Abstract Book

Abstract Book
ABSTRACTS
www.astro.gla.ac.uk/nam2010
The NAM Local Organising Committee would like to thank
the following organisations for their generous support of
NAM 2010
National Astronomy Meeting
Abstracts Book
2010 April 12–16
http://www.astro.gla.ac.uk/nam2010/
National Astronomy Meeting
Abstracts Book
2010 April 12–16
Contents
Welcome! 2
Acknowledgements 4
SocialEvents 5
Outreachevents 6
Localinformation 7
Sessions 14
RAS Afternoon 40
Abstracts 42
IndexofAuthors 91
Listofparticipants 97
Welcome!
AndyFabian
As President of the Royal Astronomical
Society(RAS),itgivesmegreatpleasure
towelcomeyoutoGlasgowUniversityfor
the2010RAS NationalAstronomyMeeting, the UK’s largest annual astronomy
andspacescienceevent. Morethan500
scientists are registered for the Meeting,
from postgraduate students to senior researchersandacademicstaff. Duringthe
week, wewilldiscussandpresentcuttingedgesciencefromacrossourfield, from
the upper atmosphere of the Earth to
galaxiesintheearlyUniverse. IntheUK
wearenotonlyoutstandinginourfield,
rankingsecondto theUS, but outstandingatcommunicatingourwork. Astronomy’sprofileinthemediaishigherthan
ever, has an enduring popularity with students in our schools and is cited by
manyasakeyfactorforinspiringentryintoacareerinscience. SoatNAM2010
wecancelebratethebestofourscienceinaninstitutionwhereastronomyhas
beentaughtforhalfamillennium, andresearchedindepthsincethe1760appointment ofAlexanderWilson as the first Regius Chair ofAstronomy, rightly
celebratedinthis250thanniversaryyear. GlasgowisagreatplaceforourannualMeetingtotakeplaceandwhateveryourareaofworkI hopetoseeandtalk
tomanyofyouinthedaysahead.
AndyFabian, PresidentoftheRoyalAstronomicalSociety
JohnC Brown
OnbehalfoftheLOC,SOC andalllocal
Glasgow area astronomers, professional
and amateur, I extend to all NAM 2010
delegates a very warm welcome to our
finecityandtotheGU CampusNAM site.
WealsowishtothankRAS/NAM foracceptingourinvitationtothissiteinrecognition of the 250th Anniversary of our
RegiusChairofAstronomy. Solarphysics,
MIST andAstronomyhaveundergoneadvancesunimaginableinWilson’sdayand
astonishing even since the last Glasgow
NAM (thenanRAS OutofTownMeeting)
in1989. Enjoyallthelatestsciencenews
here but also make sure you take some
timetoenjoyourcity, environs, andlegendaryhospitality
JohnC Brown, 10th Regius Chair ofAstronomy and 10thAstronomer Royal for
Scotland
250yearsoftheRegiusChairofAstronomyinGlasgow: Alexander
Wilson, firstRegiusChair
Alexander Wilson MA, MD was the
firstappointee(1760-1784)totheRegius
Chair of PracticalAstronomy, University
of Glasgow (founded 1451). This followedestablishmentofthefirstdedicated
University Observatory in 1757, based
on an instrument collection donated by
Alexander McFarlane of Jamaica. Refurbishmentoftheinstrumentsaftertheir
deleterious voyage were carried out for
£5byJamesWatt, atthattimea19year
old University instrument maker. There
havebeentenRegiusChairstodate, the
currentincumbent, JohnC Brown, being
also10thAstronomerRoyalforScotland.
Born in St Andrews, Wilson graduated
MA (1733)thereandbecameanapprenticetoaLondonsurgeonandapothecary. HereturnedtoStAndrewsin1739
to start a type foundry business which moved to Glasgow in 1744, supplying
the University printers. In business partnership with James Watt and Joseph
Black, he made some of the earliest scientific thermometers which played a
centralroleinBlack’sworkontheoriesoflatentandspecificheat. Priortohis
Chair appointment, Wilson had invented a new process for type, made telescopes, flownthermometersonkites, andmadespecificgravitybeadsforliquid testing including spirit ‘proof’ strength. While Regius Chair he was Clerk
of Senate and founder member of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, as well as
being very active in several areas of research, most famously for his observational discovery [Philosophical Transactions (1683–1775), 64:1–30 (1774),
doi:10.1098/rstl.1774.0001, ADS:1774RSPT...64....1W] oftheapparentdepressionofsunspotsbelowthephotosphere, todaytermedtheWilsonEffect.
[ImageofWilsoncourtesyofJamesBabingtonSmith, Wilsondescendant; excerptsofWilsonpapercourtesyoftheRoyalSociety]
3
Acknowledgements
The Local Organising Committee Lyndsay Fletcher (LOC chair), John Brown
(LOC DeputyChair), RachaelMcLauchlan(Secretary), MatthewCartmell(DepartmentofMechanicalEngineering), SaraDiegoli(ScottishUniversitiesPhysics
Alliance), DeclanDiver, HelenFraser(UniversityofStrathclyde), NormanGray,
GilesHammond, IainHannah, IkSiongHeng, NicLabrosse, AlecMacKinnon
(DepartmentofAdultandContinuingEducation), PeterMurray, MattPitkin, BonnieSteves(GlasgowCaledonianUniversity), GrahamWoan.
TheScientificOrganisingCommittee MartinHendry(SOC Chair), JohnBrown,
EduardKontar(UKSP SOC chair), AnnetteFerguson(ROE IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh), WayneHolland(UKATC,UniversityofEdinburgh), AndyTaylor(ROE IfA,
UniversityofEdinburgh), AlanThompson(BGS Edinburgh, MIST SOC chair), Ian
Bonnell(UniversityofSt. Andrews), JaneGreaves(UniversityofSt. Andrews),
SheilaRowan(UniversityofGlasgow).
The UKSP SOC Gerry Doyle (Armagh), Rekha Jain (Sheffield,) Eduard Kontar
(Glasgow; chair), DuncanMacKay(StAndrews), DavidPontin(Dundee).
TheMIST Council
Allofthe sessionconvenors forputtingtogethersuchanexcellentscientificprogramme.
OurteamofNAM helpers MattAbernathy, MarinaBattaglia, RiccardoBassiri,
Euan Bennet, Nicola Beveridge, Christina Burge, Paul Campsie, Ewan Dickson, MattEdgar, HodaGhodsi, ColinGill, DavidGraham, JingnanGuo, Karen
Haughian, Erin Macdonald, Procheta Mallik, Heather Ratcliffe, Hamish Reid,
SatoruSakai, IgnacioSantiago, EdwardThomson, FraserWatson.
John Brown, Lucie Green, Chris Lintott, Fiona Speirits, Fred Watson, and Jim
Wildasoutreacheventpresenters.
FredWatson, MarnieOgg, TheGlasgowSkepticsandTheAdmiralBar(‘Science
inthePub’).
Alltheschoolswhoparticipatedintheschools’postersession.
Wewouldalsoliketothankthefollowinginthe UniversityofGlasgow fortheir
helpandadvice: IshbelDuncanandLucindaHay(TheConferenceandVisitor
Services Office), Cha Hannaway and BillYoung (AV and IT), EllenThompson
(HospitalityServices), PatrickNwaozuzu(FInanceandPurchasingOffice), Stuart Forsyth (Corporate Communications), Anne Plissi and Jacqueline Heuchan
(Physics andAstronomyAccounts Office), AlanBowman(PhysicsandAstronomyStores).
ThankstoIainHannahfortheimageoftheGlasgowUniversityCloistersusedon
ourAbstractBookandbanners.
Reception: GlasgowCityChambers Themeetingreceptionwillbehostedby
Glasgow City Council in the City Chambers, situated in the heart of the city
centre. Thisreceptionincludesdrinksandcanapés. Advancedreservationwas
required: youwillneedtoshowyourconferencebadgetoenter.
Thisisexpectedtorunfrom18.30to20.00.
ScienceinthePub: TheAdmiralBar A “ScienceinthePub”Q&A panelsession, ledbyFredWatsonofAAO,isplannedforMonday12thfrom20.30–23.00
directlyaftertheCivicReception. FredWatsonmakesfrequentappearanceson
Australian radio andTV, which, together with his books, public lectures and
astronomytourismexpeditions, haveresultedinseveralawards.
ThevenuewillbetheTheAdmiralBarintheCityCentre, abouta10/15min
walkfromtheCityChambers(Googledirections). Thevenueisaregularhauntof
GlasgowSkepticsinthePubwhoarekindlyassistingwiththatevent. Advanced
registrationwasrequired, andalightbuffetwillbeprovidedforthosewhodid
register: showyourconferencebadgetoenter.
Tuesday13thApril
5-a-sideFootball: KelvinhallInternationalSportsArena Thisyear’scompetition
willoccurindoorsinasportingvenuethathasheldmanyaninternationalsportingevent, theKelvinhall, justafewmomentswalkfromtheUniversity.
Thecompetitionisexpectedtorunfrom18.30to21.00.
Wednesday14thApril
Dinner & Ceilidh: KelvingroveArt Gallery and Museum The meeting dinner
willbefollowedbyatraditionalceilidhbothinthespectacularKelvingroveArt
galleryandMuseum, situatedjustdownthehillfromtheUniversity.
Pleasebringyourconferencebadge, whichalsoshowsthemenuchoiceswhich
youmadeatregistration.
Thedinnerisexpectedtorunfrom19.00to24.00.
Hubble3D previewatGlasgowScienceCentreIMAX
TheGlasgowScienceCentreisshowingthenewHubble3D IMAX film, andtheir
previeweventhasfallenonthe14th. Theyhavekindlyoffered100ticketsfor
NAM delegates, soifyouareunabletogototheconferencedinner, thisisanother
alternative. Email Sharon Lyons ([email protected]) as
soonaspossible, ifyouwanttobookaticket.
Youcanfindamapoftheselocationsat http://bit.ly/9v6jsq
Allweek
While in Glasgow make sure to visit the Glasgow Science Centre, who have
specialratesforNAM delegates. Seepage 9 fordetails.
Social Events
Monday12thApril
Outreach events
Publicastronomytalks
Thesetalksarefreetoattend, butifyouhavenotalreadydoneso, pleasereserve
afreee-ticketontheweb, at http://www.astro.gla.ac.uk/nam2010/pub.php. All
thetalkswilltakeplaceat19.30inlecturetheatre 257oftheKelvinBuilding,
DepartmentofPhysicsandAstronomy, oncampusnexttothemainUniversity
building.
19:30Tuesday13thApril2010: TheMagicoftheSunandStars
JohnBrown (UniversityofGlasgow, andAstronomerRoyalforScotland) &Lucie
Green (MullardSpaceScienceLaboratory). ExplorethewondersofourownSun
andcountlessotherstarsthroughouttheuniverse.
19:30Wednesday14thApril2010: HowtoUseaMillionAstronomers–The
GalaxyZooandBeyond
ChrisLintott (UniversityofOxfordand“TheSkyatNight”). Discoverhow“CitizenScientists”arehelpingtounravelthemysteriesofhowgalaxiesformed.
19:30Thursday15thApril2010: HereistheSpaceWeather
JimWild (LancasterUniversity). Learnaboutthespaceenvironmentandhowits
“weather”impactsonhumantechnology. InassociationwiththeAstronomical
SocietyofGlasgow, http://www.theasg.org.uk/
JohnBrown&LucieGreen
ChrisLintott
JimWild
250yearsoftheAstronomyChairatGlasgow
TheHunterianMuseum, nexttothePlenarysessions, willbehostingadisplay
onAlexanderWilson. Thereisalsothechanceforasmallnumberofinterested
delegatestoviewrelatedhistoricalmaterialsfromtheUniversityLibrary’sSpecial
Collection(Wednesday14thatlunchtimeandintheafternoon–signupatthe
registrationdesk).
Outreach
FridayoftheNAM willincludeaspecialschoolspostersession, from12.00to
14.00intheKelvinBuilding(DepartmentofPhysicsandAstronomy). During
the weeks prior to the meeting, school pupils from the council areas ofWest
Dunbartonshire and South Lanarkshire have been researching sunspots, solar
activityandthepressingquestionofanylinkbetweentheseandterrestrialclimate
–onethatwouldhaveinterestedAlexanderWilsonhimself. Inthispostersession
theywillpresenttheirresults. Wehopethatmanyconferenceattendeeswilltake
theopportunitytopopinanddiscusstheireffortsandconclusionswiththem.
http://www.astro.gla.ac.uk/
nam2010/out.php
ThereisahugenumberofplacesinGlasgowtoshop, visit, eat, drink, and/or
dance. Sothefollowinglistisbynomeanscomprehensive, butpointstodifferent
areasofinterestandwhatyoushouldfindthere.
TheWestEnd(G12)
ByresRoad isthemainstreetforshops, banks, restaurants, barsandpubsinthe
WestEndandisjustafewminuteswalkwestonUniversityAvenuefromthe
mainbuildingandNAM2010. ItalsocontainstheHillheadsubwaystop.
Subway Hillhead
Shops Waitrose, Tesco, M&S SimplyFood, Iceland, Peckham’s, ClintonCards,
Clarks, Fopp, Superdrug, Specsavers, Papyrus
Pharmacy Boots
Local information
For a link-rich version of this information, see
Banks/BuildingSocities RBS,HBOS,LloydsTSB,Clydesdale, Nationwide, Santander
Take-a-away UniversityCafe, Starbucks, Subway, LittleItaly, Peckham’s, Gregg’s,
HeartBuchanan, BaguetteExpress
Restaurants Paperino’s, OranMor, Balbir’s, Stravaign, theBothy, theTwoFigs
Pubs/Bars Tennents, OranMor, Aragon, CommonRoom
AshtonLane/CresswellLane isacobbledlanelinedbybarsandrestaurantsthat
runsparalleltoByresRoad, behindHillheadunderground.
Cinema Grosvenor
Food&Drink UbiquitousChip(andthePubupstairs), Brel, theLoft, CafeAndaluzandmanymore
GreatWesternRoad isatthetopofByresRdandheadseastwardsintothecty
centre(withvariousshopsandpubs)andwestwardintotheA82andthehighlands. AtthecornerofByresRdandGreatWesternRdistheBotanicGardens
withfreeentrytotherestoredKibblePalaceglasshouse.
Subway Kelvinbridge
Restaurants CailBruichWest, TheBigBlue, Gambrino, Wudon
Pubs/Bars OranMor, Coopers, TheBelle, TheWiseMonkey
WoodlandsRdandGibsonSt leadingoffoftheeastofUnivesityAvenue)features
moreplacestoeatanddrink.
ComedyClub TheStand
Pubs/Bars UisgeBeathe, DoubletBar, ThePrimary
Restaurants TheLeftBank, ChilliesWestEnd, TattieMac’s(OtagoSt)
DumbartonRd/SauchiehallSt/ArgyleSt(G3)
DumbartonRd isatthebottomofByresRd. GoingeastwarditsplitsintoArgyle
StandSauchiehallStattheKelvingroveArtGallery. Bothofthesestreetsendup
beingtwoofthemainshoppingstreetsintheCityCentre.
KelvingroveArtGalleriesandMuseum iscompletely free andawanderaboutis
strongly recommended. ItisthemostpopularfreevisitorattractioninScotland
andmostvisitedUK museumoutsideLondon. Ithasavarietyofexhibits(includingtheobligatorydinosaurs, egyptiansarcophagi, armourandCharlesRennie
Mackintosh)andfamouspaintingsfromartistsincludingRembrandt, Matisse, Picasso, Monet, vanGogh, andparticularlySalvadorDali'sfamousChristofSaint
JohnoftheCross. Andofcoursetheconferencedinnerandceilidhwillbethere.
Museum ofTransport isalso free. Itwillbeclosingforever(movingtoanew
Clydesidemuseumin2011)onthe19thofApril, sothereisaseriesofevents
takingplaceduringtheweekofNAM2010. Withtrams, trainsandships, this
placeisabigkid’sdelight.
Subway Kelvinhall, Partick
Food&Drinks The Goat, Big Slope, The Sisters, Mother India (+Cafe), Fanny
Trollope’s
Pubs TheThreeJudges, Lismore, BenNevis
CityCentre
ThemainshoppingstreetinGlasgowareBuchananSt, SauchiehallSt(atthetop
ofBuchananSt)andArgyleSt(atthebottomofBuchananSt).
Thereisaconcentrationofpubsandrestaurantsinthe MerchantCity, particularly MerchantSquare/Candleriggs (afewblocksoutheastofthecitychambers)
8
Subway BuchananSt, StEnoch
Food&Drinks TheButterfly&thePig, TwoFatLadies, 13thNote(Veggie), Stereo,
Rumours, TheDhabba, OkoExpress,
Pubs the(legendary)HorseshoeBar, theLab, CountingHouse(bigWetherspoon’s
acrossfromcitychambers), O’Henry’s
Other
GlasgowScienceCentre/Hubble3D IMAX WhilstinGlasgow, makesuretovisit
the GlasgowScienceCentre (GSC),currentlyhometotheIYA’s‘Explorersofthe
Universe’photographicexhibition, averyfineplanetarium, andahugeIMAX
screenshowingtheamazingIMAX 3D film‘Hubble’(thisstartsonApril15th,
andyoucanbookfreeticketsforapreviewonthe14th–seepage 5 fordetails).
TheScienceCentreisalsohostinganamazingexhibition‘WallaceandGromit
present aWorld of Cracking Ideas’ which explores themes of innovation and
inventionaswellasofferingaglimpseintoWallace’szanycreativeworld. Asa
delegatetoNAM youwillbenefitfromaspecialdelegaterateof£4perperson
foradmissiontothemainScienceMallonproductionofyourdelegatebadgeat
theScienceCentreticketdesk.
TheGSC islocatedonthesouthsideoftheClyde, 40minuteswalkfromthe
campus, ortakeataxitotheCrownePlazahotelbytheSECC,andwalkacross
oneofthepedestrianbridges.
Balloch/LochLomond&theHighlands Balloch, thetownatthesouthernedge
ofLochLomond, islessthananhourawaybytrainfromQueenStlowlevelrail
station, whichyoucanreachfromPartickstation. TofullyexploreLochLomond
andthespectacularhighlandswerecommendacar. GreatWesternRoad, atthe
topofByresRoadistheA82andthisoneroadtakesyoutoLochLomond, up
byRannochMoor, Glencoe(under2hoursdriveaway)thenontoFortWilliam,
LochNessandeventuallyInverness(about4hoursdrive).
CarRental: Therearenocarhirelocationsconvenientfortheuniversity. Either
getthecarattheairport(GlasgoworPrestwick)ortheEnterprise(40OswaldSt,
G14PL) nexttoCentralstationinthecitycentre.
Stirling&GlengoyneDistillery[Saturday17thApril] Advancedregistrationwas
requiredforthistrip.
FromGlasgowwedrivetothemedievalcityofStirlingtovisitStirlingCastle,
whichoverlookstheancientcityofStirlingandisoneofthehistoricbuildings
thathavecometosymbolisethespiritofScotland. WecontinuetoTheTrossachs
alongtheshoreofLochVenacharthenclimbthedramaticDukesPasstothepretty
villageofAberfoyle. TheQueenofScotland’slakes-LochLomond-issureto
putasonginyourheart! LochLomondisthelargeststretchofinlandwaterin
Britain. We'll make a stop at Loch Lomond Shores where you can enjoy the
spectacularscenerybeforeourlaststopofthedayistoprettyGlengoyneMalt
WhiskyDistillerywhere, aswellashavingabehindthescenestourtolearnall
aboutthedistillersart, therewillbeachancetotastethefinishedproduct!
Eatingoutinthewestend
TheList isanindependentlimitedcompanybasedinScotlandfounded, inOctober1985topromotethewiderangeofarts, eventsandentertainmenttaking
placeeachyearinScotland. Thecompanymaintainstheawardwinningwebsite www.list.co.uk, wheredetailedandwide-rangingreviewsoftheeatingand
drinkingsectorinScotlandcanbefound. Belowwehavereproduced(withkind
permission)extractsfromtheList'sguidetoeatingoutinGlasgow'sWestEnd.
Seealso http://www.list.co.uk/places/restaurants/where:g12/
9
Key: B -Budget; S -StudentFriendly; V -vegetarianoptionsaccountfor1/4of
menu; W -wi-fi; L -latedining. H -HitList
AshokaAshtonLane (L,V) 19AshtonLaneGlasgow, G128SJ,Foodserved: Mon–Thu
noon–midnight; Fri/Satnoon–1am; Sun5pm–midnight. Capacity: 68.
TheAshtonLanebranchisperhapsAshoka’smostdesirableoutlet, situatedinthe
heartoftheWestEnd’squaint, cobbledeatinganddrinkingstripanddecoratedin
shadesofcoolorangeandbrownwithalargecolourfulmuralofanIndianstreet
scenecoveringonewall. Thefoodisyourtypicalmixofclassiccurries, dosas
andtandooris(there’snotahugeamountofdifferencemenu-wiserestaurantto
restaurantacrossthechain). It’sallwellcooked, inexpensiveandplentifulstuff,
withafewScottishtwistssuchashaggispakora.
TheBigBlue (B,S,V) 445GreatWesternRoad, Glasgow, G128HH,Foodserved: Mon–Thu
&Sunnoon–10pm; Fri/Satnoon–10.30pm. Capacity: 56.
A spaciouspatiowithrelaxingviewsovertheriverKelvin, Mediterranean-style
interiorswithtwistedirondécor, bleachedwallsandastylishbar, BigBlueremainsafunkyhang-outforcitydwellersofallages. Themenucoverseverybase
fromburgerstosteaktopastatoTexMextopizza.
Brel (S) 9–43Ashton Lane, Glasgow G12 8SG, Food served: Mon–Sun noon–10pm.
Capacity: 60.
BelgianbarandrestaurantBrelhasbeenafixtureontheWestEnd‚squaintAshton
Lane for over 12 years. Downstairs, the white tiled walls and heavy wooden
doors(whichareopenedonwarmdays), givethemainrestaurant–aconverted
stable–arusticfeel. Upstairs, theatmosphericwinebarSergeisanappealing
spotforanafterdarkquaffandlightbitebyflickeringcandlelight.
Budda (B,S,V) 8CresswellLane, Glasgow, G128AA,Foodserved: Mon–Satnoon–10pm;
Sun12.30–10pm. Capacity: 250.
Lodged on the cobbles of the West End’s Cresswell Lane, Bar Budda has establisheditselfasasports-bar-come-restaurantand, morerecently, alate-night
foodhaunt. Servinguphigh-qualitypubfooduntil2amattheweekends, Budda
boastsamenuofmostlyburgers, pizzasandsandwiches.
CaféAndaluz (B, L,V) 2CresswellLane, Glasgow, G128AA,Mon–Satnoon–11pm;
Sun12.30–10.30pm. Capacity: 130.
Café Andaluz resonates with a North African feel via Moorish decor. Good
seafood.
CaféAntipasti (B,V) 337ByresRoad, Glasgow, G128UQ,Sun–Thu9am–11pm; Fri/Sat
9am–midnight. Capacity: 50.
Between the fairy lights and rustic pine tables and fittings, you might be surprisedonfirstimpressionstolearnthatCaféAntipastionByresRoadisanItalian
restaurant. Good, unpretentiousfood.
Chow (B,L) 98ByresRoad, Glasgow, G128TB,Foodserved: Mon–Thunoon–2.15pm,
5–11.30pm; Fri/Satnoon–2.15pm, 5pm–midnight; Sun4.30–11.30pm. Capacity: 45.
ChowdoesnotfeellikeyouraverageChineserestaurant. Itsmanyregularsprize
thefriendlyneighbourhoodvibeandpared-downmoderndécor-andthefood’s
farfromaveragetoo. Canfeelcrowded, though.
DiMaggio’s (B,L) 61RuthvenLane, Glasgow, G129BG,Foodserved: Sun–Thunoon–10.30pm;
Fri/Satnoon–11.30pm. Capacity: 125.
Kember&Jones (B,V) 134ByresRoad, Glasgow, G128TD,Mon–Fri8am–9pm; Sat
9am–9pm; Sun9am–5pm. Capacity: 36.
Kember&JonescallsitselfaFineFoodEmporiumwithoutexaggeration–this
roomy café and continental deli really does stock some of the freshest, highqualitybreakfast, lunch, dinnerandsnackeatsyou’llfindinGlasgow.
Koh-i-Noor (L) 12GibsonStreet, Glasgow, G128NX., Foodserved: Sun–Wednoon–1am;
Thu–Satnoon–3am.
10
There’salarge, classicIndianmenu, withburgersandkebabstoo. Onceorders
areplacedit’snicetobeabletopeerbeyondthecounterandseeamealbeing
preparedwithskillandcare. Punjabimasalaistypical: aclean, creamyheat
fromthesauce, ahintofcumin.
TheLeftBank (B,S,V) 33–35GibsonStreet, Glasgow, G128NU,Foodserved: Mon–Fri
9am–10pm; Sat/Sun10am–10pm. Capacity: 60.
TheLeftBankboastsalltheunderstatedcoolofabarkitchenwhileatthesame
timeremainingasrelaxedandversatileasacafébar. ExtensiveVeganoptions.
[email protected] (S) TheGrosvenorTheatre,AshtonLane, Glasgow, G128SJ ,Food
served: Mon–Satnoon–10pm; Sun11am–10pm. Capacity: 120.
A barn-likespaceabovetheGrosvenorCinema, theupstairsrestauranthasnow
beenrevampedwitharusticItaliantheme, withanambitiousmenuemphasising
peasantdishes, cookedfamily-style(andtheyencouragethemtobesharedthat
waytoo).
NakedSoup (B) 6KerslandStreet, Glasgow, G126BL,Foodserved: Mon–Fri8.30am–8pm;
Sat10am–6pm; Sun11am–6pm. Capacity: 20.
AlthoughNakedSouphasawiderangeoffoodoptionsonitsmenuincludinga
sandwiches, saladsandbreakfast, theclueisinthename: thisplacedoesexactly
whatitsaysonthetin.
Òran Mór (B, S) 731–735 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G12 8QX, Food served:
Mon–Sat9am–9pm; Sun12.30–9pm. Capacity: 140.
ThegrandlookingÒranMór, aconvertedsandstonechurchoverlookingByres
RoadandtheBotanicGardens, attemptstocaterforthevariedwantsoftrendy
WestEndlocalsbybeingallthingstoallpunters: restaurant, club, theatre&bar.
Offersgluten-freeoptionsandwheelchairaccess.
Paperino’sWestEnd (L) 227ByresRoad, Glasgow, G128UD., Foodserved: Mon–Sun
noon–10.45pm. Capacity: 180.
Paperino’sthreebranchesinGlasgow, allservingtraditionalItaliancuisine, beganin1991withtherestaurantonSauchiehallStreet. Thewhite-washedwalls
andterracottatilesonthefloorisadecorativethemethattheownersrepeated
whentheyopenedtheByresRoadbranchin2005. Bigger, brighterandshinier,
thenewerrestauranthasacontemporaryatmosphere. A goodselectionofappetisersincludesbruschettas, antipastoandplentyofvegetarianoptions, suchas
stuffedmushroomsandmozzarellasticks.
La Parmigiana (H, V) 447 Great Western Road, Glasgow, G12 8HH., Food served:
Mon–Satnoon–2.30pm, 5.30–10.30pm. ClosedSun. Capacity: 50.
LaParmigianaisaproper, old-schoolItaliandiningexperience, withgracious,
knowledgeable–ifslightlysolemn–Italianwaitersinlongstarchedaprons, a
menuthatshowcasesaccomplishedItaliancooking, andawinelistthatwould
notlookoutofplaceinarespectedrestaurantinRome. Andafter30yearsonthe
GlasgowsceneithasjustregaineditstwoAA rosettes. Deep, richredwalls, crisp
linen, angledwoodentablesandhushedtonesallconspiretocreateaserious,
grown-upfoodieexperience.
StravaiginCaféBar (B,V) 28GibsonStreet, Glasgow, G128NX,Foodserved: Mon–Fri
10am–10.30pm; Sat/Sun11am–10.30pm. Capacity: 85.
A WestEndinstitution, StravaiginCaféBaroffersallthefashionableandlocally
sourcedeatingofthemainrestaurantdownstairsinthebasement, butinamore
relaxedsetting, andaspopularwithfamiliesasitislocalpopstars. Gluten-free
optionsandwheelchairaccessavailable; outdoortablesforsmokers.
Ubiquitous Chip (H) 12 Ashton Lane, Glasgow, G12 8SJ., Food served: Mon–Sat
noon–2.30pm, 5.30–11pm; Sun12.30–3pm, 6.30–11pm. Capacity: 130.
The restaurant consists of a glass-roofed, cobbled courtyard liberally supplied
withleafyplantsandasmallfishpond, givingitapleasantoutdoor/indoorfeel.
Theserviceisslick, professionalandwarm. Theever-changingmenuisexcitingtoreadletalonesample, withtheemphasisoninventivedishesusingfresh
ingredients. Theimpressivewinelistwillleaveyoustrugglingtochoose.
11
La Vallée Blanche (H) 360 Byres Road, Glasgow, G12 8AY., Food served: Tue–Fri
noon–2.15pm, 5.30–10.30pm; Satnoon–11.30pm; Sunnoon–10.30pm. ClosedMon.
Capacity: 76.
LaValléeBlanchesucceedsinshowingsensitivitytoshrinkingbudgetswithout
compromisingontaste. Justasitsnameandcosychaletinspireddécorimply,
the‘WhiteValley’turnsoutthesortoftraditionalFrenchfoodyoucoulddevour
afteradayinthemountains. Themenuchangesthroughouttheyeartofavour
seasonallocalproduce.
TheWeeCurryShop (B) 23AshtonLane, Glasgow, G128SJ,Foodserved: Mon–Thu
noon–2.30pm, 5.30–10.30pm; Fri/Satnoon–11pm; Sun5.30–10.30pm. Capacity: 31.
Ifchainrestaurantsaretheanathematogoodeating, thenitsgoodtoseethe
MotherIndiastablecontinuingtodefyreceivedwisdomwiththeirgrowingline
ofWeeCurryShops. TherearebranchesalsoinByresRoadandatCowcaddens.
Usefulnumbers, andemergencyinformation
GlasgowTaxis(hackneycabs)01414297070. LocalTaxiRanks: Hillheadsubway station and opposite Botanical Gardens (GreatWestern Road/Byres Road
intersection).
PrivateHire: WestEndRadioCars01419547070, CanniesburnTaxis0141956
3333, GlasgowAirportTaxis01418886363.
PublicTransport TravelineScotland http://www.travelinescotland.com/welcome.
do, 08712002233(chargesvary).
StrathclydePartnershipforTransport(SPT) http://www.spt.co.uk/
FirstbusGlasgow http://www.firstgroup.com/ukbus/scotland/swscot/home/
Scotrail http://www.scotrail.co.uk/, 08457484950(NationalRailEnquiries).
GlasgowUniversity contacts(fromaninternalphone, diallast4digits)switchboard01413302000, NAM2010RegistrationArea01413300157, MediaRelationsOfficer(StuartForsyth)01413304831.
RAS PressOfficers RobertMassey07941248035, AnitaHeward07756034243
Healthandemergencyservices
TheemergencyphonenumberintheUK is999.
AccidentandEmergency
WesternInfirmary
DumbartonRoad
Glasgow, G116NT
Phone: 01412112000
Emergencydentaltreatment
GlasgowDentalHospitalandSchool
(Call01412326323–nowalk-in)
378SauchiehallStreet
Glasgow, G23JZ
EveningserviceviaNHS24on
08454242424
http://www.nhs24.com.
Doctor'ssurgeries
26BankStreet
Glasgow, G128ND
Phone: 01413395513
12
31BuckinghamTerrace
Glasgow, G128ED
Phone: 01412116210
Pharmacies
277ByresRoad
Glasgow, G128TL
Phone: 01413391954
08:00–20:00
1278ArgyleStreet
Glasgow, G38AA
Phone: 01413393353
08:30–18:00
693GreatWesternRoad
Glasgow, G128RA
Phone: 01413390012
09:00–21:00
Security
GlasgowWestEndPoliceOffice
(Open24hours)
609-611DumbartonRoad
Glasgow, G116HY
Phone: 01415323592
GlasgowUniversityCampusSecurity
Gatehouse
UniversityAvenue
01413304444
orx4444fromanyUniversityphone
13
Sessions
Monday12th, 1545–1730
Bute P01: GalaxyFormationandEvolutionintheLow-RedshiftUniverse
WithMulti-WavelengthSpectroscopicSurveys
G255 P02: MassiveStars: NewViewsoftheirFormationandProgeny
G226 P03: 10YearsofCluster: thePast, PresentandFutureofMulti-point
MeasurementsofSpacePlasmas
Fore P04: NewViewsofSolarActiveRegionsfromHinodeandSTEREO
G466 P05: STFC CurrentFacilities
Tuesday13th, 1045–1230
G255 P06: ScienceontheWaytoSKA -Session1
Bute P07: FirstresultsfromtheHerschelSpaceObservatory
G226 P08: MagnetosphericphysicsofJovian-typeplanetsandUltra-cool
dwarfs
Fore P09: UKSP /MIST MissionsForum: theStateoftheArtandFuture:
Opportunities
G466 P10: SoftwareAstronomy: HowtoDoAstronomybyLookingThrough
aComputer
Tuesday13th, 1545–1730
Bute P11: TheDarkArtofDarkMatter-Session1
G466 P12: WaterintheSolarSystemandBeyond
G226 P13: MagnetospheresandIonospheresThroughouttheUniverse
Fore P14: MagneticCouplingoftheSolarAtmosphere:
Magneto-SeismologyoftheSolarAtmosphere
G255 P15: VISTA:PerformanceandSurveys
Wednesday14th, 1045–1230
Bute P16: ScienceontheWaytoSKA -Session2
G466 P17: A NewErainAstrochemicalStarFormation
G226 P18: GeneralMIST ScienceSession1
Fore P19: EnergeticParticlesintheSolarSystemandAstrophysical
Plasmas: ObservationsandTheory
G255 P20: ExplosionsintheDistantUniverse-Session1
Wednesday14th, 1545–1730
Bute P21: TheDarkArtofDarkMatter-Session2
G466 P22: DisksandStarsatExtremelyHighAngularResolution
Fore P23: MagneticReconnection
G226 P24: SolarInfluencesintheHeliosphere
G255 P25: ExplosionsintheDistantUniverse-Session2
Thursday15th, 1045–1230
Bute P26: TheSloanDigitalSkySurvey: theLegacyandFuture
G466 P27: StellarPopulationsinGalaxies
G226 P28: GeneralMIST ScienceSession2
Fore P29: ModellingofDynamicSolarPlasmas
G255 P30: PulsarAstrophysics
Friday16th, 1045–1230
Bute P31: TheRoleofFeedbackinGalaxyEvolution
G226 P32: StellarandExoplanetaryMagnetism
G466 P33: PublicEngagementinAstronomy, SolarandSolarSystemPhysics
Fore P34: UKSP GeneralSession
G255 P35: NewTechnologiesforFutureInstruments, Telescopesand
Missions
P01
GalaxyFormationandEvolutionintheLow-Redshift
UniverseWithMulti-WavelengthSpectroscopicSurveys
[2010April12, 15:45, p43]
WecannowstudythelowredshiftUniverse(z<0.5)usingextensivepopulation
statisticswithverylargegalaxynumbersandhighredshiftcompletenesslevels.
Inthissession, welookforwardtocontributionsonnewgalaxysurveyanalyses,
whichmakeextensiveuseofmulti-wavelengthdatasetsbycombininginformation from SDSS, GALEX, Herschel, UKIDSS, etc., on highlights from the new
GAMA survey, andonresultsfromthemostrecentgalaxyformationmodels.
The"GalaxyAndMassAssembly"(GAMA) surveyisamajorredshiftsurveyfor
galaxyformationwithanalreadyuniquespectralenergydistributioncoverage:
GALEX-UV, SDSS-optical, UKIRT-NIR, Herschel-FIR and GMRT-radio. GAMA
hasmeasuredsince2008over90knewspectraover 150sq.deg., probingina
systematicandcomprehensivemannerthefaintgalaxypopulationoveratimespanoffourbillionyears(z<0.5).
A NAM sessionfocussedaroundGAMA scienceandsimilarmulti-wavelength
opportunitiesinthelowredshiftUniverseisideallytimedwiththefirstGAMA
datareleaseplannedformid-2010. ThemajorsciencegoalscoveredbyGAMA
comprisemulti-wavelengthgalaxygroupstudies, theevolutionofthebaryonic
contentoftheUniverseandtheefficiencywithwhichgalaxiesformasfunction
ofenvironment.
Organisedby: PederNorberg(IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh), IvanBaldry(LiverpoolJohnMooresUniversity)
15:45
AaronRobotham: GalaxyAndMassAssembly(GAMA):Thenextgenerationsurveyofsurveys.
16:05
DavidHill: GAMA photometryandtheCosmicSpectralEnergyDistribution
16:20
AlfredoCarpineti: Thecolours, AGN properties, environmentsandstar
formationhistoriesofbulgedominatedpost-mergersinthelocaluniverse
16:40
Cristina C. Popescu: Modelling the UV/optical FIR/submm emission
fromSpiralGalaxies
17:00
ClaireBurke: ScaleSizeEvolutionofBrightestGalaxies
17:15
Posteradverts
Posters Leonidas Christodoulou: Galaxy Clustering Using Photometric Redshifts
EmmaCurtisLake: StudyinggalaxyevolutionwithFMOS (FibreMultiObjectSpectrograph)
IgnacioFerreras: A newapproachtodisentanglingstarformationhistoriesfromsurveydata
Jennifer Gupta: A new sample of "blazars" to study the relationship
betweenradio-loudAGN andgalaxyformation
EdoIbar: Theradiospectralindexofsub-millimetregalaxies.
RussellJohnston: Robustmethodstoprobesourceevolutioningalaxy
redshiftsurveys
LeeKelvin: GAMA:SingleandMulti-ComponentGalaxyModelling
ErinMacdonald: TheALFALFA HI AbsorptionSurvey
MatthewPrescott: RedandBlueSatelliteGalaxiesintheGalaxyand
MassAssemblySurvey
AwatRahimi: Abundancegradientsinsimulatedgalaxydiscs
DmitrijSemionov: Modellingradiationfieldsingalaxiesusinganew
radiationtransfercode
BoonKokTan: NGC 2976&NGC 3351: 12CO(3-2)Observationsand
itsCorrelationwithPAH 8um
15
P02
MassiveStars: NewViewsoftheirFormationandProgeny
[2010April12, 15:45, p45]
Massivestars, despitetheirrarity, playadisproportionateroleingalaxiessince
theydominatetheirionizingbudget, chemicalenrichmentandfeedback. This
sessionwillfocusupontopicalquestionsrelatingtothepropertiesandevolution
ofhighmassstars(mass-loss; significanceofLuminousBlueVariablestage; binarystatistics)andtheirprogeny(core-collapseSN;magnetars; GRBs)andwould
involve latest results fromTarantula survey ESO large programme, PanSTARRs
etc.
Theadventofnewinstruments(SCUBA-2), satellites(Herschel)andprogressin
findingtheearlieststagesofmassivestarformation(egtheIR darkclouds)-as
wellastherecentrenewedinterestinmodelsofhowmassivestarsform-also
makeittimelytoholdasessiondedicatedtotheformationofmassivestars. In
thissessionweaimtodrawtogetheralltheexcitingworkbeingdoneintheUK in
thisfield, whichwealsohopewillactasacatalysttodrivefuturecollaborations
intheUK communityforALMA projects.
Organisedby: PaulCrowther(UniversityofSheffield), StuartLumsden(UniversityofLeeds)
15:45
AdamAvison: ProbingSitesofMassiveStarFormation: TheMethanol
MultiBeamSurvey
16:05
Heather Cooper: The RMS Survey: Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy of
MassiveYoungStellarObjectsInTheNorthernHemisphere
16:25
BenDavies: A MassiveStarisBorn: thecircumstellardisk, envelope,
andbi-polaroutflowofW33A
16:40
ChristopherEvans: TheVLT-FLAMES TarantulaSurvey
17:00
MatthewAustin: Anultravioletstudyofthetheweakwindproblemin
O stars
17:15
AndrewMason: High-MassX-rayBinariesintheNIR:Orbitalsolutions
oftwohighlyobscuredsystems.
Posters JaneBuckle: A wide-field, high-resolutionviewofNGC2264
SimonClark: Multiplegenerationsofmassivestarformationincluster
complexes
Stacey Habergham: Type Ibc supernovae in disturbed galaxies: evidenceforatop-heavyIMF
MarkRushton: TheevolutionofthepeculiarvariableV838Monocerotis2002-2009
P03
10YearsofCluster: thePast, PresentandFutureof
Multi-pointMeasurementsofSpacePlasmas [2010April
12, 15:45, p46]
In2010, ESA'sClustermissionwillhavebeenorbitingtheEarthfor10yearsmakingmeasurementsofthemagnetosphere, bowshockandsolarwind. Duringthis
time, Clusterhashelpedtoimproveourunderstandingofvariousaspectsofsolarterrestrialandplasmaphysicsincludingmagnetosphere-ionospherecoupling,
wavesandcurrentsinthemagnetosphere, reconnectionandfluxtransport, and
plasmashocks. Inthecomingyears, Clusterwillbeabletomakethefirstmultipointinvestigationsofauroralaccelerationprocesses. Withproposalsfornew
multi-spacecraftmissionsunderconsideration, andwithClusterhavingreached
thismilestone, itistimelytoreviewthese10yearsworthofobservationsandconsiderhowtheseobservationscanhelpusinpreparingforfuturemulti-spacecraft
missionssuchasCross-ScaleandMMS.
Organisedby: ColinForsyth(UniversityCollege, London, MSSL),AndrewWalsh
(UniversityCollege, London, MSSL),AndrewFazakerley(UniversityCollege, London, MSSL),ElizabethLucek(ImperialCollege, London), MattTaylor(European
SpaceAgency)
16
15:45
C. Philippe Escoubet: 10Years of Cluster: Highlights of Multi-point
MeasurementsinSpacePlasmas
16:15
KhuromKiyani: UsingCluster’sobservationsofthesolarwindtoinvestigatecollisionlessplasmaturbulence--currentresultsandoutlookfor
thefuture
16:30
AndrewWalsh: TheMagnetotailPlasmaSheetRevisited: ClusterPEACE
Statistics
16:45
JonathanEastwood: Averagepropertiesofthemagneticreconnection
ion diffusion region in the Earth’s magnetotail: 2001 – 2005 Cluster
observationsandcomparisonwithsimulations
17:00
RogerDuthie: DoBBF eventscontributetoinnermagnetospheredipolarisation? A threeyearstatisticalstudyusingconcurrentClusterand
DoubleStarobservation
17:15
ColinForsyth: Multi-spacecraftobservationsofauroralelectronaccelerationbyCluster
Posters Mike Hapgood: Extending Cluster JSOC science operations over the
pasttenyears
MattTaylor: Here, thereandeverywhere: gettingafeelforboundary
layerevolutionusingmultipointmeasurements
P04
NewViewsofSolarActiveRegionsfromHinodeand
STEREO [2010April12, 15:45, p48]
Sincetheirlaunchin2006, theHinodeandSTEREO spacecraftshaveprovided
uswithnewinsightsintothephysicsofsolaractiveregions. Thecombinationof
threetelescopesaboardHinodeisofferingunprecedentedcoveragefromoptical
toX-raystherebyenablingstudiesofthecouplingbetweendifferentlayersofthe
solar atmosphere. Using the observations recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet
ImagingSpectrometer(EIS) aboardHinodewehavemeasuredphysicalplasma
parameterssuchaselectrondensity, temperatureandflowsinactiveregionsas
awhole, aswell asin individualcoronalstructures. TheEUV Imageraboard
STEREO has provided us with true 3-dimensional topology of active regions.
ThenewobservationalresultsobtainedbyHinodeandSTEREO haveprovided
uswithsomeveryimportantconstraintsonthetheoreticalmodellingofactive
regionloops. Inordertoexplainthenewobservationstherehavebeensignificant
advancesinthemodellingofactiveregionloops. Therefore, itisworthwhileand
timelythatwecompareourtheoreticalmodelswithobservationalresults.
Organisedby: AlisonWallace(UniversityCollege, London, MSSL),HelenMason
(DAMTP,Cambridge), GiuliodelZanna(DAMTP,Cambridge)
15:45
AlanHood: Whatcantheorydoforyou?
16:00
GiulioDelZanna: Hinode/EIS observationsofactiveregionloops
16:15
LenCulhane: PlasmaMotionsandMagneticReconnectionHeatingin
the2007, May19Flare
16:30
DurgeshTripathi: Activeregionmoss: basicphysicalplasmaparametersandtheirtimevariability
16:45
SarahMatthews: Coronalsignaturesofasunspotlight-bridge
17:00
Lucie Green: What can Hinode observations tell us about eruptions
fromsigmoidalactiveregions?
17:15
Posteradverts
Posters Caroline Alexander: X-ray Bright PointTopology Study with Hinode
andSTEREO
DavidGraham: ObservationsofflareribbondensitiesusingHinode/EIS
Iain Hannah: Regularized inversion techniques for recovering DEMs
fromHinode/XRT data
17
RobertO'Neil: Relationshipbetweenmagneticfieldandcoronaloutflowsinactiveregions
SantiagoVargasDominguez: Convectiveplasmaaroundsolarpores
P05
STFC CurrentFacilities [2010April12, 15:45, p49]
ThissessionwillprovideacommunityforumtodiscussthecurrentstatusofUK
astronomicalfacilities, includingVLT,Gemini, HerschelandSCUBA2. Thefocus
willbeonscienceresultsandfutureprospects, andcurrentandfuturedevelopmentsininstrumentation.
Organisedby: DerekWard-Thompson(CardiffUniversity)
15:45
RaySharples: UpdateontheKMOS SpectrographforESO VLT
16:00
DimitraRigopoulou: HerschelandSPICA:pushingthefrontiersintothe
coolcosmos
16:15
SimonGarrington: e-MERLIN
16:30
JohnRicher: ALMA:statusreportandfirstscience
16:45
GaryDavis: JCMT andUKIRT:GoodNewsandBadNews
17:00
DavidNutter: EarlyresultsfromSCUBA2
17:15
DavidClements: WhitherUK-LedGround-BasedSubmmAstronomy?
Posters RobertBarnsley: FRODOSpec: RoboticSpectroscopyusingtheLiverpoolTelescope
JoaoBento: A studyoftheSuperWASP detectormaps
NeilMawson: The LiverpoolTelescope: ObservationswiththeSTILT
(SmallTelescopesInstalledatLT) widefieldinstruments
P06
ScienceontheWaytoSKA -Session1 [2010April13,
10:45, p50]
BothEuropeanandUK visiondocumentsplaceSKA alongsideE-ELT asthekey
ground-basedfacilitiesforfutureastronomy. NewradiotelescopesonthepathwaytotheSKA arenowstartingtocomeonlinewithfirstscienceresultsimminentfromeMERLIN,eVLA andLOFAR.IntheseparallelsessionswewillshowcasetheseresultsalongsidethosefrommorematureinstrumentsliketheGMRT
(e.g joint GMRT/Herschel surveys). Plans for involvement of the UK science
communityinSKA anditsprecursors(ASKAP andMeerKAT) willbeoutlined.
Organisedby: MattJarvis(UniversityofHertfordshire)
10:45
SteveRawlings: PathwaytotheSKA
11:10
JohnMcKean: EarlyresultsfromthecommissioningofLOFAR
11:25
AlanPenny: A SETI pilotprogrammewithLOFAR
11:40
MattJarvis: TheMeerKAT DeepContinuumSurvey
12:00
PrinaPatel: RadioWeakGravitationalLensingwithVLA andMERLIN
P07
FirstresultsfromtheHerschelSpaceObservatory [2010
April13, 10:45, p50]
HerschelwaslaunchedinMay2009andstartedtakingsciencedatainOctober
2009. Thefirstscientificresultsfromthismissionwillbeavailableintimefor
NAM,allowingtheUK astronomicalcommunityafirstlookatsciencefromthis
majorUK andEuropeanmission. Thetimelinessofthissessionislikelytolead
topressandpublicinterest.
Organisedby: DaveClements(ImperialCollege, London)
10:45
MattGriffin: Herschel: statusandin-orbitperformance
18
11:00
AnthonySmith: InitialresultsfromHerMES:theHerschelMulti-tiered
ExtragalacticSurvey
11:15
EmmaRigby: TheHerschel-ATLAS:A firstlook
11:30
MatthewSmith: TheHerschelVirgoClusterSurvey(HeViCS)
11:45
DerekWard-Thompson: EarlyHerschelResultsonStarFormation
12:00
NeilPhillips: FirstresultsfromtheDEBRIS survey
12:15
RogerWesson: SPIRE FTS spectraofthreecarbon-richevolvedobjects
Posters HarsitPatel: SWIRE 70micronselectedGalaxies: FollowupandLuminosityFunction
P08
MagnetosphericphysicsofJovian-typeplanetsand
Ultra-cooldwarfs [2010April13, 10:45, p51]
Currentevidencesuggeststhatultracooldwarfsbridgethegapbetweensolartypestarsthatexhibitcoronalactivityandjovian-typeplanetspossessinglargescalemagnetospheresandneutralatmospheres. Evidenceforthisplanet-likebehaviorhasbeenobservedintheradioregime, whereultracooldwarfshavebeen
foundtoproduceperiodicpulsesofextremelybright100%circularlypolarized
radioemission. Thegasgiantsofthesolarsystem–particularlyJupiterandSaturn
–havebeenthesubjectofmuchintensiveresearchwithinthelastdecade. Space
missionssuchasGalileoandCassinihavegivenusunprecedentedinsightinto
thephysicalprocesseswhichshapethemagneticfields, plasmapopulationsand
auroraeoftheseplanets. ItisthusanexcellentopportunityforNAM tobring
togethertheultracoolstarcommunityandtheplanetarycommunityandtohighlighttheexcellentresearchbeingdoneinmagnetosphericphysicsbeyondthe
Earth.
Organisedby: GerryDoyle(ArmaghObservatory), NickAchilleos(University
CollegeLondon)
10:45
ChrisArridge: Giantplanetmagnetospheres: JupiterandSaturn
11:10
GreggHallinan: Dynamicspectraofindividualradiopulsesinanultracooldwarf
11:30
DavidSouthwood: Sourceofperiodicradioemission; lessonsfromSaturn
11:45
AlexeyKuznetsov: Numericalsimulationoftheelectron-cyclotronmaser
instabilityinthemagnetospheresofbrowndwarfs
11:55
JonathanNichols: VariationofSaturn'sUV aurorawithSKR phase
12:10
StuartLittlefair: UltraspecObservationsofTVLM 513-46546
12:20
PaulineLang: ThePeculiarbehaviourofRadioEmissioninFullyConvectiveStars
Posters RobertKing: PhysicalParametersofUltracoolDwarfs: TheYoungand
TheOld
Adam Masters: Structure and dynamics of the boundary of Saturn's
magnetosphere
JaphethYates: InfluenceofupstreamsolarwindconditionsonatmosphericflowsatJupiter
Shenghua Yu: Mapping radio emitting-region on low-mass stars and
browndwarfs
P09
UKSP /MIST MissionsForum: theStateoftheArtand
Future: Opportunities [2010April13, 10:45, p52]
Thissessionwillbesplitintotwoparts: TheStateoftheArtwillreviewthecurrent
statusofUK involvementinupcomingmissions; FutureOpportunitieswillbean
opencommunitydiscussiononfuturemissionsandopportunitiesbeyondand
19
outsidethecurrentCosmicVisionsprogramme. Thestatusofcurrentmissions
andfacilitieswillbepresentedinanaccompanyingpostersession. Thisisyour
chancetovoiceyouropiniononwherewemovenextinscienceatacrucial
time!"
Organisedby: DavidWilliams(UniversityCollege, London, MSSL),ColinForsyth
(UniversityCollege, London, MSSL),LouiseHarra(UniversityCollege, London,
MSSL)
10:45
RobertWalsh: NASA SDO,itsscienceandtheUCLandata-hub
11:00
Richard Marsden: Solar Orbiter: exploring the Sun and Heliosphere
connection
11:15
MicheleDougherty: EuropaJupiterSystemMission
11:30
MikeHapgood: Scienceopportunitiesforgeospacestudies?
Posters DanielleBewsher: Determinationofthephotometriccalibrationand
large-scaleflatfieldoftheSTEREO HeliosphericImagers: I.HI-1
ChrisCarr: TheRosettaPlasmaConsortium
AndrzejFludra: SOHO CoronalDiagnosticSpectrometer
RichardHarrison: TheSTEREO Mission
Mark Lester: SuperDARN UK: A new resource to study of the upper
atmosphere
ElizabethLucek: ClusterFGM:currentandfuturescientificopportunities
ChristopherOwen: SolarOrbiter: TheSolarWindAnalyserInvestigation
JianSun: HinodeUnveilsA NewSun
P10
SoftwareAstronomy: HowtoDoAstronomybyLooking
ThroughaComputer [2010April13, 10:45, p54]
Increasingly, astronomyishappeninginsoftware. Thisisn'tjustthereductionof
telescopedata(theoldStarlink/IRAF world, wherethesoftwarewasjustanaspect
ofobservationalastronomy), butastronomywherethecomputeristheprimary
instrumentdeliveringthescience. Thiscoverssimulationsanddatamining, but
mostrecentlyalsovarioustypesoffundamentallyonlineapproachestohanding
theever-intensifyingdatadeluge, includingvirtualobservatory, crowdsourcing,
socialastronomy, andthesemanticweb.
Inthisspecialsessionwewillbringtogetherleadersinthevariousstrandsofsoftwareastronomy. TheUK hasaleadingroleinthis(arguably)newsubdiscipline,
andthisspecialsessionwillbuildthiscommunity, andcementitslinkstothe
more... traditionalroutesfromphotonstoelectrons.
Organisedby: NormanGray(UniversityofGlasgow)
10:45
IntroductoryRemarks
11:00
DuncanForgan: NativeSyntheticImagingofSmoothedParticleHydrodynamicsSimulations
11:20
AnnaMariaMassone: SoftwaretoolsforprocessingRHESSI visibilities
11:40
ChrisLintott: SupportingDistributedScience: RunningGalaxyZoo
12:00
MarkJones: Developingskillsfor“softwareastronomy”: aninnovative
distancelearningprojectforOpenUniversitystudents
12:20
AvonHuxor: GraphicInterfacestoExplanatoryAnalysisofAstronomicalImageDatabases
Posters RobBlake: TheWFCAM ScienceArchive
JohnBrooke: DataIntegrationinHeliophysics
OliverButters: TheSuperWASP publicarchive
20
TobiaCarozzi: VOeventstriggeredbygravitywaves
NigelHambly: NewinfraredandopticalimagesservicesintheVO
MarkHolliman: VirtualObservatoryServicesatWFAU
BonnieSteves: ThehierarchicalstabilityofexoplanetarysystemsofBinarystarsusingtheCaledonianSymmetricFour-Bodymodelwithanew
globalregularisationalgorithmtohandlecloseencounters
P11
TheDarkArtofDarkMatter-Session1 [2010April13,
15:45, p56]
Thegoalofthissessionistounderstandthemysteriousdarkmatterthatcomprises95%ofthemattercontentoftheUniverse. TheUK isattheforefrontof
researchinthefieldsofCosmologyandParticlePhysicswithstrengthsinboth
theoryandobservations. Wewelcomeanyresearcherintheoryorobservation,
fromallfields, workingtowardsthegoalofunderstandingdarkmatter. Together
inthissessionwewilldiscusskeyquestionssuchas: “howcanwebetterexploit
synergiesbetweendirectandindirectdetection?”Toaiddiscussion, inaddition
tothetwoscheduledparallelsessionstherewillbea20-30personbreak-out
session, tobeheldonthemorningof14thApril. OuraimistofosteracollaborativeenvironmentatthemeetingthatwillleadtostrongUK-ledresearchinthis
rapidlydevelopingfield.
Organisedby: CatherineHeymans(IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh), RichardMassey
(IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh), TomKitching(IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh)
15:45
PawelMajewski: Directdetectionofdarkmatter
16:10
JustinRead: DarkMatterintheMilkyWay
16:35
Jorge Penarrubia: The impact of dark matter cusps and cores on the
satellitegalaxypopulatio
16:50
AlinaKiessling: ApplicationsofaNewandRapidSimulationsMethod
forWeakLensingAnalysis
17:00
EdwardThomson: Wave-mechanicsofLargeScaleStructure
17:10
JakobJonsson: WeighinggalaxiesusinggravitationallylensedSNLS supernovae
17:25
Posteradverts
Posters ChrisBrook: Dodarkmatterhaloshavecusps?
Olaf Davis: Extreme value statistics: predicting the frequency of the
densestclustersandsparsestvoids
MartinFeix: TeVeS andthestraightarcofA2390
IgnacioFerreras: Probingthedarkmatterhalosofearly-typegalaxies
vialensing
HodaGhodsi: SuddenFutureSingularitymodelsasanalternativeto
DarkEnergy?
GülayGürkan: Thenewpathtotimedelays?
VictoriaHamilton-Morris: LoCuSS:WeakLensingAnalysisof21Galaxy
Clustersatz=0.15-0.3
Catherine Heymans: Probing the Dark Universe withWeak Lensing
TomographyandtheCFHTLS
DanielJohn: A NewPixonWeakLensingClusterMassReconstruction
Method
CraigLawrie: Theimpactofdelensinggravitationalwavestandardsirens
ondeterminingcosmologicalparameters
HongshengZhao: BrightIdeasandDarkThoughts: "UniversalBaryonic
Scale"at"MaximumHaloGravity"
21
P12
WaterintheSolarSystemandBeyond [2010April13,
15:45, p57]
Thissessionaimstocutacrosssomeofthetraditionalsubjectareasinastrobiology, bringingpeopletogethertoconsidertheorigin, distributionandactionof
waterinthegalaxy. TopicscoveredwillspantherangefromwaterintheSolar
System–i.e. theMoon, Marsandasteroids, andicybodies(e.g. comets, Europa)
–toexoplanetaryatmospheres.
Organisedby: MonicaGrady(OpenUniversity)
15:45
PedroLacerda: TheDensitiesofKuiperBeltObjects
16:00
HenryHsieh: TheMain-BeltComets: Long-livedIceintheInnerSolar
System
16:15
Jay Farihi: The Frequency and Composition ofWater-Rich Extrasolar
Asteroids
16:30
IngoWaldmann: Characterisationofexoplanetaryatmospheres
16:45
DavidKipping: NightsidePollutionofExoplanetTransitDepths
17:00
MikakoMatsuura: Observationsandmodellingofwatervapourlines
intheHerschelSPIRE FTS spectrumoftheluminousred-supergiant, VY
CanisMajoris
17:15
AnitaRichards: AmasingWater
P13
MagnetospheresandIonospheresThroughouttheUniverse
[2010April13, 15:45, p58]
MagnetospheresareubiquitousthroughouttheUniverse, beingfoundininterstellargasclouds, intheenvironmentsofblackholesandotherdegenerateobjectsaswellasaroundplanetsandstars. Galactic, heliospheric, andexoplanetarymagnetospheresaddyetanotherdimensiontothisimmensevariety. Ionospheresandionospheric-likecollisionalplasmaenvironmentsarealsoubiquitous in planetary environements and much of the collisional plasma physics
foundinplanetaryionospherescanalsobeappliedtoastrophysicalsystemssuch
asaccretiondiscs. Thesolarsystemcontainsadiversearrayoffascinatingplanetarymagnetospheresandionospheres, eachuniquebutsharingthesamefundamental physical processes. Solar system environments have been explored
using a variety of techniques and such investigations have benefited from the
uniqueadvantageofbeingabletoincludein-situmeasurements. Thishasledto
asignificantbodyofunderstandingonspaceplasmaswhichishighlyapplicable
toastrophysicalsystems. Comparativestudiesbetweenplanets(includingEarth)
andmoonsthroughoutthesolarsystemallowinvestigationsofawiderangeof
physicalconditions, suchasmagneticfieldconfigurationandcompositionofthe
plasma. Comparisonsbetweenplanetaryandastrophysicalenvironmentsreveal
interestingsimilaritiesinsystem-levelbehaviour, suchasphaseshiftsanddrifting
periodsinperiodicplanetaryradioemissionsandtheintermittentbehaviourof
somepulsars.
We invite contributions that discuss the physical processes and structures in
astrophysicalandplanetarymagnetospheres, ionospheresandionospheric-like
collisionalastrophysicalplasmaenvironments. Weanticipatepapersthatstudy
generalmagnetosphericandionosphericphysicsleadingtoauniversalunderstandingofmagnetospheresandionospheresandwhichexploretheapplicability
ofcollisionalionosphericplasmaphysicstoastrophysicalplasmaenvironments,
suchasaccretiondiscs.
Organisedby: ChrisArridge(UniversityCollege, London, MSSL),BenStappers
(UniversityofManchester), AlanWood(AberystwythUniversity), AndyBreen
(AberystwythUniversity)
15:45
22
Introductoryremarks
15:50
SteveMiller: TheroleofH3+inplanetaryatmospheres
16:10
PatrickWeltevrede: Radioobservationsofhighlyenergeticpulsars
16:30
ThomasNeukirch: Simplemodelsforclosedfieldlineregionsofthreedimensionalrigidlyrotatingmagnetospheres
16:45
NicholasAchilleos: TheInfluenceofHotPlasmaPressureonMagnetosphericStructureatSaturn
17:00
EuanBennet: AlfvénWavesinPartially-IonisedandRecombiningPlasmas
17:15
Robert Kidd: Searching for Evidence of Star Spots in STEREO HeliosphericImagerData
Posters GeraintJones: TheShockingSizeofCometMcNaught
KevinRonald: LaboratoryExperimentstoinvestigatethemechanisms
ofAuroralKilometricRadiation
AlanWood: IonlosstotheSolarWindfromVenusatSolarMinimum
P14
MagneticCouplingoftheSolarAtmosphere:
Magneto-SeismologyoftheSolarAtmosphere [2010April
13, 15:45, p60]
Highresolutionobservations(TRACE,HINODE,STEREO) arerevolutionizingour
viewsandunderstandingofphysicalprocessesinthesolaratmosphereandthe
connectivity between various regions and phenomena taking place in the solaratmosphere. Combiningobservablepropertiesofwavesandoscillationsin
variousmagneticstructureswiththeoretical(includingnumerical)modelling, allow us determination of not only magnitude of magnetic fields but also subresolutionstructuringusingseismologicaltechniques. Thesessionaimstoreview
recentadvancesinthefieldofmagneto-seismologyandputindividualdynamical/energeticphenomenaintoamuchwiderglobalpicture.
Organisedby: I.Ballai(UniversityofSheffield), R.vonFaySeibenburgen(UniversityofSheffield), M.Mathioudakis(Queen'sUniversityBelfast)
15:45
Gary Verth: Magnetoseismology of the chromosphere with torsional
Alfvénwaves
16:00
DavidJess: ThelinkbetweenSodiumintensityenhancementsandthe
photosphericmagneticfield
16:15
TomVanDoorsselaere: Anatomyofaslowwaveinacoronalloop
16:25
SergeiZharkov: Evidenceofmagneto-acousticwavesinphotospheric
observationsofasunspot
16:35
MikeMarsh: ExploitingtheCoronalSlowMode
16:45
Richard Morton: Properties of MHD waves in plasma with variable
background
16:55
DavidPascoe: CoupledAlfvénandKinkOscillationsinCoronalLoops
17:05
PhilipCrockett: BigBrightPoint, SmallBrightPoint, Cardboardbox
17:15
DavidRobertson: Theeffectofdensitystratificationonthetransverse
oscillationsoftwoparallelcoronalloops
Posters IstvanBallai: TRACE/EUV observationofdrivenlooposcillations
NickyChorley: Longperiodoscillationsinsunspots
HughHudson: Flaresandglobalwaves, includingseismic
MarialejandraLuna: Longitudinaloscillationsinanexpandinghotcoronalloop.
BeniaminOrza: PhasemixingintheSolarCorona
23
P15
VISTA:PerformanceandSurveys [2010April13, 15:45,
p61]
VISTA'sfirstScienceruns(10daysofScienceVerification)completedon02-Nov
andVISTA wasacceptedbyESO inmidNovember. ‘DryRun'surveys(100hr
foreachofthesixsurveys)started03-NovandtheVISTA PublicSurveysformally
beginon15-Feb2010.
Whilstitwillbealittleearlytoexpectmuchnewscience, thepurposeofthis
sessionwillbetoprovideatimelyreportontheperformanceandcapabilitiesof
theas-builtVISTA,andontheprogressandresultssofarfromthefirstdataofthe
ESO publicsurveyswithVISTA.
Organisedby: JimEmerson(QueenMary, UniversityofLondon)
15:45
JimEmerson: VISTA Performance
15:55
JamesLewis: TheVISTA sciencepipeline
16:05
JamesDunlop: UltraVISTA
16:20
MattJarvis: TheVISTA DeepExtragalacticObservations(VIDEO) Survey
16:35
WillSutherland: VIKING,theVISTA Kilo-degreeInfraredGalaxySurvey
16:50
JosephFindlay: HighredshiftquasarsintheVIKING field.
17:00
RichardMcMahon: TheVISTA HemisphereSurvey
17:15
Maria-RosaCioni: TheVMC survey-I.StrategyandEarlyScienceData
Posters GemmaBagheri: A near-infraredstudyoftheMagellanicSystemwith
VISTA.
RossCollins: TheVISTA ScienceArchive
NicholasCross: FindingvariablesusingtheVISTA ScienceArchive
RoaldGuandalini: FirstobservationsofstellarclustersintheLMC from
theVMC survey
PhilipLucas: VISTA VariablesintheViaLactea(VVV) andnewUKIDSS
GPS highamplitudeIR variables
Maria Ida Moretti: Variable Stars in theVISTA near-infraredY, J, Ks
surveyoftheMagellanicCloudSystem(VMC)
P16
ScienceontheWaytoSKA -Session2 [2010April14,
10:45, p62]
BothEuropeanandUK visiondocumentsplaceSKA alongsideE-ELT asthekey
ground-basedfacilitiesforfutureastronomy. NewradiotelescopesonthepathwaytotheSKA arenowstartingtocomeonlinewithfirstscienceresultsimminentfromeMERLIN,eVLA andLOFAR.IntheseparallelsessionswewillshowcasetheseresultsalongsidethosefrommorematureinstrumentsliketheGMRT
(e.g joint GMRT/Herschel surveys). Plans for involvement of the UK science
communityinSKA anditsprecursors(ASKAP andMeerKAT) willbeoutlined.
Organisedby: MattJarvis(UniversityofHertfordshire)
10:45
TomMuxlow: Thee-MERGE LegacySurvey
11:05
EmmaRigby: Theluminosity-dependenthigh-redshiftcut-offoftheradioluminosityfunction
11:25
AndyLawrence: OriginoftheCosmicRadioBackground
11:45
HansikKim: Thespatialdistributionofcoldgasinhierarchicalgalaxy
formationmodels
12:00
RogerDeane: HighResolutionRadioObservationsofIRAS FSC10214
Posters Joanna Bulger: The OVRO Ophiuchus Pre-Stellar (OOPS) Survey: A
3.4mmContinuumEmissionStudyofCircumstellarMaterial
24
P17
A NewErainAstrochemicalStarFormation [2010April14,
10:45, p63]
Thissessionwillprovideanoverviewofcurrentresearchinastrochemistry, bringing together the fields of observational astronomy, theoretical modelling, and
laboratoryastrochemistry. Theemphasiswillbeonastrochemicalresearchin
areasthatwillreapthebenefitsofcurrentandplannedmissionssuchasJCMT,
Herschel, ALMA andJWST,particularlyareasassociatedwithstarformationin
boththenearandfaruniverse.
Thisisanexcitingtimeforthestudyofastrochemicalprocessesinthefaruniverse. Detectionsofwaterice, amorphousandaromatichydrocarbonsatredshifts 2, anddetectionsintheearlyuniverse(e.g. CO atz 6)areprovidingthe
stimulus for research into star formation in high redshift galaxies, where very
different physical parameters are needed for models. In the nearby universe,
theimprovedspatialandspectralresolutionofferedbynewinstrumentationwill
stronglyinfluencemodelsofstarandplanetformation, enabling, evenenforcing,
theinclusionofdynamicsinchemicalmodelsof, forexample, nearbycircumstellardisks. Suchmodelsandobservationsalsorequireinteractionwithdevelopinglaboratorystudies. Ournewviewofthemolecularcomplexityinthelocal
galaxywillchangedramaticallytheunderstandingofformationprocessesand
evolutionarystages.
Organisedby: JaneBuckle(CavendishAstrophysics, Cambridge)
10:45
StevenCharnley: IsotopicFractionationinPrimitiveMaterial: QuantifyingtheContributionofInterstellarChemistry.
11:00
Estelle Bayet: Extragalactic star formation activity - properties of the
verydensegas
11:15
Martin McCoustra: Photon- and Electron-driven Processes in Model
InterstellarIces
11:30
GaryFuller: AstrochemistryintheALMA era
11:45
NatalieChristopher: FirstResultsfromSHINING -SurveywithHerschel
oftheISM inNearbyINfraredGalaxies
12:00
VictoriaFrankland: TowardsUnderstandingtheFormationofWaterin
theInterstellarMedium
12:15
ZainabAwad: Thedeuteriumchemistryinlowandhighmassstarformingregions
Posters AliAbdulgalil: LaboratoryStudiesofNon-thermalDesorptionofAcetonitrilefromIcyGrainMantles
SeanChapman: InvestigatingtheOnsetofSilicateCrystallizationinthe
EarlyStagesofStarFormation
HelenChristie: ChemistryofdenseclumpsnearmovingHerbig-Haro
objects
KerryHebden: ChemicalevolutioninNGC 6302(theButterflynebula)
NadyaKunawicz: Hotcoremodelsatlowmetallicity
Paul Ruffle: The Xgear Project -A New Era forAstrochemical Modelling?
P18
GeneralMIST ScienceSession1 [2010April14, 10:45, p65]
Magnetospheric-Ionospheric-Solar-Terrestrial(MIST) researchconcernsphysical
processeswithintheSun-Earthsystem, othersolarsystembodiesandexo-planets;
inparticularthesolar/stellarwind, moonsandplanetaryatmospheresandmagnetospheres. TheMIST generalsessionisdesignedtoaddressthoseaspectsof
25
currentMIST researchnotexplicitlycoveredinothersessions, suchasneutralatmospherescience, ULF wavesandwave-particleinteractions, auroralandionosphericelectrodynamics, andground-basedstudiesofthecoupledmagnetosphereionosphere system. All researchers who are interested in any aspect of MIST
sciencearethereforeinvitedtotakepart.
Organisedby: AdrianGrocott(UniversityofLeicester), EmmaWoodfield(UniversityofLancaster), AndrewFazakerley(UniversityCollege, London, MSSL)
10:45
MarkLester: CoordinatedgroundandspaceobservationsofGeospace:
A viewfromtheground
11:05
JamesHutchinson: ObservationsofGeomagneticStormsoveraSolar
Cycle: SomeInitialFindings
11:20
AlanWood: Comparisonsofplasmatransportinthehigh-latitudeionospheresoftheEarthandVenus.
11:35
CathrynMitchell: GPS Plasmsphericimaging
11:55
Katie Turnbull: Modelling Geomagnetically Induced Currents in the
NationalGridusingSAMNET.
12:10
MartinFullekrug: SpritesandRelativisticElectronBeamsAboveThunderclouds
12:25
Posteradverts
Posters EwanDawson: EstimatingtheExtremesinGeomagneticActivityAcross
Europe
TimothySpain: MagneticfieldparallelcurrentsintheUCL-CTIP model
Jim Wild: Present day challenges in understanding the geomagnetic
hazardtonationalpowergrids
P19
EnergeticParticlesintheSolarSystemandAstrophysical
Plasmas: ObservationsandTheory [2010April14, 10:45,
p68]
Thegenerationofahigh-energynon-thermalparticlepopulationisaprominent
feature of many magnetic activity processes in solar system and astrophysical
plasmas. Examples include auroral particle acceleration in planetary magnetospheres, solar and stellar flares and energetic processes in compact objects
suchaswhitedwarfs, neutronstarsandblackholes. Thissessionaimstofurther our understanding of the physical processes underlying the generation of
high-energy non-thermal particle populations in different physical regimes by
givingresearchersfromdifferentareastheopportunitytopresenttheirworkand
exchangetheirideas. Weencouragethesubmissionofpapersonboththetheoreticalandobservationalaspects, includingtheaccelerationprocess, thepropagationandtransportofenergeticparticlesfromthelocationofacceleration, and
theirdetection.
Organisedby: ThomasNeukirch(UniversityofStAndrews), SilviaDalla(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
10:45
PhilippaBrowning: ParticleaccelerationattheSun
11:05
AndrewWright: AuroralParticleAccelerationattheEarth
11:25
ChristinaBurge: ParticleAccelerationinthePresenceofWeakTurbulenceatanX-TypeNeutralPoint
11:38
MykolaGordovskyy: Particleaccelerationinafragmentingcurrentsheet
11:51
Rim Turkmani: Electrons re-acceleration at the chromospheric footpointsofSolarFlares
12:04
HamishReid: Solar FlareAccelerated ElectronTransport through the
TurbulentDensityoftheSolarWind
12:17
MichelePiana: FromelectronmapstoaccelerationmechanismsofenergeticparticlesintheflaringSun
26
Posters MarinaBattaglia: ImagingobservationsofX-rayalbedoinacompact
diskflare
NicolasBian: ParallelelectricfieldgenerationbyAlfvénwaveturbulence
SilviaDalla: Roleoflatitudeofsourceregioninsolarenergeticparticle
events
EwanDickson: MeasurementofAnisotropyinSolarFlareElectronSpectrausingRHESSI HardX-RaySpectroscopy.
Keith Grady: Particle Motion and Energy Gains in Kinematic MHD
modelsofCollapsingMagneticTraps
JingnanGuo: Temporal, Spectral, andSpatialAnalysesofX-rayEmissionComponentsinImpulsiveSolarFlares
IainHannah: Cantheinfluenceofturbulentdensityperturbationsin
thecoronabedetectedinflareX-rayspectrum?
ChuanLi: Coronalmagnetictopologyandthesolarsourceofmajor
SEP events
Siming Liu: Stochastic Particle Acceleration by Compressive Modes
withIncompressiveModeInducedSpatialDiffusion
HeatherRatcliffe: Electromagneticemissionfrombeam-generatedLangmuirwaves
David Speirs: Numerical simulation of magnetospheric electron cyclotronemission
CraigStark: MagnetosphericParallelElectricFields
P20
ExplosionsintheDistantUniverse-Session1 [2010April
14, 10:45, p70]
Explosiveextragalactictransientsarenowbeingroutinelydiscoveredacrossthe
electromagneticspectrumcomplementedbydatafromincreasinglysensitivegravitational wave and neutrino observatories. The combination of such facilities
opensupnewopportunitiesforthestudyoftransientphenomenaincludingGammaRayBursts, Supernovaeandtidaldisruptionbysuper-massiveblackholes. We
propose a pair of sessions at NAM2010 to discuss current results in this fastmovingareaandtoencouragecoordinatedresearchcombiningphotonicand
non-photonicdata.
Theproposedsessionshavetwomaingoals: (1)todiscussthemostinteresting
recentdiscoveriesintheexplosiveUniversefromworkingfacilities; and(2)to
enhancediscussionandinteractionbetweenthesediversecommunitiesandencouragenewworkingrelationships. Thesessiontopicswouldbeapproximately
dividedinto:
• Supernovae: newdiscoveriesanddiversityofexplosionphysics;
• GRBs: recenthighlightsandpotentialforthefuture;
• The potential of future surveys and facilities for characterising explosive
transients.
We would particularly encourage reports from the current / future use of surveysandfacilitiesinvolvingUK partners(e.g. Swift, Fermi, Pan-STARRS,LOFAR,
LIGO,MAXI,HESS,CTA).
Organisedby: PaulO'Brien(LeicesterUniversity), StephenSmartt(QueensUniversityBelfast), JonathanGranot(UniversityofHertfordshire), NialTanvir (LeicesterUniversity)
10:45
MarkSullivan: LuminoustransientsinthedistantuniversewithPTF and
SNLS
27
11:30
11:45
12:00
12:15
Morgan Fraser: Identifying and chacterising the progenitors of corecollapsesupernovae
JoanneBibby: SurveyoftypeIb/csupernovaprogenitorsinnearbystarforminggalaxies.
ZachCano: TheGRB-SN connection: ExploringGRB progenitorswith
multi-wavelengthobservations
ValeriuPredoi: Searchforgravitational-waveinspiralsignalsassociated
withshortGamma-RayBurstsduringLIGO'sfifthandVirgo'sfirstsciencerun
P21
TheDarkArtofDarkMatter-Session2 [2010April14,
15:45, p71]
Thegoalofthissessionistounderstandthemysteriousdarkmatterthatcomprises95%ofthemattercontentoftheUniverse. TheUK isattheforefrontof
researchinthefieldsofCosmologyandParticlePhysicswithstrengthsinboth
theoryandobservations. Wewelcomeanyresearcherintheoryorobservation,
fromallfields, workingtowardsthegoalofunderstandingdarkmatter. Together
inthissessionwewilldiscusskeyquestionssuchas: “howcanwebetterexploit
synergiesbetweendirectandindirectdetection?”Toaiddiscussion, inaddition
tothetwoscheduledparallelsessionstherewillbea20-30personbreak-out
session, tobeheldonthemorningof14thApril. OuraimistofosteracollaborativeenvironmentatthemeetingthatwillleadtostrongUK-ledresearchinthis
rapidlydevelopingfield.
Organisedby: TomKitching(IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh), RichardMassey(IfA,
UniversityofEdinburgh), CatherineHeymans(IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh)
15:45
Reviewofthismorning'sbreak-outsession
15:55
DavidMiller: UsingtheLHC toprobeDarkMatterinphysicsbeyond
theStandardModel
16:20
MarkusHorn: TheZEPLIN-III DarkMatterSearchExperiment
16:35
FergusSimpson: UnmodifiedGravity
16:50
MatthewWalker: EmpiricalConstraintsontheDarkMatterContentof
DwarfSpheroidalGalaxies
17:05
CarlosFrenk: Cosmologyonsmallscales: thestructureof(mostly)dark
matterhalos
P22
DisksandStarsatExtremelyHighAngularResolution
[2010April14, 15:45, p72]
ThissessionaimstohighlighttotheUK astronomycommunityrecentresultsand
progressinthefieldofopticalandinfraredlong-baselineinterferometry. Opticalinterferometrycanpresentlyachieveangularresolutionsashighasverylong
baselineinterferometry(VLBI) andcancombineuptosixtelescopes. Imaging
ofdisksandstarsatextremelyhighangularresolutioncanbeachievedwiththe
existinginterferometricfacilities. Weinvitecontributionswhichdiscusscurrent
results, encouragecollaborativeresearchandexploitationoftheexistinginstruments.
Organisedby: EttorePedretti(UniversityofStAndrews)
15:45
ReneOudmaijer: Opticalandnear-infraredinterferometryofstarsand
disks
16:10
MyriamBenisty: ThecomplexinnerdisksofHerbigAeBestars
16:23
JennyPatience: Investigatingtheinnerdisksofyoungstars
16:36
FabienBaron: ImagingwithMIRC attheCHARA interferometer
16:49
RachelSmith: Resolvingdebrisdiscsinterrestrialplanetregionswith
MIDI-VLTI
28
17:02
JohnYoung: CharacterisingtheconvectionpatternonBetelgeuse
17:15
Foteini(Claire)Lykou: Dustydiscsaroundevolvedstars
Posters DavidBuscher: ScienceProspectswiththeMagdalenaRidgeObservatoryInterferometer(MROI)
JamesGordon: ImagingshockfrontsinMiravariables
EttorePedretti: Mappingstar-spotsontheRS CVnbinary ζ And
AlexRea: TheMagdalenaRidgeInterferometerFringeTracker
AnitaRichards: Dosingleoldstarsejectclumps?
P23
MagneticReconnection [2010April14, 15:45, p73]
Magneticreconnectionisafundamentalprocessinastrophysical, solarandmagnetosphericplasmas. Previouslymagneticreconnectionwasunderstoodinterms
oftwo-dimensionalMHD modelswhichsometimesleadtooversimplisticanswersregardingthedynamicsandenergeticsoftheprocess. Nowadaysthreedimensionalfluidmodels(MHD,Hallormulti-fluid)orkineticmodelsarethe
stateoftheartandthesemodelsproduceamorecomplexanddiverserangeof
reconnectionphenomena. Whilethisnewgenerationofmodelsprovidesmuch
morerealisticanswers, whichcanbebettercomparedwithobservations, theyare
alsomorechallengingtounderstand. Weinvitecontributionsfromastrophysics,
solarandmagnetosphericphysicsforajointsessionontheoryandobservations
ofmagneticreconnection, aprocesswhichiskeytoourunderstandingofplasma
dynamics.
Organisedby: GunnarHornig(UniversityofDundee)
15:45
Michael Bareford: A Nanoflare Distribution Generated by Repeated
RelaxationsTriggeredbyKinkInstability
16:00
AlisonWallace: Doesmagnetichelicityeffectactiveregionevolution
andenergetics?
16:15
DavidPontin: Regimesofmagneticreconnectionat3D nullpoints
16:30
PeterWyper: 3D MagneticNullpoints: LocalisedFantiltingandTorsionalReconnection
16:45
Robert Fear: Comparison of models of flux transfer event formation
usingpredictedandobservedasymmetry
17:00
AntoniaWilmot-Smith: Relaxationofbraidedcoronalloopsbymultiple
small-scalereconnectionevents
17:15
ClareParnell: 3-D Magneticreconnectionatseparators
Posters GunnarHornig: Turbulentrelaxationofbraidedmagneticfields
EhsanPedram: A surveyofHXR emissionofseismicallyactiveandquiet
X-classwhite-lightflares
FionaWilson: PropertiesoftheDistributionFunctionofaVlasov-Maxwell
EquilibriumfortheForce-FreeHarrisSheet
P24
SolarInfluencesintheHeliosphere [2010April14, 15:45,
p75]
ThissessionwilladdressourcurrentunderstandingoftheinfluenceoftheSun
onthesurroundingheliosphericenvironment, andtheopportunitiesforfuture
researchinthisarea. Conventionally, wehaveconductedremotesensingofthe
near-Sunenvironmentandhaveperformedinsitumeasurementsfurtheroutin
theheliosphere; thishasledtotwodistinctareasoffocus. Howeverinrecent
years, andparticularlywiththeadventoftheSTEREO mission, manynewdata
analysistechniqueshavebeendevelopedthatbridgethisdividebetweenstudies
ofthenear-Sunandinterplanetaryspaceenvironments.
29
ThereisstillmuchtolearnaboutthelinksbetweentheSunandtheheliosphere,
inparticulartheoriginsoftheambientsolarwindandsolarejecta, theirstructure
andevolutionastheypropagateintointerplanetaryspaceandtheirsubsequent
interactionswithplanetsandothersolarsystembodies. Thissessionwilldraw
togetherourcurrentknowledgeofthephysicswithinthesolar-heliosphericenvironment, whilstaddressingthemethodologiesrequiredtofurtherunderstand
andprogressthisareaofscience, withparticularemphasisontheexploitationof
multiplemissions.
AllresearcherswhoareinterestedintheSun-heliosphereconnectionareinvited
toparticipateandtocontributetothissession.
Organisedby: KimberleySteed(UniversityCollege, London, MSSL),JackieDavies
(RutherfordAppletonLaboratory), RichardHarrison(RutherfordAppletonLaboratory), ChrisDavies(RutherfordAppletonLaboratory)
15:45
Introductoryremarks
15:50
Mathew Owens: Probing the evolution of coronal and heliospheric
structureswithsuprathermalelectrons
16:15
AnthonyYeates: Non-potentialenhancementoftheSun'sopenmagneticflux
16:30
PeterGallagher: PropagationofanEarth-DirectedCoronalMassEjectionin3D
16:45
MarekKukula: SolarStormwatch: acrowd-sourcingapproachtounderstandingCoronalMassEjections
17:00
Srividya Subramanian: Small scale transient features at coronal hole
boundaries: apossiblesourcefortheslowsolarwind?
17:15
Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi: Are there imprints of hot plasma outflows
fromactiveregionsinthesolarwind?
Posters RobertBentley: TheHeliophysicsIntegratedObservatory
MarioBisi: A ComprehensiveStudyofthe13-15May2005SolarEvent(s)
ChristopherDavis: AssessingtheaccuracyofCME speedandtrajectory
estimatesfromSTEREO observationsthroughacomparisonofindependentmethods
KimberleySteed: Investigatingtheobservationalsignaturesofmagnetic
cloudsub-structure
AnthonyWilliams: CharacterisingtheSTEREO HeliosphericImagersignaturesofCorotatingInteractionRegions
P25
ExplosionsintheDistantUniverse-Session2 [2010April
14, 15:45, p76]
Explosiveextragalactictransientsarenowbeingroutinelydiscoveredacrossthe
electromagneticspectrumcomplementedbydatafromincreasinglysensitivegravitational wave and neutrino observatories. The combination of such facilities
opensupnewopportunitiesforthestudyoftransientphenomenaincludingGammaRayBursts, Supernovaeandtidaldisruptionbysuper-massiveblackholes. We
propose a pair of sessions at NAM2010 to discuss current results in this fastmovingareaandtoencouragecoordinatedresearchcombiningphotonicand
non-photonicdata.
Theproposedsessionshavetwomaingoals: (1)todiscussthemostinteresting
recentdiscoveriesintheexplosiveUniversefromworkingfacilities; and(2)to
enhancediscussionandinteractionbetweenthesediversecommunitiesandencouragenewworkingrelationships. Thesessiontopicswouldbeapproximately
dividedinto:
• Supernovae: newdiscoveriesanddiversityofexplosionphysics;
30
• GRBs: recenthighlightsandpotentialforthefuture;
• The potential of future surveys and facilities for characterising explosive
transients.
We would particularly encourage reports from the current / future use of surveysandfacilitiesinvolvingUK partners(e.g. Swift, Fermi, Pan-STARRS,LOFAR,
LIGO,MAXI,HESS,CTA).
Organisedby: PaulO'Brien(LeicesterUniversity), StephenSmartt(QueensUniversityBelfast), JonathanGranot(UniversityofHertfordshire), NialTanvir (LeicesterUniversity)
15:45
JonathanGranot: HighlightsfromFermiobservationsofGamma-Ray
Bursts
16:30
MassimilianoDePasquale: GRB090510, thefirstcasestudyofashort
GRB withGeV extendedemissiondetectedbyFermiandSwift.
16:45
AntoniaRowlinson: Discoveryoftheafterglowandhostgalaxyofthe
lowredshiftshortGRB 080905A
17:00
RachelTunnicliffe: Investigationoftheenvironmentofshortgammaray
burstGRB090510withaviewtoconstrainingtheprojenitor.
17:15
TomMuxlow: DiscoveryofanunusualnewradiosourceinthestarforminggalaxyM82: Faintsupernova, supermassiveblackhole, oran
extra-galacticmicroquasar?
Posters LauraWatson: FindingtheSourceofUHECRsusingBayesianAnalysis
ofPierreAugerData
P26
TheSloanDigitalSkySurvey: theLegacyandFuture [2010
April15, 10:45, p76]
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is the most productive survey of the sky
(Madrid & Macchero 2009), with over 65 thousand citations to the SDSS via
ADS.Inthissession, wewillgiveanoverviewoftheoutstandingSDSS discoveriessincefirstlightadecadeago, whilealsolookingforwardtothenewSDSS-III
(www.sdss3.org)projectwhichcontinuesthislegacy. Thesessionwillcovera
diverserangeofscience(planetstodarkenergy)andtopics(dataaccesstopublicationissues).
Organisedby: BobNichol(ICG,Portsmouth)
10:45
IvanBaldry: Globalpopulationstatistics, bimodalityandmultivariate
distributionsofgalaxieswithSDSS.
11:03
NicholasRoss: TheSDSS-III BaryonOscillationSpectroscopicSurvey
(BOSS):FirstResults
11:21
MathewSmith: SDSS-II SNe-AnOverviewandHostGalaxyProperties
11:39
JonLoveday: GalaxyClusteringintheSDSS
11:57
CristianoSabiu: Higher-OrderClusteringOfLuminousRedGalaxiesIn
TheSDSS
12:04
BorisGaensicke: Whitedwarfsastracersofstellar, binary, andplanetaryevolution
12:11
ZengHua Zhang: Discovery of the first wide L dwarf + giant binary
systemandeightotherultra-cooldwarfsinwidebinaries
12:18
AshleyRoss: AnalysingtheClusteringofPhotometricallySelectedGalaxies
12:25
AvonHuxor: EvidenceofTidalStrippingofthreecompactelliptical(cE)
galaxiesdiscoveredinSDSS DR7
Posters DavidMurphy: DVORAC Detector-TheDurhamVOronoiRed-sequence
AutomatedClusterDetectorfornext-generationpanoramicsurveys
31
LiekevanSpaandonk: BinarypopulationsinSDSS:A newdiagnostic
forsystemparametersofevolvedwhitedwarfbinaries
P27
StellarPopulationsinGalaxies [2010April15, 10:45, p78]
Thestudyofstellarpopulationsprovidesvitalcluesontheevolutionofgalaxies
andtheunderlyingphysicalprocesses. Theinterpretationofphotometricand
spectroscopicdatafromresolvedandunresolvedstellarsystemsrestsontheaccuracyofstellarevolutionmodelsandmodelatmospheres, theircombination
intopopulationsynthesismodels, andthetechniquesemployedtofittheoryto
observations.
Thegoalofthissessionistodiscussourcurrentknowledgeofresolvedandunresolvedstellarpopulations, focusingonboththedifferencesamongmodelsand
methods we employ in our analyses, and the developments necessary for the
fullexploitationofdatafromthecurrent-andnext-generationofastronomical
facilities.
Organisedby: MaurizioSalaris(LiverpoolJohnMooresUniversity)
10:45
RussellSmith: Learningaboutstellarpopulationsinunresolvedgalaxies
11:05
SusanPercival: Systematicuncertaintiesinherentinstellarpopulation
synthesismodelsandtheirimpactonintegratedspectraofstellarpopulations: A modeller'sperspective.
11:20
JohnEldridge: BPASS:BinaryPopulationandSpectralSynthesis
11:35
SugataKaviraj: Theroleofminormergersinthestarformationhistory
ofearly-typegalaxies
11:50
IgnacioFerreras: ConstrainingtheInitialMassFunction
12:05
MichaelBarker: TheLastMajorEpochofDiskGrowthinM33
12:20
Posteradverts
Posters RichardHutcheon: Kinematicbiasinexoplanetsurveys
OliviaJones: Crystallinesilicatesaroundoxygen-richAsymptoticGiant
BranchStarsintheLargeMagellanicCloud
Lisette Sibbons: The AGB population and the metallicity gradient in
NGC 6822
BejaminTatton: AGB StarsinWLM
PaulWoods: ThestellarpopulationsintheLargeMagellanicCloud
P28
GeneralMIST ScienceSession2 [2010April15, 10:45, p79]
Magnetospheric-Ionospheric-Solar-Terrestrial(MIST) researchconcernsphysical
processeswithintheSun-Earthsystem, othersolarsystembodiesandexo-planets;
inparticularthesolar/stellarwind, moonsandplanetaryatmospheresandmagnetospheres. TheMIST generalsessionisdesignedtoaddressthoseaspectsof
currentMIST researchnotexplicitlycoveredinothersessions, suchasneutralatmospherescience, ULF wavesandwave-particleinteractions, auroralandionosphericelectrodynamics, andground-basedstudiesofthecoupledmagnetosphereionosphere system. All researchers who are interested in any aspect of MIST
sciencearethereforeinvitedtotakepart.
Organisedby: AdrianGrocott(UniversityofLeicester), EmmaWoodfield(UniversityofLancaster), AndrewFazakerley(UniversityCollege, London, MSSL)
10:45
TimothySpain: SCANDI:All-skyviewofmeso-scalespatialstructurein
thethermosphereandion-neutralcouplingoverSvalbard
11:05
AndrewSenior: ObservationsandmodellingofartificialD-regionheatingseenbyARIES
32
11:20
HannahVickers: Observationsofdouble-peakedHF radarspectradue
tomixedechoesfromnaturalandartificialplasmairregularities
11:35
Sheila Kanani: Overview of low energy electron observations in the
vicinityofSaturn'smoonEnceladus
11:50
GabbyProvan: Evidencefortheoccurrenceof 10.6hmagneticfield
oscillationsinSaturn’sequatorialmagnetosphere
12:05
DavidAndrews: Magnetospheric-periodoscillationsinSaturn'sequatorialmagnetosphereandopentaillobesthroughouttheCassinimission
12:20
Posteradverts
Posters Ciaran Beggan: Interpolation of external magnetic fields over large
sparsearraysusingSphericalElementaryCurrentSystems
EllenClarke: AnestimationoftheCarringtonflaremagnitudefromsolar
flareeffects(sfe)inthegeomagneticrecords
AdrianGrocott: SuperDARN observationsofthesub-auroralconvectionresponsetoenhancedgeomagneticactivity
JohnHargreaves: Thedriftofauroralradioabsorptionpatchesobserved
byimagingriometer
StephanieKellett: NatureoftheringcurrentinSaturn’sdaysidemagnetosphere
GemmaKelly: Towardsmodellingofhighlatitudemagneticfieldsfrom
satellitedata
AnthonyWilliams: TrackingsolarwindstructuresfromtheSunthrough
totheorbitofMars
EmmaWoodfield: CombiningincoherentscatterradardataandIRI2007
tomonitortheopen-closedfieldlineboundaryduringsubstorms.
P29
ModellingofDynamicSolarPlasmas [2010April15, 10:45,
p79]
Newspacemissionswiththeirhigherspatial, spectral, andinparticulartemporal
resolutionareprovidingapictureofamoredynamicsolaratmosphere. Such
observationsrequireatime-dependentmodellingapproach. Whatisthestatusof
currentmodellingasregardstransientionization? Wheredowestandregarding
hydrodynamicandmagneto-hydrodynamicmodellingoftheconstantlychanging
solaratmosphereonsmallscales? Thissessionwillbelargelydirectedtowards
themodelling of various dynamic features whether observed from the ground
orspacebasedinstruments. ItwillbringtogethernotonlyMHD andHD experts
butitwillalsodiscussvariousaspectsofthepresentmodellingrelatingtoatomic
physics.
Organisedby: GerryDoyle(ArmaghObservatory), MariaMadjarska(Armagh
Observatory)
10:45
MariaMadjarska: PlasmapropertiesofanX-rayjetfrommulti-instrument
co-observations: SUMER/SoHO,EIS/XRT/HinodeandEUVI/SECCHI/STEREO
A andB
11:00
PeterCargill: A newenthalpy-basedapproachtothetransitionregion
inanimpulsively-heatedcorona
11:15
Jiaoyang Ding: Chromospheric magnetic reconnection: implications
forjet-likeeventsandcoronalheating
11:30
DavidTsiklauri: TheHydrodynamicEvolutionofImpulsivelyHeated
CoronalLoops: ExplicitAnalyticalApproximations
11:45
KarenMeyer: Non-LinearForce-FreeModeloftheSolarMagneticCarpet
12:00
Urmila MitraKraev: Detailedobservations andmodellingofasmall
flare
33
12:15
HughPotts: Theopticaldepthofwhite-lightflarecontinuum
Posters ZhenghuaHuang: Observationand3D modellingofacoronalbright
point
GuiyunLiang: CalculationandapplicationofR-matrixelectron-impact
excitationdataforionsofinteresttoastrophysicaldiagnosticmodelling
ProchetaMallik: AlfvénIonisationintheSolarPhotosphere
SrividyaSubramanian: Whatblinkersactuallyare?
KamalamVanninathan: SpiculesandCoronalHeating
LidiavanDriel-Gesztelyi: MagneticreconnectionalongQSLs-amajor
driverofactiveregionoutflows
P30
PulsarAstrophysics [2010April15, 10:45, p81]
More than 40 years after their discovery, pulsars (and latterly, magnetars) still
presentextraordinarychallengestoastrophysicalmodellinganddataanalysis.
Progressisbeingmadeinunderstandingtheunderlyingphysicsthatgovernsthe
emission characteristics of these extraordinary objects, but much remains unclearorunknown. Thephysicsoftheinterior, thecrustandtheatmosphereof
neutronstarsrequireustoconfrontourunderstandingofthebehaviourofmatterandradiationinextremeconditions. Thereisawealthofobservationaldata,
andadiversityofapplicationforthisdata, thatmakesaclearercomprehension
ofemissionprocessesandimplicationsallthemoreurgent. Weinvitesubmissionsfromallthoseinterestedpartieswhoareaddressingthefollowingtopics
intheirresearch: neutronstarinteriors; neutronstarcrusts; neutronstaratmospheres; pulsarplasmasandradiationmechanisms; behaviourofmatterunder
extrememagneticandgravitationalfields; ultra-energeticprocessesinthepulsar
environment; physicalinterpretationofradiationcharacteristicsofpulsarsand
magnetars.
Organisedby: NilsAndersson(UniversityofSouthampton), DeclanDiver(UniversityofGlasgow), AntoniodaCosta(InstitutoSuperiorTecnico-UTL,Lisbon)
10:45
IntroductoryoverviewbyDonMelrose
11:05
AntonioArmandodaCosta: PulsarElectrodynamics: TheRelativistic
KineticTheoryofRadiativePlasmas—TheGamma-raycut-off
11:15
CristobalEspinoza: GlitchesintherotationofPulsars
11:25
RobertFerdman: Testsofgeneralrelativityandbinaryevolutionstudies
usingpulsarobservations
11:35
IkSiongHeng: A BayesianSearchForGravitationalWaveRing-downs
AssociatedWithPulsarGlitches
11:45
WynnHo: CarbonatmosphereneutronstarinCassiopeiaA:Youngest
neutronstarintheGalaxy
11:55
DominicKeogh: LatestHESS observationsofPulsarWindNebulae
12:05
AndrewLevan: TheopticalandinfraredcounterpartofSGR 0501+4516
12:15
DeclanDiver: Surfaceextractionofelectronsinapulsar
Posters EwanBarr: TheEffelsbergNorthernSkyPulsarSurvey
MatthewPitkin: Knownpulsarsascontinuousgravitationalwavesources
Satoru Sakai: The effect of Gravitational Distortion of Spacetime on
PulsarTiming
NeilYoung: IntermittentRadioEmissionfromPSR B0823+26
P31
TheRoleofFeedbackinGalaxyEvolution [2010April16,
10:45, p82]
Feedbackprocesses, bothfromsupernovaeandAGN,arebelievedtobeanimportantprocessinshapingthegalaxyluminosityfunction, withdifferentmecha34
nismsbeingimportantatdifferentmassscales. Thissessionwilladdressfeedback
frombothobservationalandtheoreticalperspectivesandinvestigatetheenergeticsoftheprocessesatwork. Mechanismsforthetriggeringandterminationof
starformationandAGN activitywillbeexplored.
Organisedby: ChrisSimpson(LiverpoolJohnMooresUniversity)
10:45
Sarah Bryan: The impact of feedback on the orbital content of dark
matterhaloes.
11:00
ElisaHouse: DiskHeating: ComparingtheMilkyWaywithCosmologicalSimulations
11:15
SamGeen: TheroleoffeedbackinMilkyWaysatellitegalaxyformation
usinghighresolutionsimulations
11:30
GregStinson: StellarFeedbackinSPH GalaxyFormationSimulations
11:45
MarkWestmoquette: Superstarclusterfeedbackfromlocaltogalaxy
scales
12:00
JamesFalder: TheEnviromentsofAGN atz 1
12:15
AsaBluck: TheCo-EvolutionofMassiveGalaxiesandtheirSupermassiveBlackHolesoverthelast11.5Gyrs
Posters EmilyDown: Theorientationofaccretiondisksandjetsinquasars
KathrynHarris: ClusterandGalaxyEnvironmentsofQuasars
ElizabethMannering: TheMulti-facetedX-rayactivityofthecomplete
3CRR AGN sampleatz<0.1
RachaelMcQuillin: Momentumdrivenfeedbackfromstellarnuclei
KatePilkington: TheColdGasContentofBulgelessDiskGalaxies
CyprianRangel: SearchingforComptonThickAGN atz 2indeepX-ray
fields
XufenWu: StabilityandevolutionofclustergalaxiesinMOND
P32
StellarandExoplanetaryMagnetism [2010April16, 10:45,
p84]
Thepastfewyearshaveseenthedetectionofmagneticstar-planetinteraction
(SPI),anewlydiscoveredphenomenonthatmayyieldamethodofcharacterisingexoplanetarymagneticfieldsandconsequentlytheirinternalstructure. The
existenceofmagneticSPI remainscontroversial, however, ifconfirmed, itwould
allow our Solar System to be placed in context with other planetary systems
withintheGalaxy. Asforstellarmagnetism, recentdiscoveriesincludethepossibledetectionofaremnantfossilfieldonahotmassivestar; thefirsteversurface
mapsofpre-mainsequencestarsintheclassicalT Tauriphaseoftheirevolution;
thediscoveryofamagneticcycleonastarpossiblyinducedbyaknownorbitingclose-ingiantplanet; therapidincreaseinfieldcomplexityatthetransition
fromcompletelyconvectivelow-massstarstothosewithradiativecores; andthe
discoveryofgloballystructuredmagneticfieldsontheintermediatemassHerbig
Ae-Bestars. Thissessionwillhighlightthelatestresultsinthestudyofstellar
magnetismacrosstheHR diagram, andexoplanetarysystems.
Organisedby: ScottGregory(UniversityofExeter)
10:45
GaiteeHussain: Stellarmagnetisminsolar-typestars
11:15
RobJeffries: MagneticactivityinfastrotatingM-dwarfsaboveandbelowthefullyconvectiveboundary
11:30
StefanoBagnulo: StellarmagnetismthroughtheeyesoftheFORS1instrumentoftheESO VLT
12:00
AlineVidotto: Theinfluenceofthestellarwindonclose-ingiantplanets
12:15
GrantMiller: TheDopplerShadowofWASP-3b
Posters RobertDeRosa: InvestigatingtheX-rayEmissionofA-typeStarsThrough
theMagneticActivityofUnresolvedLowerMassCompanions
35
ScottGregory: TestingtheabilityoffieldextrapolationmodelstopredicttheX-raypropertiesofpre-mainsequencestars
P33
PublicEngagementinAstronomy, SolarandSolarSystem
Physics [2010April16, 10:45, p85]
Overthepasttwoyears, publicengagementandoutreachinAstronomy, Solar
andSolarTerrestrialPhysicsintheUK hasgainedmomentumduetotheInternationalHeliophysicalYear(IHY) andtheInternationalYearofAstronomy(IYA).
Inthissession, wewanttoexplorethenewopportunitiesthathavebeenopened
upbythesetwoprogrammes, hearingfromthepeoplewholedtheseinitiatives
andotherswhoransuccessfulevents. SinceboththeIHY andIYA havenow
finished, it is timely to discuss what has been successful about both outreach
programmes, enablethoseinterestedinoutreachtodiscussbestpractice–and
also how to retain the momentum and take outreach in the UK further. The
sessionwillcontainthefollowing:
• ReviewtalksfromanIHY andanIYA organisertosummarisethesuccesses
oftheinternationalyears(20minseach);
• ContributedtalksfromthosewhoactivelyparticipatedinoutreachactivitiesduringIHY andIYA.Sharingofexperiencesandinsights;
• 'Speednetworking'–likespeeddating, butwiththeemphasisonnetworkingwithotherpeopleinterestedinoutreach;
• Discussion–generaldiscussion, howcanwesharebestpracticeacross
Astronomy, Solar&STP?Howdomaintainthemomentumforoutreach
fromtheIHY andIYA?Howimportantinoutreachinthegrantsthatwe
applyfor? Whatcountsasoutreachandwhatdoesn't?
Organisedby: DanHillier(ROE VisitorCentre), HelenMason(DAMTP,Cambridge), DanielleBewsher(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
10:45
Introductoryremarks
10:50
SteveOwens: BeyondIYA2009: SustainableScienceEngagement
11:00
LucieGreen: OutreachduringInternationalHeliophysicalYear
11:10
AlecMacKinnon: SchoolsoutreachfortheGlasgowNAM
11:15
IngeHeyer: IYA 2009ontheBigIslandofHawaii
11:20
OliviaJohnson: Beyondconstellationstories: communicatingcuttingedgescienceandengagingnewaudiencesthroughnovelplanetarium
programmingfortheInternationalYearofAstronomy
11:25
HelenWalker: TheSocietyforPopularAstronomy'sTelescopesforSchools
Project
11:30
DanHillier: UK DarkSkyDiscovery
11:35
CharlesBarclay: Astronomyinthecurriculum. DevelopmentsatKS4
andKS5
11:40
Alison Wallace: Challenges of Public Engagement with Children in
Care
11:45
HelenMason: Sun|trek-thefinalfrontier
11:50
JimWild: DidtheSunEarthPlanworkout?
11:55
DanielleBewsher: TheBigBang!
12:00
Discussion/soapbox
Posters MartinHendry: TheScottishSolarSystem
MartinHendry: DevelopmentofanAll-SkyCameraforOutreachActivities
36
DonaldKurtz: SongsoftheStars: theRealMusicoftheSpheres
StuartLowe: 4YearsofPodcasting
RichardMorton: TheMusicoftheSunasaStar
P34
UKSP GeneralSession [2010April16, 10:45, p87]
Thissessionisdesignedtoaddressthecurrentsolarresearchnotcoveredinother
sessions. Allresearcherswhoareinterestedinsolarphysicsareinvitedtotake
part.
Organisedby: Duncan Mackay (University of StAndrews), BarbaraBromage
(UniversityofCentralLancashire), RekhaJain(UniversityofSheffield), Eduard
Kontar(UniversityofGlasgow)
10:45
PaulHiggins: TheMagneticPropertiesofFlaringActiveRegions
11:00
NicolasLabrosse: NewsolarprominencediagnosticswithEIS/Hinode
11:15
JenniferHarris: Largeamplitudetransverseoscillationsinamulti-stranded
EUV prominence, triggeredbytransientdisturbances
11:30
JamesMcLaughlin: Phasemixingofnon-linearAlfvénwaves
11:45
JamesThrelfall: Alfvénwavephase-mixinganddampingintheioncyclotronrangeoffrequencies
12:00
Fraser Watson: Automated detection and tracking of magnetic fragmentsindecayingsolaractiveregions
12:15
David MacTaggart: Simulations of magnetic flux emergence with an
overlyingfield
Posters VasilisArchontis: Magneticfluxemergenceandcoronaleruptionsin
theSun
MarioBisi: Medium-andsmall-scaletransientsinthesolarwind
BarbaraBromage: AnomalousSolarCyclesandtheEvolutionofCoronalHoles
KenDere: ChiantiPy-A PythonInterfacetoCHIANTI
GarethDorrian: RapidOscillationsintheSolarAtmosphere
EduardKontar: HardX-RayStructureofLoopFootpointsinaSolarLimb
Flare
XingLi: KineticAlfvénwavesandprotonvelocitydistributioninthe
solarwind
BrendanO'Dwyer: SDO/AIA responsetocoronalhole, quietsun, activeregionandflareplasma
P35
NewTechnologiesforFutureInstruments, Telescopesand
Missions [2010April16, 10:45, p89]
TheUK hasalongstandingheritageindevelopingthekeytechnologiesforsome
ofthemostsuccessfulandstate-of-the-artinstruments, telescopesandmissions
forastronomy. Thenextgenerationofrequirementsposessomenewchallenges,
and in the current and near-term economic climate the community will most
likelyhavetobemoreselectiveinidentifyingtheareaswhereourskillsarebest
suited. WhatarethenewtechnologiestheUK shouldbefocussinguponover
thenext10+years? Thesemayinclude, butarenotlimitedto, advanceddetectorsandreadouts, novelnewlightweightsupportstructuresforspacetelescopes,
portable high-cooling power systems, highly reflective or transmissive optical
components, low-lossmaterialsforroomtemperatureandcryogenicoperation,
newideasforactiveandadpativecontrolsystems, etc. Whilstmuchoftheneartomid-termislikelytoconcentrateonE-ELT,SKA and2ndgenerationgravitationalwavetelescopeswemustalsonotlosetrackofmissionsthatarepotentially
37
furtherdownstream(e.g. spaceinterferometrysuchasFIRI andtheEinsteintelescope). Thissessioninvitestalksandpostersfromastronomers, physicistsand
engineers, withinbothacademiaandindustry, onanytechnologydevelopment
areasthatmightbenefitthemissionsofthefuture.
Organisedby: WayneHolland(UK ATC,Edinburgh), GilesHammond(UniversityofGlasgow), DaveMelotte(UK ATC,Edinburgh)
10:45
Fraser Clarke: HARMONI - A UK led first light spectrograph for the
E-ELT
11:00
SimonDoyle: LumpedElementKineticInductanceDetectorssuitable
forlargearraysofastronomicaldetectors.
11:15
MelStrachan: Noveldeformablemirrordevelopmentsforastronomy
applications
11:30
StefanHild: High-PrecisionInterferometryandLow-Lossmaterialsfor
futureGravitationalWaveObservatories
11:45
IanHepburn: Milli-kelvincoolerfortheXMS instrumentontheInternationalX-rayObservatory
12:00
NicolaBeveridge: Hydroxidecatalysisbondingresearchforastronomicalapplications
12:15
JanBergman: FIRST Explorer-spacebornelow-frequencyradioastronomyusingpassiveformationflying
Posters JuliaKennedy: Reducingriskincryogenicinstrumentdesign: thermal
conductivitymeasurementsattheCryogenicInstrumentationResearch
Lab
GiovannaTinetti: Probingtheatmospheresofextrasolarworldswitha
dedicatedmissionfromspace
RichardWhite: Astronomyatthehighestenergies: theCherenkovTelescopeArray
38
39
RAS Afternoon
Session1: 14:00–15:20
WelcomefromRAS President, ProfessorAndyFabian.
Thefollowingmedalsandprizeswillbepresented. Thecitationsofmedalsand
prizeswillbereadbyDrFionaSpeiritsandFraserWatson.
TheGoldMedalforGeophysics
ProfessorJohnWoodhouseFRS
UniversityofOxford
TheHerschelMedal
ProfessorJamesHough
UniversityofHertfordshire
TheChapmanMedal
ProfessorBernardRoberts
UniversityofSt.Andrews
TheJackson-GwiltMedal
DrCraigD Mackay
UniversityofCambridge
AwardForServiceToAstronomy
ProfessorFranciscoSanchez
InstituteofAstrophysicsoftheCanaryIslands
AwardForServiceToGeophysics
DrFrankLowes
UniversityofNewcastleuponTyne
GroupAchievementAwardForAstronomy
SuperWASP team
representedbyProfessorDonPollacco, Queen'sUniversity, Belfast
GroupAchievementAwardForGeophysics
CHIANTI consortium
representedbyProfessorKenDere, GeorgeMasonUniversity, Virginia
HonoraryFellowship
ProfessorConnyAerts
UniversityofLeuvenandRadboudUniversity, Nijmegen
HonoraryFellowship
DrWlodekKofman
TheLaboratoryforPlanetology, Grenoble
TheFowlerAwardForAstronomy
DrBarbaraErcolano
UniversityofCambridge
WintonCapitalAwardForAstronomy
DrElizabethStanway
UniversityofBristol
WintonCapitalAwardForGeophysics
DrDavidRobinson
UniversityofOxford
Thefollowingprizewinnerswereunabletoattend.
TheGoldMedalforAstronomy
ProfessorDouglasGough
UniversityofCambridge
TheFowlerPrizeforGeophysics
DrInekedeMoortel
UniversityofStAndrews
ProfessorCarlosFrenk willgivetheDarwin2010Lectureon‘Thestandardmodel
ofcosmogony: whatnext?’
Session2: 15:45–17:30
The future of UK astronomy – a discussion chaired by ProfessorAndy Fabian
(PresidentoftheAstronomyForum), includingpresentationsanddiscussionon
theUK SpaceAgency, STFC andthe2011ComprehensiveSpendingReview. The
participantswillincluderepresentativesofSTFC andotheragencies.
41
Abstracts
LifeonTitan
WilliamBains (RufusScientific/MIT)
Livingthingshavedistinctcharacteristicsthat
constraintheirpossiblechemistry, andhence
whereandhowwemightlookforthem. I will
discusstheexampleofTitan: couldtherebelife
onthesurface? Majorlimitationsarethestability,
solubilityandreactivityofthechemicalsthatmake
uplife, andenergysourcestodrivemetabolism. I
willreviewhowtheseconstraintscanbeusedto
putlimitsonwherelifemightoccur, andthe
biochemistrythatwemightlookforeither
remotelyorwhenwegetthere. Thesurfaceof
Titandoesnotlookpromising, butifthereislife
thereitwillbesimple, explosivelyunstableunder
Earthconditions, and(tous)extremelysmelly.
TheSuperWASP Project
AndrewCameron (UniversityofStAndrews)with
D. Pollacco, C. Hellier, R. West, and WASP
Consortium
TheWASP consortiumiscurrentlytheworld's
leadingproducerofextra-solarplanetstransiting
brightstars. Itstwoautomatedwide-fieldcamera
arrays, SuperWASP onLaPalmaandWASP-South
atSutherland, eachimagesome15percentofthe
skywithacadenceof7to8minutesforbetween
4and8hourseachnight. Automatedsoftware
identifiesstarsexhibitingtheone-percentdipsin
light, recurringeveryfewdays, thatbetraythe
presenceofacompactsub- stellarcompanion.
Efficientwinnowingoflikelycandidatesforradialvelocityfollowup, incollaborationwiththe
GenevaandIAP/Haute-Provenceplanetsearch
teams, hasledtothediscoveryofsome30
transitingplanetstodate. InthispresentationI will
announceanumberofnewlyconfirmedWASP
planets. WASP'spublishedplanetdiscoveriesare
enrichingourunderstandingoftheclosest-orbiting
gasgiantplanetsaroundotherstars. Theyinclude
thehottest, mostinflatedandshortestperiod
planetsyetidentified. Manyhaverelatively
mundanecircularorbitsinthestellarequatorial
plane. Othershavehighlydisturbedeccentric,
inclinedandevenretrogradeorbits. Theyreveala
richsetofplanetaryformationandmigration
histories. Somearegrosslyinflatedbya
combinationofextremeirradiationandtidal
energydissipation. A smallnumberorbitsoclose
totheirstarsthattidalorbitdecaywillleadtotheir
destructionwithinthemain-sequencelifetimesof
theirhoststars. Aboveall, theWASP systemsare
bright. Theirdaysidethermalradiationis
accessibletoSPITZER andhasevenbeendetected
fromtheground, revealingawealthofinformation
abouttheiratmosphericthermalstructureand
chemistry. I willpreviewthefirstpublicreleaseof
processedlightcurvedatafromtheinitialyearof
theWASP project, whichwilltakeplacethisyear.
DesignchallengesintheconstructionofELTs
ColinCunningham (UK AstronomyTechnology
Centre)
TheEuropeanExtremelyLargeTelescopeis
reachingcompletionofitsdesignphase. Likeany
majorproject, ithastobalancecost, riskand
performanceinordertobeaffordableona
competitivetime-scaleandbeabletosatisfy
ambitioussciencegoals. I willdescribehowthis
balancehasbeenachievedwhilstmaintainingthe
aspirationtobuildtheworld'slargestoptical/IR
telescopewithbuiltinadaptiveoptics. I will
emphasizeUK rolesinaddressingtheconsiderable
challengesofdevelopingtheprimarymirror
consistingof984segments, theadaptiveoptics
42
Plenary
systems, andtheinstrumentsuite. Finally, I will
showsomeoftheexcitingprospectsforscientific,
technologicalandindustrialbenefitstotheUK.
ProbingCosmologywiththeCMBR
GeorgeEfstathiou (KavliInstituteforCosmology)
ThePlanckMissionwaslaunchedsuccessfullyin
Maylastyear. I willgiveasummaryofthe
scientificaimsofthePlanckMissionandabrief
overviewofitscurrentstatus. I willalsoplacethe
Planckmissionincontextwithgroundand
suborbitalCMB experimentsandotherprobesof
earlyuniversecosmology.
TheEarlyStagesofStarFormation
JenniferHatchell (UniversityofExeter)
Wheredostarsform? Howlongdoesittake?
Whatcontrolstheirmasses? Thesequestionsand
morearebeingaddressedbymappingsurveysof
molecularcloudsatlongwavelengths(infrared
andsubmillimetre), whichprovideacensusof
densecoresandthestarsformingwithinthem. I
willshowhowtheadvancesintechnologywhich
allowustomaplargeareasaremirroredinour
increasedunderstandingoftheearly, embedded
stagesofstarformation, andlooktowardsthe
futurewithHerschelandSCUBA2.
TheHighEnergySun
BobLin (Univ. ofCalifornia, Berkeley)
TheSunisthemostprolificandenergeticnatural
particleacceleratorinthesolarsystem. Largesolar
flaresarethemostpowerfulexplosionsinthesolar
system, releasingupto ∼ 1032 -33ergsin1001000s, with &10-50%ofthisenergygoingto
acceleratingelectronsto ∼ 20 keV to ∼ 100sof
MeV,andacomparableamounttoaccelerating
ionsto ∼ MeV to GeV energies. Imagingbythe
RHESSI (RamatyHighResolutionSolar
SpectroscopicImager)spacecraftofthehardX-ray
(HXR)/γ−raycontinuumand γ−raylineemission
producedbytheacceleratedelectronsandions,
respectively, showthattheprocessofmagnetic
reconnectionunderliesboththeflareenergy
releaseandtheaccelerationofelectronsandions.
InlargeSolarEnergeticParticles(SEP) events, ions
upto ∼ 100 GeV andelectronsupto ∼ 10sof
MeV,wellintothegalacticcosmicrayenergy
range, aredetectedinsitunear1AU.These
appeartobeacceleratedbycollisionlessshock
wavesdrivenbyfast(&1000km/s)coronalmass
ejections(CMEs)withoforder ∼ 10 %ofthetotal
CME energygoingintotheSEPs, thesame
efficiencyasrequiredforsupernovashocksto
accelerategalacticcosmicrays. Themost
common(&100s/monthnearsolarmaximum)
solaraccelerationoccurshighinthecoronaand
producestheimpulsiveSEP eventsobservedinthe
interplanetarymedium, thataredominatedby
∼ 0.1 − 100 keV electronsandby ∼ 10 keV to
MeV pernucleonionswithenormous(upto
&10,000)enrichmentsintheisotope3Heandin
ultraheavyelements. Theacceleration
mechanismsare, atbest, poorlyunderstood;
upcomingmissionsgoingclosetotheSun, suchas
ESA’sSolarOrbiter(∼ 0.28 AU) andNASA’sSolar
ProbePlus(∼ 9.5 solarradii), promisetoprovide
keyrelevantmeasurements.
TheESA CosmicVisionProgramme
MarkMcCaughrean (ESA)
I willpresentabriefoverviewoftheESA space
scienceandroboticexplorationprogramme,
coveringmissionscurrentlyinoperation
(includingHerschel, Planck, andRosetta)and
thoseinpreparation(LISA Pathfinder, Gaia, JWST,
BepiColombo, andtheExoMarsmissions). The
majorityofmytalkwillconcentrateonthestatus
andpromiseofthemissionscurrentlyunderstudy
aspartoftheCosmicVisionprogramme, andthe
roadmapfornewopportunitiesoverthecoming
decade.
Plasmaphenomenaonallcosmicscales
DonMelrose (UniversityofSydney)
I willgiveabriefhistoricalreviewofthe
developmentofthefieldofplasmaastrophysics,
emphasizingtheproblemsthatmotivatedthefield,
andthenewplasma-physicsideasthatwere
introducedtoaddresstheseproblems. I willthen
discussthepresent-daystatusofthreegeneric
problemsinplasmaastrophysics: 1. resonant
scatteringandparticleacceleration; 2. coherent
radioemissionmechanisms; and3. dissipationin
collisionlessastrophysicalplasmas.
Proto-planetarydisksandplanetarymigration
RichardNelson (QueenMary, Universityof
London)
Thediscoveryofextrasolarplanetswithawide
rangeoforbitalconfigurationssuggeststhatorbital
migrationplaysafundamentalroleduringthe
formationofplanetarysystems. DuringthetalkI
willreviewourcurrentunderstandingofplanetary
migration, anditsdependenceonthephysical
propertiesofprotoplanetarydiscs, withtheroleof
discthermodynamicsandturbulencebeing
highlighted. Modelsofplanetarysystemformation
includingmigrationwillbepresented.
GravitationalAstronomy
BangaloreSathyaprakash (CardiffUniversity)
Thefirstdirectdetectionofgravitationalwavesare
expectedwithinthenextfivetosixyearswhen
advancedLIGO andVirgodetectorsbeginto
operate. Thefirstdetection, whilealandmark, is
onlythebeginningofwhatpromisestobeanew
toolforobservationalastronomy, cosmologyand
fundamentalphysics. InmytalkI willdiscussthe
currentstatusofgravitational-waveobservations
andcapabilitiesoffuturedetectors. I willshow
howfutureobservationsmightimpactour
understandingofastrophysicalphenomena(e.g.,
neutronstars, blackholes, supernovae, GRGs),
fundamentalphysics(e.g., matterunderextreme
conditions, strong-fieldtestsofGR,darkenergy)
andcosmology(e.g., cosmologicalparameters,
blackholeseeds, stochasticbackgroundsfromthe
earlyUniverse).
ExploringtheUniversewithGamma-Raybursts
NialTanvir (UniversityofLeicester)
Thankstotheirextraordinaryluminosities, γ−ray
burstscanbeseenatveryhighredshifts, andas
suchprovidepowerfultoolsforexploringearly
structureformationandreionization.
Spectroscopyoftheirafterglowsgivesredshifts,
andpotentiallyalsoinformationaboutchemical
enrichmentoftheirhostsandthestateofthe
intergalactic-mediumclosetotheburst.
Identificationandcharacterisationoftheirfaint
hostsandneighbouringgalaxiesopensanew
windowongalaxyevolution. RecentlyGRB
090423wasdetectedatredshiftz=8.2,
highlightingthepromiseofGRBsforprobingthe
veryhighredshiftuniverse. I willreviewthiswork
andotherrecentdevelopmentsinthefield,
includingthestatusofhostgalaxysearches.
TheSWARM Mission
KathyWhaler (UniversityofEdinburgh)
In1999, theInternationalUnionofGeodesyand
Geophysicsadoptedaresolutiontoestablishan
InternationalDecadeofGeopotentialField
Research, heraldingthestartofadecadeof
continuousmonitoringofthemagneticfieldby
near-Earthorbitingsatellites, andimportant
advancesinspace-basedgravityfieldobservation.
FormuchoftheInternationalDecade, multisatellitevectormagneticobservationshavebeen
available, leadingtomuchbettermodelsofthe
mainfieldanditsrateofchange, andimproved
understandingoftheinfluenceofmagnetospheric
andionosphericfieldsonattemptstoisolatethe
internalfieldsignal. However, muchremainsto
bedone. Forinstance, evenduringtheparticularly
quietsolaractivityconditionsthathave
characterisedmuchofthelastfewyears, andafter
enormouseffortondataprocessingandselection
algorithms, magnetosphericandionosphericfield
effectsremainindatausedtoproduceinternal
fieldmodels, sooursignalidentificationand
separationisfarfromperfect; 'comprehensive
models'thatareintendedtoparameteriseand
modelknowninternalfieldsourcesand
magnetospheric/ionosphericcurrentsystemsare
stillonlyappropriateformagneticallyquiettimes.
However, thedemonstratedpowerfromhaving
availablesimultaneousmulti-satelliteinformation
hasledtoESA approvalforasatelliteconstellation
SWARM withintheEarthExplorerprogramme,
scheduledforlaunchin2011. Inthistalk, I will
describetheSWARM missiondevelopmentand
anticipatedapplicationsofthedata, including
howtheend-to-endsimulatorstudywasusedto
improvetheconstellationdesignoverthatinthe
originalproposal, andthepotentialofSWARM for
investigatingatmosphericprocessesrelatedto
climateandweather, suchasspaceweatherand
radiationhazards, aswellasthebetterdefinition
ofthe'geological'magneticfieldsignalandnearEarthexternalmagneticfields.
TheJamesWebbSpaceTelescope
GillianWright (UniversityofEdinburgh)
TheJamesWebbSpaceTelescope(JWST),the
successortoHubble, isalarge, 6.5mdiameter,
infrared-optimizedspacetelescope, scheduledfor
launchin2014. Itwillhaveasuiteoffour
instrumentsdesignedtoenablewideranging
sciencefromthefirstluminousgalaxiesand
galaxyevolutiontotheformationofplanetsand
theevolutionofourownSolarSystem. Inthistalk
I describethesciencethemesthathavedriventhe
observatorydesign, theenablingtechnologiesand
technicalstatusofthemissionandtheinstrument
capabilities, inparticularforthemid-infrared
instrumentMIRI.I willalsosummarisetheplans
foroperations.
GalaxiesandStellarPopulations
RosieWyse (JohnsHopkinsUniversity)
I willdiscusshowstudyingresolvedstarsinthe
nearbyUniversecanbeusedtoinferconditionsat
highredshift, tracehowgalaxiesevolveand
constrainthenatureofdarkmatter. Thisapproach
iscomplementarytodirectstudyofsystemsat
highredshift, butI willshowthatanalysisof
individualstarsallowsonetobreakdegeneracies,
suchasbetweenstarformationrateandstellar
InitialMassFunction, thatcomplicatetheanalysis
ofunresolved, distantgalaxies.
P01
ScaleSizeEvolutionofBrightestGalaxies
ClaireBurke (AstrophysicsResearchInstitute
LJMU) with C. Collins, and J. Stott
Scalesizesofellipticalgalaxieshavebeenatopic
ofdiscussionrecentlyduetotheunexpectedresult
thattheseobjectsevolvefromacompactstate.
Wepresentourpreliminaryresultsofscalesize
measurementsofbrightestclustergalaxies(BCGs)
atz∼ 1, usingdeepimagingfromHST andSubaru
MOIRCS of ∼ 10 BCGsinboththeopticaland
nearinfra-red. WefindrobustBCG scalesizesof
∼ 10kpc, andinferthatthisisevidenceformild
sizeevolutionofthishomogeneouspopulation
sincez∼ 1. Wediscussimplicationsofthisresult,
inconcertwiththerecentresultofnomass
evolutionofthesegalaxiesoverthesameperiod,
forcosmologicalmodelsofthelatetimeevolution
ofmassiveearlytypegalaxies.
Thecolours, AGN properties, environmentsand
starformationhistoriesofbulgedominatedpostmergersinthelocaluniverse
AlfredoCarpineti (ImperialCollege)with
S. Kaviraj, and GalaxyZooteam
Galaxymergingisafundamentalaspectofthe
standardhierarchicalgalaxyformationparadigm.
InDargetal.(2010MNRAS.401.1043)wehave
createdalarge, homogeneoussetofmergers
throughdirectvisualinspectionoftheentireSDSS
usingtheGalaxyZooproject, apublicuser
interfaceontheworldwidewebforthe
morphologicalclassificationofgalaxies. Atthe
timeofwriting, over200,000volunteershave
submittedover80millionclassificationsyieldinga
robustcatalogueofaround3000mergerswhich
hasbeenpresentedinDargetal. Weexplorea
subsetofgalaxiesfromthiscataloguethatare
'post-mergers', wheretheremnantappearstobe
inthefinalstagesofrelaxation. Wefocusonpostmergersthatshowevidenceforadominantbulge,
makingthemplausibleprogenitorsofearly-type
galaxies. Forthissetofgalaxiesweexploretheir
GALEX-SDSS UV/opticalcolours, AGN activity,
localenvironmentsandstarformationhistories.
64%ofourgalaxiesareeitherquiescentorshow
LINER-likeemission, whiletherestareeitherstar
forming(9%)orhaveSeyfertAGNs(25%). We
findthattheplausiblemassratiosforthemergers
thatcreatedthesesystemsarebetween1:1and
1:10, withamedianvalueofaround1:3. The
spheroidalpostmergershavebluercoloursthan
thegeneralellipticalgalaxypopulation, most
likelyduetomerger-inducedstarformation.
Comparisonwithstellarmodelssuggeststhatthe
starformationactivityinmostofthesesystems
peakedlessthan1Gyrsago, suggestingthatsome
ofstarformationrecentlydiscoveredinearly-type
galaxiesismerger-driven.
GalaxyClusteringUsingPhotometricRedshifts
LeonidasChristodoulou (UniversityofSussex)with
Jon Loveday, and GAMA Team
TheGAMA spectroscopicreleaseoffersaunique
opportunitytocalibratephotometricredshiftsfrom
SDSS downtor=19.4. Takingadvantageofthe
factthatGAMA offersatrulyrepresentativesubset
ofSDSS weconstructacatalogueof ∼ 5 million
Plenary–P01
43
objects, usinganartificialneuralnetwork(ANNz).
Moreover, wecarryoutanextensiveerroranalysis
tocheckforpossiblebiasesinourredshifts
estimation. Wealsoshowindependentestimations
oftheunderlyingredshiftdistribution, usinga
weightingmethod(Cunhaetal, 2009), which
recoversmoreaccuratelytheredshiftdistribution.
Thisallowsastorevealtheweaknessandthe
strengthsofthetwomethods. Havingdonethat,
wemeasurethetwopointangularcorrelation
functioninluminositybinsandthenusing
Limber'sapproximationwecalculatethespatial
correlationfunction. Finallywecomparewiththe
resultsintheliteraturefromspectroscopicsurveys.
However, becauseoftheuseofphotometric
redshiftsourworkextendstointrinsicallyfaint
objectswithmagnitudedowntoM=-14.
StudyinggalaxyevolutionwithFMOS (Fibre
Multi-ObjectSpectrograph)
EmmaCurtisLake (UniversityofOxford)with
Gavin Dalton, Thomas Mauch, Naruhisa Takato,
Naoyuki Tamura, Ian Smail, Philip Best,
Jim Geach, David Sobral, and FMOS team
FMOS (FibreMulti-ObjectSpectrograph)isnow
availableontheSubaruTelescopeforobtaining
near-infraredspectraintheJ andH bands. With
400targetfibres, withinawidefieldofview, this
instrumentprovidesthemeanstoextendthe
resultsfromlowredshiftspectroscopicsurveys
usingthesamelinesasdetectedintheoptical. In
particular, starformationcanbetracedbyHαemissionbetween ∼ 0.5 < z < 1.7. I willgive
overviewofFMOS andpresentinitialresults,
includingspectroscopictargetingofHiZELS (HighZ EmissionLineSurvey)objects.
A newapproachtodisentanglingstarformation
historiesfromsurveydata
IgnacioFerreras (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL)
Large, homogeneoussurveyssuchasSDSS or
GAMA allowustoapplymultivariatetechniques
basedatextractingdifferencesbetweenthestellar
populationsofgalaxiesinamodel-independent
way. InthistalkI willpresentrecentandongoing
researchfocusedonavolume-limitedsampleof
early-typegalaxiesfromSDSS.Principal
ComponentAnalysis(PCA) isusedtodefinetwo
estimatorsofaverageageandrecentstarformation
whichisthenappliedtosubsamplesofclosepairs
ofearly-types(i.e. theprecursorsofdrymergers)
ortosamplesclassifiedaccordingtothemassof
theparenthaloinordertoquantifytheeffectof
environmentonthestarformationhistoryof
galaxies. Futuredirectionsforthepromisingfield
ofmultivariateanalysisofphoto-spectroscopic
datawillbepresented.
A newsampleof"blazars"tostudythe
relationshipbetweenradio-loudAGN andgalaxy
formation
JenniferGupta (JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics)with Ian Browne
Radio-loudactivegalacticnucleiarenow
recognisedtobevitalintheprocessofgalaxy
formation, byprovidingfeedbackwhichregulates
thestar-formationprocess. Logicallyitfollowsthat
inordertounderstandgalaxyformationand
evolution, wemustunderstandAGN.However,
thedetailsofhowAGN feedbackhappensisa
difficultproblem; therearemanyunanswered
questions, suchaswhattriggerstheburstsofAGN
activity, howlongdotheburstsofactivitylastand
howdotheburstsevolve. Blazarsareasubsetof
44
P01
radio-loudAGN whereoneoftheradiojetsis
directedtowardstheobserveratasmallangleto
thelineofsight. Thereforeinblazarswegetthe
mostdirectviewoftherelativisticjetsthatmay
ultimatelyprovidethefeedback. Wehavedefined
anewsampleofnearbyblazar-likeobjects,
attemptingtominimisetheselectioneffectsin
ordertounderstandthefundamentalandintrinsic
propertiesoftheseobjects. TheSurveyof
ExtragalacticNuclearSpectralEnergies(SENSE)
samplecontains151compactradiocoreobjects
within z < 0.2. HerewepresenttheSENSE
samplewithanemphasisonthewaysinwhichwe
areusingmultiwavelengthobservationsofthe
sampletoprobethephysicsofblazarsinthelowredshiftUniverse.
GAMA photometryandtheCosmicSpectral
EnergyDistribution
DavidHill (UniversityofStAndrews)with
Lee Kelvin, Simon Driver, Aaron Robotham, and
GAMA Team
Thecosmicspectralenergydistribution(CSED)
describesthemeanradiationfieldwithinthe
sampledvolumeoftheUniverse. Itcangive
insightintothestarformationhistory, andthe
initialmassfunction. Itsmeasurementrequires
accuratephotometryfromanumberoffilters,
whichhaspreviouslyledtodiscrepanciesbetween
opticalandNIR parameters. Weintroducethe
GAMA photometricpipeline- amethodfor
generatingconsistentcoloursoverarangeof
passbands. Wedescribethegenerationof
Gigapixelmosaicsandmatchedaperture
cataloguesfromUKIDSS andSDSS data. We
quantifythesystematicoffsetsinbest-fitting
luminosityfunctionparametersproducedbyusing
differentaperturetypes, detectionthresholdsor
totalmagnitudesystems. Finally, weintroducea
CSED,producedusingtheGAMA survey, and
compareittotheoreticalmodels.
Theradiospectralindexofsub-millimetre
galaxies.
EdoIbar (UK AstronomyTechnologyCentre)with
R.J. Ivison, P.N. Best, K. Coppin, A. Pope,
Ian Smail, and J.S. Dunlop
WehaveemployedtheGiantMetre-waveRadio
TelescopeandtheVeryLargeArraytomapthe
LockmanHole. At610and1400MHz, wereach
noiselevelsof15and6microJy/beam,
respectively, withwell-matchedresolutions
(∼ 5arcsec). Atthisdepth, weobtainedreliable
detectionsforabouthalfoftheknownsub-mm
galaxies(SMGs)inthefield(SCUBA,AzTEC and
MAMBO).Forradio-identifiedSMGs, whichare
typicallyatz ∼ 2, wemeasureameanradio
spectralindexof α(1400, 610) =-0.75±0.06
(where Sν ∼ ν α )andstandarddeviationof0.29,
betweenapproximaterest-framefrequenciesof
1.8and4.2GHz. Theslopeoftheircontinuum
emissionisindistinguishablefromthatoflocal
star-forminggalaxiesandsuggeststhatextended
opticallythinsynchrotronemissiondominatesthe
radiooutputofSMGs. Coolingeffectsby
synchrotronemissionandInverseCompton
scatteringoffthecosmicmicrowavebackground
donotseemtoaffecttheirradiospectralenergy
distributions. ForthoseSMGsjudgedbySpitzer
mid-infraredcoloursandspectroscopytohost
obscuredactivegalacticnuclei(AGN),wefinda
cleardeviationfromtherestofthesample- they
typicallyhavesteeperradiospectralindices,
α(1400, 610) . −1.0. Thesefindingssuggest
thesemid-IR-/AGN-selectedSMGsmayhavean
intrinsicallydifferentinjectionmechanismfor
relativisticparticles, ortheymightresideindenser
environments. Thisworkprovidesareliable
spectraltemplatefortheestimationoffar-IR/radio
photometricredshifts, andwillenableaccurate
statisticalK-correctionsforthelargesamplesof
SMGsexpectedwithSCUBA-2andHerschel.
Robustmethodstoprobesourceevolutionin
galaxyredshiftsurveys
RussellJohnston (UniversityoftheWesternCape)
Oneofthemostfundamental, andstillrelevant,
statisticalchallengesinmodernobservational
cosmologyisaccuratelydeterminingthegalaxy
luminosityfunction. Determiningtheluminosity
functionofgalaxiesremainsavitaland
fundamentaltoolforassessingthestatisticalnature
ofgalaxyformationandevolution. Pertinentto
thisareaofstudyisaccuratelycharacterising
sourceevolutioningalaxyredshiftsurveys.
I willpresentarecentlydevelopedmethodthat
robustlyconstrainsluminosityevolutionary
modelsbyexploitingthepropertiesofthe
magnitudecompletenesstestdevelopedbyRauzy
(2001)andJohnston, Teodoro&Hendry(2007),
combinedwithamaximumentropyapproach.
Thisstatisticalapproachhasthepotential
advantageovertraditionalapproachesbynot
makinganyassumptionoftheparametricformof
theunderlyingluminosityfunctionandisalso
independentthespatialdistributionofgalaxies.
GAMA:SingleandMulti-ComponentGalaxy
Modelling
LeeKelvin (StAndrews)with Aaron Robotham,
Simon Driver, Ewan Cameron, David Hill, and
GAMA Team
I presentresultsfromtheGAMA structural
decompositionpipeline(GAMA-SIGMA;Structural
InvestigationofGalaxiesviaModelAnalysis)for
allGAMA objectswithoptical-to-near-IR imaging
fromtheSDSS &UKIDSS-LAS surveys. I showthat
photometricmodellingshorterthantheiband
restrictstherecoverabilityofgalacticproperties,
anddiscusstheroleofdustinchangingourview
oftheUniverse. I alsodemonstratehowfullbulgedisk-bardecompositionisrequiredinordertogain
furtherinsightintotheformationandevolutionof
galaxies, anddiscussitsapplicationto ∼ 12,000
nearbygalaxiesintheforthcominghighresolution/deepVST &VISTA imagingofthe
GAMA fields.
TheALFALFA HI AbsorptionSurvey
ErinMacdonald (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Jeremy Darling, and ALFALFA Team
Wepresenttheresultsofawide-areapilotsurvey
tosearchforcoldNeutralHydrogen(HI) 21cm
absorptionutilizingtheAreciboLegacyFast
AreciboL-BandFeedArray(ALFALFA) Survey. This
surveyisthefirsttoconductawide-area(517.0
deg2 )''blind''searchforHI absorptioninthelocal
universe. Thesurveyspans 10.9h < α < 14.95h
and +7.7◦ < δ < 6.3◦ centredontheVirgo
Cluster. ThefullALFALFA surveyisanHI emission
surveythatcovers
−650 ∼ km ∼ s−1 < cz < 17, 500 ∼ kms−1
(11% ofthisspanislosttoradiofrequency
interferenceandGalacticHI emission)resultingin
a ∆z=0.054alongeachlineofsight. When
completed, theALFALFA surveywillspan7000
deg2 . OursurveyissensitivetoHI absorption
linestowardsradiosourcesstrongerthan8.4mJy.
Thisincludes8983sourcesforatotalsearchpath
of ∆z = 485.1. Thereare243sourcestoward
whichalldampedLy-α systems
(N (HI) > 2 × 1020 cm−2 )couldbedetected,
and3282sourcestowardwhich
N (HI) > 2 × 1021 cm−2 columnscouldbe
detected. WedetectonepreviouslyknownHI
absorptionlineinUGC 6081, confirmingour
methodisfeasible, butmakenonewdetections.
Usingthesedata, wecalculateanupperlimitto
theHI columndensitydistributionfunctionandits
moments. Thispilotsurveydemonstratesthevalue
andfeasibilityoflarge-arearadioabsorptionline
searchesthatarenotyetpossiblewithoptical
telescopesandprovidesabaselineforfutureHI 21
cmabsorptionlinesurveysplannedfornewradio
facilities, suchasSKAMP,ASKAP,MEERKAT and
theATA.
ModellingtheUV/opticalFIR/submmemission
fromSpiralGalaxies
CristinaC.Popescu (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan)with RichardJ. Tuffs
Wepresentacomprehensivelibraryofspectral
energydistributionsofspiralgalaxiesintheMIRsubmmrangecalculatedasafunctionofa
minimalsetofphysicalparametersusingan
updatedandenhancedversionofthemodelof
Popescuetal. (2000). Wedescribehowthissetof
dust/PAH re-emissionSEDscanbeselfconsistentlycombinedwiththeexistinglibraryof
UV/opticaldustattenuationscalculatedusingthe
samemodel(Tuffsetal. 2004)toinvertan
observedsetofbroad-bandphotometryofa
galaxyspanningtheUV/optical- FIR/submm
rangetoderivetheintrinsic(i.e. aswouldbe
observedintheabsenceofdust)UV/optical
emissionofthegalaxy. Usingrealandsimulated
dataweillustratetheapplicationoftheSED
modellingtechniquetothederivationofstar
formationratesandstarformationhistoriesof
opticallyselectedspiralgalaxiesinthelocal
UniverseobservedbyGAMA andHerschel.
Specifically, wequantifyhowtheamplitudeand
wavelengthdependenceoftheUV/optical
attenuationisrelatedtotheamplitudeandcolour
oftheFIR/submmcontinuumemissionmeasured
usingthePACS andSPIRE instruments, and
describehowtoutilisemorphologicalinformation
fromhigherresolutionopticalobservationsof
GAMA galaxies(suchaslinearsizesofdisksand
thebulge-diskdecompositions)inthe
interpretationofthepanchromaticobservations.
RedandBlueSatelliteGalaxiesintheGalaxyand
MassAssemblySurvey
MatthewPrescott (LJMU AstrophysicsResearch
Institute)with IvanK. Baldry, PhilA. James, and
GAMA Team
Theroleofblue-sequencesatellitegalaxiesinthe
fuellingofdiskgalaxies. A long-standingproblem
fordiskgalaxiesistheoriginofthecontinuinggas
supplyrequiredtoexplaintheirstarformationand
chemicalabundanceproperties. Onepossible
sourceisfromgas-richsatellites, eitherthrough
minormergers('cannibalism')orfromthegas
componentonlyofthedwarfbeingtransferredto
thediskgalaxy, withthegasremovaloccurring
eitherthroughtidesorthroughsupernova-driven
winds. Aninitialsearchforgas-richcompanions
offielddiskgalaxiesusingwide-fieldH αimaging
showsthatMagellanicCloud-likesatellitesare
surprisinglyrare. Thescarcityofgas-rich
companionscouldbeindicativeoftheefficiency
withwhichtheyhavebeengas-strippedand
transformedintored-sequence, passivedwarfs. In
thistalkI willpresentthepreliminaryresultsofa
studyonthered-to-blueratioofdwarfgalaxies
aroundisolatedfielddiskgalaxiesselectedfrom
theGAMA survey, andthevariationinthisratioas
afunctionofprojectedseparation.
Abundancegradientsinsimulatedgalaxydiscs
AwatRahimi (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
with Daisuke Kawata, ChrisB. Brook,
BradK. Gibson, and Carlos Allende-Prieto
TBC
GalaxyAndMassAssembly(GAMA):Thenext
generationsurveyofsurveys.
AaronRobotham (StAndrews)with GAMA Team
TheGAMA surveyisthelatestgeneration
photometricandredshiftsurvey. Itwillcoverthe
fullSED ofgalaxies, fromtheFUV totheradio, and
iscomplementedby130,000redshiftsobtained
fromtheAAT overa3yearperiod(finishingMay
2010). GAMA willprobestructureoverthescales
of1kpcto1Mpc, helpingustounderstandgalaxy
formation, theenergyoutputoftheUniverse, and
theroleofgroupsandclustersingalaxyevolution.
Modellingradiationfieldsingalaxiesusinganew
radiationtransfercode
DmitrijSemionov (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan)
Wedescribeanewraytracingradiationtransfer
(RTR) codebeingdevelopedatUCLan, optimised
forcalculatingthedistributionofradiationfieldsin
dustygalaxies. Primaryapplicationswillbeto
modelimagesandintegratedSEDsindirectand
dustre-radiatedlightofsyntheticgalaxies
calculatedselfconsistentlywithCDM cosmology.
NGC 2976&NGC 3351: 12CO(3-2)
ObservationsanditsCorrelationwithPAH 8um
BoonKokTan (UniversityofOxford)with
Jamie Leech, Dimitra Rigopoulou, and NGLS
teammembers
Wepresent12CO(3 − 2) mapsofNGC 2976and
NGC 3351obtainedusingtheJamesClerk
MaxwellTelescope. Bothgalaxiesarepartofthe
NearbyGalaxyLegacySurvey(NGLS).We
combinethesedatawiththe12CO(3 − 2) maps
fromNobeyamaRadioObservatoryandBerkeley
IllinoisMarylandAssociationinterferometerto
deriveCO line-ratiomap. Thevalueof
12CO(3 − 2) to12CO(1 − 0) lineratiowe
obtainedwaswithin0.2--0.6range. Usingthis
ratio, wederivedthetotalmoleculargasmassof3
×107 solarmassforNGC 2976and7.55x108
solarmassforNGC 3351. Wepresentspectral
mapsanddiscussthevelocityfieldandthe
velocitydispersionofthetwogalaxies. Wefind
thatthesevelocitycomponentsareverysimilarto
thedatafromtheVLA surveyofHI emission.
Using8umSpitzerdata, weinvestigatedthe
correlationofthe12CO(3 − 2) intensitywiththe
PAH 8micronsurfacebrightness. Westudythe
radialdistributionofthesestarformationtracersin
thetwogalaxiesandsuggestthatthecorrelationis
goodathighsurfacebrightnessregion. Weextend
thisstudytoincludethetotalsurfacebrightnessof
the12CO(3 − 2) andthePAH 8 µmemissionof
17galaxieswithintheNGLS samples. Wefind
thatthecorrelationisverygoodatlargespatial
scale, asbothphysicalparameterstraceactivestar
formation.
P02
Anultravioletstudyofthetheweakwind
probleminO stars
MatthewAustin (UCL) with Raman Prinja
Learningthefinerdetailsaboutmass-lossfrom
starsofearlyspectraltypeisimperative. The
impactofthisenergeticphenomenonisgreat,
acrossalargesliceofastrophysics. Recently,
determiningtruemass-lossratesinO starshas
beenhamperedbydiscordantspectraldiagnostics.
Wedescribeanefforttocomputetherunofion
fractionwitheffectivestellartemperatureforthe
wholeO starrange, forC,N,O,P,S andSi. We
givedetailsconcerningtheprojectundertakento
fitC IV resonancelineprofilesinlateO dwarfsand
highlightthemagnitudeofthecurrentproblem.
ProbingSitesofMassiveStarFormation: The
MethanolMultiBeamSurvey
AdamAvison (JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics)with Gary Fuller, James Caswell,
James Green, and MMB Collaboration
TheMethanolMultibeamsurveyisagalactic
planesurveyforClassII methanolmasersat
6.7GHz. Theseuniquetracersofmassivestar
formationhavebeenobservedusingapurpose
builtsevenbeamreceiverontheParkesradio
telescope, withhighresolutioncounterpart
observationstakenattheAustraliaTelescope
CompactArraytoachievehighaccuracypositions.
Thesouthernhemisphereobservationsisnow
completeandthefirstcatalogueofMMB results
coveringthegalacticcenterregion(345o -> 0o > 6o )hasrecentlybeenreleased(Caswell2009).
ThisalongwithacompletesurveyoftheLarge
MagellanicCloud(Green2008)highlightthe
interestingresultsthesurveyisalreadyyielding.
Workiscurrentlyongoingtocomparethe
locationsofmassivestarformationsignpostedby
the6.7GHzmaserswithotherdataofthegalactic
planei.e. infraredsurveys(MIPS,GLIMPSE),
excitedOH masersandsoontobetaken
molecularlineobservations. InthistalkI will
addressthelatestresultsoftheMMB surveyandits
futureprospects.
SurveyoftypeIb/csupernovaprogenitorsin
nearbystar-forminggalaxies.
JoanneBibby (UniversityofSheffield)with
Paul Crowther
Pre-supernovabroad-bandimagingofgalaxieshas
revealedtheredsupergiant(RSG) progenitorof
TypeII SNe. However, whilstWolf-Rayet(WR)
starsarebelievedtobetheprogenitorofTypeIb/c
SNeadirectobservationallinkisyettobe
established. Bysurveying ∼ 10 nearbystarformingspiralgalaxieswithVLT andGeminiwe
aimtoproduceacatalogueofWR starswhichcan
bereferredtowhenaTypeIb/cSNeoccurs.
I summarizethenarrow-bandimagingtechnique
usedtoidentifyWR stars, alongwithMulti-Object
SpectroscopyMOS) confirmation. I considerthe
limitationsofground-basedimagingwith
comparisontoHST archivaldata. Bydegrading
thespatialresolutionofarepresentativesampleof
LMC Wolf-Rayetstars, tothatofatypicalgalaxyin
oursample, weaddressthequestionof
completeness. WeaskwouldtheWR emission
stillbeobservedorwoulditbedilutedtothepoint
itwasnolongerdetectable?
P01–P02
45
Finally, I willdiscusscompletedsurveysinour
sampleandhowtheyarebeingusedtoinvestigate
whetherthespatiallocationofdifferentWR
subtypescorrelateswiththelightdistributionof
thehostgalaxy. Moreover, wecancomparethe
spatiallocationoftheWR starswithbothType
Ib/cSNeandGRBs.
A wide-field, high-resolutionviewofNGC2264
JaneBuckle (UniversityofCambridge)with
J.S. Richer
Understandingthephysicsofwhereandhowstars
formisafundamentalastrophysicalquestion. The
processesassociatedwithstarformationare
important: onlargescales, inthestructureand
evolutionofgalaxies, tosmallscales, inthe
formationofplanets. Starformationoccursin
densecoresinmolecularclouds, andmassivestars
forminclustersofmixedmassstars. Studiesof
youngclustersarethereforeessentialfor
understandingmassivestarformation.
NGC2264isanattractiveregiontostudy; at800
pcitisoneofthenearestregionsofclusteredstar
formation, andcontainstwoyoungprotoclusters.
Oneoftheseisthoughttobeformingamassive
starof10-20solarmassesinthecentreofthe
cluster, fromthegravitationalmergerof
intermediate-masscores.
Wepresentwide-field, highresolution2-D and3D imagingofthisstarformingregioncovering1
squaredegree, inUKIRT WFCAM H2narrowband1-0S(1) lineemissionandJCMT HARP J=32CO emission. ThroughCO spectralimaging, we
canprovideacompletecensusofprotostellar
outflowactivityintheregion, investigatingthe
dynamicimpactoftheoutflowsonthenatal
cloud. H2emissionhighlightstheyoungestflows,
fromemissionarisingingasshockedbythe
impactofoutflows. Weusethisimagingdatato
measuretheextentoftheveryyoungestflowsin
thestarformingclusters.
Multiplegenerationsofmassivestarformationin
clustercomplexes
SimonClark (OpenUniversity)with M. Messineo,
H. Parsons, B. Davies, and M. Thompson
Theprocessesgoverningtheformationofmassive
starsarepoorlyunderstood, primarilydueto
observationaldifficultiesresultingfromtheirrarity
andhighextinction. Neverthelessitisthoughtthat
theypredominantlyforminstaraggregates, which
inturnarefoundwithinlargerclustercomplexes
associatedwiththenatalGMC.Wepresentthe
intialresultsofanextensivemultiwavelength
observingcampaignaimedatconstrainingthestar
formationhistoriesofsuchcomplexesandthe
propertiesofthecoldprotostellarcoresandthe
(proto-)stars/clustersfoundwithin, inorderto
provideconstraintsonthephysicsyeildingthem.
TheRMS Survey: NearInfra-RedSpectroscopyof
MassiveYoungStellarObjectsInTheNorthern
Hemisphere
HeatherCooper (UniversityofLeeds)with RMS
Team
TheRMS surveyisthelargestcomprehensive,
galaxy-widesurveyofmassiveyoungstellar
objects(MYSOs)todate. Colourcutsdefined
using2MASS andMSX datawereusedtoselect
mid-IR brightpointsourcesfromtheMSX satellite
survey, producingaround2000candidateMYSOs.
A seriesofmultiwavelengthfollow-upobservations
havebeendonetoclassifytheseobjectsand
characterisetheMYSOsandH II regions. Asthe
46
P02–P03
finalstageofthisprocess, near-IR spectrahave
beenusedtodistinguishtheremainingH II
regions, oldstarsandothersourcesfromthe
genuineMYSOs. Withthesenear-IR follow-up
observationscompleteinthenorthernhemisphere,
andnearingcompletioninthesouthern
hemisphere, thepreliminaryresultsandplansfor
exploitationofthenear-IR datawillbediscussed.
A MassiveStarisBorn: thecircumstellardisk,
envelope, andbi-polaroutflowofW33A
BenDavies (RochesterInstituteofTechnology, NY)
with S.L. Lumsden, M.G. Hoare, R.D. Oudmaijer,
and W.-J.de Wit
TheYoungStellarObject(YSO) W33A isoneof
thebestknownexamplesofamassivestarstillin
theprocessofforming. Wepresentnear-infrared
highspatialresolutionintegral-fieldspectroscopy
ofW33A,andfindevidencefor(a)arotationallyflattenedouterenvelopeataradiusofseveral
thousandAU,(b)ahotcircumstellardiskata
radiusof1-3AU,and(c)afastbi-polarionised
outflowonsub-milliarcsecondscales, whichis
alignedwiththeobject'slarger-scaleoutflow.
Fromthekinematicsofthematerialintheinner
nebula, wefindthatthecircumstellardiskorbitsa
centralmassof > 10M⊙ , whiletheouter
envelopeenclosesamassof ∼ 15M⊙ . These
resultsthereforeprovidestrongsupporting
evidenceforthehypothesisthattheformation
mechanismforhigh-massstarsisqualitatively
similartothatoflow-massstars.
TheVLT-FLAMES TarantulaSurvey
ChristopherEvans (UK ATC)
30DoradusintheLargeMagellanicCloudisthe
largestHII regionintheLocalGroup, providingan
ideallaboratoryforstudiesofstellarandcluster
evolution. I willgiveanoverviewoftheVLTFLAMES TarantulaSurvey, anESO Large
Programmewhichhasobtainedmulti-epoch
opticalspectroscopyofover800OB-typestarsin
30Dortoaddressfundamentalquestionsof
massivestarevolution, suchasmultiplicity, massloss, chemicalenrichmentviarotation, andcluster
dynamics.
TypeIbcsupernovaeindisturbedgalaxies:
evidenceforatop-heavyIMF
StaceyHabergham (AstrophysicsResearch
Institute)with J.P. Anderson, and P.A. James
Wecomparetheradiallocationsof169corecollapsesupernovaetotheR-bandandH αlight
distributionsoftheirhostgalaxies. Whenthe
galaxiesaresplitinto'disturbed'and'undisturbed'
categories, astrikingdifferenceemerges. The
disturbedgalaxieshaveacentralexcessofcorecollapsesupernovae, andthisexcessisalmost
completelydominatedbysupernovaeoftypesIb,
IcandIb/c, whereastypeII supernovaedominate
inallotherenvironments. Thedifferencecannot
easilybeexplainedbymetallicityorextinction
effects, andthusweproposethatthisisdirect
evidenceforastellarinitialmassfunctionthatis
stronglyweightedtowardshighmassstars,
specificallyinthecentralregionsofdisturbed
galaxies.
High-MassX-rayBinariesintheNIR:Orbital
solutionsoftwohighlyobscuredsystems.
AndrewMason (OpenUniversity)with
A.J. Norton, J.S. Clark, I. Negueruela, and P. Roche
I presentNIR spectroscopyobtainedusingtheVLT
andISAAC oftwoeclipsingX-raypulsars, OAO
1657-415andEXO 1722-363. Bothofthehighmassdonorstarsinthesesystemshaveonly
recentlybeendiscovered, duetotheirhighlevels
ofextinction. I willinitiallydiscussourworkin
spectrallyclassifyingthetwodonorstars. The
donorintheEXO 1722systemwasfoundtobe
atypicalofthisclassofHMXB.Thedonorwithin
OAO 1657wasfoundtobeamoreevolved
Ofpe/WN9star. Theseresultsthrowlightonthe
unusualpositionofOAO 1657-415intheCorbet
diagram. Wehaveconstructedradialvelocity
curvesforbothofthesesystems, andI willpresent
orbitalsolutionsandthefirstNS mass
determinationsmadeutilisingNIR spectroscopy
foreachsystem.
TheevolutionofthepeculiarvariableV838
Monocerotis2002-2009
MarkRushton (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan)with M.T. Rushton, T.R. Geballe, A. Evans,
and S.P.S. Eyres
ThepeculiarvariableV838Monocerotiswas
discoveredineruptionin2002andtransformed
fromaK-typestarintothecoolestknown
supergiant. Sincethen, itsnear-infraredspectrum
hasbeendominatedbystrongmolecularbands,
andisreminiscentofthatofanL-typebrown
dwarf. However, V838Moncontinuestoevolve
rapidly. Wepresentnear-infraredspectroscopyof
theobjectobtainedonmultipleoccasions
between2002and2009, showingthechanges
thathaveoccuredinthatperiod. Thecauseofthe
outburstofV838Monisuncertain, butthe
discoveriesofaB-typecompanionandanearby
clusterofstarsshowstheobjectistooyoungfora
nova, oraverylatethermalpulse. Theleading
explanationisastellarmerger.
P03
DoBBF eventscontributetoinnermagnetosphere
dipolarisation? A threeyearstatisticalstudyusing
concurrentClusterandDoubleStarobservation
RogerDuthie (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
with Andrew Fazakerley, Iannis Dandouras, and
Elizabeth Lucek
Theobserveddynamicalphenomenonofflowin
Earth’smagnetotailwhichisintermittent, highspeed&non-fieldalignedistermed“burstybulk
flow”(BBF).Dipolarisationofthemagneticfield
withinthenight-sidemagnetosphereofEarthmay
becausallylinkedtoBBFs. Bothphenomenaare
attributedtotheEarth'ssubstormcycle.
Competingmodelsattemptingtoexplainsubstorm
processes, andthecausallinkbetweenBBF and
dipolarisation, havestilltobeconclusivelyverified
orfalsified. Thesearechieflythecurrent
disruption(Lui1991)&near-Earthneutralline
(Bakeretal1996)models. A statisticalstudyhas
previouslybeenperformed(Takadaetal2006)
throughconcurrentobservationsbyCluster4
(“Tango”)&DoubleStarTanCe1, makinguseof
magnetotaildatafromoneyear. Itwasfoundfrom
thisthatathirdoftheBBF eventsdetectedbyCl4
hadwiththemanassociateddetectionofa
dipolarisationeventbyTC1. Thestatisticalresults
suggestedthatthespacecraftseparationwas
generallyshorter, andthemagneticfieldatTC1
typicallyhadasmallerpolarcomponent, when
associationbetweendetectionswasfound.
Additionally, near-geosynchronousregion
(R ∼ 6.6RE )dipolarisationstendednottohave
anassociationwithBBF eventdetections. The
presentstudyextendsthetimeintervaltothree
years. ThefindingsfromtheobservationofBBF &
fielddipolarisationscantherebybefortifiedand
improved. Issuesraisedbythepreviousstudycan
bealsobemorefullyaddressed.
Lui(1991)A synthesisofmagnetospherissubstorm
models, J.Geophys. Res., 96, 11,389-11,401
Bakeretal(1996)Neutrallinemodelofsubstorms;
Pastresultsandpresentview, J.Geophys. Res.,
101, 4967-4989Takadaetal(2006)DoBBFs
contributetoinnermagnetospheredipolarizations:
ConcurrentClusterandDoubleStareobservations,
Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L21109
Averagepropertiesofthemagneticreconnection
iondiffusionregionintheEarth’smagnetotail:
2001–2005Clusterobservationsand
comparisonwithsimulations
JonathanEastwood (ImperialCollegeLondon)
with T.D. Phan, M Oieroset, and M.A. Shay
Collisionlessmagneticreconnectionplaysakey
roleinthedynamicsoftheEarth’smagnetosphere.
Ofparticularimportanceisthediffusionregion,
sincethisiswherethemagneticfieldultimately
reconnects. Althoughconsiderableprogresshas
beenmadeinrecentyears, manyquestions
remain, inpartbecauseitisdifficulttomakeinsituobservationsofthisregion, andsorelatively
fewindividualeventshavebeenreportedinthe
literature.
Toaddressthisproblem, theClustermagnetotail
datasetfrom2001- 2005(constituting175
magnetotailpasses)hasbeencomprehensively
surveyedforencounterswithreconnectionsitesin
theplasmasheetbysearchingforcorrelated
reversalsinthenormalmagneticfieldand
tailward/earthwardplasmaflow. Thissurvey
resultedin33events. Oftheseevents, 23(70%)
wereinqualitativeagreementwiththeexpected
patternofHallfields, indicatingadiffusionregion
encounter. Withinthesetofdiffusionregion
encounterscorrespondingtoanti-parallel
reconnection, theabsolutesizeofboththeHall
electricandmagneticfieldwerebothfoundto
varyfromeventtoevent. However, with
appropriatenormalizationtotheobserved
boundaryconditions, consistentmagnitudesof
boththeaveragepeakHallmagneticandthe
averagepeakHallelectricfieldarefound. To
betterunderstandthisexperimentaldata, large
particle-in-cellsimulationswereperformed,
normalizedinthesamewayasthedata. A
comparisonoftheobserveddataandthe
predictionsofsimulationswillbeshown.
Theseresultshelptoestablishtheoccurrencerate
ofdiffusionregionsrelativetomacroscopic
signaturesandtheaveragepropertiesofthe
diffusionregionintheEarth'smagnetotail. We
alsodiscussthemostusefulsignaturesfor
establishingexperimentallythein-situ
measurementofdiffusionregions.
10YearsofCluster: HighlightsofMulti-point
MeasurementsinSpacePlasmas
C.PhilippeEscoubet (ESA/ESTEC) with
M.G.G.T. Taylor, A. Masson, H. Laakso, and
M. Goldstein
Afteralmost10yearsofoperations, theCluster
missionisfulfillingwithgreatsuccessitsscientific
objectives. ThemaingoaloftheClustermission,
madeoffouridenticalspacecraft, istostudyin
threedimensionsthesmallandmedium-scale
plasmastructuresinthekeyplasmaregionsofthe
Earth’senvironment: solarwindandbowshock,
magnetopause, polarcusps, magnetotail, and
auroralzone.
Duringthecourseofthemission, therelative
distancebetweenthefourspacecrafthasbeen
variedfrom100to10,000kmtostudythe
scientificregionsofinterestatdifferentscales.
Sincesummer2005, newmulti-scale
constellationshavebeenimplemented, where
threespacecraft(C1, C2, C3)areseparatedby
10000km, withthefourthone(C4)atavariable
distancefrom40to10000kmfromC3.
Wewillhighlightsomeofthemainresultsfrom
thelast10years: evolutionofblackauroras, first
directmeasurementsofelectriccurrents,
observationofthelargestreconnectioneventof
2.5millionkminlength, observationsofgigantic
surfacewaves, firstevidenceofreconnectionin
turbulentplasmaandusageofinterferometryto
localiseelectromagneticemissions. The
presentationwillalsocoverClusterdata
accessibility, throughtheClusterScienceData
System(CSDS) andtheClusterActiveArchive
(CAA) whichwasimplementedtoprovidea
permanentarchiveofhighresolutionClusterdata
fromallinstruments.
Multi-spacecraftobservationsofauroralelectron
accelerationbyCluster
ColinForsyth (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
with A.N. Fazakerley, A.P. Walsh, K. Garza,
C.J. Owen, I. Dandouras, K-H. Fornacon, and
E. Lucek
DuringrecentyearstheorbitoftheCluster
spacecrafthasevolvedsuchthatthespacecraft
passthroughtheauroralaccelerationregionclose
toperigeeduringthedaysideseason. Thispresents
theopportunitytomakemulti-spacecraft
measurementsofthisregionforthefirsttime.
Wepresentacasestudyofanupwardauroral
currentregionobservedbyClusterinDecember
2009. Duringthisevent, Cluster1andCluster3
wereapproximatelylocatedonthesamemagnetic
field-linebutseparatedby1000km. Weshowthat
theelectronpopulationwasacceleratedalongthe
field-linebetweenCluster1and3. Magneticfield
observationsconfirmthepresenceofanupward
currentsystem. Basedontheseobservationswe
estimatethesizeofthelengthoftheacceleration
region.
ExtendingClusterJSOC scienceoperationsover
thepasttenyears
MikeHapgood (STFC RutherfordAppleton
Laboratory)with M.G. Hutchinson,
M.A. Hapgood, T.G. Dimbylow, P.A. Chaizy, and
A. McDermott
JSOC hassuccessfullyco-ordinatedthescience
operationsofESA'scornerstoneClustermissionfor
tenyears. Theoriginalmissiondurationwastwo
yearsandextendingthescienceoperations
beyondthisperiodhasbeenatechnicaland
managementchallenge, especiallyasthe
spacecraftandinstrumentsage, andstaffleaveand
arereplaced. Furthermore, thesciencegoalsof
Clusterhaveevolvedinresponsetoscientific
advancesandtonewscientificopportunities
(providedbyorbitalevolutionandby
collaborationwithnewexperimentsinspaceand
ontheground). Meetingthesechallengeshas
broughtconsiderableimprovementsandpositive
insightsinco-ordinatingscienceoperations,
includingthestructuredspreadingofexpertise
withintheteamtominimiseriskandincrease
flexibilityaswellasbuilding-inincreased
automationandimprovedsafetycheckingviarulebasedplanningtechniques. Importantly, expertise
hasbeengainedinthetheoreticalandpractical
developmentanduseofgenericplanning
conceptsandsystemsaimingatimprovingthe
scientificreturnandthecostefficiencyofspace
sciencemissions, includingmulti-pointmissions.
UsingCluster’sobservationsofthesolarwindto
investigatecollisionlessplasmaturbulence-currentresultsandoutlookforthefuture
KhuromKiyani (UniversityofWarwick)with
A. Turner, S.C. Chapman, B. Hnat,
Yu. V. Khotyainstev, and F. Sahraoui
In-situobservationsofmagneticfluctuationsinthe
solarwindshowan‘inertialrange’ofMHD
turbulence, andathigherfrequencies, across-over
toscaleswherekineticeffectsbecomeimportant.
Thiscrossoverisseeninthepowerspectraldensity
(PSD) asasecondbroad-bandpowerlawregion
extendingfromthetypicalionLarmorscaleofthe
systemtoelectrongyroscales. Theoreticalstudies
ofplasmaturbulencepredictthenatureofthe
scalinginthisregioncentredaroundpredictions
ofthespectralslopeandassociatedscaling
exponents.
Wepresentresultsfromhigh-frequencymagnetic
fielddatafromClusterinintervalswherethe
spacecraftwereinquasi-stationaryambientsolar
windandtheinstrumentswereoperatinginburst
mode. Themagneticfielddataarefromthe
fluxgateandsearch-coilmagnetometersfromthe
ClusterFGM experiment(∼ 67Hz), andtheSTAFF
experiment(∼ 450 Hz). Thesedatasetsprovide
observationsofthissecondscalingrangeovertwo
decadesinfrequency. Thishighcadenceallowsa
precisedeterminationofthestatisticsatthese
smallscales.
Weperformarobustmultiscalestatisticalanalysis
focusingonthePSD,PDFsoffieldfluctuations,
higher-orderstatisticstoquantifythescalingof
fluctuations; aswellasdescribingthedegreeof
anisotropyinthefluctuationsparalleland
perpendiculartotheaveragelocalmagneticfield.
Thestudyofsolarwindturbulencepresentssome
challengestosomerecentandfuturemissions.
CurrentlyClusterstillpossessessomeofthebest
accessibleobservationsofkineticscale
electromagneticwaveforms–evenafter10years.
Toanswertheopenquestionofhowcollisionless
turbulenceisdissipatedintoheatingthesolar
wind, weneedtopushfurtherthetelemetryand
sensitivityofmeasurementsfromfuturemissions.
Weconcludebydiscussingthesourcesoferror
frominstrumentnoiseandouroutlookonhow
Clustercaninformfuturemissions.
Here, thereandeverywhere: gettingafeelfor
boundarylayerevolutionusingmultipoint
measurements
MattTaylor (EuropeanSpaceAgency)with I.J. Rae,
C. Watt, K. Nykyri, B. Lavraud, A.N. Fazakerley,
M.W. Dunlop, A. Borg, H. Laakso, C.P. Escoubet,
A. Masson, M.N. Nishino, M. Lester, S.E. Milan,
J.A. Davies, L. Kistler, C. Mouikis, M. Volwerk,
A. Grocott, C. Forsyth, A.P. Walsh, A. Lui, C. Shen,
Z. Pu, and J. Shi
Onthe11thJuly2006, duringaperiodof
northwardIMF,theGeotail, DoubleStar1and
Clusterspacecraftallcrossedthemagnetopause
regionwithin2hours(UT) ofoneanotherwhile
separatedbymanyhoursinlocaltime. Duringthis
timelarge-scaleoscillationswereobservedinboth
groundbasedandspacecraftdata. Weutilize
P03
47
thesenumerousmeasurementstoexaminethe
extentandevolutionoffluctuationsinandaround
themagnetopauseboundarylayer. Thisworkis
beingcarriedoutaspartofanInternationalSpace
ScienceInstitute(ISSI) workinggroupon
‘ComparativeCluster- DoubleStarmeasurements
oftheMagnetotail’.
TheMagnetotailPlasmaSheetRevisited: Cluster
PEACE Statistics
AndrewWalsh (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL) with A.N. Fazakerley, C. Forsyth, and
C.J. Owen
WiththeClusterActiveArchivenowcontaininga
largevarietyofhigh-quality, validateddata
products, thereisanopportunitytocarryout
large, multi-instrumentstatisticalstudiesusing
Clustermeasurements. Wepresentfirstresults
fromonesuchstudy: asurveyofelectronpitch
angledistributionsmeasuredbyClusterPEACE
duringthe2002tailseason(July- October). In
total ∼ 850,000distributionshavebeenexamined
intermsofmagneticfieldstrength, auroralindices
andotherparameters. Wefindthatthe
magnetotailplasmasheetisonlyroutinely
isotropicwhen|B| < 3nT,i.e. closetotheneutral
sheet. Outsidethisregionalow-energyfieldalignedpopulation, presumablythatidentifiedby
Asnesetal. (2008), waspresentatalllevelsof|B|.
Significantelectronfluxeswerefoundtoextendto
higher|B|athigherAL/AE andexhibitedenergydispersedbehaviouratthehigh|B|edge. The
slopeofthisdispersionalsochangedwithAL/AE.
P04
X-rayBrightPointTopologyStudywithHinode
andSTEREO
CarolineAlexander (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan)with R.W. Walsh, M. Marsh,
R.C. Maclean, and G. DelZanna
Wepresentacasestudyofamediumsized
(∼ 15")X-raybrightpointobservedwithHinode
andSTEREO.Wehavestudiedtheevolutionand
topologythroughoutitslifetimeandpresentresults
onphysicalcharacteristicsaswellasstructure.
Thetopologyhasbeenstudiedusingavarietyof
methods. Potentialfieldextrapolationshavebeen
carriedoutandcomparedwithX-rayimagesfrom
XRT.Edge-detectionimageprocessinghasthen
beenusedonXRT imagestoseeifthisclarifiesany
loopstructurepresent. STEREO datahasalsobeen
usedtoexplorethe3D topologyandinvestigate
whatline-of-sighteffectshaveonpreviousresults.
PlasmaMotionsandMagneticReconnection
Heatinginthe2007, May19Flare
LenCulhane (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
with H. Hara, T. Watanabe, L.K. Harra, and
P. Young
WereportobservationstakenwiththeHinodeEIS
spectrometerofaloop-tophotsource, anearby
fastjetandaninflowtothehotsourceregion
duringtheimpulsivephaseofalongduration
GOES ClassB9.5flareon2007, May19. The
eventwasalsoobservedwiththeHinodeSolar
OpticalandX-rayTelescopes(SOT,XRT),RHESSI
andTRACE.Intheimpulsivephase, EIS was
scanningaregionaboveFeXVII (192Å) andCa
XVIII (255Å) emittingloopsatT ∼ 5 MK witha
smallcusp-shapedapex. Theregionabovethe
loopshas12MK hotplasmacomponentsthat
48
P03–P04
wereobservedinFeXXIII (263Å) andFeXXIV
(192Å,255Å) emissionandintheRHESSI 4–6
keV band. Atthepeakoftheimpulsivephase, this
hotthermalsourceshowedexcesslinebroading
indicatingnon-thermalvelocitiesof ∼ 100 km/s
andaweakredshiftof ∼ 30 km/s. A blue-shifted
jetwithaDopplervelocityof200km/sisalso
observed. Thereisalsoacoronalstructureseenin
FeXII 195Å emissionwithmaterialflowinginto
thehotsourceregionat ∼ 20 km/s. TwononthermalhardX-raysourcesareseenwithRHESSI
inthe15–40keV band. Oneincludesbothofthe
flaringloopfootpointswhiletheotherisfound
abovethelooptop. Alloftheseobservationsare
consistentwiththelocationofamgnettic
reconnectionsitenearthehotsourceregionand
thecusp.
Hinode/EIS observationsofactiveregionloops
GiulioDelZanna (UniversityofCambridge)
Newmeasurementsofelectrontemperaturesand
densitiesinactiveregionloopsobtainedwiththe
Hinode/EIS spectrometerarepresented. Theyare
obtaineddirectlyfromlineratiosandnewatomic
data. Thesemeasurementsarecomplementaryto
thosepreviouslyobtainedonDopplermotions,
and, oncerefined, willallowdetailedcomparisons
withresultsfromtime-dependentmodelling. New
observationalandtheoreticalchallengesare
brieflydiscussed.
Observationsofflareribbondensitiesusing
Hinode/EIS
DavidGraham (GlasgowUniversity)with
Lyndsay Fletcher
Wepresentnewhighcadencemeasurementsof
plasmadensityandbulkflowvelocitiesinasolar
flareusingobservationsfromHinode/EIS and
TRACE.Wehavefoundapparentdensity
enhancementsinchromosphericflareribbonsand
footpoints, derivedusinglineratiosinFeXII,Fe
XIII andFeXIV.Bycombiningthesewithcospatialvelocitymeasurements, weseesignsof
compressionandexpansionoftransitionregion
andchromosphericplasma, inresponsetothe
flareenergyrelease. Amongtheseobservationsare
densityenhancementslastingwellintothedecay
phaseoftheflare, andsignsofasymmetricalblue
andredshiftsacrossfootpoints. Wefindthatthe
highcadenceandwidewavelengthrangeofthis
dataisparticularlysuitedtoflarestudies, and
recommendthemforfutureobservingcampaigns
inthenewsolarcycle.
WhatcanHinodeobservationstellusabout
eruptionsfromsigmoidalactiveregions?
LucieGreen (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
SoftX-rayimagesoftheSunhaveshownthatsome
activeregionscontainloops, orcollectionsof
loops, whichappearforwardorreverse"S"in
shape. Thesestructuresareknownassigmoids
andareofinterestbecausesigmoidalactive
regionshaveahighprobabilityofproducingan
eruption. Recentobservationalandtheoretical
workhassupportedtheinterpretationofthe
magneticstructureofsomesigmoidsasbeingthat
ofafluxropelyingverylowinthesolar
atmosphere, havingabaldpatchseparatrixsurface
topology. Thisworkindicatesthatthefluxropeis
presentinthesolaratmospherebeforetheonsetof
theeruption. Themainquestiontobeaddressed
nowishowthesigmoidalactiveregionswhich
produceaneruptionevolvetowardaninstability
orlossofequilibrium.
WeuseHinodeobservationstoinvestigate
eruptivesigmoidalactiveregions. Wediscussthe
importanceoftheevolutionofthephotospheric
magneticfield, theroleofreconnectionand
presentresultsfromEIS whichgiveaninsightinto
howthesigmoidandoverlyingarcadefieldevolve
towardtheonsetofaneruption.
Regularizedinversiontechniquesforrecovering
DEMsfromHinode/XRT data
IainHannah (UniversityofGlasgow)with
L. Braidwood, and E.P. Kontar
HinodeXRT providesunprecedentedspatial
resolutionknowledgeoftheplasmatemperature
distributionresultingfromheatinginthesolar
atmosphere. However, theinferenceofthe
DifferentialEmissionMeasureDEM(T) fromXRT
rawdataisanill-posedinverseproblem. Here, we
developandapplyanenhancedmodelindependentregularizationalgorithmusedin
RHESSI X-raysoftwareforthisprocessmakinguse
ofgeneralconstraintsontheformofthe
DifferentialEmissionMeasures. Thealgorithm
naturallyprovidessignaldependentresolutionof
themethodthusgivingaclearcriteriato
determinewhethertheplasmaisconsistentwith
anisothermalmodel. Itcanalsobeeasilyadapted
toworkwithothersolarmulti-filterdatasuchas
SDO/AIA
Weshowbysimulationsthatthistechniqueyields
DEM(T) withconsiderablymoreinformationand
higherqualitythanpreviousalgorithmsandapply
themethodtoXRT multi-filterobservationsof
activeregions.
Whatcantheorydoforyou?
AlanHood (UniversityofStAndrews)
Analyticalapproximationsandnumerical
simulationsarefrequentlyusedtomodelvarious
solaratmosphericphenomena. Theseresearch
topicsareoftendrivenbythelatestobservations.
A briefdescriptionofsomeoftheUK'srecent
advancesintheorywillbepresented, indicating
wherethedirectionthetopicsarelikelytotakein
thefuture. Theaimofthistalkistostimulatea
discussionofwhatobservationsareneededto
developtheoreticalmodelsfurther.
Coronalsignaturesofasunspotlight-bridge
SarahMatthews (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL) with Deborah Baker, and
SantiagoVargas Dominguez
Sunspotlight-bridgesarebrightlanesofmaterial
thatdividetheumbra. Theirappearancesignifies
thereestablishmentofthegranulationwithinthe
spot, andoftenindicatesthebeginningof
fragmentationofthespotitself. Theincreased
brightnessofthelight-bridgerelativetothe
surroundingumbraisaclearindicationthatthe
plasmatemperatureinthisregionishigher. Ithas
alsobeennotedthatlight-bridgesoftenshow
enhancedchromosphericactivity, withHα surges
andchomosphericjetsreportedinanumberof
cases(e.g. Bhartietal. 2007, Shimizuetal.
2009). Berger&Berdyugina(2003)alsofounda
constantbrightnessenhancementabovealightbridgeinobservationsinthe1600 Åpassbandof
theTransitionRegionandCoronalExplorer
(TRACE),whileKatsukawa(2007)foundthatlightbridgeformationwasspatiallyandtemporally
coincidentwiththeheatingof ∼ 1 MK loopsas
observedbyTRACE.Light-bridgesthusseemto
havearoleinreleasingmagneticenergystoredin
thespotaswellasinitsdecay. Inthisworkwe
useobservationsfromHinodeandSTEREO to
investigatetheextenttowhichthepresenceofa
sunspotlight-bridgeaffectstheoverlyingtransition
regionandcorona. Inparticularwecommenton
changesinthecoronalvelocityfieldinconnection
withactivityintheunderlyingphotosphereand
corona.
Relationshipbetweenmagneticfieldandcoronal
outflowsinactiveregions
RobertO'Neil (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
with LouiseK. Harra, and DavidR. Williams
Outflowsfromtheedgesofactiveregionshave
beenobservedwithHinodeEIS.Itisexpectedthat
theseoutflowsareoneofthesourcesoftheslow
solarwind. Thephysicalmechanismproducing
theoutflowsisasyetunclearwithvarious
suggestionsbeingputforward(e.g. compression
(Murrayetal.), magneticreconnection(Harraet
al.), quasi-separatrixlayers(Bakeretal.). Inorder
toprogresstheunderstandingofoutflowsfurther,
astatisticalstudyhasbeencarriedoutto
determinetherelationshipbetweenmagneticfield
andtheoutflowspeeds. Thisencompasseshow
theflowsevolvewithtime. Wewillpresent
preliminaryresultsanddiscusstheimplicationof
theserelatedtoslowsolarwindformation.
Activeregionmoss: basicphysicalplasma
parametersandtheirtimevariability
DurgeshTripathi (UniversityofCambridge)with
Helen Mason, GiulioDel Zanna, and Peter Young
Wepresentastudyofthephysicalplasma
parameterssuchaselectrontemperature, electron
density, columndepthandfillingfactorsinthe
mossregionsandtheirvariabilityoverashort(an
hour)andalongperiod(5consecutivedays)of
time. Primarily, wehaveanalyzedthe
spectroscopicobservationsrecordedbythe
Extreme-ultravioletImagingSpectrometer(EIS)
aboardHinode. Inadditionwehaveused
supplementaryobservationstakenfromTRACE
andtheX-RayTelescope(XRT).Wefindthatthe
mossemissionisstrongestintheFexiiandFexiii
lines. Basedonanalysesusinglineratiosand
emissionmeasurewefoundthatthemossregion
hasacharacteristictemperatureoflogT =6.2.
Theelectrondensitiesmeasuredatdifferent
locationsinthemossregionsusingFexiiratiosare
about1-3×1010 cm( -3)andabout2-4×109
cm( -3)usingFexiiiandFexiv. Theelectron
densitysubstantiallyincreases(byafactorofabout
3-4orevenmoreinsomecases)whena
backgroundsubtractionwasperformed. The
densityandtemperatureshowverysmallvariation
overtime. Bycombiningtheobservations
recordedbyTRACE,EIS andXRT,wefindthatthe
mossregionscorrespondtothefoot-pointsofboth
hotandwarmloops.
Convectiveplasmaaroundsolarpores
SantiagoVargasDominguez (UniversityCollege
London–MSSL)
Magneticstructuresarecommonlyobservedinthe
solarphotosphereatmanydifferentspatialscales,
beingsunspotsandporesthemostconspicuous
ones. Theformation, morphologyandevolutionof
magneticfeaturesareintenselylinkedtosolar
activityfromthephotospheretothecorona.
Convectiveplasmaandembeddedmagneticfield
determinethedevelopmentofdifferentstructures
butthereisnotclearconsensusfromamodel
explainingthetransitionfromporesintosunspots.
Plasmaflowsinsolaractiveregionscangiveusa
clueontheongoingprocessesandinteractions
leadingtotheformationofthesemagnetic
structures, i.e. theformationofpenumbraearound
anumbralcore. Inthepresentworkwefollowthe
evolutionofsolarporesfromhigh-resolutiontime
seriesofimagesbycomputinghorizontalproper
motions. Weaimatdeterminewhetherornotwe
findevidencesofthepresenceofstronglarge
outflowsaroundpores, asinthecaseofsunspots,
andhowtheplasmaflowsareaffectedintimeby
theevolutionofthepores.
P05
FRODOSpec: RoboticSpectroscopyusingthe
LiverpoolTelescope
RobertBarnsley (LJMU) with I.A. Steele
FRODOSpec(Fibre-fedROboticDual-beam
OpticalSpectrograph)isanewbench-mounted,
integralfieldunitspectrographcurrentlyavailable
tousersofthe2mroboticLiverpoolTelescopeon
LaPalma. I presentdetailsofthespectrographand
alsotheautomatedpipelinereductionprocess
whichdistributestheresultingdatatotheend-user
inanarrayofdifferentformatsincludingaone
dimensionalarc-fittedspectrum. Weanticipate
thattheautonomousnatureofthetelescope
combinedwiththeautomatedreduction
procedurewillbringnewdevelopmentsinthe
areasofrapidresponseastronomy, suchasGRBs,
wherequickidentificationisessentialtoobtaining
goodqualityfollowupdata.
A studyoftheSuperWASP detectormaps
JoaoBento (UniversityofWarwick)with
Peter Wheatley
Transitingplanetsurveyshavebecome
increasinglypopularsincethefirstdiscoveryofa
planetarytransitaroundHD209458usingasmall
andinexpensivewidefieldtelescope. Motivated
bythisresult, TheSuperWASP projectwas
founded, consistingof2robotictelescopesaimed
atsurveyingthenightskyinsearchofplanetary
transits. Aswithmostgroundbasedsurveys,
systematicnoiseisalimitingfactorinprecision
andagoodunderstandingofthisnoiseisvitalto
anypotentialimprovement. Herewepresenta
studyoftheSuperWASP detectormaps,
highlightingsomekeyfeaturesandinvestigating
theircauses.
WhitherUK-LedGround-BasedSubmm
Astronomy?
DavidClements (ImperialCollege)
TheUK hasagrandtraditioninground-based
submmastronomy, withahugelysuccessfulpast
andwithgreatpotentialforthenextfewyears
thankstoSCUBA2. Beyondthistimescale, though,
thereisnothingplannedwithclearUK leadership.
I willreviewthepastandpresentandlookatthe
rangeofpossibleopportunitiesforthisfieldinthe
future. Thispresentationisthenextstageina
processofcommunityconsultationonfacility
developmentsforthefutureofthisfield.
JCMT andUKIRT:GoodNewsandBadNews
GaryDavis (JointAstronomyCentre)
ThetwoUK telescopesonMaunaKeahavehad
contrastingfortunesinthepastyear. UKIRT was
identifiedfor"managedwithdrawal"bySTFC andI
willreportontheimplementationofthisandon
theimplicationsforUKIDSS andotherongoing
programmes. TheJCMT,ontheotherhand, is
currentlyinthemidstofacampaignofearly
sciencewiththerevolutionarySCUBA-2
instrumentandI willreportontheoutcomesof
thiscampaign, thenear-termplansfortheJCMT
LegacySurveyandthelong-termprospectsforthe
observatory.
e-MERLIN
SimonGarrington (UniversityofManchester)
e-MERLIN willprovide10-150milliarcsecond
resolutionimagingatcentimetrewavelengthsand
microJanskysensitivity. Thesecapabilitiesarevital
forresolvingkpc-scalestar-formingregionsand
AGN indistantgalaxiesandAU-scaleprocessesof
star-formationinourGalaxy.Theenhanced
sensitivityisbeingachievedwithnewbroad-band
receiversanddedicatedopticalfibreconnections
toanewcorrelator. Theinstrumentisbeing
commissionednowandsomeofthefirstresults
willbediscussed.
TheLiverpoolTelescope: Observationswiththe
STILT (SmallTelescopesInstalledatLT) widefield
instruments
NeilMawson (AstrophysicsResearchInstitute)
with Iain Steele
STILT isasetofthreewideimagingsetupsthat
havetheabilitytoobservethousandsofobjectsin
justasingleimage. Thecurrentsetupincludes: an
allskycamera, SkycamA,whichiscapableof
imagingto6thmagnitudewhichshowsitis
capableofdetectingsomebrighttransientevents.
A 20degreefieldofviewcamera, SkycamT,which
withitswidefieldandtheabilitytoimageto
∼ 12thmagnitudecanobservearound5000stars
inasingleimageanda1degreefieldofview
telescope, SkycamZ,whichiscapableofreaching
18thmagnitude. SkycamZ alongwithSkycamT is
attachedtothemainbodyoftheLiverpool
Telescopesobenefitsfromthepointingand
trackingabilityoftheLT.Allthreesetupscarryout
10secondexposureseveryminute, soprovide
considerableamountsofdatapernight. The
instrumentshavebeenrunningforayearnowso
thereisalsoanarchiveofunprocesseddatawhich
couldcontaindataonpasttransientevents. The
aimistocreateadatapipeline, whichwill
automaticallyreducethedataandcataloguethe
objectsineachimage. Thencrosscheckwitha
currentdatabaseandcreateanalertforany
detectedobjectwhichthesystembelievestobeof
stellaroriginandpreviouslyuncatalogued. Sofar
theSTILT systemisalreadycontributingtothe
analysisofbothaGRB andanova.
EarlyresultsfromSCUBA2
DavidNutter (CardiffUniversity)
Inthistalk, I willhighlightsomeoftheearlyresults
fromtheinitial'sharedrisks'observingperiodof
SCUBA2ontheJCMT.InparticularI willshow
datafromtheJCMT GouldBeltSurveyofnearby
star-formingregions, anddetailhowthesedata
willbeusedtoimproveourunderstandingofthe
star-formationprocess. Thequestionsthatweseek
toanswerwiththesedataincludetherelationship
betweenthemassfunctionofpre-stellarcoresat
thelowestmasses, andtherelativelifetimesofthe
differentevolutionarystagesofstarformation. I
willalsousesomefar-infrareddatafromtheAkari
satellitetodemonstratewhySCUBA2datais
essentialtocomplementthedatafromthe
Herschelsatellite, andwhythelongwavelength
providedbySCUBA2, togetherwithshorter
wavelengthdatafromHerschelwillbreakthe
P04–P05
49
degeneracybetweentemperatureandcolumn
density.
ALMA:statusreportandfirstscience
JohnRicher (Cambridge)with G Fuller, and
T Muxlow
ALMA isnowthelargestworkingsubmillimetre
interferometerintheworld: inDecember2009, its
firstthree12-mantennasoperatedtogether, and
phaseclosurewasachieved. Antennasand
receiverscontinuetoarriveandoverthenext3
yearsALMA willgrowintoa66-elementarray.
Thefirstcallforscienceproposalsislessthan12
monthsawayinthecurrentschedule, andfirst
sciencedatashouldbeavailableinlate2011. This
talkwillsummarisethestateofALMA
construction, andpresenttheexcitingscientific
opportunitiesthatALMA willsoonenable.
HerschelandSPICA:pushingthefrontiersinto
thecoolcosmos
DimitraRigopoulou (STFC RAL/Oxford)
BuildingontheheritageofthesuccessfulHerschel
missionwillbeSPICA,ajointJAXA/ESA mission.
Thisrepresentsamajorstepintheexplorationof
theDustyUniverseinthenextdecade. SPICA will
pushthefrontiersonthephysicsofdustandthe
interstellarmediumfromplanetstothedistant
Universewithunprecedentedsensitivity- thanks
toitbeingacryo-cooledmission. I willreviewthe
majorscientificdriversofthemissionfocusingin
particularonsciencethatwillbecarriedoutwith
SAFARI,theEuropean-ledfouriertransform
spectrograph.
UpdateontheKMOS SpectrographforESO VLT
RaySharples (UniversityofDurham)
KMOS isamulti-objectnear-infraredintegralfield
spectrometerunderconstructionbyaconsortium
ofUK andGermaninstitutesfortheESO VLT.
KMOS willbethefirstUK-ledfacilityclass
instrumentontheVLT andiscurrentlyinthefinal
assembly, integration&testphase. Thistalkwill
reviewthescientificpotentialofKMOS andshow
theresultsfromrecentprogressinthesubsystem
manufactureandtest.
P06
TheMeerKAT DeepContinuumSurvey
MattJarvis (UniversityofHertfordshire)with
Kurtvander Heyden
I willpresentthecaseforalargecontinuum
surveytobeundertakenwiththeSouthAfrican
SKA precursortelescope, MeerKAT.Scienceaims
covertheevolutionofstar-forminggalaxiesand
AGN,cosmologyandlarge-scalestructureand
tracingthemagneticfieldsintheUniverse.
EarlyresultsfromthecommissioningofLOFAR
JohnMcKean (ASTRON) with George Heald, and
LOFAR imagingcommissioningteam
TheLowFrequencyArray(LOFAR) willoperate
between10and240MHz, andwillobservethe
lowfrequencyUniversetoanunprecedented
sensitivityandangularresolution. Themain
sciencegoalsofLOFAR aretoi)carryoutdeep
extragalacticsurveys, ii)probetheepochof
reionization, iii)studycosmicmagnetism, iv)
investigatethetransientsky, v)studysolarphysics
50
P05–P07
andvi)observeultrahighenergycosmicrays.
LOFAR willalsoprovideanimportanttestbedfor
thetechnologies(hardwareandsoftware)thatwill
beusedfortheSKA.
TheconstructionofLOFAR iswellunderway, with
overhalfoftheDutchstationsandthree
internationalstationsroutinelyperformingboth
single-stationandinterferometricobservations
overthefrequencyrangethatLOFAR isanticipated
tooperateat. Here, I summarizethecapabilitiesof
LOFAR andreportonsomeoftheearly
commissioningresults, concentratingonthewidefieldimagingoftestfieldsaround3C 196and3C
61.1between30-78MHzand120-168MHz.
RadioWeakGravitationalLensingwithVLA and
MERLIN
PrinaPatel (InstitueofCosmology&Gravitation)
with D.J. Bacon, R.J. Beswick, T.W.B. Muxlow, and
B. Hoyle
Wecarryoutanexploratoryweakgravitational
lensinganalysisonacombinedVLA andMERLIN
radiodataset: adeep(3.3micro-Jyperbeamrms
noise)1.4GHzimageoftheHubbleDeepField
North. I measuretheshearestimatordistribution
atthisradiosensitivityforthefirsttime, findinga
similardistributiontothatofopticalshear
estimatorsforHST ACS datainthisfield. I
examinetheresidualsystematicsinshear
estimationfortheradiodata, andgive
cosmologicalconstraintsfromradio-opticalshear
cross-correlationfunctions. I shallemphasizethe
utilityofcross-correlatingshearestimatorsfrom
radioandopticaldatainordertoreducethe
impactofsystematics. UnexpectedlyI findno
evidenceofcorrelationbetweenopticalandradio
intrinsicellipticitiesofmatchedobjects; thisresult
improvesthepropertiesofoptical-radiolensing
cross-correlations. I exploretheellipticity
distributionoftheradiocounter- partstooptical
sourcesstatistically, confirmingthelackof
correlation; asaresultI suggestaconnected
statisticalapproachtoradioshearmeasurements.
A SETI pilotprogrammewithLOFAR
AlanPenny (U StAndrews)with M. Garrett
(ASTRON), M. Wise(ASTRON), R. Nichol(U
Portsmouth), R. Fender(U Southampton), and
H. Falcke(RadboudUniversiteitNijmegen)
TheLOFAR commissioningplanincludesapilot
programmetoinvestigatetheuseofLOFAR for
SETI observations. MostradioSETI searcheshave
beeninthe1-2GHzrange, andtheadventof
LOFAR permitsdeepsearchesintherelatively
unexplored80-240MHzrange.
A fewnearbystarswillbesearchedforthevery
narrowbandemissionassociatedwithartificial
sources, andthesensitivityofLOFAR anditsability
torejectterrestrialsourceswillbeinvestigated.
ThisinvestigationwillhaveimplicationsforlowfrequencySETI workwithSKA.
PathwaytotheSKA
SteveRawlings (UniversityofOxford)
I willdiscussthesciencecasesforthevarious
pathfinderandprecursortelescopesonthe
pathwaytotheSKA illustratinghowtheyinform
onkeySKA science. Theseideaswillbeextended
tomapscienceoutputontothephased
constructionoftheSKA itself.
P07
Herschel: statusandin-orbitperformance
MattGriffin (CardiffUniversity)with ESA, SPIRE
consortium, PACS consortium, and HIFI
consortium
ESA’sHerschelSpaceObservatorywaslaunched
inMay2009. Itisthefirstlarge-aperture
FIR/submmspacemission, andthefirsttoextend
beyond200micronswavelength. Itcarriesa3.5mdiametertelescope(thelargestastronomical
telescopeyetflown), passivelycooledtoaround
85K,andthreecryogenicallycooledscientific
instruments. PACS hasafarinfraredcamera
operatingat70, 100and160microns, andan
imaginggratingspectrometercovering55–210
microns. SPIRE hasathree-bandsubmillimetre
cameraoperatingsimultaneouslyat250, 350and
500microns, andanimagingFouriertransform
spectrometercovering194–670microns. HIFI is
aseven-channelsingle-pixelhigh-resolution
heterodynespectrometercoveringmostofthe
submillimetreregion. Thissuiteofinstruments
allowsastronomerstocarryoutsensitiveimaging
andspectroscopyoveradecadeinwavelength.
Herschelhasbeenplacedinanorbitaroundthe
Sun-EarthL2point(aposition1.5millionkm
distantfromEarth, ontheanti-sunwardside), and
willhaveanoperationallifetimeofatleastthree
years. Afterseveralmonthsofcommissioningand
performanceverification, thespacecraftandall
threeinstrumentsareperformingextremelywell.
Manysuccessfulsciencedemonstration
observationshavebeencarriedoutandroutine
observationsarenowunderway. I willdescribe
themainfeaturesoftheobservatoryandthe
performanceandscientificcapabilitiesofthe
instruments.
SWIRE 70micronselectedGalaxies: Followup
andLuminosityFunction
HarsitPatel (ImperialCollegeLondon)with
D.L. Clements
WepresenttheopticalandfarIR propertiesof70
micronselectedgalaxiesfromtheSWIRE XMMLSS
andLockmanfields. Wehaveobtained
spectroscopicredshiftsfor300newsourcesdown
to70micronfluxlimitof9mJyand R < 22. The
redshiftdistributionpeaksat ∼ 0.3 andhasahigh
redshifttailouttoz=3.5. Weperformemission
linediagnosticsforsourceswhereHα, Hβ , [NII]
and[SII] emissionlinesareavailabletodetermine
theirpowersource. Wefitsingletemperaturedust
SEDs, Fν = Aβ
ν B(ν, T ), to70micronsources
with160micronphotometrytoestimatedust
temperaturesandmasses. Assumingadust
emissivityindexof1.3wefindtemperaturesinthe
range ∼ 30 –50K anddustmassesintherange
106–109 M⊙ whichisconsistentwithresults
obtainedforSLUGS galaxies. Increasing β to2
resultsinslightlycoldertemperatures, which
suggesttheneedtoaccuratelydeterminethe
shapeoftheRayleigh-JeanstailofthedustSED
andmoreimportantlytounderstandtheroleof
colderdust. TherecentlylaunchedHerschel
satellitewillshedlightontheseissues. Wethen
buildfullSEDsforeachsourceusingthe
multiwavelengthdatafromopticaltofar-IR.We
findinoursamplesourceswithIR luminositiesin
range108–1013 L⊙ . TheSED fitsarethenused
toconstructthelocal(z < 0.5)70micron
luminosityfunctionandcompareourresultswith
theIRAS 60micronluminosityfunction.
FirstresultsfromtheDEBRIS survey
NeilPhillips (InstituteforAstronomy, Universityof
Edinburgh)with Jane Greaves, Brenda Matthews,
Bruce Sibthorpe, Grant Kennedy, Laura Churcher,
Amaya Moro-Martin, Mark Wyatt, and DEBRIS
consortium
TheDEBRIS surveyistargetingalargesampleof
nearbymain-sequencestarsystems, exploitingthe
wavelengthcoverage, spacialresolutionand
sensitivityofHerscheltodiscoverandcharacterise
cooldebrisdiscs. Herewepresentfirstresultsof
PACS 110and170micronsimagingoffivenearby
A andF typestarswithsignificantdustemission
(β Leo, β UMa, η Crv, ζ Tuc, ζ Dor). These
observationsarecomparedwithSpitzer/MIPS and
JCMT/SCUBA imagesatshorterandlonger
wavelengthsrespectively.
TheHerschel-ATLAS:A firstlook
EmmaRigby (UniversityofNottingham)with HATLAS team
TheHerschel-ATLAS isthelargestoftheHerschel
SpaceObservatory'sopen-timekeyprogrammes.
Itisalargeareaextragalacticsurveyproviding
simultaneousfivebandphotometryacrossa
wavelengthrangeof110-500microns. Thearea
coveredisfourtimesgreaterthanalltheother
Herschelextragalacticsurveyscombined, givinga
totalcoverageof550squaredegrees. I will
describethesurvey, andtheplannedscience
programmesassociatedwithit, andpresentthe
firstresultsfromthesciencedemonstrationphase
observations.
InitialresultsfromHerMES:theHerschelMultitieredExtragalacticSurvey
AnthonySmith (UniversityofSussex)with
HerMES Consortium
HerMES,theHerschelMulti-tieredExtragalactic
Survey, isthelargest(900hour)guaranteed-time
keyprojectonHerschel, designedtocharacterize
far-infraredandsubmillimetregalaxypopulations
overbroadrangesofredshift, luminosity, and
environment. Targetfieldsrangeinsizeanddepth
fromfractionsofasquaredegree, withdepths
belowthesubmillimetreconfusionlimitfor
characterizingthegalaxiesthatcontributethebulk
ofthefar-infraredandsubmillimetreextragalactic
background, totensofsquaredegreesforprobing
large-scalestructureandtherelationoffar-infrared
galaxiestodarkmatter. A subsetofinitialresults
fromtheScienceDemonstrationPhasewillbe
summarized, indicatingthehigh-redshiftscience
attainablewithHerschel. Areasofscience
include: measurementsofsourceconfusionnoise
levelsasafunctionofwavelength, galaxynumber
countsviadetectionstatisticsandfluctuation
analyses, galaxycolours, preliminaryspectral
energydistributionsandluminosityfunctionsfor
samplesofgalaxies, andearlyimplicationsfor
galaxymodels.
TheHerschelVirgoClusterSurvey(HeViCS)
MatthewSmith (CardiffUniversity)with HeViCS
Consortium
TheHerschelVirgoClusterSurvey(HeViCS) isan
opentimekeyprojecttoobserve64square
degreesofthenearbyVirgoCluster. Thecluster
willbeobservedinparallelmodeprovidingdata
at100, 160, 250, 350and500microns; which
canbecombinedwithawealthofdataatother
wavelengths. I willdescribethemotivationforthe
survey, thescientificobjectivesandsomeofour
firstresultsfromsciencedemonstrationdata.
EarlyHerschelResultsonStarFormation
DerekWard-Thompson (CardiffUniversity)with
J.M. Kirk, D. Stamatellos, and L. Wilcock
EarlyresultsfromHerschelarepresentedofa
numberofstar-formingregions. Imagingat5
wavebandsfrom70to500micronsallowoptical
depthandtemperaturemapstobemade. Cores
onthevergeofformingstarsareidentifiedand
modelled. Someofthesearestarlesscores, some
areprestellarandsomeareso-calledinfrareddark
clouds(IRDCs). FTS spectroscopyalsoallowsthe
gastobestudiedalongwiththedust. Typical
spectrashowthe12CO and13CO laddersof
lines, aswellasCI.Weuseamonte-carlomodel
toobtainthephysicalparameterswithinIRDCsfor
thefirsttime. Theimplicationsfortheformationof
high-massstarsarediscussed.
SPIRE FTS spectraofthreecarbon-richevolved
objects
RogerWesson (UniversityCollegeLondon)with
J. Cernicharo, M. Matsuura, M. Barlow, L. Decin,
E. Polehampton, and MESS consortium
Lowtointermediatemassstarslosemostoftheir
massduringtheirfinalstagesofevolution, inthe
formofcool, lowvelocitywinds. Thismasslossis
thedominantcontributortotheenrichmentofthe
interstellarmedium. Thepost-AGB objectsAFGL
618andAFGL 2688, andtheplanetarynebula
NGC 7027areamongthebest-studiedcarbonrichevolvedsources, andISO observations
showedthemtohaverichinfraredspectra. We
haveobtainedhighsignaltonoiseSPIRE FTS
spectraofthesethreeobjects, covering
wavelengthsfrom200-670microns, apreviously
unexploredregionofthespectrum. A large
numberofatomicandmolecularlinesfromawide
rangeofspeciesaredetected; wepresentthese
newspectraandpreliminaryanalyses
P08
Giantplanetmagnetospheres: JupiterandSaturn
ChrisArridge (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
ThemagnetospheresofJupiterandSaturnarethe
largestandmoststudiednon-terrestrial
magnetospheresintheSolarSystem. Thevastsize
ofthesestructuresispartlyduetostronginternal
dynamosandlargeplanetarymagneticmoments,
andpartlyduetotheirlocationintheheliosphere
wherethedynamicpressureofthesolarwindis
lowerthanthatneartheterrestrialplanets. Inside
thejovianandkronianmagnetospheres, large
neutraltoriiformfromneutralssputteredand
ejectedfromthesurfacesoficyandvolcanic
satellites. Theseneutraltoriibecomeionised,
producingplasmatorii. Thisplasmaisthen
subjecttoaradialdiffusionprocess, knownas
interchange, whichspreadstheplasmathroughout
themagnetosphere. Strongcentrifugalforces
associatedwiththerapidlyrotatingplasma
concentratethismaterialintoadisc. Outward
transportandcouplingbetweentheplanet's
ionosphereandequatorialmagnetospherealso
resultsinangularmomentumtransportbetween
theplanetandthemagnetosphericplasma. Inthis
talktheconfigurationandequilibriumofthe
jovianandsaturnianmagnetosphereswillbe
reviewedandwillfocuson: magnetosphericstress
balance, magnetosphere-ionospherecouplingand
thegenerationofplanetaryaurorae. Weshall
discusstheeffectsofdipoletiltandsolarwind
forcingandhowtheseprocesses"break"the
idealisednorth-southmagnetosphericsymmetry.
Thetalkwillconcludewithcommentsonthe
comparisonbetweengiantplanetandcooldwarf
magnetospheres.
Dynamicspectraofindividualradiopulsesinan
ultracooldwarf
GreggHallinan (UC Berkeley)
A numberofverylowmassstarsandbrown
dwarfshavebeendetectedproducingperiodic
pulsesofradioemission, whichhaveledtothese
sourcesbeingdubbed"ultracooldwarfpulsars".
Ourbestevidencetodatesuggeststhisradio
emissionisofthesamenatureasthatdetectedat
kHzandMHzfrequenciesfromthemagnetized
planetsinoursolarsystem, butrequiringmuch
morepowerfulkilogaussmagneticfields. More
recently, periodicsignalsofthesameperiodas
thosedetectedintheradiohavebeenfoundin
opticalandinfraredphotometricand
spectroscopicdataforanumberoftheseultracool
dwarfpulsars. I willdiscusstheresultsofarecent
Arecibocampaignthatprovidesbroadband
dynamicspectraofindividualradiopulsesfrom
theseobjectsaswellasamultifrequency
observationinvestigatingtherelationshipbetween
theradiopulsesandthemysteriousperiodic
signalsdetectedinopticalandinfrareddata.
PhysicalParametersofUltracoolDwarfs: The
YoungandTheOld
RobertKing (UniversityofExeter)with
MarkJ. McCaughrean, Jenny Patience,
Catia Cardoso, RobertDe Rosa, Derek Homeier,
and France Allard
I willpresentourcomprehensivestudyofthe
physicalpropertiestheoldfieldbrowndwarf
binary εIndiBa, Bb, thenearestbrowndwarfsto
theSun, includingresultsfromhighangular
resolutionoptical, near-infrared, andthermalinfraredimagingandmedium-resolution(uptoR
∼ 5000)spectroscopyoftheindividual
components, andournear-completeastrometric
monitoringtodeterminethedynamicalsystem
andindividualmassesofthesetwoT dwarfs. I will
thendetailtheobservationsandinterpretationof
theyoung, low-massobject2M1207b, ayoungL
dwarfwithanestimatedmassof ∼ 10MJup , butan
anomalouslylowluminosity. Thisobjectwill
serveasakeycomparisonforupcomingnearinfraredspectroscopyofplanetsimagedaround
stellarhosts.
Finally, I willbrieflydiscusstheproblems
associatedwithinferringphysicalpropertiesof
ultracooldwarfsfromlimiteddatasetsandthe
possibilitiesforusinghighresolution
spectroscopicobservationsofultracoolbinariesto
extractestimatesofthemetallicityfromsingle
objectsandso, inthelongerterm, investigateany
differenceinheavymetalenrichmentwhichmay
indicateformationthroughcoreaccretion.
Numericalsimulationoftheelectron-cyclotron
maserinstabilityinthemagnetospheresofbrown
dwarfs
AlexeyKuznetsov (ArmaghObservatory)with
Gerry Doyle
Recently, anumberofbrowndwarfshavebeen
foundtobebrightradiosources. Theirradio
emissionhashighbrightnesstemperature, high
polarizationdegree, andnarrowdirectivity. The
emissionisproducedmostlikelyduetothe
electron-cyclotronmaserinstabilityinaway
P07–P08
51
similartotheauroralradioemissionofthe
magnetizedplanetsoftheSolarsystem. Inthis
work, wesimulatenumericallygenerationofradio
emissioninmagnetospheresofbrowndwarfs. A
2D codehasbeendevelopedtoinvestigatethecoevolutionofanelectrondistributionanda
distributionofmagnetoionicplasmawaves. The
influencesofaconvergingmagneticfieldanda
field-alignedelectricfieldareconsidered, too. The
simulationparameterswerechosenbasingonthe
measurementsintheterrestrialmagnetosphere
andscaledtofittheexpectedconditionsatbrown
dwarfs. Wefoundthatthedownward-directed
accelerationofelectronsbyfield-alignedelectric
fieldtogetherwiththereflectionofparticlesfrom
magneticmirrorresultinformationofthe
"horseshoe"-likedistributions. Suchdistributions
areunstablewithrespecttoexcitationofdifferent
magnetoionicmodes, buttheZ-modeisdominant.
AmplificationoftheZ-modewavesandthe
electrondiffusiononthemresultinarapid
saturationoftheelectron-cyclotronmaser, and
thenthegrowthratesofallmodesdecrease
significantly. Thefastordinaryandextraordinary
modesareneveramplifieduptothesaturation
level. Ontheotherhand, thecontinuingactionof
thefield-alignedelectricfieldandconverging
magneticfieldpreventsthewave-particlesystem
fromreachingacompletelysaturatedstate. In
particular, thesefactorsareabletokeepthe
growthrateofthefastextraordinarymodeatthe
levelsufficienttoproduceanintenseradio
emission. Weusethesimulationresultsto
interprettheobservations, andtoestimatethe
parametersoftheemissionsources.
ThePeculiarbehaviourofRadioEmissioninFully
ConvectiveStars
PaulineLang (UniversityofStAndrews)with
Moira Jardine
LowMassStarshavebecomethesubjectof
intensestudyasthesearchforexoplanetsbecomes
moreadvanced. M Dwarfsareofparticular
interesttousastheycanbethoughtofasthe
'boundary'starsbetweenthesolar-typestarswith
radiativecoresandconvectiveenvelopesandthe
UltraCoolDwarfswhicharefullyconvective. In
mainsequencestarsthereisadirectcorrelation
betweenX-rayluminosityandRadioluminosity.
However, whenweentertherealmofthelow
massstarsthisrelationshipbreaksdown. Across
thefully-convectiveboundarytheX-rayluminosity
changeslittle, buttheradioemissionincreases; in
factthelessmassivethestarthegreaterthiseffect
becomes. Workingundertheassumptionthatthe
radioemissioncouldbebeingproducedinan
auroralring-likestructurenearthemagneticpole
ofthestar, weaimtoreproducetheradio
lightcurveseeninstarssuchasV374Peg.
UltraspecObservationsofTVLM 513-46546
StuartLittlefair (UniversityofSheffield)
TVLM 513-46546isthebeststudiedofthe
ultracooldwarfpulsars; verylowmassstarswhich
showpulsedradioemissionontherotational
periodofthestar. TheopticalvariabilityofTVLM
513-46546presentsapuzzle. Itshowsperiodic
variabilityontherotationperiod, butmulti-band
observationssuggesttheopticalvariabilityis
dominatedbypatchydustcloudsina
predominantlyneutralatmosphere. Thisis
surprisinginthecontextoftheradioemission.
Herewepresenttimeresolvedspectrophotometry
ofTVLM 513-46546usingtheelectron
multiplyingCCD,Ultraspec, takenaspartofa
52
P08–P09
multi-wavelengthcampaign. Thisdatasetallows
therelationshipbetweentheopticalvariability
andtheHalphalinefluxtobeinvestigated,
sheddingnewlightontheopticalvariabilityof
TVLM 513-46546.
Structureanddynamicsoftheboundaryof
Saturn'smagnetosphere
AdamMasters (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL) with N. Achilleos, A.J. Coates, and
M.K. Dougherty.
TheCassinispacecraft’sorbitaltourofSaturn
allowsustostudytheboundaryofagiant,
corotation-dominatedmagnetosphereintheouter
solarsystem. Processesoperateatthisinterface
betweenthesolarwindandSaturn’s
magnetospherethatleadtothetransportofmass,
momentumandenergyintothesystem. The
resultsofasurveyofthecrossingsoftheboundary
regionmadebytheCassinispacecraftare
presented. Theorientationofthemagnetopause
currentlayerisdeterminedforthemajorityofthe
crossings. Ananalysisoftheboundarynormals
suggeststhatthecrossingsmadeduringanumber
ofspacecraftorbitsweretheresultofwaveactivity
onthemagnetopausesurface. Thelow-latitude
internalboundarylayerischaracterised. Variations
intheboundarylayerandthedependenceofthe
propertiesofthelayerondifferentparametersare
investigated. Thewiderrelevanceoftheseresults
formagnetosphericscienceisdiscussed.
VariationofSaturn'sUV aurorawithSKR phase
JonathanNichols (UniversityofLeicester)with
B. Cecconi, J.T. Clarke, S.W.H. Cowley,
J.-C. Gérard, A. Grocott, D. Grodent, L. Lamy, and
P. Zarka
Itiswellknownthatvariouskronian
magnetosphericphenomenaexhibitoscillations
neartheplanetaryrotationperiod. However, the
emittedUV auroralpowerhasnotbeenshownto
varyattheSKR period. WeuseanempiricallydeterminedSKR phasetoorderthe'quiettime'
totalemittedUV auroralpowerasobservedbythe
HubbleSpaceTelescopein2005, 2007, 2008and
2009. OurresultssuggestthattheUV poweris
apparentlydependentonSKR phase, althoughthe
powervariationisonlybyfactorsoforder ∼ 2,
ratherthantheordersofmagnitudeobservedin
theSKR.Wealsoshowthatthevariationoriginates
fromthemorninghalfoftheoval, consistentwith
previousobservationsofthesourceoftheSKR.
Sourceofperiodicradioemission; lessonsfrom
Saturn
DavidSouthwood (ESA) with M.G. Kivelson
ThepulsingradiosignalsfromSaturn(Saturn
kilometricradiation, SKR),yieldsomeinteresting
lessonsforboththeproblemofidentifyingthe
ultimatesourceoftheradiosignalbutalsoon
whatmaybededucedfromperiodicradio
emissioningeneral. Commonlyithasbeen
thoughtthatperiodicradioemission, because
linkedtothemagneticfieldyieldsdirect
informationonthedeeprotationofanobject.
WhatisknownfromSaturndrawsthisassumption
intodoubt. Wereviewwhatisknowntherelation
betweentheSaturnemissionandtheplanetary
magnetosphericmagneticfieldaftersixyearsof
Cassinispacecraftorbitaldata. TheSKR is
generatedastheby-productofaninternal
interactioninthemagnetosphere. Theperiodic
signalisinpracticepulsedandyetlinkedtoa
rotatingmagneticstructure. Theprimary
interactionisaresultofthemodulationoffield-
alignedcurrentsgeneratedbetweentheouter
magnetosphericfieldwhereitisstressedbythe
solarwindandarotating“cam”magneticfield
structurewhichisthedominantfieldperturbation
intheinnerandmiddlemagnetosphere.
Influenceofupstreamsolarwindconditionson
atmosphericflowsatJupiter
JaphethYates (UniversityCollegeLondon)with
Nicholas Achilleos, and P. Guio
ThecouplingofJupiter'smagnetosphereand
ionosphereplaysavitalroleincreatingitsauroral
emissions. Thestrengthoftheseemissionsis
somewhatdependentontherelativerotational
flowswithinJupiter'sthermosphereandthe
magnetodisc. Usinganazimuthallysymmetric
globalcirculationmodel, wewereableto
simulatehowup-streamsolarwindconditions
affectatmosphericflows; herewepresentthese
preliminaryestimates. Wecalculatedmagnetic
fieldprofilesrepresentingcompressedand
expandedmagnetospheres, andtheseprofiles
werethenusedtogainfurtherinsightonthe
magneticconfigurationandcouplingofthe
magnetospherewiththeionosphereandhowthis
effectsglobalwindsandenergyinputswithin
Jupiter'sthermosphere.
Mappingradioemitting-regiononlow-massstars
andbrowndwarfs
ShenghuaYu (ArmaghObservatory)with
J.G. Doyle, G. Hallinan, A.L. MacKinnon, and
A.E. Antonova
A numberofrecentradioobservationsindicate
magneticactivityoperatedbydynamotheory
wouldbecommonphenomenononultracool
dwarfs(UCDs, spectralclasseslaterthanM7).
Currently ∼ 11 radioactiveUCDsareshowing
veryhighbrightnesstemperatureandhighly(upto
100%)circularpolarization, including3with
strongperiodicradiobeams. Thenatureofthe
emissioncouldbeinterpretedbyaneffective
amplificationmechanismofthehigh-frequency
electromagneticwaves- theelectroncyclotron
maser(ECM) instability. Wehaveperformedonedimensionalparticlesimulationtoinvestigate
responseofweaklyrelativisticelectronbeamstoa
magnetic-field-alignedelectricfieldinducedbya
time-varyingexternalcurrentsource. Wefound
relativisticelectronbeamscouldresultinstronger
instabilitythannonrelativisticbeams. Bythe
simulation, weareabletodeterminethesizeand
heightofradioemitting-region, electrondensity,
timescaleoftheinstabilityandevensurface
magneticfieldofUCDs.
P09
Determinationofthephotometriccalibrationand
large-scaleflatfieldoftheSTEREO Heliospheric
Imagers: I.HI-1
DanielleBewsher (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan)with D.S. Brown, C.J. Eyles, B.J. Kellett,
G.J. White, and B. Swinyard
Theaimofthispaperistocalculateanaccurate
large-scaleflatfieldfortheSTEREO HI-1
instruments. Thisisdonebyanalysingthe
variationinintensityofstarsinthebackground
starfieldastheypassacrosstheCCD.Inorderto
usethebackgroundstarfield, aphotometric
calibrationisperformedwhichdefinesaHI
magnitudescaleandaconversionbetweenthis
scaleandmeasuredintensity. Thephotometric
calibrationusesstellarspectrafoldedthroughthe
instrumentresponsetomakeinitialintensity
predictions. However, asecondaryprediction
methodbasedonthephotometriccalibration,
whichblendstheR-, V- andB-magnitudesofa
star, isderivedforstarswithnospectral
information. Inaddition, asolarspectrumfolded
throughtheinstrumentresponseisusedto
determineconversionfactorstoconvertfromHI
intensityunitsintomeansolarbrightness, S10and
SI units, fordiffuseorextendedsources.
TheRosettaPlasmaConsortium
ChrisCarr (ImperialCollegeLondon)with
Elizabeth Lucek
TheRosettamissionisoneoftheoriginal
‘cornerstone’missionsofESA’sHorizons2000
scienceprogramme. Thespacecraftwaslaunched
in2004, willrendezvouswiththecomet67P
Churyumov-Gerasimenkoin2014, followthe
cometfromdeep-spacethroughtoperihelion, and
placealandercraft(Philae)onitssurface.
Consequently, Rosettawillallowbothremote
sensingandinsitumeasurementssimultaneously.
Cometscontainthemostpristine, least-processed
materialinoursolarsystem. Thereareprobably
evenpre-solargrainspreservedinsidethese
bodies. TheaimofRosettaisnothinglessthanto
understandtheoriginsofthesolarsystem. Rosetta
appealstotwodistinctcommunities: theplanetary
andsolarsystemscientistswhowillinterpret
cometsasthebuildingblocksofthesolarsystem,
andthespacescientistswhoareconcernedwith
thegas/dust/plasmainteractionwiththesolar
wind. Forboth, thecometisanaturallaboratory
whichwouldbeimpossibletore-createonthe
ground. Rosettahastheopportunitytobringthese
strongUK communitiestogether, furthermore
thereisplentytointerestastronomerstoo. The
RosettaPlasmaConsortium(RPC) isasuiteof
instrumentationontheorbiterspacecraft
dedicatedtounderstandingtheevolutionofthe
comet/solar-windinteractionasafunctionof
heliocentricdistance(andhencecometary
activity). Inthisposterweoutlinethescientific
possibilitiesoftheRPC meaurements. Wedescribe
thecapabilitiesoftheinstrumentsuiteandthe
expectedenvironmentinwhichtheywilloperate.
EuropaJupiterSystemMission
MicheleDougherty (ImperialCollegeLondon)
TheEuropaJupiterSystemMission(EJSM) isan
internationalmissiontotheJupitersystemwith
jointparticipationfromESA andNASA.Itconsists
oftwoprimaryflightelementsoperatinginthe
Joviansystem: theESA-ledJupiterGanymede
Orbiter(JGO) andtheNASA-ledJupiterEuropa
Orbiter(JEO).JGO andJEO willexecutean
extendedchoreographedexplorationoftheJupiter
SystembeforesettlingintoorbitaroundGanymede
andEuropa, respectively. Theoverarchinggoalof
EJSM isthestudyoftheemergenceofhabitable
worldsaroundgasgiants. JGO andJEO willcarry
complementaryinstrumentstoachievethe
followingscienceobjectives: characterize
GanymedeandEuropaasplanetaryobjectsand
potentialhabitats, studyGanymede, Europa,
CallistoandIointhebroadercontextofthesystem
ofGalileansatellitesandfocusonJupiterscience
includingtheplanet, itsatmosphereandthe
magnetosphereasacoupledsystem.
SOHO CoronalDiagnosticSpectrometer
AndrzejFludra (STFC RutherfordAppleton
Laboratory)with Andrzej Fludra(STFC Rutherford
AppletonLaboratory)
TheSolarandHeliosphericObservatory(SOHO),
launchedinDecember1995, hasbeenin
operationforover14years. TheCoronal
DiagnosticSpectrometer(CDS) isaUK-led
instrumentonboardSOHO,operatedbyateam
fromtheRutherfordAppletonLaboratory. The
CDS facilityhasbeenusedextensivelybyalarge
usercommunity, including15UK researchgroups
andover60groupsworld-wide, andscience
studiesfill24hourseachday. CDS continuesto
beusedforallaspectsofsolaratmospheric
researchthatcanbestudiedfromEUV spectra,
participatinginregularobservingcampaignswith
HinodeandSTEREO spacecraft. Recenthighlights
includenewactiveregionloopsanalysis, new
resultsonexplosiveandgentlechromospheric
evaporationduringflares, spatiallyresolved
analysisofactiveregionheatinginthetransition
regionemission, andjointobservationsofHelium
linesbythreespectrometers(CDS,SUMER and
EIS) thatrevisethelong-standingproblemof
enhancedHeliumlineintensities. CDS remains
theonlyspectrometerobservingstrongspectral
linesfromseveralspecies, includingionsofFe, Si,
Al, Mg, Ca, Ne, N,O,andHe. Bright, unblended
linesatcooler, transitionregiontemperaturesare
uniquetoCDS andprovidemeasurementsof
Dopplervelocitiesofthecoolfilamentmaterial
associatedwithnearlyalleruptionsleadingto
CoronalMassEjections, throughlinesofHeI and
O V.CDS willthusbetheonlyavailablesourceof
spectroscopiccharacterisationoftheunderlying,
coolplasmainvolvedineruptiveeventsandCMEs
observedwiththeSolarDynamicsObservatory
AIA fromApril2010. JointCDS andSDO
observationswillbealsovitalforstudiesof
thermalstructureandheatingofloopsinthequiet
sunandactiveregions, thesolarEUV irradiance,
andin-flightcalibrationofthespectralresponseof
theSDO AIA bands.
SuperDARN UK:A newresourcetostudyofthe
upperatmosphere
MarkLester (UniversityofLeicester)with
G. Chisham, M.P. Freeman, S.E. Milan, J.A. Wild,
and T.K. Yeoman
TheSuperDualAuroralRadarNetwork
(SuperDARN) hasprovidedobservationsofthe
polar, auroral, andsub-auroralionosphereinboth
hemispheresforthelast16years. TheUK has
playedacentralroleintheinitialdevelopmentof
SuperDARN andinitsexpansionthroughthe
constructionandoperationsofradarsatHalley
Antarctica, fundedbyNERC,andinFinlandand
Iceland, fundedbyPPARC andSTFC.Furthermore
theUK hasbeenoneofthemajorusersofthedata
fromthenetwork. Withthemoveofgroundbased
STP fromSTFC toNERC,thewholeoftheUK's
contributiontoSuperDARN comesundertheremit
ofNERC.Recently, ajointprogrammebetween
theBritishAntarcticSurvey(BAS) andthe
UniversityofLeicesterhasseenthedeploymentof
aradarontheFalklandIslandsspecificallyto
investigatetheupperatmosphereinthatregion.
AninitiativebeingdevelopedbyBAS,the
UniversityofLeicesterandLancasterUniversity
willprovideanewUK facility, SuperDARN UK,
whichwillenabletheUK atmosphericcommunity
tohave(i)directaccesstocontinuousregional
synopticandclimatologicalmeasurementsof
winds, wavesandtidesintheNorthandSouth
Atlanticsectorupperatmosphere, andofenergy
inputsfromSpace; (ii)opportunitiestoruntheir
ownupperatmosphereexperimentsononeor
moreradars, forupto50%ofthetotaloperational
time; (iii)immediatehigh-leveldataproductsfrom
thewiderSuperDARN network; (iv)usersupport
forSuperDARN dataanalysissoftwareand
experimentdesign; and(v)trainingopportunities
forstudentsinradartechnologyandatmospheric
scienceexperiments. Inthispresentationwegive
anoverviewofthesystem, thedataproducts
availableandthesciencewhichcanbeachieved
withSuperDARN.
ClusterFGM:currentandfuturescientific
opportunities
ElizabethLucek (ImperialCollege)with C.M. Carr
Scienceopportunitiesforgeospacestudies?
MikeHapgood (STFC RutherfordAppleton
Laboratory)
Thenear-Earthspaceenvironmentisanimportant
targetforscientificresearcharoundtheworld. Its
differentregions(ionosphere/thermosphere,
plasmasphere, radiationbeltsandmagnetosphere)
exhibitmanyphysicalprocessesthatchallengeour
understanding, thatareoftenofpractical
importanceandthatareexemplarsofprocesses
thatoccurinmanyotherastrophysical
environments. Thistalkwilloutlineanumberof
currentandfutureopportunitiestostudythese
regionsandexplorehowUK scientistscanexploit
thoseopportunities.
TheSTEREO Mission
RichardHarrison (RutherfordAppletonLaboratory)
with C.J. Davs, J.A. Davies, C.J. Eyles, and
S. Crothers
WeprovideastatusreportontheNASA STEREO
missionandinparticularontheUK-led
HeliosphericImagerinstruments, includingan
updateofrecentscientificresults.
Theuniquefour-point, multi-instrument
measurementsmadebytheClusterspacecraftover
nearly10yearshavealreadyrevolutionisedour
understandingofthedynamicsofspaceplasma
physicsprocesses. However, therecentextension
ofthemissionuntiltheend2012, togetherwith
theevolutionofthespacecraftorbittocrossnew,
asyetunexploredregionsofthemagnetosphere,
promisethatdiscoverieswillcontinuetobemade.
Theopportunityforscientificprogressisalso
supportedbytheunprecedentedwealthofhigh
qualityandhighresolutiondatafromallCluster
instruments, availabletoallscientiststhroughthe
ESA ClusterActiveArchive. Inthepastfewyears
thesatelliteorbithasevolvednaturally, and
measurementshavealreadystartedtobemadein
theauroralaccelerationregion. Another
productiveareahasbeenincollaborationswith
the5THEMIS spacecraftlaunchedbyNASA.In
thenearfutureadditionalkeysciencetargetswill
bemeasurementsofcurrentdisruptioninthetail;
samplingthepartialringcurrentandits
connectionwithmagnetosphericcurrentsystems;
measurementoftheradiationbeltsandtheinner
plasmasphere; andconjunctionswithSWARM:3
satellitesscheduledforlaunchbyESA in2011to
makecomprehensivemeasurementsofthe
strength, directionandevolutionoftheEarth’s
field. Finally, anewinitiativetoopenupCluster
P09
53
sciencetothewiderscientificcommunityhas
beenmadebymakingacallforscienceproposals
for“specialorbits”, allowinginstrument
operationstobetailoredtoaparticularscientific
target, Thenewemphasisonmeasurementsofthe
innermagnetospherepresentchallengesforthe
magnetometer, asthemagneticfieldmagnitude
exceedsourexpectedoperatingrange. Inthis
posterweconsidersomeoftheforthcoming
scientificopportunities, andsummarisethestatus
ofFGM calibrationsanddataavailability.
SolarOrbiter: exploringtheSunandHeliosphere
connection
RichardMarsden (ESA)
Understandingtheconnectionsandthecoupling
betweentheSunandtheheliosphereisof
fundamentalimportancetoaddressingoneofthe
majorscientificquestionsoftheESA Cosmic
Vision2020programme: "HowdoestheSolar
Systemwork?"Theheliospherealsorepresentsa
uniquelyaccessibledomainofspace, where
fundamentalphysicalprocessescommontosolar,
astrophysicalandlaboratoryplasmascanbe
studiedunderconditionsimpossibletoreproduce
onEarth, ortostudyfromastronomicaldistances.
TheresultsfrommissionssuchasHelios, Ulysses,
Yohkoh, SOHO,TRACE andRHESSI,aswellas
therecentlylaunchedHinodeandSTEREO
missions, haveformedthefoundationofour
understandingofthesolarcorona, thesolarwind,
andthethree-dimensionalheliosphere. Eachof
thesemissionshadaspecificfocus, beingpartof
anoverallstrategyofcoordinatedsolarand
heliosphericresearch. However, animportant
elementofthisstrategyhasyettobeimplemented.
Noneofthesemissionshavebeenabletofully
exploretheinterfaceregionwherethesolarwind
isbornandheliosphericstructuresareformed
withsufficientinstrumentationtolinksolarwind
structuresbacktotheirsourceregionsattheSun.
ThisistheoverarchinggoalofSolarOrbiter. With
previouslyunavailableobservationalcapabilities
providedbythepowerfulcombinationofin-situ
andremotesensinginstruments, andtheunique
inner-heliosphericmissiondesignspecifically
tailoredforthetask, SolarOrbiterwilladdressthe
centralquestionofheliophysics: Howdoesthe
Suncreateandcontroltheheliosphere? Inthis
paper, wewillpresentthedetailedsciencegoals
ofthemissionandbrieflyreviewitsstatus.
SolarOrbiter: TheSolarWindAnalyser
Investigation
ChristopherOwen (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL) with D.O. Kataria, B.K. Hancock,
A.N. Fazakerley, C. Brockley-Blatt, P. Louarn,
S. Livi, and R. Bruno
SolarOrbiterwillexploreinnermostheliosphere
tounravellinksbetweenactivityinthemagnetic
field-dominatedregimeofthesolarcoronaand
theirconsequencesintheparticle-dominated
regimeoftheinterplanetarymedium. Theselinks
willberevealedthroughanalysisofobservations
oftheSunfromacomplementofpowerful, highresolutionopticalinstruments, togetherwiththose
fromstate-of-the-artinstrumentswhichsample, in
situ, theproperties, dynamicsandinteractionsof
plasma, fieldsandparticlesinthenear-Sun
heliosphere. Inaddition, theseplasmaandfield
instrumentshavehightemporalresolutions, and
thusofferuniquepossibilitiesforresolvingplasma
kineticprocessesatintrinsicscales.
Inordertoachievethemissionsciencegoals, we
needhigh-cadencemeasurementsof3D velocity
54
P09–P10
distributionfunctionsofthesolarwindelectron,
protonand α−particlespopulations, abundant
heavyionssuchasO6+andlowironchargestates
suchasFe9+orFe10+. Thesemeasurementsare
amongthosethatwillbemadebytheSolarWind
Analyser(SWA) suiteonSolarOrbiter. This
investigationrequiresmajorinternational
hardwarecollaborations, butisledbytheUK (P.I.
institute: UCL/MullardSpaceScienceLaboratory).
Inadditiontotheoverallleadershipofthesuite,
UCL/MSSL willprovidethebulkofthehardware
fortheElectronAnalyserSystem, oneof3sensor
systemswithinthesuite. TheProton-AlphaSensor
andtheHeavyIonSensorareledbypartnersin
FranceandtheUSA respectively, whileacentral
dataprocessingunit, tobebuiltinItaly, servesall
3sensorsandcompletesthesuite.
Inthisposterwebrieflypresentthesciencegoals
relatedtotheinsituexplorationoftheinner
heliosphereand, inparticular, weaddressthe
SWA sensordesignsrequiredtomeetthesegoals
underSolarOrbiterschallengingmeasurement
environment.
HinodeUnveilsA NewSun
JianSun (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL) with
Louise Harra, David Williams, Len Culhane,
Lucie Green, and Deb Baker
HinodeisajointJapan/UK/US missionwithESA
andNorwegianinvolvement. Usinga
combinationofoptical, EUV andX-ray
instrumentationHinodewillstudytheinteraction
betweentheSun'smagneticfieldanditscoronato
increaseourunderstandingofthecausesofsolar
variabilityandtheoriginsofsolaractivity. Hinode
waslaunchedsuccessfullyinSeptember2006.
Thispostergivesanoverviewofthethree
instrumentson-boardtheHinodespacecraft: Solar
OpticalTelescope(SOT),X-RayTelescope(XRT)
andEUV imagingspectrometer(EIS).Several
significantobservationalresultsobtainedduring
thefirst3.5yearsofmissionoperationsarealso
presented.
NASA SDO,itsscienceandtheUCLandata-hub
RobertWalsh (UniversityofCentralLancashire)
with S. Dalla, D. Bewsher, B.J.I. Bromage,
D.S. Brown, S.A. Chapman, M. Marsh, J. Pearson,
C. Alexander, and J. Kelly
LaunchedonFebruary11, 2010, theSolar
DynamicsObservatory(SDO) willrevolutionise
ourunderstandingoftheSunwithitsexcellent
temporalresolutionandcontinuousfulldisk
coverage. Thispresentationwillhighlightthe
scientificaimsofthemissionandhowitsthreeinstrumentsuitewillprovideawealthof
opportunitiesfornewdiscoveries. Inparticular,
wewillemphasizethechallengesassociatedwith
theapproximateterabyteperdaysizeofthe
datasetandwillpresenttheSDO/AIA datahub
beingsetupattheUniversityofCentral
Lancashire. Further, wewilloutlinehowtheUK
solarcommunitywillbeabletointeractwiththe
hubintheverynearfuture.
P10
TheWFCAM ScienceArchive
RobBlake (RoyalObservatoryEdinburgh)with
Nigel Hambly, Eckhard Sutorius, Mike Read,
Nick Cross, Ross Collins, Mark Holliman, and
Peredur Williams
InfraRedDeepSkySurveysoftheNorthern
Hemisphere
TheWFCAM ScienceArchive(WSA) isamature,
databasedriven, webaccessibleproductproviding
accesstodatatakenbytheWFCAM instrumenton
UKIRT aspartoftheUKIRT InfraRedDeepSky
Surveys(UKIDSS).
Thedataareavailableaspixeldata(inmultiextensionFITS files), jpegimages(includingcolour
imageswhereavailable), aswellasfullyqueryable
relationaldatabasescontainingfullinformationon
alldetections.
AswellasUKIDSS data, theWSA alsocontains
neighbourtablesrelatingUKIDSS detectionsto
thoseofothersurveys(including2MASS,2XMM,
MGC,andsixdatareleasesfromtheSloanDigital
SkySurvey). Forconvenience, alloftheseexternal
cataloguesarealsoavailabledirectlythroughthe
WSA interfacesothatdetectionscanbeinstantly
queriedinallsurveys.
February2010sawtheseventhUKIDSS data
release(DR7)containingover105millionsources
coveringover3,000squaredegreesacrossthreeof
thesurveys(theLargeAreaSurvey, Galactic
ClustersSurvey, andDeepExtragalacticSurvey)
withdepthsofuptomagnitude22.4. A further
770millionsourcescoveringover1,300square
degreesareduetobeaddedshortlywiththe
additionoftheGalacticPlaneSurvey(GPS) into
DR7.
Wepresentanoverviewofthelatestfeatures
containedinDR7whichareavailabletoregistered
users, aswellascoveringthefeaturesnow
accessibletoeveryoneinourlatestworldrelease
(DR4).
DataIntegrationinHeliophysics
JohnBrooke (UniversityofManchester)with
Anja LeBlanc
Heliophysicsisarelativelynewdisciplinethat
explorestheSun-SolarSystemConnection.
Althoughtheindividualcommunitiesinvolvedin
heliophysicsarewellestablished, theyhave
evolvedindependentlyandcurrentlyitis
extremelydifficulttofindandcomparedatafrom
acrossthediversesetofexistingdataarchives. We
describetheuseofmethodsderivedfromthe
SemanticWebtoaddressthisproblem. Wehave
integrateddescriptionsofdatatodevelopan
abstractheliophysicsdomainontology, whichcan
bethoughtofasacontrolledvocabularyenriched
withrulesthatcanbereasonedaboutby
machines. Theaimofthisontologyisbeusedto
mapdata(describedbydatamodels)from
differentregionsoftheheliosphere. Wearealso
developinganontologyforcoordinatesystems,
whichcandeterminewhethercoordinatesystems
canbetranslatedintoeachotherandifso,
whetherthetimeisaparameteroftheoperation.
Wealsodescribeworkflowswhichusean
ontologytofindrelevantdatasets, e.g. whichuses
anabstracttermsuchas"flare"toquerydatasets
fromtheHESSI flarelist, YOKOH flarelist, KSO
flarelist. Theworkflowfindsoverlappingevent
datafromdifferentsources, itfindstherelevant
timeintervaandlooksuptheeventlist, and
checkswhetherallinstrumentshavedatatothis
eventandreturnsonlyeventsanddatawhich
overlapeachother. ThisworkispartoftheHELIO
projectfundedbytheEU intheFP7programme,
seehttp://www.helio-vo.eu/
Thismethodthereforeprovidesadirectlink
betweenSPH simulatorsandobservers, allowing
moreconcreteobservationalpredictionstobe
made. I willillustratethisbyimagingSPH
simulationsofprotostellardiscsystemsto
determinewhatfeaturescanberesolved, e.g. disc
spiralarmsorembryonicprotoplanets.
TheSuperWASP publicarchive
OliverButters (UniversityofLeicester)with
R.G. West, D. Pollacco, C. Hellier, A.C. Cameron,
and WASP Consortium
Newinfraredandopticalimagesservicesinthe
VO
NigelHambly (UniversityofEdinburgh)with
M.S. Holliman, M.A. Read, and R.G. Mann
TheSuperWASP (WideAngleSearchforPlanets)
projectistheworld'sleadingtransitingexoplanet
survey. Itconsistsoftworoboticobservatories
(oneintheNorthernhemisphereandtheotherin
theSouthernhemisphere)thatconstantlymonitor
thenightsky. Imagesaretakensimultaneously
fromeightwide-anglecamerasineachcase. Data
firststartedtobetakenin2004, sincethenthe
datasethasbeenextensivelysearchedfor
transitingexoplanets. Other(nonexoplanet)
sciencehascomefromthedataalso, suchasthe
correlationofROSAT sourceswithvariablestars
andasteroidstudies, butthereisstillawealthof
othersciencethatcanbedonewiththedata. With
thisinmindweannouncethefirstpublicdata
releaseoftheSuperWASP archive.
ThisposterdescribesnewSimpleImageAccess
(SIA) servicespublishedtotheVirtualObservatory
bytheWideFieldAtronomyUnitattheInstitute
forAstronomy, UniversityofEdinburgh. Inthe
infrared, weprovideimagesfromthelatest
releasesfromUKIDSS,including1000sofsquare
degreesfromthewide-angle, shallowsurveysin
1.0to2.5micronpassbands(YJHK).Intheoptical,
weprovideanall-skySIA cut-outservicebasedon
thelegacySchmidttelescopephotographic
surveys(epoch1949-2000)asdigitisedbythenow
decommissionedprecisionplatescanningfacility
SuperCOSMOS.Everypartoftheskyiscoveredin
BRI withatleasttwoepochsinR;multiple-epoch
imagesareavailableinthesubstantialsurvey
overlapregions. Furthermore, specialistregions
haveadditionalfilter/epochcoverage, e.g. Halpha
andmatchedR exposuresintheGalacticPlane,
andaround200multi-epoch/colourimagesspread
over30yearsintheESO/SRC surveyfield287at
21h28m, -4500(B1950).
Thisfirstdatarelease(DR1)startsin2004inthe
Northand2006intheSouthandstretchesto2008
inbothcases. Thiscorrespondstojustunderfive
millionimages, each7.8x7.8degrees. Fromthese
imagesover100billiondatapointshavebeen
extractedforover20millionuniqueobjects. The
SuperWASP publicarchivemakesallthisdata
searchableanddownloadableviaawebinterface
hostedattheUniversityofLeicester.
VOeventstriggeredbygravitywaves
TobiaCarozzi (Univ. ofGlasgow)with
Norman Gray, and Graham Woan
VirtualObservatoryevents(VOevents)areXML
basedmessagesthatdescribeastronomicalevents.
TodatedespitethediversityofVOevents, ranging
fromsupernovaeto γ−raybursts, theyhaveall
beenofelectromagneticorigin. Inthiswork, we
lookathowtheVOeventframeworkcanalsobe
useddescribeeventsofagravitionalorigin. We
alsolookathowVOeventscanbepropagated
fromtheLIGO-VirgoAlertSystemtoVOevent
subscribersusingtheExtensibleMessagingand
PresenceProtocol(XMPP).
NativeSyntheticImagingofSmoothedParticle
HydrodynamicsSimulations
DuncanForgan (SUPA,IfA,Universityof
Edinburgh)with Ken Rice
I willpresentanewnumericalmethodforcreating
syntheticobservablesfromSmoothedParticle
Hydrodynamics(SPH) simulations. Itemploys
MonteCarloRadiativeTransfer(MCRT) techniques
toemulatethetransmissionofphotonsthrougha
medium, incorporatingbothabsorptionand
scattering, capturingthemonanimageplaneina
manneranalogoustothecaptureofphotonenergy
onaCCD.
UnlikepreviousattemptsatimagingSPH fields, I
employraytracingtechniquesthatdonotrequire
gridding, preservingthesimulation'snative
resolvingpower. Thecodealsousesalgorithms
originallydevelopedforcomputergraphics
problemstooptimiseitsefficiency.
TheseserviceshavebeenpublishedtotheVO
throughtheWFAU publishingregistry, whichcan
befoundthroughtheIVOA RegistryofRegistries.
VirtualObservatoryServicesatWFAU
MarkHolliman (UniversityofEdinburgh, Institute
forAstronomy)with Mike Read
TheWideFieldAstronomyUnithostsanumberof
VirtualObservatory(VO) servicesthatenable
accesstobothdataandprocessingapplications
housedonourserversinEdinburgh. These
servicesprovideastronomerswithapowerfulset
oftoolsforobtainingandprocessingdatainways
unattainablethroughconventionalaccess
methods. Theservicesofferedincludeconesearch
andADQL accesstoanumberofmajordatabases
developedbyourdatacentresuchasUKIDSS,
SuperCOSMOS ScienceArchive, andthe6dF
GalaxySurvey, andalsomanymirrorsof
importantdatabasesdevelopedelsewhere, suchas
SDSS,IRAS,and2XMM .ImagesforUKIDSS and
SuperCOSMOS areaccessiblethroughSIA
services. Thereareusefuldataprocessingtools
liketheSTILTS libraryfortablemanipulation, a
dataminingtoolforclassificationusingkernel
densityanalysis, andaserviceforconverting
VOTablesintoKML foruseinGoogleSky. Also
hostedareanumberofVO infrastructureservices
likeafullregistryandVOSpacethatenableusers
tofindresourcesandstoredatainanonline
accessiblelocation. WFAU providessecuredVO
servicestotheproprietaryUKIDSS releases, which
arethefirstsecuredVO servicesforamajor
proprietarydataresourceintheentireVO.Witha
limitedknowledgeofpythonandacopyofthe
VODesktopsoftwareastronomerscanscriptup
workflowsthatutilizetheseservicestoperform
complexoperationslikecrossmatchingbetween
disparatedatasetsorextractingcataloguesfrom
imagesremotely. Sincemanyofourdatabasesare
toolargetobedownloadedandaccessedlocally
theseservicesmakeitpossibletoaccomplish
complicatedtasksonlineandondedicated
hardware. WFAU’slistofVO serviceswill
continuetogrowasnewIVOA standardsare
implementedandwiththeadditionofnew
datasetsliketheVISTA surveys.
GraphicInterfacestoExplanatoryAnalysisof
AstronomicalImageDatabases
AvonHuxor (UniversityofBristol)with S. Phillipps
Inthisposterwewillpresentongoingworkin
whichearlydesignsforavisualinterfaceto
massiveimagingdatabases, suchasSDSS,are
outlined. Althoughmanytoolsforthepresentation
andanalysisofcataloguedataareavailable(e.g.
TOPCAT),theserequirethattheimagedatais
processedintointomoreabstract, typically
quantitative, properties. Howeverinthe
exploratoryphaseofthescientificprocessthe
propertiespresentinthecataloguesmaynotbe
relevant. Moreover, thelessonsfromCSCW
(computer-supportedcollaborativeworking)show
thatprematureformalisation(Shipmanand
Marshall1994)mayhinderproductivity. Inearlier
work(Huxor1994), weshowedthevalueofa
mixedinterfacecombiningtheformalnotationof
knowledge-baseswiththeinformalcomponentof
free-text. Weshowhowthisinterfacedesigncan
beextendedtoprovidesupportfortheexploratory
analysisofastronomicalimagedatabases. This
allowstheusetomanipulatetheformal'tags'
associatewiththeimagesofobjectsofinterest,
supportingbothformalandinformalreasoning.
Developingskillsfor“softwareastronomy”: an
innovativedistancelearningprojectforOpen
Universitystudents
MarkJones (TheOpenUniversity)with
James Smith, and Alan Cayless
Theabilitytoaccesslargeastronomicaldatasets
remotelyandthedevelopmentofvirtuallearning
environmentstogetherprovideaframeworkwhich
potentiallyallowsstudentstoconduct
astronomicalresearch. However, theexistenceof
suchsystems, initself, isnotsufficienttofacilitate
theeffectivedevelopmentofskillswhichwould
allowundergraduatestudentstomakeappropriate
useoftheavailabledata. Herewedescribea
projecttoallowgeographicallyseparatedstudents
toworktogethertoformacompositequasar
spectrumfromdatafromtheSloanDigitalSky
Survey. Drawingontheresultsofasmall-scale
pilotstudy, wedescribethedesignand
developmentoftheteachingmaterialtosupport
thisproject. Wediscusstheparticularchallenges
posedindevelopingstudentsintheinformation
handlingandinformationliteracyskillswhichare
requiredtoconduct“databaseastronomy”.
SupportingDistributedScience: RunningGalaxy
Zoo
ChrisLintott (UniversityofOxford)with
Arfon Smith, and GalaxyZooteam
Sinceitslaunchin2007, GalaxyZoohasgrownto
betheworld'slargestastronomicalcollaboration,
involvingmorethan250,000membersofthe
publicinclassifyinggalaxies, simulatingmergers
andhuntingforsupernovae. Developingand
supportingtheinfrastructurenecessaryforsucha
largeprojectbringschallengesofscalabilitythat
mostmodernastronomyprojectsface. I will
reviewthesolutiontheGalaxyZooteamhave
foundforsupportingsuchprojects(involving
extensiveuseofwebservicesandhostinginthe
cloud)alongwiththemethodsdevelopedtoturn
rawclicksintoscience. Finally, I willconsiderthe
P10
55
impacttheavailabilityoflargenumbersof
volunteerswillhaveonfuturesurveysand
programssuchastheLSST.
SoftwaretoolsforprocessingRHESSI visibilities
AnnaMariaMassone (CNR-SPIN) with
Michele Piana
RHESSI imagingconceptistheoneofimage
modulation: theninepairsofrotatingRHESSI
gridsprovideatemporalmodulationofthe
arrivingflux, whosepatternrepresentsaspecific
setofspatialFouriertransformofthesource. These
complexdata, thepurestformoftheRHESSI data
stream, arecalledvisibilities. Thistalkwillfirst
describeanewsoftwaretoolforthecreationof
regularizedelectronvisibilitiesassociatedtothe
photonvisibilitiesmeasuredbyRHESSI.This
softwareprovidesthesolarphysicscommunity
withaneffectiveimagingspectroscopyprocedure
whereelectronmapsoftheflaringsourceare
synthesizedatdifferentelectronenergychannels
andasmoothingconstraintalongsuchenergiesis
automaticallyimposed. Thenan
interpolation/extrapolationimagingmethodwill
bepresented, forthereconstructionofmapsfrom
bothphotonandelectronRHESSI visibilities.
Thehierarchicalstabilityofexoplanetarysystems
ofBinarystarsusingtheCaledonianSymmetric
Four-Bodymodelwithanewglobalregularisation
algorithmtohandlecloseencounters
BonnieSteves (GlasgowCaledonianUniversity)
with Anoop Sivasankaran, and Winston Sweatman
TheCaledonianSymmetricFourBodyProblem
(CSFBP) (StevesandRoy, 2001; Szell, Stevesand
Erdi, 2004: andShoaib, StevesandSzell, 2008)is
arestrictedfourbodygravitationalmodelrelevant
tothestudyofthestabilityandevolutionof
symmetricquadruplestellarclustersand
exoplanetarysystemsoftwoplanetsorbitinga
binarypairofstars. Oneofthemaindifficultiesin
studyingtheCSFBP wasthefailingofthe
numericalintegrationalgorithmtomaintain
conservationofenergyandangularmomentum
nearsingularitieswhichoccurredattwo-body
closeencounters. Recentlywehavedevelopeda
regularizationalgorithmtostudycloseencounters
andcollisioneventsoccurringintheCSFBP
(Sivasankaran, StevesandSweatman, 2009, 2010).
Inthisposterpaper, wewillillustratethat, the
developedregularizedalgorithmiscapableof
handlingthetwo-bodycloseencountersefficiently
byinvestigatingasetofCSFBP orbitscontaining
closeencounterevents. Theproposed
regularisationalgorithmhasbetternumerical
accuracyandenergyconservingproperties. Itis
nowpossibleforustoapplytheCSFBP modelto
studythestabilityandevolutionofsymmetricexoplanetarysystemsoftwoplanetsorbitingabinary
starsystem, includingthosesystemswhichpass
throughcloseencounters. Wehavenumerically
verifiedthatthehierarchicalstabilityofthesystem
dependsonananalyticalstabilityparameter
calledtheSzebehelyconstant. TheSzebehely
constantisafunctionofthetotalenergyand
angularmomentumofthesystemanditdepends
onlyontheinitialconditionsofthesystem. Using
thenewregularisationmethodforawiderangeof
Szebehely'sconstantandinitialconditions, weare
abletoverifythefour-bodyanalyticalstability
criterionofStevesandRoy(2001)andgivean
overallstabilitycriterionforpairsofexo-planets
orbitingsymmetricbinarystarsystems.
56
P10–P11
P11
Dodarkmatterhaloshavecusps?
ChrisBrook (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute, UCLan)
PureN-bodysimulationshaveshownthatcold
darkmatterhaloshavesteepinnerdensityprofiles,
or"cusps". Yetobservationsofrotationcurvesof
diskgalaxiesinferaflatter, coredinnerdensity
profile. Usingselfconsistentcosmologicalgalaxy
formationsimulations, weshowthattheinclusion
ofbaryons, whicharedynamicallysignificantin
theinnerregionsofhalos, candramaticallyalter
theprofileofthedarkmatter. Oursimulations
resultin"bulgeless"diskgalaxieswithdarkmatter
cores.
Extremevaluestatistics: predictingthefrequency
ofthedensestclustersandsparsestvoids
OlafDavis (Oxford)with Stephane Colombi,
Julien Devriendt, and Joe Silk
Oneinterestingpropertyofrandomfields- suchas
theobserveddensityfieldoftheuniverse- isthe
distributionoftheirhighestmaximaandlowest
minima. Inparticular, themaximaofthedark
matterfieldtranslatetothethelocationsofthe
mostmassiveclusters, whichexistinthehighly
non-linearregimeofgravitationalclusteringand
probetheevolutionofthepowerspectrumunder
gravity.
TorelatethetheoreticalmaximaoftheDM density
withobservedmaximainasmallregionofthe
universerequiresanunderstandingofthe
behaviourofsamplemaxima: thisisthedomainof
extremevalueorGumbelstatistics.
Wepresentanalyticalcalculationswhichcan
predictthedistributionofsuchmaximaand
minimafromtheunderlyingpowerspectrum, and
demonstrateagoodagreementwithsimulated
Gaussianfields. Wealsocompareourpredictions
totheHorizon4Πsimulation, acosmological
scaledarkmattersimulationcontaining70billion
particles.
Potentialapplicationswillbediscussed, including
likelihoodconstraintsonvoidcosmologies, and
applicationtoobservedCMB anomaliessuchas
thecoldspotand'AxisofEvil'.
Cosmologyonsmallscales: thestructureof
(mostly)darkmatterhalos
CarlosFrenk (DurhamUniversity)
Thestandardmodelofcosmology- the"Λcold
darkmatter"model- isbasedontheideathatthe
darkmatterisacollisionlesselementaryparticle,
probablyasupersymmetricparticle. Thismodel
hasbeenfamouslyverifiedbyobservationsofthe
cosmicmicrowavebackgroundradiationandthe
large-scaledistributionofgalaxies. However, the
modelhasyettobetestedconclusivelyonthe
smallscalesappropriatetomostastronomical
objects, suchasgalaxiesandclusters. I willreview
ourcurrentunderstandingofthedistributionof
darkmatteronsmallscaleswhichderiveslargely
fromlargecosmologicalN-bodysimulationsandI
willdiscussprospectsfordetectingdarkmatter,
eitherthroughitsgravitationaleffectongalaxies
andclustersor, moredirectly, through γ−ray
annihilationradiation.
SuddenFutureSingularitymodelsasan
alternativetoDarkEnergy?
HodaGhodsi (UniversityofGlasgow)with
MartinA. Hendry
Oneofthekeychallengesfacingcosmologists
todayisthenatureofthemysteriousdarkenergy
introducedinthestandardmodelofcosmologyto
accountforthecurrentacceleratingexpansionof
theuniverse. Inthisregard, manyothernonstandardcosmologieshavebeenproposedwhich
wouldeliminatetheneedtoexplicitlyincludeany
formofdarkenergy. Onesuchmodelisthe
SuddenFutureSingularity(SFS) model, inwhich
noequationofstatelinkingtheenergydensityand
thepressureintheuniverseisassumedtohold. In
thismodelitispossibletohaveablowupofthe
pressureoccurringinthenearfuturewhilethe
energydensitywouldremainunaffected. The
particularevolutionofthescalefactorofthe
Universeinthismodelthatresultsinasingular
behaviourofthepressurealsoadmitsacceleration
inthecurrenteraasrequired. InthiscontributionI
willpresenttheresultsofthetestsofanexample
SFS modelagainstthecurrentdatafromhigh
redshiftsupernovae, baryonacousticoscillations
(BAO) andthecosmicmicrowavebackground
(CMBR).WeexplorethelimitsplacedontheSFS
modelparametersbythecurrentdatathrough
employinggrid-basedandMCMC search
methods. Thisletsusdiscusstheviabilityofthe
SFS modelinquestionasanalternativetothe
standardconcordancecosmology.
Probingthedarkmatterhalosofearly-type
galaxiesvialensing
IgnacioFerreras (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL)
LoCuSS:WeakLensingAnalysisof21Galaxy
Clustersatz=0.15-0.3
VictoriaHamilton-Morris (Universityof
Birmingham)with G.P. Smith, E. Egami, T. Targett,
C. Haines, and A. Sanderson
Thecombinationofgravitationallensingongalaxy
scalesandstellarpopulationsynthesisenablesus
toconstrainthebaryonfractioningalaxies,
probingtheinterplaybetweenthedarkmatterhalo
andthebaryonphysicstransforminggasintostars.
I willpresentrecentworkbasedonasampleof
strong(early-type)lensesfromtheCastlessurvey.
Thecombinationofanon-parametricapproachto
thelensingdataandtheanalysisofthe
HST/NICMOS imagesofthelensgivea
remarkablygoodagreementbetweenbaryonand
lensingmassintheinnerregions. Theradialtrend
ofthebaryonfractionoutto4-5 Re isshown,
alongwithitsconnectionwiththeFundamental
Plane. I willputthisresultincontextwithrecent
estimatesoftheglobalbaryonfractioningalaxies.
TheLocalClusterSubstructureSurvey(LoCuSS) is
amulti-wavelengthsurveyof100X-rayluminous
galaxyclustersat0.15< z < 0.3, spanningX-ray
toradiowavelengths. Oneofthemainscience
goalsistomeasurethesubstructureoftheDark
Matterdistributionwithinclustersandtocorrelate
clustersubstructurewithresidualsonclustermassobservablescalingrelations. I willpresenta
detailedstructuralanalysisof21clustersusingour
HST/ACS SNAPSHOT data. Substructuresfoundin
the"non-parametric"lensingmassmapsare
comparedwithK-bandluminositymaps, and
ChandraX-rayfluxmaps. Thesethreeindependent
probesareincloseagreement, includingboth
structuresdetectedwithintheACS fieldsofview,
and(inasub-setofclusters)structureslocated
outsidetheobservedACS fields. Usingthenear-IR
dataasaprioronboththelocationandmassof
substructureswithintheclusters, wethenusea
BayesianmethodbasedonLenstool(Julloetal.,
2007), tofitmultipledarkmatterhaloestothe
sheardata. Ourobservationalresultsonthe
complexityoftheclustermassdistributionsare
comparedwiththeoreticalpredictionsofcluster
substructure.
TheZEPLIN-III DarkMatterSearchExperiment
MarkusHorn (ImperialCollegeLondon)
TheZEPLIN-III experimentattheBoulby
UndergroundLaboratoryusesa12-kgtwo-phase
Xenontimeprojectionchamberspecifically
designedtosearchforDarkMatterWIMPs. The
detectormeasuresbothscintillationandionisation
signalstodiscriminatebetweendifferentparticle
speciesinteractinginthedetector. Thisallows
nuclearrecoilsignaturesofWIMPstobeseparated
fromthemorenumerousbackgroundofevents
generatedbyphotonsandelectrons. Theresults
fromthefirstsciencerun, withapprox850kgdays
dataacquiredin2008, arepresented. Additionally
thecurrentupgradeoftheexperimentwithnew
ultra-low-backgroundphotomultipliersandthe
installationofaneutronvetoisshown. The
prospectiveoutcomeoftheforthcomingsecond
sciencerunisthendiscussed.
A NewPixonWeakLensingClusterMass
ReconstructionMethod
DanielJohn (DurhamUniversity)with V.R. Eke,
and L.F.A. Teodoro
Wepresentanewpixon-basedmethodforcluster
massreconstructionsusingweakgravitational
lensing. Pixonsareanadaptivesmoothingscheme
forimagereconstruction, wherethelocal
smoothingscaleisdeterminedbythedata. We
alsointroduceanewgoodness-of-fitstatisticbased
ontheautocorrelationoftheresidualsoftheshear
field. Wetestouralgorithmonsimulatedlensing
datasetsusingNFW haloswithandwithout
substructure. Wecompareourresultstoprevious
methodssuchasKaiser-Squires(KS), Maximum
Entropy(M E) andtheIntrinsicCorrelation
Function(ICF ) andshowanincreasedaccuracy
inthemassreconstructions. Wefinallydiscuss
futureapplicationstodata.
Weighinggalaxiesusinggravitationallylensed
SNLS supernovae
JakobJonsson (UniversityofOxford)with
M. Sullivan, I. Hook, S. Basa, R. Carlberg,
A. Conley, D. Fouchez, D.A. Howell, K. Perrett,
and C. Pritchet
Gravitationallensingbyforegroundmattercan
magnifyorde-magnifybackgroundsources.
Standardcandles, liketypeIasupernovae(SNeIa),
canthereforebeusedtoweightheforeground
galaxiesviagravitationallensing. Wepresent
constraintsondarkmatterhalopropertiesobtained
using175SNeIafromthefirst3-yearsofthe
SupernovaLegacySurvey(SNLS).Thedarkmatter
haloofeachgalaxyintheforegroundismodelled
asatruncatedsingularisothermalspherewith
velocitydispersionandtruncationradiusobeying
luminositydependentscalinglaws. Wecannot
constrainthetruncationradius, butthebest-fitting
velocitydispersionscalinglawagreeswellwith
resultsfromgalaxy-galaxylensingmeasurements.
Thenormalisationofthevelocitydispersion
scalinglawsarefurthermoreconsistentwith
empircalFaber-JacksonandTully-Fisherrelations.
Wehavealsomeasuredthebrightnessscatterof
SNeIaduetogravitationallensing. Thisscatter
contributesonlylittletotheSNLS sample(z < 1),
butwouldcontributesignificantlyat z > 1.6.
Theimpactofdelensinggravitationalwave
standardsirensondeterminingcosmological
parameters
CraigLawrie (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Martin Hendry, Fiona Speirits, and Joshua Logue
Recentlytherehasbeenmuchattentioninthe
cosmologyliteratureonthepotentialfutureuseof
compactbinaryinspirals, so-calledgravitational
wavestandardsirens, ashighprecisionprobesof
theluminositydistanceredshiftrelation.
Ithasbeenrecognised, however, thatweak
lensingduetointerveninglargescalestructure
willsignificantlydegradetheprecisionofstandard
sirens. Shapiroetal(2010)presentamethodfor
"de-lensing"sirens, bycombininggravitational
waveobservationswithmapsofcosmicshearand
flexionalongeachsiren'slineofsight.
Inthispresentationweexploretheimpactofthis
de-lensingprocedureforconstraining
cosmologicalparameters. UsingMonteCarlo
simulationsweinvestigatetheaccuracywith
whichthedimensionlessdensityparametersmay
bedetermined, beforeandafterde-lensing, with
futuredatafromtheproposedLISA satelliteand
EinsteinTelescope.
Directdetectionofdarkmatter
PawelMajewski (RutherfordAppletonLaboratory)
DarkMatterisoneofthegreatestmysteriesin
science. Althoughitmakesuproughly25%ofthe
universe, ithasneverbeendirectlydetected. For
lastdecadesthehuntfordetectionofdarkmater
particlehasacceleratedandbecameamotivation
tomanyofingeniousexperimentsaroundthe
world. I willpresentreviewofexistingand
planneddarkmatterdirectdetectionexperiments
withfocusonthevarietyofimplemented
experimentaltechniques.
Theimpactofdarkmattercuspsandcoresonthe
satellitegalaxypopulatio
JorgePenarrubia (UniversityofCambridge, IoA)
with A. Benson, M. Walker, G. Gilmore,
A. McConnachie, and L. Mayer
InthistalkI willshowtheresultsfromN-body
simulationsthatstudytheeffectsthatadivergent
(i.e. "cuspy")darkmatter(DM) profileintroduces
onthetidalevolutionofdwarfspheroidalgalaxies
(dSphs). I willshowthattheresilienceofdSphsto
tidalstrippingisextremelysensitivetotheslopeof
theinnerhaloprofile. I willalsooutlinetheresults
fromcalculationsthatsimulatethehierarchical
build-upofspiralgalaxiesassumingdifferenthalo
profilesanddiscmasses, whichshowthatthesizemassrelationestablishedfromMilkyWay(MW)
dwarfsstronglysupportsthepresenceofcuspsin
themajorityofthesesystems, ascoredmodels
systematicallyunderestimatethemassesofthe
knownUltra-FaintdSphs. Thesemodelsalso
indicatethatamassiveM31discmayexplainwhy
manyofitsdSphsfallbelowthesize-mass
relationshipderivedfromMW dSphs. Wealsouse
ourmodelstoconstrainthemassthresholdbelow
whichstarformationissuppressedinDM haloes,
findingthatluminoussatellitesmustbeaccreted
withmassesabove 108 --109 Msol inorderto
explainthesize-massrelationobservedinMW
dwarfs.
DarkMatterintheMilkyWay
JustinRead (UniversityofLeicester)
Experimentsdesignedtodetectadarkmatter
particleinthelaboratoryneedtoknowthevery
localphasespacedensityofdarkmatter, bothto
motivatedetectordesignandtointerpretany
futuresignal. I discussrecentprogresson
estimatingthisanditsimplications.
UnmodifiedGravity
FergusSimpson (Edinburgh)with Brendan Jackson,
and John Peacock
Byrelaxingtheconventionalassumptionofa
purelygravitationalinteractionbetweendark
matteranddarkenergy, substantialalterationsto
thegrowthofcosmologicalstructurecanoccur.
AsanillustrationI willexplorethecaseofexcess
darkmatterformingfromadecayingdarkenergy
component. Simpleanalyticsolutionstothe
modifiedgrowthratesarefoundforthesemodels.
Furthermore, neglectingthesedarksector
interactionscaninduceasignificantbiasinthe
inferredgrowthrate, potentiallyofferingafalse
signatureofmodifiedgravity.
Wave-mechanicsofLargeScaleStructure
EdwardThomson (UniversityofGlasgow)with
MartinA. Hendry, and LuisF.A. Teodoro
SimulationsofLargeScaleStructureusingN-Body
codeshavehelpeddefinethe Λ−CDM paradigm.
WhileN-Bodycodesremainthemostpopular
approach, alesserknownmethodwasdeveloped
intheearly90'sthatformulatestheequations
describinglargescalestructure(LSS) formation
withinawave-mechanicalframework. This
methodcouplestheSchroedingerequationwith
thePoissonequationofgravity. Thewavefunction
encapsulatesinformationaboutthedensityand
velocityfieldsasasinglecontinuousfieldwith
complexvalues.
InthispresentationI willreviewsomeofthekey
featuresofthewave-mechanicalapproachtoLSS.
Themethodavoidstheadditionofanartificial
smoothingparameter, asseeninN-bodycodes,
andisabletofollow'hotstreams'- somethingthat
isdifficulttodowithphasespacemethods. The
methodiscompetitivewithN-bodycodesinterms
ofprocessingtime. Thewave-mechanical
approachcanbeinterpretedintwoways: (1)asa
purelyclassicalsystemthatincludesmorephysics
thanjustgravity, or(2)astherepresentationofa
darkmatterfield, perhapsanAxionfield, where
thedeBrogliewavelengthoftheparticlesislarge.
EmpiricalConstraintsontheDarkMatterContent
ofDwarfSpheroidalGalaxies
MatthewWalker (InstituteofAstronomy,
UniversityofCambridge)
Thedwarfspheroidal(dSph)galaxiesorbitingin
theMilkyWay'shaloarethesmallest, faintestand
darkestknownobjectsforwhichinternal
kinematicsimplyadarkmattercomponent. HereI
discussconstraintsonthedensityprofilesofdSph
darkmatterhalosasderivedfromobservedstellar
kinematics, andI assessthevalidityandeffectsof
variousmodelingassumptions. I considerrealistic
observationaluncertaintiesinthecontextofefforts
todetectdarkmatterindirectlyintheformofhighenergyphotonsreleasedduringself-annihilation
events. I attempttoidentifythemostsuitabledSph
targetsforsuchsearches.
P11
57
P12
TheFrequencyandCompositionofWater-Rich
ExtrasolarAsteroids
JayFarihi (UniversityofLeicester)with
M.A. Barstow, S. Redfield, P. Dufour, and
N.C. Hambly
Theinterstellarmediumisnolongeraviable
physicalmodelfortheoriginofheavyelements
seenincoolwhitedwarfs. Instead, ongoing
Spitzerandground-basedstudiesofalarge
numberofsingle, metal-enrichedstarshave
demonstratedthesourceofthepollutionmustbe
circumstellar. Wheredetected, thegeometryof
thedustand(heavyelement)gasdisksorbiting
contaminatedwhitedwarfsareconsistentwith
tidallydisruptedasteroidanalogs, ahypothesis
whichalsoaccountsforthevolatile-poor, rocky
compositionofthephotosphericmetalsand
circumstellardebris. Tantalizingly, ahandfulof
thesepollutedwhitedwarfsappeartocontain
excesshydrogen, anindicationthatthedestroyed
minor(ormajor)planetcarriedinternalwater.
I willdescribetheevidenceforsuchwater-rich
extrasolarasteroids, andtheongoingworkto
confirmthishypothesisbysearchingforoxygenin
excessofthatexpectedfrommineraloxidesas
commonlyfoundintheinnerSolarSystem. The
confirmationofwaterinextrasolar, terrestrial
planetarybodieswillconstrainthefrequencyof
environmentsfavorabletohabitableplanet
formationandmayindicatethathabitatssuitable
toextremophilesarecommonintheGalaxy.
TheMain-BeltComets: Long-livedIceintheInner
SolarSystem
HenryHsieh (QueensUniversityBelfast)
Themain-beltcometsareanewly-identifiedclass
ofsmallbodiesinoursolarsystemwhichhavethe
orbitsofmain-beltasteroidsbutexhibitcometary
activityintheformofdusttailsorcomae,
indicatingthepresenceofsublimatingice. Since
theirdiscoveryin2006, theyhavedrawninterest
duetotheunexpectedpresenceoficybodieson
stable(i.e. long-lived)innersolarsystemorbits,
theirimplicationsforsolarsystemformation, and
theirastrobiologicalsignificanceasapossible
primordialterrestrialwatersource. I willdetailthe
advancesmadeinthestudyoftheseunusual
objectssincetheirdiscovery, discussthemany
outstandingquestionsthatstillremain, and
considertheirroleinourunderstandingofthe
originandpastandpresentdistributionofwaterin
thesolarsystem.
NightsidePollutionofExoplanetTransitDepths
DavidKipping (Harvard-SmithsonianCenterfor
Astrophysics)with G. Tinetti
Hot-Jupiterexoplanetshavebeendiscoveredto
exhibitsignificantthermalemissionfromtheir
daysidebutefficientcirculationimpliessimilar
emissionsignalsfromthenightsidetoo. This
emissionactsasaself-blendandattenuatestransit
depths, particularlyatmid-infraredwavelengths.
Theeffectisshowntocausechangesinthe
Spitzer-measuredtransitdepthsatthe1-σ levelfor
thecaseofHD 189733b. Weexplorehowthe
nightsidepollutioneffectalterstheinterpretation
ofexoplanetspectra, withemphasisonthe
signatureofwater, andalsopresentmethodsfor
accountingforthisattenuation.
58
P12–P13
TheDensitiesofKuiperBeltObjects
PedroLacerda (Queen'sUniversityBelfast)
ThecoldKuiperbeltobjects(KBOs)arebelieved
tocontainasignificantfractionofvolatilesinthe
formofice. Thefewdensityestimatesthathave
beensecuredsupportthisidea. KBO bulk
densitiescanbeconstrainedinbinaries, ifthesize
(albedo)known, orfromlightcurvedata(spin
periodandphotometricrange)underthe
assumptionthattheobjectsarenearhydrostatic
equilibrium. Oneofthemajorsciencegoalsofthe
HerschelkeyprogrammetostudyKBOswillbeto
measurethealbedosofroughly25binaryKBOs
andestimatethesystemdensities. Tothisdate,
mostoftheusefuldensityestimateshavecome
fromlightcurveanalysis. I willoutlinewhatis
currentlyknownaboutKBO densities, including
estimatesobtainedusingthemostrecent
lightcurvedata. I willdiscusspossibletrends
betweendensityandotherphysicalpropertiesand
whatthosemightbetellingusaboutthewater
contentandinteriorstructureofKBOs.
Observationsandmodellingofwatervapourlines
intheHerschelSPIRE FTS spectrumofthe
luminousred-supergiant, VY CanisMajoris
MikakoMatsuura (UniversityCollegeLondon)
with JeremyA. Yates(UCL), MichaelJ. Barlow
(UCL), Dugan Witherick(UCL), Roger Wesson
(UCL), E.T. Polehampton(RAL), BruceM. Swinyard
(RAL),and HerschelMESS Keyprojectconsortium
Watervapouriscommonlyfoundinthe
atmospheresofoxygen-richredgiantsand
supergiants. TheHerschelSpaceObservatoryhas
carriedoutaspectralsurveyofluminousMsupergiantVY CanisMajorisinthefar-infraredand
submillimetre. Inparticular, the200-670micron
regionhasbeenexploredforthefirsttimeusing
theSPIRE (SpectralandPhotometricImaging
Receiver)FourierTransferSpectrometer(FTS).We
presenttheSPIRE FTS observations, togetherwith
non-localthermodynamicequilibriumSMMOL
modellingofthefar-infraredwater-vapourlines,
dominantcoolantsintheoutflowsfromsuchstars.
AmasingWater
AnitaRichards (JBCA,UniversityofManchester)
Thewatermoleculeisoneofthefewknownto
producenatural, cosmicmasers. Thesecanattain
extaordinarybrightnesstemperatures(1017K)
whichallowstheirpositionsandvelocitiestobe
measuredwithspatialandspectralresolutionsof
milli-arcsecandtensofm/s, usingradio
interferometerssuchase-MERLIN.Masersfrom
water(anditsdaughter, thehydroxylradical)are
foundinenvironmentsfromcometstodiscs
orbitingAGN.I willconcentrateontheuseof
watermaserstomeasurethekinematicsof
moleculargasandshocksinstar-formingregions.
Lookingahead, ALMA willimagebothmaserand
thermalwater(sub-)mmlines, potentiallyexciting
indicatorsofdifferentiationinproto-planetary
discs.
Characterisationofexoplanetaryatmospheres
IngoWaldmann (UCL)
Amongthe400-plusexoplanetsdiscoveredto
date, anever-growingsampleofthetransiting
varietypresentthemselvesasgoodtargetsfor
furthercharacterisation. Usingtransmission(when
theplaneteclipsesitshoststar)andemission(the
day-sidethermalemissionoftheexoplanet)
spectroscopyitispossibletostudytheatmospheric
compositionsoftheseso-called"hotJupiters"in
moreandmoredetail. Thefeasibilityofsuch
measurementshasbeendemonstratedwithgreat
successusingSpitzerandHST intherecentyears.
Mostnotablearethedetectionsofmolecular
speciessuchaswater, methane, carbonmonoxide
anddioxideinthenearinfra-redforavarietyof
planets. Thesedetectionsallowustobuildupan
intricatepictureoftheatmosphericcompositions
anddynamicspresent. AttheendoftheSpitzer
cold-phase, agapinspace-basedobservatoriesin
thenear- tomid-infra-redhasemerged, callingfor
increasedeffortsinground-basedtechniques.
Withthedetectionofmethaneinfluorescence, in
theL-band, onHD 189733b, ithasbeenshown
thatsuchmeasurementsusingmedium-sized
telescopesonthegroundarefeasible. Atthis
conference, I willgiveanoverviewofwhathas
beendonefromthespaceandground, whatwe
havelearnedfromtheseobservations, andhowto
builduponourresultsinfuturedevelopments.
P13
TheInfluenceofHotPlasmaPressureon
MagnetosphericStructureatSaturn
NicholasAchilleos (UCL) with C.S. Arridge, and
P. Guio
AlthoughthegiantplanetsSaturnandJupiterboth
haverapidlyrotatingmagnetospheres, and
planetarydipolemomentsfarstrongerthanthe
Earth's, theydifferinseveralimportantaspects. In
thispresentation, weshowresultsofforcebalance
calculationsusingtheoreticalmagnetospheric
modelsforbothplanetswhichrevealthat: (1)The
plasmadiscinJupiter'soutermagnetospherehasa
structureprimarilyduetoabalancebetweenhot
plasmapressureandmagneticcurvatureforce;
while(2)theanalogousregionatSaturnis
maintained, inaddition, byamuchstronger
relativecontributionfromcentrifugalforce
associatedwiththerotatingplasma. Therelative
sizesofthiscentrifugalforceandthevariablehot
plasmapressureatSaturnalsostronglyaffectthe
'compressibility'ofthekronianmagnetosphere.
AlfvénWavesinPartially-Ionisedand
RecombiningPlasmas
EuanBennet (UniversityofGlasgow)with
DeclanA. Diver, and LuisF.A. Teodoro
Theearliestexampleofapartiallyionised
collisionalplasmawastheUniverseduringthe
epochofrecombination, about380,000years
aftertheBigBang. Thisisthefirsttimethatneutral
species(atoms)weremade. Inthispaper, we
modelthepropagationofAlfvénwavesthrough
thecosmicplasmaasitmakesthetransitionfrom
fullyionizedtoalmostneutral, aspartofawider
studyoftheplasmaphysicsoftheepochof
recombination. Infact, thisworkshowsthatitis
unlikelythatAlfvénwavescouldpropagate
normally, andsoarelimitedintheinformation
theycanconveyfromtheearlymagnetised
Universe.
Wepresenttheoreticalresultsandnumerical
simulationswhichshowthattransverseMHD
Alfvénwavespropagatinginaplasmathatis
undergoingsignificantrecombinationwillneither
surviveintheiroriginalform, norretain
characteristicsrelatedtotheirinitialconditions.
WefindthattheAlfvénwavesaresignificantly
affectedbytherisingneutralgaspressure, coupled
withthefallingplasmapressure, whentheplasma
ismomentum-coupledtotheneutralgas.
TheplasmavelocityfielddisturbanceoftheAlfvén
waveinducessoundwavesinthegaswhich(i)
carryenergyaway, depletingtheAlfvénwave
energy, and(ii)interactfurtherwiththeplasmato
inducemagneto-sonicwaves. Inthisway, the
propagationofAlfvénwavesisconsiderably
changedbytheevolvingionizationfraction. The
implicationofthischangeinwavepropagation
propertiesliesmainlyinthemagneticdiagnostics:
weshowthatthedetectedpolarizationof
magneticfieldarisingfromAlfvénwaves
propagatingthroughrecombiningmatteris
significantlyperturbedcomparedtothenoninteractingcase.
TheShockingSizeofCometMcNaught
GeraintJones (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
with GeraintH. Jones, RobertJ. Forsyth, and
Andre Balogh
InJanuary/Febuary2007, CometC/2006P1
(McNaught)becamethebrightestcometfor40
years. TheESA/NASA Ulyssesspacecraft, ina
near-polarorbitabouttheSun, performeda
serendipitouscrossingofMcNaught’siontail, with
itsdeepestpenetrationofthetailoccurringon
February7(Neugebaueretal., ApJ 667, 1262,
2007), atadistanceof ∼ 1.6 AU downstreamof
thecomet’snucleus. Theadditionofionized
materialtothesolarwindthatoccursat
productivecometsleadstotheformationofabow
wave/shock, asthesolarwindflowadjuststothe
presenceofthecometaryobstacle. Here, we
presentourresultsofasearchforComet
McNaught’sbowshock, primarilyusingdatafrom
Ulysses’smagnetometerinstrument, andcompare
themtothosederivedfromobservationsmade
duringtheUlyssestailcrossingofC/1996B2
(Hyakutake)in1996, andthetargetedencounters
ofotherspacecraftwithcomets. Theresultsreveal
thevastscalesoverwhichproductivecometscan
affecttheirsurroundings.
SearchingforEvidenceofStarSpotsinSTEREO
HeliosphericImagerData
RobertKidd (LancasterUniversity)with J.A. Wild,
C.J. Davis, and J.A. Davies
TheHeliosphericImager(HI) experimentson
boardNASA’sSTEREO satellitesaredesignedto
observetheinterplanetaryspacebetweenthe
EarthandtheSuninordertoimagetransientsin
thesolarwindsuchascoronalmassejections.
However, alargenumberofstarsliewithinthe
backgroundofeachimage, takingseveralweeks
tocrosstheimager’sfield-of-view. Assuch, HI
datacanpotentiallybeexploitedtostudychanges
inthelightfromthesebackgroundstars. Star
spots, likeSunspots, areareasofthestellar
photospherethatarecoolerthanthesurrounding
regionsandthereforevisiblydarker. Asaspot
movesacrossthediskofastar, thereisa
correspondingdropintheobservedlightintensity;
weseeksuchvariationsinSTEREO HI data. In
additiontoobservationalfindings, basedupon3
yearsofHI data, firstresultsfromasimplemodel
topredictlightcurvesforvariousstarspot
distributionswillbepresented. Thismodelwill
determinethefeasibilityofdetectingstarspotsin
HI dataandplaceconstraintsonsizesofspotsthat
mightbedetectedinthisway. Ultimately, the
studyofspotsonstarssimilartoourSunwill
indicatelevelsofstellaractivity, andbyextension
theseverityofso-calledspaceweather, insolar
systemsoutsideourownandplacetheextremesof
theSun’svaryingactivityinawidercontext.
TheroleofH3+inplanetaryatmospheres
SteveMiller (UCL) with Tom Stallard
Thesimplemolecularion, H3+, playsacrucial
roleintracingenergyinputsintotheupper
atmospheresofgiantplanets: itisthusatracerof
magnetospheric-ionosphericcoupling. Butitdoes
muchmorethanthat:
1)Itactsasasourceofionisation, playinga
pivotalroleinthegenerationofJouleheating; 2)It
generatesbothion- andthroughion-neutraldragneutralwinds, addingtotheenergybalanceofthe
upperatmosphere; 3)Itactsasastabilisingcoolant
- importantinthesolarsystemandbeyond.
Waytogoforsuchalittlemolecule!
Simplemodelsforclosedfieldlineregionsof
three-dimensionalrigidlyrotating
magnetospheres
ThomasNeukirch (UniversityofSt. Andrews)with
Nasser Al-Salti
Wepresentamethodtocalculatesimplethreedimensionalsolutionsofthemagnetohydrostatic
equationsintheco-rotatingframeofreference
outsidemagnetizedrigidlyrotatingcentralbodies,
e.g. planetsorstars. Wemakenosymmetry
assumptionforthemagneticfield, butneglect
outflowsandspecifyaparticularformforthe
currentdensity. Themagnetohydrostaticequations
canthenbereducedtoasinglelinearpartial
differentialequationforapseudo-potential U ,
fromwhichthemagneticfieldcanbecalculated
bydifferentiation. Theequationfor U canbe
solvedbystandardmethods, insomecaseseven
analytically. Thesolutionscanalsobeusedto
determinetheplasmapressure, densityand
temperatureasfunctionsofallthreespatial
coordinates. Despitetheobviouslimitationsof
thisapproach, itcould, forexample, beusedasa
simpletooltocreatethree-dimensionalmodelsfor
theclosedfieldlineregionsofrotating
magnetospheresofplanetsorstarswithout
assumingrotationalsymmetry.
LaboratoryExperimentstoinvestigatethe
mechanismsofAuroralKilometricRadiation
KevinRonald (UniversityofStrathclyde)with
D.C. Speirs, S.L. McConville, K.M. Gillespie,
A.D.R. Phelps, R. Bingham, A.W. Cross,
C.G. Whyte, C.W. Robertson, W. He, R.A. Cairns,
I. Vorgul, and B.J. Kellett
Electronsdescendingthroughtheauroralregions
oftheEarth’smagnetospherearesubjecttoan
increasingmagneticfield. Conservationofthe
magneticmomentassociatedwiththeelectron
trajectoriesresultsintheelectronstreamforminga
horseshoedistributioninvelocityspace. Inthe
regionsofdepletedplasmadensity(plasma
frequency << cyclotronfrequency)powerful
radiationemissionsareobservedintheX-mode
closetothecyclotronfrequency, ∼ 300kHz. It
hasbeenspeculatedthatthisradiationis
associatedwithrelaxationofthefreeenergyinthe
electrondistributionbyakineticcyclotron
instability. Itisthoughtthatsimilarprocesses
occurinmanymagnetisedastrophysicalobjects.
Toprovidefurtherinsightintothisproblem, an
experiment(scaledtomicrowavefrequenciesby
increasingthemagneticfield)hasbeendevisedat
theUniversityofStrathclydewhereanelectron
streamisinjectedintoanincreasingmagneticfield
toformcomparableelectronvelocitydistributions.
Theexperimentsareconductedinparallelwithan
extensivenumericalsimulationprogramme, which
aidsinthedesignoftheapparatusandinthe
understandingoftheelectrodynamics. These
experimentsandsimulationshaveshownstrong
agreementwithconversionefficiency(from
electronkinetictowavefieldenergy)of
∼ 1 − 3%, withtheemittedradiationneartothe
relativisticcyclotronfrequency, propagatingand
polarisedperpendiculartothebiasmagneticfield.
Theseresultsareconsistentwiththegeophysical
observations.
Themostrecentmeasurementshaveintroduceda
backgroundplasmaintothegenerationregion, to
simulatethedepletedbackgroundplasmainthe
auroraldensitycavities. Onemayanticipatethat
thisplasmawillbeclosetoupperhybrid
absorptionresonancefortheradiationgenerated
bytheenergeticbeam. Thisplasmahasbeen
notedtosignificantlyinhibittheradiation
generationwhenthedensityexceedsacertain
criticallevel.
Radioobservationsofhighlyenergeticpulsars
PatrickWeltevrede (JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics)
InthistalkI willcomparethecharacteristicsof
radiopulsarswithhighandlowspin-down
energy-lossrates. Animportantconclusionisthat
ofthefractionallinearpolarizationintheradio
bandisveryhighforhighlyenergeticpulsars. The
transitionappearstohappenatthedeathline
predictedforhigh-energycurvatureradiation,
suggestingapossiblelinkbetweentheemission
physicsofthe γ−raysandtheradio.
Itisarguedthatthemostdirectlinkbetweenthe
high-energyandradioemissioncanbefoundfor
thesubgroupofpulsarswhichwecallthe
energeticwidebeampulsars. Thesimilaritiesin
pulsemorphologysuggestthatbothtypesof
emissionareproducedatthesameextended
heightrangeinthemagnetosphereand
propagationeffectsinthemagnetospherecould
playanimportantrole. Thelatterwouldnaturally
leadtodecouplingofthewavemodes, which
couldexplaintheobservedhighdegreeoflinear
polarization.
Thereisgrowingevidencethatthebrakingtorque
ofpulsarscausestheanglebetweenthemagnetic
axisandtherotationaxistoevolveovertime. This
hasimportantconsequencesforevolutionary
modelsandforestimationsofthetotalnumberof
neutronstars. Theunderlyingphysicsofthe
changeinmagneticinclinationisfarfrom
understoodandthevalidityofthestandard
formulatoderivequantitieslikethespin-down
energylossrateappeartobequestionable.
IonlosstotheSolarWindfromVenusatSolar
Minimum
AlanWood (AberystwythUniversity)with
S.E. Pryse, M. Grande, and ASPERA team
Theabsenceofanintrinsicmagneticfieldon
Venusallowsthesolarwindtointeractdirectly
withtheionosphereandupperatmosphereofthe
planet. ThelossofionsfromtheVenusian
environmenttothesolarwindhasdirect
implicationsfortheevolutionoftheplanetary
atmosphere. Escapemechanismsinducedbythe
solarwindarethoughttobethedominantloss
processesatsolarmaximumforheavy
atmosphericgasessuchasoxygen.
P13
59
ObservationsconductedbyVenusExpressaround
solarminimumwereusedtobuildmapsofionsof
ionosphericoriginwithintheVenusian
environment. Theseobservationsshowed
asymmetriesinboththedawn-duskandnoonmidnightplanes. Inthedawn-duskdirection
greaternumbersofionswereobservedonthe
dusksidethanonthedawnside. Inthenoonmidnightplanegreaternumbersofionswere
observedonthedayside, althoughsignificant
numbersofionswereseennightwardofthe
terminator. Collectivelytheseobservations
suggestedanightwardionflowdrivenbythedayto-nightpressuregradient. Theionenergies
suggestedavelocityofseveralkm/s.
Theionmapsshowedthepresenceofoxygenions
uptoaltitudesoffewhundredsofkmonthe
daysideandtoseveralplanetaryradiionthe
nightside. Inallsectorssomeobservationsshowed
ionswithenergiesgreaterthanthatrequiredto
escapefromtheplanet, withthelargestenergies
observedintheshockedsolarwind. Inviewof
theseobservationstwotypesofionloss
mechanismsweresuggestedtooccuratVenusat
solarminimum. Atthehighestaltitudesplasma
waslostbydirectinteractionwiththesolarwind.
Atloweraltitudesthenightwardflowaccelerated
ionsintothetailregionandsomeoftheseions
hadsufficientenergytoreachtheescapevelocity.
P14
TRACE/EUV observationofdrivenloop
oscillations
IstvanBallai (UniversityofSheffield)with
David Jess
InthisstudyweuseTRACE observationsto
corroborateprevioustheoreticalwork, which
determinedtheresponseofacoronallooptoa
harmonicdriverinthecontextofidealMHD,as
wellasdeterminationofthemagneticfieldand
thedegreeoflongitudinalinhomogeneity.
WaveletandFouriertimeseriesanalysisare
appliedtoTRACE imagesoftheperiodofinterest,
andthephysicalparametersofthecoronalloop
aredeterminedusingseismologicaltechniques.
Thestudiedcoronalloopisfoundtohavetwo
periodswhichcouldbeinterpretedasbelonging
tothefundamentalandfirstharmonicbutalso
couldreflectthestageofanoverdrivenloop.
Usingcoronalseismologicaltechniqueswe
determinethemagneticfieldinsidetheoscillating
coronalloop. Theobtainedvaluesarefoundtobe
dependentonthescenarioemployedtoexplain
theperiodsofoscillations.
Longperiodoscillationsinsunspots
NickyChorley (UniversityofWarwick)with
B. Hnat, V.M. Nakariakov, A.R. Inglis, and
I.A. Bakunina
Longperiodoscillationsofthegyroresonant
emissionfromsunspotatmospheresarestudied.
Timeseriesdatageneratedfromthesequencesof
imagesobtainedbytheNobeyama
Radioheliographoperatingatafrequencyof17
GHzforthreesunspotshavebeenanalysedand
arefoundtocontainsignificantperiodsinthe
rangeofseveraltensofminutes. Waveletanalysis
showsthattheseperiodsarepersistentthroughout
theobservationperiods. Thepresenceofthe
oscillationsisconfirmedbyseveralmethods
(periodogram, wavelets, Fisherrandomisationand
empiricalmodedecomposition). Spatialanalysis
60
P14
usingthetechniquesofperiod, power, correlation
andtimelagmappingrevealsregionsofenhanced
oscillatorypowerintheumbralregions. Alsoseen
aretworegionsofcoherentoscillationofabout25
pixelsinsize, thatoscillateinanti-phasewitheach
other. Possibleinterpretationoftheobserved
periodicitiesisdiscussed, intermsoftheshallow
sunspotmodelandtheleakageofthesolargmodes. Wealsopresenttheanalysisoffollowing
onesunspotoverthecourseof9days, showing
thestabilityofthelongperiodoscillations, inboth
thebrightnesstemperatureandpolarisationdata.
BigBrightPoint, SmallBrightPoint, Cardboard
box
PhilipCrockett (Queen'sUniverstyBelfast)with
Mihalis Mathioudakis, David Jess, Sergiy Shelyag,
and Francis Keenan
PhotosphericMagneticBrightPoints(MBPs), are
thesmallestmagneticfeaturesthatarecurrently
resolvedonthesolarsurface. Beingomnipresent,
highlymagneticobjects, MBPsmayprovide
detailsonthecreation, emergenceandevolution
ofthesmall-scalekilogaussmagneticfield. HighresolutionG-bandimages, obtainedwiththe
recentlycommissionedRapidOscillationsinthe
SolarAtmosphere(ROSA) instrument, were
subjecttoanewMBP detectionalgorithm. A
distributionofMBP areawasfoundtobe
consistentwithlognormalstatistics, peaking
substantiallyabovethediffractionlimited
resolutionofthetelescope. A sharpdropofffrom
thepeaktothediffractionlimitindicatesalower
limitinarea, belowwhichMBPstendnottoexist.
Flaresandglobalwaves, includingseismic
HughHudson (SSL/UC Berkeley)with
C.A. Lindsey, and J.C. Martinez-Oliveros
Solarflaresarecloselyassociatedwithlarge-scale
wavesorotherglobalsignaturesinthecorona
(typeII bursts, EIT waves, andCMEs), Global
wavesalsoappearinthechromosphere(Moreton),
andintheinterior("sunquakes"). Themorphology
ofthesephenomenasuggeststhatallbeginin
compactsourcesatlowaltitudesinthesolar
atmosphere, andthattheirexcitationisclosely
relatedtotheimpulsivephaseoftheassociated
flare. Forthecoronalandchromospheric
signatures, theeffectscannotnowbeobserved
closetotheirradiantpoints. Theseismicsignature
ismostconspicuous15-60Mmawayfromthe
source, and30-60minutesaftertheimpulsive
phase. Wediscussthemorphologyandenergetics
oftheseglobaleffects. Weshowthatthemagnetic
restructuringinvolvedinflareenergyrelease
ultimatelymustexciteeachofthethem. This
processmayinvolveintermediarystepsthatarein
mostcasesnotwellunderstood.
ThelinkbetweenSodiumintensityenhancements
andthephotosphericmagneticfield
DavidJess (Queen'sUniversityBelfast)with
Mihalis Mathioudakis, Damian Christian,
Philip Crockett, Sergiy Shelyag, and
Francis Keenan
IntensityenhancementsintheSodiumD1
absorptionlineat5896Angstromsareoftenused
asaproxyforstrongunderlyingmagneticfield
concentrations. Utilizingarangeofhighresolutionimagersandspectro-polarimeters, we
showhowthiscorrelationbreaksdownatlow
magneticfieldstrengths. Furthermore, weapply
multi-wavelengthanalysistorevealhowSodium
brightpointsarerelatedtotheirG-band
counterpartsthroughthedetectionofhigh-velocity
downdraftsonsmallspatialscales.
Longitudinaloscillationsinanexpandinghot
coronalloop.
MarialejandraLuna (UniversityofSheffield)with
R. Erdélyi, and G. Verth
Wavesandoscillationscanprovidevital
informationabouttheinternalstructureofthe
waveguidetheypropagatein. Hereweinvestigate
analyticallythemagnetohydrodynamic(MHD)
longitudinalwavesinanexpandingcoronalloop.
Itisouraimtounderstandwhathappenstothe
MHD waveswhentheyaregeneratedinaflux
tubewherethefluxtubehasanon-constant(e.g.
expandingormagneticbottle)geometry. The
governingequationofthelongitudinalmodeis
derivedintheapproximationofweakexpansion
andissolvedundersomefurtherbyanalytical
approximations(e.g. inthelimitofthethinflux
tubeapproximation, spatialandtemporalscaling,
etc.). Itisfoundthatthepropagationofslow
longitudinalwavesinanexpandingmagneticflux
tubecanbedescribedbytheKlein-Gordon
equation. Solutionintheformofhypergeometric
functionsisdeterminedforthelongitudinal
oscillations. Therelevanceofthesesolutionsfor
solarmagneto-seismologywillbediscussed.
ExploitingtheCoronalSlowMode
MikeMarsh (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute, UCLan)
with R.W. Walsh
Observationsofthethree-dimensionalpropagation
ofwaveswithinactiveregioncoronalloopsanda
measurementofthetruecoronalslowmodespeed
areobtainedusingSTEREO.Intensityoscillations
areobservedtopropagateoutwardfromthebase
ofaloopsystem, consistentwiththeslow
magnetoacousticmode. Thewavephasevelocity
ismeasuredintheobservationsfromtheA andB
spacecraft. Thesestereoscopicobservationsare
usedtoinferthethree-dimensionalvelocityvector
ofthewavepropagationandmagnitudeof132±9
km/s, givingthefirstmeasurementofthetrue
coronallongitudinalslowmodespeed, andan
inferredtemperatureof0.84±0.12MK.These
resultsareconfirmedusingHINODE
spectroscopicobservations. Itisfoundthatthe
loophasauniformtemperatureprofilewitha
meantemperatureof0.89±0.09MK,in
agreementwiththetemperaturedetermined
seismologicallyusingtheSTEREO observations.
Theresultsfurtherstrengthentheslowmode
interpretation, andimplythatitisnotpossibleto
discriminatebetweentheslowmodephasespeed
andthesoundspeedwithintheprecisionofthe
presentobservations.
PropertiesofMHD wavesinplasmawithvariable
background
RichardMorton (UniversityofSheffield)with
R. Erdélyi
Thesolaratmosphericplasmaisanextremely
dynamicmediumthreadedbyacomplex
magneticfieldthatisconstantlysubjecttoheating
andcoolingprocesses. Themagneticfield
providesthefoundationsforawidevarietyof
plasmafinestructureinthesolaratmosphere, e.g.
coronalloops, coronalholes, prominences. Each
ofthesefeaturesinthesolaratmospherecan
supportanarrayofmagneto-hydrodynamic(MHD)
oscillatorymodes. Wepresenthereafirststudyof
thepropagationofMHD wavesinamagnetised
plasmaenvironmentthatiscoolingdueto
radiation. Previousinvestigationshave
concentratedontheaffectofradiationonthe
perturbationsonly. Anapproximateradiation
functionthathastheformofNewtoniancoolingis
usedforthesakeofsimplicity. Wefindthatthe
coolingoftheplasmaleadstoatimedependent
frequencyofMHD waves(oroscillations)and
causesbothdampingandamplificationofthese
periodicphenomena. Thisresultcouldhave
importantimplicationsforvariousaspectsof
magneto-seismologyinthesolaratmosphere.
PhasemixingintheSolarCorona
BeniaminOrza (TheUniversityofSheffield)with
I. Ballai, and A. Marcu
TheproblemofphasemixingofsolarAlfvén
wavesisrevisitedtakingintoaccountdissipative
phenomenaspecificforthesolarcorona.Our
estimationsshowthatthepreviousresultsderived
incontextoftorsionalAlfvénwavephasemixing
areheavilyunderestimatedsophasemixing
cannotbeusedtoexplainthedampingof
torsionalAlfvénwavesandheatingofopen
coronalstructures. Wealsoshowthatinorderfor
thephasemixingtostillbeaviablemechanism
unrealisticassumptionshavetobemade.
CoupledAlfvénandKinkOscillationsinCoronal
Loops
DavidPascoe (UniversityofStAndrews)with
A.N. Wright, and I. DeMoortel
Observationshaverevealedubiquitoustransverse
velocityperturbationwavespropagatingoutward
inthesolarcorona. Toinvestigatethenatureof
transversewavespropagatinginthesolarcorona
andtheirpotentialforuseasacoronaldiagnostic
inMHD seismology, weperformthreedimensionalnumericalsimulationsoffootpointdriventransversewaves. Weconsidertheeffectof
structuringontheirpropagationandbehaviour.
Whendensitystructuringispresent, resonant
absorptionininhomogeneouslayersleadstothe
couplingofthekinkmodetotheAlfvénmode.
Thedecayofthepropagatingkinkwaveasenergy
istransferredtothelocalAlfvénmodeisingood
agreementwithamodifiedinterpretationofthe
analysisofRuderman&Robertsforstandingkink
modes. Numericalsimulationssupportthemost
generalinterpretationoftheobservedloop
oscillationsasacouplingofthekinkandAlfvén
modes. Thiscouplingmayaccountforthe
observedpredominanceofoutwardwavepower
inlongercoronalloopssincetheobserved
dampinglengthiscomparabletoourestimate
basedonanassumptionofresonantabsorptionas
thedampingmechanism.
Theeffectofdensitystratificationonthe
transverseoscillationsoftwoparallelcoronal
loops
DavidRobertson (SheffieldUniversity)with
M.S. Ruderman, and Y. Taroyan
Transverseoscillationsofcoronalmagneticloops
areroutinelyobservedduringthespacemissions.
Sincethefirstobservationtheseoscillationswere
interpretedintermsofkinkoscillationsof
magnetictubes. Sometimescollectiveoscillations
oftwoormorecoronalloopsareobserved. This
makesthedevelopmentofatheoryofcollective
oscillationsofseveralloopsadesirableone.
Anotherreasonforthedevelopmentofthistheory
isthatthereareevidencesthatatleastsome
coronalloopsarenotmonolithicbutconsistof
manythinmagneticthreads. Herethelinear
theoryofkinkoscillationsoftwoparallelmagnetic
tubeswiththedensityvaryingalongthetubesis
developed. Thissystemisusedtostudytheeffect
ofdensityvariationontheeigenfrequenciesof
collectiveoscillations.
Anatomyofaslowwaveinacoronalloop
TomVanDoorsselaere (UniversityofWarwick)
with Nick Wardle, GiulioDel Zanna, and
Kishan Jansari
Weanalyseanobservationofa5minutequasiperiodicoscillationdetectedinthecoronalline
FeXII at195Å,nearthefootpointofacoronalloop
inHinode/EIS dataon08Feb2007. Thesame
oscillationisdetectedsimultaneouslyintwoother
coronallines, FeXIII at204Å andFeXI at192Å.
Theoscillationisobservedforafull2periodsin
bothDopplershiftandintensity. WeuseFourier
andwaveletanalysistodeterminetheperiodof
theoscillationtobeP =314±83sintheDoppler
shiftandP =344±61sintheintensity. We
observenegligiblephaseshiftbetweenDoppler
andintensitytimeseries. Thisisstrongevidence
fortheinterpretationoftheobservedphenomenon
intermsofapropagatingslowmagneto-acoustic
MHD mode. Forthefirsttime, weuse
spectroscopytodetectoscillationsintheelectron
density, usingtheCHIANTI atomicdatabase.
ComparingthedensityvariationsandtheDoppler
shiftsallowsustoderivetheline-of-sight
componentofthephasespeed. Thecomparisonof
thetemperatureandthedensityallowstoestimate
thecoronalvalueoftheratioofspecificheats.
Magnetoseismologyofthechromospherewith
torsionalAlfvénwaves
GaryVerth (KU Leuven)
Inspiredbythefirstdiscoveryofsolar
chromospherictorsionalAlfvénwavesbyJesset
al. (2009), magnetohydrodynamictheoryis
developedwhichpredictshowtheobservable
properties, e.g., frequency, amplitudeand
velocity, areevolvingwhilepropagatingthrough
realisticallystratifiedchromosphericwaveguides.
Itisfoundthatthesespecialincompressible
magneticwavescanbefullyexploitedasaunique
magnetoseismologicaltooltoprobetheplasma
structureoftheSun'sloweratmosphere, e.g.,
offeringarealandpracticalmappingofthe3-D
magnetismofthesolarchromosphere. The
proposedtechniquescanbeappliedtothelatest
highspatial/temporaldatafromtheUK funded
ROSA (RapidOscillationsintheSolar
Atmosphere)instrumentorthemuch-awaitedSDO
(SolarDynamicsObservatory)satellite.
Evidenceofmagneto-acousticwavesin
photosphericobservationsofasunspot
SergeiZharkov (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL) with S. Shelyag, R. Erdélyi, and
M.J. Thompson
Weshowtheobservationalevidenceforthe
presenceofMHD wavesinthesolarphotosphere
deducedfromSOHO MDI andHinode
observations. Themagneto-acousticoscillations
areobservedasacousticpowerenhancementin
thesunspotumbraathighfrequencybandsinthe
velocitycomponenttransversetothemagnetic
field. Weusenumericalmodellingofthewave
propagationthroughlocalisednon-uniform
magneticfieldconcentrationalongwiththesame
filteringprocedureasappliedtotheobservations
toidentifytheobservedwaves. Underpinnedby
theresultsofthenumericalsimulationsweclassify
theobservedoscillationsasmagneto-acoustic
wavespropagatingalongthefieldlineswith
Alfvénspeedandexcitedbythetrappedsub-
photosphericacousticwaves. Weconsiderthe
potentialapplicationofthepresentedmethodasa
diagnostictoolformagnetohelioseismology.
P15
A near-infraredstudyoftheMagellanicSystem
withVISTA.
GemmaBagheri (UniversityofHertfordshire)with
Maria-Rosa Cioni
TheMagellanicSystemrepresentsthenearest
templatetostudystellarpopulationsandgalaxy
interactions. Itcomprisesoffourcomponents: the
LargeMagellanicCloud(LMC),theSmall
MagellanicCloud(SMC),theMagellanicBridge
(MB) andtheMagellanicStream(MS).
Recentmeasurementsofthepropermotionofthe
MagellanicClouds(Kallivayaliletal. 2006)
suggestforthefirsttimethatthesegalaxiesare
approachingtheMilkyWay, supportingthetidal
formationoftheBridgefromanLMC,SMC
interaction.
TheBridgeandtheStreamarewelltracedbythe
distributionofneutralhydrogen, buttherearevery
fewobservationsthatinvestigatetheirstellar
content. IntheBridge, youngstarshavebeen
foundbyIrwin(1991), Grondinetal(1992)and
others, buttodatenostarshavebeenobservedin
thestream.
Thisprojectwillusenear-infraredobservations
fromtheliteraturetoinvestigatetheformationand
evolutionoftheMagellanicSystem'stidalfeatures
includingacontributiontotheVMC strategyfor
theBridge. Theunprecedentedsensitivityofthe
VMC datashouldalsoallowforthefuture
discoveryofstarsintheStreamaspredictedby
Mastropietro(2009), withdynamicalmodelsofthe
MagellanicSystem.
TheVMC survey- I.StrategyandEarlyScience
Data
Maria-RosaCioni (UniversityofHertfordshire)with
VMC Team
ThefirstobservingseasonoftheVMC surveyhas
beencompleted. Thesurveystrategywillbebriefly
describedtogetherandthefirstscienceresultson
theLargeMagellanicCloudwillbepresented.
TheVISTA ScienceArchive
RossCollins (IfA,Edinburgh)with R. Blake,
N. Cross, N. Hambly, M. Holliman, R.G. Mann,
M. Read, E. Sutorius, and P. Williams
ThisyearmarksthestartofVISTA'ssurvey
operationsandallofthedatafromtheseinfrared
observationsoftheSouthernHemisphereare
archivedbytheUniversityofEdinburgh'sWideFieldAstronomyGroup. Databasereleasesofthe
sourcecataloguesandobservationmetadatawill
bemaderegularlyandafteraproprietaryperiod
becomeavailablepublicly. Theseareaccessible
on-lineviaawebinterface
(http://surveys.roe.ac.uk/vsa)aswellasthroughthe
standardinternationalvirtualobservatory
interfaces. Herewedemonstratehowuserscan
makebestuseofthearchivedatabasedesignto
quicklyextracthigh-qualityscientificresultsfrom
theavailabledataset.
P14–P15
61
FindingvariablesusingtheVISTA ScienceArchive
NicholasCross (IfA,Edinburgh)with
Nigel Hambly, Ross Collins, Eckhard Sutorius,
Mike Read, and Rob Blake
TheVISTA VariablesinViaLactea(VVV) will
reobserve500squaredegressoftheGalactic
PlaneandBulgeoverthenextfewyearsin ∼ 100
separateepochstofindperiodicvariablestars,
whichwillbeusedasdistanceindicatorsofthe
structureswithintheMilkyWay. Thiswillleadto
adatasetof1billionuniquesources(withupto
100billionsingleepochdetections)ontheskyof
whichtheremaybe1millionvariables. TheVISTA
ScienceArchivemustbeabletorobustlyfindand
categorisevariablessuchthatscientistscaneasily
selectspecifictypes.
UltraVISTA
JamesDunlop (UniversityofEdinburgh)with
Karina Caputi, and UltraVISTA consortium
UltraVistaisanew5-yearultra-deepnear-infrared
surveybeingundertakenwiththeVistasurvey
telescopeintheCOSMOS extragalacticfield. By
thetimeofthismeetingwewillhavebegunto
receivedatafollowingcommencementoftheVista
surveysinFeb2010. I willsummarizethedesign
ofthissurvey, andreviewitspotentialforthestudy
ofhigh-redshiftgalaxyevolutioninthelightof
recentresultsfromHST andSubaru. I alsoplanto
discusstheperformanceofVistafordeepimaging
inthelightofourfirstdata.
VISTA Performance
JimEmerson (QueenMary, UnivofLondon)with
Will Sutherland
VISTA commissioningwascompletedinthe3rd
quarteranditwashandedovertoESO in
December2010. Theas-builtperformancewillbe
comparedtotherequiremnts.
HighredshiftquasarsintheVIKING field.
JosephFindlay (QMUL)
Theexistenceofluminousquasarsatz ∼ 6
suggeststhattheformationofthefirstsupermassiveblackholesbeganwithinthefirstfew
hundredmillionyearsofthebigbang. Assuch,
high-zquasarsofferpowerfulprobesoftheearly
universe, allowingconstraintsonearlystructure
formation, chemicalenrichmentandthestateof
theintergalacticmediumattheendoftheepoch
ofcosmicreionization.
Attheforefrontofhigh-zquasarsearchesinthe
nextdecadewillbetheVISTA Kilo-degree
INfraredGalaxysurvey(VIKING).VIKING began
itscoverageofthesouthernskyinNovemberand
shouldhavetherightcombinationofareaand
depthtodetect ∼ 10z > 6.5 quasarsoverits
1500sq.degfootprint. Usingthelatest
observationaldataI willdiscussthepotentialto
detectandisolate6.5 < z < 7.5 quasarsoverthe
VIKING field, makingparticularreferenceto
colourselectionstrategies, samplecontamination,
efficiencyandcompleteness.
FirstobservationsofstellarclustersintheLMC
fromtheVMC survey
RoaldGuandalini (UniversityofHertfordshire)
with VMC Team
Wepresentfewpreliminaryresultsonananalysis
weareperformingonthestellarclustersinthe
LargeMagellanicCloudobtainedthankstothe
firstobservationsmadebyVISTA fortheVMC
62
P15
survey. Webuiltupasampleofstellarclusters
consideringonlytheoneslocatedinoneofthe
tilesmostobservedinthefirstmonthsofthe
campaign. Weshownear-IR color-magnitude
plotsforfewofthemand, finally, weremindwhat
arethescientificgoalsthattheVMC surveycould
reachontheirstudy.
TheVISTA DeepExtragalacticObservations
(VIDEO) Survey
MattJarvis (UniversityofHertfordshire)with
Dave Bonfield, and VIDEO Consortium
I willpresentthemainsciencegoalsoftheVIDEO
surveyandprovideanupdateonthestateofthe
dataandanyearlyscienceresults.
TheVISTA sciencepipeline
JamesLewis (InstituteofAstronomy)with
Mike Irwin, Simon Hodgkin, Eduardo GonzalezSolares, and Peter Bunclark
TheVISTA telescope, withaninfraredcamera
comprising162K×2K Raytheondetectorsanda
1.7squaredegreefieldofview, representsahuge
leapininfraredsurveycapabilityinthesouthern
hemisphere. Pipelineprocessingofinfrareddatais
farmoretechnicallychallengingthanforoptical
data. Infrareddetectorsareinherentlymore
unstable, whiletheskyemissionisuptoa1000
timesbrighterthanmanyobjectsofinterest, and
variesinacomplexspatialandtemporalmanner.
Tocompensateforthis, exposuretimesarekept
short, leadingtohighnightlydatarates. VISTA will
generate ∼ 0.25TB pernightoverthenext5-10
years, whichexceedsthetotaldatarateofall8m
classterrestrialtelescopes.
Inthispresentationwediscussthescience
pipelinethathasbeendevelopedtodealwith
imagingdatafromVISTA anddiscusstheprimary
issuesinvolvedinanend-to-endsystemcapable
of: robustlyremovinginstrumentandnightsky
signatures; monitoringdataqualityandsystem
integrity; providingastrometricandphotometric
calibration; andgeneratingphotonnoise-limited
imagesandscience-qualityastronomical
catalogues.
VISTA VariablesintheViaLactea(VVV) andnew
UKIDSS GPS highamplitudeIR variables
PhilipLucas (UniversityofHertfordshire)with
D Minnitti, M Hempel, V Ivanov, M Rekjuba, and
R Saito
I describetheVVV synopticsurveyoftheGalactic
BulgeandtheGLIMPSE-Southregionofthe
GalacticplanewithVISTA.Thissurveyhas
recentlybegunandnotmuchdataarereduced
yet. However, I presentsomeearlyUKIDSS GPS
resultsonnewintriguinghighamplitudevariable
starsfromtwoepochK bandphotometryof
severaldozensquaredegreesoftheplane,
separatedby3years. A largeproportionofthe
newvariablesarelocatedinasinglestarformation
complex, SerpensOB2, suggestingthattheyare
pre-mainsequenceeruptivevariableswith
unsteadyaccretion, similartotherareclassofFU
Orionisstars. I discussthepotentiallyveryserious
implicationsforthestellarbirthlineandtheHR
diagramsinpre-mainsequenceclusters.
TheVISTA HemisphereSurvey
RichardMcMahon (UniversityofCambridge)with
VHS collaboration
TheVISTA HemisphereSurvey(V HS) willresult
incoverageofthewholesoutherncelestial
hemispheretoadepth4magnitudesfainterthan
2MASS/DENIS inatleasttwowavebandsJ andK.
IntheSouthGalacticCap, 5000squaredegrees
willbeimageddeeper, includingH band, andwill
havesupplementaldeepmulti-bandgrizY imaging
dataprovidedbytheDarkEnergySurvey(DES).
Theremainderofthehighgalacticlatitudeskywill
beimagedinYJHK andcombinedwithugriz
wavebandsfromtheVST ATLAS survey, SDSS
BOSS andSkymapper. Themediumtermscientific
goalsinclude: ahugeexpansioninourknowledge
of; thelowest-massandneareststars; deciphering
themergerhistoryourownGalaxy; measurement
oflarge-scalestructureouttoz=1andmeasuring
thepropertiesofDarkEnergy; discoveryofthefirst
quasarswith z > 7
VariableStarsintheVISTA near-infraredY,J,Ks
surveyoftheMagellanicCloudSystem(VMC)
MariaIdaMoretti (BolognaUniversity)with
Gisella Clementini, Maria-Rosa Cioni,
Vincenzo Ripepi, Marcella Marconi,
Massimo Dall'Ora, Jean-Baptiste Marquette, and
VMC Team
VMC,theVISTA Y,J,KssurveyoftheMagellanic
Clouds(MCs)willprovidethemeanK-band
magnitude(outof12epochtime-seriesdata)for
MC pulsatingvariablesforwhichperiodsare
alreadyavailablefromopticalmulti-epochsurveys
(OGLE,MACHO,andEROS II).
ThefirstVMC datawerecollectedstartingin
November2009andcoversixLargeMagellanic
Cloud(LMC) fields: theGAIA SouthernEcliptic
Polecalibrationfield; thefamous30Doradus
region; twofieldsintheproximityoftheBridge
connectingthetwoCloudsandtwofieldinthe
LMC outerdisk.
CombininginformationsfromtheEROS-II
(Tisserandetal. 2009, A&A,501, 985)andthe
OGLE-III (Soszynskietal. 2009, Acta
Astronomica, 59, 1)catalogues, wehavecompiled
thelistofRR Lyraestarsexpectedtofallintothese
sixLMC fields. ThevisualdatacovertheR,B and
V photometricbands, whiletheVMC datawill
providetheY,J,andKsmagnitudes.
StartingfromthefieldthatGAIA willobservein
theLMC,wewilllookfortheVMC infrared
counterpartsofknownvariablestars, will
constructtheirK-bandlightcurvesandderivetheir
meanK-bandmagnitudesandpulsation
parameters. WewillthenconstructPL relationsin
theK-band. FromthescatteronthesePL wewill
investigateeffectsduetometallicity, ageandother
stellarparameters. Bysearchingfordistance
variationswewillproducethefirstsystematic
investigationofthestructureoftheLMC.
VIKING,theVISTA Kilo-degreeInfraredGalaxy
Survey
WillSutherland (QueenMary, Universityof
London)with VIKING Team
I willdescribetheVIKING surveywhichhas
recentlystartedobservationsonthenewVISTA
telescopeatParanal, Chile. Thesurveyaimsto
cover1500deg2 ofextragalacticsky, overlapping
with2dFGRS andSDSS.VIKING willsurvey5
bands, Z,Y,J,H,Ks, toapprox1.5magdeeperthan
theUKIDSS LAS.Earlyfieldsarebeingtargetedon
theHerschel-ATLAS regions. I willdescribethe
earlydataprocessingandqualitycontrol, and
outlinethesciencegoalsofthesurvey.
P16
TheOVRO OphiuchusPre-Stellar(OOPS) Survey:
A 3.4mmContinuumEmissionStudyof
CircumstellarMaterial
JoannaBulger (UniversityofExeter)with
J. Patience, H. Arce, S. Corder, J Koda,
J. Carpenter, and A. Sargent
Circumstellardisksarethebirthsitesofplanet
formation. Bothdiskmassanddustopacity
spectralindexarecrucialdiskparametersin
understandingtheearlystagesoftheplanet
formationprocess. Millimetercontinuumemission
probestheopticallythin, coolerouterregionsof
circumstellardisksandisthewavelengthrangeat
whichthebulkofthecircumstellarmaterialemits.
Theresultspresentedareofa3.4mmcontinuum
surveyusingtheOVRO interferometer, ona
sampleof34membersoftheRhoOphiuchi
molecularcloud, oneofthenearestsitesof
ongoingclusteredstarformation. Thesample
consistsofbothstarlessclumpsandClass0-II
youngstellarobjects(YSOs), spanningthe
evolutionarysequenceoflowmassstarformation.
Theseobservationsinvestigatecircumstellar
materialintheformofacircumstellardiskand
surroundingenvelope. Continuumemissionis
detectedin22ofthesourcesata3σ level(typically
0.9mJy), withatypicalbeamsizeof3’’.7×2”.3.
ThemeasuredfluxesofthebrightestClass0and
faintestClassII objectsare; 227mJyand3mJy
respectively. Thedustopacityspectralindex,
indicativeofgraingrowth, ofthesesourceshas
beendeterminedfromthesefluxmeasurements,
takenincombinationwithpreviousmillimeter
wavelengthobservationsobtainedfromthe
literature. Estimationsofthetotaldiskmassesof
thesesourceshavebeendirectlycalculatedfrom
themeasuredfluxdensities. Finally, themolecular
lineemissionsof; HCN (1 − 0) (88.62679GHz),
HCO+(1-0)(89.18858GHz)andCO(1 − 0)
(115.2712GHz), wereobservedsimultaneously
withthecontinuumemissionandthedetectionsof
whichareusedastracersofsystemoutflow.
Thespatialdistributionofcoldgasinhierarchical
galaxyformationmodels
HansikKim (DurhamUniversity)with C.M. Baugh,
A.J. Benson, S. Cole, C.S. Frenk, C.G. Lacey,
C. Power, and M. Schneider
Theluminosity-dependenthigh-redshiftcut-offof
theradioluminosityfunction
EmmaRigby (IfA Edinburgh)with Philip Best,
Mairi Brookes, Jim Dunlop, John Peacock,
Louise Ker, Huub Rottgering, and Jasper Wall
Thedistributionofcoldgasindarkmatterhaloes
isdrivenbykeyprocessesingalaxyformation: gas
cooling, galaxymergers, starformationand
reheatingofgasbysupernovae. Wecomparethe
predictionsoffourdifferentgalaxyformation
modelsforthespatialdistributionofcoldgas. We
findthatsatellitegalaxiesmakelittlecontribution
totheabundanceorclusteringstrengthofcoldgas
selectedsamples, andarefarlessimportantthan
theyareinopticallyselectedsamples. Thehalo
occupationdistributionfunctionofpresent-day
centralgalaxieswithcoldgasmass
> 109 h−2 M⊙ ispeakedaroundahalomassof
∼ 1011 h−1 M⊙ , ascalethatissetbytheAGN
suppressionofgascooling. Themodelpredictions
fortheprojectedcorrelationfunctionareingood
agreementwithmeasurementsfromtheHI Parkes
All-SkySurvey. Wecomparetheeffectivevolume
ofpossiblesurveyswiththeSquareKilometre
Arraywiththoseexpectedforaredshiftsurveyin
thenear-infrared. Futureredshiftsurveysusing
neutralhydrogenemissionwillbecompetitive
withthemostambitiousspectroscopicsurveys
plannedinthenear-infrared.
Weuseanewmodel-independentmethodto
investigatetheevolutionofthesteepspectrum
radioluminosityfunctionandquantifythehighredshiftcutoff. TheanalysisusestheCENSORS
radiosourcesamplethatwehavedevelopedover
thepastfewyears, combinedwithadditionalradio
datafromtheWall&Peacock, ParkesSelected
Regions, HerculesandVLA COSMOS samples.
Wefindconclusiveevidenceforaluminositydependenthighredshiftcut-offinthesteep
spectrumradiosourcepopulation. Thespace
densityoflowerluminositysources
(P1.4GHz = 1025 to 1026 W/Hz)peakatorbelow
redshiftone, withshallowdeclinestohigher
redshifts, whilstathighpowersthecutoffmovesto
higherredshifts(z > 2 for P > 1027 W/Hz)and
becomesmorepronounced. Theexistenceofa
highredshiftcutoffisconfirmedwithhigh
statisticalsignificance, andisrobusttoestimated
redshifterrorsandtovariationsintheradio
spectralindexwithredshift. Wediscussthe
implicationsoftheseresultsformodellingthe
radiosourcepopulationthatwillbeobservedat
highredshiftsbytheSKA anditsprecursors.
A cosmicradiobackgroundseveraltimeslarger
thananticipatedhasrecentlybeendetectedbythe
ARCADE experiment. Wereviewpossiblesources
ofthisbackgroundincludingtrulydiffuse
emission, lowsurfacebrightnessradiogalaxies,
andradiosupernovae, butconcludethatthebest
explanationisaverylargepopulationofveryfaint
radiosources. Thishassignificantimplicationsfor
oneormoreoftheearlyhistoryofstarformation,
theearlygrowthofblackholes, andtheconfusion
limitforSKA.
Thee-MERGE LegacySurvey
TomMuxlow (JodrellBankCentreforAstrophysics)
with Ian Smail, Ian McHardy, and e-MERGE
consortium
HighResolutionRadioObservationsofIRAS
FSC10214
RogerDeane (Oxford)with Steve Rawlings,
Ian Heywood, Hans-Rainer Klockner, and
Richard Saunders
Thegravitationallylensed, starburst/AGN
compositegalaxyIRAS FSC10214hasbeenthe
topicof > 100 publicationsoverthepast19
years. ObservationsacrosstheEM spectrumfrom
X-raytoradiowavelengthsrevealpuzzlingand
sometimescontradictoryfeatures. Wereportthe
hithertounexploredhighspatialresolution
propertiesofthisenigmaticobjectthrough
MERLIN observations. Furthermore, wepresent
thespectralenergydistributionwhichincludes
newobservationsat330MHz(GMRT),15GHz
(RyleTelescope)andpreviouslyunpublished
Spitzerphotometry. WecomparetheinfraredSED
withanensembleofgalaxieswithsimilar
propertiesfromtheObreschkowetal(2009)semianalyticsimulationtoinvestigatetheeffectsof
differentiallensingoftheAGN andstarburst
components.
P17
OriginoftheCosmicRadioBackground
AndyLawrence (UniversityofEdinburgh)with
S. Singal, L. Stawarsz, and V. Petrosian
e-MERGE isanambitiousLegacysurveytoexploit
e-MERLIN'suniquecombinationofsensitivityand
spatialresolutiontostudytheformationand
evolutionofstar-forminggalaxiesandAGN outto
redshiftsof z > 5. Theseobservationswillprovide
apowerful, obscuration-independenttoolfor
measuringthemassivestarformationandAGN
activityinhigh-redshiftgalaxies, hencetracingthe
developmentofthestellarpopulationsandthe
blackholegrowthinthefirstmassivegalaxies.
Witharesolutionof50-200masinC- andLBands, correspondingto < 0.5 − 1.5 kpcat
z > 1, e-MERLIN givesusourfirsttrulyreliable
viewofthedistributionofstar-formationwithin
typicalgalaxiesattheepochwherethebulkofthe
starsinthepresent-dayUniversewerebeing
formed. e-MERLIN willdisentangletherelative
contributionsofAGN andstar-formation, an
essentialstepgiventheapparentlysimultaneous
growthoftheblackholesandstellarpopulations
ingalaxies. e-MERGE willalsostatistically
characterizethenatureofthesub-uJyradio
populationwhicharethetargetobjectsforthe
SKA.
LaboratoryStudiesofNon-thermalDesorptionof
AcetonitrilefromIcyGrainMantles
AliAbdulgalil (Heriot-WattUniversity)with
Elizabeth Hall, Lars Finger, Lisa Hodgson, and
Martin McCoustra
Formationofmoleculesintheinterstellarmedium
isamajorquestionwhichattractsconsiderable
attention. Itwasthoughtthatthesmallmolecular
progenitorstoEarthwereformedthroughthegas
phasereactionsintheatmosphereofouryoung
planet. Morerecently, ithasbeenproposedthat
non-thermalreactionsininterstellarandcometary
icescanproducetheseprogenitorspecies[1].
Acetonitrile(CH3CN) isonesuchmoleculethat
mightbetheprecursoroflargerbiogenic
moleculessuchasaminoacids. Ithasbeen
observedinanumberofgalacticenvironments
suchas: acoldmolecularcloud(L134N);
protostellarices(NGC7538:IRS9), protostellarhot
coregas(SgrB2(N));andinacometarycoma
(Hale-Bopp)[2]. CH3CN islikelyformedonthe
icygrainsviagas-grainreactionsbetweenCH3
andCN radicals. CH3CN normallydesorbstothe
gas-phaseattemperaturesnear90K,however
desorptioncanbeinducedbylowenergy
electrons[3]. Thispaperwilldiscussthe
adsorptionofacetonitrileonmodelinterstellar
dustsurfacesandtheeffectofelectronirradiation
ofsuchadsorbedspecies.
References
1- W.D.Geppert, E.V., M.Hamberg, V.
Zhaunerchyk, M.Kaminska, R.D.Thomas, F.
Osterdahl, F.Hellberg, A.Ehlerding, M.
Danielsson, andM.Larsson. Proc. IAU Symp.,
2008, 251, 349. 2- S.B.Charnley, S.D.R., Y.J.
Kuan, andH.C.Huang, Adv. SpaceRes., 2002,
30, 1419. 3- A.Belloche, R.T.G., H.S.P.Müller,
K.M.Menten, C.Comito, andP.Schilke, Astron.
astrophys, 2009, 499, 215.
P16–P17
63
Thedeuteriumchemistryinlowandhighmass
starformingregions
ZainabAwad (Dept. ofPhysicsandAstronomy,
UCL) with Serena Viti, and Estelle Bayet
Observationsofdeuteriumininterstellarmedium
havelongbeenusedtoprobethephysical
conditionswithininterstellarclouds. Observations
revealthatdeuteratedspeciesareabundantovera
widerangeofastrophysicalregionsincluding
warmandhotcoresaroundlow-massandmassive
stars, respectively. Earlymodelsattempttostudy
deuteriumchemistryandexplainthehigh
observedfractionationviagas-phaseschemes. Itis
nowconfirmedthatgrainsurfacereactionsplaya
roleinformingmanydeuteratedspecies. Inthis
workwefocusontheimportanceofadding
deuteratedspeciestochemicalnetworksusedin
astrochemicalmodelsandanalysetheirinfluence
ontheabundancesofdifferentspecies, in
particularinhotcoreregions. Theinfluenceof
changingtheenvironments'physicalconditionson
theabundancesofthespeciesisalsoconsidered.
IsotopicFractionationinPrimitiveMaterial:
QuantifyingtheContributionofInterstellar
Chemistry.
StevenCharnley (NASA GoddardSpaceFlight
Center)
Anomalouslyfractionatedisotopicmaterialis
foundinmanyprimitiveSolarSystemobjects,
suchasmeteoritesandcomets. Itisthought, in
somecases, totraceinterstellarmatterthatwas
incorporatedintotheSolarNebulawithout
undergoingsignificantprocessing. Wewillpresent
theresultsofmodelsofthenitrogen, oxygen, and
carbonfractionationchemistryindensemolecular
clouds, particularlyincoreswheresubstantial
freeze-outofmoleculesontodusthasoccurred.
Therangeoffractionationratiosexpectedin
differentinterstellarmoleculeswillbediscussed
andcomparedtotheratiosmeasuredinmolecular
clouds, cometsandmeteoriticmaterial. These
modelsmakeseveralpredictionsthatcanbe
testedinthenearfuturebymolecularline
observations, particularlywithALMA.
ChemistryofdenseclumpsnearmovingHerbigHaroobjects
HelenChristie (UniversityCollegeLondon)
Extragalacticstarformationactivity- properties
oftheverydensegas
EstelleBayet (UCL) with S. Viti, D.A. Williams,
J. Martin-Pintado, and S. Martin
Toincreaseourcomprehensionofthestar
formationmechanismsingalaxies, itisessentialto
firstbetterdeterminethepropertiesofthegas
whichformsstars. Unfortunately, whenobserving
extragalacticstar-formationregions, ionised,
neutral, diffuse, molecularandverydensegasare
allwellmixedinsidethebeam. Onlyatreatment
mixingtheoretical(astrochemistryand
astrophysics)andobservationalapproachescan
helpdisentanglethegascomponentsandthus
increaseourknowledgeonthemechanisms
involved. Inaddition, onecouldasks: howdoes
theenvironment(e.g. nuclearactivity)influence
thepropertiesofthedustandgas? Mytalkwillaim
atpresentingthelatestresultswehaveobtainedin
UCL onthetwosubjectsdescribedabove.
InvestigatingtheOnsetofSilicateCrystallization
intheEarlyStagesofStarFormation
SeanChapman (UniversityofManchester)with
Ciska Kemper
SpectrafromtheShort-WavelengthSpectrometer
(SWS) oftheInfraredSpaceObservatory(ISO)
obtainedfordeeplyembeddedmassiveYSOswill
beanalyzedandcomparedtothoseinthediffuse
ISM toinvestigatetheonsetofcrystallizationof
silicatesinmassiveYSOs. Featurescharacteristic
ofthecrystallinespeciesforsteriteandenstatiteare
commmonlyseeninemissionindisksaround
classI/II YSOs. HerewefocusonmassiveYSOs,
intheearlystagesofstarformation(e.g. Class0).
Theseobjectsexhibitsilicateabsorptionfeaturesin
themid-infrared, whichprobethecircumstellar
environmentandthemolecularcloud. Silicates
havebeenfoundincircumstellardisksaround
youngstarswithtypicalcrystallinitiesof10-20%,
whilstnocrystallinecomponenthasbeen
observedinthediffuseISM.Wehopetoprobethe
firststagesofcrystallizationofinterstellarsilicates,
afterthesegrainshaveleftthediffuseISM and
havebeenincorporatedintostar-forming
molecularclouds.
64
P17
Localisedregionsofenhancedemissionfrom
HCO+, NH3andotherspeciesnearHerbigHaro
objects(HHO's)havebeeninterpretedasarising
inaphotochemistrystimulatedbytheHHO
radiationonhighdensityquiescentclumpsin
molecularclouds. Staticmodelsofthisprocess
havebeensuccessfulinaccountingforthevariety
ofmolecularspeciesarisinginthe
photochemistry, butthetimescaleofthe
photochemistrydevelopmentisrathershort, soit
hasbeendifficulttoreconcilethemodelswiththe
observednumbersofemissionregions. The
chemicalmodelhasbeenadaptedtoincludea
movingradiationsource. Thisallowssome
photochemically-inducedspecies, including
methanol, tomaintainhighabundancesformuch
longerthanthepreviousmodels.
FirstResultsfromSHINING - Surveywith
HerscheloftheISM inNearbyINfraredGalaxies
NatalieChristopher (UniversityofOxford)with
E. Sturm, A. Contursi, R. Genzel, J. GraciaCarpio,
S. Hailey-Dunsheath, D. Lutz, A. Poglitsch,
L. Tacconi, J. DeJong, J. Fischer, A. Sternberg,
A. Verma, S. Madden, M. Sauvage, L. Vigroux,
Diane Cormier, U. Klaas, M. Nielbock, H. Linz,
J. Schreiber, O. Krause, D. Lemke, E. Schinnerer,
F. Walter, and M. Haas
OnbehalfoftheSHINING consortium, I will
outlinetheSHINING surveyandpresentsomeof
thefirstresultsfromdatatakenduringHerschel's
ScienceDemonstrationPhase.
SHINING isaHerschelguaranteedtimekey
programmeofthePACS consortium. Itisa
coherentfar-infraredspectroscopicand
photometricsurveyoflocalandintermediate
redshiftinfraredbrightgalaxies(starbursts, AGN,
(U)LIRGs, andlowmetallicitygalaxies). An
importantfractionofstarformationandAGN
activityintheuniversetakesplaceinsuchdusty,
infraredbrightgalaxies.
Ourgoalistousethesuperiorsensitivity, spatial
andspectralresolutionofHerscheltostudythese
galaxiesinawavelengthrangethatisleastaffected
byextinction. Weaimtoobtainacomprehensive
viewofthephysicalprocessesatworkinthe
interstellarmediumoflocalgalaxiesrangingfrom
objectswithmoderatelyenhancedstarformation
tothemostdense, energetic, andobscured
environmentsinultra-luminousinfraredgalaxies
andaroundAGN.TheSHINING samplecoversa
wideparameterrangeinluminosity, activitylevel,
andmetalenrichment, andwillbecomplemented
byafewobjectsatintermediateredshifts, i.e. ata
moreactiveepochofstarformation.
TowardsUnderstandingtheFormationofWater
intheInterstellarMedium
VictoriaFrankland (Heriot-WattUniversity)with
MarkP. Collings, and MartinR.S. McCoustra
Exposedtotheharshradiationfieldsofinterstellar
space, fewmoleculescanescape
photodestruction. However, thevastcloudsofgas
anddustthataccumulateinthegulfsofspace
betweenthestars(knownastheinterstellar
medium)havebeenobservedtocontainmore
than120differentmolecularspecies[1]. Thelow
temperature(10-100K) andpressure(10−14
mbar)conditionswithintheinterstellarmedium
limittherangeofviablegas-phasereactions
resultinginthegas-phasechemistryalonebeing
insufficienttoexplaintheobservedabundancesof
somekeychemicalspecies(forexample, H2, and
H2O).Dustgrainsprovideasurfaceonwhich
adsorbedspeciescanreact[2]andhencean
alternativepathwaytokeyinterstellarmolecules.
ThemoleculeofinteresthereisO2. Therecent
ODIN andSWAS campaignshavedeterminedthe
gaseousO2abundancetobeconsiderablylower
thanthatoftheatomicO abundance[3]implying
thatO2maybeadsorbedontothegrain.
Surfacechemistrywithinanultrahighvacuum
chamberisbeingusedtoexplorethedesorption
kineticsofO2onarangeofastrophysically
relevantsurfaces. Intheseexperiments, the
productsareidentifiedusingtemperature
programmeddesorptionandinterpretedusing
kineticanalysisofasimplesurfacemechanism.
Theultimateaimofthisresearchwillbeto
combineatomicbeamsofO andH tostudyinsitu
H2O formationonagrainsurface.
References
[1]from“129reportedinterstellarand
circumstellarmolecules”
http://www.cv.nrao.edu/%7Eawootten/allmols.html
(assessed11December2008)[2]R.Gouldand
E.Salpeter, Astrophys. J., 1963, 138, 393[3]K.
Acharyya, G.W.Fuchs, H.J.Fraser, E.F.van
DishoeckandH.Linnartz, A&A,2007, 466, 1005
AstrochemistryintheALMA era
GaryFuller (JodrellBankCentreforAstrophysicsUK ALMA ARC)
ALMA willrevolutionizethestudyof
astrochemistryinboththisandothergalaxies. In
thispresentationI willpresentrecentinitialresults
fromtheJCMT SpectralLegacySurveytogether
withrecentresultsfromastrochemicalmodels.
ThesewillbeusedtohighlighthowALMA will
impactourunderstandingofastrochemistry, and,
consequentlystarformation.
ChemicalevolutioninNGC 6302(theButterfly
nebula)
KerryHebden (JodrellBankCenterfor
Astrophysics)with Gary Fuller
Observationsofthebutterflyplanetarynebula(PN)
NGC6302revealacomplexbi-polarstructurewith
amassivelow-velocitytoruscoupledwithhighvelocityknots. Thismassiveexpandingtorushasa
highmass-lossrate(∼ 1.5 × 10−4 M⊙ yr−1 ;
Trungetal, 2008)andisbelievedtocontainthe
highestmassofcircumstellarmaterialofany
knownPN (between ∼ 1 to3M⊙ ; Perettoetal,
2007). Itsstrikingmorphologyalsoconcealsa
perculiarchemistrywherebybothOH maserand
PAH emissionhavebeendetected.
Shocks, x-raysandanencroachinghardradiation
fieldpermeatingNGC 6302aresimilarproperties
tothosefoundinAGN andaccordinglyprovidean
extremeenvironmentinwhichtotestmodelsof
theinteractionofUV photonsandx-rayswith
moleculargas.
WereporthereonthefirstdetectionofCN,HCN,
HCO+andatentativedetectionofSiC2towards
NGC 6302madeusingtheJamesClerkMaxwell
Telescope(JCMT).Thesemolecularspecies, along
withCO,aremodelledwiththeMeudonPDR
codetoconstrainconditionsinthesource. The
effectsof12C/13C chemistryonmolecular
abundancesarealsomodelledtoascertaintheir
affectsontherichchemistryinNGC 6302.
Hotcoremodelsatlowmetallicity
NadyaKunawicz (JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics)with Gary Fuller, Estelle Bayet,
David Tideswell, Andrew Markwick, and
Tom Millar
Hotcoresarethoughttobetheprogenitorsof
massivestarformation. InthispresentationI will
discussthemodellingoftheisothermalcollapseof
adarkcloud, andthefollowinghotcorestage. The
hotcoremodelisatimedependentchemical
model, whichusestheUMIST databaserate06
reactionnetwork. Threemodelshavebeen
created, torepresenttheGalaxy, theLarge
MagellanicCloudandtheSmallMagellanic
Cloud. Themodelsusechemicalabundances
takenfromobservationsofHII regionsintheir
respectivegalaxy. Themodeloutputshavebeen
usedtopredictcolumndensities. Theseresults
havebeenusedwithRADEX topredictthe
observablefluxseenacrossahotcoreforvarious
speciesincludingCS,HCN,HNC andHCO+. The
effectofdecreasingmetallicityonanobservable
hotcoreisthereforebeingexamined. Theresults
fromthisprojectshouldbedirectlycomparable
withALMA observationsofhotcoresinother
galaxies.
Photon- andElectron-drivenProcessesinModel
InterstellarIces
MartinMcCoustra (Heriot-WattUniversity)
Modernsurfacesciencetechniquesallowusto
probeinequisitedetailtheinteractionofphotons
andelectronswithmodelsoftheicymantles
expectedtogrowondustgrainsinthedense
interstellarmedium. Thistalkwilldiscussthe
resultsofmeasurementsonasimplemodelice
comprisingbenzene(C6H6)adsorbedonwater
icesurfaces. Photonexcitationataround250nm
andelectronexcitationaround250eV willbe
discussed. Theimpactofthesemeasurementson
ourunderstandingofthenon-thermaldesorption
oficygrainmantleswillbeoutlined.
TheXgearProject- A NewEraforAstrochemical
Modelling?
PaulRuffle (JodrellBankCentreforAstrophysics)
with Andrew Markwick(JBCA), Helen Roberts
(QUB),and Tom Millar(QUB)
Xgearstartedlifeasawrapperprogrammewritten
inC thatcollectedparametersforrunning
astrochemicalmodelsusingtheHMC (hot
molecularcore)FortrancodebySteveRodgers
(1998), assubstantiallydevelopedandupdatedby
HelenRoberts(2002onwards), whichutilises
LSODE:theLivermoreSolverforOrdinary
DifferentialEquations(Hindmarsh1983;
RadhakrishnanandHindmarsh1993). Thegoalof
theXgearProjectistoenableastrochemical
modelstoberuneasilyandconsistently, withfull
usercontroloverthemanyparametersthatmust
bespecifiedtorunamodel. Theseparameterscan
bedefinedonthecommandlineand/orinaplain
textconfigurationfile. However, inthelonger
termweintendtobuildaPHP-MySQL front-end
toXgear, sothatmodelscanalsobesetupandrun
usingaclientwebinterfacetoa(remote)Xgear
applicationserverorcluster. Theresultsfrom
runningsetsofmodelscoveringvariouspartsof
parameterspacecouldthenbestoredina
databaseforsubsequentquerying. Other
enhancementscouldincludealternativemodel
enginestoHMC andtheinclusionofadditional
processessuchasgas-graininteractions. Initially,
chemicalreactionrateswillbetakenfromUDFA
2006: thenewUMIST databaseforastrochemistry
(Woodall, Agundez, Markwick-KemperandMillar
2006), whichreplacedRate99: TheUMIST
databaseforastrochemistry(LeTeuffetal. 2000).
ThecodeforXgearwillbemadepublicly
availableunderthetermsoftheGNU General
PublicLicense. Weexpectthecodetocompile
successfullyunderLinux, UnixandOS X,forboth
32- and64-bitplatforms.
P18
Magnetospheric-periodoscillationsinSaturn's
equatorialmagnetosphereandopentaillobes
throughouttheCassinimission
DavidAndrews (UniversityofLeicester)with
S.W.H. Cowley, L. Lamy, and G. Provan
WepresentnewresultsofanalysisofthenearplanetaryperiodoscillationsinSaturn'smagnetic
field, employingallavailableCassinidata
obtainedtodate, includingduringtherecent
Saturnequinox. Inthisanalysisweuseanewfitto
thepreviouslystudiedspatialvariationsinthe
phaseoftheseoscillations, anddeducesecular
changesintheirperiodicities. Pre-equinoxthese
equatorialmagneticfieldoscillationsarefoundto
beconsistentlyinphasewiththoseobservedon
Southern-hemisphereopenfieldlines, andhence
withthedominantcomponentoftheSaturn
kilometricradiation(SKR) emission. Meanwhile,
fieldoscillationsonopenfieldlinesintheplanet's
Northernhemisphereareconsistentlyfoundtobe
inphasewiththeweaker, longer-period
componentoftheSKR.Nearequinox, wehave
nowobservedarapiddecreaseintheperiodofthe
equatorialfieldoscillations. Consequencesof
thesenewfindingsarediscussed.
Interpolationofexternalmagneticfieldsover
largesparsearraysusingSphericalElementary
CurrentSystems
CiaranBeggan (BritishGeologicalSurvey)with
Sam McLay
Interpolationofthemagneticfielddisturbancesto
apointremotefromanobservatorycanbe
achievedbyemployingthelatitudinal-weighted
arithmeticmeanofthefieldasmeasuredattwo
observatories, onetothenorthandonetothe
southofthepointofinterest. Analternative
techniqueforinterpolatingexternalmagneticfield
disturbancesacrosslargespatialareascanbe
achievedwiththeSphericalElementaryCurrent
System(SECS) methodusingdatafromgroundbasedmagneticobservatories. TheSECS method
representscomplexelectricalcurrentsystemsasa
simplesetofequivalentcurrentsplacedata
specificheightintheionosphere. Themagnetic
fieldrecordedatobservatoriescanbeusedto
invertfortheelectricalcurrentsandsubsequently
usedtointerpolateorextrapolatethemagnetic
fieldacrossalargearea. Weshowthatinverting
forinducedsubsurfacecurrentsystemsinaddition
toionosphericcurrentsystemscanresultinstrong
improvementstotheestimateofinterpolated
magneticfield, particularlyintheradial
componentofthefield. Wedemonstratethat
relativelyfewobservatoriesarerequiredto
produceanestimatewhichisbetterthanthenull
hypothesis(i.e. assumingnochangeinthefield)or
interpolationusinglatitudinalweightingofdata
fromotherobservatories. Wefurtherinvestigate
theapplicationoftheSECS methodinmid- tohigh
geomagneticlatitudesusingaseriesofobservatory
networkstotesthowwelltheexternalfieldcanbe
interpolatedoverlargedistances.
AnestimationoftheCarringtonflaremagnitude
fromsolarflareeffects(sfe)inthegeomagnetic
records
EllenClarke (BritishGeologicalSurvey)with
Craig Rodger(UniversityofOtago), Mark Clilverd
(BAS), Thomas Humphries(BGS), Orsolya Baillie
(BGS),and andAlan Thomson(BGS)
Inthisstudywereviewpreviousworktoestimate
themagnitudeoftheCarringtonsolarflare(1
September1859)andre-examineobservationsof
solarflareeffects(sfe)ontheKewandGreenwich
Observatorymagnetograms. A databaseofmore
recenteventsisconstructedfrom: existingsfedata
availableon-line; magneticobservatory
yearbooks; sfedatacollectedandprocessedby
EbroObservatory; additionalscalingofevents
usingone-minutevaluesfromvarious
INTERMAGNET andWDC magnetic
observatories; andGOES X-rayfluxdata. We
investigatefourofthelargesteventsindetailand
alsothestatisticalrelationshipbetweensfe
magnitudeandX-rayfluxwithrespecttosolar
zenithangleandgeomagneticlatitudeandusethe
resultstoestimatethesizeoftheCarringtonflare.
EstimatingtheExtremesinGeomagneticActivity
AcrossEurope
EwanDawson (BritishGeologicalSurvey)with
AlanP Thomson, and Sarah Reay
Rapidlychanginggeomagneticfieldvariations
constituteanaturalhazard, forexamplein
navigationand, throughgeomagneticallyinduced
currents, topowergridsandpipelinenetworks.
Thecontinuousmagneticmeasurementsavailable
tohelpusunderstandthishazardtypicallyextend
backlessthan100years; thisproblemofthelack
ofalong-termdatasetiscompoundedbythefact
thatmuchoftheolderdataisalsoinanalogue
form, orisonlyavailabledigitallyashourlyor
dailymagneticindicesormeanlevels. So, itmay
notyetbeclearwhatthetrueextremesin
geomagneticvariationsare, particularlyatthetime
scalesofsecondstominutesthatarerelevantfor
estimatingthehazardtotechnologicalsystems.
Wethereforepresentananalysisbasedonthe
applicationofastatisticaltechnique- 'extreme
valuetheory'- toanumberofdecadesofone
minutesamplesofmagneticdatafrom
observatoriesacrossEurope, andexplore
P17–P18
65
estimatedmaximainfieldvariationsinthe
horizontalstrengthanddeclinationofthefield.
Thesemaximaareexpressedintermsofthe
greatestmaximumthatmaybeobservedonce
every100and200years. Wealsoexaminethe
extremesintheone-minuterateofchangeofthese
fieldcomponentsonsimilartimescales.
Theresultsshouldfindapplicationinbothhazard
assessmentandinnavigationapplications. The
resultscanalsobeusedtomorerigorouslyanswer
theoften-askedquestion: "justhowlargecan
geomagneticvariationsget?
SpritesandRelativisticElectronBeamsAbove
Thunderclouds
MartinFullekrug (UniversityofBath)with
Toby Whitley, and Michael Rycroft
Ithasrecentlybeendiscoveredthatparticularly
intenselightningdischargescangeneratesprites
andsubsequentlyupward-directedrelativistic
electronbeamsabovethunderclouds. Thisextends
thephenomenonofrelativisticrunaway
breakdownbelievedtooccurinside
thundercloudstotheatmosphereabove
thunderclouds. Thismarksaprofoundadvancein
ourunderstandingoftheatmospherebecausewe
nowknowitactsasagiant, natural, particle
accelerator. Theacceleratedelectronscanreach
significantrelativisticenergiesofsomeMeV
duringtheirpassagefromthetroposphere, through
themiddleatmosphere, intonear-Earthspace.
Theserelativisticelectronbeamsconstitutea
currentabovethundercloudsandeffectively
transferenergyfromthetropospheretothemiddle
atmosphere. Thiscouplingprocesstherebyforms
anovelelementoftheglobalatmosphericelectric
circuitwhichlinkstroposphericthundercloudsto
theatmosphereabove.
SuperDARN observationsofthesub-auroral
convectionresponsetoenhancedgeomagnetic
activity
AdrianGrocott (UniversityofLeicester)with
M. Lester, S.E. Milan, and T.K. Yeoman
A recentadditiontotheSuperDualAuroralRadar
Network(SuperDARN),theBlackstoneradaris
locatedat ∼ 50 degreesmagneticnorth, ∼ 10
degreesequatorwardofitsauroralcounterparts. At
thislatitudetheradarregularlymakesobservations
ofplasmaconvectionequatorwardofthemain
auroraloval. Theseobservationsreveallow
velocitysub-auroralionosphericscatterthatis
wellcorrelatedwithboththeringcurrent(SYM-H)
andauroralelectrojet(AE) indicesindicatingitis
respondingdirectlytogeomagneticactivity. Inthis
paperwepresentsomestatisticalverificationof
thisrelationship, andinvestigatethetimedelay
betweentheauroralenhancementsandthesubauroralconvectionresponse. Inaddition, we
presentsomenear-conjugateTHEMIS observations
ofamagnetosphericsubstormwhichsuggesta
directrelationshipbetweenlocalisedsubstorm
activityandtheobservedsub-auroraldynamics.
ObservationsofGeomagneticStormsoveraSolar
Cycle: SomeInitialFindings
JamesHutchinson (UniversityofLeicester)with
D.M. Wright, and S.E. Milan
Geomagneticstorms, periodsofintensesolarwind
–magnetospherecouplingusuallyassociatedwith
extremeconditionsinthesolarwindsuchas
coronalmassejections(CMEs)orco-rotating
interactionregions(CIRs), causelargeglobal
disturbancesintheEarth’smagnetosphere;
66
P18
depositinglargeamountsofenergyintothe
magnetotailandproducinganenhancedring
currentandenergisingplasmatorelativisticlevels,
throughyetunknownexcitationmechanisms.
ByexploitingdatafromtheAdvanced
CompositionExplorer(ACE) spacecraftin
conjunctionwithspace- andground-based
measurementsatEarthoverthelastsolarcycle, a
databaseofgeomagneticstormshasbeen
compiledandanalysed. Herewepresentsome
initialstatisticalfindingsfromasuperposedepoch
analysisof157eventsidentifiedfromtheglobal
SYM-H index. Diurnalvariationinstormactivityis
observed, alongwiththegeneraltrendofactivity
overthesolarcycle. Radarmeasurementsfromthe
SuperDARN andauroralimagesfromthefarultraviolet(FUV) packageonboardtheIMAGE
satelliteandtheultravioletimager(UVI) onboard
thePolarspacecraft, arealsopresentedusinga
newradarbeamkeogramtechniqueto
demonstratevariationsintheauroralovalduring
stormconditions. Theresultsofcorrelationstudies
betweenstormsizesandsolarwindinputthrough
commoncouplingfunctionswillalsobe
discussed.
Overviewoflowenergyelectronobservationsin
thevicinityofSaturn'smoonEnceladus
SheilaKanani (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
with Geraint Jones, Gethyn Lewis, Chris Arridge,
Andrew Coates, and Dave Young
EnceladusresidesdeepwithinSaturn's
magnetosphere. Themagnetosphericplasma
incidentonthesatelliteisabsorbed, forminga
thermalplasmawakedownstreamofthemoon,
andacavityinhigherenergypopulations. When
theCassinispacecraftcrossesEnceladus'sL-shell,
thesecavitiesareobservedasbriefdropoutsin
energeticparticlefluxes, ormicrosignatures, most
clearlyobservedbytheMagnetosphericImaging
Instrument(MIMI).A surveyofthermalplasma
observationsbytheCassiniPlasmaSpectrometer
(CAPS) instrumenthasrevealedtheexistenceof
variousfeaturesinlowenergyelectronscloseto
thetimesofmicrosignatures, orimmediately
beforeoraftertheiroccurrence. Thesefeatures
vary; somepresentthemselvesasasetofdiscrete
spikes, coveringelectronenergiesof9-15eV and
lasting, intermittently, uptotensofminutes. Other
showevidenceofinjectioneventsclosetothe
moon'sorbitalplane. Wepresenttheresultsofa
surveyoftheseperplexingfeatures, suggest
possiblecausesfortheiroccurrenceanddiscuss
resultsfromcloseEnceladusflybys.
NatureoftheringcurrentinSaturn’sdayside
magnetosphere
StephanieKellett (UniversityofLeicester)with
C.S. Arridge, E.J. Bunce, A.J. Coates,
S.W.H. Cowley, M.K. Dougherty, A.M. Persoon,
N. Sergis, and R.J. Wilson
DeterminationofthephysicalnatureofSaturn's
ringcurrent, i.e., theactualcombinationof
currentsassociatedwiththeinertiaofthenearcorotatingplasmaandhotparticleeffects, has
beenthesubjectofmuchdebateforalmost30
years.
Hereweinvestigatethenatureoftheringcurrent
inSaturn’sdaysidemagnetosphereusingmagnetic
field(MAG) andplasmaparticle(CAPS,MIMI and
RPWS) datafromtwotypicalnear-equatorial
passesoftheCassinispacecraftspanningtheradial
rangebetween ∼ 3 and ∼ 20RS (RS isSaturn's
equatorialradius, equalto60268km). Physically,
theplasmacurrentsthatformtheringcurrentare
duetooneormoreofthreepossibleeffects; the
spatialgradientoftheperpendicularplasma
pressure, theanisotropyoftheplasmapressures
parallelandperpendiculartothefieldlines, and
theinertiaoftheflowing(near-corotating)plasma.
Weexamineplasmaparametersobtainedby
Cassiniforeachpassandcomparetheazimuthal
currentdensityprofilesdeducedwiththose
obtainedfromcurrentdiskmodelingofthe
magneticfieldperturbations.
Weshowthatthecurrentassociatedwiththe
Pperp > Ppara pressureanisotropyofthewarm
watergroupionsisimportantinside ∼ 10RS ,
cancellingasignificantfractionoftheotherwise
dominantinertiacurrentinside ∼ 6RS . The
overalltotalcurrentdensityprofileisthenfoundto
besimilartothatproducedbythepressure
gradientcurrent, butaugmentedinstrengthby
factorsof ∼ 1.5 − 2.0 bythedifferencebetween
theinertiaandanisotropycurrents. Thededuced
currentdensityprofilesareingoodagreement
withthegrossfeaturesoftheprofilesdeduced
fromcurrentdiskmodeling, thoughwiththe
currentdensitythenfallingmoresteeplywith
radialdistancethanthe 1/r dependenceassumed
inthemodel.
Towardsmodellingofhighlatitudemagnetic
fieldsfromsatellitedata
GemmaKelly (UniversityofLiverpool)with
Richard Holme, and Alan Thomson
Recentlow-Earthorbitsatellitemissionshave
providedawealthofhighqualitydataallowingfor
improvedmodelsofthenear-Earthgeomagnetic
field. However, understandinginthehighlatitude
regionsislaggingbehindduetothecomplexityof
theprocessesandinteractionsinthisregion. We
investigateresidualsbetweensomerecentmodels
(CHAOS-2, T01andCM4)anddatafromthe
CHAMP andØrstedsatellites, withtheaimof
investigatinghowwellthemodelsfitthedata,
particularlyregardingthehighlatituderegions.
Bylookingattheresidualsonanorbit-by-orbit
basiswehaveshownthatallthreemodelsshow
verysimilarfeaturesintheresiduals. Wecan
identifycurrentsourcesthatareconsistentintime
andco-latitude, evenatveryquiettimes(Kp < 2o,
night-sideonly). Thereisalsosomecorrelation
betweenthesizeoftheresidualsandlevelof
activityindicatedbythePC andAE indices. When
investigatingtwo-dayaveragedresidualplotsthe
auroralovalcanbeidentified, andthereare
enhancedresidualsoverthepolarcaps, forboth
quietanddisturbedtimes. Thisinformationwillbe
fedintoamethodforimprovinggeomagneticfield
modelsathighlatitudes.
Coordinatedgroundandspaceobservationsof
Geospace: A viewfromtheground
MarkLester (UniversityofLeicester)
Thestudyofthesolarwindmagnetosphere
ionospheresystem, sometimesreferredtoas
Geospace, isbestconductedbybringingtogether
arangeofobservationaltools. Specifically, itis
importanttounderstandthatbothinsitu
measurementsbyspacecraftandremotesensingof
measurementsbyspacecraftandfromtheground
provideanincomparabledatasetforsuch
investigations. Inthelastdecadeorso, space
missionssuchasCluster, ThemisandIMAGE,have
beenaugmentedbyarangeofgroundbased
systems, suchascoherentandincoherentscatter
radars, magnetometers, riometersandauroral
camerasandspectrographs. Herewepresentan
overviewoftheimportanceofcoordinatedground
andspaceobservationsinordertodevelopour
understandingofthelargerGeospacesystem. We
illustratethiswithexampleswhicharetakenfrom
avarietyofinstrumentsandstudies, which
illustratethecomplexity, bothintimeandspace,
ofthesystemwhichweareinvestigating. Wealso
notetheopportunitiesthatexistforcontinued
explorationofGeospacewiththecurrentand
futuremissionsandinstrumentsaswellasbythe
combinationofdatasetsinnovelways.
GPS Plasmsphericimaging
CathrynMitchell (UniversityofBath)with
P Spencer
Thispaperoutlinesamathematicalapproachto
imagingtheelectrondensitydistributioninthe
lowerplasmasphereusingGPS measurements
fromlowEarthorbit(LEO) satellites. Theproblem
ofionosphericimagingusingground-basedGPS
measurementshasbeenstudiedforanumberof
years. Suchmethodshaveprovedextremelyuseful
inprovidingdetailsofthelargerscalemorphology
oftheglobalionosphere. Theworkpresented
extendsthesemethodssoastobeabletoimage
theplasmasphereuptoaltitudesoftheGPS
satellitesat20000km. Theproblemoflimited
observationsduetothesmallnumberofLEO’sin
operationisovercomebyconstrainingthe
plasmasphericelectrondensitytobeconstant
alongmagneticfieldlines. Itisshownthata
coordinatetransformfromasphericalcoordinate
systemtoonedefinedintermsofEulerpotentials
issufficienttoprovideunambiguoussolutions.
PreliminaryresultsusingdatafromtheCOSMIC
satelliteconstellationarepresentedshowingthe
responseoftheplasmaspheretochangesinthe
interplanetarymedium.
Theresultsclearlyshowtheresponseofthe
plasmaspheretochangesintheIMF magneticfield
areconsistentwithreportedobservationsfrom
otherauthorsusingindependentobservation
techniques. Potentialnewscientificinvestigations
intomajorstormswillbepossiblewhenGPS data
fromtheforthcomingSWARM missionare
availableandtheseideasarediscussed.
Evidencefortheoccurrenceof 10.6hmagnetic
fieldoscillationsinSaturn’sequatorial
magnetosphere
GabbyProvan (UniversityofLeicester)with
D.J. Andrews, S.W.H. Cowley, M.K. Dougherty,
and L. Lamy
Andrewsetal. (2008)andProvanetal. (2009)
reportedCassiniobservationsofnear-planetary
periodmagneticfieldoscillationsinSaturn’snearequatorialmagnetosphere, andshowedthattheir
periodwascloselysimilartotheslowly-varying
periodof ∼ 10.8 hdeterminedbyKurthetal.
(2008)frommodulationsofSKR radioemissions.
Kurth. etal(2008)furtherreportedthatthese
emissionsalsoexhibitedasecondperiodof
∼ 10.6 h. FurtherinvestigationbyGurnettetal.
(2009)revealedthatthe ∼ 10.6 hmodulated
emissionoriginatesfromtheNorthernhemisphere,
whilstthe ∼ 10.8 hmodulatedemission
originatesfromtheSouthernhemisphere.
Andrewsetal. (2008)andProvanetal. (2009)
alsofoundsignificant‘jitter’inthephasesofthe
equatorialoscillations, andpresentedevidence
thatmuchofthisisnotduetomeasurementerrors
buthasarealphysicalcause. Hereweshowthat
thisphase‘jitter’isduetothesuperpositioninthe
equatorialmagnetosphereoffieldoscillationsat
theSouthernperiodwithweakeroscillationsatthe
Northernperiod. Wedeterminetherelative
amplitudesoftheseoscillations, andthephaseof
theNorthernperiodoscillationsrelativetothe
NorthernSKR modulation.
ObservationsandmodellingofartificialD-region
heatingseenbyARIES
AndrewSenior (LancasterUniversity)with
M.J. Kosch, and F. Honary
ArtificialradiowaveheatingofelectronsintheDregionisusedasadiagnostictechniquefor
studyingpolarmesosphericsummerechoes, a
radarphenomenoncausedbyminuteiceparticles
inthevicinityofthemesopause. Recentstudiesof
theheatingusingthecross-modulationtechnique
foundthatmodelsusedtopredicttheheating
overestimatedtheobservedcross-modulationbya
factorof1.5-2.5. TheAdvancedRio-Imaging
ExperimentinScandinavia(ARIES),ahighresolutionimagingriometersystem, observed
changesintheionosphericabsorptionofcosmic
radionoiseduringD-regionheating. These
observationshavebeencomparedtopredictions
fromasimilarmodeltothatusedwhenanalysing
thecross-modulationresults. Provisionalresults
showthatthemodeloverestimatesthechangein
cosmicnoiseabsorptionbyafactorofabout2.
Theseresultsleadustoquestionthevalidityofthe
usualmodelsofD-regionheatingbypowerfulHF
radiowaves.
SCANDI:All-skyviewofmeso-scalespatial
structureinthethermosphereandion-neutral
couplingoverSvalbard
TimothySpain (UCL) with A.L. Aruliah,
H.-C.I. Yiu, I. McWhirter, E.M. Griffin,
A. Charalambous, M. Kosch, L. Baddeley,
V.S.C. HowelI,and I. McCrea
TheUCL ScanningDopplerImager(SCANDI) isan
all-skyFabry-PerotInterferometerthatislocatedat
theKjellHenriksenObservatoryonSvalbardnear
theEISCAT ESR radars. Itprovidesroutine
nighttimeobservationsofthetwomostprominent
auroralandairglowemissionsat630nmor
557.7nm. Theseallowmeasurementsof
thermosphericwinds, temperaturesandintensities
ataround240kmand120kmaltitude, which
roughlycorrespondtotheF- andE-region
ionosphere. Itisoneof3existingSDIsinthe
world; theothertwoaretheoriginalAlaskanSDI
andMawson, AntarcticaSDI.Recentlythefirst
conjugatestudyoftheupperthermospherewas
madebycomparingtheSCANDI withtheMawson
SDI.Theseinstrumentshaveupsetthestandard
assumptionsofaslowlyvaryingthermosphere.
EISCAT-SCANDI experimentsusinghightemporal
andspatialresolutionmeasurementshaveshown
localisedrapidresponsestoionosphericvariability
(10sofminutesoverafewhundredkilometres
horizontaldistance), butalsoanunderlyinginertia.
Theeffectsofthisbehaviourappearinunexpected
amountsofheatingandaccelerationoftheupper
atmosphere, andhaveconsequencesforfeedback
mechanismsthroughtheneutralwinddynamo.
Observationsofdouble-peakedHF radarspectra
duetomixedechoesfromnaturalandartificial
plasmairregularities
HannahVickers (UniversityofLeicester)with
Terry Robinson
CUTLASS HF backscattertargetsmaybeartificially
inducedthroughtheuseoftheEISCAT highpower
ionosphericheatingfacilityatTromsø, Northern
Norway. Plasmairregularitiescreatedinthisway
areknowntobehighlyfield-alignedandusually
possesslowspectralwidth. Inthevicinityof
naturalwavesandirregularitiesundermore
disturbedgeophysicalconditionshowever, the
spectralwidthofartificialirregularitiesasdeduced
bythestandardSuperDARN ‘FITACF’analysis, can
besometimesappeartobebroadened. Inthis
work, wepresentsuchobservationsandemploy
theBurgmaximumentropyanalysismethodto
CUTLASS HF radarspectra, combinedwith
standard‘FITACF’parametersandDMSP satellite
measurementstoshowhowmixedartificialand
naturalHF echoesfromspatiallyseparatedsources
cangiverisetodouble-peakedspectraasaresult
ofdetectionattheedgesofantennamainlobe
Presentdaychallengesinunderstandingthe
geomagnetichazardtonationalpowergrids
JimWild (LancasterUniversity)with
A.W.P. Thomson, C.T. Gaunt, P. Cilliers,
B. Opperman, L.-A. McKinnell, P. Kotze,
C.M. Ngwira, and S.I. Lotz
SolaractivitygivesrisetochangesinthenearEarthspaceenvironment, oftenreferredtoas
spaceweather, thatcanadverselyaffect
technologiesonandabovethesurfaceofthe
Earth. Forexample, theimpactofacoronalmass
ejectionontheEarth’sprotectivemagnetosphere
canleadtoageomagneticstorm, boostingexisting
magnetosphericcurrents. Thesecurrentsystems
causelargemagneticvariationsthatinduce
electricfieldsinthesolidEarth. Thesefields, in
turn, generategeomagneticallyinducedcurrents
thatflowinconductingpipesandwires, inways
influencedbytheelectricalpropertiesofeach
network. Consequently, powergridsandpipeline
networksatalllatitudesareatriskfromthenatural
hazardofGICs. Assolaractivitybeginstoincrease
fromthedeepestsolarminimuminacentury, we
considerthecurrentunderstandingofthishazard,
asitaffectsmajorpowersystemsinEuropeand
Africa. Wealsosummarisewhatcanbesaidwith
somecertaintyaboutthehazardandwhat
researchisyetrequiredtoaddressoutstanding
questionsanddevelopusefultoolsfor
geomagnetichazardmitigation.
TrackingsolarwindstructuresfromtheSun
throughtotheorbitofMars
AnthonyWilliams (UniversityofLeicester)with
N.J.T. Edberg, S.E. Milan, M. Lester, and M. Franz
Withnodirectupstreammonitorsofthesolar
windateitherVenusorMars, thesolarwind
inputstotheplasmaenvironmentsofbothplanets
mustbeinferred. Wepresentamethod, usinga
combinationofimagesfromtheHeliospheric
Imagers(HI) ontheSolarTerrestrialRelations
Observatory(STEREO) andin-situmeasurements
fromtheAdvancedCompositionExplorer(ACE)
situatedatEarth’sL1pointtotracktheprogression
ofCorotatingInteractionRegionsthroughthe
innerheliosphere, andtopredicttheirarrivalat
VenusandMars. Weshowtheresultsofthis
methodforsolarminimumfrom1July2007to31
July2008, demonstratingthatthereisgood
agreementbetweenexpectedarrivaltimesand
observedenhancedactivityateachplanet.
ComparisonsofplasmatransportinthehighlatitudeionospheresoftheEarthandVenus.
AlanWood (AberystwythUniversity)with
S.E. Pryse, M. Grande, and H.R. Middleton
ThepresenceofaplanetarymagneticfieldatEarth
andtheabsenceofsuchafieldatVenusresultsin
substantialdifferencesinthedynamicsand
morphologyofthehigh-latitudeionospheres. In
P18
67
bothcasesphotoionisationistheprimary
mechanismbywhichthedaysideionosphereis
createdwhileparticleprecipitationandtransport
processesacttomaintaintheplasmadensitiesat
night. Howeverthemechanismsdrivingplasma
transportatEarthandVenusarefundamentally
different.
Resultsarepresentedfromtheterrestrial
ionosphereduringintervalswhentheIMF is
northwardwhichshowthattheTongue-ofIonisation(TOI) canbedrawnaroundthe
peripheryofthepolarcap(Middletonetal., 2005)
andintothenightsideionosphere(Woodetal.,
2008). Inthemagneticmidnightsectorsubstorms
canmodulatethehigh-latitudeconvectionpattern
andhencealterthespatialdistributionofthe
plasma(Woodetal., 2009). Whenthesolar
terminatorislocatedinthemagneticmidnight
sectorpolarcappatchescanformbythebreakup
ofaTOI duetovariationinthehigh-latitude
convectionpatterndrivenbythechangesinthe
IMF (WoodandPryse, inpreparation). Plasma
structuresinthissectoralsoshowaclearseasonal
variationduetochangesinthethermospherewith
theratioofthepatchdensitytothatofthe
surroundingionospherebeinggreaterinwinter
thansummer(WoodandPryse, 2009).
AtVenusobservationsofionsathighlatitudes
closetothesolarterminatorshowasymmetriesin
boththedawn-duskandnoon-midnightplanes.
Theseresultsshow, forthefirsttime, thepresence
ofanightwardionflowatsolarminimum. The
velocityofthisflowincreaseswithaltitudeandit
islikelytocontributetothelossofionsfromthe
planettothesolarwind(Woodetal., in
preparation).
Combiningincoherentscatterradardataand
IRI2007tomonitortheopen-closedfieldline
boundaryduringsubstorms.
EmmaWoodfield (LancasterUniversity)with
J.A. Wild, A. Senior, and A.J. Kavanagh
Thesizeofthepolarcap, andhencetheamountof
openmagneticfluxcontainedwithinit, isavery
importantquantitywhenitcomesto
understandingthesubstormprocessaswellas
reconnectionratesingeneral. Ground-based
proxiesoftheopen-closedfieldlineboundary
(OCFLB) havethereforebeenofgreatinterestin
recentyears. Inthisworkwebuildonprevious
studiesbyAikioetal(e.g. Ann. Geophys., 24,
1905-1917, 2006)whichuseacombinationof
EISCAT electrontemperaturemeasurementsfrom
themainlandandSvalbardtotrackthemotionof
theOCFLB.Wedemonstratewhetherusingthe
InternationalReferenceIonospheremodel
(IRI2007)canenhancethismethodandmakeit
applicabletootherincoherentscatterradars. In
particularwemakeuseofEISCAT datato
investigatetheelectrontemperaturesignaturesof
theOCFLB duringalargenumberofsubstorms.
P19
ImagingobservationsofX-rayalbedoina
compactdiskflare
MarinaBattaglia (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Eduard Kontar, and Iain Hannah
X-raysfromsolarflaresourcesareanimportant
diagnostictoolforparticleaccelerationand
transportinthesolaratmosphere. However, the
observedfluxatEarthiscomposedofdirect
68
P18–P19
emissionandphotonswhichareCompton
backscatteredfromthephotosphere. This
contributioncanaccountforupto40%ofthe
observedfluxatenergiesof30-50keV,evenfor
anisotropicsource. Wepresentimaging
observationsofacompactflareonthesolardisc.
Thesourcefull-width-halfmaximumwas
determinedatdifferentenergiesusingX-ray
visibilityforwardfitting. Theobservedsourcesize
increasesanddecreaseswithenergywitha
maximumsizeatabout40keV,contraryto
observationsmadeinlimbevents. Thebehaviour
isconsistentwithpredictionsfromMonteCarlo
simulationsofX-rayphotontransportinwhichXrayvisibilitieswerecomputedfromsimulated
mapsandfittedusingvisibilityforwardfit.
ParallelelectricfieldgenerationbyAlfvénwave
turbulence
NicolasBian (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Eduard Kontar, and John Brown
Weinvestigatethespectralstructureoftheparallel
electricfieldgeneratedbystronganisotropic
Alfvénicturbulence, inrelationwiththeproblem
ofaccelerationandheatinginastrophysical
plasmas, includingflareselectrons. A low-β twofluidMHD modelisusedtofollowtheturbulent
cascaderesultingfromthenon-linearinteraction
betweenkineticAlfvénwaves, fromthelarge
MHD scalesdowntothesmall"kinetic"scales.
Scalingrelationsareobtainedforthemagnitudeof
theelectromagneticfluctuationsshowingthe
turbulentelectricfielddevelopsacomponent
paralleltothemagneticfieldatlargeMHD scales.
Thespectrumoftheparallelelectricfieldcanbe
effectivelyusedtomodelstochasticacceleration
ofelectronsduringsolarflares. Thequasi-linear
modelingoftheaccelerationprocessisdiscussed.
ParticleaccelerationattheSun
PhilippaBrowning (JBCA,Universityof
Manchester)
Thisinvitedtalkwillgiveanoverviewofparticle
accelerationinsolarflares. Observationalaspects
ofhighenergyparticlesinflareswillbebriefly
summarised. Themaintheoreticalmodelsof
accelerationonflareswillbeoutlined, focusingon
modelsofparticleaccelerationinreconnecting
magneticfields. Somechallengesforfuturework
willbeproposed.
ParticleAccelerationinthePresenceofWeak
TurbulenceatanX-TypeNeutralPoint
ChristinaBurge (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Alec MacKinnon, and Panagiota Petkaki
Itiswellknownthatparticlesinspaceplasmas
canbeenergisedbyinteractionwithreconnection
regions, whichformatmagnetictopological
featuressuchasnullsandseparatrices.Such
energisationhasbeenstudiedinsimple, largescalefields. Hereweextendthesestudiesto
includenoisy, turbulentelectricandmagnetic
fields.Themagneticfieldisperturbedbya
superpositionofcoldplasma
eigenmodes,includingself-consistentelectricfield
oscillations,constructedasintheworkofCraig
andMcClymont. Weakturbulenceismodelledby
adoptingrandomphasesforthese
eigenmodes.Usinganadaptivestepsizemethod
wenumericallyintegrateparticleorbitsin
realisationsofthisfieldanddescribetheresulting
particledistributions.
Roleoflatitudeofsourceregioninsolar
energeticparticleevents
SilviaDalla (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute, UCLan)
with Neus Agueda(UC Berkeley)
MeasurementsofSolarEnergeticParticles(SEPs)in
interplanetaryspacecanbeusedtoconstrain
modelsoftheiraccelerationduringeruptiveevents
attheSun, providedthattherolesofmagnetic
connectiontothesourceandofinterplanetary
transportareunderstood. Itiswellknownthatthe
longitudeofthesourceregionattheSunisakey
parameterindeterminingwhetheranSEP event
willbedetectedanditscharacteristics.
Herewediscusshowthelatitudinalseparation
betweensourceregionanddetectingspacecraft
influencestheprobabilityofobservingSEPsat1
AU.Weselectasampleof477solarflaresof
magnitudegreaterthanC8.0, locatedinthewellconnectedlongitudinalrangebetweenW20and
W80, andanalysewhetherornotanassociated
SEP eventisdetectednear-Earth. Weconsider
protonmeasurementsbyGOES andelectronones
byWIND/3DP.
Theseparationinheliolatitudebetweeneachflare
regionanddetectingspacecraft, D,variesbetween
0and30degreesinthissample. Wefindan
increasedprobabilityofSEP detectionforD
between4and12degrees. ValuesofD below4
degreesandbetween12and28degreesare
characterisedbyanSEP probabilityabouthalfthat
inthe4-12degreerange.
MeasurementofAnisotropyinSolarFlare
ElectronSpectrausingRHESSI HardX-Ray
Spectroscopy.
EwanDickson (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Eduard Kontar
Theangulardistributionofelectronsacceleratedin
solarflaresisakeyparameterinunderstandingthe
accelerationandpropagationmechanismsthat
occurthere. Howeverthisanisotropyisstilla
poorlyknownquantitywithobservationalstudies
producingevidenceforanisotropicdistribution
andtheoreticalmodelsmainlyconsideringthe
stronglybeamedcase. Theeffectofphotospheric
albedocanbeusedtoinferthisanisotropyasit
influencesdifferentlydirectedphotonsallowing
diagnosticsoftheangulardistributioninthe
electrondistribution. A bi-directional
approximationwasappliedandaregularized
inversionwasperformedonHardX-ray
observationsmadebyRHESSI inordertodeduce
theelectronspectrainbothdownward(towards
thephotosphere)andupward(awayformthe
photosphere)directions. Todetermineifthe
anisotropychangessignificantlyovershortperiods
oftime. Intervalslasting4, 8and16seconds, over
theimpulsivepeakoftheflarewereexaminedfor
anychangeinanisotropy. Thiswasappliedtofour
suitableflaresdetectedbyRHESSI.The
distributionsdeterminedwereconsistentwiththe
isotropiccase.
Particleaccelerationinafragmentingcurrent
sheet
MykolaGordovskyy (UniversityofManchester)
with P.K. Browning, and G.E. Vekstein
Protonandelectronaccelerationisinvestigated
basedontheforcedreconnectionmodelinwhich
theinitialcurrentsheetfragmentsintoaseriesof
localisedcurrentfilamentsandmagneticislands.
WeusecombinationofMHD andtest-particle
approachestoconsiderparticletrajectories
consistentlywithatime-dependentreconnection
model. Itisshownthatacceleratedparticlesin
suchamodelformtwodistinctivepopulations.
Protonsandelectronsmovinginopenmagnetic
fieldhaveenergyspectrawhichareacombination
oftheinitialMaxwelliandistributionandapowerlawhigh-energy(> 10keV) tail. Thesecond
populationcontainsparticlesmovinginclosed
magneticfieldaroundo-points. Theseparticles
movepredominantlyalongtheguidingfieldand
theirenergiesfallwithinquiteanarrowrange
between100keV and10MeV.Itwasalsofound
thatparticlesmovinginclosedmagneticfieldhave
considerablyhigherpitch-anglesthanthose
movingintheopenconfiguration.
ParticleMotionandEnergyGainsinKinematic
MHD modelsofCollapsingMagneticTraps
KeithGrady (UniversityofStAndrews)with
Keith Grady, and Thomas Neukirch
Duringsolarflaresalargenumberofcharged
particlesareacceleratedtohighenergies, butthe
exactmechanismresponsibleforthisisstill
unclear. Accelerationincollapsingmagnetictraps
isoneofthemechanismsproposed. Wediscuss
analyticidealkinematicMHD modelsfor
collapsingmagnetictraps. Particleorbitsare
calculatedusingtheguidingcentre
approximation. Anillustrativeexampleofa
collapsingmagnetictrapmodelwillbepresented
togetherwithsomestudiesoftheeffectsofthe
initialconditionsoftheparticlesonthetrapping
timesandparticleenergygains.
Temporal, Spectral, andSpatialAnalysesofX-ray
EmissionComponentsinImpulsiveSolarFlares
JingnanGuo (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Siming Liu, Lyndsay Fletcher, and Eduard Kontar
Plasmaheatingandparticleaccelerationarethe
keyissuesinsolarflarestudy. TwodistinctX-ray
emissioncomponentsareoftenidentifiedinsolar
flare. Theimpulsive, non-thermalhardX-ray
componentnormallyoriginatesfromthe
chromosphericfootpoints, whilethemoregradual
thermalandsoftX-rayemissionoftenoriginates
fromcoronalsources. UsingRHESSI X-raydatawe
calculatethetime-derivativeofsolarflarephoton
lightcurvesindifferentenergybands. Theenergy
dependenceofthefluxchangerateanditstime
evolutionisstudiedforawellobservedsolarflare.
A lower(higher)rateisexpectedforthelower
(higher)energycomponent, andthetransition
energybetweenthelowandhighratecomponents
willbecomparedwiththetransitionenergy
betweenthethermalandnonthermalcomponents.
Thisstudywillhelpusquantitativelyunderstand
therelationbetweenenergeticnon-thermal
electronsandhotplasmasresponsibleforthe
observedsoftX-rays. Thisworkissupportedbythe
EU'sSOLAIRE ResearchandTrainingNetworkat
theUniversityofGlasgow(MTRN-CT-2006035484).
Cantheinfluenceofturbulentdensity
perturbationsinthecoronabedetectedinflare
X-rayspectrum?
IainHannah (UniversityofGlasgow)with
E.P. Kontar, and H.A.S. Reid
RHESSI solarflarehardX-rayobservations
sometimescannotbeadequatelyinterpretedin
termsofpurelycollisionalelectrontransport. We
insteadpresentnumericalsimulationswherewe
considertheenergeticelectron-beaminteractions
inthepresenceoflowfrequencydensity
perturbations. Wedemonstratehowtheturbulent
densityperturbationsaffectthehighfrequency
Langmuirwavesandinturn, theflareaccelerated
electrondistribution. Theconsequencesofthis
self-consistenttreatmentarediscussedforthe
observableX-rayspectrum.
Coronalmagnetictopologyandthesolarsource
ofmajorSEP events
ChuanLi (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL) with
C.J. Owen, S.A. Matthews, Y. Dai, and Y.H. Tang
A statisticalsurveyofthemajorelectronevents
duringtheperiod2002Februarythroughtheend
ofsolarcycle23ispresented. Wehaveobtained
electronreleasetimesandthepeakfluxspectra.
Wealsoderivedthecoronalmagnetic
configurationsoftherelatedsolaractiveregions
(ARs)fromthepotential-fieldsource-surface(PFSS)
model. Itisfoundthat: (1)11ofthe12open
magneticfield-lineeventsarepromptevents
whoseparticlereleasetimescoincidewiththe
maximaofflareemission. 13ofthe14closed
magneticfield-lineeventsaredelayedones, the
exceptionalprompteventisassociatedwitha
large-scalecoronaldisturbanceordimming. (2)
Anaveragedharderspectrumisfoundinopen
magneticfield-lineeventscomparedwiththe
closedones. Additionally, anobvioushigher
rolloverenergyisseeninclosedmagneticfieldlineeventscomparedwiththeopenones. These
correlationsclearlyestablishasignificantlink
betweenthecoronalmagneticfield-linetopology
andtheescapeofchargedparticlesfromthesolar
AR intointerplanetaryspaceduringthemajor
solarenergeticparticle(SEP) events.
StochasticParticleAccelerationbyCompressive
ModeswithIncompressiveModeInducedSpatial
Diffusion
SimingLiu (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Lyndsay Fletcher, and Eduard Kontar
Theinteractionbetweenlarge-scaleplasma
fluctuationsandenergeticparticlesisoften
believedtobetheprocessresponsibleforparticle
accelerationinvariousastrophysicalsituations.
Non-resonantstochasticinteractionsofparticles
withlarge-scalecompressivewavemodesleadto
second-orderFermiacceleration. Thedetailsof
thisaccelerationdependnotonlyonthespectrum
ofthecompressivemodesbutalsoontheparticle
spatialdiffusioncoefficient. Sinceincompressive
modesaremoreefficientthancompressivemodes
inscatteringoftheparticlesforthecompressive
wavespeedhigherthantheincompressiveeddy
speed, boththecompressibleandincompressible
modesplaycrucialrolesindeterminingthe
resultantparticledistribution. Wewillreportour
on-goinginvestigationofstochasticparticle
accelerationbyaspectrumofcompressiveand
incompressivemodes. Thisworkissupportedby
theEU'sSOLAIRE ResearchandTrainingNetwork
attheUniversityofGlasgow(MTRN-CT-2006035484).
Fromelectronmapstoaccelerationmechanisms
ofenergeticparticlesintheflaringSun
MichelePiana (Universita'diGenova)with
A. GordonEmslie(OklahomaStateUniversity),
and Massone(CNR - SPIN),and Anna Maria(CNR
- SPIN)
Imagingspectroscopyinvolvesinversionofboth
spatialandspectraldatatoyield‘insitu’
informationonthesourceasafunctionofboth
energyandposition. Inthespecialcasewherethe
spatialinformationisencodedintheformof
visibilities(two-dimensionalspatialFourier
transformsofthesourcestructure)itis
advantageous, bothconceptuallyand
computationally, toperformfirstthespectral
inversion, whichyieldsvisibilitiesoftheunknown
sourcefunction; andthentospatiallytransform
thesesourcefunctionvisibilities, whichyields
mapsofthesourcefunctionatdifferentenergies.
ForthevisibilitiesobservedbytheReuvenRamaty
HighEnergySolarSpectroscopicImager(RHESSI)
thisapproachhasbeenappliedforimaging
spectroscopyanalysisofhardX-rayemission
duringsolarflares. Thisprocedureinvolves:
regularizedinversionofthecountvisibilityspectra
toobtainsmoothedformsofthecorresponding
electronvisibilityspectra; applicationof
conventionalvisibility-basedimagingalgorithms
thatyieldsimagesoftheelectronfluxthatvary
smoothlywithenergy.
Thepresenttalkwillshowhowsuchanapproach
canbeutilizedtoinferquantitativeinformationon
theaccelerationmechanismsoccuringinsolar
plasmaduringtwoflaringeventsobservedby
RHESSI.Morespecifically, inthecaseofthesolar
flareobservedonFebruary202002, wewillshow
thatRHESSI dataareconsistentwithCoulomb
collisionsbetweenanaccelerationsitehighinthe
coronaandthedensechromosphericfootpoint
regions; andthatananalysisofthecentroid
positionsoftheseelectronmapsallowsustoinfer
thedensitystructureinthetwovisiblecompact
sources. Then, fortheNovember032003solar
flare, wewillshowhowPetrosianandChen
(2010)couldusethismethodandthehighresolutionX-rayobservationsprovidedbyRHESSI
toderiveseveralimportantparametersofthe
stochasticmodelforparticleacceleration.
Electromagneticemissionfrombeam-generated
Langmuirwaves
HeatherRatcliffe (UniversityofGlasgow)
Thebeamsofflare-acceleratedelectronsinthe
solarcoronahavebeenextensivelystudiedandare
knowntoproducehighlevelsofLangmuirwaves.
Thesemayinturnproduceelectromagnetic
emission, boththroughscatteringbythermalions
intheplasma, orbya3-wavedecayprocess
involvingion-soundwaves. Bothoftheseproduce
radiationneartheplasmafrequency, andare
possiblemechanismsforTypeIII radioemission
neartheplasmafrequency. Becausethelatter
requiresappreciablelevelsofionsoundwavesto
bepresentitisonlyofinterestwheretheelectron
temperaturefarexceedstheiontemperature; the
formermayoccurwhentheiontemperatureis
similar, orgreaterthan, theelectrontemperature.
Thesituationmaybetreated1-dimensionally, by
assumingthetransversewavesareemitted
perpendiculartotheLangmuirwaves. Thekinetic
equationscanthenbesolvednumerically, usinga
firstorderfinitedifferenceintegrationscheme; this
isdoneforahomogeneousplasmaatadensity
typicalofthesolarcorona.Someresultsforthe
spectrumofplasmaemissionarepresentedfor
varyingvaluesoftheelectronandion
temperatures, anddifferentfunctionalformsfor
theinitialLangmuirwavespectrum.
SolarFlareAcceleratedElectronTransport
throughtheTurbulentDensityoftheSolarWind
HamishReid (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Eduard Kontar
Solarflareacceleratedelectronbeamspropagating
awayfromtheSuncaninteractwiththeturbulent
interplanetarymedia, producingplasmawaves
andtypeIII radioemission. Theseelectronbeams
aredetectedneartheEarthwithadoublepower-
P19
69
lawenergyspectra. Wesimulateelectronbeam
propagationfromtheSuntotheEarthintheweak
turbulentregimetakingintoaccounttheselfconsistentgenerationofplasmawavesand
subsequentwaveinteractionwithdensity
fluctuationsfromlowfrequencyMHD turbulence.
Therateatwhichplasmawavesareinducedbyan
unstableelectronbeamisreducedbybackground
densityfluctuations, mostacutelywhen
fluctuationshavelargeamplitudesorsmall
wavelengths. Thissuppressionofplasmawaves
altersthewavedistrubtionwhichchangesthe
electronbeamtransport. Assuminga5/3
Kolmogorov-typepowerdensityspectraof
fluctuationsoftenobservedneartheEarth, we
investigatethecorrespondingenergyspectraofthe
electronbeamafterithaspropagated1AU.We
findadirectcorrelationbetweenthespectraofthe
doublepower-lawbelowthebreakenergyandthe
turbulentintensityofthebackgroundplasma. For
aninitialspectralindexof3.5, wefindarangeof
spectrabelowthebreakenergybetween1.7-2.1,
withhigherlevelsofturbulencecorrespondingto
higherspectralindices.
aquasi-steadystateelectricfielddistributionalong
themagneticfieldwhilepreservingquasineutrality. Theaimofthisresearchisto
understandhowtheimplicatedplasmasrespond
tothesefields, howthisvarieswithspecies
temperature, theprescribedelectricfieldstrength
andaltitude. Wepresentaplasmakinetic
treatment, analysinghowthevelocitydistribution
functionsevolvealongamagneticfluxtube,
takingintoaccountmirroringandprecipitating
populations. Bycalculatingthemomentsofthe
resultingdistributionfunctionsweascertainhow
thecollectiveelectromagneticandpressureeffects
actingontheplasmaarebalancedand
maintained, establishingadynamicequilibrium.
Herewediscussourkineticplasmamodeland
presentwork-in-progress, preliminaryresults.
Numericalsimulationofmagnetosphericelectron
cyclotronemission
DavidSpeirs (DepartmentofPhysics, Universityof
Strathclyde)with K. Ronald, K.M. Gillespie,
S.L. McConville, A.D.R. Phelps, A.W. Cross,
R. Bingham, B.J. Kellett, R.A. Cairns, and I. Vorgul
Traditionallyacceleratedelectronsinsolarflares
arethoughttobeacceleratedinthecoronalpartof
theloop, andthentraveltothefootpointswhere
theylosetheirenergyandradiatetheobserved
HardX-ray. Werevisitthisassumptionbacked
withincreasingobservationalevidencethat
challengesthissimplifiedpicture. Weproposea
newLocalRe-accelerationThickTargetModel
(LRTTM) whereatthefootpointselectronsreceive
aboostofre-accelerationinadditiontotheusual
collisionalloses. Suchmodelmayofferan
alternativetothe‘standard’collisionalthicktarget
injectionmodel(TTM) (Brown1971)ofsolarHXR
burstsources, requiringfarfewerelectronsand
solvingsomerecentproblemswiththeTTM
interpretation. Welookatthedifferentscenarios
thatcouldleadtosuchre-accelerationandpresent
numericalresultsfromoneofthem.
Whenaninitiallymainlyrectilinearelectronbeam
issubjecttosignificantmagneticcompression,
conservationofmagneticmomentresultsinthe
formationofahorseshoeshapedvelocity
distribution. Ithasbeenshownthatsucha
distributionisunstabletocyclotronemissionand
mayberesponsibleforthegenerationofplanetary
andstellarauroralradioemissions. Principle
characteristicsofsuchemissionsincludeahigh
degreeofextraordinary(X) modepolarizationand
aspectraloutputcomprisingwelldefined
componentsextendingdowntoalowerfrequency
cut-offcorrespondingtothelocalrelativistic
electroncyclotronfrequency. PiC code
simulationshavebeenundertakentoinvestigate
thedynamicsofthecyclotronemissionprocessin
theabsenceofradiationboundarieswith
particularconsiderationofthespatialgrowthrate,
spectraloutputandRF conversionefficiency.
Computationsrevealthatawell-definedcyclotron
emissionprocessoccursalbeitwithareduced
spatialgrowthratecomparedtowaveguide
boundedsimulations. RF outputisnear
perpendiculartotheelectronbeamwithaslight
backward-wavecharacterthatisalsoreflectedin
thespectraloutput. ThecorrespondingRF
conversionefficiencyof1.1%iscomparableto
waveguideboundedsimulationsandconsistent
withthepredictionsofkinetictheorythatsuggest
efficient, spectrallywelldefinedemissioncanbe
obtainedfromanelectronhorseshoedistribution
intheabsenceofradiationboundaries.
MagnetosphericParallelElectricFields
CraigStark (UniversityofSt. Andrews)with
A.N. Wright, and A.P. Cran-McGreehin
Field-alignedcurrentsobservedalongtheEarth’s
magneticfieldcoupletheionospheretothe
magnetosphere. Suchcurrents, andtheir
associatedparallelelectricfields, areresponsible
fortheobservedauroraandplayasignificantrole
intheglobalcurrentnetworksurroundingthe
Earth. Byconsideringthemotionoftheionomagnetosphericplasma, undertheinfluenceofa
backgroundelectromagneticfield, onecanobtain
70
P19–P20
Electronsre-accelerationatthechromospheric
footpointsofSolarFlares
RimTurkmani (ImperialCollege)with John Brown,
Eduard Kontar, Alec MacKinnon, and
Loukas Vlahos
AuroralParticleAccelerationattheEarth
AndrewWright (UniversityofStAndrews)
Anoverviewisgivenoftheoriginofparticle
accelerationintheterrestrialauroralcurrent
system. Theseparticlesareimportantincoupling
themagnetospheretotheionosphereviaelectrical
currentsthatflowalongmagneticfluxtubes, and
arealsoresponsibleforproducingthevisible
aurora. Examplesofspacecraftparticledatawill
beusedtoillustratesomeofthemainacceleration
mechanisms.
P20
TheGRB-SN connection: ExploringGRB
progenitorswithmulti-wavelengthobservations
ZachCano (ARI,JohnMooresUniversity
Liverpool)
OveradecadeagotheGRB-SN connectionwas
hintedat, andlaterconfirmedspectroscopicallyin
2003. Duringthisperiodithasbeenshownthatat
leastsome, ifnotalllong-durationGRBsare
causedbythecore-collapseofamassivestarinto
atypeIcSN.Althoughanabsoluteconnectionofa
GRB toaSN canonlybedonespectroscopically,
photometricevidenceofSN "bumps"inGRB LCs
thatareaccompaniedbyachangeincolour
providecircumstantialevidenceforaconnection
betweenGRBsandthecollapseofmassivestars.
Usingdatatakenonnumeroustelescopes,
includingseveralepochsonHST,threelinesof
evidenceareprovidedforaconnectionofared
SN withGRB 060729. SN "bumps"areseeninthe
light-curvesthatareaccompaniedbyachangein
colour, andatlatetimesthespectrumoftheOT
resemblesthatofthearchetype1998bw, only
redder.
Furtherevidenceisalsogivenforanassociationof
aSN withGRB 090618. A beautifully-detailed
andwell-sampledlight-curvehasbeenobtained,
andredSN "bumps"areseen. Thoughbothofthe
GRBsarelocatedatthesamecosmological
distance(z=0.54), theSNeappeardifferent. These
resultsfurthervindicatetheGRB-SN connection,
concludingthatwhileaGRB islikelyformed
duringthecollapseofamasivestar, theresulting
SNearesubstantiallydifferent.
GRB090510, thefirstcasestudyofashortGRB
withGeV extendedemissiondetectedbyFermi
andSwift.
MassimilianoDePasquale (UniversityCollege
London–MSSL) with SwiftTeam, FermiGBM
Collaboration, and LAT Collaboration
Thebright Γ−RayBurstGRB 090510was
unprecedentedasthefirstshortGRB detected
simultaneouslybySwift-XRT &UVOT andFermiLAT,coveringtheenergyrangefrom0.002keV to
morethan300GeV.ExtendedGeV emissionwas
detectedbyFermi-LAT,lastingfor200safterthe
initialtrigger, andityieldedthehighestenergy
photoneverobservedfromashortGRB (30.5
GeV).Wereportonthejointmulti-wavelength
observationsofGRB 090510performedbyFermi
andSwift. ThisexceptionalGRB enabledusto
investigatethephysicalpropertiesoftheGRB
outflow, poorlyunderstoodinshortbursts. We
discussinternalandexternalshockmodelsforthe
broadbandenergyemissionofthisobject.
Identifyingandchacterisingtheprogenitorsof
core-collapsesupernovae
MorganFraser (QueensUniversityBelfast)with
A. Pastorello, S. Smartt, and K. Takats
Core-collapsesupernovae(SNe)arethe
spectacularend-pointsofstellarevolution. Not
onlyaretheyakeytestforstellarevolutionary
models, buttheyarealsoanopportunitytostudy
thephysicsunderlyingsomeofthemostenergetic
eventsintheUniverse. Detectingtheprogenitors
oftheseSNeinarchivalimagesallowsusto
directlylinkmassivestarstosupernovae, andin
doingso, tounderstandhowthepropertiesofthe
progenitor(mass, metallicityetc.) affectthe
characteristicsandevolutionofthesupernova, and
ultimatelyleadtothedifferentsupernovasubtypes.
Wepresentrecentresultsfromoursupernova
progenitorprogram, focusinginparticularonthe
TypeII SN 2009kr, whereweidentifyacandidate
progenitorinarchivaldatafromtheHubbleSpace
Telescope. Thecandidatewefind, ifasinglestar,
isconsistentwithayellowsupergiantprogenitor,
whichisincontrasttotheredsupergiant
progenitorfoundforallotherTypeIIP SNesofar.
HighlightsfromFermiobservationsofGammaRayBursts
JonathanGranot (UniversityofHertfordshire)
TheFermi Γ−RaySpaceTelescopehasmorethan
doubledthenumberof Γ−RayBursts(GRBs)
detectedathighenergies(> 100 MeV) withinits
firstyearofoperation. Thankstotheverywide
energyrangecoveredbyFermi's Γ−rayBurst
Monitor(GBM;8keV to40MeV) andLargeArea
Telescope(LAT;25MeV to > 300 GeV) ithas
measuredthepromptGRB emissionspectrum
overanunprecedentedlylargeenergyrange(from
∼ 8 keV to ∼ 30 GeV).I willpresenthighlightsof
FermiGRB observationsoveritsfirst1.5yearsof
operation, focusingmainlyontheprompt
emissionphase. Interestingnewobservationswill
bediscussedalongwithsomeoftheirpossible
implications, including:
(i)WhatcanwelearnfromtheFermi-LAT GRB
detectionrate,
(ii)A limitonthevariationofthespeedoflight
withphotonenergy(forthefirsttimebeyondthe
Planckscaleforalinearenergydependencefrom
directtimeofarrivalmeasurements),
(iii)Lower-limitsonthebulkLorentzfactorofthe
GRB outflow(of ∼ 1000 forthebrightestFermi
LAT GRBs),
(iv)Thedetection(orinothercases, lackthereof)
ofadistinctspectralcomponentathigh(and
sometimesalsoatlow)energies, andpossible
implicationsforthepromptGRB emission
mechanism,
(v)Thelateronset(andlongerduration)ofthe
high-energyemission(> 100 MeV) comparedto
thelow-energy(< 1 MeV) emissionthatisseenin
mostFermi-LAT GRBs.
Discoveryofanunusualnewradiosourceinthe
star-forminggalaxyM82: Faintsupernova,
supermassiveblackhole, oranextra-galactic
microquasar?
TomMuxlow (JodrellBankCentreforAstrophysics)
with Rob Beswick, Simon Garrington, Alan Pedlar,
Danielle Fenech, Megan Argo,
Janinevan Eymeren, Martin Ward, Andreas Zezas,
and Andreas Brunthaler
A faintnewradiosourcehasbeendetectedinthe
nuclearregionofthestarburstgalaxyM82using
MERLIN radioobservationsdesignedtomonitor
thefluxdensityevolutionoftherecentbright
supernovaSN2008iz. Thisnewsourcewas
initiallyidentifiedinobservationsmadebetween
1-5thMay2009buthadnotbeenpresentin
observationsmadeoneweekearlier, orinany
previousobservationsofM82. Inthispaperwe
reportthediscoveryofthisnewsourceand
monitoringofitsevolutionoveritsfirst9months
ofexistence. Thetruenatureofthisnewsource
remainsunclear, andwediscusswhetherthis
sourcemaybeanunusualandfaintsupernova, a
supermassiveblackholeassociatedwiththe
nucleusofM82, orintriguinglythefirstdetection
ofradioemissionfromanextragalactic
microquasar.
Searchforgravitational-waveinspiralsignals
associatedwithshortGamma-RayBurstsduring
LIGO'sfifthandVirgo'sfirstsciencerun
ValeriuPredoi (CardiffUniversity)with LIGO
ScientificCollaboration, and VirgoCollaboration
Oneofthemostcommonlyacceptedcandidate
sourcesforshorthard γ raybursts(SHB) isthe
mergerofcompactbinaryobjects, i.e. either
neutronstar-neutronstarorneutronstar-blackhole
binarysystems. Suchmergersarealsopredictedto
emitstronggravitationalradiationwithwaveforms
thatcanbedescribedtheoretically. Wepresenta
searchfortheseknowngravitational-wave
signaturesintemporalanddirectionalcoincidence
with22SHBsdetectedby γ raytelescopesduring
LIGO'sfifthsciencerun, S5, andVirgo'sfirst
sciencerun, VSR1. Thedatareductionpipeline
makesuseofmatchedfilteringofthegravitational
wavedetectoroutputagainstatheoretical
waveformtemplatebank. Wefindnostatistically
significantgravitational-wavecandidateswithina
[-5, +1)swindowaroundthetimeofanyGRB.
Usinganadequatestatisticaltest, wefindno
evidenceforanexcessofweakgravitational-wave
signalsinoursampleofGRBs. Weexclude
neutronstar-blackholeprogenitorstoamedian
90%CL exclusiondistanceof6.7Mpc.
Discoveryoftheafterglowandhostgalaxyofthe
lowredshiftshortGRB 080905A
AntoniaRowlinson (UniversityofLeicester)with
K. Wiersema, A.J. Levan, N.R. Tanvir, P.T. O'Brien,
andothers
quiescentgalaxyatz=0.903. Thecharacteristicsof
thishost, andtheoffsetoftheburstfromit, are
inconsistentwiththepropertiesoflongGRBs, but
broadlyconsistentwiththoseofthesmallsample
ofshortGRB hosts. Thisisinkeepingwiththe
expectationsofmodelsfortheproductionofshort
GRBsincompactbinarymergers.
P21
TeVeS andthestraightarcofA2390
MartinFeix (UniversityofStAndrews)with
Hongsheng Zhao, Cosimo Fedeli,
JoséLuisGarrido Pestaña, and Henk Hoekstra
WepresentthediscoveryofshortGRB 080905A,
itsopticalafterglowandhostgalaxy. Initially
discoveredbySwift, ourdeepopticalobservations
enabledtheidentificationofafaintoptical
afterglow, andsubsequentlyaface-onspiralhost
galaxyunderlyingtheGRB position. Furthermore
thereisnosupernovacomponentpresentinthe
afterglowtodeeplimits. Spectroscopyofthe
galaxyprovidesaredshiftofz=0.1218, thelowest
redshiftyetobservedforashortGRB.TheGRB lies
offsetfromthehostgalaxycentreby ∼ 18.5 kpc,
inthenorthernspiralarmwhichexhibitsanolder
stellarpopulationthanthesouthernarm. No
emissionlinesarevisibledirectlyundertheburst
position, implyinglittleongoingstarformationat
theburstlocation. Thesepropertieswould
naturallybeexplainedweretheprogenitorofGRB
080905A acompactbinarymerger.
Wesuggesttotestthecombinedframeworkof
tensor-vector-scalartheory(TeVeS) andmassive
neutrinosingalaxyclustersviagravitational
lensing, choosingthesystemA2390withits
notoriousstraightarcasanexample. Adopting
quasi-equilibriummodelsforthemattercontentof
A2390, weshowthatsuchconfigurationscannot
producetheobservedimage. Generally, nonlinear
effectsinducedbytheTeVeS scalarfieldarevery
small, meaningthatcurleffectsarebasically
negligible. Basedonthisresult, weoutlinea
systematicapproachonhowtomodelstrong
lensesinTeVeS,whichisdemonstratedforA2390.
Comparedtogeneralrelativity, weconcludethat
discrepanciesbetweentheindependentmass
estimatesfromlensingandX-rayobservationsare
amplified. Finally, weaddressthequestionofthe
model’sfeasibilityandpossible
implications/problemsforTeVeS.
Luminoustransientsinthedistantuniversewith
PTF andSNLS
MarkSullivan (UniversityofOxford)
Thenewpathtotimedelays?
GülayGürkan (TheUniverstiyofManchester)with
Neal Jackson
TheSupernovaLegacySurvey(SNLS) andthe
PalomarTransientFactory(PTF) arebothrolling
transientsurveys, designedtosurveydistant
cosmicexplosionswithoutregardtohostgalaxy
typeorenvironment, andarethusfreefromthe
biasesassociatedwithearliergalaxy-targeted
programmes. Bothsurveysareuncoveringnew
typesandexamplesofsupernovaexplosionswith
unprecedentedultra-violetluminosities, locatedat
someofthehighestredshiftsyetdiscovered. In
thistalk, I willpresentthelatestresultsonthis
topicfrombothsurveys.
Tobetterunderstandtheuniverseandits
dynamics, theHubbleconstantisacrucial
parameterwhichprovidesvaluableinformation
abouttheexpansionrateoftheuniverse. Sofar,
theHubbleconstanthasbeendeterminedby
variousmethodssuchasCepheidvariablesby
utilizingHST KeyProjectdataandWMAP.The
accuracyoftheHubbleconstantvalueisnotbetter
than10%duetointrinsicconstraints/assumptions
ofeachmethod.
Investigationoftheenvironmentofshortgamma
rayburstGRB090510withaviewtoconstraining
theprojenitor.
RachelTunnicliffe (UniversityofWarwick)with
A. Levan
Investigationoftheenvironmentsoflong ΓRay
Bursts(GRBs)hasshownthemtobeassociated
withmassivestarsandhencehasgonesomeway
toidentifyingtheirprojenitors. A similar
procedureisrequiredforshort, hardburstsof
whichtherearefewerwellobservedevents
meaningafullinvestigationofeveryburstis
important. Wehaveanalysedtheburstand
environmentofGRB 090510, basedonNOT and
VLT observations. Thisburstwasalso
spectacularlydetectedbyFermiouttoenergiesin
excessof30GeV.Becauseofthis, italsoprovides
unprecedentedinsightintopossibleLorentz
InvarianceViolations, althoughthisdepends
cruciallyontheknownburstredshift. Usingthe
opticalafterglowwepinpointthelocationofthe
bursttooccurringsome7kpcfromthecoreofa
Gravitationallenssystemsprovideanotherprobe
oftheHubbleconstantusingtimedelay
measurements. Currentinvestigationsoftime
delaylenseshaveresultedindifferentvaluesofHo
rangingfrom50-80km/s/Mpc. Themainproblem
ingravitationallenssystemsisthatrequiresamass
modelforthelenswhichisdifficulttomeasure
independentlyunlessobservationalconstraintsare
available. Moreover, inordertoseetimedelays
clearly, fluxesofsourceshavetobevariable. On
theotherhand, usingatypicalvalueoftheHubble
constantandmeasuredtimedelaysenableusto
determineabetter/moreaccuratemassmodelfor
thelensgalaxy.
Hereweattempttodevelopanewandmore
efficientmethodformeasuringtimedelays, which
doesnotrequireregularmonitoringwithahighresolutioninterferometerarrayorwithoptical
telescopes. Instead, theWSRT isusedforflux
monitoringofdoubleimagelenssystemsinwhich
thebrighterimageisexpectedtovaryfirst.
TriggeredVLA observationscanthenbeusedto
catchthesubsequentvariabilityofthefainter
image. Wepresentpreliminaryresultsfromsucha
program.
P20–P21
71
ProbingtheDarkUniversewithWeakLensing
TomographyandtheCFHTLS
CatherineHeymans (IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh)
with Emma Grocutt, Alan Heavens, Tom Kitching,
and CFHTLenS team
Weakgravitationallensingisapowerfultechnique
formeasuringthepropertiesofdarkmatterand
darkenergyfromtheirgravitationaleffectsalone.
TheCanada-France-HawaiiTelescopeLegacy
Surveyiscurrentlythelargestdeepopticaldataset
forweaklensinganalysiscovering172square
degreesover5opticalbands. Wepresentan
investigationintotheoptimaltomographicthreedimensionalanalysisoftheCFHTLS weaklensing
signalthatminimisestheimpactofsystematics
arisingfromintrinsicgalaxyalignments. With
systematicsundercontrol, sincetheinfluenceof
darkenergyonstructuregrowthisredshiftdependent, tomographicanalysisofredshiftbins
willallowustoconstrainthepropertiesofthe
DarkUniverse.
ApplicationsofaNewandRapidSimulations
MethodforWeakLensingAnalysis
AlinaKiessling (UniversityofEdinburgh)with
Andy Taylor, and Alan Heavens
Gravitationallensingissensitivetoallgravitating
mass- bothBaryonicandDarkMatter- makingit
theidealtooltostudyCosmologyindependently
ofanyassumptionsaboutthedynamicalor
thermalstateofobjects. TheNextGenerationof
SurveyTelescopewillobservemoreofthesky
thaneverbeforeandthevolumeofdatatheywill
produceisunprecedented. Torealisethepotential
ofthesesurveys, experimentsrequirefulllarge
end-to-endsimulationsoftheSurveystotest
analysismethodsandproviderealisticerrors. We
havedevelopedanewline-of-sightintegration
approachtosimulating3-D WeakGravitational
LensShearandConvergencefields. Theselight
conesarefastertogeneratethantraditionalraytracing, sowecanrunanensembleofsimulations
allowingustogeneratecovariancematriciesfor
cosmologicalparameterestimationandstatistical
analysis. Thispresentationwillintroduceournew
analysismethodanddiscusssomeofitsmany
applicationsinweaklensingexperiments.
UsingtheLHC toprobeDarkMatterinphysics
beyondtheStandardModel
DavidMiller (UniversityofGlasgow)
Ourextremelysuccessfulmodelofparticle
physics, theStandardModel, hasaprofoundflaw:
ithasnoviablecandidatefordarkmatter. Inorder
toincorporatedarkmatterintoourpictureofthe
universe, wemustgobeyondtheStandardModel
totheoriessuchassupersymmetryorextra
dimensions. Ourcurrentdataindicatesadark
mattercandidatewithanelectroweakscalemass,
exactlytherangethatwillbeprobedbythenew
LargeHadronCollider(LHC).InthistalkI will
reviewmodelsbeyondtheStandardModelthat
provideaviabledarkmattercandidateanddiscuss
thepotentialfortheirdiscoveryattheLHC.
BrightIdeasandDarkThoughts: "Universal
BaryonicScale"at"MaximumHaloGravity"
HongshengZhao (U.ofStAndrews(SUPA)) with
Gianfranco Gentile, Benoit Famaey, Paolo Salucci,
Andrea Maccio, Baojiu Li, Henk Hoekstra, and
Martin Feix
I willinterpretaverycuriousconspiracyofdarkbrightmatteringalaxies(Gentileetal2009
Nature), insensitivetothesizesandformation
72
P21–P22
historiesoftheobservedgalaxies: thebaryonsare
concentratedtoapproximatelythesamesurface
densityattheverypositionwherethehalooffers
locallymaximumgravity. Whilenormal
gravitationalandgasfeedbackprocessesmust
alwaysoccur, itisdifficulttoforgeafeedback
history-independentuniversalscaleunlessthereis
somehelpfrompossiblynewphysicsintheDark.
A partialconfirmationisseeninsimulationsofNbodywherethematteriscoupledtoa
cosmologicalscalarfield(Zhaoetal. 2009, ApJ
Letters).
P22
ImagingwithMIRC attheCHARA interferometer
FabienBaron (UniversityofMichigan)with
John Monnier, Stefan Kraus, and Xiao Che
Wepresenttherecentresultsobtainedwiththe
MichiganInfraRedCombiner(MIRC) operatingat
theCHARA interferometeratMountWilson, CA.
Bycombininglightfromuptofourtelescopes
simultaneously, MIRC allowsfastandmodelindependentimagingofstellarsurfacesorstellar
sytemsatresolutionsbelowonemilliarcsecond.
Amongsttheimagedobjectsaretherapidrotating
starsAltairandAlderamin, thefamousinteracting
binariesBetaLyraeandAlgol, andthepeculiar
eclipsingsystemEpsilonAurigae. Finallyimaging
YoungStarObjectswillbeattemptedaspartofthe
nextMIRC campaign, exploitingthepowerofthe
new6-telescopefringe-trackingcapabilities.
ThecomplexinnerdisksofHerbigAeBestars
MyriamBenisty (INAF - Arcetri)with A. Natta,
A. Isella, E. Tatulli, F. Ménard, J.P. Berger, F. Massi,
and F. Malbet
Understandingthephysicalconditionsintheclose
circumstellarenvironmentsofyoungstarsisa
crucialsteptocomprehendplanetformationand
evolution. Inthistalk, I willdiscussnear-infrared
spectro-interferometricobservationsof
HerbigAeBestars, thatallowedustodirectlyprobe
thehotcircumstellargasanddust. Thestructureof
theirinnermostregionshasbeenwidelydebated
andinthepastdecade, thegeneralconsensushas
beenthattheobservednearinfraredexcessisdue
todirectthermalemissionfromhotdustlocatedat
theirsublimationradius, inapuffed-uprim. Inthis
talk, I willfirstpresenttwocasesthatsuggestthat
thisdescriptionismaybetoosimple. I willshow
long-baselinespectro-interferometricobservations
oftheHerbigAestarHD163296obtainedwiththe
AMBER instrumentattheVLTI,resultinginthe
largestUV coverageachievedonayoungstar
today. Modelfittingofphotometricand
interferometricobservationssuggeststhata
dominantcontributiontothenear-infrared
emissionarisesfromanopticallythinregion
extendingfromabout0.10to0.45AU,distance
fromthestaratwhichanopticallythickdustydisk
starts. I willdiscussthenatureofthisemissionand
willarguethatitcouldtracethepresenceofvery
refractorygrainsratherthangas. I willalsopresent
thecaseofHD100546, anoldHerbigBestar,
thoughttohaveatransitionaldiskwithagap.
Radiativetransfermodellingofthephotometric
andinterferometricobservationsconfirmedthe
presenceofthegap, constrainedthetotalmassof
dustlocatedinsideitsinneredge, andalloweda
generalstructureforthisevolveddisktobe
derived. Althoughgenerallyneglected, thisstudy,
inaddition, showsthatscatteredthermallightcan
havealargecontributiontothenear-infrared
continuumemission.
ScienceProspectswiththeMagdalenaRidge
ObservatoryInterferometer(MROI)
DavidBuscher (UniversityofCambridge)with
Chris Haniff, and John Young
TheMagdalenaRidgeObservatoryInterferometer
isanoptical/infraredaperturesynthesis
interferometerdedicatedtoimagingfaintobjects
atresolutionsdownto300micro-arcseconds. Itis
beingbuiltatahigh-altitudesiteinNewMexico
byapartnershipbetweentheUniversityof
CambridgeandNewMexicoTech. Wegivean
overviewofthetypesofhigh-angular-resolution
sciencethatMROI istargeting, includingstellar
astrophysics, YSO disksandplanetformation, and
AGN astrophysics. Wepresentanupdateon
progressonconstructionandanear-termtimeline
fortheinterferometer.
ImagingshockfrontsinMiravariables
JamesGordon (UniversityofCambridge)with
David Buscher, and John Young
Wediscusstheuseofhighangularresolution
opticalinterferometryforimagingshockfronts
propagatingthoughtheatmosphereofMira
variables. Highresolutionspectroscopyhas
presentedstrongevidencefortheexistenceofa
supersonicshockevidentinBalmeremission
lines. Aperturemaskingandluckyimaginginthe
emissionlineatdifferentpulsationphaseswill
allowustoreconstructimagesoftheshockfront.
Understandingthepropertiesoftheshockis
essentialforatmosphericmodelsandthe
calculationofmasslossrateswhichhavedifficulty
inaccountingforshocksinMiravariables.
Dustydiscsaroundevolvedstars
Foteini(Claire)Lykou (JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics)with Albert Zijlstra, and
Olivier Chesneau
Wepresentthediscoveryofdusty, edge-ondiscs
aroundevolvedstarsatdifferentevolutionary
stages. Menzel3, M2-9andSakurai’sObjectwere
observedwithMIDI ontheVeryLargeTelescope
Interferometer(VLTI) providingaresolutionof
∼ 0.01 arcsecinthemid-infrared. Thefirsttwo
objectscontaindiskscomposedofsilicatedust,
whilethelastcontainsadisc-likestructureof
carbonaceousmaterial. Thedustydiscsare
alignedwiththeminoraxisofthebipolarnebulae
(oradensityenhancementontheroundnebula
forthelastobject)andtheirinnerrimradiiareless
than100AU.Characterisingthedustydiscsinthe
coreofthesenebulaeandatdifferentevolutionary
stages, providesinvaluableconstraintsonthe
processesthatleadtotheseimpressivenebulae.
Thepropertiesofeachdischavebeenexplored
withthemeansofradiativetransfermodelling.
Opticalandnear-infraredinterferometryofstars
anddisks
ReneOudmaijer (UniversityofLeeds)
Theseareexcitingtimesforopticalandnearinfraredinterferometry. Itisonlyinthelastfew
yearsthatspectrallyresolvedinterferometryat
milli-arcsecondscaleshasbecomepossibleona
regularbasis, andthefuturepromisesevenmore.
InthistalkI willreviewthelatestinterferometric
resultsonbothyoungandevolvedstars.
Investigatingtheinnerdisksofyoungstars
JennyPatience (UniversityofExeter)with A. Binks,
R. Rhodes, and R. Akeson
Withtheexceptionalangularresolutionofthe
Keckinterferometer, wearestudyingtheinner
disksofyoungstarsatdifferentevolutionarystages
atspatialscalesoflessthan1AU.Thevisibilities
ofseveraltargetsindicatetheinnerdiskshave
beenspatiallyresolved. Thesizesoftheinner
disksareestimatedbasedonmodelfitsandare
comparedwiththeexpectedradiusofdust
sublimation, consideringtheluminosityofeach
object. Theestimatedinnerdiskradiioftheyoung
starsarealsocomparedwiththedistributionof
closeorbitextrasolarplanetstoinvestigate
implicationsforplanetmigration.
Mappingstar-spotsontheRS CVnbinary ζ And
EttorePedretti (SUPA,UniversityofStAndrews)
with John Monnier, AndrewCollier Cameron,
Jean-Francois Donati, and Pascal Petit
WeobservedthemagneticallyactiveRS CVn
binaryZetaAnd=HD 4502usinglong-baseline
interferometryinordertodeterminethepolarspot
structure, whichhasbeendetectedbyZeemanDopplerspectroscopyinseveralRS CVnbinaries.
ThestarisanellipsoidalK giantbinarywhichhas
beenrecentlyimagedusingtheZeeman-Doppler
technique. ThestarwasobservedattheCHARA
interferometerinAugust2007and2008. The
obtainedimagesshowasurfacewithasymmetric
featuresconsistentwithstarspots.
TheMagdalenaRidgeInterferometerFringe
Tracker
AlexRea (UniversityofCambridge)with
C. Jurgenson, F. Santoro, T. McCracken,
A. Olivares, D. Buscher, M. Creech-Eakman,
C. Haniff, J. Young, A. Shtromberg, K. McCord,
and F. Baron
TheMagdalenaRidgeObservatoryInterferometer
(MROI),acollaborationbetweenNewMexico
TechandtheUniversityofCambridge, will
performhigh-resolutionimagingdowntoa
limitingmagnitudeofH=14. Wereportonthe
statusoftheMROI fringetracker, whose
performancewillbecriticaltoreachingthis
limitingsensitivity. Designoftheinstrumentis
complete, andthefringetrackerisnowunder
constructionatMRO.Itconsistsofadedicated,
near-IR,fringe-trackingbeamcombinerand
spectrographs. Theinstrumentwillphaseupthe
interferometerbystabilizingfringesontheshorter
"nearestneighbor"baselinesofthe"Y"-geometry
array, allowingforincreasedintegrationtimeson
thelongerbaselinesandthebuildupofsignal-tonoiseinthescienceinstrument. Thebeam
combinerhasbeendesignedtoacceptlightfroma
maximumoftentelescopes(threeoneacharray
arm, oneatthe"Y"vertex), butcanoperatewith
fewerwithouthavingtochangetheoveralllayout.
Eachspectrographwillmultiplexuptofivebeam
combineroutputsontoasingledetector. A pairof
identicalspectrographsareusedtosimultaneously
samplecomplementaryfringepatternsthatare
π radiansoutofphasewitheachother, reducing
thenumberofmodulatorstepsneededtomeasure
thefringephase.
Dosingleoldstarsejectclumps?
AnitaRichards (JBCA,UniversityofManchester)
with Indra Bains, Phil Diamond, Malcolm Grey,
Graham Harper, Jeremy Lim, Dinhvan Trung, and
Jeremy Yates
Radiointerferometricimagingofatsub-AU
resolutionshowsthatthewindsaroundevolved
starsarecurdledintoclumps. Inthezonewhere
dustformationiswelladvanced(&5stellarradii),
outtomanytensR*, thewatermasercloudsare
over-denseand, ifextrapolatedbacktothestellar
surface, theirbirthsizeswouldhavebeenoforder
0.1R*. Istheclumpingscalesetbystarspots,
possiblyrelatedtoconvectioncells? Thisraisesthe
intriguingpossibilitythatthechemistryaswellas
thedensitycouldbedifferentiatedintheclumps.
Alternatively, ifthepulsation-poweredmass-loss
processissmooth, cloudsmightbearesultofdust
formation. Interferometryatwavelengthsfromcm
toopticalpenetratesdifferentdepthsinthestellar
photosphere. e-MERLIN,theEVLA andALMA will
havethesensitivityandtheimagingfidelityto
resolvethesuggestedlargeconvectioncellsinred
supergiantsandAGB starsouttoafewhundredpc
(orfurtherforRSG).Byobservingatsuccessively
lowerfrequenciesatsuitabletimeintervals, we
willtestwhetherindependent(convective)or
correlated(pulsation-driven)disturbances
dominate. Co-ordinatedVLBA ande-MERLIN
maserobservationswillshowwhetherstarspots
directlyleadtoSiO maserclumpsandwhether
thesesurvivethedustformationprocess. Wehope
thatthiswillcomplementedbyVLTI,MROI or
otheroptical/IR interferometrywhichwouldreveal
therelativedistributionofhotandalsoof
absorbingmaterialinthestronglyconvective
zone. Moreover, existingobservationsshowthat
thestarsareasymmetric. Persistentaxisymmetry
wouldsuggestthatanorderedmagneticfieldis
important(intheabsenceofdetectablerotationfor
effectivelysolitarystars)whilstvaryingdirections
wouldsuggestcomplexpulsationmodes.
Characterisingtheconvectionpatternon
Betelgeuse
JohnYoung (UniversityofCambridge)with
A. Chiavassa, X. Haubois, E. Pedretti, B. Plez,
E. Josselin, G. Perrin, and B. Freytag
TheredsupergiantBetelgeuse(AlphaOrionis)is
anirregularvariablestar. Betelgeuseisthoughtto
exhibitlarge-scaleconvectiveprocessesthatare
importantdriversofthevariabilityandmassloss
fromthestar. Wereportnewmodellingofhighangularresolutionobservations, primarilyfromthe
COAST andIOTA interferometers, spanning
severalobservationepochsandmultiple
wavebandswithintheI andH photometricbands.
Theinterferometricobservables(visibility
amplitudesandclosurephases)arecomparedwith
ad-hocmodelsfortheapparentbrightness
distributionandwith3D hydrodynamic
simulationsobtainedwithCO5BOLD,postprocessedusingtheradiativetransfercode
OPTIM3D.Wefindthatthe3D simulationsare
abletomatchtheobservedwavelengthdependenceoftheasymmetricbrightness
distributionatallofthethreeepochstested,
althoughtheapparentstellardiameterin
bandpasseswithmoderateTiO opacityis5-10%
largerthanpredictedbythesimulations. Hence
wehaveconfirmedthepresenceofagranulation
patternfeaturingsmalltomediumscale(5–15
mas)convection-relatedsurfacestructuresanda
large(∼ 30 mas)convectivecell.
P23
A NanoflareDistributionGeneratedbyRepeated
RelaxationsTriggeredbyKinkInstability
MichaelBareford (TheUniversityofManchester)
with Philippa Browning, and
RonaldVander Linden
Resolvingdebrisdiscsinterrestrialplanetregions
withMIDI-VLTI
RachelSmith (KeeleUniversity)with M.C. Wyatt
(IoA UniversityofCambridge), and C.A. Haniff
(CavendishLaboratory, UniversityofCambridge)
Itisthoughtlikelythatvastnumbersofnanoflares
occurringinthesolaratmosphereareresponsible
forthecoronahavingatemperatureofmillionsof
degrees. Weproposethatsuchindividualheating
eventcanbetriggeredwhenacoronalloop
becomesunstabletoanidealMHD kinkmode. A
featureofthemodelisthatitpredictsheating
eventswitharangeofsizes, dependingonwhere
theinstabilitythresholdforlinearkinkmodesis
encountered. Dissipationoftheloop'smagnetic
energythroughfastmagneticreconnectionbegins
duringthenonlinearstageoftheinstability, when
localisedfragmentarycurrentsheetsform.
Dustinmostdebrisdiscsoriginatesin
planetesimalbeltsakintotheKuiperbeltat
> 30AU fromtheirstars. Relativelyfewstars
exhibitdustat < 30AU.Becauseofthesmall
spatialscalesinvolvedadirectdeterminationof
thediscmorphologyinsuchregionsrequiresthe
useoflongbaselineinterferometrywith
instrumentssuchasMIDI ontheVLTI.Inthistalk
wepresentMIDI observationsoffourdebrisdisc
targetswithdustbelievedtolieintheterrestrial
planetregions(∼ 1AU).Theyouthoftwoofthese
targets(12-16Myr)meansthattheobserveddust
couldbeindicativeoftheon-goingformationof
terrestrialplanets. Fortheremainingtwoolder
targets(1.3-2Gyr)thedustislikelytobeindicative
ofarecenttransientevent. Wediscussthelimits
wecanplaceonthediscstructurewiththeMIDI
observations, andhowtheselimitscanbe
interpretedwithindifferentmodelsforthedust
origin.
Theloopisrepresentedasastraightline-tied
cylinderwithzeronetcurrent. Thetwisting
inducedbyrandomphotosphericmotionsare
capturedbytwoparameters, representingtheratio
ofcurrentdensitytofieldstrengthforspecific
regionsoftheloop. Onsetofinstabilitycanthus
bemappedasaclosedthresholdinthe2
dimensionalparameterspace. Afterflaring, the
loopevolvestothestateoflowestenergywhere
theratioofcurrenttofieldisconstantandhelicity
isconservedinaccordancewithRelaxation
Theory. Weconsiderthattheloopundergoes
repeatedepisodesofinstabilityfollowedby
relaxation, orthattheinstabilityandrelaxation
takesplaceinanensembleofsimilarloops; hence,
afrequencydistributionofeventsizes(nanoflares)
iscollated. Here, themodelisextendedtomuch
morerealisticconfigurationswhichcorrespondto
localisedphotospherictwisting, andhencehave
zeronetcurrent(contrastingwithpreviousworkin
whichtheloophadanetcurrent). Weshowthe
P22–P23
73
resultsobtainedfromusingtwomethodsof
currentneutralisationthatarecompatiblewitha
non-zeromagneticflux. Theseresultsare
comparedwiththoseoftheearlierstudy.
Comparisonofmodelsoffluxtransferevent
formationusingpredictedandobserved
asymmetry
RobertFear (UniversityofLeicester)with
Steve Milan, Joachim Raeder, and David Sibeck
Fluxtransferevents(FTEs)areburstsofmagnetic
reconnectionataplanetarymagnetopauseand
havebeenobservedatEarth, JupiterandMercury.
Theyareusuallyidentifiedbybipolarsignaturesin
thecomponentofthemagneticfieldnormaltothe
magnetopause(Bn). Severalconceptualmodels
havebeenproposedforFTE formation, including
modelsbasedonreconnectionatasingle
reconnectionline(X-line)andatmultipleX-lines.
Two-dimensionalmagnetohydrodynamicmodels
havepreviouslybeenusedtosimulateboth
scenariosandhavefoundatendencyforFTEs
generatedbysingleX-linereconnectiontoexhibit
anasymmetryintheBnsignature, withtheleading
peakbeingsubstantiallysmallerinmagnitudethan
thetrailingpeak. Ontheotherhand, FTE
simulationsfeaturingmultipleX-linereconnection
ledtomoresymmetricsignatures. Wepresenta
comparisonofthesesimulationresultswith
observationsmadeattheEarth’smagnetopauseby
theClusterspacecraft, usingadatasetof213FTEs
whichwereobservedbyallfourspacecraftin
2002/3. A tendencyisfoundfortheBnsignatures
tobeasymmetric, butwiththeleadingpeak
strongerthanthetrailingpeak- oppositetothe
predictionmadebythe2D models. Wealso
comparetheobservationswiththeresultsofa
morerecentglobal3D MHD simulationandfind
similartrendstothoseobservedbyCluster.
Turbulentrelaxationofbraidedmagneticfields
GunnarHornig (UniversityofDundee)with
Anthony Yeates, Antonia Wilmot-Smith, and
David Pontin
Magneticbraidingofcoronalloopsduetothe
motionoftheirphotosphericfootpointshaslong
beendiscussedasapossiblemechanismforthe
heatingofthesolarcorona(E.Parker, 1972). This
motivatedaseriesofnumericalexperiments
(Wilmot-Smithetal. 2009, 2010)ontheturbulent
relaxationofbraidedmagneticfields. These
experimentshaveproducedrelaxedstateswhich
differdrasticallyfromthepredictionsoftheTaylor
hypothesis.
Wepresentanewtopologicalmeasure, atypeof
generalisedfluxfunction, whichallowsusto
analysetherelaxationprocessandwhichshows
thattherearefurtherconstraintsontherelaxation
processbeyondtheconservationofthetotal
helicity, whichpreventthesystemfromrelaxingto
aTaylorstate.
3-D Magneticreconnectionatseparators
ClareParnell (UniversityofStAndrews)with
Andrew Haynes, and Rhona Maclean
Magneticseparatorsarespecialfieldlinesthat
connecttwomagneticnullpointsandlieonthe
intersectionofthesurfacesmadeupoffieldlines
thatextendfromthenullpoints. Threedimensionalreconnectioncanoccurinmany
locationsincludingnullpoints, separatrixsurfaces
andseparators. Weconsidertheimportanceof
separatorreconnectionbyconsideringvarious3D
resistiveMHD experimentsinwhichreconnection
74
P23
isakeyprocess. Inparticular, wediscussthe
frequencyofoccurrenceofseparators, their
behaviourandthenatureofreconnectioninthe
vicinityofaseparator. Wewillconcludeby
indicatingtheconsequencesofseparator
reconnectionfortheSun.
A surveyofHXR emissionofseismicallyactive
andquietX-classwhite-lightflares
EhsanPedram (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
with Sarah Matthews
Sun-quakes, generatedduringtheimpulsivephase
ofsomesolarflares, arethemostintenseacoustic
radiationobservedonthesolarsurfaceandoffer
interestingpossibilitiesforfurtheringour
understandingofflaresandactiveregion
helioseismology. Variousmechanismshavebeen
proposedastohowseismicwavescanbe
generatedfromasolarflare. Recentworkhas
shownaclosecorrelationbetweenenhanced
continuumemissionandtheseismicemission
observedduringtheimpulsivephase. Inthisstudy
wehaveexaminedtheHXR emissionfromYohkoh
andRHESSI togetherwithwhitelightemission
dataobservedbyGONG andTRACE.Highrateof
energydepositionandtheareaoverwhichthe
energyisbeingdepositedonsuggestsbackwarmingasaplausiblemechanismforgenerating
sun-quakes. Combiningthisresultwithspatialand
temporalcorrespondenceofwhite-lightemission
withthepeakintensityofHXR emissionfurther
enhancesthispossibilitywhichisinagreement
withfindingsofpreviousstudies.
Regimesofmagneticreconnectionat3D null
points
DavidPontin (UniversityofDundee)with
E.R. Priest, and K. Galsgaard
Magneticreconnectionat3D nullpoints-- aswell
astheseparatrixandseparatorstructures
associatedwiththem-- isthoughttobeofgreat
importanceintheSolarcorona. Our
understandingofthereconnectionprocessesthat
mayhappenatnullshascomealongwayinrecent
years, althoughmanyopenquestionsremain.
Recentadvancesintheoryandcomputational
experimentshaveshowntheneedtorefinethe
previouscategorisationofmagneticreconnection
atsuch3D nulls. Wepresenthereanew
categorisationintothreebasicmodes, depending
onthenatureoftheflownearthespineandfanof
thenull. Wewilldiscussthebasicpropertiesof
thesethreereconnectionmodes- 'spinefan
reconnection', 'torsionalspinereconnection'and
'torsionalfanreconnection'. Particularemphasis
willbeplacedonthemostcommon'spine-fan'
reconnectionmode, inwhichthenullpoint
locallycollapsesformingacurrentsheetspanning
boththespineandfan, andresultingintransport
ofmagneticfluxacrossboththefanandspine.
Doesmagnetichelicityeffectactiveregion
evolutionandenergetics?
AlisonWallace (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL) with LucieM. Green, SarahA. Matthews,
Cristina Mandrini, Pascal Demoulin, and
Lidiavan Driel-Gesztelyi
Thepuposeofthisstudyistoinvestigatethe
interactionsbetweensameandoppositehelicity
structuresincludinglargescalereconnection
eventssuchasflaresandCMEs, aswellassmall
scaleevents. Ofthesetwoscenarios, theonethat
producesthemostenergyisstillatopicfordebate.
Wepresentobservationsoftwoactiveregions
followingtheemergenceofabipole, onewiththe
sameandonewiththeoppositesignofhelicity
fromtheactiveregion. Inbothcasesnewflux
emergedattheNorth-Westernedgewithinthe
negative(leading)polarity. Thelifetimeofthefirst
bipolewas37hrsandthecounter-helicitybipole
was67hrs. Wediscusstheroleofreconnectionin
re-distributinghelicityandhowthiseffectsthe
activeregionevolution.
Relaxationofbraidedcoronalloopsbymultiple
small-scalereconnectionevents
AntoniaWilmot-Smith (UniversityofDundee)with
DavidI. Pontin, Gunnar Hornig,
AnthonyR. Yeates, and Klaus Galsgaard
Braidingofthesolarcoronalmagneticfieldisa
primecandidateforcoronalheating. Wereassess
magneticbraidingwithparticularemphasison
recentdevelopmentsin3D magneticreconnection
theory, concentratingontheevolutionofthe
integratedparallelelectricfield, acrucialquantity
for3D reconnection.
Westartwitharealisticbraidednon-linearforcefreemagneticfieldwithzerototalmagnetic
helicity. ThefieldisnotinresistiveMHD
equilibriumandwetrackthelossofstabilityand
subsequentdynamicsviaanumericalsimulation.
Strongcurrentconcentrationsareformedinthe
earlyevolution, thelocationofwhichisgoverned
byregionsofinitiallyhighintegratedparallel
electricfield.
Subsequentlythefieldundergoesaturbulent
relaxation, evolvingintotwounlinkedforce-free
fluxtubes. Detailsofthereconnectionprocesses
duringrelaxationareexamined; magneticfluxis
foundtoevolveinacomplexmannerandis
reconnectedmultipletimes. Theendstateofthe
relaxationsuggestsasegmentedTaylor-like
processtakesplaceandthatadditionalconstraints
beyondtheconservationoftotalhelicitygovern
therelaxation. Someprogresstowards
determiningtheseconstraintsisreported.
PropertiesoftheDistributionFunctionofa
Vlasov-MaxwellEquilibriumfortheForce-Free
HarrisSheet
FionaWilson (UniversityofStAndrews)with
Thomas Neukirch, and Michael Harrison
A discussionispresentedofaVlasov-Maxwell
equilibriumrecentlydiscoveredfortheforce-free
Harrissheet. Fortheforce-freeHarrissheet, force
balanceismaintainedbyamagneticshearfield
insteadofagradientoftheplasmapressure, the
plasmapressurebeingconstantalongwiththe
densityandthemagnitudeofthemagneticfield.
Thedistributionfunctionrecentlyfoundforthe
force-freeHarrissheethasanumberofinteresting
properties, whichvarywithparametervalues. For
example, thedistributionfunctioncanbemultipeakedintwoofthevelocitydirections, which
mayhaveimplicationsfortheonsetofmicroinstabilities.
3D MagneticNullpoints: LocalisedFantilting
andTorsionalReconnection
PeterWyper (Sheffield)with Rekha Jain
MagneticReconnection, aprocessofbreaking
ideal- MHD frozen-in-fluxconstraintsonfieldline
connectivity, isbelievedtobeanefficient
mechanismforheatingthesolarcorona. The
processisofgreatimportanceinmanyother
astrophysicalandlaboratoryplasmas. The
magneticfieldintheseplasmascanbevery
complexwiththreedimensional(3D) structure.
Reconnectionleadstoarearrangementofthe
magnetictopologyandareleaseofstored
magneticenergyinsuchstructuresifthefieldlines
aretwistedorsheared. Itcanalsoreleaseenergy
andaccelerateparticleswherelargegradientsof
themagneticfielddevelop, forexamplemagnetic
nullpoints. Recenttheoreticalprogressinour
physicalunderstandingofthe3D nullpoint
reconnectionhasbeentoexaminemagneticflux
andplasmaflowsacrosstheFanandSpineandto
understandtheirtimeevolution. Inthistalk, we
willdiscussthreetypesofsecondaryreconnection
arounda3D nullpointfromananalytical
standpoint: Fantilting/distortion, Torsionalspine
andTorsionalfan.
P24
TheHeliophysicsIntegratedObservatory
RobertBentley (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL) with Mike Hapgood, Chris Perry,
John Brooke, AnjaLe Blanc, Kevin Benson, and
Vineeth Shetty
TheHeliophysicsIntegratedObservatory, HELIO,
iscreatingacollaborativeenvironmentwhere
scientistscandiscover, understandandmodelthe
connectionbetweensolarphenomena,
interplanetarydisturbancesandtheireffectsonthe
planets. HELIO willprovideintegratedaccessto
datafromthesolar, heliospheric, geophysicsand
planetarydomainsandallowtheusertoundertake
asearchforinterestingeventsandphenomena
basedsolelyonmetadataanddataproducts.
WewilldescribehowHELIO canbeusedto
addressscienceproblemsthatspanthedomains
byallowingtheusertotrackphenomenaasthey
propagatethroughthesolarsystem.
TheHELIO infrastructureisbeingdeveloped
aroundaservice-orientedarchitecture. Thesearch
forinterestingeventsandphenomena, andthe
taskofthenfindingandretrievingthedatahas
beensplitintoanumberofservicesthatcaneither
beusedindependentlyoraspartofaworkflow.
VersionsofsomeoftheHELIO servicesarestarting
tobecomeavailableandwearelookingforuser
thatcanhelptestandrefinetheseandassistinthe
taskofdefininguserinterfacesthatbettermatch
theneedsoftheresearchcommunity.
HELIO isaresearchinfrastructurefundedunder
CapacitiesprogrammeoftheEC's7thFramework
Programme(FP7); theprojectstartedinJune2009
andhasadurationof36months. TheHELIO
ConsortiumincludesthirteengroupsfromtheUK,
France, Ireland, Italy, Switzerland, Spainandthe
US.
A ComprehensiveStudyofthe13-15May2005
SolarEvent(s)
MarioBisi (AberystwythUniversity)with
A.R. Breen, B.V. Jackson, R.A. Fallows, A.P. Walsh,
M.J. Owens, Z. Miki, P. Riley, C.J. Owen,
A. Gonzalez-Esparza, A.G. Wood, E. AguilarRodriguez, H. Morgan, E.A. Jensen, M. Tokumaru,
P.K. Manoharan, K. Fujiki, I.V. Chashei,
A.S. Giunta, J.A. Linker, V.I. Shishov,
S.A. Tyul’bashev, G. Agalya, S.K. Glubokova,
P.P. Hick, J.M. Clover, B. Pintér, and A. Buffington
Wepresentanoverviewoftheresultsofamultitechnique, multi-instrument, co-ordinatedstudyof
thesolar-eruptiveeventof13May2005andits
progressionthroughtheinnerheliosphere. We
havecombinedobservationsandmeasurements
fromcoronalandinterplanetaryremote-sensing
instruments, interplanetaryandnear-Earthin-situ
measurements, remote-sensingobservationsand
in-situmeasurementsoftheterrestrial
magnetosphereandionosphere, alongwith
coronalandheliosphericmodelling. Wediscuss
theresultantEarth-directed(halo)coronalmass
ejection(CME),andbriefly, theeffectsonthe
terrestrialspaceenvironmentandupperEarth
atmosphere. Theseanalysesareusedtotracethe
origin, development, propagation, terrestrial
impact, andsubsequentconsequencesofthis
eventtoobtainthemost-comprehensiveviewofa
geo-effectivesolareruptiontodate. Fulldetailsof
thestudyofthiseventcanbefoundinBisietal.,
SolarPhysics, TopicalIssue(TI) onRemoteSensing
oftheInnerHeliosphere, 2010, whentheTI is
published.
AssessingtheaccuracyofCME speedand
trajectoryestimatesfromSTEREO observations
throughacomparisonofindependentmethods
ChristopherDavis (STFC RutherfordAppleton
Laboratory)with J.A. Davies, and J. Kennedy
Wehaveestimatedthespeedanddirectionof
propagationofanumberofCoronalMass
Ejections(CMEs)usingdatafromtheSTEREO
HeliosphericImagers. Ingeneral, thesevaluesare
ingoodagreementwiththosepredictedby
Thernisienetal(2009)usingaforwardmodelling
methodtofitCMEsintheSTEREO COR2
coronagraphdata. Thereissomeevidencefrom
thissurveythatthespeedofaCME ismodulated
bytheambientsolarwindspeed. Thetechnique
wasverifiedbyin-situdatawherepossible. We
alsoshowthattheuncertaintiesinourderived
parametersareinfluencedbytherangeof
elongationsoverwhicheachCME istracked. In
ordertoreducetheuncertaintlyinthepredicted
arrivalat1AU towithin6hours, aCME needsto
betrackedouttoatleast30degreeselongation.
SuchatechniqueallowsthepredictionofEarthdirectedCMEstobemadelonginadvanceoftheir
arrival, providingapotentialadvanceinspaceweatherforecasting.
PropagationofanEarth-DirectedCoronalMass
Ejectionin3D
PeterGallagher (TrinityCollegeDublin)with
JasonP. Byrne, ShaneA. Maloney, and R.T. James
McAteer
Wehavedevelopedanewmethodtoreconstruct
the3D evolutionofaCME frontusingtheSun
EarthConnectionCoronalandHeliospheric
Investigation(SECCHI) onboardtheSolar
TerrestrialRelationsObservatory(STEREO).On12
December2008anEarth-directedCME was
observedbySTEREO whilethespacecraftwerein
nearquadratureat86.7ºseparation. This
positioningpresentsanidealcaseforobservingits
propagationthroughthecombinedSECCHI
instrumentfields-of-viewandapplyingour
techniquetoreconstructtheCME frontin3D.The
reconstructionallowsustodeterminethetrue
CME frontkinematicsandmorphology, andwe
measurethreeimportantdynamiceffectsatplay:
deflectionfromahighlatitudesourceregion; an
increasingangularwidth; andinterplanetarydrag.
SolarStormwatch: acrowd-sourcingapproachto
understandingCoronalMassEjections
MarekKukula (RoyalObservatoryGreenwich)with
Chris Davis, Chris Lintott, and Natasha Waterson
TheSolarStormwatchprojectisanewonline
initiativewhichmakesuseofthelargearchiveof
datafromtheSTEREO missiontogainadeeper
understandingoftheoriginandpropagationof
CoronalMassEjections. SolarStormwatchispart
ofthenewwaveof“crowdsourcing”or“citizen
science”projectswhichenlistmembersofthe
publictohelpcarryoutresearchwhichcouldnot
bedonebyscientistsworkingalone. The
spacecraftdataarepresentedinanappealingand
accessiblewaywhichisheavilyinformedbythe
designofpopularonlinegames. Thewebsite
includestutorialsectionswhichallowinterested
userstofindoutmoreaboutsolarphysicsaswell
asasectionforschoolswithsuggestionsfor
classroomactivities. Howeverthesciencegoals
aregenuineandwillleadtousefulandsignificant
researchoutput. Aswellascarryingoutrigorous
analysisofanotherwiseunder-utiliseddataset,
userscanparticipateinavibrantonline
communitywhichincludesscientistsfromthe
STEREO mission. Experiencewithpreviouscitizen
scienceprojectssuchasGalaxyZooshowsthata
significantsubsetofuserswilleducatethemselves
tothepointatwhichtheyareabletospotunusual
phenomenaandbringthesetotheattentionofthe
scienceteam, raisingtheprospectofentirely
unexpectedandnoveldiscoveries. Theprojectis
aninitiativeoftheRoyalObservatory, Greenwich
inpartnershipwiththeRutherfordAppleton
LaboratoryandtheCitizenScienceAlliance. As
such, itharksbacktotheprominentrolewhichthe
Observatoryplayedinsolarphysicsinthe19th
andearly20thcenturies.
Probingtheevolutionofcoronalandheliospheric
structureswithsuprathermalelectrons
MathewOwens (UniversityofReading)with
Nancy Crooker, Nathan Schwadron, Tim Horbury,
Benoit Lavraud, and Alexis Rouillard
Thedistributionandevolutionofmagneticfluxat
thephotosphereiscomplex. Itisdominatedby
mid-latitudemagneticfluxemergence, which
subsequentlymigratestothepoles, ultimately
facilitatingthesolarcyclepolarityreversal. Thisis
morphologicallydifferenttothefieldreversal
observedintheheliosphere, whichproceedsasa
simplerotationofanapproximatelydipolarfield.
Themagnetically-dominatedcoronalinksthese
twodisparateregions, thoughtheprocesses
responsibleforthenecessarysolarcycle
restructuringofthecoronaarenotwell
understood. Ithasbeensuggestedthatcoronal
massejections(CMEs)playacriticalrolein
coronalreconfiguration, bysheddingexcess
helicity, addingfluxtotheheliosphereand
transportingopenfluxinthemannerrequiredfor
thesolarcyclepolarityreversal. Suprathermal
electronobservationsprovideameanstotestthese
ideas. I’llpresentasummaryoftheseobservations
andattempttointerprettheminthewidercontext.
Investigatingtheobservationalsignaturesof
magneticcloudsub-structure
KimberleySteed (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL) with C.J. Owen, P. Demoulin, and S. Dasso
Magneticcloudsareasub-setofinterplanetary
coronalmassejections(ICMEs)thatexhibita
magneticfluxropestructure. Theyareoften
primarilyidentifiedbysmooth, large-scalerotation
ofthemagneticfield, howeverbothsmalland
P24
75
large-scalefluctuationsofthemagneticfieldare
observedwithinsomemagneticclouds. Wehave
identifiedasmallnumberofmagneticclouds
withinwhichmultiple, small-scalereversalsofthe
gradientoftheazimuthalmagneticfieldare
observedtowardstheircentres, andwehereinuse
theterm'sub-structure'torefertotheregionsthat
exhibitthissignature.
On13April2006, amagneticcloudwasobserved
byACE andWindwhichdisplaysmanyofthe
typicalcharacteristicsusedtoidentifyamagnetic
cloud, andalsoexhibitstheclearestexampleof
sub-structuretowardsitscentrethatwehave
found. Investigationsofthemagneticfield
observationsthatcharacteriseamagneticcloud
containingsub-structureandassociatedchanges
intheplasmaobservationshaveshownthatthe
magneticstructuredoesnotevolveoverashort
timescaleoftheorderofafewminutes, andthat
thismagneticcloudissubjecttocompression,
probablyasaresultofthefastsolarwindstream
behindit, whichisparticularlystronginthesubstructureregion. Wesuggestseveralpossible
explanationsforsub-structurewithinmagnetic
clouds, includingthepresenceofmultipleflux
ropes, warpingofthemagneticcloudstructure
andinsitumagneticreconnection.
Smallscaletransientfeaturesatcoronalhole
boundaries: apossiblesourcefortheslowsolar
wind?
SrividyaSubramanian (ArmaghObservatory)with
M.S. Madjarska, and J.G. Doyle
Coronalholesareregionsofpredominantly
unipolarcoronalmagneticfieldswithasignificant
componentofwhichisopenintotheheliosphere.
Ouraimwastofurtherexplorethesmall-scale
evolutionofCH boundariesusinghigh-resolution
andhigh-cadenceimagesfromtheX-ray
telescope/HinodetakenwithanAlPolyfilter. We
identifiedtransientX-raybrighteningsinequatorial
coronalholes, polarcoronalholes, andthequiet
Sunwithandwithouttransientcoronalholesusing
anautomatedidentificationprocedure. Wefound
thatincomparisontothequietSun, the
boundariesofcoronalholesareabundantwith
brighteningeventsincludingareasinsidecoronal
holeswhereclosedmagneticfieldstructuresare
present. ThestatisticalinvestigationofX-ray
brighteningsshowedthataround70%ofthemin
coronalholesandtheirboundariesshow
expandingloopstructuresand/orcollimated
outflows, whileonly30%inthequietSunshow
outflowswithmostofthemappeartobecontained
inthecoronabyclosedmagneticstructures. We
suggestthattheejectedplasmaguidedbythe
openmagneticfieldlinesincoronalholesand
theirboundariesescapestheSuncontributingto
theslowsolarwind.
CharacterisingtheSTEREO HeliosphericImager
signaturesofCorotatingInteractionRegions
AnthonyWilliams (UniversityofLeicester)with
S.E. Milan, J.A. Davies, C.J. Davis, and
R.A. Harrison.
DuringthecourseoftheSTEREO missionveryfew
coronalmassejectionshavebeenobserved, even
fewerhavebeenobservedtobeEarth-directed.
Despitethis, theHeliosphericImagers(HI) detect
astampedeofoutward-propagatingcoronal
plasmaenhancements, indicatingstructuredsolar
windoutflow. A widelyreportedmethodof
estimatingthespeedanddirectionfrom
elongation-time(J-)mapsoftransienteventswhich
allowsthepredictionofthetime-of-arrivalofthese
76
P24–P26
featuresatEarth. Whilethismethodisreportedto
workwhencomparingtimesofarrival, it
frequentlyappearstoproducespeedsfarlower
thanthespeedswhentheyareeventuallydetected
byin-situspacecraftsuchasACE.Tobetter
understandthenatureofthesesignatureswe
interpretfamiliesoftracesasoriginatingfroma
singlecoronalholeboundaryonthesurfaceofthe
Sungivingrisetoacorotatinginteractionregion
(CIR).Wesuccessfullyshowacorrespondence
withassociatedCIR signaturesobservedatACE,
anddissecttheanatomyofaCIR asseenbyHI.
Theseresultshighlightthedifficultyofinterpreting
2D imagesofthe3D heliosphere, whenthereare
oftenwithmanysimultaneousactiveregionsand
overlappingheliosphericstructuresalongany
particularline-of-sight. Weoutlinestrategiesfor
thefutureinterpretationofHI images.
Non-potentialenhancementoftheSun'sopen
magneticflux
AnthonyYeates (UniversityofDundee)with
D.H. Mackay, and A.A. vanBallegooijen
Formingafundamentaldynamicalconnection
withtheheliosphere, theSun'slarge-scale
magneticfieldisshapedbyinteractionsinthe
lowercorona(belowabout2.5solarradii).
Traditionalmodelsfortheglobalmagnetic
structureinthisregionhaveusedpotentialfield
sourcesurface(PFSS) extrapolationsfrom
photosphericmagneticobservations. However, in
situspacecraftmeasurementsoftheinterplanetary
magneticfieldoverseveralsolarcyclesshowthat
thePFSS extrapolationspredicttoolowalevelof
openmagneticfluxduringepochsofhighersolar
activity. Herewesuggestthatthisdiscrepancy
mayberesolvedbyrelaxingthepotential-field
assumptionandallowingforelectriccurrentsin
thelowcorona. Wedemonstratetheconcept
usingaquasi-staticnumericalmodelofthelargescalecoronalmagneticevolution, which
systematicallyproducesthesecurrentsthrough
fluxemergenceandshearingbysurfacemotions.
Thecurrentsinflatethemagneticfield, enhancing
theopenfluxduringperiodsofhighersolar
activity, inagreementwithIMF observations. In
addition, theejectionofmagneticfluxropesinthe
modelmimicstheeffectofcoronalmassejections
thatcauseshort-termfluctuationsinthe
heliosphericmagneticfield.
P25
FindingtheSourceofUHECRsusingBayesian
AnalysisofPierreAugerData
LauraWatson (ImperialCollege, London)with
Andrew Jaffe, Daniel Mortlock, and Roberto Trotta
Cosmicraysareextremelyenergeticparticlesand
mustoriginatefromsomeofthemostenergetic
processesinnature. Determiningtheirorigin
couldshedlightonprocessesthatplayakeypart
intheUniverse'sevolution. Itissuspectedthat
ultrahighenergycosmicrays(UHECRs)maycome
fromactivegalacticnuclei(AGNs): statistical
analysesofthecorrelationbetweenthelocationof
AGNsandUHECR detectionsweremadepossible
forthefirsttimebyobservationsfromthePierre
Augerobservatory(PierreAugerCollaboration,
Science318, 938, 2007). However, whilstthese
findingshinttowardscorrelation, amorerecent
analysishasfoundaweakenedcorrelation(Nature
463, 1011, 2010). Herewepresentacompletely
differentapproachtotheproblemwhichtakesthe
fullamountofavailableinformationintoaccount.
ThroughBayesiananalysis, weprovideamethod
forfindingtheprobabilitythatUHECRsoriginate
fromAGNsanddiscusstheextensionofthis
methodtothecomparisonofdifferentsources.
P26
Globalpopulationstatistics, bimodalityand
multivariatedistributionsofgalaxieswithSDSS.
IvanBaldry (LiverpoolJMU)
TheSDSS increasedthenumberof z < 0.2
galaxieswithknownredshifts, spectralandmulticolourmeasurements, byanunprecedentedfactor
overthecourseofafewyears. Thishasledtoan
explosioninstudiesoftheglobalpopulation
statisticsofgalaxies. Thedangerintheseanalyses
isthatimportantdetailsarelost, ontheother
hand, theycanprovidestrongconstraintson
galaxyevolutionandtheyprovideadescriptionof
ourUniverseonatrulycosmicscale. I willreview
someoftheSDSS resultsobtainedusingglobal
populationstatisticsincludingthesignificant
colourbimodalityandenvironmentaltrends.
Whitedwarfsastracersofstellar, binary, and
planetaryevolution
BorisGaensicke (UniversityofWarwick)
Arethereimprintsofhotplasmaoutflowsfrom
activeregionsinthesolarwind?
LidiavanDriel-Gesztelyi (UniversityCollege
London–MSSL) with A.N. Fazakerley, and
L.K. Harra
Hinodehasdiscoveredapotentialsourceofsolar
windattheedgesofactiveregionswithXRT and
EIS (e.gSakaoetal., 2007, Harraetal., 2008,
Doscheketal., 2008). Theseoutflowsarelonglastingandexistattheedgesofmostactive
regions. Wehaveexaminedinterplanetarysolar
winddatafromtheACE spacecraftandsolar
remotesensingdataincludingEIS plasmaupflows,
duringafullCarringtonRotationinterval. We
discusswhethertheevidencesupportstheidea
thattheflowsthatweseeonthesurfaceoftheSun
actuallyaretransportedtotheEarthinthesolar
wind, orifitsuggeststhattheyaremerelyrelated
toflowsinlarge-scaleloops.
I willreviewthetremendousimpactthattheSloan
DigitalSkySurveyhashadonourunderstanding
ofawidevarietyofastrophysicalenvironments
containingwhitedwarfs. Besidesincreasingthe
totalnumberofknownwhitedwarfsmorethan
five-fold, allowingdetailedstudiesoftheirgalactic
population, SDSS hasfoundnew, rarebreedsof
whitedwarfsthattraceextremebranchesofstellar
evolution. SDSS hasalsoprobedthepopulations
ofaccretinganddetachedwhitedwarfbinariesto
anunprecedentedlevelofdetail, providingthe
moststringenttestsofbinaryevolutiontodate. A
totallyunexpecteddiscoverywastheidentification
ofplanetarydebrisdiscsaroundwhitedwarfs,
originatingfromthetidaldisruptionofrocky
asteroids. Assuch, thesesystemsofferaglimpse
intothedistantfutureofourownSolarsystem,
and, moregenerally, provideinsightintothelate
evolutionofplanetarysystems.
EvidenceofTidalStrippingofthreecompact
elliptical(cE) galaxiesdiscoveredinSDSS DR7
AvonHuxor (UniversityofBristol)with
S. Phillipps, J. Price, and R. Harniman
Wepresentthreecompactgalaxies, foundina
searchofSDSS DR7, whichexhibitclearevidence
oftidalsteams. Thegalaxiesarelowmass, and
havesmalleffectiveradii, andtheirspectra
indicatethattheypossessyoungtointermediateagestellarpopulations. Theseprovidedirect
evidencefortheprocessoftidalstrippingthatis
believedtobetheoriginofM32-typegalaxies, a
"smokinggun". Thesecompactgalaxiesareall
foundinsmallgroups, suggestingthatwemaybe
seeingtheformationofsuchgalaxiesin
dynamicallyyounggalaxygroupings. Oneofthe
threeisfoundinasmallgroupnotunlikethe
LocalGroupitself, andthusprovidesanadditional
modelforunderstandingM32.
GalaxyClusteringintheSDSS
JonLoveday (UniversityofSussex)
I willreviewwhatwehavelearntaboutgalaxy
clusteringfromtheSDSS,includingconstraintson
theHaloOccupationDistribution(HOD)
formalism, therelativeclusteringofgalaxiesof
varyingcolourandluminosity, andthefirstand
subsequentdetectionsoftheBaryonAcousticPeak
inthegalaxydistribution.
DVORAC Detector- TheDurhamVOronoiRedsequenceAutomatedClusterDetectorfornextgenerationpanoramicsurveys
DavidMurphy (DurhamUniversity)with
Jim Geach, and Richard Bower
WepresenttheDVORAC detector, anewcluster
detectionalgorithmdesignedforlargepanoramic
surveyswithmulti-bandphotometry. Themethod
makesnopriorassumptionsonthepropertiesof
clustersotherthan(a)thesimilarityincolourof
clustergalaxies(theredsequence)and(b)alarge
projectedsurfacedensity. Thedetectorhastwo
mainstages. First, itidentifiesclustermembersby
photometricallyfilteringtheinputcatalogueto
detectover-densitiesincolour-magnitudespace.
Second, aVoronoitessellationidentifiesregionsof
highsurfacedensityandgroupsgalaxiesinto
clusters. Asthenextgenerationofsurveysprobe
tofainterlimits, quickandefficientalgorithmswill
berequiredtohandlethevastvolumesofdata
generated. ToprepareforthePanoramicSurvey
TelescopeandRapidResponseSystem
(PanSTARRS) survey, wehavetestedthedetector
ontheSDSS Equatorial"Stripe82", andamock
MediumDeepSurvey(MDS) PanSTARRS
cataloguebasedonthe ΛCDM modelwitha
semi-analyticgalaxyformationrecipe. Wewill
showthatclustersdetectedintheSDSS showgood
agreementwithexistingclustercataloguesand
thatthebenefitofdeeperdatahasallowedusto
identifymanypreviouslyundetectedclustersand
groups. Themocksurveyhasallowedusto
quantifytheefficiency, robustnessandreliability
ofthealgorithmbycomparingthecatalogueof
detectedclusterstothemembershipofgalaxiesin
darkmatterhaloes.
AnalysingtheClusteringofPhotometrically
SelectedGalaxies
AshleyRoss (UniversityofPortsmouth)with
WillJ Percival, and RobertJ. Brunner
TheSDSS hasproducedphotometricredshift
catalogswhichcontainover20milliongalaxies.
Wehavecreatedofapproximatelyvolumelimited
samplesofthesegalaxies, allowingprecise
measurementsoftheangular2-pointcorrelation
functionofgalaxies. Splittingthesegalaxiesinto
redshiftshellsbetweenz=0.1and0.4, wehave
foundasignificantincreaseinthebiasof L*
galaxiesbetweenz=0.1and0.4. Usingthe
measurementstodeterminethethehalooccupation-distribution(HOD) ofthegalaxiesin
eachredshiftshell, wefindourmeasurementscan
beexplainedbytheformationof L*galaxiesin
halosofmass ∼ 1012 h−1 M⊙ . Whenwesplit
thegalaxiesbytype, wefindthat, inordertoselfconsistentlyfitthemeasurements, early- andlatetypegalaxiesmustpreferentiallyexistinseparate
darkmatterhalos.
TheSDSS-III BaryonOscillationSpectroscopic
Survey(BOSS):FirstResults
NicholasRoss (LawrenceBerkeleyLab)with
ErinS. Sheldon, AdamD. Myers,
Christophe Yeche, and SDSS-III:BOSS Team
TheSDSS-III (www.sdss3.org)BaryonOscillation
SpectroscopicSurvey(BOSS) isanewfive-year
project, whichcommencedoperationsinlate
2009. ThekeygoalsofBOSS aretomeasure
redshiftsfor1.4millionLuminousRedGalaxies
(LRGs)to z < 0.8, andsimultaneously160,000
quasarsat z > 2.2. Bothsampleswillmeasure
theequationofstateofdarkenergyto1%using
theBaryonAcousticOscillation(BAO) technique.
Herewedescribethesomeoftheveryearly
resultsfromtheBOSS CommissioningPhase
whichtookplacein2009andearly2010.
Higher-OrderClusteringOfLuminousRed
GalaxiesInTheSDSS
CristianoSabiu (None)with Robert Nichol, and
Felipe Marin
TheSloanDigitalSkySurvey(SDSS) LuminousRed
Galaxy(LRG) spectroscopicsampleprovidesus
withamapoflarge-scaleover- densitiesinthe
Universewithinavolumeof ∼ 1 (Gpc/h)3 . The
mainadvantageofusingLRGsisthattheyare
highlybiasedwithrespecttotheunderlyingdark
matterandthusefficienttracersofthelarge-scale
structuresintheUniverse, e.g., LRGshavebeen
essentialforthedetectionandmeasurementofthe
BaryonAcousticOscillations(BAO).Tomakefull
useoftheLRG samples, itisimportantto
accuratelymodelthemappingbetweengalaxies
andthedarkmatter. Recently, thishasbeen
achievedusingthe"halomodel"forhowgalaxies
inhabittheirdarkmatterhalos. Indetail, weuse
theHaloOccupationDistribution(HOD) to
populateasuiteofN-bodysimulations(tocreatea
gridofmockcatalogues), andcomparetheseto
theobservedLRG population. Toaddconstraining
power, weusetheThree-PointCorrelation
Function(3PCF),whichencodesmuchmore
informationthantheusualtwo-pointstatistics. In
thistalk, wepresentresultsofourHOD analysis
foranLRG sampleselectedfromthefinalDR7
SDSS catalogue.
SDSS-II SNe- AnOverviewandHostGalaxy
Properties
MathewSmith (UCT) with R. Nichol, H. Lampeitl,
B. Dilday, B. Bassett, and SDSS-II SNeSurvey
Team
MeasurementsoftypeIaSupernovaehave
revolutionisedthecosmologicalmodelthrough
theintroductionofDarkEnergy. TheSDSS-II
SupernovaSurveyspectroscopicallyidentified
over500oftheseeventsatintermediateredshift
(0.05 < z < 0.5)andobtainedhighqualitylight-
curvesforhundredsmore. Bycombiningthese
SNeIa'swiththosefromothersurveys, themost
accuratemeasurementsofthecontentofthe
Universehavebeenmade. Weshalldescribethe
surveyitself, it'sdeterminationofthecosmological
parametersandinvestigatetherelationshipthat
thesecosmologicalprobeshavewiththeirlocal
environment. Bycreatingarobustand
representativesampleofSNeIa'swehaveshown
thattheseeventsarefarmorelikelytoappearin
galaxieswithrecentstar-formationactivitythan
"passive"galaxies, andthattheSNeIarateis
stronglydependentonhostgalaxystar-formation
rate. Additionally, weshowthatthereisan
environmentdependenceofthestretch
distributionsoftheseevents, andintriguinglythat
SNeindifferentenvironmentsmaypossess
differentabsolutemagnitudesanddifferentdust
laws.
DiscoveryofthefirstwideL dwarf+giantbinary
systemandeightotherultra-cooldwarfsinwide
binaries
ZengHuaZhang (UniversityofHertfordshire)with
David Pinfield, Avril Day-Jones, Ben Burningham,
and Hugh Jones
Weidentify806ultra-cooldwarfsfromtheirSDSS
rizphotometry(ofwhich34arenewlydiscovered
L dwarfs)andobtainpropermotionsthroughcross
matchingwithUKIDSS and2MASS.Proper
motionanddistanceconstraintsshowthatnineof
ourultra-cooldwarfsaremembersofwidely
separatedbinarysystems; SDSS 0101
(K5V+M9.5V),SDSS 0207(M1.5V+L3V),SDSS
0832(K3III+L3.5V),SDSS 0858(M4V+L0V),SDSS
0953(M4V+M9.5V),SDSS 0956(M2V+M9V),
SDSS 1304(M4.5V+L0V),SDSS 1631
(M5.5V+M8V),SDSS 1638(M4V+L0V).Oneof
these(SDSS 0832)isshowntobeacompanionto
thebrightK3giantEtaCancri. Suchprimariescan
provideageandmetallicityconstraintsforany
companionobjects, yieldingexcellentbenchmark
objects. EtaCancriAB isthefirstwideultra-cool
dwarf+giantbinarysystemidentified. Wepresent
newobservationsandanalysisthatconstrainthe
metallicityofEtaCancriA tobenearsolar, and
userecentevolutionarymodelstoconstrainthe
ageofthegianttobe2.2- 6.1Gyr. IfEtaCancriB
isasingleobject, weestimateitsphysical
attributestobe: Mass = 63 − 82MJup ,
Teff = 1800 ± 150 K, log g = 5.3 − 5.5,
[M /H] = 0.0 ± 0.1. Itscoloursarenontypical
whencomparedtootherultra-cooldwarfs, andwe
alsoassessthepossibilitythatEtaCancriB isitself
anunresolvedbinary, showingthatthecombined
lightofanL4+T4systemcouldprovidea
reasonableexplanationforitscolours.
BinarypopulationsinSDSS:A newdiagnosticfor
systemparametersofevolvedwhitedwarf
binaries
LiekevanSpaandonk (UniversityofWarwick)with
D. Steeghs, and T.R Marsh
Evolvedbinarysystemsformalargesubsetof
binarystarsandCataclysmicVariables(CVs)area
valuablesamplewithinthisgroupastheyprovide
homogeneousconfigurationsofwhitedwarfsplus
nearmain-sequencemassdonors. A key
expectationbasedonourcurrentunderstandingof
binaryevolutionisthatangularmomentumloss
drivesCVstoshortorbitalperiodsastheirmass
donorstarsshedmass. Theyprovidethesettingfor
thestudyofaccretionontocompactobjects,
includingTypeIasupernovaeandgravitational
waveemission. However, theseshort-period
P26
77
systemsarefaintandthereforesampleshave
traditionallybeenbiasedagainstthem.
ThishasfinallychangedthankstoCV searches
withinSDSS astheyareunearthingshort-period
systemsinlargernumbers. Althoughtheorbital
periodisanimportantdiagnostic, reliablemass
estimates(e.g. massratio q = Mdonor /MWD )are
neededforthedonorstarstoplaceaCV onits
evolutionarytrack.
Wehavestudiedpromisingcandidatesatthe
brightendoftheshort-periodbinarysample,
exploitingtheCaII tripletlinesinordertorecover
theirbinaryparameters. TheCaII linesoffer
advantagesoverthehydrogenandheliumlines
commonlyused, asthelatteraredominatedby
broadaccretiondiscprofiles. Ourdatasofar
clearlyvindicatethisstrategy, asmostsystems
revealsharpemissionfromtheintrinsicallyfaint
donorsontopofthediscemission, allowingusto
determinethebinaryparametersinsystemssuch
asrevealedbySDSS.
P27
TheLastMajorEpochofDiskGrowthinM33
MichaelBarker (RoyalObservatoryEdinburgh)
with A. Ferguson, R. Ibata, M. Irwin, G. Lewis,
T. Smecker-Hane, and N. Tanvir
Late-typediskgalaxieslikeM33arecommonin
thenearbyuniverse, butdifficulttoproducein
cosmologicalsimulations, soabetter
observationaldeterminationoftheirevolutionis
crucialforunderstandingdiskformation. Tothat
end, weuseHubbleSpaceTelescopeAdvanced
CameraforSurveysimagingtostudythestar
formationhistory(SFH) oftwofieldsat9.1and
11.6kpcalongM33’snorthernmajoraxis. Based
onthedistributionofstarsinthecolour-magnitude
diagrams, wefindthatthemajorityofstarsinboth
fieldsformedat z < 1. Themeanageoftheinner
fieldis ∼ 3 Gyrandthemeanageoftheouter
fieldis ∼ 6 Gyr. Theseresultsofferthemost
detailedviewyetofM33’speripheryandprovide
amuch-neededobservationalconstraintonthe
lastmajorepochofdiskassemblyinthisgalaxy.
BPASS:BinaryPopulationandSpectralSynthesis
JohnEldridge (InstituteofAstronomy(Cambridge))
with Elizabeth Stanway, Norbert Langer,
Monica Relano, and Christopher Tout
Thereisgrowingobservationalevidencethatthe
binaryfractionofmassivestarsisclosetounity.
Thereforetomodelyoungstellarpopulations
accuratelythecomplexandnon-linearevolution
ofbinariesmustbeincluded. Wehavecreateda
powerfulanduniquebinarypopulationand
spectralsynthesiscode, BPASS,thataccountsfor
binaryevolutionbyusingthousandsofdetailed
binarystarmodelsincreatingsyntheticstellar
population(Eldridge&Stanway, 2009,
MNRAS,400, 1019). Wediscusstheimportant
differencesthatwefindbetweensinglestarand
binarypopulationsforvariedobservablesof
resolvedandunresolvedstellarpopulations. We
alsoshowhowthesedifferencesgrowasthe
metallicityofthestellarpopulationdecrease.
Dependingontimewewillalsodiscoverhowwe
aretestingandcalibratingBPASS bystudying
systemssuchasNGC604inM33thatareresolved
byHST butunresolvedbyothertelescopessothat
wecanhavegreaterconfidenceinBPASS when
78
P27
applyingittostudyingthestellarpopulationsof
high-redshiftgalaxies.
ConstrainingtheInitialMassFunction
IgnacioFerreras (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL) with Dominik Leier(ARI,Heidelberg), and
Prasenjit Saha(Zurich)
TheInitialStellarMassFunction(IMF) remainsone
ofthemainunknownsinsyntheticmodelsof
stellarpopulations. ThemassiveendoftheIMF
canbeconstrainedviastudiesofopenclustersand
youngpopulations. However, thelow-massendof
theIMF ismuchhardertoconstrainduetothelow
luminosityofstarsbelow1Msun. Alternative
methodsestimatingthetotalmassareneededto
setconstraintsonthelowerendoftheIMF.Inthis
talkI willpresentrecentworkfocusedonthe
EinsteinCross. A non-parametricanalysisofthe
lensingsystemiscomparedwithpopulation
synthesismodels. A combinationofhigh
resolutionimagingwithHST/NICMOS anddeep
spectroscopywithVLT/FORS givesM/L predictions
thatarecomparedwithanumberofpopulation
synthesismodelsforarangeofIMFs. I willalso
presentpromisingnewmethodsbasedonmultivariateanalysistoconstraintheIMF from
spectroscopicdataofunresolvedstellar
populations.
Kinematicbiasinexoplanetsurveys
RichardHutcheon (KeeleUniversity)with
P.F.L. Maxted
Over400exoplanetsarenowknown, discovered
mainlybythetransitorradialvelocitymethods.
FromthesesystemsweselectaBrightTransit
Sample(BTS) andaRadialVelocitySample(RVS).
Duetoobservationalconstraintsthedistancesof
starsinthesesampleslieinalmostnonoverlappinggroups, furtherorcloserthan100pc
fortheBTS andRVS respectively. Sincethetransit
surveysavoidlowgalacticlatitudes, theBTS stars
tendtoliefurtherfromtheGalacticplane. We
haveinvestigatedwhetherthesebiasesare
expectedtointroducedifferencesinthe
distributionofageormetallicity, parameters
whicharethoughttoinfluencethefrequencyof
exoplanets.
TheaverageandmedianmetallicitiesoftheRVS
arerespectively0.03and0.10dexhigherthanfor
theBTS.Calibrationsamplesofsolar-typestars
withsimilarkinematicstotheBTS andRVS stars
havebeenpreparedandtheseshowamedian
metallicity0.02dexhigherfortheRVS.The
calibrationsamplesarelargeenoughtoreveal
evensmalldifferencesbetweenthem. Henceany
differenceinmetallicitiesisverysmallandisdue
tokinematics. Themetallicitiesoftheactual
samplesareabout0.2dexhigherthanforthe
calibrationsamples; thisconfirmsearlierresults
thatplanethoststarsaremetal-richcomparedwith
othersolar-typestars. Thereisnosignificant
differencebetweentheagesofthestarsintheBTS
andRVS samplesortheircalibrationsamples, but
thisismostlyduetothelargeuncertaintyin
estimatingtheagesofmain-sequencesolartype
stars.
Weconcludethattheselectioneffectsinherentin
thetransitsurveyandradialvelocitytechniques
can, inprinciple, leadtodifferentbiasesinthe
metallicityandagedistributionsofthestars
observedbutthisdifferenceappearstobe
negligibleinpractice.
Crystallinesilicatesaroundoxygen-rich
AsymptoticGiantBranchStarsintheLarge
MagellanicCloud
OliviaJones (UniversityofManchester)with
F. Kemper, B.A. Sargent, G.C. Sloan, P.M. Woods,
A.K. Speck, M. Matsuura, J.-P. Bernard,
K.D. Gordon, R. Indebetouw, K.E. Kraemer,
E. Lagadec, J. Th. vanLoon, I. McDonald,
M. Marengo, M. Meixner, W.T. Reach, and
A.G.G.M. Tielens
Ithasbeenshownthatthesilicatesinthedust
shellsaroundoxygen-richstarsontheasymptotic
giantbranch(AGB) canshowaconsiderable
degreeofcrystallinity. A thresholdvalueforthe
mass-lossrateexists, abovewhichthefeaturesdue
tothecrystallinesilicatesforsteriteandenstatite
appear. Weareinvestigatingtheoriginofthis
thresholdvaluebyexpandingthecrystallinity
studiestothemetal-poorenvironmentoftheLarge
MagellanicCloud(LMC).WepresentSAGE-Spec
Spitzer-IRS spectroscopyforanumberofO-rich
AGB starsintheLMC.The5-40micronspectraof
theseevolvedO-richobjectsencompassarange
ofspectralfeaturesandbandstrengths; fromthe
spectrallyrichwhichexhibitawealthofcrystalline
andamorphoussilicatefeaturestothe`naked'
(dust-free)stars, acrossarangeofmass-lossrates,
providinganidealopportunitytoexploretheonset
ofcrystallinity. Wemeasuredthefeaturestrength
ofcrystallinesilicatebandsat23.6, 28, 33.6 µm,
withrespecttothestrengthofthecontinuum
producedbythermalemissionfromamorphous
silicates. Weintendtoplotthesevaluesagainst
Ṁdust and Ṁgas , inordertosearchforacorrelation
withthedustandgasdensityrespectively. These
relationsmaybedifferentattheLMC'smetallicity
of ∼ 0.5 Z⊙ . Wecompareourresultstothosefor
O-richAGB starsintheGalaxy.
Theroleofminormergersinthestarformation
historyofearly-typegalaxies
SugataKaviraj (ImperialCollegeLondon)with
Richard Ellis, Sukyoung Yi, Kevin Schawinski,
Joseph Silk, GALEX Collaboration, and MUSYC
Collaboration
Anexcitingrecentdiscoveryhasbeenthe
detectionofwidespreadrecentstarformation
(RSF) innearbyearly-typegalaxies(ETGs), using
newsurveydataintherest-frameUV.Wereview
thecurrentstatusofthiswork, withaparticular
emphasisonthedriversofthisstarformation.
DatafromtheGALEX UV survey(z < 0.1),
combinedwithdeepopticalsurveys(e.g. MUSYC,
GOODS,COSMOS) thattracetherest-frameUV
athighredshift, indicatethatETGsofall
luminositiesformstarsoverthelifetimeofthe
Universe, withluminoussystems
(−23 < MV < −21)formingupto10-15%of
theirstellarmassafterz=1. Whilesmallmass
fractionsofyoungstarsseemtobeubiquitousin
thenearbyETG population, thesourceofthisstar
formationremainsamatterofdebate. We
demonstratethattheRSF atlateepochscannotbe
drivensolelybyinternalmassloss, suggestingthat
someormostofthegasfuellingtheRSF is
externallyaccreted. VisualinspectionofHST
imagesofETGsfromtheCOSMOS surveyat
z∼ 0.5 showaremarkablecorrespondence
betweenthepresenceofmorphological
disturbancesandUV excess, whichsuggeststhat
mergersmaybetheprincipaldriverofthisRSF.
However, themajormergerrateisfoundtobetoo
lowtosatisfythenumberofETGsthatcarrysuch
morphologicaldisturbances, suggestingminor
mergersastheprimarychannelofgasaccretion
andstarformationintheETG population. We
discusstheimplicationsofrepeatedminormerger
activityonthespectralanddynamicalevolutionof
massivegalaxiesanddrawcomparisonswiththe
literaturewhichsuggestthatminormerging, a
hithertopoorlyexploredprocess, maybeakey
elementoftheevolutionofgalaxiesatlateepochs.
Systematicuncertaintiesinherentinstellar
populationsynthesismodelsandtheirimpacton
integratedspectraofstellarpopulations: A
modeller'sperspective.
SusanPercival (LiverpoolJohnMooresUniversity)
Stellarpopulationsynthesismodelsareavitaltool
forinterpretingthepropertiesofstellarpopulations
(age, metallicity, SFH) inbothstellarclustersand
galaxies. Errorsonthesederivedpropertiescan
stemfromsystematicuncertaintiesintheSPS
modelsthemselves, and/orfromcertainproperties
inherentinthestellarpopulationwhichcan
complicatetheinterpretationofresults. Allstellar
populationsynthethismodelsrelyoncalibrations
ofthe3mainstellarparameters- effective
temperature, surfacegravityand[Fe/H].These
scalesareimplicitinstellarmodels, isochrones
andsyntheticspectra, andareexplicitlyadopted
forempiricalspectrallibraries. InthistalkI will
discusstheeffectofamismatchinscalesbetween
isochronesandspectrallibraries(thetwokey
componentsofSPS models)anddemonstratethe
impactongalaxyagesandabundanceratios
derivedfromcommonlyuseddiagnosticline
indices, andfromfullSED fitting. I willalsobriefly
discusstheeffectofextendedbluehorizontal
branchesandstatisticalfluctuationsonthederived
propertiesofstellarclusters.
TheAGB populationandthemetallicitygradient
inNGC 6822
LisetteSibbons (UniversityofHertfordshire)with
Maria-Rosa Cioni
NGC 6822isasmallIrregulardwarfthatforms
partofthelocalgroup. Itscloseproximity(∼ 470
kpc)andapparentisolationprovideaunique
opportunitytostudygalacticevolutionwithout
strongdynamicalfactors. Thisprojectaimsto
studythemetallicitygradientandthedistribution
ofthestellarpopulationwithinNGC 6822viathe
asymptoticbranchstar(AGB) componentofthe
stellarpopulation. Usingdeephighqualitynearinfraredphotometry, takenusingUKIRT in2008,
thecarbon- andoxygen-richintermediate-age
AGB starshavebeenisolated. Theratiobetween
thesepopulations, theC/M ratio, hasthenbeen
usedtoderivethe[Fe/H] abundancewithinthe
galaxy. The[Fe/H] abundanceandthedistribution
oftheAGB populationwerethenanalysedasa
functionofgalacticradius. Usingcolourmagnitudediagramsthetipoftheredgiantbranch
starshasbeenlocatedatKs=17.29±0.03andthe
colourseparationforC- andM-typestarsfallsatJK =1.188±0.01. Usingthesecutsearlyresults
indicateanoverallC/M numberratioof0.248,
withvariationinthenorthandsouth, aswellasat
largergalactocentricdistances. AlsoadenserAGB
populationhasbeenlocatedintheSW regionof
thegalaxyinthedirectionoftheouterspheroid.
Summarizing, theresolvedAGB populationacross
thewholeofNGC 6822hasbeeninvestigatedand
regionsofvaryingmetallicity, andAGB stellar
density, havebeenidentifiedwhichmayindicatea
changeorsomepasteventinthestarformation
historyofthegalaxy.
Learningaboutstellarpopulationsinunresolved
galaxies
RussellSmith (DurhamUniversity)
I willreviewcurrenttechniquesforlearningabout
thestellarcontentofunresolvedgalaxies, through
integrated-lightspectroscopy. Thesemethodshave
becomeacrucialweaponintheobservational
astronomer'sarsenal, andarenowroutinely
appliedtosamplesrangingfromtensuptotens-ofthousandsofgalaxies, toconstrainthehistoryof
starformationandchemicalenrichmentinthe
distantpast. Buthowdoweproperlyinterpretthe
resultsofsuchstudies? Howdowemake
meaningfulcomparisonstogalaxyformation
models? Whathavewereallylearned? Whatare
thecurrentlimitations, andaretheyfundamental
ormerelypracticaldifficultiestoovercomewith
largertelescopesandcleverermodelling? I will
elaborateonsomeofthesequestions, tostimulate
discussion, buttheycannotbeansweredina
fifteen-minutetalk!
AGB StarsinWLM
BejaminTatton (UniversityofHertfordshire)with
Maria-Rosa Cioni
Theaimofthisprojectistoinvestigatethestar
formationhistoryandmetallicityofthelocal
group, irregulardwarfgalaxyWLM (WolfLundmark-Melotte).
Themaindatausedforthisstudyiswidefield
JHKsnearinfraredimagingspanningaregionof
approximately1sq. degreeobtainedwiththe
WideFieldCameraonUKIRT.
Colour-magnitudediagrams(J-KsvsKs)allowed
forthedeterminationofthetipoftheredgiant
branchandfortheidentificationC-typeandMtypestarslocations. TheC/M ratiowasthen
calculatedleadingtotheproductionofasurface
mapofmetallicitydistribution. Theseresultswere
comparedwithinformationintheliterature.
ThestellarpopulationsintheLargeMagellanic
Cloud
PaulWoods (UniversityofManchester)with
SAGE-Specteam
I presenttheclassificationresultsofSAGESpectroscopy, aSpitzerLegacyprojectwhich
obtainedIRS spectraofanumberofpoint-sourcelikeobjectsintheLargeMagellanicCloud(LMC).
Suchasurveygivesusinformationaboutthedust
contentoftheLMC,andidentifyingthenatureof
theobjectsdetectedinthemid-IR helpsusto
understandhowthatdustiscycled. I willdetail
theobjectclassificationprocess, andtheresults
whichcanbedrawnfromsuchanendeavour. We
canreliablydistinguishredsupergiantsfrom
oxygen-richAGB starsbymeansofcolour, andare
abletotracetheevolutionofcarbon-richevolved
starsbymeansoftheirdustcontent. Wealsofind
that(massive)youngstellarobjectsfallintooneof
fourevolutionarygroupings.
P28
Thedriftofauroralradioabsorptionpatches
observedbyimagingriometer
JohnHargreaves (UniversityofLancaster)with
M.J. Birch, and B.J.I. Bromage
Thephenomenonofdriftingpatchesofauroral
absorption, firstrecognisedinthe1960s, ishere
illustratedinrecentobservationswithanimaging
riometerinnorthernFinland. Possiblecausesare
considered, usingincoherent-scatterobservations
fromEISCAT andF-regionvelocitiesfrom
SuperDARN.
MagneticfieldparallelcurrentsintheUCL-CTIP
model
TimothySpain (UCL) with RichardB. Horne, and
Alan Aylward
ThemagneticfieldparallelcurrentsintheEarth's
ionospheredonotcontributetoeithertheiondrag
orJouleheatingofthethermosphere, duetothe
cross-productbetweenthetotalcurrentandthe
magneticfieldintheseterms. Asaresult, the
calculationofthesecurrentswasneverexplicitly
includedintheUCL-CTIP model, despitethe
perpendicularcomponentsofthecurrentbeing
calculatedinaself-consistentmanner. The
calculationofthefieldparallelcurrentcomponent
allows, forexample, thecalculationofthetotal
magneticfieldbythepoloidal-toroidalmethod.
Herewepresentamethodofcalculationofthe
fieldparallelcomponentofthetotalcurrentand
anapplicationofthiscalculationtosomesimple
experimentsperformedwiththeUCL-CTIP model.
ModellingGeomagneticallyInducedCurrentsin
theNationalGridusingSAMNET.
KatieTurnbull (LancasterUniversity)with
A.W.P. Thomson, C. Beggan, J.A. Wild, and
F. Honary
Wepresentthefirstresultsofanewmodelwhich
usesmagnetometerdatatocalculate
GeomagneticallyInducedCurrents(GIC)
throughouttheUK NationalGrid. GIC arearesult
ofrapidvariationsinthegeomagneticfield, such
asthoseobservedduringmagneticstormsand
substorms. GIC cantravelalongpower
transmissionlinesasquasi-directcurrent,
potentiallydamagingtransformersandresultingin
blackouts.
ThenewUK modelusesSubAuroral
MagnetometerNetwork(SAMNET) data, the
methodofsphericalelementarycurrentsystems
ona2D gridanda3D conductivitymodelofthe
UK anditscontinentalshelftodeterminethe
surfaceelectricfieldduringstorms. Thiselectric
fieldisthenusedtocalculateGIC throughthe
NationalGrid, throughthegroundingpointsof
eachhighvoltagetransformerinthenetwork. We
comparemodelledGIC withmeasuredGIC during
oneparticularsubstormforfoursitesinScotland,
aswellasdiscussingthemodelledGIC atsites
elsewhereintheNationalGrid. Infutureworkwe
willexaminethegridresponseduringmajor
magneticstorms, suchasthe'Halloween'eventof
October2003.
P29
A newenthalpy-basedapproachtothetransition
regioninanimpulsively-heatedcorona
PeterCargill (ImperialCollege)with
Steve Bradshaw
Observationsofthesolarcoronarevealpersistent
andubiquitousred-shifts, whichcorrespondto
bulkdown-flows. Foranimpulsively-heated
corona(e.g. bynanoflares)thisindicatesthata
majorityofthecomponentloopstructuresarein
theradiativelycoolingphaseoftheirlifecycle.
However, thenatureofthebulkdownflowsraises
P27–P29
79
thepossibilitythatenthalpymayplayakeyrolein
theenergybalanceoftheloopsandinparticular
thatitpowersthetransitionregionradiation. We
useonedimensionalhydrodynamicsimulationsof
loopcoolingtoshowthatenthalpylossesfromthe
coronaareeasilysufficienttopowerthetransition
regionradiation. Thiscontrastswiththelong-held
viewthatdownwardthermalconductionpowers
thetransitionregion. Thetraditionaldistinction
betweenthetransitionregionandthecoronain
termsoftemperaturealoneisthenagrossly
unphysicalsimplificationandaproperdefinition
oftheinterfacebetweentheseatmosphericlayers
requiresadetailedknowledgeoftheirenergy
balance. Tothisendweproposearobustnew
definitionofthetransitionregion.
Chromosphericmagneticreconnection:
implicationsforjet-likeeventsandcoronal
heating
JiaoyangDing (ArmaghObservatory)with
M.S. Madjarska, J.G. Doyle, and Q.M. Lu
Magneticreconnectioninthelowatmosphere,
e.g., chromosphere, isinvestigatedinvarious
physicalenvironments. Itisfoundthatthe
temperatureandvelocityoftheoutflowjetsasa
resultofmagneticreconnectionarestrongly
dependentonthephysicalenvironments, e.g. the
magnitudeofthemagneticfieldstrengthandthe
plasmadensity. Thestrongermagneticfield
strengthorthelowermassdensityis, theoutflow
jetswithhighertemperatureandlargervelocity
areobtained. Undercertainphysicalconditions,
theoutflowjetscanbeheatedupto 2 × 106 K
(coronaltemperatures), anditsmaximumvelocity
reaches300- 400km/s. Inthiscase, bothcold
chromosphericjetsandhotcoronaljetsare
obtainedsimultaneously. Thisisveryhelpfulto
understandtherelationshipbetweencoldandhot
jets, aswellascoronalheatingmechanisms.
Observationand3D modellingofacoronal
brightpoint
ZhenghuaHuang (ArmaghObservatory)with
M.S. Madjarska, K. Galsgaard, and J.G. Doyle
Weusemulti-wavelengthobservationsobtained
withEIS,XRT andSOT onboardHinodetostudy
theplasmapropertiesanddynamicsofacoronal
brightpointobservedinanequatorialcoronal
hole. Theevolutionofthebrightpointwas
followedinspectrallineswithformation
temperaturesfrom 104 K to 2 × 106 K,i.e. from
chromospherictocoronaltemperatures. Wefound
thatthebrightpointhasalongerlifetimeasseenin
lowerchromospherictemperaturesthaninhigher,
coronalones. Wederivedthedensityevolutionof
thebrightpointusingthespectrallineratioFeXII
186/195. Weobtaineddensitieswhichfluctuatein
therangefrom 8 × 108 to 3 × 109 cm−3 withan
averageofabout 2 × 109 cm−3 . Thetime
sequenceofXRT imagestakenwiththeAlpoly
filterwerealsousedtostudythedynamicsofthe
brightpoint. Theplasmapropertiesofthebright
pointwillbecomparedwiththeoutputfroma3D
MHD simulation. The3D modelisacombination
ofastratifiedhydrostaticmodelatmosphereanda
potentialmagneticfieldthatisobtainedusing
potentialmagneticfieldextrapolationfrom
longitudinalmagnetogramfromSOT observations.
Themagneticstructureisstressedbyimposinga
photosphericvelocityflowderivedfromblue
continuumSOT datausingballtracking.
80
P29
CalculationandapplicationofR-matrixelectronimpactexcitationdataforionsofinterestto
astrophysicaldiagnosticmodelling
GuiyunLiang (UniversityofStrathclyde)with
N.R. Badnell
A largenumberofhigh-resolutionandhighqualityspectrahavebeen, andcontinuetobe,
obtainedfromboththeEUV (e.g. Hinode)andXray(e.g. Chandra, XMM-Newton, IXO) regions.
Manyemissionlinesobservedinthesespectraare
potentialdiagnosticsoftheelectrontemperature
anddensityofcoronal-likehotplasmas. Thereare
alsomanyunidentifiedemissionlinesandlarge
discrepanciesinlineintensityratioslikelydueto
unknowncontaminants. Suchdiagnosticsand
associatedlineidentificationsrequireaccurate
atomicdata, especiallyforelectron-impact
excitation.
Theadvantagesoftheintermediate-couplingframe
transformationR-matrixmethod(Griffinetal.
1998)makeitfeasibletoprovideexcitationdata
alongK- andL-shelliso-electronicsequences
coveringasubstantialrangeofastrophysically
importantionsatthehigh-levelofaccuracy
affordedbythe R-matrixmethod. Thisisoneof
thekeygoalsoftheUK AtomicProcessesfor
astrophysicalPlasmas(APAP) network. Herewe
willaddresseffectivecollisionstrengthsalongthe
Ne-likeiso-electronicsequence(Liang&Badnell
2010). Wealsolookataparticularion-Fe13+
(Liangetal. 2010)forwhichalaboratory
measurementhasbeenmade. Weassessthe
accuracyofourexcitationdatainbothcases.
Usingthelatest R-matrixelectron-impact
excitationdata, weanalyzetheEUV andsoftX-ray
spectraofhotplasmas, e.g. stellarcoronaand
electron-beamion-traps. Severalprevious
questionablelineintensityratiosinFe13+ have
beenexplainedsatisfactorilyandsomelinesare
identifiedinastrophysicalsourcesforthefirsttime
withtheaidofalaboratorymeasurement
performedattheHeidelbergEBIT (Liangetal.
2010).
PlasmapropertiesofanX-rayjetfrommultiinstrumentco-observations: SUMER/SoHO,
EIS/XRT/HinodeandEUVI/SECCHI/STEREO A
andB
MariaMadjarska (ArmaghObservatory)
Wewillpresentuniquemulti-instrument
observationsofanX-rayjet-likeeventtakenwith
SUMER/SoHO,EIS/XRT/HInodeand
EUVI/SECCHI/STEREO.Thephenomenonarosein
acoronalbrightpointsituatedattheboundariesof
anequatorialcoronalhole. Thecombinationof
twospectrometerscoveringtogetherthe
temperaturerangefrom10000K to12MK and
thethreeviewpointsofXRT,EUVI A andB
permittedustoderivetheplasmapropertiesand
dynamicsofthisfeature. Weanalysedthe
behaviourofdifferentspectrallinesduringthe
micro-flaringwhichtriggeredthejet-likeevent.
Wealsoobtainedthetemperaturesanddensitiesin
thereconnectionsiteandthesurroundingregion.
Thejetdynamicsanditsplasmapropertieswillbe
discussedindetail. Wewillgiveoursuggestions
forthefutureinstrumentation(spectroscopicand
imaging)andatomiccalculations.
AlfvénIonisationintheSolarPhotosphere
ProchetaMallik (UniversityofGlasgow)with
DeclanA. Diver, Lyndsay Fletcher, HughE. Potts,
and CraigS. MacLachlan
Strongphotosphericflowsnearactiveregions
inevitablyinvolvemixingneutralgasand
magnetisedplasma. Wheretherelativespeed
betweenneutralandplasmaspeciesexceedsa
criticalvalueatwhichtheenergyintheflowis
equaltothefirstionisationpotentialofa
componentspecies, thatspecieswillbeionised.
Thephysicalmechanismisasfollows: theneutral
gasimpingingontheplasmacollideswiththe
positiveionsanddisplacesthem, causingpockets
ofnegativechargeimbalance. Theresulting
electricfieldsaccelerateatailofelectronsto
energiesabovetheionisationthresholdfor
particulargasspecies. Thesenewionsremain
trappedinthemagneticstructure, leadingto
enhancedabundanceinthelowersolar
atmosphere. Wepresentnumericalsimulationsof
theevolutionoftheelectrondistributioninsucha
situation, showinghowafractionoftheaffected
populationreachesenergiesabovetheionisation
thresholdforparticularelements. Thisismost
relevantforlowcriticalionisationvelocity(CIV)
elementssuchasXe, K,Cr, Mn, Feetc, andisa
keydriverofelementover-abundance.
Non-LinearForce-FreeModeloftheSolar
MagneticCarpet
KarenMeyer (UniversityofStAndrews)with
D.H. Mackay, and A.A. vanBallegooijen
WemodelthedynamicalevolutionoftheSun's
magneticcarpet, andconstructanon-linearforcefreecoronalfieldbasedonsurfacemotions.
Ratherthanindependentlyextrapolatingthe
coronalfieldateachtimestep, wemodela
continuousevolutionofthefieldthrougha
magnetofrictionalrelaxationtechnique. Sofarwe
havestudiedenergybuildupwithinthefielddue
tothebasicinteractionsofcancellation,
emergenceandflyby. Themagnetofrictionalcode
hasalsobeendirectlyappliedtoHinode/SOT
magnetogramdatatostudythelocationand
variationoflowcoronalnullpoints.
Detailedobservationsandmodellingofasmall
flare
UrmilaMitraKraev (UniversityofCambridge
(DAMTP)) with G. DelZanna, H. Mason,
S.J. Bradshaw, and A. Asai
Wehaveobtainedaplethoraofspatially- and
temporally-resolvedspectraldataofaB-classflare
withtheEIS spectrometeron-boardtheHinode
satellite. TogetherwithdatafromtheotherHinode
instruments, aswellasGOES,TRACE andthe
NobeyamaRadioHeliograph, adetailedpictureof
theevolutionofthisflareisputtogether. Theflare
showsmany'typical'featuressuchasprecursor
events, brighteningsintheribbons, andhot(10
MK) emissionandsubsequentcooling. However,
anumberoffeaturesarenew, suchasstrongbluewingasymmetriesonlyseeninlinesformed
between1.5and2.2MK.Thetemporaland
temperaturecoverageoftheEIS observations
providesnewinsightsintoourunderstandingof
chromosphericevaporationandcooling. A
numericalsimulationusingtheHYDRAD codeto
studythecoolingofthe10MK plasmaisingood
agreementwiththeobservations. Lineblendingin
somepotentiallyusefullinesforflarediagnosticsis
alsodiscussed.
Theopticaldepthofwhite-lightflarecontinuum
HughPotts (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Hugh Hudson, Lyndsay Fletcher, and Declan Diver
Thewhite-lightcontinuumemissionofasolarflare
remainsapuzzleasregardsitsheightofformation
anditsemissionmechanism. Thiscontinuum, and
itsextensionintothenearUV,containthebulkof
theenergyradiatedbyaflare, andsoits
explanationisahighpriority. Wedescribea
methodtodeterminetheopticaldepthofthe
emittinglayerandapplyittothewell-studiedflare
of2002July15, makinguseoftheMDI intensity
images. Theopticaldepthofthevisible
continuuminthisflareissmall, consistentwiththe
observationofBalmerandPaschenedgesinother
events.
Whatblinkersactuallyare?
SrividyaSubramanian (ArmaghObservatory)with
M.S. Madjarska, J.G. Doyle, and D. Bewsher
Weinvestigateblinkersinanequatorialcoronal
holeregionusingspectral, imagingand
magnetogramco-observationstofindoutwhat
theseblinkersactuallyrepresent. Weusedan
automatedidentificationproceduretoidentify
blinkersinSoHO/CDS O v629Angstromrasters.
WealsoidentifiedbrighteningsinSTEREO/EUVI
FeIX 171AngstromimagesandHinode/XRT Al
polyimagestostudyblinkersatlowercoronal
temperaturesandtofindtheirpossiblecoronal
counterparts, respectively. AllCDS blinkershad
EUVI 171Å counterparts. Identifiedblinkerevents
wereclassifiedintotwogroups, blinkerswith
coronalcounterparts, mostlyassociatedwith
coronalX-rayjets, andblinkerswithnocoronal
counterpartswhichappearaspointedbrightenings
attransitionregiontemperatures. Thelattercould
besignatureofchromosphericfeatures(spicules
or/andmacrospicules)reachingtransitionregion
temperaturesorsimplyrepresentinducedflows
alongsmallscaleloopstructures. Webelievethat
blinkersaretransientEUV responseofvarious
dynamiceventsoriginatinganywhereinthesolar
atmospherewhichcontributetothetemperature
raiseinthetransitionregion.
TheHydrodynamicEvolutionofImpulsively
HeatedCoronalLoops: ExplicitAnalytical
Approximations
DavidTsiklauri (QueenMaryUniversityof
London)with M.J. Aschwanden
Wederivesimpleanalyticalapproximations(in
explicitform)forthehydrodynamicevolutionof
theelectrontemperature T (s, t) andelectron
density n(s, t), forone-dimensionalcoronalloops
thataresubjecttoimpulsiveheatingwith
subsequentcooling. Ouranalytical
approximationsarederivedfromfirstprinciples,
using(1)thehydrodynamicenergybalance
equation, (2)theloopscalinglawsofRosnerTucker-VaianaandSerio, (3)theNeuperteffect,
and(4)theJakimiecrelationship. Wecompareour
analyticalapproximationswith56numericalcases
oftime-dependenthydrodynamicsimulationsfrom
aparametricstudyofTsiklaurietal., coveringa
largeparameterspaceofheatingrates, heating
timescales, heatingscaleheights, looplengths, for
bothfootpointandapexheating, mostlyapplicable
toflareconditions. Theaveragedeviationsfrom
theaveragetemperatureanddensityvaluesare
typically ∼ 20%forouranalyticalexpressions.
Theanalyticalapproximationsinexplicitform
provideanefficienttooltomimictime-dependent
hydrodynamicsimulations, tomodelobservedsoft
X-raysandextreme-ultravioletlightcurvesof
heatedandcoolingloopsinthesolarcoronaand
inflaresbyforwardfitting, tomodelmicroflares, to
inferthecoronalheatingfunctionfromlight
curvesofmulti-wavelengthobservations, andto
providephysicalmodelsofdifferentialemission
measuredistributionsforsolarandstellarflares,
coronae, andirradiance. M.J.Aschwanden, D.
Tsiklauri, Astrophys. J.Suppl. Ser., 185, 171-185
(2009)DOI:10.1088/0067-0049/185/1/171
SpiculesandCoronalHeating
KamalamVanninathan (ArmaghObservatory)with
Maria Madjarska, and J.G. Doyle
Weusemulti-instrumentobservationsofspicules,
lookingforevidenceofwhetherthese
chromosphericfeaturescanalsobedetectedat
coronaltemperatures. WeanalysedCaII H images
fromSOT/Hinode, comparingthemwithdatafrom
EIS/Hinode, plushigh-resolutiondatafrom
SUMER/SoHO.WeobservespiculesattheNorth
polewith10secondcadenceSOT data. A group
ofrotatingspiculesasseenwithSOT areobserved
intheSUMER transitionregionO V 629andN V
1238asamacrospicule. EIS datadonotshow
correspondingfeaturesatcoronaltemperatures.
MagneticreconnectionalongQSLs- amajor
driverofactiveregionoutflows
LidiavanDriel-Gesztelyi (UniversityCollege
London–MSSL) with D. Baker, C.H. Mandrini,
and P. Demoulin
Therelationshipbetweenquasi-separatrixlayers
(QSLs), orinthelimitofinfinitelythinQSLs,
separatrices, andvariousactivityphenomenahas
beenexploredinmanydifferentsolarmagnetic
configurationsacrossallscalesinrecentyears. In
theabsenceofmagneticnulls, fastreconnection
alongQSLs, whicharespecificlocationsinthe
magnetictopologywherefieldlinesdisplaystrong
gradientsofmagneticconnectivity, wasidentified
asthemainphysicalprocessattheoriginofflares.
Recently, itwasshownthatfast(tensofkm/s)
persistenthotplasmaupflowsinactiveregions
(ARs)canalsobelinkedtolocationsofQSLs. Itis
likelythattheseupflowsthatoccurattheedgesof
ARsoverunipolarmagneticfieldconcentrations
areacceleratedbymagneticreconnectionalong
QSLs. Wewillshowmulti-temperaturespectral
scanobservationsfromHinode’sEIS combined
withmagneticmodelingofQSLsintwoARs
observedon20-21February2007and11January
2008. ThelatterAR isobservedandmodeled
whenitisinthevicinityofthesolarcentral
meridianwheretherearenoprojectioneffects,
therebyeliminatingambiguitylinkingtheoriginof
multi-temperatureobservationsofAR upflowsto
QSLs. WeusethePotentialSourceSurfaceModel
tolookforopenfieldlinesinthevicinityof
upflowsandQSL locationsinordertodemonstrate
whethertheseupflowsbecomeoutflowsandcan
contributetothesolarwind.
P30
TheEffelsbergNorthernSkyPulsarSurvey
EwanBarr (MPIfR Bonn)
Pulsarsarerapidlyrotatingneutronstarswhich
emitbeamsofbroadbandradioemissionfrom
theirmagneticpoles. Theextremeconditions
foundinandaroundpulsarsmakethemafantastic
naturallaboratorythroughwhichmanyaspectsof
fundamentalphysicsandastronomycanbe
probed. Assuch, modernpulsarsurveysprovide
themeansthroughwhichwepavethewayfor
newandexcitingscience. Whetheritisanexotic
pulsarwhichpushesthelimitsoftheequation-ofstate, ahighlyaccuratelytimingmillisecondpulsar
(MSP) thatcanbeusedaspartofanarraytodetect
gravitationalwavesoranormalpulsarthatwill
helpmaptheinterstellarmedium, thediscoveryof
newpulsarsinevitablyleadstoanimprovementin
ourunderstandingofoneormoreresearchareas.
Thuswewillcommenceanorthernskyblind
pulsarsurveywiththe100-mEffelsbergradio
telescopecomplimentedbyatwinsearchofthe
southernskywiththe64-mParkestelescope.
AlsopresentedhereisPSR J1745+1017,
Effelsberg'sfirstevermillisecondpulsardetection,
the18thradioFermipulsarsofardiscovered.
Surfaceextractionofelectronsinapulsar
DeclanDiver (UniversityofGlasgow)with A.A. da
Costa, E.W. Laing, C.R. Stark, and L.F.A. Teodoro
Wepresentanoveldescriptionofhowenergetic
electronsmaybeejectedfromthepulsarinterior
intotheatmosphere, basedonthecollective
electrostaticoscillationsofinteriorelectrons
confinedtomoveparalleltothemagneticfield.
Thesizeoftheinteriormagneticfieldinfluences
theinteriorplasmafrequency, viatheassociated
matterdensitycompression. Theplasma
oscillationsoccurclosetotheregionsofmaximum
magneticfieldcurvature, thatis, closetothe
magneticpoleswherethemajorityofmagnetic
fluxemerges. Giventhattheseoscillationshavea
density-dependentmaximumamplitudebefore
wave-breakingoccurs, suchwavescaneject
energeticelectronsusingonlytheself-fieldofthe
electronpopulationintheinterior. Moreover,
photonsemittedbyelectronsinthebulkofthe
oscillationcanescapealongthefieldlinesby
virtueoftheloweropacitythere(andthefactthat
theyareemittedpredominantlyinthisdirection),
leadingtofeaturesinthespectraofpulsars.
GlitchesintherotationofPulsars
CristobalEspinoza (JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics)with A.G. Lyne
A newsearchforglitcheswasperformedusingthe
JodrellBankpulsartimingdatabase, and104new
glitcheswerefoundintherotationof64pulsars.
Combiningthesewiththosealreadypublishedwe
haveputtogetheradatabasecontaining315
glitchesin102pulsars. Thedatabasewasusedto
studytheglitchactivityamongthepulsar
population, findingthatitpeaksforpulsarswitha
characteristicage τ ∼ 10 kyranddecreasesfor
longervaluesof τ , disappearingforobjectswith
τ > 20 Myr. Althoughtoalesserextent, theglitch
activityisalsolowerintheveryyoungpulsars
(τ ∼ 1 kyr). Thecumulativeeffectofglitches, or
thecolectionofmanyspin-upevents, actsagainst
theregularlong-termspindownrateofpulsars.
Thepercentageofthespindownreversedbyglitch
activitywasfoundtovarybetween0.5%and
1.6%forpulsarswithaspindownratebetween
10−14 and 3.2 × 10−11 Hzs−1 , decreasingto
lessthan0.01%towardsbothhigherandlower
spindownrates. Theseratiosareinterpretedin
termsoftheamountofsuperfluidinvolvedinthe
generationofglitches. Inthiscontext, theactivity
oftheCrabpulsarmaybeexplainedbyquake-like
activityonitscrust. Pulsarswithlowspindown
ratesseemtoexhibitmostlysmallglitches,
matchingwellthedecreaseoftheamountof
superfluidrelatedtoglitchactivity.
Theanalysisofglitchsizesindicatesthatthe
particularglitchingbehaviourofPSR J0537-6910
andtheVelapulsarmaybesharedbymostVelalikepulsars. Mostglitchesintheseobjectspresent
thelargestfrequencyandfrequencyderivative
jumpsrecorded, andseemtooccuratregular
intervalsoftime.
P29–P30
81
A betterunderstandingoftheglitchingbehaviour
ofpulsarswillconductustowardsamorerefined
knowledgeofnotonlytheirinteriorsbutalsoof
theirspinevolutionandgravitationalwave
emission.
Testsofgeneralrelativityandbinaryevolution
studiesusingpulsarobservations
RobertFerdman (UniversityofManchester)
A briefreviewwillbegivenofseveralpredictions
ofgeneralrelativity(GR) thatcanandhavebeen
testedthroughtimingobservationsofpulsarsin
binarysystems. Thiswillcover, forexample,
settinglimitsondipolargravitationalradiationand
ongravitationalconstantvariation, aswellas
strong-fieldtests. Alsotobediscussed, iftime
permits, isthestudyofbinarysystemevolution
usingpulsarobservations.
A BayesianSearchForGravitationalWaveRingdownsAssociatedWithPulsarGlitches
IkSiongHeng (UniversityofGlasgow)with
James Clark, Graham Woan, and Matthew Pitkin
Glitchesinpulsartimingarethoughttobe
associatedwithsuddenchangesinthepulsar's
angularmomentum. A fractionoftheexcess
rotationalenergyisthenradiatedawayas
gravitationalwaveemission. Wepresentasearch
fordamped-sinusoidalgravitationalwave
ringdownsusingBayesianmodelselection. We
demonstratehowtheresultfromsuchasearchis
easilyconvertedintoastatementaboutthe
physicalpropertiesofthegravitationalwave
emission.
CarbonatmosphereneutronstarinCassiopeiaA:
YoungestneutronstarintheGalaxy
WynnHo (UniversityofSouthampton)with
CraigO. Heinke
Thesurfaceofhotneutronstarsiscoveredbya
thinatmosphere. Ifthereisaccretionafterneutron
starformation, theatmospherecouldbe
composedoflightelements(H orHe); ifno
accretiontakesplaceorifthermonuclearreactions
occurafteraccretion, heavyelements(e.g., Fe)are
expected. Despitedetailedsearches, observations
havebeenunabletoconfirmtheatmospheric
compositionofisolatedneutronstars. Herewe
reportananalysisofChandraobservationsofthe
X-raysourceinthecentreoftheCassiopeiaA
supernovaremnant. Weshowthatacarbon
atmosphereneutronstarproducesagoodfittothe
spectrum. Ouremissionmodel, incontrastwith
others, impliesanemissionsizeconsistentwith
theoreticalpredictionsfortheradiusofneutron
stars. Thisresultsuggeststhatthereisnuclear
burninginthesurfacelayersandalsoidentifiesthe
compactsourceastheyoungest-known(withan
ageofabout330years)neutronstarintheGalaxy.
LatestHESS observationsofPulsarWindNebulae
DominicKeogh (DurhamUniversity)with HESS
Collaboration
Theconfinementoftherelativisticoutflowsof
pulsarsproducesaluminouspulsarwindnebula
(PWN) seenacrosstheelectromagneticspectrum.
Thesesourcesareoneofthemostprominent
classesobservedbyTeV Cherenkovobservatories
suchastheNamibianbasedHESS telescopes.
NumerousPWN havebeenobservedwithHESS,
whileadditionaldarksourcesmayrepresentrelic
PWN.InthistalkI shalloutlinesomeofthemost
excitingrecentobservationsofpulsarwind
nebulaewiththeHESS telescopes.
82
P30–P31
TheopticalandinfraredcounterpartofSGR
0501+4516
AndrewLevan (UniversityofWarwick)
I willpresentthediscoveryoftheoptical/IR
counterparttothesoft γ−repeaterSGR
0501+4516. Unlikethemajorityofmagnetars,
thisoneliesinthegalacticanticentredirection,
andhasonlymoderateextinction, allowingusto
searchforitscounterpartatlongerwavelengths.
Ourcomprehensivecampaignofobservations
beganonlyanhourafterthefirstactivationofthe
source, andcontinuedfor14months. These
observationsrevealseveralcrucialdiagnosticsof
theIR counterpartofanSGR i)rapidoptical/IR
variabilityshowsaperiodalmostidenticaltothe
X-rayderivedperiod(5.7s), ii)Thelongterm
optical/IR variationappearstotrackthatintheXrayiii)Limitsonthepropermotionsuggestthatthe
spatialvelocityis < 400 km/s, andshowthatSGR
0501+4516isnotassociatedwithanysupernova
remnants, oryoungstellarclusters, afirstfora
magnetar.
Knownpulsarsascontinuousgravitationalwave
sources
MatthewPitkin (UniversityofGlasgow)
Knownpulsarsareapotentialsourceof
continuousgravitationalwavesandtherehave
beenongoingsearchesforthemwithincurrent
gravitationalwavedetectordata. Nosignalshave
yetbeenseen, butbasedontheexpected
sensitivitiesoffuturedetectorsweexaminethe
potentialfordetectingthem. Weexaminewhat
kindofstar(e.g. strangequarkstar, hyperonstar,
ornormalneutronstar)theseobjectswouldhave
tobetoachievedetection. Wealsostudywhat
detectionscouldinferaboutthestrainonthestar's
crust.
TheeffectofGravitationalDistortionof
SpacetimeonPulsarTiming
SatoruSakai (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Graham Woan, and MartinA. Hendry
Theaimofthisresearchistodeterminetheimpact
ofgravitationallensingonpulsartiming, andits
implicationsforthedetectionofgravitational
waves. Gravitationallensingoccurswhena
massivebodypassesclosetotheline-of-sight
betweentheEarthandasource. FromGeneral
Relativity, thiscausesspace-timedistortionswhich
resultinanextrapathlengththatthelightmust
travel, andsubsequentlyadelayinthetimeof
arrival. Thisresearchwilllookattherateof
changeof(gravitational)Shapirotimedelay.
IntermittentRadioEmissionfromPSR B0823+26
NeilYoung (UniversityofManchester)with
M. Kramer, A. Lyne, B. Stappers, and P. Weltevrede
Intermittentpulsarsarecharacterisedbyperiods,
uptoyears, whentheirradioemissionisoff
followedbysimilarlylongperiodswhentheyare
on. Theyofferauniqueinsightinto
magnetosphericphysicsofpulsars. PSR B0823+26
isacandidateofthispulsarclass. Intensive
observationsofthissourcewerecarriedoutwith
theLovellTelescope, atJodrellBank, fromJanuary
toJune2009. Thispulsarhassubsequentlybeen
foundtoexhibitquasi-periodicradioemission
phases, ontimescalesshorterthanthatobservedin
thecanonicalintermittentpulsarB1931+24. Here,
I presenttheresultsandanalysisofthese
observations.
PulsarElectrodynamics: TheRelativisticKinetic
TheoryofRadiativePlasmas—TheGamma-ray
cut-off
AntonioArmandodaCosta (InstitutoSuperior
Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal)with D.A. Diver,
E.W. Laing, C.R. Stark, and L.F.A. Teodoro
Theclassicalmodellingofradiationbyaccelerated
chargedparticlesinpulsarspredictsacut-offin
photonenergyataround25GeV.Whilstthisis
broadlyconsistentwithobservations, theclassical
treatmentisnotself-consistent, andcannotbe
extendedtoexplaintherarehigh-energy
detectionsofphotonsinthe100sofGeV range. In
thispaperwerevisitthetheoreticalmodellingof
high-energyradiationprocessesinverystrong
electromagneticfields, inthecontextofboth
singleparticlesandcollectiveplasmas, which
impliesanextensionoftheVlasovtheoryof
collisionlessplasmas, totakeintoaccount
radiativeprocesses. Therearenoclassical
constraintsonthisdescription. Wefindthatthere
isindeedacriticalenergyofaround50GeV that
arisesnaturallyinthisself-consistenttreatment,
butratherthanbeingacut-off, thiscriticalenergy
signalsatransitionfromradiationthatisclassical
toaquasi-quantumdescription, inwhichthe
particleisabletoradiatealmostitstotalenergyin
asingleevent. Thisnewmodellingtherefore
placespulsarradiationprocessesonamoresecure
physicalbasis, andadmitsthepossibilityofthe
productionofTeV photonsinaself-consistentway.
P31
TheCo-EvolutionofMassiveGalaxiesandtheir
SupermassiveBlackHolesoverthelast11.5Gyrs
AsaBluck (UniversityofNottingham)with
Christopher Conselice, Omar Almaini, Elise Laird,
Kirpal Nandra, and Mark Dickinson
Supermassiveblackholes(SMBHs)arenow
thoughttobeaubiquitousconstituentofmassive
galaxies. Despitetheirrelativelysmall
contributiontothemassofgalaxies(< 1/1000)
theyexertapowerfulinfluenceovertheir
evolution–possiblytriggeringstarformationand
beingultimatelyresponsibleforshuttingthisstar
formationoff. Tightrelationshipsarefoundtoexist
inthelocalUniversebetweenglobalpropertiesof
hostgalaxies(suchasluminosity, stellarmassand
velocitydispersion)andthemassofthecentral
SMBH.Thissuggestsacausalconnectionbetween
galaxiesandSMBHs, thenatureofwhichisstill
poorlyunderstood. I willintroducemyapproach
toinvestigatethiscausalconnectionthrough
probingtheredshiftevolutioninthe MBH - M∗
relation. WeutilizeNIR imagingfromtheHST
GOODS NICMOS Survey(a180orbitHST
programtoimagetheGOODS fieldintheH band)
andthePOWIR Surveyandcombinethistothe
deepestavailableChandraX-raydata. By
constructingavolumelimitedsampleof120
activegalaxiesat z < 3, weconstrainthepossible
evolutionin MBH – M∗ tobelessthanafactor
of2. Moreover, weuseEddingtonargumentsto
calculatethetotalfractionofmassivegalaxiesthat
willundergoanactivephaseintheirevolution
sincez=3, findingthatgreaterthan25%ofall
massivegalaxieswillachieveX-rayluminositiesin
theSeyfertregimeorbrighter. Fromthiswe
deducethatthethetotalenergyreleasedbyAGN
sincez=3isgreaterthan15timesthetotal
bindingenergyofallmassivegalaxiesinthe
Universe, withinthisredshiftrange. Thiscolossal
releaseofenergymusthaveprofoundimplications
ontheevolutionofgalaxies, withmany
ramificationstilltobeproperlyunderstood.
Theimpactoffeedbackontheorbitalcontentof
darkmatterhaloes.
SarahBryan (UniversityofManchester)with
ScottT. Kay, and Shude Mao
Galaxiesarethoughttoformhierarchically,
throughthemergingandaccretionofsmaller
systems. Assuch, thereshouldbeobservational
signaturesofthesemergingprocessesinthe
remnantgalaxy, providingdynamicalinformation
aboutitsformationhistory. Weinvestigatethe
orbitalcontentofdarkmatterhaloesinorderto
explorewhatobservationalsignaturesmayresult.
Todothis, wehaveusedtheOverWhelmingly
LargeSimulations, asetofstate-of-the-arthigh
resolutioncosmologicalhydrodynamical
simulationsrunwithdifferentphysical
prescriptionsforthefeedbackprocesses. We
quantifytheeffectsofthefeedbackprescriptions
onthedynamicsandorbitsofthedarkmatterand
stellarparticles, bycomparingrunswithno
feedback, withstellarfeedbackandwithfeedback
fromAGN.Wecompareresultsofspectral
analysisoftheorbitalcontentofthesesimulations
andquantifythechangeinfractionofboxorbitsas
differentimplementationsoffeedbackare
considered, illustratingtheinfluenceoffeedback
processesontheorbitalcontentofthehaloes. We
alsoinvestigatehowtheorbitalcontentofthese
haloesdependonseveralkeyparameterssuchas
theirmass, redshiftanddynamicalstate.
Theorientationofaccretiondisksandjetsin
quasars
EmilyDown (UK GeminiSupportGroup)with
Steve Rawlings, Devinder Sivia, and Jo Baker
I willdescribehowtheorientationofasampleof
19high-zquasarswasmeasuredby(i)fittingthe
broadH-αlinewithamodelwhichincludesthe
emissionfromaflattened, extendedaccretion
disk; and(ii)bymodellingtheradiospectral
energydistributionwiththeassumptionthatthe
jetsareDoppler-boosted. Resultsare: (i)The
openingangleoftheobscuringtorusisconsistent
withpredictionsoftherecedingtorusmodel; (ii)A
possiblez-dependentvelocityoffsetbetweenthe
narrowlineregionandtheaccretiondiskisfound;
(iii)Misalignedaccretiondisksandradiojets, a
possiblesignatureofarecentgalaxymerger, are
rare.
TheEnviromentsofAGN atz1
JamesFalder (UniversityofHertfordshire)with
Jason Stevens, and Matt Jarvis
WepresentananalysisofalargesampleofAGN
environmentsatz∼ 1 usingstackedSpitzerdata
at3.6um. Thesamplecontainstype-1andtype-2
AGN intheformofquasarsandradiogalaxies,
andspansalargerangeinbothopticalandradio
luminosity. Wefind, onaverage, that2to3
massivegalaxiescontainingasubstantialevolved
stellarpopulationliewithina200-300kpcradius
oftheAGN,constituting a > 8σ excessrelativeto
thefield. Secondly, wefindevidenceforthe
environmentalsourcedensitytoincreasewiththe
radioluminosityofAGN,butnotwithblack-hole
mass. ThisisshownfirstbydividingtheAGN into
theirclassicalAGN types, whereweseemore
significantover-densitiesinthefieldsoftheradioloudAGN.Ifinsteadwedispensewiththe
classicalAGN definitions, wefindthatthesource
over-densityasafunctionofradioluminosityfor
allourAGN exhibitsapositivecorrelation. One
interpretationofthisresultisthattheMpc-scale
environmentisinsomewayinfluencingtheradio
emissionthatweobservefromAGN.Thiscould
beexplainedbytheconfinementofradiojetsin
denseenvironmentsleadingtoenhancedradio
emissionor, alternatively, maybelinkedtomore
rapidblack-holespinbroughtonbygalaxy
mergers.
TheroleoffeedbackinMilkyWaysatellitegalaxy
formationusinghighresolutionsimulations
SamGeen (OxfordAstrophysics)with
Adrianne Slyz, and Julien Devriendt
Weusesub-parsecresolutionhydrodynamic
simulationsoftheMilkyWayathighredshiftto
investigatetheformationoftheMilkyWaysatellite
galaxies. Weanalysetheinfluenceofsupernova
feedbackondwarfgalaxyformation, andthe
efficiencyofreionisationinsuppressingstar
formationinthesmallestgalaxies. Bylocating
galaxiesinourhighredshiftsimulationand
trackingthemtoz=0usingahalomergertree, we
cancompareourresultstopresent-day
observationsandcommentonthehypothesisthat
reionisationhaltsstarformationinthelowestmass
halos. Wealsoconsidertheeffectofaddinggas
physicstosimulationsoftheformationofdwarf
darkmatterhalos, andtheimpactthishasonthe
missingsatelliteproblem.
ClusterandGalaxyEnvironmentsofQuasars
KathrynHarris (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan)with R.G. Clowes, I.K. Sochting,
G.M. Williger, L. Haberzettl, L.E. Campusano, and
M.J. Graham
Usinggalaxyclustersandquasarsitispossibleto
lookatthelargescaleenvironmentofquasarsand
thereforeinferwhichformationmechanisms(e.g.,
mergers, hotgastheory, galaxyharassment)are
mostlikelytooccur. Lookingatthisoverarange
ofredshiftsandquasarluminositiesgivesan
indicationofanyevolutionofthisrelationship.
UsingCanada-France-HawaiiTelescope(CFHT),
CosmicEvolutionSurvey(COSMOS) andImamori
MagellanArealCameraandSpectrograph(IMACS)
data, galaxyclusterredshifts, positions, andshapes
weredetermined. Wherepossible, directional
informationwasconservedinordertogivemore
environmentalinformation. Thisdatacoversan
areaof4sq. degreesintotalandextendstoa
redshiftof0.8fortheIMACS dataand1.3forthe
COSMOS data.
Preliminaryresultsshowthequasarsappeartolie
preferentiallyinadirectionperpendiculartothe
majoraxisoftheclusterassociatedwithit. This
doesnotchangeovertheredshiftrange0.2-0.8.
Preliminaryresultsalsosuggestthatathigher
redshifts(z < 0.5)quasarsliefurtherawayfrom
theclustersthanatlowerredshifts, withquasarsat
redshiftslessthan0.25lyingonaveragebetween
twoandfourMpcfromtheclusterandfor
z > 0.5 theaverageisthreetosixMpc.These
distancesareproject2D distanceandtakenatthe
redshiftofthequasar.
DiskHeating: ComparingtheMilkyWaywith
CosmologicalSimulations
ElisaHouse (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute, UCLan)
with C.B. Brook, B.K. Gibson, P. SanchezBlazquez, and S. Courty
Wepresenttheanalysisoffivesimulationsrun
withdifferentparticleandgrid-basedcosmological
hydrodynamicalcodesandcomparethemwith
observationaldataoftheMilkyWay. Westudythe
velocitydispersionversusagefordiskstarsatz=0
andfindthatthreeofthesimulationsaremore
consistentwithobservationsbyHolmbergetal.
(2008)wherethestellardiskappearstoundergo
continual/secularheating. Theothertwo
simulationsareinbetteragreementwiththe
Quillen&Garnett(2001)observationsthatsuggest
a``saturation"intheheatingprofileforyoungstars
inthedisk. Wealsoanalysethekinematicsofdisk
starsatthetimeoftheirbirthfordifferentepochs
inthegalaxy'sevolutionandfindthatinsome
simulationsstarsareborncoldwithinthediskand
heatduetoacombinationofphysicaland/or
numericalprocesses, whileothersimulations
possessstellarpopulationswhichpresentlittleor
noheatingwithtime. Twoofthemodelswhich
areinbetteragreementwithobservationsofthe
MilkyWay'sstellardiskundergosignificantly
lowerminor-merger/assemblyactivityafterthelast
majormerger, i.e. oncethediskhasformed. Allof
thesimulationsaresignificantly'hotter'thanthe
MilkyWaydisk, aproblemlikelyrootedinthe
underlyingtreatmentoftheheatingandcoolingof
theinterstellarmedium, andtheresolutiondependentdensitythresholdforstarformation.
TheMulti-facetedX-rayactivityofthecomplete
3CRR AGN sampleatz<0.1
ElizabethMannering (UniversityofBristol)with
M. Birkinshaw, D.M. Worrall, D.A. Evans,
M. Hardcastle, R.P. Kraft, and E.S. Perlman
WepresentChandraimagesof9previouslyX-ray
unobservedsourcestocompleteobservationsof
the3CRR low-redshiftradiogalaxysample. The
36sourcesofthecompletesamplealsohave
excellentmulti-wavelengthradiodataandhave
beenimagedwithSpitzer(3.5-160microns)and
withHST.Thesamplespanstheimportant
transitioninradioluminositiesandmorphology
fromFRI toFRII type. Theimagingand
spectroscopyofthecores, jets, hotspotsand
atmosphereswillbeofpermanentlegacyvalue.
Thispostergivesafirstlookatthesedataand
indicateshowweplantoinvestigateparticle
accelerationmechanisms, interactionsbetween
radioplasmaandtheISM andIGM,theemission
mechanismofhotspots, andAGN fuelling
Momentumdrivenfeedbackfromstellarnuclei
RachaelMcQuillin (KeeleUniversity)
InthelastdecadeobservationswiththeHubble
SpaceTelescope(HST) haverevealedthepresence
ofmassivestarclustersatthecentresofthe
majorityoflowandintermediatemassgalaxies.
Anunexpectedobservationalresultisthatnuclear
clustermass, Mnc , scaleswiththevelocity
dispersionofthehostgalaxybulge, σ . The
Mnc − σ relationisanalogoustothatbetween
themassesofcentralsupermassiveblackholes
(SMBHs)andthevelocitydispersionsoftheirhost
galaxybulges. Theobserved M –σ relationcanbe
understoodasaconsequenceofmomentum
conservingfeedbackfromthenucleuswhich
sweepstheambientmediumintoashellthat
expandsintothegalaxy. Thereisacriticalmassof
thenucleusforwhichtheshellcanescapethe
galaxyhencecuttingoffthegrowthofthenucleus
andlockinginthe M –σ dependence. Previous
workhasmodelledthisprocessingalaxieswith
singularisothermaldark-matterhaloes. Inthis
contribution, weextendthisworkandinvestigate
the M –σ relationthatresultsfromnuclear
feedbackingalaxieswithmorerealisticdarkmatterandgasdensityprofiles.
P31
83
TheColdGasContentofBulgelessDiskGalaxies
KatePilkington (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan)with Brad Gibson, ChrisB. Brook,
Greg Stinson, and Francesco Calura
Wepresentananalysisoftheneutralhydrogen
(HI) propertiesofasetoffullycosmological
hydrodynamicaldwarfgalaxysimulations. As
reportedrecentlybyGovernatoetal. (2010), these
simulationsarethefirstoftheirkindtoresultinthe
successfulreproductionofa(dwarf)spiralgalaxy,
withoutanyassociatedstellarbulge. Inablind
experiment, wehavenowsetouttocomparein
detailtheHI distributionandkinematicsofthese
simulatedbulgelessdiskswiththoseofthree
comparabledwarfsfromtheTHINGS (TheHI
NearbyGalaxySurvey)archive. Wewishto
answerthequestion"Arethegaspropertiesofthe
firstsuccessfullysimulatedbulgelessdwarfs
consistentwithobservations?". Todoso, wehave
thusfarextractedfromthesimulations, radialand
verticaldensityprofiles, scalelengths, and
spatially-resolvedmapsofscaleheights(eg.
flaring, warping)andvelocitydispersion(eg.
velocityellipsoid, turbulence). Ourhighest
resolutiondwarfshowsseveraluniqueand
challengingcharacteristics(relativetotheTHINGS
observationsofcomparabledwarfs)whichweare
inthemidstofquantifying, including(i)ahighdensitycoldgascorewithintheinner1kpc(10
timesthedensityatoneHI diskscalelength), (ii)
significant, andcontinual, diskflaringfromthe
innertotheouterHI disk(factorof10increasein
scaleheightperdexincreaseinradius), and(iii)a
significantly(kinematically)colderHI disk(factor
of5lowerlines-of-sightvelocitydispersions,
relativetoHoII,NGC4214, andIC2574). Wewill
discusstheramificationsofourpreliminary
analysesintermsofthedefiningrolesplayedby
energyfeedbackandstarformationthresholdsin
suchcosmologicalhydrodynamicalsimulations.
SearchingforComptonThickAGN atz2indeep
X-rayfields
CyprianRangel (ImperialCollegeLondon)with
Kirpal Nandra, Elise Laird, and James Aird
CurrentlytheX-rayemissionfromAGN failsto
fullyaccountfortheobservedX-rayBackground
(XRB) atharderenergies. Ithasbeentheorizedthis
isduetoapopulationofobscuredAGN thatwe
haveyettoobserve. ComptonThick(CT) AGN
haveobscuringgasofthesurroundingtoruswith
NH > 1024 cm−2 , thustheX-rayemissionfrom
thecentralsourceisheavilysuppressed. We
presenttheresultsofasearchforCT AGN atz∼ 2
indeepX-rayfields. WeidentifyX-raydetected
AGN throughLikelihoodRatio(LR) matchingof
opticalandNIR photometrytoX-raydata.
SometimesCT AGN aredetectedviascatteredor
reflectedX-rayemissionfromthecentralsource,
butatz∼ 2 suchtheseprocessesmaybetoofaint
toyieldadetection. Stackingisthereforeusedto
testforthepresenceofX-rayemissionfrom
candidateCT sourcesselectedviatheirmultiwavelengthproperties.
StellarFeedbackinSPH GalaxyFormation
Simulations
GregStinson (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute, UCLan)
with Chris Brook(UCLan), Jeremy Bailin
(Michigan), Sarah Nicerkson(McMaster),
Hugh Couchman(McMaster), and James Wadsley
(McMaster)
Wepresentastudyofgalaxiesandtheir
accompanyingsatellitedwarfgalaxiesfoundinthe
McMasterUnbiasedGalaxySimulations, aseries
84
P31–P32
of15cosmologicalSPH simulationsofMW
massedobjects. Inthesesimulationsthatforma
rangeofgalaxymorphologies, wefindthatthe
satelliteluminosityfunctionsaresimilartowhatis
foundintheLocalGroupwheneffectivestellar
feedbackisutilized. Oneoftheproblemswiththe
galaxiesformedinthesesimulationsisthedense
centralconcentrationofmatterfoundinevery
galaxy. Weexplorepossiblesolutionstothis
problemusingalternatestarformationandstellar
feedbackrecipes.
Superstarclusterfeedbackfromlocaltogalaxy
scales
MarkWestmoquette (UCL)
Understandingstarburst-drivenoutflowsis
importantformanyreasonswithinthecontextof
galaxyevolution. However, tounderstand
outflowsonthelargescale, thedetailsoffeedback
mechanismsfromindividualstarclustersmustfirst
beunderstood. I willdiscussrecentresultsfroma
numberofhighspatialandspectralresolution
integralfieldspectroscopicstudiesoftheionized
gasenvironmentwithinasampleofnearby
starbursts. Thesestudiesareallowingustobuild
upapictureof(1)howpowerisfedfromsuper
starclustersintothesurroundingISM,(2)howthe
ISM propertiesaffecthowthispowerisdirected,
and(3)howthegasoutflowsevolvestructurally
andenergeticallytowardsthelarger-scales.
Stabilityandevolutionofclustergalaxiesin
MOND
XufenWu (PhysicsandAstronomy, UniversityofSt
Andrews)with Hongsheng Zhao, Yougang Wang,
Benoit Famaey, and Martin Feix
FollowingSchwarzschild'sapproach, weconstruct
aseriesofHernquistmodelsembeddedinexternal
fieldsintheframeworkofMOdifiedNewtonian
Dynamics(MOND).Thesemodelsrepresent
medium-massellipticalgalaxieswithmildcusps
withinagalaxycluster, providingaMONDian
externalfieldontheorderof gext ≈ a0 . UsingNbodysimulations, wefurthertestthestabilityof
thesemodels. WefindthattheSchwarzschild
modelsarenotinrigorousequilibrium. The
outskirtsofthegalaxiesdeveloplopsidedshapes
alongtheexternalfield'sdirection, andtheradii
containing 90%ofthetotalmassincreasebya
factorof 2 during 60 simulationtimes(Newtonian
Kepleriantimesatscalelengthof 1kpc)after
whichthemodelsseemtosettletoastable
equilibrium. Comparingourresultstoanisolated
galaxymodel, theSchwarzschildmodelsin
externalfieldsarelessself-consistentandstable.
P32
StellarmagnetismthroughtheeyesoftheFORS1
instrumentoftheESO VLT
StefanoBagnulo (ArmaghObservatory)with
L. Fossati, C. Izzo, J.D. Landstreet, C. Folsom, and
O. Kochukhov
Duringafulldecadeofoperations, theFORS1
instrumentoftheESO VeryLargeTelescopehas
collectedalargeamountofmagneticfield
measurementsofvariouskindsofstars. Together
withtheESPaDOnS instrumentoftheCanadaFrance-HawaiiTelescope, withtheMuSiCoS and
NARVAL instrumentsofthe2mTelescope
BernardLyotofthePic-du-MidiObservatory,
FORS1hasbeenoneoftheworkhorseinstruments
fortheobservationalstudiesofstellarmagnetism.
Severalinterestingdetectionswereobtained, some
ofthemwereeventuallyconfirmedbyfollow-up
investigations, somewerenot. Wehaveperformed
ahomogeneus(re-)analysisofthefullFORS data
archive, andinthistalkwewillgiveanupdated
reviewoftheincidenceofthestellarmagnetismin
variousclassesofstars.
InvestigatingtheX-rayEmissionofA-typeStars
ThroughtheMagneticActivityofUnresolved
LowerMassCompanions
RobertDeRosa (UniversityofExeter)with
J. Bulger, J. Patience, B. Leland, and B. Macintosh
Wepresenttheresultsofaninvestigationintothe
sourceofX-rayemissionfromnearbyearly-type
stars. ByutilisingtheROSAT All-SkySurvey
(RASS) brightandfaintsourcecatalogues, andthe
preliminaryresultsfromourongoingmultiplicity
surveyofA-typestars.
Bremsstahlungemissionhasbeendetectedfrom
numerousmain-sequencestars, fromO-M.Studies
ofmassivestarsshowX-rayluminosityscalingasa
functionofthestellar-winddensity, suggestingthat
thesestrongradiativelydrivenwindsarethe
primarygeneratingmechanism. Forlessmassive
starstheX-raygenerationisthoughttobeduetoa
dynamoeffectcausedbydifferentialrotation. Stars
frommid-B tolate-A haveinsufficientluminosity
todrivemassivewinds, norhavesufficientlydeep
convectiveenvelopesandshouldtheoretically
havelowX-rayemission. Contrarytothese
predictions, X-rayemissionhasbeendetected
fromnumerousnearbyA-typestars. Thedetection
oftwolow-massstellarcompanionstoX-ray
emittingA-typestars(e.g. AlcorB) wouldsuggest
anX-raygenerationmechanismforthese
anomalousstars- unresolvedcompanions.
Withinthisstudywehavecompiledadistance
limitedsampleofnearbyX-raydetectedA-type
stars, alongsideacontrolsampleofnonX-ray
detectedA-typestars. Thetypicalangular
resolutionachievedinourobservationswas
∼ 0.1"withthenarrowbandexposuresallowing
ustoresolve ∼ 10AU binaries, whilstsensitivityto
thebottomofthemainsequencewasachievedat
∼ 1 − 2"withthelongerbroadbandexposures.
WefindthatagreaterproportionofX-raydetected
A-typestarshaveanassociatedcompanion
comparedwiththoseinthecontrolsample,
suggestingthatunresolvedlow-masscompanions
areindeedasourceofA-starX-rayemission.
Testingtheabilityoffieldextrapolationmodelsto
predicttheX-raypropertiesofpre-mainsequence
stars
ScottGregory (UniversityofExeter)with
E. Flaccomio, C. Argiroffi, J. Bouvier, J.-F. Donati,
E.D. Feigelson, K.V. Getman, G.A.J. Hussain,
M. Ibrahimov, M. Jardine, and F.M. Walter
Byextrapolatingfromobservationallyderived
magneticsurfacemaps, obtainedthrough
Zeeman-Dopplerimaging, modelsofstellar
magnetospherescanbeconstructed. Byassuming
thattheplasmatrappedalongtheclosedfieldlines
isinhydrostaticequilibrium, coronalX-ray
emissionproperties, suchastheglobalX-ray
emissionmeasureandtheamountofrotational
modulationofX-rayemission, canbepredicted.
Forpre-mainsequencemagnetospheresthe
analysiscanbeextendedtoincorporateaccretion
flows, andpredicttheamountofsofterX-ray
emissionfromaccretionspotsthatwouldbe
observed. I willdetailthepreliminaryresultsofan
ambitiousmulti-wavelength, multi-observingsite,
andnearcontemporaneouscampaign, combining
spectroscopicoptical, nIR,UV,X-ray(200ks,
Chandra), spectropolarimetricandphotometric
monitoringoftheaccretingpre-mainsequencestar
V2129Oph. Surprisinglythenewmagneticmap
derivedfromthe2009dataappearstoindicate
thatthesurfacemagneticfieldhasundergonelittle
evolutionsinceitwaspreviouslyobservedin
2005. ThedatasetalsoallowsX-rayemissionfrom
thestellarcoronaandtheaccretionhotspotstobe
disentangledandcruciallyallowsthevalidity, and
thepredictions, ofthe3D fieldtopologiesderived
viafieldextrapolationtobecriticallyexamined.
Stellarmagnetisminsolar-typestars
GaiteeHussain (ESO)
Magneticfieldsplayaroleatalmostall
evolutionarystagesoflowmass(F toM-type)stars.
Onthepre-mainsequence, strongkG fields
channelaccretionfromcircumstellardisksonto
thecentralT Tauristars; whileinolderplanethostingsystemswefindevidenceof
magnetosphericinteractionbetweenplanetsand
theirhoststars.
ZeemanDopplerimagingtechniquesenableusto
mapstellarsurfacemagneticfieldsin
unprecedenteddetail. Magneticfield
measurementsmadefrommagnetically-sensitive
intensitylineprofilesfurthercomplementand
enhancetheinformationgainedfromthesesurface
magneticfieldmaps. Thelatestresultssuggestthat
thesizeandcomplexityofsurfacemagneticfields
differinfullyconvectivestarsandstarswith
radiativecores. A furthertransitionoccursasstars
spindownovertime.
I willreviewourcurrentunderstandingand
demonstratehowmagnetosphericmodelsoflow
massstarsbasedonsurfacemagneticfieldmaps
aretestedusingmulti-wavelengthobservations.
Finally, I willgiveanoverviewoftherichfuture
prospectsofthisfieldinlightofnewinstruments
andfacilities, bothintheshortandlong-term.
MagneticactivityinfastrotatingM-dwarfsabove
andbelowthefullyconvectiveboundary
RobJeffries (KeeleUniversity)with Richard Jackson
Wepresentresultsfromsurveysofcoronaland
chromosphericactivityamongfastrotatingMdwarfsbelongingtotheyoungopenclustersNGC
2547andNGC 2516. Ourtargetsarecoolcluster
memberswithknownrotationperiodscovering
spectraltypesfromK3toM5. Coronalactivity
appearstobecontinuousacrossthefully
convectiveboundary, wherealmostallthefully
convectivestarsexhibitsaturatedX-rayemission.
However, thelevelofsaturatedchromospheric
emissiondeclinesbyfactorsof2-3forstarsof
spectraltypeM3andcooler, coincidingwithboth
thefullyconvectiveboundaryandadramatic
increaseinaveragerotationrates. Noevidencefor
"supersaturation"wasfoundinthechromospheres
orcoronaeoftheM-dwarfs. Wediscussthese
findingsintermsofchangingmagnetictopologies.
TheDopplerShadowofWASP-3b
GrantMiller (UniversityofStAndrews)
Hot-jupiterplanetsforatlargedistancesfromtheir
hoststarsthenmigrateinwardstotheirobserved
orbitalseparations. Themechanismsresponsible
forthisarenotfullyunderstoodbutthespin-orbit
alignmentofthesystemgivescluesastohowthe
planetsmigrated. Thespin-orbitalignmentcanbe
measuredbyanalysingtheRossiter-McLaughlin
effect. Thisistheradialvelocityanomalycaused
byaplanetasittransitsthestellardisc. We
describeanewtomographicmethodforanalysing
theRossiter-McLaughlineffectandpresentthe
resultsofitsapplicationtotheWASP-3system.
Wealsoexplainhowthismethodcanbeusedto
confirmtheexistenceofplanetsaroundearly-type
starspreviouslyinaccessibletoplanethuntersdue
totheirrapidrotationandlackofspectrallines.
TheBigBang!
DanielleBewsher (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan)with D.S. Brown, J.M. Wild, L.M. Green,
G.M.H. Wilkins, M. Marsh, C. Alexander, J. Kelly,
S. Dalla, R.W. Walsh, H.E. Mason, and M. Popescu
Theinfluenceofthestellarwindonclose-ingiant
planets
AlineVidotto (UniversityofStAndrews)with
M. Opher, V. Jatenco-Pereira, and T.I. Gombosi
OutreachduringInternationalHeliophysicalYear
LucieGreen (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
Sincethefirstdiscoveryofextrasolarplanets, more
than300planetshavebeendetected, manyof
themlocatedverynearthehoststar. Becauseof
suchextremeproximity, interactionoftheplanet
withthestarisexpectedtogiverisetoavarietyof
phenomena. Thestellarwindisexpectedto
directlyinfluencetheplanetanditsatmosphere,
e.g., bychangingtheconfigurationoftheplanet's
magnetosphere, producingnonthermalplanetary
magnetosphericradioemissions, etc. Sofar, the
fewtheoreticalworksinvestigatingtheinfluence
ofthestellarwindonthemagnetosphereof
planetswerebasedonsimplifiedtreatmentsofthe
stellarwinds. Wedevelopedthree-dimensional
magnetohydrodynamicsmodelsofstellarwinds
whichenabledustodetermineself-consistently
thecharacteristicsoftheimpactingwindonthe
planet. Underrealisticstellarwindconditions, we
analyzedtheinfluenceofthewindonplanet
migrationbyestimatingthemigrationtime-scale
duetodragforcesexertedbythestellarwindona
hot-Jupiter. Furthermore, wealsoestimatedthe
powerreleasedfromthemagneticinteraction
(reconnection)betweenamagnetizedwindand
themagnetosphereofaclose-ingiantplanet. We
showthatthecharacterizationofthewind
propertiesofthehoststarisessentialforadeeper
understandingofextrasolarplanetarysystems.
P33
Astronomyinthecurriculum. Developmentsat
KS4andKS5
CharlesBarclay (MarlboroughCollegeandOxford
Astrophysics)
Educationisthefuture. Childreninfluenceparents
('thepublic')andthencepoliticalperceptionofa
subject'simportance. Ifinherententhusiasmfor
Astronomyatages10and11canbemaintained
withthepotentialofaqualificationatGCSE,I
believepupilenthusiasmforSciencecanbe
enhancedwiththeaddedbenefitthatthesubject
isequallyappealingtobothgirlsandboysatthis
level. TheGCSE inAstronomycontinuestogrow
exponentiallyandthenewSpecification,
developedwithschoolteachersandprofessional
astronomers, implementedin2009forfirstexam
in2011, lookstoseeanotherhikeinpupil
numbers. AtKS5, thedevelopmentofthe
ExtendedProjectinitiativealsoallowsforin-depth
pupilmotivatedstudyofastronomicaltopicsinthe
sixthform. I willoutlinethecurrentpositionand
discussthepotentialofthesequalifications
The'BigBang'isanationalSTEM outreachactivity
whichstartedNationalScienceweekin2010. The
UniversityofCentralLancashireleda
collaborationofsolarphysicistsfromaroundthe
UK toproducethe'LivingwithaStar'exhibition
standattheBigBang. Thispresentationwill
discussthehighs/lowsandpitfallsoforganising
suchevents!
2007to2009wasdesignatedasInternational
HeliophysicalYeartocelebrate50yearsofspace
scienceandsolarsystemphysics. TheUK joined
inwithaseriesofeventswhichranacrossthe
country. Thistalkwillgiveanoverviewofthe
activitiesthattookplaceandlessonslearned.
DevelopmentofanAll-SkyCameraforOutreach
Activities
MartinHendry (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Giles Hammond
TheChargeCoupledDevices(CCD's)foundin
commercialCCTV camerasofferhighsensitivityat
lowcost. However, intheiroff-the-shelfform
thesecamerasarelimitedtoamaximumexposure
of1/5sbyanelectronicshutterandarethereforeof
littleuseforimagingdeepskyobjects. Withminor
modificationstothecircuitboarditispossibleto
disablethisshutterandcontroltheclockpulses
whichareusedtoreadouttheCCD.Thisallows
forlow-lightimagingofastronomicalobjects.
Overthepastcoupleofyearsanall-skycamera
hasbeendevelopedattheAcreRoadObservatory,
UniversityofGlasgow. Thisdevicecomprisesa
CCTV surveillancecamerainaweatherproofbox
withanacrylicdome. A wideangle(1.6mmfocal
length)lensisattachedtothefrontofthecamera
andthisoffersanalmostfull180degreefieldof
view. Byadjustingtheexposurelengththecamera
isabletooperatebothindaylightandalsoduring
thenight. Fromtheurbanlocationofthe
observatorythisallowsobservationofbrightstars
andthemoon/planetstogetherwithobservationof
cloudstructuresandotherinteresting
meteorologicaleffects.
Thecaptureprogram(developedinMATLAB) is
capableofrunningonanyWindowsXP machine
(connectedtotheinternet)andautomatically
selectsthecorrectexposure/savestheresulting
imageasaJPEG.Theseimagescanthenbe
combinedintoamoviefortheday. A second
cameraisnearingcompletionanditwouldbe
idealifaschool/astronomicalsocietywithadark
skylocationwouldbewillingtohostthisdevice.
Theimagesfromthecameracouldbeuploadedto
theinternetandwouldbeanexcellentoutreach
andlearningtool.
TheScottishSolarSystem
MartinHendry (UniversityofGlasgow)
AspartofaScotland-wideprogrammeofpublic
outreachforIYA2009, the"ScottishSolarSystem"
projectwasapartnershipbetweenGlasgow
University, GlasgowScienceCentreand14
Scottishastronomyclubsandsocieties. The
projectcoordinatedarangepubliceventsacross
P32–P33
85
thecountry, heldatlocationswhich- with
GlasgowScienceCentreastheSun- during
AutumnMoonwatchweekcreatedascalemodel
oftheSolarSystem, withcorrectlyscaledphysical
objectsateachoftheplanetarylocations.
InthistalkI willbrieflyreviewthesuccessesofthe
ScottishSolarSystemproject, andconsiderits
legacyforfutureastronomyoutreacheventsin
Scotlandandbeyond.
IYA 2009ontheBigIslandofHawaii
IngeHeyer (JointAstronomyCentre)with
Janice Harvey(GeminiObservatory),
Peter Michaud(GeminiObservatory),
KumikoS. Usuda(SubaruTelescope),
Gary Fujihara(UniversityofHawaiiatHilo
InstituteforAstronomy), and Shawn Laatsch
(`ImiloaAstronomyCenterofHawaii)
TheInternationalYearofAstronomy(IYA) 2009
combinedtheoutreacheffortsofallthe
observatoriesonMaunaKea, whichincludesthe
UnitedKingdomInfraredTelescope, theJames
ClerkMaxwellTelescopeandtheGeminiNorth
Observatory. IYA allowedtheMaunaKea
ObservatoriesOutreachCommittee(MKOOC) to
brandourannuallocaleventswhiledeveloping
severaluniqueandinnovativeactivitiesand
products. OurflagshipJourneythroughthe
Universe(JTTU) programmeintroducedthe
Galileoscope. JTTU’steachertrainingprogrammes
andfamilyscienceeventswereenhancedwith
IYA cornerstoneactivities. Bycollaboratingwith
ourlocalnewspaper, 70,000copieswere
publishedofaspecialtabloid“StarsOverMauna
Kea”. Ourgroupadditionallycontractedawebsite
onIYA onthelocalnewspaper’swebsitewhichin
2009receivedover1.7millionhits, andwhichhas
beencontinuedforthisyear. Astronomytrading
cardswereproducedforourlocalAstroDayand
theGalileoBlockParty, thelatterbeingourevent
fortheGalileanNightsinvitingtheentirelocal
communitytotheobservatoryfacilities. A poster
contestencouragedlocalstudentstocombine
astronomyandtheirculturalbackgroundina
uniqueartisticexpression. A year-longfree
college-levelintroductoryastronomyclassgave
localteachersastronomycontentandteaching
toolsfortheirclassroomsatallgradelevels. The
directorsofallobservatoriesgavemonthlypublic
presentationsintwolocationsonourisland, and
theMaunaKeaObservatoriesleadoffthe80Telescopes24-hourwebcast. Photosandactivities
fromalleventshavebeenarchivedonour
websitestosharewiththeworld.
UK DarkSkyDiscovery
DanHillier (RoyalObservatoryEdinburghVisitor
Centre)
TheDarkSkyScotlandprogrammehasbeen
runningforthreeyearsinvolvingresearch
astronomers, astronomystudents, amateur
astronomersandsciencecommunicatorsinmore
than60publiceventsatlocationsthroughout
Scotland. IthasestablishedDarkSkyDiscovery
SitesinlocalcommunitiesandaStargazers
Welcomeschemefortourismbusinesses. UK Dark
SkyDiscovery, 2010-2012, aimstorunsimilar
programmesthroughouttheUK basedonsimilar
partnershipsinWales, NorthernIrelandandthe
Englishregions.
86
P33
Beyondconstellationstories: communicating
cutting-edgescienceandengagingnewaudiences
throughnovelplanetariumprogrammingforthe
InternationalYearofAstronomy
OliviaJohnson (RoyalObservatoryGreenwich)
with Claire Bretherton(CarterObservatory), and
Marek Kukula(ROG)
Ofthe1.4millionvisitorsattractedbythewide
rangeofexhibits, events, talks, andworkshopsat
theRoyalObservatoryGreenwich(ROG) during
theInternationalYearofAstronomy(IYA),over
130,000attendedaplanetariumshowatthePeter
HarrisonPlanetarium(PHP).OpenedinMay
2007, thePHP isnowtheonlyplanetariumin
LondonandusestheprogrammableDigistar3
systemtodeliveracombinationofliveandprerecordedshowstoschoolandpublicaudiences.
DuringIYA,theScienceEducationteamatthe
ROG explorednewwaysofexploitingtheintrinsic
excitementandsenseofconnectionwiththenight
skyofferedbyimmersiveplanetariumshowsto
supportandenhancethebroadrangeofscience
communicationeffortsacrosstheObservatory.
Wewereparticularlyinterestedinmovingbeyond
constellation-basedtoursofthenightskyto
communicateup-to-the-minuteastronomical
discoveriesandengagenon-traditionalaudiences
withinthedome.
Inthistalk, I'llreportonavarietyofnew
planetariumcontentproducedattheROG during
IYA,including"VisionsofSaturn", developedin
collaborationwiththeCassini-Huygensteamto
conveytheexcitementoftheirongoingresearchto
familyaudiences, and"Sci-FiUniverse",
developedincollaborationwiththeSci-FiLondon
FilmFestivaltoengagefilm-goingaudiencesinthe
sciencebehindsciencefiction. Lookingtothe
future, I'llaskhowinnovativecollaborationwith
planetariacouldbenefitsciencecommunication
intheUK beyondIYA.
SongsoftheStars: theRealMusicoftheSpheres
DonaldKurtz (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute, UCLan)
with R. Jain, M. Thompson, M. Roth, R. New,
Y. Elsworth, W. Chaplin, I. Roxburgh, and
D. Gough
TheRoyalSocietySummerScienceExhibitionin
2010willbeheldintheSouthbankCentrein
Londonfor9daysfrom26Juneto4Julyin
celebrationoftheRoyalSociety’s350th
anniversary. Wewillhaveanexhibit, “Songsof
theStars: theRealMusicoftheSpheres”, thatwill
beabouthelioseismologyandasteroseismology.
Aspartofouroutreachplanswehavemadetwo
posters-- onegeneralforhomedisplay, andthe
othermoredetailedforclassroomuse- thatwe
willgiveawayas“freebies”tothousandsofthe
30,000peopleexpectedtoattendtheexhibition.
Our“poster”hereatNAM isthedisplayofthese
twofreebieposters, withsomecopiesavailablefor
youtotakeaway, shouldyouwishtodoso. The
productionofthepostershasbeensupportedby
theHelio- andAsteroseismologyNetwork
(HELAS),aCoordinatedActionfundedbytheFP6Infrastructure-ProgrammeoftheEuropean
Commission.
4YearsofPodcasting
StuartLowe (TheJodcast)with JodcastTeam
Since2006wehavebeenproducingaregular
podcastcoveringastronomyandspacescience.
Wereportasummaryofourexperiencesoverthe
pastfouryearsincludingourlistener/viewing
figures, feedbackandadescriptionofourlive
episoderecordedinlate2009.
SchoolsoutreachfortheGlasgowNAM
AlecMacKinnon (UniversityofGlasgow)
PriortoNAM,pupilsinseveralschoolsaroundthe
greaterGlasgowareahavebeenworkingonalittle
researchproject, findingoutalltheycanabout
sunspotsandforminganopinionontheroleof
solaractivityinclimatechange. Theywillpresent
posterssummarisingtheirfindingsatasession
today. Wedescribehowandwhythisprojectwas
setupandgiveatrailerforthepostersession.
Sun|trek- thefinalfrontier
HelenMason (UniversityofCambridge)with
Sun|trekteam
Sun|trek(www.suntrek.org)isawebsiteaboutthe
SunanditseffectontheEarth. Itisaimedat
schoolchildren. Itisgrowingfromstrengthto
strength, withover14,000userspermonth
worldwide. Itisnowlinkedtomanywebsites
(NASA,RAS,IoP,schoolscienceandtheBBC).
WehavesomefundsfromSTFC toupdateSun|trek
andwouldlikesomehelpandideasfromour
youngersolarresearchers. Findoutmore...
TheMusicoftheSunasaStar
RichardMorton (UniversityofSheffield)with
R. Erdélyi
TheSun, atypicallate-typestar, isahighly
dynamicplasmathreadedbyarathercomplexand
ubiquitousmagneticfield. Thismagneticfield
providesthefoundationsforawidevarietyof
plasmastructureinthesolaratmosphere. Among
suchstructuresaree.g. coronalloops(huge, often
hundredsofMmlongmagneticloops), coronal
holes(openmagneticstructures)orprominences
(eruptivemagneticstructures, frequentlycausing
disruptionsinspaceweatherconditions). Because
oftheirelasticnature, eachofthesemagnetic
featuresinthesolaratmospherecansupportan
arrayofmagneto-hydrodynamic(MHD) oscillatory
modes. Fromaphysicalpointofview, thereare
twofundamentallydistinguishabletypesof
oscillatorymodesthatattractattention.Transversal
oscillationsofcoronalloops, drivenexternallyby
eruptivesolarflares, whichcanbethoughtof
analogoustosomeonepluckingaguitarstring. On
theotherhand, therearelongitudinaloscillations
ofmagneticloops, driveninternallyby
nano/micro-flares, whicharesimilartosomeone
blowingawindinstrument. Inthissense, the
ubiquitousmagneticoscillationsofthesolar
atmospherearethemusicoftheSun!
Theoscillatorymodesofmagneticstructuresare
determinedbytheinternalphysicalparametersof
thesestructures(e.g., strengthofmagneticfield,
temperature, density). ObservingtheMHD
oscillationsprovidesauniqueandunprecedented
methodforobtainingcrucialinformationabout
theotherwisedirectlyunobservable, internal
propertiesofsolaratmosphericplasma. This
technique, calledsolarmagneto-seismologyor
coronalseismology, isanalogoustothetraditional
seismologyoftheEarthwherefromdetecting
earthquakesattheEarth'ssurface, geologists
derivetheinternalsub-crustpropertiesofEarth.
Magneto-seismologyisarapidlyemergingfieldof
solarandspacephysicsprovingunprecedented
insightintosolarandstellarmagneticstructures.
Themethodreliesonthecomparisonof
theoreticallyderivedpredictionstoobservations
andapplyingtheobservationstodeterminethe
otherwiseunmeasurable, localplasmaparameters,
e.g. themuch-sought-aftermagneticfieldandits
finestructureinthesolarcorona. Understanding
accuratelytheplasmapropertiesinthesolar
atmosphereisvitalforthepredictionofspace
weatherevents, whichhaveadirectimpacton
mannedspacemissions, lifehereonEarthand
maintainingpowergridsandsatellites.
BeyondIYA2009: SustainableScience
Engagement
SteveOwens (IYA2009)
FollowingthesuccessofIYA2009, agreatdealof
momentumandexpertiseinpublicengagement
hasbeendevelopedamongsttheastronomy
communityintheUK.
Howmightthismomentumbesustained, and
whatisnextforUK astronomyoutreach?
SteveOwens, UK Co-ordinatorforIYA2009
TheSocietyforPopularAstronomy'sTelescopes
forSchoolsProject
HelenWalker (STFC RutherfordAppletonLab)
TheSPA startedplanningfortheInternationalYear
ofAstronomy(IYA2009)inApril2007, and
decidedtheywouldtryandsend1000telescopes
to1000secondaryschoolsintheUK.Theproject
provedtobeagreatsuccessandaroundonequarterofUK secondaryschoolsnowpossessa
70mmrefractingtelescopewithsupportmaterials.
Workingwithteachers, aDVD wasprofessionally
producedwithinstructionsonhowtosetupand
usethetelescope, alessonplan, interviewsand
additionalinformation. STFC fundedthepurchase
ofthetelescopesandtheRAS fundedthe
productionoftheDVD.TheSPA providedanew
areaontheirwebsitetosupportthethree
moonwatchperiodswhenschoolswere
encouragedtousethetelescopes, andSPA
volunteerslookedaftertheproject. Over85%of
theschoolswhorespondedtoasurveyattheend
oftheyearsaidthetelescopewasavaluable
additiontotheirschoolsresources. Aroundtwothirdsoftheschoolshaduseditmorethanfive
times, andtherewereover200entriesinthe
competitionforMoon-relatedartwork. Itis
estimatedthatmaybe25,000to50,000children
havelookedthroughoneofthetelescopesduring
IYA2009.
ChallengesofPublicEngagementwithChildrenin
Care
AlisonWallace (UniversityCollegeLondon–
MSSL)
Childreninpubliccareareyoungpeoplewhoare
inthecareoflocalauthoritiesorwhoarelooked
afterbyfostercarersorinchildren'shomes. These
childrenaremorelikelytofallbehindatschool
withonly13%ofattainingfivegoodGCSEs
comparedwith62%ofallchildren. Theyalso
haveamuchhigherstatisticalchanceofbecoming
unemployedwhentheyleaveschool. Thereare
around60,000childreninpubliccareintheUK at
anyonetimeandweexaminethechallenges
facedbythespacesciencecommunitytoengage
withthem. Wediscussthereasonsthatchildrenin
carearelesslikelytoachievetheirpotentialand
thefactorsthatshouldbetakenintoaccountwhen
organisingactivitiesforthem. Weinvestigate
ongoingschemesincludingtheLetterboxcluband
lookatthefuturedirectionofoutreachactivities
includinganoutlineofaproposedprojectatUCLMSSL.
DidtheSunEarthPlanworkout?
JimWild (LancasterUniversity)with
sunearthplan.netteam
sunearthplan.netisaSTFC-fundedpublic-facing
outreachprojectdesignedtoinformthegeneral
publicoftheimportanceofsolarsystemresearch
andhighlighttheUK'sleadingroleinthisfield. In
ordertoachievethisaim, theprojecthasbrought
togetherresearchscientists, professionalwebdesignersandpublishedsciencewriters.
LaunchedinFebruary2007, tocoincidewiththe
launchoftheInternationalHeliophysicalYear, the
sitehasattractedover400,000uniquevisits(with
monthlyvisitspeakingatnearly20,000)and
interestfromboththeonlineandtraditional
media. Visitorfeedbackindicatesthatthemajority
ofvisitorsarewithinthetargetaudience- adult
membersofthegeneralpublicunconnectedwith
scienceorteaching, roughlyhalfofwhichwere
previouslyunawareofUK activitiesinspace
research. Assuch, sunearthplan.netisasuccessful
andcost-effectiveexampleofanonlinescience
andtechnologyoutreachproject. Inthis
presentationwehighlighttheproject'ssuccesses,
reflectonthegreatestchallengesandsummarise
thelessonslearnedthatmightbeappliedtoother
projectsinthefuture.
P34
Magneticfluxemergenceandcoronaleruptions
intheSun
VasilisArchontis (UniversityofStAndrews)with
AlanW Hood
Oneofthemostimportantprocesses, responsible
formanydynamicalphenomenaobservedinthe
Sun, istheemergenceofmagneticfluxfromthe
solarinteriorinactiveregionsandthe
modificationofthecoronalmagneticfieldin
responsetotheemergence.
Inthistalk, wepresentnewresultsfrom3D
numericalMHD models, whichhavebeenusedto
studytheprocessofmagneticfluxemergenceinto
successiveatmosphericlayers. Wediscussthe
recentprogressandtheconnectionbetweenflux
emergenceandpossibleinitiationmechanismsof
eruptiveeventsintheSun.
Medium- andsmall-scaletransientsinthesolar
wind
MarioBisi (AberystwythUniversity)with
A.R. Breen, G.D. Dorrian, J.A. Davies, and
R.A. Fallows
Co-ordinatedobservationsofwhite-lightscattering
fromthesolarwindmadebytheSTEREO
heliosphericimagers(HIs)andinterplanetary
scintillation(IPS) fromtheEISCAT facilityinMay
2007revealedthepresenceofsignificantsmallandmedium-scalestructure(onscalesoftensof
thousandstohundredsofthousandsofkilometers)
movingatspeedscomparabletothatoftheslow
solarwind. Thesestructureswereassociatedwith
significantmagneticfieldrotationinthe
interplanetarymedium, andappeartobeclosedor
quasi-closedloop-likefeatures. Wediscussthese
observationsintermsofthelighttheycastonslow
windstructure, andpresentawidersetofslow
windobservationswhereweinvestigatethe
presenceofsmall- andmedium-scaleirregularities
asacomponentofslowwindoutflow.
AnomalousSolarCyclesandtheEvolutionof
CoronalHoles
BarbaraBromage (JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan)with Steven Chapman
A summaryoftheanomalousbehaviourofsolar
cycle23iscomparedwiththatofthe15-year
cycle(cycle4)attheendofthe18thcentury. A
meansolarcycleisderivedandusedtocompare
thecharacteristicsofthiscyclewithcycle23. For
example, bothexhibittimeswhentheirevolution
departsfromthatofthemeancyclefor2or3
years; priortothat, bothappeartoexhibitaphase
shiftofabouthalfasolarcycleinadvanceofa
regular11-yearcycle(beginningwithzeroshiftat
cycle1). SOHO-CDS synopticdatahavebeen
usedtostudytheevolutionofcoronalholes
throughoutcycle23, atthesametimederivingthe
variationintotalopenflux. In1998, thetwo
hemispheresdevelopedalagofabout2years,
whichcanbeseentoleadtoadelayinthestartof
thenextsunspotcycle, resultinginanextended
solarminimum. Aswellaspredictingthenewcyclestart, thedatasuggestthatcycle24willbe
weak, lastinglongerthanthetypical11years.
ChiantiPy- A PythonInterfacetoCHIANTI
KenDere (GeorgeMasonUniversity)
Pythonisafree, modern, object-oriented
programminglanguagethatiswellsuitedto
scientificdataanalysis. A commandlineversion
forusewithinaPythonshellisunderdevelopment
andwillbereleasedinthenearfuture.
Programmatically, eachionintheCHIANTI
databaseistreatedasanobject, providingagood
matchtothestructureoftheCHIANTI database.
ForanyionintheCHIANTI database, ChiantiPyis
abletocalculateandplotlevelpopulations,
spectrallineemissivities, contributionfunctions,
G(n, T ), free-freeandfree-boundcontinua, and
lineintensityratiosasfunctionsoftemperature
andelectronandprotondensity.
A pre-releaseversioncanbefoundat
http://sourceforge.net/projects/chiantipyandthe
currentdocumentationat
http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.
RapidOscillationsintheSolarAtmosphere
GarethDorrian (Queen'sUniversityofBelfast)
with D.B. Jess, M. Mathioudakis, D.J. Christian,
F.P. Keenan, R.S.I. Ryans, and P.J. Crockett
RapidOscillationsintheSolarAtmosphere
(ROSA) isahigh-cadence, highresolutionimaging
systemforstudyingthedynamicsolaratmosphere.
ROSA consistsofsixcameraswhichcanbetuned
toobserveatdifferentwavebandsextendingfrom
thenearinfra-redtothenearultra-violet. This
capabilityenableshigh-cadencecharacterisation
ofsolaratmosphericphenomenaatmany
wavebandssimultaneously. TheROSA cameras
cantakeupto30framespersecondinfullchip
modeorupto200framespersecondin
windowedchipmode. AttachedtotheDunnSolar
TelescopeatSacramentoPeak, NewMexico;
ROSA isnowavailableasanopenuserinstrument
fortheUK solarphysicscommunity. Thisposter
presentsasummaryoftheinstrumentcapabilties
andsomeearlyresultsfromobservingcampaigns.
Amongtheearlyresultsarehigh-cadencemultiwavebandobservationsofintergranularmagnetic
brightpoints, activeregions, sunspots, andlimb
observationsofsolarprominencesandspicules.
P33–P34
87
LargeamplitudetransverseoscillationsinamultistrandedEUV prominence, triggeredbytransient
disturbances
JenniferHarris (UniversityofWarwick)with
C. Foullon, V.M. Nakariakov, and E. Verwichte
Wepresenttheanalysisoftwosuccessivetrainsof
largeamplitudetransverseoscillationsinanEUV
prominence, observedontheNorth-Eastlimbon
30July2005. Theoscillatorytrainsaretriggered
bytransientdisturbancesproducedbytwo
successiveflares, whichoccurredabout10hours
apartinthesameremoteactiveregion(located
justnorthoftheequator, around500Mmfromthe
prominence). WeusetheSOHO/EIT 195 Åimages
witha12minutecadencetocompareoscillatory
propertiesspatially, indifferentstrandsofthe
prominence, andbetweenthetwosuccessively
excitedoscillatorytrains. Theevolutionofthe
prominence'sapparentheightabovethelimbis
determinedusing304/195 Åimageratiosfrom
SOHO/EIT,andthiscorrectionisappliedto
accountforthesolarrotation. Thevarious
filamentarystrandsareseentoexhibitdifferent
oscillatorybehaviour, intermsoftheiramplitudes,
phasesandperiods. Thelargestamplitudes, which
occurattheprominenceapex, areover20km/s
forthefirstoscillatorytrainandaround5km/sfor
thesecond, whiletheperiodatthislocationis
approximately90minutesinbothcases. Some
strandsshowdecayingoscillationswithadecay
timeofabout6hours, whileoscillationsofother
strandsaredecaylessandlastforsevencycles. We
discusshowtheobservationsmayshedlighton
thenatureoftheoscillationsandthetriggering
mechanism.
TheMagneticPropertiesofFlaringActiveRegions
PaulHiggins (TrinityCollegeDublin)with
PeterT. Gallagher, D. ShaunBloomfield, and
R.T. JamesMcAteer
TheSolarMonitorActiveRegionTracking(SMART)
algorithmisanautomatedsystemfordetecting,
tracking, andcatalogingmagneticfeatures
throughouttheirevolutionanddecay. TheSMART
methodwillformthebasisofactiveregion
extractionandtrackingwithintheHeliophysics
IntegratedObservatory(HELIO).Magnetic
propertiessuchastotalflux, fluximbalance, flux
emergencerate, Schrijver'sR-value, R*(a
modifiedversionofR),andFalconer's
measurementofnon-potentialityaredetermined
forindividualfeaturesthroughoutsolarcycle23.
SolarflaresmeasuredbytheGOES andHSI
instrumentsareassociatedwithdetectedfeatures,
andtherelationshipbetweenflaresizeand
magneticpropertyvalueispresented.
HardX-RayStructureofLoopFootpointsina
SolarLimbFlare
EduardKontar (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Natasha Jeffrey, Iain Hannah, and Marina Battaglia
Weapplynewly-developedX-rayvisibilityforward
fittingtechniquetoRHESSI dataofawell-observed
limbflaretoinvestigatetheenergyandheight
dependenceonsizes, shapes, andpositionofhard
X-rayfootpointsources. Thepositions, thevertical
extentsandthewidthsofhardX-raysourcesare
measuredasafunctionofenergy. Our
observationssuggestthattheverticaland
horizontalsizesoffootpointsaredecreasingwith
energywhilehigherenergyemissionoriginates
progressivelydeeperinthechromosphere. The
characteristicwidthsofthehardX-rayfootpoint
sourcealongthelimbdecreasewithheightand
areconsistentwithaconvergingmagneticfieldin
88
P34
thefootpoint. TheverticalsizesofX-raysources
arelargerthanpredictedbycollisionalthick-target
transportinasingledensityscaleheight
chromospherebutcanbeexplainedusingamultithreadeddensitystructureoftheloop.
Newsolarprominencediagnosticswith
EIS/Hinode
NicolasLabrosse (UniversityofGlasgow)with
B. Schmieder, and P. Heinzel
Observationsofasolarprominenceobtainedwith
theExtremeUltravioletImagingSpectrometer(EIS)
onHinodeareanalysed. Theobserveddecreasein
brightnessofEUV coronallinescanbeduetotwo
basicmechanisms: absorptionandemissivity
blocking. Theabsorptionofcoronallineradiation
inEUV isduetothephotoionisationofhydrogen,
neutralandionizedhelium. Thesecond
mechanismisthevolumeblocking, duetothe
presenceofcoolplasma, oroflowdensityhot
plasma(cavity). Weillustratethesemechanisms
usingseveralEIS spectralwindows, and
concentrateontherasterat256A whichcontains
theHeII lineblendedwiththreeothercoronal
lines. Wepresentatechniquetoremovetheblend
betweentheselines, takingintoaccountthe
absorptionandemissivityblockingofthecoronal
lines, toretrievethetrueHeII lineprofileinorder
tomakeadiagnosticoftheplasmaindifferent
partsoftheprominence.
KineticAlfvénwavesandprotonvelocity
distributioninthesolarwind
XingLi (AberystwythUniversity)
Observationsofthesolarwindhaveshownthat
protonvelocitydistributionfunctionshave
distinctiveshapes: inthefastsolarwindtheproton
temperatureinthedirectionperpendiculartothe
backgroundinterplanetarymagneticfieldishigher
thanintheparalleldirection. Thissuggeststhata
continuousheatingmechanismisneeded. The
currentunderstandingofincompressibleMHD
turbulenceincreasinglypointstotheimportance
ofkineticAlfvénwaves. Astheenergyatlarge
scalesisconvertedtosmallerscales, MHD
turbulencetheorydictatesthattheturbulentwave
numberwillincreaseintheperpendicular
directionwhiletheparallelwavenumberislargely
unchanged. Weinvestigatetheeffectofkinetic
Alfvénwavesonthevelocitydistributionfunctions
ofprotonsinthesolarwind. Firstweuselinear
Vlasovtheorytoobtainthepropertyofkinetic
Alfvénwaves. Thesewavespropagateinthe
directionalmostperpendiculartothebackground
magneticfield. Wethennumericallysimulatehow
thesewaveswillheatprotonsandshapethe
protonvelocitydistributionfunctions. Atalmost
perpendiculardirection, wavesareusually
regardedasnearelectrostatic. However, wewill
showthatthemagneticfieldofthesewavescan
notbeneglected.
Simulationsofmagneticfluxemergencewithan
overlyingfield
DavidMacTaggart (StAndrews)with A.W. Hood
MHD simulationsoffluxemergenceallowoneto
modelthelarge-scalestructureofthedynamic
evolutionofactiveregions. Modelsthatinclude
anoverlyingmagneticfield, fortheemergingfield
tointeractwith, allowforthepossibilityof
interestingphenomena, suchasCME initiation. In
thistalkwewillconsidersomeoftheseeffectsand
discusstheirimplications.
Phasemixingofnon-linearAlfvénwaves
JamesMcLaughlin (NorthumbriaUniversity)with
I. DeMoortel, and A.W. Hood
Weconsiderthebehaviourofnon-linear, nonidealAlfvénwavepropagationwithinan
inhomogeneousenvironmentinboth1D and2D
andfindclearevidencefortheponderomotive
effectandvisco-resistiveheating. The
ponderomotiveeffectgeneratesalongitudinal
componenttothetransverseAlfvénwave–witha
frequencytwicethatofthedrivingfrequency.
Analyticalworkshowstheadditionofresistive
heating. Thisleadstoasubstantialincreaseinthe
localtemperatureandthusthermalpressureofthe
plasma, resultinginmaterialbeingpushedalong
themagneticfield. ConsideringAlfvénwave
propagationin2D withaninhomogeneous
densitygradient, wefindthattheequilibrium
densityprofileissignificantlymodifiedbyboththe
flowofdensityduetovisco-resistiveheatingand
thenon-linearresponsetothelocalisedheating
throughphasemixing.
SDO/AIA responsetocoronalhole, quietsun,
activeregionandflareplasma
BrendanO'Dwyer (UniversityofCambridge)with
Helen Mason, and GiulioDel Zanna
Weexaminethecontributionofspectrallinesand
continuumemissiontothechannelsofthe
AtmosphericImagingAssembly(AIA) ontheSolar
DynamicsObservatory(SDO) indifferentregions
ofthesolarcorona. Syntheticspectrawere
obtainedusingsampledifferentialemission
measures(DEM) forcoronalhole, quietsun, active
regionandflareplasma. Thesesyntheticspectra
wereconvolvedwiththeeffectiveareaofeach
channel, inordertodeterminethedominate
contributionindifferentregionsofthesolar
corona. Wehighlightthecontributionofparticular
spectrallineswhichundercertainconditionscan
dramaticallyaffecttheinterpretationofSDO/AIA
data.
Alfvénwavephase-mixinganddampingintheion
cyclotronrangeoffrequencies
JamesThrelfall (UniversityofStAndrews)with
I. DeMoortel, and K.G. McClements
ThephasemixingofshearAlfvénwaveshasbeen
proposedasamechanismforsolarcoronalheating
[1]andsuchwavesmayalsoplayanimportant
roleinflareheatingandparticleacceleration[2].
Anytreatmentofshear-Alfvénwaveswith
frequenciesthatareasignificantfractionoftheion
gyrofrequencymusttakeintoaccounttheHall
terminthegeneralisedOhm'slaw. Weusea
numericalscheme, Lare2D,toinvestigatehowthe
phase-mixinganddampingofashear-Alfvénwave
areaffectedbytheinclusionoftheHallterm,
whichsplitsitintoaleft-circularlypolarisedion
cyclotronwaveandaright-circularlypolarised
whistlerwave. Thepresenceofatransverse
gradientinwavepropagationspeedcauseswave
dampingtooccurviaphase-mixing(Heyvaertsand
Priest[1]), whichcanbeaffectedbythedispersive
propertiesoftheioncyclotronandwhistlerwaves.
RunningLare2D forthecaseofasinglesmall
amplitudeperturbation, wehaverecoveredresults
obtainedbyHoodet. al. [3]intheMHD limit.
Wearenowusingthecodetomodelthedamping
ofsuchapulseintheHall-MHD regime, andin
thepresenceofequilibriumgradients.
ThisworkwasfundedbytheEngineeringand
PhysicalSciencesResearchCouncil, througha
CASE awardandgrantEP/G003955, andbythe
EuropeanCommunities, underthecontractof
AssociationbetweenEURATOM andCCFE.The
viewsandopinionsexpressedhereindonot
necessarilyreflectthoseoftheEuropean
Commission.
[1]Heyvaerts, J.andPriest, E.R., Astron.
Astrophys. 117, 220(1983)[2]McClements, K.G.
andFletcher, L., Astrophys. J.693, 1494(2009)
[3]Hood, A.W., Brooks, S.J., andWright, A.N.,
Proc. R.Soc. Lond. A,458, 2307(2002)
Automateddetectionandtrackingofmagnetic
fragmentsindecayingsolaractiveregions
FraserWatson (UniversityofGlasgow)with
Lyndsay Fletcher
Thebreakupanddecayofsolaractiveregionsisa
processthatiscurrentlynotwellunderstood. To
providemoreinsightintothenatureofthedecay,
wehavedevisedamethodforautomatically
detectingmagneticfragmentswithinactiveregions
andtrackingthemthroughmultipleimages. Thisis
doneusing96minutemagnetogramstakenbythe
MDI instrumentonboardSOHO andgivesus13
yearsofconsistentdatatoworkwith. A catalogue
ofactiveregionfragmentshasbeencompletedfor
theyear2001, duringthepeakofthelastsolar
cycle, andhasallowedustolookatphysical
propertiesoftheindividualfragments, tracktheir
positionand'propermotion'andexaminethe
overallfragmentdistributions. Wehopetousethe
cataloguetodeterminepossiblecausesofactive
regionbreakupandlookforanytrendsthatexist
inthisprocess. I willpresenttheresultsofthis
preliminaryanalysisofthe117,242fragments
detected, alongwithsomeideasforfutureuseof
thealgorithmsandcatalogue.
P35
FIRST Explorer- spacebornelow-frequencyradio
astronomyusingpassiveformationflying
JanBergman (SwedishInstituteofSpacePhysics)
with Richard Blott, Alistair Forbes,
David Humphreys, David Robinsson, and
Constantinos Stavrinidis
Space-bornelow-frequencyradioastronomyhas
beenidentifiedasakeyscienceapplicationfora
conceptualpathfindermission, usinganovel
space-flightconceptcalled“passiveformation
flying”. Themission, FIRST Explorer(Formationflyingsub-IonosphericRadioastronomyScience
andTechnology), iscurrentlyunderstudybythe
EuropeanSpaceAgency(ESA).Itsobjectiveisto
demonstratepassiveformation-flyingandto
performuniquesciencewithaveryhigh
serendipityfactor, byopeninganewfrequency
windowtoastronomy. Traditionally, formationflyingrequirescontinuousandminutecorrections
oftheorbitalelementsandattitudesofthe
spacecraft. Thisincreasesthecomplexity, and
associatedrisk, ofcontrollingtheformation, which
oftenmakessuchstudiesinfeasiblefor
technologicalandeconomicreasons. Passive
formation-flyingoffersaremedytothose
problems. Spacecraftinapassiveformationare
allowedtodriftandrotateslowly, butbyusing
advancedmetrologyandstatisticalmodelling
methods, theirrelativepositions, velocities, and
orientationsaredeterminedwithveryhigh
accuracy. Themetrologydataisuseddirectlyby
theradioastronomypayloadtocompensatefor
spacecraftmotionsinsoftware. Thenormallyvery
stringentspacecraftcontrolrequirementsare
therebyrelaxed, whichsignificantlyreduces
missioncomplexityandcost.
Hydroxidecatalysisbondingresearchfor
astronomicalapplications
NicolaBeveridge (UniversityofGlasgow)
TheInstituteforGravitationalResearchatthe
UniversityofGlasgowhasawellestablished
historyintheresearchofhydroxidecatalysis
bondingforgroundandspacebasedgravitational
wavedetectorapplications. Hydroxidecatalysis
bonding, usedtobondsilicasuspensionelements
tosilicamirrorsandforbondingsilicaopticsto
Zerodur, producesstrong, thermallyconductive
andlowlossbonds. Thetechniquecanbeapplied
tomanyother(oxide)materialsandisthereforeof
interestforalternativepurposes, including
astronomicalprojectssuchastheExtremelyLarge
TelescopewherePZT materialisbondedtosilicon
orsiliconcarbide, oropticalfilterapplications
wherecoatedsilicasubstratestocanbebonded
ontosilicadiscsinordertotransfercoatings. This
presentationisaimedatgivingabriefoverviewof
theresearchofafewoftheseapplications.
HARMONI - A UK ledfirstlightspectrographfor
theE-ELT
FraserClarke (UniversityofOxford)with
Niranjan Thatte(PI)
HARMONI isavisible/near-infraredintegralfield
spectrographcurrentlybeingconsideredasoneof
thefirstlightinstrumentsforthe42-mEuropean
ExtremelyLargeTelescope. HARMONI will
providemedium-highresolution
(R∼ 5000 − 20000)spectroscopyintheV-K
bands(0.47-2.5microns)overanextendedfieldof
upto10x5arcseconds. Itwillprovidearangeof
pixelsscalesof40mas/pixeltosamplethe
telescope'sGLAO correctedPSF,downto
4mas/pixeltosamplethediffractionlimited
imagesprovidedbytheATLAS-LTAO system.
I willoutlinethekeysciencecasesforHARMONI,
rangingfromextrasolarplanetstohighredshift
galaxies, alongwiththekeytechnologieswhich
willmakeHARMONI possible.
TheHARMONI consortiumisUK-led(University
ofOxfordandUKATC),withFrenchandSpanish
partners, andoffersthepossibilityofkeyUK
involvementintheE-ELT attheveryearliest
opportunity. Alongwith7otherinstruments,
HARMONI hasrecentlycompletedaphaseA
conceptualstudyforESO.
LumpedElementKineticInductanceDetectors
suitableforlargearraysofastronomical
detectors.
SimonDoyle (CardiffUNiversity)with
Phil Mauskopf
TheLumpedElementKineticInductanceDetector
(LEKID) isasimpletofabricate, superconducting
devicesuitableforuseinlargemultiplexed
detectorarrays. TodatetheLEKID has
demonstrated200microndetectionofacryogenic
blackbodysourceandsuccessfultestingofa
demonstrationarrayoperatingat2mmonthe
IRAM telescopeinOctober2009. Duetoits
combinedabsorbinganddetectingelementsthe
LEKID isanextremelysimpledetectortofabricate
requiringonlyonedepositionandetchstepto
produceanarrayofupto1000pixelsbeing
multiplexedontoasinglefeed-line. TheLEKID is
alsoaverycompactdetectormakingitidealfor
producingarrayswithhighfillingfactors. The
suitabilityoftheLEKID foruseinlargearrayshas
promptedareturnvisittotheIRAM telescopewith
adualbandinstrumentin2010. Thispresentation
willgiveanoverviewoftheLEKID detectoraswell
asitsuseoutsidethemmandsubmmastronomy
bands.
Milli-kelvincoolerfortheXMS instrumentonthe
InternationalX-rayObservatory
IanHepburn (UniversityCollegeLondon–MSSL)
Theworldsfirstcryogenfreeflightworthy
adiabaticdemagnetisationrefrigeratorforthe
coolingofcryogenicdetectorsto50mK was
deliveredtoESA inJune2008. Thissystemwas
developedbyMSSL inassociationwithEADS
AstriumundercontracttoESA anddevelopedasa
technologydevelopmentfortheXEUS mission
(nowrenamedtheIXO).TheADR wasconstructed
asasetofsub-systemsinordertoenablechanges
intechnologyandrequirementsatalaterdateto
beintegratedintothesystem. Vibration
qualificationwasperformedonthesub-systemsto
Ariane5levels.
Inthispresentationwepresentdetailsofthe
deliveredADR,itssub-systems, theproposed50
mK coolerforthecoolingoftheTES detectorson
theX-raymicrocalorimeterspectrometer
instrument(XMS) fortheInternationalX-ray
observatoryandongoingdevelopmentinheat
switchtechnologywhichwillenableacontinuous
ADR tobeconstructed.
High-PrecisionInterferometryandLow-Loss
materialsforfutureGravitationalWave
Observatories
StefanHild (UniversityofGlasgow)
Large-scaleMichelsoninterferometersformthe
coreofcurrentandfutureGravitationalWave
Antennas. SincethedaysofAlbertMichelsonand
EdwardMorley, thesensitivityofMichelson
interferometershasbeenimprovedbymorethan
12ordersofmagnitude. Tofurtherimproveour
abilitytoscantheskyforgravitationalwavesignals
avarietyofinnovativeinterferometrictechniques
andlowlossmaterialsarerequired. Thiswilllead
to2ndand3rdgenerationdetectorssuchas
AdvancedLIGO andtheEinsteinTelescope.
Thistalkwillsurveycurrent/futuretechniquesin
interferometrysuchassqueezedlight, optical
rigidityandotherQuantum-Non-Demolition
techniques. Furthermore, thepropertiesofSilicon
asacryogenicmaterialandthenovelconceptofa
monolithicreflectorbasedonmicro-structured
surfaceswillalsobepresented. Thisallowsthe
fabricationofhighlyreflectivemirrorswithoutthe
useofdifferentmaterials, whichresultsisan
opticalcomponentwithalowthermalnoise.
Reducingriskincryogenicinstrumentdesign:
thermalconductivitymeasurementsatthe
CryogenicInstrumentationResearchLab
JuliaKennedy (InstituteforAstronomy, University
ofEdinburgh)with A.L. Woodcraft
Poorknowledgeofthephysicalpropertiesof
materialsisaseverelimitationoncryogenic
design, andasinstrumentsincreaseincomplexity
whilebudgetsshrinkthislackofknowledgeis
posinganincreasingrisktocostsandschedules.
Furthermoremanynewmaterials, particularly
polymers, offertheprospectofimproved
performancebutthereislittleinformationontheir
cryogenicproperties.
P34–P35
89
Unfortunately, veryfewgroupscapableofmaking
usefulmeasurementsareabletodevotesignificant
timetodoingso. AttheCIRL (Cryogenic
InstrumentationResearchLaboratory), weare
carryingoutasystematicprogrammeof
measurementsofthethermalandelectrical
propertiesofmaterialsfrombelow4K toroom
temperature, concentratingonthoseofusein
largecryogenicinstruments.
ThesemeasurementsarepartofaUK government
fundedprogrammetoimprovetheabilityto
constructcryogenicinstrumentsinbothacademia
andindustry.
Wepresenttheresultsofinitialmeasurementsand
discussourplansforthenearandlonger-term
future.
Noveldeformablemirrordevelopmentsfor
astronomyapplications
MelStrachan (UKATC)
TheUKATC hasbeencollaboratingisaseriesof
projectsdirectedtowardsaddressingtheadaptive
opticchallengesposedbytheEuropeanExtremely
largetelescope. Wehavedevelopednovel
technologicalsolutionsforbothlargedeformable
mirrorsfortelescopewavefrontcorrection, and
miniaturedeformablemirrorsforusewithin
instruments. Ourlargedeformablemirrorsurface
material, acompliantfromofsiliconcarbide,
offersaYoung'sModuluscomparabletoglassbut
withgreater, non-catastrophic, resistanceto
fracture. Incombinationwiththeextraordinary
newmaterialwehavebeenworkingonanewlow
90
poweractuatorwithadeflectioncapabilityoftens
ofmicrons.
Adaptiveopticrequirementsforinstrumentation
suchasEAGLE fortheEuropeanextremelylarge
telescopepresentanenormouschallengeto
deformablemirrortechnology. Wehave
developedauniqueapproachusingfabricated
arraysofmultilayeractuatortechnologytoaddress
therequirementsofactuatordensityand
deflection. Ourprogrammeofworkhas
uncoveredanovelapproachwhichhasledtoa
builtintestcapability. Wewillpresentthe
outcomesofourworkwhichwebelievewilllead
toacompactdeformablemirror.
Probingtheatmospheresofextrasolarworlds
withadedicatedmissionfromspace
GiovannaTinetti (UCL) with M. Swain,
M. Tessenyi, M. Ollivier, G. Vasisht, P. Deroo,
J.P. Beaulieu, T. Henning, and THESIS team
TheTHESIS missionconceptisaspace-based,
modestcost, lowtechnicalriskmissioncapableof
characterizingtheatmospheresofexoplanets,
includingsuper-Earthsinthehabitablezone.
Significantly, THESIS doesnotrequirenew
technology. Buildingonthesuccessesofthe
SpitzerandHubblespacetelescopes, THESIS
wouldbehighlyoptimizedforsystemstability(1
partin 105 )andwoulddeliverphoton-noiselimitedspectroscopyandphotometryoverthe
crucial0.5–16micronwavelengthrange. This
rangeofwavelengthscontainssignaturesofwater,
methane, ammonia, carbonmonoxide, and
numerousothermolecules, andincludes
moleculesofpotentialprebioticsignificance.
Becausemoleculesserveasprobesof
composition, conditions, andchemistry, molecular
spectroscopyofthedaysideandnightsideregions
ofexoplanetatmospheresisthemostpowerful
toolavailableforstudyingtheseobjects. THESIS
wouldbethefirstmissionexplicitlydesignedto
characterizeplanetswherelifecouldexist; THESIS
wouldprofoundlyadvanceourunderstandingof
thephysicalconditionsandlikelythehistoriesof
exoplanets, rangingfromhot-JovianstosuperEarths. THESIS wouldbealow-costUS-European
missionwithenormousdiscoverypotential.
Astronomyatthehighestenergies: theCherenkov
TelescopeArray
RichardWhite (UniversityofLeeds)
Very-HighEnergy(VHE) γ−rayastronomyis
dominatedbyImagingAtmosphericCherenkov
Telescopes(IACTs)andisreliantuponthe
detectionofCherenkovradiationfromelectronsin
cascadesinitiatedbyastrophysical γ−rayshighin
theEarth'satmosphere. Resultsfromthelatest
generationoftelescopes, suchasHESS,MAGIC
andVERITAS haverevealedaskyrichwith
differentclassesofVHE object.
StillthelimitsoftheIACT havenotyetbeen
reached, andtopushthehigh-energyfrontierof
photonastronomytheCherenkovTelescopeArray
(CTA) hasbeenproposed. Comprising50-100
IACTsoftwotothreesizes, CTA willprovidean
orderofmagnitudeincreaseinsensitivityfrom
∼ 3 × 1010 to ∼ 1014 eV.Despitetheextreme
energies, CTA willpossessthebestsensitivityand
angularresolutionatanyenergyabovethehardXrayband.
Index of Authors
Abdulgalil, Ali, 63
Achilleos, N., 52
Achilleos, Nicholas, 52, 58
Agalya, G., 75
Agueda, Neus, 68
Aguilar-Rodriguez, E., 75
Aird, James, 84
Akeson, R., 73
Al-Salti, Nasser, 59
Alexander, C., 54, 85
Alexander, Caroline, 48
ALFALFA Team, 44
Allard, France, 51
Allende-Prieto, Carlos, 45
Almaini, Omar, 82
Anderson, J.P., 46
Andrews, D.J., 67
Andrews, David, 65
Antonova, A.E., 52
Arce, H., 63
Archontis, Vasilis, 87
Argiroffi, C., 84
Argo, Megan, 71
Arridge, C.S., 58, 66
Arridge, Chris, 51, 66
Aruliah, A.L., 67
Asai, A., 80
Aschwanden, M.J., 81
ASPERA team, 59
Austin, Matthew, 45
Avison, Adam, 45
Awad, Zainab, 64
Aylward, Alan, 79
Bacon, D.J., 50
Baddeley, L., 67
Badnell, N.R., 80
Bagheri, Gemma, 61
Bagnulo, Stefano, 84
Bailin, Jeremy, 84
Baillie, Orsolya, 65
Bains, Indra, 73
Bains, William, 42
Baker, D., 81
Baker, Deb, 54
Baker, Deborah, 48
Baker, Jo, 83
Bakunina, I.A., 60
Baldry, Ivan, 76
Baldry, IvanK., 45
Ballai, I., 61
Ballai, Istvan, 60
Balogh, Andre, 59
Barclay, Charles, 85
Bareford, Michael, 73
Barker, Michael, 78
Barlow, M., 51
Barlow, MichaelJ., 58
Barnsley, Robert, 49
Baron, F., 73
Baron, Fabien, 72
Barr, Ewan, 81
Barstow, M.A., 58
Basa, S., 57
Bassett, B., 77
Battaglia, Marina, 68, 88
Baugh, C.M., 63
Bayet, Estelle, 64, 64, 65
Beaulieu, J.P., 90
Beggan, C., 79
Beggan, Ciaran, 65
Benisty, Myriam, 72
Bennet, Euan, 58
Benson, A., 57
Benson, A.J., 63
Benson, Kevin, 75
Bentley, Robert, 75
Bento, Joao, 49
91
Berger, J.P., 72
Bergman, Jan, 89
Bernard, J.-P., 78
Best, P.N., 44
Best, Philip, 44, 63
Beswick, R.J., 50
Beswick, Rob, 71
Beveridge, Nicola, 89
Bewsher, D., 54, 81
Bewsher, Danielle, 52, 85
Bian, Nicolas, 68
Bibby, Joanne, 45
Bingham, R., 59, 70
Binks, A., 73
Birch, M.J., 79
Birkinshaw, M., 83
Bisi, Mario, 75, 87
Blake, R., 61
Blake, Rob, 54, 62
Blanc, AnjaLe, 75
Blott, Richard, 89
Bluck, Asa, 82
Bonfield, Dave, 62
Borg, A., 47
Bouvier, J., 84
Bower, Richard, 77
Bradshaw, S.J., 80
Bradshaw, Steve, 79
Braidwood, L., 48
Breen, A.R., 75, 87
Bretherton, Claire, 86
Brockley-Blatt, C., 54
Bromage, B.J.I., 54, 79
Bromage, Barbara, 87
Brook, C.B., 83
Brook, Chris, 56, 84
Brook, ChrisB., 45, 84
Brooke, John, 54, 75
Brookes, Mairi, 63
Brown, D.S., 52, 54, 85
Brown, John, 68, 70
Browne, Ian, 44
Browning, P.K., 68
Browning, Philippa, 68, 73
Brunner, RobertJ., 77
Bruno, R., 54
Brunthaler, Andreas, 71
Bryan, Sarah, 83
Buckle, Jane, 46
Buffington, A., 75
Bulger, J., 84
Bulger, Joanna, 63
Bunce, E.J., 66
Bunclark, Peter, 62
Burge, Christina, 68
Burke, Claire, 43
Burningham, Ben, 77
Buscher, D., 73
Buscher, David, 72, 72
Butters, Oliver, 55
Byrne, JasonP., 75
Cairns, R.A., 59, 70
Calura, Francesco, 84
Cameron, A.C., 55
Cameron, Andrew, 42
Cameron, AndrewCollier, 73
Cameron, Ewan, 44
Campusano, L.E., 83
Cano, Zach, 70
Caputi, Karina, 62
Cardoso, Catia, 51
Cargill, Peter, 79
Carlberg, R., 57
Carozzi, Tobia, 55
Carpenter, J., 63
Carpineti, Alfredo, 43
Carr, C.M., 53
Carr, Chris, 53
Caswell, James, 45
Cayless, Alan, 55
Cecconi, B., 52
Cernicharo, J., 51
CFHTLenS team, 72
Chaizy, P.A., 47
Chaplin, W., 86
Chapman, S.A., 54
Chapman, S.C., 47
Chapman, Sean, 64
Chapman, Steven, 87
Charalambous, A., 67
Charnley, Steven, 64
Chashei, I.V., 75
Che, Xiao, 72
Chesneau, Olivier, 72
Chiavassa, A., 73
Chisham, G., 53
Chorley, Nicky, 60
Christian, D.J., 87
Christian, Damian, 60
Christie, Helen, 64
Christodoulou, Leonidas, 43
Christopher, Natalie, 64
Churcher, Laura, 51
Cilliers, P., 67
Cioni, Maria-Rosa, 61, 61, 62, 79
Clark, J.S., 46
Clark, James, 82
Clark, Simon, 46
Clarke, Ellen, 65
Clarke, Fraser, 89
Clarke, J.T., 52
Clementini, Gisella, 62
Clements, D.L., 50
Clements, David, 49
Clilverd, Mark, 65
Clover, J.M., 75
Clowes, R.G., 83
Coates, A.J., 52, 66
Coates, Andrew, 66
Cole, S., 63
Collings, MarkP., 64
Collins, C., 43
Collins, Ross, 54, 61, 62
Colombi, Stephane, 56
Conley, A., 57
Conselice, Christopher, 82
Contursi, A., 64
Cooper, Heather, 46
Coppin, K., 44
Corder, S., 63
Cormier, Diane, 64
Couchman, Hugh, 84
Courty, S., 83
Cowley, S.W.H., 52, 65--67
Cran-McGreehin, A.P., 70
Creech-Eakman, M., 73
Crockett, P.J., 87
Crockett, Philip, 60, 60
Crooker, Nancy, 75
Cross, A.W., 59, 70
Cross, N., 61
Cross, Nicholas, 62
Cross, Nick, 54
Crothers, S., 53
Crowther, Paul, 45
Culhane, Len, 48, 54
Cunningham, Colin, 42
CurtisLake, Emma, 44
daCosta, A.A., 81
daCosta, AntonioArmando, 82
Dai, Y., 69
Dall'Ora, Massimo, 62
Dalla, S., 54, 85
Dalla, Silvia, 68
92
Dalton, Gavin, 44
Dandouras, I., 47
Dandouras, Iannis, 46
Darling, Jeremy, 44
Dasso, S., 75
Davies, B., 46
Davies, Ben, 46
Davies, J.A., 47, 53, 59, 75, 76, 87
Davis, C.J., 59, 76
Davis, Chris, 75
Davis, Christopher, 75
Davis, Gary, 49
Davis, Olaf, 56
Davs, C.J., 53
Dawson, Ewan, 65
Day-Jones, Avril, 77
DeMoortel, I., 61, 88
DeRosa, Robert, 84
Deane, Roger, 63
DEBRIS consortium, 51
Decin, L., 51
DeJong, J., 64
DelZanna, G., 48, 80
DelZanna, Giulio, 48
Demoulin, P., 75, 81
Demoulin, Pascal, 74
DePasquale, Massimiliano, 70
Dere, Ken, 87
Deroo, P., 90
Devriendt, Julien, 56, 83
Diamond, Phil, 73
Dickinson, Mark, 82
Dickson, Ewan, 68
Dilday, B., 77
Dimbylow, T.G., 47
Ding, Jiaoyang, 80
Diver, D.A., 82
Diver, Declan, 80, 81
Diver, DeclanA., 58, 80
Dominguez, SantiagoVargas, 48
Donati, J.-F., 84
Donati, Jean-Francois, 73
Dorrian, G.D., 87
Dorrian, Gareth, 87
Dougherty, M.K., 66, 67
Dougherty, Michele, 53
Dougherty., M.K., 52
Down, Emily, 83
Doyle, Gerry, 51
Doyle, J.G., 52, 76, 80, 81
Doyle, Simon, 89
Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidiavan, 74
Driver, Simon, 44
Dufour, P., 58
Dunlop, J.S., 44
Dunlop, James, 62
Dunlop, Jim, 63
Dunlop, M.W., 47
Duthie, Roger, 46
e-MERGE consortium, 63
Eastwood, Jonathan, 47
Edberg, N.J.T., 67
Efstathiou, George, 42
Egami, E., 56
Eke, V.R., 57
Eldridge, John, 78
Ellis, Richard, 78
Elsworth, Y., 86
Emerson, Jim, 62
Erdélyi, R., 60, 61, 86
ESA,50
Escoubet, C.Philippe, 47
Escoubet, C.P., 47
Espinoza, Cristobal, 81
Evans, A., 46
Evans, Christopher, 46
Evans, D.A., 83
Eyles, C.J., 52, 53
Eymeren, Janinevan, 71
Eyres, S.P.S., 46
Falcke, H., 50
Falder, James, 83
Fallows, R.A., 75, 87
Famaey, Benoit, 72, 84
Farihi, Jay, 58
Fazakerley, A.N., 47, 48, 54, 76
Fazakerley, Andrew, 46
Fear, Robert, 74
Fedeli, Cosimo, 71
Feigelson, E.D., 84
Feix, Martin, 71, 72, 84
Fender, R., 50
Fenech, Danielle, 71
Ferdman, Robert, 82
Ferguson, A., 78
FermiGBM Collaboration, 70
Ferreras, Ignacio, 44, 56, 78
Findlay, Joseph, 62
Finger, Lars, 63
Fischer, J., 64
Flaccomio, E., 84
Fletcher, Lyndsay, 48, 69, 80, 89
Fludra, Andrzej, 53, 53
FMOS team, 44
Folsom, C., 84
Forbes, Alistair, 89
Forgan, Duncan, 55
Fornacon, K-H., 47
Forsyth, C., 47, 48
Forsyth, Colin, 47
Forsyth, RobertJ., 59
Fossati, L., 84
Fouchez, D., 57
Foullon, C., 88
Frankland, Victoria, 64
Franz, M., 67
Fraser, Morgan, 70
Freeman, M.P., 53
Frenk, C.S., 63
Frenk, Carlos, 56
Freytag, B., 73
Fujihara, Gary, 86
Fujiki, K., 75
Fullekrug, Martin, 66
Fuller, G,50
Fuller, Gary, 45, 64, 64, 65
Gérard, J.-C., 52
Gaensicke, Boris, 76
GalaxyZooteam, 43, 55
GALEX Collaboration, 78
Gallagher, Peter, 75
Gallagher, PeterT., 88
Galsgaard, K., 74, 80
Galsgaard, Klaus, 74
GAMA Team, 43--45
Garrett, M., 50
Garrington, Simon, 49, 71
Garza, K., 47
Gaunt, C.T., 67
Geach, Jim, 44, 77
Geballe, T.R., 46
Geen, Sam, 83
Gentile, Gianfranco, 72
Genzel, R., 64
Getman, K.V., 84
Ghodsi, Hoda, 56
Gibson, B.K., 83
Gibson, Brad, 84
Gibson, BradK., 45
Gillespie, K.M., 59, 70
Gilmore, G., 57
Giunta, A.S., 75
Glubokova, S.K., 75
Goldstein, M., 47
Gombosi, T.I., 85
Gonzalez-Esparza, A., 75
Gonzalez-Solares, Eduardo, 62
GordonEmslie, A., 69
Gordon, James, 72
Gordon, K.D., 78
Gordovskyy, Mykola, 68
Gough, D., 86
GraciaCarpio, J., 64
Grady, Keith, 69, 69
Graham, David, 48
Graham, M.J., 83
Grande, M., 59, 67
Granot, Jonathan, 70
Gray, Norman, 55
Greaves, Jane, 51
Green, James, 45
Green, L.M., 85
Green, Lucie, 48, 54, 85
Green, LucieM., 74
Gregory, Scott, 84
Grey, Malcolm, 73
Griffin, E.M., 67
Griffin, Matt, 50
Grocott, A., 47, 52
Grocott, Adrian, 66
Grocutt, Emma, 72
Grodent, D., 52
Guandalini, Roald, 62
Guio, P., 52, 58
Guo, Jingnan, 69
Gupta, Jennifer, 44
Gürkan, Gülay, 71
H-ATLAS team, 51
Haas, M., 64
Habergham, Stacey, 46
Haberzettl, L., 83
Hailey-Dunsheath, S., 64
Haines, C., 56
Hall, Elizabeth, 63
Hallinan, G., 52
Hallinan, Gregg, 51
Hambly, N., 61
Hambly, N.C., 58
Hambly, Nigel, 54, 55, 62
Hamilton-Morris, Victoria, 56
Hammond, Giles, 85
Hancock, B.K., 54
Haniff, C., 73
Haniff, C.A., 73
Haniff, Chris, 72
Hannah, Iain, 48, 68, 69, 88
Hapgood, M.A., 47
Hapgood, Mike, 47, 53, 75
Hara, H., 48
Hardcastle, M., 83
Hargreaves, John, 79
Harniman, R., 77
Harper, Graham, 73
Harra, L.K., 48, 76
Harra, Louise, 54
Harra, LouiseK., 49
Harris, Jennifer, 88
Harris, Kathryn, 83
Harrison, Michael, 74
Harrison, Richard, 53
Harrison., R.A., 76
Harvey, Janice, 86
Hatchell, Jennifer, 42
Haubois, X., 73
Haynes, Andrew, 74
He, W., 59
Heald, George, 50
Heavens, Alan, 72
Hebden, Kerry, 64
Heinke, CraigO., 82
Heinzel, P., 88
Hellier, C., 42, 55
Hempel, M,62
Hendry, Martin, 57, 85
Hendry, MartinA., 56, 57, 82
Heng, IkSiong, 82
Henning, T., 90
Hepburn, Ian, 89
HerMES Consortium, 51
HerschelMESS Keyprojectconsortium, 58
HESS Collaboration, 82
HeViCS Consortium, 51
Heyden, Kurtvander, 50
Heyer, Inge, 86
Heymans, Catherine, 72
Heywood, Ian, 63
Hick, P.P., 75
HIFI consortium, 50
Higgins, Paul, 88
Hild, Stefan, 89
Hill, David, 44, 44
Hillier, Dan, 86
Hnat, B., 47, 60
Ho, Wynn, 82
Hoare, M.G., 46
Hodgkin, Simon, 62
Hodgson, Lisa, 63
Hoekstra, Henk, 71, 72
Holliman, M., 61
Holliman, M.S., 55
Holliman, Mark, 54, 55
Holme, Richard, 66
Homeier, Derek, 51
Honary, F., 67, 79
Hood, A.W., 88
Hood, Alan, 48
Hood, AlanW,87
Hook, I., 57
Horbury, Tim, 75
Horn, Markus, 57
Horne, RichardB., 79
Hornig, Gunnar, 74, 74
House, Elisa, 83
HowelI,V.S.C., 67
Howell, D.A., 57
Hoyle, B., 50
Hsieh, Henry, 58
Huang, Zhenghua, 80
Hudson, Hugh, 60, 80
Humphreys, David, 89
Humphries, Thomas, 65
Hussain, G.A.J., 84
Hussain, Gaitee, 85
Hutcheon, Richard, 78
Hutchinson, James, 66
Hutchinson, M.G., 47
Huxor, Avon, 55, 77
Ibar, Edo, 44
Ibata, R., 78
Ibrahimov, M., 84
Indebetouw, R., 78
Inglis, A.R., 60
Irwin, M., 78
Irwin, Mike, 62
Isella, A., 72
Ivanov, V,62
Ivison, R.J., 44
Izzo, C., 84
Jackson, B.V., 75
Jackson, Brendan, 57
Jackson, Neal, 71
Jackson, Richard, 85
Jaffe, Andrew, 76
Jain, R., 86
Jain, Rekha, 74
JamesMcAteer, R.T., 75, 88
James, P.A., 46
James, PhilA., 45
Jansari, Kishan, 61
Jardine, M., 84
Jardine, Moira, 52
Jarvis, Matt, 50, 62, 83
Jatenco-Pereira, V., 85
Jeffrey, Natasha, 88
Jeffries, Rob, 85
Jensen, E.A., 75
Jess, D.B., 87
Jess, David, 60, 60
JodcastTeam, 86
John, Daniel, 57
Johnson, Olivia, 86
Johnston, Russell, 44
Jones, Geraint, 59, 66
Jones, GeraintH., 59
Jones, Hugh, 77
Jones, Mark, 55
Jones, Olivia, 78
Jonsson, Jakob, 57
Josselin, E., 73
Jurgenson, C., 73
Kanani, Sheila, 66
Kataria, D.O., 54
Kavanagh, A.J., 68
Kaviraj, S., 43
Kaviraj, Sugata, 78
Kawata, Daisuke, 45
Kay, ScottT., 83
Keenan, F.P., 87
Keenan, Francis, 60
Kellett, B.J., 52, 59, 70
Kellett, Stephanie, 66
Kelly, Gemma, 66
Kelly, J., 54, 85
Kelvin, Lee, 44, 44
Kemper, Ciska, 64
Kemper, F., 78
Kennedy, Grant, 51
Kennedy, J., 75
Kennedy, Julia, 89
Keogh, Dominic, 82
Ker, Louise, 63
Khotyainstev, Yu. V., 47
Kidd, Robert, 59
Kiessling, Alina, 72
Kim, Hansik, 63
King, Robert, 51
Kipping, David, 58
Kirk, J.M., 51
Kistler, L., 47
Kitching, Tom, 72
Kivelson, M.G., 52
Kiyani, Khurom, 47
Klaas, U., 64
Klockner, Hans-Rainer, 63
Kochukhov, O., 84
Koda, J,63
Kontar, E.P., 48, 69
Kontar, Eduard, 68--70, 88
Kosch, M., 67
Kosch, M.J., 67
Kotze, P., 67
Kraemer, K.E., 78
Kraft, R.P., 83
Kramer, M., 82
Kraus, Stefan, 72
Krause, O., 64
Kukula, Marek, 75, 86
Kunawicz, Nadya, 65
Kurtz, Donald, 86
Kuznetsov, Alexey, 51
Laakso, H., 47
Laatsch, Shawn, 86
93
Labrosse, Nicolas, 88
Lacerda, Pedro, 58
Lacey, C.G., 63
Lagadec, E., 78
Laing, E.W., 81, 82
Laird, Elise, 82, 84
Lampeitl, H., 77
Lamy, L., 52, 65, 67
Landstreet, J.D., 84
Lang, Pauline, 52
Langer, Norbert, 78
LAT Collaboration, 70
Lavraud, B., 47
Lavraud, Benoit, 75
Lawrence, Andy, 63
Lawrie, Craig, 57
LeBlanc, Anja, 54
Leech, Jamie, 45
Leier, Dominik, 78
Leland, B., 84
Lemke, D., 64
Lester, M., 47, 66, 67
Lester, Mark, 53, 66
Levan, A., 71
Levan, A.J., 71
Levan, Andrew, 82
Lewis, G., 78
Lewis, Gethyn, 66
Lewis, James, 62
Li, Baojiu, 72
Li, Chuan, 69
Li, Xing, 88
Liang, Guiyun, 80
LIGO ScientificCollaboration, 71
Lim, Jeremy, 73
Lin, Bob, 42
Linden, RonaldVander, 73
Lindsey, C.A., 60
Linker, J.A., 75
Lintott, Chris, 55, 75
Linz, H., 64
Littlefair, Stuart, 52
Liu, Siming, 69, 69
Livi, S., 54
LOFAR imagingcommissioningteam, 50
Logue, Joshua, 57
Lotz, S.I., 67
Louarn, P., 54
Loveday, Jon, 43, 77
Lowe, Stuart, 86
Lu, Q.M., 80
Lucas, Philip, 62
Lucek, E., 47
Lucek, Elizabeth, 46, 53, 53
Lui, A., 47
Lumsden, S.L., 46
Luna, Marialejandra, 60
Lutz, D., 64
Lykou, Foteini(Claire), 72
Lyne, A., 82
Lyne, A.G., 81
Maccio, Andrea, 72
Macdonald, Erin, 44
Macintosh, B., 84
Mackay, D.H., 76, 80
MacKinnon, A.L., 52
MacKinnon, Alec, 68, 70, 86
MacLachlan, CraigS., 80
Maclean, R.C., 48
Maclean, Rhona, 74
MacTaggart, David, 88
Madden, S., 64
Madjarska, M.S., 76, 80, 81
Madjarska, Maria, 80, 81
Majewski, Pawel, 57
Malbet, F., 72
Mallik, Procheta, 80
94
Maloney, ShaneA., 75
Mandrini, C.H., 81
Mandrini, Cristina, 74
Mann, R.G., 55, 61
Mannering, Elizabeth, 83
Manoharan, P.K., 75
Mao, Shude, 83
Marconi, Marcella, 62
Marcu, A., 61
Marengo, M., 78
Maria, Anna, 69
Marin, Felipe, 77
Markwick, Andrew, 65
Marquette, Jean-Baptiste, 62
Marsden, Richard, 54
Marsh, M., 48, 54, 85
Marsh, Mike, 60
Marsh, T.R,77
Martin, S., 64
Martin-Pintado, J., 64
Martinez-Oliveros, J.C., 60
Mason, Andrew, 46
Mason, H., 80
Mason, H.E., 85
Mason, Helen, 49, 86, 88
Massi, F., 72
Masson, A., 47
Massone, and, 69
Massone, AnnaMaria, 56
Masters, Adam, 52
Mathioudakis, M., 87
Mathioudakis, Mihalis, 60
Matsuura, M., 51, 78
Matsuura, Mikako, 58
Matthews, Brenda, 51
Matthews, S.A., 69
Matthews, Sarah, 48, 74
Matthews, SarahA., 74
Mauch, Thomas, 44
Mauskopf, Phil, 89
Mawson, Neil, 49
Maxted, P.F.L., 78
Mayer, L., 57
McCaughrean, Mark, 42
McCaughrean, MarkJ., 51
McClements, K.G., 88
McConnachie, A., 57
McConville, S.L., 59, 70
McCord, K., 73
McCoustra, Martin, 63, 65
McCoustra, MartinR.S., 64
McCracken, T., 73
McCrea, I., 67
McDermott, A., 47
McDonald, I., 78
McHardy, Ian, 63
McKean, John, 50
McKinnell, L.-A., 67
McLaughlin, James, 88
McLay, Sam, 65
McMahon, Richard, 62
McQuillin, Rachael, 83
McWhirter, I., 67
Meixner, M., 78
Melrose, Don, 43
MESS consortium, 51
Messineo, M., 46
Meyer, Karen, 80
Michaud, Peter, 86
Middleton, H.R., 67
Miki, Z., 75
Milan, S.E., 47, 53, 66, 67, 76
Milan, Steve, 74
Millar, Tom, 65
Miller, David, 72
Miller, Grant, 85
Miller, Steve, 59
Minnitti, D,62
Mitchell, Cathryn, 67
MitraKraev, Urmila, 80
MMB Collaboration, 45
Monnier, John, 72, 73
Moretti, MariaIda, 62
Morgan, H., 75
Moro-Martin, Amaya, 51
Mortlock, Daniel, 76
Morton, Richard, 60, 86
Mouikis, C., 47
Murphy, David, 77
MUSYC Collaboration, 78
Muxlow, T,50
Muxlow, T.W.B., 50
Muxlow, Tom, 63, 71
Myers, AdamD., 77
Ménard, F., 72
Nakariakov, V.M., 60, 88
Nandra, Kirpal, 82, 84
Natta, A., 72
Negueruela, I., 46
Nelson, Richard, 43
Neukirch, Thomas, 59, 69, 74
New, R., 86
NGLS teammembers, 45
Ngwira, C.M., 67
Nicerkson, Sarah, 84
Nichol, R., 50, 77
Nichol, Robert, 77
Nichols, Jonathan, 52
Nielbock, M., 64
Nishino, M.N., 47
Norton, A.J., 46
Nutter, David, 49
Nykyri, K., 47
O'Brien, P.T., 71
O'Dwyer, Brendan, 88
O'Neil, Robert, 49
Oieroset, M,47
Olivares, A., 73
Ollivier, M., 90
Opher, M., 85
Opperman, B., 67
Orza, Beniamin, 61
Oudmaijer, R.D., 46
Oudmaijer, Rene, 72
Owen, C.J., 47, 48, 69, 75
Owen, Christopher, 54
Owens, M.J., 75
Owens, Mathew, 75
Owens, Steve, 87
PACS consortium, 50
Parnell, Clare, 74
Parsons, H., 46
Pascoe, David, 61
Pastorello, A., 70
Patel, Harsit, 50
Patel, Prina, 50
Patience, J., 63, 84
Patience, Jenny, 51, 73
Peacock, John, 57, 63
Pearson, J., 54
Pedlar, Alan, 71
Pedram, Ehsan, 74
Pedretti, E., 73
Pedretti, Ettore, 73
Penarrubia, Jorge, 57
Penny, Alan, 50
Percival, Susan, 79
Percival, WillJ,77
Perlman, E.S., 83
Perrett, K., 57
Perrin, G., 73
Perry, Chris, 75
Persoon, A.M., 66
Pestaña, JoséLuisGarrido, 71
Petit, Pascal, 73
Petkaki, Panagiota, 68
Petrosian, V., 63
Phan, T.D., 47
Phelps, A.D.R., 59, 70
Phillipps, S., 55, 77
Phillips, Neil, 51
Piana, Michele, 56, 69
Pilkington, Kate, 84
Pinfield, David, 77
Pintér, B., 75
Pitkin, Matthew, 82, 82
Plez, B., 73
Poglitsch, A., 64
Polehampton, E., 51
Polehampton, E.T., 58
Pollacco, D., 42, 55
Pontin, David, 74, 74
Pontin, DavidI., 74
Pope, A., 44
Popescu, CristinaC., 45
Popescu, M., 85
Potts, Hugh, 80
Potts, HughE., 80
Power, C., 63
Predoi, Valeriu, 71
Prescott, Matthew, 45
Price, J., 77
Priest, E.R., 74
Prinja, Raman, 45
Pritchet, C., 57
Provan, G., 65
Provan, Gabby, 67
Pryse, S.E., 59, 67
Pu, Z., 47
Rae, I.J., 47
Raeder, Joachim, 74
Rahimi, Awat, 45
Rangel, Cyprian, 84
Ratcliffe, Heather, 69
Rawlings, Steve, 50, 63, 83
Rea, Alex, 73
Reach, W.T., 78
Read, Justin, 57
Read, M., 61
Read, M.A., 55
Read, Mike, 54, 55, 62
Reay, Sarah, 65
Redfield, S., 58
Reid, H.A.S., 69
Reid, Hamish, 69
Rekjuba, M,62
Relano, Monica, 78
Rhodes, R., 73
Rice, Ken, 55
Richards, Anita, 58, 73
Richer, J.S., 46
Richer, John, 50
Rigby, Emma, 51, 63
Rigopoulou, Dimitra, 45, 50
Riley, P., 75
Ripepi, Vincenzo, 62
RMS Team, 46
Roberts, Helen, 65
Robertson, C.W., 59
Robertson, David, 61
Robinson, Terry, 67
Robinsson, David, 89
Robotham, Aaron, 44, 45
Roche, P., 46
Rodger, Craig, 65
Ronald, K., 70
Ronald, Kevin, 59
Rosa, RobertDe, 51
Ross, Ashley, 77
Ross, Nicholas, 77
Roth, M., 86
Rottgering, Huub, 63
Rouillard, Alexis, 75
Rowlinson, Antonia, 71
Roxburgh, I., 86
Ruderman, M.S., 61
Ruffle, Paul, 65
Rushton, M.T., 46
Rushton, Mark, 46
Ryans, R.S.I., 87
Rycroft, Michael, 66
Sabiu, Cristiano, 77
SAGE-Specteam, 79
Saha, Prasenjit, 78
Sahraoui, F., 47
Saito, R,62
Sakai, Satoru, 82
Salucci, Paolo, 72
Sanchez-Blazquez, P., 83
Sanderson, A., 56
Santoro, F., 73
Sargent, A., 63
Sargent, B.A., 78
Sathyaprakash, Bangalore, 43
Saunders, Richard, 63
Sauvage, M., 64
Schawinski, Kevin, 78
Schinnerer, E., 64
Schmieder, B., 88
Schneider, M., 63
Schreiber, J., 64
Schwadron, Nathan, 75
SDSS-II SNeSurveyTeam, 77
SDSS-III:BOSS Team, 77
Semionov, Dmitrij, 45
Senior, A., 68
Senior, Andrew, 67
Sergis, N., 66
Sharples, Ray, 50
ShaunBloomfield, D., 88
Shay, M.A., 47
Sheldon, ErinS., 77
Shelyag, S., 61
Shelyag, Sergiy, 60
Shen, C., 47
Shetty, Vineeth, 75
Shi, J., 47
Shishov, V.I., 75
Shtromberg, A., 73
Sibbons, Lisette, 79
Sibeck, David, 74
Sibthorpe, Bruce, 51
Silk, Joe, 56
Silk, Joseph, 78
Simpson, Fergus, 57
Singal, S., 63
Sivasankaran, Anoop, 56
Sivia, Devinder, 83
Sloan, G.C., 78
Slyz, Adrianne, 83
Smail, Ian, 44, 63
Smartt, S., 70
Smecker-Hane, T., 78
Smith, Anthony, 51
Smith, Arfon, 55
Smith, G.P., 56
Smith, James, 55
Smith, Mathew, 77
Smith, Matthew, 51
Smith, Rachel, 73
Smith, Russell, 79
Sobral, David, 44
Sochting, I.K., 83
Southwood, David, 52
Spain, Timothy, 67, 79
Speck, A.K., 78
Speirits, Fiona, 57
Speirs, D.C., 59
Speirs, David, 70
Spencer, P,67
SPIRE consortium, 50
Stallard, Tom, 59
Stamatellos, D., 51
Stanway, Elizabeth, 78
Stappers, B., 82
Stark, C.R., 81
Stark, C.R., 82
Stark, Craig, 70
Stavrinidis, Constantinos, 89
Stawarsz, L., 63
Steed, Kimberley, 75
Steeghs, D., 77
Steele, I.A., 49
Steele, Iain, 49
Sternberg, A., 64
Stevens, Jason, 83
Steves, Bonnie, 56
Stinson, Greg, 84, 84
Stott, J., 43
Strachan, Mel, 90
Sturm, E., 64
Subramanian, Srividya, 76, 81
Sullivan, M., 57
Sullivan, Mark, 71
Sun, Jian, 54
sunearthplan.netteam, 87
Suntrekteam, 86
Sutherland, Will, 62, 62
Sutorius, E., 61
Sutorius, Eckhard, 54, 62
Swain, M., 90
Sweatman, Winston, 56
SwiftTeam, 70
Swinyard, B., 52
Swinyard, BruceM., 58
Tacconi, L., 64
Takato, Naruhisa, 44
Takats, K., 70
Tamura, Naoyuki, 44
Tan, BoonKok, 45
Tang, Y.H., 69
Tanvir, N., 78
Tanvir, N.R., 71
Tanvir, Nial, 43
Targett, T., 56
Taroyan, Y., 61
Tatton, Bejamin, 79
Tatulli, E., 72
Taylor, Andy, 72
Taylor, M.G.G.T., 47
Taylor, Matt, 47
Teodoro, L.F.A., 57, 81, 82
Teodoro, LuisF.A., 57, 58
Tessenyi, M., 90
Th. vanLoon, J., 78
Thatte, Niranjan, 89
THESIS team, 90
Thompson, M., 46, 86
Thompson, M.J., 61
Thomson, A.W.P., 67, 79
Thomson, Alan, 66
Thomson, AlanP,65
Thomson, andAlan, 65
Thomson, Edward, 57
Threlfall, James, 88
Tideswell, David, 65
Tielens, A.G.G.M., 78
Tinetti, G., 58
Tinetti, Giovanna, 90
Tokumaru, M., 75
Tout, Christopher, 78
Tripathi, Durgesh, 49
Trotta, Roberto, 76
Trung, Dinhvan, 73
95
Tsiklauri, David, 81
Tuffs, RichardJ., 45
Tunnicliffe, Rachel, 71
Turkmani, Rim, 70
Turnbull, Katie, 79
Turner, A., 47
Tyul’bashev, S.A., 75
UltraVISTA consortium, 62
Usuda, KumikoS., 86
vanBallegooijen, A.A., 76, 80
VanDoorsselaere, Tom, 61
vanDriel-Gesztelyi, Lidia, 76, 81
vanSpaandonk, Lieke, 77
Vanninathan, Kamalam, 81
VargasDominguez, Santiago, 49
Vasisht, G., 90
Vekstein, G.E., 68
Verma, A., 64
Verth, G., 60
Verth, Gary, 61
Verwichte, E., 88
VHS collaboration, 62
Vickers, Hannah, 67
VIDEO Consortium, 62
Vidotto, Aline, 85
Vigroux, L., 64
VIKING Team, 62
VirgoCollaboration, 71
Viti, S., 64
Viti, Serena, 64
Vlahos, Loukas, 70
VMC Team, 61, 62
Volwerk, M., 47
Vorgul, I., 59, 70
Wadsley, James, 84
Waldmann, Ingo, 58
Walker, Helen, 87
Walker, M., 57
Walker, Matthew, 57
Wall, Jasper, 63
Wallace, Alison, 74, 87
Walsh, A.P., 47, 75
96
Walsh, Andrew, 48
Walsh, R.W., 48, 60, 85
Walsh, Robert, 54
Walter, F., 64
Walter, F.M., 84
Wang, Yougang, 84
Ward, Martin, 71
Ward-Thompson, Derek, 51
Wardle, Nick, 61
WASP Consortium, 42
WASP Consortium, 55
Watanabe, T., 48
Waterson, Natasha, 75
Watson, Fraser, 89
Watson, Laura, 76
Watt, C., 47
Weltevrede, P., 82
Weltevrede, Patrick, 59
Wesson, Roger, 51, 58
West, R., 42
West, R.G., 55
Westmoquette, Mark, 84
Whaler, Kathy, 43
Wheatley, Peter, 49
White, G.J., 52
White, Richard, 90
Whitley, Toby, 66
Whyte, C.G., 59
Wiersema, K., 71
Wilcock, L., 51
Wild, J.A., 53, 59, 68, 79
Wild, J.M., 85
Wild, Jim, 67, 87
Wilkins, G.M.H., 85
Williams, Anthony, 67, 76
Williams, D.A., 64
Williams, David, 54
Williams, DavidR., 49
Williams, P., 61
Williams, Peredur, 54
Williger, G.M., 83
Wilmot-Smith, Antonia, 74, 74
Wilson, Fiona, 74
Wilson, R.J., 66
Wise, M., 50
Wit, W.-J.de, 46
Witherick, Dugan, 58
Woan, Graham, 55, 82
Wood, A.G., 75
Wood, Alan, 59, 67
Woodcraft, A.L., 89
Woodfield, Emma, 68
Woods, P.M., 78
Woods, Paul, 79
Worrall, D.M., 83
Wright, A.N., 61, 70
Wright, Andrew, 70
Wright, D.M., 66
Wright, Gillian, 43
Wu, Xufen, 84
Wyatt, M.C., 73
Wyatt, Mark, 51
Wyper, Peter, 74
Wyse, Rosie, 43
Yates, Japheth, 52
Yates, Jeremy, 73
Yates, JeremyA., 58
Yeates, Anthony, 74, 76
Yeates, AnthonyR., 74
Yeche, Christophe, 77
Yeoman, T.K., 53, 66
Yi, Sukyoung, 78
Yiu, H.-C.I., 67
Young, Dave, 66
Young, J., 73
Young, John, 72, 73
Young, Neil, 82
Young, P., 48
Young, Peter, 49
Yu, Shenghua, 52
Zanna, GiulioDel, 49, 61, 88
Zarka, P., 52
Zezas, Andreas, 71
Zhang, ZengHua, 77
Zhao, Hongsheng, 71, 72, 84
Zharkov, Sergei, 61
Zijlstra, Albert, 72
List of participants
Abdulgalil, Ali(Heriot-WattUniversity)
[email protected] [P17]
Abernathy, Matthew(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected]
Achilleos, Nicholas(UCL) [email protected]
[P13, P08]
Aerts, Conny(UniversityofLeuven)
[email protected]
Alexander, Caroline(UCLAN)
[email protected] [P04]
Ames, Susan(OxfordAstrophysics)
[email protected]
Andrews, David(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P18]
Anthony, Caroline(ImperialCollege)
[email protected]
Archontis, Vasilis(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected]cs.st-and.ac.uk [P34]
Arridge, Chris(MSSL /UCL) [email protected]
[P18, P08]
Austin, Matthew(UCL) [email protected] [P02]
Avison, Adam(JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics) [email protected] [P02]
Awad, Zainab(Dept.ofPhysicsandAstronomy,
UCL) [email protected] [P17]
Badnell, Nigel(UniversityofStrathclyde)
[email protected]
Bagheri, Gemma(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected] [P15]
Bagnulo, Stefano(ArmaghObservatory)
[email protected] [P32]
Bailey, Mark(ArmaghObservatory) [email protected]
Bains, William(RufusScientific/MIT)
[email protected] [Plenary]
Baldry, Ivan(LiverpoolJMU)
[email protected] [P26]
Ballai, Istvan(UniversityofSheffield)
[email protected] [P14]
Barclay, Charles(MarlboroughCollegeandOxford
Astrophysics) [email protected]
[P33]
Bareford, Michael(TheUniversityofManchester)
[email protected]
uk
[P23]
Barker, Michael(RoyalObservatoryEdinburgh)
[email protected] [P27]
Barnsley, Robert(LJMU) [email protected]
[P05]
Baron, Fabien(UniversityofMichigan)
[email protected] [P22]
Barr, Ewan(MPIfR Bonn)
[email protected] [P30]
Bartlett, Jo(UCL/MSSL) [email protected]
Baruah, Leon(UniversityofSussex)
[email protected]
Bassiri, Riccardo(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected]
Battaglia, Marina(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19, P34]
Bayet, Estelle(UCL) [email protected] [P17, P17,
P17]
Beaulieu, Jean-Philippe(UniversityCollegeof
London) [email protected]
Beggan, Ciaran(BritishGeologicalSurvey)
[email protected] [P18]
Benisty, Myriam(INAF -Arcetri)
[email protected] [P22]
Bennet, Euan(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P13]
Bentley, Robert(UCL-MSSL) [email protected]
[P24]
Bento, Joao(UniversityofWarwick)
[email protected] [P05]
Bergman, Jan(SwedishInstituteofSpacePhysics)
[email protected] [P35]
Berry, Christopher(InstituteofAstronomy,
UniversityofCambridge) [email protected]
Best, Philip(IfA Edinburgh) [email protected] [P16,
P01]
Beveridge, Nicola(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P35]
Bewsher, Danielle(UniversityofCentral
Lancashire) [email protected] [P09, P33]
Bian, Nicolas(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19]
Bibby, Joanne(UniversityofSheffield)
[email protected] [P02]
Birch, Martin(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected]
Bird, Anthony(SAF) [email protected]
Bisi, Mario(AberystwythUniversity)
[email protected] [P99, P24, P34]
Blake, Rob(RoyalObservatoryEdinburgh)
[email protected] [P15, P10]
Bluck, Asa(UniversityofNottingham)
[email protected] [P31]
Boles, Tom(CoddenhamObservatory)
[email protected]
Bromage, Barbara(JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan) [email protected] [P34]
Bromage, Gordon(JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLan) [email protected]
Brook, Chris(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected] [P11, P31]
Brooke, John(UniversityofManchester)
[email protected] [P24, P10]
Brown, Daniel(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected]
Brown, John(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19, P19]
Browne, Paul(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected]
Browning, Philippa(JBCA,Universityof
Manchester) [email protected]
[P19, P23]
Bruce, Victoria(IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected]
Bryan, Sarah(UniversityofManchester)
[email protected] [P31]
Buckle, Jane(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P02]
Bulger, Joanna(UniversityofExeter)
[email protected] [P16]
Burge, Christina(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19]
Burke, Claire(AstrophysicsResearchInstitute
LJMU) [email protected] [P01]
Buscher, David(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P22, P22]
Butters, Oliver(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P10]
Calura, Francesco(JeremiahHorrocksInstitute,
UCLAN) [email protected] [P31]
Cameron, Andrew(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [Plenary]
Campsie, Paul(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected]
Cano, Zach(ARI,JohnMooresUniversity
Liverpool) [email protected] [P20]
Cargill, Peter(ImperialCollege)
[email protected] [P29]
Carozzi, Tobia(Univ.ofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P10]
Carpineti, Alfredo(ImperialCollege)
[email protected] [P01]
Carr, Chris(ImperialCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P09]
Chaplin, William(UniversityofBirmingham)
[email protected]
Chapman, Bob(UniversityofIceland)
[email protected]
Chapman, Sean(UniversityofManchester)
[email protected] [P17]
Chapman, Steven(UniversityofCentral
Lancashire) [email protected] [P34]
97
Charnley, Steven(NASA GoddardSpaceFlight
Center) [email protected] [P17]
Chorley, Nicky(UniversityofWarwick)
[email protected] [P14]
Christie, Helen(UniversityCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P17]
Christodoulou, Leonidas(UniversityofSussex)
[email protected] [P01]
Christopher, Natalie(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected] [P17]
Chrysostomou, Antonio(JointAstronomyCentre)
[email protected]
Cioni, Maria-Rosa(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected] [P27, P27, P15, P15,
P15]
Clark, Simon(OpenUniversity)
[email protected] [P02]
Clarke, Ellen(BritishGeologicalSurvey)
[email protected] [P18]
Clarke, Fraser(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected] [P35]
Clements, David(None) [email protected]
[P05]
Clowes, Roger(Univ.ofCentralLancashire)
[email protected]
Clube, Kim(RoyalAstronomicalSociety)
[email protected]
Collings, Mark(Heriot-WattUniversity)
[email protected]
Collins, Ross(IfA,Edinburgh) [email protected] [P15,
P15, P10]
Cooper, Heather(UniversityofLeeds)
[email protected] [P02]
Cossham, Jennifer(JohnWiley&Sons, Ltd)
[email protected]
Crockett, Philip(Queen'sUniverstyBelfast)
[email protected] [P14, P14]
Cross, Nicholas(IfA,Edinburgh) [email protected]
[P15]
Crowther, Paul(UniversityofSheffield)
[email protected] [P02, P27]
Culhane, Len(MSSL/UCL) [email protected]
[P04, P09]
Cunningham, Colin(UK AstronomyTechnology
Centre) [email protected]
[Plenary]
CurtisLake, Emma(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected] [P01]
Dalla, Silvia(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected] [P19]
Davidson, Michael(IfA,Edinburgh) [email protected]
Davies, Ben(RochesterInstituteofTechnology,
NY) [email protected] [P02]
Davies, Jackie(RutherfordAppletonLaboratory)
[email protected]
Davies, Roger(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected]
Davis, Christopher(STFC RutherfordAppleton
Laboratory) [email protected] [P24]
Davis, Gary(JointAstronomyCentre)
[email protected] [P05]
Davis, Olaf(Oxford) [email protected]
[P11]
Dawson, Ewan(BritishGeologicalSurvey)
[email protected] [P18]
DeRosa, Robert(UniversityofExeter)
[email protected] [P32]
DePasquale, Massimiliano(UCL/MSSL)
[email protected] [P20]
Deane, Roger(Oxford)
[email protected] [P16]
DelZanna, Giulio(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P04]
Dere, Ken(GeorgeMasonUniversity)
[email protected] [P34]
Dickson, Ewan(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19]
Ding, Jiaoyang(ArmaghObservatory)
98
[email protected] [P29]
Diver, Declan(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P30, P29]
Dominik, Martin(SUPA,UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected]
Doran, Emile(UniversityofSheffield)
[email protected]
Dorrian, Gareth(Queen'sUniversityofBelfast)
[email protected] [P34]
Dougherty, Michele(ImperialCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P09]
Down, Emily(UK GeminiSupportGroup)
[email protected] [P31]
Doyle, Gerry(ArmaghObservatory)
[email protected] [P08]
Doyle, Simon(CardiffUNiversity)
[email protected] [P35]
Drake, Alyssa(LJMU) [email protected]
Dunlop, James(UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected] [P15]
Duthie, Roger(MSSL,UCL) [email protected]
[P03]
Eastwood, Jonathan(ImperialCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P03]
Efstathiou, George(KavliInstituteforCosmology)
[email protected] [Plenary]
Eldridge, John(InstituteofAstronomy(Cambridge))
[email protected] [P27]
Elliott, David(RoyalAstronomicalSociety)
[email protected]
Emerson, Jim(QueenMary, UnivofLondon)
[email protected] [P15]
Enoch, Becky(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected]
Ercolano, Barbara(UniversityofExeter)
[email protected]
Escoubet, C. Philippe(ESA/ESTEC)
[email protected] [P03]
Espinoza, Cristobal(JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics) [email protected] [P30]
Evans, Christopher(UK ATC) [email protected] [P02,
P27]
Eyres, Stewart(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected]
Falder, James(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected] [P31]
Fanidakis, Nikolaos(DurhamUniversity)
[email protected]
Farihi, Jay(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P12]
Fazakerley, Andrew(MSSL-UCL)
[email protected] [P03]
Fear, Robert(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P23]
Feix, Martin(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P31, P21, P21]
Ferdman, Robert(UniversityofManchester)
[email protected] [P30]
Ferreras, Ignacio(MSSL/UCL)
[email protected] [P27, P01, P11]
Findlay, Joseph(QMUL) [email protected]
[P15]
Fletcher, Lyndsay(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P34, P29, P19,
P04, P19, P29]
Fleuren, Simone(QueenMaryUniversityLondon)
[email protected]
Fludra, Andrzej(STFC RutherfordAppleton
Laboratory) [email protected] [P09,
P09]
Forgan, Duncan(SUPA,IfA,Universityof
Edinburgh) [email protected] [P10]
Forsyth, Colin(UCL MSSL) [email protected]
[P03]
Frankland, Victoria(Heriot-WattUniversity)
[email protected] [P17]
Fraser, HelenJane(SUPA,Universityof
Strathclyde) [email protected]
Fraser, Morgan(QueensUniversityBelfast)
[email protected] [P20]
Frenk, Carlos(DurhamUniversity)
[email protected] [P11]
Fullekrug, Martin(UniversityofBath)
[email protected] [P18]
Fuller, Gary(JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics-UK ALMA ARC)
[email protected] [P17, P02, P17,
P17]
Gaensicke, Boris(UniversityofWarwick)
[email protected] [P26]
Gallagher, Peter(TrinityCollegeDublin)
[email protected] [P24]
Garcia, Percival(Percival&Associates)
[email protected]
Garrett, Michael(ASTRON) [email protected]
Garrington, Simon(UniversityofManchester)
[email protected] [P05, P20]
Gascoyne, Andrew(UniversityofSheffield)
[email protected]
Geen, Sam(OxfordAstrophysics)
[email protected] [P31]
Ghodsi, Hoda(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P11]
Gibson, Brad(UnivofCentralLancashire)
[email protected] [P31]
Gibson, Heather(OpenUniversity)
[email protected]
Gill, Colin(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected]
Gilmore, Gerard(InstituteofAstronomy)
[email protected]
Gonzale-Morales, Pedro-Alejandro(Sheffield
University) [email protected]
Goossens, Marcel(K.U.Leuven-CPA)
[email protected]
Gordon, James(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P22]
Gordovskyy, Mykola(UniversityofManchester)
[email protected] [P19]
Gosling, Andrew(Gemini, Oxford)
[email protected]
Grady, Keith(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P19, P19]
Grady, Monica(TheOpenUniversity)
[email protected]
Graham, David(GlasgowUniversity)
[email protected] [P04]
Granot, Jonathan(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected] [P20]
Gray, Norman(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P10]
Green, Lucie(UCL-MSSL) [email protected]
[P09, P33, P04]
Gregory, Scott(UniversityofExeter)
[email protected] [P32]
Griffin, Matt(CardiffUniversity)
[email protected] [P07]
Grocott, Adrian(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P18]
Guandalini, Roald(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected] [P15]
Guo, Jingnan(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19]
Gupta, Jennifer(JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics)
[email protected]
[P01]
Gürkan, Gülay(TheUniverstiyofManchester)
[email protected]
[P21]
Habergham, Stacey(AstrophysicsResearch
Institute) [email protected] [P02]
Hallinan, Gregg(UC Berkeley)
[email protected] [P08]
Hambly, Nigel(UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected] [P10, P15, P10]
Hamilton-Morris, Victoria(Universityof
Birmingham) [email protected] [P11]
Hannah, Iain(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19, P19, P34, P04]
Hapgood, Mike(STFC RutherfordAppleton
Laboratory) mike.hapg[email protected] [P24,
P09, P03]
Hargreaves, John(UniversityofLancaster)
[email protected] [P28]
Harra, Louise(UCL-MSSL) [email protected]
[P09, P09]
Harris, Jennifer(UniversityofWarwick)
[email protected] [P34]
Harris, Kathryn(UCLan) [email protected]
[P31]
Harrison, Richard(RutherfordAppleton
Laboratory) [email protected]
[P09]
Hatchell, Jennifer(UniversityofExeter)
[email protected] [Plenary]
Haughian, Karen(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected]
Hawken, Adam(UCL) [email protected]
Heavens, Alan(UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected] [P21, P21]
Hebden, Kerry(JodrellBankCenterfor
Astrophysics)
[email protected]
[P17]
Henault-Brunet, Vincent(InstituteforAstronomy,
UniversityofEdinburgh) [email protected]
Hendry, Martin(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P11, P33, P33]
Heng, IkSiong(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P30]
Hepburn, Ian(UCL/MSSL) [email protected]
[P35]
Hermanowicz, Maciej(InstituteofAstronomy,
UniversityofCambridge) [email protected]
Heward, Anita(RoyalAstronomicalSociety)
[email protected]
Heyer, Inge(JointAstronomyCentre)
[email protected] [P33]
Heymans, Catherine(IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected] [P21]
Higgins, Paul(TrinityCollegeDublin)
[email protected] [P34]
Hild, Stefan(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P35]
Hill, David(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P01, P01]
Hillier, Dan(RoyalObservatoryEdinburghVisitor
Centre) [email protected] [P33]
Ho, Wynn(UniversityofSouthampton)
[email protected] [P30]
Holland, Wayne(UK AstronomyTechnology
Centre) [email protected]
Holliman, Mark(UniversityofEdinburgh, Institute
forAstronomy) [email protected] [P10,
P10]
Hood, Alan(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P04]
Hood, Ross(InstituteforAstronomy, Universityof
Edinburgh) [email protected]
Horn, Markus(ImperialCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P11]
Horne, Keith(SUPA StAndrews)
[email protected]
Hornig, Gunnar(UniversityofDundee)
[email protected] [P23, P23]
Hough, James(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected]
House, Elisa(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected] [P31]
Hsieh, Henry(QueensUniversityBelfast)
[email protected] [P12]
Huang, Zhenghua(ArmaghObservatory)
[email protected] [P29]
Hudson, Hugh(SSL/UC Berkeley)
[email protected] [P29, P14]
Husnoo, Nawal(UniversityofExeter)
[email protected]
Hussain, Gaitee(ESO) [email protected] [P32]
Hutcheon, Richard(KeeleUniversity)
[email protected] [P27]
Hutchinson, James(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P18]
Huxor, Avon(UniversityofBristol)
[email protected] [P26, P10]
Hyde, Paul(None) [email protected]
Ibar, Edo(UK AstronomyTechnologyCentre)
[email protected] [P01]
Jain, Rekha(UniversityofSheffield)
[email protected] [P23]
Jarvis, Matt(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected] [P31, P15, P06]
Jeffries, Rob(KeeleUniversity)
[email protected] [P32]
Jess, David(Queen'sUniversityBelfast)
[email protected] [P14, P14, P14]
John, Daniel(DurhamUniversity)
[email protected] [P11]
Johnson, Olivia(RoyalObservatoryGreenwich)
[email protected] [P33]
Johnston, Rebecca(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected]
Johnston, Russell(UniversityoftheWesternCape)
[email protected] [P01]
Johnstone, Colin(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected]
Jones, Geraint(MSSL,UCL) [email protected]
[P18, P13]
Jones, Mark(TheOpenUniversity)
[email protected] [P10]
Jones, Olivia(UniversityofManchester)
[email protected]
[P27]
Jonsson, Jakob(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected] [P11]
Jordan, Carole(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected]
Kanani, Sheila(MullardSpaceScienceLaboratory)
[email protected] [P18]
Karczewski, Oskar(UCL)
[email protected]
Kaviraj, Sugata(ImperialCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P27]
Kellett, Stephanie(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P18]
Kelly, Gemma(UniversityofLiverpool)
[email protected] [P18]
Kelly, James(UCLan) [email protected]
Kelvin, Lee(StAndrews) [email protected]-andrews.ac.uk
[P01, P01]
Kennedy, Julia(InstituteforAstronomy, University
ofEdinburgh) [email protected] [P35]
Keogh, Dominic(DurhamUniversity)
[email protected] [P30]
Kerr, John(None) [email protected]
Keys, Peter(Queen'sUniversityBelfast)
[email protected]
Kidd, Robert(LancasterUniversity)
[email protected] [P13]
Kiessling, Alina(UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected] [P21]
Kim, Hansik(DurhamUniversity)
[email protected] [P16]
King, Robert(UniversityofExeter)
[email protected] [P08]
Kipping, David(Harvard-SmithsonianCenterfor
Astrophysics) [email protected] [P12]
Kitching, Thomas(UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected]
Kiyani, Khurom(UniversityofWarwick)
[email protected] [P03]
Kofman, Wlodek(LPG CNRS/UJF)
[email protected]
Kontar, Eduard(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19, P19, P19, P34,
P19, P19, P19, P19]
Kukula, Marek(RoyalObservatoryGreenwich)
[email protected] [P24, P33]
Kunawicz, Nadya(JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics) [email protected]
[P17]
Kurtz, Donald(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected] [P33]
Kuznetsov, Alexey(ArmaghObservatory)
[email protected] [P08]
Labrosse, Nicolas(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P34]
Lacerda, Pedro(Queen'sUniversityBelfast)
[email protected] [P12]
Lacey, Cedric(DurhamUniversity)
[email protected] [P07]
Lang, Pauline(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P08]
Lawrence, Andy(UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected] [P16]
Lawrie, Craig(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P11]
Lester, Mark(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P09, P18]
Levan, Andrew(UniversityofWarwick)
[email protected] [P30]
Lewis, Fraser(FaulkesTelescopeProject)
[email protected]
Lewis, James(InstituteofAstronomy)
[email protected] [P15]
Li, Chuan(MullardSpaceScienceLaboratroy)
[email protected] [P19]
Li, Xing(AberystwythUniversity) [email protected]
[P34]
Liang, Guiyun(UniversityofStrathclyde)
[email protected] [P29]
Liddle, Andrew(UniversityofSussex)
[email protected]
Lin, Bob(Univ.ofCalifornia, Berkeley)
[email protected] [Plenary]
Lintott, Chris(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected] [P24, P10]
Littlefair, Stuart(UniversityofSheffield)
[email protected] [P08]
Liu, Siming(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19, P19]
Loveday, Jon(UniversityofSussex)
[email protected] [P01, P26]
Lowe, Stuart(TheJodcast)
[email protected] [P33]
Lowes, Frank(NewcastleUniversity)
[email protected]
Lucas, Philip(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected] [P15]
Lucek, Elizabeth(ImperialCollege)
[email protected] [P03, P09, P09]
Lumsden, Stuart(UniversityofLeeds)
[email protected]
Luna, Marialejandra(UniversityofSheffield)
[email protected] [P14]
Lykou, Foteini(Claire)(JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics)
[email protected]
[P22]
MacKinnon, Alec(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19, P19, P33]
MacTaggart, David(StAndrews)
[email protected] [P34]
Macdonald, Erin(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P01]
Mackay, Craig(InstituteofAstronomy, University
ofCambridge) [email protected]
Mackay, Duncan(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected]
Mackay, Mel(InstituteofAstronomy, Universityof
99
Cambridge) [email protected]
Madjarska, Maria(ArmaghObservatory)
[email protected] [P29, P29]
Majewski, Pawel(RutherfordAppletonLaboratory)
[email protected] [P11, P11]
Mallik, Procheta(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P29]
Mannering, Elizabeth(UniversityofBristol)
[email protected] [P31]
Marsden, Richard(ESA) [email protected]
[P09]
Marsh, Mike(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected] [P14]
Mason, Andrew(OpenUniversity)
[email protected] [P02]
Mason, Helen(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P33, P04, P34]
Massey, Robert(RoyalAstronomicalSociety)
[email protected]
Massone, AnnaMaria(CNR-SPIN)
[email protected] [P10]
Masters, Adam(MullardSpaceScience
Laboratory) [email protected] [P08]
Masters, Richard(OxfordUniversity)
[email protected]
Mathioudakis, Mihalis(QueensUniversityBelfast)
[email protected] [P14, P14]
Matsuura, Mikako(UniversityCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P12]
Matthews, Sarah(UCL-MSSL) [email protected]
[P04, P23]
Mawson, Neil(AstrophysicsResearchInstitute)
[email protected] [P05]
Maxted, Pierre(KeeleUniversity)
[email protected]
Maxwell, Michael(UCLan)
[email protected]
McCaughrean, Mark(ESA) [email protected] [Plenary]
McCombie, June(UniversityofNottingham)
[email protected]
McCoustra, Martin(Heriot-WattUniversity)
[email protected] [P17, P17]
McKean, John(ASTRON) [email protected] [P06]
McLauchlan, Rachael(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected]
McLaughlin, James(NorthumbriaUniversity)
[email protected]
[P34]
McMahon, Richard(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P15]
McQuillin, Rachael(KeeleUniversity)
[email protected] [P31]
Mecheri, Redouane(QueenMaryUniversityof
London) [email protected]
Melrose, Don(UniversityofSydney)
[email protected] [Plenary]
Meyer, Karen(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P29]
Meyerdierks, Horst(RoyalObservatoryEdinburgh)
[email protected]
Miller, David(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P21]
Miller, Grant(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P32]
Miller, Steve(UCL) [email protected] [P13]
Mitchell, Cathryn(UniversityofBath)
[email protected] [P18]
MitraKraev, Urmila(UniversityofCambridge
(DAMTP)) [email protected]
[P29]
Moretti, MariaIda(BolognaUniversity)
[email protected] [P15]
Morgan, Lawrence(LiverpoolJohnMoores
University) [email protected]
Morris, Margaret(AstronomicalSocietyof
Glasgow) [email protected]
Morton, Richard(UniversityofSheffield)
[email protected] [P14, P33]
100
Murphy, David(DurhamUniversity)
[email protected] [P26]
Murray, Peter(SUPA InstututeforGravitational
Research) [email protected]
Muxlow, Tom(JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics) [email protected] [P20, P16]
Nelson, Richard(QueenMary, Universityof
London) [email protected] [Plenary]
Neukirch, Thomas(UniversityofSt.Andrews)
[email protected] [P19, P23, P13]
Nicholls, Bella(RoyalAstronomicalSociety)
[email protected]
Nichols, Jonathan(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P08]
Norberg, Peder(IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected]
Norton, Andrew(TheOpenUniversity)
[email protected]
Nutter, David(CardiffUniversity)
[P05]
O'Brien, Paul(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected]
[email protected]
O'Connor, Terry(STFC) [email protected]
O'Dwyer, Brendan(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P34]
O'Neil, Robert(UCL MSSL) [email protected]
[P04]
O'Regan, Jonathan(MSSL/UCL)
[email protected]
Orza, Beniamin(TheUniversityofSheffield)
[email protected] [P14]
Oudmaijer, Rene(UniversityofLeeds)
[email protected] [P22]
Owen, Christopher(UCL/MSSL)
[email protected] [P09]
Owens, Mathew(UniversityofReading)
[email protected] [P24]
Owens, Steve(IYA2009)
[email protected] [P33]
Parkinson, Hannah(IfA,Edinburgh) [email protected]
[P01]
Parley, Neil(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected]
Parnell, Clare(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P23]
Pascoe, David(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P14]
Pastrav, BogdanAdrian(UCLan)
[email protected]
Patel, Harsit(ImperialCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P07]
Patel, Prina(InstitueofCosmology&Gravitation)
[email protected] [P06]
Patience, Jenny(UniversityofExeter)
[email protected] [P22, P08]
Patterson, Brett(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected]
Pearson, Elizabeth(CardiffUniversity)
[email protected]
Pedram, Ehsan(UCL MSSL) [email protected]
[P23]
Pedretti, Ettore(SUPA,UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P22]
Penarrubia, Jorge(UniversityofCambridge, IoA)
[email protected] [P11]
Penny, Alan(U StAndrews)
[email protected] [P06]
Percival, Susan(LiverpoolJohnMooresUniversity)
[email protected] [P27]
Phillips, Neil(InstituteforAstronomy, University
ofEdinburgh) [email protected]roe.ac.uk [P07]
Piana, Michele(Universita'diGenova)
[email protected] [P10, P19]
Pilkington, Kate(UnivofCentralLancashire)
[email protected] [P31]
Pitkin, Matthew(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P30, P99, P30]
Pollacco, Don(QueensUniversityBelfast)
[email protected]
Pont, Frederic(UniversityofExeter)
[email protected]
Pontin, David(UniversityofDundee)
[email protected] [P23, P23]
Popescu, CristinaC. (UCLan)
[email protected] [P01]
Potts, Dale(MullardSpaceScienceLaboratory,
UCL) [email protected]
Potts, Hugh(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P29]
Predoi, Valeriu(CardiffUniversity)
[email protected] [P20]
Prescott, Matthew(LJMU AstrophysicsResearch
Institute) [email protected] [P01]
Provan, Gabby(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P18]
Quinn, Ciara(CardiffUniversity)
[email protected]
Rahimi, Awat(MSSL (UCL)) [email protected]
[P01]
Rainnie, John(RAL) [email protected]
Ramsay, Gavin(ArmaghObservatory)
[email protected]
Rangel, Cyprian(ImperialCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P31]
Ratcliffe, Heather(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19]
Rawlings, Steve(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected] [P16, P31, P06]
Rea, Alex(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P22]
Read, Justin(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P11]
Read, Mike(IfA,UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected] [P10, P15, P10]
Reay, Sarah(BritishGeologicalSurvey)
[email protected] [P18]
Regnart, Horace(None) [email protected]
Reid, Hamish(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P19]
Richards, Anita(JBCA,UniversityofManchester)
[email protected] [P22, P12]
Richer, John(Cambridge) [email protected] [P05]
Rigby, Emma(UniversityofNottingham)
[email protected] [P07, P16]
Rigopoulou, Dimitra(STFC RAL/Oxford)
[email protected] [P01, P05]
Roberts, Bernard(StAndrews)
[email protected]
Robertson, David(SheffieldUniversity)
[email protected] [P14]
Robotham, Aaron(StAndrews)
[email protected] [P01, P01, P01]
Robson, Ian(UKATC) [email protected]
Roche, Paul(FaulkesTelescopeProject/Cardiff
University)
[email protected]
Ronald, Kevin(UniversityofStrathclyde)
[email protected] [P13]
Ross, Ashley(UniversityofPortsmouth)
[email protected] [P26]
Ross, Nicholas(LawrenceBerkeleyLab)
[email protected] [P26]
Rowlinson, Antonia(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P20]
Ruffle, Paul(JodrellBankCentreforAstrophysics)
[email protected] [P17]
Rushton, Mark(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected] [P02]
Sabiu, Cristiano(None) [email protected] [P26]
Sakai, Satoru(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P30]
Salaris, Maurizio(ARI -LiverpoolJohnMoores
University) [email protected]
Santiago, Ignacio(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected]
Sathyaprakash, Bangalore(CardiffUniversity)
[email protected]
[Plenary]
Selway, Kirsty(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected]
Semionov, Dmitrij(UCLan)
[email protected] [P01]
Senior, Andrew(LancasterUniversity)
[email protected] [P18]
Sharples, Ray(UNIVERSITY OF DURHAM)
[email protected] [P05]
Sibbons, Lisette(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected] [P27]
Sibthorpe, Bruce(UK ATC)
[email protected] [P07]
Simpson, Chris(LiverpoolJohnMooresUniversity)
[email protected]
Simpson, Fergus(Edinburgh) [email protected] [P11]
Small, Emma(ARI,LJMU) [email protected]
Smartt, Stephen(Queen'sUniversityBelfast)
[email protected]
Smith, Anthony(UniversityofSussex)
[email protected] [P07]
Smith, Graham(UniversityofBirmingham)
[email protected]
Smith, Mathew(UCT) [email protected]
[P26]
Smith, Matthew(CardiffUniversity)
[email protected] [P07]
Smith, P (Wiley-Blackwell) [email protected]
Smith, Rachel(KeeleUniversity)
[email protected] [P22]
Smith, Robert(UniversityofSussex)
[email protected]
Smith, Russell(DurhamUniversity)
[email protected] [P27]
Soechting, Ilona(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected]
Southwood, David(ESA)
[email protected]a.int [P08]
Spain, Timothy(UCL) [email protected] [P18,
P28]
Speirs, David(DepartmentofPhysics, University
ofStrathclyde) [email protected]
[P19]
Squitieri, Valentina(UniversityofBristol)
[email protected]
Stanway, Elizabeth(UniversityofBristol)
[email protected] [P27]
Stark, Craig(UniversityofSt.Andrews)
[email protected] [P19]
Steed, Kimberley(UCL-MSSL) [email protected]
[P24]
Steves, Bonnie(GlasgowCaledonianUniversity)
[email protected] [P10]
Stinson, Greg(CentralLancashire)
[email protected] [P31, P31]
Strachan, Mel(UKATC) [email protected]
[P35]
Stroud, Vanessa(FaulkesTelescopeProject/The
OpenUniversity)
[email protected]
Subramanian, Srividya(ArmaghObservatory)
[email protected] [P24, P29]
Sullivan, Mark(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected] [P20]
Sun, Jian(UCL-MullardSpaceScienceLaboratory)
[email protected] [P09]
Sutherland, Will(QueenMary, Universityof
London) [email protected] [P15,
P15]
Sutorius, Eckhard(InstituteforAstronomy, ROE)
[email protected] [P15, P10]
Tam, Kuan(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected]
Tan, BoonKok(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected] [P01]
Tanvir, Nial(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [Plenary]
Tatton, Bejamin(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected] [P27]
Taylor, Matt(EuropeanSpaceAgency)
[email protected] [P03]
Taylor, William(RoyalObservatoryEdinburgh)
[email protected]
Thomson, Alan(BritishGeologicalSurvey)
[email protected] [P18]
Thomson, Edward(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P11]
Threlfall, James(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P34]
Tillson, Henry(OxfordUniversity)
[email protected]
Tinetti, Giovanna(UCL) [email protected]
[P35]
Tittley, Eric(U ofEdinburgh, ROE) [email protected]
Tripathi, Durgesh(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P04]
Tsiklauri, David(QueenMaryUniversityof
London) [email protected] [P29]
Tunnicliffe, Rachel(UniversityofWarwick)
[email protected] [P20]
Turkmani, Rim(ImperialCollege)
[email protected] [P19]
Turnbull, Katie(LancasterUniversity)
[email protected] [P28]
VanDoorsselaere, Tom(UniversityofWarwick)
[email protected] [P14]
Vanninathan, Kamalam(KamalamVanninathan)
[email protected] [P29]
Vardanyan, Mihran(UniversityofOxford)
[email protected]
VargasDominguez, Santiago(MSSL/UCL)
[email protected] [P04]
Verth, Gary(KU Leuven)
[email protected] [P14]
Vickers, Hannah(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P18]
Vidotto, Aline(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P32]
Waldmann, Ingo(UCL) [email protected]
[P12]
Walker, Helen(STFC RutherfordAppletonLab)
[email protected] [P33]
Walker, Matthew(InstituteofAstronomy,
UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P11]
Walker, Simon(UniversityofWarwick)
[email protected]
Wallace, Alison(UCL-MSSL) [email protected]
[P23, P33]
Walsh, Andrew(MSSL-UCL) [email protected]
[P03]
Walsh, Robert(UniversityofCentralLancashire)
[email protected] [P09]
Ward-Thompson, Derek(CardiffUniversity)
[email protected] [P07]
Watson, Fraser(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P34]
Watson, Laura(ImperialCollege, London)
[email protected] [P25]
Weidner, Carsten(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected]
Weltevrede, Patrick(JodrellBankCentrefor
Astrophysics)
[email protected] [P13]
Wesson, Roger(UniversityCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P12, P07]
Westmoquette, Mark(UCL) [email protected]
[P31]
Whaler, Kathy(UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected] [Plenary]
White, Richard(UniversityofLeeds)
[email protected] [P35]
Wild, Jim(LancasterUniversity)
[email protected] [P18, P33]
Williams, Anthony(UniversityofLeicester)
[email protected] [P24, P18]
Williams, David(UCL) [email protected] [P09]
Wilmot-Smith, Antonia(UniversityofDundee)
[email protected] [P23, P23]
Wilson, Fiona(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P23]
Woan, Graham(UniversityofGlasgow)
[email protected] [P30, P30, P10]
Wood, Alan(AberystwythUniversity)
alan.wood[email protected] [P18, P13]
Wood, Patricia(KeeleUniversity)
[email protected]
Woodfield, Emma(LancasterUniversity)
[email protected] [P18]
Woods, Paul(UniversityofManchester)
[email protected] [P27]
Wright, Andrew(UniversityofStAndrews)
[email protected] [P19]
Wright, Gillian(UniversityofEdinburgh)
[email protected] [Plenary]
Wu, Xufen(PhysicsandAstronomy, Universityof
StAndrews) [email protected] [P31]
Wyper, Peter(Sheffield)
[email protected] [P23]
Wyse, Rosie(JohnsHopkinsUniversity)
[email protected] [Plenary]
Yates, Japheth(UniversityCollegeLondon)
[email protected] [P08]
Yeates, Anthony(UniversityofDundee)
[email protected] [P23, P24]
Young, John(UniversityofCambridge)
[email protected] [P22, P22, P22]
Young, Neil(UniversityofManchester)
[email protected]
[P30]
Yu, Shenghua(ArmaghObservatory)
[email protected] [P08]
Zhang, ZengHua(UniversityofHertfordshire)
[email protected] [P26]
Zhao, Hongsheng(U. ofStAndrews(SUPA))
[email protected] [P31, P21, P21]
Zharkov, Sergei(MSSL,UCL) [email protected]
[P14]
daCosta, AntonioArmando(InstitutoSuperior
Técnico, Lisboa, Portugal)
[email protected] [P30]
vanDriel-Gesztelyi, Lidia(MSSL/UCL)
[email protected] [P24, P29]
vanSpaandonk, Lieke(UniversityofWarwick)
[email protected] [P26]
101
8b9be3970f4d, 2010-04-05T15:25:39+01:00
! !
! !
"
!
09:00-10:20
10:20-10:45
10:45-12:30
12:30-14:00
14:00-15:20
15:20-15:45
15:45-17:30
Evening
Mon 12th
Fri 16th
"$'-9;/'%%" $
*$$ $#
Thu 15th
"$'-?/'% ' "$'-99/'%%'
"(%$
()) %*
"$'-9</'% "" $
' )
Wed 14th
"$'-9:/'%%( -(
Tue 13th
"$'[email protected]/'$$-
)""
"$'-;/'%%$
"'%(
"$'-</'%)-
"'
%%"(45*)'
'$%%$
*)'*$0
$%$
'"""(( %$?
2;91;=3
%'!0%()'(
*$
'"""(( %$>
2:>1;83
%'!0%()'(
'"""(( %$<
29>1:83
%'!0%()'(
'"""(( %$:
28>1983
*$
''(*$
%'!0%()'(
*$
%#$(4*$
%$5
%()')*&
&$ $'#%$-
29;/883
"$'-=/'% "" #
$(
%##*$ )-
'$%%$
%##*$ )-
'$%%$
%
!0%()'(
'"""(( %$=
2:91:=3
%'!0%()'(
'"""(( %$;
29919=3
%()' , $
29?/;819A/883
*" "!. # "
29A/;83
$$'5 " 29A/881:</883
=11( %%)""
*" "!.' ( $)%
29A/;83
%()' , $
29?/;819A/883
%'!0%()'(
"$'->/'%$',
"$'-98/'%
%"" '#'%$
$"%')-&'!(
"$'-A/'% "
$+ '
"$'-9/'%'!
*'$
"$'-:/'%% $
%'!0%()'(
'"""(( %$9
28918=3
&$ $&%$
[email protected]/;81:8/883
$ $)*
2:8/;81:;/883
*" "!.%$'%,$
5* '$29A/;83
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement