Self Study

Self Study
University of Louisville Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Training Program
James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville Hospital, Louisville, Kentucky
Self-Study Review – August 2008
A
A1
Program Overview:
Program Objective:
The Residency Training Program in Radiation Oncology Physics at the University of Louisville (hereafter
referred to as the Residency Program) is a two year comprehensive post-graduate curriculum designed to train
residents in physics to provide clinical physics services in radiation oncology. The residency program is
designed to comply with guidelines recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics
Education Programs, Inc. (CAMPEP) and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and
published as AAPM Report No. 90 (2006). Acceptance into the program requires that the individual has
successfully completed a Masters or Doctorate degree in medical physics, physics or a closely related field of
study. The program is designed to accept (1) graduates of CAMPEP-accredited medical physics educational
programs or (2) graduates of other programs in medical physics, physics, or physics-related areas. Medical
physics didactic training may be required of graduates of other physics or related programs. The program is
two years in length regardless of whether the resident is a graduate of a CAMPEP accredited M.S. or Ph.D.
education program. The first year of residency is, primarily, routine procedure radiation oncology physics,
including the basics of room design, machine acceptance and commissioning, treatment planning computer
acceptance and commissioning, monitor unit calculations, 3-D treatment planning and low dose brachytherapy.
During the second year, the resident will be trained in special procedures including prostate brachytherapy,
HDR brachytherapy, total body photons, total skin electrons, radiopharmaceutical therapy, interstitial and
intracavitary brachytherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated radiotherapy, intraoperative
radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, image guided radiotherapy and respiratory gated radiotherapy.
The program was designed to stagger the two resident positions and contain a junior and senior resident each
year. The program was accredited by CAMPEP in 2003 and is scheduled for a 5 year review in 2008. This
program is intended to provide clinical training and education in the medical physics subspecialty Radiation
Oncology Physics by providing a structured, comprehensive educational experience in a clinical environment.
At the conclusion of the program, the resident is competent in radiation oncology physics practice, medical
physics knowledge, presentation skills, communication skills, and process improvement. In addition, the
program is designed to prepare physics residents for peer examination and certification by the American Board
of Radiology (ABR) in Therapeutic Radiological Physics. The resident must complete a two-year training
program and be recommended by the Program Director to sit for ABR certification. This program is under the
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direction of Michael D. Mills, Ph.D., MSPH, CRP, an Associate Professor at the University of Louisville and
Chief of Medical Physics at the Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky.
A2
Organizational Structure:
The Residency Training Program in Radiation Oncology Physics exists within the Department of Radiation
Oncology in the School of Medicine of the University of Louisville. It is a companion to the Radiation
Oncology Training Program under the direction of William J. Spanos Jr., M.D. Currently the Radiation
Oncology Training Program is approved for six positions. An American Registry of Radiologic Technology
accredited program in Radiotherapy Technology under the direction of Mellonie Brown, BS, R.T.(R)(T) CMD
is training nine individuals in Radiotherapy Technology each year. The University of Louisville Hospital acts
as a Clinical Training site for the JRCERT-accredited educational program in Medical Dosimetry directed by
the University of Wisconsin – Lacrosse. One trainee-dosimetrist is currently completing this program within
the Department of Radiation Oncology. A CAMPEP accredited graduate education program in Medical
Physics is offered at a sister state institution, the University of Kentucky. It operates under the direction of
Ralph C. Christensen, Ph.D., and offers masters and doctoral level training in Medical Physics.
The Section of Physics operates under the Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine of the
University of Louisville. Members of the Section of Physics include the Chief of Physics, three additional
faculty physics positions, one radiobiology faculty position, two staff physics positions, two resident positions
(funding is in place for both), one physics assistant, six dosimetry positions, one dosimetry training position,
three engineers, and one secretary. An organizational chart is supplied and may be found as Attachment 1.
Faculty and staff from the University of Louisville provide services for the University of Louisville Hospital
and Brown Cancer Center by contract. The University of Louisville Hospital, under the terms of this contract,
grants access to radiation oncology equipment to radiation oncology physics residents and radiation oncology
residents.
A candidate gains admission to the program by responding to advertisement in the AAPM Placement Bulletin
followed by selection for a personal interview. A six-person Physics Residency Committee (PRC) consists of
the Program Director (PRC Chairman), the Department Chairman, one faculty, and one staff medical physicist,
one medical dosimetrist and one radiation biologist. PRC members are appointed by the Chairman of Radiation
Oncology. The PRC manages all aspects of the Residency Training Program in Radiation Oncology Physics,
including the selection of candidates for interview. The faculty and staff medical physicists, physicians and a
radiobiologist rank the applicants during the interview process. Primary clinical training and teaching in the
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program is divided among faculty (three PhD and one MS level radiation oncology physicists, all with specialty
board certification, and one PhD radiation biologist) and staff (two M.S. level medical physicists, one with
specialty board certification and one in process to attain certification). In addition, 6 faculty physicians, 6
dosimetrists, 3 engineers, and 1 physics assistant contribute to the clinical training process. Certificates are
awarded by the University of Louisville, School of Medicine, and signed by the President of the University,
Dean of the Medical School, the Department Chairman and the Program Director upon completion of the
program and the recommendation of the Program Director and the Department Chairman.
All of the clinical training will take place within the James Brown Cancer Center and the University of
Louisville Hospital, although some procedure observation may take place at Norton Healthcare, Jewish
Hospital, the James Brown Cancer Center at Taylor Regional Hospital, Floyd Memorial Hospital and/or other
area healthcare facilities. Other than providing for observation of procedures, these facilities will have no role
in the residency program. All equipment associated with this program is contained within the physical plant of
the James Brown Cancer Center and the University of Louisville Hospital. A map of the University of
Louisville Medical Center is found as Attachment 2. The University of Louisville Hospital provides funds
for the ongoing support for the physics residency program, and strongly supports the program as evidenced by
the statements in Attachment 3.
Program review will consist of an internal and external program review. The external review will be performed
by CAMPEP. The internal review procedure is as follows: A faculty radiation oncologist of the University of
Louisville will chair an Internal Review Committee (IRC) in the fifth year of the program, and every fifth year,
thereafter. The IRC Chairman will select members of the Internal Review Committee. Committee members
may include members of the Radiation Safety Committee, University of Louisville faculty, current or former
radiation oncology physics residents, and current or former radiation oncology residents. Members of the PRC
are excluded from membership, except that one member may serve as liaison. The IRC will review current
CAMPEP guidelines, AAPM Task Group reports and a sample audit of another training program, if available.
The IRC will conduct interviews of current and former residents, the Department Chairman, Clinical Director
for Radiation Oncology, the PRC Chairman, the Radiation Oncology Program Training Director, and others
deemed appropriate for interview. The findings of these interviews along with a review of current guidelines
will make up the bulk of the Internal Review Audit. The Audit will consist of these findings: Review
Procedure, Survey of Educational Experience of the Faculty and Staff, Clinical Resources, Educational Program
Overview, Internal Audit Findings, and Recommendations for Improvement. This Audit report will be made
available to the CAMPEP External Review Committee.
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A3
History of Program Development:
The Residency Training Program in Radiation Oncology Physics was established at the Brown Cancer Center,
University of Louisville, in 1993 by Peter R. Almond, Ph.D., former Chief of Physics and Vice-Chairman for
Research, Department of Radiation Oncology of the University of Louisville. The residency program emerged
as postdoctoral students needed structured clinical training as part of their overall educational experience.
Graduates of the program include Zhigang Xu, Ph.D. (1995), Hui Li, Ph.D. (1995), Gennady Neyman, Ph.D.
(1998), Jodi Daves, M.S., (2002), Albert Zacarias, Ph.D. (2003), Joni Funseth, M.S. (2005), YH Zhang, Ph.D.
(2006), Eric Nelson Ph.D. (2007), and John Hegseth Ph.D. (2008). Dr. Xu, Dr. Li, Dr. Neyman, Ms. Daves, Dr.
Zacarias and Dr. Zhang have acquired specialty board certification. Ms. Funseth and Dr. Nelson began the
certification process in 2006 and 2007, respectively. All of the residents above successfully completed each
part of the ABR examination process without failure, with the sole exception of Ms. Funseth, who failed to
successfully complete Part II Written in 2006. An administrative error in the 2007 exam occurred, so the ABR
did not grade her examination that year. In 2008, she was unable to sit for the Part II written exam due to poor
health. We are hopeful she will be able to sit for the written part II exam in 2009. Although numerous postdoctoral and post-masters students have been trained at the Brown Cancer Center, the nine mentioned above
were the only ones to have graduated from a registered residency program in Radiation Oncology Physics under
the administration of the Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of Louisville.
Attachment 3 contains letters from senior administrative heads and leaders regarding the commitment of
the University of Louisville to the Physics Residency Program. This list of graduates is summarized in
Attachment 4. The training certificates are reproduced in Attachment 6.
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B1
Training Requirements:
Program Completion Requirements
The minimum program length is two years and includes four continuous semesters: Fall and Spring. Each
resident will complete the four didactic courses and the clinical rotations during the 24-month program as
described below.
Didactic Courses
The resident will complete four semester-long didactic courses of study: Stanford Dosimetry Training Tool,
Basic Radiation Oncology Physics, Core Curriculum and Radiation Biology. Additional readings may be
assigned in Advanced Radiation Oncology Physics, according to the background and needs of the student. The
course instructor will assign readings and tests. Radiation Biology, Core Curriculum and Basic Radiation
Oncology Physics will be the same course as taught to medical residents. Written and/or oral examinations are
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required for each of the physics courses and may be required for the medical resident courses. Core Curriculum
is a primary component of the Physician Radiation Oncology Residency Program at the University of
Louisville. It consists of faculty physician lectures by disease type and site: Skin, CNS, Head & Neck,
Thoracic, Breast, GI, Urinary Tract, Male GU, GYN, Adrenal, Lymphoma, Sarcoma, Pediatric, Benign and
Palliative diseases are discussed. The residents record their participation in the Typhon Group System. For this
course, no tests are given either for Radiation Oncology Residents or for Therapy Physics Residents. In
addition, the resident is expected to complete short courses in imaging and nuclear medicine physics, medical
statistics, radiation physics review and radiation biology review, as scheduled. The Imaging and Nuclear
Medicine course is 20 hours in length and will contain a written final examination.
Clinical Physics Rotations
Additionally, the resident will complete four semester-long clinical rotations. The Program Director will assign
a grade and complete an evaluation for each clinical rotation. Passing grades in all courses and rotations are
required for the resident to complete the residency program and to be awarded the training certificate.
Competency Categories covered in the four semester-long clinical rotations are:
1
External Beam Treatment Planning and Verification
2
Brachytherapy Treatment Planning and Verification
3
Room Shielding Design
4
Quality Assurance – Daily and Monthly
5
Annual Calibration – Clinical Equipment
6
TBI Photons and TSE Electrons
7
Intraoperative Electrons
8
Stereotactic Cranial and Body Irradiation
9
IMRT / IGRT
10 Respiratory Gating
11 HDR / LDR Brachytherapy Special Procedures
12 Administrative and Professional Duties
Oral Examinations
Oral examinations of residents are required annually, based on the American Board of Radiology Oral
Examination. Questions may pertain to material covered in coursework, competencies or assigned self-study.
Additional Requirements
The resident is expected to participate in the teaching effort in the Department of Radiation Oncology.
Teaching opportunities include lectures/mentoring of radiation oncology residents, dosimetry trainees, and RTT
students. The resident is expected to participate in journal club and present at a minimum 2 article reviews per
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year. The competency list includes attendance at assigned conferences; attendance must be reported. Failure to
attend a minimum number of conferences will result in the resident being placed on probation.
B2
Design and Content
Training essentials are designed generally to be consistent with the recommendations of the AAPM Report
Number 90 (2006), “Essentials and Guidelines for Hospital-Based Medical Physics Residency Training
Programs.” Residents will complete four semester-long courses of instruction. These include courses in The
Stanford Dosimetry Training Tool, Radiation Oncology Physics, Radiation Biology, and Core Curriculum
Lectures. No tests are given for the core curriculum lectures, but attendance is mandatory. The resident must
complete the examinations (midterm and final) with passing grades in each course. In the event of test failure,
remedial studies will be assigned and the resident will be reexamined. The primary instructor of each semesterlong course assigns a letter grade to the resident for each course of study. This letter grade becomes a part of
the resident’s permanent record. In addition, the resident is expected to complete short courses in imaging and
nuclear medicine physics, medical statistics and radiation biology, as scheduled.
Equipment at the James Graham Brown Cancer Center includes a TomoTherapy Unit, four Varian Linear
Accelerators, including one Trilogy with energies 4, 6, 10, and 18 MV photons, and 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV
electrons, one Philips Brilliance CT-Simulator, one Varian Acuity Simulator, Four Varian Eclipse
Workstations, three CMS Workstations, an Aria information management system, an Intra-Op Mobetron, one
Varian HDR Unit, and an array of LDR brachytherapy sources. Physics equipment includes an IBA 3-D beam
scanner, five Farmer chambers / electrometers, Unfors diagnostic instruments, and a variety of test phantoms.
The Residency Training Program in Radiation Oncology Physics shall include clinical training in a) machine
acceptance, calibration and commissioning, b) treatment planning computer commissioning and data entry, c)
patient and virtual simulation, 3-D treatment planning and dosimetry, d) brachytherapy, HDR and therapeutic
nuclear medicine e) radiation oncology special procedures including Total Skin Irradiation, Total Body
Irradiation, Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Body Stereotactic Radiotherapy, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy,
Image Guided Radiotherapy, Respiratory Gating and Intraoperative Radiotherapy, f) quality assurance, g)
principles of imaging, h) radiation biology, i) human and tumor physiology, j) radiation protection, licensing
and room design, k) radiation measurement by ionization chamber, TLD, diodes, film and other dosimeters, and
l) administrative training. Residents in the program are assigned on a rotating basis during the first year to the
following areas of radiation oncology physics service: machine commissioning, treatment planning
commissioning and data entry, treatment planning, simulation and virtual simulation, special treatment device
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fabrication, patient treatment, and quality assurance. During the second year, additional requirements include
patient chart checks and reviews, and a twenty hour assignment in the University of Louisville Radiation Safety
Office. At the end of each year, an oral examination is given to the resident modeled on the American Board of
Radiology oral examination in Therapeutic Radiological Physics. Completion of the residency program is
dependent on successful completion of the oral examinations at the end of each year of residency. The questions
given at the end of the first year are designed to reflect the didactic material covered during the first year of
residency. Many questions are drawn from material presented in the Dosimetry Training Tool; others come
from the Khan and Hall textbooks. The questions at the end of the second year are designed to mimic the ABR
oral as closely as possible. All questions from both examinations are similar to questions found on the ABR
oral exam. Figures and questions are presented in PowerPoint format with the resident providing oral
responses. During the first year, residents will complete two semester (six month) rotations. These rotations
include instruction in a) Room Design & Radiation Safety, Machine Acceptance, Calibration, Commissioning
and Quality Assurance, b) Treatment Planning Computer Algorithms, Commissioning, Data Entry and Quality
Assurance, IMRT and IGRT planning and Delivery Quality Assurance, c) Patient Simulation, Patient Virtual
Simulation, Simulator and CT Quality Assurance, Device Fabrication, and d) 3-D Treatment Planning and invivo Dosimetry Measurements. During the first year, the physics resident will learn the basics of dosimetry
measurement by ion chamber, Thermoluminescent Dosimetry, diode measurements, and film dosimetry.
During the second year, residents will complete two semester (six month) rotations. These rotations include a)
Brachytherapy, High Dose Rate Brachytherapy, Prostate Brachytherapy, Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine and
Endovascular Brachytherapy, b) 3-D Treatment Planning and Dosimetry Measurements, including
Commissioning, and Daily Localization and Image Guidance for IMRT/IGRT, c) External Beam Special
Procedures Including Total Body Irradiation, Total Skin Electron Treatments, Intra-Operative Radiation
Therapy, Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Respiratory Gating, and d) Diagnostic Equipment, Operational Radiation
Oncology Physics, including Information Management, Radiation Safety Officer Responsibilities,
Administration, Budgets, Staffing, Space, Professional Responsibilities and Board Preparation.
The resident will be assigned a Physics Rotation Mentor and a Physician Rotation Mentor during each of the
four semester rotations. The Physician Rotation Mentor will interact with physics residents so residents can
understand the indications, risks, benefits, and side effects of selected treatments for patients. The Rotation
Mentors will be responsible to assure the completion of the list of tasks assigned for the rotation. The Rotation
Mentors will report a grade evaluation of the resident’s performance during each rotation to the program
director. This rotation grade along with grade scores from each of the courses of instruction will become part of
the resident’s permanent record. The Physics Resident is required to report a Rotation Task List Record for
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each rotation. Each task or competency must be completed by the resident and signed off by the Program
Director before the task is considered complete. At the University of Louisville, this record is kept in the
database of the Typhon Group Allied Health Student Tracking software. As part of the Rotation Task List
Record, the Physics Resident is required to keep a Training Checklist for Clinical Equipment Operated by
Residents in Radiation Oncology (located at the end of the first semester checklist and under the Annual
Calibration Section of the Typhon Software). The Program Director will be responsible to assure a Physics
Resident is qualified to operate the equipment properly and safely. The Rotation Task List Record and the
Training Checklist for Clinical Equipment Operated by Residents in Radiation Oncology becomes part of the
Permanent Record of the Physics Resident.
Generally the Competency Categories are scheduled for completion according to the following schedule:
Competency Category
Semester
13 External Beam Treatment Planning and Verification
Fall, Year 1
14 Brachytherapy Treatment Planning and Verification
Fall, Year 1
15 Room Shielding Design
Spring, Year 1
16 Quality Assurance – Daily and Monthly
Spring, Year 1
17 Annual Calibration – Clinical Equipment
Spring, Year 1
18 TBI Photons and TSE Electrons
Spring, Year 2
19 Intraoperative Electrons
20 Stereotactic Cranial and Body Irradiation
Fall, Year 1
Spring, Year 2
21 IMRT / IGRT
Fall, Year 2
22 Respiratory Gating
Fall, Year 2
23 HDR / LDR Brachytherapy Special Procedures
Fall, Year 2
24 Administrative and Professional Duties
Spring, Year 2
However, there is some limited overlap respecting when the competencies may be completed. If we have
equipment to commission, if there is an unusual patient presentation, or if there are special tasks assigned to
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faculty or staff requiring resident assistance, some competencies may be completed early. Approval of all
competencies is at the discretion of the program director. Additional regularly scheduled seminars include a)
treatment technique review conference (weekly), b) multi-modality conference (includes medical oncology and
surgery, weekly), and c) core curriculum with radiation oncology residents (weekly). Other regularly scheduled
conferences include a) physics staff (monthly), b) radiation oncology journal club (monthly, one or more
physics articles presented each month), and morbidity and mortality conference (monthly). Registered
participation for a number of sessions in each of these activities is required for program completion. The
program director will evaluate and determine satisfactory participation respecting attendance at conferences.
Attendance at all conferences is recorded in the Typhon Group Software tool. Residents are expected to attend
conference at least 80% of the time. All conferences are logged in the Typhon Group Software as part of the
resident’s permanent record. The program director is made aware if a resident misses a conference for any
reason; sickness, vacation, conflicting assignment, etc. Information recorded includes the date and title of the
conference, the speaker and the topics covered in the conference. The Program Director validates the
attendance record of residents in the conferences.
Residents will be encouraged to attend local medical physics meetings associated with the Ohio River Valley
Chapter of the AAPM. In addition, funds will be allocated to allow each resident to attend at least one annual
meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Student presentations at regional or
annual meetings are encouraged not required as part of the residency program. The residency program as
designed does not require a research component, however if a student has made substantial progress completing
required competencies, a research project may optionally be assigned during the final semester of the residency
program. The resident will be assigned teaching duties for courses in physics offered to medical residents,
medical dosimetry students, and to technologists-in-training within the RTT program. Lectures may include
resident seminars, instruction in radiation protection and safety, as well as topics in radiation physics, beam
measurement and calibration, treatment planning, brachytherapy and special procedures. Participation in
teaching activities will be at the discretion of the program director. The program director will evaluate the
quality of teaching effectiveness and will assign a letter grade based on consensus evaluation of the lectures.
This grade will become part of the resident’s permanent record. Residents are trained to perform the
Continuing Medical Physics Consultation for patients under treatment at the end of the first year in residency.
Additionally, residents are given increased responsibility for planning approval, delivery quality assurance and
lectures for our various training programs during the second year. Treatment approval and final chart review
responsibilities remain with senior faculty and staff. Physics Residents receive the same stipend as that of first
or second year medical residents (PGY-1 and PGY-2). In addition, benefits, vacation, meeting allowance, book
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allowance, and other aspects of the Physics Residency Program are modeled similar to the Radiation Oncology
Residency Program at the University of Louisville. The graduate shall be given a certificate upon completion
of the program with passing grades for all courses of study and all clinical rotations and teaching activities. The
certificate will state the individual has completed a residency in Radiation Oncology Physics, the time interval
spent in the program, a notice that it is accredited by CAMPEP, and will contain signatures of the President,
University of Louisville, Dean, School of Medicine, University of Louisville; Chairman, Department of
Radiation Oncology; and the Physics Residency Program Director.
The length of the program will be twenty-four months for any individual admitted to the training program. For
residents entering who have not graduated from an accredited medical physics graduate education program, the
didactic training must be provided and successfully completed within the 2-year time period and must not
interfere with the clinical training provided. A sample training plan and clinical physics rotation schedule is
found in Attachment 5.
B3
Sample Training Plan
Sample Training Plan
Semester
Fall
Semester
Year 1
Spring
Semester
Year 2
Fall
Semester
Year 2
Spring
Semester
Year 2
Physics Residency Program in Radiation Oncology
Rotation
Mentors
Coursework
Orientation, Room design, radiation
Albert Zacarias, Ph.D.
Stanford
safety, machine acceptance, calibration,
John Bechtel, M.D.
Dosimetry
commissioning and quality assurance
Betty Achino, CMD
Training Tool
Treatment planning computer algorithms,
John Gavin, CMD
commissioning, data entry and QA
Judy Turner, CMD
Patient simulation, patient virtual
Albert Zacarias, Ph.D.
Radiation
simulation, simulator and CT quality
M. El-Ghamry, M.D.
Physics
assurance, device fabrication, twoJohn Bechtel, M.D.
dimensional treatment planning and inJoshua James, M.S.
vivo dosimetry measurements
David Wilson, M.S.
Brachytherapy, high dose rate
brachytherapy, prostate brachytherapy,
and therapeutic nuclear medicine
IMRT/IGRT treatment planning and
Tim Guan, Ph.D.
Core
dosimetry measurements
Michael Mills, Ph.D.
Curriculum
TBI, TSE, IORT, Stereotactic
Craig Silverman, MD
Radiosurgery, Stereotactic Body
Dave Wilson, M.S.
Radiotherapy, Respiratory Gating
Keith Sowards, M.S.
Diagnostic equipment, information
Michael Mills, Ph.D.
Radiation
management, RSO responsibilities,
Tim Guan, Ph.D.
Biology
administration, budgets, staffing, space, William Spanos, M.D.
Instructor
Michael
Mills, Ph.D.
and Physics
Faculty
Michael
Mills, Ph.D.
and Physics
Faculty
William J.
Spanos, M.D.
and
Physician
Faculty
Wayne
Zundel,
Ph.D.
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professional responsibilities, board
preparation
Keith Sowards, M.S.
Joel Handley, M.S.
The following are the components of the residency program:
1
Orientation
2
CPR Training and TB test
3
Completion of course work and passing scores on all tests: Dosimetry Training Tool, Radiation Physics,
Radiation Biology and Core Curriculum
4
Completion of additional didactic course work as assigned: Imaging and Nuclear Medicine Physics,
Statistics, Radiobiology Review and Physics Review
5
Additional regularly scheduled seminars include a) anatomy and technique review conference (weekly),
and b) multi-modality conference (includes medical oncology and surgery, weekly). Other regularly
scheduled conferences include a) physics staff (monthly), b) radiation oncology journal club
(monthly, one or more physics articles presented each month), and morbidity and mortality
conference (monthly).
6
Radiation Safety Rotation (20 hours)
7
Semester Long Clinical Physics Rotations
8
Presentations/lectures for RTT students, Dosimetry trainees, Radiation Oncology Residents and Physics
Staff
9
Optional research project based on resident’s performance in the program
10 RAPHEX examination and Annual Oral Examinations
B4
Training Administration
A six-person Physics Residency Committee (PRC) consists of the Program Director (PRC Chairman), the
Department Chairman, one faculty, one staff medical physicist, one medical dosimetrist and one radiation
biologist. The PRC manages all aspects of the Residency Training Program in Radiation Oncology Physics,
including the creation and modification of training objectives. Any PRC member may propose changes to the
curriculum or training objectives. A majority vote by the PRC confirms the change. During each of four
rotations, the physics resident will be assigned a list of tasks and duties under the direction of a Physics
Rotation Mentor. The Physics Rotation Mentor will vary depending on the area of training. The Program
Director will evaluate the performance of a resident by seeking input from all individuals that mentored the
resident during the semester and assign a letter grade. The resident will be evaluated in the following
categories: 1) timeliness in the performance of assigned duties, 2) quality of work, 3) completeness of tasks
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assigned, 4) mastery of material associated with program objectives, and 5) overall letter grade. All grades will
be reported to the Program Director. The resident will also assess the rotation by completing a rotation
evaluation form and an evaluation form for each mentor at the end of the rotation. These forms will assess the
resident’s response to the rotation in several categories: 1) quality of mentoring, 2) availability of mentors, 3)
reasonableness of assigned tasks, 4) appropriateness of tasks, and 5) overall impression of the rotation. The
forms are provided to the Department Chair to be used in the annual evaluation of each faculty and staff
member. A Physician Rotation Mentor will also have input into the assessment of resident performance during
the rotation. Sample review forms for the Mentor, Resident and Rotation are attached as Appendix XX.
