1 CURRENT FACULTY HANDBOOK e

1  CURRENT FACULTY HANDBOOK e
Adopted July 1, 2014
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1
CURRENT FACULTY HANDBOOK
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8-12
FACULTY HANDBOOK ………………………………………………………………………………………............... 13-93
H1. DEFINITIONS………………………………………………………………………………………………….…………. 13-43
1.1.
Colleges, Schools, Divisions, and Academic Offices ……………………….……… 13-18
1.1.1. Colleges and Schools
1.1.1.1.
The Saint Martin’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
1.1.1.2.
The School of Business
1.1.1.3.
The College of Education and Counseling Psychology
1.1.1.4.
The Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering
1.1.2. Divisions
1.1.2.1.
The Extended Learning Division
1.1.2.2.
The Spiritual Life Institute
1.1.3. Academic and Academic Support Offices
1.1.3.1.
The Faculty Center for Excellence in Teaching and Scholarship
1.1.3.2.
The Center for Student Learning, Writing, and Advising
1.1.3.2.1. The Office of Disability Support Services
1.1.3.3.
O’Grady Library
1.1.3.4.
The Office of Graduate Studies
1.1.3.5.
The Office of the Registrar
1.2.
University Offices which work closely with Academic Affairs…….……….… 18-20
1.2.1. The Benedictine Institute
1.2.2. Office of Admissions
1.2.3. Office of Finance
1.2.4. Office of International Programs and Development
1.2.7. Office of Marketing and Communications
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1.2.6. Office of Integrated Technology Services
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1.2.5. Office of Institutional Research, Effectiveness, and Assessment
1.2.5.1.
Office of Institutional Research
1.2.8. Office of Student Affairs
1.3.
Academic Leadership/Leaders…………………………………………………………………..20-25
1.3.1. The Provost
1.3.1.1.
The Provost’s Council of Advisors
1.3.1.2.
University Council of Chairs
1.3.2. Deans
1.3.2.1.
1.4.
The Dean’s Council of Chairs
The Faculty………………………………………………………………………………………………….25-37
1.4.1. Regular Faculty
1.4.1.1.
Assistant Professor
1.4.1.2.
Associate Professor
1.4.1.3.
Professor
1.4.2. Contingent Faculty
1.4.2.1.
Instructors – Full or Part-time
1.4.2.1.1. ESL Instructors
1.4.2.1.2. Laboratory Instructors
1.4.2.2.
Visiting Faculty – Full or Part-time
1.4.2.3.
Lecturers – Part-time
1.4.3. Professors Emeriti
1.4.4. University Administrators and Academic Leaders with Faculty Rank
1.4.4.1.
The University President
1.4.4.2.
The University Provost
1.4.4.3.
College/School Deans
1.4.4.4.
Faculty Seconded to Administration
1.4.5. Librarians ……………………………………………………………………………………………..33-37
1.5.
Academic Principles………………………….…………………………………………………..37-42
1.5.1. Academic Freedom
1.5.4. Conflict of Interest Conflict of Commitments
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1.5.3. Non-discrimination and Inclusive Diversity
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1.5.2. Academic Integrity
1.6.
Learning and Teaching Formats/Instructional Delivery Modes………………….42-43
1.6.1. Traditional Face-to-face Teaching and Learning
1.6.2. Distance/Online Education, Teaching, and Learning
1.6.3. Hybrid Instruction, Teaching, and Learning
1.6.4. Technology-enhanced/Technology-infused Courses
H.2. GOVERNANCE…………………………………..…………………………………………………………………………43-66
2.1.
Faculty (Self) Governance: University Level ………………………………………………….. 43-54
2.1.1. University Assembly of the Full Faculty
2.1.2. The Faculty Senate
2.1.3. The Faculty President
2.1.4. The Faculty Affairs Committee
2.1.5. Faculty Committees
2.1.5.1. Academic Computer Advisory Council
2.1.5.2. The University Core Curriculum Committee
2.1.5.2.1. Committee on the First (and Second) Year Experience
2.1.5.3. Educational Policies and Curriculum Committee – University
level
2.1.5.4. Faculty Advancement Committee
2.1.5.5. Faculty Committee on Academic Assessment
2.1.5.6. Faculty Development Committee
2.1.5.7. Faculty Library Committee
2.1.5.8. Faculty Welfare Committee
2.1.5.9. Institutional Review Board
2.1.5.10. Ad hoc Committees of the Faculty
2.1.5.11. Faculty Athletics Representative
Faculty (Self) Governance: College/School Level……………………………………………54-59
2.2.2. College/School Committees
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2.2.1. College/School Assembly
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2.2.
2.2.3. College/School Ad Hoc Committees and Task forces
2.2.4. Cross-departmental Programs
2.2.5. Academic Departments
2.2.5.1. Department Chairs
2.2.6. Departments/Programs in Receivership
2.2.7. University Lectures
2.3.
Shared Governance…………………………………………………………………………………….……59-66
2.3.1. University Committees with Faculty Representatives
2.3.1.1. Academic Standards
2.3.1.2. Athletics Advisory Board
2.3.1.3. Behavior Intervention Team
2.3.1.4. Financial Aid Committee
2.3.1.5. Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment Advisory Council
2.3.1.6. Strategic Enrollment Team
2.3.1.7. Study Abroad and other Travel Advisory Council
2.3.1.8. University Budget Committee
2.3.1.9. University Council
2.3.1.10. University Retention Committee
2.3.1.11. Veterans Support Committee
2.3.1.12. Ad hoc University Committees and Task Forces
2.3.2. Board of Trustees Committees with Faculty Members/Attendees
H.3. FACULTY ADVANCEMENT……………………………………………………………………………………………66-69
3.1.
Tenure
3.2.
Promotion
3.3.
Salaries and Rank
Conferences and Research / Development Support
Mentoring Program
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4.1.
4.2.
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H.4. FACULTY DEVELOPMENT………………………………….…………………………………………………………69-72
4.3.
Fourth-year Teaching Reduction for Tenure-Track Faculty
4.4.
Sabbatical Leave
4.5.
Post-tenure Development and Review
4.6.
Unpaid Leaves of Absence
H.5. FACULTY DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES…………………………………………….………………….....72-77
5.1.
General Expectations: Teaching, Scholarship, and Service
5.2.
Advising
5.3.
Course Syllabi and Teaching Responsibilities
5.4.
Evaluating and Grading Students
5.5.
Maintaining Office Hours
5.6.
Attending to Academic Integrity in the Classroom
5.7.
Serving on Faculty and University Committees
5.8.
Mentoring Junior Colleagues
5.9.
Annual Reports
5.10. Participating in University Activities and Initiatives (E.g. Spirit Days; Advising Day)
H.6. FACULTY CONTRACTS/LETTERS OF APPOINTMENT…………………………………………..……….77-78
6.1.
Outside Employment
6.2.
Consulting
7.2.
Teaching Load
7.1.1. Directed and Independent Studies
Teaching Load Reduction
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7.1.
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H.7. FACULTY WORKLOAD…………………………………………………………………………….…………………..78-83
7.2.1. Approved Reductions
7.2.2. Unplanned Reductions
7.2.3. Grant-funded Reductions
7.3.
Teaching Overloads
7.4.
Summer Teaching and/or Other Assignments
H.8. BENEFITS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..……….......83-87
8.1.
Benefits Specific to Regular Faculty
8.1.1.
Paid Leave for Expectant Mothers
8.1.2.
Parental Leave
8.1.3.
Parental Support through Reduction in Teaching Load
8.1.4.
Externally-funded Research Leaves with Supplemental Support from the
University
8.1.5.
Phased Retirement
H.9. FACULTY NON-RENEWAL, DISMISSAL, AND TERMINATION……………………………..………..87-91
9.1.
Non-renewal of Tenure-track Faculty
9.2.
Termination Without Prejudice of Tenured Faculty
9.3.
Dismissal for Cause
9.3.1. Dismissal for Cause of Tenure Track or Tenured Faculty
9.3.2. Dismissal of Tenured Faculty for (involuntary) Ineffectiveness
H.10. FACULTY APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES………………………………………….…………………..……….91-93
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10.2. Grievances
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10.1. Appeals
10.1.1. Appeals by Tenure Track Faculty
10.1.2. Appeals by Tenured Faculty
INTRODUCTION
Founding Principles and Enduring Values
The Saint Martin’s University Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws are founded on the
paradigm articulated by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and the
Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges (AGB), which states that the Board
of Trustees, the Administration, and the Faculty have distinct areas of responsibility, but also
have intersecting, imbricated, and interdependent roles in the governance of the University.
The Faculty, for example,
has primary responsibility for such fundamental areas as curriculum, subject matter, and
methods of instruction, research, faculty status, and those aspects of student life which
relate to the educational process.
American Association of University Professors, “Statement on
Governance of Colleges and Universities”
These distinct but intersecting, imbricated, and interdependent responsibilities exist in part to
sustain the academic integrity of the University as an institution of higher learning. The Faculty
has primary responsibility for generating and revising policies related to Faculty self-governance
and the University’s academic curriculum: areas of primary responsibility include defining
faculty status and ranks, selecting qualified faculty and recommending their appointment to the
Provost through the College/School Dean, defining procedures and criteria for faculty
advancement, determining if conditions warrant dismissal of faculty and thereafter
recommending action to the University President, and evolving a grievance/appeals processes.
Policies are subject to approval by the University’s academic leaders (Chairs, Deans, Provost,
and University President, where appropriate, as outlined in the Faculty Bylaws) and final
approval by the Board of Trustees.
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These enduring values and their activation through policies, processes, and procedures are vital
to participation by Faculty in the University’s governance and to the Faculty’s collective
responsibility, along with other members of the community, to realize the University’s mission.
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In evolving, activating, and adhering to these processes and policies, the Faculty is guided by
generally-accepted and enduring values such as the principle of academic freedom,
collaboration and consultation among constituents within the University, and fundamental
fairness in decision making as it relates to the various aspects and procedures involving faculty
work life. Fundamental fairness also refers to the balance or impartiality of proceedings that is
essential to due process.i
Revisions to the Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws
A. The Faculty, in coordination with its academic leaders and through its representative
committee(s), has primary responsibility for revising and updating the Faculty Handbook
and Faculty Bylaws and for submitting these documents for approval and inclusion
within the University’s governance documents to the University President for final
approval by the Board of Trustees.
B. The University President has the right to propose changes to the Faculty Handbook and
Faculty Bylaws directly to the Board of Trustees after informing Faculty in Faculty
Assembly about the proposed change and its rationale. This right notwithstanding, the
President may elect to present proposals to the Faculty through the process regarding
proposed changes to be followed by all other constituents as outlined below, if he/she
chooses.
C. In exceptional circumstances, when a non-academic administrator (university leaders
who do not hold faculty status or rank) wishes to recommend a change to the Faculty
Handbook and Faculty Bylaws, he/she must do so through the Office of the Provost,
who will forward the proposed change to the Faculty Affairs Committee for further
consideration along with his/her recommendation. Decisions made by the Faculty
Affairs Committee, whether to reject or accept and forward such recommendations to
the Senate, are not subject to appeal. If the recommended change is accepted and
forwarded by the Faculty Affairs Committee, the Senate follows approval procedures as
outlined below in A.
Revision Process
A. Revisions to the Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws may be proposed to the Chair of
the Faculty Affairs Committee (Handbook, 2.1.4.). Changes may be proposed by
members of the Faculty, by Faculty Committees, or by academic leaders such as Deans
and the Provost. All proposed revisions must be submitted in writing and include a
rationale.
When a proposed change (or changes) is (are) initiated by a Faculty member, a Faculty
Committee, or academic leaders, the Chair of the Faculty Affairs Committee will convene a
meeting of the Committee within ten working days to discuss the proposed change(s), and may
(c) Recommend a modified version of the proposed change, inform the petitioner or
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(b) Request the petitioner or Committee Chair, as appropriate, to appear before the Faculty
Affairs Committee to discuss and justify the proposed change;
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(a) Accept the proposed change, inform the petitioner or committee, as appropriate, in
writing, and submit the Committee’s recommendation to Faculty Senate;
Committee, as appropriate, in writing, and recommend a modified version to Faculty
Senate;
(d) Reject the proposed change and inform the petitioner or Committee, as appropriate.
Consideration by the Faculty Affairs Committee should normally take place within 14 days of
receiving the proposal unless extenuating circumstances require additional time.
If the Faculty Affairs Committee acts in accordance with (c) or (d), the petitioner or Committee
requesting the change may request a meeting with the Faculty Affairs Committee to discuss the
proposal in its original or modified form, and/or to explore whether there may be a mutually
acceptable alternative. If the Faculty Affairs Committee and the petitioner cannot reach
agreement, that is, after the petitioner exhausts the possibility of mutually acceptable
alternatives, he/she may appeal to Faculty Senate.
If the Faculty Affairs Committee rejects the proposed change, it will inform the Senate about
the Committee’s decision, but the Senate is not normally obliged to consider the proposal
unless an appeal to do so is made by the petitioner despite rejection by the Faculty Affairs
Committee.
The Faculty Senate, upon receiving a recommendation for a revision to the Handbook and/or
Bylaws from the Faculty Affairs Committee, may
(a) Accept the proposed change either in its original or modified form and take the same to
the full Faculty for a majority vote before forwarding the Faculty-ratified revision to the
Provost;
(b) Request the petitioner and/or the Chair of the Faculty Affairs Committee to appear
before Senate to discuss the proposed change and elaborate on the Faculty Affairs
Committee’s recommendation;
(c) Recommend a further modification to the proposed change to the full Faculty for a vote
before forwarding the Faculty-ratified revision to the Provost;
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The Senate must act on proposals submitted to it within 21 days, though this timeline may be
extended for extenuating circumstances. If the Senate endorses the proposed change, it will
share the proposal and its recommendation with the Faculty either electronically or in Faculty
Assembly and seek an endorsement of the same by the full Faculty by means of a vote. A
quorum is required and a majority vote serves as the Faculty’s endorsement of the proposed
change.
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(d) Reject the recommended change(s) altogether
The Faculty Senate must convey the Faculty’s decision regarding the proposed change, whether
yay or nay, to the Provost in writing within ten working days after a decision by the full Faculty.
If the Faculty approves the proposed change or a modified version, upon receiving this
recommendation for a change to the Faculty Handbook and/or Faculty Bylaws, the Provost
must submit the same to the University President with his/her recommendation and, with the
President’s recommendation, to the Chair of the Academic Affairs Committee of the Board for
consideration at their next scheduled meeting.
B. The University President may propose changes directly to the Board of Trustees for
consideration after convening a meeting of the full Faculty to discuss the proposed
change as vital to the University by providing a rationale for the same. The President is
normally expected to give the Faculty a minimum notice of 14 days to convene a
meeting to discuss the proposed change.
At the conclusion of this discussion, Faculty may elect, either in open Assembly or in an
Executive session of the full Faculty, to seek input from members and accept recommendations
from the floor regarding next steps, including the possibility of a vote on the proposed
change(s) recommended by the University President. The Senate typically acts within twenty
one (21) days of receiving a proposed change, though this time frame may be extended for
extenuating circumstances.
The Faculty President must share the Faculty’s decision, if one is taken in Faculty Assembly,
with the Provost, the University President, and the Chairperson of the Academic Affairs
Committee of the Board.
Board Approval
A. The Academic Affairs Committee of the Board, in considering any faculty-endorsed change
under revision process A described above, along with recommendations regarding the same by
the Provost and the President, may
(a) Accept the proposed change and recommend its acceptance by the Board of Trustees;
(b) Request the petitioner, the President of the Faculty, the Provost, and/or the President
of the University, to join its deliberations in considering the proposed change;
(c) Recommend a modified version of the proposed change to the Faculty President for
further consideration by the full Faculty;
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B. The Academic Affairs Committee or the full Board may consider proposed changes brought
to it directly by the University President (under revision process B above).
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(d) Reject the proposed change
Final decision on accepting or rejecting proposed changes to the Faculty Handbook and Faculty
Bylaws by any constituent rests with the Board of Trustees.
Implementation
Changes to the Faculty Handbook and/or Faculty Bylaws, once approved by the Board of
Trustees, will take effect from the following July 1, unless an earlier effective date is deemed
necessary by the Board.
Addendum
Revisions may be made in accordance with the above processes at any time. However, the
Faculty Affairs Committee and Provost will monitor the application of the Faculty Bylaws
through the course of its first year of implementation, record all modifications that are needed,
and present these to the Faculty, Deans, and academic staff for their input by April 10, and then
to the University President for consideration by April 20 of the following year, and for final
approval to the Board of Trustees at their next convened meeting.
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The entire Handbook and Bylaws, once approved, will be assessed for their effectiveness by the
Faculty Affairs Committee and Provost on behalf of the Faculty, Deans, and academic staff after
three full years of first implementation, revised in the fourth year in accordance with
identifiable and necessary directions, and reaffirmed by the Faculty prior to approval by
University leaders and the Board. Subsequent assessments will typically be undertaken in
decennial cycles.
Saint Martin’s University offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in liberal arts disciplines
and professional fields through four Colleges/Schools on its main campus in Lacey, Washington,
and a variety of undergraduate and graduate degrees and professional certificates through
traditional classroom as well as online and hybrid formats, in its Extension Campuses and
through partnerships with high schools and colleges.
The University is accredited by the Northwest Commission of Colleges and Universities;
individual Colleges/Schools and programs are also accredited by specialist accrediting bodies, as
appropriate.
DEFINITIONS
1.1.
COLLEGES, SCHOOLS, DIVISIONS, AND ACADEMIC OFFICES
1.1.1. Colleges and Schools
The Colleges and Schools of Saint Martin’s University are:
Saint Martin’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
School of Business
College of Education and Counseling Psychology
Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering
The voting membership of each College/School Faculty consists of all faculty holding Regular
Faculty appointments within the College/School. For a definition of Regular Faculty, see
Handbook 1.4.1.
Colleges and Schools are encouraged to work closely with their Deans to develop Bylaws to
determine procedures that are specific to their College/School (E.g. the conduct of
College/School Assembly, if applicable, or Chairs Council; creation of College/School
committees such as a College EPCC). College/School Bylaws have to be recommended for
approval to the Faculty Affairs Committee and the Provost who must together ensure that
procedures are consistent with policies and principles outlined in the Faculty Handbook and
Faculty Bylaws of the University.
The criteria and procedures by which additional Schools or Colleges may be formed, through
collaboration and consultation between the Faculty and its academic leaders before approval
by the President and Board of Trustees, is outlined in the Faculty Bylaws, 1.1.1.
Spanning the arts, humanities, natural sciences, and social sciences, the Saint Martin’s College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers majors and minors in these disciplines as well as the Core
curriculum for undergraduates at Saint Martin’s University. Individual programs such as
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The Saint Martin’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS)
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1.1.1.1.
Nursing and Social Work are accredited by their oversight commissions. The College also
provides preparation for careers in various professions.
1.1.1.2.
The School of Business (SoB)
The School of Business prepares students at the undergraduate and graduate levels for
professional success by building on the University’s broad liberal arts curriculum and delivering
a rigorous and diverse business and accounting curriculum. In 2014, SOB will present itself for
candidacy to the Accreditation Council for Business School Programs (ACBSP) and seek
accreditation for its undergraduate programs.
1.1.1.3.
The College of Education and Counseling Psychology (CECP)
The College of Education prepares graduates, through programs at the undergraduate and
graduate levels, for careers in elementary and secondary education and counseling psychology.
Education programs are accredited by the Professional Education Standards Board and the
Teacher Education program is accredited by the Teacher Education Accreditation Council
(TEAC).
1.1.1.4.
The Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering (SoE)
The Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering prepares undergraduate and graduate students
with the education and training necessary for further studies and professional engineering
licensure. Particular engineering programs are accredited by ABET and the School is housed in
Cebula Hall, which in 2013 was the highest LEED-certified building in the whole of the western
hemisphere, constructed to serve as a living laboratory for students and faculty.
1.1.2. Divisions and Institutes
1.1.2.1.
The Extended Learning Division
Divisions are, by definition, not self-standing units, though they may be led by a Dean or
Director. Regular Faculty members who teach in Divisions are typically housed in one of the
four Colleges/Schools of the University.
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The Dean of the Division works with the appropriate College/School Deans and Department
Chairs in identifying Contingent Faculty appointments. Contingent Faculty appointments in the
Division are endorsed by Department Chairs and Deans and approved by the Office of the
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The Extended Learning Division provides life-long learning opportunities through Certificates
and Degree programs for adults and non-traditional learners at military bases and other
extension campuses. The Division is authorized on its extension campuses to offer courses,
programs, and degrees that have been approved by faculty to be offered in its four Colleges
and Schools on the Lacey campus.
Provost. Regular Faculty in any of the four Colleges/Schools may teach courses in ELD (in load),
and Regular Faculty appointments at point of hire may include teaching commitments at ELD or
on extension campuses.
Any new credit-bearing courses, degrees, and programs of study, including ongoing initiatives,
which are expected to transition into regular programs in ELD, have to be approved by the
Regular Faculty through standard program approval procedures outlined in the Faculty Bylaws,
1.1.2.2.
The Spiritual Life Institute
The Spiritual Life Institute, an intensive five-day learning program hosted annually in the
summer by Saint Martin’s Religious Studies Department, offers students an opportunity to
dialogue on the history, ethics and beliefs of the world's religious traditions. The Institute draws
theologians, scholars, and social justice advocates, who share their insights with participants in
order to inspire awareness, challenge preconceived notions and shed light upon the spiritual
journey in an increasingly globalized world.
The Institute is open to the public. Participants may register for Continuing Education Credit or
attend without receiving credit. The Institute reports to the Provost who approves its budget
and expenditures. The Director of the Institute is typically drawn from faculty in the Religious
Studies Department. The Director submits an Annual Report of the Institute’s activities to the
Provost by September 1st each year.
1.1.3. Academic and Academic Support Offices
Academic and Academic Support Offices are typically overseen by a Director or Dean who
works closely with faculty and academic leaders to support faculty work life and to ensure the
development of students beyond the classroom. The University may re-organize Academic
Support Offices as needed to maximize student success and to support faculty in their roles as
teacher-scholars and scholar-teachers. Directors of Academic Support Offices may be drawn
from the Regular Faculty and typically serve three-year renewable terms, or they may hold staff
status, in which case, they are evaluated every five years.
Directors of University-wide academic support offices which serve the University community
across Colleges/Schools report to the Provost. Academic support functions within individual
Colleges/Schools report to the Dean of the College/School.
The following Academic Offices report to the Office of the Provost.
The Faculty Center for Excellence in Teaching and Scholarship supports the educational mission
of the University by providing opportunities for growth and renewal for faculty in all realms of
their professional lives and through all the stages of their careers.
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Faculty Center for Excellence in Teaching and Scholarship
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1.1.3.1.
The Center offers workshops and programs focused on Teaching and Learning, supports faculty
as they develop their scholarship and creative activity, advances innovation and collaboration
among faculty in teaching and learning, assists faculty with grant writing, promotes
opportunities for intellectual engagement and conversations about faculty work life in all its
dimensions, and enables faculty to acquire skills in new and developing areas such as
Communication Technology. The Center hosts workshops for faculty, disseminates materials
about advancements in pedagogy, and works with individual faculty members and departments
to advance teaching and learning by attending to evidence-based research on these
subjects. The Center also serves as a hub for those who want to discuss new trends, models,
projects, and resources that support the teaching and learning experience.
The Center is led by a Faculty Director (or two Faculty Co-Directors with distinct areas of
responsibility) who is (are) appointed for three-year renewable terms.
1.1.3.2.
The Center for Student Learning, Writing, and Advising
The Center for Student Learning, Writing, and Advising provides advising as well as academic
learning resources to help students strengthen study skills and to encourage the use of new
learning strategies. Services are available free of charge to all Saint Martin's University
students. The Center for Student Learning, Writing, and Advising is led by a staff Director who
reports to the Provost and serves in five-year renewable terms which are subject to review
prior to subsequent renewals.
The Writing Center is directed by a faculty Director who leads Writing Center functions and
daily operations, including overseeing peer readers; he/she serves three-year renewable terms
and reports to the Provost.
Learning Support
Peer tutoring services are available in specific subject areas, such a math, science, engineering,
accounting, and world languages. Students may be referred by faculty to receive supplemental
help with difficult course content, to develop more effective approaches to studying, and to
strengthen self-directed learning behaviors. Students may also be referred to work directly
with LC staff to create individualized academic improvement plans. A two-credit UNI 195
course is offered each semester for students who want to build more effective learning and
study strategies to support their academic success.
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The academic early alert program works closely with faculty and students to provide ongoing
outreach services to support student success.
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Academic Early Alert
Tutoring in Academic Disciplines
Students may use tutoring services in specific subjects, such as Mathematics and Engineering,
to supplement their classroom work and to maintain or improve their academic standing in
classes. Students may be referred by faculty, or elect to use the Center’s assistance provided
through peers or faculty in order to practice or review course materials.
Writing Support
Writing support is provided by trained peer readers who discuss with students their academic
and professional writing. In an atmosphere removed from the classroom, student readers ask
questions and make suggestions that help writers generate topics, develop a thesis, organize
material and clarify ideas. Services during the semester are offered weekdays and are free of
charge, mostly in one-hour sessions. Students are welcomed through appointments as well as
through a drop-in format. Faculty may also recommend that individual students consult the
Center in completing writing assignments.
Advising
The Center provides academic advising to students through an Academic Advisor who reports
to the Provost. Faculty members may be appointed to the Center to serve as Advisors to
students prior to their entry into the University and as they undertake their Core courses.
1.1.3.2.1. Office of Disability Support Services
The Office of Disability Support Services is dedicated to providing a variety of services for
students with disabilities at Saint Martin's University. Qualified students are encouraged to
schedule a personal interview with the Disability Support Services coordinator to determine the
level of accommodations needed. Students are encouraged to work closely with university
faculty, staff, and the DSS Office in ensuring appropriate accommodation and their ongoing
success.
The Center is led by the Director of the Center for Student Learning, Writing, and Advising.
The O’Grady Library provides vital instructional support and acts as an essential element in the
University's curricular, teaching, and research functions. As the University's major information
resource, the Library enhances and extends students' classroom and laboratory experience, and
facilitates the research conducted by faculty and students. The University Library is an integral
part of Saint Martin’s mission to sustain an atmosphere in which information and ideas are
readily accessible and freely exchanged.
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O’Grady Library
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1.1.3.3.
The O’Grady Library also supports the educational goals of Saint Martin’s University by
providing non-credit bearing instruction, services, resources, facilities, and technologies that
facilitate access to information in order to foster inquiry, creativity, discovery, and the
acquisition of knowledge. The Library is led by a Library Dean or Library Director.
1.1.3.4.
The Office of Graduate Studies
The Office of Graduate Studies coordinates the recruitment and admission of students into the
University’s graduate programs by working closely with Deans and Directors in the Colleges and
Schools. The Office also works closely with faculty and Deans in the Colleges/Schools to
organize and coordinate events such as Graduate Student and Graduate GA orientations,
Hooding ceremonies, and other graduate-program related events.
A Graduate Council of Advisors works closely with the Office of Graduate Studies on policies
and procedures relating to graduate programs. The Graduate Council includes all the Directors
of the University’s graduate programs. The Office of Graduate Studies works with graduate
program personnel to ensure the implementation of those policies and procedures.
The Provost appoints its faculty leadership, to three-year renewable terms which are subject to
review prior to reappointments.
1.1.3.5.
The Office of the Registrar
The Office of the Registrar supports faculty and students by ensuring adherence to academic
policies and procedures and by assisting students in their progress from admission into the
University to graduation. The Registrar oversees a range of activities which include registering
for courses, maintaining academic records and responding to requests for transcripts, certifying
degrees and attendance, certifying Veterans' benefits, and collaborating with faculty and staff
on Faculty, College, and University committees.
1.2.
UNIVERSITY OFFICES WHICH WORK CLOSELY WITH ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
Faculty, Deans, the Provost, and Academic Support Offices work closely with all offices within
the University, but have especially deep collaborative relationships with the following offices:
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Working in collaboration with University departments and programs, the Saint Martin’s
Benedictine Institute leads the University in upholding and promoting its Benedictine heritage.
Both on campus and off, it builds and enhances awareness of the values that, for so long, have
guided the Saint Martin’s community. As an integral part of University life, the Institute
contributes to the intellectual and spiritual development of Saint Martin’s and many faculty and
academic staff are involved in and contribute to the Institute’s programs and initiatives.
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1.2.1. The Benedictine Institute
1.2.2. Office of Admissions
The Office of Admissions works closely with faculty and academic offices to recruit students
into the University’s undergraduate academic programs. Faculty members and academic
leaders support the recruitment efforts of the Admissions Office by participating in events such
as Spirit Day and by visiting high schools to present information about the University’s
programs and commitment to the holistic development of students in and outside the
classroom. The Chief Enrollment Officer regularly updates Deans, the Provost, other University
Officers, and the Faculty President on recruitment efforts and results during the course of the
academic year and into the summer.
1.2.3. Office of Finance
The Office of Finance supports the overall academic and learning mission of Saint Martin's
University by stewarding and supporting programs and initiatives through the strategic
allocation of budgetary resources and through responsible stewardship of the University’s
overall resources. The VP for Finance works closely with the Provost on academic budgets and
on chairing the University’s Advisory Budget Committee.
1.2.4. Office of International Programs and Development
The Office of International Programs and Development (OIPD) serves the Saint Martin’s
University community by offering a variety of international programs which foster an
appreciation for cultural diversity. The Office provides services related to language, culture,
and academic exchange by recruiting and mentoring international students and by organizing
the University’s Study Abroad and international initiatives.
1.2.5. Office of Institutional Research, Effectiveness, and Assessment
The Office of Institutional Research, Effectiveness, and Assessment provides decision and
planning support services to enhance effectiveness, and provides University leaders, faculty,
and staff with timely, objective, and accurate information to help create a learning environment
in which students can succeed academically, creatively, culturally, socially and spiritually. The
office supports regional and program specific accreditation efforts, facilitates administration
and analyses of national and local surveys, promotes institutional assessment activities,
coordinates and conducts macro-analyses of those assessment activities, and provides
institutional research for official data reporting and analyses for Saint Martin’s University.
The Office of Institutional Research (IR) is the designated office of official data reporting and
analysis for Saint Martin's University. The Office reports to the Office of Institutional
Effectiveness.
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The Office of Institutional Research
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1.2.5.1.
1.2.6. Office of Integrated Technology Services
The Office of Integrated Technology Services (ITS) actively supports the educational goals of the
University by providing services, resources, facilities, and technology in order to provide access
to information and knowledge. By working closely with faculty, academic offices, Deans, and
the Provost, the department supports faculty and students through state-of-the-art
administrative systems which facilitate teaching and learning and services that encourage
intellectual inquiry.
1.2.7. The Office of Marketing and Communication
The Office of Marketing and Communications supports the academic life of the University
through publications and public relations endeavors and by working closely with faculty,
Department Chairs, Deans, and the Provost. The Office supports departments and programs in
communicating with the University's internal and external audiences, and ensures that the
University continues to expand its reach and reputation.
1.2.8. The Office of Student Affairs
The Office of Student Affairs supports the development of students through experiential cocurricular programming and prepares them for personal and professional success through
activities outside the academic classroom. Programs sponsored and organized by the Office
foster an awareness of difference that encourages students to work towards a just society;
students are encouraged to understand their moral obligation to a multicultural world and to
become faithful, compassionate, and conscientious stewards of their communities.
1.3.
ACADEMIC LEADERSHIP/LEADERS
1.3.1. The Provost
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College/School Deans report to the Provost as do the heads of various academic support
functions, such as the Library and the Registrar. The Provost is responsible for maintaining
records of academic policies and procedures and the official personnel files of faculty, for
notifying individual faculty about their eligibility for tenure, promotion, and sabbaticals, and the
Faculty as a whole about important impending deadlines.
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The Office of Academic Affairs is led by the Provost who oversees all academic programs and
academic co-curricular activities, coordinates academic projects and events, recommends
faculty sabbaticals, leaves, and advancement, supports faculty development, plans the
academic budget, and works with Deans, Directors, and other University offices to ensure that
academic excellence defines the teaching experience of faculty and the learning experience of
students at Saint Martin’s University. The Provost thus oversees the curricular, instructional,
academic co-curricular, faculty, and research functions of the University. The Provost serves as
an Officer of the University and at the discretion of the University President.
The Provost normally holds an earned terminal academic degree in one of the academic
disciplines within the University from a regionally accredited university and must carry
significant experience in prior academic leadership. Because the Provost has faculty status,
he/she is encouraged to teach a course every four years, if time permits, and if his/her home
Department has teaching needs in his/her area of expertise.
1.3.1.1.
The Provost’s Council of Advisors
The Provost’s Council of Advisors typically includes the following members:
College /School Deans
Directors of University-wide Programs
Director of the Saint Martin’s Core
The Registrar
The Chief Institutional Effectiveness Officer
The Dean of the Library
The Dean of the Extended Learning Division
The Associate Dean for Graduate Studies
Others who may be invited to attend Provost’s Council meetings include Associate Deans of the
Colleges/Schools, the Chief Information Officer, the Chief International Programs Officer, the
President of the Faculty, the Director of Assessment, and the Director of Institutional Research.
The Provost may appoint Assistant or Associate Provosts to support the work of the Provost’s
Office.
1.3.1.2.
University Council of Chairs
Chairs in all the Colleges/Schools may be called upon to meet in a University Council of Chairs
by the Provost. The UCC is an ad hoc Advisory body whose composition changes as
departmental leadership changes and whose purpose is to share information across
Colleges/Schools. The UCC also typically includes the Dean of the Extended Learning Division
and College/School Deans.
The University Council of Chairs, when convened, is chaired by the Provost, and may include
Program Directors.
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Colleges and Schools are led by academic Deans who serve as academic leaders of a College or
School and report to the Provost. The Dean structure, as it pertains to Saint Martin’s
University’s Colleges and Schools, derives from a long tradition in higher education and the
University’s particular identity as a Benedictine University founded by Saint Martin’s Order of
Monks and the Benedictine Abbey.ii
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1.3.2. Deans
Deans serve on the Provost’s Council of Advisors and as first among the Faculty in their
respective College or School. Deans normally hold an earned terminal academic degree from a
regionally-accredited university in one of the academic disciplines within the College/School to
which they are appointed, and must carry significant experience in prior academic leadership at
the level of Chair or above. Because Deans have faculty status, they are encouraged to teach a
course every two years, if time permits, and if their home Department has teaching needs in
their area of expertise.
The Dean supports the Faculty in promoting excellence through teaching, learning, and
scholarship, represents the interests of the College/School to University leaders, and
communicates directions and priorities set by University leaders to the Faculty. Deans support
faculty members in the latter’s attention to pedagogical excellence, advocate for faculty
development and a healthy faculty work life, encourage faculty as they explore curricular
developments and the creation of new programs, and support Chairs in their oversight of
academic programs. Deans are responsible for working with the Faculty to ensure academic
excellence. Deans also ensure appropriate standards for the periodic evaluation of faculty in
the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service, and make recommendations on faculty
advancement through rank and tenure. Deans also conduct workshops to train Chairs in
managing Departmental budgets; Deans prepare and administer the annual budgets of their
College/School.
Deans are selected by the Provost, typically through a national search, and are recommended
to the President for appointment; Deans report to the Provost.
Appointments to the position of College/School Dean are typically made for five-year
renewable terms, renewed by the Provost after successful reviews conducted during the fifth
year of each appointment cycle. The review process is led by the Provost and outlined in the
Bylaws.
The Responsibilities and Duties of Deans
The duties of Deans may vary slightly, depending on the College or School, but in general,
Deans share several responsibilities, which are described below.
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Internally in their Colleges and Schools, Deans support and promote educational programs,
research, and service by faculty. Deans must be effective advocates for their College/School
and faculty, both within the University and externally. Deans should manage and steward the
22
At the University level, through their service on the Provost’s Council, they may be asked to
engage in strategic planning, budget discussions, and hiring decisions. They may be invited to
join Cabinet meetings and to report on developments in their College/School. They are also
required to play a role in external relations, including fund raising, student recruitment, alumni
relations, economic development, marketing, and public relations.
resources of their College/School: fiscal, facilities, and human. They are also responsible for
working with their faculty on planning.
Engaging faculty, staff, and students in discussions of College/School issues and assuring
a positive, high-quality, and equitable work environment; joining and supporting faculty
in strategic intellectual discussions about future academic directions within the
College/School;

Reporting regularly to faculty about developments in the College/School, including fund
raising and other efforts, typically during College/School Assembly;

Advocating for the College/School and positioning it for success within the University’s
broader long-term planning;

Raising private funds for scholarships, grants, professorships, programs, facilities, and
other College/School needs, normally spending 25-30 percent of their time on such
activities;

Playing an oversight and leadership role in accreditation, assessment reports, and other
processes that are central activities in the College/School; Deans who oversee
professional programs and Colleges/Schools are responsible for leading these through
successful accreditation or reaccreditation, as appropriate;

Participating in Provost’s Council in discussions of institutional planning and policy, and
in so doing representing the College’s/School’s interests effectively;

Supporting Departments and Programs in their hiring needs and representing these to
the Provost;

Conducting annual orientation sessions for Department Chairs and Program Directors;

Communicating regularly with Departments and their Chairs regarding decisions and
directions;

Communicating regularly with the Provost regarding developments and needs in the
College/School;

Conducting annual performance evaluations of their staff direct reports;

Managing all relevant paperwork in a timely manner and responding to requests from
the Provost and other University offices;
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
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The Deans have direct responsibility for:

Serving on University Committees as requested by the Provost and University President;

Promoting interdisciplinary and inter-college collaboration and cooperation in teaching
as well as scholarly activity;

Developing external relationships for the purposes of (1) enhancing student placement
and internship opportunities; (2) providing meaningful community outreach
opportunities for students and faculty;

Assisting the Office of Admissions and Graduate Program Directors with recruitment
activities of the College/School;

Promoting the visibility of the College in the region, state and nation;

Providing oversight and coordination of the College/School website;

Undertaking other duties described elsewhere in this Handbook and in the Bylaws,
including contributing to hiring, tenuring, and promoting faculty;

Preparing and submitting an Annual Report for the College/School to the Provost by
June 1 of each academic year.
With the approval of the Provost, Deans may select Associate or Assistant Deans to assist in the
administrative responsibilities of the College/School.
Deans, Associate Deans, and Assistant Deans may teach courses in their areas of expertise, if
their teaching commitments do not impede or interfere with their administrative
responsibilities. Associate and Assistant Deans are positions of academic leadership which
report to a Dean. The responsibilities of an Assistant or Associate Dean are typically evolved by
the Dean to whom the position reports.
The Extended Learning Division is led by a Dean who reports to the Provost. The Division Dean
works closely with College/School Deans and Department Chairs in selecting faculty and on
scheduling courses at the University’s extension campuses.
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Acting or Interim Deans may be appointed by the Provost, when in the Provost's assessment
such appointments are in the best interests of the Colleges/Schools, and their Departments,
Programs, students, and faculty members. Acting/Interim Deans shall have the same
responsibilities and authority as Deans, but usually will not serve more than two fiscal years or
parts thereof.
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Acting or Interim Deans
1.3.2.1.
Dean’s Council of Chairs
Chairs in the Colleges/Schools may meet regularly in a College Council of Chairs and Program
Directors with their College/School Dean. The Council is an ad hoc Advisory body whose
composition changes as departmental leadership changes and whose purpose is to share
information and discuss matters of importance to departments. The Council in individual
Colleges/Schools may invite the Dean of the Extended Learning Division to meetings, as
appropriate, because the Dean of ELD works closely with Chairs on a variety of tasks related to
courses and programs on extension sites. Program Directors may be invited to join meetings of
the Council. The Council is chaired by the Dean of the College/School.
1.4.
THE FACULTY
As a Catholic Benedictine institution, and in keeping with a time-honored and unique tradition
in US Higher Education, Saint Martin’s University recognizes the necessity and importance of
tenured and tenure-track faculty members to advance and nurture the university’s character,
mission, and purpose (for a definition of Tenure, see Handbook, 3.1.).
The University employs Contingent Faculty in full- or part-time capacity to meet its curricular
and programmatic needs, especially in its online and extension campuses, as well as to initiate
new programs, but strives to appoint and retain a significant core of tenure-track and tenured
faculty on its main campus in Lacey.
While the University regards contingent assignments as necessary, both programmatically and
for financial reasons, it values the academic standing of Tenure in institutions of higher
education, attention to the holistic development of students in and outside the classroom
through its committed faculty and staff, and the responsibilities which attend to Tenure as vital
to the long-term development of students well beyond the time they spend taking classes. The
University aims, therefore, as resources permit, to achieve the AAUP-recommended seventyfive percent full-time to twenty-five percent part-time credits ratio on its main campus in Lacey.
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The terms and conditions of every appointment to a faculty position shall be stated in writing
and shall be consistent with the provisions in this Handbook. A copy of the appointment
letter/contract shall be supplied to the faculty member and a copy placed in his or her
personnel file, which will be held in the Office of the Provost. Any special standards applicable
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All Regular Faculty appointments are recommended for appointment by the Provost, subject to
budgetary support, to the President. Tenured Faculty appointments are approved by the Board
upon recommendation by the University President, Provost, and the Board’s Academic Affairs
Committee. Department Chairs work closely with Deans in identifying disciplinary,
departmental, and College/School needs; Deans then forward recommendations on behalf of
the Department or School/College to the Provost. Processes and procedures for appointing
Faculty are outlined in the Bylaws, 1.3.1 and 1.3.2. Contingent Faculty appointments are
recommended by the Chair and Dean to the Provost, who makes the appointment.
to the faculty member shall be included in the appointment letter/contract. Subsequent
modifications of the conditions in the appointment letter/contract typically occur as a result of
the faculty review process or in consultation with the faculty member and his/her Department
Chair and College/School Dean. Modifications have to be approved by the Provost and
subsequently, the University President. Letters of appointment specifying terms will replace
annual contracts for Regular Faculty from 2015-16.
Policies and procedures to be followed in record keeping at the pre-employment stage as well
as post-appointment of Faculty are outlined in the Bylaws along with information about
individuals who maintain rights of access and hold responsibility for maintaining confidentiality
with regard to personnel files of the Faculty.
1.4.1.
Regular Faculty
Persons who are tenure-track or tenured, full or part-time, hold faculty ranks (as described
below), receive University benefits, and have voting rights in full Faculty Assembly, the Faculty
Senate, Faculty Committees (as appropriate), their home College/School Assembly, and their
home Department.
Teaching responsibilities of the Regular Faculty include courses in the Saint Martin’s Core and
courses in their disciplinary majors and minors. The Faculty also holds primary responsibility for
advising and mentoring students in their disciplines/departments.
The Regular Faculty is selected by disciplinary peers through national searches, then endorsed
by their College/School Dean, approved by the Provost, and appointed by the Board upon
recommendation by the President.
The academic ranks of Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professor acknowledge a
faculty member’s teaching expertise and scholarly credentials evidenced through his/her
earned terminal academic degree from a regionally accredited university, continuing credibility
and currency in his/her academic discipline among peers beyond his/her immediate colleagues
at SMU, service to the University community, and leadership among his/her peers.
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Faculty with non-U.S. doctorates may be exempt, after verification of the same for equivalency
and parity with accredited terminal degrees in their field of expertise, from the “accredited”
requirement.
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Exceptions to the doctoral requirement may be made if the faculty member has the
appropriate degree, broadly accepted in the field as a terminal degree, and a proven record of
scholarly, creative, or professional achievement signifying currency and credibility among
his/her academic peers in his/her area of disciplinary expertise.
The following policies apply in appointing Regular Faculty; all determinations regarding these
are made at the point of hire and are noted in the Letter of Appointment given to the
appointee at that time:
-
Appointees who have earned tenure at a comparable institution, may be
appointed with tenure and rank, as appropriate, and at a comparable
point on the salary scale when the position has been advertised as a
senior tenured appointment; in instances where the integrity of the
advertised position (e.g. as entry level tenure track) needs to be
maintained, but the search yields a qualified candidate who has
previously achieved tenure at a comparable institution, the appointee
may be appointed at a comparable rank to the one he/she held
previously, but will be placed on a shortened track that reduces the
tenure time frame by half; the appointee would be eligible to apply for
tenure in his/her third year at Saint Martin’s in this instance;
-
Appointees who have served at a comparable institution in a tenure track
position, may receive credit up to a maximum of two years at Saint
Martin’s towards tenure; they may be placed at a comparable point on
the salary scale that reflects their years of full time teaching experience;
-
Appointees who have served full time in non-tenure track positions at
comparable institutions may not receive credit towards tenure, but may
be placed at a higher point on the salary scale in recognition of their full
time teaching experience;
-
Appointees with part time and/or pre-doctoral (or pre-terminal degree)
teaching experience do not normally receive teaching credit and are
typically placed at the starting point of the tenure and salary scale.
The Regular Faculty is responsible for all aspects of the University’s curriculum for all Boardauthorized degrees; all credit-bearing courses and academic programs in the University’s
Colleges, Schools, and Divisions, are approved by the Regular Faculty through their
representative committees and/or through the full faculty. Credit-bearing courses are typically
taught by individuals holding faculty status.
Procedures for the approval of credit-bearing courses and academic programs are outlined in
the Faculty Bylaws, 1.1.3.
A person appointed to the rank of Assistant Professor shows evidence of effective teaching and
currency/credibility in his/her academic discipline beyond his/her SMU peers through scholarly
engagement and or creative activity. Specific qualifications ordinarily include an appropriate
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Assistant Professor
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1.4.1.1.
earned terminal academic degree from a regionally accredited university, or its professional
equivalent.
1.4.1.2.
Associate Professor
A person appointed to the rank of Associate Professor has ordinarily held the rank of Assistant
Professor in an accredited college or university for at least six years. Appointment to this rank
ordinarily presupposes an earned terminal academic degree from a regionally accredited
institution and evidence of disciplinary currency and credibility as evidenced by scholarly
activity in study/research/publications.
1.4.1.3.
Professor
The rank of Professor indicates the Faculty’s recognition of the distinct professional
accomplishments in teaching and scholarship of their colleagues as well as their engaged
citizenship within the SMU community. This rank is conferred on a faculty member who has
shown himself/herself to be an outstanding instructor for a period of not less than six years at
the rank of Associate Professor, has had at least ten years of successful teaching experience at
an accredited college or university, holds an earned terminal academic degree from a regionally
accredited institution, has academic credibility and currency in his/her field of expertise among
peers beyond his/her colleagues at SMU through significant scholarly or creative
accomplishments, has engaged in meaningful service to his/her department, College/School,
and/or University, and has made noteworthy contributions to his/her field.
1.4.2. Contingent Faculty
Contingent Faculty members do not normally have voting rights on Faculty committees, the
Faculty Senate, their home College/School Assembly, or their home Departments, but are
invited to attend Faculty gatherings such as College/School and University Assembly,
professional development workshops and conferences, student and Faculty convocations, and
other community events such as lectures, presentations, and cultural performances.
Contingent Faculty may be invited by Regular Faculty or academic leaders to attend
Department and/or other meetings and to serve on ad hoc Committees and Task Forces.
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Contingent Faculty may be full- or part-time as defined below and may be contracted for a
semester, year, or multiple-years. Contingent Faculty teaching assignments are determined by
the Department Chair at the time of the faculty member’s appointment, and
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Contingent Faculty are endorsed by their disciplinary peers through Department Chairs who
work closely with their College/School/Division Deans to identify teaching needs and to vet
candidates for appointment to contingent positions. Contingent Faculty are evaluated annually
prior to re-appointment; evaluations are coordinated by Department Chairs and may include
consideration of student evaluations and classroom visits by peers.
contracts/appointment letters or teaching assignments are not guaranteed to be renewed for
subsequent semesters or years, as appropriate.
Contingent Faculty members are not eligible to apply for tenure, but certain categories of
Contingent Faculty may apply for promotion, in accordance with the requirements as
represented below. Procedures for applying for promotion are outlined in Bylaws, 1.3.3.
1.4.2.1.
Instructors – Full or Part-time
Persons who teach full or part-time, are unranked, and do not have rights to continuing
employment or voting rights on Faculty committees, the Faculty Senate, their home
Departments, or their home College / School Assembly.
Appointment as Instructor ordinarily presupposes the following qualifications: an appropriate
Master’s degree from an accredited university or its professional equivalent; evidence of
commitment to continued professional growth appropriate to his/her responsibilities.
Instructors are appointed by the Provost on the basis of recommendations by Deans or the
Chief International Programs Officer. Appointment as an Instructor may be for a semester,
single year, or multiple years and is renewable, subject to demonstrated continuing
effectiveness in teaching and recommendation by the Chief International Programs Officer or
Dean or Chair, as applicable. In certain circumstances, a full or part-time staff member may be
appointed as a part-time Instructor. Such employment does not confer full benefits or full-time
faculty status as a faculty member.
1.4.2.1.1. ESL Instructors
ESL Instructors are eligible to be considered for renewal subject to annual review and a positive
recommendation to the Provost by the Chief International Programs and Development Officer.
The process and timeline to be followed for Annual Review and renewal is outlined in the
Bylaws 4.5 and 5.2. ESL Instructors on 9-month or 10-month contracts are expected to teach,
contribute to mentoring and advising during their contractual period and to attend meetings,
workshops, Departmental retreats and field trips, as appropriate. ESL Instructors who are on
full-time appointments teach fifteen contact hours weekly.
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Laboratory Instructors serve during the academic year in a specialized laboratory (Biology,
Chemistry, Engineering, Physics, etc.). Laboratory instructors are eligible to be considered for
renewal subject to annual review and a positive recommendation to the Provost by the
Department Chairperson and Dean of the College/School.
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1.4.2.1.2. Laboratory Instructors
1.4.2.2.
Visiting Faculty – Full or Part-time
Visiting Faculty are non-tenure-track faculty members who teach full or part-time for a
predetermined length of time and receive term or terminal contracts that extend between one
and six years; visiting appointments may not be extended beyond the sixth year, for which the
Visiting appointee will receive a terminal, non-renewable contract. Visiting faculty with earned
terminal degrees from regionally-accredited universities may be appointed at any rank
applicable to Regular Faculty, based on their years of teaching experience and/or prior faculty
standing at colleges or universities. Deans will rely on recommendations by the Department
Chair regarding the rank for Visiting Faculty appointments and in recommending the same to
the Provost.
The Visiting Faculty title is typically used to fill temporary teaching needs, such as sabbatical or
leave replacements or to replace Regular Faculty who have been temporarily seconded into
administration or have undertaken significant administrative duties which require them to be
released from teaching one or more courses, to bring scholars from other institutions to
enhance disciplinary expertise in specific areas, or to appoint individuals to positions that
connote the rank of tenured faculty but which do not include all its rights and privileges, such as
voting rights on Faculty committees, the Faculty Senate, home Departments, or College /
School meetings.iii
1.4.2.3.
Lecturers – Part-time
Lecturers are part-time instructors engaged to teach one or more courses in a single term or
semester, who possess at least a graduate degree from an accredited university or holds a
professional license in the field in which he/she is contracted to teach.
A Lecturer may be recommended for promotion from Lecturer I to Lecturer II by a Department
Chair to the Dean of his/her College; criteria for promotion are outlined in the Faculty Bylaws.
Lecturer I
A Lecturer I is a part-time instructor who teaches one or more courses, and possesses a
graduate degree from an accredited university or its professional equivalent.
Lecturer II
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A Lecturer II is a part-time instructor who teaches one or more courses, possesses a graduate
degree from an accredited university, or its professional equivalent, and has demonstrated
successful teaching at the University in at least four courses over two years.
Senior Lecturer
A Senior Lecturer is a part-time instructor who teaches one or more courses, possesses a
graduate degree from an accredited university, or its professional equivalent, and has
demonstrated successful teaching at the University in at least eight courses over four years.
1.4.3. Professors Emeriti
Regular Faculty who retire may be recommended by their Chair to the Dean, who will forward
his/her recommendation to the Provost, to be awarded the honorary rank of Professor
Emeritus post retirement. This title acknowledges that:
a. The rank is granted in recognition of long-term, distinguished service to the
University and denotes a position of highest honor. By definition, it is not
automatically accorded; nor may faculty members apply for this rank;
b. The Dean of the College / School recommends candidates for Emeritus status
to the Provost, who in turn recommends the candidate for Professor
Emeritus to the President, who in turn makes a recommendation to the
Board of Trustees, who make the final decision in these cases.
Professors Emeriti are honorary members of the Faculty, with attendant rights and privileges
such as academic freedom, irrespective of whether they are invited to continue teaching. They
do not typically retain voting privileges or serve on standing committees of the University but
may be invited to serve on ad hoc committees and task forces.
1.4.4. University Administrators and Academic Leaders with Faculty Status and/or Rank
1.4.4.1.
The University President
The President of the University is an ex officio member of the Faculty with full rights of
attendance and participation in Faculty Assembly but without voting rights. At the invitation of
Committee chairs, he/she may attend but is not eligible to vote in Faculty Committees. The
University President does not normally attend Executive sessions of the Faculty Assembly but
may do so when invited by the Faculty President.
The University Provost
The Provost holds faculty status and rank within a University Department and College/School
and is an ex officio member of the Faculty with full rights of attendance and participation in
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1.4.4.2.
31
Voting restrictions do not prevent or preclude collaboration and informative discussions by
Faculty leaders and the President on matters of shared importance. The President may carry
academic rank and tenure.
Faculty Assembly but with restricted committee membership and voting rights: he/she may not
vote in elections through which faculty representatives are elected to the Faculty Senate or to
Faculty, University, or Board Committees. The Provost does not normally attend Executive
sessions of the Faculty Assembly but may do so when invited by the Faculty President.
Because the Provost is required to make, endorse, or reject decisions independently of Faculty
Committees and recommend action to other constituents, such as the President or Board,
he/she does not typically vote on decisions in Faculty Committees which forward these
decisions to the Office of the Provost for subsequent action. However, this voting restriction
does not prevent or preclude collaboration and informative discussions by
Committees/Committee Chairs and the Provost on matters of shared importance.
The Provost must be tenured and tenure eligible in accordance with the criteria for
advancement outlined in the Faculty Handbook. The University Council of Chairs is chaired by
the Provost.
During the President’s physical absence from campus, the Provost typically serves as the
President’s designee on issues or matters that may arise. Section 2.b. of the Board of Trustees
Bylaws states that “If the President is unable to perform his or her duties, the duties of that
office shall be performed by the Provost / Vice President for Academic Affairs unless the Board
of Trustees determines otherwise.”
1.4.4.3.
College/School Deans
Deans of the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Business, the College of Education and
Counseling Psychology, and the Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering, hold faculty status
and rank and serve as ex officio members of the Faculty. College/School Deans do not normally
attend Executive sessions of the Faculty Assembly either at the College/School level or at the
University level, but may do so when invited by the Faculty Chair of the College/School or by
the Faculty President, as appropriate.
The College/School Council of Chairs is chaired by the Dean of the College/School, as
appropriate.
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Because Deans may be required to make, endorse, or reject decisions made by Departments,
Faculty Committees, or other Faculty units, and to recommend actions to the Provost, Deans
may not vote in Committees within their College/School which forward these decisions to the
Office of the Dean for subsequent action. However, this voting restriction does not prevent or
preclude collaboration and informative discussions by Committees/Committee Chairs and the
Deans on matters of shared importance.
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As ex officio members of the Faculty, they retain full rights of attendance and participation in
their College/School Faculty Assembly, but hold restricted committee membership and voting
rights: they may not vote in elections through which faculty representatives are selected for
service on Faculty, College/School, University, and Board Committees.
College/School Deans typically hold an earned terminal degree in a discipline within the
College/School in which they serve as Dean. They must be tenure-eligible with academic
expertise in a discipline within their College/School in accordance with criteria outlined in the
Faculty Handbook and may be tenured.
The University may also designate leaders of other academic / academic support offices, such
as the Extended Learning Division or the Library, as Deans. Deans of academic support offices
may or may not hold faculty status and may or may not be tenured and/or tenure eligible. The
determination regarding their academic status is made by the Provost in consultation with
faculty leaders at the time of their appointment.
Deans in non-academic University offices do not normally hold faculty status.
1.4.4.4.
Faculty Seconded to Administration
A faculty member who accepts administrative or non-instructional assignments at the
College/School or University level retains his/her earned academic status and rank.
If he/she maintains at least a fifty percent teaching commitment annually while undertaking
administrative responsibilities, he/she retains status as a voting member of the Faculty. The
Faculty may, however, at the College/School level or at the University level, restrict voting
rights on specific occasions, as appropriate, when warranted by the decisions or action being
taken that relate to the administrative assignments undertaken by the faculty member.
They also retain the right of retreat to full faculty status and responsibilities at the conclusion of
their administrative assignment or, if a decision is made sooner, at the end of the semester or
academic year.
1.4.5. Librarians
As colleagues and counterparts to the Regular Faculty, Librarians enjoy certain rights and
privileges that attend to faculty ranks: the protection of academic freedom, the resources for
development, the duties of service and currency/credibility in their discipline, and
representation as well as participation as voting members of appropriate Faculty committees.
Librarians may also serve on University committees and attend and vote in Faculty Assembly.
Librarian Rank and Status
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Rank reflects the individual's cumulative record of achievement and level of
responsibility and may be as Librarian I, Librarian II, or Senior Librarian. Librarians hired
in Continuing Appointments as Librarian I are renewed subject to annual performance reviews
and are eligible to apply for promotion to the next highest rank after a specified period
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Librarians are appointed with a specific rank and status dependent upon their qualifications.
as outlined in the Faculty Bylaws.
Status represents the term of appointment of a Librarian as either for a specific
period of time or as a Continuing Appointment; Librarians in Continuing Appointments are
eligible to apply for promotion in accordance with terms and procedures outlined in the
Faculty Bylaws. Appointment status is dependent upon the needs of the University and
the qualifications of the Librarian.
Rank and status are specified on the Letter of Appointment at point of hire.
The appointment and promotion policies of Librarians in Continuing Appointments are designed
to contribute to academic and scholarly excellence. Librarians are responsible for developing
library resources and collections and for providing access to these resources to students,
faculty, and staff. Librarians also serve on University and faculty committees and task forces,
and act as partners with the Faculty and their academic leaders. The title of Librarian thus
designates their role as academic personnel.
Librarian Duties
The professional duties of Librarianship constitute the primary responsibility for Librarians, who
report to the Director/Dean of the Library.iv Librarians advance in rank as described below in
categories that parallel the advancement of Faculty. They submit Annual Reports to the
Dean/Director, and in a process that parallels that of Regular Faculty, Librarians in continuing
positions undergo annual evaluation, and a more comprehensive evaluation in their first and
third years in preparation for advancement. Continuing Librarians who hold the rank of
Librarian I are eligible to apply for promotion to Librarian II during their sixth full-time year of
service; those who hold the rank of Librarian II are eligible to apply for promotion to Senior
Librarian in their sixth year of full-time service as Librarian II. Promotion takes effect at the
start of the following academic year. All promoted Continuing Librarians undertake
comprehensive post-promotion reviews every five years.
In some circumstances, Librarians may be hired with an academic departmental affiliation that
has been approved by the Department faculty/Chair and the appropriate Dean.
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This rank is for librarians who have received the appropriate graduate degree from a program
accredited by the American Library Association or an equivalent graduate library
science/information studies degree, and have little or no professional experience in
librarianship. Generally, appointment to Librarian I will be made for those individuals with
fewer than two years of experience as a Librarian.
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Librarian I
Librarians at this rank are expected to fulfill their Librarian duties at a consistently high level.
Librarians at this rank become familiar with library functions, operations and policies,
demonstrate an interest in and an ability to contribute to the workings of the University
community, show evidence of an interest in pursuing their own professional development and
in making contributions to the profession beyond Saint Martin’s University
Librarian II
This rank is for librarians who generally have at least six years of demonstrated competence as
a Librarian I, or have established an equivalent record in comparable professional positions at
other institutions.
Librarians promoted to or appointed at the rank of Librarian II have met the position
responsibilities and expectations of Librarian I, have demonstrated the ability to master the
foundations, theory and practice of librarianship, to develop an understanding of library
operations beyond their immediate assignment, and the role of serving the wider teaching and
research community. They have demonstrated the capacity for continued growth and
development in the profession.
Librarians at this rank demonstrate the professional skills and techniques of the trained and
experienced Librarian. Those holding the rank of Librarian II contribute to and/or initiate
projects and programs within their units, and may contribute to projects outside the assigned
units as members of a Library, University task force, council or committee. They perform
assigned position responsibilities in a consistently excellent manner, contribute constructively
to recommendations concerning library functions, and show evidence of professional
development which includes participation in professional activities beyond the Saint Martin’s
work environment.
Senior Librarian
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Senior Librarians demonstrate sustained excellence in professional performance and
achievement, and contribute significantly toward the development and implementation of
projects and programs in their assigned units. They contribute to and/or initiate projects with
broad scope outside their assigned units, either individually or as members of a committee or
task force. They are accountable for performing assigned responsibilities in a consistently
excellent manner, for making thoughtful and innovative recommendations concerning library
functions, operations, and policies, and for the implementation and success of new or existing
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Senior Librarians should have demonstrated substantial growth in their profession, and
have made sustained and significant contributions in professional activities beyond the
work environment at Saint Martin’s. Such activities should enhance the individual's value
and contributions to the University and the research and learning community at Saint
Martin’s. Senior Librarians also demonstrate sustained and substantive leadership and
service within the University community.
policies, programs, and services. Senior Librarians contribute to the University, the research
and learning community through service on councils, committees or task forces. They show
evidence of sustained, substantive professional development, which includes significant
participation in professional activities beyond the Saint Martin’s work environment. Senior
Librarians may be called upon to serve in leadership roles such as that of Director or Dean of
the Library.
Salary Increases
The University has evolved a Step system by which longevity of service overall and within ranks
is recognized through annual increases for Regular Faculty, ESL Instructors, and Librarians. Step
salary increases for Librarians typically occur every year, effective at the start of the following
year. If financial reasons prevent the University from awarding Step increases in any given year,
increases will accrue for that year and will be included in the awarding of a Step increase in the
following year.
Step increases in salary do not accrue during leaves of absence and periods of absence from
Saint Martin's University.
Terminations without Prejudice
Librarians are subject to termination without prejudice due to disability, permanent or
protracted revision of the University curriculum, academic program /
department/school/college closure, bona fide financial exigency, or bona fide financial crisis.
Dismissal for Cause
Librarians may be dismissed for cause; reasons for “dismissals for cause” include but are not
limited to the following:
(1) Serious academic dishonesty;
(2) Deliberate and serious violations of the rights and freedoms of fellow faculty members,
students, staff, Librarians, or university leaders;
(3) Acts of moral turpitude;
(6) Conviction of a felony which directly relates to the fitness of the Librarian to engage in
Librarian duties and/or administration;
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(5) Use of professional authority to exploit others;
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(4) Violation of University policy substantially related to performance of Librarian
responsibilities;
(7) Continued gross neglect of duties despite oral and written warnings;
(8) Professional incompetence and ineffectiveness;
(9) Failure to fulfill contractual obligations.
1.5.
ACADEMIC PRINCIPLES
Faculty members who believe that serious violations of the principles of academic freedom and
academic integrity have occurred, or have been committed by their colleagues or academic
leaders, may grieve to the Faculty Affairs Committee. The appeals process is outlined in the
Faculty Bylaws, 10.4.
Complaints regarding harassment and discrimination are reported to the Chief Human
Resources Officer.
Violations of the University’s Conflict of Interest and Conflict of Commitments Policy by faculty
members are reviewed and resolved by the Provost.
1.5.1. Academic Freedom
Saint Martin’s University seeks to advance the common good and holds to the tenet that the
common good depends upon the free search for truth and its free exposition: "institutions of
higher education are conducted for the common good . . . The common good depends upon
the free search for truth and its free exposition" (Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom
and Tenure, 1940).
Academic freedom applies to both teaching and research. Saint Martin’s University is cognizant
of the insistence by the courts on due process within the academic community and recognizes
academic freedom as a right honored by the First Amendment to the Constitution. The
University notes with approval Justice Brennan’s opinion for the Supreme Court in Keyishian v
Board of Regents 385 U.S. 589 (1967):
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The Faculty of Saint Martin’s University has full freedom in research, subject to disciplinary
ethics and the satisfactory performance of their other academic duties as judged by their
Chairs, Dean, and Provost. Research undertaken for pecuniary reward must have the prior
approval of the University through the Provost.
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Our nation is deeply committed to safeguarding academic freedom, which is of
transcendent value to all of us and not merely to the teachers concerned. That freedom
is therefore a special concern of the First Amendment, which does not tolerate laws that
cast a pall of orthodoxy over the classroom.
Academic freedom in the classroom protects the rights of the faculty member in teaching and
of the student in learning. The Faculty of Saint Martin’s University have full freedom in
classroom discussions and exercises as outlined in the AAUP statement on professional ethics
(see Appendix A), provided that they do not jeopardize the academic freedom or civil rights of
the students.
Academic Freedom extends to a faculty member’s right to select instructional delivery modes
for his/her classroom in coordination with his/her Department Chair, based on the
appropriateness of the delivery mode to the subject being taught, its programmatic relevance,
student needs, and his/her own pedagogical strengths. Individual faculty appointed to teach in
a specific delivery mode or at extension sites (such as online, for example), must adhere to their
contractual obligations.
Academic freedom entitles individual faculty members to host co-curricular guest lecturers and
speakers related to their classes, teaching responsibilities, or disciplinary expertise without
restriction by University leaders except with regard to the availability of space and funds to
support such activities. Faculty are expected to notify their Chair when a guest speaker who is
likely to generate significant crowds and/or national media attention is scheduled on campus,
so that the University can, through its Public Safety Office prepare to manage large audiences, if
applicable, and through its Communications and Marketing Office, inform constituents, as
appropriate.
Members of the faculty are members of the community and members of a Catholic institution
of higher education.
As members of a Catholic institution of higher education, faculty members are expected
to respect the teachings of the Catholic Church, even though they need not accept these
teachings as their personal religious creeds. Faculty members measure the urgency of
these obligations in light of their responsibilities to the subject, to the students, to the
profession and to the institution. When faculty members speak or act as private persons
they must avoid creating the impression that they speak or act for the University. As
citizens engaged in a profession that is fundamentally dependent upon freedom for its
vigor and integrity, faculty members have a particular obligation to promote conditions
of free inquiry and to advance public understanding of academic freedom.
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Academic Integrity stands at the heart of intellectual life and refers to values such as eschewing
plagiarism, maintaining high academic standards in teaching and scholarship, and conducting
research and academic publishing with honesty and rigor. The Faculty models Academic
Integrity through the above values for their colleagues and students.
Saint Martin’s University views academic integrity as integral to its mission.
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1.5.2. Academic Integrity
A short summary of faculty responsibilities related to Academic Integrity is included in the
AAUP Statement of Professional Ethics:
As teachers, professors encourage the free pursuit of learning in their students. They
hold before them the best scholarly and ethical standards of their discipline. Professors
demonstrate respect for students as individuals and adhere to their proper roles as
intellectual guides and counselors. Professors make every reasonable effort to foster
honest academic conduct and to ensure that their evaluations of students reflect each
student’s true merit. They respect the confidential nature of the relationship between
professor and student. They avoid any exploitation, harassment, or discriminatory
treatment of students. They acknowledge significant academic or scholarly assistance
from them. They protect their academic freedom.
Advances in technology, the prevalence of social media, and the advent of new instructional
delivery modes have increased the need to attend to Academic Integrity and to the imperative
to ensure that policies and procedures are regularly updated to keep up with the pace of
change in the Academy. The Faculty holds primary responsibility for updating policies and
procedures relating to Academic Integrity for their faculty colleagues as well as for students.
Social-media related recommended codes of conduct are included in the Employee Handbook,
Appendices, pp.155 - 158.
The Academic Standards Committee of the Faculty exercises primary jurisdiction in attending to
Academic Integrity among students; the Faculty Affairs Committee hears grievances brought to
it by faculty members or academic leaders against any faculty colleague with regard to
violations of Academic Integrity. Procedures for the former are outlined in the Student
Handbook; procedures for handling allegations of academic misconduct among faculty,
academic staff, and academic leaders are outlined in the Faculty Bylaws.
1.5.3. Non-discrimination and Inclusive Diversity
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Faculty and staff members may not discriminate against students, other members of the
University community, visitors, or applicants, because of race, ethnicity, national origin,
ancestry, creed, color, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion or mental, physical or sensory
disability, marital status, military, or veteran status.
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In accordance with its mission statement, its Benedictine heritage, and its academic character,
Saint Martin’s University supports values which promote open-mindedness and sensitivity to
and respect for differences. It values and promotes diversity as an essential foundation for a
healthy learning community. A collegial environment is a prerequisite to the success of its
mission. The University is committed to the creation and maintenance of a tolerant learning
and working environment free from discrimination, fear, hate, and exclusionary forms of
conduct and harassment.
The Faculty explicitly condemns unlawful harassment, including sexual harassment by its
members; elaborations regarding the University’s Anti-Harassment and Non-Discrimination
Policies are outlined in greater detail in the Employee Handbook.
1.5.4. Conflict of Interest and Conflict of Commitments
General Principle
As a general principle, Saint Martin’s University's policy regarding conflict of interest and
conflict of commitments is based on the premise that honesty and professional integrity are
expected of all members, and it would be a violation of this trust if the interests of the
University are disregarded in the course of performing professional duties. Also inconsistent
with University policy is the use of one’s official position and influence to further either
personal gain or that of families or associates, whether in the conduct of University
responsibilities internally or in facilitating access to University resources and facilities to others.
In general, personal responsibility, integrity, and high ethical standards are the principal guides
in avoiding conflicts of commitment, and the University expects that all members of the faculty
and their academic leaders will conduct their activities, within the University as well as outside
the University, in a manner that reflects credit on themselves, the academy, and the University.
The responsibility to recognize potential conflicts and prevent them rests with individuals.
Faculty with questions regarding conflict of interest situations are encouraged to seek guidance
from the Office of the Provost.
Examples and Process on conflict of interest and conflict of commitments
The University recognizes that it is virtually impossible to provide specific rules covering all
possible situations that could constitute conflict of interest or conflict of commitments. The
Employee Handbook, the Faculty Handbook, and the Faculty Bylaws establish the spirit in which
interactions of members within the University and of members with entities outside the
University should be undertaken.
A faculty member accepting salaried employment at another institution while a full–
time employee of SMU; faculty may not spend more than one day in a seven–day work
week on consulting activities, and faculty ownership or management of private
enterprises is subject to review and limitations;
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A faculty member, or a member of his or her family, having an interest in, or serving as
an officer, director, or consultant to, or being otherwise employed by, any organization
or company having or seeking to have financial dealings with the University, or having
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All Regular Faculty members and academic leaders are required annually to submit a disclosure
of their external activities and financial interests, if applicable. Examples include:
an interest in any organization that is in direct competition with a service provided by
the University;
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A faculty member, a member of his or her family, or an organization in which that
faculty or family member that has a significant ownership interest or other material
interest, receiving a financial or other benefit from knowledge or information
confidential or proprietary to the University.
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Influencing or participating in negotiations, or entering into a contract, to purchase
goods and/or services for the University from an organization in which the faculty
member, or a member of his or her family, has a financial interest or a consulting or
other relationship.
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Influencing or participating in negotiations or aiming to influence directions and
decisions within the University that directly benefit a family member.
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The use for personal financial gain of privileged or confidential information emanating
from the University, or assisting an outside organization in obtaining a preferred
position with respect to such information.
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Acceptance of gratuities, gifts, or travel of more than nominal value (in excess of
$100.00) from an individual or a group, or from others seeking information from, or
association with, the University.
Conflicts of interest in themselves do not necessarily imply wrongdoing, but must be
recognized, recorded, and managed. However, the use of University resources (equipment,
space, staff, or student time) or the University name for personal gain is always prohibited.
Certain activities are generally not to be construed as conflicts of interest, and need not be
reported; these instances include
1. Receiving royalties for published scholarly works and other writings;
2. Accepting honoraria for papers and lectures;
3. Accepting prizes and awards for professional achievement.
Process
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Chairs and/or Deans should review and discuss reported conflicts of commitment and interest
with faculty members each year; reported conflicts and their resolution should be reviewed by
the Dean after initial review is conducted by a Chair.
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Conflicts of commitment must be eliminated; conflicts of interest must be managed or avoided.
If agreement between the faculty member, Chair, and Dean on the resolution of a reported
conflict cannot be reached, the faculty member may seek review and a decision by the Provost.
1.6.
LEARNING AND TEACHING FORMATS/INSTRUCTIONAL DELIVERY MODES
Saint Martin’s University delivers instruction in traditional face-to-face formats as well as
online, and in synchronous and asynchronous modes. Saint Martin’s makes many kinds of
instructional delivery modes available to students and sees all delivery modes as potentially
valuable learning formats, traditional, face-to-face teaching and learning is the primary mode of
instructional delivery for students who enter as residents or commuters into the University’s
undergraduate programs on our main campus in Lacey, WA.
 Synchronous Learning describes real‐time interaction between students and faculty that
occurs independent of location. Synchronous learning may be face-to-face or online.
 Asynchronous Learning involves interaction between faculty and students that occurs
independent of time or location.
Faculty appointments made specifically to teach in online formats and/or on satellite campuses
will be bound by the contract / appointment letter agreed to at the point of hire. Contingent
Faculty contracts typically specify instructional delivery modes and / or teaching locations.
Unless specified in their appointment letter, Regular Faculty hired into the University’s
Colleges/Schools on the Lacey campus may select the instructional delivery that best suits their
subjects, meets the needs of their students and programs, and matches their personal
pedagogical strengths, and are expected to do so in collaboration with their Department Chairs,
College/School Deans, and the Provost. The Faculty, College/School Deans, and Provost are
responsible for ensuring that in honoring a faculty member’s academic freedom to select
his/her preferred modes of instructional delivery, the commitment of the University on its main
campus in Lacey to provide education primarily through face-to-face synchronous education is
maintained.
1.6.1. Traditional Face-to-face Teaching and Learning
The traditional classroom environment where students and the instructor meet in the same
room is an example of synchronous education; such instruction is also referred to as “on‐
ground” or “on campus” instruction. Traditional face-to-face instruction is the primary teaching
and learning mode on the Lacey campus.
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Distance/Online Education may be synchronous or asynchronous and defines modes of
instructional delivery that do not constitute face-to-face instruction. Distance/Online courses
have to be designated as such from the start so that students are adequately prepared to
engage with materials and the delivery mode. Distance Learning / Online education may be
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1.6.2. Distance/Online Education, Teaching, and Learning
provided on SMU’s Lacey campus as well as satellite campuses. Faculty who teach or are
contracted to teach in online mode must demonstrate expertise in teaching online.
1.6.3. Hybrid Instruction, Teaching, and Learning
Hybrid teaching incorporates instructional delivery that includes face-to-face meetings with
students and online teaching and learning. Instruction may be entirely synchronous or partially
asynchronous.
The differentiating factor between hybrid instruction and the use of online resources in
technology-enhanced, synchronous, face-to-face instruction (as defined in 1.6.4. below) is that
the proportion of credit-bearing hours in a hybrid/blended course through face-to-face versus
online formats is specified in advance, and instruction occurs in a planned pedagogical manner
in which at least fifty percent of activities occur face-to-face. Hybrid instruction occurs on
SMU’s Lacey as well as satellite campuses.
1.6.4. Technology-enhanced / Technology-Infused Courses
Individual faculty members, both Regular and Contingent Faculty, may use online resources
such as primary texts, MOOCs, social media, podcasts, and class capture via Learning
Management Systems such as Moodle or software such as Tegrity, to supplement classroom
learning and/or may substitute engagement with online resources for particular face-to-face
class meetings. The adoption of these tools in synchronous instruction results in technologyenhanced or technology-infused courses. The University supports faculty members in their
infusion of technology into their classrooms.
2. GOVERNANCE
The Faculty works closely with their academic leaders and the University President in their
responsibility for Faculty (Self) Governance and in their participation in Shared Governance.
The Faculty’s responsibility for self-governance is exercised directly through University
Assembly of the full faculty or through the following elected bodies which work closely together
on all matters pertaining to academic and faculty life:
The Faculty Senate and its Chair, the Faculty President
Faculty Senate Committees
2.1.
Faculty (Self) Governance: University Level
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Assembly refers to gatherings of the full faculty, whether at the University level (University
Assembly) or at the College/ School level (College or School Assembly). The term “meeting” is
used to describe all other kinds of formal gatherings (e.g. Departments, Committees, Task
Forces, etc.).
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2.1.1. University Assembly of the Full Faculty
The full Faculty meets in Assembly at least twice each semester. All members of the
community who have faculty status may attend and participate in Faculty Assembly. Regular
faculty members are required to attend faculty Assembly. Other personnel who also attend
Assembly include the Registrar and the Director of the Center for Learning, Writing, and
Advising. Faculty Assembly is conducted in accordance with Robert’s Rules of Order. Privilege
of motion, second, and debate shall be afforded to all members of the faculty (Regular and
Contingent Faculty) during Assembly. Voting shall be restricted to members of the Regular
Faculty.
Faculty may invite other University leaders or staff to attend Faculty Assembly or segments of
the Assembly from time to time to report on aspects of University life that have a bearing on
the Faculty’s work and responsibilities. Examples of such guests in Assembly include the Chief
Admissions Officer, the Chief Student Affairs Officer, the Registrar, the Chief Financial Officer,
or the Chief International Programs Officer.
Faculty may initiate additional Faculty Assemblies by petitioning the President of the Faculty to
convene the Faculty in an extraordinary meeting; petitions have to specify the context for the
extraordinary Assembly and be supported by a majority of the Regular Faculty. As a courtesy,
the Faculty President will inform the Provost or University President of the scheduled meeting
and its context.
The President of the Faculty may convene a full Faculty Assembly when necessary to discuss
important University business (E.g. to propose and recommend a change in the Handbook to
the Board).
The University President or Provost may call for a Special University Assembly of the Faculty, if
necessary, to inform faculty members about important business or developments that require
their attention; the University President and Provost will typically coordinate their call for a
Special University Assembly of the Faculty by collaborating with the Faculty President and
Faculty Senate.
The full faculty is represented through the Senate and the Faculty President who chairs the
Senate, and Faculty Senate Committees.
2.1.2. The Faculty Senate
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The Faculty Senate consists of elected Senators drawn from the Regular Faculty of each College
and School. It serves as the representative body of the Faculty for conducting faculty and
academic business, the agent for overseeing and coordinating the Faculty committee structure,
and a forum for discussing issues affecting the Faculty and the University.
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Except when the Faculty Assembly is in session, the Senate exercises powers typically vested in
the Faculty and represents its will. The Faculty Senate is the voice of the Faculty and the
centerpiece of faculty governance and of faculty participation in shared governance.
The Faculty Senate promotes a climate of academic freedom, academic integrity, and inclusive
diversity; equity in tenure, promotion, workload, and salary distribution; an optimal learning
environment throughout the University; and an environment conducive to fundamental
fairness, social and economic justice, and Benedictine hospitality.
Except when the Faculty Assembly is in session, the Senate exercises powers typically vested in
the Faculty and represents its will. The specific powers, procedures, and policies are
enumerated in the Faculty Senate Constitution and Faculty Senate Bylaws (Appendix B).
The Senate consists of the Faculty President (presiding officer); President-Elect; six (6) Faculty
Senators elected from and by the Colleges and Schools; and five (5) Faculty Senators elected atlarge by the Faculty Assembly. The Provost is an ex-officio non-voting member.
2.1.3. The Faculty President
The Faculty President-elect is elected by the Faculty on an annual basis and is accountable to
the Faculty, serving as their representative and voice on issues of importance to them; he/she
also presides over Faculty Assembly and meetings of the Faculty Senate. The election of the
Faculty President occurs at the last regularly scheduled Faculty Assembly of the year and begins
immediately.
The Faculty President typically receives a six-credit reduction in his/her teaching load (from a
standard full time load of twelve semester credits each semester) in the academic year during
which he/she serves as Faculty President. Regular full time Faculty with teaching commitments
of nine semester credits each semester receive a three credit reduction in their teaching load in
the academic year during which they serve as Faculty President.
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a. Chairs and holds Faculty Assembly on a regularized basis and extraordinary
meetings of the Faculty when petitioned to do so by a majority of the Regular
Faculty;
b. Chairs meetings of the Faculty Senate;
c. Establishes the Faculty Assembly and the Faculty Senate agendas;
d. Oversees elections for all standing Faculty Committees;
e. Appoints ad hoc Faculty Committees;
f. Coordinates elections which identify faculty representatives to serve on
University committees;
g. Consults with the Faculty regarding issues of importance to faculty work life and
responsibilities
h. Assists, through an appropriate faculty committee, in recommending equitable
faculty salaries, benefits, and working conditions to the Provost
i. Represents faculty concerns to other University constituencies (i.e., the
University President, the Provost, Deans, and Trustees).
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The Faculty President
j. Aids in inter-committee coordination and prioritization of issues and concerns.
k. Serves as a liaison between Faculty and academic as well as University leaders.
2.1.4. The Faculty Affairs Committee (FAC)
The Senate serves as the voice of the Faculty and represents its interest to members and
academic as well as University leaders; it functions as a legislative body on academic issues and
programs primarily through its committees. The Faculty Affairs Committee reports to Senate
but also serves as a judicial body of the full faculty on appeals and grievances and in an Advisory
capacity to faculty and academic leaders. In its judicial capacity, it maintains confidentiality with
regard to its proceedings, reports its findings to the University President with a copy to the
Provost, and informs Senate about its conclusions.
In its custodial capacity, the Faculty Affairs Committee develops, maintains, and recommends
revisions of the Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws and adjudicates all matters and disputes
pertaining to faculty self-governance and violations of academic freedom and academic
integrity by faculty or their academic leaders. In attending to faculty governance, it
collaborates with academic leaders, as appropriate.
As a judicial body, the Committee acts as a Hearing Committee in cases involving faculty
grievance whether between faculty members or between faculty and their academic or
University leaders as well as on appeals of non-renewal, termination, tenure and promotion
decisions; (upon request of the Provost, the Committee recommends faculty privileges for
Visiting Professors and administrative officers). It also adjudicates in instances where a
complaint of academic dishonesty is filed against a faculty member or academic leader by a
fellow faculty member or academic leader. In doing so, it researches and reviews the case,
informs the Provost about its findings, and recommends a course of action to the Provost. The
Provost makes a determination. See the Grievance process outlined in Bylaws, 10.4.
As an Advisory body, the Faculty Affairs Committee may also advise the Senate, the Provost,
Deans, Chairs, and faculty, as needed.
The FA Committee consists of the following elected representatives from among the tenured
Regular Faculty: three faculty members elected from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences,
one faculty member from each of the other Colleges/Schools, and one member elected at large.
Nominations are made by members of the College/School; elections are by the full faculty.
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Faculty Senate Committees are staffed by elected faculty representatives and chaired by a
Regular Faculty member. Though committees vary in size, all four Colleges and Schools are
represented on each committee. If a College/School does not present a candidate to be elected
to a committee as represented below, a faculty representative-at-large will be elected from the
full roster of Regular Faculty.
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2.1.5. Faculty Senate Committees
All the Faculty committees represented below report to the Faculty Senate and members are
elected through Senate in full Faculty Assembly. As of 2014, there are nine standing faculty
Senate committees and a number of ad hoc Task Forces and committees authorized by the
Faculty are elected by the full faculty. Faculty members typically serve on no more than two
standing Faculty Committees.
Staff colleagues may be invited to serve on Faculty Committees, and individual committees will
determine if non-faculty members may carry voting rights.
Student representatives may be invited to join Faculty Committee deliberations or to serve on
committees, with each committee determining individually if student representatives will have
voting rights. Undergraduate student representatives will typically be elected through ASSMU.
Graduate student representatives will be selected in consultation with the Office of Graduate
Studies.
Important Qualifier
Regular Faculty may serve on only ONE among the following Faculty Committees at a time:
University Advancement
College/School Tenure and Promotion
Faculty Affairs
In the event that a College or School is unable to elect faculty as designated above to serve on
each of the above committees (because of the limited number of tenured and ranked faculty in
the College/School), alternate arrangements will be made through consultation among the
following: the Dean of the College/School, the Provost, the Faculty President, and / or members
of the Faculty Affairs Committee.
Committee structures and procedures are detailed further in the Faculty Bylaws, 2.2.2.
2.1.5.1.
Academic Computer Advisory Council (ACAC)
The Academic Computer Affairs Council oversees the policies and procedures of academic
computer operations and facilities. The Council reports to the Provost.
Membership:
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In addition, the following persons have membership and voting rights and responsibilities on
the Council:
Computer Center Manager
Dean of the Library
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Two faculty representatives are elected from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and one
each from each of the other Colleges/Schools.
A representative appointed by the University President
The Council Chair is selected by the Council membership annually.
Faculty representatives are elected to serve three (3) year, renewable terms, staggered to
ensure continuity, and may serve two continuous terms but must step off the Committee for a
year before being eligible for re-election for subsequent terms.
Duties and Responsibilities:
1. Recommend policies relative to academic computer acquisition and use;
2. Develop and recommend short and long range plans for academic campus
resources;
3. Review, prior to authorization, academic proposals for acquisition and use of
computing hardware and software (purchases exceeding $500);
4. Participate in reviewing and, where appropriate, developing proposals related to
computers; and
5. Review budgeting requests for computing acquisitions and make recommendations
to the Provost.
2.1.5.2.
The University Core Curriculum Committee
The Saint Martin’s Core provides a foundation of courses which are collectively designed to
expose students to diverse ways of thinking and to provide the intellectual, spiritual and ethical
base for meaningful, satisfying and productive lives. The Core Committee evaluates Saint
Martin’s Core and initiates revisions to the curriculum to ensure that it is current and
responsive to changes in the Academy as well as evolving needs of students.
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2.1.5.2.1. The Committee on the First (and Second) Year Experience is a subcommittee
of the Core Curriculum Committee and is chaired by the Director of the First (and
Second) Year Experience. The Committee consists of elected members from the Regular
Faculty; the Director of the First (and Second) Year Experience is appointed by the
Provost in consultation with the Core Committee and the Chair of the Faculty in the
College of Arts and Sciences; he/she is drawn from the Regular Faculty in the College.
The Director of the First (and Second) Year Experience typically receives a three-credit
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The Full faculty elects the Committee from its Regular Faculty; the full faculty also elects a chair
from the College of Arts and Sciences who serves as Director of the Core. The Core Committee
consists of the following elected representatives from among the Regular Faculty: three
members elected from the College of Arts & Sciences (one each from the Social Sciences,
Humanities, and Sciences/ Mathematics), one member from each of the other three
Colleges/Schools, the Registrar, and a representative from the Library. The Director of the Saint
Martin’s Core typically serves a three-year term which may be renewed by the full faculty in
Assembly. Since the Director oversees the foundational liberal arts curriculum of the
University, he/she typically receives a three to six-credit reduction in teaching (from a full-time
load of twelve semester credits) each semester.
course release (from a full-time load of twelve semester credits) each semester; the
release is subject to review as the University expands its attention to the Sophomore
Year Experience of first-year and transfer students.
The Director of the Saint Martin’s Core and the Director of the First (and Second) Year
Experience report to the Provost and regularly submit reports and updates to the Senate
and/or full faculty; they also attend Provost Council meetings. They also liaise regularly with
the Office of Student Life on co-curricular learning that is embedded in the Saint Martin’s Core
or offered in conjunction with it.
2.1.5.3.
Educational Policies and Curriculum Committee – University level
Membership on the University EPCC consists of the following:
A Dean appointed by the Provost for a three-year term (ex officio)
Registrar (ex officio)
Library Director (ex officio)
Six (6) members of the faculty elected for three (3) year, staggered terms.
One (1) elected from each of these academic areas: Business, Education, Engineering,
Humanities, Science and Mathematics, and Social Sciences.
All Committee members enjoy voting rights and responsibilities. The Committee Chair is elected
by and from Committee membership on an annual basis. The provost attends EPCC meetings
as a non-voting member.
The University EPCC reviews and initiates changes in the academic policies and academic
standards prescribed under the academic information section of the official University Catalog,
The Committee also reviews and may initiate changes in the University curriculum. The
Committee’s reviews, recommendations, and approvals are forwarded to Senate before going
to the full faculty for approval. Procedures regarding deliberations of the Educational Policies
and Curriculum Committee are determined by the Committee itself. The Provost makes final
decisions on recommendations made by EPCC and forwards these, as appropriate, to the
University President or Board of Trustees.
The Committee elects its Chair from among its elected members.
The FAC oversees the faculty tenure and promotion process. It represents the Faculty's
recommendation to the Provost and University President on all applications for promotion and
tenure. The Committee solicits submissions of a portfolio from all candidates eligible to apply
for tenure and/or promotion and vets each candidate separately on their application for tenure
and for promotion before making a recommendation to the Provost.
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The Faculty Advancement Committee
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2.1.5.4.
Individual members of the Committee also serve on Third-Year Review Committees of Tenuretrack Faculty.
The Committee consists of the following elected representatives from among the Regular
tenured Faculty: three members elected from the College of A & S, one each from each of the
other three Colleges/Schools, and one member elected at large from the Regular tenured
faculty. At least three of the seven members have to be full professors.
2.1.5.5.
Faculty Committee on Academic Assessment (FCAA)
The Faculty Committee on Academic Assessment (FCAA) fosters a Saint Martin’s education
which enriches the students with
-
A high level of contact between students and faculty
Classes that develop reciprocity and cooperation among students
Active learning
Habits that reflect the best uses and amounts of time for particular tasks
An understanding and acceptance of the challenge to meet high expectations
Classes that acknowledge the diversity of talents and means of learning.
Various assessment measures are utilized by the University, including course evaluations by
students of the courses they undertake. A number of University-wide surveys are also
undertaken each year, sponsored by offices such as the Office of Institutional Effectiveness and
the Retention Committee. Survey results are shared with faculty and their academic leaders
when the collected data includes academic information pertaining to faculty, courses, majors,
programs, academic Departments, and academic advising/support.
The Faculty understands the challenges which attend to adequately measuring effectiveness
and the importance of attempting to do so, a balance recognized by AAUP:
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Evaluation of teaching usually refers to the efforts made to assess the effectiveness of
instruction. The most valid measure is probably the most difficult to obtain, that is, the
assessment of a teacher’s effectiveness on the basis of the learning of his or her
students. On the one hand, a student’s learning is importantly influenced by much more
than an individual teacher’s efforts. On the other, measures of before-and-after learning
are difficult to find, control, or derive comparisons from. From a practical point of view,
the difficulties of evaluating college teaching on the basis of changes in student
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The AAUP has long recognized that the practical difficulties of evaluating student
learning do not relieve the academic profession of its obligation to attempt to
incorporate such evaluation into measures of teaching effectiveness. The Association’s
1975 Statement on Teaching Evaluation contains the following comments on “student
learning”:
performance limit the use of such a measure. The difficulties, however, should not rule
out all efforts to seek reliable evidence of this kind.
The Faculty’s assessment of teaching and learning effectiveness thus occurs within the
framework of standards recommended by AAUP:
(http://www.aaup.org/AAUP/comm/rep/MandatedAssessments.htm)
While faculty at SMU recognize and understand the importance of addressing and meeting the
criteria of outside accreditors such as the NWCCU, TEAC and ABET, the primary focus of this
Committee is not on accreditation, per se, but on:
1. Helping faculty to develop genuine, rigorous and appropriate measures of the
effectiveness of our teaching both across the University’s curriculum as a whole and in
our diverse disciplines, in the disparate courses of study we offer, and to students who
come to us with a range of abilities, needs and challenges.
2. Helping the Core Committee to develop realistic goals for enhancing teaching
effectiveness and student learning across the University’s curriculum – and
recommending review of and/or changes in that curriculum as appropriate.
3. Helping academic Program Directors and Department Chairs to develop realistic goals
for enhancing teaching effectiveness and student learning across their
Program/Departmental curricula – and recommending review of and/or changes in such
curricula as appropriate.
4. Helping individual faculty members with developing realistic goals for enhancing
teaching effectiveness and student learning in the courses they teach. Providing faculty
with workshops, mentoring and other programs and resources designed to enhance
their pedagogical effectiveness.
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Membership on the Committee will consist of three faculty elected from the College of Arts and
Sciences and one each from each of the other Colleges/Schools. The Committee liaises with the
Director of Institutional Assessment and the Chief Institutional Effectiveness Officer as well as
other faculty and academic leaders.
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Further, the Committee studies curricula to determine if students are being taught such things
as 1) process writing 2) critical thinking, 3) Benedictine values, and 4) both global and historical
awareness throughout their college careers in a broad array of courses and programs. Such
tasks will require the Committee to work closely with the Core Committee, the EPCC, and the
Provost’s Council. Working closely with these constituents and individual faculty, the FCAA
leads the Faculty’s ongoing efforts to gauge and enhance teaching effectiveness and student
learning in curricular/academic programs and departments. The Committee also liaises with the
Director of Institutional Assessment as needed.
2.1.5.6.
Faculty Development Committee
The Faculty Development Committee provides a range of faculty development services to
individual faculty members, to academic departments and divisions, and to the faculty as a
whole; develops and implements an ongoing faculty development program; defines policies
and procedures to be followed by faculty members, departments and divisions in requesting
funding for faculty development projects and/or travel; helps facilitate the selection of
recipients of the Monks of Saint Martin’s Abbey Outstanding Faculty Award.
The FDC consists of the following elected representatives from among the Regular
Faculty: three members elected from the College of A & S, one each from each of the other
three Colleges/Schools. At least three of the Committee’s six members are typically tenured
faculty.
2.1.5.7.
Faculty Library Committee
The Faculty Library Committee consists of the Library Dean or Director (as chair) and two
Librarians as well as the following elected representatives from among the Regular Faculty:
three members elected from the College of Liberal Arts & Sciences, one each from each of the
other three Colleges/Schools. Faculty representatives are elected for three (3) year, staggered
terms.
The Library Committee provides direction and assistance to the Library Dean or Director in:




the development of policies;
the evaluation of current programs and services, as well as planning for new ones;
the allocation of funds for collection development purposes; and
the formulation of budget and staffing requirements related to the operation of the
Library.
2.1.5.8.
Faculty Welfare Committee
The Faculty Welfare Committee recommends to the Faculty Senate equitable faculty salaries,
benefits, and working conditions for faculty. The Committee also works with Institutional
Research to facilitate the University’s participation in national surveys pertaining to faculty
work life.
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The FWC consists of the following elected representatives from among the Regular Faculty:
three members elected from the College of A & S, one each from each of the other three
Colleges/Schools. The Committee elects its chair from among its members.
2.1.5.9.
Institutional Review Board
While Saint Martin’s University recognizes and affirms the need for academic freedom in the
conduct of research, and the value of well-designed, responsible activities which involve human
subjects, the Faculty recognizes, and accepts its responsibility to assure the protection of any
human subjects so involved. The use of human subjects in research or investigational activities
imposes both ethical and legal responsibilities upon the institution, the project director, and the
investigator(s) for assuring that the rights and welfare of those subjects are adequately
protected. Saint Martin’s University thus requires that the project director, the investigator(s),
all participants, and the University utilize policies established by the Institutional Review Board,
which also monitor activities to insure that such protection occurs.
2.1.5.10.
Ad Hoc Committees of the Faculty
The Faculty, through its Senate, may create ad hoc committees to deal with specific issues.
Note: Faculty Committees may invite non-academic colleagues (staff, administrators, or
academic leaders) to join specific meetings of Faculty Committees on an ad hoc basis or to
serve as members on ad hoc Committees or Task Forces in order to draw on the expertise of
colleagues in specific areas. Individual committees may extend voting rights to non-faculty
members, as appropriate.
2.1.5.11.
Faculty Athletics Representative (FAR)
The role of the Faculty Athletics Representative is mandated in NCAA legislation, Bylaw 6.1.3.
In 1980, the NCAA produced the first Faculty Athletics Representative Handbook, which was
revised in 1987 and 2004. Faculty Athletics Representatives serve as points of contact between
their campuses and the NCAA in the regular conduct of intercollegiate athletics programs.
Qualifications of those who may serve as FARs are described in NCAA Bylaw 6.1.3. The Faculty
Athletics Representative is recognized as the representative of the institution and its faculty in
the relationship between the NCAA and the local campus. (NCAA Bylaw 4.02.2). The FAR is one
of five institutional representatives authorized to request an NCAA legislative interpretation on
behalf of the institution. The University President, Director of Athletics, Senior Woman
Administrator, and Compliance Coordinator (or their designate) are the other individuals
permitted to do so. (NCAA Bylaw 5.4.1.2.1.2)
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Saint Martin’s University has two FARs, one male and one female. FARs serve three-year
staggered terms, with the current FAR serving a two year term beginning in the fall term
53
In keeping with NCAA regulations, the University President designates faculty members to serve
as Faculty Athletics Representatives for the University and its Athletics Programs. Individuals so
designated are required to be a members of the Regular Faculty or an administrator who holds
faculty rank and shall not hold an administrative or coaching position in the Athletics
Department.
immediately following approval of this Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws. Though the NCAA
does not make term limits a condition for the appointment of an FAR, the FARs’ roles are
constructed at Saint Martin’s in keeping with a general principle which governs most roles and
commitments within the University. At the conclusion of their term, FARs will remove
themselves from consideration for reappointment for one year before being eligible for another
term as FAR. FARs typically alternate in their attendance at the national NCAA conferences.
Specific responsibilities of the Faculty Athletics Representative are determined by the
University, but the FAR serves as a liaison between the University’s constituents and the
Athletics Department, and as a representative of the University at NCAA conferences.
According to one of FAR’s Guiding Principles, the role of the FAR is “to ensure that the academic
institution establishes and maintains the appropriate balance between academics and
intercollegiate athletics.”
The FAR at Saint Martin’s University is expected to familiarize himself/herself with all aspects of
NCAA membership by the University and with the FAR’s Guiding Principles, and to report in
Faculty Assembly about his/her role in serving as FAR.
2.2.
Faculty (Self) Governance: College/School Level
2.2.1. College/School Assembly
The Faculty in each College/School typically meets in Assembly twice a semester or as needed
during the academic year, in addition to Special Assemblies as may be convened by the Dean
for important matters that require input from the full faculty. Colleges/Schools elect a Faculty
Chair who works closely with the Dean in setting an agenda for the College/School Assembly,
and who serves as Chair pro tempore in leading the Assembly.
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New programs and academic initiatives proposed by a College/School are formally approved by
the Faculty in College/School Assembly except when the Faculty elects a College/School EPCC to
undertake this task on its behalf. New programs, majors, and academic initiatives, when
proposed by the faculty in a College/School, are forwarded, along with a recommendation by
the Dean, to the University EPCC after approval either by the Faculty in College/School
Assembly or by their representatives on College/School EPCC. New courses may be forwarded
directly to the University EPCC with endorsement by the Department Chair/Program Director
and the Dean.
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College/School Assembly is typically called by the College/School Chair of the Faculty in
consultation with the Dean. The Dean may call a Special Assembly of the College/School to
discuss matters of importance to the Faculty or to disseminate vital College/School information;
he/she will typically coordinate with the College/School Chair in calling faculty to a Special
Assembly.
2.2.2. College/School Committees
College/School Faculty may create Committees to undertake the work of the College/School.
E.g., a College EPCC which approves and forwards new program and course proposals to the
University EPCC, and College/School Tenure and Promotions Committee which forwards their
recommendations regarding faculty promotion and tenure to the University Advancement
Committee.
In such cases, where College/School Committees parallel University Committees, with their
scope of attention limited to their particular College/School, individuals elected to serve on the
College/School Committee may not also serve on the equivalent or parallel University
Committee.
2.2.3. College/School Ad Hoc Committees and Task Forces
The Dean and Faculty in the Colleges/Schools may create ad hoc committees and Task Forces.
2.2.4. Cross-departmental Programs
Cross-departmental academic programs (E.g. Women’s Studies) are led by faculty Program
Directors who are elected by faculty in the appropriate program or appointed through
consultation between the Dean of the College/School with faculty who teach in the program, if
the program’s disciplinary expertise and faculty draw from within the College/School.
Academic Programs which serve students, staff, or faculty in more than one College/School or
whose disciplinary expertise draws from multiple Colleges/Schools report to the Provost and
faculty Directors of these programs are elected by faculty in the programs or appointed through
consultation between the Provost and faculty / University leaders, as appropriate.
Faculty Program Directors are typically appointed to three-year renewable terms, and may, in
consultation with the Dean and Provost, receive compensation in the form of stipends or
release time. The processes for appointment, review, and renewal of Faculty Program Directors
are outlined in the Bylaws 2.2.3.
Co-curricular support offices which serve students and faculty across the University may be led
by Program Directors who are academic staff (E.g. Learning, Writing, and Advising Center;
Office of Disability Services, etc.). Academic staff who serve as Program Directors are
appointed to five-year renewable terms; they undergo annual review.
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Academic Departments are units within a College or School with faculty members who typically
share disciplinary expertise in a single discipline or a cluster of related disciplines. Faculty
members are typically appointed to Departments within a College or School. Courses are
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2.2.5. Academic Departments
generally given within a Department, and often named for the Department (E.g. ENG 200).
Departments typically offer majors and minors in their areas of expertise. Some majors and
minors incorporate interdisciplinary expertise across multiple departments (E.g. Women’s
Studies or Interdisciplinary Studies).
2.2.5.1.
Department Chairs
The Department Chair serves as the academic leader within his/her Department. Departments
elect their Chair, typically from among the tenured Regular Faculty and recommend his/her
appointment to the Dean of the College/School, who finalizes the appointment. Department
Chairs are appointed to three-year terms and are subject to evaluation by the Department
faculty and Dean prior to expiration of their appointed term and may be reappointed, in
accordance with procedures outlined in the Bylaws. The selection and reappointment process
for Department Chairs is outlined in greater detail in the Faculty Bylaws, 2.2.3.
The governing responsibilities of Chairs extend only to their academic departments.
As members of the College/School Council of Chairs, Chairs serve as an Advisory body to the
Dean of their College/School; they may be called to meet in an Advisory capacity to the Provost
in a University Council of Chairs.
Department Chairs typically receive a one course reduction in teaching in each semester of the
academic year.
Since the responsibilities which attend to chairing a department extend beyond the academic
year and into summer months, Chairs may receive an administrative stipend for their summer
responsibilities.
Chairs are voting members of the Faculty. They retain in-load teaching responsibilities while
undertaking departmental administrative responsibilities, carry both instructional and
administrative duties, and come from and return to regular teaching at the conclusion of their
term as Chair.
All Departments undertake periodic program review. The program review cycle of seven years
and procedures are detailed in the Faculty Bylaws 2.2.4. Curricular review is undertaken
periodically as needed by Departments and programs.
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 Initiate the creation of Departmental documentation on Faculty advancement by
consulting all members of the Department; submit the documentation to the Dean for
cross-departmental parity in expectations; work with the faculty in the Department to
evolve written tenure and promotion guidelines, especially in the category of
scholarly/creative activity, disciplinary currency within the Academy, and disciplinary
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Department Chairs
credibility of faculty among their academic peers within and outside SMU;
 Oversee and coordinate faculty advancement, including first year mentoring and review,
class visitations and faculty consultation regarding teaching effectiveness; professional
development and service; lead department members’ Third-Year Reviews, and provide
obligatory letter for department members’ advancement files;
 Schedule and chair monthly Department meetings during the academic year;
Department Meeting Minutes or Action Items/Resolutions reached by the Faculty in
meetings are retained on file in the Department and a copy of the same is submitted to
the Office of the College/School Dean;
 Provide general oversight of department business, including communication with
students and others regarding departmental programs and curricula; coordinates
departmental classes (including scheduling, faculty load and course assignments); leads
and delegates responsibility, as appropriate, for periodic program reviews; and
curricular and new program proposals; monitors quality and methods of instruction;
leads departmental accreditation and supports College/School or institutional
accreditation activities; and encourages faculty support of Admission activities;
 Approve extension and online curriculum as well as faculty appointments on Extension
campuses by coordinating with the Dean of his/her College/School;
 Develop class schedules and oversee the monitoring of instruction;
 Lead Department faculty in recruiting tenure-track faculty; recruit and orient Contingent
Faculty;
 Guide new tenure-track appointees and advise new tenure-track faculty on matters
pertaining to academic reviews, and advancement; because the Chair has to also
evaluate new faculty members annually, he/she is responsible for appointing an
additional mentor from outside the Department who can function as an Advisor and
guide and provide supportive and constructive guidance to new appointees. Chairs also
mentor and oversee the work of Contingent Faculty;
 Oversee Program Review every seven years and internal curricular review periodically;
 Oversee post-tenure faculty development and reviews;
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 Work with the Dean to manage department staffing;
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 Appoint faculty search committees in consultation with the Dean and communicate to
the Dean departmental recommendations for hiring faculty;
 Promote academically-centered co-curricular activities (E.g. disciplinary honor societies);
 Ensure that majors and minors are appropriately advised; also ensure that advising and
other duties within the Department are evenly distributed among its members;
 Advocate for the Department to the Dean and communicate on behalf of the
Department to the Dean; communicate on behalf of the Dean to colleagues within the
Department and ensure that all faculty are up-to-date on developments in the
College/School;
 Coordinate library resources;
 Manage the departmental budget and resources; attend budget training sessions as
needed
 Implement administrative directives, as appropriate;
 Monitor the teaching load of the faculty members in the department and ensure
internal equity among its members;
 Work with Department faculty on completing Assessment Reports;
 Assist the Dean in completing Accreditation Reports for the College/School;
 Function as the first level of appeal by students in cases identified by his/her
Department faculty as constituting a violation of policies on academic dishonesty and all
student complaints, including grade appeals and academic grievances involving faculty
and staff in their Department; the appeals process as it moves from Department Chair
to College/School Dean to Provost is outlined in greater detail in the Student Handbook;
 Respond to requests from the Offices of the Dean and Provost, as appropriate, and
ensure that the Department and its faculty meet important College and University
deadlines (E.g. submission of grades, syllabi, travel requests and receipts, etc.).
Chairs carry responsibility, on behalf of their Department and its faculty, for proposing,
approving, and representing new courses, programs, and initiatives from their Departments.
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Academic receivership occurs when control of an academic Program, Department, Division, or
College/School is removed from the faculty within that unit and an outside Chair or Director or
Dean is entrusted by the College/School Dean or Provost or President, as applicable, to lead the
unit, or when the College/School Dean or the Provost undertakes direct leadership of the unit.
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2.2.6. Departments / Programs in Receivership
Academic receivership represents an extraordinary rather than typical situation because it runs
counter to the Faculty’s responsibility for self-governance, and it is frequently preceded by
warning signs that an academic unit is either becoming dysfunctional or lacks personnel who
can successfully lead it. Moving a unit into receivership is most common at the programmatic
or departmental level, but in particularly extraordinary circumstances, a Division or
College/School may be placed in academic receivership by the Provost or University President.
Procedures for placing a program in receivership are outlined in the Faculty Bylaws 1.1.4.
2.2.7. University Lectures
Faculty members also organize, lead, and contribute to a number of University-wide Lecture
Series, which are listed on the University’s web site.
2.3.
Shared Governance
Participation and sharing in the governance of the University is a professional obligation and
responsibility of the Regular Faculty.
2.3.1. University Committees with Faculty Representatives
With the exception of the Academic Standards Committee and the Study Abroad Committee
which are Advisory to the Provost, all other University Committees function in an Advisory
capacity to the University President and typically contain appointed as well as elected
members.
The Academic Standards Committee reports to the Provost and advises on, monitors, and
assesses academic standards, evolves and recommends policies and procedures as they pertain
to academic standards, advises on the admission of probationary students, reviews each
semester the progress of all students who have been placed on academic probation, considers
petitions requesting an extension of academic probation, considers student petitions for
reinstatement to the University, recommends suspension of students who fail to comply with
conditions of academic probation as well as dismissal of students who have consistently failed
to maintain the academic standards of the University, evaluates credit for experiential learning,
and makes recommendations on awarding credit for prior learning to the Provost.
The Committee consists of Regular Faculty elected from the Colleges and Schools as follows:
two members from the College of A & S; one member each from the College of Education,
School of Business, and the School of Engineering. Elected faculty serve three-year terms
before rotating off the Committee prior to being eligible for re-election for subsequent terms.
The Chief Student Affairs Officer or his/her designee, the Chief Enrollment Officer, the Dean of
the Extended Learning Division, and the University Registrar also serve on the Committee. The
Provost additionally appoints one College/School Dean and one academic staff
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Academic Standards
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2.3.1.1.
member/Advisor (typically the Director of the Learning, Writing, and Advising Center) whose
primary responsibilities involve co-curricular support, to serve on the Committee (term of staff
member). Deans appointed to the Committee serve two-year terms and rotate off the
Committee for a year before becoming eligible for re-appointment. The Provost serves on the
Committee as a non-voting member.
The Committee is co-chaired by the College/School Dean and a Regular Faculty member. All
members exercise full voting rights on the Committee, which makes its recommendations to
the Provost, who makes final decisions.
2.3.1.2.
Athletics Advisory Board
The AAB at Saint Martin’s University is appointed by the University President and is comprised
of faculty, staff, and students. It is tasked with promoting an understanding of intercollegiate
athletics among faculty and other members of the community. The AAB is strongly encouraged
by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Faculty Athletics Representative
Association (FARA).
2.3.1.3.
Behavior Intervention Team (BIT)
The charter and responsibilities of BIT, which attends to student and employee welfare, are
detailed in the Employee Handbook. Two faculty representatives are appointed by the Chief
Student Affairs Officer from among faculty with expertise/scholarship in the area of mental
health/psychology/ counseling and/or social work.
2.3.1.4.
Financial Aid Committee
The Financial Aid Committee is a policy-oriented committee which may, at the discretion of the
Financial Aid Director, serve as a practice-oriented committee.
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The Committee may be used by the Financial Aid Director as a practice-oriented committee to
guide decisions on applications. If called upon to evaluate applications, the Committee applies
the policies of the aid program to ensure equitable and fair treatment of each applicant. It
considers unique and special circumstances that may require exception to policy, performs
calculations of financial aid awards, protects the confidential information families provide, and
tracks and compiles critical statistics and other research relevant to the aid program. The
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As a policy-oriented committee, members review and advise on the development of the
philosophy and policies that govern the administration of financial aid. Members review and
evaluate the success of the aid program and make budget projections and recommendations
for continued support. The Committee also looks at statistics and research that benchmark its
activity against national and local norms, and considers the degree to which the aid program
approaches standards such as NAIS's Principles of Good Practice for Financial Aid
Administration. It also assesses the program's current and future budgetary needs.
Committee also makes recommendations for improving the processes and funding that drive
the aid program. The Committee typically meets as needed.
Members:

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
Director of Financial Aid (Chair)
Dean of Admissions
Chief Finance Officer
A Dean, appointed by the Provost
Two elected members from the Regular Faculty
2.3.1.5.
Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment Advisory Council
The Office of Institutional Effectiveness strives to instill and promote a culture of a Universitywide, comprehensive, and unified continuous accreditation and institutional research and
assessment and ownership of this commitment by all members of the community at all
locations and in all programs.
The Office is led by the Chief Institutional Effectiveness Officer who is appointed by the
University President and may report to the President or Provost. The individual appointed to
lead this office typically appoints and relies on an Advisory Council drawn from the University’s
faculty and staff. The Council serves in an Advisory capacity to the Office of Institutional
Effectiveness and assists in developing University-wide policies and processes with regards to
regional accreditation, specialized accreditations, institutional and program-specific
assessment, and institutional research.
2.3.1.6.
Strategic Enrollment Team
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The Strategic Enrollment Team examines and strengthens recruitment effort and vets
recruitment goals set by each constituent and office. The Team ensures that the recruitment
goals of the University are consistent with the University’s overall strategic goals and
aspirations, both in the short and long term.
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The Strategic Enrollment Team brings together University leaders who are directly responsible
for recruiting students to SMU: the Dean of Enrollment; the Associate Dean of Graduate
Studies; the Dean of the Extended Learning Division; and the VP for International Programs and
Development. Other University members who may be invited to join the Team at its meetings
include the Athletics Director, the Director of Admissions, the Transfer Admissions Counselor,
and faculty leaders directly involved in supporting recruitment efforts, such as the Director of
Nursing, and College/School Deans. The Team is co-chaired by the University President and
Provost.
2.3.1.7.
Study Abroad and other Travel Advisory Committee (SA-TAC)
SATAC studies and recommends to the Provost, and Chief International Programs Officer,
policies and standards for the creation, deletion, and periodic review of University-sponsored
academic programs involving domestic and international travel abroad and advises the Provost
on academic policies concerning study abroad, the Chief International Programs Officer
regarding scholarships for study abroad and other matters relating to travel, and the Chief
Student Affairs Officer regarding policies and standards governing service learning programs.
Specifically, SA-TAC
1. Considers and recommends the creation, change, or deletion of study abroad and other
travel programs;
2. Develops and supports the implementation of academic policies pertaining to teaching and
studying abroad;
3. Evaluates faculty- and staff-led program proposals and coordinates student evaluations of
these programs;
4. Reviews student scholarship applications and recommends scholarship allocations
5. Reviews proposed study abroad programs and recommend their approval to the Chief
International Programs Officer;
6. Develops and disseminates written guidelines and policies regarding the health and safety
of SMU students, faculty, and staff studying abroad or conducting university sponsored
research or business in another country;
7. Periodically reviews and discusses health and safety policies pertaining to Study Abroad and
other travel, and recommends appropriate policy revisions and actions to the Provost and
Chief Student Affairs Officer;
8. Reviews and makes recommendations on study abroad policy and program issues as
requested by the Chief International Programs Officer, the Provost, or University President.
Provost
Chief Student Affairs Officer
Chief International Programs Officer
Two Deans appointed by the Provost
Associate Dean of Students
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

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Membership on SA-TAC consists of the following:


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

Registrar
Coordinator/Director of Study Abroad (serves as chair)
Director of International Programs
Director of Financial Aid or his/her designee
Director of Counseling and Wellness Services
Three faculty representatives
The three faculty representatives are elected from among faculty members who have
participated in Study Abroad / international programs. Faculty representatives and the two
Deans serve two-year terms and must step off the Committee for a year before being reappointed to it.
2.3.1.8.
University Budget Committee
The Budget Committee is Advisory to the University President.
The Committee reviews the Annual Budget and the proposed Budget for the following year and
makes recommendations regarding funding priorities in keeping with the University’s Strategic
Plan and goals.
In making budgetary recommendations, the Committee seeks to develop a comprehensive
understanding of the resource issues facing the University and the context in which budgetary
decisions are made, and identifies core values and principles which inform decision-making
with regard to the allocation of resources. Committee members help to develop the budgetary
process and make recommendations about budgetary allocations as they move from unit needs
to allocations by the Office of Finance, which consults with Cabinet members and the University
President, before submitting the budget for approval by the President and then by the Board of
Trustees.

Vice President for Finance – Co-chair
Provost – Co-chair
One additional member of Cabinet appointed by the University President
One College/School Dean appointed by the Provost
Four Faculty representatives elected through the Faculty Senate; faculty representatives
will typically consist of one from each of the Colleges/Schools unless the Faculty elects
to present more than one representative from the School of Business because of the
specific expertise called for in representation on this committee
The Dean of the Extended Learning Division and the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies
will alternate their service on the Committee in two-year terms
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

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The Budget Committee is composed of the following members:

Three staff members appointed by the University President upon recommendation by
members of Cabinet, with one member drawn from each of the following divisions:
Academic Affairs; Student Affairs; Office of Admissions
The four Faculty and three Staff representatives serve three-year terms and rotate off the
Committee for the next year before becoming eligible for reappointment to the Committee.
This process captures the University’s intent, through the course of several years, to inform
many members of the community about the budgeting process.
The Committee Co-Chairs will typically call meetings of the University Budget Advisory
Committee, as needed.
2.3.1.9.
University Council
The University Council is an ad hoc advisory body convened by the University President.
Members are drawn from the University’s Trustees, administrators, academic leaders, faculty,
staff, and students. The Council serves as a communications forum on news and information of
importance to the University community.
2.3.1.10.
University Retention Committee
The University Retention Committee is a University committee appointed by, and reporting to,
the University President. RTC is currently chaired by the Chief Enrollment Officer. It may be
chaired or co-chaired by the Chief Enrollment Officer, the Chief Student Affairs Officer, and/or
the Provost.
Members on RTC typically include the Registrar, the Dean of Students, the Director of the
Learning Center and/or Director of Advising and Co-curricular Learning, two College/School
Deans recommended by the Provost, the Vice President of International Programs and
Development, the Director of Financial Aid, the Director of Institutional Research, and three
faculty members elected through Faculty Senate. Elected faculty members must be drawn
from different Colleges/Schools, serve a two-year term, and rotate off the Committee for one
year before becoming eligible to be reappointed to the Committee.

students are prepared for success at Saint Martin’s
the University is attentive to student outcomes
the University is effectively accomplishing its educational and social mission
the University’s reputation continues to expand as a direct consequence of attention to
student success
the University continuously extends its capacity to recruit exceptional students
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RTC aims to ensure that

the University is regularly responsive to an evolving higher education landscape and the
needs of new generations of students
The Committee analyzes data (retention, withdrawal, housing, campus climate, student
satisfaction, etc.) and implements strategies to enhance retention and graduation rates. The
Committee also recommends long-range strategies to address the ongoing needs of all students
and partners with other campus constituencies on its core charge of implementing strategies to
improve retention and graduation. The Committee thus ensures that the University provides
every student with an intentional and dynamic academic and social experience that facilitates
his/her timely completion of a degree.
2.3.1.11.
Veterans Support Committee (VSC)
VSC supports the transition of veterans from military to civilian life, and guides veterans as they
embark on or continue their university experience. Working with faculty, staff, departments, and
student organizations, VSC ensures that SMU is committed to enabling veterans to succeed in
their educational goals.
The Committee advances policies, programs, and opportunities for Veterans and is comprised of
faculty and staff from across the University and is appointed by the University President or Chief
Student Affairs Officer.
2.3.1.12.
Ad Hoc University Committees/Task Forces with Faculty membership/participants
The University President, Provost, or other Vice Presidents may form ad hoc Committees or
Task Forces to attend to University initiatives, functions, and areas that require particular
attention and lie outside the scope of standing or existing committees.
Faculty representatives to these Committees or Task Forces may be appointed by the person
creating the Committee or Task Force and/or elected by the Faculty.
In seeking to staff these Committees or Task Forces, the person initiating the ad hoc body will
inform the Faculty President of the charge of the body, the number of faculty representatives
sought, the number of faculty appointed directly to the Committee/Task Force, and the terms
of service of all appointed and/or elected faculty representatives.
Academic Affairs
Enrollment and Student Affairs
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At the invitation of the Chairperson of the Board of Trustees and University President, the
Faculty may choose to serve on select standing as well as ad hoc Board Committees as
requested; Faculty representatives to these committees will be elected by the full Faculty:
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2.3.2. Board of Trustees Committees with Faculty Members/Attendees
Facilities Committee
Finance Committee
International Programs
Investment Sub-committee
Subcommittee on Compensation
Marketing and Communications
University Advancement
3.
FACULTY ADVANCEMENT
Faculty Advancement occurs both through the progress of faculty from tenure-track to tenured
appointments and through their progress in rank from Assistant to Associate and Full
Professors. Full-time tenure-track faculty members typically apply for promotion in their sixth
year of full-time service (in their eleventh semester of full time service) at Saint Martin’s
University. Faculty may apply sooner than in their sixth year for tenure and promotion,
provided they have the support of their Chair and Department. Part-time tenure track faculty
must meet with their Chair and Dean to determine equivalency based on the percentage of
their annual teaching load.
Ranked tenured and tenure-track faculty members enhance the University’s academic
community, extend the University’s mission and commitment to serving the educational needs
of students, and ensure the Faculty’s continuing enrichment of teaching and learning.
Ranked tenure-track and tenured faculty members lead the Faculty’s self-governance,
coordinate with academic leaders on faculty governance, and contribute towards overall
governance of the University by collaborating with University leaders and by electing
representatives to serve on inter-College/School and University as well as Board committees
and task forces.
A foundation of Benedictine hospitality and stability, the principle of mutual respect, and
commitment to intellectual rigor underpin the University’s attention to advancing, tenuring,
and developing faculty through the tenure and promotions process and beyond.
Tenure and Promotion are granted by the University’s Board of Trustees upon recommendation
by the University President. The process for the granting of Tenure and Promotion begins with
a recommendation by the home Department of the faculty member, the College/School Tenure
and Promotions Committee, the Dean of the College/School, the University Advancement
Committee, and the Provost who makes his/her recommendation regarding Tenure and
Promotion to the University President. The process is detailed in Bylaws, 3.
Saint Martin’s recognizes the virtue of the tenure process as promoting academic freedom and
ensuring the stability of our academic community in the Benedictine tradition as scholars
dedicated to excellence in teaching, learning, and scholarship. Faculty may apply for tenure
and promotion simultaneously.
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Tenure
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3.1.
The tenure process assures commitment by the institution and the individual to the ideals of
academic freedom, integrity, and stability, as well as to high levels of competence,
professionalism, and service. It is founded on the premise that the institution is dedicated to its
Faculty and their development, and that the Faculty is dedicated to the ideals and objectives of
their academic specialties, their individual and collective development as teachers and scholars,
and the mission of the University.
Tenure determinations are founded on professional evaluations of individual faculty members
by their academic peers, beginning at the level of the Department before advancing at the level
of the College/School, and subsequently at the level of the University. In evaluating their peers,
faculty are guided by a common purpose and the principles of academic excellence and
academic integrity demonstrated through effective teaching, scholarly engagement, and
University service.
The awarding of tenure signifies recognition by peers and the University of a faculty member’s
strength in teaching, promise as a scholar, and commitment to serving the University
community as well as his/her academic discipline and the Academy itself. It also signifies a
commitment by the University to the continuing employment and development of the faculty
member, subject to the conditions outlined elsewhere in this Handbook.
3.2.
Promotion
The promotion system recognizes the continuing development of faculty as teachers and
scholars and rewards excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service, while continually
extending faculty commitments to these core activities through a regularized system of
attention and support by their peers and academic leaders.
Promotion in rank is accompanied by an increase in the faculty member’s salary.
Recognizing that Regular Faculty were appointed as Assistant Professors during a period in
which faculty and University leaders were engaged in evolving a Faculty Handbook and robust
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Tenure track faculty appointed prior to December 31, 2013, may elect to be considered for
tenure and promotion in accordance with terms and procedures outlined in the Handbook
under which they entered Saint Martin’s University (heretofore referred to as the previous
Handbook). It should be noted that the current Handbook and Bylaws aim to clarify those
procedures and policies and to fill in information gaps which may exist in the previous
Handbook. Faculty appointed prior to December 31, 2013, if they elect to apply for tenure and
promotion in accordance with procedures outlined in the previous Handbook, may not access
developmental support identified in the current Handbook (such as reduced teaching in the
fourth year) that attend to procedures for tenure and promotion outlined in the current Faculty
Handbook and Faculty Bylaws.
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Terms specific to Tenure-track Faculty hired as Assistant Professors prior to Dec 31, 2013:
as well as clear policies regarding faculty work life, the University will provide the following to
Regular Faculty appointed to tenure track Assistant Professorships from fall 2008 to 2013.
If the above Regular Faculty members apply for tenure and promotion at the same time and
receive tenure but not promotion to the rank of Associate Professor, and they apply for
promotion again to the rank of Associate Professor within three years of receiving tenure, and
receive a positive recommendation for promotion at the later date, the following will apply:
They will be credited with years of service at the rank of Associate Professor for the period
from their granting of tenure to the point at which they are promoted.
The increase in salary that the faculty member receives upon promotion to Associate
Professor will be to the point on the salary scale that he/she would have reached had
he/she been tenured and promoted at once after the first presentation of a portfolio to
the Advancement Committee and University leaders.
Upon successful promotion at the later date, the faculty member will receive pay
equivalent to the stipend granted at promotion retroactive to their granting of tenure as a
one-time lump sum payment.
The University President and Provost will recommend to the Faculty Advancement
Committee that the faculty member be approved to present his/her candidacy for
promotion to the rank of full Professor on a schedule that recognizes all his/her years of
credited service.
In other words, a positive decision on promotion to the rank of Associate Professor within three
years of receipt of tenure (if the applicant has applied for tenure and promotion simultaneously
and received only tenure) will result in a salary increase equivalent to that which the faculty
member would have received had he/she received positive recommendations on tenure and
promotion to Associate Professor simultaneously at the point of his/her first application for
advancement through tenure and in rank, and will include a recapture of the intervening years
in terms of both salary and service.
The above terms apply only if faculty members in the category defined above reapply for
promotion to Associate Professor no later than within three years after first presenting their
portfolio for tenure and promotion.
Faculty members may, of course, apply for promotion at any time thereafter in accordance with
standard procedures outlined in the Faculty Handbook.
The University has evolved a Step system by which longevity of service overall and within ranks
is recognized through annual increases. While differences in salary exist among the University’s
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Salary and Rank
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3.3.
Colleges and Schools – in part to recognize differences by discipline -- step salary increases
typically occur every year, effective at the start of the following year.
If financial reasons prevent the University from awarding Step increases in any given year,
increases will accrue for that year and will be included in the awarding of a Step increase in the
following year.
Step increases in salary do not accrue during leaves of absence and periods of absence from
teaching at Saint Martin's University other than sabbaticals or other approved academic leaves.
Subject to the availability of financial resources, the Faculty entrusts Trustees and University
leaders to ensure that Faculty salaries, benefits, and workloads become competitive in the
future relative to that of faculty colleagues at SMU’s peer and competitor institutions.
4. FACULTY DEVELOPMENT
4.1.
Conferences and Research / Development Support
The faculty travel program supports the development of faculty members as teacher scholars
and scholar teachers by enabling them to participate and present their work in meetings of
learned societies in their disciplines and areas of primary expertise. Faculty may apply for
travel funds to support their research interests, to cultivate expertise in their areas of
disciplinary expertise, and to develop expertise in areas such as the SMU Core curriculum or the
First Year Experience. First priority of the Committee is to support the faculty member’s
research interests and presentations or participation at conferences.
Travel funds are administered through the Faculty Development Committee as well as by Deans
of the various Colleges/Schools, and the Provost.
4.2.
Mentoring Program
Active mentoring has been shown in numerous studies to contribute significantly to a new
faculty member’s career development and professional satisfaction. Reflecting the University
Mission and the Benedictine virtue of hospitality, SMU’s Mentor Program is designed to
a. Promote excellence in teaching, scholarly activity, and service;
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Mentoring of new faculty occurs through their probationary years as a tenure-track faculty
member, both formally and informally. The Department Chair functions as a mentor to new
faculty through his/her leadership of the Department. Because Chairs also evaluate and assess
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b. Support new faculty members in their academic orientation to their
College/School and University;
c. Offer new faculty members a collegial and risk-free environment in which to
develop and refine their professional growth and development.
the development of tenure-track faculty members, the Chair also appoints one or more
additional mentors from within and/ or outside the Department who can serve as Advisors and
guides to new faculty.
Deans are encouraged to work with Chairs to evolve an evaluation of the mentoring program
and its impact on faculty development and on conducting workshops on mentoring.
4.3.
Fourth-Year Teaching Reduction for Tenure-track Faculty
Tenure-track/tenure-eligible faculty who successfully complete their Third-Year Review, and are
eligible to apply for tenure in their sixth full year of teaching in accordance with the terms of
the current Faculty Handbook, may reduce their teaching load to a total of eighteen semester
credits during their fourth year in order to advance their scholarship in preparation for
presenting their tenure portfolio in their sixth year. The reduction to eighteen semester credits
for the academic year may be taken by reducing one’s load in a single semester or by spreading
the reduction through both academic terms with nine credits of teaching in each.
Tenure track Faculty members appointed between 2010-11 and 2013-14, (who are subject to
the Handbook under which they were hired in considerations of tenure and promotion) who
wish to apply for tenure and promotion under the terms of this Handbook and Bylaws may
extend their eligibility to apply for tenure by one academic year, and request this reduction of
the Provost with the approval of their Chair and Dean, in any year prior to submitting their
tenure application. Eligibility for this reduction is restricted to Regular Faculty appointed to
teach the current standard load of twelve semester credits each semester.
Approval of the reduction is subject to presentation of a credible research agenda, promise of
successful progress on the project as demonstrated through previous accomplishments, the
ability of the faculty member’s Department to meet its teaching obligation to students, and
successful recommendation by the Department Chair and Dean of the College/School. Tenuretrack faculty who receive this reduction must return to full-time teaching in subsequent years.
4.4.
Sabbatical Leave
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Sabbatical leaves are approved by the University President, based on recommendations by the
Faculty Development Committee, the Dean of the faculty member’s College/School, and the
Provost, in that order and subject to budget availability.
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Sabbatical leaves are made available to Regular Faculty for the purpose of enabling them to
engage in creative, intellectual or artistic activities appropriate to their discipline (i.e., research,
writing, etc.). Full-time regular faculty are eligible every seventh year of full-time continuous
service to the University to apply for a sabbatical leave; eligibility of part-time Regular Faculty is
pro-rated. E.g. a Regular Faculty member who teaches half-time is eligible to apply for a
sabbatical leave in his/her fourteenth year of teaching.
Faculty members are expected to submit written reports summarizing their professional
development while on sabbatical to the Dean of their College/School within six weeks after the
conclusion of their sabbatical leave. Faculty members are also obligated to complete a year of
full-time teaching after accessing a sabbatical.
4.5.
Post-tenure Development and Review
The University regards the ongoing development of Faculty members as teacher-scholars and
scholar-teachers, both prior to tenure and post-tenure, and at all ranks, as vital to sustaining
the life of the University and its commitment to academic excellence.
Post-tenure development, review, and renewal begin after tenure is granted, and are founded
on an expectation of continued professional growth and productivity in the areas of teaching,
scholarship, and service, and ongoing support by the University for the development of faculty
members in these areas.
In attending to post-tenure development and reviews of Faculty, in keeping with the mandate
of the 2014 Accreditation Standards of the Northwest Commission of Colleges and Universities:
2.B.6 All faculty are evaluated in a regular, systematic, substantive, and collegial manner at
least once within every five-year period of service. The evaluation process specifies the
timeline and criteria by which faculty are evaluated; utilizes multiple indices of
effectiveness, each of which is directly related to the faculty member’s roles and
responsibilities, including evidence of teaching effectiveness for faculty with teaching
responsibilities; contains a provision to address concerns that may emerge between
regularly scheduled evaluations; and provides for administrative access to all primary
evaluation data. Where areas for improvement are identified, the institution works with
faculty members to develop and implement a plan to address identified areas of concern.
The University also adheres to the principles articulated by the AAUP in its “Minimum
Standards for Good Practice If a Formal System of Post-Tenure Review Is Established”
(Appendix X).
The procedures adopted by the Faculty and their academic leaders regarding post-tenure
development and review are outlined in Bylaws 4.5.
A Faculty member may request a leave of absence without pay, for a maximum period of two
years, from the Provost. Leave requests for any FMLA-qualifying reason will be coordinated
with Human Resources to ensure protection of the faculty member's FMLA rights and
compliance with the University's FMLA policy.
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Unpaid Leaves of Absence
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4.6.
The leave of absence must be requested by January 15 if the leave is to be activated by August
1 of the same year and by September 15 if it is to be activated by January 1 of the following
year. Notifications of approval will be made by March 1 and November 1, respectively. Leaves
of absence are approved one year at a time and an extension by the deadlines noted above has
to be requested for a second consecutive year of absence.
Faculty members are required by February 1 to notify the Provost about their return to work
responsibilities in August of that year and by October 1 about their return to work
responsibilities in January 1 of the following year after the period of their approved leave.
Failure to notify the Provost by the designated deadlines may result in the non-issuance of
further appointment letters.
During a faculty member’s unpaid leave of absence, his/her office and other allocated spaces,
such as a laboratory or Library carrel, will be reassigned for use by others by the Dean of his/her
College/School.
An approved leave of absence may affect the faculty member’s time-line towards an
application for tenure or promotion, but will not affect the faculty member’s eligibility for
continued employment, promotion, or contract renewal as long as the policies and procedures
which attend to taking a leave of absence as outlined above are adhered to.
5. FACULTY DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
Saint Martin’s University subscribes to the Statement on Professional Ethics that was adopted
by the Council of the American Association of University Professors in April, 1966, approved by
the Association’s Committee on Professional Ethics, adopted by the Association’s Council in
June 1987, and endorsed by the Seventy-third Annual Meeting as Association Policy (See
Appendix A).
5.1.
General Expectations: Teaching, Scholarship, and Service
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As teachers, faculty members are expected to model integrity, honesty, rational thinking, and
open-mindedness toward new and unfamiliar educational experiences. Faculty must not only
transmit information, but also guide students into becoming self-learners, and engage students
in the greater conversation of scholarship. Faculty must evaluate student work fairly and with
sufficient evidence upon which to base those evaluations. Faculty must respect the personal
nature of the relationship between student and teacher and avoid exploitation of students for
private advantage. Faculty must respect the privacy of students in non-academic matters--
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Regular faculty at Saint Martin’s University have three distinct but essential duties: to teach, to
engage in scholarship, and to serve the University and community by engaging in activities such
as committee work, recruiting events, student life, and the like. Regular full-time faculty are
typically expected to be on campus at least four days a week during each regular semester of
the academic year so that they can fulfill their teaching and other responsibilities.
unless there is an obvious case of potential imminent harm to the student or others-and to
protect their academic freedom.
As scholars, faculty must model for their students the honesty, discipline, and courage of those
who seek out and create new knowledge or creative acts. Because as teachers faculty expect
their students to test out their ideas among their peers, so too must faculty. Scholarship goes
beyond disciplinary competence and currency and contributes to the marketplace of ideas in
specific fields of study or creative production. Although professors may follow outside or
remunerative interests, these interest must never compromise their scholarly activity.
As community members, faculty are expected to serve, over the course of their careers, actively
and productively on standing or ad hoc committees; and to attend and contribute to
school/college, the Faculty Senate, Faculty Assembly and University meetings, including
Convocations, Baccalaureate Mass, Commencement, employee training sessions, orientations,
and workshops. Faculty members are encouraged to volunteer for Admission events, to
sponsor student clubs and activities, and to contribute to the Benedictine atmosphere, identity,
and mission of the University.
Continuing Contingent Faculty, such as ESL Instructors, are expected to teach and contribute to
the University through service. Research is not expected.
5.2.
Advising
Advising is an integral part of a student’s development at Saint Martin’s University. The advising
process establishes a collaborative relationship between student and Advisor in which the
student is supported and guided in his/her choice of courses, academic directions, and postgraduation goals. Effective advising encourages students to think critically, seek out resources
available within the University, and develop long-term goals and action plans. Effective Advisors
enable students to take personal responsibility for exploring options and making decisions.
Ultimately, advising allows each student to achieve a meaningful and successful educational
experience at Saint Martin’s and a transition to life and work after their formal education.
Chairs, Deans, and the Provost collaborate on ensuring that advising loads are equitably
distributed among faculty.
ESL Advisors advise students in the ESL program.
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Faculty Advisors, appointed by the Provost, also advise incoming freshman and transfer
students through the Learning, Writing, and Advising Center.
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Regular Faculty members are expected to serve as Advisors to students who major in their
discipline and to function as Advisors to pre-majors as assigned. First Year students who have
identified their major in the School of Engineering or the School of Business or the College of
Education and Counseling Psychology are also assigned to an Advisor in their School.
Academic advising is an important faculty responsibility. Although the University's policy is that
the final responsibility for meeting graduation requirements rests with the student, faculty
Advisors have an obligation to help direct the studies of advisees and answer questions they
may have, including questions about the Core Curriculum and degree requirements. To this
end, all faculty members are expected to stay informed on current policies and procedures,
have knowledge of the Saint Martin’s Core as well as program requirements in a major/minor,
be familiar with available student services, and refer students to the appropriate office when
necessary. Advisors are also expected to be available to advisees during regular office hours
and by appointment.
5.3.
Course Syllabi and Teaching Responsibilities
Faculty must meet their assigned classes at the scheduled times. Changes in the schedule
requested by the instructor are approved by the Department Chair, communicated by the Chair
to the Registrar. If, for some valid reason, the instructor cannot meet a class, he/she informs
the Chair, who will notify the students of the cancellation of the class and inform the Dean. If
longer-term absence is foreseen, the Department Chair is notified by the faculty member and
arrangements, satisfactory to assuring student progress, are made with the Dean.
A period of final examinations is scheduled at the end of the semester by the Registrar’s Office.
No examinations are to be administered to classes during the last regular week of scheduled
classes in lieu of the final examination. Final examinations, if given, must be administered at the
date and time specified by Registrar. Exceptions to this policy must be approved by the Dean.
Faculty members are expected to maintain adequate records of student progress and
attendance.
5.4.
Evaluating and Grading Students
All courses offered at SMU for semester credits are graded by faculty members. Grades serve
as an evaluation of student work, a means of communicating to students and future employers
about a student’s performance and potential for further success; a source of motivation to
students for continued learning and improvement, and a means of organizing learning in
semester cycles in that grades mark transitions in a course and bring closure to it.
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Given SMU’s firm commitment to individualized attention to student development, creating
assignments for grading, developing criteria for grading and evaluating student progress,
providing meaningful feedback on assignments, and grading itself are time-consuming but vital
functions within a faculty member’s spectrum of responsibilities each semester.
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Additionally, grading provides students with feedback on their own learning, clarifying for them
what they understand, what they don’t understand, and where they can improve. Grading also
provides feedback to instructors on their students’ learning, information that can inform future
teaching decisions.
Given the importance of timely feedback to students, all Faculty members are expected to
submit grades by the required deadlines set by the Registrar in each semester.
5.5.
Maintaining Office Hours
Regular Faculty and continuing Contingent Faculty members are expected to be available to
their students through appointments as well as through regularly-scheduled office hours during
the semesters in which they teach. It is recommended that Faculty post a schedule of their
office hours and submit a copy of their hours to their Dean. Regular Faculty members are
typically expected to maintain five – seven office hours a week. Some office hours, especially in
the case of faculty who teach online, may be held online with approval by the Department
Chair and Dean. In the case of faculty members who teach on multiple campuses during the
same semester, office hours may be proportionately divided between the different campuses.
5.6.
Attending to Academic Integrity in the Classroom
Faculty members have a responsibility to ensure and promote academic honesty and integrity
in their classrooms. The University’s policies regarding plagiarism and procedures to be
followed in identified cases of academic dishonesty by students are outlined in detail in the
Faculty Bylaws and in the Student Handbook.
5.7.
Serving on Faculty and University Committees
All Regular Faculty members are expected to further SMU’s academic mission and the goals of
their departments, College/School, or University through service on committees and task
forces.
5.8.
Mentoring Junior Colleagues
The interests of departments and the University as well as of individual faculty members are
best served when new faculty members are constructively mentored and reviewed.
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Mentors help new faculty members achieve excellence and understand the Saint Martin’s
University community, including SMU’s system of shared governance and culture of academic
excellence. Mentors are encouraged to make themselves available to the new faculty member,
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Constructive mentoring and reviewing of tenure-track faculty helps new colleagues realize their
full potential as teachers, scholars, and members of the SMU community. Given all that is at
stake, mentoring tenure-track faculty members is vital work undertaken by seasoned faculty
members as part of their commitment to their disciplines, the College, the University, and the
Academy. Though the University has adopted a formal system of mentoring, all faculty are
expected to pay particular attention to nurturing a “climate of mentoring” for new colleagues in
their departments and in the University as a whole so that all members thrive.
read /critique proposals and papers, and provide periodic reviews of progress. Mentors also
help new faculty members establish a professional network.
The benefits of the University’s mentoring program include the retention of excellent faculty
colleagues and consequent enhancement of programmatic quality as well as the University’s
mission and academic goals. Deans are encouraged to collect and maintain data regarding the
impact and value of the mentoring program.
The importance of mentoring to tenure track faculty as an aspect of faculty development and
further details regarding the mentoring program are outlined in the Faculty Bylaws 4.2.
5.9. Annual Reports
All Regular Faculty and faculty / instructors on continuing appointments at SMU submit Annual
Reports summarizing the spectrum of their professional activities during the course of the
academic year to their Department Chair and the Dean of their College/School. Feedback from
Chairs and Deans regarding Annual Reports is especially important in the case of tenure-track
faculty as they progress towards tenure.
Department Chairs meet with individual faculty, especially those in their tenure track years, to
discuss their Annual Reports alongside other relevant materials such as student evaluations of
their courses.
Chairs submit their Annual Reports to the Dean.
Deans may additionally discuss individual Annual Reports with any faculty member as
necessary, but must typically include the Department Chair in this discussion. Tenure-track
faculty members may request the presence of another colleague in lieu of the Chair. A
summary of this meeting in writing should be maintained by the Dean and copies of the same
should be shared with the faculty member and the Department Chair.
ESL Instructors in OIPD submit their Annual Reports to the Chief International Programs Officer,
who reviews their ARs alongside other relevant materials and shares a written evaluative
summary of each instructor with the instructor. The ARs and the Chief International Program
Officer’s annual evaluation are submitted to the Provost and become part of the Instructor’s
personnel file.
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Further details regarding the submission of ARs as well as the process for providing faculty with
feedback are outlined in the Faculty Bylaws 4.5. & 5.
5.10.
Participating in University Activities and Initiatives
Faculty engagement in service includes attending, supporting, and participating in University
activities such as Spirit Day, Scholars Day, Advising Day, etc. ESL Instructors are expected to
attend meetings, workshops, and retreats organized by OIPD.
6. FACULTY CONTRACTS/LETTERS OF APPOINTMENT
Regular full-time and part-time Faculty and Instructors with continuing appointments at SMU
receive letters of appointment which span nine-months, typically from August 16 until May 15
of the following year; faculty members are expected to be on campus and assume
responsibilities from Convocation in the fall until Commencement in the spring on days when
classes are in session, except for the University’s scheduled vacation periods. At point of hire,
Faculty will be reminded to safeguard their original Letter of Appointment, which must be
included in their application for tenure and promotion.
Letters of Appointment specify the following:
Nine-month Salary, salary step, and payment schedule
Faculty Rank:
Tenure Status: Tenure/Tenured
Date of the Third Year Review (if applicable)
Date when eligible for Tenure (if applicable)
Date when eligible for Promotion (if applicable)
Administrative Duties: If applicable, including any attendant reductions and compensation
A Regular Faculty member’s first Letter of Appointment with SMU will also specify whether
prior credit has been granted for teaching, based on criteria outlined in the Faculty Handbook
and Faculty Bylaws. All Letters of appointment will additionally direct faculty members to the
Employee Handbook, Faculty Handbook, and Faculty Bylaws.
The nine-month contractual salary dates are used by the University to calculate grant-funded
releases, summer salaries, and other salary equivalencies as needed.
Faculty members, though required to be on campus from Convocation until Commencement,
may elect to use the week prior to Convocation to conduct workshops, consider curricular
matters, and other issues related to their work life as teachers and scholars.
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It is the responsibility of each faculty member to know and adhere to the University’s policies
and regulations. Adherence to these regulations is part of the contract of each faculty member.
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Contingent full time and part-time faculty members receive contracts for a year, semester,
term, or summer session, as appropriate.
When questions of interpretation of the Faculty Handbook arise, clarification should be sought
from the Faculty Affairs Committee.
6.1.
Outside Employment
Outside employment, including teaching in another institution may not be undertaken during
the academic year by regular faculty members without prior approval of the Dean and the
Provost, who ascertains whether or not the outside employment interferes or is in conflict with
the faculty member’s academic duties or reduces his/her service to the University.
In the event that a request to accept outside employment is denied, the full-time faculty
member may petition the Provost for a reduction of contract so that he/she might accept the
outside employment. (This reduction can apply to regular part-time faculty, but only if they are
more than half time and less than full time, since part-time faculty must be at least half time to
be considered eligible for tenure.) The Provost grants approval of outside employment in
writing after consulting with the Dean of the Faculty member’s College/School.
A detailed Conflict of Interest and Conflict of Commitments Policy, which supplements the
above policy, is presented in the Handbook 1.5.4.
6.2.
Consulting
In some academic fields there are opportunities to do consulting work. Consultancies may be
deemed valuable by some departments in that they provide experience complementary to that
gained through research and contribute to professional growth.
Insofar as consulting work is most often akin to outside employment, the guidelines on Outside
Employment are followed. There is no reduction of workload to accommodate consulting work
unless such work is done for the University.
Departments whose members are likely to be called upon as consultants must have written
department policies which state specific terms concerning length of time, number of hours, use
of University laboratories and equipment, etc. Deans are responsible for creating these policies
in consultation with Department Chairs and submitting these policies for approval to the
Provost. Deans must also update the Provost annually through a written report about all
consulting work and any outside employment for remuneration that is undertaken by faculty in
their College/School.
Faculty workload is usually described in hours per week of formal class meetings. However, the
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7. FACULTY WORKLOAD
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For further information, please refer to the Conflict of Interest and Conflict of Commitments
Policy in the Handbook, 1.5.4.
University recognizes that the academic workload of a Regular Faculty member encompasses a
broader range of professional activities and practice in support of the University’s mission and
strategic goals. Assignment of an individual faculty member's workload, therefore, takes
account of:
(a) Instruction and preparation of courses
(b) Student supervision and instruction in laboratories, studios, and other group settings
(c) Supervision of students in tutorials, independent study, theses, projects, practica,
internships, student teaching, etc.
(d) Research or other creative activity and curriculum or pedagogical development
(e) Non-instructional academic activities such as committee service or special leadership
assignments
(f) Student advising, mentoring, and counseling
A full complement of the above responsibilities, whose scope may vary in keeping with
University needs and a faculty member’s particular strengths and interests, constitutes a fulltime work load for Regular Faculty.
Individual faculty members at Saint Martin’s University typically carry a teaching load of twelve
credit hours each semester, with varying levels of emphasis on one or more of the above
responsibilities constituting the balance of their full-time work load.
7.1.
Teaching Load
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Regular Faculty in the School of Engineering and other Colleges/Schools who were appointed
with a normal commitment of 9 semester credits of teaching each semester will continue to
teach in accordance with their Letter of Appointment, subject to their continued commitments
to scholarly engagement and University service.
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The faculty teaching load at Saint Martin’s is defined in terms of teaching credit hours. A
Regular Faculty member in a tenure-track or tenured role, regardless of rank, typically teaches
twenty-four semester hours each academic year. An adequate definition of a faculty member’s
full-time workload takes into account the full spectrum of a Regular Faculty member’s
professional and institutional responsibilities, which includes scholarship and service to the
University community.
For the purpose of calculating faculty reductions in teaching load as in-kind contributions in
grant applications, the University equates release from one course as equal to one-twelfth of a
faculty member’s annual work load during the academic year, two-courses as the equivalent of
one-sixth a faculty member’s annual academic year work load, four courses as the equivalent of
a faculty member’s one-third annual work load, and so on.
For the purpose of calculating full-time equivalency for faculty members in part-time
positions/Contingent Faculty without professional and institutional responsibilities for
scholarship or service, the University uses a formula which is detailed in the Faculty Bylaws 7.2.
The Provost, working in consort with the Faculty Affairs Committee and College/School Deans,
and subject to the availability of resources as well as attention to the University’s strategic and
long-term goals, regularly attends to the issue of equity in the overall work loads of faculty
members across the University’s Colleges and Schools.
7.1.1. Directed and Independent Studies
Directed study is designed for students who wish to research and study a topic not covered in a
course offering or to explore a topic in greater depth. In unusual circumstances, an
independent study enables a student to take a course listed in the catalog on an individualized
basis.
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Directed / Independent Studies when they are out-of-load during the academic year, because
they constitute teaching, are calculated towards a reduction to be activated at a later date.
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Regular Faculty sometimes teach Independent Studies or Directed Studies with undergraduate
or graduate students. The undertaking of Directed / Independent Studies is typically limited to
no more than nine semester credits per year per faculty member during the two regular
semesters of the academic year. Directed / Independent Studies are also restricted to Regular
Faculty (whose appointments are continuous), though in special circumstances, an exception to
this norm may be recommended by a Chair and Dean to the Provost. After undertaking a total
of Independent or Directed Studies totaling 27 semester credits of teaching through the course
of several regular semesters (summer teaching of Directed / Independent Studies do not count
in this calculation because Summer teaching, including Directed / Independent Studies, are
compensated) a faculty member may be placed on a reduced teaching load of nine semester
credits (typically three courses) in the semester following such accumulation. The reduction
may be taken by the faculty member in any semester subsequent to the accumulation.
The above does not apply if Independent or Directed Studies are compensated within a School
or College or if they are part of a faculty member’s in-load teaching during the academic year;
such an arrangement should constitute an exception rather than the norm and should be
approved by the Provost in each instance. No credit towards a release will accrue in these
cases. The above policy does not apply to internships or other kinds of supervised co-curricular
assignments.
Faculty loads may not, however, typically fall below nine semester credits in a regular semester;
therefore, faculty members on already-reduced loads of nine or fewer semester credits in a
semester have to exercise their right to a reduced teaching load – resulting from teaching a
series of Directed / Independent Studies – to the semester during which they return to their
standard teaching load of twelve semester credits each semester. Accumulated DS / IS credits
never expire and may be accumulated to gain two continuously reduced semesters of teaching;
credits may not be applied for more than one course reduction in each semester.
7.2.
Teaching Load Reductions
7.2.1. Approved Reductions in Teaching Load
The University may request that a faculty member assume non-teaching activities in general
service to his/her Department, College/School, or University. If this involvement is significantly
more extensive than would normally be expected in general service to the University, the
teaching load of the faculty member may be reduced.
Examples of such responsibilities resulting in approved reductions include:
Director of the First (and Second) Year Experience: teaching typically reduced by 3
credits each Semester
Director of the Center for Teaching and Scholarship: teaching reduced typically by 6
credits each Semester
Director of the SMU Core: teaching reduced typically by 6 credits each semester
Such a request on the part of the University is typically agreed upon by the faculty member, the
Department Chair, the Dean, and the Provost. Faculty who receive reduced loads may not
teach more courses than the reduced load. In exceptional circumstances, the Provost may
approve an exception to this rule. Reductions in teaching are subject to annual review and
adjustment by the Provost, as appropriate.
Sometimes, classes that are planned and scheduled may under-enroll and have to be canceled.
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7.2.2. Unplanned Reductions in Teaching Load
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In any event, no Regular Faculty member should typically, as a consequence of undertaking
other service or administrative commitments, reduce his/her load below 6 semester credits in
any semester. Faculty and academic leaders are discouraged from assigning dual
responsibilities to individuals, both of which constitute significant service to the University.
Reduction below 6 teaching credits in any semester of the academic year re-classifies the
faculty member as an administrator/academic leader for the academic year. Exceptions to
these standards and general best practices have to be approved by the Provost.
In the case of Regular Faculty members with a normal full-time teaching commitment of twelve
credits for the semester, if this occurs, the Dean of the College/School will examine the total
number of enrolled students in a faculty member’s full portfolio of classes and present this
information to the Provost. If the total enrollment in a faculty member’s other three courses
totals 54 or more students, the Provost may approve the faculty member to carry a reduced
three-course load in the semester during which one of his/her courses has to be canceled due
to under- or non-enrollment, providing that this is an occasional rather than regular occurrence.
If the total number of students in the faculty member’s other courses is below 54, the faculty
member will collaborate with The Department Chair and the Dean to make alternate
arrangements such as teaching another course (thus reducing the Department’s reliance on
Contingent Faculty), teaching a course in the summer without additional compensation,
undertaking significant administrative / College / School responsibilities if these are available,
or performing comparable other responsibilities, as appropriate.
In the case of faculty members in the School of Engineering who normally carry a load of nine
semester credits, the Dean of the School may give the affected faculty member a choice
between teaching a summer course for no additional compensation and or carrying a load of 12
semester credits in the semester immediately following the one in which the faculty member’s
under-enrolled class had to be canceled, or other comparable options, as appropriate. If
circumstances permit and the need exists, the Dean may, with approval by the Provost, request
that the faculty member undertake significant administrative / School responsibilities, such as
writing the accreditation Report, in lieu of the canceled class. The same applies to individual
faculty members in other Colleges/Schools who were appointed with a normal semester load of
nine semester credits.
7.2.3. Grant-funded Reductions
Faculty members are encouraged to include course-load reductions as part of their budget lines
on grant applications. The University’s Grant’s Officer or the Provost’s Office will provide
guidance and the formula to be used on grant submissions. Course releases resulting from
successful grant applications do not normally reduce a faculty member’s obligations in advising,
committee service, or ongoing responsibilities within his/her Department or College/School.
7.3.
Teaching Overloads
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Regular Faculty, irrespective of their College/School affiliation, who are on a full-time teaching
commitment for the semester (i.e. do not carry administrative or other responsibilities and
therefore are expected to teach a full load) may not be compensated for overload teaching
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Faculty may not typically undertake additional teaching in the form of overloads during regular
semesters. In exceptional circumstances, when Departmental needs are urgent, an exception
to this rule may be recommended by the College/School Dean to the Provost for approval.
Teaching load refers to all teaching activities including those on the Lacey campus, extension
campuses, online courses, and at other institutions.
unless their course load for the semester rises above twelve semester credits because of
Departmental or curricular needs that have to be met. In other words, an overload by
definition involves a commitment to more than twelve semester credits of teaching in a
semester in any of the University’s Colleges and Schools for full-time Regular Faculty.
Exceptions to this norm have to be approved by the Provost in consultation with the Dean of
the College/School.
The same principle will hold for faculty on reduced loads as a result of administrative or other
responsibilities, and Deans will work with them to calculate what constitutes an overload above
the equivalent of twelve semester credits in a semester. Exceptions to this practice have to be
recommended by the College/School Dean and approved by the Provost.
7.4.
Summer Teaching and/or Other Assignments
Summer teaching assignments are based on student needs and faculty interest in undertaking
summer teaching; faculty members are not normally required to teach in the summer term.
Faculty contracted to teach in the summer are expected to commit to teaching and attendant
responsibilities, such as advising, meetings, committees, and other university commitments
during their contractual period.
Faculty remuneration to teach summer courses is calculated on a formula based on the
individual’s nine-month salary for the year.
Faculty who prefer to be relieved from attendant duties during the period of their summer
teaching may elect to be remunerated at the standard adjunct rate for their College/School.
Faculty may also be contracted for other summer assignments for which they will be
remunerated separately.
8. BENEFITS
The University’s Benefits are outlined in detail in the Employee Handbook and Faculty are
encouraged to read the Employee Handbook regarding medical, health, retirement, and other
benefits available to employees of the University.
The following benefits are specific to Faculty and are designed to minimize disruption of
teaching and other responsibilities during the academic year and to facilitate curricular
planning by Department Chairs and Deans.
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8.1.1. Paid Leave for Expectant Mothers
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8.1. Benefits Specific to Regular Faculty
Saint Martin's University is firmly committed to protecting the rights of expectant mothers and
complying with Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act as amended by the Pregnancy
Discrimination Act of 1978. Saint Martin's University’s policy is to treat women affected by
pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions in the same manner as other employees
unable to work because of their physical condition in all employment aspects, including
recruitment, hiring, training, promotion and benefits. Pregnant employees may continue to
work until they are certified as unable to work by their physician. Further, Saint Martin's
University fully recognizes eligible employees’ rights and responsibilities under the Family and
Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Washington State Family Leave Act (WFLA), and the Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA). All eligible faculty members may access family medical leave and
short term disability in accordance with the provisions of the Employee Handbook.
In addition, because of their unique academic responsibilities, which can call for irregular time
commitments, tenure-track and tenured female faculty members who have fulfilled one year of
full-time employment service (two semesters) are eligible for a full semester of paid leave as
part of the University’s attention to pre-natal health and well-being.
For tenure-track faculty, the full semester leave will typically result in an extension of
the tenure probationary process.

The University's paid maternity leave benefit runs concurrently with statutory
FMLA/WFLA leave and replaces paid short term disability leave provided by the
University. A faculty member who chooses to access the full semester paid maternity
leave may in some cases be eligible for additional unpaid FMLA/WFLA leave in the
semester following the baby's birth, but she is not eligible to receive any additional pay
or paid disability leave under the University's short term disability policy.

Faculty members are encouraged to consult the Employee Handbook or contact the
Office of Human Resources with any questions on FMLA and WFLA leave and for
additional information on medical benefits for their new child/children.

Faculty members who access the paid leave of absence as described above may not
undertake overloads or additionally-compensated teaching responsibilities at Saint
Martin’s or elsewhere during the period of their leave.
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
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A pregnant faculty member is eligible for a fully paid leave from teaching her classes for one
semester during the semester in which she is expected to deliver a child. E.g., a faculty member
who expects to deliver / give birth between January 15 and May 15 will be eligible to take a
paid leave of absence in the spring semester of the academic year; a faculty member expecting
to deliver / give birth between August 15 and December 15 will be eligible to take a paid leave
of absence in the fall semester. Faculty members who expect to give birth during the summer
or intersession (May 15 – August 15 or December 15 – January 15) may elect , in consultation
with their Department Chair and College / School Dean, to take a leave of absence in either the
spring or fall semester. Dates are approximate.

A faculty member who accesses a semester’s leave for the delivery / birth of a child or
children may additionally access a semester-long unpaid leave-of-absence in
consultation with her Chair and Dean in the semester immediately following her
semester of fully-paid leave of absence. She may not undertake overload teaching
during the period of her unpaid leave.

A faculty member who does not return to work after her approved leave of absence
(and any approved extension) will be considered to have voluntarily terminated her
employment with Saint Martin's University and will not be entitled to renewal or
reappointment.
8.1.2. Parental Leave
Any faculty member who becomes a parent (through childbirth or placement for adoption or
foster care), who has fulfilled the necessary employment service requirement, may use up to 12
weeks of unpaid FMLA leave for parental leave. FMLA leave will run concurrently with any
other medical leave or reduction (see 8.1.3.) the faculty is taking.
If a faculty member and his or her spouse are both Saint Martin's University employees and
both are eligible for parental leave under this Policy, both may take this parental leave, but not
simultaneously and not for more than a combined total of 12 weeks. The faculty member
requesting parental leave will receive a mutually agreed upon course reduction at the
discretion of the College/School Dean. Parental Leave is not a necessary extension of the tenure
probationary process.
Parental leave must be taken within the first 12 months after the child's birth or placement.
Special circumstances may be agreed upon with the approval of the Department Chair,
College/School Dean and the Provost, in consultation with Human Resources.
8.1.3. Parental Support through Reduction in Load
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Faculty members who are typically on a nine-semester credit teaching load may access this
reduction by being released from all service, administrative, and scholarly commitments only
for two continuous semesters for the delivery or adoption of a child/children or by teaching a
six-credit load in one semester and being released from all service, administrative, and scholarly
commitments only in the subsequent semester.
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Faculty members who are new parents through birth or adoption may be placed on a reduced
teaching load of nine semester credits in each semester of the year in which they deliver or
adopt a child. Faculty members are encouraged to work closely with their Dean on planning
this reduced nine-hour teaching load. This reduced load may extend only through two regular
semesters of the year in the year of delivery or adoption of a child, but may cross academic
years (E.g. a faculty member adopting a child in April may elect to teach a reduced nine-hour
load in the spring semester as well as in the fall semester of the following year).
8.1.4. Externally-funded Research Leaves with supplemental support from the University
Faculty members holding regular appointments may apply for research funding from external
organizations and research leaves from the University to carry out the terms of these grants.
Wherever possible, it is desirable that arrangements for fellowships or other forms of financial
support from external organizations be made and confirmed prior to application for a research
leave from the University. In general, research leave applications should be made sufficiently in
advance to allow processing and enable convenient rearrangement of teaching responsibilities.
Ordinarily, applications should reach the Provost, with endorsements by the Department Chair
and Dean, no later than by October 1 for fall semester leaves to begin the following September
and before February 1 for spring semester leaves to begin the following January. Leave
requests occasioned by certain foundation grants beyond the control of the applicant may be
made later.
Faculty receiving external grants for semester-long or year-long research may also request a
supplemental grant from the University as a “top-up” if the external award they receive falls
short of their normal income for the period of the grant. In awarding supplemental University
funds as a top-up grant to support an externally-funded leave of absence, the Provost will
consider the faculty member’s service to the University and unusual promise of using the leave
to scholarly advantage and to advance his/her teaching.
Within the next semester after they return from leave, faculty members must submit a report
to their Dean and Provost.
The University requires that a faculty member granted research leave which includes pay from
SMU will return to full-time service to the University for the equivalent period following his/her
leave. If this obligation is not fulfilled, the faculty member will be expected to reimburse the
University for the salary paid while on leave, unless specifically relieved of the obligation by the
University President. Faculty members on research leaves are required to notify the Provost by
December 1st of the year about their return to the University in the following fall semester and
by September 1st of their return to the University in the following spring semester.
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In keeping with AAUP recommendations, at the time of initial appointment and periodically
thereafter, faculty will be “both counseled and urged to inform themselves about their
retirement options and benefits” by the Chief Human Resources Officer of the University.
Faculty members should notify University leaders of their decision to retire as far in advance as
possible in order to facilitate timely searches and appointments of replacement faculty. E.g., a
faculty member intending to retire in May 2014 should notify his/her Department Chair and
Dean by December 15th 2013 or as soon as possible thereafter so that the Department, if
approved to do so, can conduct a search for the 2014-15 academic year. Ordinarily, retirement
occurs at the end of the academic year and excludes the summer term. In the summer
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8.1.5. Phased Retirement
immediately following retirement, the retired faculty member may teach for the specified
percentage of his / her yearly salary.
The University may, depending on the availability of resources, evolve/design and present
eligible faculty members with a voluntary and optional phased retirement program. Such an
option would be in addition to the standard rights of Faculty to ordinarily access retirement
upon attaining eligibility for the same. In implementing a phased retirement policy, the
University adheres to the AAUP’s description of phased retirement as “enabling individuals who
are approaching retirement to arrange, on their own initiative, reductions in services and salary
acceptable both to them and to their institutions.”
The AAUP reminds us that “Since the abolition of mandatory retirement in 1993, some cases
that previously would have resulted in “involuntary retirement” now have to be treated as
involuntary termination.” Such cases will be considered by the University’s academic leaders in
consultation with the Faculty Affairs Committee, in accordance with termination proceedings
identified in this Handbook and the Faculty Bylaws.
9. FACULTY NON-RENEWAL, DISMISSAL, AND TERMINATION
Though the University appoints faculty members after national searches to tenure-track
positions with the intent of nurturing their development during their probationary period and
progress towards tenure, circumstances may arise which require that tenure-track contracts /
appointments not be renewed. Likewise, on rare occasions there are reasons to question the
fitness of a tenured faculty member, or a faculty member whose term has not expired, for
continued employment by the University.
The procedures to be followed in evaluating these reasons and taking appropriate actions must
be pursued with due consideration of the position of the faculty member and stewardship of
the academic mission of the University.
SMU has, therefore, directly adapted to the University’s governance structure AAUP’s
procedural guidelines set forth in the 1958 Statement on Procedural Standards in Faculty
Dismissal Proceedings. A copy is attached as an Appendix.
Non-renewal or threat of non-renewal is not used by the University’s academic leaders or
faculty colleagues to restrain a fellow faculty member’s academic freedom.
Termination of a tenure-track faculty member must be consistent with the principles of
fundamental fairness.
Non-renewal of a tenure-track faculty member may be made to take effect from the date of
expiration of the individual’s current contract/appointment letter. Such notice will be made in
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Non-Renewal of Tenure-track Faculty
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9.1.
accordance with Bylaws 6. & 9. The University gives tenure-track faculty members advance
notice of the University’s intent not to reappoint them for a subsequent academic year in
accordance with the provisions of Section 6. & 9. (Renewal of Contracts/Appointments). A
decision for non-renewal of a tenure-track faculty member is made by the University President
and is not made for any reason inconsistent with principles outlined in the Faculty Handbook
and procedures outlined in the Faculty Bylaws 9.
Legitimate reasons for non-renewal of a tenure-track faculty member may include, but are not
limited to:
a. Cancellation of or major change in a program (example of such major
changes include discontinuation of a curricular requirement, an academic
program, or department in whole or in part);
b. Need for reduction in faculty due to a documented decline in enrollment and
budgetary constraints;
c. Incongruence between the teaching interests of the faculty member,
documented lack of currency in his/her disciplinary expertise, and the
educational goals of the University; or
d. Demonstrated failure or ineffectiveness of the faculty member in performing
his/her major contractual responsibilities.
A tenure track faculty member may appeal the decision to not renew his/her contract in
accordance with procedures outlined in the Faculty Bylaws 10.2.
9.2.
Termination without Prejudice of Tenured Faculty
A tenured faculty member may be terminated without prejudice due to disability, permanent
or protracted revision of the University curriculum, academic program /
department/school/college closure, bona fide financial exigency, or bona fide financial crisis.
1. In cases of termination because of disability, such disability must prevent the faculty
A good faith elimination of substantial course offerings from the curriculum;
such changes must be demonstrably bona fide;
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a.
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member from performing the essential functions of his/her position with or without
reasonable accommodations, and be considered a “total disability” as defined by the
Saint Martin's University long-term disability insurance plan.
2. Before the employment of a tenured faculty member may be terminated because of
permanent or protracted revision of the University curriculum, the following are
required:
b.
A reasonable classification of all the faculty members affected by said changes.
3. Academic program closure refers to a context in which (a) a department or program in
which primary tenured appointments are held is eliminated based on educational
considerations reflecting long-range planning and/or (b) a program is eliminated due to
changes in program priorities and/or enrollment.
4. Bona fide financial crisis refers to a context in which a program, department, college, or
school is unable, and for the foreseeable future will likely remain unable, to fulfill its
teaching and research missions unless it is allowed to reduce its financial obligation to
tenured faculty. The financial crisis may not be precipitated by a decision to redistribute
funds among the Colleges/Schools.
5. Bona fide financial exigency refers to a context in which a significant decline in SMU’s
financial resources that is brought about by decline in institutional enrollment or by
other actions or events that compel a reduction in the University’s operating budget.
Financial Exigency is an emergency condition in which the University's continued
existence is in serious jeopardy for financial reasons. The University shall not
declare a state of Financial Exigency unless it is demonstrably bona fide.
Before the employment of a tenured faculty member may be terminated because of financial
exigency, the following are required:
a. Public declaration by the University of financial exigency that is demonstrably bona fide;
b. Reasonable classification of all the faculty members affected thereby, and a procedure for
establishing priority order of terminations.
In the event of termination as represented in (2), (3), (4) or (5), the University will give the
affected faculty member one year’s written notice prior to termination and make all reasonable
efforts to secure appropriate internal employment for the terminated faculty member. The
University will also provide reasonable assistance in the identification and facilitation of other
employment opportunities.
9.3.
Dismissal for Cause
9.3.1. Dismissal for Cause of Tenure-track or Tenured Faculty
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All proceedings and records of dismissal for cause proceedings shall be kept confidential to the
degree permitted by the law. The University President will decide on a case by case basis
whether action taken pursuant to this Policy will identify the affected faculty member by name.
89
Tenure-track and tenured faculty member may be dismissed for cause. Dismissal or threat of
dismissal may not be used to restrain a faculty member’s academic freedom.
In the event of a tenure-track or tenured faculty member’s dismissal for cause, the services,
appointment, and employment of the faculty member may be terminated by the University
before the end of his/her contract expiration date. The faculty member must be given written
notice of his/her termination at least thirty days in advance of the termination date, and the
definition and procedures (Bylaws 10.3.) for “dismissal for cause” must be followed.
However, if dismissal proceedings are initiated against a tenured faculty member and result in a
finding of cause, dismissal or disciplinary action other than termination may be imposed.
Disciplinary action other than termination may include, but is not limited to, reprimand,
suspension with or without pay, reassignment of duties, reduction in appointment, mandatory
counseling, and/or continued monitoring of behavior and performance. The decision is made
by the University President in consultation with the Provost.
Reasons for “dismissals for cause” include but are not limited to the following:
(5) Serious academic dishonesty;
(6) Deliberate and serious violations of the rights and freedoms of fellow faculty members,
students, staff, or university leaders;
(7) Acts of moral turpitude;
(8) Violation of University policy substantially related to performance of faculty responsibilities;
(5) Use of professional authority to exploit others;
(6) Conviction of a felony which directly related to the fitness of faculty members to engage in
teaching, research, service, outreach, and/or administration;
(7) Continued gross neglect of duties despite oral and written warnings;
(8) Professional Incompetence;
(9) Failure to fulfill contractual obligations.
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The University President makes the final determination regarding dismissal of tenure-track and
tenured faculty members after the appeals procedure, if activated by the affected faculty
member, has been exhausted.
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A recommendation to terminate a faculty member for cause may be made by a Chair and/or
Dean to the Provost. The Provost must examine the contexts for this recommendation, and
after meeting with the faculty member and giving him/her an opportunity to respond to the
charges, make his/her recommendation regarding the same to the University President. The
faculty member may appeal the decision in accordance with the Appeals Process outlined in the
Faculty Bylaws.
9.3.2. Dismissal for Cause of a Tenured Faculty Member For (involuntary) Ineffectiveness
A tenured faculty member may also be dismissed for cause for demonstrated or continuing
failure or ineffectiveness in performing his/her contractual teaching obligations.
In the case represented above, which is substantially different from dismissal for cause
represented in items (1) – (9) in Section 9.3.1., the University recognizes that “ineffectiveness”
may be involuntary and not willful and that current involuntary ineffectiveness does not detract
from a faculty member’s effective, and perhaps even exemplary, contributions to the life of the
University in other years as a teacher and scholar.
Procedures for terminating a tenured faculty member for involuntary ineffectiveness are
outlined in the Faculty Bylaws, 9.4.
10.
APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES
10.1. Appeals
10.1.1. Appeals by Tenure Track Faculty
Tenure track faculty members may file an appeal with the Faculty Affairs Committee in
response to the following recommendations by the Provost to the University President:
(1) To not renew a tenure track contract
(2) To not tenure
(3) To not promote
(1) The Faculty Affairs Committee considers appeals against decisions to not renew a tenure
track faculty member’s contract on the basis of violations of academic freedom;
(2) & (3) The Faculty Affairs Committee considers appeals by tenure track faculty members
against negative tenure and promotion decisions on the basis of violations of process
and/or violations of the Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws. Factors to be considered
by the Committee include arguments and evidence presented by the faculty member
and substantive or procedural errors demonstrated by the faculty member.
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Tenured faculty members may file an appeal with the Faculty Affairs Committee in response to
a recommendation by the Provost to the University President
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10.1.2. Appeals by Tenured Faculty
(1) To not promote
(2) To terminate for cause
The Faculty Affairs Committee hears appeals by tenured faculty members against negative
promotion recommendations and against decisions to terminate for cause on the basis of
violations of process and violations of the Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws. Factors to be
considered by the Committee include arguments and evidence presented by the faculty
member and substantive or procedural errors demonstrated by the faculty member.
If an appeal is filed with the Faculty Affairs Committee, the University President makes his/her
decision on non-renewal, tenure, promotion, and termination for cause after being notified
about the Faculty Affairs Committee’s recommendation/decision regarding the appeal.
Final decisions on non-renewal, tenure, promotion, and termination for cause are made by the
University President.
10.2. Grievances
Grievances may be filed by faculty members for violations of rights and privileges, due process,
academic freedom, misapplications of policy, and violations of the Faculty Handbook and
Faculty Bylaws. The process for appealing terminations is outlined in the Faculty Bylaws.
Definition of Grievance
A grievance is a written complaint filed by a faculty member against another faculty member or
University leader alleging a violation of University, College/School, or Department policy or
established practice. A violation occurs when there is a breach, misinterpretation, or
misapplication of existing policy.
Grievance refers to any cause of complaint arising between a faculty member covered by these
procedures and another faculty member or academic or University leader concerning the
interpretation and application of University rules and procedures, conditions of employment,
duties and discipline. Specific grievable items include, but are not limited to: rights or
obligations accorded by the contract of employment, rights or obligations accorded by the
Faculty Handbook, academic freedom or academic due process, content of personnel files (as
authorized by law), disciplinary action, and infringement of personal privacy.
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This Policy is intended to provide a fair, internal process for resolving work-related disputes
that arise between and among faculty and their academic and University leaders.
Some complaints are not subject to the Faculty grievance procedure. Excluded from the
grievance policy are complaints concerning: challenges to the University policies and rules as
set forth in the Handbook; salary step increases, promotions in rank, tenure decisions, non-
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Scope of the Policy
renewal of non-tenured faculty; and termination of tenured faculty (each of the last four[4] can
be appealed by procedures described in the Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws).
The University recognizes and endorses the importance of academic due process, the right of
redress, and of adjusting grievances without fear of prejudice or reprisal.
Accordingly, the University encourages the informal and prompt settlement of grievances
where possible as well as the orderly appeal processes set forth in the Bylaws to respect and
protect academic due process, academic freedom, and professional conduct. The formal
procedures described in this Policy, therefore, are intended to be used when matters cannot be
resolved informally. A faculty member who feels aggrieved should first seek an informal
resolution at the Department, or College/School level before filing a formal grievance. The
procedures contained in this Policy are not intended to be used to challenge the desirability of
University policies.
Regular Faculty and all categories of Contingent Faculty are covered by the faculty grievance
process. When the grievance involves faculty other than ranked faculty, the grieved issue must
relate directly to the individual’s instructional (faculty) function rather than staff or
administrative function. When in question, the Faculty Affairs Committee and Dean of the
faculty member’s College/School will determine jurisdiction. If the jurisdiction cannot be
satisfactorily resolved, the Provost will make a determination.
Grievances and appeals are heard by the Faculty Affairs Committee.
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93
All other grievances (E.g. between a staff and Faculty or by students against staff or faculty) are
covered by the grievance procedures in the Employee Handbook and Student Handbook, as
appropriate. Grievance procedures, documents, and deliberations are confidential.
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FACULTY BYLAWS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 102
FACULTY BYLAWS ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….103-170
B.1. ACADEMIC STRUCTURE ………………………………………………………………………………………… 103-119
1.1.
Colleges, Schools, Divisions, and Academic Offices………………………..…………....... 103-107
1.1.1. Procedures for adding Colleges and Schools
1.1.2. Procedures for adding Divisions
1.1.3. Procedures for adding or merging Departments and Programs
1.1.4. Procedures for Placing Colleges/Schools, Divisions, Departments, or programs in
Academic Receivership
1.1.5. Procedures for closing Schools, Colleges, Divisions, Departments, or Programs
1.2.
Academic Leadership/Leaders……………………………………………………….……………… 107-110
1.2.1. Procedures for selecting and appointing the Provost
1.2.2. Procedures for selecting and appointing Deans
1.2.3. Procedures for Evaluating Deans
1.2.3.1.
Procedures for Evaluating College/School Deans
1.2.3.2.
Procedures for Evaluating Division Deans and Associate Deans of
University-wide Programs
1.3.1. Procedures for Recruiting and Appointing Regular Faculty
1.3.1.1.1.
Procedures for Requesting and Searching for Regular Faculty
1.3.1.1.2.
Departmental Requests for Regular Faculty
1.3.1.1.3.
Requests by Program Directors and Deans for Regular Faculty
1.3.1.1.4.
Requests by Faculty or Deans for appointments that cross
Departments
1.3.1.1.5.
Provost-initiated Regular Faculty Appointments
95
The Faculty ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 110-119
Page
1.3.
1.3.1.2
1.3.1.2.1
1.3.1.2.1.1.
1.3.1.2.1.2.
Procedures for Appointing Regular Faculty
Length/Terms of Regular Faculty Appointments
Probationary Appointment of the Tenure Track
Tenured Appointments
1.3.2. Procedures for Appointing Contingent Faculty
1.3.3. Procedures for Granting Emeritus status
1.3.4. Procedures for Appointing Librarians ……………………………………………………..116-118
1.3.5. Policies Pertaining to Documents and Records ……………………………………… 118-119
1.3.5.1.
Pre-employment File
1.3.5.2.
Official Personnel file
B.2. GOVERNANCE PROCEDURES…………………………………………………………………………..…….. 119-130
2.1.
Procedures Relating to Faculty (Self) Governance: University Level………………..119-122
2.1.1. The Conduct of Full Faculty Assembly
2.1.2. The Conduct of the Faculty Senate
2.1.3. Procedures for Electing the Faculty President
2.1.4. Procedures for Electing Faculty Committees and Replacement Rules
Procedures relating to Faculty (Self) Governance: College/School Level ……….. 122-127
2.2.1. Conduct of College/School Assembly
2.2.3. Procedures governing the Election, Appointment, and Evaluation of Department
Chairs and Program Directors
2.2.3.1.
Procedures for Electing Department Chairs and Program Directors
2.2.3.2.
Procedures for Removing a Departmentally-elected Chair from
office
2.2.3.3.
Procedures for Evaluating Department Chairs and Program
Directors
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2.2.2. Procedures for Creating Faculty Committees at the College/School level
2.2.2.1.
College/School Tenure and Promotion Committee (TAP)
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2.2.
2.2.4. Departmental Procedures and Faculty Responsibilities
2.3.
Procedures relating to Shared Governance ……………………………………………………. 127-130
2.3.1. Procedures for Electing Faculty to University Committees
2.3.2. Procedures governing Faculty Participation in BOT Committees
B.3. PROCEDURES AND CRITERIA FOR FACULTY ADVANCEMENT…………………………………130-141
3.1.
Procedures governing the First-Year Review of Tenure Track Faculty
3.2.
Procedures governing the Third-Year Review of Tenure track Faculty
3.2.1.
3.2.2.
3.2.3.
3.2.4.
3.2.5.
Composition of Third-Year Review Committee
Procedure and Documentation
Timeline
Committee’s Evaluation Criteria
Role of the Review Committee
3.3.
Procedures for Applying for Tenure
3.3.1. Timeline
3.3.2. Tenure Portfolio
3.4.
Procedures for Applying for Promotion
3.4.1. Criteria
3.4.2. Timeline
3.5.
Salary Increases
Conferences and Research / Development Support
4.2.
Selection / Appointment of Mentors
4.2.1.
Objectives
4.2.2.
Timeline
4.2.3.
Procedures
4.2.4.
Confidentiality Policy
4.3.
Applications process for Junior Faculty Fourth-year Teaching Reduction
4.3.1.
Procedures and Timeline
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4.1.
97
B.4. PROCEDURES AND CRITERIA WHICH ATTEND TO FACULTY DEVELOPMENT…………..141-149
4.4.
Procedures for applying for Sabbatical Leaves
4.4.1.
Eligibility
4.4.2.
Application Procedure
4.4.3.
Length of Sabbatical
4.4.4.
Sabbatical Agreement
4.4.5.
Salaried activity during a Sabbatical
4.4.6.
Sabbatical Report
4.5.
Post-tenure Faculty Development and Review Procedures
4.6.
Applications and Procedures for Leaves of Absence
4.6.1.
Criteria and Important Dates
4.6.2.
Procedure
B.5. STANDARDS, CRITERIA, AND PROCEDURES FOR EVALUATING FACULTY ………………149-152
5.1.
General Expectations: Teaching, Scholarship, and Service
5.2.
Other Responsibilities and Duties
B.6. TIMELINE AND PROCEDURES ON FACULTY CONTRACTS/LETTERS OF APPOINTMENT….152-154
6.1.
Faculty Contracts/Appointment Letters
6.1.1. Terms
6.1.2. Contract Changes
6.1.3. Contract / Letters of Appointment Negotiations
6.2.
6.3.
Outside Employment
Consulting
Standard Teaching Load for Regular Faculty
7.1.1. Calculation of Studies and Independent Studies in Workload
7.2.
Contingent Faculty Teaching Loads
7.2.1. Sample Loads
7.3.
Procedures for governing Reductions in Teaching Load
7.3.1. Calculations of Directed and Independent Studies
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7.1.
98
B.7. PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING AND ASSIGNING FACULTY WORKLOAD…………… 154-157
7.3.2. Types of Reductions in Teaching Load
7.3.2.1. Approved Reductions
7.3.2.2. Unplanned Reductions
7.4.
Procedures for Assigning and Calculating Teaching Overloads
7.5.
Procedures for Assigning Summer Teaching and/or Other Assignments
B.8. PROCEDURES FOR APPLYING FOR BENEFITS SPECIFIC TO FACULTY……………………….157-158
8.1.
Leave for Expectant Mothers
8.2.
Parental Support through Reduced teaching
8.3.
Externally-funded leaves with supplemental support from the University
B.9. PROCEDURES GOVERNING FACULTY NON-RENEWAL, DISMISSAL, AND
TERMINATION………………………………………………………………………………………………………….… 158-162
9.1.
9.2.
Non-renewal of Tenure-track Faculty
9.1.1. Procedure
9.1.2. Terms
Termination Without Prejudice of Tenured Faculty
9.3.
Dismissal for Cause
9.3.1. Dismissal for Cause of Tenure Track or Tenured Faculty
9.3.1.1. Timeline
9.3.1.2. Procedure
9.3.1.3. Terms
9.3.2. Dismissal of Tenured Faculty for (involuntary) Ineffectiveness
9.4.
Dismissal of Tenured Faculty for Incompetence and Ineffectiveness
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10.1. Appeals by Tenure Track Faculty against Non-renewal
10.1.1. Basis of Appeal
10.1.2. Notification, Petition, and Time Frame
10.1.3. Committee Responsibilities
10.1.4. Responsibilities of the University president
10.2.
Appeals by Tenure Track Faculty on Decisions against a negative decision on
99
B.10. PROCEDURES GOVERNING FACULTY APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES……………….………162-170
Tenure and by Tenure-Track or Tenured Faculty against a negative decision on
Promotion
10.2.1. Appeals by Tenure Track Faculty against a negative recommendation on
Tenure
10.2.2. Appeals by Tenure Track or Tenured Faculty against a negative decision
on Promotion
10.3. Appeals by Tenured Faculty against Decisions to Terminate for Cause
10.3.1. Basis of Appeal
10.3.2. Notification, Petition, and Time Frame
10.3.3. Committee Responsibilities
10.3.4. Responsibilities of the University President
10.4. Grievances
10.4.1. The Faculty Affairs Committee
10.4.2. Faculty Covered by the Grievance Process
10.4.3. Grievance
10.4.4. Informal Resolution
10.4.5. Petition
10.4.6. Committee Action and Time Frame
APPENDICES …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………171-187
ENDNOTES ………………………………………………………………………………………………….………….. 188-189
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RECOMMENDED FURTHER READING ………..……………………………………………………….………………190
Introduction
Bylaws are the rules which govern the internal management of our work lives as faculty
members and as members of the Saint Martin’s University community. Bylaws help us regulate
ourselves in the conduct of our everyday work lives and provide a framework for our operation
as a community of teachers and scholars.
Examples of items included in our Bylaws are how faculty meetings and Assembly are
conducted, how faculty apply to advance in rank, how Department Chairs are selected and
reviewed, and how often faculty meetings are held. Bylaws help us map our purpose as
members of the SMU community and the practical day-to-day details of how we function as
colleagues with a shared commitment to the values, principles, and policies as outlined in the
Faculty Handbook and shared by members of the Academy.
All Faculty members and their academic and University leaders should familiarize themselves
with the Employee Handbook, the Faculty Handbook, and the Faculty Bylaws because these
collectively are important documents which govern our work lives individually and collectively.
The Faculty Handbook gives guidance and authority through the principles it articulates to the
procedures described in the Faculty Bylaws. While the Faculty Handbook presents enduring
principles and policies which govern faculty work life, Faculty Bylaws detail practices and
procedures which are likely to evolve and change; the Bylaws, unlike the Handbook, therefore,
are more likely to undergo amendment as the Faculty initiates and responds to evolving
practices and procedures.
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101
The Board of Trustees approves changes to the Employee Handbook, the Faculty Handbook and
Faculty Bylaws in accordance with procedures outlined in pp. 1-7.
ACADEMIC STRUCTURE
1.1. Colleges, Schools, Divisions, and Academic Offices
1.1.1. Procedures for adding Colleges or Schools
Faculty members, Departments, Deans, the Provost, or the University President may propose
the addition of new Colleges or Schools in keeping with the mission and strategic goals of the
University, in response to growth in programs or in the University as a whole, and if they see
the potential to better serve the needs of current students or to recruit new students by
housing closely-related programs within a new College or School.
The procedure for adding or combining Schools and Colleges is as follows: Proposals must
typically be submitted to the University EPCC, who will endorse and submit the proposal to the
Senate. At the discretion of the Senate, the full Faculty may be asked to endorse the proposal.
The proposal, after it is endorsed by the Senate and/or the full Faculty is sent (with any
proposed modifications) to the Provost. The proposal, with a recommendation by the Provost,
is sent to the University President, before being approved by the Board of Trustees.
The University President may take proposals to add or combine Colleges/Schools directly to
Senate or the Full Faculty in Assembly. The Senate or the full Faculty may, in turn, charge EPCC
with reviewing the proposal before responding to the proposal.
The naming of the new College/School should follow the same process, except in cases where
the Board of Trustees honors major donors for their significant philanthropic support of the
University by naming Colleges or Schools. In such instances, the donor’s support typically
benefits the particular College or School and the University President will inform the faculty of
the College/School of the BOT’s determination.
All proposals for the creation of a new College or School must include the following
information:
Rationale
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102
What is missing from the current educational structure that can be improved upon through a
new structure? Would the new College/School offer a new educational philosophy, curricular
focus, or teaching methodologies? In what ways would the College/School’s programs and
curriculum complement or extend those of existing Colleges and Schools? How does the new
College/School advance the Mission of the University?
Program
Describe the new College or School’s niche curriculum. Are new courses proposed as part of
the structural change?
Administrative Structure
Colleges and Schools are typically led by Deans. What is the planned timeline and process for
appointing a Dean?
How many Departments will the new College/School have? New Colleges/Schools that are
proposed should typically consist of at least two Departments and house at least six Regular
Faculty members and / or faculty affiliates. Does the vision for the College/School include the
creation of additional departments or programs?
Infrastructure
Where will the new College/School be housed? What new infrastructure needs (classrooms,
laboratories, offices, library resources, etc.) are envisioned initially and in response to planned
growth?
Staffing
Describe staffing needs in the new College/School, both administrative and faculty. What
processes will be used to ensure adequate staffing?
Student Recruitment Procedures
Describe plans for recruiting additional students. One consideration in approving new
Colleges/Schools will be the extent to which the new College/school will re-distribute existing
students rather than bring new students into the University. If the College/School is focused on
undergraduate education for traditional students, it is expected that matters such as dormitory
needs will be addressed in the proposal.
Accreditation Plans
Describe marketing strategies for publicizing the College/School to peers and prospective
students. How will the Office of Communications and Marketing support these efforts?
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Marketing Strategies
103
New professional Colleges/Schools gain their academic credibility through accreditations.
Outline the proposed plans and timeline for gaining accreditation. What special preparations
are necessary before the College/School can seek accreditation?
Business Plan/Budget
Provide a Financial Plan for the College/School with detailed calculations of ROIs for the short
and long-term (Year 1 to Year 5 and beyond). What strategies are in place in case projections
are not realized as planned?
Other Vital Information
Include any other vital information that will enable the university to understand and support
the new College/School. E.g., will the College/School have an Advisory Board? What disciplinespecific criteria will be applied in tenuring and promoting faculty?
1.1.2. Procedures for adding Divisions
Parallel procedures are to be followed in creating new Divisions within the University.
Deans/Directors of Divisions work closely with College/School Deans and Departmental Chairs
in recruiting faculty, scheduling courses, and planning programs.
1.1.3. Procedures for adding or merging Departments and Programs
Proposals to add or merge Departments may be made by the Faculty, Chairs, Deans, or the
Provost.
Procedures for adding new Departments may be brought by the Dean, Chairs, or faculty to the
faculty in the College/School and then to the University EPCC for consideration. Final approval
of the EPCC’s recommendation is made by the Provost.
Additionally, proposals for merging academic Departments require a majority approval by all
Regular Faculty members who are directly affected by the merger. Chairs, Deans, or the
Provost are required, in the latter instance, to call meetings of all affected faculty members to
discuss reasons for the proposed merger, allocation / reallocation of resources, the academic
viability of the merged unit, and staffing needs of the new Department. The proposal then
moves forward, through EPCC to Senate and then to the Provost.
Recommendations to place a Department or Program or unit in academic receivership must
include a written report which outlines the reason for the recommendation. Valid reasons may
Page
A recommendation to place a Department or Program or unit in academic receivership may be
made by faculty within that Department collectively or by a majority, the Faculty Senate, the
College/School Chair of the Faculty, or the Dean.
104
1.1.4. Procedures for placing a College/School, Division, Department, or Program in Academic
Receivership
include but are not limited to cases where a unit is unable or unwilling to govern itself in
accordance with the principles of shared governance, where it is in noncompliance with the
University’s Program Review process, where it is failing to fulfill its teaching mission, where
disregard for student and faculty welfare is evident, or where it is unable to deliver its programs
to current or prospective students.
Procedures to guide a unit through the receivership process must include a plan for a return to
self-governance at a foreseeable future date.
In placing a Department or academic unit in receivership, the Dean consults with the Provost
who must, in turn, inform the Senate within five working days of notification by the Dean. The
Senate may charge the Faculty Affairs Committee to review and report on the situation or
undertake such review directly and then provide a recommendation to the Provost with a copy
to the Dean.
The Dean, after receiving a recommendation from the Senate and in consultation with the
Provost, may place the Department or unit in receivership by appointing an external Chair or by
undertaking direct oversight of the unit for a defined period of time to be followed by a review
of the situation. At the end of this defined period, the Dean may return the Department to selfgovernance or on the basis of a review of the situation by the FA committee, continue the unit
in receivership for a further period that cannot extend beyond one academic year.
Should the unit in receivership prove to be unwilling, unable, or incapable of adequately
addressing the issues within a defined period of time as noted above, and additional actions are
needed, the Dean informs the Provost. The following steps must be undertaken:
-
The Provost notifies the Senate within five working days and consults with them;
-
The Senate charges the FA Committee to independently review the situation;
-
In consultation with the Provost, the FA Committee may bring outside reviewers to
campus to assess the situation and help re-vitalize the unit;
-
The FA Committee submits its assessment of the situation to the Provost and the Senate
with a copy to the Dean.
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In any event, every attempt will be made by the University to relocate all Regular Faculty
affected by the decisions to close a unit into related departments.
105
On the basis of such review, and if the situation persists, the Provost may suspend admissions
to the Department/Program, or transfer, consolidate, disestablish, and discontinue academic
programs within the unit.
1.1.5. Procedures for closing Schools, Colleges, Divisions, Departments, or Programs
The University and the Faculty recognize that circumstances may arise that require closing a
Program, Department, Division, or College/School. While the most common reason for
decisions to close a program is financial, other valid reasons may arise that warrant such a
consideration. The University and Faculty also recognize that low enrollment by itself is not
necessarily a reason to close essential programs and that the academic integrity of the
institution, its identity as a liberal-arts centered University, and fulfillment of its Catholic
Benedictine mission will be essential components in discussions focused on the closure and
non-viability of programs, Departments, Divisions, or Colleges/Schools.
University leaders will ensure faculty participation at all levels of the discussion in declarations
of financial exigency and/or departmental closure for any reasons. Typically, declarations of
financial exigency will be based on five years of the University’s audited financial statements,
current and following-year budgets, and detailed cash-flow estimates for future years. Program
cuts and the tenure-track job losses that usually accompany them are typically a last resort and
will follow attempts to cure budget ills by furloughs and other means.
Before an academic unit at any level is closed because of financial exigency, the following
actions are required:
a. Public declaration by the University of financial exigency that is demonstrably bona fide;
b. Reasonable classification of all the faculty members affected thereby, and a procedure for
establishing priority order of terminations.
A definition of Financial Exigency and the terms which attend to a declaration of financial
exigency by the University are outlined in detail in the Faculty Handbook, 9.2.
1.2.
Academic Leadership/Leaders
Finalists identified by the Search Committee will be available through public presentations and
meetings to the Faculty and faculty assessments of the candidates will be solicited by the
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The University Provost is typically selected through a national search process initiated by the
University President in collaboration with the Faculty and academic leaders and staff. The
Search Committee will consist of at least four faculty members (at least three of whom are
elected by the Faculty and one of whom is appointed by the University President in
consultation with the Faculty President or from a list of names provided by the Faculty
President of those willing to serve on the Committee), one Dean selected to represent the
Deans, and one Academic staff member. The University President typically appoints additional
members from Cabinet, the monastic community, and the BOT.
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1.2.1. Procedures for selecting and appointing the Provost
Search Committee before the Committee makes its recommendation to the University
President who makes the final decision internally and recommends endorsement of the finalist
by the BOT.
1.2.2. Procedures for Selecting and appointing Deans
College/School Deans are typically selected through a national search process initiated by the
Provost. The Search Committee will consist of at least four faculty members elected from the
College/School and one appointed by the Provost from outside the College/School in
consultation with the Chair of the College/School Faculty, a member of the monastic order, a
Dean, and one staff member.
Finalists identified by the Search Committee will be available through public presentations and
meetings to the College/School Faculty and faculty assessments of the candidates will be
solicited by the Search Committee before the Committee makes its recommendation to the
Provost who makes the final appointment.
1.2.3. Procedures for Evaluating Deans
1.2.3.1.
Procedures for Evaluating College/School Deans
Evaluations of College/School Deans are initiated by the Provost in the fall semester of the fifth
year of their appointment prior to renewal for a further five-year term. The Provost shares with
each Dean, a template for evaluating them based on their responsibilities, and solicits their
feedback before finalizing the template. This template is used to generate a set of survey
questions that are evolved by the Provost in consultation with the Chief Human Resources
Officer. The finalized survey questions are shared with the Dean for input and then with the
Chair of the College/School faculty.
The survey questions are sent by the Provost’s Executive Assistant to all Regular Faculty in the
Dean’s College/School, select Faculty Committee Chairs who are from other Colleges/Schools,
select members of the College/School Advisory Board (in the case of professional schools which
have ABs), and select staff members from co-curricular and other support offices. This list will
be compiled by the Provost in consultation with the Dean and the Chair of the College/School
Faculty.
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The results of the survey, along with the Provost’s independent assessment of the Dean, will be
shared with the Dean as part of his/her ongoing development. If significant and serious issues
requiring attention have been identified through the evaluation process, the Provost may work
with the Dean to design a structured development plan and subsequent assessment of growth,
typically in the following semester. The Provost typically informs the Dean about
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Evaluators will be identified on the returned survey only by category as either faculty or staff,
though individuals returning the survey will have the option of identifying themselves.
reappointment by April 15 of the spring semester of the Dean’s fifth year; in the case of Deans
with retreat rights who are not renewed, the Provost will also inform the appropriate
Department Chair of the Dean’s return to full time teaching in the Department. Deans without
retreat rights may receive renewable annual appointments as a faculty member in their area of
expertise.
Current Deans will undergo evaluation as described above in 2015-16 and typically, every five
years thereafter.
Deans complete Annual Reports which are submitted to the Provost for feedback.
Vacated Dean positions are filled in accordance with procedures described in 1.2.2. During the
period of the search, the Provost may appoint an Interim or Acting Dean.
1.2.3.2. Procedures for Evaluating Division Deans and Associate Deans of University-wide
Programs
Division Deans and Associate Deans of University-wide programs (E.G. the Graduate Studies
Office) are evaluated every five years. Evaluations of Division Deans and Associate Deans are
initiated by the Provost in the fall semester of the fifth year of their appointment prior to
renewal for a further five-year term. The Provost shares with the Division Dean(s) and
Associate Dean(s) a template for evaluating them, based on their responsibilities, and solicits
their feedback before finalizing the template. This template is used to generate a set of survey
questions that are evolved by the Provost in consultation with the Chief Human Resources
Officer. The finalized survey questions are shared with the Division Dean(s) and Associate
Dean(s).
In the case of the Division Dean(s), the finalized survey is sent by the Provost’s Executive
Assistant to select Contingent Faculty in the Division, Regular Faculty from the Lacey campus
who regularly teach in the Division, Chairs of all Departments which offer courses in the
Division, and select staff affiliated with or who work closely with the Division. This list will be
compiled by the Provost in consultation with the Division Dean.
In the case of Associate Deans, the survey is sent to all Graduate Program Directors, select
Deans, and select staff who work closely with the Associate Dean. The list of those who will be
surveyed is compiled by the Provost in consultation with the Associate Dean(s).
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The results of the survey, along with the Provost’s independent assessment of the Division
Dean(s) and Associate Dean(s), will be shared with each as part of their ongoing development. If
significant and serious issues requiring attention have been identified through the evaluation
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Evaluators will be identified on the returned survey only by category as either faculty or staff,
though individuals will have the option of identifying themselves.
process, the Provost will work with the Division Dean(s) and Associate Dean(s) to design a
structured development plan and subsequent assessment of growth, typically by the
subsequent semester. The Provost typically informs the Division Dean and Associate Dean
about reappointment by April 15th of the spring semester of their fifth year; in the case of
Division Deans or Associate Deans with retreat rights who are not renewed for a further term,
the Provost will also inform Program Directors, as appropriate. Division Deans without retreat
rights may be appointed to a renewable faculty appointment in an area of their disciplinary
expertise.
Current Division Deans and Associate Deans will undergo evaluation as described above during
the 2015-16 academic year and every five years thereafter.
Vacated Division Dean and Associate Dean positions in University offices may be filled through
a formal search process. During the period of the search, the Provost may appoint an Interim
or Acting Division Dean or Associate Dean.
1.3. The Faculty
1.3.1. Procedures for Recruiting and Appointing Regular Faculty
1.3.1.1.
Procedures for Requesting Faculty Hires
1.3.1.1.1.
Departmental Requests for Regular Faculty
Departments through their Chair typically identify curricular and personnel needs, both replacements
and new personnel needs, at the start of each academic year – typically, by October 1 – for the
following year/s and discuss these with the Dean of their College/School. The schedule for approving
and advertising positions should be coordinated with national disciplinary calendars in order to
maximize the Department or program’s success in searching for and hiring the best candidates. The
list of all Regular Faculty searches for the following year, once authorized, will be shared with the full
faculty through an announcement / communication by the Provost.
Annually, in the first half of the fall semester, the Provost requests Deans to submit their hiring
requests for Regular Faculty in their College/School along with justifications for the same. All requests
for the recruitment and appointment of Regular Faculty are discussed by the Provost individually with
Deans before these requests are prioritized and searches are authorized, subject to the availability of
funding and approval by the University President. The Provost and Dean may together also meet with
the Department requesting a search to better understand contexts.
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In prioritizing requests for Regular Faculty, the Provost considers departmental and programmatic
needs as represented by the Chair and Dean as well as the Faculty’s collective responsibility for the
Saint Martin’s Core and/or the particular responsibility of some programs, Departments, or
Colleges/Schools, for graduate education and programs on our satellite campuses. All formal requests
for searches will receive a written response from the Dean, typically by November 1.
The appropriate Department Chair works closely with his/her faculty in developing position profiles for
approved searches, which are then vetted by the Dean and Provost before being advertised. The
Department of Human Resources will serve as a resource for faculty, Chairs, Deans, and the Provost on
legal and compliance issues.
The Department carries primary responsibility for vetting (considering) applicants and candidates for
their disciplinary expertise, teaching strengths, and scholarly potential. They are also responsible for
working with the search committee on identifying appointable finalists to the Dean of the
College/School. Deans are responsible for identifying finalists committed to the goals and aspirations
of the particular College/ School and the University’s identity as a liberal arts centered University with
a strong Core Curriculum that provides a foundation for professional programs. The Provost is
responsible for vetting finalists for their commitment to the University’s mission and values.
Departments are encouraged to use electronic resources such as Skype or other video or
teleconferencing programs in order to maintain cost-effectiveness in the search process.
1.3.1.1.2. Requests by Program Directors and Deans for Regular Faculty
Requests to conduct searches for Regular Faculty may also be initiated by Program Directors who
oversee cross-disciplinary / cross-departmental programs within a College/School and by Deans who
identify vital areas of growth and development within their College/School. In both instances,
Directors and Deans should discuss these requests in advance with involved Departments and their
faculty and Chair(s) and achieve consensus regarding these personnel requests before presenting them
to the Provost. Appointments of Regular Faculty initiated by cross-disciplinary Program Directors will
nevertheless be in particular Departments and such faculty will typically carry dual responsibilities to
their home Department and the interdisciplinary program. These dual responsibilities will be
determined in advance of advertising a search by those requesting the position through discussions
with faculty and the Dean and will be specified to the appointee in writing by the Provost at the time of
appointment.
1.3.1.1.3. Requests by Faculty or Deans for appointments that cross Colleges/Schools
The following procedure is used for the screening and selection process in the three kinds of requests
for Regular Faculty appointments represented above.
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Faculty across Colleges/Schools and/or two or more Deans may identify areas of cross-College/crossSchool development for the University which requires the addition of Regular Faculty. In all such cases,
broad consensus among all constituents with interest in such initiatives, including Chairs, and among
those who are likely to contribute to them is a vital first step in presenting hiring proposals to the
Provost. Appointments will typically be made to a specific Department even if the faculty member
carries responsibilities beyond that Department and College/School. The full spectrum of the faculty
member’s responsibilities and their weighted consideration in his/her progress towards tenure and
promotion will be clearly specified at the point of hire.
a. The, Department Chair or interdisciplinary Program Director or Dean in
consultation with faculty members and/or the Dean or Deans, having
determined that a Department or inter-disciplinary program requires
additional or replacement personnel, and having secured funds and approval
from the Provost for the same, initiates a search
b. In consultation with and with the approval of the Dean/Deans, the
Department Chair or Program Director or faculty forms a search committee.
The Committee consists of appropriate departmental or program faculty, one
faculty member of a closely allied discipline; one monastic representative (if
available). Members of other University constituencies may also be
appointed to the search committee if the search committee chair chooses.
The Department Chair or the Program Director determines who serves as
committee chair in consultation with the Dean. Typically, search committees
do not exceed seven members.
c. The search committee, in consultation with the Department Chair/Program
Director, the Dean, and the Abbot of Saint Martin’s Abbey, first determines
whether a qualified member of the Abbey is, or will be in a reasonable period
of time, available to fill the position. If a qualified member of the Abbey is
available, the position is reserved. If not, the process continues.
d. The Dean makes known, through the Office of Human Resources and through
appropriate professional vehicles the availability of the faculty position,
together with an appropriate job description, qualifications, and closing date
for applications
e. The search committee screens applications, interviews selected candidates,
and compiles a short list of finalists for review by the Department Chair and
the Dean. It then arranges visits by up to three finalists to campus for
interviews with the committee, the Dean, Provost, and other appropriate
University personnel. The search committee also consults the Department
faculty prior to making its recommendation. After completing the search and
selection process, the committee makes its written recommendation to the
Department Chair, who, with his/her own recommendation, transmits a
recommendation to the Dean of his/her College/School
The Provost makes a recommendation to the University President
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g.
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f. The Dean reviews the recommendations and consults with the search
committee chair, then makes his/her recommendation to the Provost
1.3.1.1.4. Provost-initiated Regular Faculty Appointments
The Provost may initiate “Cluster Hires” in areas of importance across the University; requests
for such hires have to proceed from Department Chairs, Program Directors, and/or Faculty.
E.g. A call may be put out to Department Chairs, Program Directors, and Deans to consider
getting three or more constituents together across Departments, programs, or Colleges/Schools
to discuss parallel needs in related areas. Examples of such areas include but are not limited to
Environmental Studies or Arts Administration or Professional Science or Forensic Science or
Health Studies. If constituents reach consensus on areas such as these that might benefit
through multiple hires in multiple departments, they may submit a proposal for consideration
to the Provost.
Cluster hires are not intended to initiate the creation of new programs at point of hire but
rather to expand the curricular footprint through expertise that may result, at a future date, in
the creation of additional programs. All proposed curricular expansion in these or other
directions, if and when initiated, will undergo the standard vetting process for the approval of
new programs outlined elsewhere in this Handbook and the Bylaws. Guarantee of
programmatic expansion, in other words, is not a condition for the approval of cluster hires.
The Provost will meet with those who propose appointments within the “Cluster Hire” initiative
and with Deans, and discuss the process to be adopted for such a search if it is to be authorized
and funded. Searches for Regular Faculty through such initiatives could result, for example in
the simultaneous or staggered appointments over consecutive years of two or more individuals
into multiple Departments. E.g. in support of a possible program in Environmental Studies, a
faculty member with expertise in Environmental Policy may be appointed in the Department of
Political Science, a Geo-Chemist may be appointed in the Department of Physics, and an
Environmental Chemist may be appointed in the Department of Chemistry. Department Chairs,
Deans, and the Provost must agree in advance on the particulars relating to such appointments.
Appointments in the case of cluster hires will typically be to a specific Department, though the
faculty member’s teaching responsibilities may extend to other programs.
1.3.1.2.
Procedures for Appointing Regular Faculty
The President of the University appoints the new Regular Faculty member with authority as
delegated by the Board of Trustees.
In special circumstances, Departments or Directors/Deans may request the appointment of Regular
Faculty members who have dual responsibilities as faculty and staff. Particulars which attend to such
appointments have to be evolved and specified in advance of advertising and conducting the search,
and the person appointed to a position with faculty and staff responsibilities should receive written
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The rank, tenure eligibility, time line towards tenure, Departmental affiliation(s), and all other
particulars which relate to the position will be specified in writing by the Provost to all Faculty at the
time of their appointment.
clarification about the exact balance of duties in these roles as well as how he/she will be evaluated for
promotion and/or tenure.
All Regular Faculty, both tenure track and tenured, receive Letters of Appointment each year
which are evolved by the Office of the Provost in consultation with Deans, and sent no later
than by March 15th of the year for the academic term which begins on August 16th of the same
year and concludes on May 15th of the following year. The Letter of Appointment must specify
rank, tenure status, and salary. A sample Letter of Appointment is attached in Appendix A.
Regular Faculty who are on the tenure track must return a signed copy of the Letter of
Appointment to indicate their acceptance of employment by the University. Failure to return a
signed copy by April 15th immediately following receipt of the letter of appointment may result
in loss of employment.
First appointments of Regular Faculty are made upon conclusion of the search process, and may
be made at any point in the year.
Failure of the University to inform a faculty member about renewal or non-renewal of his/her
tenure track probationary faculty appointment will result in their automatic renewal for the
following academic year.
1.3.1.2.1. Length / Terms of Regular Faculty Appointments
1.3.1.2.1.1.
Probationary Appointment into the Tenure-Track
Regular faculty members are initially appointed on a per-year basis during the period leading up
to their tenure decision; the date by which a faculty member must apply for tenure is specified
in his/her Letter of Appointment.
Failure to apply for tenure by the date specified in the Letter of Appointment will result in the
faculty member being issued a terminal, non-renewal contract for the following year.
Regular tenure-track Faculty in the rank of Assistant Professors should show strong
commitment to teaching, to scholarly engagement that is likely to reach fuller fruition as
they advance in rank, and service at the Departmental, College, or University level.
Regular faculty members are eligible to be considered for tenure by the date specified in their
Letter of Appointment. They may be granted such status by the Board of Trustees after formal
recommendations by the Advancement Committee, the Dean, the Provost, and the University
President.
Faculty members who held tenure-track appointments at comparable institutions may be
credited upon hire with a maximum of two years towards tenure upon appointment.
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Tenured Appointments
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1.3.1.2.1.2.
Faculty members who have achieved tenure at comparable Universities or Colleges may be
appointed in tenured and ranked positions at Saint Martin’s. Determination regarding ranked
and tenured appointments is made by the Provost in consultation with the Department Chair
and the Dean.
Regular Faculty who hold the rank of Associate Professor should show strong
commitment to teaching, consistent and ongoing commitment through presentations
and publications or creative activity to scholarship, and increasing commitment to
service at the Departmental, College, or University level.
Regular Faculty who hold the rank of Full Professor should be strong and accomplished
teachers who commit also to leadership in their academic discipline through ongoing
scholarly/creative work AND/OR to significant and ongoing leadership/service within
the SMU community at many levels.
In appointing University leaders – such as Deans or the Provost – with Departmental rank and
tenure, the home Department of the appointee will be asked by the University President or
Provost (in the case of College/School Deans) to endorse the appointee and review his/her
credentials. Though this remains a courtesy consideration by the Department, it is an essential
step for all University leaders who are appointed with rank and tenure and hold retreat rights
into their home department upon relinquishing their administrative responsibilities.
Such courtesy consideration by an academic Department will not be required if the Dean or
Provost is appointed without tenure and retreat rights.
1.3.2 Procedures for Appointing Contingent Faculty
Contingent Faculty members are selected to teach during regular semesters and summer
sessions on the Lacey campus by Department Chairs or Program Directors in consultation with
the Dean and approval of the Provost.
ESL Instructors are recommended to the Provost for appointment, and renewal subject to
annual evaluations, by the Chief International Programs Officer.
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Contingent appointments are made by the semester or term and are not eligible for tenure.
Titles used in contingent appointments are outlined in the Faculty Handbook and are
determined on the basis of the University’s needs and qualifications of the candidates; titles
and the terms and conditions of the appointment are specified at the point of hire in the
appointment contract.
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Contingent appointees for extension campuses are identified by the Dean of ELD or the Dean of
the College/School, vetted by the appropriate Lacey Campus Chair/Director and Dean, and
approved by the Provost.
Laboratory Instructors are recommended to the Dean by the Department Chair and renewed by
the Provost upon recommendation by the Dean. They are subject to annual review.
1.3.3 Procedures for Granting Emeritus Status
Any tenured Regular Faculty member may nominate a retiring colleague who qualifies for
Emeritus status to the Dean who, after endorsing the nomination, must present his/her
candidacy to the Provost through a formal letter representing the case for granting Emeritus
status. The Provost considers the nomination and makes a recommendation to the University
President who makes his/her recommendation to the Board of Trustees. The decision to grant
emeritus status is granted by the Board of Trustees.
Professors Emeriti are granted their ranks for life. Teaching appointments, if given, are for one
semester or one year at a time.
1.3.4. Procedures for Appointing Librarians
The search and approval process for Librarians is similar to that for faculty. The Dean/Director
of the Library identifies hiring needs in the Library. Once approved by the Provost, searches are
advertised through the Office of Human Resources. Librarians appointed after August 1, 2014
are not tenure-track and not eligible for tenure but may be appointed in Continuing
Appointments with the right to advance in rank.
The Dean/Director of the Library will identify a search committee chair. In consultation with the
Dean, the chair forms a search committee, which will typically include two librarians, two
Regular Faculty members (from departments with which the librarian will most closely work),
one monastic representative (if available), and one library staff member. Members of other
University constituencies may also be appointed to the search committee as appropriate.
Typically, search committees do not exceed seven members.
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The search committee screens applications, interviews selected candidates, and compiles a
short list of finalists for review by the Dean. It then arranges visits by up to three finalists to
campus for interviews with the committee, the Dean, the Provost, and other appropriate
University personnel. The search committee also consults Librarians and library staff not on the
committee prior to making its recommendation. After completing the search and selection
process, the committee makes its written recommendation to the Dean, who, with his/her own
recommendation, transmits a recommendation to the Provost.
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The search committee, in consultation with the Library Dean/Director and the Abbot of Saint
Martin’s Abbey, first determines whether a qualified member of the Abbey is, or will be in a
reasonable period of time, available to fill the position. If a qualified member of the Abbey is
available, the position is reserved. If not, the process continues.
All Librarians receive Letters of Appointment each year which are evolved by the Office of the
Provost in consultation with the Dean/Director of the Library, and sent no later than by March
15th of the year for the academic year which begins on July 1 and concludes on June 30 of the
following year. The Letter of Appointment must specify the Librarian’s status, rank, and salary
step.
Librarians must return a signed copy of the Letter of Appointment to indicate their acceptance
of employment by the University. Failure to return a signed copy by April 15 th immediately
following receipt of the letter of appointment may result in loss of employment.
Librarians are evaluated annually by the Dean/Director who works with the Director of HR to
implement the standard evaluation process used for all employees. However, because
Librarians work closely with faculty members, the Dean/Director will also work closely with the
Provost to ensure input from faculty in evaluating Librarians in their first and third years and at
every point at which Librarians apply for promotion in rank.
Librarians are appointed in Continuing or Term Appointments; this is specified at point of hire.
Promotion Procedures
The following procedures will be followed when Librarians apply for promotion in rank:
1.
The Librarian informs his/her Dean/Director of intent to apply for promotion;
2.
The Dean/Director informs the Provost;
3.
The Dean/Director evolves, in consultation with the Librarian, a list of seven faculty
members with whom he/she has worked closely, and submit this list to the Provost;
4.
The Provost constitutes an Evaluation Team consisting of two faculty members from the
above list, two additional faculty members drawn from among the Regular Faculty, and
one College/School Dean other than Director/Dean of the Library.
Important Note:
The Evaluation Team solicits a recommendation from the Dean/Director of the Library
regarding the Librarian’s candidacy for promotion;
6.
The Evaluation Team solicits two additional letters from members of the Library and/or the
Regular Faculty;
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5.
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If there are two or more promoted Librarians in the Library, this Evaluation Team will
consist of two promoted Librarians, two Regular Faculty, and a College/School Dean other
than the Director/Dean of the Library
7.
The Evaluation Team evaluates the portfolio for promotion submitted by the Librarian
along with the letters of recommendation;
8.
The Evaluation Team makes a recommendation to the Provost regarding the Librarian’s
candidacy for promotion;
9.
The Provost makes a recommendation to the President;
10. The University President waits for a period of three weeks in order to provide the applicant
with an opportunity to file an appeal, if he/she wishes to do so;
11. The FAC hears the appeal – based on violation of academic freedom, fundamental fairness,
or inadequate consideration of materials submitted by the applicant.
Important Note
When the Library has three or more promoted Librarians, a three-member Appeals
Committee will be constituted by the Provost to hear the appeal. The Appeals Committee
will consist of one member from FA, one member from among promoted Librarians who
has not served on the Evaluation Team, and one Dean (not the Library Director/Dean or
the Dean who served on the original Evaluation Team)
12. The University President makes the final decision.
1.3.5. Policies Pertaining to Documents and Records
1.3.5.1. Pre-Employment File
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Application materials of finalists who are not appointed to the position are stored in electronic
format in the Provost’s Office for a period of six years.
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An applicant for a faculty position is required to provide official transcripts; a professional
resume; letters of recommendation attesting to professional qualifications and personal
integrity; and a brief statement on his/her teaching and scholarship as it supports the
University’s mission. This file is open to academic and University leaders, the Dean of the
College/School to which the candidate is applying, the Department Chair of the Department to
which the candidate is applying, and the members of the search committee duly constituted to
carry out search and selection procedures. If the candidate is employed by the University, the
pre-employment file becomes part of that individual’s official personnel file from the date of
his/her employment.
1.3.5.2.
Official Personnel File
The personnel records of each faculty member are filed in the Office of the Provost. These
records ordinarily include official transcripts of the highest earned degree, a professional
resume, letters of recommendation, letters of appointment, and contracts with the University.
The faculty member may submit letters of recommendation or commendation or other
appropriate documents to the Provost and request that these be included in his/her file. The
faculty member has access to his/her personnel file any time.
No part of that official personnel file will be relinquished, nor may anyone other than the
President and the Provost, have access to the file without permission of the faculty member.
Other individuals such as the respective College/School Deans and the Chief Human Resources
Officer may request access to a faculty member’s official personnel file; the Provost’s Office is
required to notify the faculty member about these within three working days of receiving such
requests. The faculty member whose personnel file has been requested may request that the
Dean or Chief Human Resources Officer inform them of the reasons for the file request.
The above policy does not prevent the Dean of a College/School from retaining a file (electronic
or physical) containing documents such as a faculty member’s resume, application materials,
and copies of Letters of Appointment or other communications with the faculty member on
which the Dean is copied, in a file in the Dean’s Office. The faculty member may access this file
at any time by requesting to do so.
2. GOVERNANCE PROCEDURES
2.1.
Procedures Relating to Faculty (Self) Governance: University Level
2.1.1. The Conduct of Full Faculty Assembly
Standard Procedures
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The Faculty typically designates a Regular Faculty member who has been elected to Senate to
also serve as Parliamentarian for the academic year during Faculty Assembly (and Senate?); the
Parliamentarian clarifies procedures when questions arise on the floor and is responsible for
making sure that Faculty Assembly is run according to standard rules. The Parliamentarian is
consulted by the Faculty President on issues ranging from allowing motions to extending
Assembly beyond its scheduled time to what constitutes a quorum. The Parliamentarian advises
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The Faculty President chairs the full Faculty Assembly, which is typically conducted in
accordance with Robert’s Rules of Order. While the Senate typically acts on behalf of the
Faculty on most matters, it may refer items to the full Faculty for deliberation, consideration,
and/or a vote during Faculty Assembly. All Regular Faculty members may exercise their right to
a vote in full Faculty Assembly.
the Faculty President on all matters relating to the conduct of Faculty Assembly, while the
Faculty President chairs and ultimately rules on matters of order in the Senate and in Assembly.
The University President, Provost, College/School Deans, and other academic leaders may
attend Faculty Assembly and participate in deliberations and discussions of the Faculty when
recognized by the Faculty President and called upon to do so.
The University President may not vote in Faculty Assembly.
The Provost, Deans, and other academic leaders do not typically vote in Faculty Assembly, but
may do so if invited by the Faculty President. In inviting the Provost, Deans, or other academic
leaders to participate in voting on an issue, the Faculty President must first achieve a majority
consensus from the assembled Regular Faculty.
The University President or Provost may call the Faculty to a Special Assembly, as needed.
Typically, the University President and/or Provost before calling a Special Assembly of the
Faculty, will inform the Faculty President of the context and reasons for the same.
Special Procedures
At either a regularly scheduled Assembly or special Assembly of the University Faculty, with at
least fifteen days written notice, and by a two-thirds majority, providing they constitute a
Quorum of the Regular Faculty, the Faculty may discharge the Faculty President and/or the
Senate as a whole from their role as elected representatives of the full faculty for the
remainder of the academic year.
If the Regular Faculty discharges the Faculty President, or the Senate as a whole from serving as
their representatives for the remainder of the academic year from the point at which such
action is taken, they must, within ten days of taking such action, elect a new Faculty President
and/or members of the Senate, as the case warrants.
Alternately, if a determination is made by the Faculty to discharge the whole Senate, they may
rule that by a majority vote that the full Faculty Assembly will act on behalf of the faculty on all
matters thereafter until the conclusion of that academic year or until a determination is made
by the full faculty to elect a Faculty President and/or Senators.
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The Faculty President shall act on behalf of the Faculty Senate during summer months when the
Faculty Senate is not in session. Ratification of any action(s) undertaken by the Faculty
President during this period will be required at the first Faculty Senate meeting and/or full
Faculty Assembly of the academic year.
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2.1.2. The Conduct of Faculty Senate
2.1.3. Procedures for Electing the Faculty President
The Faculty President-Elect is elected by the faculty on an annual basis. This election occurs at
the last regularly scheduled faculty meeting of the year for the following academic year.
The Faculty President
a. chairs and holds the full Faculty Assembly on a regular basis;
b. chairs meetings of the Faculty Senate;
c. in consultation with the Provost, establishes Faculty Senate and Assembly agendas;
d. oversees elections for standing faculty committees;
e. appoints ad hoc faculty committees;
f. attends Provost’s Council monthly;
g. assists the Faculty Welfare Committee in recommending equitable faculty salaries,
benefits and working conditions to the Provost;
h. represents faculty concerns to other University constituencies and leaders (i.e., the
President, the Provost, the Board of Trustees);
i.
Meets regularly and as needed with the University President and the Provost;
j.
undertakes other responsibilities at the request of the full Faculty or which may
benefit the work life of faculty.
2.1.4. Procedures for Electing Faculty Committees and Replacement Rules
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Committees typically consist of three Regular Faculty members from the College of Arts and
Sciences and one member from each of the other Colleges/Schools. Certain Committees (E.g.
Faculty Advancement, Faculty Affairs, and Faculty Development) require that all or some
members are tenured and/or hold a specific academic rank. The Faculty President will ensure
that elections are conducted in accordance with these restrictions; the Parliamentarian will
ensure that processes are followed. The general charge of each Committee is outlined in the
Faculty Handbook; each Committee is encouraged to create its Charter and specific procedural
details; these should be made available on the Senate web pages.
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Faculty are elected in full faculty Assembly to serve on Faculty Senate Committees. The current
standing Committees of the Senate are listed in the Faculty Handbook, 2.1.5.
If an elected faculty member relinquishes his/her position on a committee during the academic
year, either
(a) an election will be conducted and a replacement faculty member will be elected, in
accordance with prescribed guidelines for membership on the committee, to complete
the original member’s term,
OR
(b) the Faculty President will appoint a faculty member in accordance with prescribed
guidelines for membership on the committee, to complete the original member’s term.
2.2.
Procedures relating to Faculty (Self) Governance: College/School Level
2.2.1. Conduct of College/School Assembly
College/School Assembly will be conducted in accordance with Robert’s Rules of Order. The
Chair of the College/School Faculty may appoint a Regular Faculty member to serve as
Parliamentarian during Assembly.
The College/School faculty elects a Chair of the Faculty from among their Regular full-time
members to Chair the College/School Assembly and serve as a representative of the Faculty to
their Dean and other academic or University leaders. The Chair of the College/School Faculty
does not receive a teaching load release; his/her role typically extends to working with the
Dean to set the agenda for College/School Assembly.
Typically, the Chair and Dean of the College/School Faculty call for agenda items from the
Faculty, and meet to discuss the agenda for Assembly. The Dean’s report to the Faculty and a
report from the Chair of the Faculty will typically be included in the agenda of Assembly.
Deans may also call the faculty of the College/School to a Special Assembly, as needed. In such
circumstances, the Dean typically informs the Chair of the Faculty about the context and
reasons for calling a Special Assembly of the College/School.
2.2.2. Procedures for Creating Faculty Committees at the College/School level
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College/School Committees will typically consist of three elected faculty members, who will
elect a chair from among their membership.
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While the Faculty in a College or School may create committees to undertake College/School
business, the only mandated committee at the College/School level is the Tenure and
Promotions Committee (TAP).
2.2.2.1.
College/School Tenure and Promotions Committee (TAP)
TAP will consist of three faculty members elected from the full-time tenured and promoted
faculty members in the College or School. At least one of the three elected members have to
be full Professors. If this proves impossible because the College/School does not have a
significant number of eligible candidates at the rank of full Professor, the Dean will work with
the Chair of the Faculty to identify a full Professor from a related discipline in another College
or School.
TAP elects a chair from its membership. TAP’s responsibilities include
-
Evaluating all applications for advancement submitted by tenure-track faculty within
their College or School, and voting on their candidacy for tenure and promotion, before
forwarding its recommendation to the Dean of the College/School.
-
Working with Department Chairs and the College/School Dean to evolve clear
Department-specific Tenure and Promotion guidelines for each Department/discipline
within their College/School and ensuring that these are forwarded to the Advancement
Committee for vetting regarding consistency across Colleges/Schools. The Advancement
Committee after its vetting, sends these to the Provost for final approval and
implementation. The Provost shares the finalized guidelines with all constituents, as
appropriate.
-
Ensuring that Department-specific tenure and promotion guidelines are consulted in
their evaluation of candidates for tenure and promotion and that these Departmentspecific guidelines are forwarded with the candidate’s file to the University
Advancement Committee.
2.2.3. Procedures for the Election, Appointment, and Evaluation of Department Chairs and
Faculty Program Directors
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Election of the Chair is overseen by an external Chair. Chairs are elected by the Regular Faculty
in a Department. The Dean is notified by the Department or Program about the election. The
Provost appoints elected Department Chairs and Program Directors within a College/School,
upon recommendation by the Department or Program and the Dean, for three-year terms that
are renewable subject to evaluation and re-election by the faculty. Typically, Chairs who have
served two consecutive full terms will not be considered for a successive third term if there are
other eligible candidates within the Department.
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2.2.3.1. Procedures for Electing Department Chairs and Program Directors within a
College/School
A Dean may initiate removal of a departmentally-elected Chair at any point by following the
procedures described below.
Program Directors are elected by the Regular Faculty who routinely teach in the Program.
When the Program is within a college/School, the Dean identifies all faculty members who
teach in the Program in consultation with the College/School Chair; when the Program is intercollege, the Provost identifies the roster of faculty. The Dean or Provost, as appropriate, is
notified of the election. The Provost appoints the Program Director upon recommendation by
the faculty for three-year terms that are renewable subject to evaluation and re-election by the
faculty. Typically, Program Directors who have served two consecutive full terms will not be
considered for a successive third term if there are other eligible candidates within the Program.
2.2.3.2. Procedures for Removing a departmentally-elected Chair from office
A Dean who wishes to remove an elected Department Chair from office initiates the process by
informing the Chair and presenting the Chair and the Provost with written reasons with all
supporting documentation for the recommended removal.
The Provost convenes a Council of five tenured Chairs, at least three of whom should be from a
different College or School than that of the Chair against whom reasons for removal from office
have been presented by the Dean.
The Council reviews these reasons and all supporting documentation and makes a
recommendation to the Provost. In reviewing the situation, the Council may meet with and
discuss issues with the Chair and Dean.
The Provost takes the recommendation of the Council into consideration in determining if the
Chair is to be removed from office. The Provost conveys his/her decision in writing to the Chair
with a copy to the Dean and members of the Council.
The Chair, if removed from office, may appeal the Provost’s decision to the Faculty Affairs
Committee. The FAC will consider the appeal on the basis of violations of process and / or
violations of the Chair’s academic freedom and/or the professional well-being of the
Department/Program. FAC submits its findings to the University President. The University
President makes the final determination on reinstating or removing the Chair from office.
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Department Chairs are evaluated by their Department faculty and the Dean of their
College/School prior to reappointment by the Provost in the spring semester of their third year.
Chairs submit their Annual Reports to the Dean.
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2.2.3.3 Procedures for Evaluating Department Chairs and Program Directors within a
College/School
Process:
1. The Dean reminds the Department by February 1 that a review of the Chair will occur
prior to reelection and reappointment for another three-year term;
2. The Dean calls a meeting of all Regular Faculty within the Department by February 10
and charges a senior member of the faculty to lead the process;
3. If the Department has fewer than two Regular Faculty members, the Department may
request that additional Regular Faculty from a related Department join the Department
in its evaluation of the Chair; no more than two additional faculty may be thus invited to
join departmental deliberations;
4. The Department faculty and any additional faculty selected to join them meet and
evaluate the Chair against the list of Chair duties outlined in the Faculty Handbook; a
template listing these duties is provided to the Department by the Dean;
5. The faculty member selected to lead/facilitate the evaluation submits the results of the
evaluation to the Department faculty with a copy to the Dean.
6. The Dean may also add a letter of evaluation, based on the Chair’s Annual Report and
other observations, share the letter with the Chair, and place it in the Chair’s personnel
file.
2.2.4. Departmental Procedures and Faculty Responsibilities
Meetings
Academic Departments are required minimally to meet monthly during the academic year in
addition to meeting as needed on departmental searches and revising the curriculum, to elect a
Chair, conduct assessments, support the accreditation process, and other issues.
Nurturing and Evaluating Junior Faculty
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It is generally expected that junior faculty will begin to engage in service by participating on
committees, but that commitment to service will strengthen and deepen as faculty progress
through the ranks. The Chair, senior faculty members, and the Department as a whole must
ensure, therefore, that tenure track faculty are protected from over-extending themselves
through service and teaching commitments so that they can attend in their probationary years
to establishing a strong teaching portfolio and successfully initiating their scholarly life. The
Chair is the primary agent who ensures work load balance for all faculty in the Department.
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Senior faculty are responsible for contributing to the development of tenure track faculty
within their Departments and to their evaluation, which is led by the Department Chair.
Teaching
Faculty are required to meet their classes as scheduled. All class cancelations for any reason
have to be recorded by faculty members with the Department Chair.
Regular full time Faculty are typically present on campus four days a week during the academic
year, which starts formally at Convocation and ends at Commencement.
Annual Reports
All members of the Department submit Annual Reports detailing their annual activities and
accomplishments in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service to their Department Chairs.
Chairs review Annual Reports with individual faculty members in their Department, before
submitting them, along with any comments they may wish to add, to the Dean. Deans review
Annual Reports within their College/School, acknowledge each Annual Report individually in
writing to faculty members and summarize any concerns, as applicable, with a copy to the
Chair, and then submit a summary report to the Provost regarding all Annual Reports from their
College/School. Annual Reports and all written evaluations of them become part of the faculty
member’s Advancement and post-tenure assessment file.
Faculty submit Annual Reports to their Chair for the prior academic year by September 15 each
year; Chairs submit these with any additional comments to their Deans by October 15; Deans
discuss and communicate in writing any issues with individual faculty members and their Chairs
by November 15, and submit a summary report for their College/School to the Provost by
December 1. Deans send reminders to faculty and Chairs in their College/School by the end of
the previous academic year and again by August 15 of the new academic year about these
deadlines.
If any serious issues have been identified through the Annual Report process, the Provost may
schedule a meeting with the faculty member, his/her Chair, and Dean to discuss the Report and
any follow up actions and/or developmental support that might be necessary.
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Program Reviews/Assessments are undertaken by Departments every seven years. In a College
such as CAS, which has no accrediting body, Program Reviews serve a similar function.
Accredited programs may use their accreditation review as the equivalent of Program Review,
but all programs which do not undergo accreditation are required to undertake program
review. The cycle of Program Reviews within a College/School is established during the 201415 year through discussions and collaboration between Departments and their Deans and
publicized by the Dean to members of the College/School. The Provost will publicize the master
list of scheduled Program Reviews across the University.
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Program Review
The first cycle of Program Reviews will begin in 2015-16. Programs which undertake their first
review in 2015-16, for example, will undertake one again in 2023-2024; programs which
undertake their first Program Review in 2022-2023 will undertake one again in 2030-2031. It is
expected that across the University, no more than five Program Reviews will typically be
undertaken in any academic year.
Procedures:
-
Each College/School is part of a cycle of Program reviews; each Program is reviewed
every 7-years;
-
Each program identifies a team of two peers from comparable nearby universities to
visit and assess their program (the scope of the review might extend to curriculum,
possibilities for expansion and growth, assessment of resources, personnel needs,
staffing needs, the program’s fulfillment of mission, etc. and is determined by the
Department in advance in collaboration with the Dean);
-
The Review Team meets with the Department Chair, faculty, affiliated faculty from
other Departments, the Dean, and the Provost;
-
The Team submits a Report verbally to the Department and other interested members
of the community at the conclusion of their visit and in written format subsequently to
the Department Chair and Dean;
-
The Report is also submitted to the Provost;
-
The Provost meets with the Department and Dean to discuss how issues (such as
personnel needs, or curriculum enhancement) might be addressed by the faculty and
supported by the Dean and Provost.
-
The results of the Review will be shared with the President and Board of Trustees.
The Program Review Team is reimbursed for travel and paid a modest honorarium.
2.3.
Procedures Relating to Shared Governance
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University Committees may consist of appointed and/or elected faculty members. University
Committees and their membership criteria are listed in the Employee Handbook, 2.7 through
2.7.14, and the Faculty Handbook, 2.3.1.
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2.3.1. Procedures for Electing Faculty to University Committees
The Faculty Senate organizes the election of faculty to University Committees in accordance
with criteria for each committee as outlined in the Employee and Faculty Handbook.
If an elected faculty member is unable to serve out his/her term on a University Committee and
resigns or vacates his/her seat on the Committee during the academic year, either
(1) An election will be held in full Faculty Assembly to identify another faculty member who
will serve out the term of the previously-elected faculty member, if the remaining
period of service extends beyond a year
Or
(2) The Faculty President will appoint a faculty member to serve out the term of the
previously-elected faculty member if the remaining period of service is less than a year
2.3.2. Procedures governing Faculty Participation in BOT Committees
The following procedures will be followed for selecting faculty representatives to serve as
voting members on Board of Trustees committees, to develop a structure for faculty
representatives to report to the faculty, and to develop a structure for faculty representatives
to receive input from their faculty constituents.
Faculty Representation
Faculty representatives sit as voting members of the following Board of Trustee committees:
Academic Affairs
Ad Hoc Compensation Sub Committee
Enrollment Management
Facilities
Finance
Investment
Institutional Advancement
Marketing
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Development
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International Programs
The faculty representatives to the Board’s Academic Affairs Committee will be a member of the
Faculty Affairs Committee (most usually the Committee Chair) and the Faculty President. The
Faculty President and Faculty President-Elect will both serve on the Board’s Finance Committee
(with the President-Elect serving as a non-voting member). For the Board’s Facilities
Committee, the faculty will elect a representative from among the future occupants of any
ongoing building projects. If none are currently being undertaken, the position will be elected
at large.
Faculty representatives serving on all other committees (Compensation, Enrollment
Management, Investment, International Programs, Development, Institutional Advancement
and Marketing) will be elected at large from the tenured faculty. These representatives serve
two year terms, with a term limit of three terms. At the Board of Trustee’s behest, the Faculty
President may be asked to represent the Faculty on any, and multiple, Board Committees or
Subcommittees.
Upon receipt of committee agendas, the Faculty President will post these agendas on the
intranet in a folder accessible to faculty. At the Faculty Senate meeting following a meeting of
Board Committees, faculty representatives will provide a brief report to the Faculty.
The Faculty President may choose to caucus with Faculty Board representatives prior to Board
Meetings.
Replacements for faculty unable to complete their elected term will be made in accordance
with Senate Bylaws.
The chart below will be used to regulate the selection of faculty representatives. When the
faculty select their initial representatives for the 2014-15 term, some of the selected positions
will be staggered as short, one-year terms, so that there will be a smooth rotation of faculty
onto Board Committees.
Faculty Representative
Faculty Affairs and Faculty President
Faculty Welfare
Term
Not to exceed 6 years
Not to exceed 6 years
Faculty President/FP-Elect
2 years (one as FP,
one as FPE)
Evolving focus—the current focus is on the new Science building; therefore, having a
CAS/Science faculty member serve on the committee maximizes the communication.
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BoT Committee
Academic Affairs
Compensation Subcommittee
[ad hoc]
Finance
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Faculty have been invited to be members of ten Board of Trustees committees. These ten
committees fall into three broad categories: those that have a mandate/synergy with an
existing faculty committee; one that has an evolving focus; and those that do not have overlap
with an existing faculty committee.
BoT Committee
Facilities
Faculty Representative
CAS/Science
Term
Not to exceed 6 years
BoT Committee
Enrollment Management
Institutional Advancement
International Programs
Investment
Marketing
Development [ad hoc]
Faculty Representative
At-large
At-large
At-large
At-large
At-large
At-large
Election Years
Odd
Even
Even
Even
Odd
Odd
3. PROCEDURES AND CRITERIA FOR FACULTY ADVANCEMENT
SMU appoints tenure-track faculty intending to support their professional growth towards
tenure, and through the course of their career, to advancement in rank to Associate and full
Professor.
Tenure-track faculty members are evaluated annually during their first three years and if they
are unlikely to reach their fullest potential at SMU, they will be informed of this no later than by
the conclusion of their third year. Additional annual reviews may be initiated by the
College/School Dean in one or all years prior to the faculty member submitting his/her
application for tenure.
Once they reach their sixth year, only the most unusual circumstances should result in their not
achieving tenure; likewise, promotion in rank is the expected norm at point of tenure or
thereafter, based on criteria outlined below.
3.1.
Procedures governing the First Year Review of Tenure Track Faculty
First year tenure-track faculty are evaluated prior to being renewed for a subsequent year. In
their first year, tenure track are encouraged to refrain from taking on major committee
assignments; they are encouraged instead to focus on transitioning into the life and culture of
the University and becoming effective and compelling teachers. The First Year Review
necessarily focusses, therefore, on teaching effectiveness and the promise of future scholarship
and service.
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3.1.2. A meeting is held between the Department Chair and the first-year tenure-track faculty
member by January 15 to answer any employment-related questions and so that the
Chair can provide an assessment of the faculty member’s classroom performance.
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3.1.1. The Department Chair conducts class visitations of all first year tenure track faculty.
3.1.3. The Department Chair writes an evaluation of the faculty member’s strengths and
weaknesses and transmits it along with his/her recommendation regarding renewal to
the Dean and the faculty member by February 1.
3.1.4. An opportunity is afforded to the faculty member to respond in writing to the
evaluation; this response must be submitted to the Chair with a copy to the Dean by
February 15.
3.1.5. A recommendation to renew or not renew the faculty member beyond the current
academic year is made by the Dean to the Provost by March 1 based on the
recommendation by the Chair.
3.1.6. A decision to renew or not renew the faculty member beyond the current academic
year is made by the Provost no later than by March 15; a copy of the decision is sent to
the faculty member, the Department Chair, and the Dean.
The appeals process, if the faculty member wishes to appeal on the basis of violations of
academic freedom, is described in Bylaws 9.
The Second-Year Review typically consists of the submission of an Annual Report by the tenuretrack faculty member and a written evaluation by the Department Chair; both become part of
the tenure application file of the faculty member at a later date. Based on the results of the
First-Year Review, the Department Chair may require additional elements (such as class
visitations by peers) as part of the second year review.
3.2.
Procedures governing the Third-Year Review of Tenure Track Faculty
The Third-Year Review is intended to provide the candidate with accurate and thorough
feedback about his/her teaching and professional development, service to the University
community, and scholarly activity. The Third Year Review enables the Department, College, and
University to determine if the faculty member is making due progress towards a successful
application for tenure in future. If the candidate is making due progress towards tenure, it
provides preparatory guidance toward the tenure process by generating substantive letters
from peers and supervisors that will become an important part of the candidate’s tenure file.
3.2.1. Composition of the Third Year Review Committee
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130
Membership of the Third Year Review Committee is broad-based to provide the candidate
substantive and diverse evaluative feedback in several areas.
The Committee consists of:
a. the candidate’s Department Chair
b. a tenured peer selected by the candidate
c. a member of the College Tenure and Promotions Committee
Should the candidate be a Department Chair, the Chair of a closely related department will be
appointed by the Dean to serve on the Committee.
3.2.2. Procedure and Documentation
Each fall, the College/School Dean initiates the Third Year Review process for eligible faculty by
informing individual faculty members and their Chair.
By December 1 of the candidate’s third year, (or the equivalent for regular part-time faculty
member), the candidate informs his/her Department Chair about the tenured peer who has
agreed to serve on the Review Committee. With guidance from the Chair, the candidate
completes his/her review file for the Committee.
The Committee is charged to review the candidate’s file and make statements of evaluation and
recommendation in the areas of (1) teaching effectiveness and professional development, (2)
University service and (3) scholarly activity.
Documents relating to the First-Year and Second-Year reviews will serve as initial documents in
the portfolio built by the tenure track faculty member to be used in his/her Third-Year file and
application for Tenure and Promotion.
Saint Martin’s University recognizes that its diverse faculty members may choose any number
of ways to present an argument for first-year review, Third-Year Review, tenure, and
promotion. Therefore, the list below represents the core of the file. Candidates must submit all
the materials listed below, but may elect to augment their arguments with further materials.
The portfolio should evidence the faculty member’s activities in the three traditional areas:
teaching and professional growth, scholarly activity, and service to the University community.
Documents to be included in the portfolio may include the following:
a. Letter of appointment / hiring letter
b. All teaching evaluations, both student and peer evaluations, to date;
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d. Representative teaching materials (handouts, worksheets, lab experiments, paper
assignments, etc.);
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c. All syllabi from the courses taught;
e. Dated curriculum vitae (normally includes education, degrees earned, home and
business address, employment experience, professional publications and presentations,
university and community service, professional organizations, courses taught,
distinctions, references, professional memberships);
f. Copies of all publications, papers presented, etc. listed in curriculum vitae;
g. A personal statement of 5-8 single-spaced pages, wherein the candidate will reflect
upon his/her pedagogical approaches, achievements, service, and growth as a
professor. The statement should consider, but not necessarily be limited to, the
following:
Pedagogical strategies and theoretical assumptions in the classroom;
Professional and scholarly activities; and
Any additional materials
Additionally, the Chair and Dean are responsible for sending all written communications which
are evaluative and reference or speak to the candidate’s progress or lack of progress towards
tenure and promotion to the Department and the candidate two weeks prior to the deadline by
which the candidate has to submit his/her portfolio for the Third Year Review.
The candidate may incorporate any responses to these evaluations in his/her personal
statement.
The faculty member hands the completed file to his/her Chair by December 15;
-
The Chair hands the file to the Third-Year Review Committee by January 5 along with a
recommendation to renew or not renew the faculty member;
-
The Committee submits the file, along with its recommendation to renew or not renew
the faculty member, to the Dean of the College/School by January 20;
-
The Dean submits the file with his/her recommendation to renew or not renew the
faculty member to the Provost by February 1;
-
The Provost evaluates the file and all recommendations and informs the faculty member
of his/her decision to renew or not renew his/her tenure-track appointment by February
15.
Recommendations made by the Chair, the Third Year Review Committee and the Dean have to
be substantive evaluations of the faculty member based on criteria outlined in Departmental
Guidelines, the Faculty Handbook, the Faculty Bylaws, and the candidate’s file.
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-
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3.2.3. Timeline
If a determination is made to not continue the faculty member‘s tenure track appointment
beyond the year of the third year review, the Provost will extend a one-year, non-renewable,
terminal contract to the faculty member for the subsequent year (typically the fourth year).
The process by which a faculty member may appeal a decision not to renew his/her tenure
track appointment and to move him/her into a terminal, non-renewable, one-year appointment
in the subsequent year, based on violations of academic freedom, is outlined in Bylaws 9.
3.2.4. The Committee’s Evaluation Criteria
The Committee must rely on the criteria outlined in Departmental Guidelines, the Faculty
Handbook, and Faculty Bylaws to evaluate the tenure-track faculty member’s application file
during his/her Third Year. The Third Year review is intended in part as preparation for the fuller
review process which attends to a candidate’s application for tenure and / or promotion.
Teaching Effectiveness
To evaluate the candidate’s teaching abilities, the Committee should consider the relevant
materials submitted for review in the applicant’s file. At least two (2) members of the
Committee should make class observations of the candidate during the fall semester of the
candidate’s third-year.
Service to the University Community
To evaluate the candidate’s service to the University community, the Committee should
consider the relevant materials submitted for review in the applicant’s file. Service to the
University includes Department, College, and University Committee work. It includes any roles
and responsibilities that the candidate assumes that support the goals of his/her Department,
interests of his/her students, or the overall mission of the University. Other members of the
faculty are welcome to contribute letters of support for the candidate in relationship to these
activities.
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To evaluate the candidate’s scholarly activity, the Committee should consider the relevant
materials submitted for review in the applicant’s file. Evidence of scholarly activity may include
scholarly research and/or publications, leadership of workshops and/or conferences,
presentations at such events, creative products, active membership on the Boards or in
leadership of professional organizations, or a systematic ongoing program of study which shows
promise of developing into a publishable or creative piece. Faculty may also demonstrate their
commitment to scholarship by regularly engaging students in research projects that result in
presentations by students (who have been mentored) at regional or national conferences in
their discipline or by publishing on the scholarship of teaching and learning.
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Scholarly Activity
Since expectations with regard to “scholarly engagement” vary widely based on disciplines,
faculty must create departmental documents describing criteria for documenting scholarly
engagement in their discipline(s). The Dean and Provost must ensure that there is parity in
expectations across Colleges/Schools. The Department Chair must ensure that all Regular
Faculty in the Department are familiar with these criteria, once finalized, and that they are
included in the tenure and promotion applications of candidates.
If, because of limited resources or inadequate facilities, a junior faculty member is precluded
from research in his/her area of expertise, he /she may place special emphasis on the
scholarship of teaching and learning and/or work out comparable alternative plans for pursuing
scholarly work in consultation with his/her home Department. Departments should aim to
account for the kinds of work that might constitute “equivalent scholarly work” in their
departmental documentation in order to enable tenure track faculty members to present a
successful portfolio for tenure and promotion to the Associate Professor rank. Substantial
accomplishments in scholarship, including “equivalent scholarly work,” and in teaching and
service, remain criteria of importance in faculty advancement in rank to full Professorship.
3.2.5. The Role of the Review Committee
By January 20, the Committee submits a letter to the candidate for inclusion in his/her tenure
file that outlines its response and evaluation of the stated criteria. The letter is sent to the
candidate with a copy to the Dean and Provost.
The Committee’s letter should reflect the general consensus of the group and include
statements of concern from any dissenting members. The letter should give the Dean and
Provost a thorough analysis of the candidate’s contributions to the University in each of the
required areas, and give the candidate a clear indication of the Committee’s concerns for
growth. Further, it should indicate if the Committee recommends continuation of the faculty
member in his/her tenure track status, and if the recommendation is to make such renewal, the
Committee should point the candidate to areas that need attention prior to consideration for
tenure.
If the Committee has serious concerns regarding the candidate’s progress towards tenure but
recommends that the candidate be renewed in the tenure track for a fourth year, the
Committee may additionally request a formal review during the candidate’s fourth year. This
fourth year review process will mimic the review process conducted in the third year. Copies of
Committee’s letter and recommendation are sent to the Dean for consideration.
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The candidate may respond to the Committee’s letter by composing an additional letter that
will be placed in the candidate’s personnel file with the report from the Committee.
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Irrespective of its recommendation, the third year Review Committee’s report does not bind
TAP or the Advancement Committee in their future decisions.
3.3.
Procedures for applying for Tenure
Tenure track faculty must apply for tenure by the date specified in their Letter of Appointment.
Failure to do so by the specified date will result in the faculty member receiving a terminal,
non-renewable, contract for the following year.
Achieving tenure requires strong teaching, commitment to engaging with peers through
scholarship (E.g. presentations at national and/or regional conferences in their field of
expertise especially beyond the third year), and service to the faculty member’s
Department, College, and/or the University at large.

By May 1 of the prior academic year, the College/School Dean notifies all eligible faculty
members and their Chairs in his/her College/School about their eligibility to apply for
tenure;

By August 1, the faculty member must notify their Department Chair of their intention
to submit an application for tenure;

By August 15 of that year they must submit their application and all supporting
materials to the Chair of their Department;

By September 15 the Chair writes a letter of evaluation, after consulting tenured and
ranked colleagues, regarding the candidacy of the applicant and sends his/her letter and
the candidate’s file to TAP and a copy of his/her letter to the candidate; in her/his letter,
the Chair must clearly indicate support or lack of support for the candidate’s application
for tenure based on the criteria outlined in Departmental guidelines, the Faculty
Handbook, and Faculty Bylaws;

By October 15 the College/School Tenure and Promotions Committee evaluates and
votes on the candidacy of the applicant and sends all materials along with their
recommendation on tenure to the Dean of the faculty member’s College/School; the
Committee also sends a copy of their recommendation to the candidate;

By October 30, the Dean writes a letter evaluating the candidate’s application based on
the criteria outlined in Departmental Guidelines, the Faculty Handbook, and Faculty
Bylaws and forwards his/her letter along with all application materials to the University
Advancement Committee; the Dean also sends a copy of his/her recommendation to
the candidate;

By November 21, the University Advancement Committee evaluates and votes on the
candidacy of the applicant and sends all materials to the Provost; the Committee also
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3.3.1. Timeline
sends a copy of their recommendation to the candidate;

By December 15, the Provost evaluates and votes on the candidacy of the applicant and
sends all materials to the University President; the Provost sends a copy of his/her letter
to the candidate; further evaluation of the application ceases from this point until
January 26 to allow the candidate to lodge an appeal;

By January 5, the candidate must notify the Faculty Affairs Committee and the Provost if
he/she plans to appeal any recommendations made up to this point on his/her
candidacy;

From January 5 until January 15, the candidate may appeal any recommendation
regarding his/her candidacy – by his/her Chair, Dean, College/School TAP, or the Provost
– by notifying and filing an appeal with the Faculty Affairs Committee;

By January 25, the FA Committee must review the appeal and notify the University
President of their decision on the appeal;

By February 10, the University President acts on the application for tenure and notifies
the candidate, the Advancement Committee, the Faculty Affairs Committee, the
Department Chair, Dean of the applicant’s College/School, and the Provost. The
University President then forwards his/her recommendation to the BOT;

By May 15, the BOT, through its Academic Affairs Committee and then its full
membership, makes a final determination regarding the candidate’s tenure application.
3.3.2. Tenure Portfolio
a. Appointment / hiring letter
b. All teaching evaluations, both student and peer evaluations, to date;
c. All syllabi from courses taught;
h. Copies of all publications, papers presented, etc. that are listed in the curriculum vitae;
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e. Dated curriculum vitae (normally includes education, degrees earned, home and
business address, employment experience, professional publications and presentations,
university and community service, professional organizations, courses taught,
distinctions, references, professional memberships);
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d. Representative teaching materials (handouts, worksheets, lab experiments, paper
assignments, etc.);
i.
A personal statement of 5-10 single-spaced pages, wherein the candidate will reflect
upon his/her pedagogical approaches, service, scholarly achievements, and growth as a
professor. The statement should consider, but not necessarily be limited to, the
following:
Pedagogical strategies and theoretical assumptions in the classroom;
Professional and scholarly activities; and
Any additional materials
f. Letters of evaluation by the Department Chair, or appropriate substitutes (in case the
Chair is the candidate) to be determined by the Dean;
g. Any additional letters solicited by the faculty member from colleagues, former students,
and/or alumni. Letters should reflect specific and direct experience. For example, letters
about a candidate’s teaching should be based upon class visits; comments about service
should be based upon serving with the candidate; letters about scholarship should be
based upon one’s own relevant expertise, the testimony of others in the field, the
perusal of published materials, etc.
Additionally, the Dean of the College/School must send all written communications
accumulated during the candidate’s annual reviews prior to applying for tenure and which are
evaluative and reference the candidate’s progress or lack of progress towards tenure and
promotion to the Department Chair and to the candidate two weeks prior to the deadline by
which the candidate has to submit his/her portfolio.
The candidate may incorporate any responses to these evaluations by the Dean in his/her
personal statement.
3.4.
Procedures for Applying for Promotion
Applications for tenure and promotion may be submitted simultaneously. Candidates must
indicate their intent to apply for both and all evaluators must indicate their vote regarding both
applications as separate considerations of each.
Achieving advancement in rank to an Associate Professor requires strong teaching, ongoing
commitment to scholarship through publications or creative activity (E.g. presentations to peers
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3.4.1. Criteria
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Applications for promotion to the rank of Associate Professor are reviewed by all three
members of TAP and all members of the University Advancement committee. All members of
these committees have to be ranked at the Associate professor level or above. Applications for
promotion to the rank of full Professor are reviewed by full professors who serve on TAP and
full professors who serve on the University Advancement Committee.
at national or regional conferences and at least one article or creative piece or similar
accomplishment in one’s field), and service to one’s Department, College, or the University at
large. Faculty may demonstrate “similar accomplishments” by their commitment to scholarship,
by regularly engaging students in research projects that result in presentations by students
(who have been mentored) at regional or national conferences in their discipline, or by
publishing on the scholarship of teaching and learning.
Since expectations with regard to “scholarly engagement” vary widely based on disciplines,
faculty must create departmental documents describing criteria for documenting scholarly
engagement in their discipline(s). The Dean and Provost must ensure that there is parity in
expectations across Colleges/Schools. The Department Chair must ensure that all Regular
Faculty in the Department are familiar with these criteria, once finalized, and that they are
included in the tenure and promotion applications of candidates.
If, because of limited resources or facilities, a junior faculty member is precluded from research
in his/her area of expertise, he /she may place special emphasis on the scholarship of teaching
and learning and/or work out comparable alternative plans for pursuing scholarly work in
consultation with his/her home Department. Departments should aim to account for the kinds
of work that might constitute “equivalent scholarly work” in their departmental documentation
in order to enable tenure track faculty members to present a successful portfolio for tenure and
promotion to the Associate Professor rank. Substantial accomplishments in scholarship,
including “equivalent scholarly work,” and in teaching and service, remain criteria of
importance in faculty advancement in rank to full Professorship.
All evaluators at all stages of the process must consult Departmental documents regarding
criteria for promotion, which serve as supplemental and complementary information to that
provided in the Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws.
Achieving advancement in rank to a full Professor requires strong teaching, sustained
accomplishments through regular / ongoing publications, creative work, or the scholarship of
teaching and learning, i.e. ongoing commitment to scholarly activity, and a strong commitment
to leadership/service within the SMU community at many levels.
By May 1 of the prior academic year, the College/School Dean notifies all eligible faculty
members and their Chairs in his/her College/School about their eligibility to apply for
promotion from Assistant to Associate Professor and from Associate to full Professorial
rank;

By August 1 the faculty member must notify their Department Chair of their intention to
submit an application;
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138
3.4.2. Timeline

By September 15 the Chair writes a letter of evaluation, after consulting tenured and
ranked colleagues, regarding the candidacy of the applicant for promotion and sends
his/her letter to the Dean of the College/School; in his/her letter, the Chair must clearly
indicate support or lack of support for the candidate’s application for promotion based
on the criteria outlined in the Departmental Guidelines, Faculty Handbook and Faculty
Bylaws; the Chair must also forward the entire application file along with his/her letter
to the College/School Tenure and Promotions Committee; the Chair must also send a
copy of his/her recommendation to the faculty member;

By October 15, the College/School Tenure and Promotions Committee evaluates and
votes on the candidacy of the applicant for promotion and sends all materials to the
Dean of the College/School; the Committee also sends a copy of their recommendation
to the candidate;

By October 30, the Dean writes a letter evaluating the candidate’s application for
promotion based on the criteria outlined in the Department Guidelines, the Faculty
Handbook, and Faculty Bylaws and forwards his/her letter along with all application
materials to the University Advancement Committee; the Dean also sends a copy of
his/her recommendation to the faculty member;

By November 21, the University Advancement Committee evaluates and votes on the
candidacy of the applicant for promotion and sends all materials to the Provost; the
Committee also sends a copy of their recommendation to the candidate;

By December 15, the Provost evaluates and votes on the candidacy of the applicant for
promotion and sends all materials to the University President; the Provost also sends a
copy of his/her letter to the candidate; further evaluation of the application for
promotion ceases from this point until January 26 to allow the candidate to lodge an
appeal;

By January 5, the candidate must notify the Faculty Affairs Committee and the Provost if
he/she plans to appeal a negative recommendations by the Provost;

Between January 5 and January 15, the candidate may counter any negative
recommendations made throughout the process at any level in a letter to the University
President; this submission becomes part of the application file for promotion;

If the Provost’s recommendation is negative, the University President defers his/her
decision on the candidate’s promotion until the conclusion of the appeals process;
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By August 15 of that year the faculty member must submit their application and all
supporting materials to the Chair of their Department;
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

By January 15, the faculty member must submit his/her formal appeal of the Provost’s
recommendation and all supporting documents to the FA Committee;

By January 25, the FA Committee must review the faculty member’s appeal and notify
the University President of their decision on the appeal;

By February 10, the University President acts on the application for promotion and
notifies the candidate, the Advancement Committee, the Faculty Affairs Committee (if
there has been an appeal), TAP, the Department Chair, Dean of the applicant’s
College/School, and the Provost. The University President then forwards his/her
recommendation to the BOT;

By May 15, the BOT, through its Academic Affairs Committee and then its full
membership, makes a final determination regarding the candidate’s tenure application.
3.5.
Salary Increases
The granting of tenure and promotion is each accompanied by an increase in salary (in addition
to the annual step increase). Determination regarding the exact amount of this salary increase
is made by the University President and the allocation is reviewed every six years.
4. PROCEDURES AND CRITERIA WHICH ATTEND TO FACULTY DEVELOPMENT
4.1.
Conferences and Research / Development Support
Procedures for applying for funds from the Faculty Development Committee are evolved and
publicized by the Committee at the start of each academic year. The Committee will aim to
create a hierarchy of funding support in keeping with criteria for tenure and promotion. E.g.,
faculty presentations at conferences may be more substantially supported than attendance at
conferences, except in the first two years of a tenure track faculty member’s career when
faculty are encouraged to attend conferences as a first step towards connecting with their
academic peers.
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140
Faculty requesting funds, when available, from the Office of the Provost must submit a proposal
and budget to the Provost with a copy to the College/School Dean. Provost’s funds, when
available, are used to support faculty development in areas such as the Core Curriculum, crossCollege/School initiatives, and other University-wide programs and activities.
4.2.
Selection / Appointment of Mentor and the Mentoring Program
4.2.1. Objectives
Based on the mission of Saint Martin's University to further teaching excellence and in
reflection of the Benedictine virtue of hospitality, our Mentor Program is designed to:
a. Promote teaching excellence;
b. Introduce and guide new faculty to all aspects of their academic work life;
c. Ensure that each new faculty member receives support in academic orientation to the
University;
d. Ensure that each new faculty member be offered a risk-free and non-threatening
environment in which to develop and refine teaching skills;
e. Nature of Mentor Program: Mentoring is a support/coaching system provided by
experienced faculty for new faculty. Its emphasis for each of the two semesters is
orientation to the University and alignment of new faculty teaching skills to University
standards.
4.2.2. Timeline
Phase I: Initial Semester
Emphasis:
Academic Orientation to University and instructional expectations (syllabi
writing, developing exams, etc.).
Phase II: Second Semester
Emphasis: Instructional coaching, planning, teaching strategies, student-teacher relationships,
development of courses, exams, securing teaching materials, etc.
4.2.3. Procedures
b. A mentor will ensure initial contact to get acquainted and set up a regularly scheduled
meeting (at least one (1) every other week);
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c. The mentee will make at least one (1) observational visit to the mentor’s classroom in
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a. Mentors are matched with new faculty members by Department Chairs during the
second week of the fall semester. Typically mentors will be members of the faculty who
are not holding the position of Dean;
the initial semester;
d. The mentor will make at least one (1) observational visit first semester and two (2) visits
second semester. Verbal or written feedback will be given to the mentee after each
classroom visit.
4.2.4. Confidentiality Policy
The relationship between the mentor and the new faculty will remain confidential and
supportive. The following procedures will be followed:
a. Mentors will refrain from sharing any information regarding a mentee with the
mentee’s Department Chair, administration, colleagues or students. The single copy of
written comments used in conferences between mentor and mentee will be given to
the mentee;
b. If a new faculty member’s retention or future contract to the University is in question,
the confidentiality of the mentor/mentee role will not be violated;
c. Under unusual circumstances, a mentee may request a letter of recommendation from
a mentor for purposes of review. In such circumstances, it is up to the discretion of the
mentor whether to write such a letter and what to include in it.
4.3.
Applications process for Junior Faculty Fourth-year Teaching Reduction
Regular tenure track faculty members who typically (a) teach a twelve semester credit load in
each of the two semesters of the academic year, (b) are eligible to apply for tenure in their sixth
year, and (c) successfully complete their third year review, may take a two-course (6 credits)
reduction during their fourth year. The reduction may be taken in a single semester of the
fourth year (teaching load of 4/2 or 18 credits for the year) or spread through both academic
terms (teaching load of 3/3 or 18 credits for the year).
2. By March 5, the Chair of the Department makes a recommendation to the Dean
regarding this application for a reduced load in the fourth year; the Chair must also
clarify how the teaching needs of the Department will be met during that year,
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1. By March 1 of his/her third year, the Faculty member submits to the Chair of his/her
Department an application of no more than three pages responding to issues
documented in the Third Year Review and by proposing a plan to attend to his/her
scholarly development in preparation for building a successful tenure file in his/her sixth
year;
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4.3.1. Procedures and Timeline
especially if the University as restricted additional Contingent Faculty appointments;
3. By March 12, the Dean evaluates the application from the faculty member and the
Chair’s recommendation, and makes a recommendation to the Provost;
4. By March 19, the Provost makes a decision and communicates this in writing to the
faculty member with copies to the Dean and Chair.
5. By October 1 of the year immediately following this year of reduced teaching
responsibilities, the faculty member must submit a one-two page report to the Provost,
with a copy to his/her Dean and Chair, regarding work successfully undertaken during
the previous year.
4.4.
Procedures for Applying for Sabbatical Leaves
Sabbatical leaves enable Regular Faculty to engage in creative, intellectual or artistic activities
appropriate to their discipline (i.e., research, writing, teaching, etc.).
4.4.1. Eligibility
Any full time member of the Regular Faculty who has completed six (6) years of continuous full
time service to the University and has achieved tenure is eligible for a sabbatical leave.
4.4.2. Application Procedure
By September 20, the faculty member submits an application and supporting materials to the
University Advancement Committee. The application should present the purpose that will be
served by the sabbatical and the proposed plan of activities; the application should include a
report from any prior sabbatical activities and a recommendation by the Chair in support of the
application and arrangements concerning the continued discharge of the applicant’s activities
and responsibilities to the University during the proposed sabbatical.
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By October 20, the Dean of the College/School adds a recommendation on the candidacy of
each applicant from his/her College/School and transmits the applications and its
recommendations to the University Advancement Committee.
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By October 10, TAP evaluates all applications from the College/School and recommends their
order of priority for funding to the Dean of the College/School. The evaluation of proposals
should address the following issues: the advantage to the applicant as a scholar and teacher;
the advantage to the applicant as a member of the College and University community; the
subsequent advantage to the University and the larger community.
By November 10, the University Advancement Committee evaluates the application and
forwards their recommendation along with all supporting materials to the Provost.
By November 20, the Provost forwards the applications and the Committee recommendations,
together with his/her own, to the President.
By December 1, the President considers all submitted materials and communicates his/her
decision to the faculty member with a copy to the Department Chair, Dean, and Provost.
An applicant may request a review and re-evaluation of his/her application evaluation by the
Provost and/or the President.
4.4.3. Length of Sabbatical Leave
Sabbatical leave is granted for a semester at full salary, or for one academic year at half salary.
The period of the sabbatical leave is credited as service for the purposes of promotion and the
granting of salary step increases.
4.4.4. Sabbatical Agreement
Sabbaticals are granted upon the expressed agreement that the faculty member will continue
to serve the University for at least one (1) year after the expiration of the term of leave, unless
this provision is expressly waived by the President. Should the faculty member fail to fulfill the
terms of the sabbatical agreement, including the sabbatical report, fail to serve for at least one
(1) year, he/she is liable for repaying the whole or a proportionate share of the salary paid
during the sabbatical leave to the University.
4.4.5. Salaried Activities during Sabbatical Leave
Faculty may not undertake teaching responsibilities at SMU while on sabbatical leave. Faculty
may, however, seek approval to undertake salaried activities outside SMU during their
sabbatical that may directly benefit their development as teachers and scholars. New salaried
activities outside SMU should be enabling in nature, such as those associated with fellowships,
scholarships or stipends that enable the faculty member to undertake a sabbatical leave.
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Faculty members must submit a report of work accomplished during their sabbatical leave to
their Chair, with copies to the Dean and Provost. They should also present their sabbatical work
at an appropriate faculty forum.
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4.4.6. Sabbatical Report
4.5. Post-tenure Faculty Development and Review Procedures
By September 7th of each academic year, the Provost prepares and publishes a schedule
indicating deadlines for each of the steps in the ongoing development and review process and
notifies faculty members, that they will be scheduled for ongoing evaluation.
A faculty member will submit the following materials in a portfolio not to exceed 6 pages
(excluding any student evaluations) to his/her Chair by Wednesday of the first week of October
each year:
a. a narrative description of activities addressing teaching effectiveness; scholarly, creative,
or interpretive activity; and service to the University community;
b. student evaluations of all courses taught in the previous year;
c. any additional information
While these materials are to be submitted to the Chair every year as part of the faculty
member’s Annual Report, the formal more extensive review of these materials will occur during
every fifth year of teaching. The fifth year period beginning date commences from the date on
which tenure begins or the academic year following the last ongoing evaluation period,
whichever occurs last.
In every fifth year after achieving tenure, each faculty member will undergo formal evaluation
overseen by his/her Chair, who will organize the review in consultation with the faculty
member. The faculty member may request that one other faculty member of his or her choice
from inside or outside the Department join the Chair in the peer review. The Chair will prepare
a report summarizing findings of the multiple sourced evaluations. The resulting evaluation will
be shared and discussed with the faculty member by November 7th of the same year. The
faculty member will be given the opportunity to attach comments to the report before it is sent
by November 15th to the Dean of the College/School.
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If areas for improvement in a faculty member’s performance are identified, the Provost will
work with the Chair and Dean to develop and implement a plan by December 10 th of the same
year to address identified areas of concern.
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The Dean of the College/School will add a one-two page evaluative report, share a copy of the
same with the faculty member and Department Chair, and after ensuring that the faculty
member and Chair have no additional comments in response to this evaluation that they might
want to attach as an addendum to their original evaluation, forward the whole portfolio of
materials to the Provost. The Provost may schedule a meeting with the faculty member and
his/her Chair and Dean to discuss the evaluation.
If agreement on the plan cannot be reached, the Faculty Affairs Committee may be asked to
assist in reaching final agreement on the development plan.
TYPICAL REVIEW CALENDAR FOR REGULAR FACULTY
Fall
3rd year review
6
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
Five-year cycle begins (5-year cycle is
mandated by the NWCCU)
Annual review
in preparation
for applying for
tenure &
promotion
Tenure and
promotion
application
Tenured
appointment
begins
Post-tenure Development and Review
Post-tenure Development and Review
Post-tenure Development and Review
Post-tenure Development and Review
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7
Spring
1st year review
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Academic
Year
1
2
3
4
5
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
Post-tenure Development and Review
Post-tenure Development and Review
4.6. Applications and Procedures for Leaves of Absence
4.6.1. Criteria and Important Dates
A Regular Faculty member may request an unpaid leave of absence from the University. A
leave of absence without pay may be granted for a period not to exceed two (2) years.
Applications for leaves must be submitted for a year at a time even in instance where leaves are
undertaken in two consecutive years.
A leave of absence shall not affect the faculty member’s eligibility for continued employment,
promotion or contract renewal. Leaves of absence may be granted for reasons such as faculty
exchange, faculty loan to another University through an inter-university arrangement,
advanced study, scholarship and research, public service, or familial / personal obligations.
During a faculty member’s unpaid leave of absence from the University, his/her office and
laboratory spaces will be reassigned by the Dean for other use. Either the original space or
other comparable spaces will be assigned to the faculty member upon his/her return to Regular
Faculty status after completing the leave of absence.
By December 1 during the period of his/her leave of absence, the faculty member must inform
the Provost of his/her intention to return during the following academic year to Regular Faculty
status. Failure to do so may result in forfeiture of the faculty member’s Regular Faculty status
and continued appointment with the University.
4.6.2. Procedure
By November 1, the Dean forwards the request with his/her recommendation, to the Provost;
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By October 15, the Chair forwards the request with his/her endorsement, to the Dean;
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By October 1, a Regular Faculty member seeking to apply for leave during the following
academic year submits an application to his/her Department Chair;
By November 15, the Provost forwards his/her recommendation along with the request for
unpaid leave, to the University President;
By December 1, the University President communicates his/her decision regarding the
application for unpaid leave to the faculty member with a copy to the Chair, Dean, and Provost.
Faculty members already on their first year of unpaid leave must follow the above process and
timeline in requesting a second year of unpaid leave. If a request for an additional year
following the first year of leave is not received in the Provost’s Office by December 1, the
faculty member will forfeit his/her Regular Faculty status and continuing appointment with the
University.
5.
STANDARDS, CRITERIA, AND PROCEDURES FOR EVALUATING FACULTY
5.1.
General Expectations: Teaching, Scholarship, and Service
Teaching
Commitment to excellence in teaching is a distinguishing characteristic of Saint Martin’s
University. Each faculty member, Regular and Contingent, is expected to strive for excellence in
teaching. Indeed, teaching effectiveness is an essential criteria in evaluating faculty for tenure
and promotion.
Scholarship
The University expects scholarly, creative or interpretive activity from its Regular Faculty.
Personal involvement with the academic pursuits of one’s discipline strengthens a teacher’s
ability to transmit the processes by which new knowledge is attained. In addition, a faculty of
active learners provides a model of life-long learning for Saint Martin’s University students.
Finally, the reputations of academic departments and the University are enhanced by scholarly
and creative work.
Service
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148
The University calls on its Regular Faculty to participate in its governance and in other activities
that cannot strictly be defined as teaching or scholarship. The formulation and review of
University policy, participation in departmental administration, and leadership in developing
new programs are central to the operation of the University and are necessary components of
professional service to the University. No single pattern of service to the University is expected
of all faculty members, but each Regular Faculty member is expected to share in activities,
which contribute to the governance, operation, and general welfare of the University.
5.2.
Other Responsibilities and Duties
Student Advising
In an effort to assist each student to reach his/her full personal and professional potential, the
University emphasizes the role of Regular and Continuing Contingent Faculty, such as ESL
Instructors, in the academic advising of students. Faculty advising includes the following areas:
a. advising the student with regard to the student’s work in classes taught by
the faculty member;
b. advising the student on requirements of the Core and guiding advisees
through the University’s foundational Core curriculum;
c. advising the student on major requirements;
d. assisting the student in setting academic goals;
e. recognizing when the student needs professional assistance with personal
problems or problems related to academic skill deficiencies and directing the
student to the appropriate office or person for assistance.
Presence on Campus
Regular part-time and full time faculty members are normally expected to be on campus on
days during which they are scheduled to teach. In any event, Regular Faculty are minimally
expected to be on campus four days a week during the academic year. Continuing Contingent
Faculty, such as ESL Instructors, are expected to be on campus during the period of their
contract.
Office Hours
Faculty are required to file a syllabus for each course taught, including grading procedures, in
the Dean’s Office by no later than the end of the first week of class.
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Course Syllabi and Course Responsibilities
149
Each faculty member establishes and posts regular and adequate office hours. These are
distributed throughout the week. A minimum of 5 hours are scheduled by Regular Faculty,
although scheduled office hours and meeting times should reflect the number of academic
advisees assigned to a faculty member, and additional office hours may be needed during
registration and examination periods. ESL Instructors are expected to keep regular office hours
as recommended by the Chief International Programs Officer.
All Faculty are responsible for planning and presenting the course material, establishing course
objectives and requirements and making them known to the student, selecting and ordering
texts and supplemental materials in a timely manner, preparing, administering and grading
papers and examinations, and assigning grades.
Faculty must meet their assigned classes at the scheduled times. Requests to change the
schedule have to be approved in advance by the Dean and the Registrar. If the instructor
cannot meet a class, he/she contacts the Registrar, who notifies the students of the
cancellation of the class. The Department Chair is notified by the faculty member and
arrangements, satisfactory to assuring student progress, are made. The Registrar notifies the
Provost’s Office about all cancellations.
The period of final examinations is scheduled at the end of the semester by the Registrar’s
Office. No examinations are to be administered to classes during the last regular week of
scheduled classes in lieu of the final examination. Final examinations, if given, must be
administered at the date and time specified by Registrar. Exceptions to this policy must be
approved by the Provost.
All Faculty members are expected to maintain adequate records of student progress and
attendance.
Team Teaching Criteria
Team teaching has to be approved by the appropriate Department Chairs and the Dean(s), and
may be restricted based on a College/School’s curricular and teaching needs.
Team-taught classes will count as in-load teaching for each faculty member provided he
class enrolls a minimum of 15 students if team taught by two faculty members and 24
students minimally if team taught by three faculty members;
-
Both Faculty members are required to attend all scheduled class sessions so that
students benefit from the expertise of both faculty members and the exchange of ideas
between them;
-
All effort must be made by faculty engaged in teaching a class together to equalize their
work loads for the course with regard to grading and evaluating assignments.
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Faculty members who elect to team teach a course with a colleague are required to abide by
the following policies:
Adherence to University Policies and Procedures
Each faculty member is expected to be familiar with and adhere to the policies and regulations
of the University. The Employee Handbook, Faculty Handbook, and Faculty Bylaws constitute an
effort to summarize such regulations. When questions of interpretation arise, clarification
should be sought from the appropriate official of the University. Adherence to these
regulations is understood to be incorporated as part of the contract of every faculty member.
6. TIMELINES AND PROCEDURES FOR FACULTY CONTRACTS/APPOINTMENT LETTERS
6.1.
Faculty Contracts/Appointment Letters
Regular Faculty members receive Letters of Appointment annually by March 15th of the year for
the following year. Contingent Faculty members receive Contracts prior to the date of
appointment. Letters of Appointment and Contracts are typically signed by the University
President or by the Provost on behalf of the University President.
6.1.1. Terms Specified on Letters of Appointment and / or Faculty Contracts
Academic Rank
Each faculty member’s Letter of Appointment or Contract specifies his/her academic rank.
Length of Appointment
Each faculty member’s Letter of Appointment or Contract states the term of the contract by
specific dates.
Salary and Pay Schedule
Each faculty member’s Letter of Appointment or Contract specifies his/her nine-month salary.
The Pay Schedule is shared by the Provost electronically with all Regular Faculty at the start of
each academic year.
Duties
Each faculty member’s Letter of Appointment or Contract refers faculty members to
compliance with the policies of the University as stated in the Employee Handbook, Faculty
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University Handbooks and Faculty Bylaws
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Each faculty member’s Letter of Appointment or Contract specifies his/her maximum teaching
load, credit hours and other special duties, such as supervision, administration, research.
Handbook, and Faculty Bylaws. Both the University and the faculty member are bound by
these written policies, procedures, and regulations.
6.1.2. Contract Changes
Promotion in Rank
If a faculty member’s promotion in rank becomes effective at the beginning of the spring
semester, it is included as an amendment to his/her contract or a new updated Letter of
Appointment is given to the faculty member.
Step Increases
If a faculty member receives a step increase that is effective at the beginning of the spring
semester, it is included as an amendment to his/her contract or a new updated Letter of
Appointment is given to the faculty member.
6.1.3. Contract / Letters of Appointment Negotiations
A faculty member may reopen negotiations on any provision of his/her contract at any time
without prejudice to her or his standing or rights and without invalidating in any way the
existing contract.
The University may reopen negotiations on any provisions of any faculty member’s contract
without prejudice to its standing and rights, or to the standing and rights of the faculty member
concerned, without invalidating the existing contract.
6.2.
Outside Employment
In any event, no full time Regular Faculty member may be approved to undertake outside
employment during the regular academic semesters that exceeds eight weekly hours of work.
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In the event that a request to accept outside employment is denied, the full-time faculty
members may petition the Provost for a reduction of contract so that he/she might accept the
outside employment. (This reduction can apply to regular part-time faculty, but only if they are
more than half time, since part time faculty must be at least half time to be considered eligible
for tenure).
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Outside employment, including teaching in another institution, may not be undertaken by
regular part-time and full time faculty members during the academic year without prior
approval of the Dean and Provost. In approving outside employment during the academic year,
the Provost ascertains whether or not the outside employment interferes or is in conflict with
the faculty member’s academic duties or reduces the faculty member’s service to the
University.
Regular Faculty who undertake outside employment during the three summer months of the
year when they are not on contract with the University (May 15 – August 15) are not required
to seek permission to do so from the University, but since summer months within the academy
typically present faculty members with an opportunity for renewal and research, faculty are
encouraged to inform the Provost and consult with her/him about undertaking outside
employment in the summer. Junior faculty in particular are encouraged to preserve their
summer months for professional renewal and to build their portfolio for a successful
application for tenure and promotion.
The Provost grants approval of outside employment in writing to the Faculty member with a
copy to the Chair and Dean.
6.3.
Consulting
Some academic fields present opportunities for faculty members to undertake consulting work
in business, education, or government. Such consultancies may be valuable by some
Departments and the University in that they provide experience complementary to that gained
through research and contribute to professional growth.
Insofar as consulting work is most often akin to outside employment, the guidelines on Outside
Employment (6.3.) are followed. There is no reduction of workload to accommodate consulting
work unless such work is specifically undertaken for the University and at the request of the
University.
Departments whose members are likely to be called upon as consultants must have written
Department policies which state specific terms concerning length of time and number of hours
(which may not exceed eight weekly hours during the regular semesters of the academic year)
to be spent on consulting. Consulting assignments must also identify use of University
laboratories and equipment (for which the University reserves the right to charge a fee and/or
impose contractual obligations with regard to usage, etc.) to the Dean.
7. PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINING AND ASSIGNING FACULTY WORKLOAD
The faculty teaching load at Saint Martin’s is defined in terms of teaching semester credit
hours.
Normally, a full time Regular Faculty member with commitments to teaching, scholarship, and
service, regardless of rank, teaches twenty-four (24) semester hours each academic year.
The teaching load of the individual faculty member is evaluated by the Dean, subject to review
by the Provost.
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Standard Teaching Load for Regular Faculty
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7.1.
In its effort to assure equity in the distribution of assignments, the University recognizes that an
adequate definition of a Regular Faculty member’s workload takes into account the full
spectrum of his/her professional and institutional services.v
7.1.1. Calculation of Studies and Independent Studies in Workload
7.2.
Contingent Faculty Teaching Loads
Contingent Faculty work loads are calculated as follows: 1 hour of teaching requires 1.25 hours
of preparation. Each semester teaching hour therefore equates to 2.25 weekly work load
hours.
Contingent Faculty are typically encouraged to maintain one weekly office hour per course,
which are included in the total hours represented below in calculations of a Contingent Faculty
member’s weekly work load.
Contingent Faculty workloads do not typically exceed three 3-credit semester courses on the
Lacey Campus in each semester. Contingent Faculty workloads do not typically exceed two
three-credit courses in each eight week term on extension campuses.
7.2.1. Sample Loads
A Contingent Faculty member teaching one 3-credit course during a regular semester
carries a total work load of 7.75 weekly hours;
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A Contingent Faculty member teaching one 4-credit course during a regular semester
carries a total work load of 10 weekly hours;
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A Contingent Faculty member teaching two 3-credit courses during the regular semester
carries a total work load of 15.5 weekly hours;
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A Contingent Faculty member teaching two 4-credit courses during the regular semester
carries a work load of 20 weekly hours;
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A Contingent Faculty member teaching three 3-credit courses during the regular
semester carries a work load of 23.25 weekly hours;
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Any hours constituting required attendance at University meetings or required service
on committees or additional weekly office hours are calculated as additional hours of
commitment within a Contingent Faculty member’s work load. All additional required
hours are approved by the Provost and may be additionally compensated.
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Lacey Campus
Extension Campuses and/or 8-week terms
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A Contingent Faculty member teaching a 3-credit course (5.5 hours per week of class
time) during an eight week term carries a total work load of approximately 13.5 weekly
hours;
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A Contingent Faculty member teaching two 3-credit courses (11 hours per week of class
time) during an eight-week term carries a work load of approximately 27 weekly hours.
7.3.
Procedures governing Reductions in Teaching Load
The University may request that a Regular Faculty member assume non-teaching activities on a
temporary basis. If this involvement is heavier than would normally be expected in general
service to the University, the teaching load of the faculty member is reduced. Such a request on
the part of the University is agreed upon by the faculty member, the Department Chair, and the
Dean, and approved by the Provost.
Reductions in load for Regular Faculty, for substantial service or administrative responsibilities,
are typically for three credit hours each semester, and typically do not exceed 9 semester
credits during the year. Faculty with releases above 12 credits in the academic year function as
academic leaders/academic administrators.
7.3.1. Calculation of Directed Studies and Independent Studies in Workload
A Regular Faculty member who typically teaches twelve semester credits each semester and
has undertaken Directed or Independent Studies totaling 27 semester credits of teaching
through the course of several regular semesters may request to be placed on a reduced
teaching load of nine semester credits (typically three courses) in the semester following such
accumulation during which he/she is typically expected to teach a 12-credit load. The Dean
recommends this reduction to the Provost who approves it.
Faculty members do not lose the credits they accumulate by teaching Independent/Directed
Studies but may activate their access to a reduced load only during a semester in which they
would normally be expected to teach a 12-credit load.
7.3.2. Types of Reductions in Teaching Load
Faculty who receive approved teaching reductions as outlined in the Faculty Handbook 7.2.1.
may not teach more courses than their approved reduced load. In exceptional circumstances,
the Provost may approve an exception to this rule.
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Approved Reductions
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7.3.2.1.
7.3.2.2.
Unplanned Reductions
The principles and policies governing unplanned reductions in teaching loads are outlined in the
Faculty Handbook 7.2.2.
7.4.
Procedures for Assigning and Calculating Teaching Overloads
Regular Faculty are normally discouraged from teaching overloads, with exceptions resulting
only from pressing and temporary Departmental and/or College/School teaching needs. In any
event, Regular Faculty on reduced loads below twelve semester credits each semester may not
undertake overloads. Exceptions to this practice have to be approved by the Provost.
7.5.
Procedures for Assigning Summer Teaching and/or Other Assignments
Assignments of summer teaching are not guaranteed and are determined by the Dean and
approved by the Provost based on teaching needs.
Regular Faculty members may elect to be compensated on the basis of their nine-month
contracted salary or as a Contingent Faculty member for summer teaching. The former carries
with it continued commitment to Regular Faculty duties and responsibilities (such as advising
and service on committees) during the period of the summer contract. Faculty members who
elect to teach during the summer on contingent appointments are relieved of all duties and
responsibilities other than teaching and maintaining office hours for students in their classes.
Regular Faculty are required at point of appointment to indicate their choice of contract for
summer teaching responsibilities.
8.
PROCEDURES FOR APPLYING FOR BENEFITS SPECIFIC TO FACULTY
8.1.
Leave for Expectant Mothers
Regular Faculty members who are eligible to access leave as expectant mothers, as outlined in
the Faculty Handbook 8.1.1., are encouraged to inform their Department Chair and Dean as
early as possible in accordance with terms outlined in the Handbook. The Provost approves
Leave for Expectant Mothers Failure to give sufficient advance notice may prevent the faculty
member from being able to access the paid leave benefit for the desired semester.
Regular Faculty members who are eligible to apply for parental support through reduced
teaching as outlined in the Faculty Handbook 8.1.3. are encouraged to inform their Department
Chair and Dean as early as possible in accordance with terms outlined in the Handbook. The
Provost approves parental support through reduced teaching. Failure to give sufficient advance
notice may prevent eligible faculty members from being granted their preferred reduced
teaching schedule.
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Parental Support through Reduced teaching
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8.2.
8.3.
Externally-funded leaves with supplemental support from the University
Regular Faculty members who receive external grants for semester-long or year-long research
and who wish to request a supplemental grant from the University as a “top-up” if the external
award they receive falls short of their normal income for the period of the grant must submit a
formal request with supporting documentation to the Dean. The Dean makes a
recommendation to the Provost who approves the “top-up” grant; the total remuneration to
the faculty member from grant funds and the University contribution may not exceed his/her
contracted salary for the nine month period of the academic year.
Within the next semester after they return from leave, faculty members must submit a report
to their Dean and Provost.
The University requires that a faculty member granted research leave which includes pay from
SMU will return to full-time service to the University for the equivalent period following his/her
leave. If this obligation is not fulfilled, the faculty member will be expected to reimburse the
University for the “top-up” salary paid while on leave, unless specifically relieved of the
obligation by the University President.
Faculty members on research leaves are required to notify the Provost by December 1 st of the
year about their return to the University in the following fall semester and by September 1 st of
their return to the University in the following spring semester.
9. PROCEDURES GOVERNING FACULTY NON-RENEWAL, DISMISSAL, AND TERMINATION
9.1.
Non-renewal of Tenure-track Faculty
Non-renewal of tenure track faculty is typically initiated by the Department Chair who must
consult with all tenured Faculty members in the Department in making this determination. If
there are no tenured faculty in the Department or only one other tenured faculty member in
the Department, the Chair consults with two tenured faculty members from a related
Department. The terms which govern a Chair’s / Department’s determination not to renew a
Regular tenure track faculty member are outlined in the Faculty Handbook 9.1.
By December 1, the Chair makes a recommendation not to renew a tenure track faculty
member in writing, with all supporting documentation, to the Dean;
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By December 10, the Dean forwards the recommendation to the Provost with a written
recommendation to renew or not renew the tenure track faculty member;
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By December 20, the Provost reviews both recommendations and all supporting
documentation and makes a determination; in making this determination, the Provost
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9.1.1. Procedure
may consult with faculty leaders, members of the Department, or any other individuals
who may be familiar with the faculty member’s performance; the Provost conveys the
University’s decision not to renew the tenure track faculty member’s appointment in
writing to the faculty member with copy to the Chair, Dean, and University President.
9.1.2. Terms
If the tenure-track faculty member is in the first year of his/her appointment, his/her contract
will end at the conclusion of the same academic year in which he/she is notified about nonrenewal, i.e., by the end of his/her current contract in May of that year;
If the tenure track faculty member is in his/her second or subsequent year in the tenure track,
he/she will be informed that he/she will be given a terminal, non-renewable contract for the
subsequent year by March 15th of the academic year in which he/she is informed about nonrenewal in the tenure track; he/she may accept or reject the terminal contract for the
subsequent year, but is typically expected to do so by March 31st.
9.2.
Termination Without Prejudice of Tenured Faculty
The terms and conditions under which a tenured faculty member may be terminated without
prejudice are outlined in the Faculty Handbook 9.2.
A recommendation to terminate a tenured faculty member without prejudice is typically
initiated by the Provost, Dean, or Chair. The recommendation to terminate a tenured faculty
member without prejudice may be made at any point in the year, but the decision can be made
only by the University President.
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If the recommendation to terminate a tenured faculty member without prejudice is made
because of permanent or protracted revision of the University curriculum, academic program
closure, bona fide financial crisis, or bona fide financial exigency, the University will give the
affected faculty member one year’s written notice prior to termination and make all reasonable
efforts to secure appropriate internal employment for the terminated faculty member. The
University will also provide reasonable assistance in the identification and facilitation of other
employment opportunities.
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If the recommendation to terminate a tenured faculty member without prejudice is made
because of disability, the Chair or Dean must consult with the Provost who is required to inform
the Chief Human Resources Officer. The Chief Human Resources Officer will guide the Provost,
Dean, and Chair in documenting “total disability” as defined by the Saint Martin's University
long-term disability insurance plan, by which the disability should be of such a degree that the
faculty member is unable to perform the material and substantial duties which attend to
his/her contractual obligations. The Chief Human Resources Officer will ensure that all
supporting documentation is provided to the University President who makes the final decision
to terminate a tenured faculty member without prejudice because of disability.
9.3.
Dismissal for Cause
9.3.1. Dismissal for Cause of Tenure-track or Tenured Faculty
The circumstances under which a tenure track or tenured faculty may be dismissed for cause
are outlined in the Faculty Handbook 9.3.
9.3.1.1.
Timeline
A recommendation to terminate a tenure track or tenured faculty member for cause may be
initiated by the Provost, Dean, or Chair. The recommendation to dismiss a tenured faculty
member for cause may be made at any point in the year, but the decision can be made only by
the University President. The causes for which a decision to dismiss a tenure track or tenured
faculty member may be made are outlined in the Faculty Handbook.
9.3.1.2.
Procedure
The Chair, Dean, or Provost who initiates the process to dismiss a tenure track or tenured
faculty member for cause must present reasons in the form of a written “Charge” with all
supporting documentation to the University or academic leader to whom he/she reports;
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If a Chair or Dean initiates the process to dismiss for cause and presents a “Charge” to
the Provost, the Provost must convene a Council of tenured faculty members in
consultation with the Faculty President. The Council should consist of five tenured
faculty members who carry rank at or above that of the faculty member being
terminated.
If the Provost initiates the process to dismiss for cause and presents a “Charge” to the
University President, he/she must first meet with the affected faculty member and
present the “Charge.” The Provost also informs the Chair and Dean. The Provost then
convenes a Council of five tenured faculty members in consultation with the Faculty
President. The Council should consist of five tenured faculty members who carry rank at
or above that of the faculty member being terminated.
The Provost must take the discussion and recommendation of the convened group into
consideration before either dismissing the charge, in which case, the process ends. Or
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The Provost must take the discussion and recommendation of the convened Council
into consideration, schedule a meeting with the affected faculty member to discuss the
charges and the Council’s evaluation of the circumstances, and then make a
recommendation to the University President to dismiss the tenure track or tenured
faculty member for cause. The Provost must inform the Chair and Dean about his/her
recommendation.
the Provost makes a recommendation to the University President to dismiss the tenure
track or tenured faculty member for cause.
The affected faculty member may appeal the Provost’s recommendation to the Faculty Affairs
Committee.
(1) The FAC will consider the appeal submitted by a tenure track faculty member on the
basis of violations of academic freedom;
(2) The FAC will consider the appeal submitted by a tenured faculty member on the basis of
violations of process and violations of the Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws.
The FAC submits its determination regarding the appeal by the affected faculty member to the
University President, who must await the results of the appeals process, if activated by the
faculty member, before making a decision with regard to dismissal for cause of a tenure track
or tenured faculty member.
9.3.1.3.
Terms
In the event of a dismissal for cause, the services, appointment, and employment of the faculty
member may be terminated by the University before the end of his/her contract expiration
date. The faculty member must be given written notice of his/her termination at least thirty
days in advance of the termination date, which must specify the grounds for “termination for
cause” in accordance with Section 9.3 of the Faculty Handbook.
If dismissal proceedings are initiated against a tenured faculty member and result in a finding of
cause, dismissal or disciplinary action other than dismissal may be recommended and imposed.
Disciplinary action other than dismissal may include, but is not limited to, reprimand,
suspension with or without pay, reassignment of duties, reduction in appointment, mandatory
counseling, and/or continued monitoring of behavior and performance.
9.3.2. Dismissal of Tenured Faculty for (Involuntary) Ineffectiveness
Efforts have to be made by the Chair and Dean to assist the faculty member in regaining his/her
effectiveness; these efforts must be documented.
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Current ongoing failure or ineffectiveness by a faculty member in performing his/her major
contractual teaching obligations has to be documented by a faculty member’s Department
Chair and/or Dean and presented in writing to a faculty member, and the faculty member
should be given an opportunity to respond in writing.
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The circumstances under which a tenured faculty member may be terminated for
ineffectiveness are outlined in detail in the Faculty Handbook, 9.4.
If such efforts do not result in desirable levels of effectiveness and do not hold the promise of
returning to desirable levels of effectiveness, and because successfully serving our students in
the classroom remains a primary commitment of all faculty and their Departments and
Colleges/Schools, a recommendation to terminate the faculty member may be made by the
Dean to the Provost.
The Provost must examine the recommendation to terminate in the context of the faculty
member’s professional life as a member of the Saint Martin’s University community and
determine whether to proceed with recommending termination to the University President.
Alternatively, before recommending termination, the Provost may, if this is possible, offer the
tenured faculty member a transitional period of reassigned responsibilities in a redefined role
within the University. The specific period of such reassigned duties and the terms which attend
to this redefined role have to be provided in writing to the faculty member. These reassigned
duties and the reassigned role are provided for a specific limited time prior to separation in
order to give the faculty member a transitional period and to enable the affected Department
to search for and replace the faculty member and thus meet its teaching obligations to
students.
The faculty member may elect to accept or reject this offer of reassigned duties. The Provost
must then determine whether to proceed with a recommendation to the University President
to terminate the faculty member and also inform the faculty member about his/her decision.
The Provost should consult faculty leaders in initiating dismissal of tenured faculty members for
ineffectiveness.
10. PROCEDURES GOVERNING FACULTY APPEALS AND GRIEVANCES
10.1. Appeals by Tenure Track Faculty against Non-renewal
10.1.1. Basis of Appeal
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Within one (1) week of receipt of notification of the non-renewal decision, the faculty member
notifies the Chair of the Faculty Affairs Committee of the intent to appeal. Within two (2) weeks
of the non-renewal notification, the petitioner submits an appeal petition to the Faculty Affairs
Committee. The petition must detail the fact and circumstances, which gave rise to the
violation of his/her academic freedom and the presumed relationship between the violation
and the non-renewal decision. The petition may contain any evidence, which the petitioner
deems pertinent to the case.
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A tenure track faculty member may appeal the decision to not renew his/her contract/Letter of
Appointment, if he/she believes the decision was made in violation of his/her academic
freedom.
10.1.2. Notification, Petition and Time Frame
Upon receipt of the petition, the Chair of the FA Committee notifies the University President
and Provost and requests materials relevant to the decision in the case, including a copy of the
document specifying the reasons asserted as the basis for non-renewal of employment.
10.1.3. Committee Responsibilities
The FAC is limited to the question of whether the non-renewal decision is related to a violation
of the faculty member’s academic freedom. The responsibilities of the Committee are as
follows:
a. to consider the case carefully, including the specific reasons asserted as a
basis for non-renewal, the petitioner’s and respondents arguments and such
other testimony, arguments and evidence as the Committee deems
necessary;
b. to report to the University President within five (5) working days of
completion of deliberations, in writing, its findings and rationale for its
recommendation to uphold or reject the non-renewal decision (in addition, a
minority report may be submitted);
c. to provide copies of its report to the appellant and the Provost;
d. to maintain the confidential nature of its proceedings, except as noted
above.
10.1.4. Responsibilities of the University President
The President will consider the relevant materials and provide a decision and justification, in
writing, to the faculty member and the Faculty Affairs Committee within ten (10) working days.
If the faculty member chooses, a timely and dated written response will be made part of the
faculty member’s permanent record.
10.2. Appeals by Tenure Track Faculty against a negative decision on Tenure and by Tenure
Track or Tenured Faculty against a negative decision on Promotion
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A faculty member may appeal a negative tenure recommendation of the Provost by following
the procedures below. The basis for appeal must rest on errors in procedure, inadequate
consideration, gross abuse of the faculty member’s rights and privileges, or violation of the
principle of fundamental fairness. The faculty member should cite appropriate sections of the
Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws.
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10.2.1. Appeals by Tenure Track Faculty against a negative recommendation on
Tenure
Basis of Appeal
Timeline
A Regular Faculty member may appeal a negative recommendation by the Provost regarding
tenure to the Faculty Affairs Committee.
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By January 5 following notification of the negative recommendation on his/her
candidacy, the faculty member must notify the FA Committee and the Provost of his/her
intent to appeal;
-
By January 15, the faculty member must submit his/her formal appeal petition and all
supporting documents to the FA Committee;
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By January 25, the FA Committee must review the faculty member’s appeal and notify
the University President of their decision on the appeal.
The Committee Procedure
The FA Committee considers the appeal petition, the tenure file, the Advancement
Committee’s and Provost’s letters and other materials or information pertaining to the process
that was followed. The Faculty Affairs Committee will base its evaluation of the appeal on the
specific claim(s) set forth in the petition.
Committee Responsibilities
The responsibilities of the Faculty Affairs Committee are as follows:
a. The Committee reports to the University President, in writing, its findings and
rationale for its recommendation to uphold or reject the appealed
recommendation(s); in addition, a minority report may be submitted;
b. The Committee provides copies of its report to the petitioner, the Advancement
Committee, and the Provost;
c. The Committee must maintain confidentiality with regard to its proceeding and
findings.
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If the Provost’s recommendation on tenuring the faculty member is negative, the University
President must wait until the candidate has had time to complete the appeals process to
evaluate the candidate’s application for tenure.
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Responsibilities of the University President
If an appeal is made,
(a) By February 10, the University President evaluates the candidate’s application
for tenure and renders a decision on the same.
The University President considers all materials which are part of the candidate’s
application for tenure; the President’s notifies the applicant and sends a copy of
his/her letter to the Provost, the Dean of the applicant’s College/School, and
Department Chair.
If the faculty member chooses, he or she may submit a timely and dated written response to
the University President’s decision on his/her appeal and/or tenure decision. This written
response will be made part of his or her permanent record.
IMPORTANT NOTE
Faculty members may appeal negative decisions on tenure and promotion simultaneously.
10.2.2. Appeals by Tenure Track or Tenured Faculty against a negative decision on
Promotion
Basis of Appeal
A faculty member may appeal a negative promotion recommendation of the Provost following
the procedures below. The basis for appeal must rest on errors in procedure, inadequate
consideration, gross abuse of the faculty member’s rights and privileges or violation of the
principle of fundamental fairness. The faculty member must cite the appropriate sections from
the Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws.
Timeline
By January 5 following notification of the negative recommendation on his/her
candidacy, the faculty member must first notify the FA Committee and the Provost
about his/her intent to appeal;
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By January 15, the faculty member must submit his/her formal appeal petition and all
supporting documents to the FA Committee;
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By January 25, the FA Committee must review the faculty member’s appeal petition and
notify the University President of their decision on the appeal.
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A Regular Faculty may appeal a negative recommendation by the Provost regarding promotion
to the Faculty Affairs Committee.
The Committee Procedure
The FA Committee considers the petition, the promotion file, the Advancement Committee’s
and Provost’s letters and other materials or information pertaining to the process that was
followed. The Faculty Affairs Committee will base its evaluation of the appeal on the specific
claim(s) set forth in the petition
Committee Responsibilities
The responsibilities of the Faculty Affairs Committee are as follows:
a. The Committee reports to the University President, in writing, its findings and rationale
for its recommendation to uphold or reject the appealed recommendation(s); in
addition, a minority report may be submitted;
b. The Committee provides copies of its report to the petitioner, the Advancement
Committee, and the Provost;
c. The Committee must maintain confidentiality with regard to its proceeding and findings.
Responsibilities of the University President
If the Provost’s recommendation on promoting the faculty member is negative, the University
President must wait until the candidate has had time to complete the appeals process as
described above before evaluating the candidate’s application for promotion.
If an appeal is made,
By February 10, the University President must render a decision on the appeal for promotion
and renders a decision on the same. The University President considers all materials which are
part of the candidate’s application for promotion; the President’s notifies the applicant and
sends a copy of his/her letter to the Provost, the Dean of the applicant’s College/School, and
Department Chair.
If the faculty member chooses, he or she may submit a timely and dated written response to
the University President’s decision on his/her appeal and/or promotion decision. This written
response will be made part of his or her permanent record.
10.3. Appeals by Tenured Faculty against Decisions to Terminate for Cause
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A tenured faculty member may appeal the decision to terminate his/her contract of
employment for cause on the basis of violations in process, gross abuse of the faculty member's
rights and privileges, and/or violations of the Faculty Handbook and Faculty Bylaws.
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10.3.1. Basis of Appeal
10.3.2. Notification, Petition, and Time Frame
Within one (1) week of receipt of notification of the decision to terminate a tenured faculty
member for cause, the faculty member notifies the Chair of the Faculty Affairs Committee of
the intent to appeal.
Within two (2) weeks of notification of termination, the petitioner submits a petition to the
Faculty Affairs Committee. The petition will set forth the reasons why the petitioner believes
the termination decision was in error. It may contain any evidence, which the petitioner deems
pertinent to the case.
Upon receipt of the petition, the Chair of the Committee notifies the University President and
Provost and requests materials relevant to the decision in the case, including a copy of the
document specifying the reasons asserted as the basis for termination of employment.
10.3.3. Committee Responsibilities
The responsibilities of the Faculty Affairs Committee are as follows:
a. to consider the case carefully, including the specific reasons asserted as a basis for
termination, the petitioner’s and respondent’s arguments and such other testimony,
arguments and evidence as the Committee deems necessary;
b. to report to the University President within five (5) working days of completion of
deliberations, in writing, its findings and rationale for its recommendation to uphold
or reject the termination decision (in addition, a minority report may be submitted);
c. to provide copies of its report to the petitioner and the Provost;
d. to maintain the confidential nature of its proceedings, except as noted above.
10.3.4. Responsibilities of the University President
The President will consider the relevant materials and provide a decision and justification, in
writing, to the faculty member and the Faculty Affairs Committee within ten (10) working days.
The University recognizes and endorses the importance of academic due process, the right of
redress, and of adjudicating grievances without fear of prejudice or reprisal. Accordingly, the
University encourages the informal and prompt settlement of grievances where possible as well
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10.4. Grievances
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If the faculty member chooses, a timely and dated written response will be made part of the
faculty member’s permanent record.
as the formal processes set forth in this section to respect and protect academic due process,
academic , and professional conduct.
10.4.1. The Faculty Affairs Committee
Grievances by faculty members are heard by the Faculty Affairs Committee.
10.4.2. Faculty covered by the grievance process
Faculty governed by the grievance process include ranked faculty, unranked teaching faculty,
and librarians with faculty status. When the grievance involves faculty other than ranked
faculty, the grieved issue must relate directly to the individual’s instructional (faculty) function
rather than staff or administrative function. When in question, the Faculty Affairs Committee
will determine jurisdiction. If the jurisdiction cannot be satisfactorily resolved, the Provost will
decide.
10.4.3. Grievance
The grievance process is intended to include those matters not accorded the opportunity for
redress through the appeals process established for recommendation/decision for promotion,
tenure, non-renewal and termination. This is an internal process of self-governance and does
not include legal counsel for either party.
10.4.4. Informal Resolution:
The University encourages the resolution of grievances on an informal basis
whenever possible. Faculty members should first seek remedy through normal
peer-to-peer and/or administrative channels. If this proves unsatisfactory, the
faculty member may then petition the Faculty Affairs Committee for redress.
10.4.5. Petition:
The petition must be submitted to the Chair of the Faculty Affairs Committee
within thirty (30) working days of a significant incident related to the
grievance. The petition will set forth in detail, the grievance and state against
whom the grievance is directed. It will contain any evidence, which the
petitioner deems pertinent to establishing a prima facie case.
Once a grievance is filed in writing with the FA Committee, the Committee must determine the
following:
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Preliminary Procedures
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10.4.6. Committee Action and Time Frame
a.
b.
c.
d.
Whether the grievant has standing under the Faculty Grievance Policy;
Whether the grievance has been filed in a timely fashion;
Whether the grievance identifies an appropriate respondent(s);
Whether the grievance adequately identifies the existing policies alleged to have been
violated; and
e. Whether the grievance contains an adequate statement of the facts relevant to the
complaint.
If the Committee decides that the facts do not warrant a hearing , it will notify the petitioner in
writing. The Committee may also seek to bring about a settlement of the issue satisfactory to
the parties. If, in the opinion of the Committee, such a settlement is improbable or
inappropriate, the Committee will hear the dispute, following the procedures outlined below.
The hearing will be held within thirty (30) calendar days of receipt of the petition.
If a party to the grievance feels that a member of the Committee has a conflict of interest in the
case, the party should bring it to the attention of the Committee Chair. Should the FA
Committee decide that one of its members has a conflict of interest in the case, that member
shall remove himself/herself from the case or be removed by the Chair. An alternate member
may be appointed by the Faculty President.
Hearing Procedures
1. Hearings shall be scheduled by the FA committee with due regard for the schedule of
both parties. Grievances involving faculty/academic staff who hold academic year
appointments will normally not be held during summer semester unless the
faculty/academic staff member has a summer appointment. On the rare occasion when
a party fails to respond to repeated attempts to schedule a hearing or unreasonably
delays the scheduling of a hearing, the FA committee will schedule the hearing for the
first date available to the Committee members and the other party;
2. The FA Committee shall provide written notice of the time and place of the hearing, the
names of any witnesses, and copies of any documents submitted by the parties and
deemed relevant by the Committee, to each party at least seven (7) days before the
hearing;
5. Hearings shall be closed unless all parties agree otherwise;
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4. All hearings shall be recorded. A party may request and obtain a copy of the recording
from the FA Committee;
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3. The hearing shall be conducted in good faith and must be completed within 14 calendar
days unless the FA Committee determines that an extension of time is necessary;
6. The privacy of confidential records used in the hearing shall be respected;
7. All parties may present their cases in person and may call witnesses on their behalf. The
names of witnesses must be provided to the FAC at least seven (7) days prior to the
hearing date;
8. All parties are entitled to bring a tenured colleague of their choice to the hearing. The
name of the attending colleague must be provided to the FA Committee at least seven
(7) days prior to the hearing date;
9. Any party shall be entitled to ask pertinent questions of any witness or the other party
at appropriate points in hearings. The Chair of the Committee shall determine what
questions are pertinent;
10. The grievant bears the burden of proving that there has been a violation of policy;
11. The FA Committee, in confidential deliberations, after hearing all evidence presented by
the grievant and respondent, shall decide whether the preponderance of the evidence
supports the allegations made by the grievant;
12. After making a determination on the grievance, the FA Committee shall recommend
appropriate redress consistent with existing policies, procedures, and practices to the
Provost or President, as appropriate;
13. The Provost or President, once they receive the determination and recommendation of
the Faculty Grievance Committee, shall decide on appropriate action, and in writing,
within 14 working days of receipt of the findings and recommendations, inform the
grievant and respondent, with a copy to the FA Committee and any other members of
the community, as appropriate;
14. In cases regarding sensitive personal matters and not involving academic freedom, the
records will not be released without mutual agreement.
15. All original records are permanently retained by the University.
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In accordance with the University's Indemnification Policy, indemnification shall be provided to
all members of the Faculty Affairs Committee, members who attend and provide information at
hearing and appeals sessions, and University faculty serving as unpaid, volunteer counsel for
the parties to a grievance and in their roles as participants in a grievance. A copy of the
Indemnification Policy shall be provided to all participants who attend a hearing related to
grievances or appeals.
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Indemnification
Appendix A
SAMPLE LETTER OF APPOINTMENT
Date: X
Dr. X
Address: X
Dear Dr. X:
I am pleased to offer you the position of Assistant Professor in the Department of X within the
College/School of X at Saint Martin’s University. Your Department Chair is Dr. X.
Appointment Details








Rank and Status: XXX; Full-time - 9-month
Salary: 9-months salary of $XXX, from August 16, XXXX to May 15,XXXX, payable in
twelve monthly installments beginning on August 31, XXXX
Tenure Status: Tenure-Track
Date of First-Year Review: X
Date of Third-Year Review: X
Date of Tenure and Promotion Application: X (Year 6 of your Tenure-Track
appointment)
Effective Date of Tenure and/or Promotion, if awarded: X (Year 7 of your appointment)
Benefits: Retirement contribution as currently authorized by the Board of Trustees;
medical insurance and other coverage/options as defined by the Human Resources
Office for all employees. Please consult with Ms. Cynthia Jonson, Associate VP for
Human Resources, at 360-438-XXXX for details.
Appointment Terms
Your teaching responsibilities will include courses in your area of disciplinary expertise and in
the University’s core curriculum.
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Salary: $XX per 9-month contract period
Load: 12 semester credits in each regular semester of the academic year
Moving Expenses: Reimbursement up to 10% of base salary for actual moving expenses
to the Lacey area, within twelve months of the appointment, to be reimbursed upon
submission of receipts
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


All Regular Faculty members are evaluated annually for reappointment in the tenure-track, and
are expected to demonstrate a continuing commitment to effective teaching and professional
development, scholarly activity, and service to the University community.
In preparing to progress towards a successful application for tenure and promotion in Year
XXXX, you should discuss discipline-specific details regarding teaching and scholarship with your
Chair and with your mentor, who will be assigned to you by your Chair. You must also consult
your Department’s Tenure and Promotion Guidelines, which are available on the Provost’s web
site at www.stmartin.edu/Provost/DepartmentalGuidelines.Tenure&Promotion; these will
guide your Department in their annual evaluation of your progress towards tenure and
promotion. They will also guide the College/School Tenure and Promotions Committee, your
Dean, the University Advancement Committee, and the Provost as they evaluate your
application for tenure and promotion in the sixth year of your tenure-track appointment.
Tenure and promotion are granted by the University’s Board of Trustees upon recommendation
by the University President.
For additional details concerning your appointment and conditions of employment and work
life that pertain particularly to Regular Faculty, please refer to the Faculty Handbook and
Faculty Bylaws which are available on the University’s website at
www.stmartin.edu/FacultyHandbook&Bylaws. You should also consult the Employee
Handbook, which is available on the University’s web site at www.EmployeeHandbook.com.
Please indicate in writing to my office, within ten business days, your acceptance of this offer of
employment at Saint Martin’s University. Please retain this Letter of Appointment for your
records and for inclusion in the portfolio of materials you will be expected to submit in support
of your application for tenure and promotion.
I am pleased to welcome you into the Saint Martin’s University community and look forward to
working with you in coming years. Please feel free to contact my office or Dean X in the
College/School of X should you have any questions regarding this appointment.
Sincerely,
Dr. X, Dean of the College/School of X
Ms. X, Associate VP for Human Resources
Ms. X, Vice President of Finance
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cc:
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XXX, Provost
APPENDIX B
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SENATE CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS
APPENDIX C
AAUP 1966 Statement on Government of Colleges and Universities
The statement that follows is directed to governing board members, administrators, faculty
members, students, and other persons in the belief that the colleges and universities of the
United States have reached a stage calling for appropriately shared responsibility and
cooperative action among the components of the academic institution. The statement is
intended to foster constructive joint thought and action, both within the institutional structure
and in protection of its integrity against improper intrusions. It is not intended that the
statement serve as a blueprint for governance on a specific campus or as a manual for the
regulation of controversy among the components of an academic institution, although it is to be
hoped that the principles asserted will lead to the correction of existing weaknesses and assist in
the establishment of sound structures and procedures. The statement does not attempt to cover
relations with those outside agencies that increasingly are controlling the resources and
influencing the patterns of education in our institutions of higher learning: for example, the
United States government, state legislatures, state commissions, interstate associations or
compacts, and other inter-institutional arrangements. However, it is hoped that the statement
will be helpful to these agencies in their consideration of educational matters.
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This statement was jointly formulated by the American Association of University Professors, the
American Council on Education (ACE), and the Association of Governing Boards of Universities
and Colleges (AGB). In October 1966, the board of directors of the ACE took action by which its
council “recognizes the statement as a significant step forward in the clarification of the
respective roles of governing boards, faculties, and administrations,“ and “commends it to the
institutions which are members of the Council.” The Council of the AAUP adopted the statement
in October 1966, and the Fifty-third Annual Meeting endorsed it in April 1967. In November
1966, the executive committee of the AGB took action by which that organization also
“recognizes the statement as a significant step forward in the clarification of the respective roles
of governing boards, faculties, and administrations,” and “commends it to the governing boards
which are members of the Association.” (In April 1990, the Council of the AAUP adopted several
changes in language in order to remove gender-specific references from the original text.
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Students are referred to in this statement as an institutional component coordinate in
importance with trustees, administrators, and faculty. There is, however, no main section on
students. The omission has two causes: (1) the changes now occurring in the status of American
students have plainly outdistanced the analysis by the educational community, and an attempt
to define the situation without thorough study might prove unfair to student interests, and (2)
students do not in fact at present have a significant voice in the government of colleges and
universities; it would be unseemly to obscure, by superficial equality of length of statement,
what may be a serious lag entitled to separate and full confrontation.
The concern for student status felt by the organizations issuing this statement is embodied in a
note, “On Student Status,” intended to stimulate the educational community to turn its
attention to an important need.
1. Introduction
This statement is a call to mutual understanding regarding the government of colleges and
universities. Understanding, based on community of interest and producing joint effort, is
essential for at least three reasons. First, the academic institution, public or private, often has
become less autonomous; buildings, research, and student tuition are supported by funds over
which the college or university exercises a diminishing control. Legislative and executive
governmental authorities, at all levels, play a part in the making of important decisions in
academic policy. If these voices and forces are to be successfully heard and integrated, the
academic institution must be in a position to meet them with its own generally unified view.
Second, regard for the welfare of the institution remains important despite the mobility and
interchange of scholars. Third, a college or university in which all the components are aware of
their interdependence, of the usefulness of communication among themselves, and of the
force of joint action will enjoy increased capacity to solve educational problems.
2. The Academic Institution: Joint Effort
a. Preliminary Considerations
The variety and complexity of the tasks performed by institutions of higher education produce
an inescapable interdependence among governing board, administration, faculty, students, and
others. The relationship calls for adequate communication among these components, and full
opportunity for appropriate joint planning and effort.
Joint effort in an academic institution will take a variety of forms appropriate to the kinds of
situations encountered. In some instances, an initial exploration or recommendation will be
made by the president with consideration by the faculty at a later stage; in other instances, a
first and essentially definitive recommendation will be made by the faculty, subject to the
endorsement of the president and the governing board. In still others, a substantive
contribution can be made when student leaders are responsibly involved in the process.
Although the variety of such approaches may be wide, at least two general conclusions
regarding joint effort seem clearly warranted: (1) important areas of action involve at one time
or another the initiating capacity and decision-making participation of all the institutional
components, and (2) differences in the weight of each voice, from one point to the next, should
be determined by reference to the responsibility of each component for the particular matter
at hand, as developed hereinafter.
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The general educational policy, i.e., the objectives of an institution and the nature, range, and
pace of its efforts, is shaped by the institutional charter or by law, by tradition and historical
development, by the present needs of the community of the institution, and by the professional
aspirations and standards of those directly involved in its work. Every board will wish to go
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b. Determination of General Educational Policy
beyond its formal trustee obligation to conserve the accomplishment of the past and to engage
seriously with the future; every faculty will seek to conduct an operation worthy of scholarly
standards of learning; every administrative officer will strive to meet his or her charge and to
attain the goals of the institution. The interests of all are coordinate and related, and unilateral
effort can lead to confusion or conflict. Essential to a solution is a reasonably explicit statement
on general educational policy. Operating responsibility and authority, and procedures for
continuing review, should be clearly defined in official regulations.
When an educational goal has been established, it becomes the responsibility primarily of the
faculty to determine the appropriate curriculum and procedures of student instruction.
Special considerations may require particular accommodations: (1) a publicly
supported institution may be regulated by statutory provisions, and (2) a church-controlled
institution may be limited by its charter or bylaws. When such external requirements influence
course content and the manner of instruction or research, they impair the educational
effectiveness of the institution.
Such matters as major changes in the size or composition of the student body and the relative
emphasis to be given to the various elements of the educational and research program should
involve participation of governing board, administration, and faculty prior to final decision.
c. Internal Operations of the Institution
The framing and execution of long-range plans, one of the most important aspects of
institutional responsibility, should be a central and continuing concern in the academic
community.
Effective planning demands that the broadest possible exchange of information and opinion
should be the rule for communication among the components of a college or university. The
channels of communication should be established and maintained by joint endeavor.
Distinction should be observed between the institutional system of communication and the
system of responsibility for the making of decisions.
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A third area is budgeting. The allocation of resources among competing demands is central in
the formal responsibility of the governing board, in the administrative authority of the
president, and in the educational function of the faculty. Each component should therefore
have a voice in the determination of short- and long-range priorities, and each should receive
appropriate analyses of past budgetary experience, reports on current budgets and
expenditures, and short- and long-range budgetary projections. The function of each
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A second area calling for joint effort in internal operation is that of decisions regarding existing
or prospective physical resources. The board, president, and faculty should all seek agreement
on basic decisions regarding buildings and other facilities to be used in the educational work of
the institution.
component in budgetary matters should be understood by all; the allocation of authority will
determine the flow of information and the scope of participation in decisions.
Joint effort of a most critical kind must be taken when an institution chooses a new president.
The selection of a chief administrative officer should follow upon a cooperative search by the
governing board and the faculty, taking into consideration the opinions of others who are
appropriately interested. The president should be equally qualified to serve both as the
executive officer of the governing board and as the chief academic officer of the institution and
the faculty. The president’s dual role requires an ability to interpret to board and faculty the
educational views and concepts of institutional government of the other. The president should
have the confidence of the board and the faculty.
The selection of academic deans and other chief academic officers should be the responsibility
of the president with the advice of, and in consultation with, the appropriate faculty.
Determinations of faculty status, normally based on the recommendations of the faculty groups
involved, are discussed in Part 5 of this statement; but it should here be noted that the building
of a strong faculty requires careful joint effort in such actions as staff selection and promotion
and the granting of tenure. Joint action should also govern dismissals; the applicable principles
and procedures in these matters are well established.
d. External Relations of the Institution
Anyone—a member of the governing board, the president or other member of the
administration, a member of the faculty, or a member of the student body or the alumni—
affects the institution when speaking of it in public. An individual who speaks unofficially should
so indicate. An individual who speaks officially for the institution, the board, the administration,
the faculty, or the student body should be guided by established policy.
It should be noted that only the board speaks legally for the whole institution, although it may
delegate responsibility to an agent. The right of a board member, an administrative officer, a
faculty member, or a student to speak on general educational questions or about the
administration and operations of the individual’s own institution is a part of that person’s right
as a citizen and should not be abridged by the institution. There exist, of course, legal bounds
relating to defamation of character, and there are questions of propriety.
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The governing board has a special obligation to ensure that the history of the college or
university shall serve as a prelude and inspiration to the future. The board helps relate the
institution to its chief community: for example, the community college to serve the educational
needs of a defined population area or group, the church-controlled college to be cognizant of
the announced position of its denomination, and the comprehensive university to discharge the
many duties and to accept the appropriate new challenges which are its concern at the several
levels of higher education.
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3. The Academic Institution: The Governing Board
The governing board of an institution of higher education in the United States operates, with
few exceptions, as the final institutional authority. Private institutions are established by
charters; public institutions are established by constitutional or statutory provisions. In private
institutions the board is frequently self-perpetuating; in public colleges and universities the
present membership of a board may be asked to suggest candidates for appointment. As a
whole and individually, when the governing board confronts the problem of succession, serious
attention should be given to obtaining properly qualified persons. Where public law calls for
election of governing board members, means should be found to ensure the nomination of fully
suited persons, and the electorate should be informed of the relevant criteria for board
membership.
Since the membership of the board may embrace both individual and collective competence of
recognized weight, its advice or help may be sought through established channels by other
components of the academic community. The governing board of an institution of higher
education, while maintaining a general overview, entrusts the conduct of administration to the
administrative officers—the president and the deans—and the conduct of teaching and
research to the faculty. The board should undertake appropriate self-limitation.
One of the governing board’s important tasks is to ensure the publication of codified
statements that define the overall policies and procedures of the institution under its
jurisdiction.
The board plays a central role in relating the likely needs of the future to predictable resources;
it has the responsibility for husbanding the endowment; it is responsible for obtaining needed
capital and operating funds; and in the broadest sense of the term it should pay attention to
personnel policy. In order to fulfill these duties, the board should be aided by, and may insist
upon, the development of long-range planning by the administration and faculty. When
ignorance or ill will threatens the institution or any part of it, the governing board must be
available for support. In grave crises it will be expected to serve as a champion. Although the
action to be taken by it will usually be on behalf of the president, the faculty, or the student
body, the board should make clear that the protection it offers to an individual or a group is, in
fact, a fundamental defense of the vested interests of society in the educational institution.
As the chief planning officer of an institution, the president has a special obligation to innovate
and initiate. The degree to which a president can envision new horizons for the institution, and
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The president, as the chief executive officer of an institution of higher education, is measured
largely by his or her capacity for institutional leadership. The president shares responsibility for
the definition and attainment of goals, for administrative action, and for operating the
communications system that links the components of the academic community. The president
represents the institution to its many publics. The president’s leadership role is supported by
delegated authority from the board and faculty.
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4. The Academic Institution: The President
can persuade others to see them and to work toward them, will often constitute the chief
measure of the president’s administration.
The president must at times, with or without support, infuse new life into a department;
relatedly, the president may at times be required, working within the concept of tenure, to
solve problems of obsolescence. The president will necessarily utilize the judgments of the
faculty but may also, in the interest of academic standards, seek outside evaluations by scholars
of acknowledged competence.
It is the duty of the president to see to it that the standards and procedures in operational use
within the college or university conform to the policy established by the governing board and to
the standards of sound academic practice. It is also incumbent on the president to ensure that
faculty views, including dissenting views, are presented to the board in those areas and on
those issues where responsibilities are shared. Similarly, the faculty should be informed of the
views of the board and the administration on like issues.
The president is largely responsible for the maintenance of existing institutional resources and
the creation of new resources; has ultimate managerial responsibility for a large area of
nonacademic activities; is responsible for public understanding; and by the nature of the office
is the chief person who speaks for the institution. In these and other areas the president’s work
is to plan, to organize, to direct, and to represent. The presidential function should receive the
general support of board and faculty.
5. The Academic Institution: The Faculty
The faculty has primary responsibility for such fundamental areas as curriculum, subject matter
and methods of instruction, research, faculty status, and those aspects of student life which
relate to the educational process. On these matters the power of review or final decision
lodged in the governing board or delegated by it to the president should be exercised adversely
only in exceptional circumstances, and for reasons communicated to the faculty. It is desirable
that the faculty should, following such communication, have opportunity for further
consideration and further transmittal of its views to the president or board. Budgets, personnel
limitations, the time element, and the policies of other groups, bodies, and agencies having
jurisdiction over the institution may set limits to realization of faculty advice.
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Faculty status and related matters are primarily a faculty responsibility; this area includes
appointments, reappointments, decisions not to reappoint, promotions, the granting of tenure,
and dismissal. The primary responsibility of the faculty for such matters is based upon the fact
that its judgment is central to general educational policy. Furthermore, scholars in a particular
field or activity have the chief competence for judging the work of their colleagues; in such
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The faculty sets the requirements for the degrees offered in course, determines when the
requirements have been met, and authorizes the president and board to grant the degrees thus
achieved.
competence it is implicit that responsibility exists for both adverse and favorable judgments.
Likewise, there is the more general competence of experienced faculty personnel committees
having a broader charge. Determinations in these matters should first be by faculty action
through established procedures, reviewed by the chief academic officers with the concurrence
of the board. The governing board and president should, on questions of faculty status, as in
other matters where the faculty has primary responsibility, concur with the faculty judgment
except in rare instances and for compelling reasons which should be stated in detail.
The faculty should actively participate in the determination of policies and procedures
governing salary increases.
The chair or head of a department, who serves as the chief representative of the department
within an institution, should be selected either by departmental election or by appointment
following consultation with members of the department and of related departments;
appointments should normally be in conformity with department members’ judgment. The
chair or department head should not have tenure in office; tenure as a faculty member is a
matter of separate right. The chair or head should serve for a stated term but without prejudice
to reelection or to reappointment by procedures that involve appropriate faculty consultation.
Board, administration, and faculty should all bear in mind that the department chair or head
has a special obligation to build a department strong in scholarship and teaching capacity.
Agencies for faculty participation in the government of the college or university should be
established at each level where faculty responsibility is present. An agency should exist for the
presentation of the views of the whole faculty. The structure and procedures for faculty
participation should be designed, approved, and established by joint action of the components
of the institution. Faculty representatives should be selected by the faculty according to
procedures determined by the faculty.
The agencies may consist of meetings of all faculty members of a department, school, college,
division, or university system, or may take the form of faculty-elected executive committees in
departments and schools and a faculty-elected senate or council for larger divisions or the
institution as a whole.
When students in American colleges and universities desire to participate responsibly in the
government of the institution they attend, their wish should be recognized as a claim to
opportunity both for educational experience and for involvement in the affairs of their college
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On Student Status
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The means of communication among the faculty, administration, and governing board now in
use include: (1) circulation of memoranda and reports by board committees, the
administration, and faculty committees; (2) joint ad hoc committees; (3) standing liaison
committees; (4) membership of faculty members on administrative bodies; and (5) membership
of faculty members on governing boards. Whatever the channels of communication, they
should be clearly understood and observed.
or university. Ways should be found to permit significant student participation within the limits
of attainable effectiveness. The obstacles to such participation are large and should not be
minimized: inexperience, untested capacity, a transitory status which means that present
action does not carry with it subsequent responsibility, and the inescapable fact that the other
components of the institution are in a position of judgment over the students. It is important to
recognize that student needs are strongly related to educational experience, both formal and
informal.
Students expect, and have a right to expect, that the educational process will be structured,
that they will be stimulated by it to become independent adults, and that they will have
effectively transmitted to them the cultural heritage of the larger society. If institutional
support is to have its fullest possible meaning, it should incorporate the strength, freshness of
view, and idealism of the student body.
The respect of students for their college or university can be enhanced if they are given at least
these opportunities: (1) to be listened to in the classroom without fear of institutional reprisal
for the substance of their views, (2) freedom to discuss questions of institutional policy and
operation, (3) the right to academic due process when charged with serious violations of
institutional regulations, and (4) the same right to hear speakers of their own choice as is
enjoyed by other components of the institution.
Notes
3. Traditionally, governing boards developed within the context of single-campus institutions. In
more recent times, governing and coordinating boards have increasingly tended to develop at
the multi-campus regional, system wide, or statewide levels. As influential components of the
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2. With respect to faculty members, the 1940 “Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom
and Tenure” reads: “College and university teachers are citizens, members of a learned
profession, and officers of an educational institution. When they speak or write as citizens, they
should be free from institutional censorship or discipline, but their special position in the
community imposes special obligations. As scholars and educational officers, they should
remember that the public may judge their profession and their institution by their utterances.
Hence they should at all times be accurate, should exercise appropriate restraint, should show
respect for the opinions of others, and should make every effort to indicate that they are not
speaking for the institution” (Policy Documents and Reports, 3–4). Back to text
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1. See the 1940 “Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure,” AAUP, Policy
Documents and Reports, 10th ed. (Washington, D.C., 2006), 3–11, and the 1958 “Statement on
Procedural Standards in Faculty Dismissal Proceedings,” ibid., 12–15. These statements were
jointly adopted by the Association of American Colleges (now the Association of American
Colleges and Universities) and the American Association of University Professors; the 1940
“Statement” has been endorsed by numerous learned and scientific societies and educational
associations. Back to text
academic community, these supra-campus bodies bear particular responsibility for protecting
the autonomy of individual campuses or institutions under their jurisdiction and for
implementing policies of shared responsibility. The American Association of University
Professors regards the objectives and practices recommended in the “Statement on
Government” as constituting equally appropriate guidelines for such supra-campus bodies, and
looks toward continued development of practices that will facilitate application of such
guidelines in this new context. [Preceding note adopted by the AAUP’s Council in June 1978.]
Back to text
4. With regard to student admissions, the faculty should have a meaningful role in establishing
institutional policies, including the setting of standards for admission, and should be afforded
opportunity for oversight of the entire admissions process. [Preceding note adopted by the
Council in June 2002.] Back to text
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5. The American Association of University Professors regards collective bargaining, properly
used, as another means of achieving sound academic government. Where there is faculty
collective bargaining, the parties should seek to ensure appropriate institutional governance
structures which will protect the right of all faculty to participate in institutional governance in
accordance with the “Statement on Government.” [Preceding note adopted by the Council in
June 1978.]
Appendix D
AAUP 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure
In 1940, following a series of joint conferences begun in 1934, representatives of the American
Association of University Professors and of the Association of American Colleges (now the
Association of American Colleges and Universities) agreed upon a restatement of principles set
forth in the 1925 Conference Statement on Academic Freedom and Tenure. This restatement is
known to the profession as the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure.
The 1940 Statement is printed below, followed by Interpretive Comments as developed by
representatives of the American Association of University Professors and the Association of
American Colleges in 1969. The governing bodies of the two associations, meeting respectively
in November 1989 and January 1990, adopted several changes in language in order to remove
gender-specific references from the original text.
The purpose of this statement is to promote public understanding and support of academic
freedom and tenure and agreement upon procedures to ensure them in colleges and
universities. Institutions of higher education are conducted for the common good and not to
further the interest of either the individual teacher or the institution as a whole. 1 The common
good depends upon the free search for truth and its free exposition.
Academic freedom is essential to these purposes and applies to both teaching and research.
Freedom in research is fundamental to the advancement of truth. Academic freedom in its
teaching aspect is fundamental for the protection of the rights of the teacher in teaching and of
the student to freedom in learning. It carries with it duties correlative with rights.[1] 2
Tenure is a means to certain ends; specifically: (1) freedom of teaching and research and of
extramural activities, and (2) a sufficient degree of economic security to make the profession
attractive to men and women of ability. Freedom and economic security, hence, tenure, are
indispensable to the success of an institution in fulfilling its obligations to its students and to
society.
Academic Freedom
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2. Teachers are entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing their subject, but they
should be careful not to introduce into their teaching controversial matter which has no
relation to their subject.[2] Limitations of academic freedom because of religious or
other aims of the institution should be clearly stated in writing at the time of the
appointment.[3]
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1. Teachers are entitled to full freedom in research and in the publication of the results,
subject to the adequate performance of their other academic duties; but research for
pecuniary return should be based upon an understanding with the authorities of the
institution.
3. College and university teachers are citizens, members of a learned profession, and
officers of an educational institution. When they speak or write as citizens, they should
be free from institutional censorship or discipline, but their special position in the
community imposes special obligations. As scholars and educational officers, they
should remember that the public may judge their profession and their institution by
their utterances. Hence they should at all times be accurate, should exercise
appropriate restraint, should show respect for the opinions of others, and should make
every effort to indicate that they are not speaking for the institution.[4]
Academic Tenure
After the expiration of a probationary period, teachers or investigators should have permanent
or continuous tenure, and their service should be terminated only for adequate cause, except in
the case of retirement for age, or under extraordinary circumstances because of financial
exigencies.
In the interpretation of this principle it is understood that the following represents acceptable
academic practice:
1. The precise terms and conditions of every appointment should be stated in writing and
be in the possession of both institution and teacher before the appointment is
consummated.
2. Beginning with appointment to the rank of full-time instructor or a higher rank,[5] the
probationary period should not exceed seven years, including within this period fulltime service in all institutions of higher education; but subject to the proviso that when,
after a term of probationary service of more than three years in one or more
institutions, a teacher is called to another institution, it may be agreed in writing that
the new appointment is for a probationary period of not more than four years, even
though thereby the person’s total probationary period in the academic profession is
extended beyond the normal maximum of seven years.[6] Notice should be given at
least one year prior to the expiration of the probationary period if the teacher is not to
be continued in service after the expiration of that period.[7]
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4. Termination for cause of a continuous appointment, or the dismissal for cause of a
teacher previous to the expiration of a term appointment, should, if possible, be
considered by both a faculty committee and the governing board of the institution. In all
cases where the facts are in dispute, the accused teacher should be informed before the
hearing in writing of the charges and should have the opportunity to be heard in his or
her own defense by all bodies that pass judgment upon the case. The teacher should be
permitted to be accompanied by an Advisor of his or her own choosing who may act as
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3. During the probationary period a teacher should have the academic freedom that all
other members of the faculty have.[8]
counsel. There should be a full stenographic record of the hearing available to the
parties concerned. In the hearing of charges of incompetence the testimony should
include that of teachers and other scholars, either from the teacher’s own or from other
institutions. Teachers on continuous appointment who are dismissed for reasons not
involving moral turpitude should receive their salaries for at least a year from the date
of notification of dismissal whether or not they are continued in their duties at the
institution.[9]
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5. Termination of a continuous appointment because of financial exigency should be
demonstrably bona fide.
Appendix E
AAUP Statement on Professional Ethics
The statement that follows was originally adopted in 1966. Revisions were made and approved
by the Association’s Council in 1987 and 2009.
Introduction
From its inception, the American Association of University Professors has recognized that
membership in the academic profession carries with it special responsibilities. The Association
has consistently affirmed these responsibilities in major policy statements, providing guidance
to professors in such matters as their utterances as citizens, the exercise of their responsibilities
to students and colleagues, and their conduct when resigning from an institution or when
undertaking sponsored research. The Statement on Professional Ethics that follows sets forth
those general standards that serve as a reminder of the variety of responsibilities assumed by
all members of the profession.
In the enforcement of ethical standards, the academic profession differs from those of law and
medicine, whose associations act to ensure the integrity of members engaged in private
practice. In the academic profession the individual institution of higher learning provides this
assurance and so should normally handle questions concerning propriety of conduct within its
own framework by reference to a faculty group. The Association supports such local action and
stands ready, through the general secretary and the Committee on Professional Ethics, to
counsel with members of the academic community concerning questions of professional ethics
and to inquire into complaints when local consideration is impossible or inappropriate. If the
alleged offense is deemed sufficiently serious to raise the possibility of adverse action, the
procedures should be in accordance with the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic
Freedom and Tenure, the 1958 Statement on Procedural Standards in Faculty Dismissal
Proceedings, or the applicable provisions of the Association’s Recommended Institutional
Regulations on Academic Freedom and Tenure.
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1. Professors, guided by a deep conviction of the worth and dignity of the advancement of
knowledge, recognize the special responsibilities placed upon them. Their primary
responsibility to their subject is to seek and to state the truth as they see it. To this end
professors devote their energies to developing and improving their scholarly
competence. They accept the obligation to exercise critical self-discipline and judgment
in using, extending, and transmitting knowledge. They practice intellectual honesty.
Although professors may follow subsidiary interests, these interests must never
seriously hamper or compromise their freedom of inquiry.
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The Statement
2. As teachers, professors encourage the free pursuit of learning in their students. They
hold before them the best scholarly and ethical standards of their discipline. Professors
demonstrate respect for students as individuals and adhere to their proper roles as
intellectual guides and counselors. Professors make every reasonable effort to foster
honest academic conduct and to ensure that their evaluations of students reflect each
student’s true merit. They respect the confidential nature of the relationship between
professor and student. They avoid any exploitation, harassment, or discriminatory
treatment of students. They acknowledge significant academic or scholarly assistance
from them. They protect their academic freedom.
3. As colleagues, professors have obligations that derive from common membership in the
community of scholars. Professors do not discriminate against or harass colleagues.
They respect and defend the free inquiry of associates, even when it leads to findings
and conclusions that differ from their own. Professors acknowledge academic debt and
strive to be objective in their professional judgment of colleagues. Professors accept
their share of faculty responsibilities for the governance of their institution.
4. As members of an academic institution, professors seek above all to be effective
teachers and scholars. Although professors observe the stated regulations of the
institution, provided the regulations do not contravene academic freedom, they
maintain their right to criticize and seek revision. Professors give due regard to their
paramount responsibilities within their institution in determining the amount and
character of work done outside it. When considering the interruption or termination of
their service, professors recognize the effect of their decision upon the program of the
institution and give due notice of their intentions.
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5. As members of their community, professors have the rights and obligations of other
citizens. Professors measure the urgency of these obligations in the light of their
responsibilities to their subject, to their students, to their profession, and to their
institution. When they speak or act as private persons, they avoid creating the
impression of speaking or acting for their college or university. As citizens engaged in a
profession that depends upon freedom for its health and integrity, professors have a
particular obligation to promote conditions of free inquiry and to further public
understanding of academic freedom.
i
The Faculty notes that the principles of fairness and collaboration/consultation derive also
from the Rule of Benedict, Chapter 3. Though the specifics of the Rule apply to the monastic
context of the Abbey and the Abbot’s jurisdiction within the Abbey, the principles of
consultation by University leaders and fairness constitute noteworthy models for the general
conduct of University life at Saint Martin’s:
As often as anything important is to be done in the monastery, the abbot shall call the
whole community together and himself explain what the business is; and after hearing
the advice of the brothers, let him ponder it and follow what he judges the wiser
course. The reason we have said all should be called for counsel is that the Lord often
reveals what is better to the younger. The brothers, for their part, are to express their
opinions with all humility, and not presume to defend their own ways obstinately. The
decision is rather the abbot’s to make, so that when he has determined what is more
prudent, all may obey. Nevertheless, just as it is proper for disciples to obey the master,
so it is becoming for the master on his part to settle everything with foresight and
fairness.
These principles – of consultation among constituents and fairness in decision-making – also
define aspects of University life and conduct as outlined in the Faculty Handbook and Bylaws.
ii
The Faculty notes that the University’s transition to College/School Deans evolved as its
footprint expanded, a context that is not unlike that prescribed by the RB for the creation of
Deans in a monastery, and that the spirit of the University’s transition, as in many of its
activities, captures values articulated by the RB and the monastic order of Benedictine monks
to whom the University owes its identity and essential character:
If the brotherhood is large, let brethren of good repute and holy life be chosen from
among them and be appointed Deans; and let them take care of their deaneries in
everything according to the commandments of God and the directions of their Abbot.
Let such be chosen Deans as the Abbot may safely trust to share his burden. Let them
not be chosen for their rank, but for the merit of their life and their wisdom and
knowledge; and if any of them, puffed up with pride, should be found blameworthy and,
after having been corrected once and again and even a third time, refuseth to amend,
let him be deposed, and one who is worthy be placed in his stead.
iii
They are not currently replacing a Regular Faculty member who has taken on
administrative functions temporarily or has undertaken a leave of absence and is
expected to return to the Department in due course;
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Current full-time Visiting Faculty members who were hired prior to December 2013 and have
taught at Saint Martin’s for two-three years may be considered for tenure track appointments
in the University within the next three-five years through a locally-advertised search, subject to
the following contexts and conditions:
-
-
They have established a record of successful teaching, show promise of continuing
scholarly engagement and activity, and have the potential to contribute to the life of
the University through service;
The Department involved can demonstrate the need for an additional tenure track
appointment in the area of the Visiting Faculty member’s curricular expertise; if the
Department is able to demonstrate curricular need but not in the Visiting Faculty
member’s area of expertise, the Department’s request for an additional tenure track
hire will be considered among all such requests for the year;
-
The Department endorses by a two-thirds majority vote the Visiting Faculty member
as a candidate to be considered for a tenure track position;
-
The Dean endorses the request made by the Department;
-
University finances permit this transition.
Final approval is granted by the University President upon a recommendation by the Provost.
iv
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The University currently has two Librarians with faculty status and rank, one of whom is
tenured. Current faculty Librarians may elect to retain their tenure/tenure eligibility and
advance in rank in accordance with criteria outlined for advancement in faculty ranks in the
previous Handbook or this Handbook and Bylaws or opt to move into Continuing Librarian
status at the level parallel to their current faculty rank and proceed towards advancement in
Librarian ranks as described in the current Employee and Faculty Handbooks and Faculty
Bylaws. Vacant Librarian positions will be filled in accordance with terms outlined in the current
Handbook.
Recommended Further Reading
American Association of University Professors (AAUP)
Faculty members are encouraged to consult Policy Documents and Position Papers on the AAUP
web site: www.aaup.org
American Association of University Women (AAUW)
Faculty members are also encouraged to consult documents and statements on the AAUW
website: www.aauw.org. The AAUW advances “equity for women and girls through advocacy,
education, philanthropy, and research.” It is the nation’s leading voice promoting equity and
education for women and girls. Since its founding in 1881, AAUW members have examined and
taken positions on the fundamental issues of the day — educational, social, economic, and
political.
Other sites of interest to faculty include:
www.chronicle.com
www.insidehighered.com
http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/
E & OE
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http://www.universitiesnews.com/
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