Element 2.0, PowerStation, and Studio Engine Users Manual

Element 2.0, PowerStation, and Studio Engine Users Manual
element
®
v.2.0
Installation & User’s Guide
Includes StudioEngine and PowerStation
Manual Rev v1.8.1 — June 2014
USA Class A Computing Device
Information To User. Warning:
This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed and used
as directed by this manual, it may cause interference
to radio communication. This equipment complies
with the limits for a Class A computing device, as
specified by FCC Rules, Part 15, Subpart J, which
are designed to provide reasonable protection against
such interference when this type of equipment is operated in a commercial environment. Operation of
this equipment in a residential area is likely to cause
interference. If it does, the user will be required to
eliminate the interference at the user’s expense.
NOTE: Objectionable interference to TV or radio reception can occur if other devices are connected to
this device without the use of shielded interconnect
cables. FCC rules require the use of only shielded
cables.
Canada Warning:
“This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class A
limits for radio noise emissions set out in the Radio
Interference Regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications.” “Le present appareil numerique n’emet pas de bruits radioelectriques depassant les limites applicables aux appareils numeriques
(de les Class A) prescrites dans le Reglement sur le
brouillage radioelectrique edicte par le ministere des
Communications du Canada.”
CE Conformance Information:
This device complies with the requirements of the
EEC Council Directives: 93/68/EEC (CE Marking);
73/23/EEC (Safety – low voltage directive); 89/336/
EEC (electromagnetic compatibility). Conformity is
declared to those standards: EN50081-1, EN50082-1.
Important Safety Information
To prevent risk of electric shock: Disconnect power
cord before servicing. If fuse replacement is required,
please note: For continued protection against fire, replace fuse only with same type and value.
Caution
The installation and servicing instructions in the
manual are for use by qualified personnel only. To
avoid Electric Shock, do not perform any servicing
other than that contained in the operating instructions unless you are qualified to do so. Refer all servicing to qualified personnel.
Electrical Warning
To reduce the risk of electrical shock, do not expose
this product to rain or moisture. Keep liquids away
from the ventilation openings in the top and rear of
the unit. Do not shower or bathe with the unit.
This equipment is designed to be operated from a
power source that includes a third “grounding” connection in addition to the power leads. Do not defeat
this safety feature. In addition to creating a potentially hazardous situation, defeating this safety ground
will prevent the internal line noise filter from functioning.
Ventilation Warning
The Axia PowerStation, StudioEngine and Power
Supply/GPIO Nodes require the free flow of air for
adequate cooling. Do not block the ventilation openings in the top and rear of the unit. PowerStation,
StudioEngine and the Power Supply/GPIO Node
must be mounted with a blank rack spacer above or
damage may occur.
Failure to allow proper ventilation could damage the
unit or create a fire hazard. Do not place the unit on
a carpet, bedding, or other materials that could interfere with the rear and top panel ventilation openings.
Customer Service
We support you...
By Phone/Fax in the USA.
• You may reach our 24/7 Support Team anytime around the clock by calling +1 216-622-0247. For billing questions
or other non-emergency technical questions, call +1 216-241-7225 between 9:30 AM to 6:00 PM USA Eastern
Time, Monday through Friday.
By Phone in Europe.
• Service is available from Axia Europe in Germany at +49.8161.42467.
By E-Mail.
• Non-emergency technical support is available at [email protected]
Via World Wide Web.
• The Axia Web site has a variety of information which may be useful for product selection and support. The URL
is http://www.AxiaAudio.com.
Feedback
We welcome feedback on any aspect of the Livewire products or this manual. In the past, many good ideas from
users have made their way into software revisions or new products. Please contact us with your comments.
Updates
The operations of Element, PowerStation and StudioEngine are determined largely by software. Periodic updates
may become available - to determine if this is the case, visit our web site periodically, or contact us for advice concerning whether a newer release is more suitable to your needs.
Our electronic newsletter has announcements of major software updates for existing products, as well as keeping
you up to date on the latest Axia, Telos, and Omnia product releases. Subscribe at www.AxiaAudio.com/signup.htm.
Trademarks
Axia Audio
1241 Superior Ave. Cleveland, OH 44114 USA
+1 (216) 241-7225
[email protected]
Copyright © 2014 by TLS Corporation. Published by Axia Audio. We reserve the right to make improvements or changes in the products described in this manual, which may affect the product specifications, or to revise the manual without notice. All rights reserved.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Introduction • iii
Telos Systems, Axia Audio, Livewire, the Livewire Logo, the Axia logo, Element, PowerStation, SmartQ, Status
Symbols, Zephyr, Zephyr Xstream, Zephyr Xport, Omnia, the Omnia logo, and the Telos logo, are trademarks of TLS
Corporation. All other trademarks are the property of their respective holders.
Notice
Feedback is welcome
All versions, claims of compatibility, trademarks, etc.
of hardware and software products not made by Axia
mentioned in this manual or accompanying material
are informational only. Axia makes no endorsement
of any particular product for any purpose, nor claims
any responsibility for operation or accuracy.
Warranty
This product is covered by a Two Year limited warranty, the full text of which is included in the rear
section of this manual.
Service
You must contact Axia before returning any equipment for factory service. Axia will issue a Return
Authorization number, which must be written on the
exterior of your shipping container. Please do not
include cables or accessories unless specifically requested by the Technical Support Engineer at Axia.
Be sure to adequately insure your shipment for its
replacement value. Packages without proper authorization may be refused. US customers please contact
Axia technical support at +1 (216) 241-7225. All other customers should contact their local representative
to arrange for service.
Introduction • iv
We strongly recommend being near the unit when
you call, so our Support Engineers can verify information about your configuration and the conditions
under which the problem occurs. If the unit must
return to Axia, we will need your serial number, located on the rear panel.
Credit Where Credit’s Due
Much gratefulness and declarations of kinship to
Bruce Wilkinson, ­Milos Nemcik, Gints Linis, Michael Dosch and the rest of the Axia team in helping to assemble this manual. ­Kudos, guys — you are
owed more beers than I can count. - c.n.
At Axia, we love to hear your feedback. If you find
anything in this manual that you feel needs clarification or correction, please let us know by sending an
e-mail to [email protected] .
About This Manual
This manual covers the details of the Element broadcast console, PowerStation and StudioEngine. However it is assumed in this document that you are familiar with Livewire’s basic concepts, as outlined in
the companion Introduction to Livewire: System
Design Reference and Primer or Audio Over IP:
Building Pro AoIP Systems with Livewire by Steve
Church and Skip Pizzi, available from Elsevier Press.
If you have not done so, please review that material first. In it we explain the ideas that motivated
Livewire and how you can use and benefit from it,
as well as nitty-gritty details about wiring, connectors, and the like. Since Livewire is built on standard
networks, we also help you to understand general
network engineering so that you have the full background for Livewire’s fundamentals. After reading
Introduction to Livewire you will know what’s up
when you are speaking with the network guys that
are often hanging around radio stations these days.
New in this Element v.2.0 Manual
This manual update, written in December 2011, details the workings of the Axia Element console when
used with StudioEngine or PowerStation. Major
changes in this manual are located in Appendix D:
Working With Phones, where new methods of connecting to Telos IP phone systems are outlined.
Axia Audio
1241 Superior Avenue
Cleveland Ohio 44114 USA
Phone: +1.216.241.7225
Web: http://www.AxiaAudio.com
E-Mail: [email protected]
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Table of Contents
Chapter Four: Configuring GPIO . . . . . . . . . . . 41
GPIO Port Definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
GPIO Operator’s Microphone Logic . . . . . . . 42
Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
GPIO Control Room Guest Microphone Logic . . 43
Credit Where Credit’s Due . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
GPIO Producer’s Microphone Logic . . . . . . . 45
Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
About This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
New in this Element v.2.0 Manual . . . . . . . . . iv
A Note From The VP of Axia . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Quickstart:
Element with StudioEngine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Making Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Software Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ix
Quickstart:
Element with PowerStation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Making Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Software Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . x
Chapter One: Element with StudioEngine . . . . . . . 1
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
GPIO Studio (Monitor 2) Guest Microphone Logic 44
GPIO Line Input Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
GPIO Codec Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
GPIO Telephone Hybrid Logic . . . . . . . . . . 48
GPIO Control Room Monitor Logic . . . . . . . . 49
GPIO Studio Monitor Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
GPIO Computer Playback Device Logic . . . . . 51
GPIO External Profanity Delay Logic . . . . . . 52
GPIO Film Legendable User Button Module / Accessory Panel / Rack Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
GPIO Recording Device Logic . . . . . . . . . . 54
GPIO External Timer Control Logic . . . . . . . 55
Assigning GPIO to a Source . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
A word about the GPIO Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Input Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Output Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
StudioEngine Quick Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Chapter Five: Element Operations . . . . . . . . . . 59
IP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
StudioEngine Channel Settings . . . . . . . . . . 8
Show Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Set Your Console Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Sources, Channels and Faders . . . . . . . . . 59
Mix-Minus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Advanced Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
GPIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Monitor Module and SoftKnobs . . . . . . . . 60
Chapter Two: Element with PowerStation . . . . . . . 11
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
PowerStation Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Control Callouts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
Livewire Source Channels . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
General Fader Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
Connections and IP Configuration . . . . . . . . 23
Source Configuration - I/O Subsystem . . . . . . . 24
Source Configuration - MixEngine . . . . . . . . 26
Destination Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Advanced Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Chapter Three: Working With Sources . . . . . . . . 29
Understanding Source Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Control Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
4-Phone Module Channel Controls . . . . . . . . 66
Call Controller + 2-Fader Phone Module ­ . . . . 67
Production Module Controls . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Standard Monitor Module Controls . . . . . . . . 69
2-Fader Monitor Module Controls . . . . . . . . 70
Source-Specific Channel Controls . . . . . . . . . 87
Source Profile Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Source Profile Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Adding Backfeeds and GPIO to a Source . . . . . 37
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Studio Microphone Channel Operation . . . . 88
Phone Channel Operation . . . . . . . . . . . 88
Codec Channel Operation . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Introduction • v
Customer Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Chapter Six: Show Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Creating A Show Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Show Profile Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
The Diagnostics Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
System Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
The Channel Description Screen . . . . . . . . . 93
Chapter Ten: PowerStation Controls . . . . . . . . . . 127
Monitor Section Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Home Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127
The Aux Send / Return Description Screen . . . . 96
Record Mode Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Group Start Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Phone Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Chapter Seven: Virtual Mixer (VMIX) . . . . . . . . 103
What is VMIX? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Constructing Virtual Mixes with VMIX . . . . . . . 103
Manipulating Streams With VMODE . . . . . . . . 106
Chapter Eight: Advanced Element Controls . . . . . . 111
PowerStation Configuration Screens . . . . . . . . . 127
Element Surface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Mix Engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
Audio I/O Subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Ethernet Switch settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
Appendix A: Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
Table of Inputs and Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
Appendix B: CE Declaration of Conformity . . . . . . 141
Element Configuration Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Appendix C: FAQ / Diagnostics / Maintenance . . . . 143
The Setup Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112
Module Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
The Element Control Center . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
The Customize Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Log, Log History and Log Setup Menus . . . . . 114
Installing A New Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
Fader Cleaning Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
The Screenshot Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Appendix D: Working With Phone Hybrids . . . . . . 151
CAN Bus Information Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Nx12, Nx6, TWOx12, Series 2101 systems . . . . . 154
The Modules Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
Telos VX Broadcast VoIP System . . . . . . . . . . 151
Brightness Control Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
Call Controller Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
User Modules Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Telos One and Delta Hybrids . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Phone Channels Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
GPIO Configuration Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Script Information Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Telos Two ISDN Hybrid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Telos ONE-x-Six, Direct Interface and 1A2 Systems 160
V-Mixer Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Appendix E: Accessory Panels and User Panels . . . . 163
Engine Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
Appendix F: Channel / IP Worksheets . . . . . . . . . 167
NTP Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Sources & Profiles Configuration Menu . . . . . . 117
Chapter Nine: StudioEngine Controls . . . . . . . . . 119
Warranty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
StudioEngine Configuration Screens . . . . . . . . . 119
Introduction • vi
The Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
The Fader Channels Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
The Return & Monitor Inputs Menu . . . . . . . . 119
The Program & Monitor Outputs Menu . . . . . . 120
The VMIX & VMODE Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
The Intercom Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
The Options Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
The Stream Statistics Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
The Network Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
A Note From The Vice President of Axia
In retrospect, it’s hard to believe it’s been 10 years
since a start-up division of Telos grabbed everyone’s
attention with a radical idea about building radio studios using Ethernet. At a time when “state of the art”
meant discrete digital audio, and a routing switcher
was something only the richest stations could afford, Axia shocked everyone with the idea that studio
peripherals from the console to the audio processor
could be networked, and that everyone could have the
benefits of a routing switcher — for about a third of
the cost of traditional technology.
When we launched Axia, Telos founder Steve
Church made a prediction. “Three things will happen,” Steve told us. “First, people will say that ‘it will
never work.’ When they’re proven wrong, they’ll say
‘It works, but you don’t need that.’ And finally, as they
see Axia becoming successful, they’ll say ‘IP-Audio?
We do that too!’”
Steve, as always, was right on the money. In 10
years, Axia Livewire has become the world’s most
popular IP-Audio networking technology, and our
mixing consoles are the world’s best-selling — they’re
on-air in over 4,000 studios, and counting. You’ll find
Axia equipment everywhere: at privately-owned stations, and large clusters run by big conglomerates. At
established public broadcasters, and at newly-licensed
International stations. At government broadcast facilities, and podcast studios. Needless to say, we’re humbled by the trust broadcasters place in us — and by
your enthusiasm!
Being first with new technology is nice, but we’ve
never been content to rest on our laurels. So the Telos
R&D team continues to innovate and expand the scope
of IP-Audio. Axia consoles are the first and only IPAudio consoles with a pre-configured network switch
built in, to save broadcasters the effort and expense
of procuring and programming third-party switches.
Our compact xNode AoIP interfaces feature one-button setup, and can run on mains power or Power over
Ethernet (PoE) for flexibility and redundancy. We’ve
even developed our own zero-configuration Ethernet
switch for Livewire – xSwitch – to make deploying
IP-Audio easier than ever.
More than 45 Livewire partners believe in the vision of the Connected Studio too. Collectively, they
make dozens of hardware and software products
(ranging from telephone systems to audio processors
to program automation) that interoperate directly with
Axia networks via Ethernet – making the connections
“smart”, and eliminating the need to purchase audio
conversion devices. We’ve also partnered with the
high-performance audio standard RAVENNA to expand broadcasters’ networking options even further.
And there are a lot more great new ideas in the cooker
— so watch this space!
In the final analysis, Axia’s success isn’t due to
our efforts. It’s you, the broadcast professional, who
has embraced our vision, used our technology in ways
we never dreamed of, and raved about Axia products
to everyone who’d listen. We owe you a huge debt of
thanks. And we promise to never stop trying to amaze
and delight you.
So here’s to the next 10 years.
Onward and upward!
Marty Sacks
Vice President, Axia Audio
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Introduction • vii
2013 marks a banner year for Axia — this year
marks the first decade of the Connected Studio.
Desk phone rings; you press
ignore.” The G.M. can change
Introduction • viii
his own damned light bulbs.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Quickstart :
Element with StudioEngine
The following chapters of this manual will give you
an in-depth understanding of the capabilities of your
new Element and StudioEngine, from installation to advanced functions. This Quickstart section isn’t meant
to take the place of the following chapters, but it will
help you get everything connected fast, and
point you to the parts of the manual you’ll
need to get up and running with a minimum of fuss.
GPIO Node/Power Supply unit.
5.Connect all Audio Node power cords and plug
them into your studio’s power receptacles.
6. “Capture” your console using the instructions in
Chapter 1 of this manual.
7.Follow the instructions found in Chapter 1 to
configure IP address settings for Element and the
StudioEngine.
8.Refer to the User’s Manuals packed with your
other Axia Audio Nodes for information on how
to configure IP addresses for these units.
Making Connections
You’ve probably unpacked your boxes
and are sitting next to a pile of Axia gear,
wondering what to do first.
Software Setup
When you’ve completed physically connecting your
Axia hardware, read through the remainder of this manual to begin configuring the software options that determine how your new Element will operate.
• Chapter 1: Element with StudioEngine
• Chapter 3: Working with Sources explains how to
generate Source Profiles and construct backfeeds for
selected sources.
• Chapter 4:Configuring GPIO tells how to associate
routable logic commands with any audio source.
• Chapter 5: Element Operations takes you under the
hood to explore in-depth software options.
• Chapter 6: Show Profiles illustrates how to set and
save unique “snapshots” tailored for specific operational situations that can be recalled whenever the
need arises.
Enjoy your new Element!
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Introduction • ix
Take a look at the diagram above: it represents a typical Livewire-connected studio. After configuring your Ethernet switch, here’s what you should do
to get going:
1.Using CAT.5e or CAT.6 Ethernet cable, connect all of your Axia Audio Nodes (Analog,
AES/EBU, Microphone and Router Selector) to
100Base-T ports on your studio’s Ethernet switch.
2.Use CAT.6 Ethernet cable to connect your
StudioEngine to a Gigabit (1000Base-T) port on
the switch.
3.Use another CAT.5e or CAT.6 cable to connect
the Ethernet port on the back of the Element
GPIO Node/Power Supply to a 100Base-T port
on the switch.
4.Packed with your Element is a cable with 6-pin
Molex™ connectors. This is the power/communications cable. Lift the Element meter panel and
connect the end of the cable without the strain
relief to the corresponding port on the Element
connection panel. Connect the other end of the
cable to one of the jacks labeled “48VDC OUTPUT & COMM” on the back of your Element
Quickstart :
Element with PowerStation
The subsequent chapters of this manual will give you
an in-depth understanding of the capabilities of your new
Axia Element and PowerStation, from installation to advanced functions. This Quickstart section isn’t meant to
take the place of the following chapters, but it will help
you get everything connected fast, and point you to the
parts of the manual you’ll need to get up and running
with a minimum of fuss.
the PowerStation. Turn on the monitor.
3.If using an AUX, connect the MAIN and AUX
PSU2 connectors with the special cable provided.
4.Connect the power cords to the PSU1 receptacles
on the PowerStation’s rear panels and power up.
5.“Capture” your Element control surface faders by
holding the * and 2 keys for 5 seconds. Press #
when you see the CAPTURE prompt above each
channel.
6.Your hardware is now ready to go! However,
some basic software configuration is also needed.
Follow the instructions found in Chapter 2 to
configure IP address settings for Element and
the PowerStation. You will also need to setup
Livewire channels and assign your audio inputs
and outputs as described in Chapter 2. Factory
default IP address is 192.168.2.50.
Software Setup
The configuration of your PowerStation is accomplished by accessing its web interface. No dedicated
software is required. Configuration is not complicated,
but does require a little planning and setup.
Making Connections
Introduction • x
You’ve probably unpacked your boxes and are sitting
next to a pile of Axia gear, wondering what to do first.
Take a look at the diagram above: it represents a typical Livewire-connected radio studio with the PowerStation at its core. Here’s what you should do to get going:
1.Packed with your Element control surface is a
cable with 6-pin Molex™ connectors. This is the
power/communications cable. Lift the Element
meter panel and connect the end of the cable
without the strain relief to the corresponding port
on the Element connection panel. Connect the
other end of the cable to the jack labeled “DC/
CAN” on the back of your PowerStation MAIN.
2.Connect the DVI output on the rear panel to a
DVI-D compatible monitor before powering up
When you’ve completed physically connecting your
Axia hardware, read through the remainder of this manual to begin configuring the software options that determine how your new PowerStation will operate when
used in a Livewire network with your other Axia gear.
• Chapter 2: Setup and Connections
• Chapter 3: Working with Sources explains how to
generate Source Profiles and construct backfeeds for
selected sources.
• Chapter 4: Configuring GPIO tells how to associate
routable logic commands with any audio source.
• Chapter 5: Element Operations takes you under the
hood to explore in-depth software options.
• Chapter 6: Show Profiles illustrates how to set and
save unique “snapshots” tailored for specific operational situations that can be recalled when needed.
Enjoy your new Element console!
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Element with StudioEngine
Introduction
There’s nothing quite as much fun as taking something new out of its box. That sense of excitement as
protective packaging is stripped away; that “new gear”
smell… it’s exhilarating!
If you’re reading this, there’s a 99.9836% chance that
you’ve done just that, and are now sitting in the middle
of a room surrounded by packing material and a large
wooden crate, admiring your new Element, its GPIO
Node/Power Supply and StudioEngine — and wondering what to do next.
But before you dig in, be advised that you need to
assemble the rest of your Livewire network first. Because so much of the Element configuration process depends upon having access to audio sources and destinations, you must connect and configure your other Axia
­peripherals (Audio Nodes, GPIO Nodes, Router Selectors, etc.) prior to configuring ­Element, ­according to the
instructions supplied with each. Once you’ve done that,
come on back and we’ll get started.
Getting Prepared
This chapter will show you how to get you up and
running. We’ll install the Element console and its power
supply first, followed by the StudioEngine.
Before you dive into the hardware, you’ll need to determine a range of IP addresses to assign to each studio
and log each device’s IP as you assign it; Appendix F
contains an IP Assignment Worksheet you can use for
this purpose. IP addresses used in an Axia network must
be valid Unicast IP addresses. Determine your network’s
subnet mask settings at the same time (typically this value is set at 255.255.255.0 for intranet applications).
Livewire devices use common TCP/IP unicast
IP addresses for control and web browser access. These are numbers you assign within
the range used by your network. Since most
Livewire networks are not intended to be accessed via the Internet, we recommend you use
the non-routable IP addresses in the range of
192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.255. These IP addresses have been set aside specifically for use
with local networks.
Multicast allows efficient one-to-many connections, so Livewire uses that for its audio streams,
source advertising, and synchronization signals.
You do not need to assign these multicast addresses because the system does this automatically.
For more information on network construction,
please refer to our companion Introduction to
Livewire: System Design Reference and Primer
available at www.AxiaAudio.com/downloads/ .
To install Element in your studio furniture, you’ll
need to prepare a cutout in the counter top. A dimensional drawing with all pertinent measurements is found
just prior to this manual’s Appendix A. Make certain that
there’s adequate clearance inside the furniture for the
required power cable entry into the console; knockout
plugs are located at both bottom rear corners of Element
for cable routing access.
To configure Element, you’ll need a computer. Any
Windows desktop or notebook PC with an Ethernet port
and a standard Internet browser is acceptable.
For cable connections, CAT.5e Ethernet cable is required. Some use CAT.6 since the cost is only slightly
higher than CAT.5e. For greater detail on cable selections, we again recommend you read The Axia Guide to
Choosing Category Cable available from www.AxiaAudio.com/tech/ .
Always make certain that power has been applied
to your studio’s Ethernet switch and that the switch is
properly configured for multicast as recommended by
Axia before powering any other Axia components. It
is essential that you use a qualified switch and that it
has been configured in accordance with Axia’s guide-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
1: Element with StudioEngine: Setup & Connections • 1
Chapter One:
Unicast vs. Multicast IP Addresses: Data
is routed over IP networks in one of two ways:
point-to-point unicast or multicast.
lines. Most folks that encounter problems setting up a
new system have not paid attention to this requirement.
More information on switches can be found at http://
www.axiaaudio.com/switches. Information on specific
configurations is available in the user manuals section at
www.axiaaudio.com.
Element with StudioEngine: Setup
If you haven’t done so yet, it’s time to get your
­Element out of its packing crate. This is a two-person
job, so grab a partner.
1: Element with StudioEngine: Setup & Connections • 2
Important: Like any electronic device, Element
can be affected by static electricity. Use of a
personal grounding device is strongly recommended during transport.
Position one person at each end of Element and,
grasping the metal enclosure at the bottom, simultaneously lift upward out of the shipping crate. Remove
packing materials and store them in the crate for future
use. Carefully lower Element into your counter top cutout, taking care to lower both sides at an equal rate to
avoid becoming jammed in the cabinetry.
equate ventilation.
Connections
Cable connections for Element are entirely different
from any other mixing surface you may be familiar with.
There are no audio inputs; Element needs only a single
data / power connection to operate.
Important: Your Element MUST be grounded. Grounding reduces the risk of electric
shock by providing a “path of least resistance”
for electric current. Improper grounding can
result in a risk of electric shock. Check with a qualified electrician if you are in
doubt about how to properly ground this equipment. If your local electrical code prohibits the
use of a Station Ground for this purpose, as described above, use the specific “Safety Ground”
your local regulations mandate.
1.Rack-mount the GPIO Node/Power Supply unit
and connect it to a 100Base-T port on your studio’s
­Ethernet switch using CAT.5e or CAT.6 cable. Do
not power up the Power Supply yet.
Important: Element is a drop-in style control
surface and requires a counter top cutout. For
cutout dimensions, please refer to Appendix A.
Figure 1-2: Accessing Element’s connection panel.
Unpack the GPIO Node/Power Supply that came
with your Element and place it in its rack ensuring ad-
2.Element must be connected to a grounded metal perVGA
Display
GPIO Ports
Ethernet
Port
DC Power - CANbus to Element
Figure 1-1: Rear panel of Element GPIO/Power Supply showing connections.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
manent wiring system or other equipment grounding
conductor using the threaded grounding stud located
inside the connections bay. Open the bay by flipping
open the overbridge above the faders, as shown in
Figure 1-2. For ground sources, we recommend, in
order of preference:
»»“Station Ground,” the heavy copper strap found in
the walls and floors of many radio studios.
»» AC Safety Ground — the “3rd prong” of a nearby
outlet.
»» A bonded electrical conduit.
#12 AWG GREEN stranded wire is the minimum
wire gauge acceptable for grounding Element.
nection of Element fader and accessory modules only; connecting them to a powered Ethernet switch could damage the board’s electronics
and void your warranty.
Figure 1-5: Element connection panel. Circled
connector is for power/data cable; RJ-45’s connect to
fader and accessory modules.
What is CANbus? Controller Area Network
(CAN) is a multicast shared serial bus standard,
originally developed in the 1980s by Robert
Bosch GmbH, for connecting electronic control
units (ECUs). Although initially created for
automotive purposes, nowadays it is used in
many embedded control applications. The CAN
data link layer protocol is standardized in ISO
11898-1 (2003).
3.One end of the Element power / communication cable is fitted with a strain relief. Connect this end to
any one of the four Molex connectors on the back of
the Element GPIO Node/Power Supply. Connect the
other end to the ­Molex socket on the Element connection panel.
“Capturing” Your Console
Upon power-up of your Element, some or all of
the alphanumeric displays above the faders may read
­INACTIVE. This means that the Element CPU must be
initialized. To do this, you’ll need to enter Capture Mode.
Figure 1-4: Detail of data/communication cable ends.
4.Connect a VGA monitor to the 15-pin VGA connector on the back of the Element GPIO/Power Supply.
IMPORTANT: Element’s power cable is also
host to all data communication between the actual surface and its CPU (housed in the Element
Power Supply/GPIO Node) by ­C ANbus technology; it does not require a separate Ethernet
connection. Never connect any of the RJ-45
ports on the Element connection panel to
an Ethernet switch. These ports are for con-
Figure 1-6: Identifying the Standard Monitor Module
(left) and Monitor + 2-Fader Module (right).
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
1: Element with StudioEngine: Setup & Connections • 3
Figure 1-3: Locating the grounding stud.
1: Element with StudioEngine: Setup & Connections • 4
Press and hold both the * (star) and “2” keys on the
Monitor Module numeric pad for 5 seconds. The alphanumeric displays will change to read Capture Mode;
this enumerates all of the installed faders in the control
surface.
Now, make sure that LED displays above the faders
display the channel numbers in the order you desire. If
not, you can adjust them individually using the PGM1
and PGM2 buttons above each fader to change the channel number to the one you desire.
When you’re done adjusting channel number displays, press the 8 (enter) or # (if you have a Monitor
+2-fader module) key to exit Capture Mode and your Element is ready to use.
These knobs are context-sensitive. When any of Element’s setup modes are activated using the options keys
on the faders or Master Module, you’ll see a corresponding row of “knobs” represented onscreen, as shown in
Figure 1-8.
Hello Moto: If you have motorized faders, you
can “mirror” other motorized faders while you
are in Capture Mode. A motorized fader that is
“slaved” to a master fader will move automatically to mirror the movements of the master.
Mirrored faders both control gain for the same
source, but the master can override the setting
of the slave — useful for “split” Element setups
where talent has a local set of faders that may
be used to control certain sources, but you still
want the Board Operator to have master control.
Figure 1-8: On-screen SoftKnobs.
To mirror a fader, press the Options key above
the fader you wish to make the “slave”. An apostrophe (‘) will be displayed next to its numeric
indicator. Pressing the fader’s PGM1 and PGM2
keys will change the numeric indicator, indicating
the “Master” to which this fader is now slaved; a
display reading 2’ means that the fader is slaved
to fader 2. Pressing the Options key again returns the fader to non-mirrored mode.
Figure 1-7: Element SoftKnobs.
Note that there are sometimes functions shown both
above and below the on-screen SoftKnobs. When a function is presented above the knob, turning that knob accomplishes that function. When a function is presented
below the knob, pushing in gently on the corresponding
SoftKnob activates that function. The example shown in
Figure 1-8 is from the IP Address Book screen.
If your Element is equipped with the standard Monitor Module, you can also navigate using the control knob,
directional keys and Enter key located at the lower righthand corner of the module, as shown in Figure 1-6.
Short Navigation Tutorial
There are several different ways to change on-screen
options. The first way is with Element’s SoftKnobs, located directly above the Monitor Module and shown in
Figure 1-7.
Note that the functionality is the same but the menus
are slightly different for the Element 2-Fader Monitor
module. This module has only 3 SoftKnobs.
Figure 1-10: Master Module numeric keypad.
Additionally, whenever numeric input is required
(like entering IP addresses), you can use the numeric
keypad located just above the Navigation Keys (Figure
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
1-10) to enter numbers directly.
IP Address Configuration
Using your IP Assignment Worksheet, you’ll
now choose an IP address for both your Element and
StudioEngine. You must make sure that IP addresses for
both Engine and Surface are in the same IP network, and
are both valid Unicast addresses. For example:
»» 192.168.0.10: Element
»» 192.168.0.11: Engine
Both addresses belong to 192.168.0.x IP network,
and so will work for our application.
Note: Element v2.x software supports redundant NTP servers. Use the second field in the IP
Address Book to enter the address of a backup
server.
Once you’ve determined the IP addresses you’ll assign, turn on the Element power supply and the attached
VGA monitor.
Setting IP using the Standard Monitor Module
When Element has completed its start cycle (meter
screen appears), find the section marked Global Options on the Monitor Module. Press and hold the key
marked Fader Options located in the top right corner
of the module for five seconds to enter the IP Address
Book (Figure 1-11).
To set the IP address, rotate the leftmost SoftKnob to
highlight the line titled “Element IP Address” and push
the knob to select that line. Now use the numeric pad to
enter the IP address. Press the leftmost SoftKnob again
to “take” the new IP value. Repeat this process to set the
subnet mask value.
Continue down the screen and, in the same way, enter
the other fields’ values as appropriate.
Figure 1-11: IP Address Book,
Standard Monitor Module
• Rotate the Select/Set SoftKnob to scroll through
the list of available options. To select an option to
modify, push this knob. While modifying an options,
rotate the knob to change an option’s value, and push
the knob to move to the next field. Available options
include:
»» Element IP Address: Every piece of Livewire
gear must have its own unique IP Address. Set
the IP Address for each Element in this field.
»» Subnet Mask: Enter your network’s subnet
mask value here, usually 255.255.255.0
»» Gateway IP Address: To enable remote administration of your Livewire network or an exter
NTP server, you’ll need a gateway. If you have
one installed, enter its IP Address value here.
»» Engine IP Address: Each Axia control surface
controls a unique Studio Engine. Enter the IP of
the controlled Engine here.
»» 1st NTP Server IP Address: Element supports
NTP (Network Time Protocol) timekeeping to
synchronize time-of-day clocks across your facility. If you have an NTP server, enter its IP Ad-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
1: Element with StudioEngine: Setup & Connections • 5
Note: “Gateway” settings on Livewire equipment are optional. They may be left blank unless you intend to access the StudioEngine’s
configuration utility remotely, from outside your
network. Should you desire to do so, enter the
IP address of your master router (the one with
external network connections) whenever you’re
given the option to enter a gateway IP address.
dress here.
»» 2nd NTP Server IP Address: Element v2.x
software supports redundant NTP servers. Enter
the IP Address of your backup server here.
»» Web Page User Password: You can passwordprotect your Element’s web server connection by
entering a short numeric password here.
Note: If you set a password for HTTP access,
you will not see your password displayed in this
field upon re-entering the IP Address book. This
is a security feature intended to prevent “overthe-shoulder” password theft.
•
•
•
1: Element with StudioEngine: Setup & Connections • 6
•
If you want to reverse changes you’ve made and
haven’t saved, press the Undo knob to erase them.
Press Save to save changes you’ve made.
Press Reboot to immediately reboot the Element.
You can press Exit to leave the IP Address Book
at any time without saving your changes.
• Rotate the Select/Set SoftKnob to scroll through
the list of available options. To select an option to
modify, push this knob. While modifying an options,
rotate the knob to change an option’s value, and push
the knob to move to the next field. Available options
include:
»» Element IP Address: Every piece of Livewire
gear must have its own unique IP Address. Set
the IP Address for each Element in this field.
»» Subnet Mask: Enter your network’s subnet
mask value here, usually 255.255.255.0
»» Gateway IP Address: To enable remote administration of your Livewire network, you’ll need a
network gateway. If you have one installed, enter
its IP Address value here.
»» Engine IP Address: Each Axia control surface
controls a unique Studio Engine. Enter the IP of
the controlled Engine here.
»» 1st NTP Server IP Address: Element supports
NTP (Network Time Protocol) timekeeping to
synchronize time-of-day clocks across your facility. If you have an NTP server, enter its IP Ad-
Note: After making changes to any Element IP
address settings, you must reboot the console.
Use the “REBOOT” soft key to begin an immediate
reboot sequence.
Remember, you can even reboot Element while
on-the-air, since the audio mixing is not done in
the console but in the Studio Engine; your audio
will continue to play without interruption.
Setting IP using the 2-Fader Monitor Module
When Element has completed its start cycle (meter
screen appears), find the numeric keypad at the top right
of the Monitor Module. Press and hold the * (star), “7”
& “4” keys simultaneously for five seconds to enter the
IP Address Book (Figure 1-12).
To set the IP address, rotate the left-most SoftKnob
to highlight the line titled “Element IP Address” and
push the knob to select that line. Now use the numeric
pad to enter the IP address. Press the left-most SoftKnob
again to “take” the new IP value. Repeat this process to
set the subnet mask value.
Continue down the screen and, in the same way, enter
the other fields’ values as appropriate.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Figure 1-12: IP Address Book,
Monitor Module
»» 2nd NTP Server IP Address: Element v2.x
software supports redundant NTP servers. Enter
the IP Address of your backup server here.
»» Web Page User Password: You can passwordprotect your Element’s web server connection by
entering a numeric password here.
Note: If you set a password for HTTP access,
you will not see your password displayed in this
field upon re-entering the IP Address book. This
is a security feature intended to prevent “overthe-shoulder” password theft.
• Rotating the Action knob chooses between the following options:
»» Save stores the changes you’ve made to the IP
Address Book.
»» Undo reverses any changes you’ve made if you
haven’t yet saved them.
»» Reboot immediately reboots the Element.
StudioEngine Quick Setup
Connections
Note: We recommend leaving 1RU of “breathing space” for ventilation above and below the
StudioEngine when you rack-mount the unit.
Using the supplied AC power cord, connect the
StudioEngine to the mains. Route a length of CAT-6 cable from StudioEngine to a Gigabit port on your studio’s
Ethernet switch, but don’t connect it quite yet.
IP Configuration
1.Power on your StudioEngine; the front-panel display
will indicate the boot-up sequence. When the screen
displays IP address and network connection information, push the control knob to call the Main Menu.
2.Turn the control knob to highlight Option #4, IP
Settings (Figure 1-14), and push to select.
• Press the Exit knob to leave the IP Address Book.
Note: After making changes to any Element
IP address settings, you must save the changes and reboot the console. Use the “REBOOT”
soft key to begin an immediate reboot sequence.
Remember, you can even reboot Element while
on-the-air, since the audio mixing is not done in
the console but in the Studio Engine; your audio
will continue to play without interruption.
What about monitors and meters, you may ask? The
detailed configuration of timers, clock, monitors and
metering is not included in this basic setup. Please refer
to Chapter 5 - Element Operation where these topics
are discussed in depth.
The next section will walk you through setting up
your StudioEngine.
Figure 1-14: StudioEngine IP configuration screen.
3.Push the control knob and you’ll see that the first
line of the display (marked Net Addr) is underlined.
Push the knob again to select this line.
4.You’ll see a flashing underline under the first digit
of the IP address. Push and rotate the control knob
to select the value for this digit. Push again to “take”
the value.
5.Continue this sequence until your IP address is properly entered. When finished, turn the control knob
until the check mark at the end of the line is highlighted, and push the knob to apply the new IP address value.
6.When you’ve set the subnet mask and gateway IP address, choose OK at the bottom of the screen.
7.You’ll be asked if you’d like to reboot for changes
to take effect. select YES and connect the Ethernet
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
1: Element with StudioEngine: Setup & Connections • 7
dress here.
cable to your StudioEngine.
Secret Button Function: Here it is, the first
of many “secret” controls hidden about Element and meant for your Engineering eyes only.
If, during bootup, you press the StudioEngine’s
control knob within 6 secs of the initial screen
display, you’ll be asked if you want to reset the
front panel and HTTP passwords to factory default. This is your “backdoor” into the system
should you forget the login password to the
front panel. Changing these passwords forces
a reboot.
StudioEngine Channel Settings
For the next steps we’ll be using the StudioEngine’s
HTTP interface, so connect a computer loaded with
an Internet browser to the local switch. This computer
should have an IP address in the same range assigned to
the Element and StudioEngine.
1: Element with StudioEngine: Setup & Connections • 8
Note: Axia web interfaces have been tested
with Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5 or
later, but may also work with other browsers.
Whatever browser you choose, Java must be
enabled and your pop-up blocker, if any,
must be disabled in order to work with Axia
equipment.
Note that Windows Vista versions do not have
Java installed by default as in prior versions.
You must install the Sun Java package found at
http://www.java.com .
In a Livewire network, individual devices (audio
nodes, studio controllers, etc.) are identified by unique
IP addresses. But what about the audio streams these
devices generate? Think about how many audio sources
and destinations there are in even a small studio — there
are a lot to keep track of. In the analog days, we’d affix
a numbered label to each cable that entered the terminal
room to identify each audio circuit. Obviously, we can’t
attach pieces of paper to digital packet streams, but we
can give each one a “label.”
We refer to these “labels” as Network Channel Numbers. Each Livewire system can support 32,766 channels
of audio, which enables us to give each audio source or
destination its own unique numeric channel number.
Figure 1-15: StudioEngine Output configuration
Note: 32,000+ channel numbers exceeds the
average human’s RAM storage capacity. We recommend using a spreadsheet program — just
to make sure you don’t generate painful readmemory register errors.
As soon as you connected your StudioEngine to the
network (following the steps in the previous section), it
began to generate audio using factory default channel
numbers. To avoid conflict with other studios, you must
change those default values to new channel numbers.
1.Open the browser on your computer and point it to the
IP address you previously set for your StudioEngine.
Choose the Program And Monitor Outputs menu
option to configure the output buses of the Element.
2.You’ll be prompted to enter a user name and pass-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
A word about stream types: There are several different types of streams available in the
Mode drop-down box: Live Stereo and Standard Stereo. Live Stereo was previously referred to as
Livestreams. Use Live Stereo streams whenever you need the lowest latency for on-air
feeds, mic-to-headphone paths, etc.
Advanced Settings
You’ve no doubt noticed that there are many more
options for your Element and StudioEngine than we’ve
covered here. That’s because Chapter One was meant to
get you up and running as quickly as possible. For an indepth explanation of the other available settings, please
refer to Chapter 8: Advanced Element Controls and
Chapter 9: StudioEngine Controls.
What’s Next
Take a break! You’re done with initial set-up of your
Element and StudioEngine.
When you’re ready, you may skip Chapter 2 (PowerStation setup) and jump to Chapter 3: Working with
Sources for a walk through one of the most important
Element concepts: Source Profiles.
Standard Stereo is intended to provide the best
compatibility with older PC systems, but the
trade-off is that these streams have a higher
amount of latency.
Set Your Console Type
Note: Manual setting of console type is only
necessary on Element consoles running software versions prior to v2.0. In Elements running
v2.0 or higher, this setting will auto-detect.
Axia StudioEngines will work with different types of
consoles, so you need to tell it which type you’re pairing
it with.
1.Navigate to the “Engine ID” menu and find the “Application Interface Options” section. Be sure that
­Element is checked for the “Console Type”.
2.Click Apply.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
1: Element with StudioEngine: Setup & Connections • 9
word. The default user name is “user”. Leave the
password field blank.
3.You’ll see the screen shown in Figure 1-15, This
screen allows you to set channel numbers for all of
the audio outputs generated by Element; program
and record busses, monitor feeds, and talkback destinations. Work down the list, assign each one a unique
channel number and record them in your channel
number log.
4.Find the column entitled Mode. Each Studio Engine
is shipped with the most common streams enabled
with Live Stereo mode. Make sure all of your desired streams are enabled.
5.Choose Apply.
1: Element with StudioEngine: Setup & Connections • 10
Do digital streams
dream of electric DJs?
Just Bradbury knows.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Element with PowerStation
Note: Chapter Two of this manual discusses
system setup when using the Axia Element console with PowerStation. If your Element is being
used with a PowerStation, this section is for you.
If you are using the Axia StudioEngine with your
Element, please refer to Chapter 1.
Introduction
If you are starting here, you are the proud owner of
an Axia Element and a PowerStation. You have probably read the Quickstart section and are hungry for more
knowledge.
If your system consists of more than just a basic Element console and PowerStation, you know there is more
But before you dig in, be advised that you need to
assemble the rest of your Livewire network first. Because
so much of the configuration process depends upon having access to audio sources and destinations, you must
have a plan to connect and configure your other Axia
­peripherals (Audio Nodes, GPIO Nodes, etc.) according
to the instructions supplied with each. You should do this
prior to configuring ­the PowerStation, ­
The PowerStation Family
At this time, there are two products in the PowerStation family, PowerStation MAIN and PowerStation
AUX. PowerStation AUX, normally used as an expansion unit, is similar to PowerStation MAIN but it does
not contain the CPU/DSP module and has a single Ethernet port. PowerStation AUX can be used as a standalone IO unit if desired. PowerStation MAIN and AUX
provide power supply redundancy to each other when
connected. We will do our best to indicate where features
apply to a specific model.
Figure 2-1: PowerStation MAIN and AUX - Block Diagrams
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 11
Chapter Two:
to it than just plug-and-play. After admiring these beautiful pieces of hardware, you may be wondering what to
do next.
The Basics
If you are using a single PowerStation with an Element control surface, there is not too much planning required since the factory default configuration is designed
for out-of-box stand-alone operation. If, however, you
plan to interconnect your new PowerStation with other
Livewire gear in a larger network, you will need to be
organized. This is no different than any other studio
project. Lets have a peek under the hood and see what
the PowerStation can do. Figure 2-1 illustrates the building blocks of the PowerStation MAIN and PowerStation
AUX.
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 12
The PowerStation inputs are the sources in your
studio such as microphones, cd players and other audio
playback devices The audio outputs of the PowerStation will be connected to control room monitors, preview
(cue) speaker, headphones amplifiers and possibly some
audio recording devices. These external audio devices
may be analog or AES devices as shown in Figure 2-1.
The GPIO ports are used for control interfaces with
other external devices such as air lights, recorders and
CD players,
The 100 Mbps Ethernet ports may be used to connect
PCs running Axia’s IP-Audio driver or expand your system by adding other Livewire devices such as Axia 8x8
nodes or a PowerStation AUX.
The 1000 Mbps Ethernet ports are used to connect to
your PowerStation to other PowerStation MAIN units or
an Ethernet core switch.
The remaining connectors are used to connect your
control surface and its DVI-D monitor.
Getting Prepared
Before you dive into the hardware, you’ll need to determine a range of IP addresses to assign to each studio
and log each device’s IP as you assign it; Appendix F
contains an IP Assignment Worksheet you can use for
this purpose. IP addresses used in an Axia network must
be valid Unicast IP addresses. Determine your network’s
subnet mask settings at the same time (typically this val-
ue is set at 255.255.255.0 for intranet applications).
A PowerStation MAIN with a PowerStation AUX
will require a range of four consecutive IP addresses.
You will specify the first of these addresses and the others will be assigned automatically - be sure to accommodate these four consecutive addresses in your IP plan.
Unicast vs. Multicast IP Addresses: Data
is routed over IP networks in one of two ways:
point-to-point unicast or multicast.
Livewire devices use common TCP/IP unicast IP
addresses for control and web browser access.
These are numbers you assign within the range
used by your network. Since most Livewire
networks are not intended to be accessed via
the Internet, we recommend you use the nonroutable IP addresses such as the range of
192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.255. These IP addresses have been set aside specifically for use
with local networks.
Multicast allows efficient one-to-many connections, so Livewire uses that for its audio streams,
source advertising, and synchronization signals.
You do not need to assign these multicast addresses because the system does this automatically.
For more information on network construction,
please refer to our companion Introduction to
Livewire: System Design Reference and Primer
available at www.AxiaAudio.com/downloads/ .
When you install the PowerStation, please mount it
in an equipment rack that has free air flow. DO NOT obstruct the air flow to the PowerStation since it is dependent on convection cooling. The PowerStation does not
have any fans so you can use it in a quiet studio environment but you MUST provide adequate ventilation. Do
not obstruct the air flow above or below the PowerStation. Those vents serve a very important purpose.
To install the Element control surface in your studio
furniture, you’ll need to prepare a cutout in the counter
top. A dimensional drawing with all pertinent measurements is found in Appendix A: Specifications. Make
certain that there’s adequate clearance inside the furniture for the required power cable entry into the console;
knockout plugs are located at both bottom rear corners of
Element for cable routing access.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
For Livewire network cable connections, CAT-5e
Ethernet cable is required however many use CAT-6
since it is readily available at a slightly higher cost. For
greater detail on cable selections, we recommend you
read The Axia Guide to Choosing Category Cable available from www.AxiaAudio.com/tech/ .
In a larger network with a core switch, always make
certain that power has been applied to your core Ethernet switch and that the switch is properly configured
for multicast as recommended by Axia before powering
your other Axia components.
PowerStation - Front Panel
The indicator panel of the PowerStation MAIN,
shown here in Figure 2-2, is very clean. Sorry - there are
no controls for you to push or turn. All configuration and
setup is performed in software through the web browser
interface. The PowerStation AUX is very similar. Differences are noted in the following section.
Front Panel Indicators
Even though there are no knobs or dials, the front
panel has some very useful indicators that tell you about
the health and status of your PowerStation. In all cases,
solid GREEN indicates normal operating conditions.
PSU
This is a general health indicator for the PowerStation’s power supply. Solid GREEN is the normal state. A
RED LED indicates a power supply or fuse fault. If you
are using the backup power provided by a PowerStation
AUX, solid GREEN indicates normal health. If the AUX
power LED is ORANGE, the fault is with the PowerStation MAIN. If a PowerStation MAIN is being used without an AUX unit, a configuration checkbox located in the
MixEngine Options web page, will disable the check for
Figure 2-2: PowerStation Front Panel Indicators
the redundant power supply and return a GREEN status
for a single power supply.
LINK (PowerStation AUX only)
When illuminated continuously, this LED indicates
that the PowerStation’s Ethernet section is functioning
and that the PowerStation’s network devices are linked.
LIVEWIRE
This indicates that Livewire network traffic present
and multicast streams are properly advertised.
MASTER
Solid GREEN indicates the PowerStation a synchronized as a Master clock to the Livewire network. All other devices should then be reporting Sync or Slave. There
should be only one Master clock device in a Livewire
network at any given time.
SYNC
Solid GREEN indicates the PowerStation a synchronized as a slave to the Livewire network and the clock
is locked. Flashing GREEN indicates sync packets are
being received, but not locked yet. For the sake of illustration, both Master and Sync are illuminated in Figure
2-2. This condition should never exist in the real world
since a Livewire device is either a master or a sync slave;
never both.
OK (PowerStation MAIN only)
Solid GREEN indicates the PowerStation MAIN is
in a normal state of health. Since several internal conditions are monitored, a RED OK indicator can mean one
or more of several abnormal conditions. A correctable
fault condition will be an over-temperature alarm. Check
to ensure the unit has adequate air flow and that the heat
sinks are only slightly warm - never hot.
Contact Axia tech support for additional assistance.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 13
PowerStation’s configuration is web-based, so
you’ll need a computer with a web browser. Any
current desktop or notebook PC with an Ethernet
port and a standard Internet browser with Java
support is acceptable.
Figure 2-3: PowerStation MAIN Rear Panel Connections
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 14
PowerStation - Rear Panel
As you can see in Figure 2-3, there are no switches
or controls on the PowerStation rear panel. All setup is
performed with software. The rear panel consists of only
connectors and indicators.
Power
There are two power connectors on the PowerStation. PSU1 (MAIN) is the standard IEC receptacle for
your mains power. This is auto-sensing for voltages in
the range from 100 to 240 VAC.
The second power supply connection is labelled
PSU2 (BACKUP). It is to be used only in conjunction
with a PowerStation AUX chassis. This is a type 7W2
DB-combo connector to be used exclusively for this
purpose. If there is a failure of either the PowerStation
MAIN or AUX’s power supply, it will automatically utilize backup power provided by this connector and the
PSU indicator on the front panel will indicate the failure
condition.
Note: The PowerStation MAIN and AUX provide
backup power to each other. The failure of a
power supply in either a MAIN or AUX unit will
cause it to automatically and seamlessly use the
backup power supplied by the remaining healthy
unit.
Do not connect the PSU2 connector to any device
other than a PowerStation MAIN or AUX chassis. If you
are connecting an AUX to a “hot” MAIN, be sure the
AUX unit is powered up by first connecting PSU1 to
your mains power supply.
Audio Connections
The PowerStation’s rear panel contains all of the
connectors used for audio I/O, Ethernet, GPIO, power
supply and the connections to your Element control surface. Note that we use RJ-45 connectors are used for four
purposes:
• Analog audio inputs and outputs
• AES audio inputs and outputs
• CANBus (Element internal modules and external accessory panels)
• Ethernet (some with PoE - Power over Ethernet)
It is important to follow the proper conventions for
wiring these connectors and ensure that the connector
functions are not confused as some damage may result
with improper connections.
Analog and AES Audio
The connector pin functions shown in Figure 2-4 are
the same for both the AES and Analog inputs and outputs.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Chapter 4: Configuring GPIO provides the details.
Function Analog/AES
1
Left Ch. Input + / AES +
2
Left Ch. Input - / AES -
3
Right Channel Input +
4
Not Connected
5
Not Connected
6
Right Channel Input -
7
Not Connected
8
Not Connected
Figure 2-4: Analog and AES Audio Connector
Pin-Outs
Microphone
There are two XLR-F connectors on the rear panel
that are designed for microphone inputs. These connectors use the standard wiring convention for a 3-pin
XLR audio connector. These connectors may have 48volt Phantom Power enabled via the PowerStation’s web
page configuration so take appropriate precautions if you
connect anything other than a microphone to these inputs
when Phantom Power is enabled.
GPIO Connections
The PowerStation MAIN and AUX each include four
GPIO ports wired in the same configuration as GPIO
ports on other Axia products. Please refer to Chapter 4:
Configuring GPIO for the functions of these ports and
wiring diagrams for the DB-15 connectors.
In most cases, a GPIO port will be associated with
a single source such as a cd player, studio microphone,
profanity delay, etc. PathfinderPC may also be used to
monitor and control GPIO for advanced applications.
Figure 2-5: GPIO Connector Pin-Outs
The interconnections to GPIO ports will vary depending on the type external equipment being used and
whether or not voltage is supplied by an external device.
Ethernet Connections
The PowerStation MAIN has three types of Ethernet
connections and it is important to use them as intended
since the internal Ethernet switch is configured in a specific manner. The types of connectors available are:
• 100 Mbps PoE (Power-over-Ethernet) ports are
designed to be used with future Livewire products that will not use an external power supply
but rather obtain their power over Ethernet from
one of these special Ethernet ports.
• 100 Mbps Ethernet standard ports are used to
connect PC’s or other Livewire devices to your
Livewire network. These devices might include
additional Livewire nodes or PC’s running the
Axia IP-Audio driver.
• 1000 Mbps ports (GIGABIT PORTS) are used
for connections to other PowerStations or for
connections to an Ethernet core switch as described below.
In addition to its audio and PSU connections, the
PowerStation AUX unit has a single 100 Mbps Ethernet
connection that is intended to be connected to a 100Mbps
port on its associated PowerStation MAIN.
There are a few different configurations for the two
1000 Mbps Ethernet ports on your PowerStation MAIN.
PowerStation Ring
In this mode, the 1000 Mbps Ethernet ports will be
looped to other PowerStation Main units in a ring configuration. Up to four PowerStation MAIN chassis may
be connected in this manner. This mode provides for
Ethernet fault tolerance using standard Spanning Tree
Protocol. The failure or disconnection of any PowerStation will not affect the operation of others and any audio
from common sources connected to an operating PowerStation will continue uninterrupted.
Ethernet Core Switch
Trunk mode for an uplink port supports the connection of a PowerStation to a 1000 Mbps port on a properly
configured Ethernet core switch.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 15
INPUT CONNECTORS
Pin
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 16
Figure 2-3: PowerStation AUX Rear Panel Connections
Other Ethernet Configurations
The configuration of a system using redundant core
switches and other fault tolerant configurations is possible. Contact Axia technical support or your network
administrator for guidance. See Chapter 10: Power
Station Controls for more details on Ethernet.
SFP Modules
Both 1000 Mbps Ethernet ports are equipped with
SFP (Small Form Pluggable) slots that can be used for
media converters. Some facilities have Ethernet runs that
could exceed 100 meters. Since 100 meters is the maximum distance allowed for UTP cable, a fiber trunk must
used in these cases and various SFP modules provide
an inexpensive way to connect to this fiber-optic cable.
Note that the SFP modules cannot be used at the same
time as the 1000 Mbps copper ports since these are dualpurpose ports, not independent ports.
Please refer to Chapter 10: PowerStation Controls
for more details on Ethernet port configuration.
USB
The USB port on the PowerStation MAIN will be
used for other features that may be added in the future.
USB features are not currently implemented.
Element Console Connections
PowerStation MAIN includes two connections for
use in conjunction with your Element control surface.
PowerStation AUX provides I/O expansion and redundant power capabilities only, and cannot be connected directly to an Element control surface.
DVI Monitor
This is a DVI-D connector used to connect the video
display associated with your Element console.
Important: If your display has only analog VGA
or DVI-A, it is not suitable for use with a PowerStation. DVI-D is required.
Most monitors currently available are equipped for
DVI-D. Be sure to check this detail prior to purchasing a
monitor for your PowerStation. The cable length should
be a maximum 5 meters to be compliant with the DVI-D
specification. The display resolution is 1024 x 768.
Note: Be sure your DVI-D monitor is connected
and turned ON when the PowerStation is powered up. The PowerStation’s video output may
be disabled if a monitor is not detected on bootup.
DC/CAN Surface
This connector is a 6-pin Molex connector that is
used to provide DC power (48 vdc) plus CANBus data
to your Element control surface. Use the cable provided
with your control surface. If you require a longer cable
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Your control surface must be connected to a PowerStation MAIN using only the supplied 6-conductor
cable. Refer to Figure 2-8 in the following section.
When you connected the cable to the Element as described above, you no doubt noticed some RJ-45 connectors in the vicinity. This is your CANBus distribution
hub. Do NOT connect any Ethernet cables to the CANBus distribution hub that is inside the Element. This hub
is for CANBus connections only and may cause damage
to other equipment. The RJ-45 connector is used to distribute 48 VDC to the CANBus modules and accessory
panels.
What is CANBus? Controller Area Network
(CAN) is a multicast shared serial bus standard,
originally developed in the 1980s by Robert
Bosch GmbH, for connecting electronic control
units (ECUs). Although initially created for automotive purposes, nowadays it is used in many
embedded control applications.
Important: Element is a drop-in style control
surface and requires a counter top cutout. For
cutout dimensions, please refer to Appendix A.
Connections
Cable connections for Element are entirely different
from any other mixing surface you may be familiar with.
There are no audio inputs or outputs; Element needs only
a single data / power connection to operate.
Important: Your Element console MUST be
grounded. Grounding reduces the risk of electric shock by providing a “path of least resistance” for electric current. Improper grounding
can result in a risk of electric shock. Check with a qualified electrician if you are in
doubt about how to properly ground this equipment. If your local electrical code prohibits the
use of a Station Ground for this purpose, as described above, use the specific “Safety Ground”
your local regulations mandate.
The CAN data link layer protocol is standardized
in ISO 11898-1 (2003).
Figure 2-6: Accessing Element’s connection panel.
Element with PowerStation: Setup
If you haven’t done so yet, it’s time to get your
­ lement out of its packing crate. This can be a two-perE
son job, so grab a partner.
Important: Like any electronic device, Element
can be affected by static electricity. Use of a
personal grounding device is strongly recommended while handling the unit.
Position one person at each end of Element and,
grasping the metal enclosure at the bottom, simultaneously lift upward out of the shipping crate. Remove
packing materials and store them in the crate for future
use. Carefully lower Element into your counter top cutout, taking care to lower both sides at an equal rate to
avoid becoming jammed in the millwork.
Element must be connected to a grounded metal
permanent wiring system or other equipment grounding
conductor using the threaded grounding stud located inside the connections bay. Open the bay by flipping open
the overbridge above the faders, as shown in Figure 2-7.
For ground sources, we recommend, in order of preference:
»» “Station Ground,” the heavy copper strap found
in the walls and floors of many radio studios.
»» AC Safety Ground — the “3rd prong” of a nearby
outlet.
»» A bonded electrical conduit.
#12 AWG GREEN stranded wire is the minimum
wire gauge acceptable for grounding Element.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 17
or a cable for a “split” console configuration, please contact your Axia sales representative.
“Capturing” Your Console
If you have carefully followed to steps on the preceding pages, it is now time to apply power. Connect PSU1
and watch as your PowerStation and Element come to
life.
Figure 2-7: Locating the grounding stud.
One end of the Element power / communication
cable is fitted with a strain relief. Connect this end to
the Molex connector on the back of the PowerStation
MAIN. Connect the other end to the ­Molex socket on the
Element connection panel.
Upon power-up of your Element, some or all of
the alphanumeric displays above the faders may read
­INACTIVE. Before you can use your Element, you will
need to run the Capture routine.
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 18
Figure 2-8: Detail of data/communication cable ends.
Figure 2-10: Identifying the Standard Monitor Module
(left) and Monitor + 2-Fader Module (right).
Figure 2-9: Element connection panel. Circled
connector is for power/data cable; RJ-45’s connect to
fader and accessory modules.
A DVI-D compatible monitor must be connected to
the DVI-D connector on the back of the PowerStation.
This monitor displays metering, a clock and lots of other
user interface information.
IMPORTANT: Element’s power cable is also host
to all data communication between the actual
surface and its CPU (housed in the Element Power Supply/GPIO Node) by ­C ANBus technology; it
does not require a separate Ethernet connection.
Never connect any of the RJ-45 ports on
the Element connection panel to an Ethernet switch. These ports are for connection
of Element fader and accessory modules only;
connecting them to a powered Ethernet switch
could damage the board’s electronics and void
your warranty.
“Press and hold” the * and 2 keys on the Monitor
Module for 5 seconds. The alphanumeric displays above
the facers will change to read Capture.
Now, you will want to verify that LED displays above
the faders display the channel numbers in the order you
desire. If not, you can adjust them individually using the
PGM1 and PGM2 buttons above each fader to change the
channel number to the one you desire.
When you’re done adjusting channel number displays, press the 8 (enter) or # (if you have a Monitor
+2-fader module) key to exit Capture Mode. Your Element hardware is now ready to use.
Hello Moto: If you have motorized faders, you
can “mirror” other motorized faders while you
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
To mirror a fader, press the Options key above
the fader you wish to make the “slave”. An apostrophe (‘) will be displayed next to its numeric
indicator. Pressing the fader’s PGM1 and PGM2
keys will change the numeric indicator, indicating
the “Master” to which this fader is now slaved; a
display reading 2’ means that the fader is slaved
to fader 2. Pressing the Options key again returns the fader to non-mirrored mode.
Short Navigation Tutorial
There are several different ways to change on-screen
options. The first way is with Element’s SoftKnobs, located directly above the Monitor Module and shown in
Figure 2-11.
Note that there are sometimes functions shown both
above and below the on-screen SoftKnobs. When a function is presented above the knob, turning that knob accomplishes that function. When a function is presented
below the knob, pushing in gently on the corresponding
SoftKnob activates that function. The example shown in
Figure 2-14 is from the IP Address Book screen - rotate
to “select”; push to “take”.
If your Element is equipped with the standard Monitor Module, you can also navigate using the control knob,
directional keys and Enter key located at the lower righthand corner of the module, as shown in Figure 2-10.
Additionally, whenever numeric input is required
(like entering IP addresses), you can use the numeric
keypad located just above the Navigation Keys (Figure
2-13) to enter numbers directly.
Figure 2-13: Master Module numeric keypad.
Figure 2-11: Element SoftKnobs.
If your Element is equipped the standard Monitor
module, you will have six SoftKnobs as shown. The
2-fader Master module has three SoftKnobs. These
knobs are context-sensitive. When any of Element’s setup modes are activated using the options keys on the faders or Master Module, you’ll see a corresponding row of
“knobs” represented onscreen, as shown in Figure 2-12.
Figure 2-12: On-screen SoftKnobs.
IP Address Configuration
Using your IP Assignment Worksheet, you’ll now
choose an IP address for your PowerStation. Note that
since the PowerStation MAIN is a multi-function unit,
it will actually utilize three IP addresses. The first address is assigned to the Element console. Once this assignment has taken effect, the next two addresses will
be assigned to the PowerStation Ethernet switch and the
I/O section. For example, if you assign 192.168.0.100
to the Element, the PowerStation will automatically assign 192.168.0.101 to its internal Ethernet switch and
192.168.0.102 to its I/O module. If a PowerStation AUX
is connected, 192.168.0.103 would automatically be assigned to the AUX unit. Be sure to accommodate these
IP addresses in you IP scheme.
A PowerStation AUX may be used as a standalone
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 19
are in Capture Mode. A motorized fader that is
“slaved” to a master fader will move automatically to mirror the movements of the master.
Mirrored faders both control gain for the same
source, but the master can override the setting
of the slave — useful for “split” Element setups
where talent has a local set of faders that may
be used to control certain sources, but you still
want the Board Operator to have master control.
unit. In this case, you will use its factory-assigned IP address to access the unit for configuration with your web
browser. You may change the standalone PowerStation
AUX IP address to match your IP scheme.
again to “take” the new IP value. Repeat this process to
set the subnet mask value.
Factory default IP address is 192.168.2.50.
Multiple PowerStations? If you are configuring multiple units, we strongly recommend that
you proceed by connecting only one system at a
time. That way you will not have IP conflicts and
any PowerStation AUX units will automatically
be paired with the correct PowerStation MAIN.
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 20
If your system employs an Ethernet core switch, it
must have an IP address that is lower than any PowerStation units. This function of the IGMP standard ensures
that the multicast querier is handled by the core switch if
one exists and passed off transparently to another switch
should the core switch fail or be disconnected.
Note: “Gateway” settings on PowerStation
equipment are required. The Gateway may be
used by PowerStation during IP address setup.
A valid Gateway also enables access the PowerStation’s configuration utility remotely, from
outside your network and the use of an external
NTP server. Enter the IP address of your master
router (the one with external network connections) whenever you’re given the option to enter
a gateway IP address.
Note: Element v2.x software supports redundant NTP servers. Use the second field in the IP
Address Book to enter the address of a backup
server.
Setting IP using the Standard Monitor Module
When the PowerStation has completed its start cycle
(meter screen appears), find the section marked Global
Options on the Monitor Module. Press and hold the key
marked Fader Options located in the top right corner
of the module (or press * and 4 and 7) for five seconds to
enter the IP Address Book (Figure 2-14).
To set the IP address, rotate the left-most SoftKnob
to highlight the line titled “Element IP Address” and
push the knob to select that line. Now use the numeric
pad to enter the IP address. Press the leftmost SoftKey
Figure 2-14: IP Address Book
Continue down the screen and, in the same way, enter
the other fields’ values as appropriate.
• Rotate the Select/Set SoftKnob to scroll through
the list of available options. To select an option to
modify, push this knob. While modifying an options,
rotate the knob to change an option’s value, and push
the knob to move to the next field. Options include:
»» Element IP Address: Every piece of Livewire
gear must have its own unique IP Address. Set the
IP Address for each Element in this field.
»» Subnet Mask: Enter your network’s subnet
mask value here, usually 255.255.255.0
»» Gateway IP Address: To enable IP configuration and remote administration of your Livewire
network or an external NTP server, you’ll need a
network gateway. Usually this will be the IP address of your router.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Important: Your Gateway Subnet Mask should
be set within the same subnet as the PowerStation, even if you have no gateway installed.
Note: If you set a password for HTTP access,
you will not see your password displayed in this
field upon re-entering the IP Address book. This
is a security feature intended to prevent “overthe-shoulder” password theft.
•
•
•
If you want to reverse changes you’ve made and
haven’t saved, press the Undo knob to erase
them.
Press Save to save changes you’ve made.
Reboot immediately reboots the PowerStation.
Note: After making changes to any Element IP
address settings, you must reboot the console.
Use the “REBOOT” soft key to begin an immediate reboot sequence.
Setting IP using the Monitor+ 2-Fader Module
When the PowerStation has completed its start cycle
(meter screen appears), find the numeric keypad at the
top right of the Monitor Module. Press and hold the *
(star), “7” & “4” keys simultaneously for five seconds
to enter the IP Address Book (Figure 2-15).
To set the IP address, rotate the left-most SoftKnob
to highlight the line titled “Element IP Address” and
push the knob to select that line. Now use the numeric
pad to enter the IP address. Press the leftmost SoftKey
again to “take” the new IP value. Repeat this process to
set the subnet mask value.
Figure 2-15: IP Address Book
Continue down the screen and, in the same way, enter
the other fields’ values as appropriate.
• Rotate the Select/Set SoftKnob to scroll through
the list of available options. To select an option to
modify, push this knob. While modifying an options,
rotate the knob to change an option’s value, and push
the knob to move to the next field. Available options
include:
»» Element IP Address: Every piece of Livewire
gear must have its own unique IP Address. Set the
IP Address for each Element in this field.
»» Subnet Mask: Enter your network’s subnet
mask value here, usually 255.255.255.0
»» Gateway IP Address: To enable IP configuration and remote administration of your Livewire
network, you’ll need a network gateway. Usually
this will be the IP address of your router.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 21
»» Engine IP Address: Not required for PowerStation - do not change the factory default value.
»» 1st NTP Server IP Address: Element supports
NTP (Network Time Protocol) timekeeping to
synchronize time-of-day clocks across your facility. If you have an NTP server, enter its IP Address here.
»» 2nd NTP Server IP Address: Element v2.x
software supports redundant NTP servers. Enter
the IP Address of your backup server here.
»» Web Page User Password: You can passwordprotect your Element’s web server connection by
entering a numeric password here.
Important: Your Gateway Subnet Mask should
be set within the same subnet as the PowerStation, even if you have no gateway installed.
»» Engine IP Address: Not required for PowerStation - do not change the factory default value.
»» 1st NTP Server IP Address: Element supports
NTP (Network Time Protocol) timekeeping to
synchronize time-of-day clocks across your facility. If you have an NTP server, enter its IP Address here.
»» 2nd NTP Server IP Address: Element v2.x
software supports redundant NTP servers. Enter
the IP Address of your backup server here.
»» Web Page User Password: You can passwordprotect your Element’s web server connection by
entering a numeric password here.
Other Advanced Options
What about making changes to monitors and meters, you may ask? The detailed configuration of timers, clock, monitors and metering is not necessary for
basic setup but this is important stuff too! Please refer to
Chapter 5 - Element Operation where these topics are
discussed in depth.
Now that your Element has a basic configuration, the
next section will walk you through setting up your PowerStation.
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 22
Note: If you set a password for HTTP access,
you will not see your password displayed in this
field upon re-entering the IP Address book. This
is a security feature intended to prevent “overthe-shoulder” password theft.
• Rotating the Action knob chooses between the following options:
»» Save stores the changes you’ve made to the IP
Address Book.
»» Undo reverses any changes you’ve made if you
haven’t yet saved them.
»» Reboot immediately reboots the PowerStation.
• Press the Exit knob to leave the IP Address Book at
any time without saving your changes.
Note: After making changes to any IP address
settings, you must save your changes and reboot the PowerStation. Use the “REBOOT” soft
key to begin an immediate reboot sequence.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
PowerStation Setup
Connections and IP Configuration
In previous sections we discussed the physical connections to your PowerStation. In the last section, we
discussed how to assign an IP address to your PowerStation. Once you have assigned an IP address, you can
connect a PC to a port on the PowerStation’s Ethernet
switch. Make sure the IP address of the PC is in the same
range of the address as that chosen for your PowerStation. For example, if the address chosen for the PowerStation is 192.168.0.100, the address chosen for your PC
must also start with 192.168.0 followed by 3 digits that
are not already in use by another device.
All Axia IP addresses are assigned and
managed manually. This gives you complete
control of your address scheme and also permits you to set up a series of browser bookmarks to quickly access your PowerStation
and other Axia devices. Obviously, your
PC’s network connection is an important
connection since it is through the PowerStation’s web pages that all other settings are
manipulated.
Note: Axia web interfaces have been
tested with Microsoft Internet Explorer (version 5 or later) but also work
with other browsers including Firefox.
Whatever browser you choose, Java
must be enabled and your pop-up
blocker, if any, must be disabled
in order to work with Axia equipment.
Note that Windows Vista versions do
not have Java installed by default as in
prior versions. You must install the Sun
Java package found at http://www.java.
com .
Livewire Source Channels
Figure 2-17: PowerStation Home Page
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
The first step to setting a networked audio system is to identify the network audio
sources. The PowerStation’s home page is
shown in Figure 2-17.
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 23
There are no switches or knobs on the
PowerStation, all settings are configured in
the PowerStation’s web pages. No specialized software is required and you can use
any PC (Windows, Mac or Linux) to configure your PowerStation through the HTTP
interface.
In a Livewire network, individual devices (audio
nodes, studio controllers, etc.) are identified by unique
IP addresses. But what about the audio streams these
devices generate? Think about how many audio sources
and destinations there are in even a small studio — there
are a lot to keep track of. In the analog days, we’d affix
a numbered label to each cable that entered the terminal
room to identify each audio circuit. Obviously, we can’t
attach pieces of paper to digital packet streams, but we
can still give each one a unique “label.”
We refer to these “labels” as Network Channel Numbers. Each Livewire system can support up to 32,766
channels of audio, which enables us to give each audio
source its own unique numeric Livewire channel number.
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 24
Note: 32,000+ channel numbers exceeds the
average human’s RAM storage capacity. We recommend using a spreadsheet program — just
to make sure you don’t generate painful readmemory register errors.
As soon as you power up your PowerStation, it may
begin to generate audio using factory default channel
numbers. These numbers are acceptable for a standalone, single studio however if you have more than one
studio, you must change those default values to new
channel numbers to avoid conflict with other studios. All
Livewire Channel numbers within a Livewire network
must be unique.
Lets take a look at the HTTP interface to the PowerStation and discuss the Livewire Channel settings.
Figure 2-17 shows the “home page” of the PowerStation.
From here we can navigate to other pages where we will
configure Sources, Destinations, GPIO and other system
parameters. In this chapter, we will concentrate on the
Sources and Destinations. See Chapter 10: PowerStation Controls for other advanced settings.
Let’s proceed to configure our sources!
Source Configuration - I/O Subsystem
1.Open the web browser on your computer and point it
to the IP address you previously set for your PowerStation MAIN.
2.You’ll be prompted to enter a user name and password. The default user name is “user”. Leave the
password field blank.
3. Choose the I/O Subsystem - MAIN or AUX menu
option to configure the I/O sections of the PowerStation. The user interface for MAIN or AUX units
is identical.
4. Select Sources to proceed to the source setup page.
You will now see the Sources section as shown in
Figure 2-18. By default some source channel numbers and types may already be assigned; you can
change these to fit into your own channel numbering
plan.
Note: The PowerStation has two different types
of audio sources. Some audio sources originate with
the rear panel input connectors. Other audio sources
(PGM1, PGM2, etc) are generated internally by the
PowerStation’s DSP - the MixEngine. There are several
parameters associated with the PowerStation Sources.
This section will discuss each of these in detail. We recommend that you configure all Livewire sources before
you attempt to configure any Destinations. First we will
consider the sources that originate at the rear panel connectors; the PowerStation I/O.
Source Name
Each Source needs a name so you will know what it
is and where it is located. We suggest that you make this
name as descriptive as possible. Don’t make it too brief.
As an example, don’t just name MIC-3 because that
doesn’t tell you enough. Use something more descriptive
like Studio-4 Mic-3 since this will tell you the location of the source as well as describe the type of source.
Livewire names can contain any printable character and
can be up to 24 characters long.
Channel
This is where you will enter the unique Livewire
channel number we discussed briefly a couple of pages
back. This number must be unique and must be less than
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
32,766. Many Axia users find
it helpful to choose a number
that is related to the unit’s IP
address. For example, if the IP
address of the PowerStation I/O
is 192.168.0.123, you might assign Livewire channels 12301
through 12308 to these sources.
Stream Mode
This setting determines the
type of stream that you will be
Figure 2-18: PowerStation AUX I/O Source Configuration
delivering to the Livewire network. As a general guideline,
need approximately 50 dB of gain however this varies
widely depending on the microphone. Other sources
microphones, codecs and phone sources are usually
may need a bit of gain tweaking to get their levels norLive Stereo for lowest latency. CD’s, satellite feeds and
computer sources are usually set to Standard Stereo.
malized. Be sure to click Apply before you wander off to
another page - this will save your settings.
A word about stream types: There are currently three choices available in the Mode dropdown box: Live Stereo and Standard Stereo
and Disabled. Live Stereo was previously referred to as
Livestreams. Use Live Stereo streams whenever you need the lowest latency for on-air
feeds, mic-to-headphone paths, etc.
Standard Stereo is intended to provide the best
compatibility with older PC systems, but the
trade-off is that these streams have a higher
amount of latency.
We suggest that any sources not in use should be set
to Disabled. This will preserve bandwidth plus make
your setup less complicated.
Input Gain
This setting allows you to match the level of your
source so that the levels of the Livewire streams are standardized within the system. A gain of 0 can be used for
sources that are already operating at +4dB. Microphones
You may find it more convenient to use the Meters
page to set your Source Input Gain. This page provides
you with a visual reference.
Phantom Power
If you are using condenser microphones and you
are not using outboard microphone processors, you
will probably need to enable Phantom Power. While it
is not necessary to use Phantom Power with dynamic
microphones, it should not be harmful to dynamic microphones if Phantom Power is enabled. Do not enable
Phantom Power on channels using external microphone
processors as this may cause damage to those units.
Consult the technical manuals for your microphones and
any outboard processors to ensure you have correctly
configured the PowerStation’s Phantom Power option.
AES Mode
AES sources include an additional setting that configures the sample-rate convertors for these sources.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 25
Sharable
This setting is for backward
compatibility only. It should always be set to No for your PowerStation.
There are two possible settings:
• Asynchronous – this is the usual setting and enables sample rate conversion. Any valid AES
source can be used in this mode without concerns about dropouts due to mismatched clocks.
• Synchronous – This setting may be used for
standalone AES nodes but is not suitable for a
standalone PowerStation since the PowerStation
cannot sync to an external AES clock.
Source Configuration - MixEngine
The PowerStation includes an integrated Studio Mix
Engine. This section of the PowerStation creates all of
the Program Bus sources that are delivered to the network as well as those sources associated with monitor
and headphone feeds. Figure 2-19 shows the configuration web page for this section. To get to this page, select
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 26
Mix Engine - Prog and Monitor Out.
Channel Name and Number
This section is where you specify the Livewire channel number. You will observe that the names are predetermined and cannot be changed. As discussed in the
previous section, the channel number can be any number
from 1 to 32,766. You may wish to follow the convention
of using the last octet as a “base” for your Livewire channel numbers. For example, if the Element IP address is
192.168.0.100, you may use 10001 through 10018 for the
Livewire channel assignments of the Program and Monitor channels. The numbering convention easily extends
to the VMIX and VMODE sections that are discussed
later in Chapter 7: Virtual Mixer (VMIX).
Mode
The Mode function here is identical to that described
in the I/O section. Live Stereo should be used for any
sources in your air chain or monitoring chain as this will
minimize latency. Standard Stereo is frequently used
for Record busses, Talkback and Studio functions. Other
options include Surround and Disabled.
Status
This box allows you to view the status of the Program and Monitor audio streams. You should see OK for
streams that are enabled and the box should be blank for
Figure 2-19: PowerStation Engine Source
Configuration
any streams that are disabled.
Audio
This area provides you with a visible indicator for the
presence or absence of audio as well as an overall indication of level. In Figure 2-19 you can observe several busses that are active and levels are normal as indicated by
the green color. If levels are high, the audio box is yellow. If levels are excessive, the color will change to red.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Other Sources: The PowerStation has other sources that may be
configured in its VMIX and VMODE
sections. Please see Chapter 7:
Virtual Mixer for more details.
You have two Process options:
You may process only CR headphones
for any selection (PGM-1, PGM-2, etc)
or you may process PGM-1 in all monitoring paths. This second selection is
commonly used since it allows you to
Figure 2-20: PowerStation I/O Destination Configuration
process all PGM-1 monitoring whether
it is CR monitors, CR headphones, CR
guest headphones or Studio guests. This simulates a
example Studio 4 CR Monitor.
processed off-air feed that most radio personalities will
Channel
prefer.
The Channel will be determined by the Livewire
channel you wish to deliver to this destination. You
There are currently three Preset processing options:
may enter the Channel Number directly if you happen
Bypass, SmoothHeadphones and HotHeadphones.
to know the Livewire channel number or you may use
These descriptions are self-explanatory.
the pop-up box to select the appropriate Livewire source.
Once you make your selection (and appreciate the descriptive name you used to identify the source!), click
Destination Configuration
Each PowerStation I/O section has eight local auApply to confirm and save the Destination setting.
dio outputs to which you may deliver various Livewire
audio streams. This concept of delivering streams to a
Type
physical output is the reason we prefer to use the term
The Type field identifies whether the destination is a
Destinations to describe these outputs. As you night
“from source” or “to source” output. Lets briefly review
have guessed, there are other places where we use destithis concept.
nations and they are not associated with a physical output.
You will recall from the Introduction to Livewire;
System Design Reference & Primer manual that Livewire
permits special bidirectional streams for use in cases
The setup of the PowerStation destinations is very
similar to an Axia 8x8 node. The configuration page for
where a source and destination are associated, such as a
Destinations is shown in Figure 2-20.
codec or hybrid. The return feed to such devices is usually a mix-minus (clean feed) generated by a mixer or mix
Name
engine fed back to the device that is the primary audio
User-defined. Most people fine it useful to describe
source (and usually the name of the stream in question).
the equipment to which the destination is connected, for
You can create a bidirectional Livewire channel (includ©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 27
Integrated Omnia Processing
Some of the PowerStation’s DSP
has been assigned the task of audio
processing. Some of the famous Omnia
technology has been incorporated into
this section.
ing associated GPIO) with a single channel number!
What does this all mean in practice? If the destination is a codec or hybrid you’ll set the Destination Type
to To Source and use the same Channel number as the
stream representing the Codec or Hybrids output (the
caller or far end codec audio). This sends a backfeed to
that device. Other destinations such as CR Monitor, Program feeds to processor, etc will always be designated as
From Source.
2: Element with PowerStation: Setup and Connections • 28
Output Load
This option is only available on the analog destinations screen. This setting has two options. The usual selection is Hi-Z and is used when the outputs are fed to
High impedance destination devices. This has been the
normal case for many years. When the node is feeding
legacy equipment with 600 Ohm inputs, the 600 ohm
option should be selected. This boosts the node’s output
level by ~1 dB to maintain true +4 dB levels into 600
Ohm equipment to ensure unity gain. The audio clipping
point remains at 24 dB.
Note that output load is not configurable for AES
destinations.
Advanced Settings
You’ve no doubt noticed that there are many more
options for your PowerStation than we’ve covered here.
That’s because Chapter 2 was meant to get you up and
running as quickly as possible. For more advanced information, please refer to:
Chapter 4: GPIO Configuration
Chapter 7:Virtual Mixer (VMIX)
For an in-depth explanation of the other advanced
settings for your Element, StudioEngine and PowerStation, please refer to Chapters 8, 9 and 10, respectively,
of this manual.
What’s Next?
Take a break! You’re done with initial set-up. When
you’re ready, continue to Chapter 3 to walk through one
of the most important Element concepts: Source Profiles.
Gain
Not all equipment is designed to operate at our nominal system level of +4 dBv. This setting allows to you
trim the output level +/- 12 dB to ensure that you are
feeding your external equipment with the correct signal
level. It is considered good practise to normalize all levels coming into your system first and then adjust output
gains only when necessary.
Meters
The meters configuration page may be helpful in setting up destinations and their levels. Remember you need
to install Java before these meters can be displayed. Note
that the nominal signal level should be approximately
-20 dBFS. This corresponds to the industry standard level of +4 dBv since our “full scale” or 0dBFS is +24 dBv.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Working With Sources
In this chapter we’ll discuss how to set up inputs
for your Element console- we call them Sources. You’ll
be using the HTTP servers built into the Element and
StudioEngine (or PowerStation) to do this.
In the Element console’s design, there are two types
of profiles. One is called SHOW profile and this type of
profile contains all of the “snapshot” settings that would
be associated with a scene or preset which is the terminology used in the sound reinforcement or recording
studio industry. The SHOW profile keeps track of monitor bus settings, fader channel assignments, processing
settings, feature lockouts and many other parameters.
SOURCE profiles are the topic of this chapter. A
source profile is used to identify the parameters that are
unique to a specific Livewire source as it applies to a
specific Element console.
You will use your web browser directed at the IP address of your Element to setup SOURCE profiles.
Note: Axia web interfaces have been tested with
Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 5 or later,
but also work with other browsers.
We also like Mozilla’s FireFox browser, especially
with regards to its “tabbed browsing” capabilities. With tabbed browsing, it’s possible to bookmark the IP addressees of entire rooms worth of
Audio Nodes, then recall them in tabbed groups
with a single click. Whatever browser you choose, Java must be
installed and enabled, and your pop-up blocker
must be disabled. The latest Java package is
available at http://www.java.com .
Understanding Source Profiles
One of the most repetitive and tedious parts of studio
building has always been tying “data” to audio sources.
Consider the wiring of line selector modules: you need
Mix-minus and IFB generation has also been a problem in the past. Too often it’s a complicated process that
requires air talent to correctly determine source and bus
assignments at a moment’s notice. How many times has
unwanted audio made air thanks to this error-prone procedure?
Your Element eliminates these headaches by automatically merging audio, logic and program data into
a single, routable information stream. Since audio in a
Livewire network is transported as packetized data, it’s
easy for us to “piggyback” other data along with audio.
This is accomplished through the use of Source Profiles.
Element Source Profiles allow you to specify which
network audio sources are to be used on each console in
your facility. They also assign modifiers to an audio input. Characteristics like EQ curves, Pan trim, voice dynamics, even mix-minus source selections, can all be set
in the Source Profile and are then automatically loaded
whenever that source is assigned to an Element fader.
The result of all this is that Element is always presented with complete, consistent information about how
you want a given audio source handled.
Note: Source Profile settings do not transfer
between studios. In other words, a mic in Studio A that has EQ and dynamics applied through
a Source Profile on the Studio A Element will
not have those settings automatically applied if
that mic is loaded on the Element in Studio B.
We are, however, planning on this capability in
future versions.
Source Profile Setup
Now that you understand what Source Profiles do,
let’s set one up. You’ll use the Element and StudioEngine
HTTP interfaces to do this, so connect a computer with
an Internet browser to your Livewire switch.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
3: Configuring Inputs • 29
Chapter Three:
a cable for the remote audio source, a set of wires for a
“start” closure, another set for “stop” — even with TDM
routers, an operation as seemingly simple as logic-follows-audio often turns out to be not so simple.
Note: You can’t construct Source Profiles unless
you’ve already configured the inputs (sources)
of your studio’s Audio Nodes. Be sure you’ve assigned Livewire channel numbers and enabled
all sources in your Nodes, Engine, and PC drivers. This will make your sources visible on the
selection list in the source profile setup screen.
Make sure you’ve done this before proceeding
further through this chapter.
Your computer must be assigned a valid network IP
address in order to “see” Livewire web pages. Livewire
networks do not usually contain DHCP servers, so you
must manually assign your computer an available, fixed
IP address within the range you previously determined
for your network. Different operating systems use different methods to do this; please consult your OS’s documentation for specific instructions.
Source Profile Options
1.Enter the IP address of your Element or PowerStation in your browser; you’ll see the Element Control Center or PowerStation Control Centre displayed onscreen. Choose the “Sources & Profiles”
menu item (choose the Configuration submenu for
the Element). Enter the user name “user”, leave the
password field blank, and click OK.
3: Configuring Inputs • 30
2.Choose the Source Profiles menu item from the
main screen, and click the New Source Profile link
at the bottom of the screen. You’re now in the Source
Profile creation screen. It will look something like
the image in the previous frame - Figure 3-1.
We are showing you the entire web page so you can see
it all at once and appreciate the power of source profiles.
Let’s now break it down into smaller sections so you can
actually read the text in the figures and consider those
logical blocks with the explanation following the Figure.
We will start with Figure 3-2 and the descriptions that
follow.
Reminder: Did you define your audio sources
from the Engine and Nodes as outlined in Chapter One or Two? If not, go no further – you’ve
got to do that before you can continue with
Source Profile setup.
Figure 3-1: Source Profile options (the whole picture!)
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
termine which faders (or other inputs) you’ll allow
this source to be assigned to. For example, if your
source is a Control Room mic, and you only want
it to appear on the left-most fader, you would check
only the box marked Channel 1. You might want to
make a CD player available on any fader, so you’d
check the boxes for all faders. Some sources – especially air monitors – you might wish to prevent
from ever being assigned to a fader, so you would
uncheck the boxes for all faders. The number of fader checkboxes show will vary depending upon the
number of faders installed in your Element.
The three final check boxes, CR monitor inputs,
Studio monitor input and V-Mixer input determine whether the board op will be able to assign this
source to the CR and Studio monitor and headphone
buses or the Virtual Mixer (please see Chapter 7:
Virtual Mixer for details on this feature). Figure 3-2: Source Profile General Settings
All of the audio sources that
you previously defined (during Audio Node or PowerStation I/O setup) are available in this drop-down
box; pick one.
PRIMARY SOURCE:
•
Type a 10-character descriptive name for your source. This is the
description that will appear on the LED display
above the console fader.
•
If the source you’re
defining can supply Program Associated Data (for
instance, a computer playout system that sends song/
artist information), you can choose to have that text
dynamically substituted in the alphanumeric display
of the fader the source is assigned to. Instead of reading PROPHET_1, for example, it could scroll FERGIE.
»» Choose Show Sourcename to have the channel
alpha display the name you typed into the Source
Profile Name field above.
»» Choose Allow Application to Override if
you’d like the PAD text displayed instead.
»» Choose Show Both to have the Source Name
and PAD text alternately display on a 3-second
interval.
•
SOURCE
PROFILE
To prevent a source from appearing on these inputs’
selection lists, uncheck the desired box. Generally
speaking, normal sources such as computers and CD
players will have fader assign capability only while
sources such as off-air receivers will have monitoronly capability.
NAME:
About Mics and Headphone Feeds: Element
provides you with several headphone options,
all selectable from Element’s Monitor Module. The Monitor 1 (control room) headphone
output provides a feed intended for the Host
(board-op’s) mic position and includes the ability to monitor the Preview bus in headphones.
Guests can talk to the host directly using the
Talkback keys on their remote control panels.
SOURCE NAME OVERRIDE:
SOURCE AVAILABILITY:
These check boxes de-
The Monitor 2 headphone output sends audio to talent and guest mic positions. Talent
positions include a talkback channel that the
host or board op can use to communicate using the Talk To Monitor 2 function (guest
positions do not have this Talkback channel).
An individual headphone feed can also be constructed to associate a dedicated headphone
channel with a specific mic. This allows the
board op to send individual, targeted talkback
to a specific individual (using the Talkback
keys) without other talent or guests hearing.
•
SOURCE TYPE:
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Define your source as a micro-
3: Configuring Inputs • 31
•
phone, a line input, a telephone input, a codec or a
computer source.
»» Operator is the board operator’s mic. It is the
source mic for Element’s TALK TO functions. Its
On button serves as a COUGH/MUTE button. Its
associated logic mutes the CR monitors when On.
»» CR Producer is used for in-studio Producer’s
mic positions. It has associated GPIO logic which
can operate Talk to... functions from a remote
producer’s panel. It also mutes CR monitors
when On.
»» CR Guest is used for any other guest mic in the
control room. Its associated logic port mutes the
CR monitors when On. It can have an individual
headphone feed.
»» Studio Guest is used for any mic located in a
separate studio. Its logic mutes the Studio monitors when On. It can have an individual headphone feed.
»» Line is used for any line input audio source, analog or digital. A GPIO logic port can be used to
provide machine start/stop pulses if desired.
»» Phone defines this source as a hybrid or broadcast phone system input. A summed mono mixminus is automatically provided.
»» Codec marks this source as a codec. A dual-mono mix-minus is provided; one PA feed (right) +
one talent feed with talkback (left).
»» Computer Player defines this source as originating from a PC. Associated GPIO logic can be
used to send start/stop signals to a playout system.
3: Configuring Inputs • 32
•
Defines fader start actions and states:
»» Normal conforms to the US method of requiring
talent to manually turn the channel on and off.
»» Fader Start follows the common European
standard of activating the channel and associated
machine logic when the fader is raised from ∞.
»» Fader Start with Arm works just like the Normal setting when the fader is not set to minimum
position. When the fader is set to the minimum
position, it can be in an Armed state.
Fader Mode:
means that the channel will go to the ON state
when the fader is moved up. When in Arm state,
the channel OFF lamp will be illuminated. The
channel ON lamp will flashing in “wink” mode a long on-time and short off-time.
For all fader modes, pressing the OFF button at
any time will place the channel in the OFF state.
About Telos Phone System Modes: Telos
multi-line broadcast phone systems work in
two different modes: US Mode and Euro
Mode. In US Mode, one of the phone system’s hybrids is assigned to a console faders, and taking a caller to air is accomplished by using a
switching control to select a line on that hybrid
and turning its fader ON.
In Euro Mode, the switching control is not used;
instead, each line from the phone system is permanently assigned to a separate fader, which
may be turned ON or OFF at will. Element supports both US and Euro modes. The
next few settings are used for setting up the
desired style of phone operation.
Figure 3-3: Settings for configuring Element for
operation with Telos phone systems
Note: For complete instructions on how to use
thes options when setting up a phone system
with Element, please refer to Appendix D:
Working With Phone Hybrids.
state is entered by pressing the ON Button when the fader is down. The armed state
Armed
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Element provides no auto-answer logic when a fader with a
hybrid assigned is turned On.
»» Channel ON Answers Hybrid: When a hybrid
has an incoming call, turning its assigned fader
ON will answer the call.
»» Channel ON or Preview ON Answers Hybrid: When a hybrid has an incoming call, turning its assigned fader ON or pressing that channel’s Preview key will answer the call.
»»
Figure 3-4: More Source Profile Settings
•
PREVIEW ROUTING:
view
signal originates.
Determines where the
Pre-
»» Pre-fader listen is the legacy CUE function
that most broadcasters use.
»» After-fader listen (SOLO) is preferred by
some users and is selected here.
•
•
Determines what
will happen to a source’s off-air Preview assignment when that source is taken to air.
»» Normal, Auto-Switching Disabled: The Preview bus assignment will be retained even after
the fader is turned ON.
»» CHANNEL ON turns Preview OFF: If this
source is assigned to Preview for off-air auditioning, turning its channel ON will cancel its
Preview assignment.
»» Preview ON turns Channel OFF: Does just
what it says - sometimes used for Phone channels.
•
Allows you to enable or disable backfeeds to this audio
source.
•
This is a feature
unique to Element: Talkback is sent over dimmed
backfeed audio. If you want a hard interruption
(Talkback interrupts Program audio), set it to OFF,
which mutes the audio. But maybe your jocks would
like to just have their program audio dimmed, and
the Talkback come over it so they can still monitor
air while they’re being talked to. In this case, input
a value by which the program audio will be dimmed.
Adjustment range is 0dB to -30dB.
•
LOGIC PORT DISABLED/EXCLUSIVE MODE/
PREVIEW SWITCHING MODE:
This setting allows you
to tailor Element’s Hybrid Answer mode to suit your
facility’s operating style. It is intended for hybrids
that use external GPIO for device control.
HYBRID ANSWER MODE:
Allows you to specify the function of a SoftKnob that can be used for tweaking the
channel gain structure. The SoftKnob is accessed by
pressing the Options button on the fader channel.
»» None - disables this function
»» Fader Trim Level - adjusts trim gain in the
channel’s signal path just before the channel
fader.
»» Pre-Amp Gain - adjusts the source gain of the
Axia node or PowerStation I/O source associated
with this source.
Knob Function:
BACKWARD
FEED
ENABLED/DISABLED:
BACKWARD FEED DIM GAIN:
SHARED MODE: Allows you disable GPIO machine
logic to this audio source device or enable it in two
modes. Exclusive mode permits GPIO control associated with only a single fader. Shared mode allows
more than one user to send on/off/start signals to a
source via GPIO.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
3: Configuring Inputs • 33
•
Normal, Auto Answer Disabled:
3: Configuring Inputs • 34
•
Allows devices such as CD players or tape machines to signal their READY state to the operator through the
OFF button LED. If a device is cueing, its OFF lamp
will not be lit. Tying the device’s OFF lamp to the
Ready command means that a machine must be cued
and ready before the OFF lamp illuminates. If Enabled, the OFF lamp illuminates only when the
fader is OFF and the Ready command is active on
the GPIO. If Disabled, the OFF lamp illuminates
normally whenever the fader is turned OFF.
•
If there is a backfeed
associated with this source, this option determines
what content is fed back from the board.
»» Auto (Pgm-1/Phone) feeds the Program 1 bus
(minus the source) when this source’s fader is
ON, and feeds the Phone bus (minus the source)
when the fader is OFF. The Phone bus is actually
a special variant of PGM4. The Phone bus is prefader and pre-on/off to allow speaker-phone style
operation thru the Operator’s mic.
»» Phone feeds the Phone bus, minus the source.
Phone is a mono-sum, pre-fade and pre-on/off
variation of PGM4
»» PGM1 feeds the Program 1 bus, minus the source.
»» PGM2 feeds the Program 2 bus, minus the source.
»» PGM3 feeds the Program 3 bus, minus the source.
»» PGM4 feeds the Program 4 bus, minus the source.
»» AUX SEND A feeds the Aux Send A bus, minus
the source.
»» AUX SEND B feeds the Aux Send B bus, minus
the source.
»» AUX SEND C feeds the Aux Send C bus, minus
the source.
»» AUX SEND D feeds the Aux Send D bus, minus
the source.
GPIO READY ENABLED/DISABLED:
At the same time, sources assigned to PGM-4
are mixed and sent to the PHONE bus. PHONE is
an internal bus which does not feed a separate
output; instead, it picks up PGM-4 audio prefader and pre-On/Off and backfeeds it callers
(minus themselves, of course) when the channel
is OFF and AUTO is selected as the Feed To
Source Mode.
FEED-TO-SOURCE MODE:
About the PHONE, RECORD and PROGRAM
4 buses: Element’s PGM-4 mix bus is a special multi-purpose bus that does several things
at once to make life easier for the operator.
Sources assigned to PGM-4 are also sent to the
RECORD bus, a special post-fader, pre-on/off
output that can be used to feed recording devices.
Figure 3-5: Mode and Trim Source Profile Settings
Determines whether source will be
treated as mono or stereo, and how.
»» Stereo feeds incoming L/R signal to left and
right channels of assigned bus(es).
»» Left feeds incoming left channel to both channels of assigned bus(es).
»» Right feeds incoming right channel to both
channels of assigned bus(es).
»» Sum creates L+R mono mix of incoming stereo
source and feeds it to both channels of assigned
bus(es).
• SIGNAL MODE LOCK: Allows or disallows user’s
ability to change the source’s signal mode (as set
above) using controls on Element’s surface.
»» Unlocked allows the user to change modes if
needed.
»» Locked prevents changes to the signal mode.
•
SIGNAL MODE:
•
SIGNAL PHASE:
Allows for correction of out-ofphase program material.
»» Normal assumes correct phase polarity of source
input material.
»» Invert left reverses phase on the left channel
input.
»» Invert right reverses phase on the right channel
input.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
»» Invert left and
channel inputs.
right
reverses phase on both
•
Lets you specify an amount
of from -25 to +25 dB that is applied to the signal
just before the fader. Note that this parameter may be
controlled by a SoftKnob as described earlier.
•
Prevents operators from making changes to the above trim gain setting.
•
PANORAMA POSITION:
•
AUTO-START TIMER:
At-will EQ is set by talent using Element’s Channel Options controls, and can be employed to
trim EQ on-the-fly .
FADER TRIM GAIN:
FADER TRIM LOCK:
Lets you preset pan settings for this input. Pan is variable in 49 steps, center
being 0, far left -24 and far right +24. This setting
can be adjusted on the fly by the operator if permitted by show profile settings.
Determines whether the
event timer found in Element’s right-hand meter
display will reset to zero when this source’s fader is
turned on.
»» Disabled: timer will not reset when this source
is activated.
»» Enabled timer resets when the source is activated.
SmartQ works by varying the Q of the selected
parametric band proportional to the amount
of boost or cut you specify. A small amount
of boost or cut will affect a broader range of
frequencies for a warm, musically-pleasing effect. As gain is increased the Q sharpens, affecting a narrower range of frequencies for
tighter control of target bands. At aggressive cut levels, the EQ becomes a tunable
notch filter.
SmartQ keeps the EQ sounding natural at virtually all settings.
Pre-defined EQ can be entered during Source
Profile construction, and will be automatically applied whenever that source is assigned
to a Element fader; i.e., a -2 dB 12 kHz high
shelf filter pre-set in a microphone’s Source
Profile will be applied when any surface, in
any studio, loads that mic for use. or make
EQ for this
•
EQ STATUS: Bypass
•
Choose between
pass filter for high-frequency EQ.
•
Sets the active frequency
for high-band EQ. Variable from 1.25 kHz to 20 kHz.
If EQ HIGH MODE is set to Shelf, this setting determines the top of the shelf. If EQ HIGH MODE is
set to Band pass, this sets the center frequency of
the BP filter (SmartQ determines the width of the BP
filter, as described above).
•
Sets the center frequency of
the midrange parametric band. Variable from 125
Hz to 2.0 kHz.
•
EQ LOW FREQUENCY: Sets the center frequency of
source.
EQ HIGH MODE:
Active
shelf
or
band
EQ HIGH FREQUENCY:
EQ MID FREQUENCY:
the low parametric band. Variable from 20 Hz to 320
Hz.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
3: Configuring Inputs • 35
About Element EQ: Equalization is available
for all audio sources, and can be pre-defined
or adjusted on-the-fly. Our EQ model is threeband quasi-parametric. Controls are provided
for center frequency and boost/cut, with a
unique SmartQ™ automatic bandwidth system.
Figure 3-6: Processing- Source Profile Settings
•
Provides 40 dB of
adjustment range for boost or cut of the three parametric bands, from -25 dB to +15 dB.
EQ HIGH, MID & LOW GAIN:
The following options dealing with dynamics processor settings apply to Mic, Codec and
Phone sources only. If applied to other source
types, these settings will be ignored.
Toggles the voice compressor between Freeze and No Freeze modes.
• COMPRESSOR MODE:
Turns the voice processor’s
noise gate on and off. Choose Bypass or Active.
Some processing settings will result in a reduction of overall signal
level. This setting allows you to adjust the amount
gain to compensate for any gain lost by compressor
processing.
Turns the voice processor’s compressor functions on and off. Choose Bypass or Active.
What is this stuff? Radio engineers don’t need
a lesson in dynamics processing, but for the benefit of any jocks reading this, here’s a quick explanation of what these controls can do.
• NOISE GATE STATUS:
• COMPRESSOR STATUS:
Turns the voice processor’s deesser module on and off. Choose Bypass or Active.
• DE-ESSER STATUS:
Determines the point
at which the Noise Gate will operate (if set to Active). Adjustment range is between 0dB and -50dB.
• NOISE GATE THRESHOLD:
Sets the amount of noise
reduction that will be applied to the mic audio if
the noise gate is set to Active and the Noise Gate
Threshold is reached. Adjustment range is between
0dB and -30 dB.COMPRESSOR THRESHOLD: Determines the point at which the Compressor will operate (if set to Active). Adjustment range is between
0dB and -30dB.
• NOISE GATE DEPTH:
Sets the threshold at
which compression will be applied to the mic audio.
Adjustment range is between -30 and 0 dB.
• COMPRESSOR THRESHOLD:
3: Configuring Inputs • 36
justment range is between 1:1 and 8:1.
Sets the amount of compression that will be applied to the mic audio. Adjustment range is between 1:1 and 16:1.
• COMPRESSOR RATIO:
Determines the point at
which the De-Esser will operate (if set to Active).
Adjustment range is between 0dB and -20dB.
• DE-ESSER THRESHOLD:
Sets how aggressively the deesser will remove sibilance from the mic audio. Ad-
• DE-ESSER RATIO:
• POST PROCESSING TRIM GAIN:
A Gate is a dynamics device whose function
is to remove unwanted audio material below a
certain threshold. A gain circuit is employed to
raise or lower the volume of the audio signal;
when the signal falls below a certain set threshold, the audio level drops down to a predetermined level. The reason they are called gates
is because when they “close” it sounds as if
the audio has suddenly stopped, or has been
“gated.” You might use this on a mic channel to
eliminate background noise during times when
you’re not speaking.
Threshold settings determine at what level the
processor will begin working. For example, on
a compressor, when signal level exceeds the
threshold setting, it will be compressed; below
the threshold the signal will remain uncompressed. On a gate, threshold determines the
minimum input level required to cause the gate to
open up and pass signal; when input level drops
below the threshold, the gate will be closed preventing signal from passing. Carefully setting
the threshold allows you to very specifically control when processing is being applied to a signal.
Compression controls the dynamic range of an
audio signal. It generally reduces the volume of
very loud audio, helping to keep from “blowing
out” the mic channel with too much volume. It
can be used to make your mic channel sound
“fatter,” evening out the highs and lows of your
vocal pattern. It can also increase the overall
perceived fullness of your voice. Too much compression, however, can make your voice sound
hard and “squashed.” Use it sparingly!
To use compression, you must first set your
threshold value (usually expressed in dB). When
the audio signal is louder than this threshold, its
gain is reduced. The amount of gain reduction
applied depends on the Compression Ratio
setting. For example, with a 2:1 ratio, for every
2 decibels the input signal increases, the output
is allowed to increase only 1 decibel.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
De-Essing is just what you think it is - a way to
electronically remove extra sibilance from your
mic channel. If your mic is particularly sensitive
to “s” and “th-” sounds and accentuates them
on-air, De-Essing helps reduce these sounds to
more manageable levels. As with compression,
too much de-essing will produce annoying and
unnatural results - you’ll wind up sounding like
you’re talking through a cotton sock! Stick to
small amounts to get the effect you want.
This option allows you to define
how this source is sent to the PGM-4/Record bus.
(Record is a special pre-on/off, post-fader bus with a
special output for a dedicated recording device.)
»» Stereo sends both sides of the source to both
sides of the recording device, as normal.
»» If Phone or Codec Left, otherwise Right
sends the source to the recorder’s left channel
ONLY if the Source Type is defined as Phone or
Codec. Any other Source Type will be fed to the
recorder’s right channel.
»» Summed-Mono to Left sums the left and right
sides of the audio source and sends the
summed signal to the recorder’s left
channel.
»» Summed-Mono to Right: Same as
above, but sends summed audio to the
recorder’s right channel.
That’s the last option. Click on the Save
Changes button at the bottom of the page.
•
RECORD MODE:
operation instructions for your GPIO Nodes and Audio
Nodes are found in their respective User Manuals.)
Let’s say you’ve connected a hybrid to your Analog Node, named it “Studio 1 Phone”, and assigned it a
channel number of 12205. You’ve constructed a Source
Profile for it, and you now want to give it a mix-minus
backfeed and set up a GPIO contact closure for the “take”
and “drop” functions. Here’s how:
1.Make sure that, in your hybrid’s Source Profile, the
Source Type option is set to “Phone” and the Feed
to Source Mode is set to “Auto”. Also set the Backfeed Enabled/Disabled option to “Enabled”.
2.Use your Web browser to connect with the Audio
Node or PowerStation I/O you’ll be sending your
backfeed to. Choose Destinations from the main
menu to enter the Destinations screen (Figure 3-7);
we’ll set up our mix-minus for output #5.
3.Just to the right of each Channel name box , you’ll
see a “list” icon. Click on the list icon for output #5.
A list of available sources will pop up (Figure 3-8).
Notice that the names and channel numbers of the
Congratulations — now you know how to
create Source Profiles! You can now bring up
your new sources on the Element faders.
Adding Backfeeds and GPIO
to a Source
Since making a mix-minus and mapping
contact closures is often done at the same time
a new Source Profile is constructed, let’s briefly recap those procedures. (Detailed setup and
Figure 3-7: PowerStation I/O Destinations screen
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
3: Configuring Inputs • 37
The Freeze Gate is used to prevent “suck-up”
of room noise during speech pauses. When active, gain is not increased by the compressor
when audio is absent. “Freeze” would be the
default, since it almost always improves results.
sources are both displayed for easy identification.
We’ll choose Studio 1 Phone from the list; the list
window closes and you’re returned to the Destinations screen. The line for output #5 now displays the
channel number and name of the source.
4.Now comes the step that makes this output a mixminus. Each Destination entry line has a drop box
at the end; click on the drop-down and choose To
source.
Automagic: If the hybrid source is loaded to an
Engine and the engine is generating a mix minus
source already, the list box will show TWO identical channels for the source — but one will have
a description of “TO:” in front of it. Selecting
this source automatically selects TO SOURCE in
the TYPE box.
Figure 3-9: GPIO Port Assignment
The process is complete: you’ve made a Source Profile for your phone hybrid, created a mix-minus, mapped
it to an audio output (destination), and associated a GPIO
port for contact closures associated with the source.
Figure 3-8: Picking a source from the list box
5.Click Apply.
3: Configuring Inputs • 38
6.Now point your browser back to your Element Control Center page (or IO Subsection if you are using
a PowerStation) and choose GPIO ­
Configuration
from the menu sidebar. (You may also use a GPIO
Node other than the Power Supply/GPIO or PowerStation that shipped with your Element, just point
your browser to that node’s IP address instead.)
7.The GPIO setup screen uses the same method of assigning devices to ports as the Analog Node. Pick
a port to map your hybrid’s contact closures to, using the list tool, and click Apply. Figure 3-9 shows
the four port GPIO section of a PowerStation MAIN.
The Element and GPIO node are similar but have
eight ports.
To confirm, choose Options at the top of any Element fader channel and load your new Phone source.
Press the Talk key just below the fader; you’ll see the
Status Symbol shown in Figure 3-10 appear in the window above the channel to indicate that the operator’s mic
is talking to this telephone hybrid through it’s backfeed
channel. (Status Symbols are described in detail at the
end of Chapter 5: Element Operations.)
Figure 3-10: Status Symbol indicates mix-minus/
talkback feed to phone source.
Also, take another look at the GPIO screen on your
browser. Note the green indicators that have appeared
on the port representing your hybrid; switch the Element
channel on and off and you’ll observe the active tally
change pins (as shown in Figure 3-9).
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
What's Next
3: Configuring Inputs • 39
When you’re ready, join us in Chapter Four: Configuring GPIO for more detail about setting up logic
commands and GPIO ports for your audio sources.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
CAT.6, small and light
yet sound and data pour forth.
3: Configuring Inputs • 40
What magic is this?.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Configuring GPIO
Since the days of rotary-switch source selectors, it’s
been a challenge to properly route machine logic along
with audio. Some complicated schemes have been devised over the years, but broadcasters wanted a simple,
fast way to associate logic with audio in a routable environment.
Since the Axia IP-Audio system was designed as a
true computer network, we were able to start with a clean
sheet of paper to design the first truly routable machine
logic/audio interface. Unlike conventional logic connections which require each command circuit to be wired
individually, Axia sends machine controls over the same
Ethernet your audio travels on, further reducing infrastructure, cost and tedium.
Along with controlling external audio devices,
Element’s GPIO (General Purpose Input/Output) interface also includes logic commands for routine studio/
control room operations such as tally lights, monitor
muting, On-Air lights and more.
­
The last chapter explained source profiles and
showed you how you can associate GPIO with a source.
This chapter explains how to set up Element or PowerStation GPIO to handle these functions. We also invite
you to read the GPIO Node User’s Manual, for more indepth information on the topic of GPIO.
Note: The Element console can be used with:
- a combination 8-port GPIO Node/PSU that also contains the Element CPU
- a PowerStation that includes four GPIO ports
- one or more standalone 8-port GPIO node.
These units are all convection cooled, and we
strongly recommend that when rack-mounting
these units, you leave at least 1RU of space
above and below to ensure adequate ventilation.
Each Axia GPIO device has either four or eight DB15 connectors on its back panel. Each connector (also
known as a GPIO port) can be associated with a device
in your studio, and provides five opto-isolated inputs and
five opto-isolated outputs per device for machine control,
lamp drives and remote channel controls. GPIO ports
can also be monitored and controlled by our PathfinderPC software.
GPIO ports are programmed to support several different types of devices. How does a GPIO port “know”
which type of device is assigned to it?
Back in Chapter 3, when you constructed a Source
Profile for a telephone hybrid, you defined the source
type (see “Adding Backfeeds and GPIO to a Source Profile” in Chapter 3). This is important, because when that
source is assigned to a console fader, Element uses this
Source Profile selection to tell the GPIO Node what sort
of command to send to the attached device.
If Element “sees” in the Source Profile that the assigned device is a microphone, it tells the GPIO Node to
send logic for On, Off, Remote Mute and Remote Talk
commands on the appropriate pins. If it “sees” a line
input, it tells the GPIO Node to send Start, Stop and
Reset commands, plus closures for Ready lights, etc.
Axia GPIO ports can deliver unique command sets
for the following types of devices:
1.Microphone (Operator, Guest or Producer)
2.Line Input
3.Codec
4.Telephone Hybrid
5.Computer Playback Device
6.Control Room Monitor
7.Studio Monitor
8.Profanity Delay Device
9.Recording Device
10. Accessory Button Panel Device
The next few pages contain tables that explain what
function the pins provide in each different device mode.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
4: Configuring GPIO • 41
Chapter Four:
GPIO Port Definitions
GPIO Operator’s Microphone Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
INPUTS
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turn channel OFF
TALK (to Monitor 2) Command
13
Active Low Input
Activates the Element TALK
TO MON2 function and routes
mic audio to the Talkback bus.
MUTE Command
14
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs
TALK (to PREVIEWED
SOURCE) Command
15
Active Low Input
Activates the TALK button
on every source currently in
preview and routes mic audio
to the Talkback bus.
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON unless TALK or MUTE is
active
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF
TALK (to Monitor 2) Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK TO
MON2 is active
MUTE Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when MUTE is
active
TALK (to PREVIEWED
SOURCE) Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK to
PREVIEWED SOURCE is active.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7
if source is not providing
common
Logic +5 Volt Supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10 if
source is not providing voltage; active only when source
has been assigned to channel.
Input Common
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
4: Configuring GPIO • 42
POWER & COMMON
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
GPIO Control Room Guest Microphone Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
INPUTS
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turn channel OFF
TALK (to CR) Command
13
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs and
routes source audio to PVW
speakers
MUTE Command
14
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs
TALK (to SOURCE) Command
15
Active Low Input
Allows an external button
to activate channel TALK TO
SOURCE function. (Element
only; SmartSurface not used)
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON unless TALK or MUTE is
active
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF
TALK (to CR) Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK is
active
MUTE Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when MUTE is
active
TALK (to SOURCE) Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when the channel
TALK TO SOURCE function
is active. (Element only;
SmartSurface not used)
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7
if source is not providing
common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10 if
source is not providing voltage; active only when source
has been assigned to channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
4: Configuring GPIO • 43
POWER & COMMON
GPIO Studio (Monitor 2) Guest Microphone Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
INPUTS
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turn channel OFF
TALK (to CR) Command
13
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs and
routes source audio to PVW
speakers
MUTE Command
14
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs
TALK (to SOURCE) Command
15
Active Low Input
Allows an external button
to activate channel TALK TO
SOURCE function. (Element
only; SmartSurface not used)
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON unless TALK or MUTE is
active
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF
TALK (to CR) Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK is
active
MUTE Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when MUTE is
active
TALK (to SOURCE) Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when the channel
TALK TO SOURCE function
is active. (Element only;
SmartSurface not used)
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7
if source is not providing
common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10 if
source is not providing voltage; active only when source
has been assigned to channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
4: Configuring GPIO • 44
POWER & COMMON
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
GPIO Producer’s Microphone Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
INPUTS
ON Command
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turn channel OFF
TALK (to MONITOR 2)
­Command
13
Active Low Input
Activates the Element TALK
to MON2 function and routes
mic audio to the Talkback bus.
MUTE Command
14
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs
TALK (to PREVIEWED
SOURCE) Command
15
Active Low Input
Activates the TALK button
on every source currently in
Preview and routes mic audio
to the Talkback bus.
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON unless TALK or MUTE is
active
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF
TALK (to MONITOR 2) Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK to
MON2 is active.
MUTE Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when MUTE is
active
TALK (to PREVIEWED
SOURCE) Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK to
PREVIEWED SOURCE is active.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7
if source is not providing
common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10 if
source is not providing voltage; active only when source
has been assigned to channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
4: Configuring GPIO • 45
POWER & COMMON
GPIO Line Input Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turns channel OFF & sends
100 msec STOP pulse
INPUTS
PREVIEW Command
13
Active Low Input
Turns preview ON
RESET Command
14
Active Low Input
Turns channel OFF, while not
sending a STOP pulse
READY Command
15
Active Low Input
Illuminates OFF lamp to indicate source’s readiness
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF and READY is active
PREVIEW Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when PREVIEW
is ON
START Pulse
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 msec pulse when the
channel status changes from
OFF to ON
STOP Pulse
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 msec pulse when the
channel status changes from
ON to OFF
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
POWER & COMMON
4: Configuring GPIO • 46
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
GPIO Codec Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
INPUTS
ON Command
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turns channel OFF
TALK (to CR) Command
13
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs and
routes source audio to PVW
speakers
MUTE Command
14
Active Low Input
Mutes channel outputs
TALK (to SOURCE) Command
15
Active Low Input
Allows an external button
to activate channel TALK TO
SOURCE function.
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON unless TALK or MUTE are
active
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF.
TALK (to CR) Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when TALK is
active
MUTE Lamp
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when MUTE is
active
TALK (to SOURCE) Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when the channel
TALK TO SOURCE function is
active.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
4: Configuring GPIO • 47
POWER & COMMON
GPIO Telephone Hybrid Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
INPUTS
ON Command
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turns channel OFF
PREVIEW Command
13
Active Low Input
Turns preview ON
RESET Command
14
Active Low Input
Turns channel off while not
sending a STOP pulse
READY Command
15
Active Low Input
Illuminates OFF lamp to indicate source’s readiness
ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
ON
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF
PREVIEW Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when PREVIEW
is ON
START Pulse
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE is sent when
channel is first turned ON or
when PVW is first selected
(if “PVW answers” option is
selected).
STOP Pulse
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE sent when
channel is turned OFF.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
4: Configuring GPIO • 48
POWER & COMMAND
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
GPIO Control Room Monitor Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
MUTE CR Command
11
Active Low Input
Mutes CR monitors and Preview speakers
DIM CR Command
12
Active Low Input
Allows external dimming of
CR monitor speakers.
Enable EXT PREVIEW Command
13
Active Low Input
Feeds External Audio Input to
PREVIEW
TALK TO EXT Command
(Element).
14
Active Low Input
Turns on Talk to External
Audio on Element.
Not used.
15
Active Low Input
CR ON AIR Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates whenever CR
monitors are muted
DIM CR Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates whenever control
room monitors are DIMMED
PREVIEW Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when PREVIEW is
active.
TALK TO EXT Lamp
(Element).
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when Talk to
External is active.
TALK (to CR) Active Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active whenever a source has
activated its TALK (to CR)
function
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
4: Configuring GPIO • 49
POWER & COMMON
GPIO Studio Monitor Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
MUTE Studio Command
11
Active Low Input
Allows external muting of
Studio monitor speakers.
DIM Studio/Monitor 2
Command
12
Active Low Input
Allows external dimming of
Studio monitor speakers.
Remote Event Timer Trigger
Command
13
Active Low Input
Resets Count-up Event Timer
to zero and starts timer.
Remote Countdown Timer
Trigger Command
14
Active Low Input
Resets Countdown timer to
preset max time and starts
timer (Element only).
Not Used
15
Active Low Input
Studio ON AIR Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates whenever Studio
monitors are muted
DIM Studio/Monitor 2 Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates whenever Studio
monitors are DIMMED
Event Timer Trigger Output
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE sent when
event timer is started from
zero.
Countdown Timer Trigger
Output
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE sent when
countdown timer is started
from preset max (Element
only).
TALK TO STUDIO/MONITOR 2
Active Lamp
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates whenever the
TALK TO STUDIO/MON2 function is active.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
4: Configuring GPIO • 50
POWER & COMMON
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
GPIO Computer Playback Device Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
ON Command
11
Active Low Input
Turns channel ON
OFF Command
12
Active Low Input
Turns channel OFF & sends
100 msec STOP pulse
Turns preview ON
INPUTS
PREVIEW Command
13
Active Low Input
Not Used
14
Active Low Input
READY Command
15
Active Low Input
Illuminates OFF lamp to indicate source’s readiness
NEXT Pulse
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 mS PULSE sent when
ON button is depressed, except when initially turned ON.
OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when channel is
OFF and READY is active
PREVIEW Lamp
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Illuminates when PREVIEW
is ON
START Pulse
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE sent when
channel is first turned ON.
STOP Pulse
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 ms PULSE sent when
channel is turned OFF.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
4: Configuring GPIO • 51
POWER & COMMON
GPIO External Profanity Delay Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
11
Active Low Input
Illuminates DUMP lamp
(located on Element Monitor
Module).
INPUTS
DUMP Lamp
EXIT Lamp
12
Active Low Input
Illuminates EXIT lamp.
PAUSE Lamp
13
Active Low Input
Illuminates PAUSE lamp.
ENGAGE Lamp
14
Active Low Input
Illuminates ENGAGE lamp.
DELAY ANNUNCIATOR
Command
15
Active Low Input
Illuminates the DELAY annunciator on the Element main
screen.
DUMP Switch
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when DUMP button is
depressed.
EXIT Switch
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when EXIT button is
depressed.
PAUSE Switch
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when PAUSE button is
depressed.
ENGAGE Switch
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when ENGAGE button
is depressed.
Not Used
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
4: Configuring GPIO • 52
POWER & COMMON
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
GPIO Film Legendable User Button Module / Accessory Panel / Rack Panel
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
User Button 1 Lamp
11
Active Low Input
Illuminates User Button 1
Lamp
User Button 2 Lamp
12
Active Low Input
Illuminates User Button 2
Lamp
User Button 3 Lamp
13
Active Low Input
Illuminates User Button 3
Lamp
User Button 4 Lamp
14
Active Low Input
Illuminates User Button 4
Lamp
User Button 5 Lamp
15
Active Low Input
Illuminates User Button 5
Lamp
User Button 1 Switch
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when User Button 1 is
pushed
User Button 2 Switch
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when User Button 2 is
pushed
User Button 3 Switch
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when User Button 3 is
pushed
User Button 4 Switch
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when User Button 4 is
pushed
User Button5 Switch
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active when User Button 5 is
pushed
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
4: Configuring GPIO • 53
POWER & COMMON
GPIO Recording Device Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
Rec ON Lamp
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active whenever Record Mode
is engaged.
Rec OFF Lamp
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Active whenever Record Mode
is NOT engaged.
Not used
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
n/a
START Pulse
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 mS PULSE sent when
Record Mode is engaged.
STOP Pulse
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 mS PULSE sent when
Record Mode is disengaged.
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
OUTPUTS
4: Configuring GPIO • 54
POWER & COMMON
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v. 1/2012
GPIO External Timer Control Logic
Name
Pin
Type
Notes
START Command
11
Active Low Input
Starts timer.
STOP Command
12
Active Low Input
Stops timer.
RESET Command
13
Active Low Input
Resets timer.
FREEZE Command
14
Active Low Input
Holds timer display while
active
FREEZE Lamp
15
Active Low Input
Illuminates while timer is
frozen
START Pulse
1
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 mS PULSE sent when
Timer is started.
STOP Pulse
2
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 mS PULSE sent when
Timer is stopped.
RESET Pulse
3
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 mS PULSE sent when
Timer is reset.
FREEZE Pulse
4
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
A 100 mS PULSE sent when
Timer is frozen.
Not used.
5
Open Collector to Logic Common Return
Source Common
7
Logic Common
Connect to ground of source
device or to Pin 8
Logic Common
8
Internal 5 Volt return
Can be connected to Pin 7 if
source is not providing common
Logic + 5 Volt supply
9
Logic Supply, Individually
Fused
Can be connected to Pin 10
if source is not providing
voltage; active only when
source has been assigned to
channel.
Source Supply
10
Common for all 5 inputs
Connect to power supply of
source device or to Pin 9
NOT CONNECTED
6
INPUTS
OUTPUTS
OUTPUT
COMMON
RETURN
OUT OUT OUT OUT OUT
5
4
3
2
1
N/C
ØV (GND)
SOURCE
8
7
15
IN
5
6
14
IN
4
5
13
IN
3
4
12
IN
2
3
11
IN
1
2
10
IN
COM
+
1
9
+5 V
POWER
SOURCE
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
GPIO v.”ZA” 4/2009
4: Configuring GPIO • 55
POWER & COMMON
Assigning GPIO to a Source
As you’ve seen by studying the previous pages, a lot
of the work of assigning logic to a source is done for you;
once a GPIO port is linked with a Source Profile, all that
remains to do is to solder cables connecting the GPIO’s
DB-15 connectors to the device’s control interface.
So, how do you link a GPIO port with a Source Profile? It’s very easy; let’s do it step-by-step.
Note: This procedure assumes that you have
already defined at least one Source Profile using
the instructions outlined in Chapter 3.
1.Open your Web browser and enter the IP address
of your Element console or, if so equipped, your
­PowerStation. Choose GPIO Configuration from
menu. Enter your password if prompted (default login is “user”, leave the password field blank).
Note: If your systems includes a PowerStation,
you will have four GPIO ports. If your system
uses an Element Power Supply/GPIO unit, you
have eight GPIO ports as shown in Figure 4-1.
4: Configuring GPIO • 56
2.If you haven’t previously assigned any GPIO ports,
the GPIO definitions screen will be blank. Notice the
status indicators at the top of the page, showing the
state of the input and output pins of each port. Click
on the list icon to the right of an unused line.
Figure 4-2: GPIO Select Source popup list
3.When you click on any list icon, a small popup window will open, enumerating all of the audio sources available on the Livewire network (Figure 4-2).
Choose the source you wish to associate with a GPIO
port by clicking on it; the window will close and the
source’s name and channel number will appear in
the Channel box.
4.Type a descriptive name in the Name field, and click
on the Save button at the bottom of the page.
5.Look at the page-top status indicator for Port 1.
You’ll see that one of the pin status indicators is
lit in green; this means that the port is now sending a GPIO logic state of “true” through this
pin. Assign the source for which you just created a GPIO link to a Element channel; operate the
On and Off keys for the channel and watch the
pin status indicators change as you do so.
The source we’ve been using for this demonstration is a telephone hybrid; we can now observe the
pin status indicators change as we turn the channel
on and off, as shown in Figure 4-3.
Figure 4-3: Pin status indicators showing
GPIO port activity
Figure 4-1: GPIO definitions page
Referring to the Hybrid Logic Chart on Page 48, we
can see that when the Element channel is Off, the
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
See how easy that was? Simply assigning an existing
audio source to a GPIO port automagically configures
the port for the type of device supplying the audio, and
send the appropriate logic commands to that port when
the source is assigned to a Element channel.
A word about the GPIO Ports
Input Connections
Current on these inputs must be limited to 20 mA or
less, through the use of a current-limiting resistor. An
external power source (24 volts DC maximum) is recommended for all inputs and outputs, to prevent ground
loops between equipment. However, if customer equipment is completely isolated, using power from the GPIO
port connectors is acceptable. Figure 4-4 shows details
for both types of connections:
Figure 4-4 GPIO input connections
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
4: Configuring GPIO • 57
indicator representing Output Pin 2 – the Off Lamp
logic command – is high. Turning the channel On,
we see Pin 4 pulse briefly before Pin 1 goes high:
the GPIO has just sent a Start pulse, then lit the
On Lamp. If you turn the channel Off again, you’ll
observe a Stop pulse, and the Off Lamp command
once again become active.
Output Connections
The GPIO port’s outputs are opto-isolated. Current
should be limited 100 mA through each output, with the
total current draw from the +5 Volt supply not to exceed
3 amps. Figure 4-5 shows the recommended connections
for outputs:
4: Configuring GPIO • 58
Note: Some external devices will allow a logic
control input “sink to ground” to activate. Thus,
some devices may not work with an Axia GPO
control, because they may not fully achieve
ground through the output transistor. The voltage drop between the collector and emitter may
not be low enough to activate the device, so an
external relay controlled by the GPO may need
to be used to provide a “dry” contact closure to
the external device.
Please note that this section is provided as a “jumpstart” introduction to Axia GPIO nodes. For a fuller
understanding of the GPIO node’s options and requirements, you may wish to read the GPIO Node User’s
Manual that is available for download at www.AxiaAudio.com/downloads/ .
What's Next
When you’re ready, join us in Chapter Five for a comprehensive walk-through of Element operations.
Figure 4-5: GPIO output connections
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Element Operations
Once it’s installed in your studio, Element looks a lot
like a traditional radio broadcast console — but that’s
where the resemblance ends.
Element isn’t a console; it doesn’t actually mix or
process audio. It would be more accurate to say that
­Element is a control center, a very fancy keyboard if you
like, allowing the operator to take charge of the delivery
system, the PowerStation or StudioEngine mixing/routing engine, the phone system, the recorder/editor and
other sources.
With Element, our goal is to provide you with the
most efficient human-machine interface possible for
fast-paced, complex programs where board operators
must multi-task without error. As such, Element brings
a whole new level of control and sophistication to the
broadcast studio, while providing very intuitive operation.
Overview
Element was designed to perform equally well in air
or production studios. In the air studio, the clean interface enhances speed and accuracy without clutter or confusing controls. In the production room, deeper levels of
sophistication are accessible with the touch of a button.
Because different people work differently, we’ve
made it possible to access many functions in multiple
ways. By providing several paths to access a function,
the board operator has less to remember and is less likely
to get trapped. This also serves to bring new operators
up to speed easily.
In this chapter we’ll first give you a high-level overview of Element capabilities to help convey exactly what
Element is capable of. Then, we’ll give you detailed explanations of the various controls and functions.
Displays
Unlike other control surfaces, Element does not include built-in meters or other displays. Instead, Element
GPIO/Power Supply Node provides a VGA output to
feed your choice of display monitors. If you are using
the PowerStation, the video is provided for your video
monitor on a DVI-D connector. Both deliver the same
graphical display at 1024 x 768 resolution.
Element’s display normally shows meter levels for all
four PGM buses, a time of day clock, countdown and
time-remaining timers, and well as important status
messages. When the operator adjusts console options using the Direct Access Keys on the Master Module, the
screen helps navigate the options and, in the case of audio dynamics and EQ adjustment, shows graphic representations of the effects of changes.
Show Profiles
Element can be completely reconfigured, instantly,
to suit different types of shows. By using pre-defined
Show Profiles, talent can change board settings from
a phone and microphone intensive morning show to a
personality-based music show – or any other kind – at
the touch of a button. Some users may be familiar with
this concept since many digital consoles are capable of
storing multiple “scenes” which are very similar in function to Element’s Show Profiles.
Show Profiles are easily accessed by pressing the
Profile key located at the top of the Global Options
section of the Monitor Module. Element’s on-screen
­display will change to display a list giving instant access
to all stored Profiles. Construction and administration of
Show Profiles is covered in Chapter 6: Show Profiles.
Sources, Channels and Faders
During the course of this manual, we’ll refer often to sources and channels. These are not the same!
“Sources” are microphones, CD players, outputs from the
playout system, telephone hybrids, etc. Your Livewire
network may have a very large number of sources, in different locations, used in various studios at various times.
“Channel” would normally be used when referring to
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 59
Chapter Five:
Element’s linear pots and associated on/off controls, alpha displays, bus assignment keys, etc. But “Channel” is
also used when discussing numbered Livewire network
audio streams. To avoid confusion, we’ll call Element
channel strips “Faders”.
Sources are assigned to faders for use on-air or in
production. During initial configuration, the Source
Profiles are programmed by the engineer for appropriate logic and options (as outlined in previous chapters);
afterwards, whenever that source is assigned to a fader,
source logic follows.
Fader settings are instantly reconfigured whenever a
source is selected, to accommodate the unique requirements of the source. For example, a fader controlling a
microphone source also controls appropriate monitor
mutes. A fader controlling a line source sends “start”
and “stop” commands when the channel is turned on
and off.
Sources such as an off-air feed, can also be fed directly to the monitors for auditioning without being assigned to a fader.
5: Element Operations • 60
Mix-Minus
Mix-minus setup, especially for live broadcasts, has
always been one of the most confusing aspects of running a radio console. Element makes mix-minus easy
by automating it. The operator never has to worry about
sending a source back to itself — it just can’t happen!
Several mix-minus choices – fixed and switching –
are possible, and are configured for each source when
Source Profiles are defined by the engineer (see Chapter
3 for details). Once this setup is done, no further tweaking is needed; the operator simply uses the source. A Status Symbol display on each fader tells operators when a
particular source has a mix minus output, and even tells
them which audio mix is being backfed.
Element will support as many outputs as there are
installed faders, each with its own automated mix minus
feed. Got 24 faders? You can have 24 mix-minuses!
GPIO
Chapter 4 explained how sources can have associated GPIO (General Purpose Input/Output) control associated with them. Element GPIO interfaces are connected
to Element via the Livewire network, so you can locate
the actual machine connections either physically close
to source equipment or in a central equipment room.
During installation, the engineer configures sources
to accept and provide logic commands by selecting various options. Example: studio microphones may be set up
to automatically mute the studio monitor speakers and
illuminate an on-air warning light when turned on. The
same sources can be configured to accept GPIO logic
inputs from buttons so each studio guest can have their
own On, Off, Talk, and Mute keys.
Line sources can be configured to receive start and
stop commands from the Element as well. Start/stop
messages can also be passed, via Ethernet, to a computer-based playout system.
Monitor Module and SoftKnobs
The Monitor Module and SoftKnobs contain Element’s operating controls. This is where you’ll find volume and selection controls for monitors and headphones,
as well as keys that provide fast access to show profiles,
EQ & dynamics, Aux feeds and more. There are two
different type of Monitor Modules: one that contains
only monitor and option controls, and one that has fewer
monitor controls but adds two channel faders.
Software
The Element operating system uses a high-performance embedded Linux kernel to help ensure bulletproof, 24/7 operation. Software updates can be obtained
from Axia via the Internet and applied by the station engineer. Axia Support recommends performing backups
or making printouts of Show Profiles and other configuration data before applying new software updates.
Control Callouts
On the following pages are a “bird’s-eye view” of
­Element, with major controls and their functions.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Element with Standard Monitor Module
7
2
3
8
4
9
1.Faders can accommodate any input source. Each
channel’s Options button (at the top of the fader
strip) lets operators change sources and call up expanded channel features.
2.Assignment Buttons for the four stereo main output buses – Program-1, Program-2, Program-3
and Program-4/Record – are located atop each
fader strip.
3.Channel Displays contain a 10-character text
readout and a window for fader position numbers
and Status Symbol icons. Text is fixed for static
sources like microphones and CD players, but can
be set to show song/artist information, etc., when
computer-based audio sources are connected.
4.Monitor Module Options & Profanity Delay
Controls. Channel Options section contains Direct Access Keys for quick access to a channel’s
Source assignment, EQ, Dynamics, Pan, Mix-Minus and Aux Sends settings. These keys become
active whenever a channels Options key is pressed.
Below the Channel Options keys, a set of keys are
provided for convenient on-console control of external profanity-delay units.
5
10
6
11
5.Six SoftKnobs are context sensitive; when any
Direct Access key is pressed, the on-screen display shows the function affected by rotating and/
or pushing each knob.
6.Monitor Module Global Options & Timer Control Keys let operators recall Show Profiles, select
monitor and metering preferences and affect other
Element behaviors. Timer controls help keep track
of on-screen elapsed and remaining time displays.
7.Talkback & Preview Keys let operators preview
(cue) selected sources off-air, or quickly talk to any
source(s) with associated backfeed(s).
8.Monitor 2 Talkback & Volume Controls let operators easily talk to hosts and guests in a second
studio, and control their monitor volume.
9.Monitor Assignment Section contains volume
and selection controls for monitors, headphones,
Aux Send buses and Preview.
10.Control Knob/Nav Keys help navigate through
on-screen options.
11.Numeric Keypad lets operators dial phone systems or codecs directly. Also provides numeric
input during surface setup.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 61
1
5: Element Operations • 62
Element with 2-Fader Phone Module and 2-Fader + Monitor Module
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1.Faders can accommodate any input source. Each
channel’s Options button (at the top of the fader
strip) lets operators change sources and call up expanded channel features.
2.Assignment Buttons for the four stereo main output buses – Program-1, Program-2, Program-3
and Program-4/Record – are located atop each
fader strip.
3.Channel Displays contain a 10-character text
readout and a window for fader position numbers
and Status Symbol icons. Text is fixed for static
sources like microphones and CD players, but can
be set to show song/artist information, etc., when
computer-based audio sources are connected.
4.Numeric Keypad lets operators dial phone systems or codecs directly. Also provides numeric
input during surface setup.
5.Three SoftKnobs are context sensitive; when any
Direct Access key is pressed, the on-screen display shows the function affected by rotating and/
or pushing each knob.
6.Record Mode and Load Profile Keys let operators recall customized Show Profiles and activate
Record Mode to quickly capture off-air bits to an
external recording device.
7.Talkback & Preview Keys let operators preview
(cue) selected sources off-air, or quickly talk to any
source(s) with associated backfeed(s).
8.2-Fader Phone Module provides direct control
of all hybrid and line control functions for Telos
Nx12, TWOx12 or Series 2101 Broadcast Talkshow Systems.
9.Timer Controls help keep track of on-screen
elapsed and remaining time displays.
10.Monitor 1 Section contains volume and selection controls for monitors, headphones, Aux Send
buses and Preview.
11.Monitor 2 Talkback & Volume Controls let operators easily talk to hosts and guests in a second
studio, and control their monitor volume.
12.Headphone and Preview Volume Controls let
operators adjust Host headphone volume and control Preview (cue) volume and options.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
1.Program Meters for each of Element’s four
stereo Program buses feature true VU meter ballistics with an expanded scale. Solid bar graphs
indicate average level; the red line at -20dBFS corresponds to the 0dB mark on a traditional analog
meter. Other international standards are available.
2.Peak Indicator indicates absolute peaks to show
talent where the loudest portions of program material are landing on the VU scale. (This indicator
may be switched off if desired.)
3.Peak Indicator Warning illuminates when
peaks reach or exceed 0dBFS.
4.Day/Date and Digital Clock keep operators informed of what day it is (in case they forget, which
is entirely normal). Clock can be set for 12- or 24hour operation, and can be slaved to a networked
NTP server if desired.
5.Analog Clock presents a traditional clock face
with second hand for fast orientation.
6.Utility Meter normally shows the volume of
sources assigned to the PGM-4/Phone/Record
multifunction bus, but can optionally be slaved to
meter whatever source is auditioned in the Control
Room Monitors.
7.Annunciator Panel informs operators when Mic
channels are open, when audio is being auditioned
in the Preview (cue) channel, when Talkback is active in either direction, and when external profanity delay units (if any) are active.
8.Countdown Ring appears when Element’s
Countdown Timer is active, and decreases during
the last :60 seconds as a visual prompt.
9.Count Up and Countdown Timers provide an
automatic event timer with manual elapsed-time
function, and a countdown timer to assist in back
timing live program material.
10.Monitor Selection Indicators show talent what
source is being presented in the Control Room
and Studio Monitor channels, the CR Headphone
channel and the Preview channel, and shows the
position of each volume control when adjusted.
11.External Monitor Indicators show what sources are assigned to each of the two programmable
External Monitor channels.
12.Show Profile Indicator tells talent what Show
Profile is currently loaded, and whether the console has been changed from Profile settings.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 63
Element Stereo Main Screen Overview
Control Details
•
General Fader Controls
Although any Element faders can handle any type of
audio source, some fader functions change their
behavior depending upon the type of source assigned. Also, certain fader modules have “extra”
controls for specific uses. The controls found on
the Element 4-Fader Line Module (Figure 5-1)
are common to all Element modules, so we’ll look
at these first.
•
Fader Assignment Display
The 10 character alpha display shows the
source presently assigned to this channel.
II If the
I
PGM 1thePGM
2
fader’s Options button is pressed and
operator changes sources, this display changes too.
RECORD
MONITORS
PHONE
If a channel is ON and the operator
changes
OPTIONS PREVIEW
its source, the display will flash between the
source currently on-air and the newly selected
source. The fader will not “take” the new source
until the operator has turned the channel off, preventing on-air errors. If a Show Profile is loaded
that specifies an unavailable source, the display
reads Requested source not found.
5: Element Operations • 64
Each channel is assigned to any of the three main
output buses by selecting any (or all) of these program
keys. Generally, PGM-1 is the main air bus and
other buses are used for production or other programming requirements. All program outputs are
post-fader and post on-off function.
•
PGM-4
TALK TO/ Record / Phone Bus Key
The fourth bus functions as a regular output
bus, but
any sources
feeding PGM-4 are also sent
PREVIEWED
STUDIO
EXTERNAL
SOURCE
to a special Record bus that feeds a dedicated
recording device, as well as to the Phone bus
that sends mix-minus audio to any phone callers.
PREVIEW
STUDIO
HEADPHONES
These buses operate independently
but simultaneously, allowing jocks plenty of operational flexibility.
MONITOR
OPTIONS
STUDIO
OPTIONS
PGM-4 bus audio output is post-fader, poston/off; PGM-4 Record bus audio output is postfader,
pre-on/off, and Phone bus audio is sent to
TRANSPORT CONTROLS
callers pre-fader, pre-on/off.
•
Talkback Key
Each fader is equipped with a Talkback key,
located between the bottom of the fader and the
channel ON/OFF keys. If the source assigned to a
fader is has an associated backfeed, pressing this
key will allow the board operator to communicate
with the person at the other end of the backfeed;
CONTROL
TIMER
RECORD
OPTIONS StatusMODE
Symbol display will change to
MODE the fader’s
show that Talkback is active.
Just above the alpha display is a Status Symbol
display. This display indicates the fader’s channel
number or presents a Status Symbol to indicate
when backfeed or talkback is active.
•
PGM-1, -2 & -3 Keys
Channel Options Key
Pressing this key activates the Channel Options keys located on Element’s Master Module.
Refer to the sections on Monitor Module controls
later in this chapter for detailed functions.
Multiple Talkback keys can be selected to
talk to more than one source at a time.
Figure
5-1:Line
Module Fader
Channel
New in version 2.1 is an A/B switch function.
This function enables operators to quickly toggle
through sources available to any particular fader
by holding the Options key and pressing the OFF key.
Each time the OFF key is pressed, the fader will take the
next source from that fader’s list of available sources.
Auto-Talkback: If a source’s Backfeed mode
is set to “Auto”, the caller or remote talent
will hear PGM-1 minus himself (mix-minus)
whenever the fader he’s assigned to is ON,
and will have his Talkback channel automatically activated when the channel is turned OFF.
See Chapter 3: “Configuring Sources” for more
information on configuring backfeeds.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
•
Channel Preview Key
(called “cue” in the old days) allows
the operator to listen to sources before they air.
Element’s Preview bus allows auditioning in full
stereo. Individual source profiles can change Preview to Solo (Post-Fader) operation.
Preview
The fader controls the volume of the input
source. There are two modes for the fader: faderstart and fader-normal:
1. When the channel is used in fader-start mode,
pushing the fader all the way to the bottom of
its travel turns the module off, and sends appropriate logic commands to source equipment.
Moving the fader up turns the channel on and
sends logic commands. In fader-start mode,
the On and Off keys act more as indicators of
channel status; the On key will not turn the
channel on if the fader is at the bottom of its
travel.
2. In fader-normal mode, on/off status and
start/stop commands follow the channel ON/
OFF buttons independent of fader position.
The Preview key acts like a latching switch.
­Momentarily pressing any channel’s Preview key
assigns that channel to the Preview bus; pressing
it again removes the channel from Preview. To
enable an operator to quickly listen to various
sources, the Preview function can be interlocked:
pressing Preview on any channel will remove
any other channel from Preview mode.
If you want to preview multiple channels,
pressing and holding any Preview key disables
the interlock; other sources can be added to the
Preview mix by pressing them. Conversely, channels can be removed from a multiple Preview selection by pressing and holding any lit Preview
key and deselecting the individual channels you
wish to remove from Preview. A momentary press
of any lit Preview key will remove all channels
from Preview.
For information on how to switch between
fader-start and fader-normal modes, see the
Monitor Module Controls section later in this
chapter.
•
On and Off Keys
When the channel is in fader-normal mode
the On key ( u ) turns the channel on and the Off
key ( n ) turns it off. The channel On and Off
functions also provide logic (start and stop pulses,
monitor muting, etc.) appropriate to the selected
source.
The interlock option for Preview can be disabled in any Show Profile’s Monitor section so
that users can gang preview sources without the
need to press and hold the preview button.
The audio from the Preview bus feeds any
speakers dedicated to Preview, and can also be
routed to the operator’s headphones if desired.
Preview speakers will be muted whenever the
board operator’s microphone is ON, or is assigned
to the Preview or Record buses.
Fader
If a control-room mic is assigned to a fader,
the CR monitors and Preview speakers will mute
when that fader is turned on and when CR microphone sources are Previewed. If a fader is hosting a microphone source, pressing the On button
when the fader is already on mutes the channel, providing a “cough” function, until the button is released.
Figure
5-1:Line
Module Fader
Channel
New Feature: If you press Talk on a fader that
hosts a source with a backfeed and, while holding it, press the Preview button, both will latch
on, making it easy to have a hands-free off-line
chat using the CR Mic. Pushing either one clears
both.
New Feature: In fader-start mode, holding the
Off button while moving the fader up temporarily overrides fader-start; the channel won’t turn
on or send GPIO commands.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 65
•
4-Phone Module Channel Controls
You can assign any type of source to any Element
fader module, but some fader modules include
special keys that provide extra functions for certain types of sources. The 4-Phone Fader Module (Figure 5-2) is one of these modules. If a normal line source is assigned to a Phone Fader, the
fader and its controls operate exactly like a standard 4-Fader Module (described in the previous
section). But when a Telos telephone hybrid is
assigned to one of these faders, extra functionality is enabled.
•
Set Key
If you’re using certain Telos broadcast phone systems, pressing the Set key transfers the phone
line assigned to that fader to a handset. These
buttons are mutually exclusive across all faders;
touching a Set key on any Phone Fader switches
the handset to the line assigned to that fader and
cancels any previous line selection. For details
on Telos phone systems that utilize the Set key,
please refer to Appendix D: Working With
Phone Hybrids
Taking Calls
The Status Symbol box above the alpha display indicates an available line by displaying a
single dot. A call ringing in shows a “ringing”
icon. It is answered by pushing either the On or
Preview button. If Preview is already on, toggling to Off and then On answers the call. When
the call is answered, an “up arrow” icon displays.
Also, a window on Element‘s screen will show
call status and incoming caller ID (if available).
• Hold Key
Pressing Hold sends a hold command to the
connected Telos phone system. When connected
to European ISDN lines, a hold signal is sent to
the network. With USA ISDN lines, no network
hold function is available, so the hybrid enters a
virtual hold state.
Note: The Element’s 2-Fader Monitor Module also includes two Phone faders complete with Set and Hold buttons.
5: Element Operations • 66
When the phone channel is off and in Preview, press Off to drop the call. When the channel is on, press Off once to put the caller on hold;
twice to drop.
Making Calls
To dial out from the console, press any control key (Off, On, Hold, Set, or Preview) on a
fader that hosts a Phone source. This assigns the
Keypad on the Monitor Module to that fader. Dialing works like a mobile phone: enter all digits,
then press the Enter (8 ) or Pound (#) key to
place the call. The Status Symbol icon above the
fader indicates first that a line is active and then
that the call is proceeding. The Element display
screen will also indicate the numbers dialed and
call status.
Figure
5-2:Phone
Module Fader
Channel
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Call Controller + 2-Fader Phone Module ­
The faders on this module can be used as faders for
any console source however they are most commonly associated with phone hybrids.
This module (Figure 5-3) has a high level of integration with Telos multi-line talk show systems. It features
the hybrid controls found on Telos talk show controllers,
flanked by two faders. Typically, the left fader is linked
to the left hybrid control, and the right fader to the right
hybrid control. The faders and controls are identical to
those described for the 4-Phone Module in the previous
section.
For details on hybrid control operation and description of Status Symbols used, please refer to the Operator’s Manual supplied with your Telos phone system.
Tip: If the caller cannot hear the operator, the
most common cause is having the phone channel turned ON. Remember - when the phone
channel is ON, the backfeed to caller is a mixminus of PGM-1 (default). Only when the phone
channel is OFF will the caller hear what is assigned to PGM-4 (Phone)
Appendix D: Working With Phone Hybrids provides details on the configuration of various Telos phone
systems when used with your Element console.
Note: The Element’s 2-Fader Monitor Module
also includes two Phone faders complete with
Set and Hold buttons.
5: Element Operations • 67
Figure 5-3:Call Controller + 2-Fader Phone Module
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Production Module Controls
The Element Production Module gives productionroom gurus quick access to often-used EQ and positioning controls for each loaded source.
Its controls provide direct access to the
options presented in the EQ & DYNAMICS options screens detailed later in this
chapter.
adjusts the send level; pushing the knob toggles the
send between PRE-FADER and POST-FADER.
• The three central pairs of knobs are EQ Controls:
HI GAIN/HI FREQ, MID GAIN/MID
FREQ and LO GAIN/LO FREQ.
About Element EQ: Our EQ model
is three-band quasi-parametric. Controls are provided for center frequency
and boost/cut, with a unique SmartQ™
automatic bandwidth system.
The FREQ knobs each act slightly differently:
»» HIGH FREQ: Sets the active frequency for high-band EQ. Pushing this knob
toggles the EQ model between Shelf and
Bandpass modes. If set to Shelf, the
HIGH FREQ knob determines the top of
the shelf. If set to Bandpass, it sets the
center frequency of the BP filter (SmartQ
determines the width of the BP filter, as
described above).
»» MID FREQ: Sets the center frequency
of the midrange parametric band.
»» LOW FREQ: Sets the center frequency
of the low parametric band. Pushing this
knob toggles the EQ model between Shelf
and Bandpass modes. If set to Shelf, the
LOW FREQ knob determines the top of
the shelf. If set to Bandpass, it sets the
center frequency of the BP filter
SmartQ works by varying the Q of the
selected parametric band proportional
to the amount of boost or cut you specify. A small amount of boost or cut will
affect a broader range of frequencies
for a warm, musically-pleasing effect.
As gain is increased the Q sharpens,
affecting a narrower range of frequencies for tighter control of target
bands. At aggressive cut levels, the
EQ becomes a tunable notch filter.
SmartQ keeps the EQ sounding natural at virtually all settings.
To activate the Production Module,
press the Options key on any fader strip.
The Production Module’s overbridge display will immediately mirror the number
of that fader and the name of the source
you’re adjusting EQ for.
5: Element Operations • 68
The GAIN knobs provide 40 dB of adjustment range for boost or cut of the three
parametric bands, from -25 dB to +15 dB.
Once the Production Module is active,
you can quickly adjust EQ using the controls described below. To quickly set EQ
for multiple channels, rotate the SELECT
knob on the overbridge panel to choose
a different fader source, and press it to
TAKE that source.
The four knobs at the bottom of the
module are the PAN controls.
»» The upper left knob PANs the sound
field left-to-right.
»» The FRONT-BACK knob moves the
soundfield front-to-rear (in 5.1 mode).
Figure 5-4:Production Module
»» The SURROUND knob pans the rear
+ overbridge display
• AUX SEND A/B/C/D: These controls
speakers left-to-right (in 5.1 mode).
allow you to send the output of the ac»» The LFE knob adjusts the gain of the Low
tive fader to any or all of the four Aux Send buses for
Frequency Effects channel (in 5.1 mode).
outboard audio effects processing, custom IFB mixes, etc. Each Aux Send control has 50 dB of adjustment range, from -∞ to +10dB. Rotating the knobs
•
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Standard Monitor Module Controls
The Standard Monitor Module (Figure 5-5) contains direct-access controls for all of Element’s options
and features. Constantly-used controls like headphone
and monitor selection and
volume, plus command keys
for the on-screen timers,
controls for an external profanity delay unit, and a numeric keypad for convenient
­dialing of telephone systems
and codecs are included.
With the 2-fader monitor module, the various Channel Options are selected by navigation with the SoftKnobs.
Nav Keys & Control Knob
At the bottom right of
the standard monitor module is a Control Knob surrounded by a set of navigation keys (Up, Down, Right
and Left), an Enter key (8 ),
and a Help key (?). These
controls provide another
way to navigate Element
­option screens.
Channel
Jumping:
If any fader is in Options mode, you can
“quick jump” to set options for other fader
channels by pressing
the Options key at the
top of their channel
strips. For example, if you need
to change the Source
on several channels,
select the first channel using its Options
key, and then choose
the Channel Options
Source key. The Source
Selection list will appear
on-screen. Once the
source
reassignment
is made, simply press
the Options key on the
next channel you want
to assign a new source
to; the Source screen
will remain active, and
you’re now adjusting
settings for the new
channel. The channel
number is displayed onscreen as confirmation.
Placing a channel in Options mode lets you change
inputs, change/apply EQ
or dynamics processing;
change pan position; invert
phase; set Aux Send and
Aux Return levels; adjust
Channel Options Section
mix-minus settings for that
These keys found on
channel and adjust channel
the standard monitor modgain. The various Options
ule allow the operator to
displays; (Figure 5-7) give
Figure 5-5:Standard Monitor Module + SoftKnobs
customize the behavior
detailed channel informaof individual faders. The
tion that will vary a bit deoperator first presses the Options key atop the fader
pending on the type of source you are viewing; the Eleto be modified; the Channel Options box is displayed on
ment channel number (the physical fader position, from
­Element’s screen (Figure 5-7), and the Channel Options
left to right); the source and type assigned to that chankeys then become ­active.
nel; source ownership information and a small VU meter
displayed for confirmation.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 69
Operators can use the
directional keys to navigate
through on-screen lists, and
the Enter key to “take” a selection. The Control Knob
can also be used to scroll
through on-screen lists.
2-Fader Monitor Module Controls
The Monitor + 2-Fader Module (Figure 5-6) allows users to customize their console design, adding two
full-function faders at the cost of some direct-access
control keys in the Monitor
section. No flexibility has
been sacrificed, however; all
the functions provided by
the Standard Monitor Module are present, but are accessed differently. Controls
for all of Element’s options
and features are accessed via
on-screen menus with the
aid of the three SoftKnobs;
constantly-used
controls
like headphone and monitor selection and volume,
plus command keys for the
on-screen timers and a numeric keypad for convenient
­dialing of telephone systems
and codecs are included.
Channel Options
Pressing the Channel Options keys above your faders
will generate a slightly different display if you have the
2-Fader Monitor module since this module has three SoftKnobs as compared with the six SoftKnobs found on the
Standard Monitor Module.
In many cases, you will find
that one SoftKnob has been
used as a “selector”. It takes
a few more clicks and twists
to access some features but
the end result is the same.
5: Element Operations • 70
The 2-Fader Monitor
Module does not include the
navigation arrow keys, or
scroll knob as described on
the previous page. The “Enter” and “Help” keys are also
not included with the 2-Fader monitor module
In Figure 5-7 on the following page, you can see
some of the different screens
that are presented when you
hit the Channel Options button. Different types sources
have different options. The
three SoftKnob controls for
the 2-Fader Monitor Module
are shown below the screen
image for the Standard
Monitor Module.
When one of the sources has
been selected, rotating the
Function/Select knob allows you to select the channel option you want to view
or change. The selected
option area will be shaded
RED. Pressing this knob selects that option.
A close inspection reveals that the faders on this
module are the same as the
The following sections
faders on the 4-Phone Fader
will describe both Monitor
Figure 5-6:Monitor + 2-Fader Module + SoftKnobs
module or the 2-Fader Call
Modules. In many cases the
Controller module. The SET
user interface is identical exand HOLD buttons are included making the 2-fader
cept for the SoftKnob controls and their functions. The
Monitor Module useful for integration with hybrids that
screen shot for the 3-knob user interface will be shown
support these features.
below the 6-knob controller where applicable.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 71
Figure 5-7: Channel Options screens. Information displayed differs based on the type of source currently assigned to the
active fader. Shown clockwise from top left: Line Source Channel Options screen, Mic Source Channel Options screen,
Phone Source Channel Options screen, Codec Source Channel Options screen. 2-Fader controls are shown below.
•
Source
Pressing the Source key or selecting this option
with the SoftKnob displays the Source Selection menu.
The Source Selection screen displays the currently selected source alongside a list of available sources and
their current ownership status. Operators may select a
source using the SoftKnobs or Nav Keys. They can also
preview a source before selecting it.
If an operator tries to assign a source that’s already in use on another console and has a backfeed or logic control enabled, the ID box in the
Channel Options screen displays “Listen Only”
rights to the source (as seen in the right-hand
box above) - no backfeed will be sent from his
console, and no machine logic is tied to the fader’s ON/OFF keys. In this case, the Channel
Number box above the fader will display an “X”
which is an indicator of “listen-only” status
If the source is not in use anywhere else, the
operator is informed that they have “Full Control” of the source (as shown in the left-hand
box above), and backfeed and logic operate normally.
»» Source/Take:
rotating this SoftKnob scrolls
through the available sources. Push to take.
»» Previous: (Standard Monitor Module only)
Whenever you “take” a new source, your last
source selection is held in memory. Should you
change your mind about the new source and wish
to return to your previous source selection, press
the Previous knob. the prior source will be immediately reloaded to the fader.
»» Preview allows you to hear the highlighted
source through the Preview speakers without
having to “take” it. Press and hold to listen; release to end the preview.
»» Pressing Source again returns to the Channel
Options screen.
5: Element Operations • 72
• EQ & Dynamics
Figure 5-8: Source menu screen.
2-Fader Module controls shown below.
A Note About Source Sharing: Element’s
source sharing protocol keeps sources from receiving backfeeds from more than one console
at a time. Source control logic, however can be
either exclusive or shared.
This command allows three-band parametric equalization to be applied to the selected audio source and, if
it is a permitted source (mic, phone or codec), to apply
dynamics processing by Omnia. On the Standard Monitor Module, pressing the EQ & Dynamics key causes the
EQ screen to appear; pressing it a second time displays
the Dynamics screen, and pressing a third time exits.
When the EQ screen is displayed, a graphical representation of the equalization curve is displayed as
the controls are adjusted. The screen also indicates the
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
amount of cut/boost applied, and the center frequency
of each band.
»» Rotating the Lo Freq knob adjusts the center frequency of the low EQ band (20 - 320 Hz).
»» Rotating the Mid Gain and Mid Freq SoftKnobs
adjust gain and center frequencies of the midrange EQ band (125 Hz - 2 kHz).
»» The Hi Gain knob adjusts the boost/cut of the
high frequency band (1.25 kHz - 20 kHz).
»» Hi Freq/Shelf/Peak: Rotating this SoftKnob
adjusts the center frequency of the high EQ band
(1 kHz - 16 kHz). Pushing this knob toggles the
high-band EQ method between Peak and Shelf
modes.
»» Pressing EQ & Dynamics again displays the Dynamics screen (Standard Monitor Module only)..
Note: High, Mid and Low band adjustments
provide up to 25 dB of cut and 15 dB of boost.
Element EQ features SmartQ™ automatic bandwidth system that varies the Q of the selected
parametric band to provide the most pleasing
EQ effect.
(2-Fader Monitor module only)
This control changes the frequency band at which
the other two controls operate - low, mid or high.
Pressing this knob will exit the EQ screen.
»» Lo Gain/Bypass/Active: Rotating this SoftKnob adjusts the amount of gain or cut applied
to the low EQ band; note that the Shelf/Peak indicator next to the onscreen control automatically
shifts to Peak mode when boost is applied, and
shifts to Shelf mode when cut is applied. Pressing this knob toggles EQ between Active and
Bypass. Note that the centre SoftKnob on the
2-Fader Master Module performs the Active/
Bypass toggle function.
»» Function/Exit:
What is this stuff? Radio engineers don’t need
a lesson in dynamics processing, but for the benefit of any jocks reading this, here’s a quick explanation of what these controls can do.
A Gate is a dynamics device whose function
is to remove unwanted audio material below a
certain threshold. A gain circuit is employed to
raise or lower the volume of the audio signal;
when the signal falls below a certain set threshold, the audio level drops down to a predetermined level. The reason they are called gates
is because when they “close” it sounds as if
the audio has suddenly stopped, or has been
“gated.” You might use this on a mic channel to
eliminate background noise during times when
you’re not speaking.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 73
Figure 5-9: EQ menu screen.
Dynamics controls are available if the selected
source is a Mic, Codec or Phone input. Pressing the Dynamics & EQ key twice (Standard Monitor Module) invokes the Dynamics menu. With the 2-Fader Monitor
Module, use the functions knod to select the Dynamics
function. From here, you can add Gating, Compression and De-essing to a microphone channel. Normally, these values are part of a pre-set Show Profile;
however, on-the-fly control is provided for talent (with
permissions) to make adjustments when needed.
Threshold settings determine at what level the
processor will begin working. For example, on
a compressor, when signal level exceeds the
threshold setting, it will be compressed; below
the threshold the signal will remain uncompressed. On a gate, threshold determines the
minimum input level required to cause the gate to
open up and pass signal; when input level drops
below the threshold, the gate will be closed preventing signal from passing. Carefully setting
the threshold allows you to very specifically control when processing is being applied to a signal.
Compression controls the dynamic range of an
audio signal. It generally reduces the volume of
very loud audio, helping to keep from “blowing
out” the mic channel with too much volume. It
can be used to make your mic channel sound
“fatter,” evening out the highs and lows of your
vocal pattern. It can also increase the overall
perceived fullness of your voice. Too much compression, however, can make your voice sound
hard and “squashed.” Use it sparingly!
To use compression, you must first set your
threshold value (usually expressed in dB). When
the audio signal is louder than this threshold, its
gain is reduced. The amount of gain reduction
applied depends on the Compression Ratio
setting. For example, with a 2:1 ratio, for every
2 decibels the input signal increases, the output
is allowed to increase only 1 decibel.
The Freeze Gate is used to prevent “suck-up”
of room noise during speech pauses. When active, gain is not increased by the compressor
when audio is absent. “Freeze” would be the
default, since it almost always improves results.
5: Element Operations • 74
De-Essing is just what you think it is - a way to
electronically remove extra sibilance from your
mic channel. If your mic is particularly sensitive
to “s” and “th-” sounds and accentuates them
on-air, De-Essing helps reduce these sounds to
more manageable levels. As with compression,
too much de-essing will produce annoying and
unnatural results - you’ll wind up sounding like
you’re talking through a cotton sock! Stick to
small amounts to get the effect you want.
(2-Fader Monitor module only)
This control changes the processing control
function at which the other two controls operate
- Expander, Compressor or De-Ess. Pressing this
knob will exit the Dynamics Menu screen.
»» Rotating the Exp Gate Thresh/Bypass/Active SoftKnob varies the level of signal threshold needed for the Gate function to activate (between -50 and 0dB). Pushing this knob toggles
Dynamics between Active and Bypass states.
»» The Exp Gate Depth knob sets the amount of
»» Function/Exit:
Figure 5-10: Dynamics menu screen.
gain reduction when audio level falls below the
Exp Gate Threshold value (adjustable between
-3 and 0dB).
»» Comp Thresh/Bypass/Active sets the upper
limit of the level at which the compressor will
begin to work (between -30 and 0dB). Pushing
the SoftKnob toggles between Active and Bypass
states.
»» Comp Ratio/Freeze/No Freeze sets the compression ratio (variable between 1:1 and 16:1).
Pushing the SoftKnob activates and deactivates
the compressor’s Freeze Gate function. When the
Freeze function is active, a red “lamp” illuminates just above the Compression Ratio bargraph
meter.
»» De-Ess Thresh/Bypass/Active sets the audio
level above which the de-esser will be engaged
(from -20 to 0dB). Pushing the SoftKnob toggles
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
•
Pan & Mode Key
This function allows the operator to adjust the pan or
balance of the channel source and correct signal phase
errors.
Figure 5-11: Pan / Mode menu screen.
It’s a Lock: If a “padlock” icon appears in any
options screen, that function is “locked out” in
the Source Profile and adjustments cannot be
made. In Figure 5-11, the padlock appears just
below the soundfield representation, above the
Mode indicator. The onscreen Mode SoftKnob
is also “grayed out” to show that this function
is unavailable. Operators cannot “unlock” locked functions;
if you wish to make locked functions available,
simply modify the source profile to allow them
and when the source is reloaded to the console,
the padlock will have disappeared.
(2-Fader Monitor module only)
This control changes the other control operates Pan, Mode or Phase. Pressing this knob will exit
the Pan/Mode Menu screen.
»» Pan/Balance: Rotating this SoftKnob adjusts
the Pan setting for mono sources and the Balance
setting for stereo sources.
»» Mode: If the selected source is in stereo and
the Source Profile for the selected source permits it (see Chapter 3 for information on Source
Profiles), rotating this control lets the board op
switch source audio between Stereo (discrete
left/right), Left (left source channel fed to L/R
input), Right (right source channel fed to L/R
input) and Sum (left and right source channels
summed to mono and fed to L/R input). Push to
Take the new setting.
»» Phase: If the selected source is stereo, rotating
this control lets the board op compensate for
out-of-phase audio sources. Normal is used for
in-phase sources; Inv Left inverts the phase of
the left input channel only, Inv Right inverts
the phase of the right input channel only, and Invert Both reverses phase of both stereo channels.
If the selected source is in mono, the choices are
Normal and Invert only. Press to Take the new
setting.
»» Pressing Pan & Mode again returns to the Channel Options screen.
»» Function/Exit:
»» Aux Sends Key
Element has four stereo Aux buses that can be used
as utility buses for mixing, for constructing custom IFB
mixes, or as effects buses for production. Pressing this
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 75
between Active and Bypass states.
»» De-Ess Ratio sets the amount of sibilance reduction, in dB, that will be applied (adjustable
between 1:1 and 8:1).
»» Post Processing Gain sets the amount of gain
applied after processing. This can compensate
for gain that may be lost during compression.
»» Pressing the Dynamics & EQ key again will return you to the Channel Options screen.
key displays the Aux Sends screen.
its gain adjusted by the fader (variable level).
* Off sends no audio to the Aux Send bus.
»» Pressing Aux Sends again returns to the Channel Options screen.
•
Feed To Source Key
If the assigned source (i.e., a codec or phone hybrid)
has an associated backfeed or mix-minus, pressing this
key allows the board op to change the audio supplied
through the backfeed. This selection is normally preset when a Source Profile is constructed (see Chapter
3: Working With Sources, for information on Source
Profiles), but can be modified on-the-fly.
Figure 5-12: Aux Sends menu screen.
(2-Fader Monitor module only)
This control changes which AUX send the other
control is adjusting. Pressing this knob will exit
the Aux Sends Menu screen.
»» Send A/B/C/D: Rotate these knobs to adjust the
level of the audio you’ll be sending to any or all
of the four Aux Send buses.
»» Pre/Post Fader: Pushing any of the four Send
SoftKnobs toggles the activity state of that particular Send. The state is indicated in the display
above.
* On Pre sends the source assigned to the fader
to the selected Aux Send bus prior to having
its gain adjusted by the fader (fixed level).
* On Post sends the source assigned to the fader to the selected Aux Send bus after having
5: Element Operations • 76
»» Select/Exit:
Figure 5-13: Feed to Source menu screen.
»» The Select/Take knob, when rotated, scrolls
through the list of available audio sources that
can supply backfeed or mix-minus.
* Automatic backfeeds audio from the Phone
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
About the PHONE and PROGRAM 4 buses:
Element’s Program 4 mix bus is a special multipurpose bus that does several things at once to
make life easier for the operator. Any source assigned to Program 4 also be fed
to the PHONE bus and sent to callers when the
channel is OFF and AUTO is selected as the
Feed To Source Mode. PHONE is an internal bus
which does not feed a separate output; instead,
it picks up the Program 4 audio pre-fader and
pre-On/Off and backfeeds them to an PHONE
sources. Sources assigned to Program 4 are also sent to
the RECORD bus, a special fixed-level output
that can be used to feed recording devices. This
RECORD bus is post fader and pre on/off.
»» Rotating the Dim knob allows the operator to
adjust, in dB, the amount by which the studio
monitors are dimmed when this fader channel’s
Talkback key is pressed.
»» Pressing Feed to Source or Options a second
time exits this menu.
»» The DIM/OFF knob, when rotated will control the
amount of program dimming that occurs during
Talkback. Pushing this control will select OFF which
completely mutes the backfeed program during
talkback.
Delay Section
These keys can be used to
provide from-the-board control of an external profanity
delay unit using one of Element’s GPIO ports. Please
refer to Chapter 4: “Configuring GPIO” for instructions
on GPIO setup.
The keys provide for remote activation of Dump,
Exit, Pause and Engage functions, respectively.
Some enterprising individuals have found other used
for these keys. If they are not being used to control an external delay unit, our PathfinderPC software can monitor
these keys and perform various actions upon detecting
these button presses. Some of these uses have included
custom IFB, one-button show profile load, VMIX control . . the possibilities are virtually infinite!
Monitor Section
This controls in this section provide direct operator
access to monitor selection and volume controls.
•
Monitor 1 Knob + Source Keys
This knob, at the bottom left of the Monitor section,
controls the selection and volume of the source heard
in the Monitor 1 speakers (typically the Control Room
monitors).
»» Rotate the knob to vary the gain of the Monitor
1 speakers.
»» Use the Direct Selection Keys in the column
directly above the Monitor 1 knob to send the
output of Program 1 - Program 4, Aux Send
A - Aux Send D, or the two External monitor
sources to the Monitor 1 speakers. These keys
light to denote the selected source.
»» You can listen to any frequently-used audio
stream in your facility instantly (such as a network feed, off-the-air monitor or another studio’s
Program output) by assigning it to one of the two
External selector keys - like preset buttons on a
car radio.
Programming the External Monitor Selector keys: If you press and hold either of these
keys for five seconds, a list of available audio
streams will pop up onscreen. You can then
scroll through this list and select the source you
want to hear in the monitors when that key is
pressed. Each External key is independently
programmable. ©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 77
bus when the channel is Off, and audio from
the Program-1 bus when the channel is On,
with mix-minus if needed.
* Phone backfeeds audio from the Phone bus,
with mix-minus if needed.
* Program 1 - Program 4 backfeeds audio
from the selected Program bus, with mixminus if needed.
* Aux Send 1 - Aux Send 4 backfeeds audio
from the selected Auxiliary bus, with mixminus if needed.
You can also pre-program the source assigned
to these keys when you construct or capture
Show Profiles, using the options available on the
Monitor page of the Show Profile setup menu.
•
Headphone Knob + Source Keys
This knob, at the bottom right of the Monitor section,
controls the selection and volume of the source heard in
the board operator’s headphones.
»» Rotate to vary the gain of the Headphone feed.
»» Use the Direct Selection Keys (Standard Monitor
Module only) in the column directly above the
Headphones knob to send the output of Program 1 - Program 4, Aux Send A - Aux Send
or the two External monitor sources to the
headphones. These keys light to denote the selected source.
»» Press and hold either of the External selector
keys (Standard Monitor Module only) to display
and select from a list of available audio streams
to monitor on these keys.
D,
•
Link Key
•
Monitor 2 Knob
5: Element Operations • 78
This
key
(Standard Monitor Module only)
toggles the Monitor 1 / Headphone source Link function. When active, a change to the Monitor 1 source
automagically selects that source for the Headphone
feed, and vice versa. The Link key illuminates when this
function is active.
This knob, at the top left of the Monitor section, controls the selection and volume of the source heard in the
Monitor 2 speakers (Control Room Guests and Studio
or News booth monitors).
»» Rotate to vary the Monitor 2 speaker gain.
»» Push the knob to see an on-screen display of
sources that can be assigned to the Monitor 2
feed. Rotate to highlight the desired source, and
push again to “take”.
•
channel is fed, pre-fader, to the Monitor 2 speakers
and headphones (if used). Releasing the key ends the
talkback function.
Talk To Monitor 2 Key
The board operator can push and hold this key to talk
to the talent listening to the Monitor 2 feed. While
the key is depressed, audio from the Control Room mic
•
Preview Knob
•
Preview To HP Key
This knob controls the volume of the source heard
in the Preview (cue) speakers. Rotate the knob to vary
the gain of the Preview speakers. Note that pushing this
knob (even though it “clicks”) is not currently associated
with any action.
This key toggles the Preview To Headphone function. When active, this function sends Preview audio to
the board operator’s headphones. When inactive, audio
from the Preview bus is heard exclusively in the Preview speakers. The Preview To HP key illuminates
when this function is active.
There are three different Preview to HP modes; the
current mode is indicated by an annunciator on the Element display screen just below the headphone selection
tally.
»» Off: When Preview to HP is off, the selector key
is unlit. No preview audio will be heard in the
board-op’s HP path.
»» Stereo: Pressing the Preview to HP key once
from the Off state sends preview audio, when
present, into both sides of the operator’s headphone feed, overriding the Monitor audio. The
Preview to HP key is now lit.
»» Split: Pressing the Preview to HP key a second
time toggles SPLIT mode. In this mode, audio
from the Preview channel overrides the Headphone Monitor selection in the left headphone
channel only. Program audio is still present in
the right channel of the operator’s headphones.
Global Options Section
The Global Options keys are used to load Show
Profiles and to customize Monitor, Meter, Aux Sends/
Returns and Fader settings.
• Profile Key
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
ing has a CD player assigned to Channel
10. Obviously, there’s a conflict.
Pressing this key allows the board operator to browse
and select from the list of saved Show Profiles, custom
surface configurations that can be loaded as needed to
reconfigure Element for different shows and talent.
Instead of blindly changing the channel source
and interrupting audio that’s on-the-air, ­Element
queues the new source. When the board op is
finished with the satellite feed, he turns the
channel Off and the CD player automatically
loads.
Along with selecting a new Show Profile to load,
users can reload the currently active profile, resetting
the board to a “nominal” state if they wish to return
to their normal configuration after making on-the-fly
changes.
»» Select / Take: Rotate this knob to scroll through
the on-screen list of available Show Profiles. Push
the knob to “take” the new Show Profile.
»» Previous: When you load a new Show Profile,
Element remembers the previously loaded Profile until you exit the Show Profile screen. The
Previous command functions as a “speed key,”
highlighting the previously assigned source in
the source list and allowing the operator to return to it should they change their mind. Press
to “take.”
DON’T PANIC! Element is full of options intended to make life on-air easier and more intuitive
for today’s talent. However, it’s possible for talent not yet familiar with the way Element works
to “get lost” in the option settings. Figure 5-14: Show Profile selection screen.
As soon as you “take” a new show profile, Element
begins loading it. During the profile loading process, a
status line reads Loading (Show Profile Name) to
inform the operator of the operation in progress.
LOADING A NEW SOURCE WHILE ANOTHER
SOURCE IS STILL ACTIVE: Element will never interrupt an active source in order to load a
new one. Let’s say that the operator has a satellite
feed assigned to Channel 10, and this source
is currently on-the-air (assigned to Program-1, fader up, channel On). The board op
loads a new Show Profile to ready E
­ lement
for the next show; the Show Profile he’s load-
•
Monitor Options Key
Pressing this key reveals all sorts of neat options relating to Monitor and Headphone behavior. The Monitor
Options screen is shown in Figure 5-15.
»» Function/Exit: (2-Fader Monitor module only)
This control changes which the function of the
other knob which is used for adjusting the Monitor Options parameters. Pressing this knob will
exit the Monitor Options Menu screen.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 79
Pressing and holding the Profile key for five
seconds instantly clears changes made to the
current Show Profile, resetting the Show Profile’s default settings. All is well, and your jock
once again knows where his towel is.
other.
The strongest link: You’ve noticed that there
are no Direct Selection Keys for the headphone
source on the Monitor + 2-Fader Module. By default, CR Headphones and Monitor 1 sources are
linked - the phones will play whatever source is
assigned to the monitor speakers. So how can
the operator select a headphone source if s/he
chooses to Unlink the headphones?
When Unlinked is chosen in the Headphones
Follow Monitors box, the Preview knob doubles
as the headphone source selector. When the
operator pushes the Preview knob, the Headphone Source menu is displayed. Voila!
»» The H/P PROC knob allows the board op to turn
Headphone Processing on and off, define how it
operates if active, and change Headphone Processing settings. These controls are adjusted in a
manner similar to Channel Options EQ settings.
5: Element Operations • 80
Figure 5-15: Monitor Options menu screen.
»» Pushing the TALK LEV SoftKnob selects between adjusting the levels of the Monitor 1 Talk
To and Dim levels and the Monitor 2 Dim level.
The active function is highlighted in yellow on
the screen. Turn the knob to adjust the values of
these settings.
»» Rotate the HP LINK knob to choose whether
the headphone source will follow the Monitor
1 source selection. Push the knob to Take your
selection.
* Linked means that Headphone and Monitor
1 selections will mirror each other; making a
selection from one bank of keys on the Monitor Module will automatically choose the
same source on the other bank.
* Unlinked allows Monitor 1 and Headphone
sources to be selected independently of each
»» Pushing the HP Proc knob selects Change Settings onscreen and takes the operator to the H/P
Process screen shown in Figure 5-16. In this
screen, the operator is presented with a graphical representation of the EQ curve applied to the
headphone channel. Talent can then apply threeband parametric equalization to his or her headphone channel, and select headphone dynamics
processing. The screen indicates the amount of
cut/boost applied, and the center frequency of
each band.
»» Lo Gain/Bypass/Active: Rotating this SoftKnob adjusts the amount of gain or cut applied
to the low EQ band. Pressing this knob toggles
EQ between Active and Bypass. Note that the
EQ mode for this band automatically changes
to Peak mode when boost is applied, and Shelf
mode when cut is applied.
* Rotating the Lo Freq knob adjusts the center
frequency of the low EQ band (20 - 320 Hz).
* Rotating the Mid Gain and Mid Freq SoftKnobs adjust gain and center frequencies of
the midrange EQ band (125 Hz - 2 kHz).
* The Hi Gain knob adjusts the boost/cut of the
high frequency band (1.25 kHz - 20 kHz).
* Hi Freq/Shelf/Peak: Rotating this Soft-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Knob adjusts the center frequency of the high
EQ band (1 kHz - 16 kHz). Pushing this knob
toggles the high-band EQ method between
Peak and Shelf modes.
* Press the Monitor Options key to return to
the previous menu.
tion and is sent to both the left and right channels of the operator’s headphones.
* Split: Audio from the Preview channel
overrides the Headphone Monitor selection
in the left headphone channel only. Program
audio is still present in the right channel of
the operator’s headphones.
* After making a selection, push the knob to
Take the new value.
»» MONITOR MODE knob: Rotate to select from
the following monitor mode options.
* Stereo: The selected source will be presented in stereo on the Monitor speakers.
* Left: The left channel of the selected source
will be presented in both Monitor speakers.
* Right: The right channel of the selected
source will be presented in both Monitor
speakers.
* Sum L+R: Both channels of the selected
source will be summed and presented to both
Monitor speakers.
After making a selection, push the knob to Take
the new value.
»» HEADPHONE MODE knob: Works exactly like
the MONITOR MODE knob described above, but
affects the board operator’s Headphone channel. Pressing Monitor Options or Options exits
this menu.
Note: High, Mid and Low band adjustments
provide up to 25 dB of cut and 15 dB of boost.
Element EQ features SmartQ™ automatic bandwidth system that varies the Q of the selected
parametric band to provide the most pleasing
EQ effect. For details on SmartQ, please refer
to Page 44 of this manual.
»» The H/P PREV knob controls whether audio
from the Preview bus can be fed to the board
op’s headphones, and if so, in what manner. Note
that operators can also press the Preview to
HP key on Element’s Monitor Module to toggle
through these settings. Rotating this knob selects
from the following options:
* Off: The operator will not hear Preview audio in the headphone c­ hannel.
* ON (Stereo): audio from the Preview channel overrides the Headphone Monitor selec-
•
Meter Options Key
Pressing this key opens the Meters screen, where
you can choose preferences for the two on-screen meters
that are on the right side of the Element display, enable
six more meters and set other meter preferences. In addition, Element now supports numerous international metering standards. This is one area where there have been
numerous recent changes.
display options are:
»» PGM-4 bus - default setting.
»» Monitor 1/Preview means the meter will show
levels for the bus assigned to Monitor 1 or the
Preview bus when any source is in Previewmode.
Right-Most Meter
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 81
Figure 5-16: H/P Process settings.
can be hidden or viewed by selecting
or Hide as desired.
Meter Peaks
Show
meter source options are:
»» Program 3 - default
»» Record (Program 4; post-fade, pre on/off)
»» Phone (Program 4; pre-fade, pre on/off)
»» External 1
»» External 2
PGM 3
Figure 5-18: 2-Fader Meter Options menu screen.
permits the selection of various
international metering standards. Those selections are:
meter options are:
»» Full Scale VU - Element default North American style VU meters.
»» BBC Type PPM
»» DIN Type PPM
»» EBU Digital
»» Nordic Type
Meter Ballistics
5: Element Operations • 82
Figure 5-17: Standard Meter Options Menu.
Note: The 2-Fader Monitor module does not
have a Meter Options key. To enter the Meter
Options screen, simply press the Monitor Options button twice. The first press will give you
Monitor Options; the second press will take you
to Meter Options described below. In addition to
Meter Options, you will also find the global settings for AUX SENDS and AUX RETURNS.
Figure 5-19 illustrates the 5 different types of meters
and a comparison of these meters displaying a steady
tone with an RMS level 20 dB below digital full scale.
will open up an additional meter display that replaces the centre clock section on the Element display. These six meters can be configured to
display any other sources you have specified in the
Monitor section of your Show Profile (see Chapter 6
for details). To close the “More Meters” display, press
the Meter Options button twice.
More Meters
More Meters is toggled on/off on the 2-Fader Moni-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
AUX Sends & Returns Key
(Standard Monitor Module only) This key affects
global settings for the master send and return levels of
the four stereo Aux Send and two stereo Aux Return
buses. The outputs can be turned On or Off and can be
sent to the preview speakers and headphones (if preview
is enabled in headphones).
tor module by pressing and holding the Monitor Option button and then pressing the Monitor 2 knob.
Note: The 2-Fader Monitor module includes the
AUX SEND and AUX RETURN controls within
the Meter Options screen as shown above. The
functions of Aux Sends and returns are as described in the section that follows.
screen options:
»» The Send A/B/C/D SoftKnobs, when rotated,
set the Master Send Gain for each Aux Send bus.
Pushing any of these knobs toggles that individual
Aux Send Master On or Off.
»» The Select/Preview knob allows you to hear any
of the four Aux Send mixes in the Preview channel. Push to preview; release to end the preview.
Aux Sends Master
Figure 5-20: More Meters - Example Configuration
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 83
Figure 5-19: Meter Comparisons: Left to Right; Full
Scale VU, BBC-PPM, DIN-PPM, EBU Digital, Nordic
Element’s Aux buses can be used as utility buses for
mixing, for constructing custom IFB mixes, or as effects
buses for production. Pressing the Sends & Returns
key once takes you to the Aux Sends Master screen
(Figure 5-19); pressing it twice displays the Aux Returns Master screen (Figure 5-20), and pressing a third
time exits the menu.
Figure 5-21: Standard Aux Sends menu screen.
screen options:
»» Rotate the Return A/On/Off SoftKnob to set
the audio level of Aux Return A. Push the knob
to toggle Aux Return A On or Off.
»» Rotate the adjacent Assign/Take knob to choose
which of the four Program buses to assign the
output of Aux Return A. Push the knob to Take
the assignment.
»» Rotate the Return B/On/Off SoftKnob to set
the audio level of Aux Return B. Push the knob
to toggle Aux Return B On or Off.
»» Rotate the adjacent Assign/Take knob to choose
which of the four Program buses to assign the
output of Aux Return B. Push the knob to Take
the assignment.
»» Rotating the Select/Preview knob allows you
to select either of the Aux Return mixes for auditioning in the Preview channel; the on-screen
menu indicates which Aux Send is selected.
Push the knob to preview; release it to end the
preview.
5: Element Operations • 84
Aux Returns Master
Figure 5-22: Aux Returns menu screen.
Press the Sends
exit the menu.
•
& Returns
key one more time to
Fader Options Key
Element supports fader-normal and European-style
fader-start channel activation methods. Fader style
is now set on a per-fader basis. As a result, the global
Fader Options key is no longer used to control this function. Each input’s Source Profile contains a Fader Mode
choice, which lets you determine the activation method
of individual faders.
Note: Pressing and holding the Fader Options
key for five seconds enters the IP Address
Book discussed in Chapter 1 and 2.
Timer Section
The Timer control keys operate Element’s onscreen
event and countdown timers, and allow users to set options determining the behavior of these timers.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
first and second press of the Timer Options button. A
third press closes the Timer Options.
»» The Countdown timer is useful for counting
down to network joins, top-of-hour IDs, and other events which require exact timing. The Countdown timer is started, stopped and reset manually
using the controls displayed when the Timer Options key is pressed. To use:
* Rotate the SoftKnob marked Begin Time/
Reset to set the interval from which the
countdown will begin. As you rotate, small
numbers below the red counter onscreen will
inform you of the new countdown interval.
* Press the Begin Time/Reset knob to set the
new time you’ve dialed in.
* Press the Start/Stop knob to begin or end
the countdown.
* Pressing Freeze holds the on-screen Timer
display so you may take note of it; the timer
continues to count while the display is frozen,
and a second press of the Freeze again displays the running elapsed time counter.
Figure 5-23: Timer menu.
•
Timer Options Key
Pressing the Timer Options key on the Standard
Monitor module opens the Timer Menu (Figure 5-21).
This menu allows users to adjust how the onscreen timers behave. Note that the SoftKnobs are divided into two
sections: Countdown Timer and Count Up Timer.
The 2-Fader Monitor has a slightly different display
that changes from Count-Up to Count-Down with the
• The Count Up Timer is an event timer with three
modes, which can be set to start/stop/reset either automatically or manually. Using Source Profiles, you
can determine whether individual sources will start
or stop this timer automatically; the onscreen controls described below allow the operator to override
or modify those settings.
»» Rotate the Timer Mode SoftKnob to choose how
the event timer will operate.
* Choose Manual to start, stop and reset the
timer by hand using the controls displayed
when the Timer Options key is pressed.
* Choose Auto-Reset and the timer will automatically reset to zero and begin counting
whenever a fader whose source starts the
timer is turned On.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 85
“Look at me!!” During the last 60 seconds of
the countdown, the inner ring of Element’s
onscreen analog clock will turn red and diminish as time passes, providing the operator with
a visual cue to how much time is left until zero.
* Choose Auto-Add to have the timer count up
when a designated source’s fader is turned On
and stop counting when that source is turned
Off. In this mode, the timer will not reset to
zero when it is started.
Pressing the
menu.
Timer Options
key again exits this
Note: Pressing and holding the Timer Options
Key opens the Clock & Timer Options Menu
discussed in Chapter 1.
Pressing the Record Mode key a second time deactivates Record Mode and stops the recorder (via GPIO).
Help (?) Key and Magic Key Sequences
The Help( ?) key (Standard Monitor Module) a special key that displays system information about your Element hardware, modules and associated software. Pressing this key will pop-up this information in the centre
section of the Element display. Pressing it a second time
will return to normal. The Element will continue to operate as usual when this display is active.
“Magic Key” Sequences for Standard Monitor
•
Reset Key:
•
Freeze Key:
•
Start/Stop Key:
Pressing this key resets Element’s Count Up Timer
to zero.
Pressing Freeze holds the on-screen Timer display
so you may take note of it; the timer continues to count
while the display is frozen, and a second press of the
Freeze again displays the running elapsed time counter.
5: Element Operations • 86
If the Count Up Timer is not running, pressing this
starts the count. If the timer is running, pressing this key
stops the countdown and retains the last displayed timer
interval.
Record Mode Section
Record Mode is a special “one-touch” mode which
can be set to automatically start a designated recorder so
talent can record a phone call or remote interview with
a single button-press. Record Mode can be enabled or
disabled for each Show Profile (see Chapter 6, “Show
Profiles”, for details).
•
Engage Key:
Press this key to put Element into Record Mode.
Pressing this button activates a pre-determined recording device via GPIO assigned to the record device in
the Show Profile. In addition to triggering a recorder,
Record Mode also changes your headphones and monitors to PGM 4 Record which is indicated by flashing the
PGM 4 indicator.
Module
The list of “Magic Key” sequences for the Standard
Monitor Module are:
• IP Address Book: Press and hold the Fader Options key for 5 seconds or press and hold the * and
4 and 7 keys for 5 seconds. Press the SoftKnobs as
prompted to edit , save, reboot or Exit. Be sure to
Reboot after making any changes to this page.
• Clock & Timer Options: Press and hold the Timer
Options key for 5 seconds.
• Capture Mode: Press and hold the * and 2 keys for
5 seconds.
• Test Mode: Press and hold the * and 2 and # keys
for 5 seconds.
• Module Information: Press ? or press and hold the
* and # keys for 5 seconds.
•“Magic Key” Help - Press and hold the ? key for 5
seconds or press
“Magic Key” Sequences for Monitor + 2-Fader
Module
The list of “Magic Key” sequences for the Standard
Monitor Module are:
• IP Address Book: Press and hold the * (star), 4 &
7 keys on the keypad for 5 seconds. (That’s *+I+P.)
Press the SoftKnobs as prompted to edit , save, reboot or Exit. Be sure to Save and Reboot after making any changes to this page.
• Clock & Timer Options: Press and hold the Timer
Options key for 5 seconds.
• Capture Mode: Press and hold the * (star) & 2
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Source-Specific Channel Controls
Some fader functions change their behavior to suit
the type of source assigned to the fader. A Guest Mic input has unique functions different from those of a Codec
input, and so forth. In this section we’ll explain the channel functions unique to each type of source input.
Control Room Operator Mic Channel Operation
The Control Room Operator microphone is the board
operator’s mic. It’s always located in the Control Room,
so activating a channel designated as the CR Operator
mic affects CR monitor speaker (Monitor 1) and Preview speaker muting.
When the board operator pushes a Talkback key, all
output bus assignments for the Control Room Operator
microphone are temporarily muted, while his mic’s audio is routed to the requested Talkback destination. Releasing the button returns the channel outputs to normal.
(Pushing your own Talkback key does nothing.)
a position within the Control Room where a morning
show or talk show producer would normally sit. This
mic type mimics the operation of the Control Room mic
described above, but does not include the “cough” function; also, a Producer mic can use Talkback to talk to
the board op, but cannot talk directly to the Monitor 2
talkback channel.
Control Room Guest Microphone Channel Operation
There are often microphones in the Control Room
other than the board operator’s; i.e., an in-studio guest
wing, or perhaps an announcer located physically near
the board op. These microphones also control the muting of the Control Room monitor speakers.
The Studio 1 monitor speakers and Preview speakers will mute when this channel is turned on, or when
Preview or Record Mode are selected. Control Room
Guest mics can be turned on and off remotely, and provide on/off status to a remote logic device. Remote Talk
and Remote Mute functions are also provided, and can
be activated using a remote On/Off/Talk/Mute panel.
lets talent and guests communicate
with the board operator. When Talk is remotely activated on a CR Guest mic channel, outputs to program buses
for that channel are muted and the mic audio is fed to the
Talkback bus. While this is active, the Status Symbol on
the guest’s fader strip displays a T icon. When the user
stops talking, the channel returns to normal. The operator can then reply using the fader’s Talkback key.
Remote Talk
When the Remote Mute function is activated, the
Status Symbol displays X, and all the channel outputs are
muted until the command is released.
Pressing the channel ON key for the CR Operator
Mic while the channel is already on will mute the channel until the button is released, acting as a “cough” function for the board operator. On-air status and speaker
mutes are unaffected by this action. The CR Operator
microphone channel will mute the CR Monitors (Monitor 1) and the Preview speakers whenever the channel is
On, or if Preview or Record Mode Engage keys are
selected.
Control Room Guest Microphone channels will mute
the Control Room speakers and the Preview speakers
whenever the channel is ON, or if Preview or Record
keys are selected. If only the Phone key is selected, the
Control Room speakers will mute independently, leaving
the Preview speakers un-muted.
Producer Microphone Channel Operation
The Producer’s microphone is meant to be used at
Finally, Control Room Guest Microphone channels
have provisions for an individual Headphone feed. This
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 87
keys on the keypad for 5 seconds. (That’s *+C.)
Press # to perform the capture sequence and exit
Capture Mode.
• Module Information: Press and hold the * (star) &
# (pound) keys on the keypad for 5 seconds
to check status of installed software and fader firmware. Press and hold the * (star) &
# (pound) keys again to exit.
• Test Mode: Not yet available with this module. If
you end up here accidentally, press 0 to exit Test
Mode.
is especially useful for talent and guests in the same
room as the board operator; their headphone feeds will
all monitor the audio selected on the Monitor 2 selector, but the board op can communicate with each person
privately using Talkback key on their fader strip.
Studio Microphone Channel Operation
The third type of mic channel is a Studio Microphone.
This mic is typically located in a location separate from
the control room — perhaps a voice-over booth, a talk
studio separated by glass, or a news booth.
Logic for Studio Microphone channels is identical
to that of the Control Room Guest Microphone channel. Studio Microphone channels can be turned on and
off remotely and provide on/off status to a remote logic
device. Remote Talk and Remote Mute functions are
provided for use with a remote On/Off/Talk/Mute panel.
Remote Talk lets talent and guests communicate
with the board op. When Talk is remotely activated, outputs to program buses for that channel are muted and the
source audio is fed to the Talkback bus. While active,
the Talkback key is lit and the Status Symbol displays
TALK. When the user stops talking, the channel returns
to its previous state, and its Talkback key flashes for
three seconds, alerting the board op to the guest who
spoke to him, and enabling reply via the Talkback key.
5: Element Operations • 88
When Remote Mute is activated, the Status Symbol
will display MUTE, all channel outputs are muted until
the key is released, and the channel is again active.
The Monitor-2 speakers mute when a Studio Microphone channel is turned on, or if it is assigned to the
Program-4/Record bus.
use the Line Channel profile. The Line Channel is stereo, but the user can change the input mode to mono, left
only or right only by using the Pan & Mode key in the
Master Module’s Channel Options section.
Line channels have a variety of remote logic functions available at the GPIO interface. ON and OFF keys
can be remotely controlled, as well as the Preview key.
Each function has a corresponding lamp driver.
A Reset function is provided to remotely turn the
channel OFF while suppressing the Stop command, useful for allowing certain types of tape machines to re-cue.
You’ll also find a Ready command which will remotely
illuminate the OFF lamp on the Element channel and activate the GPIO OFF lamp driver, allowing source equipment to signal the operator with either a steady-state OFF
button (indicating source ready) or a flashing OFF button
(indicating source next). Refer to the GPIO Node User’s
Manual for information on interfacing to the GPIO’s inputs and outputs.
Phone Channel Operation
The Phone Channel profile is used, naturally, for telephone hybrid audio sources. Each Phone Channel has its
own discrete Feed-to-Source mix-minus output.
Each Element can accommodate as many unique,
automatically-generated mix-minus feeds as it has faders. If the Feed-to-Source mode is set to “Auto” (the
most common option - see Chapter 3: Working with
Sources for the section entitled “Source Profile Options”), phone callers hear the output of the Program-1
bus, minus himself, when the channels they’re assigned
to are ON. When the caller’s channel is OFF, their channel’s Talkback key is lit and they hear the Board Operator’s mic routed to their Talkback feed.
The Studio Microphone channel can be associated
with an individual Headphone feed. All Studio Microphone-associated feeds will monitor the audio selected
on the Monitor 2 selector, but the board op can communicate privately using the Talkback function.
When a Phone Channel has been assigned to an
­Element fader, the Status Symbol display located above
the channel name will display an icon to show the board
operator what is being fed to the caller.
Line Channel Operation
Line-level devices like CD players, tape players, etc.,
Phone feed-to-source outputs can also be locked to
backfeed only PGM-1, PGM-2, PGM-3 or PGM-4, us-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
ing the options provided when constructing the Source
Profile for your hybrid. This automatic switching mode
makes it very easy to prep callers and then seamlessly
put them on the air with a minimum of button pushes.
(See Chapter 3).
Channels configured for Phone sources can be turned
on and off remotely, and will provide on/off status to a
remote logic device. Remote Preview is also provided,
as are lamp drivers for On, Off and Preview. Start and
Stop pulses can be sent when the channel is turned on
or off, respectively. See Chapter 4: Configuring GPIO
for information interfacing to GPIO inputs and outputs.
Codec Channel Operation
The Codec Channel is used for codec sources. Like
the Phone Channel, each codec source is brought up on
its own channel, and an individual Feed-to-Source (mix
minus) output is provided for each codec. Codec Channels can be turned on and off remotely and provide on/
off status to a remote logic device. Remote Talk and
Remote Mute are also provided, allowing talent to take
control using their own On/Off/Mute/Talk panels.
sends uninterrupted program audio (without talkback)
for use as a PA feed.
What’s Next
One of Element’s most powerful features is the ability to instantly reconfigure the entire surface for different show types. All fader assignments, monitoring preferences and other console settings that may be related to
a specific show or function are easily “recalled” by your
operator.
Join us in Chapter Six to learn how to set up and use
Show Profiles.
When the remote mute function is activated, the Status Symbol displays M, and all the channel outputs are
muted until the command is released.
The mix-minus output normally feeds Program-1
audio to the remote, but can be switched to Program-2.
The Feed-to-Source output on a Codec Channel is a
dual mono output, occupying both sides of the stereo
pair. The Left output is normally used for remote talent’s
headphone feed, and is interrupted by Talkback audio
when the board op talks to the remote. The Right output
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
5: Element Operations • 89
Talk enables remote talent to communicate with the
board op using the Talkback bus. When Talk is activated, all outputs for that channel are muted and the
source audio is fed to the Talkback bus; the channel’s
Talkback key lights, and its Status Symbol displays
T. When the user stops talking, the channel returns to
normal, and its Talkback key flashes for three seconds,
alerting the board operator to the guest who spoke to
him, and enabling him to reply using the Talkback key.
Capital budget
may you never decrease, for
5: Element Operations • 90
we need new test gear.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Show Profiles
If you’ve already read Chapter 3: Working With
Sources you already have a good understanding of how
Source Profiles are essential to Element operation.
In the same way that Source Profiles allow you to
pre-determine how an individual channel is configured
when a source is loaded, Show Profiles let you build configuration files that can be loaded to determine how the
entire Element behaves, which sources are loaded, and
what channels they appear on.
By assembling sets of Show Profiles, each user or
show can have the board set up his or her favorite way
— sources placed where they’re most useful, monitors
set to the appropriate feed, headphones conforming to
personal preference. Or, you can use Show Profiles to
define different types of broadcasts – one for the morning show, one for talk segments, one for musical guest
interviews, one for unattended operation – that need only
to be loaded to instantly reconfigure the board for use
with a different situation.
Creating A Show Profile
Build A Show
Element’s Web interface, which you’ve used to construct Source Profiles, is also used to help build Show
Profiles, so make sure a computer with a Web browser is
connected to your Livewire network within easy reach.
Your Element is shipped from the factory with a default Show Profile. This loads the first time you turn on
your Element; it provides the “template” you’ll use to
construct custom Show Profiles. You’ve no doubt been
exploring your Element, so you might want to reload the
Default Show Profile using Show Profiles key located
on Element’s Master Module to make sure you’re in
“ready mode.”
Reminder: You can speed the setup process
by “Channel Jumping” while using the Options
menus. For example, to quickly assign sources, select
the Options key on Channel 1 and choose
Source from the Channel Options menu. Use
the Soft Knobs, Control Knob or Nav Keys to
select a source from the list; “take” the source
and then press the Options key on Channel 2. You’ll see the indicator at the top of the
Channel Options screen change to read Channel 02 to confirm that you’re now programming Channel 2.
Repeat the procedure until you’ve programmed
all your channels. You can now choose other
Channel Options to configure using the same
method.
After you’ve assigned a source for each fader, you
can configure the rest of the Channel Options:
• Equalization,
• Pan / Balance,
• Aux Sends, and
• Feed to Source.
When you’ve configured all Channel Options, continue on and make monitor and headphone selections
and adjust Aux Send / Aux Return settings if necessary,
since these are all saved in Show Profiles as well.
When you’ve got the board configured to your satisfaction, proceed to the next section.
Capture It!
It’s now time to save your Element configuration.
Enter Element’s IP address in your Web browser.
When the Main Menu appears, choose “Configuration”
under the “Sources & Profiles” heading on the sidebar
menu. This is where you’ll come whenever you need to
capture, construct or administer a Show Profile.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
6: Show Profiles • 91
Chapter Six:
The first step in building a Show Profile is to set up
Element using the Channel Options, Monitor Options
and other board options as described in Chapter 5: Element Operations. Get started by assigning a source to
each Element fader using the Options keys at the top of
each channel.
Under the Show Profiles list, you’ll then find four options:
»» Default Show Profile. This is the “starter” profile that comes with Element. If you wish, you
can overwrite this with your preferred default
options; otherwise, consider it as “return to zero”
configuration option, for use in returning Element to a “blank slate” condition.
»» New Show Profile. Choose this option when
you want to construct an entire Show Profile
completely from scratch.
»» Capture Show Profile. Takes a “snapshot” of
the current board state and saves it for recall.
This is the option we’ll use in just a moment.
Show Profile Options
Although the ability to create Show Profiles using Element’s “capture” function is powerful, there are more
options available exclusively via the Element Web interface. You will probably find that a combination of console setup, capture and Show Profile edit works best.
You’ve already set up your Element, so now you can
just “capture” your settings for further use. Choose Capture Show Profile from the menu. You’ll be prompted
to give your new profile a unique name; after you do, it’ll
be added to the list of available profiles. Voila! You’ve
just created and saved a Show Profile, which can now be
recalled for use whenever you wish.
Note: To avoid accumulating 10^6 show profiles,
your operators cannot arbitrarily capture their own show
profiles. This intentionally controlled by using the process described above and by assigning the task to an intelligent and responsible person such as the one reading
this manual.
6: Show Profiles • 92
However, there may be a few more options you’d like
to tweak — some options not accessible from Element
itself. Let’s go a little deeper into Show Profiles to find
out exactly what’s available to you.
Suggestion: As part of Element training, show
your talent how to use the Channel Options and
Monitor Options menus (discussed in Chapter
5) to assign sources and set monitor options.
Then, let them set up the board exactly the way
they want it, then use the Capture command to
save their work. This way, talent gets the satisfaction of personalizing their own Element configuration — and saves you the work!
Figure 6-1: Show Profile
Settings Menu
In the last section, we showed you how to capture the
current configuration of your Element, easily creating a
Show Profile, which was immediately added to the Show
Profiles list.
Now, click on that newly created profile. It’s probably named something like “Capture 2009-2-12 0:800”
— the date and time the capture was made.
You’ll see the menu shown in Figure 6-1. Notice that
there is an entry for each of your Element’s faders, as
well as a link for :
• Auxiliary Send & Return
•
Monitor Section
•
Record Mode
• Group Start
•
Phone.
We will now look at these in detail.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Click on any of the Channel links to examine the
settings for a fader. Many of the options will seem familiar to you; you’ve seen them before, during Source
Profile setup.
Remember that these settings are saved with the
Show Profile, not the Source Profile we discussed in the
previous chapter. In the case of a Channel, these settings
apply only to one fader for one specific Show Profile.
Settings that are intended to be global in nature should
be established in the Source Profile - that way they will
apply to ANY fader to which the source is applied.
Let’s look at these options one by one; notice as we
go that the fields match the choices you made for this
channel, using Element’s Options menus, prior to capturing the Show Profile.
Note: in addition to “active” options – choices that are actively made to Element settings
when loading a new Show Profile – there is
also a “passive” option for many items: Retain
Source Setting. Choosing Retain allows the
setting for this option to “cascade” from the
Source Profile attached to the source loaded
on this channel.
For example, you’ve set a Show Profile to load
the Control Room Host mic on Channel 1. You
specified an EQ boost of 2 dB @ 1200 Hz in the
Source Profile for the Control Room Host mic;
checking the Retain Source Setting option
here in the Channel Description Screen allows
that previously-defined EQ setting to “ride along”
when the source is loaded — without your having to specify it again.
Channel Description Section
• SOURCE ID: The name of the source you assigned
to this fader. You can change the source using the
drop-down box.
•
Specify PGM-1/2/3/4,
AUX SEND A/B/C/D or AUTO mix-minus for this
source, or Retain Source Setting. Choosing Auto
for any phone source feeds the caller PGM-1 minus
when the fader is On, and Phone (PGM-4 pre-fader) when the fader is Off.
Determines whether turning
this fader on will start/reset the Event Timer. You can
Enable, Disable or Retain Source Setting.
•
AUTO-START TIMER:
•
Choose from Stereo, Left (left
channel fed to both sides), Right (right channel fed
to both sides), Sum (sum L+R to mono and feed to
both sides) or Retain Source Setting.
•
SIGNAL MODE LOCK: Unlock
SIGNAL MODE:
or Lock the talent’s ability to change the Signal Mode, or Retain
Source Setting.
•
Adjusts signal gain just before
the fader if required. Specify a value in the range of
+/- 25 dB or Retain Source Setting.
•
or Lock the talent’s
ability to change the Fader Trim, or Retain Source
FADER TRIM GAIN:
FADER TRIM LOCK: Unlock
Setting.
•
•
Pan/Balance adjustment for this source, or Retain Source Setting.
PANORAMA POSITION: Use
PHASE:
Adjust for phase errors. May be set to Nor-
mal, Invert Left, Invert Right, Invert Left And
Right,
or Retain Source Setting.
Make EQ Active for this fader/source
combo, Bypass it, or Retain Source Setting.
•
EQ ACTIVE:
•
EQ HIGH MODE:
mode between
Shelf
Switches high-frequency EQ
and Bandpass (peak), or Re-
tain Source Setting.
•
FEED TO SOURCE MODE:
You can specify the top of
the High Frequency Shelf, or the middle frequency
of the Bandpass filter (depending upon which mode
was chosen for EQ High Mode), or Retain Source
EQ HIGH FREQUENCY:
Setting.
•
EQ MID FREQUENCY / EQ LOW FREQUENCY:
Choose the middle frequency of the Low and Middle
EQ bands, or Retain Source Setting.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
6: Show Profiles • 93
The Channel Description Screen
•
the noise gate is set to Active and the Noise Gate
Threshold is reached. Adjustment range is between
0dB and -30 dB, or Retain Source Settings.
EQ HIGH GAIN / EQ MID GAIN / EQ LOW GAIN:
dial in boost or cut for the three EQ bands, or Retain
Source Setting.
Note: For details on Element EQ operations,
please refer to Chapter 3: Working With
Sources
•
•
ASSIGN TO PGM1/2/3/4 and AUX A /B/C/D:
Checking ON for any of these buses assigns the fader
to that bus when the Show Profile is loaded. You can
also choose OFF or Retain Source Settings.
FADER: Allows you to send this fader’s source to the
Sets the amount of compression that will be applied to the mic audio. Adjustment range is between 1:1 and 16:1, or Retain
Source Settings.
•
DE-ESSER THRESHOLD: Determines the point at
which the Compressor will operate (if set to Active).
Adjustment range is between 0dB and -20dB, or Retain Source Settings.
•
Sets how aggressively the deesser will remove sibilance from the mic audio. Adjustment range is between 1:1 and 8:1, or Retain
Source Settings.
•
COMPRESSOR MODE:
Post-
Turn this channel’s
feed to the specified Aux Send bus Off, specify up
to 10 dB of boost or 25 dB of cut, or Retain Source
AUX SEND A/B/C/D GAIN:
Settings.
•
•
6: Show Profiles • 94
•
•
•
Turns the Noise Gate in the
Omnia Dynamics Processing on and off. Specify
Active or Bypass, or choose Retain Source Setting. (Only applies to Mic sources.)
THRESHOLD: Determines the
point at which the Compressor will operate (if set
to Active). Adjustment range is between 0dB and
-30dB, or Retain Source Settings.
COMPRESSOR
•
AUX A / AUX B / AUX C / AUX D PRE/POST
specified Aux Send bus either Pre-Fader or
Fader, or Retain Source Settings.
•
•
COMPRESSOR RATIO:
DE-ESSER RATIO:
NOISE GATE STATUS:
Turns the compressor in
the Omnia Dynamics Processing on and off. Specify
Active or Bypass, or choose Retain Source Setting. (Only applies to Mic sources.)
COMPRESSOR STATUS:
Turns the de-essing function
in the Omnia Dynamics Processing on and off. Specify Active or Bypass, or choose Retain Source
Setting. (Only applies to Mic sources.)
•
•
Determines the point
at which the Noise Gate will operate (if set to Active). Adjustment range is between 0dB and -50dB,
or Retain Source Settings.
NOISE GATE THRESHOLD:
Sets the amount of noise
reduction that will be applied to the mic audio if
and
tain Source Settings.
Freeze
Change the voice compresNo Freeze modes, or Re-
Specify a value
in the range of +/-20 dB that will be applied after
the processing block. This may compensate got processing gain losses. You may also choose to Retain
POST-PROCESSING TRIM GAIN:
Source Setting.
DE-ESSER STATUS:
NOISE GATE DEPTH:
sor between
•
Set how much the
program audio being fed back to this source will be
dimmed when the source is being talked to using
the Talkback feature. Adjustment range is 0dB to
-30dB, or Retain Existing Setting. Setting this to
OFF will mute the program audio backfeed during
Talkback,
BACKWARD FEED DIM GAIN:
Allows you to turn
fader On or Off when the Show Profile is loaded.
CHANNEL ON/OFF STATUS:
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Place a check mark in any
of these boxes to keep the board op from changing
the selections for this fader’s bus assignments, On/
Off state, fader position and several other parameters.
CONTROL LOCK MAP:
Individual Headphones Section
Note: These controls apply ONLY IF:
• The loaded source is a Mic-type source.
• The loaded source has an individual headphone feed associated with it.
About Channel Lock and Fader Operation:
Say that your station runs syndicated programming overnight, and you want to eliminate the
possibility that the feed could be inadvertently
disrupted. Choose Lock for the channel the feed
is assigned to, and the channel cannot be turned
off, or bus assignment changed, until the channel
is unlocked.
• The position at which the mic is installed also
has an Element accessory panel that allows
talent to select their own headphone feeds
(such as the one shown in Figure 6-2).
When you load a Show Profile
which specifies a Locked fader, the
gain value is locked to the position of the fader at the moment
the Show Profile is loaded.
When you Unlock the fader using the
Channel Options menu, the fader will
resume working normally from the
current position. You can move it and
lock again in a different position if you
wish. If the fader has been moved, the first
touch after Unlocking immediately
resets the gain to the fader’s current
position.
•
•
•
The source currently specified for monitoring in the Monitors page of the Show Profile.
•
SOURCE FOR PRESET 1: Specify
the source that will load when the accessory panel’s Ext 1 key is pressed.
•
Specify
the source that will load when the accessory panel’s Ext 2 key is pressed.
•
CURRENT SOURCE:
SOURCE FOR PRESET 2:
HEADPHONES
MASTER
GAIN:
Specify the initial amount of gain that
Specify whether this
the Individual Headphone Feed will have
fader is a Master, Slave or Indepenwhen the Show Profile loads. Turn then
dent. This setting is tied to those disOff or Use up to 85 dB of cut.
Figure 6-2: an
Element accessory
played in the Show Profile Group Start
panel with headphone
Screen; a change made here will apply
•
TALKBACK START VOLUME LOW
selector
on the Group Start Screen, and viceLIMIT: Specify a minimum gain value for
versa. (For information on the Group Start Function,
talkback (-72 to +10 dB. This prevents talent from
please refer to the Group Start Screen description
“turning off” headphones when talkback is present
later in this chapter.
and this setting is active.
GROUP START:
Motorized Element
faders can be set to assume a predefined position
when a Show Profile is loaded. Choose Off to specify
a setting of -∞, Use to specify a level to use (from -73
dB to +10 dB), or Retain Existing Setting, which
will cause the motor fader to make no changes to the
position the fader was at prior to loading the Show
Profile.
MOTOR FADER POSITION:
Record Mode
• PROGRAM 1 / 2 / 3 /4 Record: Allows automatic
BUS settings for the channel - Assign, Remove or
No Change when Record Mode is active.
•
Disables the Channel On/Off button function or No Change when Record Mode is active
ON/OFF:
Finishing Up...
Finally, there are two more controls at the very bottom of the screen:
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
6: Show Profiles • 95
•
•
•
button (also found at the top of
the screen) applies any changes made to the current
Channel Description. If you don’t click this button,
your changes won’t be saved!
turn it on, or Retain Existing Setting.
SAVE CHANGES
•
link takes you back to
the Show Profile Settings menu.
BACK TO SHOW PROFILE
The Auxiliary Send And Return
Description Screen
Setting.
•
Just as the Show Profile Channel Description screens
mirror Element’s Channel Options menus, the Auxiliary Send Description Screen captures the global Aux
Send settings that can be set using the Global Options
Sends & Returns Key located on the Master Module.
Choose from
Stereo, Left (left channel fed to both sides), Right
(right channel fed to both sides), Sum (sum L+R to
mono and feed to both sides) or Retain Existing
Aux Return A / B Signal Mode:
Aux Return A / B Panorama Setting:
Balance for the selected Aux Return, or
Trim Pan/
Retain Ex-
isting Setting.
• Aux Return A / B Assign to PGM1 / PGM2 / PGM3 /
PGM4:
Choose On to fold the selected Aux Return
into any of the four PGM buses, or choose Retain
Existing Setting.
Note: Instead of the Retain Source Settings
option found in the Channel Descriptions pages,
the Auxiliary Send Descriptions Screen features
a new option: Retain Existing Settings. Using this option with any of the Aux Send/Return
settings allows the Show Profile to be loaded
without disturbing the Aux Send/Return master
settings in use by the board operator.
From the Show Profile Settings web page, choose the
Auxiliary Send/Return Data link. You’ll find the following options:
6: Show Profiles • 96
•
Selecting
Off turns off master gain adjustment for each Aux
Send’s outbound feed. Select Use and enter a gain
value between -25 dB and 10 dB to trim overall gain
if desired, or select Retain Existing Setting.
Choose
Off to turn the selected Aux Send 1 off completely,
On to turn it on, or Retain Existing Setting.
Aux Send A / B / C / D On/Off Status:
•
Aux Return A /B Master Gain: Selecting Off turns
•
Aux A / B Source ID:
•
Save Changes
•
link takes you back to Show
Profile Settings without saving changes.
Aux Send A / B / C / D Master Gain:
•
off master gain adjustment for the selected Aux Return bus. Select Use and enter a gain value between
-25 dB and 10 db to trim overall return gain if desired,
or select Retain Existing Setting.
Choose Off to
turn the selected Aux Return off completely, On to
Aux Return A / B On/Off Status:
If this drop-down box looks
familiar, that’s because it’s just like the ones you
used earlier to construct Source Profiles and map I/O
to Axia Audio Nodes. Click in the box and select the
audio device that will be providing source audio for
the Aux 1 or Aux 2 Return.
•
button applies any changes made to
the Auxiliary Send Description and returns you to
the Show Profile Settings menu.
Back to Show Profile
Monitor Section Screen
The Monitor Section Data screen captures the Monitor settings found in Element’s Monitor Options menus.
Since you’re working on a “captured” Show Profile, this
page will, of course, mirror the choices you made when
you set up Element in the beginning of this chapter.
From the Show Profile Settings web page, choose the
Monitor Section Data link. You’ll find the page divided
into four sections: general options, Control Room Monitor options, Control Room Headphone options, and Studio Monitor options.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
timers.
General Monitor Options
»» Both Timers: All timers display tenths of a second readouts.
•
If Enable is chosen, pressing any fader’s Preview key causes any
other, previously-lit Preview key to be extinguished,
removing that source from Preview. The board
operator can assign multiple faders to Preview by
pushing and holding any lit Preview key while
pushing other Preview keys to add or subtract. If
Disable is chosen, each Preview key works like a
press-on, press-off latching switch. Multiple faders
can be assigned to Preview simply by pushing once;
a second push cancels any individual Preview assignment.
•
Choose
whether the far-right on-screen meter bars will display levels for the PROGRAM 4 bus or the source
feeding the Control Room Monitors.
•
PROGRAM 3 METER INPUT:
Figure 6-3: Show Profile - Monitor Settings
•
Lets you decide globally how the
onscreen Count Up (event) timer will behave when
this profile is loaded:
»» Choose Manual to start, stop and reset the timer
by hand using the controls displayed when the
Timer Options key is pressed.
»» Choose Auto-Reset and the timer will automatically reset to zero and begin counting whenever
a fader is turned On.
»» Choose Auto-Add to have the timer count up
when a fader is turned On and stop counting
when that source is turned Off. In this mode, the
timer will not reset to zero when it is restarted.
Choose from
Pro-
gram 3, Record, Phone, External 1, External 2.
TIMER MODE:
Allows you to set the Countdown and Count Up timers to show or hide tenths of
a second displays. Choices are:
»» No Timers: tenths of a second are hidden on
both timers.
»» Down Timers: tenths are shown only on Countdown timers.
»» Up Timers: tenths are shown only on Count Up
SWITCHED METER SOURCE SELECT:
•
Lets you
Use up to -85 dB of attenuation on the Control Room
Preview speakers, turn gain adjustment Off, or Retain Existing Setting.
•
Element’s External Preview allows other devices to
route audio into the console’s Preview system (speakers and operator headphones). Use this drop-down
box to select the External Preview source for this
Show Profile. Note that this must be enabled by a pin
on the CR Monitor GPIO.
PREVIEW SPEAKER MASTER GAIN:
SOURCE ID FOR EXTERNAL PREVIEW:
SHOW TENTHS ON:
What’s External Preview for? The word “External” refers here to any source not generated by the studio you’re working in. Let’s say
you have an intercom system that you want to
feed the console’s Preview channel. To do this,
you would take the GPO from the intercom and
use it to gate open the external preview input,
which would be fed by the intercom audio. Voila!
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
6: Show Profiles • 97
•
PREVIEW INTERLOCK MODE:
•
up to -30 dB attenuation or
10 dB gain on the contents of the Talkback bus. You
can also turn gain adjustment Off or Retain ExistTALKBACK GAIN: Use
Sources for External 1 & 2 Section
ing Setting.
•
•
Specify a gain
compensation (-6 to -3 dB) for mono-sum of talkback
audio sources
Figure 6-5: Show Profile - External Sources
FEED TO SOURCE SUM GAIN:
•
Use the
drop-down box to specify a source for Monitor 1,
External Input 1.
•
Use the
drop-down box to specify a source for Monitor 1,
External Input 2.
GPIO CHANNEL FOR EXTERNAL PROFANITY
Enter the Channel Number of the GPIO
port connected to your station’s Profanity Delay Unit.
This assigns the Delay keys on the Element Master
Module to control your external delay unit.
DELAY:
•
GPIO CHANNEL FOR UP TIMER CONTROL: Enter
•
GPIO CHANNEL FOR DOWN TIMER CONTROL:
the Channel Number of the GPIO port you wish to
use for external control of your UP timer.
SOURCE ID FOR EXTERNAL INPUT 1:
SOURCE ID FOR EXTERNAL INPUT 2:
Control Room Monitor (Monitor 1) Options
Enter the Channel Number of the GPIO port you
wish to use for external control of your DOWN timer.
Additional Meters
6: Show Profiles • 98
Figure 6-4: Show Profile - Additional Meters
This section allows to you specify the meter sources
for the six “extra” meters that can optionally be displayed in the centre section of the Element display. The
selections for each of the six meters are extensive and
include:
»» all Program, Aux, External, Monitor busses,
Phone, Record
»» all Fader Channel sources and backfeeds
»» all VMIX inputs, direct, sub and main outputs
»» all VMODE inputs and outputs
Figure 6-6: Show Profile - CR Monitor Options
•
MONITOR ASSIGNMENT:
Choose to load
PGM1,
PGM2, PGM3, PGM4, AUX A, AUX B, AUX C, AUX
D, EXT1, EXT 2 or No Source if you wish the Profile to be loaded with nothing assigned to Monitor 1.
Allows you to Use
as much as -85 dB of gain reduction on the audio
signal sent to the Monitor 1 Speakers. You can also
turn gain control Off or Retain Existing Setting.
•
CR MONITOR MASTER GAIN:
•
SIGNAL MODE: CR MONITOR
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
lets you set the au-
dio feed to the Monitor 1 speakers to Stereo,
Right, Sum or Retain Existing Setting.
•
Specify the amount of
volume by which the Monitor 1 speakers will dim
when Talk To... or Preview is in use. Use as much
as -30 dB of cut, turn the option Off, or Retain Ex-
Existing Setting.
CR MONITOR DIM GAIN:
isting Setting.
•
the board op is allowed to select a source for headphones independent of the Monitor Speakers (Use
Headphone Source Select). You may also Retain
Left,
GPIO CHANNEL FOR CR MONITOR: In this box,
you assign Monitor 1 a channel number, effectively
making it a “source” to which logic commands – to
activate Mute, Dim, tally lights – can be associated.
You’ll enter this channel number in the GPIO Setup web page to assign a GPIO port for these logic
functions. See Chapter 4, “GPIO Configuration,” for
more information.
•
PREVIEW-IN-HEADPHONES MODE:
Choices are
Off, Normal, Auto and Retain Existing Setting.
If set to Off, sources assigned to the Preview bus will
only be heard in the Control Room Preview speakers,
leaving the board operator’s headphones to continuously monitor the selected source. In Normal mode,
audio from the Preview bus will feed the board op’s
headphones, in stereo, whenever Preview is active,
interrupting the selected source. Auto mode sums
Preview audio to mono and feeds it to the right headphone; the selected source audio is also summed to
This option should typically be programmed with
the same logic channel number for all show profiles
on a single Element, since this function is primarily
used for “on-air” warning light control. Most find it
convenient to use the same channel number as the
CR Monitor audio channel.
Control Room (Monitor 1) Headphone Options
• MONITOR ASSIGNMENT: Choose to load PGM1,
PGM2, PGM3, PGM4, AUX A, AUX B, AUX C, AUX
or No Source if you wish the Profile to be loaded with nothing assigned to the board
op’s headphones.
D, EXT1, EXT2
Allows you to
Use as much as 85 dB of gain reduction on the audio signal sent to the Control Room headphones. You
can also turn gain control Off or Retain Existing
CR HEADPHONES MASTER GAIN:
Setting.
Set the audio
feed to the Control Room headphones to Stereo,
Left, Right, Sum or Retain Existing Setting.
• CR HEADPHONE INDEPENDENT: Lets you
choose whether, for this Show Profile, the Control
Room headphones should be fed the same audio as
the Monitor 1 Speakers (Follow Monitors) or if
•
SIGNAL MODE: CR HEADPHONE:
Figure 6-7: Show Profile - CR Headphone Options
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
6: Show Profiles • 99
•
mono and fed to the left headphone.
Set headphone EQ
•
CR HEADPHONE EQ ACTIVE:
•
CR HEADPHONE EQ HIGH MODE:
•
CR HEADPHONE EQ HIGH FREQUENCY:
•
when the Show Profile is loaded. You can also choose
No Source if you wish the Profile to be loaded with
nothing assigned to the Control Room monitor.
for Bypass, Active or Retain Existing Setting.
•
Use this
drop-down box to choose what source will be auditioned when External is chosen from the Studio 2
monitor assignment list.
You can
specify the top of the High Frequency Shelf, or the
middle frequency of the Bandpass filter (depending
upon which model was chosen for EQ High Mode),
or Retain Existing Setting.
•
Allows you
to Use as much as -85 dB of gain reduction on the
audio signal sent to the Monitor 2 Speakers. You can
also turn gain control Off or Retain Existing Set-
CR HEADPHONE EQ MID FREQUENCY / EQ
•
Switches highfrequency EQ model between Shelf and Bandpass,
or Retain Existing Setting.
Choose the middle frequency
of the Low and Middle EQ bands, or Retain Exist-
SOURCE ID FOR EXTERNAL INPUT:
STUDIO MONITOR MASTER GAIN:
ting.
LOW FREQUENCY:
ing Setting.
Specify the
amount of volume by which the Monitor 2 speakers
will dim when Talk To... or Preview is in use. Use
as much as -30 dB of cut, turn the option Off, or ReSTUDIO
MONITOR
DIM
GAIN:
tain Existing Setting.
•
CR HEADPHONE EQ HIGH GAIN / EQ MID GAIN
dial in boost or cut for the three
EQ bands, or Retain Existing Setting.
/ EQ LOW GAIN:
Studio Monitor (Monitor 2) Options
•
MONITOR ASSIGNMENT:
Choose to load
PGM1,
PGM2, PGM3, PGM4, AUX A, AUX B, AUX C, AUX
6: Show Profiles • 100
D
or an
External
source to the Monitor 2 channel
•
In this
box, you assign Monitor 2 a channel number, effectively making it a “source” to which logic commands
can be associated. You’ll enter this channel number
in the GPIO Setup web page to assign a GPIO port
for these logic functions. See Chapter 4, “GPIO Configuration,” for more information.
GPIO CHANNEL FOR STUDIO MONITOR:
This option should typically be programmed with
the same logic channel number for all show profiles
on a single Element, since this function is primarily
used for “on-air” warning light control.
Staying ahead of the game: You might not
have a second studio controlled from your Element — but we still recommend that you program this option for each Show Profile. Why?
The Studio Monitor logic has other functions,
and works in conjunction with the Control Room
Monitor logic. If you program it now, you won’t
have to go back and do it later.
Figure 6-8: Show Profile - Studio Monitor Options
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Record Mode Screen
Master Module Control Lock Map
Element is a pretty powerful console — perhaps the
most powerful and flexible your jocks have ever used.
And that means that there are probably plenty of functions you’d rather they not have access to; things that
could mess them up and result in the dreaded midnight
phone call.
The Master Module Control Lock Map allows you to
disable access to many Element functions to prevent settings from being tampered with. This can be done on a
per-show basis, so remember that if you wish to disable
access to a certain function globally, you must do so in
every Show Profile.
The screen-shot in Figure 6-3 shows the wide range
of options you can lock down. This includes EQ and
voice dynamics, mix-minus settings, even things like
Monitor and Headphone assignments (for particularly
clueless members of the air staff).
Placing a check mark in any of these boxes means
that the operator will not be able to modify the settings
for that item which you’ve pre-loaded in the Show Profile.
Figure 6-10: Show Profile - Record Mode
Recording Tip: The Program-4 REC bus is active whether or not you choose to use Record
Mode. Most users convenient to use Record
Mode to automatically switch their monitoring
but it is not necessary to enable Record Mode
in order to obtain audio output from the Program-4 Record bus.
Record Mode Configuration
• Record Mode Activation: If Disabled is chosen,
the board op will not be able to use Record Mode
while this Show Profile is loaded. Choose Enabled
to allow Record Mode to be used.
•
Save and Exit
• Save Changes button applies any changes made to
the Auxiliary Send Description and returns you to
the Show Profile Settings menu.
• Back to Show Profile link takes you back to Show
Profile Settings without saving changes.
Enter the
channel number of the GPIO port assigned to your
chosen recording device. This device will automatically begin recording with the board op presses
­Element’s Record Mode Engage key. See Chapter
4: Configuring GPIO for a complete reference of Element GPIO functions.
GPIO Channel for Recorder Control:
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
6: Show Profiles • 101
Figure 6-9: Show Profile - Control Locks
Element’s Record Mode helps talent quickly prepare to record a phone
bit, interview or other program segment
for later air. Any source assigned to the
Program-4 bus automatically feeds the
Record and Phone buses as well. Sources assigned to Program-4/Record
will follow the Record options in their
Source Profiles; the CR Monitor assignment automatically changes to PGM-4,
and the bus assignment keys for channels
assigned to Program-4 will flash when Record Mode
is active.
Group Start Screen
Phone Screen
The Phone screen is used when you’re setting up a
Telos TWOx12, Series 2101 or Nx12 talkshow system for
use with Element. The options in the screen are detailed
fully in Appendix D: Working With Phone Hybrids;
please refer to that chapter for details on setup. If you
do not have a Phone Module installed, this screen will
be empty.
Save and Exit:
• Save Changes button applies any changes made to
the Auxiliary Send Description and returns you to
the Show Profile Settings menu.
•
Figure 6-11: The Group Start assignment map
There may be times when you’d like to have a single
keypress activate multiple faders for convenience’ sake:
interview shows with multiple guests, election coverage
comprising multiple incoming remote lines, in-studio
performances. Element’s Group Start function lets you
designate one or more faders as a Master Fader, and one
or more as a Slave Fader. When a Master fader is turned
On or Off, the Slaves turn On and Off as well.
Back to Show Profile link takes you back to Show
Profile Settings without saving changes.
What’s Next
Chapter 7 explores the use of the powerful Virtual
Mixer (VMIX) capabilities, which allow you to create
custom mixes of networked sources and use them like
you would a single audio source. We will also discuss
VMODE which is a section that allows you to manipulate mono sources in many useful ways. Grab a cold one
and let’s dive in.
6: Show Profiles • 102
Master of your domain: In the case that you
have designated more than one fader as a Master, turning any of the Master faders On or Off
will also operate any other Master faders, as
well as any Slave faders.
Figure 6-4 illustrates how a Group Start map might
look. The grid allows you to designate each fader on
your console as either Master, Slave or Independent
(normal operation).
Note that making a change in this screen also changes the value of the Group Start setting in the fader’s
Channel Options screen (described previously in this
chapter), and vice-versa.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Chapter Seven:
Virtual Mixer (VMIX)
nected to the mixer inputs and your mixer outputs would
be connected to node inputs. Your VMIX is “wired” in a
very similar manner.
Constructing Virtual Mixes with VMIX
Virtual Mixer (or VMIX) is a cool feature present in
every Element system whether used with a StudioEngine
or PowerStation. In addition to the foreground mixing
capabilities present on the Element console itself, there
is a 40-input “virtual” mixer accessed via HTTP interface or PathfinderPC software. This mixer consists of 40
stereo input channels, a direct output for each channel, 8
submixer outputs, and one master out. The 40 channels
are divided equally among the 8 subgroups providing 5
stereo channels in each subgroup mixer.
The various VMIX outputs described above will become sources to your Livewire network and they can be
manipulated in the same manner as any other Livewire
audio source. A VMIX source may be applied to an Element fader, assigned to a node destination or simply
monitored by PathfinderPC.
The fundamental concepts of Livewire sources, destinations, inputs and outputs can be confusing to new users - especially as they apply to VMIX. Here is a review:
• Livewire sources are audio streams that are being delivered into your Livewire network.
• Livewire destinations can be physical outputs (that
are connected to external device inputs) or virtual inputs to which Livewire audio streams are delivered.
• VMIX Inputs are actually Livewire destinations since
they are virtual inputs to which Livewire streams are
being delivered.
• VMIX outputs are Livewire Sources since they represent new Livewire streams that are being introduced into our Livewire network.
If you are having trouble with this concept, it may be
helpful to think of the VMIXer as a standalone piece of
hardware. If you visualize wiring an external line mixer
to your network, the Livewire destinations would be con-
The VMIX main mix output provides a mix of all
active inputs, up to the maximum of 40. Each submixer
input includes an on/off setting, a gain setting, and automatic fade-up/fade-down time parameters. The VMIXer
works completely independently of the Element surface
and can be used without an Element if desired. In addition to static control of VMIX through its web pages,
Axia’s PathfinderPC software can also be used to dynamically control VMIX and create mixing functions
based on a variety of system-wide parameters.
StudioEngine VMIX Controls
In an Axia system, all audio processing occurs in the
StudioEngine — the Element console itself does no audio processing. That’s why VMIX settings are found in
the StudioEngine HTTP pages.
You may have noted that the Element HTTP
pages may also have a VMIX section. This is
the remnants of an earlier implementation of
VMIX, wherein the control was shared between
the Engine and the console. With Element 2.0
software, we have begun the process of transitioning to VMIX control on the StudioEngine side
only, but controls are mirrored on the Element
configuration pages to provide a smooth transition for users upgrading from earlier versions.
This chapter may make reference to the earlier
implementation for clarification reasons.
Even though the “V” in VMIX stands for “virtual”,
you can in fact perform a certain amount of “hands-on”
mixing. Although you don’t have physical control of the
virtual faders or virtual ON/OFF switches, adjustments
made to the VMIX take effect as soon as you apply them.
While you may not wish want to operate an entire show
this way, it’s valuable to know that VMIX changes saved
“on the fly” will affect your output streams immediately.
In the HTTP pages of the StudioEngine, there is a
Virtual Mixer section and a V-Mode section (We’ll get
to the V-Mode portion later in this chapter). The portions
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
7: Virtual Mixer • 103
What is VMIX?
of this page that display settings on a grey background
are indicators only, not controls. Settings displayed on
white backgrounds are controls, and can be adjusted.
At the top of the page, you can see the name of the
Engine you are logged into. Below are eight submixers, each with five stereo inputs. All eight submixes are
summed into the VMIX Main. You’re probably already
thinking that there are a lot of things you can do with
this setup!
Figure 7-1 shows a portion of the VMIX setup found
in the Studio Engine web pages. It shows the first of the
eight Submixes (VMIX 1). Let’s look at the controls and
see what they do.
7: Virtual Mixer • 104
VMIX Main is the sum of all eight submixes. Unless
you really need a stream that combines the audio outputs
of all the submixes, you may leave this disabled — it
doesn’t need to be Enabled for the submixers to work.
In Figure 7-1, the channel is Disabled (default setting).
If you need to use this mix, verify that the Channel number assigned to it is a unique channel number (just as you
would in configuring the channel numbers assigned to
Audio Node streams). When enabled, you can use this
source anywhere in your network.
In most cases, the VMIX Subs are the only channels you will need to enable. Select the type of Livewire
mode needed for the application (Live or Standard Stereo). Provide an appropriate unique channel number to
generate and send a Multicast signal to the network.
Only enable Submixes you intend to actively use; active submixes without any activity simply clutter up your
network with empty streams and waste your StudioEngine’s processing resources.
At the bottom of each of the eight submix sections is
an ­Apply button. Any changes you make will be saved
when this button is pressed. Be sure to save the changes
for each submixer as they are configured.
Other controls for each of the Submixer’s five input
channels include:
• Src Name: Enter a user friendly name for the stream
you want to assign to this input.
• Channel: Enter the unique channel number of your
audio source.
• In Stream Type: In most cases this drop down
will be set to From Source. If a source’s Backfeed
(unique feed or mix-minus audio) is desired as in input into the mixer, select To Source. (If this instruction is not clear, please review material in Chapter 3
on backfeeds and mix-minus earlier in this manual to
FIgure 7-1: Engine VMIX screen
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
network as a unique source, post the ON/OFF and
gain stage of the VMIX. Just provide a channel number to each “VMIX Fader” you’d like to send out.
• Out Stream Type: Set the stream type you want to
provide to the network for each VMIX output (Live
Stream, Standard Stream or Disabled) After you’ve
given the Submix output a unique Channel number,
enable it here. (Normally all of the VMIX “fader”
channels remain “Disabled” unless you have other
uses for them.)
• Status/Audio: An indicator field to tell you whether
the stream is valid and audio is present. Note that if
you have just enabled VMIX streams, you will need
to click Apply to commit your changes. This will reload the browser page and refresh the Status fields.
What can you do with a VMIX?
Now that you know how to set up and enable VMIX,
what might you do with it? Here are some examples.
A mix of sources to monitor
Some facilities may need to monitor one or more
sources in addition to program audio, like the “squawk
channel” some satellite feed providers use to relay announcements. If you wanted to monitor this “squawk”
audio on your Preview speaker without taking up a fader
assignment, you could create a mix of the “squawk”
source and the Preview mix from the engine. The Submix Out would be the audio source that you would route
to the Preview speaker.
Note: In this example, the “squawk” audio
would not be muted if the CR Mic were turned
on, as a normal Preview channel would be.
GPIO control of your VMIX
Imagine that you have a night jock that should monitor all four radio stations in your cluster. To help make
sure this actually happens, you could send all four off-air
signals as sources into a VMIX and take the output of
its submix to a monitor. An Accessory Panel or external
button wired to a GPIO port could provide a “press and
hold” function to allow the jock to monitor the sources
momentarily. This example is only possible with PathfinderPC control of VMIX.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
7: Virtual Mixer • 105
understand what these terms mean.)
• Status/Audio: These are status fields; OK is shown
for valid streams and ERR for invalid streams (usually, an invalid stream error indicates a duplicate or
missing source - double-check your Channel Number entries). The Audio box provides a snapshot of
the audio level with color indicator. Since this indicator is not Java-enabled, it is not dynamically updated. You will need to refresh your browser to observe
changes in level.
• Enable: Turns the input channel ON or OFF; the
boxes just below provide an option to set the “fade
up” and “fade down” times.
• Fade Time: These two fields contain time values
that control the rate in which the audio goes from
OFF to ON and visa versa. If the source is off, gain
is negative infinity (not adjustable, just a law of nature). When the source goes ON, the time in which
the audio adjusts form OFF to ON (the gain value set
in the first field) is the “Up time”. It the field is set to
1 second, the audio will “fade up” to the gain value
in 1 second. If the field is set to 0, the audio will have
no fade period and simply just turn on at the gain
value specified. The second field controls the ON to
OFF fade time. This function can be used to create
cross fades between sources when PathfinderPC is
dynamically making changes to the VMIX based on
conditions met.
• Gain: You’ll find a Master gain setting for the Submix (the mix of all five inputs) at the top of this column, followed by individual gain settings for each
input that establish the gain for the input when it is
in the ON state.
• Out Name: This column shows the name of the
stream as it will appear when viewed in source assignment boxes elsewhere on the network.
• Channel (the 2nd instance of it): Assigns a channel number to the VMIX output which is a Livewire
source. Just as each audio source from an Audio Node
and each mix and monitor feed from a StudioEngine
must have a unique channel number, so do each of
the VMIX sources that you want to make available
to the network. In most cases only the Submix output
itself needs a unique channel number, but if you so
desire, each VMIX input can also be sent back to the
PathfinderPC Control of VMIX
PathfinderPC server can be used to “control” VMIX.
How? There are two modes by which PathfinderPC can
control VMIX.
First, as a background controller, PathfinderPC can
monitor Livewire system parameters or receive commands from external devices like satellites, button panels, or automation systems and react to them by changing the state of VMIX ON/OFF, Gain, Time Up, and/
or Time Down fields. This provides many different
possibilities for facility automation, Intercom functions,
or whatever else you might imagine. For example, the
combo of PathfinderPC and VMIX could duplicate the
function provided by other products that are controlling
audio switching in many radio facilities. Refer to documentation on PathfinderPC for further information.
Secondly, an exciting new feature of PathfinderPC is
VMIX Control. This is a software fader control option
that is provided with PathfinderPC Pro. VMIX Control
brings the operation of VMIX out of the background and
provides a graphical user interface with software faders.
Figure 7-2 shows an example of a VMIX control GUI.
About PathfinderPC and VMIX: There
are several ways that PathfinderPC can be
used for background control VMIX.
First, VMIX functions can be used both as qualifiers and actions in stack events. This means
that a designer can select GPIO triggers, time
based events, user button pushes, serial port
commands, and other options and combinations
of options to decide when to make changes to
any fader in a VMIXER. The user can make a
gain change based on these events, turn a
channel off or on, and or adjust the fade times,
giving complete control over the VMIXer based
on any of the stacking events qualifiers.
Second, PathfinderPC provides an ACU protocol
translator which uses the VMIX system to mimic
hardware devices such as a Sine Systems ACU
to a Prophet Automation System. In this way, a
Prophet system can control the mixing capabilities of VMIX just as if they were ACU channels.
In this scenario, each VMIX submixer becomes
one 5 Channel ACU. GPIO hardware devices
can also be mapped to the Channels within
PathfinderPC and it will allow those triggers to
pass through to Prophet if the associated audio
channels are turned on just like the ACU. The
PathfinderPC suite also includes a Bridge application that may be run on the Prophet system to convert the serial data to TCP, which can
then be passed to multiple “clustered” PathfinderPC servers for redundancy.
Finally, PathfinderPC’s Software Authority protocol translator includes commands to control
any VMIXer present on Element consoles in the
system; any machine that can send user defined
serial or TCP commands can also control and read
VMIX functions through PathfinderPC. Using these techniques VMIX can be used as a
fully automated virtual mixer in the background
of each Element. (See the PathfinderPC manual
for the specific details on configuring PathfinderPC with VMIX.)
Manipulating Streams With VMODE
7: Virtual Mixer • 106
Figure 7-2: PathfinderPC VMIX Control
What does VMODE do?
VMIX Control enhances VMIX by providing realtime, foreground control of VMIXer parameters. It also
allows us to monitor levels of streams associated with
VMIX faders. VMIX Control is often used in applications such as a news workstation where you require only
a few inputs.
As you know, audio processing in the modern world
requires DSP. The StudioEngine provides the DSP for
Axia IP-Audio networks.
You’ve probably noticed that nearly all audio within
an Axia network travels as stereo Livewire streams. Audio Node inputs (with the exception of Mic Nodes) are
stereo, and so are Engine default sources. Most of the
time, this is just what you need. But in some cases, an
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
VMODE is an addition to the StudioEngine toolbox
that addresses this requirement; its job is to help strip,
sum, or compile a custom audio stream from other available streams in the network.
VMODE Controls
VMode, as shown in Figure 7-3, has the capacity for
up to eight separate stream-manipulation operations. The
controls are as follows:
• Input Selector contains a drop down menu that
allows you to select from a range of sources for
each VMODE input. You may choose from local
StudioEngine sources including PGM-1/2/3/4,
the Record bus, Phone bus, Aux Send A/B/C/D,
VMIX SUB 1/2/3/4/5/6/7/8, and VMIX MAIN.
You can also choose External, which then allows
you to select any other network source by entering
its channel number.
and Channel are active when the Input
Selector described above is set to External. You
may type any convenient title in the Src Name box
to identify the source; the C
­ hannel column is where
you would enter the channel number of the source
you want to perform a VMODE operation upon.
• Src
Name
• Stream Type follows the conventions found elsewhere in this manual.
»» Select From Source if you’re using a normal
source generated by studio equipment connected
to the Axia network.
»» Select To Source if you plan to use the specified stream as a backfeed (mix-minus) to a phone,
codec or IFB channel.
»» Surround is only used if the console is in Surround (5.1+2) mixing mode.
•
and Audio indicate the health of each particular channel.
»» Status indicates OK to inform you that a stream
is working normally.
Status
»» Audio shows a colored tally to indicate audio
presence.
•
is the magic box that transforms your
stereo stream into something else. You may choose
from any of the following options:
»» Pass Stereo: Passes the Left and Right channels
as is, without modification.
»» Upmix from L: In Surround mixing mode, takes
Left channel and creates 5.1 upmix. In Stereo
mixing mode, creates mono sum from Left channel.
»» Upmix from R: In Surround mixing mode, takes
Right channel and creates 5.1 upmix. In Stereo
mixing mode, creates mono sum from Right
channel.
»» Upmix from L+R: In Surround mixing mode,
sums Left and Right channels and creates 5.1 upmix. In Stereo mixing mode, creates mono sum
from both channels.
»» Upmix from stereo: In Surround mixing mode,
creates 5.1 upmix from stereo input. In Stereo
mixing mode, passes Left and Right channels
without modification.
»» Downmix from 5.1: In Surround mixing mode,
takes 5.1 Surround source and creates stereo
downmix. In Stereo mixing mode, mutes audio
(do not use).
»» Pass all: In Surround mixing mode, passes 5.1
Surround input without modification. In Stereo
mixing mode, passes Left and Right channels
without modification.
»» Split L -6: Stereo mixing mode only. Sums Left
and Right channels, reduces gain of the sum by
6dB and places mix on Left output channel.
»» Split R -6: Stereo mixing mode only. Sums Left
and Right channels, reduces gain of the sum by
6dB and places mix on Right output channel.
»» Split L -3: Stereo mixing mode only. Sums Left
and Right channels, reduces gain of the sum by
3dB and places mix on Left output channel.
»» Split R -3: Stereo mixing mode only. Sums Left
and Right channels, reduces gain of the sum by
3dB and places mix on Right output channel.
Audio Mode
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
7: Virtual Mixer • 107
application surfaces that requires only one channel of an
audio stream, or a mono sum. VMODE is an easy way to
make this happen.
»» Combine LR, 5.1: Used in Surround mode to
construct an eight-channel (5.1+Stereo) combined output. Takes Left and Right from first
VMIX input and combines it with the 5.1 audio
from the second VMIX input.
»» Combine 5.1, LR: Same as above, but takes 5.1
audio from the first VMIX input and combines it
with Left and Right from second VMIX input to
create 5.1+Stereo combined output.
The Combine options presented next are designed to work with a pair of inputs at a time.
There are eight VMODE inputs (4 pairs). If you
choose Combine L,L for the Audio Mode of the
first output, the Left channel from that input
(row 1) will be passed to the Left channel of the
output, and the Left channel of the second input
(row 2) will be passed to the Right channel of
the output. You could then Combine R,R on output 2, or pass
stereo on output 1, and combine LR, 5.1 on output 2 — or make any other combination you like.
The only limitation is that each output has access
to only two of the 8 inputs, as grouped in pairs.
In Figure 7-3, Output channel 301 will have the
Left channel from Aux Send A on the Left and
Left channel from Aux Send B on the Right using
the Combine L,L Audio Mode.
7: Virtual Mixer • 108
»» Combine L,L: Left channel of first VMIX input
is sent to Left output channel, and Left channel
of second VMIX input is sent to Right output
­channel.
»» Combine L,R: Left channel of first VMIX input
is sent to Left output channel, and Right channel of second VMIX input is sent to Right output
­channel.
»» Combine R,L: Right channel of first VMIX input is sent to Left output channel, and Left channel of second VMIX input is sent to Right output
channel.
»» Combine R,R: Right channel of first VMIX input is sent to Left output channel, and Right channel of second VMIX input is sent to Right output
­channel.
• Out Name shows the name of the VMODE output
stream as it will appear on the Axia network. This
cannot be changed.
•
is the unique channel given to the stream
so that it can be identified and used in the network.
Be certain to replace the default channel numbers to
avoid confusion.
Channel
• Out
Stream Type: Choose from Live Stereo,
and Disabled. Only enable
VMODE streams you intend to actively use; active
streams without any activity simply clutter up your
network with empty streams and create needless extra work for your StudioEngine!
Standard Stereo
•
Indicates stream health and audio
level indicator as explained in the VMIX section.
Status/Audio:
VMODE Examples
Now that you know how to set up and enable
FIgure 7-3: Engine VMODE section
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Create a mono stream.
Imagine you’ve got a satellite receiver connected to
an Audio Node. Sometimes, the program content that interests you is received on only the Left channel — there
is other content on the Right channel that you don’t want
to air! Using VMODE, you can split the L and R channels and create a new source using just the channel you
want, like so:
1. Choose External in the Input Selector box.
2. Type the receiver’s name in the Src Name box.
3. Enter the unique channel number of the receiver
in the Channel box.
4. Leave In Stream Type set as From Source.
5. Choose Upmix from L in the Audio Mode
box.
6. Enter a unique channel number in the Output
Channel box.
7. Choose a stream type from the Out Stream
Type box (you can choose Standard because this is
not live audio).
8. Click the Apply V-Mode Settings button.
You’ve just created a mono source with only the content you want that can be routed wherever you like.
4. Now, within VMODE, choose an input pair and
set their Input Selector boxes to Aux Send A and
Aux Send B.
5. Set the Audio Mode of the first of the two
VMODE inputs rows to Combine L,L.
6. Create a unique channel number and stream
type for your new VMODE stream. This unique
channel will contain the Left channel of Aux Send
A on its Left output channel, and the Left channel of
Aux Send B on its Right output channel.
7. Load your new VMODE stream to an Element
fader and assign it to PGM-4/Record. Voila!
What’s Next
You’ve learned about nearly all of Element’s functions, learned how to set up Show and Source Profiles,
configure Virtual Mixers, and more. Now, if you’re ready
to explore the final frontier, join us in Chapters 8 , 9 and
10 for a look at Element, StudioEngine and PowerStation
advanced settings.
Create a Split Record feed with Gain Control
Element v2.x introduces a “split” record function
that can be enabled in any devices’ Source Profile; this
allows you to send a sources’ audio to one channel of the
stereo Record bus. You’d like to use this split-recording
for an interview with a host several guests, placing the
host on the Left channel and all the other sources (guest
mics, phone callers, etc.) on the Right channel. Plus,
each source needs to have an independent gain stage
separate from the on-air (PGM-1) mix. Complex yes; but
with VMODE you can do it.
1. Using Element console controls, place the
Host’s mic into the Aux Send A bus, pre-fader (ON
PRE).
2. Place each additional source to be recorded on
the right channel into the Aux Send B bus, pre-fader.
3. Make certain that the Aux Send A and Aux
Send B buses are ON and at a suitable gain level.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
7: Virtual Mixer • 109
VMODE, here are a few examples of how you might
use it.
The cup steams, sweet scent
wafting lightly in the air.
7: Virtual Mixer • 110
Mmmmm... it is Earl Grey.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Chapter Eight:
Advanced Element Controls
In Chapters 1 and 2, we covered the basics of setting up your Element when used with the StudioEngine
or PowerStation. Those chapters were intended to get
you up and running quickly. Now that you’ve read this
far, you should consider yourself an advanced user! In
keeping with your dawning guru status, it’s time for a
thorough look at all of the controls found in the E
­ lement
configuration Web pages.
The HTTP interface to the Element is very similar
whether you are using the Element with StudioEngine or
PowerStation. The home page for the PowerStation has
more options since this is an integrated product including the Element and other modules.
Note: The Element can be used with either the
StudioEngine or the PowerStation. Advanced
Settings for StudioEngine are found in Chapter
9 and PowerStation settings in Chapter 10.
Fig. 8-1: Element Control Center (with PowerStation)
The Element Control Center
Figures 8-1 and 8-2 show the first screen you will see
when you log into your Element or PowerStation from
your Web browser. The main menu runs down the left
side and gives access to all of Element’s options and settings. In the main window you can see at a glance what
version of Element software is loaded, system information such as console uptime, network link integrity and
CPU stats, and more. This information screen is accessible without a password; clicking on any menu heading
will prompt you for a password. As you can see, the PowerStation menu has many more options that are related to
its integrated MixEngine, IO subsections and Ethernet
switch. We will deal with those later - this chapter is
focussed on the Element console and its configuration.
Fig. 8-2: Element Control Center (with StudioEngine)
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
8: Advanced Element Controls • 111
Element Configuration Screens
The Setup Menu
We touched briefly on the Setup screen in Chapters 1
and 2. Now let’s look at the rest of the tools on this page.
8: Advanced Element Controls • 112
•
Network Configuration contains the fields for the
Element’s IP Address and other network functions.
»» Hostname is the unique name you give the console to identify it in the Web interface. You might
want to name it after the studio it’s in.
»» IP Address: This Element’s unique network address. In the case of the PowerStation, the Ethernet switch and Audio I/O will be automatically
assigned the next two addresses in sequence. If
a PowerStation AUX exists, it will be assigned a
fourth address in this sequence. Make sure all of
these addresses are available.
»» Netmask: Enter your network’s submask here.
»» Gateway: If you have a core switch or a network
gateway to allow access from outside your facility, enter that address here. A gateway is required
for advanced IP address configurations and for
connection to an external NTP server.
»» DNS-0 & DNS-1: If your Axia network is connected to the “outside world”, you can specify
your ISP’s DNS servers in these fields. Fig. 8-3: Element with PowerStation - Setup screen
Why would you want to do this? Well, you could
simplify NTP access by entering the server’s
name, tmc.edu instead of 128.249.1.1. Or,
if you set up a DNS server in-house, you could
give real names to your StudioEngines and Phone
systems, then use those names instead of IP addresses in Element configuration pages.
•
Web Access Password: By default, the user name
is set to user and the password is blank. If you want
to add a password, type it in and click Change. Note
that passwords will not display here once changed, so
be sure to make a record of all changes.
Note: If you are using your Element console
with a PowerStation, its software is integrated
with the StudioEngine of the PowerStation. See
Chapter 10 for the PowerStation software update procedure.
Fig. 8-4: Element with StudioEngine - Setup screen
•
Software Update (Element with Studio Engine
only) This is where you upload new Element operat-
ing software.
»» Base File System Upgrade: Most Element
software updates do not include a Base File update, but if one is required, click this link to upload and apply the new code.
»» Software Versions shows you the software
packages currently stored on your Element’s flash
memory card. The blue radio button is displayed
next to the active software image.
»» Set Current Image: When you want to change
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
the active software package, click on the radio
button next to the image you wish to activate, and
click this button. A reboot is necessary to load the
new software choice.
»» Delete Current Image: Click the radio button next to software you wish to delete and click
this button. Note that you cannot delete the active
software image.
Good Housekeeping: It’s best not to keep too
many old software images around. They clutter
up Element’s flash memory, leaving less space
for Show Profiles, syslogs, and other important
data. We recommend that you keep only one
previous software package stored in Element.
»» Upload New Image: From time to time, Axia
makes new software packages available for
download from www.AxiaAudio.com. Use the
Browse and Upload Image buttons to install
new software, as described in the Technical Bulletin that accompanies each software release.
»» Reboot shuts down Element and restarts it.
(Remember that mixing takes place in the
StudioEngine, so this can be done even while
you are on the air. Interruptions of your program
stream, if any, will last less than 1 second.) A reboot is required after changing active software.
User Logo: This utility allows you to place your station’s logo on the Element operator display. To do so,
create a PNG file in Photoshop or any similar image
editor. This file must measure a maximum of 129 x
97 pixels to fill the allocated display area. Use the
Browse and Upload User Logo buttons to install
your logo file. Upon reboot, this logo will appear on
the Operator’s display. To delete a displayed logo,
click the Delete User Logo button and reboot.
• Clock Settings: You may specify time to be displayed in a 12-hour or 24-hour format. The Element
can optionally display a large digital clock and a
small analog clock as opposed to the default which
is a large analog and small digital. Here is where you
specify your preference. Reboot after changing.
• Fader Offset: Some users may want to change their
•
“nominal” fader position. This is a global setting that
permits you to do this. For example, a setting of +6
will increase the “sensitivity” of your faders by 6 dB.
The faders in this example would have to be run 6
dB lower in order for the PGM audio output to be the
same as the -0dB default setting. Your meters will
always represent the actual audio levels.
• Screenshot Compression: You can save a shot of
the Operator’s display for documentation, troubleshooting or training purposes. You may choose to
save your screenshot in JPEG or PNG format, with
three levels of compression quality using the Compression Type and Compression Quality dropdown boxes. Click Save Settings when you are
done.
• Element Configuration: This section lets you
Backup and Restore all Element configuration set-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
8: Advanced Element Controls • 113
The Customize Menu
Fig. 8-5: Element Customize Screen
tings. Backup file format is standard XML.
Save your work! We recommend backing
up your Configuration files whenever a major
change is made, or is about to be made, to your
Element. Whether you are re-configuring Show
or Source profiles en masse or about to perform
a software update, it’s always a good idea to
have a copy of your important data.
Log, Log History and Log Setup Menus
Element keeps a detailed log of each button press,
fader movement and other system events. Choosing the
Log menu item lets you examine the last 100 logged activities; choosing the Log History menu item allows you
to view an entire day’s log at one time and delete old log
files if you choose. The oldest log files are deleted automatically as storage space dictates.
Pressing your browser’s Back button will return you
to the Element menu. These screenshots may be requested by tech support if unusual behavior is reported. To
save a screenshot, simply right-click over the image and
select “save as” to name and save a copy of the screenshot on your local PC. The screenshot settings are configured on the Customize Menu.
The Modules Menu
The Modules heading displays a detailed list of the
installed modules in your Element console.
The Log Setup menu item allows you to specify an
external Syslog server and to configure the debug level.
Use this section if directed to do so by Tech Support.
The Screenshot Menu
8: Advanced Element Controls • 114
Choosing this menu item immediately captures a
shot of the Element’s Operator screen. This, in combination with the activity log, can be used to determine
just what the operator is seeing — useful for at-home
troubleshooting during those 6 AM Sunday phone calls.
Fig. 8-7: Module Information screen.
Fig. 8-6: Element Screenshot Example
Some of these fields are for diagnostics; below is a
list of those you might find useful:
•
The Address field displays the number Axia
has assigned to each fader type, followed by the setting of its module rotary ID selector switch. This is
useful in determining if any modules’ ID selectors
are set to duplicate values (see Appendix C for information on correctly setting module ID selectors).
•
The Type field gives you the actual name of
each module (i.e., 4-Fader, Master, US Phone, etc.).
•
The Status field tells you whether or not the
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
module is working, i.e., communicating with the Element CPU.
• The Firmware Version field displays the fader firmware version that’s loaded on each module.
At the bottom of the page, you’ll see a lot of information pertaining to the health of the Element’s CANBus
communication network. This is for diagnostic purposes
only.
Brightness Control Menu
This menu offers several useful options for fine-tuning your Element’s various LED and LCD displays to
your studio’s ambient lighting. All values are expressed
in percent.
From time to time, new module firmware may become available from Axia.
You may confirm the current Module Firmware
versions installed in your Element and install new
firmware by choosing this menu item.
Firmware Update:
To update Module Firmware, use the Browse
and Upload Image buttons to install the module
firmware package obtained from Axia Support.
Once a new software image has been uploaded, the
Firmware Update screen will change to notify you
which modules have new firmware available.
Each module must be updated individually. To update a module, simply click on its U
­ pdate link.
Note that updating a module takes it offline
during the update process. While audio playing
through the module’s faders will continue uninterrupted, keep in mind that while updating
(usually about 10-15 seconds) you will not be
able to adjust gain or turn faders on or off on
the module being updated.
CAN Bus Information Menu
This screen shows statistics about CANBus communications between Element’s CPU and control surface.
Note that you will need Java to view the graphical information presented in this window. During normal operation, you will see two lines, one red and one blue. These
lines provide a graphical representation of the CANBus
transmit and receive data. You will see a momentary
spike only when a button is pressed on the console or
on a CANBus accessory panel. If these lines show erratic activity, or if they do not follow the same general
trends, you may have a CANBus cabling or termination
Fig. 8-8: Module Brightness Control
LED Icon Brightness lets you adjust the luminance
of the Status Symbols / fader numbers on the Element overbridge (the little windows just above the
source identifiers).
• LED Text Display Brightness does the same for
the alphanumeric displays that indicate what source
is loaded to each fader channel.
• Round Button Brightness adjusts the luminance
of the interior LEDs that illuminate Element’s Options, PGM 1-4, Monitor, Headphone and other
selection keys.
• ON / OFF Button Brightness: You can probably
figure this one out on your own :^)
• User Module LED Text Display Flash Off-State
Brightness: If you have any SmartSwitch modules
or accessory panels installed, you can use this setting
to determine how “dark” display text is when that
text flashes for attention. A value of 0 makes the text
flash from completely on to completely off; a higher
value keeps the text slightly illuminated in its “off”
state.
• User Module Button LCD Brightness: This affects only SmartSwitch modules and panels. Determines how bright the backlighting is for each SmartSwitch button’s colored LCD screen.
• User Module Button LCD Contrast: Adjusts the
•
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
8: Advanced Element Controls • 115
•
problem.
contrast between the text and background areas of
SmartSwitch button displays.
•
Production Module Circular Bargraph Bright-
Determines the luminance of the lit segments
that surround the adjustment knobs on the optional
Element Production Module.
ness:
Phone Channels Menu
This screen allows you to set up Element for use with
Telos Series 2101, TWOx12 and Nx12 broadcast phone
systems. For more details, please refer to Appendix D:
Working With Phone Hybrids.
User Modules Menu
8: Advanced Element Controls • 116
This menu allows you to set up and use Axia accessory SmartSwitch and Film-Cap Button modules and accessory panels with your Element console. In the example shown in Figure 8-9, a Mic/Headphone control panel
has been associated with a microphone named Studio 1
Mic. In this case, the panel would be used by a studio
guest for remote control of his/her mic and headphone
selection.
Script Information Menu
Element consoles use standard Javascript code for
some routine functions. This screen is for diagnostics
and custom programming only and should not be used
without instructions from Axia Support.
V-Mixer Menu
Element allows you to mix up to 40 sources using
a built-in Virtual Mixer, consisting of eight submixers
controlling five inputs each. Setup and use is described
in Chapter 7: Virtual Mixer.
Note that the Element when used with StudioEngine
may have VMIX settings associated with the Element.
This is available for backward compatibility only. Currently, all VMIX and VMODE functions reside completely within the StudioEngine. If you are using a PowerStation, this is not a concern since the Element and
Engine functions reside within a single unit.
NTP Menu
Each individual Element in your network can use either its own internal clock or an external time server for
timekeeping. Here is how you set up NTP time sync.
Fig. 8-8: NTP Menu controls
Fig. 8-9: Element User Panels
For more information on these panels, please refer to
Appendix E: Accessory Panels and User Panels.
GPIO Configuration Menu
This menu is where you configure the assignments
for the eight opto-isolated GPIO connections found on
the Element CPU connection panel. For a thorough discussion of this screen and how to configure GPIO, please
refer to Chapter 4: Configuring GPIO. Note that the
GPIO section of the PowerStation is not associated with
the Element but rather with the MAIN and AUX I/O subsystems.
1.Choose the NTP ON radio button.
2.Enter the IP address of an NTP server in the Primary
box, and a Secondary NTP server if available.
3.Set your Time Zone offset using the dropdown box.
4.Click Save.
To disable NTP service, simply choose NTP OFF and
click Save.
You can tell if your NTP connection is working by
observing the presence of an NTP indicator on your digital click display.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
If you wish to connect to a public or external NTP
server, you will need an Internet gateway. Be sure to
specify a valid gateway in your IP configuration.
Engine Menu
If you are using your Element with a standalone
StudioEngine, this is an alternate location to enter the IP
Address of the StudioEngine your Element is paired with
(typically this is entered using the IP Address Book
screen). Click Save if you’ve made changes.
Sources & Profiles Configuration Menu
Choosing this menu item takes you to the Profiles
submenus.
Show Profiles and Source Profiles Menus
These menus allow you to construct and administer
Show and Source Profiles specific to this Element console. Refer to Chapter 3: Working With Sources and
Chapter 6: Show Profiles for details on using these controls.
What’s Next
You’ve learned about all of Element’s advanced
functions, Now, if you’re ready and eager to learn more,
proceed to Chapters 9 and 10 for a look at StudioEngine
and PowerStation advanced settings.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
8: Advanced Element Controls • 117
Legacy Configuration Menu
This screen (available on older Element software
only) enables you to restore any backups you may have
of Element Configuration files made with software prior
to Version 2.x. Use the Browse and Restore buttons to
perform the desired actions.
Featureless paper
this page would have been empty
8: Advanced Element Controls • 118
save for this haiku.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Chapter Nine:
StudioEngine Controls
In this chapter, we’ll look in-depth at all of the controls and options found in the StudioEngine web pages.
Note: If you are using you Element with a standalone StudioEngine, this chapter is for you. If
you are using your Element with PowerStation,
please jump to Chapter 10.
the password field empty.
Some of the menu items presented here – such as
Fader Channels and Stream Statistics – are purely
informational in nature. Others – Options, System –
contain options and settings that are used for setup of
your StudioEngine.
The Fader Channels Menu
Settings shown here are not adjustable. Useful for
remote assistance or diagnostics, this page can tell you
what sources are loaded to each fader of the Engine’s
associated control surface, along with the headphone
monitor source and backfeed (mix-minus), if any, is being fed to each loaded source.
Fig. 9-2: Fader Channels screen
Another informational screen, choosing this menu
option shows you what audio sources are currently assigned to your console’s:
• Auxiliary returns,
• Control Room monitor and headphone channels,
• Studio Monitor channel,
• Source Preview (Cue) channel,
• External Preview channel.
Fig. 9-1: StudioEngine Main menu
StudioEngine Configuration Screens
The Main Menu
This is the “jumping-off” point for all of the
StudioEngine settings pages, the page you’ll see after
entering your StudioEngine’s IP address into your Web
browser. Upon making any menu choice, you’ll be asked
for a password. The default factory login is user; leave
The Status and Audio boxes will allow you to view the
health and levels of audio that is present.
The “Host Name” field at the top of the page shows
the name you’ve defined for this Engine for confirmation
should you be viewing the page remotely.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
9: StudioEngine Controls • 119
The Return & Monitor Inputs Menu
Fig. 9-3: Return & Monitor Inputs Screen
The Program & Monitor Outputs Menu
9: StudioEngine Controls • 120
This is where you enable and assign unique channel
numbers to all of your console’s outputs. If any of your
Element’s outputs or monitor feeds are disabled in this
menu, that channel will have no audio output.
The outputs you control are:
• Program 1 - 4: Your console’s main Program bus
outputs.
• Program 4 Record: Special output for recording
devices which feeds the contents the Program 4 bus
post-fader and pre-On/Off switch.
• Aux Send 1 - 4: Your console’s stereo Auxiliary
Send buses.
• CR Monitor Direct: This is the output of the monitor selector before the operator’s volume controls and
mutes; useful for feeding a Producer‘s position, or
any other monitoring station with independent headphone volume controls.
• CR Monitor: Contains whatever audio source your
operator has selected to feed the Control Room monitors.
• CR Headphones: Contains whatever audio source
your operator has selected to feed the Control Room
headphones.
• Preview: The feed to the Preview (Cue) speaker.
• Talk to CR: This channel feeds audio to the Control
Room talkback channel whenever the Talk button is
pressed on any Studio Accessory panel.
• Guest Headphones: Contains whatever audio
source has been selected to feed the Guest headphones.
• Studio Monitor: Contains whatever audio source
your operator has selected to feed the Studio monitors.
• Talent Headphones: Contains whatever audio
source has been selected to feed the Talent headphones.
• Talkback: When any console Talk key is pressed,
CR Mic audio is routed, pre-fader, to this channel.
The columns following each of these entries display
the status of each channel and allow you to make changes.
The Channel column, like other similar fields used
throughout the Axia system, is where you enter a unique
channel number for each console output.
Fig. 9-4: Program & Monitor Outputs Screen
The Mode column lets you enable and disable each
output, and set the priority of each stream.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Live Stereo
Apply.
That “Radio” Sound: Over the years, talent
has become used to listening to themselves
off-air during raps, hearing their voices with
dynamics processing applied, and relying on
the levelling effects of processing to “ride the
compressor” when the mic is open.
In the age of HD Radio and 8-second delay, monitoring off the air signal is sadly no longer possible. But monitoring the Program bus leaves
most talent feeling that something’s missing
from their headphones.
To help combat this, Element offers customizable headphone EQ and built-in headphone dynamics processing by Omnia. When this feature
is used, Talent can monitor Program audio with
no delay and still hear the comfortable “air”
sound they’re used to without the hassle and
expense of outboard processors dedicated to
the headphone channel.
The VMIX & VMODE Menu
This menu allows you to view settings and make adjustments to the Element Virtual Mixer system. Please
see Chapter 7, Virtual Mixer, for details on how to use
VMIX and VMODE.
The Intercom Menu
This screen will be active if there is an Intercom
module connected to your Element surface, otherwise an
“Intercom module not connected” notice is presented. If
a module is connected, you will be presented with the
Intercom Channel Assignment options appropriate
for the module installed. In Figure 9-5, a 20 position
module is shown.
Intercom Configuration
• Intercom Label: 10 character name which will be
presented to other intercom stations and displayed on
module channel displays.
• Intercom Alternate Label: 10 character alternate
name used in the same fashion.
• Livewire channel number: A unique channel
number for the audio from this station, which will be
routed to other stations upon a talk exchange. Make
sure this number is unique to your Axia network.
• Preview Mix channel number: Assign a unique
channel number which will be used as the external
preview source in Element show profiles.
• Call drop flash: The amount of seconds for which
the Listen indicator will flash after the call was
dropped, to help identify the station which initiated
the call.
• Trigger Level: Defines the priority of this station,
for cases when multiple stations call the same location. The receiving location will provide priority in
accordance with each devices setting.
• Dim level: Define the degree of dimming, in dB,
which will be applied to lower priority calls. 0 defeats the Dim command.
• Tap to latch timeout: Defines the amount of time
in which a press is considered a “Tap to latch”. The
intercom has a latch feature, where momentarily
pressing the talk button latches the Talk function.
The amount of time defined here defines the maximum time the button is in the “down” state before
the call is considered a press-and-hold call. A value
of 0 defeats the Tap to latch feature. This is a global
setting to the module.
Intercom Key Assignment
The options in this field will vary based on the type
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9: StudioEngine Controls • 121
is for live audio where lowest latency
is required, like Program outputs and mic-to-headphone paths.
• Standard Stereo is for low-priority, non-realtime
audio. Standard streams have higher latency, but offer the best compatibility for systems with PCs using
the Axia IP-Audio driver.
• Disabled turns off outputs you don’t intend to use.
• Integrated Omnia Processing: StudioEngine
contains special audio processing presets by Omnia
that you can apply to the either:
»» Control Room Headphone channel.
»» Program 1 in all monitoring paths
This is provided so that you can simulate the “air
sound” provided by an on-air processor, so that your
jocks can have real-time Program monitoring that
sounds like “air” without having to set up a separate
processor chain. Presets are provided for several formats, as well as reduced-bit rate audio streams. To apply, choose one from the drop-down box and choose
•
9: StudioEngine Controls • 122
GPIO Configuration
This field allows for the configuration of nine “virtual GPIO” ports which can be used to interact with
the Intercom system. More information on this topic is
covered in the IP Intercom manual. These virtual GPIO
ports are accessible through port 4013.
If you need to configure GPIO routing on a physical
GPIO port using a port on the StudioEngine, make sure
to use the syntax
www.xxx.yyy.zzz:4013/n
on the GPIO node so that it is able to observe the GPIO
on the 4013 port.
of module installed; refer to the IP Intercom manual for
full details for your module.
Each module has a numbered key position with
a drop-down that has the known intercom stations or
Livewire channels defined within the “Intercom Livewire
Sources” field. The next drop-down is the Mode option
which allows you to assign the button as a Talk, Listen,
or Talk and Listen button. Selecting a station or source,
and setting its Mode, gives function to that key on the
intercom module. 20-position intercom modules provide
an option to create “pages” which can be toggled if there
are many locations you need to interact with.
Intercom Livewire Sources
Here you can enter a Livewire source that is not an
actual Intercom station. You can then configure the Intercom module to “monitor” this source with a Listen
command, or interface with a third-party Intercom or
two-way radios. More on this configuration is available
in the IP Intercom manual.
Version information
The bottom of the screen shows a version value
for the intercom software. The intercom function is independent from the StudioEngine code, and so has its
own version. This display shows the version of Intercom
code your StudioEngine is running.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
The Options page shows some initial options required for legacy software compatibility.
• Source Sharing: Provides the option to disable source lock on the sources generated by the
StudioEngine. This is only needed for legacy products; all current installs should maintain the default
setting of “Sources lockable”.
• Standard Audio Streams : Provides the option to
change the buffer value for Standard streams that enter the StudioEngine. Default values are suggested.
• Audio mixing: Provides status information only.
• V-Mixer: Defines whether your Element’s Vmix is
controlled by the StudioEngine (desired) or through
legacy Element control. It is suggestd to maintain default settings; this option is provided for legacy users
only.
be very low except for IP-Audio sources under certain
circumstances. Contact tech support if you are experiencing problems and need help in this area.
Fig. 9-6: Stream Statistics Screens
The Network Menu
Enter a unique name for this particular StudioEngine. This name is displayed on various
information and diagnostic screens. Spaces are not
allowed.
• Network Address: This field contains the IP address you’ve assigned for this StudioEngine.
• Netmask: The submask for your IP-Audio Network.
• Gateway: If your Axia network has a network gateway to allow outside access, enter its IP address here.
• Connected Console: Displays the IP address of the
Element console that is connected to your Studio Engine.
•
Host Name:
Fig. 9-5: Options Screen
The Stream Statistics Menu
This screen provides information about all active audio streams in and out of the StudioEngine. This is useful
primarily for diagnostics and contains no settings that
can be modified. Axia tech support may ask you to report
information reported on this page. In general, errors and
defects should be minimal. DSP underruns should also
Fig. 9-7: Network screen
After making changes, click the
save them.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Apply
button to
9: StudioEngine Controls • 123
The Options Menu
The Diagnostics Menu
Most users never have to look at this screen; these
options are normally used only under the guidance of
Axia Tech Support.
»» Informational: Logs all informational messages. This includes all routine events.
»» Debug: Captures all system activity for diagnostic use.
After making changes, click the Apply button to save
them.
• Internal Log Configuration: This menu choice allows you to set the detail level of the log files that are
saved internally in the StudioEngine. There are four
settings ranging from Disabled to Detailed
Two other sections permit you to download a diagnostics trace or to capture a diagnostic information.
These options should be used in consultation with
Axia Tech Support if necessary.
Note that these values are volatile and are not saved
to internal memory; if power is removed from the
device,any information contained in these logs will
be cleared.
System Menu
Fig. 9-8: Diagnostics Screen
Your StudioEngine
can generate detailed logs of system activity. If you
choose to keep syslogs, enter the IP address of the
server on which you wish the logs to be stored.
• Syslog Severity Level Filter: This menu choice
allows you to set the level at which the Syslog begins
storing system events.
»» Emergency: Generates Syslog only if the system is completely unable to operate.
»» Alert: Syslog contains only messages notifying
you that immediate attention is needed for the
system to remain operative.
»» Critical: Syslog contains only messages about
critical system errors.
»» Warning: Syslog contains only messages about
errors that could cause the system to become unstable.
»» Notice: System is operating normally, but Syslog
contains messages about unusual events that you
should know about.
9: StudioEngine Controls • 124
•
Syslog Server (IP Address):
This screen contains several software utilities and information fields pertaining to your StudioEngine.
• The System Status section of the page provides information about the physical state of the
StudioEngine.
»» System Status and Network Status inform
you as to the health of the StudioEngine and its
connection to the Axia network. Both of these indicators must be OK for normal operation.
»» CPU Usage indicates how hard the Engine is
working. This value should never exceed 80%.
»» Link Speed tells you the type of link with which
the Engine is connected to the local network
switch. This should always be 1 Gbs.
»» Network Usage In and Out show how much
bandwidth is being consumed on the Engine-toswitch link.
»» Temperature monitors the temperature of the
StudioEngine CPU. If the temperature exceeds
operating limits, a warning will appear on the
Engine’s front-panel display.
»» Fan 1 and Fan 2 Speed: Monitors the fan speeds
of the Engine’s two internal cooling fans (if your
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
engine is of the variety with fans).
• The Configuration Management section lets you
make backups of and restore your Engine settings.
Use the Browse, Backup and Restore buttons to
accomplish these actions. Use the Reset Cfg button
to reset all of your StudioEngine’s settings to an “asshipped” state. This command will completely erase
any choices you have made and reset your Engine to
the way it came from the factory, so use with caution!
to change the user password for HTTP access to the
StudioEngine. By default, the user name is user and
there is no password.
• The Hardware and Firmware section is where
you upload and apply new operating software for the
StudioEngine.
»» Use the File field and the Browse and Upload
buttons to upload new software to the Engine.
Where are my buttons? Unlike the Element
console itself, where you can store multiple versions of operating software, the StudioEngine
has only two software “banks.” If both banks are
full, you must eliminate one, or you will not see
the File, Browse or Upload controls. Instead,
you’ll see...
• The Restart section lets you remotely Restart the
StudioEngine, performing a complete reboot. Of
course, if the StudioEngine is rebooted, it will stop
delivering audio until is has reloaded its operating
system and the StudioEngine software. This will
take only 1-2 minutes but it will seem like forever!
• The Front Panel Passcode fields allow you to
passcode-protect the physical controls on the Engine’s front panel.
By default, access is open. However, if your Engines
are located in a public space in your facility, you
may wish to set a code to limit front-panel access to
authorized personnel. To enable this feature, enter a
four-digit code in the top box shown in Figure 9-9,
then enter it again in the lower box to confirm. Click
Apply to activate passcode protection.
• The
Remote Access Password
fields allow you
• The Install Bootloader and Upload Intercom
buttons allow you to update both. Do so upon the
suggestion of Axia tech support.
What’s Next
The next chapter covers PowerStation controls.
If you have managed to remember everything you
have read up to this point, congratulations! If there was
an exam, you would pass with flying colors. Well, there
is no exam but there is more great information on specific topics in the Appendices - be sure to check them
out.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
9: StudioEngine Controls • 125
Fig. 9-9: StudioEngine System Screen
»» The Commit to Bank 0 button. Pressing this
button takes the software in Bank 1 and loads it
into Bank 0, which opens Bank 1 for new software.
»» You can run Engine software from either Bank 0
or Bank 1. Simply click on the radio button next
to the software bank you wish to run from, and
click Apply Selected Bank. The Engine will reboot after changing banks, so plan this operation
for off-hours or switch program output to another
studio to avoid program interruptions.
»» The Errors message field will show diagnostic
messages about the state of the StudioEngine
should any fault conditions exist.
Meters dance in time
Waveforms swirl around my skull
9: StudioEngine Controls • 126
Music looks so cool.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Chapter Ten:
PowerStation Controls
In this chapter, we’ll look in-depth at all of the controls and options found in the PowerStation web pages.
Note: If you are using an Element console with
PowerStation, this chapter is for you. If you are
using your Element with StudioEngine, please
refer to Chapters 8 and 9.
PowerStation Configuration Screens
Home Page
This is the “jumping-off” point for PowerStationspecific settings. Previous chapters have covered the
basic items including Source Channel allocation and
configuration of ­Element Source and Show Profiles.
Chapter 8 covered the Element Advanced Controls and
that information will not be repeated here. This chapter
will cover advanced topics related to the PowerStation’s
configuration and advanced features.
Technically speaking, a PowerStation MAIN is really three separate devices with three IP addresses. The
home page shown in Figure 10-1 will link you to all
three devices plus the PowerStation AUX if one exists
however all of these devices have discrete IP addresses.
Once you establish the base IP address for the Element,
the other 2 addresses are automatically assigned. If you
have a PowerStation AUX connected, that IP address is
automatically assigned as well. Use the links shown in
Figure 10-1 to connect to all of the PowerStation’s components. While it may be possible to change the IP addresses of the individual devices to some other scheme,
we strongly recommend that you use the addresses that
have been automatically assigned since upon reboot, the
automatic address scheme for the Ethernet switch and
the MAIN and AUX I/O subsystems will prevail.
Let’s take a look at the home page menu items for the
PowerStation.
Fig. 10-1:PowerStation Home Page
Status
This section is automatically displayed when you
connect to the PowerStation. No password is required to
view this page. Here you can see:
• PowerStation software version info
• System Information including:
»» the version of Linux kernel
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
10: PowerStation Controls • 127
Figure 10-1 shows the PowerStation home page.
From here, you can see links to the various Element
functions, the Audio I/O Manager, MixEngine and Ethernet sections.
•
»» the uptime of the PowerStation expressed in
days, hours and minutes
»» CPU utilization
»» Network utilization - transmit and receive data
rates expressed in Mbps.
File System Information - provides information on memory and solid state disk utilization
for the operating system. Tech Support may ask
for this information if you are experiencing any
problems.
•
•
•
•
Setup
This section contains the network configuration including the base IP address for your PowerStation. If you
need to make changes to the IP scheme, this is where
you do it.
system AUX will be 192.168.0.123.
Netmask: This parameter is determined by your
network administrator. In a simple network, it
will be 255.255.255.0.
Gateway: This is required for advanced IP address schemes; if you intend to access our devices from outside the Livewire LAN; or if you
wish to use an external NTP server.
DNS-0 and DNS-1: Not currently required.
Web Access Password: When you connect
to your PowerStation, the user name is always
“user”. This is where you can change the user
password. Remember that changing this password will have implications if PathfinderPC
software is in use.
Reboot: A reboot is required when any changes are made to the network parameters on the
PowerStation Setup Menu.
10: PowerStation Controls • 128
NTP Setup
This section contains the setting for synchronization
to an NTP (network Time Protocol) server.
Fig. 10-2: PowerStation Setup Screen
•
•
Fig. 10-3: PowerStation NTP Setup Screen
Hostname: Displays the name that has been as-
signed to your PowerStation. This name is assigned in the MixEngine Network menu. It is
recommended that you keep this name short so
it is more easily displayed in other areas of the
system.
IP Address: This is the base IP address for your
PowerStation. For the example shown here, the
base address is 192.168.0.120. In this case, the
PowerStation’s Ethernet switch would be automatically assigned 192.168.0.121; I/O Subsystem MAIN will be 192.168.0.122 and I/O Sub-
•
NTP On/Off:
Does just what it says. You can
tell if NTP is running properly by looking for the
presence of the NTP indicator on the Element
screen - shown below.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
•
NTP Server Address (Primary and Secondary):
Enter the IP address(es) of your NTP server(s)
here. It is common for a PC on your internal
Livewire LAN to be setup as an NTP server.
Time Zone GMT +/-: Specify your GMT offset
here. Note that PowerStation does not yet have
automatic spring and fall DST adjustments. This
feature will be added soon.
Element Surface
The advanced options of the Element surface are
covered in Chapter 8: Advanced Element Controls.
Please refer to that chapter for any setup details regarding the Element console. Operation of the Element is
covered in Chapter 5: Element Operations.
Mix Engine
The PowerStation MAIN includes an integrated
StudioEngine (aka: MixEngine). The implementation is
almost identical to that of a standalone StudioEngine and
these details are covered in Chapter 9: StudioEngine
Controls.
The Fader Channels Menu
Settings shown here are not adjustable. Useful for
remote assistance or diagnostics, this page can tell you
what sources are loaded to each fader of the Engine’s
associated control surface, along with the headphone
monitor source and backfeed (mix-minus), if any, is being fed to each loaded source.
The Return & Monitor Inputs Menu
Another informational screen, choosing this menu
option shows you what audio sources are currently assigned to your console’s:
• Auxiliary returns,
• Control Room monitor and headphone channels,
• Studio Monitor channel,
• Source Preview (Cue) channel,
• External Preview channel.
The “Host Name” field at the top of the page shows
the name you’ve defined for this PowerStation for confirmation should you be viewing the page remotely.
Program and Monitor Out
This is where you enable and assign unique channel
numbers to all of your PowerStation’s Engine sources. If
any of your PowerStation outputs or monitor feeds are
disabled in this menu, that channel will have no audio
output.
The sources you control are:
• Program 1 - 4: Your console’s main Program bus
outputs.
• Program 4 Record: Special output for recording
devices which feeds the contents the Program 4 bus
post-fader and pre-On/Off switch.
• Aux Send 1 - 4: Your console’s stereo Auxiliary
Send buses.
• CR Monitor Direct: This is the output of the monitor selector before the operator’s volume controls and
mutes; useful for feeding a Producer‘s position, or
any other monitoring station with independent headphone volume controls.
• CR Monitor: Contains whatever audio source your
operator has selected to feed the Control Room monitors.
• CR Headphones: Contains whatever audio source
your operator has selected to feed the Control Room
headphones.
• Preview: The feed to the Preview (Cue) speaker.
• Talk to CR: This channel feeds audio to the Control
Room talkback channel whenever the Talk button is
pressed on any Studio Accessory panel.
• Guest Headphones: Contains whatever audio
source has been selected to feed the Guest headphones.
• Studio Monitor: Contains whatever audio source
your operator has selected to feed the Studio monitors.
• Talent Headphones: Contains whatever audio
source has been selected to feed the Talent headphones.
• Talkback: When any console Talk key is pressed,
CR Mic audio is routed, pre-fader, to this channel.
The columns following each of these entries display
the status of each channel and allow you to make changes.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
10: PowerStation Controls • 129
•
The Channel column, like other similar fields used
throughout the Axia system, is where you enter a unique
channel number for each console output.
The Mode column lets you enable and disable each
output, and set the priority of each stream.
»» Fast Stereo are for live audio where lowest latency is required, like Program outputs and micto-headphone paths.
»» Standard Stereo is for low-priority, non-realtime audio. Standard streams have higher latency,
but offer the best compatibility for systems such
as PCs using the Axia IP-Audio driver.
»» Disabled turns off outputs you don’t intend to
use.
10: PowerStation Controls • 130
•
useful primarily for diagnostics and contains no settings
that can be modified. Axia tech support may ask you to
describe information reported on this page. In general,
errors and defects should be minimal. DSP underruns
should also be very low except for IP-Audio sources under certain circumstances. Contact tech support if you
are experiencing problems and need help in this area.
Options
As shown in Figure 10-4, this menu includes two
fields that are display-only and two that can be configured:
This section also
includes the configuration of the Omnia processing
that is included in your PowerStation. The ability
to process Program 1 in all monitoring paths gives
you a processed feed that is similar to the live offair feed that jocks are used to monitoring. With the
advent of HD radio, the live air feed is now delayed
so it is not practical to monitor this signal except for
confidence purposes. By processing Program 1 in
this manner, wherever Program 1 is monitored (operator’s headphones, control room monitors, studio
monitors, guest headphones, backfeeds, etc) it can
be processed universally by applying this setting. Of
course, we don’t touch the regular Program 1 outputs that are feeding your transmitter. You will have
other processing equipment for that purpose.
Integrated Omnia Processing:
To apply, choose one from the drop-down box and
choose Apply.
Fig. 10-4: PowerStation MixEngine Options
•
•
V-Mixer and V-Mode
Chapter 7: Virtual Mixer (VMIX) fully discussed
the configuration of the VMIX and VMODE sections of
the MixEngine. Please refer to that chapter for information on that topic.
Stream Statistics
This screen provides information about all active
audio streams in and out of the StudioEngine. This is
•
•
Displays the name of the PowerStation that has been configured in the Network
Menu.
Audio Mixing: Displays the mixing mode - either Stereo or Surround.
Source Sharing: This parameter should always be set to “Sources Lockable” since this
is the compatibility mode for an Element. The
PowerStation is not intended to be used with the
SmartSurface console.
Backup Power: This setting tells the PowerStation how it should generate a power failure alarm. If Backup Power is disabled in this
Host Name:
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
screen, the PowerStation MAIN
will generate an alarm only if the
power supply in the PowerStation
MAIN should fail. When Backup
Power is set to YES, a front-panel
alarm will be visible if there is a
failure or disconnection of either
main or backup power supplies.
Note that both the PowerStation
MAIN and the PowerStation AUX
can operate normally as long as
one power supply is active.
You cannot un-check the backup
power option, if the backup power
is actually present - the software
won’t allow that. If it is unchecked,
it means that there is actually no
backup, and then the failure of the
main power will simply bring the
unit down.
As usual, if you make a change, remember to click
the Apply button before navigating away from this page.
Network
•
•
Host Name:
This is where you give your PowerStation a short, friendly name. We suggest you
include the location or name of the studio since
that will make other aspects of the system more
intuitive.
IP Settings: It is possible to make changes to IP
settings here however we recommend that you
make these changes in the main PowerStation
Setup menu as described at the beginning of this
section.
System
The System Menu of the PowerStation’s MixEngine
displays some different information than a standalone StudioEngine however the functionality is
identical. The MixEngine System screen is displayed
in Figure 10-5.
• System Status: This area displays the health
indicators and status of the motherboard in the
PowerStation. You will see some familiar items
here but you will not see Fan Speed - there are
no fans!
»» System Status and Network Status inform
you as to the health of the StudioEngine and its
connection to the Axia network. Both of these
indicators must be OK for normal operation.
»» CPU Usage indicates how hard the Engine is
working. This value should never exceed 95%.
»» Link Speed tells you the type of link with
which the Engine is connected to the local network switch. This should always be 1 Gbs.
»» Network Usage In and Out show how much
bandwidth is being consumed on the Engineto-switch link.
»» System Temperature monitors internal temperatures of the PowerStation. If the temperature exceeds operating limits, a warning will
appear on the PowerStation’s front-panel display.
»» CPU Temperature monitors the temperature
of the PowerStation’s CPU. If the temperature
exceeds operating limits, a warning will appear
on the PowerStation’s front-panel display.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
10: PowerStation Controls • 131
Fig. 10-5: PowerStation MixEngine System screen
10: PowerStation Controls • 132
»» Serial Number: Reports the CPU serial number.
»» Power1 Fuse1: “OK OK” indicates that the
power supply of the PowerStation MAIN is OK
and that its fuse is also OK.
»» Power2 Fuse2: “OK OK” indicates that the
power supply of the PowerStation AUX is OK
and that its fuse is also OK.
• Remote Access Password: The HTTP password may be changed here as well however we
recommend you use the main system page for
that function.
• Configuration Management: This section lets
you make backups of and restore your Engine
settings. Use the Browse, Backup and Restore buttons to accomplish these actions. Use
the Reset Cfg button to reset all of your settings
to an “as-shipped” state. This command will
completely erase any choices you have made and
reset your PowerStation’s Engine to the way it
came from the factory, so use with caution!
• Restart: The PowerStation may be rebooted remotely from this screen if necessary.
• Hardware and Firmware: The type of CPU
in use is displayed in the Hardware box. New
firmware updates are processed in this screen.
Remember that since the PowerStation has integrated the Element with the MixEngine, there is
a single, combined firmware update.
»» Use the File field and the Browse and Upload
buttons to upload new software to the Engine.
»» Pressing the Commit button takes the software
in Bank 1 and loads it into Bank 0, which opens
Bank 1 for new software.
»» You can run PowerStation software from either
Bank 0 or Bank 1. Simply click on the radio button next to the software bank you wish to run
from, and click Apply Selected Bank. The
system will reboot after changing banks, so plan
this operation for off-hours or switch program
output to another studio to avoid program interruptions.
Diagnostics
This section of the PowerStation MixEngine is designed to create local diagnostics reports and to deliver
real-time logging to an external Syslog Server. This area
is used under guidance from Axia Tech Support.
Audio I/O Subsystems
The PowerStation family has two audio I/O subsystems - one is associated with the PowerStation MAIN
and the other identical I/O subsystem is a part of the
PowerStation AUX. Both units are normally accessed
from the web pages of the PowerStation MAIN.
Note that the IO Subsystems currently have their
own password system. The default user name is “user”
and the user password is blank.
Sources and Destinations:
The basics of Sources and Destinations have been
thoroughly discussed in Chapter 2: Element with PowerStation. That information will not be repeated here.
GPIO
Each MAIN and AUX IO Subsystem includes four
GPIO ports. The ports can be utilized in two ways: A
port can be associated with a Livewire Channel for control to/from an external device or a GPIO port can be
monitored and controlled by PathfinderPC.
Fig. 10-6: Audio I/O Subsystem - GPIO
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
In the example shown in Figure 10-6, we can see
that output pin 1 of the Control Room Monitor GPO is
active. This indicates that a microphone in live in that
room - naturally this is the control for our ON-AIR light.
We can also see GPO pin 2 is also active - that the CR
monitors are dimmed. The cause of dimmed monitors
is the Hybrid in Preview as we can see on GPO pin 3
on port 2.
If all of this seems confusing, please read Chapter
4: Configuring GPIO. Interfacing any electronic system to the real world takes some effort, but Livewire
makes it a lot easier by associating this control with the
same Livewire channel that handles your audio stream.
Meters
The PowerStation IO Subsystem has meters to assist
with troubleshooting and level calibration.
These meters are peak-reading meters and will show
you how much headroom you have at your audio inputs
and outputs. The Green indicator is considered safe. The
meter bar will change to Yellow at 20 dB below full scale
and it will change to Red at 10 dB below full scale.
Fig. 10-7: Audio I/O Subsystem - Meters
As described previously in this manual, it is recommended that all IP address information be entered in the
PowerStation Setup menu. IP addresses are automatically assigned to the IO Subsystems and Ethernet switch. If
you make changes to IP settings in this section, they
will be over-written the next time the PowerStation
is restarted.
• Host Name: You should enter a short, logical
name here to describe the IO Subsystem. We
To make gain changes, the small arrow will increase
or decrease gain by approximately 0.1 dB. The large arrows will increase or decrease gain by approximately 1.0
dB. We recommend that all system levels be normalized
at 20 dB below full scale. At the output of an audio node
or the PowerStation IO Subsystem, this will be a standard +4dB. That’s about 1.23 volts for those who want
to measure it with an analog RMS meter.
System
This section has the configuration for the IP settings
of the PowerStation’s I/O subsystem section as well as
the provisions for software updates. Figure 10-8 shows
the web page for this section.
Fig. 10-8: Audio I/O Subsystem - System
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
10: PowerStation Controls • 133
When configuring a GPIO port, you may use the
pop-up selector to choose your Livewire source from the
selection window or you may simply enter the Livewire
channel number into the box if you happen to know it.
As usual - click Apply when you are done.
•
•
•
•
•
•
suggest you include something to indicate the
room or studio where the unit is located.
Network Address: Do not change - this address is automatically assigned during boot-up.
Netmask: Do not change - this value is automatically assigned during boot-up.
Gateway: Do not change - this address is automatically assigned during boot-up.
NTP Server: Not currently implemented or required.
Syslog Server and Severity Filter: This section also includes the syslog server IP address
and syslog level settings. Under certain circumstances, Axia tech support may request that you
collect logs of system activity. Otherwise, the
syslog settings should be left at default settings.
User Password: The user password for the IO
subsection may be changed here. Be sure to record any changes you make to the default user
password (which is blank). It is difficult for anyone to help you out if the password is not known.
Fig. 10-9: Audio I/O Subsystem - QoS and Clock
device is unavailable, another Livewire device
will automatically and seamlessly assume the
master clock function. Most engineers prefer the
master clock function to reside in their central
equipment room so it is common for any studio devices, such as the PowerStation, to be set
at clock master priority level 3 (default) With
this setting, the PowerStation will normally be
a clock slave however if it should ever lose the
connection to the master clock, it will assume
a local clock function and local audio will continue without interruption.
Be aware that making changes to device passwords after your PathfinderPC server has been
configured is going to make your life more complicated. We encourage you to make password
changes at the beginning of your setup or leave
the passwords at the default value.
10: PowerStation Controls • 134
•
Firmware Version: This section is where you
will update the firmware for the Audio IO section of the PowerStation. As with most other
Axia devices, there is provision for two different versions of firmware. The IO Subsystem will
reboot when the version is changed.
Clock mode should always be set at the default
of IP Low Rate unless directed otherwise by
Axia Support.
•
Quality of Service (QoS)
The QoS page has advanced settings related to the
levels for quality of service and Livewire click synchronization. Default settings almost always usually suitable.
Figure 10-3 shows the page for QoS settings.
• Synchronization/Livewire Clock: In all
Livewire systems, only one device may be the
master clock at any given point in time. If that
802.1p tagging
should always be enabled for Live Audio and
clock streams. This is a way of marking all highpriority packets. The VLAN ID is not set at the
device level but rather at the port of the Ethernet switch. For this reason, the VLAN ID setting is greyed out. The 802.1Q priority for all
Live streams is set at 6 and there is not a need
to change this unless requested to do so by Axia
Live Audio/Clock Streams:
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
tech support. The DSCP Class of Service setting
should be left at 48 unless changes are requested
by tech support.
•
•
Default settings are:
»» 802.1p tagging - enabled
»» VLAN ID - 0
»» 802.1Q priority - 6
»» DSCP Class of Service - 48
STP Configuration:
You can enable or disable
Spanning Tree Protocol and specify a bridge priority value (0 to 32768)
Standard streams
have higher latency that live streams and require
different settings. As with live streams, all defaults should be accepted unless changes are requested by Axia tech support.
Standard Audio Streams:
Default settings are:
»» Receive buffer - 100 msec
»» 802.1p tagging - disabled
»» VLAN ID - 0
»» 802.1Q priority - 5
»» DSCP Class of Service - 46
Fig. 10-10: PowerStation MAIN Switch - Options
Ethernet Switch settings
The PowerStation MAIN contains an integrated Ethernet switch. This switch manages the multicast functions of the PowerStation and enables it to be connected
to other PowerStations and other Livewire devices via
your managed Livewire LAN.
Options
This screen has Spanning Tree and port settings.
• Port Configuration: Allows you to select from
one of three different modes for the two gigabit
ports on the switch. Options are:
»» Access - normally used for connections to
other Livewire devices
»» Trunk - used for the connections to a core
Ethernet switch or other PowerStations.
»» Access STP port fast - may optionally be used
when you connect up to four PowerStations in
a ring configuration. By selecting this mode,
the normal STP logic is reversed. The port is
allowed to start sending packets immediately,
and loop discovery is done in parallel. There
»» Enable STP - (Spanning Tree Protocol) used
only when you are connecting multiple PowerStations (maximum of 4) in a loop configuration.
»» Bridge Priority - can be used to assign “root”
priority to devices that are connected in a loop.
A lower number indicates a higher priority.
Your network administrator should be consulted if you think you need to make changes
to the default setting.
System Parameters
As described previously in this manual, it is recommended that all IP address information be entered in the
PowerStation main Setup menu. IP addresses are automatically assigned to the IO Subsystems and Ethernet
switch. If you make a change in this section, it may be
over-written the next time the PoewrStation is restarted.
• Host Name: You should enter a short, logical
name here to describe the PowerStation switch.
We suggest you include something to indicate
the room or studio where the unit is located.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
10: PowerStation Controls • 135
is a risk of short-term flooding so this option
should be used with extreme caution.
•
•
•
•
•
Network Address:
Do not change - this address is automatically assigned during boot-up.
Netmask: Do not change - this value is automatically assigned during boot-up.
Gateway: Do not change - this address is automatically assigned during boot-up.
Syslog Server and Severity Filter: This section also includes the syslog server IP address
and syslog level settings. Under certain circumstances, Axia tech support may request that you
collect logs of system activity. Otherwise, the
syslog settings should be left at default settings.
User Password: The user password may be
changed here. Be sure to record any changes
you make to the default user password (which is
blank). It is difficult for anyone to help you out
if the password is not known.
Be aware that making changes to device passwords after your PathfinderPC server has been
configured is going to make your life more complicated. We encourage you to make password
changes at the beginning of your setup or leave
the passwords at the default value.
10: PowerStation Controls • 136
•
Fig. 10-10: PowerStation MAIN Switch - System
Firmware Version:
This section is where you
will update the firmware for the Switch section
of the PowerStation. As with most other Axia
devices, there is provision for two different versions of firmware. The Switch will reboot when
the version is changed.
What’s Next
Congratulations! There’s no test at the end of this
manual, but if there was one you’d surely pass it. There
is more great information on specific topics in the Appendices - feel free to check them out too.
If you have spotted any errors or omissions in this
manual, we want to hear about them so we can make
necessary changes in the next manual update. Thanks
for your participation and thanks for choosing Axia.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix A:
Crosstalk Isolation, Stereo Separation and CMRR
Analog Line channel to channel isolation: 90 dB isolation
minimum, 20 Hz to 20 kH
Microphone channel to channel isolation: 80 dB isolation
minimum, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Analog Line Stereo separation: 85 dB isolation minimum,
20Hz to 20 kHz
Analog Line Input CMRR: >60 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Microphone Input CMRR: >55 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Microphone Preamplifiers
Source Impedance: 150 ohms
Input Impedance: 4 k ohms minimum, balanced
Nominal Level Range: Adjustable, -75 dBu to -20 dBu
Input Headroom: >20 dB above nominal input
Output Level: +4 dBu, nominal
Analog Line Inputs
Input Impedance: >40 k ohms, balanced
Nominal Level Range: Selectable, +4 dBu or -10dBv
Input Headroom: 20 dB above nominal input
Analog Line Outputs
Output Source Impedance: <50 ohms balanced
Output Load Impedance: 600 ohms, minimum
Nominal Output Level: +4 dBu
Maximum Output Level: +24 dBu
Digital Audio Inputs and Outputs
Reference Level: +4 dBu (-20 dB FSD)
Impedance: 110 Ohm, balanced (XLR)
Signal Format: AES-3 (AES/EBU)
AES-3 Input Compliance: 24-bit with selectable sample
rate conversion,
32 kHz to 96kHz input sample rate capable.
AES-3 Output Compliance: 24-bit
Digital Reference: Internal (network timebase) or external
reference 48 kHz,
+/- 2 ppm
Internal Sampling Rate: 48 kHz
Output Sample Rate: 44.1 kHz or 48 kHz
A/D Conversions: 24-bit, Delta-Sigma, 256x oversampling
D/A Conversions: 24-bit, Delta-Sigma, 256x oversampling
Latency <3 ms, mic in to monitor out, including network
and processor loop
Frequency Response
Any input to any output: +0.5 / -0.5 dB, 20 Hz to 20 kHz
Dynamic Range
Analog Input to Analog Output: 102 dB referenced to 0
dBFS,
105 dB “A” weighted to 0 dBFS
Analog Input to Digital Output: 105 dB referenced to 0
dBFS
Digital Input to Analog Output: 103 dB referenced to 0
dBFS, 106 dB “A” weighted
Digital Input to Digital Output: 138 dB
Equivalent Input Noise
Microphone Preamp: -128 dBu, 150 ohm source, reference
-50 dBu input level
Total Harmonic Distortion + Noise
Mic Pre Input to Analog Line Output: <0.005%, 1 kHz, -38
dBu input,
+18 dBu output
Analog Input to Analog Output: <0.008%, 1 kHz, +18 dBu
input, +18 dBu output
Digital Input to Digital Output: <0.0003%, 1 kHz, -20 dBFS
Digital Input to Analog Output: <0.005%, 1 kHz, -6 dBFS
input, +18 dBu output
Audio Processing
Equalizer
Frequency Bands: 20Hz to 320Hz, 125Hz to 2KHz, 1.25KHz
to 20KHz.
Cut/Boost range on each band: -25dB to +15dB.
Q-factor: Automatic - bandwidth varies based on amount of
cut or boost.
Compressor
Threshold: -30dB to 0dB Ratio: 1:1 to 16:1
Post-processor Trim Level: Adjustable from -20dB to +20dB
Expander/Noise Gate
Threshold: -50dB to 0dB
Ratio: -30dB to 0dB
De-esser
Threshold: -20dB to 0dB
Ratio: 1:1 to 8:1
Power Supply AC Input, Audio Node
(Analog, AES/EBU, Microphone, Router Selector)
Auto-sensing supply, 90VAC to 240VAC, 50 Hz to 60 Hz,
IEC receptacle, internal fuse
Power consumption: 30 Watts
Power Supply AC Input, GPIO Node
Auto-sensing supply, 90VAC to 240VAC, 50 Hz to 60 Hz,
IEC receptacle, internal fuse
Power consumption: 33 Watts
Power Supply AC Input, StudioEngine
Auto-sensing supply, 90VAC to 240VAC, 50 Hz to 60 Hz,
IEC receptacle, internal fuse
Power consumption: 100 Watts
Power Supply AC Input, Element Power Supply/GPIO
Auto-sensing supply, 90VAC to 240VAC, 50 Hz to 60 Hz,
IEC receptacle, internal fuse
Power consumption: 150 Watts
Power Supply AC Input, PowerStation Aux & Main
Auto-sensing supply, 90VAC to 240VAC, 50 Hz to 60 Hz,
IEC receptacle, internal fuse
Power consumption: 500 Watts
Operating Temperatures
-10 degrees C to +40 degrees C, <90% humidity, no condensation
Dimensions (HxWxD) and Weight
Microphone node: 1.75 x 19 x 10 inches, 6 pounds
Analog Line node: 1.75 x 19 x 10 inches, 6 pounds
AES/EBU node: 1.75 x 19 x 10 inches, 6 pounds
Router Selector node: 1.75 x 19 x 10 inches, 6 pounds
GPIO node: 3.5 x 19 x 13 inches, 8 pounds
Studio Mix Engine 3.5 x 19 x 15 inches, 10 pounds
PowerStation Main/Aux: 7 x 19 x 15.5 inches (behind rail)
Front panel extends 2.25 inches in front of rack rail
PowerStation Main: xx.x pounds
PowerStation Aux: xx.x pounds
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix A: Specifications • 137
Specifications
Table of Inputs and Outputs
Main Outputs
Type
Comments
Program 1
Stereo
Main stereo bus (Usually referred to as Program)
Program 2
Stereo
Second stereo bus (Sometimes referred to as Audition)
Program 3
Stereo
Third stereo bus (Sometimes referred to as Utility)
Program 4
Stereo
Fourth stereo bus (Sometimes referred to as Auxiliary)
Program 4 Record
Stereo
Fourth stereo bus variation (post fader, pre on/off)
Program 4 Phone
Mono
Fourth stereo bus variation (pre fader, pre on/off)
Aux Inputs and Outputs
Type
Comments
Aux Send A Output
Stereo
Aux send bus can be used for processing or independent mixes
Aux Send B Output
Stereo
Aux send bus can be used for processing or independent mixes
Aux Send C Output
Stereo
Aux send bus can be used for processing or independent mixes
Aux Send D Output
Stereo
Aux send bus can be used for processing or independent mixes
Aux Return A Input
Stereo
Allows processing to be folded back into a mix
Aux Return B Input
Stereo
Allows processing to be folded back into a mix
Monitor-related Outputs
Type
Comments
Monitor 1
Stereo
Control room monitor speakers, source and level controlled by Element Monitor
1 control
C/R Monitor Direct
Stereo
Control room monitor output, source same as Monitor 1, fixed level output
Main Headphone
Stereo
Control room (board op) headphone, source and level controlled by Element
headphone control
Monitor 2
Stereo
Studio monitor speakers, source and level controlled by Element Monitor 2 control
Studio Headphone Talent
Stereo
Studio (talent) headphones, source same as main, fixed level output, with
talkback
Studio Headphone Guest
Stereo
Studio (guest) headphones, source same as main, fixed level output, no talkback
Preview
Stereo
Allows the connection and level control of external powered speakers.
Talk to External
Mono
Allows board operator mic to talk to other devices, a logic command is associated
Talk to CR Audio
Mono
Allows the Talk to CR audio mix to drive an external destination
Appendix A: Specifications • 138
Monitor-related Inputs
Type
Comments
External Preview Input
Stereo
Allows an external path into the preview speakers, a logic command is associated
External Monitor Input 1
Stereo
Allows an external source to be monitored by c/r or studio selectors
External Monitor Input 2
Stereo
Allows an external source to be monitored by c/r or studio selectors
Source Inputs
Type
Comments
Microphone Input n
Mono
Typical installations have 4 or 8 microphone sources per studio
Analog Line Input n
Stereo
Typical installations have 16 analog line sources per studio
Digital Line Input n
Stereo
Typical installations have 16 digital line sources per studio
Source-related Outputs
Type
Comments
Feed-to-Source A n
Mono
Mono mix-minus output feeds the left side of a stereo connection. “Talk to...”
function enabled.
Feed-to-Source B n
Mono
Mono mix-minus output feeds the right side of a stereo connection. “Talk to...”
function disabled.
Individual Hphone Feed n
Stereo
Individual headphone feed (for talent and guest mics) with *Talk to x* function
enabled.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
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Appendix A: Specifications • 139
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











Dark, dark as coal tar
it pours out, bitter and strong.
Appendix A: Specifications • 140
That’s Starbucks for you.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix B:
CE Declaration of Conformity
Supplementary Information for European Users
Declaration of Conformity
Application of Council Directives: 93/68/EEC (CE Marking); 73/23/EEC (safety low-voltage
directive); 89/336/EEC (electromagnetic compatibility).
Standards to which conformity is declared: EN50081-1, EN50082-1.
Manufacturer’s Name: Axia, TLS Corporation
Manufacturer’s Address: 1241 Superior Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Type of equipment: Audio Mixing Surface
Model No.: Element
Serial No.:
Year of Manufacture: 2005
I, the undersigned, hereby declare that the equipment specified above conforms to
the above Directives and Standards.
Place: Cleveland, Ohio, USA 44114
Date: October 30, 2005
Signature:
(on file)
Full Name: Michael Dosch
CE Mark Conformance
October 30, 2005
Axia, TLS Corp.
1241 Superior Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44114 USA
Supervision and summary by:
Michael Dosch
1.0 Introduction
1.1 Scope This record is intended to document the Axia Element audio mixing surface conformance with Council
Directives: 93/68/EEC (CE Marking); 73/23/EEC (safety-low voltage directive); 89/336/EEC (electromagnetic
compatibility).
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix B: CE Conformity • 141
Position: President
CE Mark Conformance, Cont’d
Testing was conducted during the period September 22 - October 19, 2005.
1.2 Purpose Testing was performed to evaluate safety, emissions and immunity, conformance to enable CE marking.
1.3 Conclusions The Element audio control surface was found to be compliant and CE marking was applied to
the product.
Conformity is declared to the standards: EN50081-1, EN50082-1.
2.0 HF Radiated Emissions
2.1 Standards Applied The unit was laboratory evaluated according to standard: EN50081-1 using Measurement
Document: EN55022, Class B.
2.2 Testing The unit was tested and evaluated by: Smith Electronics*
2.3 Test Results The unit was found to be in conformance for both radiated and line-conducted emissions.
3.0 Immunity
Appendix B: CE Conformity • 142
3.1 Standards Applied
3.1.1 ESD Susceptibility Measurement Document: IEC 1000-4-2 (IEC 801-2). Immunity to static electricity.
3.1.2 Radiated Susceptibility - HF Electric Field Document: IEC 1000-4-3 (IEC 801-3).
3.1.3 Conducted Susceptibility - Power Line Measurement Documents: Burst/Transients: IEC 1000-4-4 (IEC
801-4), Surge: IEC 1000-4-5 (IEC 801-5) Voltage Fluctuations: IEC 1000-4-1 (IEC 801-1)
3.2 Testing
3.2.1 ESD Immunity The unit was tested and evaluated by: Smith Electronics*
3.2.2 Radiated Immunity - RF Electric Field The unit was tested and evaluated by: Smith Electronics*
3.2.3 Conducted Immunity - Power Line Testing to IEC 801-4 was conducted by: Smith Electronics*
*Smith Electronics
8200 Snowville Rd.
Cleveland, OH 44141 (USA)
CE Conformance
This device complies with the requirements of EEC Council Directives 93/68/EEC (CE Marking); 73/23/EEC
(safety low-voltage directive); 89/336/EEC (electromagnetic compatibility). Conformity is declared to the following
standards:: EN50081-1, EN50082-1.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
FAQ / Diagnostics / Maintenance
This appendix contains answers to some frequentlyasked Element setup questions, and some troubleshooting procedures intended to determine if factory service
is needed. These procedures are not intended to take the
place of a conversation with Axia support personnel;
should you need to contact us for support, please use
the contact information listed on Page iii of this manual.
Q: How do I set the IP address of Element? Press and
hold the Fader Options key (or * and 4 and 7 keys)
located on the upper right of the Master Module for 5
seconds; the connected VGA screen will display the
IP Address Book.
network — that its network adapter has a valid IP
address and the proper subnet mask value assigned.
Assuming your computer is running Windows, you
can view these settings using a utility called IPCONFIG.EXE. Here’s what to do:
1. Double-check Element’s IP address — press
and hold the *, 4 & 7 keys (*+I+P) for 5 seconds,
until the IP Address Book appears on the display
screen. The IP address and subnet mask values are
displayed.
Q: The Element web interface asks me for a
password, but I haven’t set one.
Element can be password protected to discourage
tampering. By default, the user name is “user” and
there is no password.
Q:I just added a new module to my Element and the
module display reads INACTIVE. What do I do?
When new modules are added to Element, you
must notify the housekeeping system that they’re
there by using “Capture Mode.” To do this, press
and hold the * and 2 keys located next to Element’s control knob on the Master Module. After
five seconds, the console will enter “Capture Mode”
and the new modules will be activated — you’ll
know because all module alpha displays read
Capture Mode. To exit “Capture Mode”, press
the Enter or # key, also located next to the Control knob. Your new modules are now ready to use.
Q: I get a “Page Not Found” error when I try to
connect to Element using my Web browser.
What’s wrong?
It’s possible that your computer’s network configuration needs adjustment. Livewire networks do not
assign IP addresses dynamically (DHCP), so doublecheck to see if your computer is actually a part of the
Figure C-1: starting a command box
2. On your Windows computer, click on the Start
button and choose Run... from the menu. In the box
that appears, type “command” (or “cmd”) to start a
DOS command box, then click the OK button.
1. A black box with white type will appear. Type
ipconfig in the box, and press the “Enter” key.
You’ll be rewarded with a screen that looks like this:
The screen displays your computer’s IP address,
Subnet Mask and Gateway settings. Write these
down and compare them to those previously obtained from your Element.
Explanation: The IP address is usually expressed as four decimal numbers, each representing eight bits, separated by periods. This
is known more technically as “dotted quad
notation.” ­
An IP
fier of
fier of
server
address has two parts: the identia particular network and an identithe particular device (which can be a
or a workstation) within that network.
Since networks vary in size, there are four dif-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix C: FAQ / Diagnostics / Maintenance • 143
Appendix C:
ferent address formats or classes you
can use to construct them. We recommend that Livewire networks be constructed as Class B networks to allow
enough unique device addresses for expansion.
To learn more about IP addressing and
network construction, we recommend
reading Cormac Long’s excellent 4-part
IP Network Design, available at http://
tinyurl.com/64bb5 .
Appendix C: FAQ / Diagnostics / Maintenance • 144
Figure C-2: IPCONFIG command displays computer’s IP settings
4. Write down the values displayed
and type “exit” to close the DOS command box.
Compare the two IP addresses to be certain that your
computer is on the same network as your Element;
in a Class B network, this means that the first six
digits of the IP addresses must match. If they do not,
change the IP address of your computer’s
Network Interface Card. Consult your
Operating System’s documentation for
specific instructions on how this is done.
Also compare the Subnet Mask values;
these must be exactly the same on both
your computer and your Element. If they
are not, change your computer’s Subnet
Mask settings to match that of Element.
Note that changing a computer’s IP
settings and/or Subnet Mask settings
often requires a reboot before those
settings take effect.
screen resembling Figure C-3. Results like these, showing packets sent and returned,
indicate that your Element is active and responding
to requests. However, if the ping command produces
results like those in Figure C-4, your Element is not
responding and must be restarted. Disconnect the El-
Figure C-3: Successful PING. Element is responding normally.
ement power supply from the mains, wait 1 minute,
then restore power. If this doesn’t solve the problem,
you may not have your computer and Element on the
same LAN or VLAN. Try connecting the two directly with an Ethernet crossover cable (for greater detail
on cable diagrams, read the Introduction to Livewire:
Once your computer is using the same IP network
address and subnet as your Element, you should be
able to access your Element’s web page.
If you’ve confirmed network settings and
still cannot access your Element, “Ping”
the Surface to determine whether it is
responding to your requests. Here’s how:
1.
Use the Run... command previously described to open a DOS command
box. At the command prompt, type ping
xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (where x represents Element’s IP address).
2. If your Element is responding to comFigure C-4: PING command showing unresponsive Element
mands, the ping command will produce a
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
System Design Reference and Primer, which can be
downloaded from www.AxiaAudio.com.)
Q: I don’t see the meter displays in my Web browser when I open the pages for my Audio Nodes.
The web pages use Java to render the meter displays.
First, double-check your browser options to confirm
that Java is enabled, and turn it on if necessary. If
Java is not installed on your computer, you will need
to install it. Download the free Java installer from
http://www.java.com and follow the instructions to
install Java; once installed, the meter displays should
be visible in your Web browser.
Q: My Element GPIO/Power Supply/CPU
doesn’t boot and just beeps when I plug it in.
What do I do?
The Element CPU (non-PowerStation version) currently uses a VIA EPIA ME6000 mainboard with Award BIOS. If your Element CPU cannot boot, the computer tries to tell you you what is
wrong using POST codes (an acronym for “PowerOn Self Test”).
Award states that the only POST code their BIOS.
uses is one long beep and then two short beeps,
which indicate a graphics card problem. The reason
that only one POST code is used, according to Award,
is that the BIOS will attempt to display error codes
for other, non-video-related problems on-screen if at
all possible. If the BIOS cannot initiate the display
adapter, is issues the POST code for a display error,
which must be corrected before any other errors can
be determined. However, some other POST codes are known to exist. Consult the table that follows.
Error
Video card error — replace or re-seat
the card.
Repeating beeps
Memory Error — Memory is either
damaged or badly seated
Repeating Hi/Low
beeps
Damaged or overheating CPU
High-frequency
beeps
Overheating CPU
Jostling in transit has been known to loosen the edgeconnected cards used in Element’s CPU. If you hear
only a POST code beep upon plugging in your CPU,
disconnect power, remove the screws from the top
of the Element GPIO/Power Supply and remove and
re-seat all cards found on the internal mainboard;
typically, this will solve the problem. If it does not,
please contact Axia support for further assistance.
Installing A New Module
Adding a module to Element is a very simple,
straightforward procedure, but some minor disassembly
of the surface will be necessary if the new module is accompanied by an overbridge alphanumeric display.
1
3
2
Figure C-5: Underside of module showing (1) RJ45
connectors, (2) display panel connector, and (3)
module ID encoder.
Before beginning the installation, inspect your new
module. Take note of three features on the underside of
the module: the RJ45 connectors, the ribbon cable connector for the overbridge alpha display panel, and the
module ID encoder. (Note that not all modules require
an overbridge display and thus a ribbon connector will
not be present.)
Your module kit will contain some or all of the fol-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix C: FAQ / Diagnostics / Maintenance • 145
Q: How do I set the time on the Element? Press and hold the Timer Options key on the Master Module. After five seconds, the Clock & Timer
Options key will be displayed. All clock adjustments
may be made from this screen.
POST Code
1 Long, 2 Short
lowing items:
»» The specified module
»» An overbridge alphanumeric display panel
»» An overbridge window for the display panel
»» A ribbon connector
»» A 1-foot RJ45 patch cable
If you believe any of thse items are missing, please
contact Axia Support immediately.
panels in order to insert it. Ascertain which end panel is
closest to the position your new module will be mounted
in; this is the one you’ll remove.
There are eight machine screws that hold each Element end panel to the frame: 5 in the “bucket” and 3
under the overbridge (shown in Figure C-8, below). To
access these screws, you’ll need to remove the module
closest to this end panel and tilt the overbridge forward..
Appendix C: FAQ / Diagnostics / Maintenance • 146
Tools you’ll need for module installation are:
»» A #1 Philips-head screwdriver
»» A 2.5 mm. hex wrench
»» A 5/64” jeweler’s screwdriver
Before beginning, you’ll need to set the ID for your
new module. Each Element module must have a unique
ID. A quick way of choosing an ID is to count how many
modules are installed on your Element; typically the
factory installs modules with IDs set in numerical order
from left to right (Master Modules should always have
their ID set to “0”; more on this later). So, if you have 4
factory-installed modules in your Element, you can safely set the ID of your new module to “5”. To set the module ID, use a jeweler’s screwdriver to gently rotate the
indicator (shown in Figure C-7) to the desired number.
To begin installation, remove the blanking panel occupying the position you wish to install your new module into. Use the hex wrench to remove the hex-head
screw(s) at the top of the panel.
If your new module has an accompanying overbridge
display, you will need to remove one of Element’s end-
Figure C-8: Locations of end-panel fastening screws
in the overbridge compartment (above) and in the
“bucket” (below).
Once the screws are removed, the end panel pulls
off easily. Note the locating hole in the end panel that
receives the overbridge hinge pin.
If there are any overbridge displays between the
end of the overbridge and the position in which you’ll
be mounting your alpha panel, you must remove them.
To do so, remove the ribbon connector from the circuit
board by gently pushing the two “ears” on each side of
the connector socket. This will eject the connector.
Note: Ribbon connectors must be connected
to the alphanumeric panels “tail-down”, that is,
with the ribbon emerging from the bottom of
the connector.
Figure C-7: Setting the module ID
You may now slide the disconnected alpha panels
out of the overbridge mounting channel, along with the
blanking panel occupying your new display’s position.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
to the unused jack on any other module.
Connect the other end of the patch cable to the RHJ45
connector located on the bottom of your new module,
connect the alpha display ribbon connector.
Note: Ribbon connectors must be connected to
the modules “tail-up”, with the cable emerging
from the connector toward the top of the module.
Carefully slide your new alphanumeric panel into the
mounting channel. Note that the metal portion of the display has rounded edges which fit into the round frontmost channel; the circuit-board portion of the display must
have its top and bottom edges located in the first groove
behind the round channel.
Your new module should look as shown in Figure
C-11. Once all cables are connected, seat the module in
the frame and secure it with the provided 2.5 mm hex-
Figure C-10: Detail of overbridge mounting channel
Figure C-11: Reverse view of connected module. Note
ribbon cable is connected “tail-up”.
After all of the overbridge panels have been located
in the mounting channel, reconnect their ribbon cables.
Connect the ribbon cable that came with your new display, and thread it from the overbridge into the “bucket”
through the passage provided.
head screws.
Replace any other modules you may have removed,
and secure them as well.
Re-mount the end panel, taking care to locate the
overbridge hinge pin in the hole provided.
Now, connect the RJ45 patch cable supplied in your
module kit to any free jack on Element’s connection
panel, located in the center of the overbridge compartment.
Note: You’ve probably noticed that 4-space
modules have two RJ45 connectors on their undersides. These are “daisy chain” connectors; if
all of the jacks on your Element’s connection
panel are in use, you can connect a new module
The final step in the module installation process is to
“capture” the new console configuration. To enter Capture Mode, press and hold the * and 2 keys on the Master
Module for 5 seconds. The alphanumeric displays will
change to read Capture Mode; this enumerates all of
the installed faders in the control surface. Press the Enter or # key to exit Capture Mode; your new module is
Figure C-12: Alpha display indicates Capture Mode
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix C: FAQ / Diagnostics / Maintenance • 147
Figure C-9: Location of alpha display ribbon connectors as
seen from rear of overbridge
active and your Element is ready to use.
Module Diagnostics
Element software contains a hidden routine that allows you to perform fader, lamp and alphanumeric display diagnostics on each module should you suspect that
one of these items requires service.
When the lamp/switch test is complete, you’ll be
prompted to perform a fader operation test. As you move
the faders on the module being tested, you will see their
onscreen images move as well, and the alpha displays on
Element itself will display changing encoder values as
the faders are moved.
When you have finished testing a module, you have
To enter the diagnostic mode (Standard Monitor
module only), press and hold the * and 2 and # keys
found on Element’s Monitor Module for 5 seconds.
Appendix C: FAQ / Diagnostics / Maintenance • 148
Upon entering the lamp diagnostic mode, the monitor connected to Element will display an initial screen
with a list of all installed modules (as shown in Figure
C-13). You’ll see a description of the type of each module; preceding the description are a set of numbers in
brackets.
To begin fader diagnostics, use the Arrow keys to
highlight the fader you wish to test and press the Enter
key. You will see, onscreen, a graphical representation of
the selected module’s controls, including faders, lighted
selection keys and on/off switches.
In the first phase of the test, all of the module’s lamps
are lit and you are instructed to turn each one off. This
serves as a combination lamp and switch test.
Figure C-14: Module lamp test
the option of testing other modules, or of exiting the test
routine.
Fader Cleaning Procedures
Element’s single-element, conductive-plastic faders
were chosen for their long life and reliable operation,
but jocks will be jocks: it’s inevitable that sooner or later
you’ll need to pull a fader for cleaning.
There are no replaceable parts in the faders used in
Element. If fader movement has become rough, either
the lubricant on the glide rails has evaporated or foreign
material has gotten into the fader. Dow Corning 510 is
the preferred glide rail lubricant as it will not migrate to
the contact fingers like other lubricating oils.
Figure C-13: Module diagnostic selection
Element modules can be serviced “hot.” If you
disconnect a module, the StudioEngine will retain the
faders’ most recent settings until the hardware is recon©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
nected.
7.Lay the fader assembly on your work surface, la-
Tools and supplies you will need to remove and service a fader:
»» A 1/16” hex wrench (for fader removal)
»» A 2.5 mm hex wrench (for module removal)
»» A jeweler’s screwdriver (5/64” or smaller)
»» Cotton swabs
»» Dow Corning 510 lubricating oil
Figure C-16: Remove the fader connector cable
1.Use the 2.5 mm hex wrench to remove the retaining screw(s) at the top of the module requiring service. With the screwes removed, lift the
module at the top, tilting it upward, and pull the
locating tab at the bottom of the module from the
mounting channel.
2.Turn the module over and locate the ribbon cable
that connects the module to its overbridge display
(if present). Gently press the “ears” on each side
of the board connector to release the cable.
3.Locate and disconnect the RJ45 patch cable that
connects the module to Element’s connection
panel.
4.Remove the four-conductor fader cable from the
pins on the bottom of the fader (Figure C-16).
5.Now that the fader is disconnected, turn the module right-side up. Remove the knob from the fader to be serviced by pulling gently upward.
6.Using the 1/16” hex wrench, remove the two hex
screws at the top and bottom of the fader slot.
The fader will drop out from the bottom of the
module.
bel-side up. Remove the snap-on fader assembly
cover; it’s held in place by round stamped bosses
at each end. With the fader sitting label up and
the connector pins to the front, you’ll see a prypoint on the right end of the fader cover (Figure
C-17). Use a jeweler’s screwdriver to gently pry
off the cover.
8.Use a dry cotton swab, or a cotton swab wet with
distilled water, to clean the fader parts.
Note: The use of chemical cleaners on the conductive plastic will substantially shorten fader
life. Never touch the fader slider contact fingers
while cleaning the fader parts.
Always use a clean dry swab to dry off the conductive plastic tracks after cleaning. If the fader
rails are noticeably dirty, wipe them off using a
dry cotton swab before lightly lubricating the top
rail with Dow Corning 510.
If coffee, a soft drink or other sugared liquid
has been spilled into the fader, remove it from
the module as soon as possible and remove the
Figure C-15: Tilt module up to remove from frame.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Figure C-17: Pry point on fader cover
Appendix C: FAQ / Diagnostics / Maintenance • 149
Fader Disassembly and Cleaning
top cover of the fader. Hold the fader under hot
running water while moving the fader slider back
and forth to dissolve the sugars and other chemicals. Thoroughly dry the rails and conductive
plastic using dry cotton swabs and then lubricate
the top fader rail with Dow Corning 510.
Lubricating the Glide Rail
Appendix C: FAQ / Diagnostics / Maintenance • 150
Move the fader slider to the middle of its travel and
place one drop of Dow Corning 510 lubricant on the top
rail on either side of the fader slider bushings. Move the
slider through its full travel to distribute the lubricant.
Wipe off any excess lubricant from the rubber stops at
each end of the glide rail. Normally only the top rail (the
ribbon cable to the module.
Note: The ribbon connector must be connected
to the module “tail-up”, with the cable emerging from the connector toward the top of the
module.
7.Lay the module into the frame, engaging the locating tab at the bottom of the module and tilting the top downward into the frame. Be careful
not to pinch the ribbon cable between the module
and frame.
8.Reinstall hex-head screw(s) at top of module.
Figure C-18: Cleaning the fader glide rails
one the fader slider bushings glide on) requires lubricant.
Reinstalling The Fader
1.Snap the cover onto the fader body.
2.From below, reinsert the fader into position in the
surface, taking care that the end marked ∞ is installed adjacent to the channel’s On / Off keys.
3.Reinstall the hex screws from the top of the surface. Do not overtighten.
4.Press the fader knob firmly onto the stem.
5.Reconnect the fader leads to their mating pins on
the bottom of the fader. The sequence is:
* Green wire to pin “2”
* Black wire to pin “C”
* Red wire to pin “1”
* Bare wire to pin “G”
6.Reconnect the RJ-45 patch cable and alpha panel
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix D:
Working With Phone Hybrids
Since advanced Telos telephone interfaces have Ethernet connections, they are easily connected to your
studio network to be controlled by the Element phone
modules. Sophisticated control signaling may then pass
between the two systems without the need for the usual
parallel connections.
But we recognize that not everyone owns a Telos
phone system (even though we wish they did!), so we’ve
included GPIO capability in Element to control simpler
telephone equipment that does not have a Livewire interface.
This Appendix describes how to configure Element
for use with Telos talkshow systems. The methods described here pertain to Element software v2.5.0, so you
must have this software (or later) to use the features for
these phone hybrids described here.
Telos VX Broadcast VoIP System
This section will help you configure your Axia Element console for use with the Telos VX broadcast VoIP
telephone system. If you have not yet configured your
VX system, please refer to the Telos VX User Manual to
do so before proceeding.
1.The IP address of your VX Engine
2.The user name and password of your VX Engine
3.The name of the VX Studio you wish to connect to
4.The names and channel numbers of the VX hybrids
and Livewire outputs you wish to use in-studio
5.Optional, should you wish to load different VX Shows
using your Element console: the VX Show names
you wish to load
Note for users of previous Element software versions: With v2.5.0 software, the way
Element connects to Telos phone systems has
changed. The major difference to Element / VX
configuration is that the IP address of your VX
system must be entered in the Phone section
of your Element or PowerStation Show Profile,
instead of in the Phone Channel section as was
previously required.
In order to correctly control your VX, your Element
and/or PowerStation must be upgraded with new software. Software packages that implement this change begin with the following versions:
• PowerStation: v1.1.3a
• Element: v2.5.0.3
To obtain the latest software, please visit
AxiaAudio.com/downloads/ and follow the update instructions contained in the accompanying Release Notes
prior to proceeding with this configuration document, if
you have not already done so.
Connecting to VX
Open the Element’s Module Manager/Phone Channels web page. If you have the Call Controller module
installed, you will see the following at the top of the
screen:
You will need to know the following things in order
to configure Element for use with your VX system:
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 151
One of the advantages of an Element/Livewire studio is the smooth integration of Telos telephone interface
equipment with the mixing console. Element telephone
control modules let you put the phone controls in front of
the operator and near the associated faders. Mix-minus
is handled naturally and automatically, without the need
for the usual installation and operator contortions. And
each fader channel has its own mix-minus capability, so
you will never run out of busses.
If you don’t see this, or if the ID or Module information is incorrect, you will need to “Capture” your current
module configuration. This is normally done at the factory, but if you have added the phone module yourself,
you will need to execute the Capture so that the Element
can “see” the newly added module.
vx:192.168.0.9
where 192.168.0.9 is the IP of a VX Engine. You
can also specify a username and password if needed. (If you use the default settings, where the username is “user” and the password is empty, you don’t
need to enter anything.)
To Capture, press and hold the Help key on Element’s
Navigation Module for 5 seconds, until CAPTURE appears in the source name displays. On the phone module,
you will see the assigned ID number in the upper left
line icon position. You can change this by pushing the
adjacent line button. End Capture Mode by pressing the
Enter key on the Navigation Module.
2.Configure your VX Studio and Shows. In the
same screen where you entered VX IP number, you
can enter a VX Studio name. In the Host /Studio
Name: field, simply enter the studio name you used
in your VX’s configuration. In the example above,
the VX Studio name is “Studio 1.”
Configuring an Element Show Profile for
use with VX
Note: Entry of your VX’s IP address in Phone
Channel screen is no longer required. (At present, this screen is left in the Element Control
Center so that you can see the Connection status of your VX.) The VX IP address is now stored
in Element’s Show Profile settings, allowing you
to create different show profiles that connect to
different VX Engine studios and shows.
Figure D-2: Show Configuration screen
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 152
1.Enter your VX’s IP address. Use your Web brows-
If you wish to change a VX Show using an Element
Show Profile, simply specify the name of the VX
Show you wish to load in the Show Name field. If
you leave it empty, no VX Show will be changed, and
whichever show is currently loaded will continue to
be used. Leave the Show Password field empty. There
are no passwords for Shows in the Telos VX.
Figure D-1: Show Profile setup
er to navigate to Element’s
Sources and Profiles
web page.
Select the Element Show Profile you wish to configure, and click on Phone. ->
Configuration -> Show Profiles
In the Phone URL field, enter the IP address of your VX. In the screenshot
above, a VX IP address is shown as
3.Configure other options. Element’s Call Controller
module uses the left row of telephone line selection
buttons to control Hybrid 1, the right row to control
Hybrid 2. If you wish to use the right row of Call Controller buttons to control Hybrid 1 and the left row
to control Hybrid 2, click the Reversed Hybrid box.
VX can be used in either 12 or 24 line mode. You
can select either Auto, 12 Lines or 24 Lines with
the Mode Selection radio buttons. In 12 line mode,
12 lines are displayed on both columns of the Call
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Hybrid1,” and select Phone
for Source Type.
The Source Profile for
the hybrid should be filled
in as follows:
•
Leave the Phone
hybrid IP field empty.
•
Leave the Phone
line and Phone hybrid
(for NX12) fields at their
default value of “0.”
•
Use 2nd show
Figure D-3: Selecting a source
Controller module; the left key bank answers lines
on Hybrid 1, the right keys answer lines on Hybrid2.
In 24 line mode, both left and right key banks will
answer lines using Hybrid 1. To answer lines on any
other hybrid, operators will use the module’s SET
key to choose which hybrid to use. Selecting “Auto”
uses the configuration of the VX Show to dynamically set the number of lines used.
4.Click “Save” when done. Note that after editing and
saving a Show Profile, you must reload it from your
Element console in order for changes to take effect.
should be left unchecked.
•
The Phone Module
ID field lets you select from
the multiple phone modules
that you may have installed.
Normally, you will have
just one, so select 1 from the
drop-down box.
•
For Hybrid Nr.
select the hybrid that corresponds to the Primary Source audio you selected
above. Telos VX supports unlimited number of hybrids per studio. To find out what Hybrid number
corresponds to the audio source you selected, go to
the VX Engine/Studio configuration page and check
the sequence number of the Selectable LW channel
that you are using as the audio source here. The first
Selectable LW channel counts as Hybrid 1.
• Conferencing Allowed lets you permit “button
mash” conferencing. Unless you specially wish to
prohibit this type of conferencing, select Yes from
the drop-down box.
Configuring an Element Source Profile for
use with VX
In the Element Control Center, navigate to Source
Profiles. Click New Source Profile and a source list
window will appear as shown in Figure D-3; select the
audio channel that you configured in VX Engine under Studio configuration. In the list, you should see a
Livewire channel number and short description of the
Hybrid; give it an Element source name, such as “VX©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Figure D-4: Show Configuration options
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 153
(split mode for NX12)
•
lets you assign a line permanently to a specific fader channel, emulating a dedicated hybrid. Normally this is used
with a 4-Fader Module. If you wish to use
a Hybrid in this mode, specify one of your
VX system’s “fixed” hybrids in the Primary
Source field. In the VX Engine studio configuration, you configure both fixed and selectable hybrids; enter a Fixed Hybrid number in this field if you wish to associate this
source with a Fixed Hybrid.
Fixed Line
The other fields in the Source Profile page are nonphone specific, and may be configured as you wish. Repeat this procedure to create a source profile for each
hybrid in your studio.
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 154
You’ll now need to load the hybrid sources onto the
fader channels. This can be done either manually, or
automatically using Show Profiles. Naturally, we recommend that you make this assignment in each Show
Profile which will use the phone system, since leaving
manual assignment to air talent is asking for trouble!
For normal operation, you will assign Hybrid 1 to
the left fader channel of the Call Controller, and Hybrid
2 to the right fader channel. Additional hybrids, if you
have them, may be assigned to any channel on a 4-Fader
Phone Module.
Note: Within Element, each incoming “phone”
type audio source has an associated backfeed
for automatic mix-minus generation. There are
several user configuration options that affect
which audio sources are fed to the hybrid under
various conditions; please refer to the “Source
Profile Options” and “Feed To Source Mode” options documented elsewhere in the manual.
Activate configuration
When you are done entering configuration, save your
Show and Source profiles, and load one of your newlyedited Show Profiles to your Element console.
You can use the Element Control Center Phone
Channels page to confirm your VX connection, as
shown in Figure D-5.
Figure D-5: Confirming VX Connection
Telos Nx12, Nx6, TWOx12 and Series 2101
Multi-Studio Talkshow System
This section will help you configure your Axia Element console for use with Telos IP-based telephone systems. You should use the procedures documented here
only if:
• You have upgraded to Element v2.5.x software or
Powerstation v1.1.3a or higher, and
• You are using Telos TWOx12, Nx12, Nx6, or Series
2101 talkshow systems.
To obtain the latest software, please visit
AxiaAudio.com/downloads/ and follow the update instructions contained in the accompanying Release Notes
prior to proceeding with this configuration document, if
you have not already done so.
Note for users of previous versions: Starting with Element 2.5-series and Powerstation 1.1.3, a new and improved configuration method for connecting Element consoles
to Telos phone systems which communicate
via the legacy Telos “AP” protocol. This new
method coincides with the introduction of the
Telos VX VoIP talkshow system, as the code
additions required to support the new VX control protocol allowed us to improve software
and provide more flexibility for clients with
earlier Telos equipment as well — specifically,
for IP-connected TWOx12, Series 2101, Nx12
and Nx6 systems.
This new method lets you select control of a
specific Telos phone unit in every Element Show
profile, should you desire. For example, you
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
You will need to know the following things in order
to configure Element for use with your phone system:
1.The IP address of your Telos phone system(s)
2.The user name and password of your phone system(s)
3.The name of the phone system Show you wish to
connect to.
Configuring the Element Show Profile
The major change to Element phone configuration is
that the IP address of your Telos phone system must be
entered in the Phone section of your Element or PowerStation Show Profile, instead of in the Phone Channel
section as was previously required. The phone system IP
address is now stored in Element’s Show Profile settings,
allowing you to create different show profiles which
connect to different Telos devices.
1.Enter the Telos phone system’s IP address. Navigate to Element’s Sources and Profiles page. Select the Element Show Profile you wish to configure, and click on Phone. In the Phone URL field, enter the IP address of
the Telos phone system you’re connecting to. The
format begins with ap: (to define that you will be
using the AP protocol) followed by a login, a password, and finally the IP address. In Figure D-6, the user is telos, the password
Figure D-6: Setting connections
is telos and the IP address follows, like so:
ap:[email protected]
2.Configure the Show. In the same screen where you
entered the IP address of your Telos phone system,
enter the Telos Show running on that device. In the
screenshot example, the show is called “Hybrid
1&2.” If the Nx12 was configured for two shows, another show could have been “Hybrid 3&4.” Refer to
the configuration of your Telos device to determine
which show name you need to enter into this field.
Possible shows from a Telos TWOx12 are “Hybrid1&2”, “Hybrid1”, and “Hybrid2”. Possible
shows from an Nx6 or NX12 are “Hybrid 1&2”,
“Hybrid 3&4”, and “Hybrid 1-4”. Telos Series 2101
show names are generated in the configuration of the
system. Again, it is important that you refer to your
Telos device to determine which show is running.
The
Host / Studio Name
field can remain blank.
A Show Password is used only if there is a password assigned to the Show of your Telos unit. Otherwise, leave this field blank.
3.Configure other options. Element’s Call Controller
module uses the left row of telephone line selection
buttons to control Hybrid 1, the right row to control
Hybrid 2. If you wish to use the right row of Call Controller buttons to control Hybrid 1 and the left row to
control Hybrid 2, click the Reversed Hybrid box.
Some Telos products provide support for up to
24 lines. You can select either Auto, 12 Lines
or 24 Lines with the Mode Selection radio
buttons. In 12-line mode, 12 lines are displayed
on both columns of the Call Controller module;
the left key bank answers lines on Hybrid 1, the
right keys answer lines on Hybrid 2. In 24-line
mode, both left and right key banks will answer
lines using Hybrid 1. To answer lines on any
other hybrid, operators will use the module’s
SET key to choose which hybrid to use. Select-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 155
can configure a show profile named “WXYZ”
and specify that it connect with an Nx12 that
controls the call in lines wired directly to that
unit. Another show profile, “WABC,” has settings
to control an Nx6 handling POTS request lines
wired to it. Using this new capability, you can
define a different phone system to control for
each Show Profile, if you wish, tailored to specific on-air needs.
ing “Auto” uses the configuration of the device to
dynamically set the number of lines used.
4.Click “Save” when done. Note that after any changes made in the show profile pages, the show must be
loaded (or re-loaded) from the Element surface in order for the new settings to become active.
Configuring an Element Source Profile
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 156
In the Element Control Center, navigate to Source
Profiles. Click New Source Profile and, using the Primary Source drop-down box, select the audio channel
that you configured in the Telos device. In the list, you
should see a Livewire channel number and short description of the Hybrid; give it an Element source name, such
as “Nx12 Call1,” and select Phone for Source Type.
The Source Profile for the hybrid should be filled in
as follows:
• Leave the Phone Hybrid IP field empty.
• Leave the Phone line and Phone hybrid (for
NX12) fields at their default value of “0.”
• Use 2nd show (split mode for NX12) should be
left unchecked.
• The Phone Module ID field lets you select from the
multiple phone modules, if you have more than one
installed in your console. Normally, you will have
just one, so select “1” from the drop-down box.
• For Hybrid Nr. select the hybrid that corresponds to
the Primary Source audio you selected above. Typically this will be either a 1 or a 2.
Note: If using the second show of an Nx-series,
the value of 1 is for Hybrid 3 (the first hybrid of
the Hybrid 3&4 show) and the value of 2 is for
Hybrid 4 (second hybrid of the show).
lets you permit “button
mash” conferencing. Unless you specially wish to
prohibit this type of conferencing, select Yes from
the drop-down box.
• Fixed Line lets you assign a line permanently to a
specific fader channel, emulating a dedicated hybrid.
Normally this is used with a 4-Fader Module.
•
Conferencing Allowed
The other fields in the Source Profile page are non-
phone specific, and may be configured as you wish. Repeat this procedure to create a source profile for each
hybrid in your studio.
You’ll now need to load the hybrid sources onto the
fader channels. This can be done either manually, or automatically using Show Profiles. Naturally, we recommend that you make this assignment in each Show Profile which will use the phone system.
For normal operation, you will assign Hybrid 1 to
the left fader channel of the Call Controller, and Hybrid
2 to the right fader channel. Additional hybrids, if you
have them, may be assigned to any channel on a 4-Fader
Phone Module.
Note: Within Element, each incoming “phone”
type audio source has an associated backfeed
for automatic mix-minus generation. There are
several user configuration options that affect
which audio sources are fed to the hybrid under
various conditions; please refer to the “Source
Profile Options” and “Feed To Source Mode” options documented elsewhere in the manual.
Call Controller Operation
The operation of the Call Controller is the same
whether you are using a Telos Nx12 or 2x12 phone system. This section is not intended to replace the manual
that came with your Nx12 or 2x12 but rather give you
an overview of your phone system in the context of the
Element.
On Element’s Call Controller Module, pressing any
Line button either answers a call ringing-in or selects an
inactive line to make an outgoing call; when an inactive
line is “picked up” in this manner, the keypad located
on the Element Navigation Module is active and can be
used for dialing calls. You’ll see visual confirmation on
Element’s display screen as you dial the number, and if
caller ID is available, it is displayed after an incoming
call is answered.
Useful Note: Pressing the pound key (#) after
dialing a number will speed connect time by as
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Status Symbol indicates backfeed
(mix-minus) to hybrid is active
Block All key
Line selection
keys, Hybrid 1
Line selection
keys, Hybrid 2
Hybrid 1 fader
Hybrid 2 fader
Hold key, Hybrid 1
Hold key, Hybrid 2
Drop key, Hybrid 1
Drop key, Hybrid 2
Next key
Figure D-7: Call Controller + 2-Phone Fader Module
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 157
Transfer key
much as 2 - 5 seconds! By default, the Telco’s
central office switch “listens” for a specified period of time after you dial a requested number,
waiting in case you decide to dial more digits.
Pressing the pound key tells the switch that the
dialing sequence is complete, and bypasses this
waiting period, connecting you quicker!
Pressing any Line key for a line that is already active causes it to be locked in this state (a Lock icon will
appear in the Status Symbol window next to the locked
line), so that additional lines can be selected without this
or other locked lines being dropped. This is useful for
making certain that lines on-air are not inadvertently
dropped (such as when a talkshow guest is on a callin line), or for “button mash” conferencing. To clear a
locked line, press its Line button again; the Lock icon
will disappear and the line can then be dropped, either
by selecting another line or by pressing the Drop key.
Pressing the Drop key drops any non-locked lines
on the associated line column.
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 158
Pressing the Next key takes the line that the Nx12
or TWOx12 system has determined to be next in the onair queue for Hybrid 1. Normally, that is the line that
has been on hold the longest. If there is no line on hold,
pressing Next answers the line that’s been ringing-in the
longest.
Audio is normally routed to the fader channel adjacent to the Line key row. Pressing the Hold key on the
fader channel puts the call on Hold, from where it can be
retrieved from anywhere in the system. (The Set key on
the fader channel is not used with the Nx12 or TWOx12,
and pressing it has no effect.)
puts the phone system into “Busy” mode.
This is useful for clearing lines prior to contest call-ins.
When you enter “Busy” mode, inactive lines are busied
so that callers will receive a busy signal when they attempt to call-in. Lines that are active, i.e. on-air and on
Hold are not affected by the Block All key; however, if
these lines are dropped while Nx12 or TWOx12 is in
“Busy” mode, these lines will be “busied out” as well.
Note that “Busy” mode has no effect at all on lines which
are designated as Hot or Warm Lines. To cancel “Busy”
Block All
mode, press the Block All key again; all busied lines will
again be available for incoming callers.
The Transfer key activates the Transfer function
within the Nx12 or TWOx12. Please refer to your Telos
phone system documentation for more information on
this feature.
Telos Two ISDN Hybrid
The Telos Two has an Ethernet connection for control, so it can be tightly integrated with the telephone
control modules in the Element. It uses the 4-Phone
Fader Module, which includes a Hold and Set button in
addition to the usual complement. All control is via the
Ethernet, so no GPIO connection is necessary.
The Telos Two can be configured for ISDN system
hold or local hold. The first case is used when you want
to be able to retrieve the call from another device sharing
the ISDN line.
Installation and Configuration
The Telos Two needs to have software version 2.0.51p
or later installed. The latest software is available on the
Telos web site support page.
1.Connect your Telos Two to the Ethernet and assign it
an IP number that is acceptable for use within your
network.
2.Connect your ISDN telephone line to the Telos Two
and confirm that it is working by checking the LCD
status display.
3.Connect both Telos Two audio inputs and both outputs to an Axia Analog node. The hybrid inputs and
outputs must be connected via analog since there is
no way to separate the two hybrid back-feeds using
the AES interface. Wiring to the left side of the two
node inputs will accomplish our goal. Remember
to set the Signal Mode to LEFT when creating the
Source and Show Profiles.
4.Using the audio node’s Source configuration web
page, enter a text name and channel number for each
input. It might be convenient to include the telephone
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
xx.xx.xx.xx,n
where the “x”s represent the IP number, and the “n”
represents the hybrid number.
The Telos Two has two hybrids, so you need to repeat
this procedure to create another source profile for the
second hybrid.
Important Note: The Telos TWO has an optional internal mix-minus cross-connect feature.
Since Element provides this function automatically, you should disable this feature in the Telos
TWO (set hybrid mode to “separate”) to prevent
unexpected results.
Within Element, each incoming “phone” type audio
source has an associated back-feed. There are some user
configuration options that affect which audio sources are
fed to the hybrid under various conditions, explained in
the mix-minus/back-feed section of this manual.
Operation
Load your newly-created hybrid source on a 4-Phone
Module fader. This can be done either manually or automatically using Show Profiles.
Pressing the fader channel On button answers a ringing-in call or selects an inactive line for an outgoing call.
Pressing Preview has the same effect on the hybrid.
can be used to dial outbound calls. It is automatically
assigned to the last line that was selected. You’ll see
the number as it is being entered on the main Element
screen. After the number is complete, press the Enter
button to start the connection.
Caller ID is displayed for incoming calls. The icon
in the overbridge near the source text name changes to
show the line status.
The first time you press the Off button, the channel
audio is switched off. The second time you press the Off
button, the call will be dropped.
Pressing the module’s Hold button puts the call on
hold. (The Set button on 4-Phone Module channels is
not used with the Telos Two, and pressing it has no effect.)
Telos One and Delta Hybrids
These hybrids can be controlled using Element’s
hardware GPIO ports. Either normal 4-Fader Modules or
4-Phone Fader Modules may be used with these hybrids,
although there is no benefit from the latter as the Hold
and Set buttons have no function.
First, let’s set up GPIO connections. (Please refer to
the GPIO section of this manual, or the Axia GPIO Node
Manual, for pinout diagrams.)
1.Connect the GPIO START Pulse output to the hybrid’s “Line Take” pin, and the GPIO STOP Pulse
output to the hybrid’s “Line Drop” pin. This will
cause the On and Off buttons on the fader to which
the hybrid is assigned to operate the hybrid remotely.
Here’s a cable diagram:
Element-to-Telos ONE cable:
Function
Element
DB-15M
Hybrid
DB-9M
Common
7
6
On
4
1
Off
5
7
The keypad located on the Element Monitor module
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 159
number as part of the text name. Configure for “Fast
stream” audio mode.
5.On the node’s Destination configuration web page,
select the same channel number for each output as
was used for the corresponding input. Select “To
source” for the Type. Configure for “Fast Stream”
audio mode.
6.Open the Element Sources & Profiles Configuration
web page. Choose Source Profiles, then Create New
Source Profile. In your new source profile, choose the
Primary Source that you entered in the audio node’s
setup page. Give it an Element source name and select “Phone” for source type. Enter the phone hybrid
IP address, including the hybrid number, in the form
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 160
Element-to-Telos Delta cable:
Function
Element
DB-15M
Hybrid
DB-15M
Common
7
6
On
4
1
Off
5
7
2.Connect the hybrid inputs and outputs to an Audio
node.
3.Using the Node’s Source configuration web page, enter a text name and channel number for each input. It
might be convenient to include the telephone number
as part of the text name. Configure for “Fast Stream”
audio mode.
4.Using the Node’s Destination configuration web
page, select the same channel number for each output as was used for the corresponding input. Select
“To source” for the Type. This is how Element’s automatic backfeed/mix-minus knows where the backfeed should be sent. Configure for “Fast Stream” audio mode.
5.Open the Element Sources & Profiles Configuration
web page. Choose Source Profiles, then Create New
Source Profile. In your new source profile, choose the
Primary Source that you entered in the audio node’s
setup page. Give it an Element source name and select “Phone” for source type. Select a Hybrid Answer
Mode of “Channel ON answers hybrid” or “Channel
ON or Preview ON answers hybrid”.
6.Open Element’s Module Manager/GPIO Configuration web page. You will see the following:
GPIO as well as to audio signals. Element will generate
the appropriate control signals for hybrids when Phone is
selected as the source type.
The status display above the entry boxes show you
the GPIO status and are useful for troubleshooting.
Operation
Load the hybrid source onto a fader channel. If you
are using the GPIO to control the Hybrid functions for
the Telos One or Delta hybrids, pressing the fader channel ON button turns the Hybrid ON, and pressing the Off
button turns the Hybrid OFF.
Note: Dialing or generation of DTMF from the
Element keypad is not supported for the Telos
ONE.
Telos ONE-x-Six, Direct Interface and 1A2 Systems
To use these legacy hybrids, audio must be connected
via Analog nodes. There is a special two-position control
panel that can drop into Element to control ONE-x-Six,
Direct Interface Module or 1A2 phone systems. This
panel communicates directly to the phone systems using a dedicated cable rather than via Ethernet. Line Take
and Drop functions cannot be controlled using GPIO on
these systems, so the control surfaces supplied with the
phone systems must be used to actuate these commands.
Installation & Configuration
Figure D-8: GPIO setup
For the physical GPIO you will be connecting to
the hybrid, enter or select from the drop-down box
the Livewire source channel for the hybrid. Note the
Livewire channel number and name are keys to the
1.Install the control module and connect it to the phone
equipment.
2.Connect audio input, output, and Program-On-Hold
to an Analog node. Use the left channel inputs and
outputs for these mono signals.
3.Using the Analog node’s Source configuration web
page, enter a text name and channel number for each
input. It might be convenient to include the telephone
number as part of the text name. Configure for “Fast
Stream” audio mode.
4.Using the audio node’s Destination configuration
web page, select the same channel number for each
output as was used for the corresponding input. Se-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
lect “To source” for the Type and configure for “Fast
Stream” audio mode.
5.Open the Element Sources & Profiles Configuration
web page. Choose Source Profiles, then Create New
Source Profile. In your new source profile, choose the
Primary Source that you entered in the audio node’s
setup page. Give it an Element source name and select “Phone” for source type. Set the default input
mode to Left.
Operation
Load the hybrid source(s) onto the fader channels.
Use the control surfaces directly connected to the phone
system to select lines and place callers on the hybrids.
Faders will not be controlled by the hybrids via GPIO
and will need to be manually turned ON and OFF as
needed.
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 161
Note: Dialing or generation of DTMF from the
Element keypad is not supported for these legacy Telos phone systems.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Mimicking nature,
streams combine to form anew
Appendix D: Working With Hybrids • 162
many become one.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Accessory Panels and User Panels
Axia manufactures a comprehensive line of accessory control panels that can be placed near talent, host
or producer positions to give non-board-op users convenient control over options such as headphone source
selection and volume, mic channel on/off/mute, talkback
and routing controls. These panels connect to the Axia
network in two ways, depending upon their feature set:
via GPIO, and via CANBus.
dle with all the RJ-45 connectors). Does one of the RJ
jacks contain an RJ-45 termination device? If so, you are
ready to install your accessory panel. Remove the terminator from the distribution board and set it aside for later.
If you do not see this terminator, please contact Axia
support for more information.
Installation
User panels that connect via CANBus are much like
Element fader modules, in that they require a unique ID
setting in order for the system to recognize them correctly. Each Element module (and each CANBus accessory panel) has a multi-position rotary switch located on
its circuit board; each device attached to an Element’s
CANBus must have this switch set to a unique position.
Figure E-1: Axia accessory control panels.
Panels requiring a CANBus connection require a
cable connection to the nearest Element console. These
include the Headphone Selector Panel, Mic Control/
Headphone Selector Panel and the 4-button LCD SmartSwitch control panels.
Other panels require only a GPIO connection. These
include the Mic Control Panel, Producer’s Mic Control
Panel, 5-Button Film-Cap Switch Panel, and the 5-, 10and 15-Button Rackmount Switch Panels.
To find out what ID assignments are free, enter Element’s diagnostic mode by pressing and holding the
Help and Right Arrow keys on the Monitor Module for
five seconds.
You’ll see a description of each installed module and
accessory panel device; preceding the description are a
set of numbers in brackets.
Installing a CANBus Accessory Panel
Note: Before beginning installation, make certain that you have the latest software installed
for your StudioEngine and Element console.
Current version software is always available at
www.AxiaAudio.com/downloads/ .
Pre-installation Hardware Check
Before installing your new panel, we need to perform
a quick hardware check.
Open the overbridge panel on your Element and examine the Power Distribution Board (the one in the mid©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Figure E-2: Element diagnostic mode
Appendix E: Accessory User Panels • 163
Appendix E:
The bracketed numbers refer to device type and ID
number, respectively. The first digit identifies the type of
device; the second digit the ID (controlled by the rotary
switch). Select an ID for your new accessory panel by
determining which IDs are not in use.
Now, using a small screwdriver, turn the switch on
the bottom of the accessory panel to the ID number
you’ve selected (as shown in Figure E-3).
Now, connect the panel to the Element CANBus using CAT-5e Shielded cable. Be sure to keep make the
cable only as long as is required; 50 feet of cable for a
panel located 10 feet from the console is excessive, and
can cause problems later!
Appendix E: Accessory User Panels • 164
Shielded category cable is almost never required
in an Axia system. However, we highly recommend shielded CAT-5e in this instance in order
to prevent the digital control signals present in
these circuits from generating RF interference
after they exit the containment of the Element
chassis. In a pinch, though, regular (unshielded)
CAT-5e will work.
into the panel’s spare RJ jack.
Once connected, your new accessory panel will be
automatically recognized and ready to use. In the rare
event it is not, please “capture” the console’s new configuration, following the instructions in Chapter 1 of this
manual.
Programming
Using a connected computer, log into your Element’s
configuration web pages and select the User Modules
page. You’ll see your new panel listed there.
• For panels with mic functions, enter the channel
number of the mic source you want it to control.
• For panels with headphone functions, enter the
channel number of the mic source that the headphone
panel is adjacent to. The panel will control the headphone backfeed to that mic position.
Installing a GPIO Accessory Module
Installation
Accessory panels using GPIO connections are a
straightforward installation using standard multipleconductor cable and DB-15M connectors. You can fabricate this cable, or purchase one like the Cables To Go
#02639, a 10-foot version available from Provantage,
Best Buy or online from CablesToGo.com.
Figure E-3: Setting the ID number
Connect one end of the cable to the accessory panel
you’re installing, and the other end to the Power Distribution Board, using the jack you removed the termination block from.
If you have more than one accessory panel to install,
connect it now to the second RJ port on the back of the
first accessory panel. More panels can be daisy-chained
as needed.
On the final accessory panel, place the termination
block you removed from the Power Distribution Board
Figure E-4: Axia rackount control panels connect via
GPIO ports
Cables between the accessory panels and the Axia
GPIO Node pin-for-pin, with male-to-male connectors.
Programming a Mic Control Panel connected to an
Element GPIO Connection
This section applies when connecting a Mic Control
accessory panel to the GPIO port of your Element Power
Supply. It assumes you have already made the cable con-
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
nection described above in “Installation.”
Using a PC connected to the Axia network, enter the
configuration page for your Element and select the GPIO
Configuration section.
In the GPIO Configuration page, you will see eight
listings that correspond to the eight ports that are on the
back of the Element Power Supply. Create a name on the
listing that corresponds to the port to which you wired
your Mic Control Panel, and enter the channel number
of the mic source you want it to control.
Programming a Mic Control Panel connected to a
GPIO Node Connection
This section applies when connecting a Mic Control
accessory panel to the GPIO port of an Axia GPIO Node.
It assumes you have already made the cable connection
described above in “Installation.”
Using a PC connected to the Axia network, enter the
configuration page for the GPIO Node to which your accessory panel is connected.
Create a name on the listing that corresponds to the
port to which you wired your Mic Control Panel, and
enter the channel number of the mic source you want it
to control.
Figure E-5: GPIO status indications
Now, assign the Mic channel you’re working with
to one of the channels of your Element. Navigate to the
the Element GPIO Configuration page as shown in Figure E-5 above and observe the status indicators for the
lights and input commands on your mic controller as you
toggle the accessory panel from On to Off. Refer to the
table in Figure E-6 for the Mic GPIO profile.
Special Programming for Mic Control Panels
It is possible to connect the mic controller to a GPIO
port either on a GPIO Node or on the Element Power
Supply and program it using PathfinderPC logic control.
For more information on this, please refer to the PathfinderPC User’s Manual.
Inputs
Pin
Outputs
Pin
Power/Common
Pin
ON Command
11
ON Lamp
1
Source Common
7
OFF Command
12
OFF Lamp
2
Logic Common
8
TALK Command
13
TALK Lamp
3
+5 VDC
9
MUTE Command
14
MUTE Lamp
4
Input Common
10
not used
15
not used
5
not used
6
Figure E-6 : GPIO pinout diagram for Mic profile
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix E: Accessory User Panels • 165
Now, assign the Mic channel you’re working with
to one of the channels of your Element. Navigate to the
GPIO Node’s Configuration page and observe the status indicators for the lights and input commands on your
mic controller as you toggle the accessory panel from
On to Off. Refer to the table in Figure E-6 for the Mic
GPIO profile.
Meeting coffee, black.
Less Powerpoint, I beg you.
Appendix E: Accessory User Panels • 166
Must keep eyes open.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix F:
Channel / IP Worksheets
The scalable nature of Axia Livewire audio networks makes it possible to construct systems of any size - from a
single room to an entire multi-studio facility.
Since Livewire components – Audio Nodes, Elements, StudioEngines, PowerStation, etc. – are connected with
Ethernet, each one requires a unique IP (Internet Protocol) address. IP addresses are four bytes long and are written
in “dotted decimal” form, with each byte represented decimally and separated by a period. For example, in the IP
address 193.32.216.9, the 193 is the value for the first byte, 32 for the second, etc. Since a byte can hold values from
0 to 255, this is the range for each decimal value. If you run a public network, Host IP addresses are assigned to your
organization by your internet service provider and parceled out to individual host computers by your network administrator. He may give you this number to be entered manually, or could opt for DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol) to let your computer get the address automatically from a pool. Because Livewire devices are permanently
attached and because it is more desirable to know the IP address attached to a particular node (and perhaps assign
them in some kind of logical pattern), we do not support DHCP for our hardware nodes. Therefore, you will need to
enter an IP address into each node.
Using the audio nodes, Livewire systems can support 32,766 channels of audio; this necessitates giving each audio
source or destination its own unique identifier, called Channel ID numbers.
As you can imagine, keeping track of so many unique IP addresses and Channel ID numbers is a big job. Therefore, on the next few pages, we’ve provided you with worksheets that you can use to keep track of the numbers you’ve
assigned.
For a more detailed explanation of IP addresses, subnet masks and related issues, we highly suggest that you refer
to “Network Engineering For Audio Engineers”, Chapter 8 of our Introduction to Livewire: IP Audio System Design
Reference and Primer.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Appendix F: Worksheets • 167
A logical convention that is often followed will link the Livewire channel number to the last octet of the device IP
address. For example, if a node has an IP address of 192.168.1.12, the channel numbers assigned to the 8 sources of
that node might be 1201 through 1208.
Axia IP Address Assignment Worksheet
Appendix F: Worksheets • 168
IP Address
Device Name
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Location
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Notes
Axia Audio Channel Assignment Worksheet - SOURCES
Device Name
Device Location
Notes
Appendix F: Worksheets • 169
Channel ID Number
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Axia Audio Channel Assignment Worksheet - DESTINATIONS
Device Name
Device Location
Appendix F: Worksheets • 170
Channel ID Number
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Notes
Warranty
Telos Alliance Limited Warranty
This Warranty covers “the Products,” which are defined as the various audio equipment, parts, software and accessories manufactured, sold and/or distributed by or on behalf of TLS Corp. and its affiliated companies, collectively
doing business as The Telos Alliance (hereinafter “Telos”).
With the exception of software-only items, the Products are warranted to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period of five (5) years from the date of receipt of such Product by the end-user (such date of receipt the
“Receipt Date”). Software-only items are warranted to be free from defects in material and workmanship for a period
of 90 days from the Receipt Date. Telos will repair or replace (in its discretion) defective Products returned to Telos
within the warranty period, subject to the provisions and limitations set forth herein.
This warranty will be void if the Product: (i) has been subjected, directly or indirectly, to Acts of God, including
(without limitation) lightning strikes or resultant power surges; (ii) has been improperly installed or misused, including (without limitation) the failure to use telephone and power line surge protection devices; (iii) has been damaged by
accident or neglect. As with all sensitive electronic equipment, to help prevent damage and or loss of data, we strongly
recommend the use of an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) with all of our Products. Telos products are to be used
with registered protective interface devices which satisfy regulatory requirements in their country of use.
This Warranty is void if the associated equipment was purchased or otherwise obtained through sales channels not
authorized by Telos.
EXCEPT FOR THE ABOVE-STATED EXPRESS WARRANTY, TELOS MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED (INCLUDING IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE).
In order to invoke this Warranty, the Product must be registered via Telos’ website (found at: http://telosalliance.
com/legal/warranty) at time of receipt by end-user and notice of a warranty claim must be received by Telos within
the above stated warranty period and warranty coverage must be authorized by Telos. Contact may be made via email:
[email protected] or via telephone: (+1) 216-241-7225. If Telos authorizes the performance of warranty
service, the defective Product must be delivered to: Telos, 1241 Superior Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44114 or other
company repair center as may be specified by Telos at the time of claim.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Warranty • 171
In no event will Telos, its directors, officers, employees, agents, owners, consultants or advisors (its “Affiliates”),
or authorized dealers or their respective Affiliates, be liable for incidental or consequential damages, or for loss, damage, or expense directly or indirectly arising from the use of any Product or the inability to use any Product either
separately or in combination with other equipment or materials, or from any other cause.
Shipping Costs and Warranty Service:
If the date the customer’s notice of warranty claim is received by Telos (such date the “Warranty Claim Notice
Date”) is within the first 90 days following the Receipt Date, Telos will pay the costs of shipping such warranted Product to and from the end user’s location, and the cost of repair or replacement of such warranted Product.
If the Warranty Claim Notice Date occurs after the first 90 days following the Receipt Date and before the end of
the second (2nd) year, the customer will pay the freight to return the warranted Product to Telos. Telos will then, at its
sole discretion, repair or replace the warranted Product and return it to the end user at Telos’ expense.
If the Warranty Claim Notice Date occurs between the end of the second (2nd) year following the Receipt Date
and the completion of the fifth (5th) year, the customer will pay the costs of shipping such warranted Product to and
from the end user’s location. Telos will then, in its sole discretion, repair or replace the warranted Product at Telos’
expense. Telos also reserves the right, if it is not economically justifiable to repair the warranted Product, to offer a
replacement product of comparable performance and condition direct to the customer at a discounted price, accepting
the failed warranted Product as a trade-in.
The end user will in all cases be responsible for all duties and taxes associated with the shipment, return and servicing of the warranted Product.
No distributor, dealer, or reseller of Telos products is authorized under any circumstances to extend, expand or
otherwise modify in any way the warranty provided by Telos, and any attempt to do so is null and void and shall not
be effective as against Telos or its Affiliates.
Warranty • 172
Out of warranty units returned to the factory for repair may be subject to a $500 evaluation fee, which fee must
be prepaid prior to shipping the unit to Telos. If no repairs are required, the $500 fee will be retained by Telos as an
evaluation charge. If repairs are required, the $500 fee will be applied to the total cost of the repair.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
TCP/IP,
How did we live without thee?
Warranty • 173
Analogicly.
©2014 Axia Audio- Rev 1.8.1
Axia Audio, a Telos Alliance Company • 1241 Superior Ave. • Cleveland, Ohio, 44114, USA • +1.216.241.7225 • www.AxiaAudio.com
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