r
r
Tyendinaga
U
U
U
r
r
r
V.P.Carswell
U
r
U
r
r
r
York River
(prev NHSrEl)
U
U
r
r
r
r
William R. Kirk
U
U
U
r
r
r
Education Centre
U
U
U
U
U
r
r Future needs
UCompleted projects
Stair Climbers
Ramps
Queen Victoria
SCHOOL
Chair Lifts
Washrooms Converted or
Handicapped Washroom
installed
BUILDING ACCESSIBILITY CHART AS OF SEPTEMBER 2011
FUTURE NEEDS & COMPLETED PROJECTS
Sir Mackenzie Bowell
closing June 2011
Sophiasburgh
South Marysburgh
closing June 2011
r
U
r
U
U
U
U
U
25
U
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
19.0
APPENDIX C - NAMES OF OUTSIDE AGENCIES AND
ORGANIZATIONS INVOLVED WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION
The list of agencies in Appendix C has been obtained from the following Ministry of Education Special
Education website: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/general/elemsec/speced/guide.html,
under “Part H: APPENDICES”.
If you require assistance and wish to contact an agency, please refer to the Ministry’s list of agencies
on Pages 27 - 31 of the plan or visit Volunteer Information Quinte (VIQ) at http://www.viq.ca, a local
non-profit agency for further information.
26
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
19.0 APPENDIX C
OUTSIDE AGENCIES AND ORGANIZATIONS
INVOLVED WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION
Emotional/Behavioural
Disorders
Ontario Association of Children’s Mental
Health Centres
40 St. Clair Avenue East, Suite 309
Toronto, Ontario
M4T 1M9
Tel: (416) 921-2109
Fax: (416) 921-7600
Ontario Council for Children with
Behaviour Disorders
R.R.#1
Sunderland, Ontario
LOC 1HO
Tel: (905) 324-5300, ext. 157 (Bus.)
(905) 852-9289 (Res.)
Ontario Mental Health Foundation
365 Bloor Street East, Suite 1708
Toronto, Ontario
M4W 3L4
Tel: (416) 920-7721
Fax: (416) 920- 0026
Tourette Syndrome Foundation of
Canada
c/o 194 Jarvis Street, Suite 206
Toronto, Ontario
M5B 2B7
Tel: (416) 861-8398 or 1-800-361-3126
Fax: (416) 861-2472
Pervasive Developmental Disorders
Autism Society Ontario
1 Greensboro Drive, Suite 306
Etobicoke, Ontario
M9W 1C8
Tel: (416) 246-9592
Fax: (416) 246-9417
Geneva Centre for Autism
250 Davisville Avenue, Suite 200
Toronto, Ontario
M4S 1H2
Tel: (416) 322-7877
Fax: (416) 322-5894
Learning Disabilities
ADDO Toronto
66 Rykert Crescent
Toronto, Ontario
M4G 2S9
Tel: (416) 813-6858
Fax: (416) 488-3743
Canadian Association of Independent
Living Centres
350 Sparks Street, Suite 1004
Ottawa, Ontario
K1R 7S8
Tel: (613) 563-2581
Fax: (613) 235-4497
Council for Exceptional Children
Ontario Subdivision for Children’s
Communication Development
c/o Huron-Superior District Catholic
School Board
Special Education Department
90 Ontario Avenue
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
P6B 6G7
Tel: (705) 945-5677
Fax: (705) 945-5681
Council for Exceptional Children
Ontario Subdivision for Learning
Disabilities
1 Norma Crescent
Toronto, Ontario
M6P 3G9
Tel: (416) 766-0163 (Res.)
Learning Disabilities Association of
Ontario
365 Bloor Street East, Suite 1004
P.O. Box 39
Toronto, Ontario
M4W 3L4
Tel: (416) 929-4311
Fax: (416) 929-3905
27
Ontario Association for Families of
Children with Communication Disorders
13 Segal Drive
Tillsonburg, Ontario
N4G 4P4
Tel: (519) 842-9506
Fax: (519) 842-3228
Recommitteeement des committeees
francophones d’alphabétisation
populaire de l’Ontario
20 Nelson Street West, Suite 303
Brampton, Ontario
L6X 2M5
Tel: (905) 457-7884
Fax: (905) 457-0411
Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus
Association of Ontario
69 Yonge Street, Suite 500
Toronto, Ontario
M5E 1K3
Tel: (416) 214-1056 or 1-800-387-1575
Fax: (416) 214-1446
Training Coordinating Committee for
Linkup Employment Services for
Persons with Disabilities
1075 Bay Street, Suite 801
Toronto, Ontario
M5S 2B1
Tel: (416) 413-4922
TTY: (416) 413-4926
Fax: (416) 413-4927
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
19.0 APPENDIX C
OUTSIDE AGENCIES AND ORGANIZATIONS
INVOLVED WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION
Deaf/Hard of Hearing
Bob Rumball Centre for the Deaf
2395 Bayview Avenue
North York, Ontario
M2L 1A2
Tel: (416) 449-9651
TTY: (416) 449-2728
Tax: (416) 449-8881
Canadian Association of the Deaf
251 Bank Street, Suite 203
Ottawa, Ontario
K2P 1X3
Tel: (613) 565-2882
TTY: (613) 565-8882
Fax: (613) 565-1207
Canadian Hard of Hearing Association
2435 Holly Lane, Suite 205
Ottawa, Ontario
K1V 7P2
Tel: (613) 526-1584 (voice mail)
TTY: (613) 526-2692
Toll free: 1-800-263-8068
Canadian Hearing Society
271 Spadina Road
Toronto, Ontario
M5R 2V5
Tel: (416) 964-9595
TTY: (416) 964-0023
Fax: (416) 928-2506
Ontario Association of the Deaf
c/o 489 College Street, Suite 407
Toronto, Ontario
M6G 1A5
Tel: (416) 413-0944
TTY: (416) 513-1893 or
(416) 513-1894
Fax: (416) 413-4822
E-mail: [email protected]
Coordonnateur
Programme de la surdicécité
Ministère de l’Éducation
Centre Jules-Léger
281, rue Lanark
Ottawa, Ontario
K1Z 6R8
Tel: (613) 761-9300
TTY: (613) 761-9302
Fax: (613) 761-9301
Association ontarienne des sourdes et
des sourds francophones
20, chemin Sainte Anne, Local 219
Sudbury, Ontario
P3C 5N4
Tel: (705) 670-2705
TTY: 1-800-855-0511
Fax: (705) 670-9320
VOICE for Hearing Impaired Children
161 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 701
Toronto, Ontario
M4P 1G5
Tel: (416) 487-7719
Fax: (416) 487-7423
Gifted
Association for Bright Children
c/o 2 Bloor Street West
P.O. Box 156, Suite 100
Toronto, Ontario
M4W 2G7
Tel: (416) 925-6136 (voice mail)
Douance-Ontario
Université d5Ottawa
Pavillon Lamoureux
c/o Gilles Clouthier
145, rue Jean-Jacques Lussier
Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 6N5
Tel: (613) 562-5800, poste 4148
Developmental Disabilities
Council for Exceptional Children
Ontario Subdivision for Individuals with
Developmental Challenges
52 Barr Crescent
Brampton, Ontario
L6X 2L2
Tel: (905) 840-5442 (Bus)
(905) 840-0288 (Res)
Fax: (905) 840-0102
Down Syndrome Association of Ontario
P.O. Box 215
Freelton, Ontario
L0R 1K0
Tel: (905) 659-3946
Fax: (905) 659-3946 + Star 51
28
Ontario Association for Community Living
240 Duncan Mill Road, Suite 403
Toronto, Ontario
M3B 1Z4
Tel: (416) 447-4348
Fax: (416) 447-8974
Ontario Association for Developmental
Education (OADE)
P.O. Box 32
8 Wilson Street
Tottenham, Ontario
L0G 1W0
Tel: (905) 936-9102
Ontario Coalition for Inclusive Education
13 Birchcliffe Crescent
R.R.#4
Orillia, Ontario
L3V 6H4
Tel: (705) 329-3316
Fax: (705) 329-0479
People First of Ontario
75 The Donway West, Suite 140
Toronto, Ontario
M3C 2E9
Tel: (416) 441-1805
Fax: (416) 441-3059
The Roeher Institute
York University
Kinsmen Building
4700 Keele Street
North York, Ontario
M3J 1P3
Tel: (416) 661-9611
Fax: (416) 661-5701
Blind / Low Vision
Blind Adults Learning About Normal
Community Environments (BALANCE)
4920 Dundas Street West, Suite 302
Etobicoke, Ontario
M9A 1B7
Tel: (416) 236-1796
Fax: (416) 236-4280
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
19.0 APPENDIX C
OUTSIDE AGENCIES AND ORGANIZATIONS
INVOLVED WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION
BOOST Niagara (Blind of Ontario
Organized with Self-help Tactics)
29 Eastwood Drive
Welland, Ontario
L3C 6W3
Tel: (905) 732-9746
Fax: (905) 732-9558
Canadian Council of the Blind
Ontario Division
207 North Christina Street
P.O. Box 2323
Sarnia, Ontario
N7T 5V1
Tel: (519) 337-3606 or
1-888-818-4845
Fax: (519) 337-6502 + Star 51
Canadian National Institute for the
Blind, Ontario Division
Director, Rehabilitation
1929 Bayview Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
M4G 3E8
Tel: (416) 486-2500
Fax: (416) 480-7503
John Milton Society for the Blind in
Canada
40 St. Clair Avenue East, Suite 202
Toronto, Ontario
M4T 1M9
Tel: (416) 960-3953
Fax: (416) 921-7478
Low Vision Association of Ontario
180 St. Clair Avenue East
Toronto, Ontario
M4T 1N8
Tel: (416) 486-3442
Fax: (416) 486-3442
Ontario Foundation for Visually
Impaired Children Incorporated
P.O. Box 1116, Station “D”
Toronto, Ontario
M6P 3K2
Tel:(416) 767-5977
Fax: (416) 767-5530
VIEWS for Visually Impaired
95 Wareside Road
Etobicoke, Ontario
M9C 3B5
Tel: (416) 620-1410
Fax: (416) 620-1472
Muscular Dystrophy Association of Canada
2345 Yonge Street, Suite 900
Toronto, Ontario
M4P 2E5
Tel: (416) 488-0030
Fax: (416) 488-7523
Physical Disabilities
Ontario Association of Children’s
Rehabilitation Services
350 Rumsey Road
Toronto, Ontario
M4G 1R8
Tel: (416) 424-3864
Fax: (416) 467-7083
Bloorview MacMillan Centre
350 Rumsey Road
Toronto, Ontario
M4G 1R8
Tel: (416) 425-6220
Fax: (416) 425-6591
Ontario Brain Injury Association Executive
Director
P.O. Box 2338
St. Catharines, Ontario
L2R 7R9
Tel: (905) 641-8877 or
1-800263-5404
Fax: (905) 641-0323
Bloorview School
25 Buchan Court
Willowdale, Ontario
MJ 4S9
Tel: (416) 425-6220
Fax: (416) 494-9985
Canadian Paraplegic Association
Ontario Division
520 Sutherland Drive
Toronto, Ontario
M4G 3V9
Tel: (416) 422-5644
Fax: (416) 422-5943
Easter Seal Society
1185 Eglinton Avenue East, Suite 800
Toronto, Ontario
M3C 3C6
Tel: (416) 421-8377
Fax: (416) 696-1035
Handicapped Action Committee
Incorporated
1201 Jasper Drive, Suite A
Thunder Bay, Ontario
P7B 6R2
Tel: (807) 343-0414
Fax: (807) 344-6140
Hugh MacMillan School
25 Buchan Court
Willowdale, Ontario
M2J 4S9
Tel: (416) 425-6220
Fax: (416) 494-9985
29
Ontario Division for Physical and Health
Disabilities
President
C/o Bloorview MacMillan Centre
25 Buchan Court
Toronto, Ontario
M2J 4S9
Tel: (416) 425-6220
Fax: (416) 494-4754
Ontario Federation for Cerebral Palsy
1630 Lawrence Avenue West,
Suite 104
Toronto, Ontario
M6L 1C5
Tel: (416) 244-9686
Fax: (416) 244-6543
Ontario March of Dimes
10 Overlea Boulevard
Toronto, Ontario
M4H 1A4
Tel: (416) 425-3463
Fax: (416) 425-1920
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
19.0 APPENDIX C
OUTSIDE AGENCIES AND ORGANIZATIONS
INVOLVED WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION
Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus
Association of Ontario
69 Yonge Street, Suite 500
Toronto, Ontairo
M5E 1K3
Tel: (416) 214-1056 or
1-800-387-1575
Fax: (416) 214-1446
Multiple Disabilities
Easter Seal Society
1185 Eglinton Avenue East,
Suite 800
Toronto, Ontario
M3C 3C6
Tel: (416) 421-8377
Fax: (416) 696-1035
Ontario Association of Children’s
Rehabilitation Services
350 Rumsey Road
Toronto, Ontario
M4G 1R8
Tel: (416) 424-3864
Fax: (416) 467-7083
Ontario Brain Injury Association
Executive Director
P.O. Box 2338
St. Catharines, Ontario
L2R 7R9
Tel: (905) 641-8877 or
1-800-263-5404
Fax: (905) 641-0323
Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus
Association of Ontario
69 Yonge Street, Suite 500
Toronto, Ontario
M5E 1K3
Tel: (416) 214-1056 or
1-800-387-1575
Fax: (416) 214-1446
Students / Youth
Council for Exceptional Children
Ontario Federation of Chapters
President
480 Mary Street
Pembroke, Ontario
K8A 5W9
Tel: (613) 735-0151 (Bus);
(613) 732-9336 (Res);
Fax (613) 732-1898
Fédération de la jeunesse francoontarienne
839, rue Quinlan
Ottawa, Ontario
K1G 1R8
Tel: (613) 260-8055
Fax: (613) 260-5346
National Educational Association of
Disabled Students
Unicentre, Room 426
Carleton University
Ottawa, Ontario
K1S 5B6
Tel: (613) 526-8008
Fax: (613) 520-3704
Ontario Catholic Student Council
Federation
4001 Don Mills Road, Unit 139
North York, Ontario
M2H 3J8
Tel: (416) 499-8547
Ontario Secondary School Students’
Association
507 Gibson Street
P.O. Box 1979
Walkerton, Ontario
N0G 2V0
Tel: (519) 881-2541
Medical
The College of Family Physicians of
Canada
2630 Skymark Avenue
Mississauga, Ontario
L4W 5A4
Tel: (905) 629-0900
Fax: (905) 629-0893
Psychology
Ontario Psychological Association
730 Yonge Street, Suite 221
Toronto, Ontario
M4Y 2B7
Tel: (416) 961-5552
Fax: (416) 961-5516
30
Social Work
Ontario Association of Social Workers
410 Jarvis Street
Toronto, Ontario
M4Y 2G6
Tel: (416) 923-4848
Fax: (416) 923-5279
Speech and Language Pathology
Ontario Association of Speech-Language
Pathologists and Audiologists (OASLA)
410 Jarvis Street
Toronto, Ontario
M4Y 2G6
Tel: (416) 92l0-3676
Fax: (416) 920-6214
Educational Assistants
Canadian Union of Public Employees,
Ontario Division
305 Milner Avenue, Suite 902
Scarborough, Ontario
M1B 3V4
Tel: (416) 299-9739
Fax: (416) 299-3480
Canadian Union of Public Employees,
Ontario Division
305 Milner Avenue, Suite 902
Scarborough, Ontario
M1B 3V4
Tel: (416) 299-9739
Fax: (416) 299-3480
Dufferin-Peel Educational Resource
Workers’ Association
5805 Whittle Road, Suite 106
Mississauga, Ontario
L4Z 2J1
Tel: (905) 501-1622
Fax: (905) 501-1623
Ontario Teachers’ Federation
1300 Yonge Street, Suite 200
Toronto, Ontario
M4T 1X3
Tel: (416) 966-3424
Fax: (416) 966-5450
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
19.0 APPENDIX C
OUTSIDE AGENCIES AND ORGANIZATIONS
INVOLVED WITH SPECIAL EDUCATION
Ontario English Catholic Teachers’
Association
65 St. Clair Avenue East, Suite 400
Toronto, Ontario
M4T 2Y8
Tel: (416) 925-2493
Fax: (416) 925-7764
Council for Exceptional Children,
Ontario Federation
9 Eston Court
Richmond Hill, Ontario
L4C 8A6
Tel: (905) 884-7933 (Bus)
Fax: (905) 770-9377
Ontario Federation of Home and School
Associations
240 Bay Street, Suite 206
Toronto, Ontario
M5R 2A7
Tel: (416) 924-7491
Fax: (416) 924-5354
General
Ethno Racial People with Disabilities
Coalition of Ontario
2 Carlton Street, Suite 64
Toronto, Ontario
M5B 1J3
Tel: (416) 657-2211 or
1-888-988-3999
Provincial Parent Association Advisory
Committee on Special Education Advisory
Committee
12 Courtwood Place
Willowdale, Ontario
M2K 1Z9
Tel: (905) 221-6697
Fax: (05) 221-9371
The Canadian Council for Exceptional
Children
P.O. Box 56012, Fiesta Mall
Stoney Creek, Ontario
L8G 5C9
Tel: (905) 643-0451
Fax: (905) 643-8925
Centre for Integrated Education and
Community
24 Thome Crescent
Toronto, Ontario
M6H 2S5
Tel: (416) 658-5363
Fax: (416) 658-5067
Ontarians with Disabilities Issues
700 Bay Street, 10th Floor
Toronto, Ontario
M4G 2K1
Tel: (416) 326-0011
Fax: (416) 326-2546
31
Board Report No. B-4
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ANNUAL ACCESSIBILITY PLAN 2011-2012
20.0 GLOSSARY
TERM
DEFINITION
AAC
Accessibility Advisory Committee
AAP
Accessibility Advisory Plan
AODA
Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (2005)
APSSP
Association of Professional Student Services Personnel
ASG
Administrative Support Group
CAVEAT
Canadians Against Violence Everywhere Advocating its Termination
CYC
Child / Youth Counsellor
FM
Frequency Modulation
HAPE
Hastings and Prince Edward
HPEDSB
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
IEP
Individual Educational Plan
ISEH
Interdepartmental Special Education Head (secondary)
ISRT
In School Resource Teacher (elementary)
ITS
Information Technology Services
IMD / IDD
Intellectual Mild Disability / Intellectual Developmental Disability
ODA
Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001
OPC
Ontario Principals Council
OPP
Ontario Provincial Police
OSSTF
Ontario Secondary School Teachers Federation
OTL
Occasional Teachers Local
PECI
Prince Edward Collegiate Institute
PRIM
Pre Referral Intervention Manual
SALEP
Supervised Alternative Learning for Excused Pupils
SEAC
Special Education Advisory Committee
UDL
Universal Design for Learning
TTY
Teletypewriter (can be used by deaf individuals with Bell Relay Service)
VIP
Very Important Person
VIQ
Volunteer Information Quinte
32
Board Report No. B-5
Page 1
June 20, 2011
Decision X
To:
Information
The Chair and Members of Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
From: Thelma Goodfellow, Chair, Program and Human Resources Committee
June Rogers, Superintendent of Education, Special Education Services
Re:
Special Education Plan 2010-2011
Purpose
To approve amendments to the Special Education Plan 2010-2011.
