Section V - Technical Information
SECTION
V
Technical
Information
INDEX
Technical Information Index
List of Abbreviations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V2
National Electrical Code (NEC) Requirements . . .V3
Associations, Organizations and Standards . .V4, V5
Certification Agencies and Markings . . . . . . . . . .V5
UL, CSA and NEMA Standards
Pertaining to Leviton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V6
High-Abuse, UL Listed
Hospital Grade Wiring Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V7
Glossary of Electrical Wiring Device Terms . .V8–V10
Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V11
Dimmers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V11
Receptacles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V11, V12
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI’s) . . . . .V12
Enclosure Classifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V13–V15
Materials Used in Wiring Devices . . . . . . .V15, V16
ANSI Architectural Symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V17
NEMA Straight Blade Configurations . . . . . . . . .V18
NEMA Locking Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V19
Horsepower Ratings for NEMA Configurations . .V20
Circuit Wiring Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V21–V23
Switch Wiring Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V24
Diameter Ranges of Jacketed Cord . . . . . . . . . .V25
Wallplate Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V26
Telephone Wiring Devices —
Codes and Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .V27
Wire Color Codes and Jack Pin Designations . . .V28
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
INDUSTRY STANDARDS, RELEVANT DEFINITIONS, PERTINENT PRODUCT DATA, REPRESENTATIVE DIMENSIONAL DRAWINGS
AND GENERAL PRODUCT REFERENCES ARE INCLUDED IN THIS SECTION.
Technical Information
List of Abbreviations Used In Leviton Catalogs
ANSI
NFPA
American National Standards Institute, Inc.
11 West 42nd St., New York, NY 10036
An independent organization that identifies industrial and
public requirements for national consensus standards and
coordinates and manages their development, resolves
national standards problems, and ensures effective participation in international standardization.
Various U.S. Government Agencies often adopt ANSI
Standards. For example, the Department of Defense has
made mandatory the use of ANSI Standard Y32.9-1972,
“Graphic Symbols for Electrical Wiring and Layout Diagrams
used in Architecture and Building Construction.” Such
Standards are often developed by specialized technical societies for ANSI. The Standard referred to above was prepared
by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).
National Fire Protection Association
Battery March Park, Quincy, MA 02269
An organization devoted to promoting the science and
improving the methods of Fire Protection. Membership is
open to anyone interested. Every three years, the NFPA
produces a new edition of the NEC (see listing). The NFPA
also provides many other useful publications dealing with fire
prevention.
GSA
General Services Administration Federal Supply Service
Crystal Mall Bldg. 4, Washington, D.C. 20406
The U.S. Government administration responsible for the
approval of Federal Specifications used in the purchase of
products by all Federal Agencies.
The two most relevant Federal Specifications for Electrical
Wiring Devices are:
W-C-596, for Electrical Power Connector, Plug,
Receptacle and Cable Outlet
W-S-896, for Toggle and Lock, Flush Mounted
Switches
Leviton devices that comply with these specifications, as
verified by Underwriters Laboratories Inc., are also listed in
this catalog.
NEC
National Electrical Code
Published by the NFPA (see listing)
The purpose of the Code is the practical safeguarding of persons and property from hazards arising from the use of electricity. This Code is sponsored by NFPA under the auspices of
ANSI. It is revised every three years. OSHA (see listing) has
adopted the NEC as the code to follow in order to comply with
OSHA requirements.
OSHA
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(U.S. Department of Labor), 200 Constitution Ave. NW.
Washington D.C. 20210 (plus regional offices)
That part of the U.S. Department of Labor responsible for
assuring that employers provide safe and healthful working
conditions and equipment for employees, and that employees
properly avail themselves of these conditions.
In addition to specific regulations published in the Federal
Register, OSHA has also adopted the National Electrical Code
in part for existing installations and equipment and completely for new construction.
Note: OSHA does not approve products. Compliance with
OSHA regulations is contingent on two factors: The approval
or listing of the product by an authorized testing laboratory,
such as UL (see listing), and the proper installation and/or
use of the product in accordance with OSHA guidelines.
UL
Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
Northbrook, IL; Melville, NY; Santa Clara, CA
“An independent, not-for-profit organization testing for public
safety.” Tests by UL are the basis for acceptance by various
government agencies. Listing by UL denotes initial testing
and periodic retesting to assure continuing conformance
to standards.
NOM
Norma Official Mexicana
(Mexican Official Standard) SECOFI
Avenida Puent de Tecamachalco #6
Col. Lomas de Tecamachalco 53950
Naucalpan, Edomex Mexico
NEMA
National Electrical Manufacturers Association
2101 L St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20003
An organization of electrical manufacturers that establishes
standards for manufacture and tests for performance and
reliability of electrical products. NEMA tests are often the
basis or prerequisite for approval by the Federal Government
and/or by Underwriter’s Laboratories, Inc.
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Industry Standards for Electrical Wiring Devices
National Electrical Code Requirements for Wiring Devices
National Electrical Code NFPA No. 70-1996 (Selected Articles)
ARTICLE 90 — Introduction
ARTICLE 511 — Commercial Garages, Repair and Storage
511-10
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Protection
for Personnel
ARTICLE 100 — Definitions
ARTICLE 110 — Requirements for Electrical Installations
110-18
Arcing Parts
110-21
Marking
ARTICLE 200 — Use and Identification of Grounded Conductors
200-9
Means of Identification of Terminals
200-10
Identification of Terminals
ARTICLE 220 — Branch Circuit, Feeder and Service Calculations
220-4
Branch Circuits Required
ARTICLE 250 — Grounding
250-45
Equipment Connected by Cord and Plug
250-50
Equipment Grounding Conductor Connections
250-51
Effective Grounding Path
250-59
Cord and Plug Connected Equipment
250-74
Connecting Receptacle Grounding
Terminal to Box
ARTICLE 310 — Conductors for General Wiring
310-15
Ampacities
ARTICLE 380 — Switches
380-1
Scope
380-2
Switch Connections
380-8
Accessibility and Grouping
380-9
Faceplates for Flush-Mounted Snap Switches
380-14
Rating and Use of Snap Switches
380-15
Marking
ARTICLE 410 — Lighting Fixtures, Lampholders, Lamps, Receptacles
410-29
Cord-Connected Showcases
410-56
Receptacles, Cord Connectors and
Attachment Plugs
410-57
Receptacles in Damp or Wet Locations
410-58
Grounding-Type Receptacles, Adapters, Cord
Connectors and Attachment Plugs
ARTICLE 422 — Appliances
422-22
Disconnection of Cord- and Plug-Connected
Appliances
ARTICLE 518 — Places of Assembly
518-3(b)
Temporary Wiring Receptacles
ARTICLE 550 — Mobile Homes and Mobile Home Parks
550-5(c)
Attachment Plug Cap
550-8
Receptacle Outlets
ARTICLE 555 — Marinas and Boatyards
555-3
Receptacles
555-7
Grounding
ARTICLE 625 — Electrical Vehicle Charging System Equipment
625-22
(New Article) GFCI Protection for Cordand Plug-Connected Electric Vehicle Supply
Equipment
Technical Information
ARTICLE 210 — Branch Circuits
210-4
Multiwire Branch Circuits
210-6
Branch Circuit Voltage Limitations
210-7
Receptacles and Cord Connectors
210-8
Ground Fault Protection for Personnel
210-21
Outlet Devices
210-24
Branch Circuit Requirements
210-50
Required Outlets, General
210-52
Dwelling Unit Receptacle Outlets
210-60
Guest Rooms
210-63
Rooftop Heating, Air Conditioning and
Refrigeration Equipment Outlet
210-70
Lighting Outlets Required
ARTICLE 517 — Health Care Facilities
517-3
Definitions
517-12
Wiring Methods
517-13
Grounding of Receptacles and Fixed Electric
Equipment
517-16
Receptacles with Insulated Grounding Terminals
517-18
General Care Areas
517-19
Critical Care Areas
517-19(e)
Additional Protective Techniques
517-20
Wet Locations
517-21
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Protection
for Personnel
517-31
Emergency System
517-44
Sources of Power
517-61
Wiring and Equipment
(a) Within Hazardous (Classified)
Anesthetizing Locations
(b) Above Hazardous (Classified)
Anesthetizing Locations
(c) Other-Than-Hazardous (Classified)
Anesthetizing Locations
517-62
Grounding
517-64
Low-Voltage Equipment and Instruments
ARTICLE 680 — Swimming Pools, Fountains and Similar Installations
680-4
Definitions
680-5
Transformers and Ground Fault Circuit
Interrupters
680-6(a)
Receptacles
680-6(b)
Lighting Fixtures, Lighting Outlets, Switching
Devices and Ceiling Fans
680-7
Cord- and Plug-Connected Equipment
680-40
Outdoor Installations
680-41
Indoor Installations
680-51
Lighting Fixtures, Submersible Pumps and Other
Submersible Equipment
680-62
Cord- and Plug-Connected Equipment
680-62
Therapeutic Tubs (Hydrotherapeutic Tanks)
680-62(a)
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter
680-62(c)
Methods of Bonding
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Associations, Organizations and Standards
The following listings define the common acronyms used for a
variety of organizations.
EPRI
Electric Power Research Institute
NEMRA
National Electrical Manufacturers Representative
Association
IAEI
International Association of Electrical Inspectors
IFMA
International Facilities Management Association
BOMA
Building Owners Management Association
SEMI
Semi-Conductor Equipment and Material International
CEMRA
Canadian Electrical Manufacturers Representatives
Association
Standards Development Organizations
Technical Information
Primarily involved in the development and/or promulgation
of standards
NFPA
National Fire Protection Agency
IEC
International Electrotechnical Commission
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
ANSI
American National Standards Institute
CANENA
Consejo de Armonizacion de Normas Electrotecnicas
de Norte America (Council for Harmonization of
Electrotechnical Standardization of North America)
NMRA
National Marine Representative Association
EFI
Electro-Federation Incorporated
SAE
Society of Automotive Engineers
NECA
National Electrical Contractors Association
ISA
Instrument Society of America
IECA
Independent Electrical Contractors Association
SME
Society of Manufacturing Engineers
ECOC
Electrical Contractors of Canada
ISO
International Standards Organization
CANAME
Camara Nacional de Manufacturas Electricas (Mexico)
ASME
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Certification Agencies
Codes and Standards
Installation codes and product safety, performance and
interchangeability standards.
Primarily involved in certification of products or manufacturers to standards developed by the certification agency or
by others.
UL
Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
NEC
National Electrical Code
CSA
Canadian Standards Association
NOM
Normas Oficiales de Mexicanas (Official
Mexican Standard)
ANCE
National Association of Normalization and Certification
of the Electrical Sector (Mexico)
NMX
Normas Mexicanas
TUV
TUV Rheinland of N.A., Inc.
CEC
Canadian Electrical Code
VDE
Verband Deutscher Elektrotechniker (Germany)
CEE
European Electrotechnical Committee
BSI
British Standards Institute
Industry Associations
FM
Factory Manual
For the purpose of standardization, trade, and professional
development, etc.
NRTL
National Recognized Testing Laboratories
OSHA
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
FCC
Federal Communications Commission
DESC
Defense Electronic Supply Center
IAPA
Independent Accident and Protection Association
(Canada)
CE
European Compliance (This is not a certification agency, but
CE is the European Compliance Mark)
ETL
ETL Testing Laboratories
NMDA
National Marine Distributor Association
NEMA
National Electrical Manufacturers Association
ABYC
American Boat and Yacht Council
EIA/TIA
Electronics Industry Association/Telecommunications
Industry Association
NAED
National Association of Electrical Distributors
NAW
National Association of Wholesalers
BICISI
Building Industry Consulting Services International
IBI
Intelligent Building Institute
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
European Agencies: IEC and CEE
The IEC
The IEC is the International Electrotechnical Commission. Formed in 1906, it is a worldwide organization primarily involved in
the international standardization of electrical standards and equipment. As of 1994, 48 countries are represented in the IEC.
IEC member countries produce and consume the majority of the world’s electrical energy. They also manufacture and use the
majority of the world’s electrical products.
The IEC works towards standardization of the following areas:
Universal technical language; including definitions, and electrical symbols
Systems for ratings, testing requirements and methods of testing
Electrical system characteristics; including voltages, frequencies and tolerances
Dimensional requirements and tolerances
Universal electrical safety requirements
The CEE
The CEE is the European Electrotechnical Committee. The CEE works on safety standards, definitions for conformity and certifications
for electrical equipment. Cooperation between the CEE and the IEC has led to worldwide publications for standards pertaining to
electrical equipment.
Certification and Markings
Typical Product Certification Marks — 15 & 20 Amp Straight Blade Receptacles. Products with these markings must meet the specific testing
standards indicated.
Certification Mark
UL498
Spec Grade*
CSA,
C22.2,
No. 42M
UL 498
Hospital
Grade
CSA, C22.2,
No. 42M,
Hosp. Grade
DESC
W-C-596F
No Product Testing Required — Manufacturer’s Term Only
Certification Agency
Manufacturer Only
X
Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
Recognized Component
for OEM use.
X
Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
Canadian Standards
Association
X
X
Technical Information
Certification marks indicate a product has been tested to the requirements of a specific certification agency. Manufacturers may
choose a particular product identity (e.g. Specification Grade) even though no outside certification agency is involved. The following table illustrates the variety of certification markings typically used for 15A and 20A Straight Blade Receptacles.
X
Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
• Hospital Grade
X
Canadian Standards
Association
X
• Hospital Grade
F
S
X
X
Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
and Defense Electronic Supply
Center
X
Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
and Defense Electronic Supply
Center
Fed. Spec
F
S
Fed. Spec
• Hospital Grade
X
X
*Includes variations such as Industrial Spec. Grade, Premium Spec. Grade, etc.
NOTE: The C-UL listing mark is applied to products for the Canadian market evaluated by UL to Canadian safety standards. The C-UL US listing mark indicates compliance
with both U. S. and Canadian safety standards.
Cross References
The cross-reference guides supplied by manufacturers are convenient for determining compatible devices but they are not official
confirmation of compliance to any standard or testing criteria. Similarly, common catalog numbers used by different manufacturers
in no way imply compliance to any standard or testing criteria.
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
UL, CSA and NEMA Standards Pertaining to Leviton Devices
UL Standards Pertaining to Leviton Devices
UL20
UL50
UL94
UL486E
UL498
Technical Information
UL508
UL514A
UL514C
UL817
UL943
UL1363
UL1436
UL1449
UL1567
UL1682
& 1686
UL1776
FS
WC596F
FS
WS896
General-use switches
Enclosures for electrical equipment
Flammability testing for materials
Equipment and wiring terminals
Plugs, connectors, receptacles, inlets, outlets, taps
and adapters
Industrial equipment (including motor control
switches)
Metallic boxes/covers/wallplates
Non-metallic boxes/covers/wallplates
Cordsets
GFCI's
Temporary power taps
Outlet circuit testers
Surge suppression devices
Switches and receptacles used with AL wire
Pin & Sleeve devices
High-pressure cleaning equipment
Federal Spec receptacles
Federal Spec switches
Note: Straight blade and locking NEMA configurations are
defined by UL 1681 and NEMA WD 6.
Each UL standard consists of requirements that cover three characteristics of the product being reviewed:
1. Construction
Material properties and general design
2. Performance
Mechanical and electrical testing
3. Markings
Identification of manufacturer, applicable
ratings, etc.
CSA Standards Pertaining to Leviton Devices
C22,2, No. 0.17
C22.2, No. 42
C22.2, No. 55
C22.2, No. 111
C22.2, No. 182.1
C22.2, No. 182.2
Polymeric materials
General-use receptacles,
attachment plugs
Special-use switches
General-use switches
Industrial-type, special-use attachment
plugs, receptacles and connectors. Pin and
sleeve devices
Industrial locking type
NEMA Standards Pertaining To Leviton Devices —
In Accordance With NEMA Standard WD –1
WD 1-1.01
CORD CONNECTOR
A cord connector is a portable receptacle which is provided with means
for attachment to a flexible cord and which is not intended for permanent
mounting.
NEMA Standard 7-13-1967
WD 1-1.02
GROUNDED CONDUCTOR (SYSTEM GROUND)
A grounded conductor is a circuit conductor (normally current carrying)
which is intentionally connected to earth ground. (It is identified as the
white conductor.)
NEMA Standard 7-13-1967
WD 1-1.03
GROUNDING CONDUCTOR (EQUIPMENT GROUND)
A grounding conductor is a conductor which connects noncurrent-carrying metal parts of equipment to earth ground to provide an intentional
path for fault current to ground (It is bare, or, when covered, is identified
as the green or green with yellow stripes conductor.)
NEMA Standard 7-13-1967
WD 1-1.04
LAMPHOLDER
A lampholder is a device which is intended to support an electric lamp
mechanically and to connect it electrically to a circuit.
NEMA Standard 7-13-1967
WD 1-1.05
MALE BASE (INLET)
A male base is a plug which is intended for flush or surface mounting
on an appliance or equipment and which serves to connect utilization
equipment to a connector.
NEMA Standard 7-13-1967
WD 1-1.06
OUTLET
A outlet is a point on the wiring system at which current is taken to supply
utilization equipment.
NEMA Standard 7-13-1967
WD 1-1.07
PLUG
A plug is a device with male blades which, when inserted into a receptacle, establishes connection between the conductors of the attached
flexible cord and the conductors connected to the receptacle.
NEMA Standard 7-1-1967
WD 1-1.08
POLARIZATION (PLUGS AND RECEPTACLES)
Polarization is a means of assuring the mating of plugs and receptacles
of the same rating in only the correct positon.
NEMA Standard 7-1-1967
WD 1-1.09
POLE
The term “pole” as used in designating plugs and receptacles refers to
a terminal to which a circuit conductor (normally current carrying) is
connected.
In switches, the number of poles indicates the number or conductors
being controlled.
NEMA Standard 7-1-1967
WD 1-1.10
RECEPTACLE
A receptacle is a device with female contacts which is primarily
installed at an outlet or on equipment and which is intended to establish electrical connection with an inserted plug.
NEMA Standard 7-1-1967
WD 1-1.11
SLANT SYMBOL (/)
The “slant” line (/) as used in wiring device ratings indicates that two or
more voltage potentials are present simultaneously between different
terminals of a wiring device.
NEMA Standard 7-1-1967
WD 1-1.12
SWITCH
A switch is a device for making, breaking, or changing the connections
in an electric circuit.
A. Single-pole Switch (Single-pole, Single-throw)
A switch which makes or breaks the connection of
one conductor.
B. Double-pole Switch (Double-pole, Single-throw)
A switch which makes or breaks the connection of
two conductors of a single branch circuit.
C. Three-way Switch (Single-pole, Double-throw)
A switch which changes the connection of one conductor and which is normally used in pairs to control one utilization equipment from two locations.
D. Four-way Switch (Double-pole, Double-throw Reversing)
A form of double-pole switch which is used in conjunction with two three-way switches to control one
utilization equipment from three or more locations.
NEMA Standard 7-13-1967
WD 1-1.13
TERMINAL (ON A WIRING DEVICE)
A terminal is a fixed location on a wiring device where a conductor is
intended to be connected.
NEMA Standard 7-13-1967
WD 1-1.14
WIRE (PLUGS AND RECEPTACLES)
The term “wire” as used in designating plugs and receptacles indicates
the number or either normally current-carrying or equipment grounding connected conductors.
NEMA Standard 7-13-1967
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
High-Abuse Wiring Devices — UL Listed Hospital Grade
Why was it developed?
Plugs and Connectors
Hospital Grade Listed devices were developed to provide maximum
safety in high-abuse applications where constant strenuous use of the
device is common. These highest reliability devices are built to protect
against possible human negligence and keep the devices safe and
functional.
500 lb. Crush Test
A wired plug or connector is
placed between two steel plates
and subjected to a force which is
steadily increased to 500 pounds.
“There shall be no breakage,
deformation or other effect that
may interfere with the function of
the device.” Leviton knows that in
real industrial environments,
plugs and connectors are
crushed by forces exceeding 500
lbs. Leviton performs the crush
test with force of 2500 lbs to
ensure that our devices withstand
the really heavy hits on the job.
What are the applications for Hospital Grade,
High Abuse Devices?
Rough use occurs not just in hospitals, but every place where people
can’t or won’t be cautious with devices…the cleaning person who
yanks the floor waxer plug down the hall, the mechanic who pulls the
drill plug from the wall, or the child who removes the electric lawnmower plug from 40 feet away!
In addition, Leviton realized that devices in rough use situations are
often exposed to many corrosive liquids, such as cleaning fluids, rug
shampoos, chlorinated water, sprays, salt air and chemical fumes. Our
corrosion resistant devices permit use in environments where these
conditions are common.
Demanding Tests for UL Hospital Grade Listing
Receptacles
Abrupt Removal of Plug Test
A steel-bodied test plug with
brass blades is inserted into the
receptacle. A 10-pound weight
dropped from at least 24 inches
yanks the plug out of the receptacle. This test is done eight times
with the receptacle rotated into
different positions to create the
greatest stress on its face and
contact. After this, the grounding
contact must retain a four ounce,
0.184" diameter grounding pin,
with the receptacle face down, for
one minute. “There shall be no
breakage of the receptacle that
interferes with the receptacle function or the integrity of the enclosure.
The receptacle shall maintain the grounding path integrity through the
receptacle.”
Ground Pin Test
The grounding contact of the
receptacle is conditioned by 20
insertions with a 0.204" diameter
oversized pin. “After conditioning, a 0.184" diameter pin shall
be inserted in the grounding
contact and shall be capable of
supporting at least four ounces
for one minute.”
Power Blade Retention Test
A test plug with oversized blades
of .075" is inserted into the current-carrying opening of the connector for 20 conditioning cycles.
After the conditioning cycles,
“the contact shall be capable of
supporting for one minute 11⁄2
lbs, secured to a single .055"
thick solid steel blade without
holes.”
+4 oz.
Cord Pull Test
The cord must remain securely
fastened after straight pulls of
30 pounds, and rotating pulls
(in a 3-inch circle) of 10 pounds
for two hours. “Displacement of
conductors, insulation, and
outer jacket of the flexible cord
AWG 18 SVT shall not exceed
1/32 inch. There shall be no cuts,
rips, or tears in cord insulation.”
Heavy-duty cord stress is typical
abuse for industrial plugs and
connectors. Leviton increases the weight in the straight cord pull test to
175 lbs. with AWG 14 ST and in the rotating pull test to 20 lbs, ensuring
positive strain relief under industrial conditions.
Technical Information
Leviton has designed a line of wiring devices that withstand impact, wear,
crushing, and corrosive environments that would destroy ordinary heavyduty devices. Leviton's comprehensive line of Hospital Grade and
Industrial Grade plugs, connectors and receptacles include devices that
have passed a series of demanding UL Hospital Grade tests. This assures
the end-user of top performance in the harshest industrial environments.
Here are examples of how Leviton devices meet or exceed the requirements of the most rigorous testing!
Impact Test
A wired plug or connector is subjected to impact from a 10 lb.
weight dropped from a height of
18 inches. “There shall be no
breakage, deformation or other
effect that may interfere with the
function of the device.” Plugs and
connectors are subjected to
severe impacts in industrial settings. Therefore, Leviton exceed
the UL requirement by dropping
the weight from a height of 36
inches.
Mechanical Drop Test
A sample wired plug or connector
is suspended horizontally by its
attached cord and released so
that it impacts a hard wood surface 45 inches below the point of
suspension — repeated for 1300
cycles. “There shall be no breakage, deformation or other damage
which would interfere with the
functioning of the device.”
1.5 lb.
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Technical Information
Glossary of Electrical Wiring Device Terms
General Terms
Flanged Inlets
Adapter — An accessory used for interconnecting non-mating devices or converting
an existing device for modified use.
Ballast — A transformer that steps down AC line voltage to voltage that can be
used by fluorescent or other types of lighting. Ballasts may be electromagnetic or
electronic
Cord Connector — A portable receptacle designed for attachment to or provided
with flexible cord, not intended for fixed mounting.
Flanged Inlet — A plug intended for flush mounting on appliances or equipment to
provide a means for power connection via a cord connector.
Flanged Outlet — A receptacle intended for flush mounting on appliances or
equipment to provide a means for power connection via an inserted plug.
Fluorescent Starter — A device with a voltage-sensitive switch and a capacitor that
provides a high-voltage pulse to start a fluorescent lamp. Rated in watts.
Lampholder — A device with contacts that establishes mechanical and electrical
connection to an inserted lamp.
Plug — A device with male contacts intended for insertion into a receptacle to
establish electrical connection between the attached flexible cord and the
conductors connected to the receptacle.
Receptacle — A device with female contacts designed for fixed installation in a
structure or piece of equipment and which is intended to establish electrical
connection with an inserted plug.
Switch — A device for making, breaking, or changing the connections in an
electric circuit.
Wallplate — A plate designed to enclose an electrical box, with or without a device
installed within the box.
Corrosion Resistant — An inlet constructed of special materials and/or suitably
plated metal parts that is designed to withstand corrosive environments. Corrosion
resistant devices must pass the ASTM B117-13 five-hundred hour Salt Spray (Fog)
Test with no visible corrosion.
Flush-Mounted — An inlet intended to be installed flush with the surface of a panel
or a piece of equipment.
Locking — An inlet designed to lock an inserted matching connector when the connector is rotated in a clockwise direction. The connector can only be removed by
first turning it in a counter-clockwise direction.
Midget — An inlet designed with a smaller body diameter than standard connectors
with a similar rating.
Pin and Sleeve — An inlet with round pin-type contacts intended to mate with a
connector having hollow cylindrical female contacts.
Straight Blade — A non-locking inlet into which mating connectors are inserted at a
right angle to the plane of the connector face.
Surface-Mounted — An inlet designed to be surface mounted on a panel or piece of
equipment.
Watertight — An inlet specially constructed so that water will not enter under specified test conditions. The IP Suitability Rating designates the degree of protection a
device offers against the ingress of moisture and water (e.g. IP 55, IP 44).
Weatherproof — An inlet specially constructed to protect it from the effects of
weather in outdoor locations.
Flanged Outlets
Cube Tap — An adapter that converts one receptacle opening into multiple
openings.
Current Tap — An adapter designed for medium base lampholders which has one
or two receptacle openings. Available with or without integral switch.
Duplex — An adapter that provides two female receptacle openings when plugged
into a single receptacle opening.
Grounding - An adapter that converts a two-wire receptacle opening into a two-pole,
three-wire grounding receptacle opening.
Lampholder — A threaded adapter that converts the thread size of the lampholder
in which it is inserted so that the lampholder can accept an incandescent lamp
bulb of a different size thread.
Molded-On — An adapter that is factory molded to a length of flexible cord.
Series — An adapter wired in series to a flexible cord containing an in-line switch
used to control electrical equipment plugged into the adapter.
“W” Type — Same as “Y” type, except having three cord connectors arranged in
the form of the letter “W”.
“Y” Type — An adapter in the form of a letter “Y”, having two cord connectors on
one end and a male plug on the other end.
Corrosion Resistant — An outlet constructed of special materials and/or suitably
plated metal parts that is designed to withstand corrosive environments. Corrosion
resistant devices must pass the ASTM B17-13 five-hundred hour Salt Spray (Fog)
Test with no visible corrosion.
Flush-Mounted — An outlet intended to be installed flush with the surface of a panel
or a piece of equipment.
Locking — An outlet designed to lock an inserted plug with a matching blade
configuration when the plug is rotated in a clockwise direction. The plug can only
be removed by first turning it in a counter-clockwise direction.
Midget — An outlet designed with a smaller body diameter than standard devices
with a similar rating.
Pin and Sleeve — An outlet with hollow cylindrical female contacts intended to mate
with a plug having round pin contacts.
Straight Blade — A non-locking outlet into which mating straight-blade plugs are
inserted at a right angle to the plane of the outlet face.
Surface-Mounted — An outlet designed to be surface mounted on a panel or piece
of equipment,
Watertight — An outlet specially constructed so that water will not enter under
specified test conditions. The IP Suitability Rating designates the degree of protection a device offers against the ingress of moisture and water(e.g. IP 55, IP 44).
Weatherproof — An outlet specially constructed so that exposure to weather will not
interfere with its operation.
Cord Connectors
Fluorescent Starters
Angle —A connector that allows the attached flexible cord to exit at right angles.
Corrosion Resistant — A connector constructed of special materials and/or suitably
plated metal parts that is designed to withstand corrosive environments. Corrosion
resistant devices must pass the ASTM B117-13 five-hundred hour Salt Spray (Fog)
Test with no visible corrosion.
Dust Proof — A connector designed so that dust will not interfere with its operation.
The IP Suitability Rating designates the degree of protection a device offers against
the ingress of foreign objects (e.g. IP 20).
Explosion Proof — A connector constructed to meet the requirements of hazardous
locations as defined by the National Electrical Code, NFPA-70.
Hospital Grade — A connector designed to meet the performance requirements of
high-abuse areas typically found in health care facilities. These connectors are
tested to the Hospital Grade requirements of Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
Standard 498.
Locking — A connector designed to lock an inserted plug with a matching blade
configuration when the plug is rotated in a clockwise direction. The plug can only
be removed by first turning it in a counter-clockwise direction.
Midget — A connector designed with a smaller body diameter than standard
connectors with a similar rating.
Molded On — A connector that is factory molded to a length of flexible cord.
Pin and Sleeve — A connector with hollow, cylindrical sleeve-type contacts.
Straight Blade — A non-locking connector into which mating plugs are inserted at a
right angle to the plane of the connector face.
Weatherproof — A connector specially constructed so that exposure to weather will
not interfere with its operation.
Automatic Reset — A starter that automatically restarts a new replacement
fluorescent lamp after the circuit is energized.
Direct Current — A thermal-type starter designed for use on direct current (DC)
circuits.
Glow Discharge — A starter that provides a rapid lamp start-up and will continue to
try to start a failed fluorescent lamp, causing the lamp to flicker until it is replaced.
Manual Reset — A starter that automatically deactivates a failed fluorescent lamp to
eliminate flickering. A reset button provides a means of activating the circuit after
lamp replacement.
Adapter Variations
Lampholders
Bayonet — Designed for incandescent lamps having an unthreaded metal shell
with two diametrically opposite keyways that mate with the keyways on the lampholder. Pushing down on the bulb and turning it clockwise in the lampholder locks
the bulb in place.
Candelabra — A small screw-base threaded lampholder designed for candelabrabase incandescent lamps commonly used in chandeliers, night lights, and
ornamental lighting.
Circline — A four-contact, double-ended lampholder designed for use with tubular,
circular fluorescent lamps.
Compact Fluorescent — A lampholder designed for the Compact Fluorescent
Lamps (CFL’s) that are increasingly being used to replace incandescent lamps for
energy efficiency.
Dimmer — An electronic device with either a round knob, slide lever or finger-tip
controlled buttons used to dim/brighten incandescent lighting. Available in a variety
of wattages; fluorescent version also available.
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Glossary of Electrical Wiring Device Terms
Plugs
Angle — A plug that allows the attached flexible cord to exit at right angles.
Corrosion Resistant — A plug constructed of special materials and/or suitably plated
metal parts that is designed to withstand corrosive environments. Corrosion resistant devices must pass the ASTM B117-13 five-hundred hour Salt Spray (Fog) Test
with no visible corrosion.
Dust Proof — A plug designed so that dust will not interfere with its operation. The
IP Suitability Rating designates the degree of protection a device offers against the
ingress of foreign objects (e.g. IP 20).
Explosion Proof — A plug constructed to meet the requirements of hazardous
locations as defined by the National Electrical Code, NFPA-70.
Hospital Grade — A plug designed to meet the performance requirements of highabuse areas typically found in health care facilities. These plugs are tested to the
Hospital Grade requirements of Underwriter's Laboratories Inc. Standard 498.
Locking — A plug designed to lock into a matching connector or receptacle
configuration when the plug is rotated in a clockwise direction. The plug can only
be removed by turning it in a counter-clockwise direction.
Midget — A plug designed with a smaller body diameter than standard plugs with a
similar rating.
Molded On — A plug that is factory molded to a length of flexible cord.
Pin and Sleeve — A plug with round pin contacts.
Straight Blade — A non-locking plug that is inserted at a right angle to the plane of
the matching device face.
Weatherproof — A plug specially constructed so that exposure to weather will not
interfere with its operation.
Receptacles
AL/CU — 30A, 50A or 60A receptacles designated for use with aluminum or copper circuit conductors, identified by “AL/CU” stamped on the device.
Receptacles without this designation must never be used with aluminum circuit
conductors.
Clock Hanger — A single, recessed receptacle with a specialized cover plate that
provides a hook or other means of supporting a wall clock.
CO/ALR — 15A or 20A receptacles designated for use with aluminum or copper
circuit conductors, identified by “CO/ALR” stamped on the device. Receptacles
without this designation must never be used with aluminum circuit conductors.
Corrosion Resistant — A receptacle constructed of special materials and/or
suitably plated metal parts that is designed to withstand corrosive environments.
Corrosion resistant devices must pass the ASTM B117-13 five-hundred hour Salt
Spray (Fog) Test with no visible corrosion.
Display — Receptacle with a special cover plate intended for flush mounting on
raised floors or walls.
Duplex — Two receptacles built with a common body and mounting means;
accepts two plugs.
Dust Proof — A receptacle designed so that dust will not interfere with its operation.
The IP Suitability Rating designates the degree of protection a device offers against
the ingress of foreign objects (e.g. IP 20).
Explosion Proof — A receptacle constructed to meet the requirements of
hazardous locations as defined by the National Electrical Code, NFPA-70.
Fan Hanger — A single receptacle with a specialized cover plate that provides a
hook or other means of supporting a wall fan.
Four-In-One or “Quad” — A receptacle in a common housing that accepts up to four
plugs. Four-In-One receptacles can be installed in place of duplex receptacles
mounted in a single-gang box, providing a convenient means of adding receptacles
without rewiring.
GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) — A receptacle with a built in circuit that
will detect leakage current to ground on the load side of the device. When the
GFCI detects leakage current to ground, it will interrupt power to the load side of
the device, preventing a hazardous ground fault condition. GFCI receptacles
must conform to UL Standard 943 Class A requirements, and their use is
required by the National Electric Code NFPA-70 in a variety of indoor and outdoor
locations.
Hospital Grade — A receptacle designed to meet the performance requirements of
high-abuse areas typically found in health care facilities. These receptacles are
tested to the Hospital Grade requirements of Underwriters Laboratories Inc.
Standard 498.
Interchangeable — A receptacle or combination of receptacles with a common
mounting dimension that may be installed on a single or multiple-opening mounting
strap.
Isolated Ground — Receptacles intended for use in an Isolated Grounding system
where the ground path is isolated from the facility grounding system. The grounding
connection on these receptacles is isolated from the mounting strap.
Lighted (Illuminated) — A receptacle with a face that becomes illuminated when the
device is connected to an energized electrical circuit.
Locking — A receptacle designed to lock an inserted plug with a matching blade
configuration when the plug is rotated in a clockwise direction. The plug can only
be removed by first turning it in a counter-clockwise direction.
Pin and Sleeve — A receptacle with cylindrical sleeve-type contacts.
Safety or Tamper-Resistant — A receptacle specially constructed so that access
to its energized contacts is limited. Tamper-resistant receptacles are required by
the National Electric Code NFPA-70 in specific pediatric care areas in health care
facilities.
Single — A receptacle that accepts only one plug.
Snap-In — A receptacle with factory-assembled spring clips that securely snap into
a panel cutout without requiring additional fasteners.
Split-Circuit — A duplex receptacle that allows each receptacle to be wired to
separate circuits. Most duplex receptacles provide break-off tabs that allow them
to be converted into split-circuit receptacles.
Straight Blade — A non-locking receptacle into which mating plugs are inserted at a
right angle to the plane of the receptacle face.
Surface-Mounted — Any receptacle that mounts on a flat or plane surface.
Surge-Suppression — A receptacle with built-in circuitry designed to protect its load
side from high-voltage transients and surges. The circuitry will limit transient voltage
peaks to help protect sensitive electronic equipment such as PC’s, modems,
audio/video equipment, etc.
Triplex — A receptacle with a common mounting means which accepts three
plugs.
Weatherproof — A receptacle specially constructed so that exposure to weather will
not interfere with its operation.
Technical Information
Double-Contact Recessed — Designed for high-output fluorescent lamps.
Edison Base — An internally-threaded lampholder, with the inner shell approx. 1" in
diameter. Designed for widely-used standard medium base lamps.
Electrolier — Similar to the Edison Medium Base lampholder, but with a smaller
outer diameter.
Incandescent — Designed for use with all manufactured incandescent lamps, most
of which have threaded bases.
Intermediate — A lampholder with a threaded screw shell designed for intermediate
base lamps that have a 13/32" threaded base (smaller than the standard 1" dia.
medium base). Mostly used in decorative lighting.
Key — A lampholder with a flat or round “key” knob that operates an internal
switching mechanism (“Keyless” lampholders do not provide an internal switching
mechanism).
Lumiline — A specially designed lampholder for tubular Lumiline-type incandescent
lamps, typically used in bathrooms and retail display cases.
Medium Base — Same as the Edison base lampholder. An internally-threaded
lampholder, with the inner shell approx. 1" in diameter. Designed for widely-used
standard medium base lamps.
Miniature — Designed for the smallest available incandescent lamps with a
screw-in base, approx. 3/8" dia. Widely used in flashlights and toys, etc.
Mogul — The largest screw-in type lampholder, designed for mogul incandescent
lamps with a screw base of approx. 11/2" dia. Used in street lights and numerous
commercial/industrial applications.
Medium Bi-Pin — A fluorescent lampholder with two contacts, used in pairs. For
type T-8 tubular fluorescent lamps, approx. 1" in diameter.
Miniature Bi-Pin — Similar to medium bi-pin lampholders, but designed for type
T-5 tubular fluorescent lamps, approx. 5/8" in diameter.
Outlet Box — Medium-base incandescent lampholder designed for mounting in
31/4" or 4" electrical boxes. Available with or without pull-chain mechanism, and
with or without built-in receptacle.
Pull-Chain — An incandescent lampholder with an internal switching mechanism
that is activated by pulling down on a beaded chain or cord.
Push-Through — An incandescent lampholder with an insulated lever that
is pushed from either side to activate an internal ON/OFF switching mechanism.
Slimline Single-Pin — A fluorescent lampholder with a single contact designed for
Slimline fluorescent lamps such as the T-12 (11/2" dia.), T-8 (1" dia.), and the
smaller version T-6 (3/4" dia.).
Snap-In — An incandescent or compact fluorescent lampholder with factoryassembled spring clips that securely snap into a panel cutout without requiring
additional fasteners.
Surface-Mounted — A lampholder of any type that mounts on a flat or plane
surface.
Switches
AC/DC — A switch designated for use with either Alternating Current (AC) or Direct
Current (DC)
AC Only — A switch designated for use with Alternating Current (AC) only.
Dimmer — A switch with electronic circuitry that provides DIM/BRIGHT control of
lighting loads.
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Technical Information
Glossary of Electrical Wiring Device Terms
Door — A momentary contact switch, usually installed on a doorjamb, that is
activated when the door is opened or closed.
Double-Pole, Single-Throw (DPST)— A switch that makes or breaks the connection
of two circuit conductors in a single branch circuit. This switch has four terminal
screws and ON/OFF markings.
Double-Pole, Double-Throw (DPDT) — A switch that makes or breaks the
connection of two conductors to two separate circuits. This switch has six terminal screws and is available in both momentary and maintained contact versions,
and may also have a center OFF position.
Feed-Through — An in-line switch that can be attached at any point on a length of
flexible cord to provide switching control of attached equipment.
Flush-Mounted — A switch designed for flush installation with the surface of a panel
or equipment.
Four-Way — A switch used in conjunction with two 3-Way switches to control a
single load (such as a light fixture) from three or more locations. This switch has
four terminal screws and no ON/OFF marking.
Horsepower Rated — A switch with a marked horsepower rating, intended for use in
switching motor loads.
Interchangeable — A switch or combination of switches with a common mounting
dimension that may be installed on a single or multiple-opening mounting strap.
Lighted Handle — A switch with an integral lamp in its actuator (toggle, rocker or
pushbutton) that illuminates when the switch is connected to an energized circuit
and the actuator is in the OFF position.
Locking — A switch equipped with a locking mechanism that requires a key to
operate the switching functions.
Low-Voltage — A switch rated for use on low-voltage circuits of 50 volts or less.
L-Rated — A switch specially designated with the letter “L” in its rating that is rated
for controlling tungsten filament lamps on AC circuits only.
Maintained Contact — A switch where the actuator (toggle, rocker, pushbutton or
key mechanism) makes and retains circuit contact when moved to the ON position.
The contacts will only be opened when the actuator is manually moved to the OFF
position. Ordinary light switches are maintained contact switches.
Manual Motor Controller — A switch designed for controlling small DC or AC motor
loads, without overload protection.
Mercury — A type of switch that uses mercury as the contact means for making
and breaking an electrical circuit.
Momentary Contact — A switch that makes circuit contact only as long as the
actuator (toggle, rocker, pushbutton or key mechanism) is held in the ON position, after which it returns automatically to the OFF position. This is a “Normally
Open” switch. A “Normally Closed” switch will break circuit contact as long as it
is held in the OFF position, and then automatically return to the ON position.
Available in “Center OFF” versions with both Momentary ON and Momentary OFF
positions.
Pendant — A type of switch designed for installation at the end of a length of
portable cord or cable,
Pilot Light — A switch with an integral lamp in its actuator (toggle, rocker or pushbutton) that illuminates when the switch is connected to an energized circuit and
the actuator is in the ON position.
Pull — A switch where the making or breaking of contacts is controlled by pulling
downward or outward on the actuator mechanism.
Push Button — A switch with an actuator mechanism that is operated by
depressing a button.
Rotary — A switch where rotating the actuator in a clockwise direction makes the
circuit connection, and then rotating the actuator in either the same or opposite
direction breaks the connection.
Single-Pole, Double-Throw (SPDT) — A switch that makes or breaks the connection
of a single conductor with either of two other single conductors. This switch has 3
terminal screws, and is commonly used in pairs and called a “Three-Way” switch.
Single-Pole, Single-Throw (SPST) — A switch that makes or breaks the
connection of a single conductor in a single branch circuit. This switch has two
screw terminals and ON/OFF designations. It is commonly referred to as a
“Single-Pole” Switch.
Slide — A switch with a slide-action actuator for making or breaking circuit contact. Dimmer switches and fan speed controls are also available with slide-action
mechanisms for lighting and fan speed control
Surface-Mounted — Any switch that mounts on a flat or plane surface.
Three-Position, Center OFF — A two circuit switch, either maintained or momentary contact, where the OFF position is designated as the center position of the
actuator.
Three-Way — A switch, always used in pairs, that controls a single load such as a
light fixture from two locations. This switch has three terminal screws and has no
ON/OFF marking.
Time Delay — A switch with an integral mechanism or electronic circuit that will
automatically switch a load OFF at a predetermined time interval.
Timer — A switch with an integral mechanism or electronic circuit that can be set to
switch an electrical load ON at a predetermined time.
Toggle — A switch with a lever-type actuator that makes or breaks switch contact as
its position is changed.
T-Rated — A switch specially designated with the letter “T” in its rating that is rated
for controlling tungsten filament lamps on direct current (DC) or alternating current
(AC) circuits.
Wallplates
Combination — A multiple- gang wallplate with openings in each gang to
accommodate different devices.
Decora ® — Wallplates with Decora-size openings for compatibility with Leviton’s
entire line of Decora devices. Available in a variety of multiple-gang configurations.
Screwless-design snap-on versions also available.
Flush — A wallplate designed for flush-mounting with wall surfaces or the plane
surfaces of electrical equipment.
Gang — A term that describes the number of devices a wallplate is sized to fit (i.e.
“2- gang” designates two devices).
Midway — Wallplates that are approx. 3/8" higher and wider than the standard
size that can be mounted onto larger volume outlet boxes and/or used to hide
wall surface irregularities. These wallplates are approx. 1/4" deep to ensure a
proper fit when used with protruding devices.
Oversized — Wallplates that are approx. 3/4" higher and wider than the standard
size and are used to conceal greater wall irregularities than those hidden by Midway
wallplates. These wallplates are approx. 1/4" deep to ensure a proper fit when used
with protruding devices.
Modular — Individual-section wallplates with different openings that can be
configured into a multi-gang plate.
Multi-Gang — A wallplate that has two or more gangs.
Tandem — A wallplate with individual gangs arranged vertically one above the other.
Weatherproof (with Cover Closed) — A UL Listed cover that meets specific test standards for use in wet and damp locations with the cover closed.
Weatherproof (with Cover Open) — A UL Listed cover that meets specific test standards for use in wet and damp locations with the cover open or closed.
Surge Suppression
Clamping Voltage — The peak voltage that can be measured after a Surge
Protective Device has limited or “clamped” a transient voltage surge.
Clamping voltage must be determined by using IEEE Standard C62 testing and
evaluated by UL Standard 1449.
Joule Rating — The measurement of a Surge Protective Device’s ability to absorb
heat energy created by transient surges. Note that the Joule rating is not a part of
IEEE or UL Standards. It is not as significant a specification as Clamping Voltage,
Maximum Surge Current and other parameters recognized by these agencies.
Transient Voltage Surges — High-speed, high-energy electrical disturbances
present on AC power lines and data and communication lines, generated by utility switching, motor-load switching and lightning strikes.
Response Time — The interval of time it takes for a surge protective device to react
to a transient voltage surge. Note that this parameter is not a part of IEEE or UL
Standards and is only based on estimations made by manufacturers.
Surge Protective Device — See “Transient Voltage Surge Suppressor (TVSS)”
definition.
Transient Voltage Surge Suppressor (TVSS) — A device designed to protect sensitive electronic equipment such as computers and computer peripherals, logic
controls, audio/video equipment and a wide range of microprocessor-based
(computer chip) equipment from the harmful effects of transient voltage surges.
Also referred to as a Surge Protective Device (SPD).
Maximum (Peak) Surge Current — The peak surge current a Surge Protective
Device can withstand, based on IEEE Standard C62.45 test waveforms.
MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor) — The primary component used in most Surge
Protective Devices to clamp down transient voltages.
UL 1449 Listing — The industry standard for Surge Protective Devices. A Surge
Protective Device must have a UL 1449 Surge Suppression rating on its label in
order to verify that the device has been tested with IEEE standardized waveforms.
Devices without this identification should not be considered reliable surge
protective devices.
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Switches
Dimmers
Types of Switches
A common misconception about box-mounted dimmers is that they are
simply variable resistors (rheostats) that absorb power to dim the lights.
In fact, a rheostat would be too bulky, inefficient and heat producing to
ever be practical as a wall-mounted dimmer. In the 1950’s, the advent of
solid state technology and a type of semi-conductor called the TRIAC fostered the development of full-range dimmers and fan speed controls that
were versatile, efficient and compact enough to fit in a standard wallbox.
Leviton has always taken an active role in the development lighting control technologies. Leviton introduced the Trimatron™ Rotary Dimmer that
was only half as deep as conventional dimmers, allowing easier installation and wiring in a crowded wallbox. Today, Leviton offers innovative alldigital lighting controls that feature scene lighting and multi-location
control capabilities for sophisticated residential and commercial installations. Leviton’s complete line of controls for incandescent, low-voltage
and fluorescent lighting includes Decora-style and architectural specification grade devices, as well as traditional rotary devices. There is also a
wide selection of Fan Speed Controls
See Section C for information on Leviton’s comprehensive line of
Lighting and Fan Speed Controls.
Switch Ratings
AC ONLY switches are often called AC Quiet switches because they can
be made to operate very quietly, unlike AC/DC switches. AC ONLY
switches are rated at their full current value for lighting, including tungsten filament, quartz metal-halide, and fluorescent; and 80% current
value or full horsepower rating value for motor (inductive) loads.
AC/DC switches used for incandescent lighting should have a “T” rating
(tungsten-filament rating). The “T” rating assures end-users of the
longevity of the switch through the surge currents of a “make” action
across a tungsten filament. Such capacity is already inherent in the
design of AC Quiet switches.
AC/DC switches are rated at only 50% of their current capacity for motor
loads. A 20 amp AC/DC switch could be used to control a 10 amp motor
load, while a 20 amp AC Quiet switch can operate a 16 amp motor load.
In the past, MERCURY switches were available that operated by making
and breaking contact within a hermetically sealed capsule containing a
pool of mercury. MERCURY switches were actually silent in operation.
However, due to health concerns about mercury, these switches are no
longer manufactured and sold. MERCURY switches may still be in service in some installations
Horsepower Ratings
Switches marked with Horsepower (HP) Ratings are suitable for controlling the motor loads of the HP ratings shown on the switch, as well
as loads with a lower HP rating.
To qualify for an HP rating, a switch is tested at six times the full motor
load current corresponding the HP rating marked on the switch. For
DC motor load controllers, the test is made at 10 times the full motor
load current corresponding to the DC HP rating marked on the switch.
The test is conducted on six samples and consists of 50 On-Off operations at the load. For a 3/4 HP rating at 120/240 VAC, two sets of six
samples each are tested in addition to the regular overload endurance,
heating and insulation tests. The test circuit characteristics are:
Closed Circuit Volts
Current
Power-Factor
For 3/4 HP Rating
@ 120 VAC
120 VAC
82.8 amps
0.40 – 0.50
For 3/4 HP
@ 240 VAC
240 VAC
41.4 amps
0.40 – 0.50
Note: The current at 240 VAC is 1/2 that at 120 VAC
All switches must be in good operating condition after the tests have
been completed. There must be no excessive arcing, welding or burning
of the contacts nor arc-over to ground (the switch frames are grounded
during the Stalled Rotor Test).
Receptacles
Types of Receptacles
Receptacles generally are made to accommodate either of two types of
plugs. Straight-Blade plugs are pushed in and pulled straight out.
Locking plugs are pushed in and rotated slightly in a clockwise direction
to a position were they cannot be pulled straight out. They must be
rotated counterclockwise back to the insertion position in order to be
withdrawn. This locking action is intended to prevent accidental disconnection of the circuit by pulling the plug straight out unintentionally.
Grounding
Originally, residential electrical circuitry was “2-pole, 2-wire” and did not
have an equipment grounding means at the receptacle. The only
grounding point was at the service entrance, where the neutral (white)
conductor was grounded. The receptacle slot for the neutral wire,
according to NEMA configuration 1-15R, must be longer than the slot for
the phase or hot wire (typically black or red). This enables certain items
of equipment, like TV sets and home appliances, to have their external
metal parts or casing grounded through the white neutral connection.
Such equipment uses a polarized plug where the neutral plug blade is
wider than the hot plug blade, ensuring that it mates properly with the
NEMA 1-15R configuration receptacle. Receptacles designed for 2-pole,
2-wire circuits do not have mounting straps that are connected to a
grounding terminal. Leviton still offers 2-pole, 2-wire receptacles for
replacement use only in existing non-grounding systems.
Experience proved that a single grounding point through the neutral conductor was not sufficiently safe. Conditions could occur where fault currents and differences in potential lead to shocks, overheating, equipment
burnout and fire. Therefore, the 2-pole, 3-wire circuit was developed. A
third conductor, called the grounding conductor, does not carry current
during normal circuit operation. It is connected to the neutral bus bar at
the service entrance and runs along with the current-carrying neutral and
hot conductors .The grounding conductor is connected only to outlet
boxes, chassis and other non-current carrying components that may
carry current in case of damage or defects in the wiring system. It is
sometimes referred to as the “equipment grounding conductor.”
The grounding contacts on the 2-pole, 3-wire receptacles are most commonly shaped like a “U”, which is how the term “U-ground” evolved.
The grounding contacts on these receptacles are securely fastened to the
mounting strap. In Leviton receptacles, the grounding contacts are permanently riveted to the mounting strap, and in most Leviton Hospital
Grade and Industrial Grade receptacles they are an integral part of the
strap. Many Leviton receptacles offer dual ground connection options to
help ensure that the receptacle is properly connected to the grounding
system: An integral green grounding screw for direct connection to the
green or bare grounding wire, and a patented Groundamatic ® selfgrounding clip riveted to the strap to provide automatic ground connection when the receptacle is mounted in a properly grounded metal
wallbox.
Technical Information
Switches used in branch circuit wiring are rated in two general categories: AC ONLY and AC/DC. Originally, the electrical power furnished to
residences and businesses by utility companies was Direct Current or
DC. Because DC current was always flowing at full value, the making or
breaking of a circuit created a rather strong arc during switch operation.
For this reason, the contacts had to be widely gapped and the operation
had to be “quick make, quick break” to avoid excessive pitting or welding
of the contact points.
Alternating current operates between zero and full power 120 times per
second. Because of the oscillating characteristic of AC power, the arc
from an AC circuit is self-extinguishing on the “break” of the current. This
means a slower breaking action is possible on an AC switch, as opposed
to the breaking action required of a switch made for use with continuous
full-power DC. The pulsating nature of AC can, however, cause a “chattering” or very fast series of “makes” and “breaks” if the circuit is closed
too quickly. For this reason an AC ONLY switch works with a somewhat
slower “fast make” and “break” than an AC/DC switch.
Because the make and break actions of an AC/DC switch must be fast, it
can be rather noisy, and must use contact metals capable of enduring
such comparatively violent action while still offering acceptable electrical
conductivity. An alloy of copper is most often used.
Silver and its oxides are better conductors than copper and its oxides.
Silver is much softer than copper and therefore cannot be used in the
AC/DC switch. However, silver can be used in the AC ONLY switch
because of its gentler “fast make” characteristic, especially when silver is
alloyed with cadmium oxide, a good conductor that’s quite hard.
Isolated-Ground Receptacles
Although the conventional grounding system provides safety for personnel and equipment, it may be a source of electrical interference that can
cause problems in modern electronic equipment. Because the conventional grounding network runs through an entire facility, it can unintentionally function as a pick-up of transient electrical signals or “noise.”
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
These transient signals will then be introduced to equipment through the
ground connection. Microprocessor-based equipment, including computers, cash registers, medical equipment and audio/video equipment,
may malfunction as a result of this noise.
Isolated-Grounding Receptacles can help eliminate problems caused by
electrical interference in a conventional ground system. The ground contacts on Isolated-Ground Receptacles are electrically isolated from the
mounting strap and therefore they are isolated from the conventional
ground system. The green ground screw is connected to a pure ground
path that is separate from a facility’s grounding network. The isolated
ground network is relatively free of electrical noise because it is not a facility-wide grounding path and it’s connected to ground at a single point.
OUTLET BOX
BLACK
How a GFCI Works
LINE TERMINAL
NEUTRAL TERMINAL
WHITE
GREEN
Technical Information
CONVENTIONAL
GROUND
ISOLATED
GROUND
ISOLATED-GROUNDING RECEPTACLES
Mounting Straps
There are basically two kinds of mounting straps for receptacles. The
“through” type passes between the receptacle body and cover. The
“wrap-around” type acts as a cradle for the receptacle, surrounding its
side, ends and bottom surfaces.
Power Contact Design
The “contact” does more than make contact with the plug blade — It
must grip the plug blade for maximum electrical conductivity and
mechanical strength. Leviton receptacles feature double-wipe contacts
that grip both sides of each blade, including the U-ground contacts that
are often single-wipe in receptacles made by other manufacturers.
Leviton Hospital Grade and Industrial Grade receptacles feature triplewipe contacts for added strength and durability in high-abuse applications. Leviton contacts are made of the copper alloys that offer maximum
strength and electrical conductivity.
Wiring of Leviton Receptacles
• If a miswiring (line-load reversal) occurs during installation, the GFCI
must not be capable of supplying power to either the GFCI's face or to
feed-through terminals
• GFCIs must provide a visual and/or audible indication OR be able to
render themselves incapable of delivering power when they no longer
offer ground fault protection based on a failure to pass their internal test
Note that the National Electrical Code strongly recommends monthly
testing of all GFCIs.
Leviton SmartLockPRO ® GFCI with Lockout Action
The TEST and RESET functions on Leviton's SmartLock GFCI work
together so that a tripped GFCI cannot be reset if the GFCI circuit is no
longer providing ground fault protection. The RESET button is blocked if
GFCI protection has been compromised, eliminating the possibility of
end-users incorrectly assuming that a reset GFCI is providing ground
fault protection when it actually is not.
0.29 (7.4)
2.74 (69.6)
2.62 (66.5)
Quickwire™and Screw
Option of
(1) side wiring or
(2) Quickwire connection.
NOTE: For continuous
wiring, both sets of
terminals (screw and
Quickwire) can be used
together.
UL 2006 Code Requirements (Effective July 28, 2006)
3.28 (83.3)
Quickwire™ Connection
Insert wire into wire well.
Wire is automatically
clamped by spring
action, insuring good
electrical connection. For
copper conductors only.
When there is a ground fault condition, all of the current flowing through
the “hot” conductor is not returning through the neutral conductor. A
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) monitors the difference in current
flow between hot and neutral conductors. If the GFCI senses even a very
tiny difference in current flow between the conductors (a ground fault), it
interrupts the flow of electrical current through the device by opening its
internal double-pole contacts. According to UL Standard 943 Class A,
the GFCI must trip when there is a ground fault of 5 milliamps (±1mA).
The GFCI must also trip within approximately 25 milliseconds.
GFCI receptacles are rated for 15 or 20 amp circuits. They are used in
place of standard box-mounted duplex receptacles. GFCI receptacles
can also be feed-through wired to provide ground fault protection to feedthrough wired receptacles downstream.
See Section H for information on Leviton’s comprehensive line of
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter Devices.
4.21 (106.9)
Side Wiring
Loop wire around
terminal screw. Screw
head locks wire against
terminal. For copper or
copper/clad aluminum
conductors.
The Need for Ground Fault Protection
Circuit breakers and fuses protect equipment and building structures
from overheating and fire caused by short circuits and high-current overloads. However, the current level needed to trip a breaker is many times
greater than the amount of current needed to deliver a powerful, and
possibly lethal electrical shock. For example, the hot conductor in an
electrical device can become exposed through a break in its insulation,
and it may end up touching the device’s metal enclosure. The leakage
current that now flows through the metal enclosure will be conducted to
ground through any available path — including the body of a human
being that happens to touch the faulty device. This condition is called a
Ground Fault, and the current flowing through the person to ground can
be life threatening, though there is usually nowhere near enough current
to trip a circuit breaker.
MOUNTING STRAP
GROUNDED TO BOX
ISOLATED GROUNDING
TERMINAL (ISOLATED
FROM STRAP)
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI’s)
1.19 (30.2)
1.31 (33.3)
V
Back & Side Wiring
Option of (1) side wiring or (2) back
wiring: Insert wire into well. Tighten
screw, thus clamping wire against terminal. Back wiring for copper or copper/clad aluminum conductors.
Two-Circuit Conversion
To power each outlet of a duplex
receptacle separately, simply
break off the tab between the
two terminals.
1.70 (43.2)
SmartLockPRO ® GFCI RECEPTACLE
7599 Series
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Enclosure Type Designations
Enclosures serve the dual purpose of protecting personnel from incidental contact with the enclosed electrical equipment and protecting the enclosed
equipment against specified environmental conditions. Enclosures are rated for use in specific environmental conditions by NEMA, UL, CSA and the
IEC. The major rating systems used are the NEMA Type Numbers and the IEC Enclosure Classification Designation.
The IEC Enclosure Classification Designation — IP Suitability Ratings
The IP Suitability Ratings are a system for classifying the degree of protection provided by enclosures of electrical equipment. The higher the number in
the rating, the greater the degree of protection provided by the enclosure. Note that the rating will ONLY apply to properly installed equipment. The chart
below defines the numerals in the IP Code.
1. The First Numeral indicates the degree of protection for persons against access to hazardous parts inside the enclosure and/or against the ingress of
solid foreign objects
2. The Second Numeral indicates the degree of protection of equipment inside enclosures against damage from the ingress of water.
Elements of the IP Code
Meaning for the Protection of Equipment
Code Letters
Ingress Protection
IP
First Number
Second Number
Against Ingress of Solid Foreign Objects
Against Ingress of Water
with Harmful Effects
O – Non protected
O – Non protected
1 – ≥ 50 mm diameter
1 – Vertically dripping
2 – ≥ 12.5 mm diameter
2 – Dripping (15 °tilted)
3 – ≥ 2.5 mm diameter
3 – Spraying
4 – Splashing
5 – Dust-protected
5 – Jetting
6 – Dust-tight
6 – Power jetting
7 – Temporary immersion
8 – Continuous immersion
Note: > denotes greater than or equal to.
Example: IP 54 Suitability Rating = Ingress Protection/Dust-protected/Splashing
Enclosure Types for Non-Hazardous Locations
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL
MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
UNDERWRITERS LABORATORIES INC.
CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION
NEMA Standards Publication No. 250-1991
Enclosures for Electrical Equipment (1000 Volts max.)
UL50
Standard for Enclosures for Electrical Equipment
(10th Edition)
CAN/ CSA C22.2 No. 94-M91
Special Purposes Enclosures
Type
Designation
Type
Designation
Type
Designation
Intended Use and
Description
An enclosure is a surrounding
case constructed to provide a
degree of protection to personnel against incidental contact
with the enclosed equipment
and to provide a degree of protection to enclosed equipment
against the specified environmental conditions.
Intended Use and
Description
Intended Use and
Description
Enclosure — A surrounding case
constructed to provide a degree of
protection against incidental contact with the enclosed equipment
and to provide a degree of protection to the enclosed equipment
against specified environmental
conditions.
A complete enclosure shall be
provided for all live parts that may
be housed in it. The enclosure
shall be tight and, unless
designed for a specific installation,
such as a cast metal junction or
pull box intended to be installed in
poured concrete, shall be provided with means for mounting.
Enclosures — provide a degree of
protection against accidental contact with the enclosed equipment,
and to the enclosed equipment
against specified environmental
conditions.
No CSA equivalent.
Type 1
Enclosures are intended for indoor
use primarily to provide a degree
of protection against limited
amounts of falling dirt.
Type 1
Indoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against limited amounts of falling dirt.
Type 2
Enclosures are intended for indoor
use primarily to provide a degree
of protection against limited
amounts of falling water or dirt.
Type 2
Indoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against limited amounts of falling water or
dirt.
Type 2
An enclosure for indoor use, constructed so as to provide a
degree of protection against dripping and light splashing of noncorrosive liquids, and falling dirt.
Type 3
Enclosures are intended for outdoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against rain,
sleet, windblown dust, and damage from external ice formation.
Type 3
Outdoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against rain,
sleet, windblown dust and damage from external ice formation.
Type 3
An enclosure for either indoor or
outdoor use, constructed so as to
provide a degree of protection
against rain and snow, undamaged by the external formation of
ice on the enclosures.
For answers to technical questions, call Leviton’s Techline at 1-800-824-3005
Technical Information
4 – ≥1.0 mm
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Enclosure Types for Non-Hazardous Locations
Technical Information
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL
MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
V
UNDERWRITERS LABORATORIES INC.
CANADIAN STANDARDS ASSOCIATION
NEMA Standards Publication No. 250-1991
Enclosures for Electrical Equipment (1000 Volts max.)
UL50
Standard for Enclosures for Electrical Equipment
(10th Edition)
CAN/ CSA C22.2 No. 94-M91
Special Purposes Enclosures
Type
Designation
Intended Use and
Description
Type
Designation
Intended Use and
Description
Type
Designation
Intended Use and
Description
Type 3R
Enclosures are intended for outdoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against rain,
sleet, and damage from external
ice formation.
Type 3R
Outdoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against rain,
sleet, and damage from external
ice formation.
Type 3R
An enclosure for either indoor or
outdoor use, constructed so as to
provide a degree of protection
against rain and snow, undamaged by the external formation of
ice on the enclosure.
Type 3S
Enclosures are intended for outdoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against rain,
sleet, windblown dust, and to provide for operation of external
mechanisms when ice laden.
Type 3S
Outdoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against rain,
sleet, windblown dust, and to
provide for operation of external
mechanisms when ice laden.
Type 3S
An enclosure for either indoor or
outdoor use, constructed so as to
provide a degree of protection
against rain, snow and windblown
dust, the external mechanism(s)
remain operable while ice covered.
Type 4
Enclosures are intended for indoor
or outdoor use primarily to provide
a degree of protection against
windblown dust and rain, splashing water, hose-directed water,
and damage from external ice
formation.
Type 4
Indoor or outdoor use primarily to
provide a degree of protection
against windblown dust and rain,
splashing water, hose-directed
water, and damage from external
ice formation.
Type 4
An enclosure for either indoor or
outdoor use, constructed so as to
provide a degree of protection
against rain, snow, windblown
dust, splashing and hose-directed
water; undamaged by the external
formation of ice on the enclosure.
Type 4X
Enclosures are intended for indoor
or outdoor use primarily to provide
a degree of protection against
corrosion, windblown dust and
rain, splashing water, hose
directed water, and damage from
external ice formation.
Type 4X
Indoor or outdoor use primarily to
provide a degree of protection
against corrosion, windblown dust
and rain, splashing water, hosedirected water and damage from
external ice formation.
Type 4X
An enclosure for either indoor or
outdoor use, constructed so as to
provide a degree of protection
against rain, snow, windblown
dust, splashing and hose-directed
water; undamaged by the external
formation of ice on the enclosure.
Type 5
Enclosures are intended for indoor
use primarily to provide a degree
of protection against settling airborne dust, falling dirt, and dripping noncorrosive liquids.
Type 5
Indoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against settling airborne dust, falling dirt, and
dripping noncorrosive liquids.
Type 5
An enclosure for indoor use, constructed so as to provide a degree
of protection against dripping and
light splashing of noncorrosive liquids and settling dust, lint, fibers,
and flyings.
Type 6
Enclosures are intended for indoor
or outdoor use primarily to provide
a degree of protection against
hose-directed water, the entry of
water during occasional temporary submersion at a limited
depth, and damage from external
ice formation.
Type 6
Indoor or outdoor use primarily to
provide a degree of protection
against hose-directed water, the
entry of water during occasional
temporary submersion at a limited
depth, and damage from external
ice formation.
Type 6
An enclosure for either indoor or
outdoor use, constructed so as to
provide a degree of protection
against the entry of water during
occasional temporary submersion
at a limited depth; undamaged by
the external formation of ice on
the enclosure.
Type 6P
Enclosures are intended for indoor
or outdoor use primarily to provide
a degree of protection against
hose-directed water, the entry of
water during prolonged submersion at a limited depth, and damage from external ice formation.
Type 6P
Indoor or outdoor use primarily to
provide a degree of protection
against hose-directed water, the
entry of water during prolonged
submersion at a limited depth,
and damage from external ice
formation.
Type 6P
An enclosure for either indoor or
outdoor use, constructed so as to
provide a degrer of protection
against the entry of water during
prolonged submersion at a limited
depth; undamaged by the external formation of ice on the enclosure; resists extended corrosion.
Type 12
Enclosures are intended for
indoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against circulating dust, falling dirt, and
dripping noncorrosive liquids.
Type 12
Indoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against circulating dust, falling dirt, and dripping noncorrosive liquids.
Type 12
An enclosure for indoor use, constructed so as to provide a degree
of protection against circulating
dust, lint, fibers, and flyings; dripping and light splashing of noncorrosive liquids; not provided with
knockouts.
Type 12K
Enclosures with knockouts are
intended for indoor use primarily
to provide a degree of protection
against circulating dust, fallling
dirt, and dripping noncorrosive
liquids.
Type 12K
Indoor use primarily to provide a
degree of protection against
circulating dust, falling dirt, and
dripping noncorrosive liquids.
Type 12K
An enclosure for indoor use, constructed so as to provide a degree
of protection against circulating
dust, lint, fibers, and flyings;
dripping and light splashing of
noncorrosive liquids; and provided with knockouts.
Type 13
Enclosures are intended for indoor
use primarily to provide a degree
of protection against dust, spraying of water, oil, and noncorrosive
coolants.
Type 13
Indoor use primarily to provide
a degree of protection against
dust, spraying of water, oil, and
noncorosive coolant.
Type 13
An enclosure for indoor use,
constructed so as to provide a
degree of protection against
circulating dust, lint, fibers, and
flyings; seepage and spraying of
noncorrosive liquids including
oils and coolants.
To learn more about Leviton’s outstanding offering of devices visit our Website at: www.leviton.com
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
NEMA and IEC Enclosure Classifications
Comparing NEMA Enclosure Type Numbers and IEC
Enclosure Classification Designations (IP Suitability Rating)
High Performance Brass or “Olin Brass.” Olin brass is a copper alloy
consisting of more than 90% copper. It is more resilient than 70/30
brass and used by Leviton to form the power contacts in some
Industrial Grade and Hospital Grade devices.
Phosphor Bronze
IEC
IEC Publication 529, “Classification of Degrees of Protection Provided by
Enclosures”, defines the IP (Ingress Protection) Suitability Rating. The IP
Suitability Rating is a system for classifying the degree of protection provided by enclosures of electrical equipment. The higher the number in
the rating, the greater the degree of protection provided by the enclosure.
The first numeral of the code indicates the degree of protection for persons against access to hazardous parts inside the enclosure and/or
against the ingress of solid foreign objects. The second numeral indicates
the degree of protection of equipment inside enclosures against damage
from the ingress of water. For a more detailed explanation of the IP
Suitability Code, refer to page U-12.
The IP Suitability Rating defined by IEC 529 does not specify any degree
of protection against mechanical damage of equipment, risk of explosions, or conditions such as moisture (i.e. condensation), corrosive
vapors, fungus, or vermin.
NEMA
Beryllium Copper
An alloy of copper and .5% beryllium is used to form some of the components in Leviton Industrial Grade devices. Beryllium Copper provides
excellent strength, durability, electrical conductivity. It also retains its
resiliency at elevated temperatures. These properties make Beryllium
Copper ideal for the contact arm in heavy-duty switches.
Silver-Cadmium Oxide
Although pure silver is an excellent conductor (superior to copper), it
cannot be used for switch contacts. Over time, arcing caused by
actuation would weld the silver contacts together. Silver-cadmium
oxide, an alloy of 90% silver and 10% cadmium oxide, is widely used
by Leviton to form switch contacts. Microscopic particles of cadmium
oxide in the silver will decompose due to the heat buildup, preventing
the contacts from welding together.
Zinc-Plated Steel
In additon to being strong and durable, zinc-plated steel provides a
higher degree of corrosion resistance than standard cold-rolled steel.
Leviton uses zinc-plated steel mounting straps in many of their devices.
Leviton also offers zinc-plated steel wallplates for power receptacles,
available with either a brass or aluminum finish.
Nickel-Plated Metals
Converting NEMA Type Numbers to IEC
Classification Designations
(Note: This table cannot be used to convert IEC classification designations to NEMA
type numbers)
NEMA Enclosure
Type Number
Equivalent IEC Enclosure
Classification Designation
1
2
3
3R
3S
4 and 4X
5
6 and 6P
12 and 12K
13
IP10
IP11
IP54
IP14
IP54
IP56
IP52
IP67
IP52
IP54
Nickel-plating adds a high degree of corrosion resistance to either brass
or steel. All the metal parts in Leviton Corrosion Resistant devices
(blades, contacts, terminals, mounting straps and screws) are nickelplated for maximum corrosion resistance. In some cases, cupronickel
screws are used, which provide a high degree of corrosion resistance.
Leviton uses an electroless nickel-plating process. The standard plating
process uses an electrical charge to coat the metal with nickel. This can
produce uneven results, leaving some areas of the metal more coated
than others. The more effective electroless process involves submerging
the metal in a chemical bath where salts decompose and deposit nickel
on the metal substrate. Every surface of the metal is evenly coated.
Leviton uses this electroless process to ensure that their Corrosion
Resistant wiring devices provide maximum performance in extremely
damp and corrosive environments.
Technical Information
NEMA Standards Publication 250 defines the NEMA Enclosure Type
Numbers. Unlike the IEC Enclosure Classification Designations, NEMA
Standards Publication 250 does tests for environmental condition such
as corrosion, rust, icing, oil and coolants. For this reason and because
the tests and evaluations for other characteristics are not identical, the
IEC Enclosure Classification Designations cannot be exactly equated with
NEMA Enclosure Type Numbers.
The table below provides an equivalent conversion from NEMA
Enclosure Type Numbers to IEC Enclosure Classification Designations.
Note that the NEMA Types meet or exceed the test requirements for the
associated IEC Classifications. Therefore, this table cannot be used to
convert from IEC Classifications to NEMA Types.
Phosphor Bronze, an alloy of copper and tin, is superior in strength to
70/30 brass. The advantage of using phosphor bronze parts is that they
can be thinner than comparable parts made of standard brass without
any loss in strength. For example, Leviton uses a phosphor bronze alloy
of 95% copper and 5% tin to form power contacts in some Industrial
Grade receptacles. Phosphor bronze power contacts at .031" outperform
brass power contacts of a thicker gauge.
Stainless Steel
Materials Used in Wiring Devices
The following is an overview of the materials commonly used in wiring
devices. Note that specific brand names of materials used in Leviton
devices are subject to change due to a variety of factors. These changes
will never compromise the quality, performance and durability features of
our wiring devices. Leviton is committed to maintaining the positive qualities of the materials being replaced and choosing new materials with
superior qualities as they become available.
Brass
The type of brass commonly used in wiring devices is referred to as
standard or “70/30” brass. It is an alloy of 70% copper and 30% zinc
that provides the strength and conductivity needed for power and
ground contacts, wiring terminals and terminal screws. It is also used
for some mounting straps and wallplates.
The Olin Corporation offers a series of alloys sometimes referred to as
Type 430 Standard Stainless Steel
Type 430 stainless steel is resistant to the corrosive effects of moisture.
Leviton offers a wide selection of wallplates made from this material.
Leviton’s Raintight-While-In -Use Covers are supplied with stainless-steel
mounting screws to help ensure a long service life in wet applications.
Note that Type 430 Stainless Steel does have magnetic properties that
may interfere with magnetic-sensitive equipment.
Type 302/304 Non-Magnetic Stainless Steel
Type 302/304 Non-Magnetic Stainless Steel is suitable for applications
where sensitive equipment may be affected by magnetic material. For
example, navigational equipment in marine applications and MRI equipment in health care environments are susceptible to magnetic interference. In addition to being non-magnetic, Type 302/304 stainless Steel is
more corrosion resistant than Type 430 stainless steel. Types 302 and
304 differ in composition, but there is virtually no difference between
them in terms of non-magnetic and corrosion-resistant properties.
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Leviton offers a complete selection of wallplates made of Type 302/304
Non-Magnetic Stainless Steel. These wallplates are ideal for any application where magnetic interference must be avoided. Leviton’s Corrosion
Resistant wiring devices feature non-magnetic stainless steel assembly
screws to ensure their suitability in marine applications. For health care
applications where non-magnetic devices are desired, Leviton’s Corrosion
Resistant devices should also be used.
Technical Information
CO/ALR Devices
Aluminum is used for residential wiring in Europe because it is a good
conductor and considerably cheaper than copper. Houses with
aluminum wiring were built in the United States, but the practice
stopped at least twenty years ago. It was discovered that poor connections between aluminum wire and steel or brass terminal screws led
to serious fires. There are still homes with aluminum wiring, and the
National Electrical Code stipulates that only CO/ALR devices are to be
used in these applications.
Aluminum wire tends to oxidize over time, and the oxide layer does
not conduct electricity. This results in a poor connection with the
wiring device terminal screws, particularly if they are steel. The connections gradually heat up to the point where fires are started inside
the walls. For this reason, all standard wiring devices contain the
warning, “For use with copper or copper-clad wire ONLY. Do not use
with aluminum wire.” The only exception to this are CO/ALR wiring
devices.
Leviton offers a selection of CO/ALR devices for use with aluminum
wire. In CO/ALR devices, the terminal screws are plating with the element Indium. Indium is an extremely soft metal that forms a gassealed connection with the aluminum wire, eliminating problems
caused by oxidation.
Thermoset and Thermoplastic Material
There are significant benefits in using thermoplastics in wiring devices
instead of thermosets. Each type of thermoplastic also has particular
characteristics that may make it ideally suited for a specific application.
Thermosets
Thermoset components are manufactured by compression molding,
where powdered material is molded by heat and pressure. Thermoset
materials cannot be remolded. The major types of thermoset materials
are Phenolic, Urea and Melamine. Phenolic is primarily used for dark
colors, while Urea is used for lighter colors.
All thermoset materials provide dimensional stability when used in
wiring devices. Phenolic is also a flame-resistant material. Thermosets
do not provide a high degree of resistance to impacts, chemicals and
solvents, and therefore they are not suitable for heavy-duty applications. Thermosets are not used in Leviton Industrial Grade devices.
Urea is still widely used to manufacture wallplates.
Thermoplastics
Thermoplastic components are manufactured by injection molding
where pellets of the material are heated to a liquid which can flow into
a mold. Unlike thermosets, thermoplastics can be remolded. These
materials are the preferred choice for heavy-duty applications because
they provide superior resistance to impacts, chemicals and solvents
compared to thermosets. The following is a list of the major types of
thermoplastic materials, along with some well-known brand names.
Nylon: Zytel ®
101 Type 66 and Zytel Supertough ST 801 Type66
Polycarbonate: Lexan ®, Calibre ®, Makrolon ®
Polyester: Valox ®, Rynite ®
ABS
Acrylic
Polypropylene
Zytel ® and Rynite ® are registered trademaks of the Dupont Co.
Lexan ® and Valox ® are registered trademaks of the General Electric Co.
Calibre ® is a registered trademark of the Dow Chemical Co.
Makrolon ® is a registered trademark of Bayer, Inc.
Chemical Resistance of Materials Commonly Used in Wiring Devices*
Nylon
Melamine
Phenolic
Urea
Polyvinyl
Chloride
Polycarbonate
Acids
C
B
B
B
A
B
Alcohol
A
A
A
A
A
A
Caustic
Bases
A
B
B
B
A
C
C
Gasoline
A
B
A
C
A
B
Grease
A
A
A
A
A
B
Kerosene
A
A
A
A
A
B
Oil
A
A
A
A
A
B
Solvents
A
A
A
A
C
Water
A
A
A
A
A
CHEMICALS
Polyester
Polypropylene
B
A
A
B
A
A
B
A
B
A
A
B
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
A
C
C
B
B
A
B
A
A
Rubber
A – Completely resistant — Good to excellent for general use.
B – Resistance is fair to good — Recommended for limited service.
C – Slow attack. No recommended for use.
Thermoplastic Enhancements
UV Stability
Thermoplastics provide varying degrees of UV (Ultraviolet Light) stability.
For example, standard grade nylon will lose tensile strength and durability when exposed to sunlight and weathering. Discoloring will also occur.
There are additives that will increase the UV stability of thermoplastics.
UV Stabilized thermoplastics should be used when a device is intended
for extensive outdoor use. For example, Leviton uses UV- stabilized Lexan
in their Raintight-While-In-Use Cover, with excellent results.
Glass-Reinforced Thermoplastics
Several types of thermoplastics are available in glass-reinforced versions,
including Rynite ®, Lexan ®, Valox ® and nylon. Glass reinforcement
increases the rigidity of the material and also raises the operating temperature. For example, Leviton Momentary and Maintained Contact
Switches feature glass-reinforced thermoplastic construction, making
these switches ideally suited for rugged applications.
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
ANSI Architectural Symbols
1. LIGHTING OUTLETS
Ceiling
Wall
1.1 Surface or Pendant Incandescent, Mercury-Vapor, or Similar
Lamp Fixture
Grounded
Ungrounded
2.10 Special Purpose Connection or Provision for Connection
2.11 Multi-outlet assembly
1.2 Recessed Incandescent, Mercury-Vapor, or Similar
Lamp Fixture
R
UNG
DW
DW
UNG
X in
X in
2.12 Clock Hanger Receptacle
R
C
1.3 Surface or Pendant Individual Fluorescent Fixture
C
UNG
F
UNG
2.13 Fan Hanger Receptacle
F
1.4 Recessed Individual Fluorescent Fixture
R
R
2.14 Floor Single Receptacle Outlet
1.5 Surface or Pendant Continuous Row Fluorescent Fixture
UNG
2.15 Floor Duplex Receptacle Outlet
1.6 Recessed Continuous Row Fluorescent Fixture
UNG
R
2.16 Floor Special-Purpose Outlet
1.7 Bare-Lamp Fluorescent Strip
3. SWITCH OUTLETS
X
X
3.2
RX
RX
3.3
1.10 Blanket Outlet
3.4
B
B
3.5
1.11 Junction Box
J
J
3.6
1.12 Outlet Controlled by Low-Voltage Switching when Relay is Installed
in Outlet Box
L
S
Double-Pole Switch S 2
Three-Way Switch S 3
Four-Way Switch S 4
Key-Operated Switch S K
Switch and Pilot Lamp S P
3.1 Single-Pole Switch
1.9 Recessed Exit Light
3.7 Switch for Low-Voltage switching System
L
3.9 Switch and Single Receptacle
2. RECEPTACLE OUTLETS
Grounded
2.1 Single Receptacle Outlet
SL
3.8 Maser Switch for Low-Voltage Switching System
3.10 Switch and Double Receptacle
Ungrounded
UNG
2.2 Duplex Receptacle Outlet
UNG
2.3 Triplex Receptacle Outlet
S LM
S
S
SD
3.12 Time Switch S T
3.11 Door Switch
3.13 Circuit Breaker Switch
Technical Information
UNG
1.8 Surface or Pendant Exit Light
S CB
3.14 Momentary Contact Switch or Pushbutton for Other Than
Signaling System MC
S
3.15 Ceiling Pull Switch
S
UNG
2.4 Quadruplex Receptacle Outlet
4. RESIDENTIAL OCCUPANCIES
UNG
2.5 Duplex Receptacle Outlet — Split Wired
4.1 Pushbutton
UNG
4.2 Buzzer
UNG
4.3 Bell
UNG
4.4 Combination Bell-Buzzer
UNG
4.5 Chime
2.6 Triplex Receptacle Outlet — Split Wired
2.7 Single Special-Purpose Receptacle Outlet
2.8 Duplex Special-Purpose Receptacle Outlet
CH
2.9 Range Outlet (typical)
R
UNG
R
4.6 Annunciator
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
NEMA Straight Blade Configurations
NEMA CONFIGURATIONS FOR GENERAL-PURPOSE NONLOCKING PLUGS AND RECEPTACLES
WIRING / VOLTAGE
2-POLE 2-WIRE
125V
250V
277V AC
600V
2-POLE 3-WIRE GROUNDING
250V
277V AC
480V AC
125/250V
3-POLE 3-WIRE
1-15R
20 AMPERE
PLUG
W
2
1-15P
2-15P
3Ø 480V
3Ø 600V
3-POLE 4-WIRE GROUNDING
4-POLE 5-WIRE GROUNDING
3Ø 480V
3Ø 600V
50 AMPERE
PLUG
RECEPTACLE
2-20P
2-30R
4
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
G
5
5-15R
6
6-15R
7
7-15R
G
W
G
W
5-15P
5-20R
W
5-30R
G
G
G
6-15P
W
5-30P
G
7-15P
W
6-20P
G
7-20R
G
7-20P
G
G
W
W
10-20P
X
11-15R
Y
11-15P
X
X
X
Z
Z
Y
11-20R
Y
Z
Y
11-20P
10-30P
11-30R
X
Y
Y
Y
11-30P
Z
Y
11-50R
12
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
13
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
14
14-15R
Y
14-15P
X
Y
15
15-15R
14-20R
Y
Z
X
G
X
15-15P
X
X
Y
15-20R
14-30R
Y
15-20P
Z
X
15-30R
Z
Y
14-50R
15-30P
X
15-50R
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
W
W
W
X
Y
18-15P
Z
X
Y
18-20R
Z
W
X
Y
18-20P
Y
18-30R
Z
X
Y
18-30P
18-50R
Y
3ØY
19
277/480V
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
3ØY
20
347/600V
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
3ØY
21
120/208V
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
3ØY
22
277/480V
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
3ØY
23
347/600V
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
Z
Y
15-50P
14-60P
X
Y
W
G
G
Z
X
15-60R
X
Z
15-60P
Z
X
Y
Y
W
W
W
18-50P
G
X
W
Y
X
Y
14-60R
G
X
W
Z
X
G
Y
W
Z
W
W
Z
X
X
Z
Y
17
Z
14-50P
G
Z
Y
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
18-15R
Y
G
X
G
X
11-50P
W
16
3ØY
18
120/208V
Y
W
Y
Y
Y
X
Y
G
X
G
G
X
Z
14-30P
X Y
Z
G
X
W
W
G
Z
Y
Y
14-20P
W
W
G
G
G
G
X
W
X
X
X
Z
W
10-50P
10-50R
X
X
Z
Y
W
W
W
W
10-30R
Y
24-50P
W
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
X
G
24-50R
W
9
Y
W
G
24-30P
W
G
7-50P
W
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
10-20R
G
7-50R
8
10
G
6-50P
W
24-30R
W
G
G
G
7-30P
W
24-20P
W
W
G
7-30R
G
24-20R
W
11
PLUG
W
6-50R
6-30P
W
G
G
24-15P
24-15R
RECEPTACLE
5-50P
W
G
6-30R
W
G
5-50R
W
G
G
6-20R
W
24
G
G
G
5-20P
W
G
60 AMPERE
PLUG
2-30P
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
G
3Ø 250V
RECEPTACLE
3
G
125/250V
30 AMPERE
PLUG
2-20R
X
3Ø 250V
RECEPTACLE
W
G
347V AC
600V
4-POLE 4-WIRE
Technical Information
125V
1
15 AMPERE
RECEPTACLE
Z
X
Y
18-60R
Z
X
Y
18-60P
X
Z
Y
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
NEMA Locking Configurations
NEMA CONFIGURATIONS FOR LOCKING TYPE PLUGS AND RECEPTACLES
15 AMPERE
WIRING / VOLTAGE
2-POLE 2-WIRE
125V
250V
277V AC
600V
RECEPTACLE
L1
20 AMPERE
PLUG
L1-15R
RECEPTACLE
L2
W
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
L4
RESERVED FOR FUTURE CONFIGURATIONS
2-POLE 3-WIRE GROUNDING
L5-15R
L6
L6-15R
W
480V AC
L5-20R
G
L6-20R
G
G
X
X
L6-15P
G
G
W
L7-15P
L7-20R
L8-20R
L9-20R
3-POLE 3-WIRE
L10-20R
3Ø 250V
Z
L11-15P
L11-20R
L12-20R
X
X
G
L9-30R
L9-30P
G
G
Y
Y
X
X
X
L10-20P
W
L10-30R
L10-30P
W
Y
W
Y
Y
Y
Y
X
L11-20P
X
W
L11-30R
L11-30P
X
Z
Y
Z
L12
Y
Y
L12-20P
X
X
L12-30R
Y
L12-30P
X
Z
Z
X
Z
X
Z
Z
Y
3Ø 600V
L13
L13-30R
X
X
3-POLE 4-WIRE
GROUNDING
125/250V
L14-20R
W
G
L14-20P
G
L15
L15-20R
Y
L15-20P
3Ø 480V
L15-30R
L16-20P
X
Y
L15-30P
G
Y
Z
Z
X
X
G
Y
L16-30R
G
Y
Z
Z
G
Y
G
X
Y
W
X
G
Z
G
L14-30P
Y
Y
X
L16-20R
X
W
G
X
G
Z
L16
L14-30R
Y
Y
X
Z
X
W
X
3Ø 250V
Y
L13-30P
X
Z
L14
G
Y
Y
W
X
L8-30P
G
X
Y
3Ø 480V
L8-30R
Y
L9-20P
Y
X
Z
G
X
G
Y
G
Y
Y
W
L7-30P
G
X
L8-20P
G
Y
X
L7-30R
L24-20P
Y
L10
G
Y
W
G
Y
L9
X
L6-30P
G
Y
L7-20P
X
L8
L6-30R
W
G
L24-20R
L11-15R
G
X
G
W
G
G
L7-15R
L24
L11
L5-30P
G
Y
X
125/250V
L5-30R
X
L6-20P
Y
Y
X
600V AC
W
W
W
L5-20P
G
Y
L7
W
L5-15P
G
L16-30P
G
Y
Z
Z
X
3Ø 600V
L17
L17-30R
X
4-POLE 4-WIRE
X
3ØY 120/208V
L18-20R
Y
W
L18-20P
W
L19
L19-20R
L19-20P
L20-20R
L20-20P
4-POLE 5-WIRE
GROUNDING
L21-20R
L21-20P
L22
L22-20R
W
L22-20P
3ØY 347/600V
L21-30R
Z
L23-20P
Y
W
X
G
L21-30P
Y
W
G
Z
X
W
G
L22-30R
X
Y
W
G
L22-30P
Y
W
G
Z
Z
X
Y
W
G
Z
Y
Z
X
Y
G
L20-30P
Z
Y
W
Z
W
X
Y
X
W
G
X
L23-20R
Z
W
X
Y
Y
W
Z
Y
Z
L23
L20-30R
Z
G
L19-30P
X
W
Y
Z
W
Z
X
G
Y
X
Y
Z
Y
W
L18-30P
Z
W
X
Y
Z
L21
L19-30R
Z
W
X
Y
X
W
X
3ØY 277/480V
G
Z
Y
X
3ØY 120/208V
Y
Z
W
X
Y
W
Z
L20
L18-30R
Z
Z
X
3ØY 347/600V
L17-30P
X
Y
X
3ØY 277/480V
X
Y
G
Z
L18
L23-30R
Technical Information
347V AC
W
L3
W
277V AC
L2-20P
L2-20R
L5
PLUG
W
X
250V
RECEPTACLE
L1-15P
W
W
125V
30 AMPERE
PLUG
X
Y
W
G
Z
L23-30P
Y
W
G
Z
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Horsepower Ratings for NEMA Configurations — for Plugs and Receptacles Only
Technical Information
STRAIGHT BLADE CONFIGURATIONS
NEMA
1-15
2-15
2-20
2-30
5-15
5-20
5-30
5-50
6-15
6-20
6-30
6-50
7-15
7-20
7-30
7-50
10-20
10-30
10-50
11-15
11-20
11-30
11-50
14-15
14-20
14-30
14-50
14-60
15-15
15-20
15-30
15-50
15-60
18-15
18-20
18-30
18-50
18-60
AC HP Rating
0.5
1.5*
2*
2*
0.5
1
2
2
1.5*
2*
2*
3*
2
2
3
5
2 L-L*/1 L-N
2 L-L*/2 L-N
3 L-L*/2 L-N
2
3
3
7.5
1.5 L-L*/0.5 L-N
2 L-L*/1 L-N
2 L-L*/2 L-N
3 L-L*/2 L-N
3 L-L*/2 L-N
2
3
3
7.5
10
2
2
3
7.5
7.5
L-L Denotes phase-to-phase HP rating
L-N Denotes phase-to-neutral HP rating
*Suitable for 208V motor applications at HP rating
LOCKING CONFIGURATIONS
Rating
15A-125V
15A-250V
20A-250V
30A-250V
15A-125V
20A-125V
30A-125V
50A-125V
15A-250V
20A-250V
30A-250V
50A-250V
15A-277V AC Only
20A-277V AC Only
30A-277 V AC Only
50A-277V AC Only
20A-125/250V
30A-125/250V
50A-125/250V
15A-250V 3Ø
20A-250V 3Ø
30A-250V 3Ø
50A-250V 3Ø
15A-125/250V
20A-125/250V
30A-125/250V
50A-125/250V
60A-125/250V
15A-250V 3Ø
20A-250V 3Ø
30A-250V 3Ø
50A-250V 3Ø
60A-250V 3Ø
15A-120/208V 3ØY
20A-120/208V 3ØY
30A-120/208V 3ØY
50A-120/208V 3ØY
60A-120/208V 3ØY
NEMA
L1-15
L2-20
L5-15
L5-20
L5-30
L6-15
L6-20
L6-30
L7-15
L7-20
L7-30
L8-20
L8-30
L9-20
L9-30
L10-20
L10-30
L11-15
L11-20
L11-30
L12-20
L12-30
L13-30
L14-20
L14-30
L15-20
L15-30
L16-20
L16-30
L17-30
L18-20
L18-30
L19-20
L19-30
L20-20
L20-30
L21-20
L21-30
L22-20
L22-30
L23-20
AC HP Rating
0.5
2*
0.5
1
2
1.5*
2*
2*
2
2
3
3
5
NA
NA
2 L-L*/1 L-N
2 L-L*/2 L-N
2
3
3
5
10
NA
2 L-L*/1 L-N
2 L-L*/2 L-N
3
3
5
10
NA
2
3
5
10
NA
NA
2
3
5
10
NA
Rating
15A-125V
20A-250V
15A-125V
20A-125V
30A-125V
15A-250V
20A-250V
30A-250V
15A-277V AC Only
20A-277V AC Only
30A-277V AC Only
20A-480V AC Only
30A-480V AC Only
20A-600V AC Only
30A-600V AC Only
20A-125/250V
30A-125/250V
15A-250V 3Ø
20A-250V 3Ø
30A-250V 3Ø
20A-480V 3Ø
30A-480V 3Ø
30A-600V 3Ø
20A-125/250V
30A-125/250V
20A-250V 3Ø
30A-250V 3Ø
20A-480V 3Ø
30A-480V 3Ø
30A-600V 3Ø
20A-120/208V 3ØY
30A-120/208V 3ØY
20A-277/480V 3ØY
30A-277/480V 3ØY
20A-347/600V 3ØY
30A-347/600V 3ØY
20A-120/208V 3ØY
30A-120/208V 3ØY
20A-277/480V 3ØY
30A-277/480V 3ØY
20A-347/600V 3ØY
L-L Denotes phase-to-phase HP rating
L-N Denotes phase-to-neutral HP rating
*Suitable for 208V motor applications at HP rating
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Circuit Wiring Diagrams
WIRING DIAGRAMS FOR NEMA CONFIGURATIONS
125V — 2-POLE, 2-WIRE
250V — 2-POLE, 2-WIRE
250V
125V
W
SYS
GR
1-15R
L1-15R
2-20R
ML1-R
2-30R
L2-20R
125V — 2-POLE, 3-WIRE GROUNDING
125V
W
SYS G
GR
EQUIP
GR
5-15R
5-20R
5-30R
5-50R
L5-15R
L5-20R
L5-30R
ML2-R
250V — 2-POLE, 3-WIRE GROUNDING
Technical Information
250V
G
EQUIP
GR
6-15R 6-20R
6-30R
6-50R
L6-15R
L6-20R
L6-30R
277V AC — 2-POLE, 3-WIRE GROUNDING
277V
W
SYS G
GR
EQUIP
GR
7-15R 7-20R
7-30R
7-50R
L7-15R
L7-20R
L7-30R
600V AC — 2-POLE, 3-WIRE GROUNDING
480V AC — 2-POLE, 3-WIRE GROUNDING
480V
600V
G
G
EQUIP
GR
EQUIP
GR
L8-20R
L8-30R
L9-20R
L9-30R
125/250V — 3-POLE, 3-WIRE
250V
125V
W
SYS
GR
125V
10-20R 10-30R
10-50R
L10-20R
L10-30R
ML-3R
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Circuit Wiring Diagrams
WIRING DIAGRAMS FOR NEMA CONFIGURATIONS
3Ø 250V — 3-POLE, 3-WIRE
250V
250V
250V
11-15R 11-20R
11-30R
11-50R
3Ø 480V — 3-POLE, 3-WIRE
480V
L11-15R
L11-20R
L11-30R
3Ø 600V — 3-POLE, 3-WIRE
480V
250V
250V
480V
250V
Technical Information
L12-20R
L12-30R
L13-30R
125/250V — 3-POLE, 4-WIRE GROUNDING
250V
125V
W
125V
SYS
GR
G
EQUIP
GR
14-15R 14-20R
14-30R
14-50R
14-60R
L14-20R
15-60R
L15-20R
L14-30R
3Ø 250V — 3-POLE, 4-WIRE GROUNDING
250V
250V
250V
G
EQUIP
GR
15-15R 15-20R
3Ø 480V — 3-POLE, 4-WIRE GROUNDING
480V
480V
15-30R
15-50R
L15-30R
3Ø 600V — 3-POLE, 4-WIRE GROUNDING
600V
480V
600V
600V
G
G
EQUIP
GR
EQUIP
GR
L16-20R
L16-30R
L17-30R
V
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Circuit Wiring Diagrams
WIRING DIAGRAMS FOR NEMA CONFIGURATIONS
3ØY 120/208V — 4-POLE, 4-WIRE
120V
208V
208V
W
120V
120V
SYS
GR
208V
18-15R 18-20R
480V
480V
277V
SYS
GR
18-50R
18-60R
L18-20R
277V
277V
600V
600V
W
600V
L20-20R
L19-30R
3ØY 120/ 208V — 4-POLE, 5-WIRE GROUNDING
208V
120V
SYS
GR
L20-30R
3ØY 277/480V — 4-POLE, 5-WIRE GROUNDING
120V
120V
480V
480V
W
277V
SYS
GR
277V
277V
480V
208V
G
G
EQUIP
GR
EQUIP
GR
L21-20R
L22-20R
L21-30R
L22-30R
Technical Information
L19-20R
208V
347V
347V
347V
SYS
GR
480V
W
L18-30R
3ØY 347/600V — 4-POLE, 4-WIRE
3ØY 277/480V — 4-POLE, 4-WIRE
W
18-30R
3ØY 347/600V — 4-POLE, 5-WIRE GROUNDING
600V
W
600V
347V
SYS
GR
347V
347V
600V
G
EQUIP
GR
L23-20R
L23-30R
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Switch Wiring Diagrams
STANDARD TOGGLE TYPE SWITCHES
Single Pole
Double Pole
3-Way to 3-Way
3-Way
4-Way
3-Way
L
L
L
GRD
GRD
GRD
GRD
GRD
GRD
GRD
L
LINE
BLACK
NEUTRAL
WHITE
NEUTRAL
LINE
RED
LINE
LINE
LIGHTED HANDLE SWITCHES
Single-Pole Lighted
3-Way Lighted
Technical Information
Handle lights
when load
is OFF
L
L
GRD
GRD
GRD
L
L
LINE
BLACK
NEUTRAL
WHITE
PILOT LIGHT SWITCHES
Single-Pole Pilot
Double-Pole Pilot
M
Handle lights
when load
is ON
L
GRD
GRD
L
L
LINE
BLACK
NEUTRAL
WHITE
LINE
RED
3-WAY PILOT SWITCHES
Handle lights
when load
is ON
3-POSTION SWITCHES MOMENTARY AND MAINTAINED
Single-Pole, Double Throw
(SPDT) Center OFF
B
L
K
B
L
K
L
L
GRD
W
H
T
LINE
NEUTRAL
Double-Pole, Double Throw
(DPDT) Center OFF
B
G
R
D
W
H
T
B
G
R
D
L
L
L
O
A
D
L
L-2
B-1
B-2
A-1
A-2
L-1
M
GRD
M
LINE 1
NEUTRAL
LINE 2
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Diameter Ranges of Jacketed Cord in Accordance with Standard UL62
Acceptable range for overall diameter of jacketed cord indicated in inches and millimeters (in parentheses)
AWG SIZE
2-CONDUCTOR
3-CONDUCTOR
4-CONDUCTOR
5-CONDUCTOR
SV, SVO, SVT, SVTO
18
.22-.26.
(5.6-6.6)
.23-.27
(5.8-6.9)
—
—
SJ, SJO, SJT, SJTO
18
.28-.32
(7.1-8.1)
.30-.34
(7.6-8.6)
.33-.37
(8.4-9.4)
—
16
.31-.34
(7.9-8.6)
.33-.36
(8.4-9.1)
35-.40
(8.9-10.2)
—
14
.34-.38
(8.6-9.7)
.36-.40
(9.1-10.2)
.39-.44
(9.9-11.2)
—
12
.41-.46
(10.4-11.7)
.43-.48
(10.9-12.2)
.47-.52
(11.9-13.2)
—
10
.54-.61
(13.7-15.5)
.57-.64
(14.5-16.3)
.63-.70
(16.0-17.8)
—
18
.34-.39
(8.6-9.9)
.36-.40
(9.1-10.2)
.39-.43
(9.9-10.9)
.46-.51
(11.7-13.0)
16
.37-.41 )
(9.4-10.4)
.39-.43
(9.9-10.9)
.41-.46
(10.4-11.7)
.49-.55
(12.4-14.0)
14
.50-.55
.52-.58
(12.7-14.0)
.56-.62
(13.2-14.7)
.63-.71
(14.2-15.7)
(16.0-18.0)
12
.57-.63
(14.5-16.0)
.59-.66
(15.0-16.8)
.64-.71
(16.3-18.0)
.70-.77
(17.8-19.6)
10
.62-.69
(15.7-17.5)
.65-.72
(16.5-18.3)
.70-.78
(17.8-19.8)
.76-.84
(19.3-21.3)
8
.78-.88
(19.8-22.4)
.83-.93
(21.1-23.6)
.93-1.05
(23.6-26.7)
1.00-1.15
(25.4-29.2)
6
.92-1.05
(23.4-26.7)
.97-1.10
(24.6-27.9)
1.05-1.20
(26.7-30.5)
1.18-1.33
(30.0-33.8)
4
1.06-1.21
(26.9-30.7)
1.13-1.28
(28.7-32.5)
1.25-1.45
(31.8-36.8)
—
2
1.21-1.40
(30.7-35.6)
1.30-1.50
(33.0-38.1)
1.45-1.65
(36.8-41.9)
—
S, SO, ST, STO
Technical Information
TYPE OF CORD
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Wallplates
WALLPLATE SIZE COMPARISON
WALLPLATE DIMENSIONS
1
2.75 (69.9)W
3.13 (79.4)W
3.50 (88.9)W
2
4.56 (115.9)W
4.94 (125.4)W
5.31 (134.9)W
3
6.38 (161.9)W
6.75 (171.5)W
—
4
8.19 (208.0)W
5
10 (254.0)W
6
11.81 (300.0)W
3.50 (88.9)
3.13 (79.4)
2.75 (69.9)
NOTE: This chart is based on the standard calculation
of adding 1.81" (46.0) width for each gang in
multi-gang wallplates.
5.25 (133.4)
Oversizes
5.25 H x .260 D
(133.4 H x 6.5 D)
4.88 (123.8)
Midway
4.88 H x .260 D
(123.8 H x 6.5 D)
4.50 (114.3)
Gangs
Standard
4.50 H x D*
(114.3 H x D*)
*DEPTHS OF STANDARD WALLPLATES: Plastic — .22 (5.6)
Metal — .19 (4.7)
STANDARD
MIDWAY
OVERSIZED
.19 (4.7)
1.34 (34.1)
.41 (10.3)
.41 (10.3)
.26 (6.5)
.94 (23.8)
2.38 (60.3)
2.38 (60.3)
STANDARD SIZE WALLPLATE
81001 Series and 81003 Series
.26 (6.5)
4.88 (123.8)
2.66 (67.5)
4.50 (114.3)
1.53 (38.9)
2.38 (60.3)
4.50 (114.3)
.94 (23.8)
.94 (23.8)
MIDWAY SIZE WALLPLATE
80501 Series
OVERSIZED WALLPLATE
85101 Series
POWER RECEPTACLE WALLPLATES
4.56 (115.9)
4.56 (115.9)
Ø 2.15
(54.5)
.19 (4.7)
1.81 (46.0)
4.50 (114.3)
2.38 (60.3)
.19 (4.7)
2.38 (60.3)
1.81 (46.0)
Ø 2.47
(62.6)
4.50 (114.3)
Technical Information
.41 (10.3)
3.50 (88.9)
3.13 (79.4)
2.75 (69.9)
5.25 (133.4)
2.75 (69.9)
S701
4934 Series
4.94 (125.4)
V
80526 Series
80528 Series
2.75 (69.9)
2.50 (63.5)
Ø 2.15
(54.5)
.19 (4.7)
4.50 (114.3)
Ø 2.15
(54.5)
.26 (6.5)
2.50 (63.5)
2.38 (60.3)
4.88 (123.8)
Ø 2.15
(54.5)
3.13 (79.4)
4.88 (123.8)
.26 (6.5)
1.81 (46.0)
4927 Series
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Telephone Wiring Devices Codes and Standards
Industry Standards
At Leviton, our concern since deregulation has been the proliferation of
poor quality devices and equipment being attached to the network.
These devices meet few of the customary standards for mechanical
integrity and combustibility and have caused a number of problems for
those who have installed them.
The responsibility for ensuring that no sub-standard devices are connected to the network rests on everyone’s shoulders. In fact, the FCC
recently issued a Public Notice strongly reminding manufacturers, carriers and customers that the manufacture and installation of substandard devices and equipment will not be tolerated — and that a
substantial fine is the penalty for noncompliance. Recently, organizations such as the Federal Communications Commission (FCC),
Underwriter’s Laboratories (UL), the Canadian Standards Association
(CSA), and the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) have
been developing standards for premise wiring systems, Additionally,
Article 800 of the National Electrical Code (NEC), published by the
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), mandated “listing” of
equipment connected to telecommunications networks. Leviton has
always played a role in the standards-making process and will continue
to do so. We wholeheartedly support this new standards environment.
The “extraordinary procedures,” acceptance testing, and carrier noti-
fication for wiring clause has been eliminated. The carrier is no longer
required to take steps to protect the network from harm when there is
a violation of Part 68 a failure during testing of newly installed wiring,
or when harm has actually occurred. Once again, because the carriers now have less access to the customer premise, they will also have
less responsibility in maintaining the network.
Customer-provided, as well as carrier-provided plugs and jacks must
meet Subpart F of Part 68 when newly installed on or after January 1,
1991. Prior to this ruling, Part 68 could be interpreted to require that
only the jack at the network interface conform to Part 68.
Beware of the Number Game
FCC Part 68, Subpart F, specifies that contacts in the telephone jacks
must have 50 micro-inches of gold over 100 micro-inches of nickel.
Some manufacturers claim .5 microns of gold plating on their jack contacts. At 39.37 micro-inches per micron, that’s only 19.7 micro-inches
— less than half of what is required to meet FCC Part 68 specifications.
If jack contacts have not been plated with the right thickness or quality
of gold, corrosion at these critical points can cause signal degradation,
equipment failure, and even damage to the public telephone network.
Data networks are more at risk because even slight imperfections result
in transmission error or data loss.
The dividing line between public network and customer premises is
called the demarcation point. Equipment, including wiring, on the network side of the demarcation point is the property and responsibility of
the local telephone company (telco). Equipment and wiring on the
customer side is the responsibility of the customer, who may procure
equipment, materials, and service from the provider of their choice. A
subscriber network interface (SNI) often called a “demarcation jack”, is
recommended to be installed at the demarcation point. A standard
registered jack is often used at this point so that the network and the
premise wiring system can be quickly separated from each other. The
location of the SNI depends on local rules and on such factors as the
number of units in the facility, access, and the type and age of connecting hardware. The SNI may be inside the building or outside.
FCC Part 68 Requirements
The equipment standards outlined in FCC Part 68 were developed long
before divestiture to assure consumers, manufacturers and carriers
that terminal equipment and wiring could be connected without
degrading the network. Part 68 describes minimum requirements for
the mechanical or physical properties of wiring devices such as the
amount of gold on jack contacts, electrical performance, dimensional
integrity, material properties, and spring characteristics of contacts.
Only equipment meeting FCC Part 68 standards may be manufactured
and connected to the network. The vast changes that have occurred in
the industry because of evolving deregulation have made it necessary
to modify Part 68. To this end, FCC Wiring Docket 88-57 was issued in
1990. There have been numerous attempts to change this docket;
however, as of this writing, the following guidelines are true:
Since 1984, Part 68 specified that all connections to the network be
made through the standard plugs and standard telephone companyprovided jacks described in Subpart F or Part 68. Now, Docket 88-57
permits customers to connect to the carrier’s jack or wiring.
The demarcation point has been redefined to be not more than 12
inches from the protector, or when no protector is present, 12 inches
from the point of entry to the premises. In the past, the demarcation
point could extend into the customer premise hundreds of feet, if
necessary, depending on the wiring application. The new 12-inch ruling limits the carrier’s access to the customer premise.
The carriers are not responsible for customer wiring unless they have
an agreement for such responsibility. Because the customer can now
install a jack at the network interface, the customer is responsible for
any wiring errors and malfunctions that occur.
There are no two ways about it. The risk to your operation and equipment is so great that it only makes sense to insist on top-quality station
products. When you specify Leviton jacks, you’re assured maximum
contact life with minimum resistance. We start with durable phosphorbronze contacts and plate them with a full 50 micro-inches of lubricated hard gold over 100 micro-inches of nickel (or the electrical
performance equivalent as specified in FCC Part 68 requirements).
Jack openings are built within precise tolerances. High-quality thermoplastic rated UL 94V-0 resists distortion from changes in temperature
and humidity, physical stress, and aging. Spring contacts are engineered to maintain positive contact pressure over the life of the device.
Telecommunications Industry Association Standards
If FCC regulations protect the telephone network from harm and UL
requirements protect the consumer from harm, who is responsible for
providing performance standards for the telecommunications industry?
Recently, the FCC asked the Telecommunications Industry Association
(TIA), a sister organization of the Electronic Industries Association (EIA),
to take on this task, and they accepted the challenge. The TIA was
asked to define minimum standards for such things as how to wire a
building, what kind of wire to use, and so on. The following standards
went into effect in 1991.
Pathway Standard (EIA/TIA 569-A): This standard for installing pipe
and conduit in commercial buildings is now available through TIA
and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI).
Residential/Light Commercial Wiring (EIA/TIA 570): A draft of this
standard, which applies to premises with up to four telephone lines,
has been reviewed by ANSI and TIA committees and released.
Commercial Wiring Standard (EIA/TIA 568-A): The Commercial Wiring
Standard applies to premises with more than four telephone lines.
This draft has also been reviewed and released by ANSI and TIA
committees. At time of printing, the standards are undergoing major
revisions and are currently up for ballot.
Technical Information
Reduce Risks — Specify Leviton
Industry Basics: Drawing the Line
We’re the “Standards” People
Because Leviton is an active participant in the formation of North
American codes and standards, you can be assured that our product
development activities fully support this emerging standards environment. In fact. we have prepared several publications which describe
standard practices and provide installation guidelines for contractors.
Many Leviton distributors also sponsor training programs dealing with
telecom wiring. And, of course, Leviton’s Applications Engineering
Group is always ready to assist you with any questions you may have
about standards and codes, standard practices, or any installation
problem.
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TECHNICAL INFORMATION
Wire Color Codes and Jack Pin Designations
Electrical Network Connection
25-PAIR COLOR CODING/ISDN CONTACT ASSIGNMENTS
From 1 to 25 single or multiple-pair circuits bridged to the network or
other connected equipment.
RJ21X
Mechanical Arrangement
Circuits are provided on numbered tip and ring positions on a miniature 50-pin ribbon connector (Amphenol-type). Pins 1 (ring) and 26
(tip) are considered position 1. Pins 2 (ring) and 27 (tip) of the ribbon connector are position 2. This pairing continues through twentyfive pairs.
Technical Information
Typical Usage
Many key and PBX systems specify the RJ21X, or ‘Amphenol-type’ as
the network interface device. Many of these systems also use the
RJ21X as a connector for stations or telephone sets, wired from the
KSU or PBX Main Distribution Frame.
Note: Sometimes an RJ11 or RJ14C can be installed in place of an
RJ21X. While many smaller systems that require only a few lines may
show the RJ21X as the ‘official’ jack required under registration, less
complex jacks such as the RJ11 or RJ14C can often be specified (perhaps in multiples). If the system requires only a few lines but the
RJ21X is specified on the registration label, under FCC Part 68 you
may specify the RJ11C, RJ14C, RJ25C, or RJ61X instead.
Many Leviton jacks can be used for the RJ21X configuration where
‘intermixing’ is permitted. Substitution of these special jacks is often
both economical and practical. Contact Leviton Telcom Applications
Engineering for information about versions to meet your requirements.
ISDN Assignment of Contact Numbers as specified by
ISO Document 8877: 1987 (E)
Contact assignments for plugs and jacks:
CONTACT
NUMBER
TE
NT
POLARITY
1
Power source 3
Power sink 3
+
2
Power source 3
Power sink 3
-
3
Transmit
Receive
+
4
Receive
Transmit
+
5
Receive
Transmit
-
6
Transmit
Receive
-
7
Power sink 2
Power source 2
-
8
Power sink 2
Power source 2
+
Note: For use in TE to TE interconnections, power source/sink 3 shall conform
to the requirements specified in CCITT Recommendation 1.430, section 9.2 for
power source/sink 2.
WIRE COLOR CODES
TIP
GRE
RING
ACCESSORY
GROUND
EN
PAIR1
RED
BLACK
OW
YELL
PAIR 2
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