2015 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report

2015 Annual Security and Fire Safety Report
POLICE AND SAFETY
Fall 2015
Annual Security and Fire Safety Report
The information in this brochure is provided to you as part of Stonehill College’s commitment to safety and security on campus and
complies with the requirements of Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.
Fall 2015
1
Message from the Chief
This booklet is designed to share essential information about the Stonehill
College Police Department and the services that we provide to the campus
community. As a Department of 21 law enforcement professionals who are
all certified Special State Police Officers, we are committed to communityorientated policing and to delivering a wide range of police services twenty
four hours day, seven days a week to everyone who lives and works here, as
well as our many guests and visitors.
Our mission is to enhance the overall quality of life at Stonehill and to foster
a safe, secure campus for the entire community to enjoy. Protecting our
students, faculty and staff is our top priority. Through our patrols, on foot, on
bikes and in vehicles, we maintain a high-profile on campus and work
constantly to deter crime and the opportunities for it. We have a record of
building strong partnerships with all members of our community. These
partnerships promote an opportunity for education in such areas as Crime
Prevention, Rape Aggression Defense Training, Identity Theft, and Personal
Protection. We also host a popular Citizen’s Police Academy where community members learn in greater detail
about our operating philosophy and challenges. In addition, we encourage everyone to operate on the principle
of “See It, Hear It, and Report It” when encountering suspicious persons or witnessing suspicious activities on
our campus.
Finally, I encourage you to review this booklet which offers more information on safety and security here on the
Stonehill campus. Of course, please free to drop into our headquarters in the Old Student Union Building or
review our website at: http://www.stonehill.edu/offices-services/campus-police. Welcome to this wonderful
college and community and, in conclusion, let me add that, if you have questions or concerns, never hesitate to
call me or any of our officers at 508-565-5100.
Chief Peter L. Carnes; Chief of Police
Stonehill College Police Department
Fall 2015
2
Important Telephone Numbers
Stonehill College Campus Police Department
Police – Fire – Medical –Safety Escort
Emergency (508) 565-5555 or 911 from any campus telephone
Business (508) 565-5100
Town of Easton Police Department
Emergency: Dial 9 and then 911 from any campus telephone
Business (508) 230-3322
Counseling Services and SHARE
(Sexual Harassment/Assault Resources and Education)
(508) 565-1331
A New Day (Formerly Womansplace Crisis Center)
(508) 588-8255 (hotline)
Good Samaritan Medical Center
(508) 427-3000
Brockton Hospital
(508) 941-7000
National Domestic Violence Hotline
(800) 799-SAFE (800-799-7233)
Title IX Coordinators
Maryann Biedak, Director of Human Resources/Title IX Coordinator (508) 565-1105
Cindy MacDonald, Senior Associate Director of Intercollegiate Athletics/Title IX Deputy (508) 565-1384
Rita Pisapia, Director of Community Standards/ Title IX Deputy (508) 565-1816
Fall 2015
3
The Department of Campus Police and Safety
Campus policing and safety is coordinated by the Stonehill College Police Department. The department is
comprised of a Chief, a Lieutenant, a Detective Lieutenant, three Sergeants, ten full time Patrol Officers, and two
Community Service Officers. In addition, the department employs Communications Officers (Police
Dispatchers), office support staff, and 2 part time Gate House Attendants who are stationed in the Campus Gate
House, located at the Belmont Street entrance to the College.
Campus Police Officers are commissioned in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General Laws
Chapter 22C § 63 and have law enforcement authority, including the authority to make arrests. Campus Police
Officers have jurisdiction in and upon all property owned, occupied, or used by the College. Police Officers are
graduates of a police academy conducted or sanctioned by the Massachusetts State Police, the Massachusetts
Criminal Justice Training Council, or have met other requirements established by the Colonel of the
Massachusetts State Police. Community Service Officers serve the college community by locking campus
buildings, reporting safety and maintenance problems, and monitoring the campus for suspicious people and
activity. They do not have law enforcement or arrest authority.
The Campus Police Department is responsible for keeping the peace and enforcing public laws and college
policies. Although the Campus Police Department performs a variety of services, its primary function is to protect
the lives and property of community members and visitors to the College. Police Officers are on duty 24 hours a
day, 7 days a week and patrol the campus on foot, on mountain bikes, and in marked police vehicles.
Annual in-service refresher training is provided to all officers, and officers are assigned to attend training in a
wide variety of specialized topics such as crime prevention, community policing, sexual assault investigations,
bias motivated crimes, Response to Active Shooter, and many other subjects.
The Department maintains a close working relationship with the Easton Police Department and exchanges
information relative to criminal activity. Stonehill College does not have any written agreements (including
written agreements for the investigation of criminal incidents) with the Easton Police or the State Police. The
Detective Lieutenant oversees investigations of criminal incidents which occur on campus, and at times may work
in conjunction with outside law enforcement agencies.
Stonehill College does not own or control property off campus which is used by student organizations. Student
Organizations also do not own or control any noncampus properties. Stonehill College does lease off-campus
housing in Los Angeles, CA and Bronx, NY. The police departments in these cities are contacted annually to
gather crime statistics for the purpose of this report.
Reporting Crimes and Emergencies
Members of the community are encouraged to accurately and promptly report crimes, emergencies, and other
suspicious activity to the Stonehill College Police Department (SCPD), when the victim of a crime elects to or is
unable to make such a report. All reports of crime are taken seriously. Police Dispatchers are available 24 hours
a day to answer your calls. In response to a call, SCPD will either dispatch an officer or ask the victim to report
to SCPD to file an incident report. SCPD officers may make an arrest when deemed appropriate. All SCPD
incident reports are forwarded to the Dean of Students Office for review and referral to the Office of Community
Standards for potential action. SCPD investigators will investigate a report when it is deemed appropriate.
The Campus Police Department is located on the first floor in the Old Student Union building and may be reached
for emergencies or to report crimes by dialing 911 or x 5555 from any campus telephone or (508) 565-5555 from
any cell phone or off-campus telephone. The Campus Police business number is 508-565-5100. Free on-campus
Fall 2015
4
telephones are located in the lobbies or public areas of campus buildings. Well marked “Blue Light” emergency
telephones are located throughout the campus and may be used to report crime, suspicious activity, or to request
a safety escort.
Voluntary Confidential Crime Reporting: If you are the victim of a crime and do not want to pursue action
within the College system or the criminal justice system, you may still want to consider making a confidential
report. With your permission, a SCPD officer can file a report on the details of the incident without revealing
your identity (except to the Title IX Coordinator in the event of a reported sex offense or sexual harassment).
The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking
steps to enhance the future safety of yourself and others. With such information, the College can keep an
accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, employees and visitors; determine where there is
a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant; and alert the campus community to
potential danger. Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crime statistics for the
institution.
Students and employees should report criminal offenses to the Stonehill College Police Department for the
purpose of making timely warning reports and the annual statistical disclosure.
Campus Security Authorities (CSA’s)
Examples of Campus Security Authorities include but are not limited to:


Campus Police, Security, and others identified by the College as persons or departments on campus to
whom crimes may be reported.
Officials with significant responsibility for student and campus activities including:
1. student housing and student centers/activities
2. officials responsible for student discipline and judicial proceedings
3. coaches of sports teams & advisors to officially recognized student organizations
The following are not campus security authorities: a single teaching faculty member who is not also an advisor
to a student group; a physician in the campus health center, a counselor in a counseling center whose only
responsibility is to provide care to students; campus clergy working as pastoral counselors in their religious
capacity, and their support staff.
CSA’s receive annual training and are required to report crimes that occur on property owned, leased, or
controlled by Stonehill College. CSA’s are required by law to report crime to the Stonehill College Police
Department for the purpose of making timely warning reports and the annual statistical disclosure.
PROFESSIONAL AND PASTORAL COUNSELORS
As a result of the negotiated rulemaking process which followed the signing into law of the 1998 amendments
to 20 U.S.C. Section 1092 (f), clarification was given to those considered to be campus security authorities.
Campus “Pastoral Counselors” and Campus “Professional Counselors,” when acting as such are not considered
to be a campus security authority and are not required to report crimes for inclusion in the annual disclosure of
crime statistics. Crimes can be confidentially discussed with these employees.
Pastoral Counselor
An employee of an institution, who is associated with a religious order or denomination, recognized by
that religious order or denomination as someone who provides confidential counseling and who is
functioning within the scope of that recognition as a pastoral counselor.
Fall 2015
5
Professional Counselor
An employee of an institution whose official responsibilities include providing psychological counseling
to members of the institution’s community, and who is functioning within the scope of his or her license
or certification in a scheduled session at the Counseling Center.
Please note that on call Professional Counselors who are contacted for campus crisis situations (outside
of the Counseling Center) work as part of an emergency team. Talking on the telephone with a Stonehill
College on call professional counselor is not deemed confidential. The on call counselor may be
required to share information with other on call staff and Campus Police.
Access to Facilities
Students, faculty, and staff members at Stonehill College have access to academic, recreational, and
administrative facilities Monday-Friday during normal business hours, and during designated hours in the
evening and on weekends.
Access to residence halls is restricted by policy to students and their guests; employees who live or work in the
residence halls; and guests attending summer programs registered through the College. Resident students are
issued an identification access card and a key to their residence hall room; the access card unlocks the residence
hall main door and the key unlocks the door to the student’s room. Guests [to residence halls] are permitted only
when accompanied by their student host. We ask students and employees not to provide access, or hold open a
residence hall door, for people they do not know.
Exterior doors to residence halls are locked 24 hours a day and intrusion alarms are installed on exterior doors
that are not used as a primary entry/exit door. Access to residence halls by college employees is on an as needed
basis and is governed by access control procedures.
On Friday and Saturday nights during the academic year, between the hours of 6 p.m. and 4 a.m., a roadblock is
set up at the campus gatehouse to monitor access to the campus. Students are expected to pre-register their
weekend guests via an automated computerized “Guest Registration” system no later than 5pm on Friday and
Saturday. Guests should be prepared to show a valid form of ID with a photograph. Stonehill employees and
students coming on to campus should be prepared to present their valid Stonehill College ID card to the Gate
House officer.
Maintenance and Security of Campus Facilities
Stonehill College maintains a strong commitment to campus safety. Trees, bushes and other vegetation on campus
are trimmed on a regular basis. During patrols, Police Officers and Community Service Officers report lighting
and other deficiencies to the Facilities Management Department. Members of the community are also encouraged
to report deficiencies to Campus Police at 508-565-5100 or Facilities Management at 508-565-1380.
Officers routinely patrol parking lots, roadways, walkways, and other public areas in marked police cruisers, on
foot, and on mountain bikes. Community Service Officers and Police Officers lock the exterior doors of campus
buildings each night. Some doors are set to lock automatically via an access control system. Door and lock
deficiencies are reported to Facilities Management for repair.
Video cameras record activity at both entrances to the campus. Additional video cameras are located on campus
to record activity at specific locations. These cameras may be viewed by Dispatchers in the Campus Police
Station, but are not constantly monitored.
Fall 2015
6
Crime Prevention and Security Awareness Programs
The Stonehill College Police Department believes that it’s better to act early to prevent a crime, rather than react
to a crime after it has occurred. Stonehill College conducts various crime prevention and security awareness
programs designed to inform students and employees about campus security procedures. Students and employees
are responsible for their own safety and security and the safety and security of others. Members of the Stonehill
College are encouraged to participate in the crime prevention programs that are available to them.
Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking, and Sexual Harassment Education and
Prevention
Various campus departments such as Campus Police, Health & Wellness, Counseling Center, Residence Life,
Student Activities, General Counsel’s Office (and others) offer educational programming throughout the year for
both students and employees. In keeping with the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act (VAWA), many
of these trainings focus on sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, and the topic of “consent”.
Legal (State crimes code and campus judicial) definitions of the above are reviewed and students/employees are
advised to whom they can report these crimes, formally or confidentially and how to access on campus and off
campus resources. Students and employees are taught how they can recognize signs of abusive behavior; how to
avoid potential attacks; and how to engage safe and positive options for bystander intervention [to prevent harm
or to intervene in risky situations]. They also learn about the procedures the institution will follow when one of
these crimes is reported and about the procedural requirements for institutional disciplinary action for these
offenses.
In addition, programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, stalking and sexual assault are culturally
relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and
informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and consider environmental risk and
protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community, and societal levels.
Programs designed to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking include both
primary prevention and awareness programs directed at incoming students and new employees and ongoing
prevention and awareness campaigns offered to students and employees.
Primary training programs include; Annual (mandatory) employee training and new student training during their
orientation. These training programs cover sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.
Employees and students who are designated as Campus Security Authorities (CSA’s) also attend an annual CSA
training.
The College offers on-going training programs through the SHARE Committee. SHARE stands for Sexual
Harassment/Assault Resources and Education. The committee has representatives from various departments
including Campus Police. Additional information about SHARE can be found at
http://www.stonehill.edu/offices-services/health-wellness/share-sexual-harassment-assaul/
Stonehill College offers educational programming throughout the year. In 2014 some of the programming that
covered sexual assault, domestic and dating violence and stalking and were open to the Stonehill College
community included:
Fall 2015
7
2014 Stonehill College Prevention and Awareness Programs
DoV= Domestic Violence, DaV= Dating Violence, SA= Sexuasl Assault and S= Stalking
Name of Program
Date
Held
Location Held
Main Instructor and
Department
Bystander Intervention
Training
Jan. 17,
23, 31,
Feb. 9,
11, 17,
March
21,
April 2,
11, 15 of
2014
3/12/14
Duffy
Health & Wellness
Office
Health & Wellness
Office
Student Witness
Initiative
Counseling, Wellness,
Community Standards
A New Day: Rape
Crisis Center
Safe Spring Break
Take Back the Night
March
RA Training
4/8/14
Dining
Commons
Quad
8/20/14
Alumni Hall
Responding to Survivor
of Sexual Assault
8/20/14
Gender Based
Misconduct Policies
8/20/14
Freshmen Orientation:
Sexual Assault
Prevention Program
Gender Based
Misconduct Policy
Review to Student
Leaders and Athletes
Sexual Assault
Prevention Week
8/24/14
Campus
Ministry
Conference
Room
Campus
Ministry
Conference
Room
Shield’s Science
Center Atrium
August
Summer
Training
2014
Sept.
2014
WHEN’s
Chalking/Empowerment
Words Campaign
Stand Up Stonehill:
Speaking Engagement
Gender Based
Misconduct
Training/Review of
Policies
Gender Based
Misconduct Policy
Review
9/29/14
Quad and around
campus
10/2/14
10/8/14
9/14/14
Community Standards
Office
Is program
offered to
Students (S)
and
Employees (E)
Students
Circle
Which
Prohibited
Behavior(s)
Covered
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
Evaluation
Students
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
No
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
No
Students
Students
(RA’s)
Employees
Health Services
and Counseling
Services)
Employees
(Health
Services)
Yes
No
Yes
No
Steve Thompson: No
Zebra’s Program
Students (all
freshmen)
SA, S
Yes
Res halls, Sports
Complex, and
Merkert Gym
Community Standards
Students
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
No
On the Quad
Health & Wellness,
Campus Police,
Student Clubs, Off
campus resources, (A
New Day)
WHEN Club
Students
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
No
Students and
Employees
SA
No
Martin
Auditorium
Duffy 101
WHEN Club
SA
No
Health and Wellness
Students
&Employees
Students
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
No
Cleary Dining
Room
Health and Wellness
Students
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
No
Fall 2015
8
RAD Classes
Stall Street Journals and
posters about healthy
relationships
4 classes
held
during
Spring
semester
and 2
classes
held in
the Fall.