Background
In compliance w ith the Ministry of Education policy document Standards for School Boards’
Special Education Plans (2000), protocols established in PPM 149, and Regulation 464/97,
each board is required to “ maintain a special education plan, to review it annually, to amend
it to meet the current needs of its exceptional students, and to submit any amendment(s) to
the Minister for review ” . School boards are to consult w ith their Special Education Advisory
Committee (SEAC).
On April 5, 2011 the Ministry of Education, through the Deputy Minister of Education, released a
memorandum advising school boards that they were required to ensure that a comprehensive
report is made publicly available regarding the current special education programs and services
available to meet the needs of students in boards. School boards were required to update the
Special Education Plan by making any necessary additions and/or amendments to the relevant
sections. The Ministry of Education also enclosed a Special Education Report Checklist which
lists the components of a comprehensive Special Education Report. Boards are required to
submit a copy of the completed checklist to identify the components in the Special Education Plan
that have been updated for 2011 to the Ministry Regional Office by September 1, 2011.
Current situation
Special education staff reviewed the 2010-2011 Special Education Plan to ensure that current
programs and services were reflected accurately. Revisions were presented to the Special
Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) at the regular meeting in May, and were approved by the
Committee on May 25, 2011. The revisions were presented to the Program and Human
Resources Committee at its meeting on June 13, 2011 and the following recommendation was
made.
Appendices
Appendix A – Special Education Plan 2010-2011
Appendix B – Amendments to the Special Education Plan 2010-2011
Appendix C – Ministry of Education Special Education Report Checklist
Recommendation
Moved:
J. Williams
Seconded:
L. Kyle
That Hastings and Prince Edw ard District School Board approve the amendments to
the Special Education Plan 2010-2011 as contained in Board Report No. B-5 dated
June 20, 2011.
Respectfully submitted,
Thelma Goodfellow, Chair
Program and Human Resources Committee
June Rogers,
Superintendent of Education – Special Education Services
Education Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
Telephone: (613) 966-1170 Toll-free: 1 800 267-4350 Fax: (613) 966-6023
www.hpedsb.on.ca
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
SPECIAL EDUCATION
PLAN
JUNE, 2011
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
SECTION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
1.0
HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD D.S.B. CONSULTATION PROCESS................................ 3
2.0
SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES.............................................................. 5
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
2.10
2.11
2.12
2.13
2.14
2.15
General Model for Special Education ................................................................................ 5
Roles and Responsibilities in Special Education ................................................................ 7
Early Identification Procedures and Intervention Strategies ............................................. 13
The Identification, Placement and Review Committee Process (IPRC) and Appeals ....... 17
Educational and Other Assessments - Psycho-Ed/Speech Lang ..................................... 20
Specialized Health Support Services in School Settings .................................................. 22
Categories and Definitions of Exceptionalities ................................................................ 23
Special Education Placements Provided by HPEDSB ..................................................... 27
Individual Education Plans (IEP’s) ................................................................................... 32
Provincial and Demonstration Schools in Ontario ............................................................ 33
Special Education Staff ................................................................................................... 34
Staff Development .......................................................................................................... 36
Specialized Equipment ................................................................................................... 40
Accessibility (AODA) ........................................................................................................ 41
Transportation for Students with Special Education Needs .............................................. 42
3.0 SPECIAL EDUCATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE (SEAC)…...…….……………………….........44
4.0 COORDINATION OF SERVICES WITH OTHER MINISTRIES OR AGENCIES.........................46
5.0 SUBMISSION AND AVAILABILITY OF THE SPECIAL EDUCATION PLAN……………………49
6.0 PARENT GUIDE TO SPECIAL EDUCATION…………………………………………………………50
7.0 APPENDICES……………………………………………………………………….……..…….65
A
B
C
D
Roles and Responsibilities in Special Education
Special Education – A Guide for Parents
Specialized Health Support Services
Categories of Exceptionalities and Definitions
I.
HPEDSB Exceptionality Groupings
E
Provincial Schools and Demonstration Schools
F
Special Education Staff
G
Early Identification
I.
Transitioning to School – A Resource Guide For Families
II.
Transition to School – Student Information Package – All About Me!
III.
Early Identification Enrolment Checklist
IV.
Student Registration Form
V.
Tri-Board Student Transportation Services Medical Emergency Release of Info
VI.
Consent to the Release of Personal Student Information(RSI)
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Cont’d....
H
Identification, Placement and Review Committee
I.
Parents’ Guide to Special Education
II.
Sample IEP (Individual Education Plan)
III.
Letters of Invitation for New Identifications & IPRC Review – Elementary &
Secondary
IV.
Process for Dispute Resolution of an IEP
I
Psycho-Educational / Speech Language Referral Package Information
J
Forms / Consents
I.
Form RSI - Consent to the Release of Personal Student Information
II.
Child and Youth Counsellor Referral Form 312-5B
III.
Child and Youth Counsellor Consent for Services Form 312-5A
IV.
Special Education Request for Student Transportation Form – Tri-Board
V.
Regional Referral Placement Request Form
K
Range of Placements/Programs Available in HPEDSB
I.
Connections program-Supporting Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
- School Support Program Pamphlet
II.
Regional Programs for Students with Learning Disabilities (LD)
III.
Regional Junior Intervention Program - Elementary
IV.
Secondary School Programs for Students with Intellectual Developmental
Disabilities (I-DD) LSP (Life Skills Program)/PLP (Practical Learning Program)/CEP
(Community Employment Program)
V.
The Employment Destinations Program (EDP)
VI.
Care, Treatment, Custody and Correctional Programs (Section 23)
L
Procedures for Enrolling Students for the First Time in HPEDSB & Student
Information
M
Submission and Availability of the Plan
I.
Compliance Letter
II.
Board Motion
III.
SEAC Motion and/or Recommendations
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
1.0
HASTINGS AND PRINCE EDWARD DSB CONSULTATION PROCESS
Purpose:
To provide an opportunity for members of the Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC),
parents, students, school councils, trustees, and community agencies to advise on special education
matters. SEAC members are consulted on sections of the Special Education Plan by offering
suggestions and amendments to the Plan.
The consultation process includes:
•
•
•
•
presentation of sections of the Special Education Plan to SEAC;
discussion of each section;
feedback provided by SEAC based on input from their associated agencies;
public and the local community being invited to provide feedback and input through the
board’s website via email.
Special Education information and communication
Information pertaining to Special Education programs and services is available on the Hastings and
Prince Edward District School Board (HPEDSB) website, www.hpedsb.on.ca, Special Education
Services. Hard copies can be obtained by contacting Special Education Services at the Education
Centre, 156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario, K8N 1N9 (613) 966-1170.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Agendas and minutes for SEAC meetings are posted on the board website.
SEAC prepares communications regarding their role and how they may support parents.
These communications are featured in school newsletters and highlight various agencies and
support groups to assist parents with their special needs children. These communications are
posted on the board website.
Presentations are held for school councils, community agencies and forums as requested.
A Parents’ Guide on the Identification Placement and Review Committee (IPRC) process is
distributed through the schools.
Special Education: A Guide for Parents is distributed to all parents prior to the Identification
Placement and Review Committee (IPRC).
A Transition to School Resource Guide describing programs and services for students with
special needs is provided to all pre-school partners and agencies during the transition to
school process. Copies are distributed during JK/SK registration at local schools and are also
available on the website.
Annual review process
Ministry response to the annual submission and subsequent amendments are shared with SEAC.
The Plan remains a standing item on the SEAC agenda for the spring meetings. Consultation, review
and feedback opportunities are provided to the committee and comments are incorporated.
Parents, community, staff and board committees are provided with the opportunity to ask questions
and submit feedback on the Plan through the board’s website, through members of SEAC and via
various special education workshops and forums presented. Feedback is welcomed at any time
during the year. The Plan is approved on a yearly basis by the Board of Trustees, during the month of
June.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Minority reports
A Minority Report written by a member of SEAC is presented to the Superintendent of Special
Education Services. The superintendent will take the Minority Report to the Board as an information
item. There were no Minority reports received at the time of this report.
SEAC provides regular updates and recommendations to the board.
SEAC maintains Trustee representation on its committee.
Special Education reviews:
•
•
Review of the Individual Education Plan (IEP)
Review of the Central Information Form (CIF)
SEAC is provided information on the results of any review of Special Education programs and
services and provided with an opportunity for input.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.0
SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND SERVICES
2.1 GENERAL MODEL FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION
The Special Education Plan for Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board is designed to
comply with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Ontario Human Rights Code, the
Education Act and regulations made under the act, and any other relevant legislation.
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board believes that all students have the ability to learn
and the right to the best possible education to meet their learning abilities and styles. Every student
can benefit from and contribute to the school community. Students should be educated in the most
enabling, least restrictive setting that best meets their needs. The board’s System Plan Achievement in Motion, identifies success for each student as a key goal. A specific action plan is
described to reach this goal. This aligns with the belief that “All students can succeed”, from the
Ministry of Education document Education for All, the Report of the Expert Panel on Literacy and
Numeracy Instruction for Students with Special Education Needs, Kindergarten to Grade 6. Most
recently, in May 2006, the Working Table on Special Education presented its report entitled Special
Education Transformation to the Minister of Education. In this document, a vision for special education
programs and services was developed. The recommendations made to the Ministry offer goals that
are embedded in the board’s planning and decision making.
To address the broad range of educational needs within the student population, Hastings and Prince
Edward District School Board uses differentiated programming approaches, placements and supports.
The special needs of exceptional learners may be met through differentiation of programming in a
regular classroom. It is believed that instructional strategies implemented are good for all but
necessary for some.
Based on the Continuous Assessment Process, it is essential to maximize student achievement.
Early intervention, proactive program planning, and ongoing support as required is essential to
maximize student achievement. A wide variety of interventions must be put in place prior to seeking
placements outside the regular classroom.
It is recognized that some exceptional learners may require a degree of differentiated programming
that cannot be provided effectively through the structure of the regular class. For these students, we
provide a range of placements beyond the regular classroom to meet their needs. Such placements
will be selected based on the range of options available at the board and school level and will have
the support and participation of the parents as required by legislation.
Programs for exceptional students are based on the strengths and needs as outlined during the
Identification, Placement and Review Committee (IPRC) process, and the collaborative planning
outlined in the Individual Education Plan (IEP).
“Intervention strategies target students who are not demonstrating learning at the
Level of expected performance. To be most effective, these strategies are graduated in
their intensity. The types of graduated preventions and interventions systems take a
pyramidal form; the prevention strategies at the bottom apply to all students, and the
high-intensity interventions at the top apply to only a few”
..... Alan M. Blankstien, Failure Is Not an Option
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Organizational Structure
Deployment of personnel within Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board reflects a structure
aimed at addressing the board’s goals, improvement of student learning and the provision of effective
communication and use of resources. Trustees, through senior administration, provide the necessary
co-ordination of the board's activities.
The current organizational structure provides for a system of effective development of special
education services and coordination between the services of special education and curriculum
services in alignment with the System Plan.
AiM – Achievement in Motion for Student Success, System Plan 2010-2015, Year 1, 2010-2011
References
 Education for All, The Report of the Expert Panel on Literacy and Numeracy Instruction for
Students With Special Education Needs, Kindergarten to Grade 6
 Failure Is Not an Option, Alan M. Blankstien / Michael Fullen [Forward]
 Whatever It Takes, Richard Dufour, Rebecca Dufour, Robert Eaker, Gayle Karhanek
 Using Continuous Assessment as an Intervention Model
 Special Education Transformation: A Report of the Co-Chairs with the Recommendations of
the Working Table on Special Education
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.2 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION
The Ministry of Education defines roles and responsibilities in elementary and secondary education in
several key areas:
• legislative policy framework
• funding
• school system management
• programs and curriculum
It is important that all involved in special education understand their roles and responsibilities,
which are outlined below:
The Ministry of Education
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
defines, through the Education Act, regulations, and policy/program memoranda, the legal
obligations of school boards regarding the provision of special education programs and
services, and prescribes the categories and definitions of exceptionalities;
ensures that school boards provide appropriate special education programs and services for
their exceptional pupils;
establishes the funding for special education through the structure of the funding model. The
model consists of the Foundation Grant, the Special Education Grant, and other special
purpose grants; requires school boards to report on their expenditures for special education;
sets province-wide standards for curriculum and reporting of achievement;
requires school boards to maintain Special Education Plans, review them annually, and submit
amendments to the ministry;
requires school boards to establish Special Education Advisory Committees (SEACs);
establishes Special Education Tribunals to hear disputes between parents and school boards
regarding the identification and placement of exceptional pupils;
establishes a Provincial Advisory Council on Special Education to advise the Minister of
Education on matters related to special education programs and services; and
operates Provincial and Demonstration Schools for students who are deaf, blind, or deaf-blind,
or have severe learning disabilities.
