Council meeting papers - Part I

Council meeting papers - Part I

MEETING OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

FRIDAY 7 AUGUST 2015 commencing at 9.00am to be held in

THE SEMINAR SUITE, ROOM 5B14,

LEVEL B, BLOCK 5,

WELLINGTON CAMPUS

-

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

A meeting of Massey University Council will be held in

The Seminar Suite, Room 5B14, Level B, Block 5, Wellington Campus

on

Friday 7 August 2015

Commencing at 9.00am

AGENDA- PART I

Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act

1987

Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This means that if a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed unless non-disclosure can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That is, non-disclosure of information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part II or Finance Section matters are not seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such matters are not mentioned outside Council (or its relevant Committee).

All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information included under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for the minutes of those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the Registrar for decision on disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose Part II or Finance Section matters.

Interest: Declaration and Disqualification

In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or indirect pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a member of the staff of the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the Council (or Committee) then as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their knowledge they:

(a) must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);

(b) must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the Council (or

Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides otherwise.

Page 1 of 5

Index

Number

Item

F

B

C

A

D

E

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Welcome

1.2 Health and Safety Briefing

1.3 Apologies

1.4 Declaration of Interest/ Register of Interest

1.5 Meeting Agenda Review

1.6 Minutes of Council meeting - Part I

1.6.1 Council meeting held on 1 May 2015

1.6.2 Special Council meeting held on 3 July 2015

1.7 Matters Arising

1.8 Follow-up Schedule as at 7 August 2015

1.9 Council Agenda Plan as at 7 August 2015

2.0 STRATEGIC DISCUSSIONS

Nil

3.0 KEY REPORTS

3.1 Chancellor’s Report - Part I - oral

3.2 Vice-Chancellor’s Report – Part I

G

HI

JK

L

M

N

O

4.0 DECISION ITEMS

4.1 Council Statutes

4.1.1 Massey University Council Election Statutes 2015

4.1.2 Massey University Council Appointment Statute 2015– to be

distributed under separate cover

4.2 Council Committee Terms of Reference

4.2.1 Academic Board Terms of Reference

4.3 University Policies

4.3.1 Financial Monitoring and Control Policy

4.3.2 Records Management Policy

4.4 Massey University Graduation Dates 2017

4.5 Council and Committee meeting dates 2016

5.0 ITEMS FOR NOTING

PQ

5.1 Financial Report for the Six Months Ending 30 June 2015

5.2 Academic Board Reports

R

S

T

5.2.1 Meeting held on 15 April 2015

5.2.2 Meeting held on 17 June 2015

5.3 Correspondence: Massey University Annual Report 11 May 2015 –

C15/57

C15/58

C15/59

C15/60

C15/61

C15/62

C15/63

C15/64

C15/65

Page 2 of 5

Paper

Number

C15/51

C15/52

C15/53

C15/54

C15/55

C15/56

from Minister of Tertiary Education

6.0 INFORMATION/BACKGROUND ITEMS

6.1 Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations – Part I – deferred to

next meeting

7.0 MOVING INTO PART II

7.1 Exclusion of the Public

THE CHANCELLOR WILL MOVE THAT, EXCLUDING

• Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and University

Registrar

• Ms Cathy Magiannis, Assistant Vice-Chancellor – Strategy, Finance, IT and

Commercial Operations

• Mr James Gardiner, Director of Communications

• Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF

ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED FROM

THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE FOLLOWING

MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE; THE

COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE

CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.

Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act 1987.

Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.

Item Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

Item 8.1.1

C15/67

Confirmation of Minutesmeeting held on 1

May 2015

Item 8.1.2

C15/68

Confirmation of Minutesspecial meeting held on 3 July 2015

Item 8.2

Matters Arising

Item 8.3

Follow-up Schedule as at 7 August 2015

Item 9.1

C15/70

Distance Education Strategy – Moving

Distance’ Closer

Item 9.2

Albany Campus Developments

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 1 May 2015

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 3 July 2015

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 1 May 2015 and 3 July

2015

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 1 May 2015 and 3 July

2015 and before

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Item 10.1

Chancellor’s Report

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Page 3 of 5

Item

Item 10.2

C15/71

Vice-Chancellor’s Report – Part II – Key

Strategic Issues

Item 12.1

C15/72

Research Strategy Framework Annul Report

Item 12.2

C15/74

Financial Report for the Six Months Ended

30 June 2015

Item 12.3

C15/75

Performance and Risk Report: Second

Quarter 2015

Item 12.4

C15/76

2015 Enrolment Report as at 26 July 2015

Item 12.5

C15/77

Vice-Chancellor’s 2015 Objectives – January to June 2015

Item 12.6

C15/78

Debtors Report as at 30 April 2015

Item 12.7

C15/79

Student Management Solution

Implementation (SMSI) Programme Update

Item 12.8

Food HQ Update

Item 12.9.1

C15/80

Massey Ventures Limited Annual Report and presentation

Item 12.9.2

C15/81

Agri One Limited Annual Report

Item 19.9.3

C15/87

Massey Global Limited Annual Report

Item 12.9.4

C15/88

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper

Page 4 of 5

Item

Massey-Lincoln and Agricultural Industry

Trust Annual Report

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Item 12.10.1.1

C15/82

Finance Committee Report: meeting held on

24 March 2015

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Item 12.10.1.2

Finance Committee Report: meeting held on

5 May 2015

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

Item 12.10.2

C15/83

Honorary Awards Committee Report: meeting held on 14 July 2015

Item 12.11.1

C15/84

Academic Board Report – meeting held on

15 April 2015

Item 12.11.2

C15/85

Academic Board Report – meeting held on

17 June 2015

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

AND

Item 13.0 Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the privileged part of the meeting.

Page 5 of 5

C15/51 – August

Part I

MINUTES OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

THE MEETING OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL HELD IN

UNIVERSITY HOUSE MEETING ROOM, UNIVERSITY HOUSE,

MANAWATU CAMPUS on

FRIDAY 1 MAY 2015 AT 10.15am

PART I

PRESENT:

Mr Chris Kelly (Chancellor), Mr Michael Ahie (Pro Chancellor),

Dr Helen Anderson, Dr Russ Ballard, Ms Fiona Coote, Ms Kura Denness,

Ms Nitika Erueti-Satish, Mr Colin Harvey, Hon Steve Maharey (Vice-

Chancellor), Mr Ian Marshall, Mr Liam Tait, Mr Bruce Ullrich,

Mr Ben Vanderkolk and Professor Cynthia White

IN ATTENDANCE: Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and

University Registrar

Mr Chris Wood, Acting Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations

Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act

1987

Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This means that if a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed unless non-disclosure can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or

Committee) meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That is, non-disclosure of information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the

Official Information Act 1982. Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part

II or Finance Section matters are not seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such matters are not mentioned outside Council (or its relevant Committee).

All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information included under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for the minutes of those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the

Registrar for decision on disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose

Part II or Finance Section matters.

Page 1 of 9

C15/51 – August

Part I

Interest: Declaration and Disqualification

In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or indirect pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a member of the staff of the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the

Council (or Committee) then as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their knowledge they:

(a) Must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);

(b) Must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the

Council (or Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides otherwise.

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 WELCOME

The Chancellor opened the meeting at 10.15am welcoming those present. He noted that a pōwhiri to welcome Council members Dr Helen Anderson and Ian Marshall to Massey

University Council had taken place immediately prior to this meeting o n the Manawatū campus Marae

,

Te Pūtahi a Toi

.

He also noted that this was the last meeting for Nitika Erueti-Satish who was resigning from

Council immediately following this meeting and that Internal Student member Liam Tait had agreed to stay on until the end of 2015. He thanked Ms Erueti-Satish for her positive and willing input into Council over the two years she had been a member.

1.2 HEALTH AND SAFETY BRIEFING

In the absence of Council’s Health and Safety Spokesperson Ms Whyte, Assistant Vice-

Chancellor Operations, International and University Registrar gave a safety briefing.

1.3 APOLOGIES

Apologies were received and noted from Associate Professor Grant Duncan and Ms Lesley

Whyte.

1.4 DECLARATION OF INTEREST

The Chair noted the Interests Register and called for any further declarations. Mr Liam Tait and Ms Nitika Erueti-Satish declared an interest in item 11.1 2016 Student Fees Proposals as students affected by the decision.

Members were asked to provide updated information for the Register to the Executive

Secretary.

1.5 MEETING AGENDA REVIEW

There were late items in Part I or Part II.

Page 2 of 9

C15/51 – August

Part I

1.6 C15/46

CONFIRMATION OF PART I MINUTES - MEETING HELD ON 6 MARCH 2015

15.14 RESOLVED THAT THE MINUTES OF THE MASSEY UNIVERSITY

COUNCIL MEETING HELD ON FRIDAY 6 MARCH 2015 (PART I) BE

RECEIVED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD

WHITE/ERUETI-SATISH

Carried

1.7 MATTERS ARISING

There were no matters arising further to those on the Follow-up Schedule.

1.8 FOLLOW-UP SCHEDULE AS AT 1 MAY 2015

From Last Meeting:

No 1: Approval of 2014 Annual Financial Statements and Statement of Service Performance and signing of Letter of Representation: Delegation to Audit and Risk Committee: The delegation was exercised on 17 April 2015.

No 2: Payments to Council Members Policy 2015: Work on this action was in progress and a definitive outcome would be reported at the 7 August 2015 Council meeting.

1.9 COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – UPDATE FOR 1 MAY 2015

Vice-Chancellor’s Objectives 2014: The remaining strategy papers of the five objectives were to be added to the Agenda Plan.

Action: Executive Secretary to update Council Agenda Plan with outstanding Vice-

Chancellor Objectives 2014 strategy papers.

2.0 STRATEGIC DISCUSSIONS

There were no strategic discussions in Part I.

3.0 KEY REPORTS

3.1 CHANCELLOR’S REPORT - oral

The Chancellor reported that since the 6 March 2015 Council meeting he had attended the following:

• 17 March: A National Food Safety food security seminar;

• 17 March: A farewell for Professor Robert Anderson, Pro Chancellor College of

Sciences;

• 24 March: The inaugural Finance Committee meeting;

Page 3 of 9

C15/51 – August

Part I

• 25 March: The blessing of Pukeahu Park, Wellington;

• 14 April: Honorary Awards Committee meeting;

• 17 April: Audit and Risk Committee meeting;

• 21-23 April: Graduations in Auckland. The Chancellor thanked those Council members who attended; and

• Undertook a series of consultation sessions on the proposed changes to the Council

Constitution as follows:

 15 April: Academic Board meeting

 24 April: Auckland campus

 28 April:

Manawatū campus

3.2 C15/38

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S REPORT – PART I

The Vice-Chancellor’s report was taken as read. The Vice-Chancellor highlighted the following personnel matters:

• 9.1: The retirement of Professor Robert Anderson, Pro Vice-Chancellor College of

Sciences;

• 9.3 – 9.5: The appointment of: o

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations

Cathy Magiannis commencing at the end June 2015; o

Assistant Vice-Chancellor External Relations Penelope Barr-Sellers commencing 1 June 2015; and o

Professor Sally Morgan as Academic Board Chair for a three-year term.

4.0 DECISION ITEMS

4.1 UNIVERSITY POLICY

4.1.1 C15/39

BUSINESS CONTINUITY POLICY

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and University Registrar Mr Morriss spoke to the Policy noting that it was unchanged however there had been additions to the

Framework. He noted that Senior Leadership Team members were undertaking a training session on crisis management and it was suggested that the Chancellor or nominee may wish to attend.

In response to a question as to whether this policy was in alignment with the Emergency

Management Policy it was agreed Mr Morriss would establish the fact and align them if not.

Action: Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and University Registrar to establish that the Business Continuity Policy and Emergency Management Policy are aligned.

15.15 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE:

1. THE BUSINESS CONTINUITY POLICY (C15/39) SUBJECT TO

ALIGNMENT WITH THE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT POLICY; AND

Page 4 of 9

C15/51 – August

Part I

2. NOTE THE REVISED AND APPROVED BUSINESS CONTINUITY

MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

WHITE/VANDERKOLK

Carried

4.2 COUNCIL COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE

4.2.1 C15/40

HONORARY AWARDS COMMITTEE

Honorary Awards Committee Chair Mr Michael Ahie spoke to the Terms of Reference noting the proposed changes.

15.16 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE AMENDED HONORARY

AWARDS COMMITTEE TERMS OF REFERENCE 2015 (C15/40)

WHITE/ULLRICH

Carried

4.2.2 C15/53

FINANCE COMMITTEE

Finance Committee chair Dr Russ Ballard spoke to the Terms of Reference. It was noted that the Finance Committee Chair was an ex-officio member of the Audit and Risk Committee but the Audit and Risk Committee Chair was not was an ex-officio member of the Finance

Committee. While the objectives of the committees were different - strategic oversight for

Finance and compliance for Audit and Risk - it was agreed that the Audit and Risk Chair would be an ex-officio member of the Finance Committee but that one person may not be the chair of both committees.

15.17 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE, WITH THE FOLLOWING

FURTHER AMENDMENTS:

No 8: Membership: add: ‘Audit and Risk Committee Chair (ex-officio)’ add: ‘One person shall not be the chair of both the Finance Committee and the Audit and Risk Committee.'

THE FINANCE TERMS OF REFERENCE FOR 2015

VANDERKOLK/COOTE

Carried

5.0 ITEMS FOR NOTING

5.1 C15/41

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED 31 MARCH 2015

Acting Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations Mr

Chris Wood spoke to the report. The monies received from the Ministry of Culture and

Page 5 of 9

C15/51 – August

Part I

Heritage to cover the costs of vacating the Museum Building and the year-end forecast of

$1.1 million ahead of budget were noted.

The Financial Report for the three months ended 31 March 2015 was noted and received.

5.2 C15/42

REPORT ON DELEGATION TO AUDIT AND RISK COMMITTEE EXERCISED:

APPROVAL OF 2014 ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND STATEMENT

OF SERVICE PERFORMANCE AND SIGNING OF LETTER OF

REPRESENTATION

The report on the exercising of the delegation on 17 April 2015 was noted.

5.3 C15/43

ACADEMIC BOARD REPORT FOR THE MEETING HELD ON 18 MARCH 2015

Academic Board Appointee to Council Professor White spoke to the report highlighting the wish of the Board to have greater engagement in academic discussions. She noted that since the 18 March 2015 Board meeting Professor Sally Morgan had been elected to the chair and that she considered such increased engagement would be addressed by the Chair.

In response to a question Professor White noted that masters degrees were increasingly changing from 240 credits to 180 credits and that they could be taught over three semesters.

Such a change was in response to a global trend.

The report was noted.

5.4 C15/44

MAORI PROTOCOLS REVIEW REPORT

Ms Erueti-Satish commented that Council should continue incorporating

Māori protocols in the governance setting.

The report was noted.

6.0 INFORMATION/BACKGROUND ITEMS

6.1 C15/45

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL CONSTITUTION CONSULTATION

DOCUMENT

The Massey University Council Constitution Consultation Document had been provided for information. It was noted that alumni had not been included as a class in the draft

Constitution.

Page 6 of 9

C15/51 – August

Part I

Following the consultation process any amendments would be made by the Governance

Committee and the Council was to hold a special meeting on 3 July 2015 to approve the proposed Massey University Notice (Constitution) 2015 for forwarding to the Minister of

Tertiary Education for approval.

7.0 MOVING INTO PART II

EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

THE CHANCELLOR MOVED THAT, EXCLUDING

• Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and

University Registrar

• Mr Chris Wood, Acting Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT and

Commercial Operations

• Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF

ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED

FROM THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE

FOLLOWING MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE;

THE COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE

CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.

Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act

1987.

Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion Item

Item 8.1

C15/59

Confirmation of Minutesmeeting held on 6

March 2015

Item 8.2

Matters Arising

Item 8.3

Follow-up Schedule as at 1 May 2015

Item 10.1

Chancellor’s Report

Item 10.2

C15/47

Vice-Chancellor’s Report – Part II – Key

Strategic Issues

Item 11.1

C15/48

2016 Student Fees Proposal

Item 11.2

C15/49

Business Case: Albany Campus West

Precinct Development Access and

Infrastructure – Stage 1

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 6 March 2015

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 6 March 2015

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 6 March 2015 and before

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Page 7 of 9

Item

Item 11.3

C15/50

Loan Agreement with Massey University

Foundation Trust

Item 11.4

C15/51

Health and Safety Annual Plan 2016

Item 11.5

C15/52

Appointment of Vice-Chancellor’s Nominee to Human Ethics Committee: Southern A

Item 12.1

Report on Delegation to Vice-Chancellor:

Student Management Solution

Implementation (SMSI) Programme Update

Item 12.2

C15/54

Healthy and Safety Report – January to

February 2015

Item 12.3

C15/55

Financial Report for the Three Months Ended

31 March 2014

Item 12.4

C15/56

Performance and Risk Report: First Quarter

2015

Item 12.5

C15/57

2015 Enrolment Report as at 12 April 2015

Item 12.6

C15/58

Vice-Chancellor’s 2015 Objectives – January to March 2015

Item 12.7

C15/60

Report on E-Ballot: Review Authorisation and signing of MoE Borrowing Consent to the Audit and Risk Committee: 1 April 2015

Item 12.8.1

Finance Committee Report: meeting held on

24 March 2015

Item 12.8.2

Audit and Risk Committee Report: meeting held on 17 April 2015

Item 12.8.3

C15/61

Honorary Awards Committee Report: meeting held on 14 April 2015

Item 12.9

C15/62

Academic Board Report – meeting held on

18 March 2015

Item 14.1

C15/63

Risk Management Report – March 2015 advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

C15/51 – August

Part I

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Page 8 of 9

C15/51 – August

Part I

AND

Item 13.0

Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the privileged part of the meeting.

CHAIR

Carried

15.0 ITEMS MOVED FROM PART II TO PART I

The following decisions and report was moved from Part II into Part I.

11.4 C15/51

HEALTH AND SAFETY ANNUAL PLAN

15.25 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL:

1. APPROVE THE 2015 HEALTH AND SAFETY PLAN (INCLUDING

TARGETS) SHOWN IN APPENDIX 1; AND

2. AGREE THAT THE SAFETY CONSULTATIVE COMMITTEE BE RE-

NAMED AS THE HEALTH AND SAFETY CONSULTATIVE COMMITTEE

Signature: _______________________________________

Date

: __________________

Page 9 of 9

C15/52 - August

Part I

MINUTES OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

THE SPECIAL MEETING OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL HELD IN

THE BOARD ROOM, LEVEL ONE, SPORT AND RUGBY INSTITUTE,

MANAWATU CAMPUS on

FRIDAY 3 JULY 2015 AT 8.00am

PART I

PRESENT:

Mr Chris Kelly (Chancellor), Mr Michael Ahie (Pro Chancellor),

Dr Helen Anderson, Dr Russ Ballard, Ms Fiona Coote, Ms Kura Denness,

Associate Professor Grant Duncan, Hon Steve Maharey (Vice-Chancellor),

Mr Liam Tait, Mr Bruce Ullrich, Mr Ben Vanderkolk and Professor Cynthia

White

IN ATTENDANCE: Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and

University Registrar

Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act

1987

Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This means that if a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed unless non-disclosure can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or

Committee) meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That is, non-disclosure of information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the

Official Information Act 1982. Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part

II or Finance Section matters are not seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such matters are not mentioned outside Council (or its relevant Committee).

All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information included under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for the minutes of those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the

Registrar for decision on disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose

Part II or Finance Section matters.

Page 1 of 4

C15/52 - August

Part I

Interest: Declaration and Disqualification

In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or indirect pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a member of the staff of the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the

Council (or Committee) then as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their knowledge they:

(a) Must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);

(b) Must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the

Council (or Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides otherwise.

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 WELCOME

The Chancellor opened the meeting at 8.05am and welcomed those present. He noted that the main purpose of the meeting was to approve the Massey University Council

Constitution.

The Chancellor congratulated Internal Student member Liam Tait on the completion of his computer science degree.

1.2 HEALTH AND SAFETY BRIEFING

In the absence of Council’s Health and Safety Spokesperson Ms Whyte, Assistant Vice-

Chancellor Operations, International and University Registrar Mr Morriss gave a safety briefing.

1.3 APOLOGIES

Apologies were received and noted from Mr Colin Harvey, Mr Ian Marshall and Ms Lesley

Whyte and for lateness from Associate Professor Grant Duncan and Hon Steve Maharey

(Vice-Chancellor).

1.4 DECLARATION OF INTEREST

There were no declarations of interest further to those on the Interests Register. Members were asked to provide updated information for the Register to the Executive Secretary.

1.5 MEETING AGENDA REVIEW

Council agreed that in the interests of transparency Item 3.1 Proposed Massey University

Council Constitution (Gazette Notice 2015) (C15/50) should be taken in Part I of the meeting. For privacy reasons, prior to the paper being made available publically Assistant

Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and University Registrar Mr Morriss would remove the names of submitters.

Page 2 of 4

C15/52 - August

Part I

Late items Part II:

Updates on matters raised at the 1 May 2015 Council meeting:

• 2016 Student Fees

• Albany Campus Innovation Sciences Complex Development Access and Infrastructure

– Stage 1

The reason for the proposed exclusion of the public was as identified on the 1 May 2015

Council meeting agenda.

2.0 DECISION ITEM

2.1 C15/50

PROPOSED MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL CONSTITUTION (GAZETTE

NOTICE 2015)

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and University Registrar Mr Morriss spoke to the paper outlining the process and key points.

The Chancellor noted that the Governance Committee recommended three main amendments. These were:

1. Following feedback it was proposed that Council appoint the

Māori member thus ensuring Council would at all times, at least meet the legal requirement that one Council member shall be Māori.

2. That the Vice-Chancellor nominated Council Appointees as a mechanism to provide an appropriate balance between representational and constituency based members.

3. The term of office for any Council member was up to four years. While the Act required that the Constitution state the maximum number of terms a Council member could serve on Council, the proposed Constitution was to state the maximum number of years (12) any one Council member could serve, with the exception of the Vice-Chancellor. It was noted that this maximum number of years served did not have to be continuous. This would be clarified in the Appointment Statute.

Mr Morriss signalled that it if the Minister appointed the current Ministerial Appointees for the remainder of what would have been their current term there would be a staggering of their end-of-term dates which would address succession issues.

In response to the suggestion that, as a national university there should be national representation on Council e.g. a South Island member, it was considered that the inclusion in

Clause No 2 of ‘….ensure that appointments meet the needs of Massey University….” covered this. This would also be addressed in the Appointment Statute when describing the nature and characteristics of members.

It was noted that in Clause 2(b): ‘The Vice-Chancellor of Massey University, by virtue of the holder of the position’ ‘of the holder’ was a redundant statement. Council supported this amendment.

Action: Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and University Registrar to include the matters raised above in the Appointments Statute:

Page 3 of 4

C15/52 - August

Part I

15.27 RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL: a) NOTE THE FEEDBACK FROM CONSULTATION ON THE DRAFT MASSEY

UNIVERSITY COUNCIL CONSTITUTION; b) NOTE THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE COUNCIL GOVERNANCE

COMMITTEE TO MAKE CHANGES TO THE DRAFT CONSTITUTION AS

OUTLINED IN THIS REPORT; c) APPROVE THE REVISED MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

CONSTITUTION FOLLOWING AMENDMENTS MADE IN LIGHT OF

FEEDBACK FROM CONSULTATION (APPENDIX 5) SUBJECT TO THE

AMENDMENT FOLLOWING AMENDMENT (delete strikethrough):

(b) The Vice-Chancellor of Massey University, by virtue of the holder of the position. d) AGREE TO SUBMIT THE REVISED MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

CONSTITUTION TO THE MINISTER FOR APPROVAL AND NOTIFICATION

IN THE NEW ZEALAND GAZETTE

AHIE/BALLARD

Carried

3.0 MOVING INTO PART II

EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

THE CHANCELLOR MOVED THAT, EXCLUDING

• Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and

University Registrar

• Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF

ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED

FROM THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE

FOLLOWING MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE;

THE COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE

CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.

Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act

1987.

Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.

And

Item 5.0

Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the privileged part of the meeting.

CHAIR

Carried

Signature: _______________________________________

Date

: __________________

Page 4 of 4

C15/53 – August

Part I

Council Follow-up Schedule Part I – 7 August 2015

From last meeting

Item

1. Approval of Business

Continuity Policy

Note

:

bracketed italics are completed actions

Outcome

· In response to a question as to whether this policy was in alignment with the Emergency Management

Policy it was agreed Mr Morriss would establish the fact and align them if not.

Action

· It was established that the two policies aligned

Milestone dates

· Completed

Item

1. Changes to University

Governance: Education

Amendment Act

Council Follow-up Schedule Part I – 7 August 2015

Ongoing Issues

Note: bracketed italics are completed actions

Outcome

· The Chancellor and Assistant Vice-Chancellor

Operations, International & University Registrar were to draft a consultation paper which would cover the discussions and decisions undertaken by

Council on paper C15/18. The paper should reflect the diversity of skill set required to meet the goals and objectives of the University. The paper should also include an invitation to the student associations to provide comment on whether the student representative should be appointed or elected.

Action

· Chancellor and Assistant Vice-Chancellor

Operations, International & University

Registrar wrote the Constitution

Consultation paper.

· Delegate authority to the Chancellor to approve release of the consultation document on the Massey

University Council Notice 2015;

· Consultation paper prepared and placed on the

Massey University Council Constitution

Milestone dates

· 1 May 2015

Council meeting.

Page 1 of 2

Item

2. Payments to Council

Members Policy 2015

C15/53 – August

Part I

Outcome

Consultation webpage on 10 April 2015.

· A question was raised regarding the payment for

Chairs’ of Council Sub-Committees and whether the

Chair fee should be paid when Chairs’ attend other meetings and Graduation Ceremonies.

· The Policy was approved subject to the further review of the attendance fee for Committee chairs.

Action

· Chancellor exercised that delegation to

approve the release of the consultation document.

Milestone dates

· Massey University Council Constitution

Consultation update to be provided with

Consultation Document attached.

· It was agreed that Assistant Vice-

Chancellor Operations, International &

University Registrar, Mr Stuart Morriss, would consider and review this

· 7 August

2015 Council meeting suggestion and report back to Council.

Page 2 of 2

C15/ - August

Part I

Friday 6 March (Manawatu)

Function: Close off of previous year;

Establishing parameters for new year;

Strategy approval for the current year

· VC scene setting

· Approve Road to 2025

· Preparation for grads and Honorary Awards

· Annual Accounts for previous year

(delegation)

· Review of Council performance

Strategic College of Humanities and Social Sciences

Discussions including Institute of Education strategies: (Pro

Vice-Chancellor CHSSc)

Employability - Links to employer/employment:

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and Enterprise and Assistant Vice-Chancellor

Operations, International and University

Registrar

Site visits

Key Reports

Decision

Items

Items for noting

Palmerston North Campus Tour including

School of Sport and Exercise

· Chancellor’s Report

· Vice-Chancellor’s Reports

· Performance Review Committee Report

· 2014 Annual Accounts and Statement of

Service Performance delegation to A&R

Committee

· Renewal of Performance Framework

· Controlled Entities Reporting Schedule

· Conferring of Degrees & Awarding of

Diplomas and Certificates at graduation ceremonies delegation

· Terms of Reference- Council Committees

· Student Fee Setting Process and Principles

· Policies as per schedule

· VC scene setting 2015

· Financial Reports

· Major Capital Projects Report

· Health and Safety Report

·

Student Management System Renewal

Project

· Audit & Risk Committee Report

· Risk Management Report commentary

· Academic Board Reports

· Academic Board Chair’s Report (in person)

· Honorary Awards Committee Report

· Review of Council Evaluation 2014

Information /

Background

COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2015

· Tracking Council Decisions and

Delegations

Friday 1 May (Manawatu)

Function: Consolidation of business for current year

· Monitoring progress re enrolments

· Induction of new members

· Powhiri for new Council members

· Farewell to leaving Council members

· Approve Domestic, International and Other

Student Fees

· Student Forum

·

Te Pūtahi a Toi Marae

· Chancellor’s Reports

· Vice-Chancellor’s Reports

· Student Fee Setting Process and Principles

(Domestic and International)

· Terms of Reference – Academic Board

· Terms of Reference – Academic Committee

· Terms of Reference – Finance Committee

· Terms of Reference – Disciplinary Committee

· Graduation Dates - 2017

· Policies as per schedule

· Financial Report

· VC Performance Review Report

· Enrolment Report

· 2015 Health and Safety Annual Plan

· Health and Safety Report

· Quarterly Performance Reports

· Debtors Report

· Māori Protocols Review Report

· Audit & Risk Committee Report

· Risk Management Report commentary

· Academic Board Reports

· Massey Global Limited Annual Report 2014

·

Massey University (Management and

Valuation) Property Foundation Annual

Report 2014

· Massey Ventures Ltd Annual Report 2014

· Massey Ventures Limited Chair’s visit

Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate

A Health and Safety Briefing by will be held at the beginning of each meeting

Page 1 of 3

C15/ - August

Part I

COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2015

Friday 7 August (Wellington)

Function: Consolidation of business for current year

· Establish Council agenda plan and schedule for following year

Strategic

Student Forum

Discussions

·

Distance Education Strategy: Assistant

Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and

Enterprise

Site visits

Key Reports

Decision

Items

Items for noting

Information /

Background

Wellington Campus visit – Pukeahu Park and

Museum Building

· Chancellor’s Reports

· Vice-Chancellor’s Reports

· Investment Plan 2016-2018

· Election Statute

· Appointments Statute

· Graduation Dates – 2017

· Proposed Meeting Schedule 2016

· Draft Agenda Plan 2016

· Terms of Reference – Academic Board

· Policies as per schedule

· Financial Reports

· VC Performance Review Report

· Consolidated Performance Reports

· Debtors Report

· Enrolment Report

· Health and Safety Report

·

Student Management System Renewal

Project

·

Albany Campus Developments

· Research Strategy Framework Annual

Report (AVC RAE in person)

· Agri One Ltd Annual Report 2014

· Massey-Lincoln and Agricultural Industry

Trust Annual Report 2014

· Massey Global Limited Annual Report 2014

· Massey Ventures Ltd Annual Report 2014 and presentation

· Academic Board Reports

· Academic Board Chair’s Report (in person)

· Massey Foundation – Chair’s visit

· MU Foundation Annual report 2014

· Sydney Campbell Foundation annual report

2014

· Massey Ventures Limited Chair’s visit

Massey University (Management and

Valuation) Property Foundation

· Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations

· Council Graduation Schedule 2016

· Notice of Intention for Chancellor and Pro

Chancellor positions

Friday 30 October (Albany)

Function: Review Operating and Capital

Budgets

· Review Operating and Capital Budgets

· Establish a revenue path from outside New

Zealand to assist with driving Massey

·

·

Worldwide: Who

· Legal implications of the new Health and

Safety Bill – deferred until Bill passed into law

Albany Campus Strategy – Grow North

Wellington Campus Strategy – Think

Differently

Albany Campus visit

· Chancellor’s Reports

· Vice-Chancellor’s Reports

· Terms of Reference – Academic Board

· Policies as per schedule

· Review Operating and Capital Budgets 2016

· Financial Reports

· Consolidated Performance Reports

· Major Capital Projects Report

· VC Performance Review Report

· Enrolment Report

· Health and Safety Report

·

Student Management System Renewal

Project

·

Albany Campus Developments

· Massey Foundation – Chair’s visit

· MU Foundation Annual report 2014

· Sydney Campbell Foundation annual report

2014

·

Massey University (Management and

Valuation) Property Foundation

· Audit & Risk Committee Report

· Risk Management Report commentary

· Academic Board Reports

· Honorary Awards Committee Report

Page 2 of 3

Strategic

Discussions

Site Visits

Key Reports

COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2015

Friday 4 December (Manawatu)

Function: Budget approval & Final Decisions for

current year and prep for following year

· Approve Operating and Capital Budget for following year

· Election of Chancellor and Pro-Chancellor

· Committee membership established

· Farewell to 2015 departing members

· Induction new Council members – 1 January

2016

Grow North Strategy (Auckland)

Think Differently Strategy (Wellington)

Manawatu

Palmerston North campus visit

· Chancellor’s Report

· Vice-Chancellor’s Reports

Decision

Items

Items for noting

Information/

Background

· 2015 University Operating and Capital Budget

· Renewal of Insurance 2016-report delegation

· MVL SCI 2016

· Student Bad Debts

· Health and Safety Strategy for 2016

· Council Committee membership

· Review Guidelines for Conduct of Council and

Council Committees meetings

· Review Council Code of Conduct

· Election: Chancellor & Pro Chancellor

· Review Guidelines Council meeting conduct

2016

· Policies as per schedule

· Financial Report

· Major Capital Projects Report

· VC Performance Review Report

· Enrolment Report

· Health and Safety Report

·

Student Management System Renewal Project

· Aged Debtors Report

· Audit & Risk Report Committee

· Risk Management Report commentary

· Academic Board Reports

· Academic Board Chair Report (in person)

· Honorary Awards Committee Report

· Council Evaluation 2015

· Council Graduation Schedule 2016

Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate

A Health and Safety Briefing by will be held at the beginning of each meeting

C15/ - August

Part I

Page 3 of 3

C 15/54 – August

Part I

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S OFFICE

To:

From:

Date:

Subject:

Members of Council

Vice-Chancellor

27 July 2015

Vice-Chancellor’s Part I Report to Council

Period: mid-April to late-July 2015

Purpose:

This report is presented to update Council on key achievements, highlights and major issues arising over the period mid-April to late-July, 2015, and also seeks to give Council a flavour of the breadth and depth of University-associated activities. The report gathers together strategic items provided by college and service lines, the Vice-Chancellor’s elog and diary. Further detail is provided in the appendices to this report.

1.0

Ngā Take o te Wā

Topical Issues

1.1 Nepal Earthquakes

The earthquakes in Nepal (April 25 and May 12) have been – and continue to be – devastating, destroying lives, homes and infrastructure. Donations collected from staff and students wishing to support relief efforts along with a contribution from the University have been provided to the Red Cross.

1.2

Recent floods

Many Massey staff and students have been affected by the flooding that hit parts of the

North Island over the weekend of June 21-22, and many will also be involved in the clean-up and repairs that will be required over the coming weeks and months. Our thoughts are with you. Should any staff require time to help with clean-up or support in any way please speak directly with your manager.

Among those assisting were a group of Massey Manawatū students who formed the

Palmerston North Volunteer Army and aligned themselves with Horizons Regional Council to be utilised in the clean-up.

1.3 Staff may have seen the comments of the President of the Tertiary Education Union on the

Union’s website posted on June 18, http://teu.ac.nz/2015/06/chinese-influence-degree/.

That the president of the TEU, an organisation that represents a significant number of

Massey staff, chose to undermine the achievements of those staff is contrary and disappointing. On reflection, the TEU may realise their error and apologise.

On behalf of the University, let me reiterate that Madame Peng Lijuan received an Honorary

Doctorate because her achievements merited it. It is absurd to suggest otherwise.

Page 1 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

1.4

That she agreed to receive an Honorary Doctorate from Massey is due to the positive reputation the University has built in China over many years through the quality of its academic and professional staff.

It is this history of outstanding work that has underpinned many other positive results.

Please see my comments item 7.1 International below.

Massey Governance Structures (Educational Amendment Bill)

Chancellor Chris Kelly and other members of the University Council undertook consultation on new Governance arrangements following legislation passed by the Government. The

Council has now approved changes to Governance structures as required by the

Government. Putting aside the view that the University saw no need for change, the consultation process appears to have produced a result that should meet with approval from across the University community. These will be enacted by the end of the year. The open and positive way the Council went about consulting with the Massey community has led to the best possible outcome. Thank you again to everyone who took part in the discussion.

1.5

1.6

28th World University games

The 28th World University Games were hosted in Gwangju, Korea, from July 3-14. New

Zealand sent a team of 75 athletes representing seven sports, and 13 of whom are Massey

University students.

At the end of June the Vice-Chancellor of Lincoln University, Dr Andrew West, resigned.

Jeremy Baker is the Acting Vice-Chancellor while the search for a new Vice-Chancellor is undertaken.

1.7 It’s Wellington’s 150th Anniversary this coming weekend. Massey is assisting with the celebrations in a number of ways that will reinforce the central role the University plays in the city.

2.0

Ngā Tino Take me ngā Mahere Rautaki

Key Strategic Issues and Positioning

2.1

Please refer to item 7.1 in the International section below, reflecting the efforts of numerous

Massey staff over many years to develop the strong relationships that have built the

University’s reputation in China.

2.2

Forever Young

“Massey University doesn’t conform to the standard pattern in many ways. The University is young and so can more easily embrace change and retain a less conservative attitude. I

hope this continues forever.” – Founding Vice-Chancellor Dr Alan Stewart.

When I joined the University back in 2008, my first priority was to write a strategic plan and ensure it was promulgated as widely as possible.

Of course, we all know that plans are what are made while the real world moves on. Yet it is vitally important for any organisation, especially one as complex as a university, to have a clear sense of its direction.

The real world that we faced after 2008 was shaped by the Global Financial Crisis that soon led to the Government restricting its spending. While this was not as severe as colleagues experienced elsewhere in the world – the United States and Britain experienced savage cuts to funding – universities in New Zealand have been tightening their belts for five years with no reprieve in sight.

Less funding has meant that plans made in 2008 have not been as readily implemented as any of us might have liked. Yet we have managed to accomplish a great deal across all of our seven big goals. That we have done so can be traced to an understanding by all staff

Page 2 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

that costs had to be controlled and new sources of revenue found to enable new investments to be made.

As tough as the past few years have been, however, they have not changed the plan that has been guiding us in any substantial way. This is because the University’s strategy is driven by an understanding that the world of higher education is changing with increasing speed. In this context, financial crisis or not, change was going to come. In some ways the lack of funding has forced the process of change by making it clear that “business as usual” is not possible.

For many commentators, change in the higher education sector is described as “disruptive”,

“game-changing”, “revolutionary” and “creatively destructive”. Another smaller group occupy themselves with a spirited defence of the traditional university model (based on a particular view of Harvard, Cambridge, Oxford and other elite institutions). Each of these approaches has something to offer to the debate about higher education that is raging around the world but, for a variety of reasons, they do not offer much of practical value to university staff working hard to thrive in an era of change.

A more useful approach, in my view, is one that accepts significant change is required but we are not headed for something akin to an apocalypse.

So what are we headed for? As so often happens, the future is currently unfolding in the

United States where a perfect storm of very high levels of student debt (over a $US1 trillion), rising student fees and cuts to federal and state budgets is driving an enormous range of innovation across universities. This innovation is not just about finding a way to run universities more cost-efficiently, because at the same time as cost has become an issue so too has almost every other activity. The response from American universities has been very diverse – but here are some of the major trends, in no particular order, that can be observed:

· Differentiation – in the crowded, competitive world of higher education, individual universities are identifying what makes them different in order to ensure ongoing support of students and the wider community.

· Focused research – the high cost of research is encouraging universities to decide on

specific areas where they want to build a worldwide reputation.

· Teaching only – some institutions are choosing to focus on teaching only.

· Impact and influence – universities are being expected to show the value of their work to the wider community.

· Commercialisation of IP – moving ideas from the university into commercial hands is being seen as a core activity.

· Engagement – findings ways of working with sectors of the community in mutually

beneficial ways.

· Lowering the costs of education – finding new ways of undertaking research, teaching and mentoring that contains costs while diversifying their sources of

revenue.

· The instruction model of education – is being replaced by construction and coconstruction models.

· Personalised, blended forms of learning enabled by sophisticated technology are becoming the norm. A combination of face-to-face and on-line learning is the future.

· Massive Open On-line Courses – new technology is allowing students to access the best course material and best teachers in the world regardless of their location.

· The content of university curricula is being pushed away from liberal arts to more vocational areas and STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

· Pruning and focusing – the large number of options within the curriculum are being reduced.

· Four-year programmes – in response to demands for shorter more vocationally focused qualifications, two-0year associate degrees are being offered.

· Employment experience – students are expecting to have opportunities like

internships in order to establish a work record prior to leaving university.

· Employment universities qualifications are expected to lead to a job and a higher

income.

Page 3 of 97

2.3

C 15/54 – August

Part I

· A flexible and casualised workforce rising costs have seen a change to the employment relations.

· Funding bodies – are expecting higher rates of completion and progression to demonstrate value for money.

· Students as customers – more and more services are being offered to students who are being seen as customers. Students are being asked for feedback on their experiences.

· Students on campus – taking a prescribed course and studying full-time for the length of a qualification is giving way to greater flexibility and more fluid timelines.

· Unbundling of qualifications – programmes tailored to student needs/interests and more fluid timelines for study.

· Unbundling of services – in order to have them delivered by specialists at a lower cost.

· Internationalisation – universities are seeking to enrol students from around the world.

· Globalisation – universities are moving off-shore to establish themselves in key areas of the globe.

There are trends here that are desirable, inevitable and downright unacceptable. But they, in one way or another have to be responded to.

As noted, the response by American universities is very diverse. This is a very significant break with the past that saw all American universities emulating the model established by

Harvard.

This model was based on attracting the best students and staff into the best possible environment. Trying to live up to this model in a highly competitive environment led to a kind of educational arms race in the United States. Everyone wanted to do more and better in an ever increasingly expensive spiral. A poster university for this trend is Arizona State

University that offers its students a level of amenity that matches anything to be found in a top-end resort.

This trend is proving difficult to sustain and is being questioned by those who wonder what it contributes to quality education and research.

The United States may be leading the way, but it is clear that universities worldwide are facing or are going to face the same issues. Failure to change may well lead to the apocalypse predicted by commentators. This happens in all areas when organisations do not respond to change. Eventually the demand for something new builds up and is met by new organisations. Universities used to think they were immune from the kinds of disruption experienced by other organisations because their job could not be done any other way. Now it can be, has to be and should be.

In practice all that universities may have left to them will be the name “university” (usually protected in legislation) and the granting of qualifications. Even this is now being challenged.

It will not be long, for example, before a sustainable model of providing quality assurance to a learner will be provided by a stand-alone agency. Equally, if universities fail to provide the kind of education that the increasing numbers of people and funders demand, the many providers who are already attracting the support of frustrated learners will continue to grow.

If any of this sounds daunting – it is. But there is nothing here that has not been canvassed in the preparation of Massey’s strategic plan The Road to 2025. The challenge we face is to implement our ideas as rapidly and thoughtfully as possible. We should aim to face the challenges of the future on our terms.

Much has been achieved over the past six years, but there is a great deal yet to do.

Senior Leadership Team Planning

Each year the SLT holds three planning meetings – January/February, to look in detail at the year ahead; June/July, to focus on specific issues that will need further work so they can be worked on in rest of the year; and December, to review the year and identify issues that will be worked on over the summer.

Page 4 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

2.4

On July 21-22 the SLT will meet at the

Manawatū campus. During 2014, the SLT met in

Wellington and Albany to discuss the direction of those campuses. The Grow North initiatives

(led by Professor Ted Zorn) and the Think Differently initiatives (led by Associate Professor

Robin Peace and Professor Frank Sligo) resulted from those meetings.

At Manawatū, the area of agri-foodbusiness will be a focus because of its importance to the campus. The University has also been the driver of the Manawatū based FoodHQ “super campus” that has attracted support from around the region.

Distance education will be discussed, because Massey needs to ensure it continues to lead in this area. The Road to 2025 plan sets out clearly what the University is seeking to achieve, but we need to ensure action is being taken.

Linked to the discussion on distance education will be the recently launched Massey

University Worldwide brand, aimed at increasing the teaching and research Massey does offshore.

The SLT will also be engaging with leaders from around the

Manawatū region to discuss much closer collaboration. It is hoped a small working party can be established immediately to look at producing a co-ordinated programme of work under the title of UniverCity.

There is a great deal going on at Manawatū (as is the case on all campuses), so the SLT will be taking time to catch up with the plans being implemented by all Colleges and Service lines.

Overall, the SLT meeting is looking at producing a short document that captures the key areas of work taking place at

Manawatū that are driving the Road to 2025 strategy forward.

This was one of the key “deliverables” discussed at the all-staff meetings in March.

Grow North update

As mentioned in previous reports, the focus at Albany is growth (with the aim of continuing to develop a comprehensive, innovation focused, international campus). An Albany Campus

Leadership Group chaired by Deputy Vice-Chancellor Professor Ted Zorn is coordinating initiatives. One of the key initiatives began earlier this year with a symposium called Grow

North involving 120 participants focused on the question of growth in the North of Auckland.

The North is Auckland’s growth path – the question is how to make the best of what is inevitably going to happen.

Massey University wants to respond to this growth by ensuring that it reflects the aspirations and needs of the region. The Grow North symposium aimed to start a conversation with everyone with an interest in what is happening in north Auckland.

A further symposium was held in July informed by research being led by Dr Rebecca Gill.

The Grow North initiative is an essential part of what Massey University needs to achieve at the Albany, Auckland, campus. When the campus was opened the plan was to have a student population of 15,000. Given the population projections for north Auckland, this goal should be achieved over the next 10 years. But the University aims to do more than just grow

– we want to be part of building a smart, innovation-focused community that is the best possible place to live. As Massey is by far the largest organisation in the north, we have a responsibility to facilitate and lead where needed.

The New Zealand Herald carried an excellent article on plans for the Albany campus in late

April. Unfortunately there were a few inaccuracies. In particular, the article gave the impression that the proposed Science Innovation Complex development will be completed this year. As staff who attended briefings over the past few years will know, the University is exploring options to get started this year on a four-stage multi-year project. The progress of the project depends on growth in student numbers and availability of finance.

Page 5 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

2.4.1 Grow North – an Innovation District is a joint initiative between Massey University and

Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED). The over-arching purpose of this research is to build an environment that supports innovation to contribute to the growth of New Zealand’s economy. The research project aims to develop the vision and outcomes that support this purpose and make some high-level recommendations of what we want to achieve. Drawing on local and international research as well as stakeholder engagement, the research will be tailored to the New Zealand environment, using the unique ecology of the greater Albany area as the initial focus. The project’s community engagement, final report and symposium are planned for late November and we expect this initiative will build momentum and commitment to further develop this work and a plan for implementation.

2.5 Think Differently update

Associate Professor Robin Peace, School of People, Environment and Planning, College of

Humanities and Social Sciences Regional Director, Wellington, launched the "Let’s fly with that" initial staff-student consultation for Think Differently Wellington in a workshop at the

Wellington Staff Conference. Paper aeroplanes have accumulated in the library over the past two weeks and the results will be analysed in the next two weeks with help from the crosscampus committee. The Campus Operations Group meeting 25 June was updated on the

Think Differently Wellington campaign and invited to participate.

2.6 Massey University Investment Plan 2015-17

The Investment Plan 2015-2017 is now available online - http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/about-massey/university-management/plans-reports/

2.7 World rankings

University rankings were in the news again in May, with the release of information from QS.

Ranking systems are still far from an exact science but they are having an increasing influence on the world of higher education. Over recent years, Massey University has paid most attention to the QS system (although we are also ranked by THES and Shanghai).

Below are some of the key results.

QS will release its next assessment of universities in 2017. It is important that we ensure the information we provide is complete and accurate. Staff wanting to know more about how the ranking system works should contact Rossana Couto-Mason.

· In terms of number of subjects ranked, this is our best year since the QS Subject area rankings were created in 2012. More than 3500 universities were considered for the ranking of 36 subject areas.

· Massey had a total of 11 subjects profiled in the rankings, with two subjects (Veterinary

Sciences and Agriculture and Forestry) in the top 50 in the world.

· Our top-performing subject area was Veterinary Science, ranked 15 in the world. We were also the best university in the world for Veterinary Science, according to employers, as measured by the Employer Survey used in the rankings. This is a significant achievement.

· Our other ranked subject areas included: Agriculture and Forestry (33), Accounting and

Finance (51-100), Education (101-150), Business and Management (151-

200), Geography (151-200), Statistical and Operational Research (151-200), Computer

Science (201-250), Environmental Sciences (251-300), Mathematics (251-300), and

Biology (301-350).

An obvious anomaly in the data is the ranking of the College of Creative Arts. The college is currently ranked fourth on the Asia Pacific by Red Dot and is clearly the leading school in

New Zealand. Unfortunately, the college was not aware that QS were including Fine Arts and

Design this year (they have not in the past) so did not submit information. (Refer to item

5.2.93 below for the latest information on the Red Dot Awards.)

A copy of the School of Accountancy Year Book came across my desk in April. It provides an overview of very impressive achievements throughout 2014. No wonder Accountancy is one of Massey’s most highly ranked subjects (as above, rated in the top 100 by QS).

Congratulations.

Page 6 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

3.0 Te Rangahau me te Tohungatanga

Research and Scholarship

3.1

Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology

The 50th New Zealand Institute of Food, Science and Technology Conference was held in

Palmerston North at the beginning of July. NZIFST began at Massey and for many years included only Massey graduates. It now includes a wider range of professions involved with the food industry.

To take advantage of the NZIFST delegates being in town, the Massey Institute of Food

Science and Technology was also launched last week. This brings together some of the world-leading strengths that Massey has at a crucial time in our development. All the best to

Distinguished Professor Harjinder Singh and the members of the new institute. Please refer to Appendix I for further details.

3.2

Launch of the Joint Graduate School of Horticulture and Food Enterprise

The Institute of Agriculture and Environment hosted the launch of the Joint Graduate School of Horticulture and Food Enterprise. Massey University and Plant and Food Research have jointly created this graduate school to offer students world-class learning and research opportunities. In achieving this, Massey's teaching and research expertise will be complemented by Plant and Food Research's focus on delivering for industry. The Joint

Graduate School will foster new research and teaching collaborations between Massey and

Plant and Food Research, and support existing, high-value collaborative programmes.

The Joint Graduate School was officially inaugurated in July last year, with the launch of two

PhD scholarships to support collaborative research between Massey and Plant and Food

Research. The school will spearhead other funding and research support opportunities and activities with an aim to double the number of graduate students jointly supervised by both organisations over the next 10 years.

3.3 Riddet Institute CoRE

In May, the Riddet Institute Centre of Research Excellence (CoRE) received the very welcome news that its bid for renewed funding had been successful. This is the result of a lot of very hard work over many months by many people. Congratulations and thank you to everyone involved, in particular Distinguished Professors Paul Moughan and Harjinder

Singh. Massey University will continue to be the host institution.

The decision to continue funding for the Riddet CoRE is a vitally important one.

· It keeps together a very important and talented pool of researchers.

· It reinforces Massey University’s position as the pre-eminent university in the area of food.

· It lends weight to the formation of FoodHQ.

· It builds New Zealand’s reputation as a world leader in food research.

Please refer to Appendix II for further details.

The Riddet Institute CoRE hosted by Massey University will continue to be funded through to

2020. The University is also a partner in seven other CoREs – these are the Bio-Protection

Research Centre, QuakeCoRE: Centre for Earthquake Resilience, Ng ā Pae o te

Māramatanga, Dodds-Walls Centre, Te Pūnaha Matatini, the MacDiarmid Institute and the

Maurice Wilkins Centre for Molecular Biodiscovery. The presence of Massey in all of the

CoREs is evidence of our very strong commitment to research collaboration.

3.4

Allan Wilson Centre

I met with the Allan Wilson Centre Board recently, now that it has been confirmed that its

Centre of Research Excellence funding will finish at the end of the year. The board and the staff are working through options for the future. The University has advised the board that we will support whatever option they decide on. It is, however, vital that the strength that Massey took into the CoRE and has developed since is maintained. I am hoping to meet with Massey staff within the CoRE in the future to hear their views.

