Council meeting papers - 7 December 2012

Council meeting papers - 7 December 2012

MEETING OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

FRIDAY 7 DECEMBER 2012

commencing at 10.15 am to be held in

THE UNIVERSITY HOUSE MEETING ROOM,

UNIVERSITY HOUSE

MANAWATU CAMPUS

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

A meeting of Massey University Council

To be held in the University House Meeting Room, University House,

Manawatu Campus

on

Friday 7 December 2012 commencing at 10.15am

AGENDA- PART I

Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act

1987

Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This means that if a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed unless non-disclosure can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That is, non-disclosure of information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part II or Finance Section matters are not seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such matters are not mentioned outside Council (or its relevant Committee).

All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information included under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for the minutes of those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the Registrar for decision on disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose Part II or Finance Section matters.

Interest: Declaration and Disqualification

In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or indirect pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a member of the staff of the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the Council (or Committee) then as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their knowledge they:

(a) must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);

(b) must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the Council (or

Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides otherwise.

Page 1 of 5

F

C

D

E

G

L

M

N

O

Index

Number

Item

A

B

HI

JK

Paper

Number

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Welcome

1.2 Apologies

1.3 Declaration of Interest/ Register of Interest

1.4 Meeting Agenda Review

1.5 Minutes of Council meetings – Part I - Meeting held on 5 October

2012

1.6 Matters Arising

1.7 Follow-up Schedule as at 7 December 2012

1.8 Council Agenda Plans

1.8.1 As at 7 December 2012

1.8.2 Agenda Plan 2013

2.0 KEY REPORTS

2.1 Chancellor’s Report - Part I

2.1.1 Chancellor’s Report - oral

2.2 Vice-Chancellor’s Report – Part I

2.2.1 Vice-Chancellor’s Report

2.2.2 Financial Report for the ten months ending 31 October 2012

C12/129

C12/130

C12/131

3.0 DECISION ITEMS

3.1 University Policy Approval

3.1.1 Business Continuity Policy

3.2 Council Policy Approval

3.2.1 Guidelines for the Conduct of Council and Council Sub-

committees

3.2 Student Election Statute

C12/132

C12/133

C12/134

4.0 COMMITTEE, ASSOCIATED ENTITIES AND OTHER REPORTS

4.1 Academic Board Reports

4.1.1 Academic Board Meeting held on 17 October 2012

4.1.2 Academic Board Meeting held on 21 November 2012

C12/136

C12/137

5.0 INFORMATION/BACKGROUND ITEMS

5.1 Outcome of election for Chancellor & Pro Chancellor 2012-2013 - oral

5.2 Council Evaluation 2012

C12/138

6.0 LATE ITEMS

Page 2 of 5

7.0 MOVING INTO PART II

7.1 Exclusion of the Public

THE CHANCELLOR WILL MOVE THAT, EXCLUDING

• Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

• Ms Rose Anne MacLeod, Assistant Vice-Chancellor – Finance, Strategy and

Information Technology

• Mr James Gardiner, Director of Communications

• Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF

ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED FROM

THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE FOLLOWING

MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE; THE

COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE

CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.

Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act 1987.

Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.

Item

Item 8.1

C12/139

Confirmation of Minutes

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 5 October 2012

Item 8.2

Matters Arising

Item 8.3

Follow-up Schedule as at 7 December 2012

Item 9.1.1

Chancellor’s Report

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 5 October 2012

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 5 October 2012 and before

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Item 9.1.2

C12/140

Council Committee membership 2013

Item 9.2.1

C12/141

Vice-Chancellor’s Report

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Item 9.2.2

C12/142

Vice-Chancellor’s Objectives 2012 Update

Report

Item 9.2.3

C12/143

Financial Report for the ten months ended 31

October 2102

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Page 3 of 5

Item

Item 9.2.4

C12/144

Quarterly Consolidated Performance Report:

Quarter Three, 2012

Item 9.2.5

C12/145

Aged Debtors Report

Item 9.2.6

C12/146

New Zealand School of Music Report

Item 10.1

C12/147

Council Strategy Day: Key Performance

Indicators for the Road to 2020

Item 10.2

C12/148

Updated Investment Plan 2013-2015

Item 10.3

C12/149

Capital Asset Management Plan - Draft

Item 10.4.1

C12/150

Massey University Annual Plan 2013

Item 10.4.2

C12/151

2013 Operating Budget

Item 10.5.1

C12/152

Refurbishment and Extension of the

Wellington Campus Library

Item 10.5.2

C12/153

Sir Geoffrey Peren Building Upgrade

Item 10.6

C12/154

Bad Debts Write Off for Students Enrolled in the 2010 and Prior Academic Years

Item 10.7.1

C12/155

New Zealand School of Music Statement of

Corporate Intent

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Page 4 of 5

Item

Item 10.7.2

C12/156

Massey Ventures Limited Statement of

Corporate Intent

Item 10.7.3

C12/157

Agri One Ltd Statement of Corporate Intent

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

Item 10.8

C12/158

Conferment of Degrees

Item 10.9

C12/159

Terms of Insurance Renewal 2012-2014:

Electronic Resolution

Item 11.1.1

C12/160

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 5 October 2012

Item 11.1.2

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 7 December 2012

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

Item 11.2

C12/161

Honorary Awards Committee Report – meeting held on 13 November 2012

Item 11.3.1

C12/162

Academic Board Report – meeting held on

17 October 2012

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Item 11.3.2

C12/163

Academic Board Report – meeting held on

17 October 2012

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

AND

Item 12.0

Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the privileged part of the meeting.

Page 5 of 5

C12/129 – December

Part I

MINUTES OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

A MEETING OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL HELD IN THE

EXECUTIVE SEMINAR SUITE, (5B14), BLOCK 5, LEVEL B,

WELLINGTON CAMPUS

On

FRIDAY 5 OCTOBER 2012 AT 11.00AM

PART I

PRESENT:

Dr Russ Ballard (Chancellor), Ms Fiona Coote, Ms Kura Denness,

Associate Professor Grant Duncan, Mr Chris Kelly, Hon Steve Maharey

(Vice-Chancellor), Dr Alison Paterson (Pro Chancellor), Ms Tiri Porter,

Mr Ralph Springett, Mr Ben Thorpe, Mr Bruce Ullrich, Mr Ben Vanderkolk and Ms Lesley Whyte

IN ATTENDANCE: Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar

Ms Rose Anne MacLeod, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Finance, Strategy and

Information Technology (FSI)

Mr James Gardiner, Director Communications

Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

Dr Nigel Gould, Chair Massey University Foundation for item 11.4

Official Information Act 1982 and Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act

1987

Massey University (including its Council) is subject to the Official Information Act 1982. This means that if a specific request for disclosure is made, information that it holds must be disclosed unless non-disclosure can be justified in the terms of the Official Information Act 1982.

Matters that are included in Part II and most matters in the Finance Section of Council (or

Committee) meetings are protected from disclosure under the Official Information Act 1982. That is, non-disclosure of information relating to such matters can usually be justified in terms of the

Official Information Act 1982. Therefore, care should be taken to ensure that papers relating to Part

II or Finance Section matters are not seen outside Council (or its relevant Committee) and that such matters are not mentioned outside Council (or its relevant Committee).

All requests (whether written or oral) by any person who is not a Council member for information included under Part II or the Finance Section of Council (or Committee) meetings and requests for the minutes of those parts of Council (or Committee) meetings must be referred immediately to the

Registrar for decision on disclosure or otherwise. Individual members are advised not to disclose

Part II or Finance Section matters.

Interest: Declaration and Disqualification

In accordance with the Education Act 1989 members are reminded that if they have any direct or indirect pecuniary interest (including their conditions of service as the Chief Executive or as a

Page 1 of 9

C12/129 – December

Part I

member of the staff of the institution) in a matter being considered or about to be considered by the

Council (or Committee) then as soon as possible after the relevant facts have come to their knowledge they:

(a) Must disclose the nature of the interest at a meeting of the Council (or Committee);

(b) Must not be present during any deliberation or take part in any decision of the

Council (or Committee) with respect to that matter unless the Council decides otherwise.

1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 WELCOME

The Chancellor opened the meeting at 11.00am welcoming those present and noting that there would be a tour of the campus prior to lunch.

1.2 APOLOGIES

Apologies were received and noted from Mr Alastair Scott, Professor Tony Signal and

Professor Cynthia White.

1.3 DECLARATION OF INTEREST

The Chancellor noted the Interests Register and called for any further declarations that were of relevance to this meeting, of which there were none. Members were asked to provide updated information for the Register to the Executive Secretary.

1.4 MEETING AGENDA REVIEW

There were no late items for Part I.

Part II late item

Council Elections 2013: Student membership: Reason for exclusion from Part I: To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

1.5 C12/108

CONFIRMATION OF PART I MINUTES - MEETING HELD ON 7 SEPTEMBER

2012

RESOLVED THAT THE MINUTES OF THE MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

MEETING HELD ON FRIDAY 7 SEPTEMBER 2012 (PART I) BE RECEIVED AND

CONFIRMED AS A TRUE AND CORRECT RECORD

CHANCELLOR/ULLRICH

Carried

Page 2 of 9

C12/129 – December

Part I

1.6 MATTERS ARISING

There were no matters arising further to those on the Follow-up Schedule as at 5 October

2012.

1.7 FOLLOW-UP SCHEDULE AS AT 5 OCTOBER 2012

Last meeting: No 1: Emergency Management Policy: The Risk Manager synchronised the activities of all relevant stakeholders to achieve a common purpose.

1.8 COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – UPDATE FOR 5 OCTOBER 2012

The Council Agenda Plan as at 5 October 2012 was noted.

2.0 KEY REPORTS

2.1 CHANCELLOR’S REPORTS

2.1.1 CHANCELLOR’S REPORT – oral

The Chancellor reported that since the 7 September 2012 Council meeting he had attended the following Committee meetings and events:

• A Governance Committee meeting that would be reported in Part II;

• An Honorary Awards Committee meeting that would be reported in Part II;

• Attended an enjoyable Blues Awards Dinner in Albany at which 13 successful

Olympians were present, all of whom were students of or who had graduated from

Massey University;

• Had been on the Appointment Panel for Trustees of Central Energy Trust; and

• Had regular meetings or calls with the Vice-Chancellor.

2.2 VICE-CHANCELLOR’S REPORTS

2.2.1 C12/109

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S REPORT – PART I

The Vice-Chancellor highlighted the following sections of his report:

1.0 Topical Issues

1.1 2012 London Paralympics

1.2 2012 QS World University Rankings

1.6 Advanced Technology Institute (ATI)

2.0 Key Strategic Issues and Positioning

2.2 Internationalisation Update: The Vice-Chancellor noted his upcoming trip to India with the Minister of Tertiary Education.

2.3 Agri-food Update

Page 3 of 9

C12/129 – December

Part I

4.0 Connections and Responsibility

4.4 Bereavements: The Vice-Chancellor noted the recent death of Major General

(Retired).Piers Reid

8.0 Overall sense/feel of the place

The Vice-Chancellor noted the considerable changes taking place currently for the staff in the College of Education but that given the current tertiary education context the

University must keep changing.

In response to a question the Vice-Chancellor agreed that the six-monthly Human Resources

Report tabled at the Audit and Risk Committee would in future include the reasons behind staff choosing to join or leave the University and the processes the University used to retain staff.

Action: Assistant Vice-Chancellor People and Organisational Development to include a section in his Human Resources Report on the reasons staff joined and left Massey

University and processes used for retaining staff.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL RECEIVE THE PART I VICE-CHANCELLOR’S

REPORT

CHANCELLOR

Carried

2.2.2 C12/110

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE EIGHT MONTHS ENDED 31 AUGUST 2012

The Assistant Vice-Chancellor Finance, Strategy and IT Ms MacLeod spoke to the report noting that the University was on track to achieve the budgeted surplus.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL RECEIVE THE FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE EIGHT

MONTHS ENDED 31 AUGUST 2012

CHANCELLOR

Carried

3.0 DECISION ITEMS

3.1 UNIVERSITY POLICY APPROVAL

3.1.1 C12/111

GENERAL DEBT COLLECTION POLICY

Page 1: last sentence: Clarity was sought on the parameters of the 3% of outstanding debt. It was agreed that the qualifier ‘greater than 30 days’ would be added.

Page 1: second to last sentence: ‘cost centre’ be changed to ‘budget centre’ to align with the rest of the Policy.

Page 4 of 9

C12/129 – December

Part I

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE, WITH THE FOLLOWING AMENDMENTS:

(in bold)

• Page 1: last sentence: to read ‘… of 3% of outstanding debt greater than 30 days, unless….’

• Page 1: second to last sentence: ‘… appropriate cost budget centre.’

THE GENERAL DEBT COLLECTION POLICY (APPENDIX 1)

WHYTE/SPRINGETT

Carried

3.2 C12/112

DRAFT COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN 2013

The Chancellor gave early notice to Council of a paper that was to come to the 7 December

2012 Council meeting giving consideration to changing October Audit and Risk Committee and Council meetings to November meetings. The paper would lay out any advantages or disadvantages of such a change to the established meeting schedule.

Action: Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar to prepare the Meeting Schedule change paper and table at the 7 December 2012 Council meeting.

The Strategic Discussions and Site Visits were noted. Additionally it was considered that:

• When a business case was tabled a related site visit would be useful; and

• It would be of value to visit Marae when taking a campus tour.

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE DRAFT COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN

2013 (APPENDIX 2)

COOTE/VANDERKOLK

Carried

4.0 COMMITTEE, ASSOCIATED ENTITIES AND OTHER REPORTS

There were no Committee, associated entities or other reports.

5.0 INFORMATION/BACKGROUND ITEMS

5.1 C12/113

CHANCELLOR AND PRO CHANCELLOR ELECTIONS 2012-2013

The Chancellor noted that the completed forms of those members eligible to stand in the elections for Chancellor and Pro Chancellor were to be returned to the Returning Officer no later than 5 November 2012.

Page 5 of 9

C12/129 – December

Part I

5.2 C12/114

COUNCIL GRADUATION SCHEDULE 2013

The Chancellor noted that the completed schedules were to be returned to the Executive

Secretary no later than 30 November 2012 after which time the 2013 Graduation Schedule would be drawn up.

6.0 LATE ITEMS

There were no late items for Part I.

7.0 MOVING INTO PART II

EXCLUSION OF THE PUBLIC

THE CHANCELLOR MOVED THAT, EXCLUDING

• Mr Stuart Morriss, Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar

• Ms Rose Anne MacLeod, Assistant Vice-Chancellor Finance, Strategy and

Information Technology

• Mr James Gardner, Director Communications

• Ms Paddy Nicol, Executive Secretary

• Dr Nigel Gould , Chair Massey University Foundation for item 11.4

WHO HAVE, IN THE OPINION OF COUNCIL, KNOWLEDGE THAT COULD BE OF

ASSISTANCE, MEMBERS OF THE PRESS AND PUBLIC BE NOW EXCLUDED

FROM THE MEETING SO THAT FOR THE UNDERNOTED REASONS THE

FOLLOWING MATTERS MAY BE DISCUSSED WITHOUT PUBLIC DISCLOSURE;

THE COMMITTEE BEING SATISFIED, WHERE APPROPRIATE, THAT THERE ARE

CONSIDERATIONS WHICH OUTWEIGH THE PUBLIC INTEREST OF DISCLOSURE.

Reference: Section 48 (1) of the Local Government and Information and Meetings Act

1987.

Reference: Section 9 as detailed hereunder of the Official Information Act 1982.

Item

Item 8.1

C12/115

Confirmation of Minutes

Item 8.2

Matters Arising

Item 8.3

Follow-up Schedule as at 5 October 2012

Item 9.1.1

Chancellor’s Report

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

These matters were considered in Part II of the meeting held on 7 September 2012

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 7 September 2012

These matters were considered in Part II of the meetings held on 7 September 2012 and before

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

Page 6 of 9

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

C12/129 – December

Part I

Item

Item 9.1.2

C12/116

Governance Committee Report – meeting held on 21 September 2012

Item 9.2.1

C12/117

Vice-Chancellor’s Report

Item 9.2.2

C12/118

Financial Report for the eight months ended

31 August 2102

Item 9.2.3

C12/119

2013 Operating Budget

Item 9.2.4

C12/120

2013 Massey University Capital Plan

Item 10.1

C12/121

Relocation of the School of Public Health,

Wellington

Item 10.2

C12/122

Delegation to approve Terms of Insurance

Renewal 2012-2013

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

Item 10.3

C12/123

Council Appointment: Human Ethics

Committee: Southern A

Item 10.4

C12/124

New Zealand Food Innovation Network and

Massey University

Item 11.1.1

C12/125

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 7 September 2012

Item 11.1.3

Audit and Risk Committee Report –Meeting held on 5 October 2012

To protect the privacy of natural persons

Reference: Section 9 2 (a)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

Page 7 of 9

C12/129 – December

Part I

Item

Item 11.2

C12/126

Honorary Awards Committee Report – meeting held on 11 September 2012

Item 11.3

C12/127

Estendart Sale Report, Chair Massey

Ventures Limited

Item 11.4

C12/128

Report from Massey Foundation Chair

Reason for Proposed Public Exclusion

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

To prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage

Reference: section 9 2 (k)

AND

Item 12.0

Such matters as members of Council declare their intention to raise under Late Items in the privileged part of the meeting.

CHANCELLOR

Carried

14.0 ITEMS MOVED FROM PART II TO PART I

The following decisions were was moved from Part II into Part I

10.1 RELOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, WELLINGTON

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL:

1.

2.

3.

NOTE THAT EXTENSIVE CONSULTATION AND ENGAGEMENT HAS

ENABLED A WORKABLE SOLUTION TO RELOCATE THE SCHOOL OF

PUBLIC HEALTH FROM THE ADELAIDE ROAD PREMISES TO THE

CENTRAL CAMPUS AS OUTLINED IN THIS PAPER;

NOTE THAT THE APPROACH WILL BE A STAGED RELOCATION,

WHICH REQUIRES SEISMIC STRENGTHENING OF BLOCK 4 AS

PREVIOUSLY APPROVED BY COUNCIL;

SUBJECT TO FUNDING APPROVED IN THE 2013 CAPITAL PLAN

APPROVE THE RELOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

TO THE OFFENBERGER BUILDING (BLOCK 3) AND BLOCK 4 ON THE

MAIN WELLINGTON CAMPUS AT A COST OF $5,829,500 PLUS

CONTINGENCY OF $580,500; AND

4.

APPROVE THE RELOCATION OF THE CENTRE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH

RESEARCH CENTRE IN BLOCK 3 EARLY IN 2013 WITH ALTERATIONS

COMMENCING LATE 2012 AND THE RELOCATION OF THE SLEEP

WAKE RESEARCH CENTRE AND THE RESEARCH CENTRE FOR

MAORI HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT IN BLOCK 4, TO TAKE PLACE

FOLLOWING SEISMIC STRENGTHENING IN 2013

Page 8 of 9

C12/129 – December

Part I

10.3 COUNCIL APPOINTMENT: HUMAN ETHICS COMMITTEE:

SOUTHERN A

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THE APPOINTMENT OF

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR PATRICK MOREL TO THE MASSEY UNIVERSITY

HUMAN ETHICS COMMITTEE: SOUTHERN A, AS A VICE-CHANCELLOR

NOMINEE FOR A TERM OF THREE YEARS FROM OCTOBER 1 2012 TO

SEPTEMBER 30 2015

10.4 NEW ZEALAND FOOD INNOVATION NETWORK AND MASSEY

UNIVERSITY

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL:

1.

2.

NOTE THAT THIS DIRECTORSHIP IS PART OF AN INTERIM PLAN FOR

APPROXIMATELY LESS THAN ONE YEAR. THE NEW ZEALAND

FOOD INNOVATION NETWORK (NZFIN) WILL MOVE UNDER THE

OWNERSHIP OF THE ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE (ATI)

WHICH IS ANTICIPATED TO BE ESTABLISHED BY GOVERNMENT

TOWARDS THE END OF 2012;

NOTE THAT PROFESSOR RICHARD ARCHER WILL REMAIN AS A

DIRECTOR OF THE NZFIN ONCE THE NETWORK HAS MOVED UNDER

ATI CONTROL;

3.

NOTE THAT PERMISSION MAY BE SOUGHT TO REPLACE THE

MASSEY DIRECTOR IN THE FUTURE; AND

4.

APPROVE THE NOMINATION OF PROFESSOR RICHARD ARCHER AS

THE MASSEY UNIVERSITY DIRECTOR OF THE NZFIN

11.2 HONORARY AWARDS COMMITTEE REPORT

RESOLVED THAT COUNCIL APPROVE THAT THE NOMINATION FOR

HONORARY DOCTORATE AND MASSEY UNIVERSITY MEDAL COVER

SHEET BE AMENDED TO INCLUDE SECTIONS ON ‘ONGOING LINKS TO

MASSEY UNIVERSITY’ AND ‘FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF MAKING

THE AWARD’ AS ATTACHED

Signature: _______________________________________

Date

: __________________

Page 9 of 9

C12 –

December

Part I

Item

1. Council Meeting

Schedule 2012

Council Follow-up Schedule Part I – 7 December 2012

From last meeting

Note:

bracketed italics are completed actions

Outcome

• The Chancellor gave early notice to Council of a paper that was to come to the 7 December 2012

Council meeting giving consideration to changing

October Audit and Risk Committee and Council meetings to November meetings. The paper would lay out any advantages or disadvantages of such a change to the established meeting schedule.

Action

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University

Registrar to prepare the Meeting Schedule change paper.

• Upon further consideration Assistant

Vice-Chancellors FSI and University

Registrar have determined that the meeting schedule should remain is it is i.e. the October meeting remain and there not be a November meeting.

Milestone dates

• 7 December

2012 Council meeting.

Item

1. Consistencies in Policies of the University and

Wholly Owned

Subsidiaries

Council Follow-up Schedule Part I – 7 December 2012

Ongoing Issues

Note: bracketed italics are completed actions

Outcome

• It was noted that wholly owned subsidiaries have their own policies and that this could result in risks resulting from inconsistencies with Massey

University’s policies e.g. Health and Safety Policy.

Action

• Vice-Chancellor and Assistant Vice-

Chancellor & University Registrar were to take the matter of risks related to inconsistencies between wholly owned subsidiary policies and Massey policies to the Boards of Massey’s wholly owned subsidiaries.

• Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University

Registrar Mr Morriss noted that he would report on this issue at the 2

December 2011 Council meeting.

• This was deferred to the 2 March 2012 meeting.

• Report to be given at a future meeting.

Milestone dates

• 2 March

2012 Council meeting

• Later meeting

Page 1 of 1

C12 – December

Part I

Friday 2 March (Manawatu) the current year

• Induction of new members

• VC scene setting

OUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2012

Function: Close off of previous year; Establishing parameters for new year; Strategy approval for

• Approve Road to 2020 (Feb)

• Preparation for graduations and Honorary

Awards

• Annual Accounts for previous year (delegation)

• Review of Council performance

Strategic Presentation on Branding and Marketing 2012: Cas

Discussions Carter, Assistant Vice-Chancellor External

Relations

Friday 4 May (Albany)

Function: Consolidation of business for current year

• Monitoring progress re enrolments

Student Forum

Site visits

Key Reports

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• VC scene setting 2012

• Financial Reports

Decision

Items

• 2011 Annual Accounts delegation to A&R

Committee

• Conferring of Degrees & Awarding of Diplomas and Certificates at graduation ceremonies delegation

• Terms of Reference- Council Committees

• Policies as per schedule

Committee,

Associated

Entities and

Other

No visit – Maori Protocols Training and Hangi

• Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

• Academic Board Reports

• Performance Review Committee Report

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Review of Council Evaluation 2011

• Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations

Friday 6 July (Manawatu)

Function: Strategy planning for the following year; Approval of International Fees

• Approve International Student Fees

Commercialisation and Business Development-

AVC& University Registrar and AVC Research and

Enterprise

Milson Flight Centre - deferred Albany Campus, including student facilities and

Student Association representatives

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

VC Report including CoRE reporting to

Council

Financial Report

Quarterly Performance Reports

Aged Debtors Report

• Student Fee Setting Process and Principles

(Domestic and International)

• Research Strategy

• MVL Statement of Corporate Intent 2012

• Maori Protocols Feedback Report

• Policies as per schedule

• Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

• Academic Board Reports

• Governance Committee Report

• NZSM Annual Report 2011

• Massey University Foundation Annual Report

2011

• Massey Ventures Ltd Annual Report 2010

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Reports

• Performance Review Report

• International Student Fees 2013

• Massey Ventures Ltd Annual Report 2011

• Council Code of Conduct

• Gazette Notice: Student Membership

• Governance Committee Terms of Reference

• Academic Board Terms of Reference

• Policies as per schedule

• Audit & Risk Report –including High level risks

• Academic Board Reports

• Academic Board Chair’s Report (in person)

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Report from PVC College of Creative Arts (in person)

• Report from PVC College of Business (in person)

Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate

Council Agenda Plan 2012

C12 – December

Part I

Strategic

Discussions

COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2012

Friday 7 September (Manawatu)

Function: Approval of Investment Plan and

Domestic Fees

• Approve Investment Plan

• Approve Domestic Student Fees

• Establish Council agenda plan and schedule for following year

Friday 5 October (Wellington)

Function: Budget 2013 review

• Review Operating and Capital Budget for following year

• Insurance Renewal – delegate authority to approve

Asset Management Strategy – AVC Finance,

Strategy and IT –addressed at Council Strategy Day

Report from AVC Maori and Pasifika Strategy –

AVC Maori and Pasifika

Site Visits Turitea Campus, including student facilities and

Student Association representatives

Key Reports

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Report

• Quarterly Performance Reports

• Performance Review Report

Decision

Items

• Investment Plan 2013-2015

• Domestic Student Fees 2013

• Student Election Statute

• Draft Agenda Plan 2013

• Draft Meeting Schedule 2013

• Policies as per schedule

Wellington Campus, including student facilities and

Student Association representatives

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Report

• Performance Review Report

• Draft Operating Budget 2013

• Draft Capital Plan 2013

• Renewal of Insurance 2013 – delegation

• Policies as per schedule

Committee,

Associated

Entities and

Other

• Audit & Risk Report–including high level risks

• Academic Board Reports including Chair

• Research Strategy Framework Report (AVC

RE in person)

• Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations

Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate

• Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Notice of Intention for Chancellor & Pro

Chancellor

• Council Graduation Schedule 2013

• Report from Massey University Foundation

Chair’s (in person)

Friday 7 December (Manawatu)

Function: Budget approval and Final Decisions

for current year & preparation for following year

• Approve Operating Budget for following year

• Election of Chancellor and Pro-Chancellor

• Committee membership established

• Farewell to leaving Council members

Road to 2020 including Academic Reform – AVC

Academic and International

Farms - Moved the March 2013

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Report

• Quarterly Performance Reports

• Performance Review Report

• Aged Debtors Report

• Road to 2020 update

• 2013 University Operating Budget & Annual

Plan

• Renewal of Insurance 2013 – delegation report

• Student Bad Debts

• MVL Statement of Corporate Intent 2013

• NZSM Statement of Corporate Intent 2013

• Agri One Ltd Statement of Corporate Intent

2013

• Council Committee membership

• Revised Guidelines for Conduct of Council and

Council Committees meetings

• Election of Chancellor and Pro Chancellor (as

required)

• Policies as per schedule

• Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

• Academic Board Reports

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• NZSM Report

• Council Evaluation 2012

Council Agenda Plan 2012

C12/ - December

Part I

Friday 1 March (Manawatu)

COUNCIL AGENDA PLAN – MARCH - DECEMBER – 2013

Function: Close off of previous year; Establishing parameters for new year; Strategy approval for the current year

• Induction of new members

• VC scene setting

• Approve Road to 2020

• Preparation for graduations and Honorary

Awards

• Annual Accounts for previous year (delegation)

• Review of Council performance

Friday 3 May (Wellington)

Function: Consolidation of business for current year

• Monitoring progress re enrolments

Student Forum

Friday 5 July (Manawatu)

Function: Strategy planning for the following year; Approval of International Fees

• Approve International Student Fees

Strategies to climb the QS rankings

Discussions

Site visits Farms (adjacent to Turitea Campus) Campus site visit ( detail tbc)

Key Reports

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• VC scene setting 2013

• Financial Reports

• Workforce Shaping

Decision

Items

• 2012 Annual Accounts delegation to A&R

Committee

• Conferring of Degrees & Awarding of Diplomas and Certificates at graduation ceremonies delegation

• Terms of Reference- Council Committees

• Policies as per schedule

Committee,

Associated

Entities and

Other

• Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

• Massey University Foundation Report

• Academic Board Reports

• Performance Review Committee Report

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Review of Council Evaluation 2012

• Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations

Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

VC Report including CoRE reporting to

Council

Financial Report

Quarterly Performance Reports

Aged Debtors Report

• Student Fee Setting Process and Principles

(Domestic and International)

• Maori Protocols Review Report

• Policies as per schedule

• Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

• Academic Board Reports

• Research Strategy Annual Report 2012

• NZSM Annual Report 2012

• Massey University Foundation Annual Report

2012

• Massey Ventures Ltd Annual Report 2012

Milson Flight Centre

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Reports

• Performance Review Report

• International Student Fees 2014 – (AVC

Academic and International in person)

• Governance Committee Terms of Reference

• Policies as per schedule

• Audit & Risk Report –including High level risks

• Academic Board Reports

• Academic Board Chair’s Report (in person)

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

Page 1 of 3

C12/ - December

Part I

Friday 6 September (Albany)

Function: Approval of Investment Plan and

Domestic Fees

• Approve Investment Plan

• Approve Domestic Student Fees

• Establish Council agenda plan and schedule for following year

Friday 4 October (Manawatu)

Function: Budget review

• Review Operating and Capital Budget for following year

• Insurance Renewal – delegate authority to approve

Institute of Education strategies (New Director ) Strategic

Discussions

Site Visits

College of Health: strategies (New PVC)

Campus site visit (detail tbc)

Key Reports

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Report

• Quarterly Performance Reports

• Performance Review Report

Decision

Items

• Investment Plan 2013-2015

• Domestic Student Fees 2014

• Draft Agenda Plan 2014

• Draft Meeting Schedule 2014

• Policies as per schedule

School of Sport and Exercise

• Chancellor’s Report

• VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Report

• Performance Review Report

• 2014 University Operating and Capital

Budget

• Policies as per schedule

Friday 6 December (Manawatu)

Function: Budget approval & Final Decisions

for current year and prep for following year

• Approve Operating and Capital Budget for following year

• Election of Chancellor and Pro-Chancellor

• Committee membership established

• Farewell to leaving Council members

-IP Commercialisation (tbc: MVL and Bio Centre

Chairs/CEOs)

PN Campus site visit ( detail tbc)

Chancellor’s Report

VC Reports - to include

• VC Report

• Financial Report

• Quarterly Performance Reports

• Performance Review Report

• Aged Debtors Report

• Road to 2020

• 2014 University Operating and Capital Budget

• Renewal of Insurance 2014-report delegation

• NZ School Music SCI 2014

• MVL SCI 2014

• Student Bad Debts

• Council Committee membership

• Review Guidelines for Conduct of Council and

Council Committees meetings

• Review Council Code of Conduct

• Election of Chancellor and Pro Chancellor (as

required)

• Policies as per schedule

Page 2 of 3

Friday 6 September (Albany)

Function: Approval of Investment Plan and

Domestic Fees

• Approve Investment Plan

• Approve Domestic Student Fees

• Establish Council agenda plan and schedule for following year

Friday 4 October (Manawatu)

Function: Budget review

• Review Operating and Capital Budget for following year

• Insurance Renewal – delegate authority to approve

Committee,

Associated

Entities and

Other

• Audit & Risk Report–including high level risks

• Academic Board Reports including Chair

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Research Strategy Framework Report (AVC

RE in person)

• Tracking Council Decisions and Delegations

Business Cases will brought to Council for approval as appropriate

• Audit & Risk Report – including high level risks

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Notice of Intention for Chancellor and Pro

Chancellor

• Council Graduation Schedule 2014

C12/ - December

Part I

Friday 6 December (Manawatu)

Function: Budget approval & Final Decisions

for current year and prep for following year

• Approve Operating and Capital Budget for following year

• Election of Chancellor and Pro-Chancellor

• Committee membership established

• Farewell to leaving Council members

• Audit & Risk Report – inc high level risks

• Academic Board Reports

• Academic Board Chair Report (in person)

• Honorary Awards Committee Report

• Council Evaluation 2013

Page 3 of 3

C12/130– December

Part I

VICE-CHANCELLOR’S OFFICE

To:

From:

Date:

Subject:

Members of Council

Vice-Chancellor

26 November 2012

Vice-Chancellor’s Part I Report to Council

Period: late-September to mid-November 2012

Purpose:

This report is presented to update Council on key achievements, highlights and major issues arising over the period late-September to mid-November and also seeks to give Council a flavour of the breadth and depth of University–associated activities. The report gathers together strategic items provided by college and service lines, the Vice-Chancellor’s elog and diary. Further detail is provided in the appendices to this report.

1.0 Topical Issues

1.1 VIP visit

We have heard officially that the Duchess of Cornwall, who is accompanying the Prince of

Wales on his visit to New Zealand as part of The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations, is coming to Massey. The Duchess has a special interest in things equine and this will be the focus of her visit, which will be to Massey’s equestrian centre and Veterinary Teaching

Hospital at the Manawatū campus on November 15. Please refer to Appendix I for further details.

1.2

1.3

2012 QS World University Rankings

In my last report I advised that Massey University had improved its performance in the QS

World University Rankings compared to last year’s overall rankings, placing in the 308th position amongst the top 400 universities in the overall QS rankings.

I would like to add that QS have placed Massey in the top 100 universities for communication and media studies, in the top 150 for accounting and finance, and the top 200 for economics and econometrics. Please refer to Appendix II for further details.

Massey’s design school ranked among best in world

Global design awards scheme Red Dot has ranked Massey 11th among Asia Pacific institutions for design concept, up one place from six months ago. Massey remains the only

New Zealand or Australian university to be recognised. Red Dot is a global design awards scheme based in Germany and Singapore. The awards are highly competitive. In a letter to

Massey’s Vice-Chancellor, Red Dot’s President (Asia) Ken Koo says the red dot design ranking “seeks to honour leaders in innovation for their pursuance of design excellence”. He describes Massey as “one of the most innovative universities in Asia.”

Last year, Red Dot received a total of 3536 entries in the design concept category. These entries came from 54 countries and comprised concepts and prototypes from 90 universities,

230 companies, and a host of individual designers.

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1.4

The top ranked Asia Pacific institution for design concept was National Taiwan University of

Science and Technology, with the same ranking as six months ago; in the Americas and

Europe, top rank went to Sweden’s Umeå Institute of Design, which edged out ENSCI - Les

Ateliers in France. The ranking is calculated using a weighted formula considering the number and classes of awards won by an institution over five years, with a strong emphasis on the most recent awards won.

Massey volcanologists predict latest Mt Tongariro eruption

After the most recent eruption on August 6 (the first time in more than 100 years), Massey’s

Volcanic Risk Solutions Group director Professor Shane Cronin said it was likely Tongariro would erupt again soon after finding low levels of fresh glass in the ash. As we all now know, he was right! Mount Tongariro erupted shortly after 1.30pm on November 21 sending a plume of ash into the skies.

Massey University scientists are analyzing the ash samples at the

Manawatū to learn more about what type of eruption it was.

2.0 Key Strategic Issues and Positioning

2.1 Research update

2.1.1 2012 Massey research celebrations

This has been an exciting and challenging year for Research at Massey. We have completed an audit of our research and completed the 2012 Performance-Based Research Fund submission to the Tertiary Education Commission. We have been very successful in bidding to major funders with significant grants secured from Marsden, the Health Research Council and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment to name a few.

It is important that we acknowledge and celebrate the importance of research and researchers to the vibrancy and creativity of our academic character as a leading New

Zealand University. Accordingly, a multi-campus 2012 research celebration was held on

November 2 to thank the research community for an impressive year under very difficult conditions. Thanks to the wonders of modern technology the party brought together all staff from all campuses so they could celebrate together.

2.1.2 The launch of the Infectious Diseases Research Centre in late October went well and mapped out a programme of work that draws on a network spanning the University, New

Zealand and leading institutions around the world. Please refer to Appendix III for further details.

2.2 Teaching and Learning update

2.2.1 Distance Education and Learning Futures Alliance launched

Associate members of the Distance Education and Learning Futures Alliance were announced in mid-October at a launch event held at the

Manawatū campus. The alliance was established this year to foster innovation and to create a network of leaders at the forefront of new developments in teaching and learning in tertiary education.

Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic and International) Professor Ingrid Day presented associate membership certificates to the following staff: Dr Maggie Hartnett (College of

Education), Associate Professor Eva Heinrich (College of Sciences), Associate Professor

Lynn Jeffrey (College of Business), Associate Professor David Parsons (College of

Sciences), Dr Terry Stewart (College of Sciences and Centre for Teaching and Learning) an d Dr Sandi Shillington (Manawatū campus registrar).

Members of the Distance Education and Learning Futures Alliance International Advisory

Board, leading scholars in tertiary teaching and learning from universities in Australia,

Canada, Germany, Portugal, the United Kingdom and the United States were also announced.

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More information about the International Advisory Board and associate membership can be found at http://delfa.massey.ac.nz/.

2.3 Internationalisation update

2.3.1 Vice-Chancellor’s international visits - Indonesia

I spent the last week of September in Indonesia. The visit resulted in memoranda of understanding with:

• The Sampoerna Foundation.

• The Directorate General of Higher Education (DIKTI).

• Bogor Agricultural University.

• University of Brawijaya, Mataram University Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese

Academy of Science and the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources.

• Institute of Teknologi Sepuluh Nopember (ITS).

• Airlangga University.

The visit also included a meeting with the Ministry of Education, an alumni function, a guest lecture and attendance at the Convocation at Bogor Agricultural University where the

Indonesian Vice-President spoke on the importance of food security.

Thank you to the International Office – especially Jackie Koenders – for a well organised visit. Thanks also to Associate Professor Stephen Marsland (School of Engineering and

Advanced Technology) and Dr Chris Anderson (Institute of Natural Resources) who were in

Indonesia having developed projects and programmes that have allowed memoranda of understanding to be signed. The work of many other staff like Professor Norm Williamson

(and other IVABS staff), Professor James Chapman (and other College of Education staff) has also made a great contribution.

Thanks also to the New Zealand Ambassador to Indonesia, David Taylor and Izak Human, the Educational Counsellor for Asia.

The opportunities in Indonesia are many and significant. Once again our task will be to ensure we focus on creating long-term deep relationships of mutual benefit.

A full report of the visit is available through the International Office.

2.3.2 Vice-Chancellor’s international visits – India

In mid-October I was in Delhi in India as a member of the about to be formed India New

Zealand Education Council. The other university involved is Waikato. The visit is being led by the Minister of Tertiary Education, Steven Joyce.

The other universities represented in the education delegation were Waikato, Victoria and

Canterbury. The chief executive of Universities New Zealand was also part of the delegation.

India is one of the priority countries in Massey’s internationalisation strategy.

After fighting our way through the considerable traffic in Delhi the visit included:

The Association of Indian Universities

Sharda University

University of Delhi

Education Representatives of foreign embassies

Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry

Planning for the India New Zealand Education Council

New Zealand High Commission

The India New Zealand Education Council

Massey University signed a memorandum of understanding with Delhi University (the highest ranking university in India) during the visit. The memoranda is the result of some months of work beginning with a visit to Massey by the Delhi Vice-Chancellor Dinesh Singh earlier this year. Thanks to everyone who has been involved.

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Thank you to those in the International Office who assisted in organising the visit – in particular the relationship with Delhi.

2.3.3 I was in the United Kingdom in November. The Council requested that I take some time out to look at trends in higher education and the development of strategy. During 2013 we will be running an inclusive process to “refresh” our 2020 strategy so the time to consider how universities and other organisations are coping with change will be well spent.

While in the United Kingdom I joined a week long Oxford University Strategic Leadership programme. The topics covered, the calibre of the staff involved and the experience of the other course participants made the week intense and useful. Lessons learned will be passed on.

2.3.4 International Office activities

• The International Office hosted four visits in September; the Saudi Cultural Commission visited to meet with students and to discuss the possibility of sending further students from key institutions in Saudi Arabia; Anhui Agricultural University, to discuss potential research collaboration; and Shanghai University of Electric Power with the possibility of receiving exchange students. The Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) also visited together with Peking and Shihezi Universities to renew their tripartite agreement with

Massey (see item 2.3.5 below).

• Arthur Chin, Director International, visited Taichung and Taipei as part of the Auckland

Mayor's trade delegation to Taiwan, and then attended meetings in China. The visit included co-hosting an alumni function with the New Zealand Commerce and Industry

Office - Taipei; meetings with Feng Chia University and National Taiwan University; site visits to Industrial Technology Research Institute - Taiwan and Hsinchu technology parks; and the regional State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs office in Zhejiang province. Subsequent discussions are underway with Feng Chia University to establish a memorandum of understanding, with Study Abroad as a main theme.

• The International Office has established a small group to further develop and promote distance education for international students living in home countries or elsewhere overseas. The group is currently working through programme availability with colleges and will soon engage in a country targeted promotion.

2.3.5 China

• Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Sciences, Professor

Robert Anderson, was an invited presenter at the international forum of the 60th anniversary celebration of Inner Mongolia Agricultural University. The feature of the celebration was an International Forum on Higher Education and Social Development.

• A delegation of 10 from the China Scholarship Council, Peking University and Shihezi

University visited Massey, the outcome of which saw the signing of a memorandum of understanding tripartite agreement between the three parties, together with the signing of an academic co-operation agreement.

• Professor Steve La Grow, School of Health and Social Services, conducted a three-week workshop in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia to teach the first orientation and mobility instructors for the blind for the Mongolian Federation of the Blind. This effort at knowledge transfer was a key component of a professional development project funded by the Danish

Association of the Blind, and sanctioned by the World Blind Union.

2.3.6 Australia

• The National Centre for Dairy Education, Australia, has approached the Institute of Food,

Nutrition and Human Health to present web-based seminars on select topics – these commenced on October 16.

2.3.7 Papua New Guinea

• Following a visit by the Chief of Staff from the Papua New Guinea Defence Force, hosted by the Centre for Defence and Security Studies, opportunities are being explored for existing undergraduate papers to be delivered by distance to officers of the PNGDF.

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Additionally, the opportunity for the development and delivery of short courses on

Security Strategy are being explored for delivery to senior staff of a range of government agencies involved in national security.

2.3.8 At

Manawatū campus International students from 22 countries and their families celebrated completing their studies in 21 different programmes at a farewell/going home function for students who will not be taking part in a formal graduation ceremony. They were presented with Goodwill Ambassador Certificates from the University and the Palmerston North City

Council along with Massey pins and other mementoes. Students, families and Academic

Supervisors were very positive about the event.

2.4 Agri-Food update

2.4.1 The New Zealand Food Awards event at the end of September was a success. While the event was a success, there is a lot more to the awards than is seen on the night. Judging takes place over many months. Following the awards, the companies who have won make good use of the recognition they received. The overall impact is one of building New

Zealand’s most important industry. Please refer to Appendix IV for further details.

Thank you to everyone who worked so hard to make the Awards a success. Such events ensure that Massey University is seen as the “engine of the new New Zealand” in a tangible way.

2.4.2 The Agri-Food Business Advisory Group has signed off on a high-level agri-food business strategy, including the overall objective – “growing the agri-food economy”. This will make it possible for researchers across the University to see how their current projects contribute to this objective, both directly and indirectly. This includes work with agricultural businesses and/or food producers, as well as those that make up the support environment, such as accountants. An open meeting was held by Director of Agri-food Business Professor Claire

Massey on October 24 on the

Manawatū campus to develop a research agenda for agri-food business.

2.5

Sustainability update

2.5.1 Dr Brennon Wood, a communications sociologist from the School of People, Environment and Planning in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, will work alongside staff within the newly established Institute of Agriculture and Environment in the College of

Sciences, as part of a three-year cross-college secondment to build interdisciplinary research links with staff in the agriculture and environment platform from January.

Dr Wood will continue in his role as director of the Bachelor of AgriCommerce’s new major in

Food Economies and Society. This programme recently expanded to offer six majors that are taught by staff in three colleges: Business, Humanities and Social Sciences and Sciences. Dr

Wood will remain a member of the Centre for Excellence in Farm Business Management and continue with his research for industry and commercial clients.

2.5.2 Transport surveys on mode of travel to campus are now complete for all three campuses and this has yielded some useful insights into how we might encourage more sustainability. At the Wellington campus a remarkable total of 68 per cent of all trips to University by respondents were by a sustainable transport mode (walking, cycling, bus or train).

2.5.3 Massey University recently renewed its membership of Australasian Campuses Towards

Sustainability, an incorporated society that aims to inspire, promote and support change towards best practice sustainability in the tertiary education sector.

Membership provides all Massey staff and students with access to a range of resources and networking opportunities around sustainability. Anyone with a Massey email address can create an account by registering on the ACTS website. Regular webinars hosted by ACTS are available for those who register.

2.6 Creativity update

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The cross-College creativity working group on the Wellington campus have been discussing how to extend Massey's reputation for creativity and reach further out from the University to the wider community, starting in Wellington. The focus of discussion was on the development of an offering to support creativity in the public sector and creativity in business. This would build on connections made this year by the College of Creative Arts, e.g. extensive meetings with state sector chief executives and senior managers during the Massey-sponsored visit by

David Kester (former head of the UK Design Council) and ongoing links with Grow

Wellington. More work will be done to develop the concept in the New Year. In the meantime, on campus, an internal visual identity has been developed for staff who wish to host other staff at lunchtime seminars to share creative ideas and foster transdisciplinary collaboration.

Innovation update

Further to the update in my July report, the innovation lecture series (led by Professor Anne deBruin of the Social Innovation and Entrepreneurial Research Centre) continues to attract large audiences to Massey.

The following are the Innovation group’s major work themes:

1. ICE core: Teaching Innovation Creativity and Entrepreneurship across the curriculum

(chaired by Professor Marti Anderson, New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study):

This initiative aims to deliver a Massey-wide core papers in innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship emphasising Massey distinctiveness. The establishment of a working party for the development of a formal proposal is currently being considered. A number of Pro Vice-Chancellor’s have already identified college champions for this activity.

2. Innovation and the research agenda:

Discussions have taken place with Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research and Enterprise)

Professor Brigid Heywood on Massey’s Research Strategy and how we leverage our innovation platform to deliver on it. Professor Heywood has offered dedicated training at all levels around intellectual property management for Albany based staff and these workshops will take place in 2013.

3. Knowledge Exchange Hub (chaired by Professor Christoph Schumacher, School of

Economics and Finance):

This activity is progressing extremely well under the leadership of Professor Christoph

Schumacher and Professor Paul Spoonley. A report on these activities is being developed.

4. External Engagement Strategies (chaired by Assistant Vice-Chancellor Cas Carter):

This initiative aims to manage and facilitate growing external engagement with schools, companies and community and includes internal communication and alumni. Several meetings with Assistant Vice-Chancellor (External Relations) Cas Carter and innovation forum members have advanced our agenda here. Discussions around recruitment strategies and stakeholder management strategies have informed our activities and set out an agenda for next year.

5. Innovator-in-Residence programme:

Colin Gilchrist, the Former Innovator-in-Residence, has been appointed as Honorary

Research Fellow within School of Engineering and Technology so we can still access his expertise for industry contacts and mentoring students. College of Business is currently discussing the best way forward for identifying a useful successor activity.

6. ICT/Hi-Tech strategy:

This initiative is in response to the identification of the Albany Basin as an ICT/HiTech hub by the Auckland Supercity plan. Professor Dave Parsons from the School of

Engineering and Advanced Technology has started engagement with the e-center in facilitating the development of the ICT hub. As a start they have three ICT students working over summer on innovative commercially funded projects to provide software for cloud based systems under the guidance of Manfred Lange the e-center’s professional development software consultant. The vision is that this project can become the first concrete component of a future ICT hub and facilitate engagement with the local ICT community.

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Other activities:

Innovative Thinking workshop (run by Aruna Shekar/Dorian Scott for Innovation Forum members) was run in November 2012.

Secondary school science business project (Managed by Albany Campus Registrar

Andrea Davies) is being run over 2012/2013.

2.8 Connections update

2.8.1 Defining events

One of the ways Massey University can make clear its intention to define the future of New

Zealand is through the events it organises. The New Zealand Food Awards are an excellent example of this. The sustainable production of quality food is one of the main issues confronting the world and is central to New Zealand. The Food Awards help drive the industry forward and has gained a very high level of support.

The same goes for sport. Massey is New Zealand’s leading sports university as demonstrated by the number of our students who took part in the Olympic and Paralympic

Games. Sport is set to grow in importance not only in New Zealand but also around the world.

The Blues Awards at Albany in early October provided an excellent opportunity to showcase what Massey is doing in the sports area. Blues were awarded, Olympians recognised, gold medallist Valerie Adams spoke and everyone present went home feeling they were a part of something special. That feeling was reproduced in Palmerston North on October 9 and will be again in Wellington on December 6 when Massey will host the New Zealand Universities

Blues Awards.

The 2012 Massey University Blues supreme winners were:

• Manawatū sportsman of the year – Hamish Bond (Rowing)

• Manawatū sportswoman of the year – Kayla Sharland (Hockey)

• Albany sportsman of the year – Daniel Holt (Paralympics, Swimming)

• Albany sportswoman of the year – Gemma Flynn (Hockey)

• Extramural sportsperson of the year – Hamish Bond (Rowing)

Please refer to Appendix V for all the Massey Blues recipients.

Thinking ahead – it is vital that appropriate high profile events are organised in all of the areas Massey is seeking to be known for. Anyone thinking of such an event for 2013 or 2014 should discuss their plans with Assistant Vice-Chancellor (External Relations) Cas Carter to ensure that the maximum potential is gained from the event.

2.8.2 Continuing on the theme of defining events, the Blow Creative Arts Festival at the College of

Creative Arts has nearly completed its sixth rollout, with record attendance across its wide range of events. Opening night at the Exposure Exhibition saw more than 1400 students, guests and industry supporters gather in the new courtyard area adjacent to Te Ara Hihiko and the Fine Arts buildings, which facilitated a more cohesive exploration of the extensive exhibits. This was reviewed glowingly on Radio New Zealand by arts commentator Courtney

Johnston.

Our figures show an average daily attendance of 600 per day, including many school groups: there were two sellout Fashion Shows: an auction evening for the John Drawbridge

Scholarship Trust that raised over $20,000; and a great deal of interest was garnered from all corners by special guest David Kester. Events included the Blast Design forum, the MINA

Mobile Innovation symposium, Pasifika and Iwi Exhibitions and media screenings in collaboration with the School of English and Media Studies. Four more esteemed alumni were welcomed to the Hall of Fame, with an abundant 180 guests expected at the Gala

Dinner. The Blow Festival has continued to gather momentum over the years, and is supported by excellent communications and publicity on television, radio, major and provincial papers as well as lively social media interaction.

2.8.3 As mentioned in item 2.8.1 above, as another example of Massey University’s strong commitment to sport, we will be hosting the New Zealand University Blues awards.

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University Sport New Zealand (USNZ) is the National Sporting Organisation for tertiary sport in New Zealand. The New Zealand University Blue, awarded annually since 1919, is one of

New Zealand’s most prestigious and long standing awards that recognise a University student’s performance representing New Zealand in their sport whilst successfully achieving within their academic studies.

A total of 67 outstanding athletes, including Olympians, will be honoured at this year’s awards. This event will be hosted by Massey University, working in association with

University Sport New Zealand and sponsored by ASB Bank.

2.8.4 Future U and the new New Zealand Forum

The Future U Finals saw 12 very talented young people deliver their vision for New Zealand at the Albany campus in mid-October. Stephen Lines of Hutt International Boys Schools was the winner and will speak at the new New Zealand symposium in Auckland on December 3.

Daniel Franklin will be the key note speaker at the symposium. The feedback suggests

Future U should have a future. Please refer to Appendix VI for further details.

Acceptances received from approximately 100 business, financial, media and government for the new New Zealand forum on December 3, 2012. The event is being sponsored by

Westpac. Coverage of the forum, and keynote speaker Dr Daniel Franklin, has appeared in

The New Zealand Herald, and the New Zealand Listener, with further pre-event coverage likely in the Sunday Star-Times Sunday Magazine, Radio New Zealand and the New Zealand

Herald’s business section.

2.8.5 Social media – YouTube

At the end of October Massey’s You Tube channel has achieved a phenomenal 1 million views. Massey currently has the highest number of subscribers of all the New Zealand universities. The top 10 videos on the Massey channel, by views, included content from both our teaching and learning areas and our marketing and communication department. They were: writing structure paragraphs; hagfish; report writing; kiwi on a treadmill; horse on a treadmill; the literature review; the research proposal; 3D guitar; APA referencing; time management. Massey’s current television commercial comes in 14th place with 24,000 views.

One-University projects:

2.9

2.9.1 Institute of Education update

• The academic staffing review has now been completed. Decisions were released on

November 7, with an overall reduction of 25 academic staff. The reduction will provide scope for making new appointments in growth areas as well as provide for fixed term contract positions to “teach out” the two undergraduate initial teacher education programmes that are being phased out.

• Many staff are also retiring. Appropriate functions will be held to acknowledge their contribution over the course of their careers at Massey.

• Staff in the College of Education will begin the relocation from Hokowhitu to Turitea on the November 26, with a staggered move up until the January 7 to accommodate the selection process interviews for some of the teacher education courses.

2.9.2 College of Health update

• Web pages went live in early October to coincide with enrolments opening and students are now able to enrol in programmes in the college.

• Professor Paul McDonald has been appointed to the new position of Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Health – please refer to item 6.1 below for further details.

• All heads of school/institutes in the agreed College of Health structure have been offered positions, four have accepted and one yet to confirm. All Directors of the Public Health

Centres have been confirmed.

• The college brings together a team of 250 staff representing five Schools and Institutes.

The new college has three broad goals – health promotion (the promotion of health and wellbeing), disease prevention (prevention of disease and injury at primary, secondary and tertiary levels) and health protection (protection from environmental risks to health) and their expertise will greatly contribute to its success.

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3.0 Academic

3.1

Professors Emeriti

Three new Massey University Professors Emeriti have been announced – Professors Sir

Mason Durie, Ian Evans and Margaret Tennant. An outstanding group.

3.2

• Stakeholder meetings have been held with Counties Manakau District Health Board,

Whanganui DHB, Tariana Turia, Health Workforce New Zealand, Department of Labour and Marsden Council.

• The first in a series of public health seminars jointly hosted by the Centre for

Ergonomics, Occupational Safety and Health and the Centre for Public Health Research will be held on December 11 at Massey’s Sleep/Wake Research Centre. Professor Per

Langaa Jensen from the Technical University of Denmark will give a presentation on ‘Fit work to people – How can national occupational health regulation work in practice?’.

• A Health symposium is being planned for early 2013, which will provide the opportunity to launch the College of Health and welcome the new Pro Vice-Chancellor.

Marsden Grants

I am very pleased to announce the results from the 2012 Marsden funding round. Eight

Massey proposals were successful this year, with funding worth a total of $5,585,000.

Successful Massey Principal Investigators:

• Mary Morgan-Richards, Institute of Natural Resources (Standard)

• Phil Battley, Institute of Natural Resources (Standard)

• Gaven Martin, NZ Institute of Advanced Studies (Standard)

• Paul Plieger, Institute of Fundamental Sciences (Standard)

• Oleksandr Fialko, NZ Institute of Advanced Studies (Fast Start)

• Regina Scheyvens/Glenn Banks, School of People, Environment and Planning

(Standard)

• Helen Moewaka-Barnes, Whariki Research Centre (Standard)

• Imran Muhammad, School of People, Environment and Planning (Fast Start)

Massey submitted 110 preliminary proposals, 22 of those were invited to submit a full proposal and eight were ultimately funded. The overall success rate for Massey is 7.3 per cent, which is almost the same as the nationwide success rate of 7.7 per cent.

This is an outstanding result in such a competitive environment. Congratulations.

3.3

Māori Book Awards

The fourth Ngā Kupu Ora / Māori Book Awards were held on the October 25 and were attended by about 200 people. There were six award winners including a special Lifetime

Achievement Award for Dame Katerina Te Heikoko Mataira. Media coverage was national and international this year demonstrating the relevance of the occasion and the sense of acknowledgement for Māori authors and literature. There were printed media releases and radio before the event profiling Hēni Jacob’s publication, Mai i te Kākano, published by Te

Wānanga o Raukawa and Paula Morris, who won the Award for Fiction, highlighted her win from the Frankfurt Book Fair. After the event coverage was on Te Kaea, Māori Television, and Te Karere on TV 1 with coverage in Palmerston North in the

Manawatū Standard and in

Hastings for Matatoa by Marina Sciascia, Hilary Pedersen, and Brian Morris. Sponsorship this year was provided by Tohu Wines.

3.4 Massey has been named as a finalist in the ter tiary education sector of the Māori language awards; the award ceremony takes place in November.

3.5 Associate Professor Nicola Shadbolt, Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, was named one of the top 10 women in agriculture by Primary magazine.

3.6 Professor Anne Noble, School of Fine Arts, was co-author of the recent book, These Rough

Notes – Manhire, B, Noble, A, Meehan, N, Griffin, H. VUP, 2012. ISBN 978-0-86473-831-8

The book launch was followed by a public discussion.

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Associate Professor Lynne Ciochetto, Institute of Communication Design, published a book chapter: Profit, People, Planet and Global rebalancing: the environmental implications of the next decades of development in the East Asian nations of Japan, South Korea, China and

India’, in Global Rebalancing, Pieterse, J. and Kim, J. (eds). (2012) New York: Routledge.

3.8 Lecturer Tanya Marriot has been selected to present work in a four-page spread in the second edition of White Cloud worlds – a collection of science fiction and fantasy concept art with contributions from the world’s leading artists.

3.9 Lecturer Tanya Marriot, Institute of Communication Design, was producer and concept designer for a 48-hour film festival film, which was a Wellington region finalist, nominated for eight awards, won Best Art direction and Sexiest Short and was one of five finalists for the national finals in both sections. The film was shot in the Massey University green screen room with a crew of 30, most of whom were Massey alumni.

3.10 Dr Andrea ‘t Mannetje, Centre for Public Health Research within the School of Public Health, was awarded funding from the Health Research Council of New Zealand to undertake a three-year project titled “MOBI-KIDS New Zealand: Risk factors for brain cancer in children and adolescents”.

3.11 Professor Cynthia White, School of Humanities, was appointed external expert on a 2012-13

United States National Middle East Language Research Centre project, the Arabic distance language project, funded by a Qatar Foundation International Grant.

3.12 Professor John O’Neill, School of Arts, Development and Health Education, received the

Teacher Education Forum of Aotearoa New Zealand award for Sustained Excellence in

Teacher Education at the forum’s conference in October.

3.13 Associate Professor Lisa Emerson, School of English and Media Studies, has been awarded a 2013 Fulbright Scholar Award, which will enable her to write two new books on the life cycle of the scientific writer.

3.14

Ms Veronica Tawhai, Te Pūtahi a Toi School of Māori Studies, has been awarded the 2013

Fulbright-

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Scholar Award to engage with other indigenous political educators in the United States.

3.15 An academic paper co-authored by Massey University Professor of Human Nutrition

Bernhard Breier (Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health) has been named the most cited paper of the past 10 years in the American Journal of Physiology – Endocrinology and

Metabolism. The paper, Fetal origins of hyperphagia, obesity, and hypertension and

postnatal amplification by hypercaloric nutrition, was published in 2000 when Professor

Breier (senior lead investigator) was with the Liggins Institute.

“This paper was the first to demonstrate the importance of interactions between nutrition before and after birth and showed the critical role of eating behaviour and appetite control in long-term health and wellbeing.” The American Physiological Society acknowledged the paper in its 125th Anniversary Collection. It is a landmark paper in the field with over 500 citations. The American Journal of Physiology is the top United States journal for original basic research in physiology.

3.16

School of English and Media Studies creative writing tutor Dr Pip Adam has been presented with a $25,000 award from the New Zealand Arts Foundation for her fiction writing. Dr Adam was presented with a New Generation Award, which recognises an artist’s independence, individuality and outstanding promise. The foundation was established 11 years ago to support the generation of more creative work by New Zealand artists. Dr Adam's first collection of short stories, Everything We Hoped For, won last year's New Zealand Society of

Authors Hubert Church Best First Book Award for Fiction.

3.17 Professor Olaf Diegel, School of Engineering and Advanced Technology. has been selected as a finalist in the most inspiring individual category section of the New Zealand Innovation

Awards 2012 for his entry ODD Guitars.

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3.18 Cat owners can look forward to fewer scratches while administering medicine thanks to a new drug delivery technology developed by Massey University researchers. The technology, developed by Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences researchers Kate Hill and Dr Paul Chambers, allows medicine to be administered and absorbed through the skin, rather than having to be given orally. The innovation was a finalist in the health and science section of the 2012 New Zealand Innovation Awards. The technology was developed in conjunction with Bayer New Zealand, which subsequently used it in a new product, Hyper-T EarSport, a treatment for hyperthyroidism in cats.

Hyperthyroidism is the most common hormonal disorder of cats.

3.19 Associate Professor Marta Camps, Institute of Natural Resources, has been appointed to the position of Vice-Chairperson of the International Biochar Initiative, a non-profit organisation supporting researchers, commercial entities, policy makers, farmers and gardeners, development agents and others committed to sustainable biochar production and use.

3.20 Distinguished Professor Peter Schwerdtfeger, Institute of Natural Sciences, has been elected to the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Sciences (IAQMS) (one of six new members).

3.21 Distinguished Professor Gaven Martin, Institute of Information and Mathematical

Sciences/Institute for Advanced Study, has been elected as one of the inaugural Fellows of the American Mathematics Society.

• Professor Martin has been awarded Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for

Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics (Brown University).

• Professor Martin has been awarded Senior Fellow at the Institute for Pure and Applied

Mathematics (IPAM) (UCLA).

3.22 Distinguished Professor Paul Rainey, Institute of Molecular Biosciences/Institute for

Advanced Study, has been awarded the KITP Simons Distinguished Visiting Scholar at

UCLA Santa Barbara.

3.23 Senior Lecturer Ann Shelton, School of Fine Arts, is currently Artist in Residence at the Tylee

Cottage residency programme run by the Sarjeant Gallery in Whanganui. This is one of the oldest and most significant residency programmes for contemporary artists in New Zealand.

The residency will run November 2012-end of January 2013. The resulting new body of work will be the focus of a substantial solo exhibition mounted by the Sarjeant Gallery in 2013.

3.24 Associate Professor David Cross, School of Fine Arts, has been commissioned by

Cambelltown Arts Centre Sydney to engage with them on a three-year duration art in public space episodic residency and new work commission.

3.25 Professor Anne Noble, School of Fine Arts, has collaborated with Associate Professor

Norman Meehan (New Zealand School of Music), Hannah Griffin and Bill Manhire These

Rough Notes – an evocation of Antarctica was staged at Museum of New Zealand Te Papa

Tongarewa in October. It has also been part of the IceFest in Christchurch. A consecutive and interlinked project is the collaborative book These Rough Notes published by Victoria

University Press.

3.26 Funding for Massey health researchers

In addition to item 3.10 above and health funding success noted in my previous reports this year, Massey University researchers have now been awarded almost $1 million in research funds by the Health Research Council.

Dr Helen Fitzsimons has been awarded $500,000 to study how Alzheimer’s disease and dementia affects long-term memory storage. She is one of three researchers given a prestigious Sir Charles Hercus Research Fellowship, announced by the council. The Sir

Charles Hercus Health Research Fellowships are awarded to outstanding emerging health researchers who are committed to a career in health research in New Zealand.

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Dr Fitzsimons, of the Institute of Molecular BioSciences, will study how long-term memories are formed and stored, and how these processes are disrupted in people with cognitive disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. About 43,000 New Zealanders have dementia, and Alzheimer’s New Zealand project this will to increase to 74,000 by 2026. Dr

Fitzsimons is focusing on the role of histone acetylation in memory formation, firstly through genetic interaction studies in the fruit fly Drosophila. “This research aligns with my career objective of building a research team and collaborative network to study how long-term memories are formed and stored, with the ultimate goal of providing new targets to develop treatments for disorders such as Alzheimer’s and dementia.”

Massey University researchers were also awar ded four Māori health research PhD scholarships:

• Monica Koia (Research Centre for Māori Health and Development) received $110,050 to investigate Māori health cancer workforce initiatives.

• Sharon Awatere (School of Māori Studies) was given $109,500 for her study Māori elders' resilience and arthritis: Measuring home health outcomes.

• Teah Carlson (SHORE and Whariki) received $109,500 for her study Kaupapa Māori evaluation of a health literacy-appropriate CVD intervention.

• Felicity Ware (School of Māori Studies) received $108,402 for her study Whanau kopepe: Young Māori parents experiences of raising a family.

Diane Koti of the School of Psychology was awarded a Māori Health Research Summer

Scholarship worth $5000.

3.27 Associate Professor Helen Moewaka Barnes, SHORE & Whariki Research Centre within the

School of Public Health, was awarded funding of $850,000 from The Royal Society of New

Zealand, to undertake a three year project titled Affective practice, identity and wellbeing in

Aotearoa.

3.28 Dr Imran Muhammad, School of People, Environment and Planning, was awarded a

$345,000 a Royal Society of New Zealand Marsden Fast-Start grant for the three-year project titled Institutional change, path dependence and public transport planning in

Auckland.

3.29 Professor Chris Cunningham, Centre for

Māori Health and Development, was awarded funding from The Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand to undertake a one year project titled Cardiac – Roy Hoerara – One heart many lives – a comparative discourse into

cardiovascular disease and indigenous men.

3.30 Professor Paul Spoonley, Regional Director, and Richard Bedford’s book, Welcome to Our

World? Immigration and the Reshaping of New Zealand has been published and was first available to those participating in the Pathways to Metropolis in the 21st Century:

Immigration Issues and Futures conference at the Albany campus (October).

3.31 Dr Geoff Watson, School of Humanities, had his book titled Sporting Foundations of New

Zealand Indians published in October by the New Zealand Indian Sports Association.

3.32 Associate Professor Lisa Emerson, School of Humanities, was a Visiting Research Scholar at Queen Mary University of London during October, hosted by the Thinking Writing programme. Associate Professor Emerson conducted research on scientists as writers, and ran seminars on the scientist as writers, and teaching science writing.

3.33 Professor Paul Spoonley, Regional Director, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, was appointed a member of the Royal Society Awards committee for the 2012 Dame Joan

Metge Medal and the James Cook Fellowship, and was also a member of the Fellowship

Selection Panel.

3.34 Dr Pip Adam, School of English and Media Studies, received an Arts Foundation of New

Zealand New Generation Award.

3.35 Dr Simona Fabrizi, School of Economics and Finance, has been invited to be a research fellow at the School of Economics at the University of New South Wales during January

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2013. Dr Fabrizi will be working with Professor Hodaka Morita and Associate Professor

Arghya Ghosh within their project 'Industrial Economics Network’.

3.36 Professor Malcolm Wright, School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing, gave an invited talk to the MLeague conference in Beijing. He was also appointed a member of the

International Academic Council and Editorial Board Member of the Education Blue Book of

MLeague. Other appointees to the Council include representatives from the Sorbonne,

University of Grenoble, Michigan State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel

Hill, Hong Kong Baptist University and Macquarie University.

3.37 Associate Prof Dennis Viehland, School of Management, has been elected deputy chair of the Professors and Heads of Information Systems in New Zealand for a two-year term.

3.38 Professor Ralph Stablein, School of Management, has been invited to take up the role of

ANZAM Research Fellow for the Australian–New Zealand Academy of Management for

2013-2015.

3.39 Prof David Deakins, School of Management, has been commissioned by the OECD’s Centre for Entrepreneurship as a member of an Expert Group to contribute to their report

Entrepreneurship for Disadvantaged and Under-Represented Groups, which will be produced for the European Commission. He will produce the chapter on ‘Access to Finance’.

3.40 Dr Jason Wargent, Institute of Natural Resources, has been awarded a Central Energy Trust grant.

3.41 Aly Thompson, Bachelor of Communication student, has been awarded a SenateSHJ Prize for her essay German politics and societal culture affects its public relations practice.

3.42 Maria Baker, Bachelor of Arts student, has been awarded a Phd scholarship of $85,050 in

Māori health research - a Māori centred grounded theory study of Māori with addiction and related problems.

3.43 Jodi Porter, postgraduate diploma in Public Health student, has been awarded a PhD scholarship of $ 110,050 in

Māori health research: Ngaitai wellbeing indicators: Measuring iwi health outcomes.

3.44

Massey historian in BBC series on the real lives of servants

Professor Susan Mumm, Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Humanities and Social

Sciences and a specialist in the social, economic and religious constraints on women and domestic service in the 19th Century, was asked by the BBC to be part of a series, which begins airing in the United Kingdom on Friday September 28.

The success of television shows Downton Abbey and Upstairs Downstairs has prompted the

BBC to create a three-part documentary Servants: The True Story of Life Below Stairs. The series is partially set in what was formerly the St Faith’s Penitentiary in Cornwall and is presented by social historian Dr Pamela Cox, who uncovers the reality of servants’ lives from the Victorian era through to the Second World War.

The documentary is expected to draw in more than a million viewers per episode. The series is expected to air in New Zealand next year.

3.45 Ashley Vosper, Bachelor of Science (Hons) graduate (1999), has helped discover a new species of monkey in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The new species “Lesula” was recently confirmed after taking a few years for ratification.

3.46 Massey students and graduates did well in the Chorus New Zealand student digital art competition taking two (out of three) winning places and another two (out of ten) finalist places. Recipients were:

Winners: Elspeth Hoskin, 2011 Auckland School of Design graduate.

Finalists:

Johnson Witehira, PhD Fine Arts student.

Eric Cai, Wellington School of Design student.

Riley Sanders, Wellington School of Design graduate and current tutor.

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The winning works were the centre piece of a digital exhibition which showcases the talents of New Zealand art students to the world on one of the biggest and most recognisable digital stages – Times Square New York. The winners were flown to New York so that they could see their artwork hit the massive digital displays in the Times Square on October 10. The finalists also have their work screened in the exhibition.

To celebrate this Chorus provided a free screening at Massey Wellington campus in October, live from New York City on a massive screen located on the forecourt of Te Ara Hihiko.

3.47 Best Awards

Massey College of Creative Arts student finalists totalled 24 in this year’s Designers Institute of New Zealand Best awards, more than other tertiary entries in almost every category.

There were also alumni spread throughout the categories and established businesses who employ many of the college's graduates.

• Student Product: 9/20 Massey finalists, four of whom are from Auckland School of

Design

• Student Graphics: 9/27 Massey finalists, (representing 10 projects)

• Student Interactive: 4/9 Massey finalists,(representing 11 students, plus Tanya Marriott and her student team)

• Student Spatial: 2/8 Massey finalists

Massey awardees were:

• Jamie Hee, Bachelor of Design (Hons) student, along with other team members

Bachelor of Design (Hons) graduates Leo Chida, Nikko Hull and Kasumi Saito received a

Silver award in the Product Student section with their design Synaesthesia.

• Nicholas Marks, Bachelor of Design (Hons) student, received a Bronze award in the

Product Student section for his entry Pressure Aid.

• Marcus Brown, Bachelor of Design (Hons) graduate, received a Gold award in the

Interactive Student section for his design Who is Thomas Revell.

• Nick Graham, Bachelor of Design (Hons) graduate, received a Gold award in the Product

Student section for his design Back Yak.

• Bruce Walls, Bachelor of Design (Hons) graduate, received a Silver award in the Product

Student section for his design ORA.

• Rachel Reeves, Bachelor of Design (Hons) graduate, received a Bronze award in the

Graphics Student section for her design I am Now.

• Andre Heller, Bachelor of Design (Hons) graduate, received a Bronze award in the

Produce Student section for his design Spearfishing Watercraft.

• Courtney Norman, Bachelor of Design (Hons) graduate, received a Bronze award in the

Spatial Student section for his design Wisper Series.

3.48 Five School of Fine Arts photography students received silver or bronze awards in the New

Zealand Institute of Professional Photographers annual print awards (NZIPP). They were:

• Ben Pexton.

• Robyn Daley.

• Kayla Ward.

• Warattaya Bullot.

• Bryn Chadwick.

3.49 Ten Massey fashion students and one graduate were finalists in this year’s World of

Wearable Arts Awards 2012, and the four who took places as listed below:

• Rebecca Maxwell (graduated 2012) - Noor Reverie. WOW Factor Award - 'Winner'.

• Nicole Linnell (third year student) - Rise From the Ruins - Shell Student Innovation

Award - 'Winner'.

• Sally Spackman (third year student) - Powelliphanta Pine - Air New Zealand South

Pacific Section - 'Commended'.

• Kayla Christensen (third year student) - Taniwha Aboard - Air New Zealand South Pacific

Section - 'Honourable Mention'.

The other Massey finalists (all Bachelor of Design students) were: Anna Hicks, Georgia

Whelan, Se Uem Lee, Renee Louie, Meredith Collinson, Ashleigh Lloyd and Tasha Smith.

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More information and images are available from http://www.worldofwearableart.com/category/image-galleries/winners/2012-winners

3.50 Lucy Townend, Graduate Diploma in Journalism student, received the Alex Veysey Memorial

Prize for her drive and enthusiasm.

3.51 Helene Sterzik, PhD Science candidate, received a scholarship from the Claude McCarthy fellowship to present her research at the international life cycle management conference in

Sweden in 2013.

3.52 Lucy Cahill, Bachelor of Veterinary Science graduate, received the Young Achiever Award established by the New Zealand Equine Research Foundation and the Waikato Stud.

3.53 Further to my last report where I advised that one Massey student and two recent graduates had been voted into the top three at the Westpac Young Fashion Designer competition 2012,

I am please to advise that current Massey fashion student Jack Hill has won the Westpac

Young Designers Award at New Zealand Fashion Week. This competition is considered a launch pad for emerging fashion designers. The career-enhancing prize package includes

$5000 cash, mentoring from a leading New Zealand fashion designer, and business banking advice from Westpac. Judges said his work was a “Brilliant collection from a very talented up and coming young New Zealand designer.”

Stephanie Bellamy and Kerry Wong, both recent graduates from our fashion programme were runners-up.

3.54 Two year-one Bachelor of Engineering teams have been selected as New Zealand finalists for the Engineers Without Borders Challenge. The focus of the challenge this year was to design a solution for a specific problem in the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam. The two teams are: Albany “Anytime Cooking solution” and Palmerston North Mimosa pigra -

extracting tannins as a source of extra revenue for rice farmers.

3.55 Nicole Walton, a third-year accountancy student on the

Manawatū campus, has won the

NZICA 2012 Executive Insight programme award. Nicole submitted her winning report after her three-day placement with Palmerston North City Council in August. She has since secured employment with KPMG.

Sophie Stanley, Bachelor of Business Studies and Bachelor of Science graduate, has been announced as a Nuffield Scholar for 2012.

3.56

Another Massey first

Next year Massey will become the only university in New Zealand to offer a Master of

Journalism degree. Under the change the Graduate Diploma in Journalism will become a

Postgraduate Diploma, and also the first year of the Master of Journalism.

3.57 Accreditation

Further to my September report, I am pleased to advise that the Executive MBA programme has had its Association of MBAs (AMBA) accreditation officially confirmed, following a reviewed by a panel of international experts

4.0 Connections and Responsibility

4.1 It was great to see so many Massey people recognised in the Palmerston Creative Giants launch. There is no doubt that Massey has made a significant and very diverse contribution to the city of Palmerston North. The website is not yet fully populated so if you know of a

Massey person who should be on it, let the organisers know. The website address is: http://www.creativegiants.co.nz/.

4.2 Wildbase receives award for conservation work

Congratulations to Massey University’s Wildbase team was presented with an award from the Department of Conservation at the end of October. The award was in recognition of their long-term commitment to caring for injured wildlife, and in particular, their quick and

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comprehensive response to the wildlife crisis created by the grounding of the ship Rena last year.

The department’s area manager Jason Roxbourgh presented the award to Wildbase director

Associate Professor Brett Gartrell. Mr Roxburgh read a citation from the department’s director-general Al Morrison, who said that Massey could be proud of Wildbase for their unwavering commitment to native wildlife. The conservation awards are an opportunity to celebrate those who work tirelessly to protect and cherish the natural heritage of the

Manawatū-Rangitikei area.

Based at Massey’s

Manawatū campus, Wildbase is New Zealand’s leading wildlife health centre. Its mission is to promote and implement collaborative investigation and management of wildlife in support of the welfare and conservation of New Zealand native fauna. Wildbase offers four areas of wildlife health: hospital, oil response, research and pathology.

4.3 The College of Creative Arts War History Heritage Art and Memory research group (WHAM), of whom Institute of Communication Design staff, Tanya Marriot and Euan Robertson, are members, have founded a national chapter. The chapter, in partnership with the Auckland

War Memorial Museum, Auckland University, Te Papa Tongarewa, Waiouru Army Museum, and Massey Defence Studies, intends to develop a symposium “-360 degrees” which will describe a global perspective in recognition of the upcoming centenary commemorations.

Institutional and individual members continue to grow including membership from the imperial war museum, and leading museums from Germany, France, United States and

Canada.

4.4 Congratulations to Lin Tozer lecturer in the School of Accountancy, for receiving the

Regional Volunteer of the Year award at the

Manawatū Grassroots Sports Awards. Race secretary for the Ice Breaker Aquatics club, Ms Tozer also won the All-Rounder Award for her administration, coaching work and general support of the club at the ceremony

4.5 Professor Emeritus Ian Evans, (past member of the School of Psychology), served on the

Social Sciences selection panel for the Rutherford Discovery Fellowships for 2012, sponsored by the Royal Society of New Zealand.

4.6 Health and Counselling Centre Manager, Gabrielle Graham, has been appointed to a working group with Waitemata DHB/PHO, reviewing the Nurse Practitioner role in Primary

Health.

4.7

4.8

Following the memorandum of understanding signed with Venture Taranaki, a companion document covering the agreement to employ a Business Development Manager has been signed and the position is currently being advertised. A pilot system to support the Taranaki

Outreach initiative is being developed by the Information Technology section.

Following the memorandum of understanding signed with Hawke’s Bay Regional Council earlier this year, a companion document covering the agreement to employ a Business

Development Manager has been signed off and the position is currently being advertised.

Hawke’s Bay Regional Council also worked with us on the Hawke’s Bay Food day held in

November.

4.9 The Tertiary Education Commission’s New Zealand Tertiary Council workshop and associated functions for 45 plus Council members were held on the Wellington Campus.

4.10 Frankfurt Book Fair

Associate Professor Heather Galbraith and Lecturer Bryce Galloway mounted a co-curated exhibition Zines aus Neuseeland at the Museum Welkulturen, Frankfurt – part of the arts and culture programme associated with New Zealand’s guest of honour status at the Frankfurt

Book Fair. The exhibition featured over one hundred titles by 36 NZ makers and opened on 2

October 2012, with a performance by Mr Galloway and Daniel Powell (Mr Galloway’s collaborator based in Germany) under their musical moniker Wendyhouse. Mr Galloway had been artist-in-residence at the Weltkulturen Museum at the invitation of Director Clementine

Deliss. Mr Galloway conducted two workshops for young people and he and Associate

Professor Galbraith joined the Director in a panel discussion about independent and counter-

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culture publishing. Associate Professor Galbraith also held a research discussion and critique within the exhibition with members of the Staedelschule/Goethe University postgraduate curatorial studies programme, on the invitation of their programme Director

Stephanie Heraeus.

Also part of the official [email protected] programme was the large exhibition Contact: Artists

from Aotearoa, at the Frankfurter Kunstverein, curated by Dr Leohnard Emmerling and Aaron

Kreisler (Massey University ex-staff member and Curator at Dunedin Public Art Gallery). This exhibition included a newly commissioned wall painting by Senior Lecturer Simon Morris. As part of the invitation to make a new work, Simon was hosted as part of the Kunstverein’s

Deutsche Börse Residency Programeme. Other artists in the exhibition included; Te Putahi a

Toi Lecturer Rachel Rakena, Len Lye, Peter Robinson, Judy Millar, Marti Friedlander, Alex

Monteith, Jim Allen, and School of Fine Arts alumni Murray Hewitt (who also has a solo exhibition on in October/November at City Gallery Wellington).

The third significant contribution by School of Fine Arts researchers to the Frankfurt Book

Fair was within the New Zealand pavilion where art work ‘a library to scale’ by Senior

Lecturer Ann Shelton was screened in the curated audio visual presentation, experienced by over 67,000 people during the five days the Book Fair was open to trade and then the general public. Ms Shelton’s work was the most frequently used set-up as it was screened in between the narrative-based presentation (designed by Mike Mizrahi and Marie Adams, engineered by Mike Hodgson), and as a backdrop to readers and writers talks and events.

4.11 Dr Raja Peter (School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing) and Dr Barbara Crump

(School of Management) have prepared a report for Wellington ICT, a charitable trust, on the voluntary sector and local community’s thoughts on the value of shared services and the role of ICT in the Wellington region. The report findings were presented to Wellington non-profits, funding agencies and the Wellington City Council on October 24.

4.12 With the purpose of reinforcing strong strategic connections and taking the opportunity to present the University’s point of view, I meet with, talk and interface with various people and groups around New Zealand and overseas. The following are by way of example:

• Presented a Guest Lecture to the Department of International Relations, Faculty of

Social and Political Sciences, Airlangga University, Indonesia.

• Interview with RadioSports The Farming Show.

• Meeting with John Spencer, the Chair of the Tertiary Education Commission.

• Visit with Paul Davies, Director Intellectual Property EverEdge IP.

• Met with Auckland Council.

• Speech to Auckland Council planning office quarterly meeting.

• Catch up with Simon Power, Westpac.

• Attended the AgriFood Innovation Board strategy meeting.

• Briefing from Education NZ for the India New Zealand Education Council.

• Attended an AgriOne Board meeting.

• Attended a New Zealand School of Music meeting with Victoria University and Board.

• Attended Universities New Zealand monthly meeting.

• Attended the New Zealand University Vice-Chancellors’ meeting with Lesley Longstone and the Senior Team of the Ministry of Education.

• Discussion with Sue Suckling the chair of the new the Advanced Technology Institute

NZ.

• Met to consider Vision Manawatū Board applications.

• Discussion on the Ministry of Education’s policy regarding teacher training.

• Attended the Creative Giants launch in Palmerston North.

• Opened the Teacher Education Forum of Aotearoa New Zealand conference (TEFANZ) hosted by the College of Education and attended and spoke at the conference dinner.

The forum was, to quote many of those who attended, the best ever.

• Participated in the signing of the Zero Waste Agreement with Palmerston North Council.

• Met with Bentham Ohia, chief executive of Te W ānanga o Aotearoa.

• Interview with Jamie MacKay RadioSport.

• Visit to Peter Miskimmin, Sport NZ, at their invitation. They communicated considerable enthusiasm for what Massey is doing and want to explore ways of working closely with

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us. This is a tangible endorsement of the outstanding work being done by the Massey sports community – well done.

• Spoke at the Secondary Schools Sports Awards in Palmerston North. On behalf of the

School of Sport and Exercise I announced a Coach in Residence position at the awards.

The initiative is a partnership with Sport

Manawatū and was well received.

• Speech to the Women on Boards New Zealand Diversity Summit.

• Spoke at the AIMES Awards with the North Harbour Club in Takapuna. There was a stellar group of Massey staff and Council members in attendance. The Hon Sir Hugh

Williams (Chancellor at the time the Albany campus was developed) joined us.

• Visit to Birkbeck College, London.

• Met with Universities UK.

• Met with Professor Angela Wilkinson from Oxford University to discuss work she will be doing with Massey next year.

• Met with Daniel Franklin Executive Editor of the Economist who will be speaking at a

Massey and Westpac Sponsored event in December.

• Met with the New Zealand Deputy High Commissioner to London to discuss our internationalisation strategy.

• All day visit to Warwick University.

• Speech to the Milford Rotary.

• Attended a BioCommerce Centre Board teleconference meeting.

• Spoke to the National Research Centre for Growth and Development science symposium.

• Attended a Wellington Employers’ Chamber of Commerce teleconference meeting.

• Attended the Royal Society Research Honours dinner where the inaugural Mason Durie

Medal to the leading Social Scientist was presented.

• Met with the Board members of Te Wānanga o Aotearoa, Mana Forbes (Chair) and Ray

Miller.

• Participated in SLT Wellington Engagement. This included time with staff, students and regional school Principals.

Please also refer to item 2.3.1, 2.3.2 and 2.3.3 above for international connections.

4.13

Bereavements

4.13.1 Sir Wilson Whineray

It is with sadness that I note the passing of Sir Wilson Whineray, in late October. Sir Wilson is an alumni of Massey. He contributed greatly to New Zealand as leader in sport and business. He was also one of the most impressive people I have met.

4.13.2 Bryan Hennessey

I also wish to note the passing of Bryan Hennessey, on October 1. Bryan will remain a figure in Massey’s history as he was the principal of the Palmerston North College of Education from 1989 until the college merged with Massey University in 1996.

4.13.3 Collis Blake, MNZM, JP

I also not the passing of Collis Blake, peacefully on November 10, aged 81 years. Collis received a Diploma in Agriculture from Massey University in 1952 and was a Queens

Birthday Honours Recipient in 2000 for services to farming and the community. He was a member of the Massey University Council over the period 1999 – 2001 and a Collis Blake prize in animal science is awarded at the Massey Agriculture dinner each year. He is survived by his wife, Helen. Collis was an ongoing supporter of Massey University and he will be missed.

5.0 Financial

5.1

Budget 2013

5.2

Work on Budget 2013 continues. Baselines and establishment have been agreed at the SLT level and contributing budgets are currently being worked on.

Massey University Investment Plan

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The University’s three-year Investment Plan has been lodged with the Tertiary Education

Commission and is currently awaiting consideration by their board.

5.3 A Palmerston North couple, the late Kenneth and Elizabeth Powell, have made the largest donation received by the Massey University Foundation, an endowment of more than $1.2 million. We are incredibly grateful and humbled by this extremely generous bequest. Please refer to Appendix VII for further details.

5.4 Massey Ventures Limited has appointed Auckland business strategist Terry Allen as its new chair. Massey Ventures Limited is a fully-owned subsidiary of Massey University and was incorporated in 2005. It holds the University’s portfolio of investments in spinout companies and manages the holdings to deliver value to the University.

5.5

Mr Allen is currently the only director outside of the University; other board members include

Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research and Enterprise) Professor Brigid Heywood and

Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Finance, Strategy and IT) Rose Anne MacLeod. It is the intention of the University to appoint another external director in the last quarter of 2012.

Following discussions with the Wellington branch of the New Zealand Federation of

Graduate Women, they have confirmed they will establish a scholarship for Postgraduate

Studies at Massey’s Wellington campus.

5.6 11 Peoples Republic of China officers were welcomed to new Interpreters’ Course run by the

Professional and Continuing Education section.

5.7 Coatesville Market will hire the eastern carpark adjacent to the Recreation Centre on the

Albany campus, on the second Sunday of each month, commencing November 2012.

5.8 Joint Centre for Disaster Research within the School of Psychology, signed a partnership agreement with the United States Geological Society to research earthquake hazard education in New Zealand and Washington State.

5.9 Joint Centre for Disaster Research within the School of Psychology, also signed an agreement with Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu to work in partnership around disaster recovery research.

5.10

Professional and Continuing Education (PaCE)

Planning is under way for the delivery of two of Massey’s Foundation Education qualifications at the three Unitec Institute of Technology campuses in Auckland. An agreement was signed in August for the delivery of the Certificate of University Preparation and Certificate in Foundation Studies from February next year.

5.11 The Centre for Defence and Security Studies has been asked by the Director of the Security and Risk Group from the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet to develop a range of short courses on national and international security for delivery on a bi-annual basis to an inter-agency audience.

5.12 An interesting report on a “dispute” between Auckland University and the Government appeared in the New Zealand Herald on Monday. The focus of the dispute is the recent decision by the Government to fund more engineering and IT students. This is an issue which will impact on Massey as well so it will be worth following. The Herald is covering tertiary education throughout the week. Please refer to Appendix VIII for further details.

6.0 Enabling Excellence

6.1 I am pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Paul McDonald as the first Pro Vice-

Chancellor of the College of Health. Professor McDonald is an internationally-recognised researcher currently based at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. The new college, which takes effect from January, is an exciting strategic development at Massey that will put us at the forefront of tackling some of the big issues the world faces. Paul will join us

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around late March and Professor Ingrid Day has agreed to act as Pro Vice-Chancellor of the college until his arrival. Please refer to Appendix IX for further details.

6.2 Professor Sarah Leberman has been appointed to a three-year term as head of the School of

Management. Professor Leberman currently serves on numerous committees within the university including Academic Board, the Massey University Blues Committee and is currently Chair of the Doctoral Research Committee. She has been a steering group member of New Zealand Woman in Leadership programme since its inception in 2006, a member of the New Zealand Olympic Committee, Women in Sport Group and the Manager of the

Women’s Junior Black Sticks and Black Sticks teams, and has been a board member of

Volleyball New Zealand and Western Netball and Hockey

Manawatū.

Professor Leberman was a Fulbright Senior Scholar in 2008, and tenured at the Tucker

Centre for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, at the University of Minnesota. She is an

Editorial Board member for Journal of Sport Management, a regularly review for the Sport

Management Review and the European Sport Management Quarterly, along with being a

PhD supervisor.

6.3 Professor Kambiz Maani has been appointed to the new position of Associate Pro Vice-

Chancellor (Research) in the College of Business and will take up the position on January 7,

2013. He comes to Massey from the University of Queensland where he was Professor and

Chair in Systems Thinking and Practice. Kambiz has published widely in his field and has led or participated in numerous funded research projects, including one currently entitled “Rural

Futures” in collaboration with colleagues at AgResearch. Prior to his current post at UQ, he held several leadership positions at the University of Auckland, so he knows the New

Zealand research environment well.

6.4 Library excellence

The Library has just received the results of the 2012 Insync survey, which focuses on client satisfaction, and is run across the 38 Australian and eight New Zealand university libraries.

The Library scored in the first quartile (top 25 per cent) of the libraries surveyed over the last two-years. Congratulations to the Library.

6.5

Vice-Chancellor’s Symposium 2012

I presented the keynote address at this year’s Vice-Chancellor’s Symposium, which explored the question: What defines academic scholarship at Massey University in the 21st century?

This question is central to our mission and the 2012 Symposium provides an excellent opportunity to help shape the future of scholarship at Massey. The event this year was hosted on the Wellington campus, with staff from Palmerston North bused through for the day and the event streamed live so that staff had a chance to participate online from other campuses.

This was a great success with more than 120 staff attending. As always happens on these occasions, the opportunity for discussion across campuses and Colleges was a highlight.

Over 40 posters were presented and discussed in response to the question, "How are we defining ourselves as 21st century scholars?". The posters were excellent and reflected a shared view of the challenges and opportunities academic scholarship in the 21 st

century presents.

There were three presentations in the afternoon, from Professor Anne Noble (School of Fine

Arts) on reforming academic scholarship from an art and design perspective; Assistant Vice-

Chancellor (Research and Enterprise) Professor Brigid Heywood on reframing academic scholarship in a digital world; and Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic and International)

Professor Ingrid Day on mapping the research-teaching nexus. Breakout sessions were also held to explore several questions including: What would a Massey model of academic scholarship look like, how can Massey foster, recognise and reward a greater breadth of academic scholarship, and how should Massey access the outcomes and evidence of academic scholarship.

You can watch recordings of the keynote and spotlight presentations, view digital versions of posters presented on the day, see photos from the live event and a number of informal

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6.6 interviews of Massey's staff discussing their views on the symposium website: http://vcsymposium.massey.ac.nz

Thank you to everyone who helped ensure that the VC’s Symposium was a success.

The Massey Women in Leadership programme run in October brought together an impressive group who are already making a great contribution to the University and are looking to do more.

6.7

6.8

2013 Enrolments

The 2013 Enrolment round opened on October 1, with new students expected the first week of December and the bulk of our 2013 enrolments after Christmas. Students will be able to upload documents in support of their applications later this year. Fees have been loaded and went live online on October 3. It is worthy of note that student use of the Paper Manager

(an outcome of the Student Programme Management (SPM) Project) has increased significantly in 2012 and is expected to increase again for the 2013 enrolment round. For the

2011 academic year, students planned about 3500 papers related to the limited numbers of programmes available in the ‘box model’ at that time. In 2012 this has increased to almost

20,000 papers planned.

Further to my July report, where I mentioned that the new College of Creative Arts building

Te Ara Hihiko had been nominated for two New Zealand Timber Design Awards, I am pleased to advise that the building has been named the winner of the engineering excellence award at the Timber Design Awards 2012.

The awards recognise the best in craftmanship and timber design. This year’s event in

Auckland attracted 93 entries across nine categories, the largest response in the 30 years the awards have been held.

Te Ara Hihiko was designed by Athfield Architects and engineered by Dunning Thornton

Consultants. It was also nominated for the commercial architectural excellence award but received the ultimate accolade for its use of engineered timber. Its construction was project managed by Arrow International.

The building is the first in the world to use a post-tensioned timber seismic frame, which flexes like a push-puppet toy during earthquakes. This concept was explained as part of the winning citation by showing a video produced by students from the College’s Wellington

School of Design. It features ‘CoCABot’, a jaunty push-puppet held together by wires that stretch then spring into shape like the building.

6.9 The MBA Programme’s new ‘MBA Breakthrough’ campaign has had more than 50 specific leads in less than a month since its launch. In the campaign five Massey alumni share stories of how they made a career breakthrough. The campaign heroes include:

• Mark Young, corporate manager at Toyota.

• Adri Isbister, chief executive of Radius Medical Group.

• Hamish Nuttall, chief executive of NakedBus.

• Natalie Milne, global marketing manager of Zespri,

• Ruma Karaitiana, chief executive of Building and Construction ITO.

Their stories are available at www.mbabreakthrough.ac.nz.

6.10 The Intranet and electronic document and records management (EDRMS) projects will create a foundation and framework for advancing the way staff communicate, collaborate and manage records and information; and strengthening the business continuity capabilities of the University. More information on the Records Management project can be found on the

Staffroom website under Shared Services – Records Services.

6.11 Highlights of meetings I have had with Massey staff and associated groups included:

• A discussion with staff interested in the links being built between the University and Sri

Lanka.

• Attended a meeting of the Innovation Forum at Albany campus.

• Discussion on the University Research Strategy.

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• Participated in the Albany Blues Awards and Olympic Function (Valerie Adams presented).

• Attended a distance education event.

• iPhone video for “make your voice count”.

• Pasifika policy and Research discussion. This was very useful. A group of around 25 took part in the discussion and will now focus on preparing a specific proposal to be implemented in 2013. Anyone wanting to get involved should contact Dr Selwyn Katene.

• Review of the outcomes of the International Office visit to Indonesia.

• Follow up discussion concerning more Iranian students studying at Massey.

• Spoke at the Blues Sports Awa rds Manawatū.

• Chaired the Senior Leadership Team meeting (at Albany campus in October and

Manawatū campus in November)

• Attended the informal launch of the National Data Centre at Albany campus.

• Shortlist for the Institute of Education Director.

• Spoke at the Future U Finale (see item 2.8.4 above for further details).

• Spoke at the Massey University Agriculture student’s annual end of year awards dinner.

It was bigger and brighter than ever. A lot of interest from the industry and an outstanding group of students. Thanks to all of the staff involved in these very successful events.

• Tenders Board (October and November).

• Spoke at the launch of the Emerging Managers Programme.

• Attended the Council October meeting.

• Institute of Education shortlisting.

• Met with staff developing a very exciting Massey “app”

• Met with New Zealand Women in Leadership attendees

• Preparation for the Vice-Chancellor’s Symposium (refer item 6.3 above)

• Spoke at the Launch of the Infectious Diseases Research Centre.

• Attended the Distinguished Alumni Awards committee meeting.

• Spoke at the Massey Women in Leadership Programme.

• Catch up with Council member Professor Cynthia White.

• Pro Vice-Chancellor College of Health interviews.

• Key note speaker at the VC’s Symposium – the focus is on scholarship in the 21 st century (refer item 6.3 above).

• Met to discuss the Agrifood business strategy.

• Met with the College of Creative Arts executive.

• Met with the Creativity Working Group at Wellington campus.

• Met with new Associate Professors and Professors at Albany.

• Met with the International Office at Albany.

• 2013 Budget meeting.

• New Associate Professors and Professors at Manawa tū.

• Attending the 2012 Massey research celebrations (refer item 2.1.1 above)

• Attended the Combined Union’s meeting.

• Chaired a University Press meeting.

• Catch-up with Sir Hugh Williams, past Chancellor of Massey Council.

• Attended the end of year stakeholder function at Albany.

• Attended SLT Subcommittees (November).

• Attended an Albany Professors meeting.

• Attended Academic Board (November).

• Met with Student Presidents elect.

• Participated in SLT Wellington Engagement. This included time with staff, students and regional school Principals.

• Attended the College of Creative Arts Hall of Fame Dinner. The Blow Festival – which is proving to be yet another huge success – continues over the weekend (refer to item

2.8.2 above).

These meetings with staff are very useful. I actively seek meetings but am also pleased to be invited to discuss any of the issues the University is dealing with.

6.12 There are a lot of issues being advanced through SLT at the moment, these include: SLT meeting dates 2013; Workload policy; Intranet replacement project – phase one; General

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debt collection policy; factual corrections to Student Grievance procedures in 2012 University

Calendar; 2013 Ten Year Capital Plan; January 1 2013 Review of Professor and Associate

Professor salaries; relocation of the Wellington School of Public Health; 2013 operating budget; Leave and Ancilliary Appointments committee –August 21 2012; Service excellence;

Risk report – September 2012; Annual Report timeline; Strategy planning agenda –

December; Health and safety policies (Dogs on Campus policy; Rehabilitation policy; Safe

Driving policy and procedure; Smoke Free policy; Working in a situation likely to cause serious harm); International SOS; Review of the Matua Reo Kaupapa /

Māori Language policy and Review of the Treaty of Waitangi policy; Process outline — 2014 update of the

University’s strategic plan; Printer and photocopier replacement 2012; End of year functions;

Lead indicators: successful paper completions; Report on MOST surveys in semester 1,

2012; monthly portfolio update papers (for October and November) from Assistant Vice-

Chancellors (Research and Enterprise; External Relations; Academic and International;

Finance, Strategy and Information Technology; University Registrar; People and

Organisational Development; Māori and Pasifika), and Pro Vice-Chancellors (Business;

Humanities and Social Sciences; Education; Creative Arts; Sciences); Updated Investment

Plan 2013-2015; Annual Plan 2013; refurbishment and extension of the Wellington campus

Library; Sir Geoffrey Peren business case; Harassment policy and procedures; Health and

Safety plan 2013; review of the Massey University strategic emergency management framework; Conflict of Commitment and Interest policy; Fraud Prevention policy; Business

Continuity policy; Capital Asset Management plan 2012; Process outline - 2014 update of the

University's strategic plan (The Road to 2025); video conferencing consolidation – Discovery

2013; Consolidated Performance report: quarter three, 2012; bad debts write-off; revision of

Pre-Employment Check policy and procedure; Albany campus space reallocation project ;

Massey University Risk Management workplan 2013; Leave and Ancilliary Appointments committee – October 16 2012; Debtors Report as at September 30 2012; Procurement

Programme status report.

Further explanation on these items is provided in the SLT web reports available via the

University Management-Senior Leadership Team webpage http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/about-massey/university-management/universitymanagement/university-management_home.cfm.

7.0 Opportunities/Threats

7.1 Further to item 6.5 above on the Vice-Chancellor’s Symposium: What defines academic scholarship at Massey University in the 21st century? This was an opportunity to broaden and stimulate the discussion begun at Academic Board and the Teaching and Learning committee as to what we mean by academic scholarship within the context of the 21 st century. The discussion will continue.

The world outside is changing, we have a strategic plan that is more a play-pen than a dictate. We have agreed the general framework but our job is to start thinking how we can, in multifarious ways, take this forward. We are on the way. There are real signs of people getting it and understanding the need for them to take forward their disciplines or their service. This is an ongoing discussion. We know the direction, we know the challenges but it is up to each of us to engage with the rest of our community and talk through the many ways that will take our academic scholarship forward. We also need to contribute to a narrative about autonomous universities contributing to a better world through real connection.

Massey University sees academic scholarship as a ‘project’ – we are trying to think through how a university, of our kind, can work in this kind of environment to advance the concept of the university in this new kind of way, which really is productive for ourselves, as a university community, but also for the wider society that we serve. The debate has to carry on – the question is how we participate in that and draw the whole university into it. The vehicles are many – the research strategy roll-out, the big changes through academic reform project, how we think through what we teach, where we teach and how, the College of Health establishment. What do these things mean? We need all our staff to contribute to the debates and discussions.

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8.0

Overall sense/feel of the place

8.1 It is always a bit of a shock to see Christmas begin to appear in the shops. It is a signal that the end of the year is not far away. So much yet to do!

8.2 As we have done for the past four years, we are going to finish off 2012 by having a look at the progress we have made and our plans for 2013.

In December I will host meetings on our

Manawatū, Wellington and Albany campuses, all staff are welcome to attend. These meetings will be an opportunity for us to review what has been happening around the University during 2012 and to discuss the year ahead.

If you are unable to attend the campus meetings in person, the

Manawatū meeting will be webcast via mediasite: http://webcast.massey.ac.nz/mediasite/Viewer/?peid=15562ffa511c46baac24208c8e1d484b

1d

For further information please contact Toni Wilson: [email protected] or ext 7866

Wellington: Wednesday, December 5 in LT200 from 12 noon - 1 pm

Manawatū: Monday, December 10 in SSLB1 from 12 noon - 1 pm

Albany: Thursday, December 13 in SNW300 from 12 noon - 1 pm

Appendices attached:

Appendix I: Duchess of Cornwall to visit Massey (Ref. item 1.1)

Appendix II: Quality of teaching, research reflected in ranking (Ref. item 1.2)

Appendix III: Infectious Disease Research Centre to be launched (Ref. item 2.1.2)

Appendix IV: 2012 NZ Food Awards winners announced (Ref. item 2.4.1)

Appendix V: Massey Blues 2012 recipients (Ref. item 2.8.1)

Appendix VI: Vision of a skilled nation wins competition (Ref. item 2.8.4)

Appendix VII: Couple's record bequest 'humbling' (Ref. item 5.3)

Appendix VIII: Skills crisis: Minister's threat to union funding (Ref. item 5.12)

Appendix IX: Inaugural head of new College of Health announced (Ref. item 6.1)

Steve Maharey

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Robert Anderson escorting Queen Elizabeth II around campus in 1970.

Duchess of Cornwall to visit Massey

Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall

Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall, will visit Massey’s equestrian centre and Veterinary Teaching

Hospital at the Manawatū campus on November 15 as part of The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebrations.

Prince Charles and Camilla will be in

Manawatū, visiting Feilding and Ohakea together and splitting up for him to visit a farm while she comes to Massey.

The visit reflects her particular interest in animal welfare.

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Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Pro Vice-Chancellor College of Sciences Professor Robert Anderson will lead the official delegation that welcomes Camilla to Massey and he will host the visit to the hospital. It is the second royal visit to Massey. At the first, in 1970, Professor Anderson, who was students' association president at the time, met Queen Elizabeth.

This visit includes a short tour of the hospital led by Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical

Sciences head Professor Frazer Allan, a tour of Wildbase wildlife health centre led by Associate

Professor Brett Gartrell, who will share insights into the work of specialist wildlife veterinarians, and a visit to the equestrian centre, which will be hosted by Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University

Registrar Stuart Morriss. There, students will give a display of jumping and riding in the arena.

Professor Anderson says the visit highlights Massey’s strengths in the areas of equine research, veterinary teaching, animal health and specialist wildlife rehabilitation. “During the Duchess' time with us we hope to be able to introduce her to some of our native wildlife being treated at Wildbase.

“We think she will also enjoy finding out that students with horses who are serious competitive equestrians – as many are – are able to stable them on campus so they can keep up their training throughout the academic year.”

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Camilla's kiwi experience

Appendix I

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Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, with wildlife veterinarian Kerri Morgan

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, at the Equestrian Centre

At the Veterinary Teaching Hospital

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Holding a rehabilitating kiwi

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, held a kiwi, saw a Jack Russell terrier recovering from surgery, met

Team Massey riders at the Equestrian Centre and said she was thrilled with the "wonderful visit" to the university's Manawatü campus this afternoon.

Camilla was welcomed by Deputy Vice-Chancellor and College of Sciences Pro Vice-Chancellor

Professor Robert Anderson along with University Chancellor Dr Russ Ballard and Palmerston North

Mayor Jono Naylor.

Crowds of locals, including children from the Massey Childcare Centre, dressed up for the occasion, applauded after waiting a few minutes longer than expected for her arrival. They lined the footpath outside the vet hospital to get a glimpse of the Duchess, before she was led on the hospital tour by

Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences head Professor Frazer Allan.

There she met met staff and students working with companion animals, native wildlife and horses.

Camilla held a female brown kiwi being treated at Wildbase, the wildlife treatment facility within the hospital, and took a special interest in a Jack Russell recovering from surgery as she toured the hospital. “I’m thrilled to get a chance to look around,” she told staff and students. “I’ve had a wonderful visit.”

Plans for the $75 million upgrade and extension of the school – New Zealand’s only vet school – were discussed.

Victoria Tyson, head nurse of the small animal hospital, said Camilla was drawn to 12-year-old Jack

Russell Emil, who was recovering from chest surgery, and talked of her two rescued Jack Russells in

England, Bluebell and Beth. “She said one was naughty and one was nice, and she hoped they were behaving," Ms Tyson said. "She was lovely, really down to earth.”

Associate Professor Brett Gartrell and wildlife lecturer Kerri Morgan shared insight into the work of specialist wildlife veterinarians at Wildbase, where injured and sick native and endemic species are treated and rehabilitated, and gave her the kiwi to hold. The kiwi was receiving treatment for an

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Part I injured leg and would be released back into the Rimutaka Ranges. Camilla demonstrated a keen interest and considerable knowledge of animal welfare with her questions during the visit.

At the Equestrian Centre she watched a show jumping clinic run by elite coach and former New

Zealand Olympian John Cottle for Team Massey riders. She then walked into the arena to chat with the riders.

Chloe Akers, an education student, said Camilla asked about her horse Cortaflex-letitbe and displayed a genuine interest in the centre and horses. “She was really nice, very talkative, very smiley. Just the way she was patting him and asking questions, I could sense she loved horses.”

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar Stuart Morriss said Camilla enjoyed the hospital and equestrian centre visit. “She was delighted to meet the kiwi and thoroughly enjoyed seeing all the animals and meeting our staff and students at the vet hospital, she really thought it was a fantastic. She was interested in the fact the students can bring their own horses to the centre, and can carry on with their studies, and continue to compete internationally.

“It’s a lovely day, lovely backdrop, it’s fantastic for us to have her here and to show her what we have got and what we are able to achieve."

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Appendix II

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Quality of teaching, research reflected in ranking

Massey is pleased to have improved its place in the Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) world university rankings.

The rankings are based on various criteria including a university's reputation among academics and employers, the percentage of international staff and students it has, its ratio of academics to students and the frequency that papers by its academics are cited in other academics' papers.

Of the 20,000 universities worldwide, QS says it considers just 700 for its rankings. Massey has an overall ranking of 308 (compared to 329 last year) and in eight subject areas it ranks in the top 200.

Its highest ranking is for education – 50th equal in the world. In earth sciences and communication and media studies it is in the top 100. In statistical and operations research and accounting and finance it is in the top 150 and in biological sciences, sociology, and economics and econometrics it is in the top 200.

Massey Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey says the result is pleasing, particularly with more universities being ranked every year and all of them striving to increase their performance. "New

Zealand universities perform very creditably in a challenging environment," Mr Maharey says.

"Massey is committed to on-going improvements in the quality of our teaching and research activities. We are delighted that recent advances in our international research alliances and improvements in the quality of our research outputs in key areas of specialisation have been recognised.

"Equally important are the advances in the quality of our unique blended learning environment, which enables students to receive a world-class education by distance or on one of our campuses – or a mix of the two.

"We have updated our curriculum to make it more attractive for students seeking quality outcomes and grown our international student numbers and this too has been recognised by QS.

"Key emerging developments are the new student engagement strategy to support and build student success, the implementation of the Graduate Destination Survey to improve our knowledge of graduate employment and the enhanced provision of academic advice to students.

"Massey has growing authority in research in health sciences, research in technologies underpinning food systems research, and the growth of our capability in social science-based research in such domains as citizenship, migration dynamics, poverty remediation and environmental management.

"Our notable improvement relative to other New Zealand institutions is also very pleasing as it reflects our endeavours to lead in education and research in support of our role as New Zealand’s defining university."

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Appendix III

C12/130 – December

Part I

Infectious Disease Research Centre to be launched

Massey is bringing together researchers from across the University to combat infectious diseases that pose a threat to health, biosecurity and trade.

The Infectious Disease Research Centre will build on the University’s world-leading research into infectious disease. It will be launched at an inaugural symposium this month.

Centre director Professor Nigel French says the centre brings a “one health” approach to the work being carried out at Massey. It also builds on the University’s proven record of producing relevant research that can be quickly applied to bring about interventions with real health and economic benefits.

The centre will bring together researchers from across the University to combat infectious diseases that pose a threat to health, biosecurity and trade.

“No single discipline has all the knowledge and skills needed to meet the challenges faced by human, animal, plant and ecosystem health,” he says. “There is a growing global recognition that multidisciplinary teams are essential to tackle both the current disease problems and those that will emerge in the future.”

This interdisciplinary approach has already led to major health and economic gains, he says. “It was research led by Massey epidemiological staff that informed the national strategy to combat campylobacteriosis,” he says. “That has led to a halving of notified cases and a $40 million annual saving.”

The centre will be made up of research groups from across the University:

• mEpiLab: molecular epidemiology and veterinary public health group (Professor Nigel

French)

• Epicentre: veterinary epidemiology and economics (Professor Tim Carpenter)

• The Rainey Lab: ecological processes and evolutionary genetics (Professor Paul Rainey)

• Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences: infectious disease modelling (Professor

Mick Roberts)

• Centre for Public Health Research: public health effects of microbial exposures (Professor

Jeroen Douwes)

• Statistics and Bioinformatics Group: spatial and temporal modelling of disease (Professor

Martin Hazelton)

The symposium, at the Palmerston North Convention Centre from October 23-24, will feature introductory presentations by the group leaders and some of their leading researchers, as well as keynote addresses from Professor Bruce Levin of Emory University in the United States, Professor

Christopher Dye of the World Health Organisation, Professor Ian Gardner of the University of Prince

Edward Island in Canada, and Associate Professor Michael Baker of the University of Otago.

The centre launch function will be held at Wharerata on the

Manawatū campus at 6.30pm on

Tuesday October 23. More information about the symposium and keynote speakers can be found on the IDReC website: http://www.idrec.ac.nz/

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Appendix IV

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Part I

Madelaine Colombie of Paneton Bakery accepts the Supreme Award at the New Zealand Food

Awards

2012 NZ Food Awards winners announced

The 2012 winners of the New Zealand Food Awards were announced at a gala dinner held at the

Langham Hotel in Auckland on Thursday night. The awards celebrate the innovation and creativity of

New Zealand food products and businesses.

From a record number of 102 entries, 43 finalists from all over New Zealand were selected across 13 categories by a panel of judges, including Ray McVinnie, Geoff Scott and Nici Wickes.

The Massey University Supreme Award went to Auckland-based Paneton Bakery for their Ready to

Use Flaky Puff Pastry. They also took out the Ministry of Primary Industries Bakery Award.

Two other companies won honours in two awards categories – South Island artisan honey maker

J.Friend & Co won the New Zealand Herald Viva Gourmet Award and the KPMG Export Award, while fledgling food enterprise I AM SAUCE won the Villa Maria Other Food and Beverage Award and the

Foodbowl Value-Added Processing Technology Award.

Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey says the NZ Food Awards are the perfect opportunity to showcase

New Zealand’s largest export sector, and recognise wider aspects of the businesses entering their products.

“The awards put the spotlight on so many aspects of the food industry - from food safety and product design to export capability and business innovation, as well as taste and presentation. It’s an area where New Zealand leads the world developing innovative products and best practice and Massey

University is right at the forefront with these food and beverage producers,” he says.

The audience enjoyed a mystery box challenge put to Masterchef finalist Jax Hamilton, who was encouraged by food blogger, comedian and master of ceremonies Jesse Mulligan.

The 2012 NZ Food Awards winners are:

Massey University Supreme Award

Paneton Bakery – Ready to Use Flaky Puff Pastry

Ministry for Primary Industries Bakery Award

Paneton Bakery – Ready To Use Flaky Puff Pastry

Ministry for Primary Industries Cereal & Breads Award

32

Wild Wheat Specialty Breads – Kumara Sourdough

ATEED Snacks and Confectionery Award

Fonterra Brands Tip Top Ltd – The Ice Bar Co

ATEED Convenience & Meal Solutions Award

LHF Ltd – Naked Kitchen Fresh Chilled Meals range

Villa Maria Other Food & Beverages Award

I AM SAUCE – All Purpose Sauce

The New Zealand Herald VIVA Gourmet Award

J. Friend & Co – New Zealand Artisan Honey

Countdown Grocer’s Choice Award

J.H. Whittaker & Sons Ltd – Whittaker’s Mini Slabs

AsureQuality Food Safety Award

Greenshell NZ Ltd – Ikana Live Greenshell Mussels

Packaging Design Award

Archer MacRae Beverages Ltd – Ritzling

Foodbowl Value-Added Processing Technology Award

I AM SAUCE – All Purpose Sauce

KPMG Export Award

J. Friend & Co.

Rabobank Business Innovation Award

Appendix IV

C12/130 – December

Part I

Aria Farm for Woolworths Select

Massey University Research & Development Award

Fonterra Brands Ltd – Symbio Probalance Probiotic Yoghurt

All finalists and winners will have the opportunity to attend business capability-building workshops run by KPMG and Rabobank, and retail and commercialisation sessions run by Countdown.

For further information visit: http://www.foodawards.co.nz

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Part I

2012 Massey University Blues Award recipients:

Rachel Hughes – Archery (Bachelor of Science)

Portia Bing – Athletics (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Sarah Cowley – Athletics (Bachelor of Communication)

Andy Kruy – Athletics (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Ben Langton Burnell – Athletics (Bachelor of Agricultural Commerce)

Ryan Tinkle – Athletics (Bachelor of Nursing)

Frazer Wickes – Athletics (Bachelor of Aviation)

Jasper Bats – Canoe/Kayak (Bachelor of Arts)

Carl Duncan – Canoe Polo (Bachelor of Environmental Management)

Benjamin Gibb – Canoe Slalom (Bachelor of Accountancy)

Malcolm Gibson – Canoe Slalom (Bachelor of Veterinary Science)

Dane Cleaver – Cricket (Bachelor of Business Studies/Science conjoint)

Roald Badenhorst – Cricket (Bachelor of Business Studies/Arts conjoint)

Max Annear-Henderson – Cycling (Bachelor of Engineering)

Emily Collins – Cycling (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Cameron Karwowski – Cycling (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Rachel Southee – Cycling (Bachelor of Food Technology)

Chloe Akers – Equestrian (Bachelor of Education)

Nicola French – Equestrian (Bachelor of Arts)

Anna Green – Football (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Hayley Moorwood – Football (Bachelor of Science)

Erin Nayler – Football (Bachelor of Science)

Jenna Anderson – Hockey (Bachelor of Health Sciences)

Samantha Charlton – Hockey (Bachelor of Science)

Simon Child – Hockey (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Mitchell Cronin – Hockey (Bachelor of Science)

Michaela Curtis – Hockey (Bachelor of Sport and Exercise)

Gemma Flynn – Hockey (Bachelor Sport and Exercise)

Elizabeth Horne – Hockey (Bachelor of Agricultural Science)

Hugo Inglis – Hockey (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Richard Petherick – Hockey (Bachelor of Sport and Exercise)

Kayla Sharland – Hockey (Bachelor of Sport and Exercise)

Nick Wilson – Hockey (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Rebecca Watkin – Karate (Bachelor of Science)

Sasha Smith – Mountain Biking (Bachelor of Resource and Environmental Planning)

Amber Bellringer – Netball (Graduate Diploma in Journalism Studies)

Daniel Holt – Paralympics Swimming (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Kate Spencer – Roller Skating (Bachelor of Sport and Exercise)

Michael Arms – Rowing (Graduate Diploma in Business Studies)

Genevieve Armstrong – Rowing (Bachelor of Arts)

Harriet Austin – Rowing (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Hamish Bond – Rowing (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Genevieve Behrent – Rowing (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Toby Cunliffe-Steel – Rowing (Bachelor of Sport and Exercise)

Emily Discombe – Rowing (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Olivia Loe – Rowing (Bachelor of Business Studies)

John Storey – Rowing (Certificate in Business Studies)

34

Francie Turner – Rowing (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Nick Crosswell – Rugby (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Sarah Goss – Rugby (Bachelor of Arts)

Travis Larsen – Rugby (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Christopher Prentice – Rugby (Masters of Philosophy)

David Thomas – Rugby (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Joseph Brown – Shooting (Bachelor of Information Sciences)

Shelly Gotlieb – Snowboarding (Bachelor of Communication)

Rebecca Sinclair – Snowboarding (Bachelor of Science)

Jeremy Manley – Softball (Bachelor of Sport and Exercise)

Kurt Bassett – Swimming (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Amaka Gessler – Swimming (Bachelor of Science)

Penelope Marshall – Swimming (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Nielsen Varoy – Swimming (Bachelor of Business Studies)

Natalie Paterson – Table Tennis (Bachelor of Education)

Kane Baigent – Taekwon-do (Bachelor of Sport and Exercise)

Michael Davis – Taekwon-do (Bachelor of Engineering)

Estelle Speirs – Taekwon-do (Post Graduate Diploma in Sports Management)

Sophie Corbidge – Triathlon (Bachelor of Arts)

Hayden Moorhouse – Triathlon (Bachelor of Agricultural Commerce)

Molly Meech – Yachting (Bachelor of Arts)

Tamsin Fitzgerald – Ultimate Frisbee (Bachelor of Sport and Exercise)

Supreme Winners

Manawatū Sportsman of the year – Hamish Bond (Rowing)

Manawatū Sportswoman of the year – Kayla Sharland (Hockey)

Albany Sportsman of the year – Daniel Holt (Paralympics, Swimming)

Albany Sportswoman of the year – Gemma Flynn (Hockey)

Extramural Sportsperson of the year – Hamish Bond (Rowing)

Appendix V

C12/130 – December

Part I

35

Appendix VI

C12/130 – December

Part I

Future U finalists – Saijel Dheda, Disha Gomathinayagam, Maia Visnovsky, David Bassett, Peter

Scriven, Clare Wu, Edward Boxall, Stephen Lines, Joel Robinson, Prerena Nair, Jonathan

Papageorge, Indya Tolo.

Vision of a skilled nation wins competition

Stephen Lines, winner of the 2012 Future U competition.

A vision of New Zealand as a food basket for the world, with 100 per cent renewable energy production and a strong focus on education has won the 2012 Future U competition.

Hutt International Boys’ College student Stephen Lines presented his vision with confidence and passion, with the judges describing his presentation as having the “whole package”.

While Mr Lines painted a broad picture of the country he would like to see in 2050, he says his key message was about the important role skilled people will play in New Zealand’s future prosperity.

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Appendix VI

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Part I

“New Zealand will be relying on its people in the future,” he says. “We can’t compete with the manufacturing output in China, or the mining booms of Australia, so New Zealand really needs to focus on its talent and education if we are to succeed.”

Future U is a joint initiative by Massey University and Westpac to encourage the nation’s youth to become thought leaders. It invited high school students to post videos outlining their vision for New

Zealand in 2050.

Mr Lines was one of 12 finalists from all over the country to be chosen to workshop their vision at

Massey’s Albany campus. The group were mentored for a day by Massey University academics to help them think critically about their visions, and refine them in preparation for presentation to the

Future U judging panel and a live audience.

Massey University Vice-Chancellor and judge Steve Maharey says the 12 presentations outlined some of the changes New Zealand will face and, more importantly, how those changes should be addressed to produce a positive outcome.

“We had a variety of answers – from promoting a vegan way of life, to environmentalism and using technology in innovative ways,” he says. “I think the great thing, though, was the balance of idealism and realism, a sense of trying to look forward to a society where people have done things to try and make it better.”

Westpac’s Director of Corporate Affairs Sue Foley agrees. “It’s encouraging to know that we have a future generation that is intelligent, innovative and switched on,” she says. “They are clearly passionate about seeing the country they call home develop and achieve great things.”

Mr Lines will return to Auckland on December 3 to give the opening address at the It’s Our Future – the new New Zealand Forum, an exclusive, invitation-only event that will bring together prominent international and national thought leaders to discuss a vision for a successful New Zealand.

He will share the stage with world-renowned thought leader Daniel Franklin, executive editor of The

Economist, and the editor of Megachange 2050, a book that outlines the big trends that will shape the world’s future.

“Stephen will bring a youthful perspective the to the forum,” says Mr Maharey. “He will set the scene by presenting his vision of New Zealand in 2050, and challenging attendees to create the sort of country his generation wants to live in.”

Mr Lines says he is overwhelmed by his win and excited at the prospect of addressing the forum.

“I think it will be a fantastic opportunity to represent New Zealand’s youth in such an important discussion,” he says. “Young people need a future they can look forward to, and I’m excited to have the chance to have my input.”

For more information on Future U visit: www.future-u.ac.nz

For more information on the new New Zealand Forum visit: www.newnzforum.ac.nz

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Appendix VII

C12/130 – December

Part I

David Stephen (left) and Rangi Royal with Mitch Murdoch and Stuart Morriss.

Couple's record bequest 'humbling'

Kenneth and Elizabeth Powell

A Palmerston North couple have made the largest donation received by the Massey University

Foundation, an endowment of more than $1.2 million.

The late Kenneth and Elizabeth Powell decided several years ago that they wanted upon their deaths to establish a fund to support the study of technology in engineering and health at Massey, although neither of them had been students at the University. Mr Powell, an engineer and specialist in aircraft maintenance, said at the time that as technology and health had been central to their lives they wanted to give young enthusiasts in their home city "an extra edge".

Mr Powell, a World War II veteran who served in the Pacific as instrument fitter with the Royal New

Zealand Air Force, died in February this year, aged 88. He did his apprenticeship as an instrument fitter with Union Airways at the Palmerston North Airport at Milson and later established Aero and

General Instruments Ltd on the corner of Bourke and Cuba Streets. Mrs Powell was a registered nurse, who trained at Wellington Hospital, and completed her training as a midwife at Palmerston

North Hospital, where she worked as well as at the former Rostrata Maternity Home in the city. They married in 1958. She died in October 2006, aged 96.

Their nephew, Rangi Royal, 76, an executor of their estate, says he and Mr Powell shared many common interests, including in rugby, hunting and fishing. Mr Royal was an engineer-fitter with the

RNZAF and they often worked together on machinery. "Ken was a very, very clever engineer," Mr

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Part I

Royal says. "For example he would make new cogs for all the Palmerston North taxi meters whenever prices changed."

When Mr Royal gave the eulogy at Mr Powell's funeral, he recalled a man of great integrity, honesty, humility and modesty – someone who continued working from home as a hobby in retirement. "I was always getting at Ken for undercharging for the knowledge and time he expended on what he did,"

Mr Royal says. Although they had no children of their own, the Powells adored the children of the wider family. "They lived simply but they were extremely generous with their time for others and the family. When you consider their lifestyle, the fact there are other recipients of the estate the size of the bequest to the foundation is quite amazing."

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar Stuart Morriss yesterday thanked Mr Royal and the other estate executor David Stephen, 74, of Wanganui, for their work in winding up the estate and ensuring the smooth transfer of the funds that will enable ongoing provision of grants and scholarships for students in line with the Powells' wishes.

"We're incredibly grateful to Mr and Mrs Powell, and are privileged to be able to develop a programme of scholarships that will provide lasting benefits to generations of Massey students," Mr

Morriss said.

The foundation, established in 2004 as Massey's registered charity, provides funding for scholarships and research projects from donations and bequests. It has about $15 million under management and aims to raise about $2 million a year, with a goal of having $100 million endowed that will enable it to spend about $5 million a year on scholarships and projects that would not otherwise be funded.

Director Mitch Murdoch says the receipt of the Powell's endowment has been a very humbling experience for staff. "For a couple that had no direct connection with the University to choose to give it to Massey for the benefit of future students is amazing."

39

Appendix VIII

C12/130 – December

Part I

Skills crisis: Minister's threat to union funding

By Simon Collins Email Simon

5:30 AM Monday Nov 19, 2012

Joyce demands more engineers, but academics say change will cost jobs.

Mr Joyce said the Budget changes brought New Zealand's funding system closer to that of Australia.

Photo / Greg Bowker

Auckland University and the Government appear headed for a showdown over what courses the university is offering - and what the country needs.

Tertiary Education Minister Steven Joyce is threatening to force the university to take more engineering students, even though the university says this could cause layoffs elsewhere on the campus.

This year's Budget put an extra $42 million into engineering and $17 million into science at universities and polytechnics - while freezing funding for all other subjects - in a bid to ease skill shortages in fields such as engineering and computing.

But Auckland University vice-chancellor Stuart McCutcheon said the increase was paid as a bulk fund, and the university did not have to put it all into engineering and science.

"If we followed that, we would have increased the budgets of those faculties and made large numbers of people in the arts, creative arts, the business school and the law school redundant," he said.

"The other thing to remember is that the programmes people want to increase are generally the most expensive programmes, so to have more engineering students you may have to reduce the number of arts students by twice as many.

"It's not driven only by the needs of industry. It [the Government] wants higher participation rates for

Māori and Pacific students, but Māori and Pacific students typically go into arts and education rather than engineering, so if you shift the balance you have impacts on your equity objectives. All that makes it quite a complex picture."

Mr Joyce said that if necessary, he would step in to force change at Auckland University.

"If they want us to be more directive, I'm more than willing," he said. "I'm watching them really closely to make sure they do respond to what the market wants, and if they don't, I can go and tell them how many they should enrol for each department."

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Appendix VIII

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Mr Joyce said the Budget changes brought New Zealand's funding system closer to that of Australia, which encouraged students into areas of skill shortage, as well as reflecting students' likely future earnings.

Subject areas in New Zealand have been funded on the basis of course costs, and Mr Joyce said even then they gave universities an incentive to enrol students in cheaper subjects.

"If you look, for example, at the level of tuition subsidy that New Zealand applies to engineering and science relative to say the humanities and commerce, which are much lower costs - they don't need labs and all those sorts of expensive things - then if you were a rational decision-making institution you'd put more into the arts and commerce because you can make effectively more money out of those areas," he said.

"The other thing that we are very generous to in our subsidies is medical. If you match us against

Australia we generously fund the lower-cost courses in humanities and commerce and medicine, and we tend not to fund as well science and engineering.

"So over the years we have ended up with exactly what you'd expect, which is very high demand in medicine and humanities and commerce and lower demand in engineering and science, and that's partly as a result of those funding issues. So we have looked to redress that."

Only 5570 (4.3 per cent) of New Zealand students studying for bachelors' degrees last year were in engineering, compared with 67,300 in "society and culture" fields such as languages, law and social sciences.

Engineers NZ says engineers made up 5 per cent of all tertiary graduates in New Zealand in 2007, compared with 7 per cent in Australia and an average in OECD developed nations of 12 per cent.

A New Zealand Herald series, starting today, has found a serious mismatch between the skills required for the 15,000 jobs advertised on the Seek NZ website and the skills of the almost 300,000 unemployed.

Information technology consultants and engineering managers were the two occupations in most demand in Seek's survey released last week.

But few of the jobless had experience in these areas, and 24 per cent had held no job in the previous six years or were seeking their first job.

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Appendix IX

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Part I

Inaugural head of new College of Health announced

Professor Paul McDonald

An internationally acclaimed public health specialist has been appointed as the first head of the

University's new College of Health, Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey announced today.

Professor Paul McDonald, 55, is currently director of the School of Public Health and Health Systems at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. Recognised for his research expertise in population health planning and intervention for challenges such as reducing tobacco use, Professor McDonald is a Fellow of Britain's Royal Society for Public Health.

Mr Maharey says the appointment marks a significant milestone for Massey. "Professor McDonald is a recognised health leader for his work in Canada, the United Kingdom and New Zealand. He will play a key role in Massey's goal of being a world leader in public health, one of our areas of specialisation, and ensuring an exceptional and distinctive learning experience for students at

Massey."

More than 315 full-time equivalent staff and 2000 students across the three campuses – Albany

(where Professor McDonald will be based), Manawatū and Wellington – will come under the college when it is established from January 1. It is being set up to tackle a looming health crisis that faces the world as governments' spending on restorative health care is unable to keep up with growing demand and costs. The college will focus innovative, leading edge research and teaching to prevent disease, and promote well-being by altering the social, economic, cultural, behavioural, political, biological and environmental factors and conditions that enable health.

Professor McDonald has a Bachelor of Arts with honours in psychology from Waterloo, a Master of

Arts in clinical psychology from the University of Western Ontario and a PhD in health studies and population health from the University of Waterloo. In 2008-09 he was visiting associate professor at the Auckland University of Technology's Department of Public Health and Psychosocial Studies.

Professor McDonald says he is excited at joining the Massey University community and he and his wife, Linda, are looking forward to calling New Zealand their home. "New Zealand, like the rest of the world, is facing unprecedented challenges, such as population aging and urbanisation, growing inequities, climate change, as well as increased global connectivity and trade,” he says. “Each of them has huge, emerging implications for health. The need for innovation and leadership to deal with these challenges has never been greater. Our new college will build New Zealand’s capacity and

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Part I international legacy as a global leader and incubator for creative health enhancing people, and solutions."

He is due to take up the position in March. Acting Pro Vice-Chancellor from January until then will be

Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic and International) Professor Ingrid Day, who chairs the university's College of Health Establishment Group.

The college will include the Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, the School of Health and

Social Services, the School of Nursing, the School of Public Health and the School of Sport and

Exercise.

Massey University has five colleges – Business, Creative Arts, Education, Humanities and Social

Sciences, and Sciences. From January, Education will become an institute within Humanities and

Social Sciences.

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C12/131 – December

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE TEN MONTHS ENDED 31 OCTOBER 2012

7 December 2012

P

URPOSE

This report summarises the University’s financial results for the ten months ended 31 October

2012.

D

ISCUSSION

Income Statement (Appendix 1)

The University forecast full year operating surplus remains close to target at $8.9M. Strong controls over expenditure are an important factor in achieving the surplus, offsetting changes in government funding and tuition fees.

The operating surplus year to date is $5.1M above budget and this is expected to reduce over the next two months as timing differences in revenue and expenditure are realised.

EFTS Related Income

Achieving the EFTS income target for 2012 has not been possible due to unexpected reductions in government funding and a difficult global economy reducing international enrolment growth to 9 %.

EFTS related income is expected to be $8.4M or 2% lower than budget, including a reduction in Government grants of $2.9M for performance linked funding and performance based research funding adjustments.

EFTS Related Expenses

Controlling expenditure has enabled the University to offset the revenue shortfall and maintain its surplus within $0.1M of target. EFTS related costs are $8.7M under budget year to date and are forecast to be $8.2M under budget at year end.

Contract & Trading Contribution

Contract & Trading surpluses are tracking in line with budget. Income is $2.8M better than budget which is offset by related cost increases. The full year outturn is forecast to be close to budget.

Balance Sheet (Appendix 2)

The University balance sheet is $5.2M better than budget at 31 October 2012 with total assets of $1.10B.

Page 1 of 7

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Current assets are $12.8M lower than budget YTD due to a change in mix between short term and long term investments in accordance with the Treasury policy. This has resulted in a more efficient use of working capital which now stands at $1.14 of current assets for every $1 of current liabilities.

The debtor turnover ratio is 26.9 days which is lower than the University target of 30 days.

Borrowings are $6.4M lower than budget, YTD, which reflects the early repayment of a loan in July.

The University’s balance sheet is in a sound position with Total Equity unchanged at 31

October 2012 of $ 0.95B.

Cash Flow Statement (Appendix 3)

Cash and cash equivalents balance is $8.4M better than budget YTD as a result of maturing term investments being retained as cash to meet operating cash flow requirements between now and year end. The combined cash position and other financial assets remain in line with the treasury policy.

Net operating cash flows are $8.8M lower than budget YTD mainly due to movements within working capital that net off in the balance sheet with no significant impact to the University’s operating surplus.

Net cash flows from investing are $29.7M better than budget due to capital expenditure running behind budget by $12.4M and timing differences in purchasing longer term investments delivering a more efficient working capital ratio mentioned above.

Capital Expenditure (Appendix 4)

A summary of recurrent capital expenditure for the eight months ending 31 October 2012 is included in the table below:

Group 1 (Recurrent)

2012 2012

FY Budget YTD Actual

($000) ($000)

23,329 15,959

2012

FY Forecast

($000)

22,984

R

ECOMMENDATIONS

It is recommended that Massey University Council:

1. Receive the financial report for the ten months ending 31 October 2012.

Rose Anne MacLeod

Assistant Vice-Chancellor

(Finance, Strategy & Information Technology)

28 November 2012

Page 2 of 7

Appendices

1. Income Statement

2. Balance Sheet

3. Statement of Cash Flows

4. Capital Expenditure Report

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Page 3 of 7

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Part I

EFTS Related Income

Government Grant

EFTS Related Government Grants

TEOC Income

Total Government Grants

Student Fee Income

Domestic Student Fees

International Student Fees

Total Student Fees

Other Income

Interest Income

Trust Income

Total EFTS Income

EFTS Related Costs

Salaries

Other Staff Related Costs

Asset Related Costs

Other Direct Costs

Depreciation

Interest

Trust Costs

Total EFTS Costs

EFTS Contribution

Contract & Trading Related Income

Research Income

Consultancy Income

Teaching & Conference Income

Trading & Other Income

Total Contract & Trading Income

Appendix 1

University Income Statement

For the Ten Months Ended 31 October 2012

YTD

ACTUAL

($000)

YTD

BUDGET

($000)

YTD

VARIANCE

($000)

2011 YTD

ACTUAL

($000)

2011 FY

ACTUAL

($000)

121,520

28,721

150,241

82,184

34,876

117,059

21,672

3,684

2,753

295,410

166,798

13,784

20,425

46,351

36,095

1,146

1,822

286,421

8,990

44,235

5,176

7,202

14,577

71,190

121,575

29,976

151,551

83,420

38,267

121,688

20,695

3,333

1,929

299,196

164,548

14,691

22,907

52,198

37,912

1,299

1,567

295,122

4,074

44,821

3,797

7,208

12,486

68,312

(55)

(1,255)

(1,309)

(1,237)

(3,392)

(4,629)

978

351

824

(3,785)

(2,250)

907

2,482

5,847

1,817

153

(256)

8,701

4,916

(586)

1,379

(6)

2,091

2,878

119,249

29,957

149,206

75,017

30,699

105,716

21,445

3,964

1,883

282,214

159,544

15,137

20,129

43,002

35,609

1,244

1,563

276,227

5,987

49,099

4,533

8,887

9,955

72,474

190,705

18,421

27,502

53,698

42,569

1,500

1,792

336,187

4,536

59,290

4,741

10,347

11,570

85,948

143,100

36,126

179,226

90,842

37,220

128,062

26,088

4,404

2,943

340,723

2012 FY

BUDGET

($000)

5,998

53,548

4,268

8,271

14,282

80,369

195,728

17,652

27,961

63,114

46,050

1,554

1,871

353,931

145,890

35,971

181,861

99,129

47,881

147,010

24,596

4,000

2,462

359,929

2012 FY

FORECAST

($000)

5,747

55,025

4,920

8,358

14,827

83,129

196,977

17,059

26,172

58,212

44,020

1,380

1,961

345,780

144,256

34,605

178,861

98,299

41,744

140,043

25,176

4,077

3,369

351,527

Contract & Trading Related Costs

Staff Related Costs

Asset Related Costs

Other Direct Costs

Total Contract & Trading Costs

Contract & Trading Contribution

Total Trading Operating Surplus

27,082

1,967

38,102

67,150

4,040

13,029

24,950

2,072

37,473

64,496

3,815

7,889

(2,131)

106

(628)

(2,654)

224

5,140

28,734

2,299

35,695

66,728

5,746

11,733

34,405

2,720

45,681

82,806

3,142

7,678

29,980

2,419

44,967

77,366

3,003

9,001

31,688

2,320

45,943

79,952

3,177

8,924

Page 4 of 7

Appendix 2

YTD

Actual

($000)

University Balance Sheet

As at 31 October 2012

YTD

Budget

($000)

YTD

Variance

($000)

2011 YTD

Actual

($000)

C12/131 – December

2011FY

Actual

($000)

2012FY

Budget

($000)

Part I

2012 FY

Forecast

($000)

ASSETS

Current Assets

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Prepayments

Trade and Other Receivables

Inventories

Biological Assets

Other Financial Assets

Non Current Assets Held for Sale

Total Current Assets

Non Current Assets

Trade and Other Receivables

Other Financial Assets

Biological Assets

Property, Plant & Equipment

Total Non Current Assets

Total Assets

LIABILITY AND EQUITY

Current Liabilities

Accounts Payable and Accruals

Borrowings

Provision for Employee Entitlement

Receipts in Advance

Total Current Liability

Non Current Liability

Borrowings

Provision for Employee Entitlements

Receipts in Advance

Total Non Current Liabilities

Total Liabilities

Public Equity

Capital & Reserves

Revaluations/ Other

Surplus/(Deficit)

Total University Equity

Total Liabilities and Public Equity

46,528

2,616

15,390

1,516

3,544

43,349

2,297

115,240

38,112

1,470

18,466

1,400

3,400

63,000

2,228

128,076

8,416

1,146

(3,076)

116

144

(19,651)

69

(12,836)

119,423

1,614

20,343

1,312

3,372

-

2,199

148,263

40,105

9,382

22,738

1,505

3,544

43,178

2,372

122,824

37,024

7,000

25,141

1,400

3,400

30,000

-

103,965

33,239

9,000

23,000

1,500

3,400

21,890

465

92,494

125

39,367

668

949,335

989,495

1,104,735

125

22,224

661

948,483

971,493

1,099,569

-

17,143

7

852

18,002

5,166

125

22,224

598

933,952

956,899

1,105,162

125

23,126

668

946,532

970,451

1,093,275

125

22,224

600

951,087

974,036

1,078,001

125

40,000

670

945,287

986,082

1,078,576

20,818

95

14,317

65,790

101,020

24,364

173

14,000

67,500

106,037

15,127

33,376

1,585

50,088

151,108

21,485

32,579

1,618

55,682

161,719

(3,546)

(78)

317

(1,710)

(5,017)

26,740

243

12,166

67,343

106,492

(6,358)

797

(33)

(5,594)

(10,611)

22,415

32,079

1,660

56,154

162,646

29,358

895

15,987

50,533

96,773

24,322

950

13,500

45,493

84,265

26,606

618

15,535

50,000

92,759

21,581

32,302

1,585

55,468

152,241

20,535

32,579

1,660

54,774

139,039

13,889

32,099

839

46,827

139,586

941,034

(436)

13,029

953,627

1,104,735

929,961

-

7,889

937,850

1,099,569

11,073

(436)

5,140

15,777

5,166

930,783

-

11,733

942,516

1,105,162

930,783

2,573

7,678

941,034

1,093,275

929,961

-

9,001

938,962

1,078,001

941,034

(10,968)

8,924

938,990

1,078,576

Page 5 of 7

C12/131 – December

Part I

Appendix 3

University Cash Flow Statement

For the Ten Months Ended 31 October 2012

YTD

Actual

($000)

YTD

Budget

($000)

YTD

Variance

($000)

2011 YTD

Actual

($000)

2011 FY

Actual

($000)

Cash Flows from Operating Activities:

Cash was provided from:

Government Grants Receipts

Student Fees Receipts

Other Income Receipts

Interest

Trust Funds Receipts

150,722

129,404

101,147

3,862

868

386,003

Cash was applied to:

Payments to Employees and Suppliers

Interest Paid

313,178

1,151

314,329

Net Cash Flows From Operating Activities: 71,674

Cash Flows from Investing Activities:

Cash was provided from:

Withdrawal from Investments

Sale of Fixed Assets

109,848

291

110,139

151,550

136,712

93,682

3,507

1,800

387,251

305,533

1,243

306,776

80,475

45,000

-

45,000

Cash was applied to:

Purchase of Investments

Capital Expenditure

125,098

43,034

78,000

54,650

168,132

(57,993)

132,650

(87,650) Net Cash Flows From Investing Activities:

Cash Flows from Financing Activities:

Cash was provided from:

Loans Repaid

Loans Raised

Capital Injection

Cash was applied to:

Loan/ Vested to Massey Subsidiary

Loans Repaid

63

-

-

63

67

7,254

7,321

-

-

-

-

-

750

750

(828)

(7,308)

7,465

355

(932)

(1,248)

(7,645)

92

(7,553)

(8,801)

64,848

291

65,139

(47,098)

11,616

(35,482)

29,657

63

-

-

63

(67)

(6,504)

(6,571)

149,578

131,264

101,260

3,688

1,665

387,455

306,601

1,211

307,812

79,643

33,224

17

33,241

5,450

36,056

41,506

(8,265)

-

-

-

-

634

741

1,375

180,063

124,706

125,349

2,933

1,952

435,003

368,513

1,498

370,011

64,992

33,413

170

33,583

-

-

-

-

-

924

924

2012 FY

Budget

($000)

181,860

143,131

104,654

3,987

2,160

435,792

378,987

1,539

380,526

55,266

78,000

2,228

80,228

180,962

137,478

107,054

4,299

1,210

431,003

377,400

1,331

378,731

52,272

51,479

55,486

78,000

65,585

125,098

58,034

106,965

(73,382)

143,585

(63,357)

183,132

(51,785)

-

-

-

-

-

923

923

2012 FY

Forecast

($000)

131,047

300

131,347

63

63

67

7,349

7,416

Net Cash Flows From Financing Activities:

NET INCREASE/(DECREASE) IN CASH

Cash Brought Forward

Ending Cash Carried Forward

(7,258)

6,423

40,105

(750)

(7,925)

46,037

46,528 38,112

(6,508)

14,348

(5,932)

8,416

(1,375)

70,003

49,419

119,422

(924)

(9,314)

49,419

(923)

(9,014)

46,038

(7,353)

(6,866)

40,105

40,105 37,024 33,239

Page 6 of 7

Appendix 4

Capital Expenditure Report

For the Ten Months Ended 31 October 2012

C12/131 – December

Part I

Page 7 of 7

C12/132 – December

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

BUSINESS CONTINUITY POLICY

7 December 2012

1.0 Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to recommend to Council approval of the updated Business Continuity

Policy.

The Business Continuity Management Framework is appended for information.

Introduction 2.0

The Business Continuity Policy was originally approved in 2005, and has been in force since that date.

It has been reviewed every two years since original approval date, and has been largely unchanged.

This paper proposes minor updates to the Policy and Framework.

This paper has been prepared by the Risk Manager.

3.0 Discussion

The existing policy is fundamentally sound and reflects good practice.

Only minor amendments are recommended to update definitions to align with the AS/NZS5050:2010

Business Continuity – Managing Disruption-related risk.

The key changes recommended in the Policy are as follows; i. Inclusion of a definition for Maximum Acceptable Outage (MAO)

The key changes to the related Business Continuity Management Framework include the inclusion of

Maximum Tolerable Outage (MAO) as a standard term referring to the maximum period of time that a critical business function can be disrupted, before unacceptable impacts on service delivery occur. ii. Removed of reference to “regions” and replacement with the term ‘campus’ iii. Inclusion of reference to the Emergency Management Policy, and Strategic Emergency

Management Framework iv. Inclusion of IT Services as a critical function requiring its own Business Continuity Plan ( as well as the IT DRP)

Page 1 of 3

C12/132 – December

Part I

For information;

Appendix One: Business Continuity Policy – tracked changes

Appendix Two: Business Continuity Policy with Business Continuity Management Framework attached for information – clean copy

4.0 Consultation

The proposed changes are minor and consultation was not required. Discussions with IT Services resulted in their services being added on the list of critical functions (section 4.1)

The changes to the Business Continuity Policy and the Business Continuity Framework were endorsed by the Senior Leadership Team on the 21 st

November 2012.

5.0 Implications of Decision:

Approval of the amended Policy will be communicated using the usual advisories for Policy amendments. The requirements of the Policy will also be brought to the attention of the key managers identified in section 4.1, so that review and updating of BCP plans can be scheduled. Where BCP plans have not yet been prepared, the Risk Management Office is available to facilitate a workshop to progress this work.

6.0 Financial Implications and Treasury Comment

Yes  No

×

Financial Implications

6.1 Treaty of Waitangi Implications

Treaty of Waitangi Implications No

×

There are no Treaty of Waitangi implications.

6.2 Equity and Operational Implications

Yes 

People Implications (Staff/Student/Other) Yes 

Cultural & Ethnic Implications (Māori/Pasifika/New Migrant/Other) Yes 

Equity Implications

Gender Implications

Disability Implications

Information Technology Implications

Library Implications

International Implications

Teaching Implications

Research Implications

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes

No

X

No

×

No

×

No

×

No

×

No

×

No

×

No

×

No

×

No

×

Other (state____________________________) Yes  No

×

7.0 Implementation

As with approval of all new and/or existing policies, communication to staff will occur through the usual multiple channels of email notifications, website updates, and appropriate communications briefings for

SLT and Managers. A management toolkit to assist Managers prepare their departmental BCPs has been prepared by the Risk Management Office, and a programme of work has been scheduled in 2013 to continue to progress business continuity planning.

Page 2 of 3

C12/132 – December

Part I

7.1 Implementation of Decision

As above

8.0

8.1

Recommendations

It is recommended that Council

1. Recommend Council approve the minor changes to the Business Continuity Policy; and

2. Note the Business Continuity Management Framework.

Stuart Morriss

AVC & University Registrar

23 November 2012

Page 3 of 3

Massey University Policy Guide

BUSINESS CONTINUITY POLICY

Section

Contact

Risk Management

Risk Manager

Last Review

December 20102012

Next Review

December 20122014

Approval

Council

Purpose:

Through the adoption of Business Continuity Management best practices Massey University will achieve its business continuity aim of safeguarding our reputation and public image , in order to achieve the goals and objectives stated in the Road to 2020 Strategy .

. This will occur by using best endeavours to meet the needs of staff, students, the wider community, and other critical stakeholders, through ensuring that business critical teaching and research outcomes are not compromised by a major disruptive event.

The Business Continuity Policy forms part of the risk Risk management Management framework Framework at

Massey University ., and is aligned to AS/NSS5050:2010 Business continuity-Managing disruption-related risk

Definitions:

Business Continuity: Business continuity is “the uninterrupted availability of all key resources supporting essential business functions” (Australian National Audit Office, 2000)

Business Continuity Plans: A collection of procedures and information that is developed, compiled and maintained in readiness for use in the event of an emergency or disaster. (Associated terms: Business Recovery Plan, Disaster

Recovery Plan, and Recovery Plan)

Business Continuity Management: Business Continuity Management provides for the availability of processes and resources in order to ensure the continued achievement of critical objectives.

Business Impact Analysis: Detailed risk analysis that examine the nature and extent of disruptions and the likelihood of the resulting consequences. May include consideration of the University’s business functions, people, processes, infrastructure, resources, information, interdependencies and the nature and extent of capability loss over time ...

A major disruptive event: May be Natural (e.g. flood, hurricane, earthquake), Accidental (e.g. fire, contamination),

Commercial (e.g. loss of supply of critical services) or Wilful (e.g. sabotage, vandalism, arson, terrorism). Associated terms: “major crisis’, ‘disaster’.

Maximum Acceptable Outage (MAO): Maximum period of time that an organisation can tolerate the disruption of a critical business function. Disruption may include both the discontinuance of an activity, or the inability to perform it to an acceptable quality or with sufficient reliability. Associated ter,s”Maximum tolerable outage” or ‘maximum tolerable period of disruption”

Risk Assessment: The overall process of risk identification, risk analysis and risk evaluation.

Stakeholders: Those people and organisations that may affect, or be affected by, or perceive themselves to be affected by, a decision or activity.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Business Continuity Policy – Page 2

Policy:

Massey University must;

1. Establish a Business Continuity Plan, or Plans, to ensure business continuity for the Office of the Vice-

Chancellor, University Shared Services, each Campus, and College.

1.1. The Business Continuity Plan (or plans) must address both the general management aspects of the continuity process and those for IT and data/voice communications elements.

1.2. The Business Continuity Plan must include action plans for the reactivation of all essential

University services, and must include provision for loss of supply of services by those external agents upon which the University is critically dependant.

2. Annually review the Risk Assessment including periodic maintenance of the Business Impact Analysis.

3. Periodically update the Business Continuity plan (or plans) to ensure currency of information, and response strategies. The plan must be reviewed for possible updating within 30 days of any major operational or system changes that will have a material effect on the contingency strategy of any College/Campus/Section.

4. Undertake exercises for training and evaluation purposes of the Business Continuity Plan each year or within

30 days of any major operational or system changes that will have a material effect on the contingency strategy of any College/ Campus/Section.

MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES

University Managers must ensure that the key functions, for which they have responsibility, are able to continue following credible major disruptive events and that arrangements are in place to achieve this. This requires the proactive development, maintenance and devolution of business continuity planning within their areas. Managers are expected to encourage the active participation of staff in business continuity issues and must ensure that key personnel are able to perform competently during a major disruptive event.

University Managers must;

1. Complete a periodic Risk Assessment or more detailed Business Impact Analysis if requested.

2. Manage risks in accordance with this policy

3. Ensure that the Business Continuity Plan in their area of influence and control is exercised on schedule.

Audience:

All staff

Relevant Legislation:

None

Legal compliance:

None

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Business Continuity Policy – Page 3

Related documents and procedures:

AS/NZS 5050:2010; Business continuity – Managing disruption-related risk Standards Australia/Standards New

Zealand

!I

SO31000; Risk Management Principles and Guidelines

Business Continuity Framework

Emergency Management Policy

Strategic Emergency Management Framework

Campus Emergency Response Plans

Risk Management Policy

Risk Management Framework

Document management control:

Prepared by: Risk Manager

Authorised by: AVC and University Registrar

Approved by: Council

Date issued: 1 December 2005

Last review: December 20102012

Next review: December 20122014

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

BUSINESS CONTINUITY POLICY

Section

Contact

Risk Management

Risk Manager

Last Review

December 2012

Next Review

December 2014

Approval

Council

Purpose:

Through the adoption of Business Continuity Management best practices Massey University will achieve its business continuity aim of safeguarding our reputation and public image in order to achieve the goals and objectives stated in the Road to 2020 Strategy. This will occur by using best endeavours to meet the needs of staff, students, the wider community, and other critical stakeholders, through ensuring that business critical teaching and research outcomes are not compromised by a major disruptive event.

The Business Continuity Policy forms part of the Risk Management Framework at Massey University, and is aligned to AS/NSS5050:2010 Business continuity-Managing disruption-related risk

Definitions:

Business Continuity: Business continuity is “the uninterrupted availability of all key resources supporting essential business functions” (Australian National Audit Office, 2000)

Business Continuity Plans: A collection of procedures and information that is developed, compiled and maintained in readiness for use in the event of an emergency or disaster. (Associated terms: Business Recovery Plan, Disaster

Recovery Plan, and Recovery Plan)

Business Continuity Management: Business Continuity Management provides for the availability of processes and resources in order to ensure the continued achievement of critical objectives.

Business Impact Analysis: Detailed risk analysis that examine the nature and extent of disruptions and the likelihood of the resulting consequences. May include consideration of the University’s business functions, people, processes, infrastructure, resources, information, interdependencies and the nature and extent of capability loss over time.

A major disruptive event: May be Natural (e.g. flood, hurricane, earthquake), Accidental (e.g. fire, contamination),

Commercial (e.g. loss of supply of critical services) or Wilful (e.g. sabotage, vandalism, arson, terrorism). Associated terms: “major crisis’, ‘disaster’.

Maximum Acceptable Outage (MAO): Maximum period of time that an organisation can tolerate the disruption of a critical business function. Disruption may include both the discontinuance of an activity, or the inability to perform it to an acceptable quality or with sufficient reliability. Associated terms “Maximum tolerable outage” or ‘maximum tolerable period of disruption”

Risk Assessment: The overall process of risk identification, risk analysis and risk evaluation.

Stakeholders: Those people and organisations that may affect, or be affected by, or perceive themselves to be affected by, a decision or activity.

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Business Continuity Policy – Page 2

Policy:

Massey University must;

1. Establish a Business Continuity Plan, or Plans, to ensure business continuity for the Office of the Vice-

Chancellor, University Shared Services, each Campus, and College.

1.1. The Business Continuity Plan (or plans) must address both the general management aspects of the continuity process and those for IT and data/voice communications elements.

1.2. The Business Continuity Plan must include action plans for the reactivation of all essential

University services, and must include provision for loss of supply of services by those external agents upon which the University is critically dependant.

2. Annually review the Risk Assessment including periodic maintenance of the Business Impact Analysis.

3. Periodically update the Business Continuity plan (or plans) to ensure currency of information, and response strategies. The plan must be reviewed for possible updating within 30 days of any major operational or system changes that will have a material effect on the contingency strategy of any College/Campus/Section.

4. Undertake exercises for training and evaluation purposes of the Business Continuity Plan each year or within

30 days of any major operational or system changes that will have a material effect on the contingency strategy of any College/ Campus/Section.

MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES

University Managers must ensure that the key functions, for which they have responsibility, are able to continue following credible major disruptive events and that arrangements are in place to achieve this. This requires the proactive development, maintenance and devolution of business continuity planning within their areas. Managers are expected to encourage the active participation of staff in business continuity issues and must ensure that key personnel are able to perform competently during a major disruptive event.

University Managers must;

1. Complete a periodic Risk Assessment or more detailed Business Impact Analysis if requested.

2. Manage risks in accordance with this policy

3. Ensure that the Business Continuity Plan in their area of influence and control is exercised on schedule.

Audience:

All staff

Relevant Legislation:

None

Legal compliance:

None

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Massey University Policy Guide

Business Continuity Policy – Page 3

Related documents and procedures:

AS/NZS 5050:2010; Business continuity – Managing disruption-related risk Standards Australia/Standards New

Zealand

ISO31000; Risk Management Principles and Guidelines

Business Continuity Framework

Emergency Management Policy

Strategic Emergency Management Framework

Risk Management Policy

Risk Management Framework

Document management control:

Prepared by: Risk Manager

Authorised by: AVC and University Registrar

Approved by: Council

Date issued: 1 December 2005

Last review: December2012

Next review: December2014

© This Policy is the property of Massey University

Business Continuity Management

Framework

Version: 1.1

Last Review: December 2012

Next Review: December 2014

Approved:

This document is based upon a framework prepared by Marsh for the University of Newcastle.

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 1 of 16

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1.

Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 3

1.1.

Document Version Control ................................................................................................................................ 3

1.2.

Terminology ....................................................................................................................................................... 3

1.3.

Purpose and Scope of this Framework .............................................................................................................. 4

1.4.

Structure of this Document ............................................................................................................................... 5

1.5.

What is Business Continuity Management? ...................................................................................................... 5

1.6.

Business Continuity Policy Statement ............................................................................................................... 7

1.7.

Relationship to the Risk Management Policy .................................................................................................... 7

1.8.

Relationship to Other Policies and Procedures.................................................................................................. 7

2.

Business Continuity Management Roles and Responsibilities .................................................................. 8

3.

Notification and Activation Processes ....................................................................................................... 9

4.

Existing Business Continuity Arrangements ............................................................................................ 10

4.1.

Departments with Business Continuity Plans .................................................................................................. 10

4.2.

Continuity Arrangement Design ...................................................................................................................... 10

4.3.

Alternative Site Strategy .................................................................................................................................. 11

5.

Summary of Critical Functions ................................................................................................................. 11

6.

Building and Embedding a Business Continuity Management Culture ................................................... 12

6.1.

General ............................................................................................................................................................ 12

6.2.

Outcomes ........................................................................................................................................................ 13

7.

Training, Testing and Maintenance of Business Continuity Arrangements ............................................. 14

7.1.

Training ............................................................................................................................................................ 14

7.2.

Testing ............................................................................................................................................................. 14

7.3.

Review and Maintenance ................................................................................................................................ 15

8.

References ............................................................................................................................................... 16

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 2 of 16

1. Introduction

1.1. Document Version Control

Version No Description Author Reviewed by Issue date

0.1

0.2

0.2

Draft for consultation

Aligned for consistency with

Emergency Management

Framework

Aligned for consistency with

AS/NZS5050:2010

A Walker

A Walker C Schraders

A Walker

20/11/2009

20/09/2011

1.2. Terminology

Business Continuity is “the uninterrupted availability of all key resources supporting essential business functions” (Australian National Audit Office, 2000).

Business Continuity Plan (BCP) are a collection of procedures and information that is developed, compiled and maintained in readiness for use in the event of an emergency or disaster.

NOTE: Associated terms: Business Recovery Plan, Disaster Recovery Plan, and Recovery

Plan.

Business Continuity Management (BCM) provides for the availability of processes and resources in order to ensure the continued achievement of critical objectives.

Business Continuity Planning Coordinator ensures initial co-ordination and ongoing maintenance of the BCP.

Business Continuity Plan Owner is responsible for the implementation and the periodic review of the BIA and the BCP.

Business Continuity Plan Sponsor provides guidance and support for the BCP and development of a

BCM culture through communications and reporting.

Business Impact Analysis (BIA) is a detailed risk analysis that examines the nature and extent of disruptions and the likelihood of the resulting consequences. A BIA may include consideration of the

University’s or department’s business functions, people, processes, infrastructure, resources, information, interdependencies and the nature and extent of capability loss over time.

Critical functions are those functions and/or processes that are critical for the survival of the organisation, and, if not performed for a time period longer than the identified maximum tolerable outage (MAO), would lead to a risk with a consequence of Moderate or greater (refer to Massey

University’s Risk Management Framework for more information). For simplicity, critical functions

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 3 of 16

listed in this Framework are those functions with a maximum tolerable downtime (MTDT) of two weeks (10 working days) or less.

Critical user refers to a person, department or organisation that relies on the particular service function or application for most or all of their usual work or study functions.

Department refer to the business unit for which Business Continuity Plan applies. In this Framework document, Department means any sub-set of the University, including but not limited to: Sections /

Divisions / Colleges / Institutes / Schools / business groups.

Information Technology Disaster Recovery Plan (IT DRP) refers to the plan and arrangements for restoring information technology assets following a technology interruption. Arrangements may include business continuity arrangements being activated at alternate production facilities.

Major disruptive event may be Natural (e.g. flood, hurricane, earthquake), Accidental (e.g. fire, contamination), Commercial (e.g. loss of supply of critical services) or Wilful (e.g. sabotage, vandalism, arson, terrorism).

NOTES: 1) Associated terms: “event”, “emergency event”.

2) In Massey University’s emergency management arrangements, the terms “event” and “emergency event” have the same meaning as “major disruptive event”.

Maximum tolerable outage(MAO)

Maximum Acceptable Outage (MAO): Maximum period of time that an organisation can tolerate the disruption of a critical business function. Disruption may include both the discontinuance of an activity, or the inability to perform it to an acceptable quality or with sufficient reliability. Associated terms”Maximum tolerable outage” or ‘maximum tolerable period of disruption”

Risk assessment is the overall process of risk identification, risk analysis and risk evaluation.

Stakeholders are those people and organisations that may affect, or be affected by, or perceive themselves to be affected by, a decision or activity.

Sub-Plan refers to any additional plan, procedure, Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) or similar document, related to emergency response or business continuity within the University.

1.3. Purpose and Scope of this Framework

This Business Continuity Management (BCM) Framework is designed to assist management and staff of Massey University to implement BCM within the organisation and to assist in familiarising new managers and staff where necessary.

This framework applies to all Massey University staff who are responsible for the establishment, implementation, or maintenance of the University’s Business Continuity Management (BCM) programme.

Massey University’s BCM programme applies to all University operations/functions, regardless of the location in which they are undertaken.

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 4 of 16

The framework does not include the operations/functions of the University’s controlled entities which are expected to maintain their own BCM programmes which is aligned to good practice.

The information within this BCM Framework serves to provide guidance to University management during an interruption to University operations that is longer than tolerable.

This framework does not include specific requirements and strategies for critical functions; these are detailed in the specific College/Campus/Division BCPs.

1.4. Structure of this Document

This framework provides an overview of Massey University’s approach to Business Continuity

Management (BCM).

This section outlines the aim and scope of the Framework and relevant documents the University has in place to support the BCM programme as well as documents that are to be utilised should a major disruptive event affect the University’s operations.

Section 2 outlines the responsibilities of particular University stakeholders in establishing, maintaining and implementing the BCM programme.

Section 3 outlines the Notification and Activation process for Departmental Business Continuity

Plans (BCPs).

Section 4 lists the business continuity arrangements that already exist within Massey University.

Section 5 summarises the University’s critical functions which provides an overview of the priority services which need to be restored in the first instance following an event. The basis for determining criticality within each department is any function that has a maximum disruptive period of two weeks (10 working days) or less.

Section 6 contains guidelines for building and embedding a BCM culture within the University.

Section 7 contains guidelines on:

• BCM training

• BCM testing

• The review and maintenance of BCPs and the BCM Framework.

1.5. What is Business Continuity Management?

The objective of Massey University’s BCM programme is to promote the continuity and/or rapid recovery of critical services/functions required to support the core business of the University.

The Business Continuity Policy states the following as Massey University’s Business Continuity Aim:

To safeguard our reputation and public image … by using best endeavours to meet the needs of staff, students, the wider community and other critical stakeholders …

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 5 of 16

through ensuring that business critical teaching and research outcomes are not compromised by a major disruptive event.

BCM is a continuous improvement process of establishing and maintaining Business Continuity Plans

(BCPs) and other measures in order to respond to and recover from disruptions that threaten key resources, locations and functions. Collectively these measures are referred to as the University’s

BCM capability. This capability contributes to the University’s Emergency Management arrangements; collectively they comprise four components of response and recovery:

Emergency Response – the immediate response to an event with a focus on ensuring the safety of people followed by the protection of assets (refer to the Emergency

Management Policy and the Massey University Strategic Emergency Management

Framework for more information);

Crisis Communications – (refer to the Crisis Communications Plan for more information);

Business Continuity (including IT Disaster Recovery) – the process of restoring critical elements of University services and functions within the University’s core business processes;

Holistic Recovery – the broad activities required to restart, rebuild and regenerate the affected community, not just the restart of business operations.

The relationship between these four components of Massey University’s Emergency Management and BCM capability is outlined in the diagram below.

Figure 1: The Relationship between Business Continuity Management, Emergency

Management and IT Disaster Recovery.

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 6 of 16

1.6. Business Continuity Policy Statement

Through the adoption of Business Continuity Management best practices Massey University will achieve its business continuity aim of safeguarding our reputation and public image in order to achieve the goals and objectives stated in The Road to 2020 strategy. This will occur by using best endeavours to meet the needs of staff, students, the wider community, and other critical stakeholders, through ensuring that business-critical teaching and research outcomes are not compromised by a major disruptive event.

The Business Continuity Policy forms part of the risk management framework at Massey University, and is aligned to AS/NZS5050:2010 Business Continuity – Managing disruption-related risk

Business Continuity Policy, December 2012

1.7. Relationship to the Risk Management Policy

Business Continuity Management supports Massey University’s Risk Management Policy and provides a means of mitigating certain risks should they occur and impact a Campus, business processes, business operations or IT systems. BCM provides plans to minimise the impacts and allow the University’s processes to recover from the incident in a planned manner.

BCM also supports the University’s Emergency Management arrangements, and more specifically,

BCPs can be activated during or immediately after an emergency event that is being managed in accordance with the University’s Emergency Response Plans.

1.8. Relationship to Other Policies and Procedures

The following policies and procedures are relevant to either preparing a BCP or for the implementation of BCM within the University:

• Risk Management Policy

• Risk Management Framework

• Risk Registers

• Emergency Management Policy

• Massey University Strategic Emergency Management Framework

• University Emergency Response Plan

• Crisis Communications Plan

• Campus Emergency Response Plans

• Business Continuity Management Policy

• Business Continuity Management Framework (this document)

• Guidelines for the development of Business Impact Analyses

• Departmental Business Continuity Plan Template

• BCM Training Modules

• BCM Testing and Exercising Plan

• IT Disaster Recovery Plan

• College/Region/Division Business Continuity Plans

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 7 of 16

All departmental BCPs shall include:

• Introduction (aim and scope)

• Summary of critical functions including the maximum tolerable downtime (MTDT) for each function

• Continuity arrangements for critical functions

• Contact lists

• Outline of testing/exercising/training/review guidelines

• Document control information

• Resource requirements.

2. Business Continuity Management Roles and Responsibilities

Within the University’s BCM programme, the following University stakeholders play an important role:

University Council

The University Council sets the policy for BCM across the University.

Audit and Risk Committee

The Committee advises Council in relation to the appropriateness of the University’s BCM Framework, including the BCM Policy. It is responsible for assessing the effectiveness and overseeing the maintenance of the BCM programme.

Risk Management Office

The Risk Management Office is responsible to the Council via the Audit and Risk Committee. The Office is responsible for implementing the

University’s BCM policy including the review, development, maintenance and testing of BCPs.

Plan Sponsors

AVCs/PVCs/DVCs are the Sponsor of all BCPs that sit within their

College or Section. Plan Sponsors are responsible for providing guidance and support for the BCP and ensuring a BCM culture

Plan Owners

Department heads are appointed as Business Continuity Plan Owners.

It is their responsibility (with the assistance of the Risk Management

Office) to ensure that all critical functions under their responsibility are covered by their department’s BCP and that the BCP is maintained and reviewed in accordance with the Business Continuity Policy. The Plan

Owners report to the Plan Sponsor.

Function Owners

Each critical function noted within the departmental BCP has an appointed Function Owner. This Function Owner is responsible for the implementation of continuity arrangements for the specific critical function/s should it be interrupted.

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 8 of 16

3. Notification and Activation Processes

There are two main scenarios to consider:

1. An event occurs but departments do not immediately know that their functions and processes have been, or will be, interrupted. Examples include:

• An event occurs outside working hours which causes loss of physical access to areas of the Campus, e.g. a storm causes a tree to fall through the roof of a building.

• An event occurs that has an immediate impact on a small area of the Campus, and has the potential to expand to impact other parts of the Campus, e.g. flooding.

2. An event occurs and departments immediately know that their functions and processes have been interrupted, e.g. a power cut.

In both situations the notification and activation processes are the same; however, the size and level of complexity of the event will determine which plans are activated.

Emergency Event

Occurs

First available person notifies

FM Helpdesk

Notify affected departments

Activate relevant

Emergency

Response Plans

Plan Owner

Activate departmental BPC

University Emergency

Response Plan

Campus

Emergency

Response Plan/s

Crisis

Communications

Plan

Sub-Plan/s

Notify Plan

Sponsor

Figure 2: Activation and notification processes.

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 9 of 16

4. Existing Business Continuity Arrangements

4.1. Departments with Business Continuity Plans

Business Continuity arrangements have been, or are in the process of being, developed for departments that are responsible for critical functions that have a maximum tolerable downtime

(MTDT) of two weeks (10 working days) or less. These Business Continuity arrangements are documented in Departmental BCPs for each of these departments.

Department Plan Sponsor Plan Owner

Student Management (NSATS) AVC Academic and

International

Research Management

Services

AVC Research and Enterprise

Director – Student

Administration

Director – Research

Management Services

External Relations

Teaching and Learning

(Stream)

Library

Finance Operations

Facilities Management

Student Life

Payroll and HR

AVC External Relations

AVC Academic and

International

Director - Communications

Education Technology

Manager

University Librarian AVC Academic and

International

AVC Finance, Strategy and IT Director – Finance and Asset

Management

AVC and University Registrar Facilities Directors

AVC and University Registrar Campus Registrars

IT services

AVC People and

Organisational Development

HR Services Manager

AVC Finance, Strategy and IT CIO

4.2. Continuity Arrangement Design

Continuity arrangement design aims to provide a level of functionality and service which allows (at least) all ‘critical users’ of the recovered service or application across the University to perform their

‘critical functions’ with little or no special training; little or no change to their local workstation and local network configuration; and little or no reduction to their general productivity.

While this is an optimistic view to take, it makes sense to aim for the best solutions possible, within the constraints that exist.

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4.3. Alternative Site Strategy

In the case of events that result in the failure of the room or building that houses the affected function and/or supporting systems and services, continuity options have been developed to utilise alternative sites. Three alternative site options are generally considered in the BCPs which are:

• Alternative site on-Campus

• Alternative site off-Campus (University owned)

• Alternative site off-Campus (may be third-party owned).

These options are to be evaluated by the Plan Owner as part of their continuity strategy at the time of the major disruptive event, and are to be facilitated in consultation with Facilities Management and, where applicable, the relevant Emergency Management Team.

For specific alternative site continuity arrangements, refer to individual BCPs for details.

5. Summary of Critical Functions

This table lists all functions within the University’s Departments that have been identified as

‘critical’. The Maximum Tolerable Downtime (MTDT) for these critical functions is two weeks (10 working days) or less.

Department Plan owner MTDT

Communications (including Contact

Centre)

Security services

Insurance management

Special needs (e.g. animal welfare, student health and counselling services, student residential services)

IT Operations

PG Scholarship management process

Bio security / HASNO / Radiation Safety process

Enrolment processing

Emergency management and BCP processes

E-learning (Stream) operation

Timetabling service

Payroll processing

Teaching activities (face-to-face)

Postgraduate enrolment process

AVC – External Relations

CIO

Dean – Graduate Research School

PVCs

AVC and University Registrar

SLT and Management

AVC – Academic and International

Facilities Directors

AVC – People and Organisational

Development

Relevant PVCs

Student Management and PVCs

1 hour

Facilities Directors 1 hour

Director – Finance and Asset Management 1 hour

Various managers 1 hour

1 hours

0.5 days

0.5 days

0.5 days

0.5 days

1 day

1 day

1 day

2 days

2 days

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 11 of 16

Department

Key research infrastructure (to be further evaluated)

Library Services (online and books)

Relationship management with key stakeholders

Marketing and Communications service

Treasury function

Finance One (including Procurement)

PG Assessment and Completion process

PG Examinations and final assessments

RIMS operation

Student recruitment

Printery processing and despatch

Internal Assessment, including exam marking

Extramural support services and liaison

Industrial relations advisory

Plan owner

Relevant PVCs

University Librarian

VC and SLT

MTDT

2 days

2 days

2 days

AVC – External Relations 2 days

Director – Finance and Asset Management 2 days

Director – Finance and Asset Management 3 days

Dean – Graduate Research School 1 week

Dean – Graduate Research School 1 week

Director – Research Management Services 1 week

AVC – External Relations

AVC and University Registrar

Relevant PVCs

1 week

1 week

1 week

AVC and University Registrar

AVC – People and Organisational

Development

1 week

1 week

6. Building and Embedding a Business Continuity Management

Culture

6.1. General

Building and embedding a BCM culture within Massey University is critical for the establishment of an effective and robust business continuity programme. Implementing cultural change is a challenging and continuous process and its success within the University is primarily dependent upon the following: a) BCM becoming an integral part of the University’s strategic and day-to-day management ethos; b) Education, awareness training and participation being used to effect cultural change (merely documenting a BCM strategy and plan represents a narrow and limited method of developing a BCM culture); c) Preparation and delivery of a programme to create organisational awareness and enhance the skills, knowledge and experience required to implement, maintain, manage and execute BCM; d) Communication of the Business Continuity Policy and the visible proactive support from the

University’s executive, senior and middle management; e) Ownership of BCM by the various Departments where operational risk originates and resides

(not just within Facilities Management and/or IT Services);

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 12 of 16

f) Commitment to maintain and review the University’s Business Continuity Policy, Framework, plans and solutions on a regular basis; g) Appreciation and recognition of the importance of BCM to the University and the role of individuals within it; h) Communication to all external stakeholders (and third parties) upon whom the University depends, in both normal and major disruptive events, of the importance of BCM to the

University and their roles.

If these approaches are adopted, all those associated with the University should have confidence in its ability to manage the continuity of its operations during an event, and have in place the appropriate behaviour and culture to promote business resilience.

6.2. Outcomes

The outcomes from a BCM cultural development programme should include:

• a clearly defined and documented Business Continuity Policy agreed and signed-off by the

University’s executive or senior management (this already exists);

• acceptance and implementation of BCM as a professional management discipline;

• an understanding of the University’s BCM Framework, Policy and supporting plans and management structures;

• an organisational culture that ensures BCM activities and considerations are integral to the business-as-usual activities throughout the University at all levels;

• proactive “hands-on” promotion of BCM by the University’s executive, senior and middle management;

• an organisational, managerial and staff BCM competence to execute the organisation’s BCM strategy;

• an awareness and understanding by the University’s management and staff of the importance of BCM and their roles, accountabilities, responsibilities and authority within it;

• an understanding of the coordination activities that are required between the University’s

Emergency Management Teams, departmental Business Continuity Teams and the IT

Disaster Recovery Team in the event of a major disruptive event;

• an understanding of which Business Continuity Teams are dependent on one another for performance;

• applicable internal documents and plans as well as external standards and guidelines;

• ongoing BCM education and awareness promotion;

• a performance management and appraisal system (and a rewards and recognition system) that explicitly recognises and reinforces the importance of BCM;

• job descriptions and associated skills that include BCM at specified levels within the organisation;

• an ongoing programme of BCM training for those directly involved in the implementation, maintenance and execution of the University’s BCM capability;

• a clearly defined and documented management information system to monitor and evaluate the BCM awareness and competency of the University’s staff and managers;

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 13 of 16

• production of BCM awareness aide-memories.

7. Training, Testing and Maintenance of Business Continuity

Arrangements

As part of the University’s commitment to BCM and an open continuity culture, the University will maintain an active and regular programme of BCM training, testing and review.

7.1. Training

General BCM training, as well as role-specific training, will be provided to all staff.

To improve awareness of the University’s specific BCPs, the following training schedule is to be used:

• Induction training upon appointment for Plan and Function Owners

• Familiarisation training session for Plan Owners and Function Owners annually

• Exercise training for members of University and Campus Emergency Management Teams

(refer to the Massey University Strategic Emergency Management Framework for more details).

BCPs and associated personnel are exempt from the training / testing where the following occurs:

• The respective BCP is invoked as part of a real time incident that occurs within the last 12 months;

• An exemption is obtained for the business function that is approved by the responsible

AVC/PVC/DVC (for that functional area) giving the reasons why the training or test cannot be completed and giving a timeframe for the training / testing to occur. This shall be done in consultation with the Risk Management Office.

7.2. Testing

Plan testing will also be conducted. The University is to implement a progressive testing regime based on meeting performance expectations and seeing improvement in applying basic testing techniques. A three-year testing programme would ideally include:

In year 1: a desktop test approach for selected Departments. A desktop approach requires participants to discuss the application of BCPs for responding to a presented hypothetical major disruptive event scenario. The activity does not require the activation and mobilisation of any associated resources or personnel.

In year 2: a restricted plan activation and mobilisation activity. Typically, selected critical functions would be required to mobilise resources (e.g. emergency procedures and warden testing) to respond to a presented major disruptive event scenario. This may also involve utilisation of an alternate site.

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 14 of 16

In year 3: a simulated exercise developed involving multiple functions and potentially impacting an entire site or Campus. The exercise may require re-locating personnel and resources to an alternate site and apply BCPs to respond the major disruptive event scenario.

The outcomes of these reviews and testing activities will be integrated into the existing business structures and processes as well as the BCPs and other emergency response documentation to ensure that the processes remain focused for the University and the plans remain current and reflective of the University's business needs and strategies.

The Risk Management Office will oversee the Testing Programme, keep records of tests, including participation lists and dates.

7.3. Review and Maintenance

7.3.1. Business Continuity Management Framework

The Risk Management Office is responsible for ensuring that a review of this BCM Framework is conducted annually.

7.3.2. Business Impact Analyses (BIAs)

Massey University must:...

2. Annually review the Risk Assessment including periodic maintenance of the Business Impact

Analysis.

Business Continuity Policy, December 2012

The University-wide BIA and all other BIAs, must be reviewed at least annually.

7.3.3. Business Continuity Plans (BCPs)

Massey University must:...

3. Periodically update the Business Continuity Plan (or plans) to ensure currency of information, and response strategies. The plan must be reviewed for possible updating within 30 days of any major operational or system changes that will have a material effect on the contingency strategy of any College/Campus/Section.

Business Continuity Policy, December 2012

BCPs must be reviewed at least annually, in conjunction with the relevant BIA.

BCPs should be updated after each training / testing exercise (if weaknesses or changes are identified) and after actual events, according to outcomes of incident debrief sessions.

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 15 of 16

Contact names and details within the BCPs (generally contained in the annexes) should be reviewed and updated on a six-monthly basis, or when a restructure occurs (change to operations, change to legislation/compliance, etc), whichever occurs first.

7.3.4. Audit

Internal Audit may review BIAs and BCPs as required by the University’s Internal Audit plan.

8. References

AS/NZS5050:2010 Business Continuity- managing disruption-related risk

ISO31000: Risk Management – principles and guidelines

Business Continuity Management Framework – V1.2 – October 2012 Page 16 of 16

C12/133 – December

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

GUIDELINES FOR THE CONDUCT OF

COUNCIL AND COUNCIL COMMITTEES 2013

7 December 2012

Attached please find the Guidelines for the Conduct of Council and Council

Committees 2013. These are unchanged from those brought to Council and approved at the 2 December 2011 Council meeting for the 2012 year.

The annual approval of these Guidelines takes place at the December meeting for the following year. This early approval means they can be distributed to Council’s committees in the new-year.

Paddy Nicol

Executive Secretary - Council

26 November 2012

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C12/133 – December

Part I

GUIDELINES FOR THE CONDUCT OF

COUNCIL AND COUNCIL COMMITTEES 2013

1.0 Scheduled meetings

1.1 Council

Meetings of Council shall be held in March, May, July, September,

October and December or at other times as determined by Council.

1.2 Council Committees

Meetings of Council committees shall be determined by the committee.

2.0 Special meetings

2.1 Council

The Chancellor

• may call a special meeting of Council; and

• shall upon receipt of a request in writing from not fewer than five members stating the business to be transacted, call a special meeting.

Notice of such a meeting shall be sent to all members not less than two clear days before the day of the special Council meeting.

2.2 Council Committees

The chair of a committee of Council may call a special meeting of that committee. Notice of such a meeting shall be sent to all members not less than two clear days before the day of the special meeting.

3.0 Meeting Quorum

3.1 Council meetings

The quorum for a meeting of the Council shall be a half the members then holding office if the membership is even and a majority of the members if the membership is uneven.

3.2 Council Committee meetings

The quorum for a Council committee meeting shall be determined by each committee’s Terms of Reference.

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3.3 Apologies

If a member of Council or a Council committee cannot attend a meeting an apology should be tendered to the secretary. The secretary will minute attendance and apologies.

C12/133 – December

Part I

3.4 Extended Absence

If a member plans to absent from Council or a Council committee for a period greater than three meetings the absence is confirmed by the chair and the quorum adjusted for that period.

4.0 Meeting Chair

4.1 Council

The Chancellor shall chair the Council. In the absence of the

Chancellor the Pro Chancellor shall take the chair, and in the absence of both the Chancellor and Pro Chancellor the members of the Council present shall elect a member present to chair that meeting.

4.2 Council Committees

Committees of Council should be chaired by a member of Council.

The chair of each Committee shall be determined by that committee’s

Terms of Reference.

5.0 Secretary

5.1 Council Secretary

The Assistant Vice-Chancellor & University Registrar shall be secretary to the Council and shall arrange to have the Council and

Council committees operational work carried out.

5.2 Committee secretaries

The secretaries of Council’s committees shall be determined by each committee’s Terms of Reference.

6.0 Business of Council

6.1 Initiating agenda items

A member may initiate any matter for discussion with the leave of the chair or by giving notice of motion in writing to the secretary not less than seven clear days before the meeting at which the matter is to be considered.

6.2 Business to be transacted

The business to be transacted at any meeting shall be specified in the notice of the meeting and, except with the agreement of Council, no other business shall be transacted.

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C12/133 – December

Part I

6.3

Minutes of previous meeting

At every meeting of Council and Council committees minutes of previous meetings not hitherto approved shall be submitted for approval as a correct record before any other business is transacted.

6.4 Exclusion of the Public

All proceedings of Council and Council committees shall be open to the public except where Council or the Council committee resolves that a matter should exclude the public. The grounds to exclude the public are attached in Appendix I.

7.0 Conflict of Interest

7.1 Register of Interest

A Register of Council members interests is held by the Secretary of

Council.

7.2 Declaration of Conflict of Interest

Members with an actual or potential conflict of interest must declare that interest prior to the item being discussed. The interest will be recorded in the meeting minutes.

8.0 Debate on a Motion

8.1 Speaking Rights

Every member when speaking shall address the chair and shall not, without the leave of the chair, speak twice to the same motion or amendment except to ask a question or to explain some matter upon which the member has been misunderstood; provided that the proposer of any motion or amendment thereto shall be entitled to reply to the debate before the motion or amendment is put to the vote.

8.2 Amendment of a Motion

If an amendment to a motion under consideration is proposed the debate thenceforth shall be addressed to the amendment and not to the original motion. No amendment may be proposed to an amendment motion, but during the debate a member may give notice of intention to move a further amendment to the original motion at the conclusion of the debate on the first amendment. If an amendment on being put to the vote is carried, any further debate shall be on the original motion as amended unless a further amendment is moved.

8.3 Interruption of a debate on any motion

The debate on any motion may be interrupted by the raising of a question related to the motion, a point of order or by a motion for the reading of any document relevant to the matter. All such matters shall be dealt with by the chair before any further consideration of the matter before Council.

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C12/133 – December

Part I

8.4 Superseding of a debate on any motion

The debate on any motion may be superseded by a procedural motion that the Council adjourn; or that the question be put; or that the Council proceed to the next business; or that the matter be referred (or referred back) to the relevant committee or official.

8.5 Procedural motions

Procedural motions shall be put to the vote immediately without discussion or debate.

9.0 Voting

9.1 Decisions

All business of the Council and Council committees shall be decided by resolution, moved by a member of Council or the Council committee and agreed to by a majority of the members voting.

9.2 Determining the vote

A motion of any kind being put shall be determined in the affirmative or the negative by a majority of the voices “aye” or “no”. The chair shall state whether the ayes or noes have it, and unless a division be called for, that decision shall be conclusive. Abstentions shall be called for and recorded prior to the vote.

9.3 Determining a division

If a division is called for, the chair shall require a show of hands, “aye” or “no”, and a majority of those voting shall determine the decision.

The Chair has a deliberative vote in a division and a further vote in the case of an equality of votes.

Notes:

1. The Chancellor can authorize the Vice-Chancellor to release Part material

II into Part I.

2. Model Standing Orders For meetings of Local Authorities and

Community Boards NZS 9202:2003 and Amendment 1, 2006 shall be used as a guide on procedural matters not covered in these Guidelines.

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C12/133 – December

Part I

APPENDIX 1

Grounds to exclude the public from meetings in terms of the Local Government

Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

The local authority may by resolution or upon motion being made exclude the public from the whole or any part of the proceedings of any meeting only on one or more of the following grounds, namely:

1. That the public conduct of the whole or the relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information where such disclosure would be likely: a. To prejudice the maintenance of the law, including the prevention, investigation, and detection of offences, and the right to a fair trial; or b. To endanger the safety of any person.

2. That the public conduct of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information where the withholding of the information is necessary to: a. Protect the privacy of natural persons, including that of deceased natural persons; or b. Protect information where the making available of the information: i. Would disclose a trade secret; or ii. Would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information; or c. Protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information: i. Would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information, or information from the same source, and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied; or ii. would be likely otherwise to damage the public interest; or d. Avoid prejudice to measures protecting the health or safety of members of the public; or e. Avoid prejudice to measures that prevent or mitigate material loss to members of the public; or f. Maintain the effective conduct of public affairs through: i. The free and frank expression of opinions by, or between, or to members or officers or employees of any local authority, or any persons to whom section 2(5) of the Local Government Official

Information and Meetings Act 1987 applies, in the course of their duty; or ii. The protection of such members, officers, employees, and persons from improper pressure or harassment; or g. Maintain legal professional privilege; or h. Enable the local authority holding the information to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities; or

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i. Enable the local authority holding the information to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations); or j. Prevent the disclosure or use of official information for improper gain or improper advantage.

Provided that where paragraph 2 of this Appendix applies the public may be excluded, unless, in the circumstances of the particular case, the exclusion of the public is outweighed by other considerations which render it desirable, in the public interest, that the public not be excluded.

3. That the public conduct of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information the public disclosure of which would: a. Be contrary to the provisions of a specified enactment; or b. Constitute contempt of Court or of the House of Representatives.

4. That the purpose of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting is to consider a recommendation made to the local authority by an

Ombudsman under Section 30(1) or Section 38(3) of the Local Government

Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (in the case of a local authority named or specified in the First Schedule of this Act).

5. That the exclusion of the public from the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting is necessary to enable the local authority to deliberate in private on its decision or recommendation in: a. Any proceedings before the local authority where: i. A right of appeal lies to any Court or Tribunal against the final decision of the local authority in those proceedings; or ii. The local authority is required, by any enactment, to make a recommendation in respect of the matter that is the subject of those proceedings; and

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MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

STUDENT ELECTION STATUTE

7 December 2012

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to seek Council approval of proposed amendments to the

Statute on Election of Student Membership on Council, and approval of the proposed change to the Massey University Notice 1990.

Council Statute

At its meeting on 7 September 2012 Council:

Resolved that Council:

1. Note recent changes to Legislation pertaining to Student Membership of the University Council;

2. Adopt the attached Council Statute on the Election of Student

Representatives on Council;

3. Agree to seek amendment to the Massey University Notice 1990 to provide for student membership of Council as follows: i. One general student position elected from the general student body; ii. One Maori student position: elected from those students who identify as Maori on the current roll; and iii. One distance student position: elected from those students identified as distance students in the current roll; and

4. Agree that elections be held on the principle of one student: one vote.

Since then detail of the election process has been worked through, and elections will be conducted in line with the Election Statute in March 2013. In working through the detail, some changes to the election Statute have been recommended. Attached, as

Appendix 2, for re-approval is the revised Statute on Election of Student Members on

Council.

Changes to the Massey University Notice 1990

The resolution of Council outlined above indicated the nature of the changes proposed to the Massey Notice 1990. On further consideration it is recommended that the

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wording change in the Massey University Notice be more enabling and flexible over time.

It is recommended that Ministerial approval be sought for amended wording to the

Notice as follows: a) Delete Sections 3(f), 3(g) and 3(h) of the current 1990 notice (Appendix 3), and b) Replace these clauses with a single clause in the line with wording of Section

171(2)(e) of the Education Act as follows:

“At least 1, but not more than 3, persons who must be appointed following an election (conducted in accordance with Statutes made by

Council) by the students enrolled at Massey University”.

This wording change aligns with the legislation, is similar to wording used by other

Universities, and will enable changes to specific composition and numbers of students on Council without further change to the Notice.

Recommendations

It is recommended that Council: a) Approve the revised Council Statute on Election of Student Members on the

University Council (Appendix 2); and b) Agree that Ministerial approval for amendment of the Constitution of Council be requested as outlined above.

Stuart Morriss

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

27 November 2012

Appendices

Appendix 1: Statute on Election of Student Members on Council -tracked changes

Appendix 2: Statute on Election of Student Members on Council - clean copy

Appendix 3: Massey University Notice 1990

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MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL STATUTE

ELECTION OF STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES ON THE COUNCIL

Pursuant to section 171(2) (e) of Education Act 1989

1. Title and Commencement

This Statute may be cited as the Elections of Student Representatives Members on Council

Statute 2012 and comes into force on 7 September 2012.

2. Interpretation

'Academic Year' means a period of 12 months commencing on 1 January. 'Act' means the Education Act 1989.

'Association of Students' means an incorporated body of students enrolled at the

University.

'Candidate' means a candidate for election under this Statute as a student representative on the Council.

'Council' means the Council of the University.

'Election' means an election of student representatives members on the Council conducted under this Statute.

'Instructions for Voting' means those instructions issued by the Returning Officer for the conduct of the electronic voting by means of a secure system which ensures each Student is only able to cast one valid vote for each vacancy or for each referendumone of the three .

'Nomination Day' means the day appointed for the closing of nominations of candidates for election as student representatives members on the Council.

'Statement' means the statement made by a Candidate in accordance with clause

7(c).

'Student' means a duly enrolled student of the University.

'University' means Massey University.

'University Publications' may be in hard copy or electronic form and includes magazines, newsletters and websites published by the University.

'Vice-Chancellor' means the person holding office for the time being as the Chief

Executive Officer of the University; and includes any person for the time being acting in that capacity.

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Conduct of Elections

3. Returning Officer a. The Council shall appoint a Returning Officer to conduct Elections under this

Statute. Until otherwise determined the Returning Officer shall be the Assistant

Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar. b. Unless the Council determines otherwise the Returning Officer for Elections conducted under this Statute shall hold office until his or her removal by the

Council, or his or her resignation, incapacity or death, in any of which events the

Council shall appoint a Returning Officer in his or her place. c. Every Election conducted under this Statute shall be conducted by the Returning

Officer, but, if for any reason he or she is unable to fulfill the duties of his or her office at any Election, the Council shall appoint a substitute, who, for the purposes of that referendum, shall be deemed to be the Returning Officer.

4. Date of Election and Term of Office a. Elections conducted under this Statute shall be held at a time in the second first semester in each Academic Year determined by the Returning Officer. b. Successful Candidates shall hold office during the Calendar Year of Election immediately following their Electionfrom 26 April of the year in which they are elected to 25 April in the following year .

5. Students Eligible to Vote a. The Returning Officer shall compile authorize a list s of Students eligible to vote in an each Election, which will include all Students enrolled in the University at a date to be determined by the Returning Officer.

6. Notice of Election, Nomination of Candidates, and Closing Date for Nominations a. No less than 30 days and no more than 60 days before the day or days fixed by the Returning Officer for an Election, except where a second election for want of candidates may be required in which case as soon as reasonably practicable, the

Returning Officer shall give advance notice thereof in such University

Publications as the Returning Officer sees fit and the University website and shall in that notice state the number of positions to be filled on the Council and request the nomination of Candidates in writing and a closing date for the receipt of such nominations.

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7. Nomination of Candidates a. To be eligible for Election a nominee must: i. Be enrolled as a Student at the time when nominations close; save that a nominee who is a sitting Student member seeking re-election need not be enrolled as a Student at that time; and ii. Neither be employed for a continuous period of more than six months on a full-time basis by the University or under terms and conditions of fulltime employment set by the University nor have been so employed at any time during the two years preceding the date of the Election. b. Nomination of Candidates for Election under this Statute must: i. Be in the form scheduled to this Statute; and ii. Be signed by not less than two Students as the nominators; and iii. Carry the written consent of the nominee and a declaration of eligibility; and iv. Contain a declaration by the nominee as to whether the nominee has or has not ever been employed (as described in sub-section 7(a)(ii)) by the

University and an undertaking to include such information in all material circulated in connection with the nominee’s nomination. c. Every Candidate for election may submit to the Returning Officer with his or her nomination paper a short statement about the Candidate: i. The statement shall not exceed 250 150 words. ii. The statement must be submitted electronically. iii. The statement shall include the name, occupation, degrees, and any other relevant information about the candidate and may will include a passport -like photograph of the Candidate. iv. The Returning Officer may require a Candidate whose statement does not

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Part I comply with the requirements of this section to revise the statement so as to comply and may refuse to make available any statement which does not comply. v. The Returning Officer shall ensure that the information in each statement which complies with this section is included in the Instructions for Voting sent to each Voter. d. Every nomination paper shall be lodged with or given to the Returning Officer not later than noon 4pm on Nomination Day. The Returning Officer shall acknowledge receipt of every nomination paper on that nomination paper. e. Every Candidate shall be nominated by a separate nomination paper.

8. Rejection of Nominations a. The Returning Officer shall reject the nomination of a nominee who does not qualify for Election under sub-section 7 (a) b. Where a nomination is rejected the Returning Officer will notify the nominee in writing giving the reasons for the rejection.

9. Withdrawal of Nomination a. Any Candidate may withdraw his or her nomination at any time before noon on

Nomination Day, by notice in writing to the Returning Officer, signed by the

Candidate.

10. Death of Candidate Before Close of Nominations a. Where before the close of nominations the Returning Officer receives advice that a Candidate who has been nominated and has not withdrawn his or her nomination has died or has become incapable of holding the position for which he or she is a Candidate, his or her nomination shall be treated as if the

Candidate had withdrawn.

11. If Number of Candidates does not Exceed Number of Vacancies, Candidates to be

Declared Elected a.11. If the number of the Candidates does not exceed the number of vacancies to be filled,there is only one candidate for any election under this Statute the Returning Officer shall, as soon as practicable after the close of nominations, by notice in such University

Publications as he or she sees fit, declare the Candidate or Candidatesin that election so

Formatted

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Part I nominated to be duly elected to the Council.

12. Notice of Nominations and Election a. If the re is more than one candidate in any election under this Statute number of

Candidates exceeds the number of positions on the Council to be filled , the

Returning Officer shall, as soon as practicable after the close of nominations, give notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit of the day or days on which the Election is to be held and of the names of the Candidates.

13. Candidate May Retire a. A Candidate at an Election may retire after the close of nominations at any time before a declaration has been made pursuant to section 11 of this Statute, or, where an Election is required to be held, at any time before the day or days of the

Election, by notice in writing to the Returning Officer, signed by that Candidate. b. Where the Returning Officer receives notice pursuant to section 13(a) above: i. Where practicable, the Returning Officer shall before the day or days of the Election give notice of the retirement in such University Publications as he or she sees fit; ii. If a Candidate retires after the Instructions for Voting have been distributed, the Returning Officer shall take such steps as are practicable to advise Voters that the Candidate has retired; iii. Any vote cast for that Candidate shall be void. c. If, by the retirement of a Candidate in accordance with section 13 (a) above the number of Candidates is reduced to or below the number of positions to be filled on the Council: i. The Returning Officer shall, by notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit, before the day or days of the Election, declare the remaining Candidates to be duly elected; or ii. If the Candidate retires at such a time that it is not possible to give such a notice before the day or days of the Election, the Election shall not be held and the declaration shall be made on the day or days of the Election or as soon thereafter as possible.

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14. Death or Incapacity of Candidate After Close of Nominations a. Where: i. After the close of nominations and before the day or days of the Election, any Candidate dies or becomes incapable of holding the position for which he or she is a Candidate; or ii. Any such Candidate dies or becomes incapable as aforesaid before the close of nominations but advice of his or her death or incapacity is received by the Returning Officer after the close of nominations, the provisions of section 14 of this Statute, so far as they are applicable and with the necessary modifications, shall apply as if the deceased or incapacitated Candidate had retired on the date of his or her death or incapacity, or, as the case may be, on the date on which advice of his or her death or incapacity is received by the Returning Officer.

15. Election to be Conducted Electronically a. Unless sections 11 (a) or 13 (c) of this Statute apply, the Returning Officer shall conduct an Election by means of an electronic voting system.

16. Issue of Instructions for Voting a. The Returning Officer shall, not later than the day or days on which the Election is to be held, send by email addressed to each Student at their University email address Instructions for Voting which: i. State that these are instructions for an Election of Student representatives members on the Council; ii. Give instructions for voting in that Election; iii. State the day or days of the Election; iv. State the name and Statement of the Candidates for the Election; and v. State the number of Student representative member positions on the

Council.

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17. Method of Voting a. On receipt of the Instructions for Voting sent by the Returning Officer, the Student shall alone exercise his or her vote in accordance with the Instructions for Voting. b. Where any Student: i. Is wholly or partially blind; or ii. Suffers from any other disability which makes it difficult to cast his or her vote in the prescribed manner, that Student’s vote may be recorded by another person in accordance with the instructions of the Student.

18. Invalid Votes a. A vote shall only be valid if: i. The Student’s identification number is entered into the electronic voting system; ii. The Student’s duly chosen password pin is entered into the electronic voting system; iii. The Student has not yet recorded his or her vote; and iv. The Student’s vote is recorded on the day or days of the Election.

19. Counting of Votes a. Votes shall be counted by such means as are prescribed by the Returning

Officer. b. The Returning Officer shall make arrangements for votes to be counted as soon as reasonably practicable after the close of voting.

20. Declaration of Result a. No later than one month after all the votes have been counted, the Returning

Officer shall declare, by means of notices in such University Publications as the

Returning Officer sees fit, the result of the Election, being the name or names of the Candidates elected as Student representatives members on the Council.

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21. Recount a. Where any Student or member of the Council has reason to believe that the declaration by the Returning Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, and that on a recount thereof the result of the Election might be found to be different, he or she may within seven days after the declaration, apply to the Returning

Officer for a recount of the votes. b. Every application for a recount in accordance with section 21 (a) above shall: i. Be accompanied by a deposit of $500, which shall be refunded if, following a recount of the votes, the declaration by the Returning Officer of the result of the Election proves to be incorrect; ii. State the grounds upon which the applicant believes that the declaration by the Returning Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, and that on a recount thereof the result of the Election might be found to be different; and iii. State the name of the applicant and whether he or she is a Student or member of the Council. c. If the Returning Officer is satisfied that an applicant for a recount has reasonable cause to believe that the Returning Officer’s declaration of the result of the

Election may be incorrect and that on a recount the result of the Election might be found to be different, the Returning Officer shall, as soon as reasonably practicable after receiving the application and deposit as aforesaid, arrange for a recount of the votes to be made by such means as the Returning Officer thinks fit. d. Where the Returning Officer arranges for a recount of the votes in accordance with section 21 (c) above, he or she shall: i. Notify the applicant in writing of the result of the recount; and ii. Where the result of a recount is that the declaration by the Returning

Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, declare, by means of notices in such University Publications as he or she sees fit:

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22. Destruction of Votes

I. That upon a recount of the votes, the declaration by the Returning

Officer of the result of the Election was found to be incorrect; and

II. The Candidates elected as Student representatives members on the Council. a. The Returning Officer shall, no earlier than one month after the declaration of the result of an Election, and if an application for a recount is made, not before the declaration of the result of the Election, arrange for all records of Students’ votes to be destroyed in a manner which ensures the confidentiality of voting information is preserved.

23. Vacation of Office a. A member of the Council elected under this Statute ceases to hold office as a member if that member becomes employed for a continuous period of more than six months on a full-time basis by the University or under terms and conditions of full-time employment set by the University. The casual vacancy occurring for that reason shall be filled in accordance with section 176 of the Act.

24. Casual Vacancies a. A casual vacancy arises in the office of a Student Representative on the Council during his or her term if he or she: i. Dies; or ii. Becomes disqualified to hold office under this Statute; or iii. Is declared bankrupt; or iv. Becomes mentally disordered within the meaning of the Mental Health

(Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992; or v. Resigns office by notice in writing to the Chancellor; or vi. Is convicted of an offence and sentenced to imprisonment; or vii. Is absent without leave from three consecutive meetings of the Council.

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Part I b. A Casual Vacancy that occurs within [three] months of the end of a term of office of a Student Representative need not be filled. c. Where a Casual Vacancy occurs any earlier in the term of office of a Student

Representative it shall be filled for the remainder of the term in accordance with section 176 of the Act.

Document Management and Control

Prepared by:

Owned by:

Approved by:

Date Approved:

Review Date:

Amendment Dates:

Office of the University Registrar

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

Council

APPENDIX 2

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MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL STATUTE

ELECTION OF STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES ON THE COUNCIL

Pursuant to section 171(2) (e) of Education Act 1989

1. Title and Commencement

This Statute may be cited as the Elections of Student Members on Council Statute 2012 and comes into force on 7 September 2012.

2. Interpretation

'Academic Year' means a period of 12 months commencing on 1 January. 'Act' means the Education Act 1989.

'Association of Students' means an incorporated body of students enrolled at the

University.

'Candidate' means a candidate for election under this Statute as a student representative on the Council.

'Council' means the Council of the University.

'Election' means an election of student members on the Council conducted under this

Statute.

'Instructions for Voting' means those instructions issued by the Returning Officer for the conduct of the electronic voting by means of a secure system which ensures each

Student is only able to cast one vote for one of the three.

'Nomination Day' means the day appointed for the closing of nominations of candidates for election as student members on the Council.

'Statement' means the statement made by a Candidate in accordance with clause

7(c).

'Student' means a duly enrolled student of the University.

'University' means Massey University.

'University Publications' may be in hard copy or electronic form and includes magazines, newsletters and websites published by the University.

'Vice-Chancellor' means the person holding office for the time being as the Chief

Executive Officer of the University; and includes any person for the time being acting in that capacity.

Conduct of Elections

3. Returning Officer a. The Council shall appoint a Returning Officer to conduct Elections under this

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Statute. Until otherwise determined the Returning Officer shall be the Assistant

Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar. b. Unless the Council determines otherwise the Returning Officer for Elections conducted under this Statute shall hold office until his or her removal by the

Council, or his or her resignation, incapacity or death, in any of which events the

Council shall appoint a Returning Officer in his or her place. c. Every Election conducted under this Statute shall be conducted by the Returning

Officer, but, if for any reason he or she is unable to fulfill the duties of his or her office at any Election, the Council shall appoint a substitute, who, for the purposes of that referendum, shall be deemed to be the Returning Officer.

4. Date of Election and Term of Office a. Elections conducted under this Statute shall be held at a time in the first semester in each Academic Year determined by the Returning Officer. b. Successful Candidates shall hold office from 26 April of the year in which they are elected to 25 April in the following year.

5. Students Eligible to Vote a. The Returning Officer shall authorize lists of Students eligible to vote in each

Election, which will include all Students enrolled in the University at a date to be determined by the Returning Officer.

6. Notice of Election, Nomination of Candidates, and Closing Date for Nominations a. No less than 30 days and no more than 60 days before the day or days fixed by the Returning Officer for an Election, except where a second election for want of candidates may be required in which case as soon as reasonably practicable, the

Returning Officer shall give advance notice thereof in such University

Publications as the Returning Officer sees fit and the University website and shall in that notice state the number of positions to be filled on the Council and request the nomination of Candidates in writing and a closing date for the receipt of such nominations.

7. Nomination of Candidates a. To be eligible for Election a nominee must: i. Be enrolled as a Student at the time when nominations close; save that a nominee who is a sitting Student member seeking re-election need not be enrolled as a Student at that time; and ii. Neither be employed for a continuous period of more than six months on a full-time basis by the University or under terms and conditions of fulltime employment set by the University nor have been so employed at any time during the two years preceding the date of the Election.

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Part I b. Nomination of Candidates for Election under this Statute must: i. Be in the form scheduled to this Statute; and ii. Be signed by not less than two Students as the nominators; and iii. Carry the written consent of the nominee and a declaration of eligibility; and iv. Contain a declaration by the nominee as to whether the nominee has or has not ever been employed (as described in sub-section 7(a)(ii)) by the

University and an undertaking to include such information in all material circulated in connection with the nominee’s nomination. c. Every Candidate for election may submit to the Returning Officer with his or her nomination paper a short statement about the Candidate: i. The statement shall not exceed 150 words. ii. The statement must be submitted electronically. iii. The statement shall include any relevant information about the candidate and will include a passport-like photograph of the Candidate. iv. The Returning Officer may require a Candidate whose statement does not comply with the requirements of this section to revise the statement so as to comply and may refuse to make available any statement which does not comply. v. The Returning Officer shall ensure that the information in each statement which complies with this section is included in the Instructions for Voting sent to each Voter. d. Every nomination paper shall be lodged with or given to the Returning Officer not later than 4pm on Nomination Day. The Returning Officer shall acknowledge receipt of every nomination paper on that nomination paper. e. Every Candidate shall be nominated by a separate nomination paper.

8. Rejection of Nominations a. The Returning Officer shall reject the nomination of a nominee who does not qualify for Election under sub-section 7 (a) b. Where a nomination is rejected the Returning Officer will notify the nominee in writing giving the reasons for the rejection.

9. Withdrawal of Nomination a. Any Candidate may withdraw his or her nomination at any time before noon on

Nomination Day, by notice in writing to the Returning Officer, signed by the

Candidate.

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10. Death of Candidate Before Close of Nominations a. Where before the close of nominations the Returning Officer receives advice that a Candidate who has been nominated and has not withdrawn his or her nomination has died or has become incapable of holding the position for which he or she is a Candidate, his or her nomination shall be treated as if the

Candidate had withdrawn.

11. Only one candidate nominated for any election, Candidate declared elected a. If there is only one candidate for any election under this Statute the Returning

Officer shall, as soon as practicable after the close of nominations, by notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit, declare the Candidate in that election so nominated to be duly elected to the Council.

12. Notice of Nominations and Election a. If there is more than one candidate in any election under this Statute, the

Returning Officer shall, as soon as practicable after the close of nominations, give notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit of the day or days on which the Election is to be held and of the names of the Candidates.

13. Candidate May Retire a. A Candidate at an Election may retire after the close of nominations at any time before a declaration has been made pursuant to section 11 of this Statute, or, where an Election is required to be held, at any time before the day or days of the

Election, by notice in writing to the Returning Officer, signed by that Candidate. b. Where the Returning Officer receives notice pursuant to section 13(a) above: i. Where practicable, the Returning Officer shall before the day or days of the Election give notice of the retirement in such University Publications as he or she sees fit; ii. If a Candidate retires after the Instructions for Voting have been distributed, the Returning Officer shall take such steps as are practicable to advise Voters that the Candidate has retired; iii. Any vote cast for that Candidate shall be void. c. If, by the retirement of a Candidate in accordance with section 13 (a) above the number of Candidates is reduced to or below the number of positions to be filled on the Council: i. The Returning Officer shall, by notice in such University Publications as he or she sees fit, before the day or days of the Election, declare the remaining Candidates to be duly elected; or ii. If the Candidate retires at such a time that it is not possible to give such a notice before the day or days of the Election, the Election shall not be

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Part I held and the declaration shall be made on the day or days of the Election or as soon thereafter as possible.

14. Death or Incapacity of Candidate After Close of Nominations a. Where: i. After the close of nominations and before the day or days of the Election, any Candidate dies or becomes incapable of holding the position for which he or she is a Candidate; or ii. Any such Candidate dies or becomes incapable as aforesaid before the close of nominations but advice of his or her death or incapacity is received by the Returning Officer after the close of nominations, the provisions of section 14 of this Statute, so far as they are applicable and with the necessary modifications, shall apply as if the deceased or incapacitated Candidate had retired on the date of his or her death or incapacity, or, as the case may be, on the date on which advice of his or her death or incapacity is received by the Returning Officer.

15. Election to be Conducted Electronically

16. Issue of Instructions for Voting a. The Returning Officer shall, not later than the day or days on which the Election is to be held, send by email addressed to each Student at their University email address Instructions for Voting which: a. Unless sections 11 (a) or 13 (c) of this Statute apply, the Returning Officer shall conduct an Election by means of an electronic voting system. i. State that these are instructions for an Election of Student members on the Council; ii. Give instructions for voting in that Election; iii. State the day or days of the Election; iv. State the name and Statement of the Candidates for the Election; and v. State the number of Student member positions on the Council.

17. Method of Voting a. On receipt of the Instructions for Voting sent by the Returning Officer, the Student shall alone exercise his or her vote in accordance with the Instructions for Voting. b. Where any Student: i. Is wholly or partially blind; or

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APPENDIX 2

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Part I ii. Suffers from any other disability which makes it difficult to cast his or her vote in the prescribed manner, that Student’s vote may be recorded by another person in accordance with the instructions of the Student.

18. Invalid Votes a. A vote shall only be valid if: i. The Student’s identification number is entered into the electronic voting system; ii. The Student’s duly chosen pin is entered into the electronic voting system; iii. The Student has not yet recorded his or her vote; and iv. The Student’s vote is recorded on the day or days of the Election.

19. Counting of Votes a. Votes shall be counted by such means as are prescribed by the Returning

Officer. b. The Returning Officer shall make arrangements for votes to be counted as soon as reasonably practicable after the close of voting.

20. Declaration of Result a. No later than one month after all the votes have been counted, the Returning

Officer shall declare, by means of notices in such University Publications as the

Returning Officer sees fit, the result of the Election, being the name or names of the Candidates elected as Student members on the Council.

21. Recount a. Where any Student or member of the Council has reason to believe that the declaration by the Returning Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, and that on a recount thereof the result of the Election might be found to be different, he or she may within seven days after the declaration, apply to the Returning

Officer for a recount of the votes. b. Every application for a recount in accordance with section 21 (a) above shall: i. Be accompanied by a deposit of $500, which shall be refunded if, following a recount of the votes, the declaration by the Returning Officer of the result of the Election proves to be incorrect; ii. State the grounds upon which the applicant believes that the declaration by the Returning Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, and that on a recount thereof the result of the Election might be found to be different; and

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Part I iii. State the name of the applicant and whether he or she is a Student or member of the Council. i. Notify the applicant in writing of the result of the recount; and ii. Where the result of a recount is that the declaration by the Returning

Officer of the result of the Election is incorrect, declare, by means of notices in such University Publications as he or she sees fit:

I. That upon a recount of the votes, the declaration by the Returning

Officer of the result of the Election was found to be incorrect; and

II. The Candidates elected as Student members on the Council.

22. Destruction of Votes a. The Returning Officer shall, no earlier than one month after the declaration of the result of an Election, and if an application for a recount is made, not before the declaration of the result of the Election, arrange for all records of Students’ votes to be destroyed in a manner which ensures the confidentiality of voting information is preserved.

23. Vacation of Office a. A member of the Council elected under this Statute ceases to hold office as a member if that member becomes employed for a continuous period of more than six months on a full-time basis by the University or under terms and conditions of full-time employment set by the University. The casual vacancy occurring for that reason shall be filled in accordance with section 176 of the Act.

24. Casual Vacancies a. A casual vacancy arises in the office of a Student Representative on the Council during his or her term if he or she: c. If the Returning Officer is satisfied that an applicant for a recount has reasonable cause to believe that the Returning Officer’s declaration of the result of the

Election may be incorrect and that on a recount the result of the Election might be found to be different, the Returning Officer shall, as soon as reasonably practicable after receiving the application and deposit as aforesaid, arrange for a recount of the votes to be made by such means as the Returning Officer thinks fit. d. Where the Returning Officer arranges for a recount of the votes in accordance with section 21 (c) above, he or she shall: i. Dies; or ii. Becomes disqualified to hold office under this Statute; or iii. Is declared bankrupt; or

Page 7 of 8

APPENDIX 2

C12/134 – December

Part I iv. Becomes mentally disordered within the meaning of the Mental Health

(Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Act 1992; or v. Resigns office by notice in writing to the Chancellor; or vi. Is convicted of an offence and sentenced to imprisonment; or b. A Casual Vacancy that occurs within [three] months of the end of a term of office of a Student Representative need not be filled. c. Where a Casual Vacancy occurs any earlier in the term of office of a Student

Representative it shall be filled for the remainder of the term in accordance with section 176 of the Act.

Document Management and Control

Prepared by:

Owned by:

Approved by:

Date Approved:

Review Date:

Amendment Dates:

Office of the University Registrar

Assistant Vice-Chancellor and University Registrar

Council

Page 8 of 8

Appendix 3

C12/134 – December

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY NOTICE 1990

Extract from NZ Gazette, 11 October 1990 No.176 p.3803

Pursuant to section 168 of the Education Amendment Act 1990, the Minister of

Education gives the following notice.

Notice

1. (a)

This notice may be cited as the Massey University Notice 1990.

(b)

This notice shall come into force on the date of its publication in the Gazette.

2. There shall be a Council to be known as the Massey University Council which shall be the governing body of Massey University.

3.

The Massey University Council shall be constituted as follows:

(a)

Four members appointed by the Minister of Education

(b)

The Vice-Chancellor of Massey University

(c)

One permanent member of the academic staff of Massey University elected by the permanent members of that staff.

(d)

Two academic staff members of the Academic Board of Massey University elected by the academic staff members of that Board.

(e)

One permanent member of the general staff of Massey University elected by the permanent members of that staff.

(f)

One member who is or has been a student of Massey University appointed or elected under procedures which are in conformity with the Act, agreed between the Executive of the Massey University Students’ Association and the Executive of the Massey

University Extramural Students’ Society.

(g)

The President of Massey University Students’ Association.

(h)

The President of the Massey University Extramural Students’ Society.

(i)

Having regard to the courses provided by the University, one member appointed by the Massey University Council on the nomination of the Chancellor after consultation with the central organisation of employers within the meaning of the Labour Relations

Act 1987.

(j)

Having regard to the courses provided by the University, one member appointed by the Massey University Council on the nomination of the Chancellor after consultation with the central organisation of workers within the meaning of the Labour Relations

Act 1987.

(k)

Two members of the Council of the Court of Convocation of Massey University elected by all those on the roll of that Court voting for two lists of candidates, one of women who have been nominated and one of men who have been nominated. The highest polling woman and the highest polling man shall be declared elected. Should only one sex be represented by the nominees the two highest polling candidates shall be declared elected.

(l)

Up to four members appointed by the Massey University Council, on the nomination of the Vice-Chancellor, to ensure that the Council has sufficient rural, legal and business expertise to properly perform its functions.

Appendix 3

C12/134 – December

Part I

4.

The term of office of members of the Council, vacation of office, disclosure of members’ interest and casual vacancies are covered in sections 173 – 176 of the

Education Amendment Act 1990.

5.

Subject to section 173, the maximum term for any member, other than the Vice-

Chancellor, shall be three consecutive 4-year terms.

The powers of the Massey University Council shall not be affected by vacancy in the membership thereof.

Dated at Wellington, this 8 th

day of October 1990

PHIL GOFF, Minister of Education go1117

Appendix 3

C12/134 – December

Part I

C12/136 – December

Part I

The Chancellor

Massey University Council

Dear Chancellor,

1.

2.

Report from the Academic Board Meeting (Part 1): 17 October 2012

At the Academic Board meeting held on Wednesday 17 October 2012 the following items are referred to Council for information.

Advice on Matters of Academic Policy

There were no matters on academic policy to be reported in Part I.

Information to Council with Respect to Major Academic Directions

There were no matters with respect to major academic directions to be reported in Part

I.

3. Report of Academic Approvals Made Under Delegation

4.

The Policy Relating to Paper Information and Study Resources was approved under the delegated authority of Council.

Sub-Committee Matters

Sub-Committee Terms of Reference

University Grievance Committee

Changes to the University Grievance Committee Terms of Reference were made.

These were textual and factual corrections only.

College Of Humanities and Social Sciences Board

Changes to the College of Humanities and Social Sciences Board Terms of Reference were made to accommodate the Institute of Education into the College Board structure. The Board operates on a constituency model and the Education electorate needed to be included.

These Academic Board Sub-committee Terms of Reference are available to Council members upon request.

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Part I

5. Items of Early Notice

There were no items of Early Notice in Part I

6. For Information

Outcome of Call for Nominations for one Academic Board Appointee on Council

One nomination to stand in the election for one of the two Academic Board Appointee positions on the Massey University Council was received, that of Professor Tony

Signal. This means that Professor Signal has been elected unopposed to the Massey

University Council for a four-year term, commencing on 1 January 2013. It is noted that Academic Board Appointees to Council must remain as members of the

Academic Board to fulfill the terms of reference.

Conferring of Degrees and awarding of Diplomas and Certificates

Degrees were conferred and diplomas and certificates awarded under the delegated authority of Council.

Professor John O’Neill

Deputy Chair, Academic Board

Page 2 of 2

C12/137 – December

Part I

The Chancellor

Massey University Council

Dear Chancellor,

Report from the Academic Board Meeting (Part 1): 21 November 2012

At the Academic Board meeting held on Wednesday 21 November 2012 the following items are referred to Council for information.

1. Advice on Matters of Academic Policy

Research and Researcher Development

Assistant Vice-Chancellor Research and Enterprise Professor Heywood introduced the academic discussion asking Academic Board members to consider and respond to a series of question framed in the context of ensuring a rich and engaged contribution to the Research Strategy implementation process. Professor Heywood put the first of several questions to the Board:

What form(s) of independent peer and expert review do Academic Board members propose would best serve our needs beyond the limited provision of the PBRF processes so that Massey can be confident that it is developing and engaging in research which exemplars excellence at subject and discipline level?

Discussion around this question, and more generally, included but was not limited to the following:

• There was support for research reviews at a discipline level not at a qualification level and was seen to work well elsewhere. Such discipline based research reviews would enable work across colleges, not just within. This would result in a review of the research of the University, rather than individuals;

• Reviews at unit level could be undertaken where each unit would consider and work on at different areas depending on their circumstances;

• PBRF was seen as limited as it assessed individuals and past events;

• Research was not always measureable using PBRF measures e.g. creative arts research so a review methodology that gave a result around quality was preferable. Research reviews in creative arts were considered to be not well done world-wide with peer reviews currently falling out of favour;

• The use of the word review was seen by some as problematic as it may result in negative reactions in some staff; and

• Preparation for the next PBRF audit would need to continue alongside any other research reviews.

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C12/137 – December

Part I

Professor Heywood signaled that at this stage the discussion paper had come to the

Board and their guidance and feedback would be incorporated into any further document. It was not yet ready to be taken further but during 2013 the matter would be taken to the relevant committees of the Board and the Pro Vice-Chancellors and colleges.

Digital Teaching and Learning

National Centre for Teaching and Learning Director Professor Brown introduced the discussion paper noting the importance of digital teaching and learning to the

University which had, through its current investment positioned Massey University for its distance and blended teaching and learning options. While the student satisfaction for Stream was at 85% the University still needed to address the challenges of providing the right access to the technology and to ensure that staff are supported to use the technology effectively.

Discussion included but was not limited to the following:

• It was considered that the first discussion question would be improved by changing ‘respond’ to ‘take advantage of’;

• While many staff were undertaking research within the digital environment others were not and it was those that needed to be encouraged to consider how it framed what they did especially in light of the number of student who bring the digital environment with them into their course of study;

• Digital technology enabled engagement without boundaries with students and often with more than one technology at a time;

• The strength that Massey University had was around its interactions between staff and between staff and students;

• Learning can be enhanced through the use of digital technology and methodologies and it was considered that this enhancement was crucial; and

• It was suggested that the major challenges that were yet to take place in the digital teaching and learning environment for Massey e.g. open lectures held world-wide, international recognition of qualifications, the Engine of the

Pacific had not been addressed in this document.

Professor Brown noted that this discussion document reflected Senior Leadership

Team direction and that it perhaps needed to be broadened. He considered that only a pedagogically driven strategy would be acceptable and that importantly students would be involved in reaching any solutions.

2.

3.

Information to Council with Respect to Major Academic Directions

There were no matters with respect to major academic directions to be reported in Part

I.

Report of Academic Approvals Made Under Delegation

There were no academic approvals made under delegation in Part I.

Page 2 of 3

C12/137 – December

Part I

4. Sub-Committee Matters

There were no sub-Committee matters in Part I.

5. Items of Early Notice

Academic Audit 20134: Early Notice

It was noted that the Academic Audit 2012 was a very different audit to previous processes. Massey University was the first university to undertake the new process and as such there was a development component to it. It was intended to have a

‘lighter touch’ and more flexibility. The preparatory work was to be carried out in the

Academic Policy and Regulations Unit and the Office of the Assistant Vice-

Chancellor Academic and International followed by engagement with the College

Board, Academic Committee and Academic Board.

6. For Information

Academic Board Agenda Calendar 2013

The Academic Board Agenda Committee had met and the resulting proposed

Academic Discussions were an outcome of this meeting. Additionally Board members were asked to consider being the sponsor of the Academic Discussion: ‘Academic value of qualifications as opposed to the financial viability of qualifications’ which had been suggested as an academic discussion topic at the previous Board meeting.

Conferring of Degrees and awarding of Diplomas and Certificates

Degrees were conferred and diplomas and certificates awarded under the delegated authority of Council.

Professor John O’Neill

Deputy Chair, Academic Board

Page 3 of 3

C12/138 – December

Part I

MASSEY UNIVERSITY COUNCIL

COUNCIL EVALUATION 2012

7 December 2012

Please find attached the Council and Chair’s Evaluation 2012 for completion by

Council members.

At the Governance Committee meeting on 6 November 2009 it was agreed that this

Council and Chair’s evaluation form would be used by Council annually.

Please return the completed Council and Chair’s Evaluation 2012 form to the

Executive Secretary no later than Wednesday 19 December 2012. The data will then be compiled and provided to the Chancellor for discussion at the 1 March 2013

Council meeting.

The Evaluation Form can also be found on the Council only Intranet Webpage.

Please note that filling in your name is optional.

Paddy Nicol

Executive Secretary

26 November 2012

Page - 1 - of 9

C12/138 – December

Part I

Massey Council and Chair Evaluation Form - 2012

Name (Optional completion)……………………………

Date of evaluation:…………………………

This framework is designed to gain an insight into how well the Council is meeting its objectives. It is not intended to provide an exhaustive list of evaluation criteria.

Please assess each question according to whether you think the Council performs at a low, average or high level.

Council Evaluation

Council Functions

1. The Council understands its role and functions.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4

Comment:

2. The Council understands the organisation’s business and sectors

Low Average

5

High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

3. The Council devotes significant time and serious thought to the organisation's longer term objectives and to the strategic options available to achieve them.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

4. The Council has defined and communicated to management the scope and powers, roles and responsibilities to be adhered to by management to meet routine and exceptional circumstances

Low Average High

1

Comment:

2 3 4 5

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C12/138 – December

Part I

5. Relationships and communication with Stakeholders are well managed.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

6. Proposals from management are analysed and debated vigorously before a decision is reached by the Council.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

7. The Council has an operating plan that specifies its functions, activities and objectives.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

8. When appropriate the Council seeks counsel from professional advisers.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

9. Vice Chancellor remuneration and performance is effectively reviewed and determined by the Council.

Low Average High

1

Comment:

2 3 4 5

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C12/138 – December

Part I

10. The Council determines, annually, the objectives and measurement criteria for the Vice Chancellor.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

11. A broad range of appropriate performance indicators is used to monitor the

performance of management. Reliance is not placed solely on the financial

statements provided by management.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4

Comment:

12. The Council understands and agrees its first duty is to the entity.

Low Average

5

High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

13. The Council has procedures in place to ensure that the organisation is meeting its legal responsibilities.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

14. The Council ensures that key members of management are brought into

Council meetings so that the Council can participate and add value to management’s deliberations and work on behalf of the Council.

Low Average High

1

Comment:

2 3 4 5

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C12/138 – December

Part I

15. The Council ensures all conflicts of interest are declared.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

Council Meetings

16. Council meetings are conducted in a manner that encourages open communication, meaningful participation, and timely resolution of issues.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4

Comment:

17. Council time is used effectively so that the Council adds value for management.

Low Average

5

High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

18. Council members receive timely and accurate minutes, advance written agendas and meeting notices, and clear and concise background material to prepare in advance of meetings.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

19. All Board members are fully informed of relevant matters and there are never any surprises.

Low Average High

1

Comment:

2 3 4 5

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C12/138 – December

Part I

20. Council meetings are facilitated, but not overtly influenced by the Chairperson.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

21. The Council makes timely hard decisions when necessary and encourages management to do likewise.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

Induction, Development, Succession and Dismissal

22. New Council members are introduced to their duties with an appropriate induction process.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4

Comment:

23. Council members understand the extent of their relationship with management, and the separation of stewardship and management.

Low Average

5

High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

24. Encouragement is given for Council members to continue their study of corporate governance and improve the skills they need.

Low Average High

1

Comment:

2 3 4 5

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C12/138 – December

Part I

Council Structure

25. Subcommittees are appointed by the Council with terms of reference, composition and reporting back requirements. These aspects are formally recorded.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

26. Subcommittees have compositions appropriate to their tasks and interact effectively with the Council.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

Communication

27. Where appropriate, Council members are encouraged to discuss matters with the Vice-Chancellor after gaining the approval of the Chair.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

28. The Council’s information requirements are communicated to management on a regular basis.

Low Average High

1

Comment:

2 3 4 5

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C12/138 – December

Part I

29. The Council ensures that there is an effective communication strategy for the entity and members are involved in its implementation where appropriate.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

30. Relationships and communication within the Council are constructive.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

Council Chair Evaluation

Governance

31. The Chair establishes and maintains good governance processes for the operation of the Council and its sub-committees

Low Average High

1 2 3 4

Comment:

Communication

32. The Chair deals constructively with key stakeholders?

Low Average

5

High

1

Comment:

2 3 4 5

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C12/138 – December

Part I

33. The Chair keeps the Council well briefed on engagements and activities undertaken by the Chair and relevant to the University.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

Council Management

34. The Chair runs timely disciplined meetings with appropriate focus on key agenda items

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

35. The Chair ensures adequate opportunity for all Council members (and other contributors as appropriate) to participate in discussion or otherwise engage in the issues at hand.

Low Average High

1 2 3 4 5

Comment:

36. The Chair encourages the contribution and development of individual Council members.

Low Average High

1

Comment:

2 3 4 5

Page - 9 - of 9

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