The District School Board or School Authority
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
establishes school board policy and practices that comply with the Education Act, regulations,
and policy/program memoranda;
monitors school compliance with the Education Act, regulations, and policy/program
memoranda;
requires staff to comply with the Education Act, regulations, and policy/program memoranda;
provides appropriately qualified staff to provide programs and services for the exceptional
pupils of the board;
obtains the appropriate funding and reports on the expenditures for special education;
develops and maintains a Special Education Plan that is amended from time to time to meet
the current needs of the exceptional pupils of the board;
reviews the Plan annually and submits amendments to the Minister of Education;
provides statistical reports to the Ministry as required and as requested;
prepares a parent guide to provide parents with information about special education programs,
services and procedures;
establishes one or more IPRCs to identify exceptional pupils and determine appropriate
placements for them;
establishes a Special Education Advisory Committee;
provides professional development to staff on special education.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC)
•
•
•
•
•
makes recommendations to the board with respect to any matter affecting the establishment,
development, and delivery of special education programs and services for exceptional pupils
of the board;
participates in the board’s annual review of its Special Education Plan;
participates in the board’s annual budget process as it relates to special education;
reviews the financial statements of the board as they relate to special education;
provides information to parents, as requested.
Superintendent
•
•
•
•
•
•
supervises Special Education Services department staff;
responsibility for Special Education Services staff development (teachers and educational
assistants), allocation of educational assistants (in cooperation with Human Resources
Support Services), special education staffing in schools, special education budget, funding
initiatives (SEA/SIP, high needs funding), home instruction program, and specialized system
programs;
lead responsibility for implementation of the Special Education Plan;
liaise with community agencies;
acts as resource support for Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC);
acts as resource support for the Program/Human Resources Committee.
Assistant Superintendent
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
provides direction and assistance to the central special education team as well as elementary
and secondary special education school team, including administrators on specific board and
Ministry procedures relating to special education;
acts as an administrative resource for various special education and system committees;
supervises special education services staff;
Section 23 agreements and program monitoring;
assumes a leadership role implementing the system plan supporting school improvement
processes;
acts as resource support for Special Education Advisory Committee;
acts as resource support for the Program/Human Resources Committee;
liaises with special education, curriculum, information technology and human resources
support services in supporting achievement for all students.
Special Education Coordinators (K-12)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
holds qualifications, in accordance with Regulation 298, to teach special education;
manages and provides support for the IPRC processes at a system level;
provides regular on-going consultation and support with school teams;
provides support for school principals in addressing high-needs cases;
provides consultation to ISRTs/ISEHs about program modifications/differentiated instruction,
placement alternatives and parent communications;
works closely with schools in the development of recommendations for student identification
and placement;
along with the supervisory officer, keeps trustees apprised of the provincial and local special
education issues and situations;
responds to Ministry special education policy and communicates this information to schools;
supports the supervisory officer in the submission of the board’s Special Education Plan and
other reports as required by the Ministry and by the board.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Speech Language Pathologist
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
assesses and evaluates the articulation and/or oral language of students who are referred by
schools;
makes recommendations for speech and language remediation and assists schools by
developing programs, providing where necessary, in-service, and communication with parents;
assists in developing classroom level oral language assessment instruments/resource
materials that link to the Ontario Curriculum;
works with educational assistants to assign and supervise caseload and provide program
interventions and supports for students requiring speech/language support;
works with other members of the special education services team to develop resource
documents and provide in-service to schools, system, community partners, and parents;
liaises with outside agencies regarding collaborative support for students with communication
needs;
completes Informed Consents for assessments with parents/guardians.
Psychologist and Psychometrist
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
provide assessment, consultation, and/or observation of students who are referred by schools;
interpret assessment results and provide educational programming recommendations in a
comprehensive written report that is shared with parents and school personnel at a scheduled
case conference;
information and programming suggestions from assessments/consultations to assist schools in
the development of IEPs;
assessment/consultation findings provide important data for consideration during the IPRC
process;
provide resource support/consultation to the system including in-service presentations;
participate in the creation of board protocols and documents to assist in meeting student
needs and build capacity in the system;
the psychologist provides supervision of non-registered psycho-educational personnel.
Psycho-educational Assessment Assistant
•
•
•
reviews and monitors all student psycho-educational referral packages;
administers and scores psychometric protocols;
communicates with parents/guardians re: informed consent for assessment.
Resource/Project and Safe Workplace Coordinator
•
•
•
•
•
provides school-level support for administrators, special education coordinators, and
educational staff primarily in the areas of training, communication, planning and mentoring for
educational assistants;
educational assistant allotment and deployment
enhances and promotes the role of the educational assistant;
provides on-going communication to all stakeholders;
assists with special projects as needed.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
CYC Supervisor
• provides supervision for the child and youth counsellor team;
• provides resources for individual, group, classroom and school-wide programming for the CYC
team;
• arranges training for the CYC team;
• performs managerial tasks related to the CYC team;
• coordinates and/or responds to crisis/tragic events as required;
Child and Youth Counsellor
• supports the healthy social/emotional development of students;
• assists students to be successful in school through mental health supports and services;
• offers individual and group sessions that focus on a variety of topics such as self-esteem,
positive decision making, anger management and social skills;
• works with individual schools or a family of schools to meet students needs;
• accepts referrals that are made through the in-school resource teacher (ISRT), administration,
and/or parent community in consultation with parents and classroom teachers.
Blind and Low Vision Coordinator and Resource Teacher
• provides program support for students who are legally blind, low vision, or have a severe field
restriction and require assistive technology or direct instruction in areas of the expanded core
curriculum;
• supports classroom teachers to provide extensive accommodations as well as providing
specialized intervention and teaching strategies;
• monitors and supports staff and students in the set up, care for, and use of specialized student
equipment;
• ensures that the program, timetable, and IEP includes expanded core curriculum expectations
that address identified needs pertaining to the student’s visual impairment;
• works with the school team to develop the IEP.
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Coordinator and Resource Teacher
• provides direct instructional support for students who have a significant bilateral hearing loss
and who require amplification or specialized communication supports;
• provides program support for students who have a minimal or unilateral hearing loss, or who
have a central auditory processing disorder and who may or may not require amplification
support;
• supports classroom teachers to provide extensive accommodations as well as providing
specialized intervention and teaching strategies;
• monitors and supports the staff and student in the set up, care for and use of specialized
student equipment;
• ensures that the program, timetable, and IEP include curriculum expectations that address the
identified hearing needs of the student.
Braillist
• supports the schools in the provision of program materials by translating materials into
braille/tactiles, electronic formats (Kurzweil, MS Word), and audio format.
Autism Student Support Coordinator
• Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) support
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
The School Principal
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
carries out duties as outlined in the Education Act, regulations, and policy/program
memoranda, and through board policies/procedures;
communicates Ministry of Education and school board expectations to staff;
ensures that appropriately qualified staff are assigned to teach special education classes;
communicates board policies and procedures about special education to staff, students, and
parents;
ensures that the identification and placement of exceptional pupils, through an IPRC, is done
according to the procedures outlined in the Education Act, regulations, and board policies;
consults with parents and with school board staff to determine the most appropriate program
for exceptional pupils;
ensures the development, implementation, and review of the student’s IEP, including a
transition plan, according to provincial requirements;
ensures that parents are consulted in the development of their child’s IEP and that they are
provided with a copy of the IEP;
ensures the delivery of the program as set out in the IEP;
ensures that appropriate assessments are requested if necessary and that parental consent is
obtained;
ensures safety, medical and other plans are in place for students and all key staff is informed.
In-School Resource Teachers (ISRTs) and Interdepartmental Special Education Heads (ISEHs)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
holds qualifications, in accordance with Regulation 298, to teach special education;
uses a continuous assessment process model to determine student strengths and needs;
provides support to the classroom teacher in determining the appropriate differentiated
instruction, modifications and accommodations for students;
assists teachers in the completion of IEPs;
assists teachers in accessing resources;
uses assessment data to develop student learning profiles, in consultation with the classroom
teacher;
encourages the involvement of outside agencies and services (e.g. medical) to obtain
additional supports for students;
ensures specialized equipment is in place and accessible to the student;
makes referrals to school board regional programs, Section 23 programs and Provincial
schools where appropriate;
provides direct instruction to students with special needs where applicable;
takes case conference minutes and distributes same to the teacher, principal, parent/guardian,
and special education coordinator for central files, where appropriate.
Teacher
• carries out duties as outlined in the Education Act, regulations, and policy/program
memoranda;
•
•
•
•
•
•
follows board policies and procedures regarding special education;
maintains up-to-date knowledge of special education practices;
where appropriate, works with special education staff and parents to develop the IEP for an
exceptional pupil;
provides the program for the exceptional pupil in the regular classroom, as outlined in the IEP;
communicates the student’s progress to parents;
works with other school board staff to review and update the student’s IEP.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Special Education Teacher
In addition to the responsibilities listed above under “Teacher”:
•
•
•
holds qualifications, in accordance with regulations 298, to teach special education;
monitors the student’s progress with reference to the IEP and modifies the program as
necessary;
assists in providing educational assessments for exceptional pupils.
Educational Assistant
•
•
performs duties as assigned by their supervisor such as monitoring and supporting behaviour
intervention plans and academic programs, and implementing health care procedures such as
toileting/diapering, personal hygiene, monitoring seizures and administering medication;
may be involved in the preparation of classroom materials and may be asked to provide
program support to individuals and small groups.
Parent/Guardian
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
becomes familiar with and informed about board policies and procedures in areas that affect
the child;
participates in IPRCs, parent-teacher conferences, and other relevant school activities;
participates in the development of the IEP;
becomes acquainted with the school staff working with the student;
supports the student at home;
works with the school principal and teachers to solve problems;
is responsible for the student’s attendance at school;
is responsible for notifying school personnel of any changes (i.e. custodial updates,
biographical information, family, medical etc.) that is necessary to program appropriately for
their child.
Student
•
•
•
complies with the requirements as outlined in the Education Act, regulations, and
policy/program memoranda;
complies with board policies and procedures;
participates in IPRCs, parent-teacher conferences, and other activities, as appropriate.
Appendices
 Appendix A - Roles and Responsibilities
Reference

TEAM: Teacher Educational Assistant Manual
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.3 EARLY IDENTIFICATION PROCEDURES AND INTERVENTION STRATEGIES
Procedures are in place to identify a child’s level of development, learning abilities and needs.
Educational programs are designed to accommodate these needs to ensure a successful transition to
school and to facilitate each child’s growth and development. These procedures are a part of a
continuous assessment and program planning process that is initiated when a child is first enrolled in
school or no later than the beginning of a program of studies immediately following Kindergarten and
should continue throughout a child’s school life.
Early intervention strategies are in place for children who enter school with previously identified
needs. In January and February, the central special education team contacts local agencies to begin
the transition to school process for students who will be enrolled in the school system for the fall.
These agencies may include: Family Space (affiliated with nursery schools and day care settings),
Parent Child and Youth Clinic, Children’s Mental Health, Children’s Treatment Centre, Children’s Aid
Society, Community Living Prince Edward, Healthy Babies, Counselling Services of Belleville and
District, Sir James Whitney School for the Deaf, Community Care Access Centre, and Hastings and
Prince Edward Pre-School Speech and Language System. Agencies are knowledgeable of the early
identification process, given the Early Identification Enrolment Checklist and asked to complete the
checklist in consultation with the parents or guardians. Signed parental consent to share information
with the school board is required. In April and May, the special education coordinator coordinates a
case conference at the proposed home school with parents, school personnel and appropriate agency
representation, to review the Early ID Checklist and gain further information around student strengths,
needs, specific program needs and level and type of support required for successful school entry.
This information is used to make plans to provide adequate resources, staff supports and training to
the home school in order to meet the needs of the student.
Procedures for Early and Ongoing Identification
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board follows the requirements in the Education Act for
school boards to implement procedures for early and ongoing identification of the learning abilities
and needs of pupils. In addition to their own observations and the information provided by parents,
teachers use the information from the speech and language screening (if applicable), Pre-school
Speech and Language Transition to School Report, Early ID Enrolment Checklist and Indicators of
Language Difficulties as well as a variety of in-class developmental reading assessments. As well, a
portfolio of student work is maintained throughout the kindergarten program in order to track growth.
Communication regarding a child’s level of achievement is part of the regular reporting of progress to
parents. This occurs at scheduled intervals, two times per year. In addition, many informal
discussions occur.
The Teacher’s Role in Early Identification
It is expected that kindergarten teachers will regularly assess each Kindergarten pupil using
expectations in the Kindergarten Curriculum Document and will adjust programming and instruction to
assist children in demonstrating the expected knowledge and skills. If there are concerns about a
student, the teacher will discuss them with the in-school resource team, which consists of the
classroom teacher, in-school resource teacher (ISRT) and administration, for some general teaching
strategies and programming suggestions.
After implementing recommended strategies and programming suggestions, progress is tracked.
Often the variety of strategies suggested by these methods will suffice to manage behaviours and/or
target learning improvements. Throughout, the teacher communicates with the parent to discuss
concerns or progress. When appropriate, similar strategies are encouraged at home.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
The Parent’s Role in Early Identification
Parents play an integral part in the early identification process, initially during transition to school and
regularly throughout the school year. Discussions with the teacher, responses on the report
card/progress report and participation in parent teacher interviews and case conferences are
important ways parents can work collaboratively with the school to support student progress.
An important component of a parent’s role is participation in interventions suggested by the in-school
team or central special education staff which may include an eye examination, a hearing test, or a
discussion with the family physician or paediatrician.
Continuous Assessment
The Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board developed a Continuous Assessment Process
as an intervention model to enhance student success. The Continuous Assessment Process
encourages classroom teachers and in-school support teams to continuously monitor student success
and plan for interventions. Early intervention, proactive program planning, ongoing program support
and classroom assessment are essential to maximize student achievement.
The Continuous Assessment model is not a step by step process; it is a fluid approach to active and
ongoing problem-solving and evaluation. An intervention plan is designed and strategies are applied
based on the information gathered. The effectiveness of the strategies is evaluated through on-going
review and adjustments are made accordingly. Several cycles through the process may be necessary
to improve the intervention plan, which may require a re-evaluation of strategies, additional methods
of classroom assessment, and consultation with appropriate personnel.
School personnel can access the Using Continuous Assessment As An Intervention Model Resource
Guide to obtain additional information for resource support.
** Please see The Continuous Assessment Process Chart below **
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Communication with Parents
Parents are an essential component in the successful education of their child. Regular, informal
communication as well as discussion at parent teacher interviews maintain communication and
facilitate the early identification of problems so that strategies may be implemented. Prior to the
request for central support services, education concerns are discussed with parents and their input is
sought. Where possible, responsibilities for strategies are shared between the parents and the
school.