Page 7 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

The Government’s decision to end funding for the CoRE is not easy to understand, given the outstanding record established by the AWC. The decision cannot possibly be a reflection of quality. It seems that given limited funding and the intention to fund new CoREs the AWC missed out. My thanks go to the staff associated with the AWC – academic and professional

– for building a world leading research centre. As the host of the CoRE, Massey University has been very proud to provide an environment where excellence can flourish.

3.5 Massey University/AUT ICT Graduate School

We were informed by the Tertiary Education Commission in mid-April that the Massey

University/AUT ICT Graduate School bid was not successful. This result is no doubt very disappointing to Paul Watters, Kel Marsh and Tony Caughey and the many others who put together what was without doubt an excellent bid.

The University will need to look carefully at what to do next, but a preliminary view is that the momentum created by the bid should not be wasted.

3.6

3.7

3.8

The Resilience to Nature’s Challenges (RNC) National Science Challenge has moved to the next stage of its development. The detailed research and business plans submitted to the

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment in December 2014 have been accepted and the consortium has been awarded $19 million in funding for the period until July 2019.

Institute of Agriculture and Environment staff member Dr Jonathan Procter has led the developmen t of the mātauranga Māori component of the RNC challenge throughout the establishment phase and is expected to continue to lead this programme when it becomes fully operational. The challenge is hosted by GNS Science.

Distinguished Professor Paul Rainey, Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences and

New Zealand Institute for Advanced Studies, is a part of a multidisciplinary team that has won a 2015 Human Frontier Science Programme grant. The grant, worth $1.35 million, will fund research on bacterial interactions and bacterial evolution in micro-ecosystems, nanodroplets of 100 nL.

3.9 The School of People, Environment and Planning’s Ministry of Business Innovation and

Employment-funded Enhancing Coastal Ecosystems for Iwi - Manaaki Taha Moana research team, headed by Derrylea Hardy, Ecological Economics Research New Zealand, was awarded Massey’s only Preliminary RAGG (Red, Amber, Green, Gold) assessment status

2013-14 gold rating (out of 14 contracts). Thirteen out of 224 contracts nationwide were awarded a gold rating. An exceptional result.

3.10 Two top disaster resilience and emergency planning experts from Massey University will focus on the human aspects of surviving earthquakes in their roles at QuakeCore, the

Government’s newest Centre of Research Excellence.

Professors Bruce Glavovic and David Johnston, both from the College of Humanities and

Social Sciences, have been appointed as researchers for the recently announced

QuakeCore, which aims to “place New Zealand at the worldwide forefront of earthquake disaster resilience by utilising New Zealand as a natural earthquake laboratory”.

Joint Centre for Disaster Research director Professor David Johnston says Massey's contribution will focus on “the human dimensions of earthquakes; exploring issues around land-use planning, risk governance, community engagement and participation in risk reduction and behaviour responses to earthquake shaking”.

QuakeCore’s purpose is to bring together New Zealand’s expertise from a range of organisations in earthquake science, engineering and resilience in coordinated and collaborative approach to building resilience across our quake-prone nation in the aftermath of the Christchurch earthquake.

Page 8 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

3.11 On a similar theme to item 3.10 above, Massey University geologists Professor Mark

Bebbington, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, and Dr Gert Lube, Institute of Agriculture and

Environment, have been granted $580,000 to investigate natural hazards in New Zealand.

Professor Bebbington, a geostatistics specialist, is taking the first steps towards a nationallevel volcanic hazard model. Using a probability model, he and his team will try to predict the time and size of the next eruption at each of New Zealand’s volcanoes. The model will be based on historical records from similar volcanoes worldwide. This will allow them to compare the present risk from volcanoes to other natural hazard risks, for example, that from earthquakes.

Dr Lube, a senior research officer in Volcanic Risk Solutions, specialises on the dangerous interior of volcanic pyroclastic surges. Together with Dr Jonathan Procter, Institute of

Agriculture and Environment, and volcanologists from the University of Otago, GNS Sciences and natural hazards specialists from the United States and Italy, he will use the large-scale eruption simulator at the Manawatū campus to understand what happens to infrastructure when hit by a volcanic current.

The funding is part of $3.2 million allocated under the Natural Hazards Research Platform, a collaboration between crown research organisations and universities.

3.12 Professors Hugh Blair, Steve Morris and Paul Kenyon, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and

Biomedical Sciences, visited China and met with Professor Runlin Ma (Chinese Academy of

Sciences), Dr Harry Gao (chief executive, XinBao) and Mr Zhao (major shareholder, XinBao) to discuss research projects under the umbrella of a $2 billion grant from the Chinese

Government, Xinjiang. Please refer to Appendix III for further detail.

3.13 Further cementing our FoodHQ vision, Professor Richard Archer, Institute of Food Science and Technology, will lead the Massey-hosted project that will transform New Zealand’s primary food production into added-value exports. The Ministry of Business, Innovation and

Employment has awarded funding of $16.65 million over six years to this project. Please refer to Appendix IV for further detail.

3.14 Reminding me just how strong Massey University is in health-related disciplines, researchers in the College of Health have been awarded almost $4 million in the 2015 Health Research

Council’s Funding round. The college is proving to be a very positive development in the

University. College Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor Paul McDonald says the funding will go towards four diverse research projects tackling some of the most pressing health challenges facing New Zealand and the world. Please refer to Appendix V for further detail.

3.15 I would to make special mention of a number of other recent outstanding achievements:

3.15.1 Professor Gil Hardy, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, was honoured to be elected as a Fellow of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. The award honours exceptional achievement in practice or research, and was the first to be made to an international (non-American) member of the society and is therefore unique. The society has more than 5500 members, making it the leading worldwide interdisciplinary organisation for dietitians, nurses, pharmacists, physicians, scientists and other health professionals involved in every facet of clinical nutrition. Professor Hardy has published more than 200 research and review papers in the field of clinical nutrition and serves on three committees of the society. Please refer to Appendix VI for further details.

3.15.2 Distinguished Professor Paul Rainey, Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences and

New Zealand Institute for Advanced Studies, has been appointed an associate member of the European Molecular Biology Organisation. Please refer to Appendix VII for further details.

3.15.3 Distinguished Professor David Penny, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, was awarded an

Honorary Life Membership of the New Zealand Association of Scientists. Professor Penny has had a strong interest in New Zealand science policies in terms of international sector comparisons, outputs and the expected economic benefits. He was president of the association in 1990/1991 and contributed to its original Survey of Scientists. He was elected

Page 9 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Honorary Member at the 2014 Annual General Meeting and was presented with the certificate at the association’s 2015 annual conference held in March. Please refer to

Appendix VIII for further detail.

3.15.4 Professor Stuart Carr, School of Psychology, was awarded a Fellowship to the Society for

Industrial and Organisational Psychology at its annual conference in Philadelphia in April.

This was in recognition of Professor Carr as a “thought leader and key driving force for the evolution of Humanitarian Work Psychology which promotes humanitarianism and social advocacy on a global scale”. The award of a society fellowship is highly prestigious and a mark of peer esteem. It reflects a contribution to the research environment through having encouraged research capacity-building in the pro-social, humanitarian work psychology sphere, for example by graduate students and leading professors internationally. Please refer to Appendix IX for further detail.

3.15.5 Professor Annette Huntington, School of Nursing, has been elected deputy chair of the

Council of Deans of Nursing and Midwifery, Australia and New Zealand, this is the first time a

New Zealand member has been elected to an office of the council.

3.15.6 I also wish to note groundbreaking research lead by Professor Roger Lentle, in the College of Health, on bladder motility. Such is the novelty and importance of the findings that they have been reported in the clinical review of the prestigious journal Nature. Professor Paul

McDonald, College of Health Pro Vice-Chancellor, says: “This is just the latest series of significant research by this world-class research group conducted within our Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology – the largest collective of expertise of its kind in the

Southern Hemisphere – that will benefit so many.” Congratulations to all involved. Please refer to Appendix X for further details.

3.15.7 Professor Velmurugu (Ravi) Ravindran, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical

Sciences, has been awarded the New Zealand Society of Animal Production’s McMeekan

Memorial Award – the country’s highest honour for a production animal scientist. The award is made only when there is an outstanding individual or group worthy of the honour – with the last recipient being in 2013.

3.15.8 Professor Ravindran specialises in poultry nutrition, with emphasis on nutrient metabolism, feed enzymes, feed evaluation, amino acid availability, gut flora management and early nutrition in poultry.

3.15.9 Professor Peter Wilson, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, was awarded the Deer Industry New Zealand / Deer Farmers Association premier industry award

"in recognition of an outstanding contribution and service over 40 years to research, extension and engagement within the New Zealand farmed deer industry". A prolific published researcher and author on New Zealand farmed deer, Professor Wilson has been involved in the education of 2000-plus undergraduate veterinary students and supervised many doctoral and master's graduates.

He was also awarded Life Membership of the New Zealand Veterinary Association in recognition of service to the association and the profession.

3.15.10 Dr Anastasia Borschevsky, an associate member of the Centre for Theoretical Chemistry and

Physics in the Institute for Advanced Study and who also works at the Helmholtz Institut

Mainz in Germany, is part of the international team who investigated element 103, lawrencium – a superheavy element with more than 100 electrons. Lawrencium is unstable and does not exist in nature, meaning studies about the element are limited. The scientists produced atoms that existed for about 27 seconds in a particle accelerator. This work was published recently in a recent issue of Nature. The research is scientifically important because this is the heaviest element for which the ionisation energy has been measured. It also helps confirm the position of lawrencium within the Periodic Table of Elements and opens the door for understanding the chemical and physical properties of superheavy elements.

Page 10 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

3.15.11 The Institute of Education is a founding international partner in a project to establish a worldfirst education video journal, Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy. Professor Glenda

Anthony and Professor John O’Neill are Associate Editors and Dr Jodie Hunter and Dr Tara

McLaughlin are members of the Editorial Board. The institute has an emerging depth of expertise in video-based educational research. Alongside the journal, a learned society is in the process of incorporation, the Association of Visualisation Pedagogies, of which the institute will be an institutional member. The association will promote research and scholarship on teaching and learning using video-based methodologies. http://www.videoeducationjournal.com/.

3.15.12 A newly-released book Advances in Reintroduction Biology of Australian and New Zealand

Fauna outlines the progress in research aimed at improving reintroduction practice. It shows how sciences like population ecology and genetics can be used to predict the fates of reintroductions, and how experiments can be used to determine the management needed.

The project was led by Doug Armstrong, Oceania Chair of the Reintroduction Specialist

Group and Professor of Conservation Biology at Massey University, but is a collaboration between 70 reintroduction biologists working on projects throughout Australia and New

Zealand.

Other Massey University researchers who contributed to the publication include Kate

Richardson, Dr Kevin Parker, Dr Elizabeth Parlato, Dr Jay Gedir, Marleen Baling and former university staff members Dr John Ewen, Dr Alienor Chauvenet, Brian Lloyd, Jay Ruffle and

Ian Stringer.

3.16 Marsden Fund - 22 out of the 138 preliminary proposals submitted have been invited to submit a full proposal in the 2015 contestable funding round. These were submitted in June.

3.17 Three-Minute Thesis (3MT) Competition

It is time to start thinking about which master's and doctoral candidates will participate in the

Massey University Three-Minute Thesis competition this year. Entries are open to master's students and doctoral candidates undertaking research. Master's students must be currently enrolled in a research project of 90 points or more; Doctoral candidates must have successfully passed their confirmation milestones. The heats will run from July 21 until

August 6, with the finals on August 18. If you have any questions regarding the competition, contact Marise Murrie, Research and Enterprise.

For further highlights on our outstanding staff, students and alumni please refer to section 5.0

Celebrating Excellence – Awards and Recognition, below, and throughout this report.

4.0 Te Whakaako me te Ako

Teaching and Learning

4.1 Graduation

Amidst all of the discussion about the role of universities in the 21st century, graduation reminds everyone of our core role – to produce outstanding students. Many people comment on the way that Massey brings a personal touch to its ceremonies – that is down to the wonderful people behind the scenes. Thank you to the fantastic teams who every year make

Graduation very special and build the reputation of the University. I received a text from one happy parent who described the Wellington ceremony as “stunning”.

I have been struck by the obvious warm rapport between graduates and staff. Many graduates acknowledged staff as they crossed the stage. It demonstrated just how important the ceremony is for students and how much they appreciate staff being there with them.

One of the most distinctive features of Massey’s teaching environment is the close relationship between staff and students. Over the years many students have noted that they value being able to get to know their fellow students and their lecturers. This was mentioned to me again while talking with parents after graduation ceremonies and celebrations held

Page 11 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

across the three campuses. As one person said. “Massey has the reputation for going the extra mile for students”. Congratulations to everyone for building this reputation.

Two Doctors of Literature (honoris causa) were conferred: Gerald Hensley CNZM, in recognition of his outstanding service to the public and his scholarship in the field of political and military history, and his contribution to a project of national significance; and Archbishop

Sir David Moxon KNZM, in recognition of his outstanding service to the public in the field of religion. With citations read by Lieutenant-General Rhys Jones and Sir Anand Satyanand, respectively. Please refer to Appendix XI for further details.

A Doctor of Fine Arts (honoris causa) was conferred on renowned documentary photographer Ans Westra. The citation was read by former Massey University Pro-

Chancellor Justice Stephen Kos. Please refer to Appendix XI for further details.

A number of other special moments throughout the weeks included – Laura Schwerdtfeger, daughter of Distinguished Professor Peter Schwerdtfeger, and Dr Mirjam Guesgen, daughter of Professor Hans Guesgen, graduated with a Bachelor of Veterinary Science and a Doctor of Philosophy in Zoology, respectively – to name a few. All in all, the weeks showcased the best of Massey University.

The University is exceptionally well supported by its Council. At one event we not only had the Chancellor present but also two former Chancellors – Dr Russ Ballard and Morva

Croxon. A special thanks to Council members and Chancellor Chris Kelly for the tremendous support they provide.

Next stop November when there will be graduation ceremonies in Palmerston North.

4.2 Applied Science Scholarships

I wish to note that for the first time the amount of funding distributed in May through Applied

Science Scholarships to students studying subjects relating to agriculture topped $500,000.

This represents very significant support to students from a wide range of sponsors and reinforces Massey’s reputation as the nation’s leading agricultural university. Please refer to

Appendix XII for further details.

4.3 Academy of Sport and Sport and Exercise Mobile Laboratory

The Academy of Sport event at Manawatū in May showed clearly that elite sportspeople who are also studying see Massey University as their first choice. A group of 45 outstanding young men and women were inducted into the academy. A similar event will be held at

Albany on June 2.

The combination of sporting achievement and study continued during the month, with the launch of the Sport and Exercise Mobile Laboratory. Congratulations to Professor Steve

Stannard and his colleagues for developing such an exciting project. Please refer to

Appendix XIII for further details.

Other initiatives to support excellence in teaching and learning include: 4.4

4.4.1 The Academic Standing Project released an update to the phase-two core and detailed analysis and design has commenced for phase-three deliverables. During March, enrolled

Summer School students received updated academic standings for the Summer Semester.

4.4.2 The Foundation of Teaching and Learning at Massey course initiatives is a teaching support workshop that runs as a shared site across the three campuses and is supported with faceto-face meetings at each campus.

4.4.3 The Recording of Scholarly and Student Work policy and framework has now been approved by Academic Board. The National Centre for Teaching and Learning will now develop resources to ensure staff are able to optimise their use of the recording and Mediasite equipment in a safe manner.

Page 12 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

4.4.4

Te Ohu Whai Pakihi (the College of Business Māori Development Working Group) have reestablished th e Māori Leadership and Mentoring Programme for Māori and Pasifika students enrolled via Distance in the Bachelor of Business Studies core papers. The current focus is likely to expand to include internal Māori students on the Manawatū campus in semester two.

4.4.5 The Institute of Education’s Dr Jude MacArthur and Associate Professor Alison Kearney will work with key staff from five schools to support the development of their successful Teacher-

Led Innovation Fund project, Building Inclusive Communities Across School Networks. The project involves five schools collaborating and sharing knowledge to build inclusive communities and shared practices in order to improve participation and learning for pupils with disabilities, in particular, children with autism. The project seeks to improve teacher and school practices, pupil learning and participation, and family/whānau involvement.

4.5 Accreditation

4.5.1 The Postgraduate Diploma in Psychological Practice has received accreditation by the New

Zealand Psychologist Board for two years.

4.5.2 The School of Food and Nutrition received formal notification from the Australian Institute of

Medical Scientists that the Bachelor of Med Lab Science has been accredited for another four years – January 2015 to December 2018.

4.5.3 The School of Engineering and Advanced Technology has successfully gained Chartered

Institute of Procurement and Supply accreditation for the Master in Supply Chain

Management qualification.

Please refer to initiatives to support excellence in teaching and learning and associated highlights in section 5.0 Celebrating Excellence – Awards and Recognition, below, and throughout this report.

5.0 Te Whakanui Hiranga –

Ngā Tohu Whakamānawa

Celebrating Excellence – Awards and Recognition

5.1 Queen’s Birthday Honours

Queen’s Birthday Honours Awards were made over the weekend. Congratulations to Massey

University-connected recipients:

Alumni:

·

Mr Ian Roberts (QSM) – for services to the community and education

·

Professor Emeritus Boyd Jones (ONZM) – for services to veterinary medicine

·

Mr Geoffrey Poole (CNZM) – for services to the meat industry

·

Mrs Robyn Rosie (MNZM) - for services to education

·

Mr Manahi Paewai (MNZM) - for services to

Māori

·

Lieutenant-Colonel Peter Hall (MNZM) – for services to the New Zealand Defence Force

Past staff:

·

Mr Mark Pennington (ONZM) – for services to design

5.2 Congratulations other to our staff, students and alumni whose expertise and excellence has been recognised in the following ways:

5.2.1 130th Year

The College of Creative Arts celebrated 129 years since Arthur Riley opened the doors to the first Wellington School of Design in 1886, which means we are now in our 130th year.

Page 13 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

5.2.2 Steve Hall, a College of Creative Arts graduate, won the 11th iD International Emerging

Designer Awards at the iD Fashion Awards in Dunedin, the only kiwi to win an award. Please refer to Appendix XIV for further details.

5.2.3

Election website nominated for Oscars of the internet

I mentioned in my last report that On The Fence – an interactive web tool supported by the strategic innovations fund and devised by Massey design students for the general election – was nominated for a Webby Award, the “Oscars of the internet”. The Webbys are the annual awards for excellence on the internet, with nominees selected by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences.

On The Fence was the only non-American nomination in the People’s Voice category of

"political blog/websites". Other nominees in the political blog/websites category were Rolling

Stone magazine’s online coverage of America’s Gun Violence Epidemic, and US political news/commentary sites factcheck.org, truthdig, and politico.

The final result was that On The Fence came in fifth (in the world) – this was based on the number of popular votes received (always a challenge for small countries like New Zealand).

5.2.4 Industrial Design graduate and current Master of Design candidate Avara Moody and

Textiles graduate Kate Williams, have won Australian Graduate of the Year Awards from the

Design Institute of Australia for New Zealand. Their work will now go on to be assessed alongside the other state-wide winners for an overall award of Graduate of the Year.

5.2.5 Professor Tony Parker, College of Creative Arts, and Gallagher are continuing their winning ways. They have been named a Gold winner in the 2015 Govies Award for T20 Terminal with

Alarms, which outperformed other entries in categories including design, quality, impact in the security industry, scalability and technical advances. Ring Top Post won a Good Design selection award in the Good Design Australia Design Competition and is now in the running for a higher award.

The Ring Top Fence Post and T20 Security Access Terminal have also been selected for exhibition by Good Design Australia and the Korean Institute of Design Promotion at the annual Design Korea exhibition in Seoul.

5.2.6 Two Massey authors have had books on the Nielsen Weekly Bestseller lists recently:

· Native Bird (Mākaro Press), the third poetry volume by Associate Professor Bryan

Walpert, who teaches creative writing at the Manawatū campus, was on the top 10 list for New Zealand fiction last week – a remarkable achievement for a book of poetry, and the fact it was only launched a week earlier (listed sixth).

· War historian Professor Glyn Harper had three of his children’s books about WWI in the top five of the Nielsen Bestseller list for New Zealand Children and Teen books in April.

They are; Roly, the ANZAC Donkey (number one); Le Quesnoy: the story of the town

New Zealand saved (number two); and Jim’s Letters (number three).

5.2.7 Professor Anne Noble, School of Art, won the Overseas Photographer Award in the 31st

Higashikawa Awards. Please refer to Appendix XV for further details.

5.2.8

Sheeanda Field, the University Library’s Kaihautū Māori, has been awarded the 2015 Robin

Hakopa Te Reo Māori Award by Te Rōpū Whakahau (the leading national body that represents Māori engaged in culture, knowledge, information, communication and systems technology in Aotearoa New Zealand). This annual award recognises the recipient’s creativity, dedication and promotion of te reo and tikanga Māori within the library profession, and is well deserved by Ms Field.

5.2.9 Photography graduate, Amber Griffin, won Gold Medal (for the commercial category) at the

World Photographic Cup (plus highest scoring print).

Page 14 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

5.2.10 Dr Jeanette Berman, Institute of Education, had the following co-authored book published:

Graham, L., Berman, J. & Bellert, A. (2015) Sustainable Learning: Inclusive practices for 21st

century classrooms. Melbourne: Cambridge University Press.

5.2.11 Professor Tom Nicholson, Institute of Education, had his latest co-authored book, The New

Zealand Dyslexia Handbook, published by the Zealand Council for Educational Research

Press.

5.2.12 James Robertson, Bachelor of Agricultural Commerce student, was awarded scholarships from New Zealand Young Farmers, Balance Agri-Nutrients, FMG among others, totalling

$80,000. An outstanding success.

5.2.13 Professor Annette Huntington, School of Nursing, has been elected deputy chair of the

Council of Deans Nursing and Midwifery, Australia and New Zealand. This is the first time a

New Zealand member has been elected to the office.

5.2.14 Dr Nives Botica Redmayne, School of Accountancy, has been appointed to the council of the accounting professional body Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand.

5.2.15 Mike Fiszer, Executive Education and Enterprise, has been reappointed as a judge for the

Auckland Westpac Business Awards for 2015.

5.2.16 The Royal Society of New Zealand has appointed Professor Ralph Sims, School of

Engineering and Advanced Technology, as convenor of the expert panel for an in-depth look into climate change mitigation.

5.2.17 Dr Wendi Roe, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, was appointed as an expert adviser on the New Zealand sea lion threat management plan panel. This panel was convened by the Department of Conservation and Ministry of Primary Industries.

5.2.18 Caroline Campbell's, School of Design, multi-media, screened book for young adult readers,

Josie and the Whales, has been published by iTunes and is available in 51 digital stores worldwide.

5.2.19 Samantha Harnett, Bachellor of Design (Hons) student, won the Stake King of the Bays for swimming.

5.2.20 Katrina Jefferies, Bachelor of Agricultural Sciences student, won a $5000 scholarship in the nationwide Sovereign Be The Difference Challenge with her app to help Kiwi kids get active.

5.2.21 Solbin Kang, Postgraduate Diploma in Journalism student, was the recipient of the 2015 Kiwi

Asian Journalism Scholarship ($5000).

5.2.22 Steven Trask, Postgraduate Diploma in Journalism student, was the recipient of the Science

Media Centre's Science Journalism Fellow for 2015 ($5000).

5.2.23 Gabriel O’Callaghan, Bachelor of Veterinary Science pre-selection student, was awarded the

Heath Harris memorial scholarship worth $1000.

5.2.24 Loran Reid, Bachelor of Arts (Educational Psychology) student, was awarded the Business and Professional Women's Club Hibiscus Coast grant of $2000.

5.2.25 Jason Paulin, Bachelor of Arts student, received the 300-level prize as one of the three highachieving Spanish Language students, from Argentine Ambassador Fernando Escalona.

5.2.26 Ashleigh Grant, Master of Education student, received a $500 research grant from Mid-

Canterbury Rural Women.

5.2.27 Recipients of $2500 ADB Williams Trust scholarships were:

· Angela McFetridge, Bachelor of AgriCommerce student.

Page 15 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

· Lucy Coleman, Master of Science student.

· Edward Hewitt, Bachelor of AgriCommerce student.

· Nicole Lansdown, Bachelor of Veterinary Science student.

· Hannah Lund, Bachelor of Veterinary Science.

· Angela Wyatt, Bachelor of AgriScience student.

· Andrew McNaire, Bachelor of Science student.

5.2.28 Rebecca Elvy, Postgraduate Diploma of Business Administration graduate, has been appointed chief executive of Ngā Taonga.

5.2.29 Sami and Laura Werder, Bachelor of Applied Science and Bachelor of Science graduates, won three merit awards at the 2015 Taranaki Balance Farm Environment Awards (the

Balance Agri-Nutrients Soil Management Award, the Waterforce Integrated Management

Award and the Beef and Lamb New Zealand Livestock Award.

5.2.30 Janine Divers, Bachelor of Education graduate, with her husband Dave, won the supreme award in the 2015 Otago Balance Farm Environment Award as well as the Massey University

Innovation Award, the Donaghys Farm Stewardship award and the Balance Agri-Nutrients

Soil Management Award.

5.2.31 Mavis Mu llins, MBA (Agriculture) graduate and past Council member, was named Māori

Woman Business Leader of the Year by the University of Auckland.

5.2.32 Dr Adrian Chaplin, Bachelor of Science (Hons) graduate, won a Royal Society of Chemistry award. Dr Chaplin is a Royal Society University Research Fellow at the University of

Warwick, and previously spent four years as a postdoctoral researcher at Oxford University.

5.2.33 Kate Williams, Bachelor of Design (Hons) graduate, won the fashion and textile design category at the DIA's Australasian Graduate of the Year Awards.

5.2.34 Jonathon Howe, Graduate Diploma in Journalism graduate, has been appointed to the position of

Manawatū Region Editor of the Manawatū Standard, The Tribune and

Manawatūstandard.co.nz.

5.2.35 Professor Emeritus William Dobson, received a lifetime achievement award from the

University of Wisconsin-River Falls Alumni Association.

5.2.36 Congratulations to Massey University staff members who were awarded their New Year’s

Honours insignia at investitures by Governor-General Sir Jerry Mateparae in Auckland and

Wellington in May.

·

Associate Professor Kathryn Stowell was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of

Merit (ONZM) for services to the field of biomedical sciences. Associate Professor

Stowell completed her doctorate at Massey University before becoming a lecturer and then associate professor. Her work involves identifying and sequencing genetic variants for malignant hyperthermia.

·

World-leading sports psychologist and Massey Professor Emeritus Gary Hermansson, was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) for services to the field of sports psychology. Professor Hermansson completed a Diploma of Education, Master of Arts and Doctorate at Massey University. He then became a Professor as well as the director of Sport Sciences. Professor Hermansson has worked with a number of large institutions as well as three Olympic and three Commonwealth Games teams and has been the team psychologist for the Black Caps cricketers.

·

Ben Taufua was made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to the

Pacific Community. Mr Taufua is the Pasifika project manager for at Massey University.

He has been instrumental in creating scholarships for Pasifika people to train in disaster management – a subject of personal significance to him after losing relatives in the tsunami that struck Samoa in September 2009.

5.2.37 Dr Leah Farrall, Centre for Defence and Security Studies, co-authored a book, The Arabs at

War in Afghanistan, which was published in the United Kingdom.

Page 16 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

5.2.38 Emeritus Professor Ian Evans, School of Psychology, has had the following book published:

How and Why Thoughts Change, Foundations of Cognitive Psychotherapy, Oxford University

Press.

5.2.39 The School of English and Media Studies Honorary Research Fellow Judith Dell Panny, had the following book published: Let the Writer Stand: the work of Vincent O’Sullivan, Steele

Roberts, ISBN: 978-1-927242-80-3.

5.2.40 Doctoral student Qing Guo was awarded the doctoral prize Chinese Government Award for

Outstanding Self-Financed Students Abroad, with prize money of $US6000. The prize is targeted towards Chinese PhD students who do not require financial aid from the Chinese

Government while studying overseas and who have simultaneously achieved outstanding scientific achievements. Only three students from New Zealand were awarded this prize.

5.2.41 Doctoral student Davoud Zare was awarded the Howard See Young Rheologist Travel

Award for 2014 from the Australian Society of Rheology. The award covers conference related expenses up to $2500. Every two years the society selects a young rheologist demonstrating outstanding research and presentation skills.

5.2.42 Professor Annette Huntington, School of Nursing, is an invited member of the newly established International Nursing and Midwifery Advisory Board, for the Hamid Medical

Corporation, Qatar.

5.2.43 Professor Huntington has also been appointed to Health Workforce New Zealand’s newly established Nursing Workforce Data Integrity Working Group.

5.2.44 Professor Gil Hardy, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, has been appointed as Australasian-Asian Regional Editor for Nutrition: The International Journal of Applied and

Basic Nutritional Sciences (Impact Factor: 3.046), effective May 1. The journal Nutrition presents advances in nutrition research and science, informs its readers on new and advancing technologies and new data in clinical nutrition practice, encourages the application of the techniques of outcomes research and meta-analyses to problems in patient-related nutrition; and seeks to help clarify and set the research, policy and practice agenda for nutrition science to enhance human well-being in the years ahead.

5.2.45 Dr Liping Zou, School of Economics and Finance, was invited by the New Zealand-China

Trade Association to be a member of the judging panel for the HSBC Business Awards 2015.

This year's awards have attracted a record number of applications from some of New

Zealand’s leading firms.

5.2.46 Professor Anne de Bruin, School of Economics and Finance, has been invited and appointed a Member of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Centre for

Entrepreneurship, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) and Local Development

Review Panel, for the national review of SME and entrepreneurship policies in Canada. She has been invited as an expert on women’s entrepreneurship. She will take part in a factfinding mission in May in Canada and write the chapter on women and entrepreneurship for the final report, which is to be completed in January 2016.

5.2.47 Jessie Prebble, PhD student supervised by Dr Vaughan Symonds and Dr Jennifer Tate,

Institute of Fundamental Sciences, was awarded the Zonta

Manawatū Women in Science scholarship to attend the Botanical Society of America meeting being held in Edmonton,

Canada in July.

5.2.48 A manuscript by Dr Jean Margerison, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, has made

Editor’s Choice for the Journal of Dairy Science, a highly-ranked international journal in agriculture.

5.2.49 Nanjing University’s Department of Finance and Insurance has conferred the title of

Honorary Professor upon Associate Professor Xiaoming Li, School of Economics and

Finance. Nanjing University is among the top eight universities in China.

Page 17 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

5.2.50 Dr Li has also been appointed as an adviser, editorial board member and reviewer of the

Australian Academy of Business Leadership. He has also been named as appointed reviewer (equivalent to an editorial board member) of the Universal Journal of Accounting

and Finance.

5.2.51 Dr Warwick Stent, School of Accountancy, has been chosen as an Outstanding Reviewer for

Meditari Accountancy Research in the Emerald Literati Network 2015 Awards for Excellence.

5.2.52 Professor Jim Arrowsmith, School of Management, has been appointed to the editorial boards of the A-ranked Human Resource Management Journal and B-ranked Employee

Relations.

5.2.53 Dr Beverley Haarhoff, School of Psychology, co-authored the following book which was published: Bennett-Levy, J., Thwaites, R., Haarhoff, B, & Perry, H. (2015). Experiencing CBT

from the inside out: A self-practice/self-reflection workbook for therapists. New York: Guilford

Press.

5.2.54 Dr Catherine Cook, School of Nursing, received the Best Paper award at the New Zealand

Nurses Organisation conference held in May for her paper: The legacy of the Cartwright

Report: Māori women and gynaecological examinations. Dr Cook donated the prize of $1000 to the Christchurch Women's Refuge.

5.2.55 Professor Jenny Carryer’s, School of Nursing, paper New Zealand patients’ perceptions of

chronic care delivery was one of three papers chosen as Highly Commended by the editorial team of the Journal of Integrated Care.

5.2.56 Professor Matt Golding, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, has been asked to guest edit a special issue in the Food Structure Journal on food structures during digestion.

5.2.57 Distinguished Professor Anne Noble, School of Art, was the recipient of the Higashikawa photography award for an international photographer.

5.2.58 David Cook's, School of Art, sole-authored publication Meet Me in the Square (published by

Christchurch Art Gallery 2014) was joint winner for the Major Exhibition Catalogue category at the 2015 Museums Australia Multimedia and Publication Design Awards.

5.2.59 Wellington City Council has purchased a new artwork for its growing collection from Master of Fine Arts Alumni and School of Art Technician Shaun Waugh, School of Art. He joins an extraordinary line-up of College of Creative Arts alumni and past and present staff whose work has been collected by the council.

5.2.60 Bronwyn Holloway-Smith, College of Creative Arts, has been selected as a finalist for the

National Contemporary Art Award.

5.2.61 Two of the three Emerging Design Professionals in the Interior Awards 2015, Meg Rowntree and Andy Florkowski, are College of Creative Arts alumni. Ms Rowntree won the Emerging

Design Professional Award.

5.2.62 Palmerston North Mayor, Grant Smith, launched the book: Plains’ Science 2: inventions,

innovations and discoveries from the

Manawatū, edited by Professor Emeritus Vince Neall,

Institute of Agriculture and Environment. It contains articles written by Distinguished

Professor Paul Moughan on research on the Massey Pig Growth Model, Professor Emeritus

Neall on the Mangahao Power Scheme, Dr John Baker (formerly from Agronomy/Agricultural

Engineering Departments) on the cross slot no-tillage story, Dr Nelson Pomeroy (formerly

Ecology Department) on bumblebee production for pollination and Dr Sheelagh Hewitt

(Fonterra) on former Massey staff member Jim Henson and New Zealand blue vein cheese

5.2.63 Professor Tim Carpenter, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, was presented with the 2015 Alumni Achievement Award from the School of Veterinary Medicine,

University of California, Davis, on May 21.

Page 18 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

5.3.64 Professor Barry Scott, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, was elected as vice-president

(biological and life sciences) for the Royal Society of New Zealand.

5.2.65 Ngaire Sparkes, Postgraduate Diploma of Arts student, received an Outstanding Achiever’s award for her efforts in her undergraduate psychology papers.

5.2.66 The following outstanding Bachelor of Aviation students received awards at the Wings ceremony:

· Damen Golding was awarded the most outstanding student.

· Liam Meikle was awarded the Palmerston North Airport Professional Attributes Award.

· Joshua Paton was awarded the Air New Zealand Flying Award.

· Krishneel Naicker was awarded the Airways Corporation Academic Award, the Fieldair

Engineering Ltd Aviation Systems Award and the Hugh Francis Navigation Award.

5.2.67 Aimy Hoogenboom, Bachelor of Veterinary Science student, won the Allflex Senior

Ambassador title at the Feef Expo in Feilding.

5.6.68 Calum Linton, Bachelor of Veterinary Science student, won a scholarship for Agcarm of

$2500.

5.2.69 Leander Archer, Bachelor of Agricultural Science student, won a scholarship from Agcarm of

$2500.

5.2.70 Stephanie Gadd, Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Veterinary Sciences pre-selection student, was awarded a scholarship from KiwiRail to go towards her studies.

5.2.71 Julia May Timmins Hollongsworth, Graduate Diploma of Journalism student, was awarded a

Prime Minister’s Scholarship for Asia to further her studies.

5.2.72 Michelle Roestenburg, PhD (Arts) candidate, received a scholarship from Ngati Kahungunu

Iwi Incorporated of $500.

5.2.73 The Massey University semi-final of this year's Japanese Studies Aotearoa New Zealand

Tertiary Japanese Language Speech Contest was won jointly by Robyn Hwang and Nada El

Hosseny. The contest was held on May 25 at the Albany and Manawatū campuses and both winners are second-year distance students from Auckland.

5.2.74 Leonie Hapeta, former staff member, has been appointed to UCOL’s Council.

5.2.75 Tito Karnavian, Master of Philosophy (Hons) graduate, has been appointed to lead the

Jakarta Police.

5.2.76 Professor Jeff Wichtel, Bachelor of Veterinary Sciences and PhD (Vet) graduate, has been appointed as the new dean of the Ontario Veterinary College for a five-year term.

5.2.77 Paul Harrington, Executive MBA graduate, has been appointed as the new chief executive officer of ACG Materials.

5.2.78 Dr Jodie Hunter, Institute of Education, and Dr Natasha Tassell-Matamua, School of

Psychology, received Fulbright New Zealand Scholar Awards. Dr Hunter’s award was for her research into how diversity and equity can be addressed in mathematics education, while Dr

Tassell-Matamua’s award was for her research investigating near-death experiences from

Māori perspectives. The awards were presented at this year's Fulbright New Zealand Awards

Ceremony and Alumni Reception at Parliament Buildings, Wellington, on June 22.

5.2.79 Dr Hunter also won the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia Beth

Southwell Practical Implications Award for her research paper Teacher actions to facilitate

early algebraic reasoning, based on her PhD. This is awarded to a research paper dealing with a significant ongoing problem or issue in mathematics teaching practice and providing relevant information for both mathematics teachers and teacher educators that shows how

Page 19 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

research findings can be applied to mathematics teaching. She is only the third New

Zealander to win the award in the 25 years since it was instigated.

5.2.80 Dr Tara McLaughlin, Institute of Education, has been appointed to a three-year term as a research member of the Recommended Practices Commission of the Division of Early

Childhood. The division is an international organisation for those who work with or on behalf of young children (up to eight years) with disabilities and other special needs and their families (http://www.dec-sped.org/).

5.2.81 Dr Kim Worthington, School of English and Media Studies, had a chapter translated into

Portuguese and published in the first Brazilian book on Nobel-prizewinning writer, JM

Coetzee: Worthington, KL. (2015). Um lugar onde os corpos são os seus próprios signos:

uma releitura de Foe, de J M Coetzee, via Gubar, Spivak, Parry e Levinas. In K Rosenfield,

& LF Pereira (Eds.) Lendo Coetzee. Santa Maria, Brazil: Editora Universidade Federal de

Santa Maria: 51-86.

5.2.82 Associate Professor Christine Cheyne, School of People, Environment and Planning, had a chapter, Local Government, published in the sixth edition of New Zealand Government and

Politics (ed. Hayward, J,Oxford University Press).

5.2.83 Professor Kathryn Rountree, School of People, Environment and Planning, edited the book:

Contemporary Pagan and Native Faith Movements in Europe: Colonialist and Nationalist

Impulses, New York and Oxford: Berghahn, June 2015.

5.2.84 Professor Rountree, had the following book chapters published:

- Context is everything: Plurality and Paradox in Contemporary European Paganisms,

-

Contemporary Pagan and Native Faith Movements in Europe: Colonialist and Nationalist

Impulses, ed. K Rountree, New York and Oxford: Berghahn, pp. 1-23, June 2015.

Authenticity and Invention in the Quest for a Modern Maltese Paganism’ in Contemporary

Pagan and Native Faith Movements in Europe: Colonialist and Nationalist Impulses, ed. K.

-

Rountree, New York and Oxford: Berghahn, pp. 285-303, June 2015.

The Gods are Back: Nationalism and Transnationalism in Contemporary Pagan and Native

Faith Groups in Europe’, in Is God Back? Reconsidering the New Visibility of Religion, ed.

Titus Hjelm. London: Bloomsbury Academic, pp. 90-103, June 2015.

5.2.85

Dr Christine (Cassie) Kenney, School of Psychology, Te Pūtahi-a-Toi /Joint Centre for

Disaster Research, was appointed to the Earthquake Commission National Biannual

Research Funding Review Panel. The initial reviews were held on June 17.

5.2.86 Dr Kenney was invited by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet to be a member of the National Symposium on Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience organising committee.

5.2.87 Dr Kenney was appointed to the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment 2015 national Targeted Funding Review Panel: Hazards and Infrastructure Research and Energy and Minerals Research. Initial reviews were held on June 24.

5.2.88 Institute of Education PhD candidate Latai Tu’imana has been awarded the $10,000 2015

Ministry of Education study award in Pasifika Education Research. Ms Tu'imana presented her research proposal at a doctoral confirmation event at Manawatū on June 15. The proposed title of her research is Church as a context for Tongan children’s learning.

5.2.89 Dr Sy Taffel, School of English and Media Studies, attended the Palmerston North Volunteer

Recognition Event on June 24, having been nominated for an award for his voluntary work as a filmmaker for the Environment Network Manawatū.

5.2.90 Amanda McVitty, School of Humanities history PhD candidate, was awarded the Australian and New Zealand Medieval and Early Modern Studies Association's 2015 biennial George

Yule Award for her paper entitled My name of a trewe man: Manhood, speech and political

agency in early fifteenth-century treason trials.

Page 20 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

5.2.91 Jim’s Letters, written by the School of Humanities' Professor of War Studies Glyn Harper, gained a special recognition award as an outstanding finalist in the Library and Information

Association of New Zealand's Russell Clark award category this year. It was also announced as one of five finalists for the association's New Zealand Book Awards, Children’s Book of the Year.

5.2.92 Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce announced a number of board appointments and re-appointments recently. Among those was Professor Simon Hall, head of the Institute of Fundamental Sciences as director on the Research and Education Advanced Network

New Zealand Ltd (REANNZ). REANNZ is the Crown-owned company that owns and operates New Zealand's high-capacity, high-performance advanced information technology network (KAREN).

5.2.93 Red Dot success for 2015

It has been another great year for our Red Dot Award Design Concept entrants, who have received a total of nine awards – two more than last year. Red Dot will announce overall rankings for participating institutions closer to the gala dinner for winners in October.

Congratulations to the School of Design students and staff Lee Whiterod, Emma Fox Derwin,

Matt Clapham and Donald Preston.

Industrial/Product Red Dot Awards:

· Tim Arbuckle – Oppi Stack

· Henry Caird – Three-Dimensional Music

· Brendan Knight – Dad Cycle (pictured above)

· Alex Hoffmans-Walter – Planter

· Barnaby Ward: PK01 – The Holistic Kitchen

· Amanda Firman, Lincoln Hill, Libby Simes and Simon Gormley: Quench – Rainwater

Harvester (third-year project)

VCD Red Dot Awards

· Alice Moynihan – The Ride Guide

· Finlay Brazier – Fly Emotive - Relax

VCD Honourable Mention

· Meg Howie – Ask Away

5.2.94 Creative New Zealand’s $100,000 Craft/Object Fellowship has been awarded to Toioho ki

Apiti PhD recent graduate Areta Wilkinson. Her project, titled Hine-

Āhua: Absences and

Presences

, will use gold from Te Tai Poutini (the West Coast) and Ōtakou (Otago) regions.

Ms Wilkinson is currently at Cambridge University as part of Pacific Presences: Oceanic art

and European museums, and will travel to Berlin, Munich, Tubingen and Studgartt to view museum collection material.

5.2.95 Karen McIntyre received a $10,000 Freemasons Postgraduate Scholarship. She is enrolled in a PhD in Fine Arts through

Māori Visual Arts, developing a working model of practice for women making art in response to experiences of violence.

5.2.96

A New Zealand Post kōwhaiwhai postage stamp issue celebrates kōwhaiwhai through the artworks of six established Māori artists, five of whom are graduates of Māori Visual Arts at

Massey – Johnson Witehira (PhD fine arts), Kura Te Waru Rewiri, Sandy Adsett, Kylie Tiuka,

Ngatai Taepa. The postage stamps were issued to coincide with the dawn of Matariki (Māori

New Year).

5.2.97 During the semester break, Maddie Leach, School of Art, has been in Canada and the United

States on two new artist residency opportunities, the first with Contemporary Art Gallery in

Vancouver and the second with Neu Kirche in Pittsburgh. The Contemporary Art Gallery has committed to developing a new project with Ms Leach next year and Neu Kirche is forming a new initiative for New Zealand women artists to visit Pittsburgh, develop new projects and build connections with Carnegie Mellon University.

Page 21 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

5.2.98 Steve Hall has won the Emerging Designer section and first overall for the Miromoda

Fashion Design Awards Competition 2015. He will be showing at New Zealand Fashion

Week in August.

5.2.99 Master of Fine Arts graduate Maria O’Toole has just finished a period as artist in residence at

Samuel Marsden School, and is the recipient of an international drawing residency at

Caylus,Toulouse, from August to October.

5.2.100 Dr Simona Fabrizi, School of Economics and Finance, has been invited to be a guest editor for a special issue of the New Zealand Economic Papers journal, featuring selected internationally refereed papers, some of which will have contributed to the upcoming Third

ATE Symposium on “Advances in Industrial Organisation, Competition Policy and

Regulation” to be held at the University of Auckland, December 14-15. The special issue is due to appear in 2017.

5.2.101 In July, the Wellington Gold Awards New Thinking Award, supported by Massey University, went to John-Daniel (JD) Trask, a Bachelor of Information Sciences graduate from Massey

University. Mr Trask is an outstanding recipient of what is the inaugural New Thinking Award.

It is worth noting that he also contributed significantly on the night to the Massey University table winning the quiz. Given that there were 800-plus people present, that was not a bad effort!

Other highlights of staff, student and alumni recognition can also be found throughout this report, including section 3.0 Research and Scholarship, above.

6.0

Te Kōtuitui me Te Aronga Manaakitanga

Connections and Responsibility

6.1 I attended the ANZAC Day commemorations in Wellington on April 25. The Peace Park and the restored War Memorial provided an impressive backdrop for the service. The Massey

Dominion Museum First World War Exhibition was open and hosted a steady stream of visitors. Sir Peter Jackson and Sir Richard Taylor have led a very hard-working team that has accomplished something very special. Massey University’s role in making it all happen was acknowledged. The park, the memorial and the museum already seem part of what is destined to become central to a growing sense of positive nationalism that activities focused on the First World War seem to be engendering in New Zealand.

6.2

Recruitment and Marketing Campaign as at July 2015

The "I Am" brand campaign continues to evolve, with seven new creative executions in the market from May this year. The campaign retains the boldness and energy of last year but has been evolved into a more sophisticated, premium look and feel. The executions include still photography for outdoor (billboards), press and print ads and have added a story-telling element designed to deepen engagement with 15- and 30-second video introductions as well as longer – two-three minute – interviews with the seven featured students. The video content is being used in digital and mobile environments to further expand audience reach as well as engagement. This new media strategy is a move away from traditional televison and print advertising to digital and mobile media and is supported by an ongoing "Adwords" campaign. It is delivering exceptionally high click-through rates, proving our ads are getting cut-through and encouraging our target audiences to engage.

The brand campaign is supported with specific "I Am" campaigns for distance, semester two, open days and postgraduate, which have successfully contributed to achieving 100.3 per cent of the semester two enrolment targets.

The Summer School campaign will be in market from late August to early September. The objective is to achieve 99 per cent of our total 2015 enrolment target.

Page 22 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Brand, postgraduate and distance campaigns will continue through July to September, along with a smaller campaign for August start. College-specific campaigns for Health, Business,

Education, Agriculture, Bachelor of Arts, Aviation and College of Creative Arts will be in market from August to October. These are recruitment campaigns for the 2016 academic year.

Facebook:

We have very high levels of engagement measured by reach, likes, comments, shares, paid and organic reach, with posting Massey-owned or generated content that is relevant to our audience. We currently have 36,752 followers.

Twitter:

Our Twitter audience is steadily growing. We are maintaining our position of being the second most followed University in New Zealand on Twitter behind the University of

Auckland. As at July 1, we had 8626 followers.

Instagram:

The Massey University Instagram account continues to be the most followed university account in New Zealand with 2091 followers as at July 1.

LinkedIn:

Our LinkedIn page has the second most followers of New Zealand universities, with a total of

14,575 total followers.

Note: Sprout, our social media reporting tool, was not implemented until early this year, so comparative year-on-year data is not available for our social media platforms. We do have reporting below that tracks the size of audience across five social media platforms compared with other New Zealand universities. Some further context is needed. For example, the composition of the student cohort at each university and which social media platforms are the more widely used by age.

Engine website:

From January to June 15 there were 87,054 sessions with 73,593 unique users compared with 103,812 sessions with 89,348 unique users in the same period last year. The drop in visits is due to a combination of the brand campaign starting earlier last year and the August start campaign being directed to landing pages on the Massey website rather than the engine site.

July 1

%

University Facebook increase

Twitter % > Instagram % > LinkedIn % > YouTube % > TOTAL % >

Auckland 110,502 2% 16,987 4% 2780 47% 18,869 2% 2938 2% 152,076 3% 149,138

AUT

Canterbury

Lincoln

57,494

36,235

19,617

2% 7813 3%

5% 2646 5%

3% 4743 2%

2099 30% 12,312 5%

259 9% 7361 2%

261 9% 1752 3%

1123 3% 80,841 3% 79,718

1275 4% 47,776 4% 46,501

199 5% 26,572 3% 26,373

Massey

Otago

Vic

36,752

37,459

45,647

4% 8626 2%

3% 7827 2%

3% 6822 3%

2091 6% 14,575 2%

921 21% 9303 2%

261 10% 7203 2%

7245 2% 69,289 3% 62,044

944 2% 56,454 3% 55,510

669 2% 60,602 3% 59,933

Waikato 35,823 2% 5429 4% 1013 4% 2463 2% 712 3% 45,440 3% 44,728

6.3

Māori and Pasifika update

6.3.1

Whakanuia Te Marama O Te Reo Māori

Celebrate Māori Language Month

July is Māori language month at Massey University. The University considers the revitalisation of Te Reo Māori as a language so important that each year it extends Māori

Language Week to a month of activities, with events including Māori movies, waiata sessions, guest speakers and giant Māori scrabble games on all campuses.

Page 23 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Māori is an intrinsic part of the culture of Aotearoa New Zealand and is experiencing a resurgence in usage. Māori was recognised as an official language in 1987 and is becoming increasingly common in greetings, official functions and in education. Already there are many

Māori words in common use in our language and – even without always realising it – most of us use elements of reo Māori every day.

Massey University’s Māori name is Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa, which is not a direct translation. A literal translation is "the implantation of infinity" or "from inception to infinity".

The name is based on the view of Massey as a provider of life-long learning, able to move beyond traditional structures, and committed to the never-ending expansion of knowledge.

For a calendar of all Te Marama o Te Reo Māori events at Massey, or to book your place at events, visit the website

. http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/Māori/events/Māori-languagemonth/activities/activities.cfm

6.3.2

Gradu

ation: Māori

Of the 513 Māori who graduated in the 2015 period, 37 per cent (190) graduated in Council

(in the period June 2014 and May 2015), 7 per cent (34) graduated in the November 2014 graduation ceremony, and 29 per cent (289) attended one of the April and May graduation ceremonies (79 in Auckland, 150 in Palmerston North and 60 in Wellington). 44 per cent

(212) of all Māori graduates were from Humanities and Social Sciences, 24 per cent (121) from Business, 16 per cent (84) from Health, 10 per cent (52) from Sciences, 8 per cent (43) from Creative Arts and .02 per cent (1) from PACE.

Thirty-four per cent completed postgraduate programmes, including one Doctor of Clinical

Psychology and six PhDs (one psychology, one science, two arts and two creative arts).

Nine graduates, including two PhDs, were from the Māori Visual Arts programme.

6.3.3 Graduation Pasifika

Of the 169 Pasifika students who graduated in the 2015 period (June 2014 to May 2015), 34 per cent (57) graduated in Council, 4 per cent (7) graduated in the November 2014 ceremony, and the remaining 62 per cent (105) attended one of the April/May ceremonies

(Auckland 45, Palmerston North 36 and Wellington 24).

Thirty-seven per cent (62) of all Pasifika graduates were from Humanities and Social

Sciences, 22 per cent (37) from Business, 20 per cent (33) from Health, 14 per cent (23) from Sciences, 5 per cent (8) from Creative Arts and 4 per cent (6) from PACE.

Forty-two per cent (71) completed postgraduate programmes, including two Doctors of

Clinical Psychology and three Doctors of Philosophy.

6.3.4

Māori Science Academy

The Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor M āori and Pasifika, in conjunction with External

Relations and the College of Sciences is progressing the establishment of a Māori Academy o f Science in Manawatū to increase Māori participation in science. The academy will focus on agriculture, life sciences and agrifood business. Up to 50 year-

11 Māori pupils from Hato

Pāora College, Manukura, Palmerston North Boys' High School and Feilding High School will participate in the programme from next year. The University is working with schools and industry sponsors to confirm the work programme, which will involve homework sessions, field trips, science literacy workshops, whānau engagement and noho marae. The Māori

Academy of Science will be officially launched in January.

6.3.5 Cultural Audit Model

The Cultural Audit Model project is progressing. It is essentially a set of 15 measures distilled from strategic and contractual documents that defin e Massey’s commitment to Māori and

Pasifika advancement. The Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor M āori and Pasifika is consulting with three colleges and one service line, all of which are actively engaged in taking inventory of their respective (2014) initiatives to advance Māori and Pasifika. It is

Page 24 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

envisaged consultation with all colleges and service lines will be undertaken during the year.

A summary will be produced for each college and service line and a report collated for the

Senior Leadership Team. This report will effectively be a stocktake and provide a benchmark for monitoring and reporting on an ongoing basis.

6.3.6 Kuratini Marae refurbishment

The first stage of the project has been completed and work on clearing the site is about to begin.

6.3.7 Te Mata o Te Tau

The new Director of Te Mata o Te Tau/Academy for Māori Research and Scholarship,

Professor Huia Jahnke, has begun work with the academy (FTE 0.5). This will further enable the Māori Directorate to advance research collaborative relationships with both national and international indigenous groups.

6.3.8 A Pacific Governance Advisory Group is about to be formed and terms of reference are being drafted. The board will bring together representatives from Pasifika education and community organisations, all of whom have strengths and experience in all levels in the education sector. Importantly, the group will have an understanding of the needs of Pasifika learners and the needs of different Pasifika communities. The role of the Advisory Group will be to promote and support the implementation of the Pasifika strategy [email protected]

2020: Growing Pearls of Wisdom within Pasifika Communities.

6.3.9 This year’s Pasifika in Residence is renowned filmmaker Sima Urale. Ms Uralea will begin her residency as a fellow for the Fresh Horizons event happening at the College of Creative

Arts June 24-26. Her residency will extend into the second semester, where she will be interacting with students across all three schools and presenting a public lecture.

6.3.10 The secon d Te Whare Hēra's International Artist in Residence, Sasha Huber – along with her partner and collaborator Petri Saarikko – arrived in New Zealand in early February, and will undertake a fivemonth artist residency at the Te Whare Hēra live-work residency suite on

Clyde Quay Wharf. She is extending her long-term project Demounting Louis Agassiz on

New Zealand shores. Ms Huber's creative practice spans a variety of media, including video, photography, performance-based interventions and publications. Ms Huber and Mr Saarikko will be hosting monthly public events during their residency in Wellington, and will have an exhibition at the Wellington International Artist Residency Te Whare Hēra gallery at the end of their residency in June. Ms Huber and Mr Petri have already hosted a brunch for members of the public interested in their project Remedies, which shares traditional medicinal knowledge. Ms Huber also gave a public lecture on Demounting Louis Agassiz at the College of Creative Arts on March 19.

6.3.11 The School of English and Media Studies is establishing a partnership with

Māori arts organisation, Tawata Productions, which is led by New Zealand’s most awarded Māori playwright, Hone Kouka. Discussions continue as to how best Massey and Tawata can work together, including placing students with Tawata affiliates to give them opportunities for realworld work arts-marketing or artspublic relations experiences or internships with Māori arts organisations.

6.3.12 The Manaaki Taha Moana - Enhancing Coastal Ecosystems for Iwi - National Symposium and Hikoi, March 23-24 reported and reflected on six years of successful the Ministry of

Business, Innovation and Employment-funded research collaboration between western scientists and iwi researchers in Horowhenua and Tauranga Moana, and included a visit to sites of coastal restoration in the Horowhenua MTM Case Study.

The Manaaki Taha Moana research team comprises Professor Murray Patterson, School of

People, Environment Planning (science leader) and Derrylea Hardy, Ecological Economics

Research New Zealand (project manager), as well as researchers from Cawthron Institute,

Manaaki te Awanui, Taiao Raukawa and WakaDigital Ltd, who all presented research findings at the Symposium, alongside stakeholders and end users.

Page 25 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Professor Patterson and Derrylea Hardy gave the following presentation: Cross-Cultural

Research: Insights and Reflections from our Experiences in Manaaki Taha Moana.

6.3.13 Professor Helen Moewaka Barnes, SHORE/Whariki Research Centre, has been appointed chair of the interim Kahui

Māori, whose terms of reference agreed to work alongside Health and Wellbeing National Science Challenges.

6.3.14 Dr Sharon Henare, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology has been invited to be a member of the interim Kahui Māori to review the proposed research projects for the

Biological Heritage National Science Challenge.

6.3.15

On June 12 a memorandum of understanding was signed with the Tūhourangi Tribal

Authority in Rotorua. The agreement provides a framework for various initiatives between the parties, particularly between the Massey Business School and the authority.

6.3.16 Discussions regarding the alteration of criteria for the Massey Business School Future

Leaders Scholarship has been progressed. The aim is for a number of the 40 new student scholarships issued each year to focus on Māori students. It is expected that this will be implemented for next year's recruitment.

6.3.17 The College of Creative Arts, in collaboration with the office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor

Māori and Pasifika, will pilot a Māori mentoring programme aimed at providing leadership opportunities for senior Māori students and support for first-year Māori students. The programme will run during semester two and aims to instill the tikanga of Tuakana-Teina and promote the culture of experienced students nuturing less experienced students.

6.3.18 Associate Professor Tracy Riley, Institute of Education, will work with teachers and gifted education coordinators, from Dargaville High School and Bream Bay College to support the development and implementation of their successful Teacher-Led Innovation Fund project,

Ruamano. The project involves groups of year-9 and year-10 pupils engaging in a problemsolving project in collaboration with their community. http://giftednz.org.nz/the-ruamanoproject/

6.3.19

Te Au Rangahau (the Māori Business and Leadership Centre) in association with Westpac,

Poutama Trust, the Palmerston North City Council, Te Puni Kōkiri and UCOL hosted a

Matariki event on the evening of June 18 at the Palmerston North City Library. The event attracted more than 200 people and Dr Farah Palmer, School of Management, took the opportunity to share how this time of reflection and planning for the future aligns with the objective of Te Au Rangahau, which is to advance business and leadership knowledge that benefits the Māori and New Zealand economy.

6.4 Agrifood update

6.4.1 Please refer to items in item 3.0 Research and Scholarship item 3.13 on food processing research and 3.12 animal science successes reflecting the University’s strengths in agrifoodbusiness.

6.4.2

Agrifood Business activity report

National Fieldays:

A significant team (including recruitment, business development and research staff) attended

National Fieldays near Hamilton and hosted visitors to the Massey stand. Pro Vice-

Chancellors Professors Ray Geor, Ted Zorn and Paul McDonald attended for part of the four-day event and met with key stakeholders. Massey University was well represented at the significant stakeholder events and at the alumni event held on the Thursday evening.

Agrifood recruitment campaign:

During the year, considerable effort has gone into an integrated set of activities focusing on student recruitment (with a focus on promoting our capability across the value chain (ie agriculture, agriscience, food technology, business etc.) These are the topics identified in the

Ministry of Primary Industries’ report People Powered.

Page 26 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Website:

As part of the recruitment campaign, an agrifood website has been launched at www.masseyagrifood.ac.nz The site targets research partners, businesses and employers and the content is designed to show the university’s breadth and depth of expertise and knowledge. It showcases current research projects and the impact they are having on New

Zealand and the world.

Big Issues in Business:

The Massey Business School hosted a Big Issues in Business event at the Manaw atū campus in June, with guest speakers Martyn Dunne (Ministry of Primary Industries), Jo Finer

(Fonterra) and Dr Chris Galloway, from the School of Communication, Journalism and

Marketing – an authority on the management of risk communications.

Agricultural development projects:

Confirmation was received from Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade that the East Indonesia agricultural development project will be funded for five years (a total of $5 million). The team is led by Dr Chris Anderson and includes Professors Steve Morris and Julian Heyes and Dr

Janet Reid.

We have also been successful in another agricultural development project in Laos (worth

$10 million-$15 million over five years) where we partnered with Adam Smith International, a

British-based consultancy specialising in development activity.

Rankings:

The 2015 QS rankings have been announced and confirmed Massey’s reputation in agriculture (33rd in the world) and in veterinary studies (15th). The ranking for vet is the first time this has been calculated separately from agriculture. Please refer to item 2.7 above.

New Zealand Centre for Food Safety Science and Research Centre:

Planning and preparation for the New Zealand Centre for Food Safety Science and

Research Centre are continuing, with feedback from Ministry of Business, Innovation and

Education due back soon. The Chair (Dr Kevin Marshall) has now been confirmed.

The Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology:

The Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology was launched, bringing together the

School of Nutrition and Health, the FoodPilot and the newly-created Riddet Innovation.

Please refer to item 3.1 above.

A formal Steering Group and four separate work streams (international, media and profile, business development, capability development) have been established to support the increasing volume of activities occurring within the scope of the Director of AgriFood

Business.

The three principles of Te Puna Whakatipu continue with a busy programme of activities, supporting other academic units where appropriate and delivering on some projects themselves. The latter category includes the activities involved in FoodHQ.

Professor Claire Massey has been selected to represent Universities New Zealand on the

New Zealand Incorporated Committee, charged with coordinating projects associated with the New Zealand-China Agricultural Growth Partnership recently established by Ministry of

Primary Industries. The purpose of this group is to provide a greater level of coordination to the many activities occurring in China and to provide opportunity for greater leveraging of the different activities.

6.4.3 As part of our ongoing commitment to supporting the food innovation agenda of New

Zealand and export growth, Massey staff have also been very busy working on a major new collaborative proposal ($18 million) for Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment funding, Enabling Technologies for the Process Industries of New Zealand. Professors Jim

Jones and Richard Archer are leading the Massey team, which will host the initiative with

Page 27 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

staff drawn from AgResearch, University of Auckland, University of Otago, Plant and Food

Research and the Riddet Institute.

6.4.4 Also on the agricultural theme – the Board of AgriOne met in May to refresh its strategy.

AgriOne is a Partnership for Excellence project that brings together Massey, Lincoln and

Dairy New Zealand. The aim is to provide rapid and easy access to the agricultural expertise of the two universities for primary industries. Many staff, particularly from Sciences would have already been involved with AgriOne programmes. There are opportunities for staff from across the University who have an interest in building the capacity of the primary industries to move up the value chain.

6.5 Regional Engagement

6.5.1 In May the University signed an agreement with the Palmerston North City Council, the New

Zealand Army, Horizons Regional Council and Rangitaane with the aim of extending the

Manawatū River Walkway from the Bridge to Linton Camp. It is hoped that part of the plan will involve the building of a new footbridge across the river. The site is yet to be determined.

6.5.2 In the first of College of Health Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor Paul McDonald's regional roadshows, he travelled to Gisborne to meet with thought leaders, key healthcare providers, iwi, media and politicians to explore new opportunities and partnerships for Massey. He met with Michael Muir from the Chelsea Hospital Trust, Gisborne’s only private hospital; the editorial board of the Gisborne Herald including editor Jeremy Muir and reporters; mayor

Meng Foon; Kim Holland of Career New Zealand; Leighton Evans, chief executive of the

Eastland Community Trust; Jan Mogford and Susan Jacobs from Eastland Institute of

Technology; David

Scott, chairman of the board for Tairāwhiti District Health Board; and with

Teepa Wawatai, chief executive of Te Rūnunganui o Ngāti Porou. He also had media interviews with the Gisborne Herald, Turanga FM, and the Radio Network. The discussions were successful, with commitments from all parties to enhance our stakeholding in this critical region. Two more regional roadshows are anticipated this year, to Whanganui and

Taranaki.

6.5.3 College of Creative Arts staff Associate Professor Chris Bennewith, Associate Professor

Andre Ktori, and Dr Simon Mark, attended the second meeting of the Creative Digital

Industries Reference Group. The group has been set up by the Wellington Regional Strategy

Office (part of the Greater Wellington Regional Council) to provide advice on a taxonomy for the Creative Arts and Digital Industries, and enable the Wellington region to draw on up-todate and relevant economic data on these fast-growing sectors. The Wellington Regional

Strategy Office’s taxonomy project is being undertaken in partnership with Callaghan

Innovation and Knowledge Matrix.

6.6 Other examples of the breadth and depth of the University’s connections, relationships, contributions and impacts:

6.6.1 Associate Professor Elspeth Tilley, School of English and Media Studies, met with the

Cancer Society of New Zealand to discuss a possible Massey collaboration with their smokefree advocates in schools programme. The collaboration will build on the work of the

It’s My Life Smokefree project run by Massey, linking in with existing Cancer Society initiatives and supplying existing resources (such as the It’s My Life Smokefree DVD) to cancer society participant schools.

6.6.2 Elizabeth Stewart, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, attended a briefing by

Ministry of Health on the draft of the new Eating and Activity Guidelines that are replacing the

Food and Nutrition Guidelines for New Zealand Adults; a briefing on the updated Obesity background document being prepared by the Ministry of Health for Minister of Health

Jonathan Coleman; and represented Massey at a meeting of the New Zealand Food and

Grocery Council Health and Technical Working Group.

6.6.3 Iona McCarthy, School of Economics and Finance, and Professor Nicola Shadbolt, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, ran a workshop – Investment Analysis for Rural

Professionals – for local members of the New Zealand Institute of Primary Industry

Page 28 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Management. Eleven farm advisers attended the afternoon workshop; they realised the importance of the material covered and are keen to follow up.

6.6.4 The Big Issues in Business event Customer Loyalty through Big Data co-hosted by Massey,

Spark and Retail New Zealand was held at the Spark Conference Centre in Auckland on

March 18. Associate Professor Valentyna Melnyk, School of Communication, Journalism and

Marketing, presented the findings of her research into loyalty programmes and Dean Cook

(head of marketing at the Farmers Trading Company) presented the industry perspective.

6.6.5 A second Big Issues in Business event, The New Leaders, was held in Wellington on March

31, featuring Dr Farah Palmer, School of Management, and industry speakers Liz Gibbs

(chief executive, Philanthropy New Zealand), Mike Bennetts (chief executive, Z Energy),

Andrew Hampton (Government Chief Talent Office, State Services Commission) and Chris

Till (chief executive, Human Resources Institute of New Zealand).

6.6.6 Dr Vaughan Symonds, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, was invited to serve on a research programme review panel by David Chapman (Dairy New Zealand), which took place in

February. Under review was a seven-year project (run by Dairy New Zealand and

AgResearch) jointly funded by Dairy New Zealand and the Ministry of Primary Industries to investigate various issues around pasture forage persistence. The review panel consisted of

David Barker, Ohio State University, and Dr Vaughan Symonds, Institute of Fundamental

Sciences, with input from Cameron Ludemann and David Chapman (both of Dairy New

Zealand). The review consisted of one day of seminars and interviews with Dairy New

Zealand and AgResearch scientists who head the research and one half-day of report writing. The review report provided feedback on research thus far and guidance on the direction of research for the remaining funding period.

6.6.7 In March, staff from the Institute of Agriculture and Environment, the Institute of Veterinary,

Animal and Biomedical Sciences and the Institute of Education gave a presentation to approximately 80 people at the Ministry of Primary Industries on Innovation in Agricultural

Extension: The Farmer Learning Project.

6.6.8 The 2015 Careers Advisers Update Day: Shaping our Communities was held at the Albany campus on March 20. Professor Peter Kemp, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, made a presentation entitled Agrifood graduates wanted – the sector is crying out for qualified staff

to meet growing demand.

6.5.10 The New Zealand VEX Robotics National Championships 2015 were held from February 28-

March 1 at the Vodafone Events Centre in Manukau, Auckland, and streamed live via the

Massey University website.

6.6.9 Dr Weihong Ji, Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences and New Zealand Institute for

Advanced Studies, gave a talk to an ecology interest group of Birkenhead Primary School.

Together with the deputy head of the School, Alice Ho, who was a New Zealand Royal

Society Teaching Fellow, they are forming an ongoing collaboration involving the school students and will work on behavioural ecology of native birds in urban ecosystem.

6.6.10 Associate Professor Rebecca Sinclair and Nick Kapica, College of Creative Arts, visited

Christchurch with Professor John O’Neil and Diane Leggett, Institute of Education, to present

Massey’s shortlisted joint bid for the Greater Christchurch Education Renewal Programme.

The project would aid a transformation of Christchurch schools through a participatory design led, education informed approach. The collaboration between the College of Creative Arts and the College of Education has been particularly productive through the common ground the schools share in co-design and co-construction.

6.6.11 The Enjoy Occasional Journal The Dendromaniac, published by Enjoy Public Art Gallery, was launched at College of Creative Arts in March. The online journal contributes to current dialogue on contemporary art practice and features the writings and artworks of various

College of Creative Arts staff, including Associate Professor Ann Shelton, Dr Martin Patrick,

Maddie Leach, Sian Torrington and Bronwyn Holloway-Smith. It is available online at: http://journal.enjoy.org.nz/the-dendromaniac

Page 29 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

6.6.12 Tim Parkin, School of Design, joined members of the Wellington City Council and businesses community to mentor five teams participating in the Smart Energy Challenge. The Smart

Energy Challenge is a collaboration between Enspiral and the Wellington City Council to launch initiatives for smarter energy use in Wellington.

6.6.13 In April, Massey University successfully hosted the cross-country phase of the New Zealand

Pony Club Eventing Championships in Manawatū. More than 150 of the top junior event riders tackled what has been described as a world-class course on Massey farms and the

Arboretum. The course was designed by lecturer Andrew Scott, who is an internationally accredited cross-country designer. For more information: http://horsetalk.co.nz/2015/04/15/eventing-course-massey-hallowed-turf/#axzz3XKSCa78H

6.6.14 Pit Park project in May. The park was originally where clay came from for a local kiln. After many decades it left a hole the size of six football fields that was filled with every kind of rubbish imaginable. Slowly it is being turned into what will be a fantastic amenity for

Palmerston North. Massey students have volunteered to help with planting for the past six years. Thanks to those who volunteered this year and the staff (including the ever present

Manawatū campus registrar Sandi Shillington) who assisted.

6.6.15 MPOWER and The Warehouse Group held their research collaboration launch on May 5 at the new Sir Stephen Tindall Learning Centre at the Warehouse Group headquarters in

Northcote, Auckland. There will be three presentations from top MPOWER researchers,

Professor Stuart Carr, School of Psychology (the business of inclusion), Professor Jarrod

Haar, School of Management (business leadership), and Professor Jim Arrowsmith, School of Management (employee engagement).

6.6.16 Teacher Experience Day and Wellington regional careers advisers visit

College of Creative Arts staff worked alongside Marketing and Recruitment, to host more than 30 secondary school teachers and 35 career advisers from the around the region.

Here’s what they had to say about us: exciting new courses; excellent spaces; great comms with schools compared with other unis; great reputation as our local school; practical; industry linked; job possibilities; exciting; well resourced; modern; collaborative; at the forefront; best institution for engaging with teachers; keeping up with the global world; impressive; growing and branching wide for community; love the integration of specialist areas; love the individual approach to learning; contemporary feel; interdisciplinary approach;

I would definitely recommend it.

6.6.17 Professor Glyn Harper, School of Humanities, was the Historical Adviser on the 100th

Anniversary Tour of Gallipoli, April 14-28 2015.

6.6.18 Associate Professor Ngatai Taepa, College of Creative Arts, led a collaborated entitled WWI

Remembered: A Light & Sound Show with Transmit, GAS Project, StoryBox and artist Michel

Tuffery to produce a light and sound show projected onto the Dominion Museum Building and Carillon. The work coincided with Anzac Day and commemorates the 100th anniversary of WWI. It has been described as proud, inspired and emotional.

6.6.19 Two Massey students, Georgia-rose Winter and Sophie Goodwin, have been selected for the

New Zealand and Great Britain War Memorial Project team. They will work with two students from Wimbledon College of Art and Weta to produce the final work, which will be installed in

Pukeahu National War Memorial Park, celebrating the collaborative efforts of British and New

Zealand troops during WWI and beyond.

6.6.20 Associate Professor Chris Bennewith, College of Creative Arts, is working on a collaborative student New Zealand and Great Britain War Memorial Project between the College of

Creative Arts, Wimbledon College of Art, Weta and the British High Commission.

6.6.21 The School of English and Media Studies, in conjunction with the Palmerston North City

Council, welcomed Jaspreet Singh from Canada to the position of Literary Artist in

Residence as part of their Visiting Artist Scheme.

Page 30 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

6.6.22 Professor Jenny Carryer, School of Nursing, in her role as Chair of the National Nurses

Organisations, has been engaged in strategic discussions with Dr Jonathon Simon, director of Green Cross Health New Zealand, and Dr Graeme Benny, director of Health Workforce

New Zealand, to discuss the nursing workforce strategy and funding for the implementation of the new nurse practitioner training programme.

6.6.23 Craig McGill, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, instigated the development of the New

Zealand Indigenous Seed Bank. In April, Jessica Schnell, Institute of Agriculture and

Environment (the Seed Bank Coordinator) and Rachael Davies (Millennium Seed Bank) joined with staff from the Dunedin Botanic Garden on a collecting expedition in Fiordland, where nine species were collected. Ms Schnell and Ms Davies, in coordination with the

Department of Conservation, also collected seed of dysphania pusilla, a plant thought to have been extinct for 60 years.

As part of the development of the seed bank, a seed collector training course was held at the

Department of Conservation national office in Wellington, which increased the number of trained seed collectors to 83. There has been a steady stream of visits from staff from the

Millennium Seed Bank in Britain to join in with some of the collecting expeditions. Tim Pearce and Stephanie Miles from the Royal Botanic Gardens (and the Millennium Seed Bank partnership) will be here in May. Mr Pearce is to help with the BRAHMS database. BRAHMS powers the Millennium Seed Bank Partnership Data Warehouse into which all the New

Zealand accession data is entered. Ms Miles will help develop skills among the seed bank volunteers using the Faxitron X-ray.

6.6.24 Associate Professor Elspeth Tilley, School of English and Media Studies, was appointed as the external advisor to the Research Ethics Committee of Kuratini Tuwhera: Open

Polytechnic of New Zealand.

6.6.25 Associate Professor Tracy Riley, Institute of Education, was appointed as the external adviser to the Research Ethics Committee of Kuratini Tuwhera: Open Polytechnic of New

Zealand.

6.6.26 Associate Professor Chris Bennewith, College of Creative Arts, was chair of the Future of

Lighting Summit, as part of Vivid Sydney.

6.6.27 Spring is the name of the College of Creative Arts' rapid incubation programme for new and recent graduates, supporting those leaving the College who have aspirations to work more entrepreneurially and develop ideas from their final major project into a commercially viable project.

The Spring programme has been focussing on building strong partnerships. The "Springers" have connected with industry partners, creating mutually beneficial relationships and generating relevant experience as well as supervised development of their own intellectual property. Examples include:

·

A self-funding pilot of the Breath Friends educational illustration project in partnership

· with the Asthma Foundation.

A collaboration between the NewBee (urban beehive) project and Hive Doctor

(innovative New Zealand-designed beekeeping equipment).

A meeting with a team from Callaghan Innovation to introduce Spring and investigate

· its value to the existing incubation ecosystem. The team they met with are responsible for the Incubator Support Programme which accelerates the growth and success of

New Zealand start-up businesses through a range of services and funding.

6.6.28 Associate Professor Chris Bennewith, College of Creative Arts, Associate Professor Andre

Ktori, School of Music and Creative Media Production, and Dr Simon Mark, College of

Creative Arts, are working with Wellington Regional Council’s strategy office to develop a

Creative Industries Taxonomy for New Zealand.

6.6.29 Fab Lab Wellington hosted numerous visitors, including Martin Luff from Wikihouse New

Zealand, secondary school teachers from around the country, visitors from Fab Lab

Christchurch and Fab Lab Western Australia.

Page 31 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

6.6.30 The Academy of Sport presentation evening was held on May 18, with about 70 invitees in attendance, including Massey staff, academy athletes and their families, local sports organisations and mayors and mayoral representatives.

6.6.31 The Careers and Employability Services team took the lead in organising Massey participation in the local Sort It expo with People and Organisational Development and

Student Recruitment staff. More than 1800 people interacted with the Massey stall. The annual Career Expo was held in the Manawatū campus Student Centre dining hall and was attended by about 1000 students. The Volunteer Expo was attended by about 250 students.

6.6.32

Manawatū campus registrar Dr Sandi Shillington prepared and spoke to the Univer-City submission to Palmerston North City Council’s Long Term Plan on May 8. Meetings are scheduled with various stakeholders to promote the proposal.

6.6.33 Professor Hugh Blair, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, was appointed as an inaugural Auckland Advocate by Mayor Len Brown. The Auckland Advocate

Programme is a new initiative launched by the Auckland Convention Bureau (subsidiary of the Auckland Council) in May 2015. At the launch, 14 people were appointed as advocates and Professor Blair was the only appointee from outside Auckland. The purpose of the programme is to attract business to the city. Professor Blair was invited because under the umbrella of the AL Rae Centre, he won the right to host the 11th World Congress on

Genetics Applied to Livestock Production in Auckland in 2018 – an event expected to generate about $2m in revenue.

6.6.34 The School of English and Media Studies theatre and media students have been using their creative talents for social good by exploring new ways to communicate with people who have dementia, as well as helping others to better understand the condition. Students at the

Auckland campus, led by Dr Rand Hazou, School of English and media studies, have developed short films, music videos and a theatre performance in partnership with a nearby residential care facility, Aria Gardens in Albany, as part of the new Creativity in the

Community paper. Aria Gardens manager Jon Amesbury, says the project was “hugely positive". He says the residents who took part "felt really empowered because they were part of creative projects that recognised their lives and experiences, which increases their selfworth". Mr Amesbury is entering the project in the national Excellence in Care Awards 2015.

6.6.35 The Wellington School of English and Media Studies theatre studies programme has been named as the official New Zealand partner with international creative activism nongovernment agencies: Theatre Without Borders, The Arctic Cycle and NoPassport, to stage a short play about climate change as part of an International Climate Change Theatre Action in November. Associate Professor Elspeth Tilley, set up the international relationship with the project, which is coordinated from New York City and involves a series of worldwide readings and performances intended to bring awareness to – and discussion around – climate change. This action will involve theatre studies/expressive arts students and staff of the school in Wellington and is in support of the United Nations Conference on Climate Change in Paris taking place from November 30 to December 11.

6.6.36

Te Pūtahi-a-Toi staff Veronica Tawhai, Dr Darryn Joseph, Te Rina Warren, Koka Nadell and

Julia Taiapa were judges at the Nga Manu Korero Regional Speech Competitions on June

12.

6.6.37 Dr Taisia Huckle, SHORE Centre, and Dr Renee Railton, SHORE Centre, facilitated the

International Alcohol Control meeting prior to the KBS meeting in Munich, May 30-31.

6.6.38 Distinguished Professor Paul Spoonley, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, attended the first SuperU – Social Science Experts Panel meeting, Wellington, June 23.

6.6.39 Professor Tony Parker, College of Creative Arts, was an invited judge at the Fieldays

Innovation Awards.

Page 32 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

6.6.40 Distinguished Professor Anne Noble, School of Art, has received funding from the New

Zealand France Friendship Fund to undertake further work on a project to bring a French hives in schools project to New Zealand, and develop an innovative research collaboration between artists, scientists, educationalists and teachers.

6.6.41 The Albany Library hosted a Japanese photo exhibition in July in association with the

Japanese Consul-General. The exhibition is excellent and reminded me of how much work the University needs to do with the very diverse Auckland community to ensure that they see themselves as integral to the campus.

6.7 With the purpose of reinforcing strong strategic connections and taking the opportunity to present the University’s point of view, I meet with various people and groups around New

Zealand and overseas. The following are by way of example:

· Addressed the New Zealand Association of Cooperative Learning Conference (otherwise known as Work Integrated Learning). This was an opportunity to showcase the leadership Massey University staff are showing in this area. The work of Massey staff

Associate Professor Andy Martin, Malcolm Rees, Manvir Edwards and Levinia Paku in particular was a centrepiece of the conference. This work relates directly to the

University’s student employability strategy as well as efforts to improve learning.

· Grow North discussion with Auckland city.

· Met with Massey marketing agency (Tracta).

· Attended the ANZAC National Commemorative Service, Pukeahu National War

Memorial Park, Buckle Street, Wellington.

· Speech to the Institute of Financial Advisors about FoodHQ.

· Speech to secondary school careers advisers.

· Met with Peter Biggs, chair of Creative Wellington.

· Speech to Education Wellington International.

· Welcomed the participants to the annual Pitt Park tree planting event (this included volunteers from the Massey Manawatū Halls of Residence and campus staff).

· Welcomed the Pakistan High Commissioner, his excellency Syed Ibne Abbas, to the

Manawatū campus.

· Participated in a TV3 Three60 programme on the British election.

· Catch-up with the chief executive of New Zealand Trade and Enterprise, Peter Chrisp.

· Attended a speech by Associate Minister of Trade Todd McClay.

· Discussion on publicity for planned extension of river pathway through to Linton,

Manawatū.

· Memorandum of understanding signing with China State Administration of Foreign

Experts Affairs (SAFEA). An important government agency within the Chinese

Government system (Refer to item 7.7 below).

· Dairy New Zealand.

· Attended a BCC Board meeting (May and July).

· Met with Federated Farmers chief executive Graham Smith.

· Attended an Asia New Zealand Executive Committee meeting (May and July).

· Meeting regarding the Manawatū Chamber of Commerce Advisory Board.

· AgriOne Board meeting.

· Meeting with Radio New Zealand chief executive Paul Thompson.

· Opened the new New Zealand Forum in Hawke’s Bay (May). The forum attracted a full house, a great deal of publicity and a very spirited discussion. The focus was on the changing population in the Bay and the challenges this represents for the community.

Distinguished Professor Paul Spoonley and Associate Professor Richard Shaw led the discussion which included a line-up of almost every leading politician in the region.

· Interview with the Office of the Council of Veterinary Deans of Australia and New

Zealand.

· Interview with Jamie MacKay for RadioSport's Farming Show (May and July).

· Welcomed attendees to the Māori Academy of Science school Information evening. The discussion with five central North Island schools interested in a

Māori Academy of

Science project went well. The aim is to establish cohorts of Māori in each school who will be encouraged to study STEM subjects when they attend university. (Refer item

6.3.4 above).

· Met with the Israeli Ambassador, His Excellency Yosef Livne.

Page 33 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

· Attended the Territorial Force Employers Scheme Employer of the Year Awards.

· Academy of Sport Presentation Evening and re-signing of the Athlete Friendly Tertiary

Network Agreement at Albany.

· Attended a meeting of the EDUCANZ Transition Board.

· Speech to National Horticulture Field Days, Hastings.

· Attended a Reputation and Risk Management in the Agrifood Industry event, facilitated by Professor Claire Massey.

· In early June I depart for short visit to China with a Massey delegation. (Refer to item 7.1 below for further details).

· Visit by the Vice-President of Hebei University (June).

· Welcomed the China Scholarship Council – Group 1 participants.

· Opened the Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology.

· Welcomed the New Zealand Institute of Food Science and Technology 50th Anniversary conference.

· Speech to the New Zealand Principals Foundation on Thriving in the Asian Century.

· Met with chief executive Chris Gosling of the new combined WelTec, Whitireia Institute.

· Attended Tertiary Education and Research, Science and Technology Minister Steven

Joyce’s launch of the Resilience to Nation Challenges National Sciences Challenges.

· Met with the Local Government Conference organiser.

· Speech to the New Zealand Principals Federation Conference – A Third Way for

Education?

· Speech to the New Zealand Universities Marketing and Communications annual meeting, hosted at the

Manawatū campus.

· Attended the Wellington Gold Awards (refer to item 5?? Above).

· Attended the Japanese Photographic Exhibition.

· Tour of the Sunlight exhibition at Te Manawa Museum.

· Attended an event to mark 40 years of New Zealand-ASEAN relationships at

Government House.

· Meeting with Auckland City on the Grow North project.

6.8 Bereavements

It is with sadness that we record the passing of the following:

· Mr Craig Norgate, an outstanding alumni. Mr Norgate was one of the leading figures in agribusiness, including as chief executive of Fonterra. I recall him as a champion of New

Zealand who understood the need for change. His leadership will be missed.

· Professor Michael Thomas McManus, Professor of Plant Physiology, Institute of

Fundamental Sciences. Our condolences to his family and colleagues.

7.0

Te Ao Whānui

Internationalisation

7.1 Last year when Chinese President Xi Jinping visited New Zealand he was accompanied by his wife Madame Peng Liyuan. The University conferred an Honorary Doctorate on Madame

Peng in recognition of her outstanding international contribution to the performing arts and public service in international health and education programmes. That Madame Peng accepted our Honorary Doctorate was seen around the world, especially among Chinese people, as marking Massey out as New Zealand’s leading university.

Subsequently, Madame Peng invited Massey University to visit her in China. Over a week in early June, the Chancellor Chris Kelly, Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor Claire Robinson and

Dr Rebecca Sinclair from the College of Creative Arts, plus Arthur Chin and Michael

O’Shaughnessy from the International Office, Wellington campus registrar Deanna Riach and myself were in Beijing hosted by Madame Peng. More specifically, our hosts were the

People’s Liberation Army Academy of Art which Madame Peng leads.

Page 34 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Sir Richard Taylor and staff from Weta Workshop were also part of the visit. Sir Richard read the citation for the Honorary Doctorate conferred on Madame Peng and she asked that he be part of our delegation. The many hugely successful films that Sir Richard and Weta staff have contributed to have made them very famous in China. He is currently working on productions with Chinese film makers.

The visit began on June 7 with a series of presentations by the Academy of Arts showcasing some areas of their programme which includes music, literature, dance, drama, visual arts, communication and film. It is no exaggeration to say that the talent on display was extraordinary. As the academy staff pointed out, they count among their alumni Nobel Prize

Winners, bestselling authors, world famous musicians, leading film-makers and artists from the full range of artistic disciplines.

Massey was given opportunities to talk about what the University had to offer – particularly in the areas of creativity and design. Weta Workshop also made several presentations.

The week also included a formal dinner hosted by Madame Peng and other events with the aim of promoting relationships between the University and China. It is hard to underestimate the significance of Madame Peng, the First Lady of China, taking time to personally host an event for Massey. This is something that would normally be reserved for visiting

Governments. Our visit was organised and facilitated by the PLA Academy of Art – also something that it unusual. (Please refer to Appendix XVI for further details.)

During the visit Massey signed a memorandum of understanding with the China Scholarship

Council that will see 120 Chinese academics taking agriculture and food-related programmes through the University. This was a significant step that should lay the foundation for more scholarships being allocated to students wanting to study at Massey.

Thanks must go to the New Zealand Embassy in Beijing for hosting a function for Massey

Alumni, partner universities, recruitment agents and people from the film industry associated with Weta. The support of the embassy and staff from Education New Zealand was critical to the success of the visit.

In summary, the week was enormously important for Massey’s relationships with China. Our activities were prominent in both the mainstream and social media. Discussions are already under way as to what will be the next steps.

A visit as significant as this does not come about by chance. It is the result of Massey

University’s longstanding commitment to working in China, resulting in alumni numbering

9839, partnerships with many leading universities and Government agencies and a steady programme of reciprocal visits.

Credit needs to go to such names as Dr Alex Chu, Professors Hugh Blair, Steve Morris, Paul

Kenyon, Chris Moore, Don Cleland, Martin Young, Robert Anderson, James Chapman,

Frank Sligo, Fawzi Laswad, Richard Archer, Paul Rainey, Vice-Chancellor Judith Kinnear, Dr

Ruili Wang, Dr Mingsheng Li, Tim Harvey, Bruce Graham and many others who have steadily built Massey’s reputation in a range of disciplines. The efforts of many staff in service areas of the University have also made a significant contribution. For example, much of the success of the visit over the past week is due to the hard and patient work of Mr Chin,

Mr O’Shaughnessy and their colleagues from the International Office.

It is this history which led to Massey University being on stage when New Zealand and China signed the Free Trade Agreement and the conferment of the Honorary Doctorate on

Madame Peng. It also lies behind the $NZ2 billion announcement recently that Massey animal scientists have been appointed as expert consultants to assist in achieving a substantial increase in China’s national red meat production and to foster business relationships between China and New Zealand. In the immediate future, Massey staff will be involved in a $440,000 project.

Massey University is now in a unique position in China. Its reputation is strong and its profile is high. It is important that we build on what has been achieved in the years ahead –

Page 35 of 97

7.2

7.3

7.4

7.5

7.6

7.7

7.8

C 15/54 – August

Part I

particularly as the Massey University Worldwide project takes shape. There is no doubt that the 21st century will belong to universities that have a global reputation. What Massey achieves globally will be heavily influenced by its relationship with China.

Massey University Worldwide

Taking the best of New Zealand to the world, the first international launch of Massey

University Worldwide was held at the Going Global 2015 conference in London in June.

Thank you and congratulations to all involved for this great start. Please refer to Appendix

XVII for further detail.

Consultation with Education New Zealand has prompted renewed efforts to establish a

Foundation pathway with selected secondary schools in Shanghai (a proposal will be developed).

Consultancy support is being provided to Vision Manawatū for the development of a

Regional International Educatio n Strategy for Palmerston North and the Manawatū. The initial draft Strategy presentation has been made to the Vision Manawatū Governance

Group. The draft strategy was well received and an Advisory Group has been appointed to assist in further refining and enhancing the document. After approval, an application to ENZ for Regional Partnership Funding to implement the strategy will be developed. A regional

(city) launch of the strategy is being planned and a number of city councillors have voiced their support for the initiative which is receiving resource support from the university.

Massey Manawatū staff said farewell to a cohort of international students in May. It was very interesting to hear the individual reflections of the students on their time at Massey – universally positive. Thank you goes to Sylvia Hooker and the other international support staff who do such an outstanding job.

Committee of University Academic Programmes approval has been received for the Hebei

University of Technology (HEBUT) 3+1 programme for the Bachelor of Information Sciences degree.

International agreements included:

· Massey University has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with University of

Maastricht in the Netherlands and Professor Jenny Carryer, School of Nursing, met with international research partners in Switzerland in June.

· An offshore delivery Agreement variation was signed with Singapore Polytechnic

(BFoodTech(Hons).

· A Spanish offshore delivery agreement renewal was signed with University of New

England, Australia.

· An important memorandum of understanding was signed with the Chinese Government

Agency SAFEA (State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs ) in May. SAFEA oversee the allocation of some 37,000 scholarships annually to students who want to study at the world’s top universities – including Massey. The agreement reflects not only the current standing of Massey but also the many decades of work in China by staff who have built our reputation.

· A number of other recruitment-focused agreements were signed with international parties, including Wuhan University, the China Scholarship Council, Zhejiang University,

Ningbo Institute of Technology, University of Da Nang, Chiba University, Japan,

University of Northern British Columbia, Canada, and Rajamangala University of

Technology, Phra Nakhon, Thailand.

See also item 7.5 below.

International delegations and groups hosted included:

· The International Office and External Relations hosted a group of nine print and other media representatives from well-known organisations in Indonesia and Malaysia. This was an important opportunity to lift the University profile in two key international recruitment markets. The focus of the visit was on Massey’s innovation in Food

Sciences, and in Engineering and Technology.

Page 36 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

· The University hosted an Education New Zealand-organised delegation of Pakistan

Government Higher Education Commission officials and nine Vice-Chancellors. The

University has longstanding ties with Pakistan and is the clear leader amongst New

Zealand universities in the market. The key visit objectives were to maintain the strong relationship with the commission and continue recruitment of high-quality PhDs funded directly by the commission, and to build bilateral connections with individual universities, which increasingly have either their own funding or are funded by the commission to send faculty abroad for PhD study. A high-level relationship recognition document of understanding (Letter of Intent) with the commission was signed, along with a memorandum of understanding renewal with the University of Agriculture Faisalabad, and new memoranda of understanding with the National University of Science and

Technology and the Institute of Business Administration Karachi. All are leaders in their respective areas of expertise. Education New Zealand commended Massey for our efforts, noting the delegation members were highly impressed.

· Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Pro Vice-Chancellor College of Business Professor Ted

Zorn led the participation of a Massey delegation at a New Zealand-China Universities

Symposium arranged by the Chinese Embassy to discuss collaborative models and future opportunities. The large Chinese delegation consisted of vice-presidents and senior leaders from 14 leading universities (all are elite Project 985 members) and the

China Scholarship Council.

· The China Scholarship Council sent 37 participants to Massey Palmerston North for a 12 week programme on agricultural pedagogy. The programme is being delivered jointly between the Centre for Professional and Continuing Education, Institute of Agriculture and Environment and Institute of Education. The programme commenced late June, with a second group proposed for September. Participants are all academic staff primarily from the Henan province of China.

· The first group of Chinese university lecturers travelling to New Zealand to undertake agricultural and/or business pedagogy professional development training visited in June.

The initial agreement to host 120 delegates has been increased to 240 via a verbal agreement with the China Scholarship Council.

· Tim Croft, College of Creative Arts international adviser, coordinated the hosting of two

Chinese delegations to Wellington this month – representatives from Chinese recruitment agency JJL (pictured at Fab Lab) and journalists from the China Education

Daily and Beijing Business Today (pictured in Motion Capture suite).

· A delegation from Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine visited the

Manawatū campus. Discussions with the School of Food and Nutrition identified followup opportunities around a customised study abroad programme in Nutrition; PhD staff capability development programme and staff exchanges through the China Scholarship

Council’s visiting scholar programme.

· College of Health Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor Paul McDonald hosted a Singapore

Institute of Technology delegation at Albany to further progress negotiations on the proposed joint delivery of the Bachelor of Food Technology (Hons) programme in

Singapore.

· The sixth group of BFoodTech(Hons) students from the Singapore campus arrived to complete their research projects. Five students are based at the Albany campus and 25 at Manawatū. This is the final cohort from the campus based at Singapore Polytechnic.

· The School of Nursing hosted 25 visiting Thai nurse-academics (including two Massey alumni), from Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Thailand, at the Albany campus. The nurses expressed a great interest in the Simulation Suite where third-year students and their lecturer demonstrated a typical teaching session.

· The College of Creative Arts Doctoral and Masters programme hosted a team of scholars from Lund University in Sweden. The team is part of a collaborative initiative between College of Creative Arts staff Professor Sally Morgan, Professor Vicki

Karaminas, Associate Professor Rebecca Sinclair and Rodney Adank and Professor

Anders Warell from Lund. The visit is part of a successful grant application that provides for new and innovative experiences and opportunities for postgraduate students studying in New Zealand and Sweden. The Massey team will be visiting Lund in October as part of this exchange initiative.

· Six government and finance executives from India and the Philippines joined a one-week short course on Rural Banking and Finance in New Zealand, the third to be delivered in the past 15 months.

Page 37 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

· Piloted in 2014 with seven students, the Institute for Agriculture and Environment offering of the National Expedition and Internship programme will be run in June-July, with 37 students from 12 different United States universities. The Centre for Professional and

Continuing Education is working hard to replicate this close collaboration with the

College of Sciences and the institute by developing a joint offering from the School of

Communication,Journalism, and Marketing and the School of English and Media Studies for delivery in 2016.

· Massey University hosted a Chinese Food and Drug Administration delegation at the

Manawatū campus in June as part of its Global Food Safety Partnership facilitation role with the World Bank. The purpose of the delegation's visit to New Zealand was to learn about the development and implementation of food safety regulatory systems within the agricultural and food sector. Meetings, workshops, site tours and discussions were held with farmers, industry leaders and government agencies, including Fonterra Cooperative, Milk Testing New Zealand, the Primary Industries Ministry, Food Standards

Australia New Zealand, AssureQuality and Price Waterhouse Coopers.

· Dr Kurt Lawrence, from the United States Department of Agriculture, visited the

Manawatū campus as part of his role as external science adviser on the Primary Growth

Partnership project. He conducted a seminar on food safety that was open to all staff and was well-attended.

· Professor Thomas Glade, from the University of Vienna, recently visited to progress collaborative research with and presented a seminar to the Physical Geography Group of the Institute of Agriculture and Environment.

· The School of Engineering and Advanced Technology hosted a delegation from Hebei

University of Technology to discuss the 3+1 programme for the Bachelor of Information

Sciences degree. Approval of the programme has been received from the Pricing Bureau in China so can progress this to the next stage in readiness for the first intake of students later this year.

· The Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences hosted Dr Andrew McCabe, executive director of the American Association of Veterinary Medical Colleges. Dr

McCabe was visiting universities in Australia and took the opportunity to also visit

Massey University. He toured the Veterinary Teaching Hospital facilities followed by discussions with senior institute staff with regard to closer working links between non-

United States American Veterinary Medical Association-accredited veterinary schools.

7.9 Other examples of international connections, relationships, contributions and impact:

7.9.1 March is one of the biggest months of the year for the international recruitment team, with each of the International Coordinators travelling overseas. Activities undertaken included:

· China

Attended the China International Education Exhibition Tour Guangzhou Fair and took part in the tour organised by the Chinese Service Centre for Scholarly Exchange. This is one of the major exhibitions fairs that is renowned in China and internationally. This was followed by visits to four of our registered Chinese agents with branches in Chengdu, including Global Education Network, New Oriental, JJL and AOJI.

· Indonesia

Participated in the Education New Zealand Expo in Jakarta and Surabaya. Spoke with

50 prospective students at these events. In addition meetings were conducted with 16 agency offices across Jakarta, Surabaya and Medan. Five applications received to date.

· Vietnam and Thailand

This mission comprised of agent seminars and exhibitions in Hanoi and Ho Chi Monh, in addition to meeting with prospective students. Ten agencies were met and training provided. Nineteen applications received to date.

· Singapore and Malaysia

Participated in the Asia Business Education and AS Educentre fairs in Singapore. Met 19 prospective students of which one has an offer for semester two 2015. Met with two agents in Singapore to provide training. In Malaysia, attended five fairs and interviewed

Page 38 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

60 prospective students. In addition visited six agencies and trained 16 staff on Massey

University.

7.9.2 Dr Taisia Huckle, SHORE Centre, attended the Alcohol Harm to Others meeting in

Melbourne to advance work of the World Health Organisation/Thai Health project and the nine-country cross-national analysis funded by National Health and Medical Research

Council, Australia.

7.9.3 Fourteen Qatar Airways Massey MBA students were hosted on the Albany campus for a week this month. They then travelled to Manawatū and Wellington to complete their inbound

MBA study tour, which included visits to businesses in all centres.

7.9.4 Dr Graeme Finlayson, and Bridey White, from the Wildbase Oil Response Team (Institute of

Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences), visited Brunei where they conducted a management and rehabilitation training course for members of government (wildlife, fisheries and forestry). The four-day training course included lectures, brainstorming workshops and scenario-based exercises. The course is part of a plan by Brunei Shell Petroleum to develop capability for oiled wildlife response in the country.

7.9.5 Associate Professor Marjan van den Belt, Ecological Economics Research New Zealand, in her role as lead author, attended the second and third meetings of the Intergovernmental

Science -Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services on deliverable 3(c) – Policy

support tools and methodologies for scenario analysis and modelling of biodiversity and

ecosystem services, in Ushuaia, Argentina March 9-13, and Hungary June 10-11

(respectively).

7.9.6 The Pilipino Ambassador to New Zealand, her Excellency Virginia H Benavidez, and the

School of Nursing, co-hosted an event at the Ambassador’s residence in Wellington for 80

Pilipino nurses to acknowledge the contribution Pilipino nurses make to the health services in

New Zealand. The event is acknowledged on the embassy’s website.

7.9.7 Professor Peter Kemp, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, recently completed a review of the University of South Pacific School of Agriculture and Food Technology in Samoa and

Fiji.

7.9.8 Associate Professor Heather Galbraith, School of Art, led the New Zealand at Venice presentation of the 2015 La Biennale di Venezia national pavilion Simon Denny: Secret

Power, hosting formal blessings, openings, New Zealand and international media previews, and a very successful issue launch of the May issue of Frieze magazine. The pavilion (split across two sites, Marco Polo Airport and the Marciana Library in Piazza San Marco) received unprecedented international media interest and was named within multiple top three, 10 and

15 selections of projects to see within the biennale by esteemed critics and respected publications. The Venice Biennale is the oldest and most prestigious contemporary art biennale internationally.

7.9.9 Associate Professor Heather Galbraith, was one of two external advisers for the 2015 Asia

New Zealand Foundation/Creative New Zealand Curators Tour of Asia. Reviewing and ranking applications from around the country, and arriving at a selection of three candidates to tour China and Japan in August-September.

7.9.10 Professor Craig Johnson, Institute of Veterinary, animal and Biomedical Sciences, took part in an Animal Welfare Roadshow. This was organised under the World Animal Health

Organisation banner and highlighted animal welfare during transport and slaughter. Over 10 days, the two-day workshop was delivered to key academics and government personnel in

Thailand, Vietnam, China and Malaysia, who will now lead satellite workshops throughout their countries passing up-to-date information on to industry stakeholders, including slaughter plant workers and managers, local inspectors and transport companies workers.

7.9.11 Massey University School of Nursing is now part of the international programme measuring the prevalence of care problems and the structural determinants of care on an annual basis.

Page 39 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

7.9.12 Professor Jenny Carryer, School of Nursing, has been invited to join a collaboration led by the University of Maastricht with six other countries to examine international health care indicators.

7.9.13 Dr Carol Wham, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, has been invited by the

Hong Kong Hospital Authority to deliver class-based lectures on the topic of Advanced

Geriatric Nutrition and Dietetics, which is the 2015-16 theme for commissioned training with around 130 dietitian participants.

7.9.14 Bachelor of Design (Hons) fashion students Miriam McCreanor, Megan Stewart and Grace

Redgrave have been selected to work on a collaborative design brief with students in

Vietnam. The design brief celebrates a 40-year bilateral trade agreement between New

Zealand and Vietnam, and the significant growth in trade since the trade agreement was signed in 1994. There will be 10 New Zealand students from four New Zealand institutions collaborating with 10 Vietnamese students from four Vietnamese institutions on this design brief.

7.9.15 Professor Serge Demidenko, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, has been appointed to the international expert panel for the project 5-100 established by the

Government of Russian Federation to enable five Russian universities to enter the top 100 world university rankings by 2020. The funding of the project in 2013-14 was between

$US300,000 and $400,000 per year.

7.9.16 Professor Jim Arrowsmith and Professor Jane Parker, School of Management, have been appointed by the International Labour Organisation to advise the government of Nauru on the development of a new national employment policy. This will involve research with senior ministerial officials and other stakeholders, and is co-funded by the United Nations

Development Programme and European Union.

7.9.17 Associate Professor Cory Matthew, Institute of Agriculture and Environment, has received another year's funding for the Massey-Shanghai Jiaotong-Ningxia University Tripartite project from Education New Zealand. The project is entitled New Zealand-China Tripartite fund: create "self-sustaining cells" of professional activity based on principles of reciprocity and mutual benefit to participating universities. It involves staff exchanges between the three universities. This is a multi-institute, multi-college activity, involving the Institute of Agriculture and Environment (Associate Professor Cory Matthew/Professor Murray Potter/Dr Ranvir

Singh), Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences (Professor Tim

Parkinson/Associate Professor Richard Laven), School of Humanities (Dr Liangni Liu/Dr

Michael Li, and the College of Heath (Dr Michelle Thunders). Three Chinese academics are coming to visit between now and May next year. This is funded on a yearly basis and this is the third year for which funding has been approved.

7.9.18 Dr Flora Hung-Baesecke, School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing, has been invited to judge the Golden Flag Awards in Public Relations in Beijing, China. She has also been invited to attend the awards ceremony in November.

7.9.19 Dr Flora Hung-Baesecke, School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing, has been invited to serve as the special overseas member of the advisory board for a newlyestablished public relations society in China.

Please also refer to numerous international linkages and activities referred to throughout this report.

8.0 Te Whakatipu Rawa me te Tahua

Generating Income and Financial

Examples that demonstrate the quality and diversity of University expertise attracting funding include:

8.1 Teaching Consultants from the National Centre for Teaching and Learning, have negotiated a professional development needs analysis with the New Zealand Educational Institute, to

Page 40 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

8.2 begin with observations of nine tutors and a report recommending a programme of teaching development.

Professional and Continuing Education qualification reviews for the Foundation Certificate in

Academic English (Direct Entry English Pathway) and the Foundation Certificate in

Advanced Academic English (Direct Entry English Pathway Advanced), which were initially scheduled for next year have been brought forward to 2015 to replace the scheduled qualification review of the Certificates in Intensive English which underwent substantial change in 2014 through Committee for University Academic Programmes.

8.3 Intensive English - Module 2, offered through the Centre for Professional and Continuing

Education, is underway with approximately 100 students in seven classes in Albany.

Projections indicate that enrolments could increase to approximately 120 students by midyear.

8.4 To support the continuation of growth in enrolments in Albany, recruitment is underway for two full-time equivalent English Language teachers, Centre for Professional and Continuing

Education.

8.5 The China Scholarship Council has expanded their initial proposal request to Massey to include a business pedagogy course for a group of 50 academics to the Albany campus for

12 weeks, to learn about teaching methods in New Zealand focusing on the delivery of business subjects. This is in addition to the agricultural pedagogy courses developed for delivery in Manawat ū in July (refer to item 7.8 above for further details) and September (two groups of 40 for 12 weeks). Centre for Professional and Continuing Education is managing the project and working with staff from Massey Business School, Institute of Education and

Institute of Agriculture and Environment on the course development.

8.6 Albany campus will be hosting a group of 36 students from the renowned Toin Gakuen High

School from Japan for an Intensive English course in April. The International Marketing team and Massey Uniguides have been involved in the programme in order to present opportunities for tertiary studies to this group of high school pupils.

8.7 Dr Peter Rawlins, Dr Karen Ashton, Dr Tony Carusi and Evelyn Lewis, Institute of Education, were commissioned by the New Zealand Education Institute to review the government’s evidence on effective collaboration, leadership and sharing of effective practice and whether it measured up in the New Zealand educational context. Dr Rawlins says the Government’s proposed multi-million dollar Investing in Educational Success model ignores key evidence and research that underpins quality teaching and learning. The academics have highlighted

11 areas of concern and have presented their findings at seminars for educators around the country during March.

8.8 Vicky Forgie, Ecological Economics Research New Zealand, ran a workshop: Using a

Systems Approach for Progress Measures for Statistics New Zealand, Families Commission,

Treasury and Ministry of Social Development staff on March 5.

8.9 Dr Simon Loveday, Dr Maria Ferrua and Dr Jaspreet Singh, Institute of Food Science and

Technology, were successful in obtaining a European Cooperation in Science and

Technology travel grant from the Royal Society of New Zealand (approximately $5000 each).

This enabled them to participate in the 4th International Conference of Food Digestion held in

Naples, Italy from March 17-19.

8.10 Dr Pauline Dickinson and Verne McManus, SHORE Centre, held a two-day evaluation training workshop in Kaitaia, March 16-17, funded by the Ministry of Health.

8.11 Dr Simon Loveday, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, was successful, along with the Institute of Food Research, United Kingdom, in obtaining funding for a series of

Riddet-Institute of Food Research secondments through Biotechnology and Biological

Sciences Research Council Other Countries Partnering Awards.

Page 41 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

8.12 Arup Nag, Riddet Institute and Institute of Food Science and Technology, is the project leader of a new research contract which was successful in obtaining funding for Cheese

culture stabilization and tableting, Country Trading Ltd.

8.13 MPOWER and Agri One's new six-week human resources course for dairy farm workers and consultants is now under way. Course teachers include Dr Jeff Kennedy, Professor Jane

Parker, Professor Jim Arrowsmith and Professor Jarrod Haar, School of Management, and

No 8 HR principal Lee Astridge. The course has been formulated by the teaching team, with advice from Agri One and Dairy New Zealand. It will culminate with a dinner for all teaching staff and participants, and a hands-on module taught on a farm in Te Awamutu.

8.14 Professor Christoph Schumacher’s, School of Economics and Finance, AKE Hub (Auckland

Knowledge Exchange) research again contributed to KPMG’s Financial Institutions

Performance Survey. KPMG’s John Kensington acknowledged and thanked Massey for their ongoing partnership with KPMG on the research. The publication is distributed to the banks, financial institutions as well as the Prime Minister’s desk.

8.15 Professor Christoph Schumacher, School of Economics and Finance, and Liz Fitzmaurice,

Executive Education and Enterprise, met with Farmlands Co-operative chief operating officer

Colm Hamrogue and general manager insights and innovation Tony Sinclair to present stage one of the contracted research.

8.16 The School of Aviation is running a two-day training course for commercial unmanned aerial systems (UAS) operators and other interested parties. The course covers the recommended

New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority rules and regulations for UAS operators, airmanship, safety issues and best practice. The next course is scheduled for May 15-16.

8.17 Associate Professor Shane Telfer, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, was awarded a

Marsden Fund grant of $750,000 from the Physics, Chemistry Biochemistry Panel. His proposal 14-MAU-024, is titled Complex multicomponent metal-organic frameworks.

8.18 The Fertiliser and Lime Research Centre conducted two professional development short courses in March, each for 28 participants from the agricultural industry. These were the

Intermediate Sustainable Nutrient Management in New Zealand Agriculture courses which, along with the Advanced Sustainable Nutrient Management courses conducted by the centre, are compulsory for rural professionals wanting to gain accreditation under the

Nutrient Management Adviser Certification Programme administered by the Fertiliser

Association of New Zealand. Further courses were conducted in April with 26 participants and a further two in involving 55 participants. The demand created by the certification programme is such that it is likely the centre will conduct up to seven Intermediate and four

Advanced courses in this year.

8.19 The Ministry of Education has commissioned a video to document collaboration between

College of Creative Arts Textile Design students and secondary students at St Catherine’s

College and Wellington Girls College. The video will be posted on the TechOne website as an exemplar for secondary school technology and design teachers.

8.20 Distinguished Professor Bill Tunmer, Professor James Chapman and Dr Alison Arrow,

Institute of Education, have received funding of $1.25m from the Ministry of Education for a three-year literacy education professional services and research project, which they have designed. The project focuses on establishing successful outcomes for children at new entrant level, especially those that may need extra support such as Māori, Pasifika, and children from low socio-economic backgrounds. Included in the research team are Dr Jane

Prochnow and Dr Keith Greaney, Institute of Education, and two doctoral students, one of them former Centre for Educational Development facilitator Christine Braid.

8.21 A new research contract for Protein functionality has been funded $22,000 by Goodman

Fielder Ltd. The project leader is Dr Ashling Ellis, Massey Institute of Food Science and

Technology.

Page 42 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

8.22 A new research contract for Sungold kiwifruit proteases, has been funded $148,000 by

ZESPRI. The project leader is Dr Mike Boland, Massey Institute of Food Science and

Technology.

8.23 Dr Nicky Stanley-Clarke, Dr Awhina English and Dr Polly Yeung, School of Social Work, have been awarded an academic fellowship of $9775 for a project entitled Cutting the

Distance in Distance Education: Enhancing Digital Toolbox for students in the Bachelor of

Social Work programme.

8.24 Dr Jill Wilkinson and senior professional clinician Tom Gorte, School of Nursing, have completed a contract with regional public health for the project Health 4 Life: Supporting

Health Workers to engage with mothers for the purposes of supporting change in diet and

exercise in pregnancy and with children. Dr Wilkinson and Mr Gorte were contracted to provide the project's teaching sessions, supported by online learning.

8.24 Dr Andrew East, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, secured a sub-contract of $71,000 from StartAfresh for conducting Zespri-funded controlled atmosphere kiwifruit research.

8.26 Dr Cath Conlon, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, was successful with a grant application to Lotteries for $25,440 for a paediatric adapter for the BodPod and an oxygen saturation probe for the PeaPod.

8.27 Dr Catherine Cook, School of Nursing, is continuing to offer a well-attended professional development workshop for nurses and midwives called Professional Supervision and Clinical

Supervision.

8.28 In-Sight MBA was launched at the Albany campus this month. Seven participants from throughout New Zealand (Invercargill, Christchurch, Tauranga, Hamilton and Albany) joined the course and feedback from the students and lecturing staff was outstanding.

8.29 Dr Brennon Wood, School of People, Environment and Planning, and the inter-disciplinary team in Farmer Learning have been successful with an application to the Sustainable

Farming Fund. This will involve a lot of activity on Riverside farm over the next two years and it will also involve the Wairarapa Community being on the farm and being involved in a multidisciplinary study.

8.30 Dr Peter Jolly, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, and the International

Development Group have been awarded a European Commission Grant, effective April 1, for the implementation of the Action entitled: Integrating Education and Action for One Health –

Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan and Nepal. The total grant amount is two million Euro.

8.31 Aviation students Jamie Henderson and Isaac Henderson (who are not related) have spent about 300 hours developing a safety management system for Palmerston North Airport as part of a special topic for their Bachelor of Aviation degree. The report has also attracted the attention of other aviation organisations and the duo now have a small consultancy implementing safety management systems while they study towards their Master in Aviation

Management degrees.

8.32 The School of Humanities Japanese programme received a grant of $17,520 from the Japan

Foundation for a project to support schools to begin or consolidate Japanese language programmes.

8.33 A $6000 research contract for Screening of potatoes for carbohydrate content and starch

digestibility in vitro has been funded by Gropak Ltd. Project leader is Dr Jaspreet Singh from the Institute of Food Science and Technology.

8.34 Dr Andrew East, Institute of Food Science and Technology, secured $137,000 in PhD scholarship funding from Zespri International to work on creating ethylene production and quality dependency datasets for the new G3 kiwifruit cultivar.

Page 43 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

8.35 Dr Carol Wham, Institute of Food Science and Technology, has been engaged on a $44,000 subcontract to write four papers for publication for the University of Auckland Life and Living in Advanced Age Cohort Study project.

8.36 Professor Karen Witten, SHORE and Wh āriki Research Centre, secured a BRANZ project grant for The New Zealand Rental Housing Sector worth $283,243.

8.37 College of Creative Arts staff Associate Professor Rebecca Sinclair, Nick Kapica, Antony

Pelosi, and Anna Brown have been appointed to a panel, as part of a Massey University team of education and design researchers, for the Greater Christchurch Education Renewal

Programme: Transformation Programme, commissioned by the Ministry of Education. They, along with their education colleagues, have been chosen as one of four providers selected for the contract to commence in June, with a total procurement value of $2.3 million over three years. The programme aims to support the needs of individual schools by preparing them to deliver its transformation programme, which is also required to support school staff through a change process to work in more flexible modern teaching and learning spaces.

8.38 The Centre for Professional and Continuing Education has partnered with the University of

Technology, Sydney, to develop a new short course for government and finance executives from member institutions of the Asia Pacific Rural and Agricultural Credit Association.

Participants will spend a week in the Sydney area and a week in Auckland and the Waikato, gaining exposure to key industry value chains during a series of guided field visits.

8.39 Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment – Callaghan Innovation funding have enabled the following students:

· Hannah Webster to undertake a collaborative Textile Master of Design project with

Town and Country, Palmerston North, and Bruce Mill of Milton, entitled The revitalisation

of a weaving mill. Ms Webster completed designs for Barker’s Menswear within the research project. During the Master of Design Exhibition, she received more than 100 orders for her designs, which will be manufactured at the mills. The project is supervised by Dr Sandra Heffernan, School of Design.

· Hannah Hutchison to undertake a collaborative Textile Master of Design project with the Classic Sheepskins tannery in Napier. Ms Hutchison created a broad range of innovative materials for commercialisation. She is also supervised by Dr Heffernan.

· Monique Bowers to undertake a collaborative Textile Master of Design project with

Levana Textiles in Levin. Ms Bowers designed Nuyarn knit textiles for Helly Hansen,

Denmark, and Metallica, Melbourne, during her research project and is now employed by

Levana. She now designs for 10 new Melbourne clients as well as European brands. Dr

Heffernan is her Master of Design superviser.

8.40

Open Lab – College of Creative Arts

Open Lab activities include:

· National Design Challenge: Open Lab was awarded $130,000 from the Ministry of Social

Development Think Differently fund. This very exciting collaboration with the Ministry of

Business, Innovation and Employment aims to shift attitudes and practices to increase the accessibility of services, products, communications, transport and the built environment.

· Open Lab has been working on a project with Gibson Group to re-invigorate and modernise their brand. As a company with a 39 year history, they need draw on their reputation while also evolving their business and services to reflect the needs of the 21st century.

· Open Lab have been working with Conor English on the brand development of a new venture to China called Agribusiness New Zealand and continue to work with the

Livestock Improvement Corporation) on a number of projects using design to bring value and clarity to agriculture ventures.

· Open Lab is now working on the lakes module of the LAWA site (Land, Air, Water

Aotearoa).

· Anzacare bedwetting alarms: A team from Open Lab (Industrial, Fashion and Materials) lead by Katie Baptiste, School of Design, worked with Anzacare on a project creating a prototype alarm pad.

Page 44 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

· Over the mid-semester break Karl Kane and Tim Parkin, School of Design, completed a successful experience design pilot project with Inland Revenue. The Design and

Democracy Project were approached to explore how design-led processes could inform the Inland Revenue's service design strategy. The pilot projects specific challenge was looking at minimising activity in New Zealand's "hidden economy". Senior visual communication and spatial design students engaged in facilitated workshops over two intensive days, and presented the resulting concepts to a senior Inland Revenue

Department planning and integration team. Engaging with our designers was described by department management as "awesome, refreshing and thought-provoking" and both parties are working to build on this success with a longer-term project based within Open

Lab.

· A team from Open Lab has been working with the Treasury to incorporate design thinking in the development of policy around Māori student retention in secondary schools. The project has involved the team helping conduct user interviews with Māori students in the lower North Island, visualising some of the data gathered as user journeys and the delivery of a workshop with a number of stakeholders.

8.41 Professor Bernhard Breier, School of Food and Nutrition, received $1,199,468 (36 months) from the Health Research Council for The gut microbiome: a new pathway to obesity

prevention and metabolic health project.

8.42 Professor Jeroen Douwes, Centre for Public Health Research, received $1,199,980 (48 months) from Health Research Council for the Persistent airflow limitation and the airway

microbiome in childhood asthma project.

8.43 Associate Professor Sarah Derrett, School of Public Health (now at Otago), received

$588,676 (24 months) from the Health Research Council for the Subsequent Injury Study

(SInS): Improving outcomes for injured New Zealanders project.

8.44 Dr Tupa’ilevaililigi Ridvan Firestone, Centre for Public Health Research, received $300,000

(24 months) from the Health Research Council for the Pacific health and obesity research project.

8.45 Professor Karen Witten, SHORE and Wh āriki Research Centre, received $784,464 (36 months) from the Health Research Council for the Enabling participation for children and

young people with disabilities project.

8.46 Professor Stephen Legg, School of Public Health, received $49,950 (24 months) from ACC for the Assessment of the uptake and impact of the ACC New Zealand Moving and handling

People Guidelines (2012) project.

8.47 Professor Stephen Legg, School of Public Health, received $25,000 (12 months) from

WorkSafe New Zealand for the Occupational Health training module, WorkSafe NZ Health

and Safety Inspectors courses.

8.48 Dr Chris Wilkins, SHORE and Wh āriki Research Centre, received $208,517 (12 months) from New Zealand Police for the New Zealand Arrestee Drug Use Monitoring services project.

8.49

Dr Lanuola Asiasiga, SHORE and Whāriki Research Centre, received

· $34,647 (3 months) from Waitemata District Health Board.for the Cross sectional survey

of caregivers of children at high risk of rheumatic fever resident in West Auckland project.

· $34,783 from National Heart Foundation (12 months) for the Evaluation of Tala Pasifika’s

#KickButt Year 2 project.

8.50 Professor Sally Casswell, SHORE and Wh āriki Research Centre, received:

· $19,950 (five months) from the Health Promotion Agency for Alcohol Promotion

Workshops.

· $570,000 (36 months) from the Ministry of Health for the National Public Health Alcohol

Working Group – Workforce Training for Alcohol Regulatory Officers and Smokefree

Enforcement projects.

Page 45 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

8.51 Professor Karen Witten, SHORE and Whariki Research Centre, received $68,550.17 (18 months) from the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment for the Participatory GIS

and geovisualisation for public engagement in locality-sensitive urban regeneration and

intensification project.

8.52 Dr Pauline Dickinson, SHORE and Whariki Research Centre, received:

· $17,925.46 (two months) from Northern Regional Alliance Ltd for the Evaluation

Framework for the KPI programme

· $105,500 (18 months) from Hawke's Bay Health for the Whānau Wellness Resource

Evaluation .

· $1,180,000 (36 months) from the Ministry of Health for the Healthy Families New Zealand

Evaluation Services.

8.53 Professor Richard Archer, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology, led a team of people from six institutions (Massey University, University of Auckland, Otago University,

Riddet Institute, AgResearch and Plant and Food Research) in winning a Ministry of

Business Innovation and Employment funding bid worth $16.8 million. This funding will enable work on new food process technologies, allowing New Zealand food companies to increase export margins.

8.54 Professor Mark Bebbington and Dr Gert Lube, from the Institute of Agriculture and

Environment, have been successful in securing funding through the latest contestable funding round of the New Zealand Natural Hazards Research Platform. Professor

Bebbington’s project will make the first steps towards creating a national volcano hazard model and involves researchers from GNS Science, University of Auckland and the

University of Otago. Dr Lube’s project involves an international team of researchers working with Massey’s large-scale eruption simulator in the Boiler House (“PELE”) to understand what happens to infrastructure when hit by a volcanic current. Both projects are for $580,000 in total.

This contestable round was very competitive, with only 13 of the 66 projects funded. The two successful projects from Massey mean that the University secured 18 per cent of the total funding available.

8.55 Dr Weihong Ji, Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences and New Zealand Institute for

Advanced Study has completed her visit to Gansu Agriculture University last week with a seminar on the 3-year progress of studies on plateau zokor initiated through the GAU-

Massey University Research Centre for Grassland Biodiversity. Since 2012, the research collaboration between Weihong and the local ecologists has resulted in a total of 1,380,000

RMB (about $NZ290,000) research fund, 11 journal publications (seven in international and four in Chinese journals) and eight conference presentations

8.56 The Fertiliser and Lime Research Centre conducted one further Professional Development short course in June. This was the contact course for the first of four timelines of the

"Advanced" Sustainable Nutrient Management courses for 2015 involving 24 participants from the agricultural industry.

8.57 Anna Brown, College of Creative Arts, co-delivered a design masterclass for Treasury (with

Noel Brown from DNA and Penny Hagen from Smallfire), providing participants with tools and experience in exploring how a design approach can drive different ways of engaging with policy innovation. This project is part of Treasury's aim to improve the quality of its policy advice and introduce innovations to its way of working.

8.58 The School of Aviation has designed a two-day course Introduction to Operator Conduct for

operators of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems, which is proving to be of interest to the industry. The courses are designed to introduce RPAS operators to aviation regulations and safety processes to enhance the safety of RPAS operations. Operators will then be better prepared to meet the New Zealand Civil Aviation Authority regulations for the operation of

RPAS in New Zealand (CAA Part .102) The next two courses are scheduled for 4/5

September 4-5 and November 20-21.

Page 46 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

8.59 Dr Flora Hung-Baesecke, School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing, has obtained the Arthur W Page Center's Page and Johnson Legacy Scholar Grant ($US8000) for a research project on corporate social responsibility. This project has also been selected as part of Arthur W Page Center's Studies on Global Public Relations: CSR and Public

Diplomacy across Cultures.

8.60 University Foundation and Direct Giving programme

Another important workshop this week will focus on the Massey University Foundation and philanthropy. The University strategy contains the goal of raising a $100 million endowment fund. Good progress has been made in recent years and we are now ready to take another step up in our fundraising efforts. The workshop will be looking at what we need to do to expand the role of the foundation in order to meet our goals.

This reminds me to thank all of those staff who have signed up to the foundation’s Direct

Giving programme. This is important not just for the funding but also because it tells people who might want to donate to the University that we are prepared to invest in ourselves.

Please also note that numerous items throughout this report relate to generating income.

9.0 Kia Tuawhiti

Enabling Excellence

9.1 Assistant Vice-Chancellor External Relations

The new Assistant Vice-Chancellor External Relations, Penelope Barr-Sellers formally joined the University on June 2. Ms Barr-Sellers will be welcomed onto all campuses over the next two weeks.

9.2

9.3

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations

Further to my announcement in February, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations Cathy Magiannis started with Massey on July 1. Ms Magiannis is a widely experienced and extremely talented strategic leader who will be a valuable addition to the University management team. Thank you to Chris Wood, Caroline Diamond,

Jeff Yee, Clive Martis, Rosanna Couto-Mason and the rest of the Strategy, Finance, IT and

Commercial Operations teams for looking after the portfolio. Ms Magiannis brings a very impressive background of experience to Massey University. There will be opportunities for staff to welcome Ms Magainnis on all campuses.

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and Enterprise

In late May, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and Enterprise Professor Brigid

Heywood advised the University that she will be taking up a position with the University of

Tasmania in October. There will be many opportunities to thank Professor Heywood before she departs, but I am sure all staff will join me in acknowledging her considerable contribution over the past five years and wishing her well for the future.

9.4 Academic Dean

Professor Malcolm Wright, currently the deputy pro vice-chancellor of Massey Business

School, has been appointed to the new position of Dean, Academic.

Professor Wright will support the Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research,

Academic and Enterprise in advancing the university’s strategic goals for quality assurance, developing academic programmes and nurturing Massey's teaching and learning framework.

Professor Wright's primary focus in the short term will be as a key member of the team tasked with delivering the successful implementation of the new Student Management

System alongside the stewardship of a programme of work to ensure that Massey University engages successfully with the recommendations arising from our recent NZAQA audit.

Professor Wright is an active researcher and his appointment includes provision to continue his research with colleagues and students in the School of Communication, Journalism and

Page 47 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Marketing. Professor Wright will retain his current role as deputy pro vice-chancellor until

September 30 to help ensure a smooth transition for the Massey Business School.

9.5 Massey University Press first publisher

The Massey University Press was launched in February this year. I have strongly supported establishing a press because publishing is central to the reputation of Massey as a leading university. It was great, therefore, to see last week the appointment of Nicola Legat, former

Random House New Zealand publisher, as the first publisher for Massey University Press. I am now looking forward to the first publication.

9.6 MUSAC’s first chief executive

The appointment of Massey University-based education software business MUSAC’s first chief executive signals a new era of growth and development for the company. MUSAC Ltd

(Massey University School Administration by Computer) is 100 per cent owned by Massey

Ventures. The school administration software vendor has been operating for 20 years, originally from the former College of Education, and is now a stand-alone independent company since early last year.

9.7

9.8

Its inaugural chief executive Greg Twemlow is an expert in software architecture and the commercialisation of patents and other intellectual property. Mr Twemlow is currently start-up manager at the Creative HQ incubator in Wellington, where he mentors new ventures and is actively involved in the Wellington start-up scene.

Professor Jill McCutcheon has been appointed as the College of Health’s Deputy Pro Vice

Chancellor. She commenced her position on May 18. Her duties will take her to all of our campuses, but her primary office will be located on the sixth floor of the Social Science

Tower on our Palmerston North campus. Professor McCutcheon assumes the role following the recent retirement of Professor Steve La Grow. She will assist the Pro Vice-Chancellor

Professor Paul McDonald in managing the college with special responsibilities for growing, renewing and improving our suite of academic programmes and papers.

Massey University Staff Conference – It Starts with Us: Delivering a Defining

Experience

At the recent Staff Conferences held on each campus attendees enjoyed workshops on various topics, ranging from networking effectively to developing a professional identity; effective networking; seeking common ground with people and collaborative conversation.

9.8.1

Campus Service Excellence Awards

To recognise the efforts of members of academic or professional staff who particularly excel in their area of service, the Staff Service Excellence Award were presented to:

Wellington campus:

· Rachael Leafe, Pasifika Learning Advisor – Sustained excellence in a service area

· Wellington library Staff – Notable improvements in work practices or service experience

· Rick Smith, Information Technology Service – Contribution to Health and Safety practices

Manawatū campus:

· Carol Seelye, Humanities and Social Sciences – sustained excellence in a service area.

· ITS Service Desk – notable improvements in work practices or service experience.

· Dr Fran Wolber, College of Health – contribution to health and safety practices.

Also highly commended were:

· Brian Best, College of Sciences – sustained excellence in a service area and contribution to health and safety practices.

· Capability Development Team, People and Organisational Development – sustained excellence in a service area.

Albany campus:

· Dr Jasper Mbachu, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology – sustained excellence in a service area.

Page 48 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

· Events and Examination Management Team – notable improvements in work practices or service experience.

9.9

Staff development

The January to June 2015 Development Calendar, offering 207 development opportunities for staff – the largest six-monthly number to date - is well under way (90

Manawatū, 59

Albany, 58 Wellington). Upcoming workshops are promoted on a weekly basis on all three campuses, and direct marketing is undertaken for specific training (such as managers, academics, administrative staff, new managers and staff). The June-December Development

Calendar, was distributed to staff in June.

9.10 Staff recruitment

Online advertising of jobs has moved from unijobs.co.nz to jobs.ac.uk as part of a syndicate arranged with other New Zealand universities. This will give Massey greater reach in our staff recruitment advertising, particularly for academic staff throughout Europe and the

United States. A combined New Zealand University portal with links to each university has been developed and will start in May.

9.11 Talent Pool online

A new resource has been launched to support casual and temporary hiring needs. The

Talent Pool is an online tool with a pool of registered potential casual and fixed-term staff, who have registered with Massey University as being available for hiring. At the end of April more than 1000 people have registered their interest in working at Massey. The new tool is intended to reduce the cost of casual and temp hiring, by providing a virtual temp-agency facility within Massey.

9.12 New Staff Orientation

A new Staff Orientation event has been designed and the first of these was undertaken in

April. These will be scheduled at least four times a year on each campus. Contributors from various University sections are contributing to the content of this. Processes have been designed to support attendance by every new employee, including communications from the time of offer of employment, at the time of starting and in the induction materials, together with reporting on participation and evaluation from participants.

9.13

Staff mini-survey

Staff mini-survey results have been communicated to staff and Senior Leadership Team members. Human resources advisers are working with the SLT members to support a refocus on this and the original 2013 full survey results and actions plans.

Planning has commenced to conduct a full staff survey in September.

9.14

The Albany and Manawatū campuses each hosted the annual Volunteer Expo in May. It ties in with the employability strategy arm of global citizenship and volunteerism. A host of notfor-profit organisations were on campus. Thank you to staff who put the word out to their students and encouraged them to attend. The events were a great success.

9.15 Annual NZ Women in Leadership Programmes 2015

Congratulations to the members of staff who will be attending the 2015 New Zealand Women in Leadership Programmes for Academic and Professional Services Staff to be held in

Wellington.

Academic Programme in June 2015

Dr Margaret Forster

Dr Kathryn Hay

Dr Michelle Thunders

Professional Services Staff Programme in August 2015

Heather Lamond

Meredith MacKenzie

Page 49 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

9.16 Crisis Management preparedness

Risk Management has progressed Massey’s business continuance programme aimed at improving resilience to manage major disruptive events. The Emergency Management

Programme of Work is focusing on the fit-out of the Emergency Operations Centre (EOCs).

Crisis Management Team packs were completed, have been printed and delivered to SLT during May, and rollout to key managers occurred in June. A two-hour walk through for the crisis management will take place on August 12. A scenario-based crisis management test is scheduled to occur in September. Currently providing support for managers to refresh (or prepare) the departmental business continuity plans by July 31.

9.17 Actions arising from internal and external audits have been loaded to the risk management system. This will directly link risk monitoring to the identified risk and associated controls, and enable automation of a previously paper based process.

9.18 Student Management System

In late May the University signed an agreement with Tribal Group, an education support services company who will be providing its SITS:Vision system to replace our current student management system.

9.19 Following the approval of an Employability Framework for the University, a small group has been meeting to workshop what this might look like from a student perspective.

9.20 Extensive analysis and prototyping is nearly complete for an online communications tool

(student interface) that will enable students to track their enrolment application progress. The interface will include programme specific information, an upload facility for documents associated with University admission, links to other Massey University webpages related to the student profile, and possibly a platform for housing the online programme offer.

Requirements, concepts and cost estimates are under way in order to inform programme board approval for this tool to be developed.

9.21 Reviews of the enrolment processes are under way, with each academic services portfolio leader working with the key academic staff involved. This is to determine how enrolment processing and student advising went for their particular suite of programmes. This will be combined with the routine operational reviews undertaken by Academic Services to refine enrolment and examination processes. This follows the conclusion of the main summer peak operational period. Several refinements were implemented to streamline processes ahead of the semester two and next year's processing cycles. Examples are better coordination of international and domestic admissions, rearrangement of programme portfolio responsibilities in Academic Services and more streamlined updating of programme planning information on the website.

9.22 Student enrolment information on the website (programme planning tabs) is being updated for next year. Changes are now being made on a rolling basis, rather than a single annual update cycle as in the past. This keeps information current and accurate. The quality of the information is also being improved through close interaction between college staff and the

Academic Services portfolio owners who administer the individual programmes. A working party headed by one of the unit’s service leaders is revising the collection and publication process and page content to find further refinements.

9.23 A prototype of the qualification availability tool has been developed and is about to be made available to colleges. The tool will allow colleges to confirm that sufficient paper offerings are available to meet the various qualification regulation rules by location and delivery mode; and to reconcile this with the University decisions of where and how qualifications and specialisations will be available. The tool will also be able to be used for advisory purposes.

9.24 Massey Child Care Centre, Man awatū campus

The Tui, Hoiho, Kea and Kiwi sections of the Massey Child Care Centre Inc, Manawatū campus, was a finalist in the Prime Minister’s Education Awards this year. Congratulations –

I have heard several staff comment on the fantastic work they do with the children.

9.25 Wellington campus refits win architecture, property awards

Page 50 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Massey University’s newly-refurbished Wellington library has won top prize in the education category of the Wellington Architecture Awards.

Designed by Athfield Architects, it provides spaces to meet the creative and collaborative needs of students from the College of Creative Arts, while ensuring students from humanities, health sciences and other disciplines have spaces to complement their learning.

Judges, led by convenor and Wellington architect Arindam Sen, praised how the library’s collection, its reading rooms and group study areas represented more open and flexible spaces that also connected staff and students “breaking down the usual barrier between librarians and students, and reinforcing the openness of the library”. Its use of colour was also acknowledged with judges noting “the colours used have created a youthful and elegant space that is enjoyable to inhabit”.

The library project, along with other award winners, will now be considered for the 2015 New

Zealand Architecture Awards to be announced in November.

Meanwhile, Arrow International’s refit of space in Block 3 for the School of Public Health,

Wellington has been honoured at separate awards held in Auckland. The school was given an excellence award in the education and arts category of the Property Industry Awards

2015.

9.26 Other Campus Infrastructure

A number of projects have been completed over the past couple of months. These include:

Manawatū

· The restoration of Tiritea House (now the home of the Foundation and Alumni) is well on the way thanks to the support of Alumni – in particular the 1958 degree class. I have suggested that, when it is completed, the foundation will host an open day. The house is going to be a major asset to the University and an appropriate focus for foundation and alumni activities.

· The College of Sciences Retrofit Project continues and the Institute of Food Nutrition and

Human Health Physiology Lab (AgHort A2) has been completed and occupied.

· With the commencement of the Winter Sports Session increased use and maintenance of the fields are now under way.

· The Student Centre Dining hall re-roof is now fully completed along with the Egmont

Court Hostel bathroom upgrade, stage two.

· The Social Sciences Tower upgrade has been completed.

· Work on the Sir Geoffrey Peren Building remains on programme for mid-October completion, planning for the relocation of staff from Colombo Village to Sir Geoffrey

Peren has been completed.

· Layouts for Refectory are being finalised.

· Building works have commenced on the Wildbase/Administration building adjacent to the

Hopkirk Research Institute and the Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical

Sciences Veterinary Teaching Hospital buildings.

Wellington

· The College of Creative Arts moved into the new Block 1 activity-based flexible working environment in March. A facilitated workshop was held with a small group of staff and more are planned as the college adapts to the new environment. The inaugural session of whitiwhiti korero exchange, an innovative College of Creative Arts teaching and learning peer support initiative, also provided a forum for critical discussion about staff experiences of the new office area. An ergonomics evaluation has been commissioned and the college will implement its recommendations to ensure the health, safety, comfort and wellbeing of staff.

· Thank you to those who organised the event to mark the move of College of Creative

Arts staff from the Museum Building to Block 1 on the Wellington Campus. The music was excellent – perhaps Block 1 will become a venue for more music. It was interesting to hear Wellington musicians talking about the cream of local talent considering being in

Page 51 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

the first Creative Media cohort in 2016. It would be something very special if Massey can become the focus of the music industry in Wellington.

· Block 10 fit out: The Ministry of Cultural and Heritage work is now completed. Weta workshops are still continuing with their work.

· Completion of Stages 1 and 2 of the Wellington Library development project were celebrated last Friday in May. Thank you to everyone who has been involved in creating such an innovative environment for staff and students. The area around the Library has also improved dramatically in recent months. The shop, Student Contact Centre, Student

Services and the Atrium have all been upgraded along with new carpet tiles in the corridors. It looks great and has encouraged a lot more people to use the area. The

Wellington Library has more development to go – but for now the focus shifts to the

Manawatū Library.

· Changes to the Pyramid have now been completed, including new electronic doors to minimise heat loss and outside air pressure affecting the inside, new floor covering in the passage, new heating/cooling facilities for the area, power and services for the coffee cart etc. Facilities Management staff are working with the main users to confirm any additional services needed to finalise the improvements for this area. Overall there is a significant improvement to the space and the environment for staff and students.

Albany

· The bulk of internal works has been completed on the Study Centre Refit.

· New teaching spaces and School of Accountancy staff offices are in use.

· Albany Highway North widening: This external project is proceeding apace. We are now eight months into a 30-month period of inter-precinct traffic disruption. Auckland

Transport and their contractors have proven true to their commitment to minimise (but not prevent) traffic disruption to date. Auckland Transport and its contractor, Fulton

Hogan, have committed to providing staff with updates on the work by email.

9.27

Wellington/Palmerston North Train

There has been ongoing debate about the viability of the train running between Wellington and Palmerston North. Just in case anyone wants to make use of the service (many Massey staff already do) - the train leaves Palmerston North at 6.15am and gets back at 7.20pm.

According to the Wellington bus timetable the Seatoun and Newtown services run from the

Railway Station to near Massey Wellington in Taranaki Street, and back that way.

9.28 Employment Relations: Bargaining

Bargaining with the combined unions will commence on July 20.

The proposed parties to the Agreement are Massey University, the Tertiary Education Union

Te Hautu Kahurangi o Aotearoa Inc, the New Zealand Public Service Association

Incorporated, the New Zealand Engineering, Printing and Manufacturing Union Incorporated and the Tertiary Institutes Allied Staff Association.

9.29 Information on what to do in emergencies

In the new Health and Safety environment it is very important that teaching staff convey to students what happens in an emergency situation. With the new semester under way, new students need to be made aware of safety information. Prepared powerpoint slides for each campus and a new earthquake video can be found at http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/staffroom/national-shared-services/healthsafety/emergency-response/emergency-response_home.cfm#StudentEMinfo

9.30 Highlights of meetings I have had with Massey staff and associated groups included:

· Chaired Tenders Board (June).

· Attended the Senior Leadership Team sub-committee meeting (June).

· Regular catch-up with the Chancellor Chris Kelly (June).

· Debrief for the recent China visit.

· Met with fundraising group for the Refectory project.

· Council Strategy Day (some members of the Tertiary Education Commission attended).

· Met with the Grow North Leadership Group to discuss research proposal.

Page 52 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

· Attended six graduation ceremonies at Albany in April, along with celebrations for

Pasifika and Māori graduates.

· Met with new staff at Albany, Wellington and Manawatū. Massey is attracting some outstanding people.

· Meeting of Massey Global Board.

· Chaired Tenders Board (April, May and June).

· Hosted the SLT farewell to Assistant Vice-Chancellor External Relations Cas Carter and joined the Manawatū campus farewell to Ms Carter (Refer to item 9.1)

· Attended a College of Creative Arts event to celebrate the move into their new space.

· Pre-planning meeting for July SLT Planning Days.

· Chaired a SMSI Programme Board meeting (April and June).

· Attended a Massey University Council meeting (May). This included the University official welcome for new Council members Dr Helen Anderson and Ian Marshall. They are already making a great contribution to the governance of the University.

· Budget Policy Statement 2016 meeting.

· Combined Unions meeting.

· Catch-up with the Contact Centre, Manawatū campus.

· Attended Finance Committee (May).

· Discussed the University’s Crisis Management Programme.

· Met with the Alan Wilson Centre Governance Board.

· Attended a farewell function for international students, Manawatū campus.

· Attended a Massey Business Schools Academic Excellence Awards event.

· Attended the Wellington campus Library blessing.

· Attended si x Manawatū graduation ceremonies, along with the following functions:

Veterinary Science and Veterinary Technology graduation function; College Humanities and Social Sciences Outstanding Achiever Awards

; celebration to honour Māori graduates; celebration to honour Pasifika graduates.

· Chaired the Senior Leadership Team monthly meeting (May, June and July).

· Catch-up with Manawatū based Counselling staff.

· Spoke to the Marsden Second-Round workshop participants.

· Catchup with School of Humanities staff on Manawatū campus.

· Spoke at the 2015 Academy of Sport Presentation event (Refer to item 4.3).

· Spoke at the launch of the School of Sport and Exercise Mobile Exercise Lab Vehicle

(Refer to item 4.3).

· Presented scholarships at the Applied Science Scholarships Presentation event. (Refer to item 4.2).

· It is PDP Season (performance development and planning) for the SLT so part May was dedicated to individual meetings (yes they do this too).

· Attended an SLT sub-committee meeting (May and June)

· Met with Chancellor Chris Kelly (May).

· Attended a Governance Meeting (May).

· Graduation ceremonies 1 and 2 in Wellington along with the following functions: celebration of Māori graduates; and, celebration of Pacific Island graduates.

· Attended the Albany campus welcome to Assistant Vice-Chancellor External Relations

Penelope Barr-Sellers (Refer to item 9.1)

· Catch-up with Albany counselling staff.

· Attended a Massey University Foundation Board meeting.

· Discussion with Institute of Natural and Math Sciences staff on Scientists and the Media.

· Met with student presidents (July).

· Discussion on the future of University Sport.

· Attended the welcome for Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT and

Commercial Operations Cathy Magiannis.

· Attended an international student information session.

· Met with the College of Business executive.

· Attended Honorary Awards Committee (July).

· Attended a combined unions meeting (July).

· Attended Academic Board meeting (July)

· And a lot of time writing up the PDP reports for the SLT.

Page 53 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

· Two-day SLT midyear planning meeting at the Manawatū campus focusing on agrifoodbusines, distance education, Massey University Worldwide and links with the region. The meeting will include a major engagement with a wide range of people from the region to talk through a “UniverCity” initiative.

· Met with Auckland Students Association Advocacy Coordinators.

· Attended an Albany Staff Forum on campus developments.

· Attended a Massey Foundation Fundraising workshop.

These meetings with staff are very useful. I actively seek meetings but am also pleased to be invited to discuss any of the issues the University is dealing with.

9.31 There are a lot of issues being advanced through the Senior Leadership Team at the moment, these include: Massey University Worldwide monthly update; Uniforum review of support services; IT issues discussion points; New Zealand-based Distance education; revision of Leave regulations; Health and Safety plan 2015; 2016 student fees proposals;

Workloads policy; Health and Safety report – January to February 2015; Risk Management report – March and June; connecting academic design with management system developments; Massey University Foundation loan agreement; Crisis Management plan; boosting staff philanthropy through match funding; Workloads Taskforce recommendations not dealt with by policy changes; defining qualification availability; 2015 brand campaign update; Pre-employment policy and procedure; Sponsorship policy; Sponsorship procedures;

Publication policy; Publication processes and procedures; Student Debt Collection policy; proposal to develop Student Conduct policy and framework; Independent Review of Capital

Asset Management Systems and Processes report; Major Capital Projects report: quarter ended March 31; Social investment; bargaining strategy; Legislative Compliance report - update on remedial action as at June 30; Debtors report as at April 30; Undergraduate awards; Strategic enrolment management – 2016 budget EFTS; Cash Passport policy and procedures; review of the Financial Monitoring and Control policy; Strategic Innovations Fund grant report backs; Internal Audit reports; status update on Management Action on Internal and External recommendations as at June 30; status update on Policy Guide as at June 30;

Contracts and Trading – governance, incentives and performance – update; update of long leave devolvement; Low Performing Provision action report June; monthly portfolio update papers (for May, June and July) from Assistant Vice-Chancellors (Research, Academic and

Enterprise; External Relations; Strategy, Finance, Information Technology and Commercial

Operations; People and Organisational Development; Operations, International and

University Registrar; Māori and Pasifika), and Pro Vice-Chancellors (Business; Health;

Humanities and Social Sciences; Creative Arts; Sciences).

Further explanation on these items is provided in the SLT web reports available via the

University Management-Senior Leadership Team webpage http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/about-massey/university-management/universitymanagement/university-management_home.cfm.

9.32

Massey University Committee Appointments

9.32.1 On the recommendation of the Chairperson of the Massey University Genetic Technology

Committee and under delegated authority of Council following consultation with

Tanenuiarangi Manawatu Incorporated, I have re-appointed Dr Jonathan Procter

(Muaūpoko,

Ngāi Tahu), as a Māori member, to the Massey University Genetic Technology Committee, for a three-year term, from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2017.

9.32.2 On the recommendation of Chair of the Human Ethics Committee: Southern A and under delegated authority of Council, I have made the following appointments of community members:

· Dr Harriette Carr, for a second term of three years, from September 1, 2015, to August

31, 2018.

· Dr Donald Campbell, for a second term of three years, from April 1, 2015, to March 31,

2018.

9.32.3 On the recommendation of the Director, Human Ethics I have appointed Dr Rochelle

Stewart-Withers, as the Chair of the Massey University Human Ethics Committee: Southern

Page 54 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

B for the remainder of her first three-year term on this committee, from August 1, 2015 to

November 19 2016.

10.0

Te Whai Wāhi/Ngā Wero

Opportunities/Threats

10.1 As stated in item 7.1 above, Massey University is now in a unique position in China. Its reputation is strong and its profile is high. It is important in the years ahead that we build on what has been achieved – particularly as the Massey University Worldwide project takes shape. There is no doubt that the 21st century will belong to universities that have a global reputation. What Massey achieves globally will be heavily influenced by its relationship with

China.

10.2 I see that philanthropist Owen Glen has gifted $5 million to Auckland University’s Business

School. Mr Glen has also suggested that the Government change the rules surrounding charitable donations to encourage more giving. This is a sensible idea. Given that

Government is tightly regulated, universities need to find other sources of funding. In

Singapore, for example, for each dollar donated to a university, the Government adds three more.

10.3 The Government delivered its Budget in May. Although there have been no increases in funding, it is good to see that there have been no serious cuts. (It looks like fee increases will be limited to 3 per cent, which will cost the University some funding – but that has yet to be finalised). One useful announcement was that funding rates for some key areas like agriculture are being increased. This will be funded from the falling enrolments across the sector predicted for the next few years. For more detail please refer to Appendix XVIII.

10.4 Successes in Health Research Council and Ministry of Business, Innovation and

Employment funding are recognition of the Massey’s specialist strengths particularly in the areas of agrifood-business and health. (Refer to Items 3.1.2, 3.13, and 3.14, the launch of the Joint Graduate School of Horticulture and Food Enterprise (item 3.2)), along with numerous items throughout this report). This, in addition to the recent announcement by

Scientific American, which saw New Zealand ranked third in the world for developing biotechnology innovation potential, augers well. NZBIO chief executive Dr Will Barker praised local industry representatives. “Palmerston North is a great environment for growing agriculturally-focused biotech. Having Massey University, AgResearch and Grasslands on your doorstep are all world-leading teams developing world-beating technologies,” he said.

10.5 Growing student enrolments is one of the key areas of focus for the University this year. In the period between 2010 and 2013, the Tertiary Education Commission required that the student numbers be reduced to a forecast set in 2004. In 2014 when it became clear that school leaver numbers were flat, the TEC indicated that if the University could increase enrolments that would be acceptable. With three physical campuses (Albany yet to be completed) and distance students, the University needs to grow its numbers. In 2013 marketing and recruitment were stepped up as it has been again this year. With the second semester in sight, enrolments are being watched carefully to see if the University is on target for the year. Success still depends on enrolments for Summer School and that in turn depends on an attractive programme being offered to students.

10.6 I spent a good deal of my time talking with school teachers and principals at conferences in early July and was struck (again) by the important role Massey University has to play in

“shaping the future of the nation”. Education around the world is in a state of flux as the sector struggles to meet the demands of a rapidly changing environment. They are caught in the middle of a debate about education that has been raging for decades and shows no sign of being resolved. Providing the education community with a clear understanding of what is driving this debate and indicating the range of responses that might serve them best is something we can contribute.

What we can do for education we can also do for so many other areas of society where equally divisive debates are taking place. It is not our job to tell people what to do – but we

Page 55 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

can assist by helping them to understand the challenges they face and setting out the options available. This, in my view is a core role for the modern university.

11.0

Te Mana o te Wānanga

Overall sense/feel of the place

11.1 Graduation season provides the University, along with families and communities, the opportunity to celebrate the achievements of our students. It is also an opportunity to showcase the University and the regions our campuses belong to. Thank you again to academic and support staff for supporting our students through their journey and to all those involved in the ceremonies and associated events and celebrations. Truly great to be part of.

11.2 With half of 2015 behind us, it is useful to look at what each of us set out to achieve and what is left to do. I have provided recirculated (via my elog of June 29) the presentation to all staff that I gave in March. It lists what colleges and service lines indicated they would focus on during the year. Progress is being made in all areas – some more than others. By the end of the year all-staff meetings, however, I hope to be able to tick off a complete list (bar those items that met unforeseen problems).

I have indicated that this would be a good time for colleges, service lines and all areas of the

University to pause and make sure that everything planned to happen this year is on target.

The Council met on July 3 to discuss key strategic issues and finalise details for the new governance arrangements required by the Government. Some members of the Tertiary

Education Commission also attended the meeting.

11.3 The Council also took time to look at the large number of strategic developments that are under way or planned. The University is doing a lot as it seeks to respond to the demands of

Government and the wider environment. Council members indicated their support for what is happening. The Council discussion was intended to be a precursor to a meeting with the

Tertiary Education Commission. Unfortunately only two of 12 could make the meeting in the end. However, the discussion turned out to be very useful and it is intended to continue the engagement with the full commission in August.

It is vital that the University does talk in depth with the commission given that they are our major funder. As it stands, the commission is largely restricted to funding student numbers and holding universities accountable for completion and progression. While important, these areas of focus are far too narrow. A debate on how to fund a modern university is urgently needed.

11.4 The Senior Leadership Team have just met to look at how the year is progressing and what is happening on the Manawatū campus. Last year the Senior Leadership Team focused on the Albany campus (producing the Grow North initiative led now by Professor Ted Zorn – refer to item 2.4 above) and Wellington campus (producing the Think Differently initiative now led by Associate Professors Robyn Peace and Professor Frank Sligo – refer to item 2.5 above).

Appendices attached:

Appendix I: Largest food science institute tackles global issues (Ref. item 3.1)

Appendix II: Renewed funding for Riddet Institute (Ref. item 3.3)

Appendix III: NZ farming expertise fosters NZ-China relationship (Ref. item 3.12)

Appendix IV: $16 million funding for food processing research (Ref. item 3.1.3)

Appendix V: $4m in funding for Massey health researchers (Ref item 3.14)

Page 56 of 97

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Appendix VI: Massey professor's ASPEN Fellowship a first for New Zealand (Ref item 3.15.1)

Appendix VII: Rainey elected to European biology organisation (Ref. item 3.15.2)

Appendix VIII: Penny made honorary life member of science association (Ref. item 3.15.3)

Appendix IX: Massey man honoured for global poverty research (Ref. item 3.15.4)

Appendix X: Identifying overactive bladder issues just got easier (Ref. item 3.15.6)

Appendix XI: Humanities flagged by diplomat and church leader Hon Docs (Ref item 4.1)

Ans Westra retrospective follows award of honorary doctorate (Ref item 4.1)

Appendix XII: Massey presents half a million dollars in ag-hort scholarships (Ref. item 4.2)

Appendix XIII: New mobile exercise lab launched (Ref. item 4.3)

Appendix XIV: International kudos for emerging fashion designer (Ref. item 5.2.2)

Appendix XV: Noble’s photography honoured in Japan (Ref. item 5.2.7)

Appendix XVI: China’s First Lady hosts Massey, Weta arts delegation (Ref item 7.1)

Appendix XVII: Massey University Worldwide launches in London (Ref. item 7.2)

Appendix XVIII: Budget 2015: How it affects Massey University (Ref. item 10.3)

Steve Maharey

Page 57 of 97

Appendix I

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Distinguished Professor Harjinder Singh is to head the new Massey University Institute of Food

Science and Technology

Largest food science institute tackles global issues

Page 58 of 97

Appendix I

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Professors Emeriti Dick (left) and Mary Earle (right) reveal a commemorative plaque to mark the opening with Professor Paul McDonald and Distinguished Professor Harjinder Singh.

A new institute has been launched at Massey University which will deliver not only high quality teaching programmes and multidisciplinary research but also connect with the real world, industry and businesses – all to solve the big food and nutrition challenges facing the globe.

The Massey University Institute of Food Science and Technology (MIFST) was launched last night at a dinner on the Manawatū campus.

The new institute is an overarching structure that melds together the activities of the School of Food and Nutrition, FoodPilot and Riddet Innovation to become the Southern Hemisphere’s leading and largest food and nutrition group.

The key issues the institute will address are creating nutritious foods for the future, food and nutrition security, food safety and food innovation. Scientists will also look to develop novel food products ingredients, advanced processing technologies, and innovative packaging of foods.

The institute will be headed by world-renowned authority in food science Distinguished Professor

Harjinder Singh. He will remain co-director of the Riddet Institute Centre of Research Excellence with

Distinguished Professor Paul Moughan – a move which aligns the strategies of both institutes.

“The institute creates a critical mass and will offer innovative teaching programmes combined with world-class research capability and facilities,” Professor Singh says.

College of Health Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor Paul McDonald said this initiative brings together the best of all worlds. “It combines excellent academic and teaching programmes with world-class research opportunities” he says. “Massey is taking the lead to answer the problems facing humanity.”

Company director of cDNAk Enterprises Limited Dr Kevin Marshall agreed. “The New Zealand food industry contributes a great deal to our economy. In the future, we’re going to need highly skilled people who have the capacity to create and innovate. This institute is going to play a key role in providing an innovative training environment for graduates as well as providing the research and development the industry’s needs.”

Massey University Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey said the institute will work well with the university’s other multi-partner initiatives. “We are part of the New Zealand Food Safety Research

Centre, FoodHQ and the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment-funded food processing alliance. The umbrella structure of MIFST cements our role in Australasia as the leading academic and research grouping in food and nutritional sciences.”

The dinner last night saw a gathering of leading people in the food industry and the sciences including Palmerston North mayor Grant Smith, Fonterra external relationships liaison manager Dr

Kevin Palfreyman, Director of Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

(CSIRO) Flagship of Food Nutrition and Bioproducts Professor Martin Cole and Chief Executive

Officer of the Royal Society of New Zealand Andrew Cleland.

Also among them were Professors Emeriti Dick and Mary Earle, who have made a huge contribution to the development of food technology study at Massey University and around the world. They revealed a commemorative plaque to mark the opening.

The launch of the institute coincides with the fiftieth anniversary of the New Zealand Institute of Food

Science and Technology.

Page 59 of 97

Appendix II

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Co-directors of the Riddet Institute Distinguished Professors Paul Moughan (left) and Harjinder

Singh.

Renewed funding for Riddet Institute

New Zealand’s premier centre for fundamental and strategic scientific research in food, the Riddet

Institute hosted by Massey University, has been selected once again as a Centre of Research

Excellence (CoRE).

Following a stringent selection process, four additional groups have been selected as CoREs, meaning they will each receive several million dollars of funding annually for the period from 2016-

20. This brings the total number of centres to 10. Massey is a partner or host of seven of them.

The Riddet Institute was established in 2003 and focuses on four key aspects of science: food material science, novel food processing, human nutrition, and gastrointestinal biology. Their goal is to play a pivotal role in developing future foods that meet the nutritional needs of the world and at the same time boost the value of New Zealand’s food exports.

Massey Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey says the decision reflects the outstanding leadership and talent of staff within the centre.

“The expertise of our scientists is wide ranging and world renowned," Mr Maharey says. "The Riddet

Institute has scientists who work across the spectrum. It is these people working at the interface between food science and nutrition that will allow us to meet the food challenges of the future.

"The fact that Massey is a partner in six of the remaining nine CoREs is testament to wide-ranging areas of expertise in which we collaborate across the areas of research excellence that matter most to New Zealand."

Riddet co-directors Distinguished Professor Paul Moughan and Distinguished Professor Harjinder

Singh say they are delighted with the continued funding. They say the work of the institute is "vital for a highly innovative and viable food export sector and will allow for continuation of world class fundamental food science and research training”

Page 60 of 97

Appendix II

C 15/54 – August

Part I

“The CoRE funding reflects the outstanding academic credentials and world class standing of the

Riddet Institute team.”

Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment Minister Steven Joyce says CoREs provide a collaborative environment that foster innovative research. “The work of our 10 CoREs will deliver benefits to New Zealand across economic, environmental and social platforms that will make a difference to the lives of all New Zealanders."

The Riddet Institute is a partnership between Massey University (the host), the University of Otago,

The University of Auckland, AgResearch and Plant and Food Research.

CoREs have been operating in New Zealand since 2002 and received more than $434 million in funding from the Government.

The other three CoREs announced today are the Bio-Protection Research Centre hosted by Lincoln

University, QuakeCore: Centre for earthquake resilience hosted by the University of Canterbury and

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga hosted at the University of Auckland.

The six CoREs announced last year are the Maurice Wilkins Centre (hosted by the University of

Auckland), the MacDiarmid Centre (Victoria University of Wellington), the Medical Technologies

CoRE (Auckland), the Dodd-Walls Centre for Photonic and Quantum Technologies (University of

Otago), Te Punaha Matatini – the Centre for Complex Systems and Networks (University of

Auckland), and Brain Research NZ (University of Otago and University of Auckland).

The government's announcement can be read at: http://www.stevenjoyce.co.nz/index.php?/archives/584-Four-more-Centres-of-Research-Excellence-

Funded.html

Page 61 of 97

Appendix III

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Professor Paul Kenyon (second from left) and Professor Hugh Blair (far right) inside the XinBao sheep facility.

NZ farming expertise fosters NZ-China

relationship

Massey University animal scientists have been appointed as expert consultants to the XinBao farm,

Urumqi, China foster the business relationship between China and New Zealand.

Professors Hugh Blair, Steve Morris and Paul Kenyon from Massey University’s International Sheep

Research Centre have been visiting China over the last 10 years to establish relationships with the

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shihezi University staff and, more recently chief executive officer of

XinBao Dr Harry Gao.

Their most recent visit involved visiting the XinBao sheep farming operation on Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps property. The immediate goals of this farm are to produce one million lambs annually from 500,000 ewes with year-round lambing, and to capitalise on co-products like methane from animal waste and electricity from shed-mounted solar panels.

During the visit the scientists designed a $NZ400,000 research project to collect baseline data which will allow the assessment of productivity and profitability of any proposed changes to the farming system. A total of seven research projects are being developed over the next three to six months for which XinBao will contract Massey University’s expertise in sheep production and education.

Professor Blair said the rate of progress has been “incredible” and this comes down to sharing knowledge between the two countries.

“We are occasionally challenged by New Zealanders who think we are giving away the country’s knowledge in sheep farming, however, we believe the opportunities for New Zealand to collaborate in

Chinese tertiary education and on-farm research provide major opportunities for New Zealand to learn, improve and share.”

He says the benefits flow both ways “We are discovering things about indoor sheep farming systems that might have a place in environmentally sensitive parts of New Zealand”.

Page 62 of 97

Appendix III

C 15/54 – August

Part I

As well as environmental benefits, Professor Blair says there is huge economic opportunity for New

Zealand. “China is a significant trading partner for New Zealand and anything we can do to improve our relationship is beneficial. This includes research mentoring and collaboration.”

“China will shortly be the powerhouse of science discovery – current projections has China overtaking the USA in the next 5-10 years (depending on what criteria you use). Massey wants to be part of that knowledge generation, just as we have been part of the euro-centric knowledge generation for the last 150 years.”

In April 2015, XinBao was granted two billion New Zealand dollars of funding from the Chinese government to assist with achieving the vision of increased sheep meat supply as part of the Central

Government’s drive to substantially increase national red meat production.

Related articles

China friendship award for sheep scientist

Animal agriculture expert made honorary professor

Visit by Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences

Created: 08/06/2015 | Last updated: 08/06/2015

Page 63 of 97

Appendix IV

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Transforming primary food production into added-value exports

$16 million funding for food processing research

Professor Richard Archer, Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology

Page 64 of 97

Appendix IV

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Cutting-edge research in food engineering will be funded in a new programme that brings together engineers and scientists from universities and crown research institutes to improve profits for New

Zealand food producers.

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment funding of $16.65 million over six years will enable research focused on selected processing steps – called unit operations – that will transform

New Zealand’s primary food production into added-value exports.

Similar processing steps, like drying or freezing, are used by many sectors of the food industry, but the new programme will use a co-innovation approach between teams of researchers and companies to conceive and develop new unit operations and extend the applications of existing technologies in order to enable manufacture of new products and provide improved efficiencies.

The programme will be hosted by Massey University, with Professor Richard Archer as national science leader, and partner organisations are AgResearch, Plant and Food Research, the Riddet

Institute, the University of Auckland and the University of Otago.

The programme is closely linked to the New Zealand Food Innovation Network and will make use of the regional product development centres based in Auckland, Hamilton, Palmerston North,

Christchurch and Dunedin.

It utilises and widens the networks of FoodHQ, which is the substantial Man awatū-centred cluster of agrifood business innovation organisations.

Plant and Food chief executive Peter Landon-Lane says: "The large-scale collaborative approach to research is the most efficient way for New Zealand to make rapid progress."

AgResearch research director Warren McNabb says with four of the partners already linked in the

FoodHQ collaboration, the involvement of Auckland and Otago universities creates high-level engagement between an extremely large cross-section of the New Zealand food industry, which he welcomes.

Massey Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey says the programme is a great example of aligning research capability with industry need and national necessity. “It is a strength of the University that we have researchers with rich industry experience able to bring such a programme together.”

Professor Archer says the first commercialisations will be by participating companies, but the programme allows the technologies to become available soon after to other New Zealand companies to move other products up the value chain – an approach that should resonate with the business sector.

"In funding the programme, the ministry is targeting the huge value that downstream processing offers," he says. "Currently, much farm gate production leaves New Zealand with only minimal processing, particularly for Māori food assets, which are now concentrated in primary production.

"While this new research programme enables new food processing capability, it sits alongside existing funded programmes, including the High-Value Nutrition national science challenge, the industry-targeted Primary Growth Partnerships and the BioResource Processing Alliance. The alliance is focused on returning value from various biological product streams that otherwise find only low-value outlets or go to waste."

One partner company is Dunedin-based Mainland Poultry. Managing director Michael Guthrie says the programme is exactly what is needed to ensure the company's products are suitable for the new export market opportunities they have identified. "Until now the risk of developing new technology is too great for us to take on our own," Mr Guthrie says.

Created: 25/06/2015 | Last updated: 25/06/2015

Page 65 of 97

Appendix V

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Professor Bernhard Breier

$4m in funding for Massey health

researchers

Professor Karen Witten

Page 66 of 97

Appendix V

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Professor Jeroen Douwes

Associate Professor Sarah Derrett

Massey University researchers in the College of Health have been awarded almost $4 million in the

2015 Health Research Council’s Funding round.

Pro Vice-Chancellor Paul McDonald says the funding will go towards four diverse research projects tackling some of the most pressing health challenges facing New Zealand and the world.

Investigating gut microbiomes in women:

Chair in Nutrition Professor Bernhard Breier has been awarded almost $1.2 million over three years to investigate the gut microbiome – the mass of bacteria residing in the human gut - in women of

Pasifika and New Zealand European descent in the fight against obesity.

Tantalising new evidence suggests that microbial complexity and functionality in the gut may play a crucial role in obesity. Professor Breier and a team from Massey University, and the Universities of

Auckland and Otago, will test whether diet, taste perception, sleep and physical activity can modify the gut microbiome and its impact on obesity.

Enabling participation for children with disabilities:

Professor Karen Witten has been awarded almost $800,000 over three years for research into how built environments, amenities and social environments create barriers for children and young people

Page 67 of 97

with disabilities.

Appendix V

C 15/54 – August

Part I

In association with non-governmental organisations in the disability sector, Professor Witten will work with children and young people with motor and sensory impairments and their families to understand their experiences in the public realm using a range of methods across diverse Auckland neighbourhoods.

How airway micro-organisms affect children with asthma:

Childhood asthma is a complex condition which could lead to more severe asthma or other conditions in later life. Professor Jeroen Douwes has been awarded nearly $1.2 million over four years to investigate which airway micro-organisms are associated with lung function deficits and nonallergic inflammation in childhood asthma in 240 New Zealand children. It is the fifth consecutive project Professor Douwes has had funded by the Health Research Council.

Improving outcomes for injured New Zealanders:

Last year the Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) spent $1.8 billion and received 1.8 million injury claims. Of those claims, 28 per cent have been identified as subsequent injury claims.

Associate Professor Sarah Derrett has been awarded almost $600,000 over two years for a

Subsequent Injury Study to identify if interventions can be developed for people who suffer a re-injury or identify as being “accident prone”.

“These projects are representative of the cutting edge, applied science we are conducting across the

College of Health at Massey University,” said Pro Vice-Chancellor Paul McDonald.

“Our top scientists and students are using their talents and novel ideas to solve the 21st century’s biggest health challenges such as obesity, asthma and disability. Winning such a high proportion of the HRC project grants shows our growing strength and ability to look at issues in groundbreaking ways.”

Thirty-three researchers from across New Zealand received a combined total of more than $34.5 million in project funding in the Health Research Council’s 2015 funding round.

Created: 09/06/2015 | Last updated: 09/06/2015

Page 68 of 97

Appendix VI

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Professor Gil Hardy

Massey professor's ASPEN Fellowship a first for New Zealand

A long and illustrious career investigating the complex issue of feeding people using tubes has seen

Massey University’s Professor Gil Hardy elected as the first non-American Fellow of the American

Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN).

Professor of Clinical Nutrition in the School of Food and Nutrition, Professor Hardy helped establish the Master of Nutrition and Dietetics at Massey University.

“Being elected a Fellow is a great honour and one I wasn’t expecting,” says Professor Hardy. “They usually elect past presidents as Fellows, but when the current president announced the award and made the presentation, it was a very nice feeling. It’s good not only for me but also for Massey and the School of Nutrition in the College of Health.

Founded in 1976, ASPEN is an interdisciplinary organisation whose members are involved in the provision of clinical nutrition therapies, including enteral (tube feeding directly into the intestinal tract) and parenteral (tube feeding directly into the vein). It has more than 6000 members worldwide, comprised of dietitians, nurses, pharmacists, physicans, scientists, students and other health professionals working in the field of nutrition support clinical practice, research and education.

Professor Hardy says ASPEN is the largest and longest-serving organisation in this field. Over the last forty years the process of feeding by tube has changed quite a bit.

“There is a spectrum of problems with the intestine and food absorption. At the extreme end, people have no intestinal function at all, which used to result in death, until in the late 1960s when surgeons developed techiques for inserting a sterile feeding tube into the heart. In the early days, most of the emphasis was on this intravenous (by vein) feeding, otherwise known as parenteral nutrition (PN). If you go further along the spectrum where people may have some partial gut function, they can take

Page 69 of 97

Appendix VI

C 15/54 – August food in a liquid form by nasogastric tube feeding into the stomach. That’s called enteral nutrition

Part I

(EN).

“In the early days it was thought that our gut was just a convenient tube to take food down into the stomach and then out, but increasingly it was found to be a major organ that affects our immune system. So today the motto is “if the gut works, use it” – even if only partially. It’s always been a strong recommendation for when a baby is born to get it to suckle, to stimulate the gastro-intestinal system. Even for babies fed intravenously, nurses still try to get them to attach to improve the generation of immune factors.”

With the advent of multi-disciplinary medical teams in the 1990s, Professor Hardy says a wider range of health professionals became involved in nutrition support teams (NST), and this helped to raise the profile of dietitians.

“Most large hospitals have a NST with either a surgeon or gastro-enterologist, a pharmacist, a dietitian and a specialist nurse. This team approach has been good for all the disciplines, and we’ve seen that reflected in the membership the professional societies, such as ASPEN and AuSPEN (the

Australasian society) – with something like 75 per cent of the members being dietitians or nutritionists."

Professor Hardy is also in great demand as a speaker for other nutrition societies in Europe, South

America and Asia.

“An increasing area of interest is the potential for drug and nutrient interactions. People know not to eat grapefruit with particular drugs – but there are all sorts of potential interactions between many common drugs and different foods, and and that’s more acute when you’re feeding by PN or EN.

However, a lot of the evidence at the moment is anecdotal, so there’s a major opportunity for more evidence-based scientific research. In ASPEN we’ve selected 10 of the most common drugs that are likely to cause some kind of interaction – and our task force is looking to see just what the evidence is, and what new clinical research is needed.”

But it’s not only the research aspects that Professor Hardy enjoys. Five years ago he was instrumental in helping set up a support group called Parenteral Nutrition Down Under (PNDU).

There are around 200 adults and children with intestinal failure (IF) in Australia and New Zealand, who are dependent on PN tube feeding every day at home.

“There aren’t large numbers being fed this way, but it’s the extreme end of the feeding spectrum and quite often people can feel isolated when they’re told they can manage their therapy themselves at home (called HPN). There’s lots to learn; using sterile techniques to change the tube connections and minimise the risk of infection, setting up an electronic pump to infuse their feeds, usually overnight.”

The organisation has produced several guide booklets, set up a Facebook page and a private internet chat forum, so that people have somebody else in a similar situation to email or phone, and talk to.

“There’s lots of discussion, about national or international travel with their pumps and feeding bags, and practical problems such as pump alarms going off in the middle of the night,” he says.

Professor Hardy says that being involved with PNDU is extremely rewarding. “I think that’s one of the most satisfying parts of the job – being more directly involved with “HPNers.” We’ve organised a few seminars and little social get-togethers – afternoon tea without the tea – so that patients (and their carers/families) can meet somewhere informally and share their exeriences. I think that’s what has always fascinated me – because if you’re just doing nutrition research you can sometimes forget that there’s a person at the receiving end. So it’s been great to see how people cope with IF – and I have great admiration for them.”

For more information on ASPEN, visit their website .

Page 70 of 97

Appendix VII

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Distinguished Professor Paul Rainey

Rainey elected to European biology organisation

Distinguished Professor Paul Rainey is the first New Zealander to be elected as an associate member of the European Molecular Biology Organisation.

The organisation has more than 1700 of the top life science researchers from Europe and around the world, including 79 nobel laureates. One hundred and forty members are associate members.

Election to the organisation is recognition of research excellence and outstanding achievements made by a life scientist.

Professor Rainey is part of Massey University's New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study. Based at the Auckland campus, it comprises a community of internationally recognised researchers whose expertise spans a broad spectrum of fundamental sciences.

Established in 2007, it has grown rapidly to become New Zealand’s premier place for research excellence. Among the faculty is Distinguished Professor Peter Schwertfedger, last year’s recipient of

New Zealand’s most prestigious science prize, the Rutherford Medal.

Institute director Distinguished Professor Gaven Martin says the institute is exceptionally proud of

Professor Rainey's achievement and the recognition given to him by the organisation. “Election highlights the importance of investing in fundamental research as a platform to build the world’s knowledge base," Professor Martin says. "Applications of this knowledge have been instrumental in understanding applied problems such as the kiwifruit pathogen PSA.”

Professor Rainey heads The Rainey Lab within the institute that researches evolutionary process using populations of microbes whose evolution is tracked in real time. Research ranges from the evolution of virulence in bacterial pathogens, to the evolution of cooperation and the evolutionary

Page 71 of 97

Appendix VII

C 15/54 – August

Part I transition from single cells to multicellular life. From this research have come numerous high-profile publications that have significantly advanced fundamental knowledge in the field of biology.

He says he is delighted and honoured to be elected and credits that to the work of his team. "Election is as much an acknowledgement of the commitment and innovation of those members of my team – past and present – who have given so much of their own energy, creativity and vitality to the research programme, as it is a personal achievement.”

Page 72 of 97

Appendix VIII

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Distinguished Professor David Penny

Penny made honorary life member of science association

Distinguished Professor David Penny from Massey University’s Institute of Fundamental Sciences has been awarded an honorary life membership of the New Zealand Association of Scientists.

Professor Penny has undertaken numerous research projects in order to understand biology at its most basic level – the level of the genome (DNA). This includes challenging theories eukaryote

(organisms whose cells have a nucleus and other microscopic structures) evolution, finding the origins of flightlessness in birds like the moa, and tracing the origins of kumara.

His accomplishments include ranking among an elite group of New Zealand scientists whose h-index

(a measure of scientific productivity and impact defined as the number of scientific papers that have been cited at least that number of times) exceeds 60.

He was awarded the Marsden Medal in 2000 in recognition of his outstanding service to science and the profession of science. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand and, in 2004, was awarded the Rutherford Medal in recognition of his distinguished contributions in theoretical biology, molecular evolution, and the analysis of DNA information. In 2005, Massey University recognised his achievements by appointing him a Distinguished Professor. He was honoured with a special tribute edition of the journal of the New Zealand Association of Scientists in 2009.

Professor Penny has also had a strong interest in New Zealand science policy. He was President of the New Zealand Association of Scientists in 1990 and 1991 and contributed to its original Survey of

Scientists – outlining the attributes and accomplishments of the New Zealand research, science and technology workforce, the concerns of scientists and their values relating to science and society.

He was elected an honorary member of the association at the 2014 annual general meeting and was presented with the certificate at the association’s 2015 annual conference held in March.

Page 73 of 97

Appendix IX

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Professor Stuart Carr with colleagues from Tshwane University of Technology and Kliptown Youth

Programme, Soweto

Massey man honoured for global poverty

research

A Massey psychologist has been honoured internationally for his research tackling the intractable issue of reducing global poverty.

Professor Stuart Carr, an industrial and organisational psychologist in the School of Psychology, has been awarded a Fellowship to the Society for Industrial and Organisational Psychology (SIOP) at its annual conference in Philadelphia.

He was recognised as “a thought leader and key driving force for the evolution of Humanitarian Work

Psychology which promotes humanitarianism and social advocacy on a global scale.”

His global research on work-related humanitarian issues have been embraced at the highest levels through the United Nations, the International Labour Organisation (ILO) and the Organisation for

Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

Professor Carr has spent over 25 years showing how everyday workplace dynamics impact global and local poverty, and poverty reduction. His work has led major international organisations to change their remuneration schemes for international and local workers, to improve motivation and decrease dependence on aid.

Dubbed by his peers as the world’s leading psychologist applying organisational and social psychology to the challenges of poverty reduction, Professor Carr says his recent award is encouraging for others working in the field. He says it signals the extent to which his profession is contributing to “empowerment at work, sustainable livelihood, and to global poverty reduction.”

He says the fellowship is “a big personal honour,” but adds; “most of the outcomes have happened through team work.

Page 74 of 97

Appendix IX

C 15/54 – August

Part I

“Collectively, for example, our teams have helped to highlight the injustice of ‘dual salary’ systems that are funded globally, and which pay expatriate versus in-country workers radically different wages, even though they are often equally qualified and experienced. More recently, in conjunction with MPOWER at Massey University, we have been looking at the humanitarian work psychology of living wages, and whether there is an evidence-based business case for shared prosperity.”

He is inspired by working closely with like-minded colleagues, for example, in the newly formed End

Poverty and Inequality Cluster (EPIC) in the School of Psychology, and before that the Poverty

Research Group.

“Many people are drawn to study psychology precisely because they want to work with people, and to make a useful contribution towards a better quality of life. This human focus has been a guiding motive throughout my own career,” he says.

He is currently in South Africa, under a Memorandum of Understanding with Tshwane University of

Technology, working with its Department of People Management and Development on living wages in South Africa and New Zealand, and their contribution towards poverty reduction. He is also working with the Kliptown Youth Programme, a local organization, which enables education for children from the Kliptown Squatter Camp in Soweto.

Professor Carr says there is a “huge, unmet demand” for transferring theory and research on poverty reduction and sustainable livelihood into policy and action by companies, supply chains, multinational and multilateral organizations, joint ventures, small to medium enterprises, education and health departments in government and the private sector.

In alignment with the launch later this year of what he describes as the United Nations’ “most ambitious and integrated plan for human development ever conceived,” the EPIC team is aiming to create a new international 180-credits Masters qualification.

Named "Psychologies of Sustainable Development”, it will create new pathways for bringing about change. The degree will cover all 17 of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals, ranging from enabling sustainable health and education to promoting decent work.

Last year, Professor Carr was made a fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Created: 18/06/2015 | Last updated: 18/06/2015

Page 75 of 97

Appendix X

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Prescribing the right medicine for overactive bladder syndrome is difficult

Identifying overactive bladder issues just got easier

Professor Roger Lentle

Biomedical researchers at Massey University have just published ground-breaking research that could lead to faster diagnosis of bladder problems in women, in a leading specialist journal, the

Page 76 of 97

British Journal of Urology.

Appendix X

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Such is the novelty and importance of the findings that they have also been reported in the clinical review section of the prestigious journal Nature.

Professor Roger Lentle leads the digesta group in the Physiology department of the School of Food and Nutrition, the research team that is currently investigating the relationship between normal and disordered bladder motility (the ability of the bladder walls to move and contract spontaneously). The team includes a senior consultant urologist from Palmerston North Hospital and researchers from the

Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences at Massey University.

“Understanding the motility — or movement, including contractions — of the bladder is particularly important for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome (OAB) — a debilitating disorder that affects 16 per cent of women over 40 years of age, and this increases to over 60 per cent of female rest home residents in the Western world,” Professor Lentle says.

The bladder acts as a reservoir for the urine that is being continuously made by the kidneys. Its walls gradually relax as the volume of urine that is stored gradually increases. This control of the elasticity of the bladder wall prevents pressure building up inside the bladder. If the pressure is successfully controlled the bladder can accommodate the incoming urine and signals can be sent to the brain accurately indicating how full it is.This allows us to visit the toilet when it is convenient, and then allows the brain to send a conscious signal to empty the bladder.

The system for accommodating urine and controlling pressure can sometimes go wrong. Hence the pressure can suddenly go up or down, and the signal that the bladder is full suddenly activates. This can lead to distressing problems, such as frequent trips to the toilet or being “caught short” when there is not enough time to reach the toilet. This can happen in both men and women for a number of medical reasons, but is much more common in women.

Until now there have been no tests that are able to identify the disorder in the walls of the bladder.

Worse still, similar symptoms can be caused by disorders other than OAB. This means clinicians have had to rely on an expensive strategy of excluding the other, more readily identifiable, causes of the symptoms and scoring symptom intensity to evaluate treatment.

The Massey team has developed and used a novel technique termed “two dimensional video spatiotemporal mapping” to visualise and track the minute movements made by the bladder wall during its accommodation of incoming urine.

“The mapping algorithm works by mathematically comparing successive frames of a video film so that minute changes not visible to the human eye can be identified. The results are plotted with a colour code identifying the areas of greatest movement and overlaid onto successive frames of the original video,“ says Professor Lentle. The results were surprising.

“We thought that the entire bladder wall would contract or relax simultaneously to reduce pressure, but it turns out that adjustment ocurred in patches and that these patches migrated in continuous circuits over the surface of the bladder.”

Seeing this activity meant researchers could then determine the size of the patches, the rate at which they moved over the surface of the bladder and the time taken for them to complete a circuit.

“The results may be a game-changer in the diagnosis of OAB, as we hope that comparisons of similar measurements taken from people with OAB alongside those from healthy people will give a clearer understanding of what exactly goes wrong.

“We’re currently investigating ways that clinicians could map these movements using laparoscopes or cytoscopes — instruments that can take videos of the bladder wall without the need for surgery.

Once we have developed that technique we hope to test a large group of women with “normal” bladders, and women with OAB in order to evaluate which of these measurements are affected by the disorder,” he says.

“Ultimately, if we can identify such measurements, and can provide urologists with a means of taking

Page 77 of 97

Appendix X

C 15/54 – August

Part I them, it will enable definitive diagnosis and direct testing of the effect of drugs that may control OAB in the patient.”

Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Health Professor Paul McDonald says the research will benefit many people.

“This is just the latest series of significant research by this world-class research group conducted within our Massey Institute of Food Science and Technology (MIFST) – the largest collective of expertise of its kind in the Southern Hemisphere – that will benefit so many.

“Roger Lentle’s team has a long and distinguished track record of producing important research helping us to better understand digestion and bladder problems.”

Page 78 of 97

Appendix XI

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Lieutenant General (retired) Rhys Jones, Professor Brigid Heywood, Dr Gerald Hensley and

Professor Glyn Harper

Humanities flagged by diplomat and church leader

Professor Peter Lineham, Archbishop Dr Sir David Moxon and Sir Anand Satyanand

An Anglican church leader based in Rome and top former diplomat who has worked for 10 New

Zealand prime ministers were conferred with honorary doctorates at Massey University’s College of

Humanities and Social Sciences graduation ceremonies today.

Page 79 of 97

Appendix XI

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Former diplomat and public servant-turned-author Gerald Hensley CNZM and Archbishop Sir David

Moxon have both have come under fire in their respective roles from terrorists’ bullets and nuclear bombs. They have served New Zealand in political administration and clerical roles around the world and been at the centre of pivotal events in history.

Both published authors, they were each awarded the degree of Doctor of Literature (honoris causa) by the University for their contribution to their respective fields of politics and religion.

Dr Hensley's diplomatic career spanned two decades, including eight years as Permanent Head of the Prime Minister’s Department – four with National’s Sir Robert Muldoon and nearly four with

Labour’s David Lange. In that time, he says he learned much about politics and the “art of getting something done” whilst managing, reconciling and compromising half a dozen conflicting views.

Among his numerous roles and postings around the globe – from the Pacific and Asia to the United

States of America and London – he says he is most proud of the part he played in securing independence for Samoa in 1962 and the Cook Islands in 1965.

One of his more hair-raising memories was in April 1973 in Washington, where he served as

Counsellor at the New Zealand Embassy. The Black September terror group painted slogans on his house and fired shots through the window of a bedroom where his elderly parents were sleeping.

This was thought to have been the first Islamic-based terror attack in the United States.

Dr Hensley has published numerous articles on Asian and Pacific Affairs, as well as three books.

In his address to graduates, he spoke of the timeless value of studying humanities. “The pace of change today threatens to disengage us from the past," he said. "Knowledge has been transformed over the last two or three decades, in the sciences, medicine, biology, psychology and many other disciplines. Some experts have proclaimed that any knowledge older than 15 years is likely to be out of date and not worth knowing.

“The humanities differ from other disciplines in the long stretch of their view,” he said. “Literature and history are not the prisoners of time. Both are able to range over the centuries to show human nature in all its complexity and at its fullest stretch, from heroic greatness to deepest infamy.

“The glory of studying the humanities is that their revelation of the wonder, sadness, heroism and sheer variety of life sustains us for a lifetime."

In his capacity as a historian, he is co-chair of the World War One Centenary History Project, run in partnership with Massey University, New Zealand Defence Force, the Ministry for Culture and

Heritage, and the Returned and Services Association.

Archbishop Dr Sir David Moxon, who flew from Rome to his hometown of Palmerston North for the ceremony, said he was delighted to receive his honorary degree, given that he was unable to attend graduation for his Master of Arts in Education, which he completed at Massey in 1976. He is currently resident in Rome as the Representative of the Anglican Church to the Holy See.

He told the graduates in his speech there was no longer a “generational time gap of say 25 years between what a university expounds and its impact on the conduct, ethics, strategic planning, advocacy, legislation, treaties and political decisions of a nation".

Humanities and social sciences graduates should be mindful that "the value of Massey as a learning engine will be measured by the flourishing of people’s personal learning for the common good, by the intellectual, imaginative and empathetic powers it has fostered and deployed from deep within the hearts and minds of people.”

He gave an example of how studying the humanities can empower people to make a stand on important issues from his own life when he took part in a peace flotilla to French Polynesia to protest against nuclear weapons testing in the Pacific.

“Shortly after our arrival a huge nuclear bomb was finally detonated under Fangataufa Atoll of 110 kilotons, five times the size of the bomb that was dropped on Hiroshima,” he said. “We all went quiet then, filled with a sense of huge sadness. This seemed to us to be sheer madness; to desecrate the earth with nuclear poison and trial a weapon that could plunge the whole world into a nightmare of destruction and death.”

His specific political role was to try to encourage French church awareness and action, and to influence French public opinion through broadcasts and press releases from near the nuclear bomb site. “At the time, 65 per cent of the French public were already against testing. We hoped that this

Page 80 of 97

Appendix XI

C 15/54 – August would be raised to the point where President Chirac would be unable to proceed with five more

Part I detonations. In the end, he reduced the tests by two.”

He says he learned from this experience that “when we need to pull together and harness our education and training for the common good, we can be extraordinary. Which is surely the point of this graduation: to find ways of pooling your talents and knowledge for the common good.”

Sir Anand Satyanand, in his citation, said “although he [Sir David] has risen to occupy the highest posts in the church, he has never lost roots in the general community, having worked as a young man at the Longburn meat works and as a Volunteer Service Abroad worker in the Pacific. “

Along with numerous roles in the Anglican Church throughout New Zealand and the Pacific, he attended the University of Oxford Honours School of Theology, St Peter's College, Oxford, where he graduated with a BA (hons) in 1978 and a Master of Arts in 1982.

He says his role in Rome involves engaging with and building a rapport with the Catholic Church at a time of significant change within the Catholic church by discussing “things we all agree on, things we might agree on and things we’ll never agree on.”

He has meet Pope Francis several times, and describes the experience as; “like sitting down with a favourite uncle. He’s very honest and courageous. Very compassionate and humble.”

One of the projects he is most excited about in his current role being part of an initiative with leaders of Anglican, Catholic, Jewish, Muslim, Hindu and Buddhist faiths to end slavery and human trafficking in the world, and to fight for justice and development.

Page 81 of 97

Appendix XI

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Ans Westra acknowledges the applause at the Michael Fowler Centre after being awarded her honorary doctorate by Massey University Chancellor Chris Kelly during graduation celebrations last week.

Ans Westra retrospective follows award of honorary doctorate

Celebrations for renowned documentary photographer Ans Westra continue next week with an exhibition showcasing more than 30 years of her work.

Fresh from being awarded an honorary doctorate by Massey University, Ms Westra’s legacy will be further celebrated with a photographic retrospective from 1963 to 1998 of black and white images at

Suite Gallery, 241 Cuba St, Te Aro, Wellington.

The exhibition, being staged from June 9 to July 4, visually represents the sheer breadth of work that was also highlighted at the Michael Fowler Centre last week where Ms Westra was conferred with a

Doctor of Fine Arts during graduation ceremonies for Massey University.

For more than 50 years Ms Westra, who immigrated to New Zealand from the Netherlands in 1957, has stamped her mark on the country’s photographic scene. She is widely recognised as having produced one of the most comp rehensive records of Māori over a half century characterised by significant political and cultural change.

In his citation outlining her achievements, former Massey University Pro-Chancellor Justice Stephen

Kos said Ans Westra showed how New Zealand had well and truly emerged from its colonial past.

“And she continued to do so over the next half century, in books and in exhibitions,” Justice Kos said.

“Tackling subjects we often feel uncomfortable about: gangs, protest marches, and prostitution in an exhibition called Behind the Curtain. The mirror held up to reveal places we seldom see and seldom look for.

Or topics that we should feel uncomfortable about .The unchecked despoliation of the environment, for instance. This was the subject of her last book in 2013. Nga Tau ki Muri: Our Future takes us firmlyfrom the familiar monochromatic imagery of her early work to full colour. It makes the scars on

Page 82 of 97

Appendix XI

C 15/54 – August the landscape from roads and erosion, the stunted trees and cesspools made of once-pristine

Part I waterways, so much more evident. It is, again, a challenging work.”

Justice Kos said Ans Westra was especially effective at allowing us, through her imagery, to meet ordinary people from all walks of life.

“She has altered our perspectives, and she has altered our focus. She has created a now-indelible record of artists, writers, protesters, gang members, working people and socialising people.”

Page 83 of 97

Appendix XII

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Cameron Houston, winner of the Dreamfields Farm Agricultural Scholarship

Massey presents half a million dollars in ag-hort scholarships

Benajamin Howard (left) being presented the Farmax Scholarship by Farmax General Manager

Gavin McEwen.

Massey University last night presented more than $500,000 worth of scholarships to 114 existing and prospective agriculture students.

The university, top-ranked in New Zealand for agriculture and 33rd in the latest world rankings, has handed out agriculture and horticulture scholarships to undergraduate and postgraduate students for more than 20 years.

Page 84 of 97

Appendix XII

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Among them are Cameron Houston and Benjamin Howard, winners of the two newest awards, the

Dreamfields Farm Agricultural Scholarship and the Farmax Scholarship, together worth $6,000 a year.

The Dreamfields scholarship is to encourage students from Bay of Plenty secondary schools to study agriculture. It was set up with the help of Bruce and Judy Woods from Dreamfields Farm at Otakiri, near Whakatane. The couple were winners of last year's Massey Innovation Award at the Ballance

Farm Environment Awards.

Mr Houston, a second-year Bachelor of Science student who came to Massey from Whakatane High

School, says agriculture – his major – combines his love for the outdoors and working with animals and the environment. He hopes to use the knowledge gained from his degree to create efficient, environmentally friendly dairy farms in his Whakatane district.

“There are a range of career options and I’d love to explore them all to have a well-rounded view of agriculture," he says. "This includes maybe heading a field of research, working as a farm consultant or working in land management and preservation.”

He sees the future of dairying revolving around sustainable practices. “We need to be able to conserve our fresh water sources and this issue will continue to be important – that’s why I’m also minoring in environmental science.”

Mr Howard is completing a Bachelor of AgriScience with Honours with the help of the Farmax

Scholarship, established by the Waikato-based technology company developed by AgResearch to support farming.

His honours research involves developing a system that allows farmers to predict the amount of metabolisable energy in pasture so they can create suitable feed budgets and regimes.

He says he needs to measure the loss in sugar from the time of harvest to the time of analysis. The inspiration for his research came from growing up on his parent’s dairy farm in Whakatane. “I have always been curious about how things work and how we can refine aspects of a system to sustainably optimise production.”

He says Massey University was an obvious choice for study. "I wanted to learn the latest information from the best people.”

Page 85 of 97

Appendix XIII

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Professor Steve Stannard (right) with student and elite track cyclist Gemma Payne.

New mobile exercise lab launched

One of Massey University’s newest science laboratories will not be staying on the campus for very long – that is because this laboratory is a 2.5 metre by 7 metre long trailer designed to bring the learning experience to distance students and elite athletes all over the country.

The Massey University School of Sport and Exercise Science’s ‘Human Engine Room’ was unveiled today in a battle of fitness on the Manawatū campus concourse. Students were given the opportunity to test the mobile lab, and themselves, by jumping on an electronically-braked exercise bike and getting a measure of their VO2 max – the maximum amount of oxygen an athlete can use.

Along with the exercise bike, the lab possesses the ability to house a treadmill and gas analysis equipment – allowing oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide production to be measured to calculate energy consumption or food utilization during exercise.

It is operated by two lab technicians who are trained sport scientists. The lab is powered by its own generator or can be connected to the grid.

Professor Steve Stannard, who initiated the project, said the idea is to bring the teaching laboratory to students.

“The idea came from a couple of students who were elite athletes but couldn’t finish their degree in sport and exercise science because they couldn’t do the practical component of the papers. We wanted to make it possible for them. That idea grew and now we can bring the lab to the people so to speak.”

Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey said the Human Engine Room is a great addition to Massey

University’s distance learning strategy. “What we try to do as a university is be the leading edge of research and teaching” he said. “High performance athletes are increasingly attracted to the

Page 86 of 97

Appendix XIII

C 15/54 – August

Part I university not only because we allow them to perform at the level they are at but also because they know they’ll get a quality qualification.”

“Sport and exercise is going to be a major area that will continue developing in the university.

Particularly because, in a country like new Zealand, sport is so central to the way we think about ourselves.”

The Human Engine Room is an initiative of the School of Sport and Exercise Science with funding from the Massey University Strategic Innovation Fund – a grant designed to enable new educational technology initiatives.

Page 87 of 97

Appendix XIV

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Caption: Fashion designer Steve Hall, at right, accepts the applause of the audience after winning the Emerging Designer Award at iD FashionWeek in Dunedin. Photo credit Chris Sullivan @ Seen In

Dunedin for iD Dunedin Fashion Week.

International kudos for emerging fashion designer

Fashion designer Steve Hall has been presented with the International Emerging Designer Award at iD Fashion Week in Dunedin. It sees him join a growing list of successful students to have studied fashion design at Massey’s College of Creative Arts.

By winning the award, Mr Hall, 25, joins Project Runway winner Sean Kelly as a graduate of the fashion design programme who has enjoyed recent international success.

Mr Hall’s collection, ‘Abandon Man,’ won the plaudits ahead of entries from throughout New Zealand and Australia as well as entries from China, Singapore, India, Slovakia and the United States.

His work has its own international focus drawing on Japanese culture and the costume of the samurai and ninja. Judge Margi Robertson says it reveals a strong masculine and military-inspired look that is counterbalanced by the soft touch of cut, proportion and shape.

There was nothing traditional about his designs either, she says.

“It wasn’t over the top; in a quietly confident way it was a new silhouette for a guy, which is quietly refreshing. It was very beautifully constructed, and it could be worn by men or women. Very androgynous.”

It earned Hall $6000 and a chance to win the People’s Choice Award which will be announced tonight at the climax to the week-long the iD Fashion Show held on the platform of Dunedin Railway

Station.“It’s great,” Mr Hall said after his win.

“ It’s the best thing that happened to me so far and perfect for my career.

Page 88 of 97

Appendix XIV

C 15/54 – August

Part I

“I think I’d like to get work at an existing fashion house now and get some experience before thinking about doing my own thing.”

The judges were impressed by the calibre of the of all the awards finalists, with many of them displaying innovative new construction technologies, unique hand-made fabrics, and expert tailoring.

Mr Hall’s submission of designs represents a evolution from the male urban street wear he designed when studying at the College of Creative Arts, which he attended after starting his studies at Bay of

Plenty Polytechnic.

Originally from Tauranga, Mr Hall of is of Te Arawa descent.

Page 89 of 97

Appendix XV

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Distinguished Professor Anne Noble

Noble's photography honoured in Japan

Distinguished Professor Anne Noble of Whiti o Rehua, the School of Art at Massey University, has won the prestigious Japanese Higashikawa Prize for an Overseas Photographer.

The annual Higashikawa Awards are sponsored by the municipality of Higashikawa, Japan, which declared itself the Culture Capital of Photography in 1985. The overseas photographer award (of JPY

1,000,000) raises the Japanese profile of exceptional overseas photographers who are relatively unknown in Japan. Each year, the awards committee focuses on a different country or region.

Professor Noble was selected for the award from a shortlist of 13 New Zealand photographers.

Michiko Kasahara, member of the Higashikawa Photography Awards Jury, says the decision was supported “by an overwhelming majority” on the jury.

The Higashikawa Award adds to Professor Noble’s already substantial international reputation. In

2009 she received an Arts Foundation Laureate Award in recognition of her contribution to the visual arts in New Zealand. She has also received an ONZM for services to photography in New Zealand, and was a recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship to undertake a residency at Colombia College, Chicago in 2014. Professor Noble has worked as a curator, representing Australia and New Zealand as

Oceania curator for the Musee du quai Branly Photoquai Biennale in 2009, 2011 and 2013. She is sought internationally, as advisor on creative arts research, photography teacher, keynote speaker and judge of international photography awards.

Antarctica has been a major focus of her work over the last decade resulting in three photographic book and exhibition projects, Ice Blink, 2011 (Clouds) The Last Road, 2014, and Whiteout /

Whitenoise (forthcoming), through which she explores new ways to see and imagine a place that most people only encounter second-hand through the photographic image. Noble’s Antarctic projects have been exhibited widely nationally and internationally.

More recently, Professor Noble has turned her attention to the decline of the honeybee and global

Page 90 of 97

Appendix XV

C 15/54 – August

Part I threats to complex natural systems. Her current project Song Sting Swarm is concerned with the symbiotic relationship between bees and humans and is premised on close creative collaborations with scientists, with professional apiarists and with members of amateur beekeeping communities.

Page 91 of 97

Appendix XVI

C 15/54 – August

Part I

China's First Lady, Madame Peng, welcomes Massey University Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey.

China’s First Lady hosts Massey, Weta

arts delegation

Mr Maharey’s visit to China with a delegation of creative arts industry leaders has already attracted the attention of Chinese media.

China’s First Lady, Madame Peng Liyuan, wants stronger ties between China, Massey University and Weta Workhop following a reception she hosted in Beijing.

Chancellor Chris Kelly, Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey, College of Creative Arts Pro Vice-Chancellor

Professor Claire Robinson and senior university staff members have been joined in China this week

Page 92 of 97

Appendix XVI

C 15/54 – August

Part I by Weta creative director Sir Richard Taylor and several Weta staff, at the invitation of Madame Peng and the People’s Liberation Arts Academy. They are there to showcase the University and Weta’s innovation across the arts spectrum as well as to experience and learn about Chinese culture and innovation.

The reception, preceded by formal talks at the Diaoyutai State Guesthouse, was attended by a

Chinese vice-minister of education and senior defence staff from the People’s Liberation Army.

Madame Peng emphasised the importance China and New Zealand place on education and the valuable role that Massey and Weta Workshop have in developing the next generation of leaders.

She encouraged further exchanges between China, Massey and Weta Workshop.

She said the honorary doctorate conferred on her by the University in November when she visited the College of Creative Arts was not only a personal honour but sent a message of goodwill from

Massey to the people of China. Having face-to-face exchanges with Massey Wellington students who had exhibited their works had been wonderful, she said.

Earlier in the day, the delegation was warmly hosted at the People’s Liberation Army Arts Academy, of which Madame Peng is president. The academy showcased the talent of its staff and students in the performing and creative arts through a series of high-quality performances and exhibitions. Mr

Maharey and Professor Robinson gave presentations about Massey and discussed opportunies for collaboration with academy leaders.

At a separate event, Mr Maharey with Sir Richard and New Zealand Ambassador to China John

McKinnon jointly hosted a reception for friends of Massey and Weta Workshop at the Ambassador’s

Residence in Beijing. Senior university, government and recruitment partners and senior film industry executives attended.

The highlight of the evening was the signing of an agreement between Massey and the China

Scholarship Council under which the first group of more than 30 university lecturers from western

China will arr ive in Manawatū later this month for a three-month professional development programme on teaching agriculture.

China Scholarship Council secretary-general Liu Jinghui welcomed the agreement and encouraged the development of further innovative collaborations with Massey.

Leading media outlets, including Xinhua, China Daily and CCTV7, have conducted interviews and provided coverage of the delegation’s visit.

Created: 12/06/2015 | Last updated: 12/06/2015

Page 93 of 97

Appendix XVII

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Professor Heywood (left) launched Massey University Worldwide along with External Relations international account manager Rachel O’Connor

Massey University Worldwide launches in

London

The first international launch of Massey University Worldwide was held at the Going Global 2015 conference in London last week.

About 1600 international education leaders gathered at the conference, where issues and challenges facing international education were discussed.

Professor Brigid Heywood, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research, Academic and Enterprise says the conference was the perfect platform to launch Massey University Worldwide to the global higher education community and promote Massey’s growing trans-national provision.

Professor Heywood launched Massey University Worldwide along with External Relations international account manager Rachel O’Connor.

Massey University was visible in all sessions as a result of its sponsorship and its exhibition stand attracted significant attention from delegates seeking information about New Zealand and Massey

University programmes.

“Sponsoring the event and having a prominent exhibition site ensured that Massey University

Worldwide gained maximum exposure to our key audiences and through this activity we have secured the interest of a number of potential partners from several international locations, including

South America, Asia and China, as well as across Europe," Professor Heywood says.

As well as the Going Global 2015 conference, Mrs O’Connor attended the launch of the Association of Commonwealth Universities (ACU) internationalisation community at the Houses of Parliament at

Westminister. This new community group aims to bring university staff from across the association membership together to collaborate and discuss areas such as student and staff mobility,

Page 94 of 97

Appendix XVII

C 15/54 – August

Part I international campuses, and the internationalisation of curricula and research. Professor Heywood met with the Higher Education Academy team which was promoting its developing international activity and discussed how to strengthen the link between Massey and the academy. As a new international partner, Massey's staff featured strongly in the academy presentations at Going Global, which added weight to its overall presence at the event.

In addition, Professor Heywood and Mrs O’Connor met with Kea New Zealand regional director for the United Kingdom and Europe, Tania Bearsley, to present on Massey University Worldwide.

Professor Heywood also attended a workshop at the Royal Society and met with various representatives working across the international educational development sector.

Massey University Worldwide is about taking Massey people and their expertise to the rest of the world and is designed to meet the specific professional development needs of cohorts in targeted regions. Through developing partnerships with relevant international agencies, organisations and governments, Massey University Worldwide enables learners across the globe to have access to breakthrough New Zealand thinking and a unique learning experience. For more information about

Massey University Worldwide, visit masseyworldwide.ac.nz

Page 95 of 97

Appendix XVIII

C 15/54 – August

Part I

Budget 2015: How it affects Massey University

Summary

Consistent with prior years, the 2015 Budget introduces very modest increases in tertiary funding in areas of specific interest to the Government, but is also proposing to remove some funding by way of a reduction in the Annual Maximum Fee Movement (AMFM) regime.

The government has announced:

· A “boost” of $113m into the tertiary sector.

· A reduction in the maximum applicable AMFM rate from 4% to 3% following public consultation in June.

However, it is important to note that this funding “boost” will be financed by:

· The funding released from falling domestic demand.

· Re-prioritisation of other funding within Vote Tertiary Education.

· Some additional money from the Crown.

As such, the sector will not actually realise an overall increase in funding of $113m. It is unclear how much additional sector funding from the Crown there could actually be. This will depend on the funding realised from the first two points above.

Therefore, in terms of 2016 SAC funding, there will be two, opposing funding forces:

· Massey may first have funding levels reduced based on TEC assumptions of declining

EFTS.

· Offsetting this, Massey would benefit from increased funding rates for certain programmes, and potentially from growth in engineering EFTS.

Depending on the quantum of each of these, Massey may realise an overall funding net gain, in turn offset in part by the reduction in AMFM student fee increases.

Specific Announcements

The Government continues to target specific areas of funding for the sector.

Relevant to Massey:

· $85.8m over four years for significant targeted increases in tuition rates at degree level and above, including a 7.5 per cent increase for science, a 20 per cent increase for agriculture, and increases for optometry, pharmacy and physiotherapy.

· $11.4m over four years to increase the number of engineering graduates, including $5.2m for more engineering places, and funding for activities to raise the profile of engineering and support more people to become engineers.

· Baseline funding to introduce Rate My Qualification, which allows employers to provide direct feedback to tertiary providers, and students to see what qualifications employer’s value.

· Proposed reduction in AMFM from 4% to 3% (due for consultation June 2015).

A further key focus for the 2015 budget is investment in New Zealand led research, injecting:

· $80m for research and development growth grants; and

· $25m to establish Regional Institutes for scientific research.

Of less relevance to Massey:

· An $8 .4m contingency to grow Māori and Pasifika Trades Training (up to 500 new learners per annum from 2016).

· $5.9m over four years to support an increase in demand for Trainee Medical Intern Grants.

· $900,000 in operating funding over four years and $1m of reprioritised capital funding to expand the Youth Literacy and Numeracy Assessment Tool.

Page 96 of 97

So what does this mean for Massey?

Appendix XVIII

C 15/54 – August

Part I

The impact of the $113m for the New Zealand higher education system on Massey is summarised as follows:

· Increases to Science and Agriculture could lead to an increase in revenue of up to $4.1m

(analysis based on 2014 EFTS).

· Massey is also set to benefit from the funding increases for pharmacy, physiotherapy and engineering. However engineering in particular depends on growth in EFTS, and therefore the impact is yet to be determined.

· The reduction from 4% to 3% of the AMFM permissible increase in student fees is estimated to cost Massey approximately $0.9m in lost student fess revenue. However, this change is not final, and is subject to a consultation process in June.

· Any overall increases in funding may be partially offset by TEC assumptions of reduced funded EFTS as part of the negotiated indicative funding envelope for 2016.

Research Funding

Of particular interest is the $25m fund to establish Regional Institutes for scientific research. The proposed new research institutes are expected to be industry-led and to support innovation in regional areas outside of Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch. It is anticipated the Institutes will follow the model of the Cawthron Institute in Nelson, and a cited example cited of a future one is a dairy research institue based in Norlthland.

The

Manawatū campus in particular is well placed to benefit from these initiatives. However, since these Institutes will be privately-led, Massey will need to compete for any funding by potentially providing services to these institutes.

In Conclusion

Overall, in 2016, Massey may realise a modest increase in SAC funding, but this depends principally on assumptions around TEC estimates of EFTS decline, actual enrolments in those courses where funding rates have increased and any realised EFTS growth in engineering courses.

Chris Wood

(Acting) AVC Strategy, Finance IT and Commercial Operations

May 2015

Page 97 of 97

C15/55 – August

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL ELECTION STATUTES 2015

7 August 2015

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek Council approval of election statues pertaining to elections of academic staff, professional staff, and student members of Council.

Discussion

At its meeting on 3 July 2015 Council approved the Massey University Notice (Constitution)

2015 for submission to the Minister for gazetting (Appendix 1). It is understood that the

Notice will be gazetted on Thursday 30 July 2015.

The Notice provides for the election of one member of Council from each of the categories of academic staff, professional staff, and students. The Education Act 1989 provides that

Council can approve Statutes to govern the elections and appointments of members to

Council.

Attached please find the proposed Statutes for Council approval governing elections to

Council as follows: a. Massey University Council Electronic Election Statute 2015 (C15/55A) b. Massey University Council Elections (Academic Staff member) Statute 2015

(C15/55B) c. Massey University Council Elections (Professional Staff member) Statute 2015

(C15/55C) d. Massey University Council Election (Student member) Statute 2015 (C15/55D)

The Council Appointments Statute is under preparation and will be distributed under separate cover.

Page 1 of 3

C15/55 – August

Part I

Recommendation

It is recommended that Council:

1. Approve, subject to minor amendment, the a. Massey University Council Electronic Election Statute 2015 (C15/55A); b. Massey University Council Elections (Academic Staff member) Statute 2015

(C15/55B); c. Massey University Council Elections (Professional Staff member) Statute

2015 (C15/55C); d. Massey University Council Election (Student member) Statute 2015

(C15/55D); and

2. Delegate to the Chancellor the authority to release the final versions of each Statute following review and amendments

Stuart Morriss

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and University Registrar

30 July 2015

Page 2 of 3

C15/55 – August

Part I

Appendix 1: Massey University Notice (Constitution) 2015

Pursuant to section 170 of the Education Act 1989 ("the Act"), the Minister for Tertiary

Education gives the following notice.

N o t i c e

1. (1) This notice may be cited as the Constitution of Massey University Council Notice

2015.

(2) This notice shall come into force on 1 January 2016.

(3) This notice will replace the previous constitution established in 2013.

2. The Massey University Council shall comprise 12 members and be constituted to ensure that appointments meet the needs of Massey University and the sound governance of the

Institution as follows:

(a) Four members appointed by the Minister responsible for Part 13A of the Education

Act 1989.

(b) The Vice-Chancellor of Massey University, by virtue of the position.

(c) One permanent member of the academic staff of Massey University appointed by

Council following an election (conducted in accordance with Statutes made by the

Council) by the permanent members of that staff.

(d) One permanent member of the professional (general) staff of Massey University appointed by Council following an election (conducted in accordance with Statutes made by the Council) by the permanent members of that staff.

(e) One member who must be appointed following an election (conducted in accordance with Statutes made by the Council) by students enrolled at Massey University.

(f) Up to four members appointed by the Massey University Council on the nomination of the Vice-Chancellor in accordance with Statutes established under Section 171C of the Education Act 1989 that will ensure that at least one of these members shall be

Māori.

3. The term of office of members of the Council, vacation of office, disclosure of members' interest and casual vacancies are covered in sections 173-176 of the Education Act 1989.

4. Subject to section 173, the maximum number of occasions on which a person, other than the Vice-Chancellor, may be appointed as a member of the Council is the number that, for that person, ensures that the total period for which they are a member of the Council does not exceed 12 years.

5. No act or proceeding of the Massey University Council shall be invalidated by the vacancy in the membership thereof, or by any other matter referred to in S171F of the Education Act

1989.

Dated at Wellington this

HON STEVEN JOYCE, Minister for Tertiary Education.

Page 3 of 3

C15/55A – August

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY

COUNCIL ELECTRONIC ELECTION STATUTE 2015

Pursuant to section 171of Education Act 1989

1. Title and Commencement

This Statute may be cited as the Electronic Election Statute 2015 and comes into force on 7

August 2015.

Conduct of Elections

2. Returning Officer a. The Council shall appoint a Returning Officer to conduct Elections under this

Statute. Until otherwise determined the Returning Officer shall be the University

Registrar. b. Unless the Council determines otherwise the Returning Officer for Elections conducted under this Statute shall hold office until his or her removal by the

Council, or his or her resignation, incapacity or death, in any of which events the

Council shall appoint a Returning Officer in his or her place. c. Every Election conducted under this Statute shall be conducted by the Returning

Officer, but, if for any reason he or she is unable to fulfill the duties of his or her office at any Election, the Council shall appoint a substitute, who, for the purposes of that referendum, shall be deemed to be the Returning Officer.

3. Date of Election and Term of Office a. Elections conducted under this Statute shall be held at a time in the Year determined by the Returning Officer. b. Successful Candidates shall hold office for a term consistent with Section 173-

176 of the Education Act 1989 and with the Constitution of Massey University

Council Notice 2015.

4. Electors a. The Returning Officer shall compile a list of Electors eligible to vote in each election, which will include all Electors at a date to be determined by the

Returning Officer.

5. Notice of Election, Nomination of Candidates, and Closing Date for Nominations a. No less than 30 days and no more than 60 days before the day or days fixed by the Returning Officer for an Election, except where a second election for want of candidates may be required in which case as soon as reasonably practicable, the

Page 1 of 8

C15/55A – August

Part I

Returning Officer shall give advance notice thereof in such University

Publications as the Returning Officer sees fit and the University website and shall in that notice request the nomination of Candidates in writing and a closing date for the receipt of such nominations.

6. Nomination of Candidates a. To be eligible for Election a candidate must meet the criteria at the time when nominations close. b. Nomination of Candidates for Election under this Statute must: i. Contain the required information as set out in the relevant election statute, procedure or terms of reference; and ii. Be signed by not less than two Electors as the nominators; and iii. Carry the written consent of the nominee and a declaration of eligibility; and iv. Be in such a form so as to be verifiable by the Returning Officer. c. Every Candidate for election may submit to the Returning Officer with his or her nomination paper a statement about the Candidate: i. The statement shall not exceed 200 words. ii. The statement must be submitted electronically. iii. The statement shall include information about the candidate relevant to the role of a Massey University Council member, including how the skills and competencies of the candidate meet the needs of Massey University and the sound governance of the Institution, and will include a passportlike photograph of the Candidate. iv. Contain a declaration by the nominee to abide by the statutes of the

University and the Massey University Election Rules for Candidates

(Schedule 1). v. The Returning Officer may require a Candidate whose statement does not comply with the requirements of this section to revise the statement so as to comply and may refuse to make available any statement which does not comply. This requirement and ability to refuse is the sole and exclusive responsibility of the Returning Officer whose decision will be final. vi. The Returning Officer shall ensure that the information in each statement which complies with this section is included in the Instructions for Voting sent to each Voter. d. Every nomination paper shall be lodged with or given to the Returning Officer not later than 4pm on Nomination Day. The Returning Officer shall acknowledge receipt of every nomination paper on that nomination paper. e. Every Candidate shall be nominated by a separate nomination paper.

Page 2 of 8

C15/55A – August

Part I

7. Rejection of Nominations a. The Returning Officer shall reject the nomination of a nominee who does not qualify for Election under sub-section 6 (a) b. Where a nomination is rejected the Returning Officer will notify the nominee in writing giving the reasons for the rejection.

8. Withdrawal of Nomination a. Any Candidate may withdraw his or her nomination at any time before noon on

Nomination Day, by notice in writing to the Returning Officer, signed by the

Candidate. A withdrawal must be treated as a retirement as per Clause 12.

9. Death/incapacity of Candidate Before Close of Nominations a. Where before the close of nominations the Returning Officer receives advice that a Candidate who has been nominated and has not withdrawn his or her nomination has died or has become incapable of holding the position for which he or she is a Candidate, his or her nomination shall be treated as if the

Candidate had withdrawn.

10. Only one candidate nominated for the election, Candidate declared elected a. If the number of candidates does not exceed the number of vacancies to be filled, the Returning Officer shall, as soon as practicable after the close of nominations, by notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit, declare the

Candidate in that election so nominated to be duly elected to the Council.

11. Notice of Nominations and Election a. If the number of candidates exceeds the number of positions to be filled, the

Returning Officer shall, as soon as practicable after the close of nominations, give notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit of the day or days on which the Election is to be held and of the names of the Candidates for the election.

12. Candidate May Retire a. A Candidate at an Election may retire after the close of nominations at any time before a declaration has been made pursuant to section 11 (d) of this Statute, or, where an Election is required to be held, at any time before the day or days of the

Election, by notice in writing to the Returning Officer, signed by that Candidate. b. Where the Returning Officer receives notice pursuant to section 12(a) above: i. Where practicable, the Returning Officer shall before the day or days of the Election give notice of the retirement in such University Publications as he or she sees fit; ii. If a Candidate retires after the Instructions for Voting have been distributed, the Returning Officer shall take such steps as are practicable to advise Voters that the Candidate has retired; iii. Any vote cast for that Candidate shall be void. c. If, by the retirement of a Candidate in accordance with section 12 (a) above the

Page 3 of 8

C15/55A – August

Part I

number of Candidates is reduced to or below the number of positions to be filled on the Council: i. The Returning Officer shall, by notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit, before the day or days of the Election, declare the remaining Candidate to be duly elected; or ii. If the Candidate retires at such a time that it is not possible to give such a notice before the day or days of the Election, the Election shall not be held and the declaration shall be made on the day or days of the Election or as soon thereafter as possible.

13. Death or Incapacity of Candidate After Close of Nominations a. Where: i. After the close of nominations and before the day or days of the Election, any Candidate dies or becomes incapable of holding the position for which he or she is a Candidate; or ii. Any such Candidate dies or becomes incapable as aforesaid before the close of nominations but advice of his or her death or incapacity is received by the Returning Officer after the close of nominations, the provisions of section 12 of this Statute, so far as they are applicable and with the necessary modifications, shall apply as if the deceased or incapacitated Candidate had retired on the date of his or her death or

14. Election to be Conducted Electronically incapacity, or, as the case may be, on the date on which advice of his or her death or incapacity is received by the Returning Officer. a. Unless sections 10 (a) or 12 (c) of this Statute apply, the Returning Officer shall conduct an Election by means of an electronic voting system.

15. Issue of Instructions for Voting a. The Returning Officer shall, not later than the day or days on which the Election is to be held, send by email addressed to each Elector at their University email address Instructions for Voting which directs Electors to the instructions for an

Election of members on the Council which: i. Give instructions for voting in that Election; ii. State the day or days of the Election; and iii. State the name and Statement of the Candidates for the Election.

16. Method of Voting a. On receipt of the Instructions for Voting sent by the Returning Officer, the shall alone exercise his or her vote in accordance with the Instructions for Voting. b. Where any Elector: i. Is wholly or partially blind; or ii. Suffers from any other disability which makes it difficult to cast his or her

Page 4 of 8

C15/55A – August

Part I

vote in the prescribed manner, that Elector’s vote may be recorded by another person in accordance with the instructions of the Elector.

17. Invalid Votes a. A vote shall only be valid if: i. The Elector’s identification number is entered into the electronic voting system; ii. The Elector’s duly chosen pin is entered into the electronic voting system; iii. The Elector has not previously recorded his or her vote; and iv. The Elector’s vote is recorded on the day or days of the Election.

18. Counting of Votes a. Votes shall be counted by such means as are prescribed by the Returning

Officer. b. The Returning Officer shall make arrangements for votes to be counted as soon as reasonably practicable after the close of voting.

19. Declaration of Result a. No later than one month after all the votes have been counted, the Returning

Officer shall declare, by means of notices in such University Publications as the

Returning Officer sees fit, the result of the Election.

20. Recount a. Where any Candidate has reason to believe that the declaration by the Returning

Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, and that on a recount thereof the result of the Election might be found to be different, he or she may within seven days after the declaration, apply to the Returning Officer for a recount of the votes. b. Every application for a recount in accordance with section 21 (a) above shall: i. Be accompanied by a deposit of $500, which shall be refunded if, following a recount of the votes, the declaration by the Returning Officer of the result of the Election proves to be incorrect; ii. State the grounds upon which the applicant believes that the declaration by the Returning Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, and that on a recount thereof the result of the Election might be found to be different; and iii. State the name of the applicant. c. If the Returning Officer is satisfied that an applicant for a recount has reasonable cause to believe that the Returning Officer’s declaration of the result of the

Election may be incorrect and that on a recount the result of the Election might be found to be different, the Returning Officer shall, as soon as reasonably practicable after receiving the application and deposit as aforesaid, arrange for a

Page 5 of 8

C15/55A – August

Part I

recount of the votes to be made by such means as the Returning Officer thinks fit. d. Where the Returning Officer arranges for a recount of the votes in accordance with section 20 (c) above, he or she shall: i. Notify the applicant in writing of the result of the recount; and ii. Where the result of a recount is that the declaration by the Returning

Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, declare, by means of notices in such University Publications as he or she sees fit:

I. That upon a recount of the votes, the declaration by the Returning

Officer of the result of the Election was found to be incorrect; and

II. The name or names of the candidates duly elected.

21. Destruction of Votes a. The Returning Officer shall, no earlier than one month after the declaration of the result of an Election, and if an application for a recount is made, not before the declaration of the result of the Election, arrange for all records of Electors’ votes to be destroyed in a manner which ensures the confidentiality of voting information is preserved.

22. Casual Vacancies a. A casual vacancy arises in the office of a Member on the Council during his or her term if he or she: i. Dies; or ii. Becomes disqualified to hold office under this Statute; or iii. Is declared bankrupt; or iv. Becomes mentally disordered within the meaning of the Mental Health

(Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992; or v. Resigns office by notice in writing to the Chancellor; or vi. Is convicted of an offence and sentenced to imprisonment; or b. A Casual Vacancy that occurs within [three] months of the end of a term of office need not be filled. c. Where a Casual Vacancy occurs any earlier in the term of office it shall be filled in accordance with section 176 of the Act.

23. Definitions

'Academic Year' means a period of 12 months commencing on 1 January. 'Act' means the Education Act 1989.

'Candidate' means a candidate for election under this Statute as a member on the

Council.

Page 6 of 8

C15/55A – August

Part I

'Council' means the Council of Massey University.

'Election' means an election of members on the Council conducted under this Statute.

'Instructions for Voting' means those instructions issued by the Returning Officer for the conduct of the electronic voting by means of a secure system which ensures each

Elector is only able to cast one vote.

'Nomination Day' means the day appointed for the closing of nominations of candidates for election as members on the Council.

'Statement' means the statement made by a Candidate in accordance with clause

6(c).

'University' means Massey University.

'University Publications' may be in hard copy or electronic form and includes magazines, newsletters and websites published by the University.

'Vice-Chancellor' means the person holding office for the time being as the Chief

Executive Officer of the University; and includes any person for the time being acting in that capacity.

Document Management and Control

Prepared by:

Owned by:

Office of the University Registrar

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

Approved by:

Date Approved:

Council

7 December 2012 (C13/01-March: 3.2.2)

1 March 2013 (C13/32 - May: 1.5)

7 August 2015 ( )

Page 7 of 8

C15/55A – August

Part I

Schedule 1: Massey University Council Election Rules for Candidates

The purpose of the Rules:

1. To control the conduct of the elections;

2. To restrict election campaigning to the official statement made by each candidate.

Provision of Information

Each candidate will be asked to provide a statement of no more than 150 words to the

Returning Officer for the purpose of the election. At the commencement of the election the

Returning Officer will provide the electorate (those eligible to vote) with the statement provided by each candidate.

Conduct

1. Candidates are not permitted to use University resources in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

2. Candidates are not permitted to use any medium, electronic or otherwise, in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

3. Candidates are not permitted to engage or intentionally solicit the services of a third party in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

Penalty

Failure to comply with these Rules may result in the Returning Officer exercising any of the powers available to him under the provision of the Council Statute.

Page 8 of 8

C15/55B – August

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY

COUNCIL ELECTIONS (ACADEMIC STAFF MEMBER) STATUTE 2015

Pursuant to section 171of Education Act 1989

1. Title and Commencement

This Statute may be cited as the Council Elections (Academic Staff Member) Statute 2015 and comes into force on 7 August 2015.

2. Application

This Statute applies to Academic staff of the University.

3. Purpose

The purpose of this Statute is to govern the election to the Massey University Council by members of the permanent Academic staff of one member who is a permanent Academic staff member.

4. Statute

For the purposes of electing one member of the University Council being a permanent member of the Academic staff of Massey University pursuant to the constitution of the

Council approved by the Minister of Tertiary Education under the provisions of s 170 of the

Education Act 1989:

· Each elector will be eligible to nominate a candidate and vote; and

· Each elector will be eligible to be nominated as a candidate

5. The date of the election will be determined by the Returning Officer and reported to

Council.

6. The election shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Electronic

Voting Statute 2015 except where a specific requirement of this statute applies.

7. The nomination of Candidates for election under this Statute must: a. Be in the form approved by the Returning Officer; and b. Be signed by not less than two voters as the nominators; and c. Carry the written consent of the nominee and a declaration of eligibility; and d. Contain a declaration by the nominee to abide by the statutes of the University and the Massey University Election Rules for Candidates (Schedule 1).

8. Each person elected in accordance with the provisions of this statue will hold office for a term of four years unless he or she resigns, retires from office, or ceases to be a permanent member of the Academic staff of the University, when the position will become a casual vacancy.

Page 1 of 4

C15/55B – August

Part I

9. Definitions

'Candidate' means a permanent member of the Academic staff who is nominated by

Electors in accordance with the provisions of this Statute.

'Council' means the Council of Massey University.

'Election' means an election conducted under this Statute and the Massey University

Council Electronic Voting Statute.

Elector’ means a permanent member of the Academic staff of Massey University as deemed by the Vice-Chancellor to be those staff of the Academic staff payroll unless otherwise determined by the Vice-Chancellor.

'Instructions for Voting' means those instructions issued by the Returning Officer for the conduct of the electronic voting by means of a secure system which ensures each

Elector is only able to cast one vote.

'Nomination Day' means the day appointed for the closing of nominations of candidates for election as members on the Council.

‘Permanent member’ in relation to the Academic staff of an institution, means a member of that staff –

(a) Who is employed either on a full-time or part-time basis –

(i) For a period ending, unless sooner terminated, on his or her reaching a specified age; or

Until he or she retired or resigns; or (ii)

(b) Who has been employed, whether under a contract for a specified period or otherwise, and either on a full-time or part-time basis, for at least 3 months; or

(c) Who has been employed, whether under a contract for a specified period or otherwise, and either on a full-time or part-time basis, for less than 3 months and whose employment is, in the opinion of the chief executive of the institution, likely to continue for at least 3 months from the date of commencement of that employment.

‘Academic Staff Member on Council’ means: One permanent member of the

Academic staff of Massey University appointed by Council following an election

(conducted in accordance with Statutes made by the Council) by the permanent members of that staff.

'University' means Massey University.

'University Publications' may be in hard copy or electronic form and includes but is not restricted to magazines, newsletters, email, and websites published by the University.

'Vice-Chancellor' means the person holding office for the time being as the Chief

Executive Officer of the University; and includes any person for the time being acting in that capacity.

Related Documents

· Education Act 1989

· Massey University Council Electronic Election Statute

Page 2 of 4

· Massey University Notice (Constitution) 2015

· Council Elections – Academic Staff Nomination Form

Document Management and Control

Prepared by:

Owned by:

Approved by:

Office of the University Registrar

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

Council

7 December 2012 (C13/01-March: 3.2.2) Date Approved:

1 March 2013 (C13/32 - May: 1.5)

7 August 2015 ( )

C15/55B – August

Part I

Page 3 of 4

C15/55B – August

Part I

Schedule 1: Massey University Council Election Rules for Candidates

The purpose of the Rules

1. To control the conduct of the elections;

2. To restrict election campaigning to the official statement made by each candidate.

Provision of Information

Each candidate will be asked to provide a statement of no more than 200 words to the

Returning Officer for the purpose of the election. At the commencement of the election the

Returning Officer will provide the electorate (those eligible to vote) with the statement provided by each candidate.

Conduct

1. Candidates are not permitted to use University resources in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

2. Candidates are not permitted to use any medium, electronic or otherwise, in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

3. Candidates are not permitted to engage or intentionally solicit the services of a third party in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

Penalty

Failure to comply with these Rules may result in the Returning Officer exercising any of the powers available to him under the provision of the Council Statute.

Page 4 of 4

C15/55C – August

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY

COUNCIL ELECTIONS (PROFESSIONAL STAFF MEMBER) STATUTE 2015

Pursuant to section 171of Education Act 1989

1. Title and Commencement

This Statute may be cited as the Council Elections (Professional Staff Member) Statute 2015 and comes into force on 7 August 2015.

2. Application

This Statute applies to Professional (general) staff of the University.

3. Purpose

The purpose of this Statute is to govern the election to the Massey University Council by members of the permanent Professional staff of one member who is a permanent

Professional staff member.

4. Statute

For the purposes of electing one member of the University Council being a permanent member of the professional (general) staff of Massey University pursuant to the constitution of the Council approved by the Minister of Tertiary Education under the provisions of s 170 of the Education Act 1989:

· Each elector will be eligible to nominate a candidate and vote; and

· Each elector will be eligible to be nominated as a candidate

5. The date of the election will be determined by the Returning Officer and reported to

Council.

6. The election shall be conducted in accordance with the provisions of the Electronic

Voting Statute 2015 except where a specific requirement of this statute applies.

7. The nomination of Candidates for election under this Statute must: a. Be in the form approved by the Returning Officer; and b. Be signed by not less than two voters as the nominators; and c. Carry the written consent of the nominee and a declaration of eligibility; and d. Contain a declaration by the nominee to abide by the statutes of the University and the Massey University Election Rules for Candidates (Schedule 1).

8. Each person elected in accordance with the provisions of this statue will hold office for a term of four years unless he or she resigns, retires from office, or ceases to be a permanent member of the professional (general) staff of the University, when the

Page 1 of 4

C15/55C – August

Part I

position will become a casual vacancy.

9. Definitions

'Candidate' means a permanent member of the Professional (general) staff who is nominated by Electors in accordance with the provisions of this Statute.

'Council' means the Council of Massey University.

'Election' means an election conducted under this Statute and the Massey University

Council Electronic Voting Statute.

Elector’ means a permanent member of the professional (general) staff of Massey

University as deemed by the Vice-Chancellor to be those staff of the General staff payroll unless otherwise determined by the Vice-Chancellor.

'Instructions for Voting' means those instructions issued by the Returning Officer for the conduct of the electronic voting by means of a secure system which ensures each

Elector is only able to cast one vote.

'Nomination Day' means the day appointed for the closing of nominations of candidates for election as members on the Council.

‘Permanent member’ in relation to the Professional (general) staff of an institution, means a member of that staff –

(a) Who is employed either on a full-time or part-time basis –

(i) For a period ending, unless sooner terminated, on his or her

(ii) reaching a specified age; or

Until he or she retired or resigns; or

(b) Who has been employed, whether under a contract for a specified period or otherwise, and either on a full-time or part-time basis, for at least 3 months; or

(c) Who has been employed, whether under a contract for a specified period or otherwise, and either on a full-time or part-time basis, for less than 3 months and whose employment is, in the opinion of the chief executive of the institution, likely to continue for at least 3 months from the date of commencement of that employment.

‘Professional Staff Member on Council’ means: One permanent member of the

Professional (general) staff of Massey University appointed by Council following an election (conducted in accordance with Statutes made by the Council) by the permanent members of that staff.

'University' means Massey University.

'University Publications' may be in hard copy or electronic form and includes but is not restricted to magazines, newsletters, email, and websites published by the University.

'Vice-Chancellor' means the person holding office for the time being as the Chief Executive

Officer of the University; and includes any person for the time being acting in that capacity.

Related Documents

· Education Act 1989

Page 2 of 4

· Massey University Council Electronic Election Statute

· Massey University Notice (Constitution) 2015

· Council Elections – Professional (General) Staff Nomination Form

C15/55C – August

Part I

Document Management and Control

Prepared by:

Owned by:

Approved by:

Date Approved:

Office of the University Registrar

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

Council

7 December 2012 (C13/01-March: 3.2.2)

1 March 2013 (C13/32 - May: 1.5)

7 August 2015 ( )

Page 3 of 4

C15/55C – August

Part I

Schedule 1: Massey University Council Election Rules for Candidates

The purpose of the Rules

1. To control the conduct of the elections;

2. To restrict election campaigning to the official statement made by each candidate.

Provision of Information

Each candidate will be asked to provide a statement of no more than 200 words to the

Returning Officer for the purpose of the election. At the commencement of the election the

Returning Officer will provide the electorate (those eligible to vote) with the statement provided by each candidate.

Conduct

1. Candidates are not permitted to use University resources in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

2. Candidates are not permitted to use any medium, electronic or otherwise, in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

3. Candidates are not permitted to engage or intentionally solicit the services of a third party in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

Penalty

Failure to comply with these Rules may result in the Returning Officer exercising any of the powers available to him under the provision of the Council Statute.

Page 4 of 4

C15/55D – August

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY

COUNCIL ELECTIONS (STUDENT MEMBER) STATUTE 2015

Pursuant to section 171of Education Act 1989

1. Title and Commencement

This Statute may be cited as the Council Elections (Student Representative) Statute 2015 and comes into force on 7 August 2015.

Conduct of Elections

2. Returning Officer a. The Council shall appoint a Returning Officer to conduct Elections under this

Statute. Until otherwise determined the Returning Officer shall be the University

Registrar. b. Unless the Council determines otherwise the Returning Officer for Elections conducted under this Statute shall hold office until his or her removal by the

Council, or his or her resignation, incapacity or death, in any of which events the

Council shall appoint a Returning Officer in his or her place. c. Every Election conducted under this Statute shall be conducted by the Returning

Officer, but, if for any reason he or she is unable to fulfill the duties of his or her office at any Election, the Council shall appoint a substitute, who, for the purposes of that referendum, shall be deemed to be the Returning Officer.

3. Date of Election and Term of Office a. Elections conducted under this Statute shall be held at a time in the Academic

Year determined by the Returning Officer. b. Successful Candidates shall hold office for a term consistent with Section 173-

176 of the Education Act 1989 and with the Constitution of Massey University

Council Notice 2015.

4. Students Eligible to Vote a. The Returning Officer shall authorize the list of Students eligible to vote for the

Student Member on Council in the Election, which will include all Students enrolled in the University at a date to be determined by the Returning Officer.

5. Notice of Election, Nomination of Candidates, and Closing Date for Nominations a. No less than 30 days and no more than 60 days before the day or days fixed by the Returning Officer for an Election, except where a second election for want of candidates may be required in which case as soon as reasonably practicable, the

Page 1 of 9

C15/55D – August

Part I

Returning Officer shall give advance notice thereof in such University

Publications as the Returning Officer sees fit and the University website and shall in that notice request the nomination of Candidates in writing and a closing date for the receipt of such nominations.

6. Nomination of Candidates a. To be eligible for Election a nominee must: i. Be enrolled as a Student at the time when nominations close; ii. Neither be employed for a continuous period of more than six months on a full-time basis by the University or under terms and conditions of fulltime employment set by the University nor have been so employed at any time during the two years preceding the date of the Election. b. Nomination of Candidates for Election under this Statute must: i. Be in the form approved by the Returning Officer; and ii. Be signed by not less than two Students as the nominators; and iii. Carry the written consent of the nominee and a declaration of eligibility; and iv. Contain a declaration by the nominee as to whether the nominee has or has not ever been employed (as described in sub-section 7(a)(ii)) by the

University and an undertaking to include such information in all material circulated in connection with the nominee’s nomination. c. Every Candidate for election may submit to the Returning Officer with his or her nomination paper a statement about the Candidate: i. The statement shall not exceed 200 words. ii. The statement must be submitted electronically. iii. The statement shall include information about the candidate relevant to the role of a Massey University Council member, including how the skills and competencies of the candidate meet the needs of Massey University and the sound governance of the Institution, and will include a passportlike photograph of the Candidate. iv. Contain a declaration by the nominee to abide by the statutes of the

University and the Massey University Election Rules for Candidates

(Schedule 1). v. The Returning Officer may require a Candidate whose statement does not comply with the requirements of this section to revise the statement so as to comply and may refuse to make available any statement which does not comply. This requirement and ability to refuse is the sole and exclusive responsibility of the Returning Officer whose decision will be final. vi. The Returning Officer shall ensure that the information in each statement which complies with this section is included in the Instructions for Voting sent to each Voter.

Page 2 of 9

C15/55D – August

Part I

d. Every nomination paper shall be lodged with or given to the Returning Officer not later than 4pm on Nomination Day. The Returning Officer shall acknowledge receipt of every nomination paper on that nomination paper. e. Every Candidate shall be nominated by a separate nomination paper.

7. Rejection of Nominations a. The Returning Officer shall reject the nomination of a nominee who does not qualify for Election under sub-section 6 (a) b. Where a nomination is rejected the Returning Officer will notify the nominee in writing giving the reasons for the rejection.

8. Withdrawal of Nomination a. Any Candidate may withdraw his or her nomination at any time before noon on

Nomination Day, by notice in writing to the Returning Officer, signed by the

Candidate.

9. Death of Candidate Before Close of Nominations a. Where before the close of nominations the Returning Officer receives advice that a Candidate who has been nominated and has not withdrawn his or her nomination has died or has become incapable of holding the position for which

10. Only one candidate nominated for the election, Candidate declared elected he or she is a Candidate, his or her nomination shall be treated as if the

Candidate had withdrawn. a. If there is only one candidate for the election under this Statute the Returning

Officer shall, subject to the candidate meeting the requirements for appointment to Council as provided by Clause 11 (b) of this Statute, as soon as practicable after the close of nominations, by notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit, declare the Candidate in that election so nominated to be duly elected to the Council.

11. Evaluation and Notice of Nominations and Election a. If there is either one, or more than one nomination received for election under this Statute, the Returning Officer shall, as soon as practicable after the close of nominations, call a meeting of the Massey University Council Governance

Committee. b. The Council Governance Committee will evaluate all nominations for suitability against the skills and competencies required in the role of a Massey University

Council member in order to contribute to the sound governance of the Institution. c. Nominees will be advised of the outcome of the Council Governance Committee evaluation of suitability for the position of Student member on Council. d. Candidates for the election will be provided, and asked to read and agree to, the

Massey University Election Rules for Candidates. e. The Returning Officer will give notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit of the day or days on which the Election is to be held and of the names of

Page 3 of 9

C15/55D – August

Part I

the Candidates for the election.

12. Candidate May Retire a. A Candidate at an Election may retire after the close of nominations at any time before a declaration has been made pursuant to section 11 (d) of this Statute, or, where an Election is required to be held, at any time before the day or days of the

Election, by notice in writing to the Returning Officer, signed by that Candidate. b. Where the Returning Officer receives notice pursuant to section 12(a) above: i. Where practicable, the Returning Officer shall before the day or days of the Election give notice of the retirement in such University Publications as he or she sees fit; ii. If a Candidate retires after the Instructions for Voting have been distributed, the Returning Officer shall take such steps as are practicable to advise Voters that the Candidate has retired; iii. Any vote cast for that Candidate shall be void. c. If, by the retirement of a Candidate in accordance with section 12 (a) above the number of Candidates is reduced to or below the number of positions to be filled on the Council: i. The Returning Officer shall, by notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit, before the day or days of the Election, declare the remaining Candidate to be duly elected; or ii. If the Candidate retires at such a time that it is not possible to give such a notice before the day or days of the Election, the Election shall not be held and the declaration shall be made on the day or days of the Election or as soon thereafter as possible.

13. Death or Incapacity of Candidate After Close of Nominations a. Where: i. After the close of nominations and before the day or days of the Election, any Candidate dies or becomes incapable of holding the position for which he or she is a Candidate; or ii. Any such Candidate dies or becomes incapable as aforesaid before the close of nominations but advice of his or her death or incapacity is received by the Returning Officer after the close of nominations, the provisions of section 14 of this Statute, so far as they are applicable and with the necessary modifications, shall apply as if the deceased or incapacitated Candidate had retired on the date of his or her death or incapacity, or, as the case may be, on the date on which advice of his or her death or incapacity is received by the Returning Officer.

14. Election to be Conducted Electronically a. Unless sections 11 (a) or 13 (c) of this Statute apply, the Returning Officer shall conduct an Election by means of an electronic voting system.

Page 4 of 9

C15/55D – August

Part I

15. Issue of Instructions for Voting a. The Returning Officer shall, not later than the day or days on which the Election is to be held, send by email addressed to each Student at their University email address Instructions for Voting which directs Electors to the instructions for an

Election of Student members on the Council which: i. Give instructions for voting in that Election; ii. State the day or days of the Election; and iii. State the name and Statement of the Candidates for the Election.

16. Method of Voting a. On receipt of the Instructions for Voting sent by the Returning Officer, the Student shall alone exercise his or her vote in accordance with the Instructions for Voting. b. Where any Student: i. Is wholly or partially blind; or ii. Suffers from any other disability which makes it difficult to cast his or her vote in the prescribed manner, that Student’s vote may be recorded by another person in accordance with the instructions of the Student.

17. Invalid Votes a. A vote shall only be valid if: i. The Student’s identification number is entered into the electronic voting system; ii. The Student’s duly chosen pin is entered into the electronic voting system; iii. The Student has not previously recorded his or her vote; and iv. The Student’s vote is recorded on the day or days of the Election.

18. Counting of Votes a. Votes shall be counted by such means as are prescribed by the Returning

Officer. b. The Returning Officer shall make arrangements for votes to be counted as soon as reasonably practicable after the close of voting.

19. Declaration of Result a. No later than one month after all the votes have been counted, the Returning

Officer shall declare, by means of notices in such University Publications as the

Returning Officer sees fit, the result of the Election, being the name or names of the Candidates elected as Student members on the Council.

Page 5 of 9

C15/55D – August

Part I

20. Recount a. Where any Candidate has reason to believe that the declaration by the Returning

Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, and that on a recount thereof the result of the Election might be found to be different, he or she may within seven days after the declaration, apply to the Returning Officer for a recount of the votes. b. Every application for a recount in accordance with section 21 (a) above shall: i. Be accompanied by a deposit of $500, which shall be refunded if, following a recount of the votes, the declaration by the Returning Officer of the result of the Election proves to be incorrect; ii. State the grounds upon which the applicant believes that the declaration by the Returning Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, and that on a recount thereof the result of the Election might be found to be different; and iii. State the name of the applicant and whether he or she is a Student or member of the Council. c. If the Returning Officer is satisfied that an applicant for a recount has reasonable cause to believe that the Returning Officer’s declaration of the result of the

Election may be incorrect and that on a recount the result of the Election might be found to be different, the Returning Officer shall, as soon as reasonably practicable after receiving the application and deposit as aforesaid, arrange for a recount of the votes to be made by such means as the Returning Officer thinks fit. d. Where the Returning Officer arranges for a recount of the votes in accordance with section 21 (c) above, he or she shall: i. Notify the applicant in writing of the result of the recount; and ii. Where the result of a recount is that the declaration by the Returning

Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, declare, by means of notices in such University Publications as he or she sees fit:

I. That upon a recount of the votes, the declaration by the Returning

Officer of the result of the Election was found to be incorrect; and

II. The Candidate elected as Student member on the Council.

21. Destruction of Votes a. The Returning Officer shall, no earlier than one month after the declaration of the result of an Election, and if an application for a recount is made, not before the declaration of the result of the Election, arrange for all records of Students’ votes to be destroyed in a manner which ensures the confidentiality of voting information is preserved.

22. Vacation of Office a. A member of the Council elected under this Statute ceases to hold office as a member if that member becomes employed for a continuous period of more than

Page 6 of 9

C15/55D – August

Part I

six months on a full-time basis by the University or under terms and conditions of full-time employment set by the University. The casual vacancy occurring for that reason shall be filled in accordance with section 176 of the Act.

23. Casual Vacancies a. A casual vacancy arises in the office of a Student Member on the Council during his or her term if he or she: i. Dies; or ii. Becomes disqualified to hold office under this Statute; or iii. Is declared bankrupt; or iv. Becomes mentally disordered within the meaning of the Mental Health

(Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992; or v. Resigns office by notice in writing to the Chancellor; or vi. Is convicted of an offence and sentenced to imprisonment; or b. A Casual Vacancy that occurs within [three] months of the end of a term of office of a Student Member need not be filled. c. Where a Casual Vacancy occurs any earlier in the term of office of a Student

Member it shall be filled in accordance with section 176 of the Act.

24. Definitions

'Academic Year' means a period of 12 months commencing on 1 January. 'Act' means the Education Act 1989.

'Candidate' means a candidate for election under this Statute as a student member on the Council.

'Council' means the Council of Massey University.

'Election' means an election of student members on the Council conducted under this

Statute.

'Instructions for Voting' means those instructions issued by the Returning Officer for the conduct of the electronic voting by means of a secure system which ensures each

Student is only able to cast one vote.

'Nomination Day' means the day appointed for the closing of nominations of candidates for election as student members on the Council.

'Statement' means the statement made by a Candidate in accordance with clause

6(c).

'Student' means a duly enrolled student of the University.

‘Student Member on Council’ means: One member who must be appointed following an election, conducted in accordance with this Statute, by students enrolled at Massey University.

Page 7 of 9

C15/55D – August

Part I

'University' means Massey University.

'University Publications' may be in hard copy or electronic form and includes magazines, newsletters and websites published by the University.

'Vice-Chancellor' means the person holding office for the time being as the Chief

Executive Officer of the University; and includes any person for the time being acting in that capacity.

Related Documents

· Education Act 1989

· Massey University Council Electronic Election Statute

· Massey University Notice (Constitution) 2015

· Council Elections – Professional (General) Staff Nomination Form

Document Management and Control

Prepared by:

Owned by:

Approved by:

Date Approved:

Office of the University Registrar

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

Council

7 December 2012 (C13/01-March: 3.2.2)

1 March 2013 (C13/32 - May: 1.5)

7 August 2015 ( )

Page 8 of 9

C15/55D – August

Part I

Schedule 1: Massey University Council Election Rules for Candidates

The purpose of the Rules

1. To control the conduct of the elections;

2. To restrict election campaigning to the official statement made by each candidate.

Provision of Information

Each candidate will be asked to provide a statement of no more than 200 words to the

Returning Officer for the purpose of the election. At the commencement of the election the

Returning Officer will provide the electorate (those eligible to vote) with the statement provided by each candidate.

Conduct

1. Candidates are not permitted to use University resources in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

2. Candidates are not permitted to use any medium, electronic or otherwise, in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

3. Candidates are not permitted to engage or intentionally solicit the services of a third party in any way to distribute material to promote themselves or others for the purposes of the election.

Penalty

Failure to comply with these Rules may result in the Returning Officer exercising any of the powers available to him under the provision of the Council Statute.

Page 9 of 9

C15/57 – August

Part I

Chair, Academic Board

MEMORANDUM

To:

From:

Date:

Council Secretary

Professor Sally Morgan, Chair of Academic Board

20 July 2015

Regarding:

Academic Board Terms of Reference

The attached Academic Board Terms of Reference have been amended to reflect the changes to the membership, to include the agreed changes from the 2010 Chair’s Terms of Reference and to reflect the repeal of Section 171 (10) of the Education Act 1989 which defined the permanent status of professorial and academic staff.

Recommendation

It is recommended that Council approve the Academic Board Terms of Reference

Professor Sally Morgan

Page 1 of 1

C15/57 – August

Part I

ACADEMIC BOARD TERMS OF REFERENCE

1.0 Statement of Intent and Purpose

The role and function of Massey University’s Academic Board is derived from University

Strategy and from legislation.

1.1 University Strategy

The University’s teaching and learning strategy is to provide an exceptional, distinctive and high quality learning experience for all students. Effective engagement of the

University community in academic decision-making is an integral part of this strategy.

Academic Board is the foremost body for the academic decision-making process. In carrying out this role the Academic Board acts as guardian of the core principles, processes, standards and integrity of Massey University’s academic and research programmes, and other academic matters.

1.2 Legislative Authority

The Education Act 1989 requires the University Council to establish an academic board consisting of the institution’s Vice-Chancellor, and members of the staff and students to:

(a) advise the council on matters relating to courses of study or training, awards, and other above (Section 182(4)).

1.3 Specific Delegations academic matters; and (b) exercise powers delegated to it by the council (Section 182(2)) and by the Vice-Chancellor (Section 197(1)). The Council is to request and consider the advice of Academic Board prior to making decisions in respect of academic matters in (a)

Academic Board provides reports, advice and recommendations to Council with respect to major academic directions including the introduction of new programmes and majors; and the receipt of Sub-Committee Annual Reports, and major changes to Regulations.

Council delegates the following powers to Academic Board:

To consider, approve and/or adopt:

· Proposals for the introduction of new academic qualifications

· Proposals for the introduction of new subjects

· Proposals for the introduction of new majors

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 1 of 6

C15/57 – August

· Changes to existing or introduction of new academic policies and procedures

Part I

· Formal responses to NZVCC (including its delegate) on University Academic

Programmes or NZQA on any matter relating to the structure and composition of degree frameworks and definitions

· Any academic issues relating to the University’s portfolio of qualifications

· Conferment of Degrees and awarding of Diplomas and Certificates (including the power to revoke)

· The Terms of Reference of Sub-committees of Academic Board

· Any other matter referred by Council.

2.0 Committees of Council

2.1 Academic Board is a Board established pursuant to Section 182(2) of the Education

Act 1989. The Academic Board advises the council on matters relating to courses of study or training, awards, and other academic matters. The Board also undertakes certain functions on behalf of Council with authority to act under delegation or by

Council-approved statute.

2.2 The role, function, composition and responsibilities of the Academic Board are reflected in the Academic Board Terms of Reference as approved by Council from time to time.

2.3 The Academic Board may convene sub-committees to undertake specific duties on behalf of the Board. For the avoidance of doubt, all sub-committees constituted by the Academic Board are hereby deemed to be Committees of Council appointed pursuant to Section 193 of the Education Act 1989. All delegations by the Academic

Board to its sub-committees are hereby deemed to be delegations by Council to its

Committees. Those sub-committees may further delegate to staff.

2.4 The Terms of Reference, including the membership of such sub-committees shall be approved by the Academic Board under the delegated authority of Council and such sub-committees will be bound by their Terms of Reference or such other Terms of

Reference as agreed by the Academic Board from time to time.

2.5 There are 12 permanent sub-committees of Academic Board two of which ha sve subcommittees. They are as follows:

· Academic Committee

· Teaching and Learning Committee

· University Scholarships Committee

· University Research Committee o

Doctoral Research Committee

· Human Ethics Chairs Committee o

Human Ethics Committees – Northern, Southern A and Southern B

· University Library Committee

· Grievance Committee

· College of Business College Board

· College of Creative Arts College Board

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 2 of 6

C15/57 – August

Part I

· College of Health College Board

· College of Humanities & Social Sciences College Board

· College of Sciences College Board

3.0 Membership

3.1 The membership of the Board shall be comprised as follows:

·

Vice-Chancellor

·

Director, Pasifika

1

·

Assistant Vice-Chancellors: Academic and International ,

Research , Academic and Enterprise

, and Māori and Pasifika

32

·

Pro Vice-Chancellors: Colleges of Business, Creative Arts,

Health, Humanities & Social Sciences, and Sciences

5

1

·

Director, New Zealand School of Music

·

Director, Teaching and Learning

1

1

·

Academic Board Sub-Committee Chairs: Scholarships, Human

Ethics Chairs and Library

·

College Board Chairs (unless appointed in another capacity)

3

5

·

Academic Board Sub-Committees: Sub-Committee Chairs: 1

Doctoral Research

·

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and&

University Registrar

·

University Librarian

·

Māori Academic Staff

·

Professors: Three from each College

1

1

2

15

·

Academic Staff: Three from each College 15

·

Student Representatives (representing undergraduate, postgraduate, distance, Māori, Pasifika and international student

5 interests

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Elected

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Elected

Elected

Elected

Elected

Total membership

5553 -

60

3.2 Elected Members

The majority of members of Academic Board will be elected members. Elections will be carried out in line with University practices and carried out by the office of the Assistant

Vice-Chancellor Operations, International & University Registrar. The following specific processes will apply.

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 3 of 6

C15/57 – August

Part I

3.2.1 Professorial Elections (15) (three year terms)

· All professors of the University with permanent status

1

, (Education Act 1989 Section

171 (10)) comprise the Professorial Electoral College

· Nominations will be called for and elections held in a manner to ensure that:

· Professors from each College are nominated; and

· Up to three professors from each College are elected.

3.2.2 Academic Staff elections (three from each College) (three year terms)

· All academic staff

, with permanent status with permanent status (Education Act 1989

Section 171 (10)) will comprise the Academic Electoral College for each of the colleges.

· Nominations will be called for by each College in a manner that will ensure that any permanent academic staff member has an opportunity to nominate.

· Elections will be held in a manner to ensure that up to three academic staff from each

College are elected.

3.2.3

Māori Academic Staff (two) (three year terms)

· All Māori academic staff with permanent status

(Education Act 1989 Section 171

(10)) will comprise the

Māori Academic Electoral College.

· The Assistant ViceChancellor Māori and Pasifika will co-ordinate the process for nominations in a manner that will ensure any permanent

Māori academic member of staff has the opportunity to nominate.

· Elections will be held in a manner to ensure that up to two Maori academic staff are elected.

3.2.4 Student Representatives (five) Annual Terms

· There will be five student members to include representation from undergraduate, postgraduate, distance, Māori, Pasifika and international student interests elected in a manner as determined by the Federation of Massey University Students’

Associations.

1 in relation to the academic or general staff of an institution, means a member of that staff –

(a) Who is employed either on a full-time or part-time basis –

(i) For a period ending, unless sooner terminated, on his or her reaching a specified age; or

(ii) Until he or she retired or resigns; or

(b) Who has been employed, whether under a contract for a specified period or otherwise, and either on a full-time or part-time basis, for at least 3 months; or

(c) Who has been employed, whether under a contract for a specified period or otherwise, and either on a full-time or part-time basis, for less than 3 months and whose employment is, in the opinion of the chief executive of the institution, likely to continue for at least 3 months from the date of commencement of that employment.

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 4 of 6

Formatted: Indent: Left: 0 cm, First line: 0 cm

Formatted: Indent: Left: 0 cm

Formatted: Indent: Left: 0 cm, First line: 0 cm

Formatted: English (New Zealand)

C15/57 – August

Part I

4.0 Chair of Academic Board

4.1 Chair candidates will be Professorial members of the Academic Board, except those professors who are Senior Leadership Team members, and will be elected by Academic Board members for a three year term.

4.2 The proposer and seconder must have a recognisable stakeholder interest in

4.2 Massey University, but not necessarily as a member of Academic Board, and will be willing to be identified to members of Academic Board .

Academic Board members only may nominate and second candidates.

4.3 Candidate nominations must be proposed and seconded with the candidate's written consent.

4.4 Candidates should provide a statement of their vision for the position, and the skills and experience they bring to the position.

4.5 The Electoral College will be comprised of all members of the Academic Board.

4.6 The nomination and electoral process shall follow Council and Council committee practice. Voting will be via postal or electronic ballot.

4.6 Voting will be by anonymous postal ballot.

4.7 There shall be a Terms of Reference for the Chair of Academic Board which will include the tenure of the position, the nature of the support required for this position, and the nature of the formal relationship of this position with the

University Council.

4.8 The Chair of Academic Board will meet with Council on a regular basis to present the reports, recommendations and advice to Council on academic matters and be in attendance at Council meetings for specific academic discussions .

4.9 The Chair of Academic Board and the Academic Board appointees to Council shall meet regularly.

4.10 A deputy chair of Academic Board will be elected annually by the Board at the first meeting of the year, or at the meeting immediately following the election of the Chair of Academic Board and will act in the chair’s absence. Deputy chair candidates will be Professorial members of the Academic Board, except those professors who are Senior Leadership Team members.

5.0 Meetings and other Protocols

5.1 Meetings shall be held once a month in February, March, April, June July,

August, October and November in the ordinary course of events.

5.2 The Chair may convene additional meetings as he or she thinks necessary for the efficient performance of the functions of the Academic Board.

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 5 of 6

Formatted: Normal, Justified, Indent:

Left: 1.27 cm, Hanging: 0.98 cm, Add space between paragraphs of the same style, Outline numbered + Level: 2 +

Numbering Style: 1, 2, 3, … + Start at:

1 + Alignment: Left + Aligned at: 1.27

cm + Indent at: 1.9 cm

C15/57 – August

Part I

5.3 If so requested by written notice by not fewer than 15 members of the Academic

Board the Chair shall convene a meeting.

5.4 The agenda for Academic Board meetings will be established by the Agenda

Working Group comprising at a minimum the Chair of the Board, the deputy

Chair of Academic Board, the Vice-Chancellor or his or her delegate and one member of the Board elected by the elected members of the Board.

5.5 The agenda of Academic Board should regularly include opportunities for reflection, debate and academic policy-formation focused on the values of the

University, its strategic direction and academic policies and practices that have significant implications for teaching and research.

5.6 In setting agendas Academic Board acknowledges the benefit whenever possible of early notification of academic matters under consideration.

5.7 The quorum for a meeting of the Academic Board shall be a majority of the members then holding office being present.

5.8 The Committee secretary will record attendance and apologies.

5.9 The Academic Board may by resolution dismiss a member of the Board as a member if the member fails to attend three consecutive meetings of the

Academic Board without having given the Chair prior notice of his or her inability to attend the meeting concerned.

5.10 Unless otherwise specified in these Terms of Reference the conduct of meetings of Academic Board will be in line with the guidelines adopted by the University

Council from time to time and where not specified shall be determined by the

Chair with reference to established meeting practice and procedure.

5.11 Elections will be held as set out in these Terms of Reference and otherwise as in accordance with established University policy and practice.

6.0 Reporting to Council

The Academic Board will report regularly to the University Council for information and approval, and to the wider University community on its activities.

7.0 Academic Board Appointees on Council

The constitution of the Council calls for two members of the Academic Board to be elected to Council by Academic Board. The two Academic Board appointees on

Council will report regularly to the Board with respect to Part I academic matters.

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 6 of 6

C15/57 – August

Part I

ACADEMIC BOARD TERMS OF REFERENCE

1.0 Statement of Intent and Purpose

The role and function of Massey University’s Academic Board is derived from University

Strategy and from legislation.

1.1 University Strategy

The University’s teaching and learning strategy is to provide an exceptional, distinctive and high quality learning experience for all students. Effective engagement of the

University community in academic decision-making is an integral part of this strategy.

Academic Board is the foremost body for the academic decision-making process. In carrying out this role the Academic Board acts as guardian of the core principles, processes, standards and integrity of Massey University’s academic and research programmes, and other academic matters.

1.2 Legislative Authority

The Education Act 1989 requires the University Council to establish an academic board consisting of the institution’s Vice-Chancellor, and members of the staff and students to:

(a) advise the council on matters relating to courses of study or training, awards, and other academic matters; and (b) exercise powers delegated to it by the council (Section 182(2)) and by the Vice-Chancellor (Section 197(1)). The Council is to request and consider the advice of Academic Board prior to making decisions in respect of academic matters in (a) above (Section 182(4)).

1.3 Specific Delegations

Academic Board provides reports, advice and recommendations to Council with respect to major academic directions including the introduction of new programmes and majors; and the receipt of Sub-Committee Annual Reports, and major changes to Regulations.

Council delegates the following powers to Academic Board:

To consider, approve and/or adopt:

· Proposals for the introduction of new academic qualifications

· Proposals for the introduction of new subjects

· Proposals for the introduction of new majors

· Changes to existing or introduction of new academic policies and procedures

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 1 of 6

C15/57 – August

Part I

· Formal responses to NZVCC (including its delegate) on University Academic

Programmes or NZQA on any matter relating to the structure and composition of degree frameworks and definitions

· Any academic issues relating to the University’s portfolio of qualifications

· Conferment of Degrees and awarding of Diplomas and Certificates (including the power to revoke)

· The Terms of Reference of Sub-committees of Academic Board

· Any other matter referred by Council.

2.0 Committees of Council

2.1 Academic Board is a Board established pursuant to Section 182(2) of the Education

Act 1989. The Academic Board advises the council on matters relating to courses of study or training, awards, and other academic matters. The Board also undertakes certain functions on behalf of Council with authority to act under delegation or by

Council-approved statute.

2.2 The role, function, composition and responsibilities of the Academic Board are reflected in the Academic Board Terms of Reference as approved by Council from time to time.

2.3 The Academic Board may convene sub-committees to undertake specific duties on behalf of the Board. For the avoidance of doubt, all sub-committees constituted by the Academic Board are hereby deemed to be Committees of Council appointed pursuant to Section 193 of the Education Act 1989. All delegations by the Academic

Board to its sub-committees are hereby deemed to be delegations by Council to its

Committees. Those sub-committees may further delegate to staff.

2.4 The Terms of Reference, including the membership of such sub-committees shall be approved by the Academic Board under the delegated authority of Council and such sub-committees will be bound by their Terms of Reference or such other Terms of

Reference as agreed by the Academic Board from time to time.

2.5 There are 12 permanent sub-committees of Academic Board two of which have subcommittees. They are as follows:

· Academic Committee

· Teaching and Learning Committee

· University Scholarships Committee

· University Research Committee o

Doctoral Research Committee

· Human Ethics Chairs Committee o

Human Ethics Committees – Northern, Southern A and Southern B

· University Library Committee

· Grievance Committee

· College of Business College Board

· College of Creative Arts College Board

· College of Health College Board

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 2 of 6

C15/57 – August

Part I

· College of Humanities & Social Sciences College Board

· College of Sciences College Board

3.0 Membership

3.1 The membership of the Board shall be comprised as follows:

·

Vice-Chancellor

·

Director, Pasifika

1

·

Assistant Vice-Chancellors:, Research, Academic and

Enterprise

, and Māori and Pasifika

2

·

Pro Vice-Chancellors: Colleges of Business, Creative Arts,

Health, Humanities & Social Sciences, and Sciences

5

1

·

·

Director, Teaching and Learning

·

Academic Board Sub-Committee Chairs: Scholarships, Human

Ethics Chairs and Library

1

3

·

College Board Chairs (unless appointed in another capacity)

·

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Operations, International and

University Registrar

5

·

Academic Board Sub-Committees: Sub-Committee Chairs: 1

Doctoral Research

1

·

University Librarian

·

Māori Academic Staff

·

Professors: Three from each College

·

Academic Staff: Three from each College

1

2

15

15

·

Student Representatives (representing undergraduate, postgraduate, distance, Māori, Pasifika and international student

5 interests

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Elected

Appointed

Appointed

Appointed

Elected

Elected

Elected

Elected

Total membership

53-60

3.2 Elected Members

The majority of members of Academic Board will be elected members. Elections will be carried out in line with University practices and carried out by the office of the Assistant

Vice-Chancellor Operations, International & University Registrar. The following specific processes will apply.

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 3 of 6

C15/57 – August

Part I

3.2.1 Professorial Elections (15) (three year terms)

· All professors of the University with permanent status

1

, comprise the Professorial

Electoral College

· Nominations will be called for and elections held in a manner to ensure that:

· Professors from each College are nominated; and

· Up to three professors from each College are elected.

3.2.2 Academic Staff elections (three from each College) (three year terms)

· All academic staff, with permanent status will comprise the Academic Electoral

College for each of the colleges.

· Nominations will be called for by each College in a manner that will ensure that any permanent academic staff member has an opportunity to nominate.

· Elections will be held in a manner to ensure that up to three academic staff from each

College are elected.

3.2.3

Māori Academic Staff (two) (three year terms)

· All Māori academic staff with permanent status will comprise the Māori Academic

Electoral College.

· The Assistant ViceChancellor Māori and Pasifika will co-ordinate the process for nominations in a manner that will ensure any permanent

Māori academic member of staff has the opportunity to nominate.

· Elections will be held in a manner to ensure that up to two Maori academic staff are elected.

3.2.4 Student Representatives (five) Annual Terms

· There will be five student members to include representation from undergraduate, postgraduate, distance, Māori, Pasifika and international student interests elected in a manner as determined by the Federation of Massey University Students’

Associations.

1 in relation to the academic or general staff of an institution, means a member of that staff –

(a) Who is employed either on a full-time or part-time basis –

(i) For a period ending, unless sooner terminated, on his or her reaching a specified age; or

(ii) Until he or she retired or resigns; or

(b) Who has been employed, whether under a contract for a specified period or otherwise, and either on a full-time or part-time basis, for at least 3 months; or

(c) Who has been employed, whether under a contract for a specified period or otherwise, and either on a full-time or part-time basis, for less than 3 months and whose employment is, in the opinion of the chief executive of the institution, likely to continue for at least 3 months from the date of commencement of that employment.

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 4 of 6

C15/57 – August

Part I

4.0 Chair of Academic Board

4.1 Chair candidates will be Professorial members of the Academic Board, except those professors who are Senior Leadership Team members, and will be elected by Academic Board members for a three year term.

4.2 Academic Board members only may nominate and second candidates.

4.3 Candidate nominations must be proposed and seconded with the candidate's written consent.

4.4 Candidates should provide a statement of their vision for the position, and the skills and experience they bring to the position.

4.5 The Electoral College will be comprised of all members of the Academic Board.

4.6 The nomination and electoral process shall follow Council and Council committee practice. Voting will be via postal or electronic ballot.

4.7 There shall be a Terms of Reference for the Chair of Academic Board which will include the tenure of the position, the nature of the support required for this position, and the nature of the formal relationship of this position with the

University Council.

4.8 The Chair of Academic Board will meet with Council on a regular basis to present the reports, recommendations and advice to Council on academic matters and be in attendance at Council meetings.

4.9 The Chair of Academic Board and the Academic Board appointees to Council shall meet regularly.

4.10 A deputy chair of Academic Board will be elected annually by the Board at the first meeting of the year, or at the meeting immediately following the election of the Chair of Academic Board and will act in the chair’s absence. Deputy chair candidates will be Professorial members of the Academic Board, except those professors who are Senior Leadership Team members.

5.0 Meetings and other Protocols

5.1 Meetings shall be held once a month in February, March, April, June July,

August, October and November in the ordinary course of events.

5.2 The Chair may convene additional meetings as he or she thinks necessary for the efficient performance of the functions of the Academic Board.

5.3 If so requested by written notice by not fewer than 15 members of the Academic

Board the Chair shall convene a meeting.

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 5 of 6

C15/57 – August

Part I

5.4 The agenda for Academic Board meetings will be established by the Agenda

Working Group comprising at a minimum the Chair of the Board, the deputy

Chair of Academic Board, the Vice-Chancellor or his or her delegate and one member of the Board elected by the elected members of the Board.

5.5 The agenda of Academic Board should regularly include opportunities for reflection, debate and academic policy-formation focused on the values of the

University, its strategic direction and academic policies and practices that have significant implications for teaching and research.

5.6 In setting agendas Academic Board acknowledges the benefit whenever possible of early notification of academic matters under consideration.

5.7 The quorum for a meeting of the Academic Board shall be a majority of the members then holding office being present.

5.8 The Committee secretary will record attendance and apologies.

5.9 The Academic Board may by resolution dismiss a member of the Board as a member if the member fails to attend three consecutive meetings of the

Academic Board without having given the Chair prior notice of his or her inability to attend the meeting concerned.

5.10 Unless otherwise specified in these Terms of Reference the conduct of meetings of Academic Board will be in line with the guidelines adopted by the University

Council from time to time and where not specified shall be determined by the

Chair with reference to established meeting practice and procedure.

5.11 Elections will be held as set out in these Terms of Reference and otherwise as in accordance with established University policy and practice.

6.0 Reporting to Council

The Academic Board will report regularly to the University Council for information and approval, and to the wider University community on its activities.

7.0 Academic Board Appointees on Council

The constitution of the Council calls for two members of the Academic Board to be elected to Council by Academic Board. The two Academic Board appointees on

Council will report regularly to the Board with respect to Part I academic matters.

Academic Board Terms of Reference: Approved by Council 1 Dec 2006

Reviewed: February 2010: Academic Board. Recommended Council approval: Approved: Council 5 March 2010

Reviewed: June 2012: Academic Board: Recommended for Council approval: Approved Council 6 July 2012: Updated 1

Jan 2013 (College of Education/Health amendments)

Reviewed: July 2015: Academic Board. Recommended for Council Approval:

Page 6 of 6

C15/58 – August

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

FINANCIAL MONITORING AND CONTROL POLICY

7 August 2015

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the Financial Monitoring and Control Policy for a further two years.

Background

The Financial Monitoring and Control Policy is due for review. Changes are being recommended which will enhance the policy and ensure the policy is consistent with current practice and terminology.

Discussion

The following key changes have been made to the Policy:

1. Refined and clarified existing definitions and added definitions for “Baseline”, “Ten

Year Capital Plan” and “Uncontrollable Costs”.

2. Added in a section in relation to the baseline budget process, including clarifying the definition of “Baseline”.

3. Clarified the Financial Monitoring and Reporting section to reflect actual practices.

4. Clarified roles and titles.

5. Ensured linkages between the budget and the University strategy, annual plans and ten year capital plan.

Consultation

· Internally within Finance.

· Reporting line business managers.

· Senior Leadership Team

All feedback has been incorporated into the Policy.

Page 1 of 2

Financial implications and Treasury Comment

Financial Implications

Treaty of Waitangi Implications

Not applicable.

Equity and Ethnic Implications

Cultural Implications (Maori/Pasifika/New Migrant/Other)

Ethnic Implications

Gender Implications

Disability Implications

Other (state____________________________)

Publicity & Communications

C15/58 – August

Part I

No

No

No

No

No

No

The Policy will be published through the Office of Risk Management. Communication as a renewed policy will be through the Office of Risk Management.

Recommendations

It is recommended that Massey University Council:

1. Approve the Financial Monitoring and Control Policy for a further two years.

Cathy Magiannis

Assistant Vice-Chancellor

Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations

28 July 2015

Page 2 of 2

Massey University Policy Guide

FINANCIAL MONITORING AND CONTROL POLICY

Section

Contact

Finance and Asset Management (FAM)

Director Finance and Asset

ManagementChief Financial Officer

Last Review

May 2011August 2015

Next Review

May 2013August 2017

Approval

Effective

Date

C11/77 July: 3.2.1

Purpose:

The purpose of this policy is to provide assurance to the University Council and Senior Leadership Team that the financial goals of the University are being met and that accountability and(SLT) that responsibility for financial performance and stewardship of assets is clearly defined.

Definitions:

Annual Budget: Annual revenue and expenditurefinancial statements budget approved by the University Council including the rolling five year capital plan.

Baseline: An agreed level of financial resourcing for costs for each reporting line. Baseline resourcing covers those

University costs that are funded by SAC, PBRF, Equity Funding, student fees, interest and trust income. Costs not covered by the baseline are those that arise principally from activities funded by external third parties or through charges to students for voluntary services.

Budget Centre Manager: The Budget Centre Manager is the level 3 or a level 4three or level four manager with financial delegated financial authority , to make financial commitments for the budget centre. Other staff with sub delegations for a budget centre are not budget centre managers.

Materiality: An item can be materially importantmaterial if it has a significant financial impact on the financial performance of the budget centre. Professional judgement is required in assessing material items but as a guide 5% of the budget centre’s total cost or revenue budget or $ 100,000 which everwhichever is lower wouldmight be considered material.

Other examples of items that may be materially important and should be included in reports include contract disputes, overdue debtors, receiverships, non performance of contract and potential for University reputational damage.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Style Definition: L2 Text: Tab stops:

Not at 0.63 cm

Style Definition: L3 Text: Tab stops:

Not at 1.4 cm

Formatted: Right, Tab stops: Not at

3.22 cm

Formatted: Justified, Space Before:

12 pt, After: 12 pt, Tab stops: 10.51

cm, Left

Formatted: Font: Bold

Massey University Policy Guide

Financial Monitoring and Control Policy – Page 2

Accounting Advisors: Are all accountants within the FAM Management Accounting Team.

Risk Management: Refer to the University’s risk management framework.

Ten Year Capital Plan (TYCP): Rolling ten year capital plan approved by the University Council annually.

Uncontrollable Costs: Costs within an individual reporting line which relate whole of University costs and cannot be controlled by the individual reporting line.

Policy:

Overview

The SLT will make recommendation to the University Council will approve, for approval, an annual budget each year after considering the annual plan, TYCP, investment plan , strategy and financial goals of the University. This will provide the framework for managing the University finances including meeting financial performance targets, maintaining an appropriate financial positioneffective balance sheet management and ensuring treasury and cash flow commitments are met.

The annual baseline and budget process is initiated through aan annual budget policy statement , linked to the

University’s strategy, that outlines the high level economic considerations that will impact the baseline and budget process.

Financial targets will be approved by the Senior Leadership Team SLT based on the budget policy statement and the

Councils, University strategy and objectives, baseline agreements and the University’s investment and, financial sustainability goals after reviewing the long term financial modeland agreed surplus requirements .

The annual planning and investment plan processprocesses will identify how the strategic goals of the University will be met , including achievement of the financial targets.

DetailedBudget Centre Managers will prepare budgets will be prepared by for the budget centre managers following the planning processes, for all budget centres and , including any projects within the budget centre, to allowfollowing the planning process guidelines so the financial implications from the planning round to be incorporatedare identified within the financial plans.

1. Baseline Process

Baselines are tracked on an on-going basis, and are updated to reflect changes in the detailed budgets. levels of

Government and student fees income, to reflect Vice-Chancellor, Senior Leadership Team (SLT) and Council decisions or resource changes between reporting lines or changes to the level of surplus target. Only approved baseline decisions with associated “Fin Ref” numbers, as required by the SLT approval process, will be included as baseline changes, with the exception of salary increases, depreciation charges and uncontrollable costs, which are calculated and added to baselines annually by Finance as part of the annual budget process.

Once the baseline has been finalised annually for each reporting line, and signed by the respective SLT member, each budget centre within that reporting line is required to prepare its own budget. The aggregate of all budget centre costs, excluding activities funded by third parties, must not exceed the total baseline amount for the reporting line,

1.2. Budget Phasing

Formatted: Font: 10 pt, Not Bold,

English (New Zealand)

Formatted: Comment Reference,

Font: Times New Roman, 12 pt

Formatted: Left, Indent: Left: 0.63

cm

Formatted: Font: Bold

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Financial Monitoring and Control Policy – Page 3

To ensure financial performance and cash flow management is carefullyare appropriately monitored and managed , Budget Centre Managers will phase the annual budgets must be accurately allocated by budget centre managers across the twelve months of the financial year. This budget phasing will form the basis of all variance analysis and commentary abouton financial performance.

Capital budgets will be phased by the National Capital Manager in consultation with the Facilities Directors and

Capital Projects managers in consultation with the National Capital Manager .

2.3. Financial Management

Budget Centre Managers are responsible for ensuring all income and expenditure budgets approved by Council are met including the individual projects underwithin their budget centrecentres . The delegations policy and framework outline specific responsibilities in respect of commitment to contracts and purchasing goods or services.

All budget centre managersBudget Centre Managers are expected to have a highan appropriate level of financial literacy and will ensure they develop and maintain their financial competency. This includes understanding the fundamental financial concepts of accruals, commitments, income, operating expenditure, capital expenditure, assets, liabilities, cash flow , delegations , and the impact of their actions on the financial statements.

The Director, Finance and Asset ManagementChief Financial Officer (CFO) will request budget centre managersBudget Centre Managers to reforecast their income and expenditure periodically to identifyreflect where factors behind assumptions included in the original annual budget have changed significantly.

3.4. Financial Monitoring and Reporting

Budget Centre Managers

Budget Centre Managers are accountable for reporting against their compliance with the approved Council budgetbudgets and forecasts on a monthly basis for their budget centre and all projects under their budget centre.

. A commentary in relation to material variances should be provided, including action being taken to address the variance.

Any material variances should be advised to the appropriate accounting advisor for the reporting line and note the reason for the variance, what action is being taken to mitigate the variance and what the timeframe to mitigate the variance will be.

Non financial material variances should be noted as well as these may have a consequential financial effect.

Reporting Line Managers

SLT members are accountableresponsible for reporting against their compliance with the Councilapproved

CouncilReporting Line budget for their reporting line, including all projects under their reporting line,and forecast to the Vice Chancellor on a monthly basis. The specific reporting requirements will be defined by the Vice -

Chancellor.

Any materialMaterial variances mustshould be advised to the appropriate accounting advisor for the reporting line and notecommented on, noting the reason for the variance , what and any action is being taken to mitigate the variance and what the timeframe to mitigate the variance will be .

The accounting advisors Finance will provide an independent assessment of reporting line performance to the

Senior Leadership TeamSLT member.

Senior Leadership TeamSLT & Council

Formatted: Indent: Left: 0.63 cm

Formatted: Font: Bold, Italic

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Financial Monitoring and Control Policy – Page 4

SLT will recommend an annual budget for University Council to approve.

The Vice Chancellor and SLT are accountableresponsible for the University’s compliance with the Council approved budget and will report to the Council on a monthly basisat each Council meeting .

The DirectorAVC Strategy , Finance , IT and Asset ManagementCommercial Operations (AVC SFIC), through the

CFO, will provide an independent assessment of financial performance, financial position and cash flows for the

University and clearly identify responsibility for changes in financial performance, financial position or cash flow.

The Director, Finance and Asset Management The AVC SFIC, through the CFO, is responsible for preparing the annual report for the University.

4.5. Delegations & Internal Controls

An important internal control is the financial delegation authorities whichFinancial delegations must be adhered to.

Good financial management requires that Budget Centre Managers enforce internal control systems that ensure

(1) segregation of duties in the purchasing process, and (2) ethical commercial practice.

Budget Centre Managers must ensure that all potential conflictconflicts of interestsinterest arising from commercial transactions are identified and minimisedappropriately managed .

All external and internal financial reporting must comply with generally accepted accounting practice as defined in the Financial Reporting Act 1993 and Amendments.

Audience:

All staff.

Relevant Legislation:

Public Finance Act 1989 and Amendments

Education Act 1989 and Amendments

Financial Reporting Act 1993 and Amendments

Legal Compliance:

Section 41 of the Public Finance Act 1989 requires Universities to prepare statementsthe annual report as soon as possible after the end of the financial year.

Section 203 of the Education Act 1989 states that Section 41 will apply to every (tertiary) institution, and further that the financial year will read as academic year.

Financial Reporting Act 1993 and Amendments require issuers of securities to the publicrequires a reporting entity to prepare financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting practice, and present a true and fair view of their affairs. This requirement extends to other institutions, including UniversitiesThe University falls within the

Financial Reporting Acts 1993’s definition of a reporting entity .

Related Procedures and Documents:

Conflict of Commitment and Interest Policy

Formatted: Indent: Left: 0 cm, First line: 0.63 cm

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Financial Monitoring and Control Policy – Page 5

Delegations of Authority Document

Performance and Risk Reporting Policy

Procurement Policy

Procurement Procedures

Conflict of Commitment and Interest Policy

Delegations of Authority Document

Performance and Risk Reporting Policy

Procurement Policy

Procurement Procedures

Document Management Control:

Prepared by: Management Accounting ManagerChief Financial Officer

Owned by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Strategy, Finance, Strategy and Information Technology)IT & Commercial

Operations

Authorised by: C11/77 July: 3.2.1

Date issued: 6 May 2011August 2015

Last review: May 2011August 2015

Next review: May 2013August 2017

Formatted: Highlight

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Section

Contact

Finance

Chief Financial Officer

Last Review

August 2015

Next Review

August 2017

Approval

Effective

Date

Massey University Policy Guide

FINANCIAL MONITORING AND CONTROL POLICY

Purpose:

The purpose of this policy is to provide assurance to the University Council and Senior Leadership Team (SLT) that responsibility for financial performance and stewardship of assets is clearly defined.

Definitions:

Annual Budget: Annual financial statements budget approved by the University Council

Baseline: An agreed level of financial resourcing for costs for each reporting line. Baseline resourcing covers those

University costs that are funded by SAC, PBRF, Equity Funding, student fees, interest and trust income. Costs not covered by the baseline are those that arise principally from activities funded by external third parties or through charges to students for voluntary services.

Budget Centre Manager: The Budget Centre Manager is a level three or level four manager with delegated financial authority to make financial commitments for the budget centre. Other staff with sub delegations for a budget centre are not budget centre managers.

Materiality: An item can be material if it has a significant financial impact on the financial performance of the budget centre. Professional judgement is required in assessing material items but as a guide 5% of the budget centre’s total cost or revenue budget or $ 100,000 whichever is lower might be considered material.

Other examples of items that may be materially important and should be included in reports include contract disputes, overdue debtors, receiverships, non-performance of contract and potential for University reputational damage.

Risk Management: Refer to the University’s risk management framework.

Ten Year Capital Plan (TYCP): Rolling ten year capital plan approved by the University Council annually.

Uncontrollable Costs: Costs within an individual reporting line which relate whole of University costs and cannot be controlled by the individual reporting line.

Policy:

Overview

The SLT will make recommendation to the University Council, for approval, an annual budget each year after considering the annual plan, TYCP, investment plan, strategy and financial goals of the University. This will provide

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Financial Monitoring and Control Policy – Page 2 the framework for managing the University finances including meeting financial performance targets, effective balance sheet management and ensuring treasury and cash flow commitments are met.

The annual baseline and budget process is initiated through an annual budget policy statement, linked to the

University’s strategy, that outlines the high level economic considerations that will impact the baseline and budget process.

Financial targets will be approved by the SLT based on the budget policy statement, University strategy and objectives, baseline agreements and the University’s investment, financial sustainability goals and agreed surplus requirements.

The annual planning and investment plan processes will identify how the strategic goals of the University will be met, including achievement of the financial targets.

Budget Centre Managers will prepare budgets for the budget centre, including any projects within the budget centre, following the planning process guidelines so the financial implications from the planning round are identified within the financial plans.

1. Baseline Process

Baselines are tracked on an on-going basis, and are updated to reflect changes in the levels of Government and student fees income, to reflect Vice-Chancellor, Senior Leadership Team (SLT) and Council decisions or resource changes between reporting lines or changes to the level of surplus target. Only approved baseline decisions with associated “Fin Ref” numbers, as required by the SLT approval process, will be included as baseline changes, with the exception of salary increases, depreciation charges and uncontrollable costs, which are calculated and added to baselines annually by Finance as part of the annual budget process.

Once the baseline has been finalised annually for each reporting line, and signed by the respective SLT member, each budget centre within that reporting line is required to prepare its own budget. The aggregate of all budget centre costs, excluding activities funded by third parties, must not exceed the total baseline amount for the reporting line,

2. Budget Phasing

To ensure financial performance and cash flow management are appropriately monitored and managed, Budget

Centre Managers will phase the annual budgets across the twelve months of the financial year. This budget phasing will form the basis of variance analysis and commentary on financial performance.

Capital budgets will be phased by the Facilities Directors and Capital Projects managers in consultation with the

National Capital Manager.

3. Financial Management

Budget Centre Managers are responsible for ensuring all income and expenditure budgets approved by Council are met including the individual projects within their budget centres. The delegations policy and framework outline specific responsibilities in respect of commitment to contracts and purchasing goods or services.

All Budget Centre Managers are expected to have an appropriate level of financial literacy and will ensure they develop and maintain their financial competency. This includes understanding the fundamental financial concepts of accruals, commitments, income, operating expenditure, capital expenditure, cash flow, delegations, and the impact of their actions on the financial statements.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Financial Monitoring and Control Policy – Page 3

The Chief Financial Officer (CFO) will request Budget Centre Managers to reforecast their income and expenditure periodically to reflect where factors behind assumptions included in the original annual budget have changed significantly.

4. Financial Monitoring and Reporting

Budget Centre Managers

Budget Centre Managers are accountable for reporting against their approved budgets and forecasts on a monthly basis. A commentary in relation to material variances should be provided, including action being taken to address the variance.

Reporting Line Managers

SLT members are responsible for reporting against their Council-approved Reporting Line budget and forecast to the Vice-Chancellor on a monthly basis. The specific reporting requirements will be defined by the Vice-

Chancellor.

Material variances should be commented on, noting the reason for the variance and any action being taken to mitigate the variance.

Finance will provide an independent assessment of reporting line performance to the SLT member.

SLT & Council

SLT will recommend an annual budget for University Council to approve.

The Vice-Chancellor and SLT are responsible for the University’s compliance with the Council approved budget and will report to the Council at each Council meeting.

The AVC Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations (AVC SFIC), through the CFO, will provide an independent assessment of financial performance, financial position and cash flows for the University and clearly identify responsibility for changes in financial performance, financial position or cash flow.

The AVC SFIC, through the CFO, is responsible for preparing the annual report for the University.

5. Delegations & Internal Controls

Financial delegations must be adhered to.

Good financial management requires that Budget Centre Managers enforce internal control systems that ensure

(1) segregation of duties in the purchasing process, and (2) ethical commercial practice.

Budget Centre Managers must ensure that all potential conflicts of interest arising from commercial transactions are identified and appropriately managed.

All external and internal financial reporting must comply with generally accepted accounting practice as defined in the Financial Reporting Act 1993 and Amendments.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Financial Monitoring and Control Policy – Page 4

Audience:

All staff.

Relevant Legislation:

Public Finance Act 1989 and Amendments

Education Act 1989 and Amendments

Financial Reporting Act 1993 and Amendments

Legal Compliance:

Section 41 of the Public Finance Act 1989 requires Universities to prepare the annual report as soon as possible after the end of the financial year.

Section 203 of the Education Act 1989 states that Section 41 will apply to every (tertiary) institution, and further that the financial year will read as academic year.

Financial Reporting Act 1993 and Amendments requires a reporting entity to prepare financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting practice, and present a true and fair view of their affairs. The

University falls within the Financial Reporting Acts 1993’s definition of a reporting entity.

Related Procedures and Documents:

Conflict of Commitment and Interest Policy

Delegations of Authority Document

Performance and Risk Reporting Policy

Procurement Policy

Procurement Procedures

Document Management Control:

Prepared by: Chief Financial Officer

Owned by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor Strategy, Finance, IT & Commercial Operations

Authorised by: C11/77 July: 3.2.1

Date issued: August 2015

Last review: August 2015

Next review: August 2017

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

C15/59 – August

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

RECORDS MANAGEMENT POLICY FOR APPROVAL

7 August 2015

Proposal

This paper seeks Council approval of the current Records Management Policy. This policy was put in place in March 2007 and was regularly reviewed every two years to ensure that the policy reflects good practice and supports effective and compliant recordkeeping. The latest version of the policy was approved by the Council in September 2013.

The Policy supports the University’s compliance with the Public Records Act and other legislations and further positions Massey for excellence in the management of records.

Introduction

The Policy has been fully reviewed and updated to reflect Massey’s move to an Electronic

Document and Records Management System (EDRMS) through deployment of OneMassey

Collaboration sites. A status report for EDRMS System Go-live and Post-project Roll-out was submitted to SLT for noting (SLT 14/12/315), which was well-received.

The Policy has also been updated to ensure good recordkeeping practice and compliance with the new Records Management Standard issued by Archives New Zealand, which has replaced the four mandatory standards.

The updated Policy was endorsed by the SLT Committee in June 2015 (SLT 15/06/104), with the Review cycle updated from 3 years from 2 years.

Marked-up and clean versions of the Policy are attached.

Discussion

The University Records Management Framework was established in 2010, and Records

Management is making good progress in enhancing the Framework, with the successful completion of the EDRMS project in December 2014. OneMassey Collaboration sites, as a new digital workplace which supports sound records management, can now be ordered for use by Massey staff through the Site-provisioning tool from OneMassey.

Training and resources have been established to guide teams through setting up and using a

Page 1 of 3

C15/59 – August

Part I

site for collaboration. The EDRMS team will provide assistance and work on site roll-out across the University as a business-as-usual operation.

A full review of the current policy was undertaken through many focus group discussions and staff workshops across the University over the EDRMS project period. We started with the policy review in 2014, while also working on guidelines and support material in order to provide staff with practical help to support their adoption of the new system.

There are no changes to the intent or nature of the current policy. Key reasons to update this policy are to make this policy read clearer, and to reflect the availability of the new

EDRMS system and the alignment of the new Records Management standard which came into effect in July 2014. Key updates are:

· Overall update to improve the readability of this policy

· Standardised our terminology to ensure consistency throughout policy

· Updated the recordkeeping principles to reflect a few principles of electronic recordkeeping

· Updated the Responsibilities section to support electronic recordkeeping

· Updated the Definition sections, with EDRMS included

Consultation

This updated policy was widely consulted on with all Heads of Departments, ITS,

Employment Relations, Records Champions and OneMassey project team and project board members through different communication channels. Staff and other key stakeholders were also invited to provide input into the EDRMS solution through their participation in workshops/ focus group meetings and online surveys. All feedback was acknowledged and reviewed to develop the final version of this policy.

The Policy was discussed at the 26 May 2015 SLT Sub-Committee meeting and subsequently the 8 June 2015 SLT Committee meeting, with endorsement for Council approval obtained.

Financial implications and Treasury Comment

Financial Implications Yes

Treaty of Waitangi Implications

Treaty of Waitangi Implications Yes

Equity and Ethnic Implications

People Implications (Staff/Student/Other)

Equity Implications

Gender Implications

Yes

Cultural & Ethnic Implications (Māori/Pasifika/New Migrant/Other) Yes

Yes

Yes

Disability Implications

Information Technology Implications

Library Implications

Yes

Yes

þ

Yes

No ý

No ý

No ý

No ý

No ý

No ý

No ý

No

No ý

Page 2 of 3

International Implications

Teaching Implications Implications

Research Implications Implications

Other (state________________________)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

C15/59 – August

Part I

No ý

No ý

No ý

No ý

The ITS Transition Plan for EDRMS post-project roll-out was established and implemented in December 2014. The deployment of the OneMassey Collaboration sites and ongoing support from 2015 onwards will be achieved under the provision of the

Records Management operational budget. The OneMassey project has assigned 100 hours of EDRMS developer resources per month for advancing the system. Records Management has fully funded an ITS Business Analyst to help with EDRMS enhancement and deployment across the University.

BAU post-implementation support is being provided by ITS in partnership with the

EDRMS team as an integral part of the OneMassey’s services for the University.

OneMassey and EDRMS learning and training programmes are available to all staff in both online and classroom settings. Good EDRMS learning resources are available in

OneMassey and STREAM to suit self-paced learning. The EDRMS team has also been providing flexible user adoption support since the system go-live, and this will continue through different deployment phases in 2015 and beyond.

Publicity & Communications

The approval and key changes of this policy will be communicated to all Head of

Departments and published on the Policy Guide through the Office of Risk Management.

Records Management will also communicate this through their Information Champions network to improve staff awareness on good recordkeeping practice. The ongoing enhancement and deployment of OneMassey Collaborative sites will continue through the

EDRMS workstreams to support the full implementation of the Records Management

Framework at Massey.

Recommendations

It is recommended that the Council:

Approve the proposed changes to the Records Management policy.

Alan Davis

AVC People & Organisational Development

27 Jul7y 2015

Encls. 1. Updated Records Management Policy (With tracked changes and comments)

2. Updated Records Management Policy (Clean)

Page 3 of 3

Massey University Policy Guide

RECORDS MANAGEMENT POLICY

Section University Management

Contact Records Manage mentr

Last Review MaySeptember 201 53

Next Review MaySeptember 201 75

Approval C13/112-October: 3.1.3

Purpose:

To provide a framework, establish accountabilities and maintain recordkeeping practices and principles thereby ensuring that full and accurate records of the business transactions, actions and decisions of Massey University are created and that these records are used, maintained, made accessible, stored and legally disposed of in a manner that meets all relevant legislative, regulatory and University requirements in accordance with prudent business practice.

Policy:

All staff of the University , and its affiliated organisations and any organisations contracted to deliver services on

Massey’s behalf will create and maintain full and accurate records of the University’s business activity, in accordance with its normal, prudent business practice, and capture them in a University recordkeeping system. The following recordkeeping principles will apply to all records:

• Records must be accurately and securely captured when generated or received.

• These records should be full and accurate to the extent necessary to: o facilitate action by University employees, at any level, and by their successors; o make possible a proper investigation of the conduct of business by anyone authorised to undertake such scrutiny and o protect the financial, legal and other rights of the University and any others affected by its action and decisions.

• The record copy should be unique and original and should be held once only, by the originator or person who originally created or received it.

• Records must be stored in a manner that ensures that they are accessible to authorised staff but protected from theft, misuse, modification, damage and loss; and accessible over time.

• Access to records must be controlled to ensure compliance with legislation and the University Records

Management procedures.

• Records must be classified according to an approved Business Classification Scheme.

Comment [CF1]: No changes, just clarifying the policy scope here

Comment [CF2]: The following recordkeeping principles will apply as the

Records Management Framework continues to be implemented at Massey.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 2

Metadata will be assigned and persistently linked to records and aggregations of records.

• Metadata for disposal of records will be generated or captured, and managed systematically for as long as required to account for the disposal.

• Inactive records will be moved to appropriate offsite storage and managed there in accordance with the

Offsite Storage procedures. If necessary, inactive electronic records may be stored in second or third-tier storage in order to avoid affecting the speed and availability of the recordkeeping system.

Comment [CF3]: To align with the new

Records Management standard requirements from Archives NZ. The implementation of the EDRMS will support the metadata requirements.

• Vital records will be identified and managed in a secure and protected way.

• The retention and disposal of records must be undertaken in accordance with the approved General Disposal Authority (GDA) for Universities and any variations of this that have been approved by Archives New Zealand for use by Massey University.

• In accordance with the provision of the GDA certain classes of record will automatically be appraised for historical or legacy value by the University Archivist at time of sentencing and the custody of these records will pass to the University Archives at this time. Electronic Records in the Electronic Document and Records

Management System (EDRMS) will be appraised automatically in accordance with the GDA based on rules and reports run within the EDRMS.

All records must be:

• Compliant with the recordkeeping requirements arising from the regulatory and accountability environment in which Massey operates.

• Adequate for the purpose for which they are kept.

• Complete or include the structural and contextual information necessary to document and action.

• Meaningful – containing metadata, information and/or linkages that ensure the business context in which the record was created and used is apparent.

• Accurate – to correctly reflect the transactions that they document.

• Authentic – enabling proof that they are what they purport to be and that their purported authors did indeed create them through the use of appropriate metadata.

• Inviolate – securely maintained to prevent unauthorised access, alteration or removal.

• Accessible within the provisions of the Public Records Act 2005, the Official Information Act 1982 and the

Privacy Act 1993.

• Retained for the time allocated in the retention and disposal schedule and only disposed of with approval from an authorised person.

Note: Some records are excluded from Government or external scrutiny but must still be managed within the

Records Management Framework as if they were. This adds consistency and value to all staff and stakeholders who access them.

Comment [CF4]: The automatic appraisal rules run in the EDRMS will improve recordkeeping efficiency for the

University.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 3

Records Ownership:

All records created or received by University staff in the course of their duties on behalf of the University are owned by the University and subject to its control – unless otherwise superseded by another University Policy or Agreement.

All records created by a contractor during the course of a contract belong to the University and should be captured and managed in the University recordkeeping systems - unless otherwise agreed in the formal contract specifying any exclusion.

Responsibilities:

The Vice-Chancellor has ultimate responsibility for ensuring that the University meets its statutory and accountability obligations in recordkeeping. The oversight of the administration of University records is vested with the AVC People and Organisational Development (Operations) and University Registrar through the execution of the University ’s

Records Management FrameworkProgramme of work , to support the University’s strategic goals and ensure compliance with the Public Records Act 2005 and best practices for recordkeeping

.

Senior Leadership Team, Heads of Departments (or equivalents)Executives areare responsible for:

• Ensuring that funds and resources are available for the provision of a records management programme s that meets the requirement of this policy .

Managers

(or equivalents) (HODs or equivalent) are responsible for:

• Ensuring that staff are aware of Massey University’s recordkeeping policies and procedures.

• Ensuring that appropriate records are created and maintained in their area of responsibility.

• Assigning recordkeeping responsibilities and ensuring that staff know where to go for assistance.

• Ensuring that no records are destroyed, altered, sold or transferred without authorisation by using the GDA or as authorised by the University Records Manager.

• Ensuring that there is a budget to meet Massey University’s recordkeeping responsibilities.

• Ensuring that InformationRecords Champions are identified for each area of the business under the

Manager’s control. Otherwise, the Manager will act as the Information Champion for their responsible area by default.

Information (Records)Records

Champions are responsible for:

• Assisting staff to adhere to the recordkeeping polic iesy and procedures related to records and recordkeeping .

• Assisting the Records Management team to communicate the objectives of rthe R ecords mM anagement programme s .

• Ensuring that new staff know where to find information on how records are managed and are trained in the procedures related to recordkeeping.

The University Records Manager is responsible for:

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Comment [CF5]: Have reviewed this policy with the PRA statements and other university policies – intellectual control of records has been clarified in the policy.

Comment [CF6]: To reflect the current responsibilities of records management at

Massey

Comment [CF7]: To reflect the change of management line for Records

Management.

Comment [CF8]: To maintain consistent terminology.

Comment [CF9]: Just to make the statement easier to read.

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 4

• Leading the development and implementation of strategies and policies of recordkeeping and its associated systems to support efficiency and legislative compliance of the University.

• Ensuring that the Developing and implementing a comprehensiveUniversity Records Management

Framework is effectively implemented and maintained through continuous business improvement records management programme that supports the University Records Management policy .

• Ensuring that the electronic and physical records management programmes are effectively delivered for the

University.

• Ensuring that Developing and maintaining recordkeeping policies and procedures covering the access, retrieval, use, retention, disposal, conversion, and migration of records.

• Developing and maintaining the Businthe business ess cC lassification Schemeand recordkeeping metadata schemas (inc. managed metadata) are implemented and maintained for the University.

Providing guidance on the development ofDeveloping records management training programme s and ensuring that all relevant staff receive appropriate record s management and EDRMSkeeping training s .

• Ensuring that the

InformationRecords Champion network is established,established, mentored and trained.

• Coordinating with Massey’s IT specialists and relevant staff to adopt technological solutions which enable effective management of documents and records.

Ensuring that effective Developing auditing processes and monitoring controls of the University recordkeeping systems are in place and adhered toto ensure compliance and efficiency .

• Providing policy advice and strategic guidance with regard to all recordkeeping practices and systems.

• Ensuring that sentencing of records occurs in accordance with the GDA and the Records Management procedures.

• Authorising the disposal of records as per University’s Delegation Authority .

• Assigning access restrictions to records where necessary.

The

Records

Management TeamStaff isare responsible for:

• Providing record keepings services and user support for the implementation and maintenance of the University

Records Management Frameworksystem .

Assisting in the improvement of recordkeeping work practices including the implementation and maintenance of the classification scheme, managed metadata and retention schedules in the hybrid work environment.

• Coordinating recordkeeping activities and liaise with staff and the InformationRecords Champions for the best service delivery and the promotion of good recordkeeping practices.

• Liaising with organisational units to assess their electronic records and document management requirements, and assisting them in the implementation of EDRMS to support their business and recordkeeping requirements.

Developing and implementing the EDRMS across the University.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Comment [CF10]: For clarity

Comment [CF11]: Updated the Records

Team’s responsibilities to further implement the RM Framework for the

University.

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 5

Administrative management and maintenance of the University recordkeeping systems.

• Providing user support on electronic records and document management, and promoting user adoption within the EDRMS environment.

• Coordinating with relevant staff for the lodgement, storage, retrieval and archiving of records

• Liaising with the University Archives on the identification of records under GDA for historical or specific archival value at the time of sentencing in accordance with the Records Management procedures.

Assisting in the identification and registration of legacy records into the University recordkeeping systems.

• Coordinating the appraisal and disposal of records in accordance with the standard procedures.

Maintaining EDRMS and Records Management Intranet sites and facilitating communication to the University community on recordkeeping matters.

• Providing EDRMS training to support its implementation at Massey.

• Providing advice, user training and guidance on recordkeeping as required.

The Information Technology System (ITS) group is responsible for:

• Ensuring that the maintenance of the business and information systems and electronic repositories at Massey is consistent with the requirements described in this policy.

• Coordinating with the Records Management team where necessary in the maintenance of technology for the business and information systems at Massey, including maintaining appropriate system accessibility, security, backup and disaster recovery.

The University Archivist is responsible for:

Comment [CF12]: Added ITS’s responsibility to work in partnership with

Records Management in electronic recordkeeping systems at Massey.

• Appraising for historical and archival value, records identified under the GDA in accordance with the Records

Management procedures.

• Appraisal of non record items for historical or archival value.

• Maintenance and storage of archival records to the appropriate standard and in accordance with the PRA requirements.

• Maintenance and storage of non record archives in an approved, compliant and controlled environment.

• Controlling access and use of archival records.

• Arrangement and describing of the archival records according to established principles of archival description.

• Maintaining appropriate metadata for archival records in accordance with the appropriate standards and the

Records Management procedures.

• Transfer of archival records to Archives New Zealand or to an Archives New Zealand approved repository in accordance with the GDA and the Records Management procedures.

All Staff are responsible for:

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 6

• Complying with Massey University’s Records Management policies and procedures.

• Creating full and accurate records of all business activity, including keeping records of work processes as identified in the procedures and documented workflow processes individual to the relevant department.

• Maintaining records using the approved format, naming conventions and storage units; and in accordance with the Records Management procedures.

Ensuring that all business activities are adequately documented and the resulting records filed into and maintained by University recordkeeping systems.

• Ensuring that personal or duplicate materialsnon records are clearly separated from records.

• Appropriately storing records to ensure that they are securely stored and accessible over time.

• Retaining records according to the principles of the Massey University’s Retention and Disposal Schedule and not relinquishing control over, destroying, or removing records without authority.

• Following the established procedures for disposal of records.

• Preventing any unauthorised access to records and ensuring that personal or sensitive information is protected.

• Liaising with the Records Management team when assistance and advice is required.

Definitions:

Approved Repository means a repository approved by the Minister responsible for Archives New Zealand for public archives under the Public Records Act. Under PRA section 21 (1), every public office must transfer possession and control of public records that have been in existence for 25 years: a) To the possession of Archives New Zealand and the control of the Chief Archivist; or b) To the possession of an approved repository and the control of the Chief Archivist

Appraisal under the Public Records Act refers to the process of evaluation to determine whether records are needed by the University and how long they should be kept for. Appraisal involves deciding which records of the University should be retained permanently as public archives, and which records should be destroyed once the University's business and accountability requirements have been met. This is based on analysis of the University's business activities, while weighing up community expectations about permanent retention of these records.

Archives means those records, identified for long term preservation for regulatory or historical reasons.

Affiliated oO

rganisations mean those organisations or entities where the University has an ownership stake of 50% or more.

Business aA

ctivity is an umbrella term covering all the functions, processes, activities and transactions of the

University and its employees that are related to the management and administrative functions of the University. It excludes activities related to personal research.

Business cC lassification sS

cheme is the systematic identification and arrangement of business activities and/or records into categories according to logically structured conventions, methods, and procedural rules represented in a classification system.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Comment [CF13]: To articulate the recordkeeping requirements as per PRA standards.

Comment [CF14]: To encourage

Massey staff to contact the Records

Management team for advice or assistance if required.

Comment [CF15]: Reviewed all definitions to ensure that all key terms are clearly defined and presented in this section.

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 7

Classification includes determining document or file-naming conventions, user permissions and security restrictions on records. The structure of a business classification scheme is hierarchical, moving from the general to the specific.

Disposal is the final decision concerning the fate of records, i.e. destruction or transfer to archives. This also includes the programme of activities to support transfer such as surveys, scheduling, and records destruction. Digitisation is also considered a disposal action and needs to be identified, controlled and source records approved for disposal prior to such digitisation occurring.

Document Management refers to a process for managing the life cycle of a document, including inception, version creation, publication, storage, retention and disposal. This usually refers to electronic documents, and uses specific document management software.

Electronic Records are digital Records which are capable of being processed in a computer system and/or stored at any instant in a medium which requires electronic or computer equipment for retrieval. This includes digitised paper records.

Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS) – Massey is implementing an EDRMS which has been specifically designed to manage the creation, use, maintenance and disposal (inc. archival) of electronic records (particularly email and document based records) for the purposes of providing evidence of business activities and facilitating effective information management across the University. The system maintains appropriate contextual information and metadata, as well as links between records to support their value as evidence. The EDRMS may also automate business processes such as workflows and approvals and be integrated with other business systems. The

EDRMS at Massey, comprising of SharePoint, RecordPoint and Colligo, will contribute to Massey’s strategic goals by improved organisational efficiency; supporting business continuity and legislative compliance.

Metadata is structured data that describes and/or enables finding, managing, controlling, understanding or preserving other information overtime. Recordkeeping metadata enables the creation, management and use of records through time. It can be used to identify, authenticate and contextualise records and the people, processes and systems that create, manage and use them.

Metadata Schema is a framework that specifies and describes a standard set of metadata elements and their interrelationships. Note: Schema provides a formal syntax (or structure) and semantics (or definitions) for the metadata elements.

Managed Metadata (Taxonomy) in this policy refers to a hierarchical collection of centrally managed terms that can be defined and then used as attributes (values) for list and library items in SharePoint at Massey. They can also be used for tagging and searching for information.

General Disposal Authority (GDA) refers to the sector-specific disposal authority issued by the Chief Archivist of

Archives New Zealand for New Zealand Universities. It sets out the authority and criteria for retention and disposal for all records created or received by New Zealand Universities that are covered by the Public Records Act 2005.

Non records refer to materials that do not fall within the definition of an official record for the University. This includes copies of records that are kept for personal reference or convenience; or documents/ other items that are identified as being of permanent value and they will be preserved for archival purposes.

Public records means any record, in any form, in whole or in part, created or received by a public office (such as

Massey University) in the course of its business. This excludes: special collections and records generated by the academic staff or students of the University that are not defined as University Records. The term Public Record does not necessarily imply public access or the placement of such records into the public arena.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 8

Record is information recorded in any format that is created or received and maintained in the transaction of business activities and retained as evidence of such an activity. A record may be: a document, signature, seal, text, image, sound, speech or data. It can be compiled, recorded or stored in written form on any material, or on film, negative, tape or other medium which will make it reproducible, or by means of any recording device or process, computer, or other electronic device or process which will make it machine readable.

Record in this policy refers to any information recorded in any form that is created or received and maintained in the transaction of business activities and retained as evidence of such an activity by Massey University (inc. all staff, affiliated organisations and anyone contracted to deliver services on its behalf). This covers all functions of the

University including management, academic and administration. A record may be a document, signature, seal, text, image, sound, speech or data, and it can be in audio, electronic (including web pages) or physical format.

This includes:

• teaching and research materials owned by the University, and

• the records of the University’s affiliated organisations ,.

• research data, whether received from external parties or created by the University (which shall at all times be subject to research protocols and the Privacy Act).

This excludes:

• an individual’s documents, correspondence or personal papers that have been created in a private capacity,

• materials received for information only,

• primary drafts and working papers not recording decisions,

• published research that are not covered by the University’s Intellectual Property Policy,

• copies of documents kept for personal reference or convenience.

Public Records means any records, in any form, in whole or in part, created or received by a public office (such as Massey University) in the course of its business which are covered by the Public Records Act 2005. The GDA provides a detailed guide to the various types of Public Records. The term ‘Public Record’ does not necessarily imply public access or the placement of such records into the public arena.

This excludes records not covered by the Public Records Act, i.e. teaching and research materials generated by academic staff or students, including (but not limited to) raw data, analysed data, working notes and publications.

Recordkeeping means the creation and maintenance of complete, accurate and reliable evidence of business transactions in the form of recorded information. Recordkeeping includes the following:

• the creation of records in the course of business activity and the means to ensure the creation of adequate records;

• the design, establishment and operation of recordkeeping systems, including the definition of metadata; and

• the management of records used in business (traditionally regarded as the domain of records management) and as archives (traditionally regarded as the domain of archives administratio n).

Recordkeeping System refers to a system which captures, manages and provides access to records over time. The system can be manual or electronic, depending on the records formats and the operating environment. A manual system, such as corporate filing systems and registers, may be appropriate to capture and maintain physical records.

A business information system or database application (e.g. finance system, HR system), while not a dedicated recordkeeping system, may incorporate aspects of recordkeeping functionality.

Records Mm

anagement is the field of management responsible for the efficient and systematic control of the creation, receipt, maintenance, use and disposition of records, including processes for capturing and maintaining evidence of and information about business activities and transactions in the form of records.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Comment [CF1]: Changes made as to address the matters highlighted at the SLT

Sub Committee meeting.

Comment [CF2]: As above

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 9

Retention and dD isposal sS chedule

See General Disposal Authorityand GDA refers to the document that prescribes the length of time that university records are to be retained and how these are to be disposed of when this time has been reached .

Sentencing refers to the process of identifying and classifying records according to a disposal authority and the act of applying a disposal action specified in it to the record.

University aA

rchives means the organisation al unit responsible for appraising, acquiring, preserving and making available archival material of the University.

University Archivist means the person responsible for the effective management and administration of the archives within Massey University.

University record is any record or other material, in any form, which has been created, received, recorded or legally filed by the administrative and academic offices of the University that is related to the management and administrative functions of the University. This includes all processes relating to students, teaching and research management and the activities of affiliated organisations. This excludes: an individual’s records or personal papers that have been created in a private capacity, copies of documents used for reference, working papers and published research that are not covered by the University’s Intellectual Property Policy.University Records Management Framework is an organising framework that has a combination of key, interconnected elements which support effective and compliant recordkeeping at Massey within the operational, regulatory and legislative environments. The framework provides a basis for the University to identify and prioritise additional recordkeeping artefacts and improvement activities for further development. The current framework includes:

• Policy and procedures

• Business Classification Scheme

• EDRMS and recordkeeping tools

• General Disposal Authority

• Training and coaching programmes

Vital rR ecords

refers tomeans those records that are essential for the ongoing business of the University and without which the University could not continue to function effectively.

Examples include: contracts, current financial, staff and payroll records, student academic records, research data, systems documentation, business continuity plans, emergency contact details, etc. The identification and protection of

Vital Records is a primary concern of records management and disaster planning.

Audience:

This policy applies to academic and professional staff of the University and its affiliated organisations, including its business enterprises such as wholly owned subsidiary companies, joint venture companies, partnerships, trusts and research centres. It also applies to volunteers and independent contractors in the course of their work for and on behalf of the University.

Relevant legislation:

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 10

§

Financial Legislation

Financial Reporting Act 1993

Public Finance Act 1989

Goods and Services Tax Act 1985

Income Tax Act 1994

Tax Administration Act 1994

§

§

Mäori and Treaty of Waitangi Legislation

State Owned Enterprises Act 1986, sec. 9

§

Privacy Legislation

Privacy Act 1993

§

Employment Legislation

Employment RelationsContracts Act 20001991

Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992

§

Commercial Legislation

Companies Act 1993

§

Public Sector Legislation

Public Records Act 2005

Official Information Act 1982

Ombudsmen Act 1975

Public Finance Act 1989

Intellectual Property Legislation

Copyright Act 1994

Designs Act 1953

Patents Act 1953

Trade Marks Act 20021953

§

Education Sector Legislation

Education Act 1989 and amendments

Massey University Act 1963

§

Medical Legislation

Health Act 1956

Health (Retention of Health Information) Regulations 1996

Health Information Privacy Code 1994

Radiation Protection Act 1965

§

Other Legislation

Electronic Transactions Act 2002

Evidence Acts

National Library of New Zealand Act 2003

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Comment [CF16]: Updated as requested by the Employment Relations

Manager.

Comment [CF17]: Added as requested by the University Health and Safety

Manager.

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 11

Legal compliance:

§

Financial Legislation

Financial Reporting Act 1993

Defines the standards to be used in preparing financial reports and obligations in respect of the preparation and audit of financial statements.

See also Public Finance Act 1989 for relevant sections

Goods and Services Tax Act 1985

Includes requirements for the keeping of records to support the administration of the Goods and Services

Tax system (s 75) and their retention for a period of at least seven years after the end of the taxable period to which they relate.

Income Tax Act 1994

Includes requirements to furnish records to support specific rebates or deductions, such as those for demonstrating the business use of motor vehicles (s DH2 - 3).

Tax Administration Act 1994

Requires taxpayers and employers to keep records in relation to business matters for tax purposes. Such records are to be retained for at least seven years after the end of the income year to which they relate (s

22 (2)). Other recordkeeping provisions include the Inland Revenue Commissioner's powers to obtain information, the furnishing of tax returns, and the secrecy of information provided in relation to tax matters.

§

Mäori and Treaty of Waitangi Legislation

State Owned Enterprises Act 1986, sec. 9

This Act states: “Nothing in this Act shall permit the Crown to act in a manner that is inconsistent with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi”. This requires the Crown to act in good faith and make informed decisions. From this requirement the duty to consult has developed.

§

Privacy Legislation

Privacy Act 1993

Establishes a set of privacy principles to ensure the protection of personal privacy in respect of both public and private sector organisations. The Act is of prime importance and should be clearly understood by all information management professionals.

§

Employment Legislation

Employment ConRelationstracts Act 20001991

Contains recordkeeping requirements for redundancy of employment records (s 6947 ). Wages and time records for any period in the preceding six years must be available for the employee (s130) . There is also a requirement to retain records of any strikes and lockouts (s 98142 )

Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992

Requires employers to maintain a register of accidents and serious harm. No retention period is given.

§

Commercial Legislation

Companies Act 1993

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 12

Includes provisions requiring the maintenance of a share register (s 87 - 94), company records (s 189 -

191), accounting records (s 194), and audit and reporting obligations. It allows the inspection of company records (s 178 - 179 and s 215 - 218). Other provisions include the registration of companies with the

Registrar of Companies. The Act should not be confused with the Commerce Act 1986 in which no major provisions are found though a requirement to register applications is implied.

§

Public Sector Legislation

Public Records Act 2005

Provides for the selection of public records and archives for creation, maintenance and retention. Directs that public records and archives may only be destroyed or disposed of with the authority of the Chief

Archivist. Provides for the deposit of public archives with the Archives of New Zealand and describes conditions for the management of material so deposited. Sets out the powers of the Chief Archivist in respect of current public records.

Official Information Act 1982

Provides for access to official information, except where specific reasons for withholding it exist, such as national security or the protection of personal privacy.

Ombudsmen Act 1975

Contains requirements for documenting complaints and the supply of written evidence to support complaints. Specifies access restrictions on a complaint or supplied evidence, and on publication of any summary report resulting from a complaint. Allows Ombudsman to review complaints, records and decision-making processes and procedures.

Public Finance Act 1989

Covers the reporting requirements of the Crown, Government Departments and Crown Entities, including requirements for Audit Office issuing of Audit Opinions.

§

Intellectual Property Legislation

Copyright Act 1994

Contains references to the requirements for documenting copyright in original works, transferring copyright and licensing for use/copying. Includes documentation requirements for hearings of the Copyright

Tribunal. Copyright Regulations also apply.

Designs Act 1953

Contains recordkeeping requirements for all documents associated with the creation and registration of a design with the Patents Office. Includes specific requirements regarding the creation and accessibility of the Register of Designs. Designs Regulations also apply.

Patents Act 1953

Contains recordkeeping requirements for all documents associated with the application for and certification of New Zealand patents. Includes specific requirements regarding the creation and accessibility of the

Register of Patents. Patents Regulations also apply.

Trade Marks Act 20021953

Covers recordkeeping requirements for all documents relating to the application for and certification of

New Zealand registered trademarks. Includes specific requirements regarding the creation and accessibility of the Register of Trademarks. Trade Marks Regulations also apply.

§

Education Sector Legislation

Education Act 1989 and amendments

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 13

Covers recordkeeping requirements for all documents relating to the creation of annual reports, minutes and other statutory council and board records.

Massey University Act 1963

This act covers the University as an entity and provides for recordkeeping requirements of specific regulatory documents

§

Medical Legislation

Health Act 1956 and amendments

This act addresses the legal implications and requirements for the use and transfer of patient records.

Health (Retention of Health Information) Regulations 1996

This act addresses outlines the legal requirements for the retention of patient records by PHOs, private hospitals and doctors in private practice.

Health Information Privacy Code 1994

The Health Information Privacy Code 1994 outlines the requirements for storage of patient records and also provides for the non release of information to patients in certain circumstances.

Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights

This act address the requirements for recordkeeping relating to the rights of patients cared for under the provisions of the Health and Disability acts.

General Disposal Authority for District Health Boards

This GDA provides best practice for the retention and disposal of patient records.

§

Other Legislation

Electronic Transactions Act 2002

This act addresses the legal implication and requirements for the use of electronic information and media.

Evidence Acts

The Evidence Act 1908 governs the admissibility of documents and records in Courts. This Act lacks a definition of documents, but the Evidence Amendment Act 1945 defines them as including “books, maps, plans, drawings and photographs”. Since both Acts were written before the development and widespread use of computers they do not address the issues of machine generated information. The Evidence

Amendment Act (No. 2) 1980 governs the admissibility of business records as documentary hearsay evidence. In 1999, the Law Commission published a report (NZLCR55: Evidence Part Two: Evidence

Code and Commentary. 1999) that contained significant proposed changes to legislation. The report addressed issues such as the evidential value of machine-generated information and the definition of documents. In addition amendments to the act were passed in 2006 further defining “a document”.

National Library of New Zealand Act 2003

This act provides for the deposit of published documents by Crown Entities and other State owned or funded enterprises. The act requires that identical copies of the published document be provided.

References:

Australian Standard AS 4390, Records Management, Homebush (NSW), 1996

International Standard ISO 15489, Information and Documentation – Records Management, Geneva, 2001

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Comment [CF3]: Further references provided as to address the matters highlighted at the SLT Sub Committee meeting.

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 14

Judith Ellis, (ed.), Keeping Archives, 2nd ed., Port Melbourne, 1993

Archives New Zealand, Continuum Resource Kit

Records Management Standard for the New Zealand Public Sector, 2014

S5: Digital Recordkeeping Standard, 2010

ICA-Req Module 2 Guidelines & Functional Requirements for Electronic Records Management Systems, 2008

ICA-Req Module 3 Guidelines & Functional Requirements for Records in Business Systems, 2008

G20: Guide to Managing Web Records, 2009

Medical Council of New Zealand – Maintenance and Retention of patient records

Australian Standard AS 4390, Records Management, Homebush (NSW), 1996

International Standard ISO 15489, Information and Documentation – Records Management, Geneva, 2001

Judith Ellis, (ed.), Keeping Archives, 2nd ed., Port Melbourne, 1993

Archives New Zealand, Continuum Resource Kit

Medical Council of New Zealand – Maintenance and Retention of patient records

Related procedures / documents:

OneMassey Collaboration Site Guidelines

Business Classification Scheme

Disposal Procedure

General Disposal Authority for New Zealand Universities

Hard Copy Records Guideline

Offsite StorageRecords Procedure

Research Protocols in force from time to time or as agreed with data providers

Document management control:

Prepared by: University Records Manager

Owned by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor People and Organisational DevelopmentAssistant Vice Chancellor (Operations)

& University Registrar

Approved by: C11/94-September: 3.2.1

Date issued: 7 March 2007

Last review: MaySeptember 201 53

Next review: MaySeptermber 201 75

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Comment [CF18]: Name of the existing procedure updated.

Comment [CF19]: This policy is now owned by AVC POD due to the change of management reporting line.

Massey University Policy Guide

RECORDS MANAGEMENT POLICY

Section University Management

Contact Records Management

Last Review

May 2015

Next Review

May 2017

Approval

Purpose:

To provide a framework, establish accountabilities and maintain recordkeeping practices and principles thereby ensuring that full and accurate records of the business transactions, actions and decisions of Massey University are created and that these records are used, maintained, made accessible, stored and legally disposed of in a manner that meets all relevant legislative, regulatory and University requirements in accordance with prudent business practice.

Policy:

All staff of the University, its affiliated organisations and any organisations contracted to deliver services on Massey’s behalf will create and maintain full and accurate records of the University’s business activity, in accordance with its normal, prudent business practice, and capture them in a University recordkeeping system. The following recordkeeping principles will apply to all records:

Records must be accurately and securely captured when generated or received.

These records should be full and accurate to the extent necessary to: o facilitate action by University employees, at any level, and by their successors; o make possible a proper investigation of the conduct of business by anyone authorised to undertake such scrutiny and o protect the financial, legal and other rights of the University and any others affected by its action and decisions.

The record copy should be unique and original and should be held once only, by the originator or person who originally created or received it.

Records must be stored in a manner that ensures that they are accessible to authorised staff but protected from theft, misuse, modification, damage and loss; and accessible over time.

Access to records must be controlled to ensure compliance with legislation and the University Records

Management procedures.

Records must be classified according to an approved Business Classification Scheme.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 2

Metadata will be assigned and persistently linked to records and aggregations of records.

Metadata for disposal of records will be generated or captured, and managed systematically for as long as required to account for the disposal.

Inactive records will be moved to appropriate offsite storage and managed there in accordance with the

Offsite Storage procedures. If necessary, inactive electronic records may be stored in second or third-tier storage in order to avoid affecting the speed and availability of the recordkeeping system.

Vital records will be identified and managed in a secure and protected way.

The retention and disposal of records must be undertaken in accordance with the approved General Disposal

Authority (GDA) for Universities and any variations of this that have been approved by Archives New Zealand for use by Massey University.

In accordance with the provision of the GDA certain classes of record will automatically be appraised for historical or legacy value by the University Archivist at time of sentencing and the custody of these records will pass to the University Archives at this time. Electronic Records in the Electronic Document and Records

Management System (EDRMS) will be appraised automatically in accordance with the GDA based on rules and reports run within the EDRMS.

All records must be:

Compliant with the recordkeeping requirements arising from the regulatory and accountability environment in which Massey operates.

Adequate for the purpose for which they are kept.

Complete or include the structural and contextual information necessary to document and action.

Meaningful – containing metadata, information and/or linkages that ensure the business context in which the record was created and used is apparent.

Accurate – to correctly reflect the transactions that they document.

Authentic – enabling proof that they are what they purport to be and that their purported authors did indeed create them through the use of appropriate metadata.

Inviolate – securely maintained to prevent unauthorised access, alteration or removal.

Accessible within the provisions of the Public Records Act 2005, the Official Information Act 1982 and the

Privacy Act 1993.

Retained for the time allocated in the retention and disposal schedule and only disposed of with approval from an authorised person.

Note: Some records are excluded from Government or external scrutiny but must still be managed within the

Records Management Framework as if they were. This adds consistency and value to all staff and stakeholders who access them.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 3

Records Ownership:

All records created or received by University staff in the course of their duties on behalf of the University are owned by the University and subject to its control – unless otherwise superseded by another University Policy or Agreement.

All records created by a contractor during the course of a contract belong to the University and should be captured and managed in the University recordkeeping systems - unless otherwise agreed in the formal contract specifying any exclusion.

Responsibilities:

The Vice-Chancellor has ultimate responsibility for ensuring that the University meets its statutory and accountability obligations in recordkeeping. The oversight of the administration of University records is vested with the AVC People and Organisational Development through the execution of the University Records Management Framework, to support the University’s strategic goals and ensure compliance with the Public Records Act 2005 and best practices for recordkeeping

.

Senior Leadership Team, Heads of Departments (or equivalents) are responsible for:

Ensuring that funds and resources are available for the provision of records management programmes that meets the requirement of this policy.

Managers (or equivalents) are responsible for:

Ensuring that staff are aware of Massey University’s recordkeeping policies and procedures.

Ensuring that appropriate records are created and maintained in their area of responsibility.

Assigning recordkeeping responsibilities and ensuring that staff know where to go for assistance.

Ensuring that no records are destroyed, altered, sold or transferred without authorisation by using the GDA or as authorised by the University Records Manager.

Ensuring that there is a budget to meet Massey University’s recordkeeping responsibilities.

Ensuring that Information Champions are identified for each area of the business under the Manager’s control. Otherwise, the Manager will act as the Information Champion for their responsible area by default.

Information (Records) Champions are responsible for:

Assisting staff to adhere to the recordkeeping policies and procedures.

Assisting the Records Management team to communicate the objectives of records management programmes.

Ensuring that new staff know where to find information on how records are managed and are trained in the procedures related to recordkeeping.

The University Records Manager is responsible for:

Leading the development and implementation of strategies and policies of recordkeeping and its associated systems to support efficiency and legislative compliance of the University.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 4

Ensuring that the University Records Management Framework is effectively implemented and maintained through continuous business improvement.

Ensuring that the electronic and physical records management programmes are effectively delivered for the

University.

Ensuring that the business classification and recordkeeping metadata schemas (inc. managed metadata) are implemented and maintained for the University.

Providing guidance on the development of records management training programmes and ensuring that all relevant staff receive appropriate records management and EDRMS trainings.

Ensuring that the Information Champion network is established, mentored and trained.

Coordinating with Massey’s IT specialists and relevant staff to adopt technological solutions which enable effective management of documents and records.

Ensuring that effective auditing processes and monitoring controls of the University recordkeeping systems are in place and adhered to.

Providing policy advice and strategic guidance with regard to all recordkeeping practices and systems.

Ensuring that sentencing of records occurs in accordance with the GDA and the Records Management procedures.

Authorising the disposal of records as per University’s Delegation Authority.

Assigning access restrictions to records where necessary.

The Records Management Team is responsible for:

Providing recordkeeping services and user support for the implementation and maintenance of the University

Records Management Framework.

Assisting in the improvement of recordkeeping work practices including the implementation and maintenance of the classification scheme, managed metadata and retention schedules in the hybrid work environment.

Coordinating recordkeeping activities and liaise with staff and the Information Champions for the best service delivery and the promotion of good recordkeeping practices.

Liaising with organisational units to assess their electronic records and document management requirements, and assisting them in the implementation of EDRMS to support their business and recordkeeping requirements.

Developing and implementing the EDRMS across the University.

Administrative management and maintenance of the University recordkeeping systems.

Providing user support on electronic records and document management, and promoting user adoption within the EDRMS environment.

Coordinating with relevant staff for the lodgement, storage, retrieval and archiving of records

Liaising with the University Archives on the identification of records under GDA for historical or specific archival value at the time of sentencing in accordance with the Records Management procedures.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 5

Assisting in the identification and registration of legacy records into the University recordkeeping systems.

Coordinating the appraisal and disposal of records in accordance with the standard procedures.

Maintaining EDRMS and Records Management Intranet sites and facilitating communication to the

University community on recordkeeping matters.

Providing EDRMS training to support its implementation at Massey.

Providing advice, user training and guidance on recordkeeping as required.

The Information Technology System (ITS) group is responsible for:

Ensuring that the maintenance of the business and information systems and electronic repositories at Massey is consistent with the requirements described in this policy.

Coordinating with the Records Management team where necessary in the maintenance of technology for the business and information systems at Massey, including maintaining appropriate system accessibility, security, backup and disaster recovery.

The University Archivist is responsible for:

• Appraising for historical and archival value, records identified under the GDA in accordance with the Records

Management procedures.

• Appraisal of non record items for historical or archival value.

• Maintenance and storage of archival records to the appropriate standard and in accordance with the PRA requirements.

• Maintenance and storage of non record archives in an approved, compliant and controlled environment.

• Controlling access and use of archival records.

• Arrangement and describing of the archival records according to established principles of archival description.

• Maintaining appropriate metadata for archival records in accordance with the appropriate standards and the

Records Management procedures.

• Transfer of archival records to Archives New Zealand or to an Archives New Zealand approved repository in accordance with the GDA and the Records Management procedures.

All Staff are responsible for:

Complying with Massey University’s Records Management policies and procedures.

Creating full and accurate records of all business activity, including keeping records of work processes as identified in the procedures and documented workflow processes individual to the relevant department.

Maintaining records using the approved format, naming conventions and storage units; and in accordance with the Records Management procedures.

Ensuring that all business activities are adequately documented and the resulting records filed into and maintained by University recordkeeping systems.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 6

Ensuring that personal or duplicate materials are clearly separated from records.

Appropriately storing records to ensure that they are securely stored and accessible over time.

Retaining records according to the principles of the University’s Retention and Disposal Schedule and not relinquishing control over, destroying, or removing records without authority.

Following the established procedures for disposal of records.

Preventing any unauthorised access to records and ensuring that personal or sensitive information is protected.

Liaising with the Records Management team when assistance and advice is required.

Definitions:

Approved Repository means a repository approved by the Minister responsible for Archives New Zealand for public archives under the Public Records Act. Under PRA section 21 (1), every public office must transfer possession and control of public records that have been in existence for 25 years: a) To the possession of Archives New Zealand and the control of the Chief Archivist; or b) To the possession of an approved repository and the control of the Chief Archivist

Appraisal under the Public Records Act refers to the process of evaluation to determine whether records are needed by the University and how long they should be kept for. Appraisal involves deciding which records of the University should be retained permanently as public archives, and which records should be destroyed once the University's business and accountability requirements have been met. This is based on analysis of the University's business activities, while weighing up community expectations about permanent retention of these records.

Archives means those records, identified for long term preservation for regulatory or historical reasons.

Affiliated Organisations mean those organisations or entities where the University has an ownership stake of 50% or more.

Business Activity is an umbrella term covering all the functions, processes, activities and transactions of the

University and its employees that are related to the management and administrative functions of the University. It excludes activities related to personal research.

Business Classification Scheme is the systematic identification and arrangement of business activities and/or records into categories according to logically structured conventions, methods, and procedural rules represented in a classification system.

Classification includes determining document or file-naming conventions, user permissions and security restrictions on records. The structure of a business classification scheme is hierarchical, moving from the general to the specific.

Disposal is the final decision concerning the fate of records, i.e. destruction or transfer to archives. This also includes the programme of activities to support transfer such as surveys, scheduling, and records destruction. Digitisation is also considered a disposal action and needs to be identified, controlled and source records approved for disposal prior to such digitisation occurring.

Document Management refers to a process for managing the life cycle of a document, including inception, version creation, publication, storage, retention and disposal. This usually refers to electronic documents, and uses specific document management software.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 7

Electronic Records are digital Records which are capable of being processed in a computer system and/or stored at any instant in a medium which requires electronic or computer equipment for retrieval. This includes digitised paper records.

Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS) – Massey is implementing an EDRMS which has been specifically designed to manage the creation, use, maintenance and disposal (inc. archival) of electronic records (particularly email and document based records) for the purposes of providing evidence of business activities and facilitating effective information management across the University. The system maintains appropriate contextual information and metadata, as well as links between records to support their value as evidence. The EDRMS may also automate business processes such as workflows and approvals and be integrated with other business systems. The

EDRMS at Massey, comprising of SharePoint, RecordPoint and Colligo, will contribute to Massey’s strategic goals by improved organisational efficiency; supporting business continuity and legislative compliance.

Metadata is structured data that describes and/or enables finding, managing, controlling, understanding or preserving other information overtime. Recordkeeping metadata enables the creation, management and use of records through time. It can be used to identify, authenticate and contextualise records and the people, processes and systems that create, manage and use them.

Metadata Schema is a framework that specifies and describes a standard set of metadata elements and their interrelationships. Note: Schema provides a formal syntax (or structure) and semantics (or definitions) for the metadata elements.

Managed Metadata (Taxonomy) in this policy refers to a hierarchical collection of centrally managed terms that can be defined and then used as attributes (values) for list and library items in SharePoint at Massey. They can also be used for tagging and searching for information.

General Disposal Authority (GDA) refers to the sector-specific disposal authority issued by the Chief Archivist of

Archives New Zealand for New Zealand Universities. It sets out the authority and criteria for retention and disposal for all records created or received by New Zealand Universities that are covered by the Public Records Act 2005.

Record in this policy refers to any information recorded in any form that is created or received and maintained in the transaction of business activities and retained as evidence of such an activity by Massey University (inc. all staff, affiliated organisations and anyone contracted to deliver services on its behalf). This covers all functions of the

University including management, academic and administration. A record may be a document, signature, seal, text, image, sound, speech or data, and it can be in audio, electronic (including web pages) or physical format.

This includes:

• teaching and research materials owned by the University, and

• the records of the University’s affiliated organisations.

• research data, whether received from external parties or created by the University (which shall at all times be subject to research protocols and the Privacy Act).

This excludes:

• an individual’s documents, correspondence or personal papers that have been created in a private capacity,

• materials received for information only,

• primary drafts and working papers not recording decisions,

• published research that are not covered by the University’s Intellectual Property Policy,

• copies of documents kept for personal reference or convenience.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 8

Public Records means any records, in any form, in whole or in part, created or received by a public office (such as Massey University) in the course of its business which are covered by the Public Records Act 2005. The GDA provides a detailed guide to the various types of Public Records. The term ‘Public Record’ does not necessarily imply public access or the placement of such records into the public arena.

This excludes records not covered by the Public Records Act, i.e. teaching and research materials generated by academic staff or students, including (but not limited to) raw data, analysed data, working notes and publications.

Recordkeeping means the creation and maintenance of complete, accurate and reliable evidence of business transactions in the form of recorded information. Recordkeeping includes the following:

• the creation of records in the course of business activity and the means to ensure the creation of adequate records;

• the design, establishment and operation of recordkeeping systems, including the definition of metadata; and

• the management of records used in business (traditionally regarded as the domain of records management) and as archives (traditionally regarded as the domain of archives administratio n).

Recordkeeping System refers to a system which captures, manages and provides access to records over time. The system can be manual or electronic, depending on the records formats and the operating environment. A manual system, such as corporate filing systems and registers, may be appropriate to capture and maintain physical records.

A business information system or database application (e.g. finance system, HR system), while not a dedicated recordkeeping system, may incorporate aspects of recordkeeping functionality.

Records Management is the field of management responsible for the efficient and systematic control of the creation, receipt, maintenance, use and disposition of records, including processes for capturing and maintaining evidence of and information about business activities and transactions in the form of records.

Retention and Disposal Schedule – See General Disposal Authority.

Sentencing refers to the process of identifying and classifying records according to a disposal authority and the act of applying a disposal action specified in it to the record.

University Archives means the organisational unit responsible for appraising, acquiring, preserving and making available archival material of the University.

University Archivist means the person responsible for the effective management and administration of the archives within Massey University.

University Records Management Framework is an organising framework that has a combination of key, interconnected elements which support effective and compliant recordkeeping at Massey within the operational, regulatory and legislative environments. The framework provides a basis for the University to identify and prioritise additional recordkeeping artefacts and improvement activities for further development. The current framework includes:

• Policy and procedures

• Business Classification Scheme

• EDRMS and recordkeeping tools

• General Disposal Authority

• Training and coaching programmes

Vital Records refers to records that are essential for the ongoing business of the University and without which the

University could not continue to function effectively.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 9

Examples include: contracts, current financial, staff and payroll records, student academic records, research data, systems documentation, business continuity plans, emergency contact details, etc. The identification and protection of

Vital Records is a primary concern of records management and disaster planning.

Audience:

This policy applies to academic and professional staff of the University and its affiliated organisations, including its business enterprises such as wholly owned subsidiary companies, joint venture companies, partnerships, trusts and research centres. It also applies to volunteers and independent contractors in the course of their work for and on behalf of the University.

Relevant legislation:

§

Financial Legislation

Financial Reporting Act 1993

Public Finance Act 1989

Goods and Services Tax Act 1985

Income Tax Act 1994

Tax Administration Act 1994

§

Mäori and Treaty of W aitangi Legislation

State Owned Enterprises Act 1986, sec. 9

§

Privacy Legislation

Privacy Act 1993

§

Employment Legislation

Employment Relations Act 2000

Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992

§

Commercial Legislation

Companies Act 1993

§

Public Sector Legislation

Public Records Act 2005

Official Information Act 1982

Ombudsmen Act 1975

Public Finance Act 1989

§

Intellectual Property Legislation

Copyright Act 1994

Designs Act 1953

Patents Act 1953

Trade Marks Act 2002

§

Education Sector Legislation

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 10

Education Act 1989 and amendments

Massey University Act 1963

§

Medical Legislation

Health Act 1956

Health (Retention of Health Information) Regulations 1996

Health Information Privacy Code 1994

Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights

Radiation Protection Act 1965

§

Other Legislation

Electronic Transactions Act 2002

Evidence Acts

National Library of New Zealand Act 2003

Legal compliance:

§

Financial Legislation

Financial Reporting Act 1993

Defines the standards to be used in preparing financial reports and obligations in respect of the preparation and audit of financial statements.

See also Public Finance Act 1989 for relevant sections

Goods and Services Tax Act 1985

Includes requirements for the keeping of records to support the administration of the Goods and Services

Tax system (s 75) and their retention for a period of at least seven years after the end of the taxable period to which they relate.

Income Tax Act 1994

Includes requirements to furnish records to support specific rebates or deductions, such as those for demonstrating the business use of motor vehicles (s DH2 - 3).

Tax Administration Act 1994

Requires taxpayers and employers to keep records in relation to business matters for tax purposes. Such records are to be retained for at least seven years after the end of the income year to which they relate (s

22 (2)). Other recordkeeping provisions include the Inland Revenue Commissioner's powers to obtain information, the furnishing of tax returns, and the secrecy of information provided in relation to tax matters.

§

Mäori and Treaty of W aitangi Legislation

State Owned Enterprises Act 1986, sec. 9

This Act states: “Nothing in this Act shall permit the Crown to act in a manner that is inconsistent with the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi”. This requires the Crown to act in good faith and make informed decisions. From this requirement the duty to consult has developed.

§

Privacy Legislation

Privacy Act 1993

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 11

Establishes a set of privacy principles to ensure the protection of personal privacy in respect of both public and private sector organisations. The Act is of prime importance and should be clearly understood by all information management professionals.

§

Employment Legislation

Employment Relations Act 2000

Contains recordkeeping requirements for redundancy of employment records (s69). Wages and time records for any period in the preceding six years must be available for the employee (s130). There is also a requirement to retain records of any strikes and lockouts (s98)

Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992

Requires employers to maintain a register of accidents and serious harm. No retention period is given.

§

Commercial Legislation

Companies Act 1993

Includes provisions requiring the maintenance of a share register (s 87 - 94), company records (s 189 -

191), accounting records (s 194), and audit and reporting obligations. It allows the inspection of company records (s 178 - 179 and s 215 - 218). Other provisions include the registration of companies with the

Registrar of Companies. The Act should not be confused with the Commerce Act 1986 in which no major provisions are found though a requirement to register applications is implied.

§

Public Sector Legislation

Public Records Act 2005

Provides for the selection of public records and archives for creation, maintenance and retention. Directs that public records and archives may only be destroyed or disposed of with the authority of the Chief

Archivist. Provides for the deposit of public archives with the Archives of New Zealand and describes conditions for the management of material so deposited. Sets out the powers of the Chief Archivist in respect of current public records.

Official Information Act 1982

Provides for access to official information, except where specific reasons for withholding it exist, such as national security or the protection of personal privacy.

Ombudsmen Act 1975

Contains requirements for documenting complaints and the supply of written evidence to support complaints. Specifies access restrictions on a complaint or supplied evidence, and on publication of any summary report resulting from a complaint. Allows Ombudsman to review complaints, records and decision-making processes and procedures.

Public Finance Act 1989

Covers the reporting requirements of the Crown, Government Departments and Crown Entities, including requirements for Audit Office issuing of Audit Opinions.

§

Intellectual Property Legislation

Copyright Act 1994

Contains references to the requirements for documenting copyright in original works, transferring copyright and licensing for use/copying. Includes documentation requirements for hearings of the Copyright

Tribunal. Copyright Regulations also apply.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 12

Designs Act 1953

Contains recordkeeping requirements for all documents associated with the creation and registration of a design with the Patents Office. Includes specific requirements regarding the creation and accessibility of the Register of Designs. Designs Regulations also apply.

Patents Act 1953

Contains recordkeeping requirements for all documents associated with the application for and certification of New Zealand patents. Includes specific requirements regarding the creation and accessibility of the

Register of Patents. Patents Regulations also apply.

Trade Marks Act 2002

Covers recordkeeping requirements for all documents relating to the application for and certification of

New Zealand registered trademarks. Includes specific requirements regarding the creation and accessibility of the Register of Trademarks. Trade Marks Regulations also apply.

§

Education Sector Legislation

Education Act 1989 and amendments

Covers recordkeeping requirements for all documents relating to the creation of annual reports, minutes and other statutory council and board records.

Massey University Act 1963

This act covers the University as an entity and provides for recordkeeping requirements of specific regulatory documents

§

Medical Legislation

Health Act 1956 and amendments

This act addresses the legal implications and requirements for the use and transfer of patient records.

Health (Retention of Health Information) Regulations 1996

This act addresses outlines the legal requirements for the retention of patient records by PHOs, private hospitals and doctors in private practice.

Health Information Privacy Code 1994

The Health Information Privacy Code 1994 outlines the requirements for storage of patient records and also provides for the non release of information to patients in certain circumstances.

Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers’ Rights

This act address the requirements for recordkeeping relating to the rights of patients cared for under the provisions of the Health and Disability acts.

General Disposal Authority for District Health Boards

This GDA provides best practice for the retention and disposal of patient records.

§

Other Legislation

Electronic Transactions Act 2002

This act addresses the legal implication and requirements for the use of electronic information and media.

Evidence Acts

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Records Management Policy – Page 13

The Evidence Act 1908 governs the admissibility of documents and records in Courts. This Act lacks a definition of documents, but the Evidence Amendment Act 1945 defines them as including “books, maps, plans, drawings and photographs”. Since both Acts were written before the development and widespread use of computers they do not address the issues of machine generated information. The Evidence Amendment

Act (No. 2) 1980 governs the admissibility of business records as documentary hearsay evidence. In 1999, the Law Commission published a report (NZLCR55: Evidence Part Two: Evidence Code and Commentary.

1999) that contained significant proposed changes to legislation. The report addressed issues such as the evidential value of machine-generated information and the definition of documents. In addition amendments to the act were passed in 2006 further defining “a document”.

National Library of New Zealand Act 2003

This act provides for the deposit of published documents by Crown Entities and other State owned or funded enterprises. The act requires that identical copies of the published document be provided.

References:

Australian Standard AS 4390, Records Management, Homebush (NSW), 1996

International Standard ISO 15489, Information and Documentation – Records Management, Geneva, 2001 Judith

Ellis, (ed.), Keeping Archives, 2nd ed., Port Melbourne, 1993

Archives New Zealand, Continuum Resource Kit

Records Management Standard for the New Zealand Public Sector, 2014 S5:

Digital Recordkeeping Standard, 2010

ICA-Req Module 2 Guidelines & Functional Requirements for Electronic Records Management Systems, 2008 ICA-

Req Module 3 Guidelines & Functional Requirements for Records in Business Systems, 2008

G20: Guide to Managing Web Records, 2009

Medical Council of New Zealand – Maintenance and Retention of patient records

Related procedures / documents:

OneMassey Collaboration Site Guidelines

Business Classification Scheme

Disposal Procedure

General Disposal Authority for New Zealand Universities Hard

Copy Records Guideline

Offsite Storage Procedure

Research Protocols in force from time to time or as agreed with data providers

Document management control:

Prepared by: University Records Manager

Owned by: Assistant Vice-Chancellor People and Organisational Development Approved by:

Date issued: 7 March 2007 Last review: May 2015 Next review: May

2017

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

C15/60 – August

Part I

MEMORANDUM

To:

From:

Date:

Massey University Council

Deanna Riach, Campus Registrar and Graduation Committee Chair

17 July 2015

Subject: GRADUATION DATES - 2017

Attached are the proposed 2017 Graduation dates for Council consideration and approval.

As a result of the way Public Holidays (Easter and Anzac Day) fall in 2017 and to meet venue hire availability, the Campus Registrars in collaboration with Student

Administration, recommend that Graduation would begin at Albany on the 26 th

April

(later in April than usual because of Easter and would be held on the 3 days between

Anzac Day and the weekend), be followed by Manawatu in the week commencing 8 th

May and end in Wellington on 25 th

May (26 th

for Pasifika and Maori celebrations).

Page 1 of 2

C15/60 – August

Part I

Year

2017

Albany

Graduations

Wednesday 26 April

– Friday 28 April

Celebrations:

Pasifika: Wednesday

26 April

Maori: Thursday 27

April

Manawatu

Graduations

Monday 8 May –

Thursday 11 May

Friday 24

November

Celebrations:

Pasifika: Thursday

11 May

Maori: Thursday 11

May

Wellington

Graduations

Thursday 25 May –

Friday 26 May

Celebrations:

Pasifika: Friday 26

May

Maori: Friday 26

May

Easter Anzac Day

14-17

April

Tuesday

25 April

Page 2 of 2

C15/61 - August

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

PROPOSED COUNCIL AND COUNCIL COMMITTEE MEETINGS

SCHEDULE 2016

7 August 2015

This paper proposes that the 2016 meeting schedule will follow that established for

2015. It is recognised that the 2015 meeting schedule was new and has not been evaluated for its effectiveness however in light of ensuring dates are in members’ diaries it has been decided to propose the dates at this time noting that there may be changes as an outcome of the evaluation of the current year’s meeting schedule or the requirements of the new Council.

The 2016 graduation and celebration to honour graduates dates have been included in the schedule.

The proposed 2016 schedule for the following meetings/activities is attached

· Council

· Audit and Risk Committee

· Finance Committee

· Honorary Awards Committee

· Performance Review Committee

· Council Strategy Day

· Induction of new Council members

In summary the schedule proposes:

· There are five Council meetings.

· Audit and Risk Committee meetings: o

There are four videoconference meetings, timed to address the main business of the Committee o

Dates have been proposed in line with the 2015 meeting schedule but may be subject to change.

· Finance Committee meetings: o

There are four videoconference meetings, timed to address the main business of the Committee o

Dates have been proposed in line with the 2015 meeting schedule but may be subject to change.

· Honorary Awards Committee meetings have been scheduled in line with 2015 and will continue to meet by teleconference.

· The Performance Review Committee will meet in late January. The date has yet to be determined.

Page 1 of 3

C15/61 - August

Part I

· The Council Strategy Day has been scheduled to take place in July in line with

2015.

· The date of the induction of new Council members has been scheduled the day before the first (March) Council meeting and the powhiri on the day of the

Council meeting.

· Governance Committee meeting dates have not been scheduled at this time

· Graduation dates are as determined by Council.

Recommendation

It is recommended that Council approve the 2016 Council and Council Committee

Meetings Schedule noting that there may be some changes to the schedule.

Paddy Nicol

Executive Secretary

29 July 2015

Page 2 of 3

C15/61 - August

Part I

Massey University Council and Committee meetings 2016

&

Graduation Schedule 2016

Month Date

January Late January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

Activity

Performance Review Committee

Tuesday 9 Feb

Friday 12 Feb

Honorary Awards Committee

Audit and Risk Committee meeting

Thursday 3 March Induction of new members– Chancellor, AVC & University

Registrar and Executive Secretary

Friday 4 March Powhiri and Council meeting

Tuesday 22 March Finance Committee

Friday 15 April

Tuesday 19 April to

Friday 22 April

Friday 6 May

Audit and Risk Committee meeting

Graduations at Auckland and Celebrations to Honour Māori and Pasifika Graduates

Mon 9 May to

Thursday 12 May

Council meeting

Graduations at Palmerston North and Celebrations to

Honour Māori and Pasifika Graduates

Tuesday 16 May

Thursday 26 May

Friday 27 May

Finance Committee

Graduations at Wellington and

Celebrations to Honour Māori and Pasifika Graduates

Honorary Awards Committee Tuesday 14 June

Friday 1 July

Tuesday 12 July

Friday 5 August

Council Strategy Day

Honorary Awards Committee

Council meeting

Campus/Region

Wellington

Teleconference

Videoconference

Manawatu

Manawatu

Videoconference

Videoconference

Auckland

Manawatu

Palmerston North

Videoconference

Wellington

Teleconference

Manawatu (tbc)

Teleconference

Wellington

Friday 12 August

September Tuesday 27 Sept

October

Audit and Risk Committee

Honorary Awards Committee

Monday 17 October Finance Committee meeting

Friday 28 October Council meeting

November Tuesday 8 Nov

Friday 11 Nov

Tuesday 15 Nov

Honorary Awards Committee

Audit and Risk Committee meeting

Finance Committee meeting

Friday 25 Nov Graduations at Palmerston North

December Friday 2 December Council meeting

Key

Council

Audit and Risk Committee

Finance Committee

Honorary Awards Committee

Performance Review Committee

Graduations

Council Strategy Session

Induction new members

Videoconference

Teleconference

Videoconference

Albany

Teleconference

Videoconference

Videoconference

Palmerston North

Manawatu

Page 3 of 3

C15/62 - August

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

FINANCE REPORT TO 30 JUNE 2015

7 August 2015

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide Council with an update as to the financial performance and financial position of Massey University and its controlled entities (the group) for the six months ended 30 June 2015.

Discussion

A new dashboard format of the finance report was presented to Council at their meeting in

May 2015. The primary purpose behind the changes is to reduce the volume of information presented to Council and SLT members, whereby only that information that is essential at

Council and SLT level is included.

Enclosed is the summary “dashboard style” report for the six months ended 30 June 2015.

Consultation

SLT and Council were consulted on the draft format of the report and feedback incorporated into the report.

Financial implications and Treasury Comment

Financial Implications

No

Treaty of Waitangi Implications

Not applicable.

Equity and Ethnic Implications

Cultural Implications (Maori/Pasifika/New Migrant/Other)

No

Ethnic Implications

Gender Implications

Disability Implications

Other (state____________________________)

No

No

No

No

Page 1 of 2

C15/62 - August

Part I

Publicity & Communications

Not required.

Recommendations

It is recommended that Massey University Council:

1. Note the contents of the Finance Report for the six month period ended 30 June 2015;

Cathy Magiannis

Assistant Vice-Chancellor

Strategy, Finance, IT and Commercial Operations

30 July 2015

Page 2 of 2

Government Grant

Student Fees

Other Income

Interest

Trust

Total Income

Salaries Costs

Other Direct Costs

Depreciation

Interest Costs

Trust Costs

Total Costs

Operating Surplus

INCOME STATEMENT

YTD

ACTUAL

($000)

91,932

79,767

57,604

2,588

2,739

YTD

BUDGET

YTD

VARIANCE

($000)

91,811

79,231

($000)

121

536

51,173 6,432

1,252 1,336

1,891 848

234,630 225,358 9,273

FY

FORECAST

($000)

181,629

157,360

102,508

3,937

4,631

FY

BUDGET

($000)

183,622

156,005

98,526

2,355

4,024

450,065 444,532

FY FORECAST

TO BUDGET

VARIANCE

($000)

(1,993)

1,355

3,982

1,582

607

5,533

129,718 129,060 (658)

63,162 62,391 (771)

24,423

476

1,255

24,794

955

977

371

479

(278)

219,034 218,177 (857)

15,596 7,181 8,415

263,308

125,934

50,633

993

4,738

4,459

262,228

123,630

50,399

1,910

1,925

445,606 440,092

4,440

(1,080)

(2,304)

(234)

917

(2,813)

(5,514)

19

Income Statement Comments

The group’s YTD operating surplus of $15.6m was $8.4m ahead of budget. The positive result compared to budget for the six months to June 2015 was mainly due to:

+ Income received from the Ministry of Culture and Heritage (MCH) to cover the costs of vacating part of Block 10 (Museum Building) in the Wellington campus;

+ Timing differences in revenue and expenses, in particular with contract and trading activities;

+ Higher returns from investments and lower borrowing costs as a result of the delays in the capital plan leading to the University holding higher cash balances than expected; and

+ Unrealised gains from the Massey University Foundation Trust (MUF) investments.

The YTD positive movements offset by MUF’s projected drop in surplus, have been reflected in the forecast.

The year-end forecast currently includes savings which may be covered by "one-off" revenue items. Should this revenue not eventuate these savings may be required.

Current Assets

Non-Current Assets

Current Liabilities

Non-Current Liabilities

Net Assets

Equity

MASSEY UNIVERSITY GROUP FINANCIAL RESULTS

YEAR TO DATE 30 June 2015

BALANCE SHEET

YTD

ACTUAL

YTD

BUDGET

($000)

176,345

($000)

142,128

1,102,251 1,017,568

150,315 151,150

50,365 50,492

1,077,916 958,054

YTD

VARIANCE

($000)

34,217

84,683

835

127

119,862

1,077,916 958,054 (119,862)

Balance Sheet Comments

FY

FORECAST

($000)

111,787

1,131,886

112,673

64,537

1,066,463

1,066,463

FY

BUDGET

FY FORECAST

TO BUDGET

VARIANCE

($000)

($000)

97,823

1,021,823

107,688

57,127

954,831

13,964

110,063

(4,985)

(7,410)

111,632

954,831 (111,632)

Liquidity and Solvency

Trade and other receivables are managed within set targets. This was reflected in the debtor’s turnover as at 30 June 2015 of 28.3 days compared to a budget of 30 days.

The reclassification of non-current assets to current assets was one of the main contributors towards the working capital being $1.17 current assets to every $1.00 of liabilities. This is also reflected in the

FY current asset forecast being higher than the FY budget.

Non-Current Assets

The unexpected increase in the 2014 asset revaluation was the main driver behind the YTD favourable variance of $84.7m. This was partly offset by delays in the capital programmes especially in software related capital projects.

The delays in the capital programmes are expected to reduce towards year end. This combined with the unexpected 2014 asset revaluation increase has been factored into the FY forecast.

Current Liabilities

A decrease in trade creditors was offset by an increase in revenue received in advance. These timing differences have resulted in an overall decrease in current liabilities.

Similar to the previous month's forecast, current liabilities are expected to be higher than FY budget as a result of higher revenue in advance carried over from last year.

Non-Current Liabilities

Although YTD non-current liabilities were in line with budget, the FY forecast is expected to be above budget, reflecting rent received in advance not included in the budget.

Cash At Beginning

Net From Operating Activities

Net From Investing Activities

Net From Financing Activities

Net Cashflow

Net Foreign Exchange

Cash At End

YTD

ACTUAL

STATEMENT OF CASHFLOW

YTD

BUDGET

YTD

VARIANCE

($000)

50,661

($000)

37,358

73,678 59,098

(44,626) (51,125)

(337) (535)

28,715

447

79,823

7,438

0

($000)

13,303

14,580

6,499

198

21,277

447

44,796 35,027

FY

FORECAST

($000)

50,661

55,500

FY

BUDGET

FY FORECAST TO

BUDGET

VARIANCE

(90,371) (84,629)

8,559

24,349

($000)

37,358

44,932

13,669

(26,312) (26,028)

0 0

11,330

($000)

13,303

10,568

(5,742)

(5,110)

(284)

0

13,019

Cashflow Statement Comments

Overall, YTD net cash flows from operating activities were higher than budget mainly due to income received from MCH to cover the costs of vacating part of Block 10 (Museum Building) in the Wellington campus, lower than expected 2014 SAC funding wash up and minor timing differences in operating expenses.

These YTD movements have been included in the FY forecast. In addition the University is forecasting to receive a $5m lease incentive in relation to student accommodation. The cash will be recognised upon receipt but, in accordance with accounting standards, the income will be spread over the life on the lease.

YTD net cash flows from investing activities were behind YTD budget mainly due to the extension of investment terms which has been offset by lower capital expenditure due to delays in the capital plan.

Overall, delays in capital expenditures are expected to reduce towards the end of the year. This, along with the increase in capital spend, has resulted in the FY forecast being $5.7m higher than FY budget.

YTD net cash flows from finance activities were in line with YTD budget and the level of borrowing required is expected to be lower than originally anticipated due to retiming of capital spend and "one off" unbudgeted cash receipts.

YTD = Year to Date

FY = Full Year

C15/63 - August

Part I

2.

The Chancellor

Massey University Council

Dear Chancellor,

Report from the Academic Board Meeting (Part I): 15 April 2015

At the Academic Board meeting held on Wednesday 15 April 2015 in Part I of the meeting the following items are referred to Council for information.

1. Advice on Matters of Academic Policy

No matters of Academic Policy were discussed at the meeting.

Information to Council with Respect to Major Academic Directions

Academic Scholarship in the 21 st

Century

In 2013 the first discussion paper came to Academic Board and was the circulated to

College groups. Feedback was generally positive and the new document reflects both the feedback and aligns with the Road to 2025 to identify the modern academic identity.

A working group is tasked with coming up with proposals for changes to the promotion criteria to reflect the changes to the wider academic landscape. There is no intention to polarise teaching and research posts just to acknowledge the different pathways of staff.

The role of professional staff in research and teaching was raised. At this stage the

PBRF rules do not allow the inclusion of professional staff.

Academic Freedom and the University Mission directing staff into specific areas of research was raised and how to manage a balance between teaching and research.

While the Education Act recognises Academic Freedom, the University needs to focus on its areas of expertise and the strengths of the Institution.

Academic promotion is one part of a suite of measures to recognise and reward performance.

The document is out to continue the conversation with Colleges and to allow Colleges to unpick and discover the detail.

The results of the discussion and the working group will come to the Board at a later date.

Page 1 of 2

C15/63 - August

Part I

Employability Framework

The framework is a response to the expectations from the government that universities are preparing students for employment. The intent is to reframe this into employability, ensuring the university is contributing to an environment where students are ready for work.

The work that has gone into the framework was acknowledged however the risk to the traditional role of universities was identified and there was concern that the framework was inadvertently promoting the desires of business over the value of education and scholarship. It was pointed out that Massey earned its pedigree for applied learning qualifications and a number of our qualifications align closely with employers and many of our students come to university to improve their position in society and it was important that the University address the aspirations of our students.

3. Report of Academic Approvals Taken Under Delegation

There were no approvals taken under delegation in Part I of the meeting.

4. Sub-Committee Matters

Academic Board received the Annual Reports for the College of Humanities and

Social Sciences, the College of Creative Arts, the University Research Committee and

5.

6.

the University Library Committee.

Items of Early Notice

There are no matters for early notice to report in Part I of the meeting.

For Information

There were no matters for information in Part I of the meeting.

Conferring of Degrees and awarding of Diplomas and Certificates

Degrees were conferred and diplomas and certificates awarded under the delegated authority of Council.

Professor Sally Morgan

Chair, Academic Board

Page 2 of 2

C15/64 – August

Part I

The Chancellor

Massey University Council

Dear Chancellor,

Report from the Academic Board Meeting (Part I): 17 June 2015

2.

At the Academic Board meeting held on Wednesday 17 June 2015 in Part I of the meeting the following items are referred to Council for information.

1. Advice on Matters of Academic Policy

The Board approved the Code of Responsible Research Conduct

Information to Council with Respect to Major Academic Directions

Implementing the Pasifika Strategy

Director Pasifika Dr Koloamatangi spoke to the draft implementation strategy outlining the five strategic goals and the areas of focus for Pasifika students at Massey

University.

Strategic Goal One is to support academic excellence by creating a learning environment that supports cultural values and practices, where Pasifika success is the norm. Recruitment, retention and completion rates have had a slight increase each year. Failure and non-completion rates have been identified as an area of concern. The development of Pasifika space is under consideration and it is hoped that the fale project will be able to begin in 2016. Increasing study space for Pasifika students was seen as a pressing issue to be addressed before the completion of the fale.

Strategic Goal Two is to develop Pasifika research capacity and provide research-led opportunities necessary to promote community development and achieve positive development outcomes for Pasifika. The Pacific Research and Policy Centre was launched in November 2014 and is being promoted throughout New Zealand and the

Pacific. Research guidelines for researchers working in Pasifika areas are being developed including advise on who to talk to and Pasifika methodologies. There are also scholarships available and the Directorate is working with community groups to add to this pool. There are a number of promotional events happening including postgraduate breakfast meetings and the Pasifika Excellence Awards to encourage

Pasifika postgraduate students.

Strategic Goal Three is to connect, facilitate and sustain engagement with all key internal and external stakeholders and champions who play a role in ensuring the

Page 1 of 3

C15/64 – August

Part I

success of the [email protected] 2020 Strategy. They are meeting with many organisations and community groups but build links with churches, public sector groups and businesses. Events are being hosted on Pacific themes including an annual lecture series and business breakfasts. Dr Koloamatangi acknowledged the Pacific advisory committee in the College of Creative Arts as an example of positive and proactive support. The University has had a presence at a number of cultural events including Polyfest and the North Shore Pasifika festival.

Strategic Goal Four is to grow and strengthen the capability within Massey University to respond to the learning and development needs of Pasifika students and communities by building a Pasifika staff network and expanding the annual student and staff network conference to anyone with a focus and interest in Pasifika matters, providing a platform for sharing research and expertise.

Strategic Goal Five is to develop Pasifika curriculum across all Colleges, to grow

Pasifika content in more papers and the Directorate will work with Colleges to identify good fit papers. There is a hope that a major and a minor in Pacific Studies could be offered in the BA. However this requires further work.

Discussion took place around the five goals.

Academic Design Authority

Dean Academic Professor Wright presented the report on the Academic Design

Authority. Success of the implementation of the new Student Management System heavily depends on the integration of the calendar of qualifications the University offers. The project’s intent was to ensure the portfolio was fit for purpose and attractive to students and staff while being presented in such a way that avoided the bespoke design of the new system and having old regulations driving design requirements whilst not forcing everything into a single direction. It was acknowledged that there would need to be changes to some regulations during this time and the project aim was to follow standard approval processes by enabling special meetings rather than bypassing the decision making process.

5.

4.

Discussion took place around the Academic Design Authority.

3. Report of Academic Approvals Taken Under Delegation

Academic Board approved the College of Business Board Terms of Reference.

Sub-Committee Matters

Academic Board received Annual Reports from the Teaching and Learning

Committee, the Human Ethics Chairs Committee and the College of Health Board.

Items of Early Notice

There are no matters for early notice to report in Part I of the meeting.

Page 2 of 3

C15/64 – August

Part I

6. For Information

There were no matters for information in Part I of the meeting.

Conferring of Degrees and awarding of Diplomas and Certificates

Degrees were conferred and diplomas and certificates awarded under the delegated authority of Council.

Professor Geoff Jameson

Acting Chair, Academic Board

Page 3 of 3

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement

Table of contents