C
C1
Physics Residents
Admissions
Prospective residents will be provided with an application packet that contains information necessary to make a
decision regarding whether to apply, how to apply, and what to expect during the application process.
Information explaining the field of medical physics and residency training will be included. At present, the
documents provided include 1) AAPM’s “The Medical Physicist”, 2) AAPM’s “The Roles, Responsibilities,
and Status of the Clinical Medical Physicist”, and 3) AAPM Report Number 90, “Essentials and Guidelines for
Hospital-Based Medical Physics Residency Training Programs”. Also included is a brochure, describing the
University of Louisville Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Training Program.
Admission standards respecting evidence of degrees and board certification, undergraduate and
graduate transcripts, letters of recommendation, biography, and other information concerning the
history of the applicant are clearly stated in the application form Appendix XX. Preference will be given
to graduates of CAMPEP-accredited academic programs. Prospective students must have acquired or be in the
final stages of completing a graduate degree. Trainees entering the University of Louisville Radiation Oncology
Physics Residency Training Program will have acquired a strong foundation in basic physics. The trainee shall
document a master’s or doctoral degree in medical physics, physics, engineering, mathematics, or other science
with physics training equivalent to a minor in physics. The latter physics training shall be evidenced by upper
level courses in mechanics, electricity and magnetism, quantum mechanics, atomic structure, nuclear physics,
and statistical mechanics.
Trainees entering the University of Louisville Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Training Program will
have acquired some coursework toward a strong didactic background in medical physics as described in AAPM
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Report Number 79, “Academic Program for Master of Science Degree in Medical Physics”. This will be
demonstrated by 1) graduation from a CAMPEP-accredited medical physics graduate education program, or 2)
transcripts from an unaccredited medical physics graduate education program. The preferred qualification for
entry into the residency program is a Ph.D. or M.S. degree in medical physics from a CAMPEP accredited
program. The program may allow residents to enter with some deficiencies respecting medical physics training,
or some other aspect of their preparation. If our program were to accept such a candidate, we would require the
resident to take an entry examination equivalent to a final examination given to radiation oncology residents to
provide an initial evaluation of that resident. We would require the completion of all modules in the Dosimetry
Training Tool within three months, and the completion of a self-study program in Khan within 6 months. The
resident would be required to pass a written and an oral examination appropriate for physics mastery of
radiation oncology physics at the end of the Fall Semester, 1st year. Failure to complete these examinations
successfully would result in additional remedial work, as determined by the PRC. In that event, the PRC will
propose the mechanism by which the resident will receive this additional didactic training. This mechanism
will include a specific course of study with parameters for satisfactory completion of that course of study. The
Program Director will evaluate whether the candidate has successfully completed the didactic training prior to
program completion. The Program Director will report his/her findings to the PRC and the PRC will make the
final decision respecting training to address the deficiency.
The PRC manages all aspects of the Residency Training Program in Radiation Oncology Physics, including the
selection of candidates for interview. The faculty and staff medical physicists, physicians and a radiobiologist
rank the applicants during the interview process. Interview factors ranked include Transcript (overall
performance during graduate program), Letters of Recommendation, Medical Physics Experience,
Motivation/Personality, and whether the individual is a graduate of a CAMPEP-accredited academic program.
The top candidates are selected and invited for a personal interview. For candidates requiring significant travel
times and costs, a telephone interview may be used as a preliminary screening before a formal invitation for the
full interview process is given. The final decision respecting admission to the program rests with the PRC. The
offer to the successful candidate is extended by the Program Director at the end of the first week in March.
Admission policies shall be nondiscriminatory expect as related to standards for successful performance in the
program. The quality of the entering residents will be such that successful completion of the required training
is not precluded by inadequate qualifications or deficiencies upon admission. The general aptitude and
qualifications of entering residents will be considered in the accreditation evaluation. Data on graduates of
the University of Louisville Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program can be found in Attachment
13
4. Full admissions records including letters of recommendation and transcripts will be made available for the
site visit.
Table 1: Chronological list of residents admitted into the program over the past 5 years
Resident Name
Residency Start Date
Finish Date
Graduate Degrees,
University, Year
Joni Funseth, M.S.*
July, 2003
December, 2004
Univ. of Louisville, 2003
Yinghui Zhang, Ph.D.
October, 2004
July, 2006
Utah State Univ., 1998
Eric Nelson, Ph.D.
June, 2005
May, 2007
Univ. Cent. Florida, 2003
John Hegseth, Ph.D.
July, 2006
June, 2008
Ohio State Univ. 1990
*Joni was a Certified Medical Dosimetrist when she entered the program. She was not required to complete the
1st Semester Dosimetry Rotation, and was therefore awarded a 6 month credit. Her program lasted 18 months.
C2
Recruitment Efforts
The Program Director will design the recruitment program, which will have several aspects. An advertisement
for the position is placed in the AAPM Placement Bulletin in October and/or November. Applicants will be
sent an application packet. The PRC will select the candidates for interview before February 1. An example of
such an advertisement is found in Attachment 17. It is the history of our program that such efforts produce a
satisfactory pool of applicants for the position.
C3
Enrollment
Program capacity is two residents. An agreement between the University of Louisville-Department of
Radiation Oncology, and the University of Louisville Hospital provides permanent funding for two positions.
With our current faculty and staff numbers, a third residency position, for full or part time enrollment may be a
possibility for this program
Table 2: Alphabetical list of current residents:
Resident Name
Residency Start Date
Anticipated Finish Date
Graduate Degrees,
University, Year
Ted Steger, Ph.D.
June 2007
May, 2009
U. Texas Grad. Sch. Of
Biomed Sci., 2004
Kate Dikeman, M.S.
July 2008
June 2010
Univ. of Kentucky, 2008
14
University of Louisville Brown Cancer Center
2008-2010 Radiation Oncology Physics Resident Rotation Schedule
Mentors – Faculty or Staff
Michael Mills
Tim Guan
Dave Wilson
Albert Zacarias
Keith Sowards
Joshua James
Joel Handley
Elizabeth Achino
Judy Turner
John Gavin
Lynn Osborne
Mellonie Brown
Fall 2008
TS
TS
TS
KD
TS
TS
TS
KD
KD
KD
KD
KD
Spring
2009
TS
TS
KD
KD
TS
KD
TS
Fall 2009
KD
KD
KD
NR
KD
KD
KD
NR
NR
NR
NR
NR
Spring
2010
KD
KD
NR
NR
KD
NR
KD
All listed personnel may act to mentor the Physics Residents, depending on the task. If you see your name,
follow the column to the right. If the resident’s initials are in bold, you bear primary responsibility for helping
the resident complete his/her competencies during that semester. If the font is not bold, you bear secondary
responsibility for that resident for that semester. You bear primary or secondary responsibility only for one
resident at a time.
TS – Ted Steger
KD – Kate Dikeman
NR – New Resident in July, 2009
C4
Evaluation of Resident Progress
Resident progress will be based on the following criteria:
1
Records of competencies completed
2
Successful completion of courses and semester rotations
3
Performance on first year Raphex examination and annual oral examination
4
Attendance at regularly scheduled conferences
The resident will be assigned Physics Rotation Mentors during each of the four semester rotations. The Physics
Rotation Mentor will be responsible to assure the completion of the list of tasks assigned for the rotation. The
Physics Rotation Mentors will report an evaluation of the resident’s performance during each rotation to the
Program Director. The Program Director will assign a rotation grade based on input and the evaluations of the
resident’s Rotation Mentors for that semester. This rotation grade along with letter grade scores from each of
the courses of instruction will become part of the resident’s permanent record. The Physics Rotation Mentors
15
will evaluate the performance of a resident in several categories: 1) interactions with others, 2) oral and written
communication, 3) anticipation, analysis and reaction to problems, 4) seeks advice and guidance when
appropriate, 5) contribution of innovative ideas, 6) initiative, 7) motivation, 8) interest and enthusiasm, 9)
effort, 10) preparation, 11) time management, 12) documentation, 13) multitasking, 14) compliance with
established policies and procedures, 15) equipment handling, 16) skill development, 17) professional
development, 18) participation in meetings/discussions, 19) teaching preparation and delivery, and 20) teaching
effectiveness. A Physician Rotation Mentor will also have input into the assessment of resident performance
during the rotation. All evaluations are reported to the Program Director and become part of the permanent
record of the resident. As residents are required to operate clinical and physics equipment during their rotations,
residents must document they have receive training from a senior physicist in the safe and proper operation of
this equipment.
Residents will also complete four semester-long courses of instruction. These courses are the Stanford
Dosimetry Training Tool, Basic Radiation Oncology Physics, Core Curriculum and Radiation Biology.
The
resident must complete the examinations (lecture examinations and final) with passing grades in each course.
In the event of test failure, remedial studies will be assigned and the resident will be reexamined. The primary
instructor of the course assigns a letter grade to the resident for each course of study. This letter grade becomes
a part of the resident’s permanent record.
Additional regularly scheduled seminars include a) treatment planning conference (weekly), b) tumor
conference (clinical case presentations, weekly), c) multi-modality conference (includes medical oncology and
surgery, weekly), and d) residents grill with radiation oncology residents (weekly). Other regularly scheduled
conferences include a) physics staff (monthly), b) research (monthly), c) radiation oncology journal club
(monthly, two physics articles presented each month). Registered participation in each of these activities is
required for program completion. The program director will evaluate and determine satisfactory participation
respecting attendance at conferences.
All academic and rotation requirements for the resident will be those in effect at the time the trainee enters the
program. In addition to the above methods of evaluation, the resident will meet with the Program Director on a
semi-annual basis, just after the completion and grading of each rotation. The Program Director may call a
meeting of the Physics Residency Committee to discuss the progress of a trainee, if specific guidance from the
PRC is needed.
16
C5
New Resident Orientation
The first month in training will be devoted to resident orientation. The resident will attend University of
Louisville orientation respecting policies of all University employees. The Program Director will be
responsible for explaining the program’s requirements, resident administrative procedures and Department and
University expectations. The resident will be informed of staff and program resources, laboratories and funding
during the orientation. During the three weeks, new physics and physician residents experience a general
orientation to radiation oncology. Since few new residents are familiar with a clinical radiation oncology
setting, a rigorous clinical overview is scheduled with 42 classroom hours of instruction. At present, the
medical ethics lecture course is not included in orientation, but is provided within the first three months of the
program.
2008-2009 New Resident Physics Orientation
Date
7/3 Thu
4th Floor Lib
7/8 Tue
Lower Lib
7/8 Tue
Lower Lib
7/8 Tues
Lower Lib
7/8 Tue
Lower Lib
7/8 Tue
Lower Lib
7/9 Wed
Lower Lib
7/9 Wed
Labs in Clinic
7/9 Wed
Lower Lib
7/9 Wed
Lower Lib
7/9 Wed
Lower Lib
7/10 Thu
Otho ENT, 3rd Flr
7/10 Thu
4th Floor Lib
7/10 Thu
4th Floor Lib
7/10 Thu
Lower Lib
7/11 Fri
4th Floor Lib
Category*
Hours
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
Time
1:00 PM –
4:00 PM
8:00 am –
10:00 am
10:00 am –
11:00 am
11:30 am –
1:30 PM
2:00 PM –
3:00 PM
3:00 PM –
4:00 PM
8:00 am –
10:00 am
10:00 am –
12:00 noon
1:00 PM –
2:00 PM
2:00 PM –
3:00 PM
3:00 PM –
4:00 PM
8:00 am –
10:00 am
10:00 am –
12:00 noon
1:00 PM
2:00 PM
2:00 PM 4:00 PM
8:00 am –
10:00 am
Topic
Machine Basics
On-call duties, Coding
Brachytherapy Overview
Resident Orientation I
Radiation Oncology
TomoTherapy Guest Lunch
Lecture
Research
Resident Orientation I
Radiation Oncology
Nursing
Brachytherapy Laboratory
RTT and Dosimetry Programs
Dosimetry
Lab, X-ray Scheduling
External Beam Conventional
External Beam
Hand Calculations
Machine Safety
Rad Onc Nomenclature
BCC Standards
External Beam IMRT/IGRT
Presenter
Kristi Owen 1:00 PM,B.
Kelly P. Slone (2–4 PM)
D. Wilson LDR,
K. Sowards HDR
Kristi Paris
Dr. Rock Mackie/Michael
Mills
Liz Wilson
Dr. William Spanos
Rosemary Wafford
Lisa Tobe
Keith Sowards HDR
Joel Handley LDR
Mellonie Brown
Judy Turner
Betty Achino
Decora Coleman; Lakisha
Phillips
Albert Zacarias
Josh James
Ted Steger
Joel Handley
Wendall Sargent
Tim Schadt
Michael Mills
Albert Zacarias – Trilogy
17
7/11 Fri
4th Floor Lib
7/11 Fri
Lower Lib
7/14 Mon
Lower Lib
7/14 Mon
Lower Lib
7/14 Mon
Lower Lib
7/15 Tue
4th Floor Lib
7/15 Tue
4th Floor Lib
7/15 Tue
4th Floor Lib
7/15 Tue
4th Floor Lib
7/16 Wed
Lower Lib
7/16 Wed
GYN Onc, 3rd Flr
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
10:00 am –
12:00 noon
1:00 PM 2:00 PM
8:00 am –
10:00 am
10:00 am –
12:00 noon
1:30 PM –
2:30 PM
8:00 am –
10:00 am
10:00 am –
12:00 noon
2:00 PM –
3:00 PM
3:00 PM –
4:00 PM
8:00 am –
10:00 am
10 am –
12:00 noon
IGRT Laboratory – Dosimetry,
DQA
Notes and Coding
Albert Zacarias - Trilogy
Josh James – Tomo
JoAnn Ross, Penny Sloan
Radiation Oncology QA
Michael Mills
QA in Aria
Albert Zacarias
Coding Orders & Front Office
JoAnn Ross & Penny
Slone
Kristi Paris
Resident Orientation II
Radiation Oncology
Radiation Safety
Michael Mills
Transcription
Pat Noonan
Resident Orientation II
Radiation Oncology
Radiation Biology in
Radiation Oncology
Radiation Safety
Laboratory
William Spanos
Wayne Zundel
Keith Sowards
Joel Handley
After these lectures, the new physics residents are assigned to “shadow” radiation therapists in simulation and
on the various treatment machines for 2 weeks. This time is intended to give the new physics resident a
foundation on which the structured rotations are built. During the first month, the new physics resident also
undergoes CPR training and a TB test. All time spent during orientation and observing on the machines is
logged into the Typhon Group database.
All residents are assigned appropriate personnel radiation monitoring devices, including body and ring badges.
During the orientation process, the entering residents are required to attend one hour of instruction respecting
safety around linear accelerators, CT units and therapy simulators. A senior physicist and an engineer offer the
latter instruction. The University of Louisville Hospital offers CPR instruction. Entering residents are required
to attend a CPR course as soon as it can be arranged with the course director. A TB test is also required during
the first month of employment.
D
D1
Program Administration
Structure within Hospital or Medical Center
A six-person Physics Residency Committee (PRC) consists of the Program Director (PRC Chairman), the
Department Chairman, one faculty medical physicist, one staff medical physicist, one medical dosimetrist and
one radiation biologist. The PRC manages all aspects of the Residency Training Program in Radiation
18
Oncology Physics. The program operates entirely within the Department of Radiation Oncology, School of
Medicine, and University of Louisville. The University of Louisville – Department of Radiation Oncology
provides professional Radiation Physics and Radiation Oncology services to the Brown Cancer Center and the
University of Louisville Hospital. All equipment is located within the James Graham Brown Cancer Center and
the University of Louisville Hospital. A service contract between the Department and U of L Hospital provides
support for all physics services, including support for two physics residency positions. The Department of
Radiation Oncology, the University of Louisville Hospital, and the Medical Director of the Brown Cancer
Center strongly support the physics residency program, as evidenced by the letters of support in Attachment
3. The University of Louisville Hospital is owned by the University of Louisville, but operates as a separate
corporation. The University of Louisville Hospital leases space owned by the University of Louisville for
hospital and outpatient facilities. Physicians and medical physicists are employed by the University of
Louisville; dosimetrists are employed by the University of Louisville Hospital. Despite disparate sources of
income, all faculty and staff mentors work together as a team to fulfill the education / training mission of the
Brown Cancer Center. All faculty and staff have access to the Typhon Group system and are able to participate
in the completion/recording process of the resident competency progress and in the ongoing resident evaluation
process.
The PRC has developed the following rules of administrative procedures for the Radiation Oncology Physics
Residency Program:
Contingency Plan if a Resident Fails a Rotation
If a resident in radiation oncology physics receives a failing grade in a rotation, either through a failure of
performance or a failure of examination, the six-person Physics Residency Committee will hold a formal
meeting to discuss the reasons that contributed to the failure. The PRC will recommend one of two courses of
action. 1) The PRC determines the resident has not mastered any part of the knowledge associated with the
rotation. In this event, the resident will be required to complete the full rotation again with another Physics
Rotation Mentor. This will result in the lengthening of the program for that resident by up to three months.
Support for these three months will be provided for the resident, but the salary will be reduced to up to 50% of
that for a full-time residency position. University of Louisville Hospital will provide the funding for the three
months (maximum) that will be allowed for the resident to complete tasks associated with the residency. 2) The
PRC determines the resident has not mastered some part of the knowledge associated with the rotation. In this
event, the resident will be required to review this deficiency in knowledge with another Physics Rotation
Mentor. The resident will also continue in the residency rotation that would be otherwise assigned. After one
19
month, the resident will be given a second oral examination. If the resident passes this examination, the
resident will continue in the rotation schedule as designed. If the resident fails the examination, the resident
will be required to complete the full rotation again with another Physics Rotation Mentor. This will result in
the lengthening of the program for that resident by at least three months.
If the program is lengthened under the options listed above, the resident will be required to provide clinical
services in the identified areas of weakness. Only one failing grade in a clinical rotation will be permitted for a
resident. A second failing grade in any rotation will result in dismissal from the residency program. No
funding will be provided to support the residency position beyond three months.
Disciplinary Procedures and Dismissal
A resident in radiation oncology physics may be dismissed from the Program based on failure to achieve the
academic standards outlined above, or based on violations of behavior and conduct as outlined below. The
disciplinary, dismissal and grievance procedures of the Program are outlined following the behavior and
conduct guidelines.
1.
Behavior and Conduct Standards. Radiation oncology physics residents are expected to maintain the
professional appearance and conduct suitable to a radiation oncology physicist employed by the
University of Louisville. The trainee will dress appropriately in the clinical setting. All interactions
with staff, patients, visitors and fellow residents will be carried out in a courteous and respectful
manner. A resident may be subject to immediate probation or dismissal without warning for any
single violation below:
a. Any abusive or discourteous action to or about a patient or visitor.
b. Unauthorized removal of property belonging to the University of Louisville, a patient, visitor,
employee or other student.
c. Willful destruction of University of Louisville property.
d. Conviction of a felony offense.
e. Defrauding, attempting to defraud, or falsification of any University of Louisville or University
of Louisville Hospital record or document, or acquisition, discussion, or release of confidential
information regarding patient care, research, employment, or other official University of
Louisville or University of Louisville Hospital operations.
f. Fighting or dangerous “horseplay”.
g. Unauthorized use or possession of intoxicants or drugs.
20
h. Willful violation of University of Louisville or University of Louisville Hospital safety
regulations.
i. Gross insubordination.
j. Gambling
k. Use of insulting, abusive, or obscene language to other personnel or patients.
l. Failure to report to class or rotation following the expiration of an excused absence or an
approved leave of absence.
m. Absenteeism for five days without notification of the Program Director, and/or absenteeism
without satisfactory explanation.
n. Notification to the University of Louisville or the University of Louisville Hospital of conviction
for a major crime.
2.
The resident may be placed on disciplinary action for the following violations:
a. Unexcused absence from assigned area.
b. Lack of cooperation with instructors or staff.
c. Failure to report patient-related incidents or errors that warrant a report
The Program Director will notify the Physics Residency Committee (PRC) regarding dismissal or disciplinary
action respecting a resident. The PRC will make the decision and the resident will be notified in writing within
24 hours of the decision.
Progressive Discipline Procedures
If a student is placed on disciplinary action by the PRC, or if misconduct violations are reported to the Program
Director, the following steps of progressive discipline will be used.
1.
Oral discussion: An oral discussion of the problem should be conducted in private with the Program
Director, allowing the resident to offer an explanation or justification. If no justification or
satisfactory explanation is offered, the Program Director should put the resident on notice that if
unsatisfactory performance or misconduct continues, more severe action will be taken. In doing so,
the Program Director should make it clear that the only purpose of the discussion is to correct an
unacceptable situation, and there is no wish to penalize or threaten the resident. A written report of
the contents of the discussion will be written by the Program Director, and a copy kept in the
student’s file.
2.
Written guidance: During this procedure, the Program Director must always point out prior attempts
to resolve problems through instruction and oral discussion. If the resident is unable to satisfactorily
respond to the problem, the Program Director will then complete a Guidance Report (Conference /
21
Counseling Record), and place the resident on Written Guidance for 30 days. When the Written
Guidance period expires, the Program Director must determine whether or not the deficiency has
been corrected. If corrected, the Program Director should advise the resident that the Written
Guidance period has expired. If, however, the deficiency has not been corrected, the Program
Director may either extend the Written Guidance period for 30 days or place the student on
Probation. In no case should the Written Guidance status be extended more than once. The Program
Director must forward a copy of the report of the Written Guidance to the PRC.
3.
Probation: Probation is a serious step in the disciplinary process. For this reason, the Program
Director must review the circumstances of the situation with two (2) members of the Physics
Residency Committee. Probation is normally for a specified period of time, from 30 to 90 days.
The Probation Notice becomes part of the resident’s file. The Notice should contain the following:
a. An explanation of the circumstances surrounding the disciplinary action. Copies of the Oral
Discussion and Written Guidance notices may be attached, if these steps were taken prior to
Probation.
b. The probation period
c. A description of the requirements for removal of Probation status.
If a resident satisfies the requirements for removal of Probation status, the Program Director should
complete the Probation Notice with “Date Removed From Probation” and forward a copy to the
PRC. If the Probation period expires without a satisfactory resolution of the problem, the student is
subject to dismissal.
4.
Dismissal: A student, who, despite the preliminary steps described above, continues to violate
acceptable standards of performance or behavior may be subject to dismissal. This serious step is
never taken against a resident without concurrence of the Program Director, the Department
Chairman, and the Physics Residency Committee. This consensus is not a perfunctory one, but is
intended to assure that the fact and circumstances fully warrant dismissal and that the student
involved has been given every reasonable consideration before this decision is made.
Grievance Procedures for Radiation Oncology Physics Residents
Any resident, who believes that a condition of their training is unjust, inequitable, or a hindrance to effective
operations or performance, may initiate a grievance. The resident must first attempting to resolve the problem
through informal discussion with their immediate supervisor. The Staff Grievance Officer is available to
consult with a resident in each stop of the grievance process, including the initial formulation of the grievance
statement. The Staff Grievance Officer cannot serve as an advocate for or representative of residents, but may
22
work closely with residents, departments and Personnel Services to seek equitable resolutions of all grievances.
A resident may provide copies of all grievance materials to the Staff Grievance Officer if the resident chooses
to do so. If the grievance is not resolved through informal discussions with the Program Manager, the
following procedures shall be followed in pursuing the grievance:
1.
The Program Manager who receives the grievance shall respond to the grievance in writing within
five workdays of receiving the grievance. The response shall outline the actions that will or will not
be taken to resolve the grievance. Copies of the response shall be sent to the Assistant VicePresident for Human Resources and the Director of Affirmative Action.
2.
If the resident is not satisfied with the Program Manager’s response to the grievance, the resident
shall submit copies of the original grievance and the supervisor’s response to the grievance to the
Department Chairman and, if the resident continues to be dissatisfied with the response to the
grievance, to the level of the Dean, whose decision shall be final.
This grievance procedure is parallel to that found in the Staff Handbook of the University of Louisville.
D2
Program Director:
The program director is responsible for coordinating the faculty and staff, advising the residents, and evaluating
and promoting the program. The Program Director also serves as Chief of Medical Physics, Department of
Radiation Oncology of the University of Louisville – School of Medicine. As Chief of Medical Physics, the
Program Director is able to assign rotations, mentoring, supervision and special topics for investigation among
the faculty and staff who serve in the Department of Radiation Oncology. The Program Director reports
directly to the Radiation Oncology Department Chairman. The Program Director has full authority to organize
and direct the teaching program, and devotes a significant amount of time and effort in the organization.
Although the Program Director has input, the Program Director does not control the numbers of clinical faculty
nor the facilities available for training. Items administered by the Program Director include:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Correspondence with prospective trainees
Scheduling of prospective residents visits
Scheduling of classrooms for faculty lectures
Scheduling of Physics Residency Committee meetings
Preparation for resident orientation
Administrative support for residents
Program correspondence
Preparation of clinical rotation schedule
Preparation of didactic lecture schedule
Scheduling Physics Resident seminars
Scheduling Oral Exams
Initiation of Physics Residency Program Review
23
The current Program Director and Chief of Medical Physics is Michael D. Mills, Ph.D., MSPH, a Certified
Radiological Physicist. Dr. Mills is a Qualified Medical Physicist, with extensive experience in both the
clinical and educational aspects required in developing and maintaining excellence in a radiation oncology
physics training program. He is an Associate Professor in the School of Medicine, University of Louisville. He
is board certified in Radiation Oncology Physics by the ABMP. He is board certified in Radiological Physics
by the American Board of Radiology. Dr. Mills is a Fellow of the American Association of Physicists in
Medicine, and the American College of Medical Physics. He served as Chairman of the American College of
Medical Physics in 1995, served as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics (2003 –
2007), and is a recipient of the Marvin M.D. Williams Award of the American College of Medical Physics
(2007). He holds license # MP022 to practice all subspecialties of medical physics in Texas (presently, there is
no licensure of medical physicists in Kentucky).
D3
Committee Meetings
Faculty Meeting – The Faculty of the Department of Radiation Oncology meets every other week to conduct
business of the Department. Ongoing administration of the Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program is
performed at this meeting, and any problems or issues involving the program are discussed and resolved. Input
from any faculty member to the PRC may be communicated to the Program Director at any Departmental
faculty meeting. Records are retained for three years.
The Physics Residency Committee (PRC) meets at least annually to conduct business associated with the
Residency Program in Radiation Oncology Physics. At this meeting the PRC reviews and evaluates files
containing the educational, training and work records of program applicants. Also, the PRC considers and
addresses any curricula or process issues respecting the program during this meeting. Records of this meeting
are retained for three years. Ad-hoc meetings may be called if deemed desirable by the Program Director. The
PRC meets to select candidates for interview, and to select the candidates for admission to the program.
D4
Records Available for Review
The Program complies with the “Federal Family Educational Right and Privacy Act of 1974” (Buckley
Amendment). The resident has the right to inspect any of his or her own official records. No one but the
student may inspect his/her own record, with the following exceptions:
1.
Instructors or Program officials who have legitimate academic interest.
2.
Representatives of the State Educational authorities
3.
Representatives of the President of the University of Louisville.
24
4.
Representatives of the Comptroller General of the United States.
5.
Representatives of the United States Department of Health and Human Services
6.
Representatives of the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs, Inc.
(CAMPEP) for program approval purposes, when applicable.
Records for review shall include the following:
1
2
3
Physics Residency Committee minutes (retained three years)
a)
For administrative activities
b)
Applicant selection activities
c)
Oral examination evaluations (retained for life in the resident file)
Resident Applications (finalists retained three years, all applicants retained one year)
a)
Application forms
b)
Transcripts
c)
Candidate interview evaluations
Residents (retained for life)
a)
Training Schedules
b)
Rotation objectives and expectations
c)
Rotation evaluations
d)
Examination results
e)
Oral examination results
Application records, transcripts, letters of recommendation, personnel records, performance evaluations, letter
grades, and subsequent performance respecting board examination of former residents will be made available to
the site-visit team. Departmental policy prevents the distribution of these materials in this document. The sitevisit team should request such records for examination from the Program Director.
E
E1
Resources
Staff
Current faculty and staff of the Department of Radiation Oncology include:
CLINICAL FACULTY AND STAFF:
% FTE for Physics Residency Program
Physicians:
Dr. William Spanos
Professor and Chairman
2%
Program Director – Radiation Oncology
25
Dr. Baby Jose
Professor and Vice-Chairman
2%
Dr. Craig Silverman
Professor
2%
Dr. John Bechtel
Assistant Professor
3%
Dr. Moataz El-Ghamry
Assistant Professor
2%
Dr. Anthony Dragun
Assistant Professor
(starts 11/1/08)
2%
Nurse Practitioner:
To Be Named
Nurse Practitioner
PHYSICS FACULTY AND STAFF:
1%
% FTE for Physics Residency Program
Qualified Medical Physicists:
Dr. Michael Mills
Associate Professor
15%
Chief of Physics, Program Director
Radiation Oncology Physics
Dr. Tim Guan
Clinical Associate Professor
5%
Dr. Albert Zacarias
Assistant Professor
10%
Mr. David Wilson
Assistant Professor
5%
Mr. Keith Sowards
Clinical Physicist
5%
Clinical Physicist
5%
Physics Assistant
5%
Ms. Betty Achino
Chief of Dosimetry
3%
Ms. Judith Turner
Clinical Dosimetrist
3%
Ms. Lynn Osborne
Clinical Dosimetrist
3%
Mr. John Gavin
Clinical Dosimetrist
3%
Ms. Mellonie Brown
Clinical Dosimetrist
Director, RTT Program
3%
Assistant Professor
5%
Physicists Undergoing Certification:
Mr. Joshua James
Mr. Joel Handley
Medical Dosimetrists
RADIOBIOLOGY:
Dr. Wayne Zundel
Physics faculty and staff will be responsible for mentoring residents during semi-annual rotations. Physics
faculty and staff will be responsible for mentoring and testing residents respecting all coursework and
competencies in the program. The physicist to resident ratio in 2008 is 7:2. It is possible a third resident could
26
be admitted with this level of faculty and staff support, but as yet funding is not in place and we have no plans
to create such a position.
E2
Finances
The University of Louisville Hospital provides funding for two continuing Radiation Oncology Resident
positions. The goal of our program is to fund two residents at 100% of the time. Each resident will be expected
to participate full-time in the program. The resident is responsible for personal living and transportation
expenses.
Resident Support (annual) is:
Salary (Support):
$
Benefits (23%)
45,000
10,350
Travel
2,150
Books
500
Total
$
58,000
In the Louisville area, expenses (annual) are estimated to be:
Living expense Burden:
Housing
$
20,000
Utilities
$
5,000
Health Care
2,000 out of pocket
Books, etc.
Total
500
$
27,500
Salaries for Radiation Oncology Physics Residents are equivalent to those of all medical residents at the
University of Louisville. Currently these salaries are in excess of $45,000 per year. The resident should expect
to provide a personal laptop computer for his or her use. In addition, $500.00 is awarded to each resident
annually for the purchase of textbooks.
E3
Facilities
27
The University of Louisville Hospital has completed a $20 million dollar renovation of the Radiation Oncology
Department clinical facilities. It includes the replacement of all therapy equipment with state-of-the-art Varian
Accelerators. Currently the department uses a dual photon-energy EX accelerator, three dual photon-energy IX
accelerators including one Trilogy with stereotactic and respiratory gating capabilities, and one TomoTherapy
Hi-Art unit. With the exception of the latter, all have electron capability and 120 leaf multileaf collimators. A
Varian Vari-source HDR unit is placed in a dedicated treatment suite. A Mobetron Intra-operative Radiation
Therapy unit is located in the operating rooms of the University of Louisville Hospital. Laboratories are
equipped with recent models of ion chambers, electrometers, film-scanners, beam scanners, TLD and other
dosimetry devices.
Diagnostic facilities include a Varian Acuity simulator and a dedicated Philips Accusim large bore CT-Sim
unit. Four Varian Eclipse workstations and 3 CMX XIO workstations are available for treatment planning. A
fully functional mold room provides custom blocks for individual patient needs. A brachytherapy laboratory is
available for source storage, calibration and loading. Although no machine shop is available on site, an
extensive machine shop is available in the Health Science Center. A conference room is available for lectures
and all clinical conferences.
Each resident is assigned a cubicle in the physics work area along with a computer with Web access. Residents
have keys and access to the building 24 hours a day. Residents have unrestricted access to the physics and
radiation oncology libraries, as well as access to the Kornhauser Medical School Library. The physics library
contains contemporary journals such as Medical Physics, IJROBP, Physics in Medicine and Biology, Medical
Dosimetry, ICRU and NCRP Reports, and a large number of current texts, proceedings, and workshop reports.
The radiation oncology library contains a large number of contemporary texts, journals and proceedings related
to the practice of radiation oncology. Residents have access to office supplies, copying equipment, computing
equipment, a fax machine and an Internet connection. All laboratories meet modern standards of lighting,
ventilation, and comfort. The clinic library/conference room is equipped with a whiteboard, television and
video projection equipment. The resident is assigned a desk in the physics laboratory. Residents have keys and
access to the building 24 hours a day. Procedures are in place 1) to allow the residents reasonable access time
to clinical equipment, 2) to provide residents sufficient training and technical support to ensure safe and proper
use of equipment, and 3) to ensure equipment is left in the proper state for clinical use.
F
Safety
28
Residents will be working in a radiation and high-voltage environment, where the potential exists for bodily
injury to themselves and others. During the orientation process, the entering residents are required to attend one
hour of instruction respecting safety around linear accelerators, CT units and therapy simulators. A senior
physicist and an engineer offer this instruction. All residents are assigned appropriate personnel radiation
monitoring devices, including body and ring badges. Exposures are reviewed during the quarterly meeting of
the University of Louisville Radiation Safety Committee. Thereafter, a senior physicist will instruct a resident
in the safe and proper operation of all physics and clinical equipment before the resident is allowed to operate
such equipment. Competencies are required that review the Material Safety Data Sheet for Lipowitz metal
(Cerrobend), and ozone hazards. Operation of equipment and hazardous materials training is documented as a
competency in the Typhon Group software and approved by the Program Director. The University of
Louisville Hospital offers CPR instruction. Entering residents are required to attend a CPR course as soon as it
can be arranged with the course director. Annually, continuing safety lectures are offered respecting
radioactive materials. Material on radiation safety is offered in Attachments XX
G
G1
Future Plans
Summary of Strengths and Needs
The facilities, patient load, procedures, and faculty all contribute to a program of significant resources. There
are approximately 85 years of combined experience among the physics faculty and staff. Training in almost all
special features and procedures are included as part of this residency program. Weaknesses include the limit of
two funded residency positions. We would like to expand the program and be able to train four medical
physicists, graduating two each year. We are evaluating several options to expand the program.
Program reviews will consist of an internal and external program review. The external review will be
performed by CAMPEP. The internal review procedure is as follows: A faculty member of the University of
Louisville outside the Department of Radiation Oncology will chair an Internal Review Committee (IRC) in the
fifth year of the program, and every fifth year, thereafter, prior to the CAMPEP external review. The IRC
Chairman will select members of the Internal Review Committee. Committee members may include members
of the Radiation Safety Committee, University of Louisville faculty, current or former radiation oncology
29
physics residents, and current or former radiation oncology residents. Members of the PRC are excluded from
membership, except that one member may serve as liaison. The IRC will review current CAMPEP guidelines,
AAPM Task Group reports and a sample internal audit of another training program. The IRC will conduct
interviews of current and former residents, the Department Chairman, Clinical Director for Radiation Oncology,
the PRC Chairman, the Radiation Oncology Program Training Director, and others deemed appropriate for
interview. The findings of these interviews along with a review of current guidelines will make up the bulk of
the Internal Review Audit. The Audit will consist of these findings: Review Procedure, Survey of Educational
Experience of the Faculty and Staff, Clinical Resources, Educational Program Overview, Internal Audit
Findings, and Recommendations for Improvement.
G2
Further Developments and Improvements
An immediate goal is to discuss medical physicist training with the Program Directors of the CAMPEPaccredited academic program at the University of Kentucky. Discussions range from coordinating the
residency opportunities for UK students to developing a combined DMP program. Plans for developing a
Doctorate of Medical Physics program are contingent on the cooperation of the University of Kentucky and the
CAMPEP accredited academic program in existence at that fine University. At this point, negotiations are
stalled. The University of Kentucky is uncertain as to the need for a DMP program, but remains highly
supportive of its CAMPEP accredited Masters level program in Medical Physics.
Another intermediate goal is to examine incorporation of distributed affiliations with other radiation oncology
treatment centers to train medical physicists in therapy physics. At this point, preliminary discussions have
taken place with two institutions. Two other institutions have expressed interest, but have yet entered into
formal discussions. Any expression of serious intent by any institution would be followed by a clear written
proposal for CAMPEP’s consideration and support.
30
Appendix A – Letters of Invitation and Institutional
Commitment
31
32
33
34
Appendix B – Documentation of Institutional
Accreditation
35
36
37
Appendix C – Clinical Rotation Summaries –
Training Plan:
Schedule of Residents, Mentors, Support Mentors and Rotations
University of Louisville Brown Cancer Center
2008-2010 Radiation Oncology Physics Resident Rotation Schedule
Mentors – Faculty or Staff
Michael Mills
Tim Guan
Dave Wilson
Albert Zacarias
Keith Sowards
Joshua James
Joel Handley
Elizabeth Achino
Judy Turner
John Gavin
Lynn Osborne
Mellonie Brown
Fall 2008
TS
TS
TS
KD
TS
TS
TS
KD
KD
KD
KD
KD
Spring
2009
TS
TS
KD
KD
TS
KD
TS
Fall 2009
KD
KD
KD
NR
KD
KD
KD
NR
NR
NR
NR
NR
Spring
2010
KD
KD
NR
NR
KD
NR
KD
All listed personnel may act to mentor the Physics Residents, depending on the task. If you see your name,
follow the column to the right. If the resident’s initials are in bold, you bear primary responsibility for helping
the resident complete his/her competencies during that semester. If the font is not bold, you bear secondary
responsibility for that resident for that semester. You bear primary or secondary responsibility only for one
resident at a time.
Dr. Bechtel will assist the residents with any clinical / medical questions.
TS – Ted Steger
KD – Kate Dikeman
NR – New Resident in July, 2009
1
During all Semesters, the following conferences are scheduled. Physics residents are asked to attend all
conferences, and a minimum number are required:
a) anatomy and technique review conference (weekly)
b) multi-modality conference (includes medical oncology and surgery, weekly)
c) core curriculum with radiation oncology residents (weekly)
d) physics staff (monthly)
38
e) radiation oncology journal club (monthly, one or more physics articles presented each month)
f) morbidity and mortality conference (monthly)
2
The following courses are scheduled. Physics residents must pass each course and limited participation
teaching the radiation oncology resident physics course is required.
a) Stanford Dosimetry Training Tool (Fall Semester Year 1)
b) Basic Radiation Oncology Physics (Spring Semester Year 1 or Fall Semester Year 2)
c) Core Curriculum (Both Semesters, Both Years)
d) Radiation Biology (Spring Semester Year 1 or Fall Semester Year 2)
3
The following short courses / rotations are required. Residents must complete these with satisfactory
grades and evaluations:
a) Imaging Physics and Nuclear Medicine Physics for Radiation Oncology
b) Health Physics Laboratory Rotation
c) Review course in Radiation Oncology Physics
d) Review course in Radiation Biology
e) Advanced Physics Readings assigned from Van Dyk’s Textbook
4
The following tests / evaluations must be satisfactory:
a) Annual Oral examinations
b) RAPHEX examination
c) Semester resident evaluations
5
The following competency categories and competencies are required of physics residents. In general,
any competency may be completed during any rotation, however many competencies are scheduled
for completion during a specific rotation. Some flexibility is needed, since some patient
presentations are not seen very often and new capital equipment arrives infrequently.
a) External beam treatment planning, verification
i)
Lung with off-cord
ii)
Breast
iii)
GU
iv)
GYN
v)
GI
39
vi)
H&N
vii)
Lymphoma
viii)
Melanoma
ix)
Pediatric
x)
Sarcoma
xi)
Thoracic
xii)
Mantle field by hand
xiii)
Mantle field 3-D
xiv)
Patient Diode Dosimetry
xv)
Patient TLD Dosimetry
xvi)
Patient Film Dosimetry
xvii)
Patient Cast and/or Mold
xviii)
Custom Photon Cerrobend Block / Device
xix)
Custom Electron Cerrobend Block / Device
xx)
Participate in Conventional Patient Simulation
xxi)
Participate in Virtual Patient Simulation
xxii)
Participate in Image Acquisition / Fusion – CT-MRI
xxiii)
Participate in Image Acquisition / Fusion – CT-PET
xxiv)
Participate in Patient Simulation – Localization
xxv)
Participate in Patient Simulation – Immobilization
xxvi)
MU Calculation SSD – PDD
xxvii)
MU Calculation SSD-TAR
xxviii)
MU Calculation SSD- TMR
xxix)
MU Calculation SSD – TPR
xxx)
MU Calculation – Photon Extended SSD
xxxi)
MU Calculation – Electron Extended SSD
xxxii)
MU Calculation – off-axis points
xxxiii)
MU Calculation – Heterogeneity calculation
xxxiv)
MU Calculation – Asymmetric jaw calculation
xxxv)
MU Calculation – Enhanced Dynamic Wedge
xxxvi)
Treatment Plan Verification
xxxvii)
Treatment Record Verification (Written chart)
xxxviii)
Treatment Record Verification (Electronic chart)
40
xxxix)
Patient Position (EPID)
xl)
Patient Position CBCT
xli)
Patient Position MVCT
xlii)
Fetal Dose Calculation
xliii)
Pacemaker Calculation
xliv)
Planning Workstation – Data Acceptance, Commissioning Review
xlv)
Planning Workstation – Quality assurance
xlvi)
Planning Workstation – Computer Algorithms Review
xlvii)
Patient Safety Review – Blocks, Couch, Accessories
xlviii)
Review Electrical, Ozone, Cerrobend Hazards
xlix)
4D-CT Simulation
b) Brachytherapy treatment planning, verification
i)
LDR Cervix plan
ii)
LDR Tandem and ovoid plan
iii)
LDR Prostate plan
iv)
LDR Tongue plan
v)
LDR H&N plan
vi)
HDR Cervix
vii)
HDR Tandem and ovoid plan
viii)
HDR Lung
ix)
Receive Shipment of Radioactive Materials
x)
Send Shipment of Radioactive Materials
xi)
Receive HDR source
xii)
Send HDR source
xiii)
Perform source leak check with Radiation Safety
xiv)
Perform source activity checks: Cs-127, Ir-192
xv)
Perform source activity checks: I-125, Pd-103
xvi)
Review Radioactive Materials License with Radiation Safety
xvii)
Release calc with radioactive patient - I-131
xviii) Release calc with radioactive patient - I-125
xix)
Review reporting procedure for medical events
xx)
Review of Records with Radiation Safety
c) Room Shielding Design
41
i)
Simulator vault
ii)
Simulator vault with CBCT
iii)
CT Simulator Vault
iv)
HDR Vault
v)
Linear Accelerator Vault with IMRT / IGRT
vi)
TomoTherapy Vault
d) Quality Assurance, Daily, Monthly
i)
Daily QA – Simulator
ii)
Daily QA - CT Simulator
iii)
Daily QA - Linear Accelerator
iv)
Daily QA - Trilogy Linear Accelerator
v)
Daily QA - TomoTherapy Hi-Art Unit
vi)
Monthly QA of Dosimetry Equipment - Constancy Checks
vii)
Monthly QA – Simulator
viii)
Monthly QA - CT Simulator
ix)
Monthly QA - Linear Accelerator
x)
Monthly QA - Trilogy Linear Accelerator
xi)
Monthly QA - TomoTherapy Hi-Art Unit
e) Annual calibration, clinical equipment
i)
Annual Simulator Calibration
ii)
Annual CT - Simulator Calibration
iii)
Annual Linear Accelerator Calibration
iv)
Annual Intraoperative Linear Accelerator Calibration
v)
Annual Instrument Intercomparison
vi)
TG-51 Photon Calibration
vii)
TG-51 Electron Calibration
viii)
Annual TomoTherapy Hi Art Unit Calibration
ix)
Operation of Linear Accelerators
x)
Operation of Tomotherapy Unit
xi)
Operation of Farmer type Chamber / Electrometer
xii)
Operation of Well type Chamber / Electrometer
xiii)
Operation of 3-D Beam Scanner
xiv)
Operation of Unfors Radiographic Meter
42
xv)
Operation of Unfors CT Meter
xvi)
Operation of Intraoperative Unit
f) TBI Photons, TSE electrons
i)
TBI Photon Annual Calibration
ii)
TSE Electron Annual Calibration
iii)
TBI Photon Plan
iv)
TSE Electron Plan
v)
Ozone Hazard for TSE Electrons
g) Intraoperative electrons
i)
Annual Calibration of Intraoperative Unit
ii)
Patient Intraoperative Plan and Delivery
iii)
Daily QA of Intraoperative Unit
h) Stereotactic cranial, body
i)
Stereotactic Daily Quality Assurance
ii)
Stereotactic Annual Quality Assurance
iii)
Stereotactic Cranial Plan
iv)
Stereotactic Body Plan
i) IMRT / IGRT
i)
Step and Shoot Plan
ii)
Sliding Window Plan
iii)
Compensator IMRT Plan
iv)
TomoTherapy IMRT Plan
v)
Step and Shoot DQA
vi)
Sliding Window DQA
vii)
Compensator IMRT DQA
viii)
TomoTherapy IMRT DAQ
ix)
Rapid Arc (VMAT) Plan
x)
Rapid Arc (VMAT) DQA
xi)
DQA with Film
xii)
DQA with Ion Chamber
xiii)
DQA with Portal Dosimetry
xiv)
DQA with MapCHECK
j) Respiratory Gating
43
i)
Respiratory Gating Simulation
ii)
Respiratory Gating Plan
iii)
Respiratory Gating DQA
iv)
4DCT Simulation
v)
4DCT Plan
vi)
4DCT DQA
k) HDR / LDR Brachytherapy
i)
HDR Cervix Plan and Delivery
ii)
HDR Tandem and Ovoids Plan and Delivery
iii)
HDR Lung Plan and Delivery
iv)
LDR Tandem and Ovoids Plan and Treatment
v)
LDR Interstitial with Ir-192 Plan and Treatment
vi)
I-131 Plan, Release Calculation and Treatment
l) Administrative and Professional Duties
6
i)
Publishing in Scientific and Clinical Journals
ii)
Staffing and Manpower (Abt Studies)
iii)
Billing Procedures
iv)
Job Search
v)
Professional Organizations and Certification
vi)
Malpractice and Legal Issues
vii)
The Care Bill and Licensure
viii)
Workforce and the Future of Medical Physics
Rotation Title, Preceptor / Mentor, Duration, Recommended References, and Evaluation Scheme:
44
Rotation 1; 6 Months – Task List for Radiation Oncology Physics Residents
Orientation, Rotation in Patient Simulation, Patient Virtual Simulation, Simulator and CT Quality Assurance,
Device Fabrication, 3-D Treatment Planning and In-Vivo Dosimetry Measurements
Mentors: Betty Achino, CMD; Albert Zacarias, Ph.D.
Overview:
Clinical training will be under the direction of the Assistant Director of the Radiation Oncology Physics
Residency Program. The training and supervision of clinical physics activities will be by the faculty and
professional staff of the Physics Section of the Radiation Oncology Department. The training in dosimetry
procedures will be by the Dosimetry Section of the Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville
Hospital. All patient care activities will be checked and signed by either a Certified Medical Dosimetrist or a
Certified Medical Physicist, as appropriate. The resident’s progress will be reviewed by the Radiation
Oncology Physics Residency Program Director quarterly.
Learning Objectives:
1 Learn simulation and virtual simulation procedures, including patient positioning, immobilization and
localization. CT virtual simulation will include tumor localization, patient contours and virtual
radiographic/fluoroscopic positioning of beams. Beams will be modified with custom
blocking/MLC shaping. The resident will develop a simulation skill level acceptable to the faculty
radiation oncologists and the rotation supervisors.
2 Learn simulator and CT-simulator quality assurance.
3 Learn computer-assisted isodose generation techniques and external beam treatment planning
procedures with a 3-D treatment planning system.
4 Learn and perform Monitor Unit calculations, including: SSD/PDD, SAD/TAR/TMR/TPR, extended
SSD for photons and electrons, off-axis points, heterogeneity (inhomogeneity) corrections, tissue
compensation, asymmetric collimation, Sc & Sp, and enhanced dynamic/virtual wedge calculations.
5 Learn treatment plan verification, treatment record verification, Monitor Unit calculation/verification,
image based (ultrasound/EPID) patient positioning, tissue compensation, information systems data
entry and integrity, record and verify systems, fetal dose and pacemaker considerations.
6 Learn treatment delivery verification, in-vivo patient dosimetry methods and procedures.
During the six-month rotation, the radiation oncology physics resident should complete the following tasks:
1
2
3
4
Complete all training modules within the Stanford Dosimetry Training Tool.
Observe and participate in patient simulations for six months.
Observe and participate in patient virtual simulations for six months.
Perform simulator, and CT Quality Assurance for six months according to the following
a. Perform Daily Quality Assurance checks for simulator and CT-simulator.
b. Perform Monthly Quality Assurance checks for simulator and CT-simulator.
5 Fabricate custom Cerrobend treatment devices for one month.
a. Fabricate custom cast and mold work for six months.
6 Plan one or more of the following external beam case types with the 3-D treatment planning system.
Plans may be coplanar or non-coplanar (3D). These plans will utilize CT, MRI, PET, Ultrasound
and fusion/registration imaging techniques:
a. Breast
b. Central nervous system (CNS) - Simple cranium
c. Genitourinary (GU) - Prostate / Multiple and Conformal Fields
d. Gynecological/Cervix (GYN)
45
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
e. Gastrointestinal (GI) – Esophagus, Colon / Rectum
f. Head and Neck (plan at least one maxillary antrum from file)
g. Lymphoma
h. Melanoma
i. Pediatrics
j. Sarcoma
k. Thoracic (Lung with off cord)
Plan one of the following irregular field case types with the 3-D treatment planning system:
a. Clarkson mantle by hand
b. Clarkson mantle by 3-D treatment planning system
Assist in performing an annual calibration (using TG-51) on at least one linear accelerator. Record the
results in Argus.
Observe and participate in patient simulations for six months.
Observe and participate in patient virtual simulations for six months.
Perform Annual Calibration on a simulator and a CT-simulator.
Perform all procedures to commission and the following dosimetry systems.
a. Patient diode dosimetry
b. Thermoluminescent dosimetry
c. Film dosimetry system
Assist in performing an annual calibration (using TG-51) on at least one linear accelerator. Record the
results in Argus.
Complete all modules within the Stanford Dosimetry Training Tool.
The Rotation Mentor will train and evaluate resident performance for QA checks and construction of devices.
The radiation oncologist must approve all plans for patient use.
Readings:
1
2
3
Stanford Dosimetry Tool – all sections.
ICRU Report 50
Prescribing, Recording and Reporting Photon Beam Therapy (1993)
ICRU Report 62
Prescribing, Recording and Reporting Photon Beam Therapy (Supplement to 50)
(1999)
4 XR Zhu, Entrance Dose Measurements for in-vivo dosimetry, JACMP (1) 3, 2000.
5 AF McKinlay, Thermoluminescence Dosimetry, Adam Hilger, (1981).
6 DMB Watkins, Radiation Therapy Mold Technology, Pergamon Press, (1981).
7 SK Jani, CT Simulation for Radiotherapy, Medical Physics Publishing, (1993).
8 JP Gibbons, Monitor Unit Calculations for External Photon & Electron Beams (2000).
9 GC Bentel, Radiation Therapy Planning, McGraw Hill, (1993).
10 LK Wagner, RG Lester and LR Saldana, Exposure of the Pregnant Patient to Diagnostic Radiations: A
Guide to Medical Management 1997.
11 AF McKinlay, Thermoluminescence Dosimetry, Adam Hilger, 1981.
46
Rotation 2; 6 months - Task List for Radiation Oncology Physics Residents
Rotation in Room Design and Radiation Safety, Machine Acceptance, Calibration, Commissioning and QA
Mentors: Albert Zacarias, Ph.D.; David Wilson, M.S.
Learning Objectives:
1. Participate in all Quality Assurance activities. These will familiarize the resident with the operations
and performances of common equipment found in radiation oncology.
2. Learn aspects of equipment selection, including performance specification, feature comparison,
mechanical/architectural considerations, and performance test designs.
3. Learn aspects of personnel and patient protection, including room design and shielding calculations,
licensure of sources by Nuclear Regulatory Commission or state agency, construction supervision
and site planning, and radiation surveys – including on low photon energy (6 MV) and one high
photon energy (18 MV).
4. Perform one acceptance test for a linear accelerator, including mechanical, safety and radiation tests.
Learn to enter information into a 3-D treatment planning computer and to check that information.
Validate treatment planning data for one treatment planning computer.
5. Assist in an annual calibration for one linear accelerator. This will allow the resident to experience the
level of precision and range of activities to certify a linear accelerator for continuing clinical use.
Learn Protocols AAPM TG-51, TG-61, and TG-25.
6. Learn to commission and develop a QA program for a virtual simulator, linear accelerator and a 3-D
treatment planning system. Include daily, weekly, monthly, and annual QA tasks and procedures,
based on AAPM TG-40.
7. Learn to commission a monitor-unit calculation program for clinical use.
During the six-month rotation, the radiation oncology physics resident should complete the following tasks:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Generate a Room Design, documenting the shielding specifications for the following equipment
units:
a.
Linear Accelerator
b.
Simulator
c.
CT Simulator
d.
HDR unit
The report will be reviewed, corrected and graded by the Rotation Mentor. If possible, actual
clinical installations will be used and the shielding results compared with those in place.
Participate in the monthly QA checks of the following equipment units for each of the six months:
a.
Linear Accelerators
b.
Simulators
c.
CT unit
d.
HDR unit
The Rotation Mentor will monitor performance and completeness of these tasks.
Participate in the daily QA of the following units for at least 5 days:
a.
Linear Accelerators
b.
Simulators
c.
CT Simulator
d.
HDR unit
Serve two week rotation in Radiation Safety Office
Assist in performing an annual calibration (using TG-51) on at least one linear accelerator. Write up
the report.
47
6.
Work through all daily, weekly, monthly and quarterly quality assurance procedures in the QA
manual.
Prepare one seminar on a topic assigned by the Rotation Mentor.
a.
Complete Data sheets to enter physics data into a 3-D treatment-planning computer for:
Photons, low and high energy
b.
Electrons, low and high energy
c.
Cs-137 sources
d.
Ir-192 sources
e.
I-125 sources
f.
Pd-103 sources
Rotation Mentor will review and compare to those used to commission the TP system.
Verify the information in the 3-D treatment-planning computer according to protocols provided by
the manufacturer and developed in house.
Develop a program for Quality Assurance for the treatment-planning system according to existing
Quality Assurance Protocols and in-house QA standards.
Generate a comprehensive Acceptance, Commissioning and Quality Assurance report for the 3-D
treatment-planning system.
Commission a commercial photon and electron monitor-unit calculation program for clinical use.
Prepare a sample data book for use by the dosimetry section.
Assist in performing an annual calibration (using TG-51) on at least one linear accelerator. Enter the
information into Argus.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Readings:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
AAPM Report 21, Specification of Brachytherapy Source Strength (1987) – TG 32
AAPM Report 32, Clinical Electron Beam Dosimetry, Med Phys (18) 1 – TG 25
AAPM Report 46, Comprehensive QA for Radiation Oncology, Med Phys (21) 4 – TG 40
AAPM Report 47, AAPM Code of Practice for Linear Accelerators, Med Phys (21) 7 – TG 45
AAPM Report 51, Dosimetry of Interstitial Brachytherapy Sources, Med Phys (22) 2 – TG 43
AAPM Report 56, Medical Accelerator Safety Considerations, Med Phys (20) 4 – TG 35
AAPM Report 62, QA for Clinical Radiotherapy Treatment Planning, Med Phys (25) 10 – TG 53
AAPM Report 67, Protocol for Clinical Dosimetry of High Energy Photon and Electron Beams Med
Phys (26) 9 – TG 51
AAPM Report 72, Basic Applications of Multileaf Collimators (2001) – TG 50
NCRP Report 32, Radiation Protection in Educational Institutions (1966)
NCRP Report 105, Radiation Protection for Medical and Allied Health Personnel (1989)
NCRP Report 107, Implementation of the Principle of ALARA for Medical and Dental Personnel
(1990)
PH McGinley, Shielding Techniques for Radiation Oncology Facilities, Medical Physics Publishing
(1998)
AAPM OR-01, Information Transfer from Beam Data Acquisition Systems, TG – 11
48
Rotation 3 – Task List for Radiation Oncology Physics Residents
Rotation in Brachytherapy, High Dose Rate Brachytherapy, Prostate Brachytherapy, Therapeutic Nuclear
Medicine, IMRT Treatment Planning, Delivery Quality Assurance Measurements, and Radiation Safety Officer
Duties and Responsibilities
Mentors: Tim Guan, Ph.D., Michael Mills, Ph.D.
Learning Objectives:
1 Learn to plan LDR brachytherapy cases using Patterson-Parker rules and a 3-D treatment planning
system.
2 Learn acceptance, commissioning, and annual calibration tasks for a High Dose Rate afterloading
system.
3 Learn to plan HDR cases.
4 Learn physics and dosimetry procedures for prostate seed brachytherapy.
5 Learn physics and dosimetry procedures for endovascular brachytherapy
6 Learn procedures for the ordering and administration of therapeutic radionuclides.
7 Learn to enter information into an IMRT treatment-planning computer and to check that information.
8 Learn to commission and develop a QA program for an IMRT treatment-planning computer.
9 Learn to Plan IMRT for a number of clinical sites.
10 20 hour rotation in Radiation Safety
11 The radiation oncologist must approve all brachytherapy, IMRT and IGRT plans for patient use. The
Rotation Mentor will train and test the resident in brachytherapy, IMRT/IGRT commissioning and
IMRT/IGRT QA procedures.
During the six-month rotation, the radiation oncology physics resident should complete the following tasks:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
Plan one of the following brachytherapy case types with the 3-D treatment planning system:
a. Tandem and Ovoids
b. Vaginal Cylinder
c. Iridium Base of tongue
d. Prostate seed implant
Review Patterson-Parker Rules. Assist in all brachytherapy procedures for three months, including
source ordering, source transport and loading, and room surveys.
Perform Acceptance and Commissioning tasks to begin a High Dose Rate afterloading program.
Participate in the quarterly source exchange and perform all of the associated QA procedures for the
HDR unit.
Plan one of the following HDR cases:
a. Tandem and Ovoids
b. Vaginal Cylinder
c. Single catheter lung
d. Multiple catheter lung
Assist in performing the annual calibration of the HDR unit. Write up the report.
Assist in prostate brachytherapy procedures for three months.
Participate with physics staff to order radionuclides for therapeutic use.
Participate in the administration of therapeutic radionuclides (Strontium, Samarium and Iodine) for
three months.
Assist in performing an annual calibration (using TG-51) on at least one linear accelerator. Write up
the report.
49
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Verify the information in the IMRT treatment-planning computer according to protocols provided by
the manufacturer and developed in house.
Develop a program for Quality Assurance for the IMRT treatment-planning system according to
existing Quality Assurance Protocols and in-house QA standards.
Generate a comprehensive Acceptance, Commissioning and Quality Assurance report for the IMRT
treatment-planning system.
Plan one of the following external beam case types with the IMRT treatment planning system:
a. Prostate
b. Head and Neck
c. Lung
d. Other sites as assigned
Participate in the physics weekly chart review schedule for all patients on one machine each week.
Twenty hour rotation in Radiation Safety to include review of regulations, mock inspection, wipes
tests, radioactive material license management and other associated duties.
Participate in teaching the Residents Physics Course for Radiation Oncology Residents.
Readings:
1
2
3
4
5
AAPM Report 41
Remote Afterloading Technology (1993) – TG – 41.
AAPM Report 59
Code of Practice for Brachytherapy Physics, Med Phys (24) 10 – TG – 56.
AAPM Report 61
High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Treatment Delivery, Med Phys (25) 4 – TG – 59.
AAPM Report 68
Permanent Prostate Seed Implant Brachytherapy, Med Phys (26) 10 – TG – 64.
AAPM Report 69
Recommendations of the AAPM on 103-Pd Interstitial Source Calibration and
Dosimetry: implications for dose specification and prescription, Med Phys (27) 4
6 AAPM Report 71
A Primer for Radioimmunotherapy and Radionuclide Therapy (2001) TG – 7.
7 P Tripuraneni, S Jani, E Minar, M Leon, Intravascular Brachytherapy, ReMedica, (2001).
8 Interstitial Collaborative Working Group, Interstitial Brachytherapy, Raven Press, (1990).
9 J Van Dyk, The Modern Technology of Radiation Oncology, Medical Physics Publishing (1999).
10 DR Wigg, Applied Radiobiology and Bioeffect Planning, Medical Physics Publishing (2001).
11 JA Purdy and G Starkschall, 3-D Planning and Conformal Radiation Therapy, Adv. Med. Pub. (1999).
12 JA Purdy, WH Grant, JR Palta, EB Butler, & CA Perez, 3-D Conformal and Intensity Modulated
Radiation Therapy: Physics & Clinical Applications, Adv. Med. Pub. (2001).
50
Rotation 4 – Task List for Radiation Oncology Physics Residents
External Beam Special Procedures Including Total Body Irradiation, Total Skin Electron Treatments, IntraOperative Radiation Therapy, Rotation in Diagnostic Equipment, Information Management, Administration,
Budgets, Staffing, Space, Professional Responsibilities and Board Preparation
Mentors: Michael Mills, Ph.D. and Keith Sowards, M.S.
Learning Objectives:
1
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Learn to commission a total-body photon special procedure, both with and without a Mick Frame.
Plan total body photon irradiation, both with and without a Mick Frame.
Learn to commission a Stanford total skin electron technique.
Plan total skin electron treatments.
Learn QA procedures for Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy.
Plan assist, and calculate MU for IORT Cases
Learn Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy procedures and set-up.
Plan Stereotactic cases, perform patient quality assurance, and assist in the treatment of patients.
Learn the use of medical imaging equipment in radiation oncology.
Learn the role of the radiation oncology physicist.
Learn to administrate a radiation oncology physics practice.
Learn to prepare for board examination.
During the six-month rotation, the radiation oncology physics resident should complete the following tasks:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Participate in conventional and Mick Frame TBI procedures for six months. Review all
commissioning data for these procedures.
Plan one conventional and one Mick Frame TBI cases.
Participate in all Total Skin Electron procedures for six months. Review all commissioning data for
these procedures.
Participate in all Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy procedures for six months, including warm-up
and quality assurance. Review all commissioning data for these procedures.
Participate in the annual calibration of the IORT unit. Prepare the report.
Participate in all Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy patient
procedures for six months. Perform all QA procedures and plan at least one case.
Participate in the physics weekly chart review schedule for all patients on one machine each week.
Participate in teaching the Residents Physics Course for Radiation Oncology Residents.
Review acceptance, commissioning, quality assurance, annual calibration and performance testing of
the following diagnostic equipment:
a. Radiation therapy simulator
b. CT and CT-simulator
c. Ultrasound unit
d. MRI unit
e. PET scanner
Review computer system management operation with Computer Network Manager. Review the
record and verify system, billing system and tumor registry system.
Review all appropriate Local, State and Federal regulations respecting the use of radioactive
materials, diagnostic and therapeutic equipment, and quality management programs for hospitals and
universities.
Review the duties of the Radiation Safety Officer and the duties of the Chairman of the Radiation
Safety Committee.
51
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
Prepare a mock budget, staffing and space needs estimate based on projected increases in patient
load.
Review the professional activities of the medical physicist with the Rotation Mentor; design a short
special project to be completed within the six-month rotation.
Perform fetal dose calculations from exposure to diagnostic (1 calc) and therapeutic (1 calc)
radiation.
Outline, with the Rotation Mentor, a complete Board preparation study schedule.
Participate in the physics weekly chart review schedule for all patients on one machine each week.
Readings:
1.
AAPM Report 17
The Physical Aspects of Total and Half Body Photon Irradiation (1986) – TG –
29.
2.
AAPM Report 23
Total Skin Electron Therapy: Technique and Dosimetry (1987).
3.
LL Gunderson, Intraoperative Irradiation: Techniques & Results, Humana Press (1999).
4.
AAPM Report 54
Stereotactic Radiosurgery (1995) – TG – 42.
5.
AAPM Report 38
The Role of a Physicist in Radiation Oncology (1993) – TG – 1
6.
AAPM Report 42
The Role of the Clinical medical Physicist in Diagnostic Radiology (1994)
7.
AAPM Report 50
Fetal Dose from Radiotherapy with Photon Beams, Med Phys (22) 1 – TG 36
8.
LK Wagner, RG Lester, LR Saldana, Exposure of the Pregnant Patient to Diagnostic Radiations,
Medical
Physics Publishing (1997).
9.
TS Curry, JE Dowdey, RC Murry, Christensen’s Introduction to the Physics of Diagnostic Radiology,
Lea and
Febiger, (1990).
10.
P Sprawls, Physical Principles of Medical Imaging, Medical Physics Publishing (1995).
11.
W Hendee, R Ritenour, Medical Imaging Physics, Mosby Year Book (1992).
12.
JA Sorenson and ME Phelps, Physics in Nuclear Medicine, Grune & Stratton (2003).
13.
P Sprawls, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Medical Physics Publishing (2000).
14.
JT Bushberg, Essential Physics of Medical Imaging, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (2001).
15.
KR Hogstrom and JL Horton, Introduction to the Professional Aspects of Medical Physics, University of
Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (1999).
16.
RJ Shalek and DS Gooden, Medical Physicists and Malpractice, Medical Physics Publishing
52
Books for Medical Physics Residency Program
Radiation Therapy Planning, Second Edition
By: Gunilla Bentel
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
The Physics of Radiation Therapy, Third Edition
By Faiz M. Khan
Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Radiation Oncology Physics: A Handbook for Teachers and Students
By: Ervin B Podgorsak, Editor
Publisher: International Atomic Energy Agency
http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PDF/Pub1196_web.pdf
The Modern Technology of Radiation Oncology Vol. 1 & Vol. 2
Editor: Jacob Van Dyk
Publisher: Medical Physics Publishing
Physics of Radiology, Second Edition
By: Anthony Brinton Wolbarst
Publisher: Medical Physics Publishing
Radiobiology for the Radiologist, Fourth Edition
By: Eric Hall
Publisher J.B. Lippincott Company
Principals and Practice of Radiation Oncology
By: Edward C. Halperin, Carlos A. Perez, and Luther W. Brady
Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins
Medical Physicists and Malpractice
By: Robert J. Shalek and David S. Gooden
Publisher: Medical Physics Publishing
Shielding Techniques – Radiation Oncology Facilities, Second Edition
By: Patton H. McGinley
Publisher: Medical Physics Publishing
Introduction to Health Physics – Third Edition
By: Herman Cember
Publisher: McGraw-Hill
Physics in Nuclear Medicine, Third Edition
By: Simon Cherry, James A. Sorenson, and Michael E. Phelps
Publisher: Saunders
53
7 Examples of Student Reporting in the Typhon System:
This is an example of the report of conferences attended by our
Junior Resident. She has been in the residency program and in
the system for six weeks:
Allied Health Student Tracking - Administration Section
CLINICAL CONFERENCE LOGS
BY STUDENT
Facility: University of Louisville SOM - Radiation Oncology (Facility
#9025)
Michael D. Mills, PhD is logged in.
Go To...
Pick a student:
Date
Dikeman, Kate
Generate Report
CLINICAL CONFERENCE LOGS FOR: Dikeman, Kate
Topic/Speaker
7/8/2008 Brachytherapy
Dave Wilson and Keith Sowards
Hour
s
CME/CEU
2.0
N
2.0
N
1.0
N
1.0
N
1.0
N
1.0
N
2.0
N
2.0
N
2.0
N
[Associated Course: Orientation - Brachytherapy Overview]
7/9/2008 Brachytherapy
Keith Sowards and Joel Handley
[Associated Course: Orientation - Brachytherapy Laboratory]
7/9/2008 Dosimetry
Betty Achino
[Associated Course: Orientation - Dosimetry Operations]
7/9/2008 Therapy and Dosimetry Programs
Judy Turner
[Associated Course: Orientation - RTT and Dosimetry Programs]
7/10/2008 External Beam, Conventional
Albert Zacarias and Josh James
[Associated Course: Orientation - External Beam - Conventional]
7/10/2008 Machine Safety
Tim Schadt
[Associated Course: Orientation - Machine Safety - Engineering]
7/10/2008 Monitor Unit Hand Calculations
Ted Steger
[Associated Course: Orientation - External Beam - Hand Calculations]
7/10/2008 Nomenclature
Dr. Mills
[Associated Course: Orientation - Rad Onc Standards & Nomenclature]
7/11/2008 DQA
Albert Zacarias and Josh James
54
[Associated Course: Orientation - IGRT Laboratory - Dosimetry - DQA]
7/11/2008 External Beam, IMRT & IGRT
Albert Zacarias and Josh James
2.0
N
1.0
N
1.0
N
2.0
N
2.0
N
2.0
N
2.0
N
2.0
N
1.0
N
1.0
N
4.0
N
1.5
N
1.0
N
1.0
N
[Associated Course: Orientation - External Beam - IMRT / IGRT]
7/11/2008 M&M
Dr. Owens
[Associated Course: Core Curriculum (Clinical)]
7/14/2008 Brain & Cord Treatment
Dr. Freeman
[Associated Course: Anatomy and Technique]
7/14/2008 Quality Assurance
Dr. Mills
[Associated Course: Orientation - Radiation Oncology Quality Assurance]
7/14/2008 Quality Assurance, Aria
Albert Zacarias
[Associated Course: Orientation - QA in ARIA]
7/15/2008 Radiation Safety
Dr. Mills
[Associated Course: Orientation - Radiation Safety]
7/16/2008 Radiation Biology
Dr. Zundel
[Associated Course: Orientation - Radiation Biology in Rad Onc]
7/16/2008 Radiation Safety Lab
Keith Sowards and Joel Handley
[Associated Course: Orientation - Radiation Safety Laboratory]
7/18/2008 Brain Mets and Cord Compression
Dr. Owens
[Associated Course: Core Curriculum (Clinical)]
7/18/2008 Chart Reviews
Everyone
[Associated Course: Core Curriculum (Clinical)]
7/23/2008 CPR Training
EduStat
[Associated Course: Core Curriculum (Clinical)]
7/25/2008 Prostate, Lung
Dr. Owens
"Effect of preoperative chemoradiation in addition to preoperative chemotherapy: a randomized trial in
stage III non-small-cell lung cancer" "Long term results of conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer:
impact of dose escalation on biochemical tumor control and distant metastasis-free survival outcomes"
[Associated Course: Journal Club]
7/29/2008 Target the TGFß Pathway to Prevent Normal Tissue Injury from
Cancer Therapy
Mitchell S. Anscher, M.D., FACR, FACRO
[Associated Course: Core Curriculum (Clinical)]
8/1/2008 Brachytherapy Basics
Dr. El Ghamry
[Associated Course: Core Curriculum (Clinical)]
55
8/8/2008 M&M
1.0
Dr. Freeman
N
Radiation necrosis from SRS
[Associated Course: Core Curriculum (Clinical)]
Total Conference Hours: 38.5
[ 0.0 CME/CEU Hrs
]
***Report generated 8/15/2008 5:56:43 PM ET***
©2008 Typhon Group LLC
For the below: This is for our Junior Resident, who has been
in our program six weeks. Blue indicates completed
competencies, Red indicates competencies are yet to be
completed.
Allied Health Student Tracking - Administration Section
COMPETENCY TOTALS
Facility: University of Louisville SOM - Radiation Oncology (Facility
#9025)
Michael D. Mills, PhD is logged in.
Go To...
OPTIONAL FILTERS
Dikeman, Kate
Student:
Grad. Class:
--All--
Group:
--All--
Date Range: From
Semester:
--All--
Course:
--All--
Clinical Site:
--All--
Faculty/Preceptor:
--All--
Sort by:
Item
To
mm/dd/yy [Blank = All dates]
Category
Show only critical competencies
Show only competencies with minimum requirements
COMPETENCY TOTALS
View/Export Results to Excel
56
Displays how many times a competency was marked as observed, assisted, or done. The "Minimum Required" numbers (optionally entered by the administrator)
refer to the minimum of each competency that should actually be performed by a student (marked "Assisted" or "Done"). Items with minimums will appear in red
if the minimum has not been met, and will turn to blue once the minimum has been met. Minimum requirements are only valid if you have filtered for a particular
student.
MINIMUM
OBSERVED ASSISTED
DONE
REQUIRED ITEM [CATEGORY]
0
0
0
1
4DCT DQA [RESPIRATORY GATING]
0
0
0
1
4DCT Plan [RESPIRATORY GATING]
0
0
0
1
4DCT Simulation [RESPIRATORY GATING]
0
1
1
4D-CT Simulation [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
0
1
Annual Calibration of Intraoperative Unit [INTRAOPERATIVE ELECTRONS]
0
0
0
1
Annual CT - Simulator Calibration [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
0
1
1
Annual Instrument Intercomparison [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
0
0
0
0
1
Annual Intraoperative Linear Accelerator Calib. [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
0
0
0
2
Annual Linear Accelerator Calibration [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
0
0
0
1
Annual Simulator Calibration [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
0
0
0
1
Annual TomoTherapy Hi Art Unit Calibration [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
0
0
0
1
Billing Procedures [ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL DUTIES]
0
0
0
1
Breast [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
Compensator IMRT DQA [IMRT / IGRT]
0
0
0
1
Compensator IMRT Plan [IMRT / IGRT]
0
0
0
1
CT Simulator Vault [ROOM SHIELDING DESIGN]
0
0
1
Custom Electron Cerrobend Block / Device [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
0
1
Custom Photon Cerrobend Block / Device [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
Daily QA - CT Simulator [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
0
1
Daily QA - Linear Accelerator [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
0
1
Daily QA - Simulator [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
0
1
Daily QA - TomoTherapy Hi-Art Unit [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
0
1
Daily QA - Trilogy Linear Accelerator [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
3
1
Daily QA of Inraoperative Unit [INTRAOPERATIVE ELECTRONS]
0
0
0
1
DQA with Film [IMRT / IGRT]
0
0
1
DQA with Ion Chamber [IMRT / IGRT]
0
0
0
0
1
DQA with MapCheck [IMRT / IGRT]
0
0
0
1
DQA with Portal Dosimetry [IMRT / IGRT]
0
0
0
1
Fetal Dose Calculation [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
GI [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
1
GU [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
0
1
GYN [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
HDR Cervix Plan [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
HDR Cervix Plan and Delivery [HDR / LDR BRACHYTHERAPY]
0
0
0
1
HDR Lung Plan [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
HDR Lung Plan and Delivery [HDR / LDR BRACHYTHERAPY]
0
0
0
1
HDR Tandem and Ovoids Plan [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
HDR Tandem and Ovoids Plan and Delivery [HDR / LDR BRACHYTHERAPY]
0
0
0
1
HDR Vault [ROOM SHIELDING DESIGN]
0
0
0
1
Head and Neck [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
I-131 Plan, Release Calculation and Treatment [HDR / LDR BRACHYTHERAPY]
0
0
0
1
Job Search [ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL DUTIES]
0
0
0
1
LDR Cervix Plan [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
LDR Head and Neck Plan [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
1
1
LDR Interstitial with Ir-192 Plan and Treatment [HDR / LDR BRACHYTHERAPY]
0
0
0
1
LDR Prostate Plan [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
LDR Tandem and Ovoid Plan [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
LDR Tandem and Ovoids Plan and Treatment [HDR / LDR BRACHYTHERAPY]
0
0
0
1
LDR Tongue Plan [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
Linear Accelerator Vault with IMRT / IGRT [ROOM SHIELDING DESIGN]
0
0
0
1
Lung with off-cord [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
Lymphoma [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
1
Malpractice and Legal Issues [ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL DUTIES]
0
0
0
0
1
Mantle Field by Hand [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
Mantle Field using 3-D System [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
Melanoma [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
1
2
Monthly QA - CT Simulator [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
0
2
Monthly QA - Linear Accelerator [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
1
2
Monthly QA - Simulator [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
0
2
Monthly QA - TomoTherapy Hi-Art Unit [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
0
2
Monthly QA - Trilogy Linear Accelerator [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
1
2
Monthly QA of Equipment - Constancy Checks [QUALITY ASSURANCE - DAILY, MONTHLY]
0
0
1
1
MU Calculation - Electron Extended SSD [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
1
1
MU Calculation - Off-axis points [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
1
1
MU Calculation - Photon Asymmetric collimation [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
1
1
MU Calculation - Photon Enhanced Dynamic Wedge [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
0
1
1
MU Calculation - Photon Extended SSD [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
1
1
MU Calculation - Photon Heterogeneity Correction [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
1
1
MU Calculation - SSD - PDD [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
1
1
MU Calculation - SSD - TAR [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
0
0
1
1
MU Calculation - SSD - TMR [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
57
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
MU Calculation - SSD - TPR [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Operation of 3-D Beam Scanner [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
Operation of Farmer type Chamber / Electrometer [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
Operation of Intraoperative Unit [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
Operation of Linear Accelerators [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
Operation of Tomotherapy Unit [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
Operation of Unfors CT Meter [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
Operation of Unfors Radiographic Meter [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
Operation of Well type Chamber / Electrometer [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
Ozone Hazard for TSE Electrons [TBI PHOTONS, TSE ELECTRONS]
Pacemaker Dose Calculation [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Participate in Conventional Patient Simulation [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Participate in Image Acquisition/Fusion - CT - MRT [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Participate in Image Acquisition/Fusion - CT - PET [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Participate in Patient Simulation - Immobilization [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Participate in Patient Simulation - Localization [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Participate in Virtual Patient Simulation [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Patient Cast and / or Mold [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Patient Diode Dosimetry [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Patient Film Dosimetry [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Patient Intraoperative Plan and Delivery [INTRAOPERATIVE ELECTRONS]
Patient Position (Cone Beam CT) [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Patient Position (EPID) [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Patient Position (MV CT) [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Patient Safety Review - Blocks, Couch, Accessories [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Patient TLD Dosimetry [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Pediatric [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Perform source activity checks: Cs-127, Ir-192 [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Perform source activity checks: I-125, Pd-103 [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Perform source leak check with Radiation Safety [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Planning Workstation - Computer Algorithms Review [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING,
VERIFICATION]
Planning Workstation - Data Accept. Com. Review [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Planning Workstation - Quality Assurance [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Professional Organizations and Certification [ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL DUTIES]
Publishing in Scientific and Clinical Journals [ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL DUTIES]
Rapid Arc (VMAT) DQA [IMRT / IGRT]
Rapid Arc (VMAT) Plan [IMRT / IGRT]
Receive HDR source [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Receive shipment of radioactive materials [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Release calc with radioactive patient - I-125 [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Release calc with radioactive patient - I-131 [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Respiratory Gating DQA [RESPIRATORY GATING]
Respiratory Gating Plan [RESPIRATORY GATING]
Respiratory Gating Simulation [RESPIRATORY GATING]
Review Electrical, Ozone, Cerrobend Hazards [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Review of Records with Radiation Safety [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Review Radioactive Materials License with Rad Saft [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Review reporting procedure for medical events [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Sarcoma [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Send HDR source [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Send shipment of radioactive materials [BRACHY TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Simulator vault [ROOM SHIELDING DESIGN]
Simulator vault with CBCT [ROOM SHIELDING DESIGN]
Sliding Window DAQ [IMRT / IGRT]
Sliding Window Plan [IMRT / IGRT]
Staffing and Manpower (Abt Studies) [ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL DUTIES]
Step and Shoot DQA [IMRT / IGRT]
Step and Shoot Plan [IMRT / IGRT]
Stereotactic Annual Quality Assurance [STEREOTACTIC CRANIAL, BODY]
Stereotactic Body Plan [STEREOTACTIC CRANIAL, BODY]
Stereotactic Crainal Plan [STEREOTACTIC CRANIAL, BODY]
Stereotactic Daily Quality Assurance [STEREOTACTIC CRANIAL, BODY]
TBI Photon Annual Calibration [TBI PHOTONS, TSE ELECTRONS]
TBI Photon Plan [TBI PHOTONS, TSE ELECTRONS]
TG-51 Electron Calibration [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
TG-51 Photon Calibration [ANNUAL CALIBRATION - CLINICAL EQUIPMENT]
The Care Bill and Licensure [ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL DUTIES]
Thoracic [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
TomoTherapy IMRT DAQ [IMRT / IGRT]
TomoTherapy IMRT Plan [IMRT / IGRT]
TomoTherapy Vault [ROOM SHIELDING DESIGN]
Treatment Plan Verification [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Treatment Record Verification (Electronic Chart) [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
Treatment Record Verification (Written Chart) [EXT BM TREATMENT PLANNING, VERIFICATION]
TSE Electron Annual Calibration [TBI PHOTONS, TSE ELECTRONS]
TSE Electron Plan [TBI PHOTONS, TSE ELECTRONS]
58
0
0
0
1
Workforce and the Future of Medical Physics [ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROFESSIONAL DUTIES]
***Report generated 8/15/2008 5:58:48 PM ET***
©2008 Typhon Group LLC
Example of a Competency Completion Report
Allied Health Student Tracking - Administration Section
PRINTABLE CASE LOGS
INDIVIDUAL CASES
Facility: University of Louisville SOM - Radiation Oncology (Facility
#9025)
Michael D. Mills, PhD is logged in.
Case ID #: 1149-20080814-004
Date of Service: 8/14/2008
Edit Case Status/Comments
9
Student Information - Steger, Theodore R
Semester: Fall
Course: Core Curriculum (Clinical)
Faculty/Preceptor: Mills, Michael D.
Clinical Site: James Graham Brown Cancer Center
Patient Demographics
Group Encounter
Clinical Information
Time with Patient: 45 minutes
Consult with Faculty/Preceptor: 45 minutes
Competencies (Observed/Assisted/Done) (Critical in Bold)
IMRT / IGRT - DQA with Portal Dosimetry (Done)
IMRT / IGRT - Step and Shoot DQA (Done)
Respiratory Gating - 4DCT DQA (Done)
Other Questions About This Case
Clinical Notes
Portal Imager DQA with Albert on Body Stereo
Encounter Continuity
Go To Main Menu
Linked encounters: N/A
©2008 Typhon Group LLC
Example of a Resident’s Review of a Faculty Member
59
Individual Responses Detail - "Faculty/Preceptor Evaluation by Resident"
(Filters currently OFF)
TOTAL RESPONSES: 4
Evaluation by:
Evaluation of:
Evaluation Period:
Survey Completed:
Students (Steger, Theodore R)
Clinical Supervisors (James, Joshua)
7/3/2008
7/3/2008 8:21:50 AM
1.
Rotation Semester
•
Fall
2.
Year
•
2007
3.
Mentor's ability to teach materials in objectives
•
Excellent
4.
Mentor's knowledge of material in objectives
•
Good
5.
Learning environment created by mentor
•
Excellent
6.
Effective and timely feedback regarding performance
•
Good
7.
Mentor's availability to assist the residents
60
•
Excellent
8.
Overall teaching ability
•
Excellent
Responses as of 8/15/2008 5:35:04 PM CT
Example of a Resident’s Semester Evaluation
Individual Responses Detail - "Semester Evaluation"
(Filters currently OFF)
TOTAL RESPONSES: 2
Evaluation by:
Evaluation of:
Evaluation Period:
Survey Completed:
Students (Theodore R Steger)
Program
7/18/2008
7/18/2008 3:31:23 PM
1.
Indicate the Semester for which you are completing the evaluation.
•
Spring, Year 1
2.
Estimate the percentage of your time performing clinical physics activities associated with a specific
patient(treatment preparation, brachytherapy, clinical dosimetry, etc).
•
30%
3.
Estimate the percentage of time performing clinical competencies not associated with a specific patient
(machine based: shielding design, radiation safety, monthly QA, annual QA, etc.).
•
30%
4.
Estimate the percentage of your time performing clinical development projects (not for a specific
patient).
61
•
20%
5.
Estimate the percentage of time reading, in courses and conferences, and teaching.
•
20%
6.
Interactions with faculty and teaching staff - friendliness and accessibility of staff.
•
Excellent
7.
Interactions with faculty and teaching staff - Preparation, meaningfulness and time for mentoring /
teaching sessions.
•
Excellent
8.
Comprehensiveness of exposure to the clinical objectives of this semester.
•
Good
9.
Overall effectiveness of this rotation.
•
Excellent
10.
Identify the strengths of this rotation.
•
Was able to spend more time planning due to completion of Linac commissioning. Dosimetrists were
very helpful and willing to teach.
11.
Identify the weaknesses of this rotation.
•
The amount of structure was improved from the Fall, and even from the beginning of the semester.
12.
Please make any other comments or suggestions for improvement of this rotation.
62
•
No response
Responses as of 8/15/2008 5:38:00 PM CT
Example of a Resident’s General Performance Evaluation
Individual Responses Detail - "General Performance Evaluation"
(Filters currently OFF)
TOTAL RESPONSES: 9
Evaluation by:
Evaluation of:
Evaluation Period:
Survey Completed:
Clinical Supervisors (Michael D. Mills)
Students (Steger, Theodore R)
7/2/2008
7/2/2008 3:35:18 PM
1.
Interactions with others
•
Excellent
2.
Oral and written communication
•
Excellent
3.
Anticipation, analysis and reaction to problems
•
Superior
4.
Seeks advice and guidance when appropriate
•
Excellent
5.
Contribution of innovative ideas
•
Superior
6.
63
Initiative
•
Excellent
7.
Motivation
•
Excellent
8.
Interest and enthusiasm
•
Excellent
9.
Effort
•
Excellent
10.
Preparation
•
Excellent
11.
Time management
•
Excellent
12.
Documentation
•
Excellent
13.
Multitasking
•
Excellent
14. Compliance with established policies and procedures
64
•
Superior
15. Equipment handling
•
Excellent
16.
Skill Development
•
Excellent
17.
Professional development
•
Superior
18.
Participation in meetings/discussions
•
Excellent
19.
Teaching preparation and delivery
•
Superior
20.
Teaching effectiveness
•
Superior
Responses as of 8/15/2008 5:41:58 PM CT
65
Department Of Radiation Oncology
Physics Residency Committee Minutes
The annual Physics Residency Committee Meeting for the Department of Radiation Oncology was held on
January 17, 2008.
Present: Michael Mills, Ph.D.
Albert Zacarias, Ph.D.
Tim Guan, Ph.D.
Wayne Zundel, Ph.D.
Betty Achino, C.M.D.
David Wilson, M.S.
William J. Spanos, M.D.
Minutes from Feb, 2007 were reviewed and approved.
Old Business
1
2
Results of Resident Position Offer – The first choice from our last ranking, Ted Steger, accepted the
position and began on June 1, 2007. Ted came to us from a CAMPEP accredited PhD Program at
MD Anderson, Houston. He has exceeded expectations as a highly competent medical physicist and
professional.
Wayne Zundel reported the completion of the Radiobiology Course with everyone receiving a passing
grade.
New Business
1
2
Review of Resident Progress
a. Eric Nelson: Eric received his certificate and graduated the program April 30, 2007. At that
time he had completed all his competencies, including all the final semester competencies, and
all course work with satisfactory scores. Courses include the Radiation Biology Course, the
Physics course, and the Dosimetry Training Tool. Competencies completed included all of the
administrative, stereotactic and IGRT as well as HDR. Eric is working at Norton Suburban in
Louisville, and will begin the board certification process later this year.
b. John Hegseth: John has completed the HDR and IMRT / IGRT competencies and is working on
Stereotactic Cranial. He has made good progress completing the work expected of a resident by
the end of the third semester. He has completed all coursework with acceptable scores on the
final exam. Dosimetry Training Tool scores are all acceptable. His RAPHEX score was
acceptable, but not above the 90th percentile. Commissioning of the “C” machine occupied two
months of his third semester rotation. He is still al little early in the stereo rotation; it is hoped
we will begin stereotactic body procedures early enough for him to have some exposure to them.
We will plan our first case both for TomoTherapy and Varian Trilogy and attempt to involve
John. He is on schedule to graduate at the end of June, 2008. He should begin the job search
process as it is anticipated he will graduate on schedule. He has a desire to remain in Louisville
for family reasons, but there are no anticipated openings at the Brown Cancer Center.
c. Ted Steger: Ted also worked to commission the “C” machine. Although this experience was
unique for the residency program (new machines only come along so often), it has put him
behind completing the treatment planning competencies. However, he is significantly ahead
completing the second semester competencies. Also, he has finished the entire Dosimetry
Training Tool review with acceptable scores. He also completed the Radiobiology course with
an acceptable score on the final.
Ranking of Resident Applicants
66
Residents were ranked as follows:
WZ
MM
WS
DW
BA
TG
Total
M Blakey
2
4
4
5
5
5
25
Tim Burns
4
4
3
3
3
3
20
Victor Jacome
3
2
2
2
2
2
13
N Remmes
5
5
5
4
4
5
28
Alternate candidate not ranked, Kate Dikeman
3
Search for a Residency Management Tool – Michael Mills is continuing a search for a Web-based tool
to facilitate residency management. The New Innovations Software used by all physician residency
programs at the University of Louisville offers some promise, but it is very heavy with complexity
and features we do not use. In addition, there may be some political complications associated with
the use of this program.
Submitted for approval,
Michael D. Mills, Chairman
67
Department Of Radiation Oncology
Physics Residency Committee Minutes
The annual Physics Residency Committee Meeting for the Department of Radiation Oncology was held on
February 15, 2007.
Present: Michael Mills, Ph.D.
Albert Zacarias, Ph.D.
Tim Guan, Ph.D.
Wayne Zundel, Ph.D.
Betty Achino, C.M.D.
David Wilson, M.S.
William J. Spanos, M.D.
Minutes from Mar, 2006 were reviewed and approved.
Old Business
1
2
Results of Resident Position Offer – The second choice from our last ranking, John Hegseth, accepted
the position and began on July 1, 2006. John is a full Professor in physics from the University of New
Orleans. He has an imaging background, but not medical imaging.
Joni Funseth-Smotzer did not pass the Part II Written Examination. We are working with her to design
a study program to give her greater confidence and preparation for the next examination.
New Business
1
Review of Resident Progress
a. YH Zhang: YH graduated the program on July 31, 2006. He is currently working in Brookline,
MA with several senior physicists. He passed Parts I and II written, and is scheduled to take the
oral examination in Therapeutic Radiological Physics in June of 2007.
b. Eric Nelson: Eric is on track to complete his residency program by May of this year. He has
demonstrated competence in some special procedures, including stereotactic radiosurgery, HDR,
and TomoTherapy. He has completed all of the DTT course work and testing, as well as
Radiation Biology and Physics. Eric was a valuable asset to our RTT program, as he took
responsibility for teaching the physics lectures. Eric demonstrated initiative and resourcefulness
helping us solve some networking and IT issues. We anticipate no problems for him to complete
the program and successfully complete the ABR examination process.
c. John Hegseth: John has made some progress toward completing the Dosimetry Training Tool
modules, but need encouragement to go ahead and finish them. He needs to spend more time in
dosimetry finishing all of the required dosimetry planning competencies. He shows a substantial
physics knowledge base, but is a little weak in the biological sciences. He performed well in the
radiation physics course. He has made some progress in the machine QA competencies
scheduled for the second quarter. He needs to complete an annual calibration on all equipment
this semester to stay with the program. He seems to be a little behind, but at this point there is
no reason for concern.
68
3
Ranking of Resident Applicants
Physics Residency Candidate Ranking
Mills
Guan
Zacarias
Achino
Zundel
Total
STEGER
1
1
5
1
1
9
(1)
LIAO
2
2
3
4
4
15
(2)
BOWERS
3
5
5
5
2
20
WOCH
4
4
2
2
5
17
FU
5
5
1
5
5
21
NIVEN
5
5
5
5
5
25
VOGDS
5
3
4
3
3
18
(3)
(4)
Steger is by far the most qualified candidate. We plan to make an early offer to him.
4
Search for a Residency Management Tool – Michael Mills is going to start looking for an appropriate
residency management tool. This tool would ideally be web-based, but could also be standalone in the
department. It is possible something could be written in-house, but that would involve a substantial
amount of effort. A prototype Excel-based Clinical Activity Report for the Residency Program was
reviewed.
Submitted for approval,
Michael D. Mills, Chairman
69
Department Of Radiation Oncology
Physics Residency Committee Minutes
The annual Physics Residency Committee Meeting for the Department of Radiation Oncology was held on
March 21, 2006.
Present: Michael Mills, Ph.D.
Albert Zacarias, Ph.D.
Tim Guan, Ph.D.
Wayne Zundel, Ph.D.
Betty Achino, C.M.D.
David Wilson, M.S.
William J. Spanos, M.D.
Minutes from Feb, 2006 were reviewed and approved.
Old Business
1
Results of Resident Position Offer – The second choice from our last ranking, John Hegseth,
accepted the position and began on July 1, 2006. John is a full Professor in physics from the
University of New Orleans. He has an imaging background, but not medical imaging.
New Business
1
Review of Resident Progress
a. Joni Funseth-Smotzer: Joni graduated in December, and was offered a position as a staff
medical physicist here in our Department. Joni has assumed some responsibility for
HDR treatments and TomoTherapy DQA. She passed the part I Written ABR
examination and is preparing to take Part II Written this fall. Joni was offered an
abbreviated residency program since she is a trained medical dosimetrist.
b. YH Zhang: YH continues to make progress as a resident. He passed the Part I written
examination for the ABR. He has completed his coursework and is on track to finish by
this September. He began our program two months late as our first choice for this
position backed out of the July 1 start date the last week in June. YH has completed most
competencies in machine quality assurance, dosimetry and annual calibrations. He is
now fulfilling competencies in stereotactic radiosurgery, TomoTherapy DQA and HDR.
He struggled a little with the brachytherapy and nuclear medicine procedures, and has yet
to complete certain competencies for these.
c. Eric Nelson: Eric has assumed some responsibility for teaching RTT students. He has
completed most of the dosimetry competencies and is working on machine QA. Eric is
very pleasant and seems well motivated. He does everything we request without
comment and seems to be enthusiastic about the program. He has completed all
coursework to date without any problems. He is making progress completing the
Dosimetry Training Tool modules.
2
Ranking of Resident Applicants
70
Ratings by Committee Members (Achino and Zundel elected not to score candidates)
1
2
Spanos
Figueroa
Madani
Mills
Figueroa
Hegseth
3
4
Hegseth Madani
Bernadin Wang
Guan
Figueroa
Wang
Wilson
Madani
Hegseth
Zacarias Zundel
Bernadin Figueroa
Figueroa Bernadi
n
Bernadin Figueroa Madani
Hegseth
Hegseth Bernadin Hegseth Wang
Total Scores:
Figueroa
Hegseth
Bernadin
Madani
9
18
19
19
Submitted for approval,
Michael D. Mills, Chairman
71
Physical Concepts of Radiation Oncology
Text: The Physics of Radiation Therapy, Third Edition, by Faiz M. Khan
Mondays 7:30 – 9:00 A.M., Wednesday 12:00 noon -1:30 P.M.
Monday - 4th Floor Conference Room
Wednesday, ENT Conference Room, except for the days below:
2nd floor Administrative Room - 2/13, 3/12, 4/2, 5/7, 6/4, 7/9, 8/6, 9/3, 10/1, 11/5, 12/3
Course Director: Michael D. Mills, Ph.D.
Read the assigned Chapter before class. Each class will have short review test or homework assignment. Each Lecturer will test at
the end of his lecture series, 80 is passing. A failing grade on a test will result in additional assignments and testing. Each physicist
is responsible for approximately 100 pages of material, 5-7 lectures and 1-2 tests. Grading: Each Test is 10% of final grade, Final is
50% of final grade. A failing grade in the course will result in additional assignments and testing. Categories: 1 Radiation Physics
and Instrumentation; 2 Radiation Protection; 3 Mathematics Pertaining to the Use and Measurement of Radioactivity
Chapter
1
2
3
4
4
5
5
6
7
8
8
Test, 1-8
9
10
11
12
12
13
15
15
15
15
15
Test 9-13, 15
16
17
14
14
14
Test, 14,16,17
18
19
20
21
22
23
Test 18-23
Final
Topic
Structure of Matter
Nuclear Transformations
Production of X-Rays
Clinical Radiation Generators
Clinical Radiation Generators
Interactions of Ion. Radiation
Interactions of Ion. Radiation
Measurement of Ionizing Radiation
Quality of X-Ray Beams
Measurement of Absorbed Dose
Measurement of Absorbed Dose
Test, 1-8
Dose Distribution and Scatter Analysis
A System of Dosimetric Calculations
Treatment Planning I, Isodose Distributions
Treatment Planning II: Patient Data, Corrections and Setup
Treatment Planning II: Patient Data, Corrections and Setup
Treatment Planning III: Field Shaping, Skin Dose, Field Sep.
Brachytherapy
Brachytherapy
Brachytherapy
Brachytherapy
Brachytherapy
Test, 9-13, 15
Radiation Protection
Quality Assurance
Electron Beam Therapy
Electron Beam Therapy
Electron Beam Therapy
Test, 14, 16, 17
TBI
Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy
IMRT/IGRT
Stereotactic Radiosurgery
High Dose Rate Brachytherapy
Prostate Implants
Test, 18-23
Assessment of Patient Setup and Verification
Hyperthermia and Particle Therapy
Imaging for Radiation Oncology
Imaging for Radiation Oncology
100 Questions, one point each
Category
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
Instructor
Guan
Guan
Guan
Guan
Guan
Guan
Guan
Guan
Guan
Guan
Guan
Guan
Zacarias
Zacarias
Zacarias
Zacarias
Zacarias
Zacarias
Wilson
Wilson
Wilson
Wilson
Wilson
Wilson
Sowards
Sowards
Mills
Mills
Mills
Mills/Sowards
James
James
James
James
Sowards
Sowards
James/Sowards
Zacarias/Hegseth
Zacarias/Hegseth
Mills/Steger
Mills/Steger
Mills
Date
2/11
2/13
2/18
2/20
2/25
2/27
3/3
3/5
3/10
3/12
3/17
3/19
3/24
3/26
3/31
4/2
4/7
4/9
4/14
4/16
4/21
4/23
4/28
4/30
5/5
5/7
5/12
5/14
5/19
5/21
5/28
6/2
6/4
6/9
6/11
6/16
6/18
6/23
6/25
6/30
7/2
7/7
72
Radiation and Cancer Biology For Radiation Oncology Residents 2008 Schedule Tues & Thurs from 3:30‐5:30 pm. BCC 4th Floor Conference Room Please note that class time is protected and the clinical faculty are aware of this. You are expected to be on time for lectures. Any absences due to vacation that conflict with test dates MUST be rescheduled well in advance of that date. On exam dates, please arrive promptly and please arrange for NO interruptions with phones/beepers on vibrate. INSTRUCTORS: TEXTBOOKS: DR. WAYNE ZUNDEL (UL – RAD. ONC.) COURSE COORDINATOR DR. LU CAI (UL – MEDICINE & RAD. ONC.) LECTURER DR. WILLIAM SPANOS (UL – RAD. ONC.) LECTURER DR. CRAIG SILVERMAN (UL – RAD. ONC.) LECTURER DR. JOHN BECHTEL (UL – RAD. ONC.) LECTURER DR. ANTHONY DRAGON (UL – RAD. ONC.) LECTURER DR. EL‐ GHAMRY (UL – RAD. ONC.) LECTURER DR. A. BEN JENSON (UL – PATHOLOGY) LECTURER DR. ROBERT MITCHELL (UL –MEDICINE) LECTURER DR. DOUG DEAN (UL–OPHTHALMOLOGY) LECTURER DR. DONALD NERLAND (UL – PHARMACOLOGY) LECTURER DR. W. GLENN MCGREGOR (UL – PHARMACOLOGY) LECTURER DR. J. CHRISTOPHER STATES (UL – PHARMACOLOGY) LECTURER DR. CHI LI (UL –MEDICINE) LECTURER DR. SUCHETA TELANG (UL – MEDICINE) LECTURER ‐ Radiobiology for the Radiologist (RR), Hall & Giaccia 6th Edition (Required). ‐ The Biology of Cancer (BC), Robert A. Weinberg (Required, copies of the relevant chapters will be provided). ‐ Radiobiology Practice Examinations (compilation), Chapman et al. (Recommended). ‐ Current literature reviews will also be provided for each topic when available. Recommended Ancillary Courses: - “Radiation Biology Refresher Course for Residents in Radiation Oncology", sponsored by the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. Late April, 3 day course. Recommended for senior residents. - The Ostler Institute Review Course for Radiation Oncology Written & Oral Boards (CME credit available). Radiation Biology Course Goals: This course will cover the fundamentals of the biological effects of ionizing radiation in living tissues, including specific cell and tissue radiosensitivity, radiation syndromes and related effects, as well as basic biological mechanisms that bring about somatic and genetic effects. Research applications and clinical radiation biology will be highlighted. Strategy: This course will be didactic lectures in each topic listed below followed by discussion of problems frequently seen on certification board exams. Grading: While there will be no formal grade given for this course, five exams will be to gauge your progress and likelihood of passing the radiation biology component of your board exams. If you are able to achieve a 90% or higher on the final exam, you will be excused from radbio classes the following year provided that you challenge that year’s final exam successfully (>90%). Exam Schedule: Exam I ‐ September 25th, 2008. Exam II ‐ October 9th, 2008. Exam III ‐ November 11th, 2008. 73
Exam IV ‐ December 16th, 2008. Comprehensive Exam ‐ December 18th, 2008. I. Cell & Cancer Biology Brief Organizational Meeting Aug. 26th (Zundel) • Discussion of Syllabus • Expectations Molecular Biology – Techniques and Concepts (RR: Chs. 2, 16; BC: Ch. 1) Aug. 28th. (Zundel) Molecular Biology • Central Dogma • Recombinant DNA • Cloning • Gene Expression/Repression • Knock‐out/in • Promotor Analysis • Genomic Arrays • Protein Analysis • Other ‘Omics’ • In silico Analysis Signaling Pathways Impacting Radiation Sensitivity. (RR: Ch. 17; BC: Chs. 5, 6) Sept. 2nd. (Mitchell) Cellular Signaling • Receptor/ligand interactions • Phosphorylation/dephosphorylation reactions • Major mitogenic & survival signaling pathways • Transcriptional activation • Radiation‐induced signals • Radiation‐induced gene expression Cell cycle (RR: Chs. 2, 4, 17; BC: Ch. 8) Sept. 4th. (Dean) Cell Cycle • Cycle Overview • Rb Pathway & Regulation • Cyclins • Cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors • DNA damage sensitive checkpoints o G1 Checkpoint o G2 Checkpoint o Spindle Checkpoint ƒ Checkpoint misregulation resulting in altered chromosome segregation (Fukasawa 2007). Mechanics of Cell Death and Cell Fate (RR: Chs. 3, 17; BC: Ch. 9). (Brown & Attardi 2005). Sept. 9th. (Li) • Apoptotic death o Developmental and stress induced o Morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis o Molecular pathways leading to apoptosis • Radiation‐induced apoptosis in normal tissues and tumors • Necrotic death o Morphological, pathological, and biochemical features of necrosis • Mitotic death following irradiation • Cell division post‐radiation and time to clonogenic cell death • Autophagy 74
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Radiation‐induced senescence Bystander Effect Hereditary Effects of Radiation (RR: Chs. 2, 3, 5) Sept. 11th. (States) • Types of XRT‐induced Damage DNA Damage o Assays for DNA damage o sucrose gradient sedimentation, neutral and alkaline filter elution, pulsed field electrophoresis (PFGE), comet assay, plasmid‐based assay o Types of DNA lesions and numbers per cell/Gy o Spurs & Blobs o Multiply damaged sites o Single lethal hits and accumulated damage (inter‐ and intra‐track) o Role of oxygen in the generation of damage • Role of LET and radiation quality • Radiation‐Sensitive Syndromes Cancer Syndromes DNA Repair Mechanisms (RR: Chs. 5 ) Also need a good review(s) of DNA double‐strand break repair. Sept. 16th. (McGregor) • DNA Repair DNA Repair o Classes of DNA Repair o Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Repair ƒ Mechanisms involved in repair of base damage and DNA single strand breaks ƒ Mechanisms involved in repair of double strand breaks (Kobayashi 2008 or similar review). Introduction to Molecular Cancer Biology (RR: Ch. 17; BC: 2, 4, 7, 10, 11) Sept. 18th. (Zundel) • Tumorigenesis • Genomic Imprinting • Oncogenes & Tumor Suppressors • Gatekeepers & Caretakers • Telomeric changes in cancer • Signaling abnormalities in cancer • Tumor Heterogeneity • Epigenetic changes in cancer o e.g. hypermethylation • Tumor Progression • Local Invasion • Distant Metastases Tumor Vasculature & Hypoxic Environment (RR: Ch. 6, 17; BC: Ch. 13) Sept. 23rd. (Zundel) • Tumoral Hypoxia (need a decent review here) o Measurement of hypoxia o Direct/Indirect Effects of Tumoral Hypoxia o Transient and chronic hypoxia o Hypoxia as a factor in tumor progression • Hypoxia‐induced signal transduction • Angiogenesis • Tumor vasculature **Exam I September 25th, 2008** II. Basic Concepts & Predictive Models in Radiation Therapy (XRT) 75
Introduction to Radiation Biology (RR: Ch. 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 18, 20) Sept. 30th (Zundel) • Direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation • Generation of free radicals • Definition of LET and quality of ionizing radiation • Definition of RBE • RBE as a function of LET • Endpoint dependence of RBE • Models & Techniques used in Radiobiology o Dose Response Assays o Calculation of plating efficiency and surviving fraction o In vitro clonogenic assays o Effect of LET on cell survival o Effects of dose, dose rate, cell type o In vivo clonogenic assays ƒ Bone marrow stem cell assays, jejunal crypt stem cell assay, skin clones, kidney tubules o Functional endpoints • Oxygen Effects on Cell Survival o Definition of OER OER o Effect of dose, dose rate, cell type o OER as a function of LET o Impact of O2 concentration o Time scale of oxygen effect o Mechanisms of oxygen effect o Reoxygenation following irradiation • Solid Tumor Assay Systems o TD50 limiting dilution assay o Tumor regrowth assay o TCD50 tumor control assay o Lung colony assay o In vitro/in vivo assay o Monolayers vs. 3‐D spheroid cultures Radiation‐induced Chromosomal Damage (RR: Chs. 2, 3). Oct. 2nd (Zundel) • Radiation‐induced Chromosome Damage o Assays ƒ Conventional smears ƒ banding ƒ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) ƒ FISH/SKY o Stable and unstable chromatid and chromosome aberrations o Dose response relationships o Use of peripheral blood lymphocytes in in vivo dosimetry • Relation to Survival Curves • Random nature of cell killing and Poisson statistics • Doses for inactivation of viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotic cells after irradiation • Single hit, multi‐target models of cell survival • Two component models • An Introduction to the Linear‐Quadratic Model • Calculations of cell survival with dose • Effects of dose, dose rate, cell type 76
Cell, Tissue & Tumor Kinetics in XRT (RR: Chapters 4, 5, 21) Oct. 7th . (Bechtel) • Mitotic Index o Measurement of cell cycle parameters by 3H‐thymidine o Measurement by flow cytometry, DNA staining and BrdU o Cell cycle synchronization techniques and uses • Cell Cycle and Radiosensitivity • 4 Rs of XRT • Tissue Kinetics • Sub‐lethal damage repair • Potentially lethal damage repair • Half‐time of repair • Effects of dose, dose rate, and cell type • Effect of dose fractionation • Effect of LET • Dose‐Rate Effects • Inverse Dose‐Rate Effects • Measuring cell cycle transition • Potential tumor doubling time (Tpot) • Growth fraction • Cell loss factor • Cell loss • Volume doubling times • Growth kinetics of clinical and experimental tumors **Exam II October 9th, 2008** III. Classical Radiobiology LET, RBE and α/β Ratios (RR: Chapter 3, 7) Oct. 14th. (Spanos) • Linear Energy Transfer • Relative Biological Effectiveness • Linear‐Quadratic Model (Linear‐Quadratic Model ) • α/β Ratios Normal Tissue Responses in XRT (RR: Chapters 9, 13, 19) Oct. 16th & 21st (Silverman) • Responses in skin, oral mucosa, oropharyngeal and esophageal mucous membranes, salivary glands, bone marrow, lymphoid tissues, bone and cartilage, lung, kidney, testis, ovary, eye, central and peripheral nervous tissues • Scoring systems for tissue injury • LENT and SOMA • Acute vs Late Responses • Casarett’s Classification of tissue sensitivity • H & F type populations • Radiation‐induced effects of growth factors • Tolerance • Differences between slowly and rapidly proliferating tissues • Molecular and cellular responses in slowly and rapidly proliferating tissues • Regeneration • Remembered dose 77
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Functional subunits Mechanisms underlying clinical symptoms Latency Inflammatory changes Cell killing Radiation fibrosis Vascular damage Volume effects Pharmacological modification of XRT responses (Normal tissue radioprotection) Cataractogenesis Total Body Irradiation (RR: Chapter 8) Oct. 23rd. (El‐Ghamry) • Acute Radiation Syndrome • Early Lethal Effects • Prodromal radiation syndrome • Cerebrovascular syndrome • Gastrointestinal syndrome • Hematopoietic syndrome • Mean lethal dose and dose/time responses • Immunological effects • Assessment and treatment of radiation accidents or terrorism • Bone marrow transplantation ASTRO – October 28th – November 1st Therapeutic Ratio (RR: Chapter 18) Nov. 4th. (Bechtel) • Tumor control probability (TCP) curves o Calculation of TCP o Factors affecting shape and slope of TCP curves o Influence of tumor repopulation/regeneration on TCP • Normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) curves • Influence of normal tissue regeneration on responses • Response of subclinical disease • Causes of treatment failure • Factors determining tissue tolerance • Normal tissue volume effects • Dose‐volume histogram analysis • Effect of adjuvant or combined treatments on therapeutic ratio Time, Dose & Fractionation (RR: Chapter 3, 22). Nov. 6th. (El‐Ghamry) • The 4 R’s (Effect of time) • Fractionated vs single dose • Strandquist plot & the Ellis nominal standard dose system • Fractionation size/time and the influence on early‐ and late‐responding tissues • Accelerated repopulation • Therapeutic Ratio (Effect of tissue/tumor types on α/β ratios & responses to dose fractionation) • Power‐Law Models • Target‐Cell Hypothesis • Quantitation of multifraction survival curves • Effects of multifraction survival curves on the Linear‐Quadratic Model 78
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BED and isoeffect dose calculations **Exam III November 11th, 2008** IV Adjuvant XRT Therapies and Exposure Considerations Tumor Pathology (BC: 16.0‐16.2) Need a really good review or chapter. Nov. 13th (Jenson) • Genetic Abnormalities in XRT‐treated Cancers (website ‐ Cancer staging, Epidemiology) • Correlations between Oncogene/Tumor Suppressor Expression & XRT Sensitivity • Biomarkers of XRT‐sensitivity • Hypoxic Biomarkers • Molecular profiling and staging of cancer o Gene expression profiling o Proteomics Radiosensitizers, Bioreductive drugs, Radioprotectors (RR: Chapter 25) Nov. 18th. (Zundel) • Tumor radiosensensitization o Halogenated pyrimidines, nitroimidazoles Radiation Sensitizers • Hypoxic cell cytotoxins o tirapazamine • Mechanisms of action, sulfhydryl compounds, WR series, dose reduction factor (DRF) • Biological response modifiers Radiation modulators Predictive Assays (RR: Chapter 23) • Intrinsic Radiosensitivity • Hypoxic content • Proliferation • Repair capacity Chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy (RR: Chapter 5, 27) Nov. 20th. (Nerland) • Classes of agents & mechanisms of action (Chemotherapy drugs) o Alkylating agents o Antibiotics o Antimetabolites o Nucleoside analogs o Vinca Alkaloids o Taxanes o Miscellaneous agents o Topo inhibitors o Enzyme Inhibitors o Endocrine drugs o Cytokines and immunomodulators • Dose‐Response relationships • Sublethal & Potentially Lethal Damage Repair • Chemotherapy combinations • The oxygen effect in chemotherapy • Multiple drug resistance • Interactions of chemotherapeutic agents with radiation therapy (chemoradiation therapy) Happy Thanksgiving Holiday – November 25th Alternative Modalities (RR: Chapters 24) Nov. 27th (Dragon) 79
• BNCT • Fast Neutrons • Proton Beam (Proton Therapy) • Carbon Ions • Stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy • IORT • Radioimmunotherapy • Photo Dynamic Therapy • Ultrasound Brachytherapy (RR: Chapters 5) Nov. 27th (Dragon) • Dose rate effects (HDR and LDR) • Choice of isotopes • Interstitial and intracavitary use • Radiolabeled antibodies • BED and Isoeffective dose calculations Low dose radiation Need a really good review or chapter Dec. 2nd. (Cai) Hyperthermia (Zundel) (RR: Chapter 28) Dec. 4th. (Zundel) • Delivery modalities • Cellular response to heat • Heat shock proteins • Thermotolerance • Response of tumors and normal tissues to heat • Combination with radiation therapy Therapeutic targets and novel strategies (RR: Chapter 26; BC: Ch. 16.2‐16.16) • It’s still all about the target,… • Nanodevices • Monoclonals • Small molecule inhibitors • Gene therapy • Immunotherapy Radiation Exposure & Protection (RR: Chapter 10, 11, 14, 15) Dec. 9th. (Cai) • Definitions and Stages of Carcinogenesis • Sources of human data • Stochastic and deterministic effects • Latent Period • Specific malignancies • Risk Estimates • Calculations based on risk estimates • Effective dose ‐ relative weighting factors (Wr) • Equivalent dose – tissue weighting factor • Committed dose • Collective exposure dose • Dose limits for occupational and public exposure • Hereditary Effects of Mutation • Single gene mutation • Chromosome aberrations • Relative vs. absolute mutation risk 80
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Doubling dose Heritable effects in humans Risk estimates for hereditable effects ICRP and NCRP Dose response for radiation‐induced cancers Importance of age at exposure and time since exposure Malignancies in prenatally exposed children Second tumors in radiation therapy patients Risk estimates in humans Risk when G2/M is compromised Radiation Teratology – (RR: Chapter 12). Dec. 11th. (Telang) • Effects on developing embryo and fetus • Intrauterine death • Congenital abnormalities and neonatal death • Microcephaly, mental retardation • Growth retardation • Dose, dose rate, and stage in gestation • Human experience of pregnant women exposed to therapeutic dose **Exam IV December 16th, 2008** **Comprehensive Exam. December 18th, 2008** Useful Websites: • Web‐Rad‐Train (Practice Exam from Hall website) • http://radonc.wikidot.com/ (A very useful and amusing blog from an escapee of a RadOnc Residency) • http://www.uic.edu/com/uhrd/manual/Contents.html (Course notes MJ Blend) • Cancer Mortality Maps & Graphs Web site – provides interactive maps, graphs text, tables and figures showing geographic patterns and time trends of cancer death rates for more than 40 cancers. Ongoing Clinical Trials • http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials • http://www.nccn.org/clinical_trials/default.asp • Medical Oncology Clinical Trials ‐ Stanford • Radiation Oncology Clinical Trials ‐ Stanford RadBio‐related Organizations • American Association for Cancer Research • Radiation Research Society • Radiological Society of North America •
ASTRO 81
STANFORD DOSIMETRY TRAINING TOOL
Course Module Titles
1.
Fundamentals of the Medical Management of Cancer
2.
Anatomy for Medical Dosimetrists
3.
Radiobiology for Medical Dosimetrists
4.
Fundamentals of Radiation Safety
5.
Physics Fundamentals for Radiation Therapy
6.
Production of Teletherapy Radiation
7.
Sources for Brachytherapy Radiation
8.
Introduction to Radiological Imaging
9.
Dosimetry Instrumentation
10. Measurement of Dose in Radiation Oncology
11. Introduction to Teletherapy Dose Calculations
12. Introduction to Brachytherapy Dose Calculations
13. Introduction to Teletherapy Treatment Planning
14. Brachytherapy Treatment Planning
15. Practice Dosimetry Problems
16. Radiographic and Virtual Simulation
17. Treatment Planning for Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy
18. High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy
19. Treatment Planning for Seed Implants
20. Treatment Planning for Stereotactic Radiosurgery
21. Treatment Planning for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy
22. Dosimetric Quality Assurance for Radiation Oncology
23. Professional Issues for Medical Dosimetrists
24. Basic Math Skills for Dosimetry
82
Appendix D – Program Graduates
Reverse Chronological List of Residency Program Graduates – Past 10 Years
Name
Time in Program
Supervisor
Current Occupation
Board Certification
(m)
Jodi Daves, MS
21
Michael Mills
Medical Physicist
Yes
Albert Zacarias, PhD
12
Michael Mills
Medical Physicist
Yes
Joni Funseth, MS
18
Michael Mills
Medical Physicist
In progress
Yinghui Zhang, PhD
24
Michael Mills
Medical Physicist
Yes
Eric Nelson, PhD
24
Michael Mills
Medical Physicist
In progress
John Hegseth
24
Michael Mills
Medical Physicist
In progress
83
Appendix E – Staff Biographical Sketches and
Primary Clinical Interest in alphabetical order
Elizabeth Achino, BS, CMD
Dosimetry Supervisor, IGRT
John Bechtel, MD
Lung
Mellonie Brown, MS
RTT and Dosimetry Program Director, IGRT
Anthony Dragun, MD
Breast
Moataz El-Ghamry, MD
Brachytherapy
John Corey Gavin, BS, CMD
IGRT
Tim Guan, PhD
Stereotactic Radiosurgery
Joel Handley, MS
Brachytherapy
Joshua James, MS
TomoTherapy
Baby Jose, MD
Prostate
Michael Mills, PhD
Residency Program Director, IGRT
Lynn Osborne, CMD
IGRT Planning
Craig Silverman, MD
Stereotactic Radiosurgery
Keith Sowards, MS
HDR Brachy and Prostate Brachy
William Spanos, MD
Department Chairman, H&N Cancer
Judith Turner, BS, CMD
IGRT Planning
David Wilson, MS
Brachytherapy and electrons
Albert Zacarias, PhD
IGRT and Respiratory Gating
Wayne Zundel, PhD
Radiation Biology
84
Biographical Sketch – Elizabeth Achino, BS, CMD
Academic Appointments:
N/A
Clinical Appointments:
Chief of Medical Dosimetry, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Mentor for medical dosimetry
Committee:
Physics Residency Committee Member
Rotation Mentor:
Support Mentor Junior Resident Fall Semester in medical dosimetry
Education:
BA, Biology Spalding College
Post Graduate Training:
N/A
Certification:
Certified in Medical Dosimetry (MDCB), August 1988
Clinical Responsibilities:
IMRT/IGRT Treatment planning
Research Interests:
N/A
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
N/A
85
Biographical Sketch – John H Bechtel, M.D.
Academic Appointments:
Assistant Professor, University of Louisville
Clinical Appointments:
Radiation Oncologist, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Core Curriculum Lecturer, Primary Physician Support for Physics Residents
Committee:
Physics Residency Committee
Rotation Mentor:
N/A
Education:
M.D., University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine
Post Graduate Training:
Residency, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Certification:
ABR Certification in Radiation Oncology, 2005
Clinical Responsibilities:
Lung, IGRT, HDR
Research Interests:
N/A
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
1
Stinchcombe TE, Morris DE, Moore DT, Bechtel JH, Halle JS, Mears A, Deschesne K, Rosenman JG,
Socinski MA. “Post-chemotherapy gross tumor volume is predictive of survival in patients with
stage III non-small cell lung cancer treated with combined modality therapy.” Lung Cancer.
2006Apr;52(1):67-74.
2
Bechtel J and Tepper J. "Adjuvant radiation therapy of patients with rectal cancer" Clinical Colorectal
Cancer. 2003 Feb;2(4):213-22.
86
Biographical Sketch – Mellonie Fisher Brown, CMD, R.T.(T.)
Academic Appointments:
None
Clinical Appointments:
Program Director for Radiation Therapy School and Medical Dosimetrist
Role in Residency Program: Mentor for medical dosimetry
Committee:
None
Rotation Mentor:
Support Mentor Junior Resident Fall Semester in medical dosimetry
Education:
BS, Biology; BS, Radiation Therapy, Medical University of South Carolina
Post Graduate Training:
MS in Educational Technology, Boise State University expected December 2008
Certification:
Registered in Radiation Therapy (ARRT), May 1990
Certified in Medical Dosimetry (MDCB), August 1993
Clinical Responsibilities:
IMRT/IGRT Treatment planning
Research Interests:
N/A
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
N/A
87
Biographical Sketch – Anthony E. Dragun, M.D.
Academic Appointments:
Assistant Professor, University of Louisville
Clinical Appointments:
Radiation Oncologist, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Core Curriculum Lectures
Committee:
N/A
Rotation Mentor:
N/A
Education:
M.D. MCP-Hahnemann University School of Medicine
Post Graduate Training:
Residency, Medical University of South Carolina
Certification:
ABR – Radiation Oncology 2008
Clinical Responsibilities:
Breast, IGRT Prostate, HDR, LDR and Stereotactic
Research Interests:
N/A
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
1 Dragun AE, Jenrette JM, Pope TL et al. Mammographic surveillance after MammoSite breast
brachytherapy: architectural patterns and additional interventions. Am J of Clin Oncol. 2007; 30(6).
2 Dragun AE, Jenrette JM, Harper JL et al. Predictors of Cosmetic outcome following MammoSite breast
brachytherapy. International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics. 2007; 68(2): 354-58
3 Dragun AE. Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: A Viable Choice. RT-Image 2007; 20 (37).
4 Harper JL, Dragun AE. Patient positioning during breast brachytherapy. Radiation Therapist. Spring
2007
5 Zauls JA, Dragun AE, Sharma AK. Intensity modulated radiation therapy for unresectable solid
pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas: a case report. Am J of Clin Oncol 2006; 29(6):639-640.
6 Bhandari RN, Dragun AE, Aguero EG, et al. External beam radiotherapy for perirectal angiomyxoma
results in dramatic clinical response and allows a patient to avoid abdominoperineal resection. Am J
of Clin Oncol 2006; 29(3): 318-319.
7 Dragun AE, Aguero EG, Harmon JF, et al. Chest wall dose in MammoSite breast brachytherapy:
radiobiologic estimations of late complication risk based on dose-volume considerations.
Brachytherapy 2005; 4 (4): 259-63.
8 Vu KN, Dragun AE, Cole DJ et al. Accelerated partial breast irradiation using the MammoSite breast
brachytherapy technique: a multidisciplinary approach to breast conservation therapy. Commun
Oncol 2005; 2: 477-90.
9 Dragun AE, Harmon JF, & Aguero EG. Defining the target and protecting normal tissue in inverseplanned intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck, prostate and gynecologic
cancers: a comparative review. Commun Oncol 2005; 2:299-306.
88
Biographical Sketch – Moataz N. El-Ghamry, M.D.
Academic Appointments:
Assistant Professor, University of Louisville
Clinical Appointments:
Radiation Oncologist, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Core Curriculum Lectures
Committee:
N/A
Rotation Mentor:
N/A
Education:
M.D., University of Alexandria, Alexandria, Egypt
Post Graduate Training:
Residency, Ohio State University
Certification:
ABR Radiation Oncology, July 2008
Clinical Responsibilities:
HDR and LDR Brachytherapy
Research Interests:
Prostate LDR Brachytherapy
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
Treatment of Rectal Cancer
Selected Publications:
1
Ho, P. et al: Repair with collagen tubules linked with brain-derived neutrophic factor and ciliary
neutrophic factor in rat sciatic nerve injury model. Arch Otolaryngology H&N Surg. 124(7), 1998.
2
El-Ghamry, M., Willett C.: Local excision and postoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer.
Seminars Colon & Rectal Surg. 12(4):209-13, 2001.
89
3
Biographical Sketch – John Corey Gavin, CMD, R.T.(T.)
Academic Appointments:
None
Clinical Appointments:
Medical Dosimetrist
Role in Residency Program: Mentor for medical dosimetry
Committee:
None
Rotation Mentor:
Support Mentor Junior Resident Fall Semester in medical dosimetry
Education:
AS in Radiologic Technology, University of Louisville, 1996
BS in Health Arts, University of St. Francis, 2001
Post Graduate Training:
Trainee in Medical Dosimetry, University of Louisville Hospital, 2002
Certification:
Registered in Radiation Therapy (ARRT), May 1997
Certified in Medical Dosimetry (MDCB), August 2002
Clinical Responsibilities:
IMRT/IGRT Treatment planning
Research Interests:
N/A
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
N/A
90
Biographical Sketch – Yuhua Timothy Guan, PhD
Academic Appointments:
Clinical Associate Professor, Radiation Oncology
Clinical Appointments:
Physicist, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Mentor for Stereotactic and HDR training
Committee:
Member of Physics Residency Committee
Rotation Mentor:
Primary mentor Senior Resident Fall Semester in Stereotactic
Fall Second Year
Education:
Post Graduate Training:
Certification:
PhD, 1986, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas
Postdoctoral Research Associate, Brown Cancer Center, 1991 - 1993.
American Board of Radiology in Therapeutic Radiological Physics, 1996
Clinical Responsibilities:
Primary physicist: stereotactic radiosurgery, Tomotherapy & HDR brachytherapy
Research Interests:
Stereotactic radiosurgery
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
1
Y. Guan and C. R. Quade, "Curvilinear Coordinate Formulation for -Rotation-Large Amplitude Internal
Motion Interactions. I. The General Theory", J. Chem. Phys., 84, 5624 (1986).
2 Y. Guan and C. R. Quade, "Curvilinear Coordinate Formulation for Vibration-Rotation-Large
Amplitude Internal Motion Interactions. II. Application to the Water Molecule", J. Chem. Phys., 86,
4808 (1987).
3 Y. Guan, G. C. Lynch, and D. L. Thompson, "Intramolecular Energy Transfer and Cis-Trans
Isomerization of HONO", J. Chem. Phys., 87, 6957 (1987).
4 Y. Guan and D. L. Thompson, "Relaxation of Excited Normal Modes in Benzene", J. Chem. Phys., 88,
2355 (1988).
5 T. Uzer, B. MacDonald, Y. Guan, and D. L. Thompson, "Theoretical Studies of Mode Specificity in the
Dissociation of Overtone-Excited Hydrogen Peroxide", Chem. Phys. Lett., 152, 405 (1988).
6 Y. Guan and D. L. Thompson, "Mode Specificity and the Influence of Rotation in Cis-Trans
Isomerization and Dissociation in HONO", Chemical Physics, 139, 147 (1989).
7 Y. Guan and D. L. Thompson, "Relaxation of Excited CH Stretching Mode in Toluene", J. Chem. Phys.,
92, 313 (1990).
8 Y. Guan, J. T. Muckerman, and T. Uzer, "Desorption of Vibrationally Excited Adsorbates in
Competition with Relaxation: A Classical Picture", J. Chem. Phys., 93, 4383 (1990).
9 Y. Guan, J. T. Muckerman, and T. Uzer, "Desorption of Vibrationally Excited
* Adsorbates in
Competition with Relaxation: A Quantal Picture", J. Chem. Phys., 93, 4400 (1990).
10 Y. Guan and J. T. Muckerman, "Calculation of the Vibrational Levels of the Electronically Excited
Ar-OH Using a Proposed Potential Energy Surface and Analytic Discrete Variable Representations", J.
Phys. Chem., 95, 8294 (1991).
11 T. Y. Guan, P. R. Almond, H.C. Park, R.D. Lindberg, C.B. Shields: Image of Radiation Dose for
Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Medical Dosimetry, 18(3):135-142, (Fall,1993).
12 Zhigang Xu, Hui Li, P.R. Almond, and T.Y. Guan: Verification of absorbed dose determined with
plane-parallel chambers in clinical electron beams following AAPM Task Group 39 protocol using
ferrous sulphate dosimetry. Medical Physics. Vol. 23-3, 377 (1996).
91
Biographical Sketch – Joel Handley, MS
Academic Appointments:
N/A
Clinical Appointments:
Physics Assistant, Department of Radiation Oncology, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Support Brachytherapy Mentor
Committee:
None
Rotation Mentor:
Support Mentor Senior Resident, Fall and Spring Semesters in Brachytherapy
Education:
BS Physics, University of Kentucky, 2002
MS Physics, University of Kentucky, 2006
Post Graduate Training:
OJT Trainee in Therapy Physics, Brown Cancer Center
Certification:
N/A
Clinical Responsibilities:
LDR Brachytherapy, Unsealed source radiation therapy
Research Interests:
N/A
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
N/A
92
Biographical Sketch – Joshua A. James, MS
Academic Appointments:
N/A
Clinical Appointments:
Physicist, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Mentor for TomoTherapy
Committee:
N/A
Rotation Mentor:
Support Mentor Senior Resident Fall Semester TomoTherapy
Support Mentor Junior Resident Spring Semester
Education:
BS Physics, Western Kentucky University 2003
MS Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2005
Post Graduate Training:
N/A
Certification:
Passed ABR Part 1
Clinical Responsibilities:
TomoTherapy, Intraoperative Radiotherapy, Stereotactic
Research Interests:
N/A
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
1
JD Fenwick, WA Tome, HA Jaradat, SK Hui, JA James, JP Balog, CN DeSouza, DB Lucas, GH
Olivera, TR Mackie, BR Paliwal. “Quality Assurance of a Helical Tomotherapy Machine.” Phys.
Med. Biol. 49 (2004) 2933-2953
2
MW Kissick, J Fenwick, JA James, R Jeraj, JM Kapatoes, H Keller, TR Mackie, G Olivera, ET Soisson.
“The Helical Tomotherapy Thread Effect.” Medical Physics. 32:5 (May 2005) 1414-1423
3
SA Boswell, R Jeraj, KJ Ruchala, GH Olivera, HA Jaradat, JA James, A Gutierrez, D Pearson, G Frank,
TR Mackie. “A Novel Method to Correct for Pitch and Yaw Patient Setup Errors in Helical
Tomotherapy.” Medical Physics. 32:6 (June 2005) 1630-1639
93
Biographical Sketch – B. Oliapuram Jose, M.D.
Academic Appointments:
Professor, University of Louisville
Clinical Appointments:
Radiation Oncologist, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Core Curriculum Lectures
Committee:
N/A
Rotation Mentor:
N/A
Education:
(M.B.B.S.) from Medical College Kottayam, University of Kerala, India
Post Graduate Training:
Radiation Oncology Residency, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Certification:
ABR Therapeutic Radiology, 1978
Clinical Responsibilities:
Prostate, Lung
Research Interests:
Prostate
Inter & Extra-mural Support:
1.
The University of Pittsburgh Subcontract under NIH Contract N01-CB-23867. NASBP: The Treatment
of Primary Breast Cancer. Subcontract #7666-140 (Protocol B-06), Co-PI, 1980.
2.
The University of Pittsburgh Subcontract under NIH Contract #n01-77177-NSABP, Colo-rectal
Protocol. Subcontract #39926-87. (Protocol R-01), Co-PI, 1980.
3.
SECSG - Cooperative Agreement. Dr. Jose (Co-PI) was the Coordinating Radiation Oncologist for
SECSG which is a multi-institutional group and the University of Louisville was receiving a grant from
this group, 1982.
4.
A multi-center maintenance study with pilocarpine for the relief of xerostomia. Khan, Z., Jose, B. (CoPI) and Barr, C. MGI Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 1991, $34,860.
5.
A comparison study of the use of RSR13 in patients receiving cranial radiation for glioblastoma
multiforme, $19,994. Allos Therapeutics, 8/2000. Spanos WJ, Jose B.O., (Co-PI), Paris KJ.
6.
Funding from Novoste for use of Beta Cath System in Clinical Phase III trial to prevent re-stenosis in
coronary arteries. Jose BO (Co-PI), Spanos WJ, 2003.
7.
Comparison of IntraOperative MRI-Guided Procedures to Standard Procedures. National Institute of
Health Grant. Thomas M. Moriarty, M.D.; John Harpring, M.D., George Raque M.D., Gregory Postel,
M.D., Ronaldy D. Caruso, M.D., Brian Aronson, M.D, Albert Seo, M.D., T. Jeffery Wieman, M.D.,
Celia Chao, M.D., Michael Edwards, M.D., B. Oliapuram Jose, M.D. (Co-PI) NIH Grant August
2001, $1,300,000.
8.
American College of Radiology National Clinical Trials to Test Effectiveness of Treatment Modalities
on Cancer in Humans, Kristie J. Paris, M.D., B. O Jose, M.D. (Co-PI), William J. Spanos, M.D.
$19,925, 1998.
Research: Summary
Prostate therapies with image guided radiotherapy.
94
Selected Publications:
1.
Jose B, Duncan A, Lindberg RD, Spanos Jr. WJ, Paris KJ: Glioblastoma multiforme in adults - results
of treatment. J Ky Med Assn, 88:650-652, Dec 1990.
2.
Jose B, Banis J, Flynn M, Lindberg RD, Spanos Jr. WJ, Paris KJ: Irradiation and free tissue transfer in
head and neck cancer. Head and Neck, 13:784-787, May/June 1991.
3.
Paris KJ, Spanos Jr. WJ, Day TG, Jose B, Lindberg RD: Incidence of complications with mini vaginal
culpostats in carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Intl J Rad Oncol Biol Phys, 21:(4)911-917, Sept 1991.
4.
Spanos Jr. WJ, Day TG, Abner A, Jose B, Paris KJ, Pursell S: Complications in the use of intraabdominal P-32 for ovarian carcinoma. Gyn Oncol, 45:243-247, June, 1992.
5.
Paris K, Spanos Jr. WJ, Lindberg RD, Jose B: Phase I-II study of multiple daily fractionation for
palliation of advanced head and neck malignancies. Int J Rad Oncol Biol Phys, 25:657-660, March,
1993.
6.
Jose B, Lindberg RD, Paris KJ, Spanos Jr. WJ: Irradiation in the management of anal
carcinoma. J Ky Med Assn, 91:236-241, June, 1993.
7.
Spanos Jr. WJ, Day T, Jose B, Paris KJ, Lindberg RD: Use of P-32 in stage III epithelial carcinoma of
ovary, Gyn Oncol, 54:35-39, 1994.
8.
Butler D, Jose B, Lindberg RD, Paris KJ, Spanos Jr., WJ: Pediatric astrocytoma -The Louisville
Experience: 1978-1988. Am J Clin Oncol, 17(6)475-479, 1994.
9.
Jose B, Lindberg RD, Spanos Jr. WJ, Paris KJ: Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Central
Nervous System Tumors. J of KY Med Assn, 93:88-92, March 1995.
10.
Tisdale B, Paris KJ, Lindberg RD, Jose B, Spanos WJ - Radiation Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer: A
retrospective study of the University of Louisville experience, Southern Medical Journal 88(7):741-744,
July 1995.
11.
Seither RB, Jose B, Paris KJ, Lindberg RD, Spanos Jr., WJ: Results of irradiation in patients with highgrade gliomas evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging, Am J of Clin Oncol
18(4):297-299, August 1995.
12.
Butler D, Lindberg RD, Jose B, Paris KJ, Spanos Jr., WJ: Adult Wilms' tumor - case report and
review of the literature, J of KY Med Assn, Vol 95, May '97, P. 191-196.
13.
Bradford W, Jose B, Butler D, Lindberg RD, Paris KJ, Spanos Jr., WJ, Patel C.C., Bertolone SJ:
Rhabdomyosarcoma - ten year review. J of KY Med Assn, 96:399-402, October 1998.
14.
Jose B, Bailen JL, Albrink FH, Steinbock GS, Cornett MS, Benson DC, Schmied WK, Medley RN,
Spanos WJ, Paris KJ, Koerner PD, Gatenby RA, Wilson DL, Meyer R, Brachytherapy in Early Prostate
Cancer - Early Experience , J of KY Med Assn 97:12-19, January 1999.
95
15.
Butler DF, Bolton ME, Spanos WJ, Day TG, Paris KJ, Jose BO, Ackerman DM, Cornett MS, Lindberg
RL: Retrospective Analysis of Patients With Primary Fallopian Tube Carcinoma. J of KY Med Assn,
97:154-164, April 1999.
16.
Butler D, Lindberg RD, Jose B, Paris KJ, Spanos WJ, Goldsmith J - Analysis Of Late Effects Of
Radiation Therapy In Pediatric CNS Tumor - J of KY Med Assn, 97:463-471, October 1999.
17.
Mills MD, Spanos WJ, Jose BO, Kelly BA, Brill JP: Preparing a cost analysis for the section of
medical physics—guidelines and methods, J of Appl Clin Med Phys 1(2)76-85, March 2000.
18.
Robinson, KA, et al Results of BETACATH TRIAL, Multi-center trial, randomized multi-center trial
for radiation vs. sham radiation in patients with de novo re-steonosis after angioplasty (Participating
trial) Vascular Radiotherapy Monitor, 3(3)81-82, 2001.
19.
Randomized Trial of 90Sr/90YB Radiation vs. Placebo Control for Treatment of In-Stent Restenosis –
START TRIAL, Multi-center Trial. Circulation – 106:1090-1096, 2002.
20.
Carrascosa, LA, Jose, BO, Spanos, Jr. WJ: Synchronous primary bilateral breast lymphoma. Am J of
Clin Oncol, 27(6):635, 2004.
21.
Jose, BO, Koerner P, Spanos Jr, WJ, Paris KJ, et al: Pediatric Hodgkin’s Disease, J of KY Med Assn
102(3):104-106, March 2004.
22.
Jose BO, Bradford, W, Koerner P, Paris KJ , Spanos Jr, WJ, et al: Hodgkin’s Lymphoma in Adults –
Clinical Features, J of KY Med Assn, 103:15-17, January 2005.
23.
Minor GI, Yashar CM, Spanos Jr, WJ, Jose BO, Silverman CL, et al: The relationship of radiation
pneumonitis to treated lung volume in breast conservation therapy, Breast Journal, 12(1):48-52,
January-February 2006.
96
Biographical Sketch – Michael D. Mills, PhD, MSPH
Academic Appointments:
Associate Professor (Tenure) University of Louisville
Clinical Appointments:
Chief of Physics, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Program Director, Mentor for Professional and Administrative Training
Committee:
Chair of Physics Residency Committee
Rotation Mentor:
Primary Mentor: Senior Resident Spring Semester Professional/Administrative
Education:
BS Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1974
MS Applied Nuclear Science, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1975
PhD Biomedical Sciences, University of Texas, Houston, 1980
MS Public Health, University of Louisville, 2002
Post Graduate Training:
Postdoctoral Research Assistant, MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1980-81
Certification:
ABR Therapeutic Radiological Physics, 1983
ABR Diagnostic and Medical Nuclear Physics, 1991
ABMP, Radiation Oncology Physics, 1992
Clinical Responsibilities:
Chief of Physics for all routine and special procedures
Research Interests:
Cost-effectiveness of radiotherapy, solid modulator IMRT
Inter & Extra-mural Support:
1
CA-06294, Co-Investigator, Significance of heterogeneity corrections in electron beam treatment
planning using CT Scans, 1986-1991, National Cancer Institute, $215,199.
2 NCI Contract CM-57775-21, Co-Investigator, Evaluation of high energy electron external beam
treatment planning, 1986-1989, National Cancer Institute $516,000.
3 PCF # 00-930, Co-Project Director, Evaluation of the vascular effects of single treatment dose of
Gadolinium Texaphyrin, 2000-2001, Pharmacyclics, Inc. $11,689.
4 PCF # 01-307, Principal Investigator, Shielding assessment of a mobile electron accelerator for
intraoperative radiotherapy, 2000-2001, Intra-Op, Incorporated. $22,044.
5 PCF # 03-0154, Co-Project Director, Is X-irradiation a viable therapy for spinal cord injury? Kentucky
Spinal Cord Injury Research Trust, 2003-2005, $298,362.
6 Project Director, Development of a radiation oncology terminology and a cost effectiveness tool for
evaluation of new radiation oncology technology – funded by TomoTherapy Corporation 7/05, 20052006, $100,000.
Research: Summary
My career interests have included: Determination of neutron spectrum and dose for leakage neutrons produced
in high-energy linear accelerators, demonstration of the molecular basis for radiation-hyperthermia cell killing
synergy, and application of pencil-beam theory to the calculation of electron dose in heterogeneities using CT
data. I developed a theory and algorithm to predict electron beam output factors for rectangular electron fields I
evaluated the relationship between instantaneous dose rate and electron beam Relative Biological Equivalence,
predicted dose to lymphoma patients treated with combination electrons and photons to minimize cord dose,
and determined the exposure rate constant for an I-125 seed. In other projects, I optimized the treatment
protocol for electron total scalp irradiation, designed the shielding for an operating room based electron linear
accelerator for intra operative radiotherapy, and tested the current protocol for the treatment of pediatric
97
meduloblastoma patients by verifying the dosimetry of electron total spine irradiation abutted to lateral photon
cranial fields. I participated in a collaborative NCI-contract effort to define state-of-the-art electron pencil
beam treatment planning using a three dimensional treatment planning system with three dimensional
heterogeneity corrections.
I am designing and implementing a new type of technology evaluation study that will be able to track cost and
benefit information for emerging cancer therapeutic technologies. This informatics project is in collaboration
with Dr. Robert Esterhay, MD, in the School of Public Health. The project is supported by a grant from the
TomoTherapy Corporation. This project involves contributing concept-based terminologies to a public
repository of information, and using this information infrastructure to build a research tool to allow real-time
collection of cost, treatment and outcomes data. Ultimately, it will be possible to use this tool to perform costutility studies of emerging medical technologies in real time
Selected Publications:
1. McGinley PH, Wood M, Mills M, Rodriguez R: Dose levels due to neutrons in the vicinity of high
energy medical accelerators. Medical Physics 3(6):397-402, 1976.
2. Mills MD, Meyn RE: Effects of hyperthermia on the repair of radiation induced DNA
strand breaks. Radiation Research 87:314-328, 1981.
3. Hogstrom KR, Mills MD, Almond PR: Electron beam dose calculations. Physics in Medicine and
Biology 26:445-459, 1981. [Physics in Medicine and Biology has published over 5000 articles since 1956.
This article was reported as the tenth most cited article and the most cited radiation oncology article in the
history of Physics in Medicine and Biology, with 199 citations. Patterson MS: Physics in Medicine and
Biology top ten. Letter to the Editor. Physics in Medicine and Biology 49:L1-L4, 2004.]
4. Mills MD, Hogstrom KR, Almond PR: Prediction of electron beam output factors. Medical Physics
9(1):60-68, 1982.
5. Mills MD, Meyn RE: Hyperthermic potentiation of unrejoined DNA strand breaks following irradiation.
Radiation Research 95:327-338, 1983.
6. Hogstrom KR, Mills MD, Meyer JA, Palta JR, Mellenberg DE, Meoz AT, Fields RS: Dosimetric
evaluation of a pencil-beam algorithm for electrons employing a two-dimensional heterogeneity correction,
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics 10:561-569. 1984.
7. Mills MD, Hogstrom KR, Fields RS: Determination of electron beam output factors for the Therac 20.
Medical Physics 12(4):473-476, 1985.
8. Sinesi C, McNeese MD, Peters LJ, Goepfert H, Mills MD: Electron beam therapy for
eyelid
carcinomas. Head and Neck Surgery 10(1):31-37, 1987.
9. Mills MD, Fuller LF, Zagars GK, McNeese MD: Spinal cord dose reduction using
an anterior 13 MeV electron field situated between a split anterior 60Co field.
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics 13(10):1571-1575, 1987.
10. Hashemi AM, Mills MD, Hogstrom KR, Almond PR: The exposure rate constant for a
silver-wire 125I seed. Medical Physics 15(2):228-234, 1988.
11. Mills MD, Almond PR, Boyer AL, Ochran TG, Madigan WP, Rich TV, Dally EB:
Shielding considerations for an operating room based intra-operative electron
radiotherapy unit. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 18(5):1215-1221, 1990.
12. Able CM, Mills MD, Hogstrom KR, McNeese MD: Evaluation of a total scalp
irradiation technique. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics,
21(4):1063-1072, 1991.
13. Mills MD, Spanos WJ, Jose BO, Kelly BA, and Brill JP: Preparing a cost analysis for the
section of medical physics, guideline and methods. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical
Physics, Vol. 1, (2): 76-85, 2000. (Principal author)
98
14. King RP, Anderson RS and Mills MD: Geometry function of a linear brachytherapy source.
Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics, Vol. 2 (2): 69-72, 2001. (Project Supervisor)
15. Mills MD, Fajardo LC, Wilson DL, Daves JL, and Spanos, WJ: Commissioning of a mobile
electron accelerator for intraoperative radiotherapy. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical
Physics, Vol. 2, (3): 121-130, 2001. (Principal Author)
16. Daves JL and Mills MD: Shielding assessment of a mobile electron accelerator for
intraoperative radiotherapy. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics, Vol. 2, (3): 165173, 2001. (Project Supervisor)
17. Loy DN, Zhang YP, Onifer SM, Mills MD, Cao QL, Darnall JB, Fajardo LC, Burke DA,
Magnuson, DSK, and Whittemore SR: Functional redundancy of ventral spinal locomotor
pathways. Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 22, (1): 315-323, 2002. (Co-PI)
18. Loy DN, Talbott JF, Onifer SM, Mills, MD, Burke DA, Dennison, JB, Fajardo LC,
Magnuson DSK, and Whittemore SR: Both dorsal and ventral spinal cord pathways
contribute to overground locomotion in the adult rat. Experimental Neurology, Vol 177, (2):
575-580, 2002. (Co-PI)
19. Herman MG, Mills MD, and Gillin, MT: Reimbursement versus effort in medical physics practice in
radiation oncology. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics, Vol. 4, (2): 178187, 2003.
20. Wysoczynski M., Reca R, Ratajczak J, Kucia M, Shirvaikar N, Honczarenko M, Mills M, Wanzeck J,
Janowska-Wieczorek A, and Ratajczak M: Incorporation of CXCR4 into membrane lipid rafts primes
homing-related responses of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to an SDF-1 gradient. Blood, Vol. 105,
(1): 40-48, 2005.
21. May N. Tsao, MD, Minesh P. Mehta, MD, Timothy J. Whelan, M.D., David E. Morris, M.D., James A.
Hayman, M.D., John C. Flickinger, M.D., Michael Mills, Ph.D., C. Leland Rogers, M.D., and Luis
Souhami, M.D.: The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) EvidenceBased Review of the Role of Radiosurgery for Malignant Glioma. Int. J. Radiation Oncology Biol. Phys.,
Vol. 63(1):47-55, 2005.
22. T. Minesh P. Mehta, M.D., May N. Tsao, M.D., Timothy J. Whelan, M.D., David E. Morris, M.D., James
A. Hayman, M.D., John C. Flickinger, M.D., Michael Mills, M.D., C. Leland Rogers, M.D., and Luis
Souhami, M.D.: The American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) EvidenceBased Review of the Role of Radiosurgery for Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases, Int. J. Radiation
Oncology Biol. Phys., Vol 63(1):37-26, 2005.
23. Mills MD: Analysis and practical use - The Abt study of medical physicist work values for radiation
oncology physics services: round II. Journal of the American College of Radiology, Vol 2(9):782-789,
2005 (Principal Author)
24. Mills MD, Spanos WJ, and Esterhay RJ: Considerations of cost-effectiveness for new radiation oncology
technologies. J Am Coll Radiol Vol 3(4): 278-288, 2006. (Principal Author)
25. Beddar AS, Biggs PJ, Chang S, Ezell GA, Faddegon BA, Hensley FW, and Mills, MD: Intraoperative
radiation therapy using mobile electron linear accelerators: Report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee
Task Group No. 72. Med. Phys Vol 33(5):1476-1489, 2006.
26. Talbott JF, Cao Q, Enzmann GU, Benton RL, Achim V, Cheng XX, Mills MD, Rao MS and Whittemore
SR: Schwann Cell-Like Precursor Cells Following Engraftment into the Demyelinated Spinal Cord is BMPDependent. Glia Vol 54:147-159, 2006.
27. Zacarias A, Balog J, and Mills M: Radiation Shielding Design of a New Tomotherapy Facility. Health
Physics Vol 91(4):289-295, 2006. (Project Supervisor)
28. Mills MD, Esterhay RJ, and Thornewill J: Using a Tetradic Network Technique and a Transaction Cost
Economic Analysis to illustrate an economic model for an open access medical journal. First Monday Vol
12(10):1-14, 2007. (Principal Author)
99
Biographical Sketch – Lynn M. Osborne CMD, R.T.(R.)(T.)
Academic Appointments:
None
Clinical Appointments:
Medical Dosimetrist
Role in Residency Program: Mentor for medical dosimetry
Committee:
None
Rotation Mentor:
Support Mentor Junior Resident Fall Semester in medical dosimetry
Education:
RTT Program, University of Kentucky, 2000
Post Graduate Training:
N/A
Certification:
Registered in Radiation Therapy (ARRT), 2000
Certified in Medical Dosimetry (MDCB), 2004
Clinical Responsibilities:
IMRT/IGRT Treatment planning
Research Interests:
N/A
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
N/A
100
Biographical Sketch – Craig L. Silverman, MD
Academic Appointments:
Clinical Professor, University of Louisville
Clinical Appointments:
Radiation Oncologist, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Core Curriculum Lecturer
Committee:
N/A
Rotation Mentor:
N/A
Education:
MD, Northwestern University School of Medicine
Post Graduate Training:
Residency in Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine
Certification:
ABR Therapeutic Radiology, 1982
Clinical Responsibilities:
Pediatric Radiation Oncology, Stereotactic Radiosurgery, Respiratory Gating
Research Interests:
Stereotactic Radiosurgery
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
1.
Silverman,C.L., and Marks,J.E.: “Prognostic Significance of Contrast
Enhancement in Low Grade Astrocytomas of the Adult Cerebrum”. Radiology 1981; 139:211213.
2.
Walker,S.J., Whiteside,L.A., McAllister,W.H., Silverman,C.L., Thomas,P.R.: “Slipped Capital
Epiphysis Following Radiation and Chemotherapy”. Clinical Orthopedics 1981;159:186-193.
3.
Silverman,C.L., Thomas,P., McAllister,W., Walker,S., and Whiteside,L.: “Slipped Capital
Femoral Epiphysis in Irradiated Children – Age, Dose, Volume Relationships”. Int J of Rad Onc,
Bio & Phys 1981; 7:1357-1363.
4.
Silverman,C.L., and Wasserman,T.: “Cutaneous Hodgkin’s Disease”. Arch of Dermatology,
1982; 118:918-921.
5.
Silverman,C.L., and Simpson,J.: “Cerebellar Medulloblastoma – Importance of Posterior Fossa
Dose to Survival and Patterns of Failure”. Int J of Rad Onc, Bio & Phys 1982;8:1869-1876.
6.
Silverman,C.L., and Marks,J.E.: “Epidermoid and Undifferentiated
Carcinomas from Occult Primaries”. Sem in Onc 1982:9:435-441.
7.
Silverman,C.L., Marks,J.E., Lee,F., and Ogura,J.H.: “Epidermoid and Less Undifferentiated
Carcinoma Presenting in Cervical Lymph Nodes
from Occult Primaries”. Laryngoscope 1983:93:645-648.
8.
Silverman,C.L., Palkes,H., Talent,B., Koval,E., Clouse, J., and
Thomas, P.: “Late Effects of Radiotherapy on Patients with Cerebellar Medulloblastoma”.
Cancer 1984; 54:35-40.
9.
Blatt,J., Wollman,M.R., Albo,V.C., Orlando,S., and Silverman,C.L.:
101
“Recurrent Testicular Infiltrates Following Radiation Therapy for Lymphoid Malignancy”. Med
Ped Onc 1984;12(5):335.
10.
Cook,B., Yries,J.K., Martinex,A.J. and Silverman,C.L.: “Malignant
Fibrous Histiocytoma of the Clivus in a Two and One-Half Year Old
Child”. J Neurosurgery:1985;61:547-549.
11.
Silverman,C.L., and Marks,J.E.: “Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Hypopharynx”. Clinics in
Onc 1986;5:505-524.
12.
Charkes,N.D., and Silverman,C.L.: “Does Radiotherapy Affect Regional
Bone Formation?” Ed. – J of Nucl Med 992:33(10):1780-1782.
13.
Andrews,D.W., Silverman,C.L., Glass,J., Downes,B., Riley,R.J., Corn,
B.W., Werner-Wasik,M., Curran,W.J., McCune,C.E., Rosenwasser,R.H., Buchheit,W.A.:
“Preservation of Cranial Nerve Function after Treatment of Acoustic Neurinomas with
Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy”. Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 1995:64:165-182.
14.
Glass,J., Silverman,C.L., Axelrod,R., Corn,B.W., Andrews, D.W.:
“Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy with Cis-platinum Radiosensitization in the Treatment
of Recurrent, Progressive or Persistent Malignant Astrocytoma”. Amer J Clin Onc 1997;20:226229.
15.
Phan,C., Mindrum,M., Silverman,C.L., Paris,KJ., Spanos,WJ,Jr., :
“Matched Control Retrospective Study of the Acute and Late
Complications in Patients with Collagen Vascular Diseases Treated with Radiation Therapy”.
The Cancer Journal 2003; Vol 9, 6:461-466.
16.
Kalapurakal,JA., Silverman,CL., Akhtar,N., etal: “Acute Hperthermia
following SRS for Pituitary Adenoma”, British Journal of Radiology
72(864)1218-1221,1999.
17.
Kalapurakal,JA.,Silverman,CL.,Akhtar,N.,etal:“Improved Trigeminal and
Facial Nerve Tolerance following Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for large Acoustic
Neuromas, British Journal of Radiology,72:864)1202-1207,1999.
18.
Kalapurakal,JA.,Silverman,CL.,Akhtar,N.: “Intracranial Mengiomas:
Factor that influence the Development of Cerebral Edema after Stereotactic Radiosurgery and
Radiation Therapy; Radiology 204(2) 461-465,1997.
19.
Phan,C., Mindrum,M.,Silverman,CL,Paris,KJ.,Spanos,WJ: “MatchedControl Retrospective Study of the Acute and Late Complications in Patients with Collagen
Vascular Diseases Treated with Radiation Therapy; The Cancer Journal, Vol 9, (6) Nov/Dec
2003.
20.
Jose,BO.,Koerner,P.,Bertolone,S.,Patel,CC.,Spanos,WJ.,Paris,KJ.,
Silverman,CL.,Yashar,CM.: “Pediatric Hodgkin’s Disease”. J Kentucky
Med Assoc; 2004;Vol 102,(3),104-107,2004.
21.
Jose,BO.,Koerner,P.,Spanos,WJ.,Paris,KJ.,Silverman,CL.,Yashar,CM.,
102
Carrascosa,LA.,”Hodgkin’s lymphoma in adults—clinical features”. J Ky Med Assoc;Vol
103,(1),15-17,January 2005.
22.
Minor,G.I.,Yashar,CM,Spanos,WJ,Jose,B.O.,Silverman,CL,
Carrascosa,L.A.,Farmer,M.,Paris,K.J.: “The Relationship of Radiation Pneumonitis to Treated
Lung Volume in Breast Conservation Therapy;
The Breast Journal, Vol 12,(1)48-52,2006.
23.
Cheerva,C.,Raj,A.,Bertolone,SJ.,Bertolone,K.,Silverman,CL: “BK
Virus-associated Hemorrhagic Cystitis in Pediatric Cancer Patients Receiving High-dose
Cyclophosphamide; J Pediatr Hematol Oncol, Vol 29,(9)617-621,September 2007.
103
Biographical Sketch – Keith T. Sowards, MS
Academic Appointments:
N/A
Clinical Appointments:
Clinical Physicist, James Graham Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Mentor for HDR Brachytherapy
Committee:
N/A
Rotation Mentor:
Support Mentor Senior Resident Fall and Spring Semesters HDR Brachytherapy
Education:
BS Physics, University of Kentucky 1995
MS Health Physics, University of Kentucky 1999
Post Graduate Training:
Medical Physics Residency Program University of Kentucky 2001
Certification:
ABR Certification in Therapeutic Radiological Physics, 2005
Clinical Responsibilities:
HDR Brachytherapy, Stereotactic Radiosurgery
Research Interests:
Brachytherapy source characterization
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
I have published multiple articles characterizing a number of commercially available brachytherapy sources.
Selected Publications:
1.
A.S. Meigooni, K. Sowards, M. Soldano: Dosimetric Characteristics of the InterSource 103Palladium
Brachytherapy Source. Medical Physics 27(5), 1093-1100 (2000).
2.
C. Popescu, J. Wise, K. Sowards, A.S. Meigooni, and G. S. Ibbott: Dosimetric Characteristics of the
PharmaSeed TM Model BT-125-1 Source. Medical Physics 27(9), 2174-2281 (2000).
3.
Ali S. Meigooni, K. Sowards, D. Gearheart: Experimental Determination of Dosimetric Characteristics
of Best 125I Brachytherapy Source. Medical Physics 27(9), 2168-2173 (2000).
4.
D. Gearheart, A. Drogin, K. Sowards, A.S. Meigooni, and G.S. Ibbott: Dosimetric Characteristics of a
New 125I Brachytherapy Source. Medical Physics 27(10), 2278-2285 (2000).
5.
A.S. Meigooni, S.A. Dini, K. Sowards, J.L. Hayes, and A. Al-Otoom: Experimental Determination of
the TG-43 Dosimetric Characteristics of EchoSeed™ Model (6733 Brachytherapy Source. Medical
Physics 29(6), 939-942 (2002).
6.
A. Meigooni, K. Sowards, G. Myron: Evaluation of the QZ Veridose Patient Monitoring Phantom.
Medical Dosimetry Journal 29:49-54 (2003).
7.
A. Meigooni, G. Myron, K. Sowards: Evaluation of the Veridose Invivo Dosimetry System. Medical
Dosimetry 27:29-36 (2002).
104
8.
A.S. Meigooni, M.M. Yoe-Sein, A.Y., Al-Otoom, and K.T. Sowards: Determination of the Dosimetric
Characteristics of InterSource 125Iodine Brachytherapy Source. Applied Rad & Isotopes 56:589-599
(2002).
9.
Ali S. Meigooni, Joshua Hayes, Hualin Zhang, and Keith Sowards: Experimental Determination of
IsoAid ADVANTAGE™ 125I Brachytherapy Source. Medical Physics 29(9):2152-2158 (2002).
10.
A.S. Meigooni, Z. Bharucha, M. Yoe-Sein, and K.T. Sowards: Dosimetric characteristics of the Best®
double-wall 103Pd brachytherapy source. Med Phys 28(12):2568-2575 (2001).
11.
K.T. Sowards, A.S. Meigooni: A Monte Carlo evaluation of the dosimetric characteristics of the Best ®
Model 2301 125I Brachytherapy Source. Applied Radiation and Isotopes 57:327-333 (2002).
12.
A.S. Meigooni, K.T. Sowards: A Qualitative and Quantitative Evaluation of the Dose Distribution for
Prostate Implants Using Various Designs of 125I and 103Pd Sources. Medical Physics (In Press 2003).
13.
K.T. Sowards, A.S. Meigooni: A Monte Carlo evaluation of the dosimetric characteristics of the
Amersham model 6733 125I brachytherapy source. Brachytherapy Vol. 1(4):227-232 (2002).
14.
K.T. Sowards: Monte Carlo Dosimetric Characterization of the IsoAid ADVANTAGETM 103Pd
Brachytherapy Source. Journal of the American College of Medical Physics, Vol 8, No 2, (2007).
105
Biographical Sketch – William J. Spanos, MD
Academic Appointments:
Professor, University of Louisville
Clinical Appointments:
Chairman, Department of Radiation Oncology, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Clinical Director, Lecturer in Core Curriculum
Committee:
Physics Residency Committee
Rotation Mentor:
N/A
Education:
MD, Loma Linda University
Post Graduate Training:
Residency, MD Anderson Cancer Center
Certification:
ABR in Therapeutic Radiology, 1977
Clinical Responsibilities:
Head & Neck, Breast
Research Interests:
Combination Therapies
Inter & Extra-mural Support:
Research: Summary
Selected Publications:
1.
Jose B, Duncan A, Paris KJ, Lindberg RD, Spanos Jr. WJ: Glioblastoma multiforme in adults - results
of treatment. J Ky Med Assoc, 88:650-652, December 1990.
2.
Jose B, Banis J, Flynn M, Lindberg RD, Spanos Jr. WJ, Paris, KJ, Rohm, J: Irradiation and free tissue
transfer in head and neck cancer. Head and Neck, 13:213-216, May/June, 1991.
3.
Paris KJ, Spanos Jr. WJ, Day TG, Jose B, Lindberg RD: Incidence of complications with mini vaginal
culpostats in carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Int J Rad Oncol Biol Phys, 21/4)911-917, September
1991.
4.
Spanos Jr. WJ, Day T, Abner A, Jose B, Paris KJ, Pursell S: Complications in the use of intraabdominal P-32 for ovarian carcinoma. Gynecol Oncol, 45:243-247, 1992.
5.
Fu KK, Cox JD, Pajak TF, Nelson DF, Sause WT, Spanos Jr. WJ, Russell AH, Marcial VA, Komaki
R: RTOG altered fractionation trials. Congress Proceedings, 2:567-572, 1992.
6.
Spanos Jr. WJ, Perez CA, Marcus S, Poulter CA, Doggett RLS, Steinfeld AD, Grigsby PW: Effect of
rest interval on tumor and normal tissue response - a report of phase III study of accelerated split course
palliative radiation for advanced pelvic malignancies RTOG-8502, Int J Rad Oncol Biol Phys, 25:399403, February 1993.
7.
Paris KJ, Spanos Jr. WJ, Lindberg RD, Jose B, Albrink F: Phase I-II study of multiple daily
fractionation for palliation of advanced head and neck malignancies, Int J Rad Oncol Biol Phys, 25:657660, March 1993.
8.
Jose B, Lindberg RD, Paris KJ, Spanos Jr. WJ: Irradiation in the management of anal cancer with
literature
review, J Ky Med Assoc, 91:236-241, June 1993.
9.
Spanos Jr. WJ, Day T, Jose B, Paris KJ, Lindberg RD: Use of P-32 in Stage III epithelial carcinoma of
106
the
ovary, Gynecol Oncol, 54:35-39, July 1994.
10.
Spanos Jr. WJ, Clery M, Perez CA, Grigsby PW, Doggett RLS, Poulter CA, Steinfeld AD: Late effect
of multiple daily fraction palliation schedule for advanced pelvic malignancies (RTOG-8502), Int J Rad
Oncol Biol Phys, 29(5)961-967, July 1994.
11.
Butler D, Jose B, Summe R, Paris, K, Bertolone S, Patel CC, Spanos Jr. WJ, Lindberg R: Pediatric
Astrocytomas, The Louisville Experience: 1978-1988, Am J Clin Oncol, 17(6)475-479, Dec 1994.
12.
Jose B, Lindberg RD, Spanos Jr. WJ, Paris KJ: Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Central
Nervous System Tumors, J Ky Med Assoc, 93:88-92, March 1995.
13.
Grigsby PW, Russell A, Bruner D, Eifel P, Koh WJ, Spanos Jr. WJ, Stetz J, Stitt JA, Sullivan J: Late
Injury of cancer therapy on the female reproductive tract, Int J Rad Oncol Biol Phys, 31(5):1281-1299,
March 1995.
14.
Tisdale Ba, Paris KJ, Lindberg RD, Jose B, Spanos, Jr. WJ: Radiation therapy for pancreatic cancer: a
retrospective study of the University of Louisville Experience, So Med J, 88(7):741-744, July 1995.
15.
Seither RB, Jose B, Paris KJ, Lindberg RD, Spanos, Jr. WJ: Results of irradiation in patients with
high-grade gliomas evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging, Am J Clin Oncol, 18(4):297-299, August
1995.
16.
Cornett MS, Paris KJ, Spanos, Jr. WJ, Lindberg RD, Jose B: Radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas:
a retrospective study of the University of Louisville experience, Am J Clin Oncol, 19(3):292-295,
September 1996.
17.
Makhija S, Spanos, Jr. WJ, Day, Jr. TG, Doering D: CA-125 levels after surgical exploration and
radioactive chromic phosphate in ovarian cancer patients, Gynecol Oncol, 63:85-88, October 1996.
18.
Lojun SL, Sigdestad CP, Connor AM, Spanos, Jr. WJ, Bosscher JR: Murine intestinal crypt survival
after combined Taxol plus radiation exposure, Gynecol Oncol, 63:180-183, November 1996.
19.
Spanos Jr. WJ, Pajak TJ, Emami B, Rubin, P, Cooper JS, Russell AH, Cox JD: Radiation Palliation of
Cervical Cancer, J Nat'l Cancer Inst Monogr, 21:127-130, December 1996.
20.
Bradford WB, Jose BO, Butler D, Lindberg RD, Paris K, Spanos Jr, WJ, Patel CC, Bertolone SJ:
Rhabdomyosarcoma in Children-A Ten Year Review, J of KY Med Assoc 96:399-402, October 1998.
21.
Jose BO, Bailen JL, Albrink FH, Steinbock GS, Cornett MS, Benson DC, Schmied WK, Medley RN,
Spanos Jr. WJ, Paris KJ, Korner PD, Gatenby RA, Wilson DL, Meyer, R.: Brachytherapy in Early
Prostate Cancer--Early Experience, J of KY Med Assoc, 97:8-12, January 1999.
22.
Butler DF, Bolton ME, Spanos Jr. WJ, Day, Jr. TG, Paris KJ, Jose BO, Ackerman DM, Cornett MS,
Lindberg RD: Retrospective Analysis of Patients with Primary Fallopian Tube Carcinoma Treated at the
University of Louisville, J of KY Med Assoc, 97:154-164, April 1999.
23.
Butler D, Lindberg RD, Jose B, Paris KJ, Spanos WJ, Goldsmith J - Analysis Of Late Effects Of
Radiation Therapy In Pediatric CNS Tumor – J of KY Med Assn, October 1999.
107
24.
Mills MD, Spanos Jr. WJ, Jose BO, Kelly BA, Brill JP: Preparing a cost analysis for the section of
medical physics -- guidelines and methods, J of Appl Clin Med Phys, 1(2):76-85, March 2000.
25.
Spencer S, Harris J, Wheeler R, Machtay M, Shultz C, Spanos Jr. WJ, Rotman M, and Meredith R:
RTOG 96-10: Phase I Study of Reirradiation (RRT) with Concurrent Hydroxyurea (HU) and 5Fluorouracil (FU) in Patients (PTS) with Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck (SCH&N).
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, 51(5):1299-1304, 2001.
26.
Mills MD, Fajardo LC, Wilson DL, Daves JL and Spanos Jr. WJ: Commissioning of a mobile electron
accelerator for intraoperative radiotherapy. J Appl Clin Med Phys, 2(3):121-130, 2001.
27.
Phan C, Mindrum M, Silverman C, Paris K, and Spanos Jr. WJ: Match controlled retrospective study
of the acute and late complications in patients with collagen vascular diseases treated with radiation
therapy. The Cancer Journal, Vol. 9(6):461-466, 2003.
28.
Jose BO, Bertolone, S., Patel, C.C,. Koerner P, Spanos Jr, WJ, Paris, J., Silverman, C.L., and Yashar,
C.M.: Pediatric Hodgkin’s Disease – J of KY Med Assn 102(3):104-106, March 2004.
29.
Carrascosa, LA, Jose, BO. & Spanos, Jr. WJ.: Synchronous primary bilateral breast lymphoma.
Am J of Clin Oncol, 27(6):635, 2004.
30.
Jose BO, Koerner P, Spanos Jr. WJ, Paris KJ, Silverman CL, Yashar CM, Carrascosa LB: Hodgkin’s
Lymphoma in Adults – Clinical Features. J of KY Med Assn 103:15-17, January 2005.
31.
Hak Choy, Abdenour Nabid, Baldassarre Stea, Charles Scott, Wilson Roa, Larry Kleinberg, Joseph
Ayoub, Colum Smith, Luis Souhami, Solomon Hamburg, William Spanos, Harvey Kreisman, Adam P.
Boyd, Pablo J. Cagnoni, Walter J. Curran: Phase II Multicenter Study of Induction Chemotherapy
Followed by Concurrent Efaproxiral (RSR13) and Thoracic Radiotherapy for Patients with Locally
Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer. J of Clin Oncol 23(25):5918-5928, September 2005.
32.
Yashar CM, Spanos, Jr. WJ, Taylor DD, Gercel-Taylor C: Potentiation of the radiation effect with
genistein in cervical cancer cells. Gyn Oncol 99 (1):199-205, October 2005.
33.
Minor GI, Yashar CM, Spanos, Jr. WJ, Jose BO, Silverman CL et al: The relationship of radiation
pneumonitis to treated lung volume in breast conservation therapy, Breast Journal 12(1):48-52, JanuaryFebruary 2006.
34.
Carrascossa LA, Yashar CM, Paris KJ, LaRocca RVl, Faught SR and Spanos, Jr. WJ: Palliation of
pelvic and head and neck cancer with paclitaxel and a novel radiotherapy regimen. J of Palliative
Medicine 10(4):877-881, August 2007.
35.
Spencer SA, Harris J, Wheeler RH, Machtay M, Schultz C, Spanos, Jr. WJ, Rotman M, Meredith R,
Ang K: Final Report of RTOG-9610, A Multi-institutional trial of re-irradiation and chemotherapy for
unresectable recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, Head & Neck DOI: 10.1002:281287, March 2008.
108
Biographical Sketch – Judith Marie Turner, BS, CMD, R.T.(R.)(T.)
Academic Appointments:
None
Clinical Appointments:
Medical Dosimetrist
Role in Residency Program: Mentor for medical dosimetry
Committee:
None
Rotation Mentor:
Support Mentor Junior Resident Fall Semester in medical dosimetry
Education:
BS, Interdisciplinary Studies
Post Graduate Training:
N/A
Certification:
Registered in Radiation Therapy (ARRT), 1972
Certified in Medical Dosimetry (MDCB), 1993
Clinical Responsibilities:
IMRT/IGRT Treatment planning
Research Interests:
N/A
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
N/A
Selected Publications:
N/A
109
Biographical Sketch – David L. Wilson, MS
Academic Appointments:
Assistant Clinical Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology
Clinical Appointments:
Clinical Physicist, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Mentor for IGRT and Machine Commissioning / Calibration
Committee:
Member of Physics Residency Committee
Rotation Mentor:
Support Mentor Senior Resident Fall Semester, Junior Resident Spring Semester
Education:
BS Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 1975
MS Physics, University of Kentucky 1978
Post Graduate Training:
Passed PhD qualifying examination at University of Kentucky 1990
Certification:
ABR Therapeutic Radiological Physics 1986
ABMP Radiation Oncology Physics 1992
Clinical Responsibilities:
LDR Brachytherapy, IGRT
Research Interests:
Brachytherapy, electron beam therapy
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
Research interests include source characterization and electron beam calculations
Selected Publications:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Sharma, S.C., Wilson, D.L., and Jose, B.: Variation of output with atmospheric pressure and ambient
temperature for Therac-20 linear accelerator. Medical Physics 10:15, 712, 1983.
Sharma, S.C., Wilson, D.L. and Jose, B.: Iridium seed implantation procedures and safety guidelines.
AAMD Journal VIII:4, 1983.
Sharma, S.C., Wilson, D.L. and Jose, B.: Dosimetry of small fields for Therac-20 electron beams.
Medical Physics 11:5, 697-702, September/October 1984.
Sharma, S.C., Wilson, D.L. and Jose, B.: Radioactive cesium implantation procedures and safety
guidelines. AAMD Journal IX:3, 14-18, 1984.
Dodd, D.T., George, D.I., Farman, A.G., Sharma, S.C. and Wilson, D.L.: Backscatter radiation from
restorative materials during Co-60 therapy, Journal of Oral Medicine, Vol. 40:2, 72-75, 100, 1985.
Farman, A.G., Sharma, S.C., George, D.I., Wilson, D.L., Dodd, D., Figa, Robert, Haskell, Bruce:
Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation. Radiology,
156:523-526, 1985.
Sharma, S.C., and Wilson, D.L.: Depth dose characteristics of elongated fields for electron beams from a
20 MeV accelerator. Medical Physics, 12(4):July/August, 1985.
Shorton, D.L., Farman, A.G., George, D.I., Sharma, S., and Wilson, D.: Radiation exposure to critical
structures during transfacial and transcranial TMJ radiography. Dentomaxillofacial Radiology, 14:93-96,
1985.
Wilson, D.L., Sharma, S.C., Jose, B., and Lindberg, R.D.: An intracavitary cone system for electron beam
therapy using Therac-20 linear accelerator. Int. J. of Radiation Oncology/Biology, Physics, 12:10071011, 1986.
Sharma, S.C. and Wilson, David L.: Dosimetric study of total skin irradiation with a scanning beam
electron accelerator. Medical Physics 14(3), May/June, 1987.
B. Olipauram, Jose, M.D.; James L. Bailen, M.D.; Frederick H. Albrink, M.D.; Greg S. Steinbock, M.D.;
110
Mark S. Cornett, M.D.; David C. Benson, M.D.; William K. Schmied, M.D.; Richard N. Medley, M.D.;
William J. Spanos, M.D.; Kristie J. Paris, M.D., Paul D. Koerner, M.D.; Richard A Gatenby, Ph.D., David
L. Wilson, M.S.; Richard Meyer, M.S.: Brachytherapy in Early Prostate Cancer--Early Experience.
Kentucky Medical Association Journal July 1999/Vol. 97, pgs. 12-16.
111
Biographical Sketch – Albert D. Zacarias, PhD
Academic Appointments:
Assistant Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology
Clinical Appointments:
Physicist, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Mentor for IGRT, Respiratory Gating and Intraoperative Radiotherapy
Committee:
Member of Physics Residency Committee
Rotation Mentor:
Primary Mentor Junior Resident, Fall and Spring Semester
Education:
BS Physics, Concordia University, 1978
MS Physics, University of Connecticut 1982
PhD Physics, University of Notre Dame 1990
Post Graduate Training:
Medical Physics Resident, University of Louisville, 2003
Certification:
ABR Therapeutic Radiological Physics 2006
Clinical Responsibilities:
IGRT, Respiratory Gating, Intraoperative Radiotherapy
Research Interests:
IGRT plan optimization, Decimal solid modulators
Inter & Extra-mural Support: N/A
Research: Summary
I developed a new method of plan optimization allowing for higher quality IGRT plans for Varian Trilogy.
Selected Publications:
1
Zacarias AS., Livingston AE., Lu YN., and Ward RF., Berry HG., and Dunford RW.: Measurement of
2s-2p transition energies in helium-like and lithium-like nickel. Nucl. Instr. Meth. Physics Research
B31, 41-42, 1988.
2
Lu YN., Livingston AE., Zacarias AS., and Ward RF., Mazure AJ., Galvez EJ., and Engstrom L.:
Structure of hydrogenic transitions in high-z beryllium-like ions. Nucl. Instr. Meth. Physics
Research B31, 157-160, 1988.
3
AE., Serpa FG., Zacarias AS., Curtis LJ., Berry HG., and Blundell SA.: Lifetime measurements in
highly ionized silicon. Phys Rev A 44: (11) 7820-7822, 1991.
4
Zacarias AS., Lane RG., and Rosen II.: Assessment of a linear-accelerator for segmented conformal
radiation-therapy. Med Phys 20: (1) 193-198, 1993.
5
Bhatnagar A., Ansari NH, Zacarias A., and Srivastava SK.: Digital image-analysis of cultured rat lens
during oxidative stress-induced cataractogenesis. Exp Eye Res 57: (4) 385-391, 1993.
6
Livingston AE., Buttner R., Zacarias AS., Kraus B., Schartner. KH, Folkmann F., and
Mokler PH.: Extreme-Ultraviolet spectrum of Ne III. J Opt Soc Am B 14: (3) 522-525, 1997.
112
7
Lui S-Q., Jin H., Zacarias A., Srivastava S., and Bhatnagar A.: Binding of pyridine nucleotide
coenzymes to the voltage-sensitive K+ channel. Chem Biol Interact. 2001 Jan 30;130-132(1-3):95562.
8
Srivastava S, Dixit BL, Ramana KV, Chandra A, Chandra D, Zacarias A, Petrash JM, Bhatnagar A,
Srivastava SK.,: Structural and kinetic modifications of aldose reductase by S-nitrosothiols,
Biochem J. 2001 Aug 15;358(Pt 1):111-8.
9
Liu, SQ., Jin, H., Zacarias, A., Srivastava, S., and Bhatnagar A.: Binding of pyridine coenzymes to the
beta-subunit of the voltage-sensitive potassium channels. Chem Biol Interact. 2001 Jan 30;130132(1-3):955-62.
10 Srivastava S, Liu SQ, Conklin DJ, Zacarias A, Srivastava SK, Bhatnagar A.: Involvement of aldose
reductase in the metabolism of atherogenic aldehydes. Chem Biol Interact. 2001 Jan 30;130-132(13):563-71.
11 Zacarias A., Bolanowski D, Bhatnagar A.: Comparative measurements of multicomponent
phospholipid mixtures by electrospray mass spectroscopy: relating ion intensity to concentration.
Anal Biochem. 2002 Sep 1;308(1):152-9.
12 Zacarias A, Balog J, Mills M.: Radiation shielding design of a new tomotherapy facility. Health Phys.
2006 Oct;91(4):289-95.
113
Biographical Sketch – Wayne S. Zundel, PhD
Academic Appointments:
Assistant Professor, University of Louisville
Clinical Appointments:
Radiation Biologist, Brown Cancer Center
Role in Residency Program: Radiation Biology Lecturers
Committee:
Physics Residency Committee
Rotation Mentor:
N/A
Education:
PhD in Cancer Biology, Stanford University
Post Graduate Training:
Lecturer, Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University
Certification:
N/A
Clinical Responsibilities:
N/A
Research Interests:
Hypoxia, oxygen pathways
Inter & Extra-mural Support:
1
NIH / NCI - RO-1 2004 – 2008. Analysis of CSN5 Interaction with the HIF-α/VCB Complex and
Mechanistic Characterization of HIF-α Stabilization.
2
GRID Computing Grant. Virtual screen for small molecule inhibitors of several molecular targets.
Research: Summary
Regulation of hypoxic mechanisms and their affects on cancer therapies.
Selected Publications:
1
Zundel W, Giaccia A. Inhibition of the anti-apoptotic PI(3)K/Akt/Bad pathway by stress. Genes and
Development 1998 Jul 1;12(13):1941-6.
2
Zundel W, Swiersz LM, Giaccia A. Caveolin-1 mediated regulation of receptor tyrosine kinaseassociated PI(3)K activity by ceramide. Molecular & Cellular Biology. 2000 Mar; 20(5):1507-14.
3
Zundel W, Schindler C, Koong A, Haas-Kogan D, Kaper F, Chen E, Shalev N, Ryan HE, Johnson RS,
Jefferson AB, Stokoe D, Giaccia A. PTEN controls angiogenic and glycolytic gene expression by
hypoxia and growth factors. Genes and Development 2000 Feb 15;14:341-48. (Paper alert –
Current Opinion in Genetics & Development Vol. 10.3, 235-334, June 2000).
4
Bemis L, Chan DA, Finkielstein CV, Sutphin PD, Qi L, Chen X, Stenmark K, Giaccia A, Zundel W.
Distinct Aerobic and Hypoxic Mechanisms of HIF-1 Regulation by CSN5. Genes and
Development. 2004 Apr 1;18(7):739-44.
5
Mikus P & Zundel W, COPing with Hypoxia. Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology. 2005 AugOct;16(4-5):462-73.
114
6
Richardson K & Zundel W. The Emerging Role of the COP9 Signalosome in Tumor Progression.
Molecular Cancer Research. 2005 Dec 1; 3(12).
7
Winner M, Koong AC, Rendon BE, Zundel W, Mitchell RA. Amplification of tumor hypoxic responses
by macrophage migration inhibitory factor-dependent hypoxia-inducible factor stabilization. Cancer
Research 2007 Jan 1;67(1):186-93.
8
Winner M, Leng L, Zundel W, Mitchell RA. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor manipulation and
evaluation in tumoral hypoxic adaptation. Methods in Enzymology 2007 435:355-69.
115
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