Should difficulties persist and a consultation or formal assessment be recommended, parents will be
contacted by the in-school team, and will receive information regarding the nature of the assessment.
Consent is part of the necessary documentation for the student referral package. Thus, prior to
assessment, a consent form is sent home and must be returned indicating consent to the
assessment. Parents will then be contacted by special education services staff as part of the board’s
‘Informed Consent’ process. A case conference may be held to share results of the educational,
speech and language and/or psycho-educational assessments and reports. Recommendations are
provided to assist with student programming. Based on the results of the report(s) and the student’s
profile, a recommendation may be made for formal identification. In this case, the parent is provided
with a copy of the Parent Guide to the IPRC and implications of a formal identification are discussed.
Procedures for the IPRC process are outlined in detail in Section 2.4.
Appendices




Appendix G - Early Identification Enrolment Checklist
Appendix I - Educational and Other Assessment Tools
Appendix I - Psycho-Educational /Speech Language Referral Package Information
Appendix H - Parents’ Guide to Special Education
Reference
 Using Continuous Assessment as an Intervention Model - A Resource Guide
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.4
THE IDENTIFICATION, PLACEMENT AND REVIEW COMMITTEE (IPRC) PROCESS AND
APPEALS
The Ministry of Education (Ontario Regulation 181/98) requires that all school boards establish
Identification, Placement and Review Committees (IPRCs). It requires that all exceptional students be
reviewed at least once a year, or, if there is a change in identification or a change in placement, that
an IPRC meeting be convened to conduct this review.
Parents may request, in writing, that the principal refer a student to an IPRC. Within 15 days of the
parent’s request, the principal must provide parents with a written statement acknowledging receipt of
the request and advising approximately when the principal expects the IPRC will meet to discuss the
student.
Training
•
•
•
•
ongoing in-service is provided by special education services for ISRTs and ISEHs with specific
in-services having an IPRC focus;
school teams also refer to the Special Education A Guide for Educators 2001, Part D - The
Identification, Placement and Review Process
consultation occurs throughout the year between special education coordinators and
ISRT/ISEH regarding current and emerging identification and placements for students
ISRT/ISEH receives documents to support planning and conducting of the IPRC.
Prior to the IPRC
•
•
•
•
new information, assessments and/or reports are reviewed with parents
parents are provided with a Letter of Invitation and the Parents’ Guide 10 days prior
through written notification to the principal, parents may waive the annual review if they feel
their child is being well served by their current identification and placement
parents may arrange for other persons to attend the IPRC meeting (representative of the
parent or student, representatives from relevant agencies, etc.)
During the IPRC
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
the IPRC committee is comprised of at least 3 persons, one of whom must be a principal or a
supervisory officer
parents and students ages 16 or older are entitled to participate in all committee discussions
about the student
following introductions of all individuals attending the IPRC, the purpose of the meeting
should be explained, and all participants should feel that their contributions are valued
the Special Education - A Guide for Parents is available in both a pamphlet and booklet
version at the IPRC
(http://www.hpedsb.on.ca/ec/services/spe/downloads/parentguide_screen.jpg )
a review of the student’s strengths and needs must occur
the proposed exceptionality is presented according to the categories and definitions provided
by the Ministry of Education
the proposed placement is presented
after all of the information has been reviewed and discussed, the Committee records its
decision regarding the pupil’s identification and the student’s placement on the Central
Information Form (CIF)
the parent (or student, if 16 or older) is requested to sign the CIF confirming agreement or
disagreement of the decision
the chair of the committee signs the completed CIF
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
After the IPRC:
•
•
•
•
the chair of the committee must provide a copy of the completed CIF along with a copy of the
Ministry Exceptionality Definitions to the parent or the student, if over the age of 16
one copy of the CIF is also placed in the student’s Ontario Student Record (OSR) and the
original is sent to special education services
the parent or student age 16 or older may request, within 15 days of receipt of the statement of
decision, a second meeting to discuss the identification and/or placement. If the parent does
not agree with the second IPRC’s decision, within 30 days of receipt of the initial IPRC
decision, the parent can file a notice of appeal with the secretary of the board or designate
if the parent or student age 16 or older did not attend the meeting and sign the consent section
of the CIF, an additional copy of the CIF is mailed home to be signed and returned to the
school within 15 days of receiving the CIF
Referrals, Reviews and Appeals Statistics
Currently Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board gathers IPRC data from the board’s IEP
Engine and from the individual schools.
2010-11
Elementary
B
83
CA
92
CH
13
CL
124
CS
3
CLD
194
IG
4
IMD
121
IDD
121
PD
14
PV
4
M
84
Total
857
Secondary
105
40
7
17
0
347
14
304
180
12
2
127
1155
Total
188
132
20
141
3
541
18
425
301
26
6
211
2012
B - Behaviour
IG - Intellectual Gifted
CA - Communication Autism
IMD - Intellectual Mild Disability
CH - Communication Hearing
IDD - Intellectual Developmental
Disability
CL - Communication Language
PD - Physical Disability
CS - Communication Speech
PV - Physical Blind
CLD - Communication Learning
Disability
Elementary
Secondary
Total
M – Multiple
APPEALS 2010-11
0
0
0
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Appendices
 Appendix H - Parents’ Guide to Special Education
 Appendix B - Special Education: A Guide for Parents
 Appendix B - Letter of Invitation to IPRC
Reference
 Special Education: A Guide for Educators (Ministry of Education 2001)
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.5 EDUCATIONAL AND OTHER ASSESSMENTS
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board strives to make the assessment process as
expedient as possible without sacrificing accuracy and quality. A wide range of assessment
opportunities are available to assist with the identification of and programming for students. A
complete listing of assessment tools, who administers the tools, administrator’s qualifications, and
method of parental consent and communication of results, can be found in the Appendix - Educational
and Other Assessment Tools.
School-based assessments may take place at any time throughout the year as needed. These results
are primarily used for programming purposes, to assist with IEP development, and/or to obtain data to
evaluate independent performance.
In order to access support through special education services, the school, in most cases, must
demonstrate that they have implemented and assessed a number of interventions and problemsolved through their regularly scheduled in-school team meetings which include the special education
coordinators. Standardized and/or curriculum-based assessments must also be completed; strategies
must be applied, and targeted at areas identified in the test profile. If concerns continue after review of
all test and classroom performance data, then the in-school team, in consultation with the special
education coordinator, would complete a referral for consultation and/or assessment through special
education services.
Psycho-educational Assessments
The in-school team submits referrals to special education services for assessment or consultation.
Assessments and consultations are completed by the psychometrist and/or the psychologist. Signed
parental consent for review of the psycho-educational referral package is required, as well as
informed consent, before the assessment is initiated. All third party consultations require a signed
Release of Student Information Form.
The management of the psycho-educational caseload involves frequent contact with school personnel
to evaluate changing school needs and emerging priorities.
The number of psycho-educational assessments completed per year varies depending on
completeness of initial referral, time of year, concurrent reviews (possibly resulting in an increase of
referrals) and the complexity of an individual case. At certain times of the year, assessments may be
prioritized. On average, the wait time for a psycho-educational assessment ranges from 6 to 9
months. Case conferences are generally completed within one month of the completion of the report.
Speech and Language Assessments
Speech and language assessments, hearing screenings and auditory processing testing are also
processed through special education services. Currently there are two speech-language pathologists
employed by the board. Following the process at the school level (as previously noted), the student
referral package is forwarded to special education services and reviewed by the speech-language
pathologist. Signed parental consent for review of the referral package is required, as well as informed
consent, before the assessment is initiated. Most assessments are completed within 3 to 9 months,
and written results are communicated to relevant staff and parents. Case conferences are held,
where appropriate and ongoing consultation and support is provided by speech-language pathologists
as required. Speech-language educational assistants work closely with the speech language
pathologists to assist with implementation of recommendations and monitor progress. The
management of the speech and language assessment caseload involves frequent contact with school
personnel to evaluate changing school needs and emerging priorities.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Description of Protocols for Sharing Information with Staff and Outside Agencies
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board communicates assessment results with relevant
staff and parents through a scheduled case conference. Results of assessments and reports are
provided to parents.
All reports from special education services are confidential documents that are kept in a secure
location; with a copy provided for inclusion in the student’s OSR. Assessment information is only
shared with outside agencies if requested and accompanied by an appropriate consent form to
indicate parental awareness and consent.
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board follows the guidelines of the appropriate
professional agencies involved and adheres to the requirements of the Municipal Freedom of
Information and Protection of Privacy Act (MFIPPA) and the Personal Information Protection and
Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA).
Appendices
 Appendix I - Educational and Other Assessment Tools
 Appendix I - Psycho-Educational / Speech Language Referral Package
References




Hastings and Prince Edward DSB - OSR Manual/Guidelines
Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (MFIPPA) in HPEDSB
Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA)
Personal Health Information
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.6 SPECIALIZED HEALTH SUPPORT SERVICES IN SCHOOL SETTINGS
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board works with various community agencies and
service providers to provide health support for students who require specialized support in a school
setting. Community partners include Community Care Access Centres (CCAC), Children’s Treatment
Centre (CTC), Hastings and Prince Edward Pre-school Speech and Language System, Children’s
Mental Health Services, Community Living Prince Edward (CLPE), and Counselling Services of
Belleville and District (CSBD).
Services available to eligible students (Appendix C) include: nursing services (i.e. sterile intermittent
catheterization, tube feeding, etc.), physiotherapy, occupational or speech therapy, toileting, feeding,
early intervention programs and counselling services. Hastings and Prince Edward District School
Board endeavours to provide, where appropriate and available, in-house support in the following
areas:
•
•
•
•
speech-language intervention (speech-language educational assistants with direction from the
speech-language pathologists)
personal care such as toileting, feeding, changing, lifting, shallow suctioning, clean, intermittent
catheterization (educational assistants)
administration of medication and/or assistance with medical procedures
social/emotional assessment programming, counselling and support (child and youth counsellors)
Referral Process
School personnel may identify the need for a referral for service or they may be informed by the
parents, special education staff or a supporting agency that a referral is recommended. It is the
school's responsibility to obtain parental consent for assessment, intervention and/or support or to
initiate a referral to School Health Support Services or other support agencies. Consultation with a
special education coordinator is required prior to forwarding requests to the Community Care Access
Centre (CCAC) except in the case of speech/language therapy, where a HPEDSB speech-language
pathologist must pre-assess or confirm all new referrals for speech therapy or intervention.
Appendices



Appendix C - Specialized Health Support Services
Appendix J - Child and Youth Counsellor Referral/Consent for Services Form
Appendix I - Psycho-Educational / Speech Language Referral Package Information
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.7 CATEGORIES AND DEFINITIONS OF EXCEPTIONALITIES
The Ministry of Education provides Categories and Definitions of Exceptionalities “Standards for
School Boards’ Special Education Plans” (2000).
For each of the categories and definitions, Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board has
developed documentation that will assist schools in appropriately identifying students’ exceptionalities
in relation to the IPRC process. Criteria indicators are identified for each exceptionality to support
school decision making.
For each area of exceptionality, Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board continues to
review and refine identification procedures based on:
•
•
•
•
consultation with the regulated professionals within the board and community;
a range of interventions/services within the board and its surrounding region;
assessment information and data collection;
provincial input, including:
– Ministry of Education development and release of the standards for each exceptionality
– Ministry of Education Special Education Guide information on categories, definitions, and
disorders.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
ONTARIO MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
CATEGORIES OF EXCEPTIONALITIES AND DEFINITIONS
(Revised January 1999)
❑
BEHAVIOUR *(B)
A learning disorder characterized by specific behaviour problems over such a period of time, and to such a marked
degree, and of such a nature, as to adversely affect educational performance, and that may be accompanied by one
or more of the following:
a)
b)
c)
d)
an inability to build or to maintain interpersonal relationships;
excessive fears or anxieties;
a tendency to compulsive reaction; or
an inability to learn that cannot be traced to intellectual, sensory, or other health factors, or any
combination thereof.
❑COMMUNICATION
❑
Autism
*(CA)
A severe learning disorder that is characterized by:
a)
▸
▸
▸
▸
disturbances in:
rate of educational development;
ability to relate to the environment;
mobility;
perception, speech, and language.
b)
lack of the representational symbolic behaviour that precedes language.
❑
Deaf and Hard of Hearing
*(CH)
An impairment characterized by deficits in language and speech development because of a diminished or nonexistent response to sound.
❑
Language Impairment
*(CL)
A learning disorder characterized by an impairment in comprehension and/or use of verbal communication or the
written or other symbol system of communication, which may be associated with neurological, psychological,
physical, or sensory factors, and which may:
a)
involve one or more of the form, content, and function of language in communication; and
b)
▸
▸
▸
include one or more of the following:
language delay;
dysfluency;
voice and articulation development, which may or may not be organically or functionally based.
❑
Speech Impairment
*(CS)
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
A disorder in language formulation that may be associated with neurological, psychological, physical, or sensory
factors; that involves perceptual motor aspects of transmitting oral messages; and that may be characterized by
impairment in articulation, rhythm, and stress.
❑
Learning Disability
*(CLD)
A learning disorder evident in both academic and social situations that involves one or more of the processes
necessary for the proper use of spoken language or the symbols of communication, and that is characterized by a
condition that:
a)
▸
▸
▸
▸
▸
▸
is not primarily the result of:
impairment of vision;
impairment of hearing;
physical disability;
developmental disability;
primary emotional disturbance;
cultural difference; and
b)
results in a significant discrepancy between academic achievement and assessed intellectual ability, with
deficits in one or more of the following:
▸
▸
▸
▸
c)
▸
▸
▸
▸
▸
receptive language (listening, reading);
language processing (thinking, conceptualizing, integrating);
expressive language (talking, spelling, writing);
mathematical computations.
may be associated with one or more conditions diagnosed as:
a perceptual handicap;
a brain injury;
minimal brain dysfunction;
dyslexia;
developmental aphasia.
❑INTELLECTUAL
❑
Giftedness
*(IG)
An unusual advanced degree of general intellectual ability that requires differentiated learning experiences of a depth
and breadth beyond those normally provided in the regular school program to satisfy the level of educational potential
indicated.
❑
Mild Intellectual Disability
*(IMD)
A learning disorder characterized by:
a)
an ability to profit educationally within a regular class with the aid of considerable curriculum
modification and supportive service;
b)
an inability to profit educationally within a regular class because of slow intellectual development;
c)
a potential for academic learning, independent social adjustment, and economic self-support.
❑
Developmental Disability
*(IDD)
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
A severe learning disorder characterized by:
a)
an inability to profit from a special education program for students with mild intellectual disabilities
because of slow intellectual development;
b)
an ability to profit from a special education program that is designed to accommodate slow intellectual
development;
c)
a limited potential for academic learning, independent social adjustment, and economic self-support.
❑ PHYSICAL
❑
Physical Disability
*(PD)
A condition of such severe physical limitation or deficiency as to require special assistance in learning situations to
provide the opportunity for educational achievement equivalent to that of pupils without exceptionalities who are of
the same age or developmental level.
❑
Blind and Low Vision
*(PV)
A condition of partial or total impairment of sight or vision that even with correction affects educational
performance adversely.
❑
MULTIPLE
❑
Multiple Exceptionalities
*(M)
A combination of learning or other disorders, impairments, or physical disabilities, that is of such nature as to require, for
educational achievement, the services of one or more teachers holding qualification in special education and the provision of
support services appropriate for such disorders, impairments, or disabilities.
*( ) = Exceptionality Code
Appendices

Appendix D - HPEDSB Exceptionality Groupings
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.8 SPECIAL EDUCATION PLACEMENTS PROVIDED BY HPEDSB
In preparation for the submission of the annual Special Education Plan to the Ministry of Education,
SEAC members are presented with a copy of the draft Special Education Plan for their review and
input. At a regular SEAC meeting, members have the opportunity to review and respond to the range
of placements available in the board. Amendments to the board’s Special Education Plan occur from
time to time to meet the current needs of the exceptional pupils of the board. Amendments of the
board’s plan are also reviewed with SEAC at a regular meeting.
The individual student profile is given first consideration for all exceptionalities when determining the
appropriate placement. The following placements apply to both the elementary and secondary
panels. Throughout our board, the first choice considered in placement options for the IPRC
committee is always in the regular classroom. Support to assist teachers with integrating a student
with exceptional needs into the regular classroom is available from the special education resource
teacher (ISRT/ISEH) and other board/outside agency personnel. It is recognized that some
exceptional learners may require a degree of differentiated programming that can not be provided
effectively through the structure of the regular class. For these students, we provide a range of
placements beyond the regular class to meet their needs. Such placements will be selected based
upon the range of options available at the board and school level and will have the support and
participation of parents, as required by legislation.
RANGE OF IPRC PLACEMENT OPTIONS
Regular Class with Indirect Support
• The student is placed in a regular class for the entire day, and the teacher receives specialized
consultative services.
• The student may have access to support within the classroom.
Regular Class with Resource Assistance
•
The student is placed in the regular class for most or all of the day and receives specialized
instruction, individually or in a small group, within the regular classroom from a qualified
special education teacher.
Regular Class with Withdrawal Assistance
• The student is placed in the regular class and receives instruction outside of the classroom for
less than 50% of the school day, from a qualified special education teacher.
Special Education Class with Partial Integration
• The student is placed by the IPRC in a special education class where the student - teacher
ratio conforms to Regulation 298, Section 31, for at least 50% of the school day, but is
integrated with a regular class for at least one instructional period daily.
Special Education Class Full – Time
• The student is placed by the IPRC in a special education class, where the student - teacher
ratio conforms to Regulation 298, Section 31, for the entire school day.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
OTHER PROGRAMS AVAILABLE
In some situations a placement within the range of placements offered by the board is not feasible
(i.e. mental health needs, physical health needs) so another option must be considered:
Home Instruction
• instruction is provided for a student who cannot continue in his/her regular program for
medical/mental health reasons
• elementary students receive instruction from a qualified teacher for up to three hours per week and
follow the program set out by the student’s home school
• secondary students receive instruction from a qualified teacher for up to four hours per week and
follow the program laid out by the secondary school in which they are enrolled
• this is not used for a prolonged period of time and the focus is always on returning the student to a
regular school placement
• Additional information is available under Procedure 396 as follows: Procedure 396 - Home
Instruction
• Additional information is available under Procedure 396 Forms as follows: Procedure 396 - Home
Instruction Forms
Care, Treatment, Custody and Correctional Programs (Section 23)
• students in a residential or day treatment program require an educational program in addition to
their care and treatment program
• students are placed into the care and treatment program through the outside agency supporting the
program and the HPEDSB partners to provide the educational program
Employment Destinations Pathway (EDP)
• The Aim System Plan, under Success for Each Student and the implementation of Growing
Success, identified the need for a review of the Employment Destinations Program (EDP). This
review began in September, 2010 and concluded with recommendations and future direction for
EDP.
• provides students with an opportunity to prepare for the world of work and a healthy lifestyle
through job skills training, certification, career exploration and experience, with an emphasis on
transitioning to independence
• secondary students functioning 4 or more years below chronological peers in most subject areas
• secondary school placement and support of students in the EDP pathway; IPRC Regular Class
with Indirect Support
• system special education coordinator support for programming and work experience
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
SPECIAL EDUCATION PLACEMENTS
Placements Available
Junior Intervention Program
SPECIAL EDUCATION CLASS FULL-TIME
Exceptionality
Admission Criteria and Process
Behaviour (B)
Significant behaviour concerns are interfering
with ability to learn/ engage effectively in
learning environment
Maximum
class size
8
Coordinator Involvement
Grades 4-6
All interventions at the school level tried
Emphasis is on social/ behaviour
skill development
Regional Referral Process
Special Education Class Full-time
Students may have another identified
exceptionality
Parental involvement and support for
collaborative planning
IPRC to program placement
Essential Skills Program
Developmental
Disability (IDD)
Coordinator Involvement
st
At or below the 1 percentile or 2
Grades K-8
Emphasis is on functional
numeracy/literacy social & self
control skills, basic living skills
Special Education Class Full-time
10
nd
Extremely low on a psycho educational
cognitive assessment
Low adaptive skills
Students may have another identified
exceptionality
IPRC to program placement
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Placements Available
SPECIAL EDUCATION CLASS FULL-TIME
Exceptionality
Admission Criteria and Process
Maximum
class size
16
Life Skills Program
Identified exceptional
students with one or
more exceptionalities
Secondary
Coordinator Involvement
st
At or below the 1 percentile or 2
nd
Extremely low on a psycho educational
cognitive assessment
Emphasis is on life skills, functional
numeracy/literacy skills,
community/independent living skills
Low adaptive skills
Parental involvement and support for
educational planning.
Special Education Class Full-time
IPRC to program placement
Practical Learning Program
Identified exceptional
students with one or
more exceptionalities
Secondary
Coordinator Involvement
st
At or below the 1 percentile or 2
16
nd
Extremely low on a psycho educational
cognitive assessment
Emphasis is life skills, functional
numeracy/literacy skills,
employability skills and
community/independent living skills
Low adaptive skills
Parental involvement and support for
educational planning.
Special Education Class Full-time
IPRC to program placement
Community Employment Program
Secondary
Emphasis is employability skills and
community/independent living skills
Special Education Class Full-time
Identified exceptional
students with one or
more exceptionalities
Coordinator Involvement
st
nd
At or below the 1 percentile or 2
Extremely low on a psycho educational
cognitive assessment
Low adaptive skills
Parental involvement and support for
educational planning
IPRC to program placement
16
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
REGULAR CLASS WITH WITHDRAWAL ASSISTANCE
Placements Available
Exceptionality
Admission Criteria and Process
Connections
Grades K - 8
Communication-Autism
(CA)
Pediatric or psychological diagnosis confirming PDD/ASD
and observational data to support the placement and profile
Coordinator Involvement
All interventions at the school level attempted
Regional Referral Process
Parental involvement and support for collaborative planning
Students may have another identified exceptionality
IPRC to program placement
Communication-Learning
Disability (CLD)
Coordinator Involvement
All interventions at the school level attempted
Diagnosis of a Learning Disability by a Member of the
College of Psychologists
Demonstrated potential to benefit from assistive technology
Regional Referral Process
Parental involvement and support for collaborative planning
Students may have another identified exceptionality
IPRC to program placement
Emphasis on social, integration,
communication and learning skills
development
Regular Class with Withdrawal
Assistance
Empower Program
Grades 4 -8
Emphasis is on the development
of self advocacy and assistive
technology skills
Regular Class with Withdrawal
Assistance
Appendices






Appendix K - Connections Classes Program
Appendix K - Empower Program
Appendix K - Junior Intervention Program
Appendix K - Essential Skills Program
Appendix K - Secondary School Programs (Students with Intellectual Developmental Disabilities)
LSP (Life Skills Program)/PLP (Practical Learning)/CEP (Community Employment) Program Brochure
Appendix K - Care, Treatment, Custody and Correctional Programs (Section 23)
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.9 INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PLANS (IEPs)
The Ministry of Education published a document Individual Education Plans: Standards for
Development, Program Planning, in the fall of 2000. This document describes province-wide
standards for developing; implementing and monitoring Individual Education Plans (IEPs) for
exceptional students and for students not identified as exceptional who are receiving special
education programs and services. A resource document entitled, The Individual Education Plan (IEP)
A Resource Guide 2004, was also published by the Ministry to further clarify the IEP development
process. Hastings and Prince Edward DSB has developed and implemented an IEP template in
compliance with Ontario regulation 181/98 and the expectations outlined in the IEP Standards 2000
for use with exceptional students in both the elementary and secondary panels. The board currently
uses the IEP Engine to facilitate the completion of IEPs and the sharing of information among schools
and programs. A common IEP addresses the needs of exceptional students within the schools and
the requirements of the Ministry of Education.
In 2002 Ministry staff reviewed the board’s IEPs and offered suggestions for improvement to meet
Ministry standards. The Ministry review was shared in the form of a report card. The suggestions
made were then incorporated: revisions were made accordingly on the IEP Engine; a resource
package was developed to support the schools in meeting Ministry standards.
The board participated in the Ministry of Education’s Regional Review of the IEP. Suggestions and
recommendations from that review are being incorporated into the board’s professional development
planning with staff. The board will continue to update administrators on the IEP standards through
various in-service sessions with administrators. In-school special education resource teachers
receive regular training at monthly meetings and through the special education coordinators. IEPs are
reviewed regularly by administrators with the term report card and centrally by staff in special
education services.
Appendices
 Appendix H - Sample IEP
 Appendix H - HPEDSB IEP Dispute Resolution
Resource
 IEP: A Resource Guide, 2004 (Ministry of Education)
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.10 PROVINCIAL AND DEMONSTRATION SCHOOLS IN ONTARIO
The in-school resource team and special education services staff work collaboratively with parents to
support the student’s admission to a Provincial or Demonstration School. This occurs only when it is
determined that the student fits the profile for admission and where it is the wish of the parent that the
student be considered for placement. Each application is managed by the in-school resource team in
consultation with a key person identified centrally in special education services as the contact for
consultation and for admission. Consultation with provincial and demonstration school staff is well
established and ongoing.
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board is committed to the transportation needs of its
students to Provincial and Demonstration Schools in accordance with board policy for those students
residing within the board’s jurisdiction. Arrangements may also be made for an assistant to
accompany the student if necessary. Normally, transportation is provided on a weekly basis so that
students may return home on the weekends. Given the size and location of our jurisdiction in
proximity to the majority of available programs, the cost of transportation is significant. Hastings and
Prince Edward District School Board continues to work with Provincial and Demonstration school
officials to monitor and assist with the challenges of supervision during transport.
At the writing of this report, the numbers of HPEDSB students attending Provincial and
Demonstration Schools are as follows:
Sir James Whitney School for the Deaf
Sagonaska
W. Ross MacDonald
Trillium Provincial School
24
1
2
1
Appendix
 Appendix E - Provincial Schools and Demonstration Schools
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.11 SPECIAL EDUCATION STAFF
The delivery of special education programs and services for students is labour intensive and requires
parents, community, and board participation. Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
employs a wide range of specialized personnel at the school and system level.
Special Education Services - Mandate
Special Education Services has a prime responsibility to support school teams and teachers in the
implementation of effective programming and appropriate placements for exceptional students. The
schools’ and system’s responses are based on the Ministry of Education’s requirements for special
education as outlined in the Education Act and Regulations. In addition, the recommendations from
schools, parents, school councils, outside agencies and SEAC help to determine the use of
resources.
Most special education resources are deployed at the school level (i.e. special education resource
teachers, program support teachers, specialized program teachers, educational assistants, and child
and youth counsellors). Hastings and Prince Edward DSB continues to use monies in excess of
Ministry funding to address the learning needs of exceptional students.
The members of special education services provide professional development opportunities for all
members of the professional learning community based on the recommendations from the Ministry of
Education document Education for All, The Report of the Expert Panel on Literacy and Numeracy
Instruction for Students With Special Education Needs, Kindergarten to Grade 6, Growing Success,
Caring and Safe Schools, Shared Solutions, Inclusive and Equitable Schools, and Learning for All.
Responsibility of Special Education Services
Special Education Services supports the systematic and consistent implementation of Ministry of
Education special education policies and procedures across all schools. The special education coordinators, under the supervision of the superintendent of special education, manage the IPRC
processes at a system level, provide support to the IPRC at a regional and school level, and provide
support to schools in regard to program modifications, accommodations and services as related to the
Ministry exceptionalities.
Board/System-Level Special Education Staff
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Superintendent
Assistant Superintendent
Special Education Coordinators (K-12)
Resource/Project and Safe Workplace Coordinator
Speech Language Pathologists
Psychometrist and Psychologist
Psycho-educational Assessment Assistant
Child and Youth Counsellors Supervisor
Blind and Low Vision Coordinator and Resource Teacher
Deaf and Hard of Hearing Coordinator and Resource Teacher
Braillist
Autism Student Support Coordinator
Administrative Support Staff
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
School-Based Special Education Staff
•
•
•
•
In-School Resource Teachers (ISRTs) - Elementary
Interdepartmental Special Education Heads (ISEHs)- Secondary
Educational Assistants - Elementary and Secondary
Child and Youth Counsellors - Elementary and Secondary
Appendix A
 Roles and Responsibilities in Special Education - Central Organization
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.12 STAFF DEVELOPMENT
The Board’s System Plan - AiM, Achievement in Motion for Student Success, identifies success for all
students as a key goal. Supporting the system as a professional learning community is a critical
action to reach this goal. It is believed that embracing the characteristics of a professional learning
community will enhance the system’s ability to achieve goals that individuals would not be able to
reach on their own. This goal aligns with the number one belief all students can succeed, from the
Ministry of Education document Education for All.
In order to reach this goal, staff development within a professional learning community is an essential
requirement in the successful delivery of special education programs and services. The board will
continue to champion an inclusive, non-categorical (rather than exceptionality-based) approach to
address programming for students with special education needs. The board is committed to the goal
of “increased capacity of all staff to educate a wider range of learners” which is recommended in the
Special Education Transformation document.
Priorities for Staff Development
Using the seven beliefs identified in the Education for All document, the following priorities are
identified:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
All students can succeed.
Universal design and differentiated instruction are effective and interconnected means of
meeting the learning or productivity needs of any group of students.
Successful instructional practices are founded on evidence-based research, tempered by
experience.
Classroom teachers are the key educators for a student’s literacy and numeracy development.
Each child has his or her own unique patterns of learning.
The classroom teacher needs the support of the larger community to create a learning
environment that supports students with special education needs.
Fairness is not sameness.
The board, through the System Strategic Plan, affirms its commitment to provide programs and
services to help all students and staff reach their full potential.
Consultation with the Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC)
SEAC has the opportunity to be consulted about staff development. Feedback to the staff
development plan developed by special education services staff is solicited at strategic points in the
planning cycle. SEAC members are invited to participate in staff development opportunities such as:
• Parent Awareness Programs;
• Professional Development Opportunities offered by the Board;
• Professional Development Opportunities offered by community agencies.
Professional development opportunities are also offered on a regular basis at SEAC meetings.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Training for Staff
According to several studies that have examined the effects of implementing a participatory
management method such as learning communities, the most notable impact is that participants
develop a feeling of empowerment - “that their strengths and skills are allied, they have natural
systems for mutual help, and that they engage in proactive behaviour when facing changes”
(Zimmerman & Rappaport, 1988). The model of the professional learning community is used in
Hastings and Prince Edward DSB for Ministry, regional, board, special education, school and
community initiatives.
Hastings and Prince Edward DSB special education staff attends conferences and workshops and
Ministry meetings/training sessions regularly according to their portfolio and interest. Professional
growth with respect to current practices, research, training, and Ministry initiatives occurs at regularly
scheduled meetings. In addition presentations from local agencies may join these professional
learning communities to keep educators apprised of current services and the procedures to access
these supports available to them. All resource teachers attend these meetings and for certain training
or reflective dialogue administrators also attend.
In the fall, all new teachers and educational assistants are given an overview of special education
during training at the Education Centre. Throughout the year, there are specific in-services offered by
special education staff to co-ordinate with the plans of curriculum services for new teacher in-services
on topics such as assessment and evaluation, IEP development, and Using Continuous Assessment
as Intervention Model strategies.
Special education personnel are also available throughout the year to support specific school
requests to provide in-services related to specific topics at staff meetings. Individualized support is
available for school staff members:
• to visit and increase understanding of board programs;
• for problem-solving with respect to individual student or program needs;
• to attend a presentation/workshop specific to student need(s);
• to have the special education/information technology staffs provide training.
Training for Educational Assistants
In partnership with Loyalist College, various courses are offered such as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Communication-Autism
Learning Disabilities
Behaviour Management
Assistive Technology
Intellectual Disabilities (IDD and IMD)
Pre-employment /life skills program
Speech/Language
Course requirements are part of the job descriptions for the educational assistants and are strongly
recommended for certain jobs working with specific students or within a regional program. On-going
professional development workshops at both the school and board levels occur throughout the year.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Ministry of Education Funded Professional Development
Professional development plans for special education staff are tied to Ministry funding, the HPEDSB
AiM System Plan which includes the HPEDSB Board Improvement Plan for Student Achievement.
Staff development to support teachers and educational assistants who work with students with Autism
has been designed based upon Ministry of Education funding. This has included: ABA training
provided to school teams, collaborative ABA training sessions delivered with Pathways School
Support Program, release time provided for planning time for school teams involved in Seamless
Transitions connections for students with ASD. As well, existing resources were moved to the
Resource Center and a top up of lending resources, including sensory kits occurred.
Budget amount: $33,340.00
Staff development was provided through the MISA Ottawa Region Professional Network for ten
teachers from Grades 6 to 10 who worked on a collaborative inquiry to understand how
accommodations provided in the regular classroom (e.g., Premier Assistive Technology, SMART
Ideas, and Dragon Naturally Speaking) increase student engagement, thinking and learning.
Budget amount: $7000.00
Staff development and course/program material development for teachers of students in Locally
Developed Grade 9 English, Mathematics and Geography was provided through the Learning for All
Council of Directors (CODE) funding. This aligned with the recommendations of the review of the
Employment Destinations Program (EDP) noted in the board plan below.
Budget amount: $55,715.00 (Shared with Ottawa Catholic Schools)
AiM – Achievement in Motion for Student Success System Plan
The AiM System Plan outlined three goals: Success of Each Student, Employee Excellence and
Community Connections. Within these three goals, Action Plans and Action Steps are developed
based on broad consultation with all stakeholder groups, including SEAC. The following priorities
have included staff development in special education:
Success for Each Student
Assistive Technology - Premier Assistive Technology continues to be available for students on all
academic computers. Staff training for Premier Assistive Technology occurred for elementary and
secondary resource teachers, teachers, educational assistants and students. In elementary settings
training for staff was often linked with training experiences within the classroom setting, thus reaching
all students. In secondary settings, schools created proposals to further training at each school site.
In addition, Premier At Home became available in the fall of 2010, making assistive technology
available at home as well as at school.
Special Equipment Amount (SEA) - Staff development and training continues through partnership
support of Information Technology Services and Special Education Services staff. When students
receive SEA equipment (e.g., laptops with assistive technology) training is provided for individual
students, as well as teachers and educational assistants who work with the student. Training was
also provided to resource teachers regarding the new eligibility requirements for SEA equipment
based upon the HPEDSB Special Equipment Amount (SEA) Resource Guide.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Growing Success: Assessment, Evaluation and Reporting in Ontario Schools 2010 – The
implementation of this Ministry of Education policy document resulted in the consolidation of HPEDSB
Alternative Report Cards for elementary and secondary students who require programming outlined
on IEPs that is beyond that of the Ontario Curriculum. Alternative Report Card Grade 1 to 12
templates were developed and implemented to meet the new policy document requirements. Staff
development training was provided on the new report cards, links to student IEPs and Alternative
Report Card comment writing (based upon developed sample comment resources for teachers).
Employment Destinations Program (EDP) Review – The EDP program underwent review during
the school year. Based upon recommendations of the program review, curriculum materials for
Locally Developed Mathematics, English and Geography were developed. Staff development and
training based upon these curriculum documents will begin in the spring of 2011 and continue into the
2011-2012 school year.
Safe, Caring and Inclusive Schools – training for each administrator was provided based upon the
Caring and Safe Schools in Ontario: supporting students with special education needs through
progressive discipline K – 12, 2010 Ministry of Education resource document. Teachers and
administrators participated in various training opportunities through the Eastern Ontario Network for
Equity and Inclusive Education. After school training for all stakeholders included the following
presentations: Imagine a World Free from Fear and Building Inclusive Schools. The Canadian
Hearing Society presented the Barrier Free Education for teachers, educational assistants,
administrators and managers. Behaviour Management System training was provided for educational
assistants and teachers in regional special education program classes. Ongoing training and support
is provided to school team staff as needed regarding Behaviour Management Safety Plans for
individual students.
Working Together for Kid’s Mental Health Demonstration Project – Ongoing support was
provided for staff training regarding mental health assessment tools. Community Partners include
Children’s Mental Health,
In-school Resource Teachers (ISRTs) and Interdepartmental Special Education Heads (ISEHs) Ongoing staff development and capacity building regarding the Continuous Assessment Process,
assistive technology programs, and special education legislation/procedures was provided at monthly
ISRT/ISEH meetings.
Budget Amount: $75,000.00
Communication with Staff
All staff can learn about professional development opportunities through the board web page at
www.hpedsb.on.ca and communication to the school via e-mail, system memos, and flyers or from
the special education staff. The board is committed to ongoing training for all staff, as referenced in
its priorities in the System Plan - AiM, Achievement in Motion for Student Success.
AiM – Achievement in Motion for Student Success, System Plan 2010-2015, Year 1, 2010-2011
Reference
 Education for All, The Report of the Expert Panel on Literacy and Numeracy Instruction for
Students With Special Education Needs, Kindergarten to Grade 6, Ministry of Education
 Special Education Transformation: A Report of the Co-Chairs with the Recommendations of
the Working Table on Special Education
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.13 SPECIALIZED EQUIPMENT
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board recognizes that specialized equipment is essential
for some students to achieve their full potential and benefit from instruction. A variety of equipment is
provided for exceptional students through a collaborative approach among community agencies,
parents, the board, and the Ministry of Education. The board reserves the right to determine the type
of equipment that is purchased and whether the need is warranted. The equipment remains the
property of Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board.
Individualized Equipment
Assistance for equipment is provided for individual students for use at school and is based on
documentation that supports their need for specialized equipment. The request for individualized
equipment must be supported by an assessment from an appropriately qualified professional and
must include a diagnosis of the condition the equipment is meant to address, and a functional
recommendation regarding the specific types of equipment the student requires to address his or her
strengths and needs. For 2010-11 there are two components to SEA funding:
SEA Per Pupil Amount – for purchases of all computers, software, computing related devices and
required supporting furniture identified for use by students with special education needs, training and
technician costs. Funding is based on a SEA Per Pupil Amount allocation plus an amount based on
average daily enrolment.
SEA Claims-Based Funding – for other non-computer based equipment to be utilized by students
with special education needs including sensory support, hearing support, vision support, personal
care support and physical assists support equipment. Boards are responsible for the first $800.00 in
cost for any student per year.
Protocols, coordination, management, and maintenance of SEA equipment and training requirements
are the responsibility of the board. Equipment purchased with SEA funding is portable and moves
with the student as outlined in the SEA Ministry Guidelines. Processes are in place to monitor the
movement of students with specialized equipment. The special education resource teacher in each
school tracks the student’s equipment and use of, and ensures that it is documented in the student’s
IEP.
Other Equipment
A portion of the special education budget is allocated to provide for resources and the acquisition of
equipment to support programming needs of exceptional students. The board endeavours to provide
access to specialized equipment in resource rooms, regional centres and/or specialized programs for
individual or groups of exceptional students who may not qualify for SEA funding. This type of
equipment includes items such as specialized tables, computer systems and programs, tape
recorders, sensory items and manipulatives, brailed resources, etc.
Assistive technology and appropriate software applications for exceptional students are pursued to
ensure that student’s needs are being met as effectively as possible. Rapid technology development
is opening new avenues for learning, mobility and communication for many exceptional students.
Additional information is available under:
• Procedure 215 as follows: Procedure 215 - Special Equipment Amount
• Special Equipment Amount Resource Guide: SEA Resource Guide
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.14 ACCESSIBILITY (AODA)
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board has a total of 57 buildings in its jurisdiction. Many
schools have been added to, or modified, over their history. Some schools are multi-level, and were
designed without consideration for the needs of individuals with physical disabilities.
As part of the planning process for students with physical disabilities the receiving school’s
accessibility is reviewed by school and board personnel to determine the accommodations required to
meet the students’ needs. Input is requested from parents and from the appropriate community
professional familiar with the student’s needs. Requests and recommendations, such as occupational
therapy, come from agencies such as the Children’s Treatment Centre, the Child Development Centre
of Hotel Dieu Hospital, or the Access Centre for Hastings and Prince Edward Counties.
Accommodations that have been made include the installation of ramps, chairlifts and elevators in
schools, the remodelling of washrooms for wheelchairs, the installation of power operated doors, and
the re-configuring of classroom space to accommodate wheelchairs. The board’s multi-year plan for
improving accessibility provides details of the accommodations that have been put in place for the
current school year.
In the spring of 2003, Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board struck a committee, the
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board Accessibility Advisory Group, in response to the
requirements of the Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001 (ODA). This committee, chaired by the
Controller of Facility Services, has been charged with describing the measures that Hastings and
Prince Edward District School Board has taken in the past and measures that will be taken in the
future. Focus areas, plans and ongoing commitments, in addition to the accommodations already in
place, have been identified by the working group. Further details on the committee’s membership and
mandate can be obtained by contacting the Controller of Facility Services at the Education Centre.
The Board has provided training for all staff as required by the customer service regulation and the
AODA (2005).
Within the school environment, individual protocols are established by in-school teams, in conjunction
with parents and community professionals, to assist students with disabilities in their day-to-day
activities. These protocols include the development of safety procedures regarding fire drills, lunch
and recess, as well as the arrival to and departure from school.
Additional information can be found regarding the Multi-Year Plan for Accessibility as follows:
• HPEDSB Accessibility Plan
Reference
 Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) 2005
 Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2001 (ODA)
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
2.15 TRANSPORTATION for Students with Special Education Needs
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board has an area in excess of 7,200 square kilometres.
It serves over 54 schools and facilities from Lake Ontario in the south to the southern boundary of
Algonquin Provincial Park in the north. The majority of exceptional students attend their
neighbourhood schools, although some do attend congregated classes and programs in out-ofboundary schools and in Provincial Schools.
Transportation is arranged with, and provided through Tri-Board Transportation Services located in
Napanee. Most exceptional students requiring transportation ride a regular school bus. More
specialized vehicles, such as mini-buses, cars/vans, or taxis, may be provided for students requiring
this type of transportation. Wherever possible, schedules are planned to benefit the student and to
maximize transportation efficiency.
Special transportation is considered for:
•
•
•
•
•
•
students with physical disabilities that prevent them from accessing a regular school bus;
students who have been placed in a regional class or in a program that is not in their
neighbourhood school:
students who have been identified with exceptionalities of behaviour, communication autism,
or intellectual developmental disability, of such severity that they are unable to walk to school
or to access a regular school bus;
students with disorders where the severity is such that they are at risk to either themselves or
other students, even with a bus monitor in place;
students who are in Care and Treatment Facilities outside of their neighbourhood school area,
and where transportation to such programs is feasible; and
students attending Provincial or Demonstration Schools.
The following process is used in deciding if a special needs student may access special
transportation:
•
•
•
The school/program forwards a request for special transportation for a student, on the
designated Tri-Board Student Transportation Services - Special Education Request for
Student Transportation Form. This form is sent to the appropriate special education
coordinator responsible for the school or program. The form outlines the student’s
demographics and the reason for the special transportation request. The special education
coordinator, in consultation with the school/program, and, when warranted, with the
superintendent of special education or with Tri-Board Transportation services, may approve of
the request.
The approved request is forwarded by fax to Tri-Board Transportation which arranges the
transportation and contacts the student’s parent(s).
The approved request is kept on file in special education services for the duration of the school
year.
The safety criteria that is used by Tri-Board Transportation in the tendering and the selection of
transportation providers for exceptional students includes:
•
•
•
•
•
•
drivers must have first aid training;
wheelchairs must be secured during transit;
drivers have a criminal background check;
review of the Commercial Vehicle Automobile Registration;
review of driver’s safety record, including PMO and Highway infractions;
review of the age of the equipment to be used.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Appendix
 Appendix J - Special Education Request for Student Transportation Form
Reference
 Transportation Guide
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
3.0
SPECIAL EDUCATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE (SEAC)
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board has established and will maintain a Special
Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) in keeping with Regulation 464/497. The purpose of the
Special Education Advisory Committee is to act in an advisory capacity to the Board on Special
Education matters.
Appointments/Meetings
All appointments to the Special Education Advisory Committee will be guided by the terms and
conditions for trustees. At the completion of the terms of office of SEAC members, the board will
advertise in the local papers for representation from the associations and for members-at-large for the
next term of the Board of Trustees. A local association will write to the Director of Education to
request representation on the Special Education Advisory Committee. A letter should include the
nomination and qualifications of the nominee. Each recognized association is entitled to one member.
Where there are more than twelve associations in the areas of the jurisdiction of the board, the board
shall select the twelve local associations that shall be represented. The Board may appoint to the
membership of the SEAC only those persons who qualify. The Special Education Advisory
Committee shall consist of:
1)
Two members and one alternate member for each, appointed by the Board from among its
own members;
2)
One representative of the Mohawks of the Bay of Quinte in accordance with the legislation;
3)
One representative from each of the local associations not to exceed twelve, in the area of
jurisdiction of the Board, as nominated by the local association and appointed by the
Board;
2)
One alternate for each representative of a local association, nominated by each local
association and appointed by the Board; and
3)
If the Board so chooses, up to two members appointed by the Board who are not
representatives of a local association, are not members of the Board or another committee
of the Board that is appointed by the Board.
Each person appointed under section 1 to 5 above shall have the qualifications required for being a
member of the Board that appointed them.
The Special Education Advisory Committee meets once a month on the last Thursday of each month,
from September to June, at 5:00 p.m. usually at the Education Centre, Ann Street, Belleville. Offsite
meetings are encouraged and upon approval of SEAC, held at local schools in the district. The
committee also receives presentations by local associations, agencies, staff and students. These
presentations have assisted the SEAC in becoming aware of the mandate of the local associations
and the services provided as well as program and services provided by the board in support of
exceptional students.
Each SEAC member is provided with an orientation package which includes Ministry regulations and
board policies pertaining to SEAC and a copy of the board’s Special Education Plan. An orientation
session is made available for new and remaining members of SEAC after each trustee election.
SEAC members need to be aware of their role as outlined in Regulation 464/97, Board Policy No.
11-G Special Education Advisory Committee and the board’s delivery model for special education.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Members of the public and parents are provided with various avenues to communicate with SEAC.
Information on SEAC is available on the Board website at www.hpedsb.on.ca, Special Education.
The Special Education Advisory Committee has co-ordinated newsletter inserts for schools called
“Special Connections” which are distributed by schools to parents and are accessible on the board’s
website.
SEAC members are provided updates on the establishment, development and delivery of special
education programs and services for exceptional students at each regular meeting. This remains a
standing item on the agenda for the meetings.
The annual budget as it pertains to special education is presented to SEAC by the Superintendent of
Business Services in the spring of each year.
Ministry response to the annual Special Education Plan submission and subsequent amendments are
shared with the Special Education Advisory Committee. The Plan also remains a standing item on
the SEAC agenda for the spring meetings. SEAC is provided with the opportunity for consultation,
input and feedback on all items presented and to make recommendations as they relate to the special
education programs and services for exceptional pupils. Recommendations from the SEAC are
presented to the board’s Program and Human Resources Committee prior to the full Board.
Additional information can be accessed as follows:
• Special Education Advisory Committee Policy No.11-G
• Special Connections Sample
• Special Education Advisory Committee 2011-2014
References
 Regulation 464/97
 Educating Together: A Handbook for Trustees, School Boards and Communities
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
4.0
COORDINATION OF SERVICES WITH OTHER MINISTRIES OR AGENCIES
Pre-school Transition to School
•
•
Contact is made with the various agencies providing support to high-needs pre-schoolers (i.e.
Family Space/Early Years Centre, Children’s Mental Health, Counselling Services of Belleville and
District, Healthy Babies, Healthy Children, Community Living Prince Edward), several months prior
to school entry. Central special education staff meets with parents and representatives from the
agencies at the student’s home school to identify the student’s strengths and needs and to assess
the level and type of support required for successful school entry.
Students who receive support and/or programming from a preschool program for students who are
deaf follow the same process laid out above, but the initial contact is often made through our
Itinerant Teacher of the Deaf and Hearing Impaired who also attends the meetings to determine
the level of support required for the student.
Pre-school Speech and Language Programs
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Hastings and Prince Edward Pre-school Speech and Language System (HPEPSLS) partners
provide the board with a list of pre-school students who will transition into the school system by
early May to allow for planning regarding speech and language services required.
HPEPSLS will keep Junior Kindergarten students through to Senior Kindergarten both for speech
and language services.
HPEPSLS will provide language development support to the Junior Kindergarten teacher working
with the students on their caseload.
If a speech language need is suspected in a Junior Kindergarten student and that student is not
receiving HPEPSLS services or has not come off the HPEPSLS wait list by October of their Junior
Kindergarten year, referral is made for board speech language assessment and intervention.
HPEPSLS will send discharge reports to the board’s speech and language pathologist.
HPEPSLS includes recommendations in their transition to school report that a child may be
eligible for Access Centre support.
Schools receive a “Transition to School’ report from HPEPSLS for children who continue to require
speech and/or language support from the board’s speech language pathologists.
Community Care Access Centre
•
•
•
Community Care Access Centre (CCAC) partners with the board to provide support for
Students with:
- severe articulation difficulties, speech dysfluencies and voice disorders
- occupational therapy needs (fine/gross motor/sensory)
- physiotherapy
- nursing
CCAC speech language pathologists (SLPs) will provide intervention support to school personnel
for students on their caseload.
Transition of students to board speech language caseload occurs when students no longer meet
the severity criteria. This is achieved via CCAC SLPs discharge reports to board speech
language pathologists and school personnel.
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Quinte Children’s Treatment Centre (QCTC)
Partners with the board to provide support in the following areas for students with physical or
multiple disabilities:
-physiotherapy and occupational therapy;
-speech language pathology;
-social work and psychometric services.
• Partners with the Board in the transitioning of children into Junior and Senior Kindergarten and
transition physiotherapy /occupational therapy needs within the school to the Access Centre.
• Therapy staff continue to provide assessments for some equipment needs required within the
school (i.e. walkers, standing frames, specialized computer hardware/software) and provide
support documents as required for Special Equipment Amount (SEA) funding. Specialty
programs such as seating and mobility and augmentative communication and psychometric
services are provided on a consultation basis in the schools throughout the child’s school career.
•
Intensive Intervention Programs for Children with Autism
•
•
•
•
•
The Autism Intervention (AIP) Program through Counselling Services of Belleville and District
(CSBD) services clients who require Intensive Behaviour Intervention (IBI)
Intensive Behavioural Intervention (IBI) is a clinically supervised, intensive, comprehensive and
individualized treatment program developed for children and youth with severe autism. IBI is
based on the scientific principles of the broader field of Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA).
Once the student is registered in school the team, (AIP staff, school group coordinator, and school
staff) assist with the transition to school and continue to participate in case conferences as
required.
Seamless Transitions (Connections for Students) is the agreed upon process between the Ministry
of Education and the Ministry of Children and Youth services that supports the successful
transition for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) from Intensive Behaviour Intervention
(IBI) therapy to increased time at school.
Seamless Transitions includes the AIP staff, school staff, special education coordinator, ABA
student support coordinator, and Pathways School Support Program and begins when the student
is discharging from IBI.
Pathways School Support Program for Children with Autism
• Collaboration with Hastings and Prince Edward DSB and Pathways for Children and Youth-School
Support Program for Children with Autism is to enhance educational experience of school-aged
learners with ASD.
• Pathways consultants work with Hastings Prince Edward DSB staff providing a range of services
including training, consultation, assisting in the development of resource material and serve as a
vital member on the Seamless Transitions (Connections for Students) Transitions team.
• Pathways consultants work with Hastings and Prince Edward DSB staff providing a range of
services including training, consultation, planning and assisting in the development of resource
material.
• Principals, ISRTs, and ISEHs can initiate a request for services by consulting with their school
group special education coordinator.
• Additional information can be found by accessing the Seamless Transitions Resource Guide as
follows: Seamless Transitions Resource Guide
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Care, Treatment, Custody and Correctional Programs
•
•
•
When students are attending programs offered by care and treatment facilities in partnership with
our board, central special education staff attend regular treatment meetings in order to be kept
informed of the student’s progress.
Prior to entry into a Care and Treatment facility, it is the board’s practice to share (with appropriate
parental/guardian consents) any appropriate documentation. This is done in conjunction with the
school level special education staff and/or administration.
Once it is determined that a student is ready to be transitioned into the community school in the
board, staff from the community school is invited to attend the monthly review meeting and an
extensive package of documentation regarding the student’s needs is shared. The re-entry plan is
regularly reviewed until the student completes a full-time transition to the community school.
Transition to Post Secondary Destinations
• In partnership with the School to Community Transition Committee, arrangements are made with
Developmental Services Agencies to assist with the transition from school to community for
students with developmental disabilities. In partnership with a Developmental Services Agency, a
community network of support is identified for the student to assist with employment or activity
programs, living arrangements and financial planning.
Programs Offered by Other District School Boards
• Appropriate placement and support decisions are made when an exceptional student arrives from
a program offered by another District School Board. In preparation for a successful entry, contact
is made with the sending board, documentation is acquired and a case conference is held that
involves the special education coordinator. The same arrangement is followed for students
returning from a Section 23 placement into Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board.
• Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board reviews (with appropriate parents/guardian
consents) any assessments accompanying a student in any of the above situations.
Appendices
 Appendix J - Form RSI (Release of Student Information)
 Appendix L - Procedures for Student Enrolling for the First Time in HPEDSB
 Appendix K - Connections Classes – Supporting Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder
(ASD) Brochure
 Appendix K - Referral for ASD Consultants
 Appendix J - Forms and Consents
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
5.0
SUBMISSION AND AVAILABILITY OF THE SPECIAL EDUCATION PLAN
In accordance with Regulation 306 under the Education Act, the board will submit two copies of the
Special Education Plan and subsequent amendments by July 31st of the current year. If no
amendments are required, the Ministry of Education will be notified by the same date.
The Special Education Plan is available to the public through the board’s website at
www.hpedsb.on.ca via SEAC members and from Special Education Services at the Education Centre,
156 Ann Street, Belleville, Ontario, K8N 1N9.
SEAC Agendas and Minutes are posted and available on the board’s website. Archived minutes and
meeting support documentation is also available from Special Education Services.
Appendices
Current Year:
 Compliance letter from the Director of Education
 Board’s motion of approval of the Plan
 SEAC motion and recommendation
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
6.0
PARENT GUIDE TO SPECIAL EDUCATION
A Great Place to Learn and A Great Place to Work!
Parents’ Guide
to
Special Education
Special Education Services
156 Ann Street
Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
(613) 966-1170
FAX: (613) 966-9322
www.hpedsb.on.ca
[email protected]
January 2010
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Table of Contents
Identification, Placement and Review Committee (IPRC)
- Definition and role .................................................................. 1
Exceptional pupil ................................................................................. 2
Individual Education Plan (IEP)........................................................... 3
IPRC meeting requests ........................................................................ 3
Attendance at IPRC meetings ............................................................. 4
Information about the IPRC meetings ................................................. 4
IPRC meetings - When? What? .......................................................... 5
IPRC consideration re placement decision......................................... 6
Statement of decision ......................................................................... 6
What happens after the IPRC has made its decision? ....................... 7
Review of decision .............................................................................. 7
IPRC decision appeal ......................................................................... 8
The Appeal Process ........................................................................... 9
Special education programs and services ........................................ 10
Organizations to assist parents ......................................................... 11
Provincial and demonstration schools ............................................... 12
Additional information ........................................................................ 12
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
The purpose of this Parents’ Guide is to provide you with information about the Identification,
Placement, and Review Committee (IPRC), and to set out for you the procedures involved in
identifying a pupil as “exceptional”, deciding the pupil’s placement, or appealing such decisions if you
do not agree with the IPRC.
If, after reading this guide, you require more information, please see the contact information at the end
of the document.
Note:
1. If you wish to receive this Parents’ Guide in a braille, large print, or audio-cassette format, please
contact Special Education Services at the address or telephone number shown on the cover of this
Guide.
2. When used in this Guide, the word “parent” includes guardian.
What is an Identification, Placement and Review Committee (IPRC)?
An IPRC is composed of at least three persons, one of whom must be a principal or supervisory
officer of the board. Other members of the committee may include a special education coordinator,
the resource teacher or special education head from your child’s school, and your child’s classroom
teacher. In Ontario, Regulation 181/98 requires that all school boards set up IPRCs. The duties of
this committee are listed below.
What is the role of the IPRC?
The IPRC will:
•decide whether or not your child should be identified as exceptional;
•identify the areas of your child’s exceptionality, according to the Categories of Exceptionalities
and Definitions provided by the Ministry of Education;
•decide an appropriate placement for your child such as:
regular class with indirect support, regular class with resource assistance, regular class with
withdrawal assistance, and special education class with partial integration or special education
class full-time;
•review the identification and placement at least once in each school year.
1
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Who is identified as an exceptional pupil?
The Education Act defines an exceptional pupil as “a pupil who’s behavioural, communicational,
intellectual, and physical or multiple exceptionalities are such that he or she is considered to need
placement in a special education program...” Students are identified according to the Categories of
Exceptionalities and Definitions provided by the Ministry of Education.
What is a special education program?
A special education program is defined in the Education Act as an educational program that:
•is based on and modified by the results of continuous assessment and evaluation, usually by the
child’s classroom teacher; and
•includes a plan (called an Individual Education Plan or IEP)
containing specific objectives and an outline of special education services that meet the needs of
the exceptional pupil.
What are special education services?
Special education services are defined in the Education Act as the facilities and resources, including
support personnel and equipment, necessary for developing and implementing a special education
program. The Education Act in Ontario requires that school boards provide, or purchase from another
board, special education programs and services for their exceptional pupils.
2
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
What is an Individual Education Plan (IEP)?
The IEP is an individual plan containing specific objectives and an outline of special education
services that meet the needs of the exceptional pupil. It must be developed for your child, in
consultation with you, as the parent/guardian. It must include:
•a summary of your child’s strengths and needs;
•specific educational expectations;
•an outline of the special education program and services that will be received;
•a statement about the methods by which your child’s progress will be reviewed; and
•for students 14 years and older (except those identified as exceptional solely on the basis of
giftedness), a plan for transition to appropriate post secondary school activities such as work,
further education, and community living.
The IEP must be completed within 30 days after your child has been placed in the program, and the
principal must ensure that you receive a copy of it.
How is an IPRC meeting requested?
The principal of your child’s school:
•must request an IPRC meeting for your child, upon receiving your written request;
•may, with written notice to you, refer your child to an IPRC when the principal and the child’s teacher
or teachers believe that your child may benefit from a special education program.
Within 15 days of receiving your request or giving you notice, the principal must provide you with a
copy of this guide and a written statement noting an approximate date when the IPRC will meet.
3
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
May parents attend the IPRC meeting?
Regulation 181/98 entitles parents and pupils 16 years of age or older:
•to be present at and participate in all of the Committee’s discussions about their child; and
•to be present when the Committee’s identification and placement decision is made.
Who else may attend an IPRC meeting?
•the principal of your child’s school;
•other resource people such as your child’s teacher, special education staff, board support staff, or
the representative of an agency who may provide further information or clarification;
•your representative – that is, a person who may support you or speak on behalf of you or your child;
and
•an interpreter, if one is required. You can request the services of an interpreter through the principal
of your child’s school.
Who may request that others attend?
Either you or the principal of your child’s school may make a request for the attendance of others at
the IPRC meeting.
What information will parents receive about the IPRC meeting?
At least 10 days in advance of the meeting, the chair of the IPRC will provide you with written
notification of the meeting and an invitation to attend the meeting as an important partner in
considering your child’s placement. This letter will notify you of the date, time, and place of the
meeting, and it will ask you to indicate whether you will attend.
Before the IPRC meeting occurs, a case conference will be held. During the case conference,
information about your child that will be considered by the IPRC will be discussed including the results
of assessments or a summary of information. Copies of written information will be shared between
school staff and parents.
4
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
What if parents are unable to attend the scheduled meeting?
If you are unable to attend the scheduled meeting, you may:
•contact the school principal to arrange an alternative date or time; or
•let the school principal know that you will not be attending, and as soon as possible after the
meeting, the principal will forward to you for your consideration and signature, the IPRC’s written
statement of decision noting the decision of identification and placement and any
recommendations regarding special education programs and services.
What happens at an IPRC meeting?
•The chair introduces everyone and explains the purpose of the meeting.
•The IPRC members will review all available information about your child. They will:
•consider an educational assessment of your child;
•consider, subject to the provisions of the Health Care Consent Act, 1996, a health or other
assessment of your child conducted by a qualified practitioner if they feel that such an
assessment is required to make a correct identification or placement decision;
•interview your child, with your consent, if your child is less than 16 years of age, if they feel it
would be useful to do so; and
•consider any information that you submit about your child or that your child submits if he or she is
16 years of age or older.
•The Committee may discuss any proposal that has been made about a special education program or
special education services for your child. Committee members will discuss any such proposal at
your request, or at the request of your child if the child is 16 years of age or older.
•You are encouraged to ask questions and join in the discussion.
•Following the discussion, after all the information has been presented and considered, the
Committee will make its decision.
5
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
What will the IPRC consider in making its placement decision?
Before the IPRC can consider placing your child in a special education class, it must consider whether
placement in a regular class with appropriate special education services will:
•meet your child’s needs; and
•be consistent with your preferences.
If, after considering all of the information presented to it, the IPRC is satisfied that placement in a
regular class will meet your child’s needs and that such a decision is consistent with your preferences,
the Committee will decide in favour of placement in a regular class with appropriate special education
services.
If the Committee decides that your child should be placed in a special education class, it must state
the reasons in its written statement of decision.
What will the IPRC’s written statement of decision include?
The IPRC’s written statement of decision will state:
•whether the IPRC has identified your child as exceptional;
•where the IPRC has identified your child as exceptional,
•the categories and definitions of any exceptionalities identified, as they are defined by the
Ministry of Education;
•the IPRC’s description of your child’s strengths and needs;
•the IPRC’s placement decision; and
•any IPRC recommendations regarding a special education program and special education
services (including any referrals to the Ministry’s provincial and demonstration schools);
•where the IPRC has decided that your child should be placed in a special education class, the
reasons for that decision.
6
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
What happens after the IPRC has made its decision?
•If you agree with the IPRC decision, you will be asked to indicate, by signing your name that you
agree with the identification and placement decisions made by the IPRC. The statement of
decision may be signed at the IPRC meeting or taken home and returned.
•If the IPRC has identified your child as an exceptional pupil and you have agreed with the IPRC
identification and placement decision, the board will promptly notify the principal of the school at
which the special education program is to be provided of the need to develop an Individual
Education Plan (IEP) for your child.
Once a child has been placed in a special education program, can the placement be
reviewed?
•A review IPRC meeting will be held within the school year, unless the principal receives written
notice from you, the parent, dispensing with the annual review.
•You may request a review IPRC meeting any time after your child has been in a special education
program for 3 months.
What does a review IPRC consider and decide?
•The review IPRC considers the same type of information that was originally considered.
•With your written permission, the IPRC conducting the review will consider the progress your child
has made in relation to the IEP.
•The IPRC will review the placement and identification decisions and decide whether they should be
continued or whether a different decision should now be made.
7
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
What can parents do if they disagree with the IPRC decision?
•If you do not agree with either the identification or placement decision made by the IPRC, you may:
•within 15 days of receipt of the decision, request that the IPRC hold a second meeting to discuss
your concerns; or
within 30 days of receipt of the decision, file a notice of appeal with the;
Director of Education
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
156 Ann Street
Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
•If you do not agree with the decision after the second meeting, you may file a notice of appeal within
15 days of your receipt of the decision.
If you do not consent to the IPRC decision and you do not appeal it, the board will instruct the
principal to implement the IPRC decision.
How do I appeal an IPRC decision?
If you disagree with the IPRC’s identification of your child as exceptional or with the placement
decision of the IPRC, you may, within 30 days of receipt of the original decision or within 15 days of
receipt of the decision from the second meeting described above, give written notification of your
intention to appeal the decision to:
Director of Education
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
156 Ann Street
Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
The notice of appeal must:
•indicate the decision with which you disagree; and
•include a statement that sets out your reasons for disagreeing.
8
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
What happens in the appeal process?
The appeal process involves the following steps:
•The Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board will establish a Special Education Appeal
Board to hear the appeal. The appeal board will be composed of three persons (one of whom is to
be selected by you, the parent) who have no prior knowledge of the matter under appeal.
•The chair of the appeal board will arrange a meeting to take place at a convenient time and place,
but no later than 30 days after he or she has been selected (unless parents and board both
provide written consent to a later date).
•The appeal board will receive the material reviewed by the IPRC and may interview any persons who
may be able to contribute information about the matter under appeal.
•The parent and child, if he or she is 16 years old or over, are entitled to be present at, and to
participate in all discussions.
•The appeal board must make its recommendation within 3 days of the meeting ending. It may:
•agree with the IPRC and recommend that the decision be implemented; or
•disagree with the IPRC and make a recommendation to the board about your child’s
identification, placement, or both.
•The appeal board will report its recommendations with reasons, in writing, to the parent and to the
school board.
•Within 30 days of receiving the appeal board’s written statement, the District School Board will
decide what action it will take with respect to the recommendations (boards are not required to
follow the appeal board recommendation).
•The parent may accept the decision of the District School Board, or may appeal to a Special
Education Tribunal. You may request a hearing by writing to the secretary of the Special
Education Tribunal. Information about making an application to the tribunal will be included with
the appeal board’s decision.
9
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
What special education programs and services are provided by the board?
The Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board provides the following range of Special
Education Programs and Services:
Regular Class with Indirect Support
•The student is placed in a regular class for the entire day, and
receives specialized consultative services.
•The student may have access to support within the classroom.
the teacher
Regular Class with Resource Assistance
•The student is placed in the regular class fro most or all of the day and receives specialized
instruction, individually or in a small group, within the regular classroom from a qualified
special education teacher.
Regular Class with Withdrawal Assistance
•The student is placed in the regular class and receives instruction outside of the classroom for
less than 50% of the school day, from a qualified special education teacher.
Special Education Class with Partial Integration
•The student is placed by the IPRC in a special education class where the student - teacher ratio
conforms to Regulation 298, Section 31, for at least 50% of the school day, but is integrated
with a regular class for at least one instructional period daily.
Special Education Class Full – Time
•The student is placed by the IPRC in a special education class, where the student - teacher ratio
conforms to Regulation 298, Section 31, for the entire school day.
10
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
What community services are available to assist parents?
Many parent organizations are available to provide information and support to parents of exceptional
children. Within the area served by Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board, the following
organizations serve the needs of children and parents:
Association for Community Living
Association for Early Childhood Education
Autism Association of Ontario
Children’s Aid Society
Children’s Mental Health Services
Children’s Treatment Centre (Quinte Healthcare -Belleville)
Community Living Prince Edward
Counselling Services of Belleville and District
Family Space Quinte
Five Counties Children’s Centre
Loyalist College Disability Services
Parent-Child Clinic (Quinte Healthcare -Belleville)
South East Community Care Access Centre
Please contact Special Education Services for the current telephone numbers for the organizations
listed.
What are the Ministry’s provincial and demonstration schools?
The Ministry operates provincial and demonstration schools throughout Ontario for deaf, blind, deafblind, and severely learning-disabled students, as well as those with attention deficit hyperactivity
disorder (ADHD). Residential programs are offered at the schools Monday to Friday, for students who
live too far from school to travel daily. Placements in provincial demonstration schools are limited and
are open to all students in Ontario. Admission to these schools is determined by the Admissions
Committee for each school, following referral by an IPRC.
11
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Demonstration schools for English-speaking students with severe learning disabilities and for students
with learning disabilities in association with ADHD are:
Sagonaska School
350 Dundas Street West
Belleville ON K8P 1B2
Phone: (613) 967-2830
Amethyst School
1090 Highbury Avenue
London ON N5Y 4V9
Phone: (519) 453-4408
Trillium School
255 Ontario Street South
Milton ON L9T 3X9
Phone: (905) 878-2851
The Schools for the Deaf are:
The Ernest C. Drury School
255 Ontario Street South
Milton ON L9T 2M5
Telephone: (905) 878-2851
TTY: (905) 878-7195
The Robarts School
1090 Highbury Avenue
PO Box 7360, Station E
London ON N5Y 4V9
Telephone and TTY: (519) 453-4400
The Sir James Whitney School
350 Dundas Street West
Belleville ON K8P 1B2
Telephone and TTY: (613) 967-2823
The School for the Blind and Deaf-blind is:
The W. Ross Macdonald School
350 Brant Avenue
Brantford ON N3T 3J9
Phone: (519) 759-0730
12
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
Where can parents obtain additional information?
Additional information can be obtained from the principal of your child’s school and/or by contacting:
Special Education Services
Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
156 Ann Street
Belleville, Ontario K8N 1N9
(613) 966-1170
FAX: (613) 966-9322
E-mail: [email protected]
NOTES:
Board Report B-5
Appendix A
June 20, 2011
7.0
APPENDICES
Copies of Appendices are available upon request from:
Special Education Services
156 Ann Street
Belleville, Ontario
K8N 1N9
613-966-1170
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.hpedsb.on.ca
Board Report B-5
Appendix C
June 20, 2011
Board Report B-5
Appendix C
June 20, 2011
Board Report No. C-1
Page 1
June 20, 2011
Decision
To:
Information
X
The Chair and Members of Hastings and Prince Edward District School Board
From: Kathy Soule, Director of Education and Secretary of the Board
Re:
Calendar of events
Purpose:
To provide a list of upcoming meetings, conferences and conventions.
Board and Committee meetings
DATE
Monday, June 20
TIME
2:30 p.m.
EVENT
Public Budget Meeting
Conferences and Conventions
Thursday, July 7 to
CSBA Congress & OPSBA AGM
Sunday, July 10
LOCATION
Board Room
Westin Hotel
Ottawa
System and School Events
DATE
Tuesday, June 14
Thursday, June 16
Friday, June 17
Friday, June 17
TIME
All Day
4:00 – 6:00
p.m.
2:15 p.m.
EVENT
District Track and Field
Sir Mackenzie Bowell Public
School Celebration 1964-2011
Assembly including Terrific Kids
presentation
Fun Fair
LOCATION
Mary Ann Sills Park
Sir Mackenzie Bowell Public
School
Pinecrest Elementary School
Terrific Kids Assembly
Year End Assembly
Year End Assembly
Year End Assembly
Kente Public School
Trenton High School
North Hastings High School
Centre Hastings Secondary
School
Bayside Public School
Monday, June 20
Monday, June 20
5:50 p.m. to
8:00 p.m.
10:45 a.m.
TBA
TBA
TBA
(afternoon)
10:00 a.m. to
2:30 p.m.
5:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
Monday, June 20
Tuesday, June 21
6:30 p.m.
Afternoon
Tuesday, June 21
9:00 a.m.
French Immersion Orientation
Day
Parent Involvement BBQ,
Classroom Literacy & Concert
School Council Meeting
Graduation Ceremony at Quinte
Secondary School
School Council Meeting
National Aboriginal Day
Celebrating the Four Elements
3 Pitch Tournament
Tuesday, June 21
Wednesday, June 22
9:30 a.m.
2:00 p.m.
Terrific Kids Assembly
Terrific Kids Assembly
Wednesday, June 22
Thursday, June 23
9:00 a.m.
6:30 p.m. to
8:00 p.m.
11:25 a.m.
Friday, June 17
Friday, June 17
Friday, June 17
Friday, June 17
Monday, June 20
Monday, June 20
Thursday, June 23
Terrific Kids Assembly
Grade 8 Graduation at Centre
Hastings Secondary School
Caring Kids
Kente Public School
Hermon Public School
Pinecrest Elementary School
Quinte Adult Education
Bird’s Creek Public School
Marmora Senior School
Queen Elizabeth Public
School (Trenton)
North Trenton Public School
V.P. Carswell Elementary
School
Sophiasburgh Public School
Madoc Public School
Bayside Public School
Board Report No. C-1
Page 2
June 20, 2011
Thursday, June 23
Thursday, June 23
Thursday, June 23
Thursday, June 23
Thursday, June 23
7:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m. to
7:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
Celebrating the Arts
Prom at Occasions by the Bay
Grade 8 Celebration
Thursday, June 24
5:00 p.m.
Thursday, June 24
Friday, June 24
Friday, June 24
Friday, June 24
Friday, June 24
Monday, June 27
Monday, June 27
7:00 – 9:00
p.m.
10:40 a.m.
1:20 p.m.
11:25 a.m.
6:00 p.m.
9:45 a.m.
6:00 p.m.
Monday, June 27
Monday, June 27
2:00 p.m.
6:30 p.m.
Grade 6 Graduation
Grade 8 Graduation
Monday, June 27
7:00 p.m.
Grade 8 Celebration
Monday, June 27
Monday, June 27
Monday, June 27
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
Monday, June 27
7:00 p.m.
Grade 8 Graduation
Grade 8 Graduation
Grade 8 Graduation @ Marmora
Pentecostal Church
Grade 8 Graduation
Monday, June 27
6:50 p.m.
Grade 8 Graduation
Tuesday, June 28
Tuesday, June 28
9:45 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
Grade 4 Graduation
Awards Assembly
Tuesday, June 28
12:00 noon
Tuesday, June 28
8:30 a.m.
Tuesday, June 28
7:00 p.m.
Tuesday, June 28
Tuesday, June 28
Tuesday, June 28
Wednesday, June 29
9:30 a.m.
7:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.
9:30 a.m.
Wednesday, June 29
Wednesday, June 29
5:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
Awards Assembly
Grade 8 Graduation
Year End Awards Assembly
Celebration Assembly JK –
Grade 7
Graduation at Maranatha Church
Graduation Ceremonies
Wednesday, June 29
Wednesday, June 29
7:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
Graduation Ceremonies
Graduation Ceremonies
Wednesday, June 29
7:00 p.m.
Wednesday, June 29
7:00 p.m.
Graduation Ceremonies at The
Empire Theatre
Graduation Ceremonies
Grade 8 Graduation
Grade 8 Graduation at
Centennial Secondary School
Grade 8 Graduation @
Centennial Secondary School
Grade 8 Dance
Celebration Assembly
Bus Patroller’s Pizza Party
Caring Kids Awards
Grade 8 Graduation
Grade 3 Graduation
Grade 6 Graduation
JK-Grade 2 Awards Assembly &
Volunteer Appreciation
Terrific Kids and Starfish
Assembly
Grade 8 Graduation
Marmora Senior School
Moira Secondary School
Queen Elizabeth Public
School, Belleville
Deseronto Public School
Harmony Public School
Harry J. Clarke Public
School
Harry J. Clarke Public
School
Hermon Public School
Marmora Senior School
Bayside Public School
Foxboro Public School
Earl Prentice Public School
V.P. Carswell Elementary
School
Hermon Public School
Pinecrest Memorial
Elementary School
North Hastings Senior
Elementary School
Bayside Public School
Kente Public School
Marmora Senior Public
School
Sir Mackenzie Bowell Public
School
Sophiasburgh Central
School
Earl Prentice Public School
Madoc Township Public
School
North Trenton Public School
Madoc Public School
Prince Charles Public
School (Trenton)
V.P. Carswell Public School
C.M.L. Snider School
Deseronto Public School
Queen Elizabeth Public
School, Belleville
Quinte Secondary School
Centennial Secondary
School
Bayside Secondary School
Centre Hastings Secondary
School
Moira Secondary School
North Hastings High School
Board Report No. C-1
Page 3
June 20, 2011
Wednesday, June 29
7:00 p.m.
Wednesday, June 29
7:00 p.m.
Graduation Ceremonies at the
Prince Edward Community
Centre
Graduation Ceremonies
Prince Edward Collegiate
Institute
Trenton High School
Please refer to the System Calendar of Events, school websites and newsletters for a complete listing of
school and system activities.
Respectfully submitted,
Kathy Soule
Director of Education and Secretary of the Board
Board Report No. C-2
Page 1
June 20, 2011
-DRAFTBOARD AND COMMITTEE MEETING DATES
2011-2012
6
12
12
19
22
26
26
7
7
7
14
14
24
16
16
23
26
30
30
5
5
5
22
26
26
7
14
22
24
28
28
September
Executive Committee
Special Public Board
Operations & Finance
Program/HR
S.E.A.C.
COW Board
Public Session Board
November
Executive Committee
Program/HR
Operations & Finance
COW Board
Public Session Board
S.E.A.C.
January
Executive Committee
Operations & Finance
Program/HR
S.E.A.C.
COW Board
Public Session Board
March
Executive Committee
Operations & Finance
Program/HR
S.E.A.C.
COW Board
Public Session Board
May
Executive Committee
Operations & Finance
Program/HR
S.E.A.C.
COW Board
Public Session Board
2:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
3
11
17
24
24
27
October
Executive Committee
Operations & Finance
Program/HR
COW Board
Public Session Board
S.E.A.C.
2:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
5
15
December
Annual Board Meeting
S.E.A.C.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
6
13
21
23
27
27
2:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
2
10
16
23
23
26
2:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
4
11
11
14
18
18
February
Executive Committee
Operations & Finance
Program/HR
S.E.A.C.
COW Board
Public Session Board
April
Executive Committee
Operations & Finance
Program/HR
COW Board
Public Session Board
S.E.A.C.
June
Executive Committee
Program/HR
Operations & Finance
S.E.A.C.
COW Board
Public Session Board
2:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
5:30 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
5:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.
June 20, 2011
Board Report No. D-1
Page 1
June 20, 2011
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement