3760-A2-GB91
You have accessed an older version
of a Paradyne product document.
Paradyne is no longer a subsidiary
of AT&T. Any reference to
AT&T Paradyne is amended to
read Paradyne Corporation.
Paradyne
3760-A2-GB91-20
Issue 3
April 1994
KeepInTouch Card Modem
Models 3760, 3762, 3763,
and 3764
User’s Guide
E
COPYRIGHT
1994 AT&T Paradyne
Corporation*
All Rights Reserved
Printed in U.S.A.
Notice
This publication is protected by federal copyright law. No part of
this publication may be copied or distributed, transcribed, stored
in a retrieval system, or translated into any human or computer
language in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical,
magnetic, manual or otherwise, or disclosed to third parties
without the express written permission of AT&T Paradyne
Corporation, 8545 126th Ave. N., P.O. Box 2826, Largo, Florida
34649-2826.
AT&T Paradyne Corporation makes no representation or
warranties with respect to the contents hereof and specifically
disclaims any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for
a particular purpose. Further, AT&T Paradyne Corporation
reserves the right to revise this publication and to make changes
from time to time in the contents hereof without obligation of
AT&T Paradyne Corporation to notify any person of such
revision or changes.
Changes and enhancements to the product and to the
information herein will be documented and issued as a new
release or a Technical Update Memo (TUM) to this manual.
A Reader’s Comments form is provided at the front of this
publication and your comments are appreciated. If the form has
been removed, address comments to AT&T Paradyne
Corporation, Technical Publications, 8545 126th Ave. N., P.O.
Box 2826, Largo, Florida 34649-2826. AT&T Paradyne may use
or distribute any of the information supplied, as appropriate,
without incurring any obligation whatsoever.
* AT&T Paradyne is a member of AT&T’s Communications
Products group.
A
Issue 3 April 1994
Trademarks
AT is a trademark of Hayes Microcomputer Products, Inc.
AXCELL is a trademark of Spectrum Cellular Corporation.
ETC is a trademark of AT&T.
EXTRA! is a registered trademark of Attachmate Corporation.
Hayes is a registered trademark of Hayes Microcomputer Products,
Inc.
KeepInTouch and KIT are trademarks of AT&T.
MNP is a trademark of Microcom, Inc.
Motorola is a registered trademark of Motorola, Inc.
MS-DOS (DOS) is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.
All other product names are copyrighted and registered
trademarks of their respective owners.
ąą
Warranty
A limited warranty is provided with this product. Refer to the
enclosed Warranty Card for more information.
1. Read and follow all warning notices and instructions
marked on the product or included in the manual.
2. Do not attempt to service this product yourself, as
opening or removing covers may expose you to
dangerous high voltage points or other risks. Refer all
servicing to qualified service personnel.
3. General purpose cables are provided with this
product. Special cables, which may be required by the
regulatory inspection authority for the installation site,
are the responsibility of the customer.
4. When installed in the final configuration, the product
must comply with the applicable Safety Standards and
regulatory requirements of the country in which it is
installed. If necessary, consult with the appropriate
regulatory agencies and inspection authorities to
ensure compliance.
Issue 3 April 1994
B
5. A rare phenomenon can create a voltage potential
between the earth grounds of two or more buildings. If
products installed in separate buildings are
interconnected, the voltage potential may cause a
hazardous condition. Consult a qualified electrical
consultant to determine whether or not this
phenomenon exists and, if necessary, implement
corrective action prior to interconnecting the products.
In addition, if the equipment is to be used with
telecommunications circuits, take the following
precautions:
– Never install telephone wiring during a lightning storm.
– Never install telephone jacks in wet locations unless the
jack is specifically designed for wet locations.
– Never touch uninsulated telephone wires or terminals
unless the telephone line has been disconnected at the
network interface.
– Use caution when installing or modifying telephone
lines.
– Avoid using a telephone (other than a cordless type)
during an electrical storm. There may be a remote risk
of electric shock from lightning.
– Do not use the telephone to report a gas leak in the
vicinity of the leak.
Government Requirements and Equipment Return
Certain governments require that instructions pertaining to
modem connection to the public switched telephone network be
included in the installation and operation manual. Specific
instructions are listed in the following sections.
C
Issue 3 April 1994
United States
NOTICE TO USERS OF THE PUBLIC SWITCHED
TELEPHONE NETWORK
1. This equipment complies with Part 68 of the FCC rules. On
the equipment is a label that contains, among other
information, the FCC registration number and ringer
equivalence number (REN) for this equipment. If requested,
this information must be provided to the telephone company.
2. The Universal Service Order Code (USOC) associated with
the services the equipment is to be connected is RJ11C.
3. The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) is used to determine
the quantity of devices which may be connected to the
telephone line. Excessive RENs on the telephone line may
result in the devices not ringing in response to an incoming
call. In most, but not all areas, the sum of the RENs should
not exceed five (5.0). To be certain of the number of devices
that may be connected to the line, as determined by the total
RENs, contact the telephone company to determine the
maximum RENs for the calling area.
4. If the modem causes harm to the telephone network, the
telephone company will notify you in advance that temporary
discontinuance of service may be required. But if advance
notice is not practical, the telephone company will notify the
customer as soon as possible. Also, you will be advised of
your right to file a complaint with the FCC if you believe it is
necessary.
5. The telephone company may make changes in its facilities,
equipment, operations, or procedures that could affect the
operation of the equipment. If this happens, the telephone
company will provide advance notice in order for you to
make the necessary modifications in order to maintain
uninterrupted service.
6. If your modem needs to be returned for repair or
replacement, follow the return policy as indicated on your
warranty card.
7. No repairs may be made by the end use customer.
Issue 3 April 1994
D
8. This modem cannot be used on public coin service provided
by the telephone company. Connection to Party Line Service
is subject to state tariffs. (Contact the state public utility
commission, public service commission or corporation
commission for information.)
9. The Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 makes it
unlawful for any person to use a computer or other
electronic device to send any message via a telephone fax
machine unless such message clearly contains in a margin
at the top or bottom of each transmitted page or on the first
page of the transmission, the date and time it is sent and an
identification of the business or other entity, or other
individual sending the message and the telephone number
of the sending machine of such business, or other entity, or
individual.
In order to program this information, follow the steps outlined
in the manual supplied with your fax software.
10. An FCC compliant telephone cord with modular plugs is
provided with this equipment. This equipment is designed to
be connected to the telephone network or premises wiring
using a compatible modular jack which is Part 68 compliant.
E
Issue 3 April 1994
EMI Warnings
! WARNING:
This equipment has been tested and found to comply with
the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of
the FCC rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference in a
residential installation. This equipment generates, uses, and
can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and
used in accordance with the instruction, may cause harmful
interference to radio or television reception, which can be
determined by turning the equipment off and on. The user is
encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more
of the following measures:
G
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna
G
Increase the separation between the equipment and
receiver
G
Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit
different from that to which the receiver is connected
G
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician
for help
! WARNING:
The authority to operate this equipment is conditioned by the
requirement that no modifications will be made to the
equipment unless the changes or modifications are expressly
approved by AT&T Paradyne.
To comply with Part 15 FCC Regulations, the snap-on ferrite
clamp supplied with the Model 3762 modem’s cellular direct
connect interface cable must be installed. Refer to the
installation procedures provided with the cable for
instructions.
To Users of Digital Apparatus in Canada:
This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for
radio noise emissions from digital apparatus set out in the
radio interference regulations of the Canadian Department of
Communications.
Issue 3 April 1994
F
Le presént appareil numérique n’émet pas de bruits
radioélectriques dépassant les limites applicables aux
appareils numériques de la Classe B prescrites dans le
règlement sur le brouillage radioélectrique édicté par Le
Ministère des Communications du Canada.
Canada
NOTICE TO THE USERS OF THE CANADIAN PUBLIC
SWITCHED TELEPHONE NETWORK
The Canadian Department of Communications label identifies
certified equipment. This certification means that the equipment
meets certain telecommunications network protective,
operational and safety requirements. The Department does not
guarantee the equipment will operate to the user’s satisfaction.
Before installing this equipment, users should ensure that it is
permissible to be connected to the facilities of the local
telecommunications company. The equipment must also be
installed using an acceptable method of connection. In some
cases, the company’s inside wiring associated with a single line
individual service may be extended by means of a certified
connector assembly (telephone extension cord). The customer
should be aware that compliance with the above conditions may
not prevent degradation of service in some situations.
Repairs to certified equipment should be made by an authorized
Canadian maintenance facility designated by the supplier. Any
repairs or alterations made by the user to this equipment, or
equipment malfunctions, may give the telecommunications
company cause to request the user to disconnect the
equipment.
Users should ensure for their own protection that the electrical
ground connections of the power utility, telephone line and
internal metallic water pipe system, if present, are connected
together. This precaution may be particularly important in rural
areas.
G
Issue 3 April 1994
! CAUTION:
Users should not attempt to make such connections
themselves, but should contact the appropriate electric
inspection authority, or electrician, as appropriate.
The Load Number for this equipment is listed on the modem’s
label. The Load Number (LN) assigned to each terminal device
denotes the percentage of the total load to be connected to a
telephone loop which is used by the device to prevent
overloading. The termination on a loop may consist of any
combination of devices subject only to the requirement that the
total of the Load Numbers of all devices does not exceed 100.
If your equipment is in need of repair, return it to its place of
purchase or arrange to have your equipment repaired by
contacting Inventory Control Office, 100 York Blvd., Suite 200,
Richmond Hill, Ontario L4B1J8, telephone (416) 494-0453.
United Kingdom
Facilities
This apparatus has been approved for the use of the following
facilities:
G
Modem
G
Automatic call initiation
G
Detection of initial proceed indication
G
Auto Answering
G
Operation in the absence of proceed indication
G
Auto Clear from the call originating end
G
Storage of telephone numbers for retrieval by a
predetermined code
G
Multifrequency and Loop Disconnect signalling
Any other usage will invalidate the approval of the apparatus if
as a result it then ceases to comply with the standards against
which approval was granted.
Issue 3 April 1994
H
When entering network addresses into the dialing directory,
please ensure that the telephone numbers are correct.
Interconnection circuits between this modem and any other
equipment should be such that the equipment continues to
comply with the requirements of clause 4.2 of EN41003 for TNV
(Telephone Network Voltage) circuits and clause 2.3 of EN
60950 for SELV (Safety Extra Low Voltage) circuits after making
connection between circuits.
The power supply must be properly connected and switched on
before the modem will work correctly.
Ringer Equivalence Number
The Ringer Equivalence Number (REN) is a customer guide
indicating approximately the maximum number of items of
apparatus that should be connected simultaneously to the
telephone line. The sum of the RENs should not exceed four.
This value includes any BT provided instrument which may be
assumed to have a REN of 1 unless marked otherwise. The
REN of the KeepInTouch Card modem is listed in Appendix B,
Technical Specifications.
! WARNING:
Do not connect any other items of apparatus in parallel with
this modem.
Telephone Line
The modem may be connected to the following circuits:
I
G
Direct exchange lines of the public switched telephone
network, but not shared service or 1+1 carrier systems.
The line should provide either loop disconnect or
multifrequency signalling.
G
The modem may also be connected as an extension to a
compatible PABX, although there is no guarantee of
correct working in all circumstances.
Issue 3 April 1994
Power Requirements
It is a condition of approval that the power required by the host
and the total of all adapter cards installed within the host
environment, together with any auxiliary apparatus, does not
exceed the power specification as stated in the Technical
Reference Material of the host apparatus. The power
requirements for the KeepInTouch Card modem are 5V and
1 Watt.
In order to maintain the independent approval of this card, it is
essential that other optional cards do no use (or generate)
mains Voltages or any other hazardous voltage. A hazardous
voltage is one which exceeds 42.24V peak a.c. or 60V d.c. If
you have doubt, seek advice from a competent engineer before
installing other adapters into the hoist equipment.
The equipment must be installed such that with the exception of
the connections to the host, clearance and creepage distances
shown in Table 1 are maintained between the card and any
other assemblies which use or generate a voltage shown in the
table. The larger distance shown in brackets applies where the
local environment within the host is subject to conductive
pollution or dry non-conductive pollution which could become
conductive due to condensation. Failure to maintain these
minimum distances would invalidate the approval.
Table 1. Power Requirements (United Kingdom)
Clearance
(mm)
Creepage
(mm)
Voltage used or Generated by
Host or Other Cards
2.0
2.6
4.0
4.0
2.4
3.0
5.0
6.4
Up to 50 Vms or Vdc
Up to 125 Vms or Vdc
Up to 250 Vms or Vdc
Up to 300 Vms or Vdc
(3.8)
(4.8)
(8.0)
(10.0)
Issue 3 April 1994
J
Contents
1
Introduction
G Welcome to the World of Portable, High-Speed Data
Communications!
G KeepInTouch Card Modem Package
Supplied Equipment
Required Equipment
G Where to Find Additional Information
2
Installation
G KeepInTouch Card Modem Installation Procedures
Model 3760 and Model 3762 Installation
Procedures
Model 3763 and Model 3764 Installation
Procedures
G Configuring Your PC to Use the
KeepInTouch Card Modem
G Fax Application Software
G Using Hayes AutoSync
3
1-1
1-2
1-2
1-4
1-5
2-1
2-1
2-4
2-5
2-7
2-7
Using Your Modem
G
G
G
G
G
G
Using AT Commands
Making a Call with Your Modem
Disconnecting a Call
Manually Answering a Call
Viewing, Selecting, and Saving Modem Settings
Operating Modes (Command and Data)
Switching Between Data Mode and Online
Command Mode Using the Escape
Sequence
G Changing Modem Modulations and Modem Speed
Issue 3 April 1994
3-1
3-3
3-4
3-6
3-6
3-7
3-7
3-8
i
Contents
G An Overview of File Transfers and Fax Operation
File Transfers
Fax Operation
G Using Cellular Channels
4
3-9
3-9
3-10
3-10
AT Command Set and S-Registers
G AT Commands and S-Registers
G Country Specific Information
4-1
4-29
A
Troubleshooting
A-1
B
Technical Specifications
B-1
C
Result Codes
C-1
D
Cellular Communications
G Connecting your Modem for Cellular Operation
Direct Connection to a Cellular Telephone
Connection to a Cellular Telephone through
an RJ11 Adapter Box
G Configuring Your Modem for Cellular Operation
Automatic Cellular Setup for
Direct Connection on the Cellular Side
&F5 Cellular Setup for RJ11 Adapter
Connection on the Cellular Side
&F6 Cellular Setup for Connection
on the PSTN Side
ii
Issue 3 April 1994
D-1
D-2
D-2
D-3
D-3
D-4
D-5
Contents
G ETC Protocol and Interworking with
Non-ETC Modems
Placing a Call Through a Public Switched
Telephone Network (PSTN)
Placing a Call Through a Modem Pool
G Fax over Cellular
G Tips for Successful Cellular Operation
G Overview of Cellular Communication
D-6
D-6
D-7
D-7
D-8
D-9
GL Glossary
GL-1
IN
IN-1
Index
Issue 3 April 1994
iii
Figures
1
Introduction
G 1-1
2
Supplied Equipment
1-3
Installation
G 2-1
Model 3760 and Model 3762
Modem Installation
G 2-2 Model 3763 and Model 3764
Modem Installation
iv
Issue 3 April 1994
2-2
2-4
Tables
4
AT Command Set and S-Registers
G 4-1
G 4-2
AT Command and S-Register Reference
Country Specific AT Command and
S-Register Values
G 4-3 Other Country-Specific Information
A
A-1
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-5
Modem Health
Modem — Computer Connection
Modem — Telephone Line Connection
Online Operation
Fax Operation
B-1
Result Codes
G C-1 Result Codes
D
A-2
A-3
A-4
A-9
A-10
Technical Specifications
G B-1 Technical Specifications
C
4-29
4-30
Troubleshooting
G
G
G
G
G
B
4-2
C-1
Cellular Communications
G D-1 Automatic Cellular Setup
Configuration Parameters
G D-2 &F5 Cellular Setup Configuration Parameters
G D-3 &F6 Cellular Setup Configuration Parameters
Issue 3 April 1994
D-4
D-4
D-6
v
Introduction
1
Welcome to the World of
Portable, High-Speed Data
Communications!
Congratulations on your purchase of the AT&T Paradyne
KeepInTouch Card modem. The KeepInTouch Card is a credit
card size modem that combines high-speed V.32 bis data
communications with Group 3 send-and-receive fax capability.
The modem fits into any notebook or laptop personal computer
that has a Personal Computer Memory Card International
Association (PCMCIA) Release 2 socket and allows you to keep
in touch with your home or office from anywhere around the
world.
The KeepInTouch Card family of modems includes Models
3760, 3761, 3762, 3763, and 3764. This manual contains
information on Model 3760, Model 3762, Model 3763, and
Model 3764.
Model 3763 and Model 3764 are intended for international
(particularly European) applications only and are not for use in
North America.
The KeepInTouch Card high-speed modem can transmit and
receive information over a standard telephone line at 14,400 bits
per second. It is compatible with a variety of modem standards,
allowing it to communicate with slower modems. To ensure
error-free data transfers, the KeepInTouch Card modem
employs V.42 and MNP Levels 4–2 error control. To increase
effective data throughput and reduce the duration of calls, the
t
Issue 3 April 1994
1-1
modem utilizes both V.42 bis and MNP5 data compression
standards to achieve peak transmission rates up to 57,600 bps.
For fax operation, the modem supports both Class 1 and Class
2 fax standards. Class 1 fax places most of the processing
burden on the software while Class 2 fax places it on the
modem. In addition, the modem also supports the CCITT V.17
fax protocol which allows fax transfers to occur over standard
telephone lines at 14,400 bps. To take advantage of the 14,400
bps data rate, you must connect to a fax machine or fax modem
that also supports the V.17 protocol.
KeepInTouch Card modems Model 3762 and Model 3764 also
support transmission over a cellular network. These models use
the ETC (Enhanced Throughput Cellular) protocol which
improves data communications over cellular telephone
channels. For more information about cellular operation, refer to
Appendix D, Cellular Communications.
t
The Hayesr AutoSync feature is also available in selected
models of the KeepInTouch Card modem. For more information
on Hayes AutoSync, refer to the Using Hayes AutoSync section
in Chapter 2, Installation.
KeepInTouch Card Modem
Package
The following sections describe what equipment is supplied and
what equipment is required to install and operate the modem
(see Figure 1-1).
Supplied Equipment
The following hardware and software is included with the
modem:
1-2
G
One KeepInTouch Card modem
G
One user’s guide
G
(For Model 3760 and Model 3762 only:) A 2-pin modular
telephone cord.
Issue 3 April 1994
G
(For Model 3763 and Model 3764 only:) A 25-pin
modular connector attached to a 2-meter-long telephone
cord, terminated by a telephone plug which is specific to
the country in which it will be used.
The following items are optional and may not be packaged with
your modem:
G
One KeepInTouch Card Installation Utilities support
software diskette (3.5”) containing both configuration
and utility programs, and help text files which contain
instructions on how to use the utility programs as well as
detailed information on the ATt command set.
NOTE:
If your modem is included as part of your PC purchase,
then a KeepInTouch Card Installation Utilities diskette may
not ship with the modem.
G
Diskettes and user’s guides for software which allows
you to send data and fax transmissions.
G
A technical information update sheet (if necessary).
Figure 1-1. Supplied Equipment
Issue 3 April 1994
1-3
Required Equipment
The following additional hardware and software is necessary to
install and operate the modem.
G
A notebook or laptop personal computer that supports a
PCMCIA Release 2.0 socket.
G
A communications software application to allow the PC
to control the modem (if not supplied with your modem).
This type of software application will allow you to use
your modem to transfer files to and from your PC,
receive electronic mail (e-mail), dial into bulletin boards,
etc.
G
If fax operations are desired, you will also need fax
application software to control fax operation (if not
supplied with your modem).
For connection to a normal telephone line you need:
G
A telephone outlet.
For connection to a cellular telephone channel (available with
selected models only) you need:
1-4
G
A cellular telephone,
G
A Cellular Direct Connect Cable specific to your type and
model of cellular telephone. For more information about
equipment for cellular operation, refer to Appendix D,
Cellular Communications.
Issue 3 April 1994
Where to Find Additional
Information
There are help text files (also called “readme” files) available
which contain information to supplement this user’s guide. The
help text files may contain information which is more recent than
what is printed in this user’s guide. The files cover a variety of
topics, including modem installation, tutorial information, AT
command usage, and cellular operation. These help text files
are available through the following sources:
G
The files are on the Installation Utilities diskette which
may have been packaged with your modem.
G
If you did not receive an Installation Utilities diskette and
your modem was included in a PC purchase, your PC
vendor may have loaded the files from the diskette onto
the hard drive for you.
G
The help text files are also available on a Bulletin Board
System (BBS). To access the BBS, see your warranty
card for the telephone number, or contact your modem
vendor. The BBS always contains the most up-to-date
versions of the help text files.
To read the information in the help text files, you may use the
“readme” program provided on the Installation Utilities diskette
or you may use a word processing application or text editor. The
files are in ASCII format. To use the readme program provided
on the Installation Utilities diskette:
TYPE: a:\README a:filename
where a is the letter designated for your PC’s floppy
drive, and filename is the name of the help text file
you want to view, such as readme.txt.
PRESS: Enter
Issue 3 April 1994
1-5
Installation
2
KeepInTouch Card Modem
Installation Procedures
The following section describes how to install Models 3760,
3762, 3763, and 3764 of the KeepInTouch Card modem. Please
take a minute to review these procedures before installing your
modem.
Model 3760 and Model 3762 Installation
Procedures
Use Figure 2-1 and the following procedures to install
Model 3760 and Model 3762 modems.
Issue 3 April 1994
2-1
Figure 2-1. Model 3760 and Model 3762 Modem Installation
1. Locate an unused PCMCIA socket on your PC. Refer to
your PC’s user’s guide for more information about the
PCMCIA socket.
2. Hold the modem so that the product logo label is facing up,
and the 68-pin connector is facing the PCMCIA socket.
Insert the modem into the socket, pushing it all the way in so
that all 68 pins are engaged.
2-2
Issue 3 April 1994
3. Connection to a Telephone Outlet
If you intend to use regular telephone lines, use the 7-foot
cord that has the 2-pin connector and use this step. If,
however, you intend to use a cellular telephone, refer to the
Direct Connection to a Cellular Telephone section in
Appendix D, Cellular Communications.
Plug the modular cord’s 2-pin connector into the modem’s
2-pin rear edge connector. Since the 2-pin connector is not
keyed, it does not matter which way it is plugged in.
Next, plug the cord’s modular telephone plug into the
telephone jack.
4. Make sure that your modem is installed and that your
PCMCIA slot is configured for modem operation before
using a communications or fax application. Refer to the
section Configuring Your PC to Use the KeepInTouch Card
Modem later in this chapter.
Issue 3 April 1994
2-3
Model 3763 and Model 3764 Installation
Procedures
Use Figure 2-2 and the following procedures to install Model
3763 and Model 3764 modems.
Figure 2-2. Model 3763 and Model 3764 Modem Installation
1. Locate an unused PCMCIA socket on your PC. Refer to
your PC’s user’s guide for more information about the
PCMCIA socket.
2. Hold the modem so that the product logo label is facing up,
and the 68-pin connector is facing the PCMCIA socket.
Insert the modem into the socket, pushing it all the way in so
that all 68 pins are engaged. Note that PC power can be ON
or Off.
2-4
Issue 3 April 1994
3. Connection to a Telephone Outlet
If you intend to use regular telephone lines, use this step. If,
however, you intend to use a cellular telephone, refer to the
Direct Connection to a Cellular Telephone section in
Appendix D, Cellular Communications, then continue with
Step 4.
Plug the telephone line connector’s 25-pin plug (registration
label facing up) into the modem’s 25-pin rear edge
connector.
4. Insert the plug end of the telephone line connector’s modular
telephone cord into a telephone outlet.
5. Make sure that your modem is installed and that your
PCMCIA slot is configured for modem operation before
using a communications or fax application.
Configuring Your PC to Use the
KeepInTouch Card Modem
After installing the modem in your PC, you need to configure
your PC to recognize your KeepInTouch Card modem. Some
KeepInTouch Card modems are shipped with an Installation
Utilities diskette. This diskette contains a configuration
program which will check your PC and modem configuration.
NOTE:
If your modem is included as part of your PC purchase,
your PC supplier may have loaded the files from the
Installation Utilities diskette, or their own installation
utilities, onto your hard drive. If you did not receive a copy
of the diskette, check to see if the files are already on your
hard drive. Note, however, that not all PCs require
installation utilities. If you did not receive a diskette and
there are no installation utilities on your hard drive, then
your PC supplier has already configured your PC for
PCMCIA operation and you are not required to perform an
installation procedure.
Issue 3 April 1994
2-5
Perform the following steps to configure your KeepInTouch Card
modem on your PC:
1. Review the diskette’s help text files before continuing.
These files contain information on the utility programs and
will guide you through the configuration process. For more
information on viewing the help text files, see the section
Where to Find Additional Information in Chapter 1,
Introduction.
2. Run the INSTALL program by inserting the diskette into the
floppy drive and typing the following command at the DOS
prompt:
TYPE: a:\install
where a is the designated letter for your floppy
drive.
PRESS: Enter
3. Review the documentation that came with your PC to see if
your PC supports PCMCIA Card Service and Socket
Services (modem drivers).
If your PC does include these modem drivers, no further
steps are required to configure your modem — do not
proceed to Step 4. Your PC is now set up to recognize your
KeepInTouch Card modem in the PCMCIA slot.
If your PC does not include these drivers, or if you are
unsure, proceed to the next step.
t
4. Select the “Configure the KIT Card Modem” option to
invoke the CONFIG program. The CONFIG program
examines COM port availability and reconfigures the modem
and PCMCIA socket for modem operation.
Refer to the help text files on the diskette for more
information on using the CONFIG program.
Other utilities included on the diskette are the diagnostic,
upgrade, and hot insertion programs. The diagnostic program is
useful in testing the modem and isolating problems. The
upgrade program is used to update the firmware level of the
modem when new releases become available. (Note, however,
that the upgrade feature is not available for Model 3760 and
Model 3763.) Hot insertion allows you to insert or remove the
modem while the PC is powered ON (most newer PCs already
include support for this feature in their Card and Socket
2-6
Issue 3 April 1994
Services). For more information on these programs, refer to the
help text files included on the diskette.
Fax Application Software
Some KeepInTouch Card modems ship with software which will
allow you to send and receive facsimiles. Follow the installation
and operation instructions which are packaged with the fax
software.
Before installing any fax software, make sure the modem is
connected to your computer and turned ON.
Using Hayes AutoSync
Hayesr AutoSync is available in Model 3762 and Model 3764.
The Hayes AutoSync feature allows your modem to establish a
call between an asynchronous computer and a synchronous
mainframe computer. The advantage of this is that it eliminates
the need for a synchronous interface card in your PC.
To use this feature, a Hayes AutoSync communications
package, such as EXTRA!r Extended for DOSr by Attachmate,
must be used.
After using the Hayes AutoSync feature, it is recommended that
you reload your modem’s original configuration settings to avoid
possible conflicts during normal modem operation. The
procedure for reloading modem settings is discussed in
Chapter 3, Using Your Modem.
Issue 3 April 1994
2-7
3
This chapter highlights some of the basic functions and
commands necessary to operate your modem. Whether you
consider yourself a novice or an experienced user in data
communications, you may want to read through some of the
examples to become familiar with your modem’s operation.
Using AT Commands
The KeepInTouch Card modem uses AT commands and
S-Registers to control its operation and firmware configuration.
These commands are issued from your computer through your
communications software package.
Your modem is compatible with the standard Hayes AT
command set, the most common commands used throughout
the industry, and also uses what is known as an extended AT
command set: those commands unique to the KeepInTouch
Card modem. All of these commands are listed in Chapter 4, AT
Command Set and S-Registers.
Please review the following guidelines before using any AT
Commands.
G
AT commands must be entered while the modem is in
either Command mode or online Command mode.
The escape sequence (+++) is used to enter online
Command mode from Data mode. (For more
information, refer to the Operating Modes (Command
and Data) section found later in this chapter.)
G
All commands (except A/ (repeat last command) and
+++ (escape sequence)) must begin with the characters
AT and end by pressing the Enter key.
Issue 3 April 1994
3-1
G
The AT (or at) prefix (which means attention) can be
upper- or lowercase, but the modem will not recognize
mixed case prefixes (At or aT).
G
The data character format (how your data is structured)
for the AT command set must be one of the following. It
can be set using your communications software:
–
8 data bits + no parity + 1 stop bit.
–
7 data bits + parity + 1 stop bit (parity can be
odd, even, mark, or space).
G
Commands can be entered one at a time or in strings
(several commands at once – for example, AT&F5&W).
Strings can have up to 40 characters after the AT prefix.
Spaces, parentheses, and hyphens are not considered
characters.
G
Commands described in this manual with the suffix n
have several options associated with them. For example,
in the En command, E0 disables the modem’s ability to
echo characters back to your screen while E1 allows the
modem to echo characters back to the screen. If no
value is entered for the n suffix, the modem assumes a
zero (0) value (in this case, the echo function is turned
Off).
G
Valid commands are acknowledged with numeric or word
result codes (unless the result codes have been
disabled using the Q1 command). Appendix C lists all
available result codes with numeric and word
equivalents.
NOTE:
All commands supported by the KeepInTouch Card
modem are described in Chapter 4, AT Command Set and
S-Registers. For more detailed information on the AT
command set, refer to the help text file “atcmds.txt” on the
Installation Utilities diskette.
3-2
Issue 3 April 1994
Making a Call with Your
Modem
The dial command (D) is used to initiate a call. When the
modem receives this command, it goes off-hook (connects the
modem to the phone line so that a call can be made), and dials
the telephone number entered. Going off-hook is similar to
picking up a telephone’s handset.
Dial command strings contain the dial command, dial
modifiers, and the telephone number. A dial modifier tells the
modem to perform additional tasks when dialing a telephone
number.
The following can be used as dial modifiers:
T–
Touch-tone dialing. Any digit 0—9, * , # , A, B, C, or D can
be dialed as tone.
P–
Pulse dialing. Only the digits 0—9 can be dialed in Pulse
Dial mode.
- , ( ), and Space. These characters are ignored by the dial
string and can be included in the dial string to enhance
readability.
,–
Pause. Causes the modem to pause before processing the
next character in the dial string. The length of this pause is
determined by the value held in S-Register S8, the Pause
Time configuration option.
W–
Wait for dial tone. Modem waits for a second dial tone
before processing the dial string. For example, if you must
dial a 9 to reach an outside telephone line, the W modifier
delays the modem from dialing until it receives a second
dial tone for the outside line.
R–
Reverse Dial mode. Causes the originating modem to
send out an answer tone once it no longer detects
ringback. (Ringback is the ring you hear at the originating
site when making a call.) The R parameter must be the
last character in the dial string. For correct operation, at
least one ringback must be detected; therefore, the remote
modem should be placed off-hook into originate mode on
the second ring or later.
Issue 3 April 1994
3-3
@ – Quiet answer. Wait for five seconds of silence after dialing
the number. If the silence is not detected, the modem
sends a NO ANSWER result to the computer.
!–
Hook flash. This causes the modem to go on-hook for a
specific time period, then return to off-hook. The amount of
time the modem will be on-hook varies by country. Refer to
Table 4-3 in Chapter 4 for the hook flash time period for
your country.
;–
Return to Command mode. Allows AT command strings
that exceed the 40-character limit to be linked together.
This is useful when using a calling card number or an
international telephone number. Modem returns to
Command mode after dialing a number without
disconnecting the call.
A dial string example for a local call using tone dialing:
TYPE: ATDT 5551234
where D is the dial command, T is the Tone dialing
modifier, and 555-1234 is the telephone number.
PRESS: Enter
If you would like to know more about the function of the dial
command, refer to the following commands in Chapter 4: DL
(Dial Last Number), P (Pulse), T (Tone), &Z (Store Telephone
Numbers), S6 (Blind Dial Pause Time), S7 (No Answer
Time-out), and S8 (Dial Modifier Pause Time).
Disconnecting a Call
Three ways you can disconnect a call are the any-key abort
function, the H command, and DTR disconnect. The modem
will disconnect if any key on the keyboard is pressed while the
modem is dialing a call or is engaged in the handshaking
process. The handshaking process occurs when the two
modems connect, and then spend a brief period deciding how
they will transfer data, the speed of the transfer, and if error
control will be used. This is usually identified by the high-pitched
tones emitted by your modem.
3-4
Issue 3 April 1994
The any-key abort is useful if the number dialed does not
answer. Otherwise, if you do not press a key, the call will
time-out and disconnect based on the settings of other
configuration options, such as S-Register 7.
The ATH command is another method of disconnecting. Once
your call is complete, enter online Command mode and issue an
ATH command to make your modem hang up, or go on-hook.
The format and procedure for an ATH command is:
TYPE: +++
To exit Data mode and enter online Command mode
TYPE: ATH or ATH0
PRESS: Enter
The modem disconnects.
A third, and more subtle approach to hanging up a call, is to
make sure that the &D command is set to &D2 (the factory
default setting which is standard EIA RS-232 operation). This
will allow your communications software to drop the DTR signal
to the modem and force the modem to disconnect the call. This
method is often used by communications software.
Also note that your modem will automatically disconnect when
the remote modem hangs up.
If you would like to know more about disconnecting a call, refer
to the following commands in Chapter 4: +++ (escape
sequence), O (Return Online to Data Mode), X (Extended
Result Codes, Dial Tone Detect, Busy Tone Detect), Y (Long
Space Disconnect), &D (DTR Action), \N (Error Control Mode),
\T (No Data Disconnect Timer), S7 (No Answer Time-out), S10
(No Carrier Disconnect), and S85 (Fast Disconnect).
Issue 3 April 1994
3-5
Manually Answering a Call
The best way to answer a call is to set the Auto-Answer Ring
Number register (S0) to 1 or more rings. The modem is
configured at the factory to automatically answer after a
specified number of rings. The number of rings used as the
factory setting for S0 varies by country and is listed in Table 4-2
in Chapter 4. If S0 = 0, use the ATA command to manually
answer incoming calls.
The format for an ATA command is:
TYPE: ATA (after the modem rings)
PRESS: Enter
NOTE:
DTR must be present (activated by the communications
software) for the modem to answer the call.
Viewing, Selecting, and Saving
Modem Settings
Modem settings determine how the modem functions. These
settings are known as configuration options and are stored in
two permanent memory areas, User 0 and User 1.
When the modem is initially turned ON, the contents of one of
the two memory areas are retrieved into a volatile work area of
memory known as Active. If you should make changes to the
modem’s configuration and turn Off the modem without saving
those changes, then they are lost forever.
On the other hand, User 0 and User 1 are nonvolatile memory
areas that can permanently store configuration options to the
modem’s Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only
Memory (EEPROM) chip. If your modem requires a particular
configuration to work in an application, then those settings can
be created and saved to one of the two nonvolatile memory
areas.
3-6
Issue 3 April 1994
If you would like to know more about viewing, saving, and
reloading factory settings, refer to the following commands in
Chapter 4: &V (Result Codes Format), &W (Write/Save), &F
(Select Factory Default), and Z (Reset and Load Active).
Operating Modes (Command
and Data)
Before a modem goes online (establishes a successful
connection with a remote modem), it is considered to be in
Command mode, an idle state where you can modify its
operating parameters or issue modem commands. (Any
command issued is acknowledged with a response in either
words or digits. These are known as a result code and are
listed in Appendix C.)
Once the modems are online, either by answering or originating
a call, they automatically switch to Data mode. Data mode is a
state where any entries made from the computer are considered
data and are transmitted and received between modems. The
modems remain in Data mode until the connection is broken
with a disconnect or until they are forced into online Command
mode using the escape sequence (+++).
Switching Between Data Mode and
Online Command Mode Using the
Escape Sequence
The escape sequence allows you to exit Data mode and enter
online Command mode while maintaining a connection with the
remote modem. It consists of three consecutive plus (+)
characters and is only valid when the KeepInTouch Card modem
is online and in Data mode.
To enter online Command mode while in Data mode, enter the
following sequence:
TYPE: +++
The value of the escape sequence character (+++) and
the idle time required before and after an escape
sequence are determined by the S2 and S12 registers. If
you want to change these values, refer to Table 4-1 in
Chapter 4.
Issue 3 April 1994
3-7
NOTE:
The modem enters online Command mode and responds
with an OK.
To return to Data mode from online Command mode, use the O
command. Enter the following command:
TYPE: ATO
PRESS: Enter
Changing Modem Modulations
and Modem Speed
A modem modulation is a set of guidelines that determine how
the modems connect and at what speed they communicate.
Modulations, such as V.32 bis (pronounced vee-dot 32 bis),
V.32, V.22 bis, V.22, Bell 212A, V.21, Bell 103J, and V.23, have
a maximum and minimum data rate, the speeds at which data is
transferred over the telephone line. These rates are measured in
bits per second.
For example, a V.32 bis modem can operate at data rates
ranging from 14,400 bps to 4800 bps while a V.22 bis modem
operates at 2400 and 1200 bps. Normally, modems using
different modulations do not connect. However, through a
function known as automoding, the KeepInTouch Card modem
is capable of detecting and then switching to the remote
modem’s modulation assuring compatibility with a variety of
modems.
If there is ever a need to change modem modulations, use the
%B command, which is described in Chapter 4 and in the help
text file “atcmds.txt” on the Installation Utilities diskette.
3-8
Issue 3 April 1994
If you would like to know more about how the KeepInTouch Card
modem uses modem modulations and data rates, refer to the
following commands in Chapter 4: B (CCITT/Bell), S41
(Dial-Line Rate), S76 (V.32 bis Autorate for Dial-Line Operation),
and S78 (V.32 bis Automode for Dial-Line Operation).
An Overview of File Transfers
and Fax Operation
This section does not describe how to transfer and receive files
and fax messages – your communications and fax software and
their supporting documentation define this process. Its purpose
is to make you aware of the basics involved when using these
forms of communications with the KeepInTouch Card modem.
File Transfers
Two terms essential to file transfers are download and upload.
A download occurs when you want to receive a file from a host
site. An upload occurs when you want to send a file to a host
site. However, before you can do this, the following must occur:
G
Your modem and PC must be configured for modem
operation before executing your communications
software.
G
Your modem must be online with another modem.
G
You must have communications software that is
operating and in terminal mode.
G
Determine whether you want to upload or download files.
G
Verify that the character format (7 data bits, odd parity,
1 stop bit; 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit; and so on) is
the same for both the local and remote modems.
G
Select a file transfer protocol (ZMODEM, YMODEM,
XMODEM, Kermit, and so on) that is compatible with
your communications software and remote system.
Some protocols require simultaneous actions at both
ends of the link to start a transfer, while others permit
initiation of the transfer from one side only.
Issue 3 April 1994
3-9
A file transfer protocol sets up the ground rules that your modem
and the remote system will use to get files back and forth. Your
communications software manual will describe the various
protocols it supports. Your communications software will usually
walk you through the download/upload process.
Fax Operation
Fax software essentially turns your computer and modem into a
fax machine and allows you to send a file to or receive a file
from another fax modem or fax machine.
Similar to your communications software, your fax software uses
basic AT commands for functions such as dialing and answering
calls and for speaker control and adjustments. Refer to your
communication software’s user’s guide for more information on
AT command support.
Before sending or receiving a fax, verify the following:
G
Your modem and PC must be configured for modem
operation before executing your fax software.
G
You must have fax software installed on your PC. (For
the KeepInTouch Card modem, if sending or receiving a
fax, the software must be operating.)
G
Some fax software packages require the modem to have
Auto-Answer disabled (S0 = 0) to receive a fax.
G
Some fax software packages require that the modem
use software flow control (\Q) to send and receive a fax.
Refer to your fax software documentation for more on fax
operation.
Using Cellular Channels
Some models of the KeepInTouch Card modem can transfer
data over cellular communication channels. For more
information on cellular operation, refer to Appendix D, Cellular
Communications.
3-10
Issue 3 April 1994
4
AT Commands and S-Registers
This chapter provides a list of all AT commands and S-Registers
supported by the KeepInTouch Card modem. This chapter first
lists AT commands in alphabetical order followed by S-Registers
listed in numerical order. Factory settings are listed in bold.
In general, AT commands are responsible for instructing the
modem to do a task, while S-Registers are responsible for
determining how the AT command will perform that task. You
issue these commands to your modem via your communications
software. When a modem receives a command, it responds with
a message, known as a result code, that displays on your
monitor. Result codes are described in Appendix C.
For a brief overview of command guidelines, refer to the Using
AT Commands section in Chapter 3, Using Your Modem. For
more detailed information on the commands, refer to the help
text file “atcmds.txt” on the Installation Utilities diskette.
The AT commands and S-Registers supported by the
KeepInTouch Card modem are listed in Table 4-1. The
acceptable values for some AT commands and S-Registers
depend on the country in which your are operating your modem.
For those AT Commands and S-Registers, you will be referred
to Table 4-2 for the acceptable values for your country. Table 4-3
also provides command usage information which varies by
country.
Issue 3 April 1994
4-1
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (1 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
+++
Escape sequence
The escape sequence allows the modem to exit Data
mode and enter online Command mode.
A/
Repeat last command
Do not precede this command with an AT prefix or
conclude it by pressing the Enter key.
A
The Answer command allows the modem to go
off-hook and attempt to answer an incoming call.
Bn
CCITT/Bell Mode
This command selects whether the modem uses the
CCITT V.21 and V.22 protocols or the Bell 103J and
212A protocols for operation at 300 or
1200 bps. It also determines whether it receives at 75
bps and transmits at 1200 bps or transmits at
75 bps and receives at 1200 bps when using
CCITT V.23 protocol. This command is used in
conjunction with the S41 register settings 7—13.
B0
V.21 or V.22 protocol
B1
Bell 103 or Bell212A protocol
B2
V.23 protocol (75 bps/1200 bps)
B3
V.23 protocol (1200bps/75 bps)
NOTE: For B2 and B3, both modems must be
configured for the same mode of operation.
4-2
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (2 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
C
Automatic Cellular Setup
When this feature is enabled, the modem will
automatically configure itself for cellular operation
when it detects a direct connection to a cellular
telephone. Refer to Appendix D, Cellular
Communications, for more information on this
command.
NOTE: This command is not supported in Model 3760
and Model 3763, as these models do not support
cellular operation.
C0 Enables automatic cellular setup
C1 Disables automatic cellular setup
Dn
Dial
This command allows the modem to begin the dialing
sequence of the dial string n (modifiers and telephone
number).
DL
Dial Last Number
This command redials the last telephone number
dialed. For this command to work properly, at least one
valid ATD command must have been issued since the
modem was turned ON.
DS=n
Dial telephone number stored in directory location n.
En
Command Character Echo
This command controls whether or not the characters
you enter from your computer’s keyboard are echoed
back to your monitor when the modem is in Command
mode.
E0
Disables echo
E1
Enables echo
Issue 3 April 1994
4-3
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (3 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
Hn
Hook
This command lets the modem go on-hook to
disconnect a call or off-hook to busy out the telephone
line.
H or H0
The modem goes on-hook.
H1
The modem goes off-hook.
In
Identification
This command displays specific information about your
modem.
I0
Displays product code – 144
I1
Displays firmware revision number (three digits
only, see I19 for full display)
I2
Performs an EEPROM check
I3
Displays serial number
I4
Displays alphanumeric modem number
I5
Displays circuit card part number
I6
Displays software part number
I9
Displays firmware revision number
I10
Allows the value of I0 to be changed to
144 (I10=0), 240 (I10=1), 480 ( I10=2),
960 ( I10=3), or 120 (I10=4)
I11
Displays a ROM checksum in a hexadecimal
format
I17
Displays last fatal error recorded
I19
Displays the entire firmware revision number
Ln
4-4
Speaker Volume
The modem cannot adjust the volume of the PC’s
speaker. Therefore, this command has no effect.
However, if this command is issued, the modem
responds with an OK.
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (4 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
Mn
Speaker On/Off Control
M0
Speaker always Off.
M1
Speaker ON until carrier signal becomes
active.
M2
Speaker always ON.
O
Return Online to Data Mode
This command allows you to exit Online Command
mode and return to Data mode.
P
Pulse Dial (Used with rotary telephone lines)
This command configures the modem for Pulse
dialing. To disable Pulse dialing, issue the T (tone dial)
command.
Qn
Result Codes
Q0
Enables result codes
Q1
Disables result codes
Q2
Enable in Originate mode
Sn=r
Change S-Register
n = S-Register
r = new value of S-Register (0 to 255)
Sn?
View S-Register
n = S-Register
T
Tone Dial (default dialing method)
This command configures the modem for touch-tone
dialing.
Issue 3 April 1994
4-5
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (5 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
Vn
Result Codes Format
This command controls whether or not result codes
appear as words or as numeric codes.
V0
Displays as digits (Numbers 1)
V1
Displays as text
V2
Displays as digits (Numbers 2)
Xn
(continued
on next
page)
Extended Result Codes, Dial Tone Detect, Busy Tone
Detect
This command controls three different configuration
options.
Extended Result Codes allow additional information to
be displayed with the result code.
Dial Tone Detect, if enabled, causes the modem to
wait (up to 10 seconds) for a dial tone before dialing. If
disabled (also known as blind dialing), the modem
dials the call regardless of dial tone detection.
NOTE: Blind Dialing is not supported in some
countries outside of North America. Therefore, dial
tone detection cannot be disabled in those countries.
See Table 4-3 for more information.
Busy Tone Detect, if enabled, sets the modem to
monitor for a busy tone. If disabled, the modem
ignores busy tones.
4-6
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (6 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
Xn
Extended Result Codes, Dial Tone Detect, Busy Tone
(continued Detect
from
X0
Disables extended result codes 5 –16, dial tone
previous
detect, and busy tone detect. See above note
page)
concerning blind dialing.
X1
Enables extended result codes 5 –16, disables
dial tone detect and busy tone detect. See
above note concerning blind dialing.
X2
Enables extended result codes 5 –16 and dial
tone detect, disables busy tone detect.
X3
Enables extended result codes 5 –16, disables
dial tone detect, enables busy tone detect.
See above note concerning blind dialing.
X4
Enables extended result codes 5 –16, dial
tone detect, and busy tone detect.
X5
Adds error control suffix (REL) to extended
result codes 20 –27 if error control is used,
enables dial tone detect and busy tone detect.
X6
Adds either V.42 or MNP suffix to extended
result codes 20 –27 if data compression is used,
enabled dial tone detect and busy tone detect.
X7
Computer’s data rate appears in the Connect
message instead of the telephone line data rate,
enables dial tone detect and busy tone detect.
Issue 3 April 1994
4-7
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (7 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
Yn
Long Space Disconnect
This command determines the modem’s response to a
continuous spacing condition sent from the remote
modem when it is online.
Y0
Disable
Y1
Enable
Zn
Reset and Load Active
This command loads the settings of either the User 0
or User 1 permanent storage area into the Active
memory locations.
Z0
Loads User 0 configuration options into
Active.
Z1
Loads User 1 configuration options into
Active.
Z or Z3 Performs a reset and loads storage area
specified by &Y into Active.
&Cn
CD Control
This command controls the Carrier Detect signal.
&C0
Forced On
&C1
Follows standard RS232 operation
&C2
Wink when disconnected
&C3
Follows DTR
&C4
Simulated Control Carrier
&C5
Disconnects when DTR turns Off
4-8
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (8 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
&Dn
DTR Action
This command controls what actions are taken by the
modem based upon the Data Terminal Ready signal.
&D0 Ignore true status, treat as always ON.
&D1 Places modem into Online Command mode (the
call is not disconnected) when the DTR signal
turns Off. An ATO returns the modem to Online
mode.
&D2 Follows standard RS232 operation. When
DTR turns Off, the modem disconnects.
&D3 Reloads the contents of User 0 (ATY0) or
User 1 (ATY1) into the Active memory area
when DTR turns Off. This is similar to the ATZ
command (ATZ=ATZ3), but does not perform a
complete power reset.
&D4 NOTE: This is used in specialized applications
and is not required by the typical user.
The local modem does not disconnect from the call
until the local computer turns DTR Off regardless of
how the remote modem disconnects the call. See S25
for more information.
Issue 3 April 1994
4-9
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (9 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
&Fn
Select Factory Default and ETC Configuration Options
This command reloads the factory configuration
options into the Active memory area and enables the
ETC (Enhanced Throughput Cellular) protocol in your
modem. Refer to Appendix D, Cellular
Communications, for more information on this
command.
&F0 Loads factory configuration options into Active
memory.
&F5 Loads the ETC protocol. Use this setting when
the modem is attached to a cellular telephone
through an RJ11 adapter box. Not supported by
Model 3760 and Model 3763, as these models
do not support cellular operation.
&F6 Loads the ETC protocol. Use this setting when
the modem is connected directly to a normal
telephone line, but communicates with remote
modems that are attached to either a PSTN or
a cellular telephone. Not supported by Model
3760 and Model 3763, as these models do not
support cellular operation.
&Gn
V.22 bis Guard Tone
This command determines whether the V.22 bis guard
tone is disabled, set to 550 Hz, or set to 1800 Hz.
This option is not used in North America but is
mandatory in some countries outside of North
America. See Table 4-3 for more information.
&G0 Disable
&G1 550 Hz
&G2 1800 Hz
4-10
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (10 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
&In
Transmit Level
This command sets the power level the modem uses
to transmit data over dial lines. The transmit output
level can range from –10 dBm to –25 dBm. Note that
values below –25 dBm are for future use.
NOTE: The transmit level cannot be changed in some
countries outside of North America. See
Table 4-3 for more information.
The default setting is Permissive (–9 dBm).
&J0
Transmit Level
This command sets the modem transmit level to the
maximum value in Permissive mode (–10 dBm).
NOTE: The transmit level cannot be changed in some
countries outside of North America. See
Table 4-3 for more information.
&J0
&Mn,
&Qn
Async/Sync Mode and Computer Dialer Type
These commands both set the modem for either
asynchronous or synchronous operation and select the
type of dialing method the modem uses, either AT
commands or DTR dialing. Both the &M0 and &Q0
commands perform the same function.
&M0 or &Q0 Enables asynchronous operation
with AT command protocol dialing.
&Q4
Enables Hayes Autosync mode.
Not available in Model 3760 and
Model 3763.
Issue 3 April 1994
4-11
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (11 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
&Rn
RTS Action
This command controls how the modem responds to
the Ready-to-Send (RTS) signal input from the
computer.
&R0 Follows standard RS-232 operation
&R1 Ignore
&R2 Simulated Control Carrier
&Sn
DSR Control
This command controls the Data Set Ready (DSR)
signal output from the modem.
&S0 Forced ON
&S1 Follows standard RS-232 operation
&S2 Wink when disconnected
&S3 Follows DTR
&S4 ON Early
&S5 Delay until Data mode is entered
4-12
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (12 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
&Tn
Tests
The &T command allows you to perform diagnostic
tests on your modem. The modem must be configured
for Direct mode (\N1) before a test is started.(Note that
commands &T1, &T6, &T7, and &T8 can also be
performed in Buffer mode (\N0).) The test invoked by
commands &T1–&T8 run until the &T0 command
(Abort) is issued.
&T0 Stops any test in progress and displays results.
&T1 Local Analog Loopback test.
&T2 Pattern test.
&T3 Local Digital Loopback test.
&T4 Accepts Remote Digital Loopback test request.
&T5 Denies Remote Digital Loopback test request.
&T6 Remote Digital Loopback test.
&T7 Remote Digital Loop back test with Pattern.
&T8 Local Analog Loopback test with Pattern.
&T9 Self-test.
Issue 3 April 1994
4-13
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (13 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
&Vn
View Configuration Options and Phone Directory
&V0 Displays current configuration options in Active
memory.
&V1 Displays configuration options stored in memory
area specified by &Y command.
&V2 Displays configuration options stored in
User 0.
&V3 Displays configuration options stored in
User 1.
&V4 Displays telephone numbers stored in directory
locations 1 and 2.
&V8 Displays modem status information for
troubleshooting.
&V1n Displays a continuous scroll of the View
command. (n = 0 for &V0, 1 for &V1, 2 for &V2,
3 for &V3, and 4 for &V4.)
&Wn
Write (Save) Changes to Memory
This command allows you to save modem settings to
one of two memory locations, User 0 or User 1.
&W0 Saves current configuration options to
User 0.
&W1 Saves current configuration options to
User 1.
&Xn
Transmit Clock Source
This command is not supported by the modem. OK
appears if the command is issued.
4-14
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (14 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
&Yn
Load Configuration Options on Power-Up
This command determines which set of configuration
options are loaded into Active memory when a modem
power-up occurs.
&Y0 Loads configuration options from User 0.
&Y1 Loads configuration options from User 1.
&Zn=x
Store Telephone Numbers
Stores telephone number n into directory x
(1 and 2).
\An
Maximum Frame Size
This command determines the maximum frame (or
block) size used for V.42 or MNP 4–2 error control
operation. For example, if the telephone connection is
poor, this allows you to adjust the data’s block size and
possibly improve the modem’s performance. Note that
for V.42 operation, the modem has a maximum size of
128 characters.
\A0 64 characters per frame
\A1 128 characters per frame
\A2 192 characters per frame
\A3 256 characters per frame
\A4 32 characters per frame
\A5 16 characters per frame
Issue 3 April 1994
4-15
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (15 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
\Cn
Error Control Negotiate Buffer
This command will control whether or not the modem
buffers (saves into a temporary waiting area) the data
that it received from the remote modem during an
interval in which the modem attempts to establish a
connection using V.42 or MNP error control. Online
changes to this option do not take effect until a
disconnect occurs.
\C0 Disable
\C1 Enable
\C2 Disable and Switch
\Dn
CTS Control
This command controls the Clear-to-Send (CTS)
signal sent to the computer.
\D0 Forced ON.
\D1 Follows standard RS-232 operation.
\D2 Wink when disconnected.
\D3 Follows state of DTR signal.
\Gn
Modem-to-Modem Flow Control
This command controls XON/XOFF flow control.
\G0 Disables
\G1 Enables
4-16
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (16 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
\Kn
Break Buffer Control, Send Break Control, Break
Forces Escape
This command controls three different configuration
options.
Break Buffer Control determines if data stored in the
modem’s buffer is saved or discarded when the
computer issues a break sequence.
Send Break Control determines what is sent from the
modem first, data or a break, in the event that a break
sequence is sent from the computer.
Break Forces Escape determines whether or not the
modem should enter Command mode when it receives
a break sequence from the computer.
\K0 Discards data, sends break before data, and
enables break forces escape.
\K1 Discards data, sends break before data, and
disables break forces escape.
\K2 Keeps data, sends break before data, and
enables break forces escape.
\K3 Keeps data, sends break before data, and
disables break forces escape.
\K4 Keeps data, sends data before break, and
enables break forces escape.
\K5 Keeps data, sends data before break, and
disables break forces escape.
Issue 3 April 1994
4-17
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (17 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
\Nn
Error Control Mode
This command determines the type of error control
used by the modem.
\N0 Buffer mode
\N1 Direct mode
\N2 MNP or disconnect
\N3 MNP or buffer
\N4 LAPM or disconnect
\N5 LAPM or buffer
\N6 V.42/MNP or disconnect
\N7 V.42/MNP or buffer
\Qn
Flow Control of Computer and Modem
This command controls two different configuration
options. Flow Control of Computer determines how the
modem controls the flow of data from the computer.
Flow Control of Modem determines how the computer
controls the flow of data from the modem.
Flow Control of Computer
\Q0, \Q5, \Q6 Disable
\Q1, \Q4
XON/XOFF
\Q2, \Q3
CTS to computer
Flow Control of Modem
\Q0, \Q2,\Q4 Disable
\Q1, \Q5
XON/XOFF
\Q3, \Q6
RTS to modem
4-18
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (18 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
\Tn
No Data Disconnect Timer
This command forces the modem to disconnect if no
data is transmitted or received within a specified time
period.
\T0
Disable
\Tn
Sets the No Data Disconnect Timer to value n,
which varies by country. See Table 4-2 for
acceptable values.
\Xn
XON/XOFF Passthrough Flow Control
This command controls whether or not the modem
passes XON/XOFF characters from the locally
attached computer through to the remote modem.
\X0 Disable (do not pass XON/XOFF)
\X1 Enable
%An
Error Control Fallback
This command allows you to change the ASCII value
of the error control fallback character n to an ASCII
value from 0 to 127. The factory default is 13, an
ASCII carriage return.
%Bn
Modulation/Data Rate
This command sets the modem’s modulation and
maximum data rate.
%B300
V.21 or Bell 103 – max rate 300 bps
%B1200
V.22, V.23, or Bell 212A –
max rate 1200 bps
%B2400
V.22 bis – max rate 2400 bps
%B4800
V.32 bis/V.32 – max rate 4800 bps
%B7200
V.32 bis – max rate 7200 bps
%B9600
V.32 bis/V.32 – max rate 9600 bps
%B12000 V.32 bis – max rate 12,000 bps
%B14400 V.32 bis – max rate 14,400 bps
Issue 3 April 1994
4-19
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (19 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
%Cn
V.42 bis and MNP 5 Data Compression
This command enables or disables the use of
V.42 bis and MNP Level 5 data compression. Online
changes do not take effect until a disconnect occurs.
%C0 Disable
%C1 Enable
%Rn
Disable Autobaud and Set DTE Rate
This command enables or disables the autobaud
function and sets the data rate for the DTE interface.
The changes made by this command are volatile and
cannot be saved. When the modem is reset, autobaud
is once again enabled.
%R
Enable autobaud
%R300
Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 300
%R600
Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 600
%R1200 Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 1200
%R2400 Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 2400
%R4800 Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 4800
%R9600 Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 9600
%R12000 Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 12000
%R14400 Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 14400
%R19200 Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 19200
%R38400 Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 38400
%R57600 Disables autobaud, sets DTE rate to 57600
4-20
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (20 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
S0=n
Auto-Answer Ring Number
This register determines the number of rings the
modem will count before automatically answering a
call.
Acceptable ring counts vary by country and are listed
in Table 4-2.
A ring count of 0 will disable the auto answer feature.
S2=n
AT Escape Character
This register determines the ASCII value used for an
escape sequence (+++).
Accepts an ASCII value from 0 to 127.
Factory setting is 43, an ASCII + character.
S3=n
Carriage Return Character
This register determines the ASCII value used as the
carriage return (Enter key).
Accepts an ASCII value from 0 to127.
Factory setting is 13, an ASCII carriage return.
S4=n
Line Feed Character
This register determines the ASCII value used as the
line feed character.
Accepts an ASCII value from 0 to 127.
Factory setting is 10, an ASCII line feed character.
S5=n
Backspace Character
This register determines the ASCII value used as the
backspace (Backspace key).
Accepts an ASCII value from 0 to 127.
Factory setting is 08, an ASCII backspace character.
Issue 3 April 1994
4-21
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (21 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
S6=n
Blind Dial Pause Time
This register determines how long (in seconds) the
modem waits, after going off-hook, before dialing a
telephone number when the Dial Tone Detect
configuration option (X command) is disabled.
NOTE: Blind dialing is not allowed in some countries
outside of North America. Therefore, this command
has no effect in those countries. See Table 4-3 for
more information.
Acceptable values vary by country and are listed in
Table 4-2.
S7=n
No Answer Time-out
This register determines how long (in seconds) an
originating modem waits before abandoning a call
when no answer tone is received.
Acceptable values vary by country and are listed in
Table 4-2.
S8=n
“,” Pause Time for the Dial Modifier
This register determines how long (in seconds) the
modem pauses when it encounters a comma (,) in the
Dial command string.
Accepts a value from 0 to 255 seconds.
Factory setting is 2 seconds.
S10=n
No Carrier Disconnect
This register determines how long (in tenths of
seconds) the modem allows the carrier signal to be Off
before disconnecting the call.
The time period may be a entered in 0.1 second
increments. Acceptable values vary by country and are
listed in Table 4-2.
In those countries which allow a value of 255, the 255
value disables this feature.
4-22
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (22 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
S11=n
DTMF Tone Timer (ON)
This register controls the length of the DTMF (touch
tone) ON time.
Acceptable values vary by country and are listed in
Table 4-2.
If you enter a value lower than the minimum
acceptable value, that minimum value will be used.
S12=n
Escape Guard Time
This register sets the value (in 20-millisecond
increments) for the required pause before and after the
escape sequence (+++) is issued.
Accepts a value from 0 to 255 in 20 millisecond
increments.
Factory setting is 50 (1 second/1000 msec).
S13=n
DTMF Tone Timer (Off)
This register controls the length of the DTMF (touch
tone) Off time, or interdigit delay.
Acceptable values vary by country and are listed in
Table 4-2.
If you enter a value lower than the minimum
acceptable value, that minimum value will be used.
S18=n
Test Time-out
This register sets the duration (in seconds) for any
modem test issued by the &T command.
0 = Disable
Accepts a value from 1 to 255 seconds.
Factory setting is 0 seconds.
Issue 3 April 1994
4-23
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (23 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
S25=n
DTR Detection
This register determines how much time elapses
between the modem detecting the loss of DTR and the
modem responding to the loss of DTR. This setting is
used to determine the DTR delay required by the &D4
command.
Accepts a value of 0 for Disable, or from 1 to 254 (in
0.1 second increments), or 255 for infinite delay.
S26=n
RTS-to-CTS Delay
This register sets the length of time (in 10-millisecond
increments) the modem waits after receiving the RTS
signal before issuing the CTS signal to the computer.
Accepts a value from 0 to 255 in 10 millisecond
increments. Factory setting is 0 milliseconds.
S41=n
Dial-Line Rate
This register determines which modem protocol, along
with its highest data rate, the modem uses for
operation on dial lines. Online changes do not take
effect until a disconnect occurs.
Also refer to the B command for related information.
Accepts the following values:
0, 1 = 14,400 (V.32 bis)
2 = 12,000 (V.32 bis)
3 = 9600 (V.32 bis/V.32)
4 = 7200 (V.32 bis)
5 = 4800 (V.32 bis/V.32)
6 = 2400 (V.22 bis)
7 = 1200 (V.22)
8 = 1200 (212A)
10 = 0-300 (V.21)
11 = 0-300 (103J)
12 = 1200/75 (V.23)
13 = 75/1200(V.23)
4-24
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (24 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
S43=n
V.32 bis Train
This register determines whether minimum or
maximum time durations are used during the V.32
bis/V.32 handshaking sequence for dial-line
applications.
0 = Long
1 = Short
S49=n
Buffer Disconnect Delay
This register determines how long (in seconds) the
modem continues attempting to transmit data stored in
its buffers after the modem is commanded to
disconnect by a locally attached computer. This also
applies to the modem’s receiving buffers when it is
commanded to disconnect from a remote modem or
computer.
0 = Disable
Accepts a value from 0 to 255 seconds.
Factory setting is 10 seconds.
S76=n
V.32 bis Autorate for Dial-Line Operation
This register determines if the Autorate function is
used on dial lines when connected in V.32 bis mode.
Autorate allows the modem to adjust line speed due to
noise.
0 = Enable
1 = Disable
2 = Start at 4800
3 = Start at 9600
Issue 3 April 1994
4-25
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (25 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
S78=n
V.32 bis Automode for Dial-Line Operation
If enabled, automode permits the modem to
automatically connect to a remote modem using any
supported modulation scheme. If disabled, the modem
only supports the modulation scheme selected by the
S41 register (Dial-Line Rate).
0 = Enable
1 = Disable
S79=n
V.17 Fax Disable
This register allows you to enable or disable V.17 fax
(14,400 bps) functionality in your modem. This is
necessary if your PC fax application does not correctly
support V.17 operation.
0 = Enable
1 = Disable
S84=n
AT Command Mode
This register determines how the modem responds to
valid and invalid AT commands.
0 = Normal
1 = No_Error
2 = No_Strap_or_Error
CAUTION: If the modem is set for No_Strap_or_Error,
you must use the S84 register (ATS84=0) in order to
restore the modem to normal operation.
4-26
Issue 3 April 1994
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (26 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
S85=n
Fast Disconnect
This command controls when the modem disconnects
after receiving a disconnect command from the locally
attached computer. If enabled, the modem goes
on-hook immediately. If disabled, the modem issues a
cleardown sequence and, if so configured, a long
space prior to disconnecting.
0 = Disable
1 = Enable
S89=n
V.42 ARQ Window Size Increase
This register allows the V.42 ARQ Window Size to be
set from 6 frames to 15 frames. This register is only
valid when using V.42 bis data compression or V.42
error control.
0 = 6 frames (factory setting)
1 = 7 frames
2 = 8 frames
3 = 9 frames
4 = 10 frames
5 = 11 frames
6 = 12 frames
7 = 13 frames
8 = 14 frames
9 = 15 frames
NOTE: Values greater than 9 (15 frames) default
to 9.
Issue 3 April 1994
4-27
Table 4-1. AT Command and S-Register Reference (27 of 27)
AT
Command
Description
or
S-Register
S90=n
DTE Rate = VF Rate
This register forces the computer’s (DTE) data rate to
be equal to the VF (telephone line) data rate. This
register is not valid if the modem is configured for
Direct mode (\N1).
0 = Disable
1 = Enable
S91=n
Cellular Enhancements
This is part of the ETC protocol.
NOTE: This command is not supported in
Model 3760 and Model 3763, as these
models do not support cellular operation.
0 = Disable
1 = Enable
4-28
Issue 3 April 1994
Country Specific Information
The acceptable values for some AT commands and S-Registers
depends on the country in which you are operating your modem.
Table 4-2 contains information on the values to be used for
those commands and S-Registers when operating your modem
in the United States, Canada, and United Kingdom. Table 4-3
contains information on other features which are country
dependent.
Table 4-2. Country Specific AT Command and S-Register Values
United States
and Canada
United Kingdom
\Tn
1–255 min.
n.a.
1–255 min.
n.a.
S0=n
0–255 rings
1 ring
0–255 rings
1 ring
S6=n
2–255 sec
2 sec.
4–7 sec
4 sec.
S7=n
1–255 sec
45 sec.
59 sec.
59 sec.
S10=n
1–255 (tenths 2 sec.
of seconds)
1–255 (tenths 2 sec.
of seconds)
S11=n
50–255 ms
70 ms
80 ms
80 ms
S13=n
50–255 ms
70 ms
80 ms
80 ms
Issue 3 April 1994
4-29
Table 4-3. Other Country-Specific Information
United States
and Canada
United
Kingdom
! Hook Flash dial modifier time period
0.5 seconds
80 ms
Can transmit level be changed?
(see &I, &J0)
Yes
No
Transmit Levels (Permissive)
–9 dBm
–10 dBm
Is Blind dialing supported? (see X, S6)
Yes
Yes
Is Guard Tone mandatory? (see &G)
No
Yes
4-30
Issue 3 April 1994
Troubleshooting
A
This appendix points out basic problems that can occur when
operating a KeepInTouch Card modem. It begins with simple
actions and progresses to more detailed reasons as to why your
modem may not operate. Use the hints provided in
Tables A-1 through A-5 to troubleshoot problems you may
encounter.
Your modem may have been shipped with an Installation Utilities
diskette. If you have this diskette, there is a diagnostics program
which may assist you in troubleshooting problems with your
modem. Refer to the help text files on the diskette for more
information on using the diagnostics program.
NOTE:
If your modem is included as part of your PC purchase,
your PC supplier may have loaded the files from the
utilities diskette onto your hard drive. If you did not receive
a copy of the diskette, check to see if the files are already
on your hard drive. Note, however, that not all PC
suppliers provide this diskette or files on the hard drive.
You may have access to a Bulletin Board System (BBS) if there
is a BBS telephone number on your warranty card. You may use
the BBS to view the most recent help text files, and to obtain the
latest releases of the utilities programs.
If you are experiencing problems while configuring your modem
to use it for the first time, use the Install program on the utilities
diskette to evaluate how the modem has been configured on
your PC.
If you have successfully used the modem in your PC on
previous occasions and are now having trouble, use the
Diagnostic program to check for modem hardware problems.
Issue 3 April 1994
A-1
If you suspect that the firmware on your modem has been
corrupted, you may want to use the Upgrade program. The
Upgrade program will install new firmware into your modem from
the Bulletin Board System. NOTE: Model 3760 and Model 3763
modems are not upgradeable.
Table A-1. Modem Health
Symptom
Action
Modem does
not respond
Make sure the modem is properly seated in the
PCMCIA slot.
Make sure the modem is not in Low-Power
(Sleep) mode.
Make sure the PC is PCMCIA compliant.
Make sure the PC is turned ON.
A-2
Issue 3 April 1994
Table A-2 isolates problems to the connection between your
modem and computer. It focuses on the modem not accepting
AT commands from the computer.
Table A-2. Modem — Computer Connection
Symptom
Action
Modem does
not accept or
echo back AT
commands
Verify that the Configuration Program has
configured the modem for the correct
communications port. Refer to Chapter 2,
Installation.
Make sure that the communications software
has the correct COM port selected.
Make sure that all AT commands are terminated
with a carriage return.
Use your communications software to verify:
G that the computer has a valid character
format. Valid format consists of 8 data bits
with no parity or 7 data bits with even, odd,
mark or space parity.
G that the computer’s nominal data rate
(57,600 bps–300 bps) is supported by the
modem.
Issue the ATE1 command to make sure that
characters can be echoed back to your monitor.
An OK response should appear. Then, enter an
AT and carriage return to make sure characters
display to your monitor.
Issue 3 April 1994
A-3
Table A-3 provides solutions to problems that can occur when
your modem tries to answer or originate a call.
Table A-3. Modem — Telephone Line Connection (1 of 5)
Action
Symptom
CONNECTION PROBLEMS —
Dial Environments in Answer mode
Modem does
not go off-hook
and answer an
incoming call
Make sure the modem and PCMCIA socket are
configured for modem operation.
Make sure the telephone cord is connected to
the telephone line connector.
Make sure the telephone line connector is
properly connected to the modem.
Attach a standard telephone to the wall
telephone outlet and verify that it rings during
incoming calls.
Verify that the Auto-Answer Ring Count
configuration option (S-Register 0) is set to a
value other than 0 (disable).
Verify that the computer is providing DTR to the
modem. Set the modem’s &D command (DTR
Action configuration option) to Ignore (&D0).
A-4
Issue 3 April 1994
Table A-3. Modem — Telephone Line Connection (2 of 5)
Action
Symptom
CONNECTION PROBLEMS —
Dial Environments in Answer mode
Modem goes
off-hook,
answers, but
does not
connect
Verify that the modem is optioned for Automode
enable (S78=0). Verify that the originating
modem supports your modem’s modulation
schemes. The modem recognizes CCITT V.32
bis, V.32, V.22 bis, V.22, V.21, Bell 212A, Bell
103J, and V.23. Note that the modem does not
support other vendors’ proprietary modulation
schemes.
Determine the originating modem’s modulation
scheme, and then use the S41 register to force
your modem to operate at the same modulation
scheme as the originating modem.
Perform a Local Analog Loopback test (&T1)
and verify that data entered at the computer is
echoed back to the computer.
Issue 3 April 1994
A-5
Table A-3. Modem — Telephone Line Connection (3 of 5)
Action
Symptom
CONNECTION PROBLEMS —
Dial Environments in Originate mode
Modem does
not go off-hook
and begin
dialing
Make sure the modem and PCMCIA socket are
configured for modem operation.
Make sure the telephone line connector is connected to the modem. Make sure you are using
a supported telephone line connector.
If using AT Dialing, refer to the Table A-2,
Modem — Computer Connection.
If using DTR Dialing, verify that the telephone
number stored in directory location 1 is correct,
and verify that the computer is raising DTR from
Off to ON to initiate a dial.
If the modem does not break dial tone, check
the settings of S11 and S13.
Refer to the Making a Call with Your Modem
section in Chapter 3, Using Your Modem, to
verify that you are using the proper command
format.
A-6
Issue 3 April 1994
Table A-3. Modem — Telephone Line Connection (4 of 5)
Action
S
Symptom
CONNECTION PROBLEMS —
Dial Environments in Originate mode
Modem dials
but does not
connect
If the modem is operating behind a PBX,
determine if a 9 and comma are needed before
the telephone number.
Verify whether Tone or Pulse dialing is needed.
Verify if one modem is configured for error
control/disconnect (\N2, \N4, \N6, \N7) and the
other modem is configured for no error control.
Try calling in Buffer mode (\N0).
If both modems use V.32 bis or V.32
modulation, set the modem’s V.32 bis Train
configuration option (S-Register 43) to Long (0).
Intermittent
disconnects,
high error rates,
or excessive
retransmissions
Use the &T7 command to perform a remote
digital loopback test with pattern test.
Perform a self-test using the AT&T9 command.
Perform a local analog loopback with a Pattern
test.
If the modem passes the above tests and a
problem still exists, then the problem is likely not
with your modem.
High error rates
occur when
running a local
loopback or
self-test
Incoming rings can cause data errors during a
loopback test. Abort the test, disconnect the
modular telephone cord, and restart the test.
Issue 3 April 1994
A-7
Table A-3. Modem — Telephone Line Connection (5 of 5)
Action
Symptom
CONNECTION PROBLEMS —
Dial Environments in Originate mode
Modem does
not receive a
dial tone and
sends a NO
DIALTONE
message to
your computer
Make sure the telephone cord is connected to
the telephone line connector.
Modem
establishes and
disconnects a
call
You may have a poor telephone line connection.
Try dialing again.
Attach a telephone directly to the wall outlet to
verify that a dial tone exists.
Disable the Dial Tone Detect configuration
option (X0, X1, and X3) and dial the telephone
number. This will force the modem to dial
without detecting a dial tone on the telephone
line. This type of dialing is known as Blind
Dialing. NOTE: Blind Dialing is not supported in
some countries outside of North America. Refer
to Table 4-3 in Chapter 4 for more information.
The remote modem may have encountered an
error control disconnect, where the modem is
configured to establish a call using error
correction. If the modems cannot negotiate error
control, then a disconnect occurs.
Your telephone may have Call Waiting enabled.
Refer to your local phone book for procedures to
disable this feature.
Perform a Local Analog Loopback (&T1) test to
check the modem’s hardware operation.
A-8
Issue 3 April 1994
If the modems are having trouble passing data after connecting,
Table A-4 lists several recommendations and solutions to this
problem.
Table A-4. Online Operation
Symptom
Action
Data is
scrambled
Use your communications software to verify that
the character format (data bits, parity, and stop
bits) is set to the same value in both modems.
Missing data
Verify that you are using the same method of
during a transfer flow control for both the modem and the
computer.
If using XON/XOFF flow control, verify that the
modem’s parity matches the computer’s parity.
The KeepInTouch Card modem contains a
16550A compatible UART which is useful for
high-speed data transfers. Make sure that your
communications software supports a 16550A
UART and high data rates.
Garbage
characters
appear on your
monitor when
your modem
connects to
another modem
Your modem is not using error control, and the
other modem is using error control. The garbage
characters are part of the error control
handshaking sequence.
Modem hangs
up, but does not
indicate a hang
up
Make sure that the &D2 command (Standard
RS-232 operation) is set.
Make sure that the &C1 command is set so that
when the CD signal turns Off, the modem hangs
up.
Issue 3 April 1994
A-9
Table A-5 focuses on problems you may experience during fax
operation.
Table A-5. Fax Operation
Symptom
Action
Modem cannot
send or receive
a fax
Make sure the modem and PCMCIA socket are
configured for modem operation.
Disable V.17 fax by using the S79 command.
Refer to the Fax Operation section of Chapter 3
or your fax application software user’s guide for
more information.
A-10
Issue 3 April 1994
B
Table B-1 lists technical specifications for the KeepInTouch
Card modem.
Table B-1. Technical Specifications (1 of 3)
Specifications
APPROVALS
Model 3760
FCC Part 15
FCC Part 68
REN
DOC CS-03
Description
See modem label for certification number
See modem label for registration number
0.4B
See modem label for certification number
Listed to UL 1950
Certified to CSA C22.2 No. 950
UL
CSA
Model 3762
FCC Part 15
FCC Part 68
REN
DOC CS-03
See modem label for certification number
See modem label for registration number
0.4B
See modem label for certification number
Listed to UL 1950
Certified to CSA C22.2 No. 950
UL
CSA
Issue 3 April 1994
B-1
Table B-1. Technical Specifications (2 of 3)
APPROVALS (cont.)
Model 3763
This product is intended for use only
outside of North America. For approvals,
refer to information printed on the
modular telephone connector.
Model 3764
This product is intended for use only
outside of North America. For approvals,
refer to information printed on the
modular telephone connector.
COMPATIBILITY
Dial-Line Modulations
CCITT V.32 bis (14,400, 12,000, 9600,
7200, 4800 bps)
CCITT V.32 (9600, 4800 bps)
CCITT V.22 bis (2400 bps)
CCITT V.22 (1200 bps)
CCITT V.21 (300 bps)
Bell 212A (1200 bps)
Bell 103J (300 bps)
Fax Modulations
CCITT V.29 (9600, 7200 bps — Group 3
fax)
CCITT V.27 ter (4800, 2400 bps)
CCITT V.17
ENVIRONMENT
Operating Temperature
Relative Humidity
Shock and Vibration
Storage Temperature
B-2
32°F (0°C) to 122°F (50°C)
5% to 90% (noncondensing)
Withstands normal shipping and
handling
– 4°F (–20°C) to 158°F (70°C)
Issue 3 April 1994
ā
Table B-1. Technical Specifications (3 of 3)
INTERFACES
Card Modem
Telephone Line
Connector
68-pin PCMCIA Type II connector
25-pin card/telephone line interface
connector
25-pin telephone line interface
connector/card interface connector
RJ11C connector (USA)
CA11A connector (Canada)
An approved connector (for each
supported country outside of North
America)
DIMENSIONS
Height
Width
Length
0.196 inches (5.0 mm)
2.126 inches (54.0 mm)
3.370 inches (85.6 mm)
TRANSMIT LEVEL
Dial Line
Permissive. Values vary by country. See
Table 4-3 for more information.
DATA RATES
Dial Line
14,400, 12,000, 9600, 7200, 4800, 2400,
1200, or 300–0 bps.
Computer Data Rates
57,600, 38,400, 19,200, 14,400, 9600,
7200, 4800, 2400, 1200, 300 bps.
ERROR CONTROL
CCITT V.42
MNP 4–2
DATA
COMPRESSION
CCITT V.42 bis
MNP 5
CELLULAR
Enhanced Throughput Cellular (ETC)
(not available in Model 3760 and
Model 3763)
Issue 3 April 1994
B-3
Result Codes
C
Result codes are informational messages sent from the modem
and displayed on your monitor. These messages are the
modem’s response to commands you issue to the modem. They
can inform you of the status of a call (Ring, No Answer), or
whether or not a command is valid (OK, Error), or whether or
not the modem has connected using error control (Connect
14400 V42/MNP/Bfr).
The KeepInTouch Card modem ships from the factory
configured to use the word format. If your computer requires
that you use the numbers format instead, refer to the Qn, Vn,
and Xn commands in Chapter 4.
Table C-1 describes the result codes supported by the
KeepInTouch Card modem.
Table C-1. Result Codes (1 of 3)
Number 1,
Number 2
Word
Description
NOTE: The following result codes are enabled by the X0–X7
commands.
0,0
OK
Command executed
1,1
CONNECT
Modem connected to line
2,2
RING
Modem receiving a ring voltage from
the VF line
3,3
NO
CARRIER
Modem lost carrier signal, does not
detect carrier signal, or does not
detect answer tone
4,4
ERROR
Invalid command
Issue 3 April 1994
C-1
Table C-1. Result Codes (2 of 3)
Number 1,
Number 2
Word
Description
NOTE: The following result codes are enabled by the
X1–X7 commands.
5,5
CONNECT
1200
Connection at 1200 bps
6,6
NO
DIALTONE
No dial tone detected
7,7
BUSY
Busy or trunk busy signal detected
8,8
NO ANSWER No “quiet” answer @
9,9
WRONG
CALL
Voice detected at the called number.
(available in Europe only)
10,10
CONNECT
2400
Connection at 2400 bps
11,11
CONNECT
4800
Connection at 4800 bps
12,12
CONNECT
9600
Connection at 9600 bps
13,16
CONNECT
12000
Connection at 12,000 bps
14,13
CONNECT
14400
Connection at 14,400 bps
16,15
CONNECT
7200
Connection at 7200 bps
19,1
CONNECT
300
Connection at 300 bps
C-2
Issue 3 April 1994
Table C-1. Result Codes (3 of 3)
Number 1,
Number 2
Word
Description
NOTE: The following result codes are enabled by the
X5 command (REL suffix) or the X6 command (V.42, V.42 bis,
MNP 2, MNP3, MNP4, or the MNP 5 suffix).
20,10
CONNECT
2400/REL
Connection at 2400 bps with error
control
21,11
CONNECT
4800/REL
Connection at 4800 bps with error
control
22,12
CONNECT
9600/REL
Connection at 9600 bps with error
control
23,16
CONNECT
12000/REL
Connection at 12,000 bps with error
control
24,13
CONNECT
14400/REL
Connection at 14,400 bps with error
control
26,15
CONNECT
7200/REL
Connection at 7200 bps with error
control
27,5
CONNECT
1200/REL
Connection at 1200 bps with error
control
40,40
FORBIDDEN
Forbidden number called. Forbidden
numbers are those at which a voice
has been detected (available in
Europe only).
41,41
DELAYEDxx
Call was not placed because a delay
is still in effect for xx minutes. Try
again after xx minutes (available in
Europe and Japan only).
NOTE: The following result codes are enabled by the
X7 command (Computer data rate suffix).
15,14
CONNECT
19200
Connection at 19,200 bps
28,28
CONNECT
38400
Connection at 38,400 bps
30,30
CONNECT
57600
Connection at 57,600 bps
Issue 3 April 1994
C-3
D
Connecting your Modem for
Cellular Operation
Model 3762 and Model 3764 KeepInTouch Card modems
support communication over cellular telephone channels. There
are two methods for connecting your modem to a cellular
telephone.
The first method is known as Direct Connect. This method
allows you to connect the modem directly to the cellular
telephone by using a special cable, known as a Cellular Direct
Connect Cable.
The second method of connection requires an external device,
such as an RJ11 adapter box, which generates call progress
tones to the modem.
Direct connection is the preferred method for connecting your
modem to a cellular telephone, as it offers superior performance
over the RJ11 adapter box. Direct connection is supported in
Model 3762 and Model 3764 KeepInTouch Card modems.
For information on which models of cellular telephones may be
directly connected to your modem, as well as cable ordering
information, refer to the help text file “cellular.txt.”
The “cellular.txt” help text file also contains the most up-to-date
information on configuring your modem for cellular operation and
obtaining the best performance over a cellular network.
Issue 3 April 1994
D-1
NOTE:
For information on accessing “cellular.txt” and other help
text files, refer to the section Where to Find Additional
Information in Chapter 1, Introduction.
Direct Connection
to a Cellular Telephone
To connect the modem to a cellular telephone with a Cellular
Direct Connect Cable, first install the modem in your PC, as
described in Chapter 2, Installation. Then use the following
procedure and Figure 2-1 (in Chapter 2) to connect your modem
directly to a cellular telephone:
1. Plug the cellular cable’s 9-pin connector into the modem’s
9-pin rear edge connector. The connector’s slot must face
up.
2. Attach the other end of the cellular cable to the cellular
telephone.
3. You may need to upgrade the firmware on your modem to
support your specific model of cellular telephone. For more
information, refer to the “cellular.txt” help text file.
Connection to a Cellular Telephone
through an RJ11 Adapter Box
To purchase an adapter box, contact your cellular telephone
supplier. Make sure you specify the type of telephone you have
since several types of adapters are available.
To connect the modem to a cellular telephone through an RJ11
adapter box, first install the modem in your PC, as described in
Chapter 2, Installation. After installing the modem in your PC,
follow the instructions which are supplied with the RJ11 adapter
box.
D-2
Issue 3 April 1994
Configuring Your Modem for
Cellular Operation
You must configure your modem for cellular operation. If the
modem is on the cellular side of the connection (connected to a
cellular telephone), there are two methods for configuring the
modem. Choose a method based on the type of connection you
have selected. If you are using Direct Connect, configure the
modem to use the automatic cellular setup feature by using the
C command. If you are using an RJ11 adapter box, use the
&F5 command.
If the modem connects to a normal land-line public switched
telephone network (PSTN), but communicates to a remote
modem that can be attached to either a cellular or PSTN
telephone, use the &F6 command.
The following sections describe how to configure your modem
using these three different methods.
Automatic Cellular Setup for
Direct Connection on the Cellular Side
Use this feature when the modem is connected to a cellular
telephone by a Cellular Direct Connect Cable. Your modem can
be configured to automatically switch to a cellular configuration
whenever it detects the presence of a directly connected cellular
telephone. When the cellular direct connection is broken and
replaced by a normal telephone line connection, the modem will
switch back to a land-line configuration. This feature enables
you to easily switch between cellular and land-line telephones
without resetting individual modem configuration parameters.
To use this feature, Automatic Cellular Setup must be enabled
by using the C0 command.
When the Automatic Cellular Setup feature is enabled, and the
modem detects a direct connection to a cellular telephone, the
modem automatically changes specific configuration options for
cellular operation as shown in Table D-1.
Issue 3 April 1994
D-3
Table D-1. Automatic Cellular Setup Configuration Parameters
Configuration Option
Automatic
Cellular Setting
AT Command
Equivalent
Error Control Mode
LAPM or disconnect
\N4
Maximum Frame Size
32 characters/frame
\A4
No Carrier Disconnect
10 seconds
S10=100
V.32 bis Train
Short Train
S43=1
V.32 bis Autorate
Start at 9600
S76=3
V.42 ARQ Window Size Window size of 15
S89=9
Cellular Enhancements
S91=1
Enable
When the modem detects a normal land-line telephone
connection, the parameters in Table D-1 automatically switch
back to their non-cellular settings.
&F5 Cellular Setup for RJ11 Adapter
Connection on the Cellular Side
Use the &F5 command to configure your modem for cellular
operation when the modem is attached to a cellular telephone
through an RJ11 adapter box. This command restores the
modem to its factory default configuration (as if &F0 had been
entered) and then changes specific configuration options for
cellular operation as shown in Table D-2.
Table D-2. &F5 Cellular Setup Configuration
Parameters (1 of 2)
Configuration Option
&F5
Cellular Setting
AT Command
Equivalent
Error Control Mode
LAPM or disconnect
\N4
Maximum Frame Size
32 characters/frame
\A4
No Carrier Disconnect
10 seconds
S10=100
V.32 bis Autorate
Start at 9600
S76=3
V.42 ARQ Window Size Window size of 15
D-4
Issue 3 April 1994
S89=9
Table D-2. &F5 Cellular Setup Configuration
Parameters (2 of 2)
Configuration Option
&F5
Cellular Setting
AT Command
Equivalent
Cellular Enhancements
Enable
S91=1
Transmit Level
(in North America only)
–16 dBm
&I16
No Answer Time-out
120 seconds
S7=120
V.32 bis Train
Short train
S43=1
NOTE:
In North America, some of the hardware components of
your cellular telephone setup, such as the RJ11 adapter
box, may require you to make adjustments to your
modem’s dial transmit level (&I command).
If you are using a Spectrum Cellular AXCELL box, then
issue the &I10 (–10 dBm) command after the &F5
command to adjust the modem’s dial transmit level. For
example:
t
TYPE:
AT&F5&I10&W
PRESS: Enter
&F6 Cellular Setup for
Connection on the PSTN Side
If your modem connects directly to normal land lines, but
communicates to a remote modem that may be attached to
either a cellular telephone or normal telephone line, configure
the modem using the &F6 command. This command restores
the modem to its factory default configuration (as if &F0 had
been entered) and then changes specific configuration options
for cellular operation as shown in Table D-3.
Issue 3 April 1994
D-5
Table D-3. &F6 Cellular Setup Configuration Parameters
Configuration Option
&F6
Cellular Setting
AT Command
Equivalent
Error Control Mode
LAPM or disconnect
\N4
Transmit Level
(in North America only)
–18 dBm
&I18
No Answer Time-out
120 seconds
S7=120
No Carrier Disconnect
10 seconds
S10=100
V.32 bis Train
Short train
S43=1
V.42 ARQ Window Size Window size of 15
S89=9
Cellular Enhancements
S91=1
Enable
ETC Protocol and Interworking
with Non-ETC Modems
To ensure successful data transfer over a cellular channel, your
modem supports the ETC (Enhanced Throughput Cellular)
protocol which improves data communications over cellular
telephone channels. The ETC protocol provides a number of
enhancements to both the V.42 error control protocol and the
V.32 bis modem protocol. These enhancements increase
modem performance and reliability when communicating data
over a cellular telephone channel.
Placing a Call Through a Public
Switched Telephone Network (PSTN)
For best operation, it is recommended that the land-line modem
also support the ETC protocol. When this is not possible,
adequate operation can usually be obtained as long as the
land-line modem supports the V.42 error control protocol. The
following describes changes to both the mobile site and land-line
modem that can improve modem performance.
G If it is known that the remote land-line modem is not an
ETC modem, but that it does support either V.32 bis or
V.32 protocol, then configure the mobile site modem to
operate at 4800 bps by using the %B4800 command.
D-6
Issue 3 April 1994
G
If it is known that the remote land-line modem is not an
ETC modem, but that it does support V.22 bis protocol,
then configure the mobile site modem to operate at
1200 bps by using the %B1200 command.
G
If possible, make sure that the remote land-line modem
is at least configured for Reliable mode (connect using
V.42 error control, MNP 4–2, or disconnect). Better
performance can be achieved if the modem is configured
for V.42 (LAPM) only mode.
G
For both the mobile site and land-line modems, set the
No Carrier Disconnect Timer setting to 10 seconds. For
most modems, this command is ATS10=10.
Placing a Call Through a Modem Pool
Many cellular carriers now offer Cellular Modem Pools. These
Cellular Modem Pools are highly recommended, as they allow
your ETC modem to connect to virtually any modem in the
world. Contact your local cellular service provider for information
on the availability of Modem Pools in your area.
To place a call to a remote site through a Modem Pool, add a
∗3282 command to the ATDT command prior to the dial string:
TYPE: ATDT∗3282n
where: n is the telephone number
PRESS: Enter
The 3282 number is easily remembered, as it spells out the
word DATA on your telephone keypad.
Fax over Cellular
The following provides information when sending a fax over a
cellular network:
G If you use the &F5 command for cellular setup (instead
of Automatic Cellular Setup via the C command), then
make sure the PC fax program is limited to 4800 bps
operation for best results. The C command sets this limit
automatically.
Issue 3 April 1994
D-7
G
The standard fax initialization string that is used for
PSTN fax operation can also be used for cellular fax
operation, with one addition: when operating through a
Motorolar Cellular Connection RJ11 adapter box, adjust
the transmit level to –16 dBm (by adding &I16 to the
initialization string). (NOTE: The &I command is only
available in selected countries. Refer to Table 4-3 for
more information.)
G
If you are using a software application capable of
transmitting both data and fax, use either the C
command for Automatic Cellular Setup (for Direct
Connect) or the &F5 command (for RJ11 adapters) if you
plan to transmit both data and fax.
Tips for Successful Cellular
Operation
The following section lists several issues to be aware of when
using cellular channels for data communications:
G If possible, avoid peak cellular transmission hours.
Heavy telephone traffic during this period (for example,
rush hour and lunch hour) can impair network conditions
and affect data transfers. Cellular rates are also lower
during off-peak hours.
D-8
G
When using a hand-held cellular telephone (a
600 milliwatt telephone), make sure the antenna is
extended and that the telephone rests in a vertical
position. Commercially available leather briefcases that
hold the computer and telephone help facilitate this.
G
When using a portable cellular telephone (a 3 watt
telephone), make sure that the telephone is attached to
an external antenna.
G
Cellular communications within a building may not be
possible due to the number of obstructions within a
building. If you are having problems while trying to
transfer or receive data from inside a building, try
locating the cellular telephone near a window for better
cellular reception.
G
Performance when stationary is usually better than when
moving. If you encounter problems, stop the vehicle and
place the call from a stationary position.
Issue 3 April 1994
G
Z modem protocol is recommended for file transfers.
Most software packages today support this protocol.
Z-modem is a efficient protocol with low overhead, and it
allows a dropped call to resume the file transfer at the
point of disconnect.
G
If you are using an RJ11 adapter box, make sure that it
has a fresh battery installed.
G
Although you cannot guarantee that the modem you
connect to supports ETC, the remote modem should use
V.42 error correction at a minimum. (If this is not
possible, then the remote modem should use Reliable
mode.) In addition, the remote modem should also use
similar configuration settings as described earlier.
Overview of Cellular
Communication
Cellular communication uses radio waves to transmit a call (your
signal) between the cellular telephone and the cell’s
transmission tower. A cellular network consists of adjacent
geographic regions known as cells. Within each cell, there is a
transmission tower that communicates directly to both the
cellular telephone and a Mobile Telephone Switching Office
(MTSO).
The tower and MTSO constantly monitor the location and signal
power of your call. When your call becomes too weak to be
handled by the tower in that cell, either due to distance from the
tower or high activity on the network, it is “handed off” to another
cell. The tower uses radio waves to interface with the cellular
telephone, and the MTSO uses traditional land lines to interface
between the transmission tower and ultimately the remote caller.
The following is a brief list of some of the interference your
signal is subject to when using cellular channels:
G
Man-made and natural structures, such as buildings,
tunnels, trees, hills, and valleys can block your signal.
G
Your proximity to the cell’s transmission tower can affect
your signal’s strength.
G
Heavy phone traffic, especially during peak periods such
as rush hour and lunch hour, and contention for an
Issue 3 April 1994
D-9
available frequency can determine if your data call
connects.
D-10
G
Hand-offs, the passing of your call from one cell to
another, can cause delays which result in lost data or
disconnection. Note that a hand-off can occur while you
are stationary, especially during peak periods.
G
Multipath, a type of interference that is caused by your
signal’s reflection from buildings and passing vehicles,
can affect your data transmission. Multipath can occur
while you are stationary or moving.
Issue 3 April 1994
Glossary
A
Active
A nonvolatile configuration area containing the most recently
saved configuration options. Any changes made to configuration
options can be saved by issuing an AT&W0 command.
analog signal
A type of signal used to transmit data over telephone lines.
Answer mode
The modem is in a state where it is ready to receive an incoming
call. For example, an ATA (Answer) command has been issued
to place the modem into online answer mode. The modem has
been forced off-hook and is generating an answer tone,
beginning the handshaking process with the calling modem.
Async Dial
A factory preset configuration area containing the configuration
options most often used in asynchronous dial networks.
asynchronous transmission
A data transmission that is synchronized by a transmission start
bit at the beginning of a character (five to eight bits) and one or
more stop bits at the end.
AT command set
A group of commands, issued from an asynchronous computer,
that allows control of the modem while in Command mode. All
commands must begin with the characters AT and end with a
carriage return.
AT command string
This consists of several AT commands issued at once. The
string is preceded with an AT prefix.
Issue 3 April 1994
GL-1
AT prefix
A prefix issued before every AT command (except A/ and +++)
which identifies the computer’s data rate, parity, and character
length.
autobaud
Modem automatically determines the asynchronous computer
data rate when using AT commands.
B
Bell 103J
An AT&T Bell standard for 300 bps data transmission.
Bell 212A
An AT&T Bell standard for 1200 bps data transmission.
bps
Bits per second. Indicates the speed at which data is transmitted
between devices.
buffer
A storage area used to compensate for differences in data flow
rate when transmitting data from one device to another.
C
CD
Carrier Detect. A signal between the local and remote ends of a
network indicating energy exists on the transmission circuit.
Associated with Pin 8 on an EIA RS-232 interface.
chassis ground
Pin 1 of an EIA RS-232 interface.
GL-2
Issue 3 April 1994
command line
Contains the command(s) instructing the modem to perform a
function. Command lines begin with the AT prefix, and are
executed when you press the Enter key.
Command mode
One of two modem operating modes. When in Command mode,
the modem accepts commands instead of transmitting or
receiving data.
COM port
Communications port. A computer’s serial communications port
used to transmit to and receive data from a modem. The
modem connects directly to this port.
communications software
Software installed on a computer that controls the modem.
configuration option
Modem software that sets specific operating parameters for the
modem. Sometimes referred to as straps.
CTS
Clear-to-Send. A signal, sent to the computer via Pin 5 of an
EIA RS-232 interface, indicating that the modem is ready for the
computer to transmit data.
D
data compression
The elimination of empty fields, redundancies, and gaps in order
to reduce storage capacity needs and the amount of data to be
transmitted. Anything that is eliminated is restored after the data
is received.
Issue 3 April 1994
GL-3
Data mode
One of two operating modes. When in Data mode, the modem
considers any input from the computer to be data and transmits
it across the telephone line to the remote modem.
DCE
Data Communications Equipment. A modem.
dial command modifiers
A modifier used in the dial string that instructs the modem how
to process a dialed telephone number.
dial string
A series of characters that consists of numbers and modifiers
used to dial a telephone number.
digital signal
A signal used to transfer data between a locally attached
computer and modem.
download
A file transfer in which a file is received from another computer.
DSR
Data Set Ready. A signal from the modem to the computer, sent
via Pin 6 of an EIA RS-232 interface, that indicates the modem
is turned ON and connected to the computer.
DTE
Data Terminal Equipment. The equipment, such as computers
and printers, that provides or creates data.
DTR
Data Terminal Ready. A signal from the computer to the modem,
sent via Pin 20 of an EIA RS-232 interface, that indicates the
computer is turned ON and connected to the modem.
GL-4
Issue 3 April 1994
E
EIA-RS232
An Electronic Industries Association’s standard defining the
25-position interface between data terminal equipment and data
communications equipment.
EIA/TIA 578
An Electronic Industries Association’s standard fax modems.
error control
A method used by the modem to detect and correct data
transmission errors.
escape sequence
Default setting is +++. This sequence lets you switch your
modem from Data mode to Command mode.
extended result codes
An asynchronous message (in either numbers or words) that
includes VF data rate and error control information the modem
sends to the computer after executing or trying to execute a
command.
F
factory defaults
A predetermined set of configuration options containing the
optimum settings for operation on asynchronous dial networks.
fax software
Software installed on a computer that allows a modem to send
and receive facsimiles from another fax modem or fax machine.
Issue 3 April 1994
GL-5
flow control
A process in which devices stop and start the flow of data in a
network to avoid losing data.
H
handshaking
The exchange of predetermined codes and signals (tones) to
establish a connection between two modems.
I
idle state
A state in which the modem’s configuration options can be
modified or commands can be issued to the modem using AT
commands.
L
loopback test
Any test that verifies the integrity of a device by sending data
from one device to another, and then checking the received data
for errors. Various loopback tests can be used to isolate a
problem to the computer, modem, or telephone line.
GL-6
Issue 3 April 1994
M
MNP
Microcom Networking Protocol. Levels 4—2 of this protocol
detect and correct data errors caused by poor telephone line
conditions. Level 5 includes data compression.
modem
MOdulator/DEModulator. A device used to convert data from a
digital signal to an analog signal so that data can be transmitted
over a telephone line. Once the data is received, the analog
signal is converted back into a digital signal.
O
off-hook
A telephone or modem is being used.
on-hook
A telephone or modem is not being used.
Originate mode
The modem is in a state where it is ready to transmit a call. In a
dial network, it is the modem that makes the call.
Issue 3 April 1994
GL-7
P
parity
A way of checking data accuracy by counting the number of bits
that have a value of one.
PBX
Telephone switching equipment (Private Branch Exchange)
dedicated to one customer. A PBX connects private telephones
to each other and to the public dial network.
PCMCIA
Personal Computer Memory Card International Association.
Standard used to define the physical and operational
characteristics of a ‘‘credit card” device.
protocol
The rules for timing, format, error control, and flow control during
data transmission.
pulse dialing
One of two dialing methods, in which telephone numbers are
sent as pulses (brief changes in voltage or current intensity)
across the telephone line. Rotary telephones use pulse dialing.
R
register
A part of the modem’s memory that contains values that
determine the modem’s operating characteristics.
result code
An asynchronous message (in either numbers or words) that the
modem sends to the computer after executing or trying to
execute a command.
GL-8
Issue 3 April 1994
RTS
Request-to-Send. A signal from the computer to the modem,
sent via Pin 4 of an EIA RS-232 interface, that states the
computer has data to send.
RXD
Receive Data. Pin 3 of an EIA RS-232 interface that is used by
the computer to receive data from the modem. Conversely, the
modem uses Pin 3 to transmit data to the computer.
S
S-Registers
Registers that contain information affecting the modem
parameters. All S-Registers must be preceded by the AT prefix.
signal ground
Pin 7 of an EIA RS-232 interface.
synchronous transmission
Data transmission that is synchronized by timing signals.
Characters are sent at a fixed rate. This type of transmission is
more efficient than asynchronous transmission.
T
tone dialing
One of two dialing methods, in which telephone numbers are
sent as tones across the telephone lines.
training
A process where two modems try to establish a connection over
the telephone line.
Issue 3 April 1994
GL-9
TXD
Transmit Data. Pin 2 of an EIA RS-232 interface that is used by
the computer to transmit data to the modem. Conversely, the
modem uses Pin 2 to receive data from the computer.
U
upload
A file transfer in which you send a file to another computer.
User 0
A user-defined configuration area containing customized
configuration options for a specific application.
User 1
A user-defined configuration area containing customized
configuration options for a specific application.
V
V.21
A standard for modems operating full-duplex with asynchronous
or synchronous data at 300 bps over dial telephone lines.
V.22
A standard for modems operation full-duplex with asynchronous
or synchronous data at 1200 bps over dial telephone lines.
V.22 bis
A standard for modems operating full-duplex with asynchronous
or synchronous data at 2400 or 1200 bps over dial telephone
lines.
GL-10 Issue 3 April 1994
V.23
A standard for modems operating with asynchronous or
synchronous data at 1200 or 600 bps over dial or leased
telephone lines
V.32
A standard for modems operating full-duplex with asynchronous
or synchronous data at 9600 or 4800 bps on dial or leased
telephone lines.
V.32 bis
A standard for modems operating full-duplex with asynchronous
or synchronous data over dial or leased telephone lines at
14,400, 12,000, 9600, 7200, or 4800 bps.
V.42
A standard for error control protocol.
V.42 bis
A standard for data compression.
X
XOFF
A character that tells the computer or modem to stop
transmitting data.
XON
A character that tells the computer or modem to start or resume
transmitting data
Issue 3 April 1994 GL-11
Index
A
automoding, 3-8
AutoSync. See Hayes AutoSync
AT Commands.
description, 4-1
guidelines for use, 3-1
+++ (escape sequence), 3-7,
4-2
A/ (repeat last command), 4-2
A (answer), 4-2
B (CCITT/Bell Mode), 4-2
C (automatic cellular setup), 4-3,
D-3
D (dial), 3-3, 4-3
DL (dial last number), 4-3
DS (dial stored number), 4-3
E (command character echo),
4-3
H (hook), 3-4, 4-4
I (identification), 4-4
L (speaker volume), 4-4
M (speaker on/off), 4-5
O (return online to data mode),
4-5
P (pulse dial), 4-5
Q (result codes), 4-5
S (change/display S-register),
4-5
T (tone dial), 4-5
V (result codes format), 4-6
X (ext. result codes, dial tone
detect, busy tone detect),
4-6, 4-7
Y (long space disconnect), 4-8
Z (reset and load active), 4-8
&C (CD control), 4-8
&D (DTR action), 4-9
&F (select factory default and
ETC configuration), 4-10,
D-3
&G (V.22 bis guard tone), 4-10
&I (transmit level), 4-11
&J (permissive mode), 4-11
&M and &Q (async/sync mode
and computer dialer type),
4-11
&R (RTS action), 4-12
&S (DSR control), 4-12
&T (tests), 4-13
&V (view config. options and
phone directory), 4-14
&W (write/save changes to
memory), 4-14
&X (transmit clock source), 4-14
&Y (load options on power up),
4-15
&Z (store telephone numbers),
4-15
\A (maximum frame size), 4-15
\C (error control negotiate
buffer), 4-16
\D (CTS control), 4-16
\G (modem-to-modem flow
control), 4-16
\K (buffer control, send break
control, break forces
escape), 4-17
\N (error control mode), 4-18
\Q (flow control of computer and
modem), 3-10, 4-18
\T (no data disconnect timer),
4-19
\X (XON/XOFF passthrough
flow control), 4-19
%A (error control fallback
character), 4-19
%B (modulation/data rate), 4-19
%C (V.42 bis and MNP 5 data
compression), 4-20
%R (disable autobaud and set
DTE rate), 4-21
B
bulletin board system, A-1
Issue 3 April 1994
IN-1
C
F
Card Services and Socket
Services, 2-6
Cellular Direct Connect Cable, 1-4,
D-1
cellular operation
automatic cellular setup, D-3
direct connect, D-1
ETC, 1-2, D-6
interference, D-9
RJ11 adapter box, D-1, D-9
Command mode, 3-1, 3-7
communications software, 1-4
configuring your modem, 2-5, 2-6
factory settings, 4-1
fax, 1-2, 3-9, D-7
software, 1-4, 2-7
file transfers, 3-9
Hayes AutoSync, 1-2, 2-7
help text files, 1-5
hot insertion, 2-6
I
D
data compression
MNP, 1-2
V.42 bis, 1-2
Data mode, 3-7
data rates, 3-8
diagnostic program, 2-6, A-1
dial modifiers, 3-3
DTR disconnect, 3-4
install program, A-1
installation procedures
model 3760, 2-1
model 3762, 2-1
model 3763, 2-4
model 3764, 2-4
installation utilities diskette, 1-3,
2-5
M
E
Enhanced Throughput Cellular,
B-3
equipment
cellular operation, 1-4
optional, 1-3
required, 1-4
supplied, 1-2
error control
MNP, 1-1
V.42, 1-1
IN-2
H
Issue 3 April 1994
Modem configuration areas
Active, 3-6
User 0, 3-6
User 1, 3-6
modulations, 3-8, A-5, B-2
R
T
readme files. See help text files
result codes, 3-2, 3-7, 4-30, C-1
RJ11 adapter box, D-5
technical specifications, B-1–B-4
troubleshooting, A-1–A-11
tutorials.
answering a call, 3-6
changing modem settings, 3-6
changing modulation and
speed, 3-8
disconnecting a call, 3-4
making a call, 3-3
operating modes, 3-7
sending files and faxes, 3-9
S
S-Registers, 3-1
description, 4-1
S0 (auto-answer ring number),
3-6, 3-10, 4-22
S2 (AT escape character), 4-22
S3 (carriage return character),
4-22
S4 (line feed character), 4-22
S5 (backspace character), 4-22
S6 (blind dial pause time), 4-23
S7 (no answer time out), 4-23
S8 (pause time for dial modifier),
4-23
S10 (no carrier disconnect),
4-23
S11 (DTMF tone timer ON), 4-24
S12 (escape guard timer), 4-24
S13 (DTMF tone timer OFF),
4-24
S18 (test time-out), 4-24
S25 ( DTR detection), 4-25
S26 (RTS-to-CTS delay), 4-25
S41 (dial-line rate), 4-25, A-5
S43 (V.32 bis train), 4-26
S49 (buffer disconnect delay),
4-26
S76 (V.32 bis autorate), 4-26
S78 (V.32 bis automode), 4-27,
A-5
S79 (V.17 fax disable), 4-27
S84 (AT command mode), 4-27
S86 (fast disconnect), 4-28
S89 (V.42 ARQ window size),
4-28
S90 (DTE rate = VF rate), 4-29
S91 (cellular enhancement),
4-29
U
upgrade program, 2-6, A-2
V
V.17 fax, 4-27
See also fax
Issue 3 April 1994
IN-3
Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertising