SDC Outline

SDC Outline

OFFICE OF CURRICULUM, INSTRUCTION, & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Science

MIDDLE SCHOOL COURSE OUTLINE

(Revised September 2011)

Course Code Department

Course Title

Science 7

Abbreviation

Sci 7

Grade Level

5640

7

Course Length 1 year

Co-requisites

Current placement in MM, ED, OI, DHH

Special Education program based on IEP

Teacher Certification

Special Education

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The seventh grade SDC science course is designed specifically for the needs of students with mild/moderate disabilities who are at the emergent, early, and intermediate levels of listening, speaking, reading, and writing proficiency. Students in this course cover the essential content and utilize the same basic textbook as their general education counterparts supplemented with content-parallel materials at a simplified reading level. Additionally, primary language materials for

ELL students will be provided, when available and as needed, to facilitate the preview and review of essential content. The course delivery varies in pacing, instructional methodology, and supplemental materials. It is designed to provide depth versus breadth of the content standards, and provide more modified content, comprehensible input, and literacy development in the content area.

Seventh grade science is an integrated standards and laboratory based program. Students will spend approximately forty percent (40%) or more of their class time on hands-on activities.

Introductory principles of earth, life, and physical sciences will be explored incorporating constructivist methods of teaching. Science activities will be based on benchmark requirements and will utilize the skills and techniques outlined in the Investigation and Experimentation Strand of the Content Standards.

GOALS:

(Student needs this course is intended to meet)

• Students will learn all of the California State Standards for 7 th

Grade Science, which emphasize life sciences. The use of well-designed, memorable experiences and the application of scientific knowledge and methodology are essential in helping students achieve appropriate comprehension of the content.

• Students will improve their ability to learn independently by drawing generalizations from science related articles, books, graphs, charts, and diagrams. Regular opportunities are provided for students to clearly communicate their understanding through oral and written explanations of science concepts.

• Students will study the applications of science in everyday life to inspire them to consider pursuing advanced studies in science and explore the wide variety of related career choices available.

Science 7 SDC - Page 2

Academic Literacy In SDC Content-Area Classes:

Completion of content courses is an essential requirement for students to receive a high school diploma.

Content area classes play an important role in developing and strengthening students’ progress towards reading, writing, listening and speaking.

Students should be encouraged to expand their vocabulary and other language skills.

When content-area information and materials have been made comprehensible through instruction in the content area class, special education students will progress through phases of developing academic literacy.

The students’ degrees of literacy will significantly affect the pace that students move through these phases.

The following are stages of literacy development and instructional components that will help teachers determine the appropriate pathway for developing literacy.

Emergent

.

(Kinder – 2 nd

grade literacy level) Students have beginning literacy skills.

A student who exhibits some of the following behaviors may be considered an emergent reader:

• decoding cvc, cvvc, cvce words

• reads and writes 0-200 sight words

• answers basic, literal comprehension questions (i.e, who, where)

• writes using inventive or phonetic spelling, basic sight words

• writes using simple sentences

• begins most sentences with the same pattern (I…, My dog…)

• uses few adjectives

• writing is off topic or strays

Students progressing through this level will:

• participate in modified group/class projects, discussions and oral presentations with non-verbal responses (e.g., gestures, drawings, graphic organizers) and/or single words or phrases with assistance (e.g., word walls, language structure walls).

• begin to participate orally in some content area reading strategies (especially pre-reading, KWL, and anticipation guides presented orally), with single words or phrases to analyze concepts from explicitly taught texts and other course reading materials.

• respond to Curriculum Embedded Assessment prompts (read to them and clarified for them) non-verbally (e.g., graphic organizers with drawings) and/or orally with single words or phrases.

• begin to use the alphabet to write in teacher-guided learning logs, selected homework and interactive notebooks, and to organize and record expository information on pictures, lists, charts and tables using single words or phrases.

• understand the need for using modified test-taking strategies (using previously taught vocabulary) on the required district/state assessments, such as, End of Course Exams (with alternate presentation and response), and STAR.

Early

.

(2 nd

– 3 rd

grade literacy level) Students have little or no academic proficiency and varying levels of academic literacy skills and concepts. A student who exhibits some of the following behaviors may be considered an early reader:

• reads cvc, cvvc, cvce words

• decodes blends, diagraphs, multisyllabic words

• reads and writes 200-300 sight words

• answers literal comprehension questions (i.e., why, how) and is beginning to consciously use comprehension strategies (predicting, rereading, summarizing, etc.)

• writes using correct cvc, cvvc, cvce spelling, sight words, attempts multi-syllabic words

• writes using simple sentences and attempts some complex sentences

• is beginning to use descriptive language

• writing is simple, on topic

Students progressing through this level will:

• participate in group/class projects, discussions and presentations with non-verbal responses (e.g., gestures, drawings, graphic organizers, roleplaying) and/or oral or written single words, phrases and simple sentences with assistance (i.e., using the academic participation cards).

• participate orally in some content area reading strategies (especially pre-reading, KWL, academic participation cards, anticipation guides) or write using single words, phrases and/or simple sentences to analyze concepts from texts and other course reading materials.

• respond to Curriculum Embedded Assessment prompts (read to them and clarified for them) non-verbally (e.g., graphic organizers with drawings) and/or orally with single words, phrases and simple sentences in an outline format.

• use writing in a variety of ways such as, but not limited to, guided class note-taking, learning logs, interactive notebooks, representing information on pictures, lists, charts and tables using single words, phrases or simple sentences, and completing student handouts, selected homework, and modified class projects.

• understand the need for using test-taking strategies (using taught vocabulary) on the required district/state assessments, such as, End of Course

Exams (with alternate presentation and response), and STAR.

Science 7 SDC - Page 3

Intermediate

.

(4 th

– 5 th

grade literacy level) Students have some academic proficiency about topics that have been explicitly taught to them. A student who exhibits some of the following behaviors may be considered an intermediate reader:

• reads cvc, cvvc, cvce words, blends, and diagraphs

• decodes words

• reads and writes 400-500 sight words

• answers literal and inferential comprehension questions and consciously uses comprehension strategies

(predicting, rereading, summarizing, etc.)

• writes using correct cvc, cvvc, cvce spelling, sight words, most multi-syllabic words

• writes using both simple and complex sentences

• uses descriptive language

• writing is on topic and interesting

Students progressing through this level will:

• participate in group/class projects, discussions and presentations with simple sentences and many attempts at more complex sentences.

• use content area reading strategies (especially pre-reading, KWL, academic participation cards, anticipation guides, Reciprocal Teaching and

Question/ Answer Relationships) to analyze concepts from taught texts and other course reading materials.

• respond to Curriculum Embedded Assessment prompts (read to them and clarified for them) orally and with simple and some complex sentence structures in at least three paragraphs.

• use writing in a variety of ways such as, but not limited to, class note-taking, learning logs, interactive notebooks, response logs, and completing student handouts, homework, and class projects.

• understand the need for using test-taking strategies (using taught vocabulary) on the required district/state assessments, such as, End of Course

Exams (with alternate presentation and response), and STAR.

* Should you have a student who is functioning higher than the above levels (i.e., fluent), it is

suggested that you hold an IEP and discuss alternate options such as RSP placement or mainstreaming for content area instruction.

Science 7 SDC - Page 4

CONTEXT: CONTENT SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

6th

Density (Qualitative) -------- (CA 8)

Energy

7th

Temperature vs. Heat

Heat Transfer

8th

Observing and Defining Motion

Forces and their Effects

Gravity’s Larges Scale Effects

Basic Atomic Theory

Periodic Table as a Tool

Metals, Non-metals, Inert Gases

Electrons beyond the Bohr Model

Ions and Isotopes

Physical & Chemical Properties

Element vs. Compound Properties

Chemical Bonding

Atoms and Ions Forming Solids

Phases and Molecular Motion

Chemical Formulas

Chemical Equations & Conservation of Matter

Exothermic vs. Endothermic

Acids, Bases, and pH

Density & Buoyancy

Sound and Light Energy ------ (CA 7)

Earth Sciences Life Sciences

Earth’s Layers Food Chains / Food Webs

Plate Tectonics

Mountain Building

Earthquakes, Faults, and Epicenters

Volcanoes

California Geology

Ecosystems

Human Impacts on Ecosystems --------- (LB)

Mechanical & Chemical Weathering

Six Designated Lessons from Project

Minerals

ALERT Health Curriculum

Rock Cycle (Igneous, Metamorphic, and

Sedimentary Rocks)

Sun’s Effect on Weather

Convections

Solar Energy

Atmospheric Conditions

Natural Resources

Stratigraphy: Fossil Locations Rock --(CA 7)

Geol. Timeline of Earth’s History -------(CA 7)

Formation of Fossils -----------------------(CA 7)

Methods of Dating Earth’s History -----(CA 7)

Cell Similarities & Differentiation

Function of Cell Structures

Energy at the Cellular Level

Photosynthesis / Respiration

Mitosis

Genetics

DNA RNA Protein ----------------- (LB)

Sexual / Asexual Reproduction

Meiosis ----------------------------------------- (LB)

DNA, Genes, & Alleles

Dominant & Recessive Traits

Theory of Evolution

Natural Selection

Body Systems

Taxonomic Keys ----------------------------- (LB)

Kingdoms & Major Phyla ------------------ (LB)

Galaxies and Stars

Simple Machines

Life Cycles of Stars (Nebular Theory,

and the Human Body -------------(CA 7)

Novas,

Blood Pressure and Heart Valves---(CA 7)

Distances in Astronomy

Organic Chem. / Biochem.

Light Sources and Reflectors in the

Universe

Cosmology (Universe Origin) --------- (LB)

Solar System

Three Designated Lessons from Project

ALERT Health Curriculum

Notes regarding non-aligned content:

(LB) => Long Beach specific content; not found in CA Science

Content Standards

(CA 7) => 7 th

grade content which has been moved to 6 th

or 8 th

grade to accommodate reduced science instruction in 7 th

grade

(CA 8) => 8 th

grade content which should be presented qualitatively in 6 th

grade to help explain convections and other Earth science related content

Science 7 SDC - Page 5

CONTEXT: SKILLS SCOPE AND SEQUENCE

Investigation and Experimentation:

Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations.

As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will:

6th

7a. Develop a hypothesis.

b. Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.

c. Construct appropriate graphs from data and develop qualitative statements about the relationships between variables.

d. Communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and oral presentations.

e. Recognize whether evidence is consistent with a proposed explanation.

f. Read a topographic map and a geologic map for evidence provided on the maps and construct and interpret a simple scale map.

g. Interpret events by sequence and time from natural phenomena (e.g., the relative ages of rocks and intrusions).

h. Identify changes in natural phenomena over time without manipulating the phenomena (e.g., a tree limb, a grove of trees, a stream, a hillslope).

7th

7a. Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.

b. Utilize a variety of print and electronic resources (including the World Wide Web) to collect information as evidence as part of a research project.

c. Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

d. Construct scale models, maps and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge (e.g., motion of Earth’s plates and cell structure).

e. Communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and verbal presentations.

8th

9a. Plan and conduct a scientific investigation to test a hypothesis.

b. Evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of data.

c. Distinguish between variable and controlled parameters in a test.

d. Recognize the slope of the linear graph as the constant in the relationship y=kx and apply this to interpret graphs constructed from data.

e. Construct appropriate graphs from data and develop quantitative statements about the relationships between variables.

f. Apply simple mathematical relationships to determine one quantity given the other two

(including speed = distance/time, density = mass/volume, force = pressure x area, volume=area x height).

g. Distinguish between linear and non-linear relationships on a graph of data.

Science 7 SDC - Page 6

CA CONTENT STANDARDS

NOTE: [LS10] indicates standards that will be assessed on the

10 th

grade No Child Left Behind Biology/Life Science Test.

Grade 7 Focus On Life Science:

Cell Biology

1. All living organisms are composed of cells, from just one to many trillions, whose details usually are visible only through a microscope. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know … a. cells function similarly in all living organisms. b. the characteristics that distinguish plant cells from animal cells, including chloroplasts and cell walls. c. the nucleus is the repository for genetic information in plant and animal cells. [LS10] d. that mitochondria liberate energy for the work that cells do, and chloroplasts capture sunlight energy for photosynthesis. [LS10] e. cells divide to increase their numbers through a process of mitosis, which results in two daughter cells with identical sets of chromosomes. [LS10] f. that as multicellular organisms develop, their cells differentiate.

Genetics

2. A typical cell of any organism contains genetic instructions that specify its traits. Those traits may be modified by environmental influences. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know… a. the differences between the life cycles and reproduction methods of sexual and asexual organisms. [LS10] b. sexual reproduction produces offspring that inherit half their genes from each parent. c. an inherited trait can be determined by one or more genes. [LS10] d. plant and animal cells contain many thousands of different genes and typically have two copies of every gene. The two copies (or alleles) of the gene may or may not be identical, and one may be dominant in determining the phenotype while the other is recessive. [LS10] e. DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is the genetic material of living organisms and is located in the chromosomes of each cell. [LS10]

Evolution

3. Biological evolution accounts for the diversity of species developed through gradual processes over many generations. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know: … a. both genetic variation and environmental factors are causes of evolution and diversity of organisms. [LS10] b. the reasoning used by Darwin in making his conclusion that natural selection is the mechanism of evolution. [LS10] c. how independent lines of evidence from geology, fossils, and comparative anatomy provide a basis for the theory of evolution. [LS10] d. how to construct a simple branching diagram to classify living groups of organisms by shared derived characteristics, and how to expand the diagram to include fossil organisms. e. that extinction of a species occurs when the environment changes and the adaptive characteristics of a species are insufficient for its survival.

Note: This section has been moved to 6

th

grade in Long Beach to accommodate singlesemester 7

th

grade science programs.

Earth and Life History (Earth Science)

4. Evidence from rocks allows us to understand the evolution of life on Earth. As the basis for understanding this concept, students know … a. Earth processes today are similar to those that occurred in the past and slow geologic processes have large cumulative effects over long periods of time. b. the history of life on Earth has been disrupted by major catastrophic events, such as major volcanic eruptions or the impacts of asteroids. c. that the rock cycle includes the formation of new sediment and rocks and that rocks are often found in layers, with the oldest generally on the bottom. d. that evidence from geologic layers and radioactive dating indicates Earth is approximately 4.6 billion years old and that life on this planet has existed for more than 3 billion years.

Science 7 SDC - Page 7

e. fossils provide evidence of how life and environmental conditions have changed f. how movements of the Earth’s continental and oceanic plates through time, with associated changes in climate and geographical connections, have affected the past and present distribution of organisms. g. how to explain significant developments and extinctions of plant and animal life on the geologic time scale.

Structure and Function in Living Systems

5. The anatomy and physiology of plants and animals illustrate the complementary nature of structure and function. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know … a. plants and animals have levels of organization for structure and function, including cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and the whole organism. [LS10] b. organ systems function because of the contributions of individual organs, tissues, and cells. The failure of any part can affect the entire system. c. how bones and muscles work together to provide a structural framework for movement. [LS10] d. how the reproductive organs of the human female and male generate eggs and sperm and how sexual activity may lead to fertilization and pregnancy. e. the function of the umbilicus and placenta during pregnancy. f. the structures and processes by which flowering plants generate pollen, ovules, seeds, and fruit. g. how to relate the structures of the eye and ear to their functions.

Note: This section has been moved to 8

th

grade in Long Beach to accommodate singlesemester 7

th

grade science programs.

Physical Principles in Living Systems (Physical Science)

6. Physical principles underlie biological structures and functions. As a basis for understanding this concept, students know … a. visible light is a small band within a very broad electromagnetic spectrum. b. that for an object to be seen, light emitted by or scattered from it must be detected by the eye. c. light travels in straight lines if the medium it travels through does not change. d. how simple lenses are used in a magnifying glass, the eye, a camera, a telescope, and a microscope. e. that white light is a mixture of many wavelengths (colors) and that retinal cells react differently to different wavelengths. f. light can be reflected, refracted, transmitted, and absorbed by matter. g. the angle of reflection of a light beam is equal to the angle of incidence. h. how to compare joints in the body (wrist, shoulder, thigh) with structures used in machines and simple devices (hinge, ball-and-socket, and sliding joints). i. how levers confer mechanical advantage and how the application of this principle applies to the musculoskeletal system. j. that contractions of the heart generate blood pressure and that heart valves prevent backflow of blood in the circulatory system. [LS10]

Investigation & Experimentation

7.

Scientific progress is made by asking meaningful questions and conducting careful investigations. As a basis for understanding this concept and addressing the content in the other three strands, students should develop their own questions and perform investigations. Students will … a. select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data. b. use a variety of print and electronic resources (including the World Wide Web) to collect information and evidence as part of a research project. c. communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence. [LS10] d. construct scale models, maps and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge (e.g., motion of Earth’s plates and cell structure). e. communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and verbal presentations.

Science 7 SDC - Page 8

DISTRICT PERFORMANCE STANDARDS:

The Long Beach Unified School District has common assessments and assignments that are required for seventh grade science. The Performance Standard Criteria are shown in the table below. The objective is to have all students achieve at or above the Proficient Level and receive a C or better in the course. Performance level is determined by the average of the assessments or assignments.

Science Performance Standard Criteria

Graded Student Work

Standards-Based Classroom

Assessments

Written Response / Lab Report /

OES

(6 point scale)

Written Response / Lab Report /

OES

(4 point scale)

Average is a 1 or less than 60%

Less than 60%

Average is a 2 or 60% - 69%

60% - 69%

Average is a 3 or 70% - 84%

70% - 84%

Advanced

Proficient

Average is a 4 or 85% - 100%

85% - 100%

1-2 3 4 5-6

1 2 3 4

End-Of-Course Exam Less than 45% 45% - 59% 60% - 84% 85% - 100%

OUTLINE OF CONTENT AND RECOMMENDED TIME ALLOTMENT:

Content sequencing and time allocations are only suggestions and may be adjusted to suit school site curriculum plans and student needs.

SCIENCE 7

Cell Biology

1. All living organisms are composed of cells, from just one to many trillions, whose details usually are visible only through a microscope.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… cells function similarly in all living organisms.

(1,a)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Divide and Conquer

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In pairs, use cards with illustrations of unicellular and multicellular organisms and separate into appropriate stacks.

Match illustrations of cell organelles with illustrations of things with analogous functions.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Summarize the 3 points of the cell theory.

• Differentiate unicellular from multicellular organisms.

• Cite significant differences between cells in different environments (the variety of cells in animals and plants, bacteria such as Escherichia bacterium living in an intestine or a Thermophilus bacterium living in a superheated geyser).

• Explain the common functions within cells in all living organisms (i.e., all cells contain

DNA genome which is expressed by a universal code; cell division and energy production are very similar in all living cells).

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS,

Ch 1:1,2

PH FoLS, Ch 1:1-2

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

cell theory multicellular genome

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Venn diagram or double bubble(compare-contrast)

Unicellular vs. multicellular

Circle map (brainstorm) of common functions within cells within cells of all living organisms

SKILLS FOCUS:

Classifying, comparing, organizing, and contrasting

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• View prepared slide of cork cells, and different kinds of specialized cells (nerve cell, blood cell, muscle cell, Escherichia bacterium,

Thermophilus bacterium, etc.)

• Focus on LS, 1:2, Conc’s in Motion,

Interactive Table of cell structures, p. 63

• Focus on LS, 1:2, Mini Lab, “… model a cell”, p. 65

• Focus on LS, 4-in-1 Lab, The

Compound Light Microscope, pp. 1-4

• Focus on LS, Ch 1 Transparency

“Organic compounds”

“A Factory Analogy”

Wikipedia: Extremophiles http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/

Extremophile

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 9

Cell Biology (Cont’d)

1. All living organisms are composed of cells, from just one to many trillions, whose details usually are visible only through a microscope.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… the characteristics that distinguish plant cells from animal cells, including chloroplasts and cell walls. (1,b)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Your Basic Unit

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In pairs, make a wet mount slide of elodea or human cheek cells (human cells require parental permission).

Draw 3-4 cells. Label one cell.

Title the diagram. Compare group members’ diagrams.

In pairs, from a diagram of an animal and plant cell, identify each cell stating the reason and then label the organelles.

In pairs, view prepared slides of plant and animal cells.

Diagram observations on a lab sheet. Make a poster of one of the diagrams and present it to the class.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Identify the parts/ function of a compound microscope.

• Manipulate the compound microscope.

• Prepare and examine wet mount slides to identify major cell organelles that differentiate plant cells from animal cells.

• Explain that plants have rigid cell walls while animal cells have a shape defined by an underlying cytoskeleton.

• Explain that many plant cells contain chloroplasts and a central vacuole, which are not found in animal cells.

• Compare and contrast plant cells and animal cells using a

Venn diagram.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 1:2,3

PH FoLS, Ch 1:1-2

Focus on LS, Ch 1:1,2

PH FoLS, Ch 1:2

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

compound cytoplasm microscope cytoskeleton wet mount slide organelle cell wall chloroplast cell membrane central vacuole

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Venn Diagram or double bubble

(compare-contrast) and animal and a plant cell.

Label a diagram of a compound microscope

SKILLS FOCUS:

Comparing, contrasting, organizing

Construct scale models and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge.

(I&E 7.d)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Demonstrate microscope parts and use

• View plant and animal cells under microscope to compare and contrast

• Focus on LS, Brain Pop Movies online, “Cell Specialization”

• Focus on LS: 1:2, “Conc’s In

Motion”, Visualizing plant cells, p. 58, and animal cells, p. 59

• Focus on LS, 1:2, Demo., Cell Wall, p. 58

• Focus on LS, 1:2, Demo., Fluid in

Cells, p. 59

• Cell structure board game and jigsaw activity

• Micro-slides (to be used with micro viewer): Plant Cells, Animal Cells

(

Blood cell, nerve cell, cheek cell etc.)

• Model making of a wet mount slide.

KEY VOCABULARY:

DNA nucleus

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

… the nucleus is the repository for genetic information in plant and animal cells.

(1,c)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Your Basic Unit

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In pairs, build a DNA model using paper or pipe cleaners and beads. Have students give an example of a something else that serves a blueprint function (i.e., building blueprints, instructions for building a toy, recipes, engine schematics, computer programs)

Have students create a model to show by analogy why DNA is visible when condensed.

• Explain that DNA molecules contain the code, or “blueprint”, for organisms.

• Explain that the DNA molecules make up structures called chromosomes.

• Identify the nucleus and chromosomes on prepared slides of plant and/or animal cells.

• Explain that if cells are not actively dividing, the DNA will be contained within the nucleus, but is not condensed and will therefore not be visible.

• Explain that when the cell is actively dividing, the chromosomes will be condensed and visible, but the nuclear membrane will not be present. chromosomes

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Tree map of Nucleus, chromosomes, DNA, Genes

(show relationships)

SKILLS FOCUS:

Observe

Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including microscopes) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.

(I&E 7.a)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Using a microscope, view a fixed and stained section of onion root tip, focusing on the DNA within the nucleus. (Framework p.104)

• Focus on LS, 1:1, Data Lab, “… observe DNA in a cell”, p. 54

Science 7 SDC - Page 10

Cell Biology (Cont’d)

1. All living organisms are composed of cells, from just one to many trillions, whose details usually are visible only through a microscope.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… that mitochondria liberate energy for the work that cells do and chloroplasts capture sunlight energy for photosynthesis. (1,d)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Your Basic Unit

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In pairs or small groups, role play the function and structure of mitochondria and chloroplasts, using visual representations of the molecules involved.

In pairs, show how CO

2

and

H

2

0 rearrange to form glucose

– using molecular model kits or marshmallows.

In pairs, construct the balanced equation for photosynthesis. Explain orally to group members why animals depend on plant photosynthesis.

In pairs, describe the role of chloroplasts in photosynthesis.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Explain that an organism’s food is broken down by digestion into simple sugar molecules that travel to all of the individual cells.

• Demonstrate that chemical energy is stored in the bonds that hold the atoms together in a sugar molecule.

• Diagram how mitochondria in every cell efficiently extract the chemical energy from these sugar molecules by breaking the sugars (6-carbon) into carbon dioxide (1-carbon).

• Describe how the mitochondria convert the sugar’s energy into another form of chemical energy in molecules that are easily used by the cell.

• Create an analogy to express mitochondrial function such as, considering the sugar to be like crude oil that a car cannot run on until it is refined into an easily used form – gasoline.

• Explain that chloroplasts use pigments to capture the energy of sunlight.

• Make a diagram showing how the energy captured in chloroplasts drives a chemical reaction that takes carbon dioxide molecules (1-carbon) from the air and connects them together to form sugar molecules (6-carbon).

• Explain that plants are called producers because they produce (synthesize) their own food, in the form of sugar molecules, from light (photo), air, and water. This is why the process is called photosynthesis.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 1:3

PH FoLS, Ch 2:1-2

Connections

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

KEY VOCABULARY:

photosynthesis simple sugar cycle chemical energy pigment energy captured stored energy stomata source chlorophyll nitrogen cellular respiration consumers

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Circle map of photosynthesis

(adding new information in different color)

Illustrate the analogy of mitochondrial function to crude oil

SKILLS FOCUS:

Analyzing, summarizing

Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data. (I&E 7.a)

Construct scale models, maps and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge

(e.g., motion of Earth’s plates and cell structure).

(I&E 7.d)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS, 1:3, Identifying

Misconceptions, p. 69 TE

• Focus on LS: 1:2, “Conc’s In

Motion”, animation of cell resp, p. 60

• Focus on LS, 1:3, Practice Skills, p.

71 TE

• Focus on LS, 1:3, Fig. 25, p. 71

• Focus on LS, 1:3, Mini Lab, ”… see photosynthesis”, p. 73

Science 7 SDC - Page 11

Cell Biology (Cont’d)

1. All living organisms are composed of cells, from just one to many trillions, whose details usually are visible only through a microscope.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… cells divide to increase their numbers through a process of mitosis, which results in two daughter cells with identical sets of chromosomes.

(1,e)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Divide and Conquer

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In pairs, put diagrams of the stages of mitosis in proper order.

In small groups, put together a mitosis puzzle and explain the process of mitosis.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Define mitosis as the process by which individual cells reproduce themselves.

• Explain that before a cell divides, it must replicate a copy of the DNA in the nucleus and double the number of organelles in the cytoplasm, such as mitochondria and chloroplasts.

• Diagram and explain the events that occur during mitosis.

• Diagram and explain how replicated DNA chromosomes segregate so that each daughter cell receives the same number of chromosomes

(two of each type to make a diploid organism).

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 2:1

PH FoLS, Ch 2:3

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

cell division prophase chromatin metaphase mitosis anaphase cell cycle telophase diploid

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Flow chart of mitosis

Venn diagram or double bubble

Cell cycle vs. life cycle

SKILLS FOCUS:

Predicting, observing, calculating

Construct scale models, maps and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge

(e.g., motion of Earth’s plates and cell structure).

(I&E 7.d)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Micro slides: Plant Mitosis

• Focus on LS, Brain Pop Movies online, “Mitosis”

• Focus on LS, Ch 2 Transparency

“Animal Cell Division”

• Tissue Slides from SMRC

• Stained section of onion root tip showing cells undergoing mitosis with visible, condensed chromosome structures

• Class Role Play: DNA replication

CellsAlive.com: Mitosis animation http://www.cellsalive.com/mitosis. htm

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 12

Genetics

2. A typical cell of any organism contains genetic instructions that specify its traits. Those traits may be modified by environmental influences.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) is the genetic material of living organisms and is located in the chromosomes of each cell.

(2,e)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Mutations

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

Create a tree diagram,

“Chromosome Structure”, to contrast the functions of proteins and DNA in the chromosomes, including how the proteins are responsible for condensing and moving the chromosomes for replication.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Explain that the chromosomes in eukaryotes are made of a combination of DNA and protein.

• Distinguish between the roles of proteins in a chromosome, which help to support the DNA structure and functions, and

DNA, which stores all of the genetic information.

• Infer that chromosomes organize genetic information of a cell into discrete units. For instance, sex-linked traits are all located on the X and Y chromosomes.

• Recall that humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes that vary in size.

• Explain that chromosomes are normally loosely stretched out in the nucleus and are not visible under a microscope until they pull together in condensed form for mitosis.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 1:2 and 2:1, 4:2

PH FoLS, Ch 3:3 and 4:1

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

chromosomes sex-linked chromatin

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

SKILLS FOCUS:

Abstract reasoning

Construct scale models, maps and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge

(e.g., cell structure).

(I&E 7.d)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS, 4:2, Critical Thinking,

“Infer”, p. 186 TE

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 13

Cell Biology (Cont’d)

1. All living organisms are composed of cells, from just one to many trillions, whose details usually are visible only through a microscope.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… that as multicellular organisms develop, their cells differentiate. (1,f)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Divide and Conquer

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

Create an illustrated timeline showing when different cells begin to differentiate in an embryo.

Use Venn diagrams to compare and contrast different types of cells in an organism.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Examine a variety of tissue samples showing differentiated cells in plants and animals.

• Explain that all of the different cell types in a multicellular organism began as a single fertilized egg.

• Point out evidence from pictures/diagrams that at very early stages, cells begin to form distinct structures, implying that the cells are no longer identical.

• Define cells that have become identifiable types as differentiated cells.

• Cite evidence that plant cells often retain the ability to differentiate into other tissue types. For example, plants which can root from clippings.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 2:2

PH FoLS, Ch 16:1 & 23:3

Connections

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

KEY VOCABULARY:

embryo different fertilized egg differentiation

differentiated

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Flow chart: Mitosis specialization

Refer to flow chart of mitosis made for 1d

SKILLS FOCUS:

Observing, classifying, communicating, organizing

Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

(I&E 7.c)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Observe prepared slides of plant and animal tissues.

• Focus on LS, Lab, “Exploring the

Unknown”, p. 74

• Focus on LS, 2:2, Identifying

Misconceptions, p. 102 TE

• Focus on LS, Brain Pop Movies online, “Cell Specialization”

Wikipedia: cellular differentiation http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cellular_ differentiation

NOVA Online: animation of early embryo development and differentiation http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ odyssey/clips/

Science 7 SDC - Page 14

Begin District Quarter 2 (or 4) Exam Material

Genetics

2. A typical cell of any organism contains genetic instructions that specify its traits. Those traits may be modified by environmental influences.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… the differences between the life cycles and reproduction methods of sexual and asexual organisms. (2,a)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Mutations

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In small groups, make a poster or other visual of different types of asexual reproduction, including examples of each and then compare to sexual reproduction.

In small groups research common types of vegetative propagation. Each group presents a demonstration of vegetative propagation to the class.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Diagram and explain fertilization as the key step in sexual reproduction for animals when a haploid egg and sperm cell fuse to form a diploid fertilized egg

(zygote).

• Diagram the parallel sexual reproduction process in plants where pollination of haploid cells in flowering plants produces diploid seeds.

• Explain how sexual reproduction produces new organisms that are genetically related to both parents.

• Explain how hermaphroditic sexual reproduction occurs when sperm and egg generated by a single organism fuse.

• Define reproduction without fertilization as asexual.

• Describe different types of asexual reproduction (i.e., fission, budding, vegetative propagation).

• Cite examples of organisms that reproduce asexually.

• Give examples of organisms have both sexual and asexual reproduction methods.

• Explain that growth into a new adult organism involves many cell divisions (mitosis) and developmental stages.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 3:1-4

PH FoLS, Ch 8:2, 11:3,

12:1,3, and 23:2

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

fission budding

fertilization zygote pollination gymnosperm angiosperm seed sperm flower egg

hermaphroditic sexual reproduction

asexual reproduction

sexual reproduction

vegetative propagation

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Triple Venn Diagram

Sexual vs. Asexual vs. hermaphroditic reproduction

Tree Map (budding, fission, and vegetative propagation

Flow chart ( each type of reproduction

SKILLS FOCUS:

Comparing, contrasting

Communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and verbal presentations.

(I&E 7.e)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Flow chart ( each type of reproduction)

• Focus on LS, Lab, “Plant

Propogation”, pp. 158-159

• Use microscope (with Flex Cam, if available) to show budding yeast in varying temperatures of water

• Focus on LS, 3:4, Mini Lab, “How Do

Yeast Reproduce?”, p. 153

• Tell Me Why video, “Flowers”

Grow sweet potato plants in class

• Focus on LS: Ch 3 Transparencies

“It’s Raining, It’s Sporing”

“Fern Life Cycle”

“Spuds and Buds”

“Asexual Reproduction”

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 15

Structure and Function in Living Systems (cont’d)

5. The anatomy and physiology of plants and animals illustrate the complementary nature of structure and function.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

Adopted

Textbook Connections

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

… the structures and processes by which flowering plants generate pollen, ovules, seeds, and fruit.

(5,f)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Flower Power

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

Divide groups of 4 into partners and have each set of partners become experts of either male or female reproductive parts of flower.

Then each set of partners teaches the other using actual flowers.

Explain how the flower is the reproductive structure of angiosperms, which may contain male, female or both parts.

Describe the male reproductive parts of the flower, including: stamen, anther, pollen granules, filament and receptacle.

Describe the female reproductive parts of the flower, including pistil, stigma, pollen grains, style, pollen tube, ovary, ovules, and ova.

Describe the process after fertilization from seed to fruit.

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 3:2

PH FoLS, Ch 11:3

KEY VOCABULARY:

angiosperm pollen filament pollen tube pistil ovary anther style ova receptacle

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Magic Boxes vocabulary format on parts of flower

Diagram parts of flower and label and explain function of each part

Flow Map: Seed to Fruit

SKILLS FOCUS:

Observation

Select and use appropriate tools and technology (including calculators, computers, balances, spring scales, microscopes, and binoculars) to perform tests, collect data, and display data.

(I&E 7.a)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS, Virtual Lab “The Simple

Life: What is the life cycle of a simple plant?” at ca7.msscience.com

• Focus on LS, 3:2, Demo., “Plant

Reproduction”, p. 137 TE

• Focus on LS, 3:2, Mini Lab “What’s in a flower?”, p. 138

• Focus on LS, 3:2, Conc’s in Motion: animation of the angiosperm life cycle, p. 139

• Focus on LS, 3:2, Demo., “Model

Diversity” using fruit, p 140 TE

• Focus on LS, Ch 3 Transparency

“It’s Raining, It’s Sporing?”

Science 7 SDC - Page 16

Structure and Function in Living Systems (cont’d)

5. The anatomy and physiology of plants and animals illustrate the complementary nature of structure and function.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

Adopted

Textbook Connections

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

NOTE: This unit requires parent notification.

… how the reproductive organs of the human female and male generate eggs and sperm and how sexual activity may lead to fertilization and pregnancy.

(5,d)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Life Begins

CR: Can’t You See it?

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

Individuals use chart from

Focus on LS, “Reading Tip” p.

729, (teacher note: leave out the names of the male and female reproductive systems for the students to complete).

Describe the male reproduction system, including testes, scrotum, and sperm.

Describe sperm production from immature cells in the walls of the seminiferous tubules to flagellated cells stored in the

• epididymis.

Explain that during sexual arousal millions of sperm are transported to the urethra and ejaculated through the penis and that some may exit before ejaculation without the man’s

• knowledge.

Explain how sexual activity without ejaculation can release sperm causing fertilization and

• pregnancy.

Describe the female

• reproduction system.

Explain ovulation following the path of the egg (oocyte) from a ruptured follicle of the ovaries

(ovulation), to the Fallopian tubes, and uterus.

Explain how a sperm can be deposited in or near the vagina

• and can fertilize the egg.

Describe pregnancy from the implantation and development of the fertilized egg in the uterus tothe delivery of a baby,

• typically 9 months later.

Explain the physiology of why menstruation occurs noting that when the cycle stops, this can be the first sign of pregnancy.

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 13:1

PH FoLS, 23:2,3

KEY VOCABULARY:

penis ovaries testes ovulation scrotum oocyte urethra vagina ejaculation uterus fertilization menstruation pregnancy follicle embryo fetus

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Label diagrams of male and female reproduction systems

Flow chart: path traveled by sperm through male reproduction system

Flow Chart: path traveled by egg through female reproduction system

SKILLS FOCUS:

Evaluating, predicting, graphing

Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

(I&E 7.c)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

NOVA Video: “The Miracle of Life”,

60 min.,

(CA standards 5,d and 5,e)

• Focus on LS: 13:1 Data Lab, “Which hormones control ovulation?”, p. 509

• Focus on LS: Ch 13 Transparencies

“Thoughts on Reproduction”

“Male and Female Reproductive

Systems”

“Fertilization”

Science 7 SDC - Page 17

Structure and Function in Living Systems (cont’d)

5. The anatomy and physiology of plants and animals illustrate the complementary nature of structure and function.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

NOTE: This unit requires parent notification.

… the function of the umbilicus and placenta during pregnancy. (5,e)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Life Begins

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In a small group create a 3part outline from text: 1) placenta; 2) umbilical cord; 3) list drugs & diseases passed from mother to baby.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

Explain the role of the placenta in a developing fetus.

Explain the role of the umbilical cord (noting that the blood of the mother and fetus do not mix

• together).

Discuss how drugs, alcohol and infectious viruses, including

HIV, can easily pass from the mother’s blood to the blood of the fetus.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 13:2

PH FoLS, Ch 23:3

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Tree Maps: Structures and functions of Umbilical cord and of placenta

SKILLS FOCUS:

Comparing

Utilize a variety of print and electronic resources (including the

World Wide Web) to collect information as evidence as part of a research project.

(I&E 7.b)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS: 13:2, “Conc’s in Motion”

Interactive Table about the stages of pregnancy, p. 516

• Focus on LS: 13:2, Data Lab: “folic acid … birth defects?”, p. 519

• Focus on LS: 13:2, “Conc’s In

Motion”, Interactive Table on stages of pregnancy, p. 516

• Focus on LS: 13:2, Design Your Own

Lab, “A Healthy Pregnancy” , p. 522-

523

• Focus on LS: 13:2, Real World

Science: Science & Society, p. 525

• Focus on LS, Ch 13 Transparencies

“A New Development”

“Human Development”

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 18

Genetics (cont’d)

2. A typical cell of any organism contains genetic instructions that specify its traits. Those traits may be modified by environmental influences.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… sexual reproduction produces offspring that inherit half their genes from each parent. (2,b)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Mutations

CR: In the Pink

CR: A Very Hairy Problem

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

Create a color-coded diagram to represent chromosomes in a sperm cell and an egg cell.

Using a third color, show the

DNA in the mitochondria of the egg. Show how the DNA in the nucleus of the zygote is a mixture of DNA from both parents, while the mitochondrial DNA remains the same.

… an inherited trait can be determined by one or more genes.

(2,c)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: In the Pink

CR: A Very Hairy Problem

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

Have pairs of students sketch an organism pointing out traits which are controlled by single genes and others which are controlled by multiple genes.

Cite evidence for each.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Illustrate how sexual reproduction combines genetic material from two distinct cells to form a new and unique combination.

• Show by models or illustrations that nearly half of the genetic material comes from each parent.

• Define genes as portions of the

DNA that code for specific traits.

• Define inherited traits as physical characteristics that have been passed down through generations by DNA.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 3:1-3

mitochondrial DNA: p 65 and p 187 “Maternal Inheritance”

PH FoLS, Ch 3:2 and 4:1

Focus on LS, Ch 4:2

PH FoLS, Ch 4:1

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

offspring probability genotype trait

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Diagram of Chromosome Path from parents using illustration of a mother and father. (Kim Dalton’s)

SKILLS FOCUS:

Inferring, classifying

Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

(I&E 7.c)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Use of Blood Type chart( shows which combinations of alleles result in each blood type)

Focus on LS, 3:1, Science Skills,

“Make a Table”, p. 128 TE

• Focus on LS: Ch 3 Transparency

”Fertilization”

KEY VOCABULARY:

gene pedigree

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

SKILLS FOCUS:

Observation, logic

Utilize a variety of print and electronic resources (including the

World Wide Web) to collect information as evidence as part of a research project.

(I&E 7.b)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS, 4:2, Science Concepts,

“Activity”, p. 184 TE

• Focus on LS: Ch 4 Transparency

”Genetic Inheritance”

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 19

Genetics (cont’d)

2. A typical cell of any organism contains genetic instructions that specify its traits. Those traits may be modified by environmental influences.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… plant and animal cells contain many thousands of different genes and typically have two copies of every gene.

The two copies (or alleles) of the gene may or may not be identical, and one may be dominant in determining the phenotype while the other is recessive. (2,d)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: In the Pink

CR: A Very Hairy Problem

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In pairs, create a diagram of a diploid chromosome with areas labeled for various genes. Show how the two resulting gametes will carry different alleles for the same gene trait.

Individuals, pairs, and groups work out problems of varying degrees of difficulty on Punnett squares. (Blood type problems are excellent.)

In pairs, research an area of interest in genetics and report to class with visuals of choice.

In pairs, research genetic disorders and present to class.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Analyze traits of people to appreciate that there are tens of thousands of traits controlled by genes.

• Explain that genes exist in multiple versions, called alleles.

• Account for the diversity of individuals by explaining that every person has the same genes as other people, but in a combination of alleles unique to the individual.

• Logically show that by definition, diploid organisms will have two copies (or alleles) of every gene, which may be identical or different.

• Explain that one of the alleles in a pair may be dominant over the other (recessive allele) so that it is expressed outwardly.

• Define phenotype as the outward expression of genes as traits.

• Predict phenotypic expression of traits in offspring of sexual reproduction using a 2x2

Punnett square.

• Explain that genetic disorders are not caused by the presence of a gene that other individuals lack. They are caused by an abnormal allele being expressed.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 4:1,2

PH FoLS, Ch 3:1,2 and 4:2

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

alleles

dominant genotype recessive phenotype

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Pre-made Punnett square to interpret the phenotype and genotype relationship (CA

Framework, p. 108)

SKILLS FOCUS:

Diagram, organize

Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

(I&E 7.c)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS, 4:1, Practice Skills,

“Make a Table”, p. 174 TE

• Focus on LS, 4:1, Science Concepts,

“Use Models”, p. 1774 TE

• Focus on LS, Ch4 Transparency

“Pedigree”

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 20

Evolution

3. Biological evolution accounts for the diversity of species developed through gradual processes over many generations.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… both genetic variation and environmental factors are causes of evolution and diversity of organisms.

(3,a)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Adapt or Die

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In pairs, collect pictures of various organisms. Have students choose an organism and list as many special adaptations as they can, which enable that organism to survive in its environment. The pair then shares their observations with the class.

Extend the previous activity by having students think of an environmental change, which would cause an adaptation they described to be unfavorable to the organism.

… the reasoning used by Darwin in making his conclusion that natural selection is the mechanism of evolution.

(3,b)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Adapt or Die

:

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In small groups research and make a list of animals and/or plants that are extinct and those that are endangered.

Being guided by the theories of “natural selection” and

“struggle for existence” discuss and predict why each of the animals or plants is on this list.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• List examples of variations among individuals in a population.

• Explain that genetic variability means there are favorable and unfavorable traits in a population.

• Discuss how genetic homogeneity (ex. cheetah) makes a population more susceptible to extinction (ex. succumbing to an infectious disease for which there is no natural resistance).

• Give reasons why genetic variation is important for survival.

• Explain that environmental factors (such as habitat loss, climate change, and the introduction of non-native species) may be a cause of natural selection.

• Define natural selection, noting that it is considered the primary mechanism for evolution.

• Provide examples of how differences in offspring occur randomly and may affect an individual’s ability to survive and reproduce.

• Give examples of environment and ecological conditions that affect the survival and reproduction of species.

• State the reasoning and evidence that Darwin gave in forming his law of natural selection.

• Explain how natural selection accounts for the great variety of species seen today, and for the great number of extinct and non-extinct species found in the fossil record.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on Life

Science, Ch 5:1,2, 6:1

PH FoLS: Ch 5:1

Focus on LS, Ch 5:1

PH FoLS, Ch 5:1,2

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

environmental factors genetic variation

evolution species theory variation populations extinction ancestry

selection

genetic

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Multiflow map: organisms/environmental condition change/adaptation

SKILLS FOCUS:

Interpreting data, drawing conclusions

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS: 5:1, Launch Lab,

“…attracts insects to flowers?” p. 207

• Focus on LS: 5:1, Mini Lab, “…the strongest survivors?”, p. 228

• Focus on LS: 4-in-1 Lab, “Differences in Species”, pp. 23-24

• Focus on LS: 4-in-1 Lab, “Seed

Adaptations”, p. 33-36

• Focus on LS: Culturally Responsive

Teaching, “… Seeds for a Healthy

Planet”, p. 19

• Focus on LS: Ch 5 Transparencies

“It’s a Camel Now”

“A Family Reunion”

KEY VOCABULARY:

natural selection species

Charles Darwin offspring fossil record environment

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Tree Map or Outline: Darwin and

Natural Selection

Circle Map: Natural Selection

SKILLS FOCUS:

Comparing, observing, interpreting data, inferring

Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

(I&E 7.c)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS: 5:1, Mini Lab “… shape of a bird’s beak …?”, p. 214

• Focus on LS: 4-in-1 Lab, “Bird Beaks and Physical Adaptations”, p. 25-28

• Focus on LS: 5:2, Design Your Own

Lab, “… apply … natural selection to island species?”, p. 230-231

• Focus on LS: 6:4, Real World

Science, p. 268-269

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 21

Evolution (cont’d)

3. Biological evolution accounts for the diversity of species developed through gradual processes over many generations.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… how independent lines of evidence from geology, fossils, and comparative anatomy provide a basis for the theory of evolution. (3,c)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: The Leg Bon’s Connected to the …

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

Graph a curve to show half-life decay of a radioactive isotope.

Use this graph to predict the age of a given sample.

In pairs, orally explain radioactive dating and relative dating evidences and how they support the theory of evolution.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Describe the process of fossilization and explain how fossils preserve evidence of ancient life.

• Cite evidence from comparative anatomy

(homologous structures) that can be seen as evidence that all vertebrates descended from a common ancestor.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 6:1,2

7:1,2

PH FoLS: Ch 5:2-3 & 6:1-4

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

evolution theory homologous structures absolute age dating radioactive dating relative age dating comparative anatomy fossil record variation fossil fossilization anatomy paleontologist population geology vertebrates protein

Law of Superposition

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Flow Chart: Change in plants/animals over time

Circle Map: Fossils

SKILLS FOCUS:

Classifying, organizing, inferring, drawing conclusions, comparing, contrasting

Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

(I&E 7.c)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS: 6:1, Mini Lab, “How do fossils form,?” p. 249

• Focus on LS: 6:2, Data Lab, “… proteins tell us about evolution” p. 255

• Focus on LS: Ch 6 Transparencies

“Fossil Formation”

“Guess Again”

“Ancient Geography”

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 22

Evolution (cont’d)

3. Biological evolution accounts for the diversity of species developed through gradual processes over many generations.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

…how to construct a simple branching diagram to classify living groups of organisms by shared derived characteristics and how to expand the diagram to include fossil organisms.

(3,d)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

PT: A Leafy Situation

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In small groups, create a poster on one Kingdom from students’ Tree Maps. Display the posters for a Carousel activity, where groups move from poster from poster, either writing or illustrating what they are learning.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Define systematics as the classification of organisms according to their characteristics.

• Discuss how classification groups organisms together based on shared characteristics (using the system developed by Carolus

Linnaeus).

• Create a branching tree diagram that shows the probable evolutionary relationships among living organisms and their ancestors.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 6:4

PH FoLS, 5:2 7:3

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

systematics classification branching tree diagram ancestors evolutionary relationships

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Tree map: 6 Kingdoms

SKILLS FOCUS:

Comparing, contrasting, inferring, interpreting data, diagraming, organizing, classifying

Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

(I&E 7.c)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS: 6:4, “Conc’s In Motion”,

Interactive Table of levels of classification, p. 263

• Focus on LS: 6:4, Mini Lab, “… create a dichotomous key?”, p. 264

• Focus on LS: 6:4, Lab “Classifying the

Students in your Class”, p. 266-267

• Focus on LS: 4-in-1 Lab,

“Classification”, p. 29-31

• Focus on LS: 4-in-1 Lab, “Designing a

Classification System” , p. 97-98

• Focus on LS: Ch 6 Transparencies

“It’s a Bird! It’s a Plane! It’s all of the Above!”

“Modern Classification”

“Bear Evolution”

• Focus on LS: Ch 8 Transparencies

“Geologic Time”

“Geologic Time Scale”

Berkeley/NSF: Cladistics “T-Rex” http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/ education/explorations/tours/Trex/ index.html

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 23

Evolution (cont’d)

3. Biological evolution accounts for the diversity of species developed through gradual processes over many generations.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… that extinction of a species occurs when the environment changes and the adaptive characteristics of a species are insufficient for its survival. (3,e)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Adapt or Die

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In pairs, write an explanation of the “fossil record”, making sure to cover that most species on Earth are now extinct.

In pairs, list extinct species and research specific factors that contributed to the extinction and report findings to class.

In small groups list ways an environment might change for its organisms. Then, list ways an organism might adapt in order to survive in that changing environment.

Refer to American Field Guide activity from 3c.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

• Explain how the fossil record indicates that most of the species that once lived on

Earth are now extinct.

• Enumerate specific factors that contribute to species extinction.

• Describe how extinction of a species occurs when adaptive characteristics of the species are no longer sufficient to allow the species to survive under changing environmental conditions.

• Discuss how random mutations may result in variations of traits that give some organisms advantages to survive changing environmental conditions.

• Cite examples of factors that affect the process of natural selection (overproduction, competition, and variations).

• Describe how natural selection will ultimately lead to the existence of populations better able to survive and reproduce in the current environmental conditions.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 5:2,

6:3,

Ch 8:2,3 p. 324-343

PH FoLS, 5:1,2 3:4

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

species environment mutations overproduction competition variation geographic isolation populations

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Multiflow Map: Extinction is the event with names of Organisms listed on left and the reasons for extinction listed on right.

Multiflow Map: Survival is the event with examples of environmental changes on left and the adaptations listed on right.

SKILLS FOCUS:

Comparing, contrasting, inferring, interpreting data, making models, classifying

Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

(I&E 7c)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS, 5;2, “Conc’s In Motion”,

Interactive Table on causes of extinction, p. 226

• Focus in LS, 5:2, Science & Society,

“Habitat Degradation …”, p. 233

• Focus on LS, 8:3, Lab, “…CA Change over geologic time”, p. 342-343

• Focus on LS, Ch 5 Transparency

“Skull Shape and the Brain”

• Focus on LS, Ch 6 Transparency

“Ancient Geography”

“Mountain Building and Evolution”

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 24

Structure and Function in Living Systems

5. The anatomy and physiology of plants and animals illustrate the complementary nature of structure and function.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… plants and animals have levels of organization for structure and function, including cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, and the whole organism.

(5,a)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Organized Organisms

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In small groups, using diagrams of amoeba, explain and write how it performs all functions necessary to live.

In small groups, make an analogy from a student’s life to compare to the organization of structure of an organism (see examples in task analysis).

In pairs, research mitochondria in athletics and the importance of mitochondria in muscle contraction. Have pairs present to small groups.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

Explain how a one-celled organism (such as an amoeba) performs all of the functions necessary for life.

Explain that plants and animals

• are multicellular organisms.

Cite specific examples of cellular specialization

(differentiation).

Give several examples of cells which function together as tissue, which is part of an organ within an organ system, which is necessary for the life of an organism.

Provide analogies from the community or school of similar organizational structures. For instance, an athlete (cell) works as part of a team (tissue), which represents its school (organ) and school district (organ system) providing healthy activity and attitudes that benefit the nation (organism).

Describe how the musculoskeletal system of animals is made up of many

• muscle groups.

Explain the organization of a muscle, starting with its organelles (such as mitochondria that provide energy for muscle contraction), to groups of muscle cells to bundles of muscle fibers that together enable the organism to move.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 2:2,

Ch 9:1, p. 364-365

PH FoLS, 16:1, 7:1, 17:2, and 22:1,2

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

multicellular musculoskeletal tissue bundle organ fiber organ system

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Flow map: Show the organization of structure of an organism (from cell to whole organism)

Flow map: Organization of structure of a plant

Review from 1a Venn diagrams: unicellular vs. multicellular

Diagram and label parts of amoeba

Diagram cell, emphasize mitochrondria; label and describe function

Flow map: cells of musculoskeletal system

SKILLS FOCUS:

Organizing, analyzing

Communicate the logical connection among hypothesis, science concepts, tests conducted, data collected, and conclusions drawn from the scientific evidence.

(I&E 7.c)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS, 2:2, Mini Lab, “What is a

Tissue?”, p. 103

• Focus on LS: 5;2, “Conc’s In Motion”,

Interactive Table on human organ systems, p. 105

• Focus on LS, 2:2, Demo., Bone

Tissues, p. 106

• Focus on LS, 2:2, Design your own lab, “Design an Organ”, p. 108-109

• Focus on LS, 2:2, Virtual Lab “Cell,

How do animal and plant cells work?”, p. 106 TE

• Focus on LS, Ch 2 Transparency

“At Home in the Salt”

• Focus on LS, Ch 9 Transparency

“Human Bones”

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 25

Structure and Function in Living Systems (cont’d)

5. The anatomy and physiology of plants and animals illustrate the complementary nature of structure and function.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… organ systems function because of the contributions of individual organs, tissues, and cells. The failure of any part can affect the entire system.

(5,b)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Organized Organisms

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In small groups, draw, color and build the pulmonary and circulatory systems – or – use pre-made diagrams to color and cut.

In small groups, write an explanation of the function of each of these systems and post with their colorful diagrams. Add an extra diagram to show what causes one of the problems listed in the last section of the task analysis.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

Review (from grade 5) how oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged in the lungs and body tissues.

Explain how the pulmonary – circulatory system functions as a whole.

Describe how heart attacks, suffocation, pneumonia, and strokes are each caused by a particular failure of the pulmonary-circulatory system.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 2:2, and 10:1,2

PH FoLS, 15:3, 19:1-4, and 20:1

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

pulmonary circulatory lungs artery diaphragm vein pneumonia capillaries alveoli atherosclerosis heart attack suffocation stroke shock

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Tree Maps: Pulmonary and

Circulatory Systems, include consequences of systems breakdown and/or failure.

SKILLS FOCUS:

Modeling

Utilize a variety of print and electronic resources (including the

World Wide Web) to collect information as evidence as part of a research project..

(I&E 7.b)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS, 10:1, Launch Lab:

“Does your pulse change?”, p. 389

• Focus on LS, 10:1, Science

Concepts, Activity, p. 394

• Focus on LS, 10:1, Demo., “Air

Pressure”, p. 397

• Focus on LS, 10:1, Conc’s in Motion,

Interactive Table on components of whole blood, p. 397

• Focus on LS, 10:1, Data Lab, “… illness affect the cardiopulmonary system?”, p. 404

• Focus on LS, 10:1, Virtual Lab

“Hypertension”, p 389

• Focus on LS, 10:2, Demo., “Model a

Diaphragm” , p. 407

• Focus on LS, 10:2, Science Concepts

Activity, “Heart Rate”, p. 408

• Focus on LS, 10:2, Conc’s in Motion: animation of blood flow through the heart, p. 409

• Focus on LS, 10:2, Mini Lab “… cardiopulmonary system”, p. 412

• Focus on LS, 10:2, Applying Math

“Blood Pressure Variations”, p. 413

• Focus on LS, 10:2, Design Your Own

Lab “Model and Invent”, p. 414-415

• Focus on LS, 10:2, Real World

Science: Science &Career, p. 416

• Focus on LS, Ch 10 Transparencies

“A friend in need”

“Circulation”

“How to Relax in Traffic”

• Focus on LS, Ch 1 Transparency

“Oxygen and the Body”

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 26

Structure and Function in Living Systems (cont’d)

5. The anatomy and physiology of plants and animals illustrate the complementary nature of structure and function.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… how bones and muscles work together to provide a structural framework for movement. (5,c)

[LS10]

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: Cooperative Movement

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In small groups, do Focus on

LS, p. 539, “Check Your

Progress”: Allow students to sketch each other moving slowly, particularly arm movements of flexion, extension and curling.

Individually, explain and write how skeletal muscles work in pairs and give examples.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

Describe how the skeletal system provides support and

• protection to the body.

Describe the relationships between muscles, tendons and

• bones with the nervous system.

Explain how contraction and relaxation of different muscle groups cause movement.

Demonstrate examples of flexion and extension, such as with the biceps and triceps, describing what happens to the angle between the humerus and ulna during these coordinated

• movements.

Discuss the roles of opposing muscle groups.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 9:1

PH FoLS, 17:1-3

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

tendon biceps ligament triceps contraction humerus relaxation ulna

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Tee Map: Skeletal and Muscular

Systems

Flow map: one movement of arm

Diagram and label bones, muscles and tendons of the arm, explain the relationship of each.

SKILLS FOCUS:

Observe, experiment

Communicate the steps and results from an investigation in written reports and verbal presentations.

(I&E 7.e)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS, Virtual Labs, “Bones”, p. 357

• Focus on LS, 9:1, Demo., “Flexion”, p. 364 TE

• Focus on LS, 9:1, Mini Lab “How do bones and muscles interact?”, p. 366

• Focus on LS, 9:1, Real World

Science: Career and Society, p. 380-

381

• Focus on LS, Ch 9 Transparency

“No Sweat”

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 27

Structure and Function in Living Systems (cont’d)

5. The anatomy and physiology of plants and animals illustrate the complementary nature of structure and function.

Standards and

Assessments

“Students know…”

… how to relate the structures of the eye and ear to their functions.

(5,g)

DISTRICT ASSESSMENTS:

CR: The Eyes Have it

MODIFIED ASSESSMENTS:

In pairs, trace the path of a sound wave as it passes through the parts of the ear, naming each part, use Fig. 23, p.707, Focus on LS.

In pairs, explain and write what happens when sound waves reach the eardrum. See Focus on LS p. 707, “Using Visuals”,

Fig. 23.

In pairs, explain and write what happens to vibrations as they pass through the ear. Fig. 23

In small groups, role-play the parts of the ear with each person assigned a part of the ear. Then the part is described, pointed out on a visual and then its function is explained in relation to the other parts.

In small groups, role-play the parts of the eye (using the same format as the ear) and identify each part and explain its function.

Task Analysis

“Students are able to …”

Identify and explain the function of the different parts of the eye, including: retina, iris, pupil, lens, cone cells and rod cells.

Explain the structure and function of the different parts of the human ear, including external ear (of humans and other mammals), middle ear, tympanic membrane, malleus, incus, stapes, inner ear.

Identify the different parts of the ear and explain how those parts work together to transmit sensory information through sound waves.

Adopted

Textbook

Correlation(s)

Focus on LS, Ch 11:4, and 12:1,2

PH FoLS, Ch 22:4

Connections

KEY VOCABULARY:

iris malleus pupil incus retina stapes cone cell inner ear rod cell

GRAPHIC ORGANIZERS:

Diagram, label and explain the function of the ear and the eye

Brace Maps of the eye and ear

SKILLS FOCUS:

Analyzing, making models

Construct scale models and appropriately labeled diagrams to communicate scientific knowledge.

(I&E 7.d)

LABS / DEMOS / VISUALS:

• Focus on LS: 11:4, p. 451 Identifying

Misconceptions: seeing in the dark; have students test iris response to light and dark

• Focus on LS: 11:4, “Conc’s in Motion” animation of lens and light through eye, p. 452

• Focus on LS: 11:4, “Conc’s in Motion”

Interactive table on structures and functions of the eye, p. 453

• Focus on LS: 11:4, Lab, “Can a cow teach you about your eyes?”, p. 458-

459

• Focus on LS: 11:4, Real World

Science: Science & Technology, p. 460

• Focus on LS: 12:1, Launch Lab: “How many sounds can you make?”, p. 469

• Focus on LS: 12:1, Demo., “Vibrations

Cause Sound”, p. 472

• Focus on LS: 12:2, Mini Lab “How does the ear hear?”, p. 489

• Focus on LS: 12:2, Lab “Animal

Hearing”, p. 490-491

• Focus on LS: 12:2, Real World

Science: Science & Technology, p. 492

• Focus on LS: Ch 11 Transparency

“The Eye”

• Focus on LS: Ch 12 Transparency

“The Ear”

“Sound”

Appx

Time

(per 180 days)

Science 7 SDC - Page 28

APPLICATION OF COURSE CONTENT:

Career Connection:

Related Major Skills & Characteristics

objective observation, careful measurement, curiosity, problem solving, organizational skills, numerical reasoning, ability to analyze & interpret data, critical thinking, reading comprehension, concise and accurate communication skills, computer literacy, logical thinking, team skills, testing skills, practical safety awareness, evidence evaluating

Related Careers

Students who continue in the sciences can prepare for the following careers:

Aeronautical Engineer Chemical Engineer Mining Geologist Physiologist

(Rocket Scientist)

Agricultural Ecologist

Analytical Chemist

Aquatic Microbial Ecologist

Astronomer

Automotive Engineer

Biochemist

Biologist

Biotechnologist

Botanist

Cell Biologist

Electrical Engineer

Energy

Fire Fighter

Geologist

Geneticist

Immunologist

Marine Biologist

Materials Scientist

Medical Researcher

Meteorologist

Microbiologist

National Park Ranger

Neurobiologist

Nuclear Physicist

Nurse

Paleontologist

Pathologist

Pediatrician

Petroleum Geologist

Pharmacist

Physician

Physicist

Professor

Quality Control Specialist

Radiologist

Refrigeration Technician

Science Fiction Writer

Seismologist

Teacher

Technical Editor

Veterinarian

Virologist

Wildlife Ecologist

METHODS:

Lesson Design & Delivery:

Teachers will incorporate these components of lesson design during direct instruction and inquiry activities. The order of components is flexible, depending on the teacher’s vision for the individual lesson. For instance, the objective and purpose, while present in the teacher’s lesson plan, are not made known to the students at the beginning of an inquiry lesson.

Anticipatory Set

E

ssential

E

lements of

Objective

Standard Reference

Purpose

E

ffective

I

nstruction

Model for Lesson Design

Using Task Analysis

Input

Modeling

Check for Understanding

Guided Practice

Closure

Independent Practice

Some components may occur once in a lesson, but others will recur many times. Checking for understanding occurs continually; input, modeling, guided practice and closure may occur several times. There may even be more than one anticipatory set when more than one content piece is introduced.

Active Participation:

Teachers will incorporate the principles of active participation and specific strategies to ensure consistent, simultaneous involvement of the minds of all learners in the classroom. Teachers should include both covert and overt active participation strategies, incorporating cooperative learning structures and brain research.

Some of the possible active participation strategies include:

COVERT

• Recall

• Imagine

• Observe

• Consider

OVERT

(Oral)

• Pair/Share

• Idea Wave

• Choral Response

• Give One, Get One

• Socratic Seminar

• Cooperative Discussion

Groups (i.e.Talking Chips,

Gambit Chips)

OVERT

(Written)

• Restate in Journals / Notes

• Response Boards

• Graphic Organizers

• Folded Paper

• Ticket Out of Class

OVERT

(Gestures)

• Hand Signals

• Model with Manipulatives

• Stand up/ Sit down

• Point to Examples

Science 7 SDC - Page 29

Baldridge Quality Tools:

Students can become more positively involved in their education through goal setting, self-assessment, and data tracking and analysis by making use of the following strategies:

BALDRIDGE TOOL PURPOSES

Affinity Diagram

Flowchart

– finding consensus, organizing complex information

– describing a process, planning a project, identifying problem steps in a process

Force Field Diagram – identifying obstacles, finding causes and solutions to problems

Issues / Ideas Bin – handling individual questions/requests without stopping a group activity, providing

Data Folder

Plus / Delta anonymous input, obtaining diverse input in specific areas.

– tracking goals and actual results

– tracking improvement efforts, identifying opportunities for change, finding out what’s working and what’s not working in a process, procedure, activity, etc.

Class Data Graphs – displaying trends for goal setting

Learning styles and learning challenges of your students may be addressed by implementing combinations of the following:

Reading Strategies in Science SDAIE Strategies for English

Learners

‰ Pre-teaching

‰ Vocabulary

‰ Pre-reading

Structures

‰ Trail

Teaching

Knowledge (Graphic

Organizers, Schema)

‰ Grouping

Intelligences

‰ Adapt the Text

Learning

(Manipulatives, Visuals)

‰ Lower the Affective Filter

(including Processing Time)

(including Cultural Aspects)

Significant, Proven Science Strategies for ALL Science Students

Differentiation for Advanced

Learners

‰ Curriculum

Assignments

‰ Flexible

‰ Acceleration

‰ Depth and Complexity

Study

‰ Inquiry

Presentations

‰ Essential

‰ Summarization

‰ Peer

Speakers

Please note that these strategies often overlap and should not be limited to specifically defined courses or student populations.

MATERIALS:

Basic Textbook and Supplementary Materials:

Glencoe Science: Focus on Life Science,

McGraw-Hill Glencoe, 2007

Science Online: ca7.msscience.com

- Study Tools, Extensions, For Teachers safety equipment: goggles, latex gloves, fire extinguisher glassware: flasks, beakers, test tubes, etc. measuring devices: triple beam balance, rulers, volumetric containers chemical reagents microscopes, microviewers, hand lenses, dissection equipment appropriate technology

™ Many items are available through Science/Math Resource Center (SMRC).

Science 7 SDC - Page 30

SUPPORT FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS:

Resources Accompanying the Basic Text:

Printed Study Guide (chapter summaries) available in five languages

Student workbooks available in Spanish

Text chapters on audiocassette available in English and Spanish

Unit review videos available in English and Spanish

Suggested alternate/supplemental activities geared for ELL’s

• Hands-on activities and projects

• Supplemental audio/visual content materials

• Computer resources available through software and the internet

• Newspapers and magazines

• Guest speakers

• Posters and models

• Graphs and data tables

• Music and songs

RESOURCES:

Documents

‰

Science Framework: ..............

http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/pn/fd/documents/scienceframework.pdf

[or find it posted in sections at the LBUSD Science Office website]

‰

‰

‰

‰

CST / NCLB Test Blueprints: ............................

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/blueprints.asp

CST Reference Sheets: ......................................

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/cstsciref.asp

CST Released Test Questions ............................

http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/sr/css05rtq.asp

National Science Standards: ....................

http://www.nap.edu/readingroom/books/nses/html/

‰

‰

Science Safety Handbook for CA Public Schools (1999) can be ordered from the CDE at ....................................

http://www.cde.ca.gov/re/pn/rc/

LBUSD Approved Chemicals List

,

Chemical Hygiene Plan

, and

Science Fair

Resources: http://www.lbusd.k12.ca.us/Main_Offices/Curriculum/Areas/Science/teacher_resources.cfm

District Offices

‰

Science Curriculum Office

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2963) o

K-12 science standards, curriculum, professional development, science fair

‰

Science / Math Resource Center (SMRC)

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2964) o hands-on materials, consumable material orders, alternative standards-based curriculum packets

‰

Instructional Materials Workshop (IMW) o standards-based instructional materials o content integrated instructional materials

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2965) o wood shop / lumber room o copying, enlarging, and laminating o

monthly supplements for science

‰

Office of Multimedia Services (OMS)

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 7145) o videos for check out to fit the curriculum (see your librarian for current catalogs) o district TV channels programming

‰

PALMS Office

Program Assistance for

(562) 8031) o technical assistance and professional development for English Language Development (ELD) and Specially

Designed Academic Instruction In English (SDAIE) o assistance in the implementation and maintenance of programs addressing the needs of English Language

Learners (ELLs)

‰

Health Curriculum Office o curriculum and training for mandated health content

(562) 997-8000 (ext. 2967)

Science 7 SDC - Page 31

EVALUATION:

Student achievement in this course will be measured using multiple assessment tools.

Assessments will be used for diagnosing student understanding before instruction, monitoring student learning during instruction, and evaluating student understanding after instruction.

SUGGESTED EVALUATION TOOLS:

Source Diagnose Monitor Evaluate

District Developed

Assessments

Glencoe Science:

Focus on Life Science

Teacher Developed

Assessments

Grade Level Pretest

Reading Essentials:

Before You Read

Launch Labs

New Vocabulary

Pre-quiz

Pre-Test

Vocab. Knowledge Rating

Open-Ended Science

Performance Task

Reading Check questions

Science Notebook, “

Summarize It”

Lesson Review:

Summarize, Using

Vocabulary, Understanding Main Ideas,

Applying Science

Reading Essentials:

Think it Over,

Reading Check, Picture This

Applying Math

Foldables

Active Folders

Mini Lab and Lab

Standards Review

Warm-Up

Quiz

Proving Behavior

Lab

End of Course Exam

Standards Assessment

Performance Assessment

Sci Activities for Adv. Learners

Chapter & Unit Tests

Rubric Scored Projects, Labs, and

Writings

Chapter / Unit Test

Practicum

Semester Final Exam

SUGGESTED GRADE WEIGHTING:

(with some possible examples) o objective tests including comprehensive finals o performance tasks (rubric scored) o open-ended questions (rubric scored) o

portfolios o

student not more than 10% o

discovery o assignments reinforcing class lesson o

essays o

organization o

research o

lab o

active o science fair projects o research-based reports and projects o note taking skills o

organization o

oral o individual and group projects and assessments

Submitted by: Eric Brundin (S. Garcia)

STANDARD GRADING SCALE:

Advanced Proficient

...........................................................................................................................................

A 90 – 100%

B 80 – 89%

Proficient

C 70 – 79%

....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Partial Proficient

...........................................................................................................................................

D 60 – 69%

Not Proficient

Revised Board Date: 10/4/11

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