Throughout year
Cleary Dining
Room and Holy
Cross Center
Library
Health and Wellness
Office and Campus
Police
Students &
Employees
DoV, DaV,
SA, S
Yes
Res halls
Health and Wellness
Office and MAV
Student Club
Students
DaV, SA
No
Bystander Intervention Program: “Bystander” training is a 2-hour training that provides students with an
understanding of the culture of sexual assault on college campuses and provides participants with tools and
techniques they can use to help prevent this and other negative behaviors on our campus.
Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) is a program that offers realistic self-defense options for women. The RAD
System is a comprehensive self-defense course, which promotes awareness, prevention, risk reduction, and risk
avoidance, and progresses to the basics of physical hands-on self-defense training. RAD is not a Martial Arts
program. RAD offers simple physical techniques that are easy to learn, retain, and employ under stressful
circumstances. Certified R.A.D. Instructors are from the Campus Police and Health and Wellness Department.
Printed Crime Prevention Materials – Pamphlets, brochures, and other materials designed to inform students
and employees about the prevention of crimes are made available throughout the campus at various locations
including the Campus Police Station and the Health and Wellness Office, located in the Dining Commons. These
materials provide information on residence hall safety & security; bicycle and motor vehicle safety; crime
prevention; sexual assault; domestic violence; dating violence; stalking; and drug & alcohol education.
Safety Escorts - This service provides a “safety” escort upon request for persons walking across campus. Escorts
may be provided by an officer in a vehicle, on foot, or on a mountain bike.
Residence Hall Security - Campus Police works closely with the Residence Life Department to promote safety
in the residence halls through training and education of staff and residents.
Fall 2015
9
Emergency “Blue Light” Telephones – Emergency telephones are located throughout the campus. Pressing a
button will activate an emergency call to the Campus Police Dispatch Center.
Crime Prevention Tables – Throughout the year, Campus Police participates in educational resource fairs.
Officers host a resource table, distribute educational materials, and answer safety related questions.
Security and Fire Alarms Systems – Fire alarms, carbon monoxide alarms, and card access door alarms ring
into the Campus Police Dispatch Center. In addition, some offices are also equipped with intrusion or panic alarms
which ring into the Dispatch Center. Campus Police schedules unannounced fire drills each semester in all
residence halls.
Citizens Police Academy – In the spring of 2015, Campus Police debuted their first Citizens Police Academy.
The program will continue in the fall with sessions covering; History of Policing, History of Criminal Justice in
America, Stonehill College Police Operations, Criminal Law, Motor Vehicle Law, Constitutional Law,
Criminal Investigations and Forensics, Sexual Assault Investigations, Campus Title IX Investigations, Domestic
Violence, Cyber Crime, and Careers in Policing.
Timely Warning Policy
Fall 2015
10
In the event that a situation arises on campus, that constitutes a serious or continuing threat, a campus wide
“timely warning notice” will be issued. The content of the timely warning notice is developed by the Chief of
Police and the Director of Media Relations (or their designees) along with input from some members of the
Emergency Response Team, which may include: College President, VP of Student Affairs, Dean of Students,
General Counsel, and VP of Finance. The warning will be issued by the Campus Police Department or Media
Relations via email to students, faculty, and staff. The warning may also be posted as a targeted announcement
on the Stonehill College myHill website. If deemed necessary by Campus Police, Timely Warning Notices may
also be posted in residence halls and in academic buildings. Timely warning notices shall be provided to
students and employees in a manner that is timely, in an attempt to aid in the prevention of similar crimes, while
withholding as confidential the names and other identifying information of victims.
The warning will be issued in a timely manner to notify community members about select crimes in and around
the community. Timely warning notices would be distributed for the following Uniform Crime Reporting
Program (UCR)/National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS) classifications: arson, murder/non
negligent manslaughter, and robbery.
Cases of aggravated assault and sex offenses are considered on a case-by-case basis, depending on the facts of
the case and the information known by SCPD. For example, if an assault occurs between two students who have
a disagreement, there may be no on-going threat to other Stonehill College community members and a timely
warning notice would not be distributed. Some cases involving sexual assault are reported long after the
incident occurred; thus, it would not be possible to distribute a “timely” warning notice to the community in
those cases. Sex offenses will be considered on a case-by-case basis depending on when and where the incident
occurred, when it was reported, and the amount of information known by the SCPD. The Stonehill College
Police Chief or his designee reviews all reports to determine if there is an on-going threat to the community and
if the distribution of a timely warning notice is warranted. Timely warning notices may also be issued for other
crime classifications, as deemed necessary.
Community members who have information about a crime or other serious incident should report the incident to
the Stonehill College Campus Police Department so that a timely warning notice can be issued, if warranted.
These warnings will be distributed if the incident is reported either to the SCPD directly, or indirectly through a
campus security authority or the local police.
The decision to issue a crime alert shall be decided on a case by case basis in light of all the facts surrounding a
crime, including factors such as the nature of the crime, the continuing danger to the campus community, and the
possible risk of compromising law enforcement efforts.
Emergency Notification Systems and Procedures
Stonehill College has an Emergency Management Plan which is intended to provide a standard document of broad
guidelines, procedures, and organizational structure so that key individuals who must make and communicate
decisions during an emergency can do so efficiently and effectively.
The emergency procedures are designed to provide a safe and secure environment during and after an emergency
situation. Since an emergency may be sudden and without warning, the procedures are designed to be flexible in
order to accommodate contingencies of various types and magnitudes.
Defining and Categorizing Emergency Incidents - An “Emergency Incident” is a situation or condition, which
significantly disrupts or potentially disrupts the educational mission, residential or student life, and/or
administrative function of a significant portion of the Stonehill College community.
Fall 2015
11
Levels of Emergency Severity: - Because each “Emergency Incident” situation will be unique, it is imperative
that the situation is evaluated to determine a severity level based on the following criteria: LOW – situation is
manageable within the department or division, or in coordination with Campus Police (if necessary); ELEVATED
– the situation has larger impact on campus life and may require media/ communication; and CRITICAL – the
situation has a major impact on campus life or college reputation, or requires outside resources beyond the
College’s capacity.
Determining an Emergency Incident: When a First Responder determines that an emergency situation may exist,
the first responder must notify his/her supervisor and Campus Police immediately. Campus Police will respond
and assist the supervisor in assessing the situation and severity level and determine if notifying the Chief of Police
and/or a college officer/president is warranted.
In situations that immediately threaten life or property, the Easton Fire/Rescue Department and Easton Police
Department will be contacted.
Notification and Response Procedures: If the Chief of Police and/or the appropriate Division Head have confirmed
that an emergency incident is at the Elevated level, the Division Head will inform the General Counsel and Media
Relations. If the incident is confirmed to be at the Critical level, the Division Head will inform the College
President and all other Division Heads of the situation and any action steps being taken.
If the Chief of Police and/or the appropriate Division Head have confirmed that an emergency incident is at the
Critical level, the Chief of Police will contact the Emergency Response Team members for response and notify
them of the command center location. This group or their designee will have the responsibility for determining
the segments(s) of the community to receive the notification and for preparing and disseminating emergency
messages and updates. The Emergency Response Team consists of:
Emergency Response Group
Associate Vice President for Operations (Emergency Response Group Leader)
Associate Vice President for Student Affairs /Dean of Students
Director of Communications and Media Relations (Crisis Communication Team Leader)
General Counsel
Chief Information Officer
Telecommunications Coordinator
Director of Residence Life
Director of the Counseling Center
Director of Health Services
Director of Information Technology
Director of Human Resources
In the event of a serious incident which poses an immediate threat to members of the Stonehill College
community, the college will immediately notify the campus community and has various systems in place for
communicating information quickly to the community. Police officers will respond to reports of threats. Upon
confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation occurring on campus and involving an
immediate threat to the health or safety of the campus community, some or all of these methods of
communication may be activated. The methods that may be used include: activating “Blackboard Connect”, an
emergency notification system which can deliver a message via text messaging, email, and/or telephone voice
messaging; posting a message on the MyHill portal; sending announcements to the community via the Stonehill
College email system; use of a handheld (or building) public address (PA) system, and messages posted on the
homepage of the Stonehill College website. Updates and follow-up information will be posted on the front page
of the College’s website or will be distributed using one or more of the systems described above.
Fall 2015
12
The content of the emergency notification is developed by the Chief of Police and/or the Director of Media
Relations (or their designees) along with input from some members of the Emergency Response Team which
may include: College President, VP of Student Affairs, Dean of Students, General Counsel, and VP of Finance.
The emergency notification will be issued by the Campus Police Department or Media Relations or their
designee.
Sign up to receive emergency text messages via Blackboard Connect, by following these instructions:
1. Login to myHill.
2. If you are a student, select the myAcademics tab, then click on the Update/View Address and Phones link
in the "Personal Information" channel.
3. If you are an Employee, select the Employee Services tab, then click on the Update/View Address and
Phones link in the "Personal Information" channel.
4. Click Current under the “Permanent/Legal address type” to change your home address or one of your
personal phone numbers. The “Update Address and Phones” page will be displayed. Do not change the dates
in the "Valid From" and "Until This Date" fields.
5. Update your address by typing over your existing address and click Submit when done.
6. Scroll down to display the area where you enter your phone number(s).
7. The home phone should be entered into the “Primary Phone Number For This Address” field.
8. The “Cellular” phone type is used as your request to receive text message alerts to your cell phone using the
Hill Alert system.
9. Once you have completed the changes, just click on the Submit button at the bottom of the page.
10. You'll be brought back to the “Update Addresses and Phones” page, at which point you can continue to
modify another address type, navigate back to the myAcademics tab (students) or the Employee Services tab
(Employees), or logout of myHill.
Emergency notifications are sent to Stonehill College faculty, staff, and students. If an emergency may affect the
larger Easton community, the Easton Police Department would be notified to alert Easton community members.
Neighbors of Stonehill College, parents of students, and other interested members of the larger community can
view information and updates on the Stonehill College webpage as information becomes available.
The notification will be delivered without delay, taking into account the safety of the community, determining
the content of the notification, and initiating the notification system, unless issuing the notification will, in the
judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise
mitigate the emergency.
It is the goal of the crisis communication plan is to establish guidelines for dealing with a variety of situations,
and to ensure that campus officials and communicators are familiar with those procedures and their roles in the
event of a crisis. The plan is designed to be used in conjunction with the normal decision-making hierarchy of the
Fall 2015
13
College and does not supplant that decision-making process. It is designed to be used in conjunction with
operational crisis response plans managed through other departments on campus.
The College’s Crisis Management Team plans, publicizes, and conducts a test of the emergency response plans
and notification system annually and maintains a record documenting each test including a description of the
exercise, the date, time, and whether it was announced or unannounced.
Procedures for Missing Students Residing on Campus
If a member of the College community has reason to believe that a student who resides in on-campus housing is
missing, the Stonehill College Police Department should be contacted immediately at 508-565-5555. If the
student cannot be quickly located, an incident report will be generated and an investigation will be initiated in
order to attempt to locate the missing student. The Stonehill College Police Department maintains a detailed and
specific protocol for conducting missing person investigations, which can be made available upon request.
If the Stonehill College Police Department determines that a student is missing and has been missing for 24 hours,
the Easton Police Department, the police department of the community where the missing student maintains a
home of record, and the person designated as the student's “missing person” emergency contact will be notified
no later than 24 hours after the student is determined to have been missing. If the missing student is under the
age of 21, a missing person notice will be posted on the national crime investigation center database. If the
missing student is under the age of 18 and is not an emancipated individual, Stonehill will notify the student's
parent or legal guardian and any other designated contact person immediately after the Stonehill College Police
Department has determined that the student has been missing for more than 24 hours.
When annually registering names of emergency contacts during the online registration process through the myHill
portal, students will have the option to confidentially identify an individual to be contacted in the event the student
is determined to be missing for 24 hours. If the student has identified such an individual, Stonehill will notify that
person after the student is determined to have been missing for 24 hours. Missing person contact information is
kept confidential and only accessible to authorized campus officials and law enforcement. It will not be disclosed
outside of a missing person investigation.
Crime Reporting
Stonehill College notifies the campus community about crime and crime related problems via the following.
Annual Security and Fire Safety Report – The Annual Security and Fire Safety Report is published by October
1st of each year. It’s made available to the entire community and to any individual or organization requesting a
copy. The report contains safety and security-related policy statements and certain crime statistics for the last
three calendar years.
Daily Crime Log - A chronological record of all crimes reported to the College Police, as well as the names of
persons arrested, is maintained at the Campus Police Station and is available for viewing during regular college
business hours.
Student Newspaper – At times The Summit publishes selected incidents from the Public Log.
Connect notification system.
Gender-Based Misconduct
Statement of Intent
Stonehill College is committed to providing a learning and working environment that is free from gender-based
discrimination or harassment. As such, the College does not tolerate any kind of gender-based discrimination or
Fall 2015
14
harassment, which includes sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, and gender-based harassment. The College
is committed to fostering a healthy and safe environment that emphasizes the dignity and worth of every
member of its community.
Gender-based misconduct comprises a broad range of behaviors focused on sex and/or gender discrimination
that may or may not be sexual in nature. Sexual harassment, sexual misconduct, gender-based harassment,
stalking, and dating/domestic violence are forms of gender-based misconduct under this policy, and, in addition,
they are acts prohibited by law and can therefore also be addressed by local law enforcement. Misconduct can
occur between strangers or acquaintances, including people involved in an intimate or dating relationship.
Gender-based misconduct can be committed by men or by women, and it can occur between people of the same
or different sex.
Gender-based misconduct is a serious concern on college campuses throughout the country. To address this
problem, the College provides educational and preventative programs, services for individuals who have been
impacted by gender-based and sexual misconduct, and accessible, prompt, and equitable methods of
investigation and resolution. Additionally, the College will not tolerate any acts of gender-based discrimination
and will take effective means to end any acts, up to and including dismissal of the offending individual.
Consistent with its commitment to addressing gender-based discrimination and harassment, the College
complies with Title IX of the Higher Education Amendment of 1972, which prohibits discrimination on the
basis of sex in education programs or activities. Gender-based misconduct, as defined in this document,
constitutes forms of sex discrimination prohibited by Title IX. The Gender-Based Misconduct Policy applies
regardless of the complainant’s or respondent’s race, gender, disability, age, marital status, religion, color,
national origin, sexual orientation, or other personal characteristics.
The Gender-Based Misconduct Policy provides guidance for individuals who may be the victim of genderbased misconduct, outlines the College’s response to alleged incidents, and identifies relevant departments
within the College responsible for managing the policy and programs associated with it.
Examples and Definitions
Gender-Based Harassment
Acts of verbal, nonverbal, or physical aggression, intimidation, stalking, or hostility based on gender or genderstereotyping constitute gender-based harassment. Gender-based harassment can occur if individuals are
harassed either for exhibiting what is perceived as a stereotypical characteristic of their sex, or for failing to
conform to stereotypical notions of masculinity or femininity. In order to constitute harassment, the conduct
must be such that it has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s academic
performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, demeaning, or offensive living or learning environment.
Dating Violence
Note that Massachusetts does not have a dating violence law. Similar violations would likely be classified under
Domestic Violence Law.
The use of physical violence, coercion, threats, intimidation, isolation, stalking, or other forms of emotional,
sexual, or economic abuse directed towards a partner in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature
constitutes dating violence. This includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, isolate, frighten, terrorize,
coerce, threaten, or injure someone. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a
consideration of the following factors: length of the relationship, type of relationship, or frequency of
interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. Dating violence can be a single act or a pattern of
behavior in relationships. Examples may include the following:
Fall 2015
15
• Slapping
• Pulling hair
• Punching
• Damaging one’s property
• Driving recklessly to scare someone
• Harassment directed toward a current or former partner
• Threats of abuse such as threatening to hit, harm, or use a weapon on another (whether victim or
acquaintance, friend, or family member of the victim), or other forms of verbal threats
The federal definition as per the Violence Against Women Act is:
Dating Violence: Violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a
romantic or intimate nature with the victim.
i. The existence of such a relationship shall be based on the reporting party’s statement and with
consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of
interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.
ii. For the purposes of this definition—
A) Dating Violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of
such abuse.
B) Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.
Domestic Violence
Any of the behavior described above in “Dating Violence” directed towards a spouse, a person with whom the
individual who may be the victim shares a child in common, a person who is cohabitating with or has
cohabitated with the person who may be the victim as a spouse, a person similarly situated to a spouse of the
individual who may be the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of Massachusetts, or any person
who the perpetrator knows has an outstanding temporary or permanent vacate, restraining or no contact order or
judgment issued pursuant to Massachusetts law in effect against the perpetrator at the time the violence occurs.
The federal definition as per the Violence Against Women Act is:
Domestic Violence:
i. A Felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed—
A) By a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim;
B) By a person with whom the victim shares a child in common;
C) By a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or
intimate partner;
D) By a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family
violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or
E) By any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s
acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of
violence occurred.
Stalking
A course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her
safety or the safety of others, or suffer substantial emotional distress. A course of conduct is defined as “a
pattern of actions over a period of time, however short, evidencing a continuity of conduct.”
Stalking includes any behaviors or activities occurring on more than one occasion that collectively instill fear in
an individual, and/or threaten her or his safety, mental health, or physical health. Such behaviors and activities
Fall 2015
16
may include, but are not limited to, the following:
• Non-consensual communication including face-to-face communication, telephone calls, voice messages,
text messages, email messages, instant messages, written letters, gifts or any other communications that
are undesired and/or place another person in fear
• Use of on-line, electronic, or digital technologies including:
o Posting of pictures or information in chat rooms or websites
o Sending unwanted/unsolicited email or talk requests
o Posting private or public messages on internet sites, social networking sites, and/or school bulletin
boards
o Installing spy-ware on an individual’s computer
o Using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) to monitor an individual
• Pursuing, waiting, or showing up uninvited at a workplace, place of residence, classroom, or other
locations frequented by an individual
• Surveillance and other types of observation, whether by physical proximity or electronic means
• Trespassing
• Vandalism
• Non-consensual touching
• Direct physical and/or verbal threats against an individual or his or her loved ones
• Gathering information about an individual from family, friends, co-workers, and/or classmates
• Manipulative and controlling behaviors, such as threats to harm oneself or threats to harm someone close to
the individual
• Defamation (lying to others about the individual, etc.)
The federal definition as per the Violence Against Women Act is: Engaging in a course of conduct directed at a
specific person that would cause a reasonable person to (1) Fear for the person’s safety of the safety of others;
or (2) Suffer substantial emotional distress.
Related Massachusetts Legal Definitions
Misconduct cases adjudicated by the College are not governed by Massachusetts state law, but instead by
College policy (see explanation of policy in the next section below). However, students who believe they have
been the victim of a crime may choose to pursue a criminal investigation through local law enforcement. In
those instances, Massachusetts law applies. Below are the definitions of Massachusetts crimes related to genderbased misconduct.
Domestic Violence: Massachusetts General Law chapter 209A, section 1 defines domestic abuse as “the
occurrence of one or more of the following acts between family or household members: (a) attempting to cause
or causing physical harm; (b) placing another in fear of imminent serious physical harm; (c) causing another to
engage involuntarily in sexual relations by force, threat or duress.” See also:
http://www.malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartII/TitleIII/Chapter209A
Dating Violence: Massachusetts does not have a law pertaining to violence that occurs between people in a
dating relationship. Instead, Massachusetts General Law chapter 265, section 13A would apply: “an assault or
an assault and battery: (i) upon another and [the perpetrator] by such assault and battery causes serious bodily
injury; (ii) upon another who is pregnant at the time of such assault and battery, [the perpetrator] knowing or
having reason to know that the person is pregnant; or (iii) upon another who [the perpetrator] knows has an
outstanding temporary or permanent vacate, restraining or no contact order or judgment issued pursuant to
[applicable law], in effect against him at the time of such assault or assault and battery.”
Fall 2015
17
http://www.malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartIV/TitleI/Chapter265/Section13a’
Sexual Assault: Massachusetts defines rape as (1) the penetration of any orifice by any body part or object (2)
by force and (3) without consent. Rape also includes instances where the victim is incapacitated (“wholly
insensible so as to be incapable of consenting”) and the perpetrator is aware of the incapacitation.
http://www.malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartIV/TitleI/Chapter265/Section22;
http://masscases.com/cases/sjc/450/450mass583.html
Consent: The voluntary agreement, demonstrated by words or actions, by a person with sufficient mental
capacity to make a conscious choice to do something proposed by another, free of duress. Commonwealth v.
Lopez, 433 Mass. 722 (2001), Commonwealth v. Lefkowitz, 20 Mass. App. Ct. 513 (1985); see also:
http://www.malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartIV/TitleI/Chapter265/Section22;
Stalking: Massachusetts General Law chapter 265, section 43 defines “Stalking” as “(1) willfully and
maliciously engag[ing] in a knowing pattern of conduct or series of acts over a period of time directed at a
specific person which seriously alarms or annoys that person and would cause a reasonable person to suffer
substantial emotional distress, and (2) mak[ing] a threat with the intent to place the person in imminent fear of
death or bodily injury.” see also:
http://www.malegislature.gov/Laws/GeneralLaws/PartIII/TitleI/Chapter265/Section43
Sexual Misconduct
Stonehill College strictly prohibits sexual misconduct in all forms. Students found responsible for violating this
policy will face disciplinary sanctions, up to and including dismissal from the College. Sexual misconduct
includes the following:
• Non-Consensual Sexual Intercourse, which includes but is not limited to, penetration of a bodily orifice
(vagina, anus, or mouth) by an object or by a body part and/or non-consensual fellatio or cunnilingus
with anyone without consent, or attempts to commit the same after lack or withdrawal of consent has
been communicated.
• Non-Consensual Contact, which includes but is not limited to, intentional physical contact of a sexual
nature (touching breasts, buttocks, or pubic area) with anyone without consent, or attempts to commit the
same after lack or withdrawal of consent has been communicated. In addition, any disrobing of another
or exposure to another without consent may also constitute non-consensual sexual contact.
• Sexual Exploitation, which occurs when a student takes advantage of another without his/her
consent for his/her own advantage or benefit, to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one
being exploited, or behavior that does not otherwise constitute one of the other offenses
specifically noted in the Gender-Based Misconduct Policy. Examples of sexual exploitation
include, but are not limited to:
o Sexual exhibitionism
o Prostitution or the solicitation of a prostitute, escort or the solicitation of an escort
o Non-consensual video, photographing, or audio-taping of sexual activity and/or distribution of these
materials via mediums such as the internet
o Going beyond the boundaries of consent (e.g. allowing people to watch consensual sex without
knowledge of the participants)
o Peeping or other voyeurism
o Knowingly transmitting a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) to another individual
• The use of drugs or alcohol to render another person physically or psychologically incapacitated as a
precursor to or part of sexual activity.
• Sexual Harassment, which includes, but is not limited to: o Sexual advances, whether or not they
Fall 2015
18
involve physical touching
o Requests for sexual favors in exchange for actual or promised job or academic benefits, such as
favorable reviews, salary increases, promotions, increased benefits or academic advantages
o Lewd or sexually suggestive comments, jokes innuendos or gestures, including stripping and/or the
solicitation of stripping
o Displaying sexually suggestive objects, pictures, magazines or cartoons
o Commenting about or inappropriately touching an individual’s body
o Inquiries or discussion about an individual’s sexual experiences or activities and other written or
oral references to sexual conduct
For more information regarding sexual harassment please see Stonehill’s Opposition to Sexual Harassment
Policy. Further, for information regarding consensual employee-student relations, see Policy E3.47 EmployeeStudent Consensual Relations.
The federal definition as per the Violence Against Women Act is:
Sexual Assault: An offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest, or statutory rape as used in the
FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) program. Per the National Incident-Based Reporting System User
Manual from the FBI UCR Program, A sex offense is “any sexual act directed against another person, without
the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim if incapable of giving consent.”
Rape: The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or
oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim.
Fondling: The touching of the private parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification,
without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving
consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
Incest: Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein
marriage is prohibited by law.
Statutory Rape: Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
Consent
Consent means informed, freely, and voluntarily given agreement, communicated by clearly understandable
words or actions, to participate in each form of sexual activity. Consent is mutually understandable when a
reasonable person would consider the words or actions of the parties to have demonstrated agreement between
them to participate in the sexual activity. Consent will not be assumed by silence, impairment due to alcohol or
drugs, unconsciousness, sleep, physical impairment, or lack of active resistance. Specifically, consent may
never be given by minors (for example, in Massachusetts, those not yet 16 years of age), mentally disabled
persons, those who are unconscious, unaware or otherwise physically helpless, or those who are incapacitated as
a result of alcohol or other drug consumption (voluntary or involuntary).
In the absence of mutually understandable words or actions, neither party should assume that it is permissible to
engage in sexual activity.
A person who wishes to engage in sexual activity must ensure that he/she has the consent from his/her partner.
Consent to some form(s) of sexual activity does not necessarily mean consent to other forms of sexual activity.
Consent to sexual activity may be withdrawn at any time, as long as the withdrawal is communicated, at which
point all sexual activity for which consent has been withdrawn must cease. Acquiescence to sexual activity
Fall 2015
19
based on the use of fraud or force (actual or implied), whether that force be physical force, threats, intimidation
or coercion, is never consent. Incapacitation is a state of extreme intoxication in which an individual is unable to
give consent because he or she lacks the capacity to understand the "who, what, when, where, why, or how" of
the sexual interaction. A person who knows or should have reasonably known that another person is
incapacitated may not engage in sexual activity with that person.
Additional Clarification Regarding Sexual Misconduct
• A person who is the object of sexual aggression (actual or threatened force) is not required to physically,
verbally, or otherwise resist a sexual aggressor.
• While a person’s non-verbal actions can constitute consent, verbal communication between two people is
the best way to ensure that each person knows the intentions of the other person.
• Previous sexual relations or a current or past intimate/romantic relationship between two people is not the
equivalent of consent to future sexual activity.
• Use of alcohol or other drugs does not excuse a violation of the Sexual Misconduct Policy.
• Attempts to commit sexual misconduct and/or aiding the commission of sexual misconduct as an
accomplice are also prohibited under this policy.
Obtaining Information, Protection, Support or Counseling
Stonehill College encourages individuals who may be the victim of gender-based misconduct to report incidents
to the Title IX Coordinator, Stonehill College Police Department or to local law enforcement authorities,
depending on the location of where the incident occurred, but respects that it is the individual’s decision
whether or not to report the incident.
In certain circumstances, the College may need to report an incident to law enforcement authorities. Such
circumstances include any incidents that warrant the undertaking of additional safety and security measures for
the protection of the individual and the campus community. Additionally, in situations where the health and
safety of the individual and/or campus community is at risk, it may be necessary to notify additional appropriate
College officials.
Protective Measures
In some circumstances, an individual who may be the victim may wish to seek an order of protection from a
court or appropriate jurisdiction against the alleged perpetrator. In these circumstances, Campus Police will
assist individuals in their attempt to secure these orders. Individuals may also seek restriction of access to the
College by non-students or non-employees when appropriate.
Stonehill College is committed to supporting individuals who may be the victims by providing the necessary
safety and support services and accommodations, including but not limited to academic, living, transportation
and working situations, if they are reasonably available and regardless of whether the victim chooses to report
the crime to the police. Crisis intervention and victim safety concerns will take precedence. Due to the complex
nature of the problem, the individual may need assistance in obtaining one or more of the following:
• No-contact order
• Services of a S.H.A.R.E. Advisor.
• Change in an academic schedule
• Alternative housing and/or office accommodations
• An interim restriction/suspension of the accused individual
• Resources for medical and/or psychological support.
For assistance in obtaining these safety accommodations, students may contact the Director of Community
Standards at 508-565-1323. Employees may contact the Director of Human Resources at 508-565-1105.
Fall 2015
20
If safety is an immediate concern, contact Campus Police at 508-565-5555, or dial 911 for assistance from local
law enforcement.
Emotional and Psychological Support
The College offers services to individuals who may be the victim of gender-based misconduct even if they
choose not to report the incidents. The Student Affairs Office provides assistance in a safe, supportive, and
private setting. Human Resources can provide similar services for employees.
Counselors at a variety of departments/agencies both on and off campus can assist a person in deciding what
steps to take, such as obtaining counseling, seeking medical attention, preserving evidence, and reporting to
authorities. Information, support, and advice are available for anyone who wishes to discuss issues related to
gender-based misconduct. Specifically, in cases of sexual assault, they may help determine whether or not a
sexual assault has actually occurred, and whether or not the person seeking information has been assaulted, has
been accused of sexual assault, or is a third party.
ON CAMPUS
Counseling/Advising
SHARE
Health
Mental Health
Campus Emergencies
Student Financial Aid
Religious
OFF CAMPUS
Type of Services
Available
Provides academic
support and guidance
Sexual
Harassment/Assault
Resources and
Education
Appointment based
clinic for full time
students.
Assessments and
individual and group
counseling.
Police, Fire, EMS
Assist in finding
resources to afford a
Stonehill College
education.
Offers a vibrant
combination of liturgical
life, retreat life, faith
formation, service
opportunities and
sacramental initiation.
Sexual Assault
Health
Offers a variety of health
care services
Mental Health Services
Victim Advocacy
Health Services
Ensures access to
equitable services across
the Commonwealth
Contact Information
508-565-1306
http://www.stonehill.edu/officesservices/health-wellness/sharesexual-harassment-assaul/shareadvisors/
508-565-1307
Assessments and
individual and group
counseling.
Campus Police
Student Financial
Assistance
508-565-1331
Campus Ministry
508-565-1487
Type of Services
Available
Counseling
Mental Health
Service Provider
Academic Services and
Advising
Sexual Harassment &
Assault. Domestic
Violence and Stalking
Service Provider
Brockton Womansplace
Crisis Center
Good Samaritan Medical
Center
Westside Behavioral
Health, LLC
Massachusetts Office of
Victim Assistance
Fall 2015
21
508-565-5555
508-5651088
Contact Information
HOTLINES: Sexual Assault:
(508) 588-8255
508-427-3000
508-580-4611
617-371-1234
Legal Assistance
Visa and Immigration
Assistance
Legal information,
Advice, Aid
Legal Assistance
Student Financial Aid
Financial Consultant
Other
Local Police/Emergency
Massachusetts Legal
Assistance Corp
Massachusetts Office of
Student Financial
Assistance
Massachusetts Office of
Student Financial
Assistance
Easton Police Station
617-367-8544
http://www.welcometousa.gov
617-391-6070
911 or 508-565-3322
Medical and Counseling Attention
A person who may be the victim of sexual misconduct is urged to seek appropriate medical evaluation as
promptly as possible, ideally within 96 hours of the incident. To help preserve evidence of a sexual assault, the
individual who may be the victim of gender-based misconduct is encouraged not to bathe or douche, urinate, or
drink any liquids. If oral contact has occurred, the individual is encouraged to refrain from smoking, eating, or
brushing their teeth. In addition, if clothes are changed, soiled clothes should be placed in a paper bag, as plastic
destroys crucial evidence.
After an incident of sexual assault, dating violence or domestic violence, the victim should consider seeking
medical attention as soon as possible at the Brockton Hospital in Brockton MA. Evidence may be collected
even if you chose not to make a report to law enforcement. It is important that a victim of sexual assault not
bathe, douche, smoke, change clothing or clean the bed/linen/area where they were assaulted if the offense
occurred within the past 96 hours so that evidence may be preserved that may assist in proving that the alleged
criminal offense occurred/or is occurring or may be helpful in obtaining a protection order. In circumstances of
sexual assault, if victims do not opt for forensic evidence collection, health care providers can still treat injuries
and take steps to address concerns of pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted infections. Victims of sexual
assault, domestic violence, stalking, and dating violence are encouraged to also preserve evidence by saving text
messages, instant messages, social networking pages, other communications, and keeping pictures, logs or other
copies of documents, if they have any, that would be useful to College adjudicators/investigators or police.
As time passes, evidence may dissipate or become lost or unavailable, thereby making investigation, possible
prosecution, disciplinary proceedings, or obtaining protection from abuse orders related to the incident more
difficult. If a victim chooses not to make a complaint regarding an incident, he or she nevertheless should
consider speaking with Campus Public Safety or other law enforcement to preserve evidence in the event that
the victim decides to report the incident to law enforcement or the College at a later date to assist in proving that
the alleged criminal offense occurred or that may be helpful in obtaining a protection order.
Privacy and Confidentiality
Students have the right under federal law (Title IX) to expect that reports of gender-based misconduct will be
taken seriously by Stonehill College. Under federal law, if a student makes a formal report about gender-based
misconduct to a College official (e.g. officials within Student Affairs, a Title IX Coordinator/Deputy, Resident
Assistants, Residence Directors, Campus Police, and certain other staff members with supervisory
responsibilities), or when deemed necessary to protect the interests of the College community, the College has
an obligation to investigate the complaint.
To the extent possible, the College will protect the privacy of all parties to a complaint of gender-based
misconduct. Generally, an individual over the age of 18 can speak confidentially with certain persons in legally
protected roles, such as counselors at Counseling Services, campus ministers, and/or professional medical staff
in Health Services. Please note that you should not disclose confidential information to non-professional staff,
such as administrative assistants, as they may be required by law to pass along the report to Campus Police or a
Fall 2015
22
Title IX coordinator. Professional counselors, campus ministers, and medical care providers are required by law
to pass along non-personally identifiable information to Campus Police for statistical purposes only, in which
case the only information that will be released is that an incident was reported, the type of incident, and the
general location of the incident (on or off campus). These statistics are made available through publication in
the Annual Campus Security Report. The College officials will notify a Title IX Coordinator/Deputy, in writing,
that a sexual assault complaint has been filed.
Please note, however, that there are some circumstances in which a College official who is typically allowed to
keep reports of sexual assault confidential is legally required to break confidentiality, such as where there
appears to be a risk of immediate harm. Additionally, the College may be required to notify the Massachusetts
Department of Children & Families if it receives a report regarding the abuse (including sexual assault) of an
individual under the age of 18. Wherever possible, the College will honor requests for confidentiality.
Additionally, when the College, through a report to a College official, becomes aware of an incident of sexual
misconduct that occurred on campus or a locale that impacts the College community, and there is a potential for
bodily harm or danger to members of the College community, College staff will issue a timely warning to the
campus. While the College will provide enough information to safeguard the campus community, a student’s
name or other personally identifying information will not be disclosed.
Confidentiality with respect to a person accused of violating the sexual misconduct policy is governed by the
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), also known as the Buckley Amendment. FERPA
provides that personally identifiable information maintained in the educational records of an institution shall not
be disclosed, except as otherwise specified by law.
Victims may request that directory information on file with the College be withheld by request to the
Registrar’s Office.
Regardless of whether a victim has opted-out of allowing the College to share “directory information,”
personally identifiable information about the victim and other necessary parties will be treated as confidential
and only shared with persons who have a specific need-to-know, i.e., those who are investigating/adjudicating
the report or those involved in providing support services to the victim, including accommodations and
protective measures. By only sharing personally identifiable information with individuals on a need-to-know
basis, the institution will maintain as confidential, any accommodations or protective measures provided to the
victim to the extent that maintaining such confidentiality would not impair the ability of the institution to
provide the accommodations or protective measures.
The College does not publish the name of crime victims or other identifiable information regarding victims in
the Daily Crime Log or in the annual crime statistics that are disclosed in compliance with the Jeanne Clery
Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. Furthermore, if a Timely Warning
Notice is issued on the basis of a report of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking, the
name of the victim and other personally identifiable information about the victim will be withheld.
S.H.A.R.E Advisors for Cases of Gender-Based Misconduct
S.H.A.R.E. Advisors are a group of trained staff and faculty members who provide support and assistance to
Stonehill students who may have experienced gender-based misconduct and those students accused of genderbased misconduct. Students can access S.H.A.R.E. Advisors by calling Counseling Services during business
hours (8:30am – 4:30pm) and Campus Police after 4:30pm. It is important to note that S.H.A.R.E. Advisors, as
they are private, not “confidential,” resources and therefore must make a formal report of gender-based
misconduct if one has not already been completed.
Fall 2015
23
S.H.A.R.E. Advisors are trained and available to assist the individual who may have been the victim of genderbased misconduct and/or student accused of gender-based misconduct in a variety of ways, including:
• Assistance with emergency rape crisis treatment and emergency medical services including accompanying
the individual to the hospital, working with police, etc.
• Assistance, guidance, and support throughout the College investigative process and/or the criminal justice
process
• Assistance in coordinating academic concerns, such as missed classes, assignments, or change of class
section
• Assistance in contacting community resources, such as rape crisis centers or support groups
• General support and assistance as needed
While S.H.A.R.E. Advisors are available to assist, it is always the choice of the individual who may have been
the victim of gender-based misconduct and the individual who was accused of such misconduct whether to
utilize this support service.
Filing a Gender-Based Misconduct Report
A person who believes he/she was the victim of another’s gender-based misconduct is encouraged to report the
incident. A victim has the option to report the incident to the police department with jurisdiction over the
location where the assault occurred, but victims are not required to report the incident to the police. There are
members of the Stonehill campus community who are available to assist a victim in notifying law enforcement
authorities, if the victim so chooses. Campus Police or a Title IX Officer can assist you with this.
Several options for reporting are available:
1. File a Report with the College: Students can report gender-based misconduct to a College official, such
as officials within Student Affairs or Campus Police, Resident Assistants, Residence Directors, or a Title
IX Coordinator/Deputy. The College recognizes the following individuals as the Title IX
Coordinator/Deputies:
Maryann Biedak – Director of Human Resources/Title IX Coordinator
320 Washington Street
Easton, MA 02357
508-565-1105
[email protected]
Rita Pisapia – Director of Community Standards/Title IX Deputy
320 Washington Street
Easton, MA 02357
508-565-1323
[email protected]
Cindy MacDonald – Senior Associate Director of Intercollegiate Athletics/Title IX Deputy
320 Washington Street
Easton, MA 02357
508-565-1384
[email protected]
Title IX Investigator will investigate the allegation and submit a report containing factual findings, a
determination of responsibility, and a recommendation regarding any disciplinary action that may be
appropriate. Students may also request that Campus Police attend interviews with the individual who
may be the victim of gender-based misconduct, the accused, and witnesses in the event that the person
who may be the victim chooses to initiate a criminal investigation. A criminal investigation would occur
concurrently with the Title IX investigation, but it is separate and distinct from the Title IX
Fall 2015
24
investigation. The results of a criminal investigation may be passed on to the local District Attorney.
2. File a Report with the Stonehill Campus Police Department: Students can file a report by calling
508-565-5555 (emergencies) or 508-565-5100 (business) or directly at the Campus Police Station
located on the first floor of the Old Student Union.
3. File a Report with the Easton Police Department: Students can contact the Easton Police Department
at 508-230-3322 or by dialing 911 from a cell phone. Campus Police will be notified if dialing 911 from
a campus phone. Campus Police can assist in notifying the local police if the student chooses.
4. File an Anonymous Report: Students who wish to anonymously inform the College of a gender-based
misconduct may file an incident report on-line through the Community Standards web page. The
information provided to the College in this manner will only be used for Clery Act data collection and
will be kept confidential. Anonymous reports cannot be used to initiate a Title IX investigation.
5. Take No Action: Students have the right not to file a report, yet they are highly encouraged to seek
medical attention and counseling. Students who wish to file a report at a later date may contact a Title IX
Coordinator. However, please note that a delay in reporting could weaken evidence used to determine
whether a student is found responsible for gender-based misconduct, including a sexual assault.
If a report of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking is reported to the College, below are
the procedures that the College will follow:
Incident Being
Reported
Sexual Assault
Procedure Institution Will Follow
1. Depending on when reported (immediate vs delayed report), institution will
provide complainant with access to medical care
2. Institution will assess immediate safety needs of complainant
3. Institution will assist complainant with contacting local police if complainant
requests AND provide the complainant with contact information for local police
department
4. Institution will provide complainant with referrals to on and off campus mental
health providers
5. Institution will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective
measures, if appropriate.
6. Institution will provide the victim with a written explanation of the victim’s rights
and options
7. Institution will provide a “No trespass” (PNG) directive to accused party if
deemed appropriate
8. Institution will provide written instructions on how to apply for Protective Order
9. Institution will provide a copy of the policy applicable to Sexual Assault to the
complainant and inform the complainant regarding timeframes for inquiry,
investigation and resolution
10. Institution will inform the complainant of the outcome of the investigation,
whether or not the accused will be administratively charged and what the outcome
of the hearing is
11. Institution will enforce the anti-retaliation policy and take immediate and separate
action against parties that retaliate against a person for complaining of sex-based
discrimination or for assisting in the investigation
Fall 2015
25
Stalking
1. Institution will assess immediate safety needs of complainant
2. Institution will assist complainant with contacting local police if complainant
requests AND provide the complainant with contact information for local police
department
3. Institution will provide written instructions on how to apply for Protective Order
4. Institution will provide written information to complainant on how to preserve
evidence
5. Institution will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures
to protect the complainant, if appropriate
6. Institution will provide the victim with a written explanation of the victim’s rights
and options
7. Institution will provide a “No trespass” (PNG) directive to accused party if
deemed appropriate
Dating Violence
1. Institution will assess immediate safety needs of complainant
2. Institution will assist complainant with contacting local police if complainant
requests AND provide the complainant with contact information for local police
department
3. Institution will provide written instructions on how to apply for Protective Order
4. Institution will provide written information to complainant on how to preserve
evidence
5. Institution will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures
to protect the complainant, if appropriate
6. Institution will provide the victim with a written explanation of the victim’s rights
and options
7. Institution will provide a “No trespass” (PNG) directive to accused party if
deemed appropriate
Domestic
Violence
1. Institution will assess immediate safety needs of complainant
2. Institution will assist complainant with contacting local police if complainant
requests AND complainant provided with contact information for local police
department
3. Institution will provide written instructions on how to apply for Protective Order
4. Institution will provide written information to complainant on how to preserve
evidence
5. Institution will assess need to implement interim or long-term protective measures
to protect the complainant, if appropriate
6. Institution will provide the victim with a written explanation of the victim’s rights
and options
7. Institution will provide a “No trespass” (PNG) directive to accused party if
deemed appropriate
The Investigation and Disciplinary Process for Gender-Based Misconduct
Pursuant to Title IX, campus officials must take appropriate actions to ensure that investigations of genderbased misconduct complaints are normally completed within 60 days of receiving a complaint, unless there are
extenuating circumstances.
Fall 2015
26
Formal rules of process, procedure, or rules of evidence such as those applied in criminal or civil courts are not
used in Title IX investigations. Reports of gender-based misconduct will be referred to one of the College’s
Title IX Investigators, who will investigate the allegation. Upon review of the complaint, the Title IX
Investigator may recommend to the Director of Community Standards that interim restrictions/protective
measures be put into place. Interim measures may include, but are not limited to, no contact orders, changes in
housing accommodations, changes in academic schedule and accommodations, residence hall suspension,
campus restrictions, and College suspensions. These actions may be instituted at any point during the
investigation process.
Upon completion of the investigation, the Investigator will submit to the Associate Vice President for Student
Affairs/Dean of Students a report containing factual findings, a determination of responsibility, and a
recommendation regarding any disciplinary action that may be appropriate. The Associate Vice President for
Student Affairs/Dean of Students will then issue a formal decision in the matter. All appeals will be considered
by the Vice President for Student Affairs in accordance with the appeals process as outlined in the Hill Book.
Appellate decisions are final. Students who may be the victim of gender-based misconduct or who are accused
of gender-based misconduct are permitted to submit questions for the Title IX Investigator to ask of the
witnesses, including of the individual reporting the misconduct. Generally, in regards to sexual misconduct
cases, questions, statements, or information about the sexual activity of the person who believes she or he was
the victim of another’s misconduct with anyone other than the charged student is not relevant, and thus will not
be considered in the adjudication process. If the individual who believes she or he is the victim of another’s
misconduct raises her/his own sexual activity with anyone other than the charged student, relevant questions
may then be asked about that relationship.
The College will disclose, in writing, the result of the investigation (including the initial, interim and final
decision), including the rationale for the result and sanctions; the procedures for appeal, any change to the result
and when the results become final of any institutional adjudication conducted against a charged student to the
individual accused, as well as to the individual who may have been the victim of gender-based misconduct.
Adjudication of Violations
The College’s disciplinary process includes a prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution process. In
all instances, the process will be conducted in a manner that is consistent with the institution’s policy and that is
transparent to the accuser and the accused. Usually, the resolution of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual
assault and stalking complaints are completed within 60 days of the report. However, each proceeding allows
for extensions of timeframes for good cause with written notice to the accuser and the accused of the delay and
the reason for the delay. College officials involved in the investigation or adjudication of domestic violence,
dating violence, sexual assault and stalking complaints are trained annually on the issues related to domestic
violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking as well as how to conduct an investigation and hearing
process that protects the safety of the victim and promotes accountability. Furthermore, each policy provides
that:
1. The accuser and the accused will have timely notice for meetings at which the accuser or accused, or
both, may be present;
2. The accuser, the accused and appropriate officials will have timely and equal access to any information
that will be used during formal and informal disciplinary meeting and hearings;
3. The institutional disciplinary procedures will not be conducted by officials who have a conflict of
interest or bias for or against the accuser or the accused;
Whether or not criminal charges are filed, the College, or a person may file a complaint under the following
policies, depending upon the status of the accused (student or employee):
Fall 2015
27
Statement of Rights for Those Involved in Incidents of Gender-Based Misconduct
It is the goal of Stonehill College to ensure that students have access to needed resources, services, and
information.
Ordinarily, the College assures all students involved in incidents of gender-based misconduct will:
• Be notified of available spiritual and personal counseling, mental health, medical, or student services, both
on campus and in the community as appropriate.
• Receive notification of options for and available assistance in changing academic, living, transportation
and working situations after an alleged incident of gender-based misconduct, if so requested and if such
changes are reasonably available (no charges or investigation, campus or criminal, need to occur before
this option is available).
• Have the matter investigated in a timely manner.
• Have the matter handled in accordance with College policy.
• Be offered a S.H.A.R.E. Advisor to be present at any time during the investigation.
• Be accompanied to any related meeting or proceeding by a support person of their choice to provide
personal support and guidance. A support person may not directly address the Title IX investigators or
otherwise participate actively in the investigation.
• Be allowed to submit questions for the Investigator to ask witnesses, including the individual reporting the
misconduct.
• Not have irrelevant prior sexual history admitted in a formal disciplinary hearing in cases of sexual
misconduct.
• Be notified in writing within 3 business days of the formal decision of the Associate Vice President for
Student Affairs/Dean of Students.
• Be allowed to appeal the finding and sanction of a formal adjudication in accordance with the standards for
appeal established under “Rights of All Parties in Formal Discipline Hearings,” as published by the
College.
• Be free from any behavior that may be construed by the College to be intimidating, harassing, or
retaliatory.
• Choose whether to resolve the matter through an informal process, if agreed upon by both parties.
Rights Specific to an Individual who May be the Victim of Gender-Based Misconduct
Ordinarily, the College assures all students reporting allegations of gender-based misconduct will:
• Choose whether to initiate a formal investigation, unless the College deems it necessary to protect the
safety of the College community or in compliance with applicable law.
Rights Specific to an Individual Accused of an Incident of Gender-Based Misconduct
Ordinarily, the College assures all students accused of an incident of gender-based misconduct will:
• Be notified of a report of gender-based misconduct in accordance with College policy.
Retaliation
The College encourages students to report all incidents of gender-based misconduct. Any threat of retaliation or
other attempts to prevent the reporting of an incident of gender-based misconduct is itself prohibited and will
result in disciplinary actions and/or sanctions.
Amnesty
At times, students are hesitant to report the occurrence of a gender-based assault to College officials because
they are concerned that they themselves, or witnesses to the misconduct, may be charged with violations of the
alcohol policy. While these behaviors are not condoned by the College, the importance of dealing with them
Fall 2015
28
pales in comparison to the need to address instances of alleged gender-based misconduct. Accordingly, in these
cases, the College will not pursue disciplinary action against a student who claims, in good faith, to be the
victim of a gender-based misconduct in connection with the reporting of a gender-based incident, or against
students named as witnesses to the incident.
Education and Prevention
The College is committed to providing on-going education and support programs aimed at the eradication of
gender-based misconduct. In addition, the College will evaluate on an ongoing basis, all policies and procedures
related to gender-based misconduct.
Opposition To Sexual Harassment and Other Forms of Discrimination
Stonehill College is committed to providing a learning and working environment that is free from unlawful
harassment and discrimination. As such, the College does not tolerate any kind of discrimination or harassment.
The College is committed to fostering a healthy and safe environment that emphasizes the dignity and worth of
every member of its community.
Members of the Stonehill community who hold positions of authority have a particular responsibility to be
aware of the power inherent in their relationships with students and subordinates and to avoid behavior that may
be perceived as sexual harassment. All members of the Stonehill community, with academic or supervisory
responsibility for another, must keep their relationships, especially those with students, on a professional level.
This policy applies to the workplace during normal business hours, as well as work-related social and business
functions, whether on or off the College campus and whether during or outside of the normal business hours,
and also while employees and students are on business, academic, or athletic related travel. The College will
take effective means to end any sexual harassment, up to and including termination or dismissal of the
offending individual and will take reasonable steps to mitigate the effects of harassment on any individual,
individuals, or the community as a whole.
Sexual Harassment:
Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or
physical conduct of a sexual nature, when submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a
term or condition of employment; submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for
employment or academic decisions; or such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with
an individual’s work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, humiliating, or sexually
offensive working or academic environment.
The following are examples of conduct that may constitute sexual harassment:
1. Sexual advances, whether or not they involve physical touching.
2. Requests for sexual favors in exchange for actual or promised job or academic benefits, such as favorable
reviews, salary increases, promotions, increased benefits or academic advantages.
3. Lewd or sexually suggestive comments, jokes, innuendos, or gestures.
4. Displaying sexually suggestive objects, pictures, magazines, or cartoons.
5. Commenting about or inappropriately touching an individual’s body.
6. Inquiries or discussion about an individual’s sexual experiences or activities and other written or oral
references to sexual conduct.
7. Sexual exploitation, which is defined for the purposes of this policy as any abuse of a position of
vulnerability, differential power, or trust for sexual purposes. This includes profiting monetarily, socially
or politically from the sexual exploitation of another. Sexual exploitation is one of the purposes of
trafficking in persons (performing in a sexual manner, forced undressing and/or nakedness, coerced
marriage, forced childbearing, engagement in pornography or prostitution, sexual extortion for the
granting of goods, services, assistance benefits, sexual slavery).
Fall 2015
29
Complaints of Sexual Harassment:
If a member of the Stonehill community believes that he or she has been subjected to sexual harassment or
inappropriate sexual conduct, a first step, if the person feels comfortable in doing so, is to inform the person
engaging in the conduct that it is unwelcome and ask the person to stop. Retaliation against anyone who
confronts the individual whose conduct is offensive, brings a complaint of sexual harassment, or cooperates in
an investigation is unlawful and will not be tolerated by the College. The College is committed to investigating
all complaints promptly and fairly. To the extent practicable, the College will protect the confidentiality of the
individuals involved and initially consider informal resolution. The College is committed to proceeding as
necessary to eliminate sexual harassment and will take appropriate corrective action which may include
counseling, written warnings, or other discipline up to immediate dismissal.
The College is committed to upholding the requirements of state and federal harassment and discrimination
laws, including, but not limited to, Title IX of the Higher Education Amendments of 1972, the Violence Against
Women Act, and the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act, as those laws exist and may be amended from
time to time.
The College includes in its policy S1.14, Gender-based Misconduct definitions of gender-based harassment,
dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. Such definitions are incorporated herein by reference and
apply equally to students and employees when applying College policies. The following individuals have been
designated as contacts for assisting students in addressing any sexual harassment concerns:
-565-1363
-565-1363
-565-1311
-line) 1-877-472-2110
The following individuals have been designated as contacts for assisting employees in addressing any sexual
harassment concerns:
-565-1105
-565-1413
-line) 1-877-472-2110
-800-828-6025
In addition to the above-named individuals, the following individuals have been designated pursuant to Title IX
of the Education Amendments of 1972 as the Title IX Coordinator/Deputies for the College:
Biedak, Director of Human Resources, 508-565-1105, Department of Human
Resources, Stonehill College, 320 Washington Street. Easton, MA 02357.
-565-1323, Department
of Community Standards, Stonehill College, 320 Washington Street, Easton, MA 02357. Deputy Title IX
Coordinator, Cynthia MacDonald, Associate Director of Athletics, 508-565-1391 , Department of Athletics,
Stonehill College, 320 Washington Street, Easton, MA 02357.
Title IX Coordinators shall coordinate the College’s compliance with Title IX, including identifying and
addressing any patterns or systematic problems that arise during the review of complaints. If any Title IX
Coordinator is directly involved in an investigation or complaint, the other Title IX Coordinators shall assume
responsibility for any Title IX review involving such investigation or complaint.
Individuals seeking to secure a protective order may contact any of the Title IX Coordinator/Deputies listed
above or the Chief of Campus Police for assistance with and information concerning the court process in
Massachusetts. Additional information may be obtained at: http://www.mass.gov/courts/forms/restrain-harassforms-gen.html or by visiting the Taunton District Court House, 40 Broadway #2100, Taunton, MA 02780.
Employees who have secured a protective order may present it to the Chief of Campus Police, who will
Fall 2015
30
coordinate an enforcement plan.
Employees who are victims of sexual harassment or domestic violence have the right to seek work
accommodations from the College to assist in the mitigation and prevention of unlawful discrimination.
Accommodations may be requested through the Director of Human Resources. Accommodations are addressed
individually on a case by case basis. Accommodations may include, but are not limited to, change in parking
location, change in work/office locations, modification of work hours, and changing of email address or phone
number.
Other Forms of Harassment and Discrimination:
It is also unlawful and a violation of Stonehill policy to harass any member of the community because of his or
her race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, religion, age, physical or mental disability, sexual orientation or
any other characteristic protected by state or federal law. Any individual who believes that he or she has been
subject to any type of harassment may institute the resolution and complaint procedure outlined above under
Section III. The Office of the General Counsel shall provide annual training to employees on sexual harassment
and other forms of discrimination consistent with the requirements of state and federal law.
Government Resources:
The College encourages individuals to initially seek resolution of sexual harassment complaints through its
internal procedures; however, formal complaints can also be brought to these government agencies. The time
periods for filing are EEOC 300 days; MCAD 6 months:
3921, 617-289-0111
ment Center,
Boston, MA 02203, 800-669-4000
Boston, MA, 02108, 617-994-6000.
Assistance for Victims: Rights & Options
Regardless of whether a victim elects to pursue a criminal complaint, the college will assist victims of sexual
assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking and will provide each victim with a written explanation
of their rights. In Massachusetts, a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault or stalking has
the following rights:
Victim’s Rights
Stonehill College does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational programs. Sexual harassment and
sexual violence are types of sex discrimination. Other acts can also be forms of sex-based discrimination and
are also prohibited by Stonehill College as well as federal law whether sexually based or not. These acts include
dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. Stonehill College wants to inform you of our policy and
procedures that address sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking, whether the incident
occurs on or off campus, as well as your rights and Stonehill College’s responsibilities.
Victims of sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking will receive a full copy of our
institution’s Notice of Victim’s Rights. The Notice of Victim’s Rights has procedures in place that serve to be
sensitive to those who report sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. These procedures
include our responsibility to inform you of your right to file criminal charges as well as the availability of
medical, counseling, and support services. We also offer additional remedies to prevent contact between a
victim and an accused party, such as a temporary or permanent changes in housing, academic, transportation
and working conditions, if reasonably available. The policy also addresses possible sanctions and interim and/or
long-term protective measures that Stonehill College may impose following a report through the final
determination of our discipline process. If you would like more information than is contained in this handout
Fall 2015
31
regarding any process or procedure, or if you would like to make a report, ask questions about the Notice of
Victim’s Rights, or need to request an accommodation to your living or working arrangements regardless of
whether or not you chose to report the crime to law enforcement or campus police, contact Stonehill College’s
Title IX Coordinator (Maryann Biedak, Department of Human Resources, Merkert Tracy Building, Office
Phone: 508-565-1105)
Further, Stonehill College complies with Massachusetts law in recognizing Abuse Prevention Orders (209A)
and Harassment Prevention Orders (258E): Any person who obtains an Abuse Prevention Orders (209A) or a
Harassment Prevention Orders (258E) from Massachusetts or any reciprocal state should provide a copy to
Campus Police. In the event a person is seeking to obtain either an Abuse Prevention Order (209A) or a
Harassment Prevention Order (258E), the Stonehill College Police Department will make all reasonable
attempts to help facilitate the required process. The victim may also meet with Campus Police to develop a
Safety Action Plan, which is a plan for Campus Police and the victim to reduce risk of harm while on campus or
coming and going from campus. This plan may include, but is not limited to: escorts, special parking
arrangements, changing classroom location, or allowing a student to complete assignments from home, etc.).
ABUSE & HARASSMENT PREVENTION ORDERS
There is no charge to get an abuse prevention order. If you need help with getting an order, the Massachusetts
Office for Victim Assistance (http://www.mass.gov/mova/) offers a program called SAFEPLAN that provides
specially trained and certified advocates to help you in many courts across the state.
There are other programs in some courts that provide people who can help you fill out the forms and go with
you to the courtroom. In some cases, the advocate is from the local domestic violence service provider. In other
cases, District Attorney Office victim-witness advocates assist people in filing for a 209A order. A list of
domestic violence service providers can be found at Jane Doe, Inc. (http://www.janedoe.org/) People at these
organizations can tell you if they have court advocates or, if not, how to reach a court advocate.
If you need help immediately such as safety planning or shelter, call the SAFELINK hotline at 1-877-785-2020,
which can find you a domestic violence program or shelter near you.
HOW TO OBTAIN AN ABUSE PREVENTION ORDER (209A)
During regular business hours on weekdays, you can go to the Taunton District Court located at 40 Broadway
#2100, Taunton, MA 02780. Telephone: (508) 977-6135.
Proceed to the Civil Clerk’s office and tell them you want to ask for a 209A order. They will give you the forms
you need.
If you are in crisis and courts are closed, you can call or go to Campus Police or the Town of Easton Police
Department. The police will give you the forms to fill out and then call a judge. If the judge grants the order, it
is only temporary until the next court business day. The order given to you by the police will tell you which
court to go to and when you need to be at the court.
HOW TO OBTAIN A HARASSMENT PREVENTION ORDER (258E)
There is no charge to get a harassment prevention order. During regular business hours on weekdays, you can
go to the Taunton District Court located at 40 Broadway #2100, Taunton, MA 02780. Telephone: (508) 9776135.
If you are in crisis and courts are closed, you can call or go to Campus Police or the Town of Easton Police
Department. The police will give you the forms to fill out and then call a judge. If the judge grants the order, it
Fall 2015
32
is only temporary until the next court business day. The order given to you by the police will tell you which
court to go to and when you need to be at the court.
Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. They are “individuals who
observe violence or witness the conditions that perpetuate violence. They are not directly involved but have the
choice to intervene, speak up, or do something about it.”1 We want to promote a culture of community
accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further
harm. We may not always know what to do even if we want to help. Below is a list2 of some ways to be an
active bystander. Further information regarding bystander intervention may be found. If you or someone else is
in immediate danger, dial 911.This could be when a person is yelling at or being physically abusive towards
another and it is not safe for you to interrupt.
1. Watch out for your friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like they
could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are ok.
2. Confront people who seclude, hit on, try to make out with, or have sex with people who are
incapacitated.
3. Speak up when someone discusses plans to take sexual advantage of another person.
4. Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking.
5. Refer people to on or off campus resources listed in this document for support in health, counseling, or
with legal assistance.
Risk Reduction
With no intent to victim blame and recognizing that only abusers are responsible for their abuse, the following
are some strategies to reduce one’s risk of sexual assault or harassment (taken from Rape, Abuse, & Incest
National Network, www.rainn.org)
1. Be aware of your surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to
find a way to get out of a bad situation.
2. Try to avoid isolated areas. It is more difficult to get help if no one is around.
3. Walk with purpose. Even if you don’t know where you are going, act like you do.
4. Trust your instincts. If a situation or location feels unsafe or uncomfortable, it probably isn’t
the best place to be.
5. Try not to load yourself down with packages or bags as this can make you appear more
vulnerable.
6. Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money.
7. Don't allow yourself to be isolated with someone you don’t trust or someone you don’t know.
8. Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of your
surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.
9. When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, check in with
each other throughout the evening, and leave together. Knowing where you are and who is
around you may help you to find a way out of a bad situation.
10. Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see something
suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911
in most areas of the U.S.).
11. Don't leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a
phone call. If you’ve left your drink alone, just get a new one.
12. Don't accept drinks from people you don't know or trust. If you choose to accept a drink, go
1
Burn, S.M. (2009). A situational model of sexual assault prevention through bystander intervention. Sex Roles, 60, 779-792.
Fall 2015
33
with the person to the bar to order it, watch it being poured, and carry it yourself. At parties,
don’t drink from the punch bowls or other large, common open containers.
13. Watch out for your friends, and vice versa. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated
for the amount of alcohol they’ve had, or is acting out of character, get him or her to a safe place
immediately.
14. If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact law enforcement immediately
(local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.). Be explicit with
doctors so they can give you the correct tests (you will need a urine test and possibly others).
15. If you need to get out of an uncomfortable or scary situation here are some things that you can
try:
a. Remember that being in this situation is not your fault. You did not do anything
wrong, it is the person who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.
b. Be true to yourself. Don't feel obligated to do anything you don't want to do. "I don't
want to" is always a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are
comfortable with.
c. Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you don’t feel comfortable you
can call them and communicate your discomfort without the person you are with
knowing. Your friends or family can then come to get you or make up an excuse for you
to leave.
d. Lie. If you don’t want to hurt the person’s feelings it is better to lie and make up a reason
to leave than to stay and be uncomfortable, scared, or worse. Some excuses you could use
are: needing to take care of a friend or family member, not feeling well, having
somewhere else that you need to be, etc.
16. Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of the room? Where are the
doors? Windows? Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an
emergency phone nearby?
17. If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait
until you both have your full judgment before doing anything you may regret later.
Nearly all of the sexual assaults reported to the Campus Police are committed by acquaintances. Victims of sexual
assault are urged to report the incident to Campus Police as soon as possible, regardless of where the offense took
place, whether or not the offender is known to the victim. College officials who are informed of a sexual assault
in their official capacity as College employees will encourage the victim to make a report to the Campus Police
or other off-campus law enforcement authorities. Campus Police work closely with the victim to ensure that the
appropriate medical care and counseling is made available and will assist the victim in notifying the appropriate
off-campus law enforcement authorities if applicable.
Victims of sexual assaults are not required to file formal criminal charges, even if they report the incident to the
Campus Police. A Campus Police investigator, specially trained in dealing with victims of sexual assault, will
present the victim with a full range of options and services available so the victim can choose the most appropriate
course of action. Among the options available to a student victim of sexual assault are such things as on-campus
or off-campus counseling and mental health services, relocation to a different residence facility (if the victim
resides in college housing), and changes in the victim’s academic class schedule if the victim wishes, and if such
changes are reasonably available.
Stonehill College will, upon written request, disclose to the alleged victim of a crime of violence or a non-forcible
sex offense, the report on the results of any disciplinary proceeding conducted by the institution against a student
who is the alleged perpetrator of such crime or offense. If the alleged victim is deceased as a result of such crime
or offense, the next of kin of such victim shall be treated as the alleged victim for purposes of this paragraph.
Fall 2015
34
Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act
In keeping with the federal Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act, the Campus Police Department will maintain
any records provided by the Massachusetts Sex Offender Registry Board of registered sex offenders who have
indicated that they are employed or enrolled at Stonehill College. Any member of the college community who
wishes to review these records should contact the Chief of Police during normal business hours. For further
information concerning the crimes for which convicted offenders must register, or regarding additional access to
records of registered sex offenders, contact the Massachusetts Sex Offender Registry Board by telephone at
978.740.6400 or via the internet at http://www.mass.gov/eopss/agencies/sorb/.
For more information about the College’s sexual assault awareness programs and resources visit the SHARE
website at:
http://www.stonehill.edu/offices-services/health-wellness/share-sexual-harassment-assaul/
If you are Sexually Assaulted or Raped
Get to a safe place. – Report the crime to Campus Police or the appropriate local law enforcement agency in the
jurisdiction where the assault occurred.
Get medical attention. – Brockton Hospital is experienced and prepared to help sexual assault survivors. Medical
attention should be sought as soon as possible because you could be injured internally, as well as externally, by
an attack. A prompt medical exam will test for pregnancy, HIV, and other sexually transmitted diseases. A
medical examination can secure valuable physical evidence that will be important and can be used later if you
wish to have the assailant prosecuted. Campus Police are available 24 hours a day and can assist you in getting
immediate medical attention.
Do not drink, bathe, douche, brush your teeth, change your clothing, or comb your hair. It’s only natural to want
to do these things, but you may be destroying evidence you will need if you decide to prosecute at a later date.
To preserve evidence such as clothing or bedding, place in a paper (not plastic) bag. We recommend having a
Police Officer collect any evidence.
RESOURCES
Call SHARE. (508) 565-1331. SHARE (Sexual Harassment/Assault Resource Educators) advocates are trained
faculty and staff members that are available 24 hours a day to provide support and help you understand your
options regarding medical attention, legal implications, and college judicial actions. Students can access SHARE
Advisors by calling the Counseling Center during business hours (8:30am-4:30pm).
Campus Police and Residence Life Staff can access SHARE advocates after business hours. It is important to
note that SHARE Advisors are private, not “confidential” resources, must make a formal report of sexual
misconduct if one has not already been completed.
Seek Counseling. - Counseling is a very important step in helping someone who has been sexually assaulted regain control of his or her life. Professional counseling services is confidential and is available locally, both on
and off campus.
How SHARE can help. SHARE advocates are trained faculty and staff members who have volunteered to serve
as advocates for victims of sexual assault.
A SHARE advocate can provide:
 Assistance with emergency rape crisis treatment and emergency medical services including accompanying
the victim/survivor to the hospital, police, etc., as requested.
 Assistance, guidance and support throughout the College judicial process and/or criminal justice process,
should the victim choose to pursue this course of action.
Fall 2015
35

Assistance in referrals around academic concerns such as missed classes and assignments, changing class
sections, etc.
 Assistance in obtaining alternative living arrangements.
 Assistance in contacting community resources such as rape crisis center support group.
 General support and assistance as needed.
If you prefer off-campus counseling, call A New Day (formerly Womansplace Crisis Center). A New Day is
located in Brockton, MA. The hotline number is 508-588-8255 and their website is http://anewdayma.org
Education and Prevention
The College is committed to providing on-going education and support programs aimed at the eradication of
sexual assault. In addition, the College will evaluate on an ongoing basis, all policies and procedures related to
sexual misconduct.
Alcohol and Drug Policies
Stonehill College is a grantee covered under the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989. The College
provides a drug and alcohol awareness program and students are expected to know about the dangers of drug
abuse, the policies affecting drug and alcohol abuse, and resources for available drug counseling within the
College. Furthermore, students are expected to know the state and federal laws for unlawful possession, use, or
distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol. Stonehill College Police enforces federal and state laws, local ordinances
and College policies regarding the illegal use, possession, and sale of alcohol and drugs.
Members of the Stonehill community who use illicit drugs create a risk of serious danger to the health and safety
of not only of themselves, but to other members of the community. The College takes reasonable steps to ensure
that drug abuse does not occur, and will comply with applicable law and administrative regulations requiring
maintenance of a drug-free workplace.
Students interested in learning more about health risks associated with use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol
are encouraged to inquire at Health Services, the College Counseling Center, or the Student Affairs Office.
Students wishing to explore counseling assistance may do so at the Counseling Center. All counseling contacts
are confidential.
Link to Stonehill College Alcohol and Drug Policies:
https://stonehill.policytech.com/dotNet/documents/?docid=2837&LinkedFromInsertedLink=true&public=true
Alcohol Policy
Stonehill Students are responsible for any alcohol or drugs found in their rooms or car, or
possessed by themselves, their guests or visitors.
Massachusetts General Law forbids the possession, sale, serving, or procurement of the
alcohol to any person(s) under the age of twenty-one (21) years of age. The law also forbids
falsifying age and identification cards. Stonehill College
supports the law and expects all students, faculty, administrators, and staff to abide by it.
Violators will be fined and/or sanctioned.
Use or possession of alcoholic beverages in public areas (regardless of age), except at approved functions is a
violation of town ordinance for the Town of Easton and is prohibited by the College.
Fall 2015
36
All students who violate the alcohol policy on campus property, or at off campus sponsored events, will be held
accountable for their behavior. A student found to be responsible, and/or in possession of a common source
including, but not limited to; a full/empty keg, pony keg, beer ball, punch bowl, gelatin shots, while on Stonehill
College grounds, except at approved functions is in violation of this policy and subject to sanction(s).
The use/possession of alcohol paraphernalia including, but not limited to ice luge, funnel, beer taps, etc., are in
violation of this policy and subject to sanction(s).
Driving Under the Influence of Drugs/Alcohol is a violation of both law and of college policy.
Drug Policy
The use, possession, sale or distribution of narcotic or illegal drugs, such as
hallucinogens, cocaine, heroin, marijuana, LSD, etc etc. is strictly prohibited. The
unauthorized use or possession of drugs prescribed for medical purposes is also
strictly prohibited.
The use, possession of drug paraphernalia is not permitted and is in violation of this
policy and subject to sanction(s). Stonehill Campus Police Department enforces all
state and federal drug laws.
Students found to be responsible for drug policy violations will be required to participate in a drug use assessment
program with the Coordinator of Alcohol and Drug Education. The Associate Vice President of Student Affairs,
or her designee, may also initiate other sanctions.
In addition to the imposition of disciplinary sanctions which may include suspension or separation from the
College, students and employees may face prosecution and imprisonment under Federal and Massachusetts laws
for criminal offenses.
Stonehill College works to provide a drug-free workplace for all College employees and students. The
departments of Health Services, Counseling, and Human Resources provide resources for treatment and referral
for students and employees with substance abuse problems. For more information on drug and alcohol policies,
please refer to the student Hill Book or the employee handbook.
Sanctions which may be imposed for violations of College Policy
1. In determining a sanction, the AVPSA/Dean of Students, or designee, may consider the student’s present
demeanor, past disciplinary record, the nature of the misconduct, and the severity of any damage, injury, or
harm resulting from the misconduct or other factors.
2. The College has a special concern for incidents in which persons are mistreated because of race, gender,
disability, age, marital status, religion, color, national origin, sexual orientation or other personal
characteristic. Such incidents negatively impact not only individuals, but also the free and open academic
environment of the College. More severe sanctions are appropriate for such misconduct.
3. Sanctions do not become effective until the appeal process is completed.
4. Some College policies specify sanctions for violations. See individual policies for sanctions required, if any.
5. The AVPSA/Dean of Students, or designee, may impose the following sanctions upon any student found to
have violated the Community Standards. See individual policies for specified sanctions for certain violations.
Fall 2015
37
a. Warning: A notice, either verbal or written, that the student is violating or has violated College
regulations, must cease the conduct immediately, and that continuation or repetition of wrongful
conduct may be cause for more severe disciplinary action.
b. Parental Notification: The College may notify parents/guardians when students under the age of
21 have been found responsible for violating the College’s alcohol or other drug policies, when
there is a serious health or safety issue regarding a student, or if a student’s residency or student
status is in jeopardy.
c. Loss of Privileges: Denial of specified privileges for a designated period of time.
d. Restriction: Denial of access to any campus facility, activity, class, or program. This includes nocontact orders.
e. Fines: Financial sanction.
f. Restitution: Compensation for loss, damage, or injury. This may take the form of appropriate
service or monetary or material replacement.
g. Community Restitution Project: Assignment of an appropriate service project that will benefit
the College community, responsible student or others.
h. Educational Program/Project: Required attendance at an educational workshop or completion of
an educational project that will benefit the College community, responsible student, or others.
i. Assessment: A student may be referred to Counseling Services, Health Services, or other
appropriate office or local agency for consultation or assessment.
j. Disciplinary Probation: A period of time during which a student may be excluded from
participation in all social and extracurricular activities such as representing the College,
participating in intercollegiate athletics, SGA, or study abroad.
k. Relocation of Residence: Required assignment to another residence area.
l. Deferred Suspension from Residency: Warning that if the student is found responsible for
violating the Community Standards during a specific period of time, the student may be
immediately removed from the residence halls for a specific period of time after which the
student may reapply for housing. Reapplication for housing does not guarantee immediate
placement. Conditions for returning to the residence halls may be specified.
m. Suspension from Residency: Separation of the student from the residence halls for a specific
period of time, after which the student may reapply for housing. Reapplication for housing does
not guarantee immediate placement. Conditions for returning to the residence halls may be
specified.
n. Residence Hall Dismissal: Permanent separation of the student from the residence halls.
o. Deferred College Separation: A warning that if the student is found responsible for violating the
Community Standards during a specific period of time, the student may be immediately
separated from the College for a specific period of time after which the student may reapply.
Conditions for readmission may be specified.
p. College Separation: Students who have been separated from the College for a period of time
must meet with the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students or designee at
least two weeks prior to the readmission deadline to review any outstanding sanctions and the
readmission process. Students who have completed all assigned sanctions or made sufficient
progress, as determined by the Associate Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students or
designee, may be conditionally approved to register for the following semester; however,
students must then meet all stated requirements in order to return to the College and officially
resume residency and/or coursework.
Fall 2015
38
q. Deferred College Dismissal: Warning that if the student is found responsible for violating the
Community Standards during a specific period of time, the student may be immediately
dismissed from the College.
r. College Dismissal: Permanent separation of the student from the College.
s. Revocation of Admission or Degree: Admission to the College or revocation of a degree
awarded from the College may be revoked for fraud, misrepresentation, or another violation of
the Community Standards in obtaining the degree or for other serious violations committed by a
student after admission or prior to graduation.
t. Withholding Degree: The College may withhold awarding a degree otherwise earned until the
completion of the disciplinary process set forth in the Student Discipline System, including the
completion of all sanctions imposed, if any.
u. Student Organization Recognition in Jeopardy: A delayed removal of recognition as a recognized
student organization. Any proven violation during a specific period of time may result in the
student organization’s immediate loss of recognition for a specified period of time.
v. Loss of Recognition: During a specific period of time, a recognized student organization may not
associate itself with the College by using the College name, facilities, or other rights and
privileges of recognized student organizations after which the group may reapply for recognition.
There is no guarantee re-recognition will be granted. If re-recognition is granted, conditions for
re-recognition may be specified. Other sanctions may be imposed instead of or in addition to
those specified above. In addition to the above sanctions, student conduct that warrants action
within the Student Discipline System may result in forfeiture of all Stonehill scholarships,
financial aid or monies paid.
6. More than one of the sanctions listed above may be imposed for any single violation.
7. A campus department, separate from the Student Discipline System, may place a restriction on a student
found responsible for violating the Community Standards such as the loss of merit points for housing
assignments, restrictions for athletes or the denial of study abroad, campus parking or other privileges.
Crime Prevention Tips
Residence Hall and Building Security
 Keep your room/office door locked every time you are away. A thief with a target in mind needs only
SECONDS to accomplish his/her task.
 Don’t leave belongings unattended in the library, cafeteria, or in cubbies or lockers without locks.
 Keep valuables secured out of sight. Laptop computers, pocketbooks and cameras belong in a locked
drawer, not under the desk or on a shelf.
 Not all people at the College are students or guests. Some people come to a college campus to commit
personal and property crimes.
 Do not prop doors open.
 Do not allow strangers to follow you into the building.
Report Suspicious People, Activity and Vehicles
 There are people who roam the campus buildings looking for unlocked doors, etc. They usually will make
up a fictitious name to gain access to a building or room. Report this to Stonehill College Police
immediately and try to gain a description of the person such as clothing, height, weight, color, age, and
other markings.
 If you see a person hanging around a vehicle, near a closed building after hours, near a walking path or
other place that seems suspicious, call Campus Police.
Fall 2015
39

If you see a vehicle driving around a campus lot, stopped behind a building, or parked in the woods, call
Campus Police.
Personal Safety Tips
 Always be aware of your surroundings.
 Walk or jog with a friend, not alone.
 Avoid dark isolated areas.
 Use the safety escort service.
 Know your limit on alcohol and do not accept drinks from others.
 Tell a friend where you are going and when you will return.
 Carry a personal alarm or noise maker. Yell if you need help.
 Carry a cell phone if possible.
 Know where the “blue light” emergency phones are located.
 If being followed, head toward a well-lit occupied area and call police.
 When possible, park in an area that will be well lit.
 When approaching your car have your keys out in advance.
 Lock your car. Lock valuables in the trunk, or hide them from view.
 Don’t get in your car until you have looked inside.
 Before driving your car, lock your doors and put on your seatbelt.
 Trust your instincts. If it doesn’t feel right, it probably isn’t.
Policy for Reporting the Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics
The Stonehill College Police Department prepares this report to comply with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of
Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. This report can also be located on our website at
www.stonehill.edu. This report is prepared in cooperation with Student Affairs, Residence Life, Community
Standards, and Facilities Management. Each department provides updated information on their policies,
procedures, and educational programs to comply with the Clery Act.
Campus crime, arrest and referral statistics include those reported to the Campus Police, Campus Security
Authorities, and outside law enforcement agencies.
Campus Counseling staff inform their clients of the procedures to report crime to Campus Police on a voluntary
or confidential basis, should they feel it is in the best interest of the client.
Each year, an email notification is made to all enrolled students and college employees. The email notifies the
community that the report is available and provides a direct link to the report. Any person may obtain a paper
copy of the report at the Campus Police Department located at the Old Student Union or by calling (508) 5655100. In addition, paper copies are available to prospective employees at the Human Resources Department and
to all prospective students at the Admissions department.
Crime Definitions
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter: The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.
NOTE: deaths caused by negligence, attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicides, accidental deaths, and justifiable
homicides are excluded.
Negligent Manslaughter: The killing of another person through gross negligence.
Robbery: The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody or control of a person or
persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.
Fall 2015
40
Aggravated Assault: An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or
aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely
to produce death or great bodily harm. It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault when a
gun, knife or other weapon is used which could or probably would result in a serious potential injury if the crime
were successfully completed.
Burglary: The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. For reporting purposes this definition
includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a larceny or a felony: breaking and entering with intent to commit
a larceny; housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.
Motor Vehicle Theft: The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. (All cases where automobiles are taken by
persons not having lawful access, even though the vehicles are later abandoned - including joy riding).
Arson: The willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house,
public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, or personal property of another kind.
Sex offenses definitions from the National Incident-Based Reporting System Edition of the Uniform
Crime Reporting Program:
Sex Offenses: Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person's will; or not
forcibly or against the person's will where the victim is incapable of giving consent.
A. Rape-The carnal knowledge of a person, forcibly and/or against that person's will; or not forcibly or against
the person's will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her temporary or permanent mental
or physical incapacity (or because of his/her youth).
B. Sodomy-Oral or anal sexual intercourse with another person, forcibly and/or against that person's will; or not
forcibly against the person's will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or
because of his/her temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.
C. Sexual Assault With An Object-The use of an object or instrument to unlawfully penetrate, however slightly,
the genital or anal opening of the body of another person, forcibly and/or against that person's will; or not forcibly or
against the person's will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her youth or because of his/her
temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity.
D. Fondling-The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, forcibly and/or
against that person's will; or, not forcibly or against the person's will where the victim is incapable of giving consent because
of his/her youth or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
Sex Offenses-Nonforcible: Unlawful, nonforcible sexual intercourse.
A. Incest-Nonforcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage
is prohibited by law.
B. Statutory Rape-Nonforcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.
Drug, Alcohol, and Weapon Violations of Law
Drug Abuse Violations: Violations of state and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing,
manufacturing, and making of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include: Opium or cocaine and their
Fall 2015
41
derivatives (morphine, heroin, codeine); marijuana, over 1 oz, ; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, methadone); and
dangerous non-narcotic drugs (barbiturates, Benzedrine.)
Liquor Law Violations: The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting: the manufacture, sale, transporting,
furnishing, possessing of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating a still;
furnishing liquor to minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation or liquor; drinking on
a train or public conveyance; all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned. (Drunkenness and driving under
the influence are not included in this definition).
Weapon Law Violations: The violation of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature,
such as: manufacture, sale, or possession of deadly weapons: carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly:
furnishing deadly weapons to minors; aliens possessing deadly weapons; all attempts to commit any of the
aforementioned.
***Crime definitions are from the Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook,
Crime Statistics
Under the Violence Against Women’s Act, campuses, beginning in calendar year 2013, need to report crime
statistics for Stalking, Domestic Violence and Dating Violence. Massachusetts does not have a law pertaining
specifically to violence that occurs between people in a dating relationship.
2014 Crime Statistics
Offense
(Reported By
Hierarchy)
Murder/Non
Negligent
Manslaughter
Negligent
Manslaughter
Rape
Fondling
Year On
NonPublic
Total
Campus Campus Property
Residential Unfounded
Facilities* Crimes
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
2014
2014
7
4
0
0
0
0
7
4
5
4
0
0
Incest
Statutory Rape
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor Vehicle
Theft
Liquor Law Arrests
Drug Law Arrests
Weapons Law
Arrests
Liquor Law
Violations Referred
for Disciplinary
Action
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
2014
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2014
2014
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
2014
269
0
0
269
254
0
Fall 2015
42
Drug Law
Violations Referred
for
Disciplinary Action
Weapons Law
Violations Referred
for Disciplinary
Action
2014
1
0
0
1
1
0
2014
0
0
0
0
0
0
Offense
Year On
NonPublic
Total
Residential Unfounded
(Crimes Not
Campus Campus Property
Facilities* Crimes
Reported By
Hierarchy)
Arson
2014 0
0
0
0
0
0
Domestic Violence 2014 2
0
0
2
2
0
Dating Violence
2014 4
0
0
4
4
0
Stalking
2014 4
0
0
4
4
0
*Note: Residential Facility Crime Statistics are a subset of the On Campus Category, i.e. they are counted in
both categories.
Note 1. Massachusetts decriminalized marijuana (possession of less than 1 oz). Less than 1 oz. of marijuana is a civil offense
and not counted for the purposes of drug law violations.
Note 2. Non-Campus Properties: Stonehill College leased an apartment building located at 2416 Lorillard Place Bronx,
NY 10458 for the spring semester in 2014 and rooms in the New Yorker Hotel in the fall of 2014. A small group of
students resided in these rooms while participating in a Stonehill College sponsored internship. We made an attempt but
were unable to obtain any crime statistics from New York Police specifically to these properties. Stonehill also leases an
apartment located at 3600 Barham Blvd Los Angeles, CA. We were unable to obtain any statistics from the Los Angeles
Police Department specific to the apartments we rent.
Change in Reporting for Calendar Year 2014
Beginning in calendar year 2014, Colleges and Universities are now required to report on additional crime
categories to include: Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, and Stalking, In addition the reporting of sex
offenses changed to add: Rape and Fondling in place or the former category: “Forcible Sex Offenses” and
Incest and Statutory Rape in place of the former “Nonforcible Sex Offenses”.
Reported Criminal Offenses for Calendar Year 2012 and 2103
Total Reported Criminal Offenses (On-Campus):
Category
2012
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter
0
Negligent Manslaughter
0
Sex Offenses
6
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses
0
Robbery
0
Aggravated Assault
0
Burglary
1
Motor Vehicle Theft
0
Arson
1
2013
0
0
3
0
0
0
1
0
0
Fall 2015
43
Of the Total Reported Criminal Offenses Listed Above, those that Occurred in Residence Halls:
Category
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter
Negligent Manslaughter
Forcible Sex Offenses
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses
Robbery
Aggravated Assault
Burglary
Motor Vehicle Theft
Arson
2012
0
0
4
0
0
0
1
0
0
2013
0
0
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
Total Reported Criminal Offenses on Public Property Adjacent to Campus:
Category
2012 2013
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter
0
0
Negligent Manslaughter
0
0
Forcible Sex Offenses
0
0
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses
0
0
Robbery
0
0
Aggravated Assault
0
0
Burglary
0
0
Motor Vehicle Theft
0
0
Arson
0
0
Total Reported Criminal Offenses on Non-Campus Property***:
Category
2012 2013
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter
0
0
Negligent Manslaughter
0
0
Forcible Sex Offenses
0
0
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses
0
0
Robbery
0
0
Aggravated Assault
0
0
Burglary
0
0
Motor Vehicle Theft
0
0
Arson
0
0
***Non-Campus Properties: Stonehill College leases an apartment building located at 2416 Lorillard Place Bronx, NY
10458. A small group of students reside in this residence apartment while participating in a Stonehill College sponsored
internship. We made an attempt but were unable to obtain any crime statistics from New York Police specifically to this
property. Stonehill also leases an apartment located at 3600 Barham Blvd Los Angeles, CA. We were unable to obtain any
statistics from the Los Angeles Police Department specific to the apartments we rent.
Fall 2015
44
Arrests and Campus Judicial Referrals
Arrests (On Campus):
Category
Weapons Violations
Drug Law Violations
Liquor Law Violations
2012
0
1
0
2013
0
0
0
Of the Arrests Listed, those that occurred in Residence Halls:
Category
2012 2013
Weapons Violations
0
0
Drug Law Violations
0
0
Liquor Law Violations
0
0
Arrests in Public Property Adjacent to Campus:
Category
2012 2013
Weapons Violations
0
0
Drug Law Violations
1
0
Liquor Law Violations
0
0
Campus Disciplinary Action/Judicial Referrals for Violations of Law (On Campus):
Category
2012 2013
Weapons Violations
2
4
Drug Law Violations
0
1
Liquor Law Violations
223
276
Note: Massachusetts decriminalized marijuana (possession of less than 1 oz). Less than 1 oz. of marijuana is a civil offense
and not counted for the purposes of drug law violations.
Hate Crime Reporting
No hate crimes were reported for 2012, 2013 or for 2014.
The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act requires the separate
reporting, by category of prejudice, of any crime reported in the classifications above and any other crime
involving bodily injury that manifests evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim’s
actual or perceived race, gender, religion, sexual orientation, ethnicity, or disability.
Beginning with data for the 2009 calendar year (and earlier years if an institution had already collected it),
institutions now must report statistics for four additional categories of crime that are more commonly bias related
than the main Clery crimes. These crimes are only required to be reported if they are motivated by bias. These
additional categories include: Larceny-theft, Simple assault, Intimidation, and Destruction, damage, or vandalism
of property.
Note 1: Public Property is defined as the public streets, sidewalks, other thoroughfares or parking facilities adjacent to college facilities.
For the purpose of this report, incidents have been included which were reported by Easton police to have occurred on public property
within the area bounded by campus property.
Note 2: The term Non-Campus Building or Property means any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization
recognized by the College or any building or property owned or controlled by the College and used in direct support of educational
Fall 2015
45
purposes, frequented by students, but not in the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the main campus, as well as off-campus
apartments leased by the College.
Compiling Crime Statistics
The statistics were compiled by first reviewing reports from the case files of the Stonehill College Police
Department. Other College departments and individuals with significant responsibility for student and campus
activities were then provided with reporting forms to be submitted to the College Police for compilation. Finally
local and state police agencies were asked to provide statistics for applicable incidents on public property and
non-campus property. All records were the analyzed to eliminate duplication.
Fire Safety in On-Campus Residence Halls
Stonehill College administers an aggressive program of regular inspection, testing and maintenance of College
premises, especially residence facilities, to ensure compliance with applicable fire and life safety codes and
standards, conducting regular egress drills and providing a variety of educational and training programs for
students, faculty and staff.
In 2012 the campus fire alarm system was upgraded by the Facilities Management Department. They incorporated
the fire alarm monitoring system to the wireless system used to monitor carbon monoxide. They added wireless
panels throughout campus which signal back to the central monitoring system at the Campus Police Dispatch
Center.
Fire alarm and suppression systems:
All on-campus residence halls (see chart below), except those in O’Hara Village, are equipped with both
automatic and manually operated fire alarm notification devices which ring into the Campus Police Dispatch
Center. All on-campus residence halls, including O’Hara Village, have sprinkler systems which meet and in
many cases exceed state and local building and fire safety codes. The fire alarm systems in all on-campus
residence facilities consist of horns and strobe lights alerting residents to an alarm. All fire alarm systems
contain emergency batteries to ensure operation during a power outage, and most facilities also have emergency
generators designed to automatically activate whenever there is a power outage. These back-up batteries and
generators will operate life safety systems, including fire safety equipment and emergency exit lighting.
Fall 2015
46
Residence Hall
Fire Alarm
Monitored by
SCPD
Full Sprinkler
Covers
residence hall
rooms &
Common
Areas
Smoke
Detectors
All Residence
Hall Rooms
Fire
Extinguishers in
designated
common areas
Evacuation
plans and
Placards
Number of
evacuation
(fire) drills
each calendar
year
Boland Hall
Alden/Bradford
Chandler/Dunster
Endicott/Fanuel
Goveneur/Hawthorne
Irving/Jefferson
King /Lafayette
Mather/Nowell
Otis A & B
Phipps A & B
Quincy A & B
Amebury/Becket
Chatham/Deerfield
Essex/Franklin
Georgetown/Harwich
Ipswich/Jamestown
Kingston/Lowell
Manchester/Nantucket
Orleans A & B
Plymouth A & B
Rehoboth A & B
Corr
Holy Cross Center
New Hall
Notre Dame du Lac
O’Hara Hall
Annisquam
Centerville
Forestdale
Hyannis
Onset
Osterville
Pocasset
Sagamore
Benaglia
Cascino
Flynn
Sheehan
Sullivan
Cedarville
Cotuit
Humarock
Manomet
P.H. Village – Seabrook
Villa Theresa
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
On-campus residence halls are also equipped with fire-rated smoke/fire doors designed to impede the spread of
smoke and fire. Regular inspections are conducted by Campus Police, Residential Life and Facilities staff who
report fire hazards in residence halls and facilitate prompt resolution.
Fall 2015
47
Upon receipt of a fire alarm, Campus Police Officers are immediately dispatched, and if needed, the Easton Fire
Department is notified.
On-campus housing consists of a variety of configurations, including traditional dormitory-style buildings,
modular housing units, village style buildings and newly-constructed apartment style and suite style facilities.
Each facility is equipped with the fire and life safety systems required by the building codes. Fire safety equipment
is reviewed regularly to identify locations where enhancements such as additional sprinkler and smoke detection
systems beyond those required by building codes are appropriate and plans for such enhancements are integrated
into the College's annual facilities maintenance project plan.
Policies and Rules for Electrical Appliances, Smoking and Open Flames:
Smoking and open flames are not permitted inside any campus building. Prohibited items include: candles,
flammable liquids, flame lamps, and incense. Violators will be fined and subject to disciplinary action.
The use of electric blankets, hot plates, “George Foreman” type grills, toasters, toaster ovens, broilers, popcorn
poppers, air conditioners, space heaters, and microwaves/microfridges in student rooms and in common areas is
prohibited, except as provided by the College. Refrigerators larger than 4.5 cubic feet in student rooms are not
allowed.
All types of halogen lamps are prohibited. Attaching or hanging items made of combustible material from the
ceiling is prohibited. Gas grills of any type are not permitted on College grounds. Students are encouraged to
utilize the charcoal grills located in their residence area or behind the Roche Dining Commons. The accumulation
of debris, dirty laundry, cans and bottles is prohibited. Exterior decorations on residence halls and in residence
areas are prohibited, unless provided by the College.
Coffee makers, curling irons, clothes irons, hair straighteners, hot pots, and other such appliances are allowed
only if they have an automatic shut off. Students must have proof of automatic shut off.
Multiple outlet extension cords of any kind are prohibited. If you need an outlet strip you must purchase a UL
approved unit with a circuit breaker. All string lights must be hung properly, safely, and ensure intact cord
insulation.
Inspections
Periodically, Residence Life Staff will inspect all student rooms on campus to make sure they are safe for student
occupants. Individual students may be fined $25.00 - $50.00 for each Fire Safety Code Violation. The students
will have, at most, twenty-four hours to correct the violation(s) after which time, failure to correct the violation
may lead to loss of residency. In order to insure integrity of the inspections, students do not have to be notified or
present.
Further, the Easton Fire/Rescue Department, Stonehill Facilities and Maintenance Department, the Town of
Easton Building Inspector and Stonehill Campus Police may also conduct unannounced inspections of student
rooms.
Student compliance with these Fire and Safety Regulations is necessary to insure the safety of all campus
residents.
To view the complete fire safety policy, please go to: http://www.stonehill.edu/files/resources/fire_safety.pdf
Fall 2015
48
Fire Safety Training
The Residence Life Department provides training for Residence Assistants during the annual RA training just
prior to the beginning of the academic year. At the start of the semester, during their opening floor meetings,
Residence Life staff will explain the importance of evacuating the building during a fire alarm. They will review
the fire evacuation routes in the buildings and point out the closest exits. In first-year areas, Residence Life staff
posts a list of prohibited items on move-in day.
Fire Drills
The Campus Police and Residence Life departments work together to conduct one fire drill each semester in all
residence halls. During the fire drills, residence rooms are checked to ensure that all students have evacuated the
building.
Procedures for Housing Evacuation
When the fire alarm is activated in a campus building or residence hall, all occupants are required to exit the
building via the nearest exit. Evacuation routes are posted in each building. Occupants are required to exit the
building in a safe, orderly manner and to assemble a safe distance from the building.
About 90% of Stonehill College students live on-campus. The residences have kitchen areas and as a result, each
year there are a number of incidents when students over cook food on the stove or in the microwave. Smoke from
over cooked food items may activate the local smoke detector, which will reset once the smoke dissipates. Campus
Police respond to all fire alarm activations to ensure safety. Students are required to evacuate their building when
the fire alarm is activated - even if they know the cause of the alarm is burned food. Campus Police will allow reentry once the area has been checked and determined to be safe.
A record of all fires in on-campus residence hall facilities is included in the campus fire log maintained by and
located at the Campus Police Department. The crime and fire logs are available for public viewing during normal
business hours.
General Procedures for Students and Employees to Follow in Case of a Fire
Campus Police Officers respond to all fire alarms which ring into the College's automatic alarm system or by
persons who report the presence of smoke or fire. Officers investigate to determine the cause of the alarm. In
the case of an actual fire, an incident report is generated and a detailed record of the fire is maintained.
Anyone observing a fire in a Stonehill facility should immediately activate the fire alarm by operating the nearest
manual pull station if the fire alarm is not already sounding. Pull stations are typically located near doors leading
to stairways and exits. Witnesses can also contact the Campus Police Department at 508-565-5555 but should not
delay in exiting the building. Upon hearing a fire alarm all occupants should evacuate the building immediately
by using the stairs, not the elevator.
Reporting a Fire
If a fire occurs, call 911. Staff members who discover evidence of a past fire, which has been extinguished, are
required to report their observations to the Campus Police Department. Such reports also result in an
investigation, a written police report, and documentation in the public log.
Fall 2015
49
Future Improvements in Fire Safety
Stonehill made no changes to the fire safety systems in 2014. Presently the Sally Blair Ames Sports Complex is
undergoing an expansion and as part of that project, the existing fire alarm will be upgraded. This is anticipated to be
completed in 2015.
Fall 2015
50
2014 FIRE STATISTICS
Residence Hall – All
residences are located at 320
Washington Street North
Easton, MA 02357
Boland Hall
Total
# of
Fires
Fire
#
Cause of fire
# of
injuries
# of
deaths
Value of
property
damage
1
1
0
0
$0-99
Colonial Court – Alden
Colonial Court – Bradford
Colonial Court – Chandler
0
0
0
0
0
0
Popcorn bag ignited in
microwave and quickly
extinguished
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Colonial Court – Dunster
Colonial Court – Endicott
Colonial Court – Fanuel
Colonial Court – Goveneur
Colonial Court – Hawthorne
Colonial Court – Irving
Colonial Court – Jefferson
Colonial Court – King
Colonial Court – Lafayette
Colonial Court – Mather
Colonial Court – Nowell
Colonial Court – Otis A
Colonial Court – Otis B
Colonial Court – Phipps A
Colonial Court – Phipps B
Colonial Court – Quincy A
Colonial Court – Quincy B
Comm. Court – Amesbury
Comm. Court – Becket
Comm. Court – Chatham
Comm. Court – Deerfield
Comm. Court – Essex
Comm. Court – Franklin
Comm. Court – Georgetown
Comm. Court – Harwich
Comm. Court – Ipswich
Comm. Court – Jamestown
Comm. Court – Kingston
Comm. Court – Lowell
Comm. Court – Manchester
Comm. Court – Nantucket
Comm. Court – Orleans A
Comm. Court – Orleans B
Comm. Court – Plymouth A
Comm. Court – Plymouth B
Comm. Court – Rehoboth A
Comm. Court – Rehoboth B
Corr Hall
Holy Cross Center
New Hall
Notre Dame du Lac
O’Hara Hall
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
$0-99
O’Hara Village – Annisquam
O’Hara Village – Centerville
O’Hara Village – Forestdale
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Toaster caught on fire
and was extinguished
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2015
51
2014 FIRE STATISTICS
Residence Hall – All
residences are located at 320
Washington Street North
Easton, MA 02357
O’Hara Village – Hyannis
O’Hara Village – Onset
O’Hara Village – Osterville
O’Hara Village – Pocasset
O’Hara Village – Sagamore
Pilgrim Heights – Benaglia
Pilgrim Heights – Cascino
Pilgrim Heights – Flynn
Pilgrim Heights – Sheehan
Pilgrim Heights – Sullivan
P.H. Village – Cedarville
P.H. Village – Cotuit
P.H. Village – Humarock
P.H. Village – Manomet
P.H. Village – Seabrook
Villa Theresa
Total
# of
Fires
Fire
#
Cause of fire
# of
injuries
# of
deaths
Value of
property
damage
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2015
52
2013 FIRE STATISTICS
Residence Hall – All
residences are located at 320
Washington Street North
Easton, MA 02357
Boland Hall
Total
# of
Fires
Fire
#
Cause of fire
# of
injuries
# of
deaths
Value of
property
damage
0
0
0
0
0
0
Colonial Court – Alden
Colonial Court – Bradford
Colonial Court – Chandler
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Colonial Court – Dunster
Colonial Court – Endicott
Colonial Court – Fanuel
Colonial Court – Goveneur
Colonial Court – Hawthorne
Colonial Court – Irving
Colonial Court – Jefferson
Colonial Court – King
Colonial Court – Lafayette
Colonial Court – Mather
Colonial Court – Nowell
Colonial Court – Otis A
Colonial Court – Otis B
Colonial Court – Phipps A
Colonial Court – Phipps B
Colonial Court – Quincy A
Colonial Court – Quincy B
Comm. Court – Amesbury
Comm. Court – Becket
Comm. Court – Chatham
Comm. Court – Deerfield
Comm. Court – Essex
Comm. Court – Franklin
Comm. Court – Georgetown
Comm. Court – Harwich
Comm. Court – Ipswich
Comm. Court – Jamestown
Comm. Court – Kingston
Comm. Court – Lowell
Comm. Court – Manchester
Comm. Court – Nantucket
Comm. Court – Orleans A
Comm. Court – Orleans B
Comm. Court – Plymouth A
Comm. Court – Plymouth B
Comm. Court – Rehoboth A
Comm. Court – Rehoboth B
Corr Hall
Holy Cross Center
New Hall
Notre Dame du Lac
O’Hara Hall
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
O’Hara Village – Annisquam
O’Hara Village – Centerville
O’Hara Village – Forestdale
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2015
53
2013 FIRE STATISTICS
Residence Hall – All
residences are located at 320
Washington Street North
Easton, MA 02357
O’Hara Village – Hyannis
O’Hara Village – Onset
O’Hara Village – Osterville
O’Hara Village – Pocasset
O’Hara Village – Sagamore
Pilgrim Heights – Benaglia
Pilgrim Heights – Cascino
Pilgrim Heights – Flynn
Pilgrim Heights – Sheehan
Pilgrim Heights – Sullivan
P.H. Village – Cedarville
P.H. Village – Cotuit
P.H. Village – Humarock
P.H. Village – Manomet
P.H. Village – Seabrook
Villa Theresa
Total
# of
Fires
Fire
#
Cause of fire
# of
injuries
# of
deaths
Value of
property
damage
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2015
54
2012 FIRE STATISTICS
Residence Hall – All
residences are located at 320
Washington Street North
Easton, MA 02357
Boland Hall
Total
# of
Fires
Fire
#
Cause of fire
# of
injuries
# of
deaths
Value of
property
damage
0
0
0
0
0
0
Colonial Court – Alden
1
1
0
0
>$1,000.
Colonial Court – Bradford
Colonial Court – Chandler
0
0
0
0
Resulted from sunlight
refracting off of a
makeup mirror causing
a cardboard box to
ignite.
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Colonial Court – Dunster
Colonial Court – Endicott
Colonial Court – Fanuel
Colonial Court – Goveneur
Colonial Court – Hawthorne
Colonial Court – Irving
Colonial Court – Jefferson
Colonial Court – King
Colonial Court – Lafayette
Colonial Court – Mather
Colonial Court – Nowell
Colonial Court – Otis A
Colonial Court – Otis B
Colonial Court – Phipps A
Colonial Court – Phipps B
Colonial Court – Quincy A
Colonial Court – Quincy B
Comm. Court – Amesbury
Comm. Court – Becket
Comm. Court – Chatham
Comm. Court – Deerfield
Comm. Court – Essex
Comm. Court – Franklin
Comm. Court – Georgetown
Comm. Court – Harwich
Comm. Court – Ipswich
Comm. Court – Jamestown
Comm. Court – Kingston
Comm. Court – Lowell
Comm. Court – Manchester
Comm. Court – Nantucket
Comm. Court – Orleans A
Comm. Court – Orleans B
Comm. Court – Plymouth A
Comm. Court – Plymouth B
Comm. Court – Rehoboth A
Comm. Court – Rehoboth B
Corr Hall
Holy Cross Center
New Hall
Notre Dame du Lac
O’Hara Hall
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2015
55
2012 FIRE STATISTICS
Residence Hall – All
residences are located at 320
Washington Street North
Easton, MA 02357
O’Hara Village – Annisquam
O’Hara Village – Centerville
O’Hara Village – Forestdale
O’Hara Village – Hyannis
O’Hara Village – Onset
O’Hara Village – Osterville
O’Hara Village – Pocasset
O’Hara Village – Sagamore
Pilgrim Heights – Benaglia
Pilgrim Heights – Cascino
Pilgrim Heights – Flynn
Pilgrim Heights – Sheehan
Pilgrim Heights – Sullivan
P.H. Village – Cedarville
P.H. Village – Cotuit
P.H. Village – Humarock
P.H. Village – Manomet
P.H. Village – Seabrook
Villa Theresa
Total
# of
Fires
Fire
#
Cause of fire
# of
injuries
# of
deaths
Value of
property
damage
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Fall 2015
56
Fall 2015
57
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement