2007-08 Faculty Manual

2007-08 Faculty Manual
Faculty Manual
July 2007
Faculty Senate – Clemson University – Clemson, South Carolina
List of Changes in the 2007-08 Faculty Manual
Certain policies have been moved from Section IX to Section X and an explanatory
note added to Section X to the effect that items in this section are state and/or
university policies that are being included solely as information.
Substantive revisions can be found in the following sections:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
I.C. Date of revision of Faculty Manual changed to July 1
II.E. Added statement on confidentiality
III.H. Retired faculty (status of TERIed faculty)
IV.D. Clarifying the separate and independent review by chair
IV.D. Relevant Guidelines for promotion and tenure
IV.G. Probationary period for nine and twelve month faculty
V. (Entire Section) Grievance Procedure
VI.D.3. Vice Provost for Computer and Information Technology and
associated committees
9. VI.D-F. (et passim) Designating the graduate and undergraduate deans as
Vice-Provosts
10. VI.I. Composition of search and screening committees for administrators
11. VII.B. Adding the Vice Provost for International Affairs to the Academic
Council
12. VII.B.1.h. (undergraduate) Academic Grievance Committee
13. VII.B. (graduate) Academic Grievance Committee
14. VII.B. Addition of committees reporting to Vice Provost for International
Affairs
15. VII.C.4 Separating Honorary Degrees Committee from Campus Names
Committee
16. VII.C.5. Summer Reading Advisory Committee
17. VII.D. Computer Advisory Committee
18. VII.F.3. Campus Recreation Advisory Board
19. VIII. Article II, Section 8 of the Faculty Constitution, description of
Grievance Board
20. X.A.3 Nepotism Policy
TABLE OF CONTENTS
2007-08
LIST OF CHANGES
PART I. PROLOGUE
A. University Mission Statement................................................................................................................. I-1
B. The Clemson Will................................................................................................................................... I-1
PART II. INTRODUCTION
A.
B.
C.
D.
The Nature and Function of this Manual ................................................................................................ II-1
Using this Manual .................................................................................................................................. II-1
Procedures for Updating the Manual ..................................................................................................... II-1
Alleged Violations of the Manual .......................................................................................................... II-2
1 Resolving the issue ........................................................................................................................ II-2
2. Recusal of the Senate President or Provost ................................................................................... II-2
E. Confidentiality ........................................................................................................................................ II-2
PART III. THE FACULTY
A. General Philosophy ................................................................................................................................ III-1
B. Academic Freedom and Responsibility ................................................................................................. III-1
C. General Qualifications for Faculty Appointments .................................................................................. III-3
D. Regular Faculty Ranks .......................................................................................................................... III-3
1 Instructor ....................................................................................................................................... III-3
2. Assistant Professor......................................................................................................................... III-4
3. Associate Professor ....................................................................................................................... III-4
4. Professor ........................................................................................................................................ III-4
5. Library Faculty .............................................................................................................................. III-4
E. Special Faculty Ranks ............................................................................................................................ III-4
1. Visiting Faculty ............................................................................................................................ III-4
2. R.O.T.C. Faculty ........................................................................................................................... III-4
3. Adjunct Faculty .............................................................................................................................. III-4
4. Research Faculty ........................................................................................................................... III-4
5. Extension Faculty .......................................................................................................................... III-5
6. Lecturer .......................................................................................................................................... III-5
7. Temporary Lecturer ....................................................................................................................... III-5
8. Senior Lecturer .............................................................................................................................. III-5
9. Post Doctoral Research Fellow ..................................................................................................... III-5
10. Part-Time Faculty .......................................................................................................................... III-5
F. Endowed Chairs and Titled Professorships ........................................................................................... III-6
G. TERIed Faculty ....................................................................................................................................... III-7
H. Emeritus Faculty .................................................................................................................................... III-7
I. Retired Faculty ....................................................................................................................................... III-7
J. Faculty Awards ...................................................................................................................................... III-8
1. The Alumni Master Teaching Award ............................................................................................ III-8
2. The Alumni Award for Outstanding Research ............................................................................ III-8
3. The Alumni Award for Distinguished Public Service ................................................................... III-8
4. The Alan Schaffer Faculty Senate Service Award ......................................................................... III-8
5. The Class of ’39 Award ................................................................................................................. III-8
6. Centennial Professorship Award.................................................................................................... III-9
Faculty Manual – July 2007
i
PART IV. PERSONNEL PRACTICES
A. Procedures for Faculty Appointments ................................................................................................... IV-1
B. Affirmative Action Policies and Procedures for the Recruitment and Appointment of Faculty ............. IV-1
and Administrators
1. Pre-Recruitment Stage .................................................................................................................. IV-2
2. Recruitment Stage .......................................................................................................................... IV-2
3. Appointment Stage ....................................................................................................................... IV-2
C. Terms of Appointment ........................................................................................................................... IV-3
D. Procedures for Renewal of Appointment, Tenure, and Promotion ........................................................ IV-3
E. Annual Performance Evaluation ............................................................................................................ IV-4
1. Establishment of Goals using Form 1 ........................................................................................... IV-4
2. Statement of Accomplishments using FAS and Form 2 .............................................................. IV-5
3. Annual Faculty Evaluation using Form 3 ...................................................................................... IV-5
F. Notification of Renewal and Non-Renewal of Appointments ............................................................... IV-6
G. Tenure Policies ...................................................................................................................................... IV-6
H. Post Tenure Review ............................................................................................................................... IV-7
1. Purpose .......................................................................................................................................... IV-7
2. Coverage ........................................................................................................................................ IV-7
3. Guidelines ...................................................................................................................................... IV-8
4. Post Tenure Review Committee .................................................................................................... IV-8
5. Part I Post Tenure Review ............................................................................................................. IV-8
6. Part II Post Tenure Review ............................................................................................................ IV-8
a. External Representation Options .............................................................................................. IV-8
b. Documents to PTR Committee and Department Chairs........................................................... IV-9
c. Annual Performance Reviews to PTR Committee ................................................................... IV-9
d. PTR Committee Examination Requirements ........................................................................... IV-9
e. Reports by PTR Committee, Department Chair ....................................................................... IV-9
f. Final Ratings ............................................................................................................................. IV-9
g. Transmittal of Final Rating to Provost ..................................................................................... IV-9
7. Remediation ................................................................................................................................... IV-9
8. Dismissal for Unsatisfactory Professional Performance ................................................................ IV-9
I. Promotion Policies ................................................................................................................................. IV-10
J. Salary Determination Procedures .......................................................................................................... IV-10
K. Resignation, Termination, and Dismissal .............................................................................................. IV-10
1. Resignation .................................................................................................................................... IV-10
2. Termination.................................................................................................................................... IV-10
3. Dismissal........................................................................................................................................ IV-11
PART V. GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES
A. Overview ............................................................................................................................................... V-1
B. Assistance in Dealing with Complaints: Ombudsman for Faculty, Postdoctoral Fellows, and
Graduate Students ................................................................................................................................... V-1
C. Assistance in Dealing with Complaints: Grievance Counselors ............................................................ V-2
D. Bases for Grievances ........................................................................................................................... V-2
1. Category I ...................................................................................................................................... V-2
a. Dismissal .................................................................................................................................. V-2
b. Termination .............................................................................................................................. V-2
c. Discrimination .......................................................................................................................... V-2
d. Academic Freedom................................................................................................................... V-2
2. Category II .................................................................................................................................... V-3
a. Improper Implementation of Departmental, College and/or University Policies/Procedures .. V-3
b. Lack of Civility and/or Lack of Professional Responsibility ................................................... V-3
Faculty Manual – July 2007
ii
E. Attempts to resolve matters without filing a grievance ......................................................................... V-3
1. Meeting with Department Chair .................................................................................................... V-3
2. Meeting with Dean......................................................................................................................... V-3
3. Requirement Not to Meet in Cases of Non-Reappointment .......................................................... V-3
F. Filing a petition ...................................................................................................................................... V-4
1. Petition ........................................................................................................................................... V-4
2. Petition Specifics ........................................................................................................................... V-4
G. The Grievance Board ............................................................................................................................. V-4
1. Grievance Board .......................................................................................................................... V-4
2. Grievance Board Requirements ................................................................................................... V-4
3. Grievance Board Report............................................................................................................... V-4
H. Determination of Grievability ................................................................................................................ V-4
1. Determination Process ................................................................................................................... V-4
2. Initial Meeting of Grievance Board ............................................................................................... V-5
3. Review by Provost or Grievance Board ......................................................................................... V-5
4. Response from Respondent(s) ....................................................................................................... V-5
5. Petitioner no longer Employed at Clemson University.................................................................. V-5
I. Grievance Hearings ............................................................................................................................... V-5
1. Hearing Panel Composition and Process ....................................................................................... V-5
2 Hearing Date .................................................................................................................................. V-5
3. Recusals and Challenges ................................................................................................................ V-5
4. Role of Advisor.............................................................................................................................. V-6
5. Evidence and Witnesses................................................................................................................. V-6
6. Claim of Surprise ........................................................................................................................... V-6
7. Findings of Fact and Recommendations ........................................................................................ V-6
8. Findings of Fact and Recommendations in Cases of Professional Responsibility ......................... V-6
9. Submission of Findings and Recommendations ............................................................................ V-6
10. Provost’s Decision ......................................................................................................................... V-6
J. Appeals .................................................................................................................................................. V-7
1. Appeals to President ...................................................................................................................... V-7
2. Appeals to Board of Trustees ......................................................................................................... V-7
K. Protection of Petitioners.......................................................................................................................... V-7
1. Action after Appeals ...................................................................................................................... V-7
2. Action after Final Decision ............................................................................................................ V-7
PART VI. THE UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
K.
The Board of Trustees ............................................................................................................................ VI-1
The President of the University ............................................................................................................. VI-1
The Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost .......................................................................... VI-2
The Vice Provosts .................................................................................................................................. VI-2
1. Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Studies ........................................................................ VI-2
2. Vice Provost and Dean of the Graduate School ............................................................................ VI-3
3. Vice Provost for Computer Information Technology and Chief Information Officer ................... VI-3
4. Vice Provost for International Affairs ......................................................................................... VI-3
The Deans of the Colleges ..................................................................................................................... VI-3
The Dean of Libraries ............................................................................................................................ VI-3
The Department Chairs .......................................................................................................................... VI-4
Selection of the President ..................................................................................................................... VI-4
Selection of Other Academic Administrators ......................................................................................... VI-5
Review of Academic Administrators ..................................................................................................... VI-6
The Nonacademic Administration: University Vice Presidents and Executive Officers ....................... VI-7
1. Vice President for Advancement ................................................................................................ VI-7
2. Vice President for Public Service and Agriculture ....................................................................... VI-7
3. Vice President for Student Affairs .............................................................................................. VI-8
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iii
4. Vice President for Research and Economic Development ............................................................ VI-8
5. Executive Secretary to the Board of Trustees ............................................................................... VI-8
6. Other Administrators Reporting to the President .......................................................................... VI-8
PART VII. FACULTY PARTICIPATION IN UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE
A. General Framework ............................................................................................................................... VII-1
B. Academic Council .................................................................................................................................. VII-1
1. Council on Undergraduate Studies ............................................................................................... VII-2
a. Academic Advising .............................................................................................................. VII-2
b. Undergraduate Curriculum .................................................................................................. VII-2
c. Admissions ........................................................................................................................... VII-2
d. Continuing Enrollment.......................................................................................................... VII-3
e Calhoun Honors College ....................................................................................................... VII-3
f. Scholarships and Awards Committee ................................................................................... VII-3
g. Academic Integrity Committee ............................................................................................. VII-3
h. Academic Grievance Board .................................................................................................. VII-3
2. Council on Graduate Studies ........................................................................................................ VII-4
a. Graduate Curriculum ........................................................................................................... VII-4
b. Graduate Admissions and Continuing Enrollment Appeals ................................................. VII-4
c. Graduate Fellowships and Awards ...................................................................................... VII-4
d. Graduate Advisory Committee ............................................................................................. VII-4
e. Graduate Academic Grievance Committee .......................................................................... VII-4
f. Graduate Academic Integrity Committee ............................................................................. VII-5
3. Committees Reporting to the Vice Provost for International Affairs ............................................ VII-5
a. International Studies Curriculum Committee ....................................................................... VII-5
b. International Programs Coordination Committee ................................................................. VII-5
c. International Services Coordination Committee .................................................................. VII-6
C. Councils, Commissions, and Committees Reporting to the President ................................................... VII-6
1. Administrative Council ................................................................................................................. VII-6
2. President's Cabinet ......................................................................................................................... VII-6
3. Athletic Council ............................................................................................................................. VII-6
a. Faculty Athletics Representative ......................................................................................... VII-6
b. Functions of the Athletic Council ......................................................................................... VII-7
c. Membership of the Athletic Council ..................................................................................... VII-7
d. Committees of the Athletic Council...................................................................................... VII-8
4. President’s Commission on the Status of Women ......................................................................... VII-8
5. Honorary Degree and Naming Committee ................................................................................... VII-8
6. Summer Reading Program Committee ......................................................................................... VII-9
7. Staff Senate .................................................................................................................................... VII-9
8. President’s Commission on the Status of Black Faculty and Staff ............................................... VII-9
9. Parking Review ............................................................................................................................. VII-9
D. Committees Reporting to the Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Provost ................................... VII-10
1. Computer Advisory Committee ...................................................................................................... VII-10
2. Libraries Advisory Committee ....................................................................................................... VII-10
3. University Assessment Committee ................................................................................................ VII-10
4. Innovation Fund Awards Committee ............................................................................................ VII-11
E. Committees Reporting to the Vice President for Research and Economic Development....................... VII-11
1. Animal Research Committee ....................................................................................................... VII-11
2. Institutional Biosafety Committee ................................................................................................. VII-11
3. Human Subjects Committee ......................................................................................................... VII-12
4. Intellectual Property Committee .................................................................................................... VII-12
5. Research Grants Committee ......................................................................................................... VII-12
F. Committees Reporting to the Vice President for Student Affairs ........................................................... VII-12
1. Alcohol and Other Drugs Task Force ............................................................................................ VII-12
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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G.
H.
I.
J.
2. Media Advisory Board................................................................................................................... VII-13
3. Campus Recreation Advisory Board ............................................................................................. VII-13
4. Student Health Committee ............................................................................................................ VII-13
5. Parking Advisory Committee ....................................................................................................... VII-13
6. Student Affairs Student Advisory Board ...................................................................................... VII-14
Committees, Boards, and Units Reporting to the Chief Business Officer .............................................. VII-14
1. Accident Review Board ................................................................................................................ VII-14
2. Advisory Committee of Budget Center Representatives .............................................................. VII-14
3. Bookstore Advisory Committee ................................................................................................... VII-14
4. University Facilities Advisory Committee (UFAC) ..................................................................... VII-14
5. Vending Machine Committee ........................................................................................................ VII-14
6. Office of Human Resources .......................................................................................................... VII-15
Other University Organizations ............................................................................................................. VII-15
1. Organization of Academic Department Chairs ............................................................................. VII-15
2. Ad Hoc Committees ...................................................................................................................... VII-15
Faculty Participation in College Governance ........................................................................................ VII-15
Faculty Participation in Departmental Governance ............................................................................... VII-16
PART VIII.
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE FACULTY OF CLEMSON
UNIVERSITY
PREAMBLE ................................................................................................................................................. VIII-1
ARTICLE l: THE FACULTY ..................................................................................................................... VIII-1
Section l. Membership ............................................................................................................................ VIII-1
Section 2. Functions ............................................................................................................................... VIII-1
Section 3. Officers .................................................................................................................................. VIII-2
Section 4. Meetings ................................................................................................................................ VIII-2
Section 5. Rules of Order ....................................................................................................................... VIII-2
ARTICLE II: THE FACULTY SENATE .................................................................................................... VIII-2
Section 1. Functions ............................................................................................................................... VIII-2
Section 2. Membership ........................................................................................................................... VIII-3
Section 3. Officers .................................................................................................................................. VIII-4
Section 4. Meetings ................................................................................................................................ VIII-4
Section 5. Committees ............................................................................................................................ VIII-4
Section 6. Rules of Order ....................................................................................................................... VIII-5
Section 7. Permanent Committees .......................................................................................................... VIII-5
Section 8. Boards .................................................................................................................................... VIII-5
ARTICLE III: THE COLLEGIATE FACULTIES ...................................................................................... VIII-6
Section 1. Definition ................................................................................................................................ VIII-6
Section 2. Functions ............................................................................................................................... VIII-6
ARTICLE IV: THE CURRICULUM COMMITTEES ...................................................................................... VIII-6
Section 1. Definition ............................................................................................................................... VIII-6
Section 2. Membership ............................................................................................................................ VIII-6
Section 3. Procedure ............................................................................................................................... VIII-6
ARTICLE V: AMENDMENT ..................................................................................................................... VIII-7
PART IX. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES
A.
B.
C.
D.
Overview ................................................................................................................................................ IX-1
Work Load .............................................................................................................................................. IX-1
Work Schedule ....................................................................................................................................... IX-1
Teaching Practices ................................................................................................................................. IX-2
1. Syllabus ...................................................................................................................................... IX-2
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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E.
F.
G.
H.
I.
J.
K.
2. Office Hour .................................................................................................................................... IX-2
3. Class Schedules ............................................................................................................................. IX-2
4. Faculty Absence from Class ......................................................................................................... IX-2
5. Attendance Policy ......................................................................................................................... IX-2
6. Examinations and Grading ............................................................................................................ IX-3
7. Student Rights and Responsibilities .............................................................................................. IX-4
8. Privacy .......................................................................................................................................... IX-4
9. Academic Integrity ....................................................................................................................... IX-5
10. Student Advising ........................................................................................................................... IX-5
11. Evaluation of Teaching by Students .............................................................................................. IX-5
12. Students with Disabilities ............................................................................................................. IX-6
13. Sale of Textbooks to Students........................................................................................................ IX-7
Professional Responsibility Toward Colleagues ................................................................................... IX-7
Graduation, Commencement, and Other Formal Academic Ceremonies ............................................... IX-7
Summer Teaching .................................................................................................................................. IX-7
Other Summer Employment .................................................................................................................. IX-7
Dual Employment and Overload Compensation .................................................................................... IX-8
Sabbatical Leave .................................................................................................................................... IX-8
Graduate Study by Faculty .................................................................................................................... IX-9
PART X. SUMMARY OF SELECTED STATE AND UNIVERSITY POLICIES
A. Workplace and Personnel ...................................................................................................................... X-1
1. Equal Opportunity Policies ........................................................................................................... X-1
2. Drug and Alcohol Policy .............................................................................................................. X-2
3. Nepotism Policy ............................................................................................................................ X-2
4. Racial Harassment Policy ............................................................................................................. X-2
5. Sexual Harassment Policy ............................................................................................................. X-2
6. Leave and Holidays ...................................................................................................................... X-3
a. Annual leave .......................................................................................................................... X-3
b. Sick leave................................................................................................................................ X-3
c. Funeral leave........................................................................................................................... X-3
d Court leave ............................................................................................................................. X-3
e Military leave ......................................................................................................................... X-4
f. Holiday leave ......................................................................................................................... X-4
g. Change of appointment .......................................................................................................... X-4
7. Professional Travel ....................................................................................................................... X-4
B. Procedures for Resolution of Discrimination / Harassment Complaints .............................................. X-4
1. Informal Complaint Process............................................................................................................ X-5
2. Formal Complaint Process .......................................................................................................... X-5
3. Appeals of the Formal Complaint Process ...................................................................................... X-6
4. Filing With External Agencies ........................................................................................................ X-6
5. Temporary Measures...................................................................................................................... X-7
6. Retaliation Prohibited ................................................................................................................... X-7
C. Professional Activities ............................................................................................................................ X-7
1. Copyright Policy ............................................................................................................................ X-7
2. Human Subjects ............................................................................................................................. X-7
3. Humane Care and Use of Animals ................................................................................................. X-8
4. Patent Policy ................................................................................................................................. X-8
5. Policy on Research Ethics ............................................................................................................. X-11
6. Research Data Access & Retention Policy ..................................................................................... X-12
7. Use of Recombinant DNA, Biological and Chemical Hazards, and Radioactive Agents .............. X-13
D. Private Outside Employment ................................................................................................................. X-14
1. Consulting ...................................................................................................................................... X-14
2. Outside Activities ........................................................................................................................... X-14
Faculty Manual – July 2007
vi
3. Use of University Facilities and Equipment ................................................................................... X-14
4. Reporting Requirements .................................................................................................................. X-14
E. External Communications: Media Relations ........................................................................................ X-15
1. Responding to Media Inquiries ...................................................................................................... X-15
2. Releasing Information to the Media .............................................................................................. X-15
APPENDICES
Appendix A .................................................................................................................................................... viii
Appendix B .................................................................................................................................................... xi
Appendix C .................................................................................................................................................... xii
Appendix D ................................................................................................................................................... xiv
Appendix E ................................................................................................................................................... xvi
Appendix F .................................................................................................................................................... xviii
Appendix G .................................................................................................................................................... xxiv
Appendix H .................................................................................................................................................... xxiv
Appendix I ..................................................................................................................................................... xxv
Appendix J ..................................................................................................................................................... xxvii
INDEX
Faculty Manual – July 2007
vii
PART I.
PROLOGUE
A. University Mission Statement
The mission of Clemson University is to fulfill the covenant between its founder and the people of South
Carolina to establish a “high seminary of learning” through its land-grant responsibilities of teaching,
research, and extended public service.
Clemson University is a selective, public, land-grant university in a college-town setting along a dynamic
Southeastern corridor. The university is committed to world-class teaching, research, and public service in
the context of general education, student development and continuing education. Clemson’s desire is to
attract a capable, dedicated and diverse student body of approximately 12,000 to 14,000 undergraduate and
4,000 to 5,000 graduate students, with priority to students from South Carolina.
Clemson offers a wide array of high-quality baccalaureate programs built around a distinctive core
curriculum. Graduate and continuing education offerings respond to the professions, while doctoral and
research programs contribute to the economic future of the state, nation and world. The university
emphasizes agriculture, architecture, business, education, engineering, natural resources, science and
technology. The university also promotes excellence in education and scholarship in selected areas of the
creative arts, health, human development, the humanities and social sciences. In all areas, the goal is to
develop students’ communication and critical-thinking skills, ethical judgment, global awareness, and
scientific and technological knowledge. Students remain the primary focus of the university.
Just as Clemson values it students, the university also values its faculty and staff who have committed their
talents and careers to advance its mission. Clemson pledges to support their work, to encourage their
professional development, to evaluate their professional performance and to compensate them at nationally
competitive levels.
B. The Clemson Will
Thomas Green Clemson was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in July of 1807 and died at Fort Hill,
Oconee County, South Carolina, on the 6th of April, 1888. His Will and the Act of Acceptance of the
General Assembly of South Carolina (November 27, 1889) established Clemson as a land-grant, statesupported institution. Pertinent excerpts from the Will and the Act follow.
"Whereas, I, Thos. G. Clemson, of the county and State aforesaid, did, on the 14th day of August, 1883,
execute my last will and testament wherein I sought to provide for the establishment of a scientific
institution upon the Fort Hill place, and therein provided what sciences should be taught in said institution;
and, whereas, I am now satisfied that my intention and purpose therein may be misunderstood as intending
that no other studies or sciences should be taught in said institution than those mentioned in said will,
which was not my purpose or intention. Now, desiring to make my purpose plain as well as to make some
other changes in the distribution of my property, than made in said will, I do now make, publish and
declare this instrument as and for my last will and testament, hereby revoking all previous wills and
codicils by me made, especially the will above referred to, dated August 14th, 1883.”
"Feeling a great sympathy for the farmers of this State, and the difficulties with which they had to contend
in their efforts to establish the business of agriculture upon a prosperous basis, and believing that there can
be no permanent improvement in agriculture without a knowledge of those sciences which pertain
particularly thereto, I have determined to devote the bulk of my property to the establishment of an
agricultural college upon the Fort Hill place.”
“This institution, I desire, to be under the control and management of a board of trustees, a part of whom
are hereinafter appointed, and to be modeled after the Agricultural College of Mississippi as far as
practicable. My purpose is to establish an agricultural college which will afford useful information to the
farmers and mechanics, therefore it should afford thorough instruction in agriculture and the natural
sciences connected therewith -- it should combine, if practicable, physical and intellectual education, and
should be a high seminary of learning in which the graduate of the common schools can commence, pursue
and finish the course of studies terminating in thorough, theoretic and practical instruction in those sciences
and arts which bear directly upon agriculture, but I desire to state plainly that I wish the trustees of said
institution to have full authority and power to regulate all matters pertaining to said institution -- to fix the
course of studies, to make rules for the government of the same, and to change them, as in their judgment,
experience may prove necessary, but to always bear in mind that the benefits herein sought to be bestowed
are intended to benefit agricultural and mechanical industries. I trust that I do not exaggerate the
importance of such an institution for developing the material resources of the State by affording to its youth
the advantages of scientific culture, and that I do not overrate the intelligence of the legislature of South
Carolina, ever distinguished for liberality, in assuming that such appropriations will be made as will be
necessary to supplement the fund resulting from the bequest herein made. I therefore give and devise to my
executor, hereinafter named, the aforesaid Fort Hill place, where I reside, formerly the home of my fatherin-law, John C. Calhoun, consisting of eight hundred and fourteen acres, more or less, in trust, that
whenever the State of South Carolina may accept said property as a donation from me, for the purpose of
thereupon founding an agricultural college, in accordance with the views I have hereinbefore expressed, (of
which the Chief Justice of South Carolina shall be the judge), then my executor shall execute a deed of the
said property to the said State, and turn over to the same all property hereinafter given as an endowment of
said institution, to be held as such by the said State so long as it, in good faith, devotes said property to the
purposes of the donation; provided, however, that this acceptance by the State shall be signified, and a
practical carrying-out be commenced within three years from the date of the probate of this my will.”
"...The seven trustees appointed by me shall always have the right, and the power is hereby given them and
their successors, which right the legislature shall never take away or abridge, to fill all vacancies which
may occur in their number by death, resignation, refusal to act, or otherwise. But the legislature may
provide, as it sees proper, for the appointment or election of the other six trustees, if it accepts the donation.
And I do hereby request the seven trustees above named, or such of them as may be living, or may be
willing to act, to meet as soon after my death as practicable, and organize, and at once to fill all vacancies
that may have occurred, and to exert themselves to effectuate my purposes as herein set forth, and I hereby
instruct my executor to notify them of their appointment herein as soon after my death as practicable. The
name of this institution shall be the 'Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina....”
"[The trustees] shall erect upon the Fort Hill place such a school or college for the youth of South Carolina
as, in their judgment, will be for their best interest; provided, that said school or college shall be for the
benefit of the agricultural and mechanical classes principally, and shall be free of costs to the pupils, as far
as the means derived from the endowment hereinafter provided and the use of the land may permit ...."
From the Act of Acceptance: "That upon the execution of a deed and transfer of said property to the State
by the said executor in accordance with the provisions of said will, an Agricultural and Mechanical College
shall be, and the same is hereby, established in connection with the aforesaid devise and bequest, to be
situated at Fort Hill, in Oconee County, on the plantation so devised, in which college shall be taught all
branches of study pertaining to practical and scientific agriculture and other industries connected therewith
and such other studies are not inconsistent with the terms of the said will."
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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PART II.
INTRODUCTION
A. The Nature and Function of this Manual
The Clemson University Faculty Manual is a compilation of information pertaining to faculty participation
in the governance of the university. It includes summaries of those university policies and procedures that
are of major concern to faculty. The need to have a Manual of manageable size dictates that this document,
though comprehensive, be less than complete. Consequently, in certain places the reader is directed to
other documents or sources to obtain more detailed information.
Since the first Manual for Clemson University faculty was distributed in 1960, it has undergone numerous
revisions. The guiding principle behind recent editions (since 1995) was the desire to record and codify the
changes made in the principal governing instrument following campus reorganization and internal policy
changes. The most current version of the Manual is available on the Faculty Senate’s World Wide Web
page (http://www.lib.clemson.edu/fs/ ), where cumulative revisions of the Faculty Manual of a substantive
nature are posted each year no later than July 1st for use during the next academic year.
B. Using this Manual
The Faculty Manual is divided into ten parts. Each part is paginated separately. There are also nine
appendices, a Table of Contents, and an index. The editors have tried to make the Manual as “user
friendly” as possible. All suggestions for improvement will be carefully considered.
C. Procedures for Updating the Manual
Any person or group on campus may suggest revisions of the Faculty Manual by submitting a request to
the Faculty Senate President (Senate President). The Senate President shall refer the matter to the
appropriate committee for consideration. If that committee agrees the change should be made, the
committee submits the proposed change in the form of a resolution to the Senate where a two-thirds
majority is needed for approval. Before the change is entered in the Faculty Manual, the Faculty Manual
Editorial Consultant must check the language and format of the proposed resolution, and ensure that the
Manual will remain internally consistent with the inclusion of the proposed change. Any Senate resolution
that is distributed prior to a regularly scheduled Senate meeting should also be checked in advance by the
Faculty Manual Editorial Consultant to see if it requires a change in the Manual. If it does require a
change, the proposed resolution must specifically indicate the proposed language of the change. In the
event that a resolution amending the Faculty Manual comes to the floor of the Senate without having been
reviewed by the Editorial Consultant, said resolution shall be subject to review once it has been passed.
Any substantial ambiguities or inconsistencies will be noted by the Editorial Consultant as the resolution
proceeds forward for approval by the administration. Any revision of the Faculty Manual proposed by the
Editorial Consultant following administrative review is subject to a final approval by the Faculty Senate
Policy Committee.
The Faculty Manual Editorial Consultant forwards resolutions amending the Faculty Manual that have
been approved by the requisite two-thirds majority to the Provost for consideration by the university
administration. The Provost will forward any resolutions that require approval by the Board of Trustees to
the Board after approval by the administration and will advise the Senate President of this action. The
Provost will advise the Senate President of the administration’s decision and, as applicable, the Board’s
decision. If the administration rejects the proposal or accepts it only subject to a change in its language, the
Senate President returns the proposal to the person or group who initiated the resolution. That person or
group may decide, with the advice of the Senate President, to drop the issue or to propose a new resolution
responding to expressed concerns.
The specific revision of the Faculty Manual will take effect upon final approval by the Provost, or the
Board of Trustees for those changes subject to the Board’s approval. The approved resolution will be
incorporated into both the master hard copy of the Faculty Manual maintained in the Faculty Senate Office
by the Program Assistant and the electronic version of the Faculty Manual no later than July 1st to be used
during the next academic year. This process of incorporation will be at the direction of the Editorial
Consultant and under the oversight of the Senate President. When it is completed, the Senate President will
report to the Senate and Provost that the Manual has been is updated. Overall responsibility for
maintaining and distributing the Clemson University Faculty Manual is vested in the Office of the Vice
President for Academic Affairs and Provost and is carried out by the Faculty Senate Office.
If there is uncertainly about how to apply the Faculty Manual in a particular situation, users are invited to
consult with the Faculty Senate President and the Faculty Manual Editorial Consultant. The Senate
President may handle the matter or refer it to the relevant committee or person for resolution.
D. Alleged Violations of the Manual
If the procedures and policies outlined in this Manual have not been followed, a written and signed report
should be made to the President of the Faculty Senate. The report should include the section of the Manual
that is not being followed, the person(s), department(s), etc. involved, and a brief description of the
situation. The President may handle the matter or refer it to the relevant committee or person for resolution.
The name(s) of the person(s) filing the report shall be kept confidential by the President of the Faculty
Senate.
1.
Resolving the issue. The President of the Faculty Senate, or one of the standing committees that
s/he may designate to address the matter in his/her stead, may seek additional information. If the
Senate President, or the designated committee, decides that a Faculty Manual violation has not
occurred, that decision shall be communicated to the individual making the allegation and the
matter will be considered closed. If the Senate president, or the designated committee, decides that
a Faculty Manual violation has occurred, s/he or the committee will notify the person charged
with the violation that the issue is being considered and recommend a resolution to address the
violation. The Senate president will communicate the proposed resolution to the complainant, the
alleged violator(s) and any other named parties, and the Provost in writing. All of these persons
shall be asked to respond in writing within seven weekdays of receiving the decision. If any of
these parties do not accept the resolution, the Senate president shall forward the proposed
resolution, as well as any relevant materials, to the Provost. The Provost shall render a decision in
writing and communicate it to the Senate president and all involved parties.
2.
Recusal of Senate President or Provost. If the alleged Faculty Manual violation involves the
Senate President, the chair of the Senate Policy Committee shall serve in place of the Senate
President. If the alleged Faculty Manual violation involves the Provost, the President of the
University shall serve in place of the Provost.
E. Confidentiality
In several subsequent sections of the Faculty Manual, as well as in the preceding paragraph, it is
stated that certain kinds of information disclosed to Faculty Senate members, other faculty members,
grievance hearing panels, Clemson University administrators and others will remain "confidential."
It is the intent of the University that this information shall remain confidential and that University
faculty and staff shall be obliged to maintain that confidentiality to the extent permitted by state and
federal law. However, if Clemson University receives a valid request for documents or information
through court order, subpoena, discovery request, police proceedings, the South Carolina Freedom
of Information Act or other legally recognized proceedings, Clemson University may be required by
law to disclose documents or information that the Faculty Manual states will remain confidential.
Any such mandatory disclosure shall not be considered to be a violation of the Faculty Manual.
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PART III.
THE FACULTY
A. General Philosophy
Institutions of higher learning are communities of scholars in which faculty gather to seek, teach, and
disseminate knowledge for its own sake rather than for any immediate political, social, or economic goal.
Such institutions are conducted for the common good and not to further the interests of either the individual
faculty member or the institution as a whole. The attainment of that common good depends upon the free
search for truth and its free expression.
Academic freedom is essential to these purposes. Colleges and universities can fulfill their missions only
when their faculties enjoy the academic freedom to pursue knowledge without fear of pressure from
sources inside or outside their institutions. For this reason, academic freedom is a right and not a privilege
to be granted or withheld. As will be indicated below, however, such freedom carries with it
commensurate duties and responsibilities.
It is the policy of Clemson University to preserve and defend academic freedom by vigorously resisting all
efforts from whatever source to encroach upon or restrict it. In policy and in practice, the university and its
accrediting agency, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, adhere to the 1940 Statement of
Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure of the American Association of University Professors
(AAUP), which has long been recognized as providing reasonable and authoritative guidelines for
American institutions of higher learning. The section on academic freedom below essentially reiterates the
principles set forth in this statement, with some modification and extension consistent with its intent and
with later declarations by the Association.
B. Academic Freedom and Responsibility
Their scholarship and mastery of their subjects entitles faculty to hold teaching positions and to enjoy
freedom in the presentation of those subjects in the classroom. Thus, it is inappropriate and improper for
faculty to persistently intrude materials unrelated to their subjects into their teaching. It is likewise a
violation of professional responsibility to fail to present the subject matter of a course as announced to
students and as approved by the faculty in its collective responsibility for the curriculum.
Faculty members are entitled to full freedom in research and publication, subject to any restrictions set by
law or by applicable codes of professional ethics, and subject to the satisfactory performance of their other
academic duties and to stated university policy on outside employment. Research and/or consultation for
pecuniary return should be based upon an understanding between the individual faculty member and the
institution. Except under conditions of national emergency, a faculty member should not undertake
research on university time or use university facilities or funds under any agreement which would (except
for a clearly stated, reasonable time) prohibit open communication of the results.
Faculty members are citizens, members of learned professions, and officers of institutions of higher
learning. As members of a community, Clemson faculty members have the rights and obligations of any
citizen. They measure the urgency of these obligations in the light of their responsibilities to their students,
disciplines, professions, and to the university. When they speak or write as private persons, faculty shall be
free from institutional censorship or disciplinary action, but they shall avoid creating an impression that
they are speaking or acting for the university. When they speak or write within the areas of their expertise,
faculty have the right to identify themselves by academic rank and institutional affiliation. In so doing,
they should not assert or imply that they are acting as spokespersons for the university. As professional
educators and academic officers, they are aware that the public may judge their profession and their
institution by their utterances. Hence, faculty members should endeavor to be accurate, to exercise due
restraint, to show respect for the utterances of others, and, when appropriate, to indicate that they are not
officially representing Clemson University.
Because freedom of access to recorded knowledge is essential to teaching, learning, and research in a
democracy, the right and obligation of the university to provide a full range of materials on any subject,
however unpopular, controversial, or apparently incorrect, shall not be infringed. The principles of
academic freedom shall apply to the acquisition and preservation of such materials and also to those who
provide and those who use them.
Because academic freedom also includes the right to hear, Clemson endorses the 1957 Declaration of the
AAUP that the university "...asserts the right of students to listen to anyone whom they wish to hear [in the]
belief that it is educationally desirable that students be confronted with diverse opinions of all kinds, [and
Clemson further] holds that any person who is presented by a recognized student or faculty organization
should be allowed to speak on . . . campus."
Duly constituted organizations at Clemson University may invite and hear speakers without fear of
reprisals. However, in the exercise of this right it is recognized that:
“Membership in the academic community imposes upon students, faculty members,
administrators, and trustees an obligation to respect the dignity of others, to acknowledge
their right to express differing opinions, and to foster and defend intellectual honesty,
freedom of inquiry and instruction, and free expression on and off the campus. The
expression of dissent and the attempt to produce change, therefore, may not be carried out
in ways which injure individuals or damage institutional facilities or disrupt the classes of
one's teachers or colleagues. Speakers on campus must not only be protected from
violence but must be given an opportunity to be heard. Those who seek to call attention to
grievances must not do so in ways that significantly impede the functions of the
institution.” (1970 Declaration of the AAUP Council)
Academic freedom, then, is inevitably accompanied by academic responsibility. Various aspects of this
responsibility are specified below. Nothing in this description is intended to abridge in any way the
principles and procedures advanced in the 1940 AAUP Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and
Tenure. The description itself is derived in substantial measure from the AAUP Statement on Professional
Ethics (1966).
Faculty members have responsibilities to their students. They shall encourage in students the free pursuit
of learning and independence of mind, while holding before them the highest scholarly and professional
standards. Faculty shall show respect for the student as an individual and shall adhere to their proper role
as intellectual guides and counselors. They shall make every reasonable effort to foster honest academic
conduct and to ensure that their evaluation of each student reflects, as nearly as possible, the true worth of
the student's academic performance, regardless of considerations of race, creed, gender, sexual orientation,
or personal beliefs. Faculty shall eschew any exploitation of students for private advantage and shall
acknowledge any significant assistance received from them.
Faculty members also have responsibilities to their colleagues, deriving from their common membership in
a community of scholars. They shall respect and defend the free inquiry of their associates. In the
exchange of criticism and ideas they shall show due regard for the opinions of others and shall
acknowledge their intellectual debts. They shall strive to be objective and fair in any professional
judgments of their colleagues. A fuller description of professional responsibilities toward colleagues can
be found in Section IX.E. of the Manual.
Faculty members have responsibility to their disciplines and to the advancement of knowledge generally.
In this regard their primary obligation is to seek and to state the truth as they perceive it. To this end, they
shall devote their energies to developing and improving their scholarly competence. They shall exercise
critical self-discipline and judgment in using, extending, and transmitting knowledge, and they shall at all
time practice intellectual honesty.
Faculty members have responsibilities to the university. Thus, faculty shall accept a reasonable share of
the responsibility for the governance of the university. While exercising their right to evaluate university
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policies and procedures and to seek to revise them, they shall abide by such policies and procedures as are
current, provided these do not contravene academic freedom. While individual faculty determine the
amount and nature of the work they perform outside the university, they shall do so within the guidelines
set forth in university policy (see Part VIII, Section K.) and with full regard for their paramount
responsibilities within the university. In the eventuality of a foreseen interruption or termination of a
faculty member's service with the university, the effects of such a change upon the program of the
university shall be taken into account and due notice shall be given.
In their formal capacity as employees of the State of South Carolina, faculty members are bound by the
Rules of Conduct . . . for Public Officials and Public Employees prepared by the S.C. State Ethics
Commission. In the main these rules have to do with the use of an official position for personal gain or to
exercise improper influence. For example, no faculty member may "use or disclose confidential
information gained in the course of or by reason of his/her official position or activities in any way that
would result in financial gain for himself/herself or for any other person." Faculty seeking clarification of
their status according to the Rules of Conduct should contact the university human resources division.
C. General Qualifications for Faculty Appointments
Individuals appointed to the Faculty of Clemson University are expected to exhibit and maintain mastery of
their fields, whether they are appointed primarily for teaching, research, public service, librarianship, or
administration. In judging the effectiveness of an individual's work, the quality of performance of assigned
duties in teaching, research, public service, librarianship, and/or administration shall be considered, along
with knowledge of subject matter, professional stature, contributions to professional societies, and
contributions to the university through student counseling, committee work, assigned administrative duties,
and public service activities. It is the responsibility of academic administrators to keep faculty clearly
informed as to the duties required or expected of them.
Rank at initial appointment and promotion in rank is based on education, relevant experience,
accomplishments, and effectiveness of performance in the areas listed in the preceding paragraph. The term
"relevant experience" used below is broadly interpreted to include professional experience judged to be
pertinent to the position to which the faculty member is appointed. Degree requirements refer to earned
degrees from institutions of recognized standing in subject fields relevant to the field of appointment.
Specific qualifications are set forth in departmental guidelines. The departmental faculty, through a peer
review process, is the primary judge of these qualifications. The details of the peer evaluation process vary
among departments, but the general procedure is described in Section D below, along with the minimum
expectations for individuals holding various academic ranks. These standards are not imposed rigidly,
however, since illustrious achievements and national or international recognition may overshadow any
requirements as to educational level and length of experience. Further, it should be understood that
satisfying the minimal educational and experiential requirements does not in itself necessarily justify
advancement in rank, for such advancement is based upon ongoing evaluations of a faculty member's
professional accomplishments in the context of departmental, school, college, and university needs and
expectations.
D. Regular Faculty Ranks
Regular appointments are full-time appointments in an academic unit that is under the jurisdiction of the
Provost for individuals expected to have a permanent association with the university. Except for Instructor,
these are tenurable appointments. Until tenure is granted, regular appointments are for one-year terms.
Non-renewal requires advance notice (see Part IV, Section F). Regular appointments carry voting
membership in the university faculty.
1.
Instructor. Normally, the master's degree or equivalent is required, with preference given to those
pursuing the terminal degree. Appointees should show promise for advancement to a higher rank.
Instructors are eligible for promotion to assistant professor only if they have the qualifications for
the rank of assistant professor, a position becomes available, and the department has conducted or
conducts a national search for that position. Instructors not promoted by the end of the fourth year
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of service will receive a one-year terminal appointment. Instructor is not a tenurable rank, but
three or fewer years of service in that rank may be credited toward tenure.
2.
Assistant Professor. The terminal degree is normally required, but substantial progress toward
the terminal degree may be acceptable. The persons appointed to this rank should show evidence
of ability to meet the requirements for advancement in faculty rank.
3.
Associate Professor. Normally, the terminal degree and relevant experience are required. Also
expected is evidence of scholarly or creative publication; fulfillment of service responsibilities to
the department, the school, the college, and the university; and marked success in teaching,
research, and/or public service.
4.
Professor. The terminal degree, relevant experience, and continued significant scholarly/creative
accomplishment are required. The rank of professor is granted on the basis of distinguished
scholarly or creative publication, outstanding contributions to the university, and conspicuous
success in all areas of assigned responsibility in teaching, research, and/or public service.
5.
Library Faculty. The library faculty ranks of General Librarian, Assistant Librarian, Associate
Librarian, and Librarian correspond to the faculty ranks of Instructor, Assistant Professor,
Associate Professor, and Professor. The Guidelines for Appointment, Reappointment, Tenure and
Promotion of Library Faculty specify qualifications for these ranks. Provisions of this Manual
that refer to specific faculty ranks apply to the corresponding Library faculty ranks.
E. Special Faculty Ranks
Appointments to special faculty ranks include visiting, adjunct, and part-time positions as well as the
special ranks of lecturer and post doctoral research fellow in academic units that are under the jurisdiction
of the Provost. Conditions of appointment must be fully detailed in the appointment letter. Such
appointments may be renewable, but they do not normally carry any expectation of renewal, are not
tenurable, and service in such ranks normally does not count towards the tenure probationary period.
Special appointments do not carry voting privileges except as may be provided in relevant
college/school/departmental faculty bylaws.
1. Visiting Faculty. The term "visiting" denotes a temporary appointment of an individual for a term
of one year or less, subject to limited renewals. Visiting appointments are appropriate only in
cases in which the association with the university is meant to be temporary and brief. The
qualifications for visiting faculty shall be comparable to those for appointment at corresponding
regular faculty rank.
2.
R.O.T.C. Faculty. Army and Air Force personnel are nominated by their respective services and
are approved by the university for appointment to the faculty of the Reserve Officer Training
Corps program. These appointments are generally for three-year terms. The appropriate faculty
rank is determined by the qualifications of the individual.
3.
Adjunct Faculty. The term "adjunct" denotes an advisory appointment. It may be assigned to
individuals whose principal employer is other than Clemson University and who bring needed
expertise to the teaching, research, or public service programs of the University. The
qualifications for adjunct faculty rank shall be comparable to those for appointments at
corresponding regular faculty ranks. Adjunct appointments generally do not involve remuneration
from the university; are for one year or less; are individually negotiated as to terms; and may be
renewable. Adjunct appointments shall be limited to those making active contributions to the
teaching, research, or public service programs of the university, and are subject to review by
departmental faculty.
4. Research Faculty. The title of research professor, research associate professor, and research
assistant professor (depending upon professional qualifications) may be granted to persons
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engaged in full time research who are supported exclusively (including fringe benefits) from
external funds or foundation accounts. Such appointments must be initiated by the host
department(s) in accordance with departmental bylaws and approved by the dean and the Provost.
These positions are contingent upon the availability of external funds and adequate space;
termination is automatic upon expiration of external funding. Individuals holding these positions
will be subject to annual review utilizing the faculty activity system for faculty continuance.
Initial appointment, reappointment, and promotion will be based on departmental bylaws and will
be contingent upon plans for and contributions to the department’s undergraduate, graduate, and
public service programs that interface with their research or public service activities. Examples
are participation in departmental seminars, research exposure with undergraduate and graduate
students, provision for funding of graduate students, service on the graduate advisory committee,
and public service activities related to the department’s mission. Distribution of indirect costs or
overhead generated shall follow university policy. These positions are not tenurable, nor shall
time spent in such a position count toward tenure.
5.
Extension Faculty. The title of extension professor, extension associate professor, and extension
assistant professor (depending upon professional qualifications) may be granted to persons
engaged in full time extension or public service who are supported exclusively (including fringe
benefits) from external funds or foundation accounts. Such appointments must be initiated by the
host department(s) in accordance with departmental bylaws and approved by the Dean and the
Provost. These positions are contingent upon the availability of external funds and adequate
space; termination is automatic upon expiration of external funding. Individuals holding these
positions will be subject to annual review utilizing the faculty activity system for faculty
continuance. Initial appointment, reappointment, and promotion will be based on departmental
bylaws and will be contingent upon plans for and contributions to the department’s extension
and/or public service programs. Distribution of indirect costs or overhead generated shall follow
university policy. These positions are not tenurable, nor shall time spent in such a position count
toward tenure.
6.
Lecturer. This rank is assigned to individuals with special qualifications or for special functions
in cases in which the assignment of other faculty ranks is not appropriate. Full-time academic
appointments shall be for one-year terms and may be renewed. (The termination date of
appointments made for the full academic year shall be extended over the summer until the next
academic year begins.) Notice of renewal or non-renewal must be provided before July 15 for the
following academic year. After four or more years of continuous appointment as a lecturer, one
year’s notice of non-renewal must be provided.
7.
Temporary Lecturer. This rank is assigned to individuals who receive limited duration
appointments. These appointments shall be for one-year or less and may be renewed.
8. Senior Lecturer. After six years of satisfactory performance a lecturer may be reclassified as a
senior lecturer. Equivalent experience at Clemson, such as that obtained in a visiting position,
may be counted. A department chair, with the concurrence of the department’s advisory
committee, may recommend an individual to the college dean who makes the appointment. Senior
lecturers may be offered contracts ranging from one to three years with the requirement of one
year’s notice before termination. This rank is not available to faculty with greater than 50%
administrative assignment.
9. Post Doctoral Research Fellow. This title denotes an appointment for special research functions,
typically in connection with externally funded research projects. The individuals appointed shall
have the general qualifications for regular faculty. The term of appointment normally shall not
exceed one year. Limited renewals are possible.
10. Part-Time Faculty. Individuals who are assigned less than full normal workloads in teaching,
research, and/or public service may be appointed to the ranks of Instructor, Assistant Professor,
Associate Professor, or Professor with the suffix, "part-time." Such appointments are made for
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one semester or one year, renewable. Qualifications for rank at initial appointment and for
promotion are the same as for regular faculty ranks. These employees participate in the state
retirement system, but appointments for less than three-quarters time do not carry any insurance or
related fringe benefits, nor do they allow for reduced fees for enrollment in university courses.
F. Endowed Chairs and Titled Professorships
These positions are established in recognition of exceptional levels of achievement. The priorities placed
on excellence in teaching, research, and public service vary with the purposes of the particular
professorship or chair. A university chair is normally funded by an endowment which is the sole or
primary source of the holder's remuneration. Holders of titled professorships are remunerated with state
funds, but receive salary supplements from endowments or from annual grants to the university.
Procedures for appointments to these positions are set forth below.
According to a policy adopted on July 17, 1981, by the Board of Trustees, those appointed to endowed
chairs and titled professorships must be selected by members of the academic community. Because of the
university-wide importance of such a position, there must be representation on the search-and-screening
committee from a college other than the one to which the chair or titled professorship is assigned. In all
cases nominations of candidates for the position shall be openly and publicly solicited.
A limited number of Alumni Distinguished Professors are selected from those Clemson University faculty
holding the rank of professor who have been employed by Clemson University for at least 5 years.
Selection is based on dedication to and excellence in teaching and a continuing commitment to Clemson
University and Clemson students. Evaluation criteria encompass all achievements in teaching, research,
public service and other professional activities. Alumni Distinguished Professors receive a salary
supplement from the Clemson University Alumni Association, and one of their number serves on the
Alumni National Council.
For selection of Alumni Distinguished Professors, the faculty of each college elects a college selection
committee with representatives from each department offering undergraduate courses. Each college
selection committee forwards not more than three nominees to the final selection committee. The final
selection committee, composed of the collegiate deans and chaired by the senior collegiate dean in terms of
service as dean, recommends a single nominee for each vacancy to the Provost. The Provost forwards all
documentation, along with any comments of his/her own, to the President for final approval. If the
President so directs, the Provost asks the committee for additional nominations. If additional nominations
are requested, the college selection committee will again submit nominees to the final selection committee
and the entire selection process is repeated.
For all other endowed chairs and titled professorships, the composition of the search-and-screening
committees shall receive the approval of the Provost. The majority of each such committee shall be
composed of faculty members from the department to which the chair or titled professorship is assigned
and shall be elected by the faculty of that department. At least one faculty member from a related
discipline in another college shall be appointed to the committee by the Provost. Administrators in the line
of appointment shall not serve on the committee. The committee nominates a slate of candidates and
forwards its recommendations to the department chair. The department chair recommends a candidate for
the position and forwards this recommendation, along with the slate of nominees, for review and approval
by the dean, the Provost, and the President. If the President so directs, the Provost asks the committee for
additional nominations.
The rank and tenure status of those appointed to endowed chairs and titled professorships shall be
determined by the applicable rules, regulations, policies, and practices governing all appointments to the
faculty of Clemson University. Inasmuch as endowed chairs and titled professorships are established in
recognition of exceptional levels of achievement in teaching, research, and public service, individuals
whose principal responsibilities are administrative are not normally eligible for these appointments. Under
exceptional conditions a department chair or prospective department chair may receive an appointment to
an endowed chair or titled professorship. Such an appointment must be ratified by a two-thirds vote of
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approval by the faculty of the affected department. This vote shall be by secret ballot and shall be
administered by the department’s tenure and promotion or personnel committee.
The university community as a whole has a vested and vital interest in the academic contributions of
holders of endowed chairs and titled professorships. Consequently, while appointments to such chairs and
professorships shall be for an indefinite period, and while the performance of the holders of such
appointments shall be subject to the normal reviews of performance to which all faculty members are
subject, special or periodic review of the professional performance of these particular faculty members may
be conducted, but only if conditions stated at the time of award so stipulate. Such a review may be initiated
by the dean of the college if requested by both the departmental faculty advisory committee and the
department chair. If the holder of the chair or endowed professorship is the department chair, the dean of a
college shall initiate the review at the request of the departmental tenure and promotion or personnel
committee.
For any such review the Provost shall ensure that a committee (composed in the same manner as the
search-and-screening committee that made the initial selection of the holder) evaluates the performance of
the holder of the chair or titled professorship. Recommendations for removal by this committee shall
follow the same route as those of the initial search-and-screening committee. Should these
recommendations result in a decision by the President to remove the incumbent from the chair or titled
professorship, such a decision shall not affect the incumbent's tenure status and professorial rank. If the
holder of the chair or endowed professorship is a department chair or prospective department chair, the
appointments shall be independent.
Before the end of the fiscal year a record of all expenditures from the account supporting each endowed
chair and titled professorship shall be made available to its holder.
G. TERIed Faculty
Faculty (and staff) who meet retirement eligibility criteria with the South Carolina Retirement
System may sign a TERI (Teacher and Employee Retention Incentive) agreement under which their
retirement pension is deposited in a non-interest-bearing account while they continue to perform
their regular duties for up to five years. TERIed faculty enjoy all the rights, privileges, and
responsibilities of regular faculty. Upon exiting the TERI program, faculty members who have
sufficient years of service become emeritus faculty. Additional information about the TERI program
can be found on the Office of Human Resources website
(www.clemson.edu/humanres/Payroll_Benefits/TERI_faq.htm).
H.
Emeritus Faculty
Regular faculty members, including library faculty, who have served at least five years at the university and
fifteen years in the academic profession receive the title of Emeritus or Emerita appended to their
professorial rank upon official retirement. All retired faculty and professional staff are entitled to become
members of an emeritus organization, whether or not they meet the requirements above.
In recognition of their service to the university, their honored place in the university community, and their
ongoing capacities for advancing human knowledge and contributing to the intellectual and cultural life of
the university, emeritus faculty as scholars have certain rights and privileges accorded to them by Clemson
University. For example, they are members of the university faculty (see Part VII below, Faculty
Constitution, Article I, Section 1) and are welcome to participate fully in all meetings of the university
faculty. Colleges and academic departments may extend similar invitations to their retired colleagues.
I.
Retired Faculty
It is the policy of the university to allow emeritus and other retired faculty and staff to use as many of its
facilities and services as practicable. To this end the university provides a faculty identification card upon
request to the university personnel division, which is used for Library and other privileges. Retired faculty
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may, upon application, be granted faculty parking privileges, receive reduced rates on athletic tickets,
obtain membership in Fike Recreation Center, retain access to university computing services, and enjoy
any other benefits accorded to faculty which do not exert undue financial burdens upon the university. In
addition, they may request the use of available office and/or lab space and may apply, upon approval, for
university research grants under the same rules as other faculty.
Those retired faculty who remain professionally active shall be allocated office and laboratory space to an
extent commensurate with the level of their activity. Not less than three nor more than twelve months prior
to retirement, the faculty member shall submit to the department chair a brief description of the nature and
proposed level of activity. If the faculty member and chair cannot agree upon the allocation of space, the
matter shall be referred to the dean of the college. If the matter cannot be reconciled at that level, it shall be
adjudicated by an ad hoc committee consisting of a department chair from another college appointed by the
Provost, a member of the Faculty Senate research committee appointed by the Faculty Senate President,
and a chaired professor elected by the chaired professors. This committee shall conduct expeditious
hearings, which shall include seeking input from faculty in the affected department, as well as from the
retiree, the department chair, and the dean. The recommendation of this committee shall be final.
Annually, three months prior to the anniversary of retirement, the retired faculty member shall submit to
the department chair a concise report of activities in the previous year and a description of the proposed
activities for the following year. Disagreements on the continuation of space assignments will be resolved
in the manner described above.
J.
Faculty Awards
1.
The Alumni Master Teaching Award. Presented annually to a member of the faculty, this
award recognizes outstanding classroom teaching. Nominations for the award may be made by
any member of the Clemson University student body, faculty, or administration. Selection of the
recipient is made by the Student-Alumni Council.
2.
The Alumni Award for Outstanding Research. Jointly administered by the Clemson University
chapters of Sigma Xi and Phi Kappa Phi, this award annually recognizes outstanding contributions
to research by Clemson faculty.
3.
The Alumni Award for Distinguished Public Service. This award is presented annually and
recognizes distinguished service to the citizenry of South Carolina by Clemson specialists,
extension workers, and county agents.
4.
The Alan Schaffer Faculty Senate Service Award recognizes exceptional service on behalf of
the Faculty Senate. Any faculty or staff member or administrator is eligible, with strong
preference given to individuals who have provided direct service to the Faculty Senate. Current
Faculty Senate officers are ineligible.
5.
The Class of ’39 Award for Excellence has been established by the Class of 1939 to recognize
the achievements of the Clemson Faculty. The Award will be made to a faculty member who is
judged by his or her peers to have made the "highest achievement of service" to the Student Body,
the University, and the Clemson Community, State of South Carolina, or the Nation. Eligibility
requirements are: be an active faculty member, have at least five years of Clemson University
faculty service, have been granted tenure at Clemson University, have performed in an outstanding
manner in at least two of the following areas: (1) assigned responsibility, (2) interrelations with
the Student Body, (3) activities in behalf of the University, and (4) activities benefiting the local
community, state or nation.
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III-8
6.
The Centennial Professorship Award is a rotating award bestowed by the Clemson University
faculty on an outstanding colleague. The Professorship is supported by an endowment jointly
funded by the Clemson University faculty and their friends and a matching grant from the
Commission on Higher Education. Faculty who are tenured or have a tenure-track appointment
are eligible for this award and will be considered on the basis of demonstrated excellence in one or
more of the following areas: undergraduate and/or graduate teaching, applied and/or basic
research, public/extension service and/or librarianship.
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PART IV.
PERSONNEL PRACTICES
A. Procedures for Faculty Appointments
Candidates for appointment to the regular faculty shall be recruited and evaluated by a search-andscreening committee composed of members of the regular faculty and others if specified in departmental
bylaws. Such committees are selected in accordance with departmental bylaws or, in the absence of
relevant bylaws, by the departmental faculty Advisory Committee. The credentials of each applicant shall
be made available to all regular departmental faculty, from whom information and recommendations
regarding selection shall be solicited. The search-and-screening committee shall make nominations of
suitable candidates to the department chair, including recommended rank and tenure status on appointment.
Proposals for appointment with immediate tenure, tenure probationary periods of two years or less, and
appointment at a rank higher than assistant professor must be reviewed in accordance with the department's
tenure-and-promotion process. Transfers of tenured faculty between departments shall be reviewed by an
appropriate departmental committee and a recommendation forwarded to the appropriate administrator.
The department chair shall make recommendations to the dean from the candidates nominated by the
search-and-screening committee. If no appointment can be made from this list, additional nominations
shall be sought from the committee. In the recommendation to the dean, the department chair shall indicate
the degree of support of the faculty for the recommended candidate, the suggested rank, and the candidate's
suggested tenure status, where appropriate.
All administrators and search-and-screening committee members shall ensure compliance with Affirmative
Action guidelines (see Section B, below) and with “Procedures for Employing Non-citizens” (see the
University Personnel Manual).
Any waiver of university search and screening procedures for particular appointments must be requested by
the department chair with approval of the faculty’s Departmental Advisory Committee and the
departmental promotion, tenure and reappointment committee. Such waiver must be approved by the
Office of Access and Equity and the Provost and must be documented through the submission of Waiver of
Posting Form to the Office of Access and Equity for approval prior to any offer of appointment. The
purpose of such a waiver is to allow for targeted appointments without widespread recruitment efforts in
special cases or circumstances, such as hiring a high profile faculty member (e.g., Nobel laureate, national
academy member), individuals who will enhance faculty diversity, or spouses of newly appointed faculty
and/or administrators (see Section B, below). If the appointment is to a tenure-track position, the
appointment must be approved by the departmental committee responsible for hiring decisions and the rank
and tenure status must be approved by the departmental promotion, tenure and reappointment committee.
The selection of faculty for special appointments to meet temporary and/or short-notice needs requires that
the department chair have greater discretionary authority. However, it is incumbent upon the chair to
solicit responses from the faculty and to utilize the procedures for appointment of regular faculty whenever
feasible.
B. Affirmative Action Policies and Procedures for the Recruitment and Appointment of Faculty
and Administrators
Each college has its own affirmative action coordinator, appointed by the President, who establishes and
monitors employment goals and timetables. The coordinator bears the responsibility for ensuring that each
department in the college complies with both the letter and spirit of Clemson's affirmative action program.
Specifically, each coordinator helps to implement affirmative action policy as related to the college and
serves as liaison between the college and the Office of Access and Equity.
It is the policy of Clemson University that no person is to be accepted or rejected for employment solely on
the basis of age, gender, disability, race, religion, national origin or sexual orientation. However, special
attention to the identification, recruitment, and selection of minority group members, women, and disabled
individuals is consistent with state and federal laws and regulations and with university policy.
Every administrative and academic officer and search-and-screening committee shall take appropriate steps
within the areas of their responsibility to ensure that for each faculty and other professional position an
active and thorough recruitment effort is made for qualified females, members of minority groups, and
disabled individuals.
Such efforts shall be viewed by the Provost as an important factor in determining the acceptability of any
recommendation for a position. Clemson's affirmative action policies and procedures are intended to
complement the university's previous recruiting efforts. In this regard it is considered proper to define
eligibility criteria so as to broaden the base of the talent pool to include special experience, training, and
education not normally considered when such factors are important characteristics of eligibility for the
position. Such considerations must be applied equally to all candidates for a position. The
recommendation for an appointment to a position is to be made on the basis of the candidate's qualifications
for the position.
1.
Pre-Recruitment Stage. The search-and-screening committee of the department or equivalent
unit shall complete an Unclassified Vacancy Announcement Form (AA-1) in consultation with the
Office of Access and Equity. The Office advises the committee on the most effective ways to
distribute information about the availability of the position to minority groups, women, and
disabled persons, so as to encourage applications from these sources. Whenever feasible, the
search-and-screening committee itself should include minority group members, women, and/or
disabled individuals.
2.
Recruitment Stage. All correspondence and advertising shall indicate that Clemson University is
an "Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer," and all recruiting sources are
to be informed of that fact by the committee. Federal regulations require that affirmative action
employers collect and maintain data on the race, sex, disability status, and ethnic identity of all
applicants for employment. This information, however, may not be required of applicants but may
be voluntarily provided by applicants completing Affirmative Action Form 2 (AA-2).
If a particular applicant pool contains no or few minority, female, or disabled candidates, the director of the
Office of Access and Equity should be asked to provide the recruiting unit with additional assistance in
establishing suitable contacts. The group of applicants considered shall include qualified minorities,
disabled persons, and women unless documentation is supplied that special efforts to recruit them have
been made and failed.
There may be instances in which a person is recommended for a position by a search-and-screening
committee without widespread recruitment efforts having been undertaken. Such cases may be justified
when a qualified individual may be promoted from within the institution, when time is of the essence, when
university operations would suffer as a result of an interim appointment, or when a person is available who
is uniquely qualified for a position. By their very nature, such cases are rare. The acceptability of such
cases shall be measured not only against the urgency of those particular appointments but also against past
efforts to employ members of minority groups and women in the unit(s) recommending those
appointments.
3. Appointment Stage. When the search-and-screening process has resulted in the selection of a
candidate for appointment to a position, a Request to Hire form that documents the recruitment
efforts for that position shall be prepared by the department chair or equivalent administrator in
consultation with the director, Office of Access and Equity. This form shall be submitted to the
Provost, without whose approval no offer to candidates shall be made. The dean of the college or
equivalent administrator is responsible for monitoring the search-and-screening process to ensure
that affirmative action policies and procedures are being followed. Upon receipt of the Provost's
approval of the Request to Hire form, the dean issues the employment offer, utilizing the
university's standard contract letter format.
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C. Terms of Appointment
The offer of appointment to a prospective faculty member shall be made in writing by the dean of the
college concerned, following a standardized procedure that includes establishing the appointment's terms
and conditions. Any special understandings or conditions incumbent upon either party must be explicitly
stated. The letter of understanding, upon acceptance by the appointee, along with relevant portions of the
Faculty Manual, becomes the employment contract.
All regular appointments are to the rank of instructor or higher. In any regular appointment at Clemson
University the initial appointment is for one year or less, subject to renewal for a one-year term. Tenure
may be granted under the provision of Part IV, Section G. Tenure, having been granted, is continuous
thereafter and can be revoked only through termination or dismissal under the terms of Part IV, Section K.
Special appointments, such as those awarded to post doctoral research fellows, lecturers, visiting, adjunct,
and part-time faculty as well as to R.O.T.C. personnel, generally specify brief associations with the
university and limited faculty functions.
Except for faculty with tenured status, individuals holding teaching, research, or public service
appointments shall be informed each year in writing of their appointments and of all matters relative to
their eligibility for the acquisition of tenure. Any special standards adopted by the faculty member's
department, school, or college shall also be brought immediately to the individual's attention.
D. Procedures for Renewal of Appointment, Tenure, and Promotion
Because the faculty of a department or equivalent academic unit is the primary judge of the qualifications
of its members, peer evaluation is essential in recommendations for appointment, renewal of appointment,
tenure, and promotion. All peer recommendations regarding any individual holding faculty rank in a
department shall, therefore, originate within the faculty of that department. Individual departments at
Clemson University establish written procedures and committee structures in order to facilitate peer
evaluation. These written procedures must incorporate attention to “Best Practices for a Performance
Review System for Faculty” (Appendix E).
All personnel matters are confidential and a matter of trust. The departmental committee(s) reviewing
appointment, promotion, and tenure matters shall be composed of full-time faculty members excluding
individuals who, as administrators, have input into personnel decisions such as appointment, tenure, and
promotion. Initial recommendations on personnel decisions are made by the faculty peer review committee
and the department chair. In cases where there is no department chair, the administrative recommendation
is made by the school director. From the remainder of this section (D) through Section J, references to chair
should be understood to refer to the school director if and only if there is no departmental chair.
The chair may be invited to serve as resource person but may not be present during committee deliberations
and voting. Departmental procedures for peer evaluation shall be in writing and shall be available to the
faculty, the chair, the dean, and the Provost. Each department's peer evaluation process shall receive
formal approval by the faculty, the department chair or school director, the dean, and the Provost. To the
maximum extent possible, the procedures followed and criteria used shall be explicit.
The department chair shall ensure that any faculty member eligible for renewal of appointment, tenure, or
promotion is given an opportunity to be reviewed. The appropriate committee reviews each case in
accordance with departmental procedures and policies, and renders a written recommendation. The
department chair does not participate in the deliberations of the committee, but does issue a separate
and independent recommendation as to the disposition of the case after receiving the recommendations
of the committee. The chair shall provide the committee charged with peer review with a copy of the
recommendation. The chair shall also ensure that the affected faculty member is promptly informed in
writing as to the results of and rationale for both recommendations, and the faculty member may elect to
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IV-3
include a letter of response in the materials forwarded to the dean. In cases of promotion or early
tenure consideration, the candidate may withdraw from further consideration at this point.
The chair shall forward to the dean both recommendations, the supporting evaluations, and the candidate's
dossier. In cases in which there is a discrepancy in the rationale for retention, tenure, or promotion between
a faculty member’s peer committee and that of the department chair, that administrator shall make the dean
aware of the discrepancy. The dean will meet with the chair and with the peer committee to discuss
reasons for the discrepancy. A “Request for Personnel Action” form shall be attached to provide a record
of the review at all administrative levels.
The dean reviews the complete file, makes a separate recommendation on the “Request for Personnel
Action” form, and writes a report which includes a rationale for supporting or opposing the
recommendations of the peer committee and department chair. The dean may establish committees within
the college to provide assistance and advice in such reviews. The dean shall promptly inform the candidate
in writing of his or her recommendation and its rationale, and the faculty member may elect to include a
letter of response in the materials forwarded to the provost. If the dean’s recommendation differs from
those of the peer committee and/or the department chair, the differences shall be discussed with them prior
to informing the candidate. Except in cases of penultimate year tenure review, the candidate is offered the
opportunity to withdraw at this stage. In all other cases the complete file is forwarded to the Provost.
The Provost reviews the complete file and forwards a recommendation for final action to the President. If
the Provost agrees with concurring recommendations of the peer review committee, the department chair,
and the dean, he/she may simply indicate this and sign the “Request for Personnel Action” form.
Otherwise, the Provost shall write a recommendation to the President which includes a rationale in addition
to completing and signing the “Request for Personnel Action” form. The Provost shall ensure that the
affected faculty member is informed promptly in writing as to the final action.
In the case of proposed new appointments of regular faculty, the primary peer evaluation of candidates'
qualifications is made by the appropriate search-and-screening committee. However, appointment with
immediate tenure, or with probationary periods of two years or less, or immediate appointment to a rank
higher than assistant professor must be reviewed in accordance with the department's regular tenure and
promotion peer evaluation process. These written procedures must incorporate attention to “Best Practices
for a Performance Review System for Faculty,” Appendix E.
E. Annual Performance Evaluation
The annual performance evaluation by the chair or director and evaluation by the faculty peer review
committee shall be conducted on a calendar year basis, beginning in January for the preceding calendar
year. These reviews must incorporate attention to “Best Practices for a Performance Review System for
Faculty,” Appendix E. For teaching faculty, student evaluations must be used as indicated in Section
IX.D.10.
1.
Establishment of Goals using Form 1 (Appendix C):
No later than Wednesday of the third full week after classes begin in the spring semester, the
faculty member enters his/her goals for the year in the Faculty Activity System (FAS). No later
than the end of the fifth full week the faculty member’s goals and assigned duties for that year are
established by the chair or director in consultation with the faculty member; the percentage of
emphasis given to each goal area is determined at the same time. “Professional Goals and Duties”
(in Appendix C and printed from FAS) is used as a written record of these matters. Where there is
a disagreement, the chair or director has the final responsibility to determine duties and goals and
to set the percentage of emphasis distributed among goals; a faculty member who disagrees may
file a disclaimer and indicate his or her disagreement on Form 1. A signed, printed copy of Form
1 will be placed in each faculty member’s personnel file. These goals are frozen for the university
after the seventh full week of classes. If a revision of goals is required because of a significant
change in workload or in response to input from the dean or chair, revised goals for the fall
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semester may be entered no later than Wednesday of the third full week after classes begin in the
fall semester. Revised goals must be agreed to by the department chair or director. Disagreement
is handled as in the same manner as in the spring. If goals are revised, a signed, printed copy of
the new Form 1 will be added to the faculty member’s personnel file.
2. Statement of Accomplishments using FAS and Form 2 (Appendix C):
No later than the end of the second full week of classes in the spring semester, each faculty member
completes Evaluation Form 2, “Annual Report of Professional Accomplishments” and submits it to
the chair or director. (Form 2 is found in Appendix C and printed from FAS.) While this report
will, in most cases, correspond to goals laid out in Form 1, faculty need to record the fullest account
of yearly activity, especially concerning matters that might not otherwise come to the attention of
the chair or director. Accomplishments not listed as objectives on Form 1 should be clearly
identified as such. This annual report is restricted to activities related to the faculty member’s
professional responsibilities and/or professional development.
3. Annual Faculty Evaluation using Form 3 (in Appendix C):
Form 3 records the department chair’s summary evaluation of the faculty member. On the basis of
material in Forms 1 and 2, personal observations, and a second interview, the chair or director
completes Evaluation Form 3, “Evaluation of Academic Personnel” and forwards it to the dean no
later than the end of the seventh full week of classes in the spring semester. In the case of tenuretrack faculty, the chair may attach the faculty member’s most recent reappointment
recommendation to the annual performance review (Form 3) and then complete the balance of the
form, including evaluation of any accomplishments after the reappointment evaluation.
The narrative evaluation has three parts: (a) a description of the individual’s effectiveness with
emphasis upon demonstrated strengths, (b) an indication of the area(s) where improvement is
needed, and (c) suggestions of ways by which the faculty member can reach a higher stage of
professional development.
In addition to a narrative evaluation, Form 3 calls for a “Total Performance Rating,” a six-step scale
ranging from “excellent” to “unsatisfactory.” The department chair will check one category. After
completing and signing Form 3, a copy goes to the faculty member who signs it and returns it to the
chair or director. Signing this form does not imply agreement with the evaluation and the faculty
member has the right to file a disclaimer to the chair’s or director’s evaluation within ten calendar
days of its receipt. The chair will respond to any disclaimers and revise the evaluation if
appropriate.
After ten calendar days, the chair or director forwards Forms 1, 2, and 3, including any attachments
and disclaimers, to the Dean. The chair is expressly prohibited from forwarding to the dean any
material that was not seen by the faculty member during the evaluation process. After receiving the
evaluation package, the dean has three weeks in which to read, sign, comment on the faculty
member’s performance and the chair’s evaluation, and return the package. The dean will respond
to any disclaimers and revise the evaluation if appropriate. Finally, a copy of Form 3 must go to
the faculty member who will read, sign, and return the form to the chair. The faculty member’s
signature does not imply agreement and a disclaimer to the dean’s evaluation can be filed within ten
calendar days of receipt. Any annual evaluation to which a disclaimer has been filed (including
copies of Forms 1, 2, and 3, all disclaimers, all responses, and any other supporting documents)
must be forwarded to the Provost for information before being returned to the dean’s office, to the
chair’s office, and, finally to the faculty member. Filing a disclaimer does not preclude or delay
filing a grievance under Grievance Procedure II (see section V.D. and Appendices I and J). The
time period for the grievance process begins after the faculty member acknowledges by signature
that he/she has received the dean’s response to the evaluation.
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IV-5
Form 3, including all supporting documents (Forms 1 and 2, all disclaimers, all responses, and any
other supporting documents), is an official document useful in faculty development and providing
important information for decisions concerning reappointment, promotion, tenure, and salary. It
becomes a part of the faculty member’s permanent, confidential file retained by each college dean.
The faculty member has the right of full disclosure of his/her confidential file.
In departments with four or more faculty, excluding the chair, a faculty member may request and
receive in a timely fashion a report on how the six categories of the “total performance rating” were
distributed among his/her colleagues, i.e., how many rated “excellent,” “very good,” etc. Where
there are sufficient numbers of faculty so that confidentiality can be maintained, a more precise
distribution appropriate to the rank and tenure status of the inquiring faculty member will be
reported.
F.
Notification of Renewal and Non-Renewal of Appointments
The dean of the college shall notify non-tenured regular faculty members of the terms and conditions of the
renewal of their appointments no later than May 16. Because the university budget requires legislative
approval, salary notification may be delayed until after the General Assembly has acted.
Regardless of the stated term or other provisions of any regular appointment, written notice that a nontenured appointment is not to be renewed shall be given to the faculty member in advance of the expiration
of the appointment, according to the following schedule: 1) not less than three months in advance of the
appointment's expiration if the faculty member is in the first year of service; 2) not less than six months in
advance if in the second year of service; 3) at least twelve months before the expiration of an appointment
after two or more years of service.
Special appointments do not require notice of non-renewal since such appointments are for stated periods
of limited association with the university. The university does renew special appointments on a year-toyear basis in some instances. In such cases the university endeavors to provide reasonable notice of
subsequent non-renewal.
G. Tenure Policies
After the expiration of a probationary period, faculty may be granted tenure, with their service terminated
only for adequate cause and subject to due process in the consideration of their cases. Tenure is intended to
enhance freedom in teaching, research, and other professional activities, and to provide the economic
security required to sustain these freedoms.
Faculty with the rank of Assistant Professor or higher are eligible for tenure. However, faculty promoted
from Instructor to higher rank may apply for credit towards the tenure probationary period for prior service
as Instructor. Such applications shall be made to the chair or director or equivalent administrator at the
time of promotion and shall be subject to peer review. Any decision shall be communicated in writing to
the applicant before the next regular semester.
The tenure probationary period for a full-time regular faculty member shall not exceed seven years. If
advance written agreement is reached by a faculty member, the chair or director, the dean, and the Provost,
periods of leave without pay may be excluded from this seven-year period. Included within the tenure
probationary period may be the faculty member's full-time tenured or tenure-track service at other
institutions of higher learning, subject to advance written agreement. Candidates must be notified of their
options during the contract negotiation process. Agreements for immediate tenure or for a probationary
period of two years or less shall be reviewed in accordance with a department's regular tenure peer
evaluation process. Probationary faculty who give birth, father, or adopt a child during their probationary
period may, at their request, receive a one-year extension of the tenure decision. The request for an
extension must come within two months of the birth or adoption. The extension will automatically be
granted unless the chair or dean can document sufficient reason for denial. Normally, a maximum of two
such extensions may be granted. Extension of the probationary period of a faculty member for serious
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IV-6
illness, family tragedy or other special circumstances may be granted with the approval of the department
chair, dean and Provost.
All regular faculty appointments are made on a year-to-year probationary basis until tenure is granted.
Each appointment renewal and all grants of tenure (including appointment with immediate tenure) shall be
subject to a peer review of the individual's qualifications by the affected department, as set forth above in
Section D. All grants of tenure shall be approved by the President of the University, and tenure notification
shall be made in writing in accordance with procedures developed by the President.
Normally, the decision to grant tenure shall be made during the penultimate year of the probationary period
and becomes effective at the beginning of the next year. In exceptional cases tenure may be granted earlier.
A recommendation to confer tenure for an assistant professor must be accompanied by a favorable
recommendation for promotion to associate professor. Factors considered in early tenure may include
relevant experience in other than tenure-track positions. Those persons holding tenure elsewhere may be
considered for immediate tenure at Clemson, but this procedure shall not be considered as routine. Should
notice of the denial of tenure not be given in advance of the expiration of the final probationary
appointment (as provided in Part IV, Section F), tenure shall become automatic at the end of the
probationary period.
Leave time taken which benefits the institution as well as the individual faculty member may count as
probationary period service. Time spent as lecturer or post-doctoral research fellow, as visiting, part-time,
or adjunct faculty, or in other non-tenure-track positions, shall not count as tenure probationary service.
The probationary period for all regular nine-month faculty begins August 15th and for regular twelvemonth faculty, July 1st of the calendar year in which the individual is officially added to the faculty roster.
However, nine month faculty officially joining the university after October 1st of a calendar year shall have
their probationary period begin on the August 15th and twelve-month faculty on the July 1st following
their appointment.
H.
Post Tenure Review
1. Purpose. Post-tenure review (PTR) serves to evaluate rigorously a faculty member’s professional
contributions. The review should be used to ensure that all faculty serve the needs of the students
and the institution and that excellent faculty are identified and rewarded. Although the focus of
PTR is on the performance of the individual since his or her last tenure or post-tenure review, the
overall contribution of the individual faculty member to Clemson University should not be
neglected.
2. Coverage. All faculty members holding a tenured faculty position shall be subject to PTR except
for a faculty member planning to retire by August 15th of the same academic year in which the post
tenure review would occur, providing that a binding letter of intent to retire is signed thereby
waiving the PTR.
The period for post tenure review is after every five years. The first five-year period begins at the
time that tenure is granted. Promotion during that period does not alter the schedule for review.
PTR review covering that five year period are conducted during the fall semester of the sixth year
when one or more faculty members in a department or equivalent unit is scheduled for review.
Review of tenured academic administrators is accomplished in accordance with Section VI. L.of
the Faculty Manual.
Periods of sick leave, sabbatical leave, or leave without pay will be excluded from this five-year
period. Faculty who give birth, father, or adopt a child during any five-year period may, at their
request, receive a one-year extension of the post-tenure review. The request for an extension must
come within two months of the birth or adoption. The extension will automatically be granted
unless the chair or dean can document sufficient reason for denial. Extension of the post-tenure
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review period of a faculty member for serious illness, family tragedy or other special circumstances
may be granted with the approval of the department chair, dean and Provost.
3. Guidelines. The faculty of each academic unit shall prepare written guidelines (approved by a
majority of the faculty, the respective dean, and the Provost) providing details of the PTR process.
These guidelines must incorporate attention to “Best Practices for Post-Tenure Review,” Appendix
H numbers 1 through 12. Although the details may vary from one academic unit to another or from
one college to another within the university, such guidelines must be consistent with the following
principles to ensure appropriate rigor.
•
•
•
•
•
The primary basis for PTR is the individual’s contributions in the areas of research and/or
scholarship, teaching, and service.
Guidelines must be flexible enough to accommodate faculty members with different
professional responsibilities.
PTR shall not infringe upon the accepted standards of academic freedom. Sex, age, ethnicity,
and other factors unrelated to an individual’s professional qualifications shall not be
considered in the review process.
The chairperson of the academic department and the dean of the college must not be involved
directly in the peer review process at the departmental level.
The Post-Tenure Review must be linked to the annual reviews.
4. Post Tenure Review Committee. Whenever any faculty member is scheduled for regular review or
in a period of PTR remediation, a PTR committee will be constituted in accordance with
departmental bylaws that is separate from the regular personnel committee(s). Faculty members
subject to Part II of PTR will be recused from participating in this second stage process. Only
tenured faculty members are eligible for election to the PTR committee. The size of the committee
may vary from one academic unit to another; however, the committee must have a minimum of
three members. In cases in which the department does not have enough tenured faculty members to
constitute a PTR committee, the departmental peer review committee will elect outside faculty
members from other departments who are qualified to serve on the PTR committee. The PTR
committee will elect its own chair.
5. Part I Post Tenure Review. The PTR committee will review the ratings received on the most recent
available series of five years of annual performance reviews, as specified in the Best Practices for
Post-Tenure Review (#3). Merit salary increments are based on these annual performance reviews,
as is consistent with the Best Practices for Post-Tenure Review (#9). All tenured faculty members
receiving no more than one (of five) annual performance rating of “fair,” “marginal,” or
“unsatisfactory” in Part I of the Post Tenure Review process receive a Post Tenure Review rating of
“satisfactory.” These faculty members are thereby exempt from Part II of Post Tenure Review.
6. Part II Post Tenure Review. Part II consists of additional review by the Post Tenure Review
Committee and the department chair of those identified in Part I as subject to further review. All
tenured faculty members receiving two or more annual performance ratings of “fair,” “marginal,”
or “unsatisfactory” will be reviewed under Part II of Post Tenure Review.
a.
In order to ensure adequate external representation in the Part II Post Tenure Review process,
departments must choose ONE of these options in drafting departmental personnel policy
procedures.
• utilize reference letters submitted from outside the department on each individual under
review,
• add to the PTR committee a faculty member or professional equivalent from outside the
department nominated and elected according to departmental bylaws,
• allow each faculty member under review the option of either having external letters
solicited or incorporating the external committee member in the review process.
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b.
The faculty member undergoing Part II of PTR must provide, at a minimum, the following
documents to the PTR committee and the department chair.
• a recent copy of the curriculum vita (paper or electronic);
• a summary of teaching evaluations (if appropriate to the individual’s duties) for the last 5
years, including student evaluations;
• a plan for continued professional growth;
• detailed information about the outcomes of any sabbatical leave awarded during the
preceding five years; and
• if required by departmental personnel policy procedures, the names of six referees
outside the department whom the PTR committee could contact for references
c. The chair of the academic unit must provide the PTR committee with copies of the faculty
member’s annual performance reviews covering the preceding five years.
d. The role and function of each faculty member, as well as the strength of the overall record, will
be examined by the PTR committee. If provided in departmental bylaws, the PTR committee is
required to obtain a minimum of four reference letters of which at least two must come from
the list of six submitted by the faculty member.
e. The PTR committee will provide a written report to the faculty member. The faculty member
should be given at least two weeks to provide a response to the committee. Both the
committee’s initial report and the response of the faculty member will be given to the dean of
the academic unit. The department chair will submit an independent written report to the
faculty member who will then have two weeks to provide a response. The chair’s original
report and the faculty member’s response will be forwarded to the college dean. The ratings of
either Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory will be used in all stages of the review by the PTR
committee and the chair..
f. If both the PTR Committee and the chair, or either the PTR Committee or the chair, rates the
candidate as satisfactory, the candidate’s final rating shall be satisfactory. If both the PTR
Committee and the Chair rate the candidate as unsatisfactory, the candidate’s final rating shall
be unsatisfactory.
g. If the candidate’s final rating is satisfactory, the dean will forward that information to the
Provost in summary form without appending any candidate materials. If the candidate’s final
rating is unsatisfactory, the dean will forward all materials to the Provost.
7. Remediation. Individuals who receive a rating of Unsatisfactory must be given a period of
remediation to correct deficiencies detailed in the PTR reports. The chair in consultation with the
PTR committee and the faculty member will provide a list of specific goals and measurable
outcomes the faculty member should achieve in each of the next three calendar years following the
date of formal notification of the unsatisfactory outcome. The university will provide reasonable
resources (as identified in the PTR reports and as approved by the chair and the dean) to meet the
deficiencies. The chair will meet at least twice annually with the faculty member to review
progress. The faculty member will be reviewed each year by the PTR committee and the chair, both
of whom shall supply written evaluations. At the end of the three-year period, another post-tenure
review will be conducted. If the outcome is again Unsatisfactory, the faculty member will be
subject to dismissal for unsatisfactory performance. If the review is Satisfactory, then the normal
five-year annual performance review cycle will resume.
8. Dismissal for Unsatisfactory Professional Performance. If dismissal for unsatisfactory professional
performance is recommended, the case will be subject to the rules and regulations outlined in the
Faculty Manual Section K, below.
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IV-9
I.
Promotion Policies
Recommendations for promotion are based upon the evaluations of a faculty member's performance and
credentials by peers and administrators. Such evaluations are based on written criteria established by each
academic department. Nevertheless, some general attributes and experience requirements are associated
with the various ranks. (See Part III, Sections C and D for general qualifications.)
J.
Salary Determination Procedures
Procedures for arriving at an individual faculty member's salary increase vary among colleges and from
year to year. The following description, then, shall only be construed as outlining typical considerations.
The annual university budget received from the state includes an allocation for salaries. A portion of this is
available for salary increases. Normally, the three possible components of salary increments for an
individual are cost-of-living, merit, and promotion. In addition, funds may be set aside for special
adjustments for various purposes. The allocation of faculty salary funds to promotion, merit, and cost-ofliving is normally determined by the university, though the state often imposes constraints on permissible
salary increases, exceptions to which may require approval by the State’s Budget and Control Board.
Increases for merit and cost-of-living may not be uniform in percentage terms due to differences in
productivity, because of inequities, or for other reasons. The chair or director has the responsibility for
making the initial determinations of individual salary increments. An individual's recommended merit
increase is based upon the performance evaluation by the chair or director although there may be no precise
correlation between the annual faculty evaluation and the amount of salary increase.
The chair's or director's salary recommendations are forwarded to the dean for review and approval, and are
subject to subsequent review by the Provost and the President. Salary notifications are sent to faculty by
the dean at the earliest opportunity, normally in June or July. Not infrequently, notices are delayed by the
lateness of the General Assembly in passing the state budget.
Any faculty member may request a summary report of the range and number of salary increases within a
department, i.e., the number receiving 0-0.9%, 1.0-1.9%, etc. If confidentiality can be maintained, the
salary information may be reported by faculty rank.
K. Resignation, Termination, and Dismissal
1. Resignation. A faculty member may resign an appointment effective at the end of an academic
year. Notice should be given in writing at the earliest possible opportunity, e.g., within thirty days
of acceptance of a new position elsewhere or within thirty days of receiving notification of the
Clemson appointment and salary for the next academic year, whichever is earlier. The faculty
member may request a waiver of these requirements in the case of hardship, or where the member
would otherwise be denied substantial professional advancement or other opportunities.
Professional ethics require that the faculty member consider the needs of students and obligations
to the academic community in scheduling such a departure and in giving the maximum notification
feasible to the university.
2. Termination. Termination is to be understood to mean the removal or discharge of a faculty
member with tenure, or of an untenured faculty member before the end of the specified term of the
appointment, because of institutional contingencies or financial exigencies. Causes for termination
are: 1) institutional contingencies such as the curtailment or discontinuance of programs,
departments, schools, or colleges, or other conditions requiring reductions in staff, and 2) financial
exigencies which are demonstrably bona fide. Steps available to the faculty member to appeal
termination by filing a grievance petition are set forth in Part V of the Faculty Manual.
Termination of appointment may be initiated by any administrator in the chain of supervisory
responsibility. The faculty member concerned shall be given written notice of termination with
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IV-10
reasons therefore as soon as possible, but not less than twelve months in advance of termination.
Before a termination of appointment based on the abandonment of a program or department of
instruction is initiated, every effort shall be made by the Administration to place the affected faculty
member in another suitable position. If an appointment is terminated before the end of the period
of appointment because of financial exigencies or because of the discontinuance of a program of
instruction, the released faculty member's position shall not be filled by a replacement within a
period of two years, unless the released faculty member has been offered reappointment and a
reasonable time has elapsed within which he/she may accept or decline the position. Termination
for medical reasons shall be based upon clear and convincing medical evidence.
3. Dismissal. Dismissal is to be understood as the removal or discharge of a faculty member from a
tenured position, or from an untenured position before the end of the specified term of the
appointment, for cause. Actions that could reasonably be construed as having extremely adverse
effects upon Clemson University, such as serious violations of law, could result in the initiation of
procedures of dismissal "for cause." In a similar category are: blatantly unprofessional conduct,
such as the continued neglect of important responsibilities; markedly sub-standard performance of
duties; or highly serious breaches of university regulations such as falsification of credentials
submitted in application for a faculty position. Sufficient cause for such a dismissal must be
related directly and substantively to the faculty member's professional fitness as a teacher and/or
researcher or as a librarian.
Dismissal may be initiated by any administrator in the chain of supervisory responsibility. The
burden of proof that adequate cause exists rests with the university. Causes for dismissal are: 1)
conduct seriously prejudicial to the university through infraction of law or through moral turpitude;
2) repeated or significant failure to perform the duties of the position to which the faculty member
is assigned, or performance of duty demonstrably below accepted standards; and 3) breach of
university regulations that include, but are not limited to, violation of confidentiality, falsification
of credentials, or plagiarism, provided that such violations have serious adverse effects on the
university or the individual.
Action for dismissal of a faculty member must be in writing, must contain a statement of reasons or
charges, and must be presented to the individual concerned subsequent to discussions between the
faculty member and appropriate administrative officers looking toward a mutual solution. The
steps available to the faculty member to challenge dismissal by filing a grievance petition are
described in
Part V.
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IV-11
PART V.
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES
A. Overview
A formal grievance procedure is available to faculty members to facilitate the redress of alleged injustices.
Any person holding a faculty appointment (see Part III, Sections D and E) at Clemson University,
including academic administrators, may file a grievance under the procedure described in this section.
1
Category I grievances address such matters as dismissal, termination, unlawful discrimination, or
violation of academic freedom. Category II grievances address unfair or improper application of
administrative authority or allegations of lack of civility and/or lack of professional responsibility. In all
cases the burden of proof rests on the faculty member who has filed the petition.
All parties to a grievance, including witnesses, are expected to adhere to the highest standard of honesty
and professional responsibility expected of all faculty members at all times. Each faculty member and any
other person involved in grievance procedures shall be free from any or all improper restraint, interference,
coercion, or reprisal on the part of associates or administrators in filing a grievance, in accompanying a
faculty member filing a grievance, in appearing as a witness, or in seeking information in accordance with
the procedures described herein. These principles apply with equal force after a grievance has been
adjudicated. Should these principles be violated, the violations should be brought to the attention of the
Provost or the President, if necessary, for appropriate remedial action. Should the faculty member not
receive satisfaction from the remedial action taken by the Provost, an appeal may be made to the President,
and subsequently (if necessary) to the Board of Trustees.
Guidelines related to all aspects of the grievance procedure may be obtained from the Faculty Senate
Office or the Faculty Senate web site (www.lib.Clemson.edu/fs) prior to filing any grievance. A
descriptive flow chart in Appendix J explains the sequence and time frame for the various steps in the
grievance process. Weekdays, for purposes of the grievance process, are defined as Monday-Friday,
excepting University holidays.
B. Assistance in dealing with complaints: Ombudsman for Faculty, Postdoctoral Fellows, and
Graduate Students
A Professional Ombudsman with experience as a faculty member and knowledge of faculty governance
serves the Faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students. The Professional Ombudsman serves as
an independent, informal, neutral and confidential resource to assist in exploring alternative dispute
resolution options. Faculty, post-doctoral fellows, and graduate students are encouraged to use the
confidential services of their Professional Ombudsman which are available free of charge. The
Professional Ombudsman may discuss how to access formal processes appropriate in various
circumstances but does not participate in any formal proceeding, including serving as a witness.
Communications with the Professional Ombudsman do not constitute notice of claims against the
university. The Professional Ombudsman and members of his/her office staff adheres to the International
Ombudsman Association (IOA) Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice, as set forth at
http://www.ombudsassociation.org/standards.html . Separate Professional Ombudsmen serve
undergraduate students and classified staff.
The Professional Ombudsman reports to the Provost for administrative purposes and, without breaching
confidentiality, provides both the Provost and a sub-committee of the Faculty Senate Executive/Advisory
Committee with summary reports of the types of issues handled by his/her office. This sub-committee of
the Faculty Senate Executive/Advisory Committee is composed of the immediate past president and the
president of the Faculty Senate; the faculty representative to the Board of Trustees; one faculty member
appointed annually by the Faculty Senate Advisory Committee; and one faculty member appointed
1
This single procedure replaces the two different procedures formerly in effect.
annually by the Professional Ombudsman. Members of this committee may not simultaneously serve on
the Grievance Board.
In conducting the affairs of this office the Professional Ombudsman shall be independent and free from any
and all improper restraint, interference, coercion or reprisal. The Professional Ombudsman shall be
protected from retaliation. Should these principles be violated, the violations should be brought to the
attention of the Provost and, if necessary, to the President of the University.
C. Assistance in dealing with complaints: Grievance Counselors
For persons seeking assistance in understanding grievance procedures, the Faculty Senate provides the
services of grievance counselors. A counselor offers advice on which of the grievance categories to cite
prior to filing a grievance petition. At the request of the petitioner, the grievance counselor will review the
petition before it is submitted to assist in clarifying the grievable allegations. The counselor, however,
does not render any decision on the merits or substance of the petition. Administrators may also seek
advice of counselors on grievance matters. Information about general procedures followed in grievance
hearings can be obtained from grievance counselors and the Faculty Senate Office. Grievance counselors
do not advise faculty members or administrators from their own colleges, do not act for both parties to the
same case, and do not accompany petitioners to hearings or testify in a case for which they have been
consulted as counselor(s). Individual counselors may seek advice from fellow counselors and may refer
their clients to other counselors to expedite the grievance process.
Seven counselors will usually be in office at the same time, serving three-year staggered terms. Two
counselors (and any additional persons needed to fill unexpired terms) are nominated annually by the
Faculty Senate Advisory Committee from the ranks of tenured Associate Professors and above who have a
thorough knowledge of the Faculty Manual and the grievance processes. The Faculty Senate Advisory
Committee will attempt to provide minority representation whenever possible. New counselors are elected
by the Faculty Senate at its January meeting. The seventh counselor, appointed by the Provost, must be an
academic administrator. Grievance counselors are accorded the same protection afforded faculty members
involved in grievance procedures. The names of the counselors are available from the Faculty Senate
Office, the President of the Faculty Senate or the Provost.
D. Bases for Grievances
1. Category I. Category I grievances may be based any of the following grounds:
a.
Dismissal from employment with the university. A dismissal is the "removal or discharge of
faculty member from a tenured position, or from an untenured position before the end of the
specified appointment, for cause." Adequate cause for dismissal must be related directly and
substantively to the fitness of the faculty member in his/her professional capacity. (See
Section IV. K.)
b.
Termination from appointment by the university of a faculty member with tenure, or of a nontenured faculty member before the end of a specified term of appointment. Termination means
"the removal or discharge of a faculty member with tenure, or of an untenured faculty member
before the end of the specified term of the appointment because of institutional exigencies."
(See Section IV.K.)
c.
Discrimination in compensation, promotion, and/or work assignments. A Category I grievance
may be filed alleging discrimination based on age, gender, disability, race, religion, national
origin or sexual orientation, or status as a disabled veteran or a veteran of the Vietnam era, or
discrimination prohibited by federal or state law or regulation.
d.
Violation of academic freedom. Any non-tenured faculty member who alleges that violations
of academic freedom significantly contributed to a decision to cease, in any manner, his/her
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V-2
appointment with the university, may file a Category I grievance. (For a definition of academic
freedom, see Section III.B.)
2. Bases for Grievances: Category II. Category II grievances include allegations of improper or
unfair actions or procedures by administrators and others in positions of responsibility, lack of
civility or professional responsibility, or other matters that the Grievance Board and/or the Provost
may agree are grievable. Other Category II matters may be grievable based on a determination by
the Grievance Board (or the Provost if the petitioner elects to have the case reviewed outside the
Grievance Board). Minor complaints are not grievable. What constitutes a "minor complaint" is
left to the discretion of the Grievance Board (or the Provost, as indicated above). Complaints
arising out of the authorized exercise of faculty and administrative judgment and discretionary
powers are usually not grievable.
a.
A Category II grievance may be based on an allegation that a person or persons in
appropriate position of authority or responsibility have failed to properly implement
departmental, college or university policies or procedures so as to adversely affect the
petitioner. Category II grievances include allegations of improper or unfair actions in such
matters as
• application of recognized criteria or guidelines used in formal review processes
• assignment of professional duties by an administrator
• appraisal (by an administrator) of the petitioner's performance
denial (by an administrator) of the petitioner's access to departmental, college, or
university resources
• determination (by an administrator) of the petitioner's salary increment.
b. A Category II grievance may also be based on allegations of a serious, aggravated lack of
civility and/or lack of professional responsibility, that is, actions, activities or behaviors
which seriously disrupt the normal workday or educational mission. Such allegations must be
related directly and substantively to the professional responsibilities of the faculty member in
his/her professional capacity as a teacher or researcher and member of the University
community. Before such an allegation is filed, every effort shall be made and documented
that the involved parties have exhausted all other administrative avenues and processes to
mediate and resolve the dispute. In addition, using the services of the Faculty Ombudsman is
strongly encouraged.
Allegations that may be considered in this general class include, but are not limited to: disrespect
for the free inquiry of colleagues; disrespect for the opinion of others; lack of equitable treatment
of all personnel; creation of the impression that a faculty member speaks or acts for the University;
lack of cooperation and civil interaction with colleagues; personal attacks against colleagues;
intolerance or intimidation of colleagues; failure to follow University policies established to
eliminate violence, discrimination and harassment. Allegations must be of a serious and disruptive
nature. Sanctions imposed by the Provost may include, but are not limited to oral or written
warnings, oral or written reprimands, suspension without pay, or dismissal. [A more detailed
discussion of professional responsibility can be found in Section IX.G.]
E. Attempts to resolve matters without filing a grievance
1. A faculty member with a grievance shall first meet with the department chair for a discussion of the
matter. This discussion must take place within 30 weekdays of the matter's occurrence. (See
Section V.A. for a definition of weekdays.) Extensions may be granted by the Provost as needed
during the summer period. Both parties shall meet in good faith and shall make every attempt to
resolve the matter in an equitable and professional manner.
2. If the matter cannot be resolved at the level of the academic department, the faculty member shall
meet with the dean for a discussion of the matter. The faculty member must request this interview
within fifteen weekdays of the discussion of the matter with the department chair. The dean shall
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V-3
confer with the faculty member within ten weekdays upon receiving the request. Again, the
resolution of the matter in an equitable and professional manner shall be the primary goal of those
involved.
3. In the case of non-reappointment, denial of tenure or denial of promotion, termination or dismissal,
the requirement to meet with the department chair and the dean does not apply.
F. Filing a petition
1. A faculty member who desires to file a grievance must submit a written petition within 20
weekdays after the date of the alleged grievance, or after the completion of the meetings specified
above. (As an example of the time limits, if notification is given that a faculty member will be
dismissed for cause, the time period begins with the date of receipt of the letter in which the faculty
member was notified. The time period does not begin with the effective date of dismissal.) The
procedure that begins with a petition and ends with a decision is described in a flow chart in
Appendix J of the Faculty Manual. The petition is submitted to the Provost’s Office, which will
forward the original petition and supporting documents to the Faculty Senate Office. After 20
weekdays have passed, the faculty member forfeits the right to petition and any actions taken with
respect to the faculty member shall become final.
2. The grievance petition must state the specific individual(s) against whom the grievance is filed, the
dates upon which the alleged grievable matter occurred, the specific basis or bases on which the
grievance is filed (see Sections V.D. 1 and 2, above), a list of the supporting documents appended
to the petition and the specific relief sought by the petitioner. Sufficient supporting evidence
should be provided for the Grievance Board to determine probable cause that a grievable matter has
occurred. See Appendix J for a grievance petition form.
G. The Grievance Board
1. The Grievance Board consists of members elected by the members of the Faculty Senate from a
pool of nominees named by the Executive and Advisory Committees of the Faculty Senate in a
joint meeting, and from nominations made from the floor at the Senate election meeting. The
Senate shall hold an election each January to replace Grievance Board members whose terms have
expired and to fill positions that have become vacant during the previous calendar year. If
necessary, the Faculty Senate Advisory Committee may make interim appointments to ensure a
sufficient number of members on the Grievance Board. The Faculty Senate Advisory Committee
shall appoint the Chair of the Grievance Board.
2.
Members of the Grievance Board must be tenured regular faculty at the time of their election, and
shall be members, alternates, or former members of the Faculty Senate. These Grievance Board
members shall consist of a representative from the Library and two representatives from each
college with two-year terms of service. Training for Grievance Board members as well as
grievance counselors will be offered annually and both groups are strongly encouraged to
participate. The Board, through selected hearing panels, hears grievances brought to it in
accordance with the faculty grievance procedure.
3. Once each academic year, the Chair of the Grievance Board shall give the Faculty Senate a
summary report concerning grievance activities.
H. Determination of grievability
1. Grievance petitions are submitted to the Provost, who forwards the originals to the Faculty Senate
Office to be reviewed by the Grievance Board. The Grievance Board determines whether the
allegations in the petition are grievable according to the criteria in sections V.D.1 and/or 2. At least
five members of the Board must be present in order to make a determination. The Board shall
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V-4
render its decision on grievability within ten weekdays of receipt of the petition, and notify all
named parties.
2. If the petition is filed during one of the long semesters of the regular academic year, the Grievance
Board shall call a special meeting within ten weekdays of receipt of a properly submitted petition.
If the petition is filed at any other time, it will be reviewed no later than ten weekdays after the first
day of classes of the next long semester. A quorum for this meeting shall consist of five members
of the Grievance Board. If the petition is deemed grievable, the chair of the Board shall send copies
of the petition to those against whom the grievance is brought.
3. The petitioner may request that the matter be addressed by the Provost rather than the Grievance
Board. If the matter is not to be considered by the Grievance Board, the Provost shall review the
case and request any additional information from any person involved, as needed. If the Provost
determines the matter to be grievable, the Provost shall render a final decision within 22 weekdays
of receipt of the petition. If the Provost determines the matter to be non-grievable, the Provost
shall notify all parties within ten weekdays of receipt of the petition. The written decision will be
transmitted to the named parties and the Faculty Senate Office, which will notify the Grievance
Board.
4. The Grievance Board or the Provost shall determine to which of the person(s) named in the petition
copies of the petitions or relevant portions thereof shall be sent. Respondents to the petition may
file a response with the Provost or the Grievance Board. Any such responses must be filed within
15 weekdays of receiving the petition. This response is not to exceed ten pages excluding
supporting documents which may be submitted as an appendix to the response.
5. If the person filing the grievance has since left the employ of the University, the Grievance Board
may at its discretion decide not to proceed further at any point in the process.
I.
Grievance Hearings
1. The Grievance Board shall create a hearing panel of five members for each Category I grievance
and a panel of three members for each Category II grievance from among the members of the
Board. The Board will, within 20 weekdays after reaching the decision to hear the petition, set a
date for the initial hearing, which will be a single hearing for Category I and one or more hearings
as needed for Category II. For a Category I hearing, the chair shall give each party to the grievance
20 weekdays written notice of the hearing. Notification of the hearing date will include: i) the
time, place and nature of the hearing; ii) the procedure to be followed during the hearing; iii) a
statement of the basis or bases on which the petition is to be heard; and iv) references to pertinent
university statutes and portions of the Faculty Manual. For Category II, the initial hearing will be
scheduled within 20 weekdays of the Board’s determination of grievability.
2. The hearing shall be held during one of the long semesters of the regular academic year, unless the
Provost deems the matter of sufficient urgency, and requests that the hearing take place at a time
outside the normal academic year. In this case those members of the Grievance Board who have
nine-month appointments will be compensated at a rate equal to that of their normal salary for any
day or fraction thereof.
3. Members of the Grievance Board shall remove themselves from the case if they deem themselves
disqualified for reasons of bias or conflict of interest, and shall not serve if they are from the same
college as the petitioner or any respondent(s). The named parties shall each have a maximum of
two challenges without stated cause. If such removals and challenges reduce the membership of
the hearing panel below five for Category I and below three for Category II, the President of the
Faculty Senate shall make additional appointments from the Senate to ensure a hearing panel
composed of the required number of members.
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4. All named parties shall be permitted in all proceedings to have and be accompanied by an advisor
of their choice, other than their grievance counselors. The advisor shall be permitted to advise
only, and not speak on behalf of any named party. All matters pertaining to the grievance shall be
kept confidential to the extent permitted by law. The hearing shall be closed to the public.
Witnesses will only be present to testify and will not attend the entire hearing (for category I). For
Category I grievances, a verbatim record of the hearing shall be taken and made a part of the
record.
5. Both parties shall be permitted to offer evidence and witnesses pertinent to the issue. The Provost
(or the President if the Provost is a named party) shall, so far as possible, assist the hearing panel in
securing the cooperation and attendance of witnesses and named parties and shall make available
documents and other evidence under her/his control. Those persons requested to testify are
strongly encouraged but cannot be compelled to testify. When the hearing may be expedited and
the interest of the parties shall not be substantially prejudiced, any part of the evidence may be
received in written form. All written evidence submitted by all parties to the grievance hearing in a
Category I petition must be received by the chair of the hearing panel not less than seven weekdays
prior to the date set for the hearing; any material received after that date may be excluded by the
hearing panel at its discretion. For Category II, written material can be received any time during the
hearing process. Documentary evidence may be received in the form of copies or excerpts if the
original is not readily available. Irrelevant, immaterial, or unduly repetitious evidence should not
be included. If an objection is made to any evidence being offered, the decision of the majority of
the panel shall govern.
6. In Category I hearings, the hearing panel may at its discretion grant adjournment to either party to
investigate evidence concerning which a valid claim of surprise is made. Both parties may ask
questions of witnesses and each named party. Members of the panel may ask questions of any
party or witness at any time during the hearing. Members of the panel are expected to keep all
discussions confidential to the extent permitted by law.
7. In Category I hearings, findings of fact and recommendations of the hearing panel must be based
solely on the hearing record and shall be submitted to the Provost. In Category II hearings, findings
are based on hearings and written evidence. In petitions alleging unfairness in applying university
procedures, it is important that the hearing panel not substitute its judgment for that of the faculty
or administrator who made the decision at issue. The merits of the decision, per se, are not at issue.
Rather, the issues are whether or not procedures were followed or whether some unfair or improper
influence so colored or affected the judgment of the faculty or administrator that the decision
reached would have been different had no such improper or unfair influence existed. Thus, so long
as the appropriate policies and procedures were followed the only issues are the existence of
improper or unfair influences and the extent of their influence upon the decision involved. The
petitioner has the burden of proof in establishing that such influence existed and that its presence
dictated the nature of the decision reached.
8. In cases of complaints alleging lack of civility and/or lack of professional responsibility, the
findings of fact and recommendations of the hearing panel must specify the impact of the actions,
activities, or behaviors on the mission of the department, school, other relevant unit and explicitly
address the issue of culpability so that the Provost may impose sanction(s), if deemed appropriate.
9. Within ten weekdays of the final hearing for either category, the panel shall submit its findings and
recommendations to the Provost along with appropriate documents and records. In the event the
Provost has been recused from a decision making capacity, the findings and recommendations shall
be submitted to the President. The majority vote shall be the recommendation forwarded to the
Provost by the hearing panel. The findings and recommendation must be submitted only to the
Provost within ten weekdays after conclusion of the hearing.
10. The Provost or the President shall review the findings and recommendations and the record of the
hearing (for Category I grievances, the audiotape or transcript of the hearing) and shall render a
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V-6
written decision within 22 weekdays of receipt of the hearing panel’s report. The decision shall
include findings of fact and recommendations, separately stated. Copies of the decision, including
the hearing panel’s findings and recommendations, shall be sent to the petitioner by certified mail.
The Provost will also provide copies to all named parties, the hearing panel, and the Faculty Senate
Office.
J.
Appeals
1. The Petitioner may appeal the Provost's decision to the President. A written appeal must be
submitted to the Office of the President within ten weekdays after receipt of the Provost's decision.
If an appeal is made, the President shall review the hearing record and the decision of the Provost
and shall render a written decision within 20 weekdays of receipt of the request for the review. The
decision shall include findings of fact and recommendations. Copies of the decision of the
President shall be sent to all parties, the Provost, the Faculty Senate Office, and the hearing panel.
2. In the case of a Category I grievance, the Petitioner may appeal the decision of the President to the
Board of Trustees. A written appeal must be submitted to the Executive Secretary of the Board of
Trustees within ten weekdays after the receipt of the President's decision. Receipt by the Executive
Secretary shall be deemed receipt by the Board. If an appeal is made, the Board of Trustees, or a
committee of Board members appointed by the Chair, shall review the record of the hearing and the
decisions of the President and the Provost, and shall render a final decision on behalf of the
university. The decision shall be in writing and shall include findings of fact and
recommendations. Copies of the decision shall be sent to all parties, the President, the Provost, and
the hearing panel.
K.
Protection of Petitioners
1. If a grievance has been filed in a timely manner, any action taken against the faculty member that
forms the basis for the grievance shall not become final until the appeals process is exhausted and a
final decision is rendered on behalf of the university. If the faculty member does not appeal any
step of the procedure within the time limits prescribed herein, the last decision rendered shall
become the final decision of the university.
2. If the action which forms the basis for the grievance filed by the faculty member could eventually
involve any type of discontinuance of appointment with the university as stated above, the faculty
member shall not be removed from his/her university duties until a final decision is rendered under
this grievance procedure. The exception to this principle would be that, prior to the final decision
being rendered, the faculty member may be relieved of all duties or assigned to other duties if the
risk of adverse consequences to himself/herself, to others, or to the institution is heightened by
continuance in the affected individual's normal assignment. Before taking such action the
administration shall consult with the Faculty Senate Advisory Committee. The salary of the faculty
member shall always continue until a final decision is rendered by the university.
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V-7
PART VI.
THE UNIVERSITY'S ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE
A. The Board of Trustees
The letter and spirit of the Clemson bequest still govern the university's basic administrative structure. The
Board of Trustees, for example, continues to have seven "life trustees" who are empowered to fill any
vacancy in their ranks due to "death, resignation, refusal to act, or otherwise." Six other trustees are elected
by the General Assembly of South Carolina, three every two years for four-year terms.
The Board of Trustees adopts the basic long-range objectives of the university and the basic policies for
achieving them; provides policy instruction for long-range planning; adopts the statutes of the university;
elects the President of the University; employs the Executive Secretary of the Board; maintains ownership
of university assets; and oversees the evaluation of the university.
To accomplish its purposes the Board of Trustees meets at least four times annually. Its presiding officer is
the Chairman, elected for a two-year term (but restricted to no more than three consecutive terms). The
Board appoints an Executive Secretary, who serves at its pleasure, and maintains as standing committees an
Executive Committee as well as committees for Budget and Finance, Educational Policy, Student Affairs,
Agricultural and Natural Resources, and Institutional Advancement. (Names and addresses of current
members of the Board of Trustees are given in Appendix A.)
The Board of Trustees is assisted in its governance activities by an official Faculty Representative who is
granted privileges beyond those accorded to Board visitors. This includes receipt of Minutes, Agendas, and
attachments to all Board and Committee meetings and an opportunity to be included on the Agenda upon
approval of request. (See Appendix B for the selection process.)
To the administration of Clemson University the Board of Trustees delegates authority for: developing
plans for achieving basic university objectives; developing short- and long-range plans within the delegated
framework; recommending guidelines for university advancement; adopting the President's administrative
policies governing university operations; recommending bylaws for implementing Trustees' functions;
recommending university statutes to the Trustees; adopting operating budgets and controlling expenditures
within approved limits; overseeing administrative control; evaluating the results secured; and investing
funds under policy authority.
B. The President of the University
The President is the chief executive officer of the university. To the President the Board of Trustees
delegates authority for: giving leadership to all phases of university planning; coordinating the operations
of all units of the university; carrying out major university public relations functions; evaluating the results
of university plans; and appointing such personnel as report to the President in accordance with policies
outlined in Part II of this Manual. The President of the University and his Cabinet review and comment on
all policy matters under consideration by the Board of Trustees.
Having the general supervision over all university activities, the President is an ex-officio member of all
university councils, commissions, and committees and serves as liaison officer between the Board of
Trustees and the university faculty and staff. The President presides at commencements and graduations.
The President approves appointments of Alumni Distinguished Professors and endowed professorships and
chairs, and recommendations for tenure, promotion, dismissal, and termination. Appeals by faculty and
students concerning grievances may be heard by the President after regular procedures have been followed.
The President appoints the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, as well as the other executive
officers, and reviews the appointees’ performance in office.
C. The Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost
The Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost (hereafter referred to as the Provost) is the chief
academic officer of the university and Chairperson of the university faculty. Responsible directly to the
President for all academic matters, the Provost has administrative jurisdiction over teaching and computing
services. The Provost recommends to the President short- and long-range plans for academic development
and formulates policies to implement approved plans; gives direction and guidance to the deans in the
development and operation of academic programs, and to the directors of Admissions, Financial Aid, and
Professional Development; coordinates the activities of the deans and those directors; counsels with college
deans concerning faculty evaluation and reappointment of department chairs and school directors. It is
through the Provost that recommendations from the Faculty Senate, university commissions, councils, and
committees, and the deans are forwarded to the President. In the President’s absence, the Provost serves as
Acting President of the University. As directed by the President, the Provost represents the university on
matters relating to academic programs before the State’s Commission on Higher Education and its
committees and before other state governmental bodies.
The Provost approves or recommends to the President actions pertaining to faculty recruitment,
appointments, re-appointments, tenure, promotion, termination, and dismissal. Recommendations
regarding faculty grievances and student academic grievances are received by the Provost for decision. In
addition, questions concerning conflict of interest are reviewed by the Provost.
The Provost also receives recommendations on curricular matters from university curriculum committees
and forwards recommendations to the President; approves the bylaws of the collegiate faculties and reviews
the minutes of their meetings; receives and transmits to the faculty proposed amendments to the Faculty
Constitution; presides at meetings of the university faculty; evaluates the performance in office of the
academic deans; appoints search-and-screening committees for certain administrative positions;
recommends the appointment of academic administrators to the President; counsels with college deans
concerning faculty evaluation and reappointment of department chairs/school directors; chairs the
Academic Council; serves as liaison officer between the Faculty Senate and the President; meets semiannually with the Director of the Student Athlete Enrichment Program; and delegates authority to the Vice
Provosts, the Assistant Vice President for Academic Affairs, and the Dean of Libraries.
Further, the Provost supervises the preparation of the budgetary requests and budgets of the Library and the
colleges, allocates funds for their operation, and approves amendments thereto; establishes guidelines for
the implementation of faculty salary increases, and recommends such increases to the President; receives
recommendations from the collegiate deans concerning the formation and dissolution of departments,
faculties, schools, and centers and transmits his/her recommendation to the President, the Board of
Trustees, and/or the Commission on Higher Education as appropriate.
D. The Vice Provosts
There are four Vice Provosts reporting to the Provost. The Vice Provosts share duties that include serving
on and occasionally chairing a variety of committees, participation in program development, forming and
maintaining relationships with other academic institutions and with the Commission on Higher Education,
and such other responsibilities as may be assigned by the Provost.
1. The Vice-Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Studies coordinates all undergraduate academic
programs including recruiting, admitting, and enrolling new undergraduate students; retaining
students; and overseeing the Honors program, the Cooperative Education program, financial aid,
registration services, Student Athlete Enrichment Program, and other university-wide
undergraduate academic programs. The Dean of Undergraduate Studies or designee chairs the
Undergraduate Curriculum Committee.
2.
The Vice-Provost and Dean of the Graduate School coordinates all graduate programs,
advises the Provost on policies and regulations pertaining to graduate study, graduate admissions
policies, graduate student programs, graduate tuition, graduate healthcare and health insurance, and
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the assessment, review, continuation of degree programs and granting of graduate degrees. The
Dean of the Graduate School makes the annual allocation of Graduate Assistantship Differentials.
The Dean or his/her designee chairs the Graduate Curriculum Committee and participates in other
subcommittees of the Graduate Council as noted below.
3. The Vice Provost for Computing and Information Technology and Chief Information Officer
is responsible for university-wide planning for information technology, and for the administration,
coordination, budgeting, and planning associated with the university’s central computing services
groups: Customer Relations and Learning Technologies, Research Computing, Enterprise
Applications, Computing, Systems and Operations, and Network and Telecommunications.
4. The Vice Provost for International Affairs is the university’s chief international officer. Principle
responsibilities include negotiating and approving international agreements; developing,
coordinating, managing and supporting all university international programs such as study abroad,
study and research exchanges, service learning and internships; and all international immigration
and employment services for international students, scholars, visitors, faculty and staff. The Vice
Provost chairs the International Programs Coordination Committee, the International Services
Coordination Committee, and the International Studies Curriculum Committee.
E. The Deans of the Colleges
The deans of the colleges are the chief administrative officers of Clemson University's five colleges. The
deans provide leadership in formulating educational policy and serve as their collegiate faculties' agents in
the execution of such policy. Among other duties, the deans represent the college in relations with other
colleges of the university; ensure that faculty enjoy academic freedom and exercise academic
responsibility; ensure that faculty peer evaluation, where appropriate, is part of the policies and procedures
of all academic departments; review departmental recommendations for appointment, renewal, promotion,
tenure, termination, and dismissal, and forward recommendations to the Provost; approve appointments to
the college of prospective faculty; send letters of renewal or non-renewal of contract to probationary
faculty; monitor Affirmative Action policy implementation by the several departments; review the annual
evaluation of each faculty member of the college; periodically review and evaluate the performances of the
department chairs and school directors as outlined in the policy for evaluation of administrators in concert
with the Provost concerning reappointment recommendations; allocate budgets for instruction, supplies,
and equipment, etc., and monitor the expenditure of all college funds; hear faculty grievances pursued
beyond the departmental level and cooperate in formal grievance procedures; monitor faculty workloads
and schedules; approve recommendations for sabbatical leaves and leaves of absence; establish ad hoc
committees of the collegiate faculty; appoint department chairs, school directors, and other academic
administrators from within departments in accordance with policies and procedures specified; and serve on
various councils, commissions, and committees as set forth in university policy. In some colleges of the
university the deans are assisted by associate and/or assistant deans and/or directors who are assigned
responsibilities by and report directly to their respective deans.
The performance in office of each college dean is reviewed at regular intervals (see Section M, below) by
the Provost. College deans hold faculty rank and engage in the teaching, research, and public service
functions of faculty to the extent feasible.
F. The Dean of Libraries
The Dean of Libraries is the chief administrative officer of the Clemson University Libraries. In dealing
with the Library faculty, the duties of the Dean of Libraries are the same as those of the Deans of the
Colleges. The Dean of Libraries is a member of the Academic Council. The Dean of Libraries may be
assisted by Associate or Assistant Deans of the Libraries and the Library Chair. As delineated in the
Bylaws of the Library Faculty, the library chair performs the duties of a department chair.
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VI-3
The performance of the Dean of Libraries is reviewed at regular intervals (See Section M, below) by the
Provost. The Dean of Libraries holds faculty rank and engages in teaching, research, and public service
functions of faculty to the extent feasible.
G. The Department Chairs
Department Chairs are generally responsible for the activities of their departments, for which they are
accountable to the school director and/or to the dean of the college. Their primary responsibility is to
ensure the quality of the teaching, research, and public service program and its delivery within their
departments while continuing to engage in their own teaching, scholarship, and public service activities.
Department chairs represent their departments in relations with other departments and schools and with the
deans and other administrative officers of the university. In exercising leadership in the improvement of
departmental programs and of the departmental faculty, a chair is expected to take initiatives to report that
unit’s needs and advocate its goals and plans.
A department chair’s specific functions include:
• ensuring implementation of departmental policies and procedures involving peer evaluations;
recommending faculty appointment, reappointment, tenure, promotion, termination, and dismissal;
negotiating with prospective faculty;
• monitoring departmental implementation of Affirmative Action policies and procedures;
• annually evaluating each member of the department’s faculty and participating in the evaluation of
staff; developing budgets in concert with school directors and college deans and allocating such
funds for instructional and other purposes;
• hearing informal faculty grievances and cooperating in formal grievance procedures;
• supervising the department’s program of instruction, including curriculum, scheduling, faculty
workload, and departmental research and public service;
• ensuring that students’ rights are preserved; supervising the advising of departmental majors and
graduate students;
• monitoring student evaluation of instruction, courses, and programs;
• providing leadership in student recruitment, student advising, and student placement;
• coordinating and supervising summer school programs and freshman/transfer orientations;
• making recommendations concerning applications for professional travel and sabbatical leave;
• arranging meetings of the departmental faculty; meeting with the departmental advisory
committee and appropriate constituent and advisory groups for the discipline;
• establishing accreditation and ad hoc departmental committees; and
• carrying out other such duties as shall be assigned by the school director and/or the dean of the
college or as set down in university policy, or in collegiate bylaws, school or departmental bylaws.
Department chairs serve at the pleasure of their respective school directors and collegiate deans, who
formally evaluate the performance in office of chairs reporting to them before the end of the chair’s second
year in office and every fourth year thereafter. In making recommendations for reappointment, deans will
transmit the results of the faculty evaluation of the chair and confer with the Provost before renewing the
appointment. All chairs of academic departments hold faculty rank.
H. Selection of the President
In the selection of the President of the University, the Board of Trustees recognizes the interests of the
university Faculty and Extension Personnel and other university constituencies. The Faculty Senate
President, the President of the Extension Senate, and one Professor elected for this purpose by the
Professors are appointed to the eleven-member Screening Committee for President of the University. The
Screening Committee develops a list of approximately ten available candidates and submits their names to
the Selection Committee.
The Selection Committee is comprised of five members: three Trustees, the Faculty Senate President, and
the President of the Student Body. The Chairman of the Board of Trustees is an additional ex-officio
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VI-4
member of both committees. The Committee receives the report and recommendations of the Screening
Committee and makes recommendations to the Board of Trustees.
The Board of Trustees elects the President of the University to serve at its pleasure. The complete
Selection Process for the President of Clemson University can be found in the Trustee Policy Manual. The
Board also reserves to itself final review authority over the appointment of officers of the university who
report directly to the President and over the appointment of the deans of the university.
I. Selection of Other Academic Administrators
When an appointment is to be made to any other academic administrative position, a faculty search-andscreening committee shall be formed to make recommendations to fill that position. The committee shall
include one classified staff representative elected by the staff members in the academic unit. The
committee shall consist of at least nine faculty, staff and student members, with the committee’s
majority being faculty members elected by their peers. Student representation shall be encouraged
when appropriate. This committee shall submit a short list of candidates for the position from which the
appointment shall be made. If an appointment cannot be made from this list, the search-and-screening
committee may take additional nominations. If no other candidates are acceptable to the committee, the
matter shall be brought to the attention of the Provost, who shall consult with the appointing administrator
and the search-and-screening committee with regard to appropriate actions.
When feasible, student representatives shall be nominated by student clubs or other assemblies associated
with the unit in question; where unfeasible or impractical, student representatives shall be nominated by the
President of the Student Senate and/or the President of the Graduate Student Government. At its
discretion, each committee shall be empowered to add other individuals as non-voting members.
The selection and appointment of all academic administrators shall be in conformity with applicable
University Affirmative Action policies and procedures. In particular, in the selection of each search-andscreening committee, diverse representation with respect to race and gender shall be included whenever
feasible. Form CUFM-1001 in Appendix C shall be used to document the composition of the search-andscreening committee and the appointment procedure. After all required signatures have been obtained; the
President’s office will forward this form to the immediate supervisor of the selected administrator, with a
copy to the office of the Faculty Senate.
For the selection of an academic department chair or other academic administrators within a department, a
search-and-screening committee shall be formed from the faculty within that department, school, or
college, including a classified staff representative and a student from that college. A majority of the
members of this committee shall be faculty members elected by the faculty of that department, school or
college or equivalent administrative unit. A minority of the faculty members of the committee may be
appointed by the dean of the college or equivalent administrator. The dean shall make the appointment
from the list submitted by the committee, subject to the approval of the Provost and the President.
For the selection of an assistant dean, associate dean, or director within a college or the Library, a
committee shall be formed that includes a student from that college and a classified staff representative
elected by the classified staff in that college. A majority of the members of the search-and-screening
committee shall be elected by the faculty of that college or equivalent administrative unit (for the Dean and
Director of the Cooperative Extension Service, a majority of the members of the committee shall be elected
by the Extension Senate); the minority may be appointed by the dean of the college or an equivalent
administrator. The dean shall make the appointment from the list submitted by the committee, subject to
the approval of the Provost and the President.
For the selection of an academic administrator of an off-campus program, the search-and-screening
committee shall represent both the off-campus program and the appropriate on-campus academic areas.
The majority of the representatives to this committee shall be elected by the affected faculty; the minority
may be appointed by the dean of the college. The dean shall make the appointment from the list submitted
by the committee, subject to the approval of the Provost and the President.
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For the selection of a Vice Provost, an academic dean (other than a college dean), or other academic
administrators not specified elsewhere who report directly or indirectly to the Provost, the Provost (after
consultation with the Faculty Senate Advisory Committee) shall appoint a search-and-screening committee
that includes at least one student. For the Vice President for Public Service and Agriculture the committee
shall include a county extension agent. The Provost shall make the appointment to the position from the
list submitted by the committee, subject to the approval of the President.
For the selection of the Provost, the President of the University (after consultation with the Faculty Senate
Advisory Committee) shall appoint a committee that includes a majority of faculty as well as one graduate
student, one undergraduate student, and a staff member appointed by the President of the Staff Senate. The
President shall appoint the Provost from the list submitted by the committee.
For the Vice President for Public Service and Agriculture the search and screening committee shall include
a county extension agent as well as a staff person appointed by the President of the Staff Senate. The
President shall appoint the Vice President for Public Service and Agriculture from the list submitted by the
committee.
This university policy on the selection of academic administrators was adopted by the Board of Trustees in
July, 1981. It modifies the previous policy by providing for student participation and for enhanced faculty
participation in the selection of all academic administrators. It is not intended to circumscribe or otherwise
constrain the ability of academic administrators to modify the duties and responsibilities of incumbent
administrators who report to them or to change the titles of existing positions so as to alter duties and
responsibilities.
J. Review of Academic Administrators
University policy, adopted by the Board of Trustees in January 1981 and modified in May 1998, establishes
procedures for the review of academic administrators. Administrative officers of the university serve at the
pleasure of their respective supervisors. Thus, appointment to an administrative position, whether as
department chair, director, dean, vice provost, or provost does not assure continuance in office for any
specific period of time. These individuals will be subject to periodic review as outlined below in lieu of
post-tenure review. Individuals wishing to substitute administrative review for post-tenure review must
submit parallel documentation. Status as tenured or untenured faculty, however, is not affected by the
termination of an administrative appointment.
In the normal performance of their duties, administrators are subject to evaluations. Such evaluations shall
employ the standard Clemson University form for the evaluation of administrators (see Appendix D),
which shall be submitted to the chair of the evaluation committee. The evaluation committee will involve
the faculty most affected by a particular administrator as well as that administrator's supervisor. In all
instances of an administrator’s review, a comment period of 15 days shall be provided. The affected
faculty or constituent group is defined as follows: (a) all tenured and tenure-track members of a
department, (b) all regular faculty of the appropriate college for academic deans and (c) all staff affected by
that administrator.
Each administrator evaluation committee shall consist of seven members, selected as follows:
•
For a department chair, four members of the committee shall be selected from the regular faculty
of the department by vote of the regular faculty in the department. If a department has fewer than
four regular faculty members, the regular faculty shall elect regular faculty from related units to
ensure four elected faculty. For evaluation of deans and other administrators, each academic unit
within the college will nominate one regular faculty member, chosen by election within the unit.
Four committee members shall be selected from this slate of nominees by vote of the regular
faculty in the college.
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•
The administrator under evaluation shall choose a member of the committee from the constituent
group.
•
The immediate supervisor shall choose a member of the committee from the constituent group.
•
The classified staff of the academic unit (department, school, college, etc.) shall elect one of their
number as their representative. If no staff representative can be elected, such as might occur in a
small department or if no person agrees to be nominated, the committee will consist of the six
members described above.
This committee procedure shall not preclude any faculty or staff member in the constituent group from
providing advice directly to the immediate supervisor. In all instances the administrator evaluation
committee will provide a written summary of faculty or staff opinion as solicited by the approved Clemson
University form. As part of the review process department chairs and collegiate deans will supply the
reviewing committee with the following materials: a plan for personal professional growth, a vision
statement for the unit’s future, a summary of activities and accomplishments including research, teaching
and public service since the last review, and a roster of six references outside the unit whom the committee
may contact for professional perspective.
Before the end of a department chair's second year in office and every fourth year thereafter, the
appropriate dean shall conduct a formal review of that chair's performance. This review shall include
receipt of the written summary from the administrator evaluation committee; it may include interviews
and/or other forms of consultation by the dean with each tenured and tenure-track faculty member of the
department as well as staff. At the discretion of the dean, the affected department's Faculty Advisory
Committee may be enlisted to assist in conducting the formal reviews. When the review process has been
completed, the dean shall make a report to the Provost. Subsequently, a brief summary of the decision will
be communicated to the department chair involved and the evaluation committee.
Likewise, the Provost shall formally review the performance of deans before the end of the dean’s third
year in office and every fifth year thereafter, consulting especially with department chairs and directors as
well as with faculty and staff through the administrator evaluation system. The Provost will meet with the
evaluation committee to receive its input and afterwards will report his/her conclusion to the dean. The
Provost’s conclusion will be communicated to the evaluation committee, and to the college at the next
meeting of the college faculty. Likewise, the President of the University shall review the performance of
the Provost before the end of the Provost’s fifth year in office and every fifth year thereafter, consulting
especially with the academic deans and with representative department chairs and faculty, and staff. The
President’s conclusion will be communicated to the university community at the next meeting of the
university faculty.
In all instances, the evaluation materials generated in the review process shall be treated with the strictest
confidence with only those in the review hierarchy entitled to access. The accumulated administrator
evaluation forms are sent to Records Management and saved for five years. These evaluations should also
be made available to the next evaluation committee.
K. The Nonacademic Administration: University Vice Presidents and Executive Officers
Non-academic university operations (those not under the purview of the Provost) are organized under four
major areas of administration, each headed by a chief administrative officer, responsible to the President of
the University. These administrative officers and the units of the university that report to them are listed
below:
1. Vice President for Advancement: Clemson University Foundation; Public Affairs; Alumni
Relations; Development; and Conference, Guest, and Visitor Programs.
2. Vice President for Public Service and Agriculture: Agriculture and Forestry Research System;
Cooperative Extension Service; Livestock-Poultry Health; Regulatory and Public Service
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VI-7
Programs; Strom Thurmond Institute of Government and Public Affairs; Archibold Tropical
Research Center in Dominica; and Housing Institute.
3. Vice President for Student Affairs: Housing (Residential Life, Facilities, Information Technology
Services); Student Life (Health Services, Counseling and Psychological Services, Career Center,
Student Activities/Union, Campus Recreation, Student Development Services, Student Conduct);
Gantt Intercultural Center (Multicultural activities, International Student Programs); and Municipal
Services (Fire and EMS, Law Enforcement & Public Safety, Fire/EMS, Municipal Court, Parking
Services, Student Post Office).
4. Vice President for Research and Economic Development: Research Compliance (including
Human Subjects, Animal Research, & Institutional Biosafety); Intellectual Property and Special
Projects; Sponsored Programs (Pre-award); Clemson University Research Foundation; Contract
Advising (Legal); university Research Grant Committee; Technology Transfer; South Carolina
Research Center; Clemson Apparel Research; Institute of Wildlife and Environmental Toxicology;
and other select centers and institutes.
5. Executive Secretary to the Board of Trustees: Access and Equity; Internal Auditing;
Governmental Affairs; and Institutional Research.
6. Reporting directly to the President: the General Counsel; the Athletic Director; the Associate
Director for Athletic Compliance; and the Chief Financial Officer.
Specific committees in these non-academic areas are listed in Part VII.
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PART VII.
FACULTY PARTICIPATION IN UNIVERSITY GOVERNANCE
A. General Framework
In accordance with the Will of Thomas Green Clemson and the Act of Acceptance by the General
Assembly of South Carolina, ultimate responsibility for the governance of Clemson University is vested in
the Board of Trustees. The Board is charged with setting university policies so as to achieve the goals
established by Mr. Clemson in his will and to serve the needs of the State of South Carolina. Thus, final
authority and responsibility for all policy decisions rest with the Board.
In order to operate the university effectively, the Board delegates responsibility in various areas to the
President of the University, to certain administrative officials, and to the faculty. The President is the
executive officer charged with administering the university in accordance with the policies adopted by the
Board and with primary responsibility for leadership and planning for the institution. The President is
charged with responsibility for academic, personnel, development, and fiscal and budgetary matters; with
providing for and maintaining the physical facilities of the university; with representing the institution to its
several publics; with the administrative implementation of the various policies of the university.
The faculty, as the repository of learning in the various academic fields of study, is charged with creating
the curriculum; setting requirements for degrees; determining when requirements have been met; approving
candidates for degrees. The faculty also has primary responsibility for such academic matters as evaluating
the qualifications of current or prospective faculty members; initiating recommendations for faculty and
academic administrative appointments; faculty reappointment, tenure, and promotion recommendations.
To carry out its role in the governance of the university, the faculty is formally organized through a Faculty
Constitution, which can be found in Section VIII of this Manual. The Faculty Senate, various university
committees, and the several college, school, and departmental faculties and their committees facilitate the
execution of the business of the faculty.
The Faculty Senate is the elected body that represents the faculty in its relationship with the administration,
especially in regard to policy matters involving the academic prerogatives of the faculty and faculty
welfare. To fulfill their academic governance responsibilities levels, the faculties of the several colleges,
schools, and departments are formally organized according to bylaws. Indeed, the primary exercise of the
academic prerogatives of the faculty takes place at the department level, where the specific professional
expertise of a particular discipline can be brought to focus on academic matters, including questions
regarding curriculum, appointment, tenure, and promotion.
Since the effective functioning of the university requires communication and cooperation between the
faculty and the administration, a university council, commission, and committee structure has been
established. This structure provides for faculty participation in planning, policy formulation, and decisionmaking in all areas that bear upon faculty concerns. The most comprehensive body within this structure is
the Academic Council, with its subsidiary commissions and committees. As outlined below, the Academic
Council includes representatives from various constituencies of the university (students, nonacademic
administrators, as well as faculty and academic administrators). Additional committees exist outside the
Academic Council structure and are organized here by administrative area.
B. Academic Council
The Academic Council reviews and recommends academic policy to the Provost. Such matters may be
routed to the President through the Provost by a majority vote. The council receives reports and
recommendations from committees and groups reporting to it. The Academic Council also reviews
recommendations regarding university-wide academic policy that emanate from the office of the Provost,
the Faculty Senate, the Student Senate, collegiate faculties, as well as from ad hoc committees appointed by
the President or Provost. The Academic Council shall view its role primarily as an oversight body guiding
and advising the university with regard to academic policy.
Membership of the Academic Council consists of the following: The Provost (chair); two members from
each college and from the library: the college and library deans; one faculty member from each college and
the library elected for a staggered three-year term; two undergraduate students: the president of the student
body and the president of the Student Senate; president of the graduate student government; Faculty Senate
President, Vice-Provost and Dean of the Graduate School, Vice- Provost and Dean of Undergraduate
Studies, and Vice-Provost for International Affairs. Non-voting are: President-elect of the Faculty
Senate; Dean of Student Life; president of the Staff Senate; and Extension Senate chair.
1. Council on Undergraduate Studies. This council consists of all faculty members, students, and
administrators from each subcommittee listed below. The Vice-Provost and Dean of
Undergraduate Studies will be a non-voting member serving as chair and will convene the council
each fall. All terms begin August 15 of the academic year. In the instance of a resignation from a
subcommittee, the dean of that college appoints a replacement who serves until the next election for
seating on August 15. The Council on Undergraduate Studies recommends to the Academic
Council all policy matters which originate with it, from the colleges, the Faculty Senate, the Student
Senate, or from the various subcommittees that report to it which are:
a. Academic Advising Committee oversees coordination of university advising activities
(including college academic advising centers, academic support center, colleges, etc.); informs
advisors of current policies on advising; periodically reviews the mission of academic
advising; coordinates assessments of the university advising system; and provides professional
development for advisors. Membership consists of the following: Two tenured or tenure-track
faculty elected from each college for a two-year term on a staggered basis, one additional
member with experience and interest in advising elected from each college for a two-year term,
two at-large appointments made by the Provost, and one undergraduate student appointed by
the president of the Student Senate. An ex officio, non-voting member is a representative of
the office of undergraduate studies. The chair is elected by the membership.
b. Undergraduate Curriculum Committee is comprised of the Vice-Provost and Dean of
Undergraduate Studies or some other member of the Provost’s staff who serves as non-voting
chairperson. Each college has two voting members, one of whom is chair of the collegiate
curriculum committee, and the collegiate committee elects the second. The term of office is for
three years in rotation. Non-voting members in addition to the chair include one elected library
faculty, one undergraduate student appointed by the student body president, the registrar, the
Calhoun honors college director, and other members of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies as
needed. The committee’s jurisdiction is set forth in the Faculty Constitution, Article 4.
Interdisciplinary curricular proposals may be brought to the Undergraduate Curriculum
Committee from oversight committees in the particular interdisciplinary area that are created
by the college or colleges participating in the creation and staffing of these courses or
curricula. If the participating departments or academic units are within a single college, a
committee to oversee the interdisciplinary curriculum shall be established in the college bylaws
providing for representation by affected departments or academic units. If the participating
departments or academic units come from more than one college, a joint committee shall be
established and be reflected in the bylaws of each participating college. The Honors College is
also authorized to initiate interdisciplinary honors courses. Interdisciplinary proposals must be
sent to college curriculum committees for review and comment before being considered by the
university curriculum committees. The curriculum committees shall maintain a list of such
committees to be published annually as an appendix to the Faculty Manual.
c. Admissions Committee formulates and recommends undergraduate admissions policies to the
Council on Undergraduate Studies. It also serves as the appeals committee for undergraduate
admissions. Membership consists of five faculty members serving three-year terms elected one
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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from each college, the chair of the Faculty Senate scholastic policies committee (or designee),
and the chair of the Student Senate academic affairs committee. Non-voting members are the
director of undergraduate admissions (chair), the director of undergraduate academic services,
and the director of housing.
d. Continuing Enrollment Committee formulates and recommends undergraduate continuing
enrollment appeals policies to the Council on Undergraduate Studies. It is responsible for
recommending policies relating to advising and retention. Only faculty members may serve as
the review committee when considering undergraduate continuing enrollment appeals.
Membership consists of five elected faculty, one from each college, serving three-year terms,
the chair of the Faculty Senate scholastic policies committee or designee, the student chair of
the minority council, and an undergraduate student appointed by the student body president.
The non-voting director of undergraduate academic services is the chair.
e. Calhoun Honors College Committee formulates and recommends policies and procedures for
Calhoun Honors College to the Council on Undergraduate Studies. The faculty members on
the committee serve as the curriculum committee for the honors program. Membership
consists of five faculty members, one from each college elected for a three-year term. Colleges
shall elect from their ranks faculty with experience and interest in the Honors College as
indicated by such activities as teaching honors courses, directing honors theses and research
projects, and serving on honors committees at the department and college level. Other voting
members are: one member of the Faculty Senate elected for a one-year term; two faculty
members, each serving two-year terms and appointed by the director of the Honors College
from the combined constituencies of the Dixon Senior Fellows, Calhoun Honors seminar
instructors, and Bradbury Award recipients; one student member of the Dixon Fellows
program elected by the other fellows; one student member of the Calhoun Society elected by
the members of the Society; one honors student appointed by the director of the Honors
College. All student members shall serve one-year terms. Non-voting members are the
director, associate director, and assistant director of the Honors College, and one representative
from the office of undergraduate admissions.
f. Scholarships and Awards Committee formulates and recommends policies and procedures
relating to scholarships and awards to the Council on Undergraduate Studies. It reviews the
selection of recipients for university and collegiate undergraduate scholarships and grants-inaid. Membership consists of six elected faculty members, one from each college and the
library, serving three-year terms, the chair of the Faculty Senate scholastic policies committee
or designee, and one undergraduate student, appointed by the student body president. Nonvoting members are the director of financial aid (chair), the director of Calhoun Honors
College, the dean of student life, the director of admissions, and the registrar.
g. Academic Integrity Committee hears appeals concerning possible academic dishonesty by
undergraduate students. The committee’s procedures and the penalties it may impose are set
forth in the current Undergraduate Announcements. The committee is composed of two
tenured faculty elected from each college for a two year term, and ten undergraduate students,
two from each college, nominated by the student body president and appointed by the Provost
for two year terms. Terms for both faculty and students begin with fall semester late
registration.
h. Academic Grievance Board. The Academic Grievance Board consists of two separate
entities, the Academic Grievance Panel and he Academic Grievance Committee. The
Academic Grievance Panel is responsible for the initial review of grievances, determining
which grievances will be forwarded to the Academic Grievance Committee.
The Academic Grievance Panel consists of five faculty members, one from each college,
appointed by the Dean of Undergraduate Studies for three-year terms; two undergraduate
Faculty Manual – July 2007
VII-3
students appointed in rotation among the colleges for two years terms, appointed by the
President of the Student Senate. One of the faculty representatives will be elected chair each
year.
The Academic Grievance Committee is responsible for hearing student grievances forwarded
by the Academic Grievance Panel, proposing resolution of grievances, and in the case of
appeals, making recommendations to the Dean of Undergraduate Studies. Grievances are
heard by three member subcommittees appointed by the chair. The committee consists of 15
faculty members(three from each college), elected by their faculties for three year terms, and
10 students, appointed by the President of the Student Senate for two-year terms. The Dean of
Undergraduate Studies appoints the chair. Further information is available in the
Undergraduate Announcements.
2. Council on Graduate Studies. This council provides oversight for policy and procedural
implementation relating to graduate education by: receiving, stimulating, and originating proposals
for the development of graduate education; reviewing, considering, and disseminating
recommendations from its constituent committees; and approving and forwarding to the Academic
Council those recommendations requiring specific action. This council consists of the faculty,
students, and administrators from each sub-committee listed below. The Vice-Provost and Dean
of the Graduate School is a non-voting member and convenes the council each fall. The council
elects its own chair. In case of a faculty resignation, the college dean appoints a replacement who
serves until the next election.
a. Graduate Curriculum Committee is composed of the Vice-Provost and Dean of the
Graduate School as non-voting chair, plus two representatives of the graduate curriculum
committees of the several colleges, one of whom will be the chair of the college graduate
committee and the other elected by the college graduate committee. Should a college have a
single curriculum committee, the college committee will elect two representatives to this
committee.
b. Graduate Admissions and Continuing Enrollment Appeals Committee deals primarily
with graduate admissions and continuing enrollment appeals. Its recommendations on policy
and reports on general statistics are submitted to the Academic Council. Membership consists
of one faculty representative from each college elected by the collegiate faculty for three-year
terms. The associate Dean of the Graduate School serves as non-voting chair.
c. Graduate Fellowships and Awards Committee formulates and recommends policies and
procedures relating to graduate fellowships and awards. It oversees selection of the recipients
for university-wide fellowships and the campus competition from departmental nominations
for outstanding graduate teaching assistants as well as future award recognitions for graduate
students. Membership consists of one faculty member representative from each college elected
by the collegiate faculties for a staggered two-year term. Non-voting members are the director
of financial aid or designee and an assistant/associate Dean of the Graduate School (chair).
d. Graduate Advisory Committee independently studies and reviews policy on non-curricular
graduate student academic matters and on those issues affecting the general welfare of graduate
students. Membership consists of one faculty member from each college elected by the
collegiate faculties for three-year terms and two graduate students appointed by the president
of graduate student government. The non-voting chair is the Vice-Provost and Dean of the
Graduate School.
e. The Graduate Academic Grievance Committee consists of 15 faculty representatives,
three from each college, and five student representatives, preferably one from each
college. Faculty representatives are selected by their colleges and serve three-year
staggered terms. Student representatives on the committee are selected and approved by
the Graduate Student Government through an application and interview process in the
Faculty Manual – July 2007
VII-4
spring semester. Students serve one-year terms. No member of the Graduate Academic
Grievance Committee may simultaneously be a member of the undergraduate academic
grievance committee, nor may they be members of the undergraduate or graduate
academic integrity committees. The selection of faculty and student membership on the
Graduate Academic Grievance Committee will occur in April of each year as needed.
The Initial Grievance Review Board is responsible for determining which grievances will
go forward to the Graduate Academic Grievance Committee. The IGRB is comprised of
one faculty representative from each of the colleges, appointed for one-year terms. In
addition, there is one graduate student representative on the IGRB, appointed for a oneyear term. The members of the Initial Grievance Review Board are selected by and from
the membership of the Graduate Academic Grievance Committee. The IGRB selects a
faculty member to serve as its chair.
The Graduate Academic Grievance Committee is responsible for hearing student
grievances forwarded to it by the IGRB, proposing resolutions, and, in the case of appeal,
preparing the file and forwarding recommendations to the dean of the Graduate School.
Grievances are heard by 5-person subcommittees, three faculty and two graduate
students, appointed by the chair of the Graduate Academic Grievance Committee as
cases are received from the IGRB. The Graduate Academic Grievance Committee will
only hold hearings on cases referred to it by the IGRB. The chair of the Graduate
Academic Grievance Committee is a faculty member selected by the membership of the
committee at its first meeting.
f. Graduate Academic Integrity Committee. Allegations of violations of academic integrity on
the part of a graduate student should be brought to the attention of the Graduate Academic
Integrity Committee through the Office of the Vice Provost and Dean of the Graduate School.
The committee’s policies and procedures are available through the Graduate School.
Membership of this committee consists of five tenured faculty members involved in graduate
education (one from each college elected by the collegiate faculty for two-year terms) and two
graduate students approved by the Graduate Student Senate for no more than a two-year term.
A chairperson will be elected from within the Committee's membership. The chairperson is a
voting member of the Committee. The Dean is the administrative coordinator and non-voting
member of the Academic Integrity Committee. All proceedings of the committee are
confidential. Details may be found in Graduate School Announcements."
3.
Committees Reporting to the Vice Provost for International Affairs
a.
International Studies Curriculum Committee. The International Studies Curriculum
Committee develops and reviews course proposals for courses designated as
international studies courses, and recommends approved international studies courses to
the Undergraduate or Graduate Curriculum Committee for final consideration and
approval. The Vice Provost for International Affairs chairs the committee, which is
composed of one elected representative from each of the five colleges and the library.
Nonvoting members are the Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Studies, the ViceProvost and Dean of the Graduate School, the Director of the Honors College, and the
Director of Study Abroad.
b. International Programs Coordination Committee. The International Programs
Coordination Committee coordinates information and recommends policies and plans
for study abroad, international research opportunities, and international internship and
co-op opportunities. The committee is chaired by the Vice Provost for International
Affairs. Each member of the Provost’s Advisory Council designates a senior faculty or
staff representative from their respective areas to serve on the committee as
appropriate.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
VII-5
c.
International Services Coordination Committee. The International services
Coordination Committee coordinates information and reviews and recommends policies
and plans for international student recruitment, admission and retention, financial aid,
and academic support as well as international student affairs, immigration services, and
tax and employment information for international students, scholars, faculty and staff.
The committee is chaired by the Vice Provost for International Affairs. Each members
of the Provost’s Advisory Council designates a senior faculty or staff representative
from their respective areas to serve on the committee as appropriate.
C. Councils, Commissions, and Committees Reporting to the President
1. Administrative Council. The President, as chief executive officer of the university, is charged
with administering the university in accordance with policies adopted by the Board of Trustees and
with primary responsibility for leadership and planning. In order to carry out the charges of office
effectively and efficiently, the President may convene administrative leaders, including, but not
limited to, those administrators who report directly to the President.
The Administrative Council meetings primarily serve as staff meetings between the President and
those individuals reporting to him or her. The administrative council assists the President in
planning for the university; reports information and action items to the President; provides advice
or counsel to the President about activities in each area of the university; and demonstrates
leadership in developing, implementing, and/or evaluating university policies.
2. President's Cabinet. The President's cabinet advises the President on policy decisions affecting all
areas of the university and serves as a communications forum between the President and the various
administrative divisions of the university. Chaired by the President, the cabinet is composed of the
vice presidents, the secretary to the Board of Trustees, the general counsel, the chief alumni and
development officer; the chief Financial Officer, the chair of the President’s Commission on the
Status of Women, the chief public affairs officer, the Director of News Services, the Director of the
Office of Access and Equity, the President of the Staff Senate, the President of the Extension
Senate, the Faculty Senate President, the Executive Director of Governmental Affairs, the President
of the Student Body, the President of the Graduate Student Government, the Executive Secretary of
IPTAY, and others as designated by the President.
3. Athletic Council. Institutional control of intercollegiate athletics rests with and is exercised by the
President of the University. In this capacity the President is ultimately responsible for ensuring that
Clemson's athletic policies and programs are in compliance with the rules and regulations of the
National Collegiate Athletic Association and the Atlantic Coast Conference. Authority for the
administration and management of intercollegiate athletic programs is exercised by the athletic
director who is accountable to the President.
a. Faculty Athletics Representative. The Faculty Athletics Representative (FAR) represents the
University and its faculty in the University’s relationships with the National Collegiate Athletic
Association (NCAA) and the Atlantic Coast Conference. It is the responsibility of the Faculty
Athletics Representative to work with all involved parties in ensuring academic integrity,
facilitating institutional control of intercollegiate athletics, and enhancing the student-athlete
experience. Clemson’s FAR is a tenured associate or full professor who has served on
Clemson’s faculty a minimum of ten years who is familiar with the policies and procedures of
the Athletic Council and knowledgeable of Clemson’s Athletics Program generally. Clemson’s
FAR shall serve an initial term of four years, thereafter renewable for up to three additional
two-year terms for a maximum of 10 years. Renewals will be at the President’s discretion but
consultation and collaboration with the Athletic Council in making the decision is essential.
The nominating committee to select the FAR consists of the Chair of the Athletic Council and the
chairs of the standing committees of the Council plus the Faculty Senate’s representative to the
Athletic Council. Other faculty, staff or administrators may also be appointed by the Athletic
Faculty Manual – July 2007
VII-6
Council to serve as non-voting members of the nominating committee. The outgoing FAR serves
as a non-voting member of the committee. The committee recommends a slate of candidates to the
President, who makes the final decision. The President may ask the nominating committee for
additional names as needed.
For additional information about the Faculty Athletic Representative’s selection and
responsibilities, refer to Clemson University Athletic Council Policies and Procedures.
b. Functions of the Athletic Council. The principal function of the Athletic Council is to advise
the Clemson University administration on all major decisions affecting the administration of
the athletic department. The Athletic Council shall recommend policy on intercollegiate
athletics to the athletic director and, when appropriate, to the President. Specific duties of the
Athletic Council include monitoring the recruitment, scholastic eligibility, and academic
progress of student athletes, reviewing athletic schedules and ticket prices, advising the
university's faculty representative to the NCAA and ACC on matters of pending legislation,
evaluating athletic policies and programs to ensure their compatibility with the overall aims
and mission of the university., and participation in the screening and selection of applicants for
the position of athletic director.
c. Membership of the Athletic Council. The membership of the Athletic Council is as follows:
• Two elected faculty representatives from each college and one from the library. In
addition, the colleges and the library shall each elect one alternate who shall have voting
rights and shall serve on the Athletic Council in the absence of the elected representative.
Faculty representatives serve staggered three-year terms. Consecutive terms are permitted.
• Three full-time enrolled members of the student body, one each appointed by the president
of the student body, the president of the Student Senate, and the president of the Graduate
Student Government.
• Two full-time enrolled student athletes, one representing revenue-producing sports and
one from Olympic (non-revenue producing) sports, appointed by the athletic director.
• One representative of the Clemson alumni association appointed by the Alumni National
Council.
• One member of IPTAY who may be the president of IPTAY or the president's designee.
• The Faculty Senate President or a member of the Faculty Senate nominated by the Senate
President and elected by the Advisory Committee of the Faculty Senate.
• Three at-large appointees of the President of the University; one of whom shall be from
student affairs.
• One member of the Staff Senate appointed by the President of the Staff Senate.
• One representative (unclassified field staff) appointed by the Extension Senate.
Presidential appointees serve two-year terms, once renewable. Student members of the Athletic
Council serve one-year terms consecutive up to two years. Except as described above, all other
voting members of the Athletic Council serve one-year terms consecutive up to three years. The
term of membership begins on May 16th of each year and ends on May 15th of the subsequent
year.
Ex-officio non-voting members include the associate athletic director for compliance, the
university's NCAA/ACC representative, the athletic director, one associate director of athletics
designated by the athletic director, and the senior women’s administrator for the athletic
department.
At the biennial March meeting of the Athletic Council the voting members elect from the regular,
full-time faculty members a chair and vice chair whose two-year terms commence at the first
Athletic Council meeting after May 15th of that year. All regular, full-time faculty Athletic
Council members are eligible for election to these offices regardless of the length of time remaining
on their terms.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
VII-7
d. Committees of the Athletic Council. There are five standing committees of the Athletic
Council:
• Governance and Rules Compliance. This committee ensures that the mission of the
athletics program supports the mission and goals of the institution, reviews matters of
institutional policy and control, and monitors compliance with rules and regulations.
• Academic Standards and Integrity. This committee considers issues related to admissions,
academic standards, academic support services, and academic program scheduling.
• Fiscal Integrity and Facility Planning. This committee is responsible for monitoring
financial practices, overseeing fiscal and facility management and planning, and reviewing
fiscal policies and procedures.
• Equity, Welfare and Sportsmanship. This committee assures the fair and equitable
treatment of women and other minorities, protects the physical and educational welfare of
student athletes, and assures that all associated with athletics are committed to the
fundamental values of sportsmanship and ethical conduct.
• Campus and Community Relations. This committee monitors university community
perceptions of athletic program issues and reviews and proposes athletic initiatives to
improve campus and community relations.
For additional information about the Athletic Council, its officers and committees, refer to Clemson
University Athletic Council Policies and Procedures.
4. President’s Commission on the Status of Women. The commission was established at Clemson
to improve the quality of life for women at Clemson. The commission’s charge is to discern the
status of women at Clemson University and document findings; discover and pursue the removal of
institutional barriers; collect information and conduct research regarding issues that affect women,
including the study of practices followed by commissions on women at other universities; and
explore problem areas that limit equal opportunities and advancement. The commission publicizes
the role of the university in improving the status of women at all levels. Membership of the
commission consists of seven members of the faculty, six members of the staff, and other nonvoting university faculty and staff as designated by the President. Members are appointed by the
President for three-year staggered terms beginning in August from nominations by the Faculty
Senate and the Staff Senate. The chair of the commission is appointed by the President for a threeyear renewable term after consultation with the commission. The chair appoints a deputy chair for
a one-year term.
5. Honorary Degree and Naming Committee. This committee consists of the Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost (chair); the President of the Faculty Senate (secretary); the
most recent past president of the Faculty Senate currently in the employ of Clemson
University; the most senior (in years of service) Alumni Distinguished Professor; and the most
senior (in years of service) holder of an endowed chair/titled professorship. When
functioning to select candidates for an honorary degree, the chair of the institutional
advancement committee of the Board of Trustees and the chair of the Board of Trustees will
be added.
When the committee functions to name candidates for an honorary degree, it evaluates a
candidate’s credentials and submits a recommendation for the awarding of an honorary
degree to the President of the University. The President will forward a recommendation to
the Board of Trustees for approval. When serving as a naming committee, this body
recommends appropriate names for university lands and facilities to the university President
for approval by the Board of Trustees.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
VII-8
6. Summer Reading Advisory Committee. The Summer Reading Advisory Committee
recommends to the Provost and the President of the University one or more selections of a
book for the Freshman Summer Reading Program, as well as suggesting related themes for
that year’s Presidential Colloquium. The Provost and the President of the University have
final approval authority for the book to be selected. The committee is chaired by the Dean of
Undergraduate Studies, who serves as an ex-officio and nonvoting member along with the
Director of the Freshman Summer Reading Program. Voting membership consists of the
Director of Freshman Writing; the Director of the Presidential Colloquium Series, a student
member appointed by the President of Student Government, and a faculty member from each
of the colleges and the library. The student and faculty representatives serve one-year
renewable terms.
7. Staff Senate studies, formulates, and recommends general policies and procedures to the
President's cabinet concerning the staff employees of the university, including job skill
development, compensation, benefits, and welfare. The distribution of elected members among
vice presidential areas is based upon an approximate 2:100 ratio of classified employees within
each area. For a precise breakdown of membership representation, see Clemson University Staff
Senate Bylaws. Elections are held annually and elected members serve three-year terms. The
Director of Human Resources serves as a non-voting member. Its sub-committees are:
• Executive Committee consists of the president, vice president, immediate past president, the
chairs of the standing committees, secretary, treasurer, parliamentarian, and the ex-officio
members. This committee proposes the annual agenda and refers items to the appropriate
committees.
• Policy and Welfare Committee studies classified staff concerns and formulates and
recommends university-wide policies and procedures related to classified staff employees. The
committee also considers development of job and supervisory skills, compensation, benefits,
and other items pertaining to the welfare of the classified staff employees.
• Communications Committee provides a forum for the communication of questions, informed
answers, and ideas. The committee publishes the Staff Senate newsletter as a systematic
means of communicating existing university policy, specific actions and feedback concerning
all matters considered by the Commission. The committee is responsible for the CSC booth at
the annual benefits fair. The booth promotes classified staff activities, achievements, and
goals.
• Scholarship Committee is responsible for raising funds for the annual scholarships that will
provide access to the educational experience at Clemson University for dependent children of
staff. This committee also coordinates an annual golf tournament and other fundraising drives.
• Membership Committee reviews representation, conducts annual elections, and coordinates
orientation and annual awards luncheon.
• Activities Committee serves as a support arm to the other Standing Committees, providing
logistical assistance for special events.
8. President’s Commission on the Status of Black Faculty and Staff. The purpose of the
commission is to advise the President and the administrative council with specific
recommendations to enhance the quality of life for all black faculty and staff. The Commission
consists of six members of the faculty, six members of the classified staff, and other university
faculty and staff (non-voting members) as designated by the President. Members are appointed by
the President to serve staggered three-year terms. The chair is appointed by the President for a twoyear term.
9.
Parking Review Board. The Board consists of forty-three members drawn from faculty, staff, and
students (with alternates from each of the constituent bodies) who in subcommittee panels of five
members (one faculty/librarian and one staff member, two undergraduate students, and one
graduate student) constitute the campus administrative review body for appealed parking violations.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
VII-9
The membership consists of two faculty members from each college elected for a three-year
staggered term, with the Faculty Senate selecting an alternate; one member and alternate elected by
the library; eight classified staff plus three alternates on three-year staggered terms selected by the
President of the Classified Staff Senate; sixteen undergraduate students and six alternates selected by
; the Attorney General of the student body; and eight graduate students plus three alternates appointed
by the President of Graduate Student Government for one-year terms.
D. Committees Reporting to the Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Provost
1. Academic Computing Advisory Committee reviews and advises on policies related to academic
computing and information technology, including educational and research computing. The
Committee also sets the membership criteria for three standing subcommittees: Research
Computing and Cyberinfrastructure, Customer Relations and Learning Technologies, and
Distance Education. Voting membership consists of one faculty member serving a three-year term
elected by each of the colleges and the library; a representative from the Faculty Senate elected
annually; and a graduate student appointed by the President of Graduate Student Government. The
chairs of standing subcommittees also serve as ex-officio members of the Committee. Nonvoting membership includes the Vice Provost for Computing and Information Technology (chair)
and a representative from Public Service Activities (PSA).
2. Libraries Advisory Committee reviews and advises on policies for the university libraries.
Membership consists of the dean of the library as the committee’s non-voting chair; one faculty
representative serving a three year term elected from each college and the library; a representative
of the Faculty Senate elected annually; a representative of the Staff Senate appointed annually by
the Senate President; an undergraduate student appointed by the President of the Student Senate;
and a graduate student appointed by the President of the Graduate Student Government.
3. University Assessment Committee provides leadership and assistance in developing and
overseeing a program of evaluation and feedback to enhance the effectiveness of the university.
The committee develops and recommends university-wide assessment policies, assists in
developing assessment procedures that meet accepted standards for data collection and analysis,
reviews assessment procedures for consistency with goals and objectives, reviews results of
assessment activities and recommends improvements, reviews the progress of the university in
implementing assessment activities, reviews all assessment reports and coordinates the preparation
of annual reports for the State Commission on Higher Education, strives to ensure that assessment
information is not misused, and monitors the effects of assessment to ensure that assessment results
are used in subsequent planning activities.
Members of the Assessment Committee with three-year terms include: two representatives from
each college and one from the library appointed by the respective deans, two representatives from
different areas of administration and advancement appointed by the Vice President for
Administration and Advancement, one representative appointed by the Dean of Undergraduate
Studies, and two representatives from student affairs appointed by the Vice President of Student
Affairs; one representative appointed by each of the following: the Athletic Director, the Dean of
the Graduate School, the Vice President for Public Service and Agriculture, and the Vice President
for Research and Economic Development. Two undergraduate students are appointed by the Vice
President for Student Affairs for two-year terms. A representative of the Faculty Senate, one
college dean appointed by the Council of Academic Deans, and one graduate student appointed by
the Dean of the Graduate School serve one-year terms. The directors of assessment and of planning
are ex-officio, nonvoting members. The head of institutional research and other nonvoting
members, recommended by the committee and appointed by the Provost for one-year terms, serve
as resource persons for the committee. The committee elects its own chair for a one-year term from
among the faculty and administrative representatives. The vice-chair is elected annually by the
committee and will succeed the chair the following year. The chair remains as a member of the
committee for the year following his or her tenure as chair. The three members, chair, vice-chair
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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and former chair, do not count against allocations from the colleges.
4. Innovation Fund Awards Committee administers the Clemson University innovation fund, which
provides a source of funding for unique ideas that do not have an alternative university funding
source; provides an incentive for innovative initiatives and programs that have a mutual benefit to
the university; and promotes the application of skills, techniques, and knowledge of two or more
disciplines toward a common goal or goals. Priority is given to proposals that support initiatives
that enhance or improve undergraduate education. The fund is not intended to support proposals
for which other university funding sources exist.
Members of the committee are the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost; the Vice
President for Public Service and Agriculture; the chair of the Assessment Committee; a holder of an
endowed chair; and an alumni master teacher. The Provost appoints the alumni master teacher and
the endowed chair holder. The Provost chairs the committee. Proposals are given priority based on
uniqueness, need, and overall benefit to the university. The committee reviews and evaluates the
merits of proposals received. Information concerning the preparation of proposals can be obtained
from the Provost’s office.
E. Committees Reporting to the Vice President for Research and Economic Development
The Research Council provides advice and representation on issues affecting the university’s research
efforts. The Research Council will provide the Vice President for Research and Economic Development
direct faculty input on future policy and procedural matters to enhance the quality of scholarly endeavors
and the growth of research programs under his/her direction. The Research Council will be expected to
transcend unit and college lines, to promote shared values, and to represent a cohesive point of view to the
Vice President for Research and Economic Development.
The council membership consists of one faculty member elected from each college and the library for a
three-year term; one faculty member appointed from each college by the Vice President for Research and
Economic Development in consultation with the collegiate dean; the current chair of the Faculty Senate
research committee (or designee); and the chairs of each of the subcommittees listed below.
The Vice President for Research and Economic Development shall convene the membership for the
purpose of electing a chair. The council will meet at least three times each academic year. A special
meeting can be called by the chair, by the Vice President for Research and Economic Development, or by
request of a third of the council members in order to manage the council’s business.
The following committees report to the Research Council.
1. Animal Research Committee consists of the university veterinarian; the university animal
facilities administrator; a faculty member from each college having animal facilities; a wildlife
specialist; and a resident of a local community who is not an employee of the university.
Committee appointments are made for three-year terms by the Vice President for Research and
Economic Development for indefinite terms. The committee elects the chair. The committee is the
principal university advisory group on the humane care and use of animals. It maintains oversight
of the university animal programs, facilities, and procedures and reviews the care and use of all
animals included in the university policy.
2. Institutional Biosafety Committee consists of the Director of Environmental Health and Safety,
the Associate Vice-President for Research Compliance, two faculty with expertise relevant to
recombinant DNA (rDNA) technology, two faculty with expertise in chemical and/or biological
hazards, two residents of the community who are not employed by the university, and when
possible, one non-doctoral laboratory technician. Other university faculty or staff with expertise in
the health professions or animal, plant or plant pathogen/pest containment may be asked to serve on
the committee when necessary. The Associate Vice President for Research is a non-voting member
of the committee. The chair and all members of the committee are appointed to three year terms by
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the President in consultation with the Vice President for Research. This committee reviews and
approves rDNA, chemical, and biological hazardous activities conducted at or sponsored by the
university. The committee also assesses and approves the facilities, procedures, practices, and the
training and expertise of personnel engaged in rDNA, chemical, and biological hazards research
and teaching.
3. Human Subjects Committee consists of the Associate Vice President for Research Compliance
(chair); one faculty member from each college having a significant number of activities involving
human subjects; a medical doctor nominated by the Vice President for Student Affairs; and a
resident of the local community who is not an employee of the university. All members are
appointed by the Vice President for Research and Economic Development to serve three-year
terms. This committee, functioning as the institutional review board, approves all activities of the
university that involve human subjects and ensures that the rights and welfare of subjects are
adequately protected, that the risks to subjects are outweighed by potential benefits, and that the
informed consent of subjects is obtained by methods that are adequate and appropriate.
4. Intellectual Property Committee consists of a chair appointed by the Vice President for Research
and Economic Development; the senior contract advisor who acts as secretary; the general counsel
or his/her designee; a representative from administration and advancement; an associate dean from
each college; one graduate student representing the graduate student government, for a one-year
term; one undergraduate student nominated by the dean of student affairs for a one-year term; a
faculty representative elected from each college; and the person from Cooper Library identified as
patent coordinator serving in an ex officio, non-voting capacity. This committee recommends
intellectual property policy to the Vice President for Research and Economic Development;
approves or disapproves patent and other intellectual property proposals submitted in accordance
with patent policies of the university; and makes recommendations to the Vice President for
Research and Economic Development.
5. Research Grants Committee consists of two faculty representatives elected for three-year terms
by the faculty of each college plus one member elected for a three-year term from the library. The
chair is elected annually by the committee. This committee receives applications for grants in
support of research from faculty members in all departments of the university. Eligible faculty are
those with tenure, tenure-track, or emeritus faculty status. Only one submission per person is
allowed. Faculty who have received a URGC grant within the previous two years are not eligible.
The committee makes grants to new faculty members initiating research and to faculty members
initiating research in a new area or in areas where other sources of support are inadequate or
nonexistent. Priority is given to new faculty (5 years or less at Clemson). Grant applications may
be obtained from the Office of Sponsored Programs. Applications are solicited annually through
announcements on World Wide Web.
F. Committees Reporting to the Vice President for Student Affairs
The following committees, task forces and other organizations report to the Vice President for Student
Affairs.
1. Alcohol and Other Drugs Task Force consists of representatives of designated departments
within the university as well as from the local community. The Vice President for Student Affairs
appoints members to represent the following areas: university union, university housing, counseling
and psychological services, health services/medical services, health services/health education,
public safety, peer health educators, athletics, county, student government, public
affairs/publications, Clemson city police, fraternities and sororities, campus ministry, graduate
student government, and other individuals as appropriate. Two faculty members are elected by the
Faculty Senate. The chair is elected annually by the committee.
2. Media Advisory Board provides input to the media advisors on issues affecting campus media
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and/or media related issues; allocates University resources to student media organizations as
available (including space, budget dollars, equipment, and funding from the Media Reserve
account); reviews written complaints and suggestions from any person concerning any media
organization or the media in general and advises the media adviser(s) and the affected media
organization as to the proper course of action to take in response to the complaints or suggestions;
and makes recommendations to the Vice President for Student Affairs relating to the Media
Advisory Board structure, media policies, and other issues relating to student media. The board
consists of one administrator appointed by the Vice President for Student Affairs;, one member of
the faculty elected by the Faculty Senate; one nonfaculty employee from University Relations
appointed by the Chief Public Affairs Officer; two members from Student Government, one
appointed by the Student Body President and one by the Student Senate President; the leader or
designee thereof from TAPS, The Tiger, Tiger Town Observer, CCN, and WSBF; and the director
of the University Union or a designee.
3. Campus Recreation Advisory Board represents the interests and needs of the students and
university community in the area of recreational services. The primary function of the Board
is to advise the Department of Campus Recreation regarding strategic directions, operational
and programmatic issues. This Board studies, formulates, and recommends policies relating
to physical recreation facilities and programs to the Director of Campus Recreation. The
Board consists of three faculty members elected by the Faculty Senate for three year terms,
one staff member appointed by the Staff Senate President, one staff member from Student
Affairs, one staff member from IT Services, two students from the Residence Hall
Association, one from the National Panhellenic Council, one from the Interfraternity
Council, three representative from Undergraduate Student Government (Health and Human
Services, Finance and Procedures, University Services), one from the Graduate Student
Government, one from the Men’s and Women’s Swimming and Diving Team, one from the
Intramural Council, one from the Club Sports Association, one from the Clemson Outdoor
Recreation Experience, one from the National Pan-Hellenic Council, two students appointed
at large by the Board. All student members are appointed on one year terms. The Director of
Campus Recreation serves as the Chair and as a non-voting member.
4. Student Health Committee formulates and recommends policy on food services, health service,
counseling/career planning, and student insurance to the Vice President for Student Affairs.
Members are the director of health services; the director of counseling and psychological services;
the director of campus services; the associate director of residential life; the chair of the Student
Senate Food and Health Committee and one member of that committee nominated by the chair; one
undergraduate student nominated by the student body president; one undergraduate student
appointed by the Vice President for Student Affairs; one graduate student representative; and one
faculty member elected by the Faculty Senate to a two-year term. The chair is designated by the
Vice President for Student Affairs.
5. Parking Advisory Committee serves as an advisory body, providing advice to the dean of
municipal and health services with reference to campus parking issues including policies,
enforcement, fees, zone designation, maintenance, and construction of parking facilities.
committee membership shall consist of: two faculty members elected by the Faculty Senate, who
serve two year-staggered terms from May through April; one staff member appointed by the Staff
Senate president; one student member appointed by the student government; one student member
appointed by the Graduate Student Government; a police department representative; an athletic
department representative; a housing office representative; the campus master planner; and the
Director of Parking Services (serves ex-officio, non-voting). The representatives of the Staff
Senate, the student body, and the Graduate Student Government serve one year terms from May
through April. Additionally, resource persons may be requested to attend from campus areas
including but not limited to: campus events office, Director of the Parking Review Board, facilities
maintenance and operations, and performing arts. Members serve two-year staggered
terms from May through April with one member appointed each year. The initial appointment shall
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include one member for one year and one member for two years.
The Parking Advisory Committee elects a chair to serve for twelve months, or other period of time
as agreed upon by a majority of the committee. The chair shall be responsible for convening the
committee and forwarding meeting agendas to the recorder for duplication and dissemination. A
staff member of parking services department shall serve as recorder for the meetings. The recorder
shall duplicate and disseminate meeting agendas provided by the chair, prepare minutes of the
committee meetings (including advisory statements of the committee) and forward them to
committee members and the dean of municipal and health services. The chair shall convene the
committee monthly when items appropriate for discussion have been placed on the agenda.
6. Student Affairs Student Advisory Board consists of approximately 30-35 students ranging from
freshmen to graduate students reflecting the diversity of the student body at Clemson University.
This group is responsible for communicating thoughts/ideas/suggestions on ways of improving
student life at Clemson to the student affairs administration. Issues include health service
operations, security issues, bookstore services, career services, parking services, computer services,
etc. This group meets on a monthly basis and is chaired by the Vice President for Student Affairs.
G. Committees, Boards, and Units Reporting to the Chief Business Officer
The following committees, boards and other units report to the Chief Business Officer.
1. Accident Review Board. In accordance with state guidelines, the board reviews accidents that
involve vehicles belonging to the university. The board also makes recommendations to the
appropriate agencies or departments for improving safety. Membership consists of the Director of
Risk Management (chair) from administration and advancement; representatives from research
services; student affairs; the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences; Faculty Senate;
Staff Senate; student government; campus services; public safety; and transportation services.
2. Advisory Committee of Budget Center Representatives. This committee reviews and revises
policies concerning the university budget planning process. Members include representatives from
the major budget centers including the academic colleges, the library, PSA, research, the Provost’s
office, and the Faculty Senate and the Staff Senate. The chief business officer serves as chair.
3. Bookstore Advisory Committee reviews and advises on policies for the university bookstore.
Membership consists of the manager of the bookstore (nonvoting), the director of campus services
(nonvoting), two faculty representatives elected from each college and one elected from the library,
and one representative chosen annually from each of the following: the Faculty Senate, an
undergraduate student, a graduate student, and a staff person. The chair is elected annually from
the committee membership.
4. University Facilities Advisory Committee (UFAC) provides oversight of the planning and
assessment process used by the facilities department. UFAC assists that department by identifying,
establishing, and evaluating priorities for infrastructure investments and ensuring that alterations of
campus buildings comply with institutional policies and pertinent codes. Assessment priorities for
the committee include preventative maintenance, maintenance repair and renovation, facility
condition and benchmarking. Assessment reports will be delivered to the chief business officer and
the Administrative Council by November 30th of each year. The committee meets at least quarterly
and will consist of representatives from each college and the library, the Provost’s office, and from
major auxiliary departments. The chief facilities officer serves as chair.
5. Vending Machine Committee reviews requests from university departments or organizations for
the funding of special activities from the vending machine fund. This committee consists of the
budget director as chair; the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs; the Vice President
for Student Affairs; the Faculty Senate President; the President of the Graduate Student
Government; the President of the Student Body; the President of the Staff Senate; and the Director
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VII-14
of Fiscal Affairs - or their designees.
6. Office of Human Resources. The Office of Human Resources is responsible for payroll and
benefits, employee relations and assistance programs, employee records, training and technology,
and classification, compensation, and recruitment.
H. Other University Organizations
1. Organization of Academic Department Chairs serves as a forum for communication between the
academic department chairs and others at the university, such as the Faculty Senate, the Academic
Council, and the university administration. This organization also provides advice on academic and
administrative matters. An executive committee composed of a member from each college
represents the group between meetings of the membership.
2. Ad Hoc Committees. Ad Hoc Committees may be convened by appropriate university officials or
organizations to carry out a SPECIFIC charge. Ad Hoc Committees MUST have a definite date by
which time their work is completed and the committee disbanded.
I. Faculty Participation in College Governance
In conformity with policy adopted by the Board of Trustees in January, 1981, the faculty of each college or
equivalent unit is organized in accordance with bylaws developed by its faculty under guidelines for the
governance of academic units. Copies of college bylaws are available from the dean’s office or the
Provost’s office. Although college bylaws vary, certain policies and procedures for faculty participation in
college governance must be followed by all Collegiate Faculties.
Formal meetings of the faculty of college shall be held at least once during each of the long semesters. At
such meetings standing and other committees of the college report to the faculty and make
recommendations. However, any member of a Collegiate Faculty may raise a question concerning the
academic affairs of the college before the faculty. Where immediate action on such questions is deemed
inadvisable, the presiding officer, with the concurrence of the faculty, may refer them to appropriate
college committees.
Recommendations from the college faculty are to be forwarded to the appropriate University council,
committee, or administrative officer. Minutes of Collegiate Faculty meetings are to be forwarded to the
Provost and Vice-President for Academic Affairs and to the President of the University for their
information.
Each college with degree program responsibilities shall have as a standing committee a Curriculum
Committee. At the discretion of the faculty and in accordance with college bylaws, a college may establish
separate Undergraduate and Graduate Curriculum Committees. Each college’s Undergraduate Curriculum
Committee elects its own chair, who also serves on the University Undergraduate Curriculum Committee.
A second representative shall be elected by the committee. Likewise, the elected chair of the College’s
Graduate Curriculum Committee represents the college on the University Graduate Curriculum Committee.
A college that chooses to maintain a single curriculum committee delegates to that committee the authority
to name the college representative to the University Graduate Curriculum Committee.
Each department or equivalent unit of the college shall elect its representative(s) to the college curriculum
committee in accordance with procedures established in the college bylaws. In colleges in which the
number of departments is small, college bylaws may specify alternate procedures for establishing the
membership of college curriculum committees. Terms of service on college curriculum committees are to
be determined by the faculty of each college and specified in its bylaws.
Curricular recommendations emanating from the departments or equivalent units of each college are acted
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upon by the Collegiate Faculty and/or by the appropriate college curriculum committee. Upon approval
such curricular items are to be forwarded to the appropriate University Curriculum Committee for action.
A Collegiate Faculty may also establish other standing committees whose composition and membership are
determined by the faculty in accordance with the college bylaws. Said committees shall report to the
Collegiate Faculty at regular intervals. Ad Hoc committees may be established at the discretion of the dean
of the college.
Membership on college committees need not be confined to Collegiate Faculty only: college bylaws shall
provide for student and staff on representation wherever appropriate.
J. Faculty Participation in Departmental Governance
In conformity with policy adopted by the Board of Trustees in January, 1981, the faculty of each
department or equivalent unit is organized in accordance with bylaws developed by its faculty under
guidelines for the governance of academic units. . Copies of departmental bylaws are available from the
department office, the dean’s office or the Provost’s office. Although, departmental bylaws vary, certain
policies and procedures for faculty participation in departmental governance must be followed by all
departmental faculties.
The faculty who comprise an academic department or equivalent unit constitute the primary authority on
academic matters such as the department’s curriculum and its major and minor programs. In such matters
the influence of the department chair and of the dean (if the latter happens to be a member of the
department) extends only so far as their status as departmental faculty. The faculty of a department or
equivalent unit also constitutes the primary judge of the qualifications of its members; thus peer evaluation
is an essential element in the appointment, reappointment, promotion, and tenure of department members
(see Part IV. A - D, G - I).
Since the will of the department with regard to academic matters is most properly established in formal
assemblages, the department chair shall conduct a regular meeting of the departmental faculty at least once
in each of the long semesters. Minutes of these meetings shall be forwarded to the dean of the college or
the equivalent administrator for his/her information.
Each department or equivalent unit shall have a standing Advisory Committee of faculty members, shared
by the department chair, the composition and membership of which shall be approved by the regular faculty
of the department. In small departments the faculty may elect to have the entire regular faculty serve as the
Advisory committee. This committee shall advise the chair on matters which he/she brings to it.
If approved by the department chair and the departmental faculty, other standing committees may be
established. These committees shall forward recommendations to the chair and report to the departmental
faculty at regular intervals. Ad Hoc committees may be established at the department chair’s discretion.
All departmental committees, however, must be established in ways consistent with college bylaws and
with the Faculty Manual. Membership on departmental committees need not be confined to faculty:
student and/or staff representation shall be provided for wherever appropriate. Each department shall also
elect representatives to the college curriculum and other committees in accordance with procedures
established in the college bylaws.
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PART VIII. The Constitution of the Faculty of Clemson University
The faculty of Clemson University was first formally organized in 1956, with separate constitutions and
bylaws for the academic faculty and for the research faculty. In 1970 these two bodies were unified under
a single constitution and bylaws of the Clemson University Faculty, with the Faculty Senate as the sole
representative assembly of the faculty. A second major revision, approved by the Clemson University
faculty on December 11, 1981, and by the Clemson University Board of Trustees on January 22, 1982,
incorporated the collegiate faculties and the university curriculum committees into the formal faculty
organization. As part of this thorough revision, a unitary Constitution format was adopted in place of the
previous constitution and bylaws structure.
THE CONSTITUTION OF THE FACULTY OF CLEMSON UNIVERSITY PREAMBLE
To fulfill its role of preserving, interpreting, and advancing knowledge, a university depends upon the
scholarship and professionalism of its Faculty. It is by virtue of that scholarship and professionalism that
university faculties are entrusted with major responsibilities with respect to academic issues and concerns.
In recognition of these principles, Clemson University makes provision for faculty participation in
planning, policy-making, and decision-making with regard to academic matters. The university also
provides for such participation in matters of faculty welfare and general university concern.
To facilitate such participation the Faculty is formally organized in accordance with this Constitution as
approved by the Clemson University Board of Trustees. Various faculty functions are assigned to an
elected assembly, the Faculty Senate; to the Undergraduate and Graduate Curriculum Committees; and to
the collegiate faculties and their respective departmental faculties. For the purposes of this Constitution,
the term “department” shall designate a discipline-specific, self-governing unit within a school or college.
In addition, the faculty is represented on various university councils, commissions, and committees which
act in concert with the university administration in developing university policies and procedures.
ARTICLE l: THE FACULTY
Section l. Membership
The Faculty of Clemson University consists of the President; Vice President for Academic Affairs and
Provost; other administrators with faculty rank; faculty with regular appointments as Professor, Associate
Professor, Assistant Professor, or Instructor; Librarians; Emeritus Faculty; and such other individuals as the
faculty may duly elect. A petition for the election to membership in the Faculty of any person who is not
automatically a member must be submitted to the Faculty Senate and referred by that body, with its
recommendation, to the faculty for action at the next regular meeting of the faculty. Election to
membership shall be by simple majority vote of the members present.
Section 2. Functions
The functions of the Faculty shall be to approve candidates for degrees; to fulfill its responsibilities in
academic matters such as curriculum, requirements for earned degrees, academic regulations, admissions,
and registration; through departmental and collegiate review processes to recommend the appointment,
tenure, and promotion of its prospective and current members; to participate in the selection and evaluation
of academic administrators as provided for in established university policies; to participate in formulating
policies affecting the teaching, research, and public service functions of the university; and to consider any
matters that may affect the welfare of its members.
On matters pertaining specifically to the individual colleges, these functions are exercised by the collegiate
faculties, with review at the university level as specified by established university policies. Similarly, the
collegiate faculties recognize the primary authority of the faculty of each academic department on
academic matters pertaining to that department. The faculty may refer to the Faculty Senate for
investigation and action matters that relate to the welfare of the faculty, as well as to the teaching, research,
and public service policies of the university, and other matters of general institutional concern. The
Undergraduate and Graduate Curriculum Committees act for the faculty in reviewing curricular proposals
emanating from the several collegiate faculties, and recommend their disposition to the Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost.
The faculty shall receive regular reports from the Faculty Senate, and may act upon any matters brought
before it by the Faculty Senate or by individual faculty members.
Section 3. Officers
The Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost shall be the chair of the Faculty. The Provost shall
appoint a secretary and, when necessary, shall appoint an acting chair to serve in his or her absence.
Section 4. Meetings
Regular meetings of the faculty shall be held at the beginning of the academic year and at the end of each
long semester. Special meetings of the faculty may be called by the Chairperson, by the Faculty Senate, or
by written petition of at least ten percent of the faculty. A notice of the meeting and the agenda shall be
distributed to the faculty at least five days in advance of the meeting.
The quorum for any meeting of the Faculty shall be that number of members deemed necessary by the chair
to transact business other than the amendment of this Constitution.
For any meeting of the Faculty, the following order of business shall be adhered to:
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
Call to Order;
Reports;
Unfinished business;
New business;
Adjournment.
The Minutes of each faculty meeting shall be approved by the Faculty Senate.
Section 5. Rules of Order
The Faculty shall conduct all parliamentary procedure in accordance with the most recent edition of
Robert's Rules of Order.
ARTICLE II: THE FACULTY SENATE
Section 1. Functions
The Faculty Senate is the representative assembly of the faculty. It represents the faculty of Clemson
University in its relationship with the university administration; recommends new policies or changes in
existing policies to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs; and promotes the welfare of the
faculty and of its individual members. Specifically, the Faculty Senate acts:
1) to review and recommend academic policies, procedures, and practices at the university level;
2) to preserve collective and individual faculty prerogatives as they are set forth in established
university policies and procedures;
3) to make recommendations on matters affecting faculty welfare;
4) to provide good offices for the redress of faculty grievances;
5) to articulate and promulgate faculty positions on issues of general concern within the university;
6) to maintain liaison with the faculties of other colleges and universities on matters of common
concern.
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The Faculty Senate President shall report annually at the meeting of the faculty held prior to Spring
Commencement. To keep the faculty adequately informed, special reports shall be made as necessary.
Section 2. Membership
Members of the Faculty Senate shall be elected by the faculty, voting by colleges in accordance with
policies and procedures set forth in the bylaws of the several collegiate faculties. These bylaws may also
establish provisions for the recall of faculty senators from the college, with the exception of those holding
elected Senate office. Senate terms shall be three years except as otherwise provided. For the allocation of
Senate seats and all other provisions of this article, the librarians shall be considered as a faculty
representing a college.
Any member of the Faculty may be eligible for membership on the Faculty Senate, except department
chairs, school directors, deans, the provost, vice provosts, vice presidents, the president, and others with
primarily administrative duties.
Elections shall be held in March of each year, with terms of office to begin with the April meeting of the
Senate. The election of members of the Faculty Senate shall be by secret ballot.
When a new college is officially established it shall be entitled to representation in the Faculty Senate as
soon as an election can be held. A new college shall have one member in the Faculty Senate until the next
allocation of seats. Whenever a new college is established, the next allocation of seats shall be obtained in
the February following official establishment.
Vacancies created on the Faculty Senate for any cause shall be filled for the unexpired terms by
supplementary elections within the colleges concerned as soon as such vacancies occur. Senators absent
for the summer or for other temporary leaves such as sabbaticals, or appointed to temporary or interim
administrative positions, shall request leaves of absence from the Senate and shall be replaced during their
absences by substitutes elected by the Collegiate Faculty.
Each college, except the Library, shall elect two alternates on a yearly basis; the Library shall elect one.
Alternates may twice succeed themselves. An alternate shall have the status of a full member at any Senate
meeting attended in place of a regular member.
With the exception of those Senators who have served one year or less, members of the Faculty Senate may
not succeed themselves.
As a rule, there shall be thirty-five members of the Faculty Senate. Emeritus faculty are excluded from the
Faculty count for the purpose of Senate seat allocation. Senate seats shall be allocated according to the
ratio of the number of members of the Faculty in a college to the total number of members of the Faculty in
the university. Each college shall have as many seats as are in the nearest whole number when its ratio is
multiplied by thirty-five, provided each college has at least one representative. For the purposes of this
calculation, the Library is considered a college.
If the total number of seats allocated thus far is less than thirty-five, the remaining seats are allocated to the
colleges with the larger fractions until there is a total of thirty-five members. If this formula produces an
exact tie for a seat, each college involved shall be awarded a seat.
The Faculty Senate President shall obtain a new allocation from the Chairperson of the Faculty during
February of every odd-numbered year after the most recent allocation. This allocation shall be given to the
dean of each college in time for the March election and shall control the numbers elected to the Faculty
Senate at that time. If one or more members are gained, the collegiate faculty may designate new seats to
have terms of less than three years in order to balance the terms within the college delegation. If one
member is lost in the new allocation, one fewer member shall be elected to the Faculty Senate at that
election. If the new allocation results in the loss of one or more members whose terms have not expired,
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the membership of the Senate shall be temporarily enlarged to accommodate the new allocation. New
allocations shall be based on the number of members of the Faculty at the beginning of the fall semester.
Section 3. Officers
The officers of the Faculty Senate shall be the President, the Vice President, who shall be the PresidentElect, and the Secretary. The Vice President and the Secretary shall be elected at the regular meeting in
March of each year. The term of a Senator shall be extended one time, if necessary, to permit him or her to
initiate or complete his or her service as an officer. Should such an extension of term be necessary, his or
her successor will serve a three-year term which will commence at the completion of the officer’s term.
The advisory committee shall submit to the Senate no less than two nominees for each elective office.
Election of officers shall be by secret ballot, with a simple majority required for election.
In order to recall an officer of the Faculty Senate, a petition signed by not less than two-thirds of the elected
members of the Senate shall be required. If an office is vacated by recall, resignation, or other cause, the
Faculty Senate shall elect at the next regular meeting a successor for the unexpired term.
The retiring officers shall serve at the April meeting through the completion of Unfinished Business. The
retiring president shall give the Senate report at the subsequent meeting of the Faculty.
Section 4. Meetings
The date and time of the regular monthly meetings of the Faculty Senate shall be determined by the
advisory committee. The schedule of the meetings for the year shall be announced not later than the first
day of May through appropriate communications. With the approval of a majority of the advisory
committee, special meetings of the Faculty Senate may be called at any time by the Faculty Senate
President.
Except for executive sessions, all meetings of the Faculty Senate shall be open to any member of the
faculty. Any member of the faculty may present any problem or suggestion to the Senate for the Senate's
consideration, provided the faculty member notifies the Faculty Senate President at least one week prior to
the Senate meeting. Visitors may be invited by a member of the advisory committee to participate in any
specific discussion.
Two-thirds of the membership of the Faculty Senate shall be the quorum for the transaction of all business.
Section 5. Committees
The chairperson and at least a majority of the members of all committees of the Faculty Senate shall be
members of that body, and any other members shall be members of the faculty. The basic functions of such
committees shall be to consider matters pertaining to faculty concerns and to make recommendations to the
Senate. Committees may act on their own initiatives or on instruction from the Senate or its presiding
officer. The committees, through the Faculty Senate, may be requested by the faculty, Vice President for
Academic Affairs and Provost, or the President to consider and report on any matter of faculty concern.
The standing committees of the Faculty Senate shall be as follows:
The Executive Committee: shall consist of the Officers of the Faculty Senate and the chairpersons of the
standing committees and the Finance Committee. The Faculty Senate President shall be chair of this
committee.
The Advisory Committee: shall be composed of the officers of the Faculty Senate, a Senator from the
library, two members from each college elected by the delegation of that college prior to the April meeting,
and also the Immediate Past Faculty Senate President and the Faculty Representative to the Board of
Trustees (both of whom shall serve in a non-voting capacity and be excluded from serving on grievance
hearings). The Faculty Senate President shall be the Chair of this committee. It shall be the function of this
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committee to advise the Faculty Senate President and to serve as the nominating committee for the Faculty
Senate. In no case shall nominations by the advisory committee preclude nominations from the Senate
floor. The advisory committee shall appoint the members of the other standing committees and any special
committees and shall designate the chairpersons thereof. The chairpersons of the standing committees shall
as a rule be from different colleges. The advisory committee also hears grievances brought under Faculty
Grievance Procedure I.
The Welfare Committee: shall make recommendations concerning such policies as relate to: work loads;
extra- curricular assignments; summer employment; non-university employment; salaries; leaves of
absence; sabbatical leaves; professional travel; retirement; and such other policies as affect faculty welfare
and morale.
The Scholastic Policies Committee: shall be concerned with all policies of an academic nature which
pertain to students. Such policies include recruitment; admissions; transfer credit; class standing
requirements; academic honors policies; graduation requirements; class attendance regulations; student
counseling and placement; and other related policies.
The Research Committee: shall study and make recommendation on policies, procedures, and practices
primarily related to research.
The Policy Committee: shall concern itself with general university policies, particularly as they relate to
the Faculty. Such policies include those which pertain to: academic freedom and responsibility; faculty
professional ethics; the appointment, tenure, and promotion of faculty; and faculty participation in
university governance. Other matters of particular faculty interest, which are not within the purview of the
other standing committees and which are not of such a specialized nature as to justify ad hoc committees,
would normally be referred to the Policy Committee.
Section 6. Rules of Order
The Faculty Senate shall conduct all parliamentary procedures in accordance with the most recent edition
of Robert's Rules of Order. A parliamentarian shall be appointed by the Faculty Senate President. The
Faculty Senate shall be empowered to develop those procedural bylaws which facilitate the achievement of
its purposes.
Section 7. Permanent Committees
Permanent committees, in addition to the standing committees provided for in the Constitution, may be
created for purposes which extend beyond those normally associated with ad hoc committees. The
permanent committees of the Faculty Senate and their duties are:
The Finance Committee: investigates and reports to the Faculty Senate relevant financial matters of the
university.
Section 8. Boards
The Grievance Board. The Grievance Board consists of members elected by the members of the
Faculty Senate from a pool of nominees named by the Executive and Advisory Committees of the
Faculty Senate in a joint meeting, and from nominations made from the floor at the Senate election
meeting. The Senate shall hold an election each January to replace Grievance Board members
whose terms have expired and to fill positions that have become vacant during the previous calendar
year. If necessary, the Faculty Senate Advisory Committee may make interim appointments to
ensure a sufficient number of members on the Grievance Board. The Faculty Senate Advisory
Committee shall appoint the Chair of the Grievance Board.
Members of the Grievance Board must be tenured regular faculty at the time of their election, and
shall be members, alternates, or former members of the Faculty Senate. These Grievance Board
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VIII-5
members shall consist of a representative from the Library and two representatives from each
college with two-year terms of service. The Board, through selected hearing panels, hears grievances
brought to it in accordance with the faculty grievance procedure.
ARTICLE III: THE COLLEGIATE FACULTIES
Section 1. Definition
The faculty members of each college within the university are organized as Collegiate Faculties according
to individual college bylaws approved by the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost.
Section 2. Functions
Each collegiate faculty exercises the authority and responsibility of the faculty on academic matters
pertaining to the individual college, subject to the primary authority of the several departmental faculties on
academic matters pertaining to the respective departments. Specifically, a collegiate faculty approves
candidates for all graduate and undergraduate degrees, and recommends all proposals for new or revised
academic requirements, courses, and curricula within the college. Where provided by college bylaws,
collegiate peer review processes offer recommendations on appointment, re-appointment, tenure, and/or
promotion in addition to the primary recommendations which emanate from the review processes of the
several academic departments.
ARTICLE IV: THE CURRICULUM COMMITTEES
Section 1. Definition
The University Curriculum Committees act for the faculty in reviewing all proposals for curricular changes,
and recommend such changes to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost. The Undergraduate
and Graduate Curriculum Committees shall have jurisdiction over undergraduate and graduate matters
respectively.
Section 2. Membership
The Undergraduate Curriculum Committee shall be comprised of the Dean of Undergraduate Studies or
other member of the Provost's staff designated by the Provost as non-voting Chairperson, plus two
representatives of the undergraduate curriculum committees of the several colleges, one of whom will be
the chair of the college committee and the other elected by the college committee. Similarly, the Graduate
Curriculum Committee shall likewise be composed of a non-voting Chairperson from the Provost’s staff,
plus representatives of the graduate curriculum committees of the several colleges, one of whom will be the
chair of the college committee and the other elected by the college committee. Should a college have a
single curriculum committee, the chairperson and one other representative elected by the college committee
shall serve on the University Undergraduate Curriculum Committee and the college committee shall elect
two representatives to the University Graduate Curriculum Committee.
Section 3. Procedure
The curriculum committees shall review all curricular proposals in their respective areas of jurisdiction that
emanate from the several collegiate faculties, and shall ensure the adherence of such proposals to all
applicable university policies and regulations. The curriculum committees may initiate curricular proposals
whose effects would be university-wide, but may not act upon such proposals until all collegiate faculties
have had an opportunity to review and respond to them.
Curricular proposals recommended by either university curriculum committee shall be submitted to the
Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost. The Provost shall forward these curricular proposals
with his or her recommendations to the President for final approval. The Provost shall inform the
curriculum committees and all affected collegiate faculties of the President's actions.
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VIII-6
ARTICLE V: AMENDMENT
Constitutional amendments may be proposed by either of two methods.
A proposed amendment may be submitted by at least ten members of the faculty to the Faculty Senate at a
regular meeting of that body. The Faculty Senate must vote on the proposed amendment at no later than
the fourth meeting after submission. A simple majority vote is required for the proposed amendment to be
submitted to the faculty. Alternatively, a proposed amendment to this Constitution may be submitted in
writing to the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs one month before the next scheduled
faculty meeting. Signatures of at least ten percent of the members of the faculty must accompany the
proposed amendment in order to validate the proposal.
The Provost shall publicize a proposed amendment at least three weeks prior to the meeting at which action
is to be taken. Amendments may be considered at either of the regular faculty meetings held at the
conclusion of the long semesters. A two-thirds majority vote of the members present is required for
passage with a quorum defined as at least one-half of the faculty, exclusive of emeritus faculty. Any
amendment passed by the faculty shall become effective upon approval by the Clemson University Board
of Trustees.
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VIII-7
PART IX.
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES
A. Overview
The first responsibility of teaching faculty is to their students. Because faculty teach not only by formal
instruction but also by example, they must be fully aware of their responsibilities to their students and must
endeavor to fulfill those responsibilities conscientiously.
Some policies concerning faculty-student relationships--particularly those regarding class attendance,
academic dishonesty, and student rights and responsibilities--are set forth in greater detail in the university's
Student Handbook, Each faculty members receives a copy of the Student Handbooks. Various policies
contained in the Handbook are subject to review by the Faculty Senate, the Undergraduate Curriculum
Committee, and/or the Academic Council. Faculty are advised to become conversant with the Handbook,
especially where it addresses the kinds of academic matters considered below.
B. Work Load
The normal faculty workload entails teaching and research assignments; service to the department, school,
college, and the university; and/or other professional activities. The usual teaching assignment at Clemson
University is 9-l2 credit hours for each of the two regular semesters. The particular teaching assignment of
an individual faculty member may, for a number of reasons, vary from department to department and even
within departments. Departments with heavy faculty research obligations may in some instances reduce
teaching loads and assign the hours so released to research. Released time may also be provided through
funded research. Unusually heavy service assignments (e.g., committee work, administrative duties,
advisory responsibilities, public service) may also lead to reduced teaching assignments, depending upon
the staffing situation in a given department. In some instances graduate courses, off-campus courses, or
unusually large classes may be considerations in workload decisions.
Off-campus courses are offered by some colleges, including the program at Furman University leading to
the Master of Business Administration degree through the College of Business and Behavioral Sciences
and the courses taught at the University Center of Greenville. These courses are taught by Clemson faculty
and carry university credit.
Work assignments for faculty on non-teaching appointments and librarians are made on the basis of
particular tasks to be accomplished or periods to be covered. Workloads for faculty members whose
responsibilities include teaching as well as non-teaching assignments are established on a percentage basis.
Courses are assigned to faculty by the department chair on the basis of established departmental
procedures. Factors taken into consideration include: departmental needs, faculty expertise, faculty
preferences for particular teaching assignments, faculty schedules, and the nature and extent of nonteaching workloads.
C. Work Schedule
Members of the learned professions, whether faculty or administrators, by tradition and practice, give
generously of their time, energies, and abilities to further their institution's goals and purposes and their
own professional pursuits. There is no reasonable way of regulating the hours devoted to such activities
and no meaningful way of measuring them. Truly professional scholars, teachers, researchers, and
administrators devote significant portions of their waking hours to such pursuits. Clemson University
recognizes that this unique combination of responsibilities for teaching, research, public service, and
administrative activities mandates considerable variation in professional work schedules. The employment
contract for nine-month faculty covers the period August 15-May 16. Outside this period faculty members
may not be required to work for the university without compensation.
Except for formally scheduled classes and other regular activities, the duty schedules of the full-time
teaching faculty are necessarily flexible. The discretion of the individual faculty member, therefore,
governs the use of non-classroom time in accordance with the various demands of the university, of public
service, continuing scholarly development, advising, research, writing, and other professional activities.
Those in administrative positions and in full-time research have similarly unpredictable demands made
upon their time. Beyond the fundamental requirement that faculty meet their scheduled classes and fulfill
other regular commitments, faculty are evaluated on the quality of their performance as scholars, teachers,
and researchers rather than on such quantitative bases as the number of their preparation hours or the
regularity of their work schedules.
Because of the extended schedule of hours for which library service must be available, librarians have their
work loads distributed over long working days and seven-day working weeks. Librarians' total work loads,
however, should be comparable to those of professional personnel similarly situated in other university
positions.
D. Teaching Practices
1. Syllabus. A syllabus must be prepared for every undergraduate and graduate class and made
available to students at as early a class meeting as practicable, but no later than the last class period
before the last day for a student to add a class. It should state the course expectations, including a
topical outline of the course, grading policies, and attendance policies.
2. Office Hours. Faculty members should also be accessible to students with respect to course work
outside of scheduled class-meeting times. Because of the diverse nature of the academic
departments, each department or school establishes its own written office hours policy approved by
the college dean.
3. Class schedules. A semester is normally fifteen class weeks in length, exclusive of final exams.
Lecture courses meet fifty minutes per week per credit hour. Two or three contact hours of
laboratory are assigned per credit hour. Three-credit classes meet for fifty minutes Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday or for seventy-five minutes Tuesday and Thursday. This pattern allows for
a fifteen-minute break between classes. Prompt dismissal of classes permits students who must
travel between widely separated classroom buildings to enter their next class on time. A three
credit-hour summer course meets for ninety minutes, five days per week, for twenty-five meetings.
Appropriate adjustments are made for courses with more or fewer credit hours, or for laboratory
courses. A limited number of regular semester courses and summer courses are offered on variant
schedules. Most of these are late afternoon or evening courses intended for graduate students and
other special groups. Course offerings are listed in advance of early registration, which occurs in
April for the fall semester and in November for the spring semester. Listings of summer offerings
are available at the November early registration.
4. Faculty Absence from Class. Teaching faculty are obligated to meet their classes regularly at the
appointed times. When there are valid reasons for being absent from class (e.g., illness,
emergencies, or travel on university business), the faculty member should notify the affected
classes and the department office. If possible, such notification should be given in advance.
Suitable arrangements, such as, substitute instructors, library assignments, or other appropriate
utilization of class time, should also be made. If no advance arrangements are made, students are
authorized to leave after waiting the time specified by the teacher at the beginning of the course in
the course syllabus.
5. Attendance Policy. The full attendance policy for undergraduates is set forth in Undergraduate
Announcements but the key points are as follows. All students are required to attend the first day of
classes and labs or contact the instructor to indicate their intention to remain in that class. The
faculty member is obligated to inform students in writing about attendance policy during the first
full week of classes. In some departments attendance policy is established on a departmental basis.
Regular and punctual attendance at all class and lab sessions is the responsibility of each student.
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IX-2
College work proceeds at such a pace that regular attendance is necessary in order for each student
to obtain maximum benefits from instruction. All absences are matters to be resolved between the
instructor and the student. In the event that a student finds it necessary to be absent from class, it is
the student’s responsibility to make up resulting deficiencies.
Redfern Health Center does not issue official “medical excuses.” Students visiting the Center are
given a receipt. This document or a telephone call to the Center can be used to confirm services
were rendered. No diagnosis or other confidential information is given.
A student who incurs excessive absences in a given course may be dropped from that course by the
instructor in accordance with stated course policy. Students may withdraw from a course by using
the online drop and add system. Students who withdraw after the first two weeks of classes shall
have grades recorded for those courses. Prior to the last seven weeks of classes, this grade would
normally be "W." Students are limited to no more than seventeen hours of "W" grades during their
academic careers. Transfer students, however, may withdraw from no more than twelve percent of
their total academic work or up to seventeen hours of course work, whichever is fewer remaining in
their chosen undergraduate curriculum at the time of their transfer to Clemson University.
6. Examinations and Grading. Faculty should announce course requirements, procedures for
examinations, and grading standards during the first full week of classes. Final examinations must
be given on the dates and at the times designated in the final examinations schedule. Detailed
information on grading and examination procedures can be found in Clemson University’s
Undergraduate Announcements and in the Student Handbook.
Clemson University uses the assignment of the following undergraduate grades: A--excellent work;
B--above average work; C-- satisfactory work; D--unsatisfactory but passing work; F--failure (to
receive credit the student must repeat the course and earn a "D" or above); W—withdrawn after the
first two weeks of class work and prior to the last seven weeks of classes, not including the
examination period; I-- incomplete work (to be used only when a relatively small part of all course
requirements has not been completed). Under some circumstances a course can be taken on a
Pass/Fail basis.
A student receiving an "I" is allowed thirty days after the beginning of the next regular semester to
make up the incomplete work. One extension of the deadline may be granted in unusual
circumstances if approved by the instructor and department chair. A make-up grade form is sent to
each instructor who gives an "I" grade, and the form has a place to approve an extension. The
grade of "I" remains on the academic record until the make-up grade is received in Student
Records. Even though the "I" grade is computed like an "F" in the student's grade average, the
instructor should submit a make-up grade of "F" if that is intended to be the final grade.
An undergraduate may not repeat a course for credit in which a grade above "C" has been earned.
Both grades are recorded in the student's transcript. For more detailed information on examinations
and grading, faculty should consult the section, "Scholastic Regulations," in the Undergraduate
Announcements.
Faculty will retain all grade records for 120 days, exclusive of summer vacation. Faculty who leave
the university for any reason or who are going on sabbatical or taking leave of absence, shall submit
their grade records to the department to be retained for 120 days exclusive of summer vacation.
Once near mid-term in every undergraduate course the instructor shall make available for each
student: (a) that student’s ranking to date in that course or (b) that student’s course grade to date,
relative to the grading system stated in the course syllabus. This feedback should occur near midterm, but it shall occur no later than the course meeting prior to the last day to withdraw without
final grades. More frequent feedback is strongly encouraged. Both student and instructor are to
recognize that this feedback reflects the student’s performance up to that point in time and, as such,
that student’s final course grade may change based upon subsequent performance. This policy
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IX-3
includes all undergraduate courses and applies to summer school, including Maymester.
7. Student Rights and Responsibilities. As indicated in the 1967 Joint Statement on Rights and
Freedoms of Students of AAUP, academic institutions exist for the transmission of knowledge, the
pursuit of truth, the intellectual development of students, and the general well-being of society.
Free inquiry and free expression are indispensable to attaining these goals. As members of the
academic community, students should be encouraged to develop the capacity for critical judgment
and to engage in a sustained and independent search for truth.
Freedom to teach and freedom to learn are indispensable elements of academic freedom. The
freedom to learn depends upon appropriate opportunities and conditions in the classroom, on the
campus, and in the community at large. Students are expected to exercise their freedom
responsibly.
The responsibility to secure and respect general conditions conducive to the freedom to learn is
shared by all members of the academic community. The faculty member, in the classroom and in
conference, should encourage free discussion, inquiry, and expression. Students should be free to
take reasoned exception to the data or views offered in any course of study and to reserve
judgments about matters of opinion; however, they are responsible for learning the content of any
course of study for which they are enrolled.
Student performance is to be evaluated solely on an academic basis, not on opinions or conduct in
matters unrelated to academic standards. Students receive protection against prejudiced or
capricious academic evaluation by means of orderly procedures set forth in the Student Handbook.
Information about student views, beliefs, and political associations which faculty members acquire
in the course of their work as instructors, advisors, and counselors is confidential. It is a faculty
member's professional obligation to guard against the improper disclosure of such information.
Faculty judgments concerning the ability and character of any student are to be provided only as the
academic growth and development of the student may be fostered and only on a need-to-know
basis.
8. Privacy. Specifically, the privacy of students and the regulation of access to and release of their
university-maintained records come under the federal government's Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974. This act accords students the right of access to their "educational records"-defined as records, files, documents, and other materials (including, but not limited to, handwriting,
print, tapes, film, microfilm, and microfiche) which both contain information directly related to a
student and are physically maintained by the university or by anyone acting for the university.
However, not included in the definition of "educational records"--and thus excepted from such
student access--are supervisory, instructional, and administrative personnel records and such items
pertaining thereto as grade books, observational notes, and notes for recollection purposes so long
as they remain in the sole possession of their authors and are not revealed to any person other than
the authors' substitutes. Thus federal law (as well as the South Carolina Freedom of Information
Act) does not require faculty and administrators to give students access to such records as are
personally maintained by faculty and are kept in strict confidence by faculty.
For faculty, then, the main significance of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act is that
the right of access to information concerning student grades and other performance evaluations is
limited to the students themselves and not to any third party including parents except those with a
clear need to know (such as substitute faculty and official custodians of records). Thus, for
example, grades received by an individual student for any type of scholastic work performed may
not be publicly communicated either in oral or written form that uses any personally identifiable
information (e.g., the name, address, or Social Security number of the student) without the written
consent of the student. Faculty should not mention grades or scholastic progress to parents,
verbally or written, without the prior written consent of the student. Without such written consent,
Faculty Manual – July 2007
IX-4
faculty should not discuss scholastic progress relating to a specific individual over the phone, even
if the person to whom they are speaking identifies themselves as the specific student.
Faculty should also be aware that students have the right to review confidential recommendations
that are used in application for employment or for admission to the university or to other
educational institutions, or that contains information concerning honors and awards--provided that
such recommendations are included in educational records maintained by the university and that the
students have not waived this right.
Under the South Carolina Freedom of Information Act, scholastic records prepared and maintained
by individual faculty may be kept in confidence and are not subject to mandatory disclosure to any
person, including students. That is, the Act specifically excludes such "scholastic records" from
those "public records" to which it gives citizens access.
It should be noted, however, that the Act could be interpreted to include such scholastic "tools" as
syllabi, textbooks and other assigned readings, illustrations, photographs, films, phonograph
materials, etc. used in a course of instruction, and any other documentary materials prepared,
owned, used, in the possession of, or retained by a public body such as Clemson University. All
such items then are potentially accessible for inspection by citizens upon due application.
The full university policy statement regarding compliance with the Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974 is available from the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.
Information concerning and interpretations of federal and state laws governing such matters can be
obtained from the General Counsel.
9. Academic Integrity. The Clemson University community has inherited Thomas Green Clemson’s
vision of this institution as a “high seminary of learning.” Fundamental to this vision is a mutual
commitment to truthfulness, honor, and responsibility without which we cannot earn the trust and
respect of others. Furthermore, we recognize that academic dishonesty detracts from the value of
a Clemson degree. Therefore, lying, cheating, or stealing in any form will not be tolerated.
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•
•
•
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•
Any breach of the principles outlined in the Academic Integrity Statement is considered an act
of academic dishonesty.
Academic dishonesty is further defined as:
Giving, receiving, or using unauthorized aid on any academic work;
Plagiarism, which includes the copying of language, structure, or ideas of another and
attributing the work to one’s own efforts;
Attempts to copy, edit, or delete computer files that belong to another person without the
permission of the file owner, account owner or file number owner;
All academic work submitted for grading contains an implicit pledge and may contain, at the \
request of the instructor, an explicit pledge by the student that no unauthorized aid has been
received.
It is inherent that faculty members enforce the academic integrity policy. Please consult
Undergraduate Announcements for details concerning the hearing committee structure,
procedures, and penalties.
10. Student Advising. Advising is a unique form of teaching that offers special rewards to both
students and faculty. Faculty with special dedication to students and with commitment to perform
work more demanding than classroom teaching should be chosen as academic advisors. It
follows, therefore, that advising along with classroom teaching is considered in assessing
performance.
The primary purpose of academic advising is to assist students in their pursuit of educational
programs designed to attain their life goals and meet career objectives. An academic advisor helps
students identify and assess alternatives and evaluate consequences of their decisions. Good
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IX-5
advising assists students in understanding institutional policies and procedures; in making
academic decisions and examining progress toward goals; and in understanding available
institutional and community support services.
Each academic unit has an academic advising coordinator who assumes primary responsibility for
knowing academic regulations and policies; attends university meetings on advising; disseminates
information to other advisors; and monitors and assists other advisors. All advisors should
schedule adequate and convenient office hours to meet student needs for consultation. Special
attention must be given to student advising needs during early registration, orientation, and late
registration periods.
11. Evaluation of Teaching by Students. The university provides a standard form that meets the
minimum requirements of best practices for student evaluation of teaching faculty. This form
must be approved by the Scholastic Policies Committee of the Faculty Senate. Individual
departments may develop questions supplemental to the university’s minimum standard questions
or employ comprehensive supplemental questions, but the standard questions are required. These
forms will be distributed in every class near the end of the semester. The instructor will announce
to the students that completed forms will not be examined until course grades have been
submitted. It is required that instructors leave the room while forms are being completed by
students. A student proctor will conduct the evaluation.
Student evaluation of teaching is mandatory for all instructors at both the undergraduate and
graduate levels. All evaluation forms are returned directly to the instructor to be retained for a sixyear period. Course summary information from the evaluation forms will become part of the
personnel review data for annual review, reappointment, tenure and promotion, and for post-tenure
review consideration. The university will retain electronic copies of all evaluation summaries for
the purpose of verification that the evaluations have been carried out. These summaries will also
be used for annual review, reappointment, tenure, promotion or post-tenure review only if a
faculty member’s forms are not available. Access to these electronic summaries shall be with
notification to the faculty member involved.
Other evaluation methods which must be given at least equal weight in the teaching evaluation
process include one or more of the following:
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•
•
•
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evaluation of course materials, learning objectives, and examinations by peers and/or
supervisors,
in-class visitation by peers and/or supervisors,
a statement by the faculty member describing his/her methodology,
exit interviews/surveys with current graduates and alumni,
additional criteria as appropriate to the discipline, and
any rejoinders or comments on student evaluations provided by the faculty member.
12. Students with Disabilities. Clemson University complies with federal law that prohibits
discrimination in programs and activities for students with disabilities. Section 504 of the
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 states:
“No otherwise qualified disabled individual...shall, solely by reason of his disability, be excluded
from the participation in, be denied benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any
program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.”
Appropriate documentation of a disability is required and once obtained, a letter of accommodation
is developed with the student who hand delivers it to instructors.
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IX-6
The Office of Disability Services provides auxiliary services such as assisting with early
registration; transcribing recorded lectures; and assisting with recorded texts, interpreters for the
deaf, and readers for the blind. Direct classroom accommodation such as test proctoring, extended
time, and alternative test formats are arranged by the academic department once the
accommodation letter is received. Faculty are encouraged to discuss students’ needs when they
self-identify; however, accommodations should not be provided without receiving the above
mentioned accommodation letter with a current date and original signature.
13. Sale of Textbooks and Other Course Materials to Students. Under no circumstances should the
faculty member engage in the direct sale of textbooks or other course materials to students. This
restriction does not limit the freedom of faculty members to assign their own textbooks or other
materials or to develop course materials that can be sold through the bookstore or other suppliers.
E.
Professional Responsibility Toward Colleagues
In the spirit of Clemson University’s founder, Thomas Greene Clemson, who in his bequest stated that he
sought to establish a “high seminary of learning,” Clemson University faculty are expected to be committed
to the highest ideals of the pursuit of knowledge. In this pursuit, faculty members commit themselves to
conduct their professional responsibilities in a manner founded on the highest ethical standards and
demonstrate mutual respect for one another.
As members of the university community of scholars, faculty members have major responsibilities to their
colleagues that must always guide their actions when interacting with each other. Faculty members should
respect and defend the full inquiry of their colleagues. Debate and discourse strengthen the search for new
knowledge and the proper intellectual climate expected of a university. But in these exchanges, faculty
members must show appropriate regard for the opinions of others and the legitimacy of their intellectual
pursuits. Faculty members must strive to be objective and fair in any professional judgments they make of
their colleagues. These responsibilities extend to encouraging and supporting the professional development
of colleagues in one’s department and college as well as the university as a whole. Faculty members must
continuously strive to avoid actions that are demonstrably divisive and create an atmosphere that is not
conductive to the University’s work and mission. Faculty members should reflect the ideals of high ethical
standards of personal behavior, academic freedom, mutual respect in an atmosphere of civility, acceptance
of diversity in perspectives, ideas and opinions, and treating teaching, research and public service as
integrative activities. Procedures and policies to be followed when these responsibilities appear to have
been violated may be found in Part V of the Faculty Manual.
F. Graduation, Commencement, and Other Formal Academic Ceremonies
Faculty members shall normally participate in appropriate academic dress in at least one of the following
academic ceremonies annually: Graduation or Commencement. The faculty of each college shall
determine appropriate representation at each ceremony. Each department (or school, if there is no
department) of the college shall ensure that its proportionate representation is present. A marshal and a
standard bearer shall be selected to lead each college faculty into the ceremony.
G
Summer Teaching
Faculty on nine-month appointments may accept compensated summer employment elsewhere, in the
university's summer sessions, or in connection with such specific assignments (e.g., special administrative
or committee duties or research) as may be offered through the university. Faculty on nine-month
appointments are not required to teach in summer sessions. Likewise, nine-month faculty are neither
required to perform university duties nor be available for university responsibilities without compensation
outside the period August 15-May 16. Faculty on twelve-month appointments, however, are required to
perform year-round duties, with time off for annual leave.
Faculty who teach at Clemson in summer sessions are expected to fulfill the regular responsibilities
associated with university instruction, such as holding classes as scheduled and maintaining reasonable
Faculty Manual – July 2007
IX-7
office hours. Likewise faculty with special summer research or other responsibilities should make known
to their chairs where and when they may usually be contacted.
Compensation for summer school teaching is computed on the basis of 3.25% of the faculty member’s base
salary per credit hour. For a course in which the number of registered students is inadequate to support full
payment, a faculty member may be offered the option either not to teach the course or to receive a reduced
salary based on tuition income generated. A chair or dean may propose an alternative policy, which would
take effect if approved by the Departmental or College Faculty Advisory Committee (or the
departmental/college faculty as a whole if no Advisory Committee exists). Any such alternative
departmental/college policy shall be distributed in writing to all departmental or college faculty.
H. Other Summer Employment
Compensation for other teaching, for sponsored research, and/or for extension activities performed during
the months between the academic years (fall and spring semesters) and not related to a summer session is
computed at the same rate as for nine-month faculty members’ "base period" for the immediately preceding
academic year. (Here "base period" means either a semester or an academic year and “base pay” means the
compensation allowed for full-time employment during a base period). The formula for calculating
compensation for summer employment other than summer-session teaching is as follows:
The faculty member’s daily compensation rate is calculated by dividing the number of working days
during the summer period into one-third of the faculty member’s base pay for the immediately preceding
academic year. The faculty member is then paid at this rate for each day of employment by the university
during the summer period. When a legal or declared holiday happens to fall on a working day during the
summer period, it is to be considered a paid holiday if the faculty member has been or is to be employed for
a minimum of thirty successive working days, which include the holiday(s) in the summer period.
Vacation leave is accrued at the rate of one and one-half days for each twenty working days. Such leave
may be taken only during the time period supported by the summer employment funding source(s) and is
subject to approval on university form CUBO-400. It is approved and recorded within each department and
is not reflected on the university computerized leave system.
I. Dual Employment and Overload Compensation
Dual Employment and overload compensation will be considered when a faculty member is asked to
assume an additional workload which significantly surpasses the 12 credit hour equivalent expectation
during a semester. Such dual employment/overload compensation may be either internal (e.g., overload
teaching at Clemson) or external (work for another state agency). The maximum compensation allowable
is thirty percent of the base period salary (semester, academic year, or calendar year, as appropriate). The
Division of Human Resources can supply further details.
The request for dual employment/overload compensation must be accompanied by clear documentation,
verified by the department chair or school director and approved by the dean, that the faculty member’s
base-line workload is at or above the expected 12 credit hour equivalent before assuming additional duties.
The department chair or school director must verify that these additional activities are consistent with the
mission and strategic directions of the faculty member’s college and department or school. Furthermore,
the faculty member must document that adequate and appropriate arrangements have been made for
regularly scheduled classroom activities and office hours if these are impacted by the dual
employment/overload compensation assignment.
J. Sabbatical Leave
Sabbatical leave may be granted by the President of the University to any tenured faculty member who has
completed at least six years of full-time service with the university. The purpose of sabbatical leave is to
relieve faculty of normal duties so that they might pursue significant projects facilitating their professional
growth and development, thus enhancing their future contributions to the mission of the university. Such
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leaves, therefore, are not granted automatically upon completion of the necessary period of service.
Sabbaticals cannot occur more frequently than every seventh year.
Applications for sabbatical leave by faculty on nine-month appointments may entail a request for one
semester of leave at full pay or for two successive semesters at half pay. Applications for sabbatical leave
by faculty on twelve-month appointments and administrators with faculty rank may be made for periods up
to six months at full pay or for periods of over six months to one calendar year at half pay. There shall be
no discrimination between one-semester or two-semester sabbaticals for nine-month faculty and between
six-month or twelve-month sabbaticals for faculty with twelve-month appointments. Certain fringe benefits
may be continued during sabbatical if arrangements are made in advance with the Division of Human
Resources. Faculty on sabbatical leave will maintain all the rights and privileges of regular faculty. The
following steps should be followed in the application and review processes for sabbatical leaves:
•
Applicants requesting sabbatical leaves should prepare a proposal containing information on the
goals of the sabbatical including supporting materials and information on how the teaching
responsibilities of the applicant will be handled while he or she is away from campus. An
applicant must consult with the department chair concerning teaching responsibilities.
•
Normally, the proposal for a sabbatical leave should be submitted to an elected departmental
committee, chaired by the department chair, for review no later than January 31 (for sabbaticals
beginning in the fall semester) or no later than May 31 (for sabbaticals beginning in the spring
semester).
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The departmental committee's written recommendation shall be forwarded directly to the dean of
the college with a copy to the applicant. The departmental committee will take no longer than two
weeks to submit its recommendation.
•
The dean of the college will forward his or her recommendation to the Provost and the applicant
no later than February 28 or June 30, as appropriate.
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By March 15 or July 15, the Provost will forward his or her recommendation to the President and
inform the applicant, the dean of the college, and the chair of the department of his or her
recommendation.
•
The President shall render his or her decision within two weeks of receiving the Provost's
recommendation.
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The Office of the Provost shall maintain and publish a list of the individuals granted sabbaticals,
the date the sabbatical was approved, the title of the project, and the dates when the sabbatical was
taken.
Sabbatical leaves are granted in good faith. When such a leave is ended, a faculty member is expected to
return to regular service with the university for at least one contract year or, at the university's request,
refund the remuneration received from the university during that time. Upon return from sabbatical leave
the faculty member shall file a written report with the department chair or school director on his/her
professional activities during the leave period.
K. Graduate Study by Faculty
With the approval of the appropriate administrators and the Vice Provost and Dean of the Graduate
School, university faculty, administrators, and staff may pursue graduate work for credit at Clemson.
However, no faculty member with a rank higher than instructor may be considered as a candidate for an
advanced degree at Clemson University in his/her primary area of professional responsibility or in the
department in which he/she is a member.
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IX-9
PART X.
SUMMARY OF SELECTED UNIVERSITY AND STATE
POLICIES
The material in this section is provided for information only. These policies apply to the faculty as
employees of Clemson University and the State of South Carolina, but the Faculty Senate cannot
initiate substantive changes as they can in most other sections of the Faculty Manual. The Faculty
Senate does choose what kinds of information to include in this section based on requests from
faculty or administrators, or based on the recommendations of the Policy Committee and the
Executive/Advisory Committee.
A. Workplace and Personnel
Each department/school is required to keep a copy of all university policies affecting faculty and make it
available for faculty use. The following sections offer a general summary statement of personnel policies in
selected areas that are of particular interest to faculty.
As university and State employees, faculty must adhere to numerous policies. These policies are given in
their entirety in the Clemson University Personnel Policies and Procedures Manual which is available in
the Library and in each departmental office. These include:
Summer Compensation for 9-month Faculty Members; Dual Employment; Method of Compensation
Deductions; Computerized Leave Systems; Annual Leave (Payment upon Retirement or Death); Leave
With Pay; Leave Without Pay; Hazardous Weather and Emergency Conditions Leave Policy; Unauthorized
Absences; Financial Disclosure Policy for Sponsored Programs; Employee Leave Transfer Program; Social
Security; South Carolina Retirement System; Service Retirement; Optional Retirement Program; Disability
Retirement; Retirement Options; Survivor’s Benefits; Creditable Service; Federal Retirement; Workers
Compensation; Education, Recreation, and Cultural Benefits; Eligibility for Membership and Fees for UseCampus Recreation Facilities; Tuition Assistance Program; Group Insurance Benefits; S.C. State Health
Insurance Program; Dental Insurance Program; Money-Plus Program; Cancer Insurance; Long-term Care
Insurance; Disability Insurance; Life Insurance; Credit Union and Savings Bonds; Annuities and Deferred
Compensation; Other Voluntary Deductions; Agency Directed Training; Employee Training Opportunities;
Employee Innovation Program; Employee Drug and Alcohol Program; Employee Assistance Program;
Conduct of Employee and Official Information; Fleet Safety Program; Political Activities of Employees;
State Governmental Contacts; Smoking Policy; Missing Fund and/or Missing Property; General (Freedom
of Information Act) Inquiries; Academic Permanent Records; Terminal Pay; Death; Retirement; External
Communications: Contacts with State Officials/Agencies and Procedures for Resolution of
Discrimination/Harassment Complaints.
1. Equal Opportunity Policies. Clemson University, in compliance with Titles VI and VII of the Civil
Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, and Sections 503
and 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, does
not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, or disability in any of its
policies, procedures, or practices; nor does the university, in compliance with the Age
Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, as amended, and Section 402 of the Vietnam Era
Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974, discriminate against any employees or applicants for
employment on the basis of their age or because they are disabled veterans or veterans of the
Vietnam era. Clemson University conducts its programs and activities involving admission, access,
treatment, employment, teaching, research, and public service in a nondiscriminatory manner as
prescribed by Federal laws and regulations.
In conformance with university policy and pursuant to Executive Order 11246, as amended, Section
503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Section 402 of the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment
Act of 1974, Clemson University is an Affirmative Action /Equal Opportunity Employer.
Inquiries concerning the above may be addressed to any of the following: President, Clemson
University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634; Director for Access and Equity, Clemson University,
Clemson, South Carolina 29634; Director, Office for Civil Rights, Department of Education,
Washington, D.C. 20201.
2. Drug and Alcohol Policy. Clemson University recognizes that the illegal or abusive use of alcohol
or drugs by members of the campus community jeopardizes the safety of the individual and the
campus community, and is not conducive to the academic learning process. Clemson University is,
therefore, committed to having a campus that is free of the illegal or abusive use of drugs and
alcohol. This policy is implemented in compliance with the Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988, the
Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 and the South Carolina Drug-Free
Workplace Act of 1990. Each employee shall receive and acknowledge receipt of a copy of the
Drug and Alcohol Policy. Further information can be obtained from the Office of Human
Resources.
3. Nepotism Policy “…[A] public employee may not make, participate in making, or in any
way attempt to use his…office to influence a governmental decision in which he, a member of
his immediate family, an individual with whom he is associated, or a business in which he is
associated has an economic interest. A…public employee who, in the discharge of his official
responsibilities, is required to take an action or make a decision which affects an economic
interest of himself, a member of his immediate family, an individual with which he is
associated, shall prepare a written statement describing the matter requiring action or
decisions and the nature of his potential conflict of interest with respect to the action or
decision; …if he is a public employee, he shall furnish a copy of the statement to his superior,
if any, who shall assign the matter to another employee who does not have a potential conflict
of interest.” (excerpt from state law)
Family member means an individual who is the employee’s spouse, parent, brother, sister,
child, mother-in-law, father-in-law, daughter-in-law, son-in-law, grandchild, a child residing
in the employee’s household, or an individual claimed by the employee or the employee’s
spouse as a dependent for income tax purposes.
4. Racial Harassment Policy. Racial harassment of university faculty, staff, students, or visitors is
prohibited and shall subject the offender to appropriate disciplinary action. It is the policy of
Clemson University to conduct and provide programs, activities, and services to students, faculty,
and staff in an atmosphere free from racial harassment. Racial harassment is any behavior that
would verbally or physically threaten, torment, badger, heckle, or persecute an individual because
of his/her race. Faculty members can seek advice from the Office of Access and Equity.
5. Sexual Harassment Policy. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, provides that it
shall be an unlawful discriminatory practice for any employer, because of the sex of any person, to
discharge without just cause, to refuse to hire, or otherwise discriminate against any person with
respect to any matter directly or indirectly related to employment. Harassment of an employee on
the basis of sex violates this federal law. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has
issued guidelines as to what constitutes sexual harassment of any employee under Title VII.
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, prohibits sexual discrimination in any
educational program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. Clemson University receives
such assistance.
The Board of Trustees has determined that the Title VII guidelines on sexual harassment against
employees shall be equally applicable in the instance of sexual harassment of students by
employees. Accordingly, the following university guidelines are issued.
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Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a
sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when:
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Submission to such conduct is made explicitly, or implicitly, a term or condition of an
individual's employment or academic standing, or
Submission to, or rejection of, such conduct by an individual is used as a basis for
employment or for arriving at academic decisions affecting an individual, or
Such conduct unreasonably interferes with an individual's work, or academic performance, or
creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or academic environment.
Sexual harassment of university faculty, staff, or students is prohibited and shall subject the offender
to oral or written warnings, suspension, transfer, demotion, or dismissal. In the event a claim of
sexual harassment arises, the claimant may utilize university grievance procedures which have been
established for faculty, staff, and students, as appropriate.
The Board of Trustees has also determined that sexual harassment can occur not only in situations
envisaged by existing federal laws and guidelines, but also in instances for which no law, per se, has
been enacted. Federal law and the guidelines set forth above contemplate a one-directional
transgression, namely, a supervisor harassing an employee, or faculty member harassing a student.
However, sexual harassment occurs in many forms. Therefore, this policy also prohibits an
employee from sexually harassing a superior, a student from sexually harassing a faculty member, or
any form of peer harassment. When such actions occur, the offended individual should take
corrective measures in accordance with usual practice and procedure.
6. Leave and Holidays. As state employees, faculty are eligible for state leave and holiday benefits.
For a full explanation refer to the Personnel Manual. A brief explanation of some of the leave
benefits follows.
a. Annual leave. Faculty on an academic year (nine-month) appointment do not accrue annual
leave. The terms of annual leave for persons holding twelve-month faculty appointments, which
include administrators and librarians, are somewhat different from those of classified personnel.
Annual leave for twelve-month faculty is accumulated at the rate of eighteen working days per
year for the first nineteen years of service at Clemson, and thirty days per year thereafter. A
maximum of forty-five unused leave days may be carried forward into each calendar year.
Although all accumulated leave may be used each year, no more than thirty working days of
leave may be used in one calendar year without the Provost’s approval. Twelve-month faculty
on sabbatical leave accrue annual leave provided they return to duty.
b. Sick leave accrues monthly at the rate of 9.38 hours of sick leave per month for every month a
faculty member is in pay status for one-half or more work days of the month excluding summer
employment of nine-month employees. Sick leave may be used when personal illness or injury
prevents one from performing regular duties or for medical appointments. A maximum of 10
days sick leave per year may also be taken for the illness of an immediate family member.
“Immediate family,” as defined in the SC Sick Leave Act, includes spouse and children and the
following relations to the employee or the spouse of the employee: mother, father, brother,
sister, grandparent, or legal guardian and grandchildren if the grandchild resides with the
employee and the employee is the primary caretaker of the grandchild.
c. Funeral leave. A faculty member shall, upon request, be granted up to three consecutive days
of leave with pay upon the death of any member of his/her immediate family. “Immediate
family” is defined as the spouse, great grandparents, grandparents, parents, brothers, sisters,
children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren of either the faculty member or his/her spouse.
d. Court leave is granted for obedience to a subpoena or other legal direction by a proper authority
to serve on a jury, testify, or serve as a witness. Any jury fees and travel payment shall be
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retained by the faculty member. When a faculty member is a voluntary witness in litigation as
an individual, and not in any official capacity, court leave is not granted.
e. Military leave is granted, up to the maximum accorded by state law (currently 15 days), for
active duty or training with the armed forces of the United States or the National Guard. The
leave days need not be consecutive and may involve more than one tour of duty.
f. Holiday leave is granted for official holidays; however, teaching schedules and other
circumstances may require the faculty member's presence. Nine-month faculty receive the
regular student holidays listed in the Undergraduate Announcements unless special
circumstances require their presence.
g. Change of Appointment. A faculty member who shifts from a nine-month to a twelve-month
appointment shall have leave calculated on the basis of the total number of years service to the
university.
A faculty member who shifts from a twelve-month to a nine-month appointment has the following options
for handling accrued annual leave: 1) all accrued annual leave earned (up to a maximum of forty-five days)
will be credited to the individual's account and frozen until retirement or termination, upon which the
credited amount will be paid at the salary rate in effect upon retirement or termination; 2) all accrued
annual leave (up to a maximum of forty-five days, regardless of any leave used in the current calendar year)
will be computed at the rate of salary in effect immediately prior to the transfer to the new appointment and
will be paid to the individual on the last payday prior to the transfer. It is the faculty member's
responsibility to notify the Division of Human Resources if such a shift is being planned.
7. Professional Travel. Clemson University recognizes the importance of attendance at professional
meetings to faculty growth and development and encourages faculty participation in such activities.
Thus, the university provides financial support for professional travel to the extent that financial
circumstances permit. Department chairs and school directors are responsible for establishing
travel criteria and priorities. Such criteria and priorities can vary from year to year depending upon
the travel funds available, the number of faculty applying for professional travel allotments, the
nature of faculty participation in particular meetings, distances to be traveled, modes of travel, etc.
On these bases, department chairs allocate travel funds among departmental faculty. Departments
normally try to maintain small contingency travel funds for special circumstances.
To be reimbursed for travel expenses the faculty member completes a travel voucher and attaches
to it receipts for registration, transportation, and lodging. Meal reimbursement is subject to the
state per diem schedule. Reimbursement for official travel in personal vehicles is only allowed
under certain conditions. Cash advances for travel may be secured by completing a travel cash
advance form (available from the departmental or school office) and taking the signed form to the
Bursar’s Office. Travel outside the United States and Canada involves special procedures for
approval. For further information, consult the Office of Access and Equity.
B. Procedures for Resolution of Discrimination / Harassment Complaints
These procedures will be applied in conjunction with the following Clemson University Policies for
Equitable Treatment: Affirmative Action / Equal Employment Opportunity Policy, Policy on HIV Disease
and Aids, Policy for Individuals with Disabilities, Policy for Disabled and Vietnam-Era Veterans, and
Harassment Policy. (These policies can be found at http://www.clemson.edu/access/ under “Policies”.)
These procedures apply to complaints of discrimination based on age, color, disability, gender, national
origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran’s status. The Office of Access and Equity is responsible
for investigating and processing all such complaints of discrimination / harassment made against any
member of the Clemson University community, including faculty, staff, or students, or any vendor or
contractor conducting business within the university with one exception. Any grievance submitted as a
Category I Faculty Grievance under the Faculty Manual will be handled in accordance with the procedures
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outlined in the Faculty Manual (www.lib.clemson.edu/fs/FacultyManual/FacultyManual.pdf) even if the
grievance includes allegations of discrimination.
All members of the Clemson community should contact the Office of Access & Equity if they observe or
encounter conduct that may violate any of the University’s Policies for Equitable Treatment. Reports of
alleged violations may also be made to an immediate supervisor. Alternatively, if the immediate supervisor
is the alleged harasser, complaints may be made to the next level supervisor. Students can report alleged
violations to the Office of the Dean of Students (undergraduate students), the Dean of the Graduate School
(graduate students), Academic Deans, Department Chairs, or directly to the Office of Access and Equity.
University officials, managers, Deans, Department Chairs, and supervisors that receive a complaint of
discrimination / harassment are required to notify the Office of Access and Equity in order to have
complaints promptly processed under the Informal and/or the Formal Complaint process described below.
Information essential to an investigation must be provided to the Office of Access and Equity upon request.
Reports of discrimination/harassment should be brought as soon as possible after the alleged conduct
occurs. Prompt reporting enables the University to more effectively investigate the facts, determine if a
violation of any policy has occurred, and provide an appropriate remedy or disciplinary action. Therefore,
complaints investigated under this procedure must be reported as described in the previous paragraph no
more than 120 days after the complaining party becomes aware of the allegedly discriminatory or harassing
conduct.
1. Informal Complaint Process
The goal of the Informal Complaint Process is to resolve concerns at the earliest stage possible with
the cooperation of the parties involved. This process includes but is not limited to discussions with the
parties, mediating an agreement between the parties, referring the parties to counseling programs,
conducting targeted educational and training programs, and making other recommendations for
resolution. Upon notification of an informal complaint, an investigator in the Office of Access and
Equity will conduct an investigation into the allegations using the following process:
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Discussions will be conducted separately with the complainant and the accused to review the
allegation(s) and develop a mutually satisfactory resolution. If deemed appropriate, the
investigator may bring the parties together for a joint discussion.
The resolution process will be confidential to the extent permitted by law. The Office of
Access and Equity shall advise all parties of the confidentiality of the investigation and the
strict prohibition against retaliation.
A written record of the allegation(s) and the resolution will be provided to the parties and
retained in the Office of Access and Equity.
If the investigator, after hearing the complainant’s statement, determines that a formal
investigation is necessary, the complaint will be handled under the Formal Investigation
Process below.
Resolution of complaints handled under the Informal Complaint Process shall either be
completed within 30 days of receipt of the complaint by the Office of Access & Equity or
referred to the Formal Complaint process within that time period. The Office of Access &
Equity shall notify all parties in writing if a matter originally submitted under the Informal
Complaint process is going to be handled under the Formal Complaint process.
The Informal Complaint Process is an optional step. The complaining party or the Office of
Access and Equity may decide to skip the Informal Complaint Process and proceed under the
Formal Complaint Process.
2. Formal Complaint Process
The formal complaint process will be followed by the Office of Access and Equity if the informal
complaint process is not successful or appropriate for addressing the allegations of the complaining
party (such as when the facts are in dispute in reports of serious misconduct). The wishes of the
individual making the report shall be considered but are not determinative in the decision to initiate
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the Formal Complaint Process. For example, the University may determine that it is obligated to
proceed under the Formal Complaint Process due to the seriousness or nature of the allegations
even if the complaining party would prefer to proceed under the Informal Complaint Process.
Upon notification of a formal complaint, an investigator in the Office of Access and Equity will
conduct an investigation into the allegations using the following process:
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The process will be confidential to the extent permitted by law. The Office of Access and
Equity shall advise all parties of the confidentiality of the investigation and the strict
prohibition against retaliation.
The investigation shall include interviews with the parties, interviews with other witnesses as
needed, and a review of relevant documents if appropriate. If all witnesses identified by the
parties are not interviewed, the investigator will document the reason the interviews were not
conducted.
The individual(s) accused of violating any Clemson Policy for Equitable Treatment shall be
given a written statement of the allegations made by the complainant.
The investigation shall be completed as promptly as possible and in most cases within 45 days
of the date the Formal Investigation Process was initiated. If the investigation cannot be
completed within 45 calendar days because of valid extenuating circumstances, the
complainant will be notified and given a projected time of completion. In cases where the
complaint is submitted to Access & Equity near the end of the semester, the 45-day limit can
be suspended until the start of the following semester if necessary to conduct interviews of
witnesses or primary parties who were unavailable during academic breaks.
The investigation should result in a written report that includes a statement of the allegations,
the positions of the parties, a summary of the findings of fact, and a determination by the
Investigator as to whether University policy has been violated, and recommendations for
actions to resolve the complaint if appropriate. If all witnesses identified by the parties were
not interviewed, the report shall include a statement explaining why. The report shall be
submitted to the University official(s) with authority to implement the actions necessary to
resolve the complaint.
The complainant and the accused shall be informed within 30 days of the conclusion of the
investigation that the investigation is complete and whether any violations of policy were
found. The complainant shall be informed of actions taken to resolve the complaint only if
they are directly related to the complainant, such as a directive that the accused not contact the
complainant. The complainant may generally be notified that the matter has been referred for
disciplinary action, but shall not be informed of the details. Both parties will be notified if all
witnesses they identified were not interviewed and the reason they were not interviewed.
3. Appeals of the Formal Complaint Process
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The complainant or accused has a right to appeal the decision of the formal complaint
process.
Appeals must be submitted in writing to the Office of the President of the University within 7
working days (excluding weekends and University holidays) after receipt of the final report of
the formal complaint process. The President will appoint a member of his Administrative
Council to review and decide the appeal.
Decisions not appealed within such time are deemed final.
The appointed member of the Administrative Council will issue a decision on the Appeal to
all parties involved within thirty (30) calendar days after receipt of the written Appeal.
4. Filing with External Agencies
In addition to, or in lieu of, the procedures outlined above, a complainant may file complaints with
external agencies as follows:
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Students (undergraduate or graduate) may file a complaint with the United States Department
of Education, Office for Civil Rights. Complaints must be filed within 180 calendar days of
the date of the most recent alleged discrimination.
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Employees may file complaints with one of two external agencies: the South Carolina Human
Affairs Commission (must file within 180 calendar days of the date of the most recent
discrimination); or the U. S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (must file within
300 calendar days of the most recent alleged discrimination.)
5. Temporary Measures
At any point in the informal or formal complaint process, the investigator may recommend interim
actions to protect parties or witnesses to the investigation including but not limited to separating the
parties, reassignment, alternative work or student housing arrangements or other types of temporary
measures. The University also reserves the right to issue no contact provisions to any or all parties
involved in the procedures.
6. Retaliation Prohibited
Retaliation is conduct causing any interference, coercion, restraint or reprisal against a person filing
a complaint of discrimination/harassment or assisting in any way in the investigation and resolution
of a complaint. Retaliation is a violation of the University’s Harassment Policy and appropriate
sanctions will be taken against anyone found to have participated in any acts of retaliation.
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Persons who feel they have been subjected to retaliation for filing a complaint of
discrimination/harassment or for assisting with the resolution of a complaint should contact
the Office of Access and Equity.
C. Professional Activities
1. Copyright Policy. Clemson University recognizes the right of faculty to engage in the uncommissioned creation of all scholarly, pedagogical, and artistic work subject to copyright, to
copyright such works, and to receive royalties from their use. “Un-commissioned creations” are
defined as those which do not receive aid from the university or from an outside agency through
university channels. As to other creations and their copyrights, the university relies on the
discretion and professional ethics of faculty.
Computer programs developed by faculty without university support will at all times be solely
owned by the authors of the copyright. Computer software programs developed with university
support are subject to the university Computer Software Copyright Policy. For further information,
contact the Office of University Research.
2. Human Subjects. Clemson University has filed the required general assurances of compliance
with the regulations of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for the protection of
human subjects. Although the assurance applies to human subject activities supported by federal
funds, it has been adopted as university policy and, as such, applies to all human subject research
activities carried out by university personnel. Faculty contemplating such activities must submit a
form for approval to be reviewed by the Committee for Protection of Human Subjects. The
Committee ascertains whether the rights and welfare of subjects are adequately protected, the risks
to subjects are outweighed by the potential benefits, and the informed consent of subjects is
obtained by adequate and appropriate methods.
Further, faculty engaging in human subject research are responsible for adhering to the relevant
guidelines established by their professional and/or accrediting organizations. For further
information, faculty should contact the Office of Research Compliance.
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3. Humane Care and Use of Animals. Clemson University has established a policy and protocol for
the use of live animals in research, instruction, and public service activities. Use of vertebrate
animals is reviewed and approved by the Animal Research Committee. Faculty contemplating such
activities must submit a protocol form requesting approval to the Committee. For further
information, faculty should contact the Animal Research Committee or Research Services.
4. Patent Policy
Clemson University recognizes that research and scholarship should be encouraged without regard
to potential gain from licensing fees, royalties, or other such income; however, the university also
recognizes that patentable inventions and discoveries may arise from staff research. The policies
governing the administration of such inventions should provide adequate recognition and incentive
to inventors and at the same time ensure that the university will share in the rights pertaining to
inventions in which it has an equity. Any incomes accruing to the university shall be used in the
furtherance of the university’s academic mission, e.g. instruction, research, and public service.
Decisions as to the disbursement of such funds shall take into account recommendations by the
Intellectual Property Committee. The university Patent Policy follows for detailed reference.
The basic objectives of the university’s policy regarding patents include the following:
• to maintain Clemson University’s policy of encouraging research and scholarship as creative
academic endeavors while recognizing that commercially viable inventions may result from
such endeavors;
• to delineate procedures to encourage inventors to report discoveries with patent potential and to
assist them, while at the same time safeguarding the interests of all concerned parties;
• to make inventions developed in the course of university research available to the public under
conditions that will promote their effective utilization and development;
• to assure that inventions developed in the course of university research shall not be used to the
detriment of the public interest by the unnecessary exclusion of any qualified user or by any
other means;
• to provide adequate recognition and incentives to inventors through shares in any proceeds from
their inventions, since -- unlike common commercial practices -- university charges and salary
scale are not based on the expectation of income from inventions by the university;
• to advance and encourage research and other academic activities within the university with
monies accruing to the university from its equity in inventions developed in the course of
research supported by funds or utilizing facilities administered by the university, or in other
inventions which are handled through the university;
• to recognize the equity of any outside sponsor by allowing reasonable and equitable provisions
for the granting of patent rights to the sponsor, consistent with the university’s basic objectives
outlined above and subject to the university’s need to maintain the tax exempt status of
financing used for certain university facilities.
The rights of Clemson University in patents arising from research will vary depending on the
proportionate contribution of the institution to the performance of the research projects or on the
type of contract agreed upon with cooperating agencies. Research projects can vary from those
wholly financed by the university or by a university administered fund to projects which receive
no significant university support.
• Clemson University will have ownership rights in all inventions of university personnel
including students, that are conceived or first actually reduced to practice as a part of or as a
direct result of: (a) university research; (b) activities within the scope of the inventor’s
employment by, or in official association with, the university; and (c) activities involving the
use of university information not available to the public, or funds administered by the
university.
• To the extent that an invention is conceived, developed and reduced to practice by a member of
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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the faculty, staff, and students, on his/her own time, outside the scope of his/her employment or
association with the university and without university facilities, materials, or resources,
ownership of such invention shall belong to such member of the faculty, staff, and students.
They may submit their invention to the university for possible patenting and/or commercial
exploitation and management under terms to be agreed upon by the inventor and the university.
• The provisions of the Clemson Patent Procedures are subject to any applicable laws, regulations,
or specific provisions of the grants or contracts which govern the rights in inventions made in
connection with sponsored research.
• In order to avoid any question concerning the tax exempt status of financing used for certain
university facilities, Clemson shall seek to: (a) retain ownership of inventions arising during
performance of research sponsored by any private sponsor and/or federal Government sponsor
and; (b) grant to such sponsor(s) any right in the invention only under compensation terms that
are set after the time when the invention comes into existence and that are at a fair market level
of compensation to Clemson. Under the terms of certain contracts and agreements between
Clemson and various agencies of government, private and public corporations, and private
interests, Clemson may be required to license patent rights to the contracting party. Clemson
retains the right to enter into such agreements whenever such action is considered to be both in
its best interest and in the public interest. The university will not agree to grant any rights in
future inventions to private corporations or businesses unless such provision is included in the
contract that sponsored the work leading to the invention.
• Special cases not covered by the above statements or which arise because of conflict of interest
shall be considered by the Intellectual Property Committee and an appropriate recommendation
submitted to the University Administration.
The university’s Intellectual Property Committee: a) evaluates patent proposals prepared by a member
of the faculty, staff, or student body and then recommends whether the university should accept the
proposal and attempt to obtain the patent; b) recommends the equity of the university and of the
inventor within the limits specified in the policy statements outlined below; and c) recommends how
the patents of Clemson University shall be assigned.
Faculty members, staff, and students who believe they have patentable inventions (ideas, concepts,
methods, materials, processes) in which the university has ownership rights shall bring them to the
attention of the Intellectual Property Committee in accordance with the following guidelines.
When a potential patent application is received by the Intellectual Property Committee, the chair shall
convene a sub-group to recommend a preliminary course of action. The sub-group shall consist of the
Intellectual Property Committee chair, the Intellectual Property Committee representative from the
college of the candidate patent application, and one other member of the Intellectual Property
Committee to be selected by the chair. If the particular college or unit is not represented on the
Intellectual Property Committee, the sub-group will be composed of the chair and two members of the
Intellectual Property Committee appointed by the chair. After reviewing the relevant materials and
discussions with the inventor(s), the sub-group will recommend to the Intellectual Property Committee
one of three courses of action: (a) return of the idea/invention to the inventor(s) for their own patent
pursuits, relinquishing university rights and subsequent responsibilities for costs and incomes: (b)
referral of the patent application package to a research corporation or foundation acting as agent for its
pursuit, with associated university and inventor(s) patent income sharing as determined by Clemson’s
agreement with that agent, or, (c) recommend the university pursue the patent application using its
own financial and legal resources (when intellectual property originates in the South Carolina
Agricultural Experiment Station (SCAES) then SCAES will pay all costs associated with the patent).
If actions (a) or (b) are recommended by the sub-group and the inventor(s) accept this
recommendation, the chair will present the recommendation to the Intellectual Property Committee, at
its next regular meeting, for action. The Intellectual Property Committee will have a maximum of 45
days to complete the review and take action on a particular disclosure. If action (c) is recommended,
or the inventor(s) disagree with the sub-group recommendation, then the inventor(s) will present their
disclosure before the full Intellectual Property Committee for its consideration and action. In each
case, the Intellectual Property Committee’s recommendations will be sent to the Vice President for
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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Research and Economic Development or designee for approval prior to further action.
In these cases where a Federal agency sponsored all or a part of the research, that agency will be
informed of patent action(s) within 60 days of such action(s).
•
•
•
•
“Patent Income” is defined to include income associated with any patent disclosure made to the
Intellectual Property Committee for exploitation, even if the income is received before a patent
application has been filed or a patent issued, and includes such monies received as royalties, fees,
advanced payments, court awarded infringement damages, payments received in settlement of
infringement disputes, and the like, calculated after the costs of exploiting the disclosure have
been reimbursed to the university, some examples of such costs are the cost of securing the patent,
appropriate licenses, and other legal efforts as required. Patent income shall not include indirect
economic benefits resulting from the technological position established by the patented
technology or the sale of derived articles or concepts, including such items as a follow-on NSF
Grant that use the patented technology as a basis for future work.
Patent Income shall be divided into an Inventor(s) Share, a University Share, the Inventor(s)
Home
College(s)’ Share, and Discretionary Funds. The Inventor(s)’ Share is the portion of Patent
Income paid directly to the inventor(s) as a group for their personal income. The determination of
who is an “inventor” shall be made in accordance with the patent laws of the United States. The
Inventor(s)’ Home College(s)’ Share is the portion of the Patent Income payable to the home
colleges of the inventor(s) as a group. The University Share is the portion of Patent Income paid
to the university (or SCAES). Discretionary Funds is the portion of Patent Income paid to the
home college(s) of the inventor(s)’ for the inventor(s)’ use as discretionary scholarship/research
support.
The percentage allocations of the various shares of Patent Income shall be calculated as follows:
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•
•
•
For the first $50,000 of Patent Income:
Inventor(s)’ Share equals 40%;
Inventor(s)’ Home College(s)’ Share equals 20%;
University Share equals 40%.
For Patent Income in excess of $50,000, the allocation is as follows:
Discretionary Funds equals 20%;
Inventor(s)’ Home College(s)’ Share equals 20%;
University Share equals 40%.
Inventors’ Shares: (A) The Inventor(s)’ Share will be shared equally among all inventors, unless
they agree otherwise. (B) Inventor(s) may always arrange for his/her/their personal share(s) to be
retained by the university, e.g., to support his/her/their research. (C) The Inventors(s) Share will
continue even though the individual may have left the university. (D) When an inventor leaves
the university, the discretionary funds are added to the University Share. (E) When SCAES, and
not the university, pays all of the costs associated with exploiting the invention, then SCAES
stands in the shoes of the university and thus receives the University Share. (F) When none of the
inventors has a home college, the Inventor(s)’ Home College(s)’ Share and/or Discretionary Funds
are/is added to the University Share.
No assignment of or license for (or agreement to assign or license) any invention developed in the
course of research supported by funds or utilizing facilities administered by the university may be
entered into by any faculty member, staff member, or student without the written consent of the
university. The university shall have the ultimate right to resolve any conflict of interest arising in
this connection with third parties or organizations. The basic objectives of the patent policy stated
above shall serve as the criteria for approval of assignments, licenses, and agreements to assign or
license.
Foreign patent applications will not be filed unless: a) substantial justification exists relative to
the commercial potential of the invention; b) one or more firms have expressed their intent to
license the technology; or c) the college/department/unit assume all filing and other foreign
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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application costs.
There will be an annual review of foreign application/patent status. Foreign applications/patents
that are not active with respect to license or license potential may be dropped.
Foreign application/foreign rights will be released to the inventor(s) if the Committee does not
recommend initial or continued pursuit by the university and provided that the inventor(s) sign an
agreement including the following provisions:
If the foreign rights generate income in the hands of the inventors, then such income would
be applied initially to the outlays made by the inventors to secure such income, secondly to
the expenses incurred by the university regarding such foreign rights prior to conveying same
to the inventors with any remaining income shared as follows: 60% to the inventor(s) and 40%
to the university for net income. The inventor(s) will maintain market and accounting records
that will be available for review by the university on request.
An increasing number of the university’s U. S. patents are subject to the payment of maintenance fees
in order to keep such patents in force. Accordingly, there may be instances in which the university
decides to abandon some of its non-producing U. S. patents. Regarding such non-producing U. S.
patents to be abandoned by the university, the university will offer to convey such patents to the
inventors under the arrangement described for foreign patents described in
Section VIII.
No university personnel shall accuse any third party of infringing any patent owned by the university
unless express written permission has previously been obtained from the President of the University to
make such allegation or accusation of infringement. Prior to granting such permission and prior to
initiating litigation to resolve infringement of a university patent, the President shall consult with legal
counsel and other counsel, as the President deems appropriate.
During the summer sessions and extended university holiday periods, the chair will have the authority
to: a) Expedite the review of patent disclosures deemed time critical, in terms of negotiations with
prospective licensees, meeting filing deadlines, and the like; b) Initiate negotiations with prospective
licensees for patent filing/processing fees or the like; and c) Such other activities that are time critical
and cannot be delayed for handling at a regular or special called meeting of the committee.
Good laboratory practice dictates the use of bound notebooks for record keeping, making entries on a
daily basis. This “diary” format provides a day-to-day chronology. Use the notebook to record a
conception (a complete description of a means to accomplish a particular purpose or result), laboratory
data, and drawings. Each entry should be headed with a title and continued on successive pages.
Make entries in ink and do not erase; draw a line through text or drawings to be deleted, and enter the
material in corrected form. Draw a line through blank spaces on the page. Separate sheets and
photographs pasted to notebook pages should be referred to in an entry. Material that cannot be
incorporated in the notebook should be keyed to an entry. Sign and date all entries at the time they are
made, and have them witnessed. A witness must be someone who has read the material and is capable
of understanding it, yet had nothing to do with producing it. Secure additional witnesses when
something important or highly unusual is discovered. Remember that an inventor and his or her coinventor(s) cannot serve as their own witnesses. Records - when made a matter of routine - take only a
small amount of time and effort, become an invaluable asset to work in progress, and may ultimately
reserve for the inventor those rights to which he or she is, by priority, entitled.
Records that support the conception, development, and demonstration of a particular intellectual
property should be available for review by the Intellectual Property Committee and patent counsel at
each stage of review of a particular disclosure.
5. Policy on Research Ethics. Clemson University recognizes the need for faculty to exercise
personal judgment and interpretation in research activities in order to maintain an environment of
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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creativity and discovery within the academic community. Care must be taken to ensure that honest
error and ambiguities of interpretation of research activities are distinguishable from outright
misconduct. Misconduct is construed as dishonest deviation from accepted practices in conducting
research activities, or fraudulent failure to comply with university, regulatory, and funding agency
requirements affecting specific aspects of the conduct of research. This includes falsification of
data, plagiarism, the misappropriation of others’ ideas (the unauthorized and intentionally dishonest
use of privileged information such as may be gained during peer, paper, or grant reviews),
malicious and public misrepresentation of a colleague’s ethical research behavior, conflicts of
interest that could influence the researcher’s decisions or conclusions, or which could provide
unfair gain to the researcher, other misuse of position as researcher for personal gain, or
exploitation (such as failure to credit work, misrepresentation of a research relationship) of
students, or other persons, for research purposes.
Allegations or complaints involving the possibility of misconduct can be raised by anyone, and are
subject to the university Policy on Research Ethics. The allegation should be made in writing to the
Faculty Senate President in a confidential manner and signed. Procedures regarding inquiry and
investigation of the allegation are defined in the Policy on Research Ethics. For further information
contact the Office for Sponsored Programs.
6. Research Data Access and Retention Policy. In the exacting pursuit of meritorious research
where honest challenges toward research findings are encouraged; when charges of fraudulent
scientific processes may be encountered; and when legislative mandates are received, the university
must focus its efforts toward policy development concerning administration of research in order to
establish clear ownership and to ensure the integrity, access, and preservation of the university’s
research records.
Information of a scientific or technical nature that is created, assembled, or accumulated and which,
as a standard practice, is recorded in the course of a university supported research project is defined
as research data. The terms “research record(s)” or “record(s)” or “research data” are considered
interchangeable within the context of this policy statement. The meaning of the term may vary
from field to field, and the university will rely upon the standard practices of the relevant field to
serve as the guiding principle. For the purpose of this policy, the term “research data” does not
include financial, business or management records or pertaining to award administration.
Except when expressly provided otherwise by contractual agreement, ownership of research data
resides with the university. Individuals responsible for the generation of research data (e.g.,
faculty, students, staff) have a legal obligation, as well as potential future benefits, to ensure that
such data are properly cared for and retained. To this end, the Principal Investigator of a research
project is primarily responsible for:
•
•
•
The proper recording, retention and preservation of all original research records as expected
within the standard operational practices of the relevant field;
The careful supervision and education of all relevant project personnel concerning these
necessary procedures;
The timely reporting to the immediate supervisor, upon discovery, of significant instances of
non compliance of this policy statement.
Research records should include sufficient detail to permit examination for the purposes of
replicating the research; to respond to questions that may result from unintentional error or
misinterpretation; to establish the authenticity and origin of research data, and ultimately to confirm
the validity of the projects conclusions and/or published findings.
In general, if the retention period for research data is not otherwise established by the contractual
terms of a sponsored project, a period of no less than five years, either after professional publication
of final research findings, or after project completion (whichever is longer) may be adequate unless
an extended period is necessary in connection with other project related matters, e.g., inquiries
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concerning scientific misconduct that are underway or impending. Regarding patent data, the
period of retention should extend at least through the life of the patent, and longer if considered
necessary to protect against a claim of interference, infringement, or liability.
The responsibility for a project’s research data retention and preservation lies with the Principal
Investigator, and accordingly the Principal Investigator is considered the custodian of research data,
unless circumstances require assignment of custodial responsibilities to another appropriately
qualified university academician. Transfer of custodian responsibility for whatever cause will be
formally recorded as an approved action by the department chair, director, or dean in accord with
college policy. If the project is supported by grant or contract funds, a copy documenting the
custodian transfer will also be provided to the Vice President for Research and Economic
Development for record filing.
The opinion of the Principal Investigator will be consulted and considered upon receipt of FOI
requests, although the university, as owner of those records, reserves the right to seek the judgment
of university legal counsel to ultimately determine rights of access under FOI circumstances should
differences of opinion rise.
The university’s responsibility to safeguard research data from unauthorized disclosure must be
recognized as a priority by the individuals entrusted with those records. Any data generated as
confidential shall be treated as such in perpetuity.
The physical location of original research records is expected to be within the premises of the
university facilities. Circumstances will arise that will justify reasonable exceptions to this
practice; however, as long as proper control and oversight is maintained by the university, the
custodian in consultation with their supervisor may determine the appropriate measures for
administration of this policy and the security of original records.
Faculty who retire, or terminate their employment and transfer to another institution may negotiate
with the department chair, director, or dean as appropriate (and Vice President for Research and
Economic Development if a sponsored project is involved), and enter into a “transfer agreement”
that specifically describes the extent of original research data (notebooks, lab records, etc.) to be
transferred or otherwise relinquished, to the faculty member, or their new institution. In such
agreements the university will be guaranteed the full and prompt access (without cost or fee) to any
original records transferred to an external party. Prior to the department of the faculty member,
affected research records remaining with the university must be inventoried and custodial
responsibility reassigned.
Scheduled destruction of research records archival control may take place without further notice,
review, or approval. Any other proposed action that would render those records unusable or, in
effect, destroyed is unauthorized and cannot occur without advance notice to and approval by the
department chair, director, or dean responsible for the safeguarding of the project’s research
records.
While it is not the intent of, nor deemed necessary for this policy statement to require
extraordinarily detailed record keeping of the specific whereabouts of research records, their
prompt access by individuals seeking to conduct purposeful research, appropriate administrative
reviews, or legal inquiry must be assured.
For further information contact Clemson University Records Management.
7. Use of Recombinant DNA, Biological and Chemical Hazards, and Radioactive Agents. The
Institutional Biosafety Committee was established in response to federal guidelines mandating
peer review of all protocols that will involve the use of hazardous procedures or materials. This
mandatory review is triggered at Clemson University by the principal investigator’s completion
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of the Memorandum of Understanding and Agreement or Registration Concerning Recombinant
DNA Research, or the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) Concerning Research Involving
Chemical Hazards, or the MOU Concerning Research Involving Bio-hazards. Depending on
which hazard exists, one (or several) of these documents should be completed and signed by the
principal investigator (PI) and the Chair of the Department. The document should then be
submitted to the Office of Research Compliance, 300 Brackett Hall, where it will be processed
and sent to the applicable subcommittee for prompt review. During the process, the Director of
Environmental Health and Safety (EHS), acting as an ex officio member of each subcommittee,
will be invited to comment on the protocol. After questions are resolved between reviewers and
the principal investigator, the document is recommended for approval to the Vice President for
Research and Economic Development or designee. For more information, call the Institutional
Biosafety Coordinator at 656-0636.
EHS is responsible for maintenance of a safe environment at Clemson University and will work
with the PI who is directly responsible for adherence to safety regulations and the protocols in
his/her laboratory.
EHS will assist investigators in developing protocols when requested. Contact the Director of
EHS at 656-1806. The PI’s responsibility includes sufficient supervision of students and
technicians to assure their adherence to the approved protocol.
d. Private Outside Employment
"Private outside employment" refers to both private consulting activities and other remunerative
outside activities of faculty members. "Consulting activity" is defined as professional work
performed outside university auspices that is substantively related to a faculty member's area of
expertise and duties at the university. "Outside activities" refers to employment or business
activities (other than personal and private financial transactions) designed to enhance the income or
wealth of the faculty member but not directly related to his/her area of expertise as a faculty
member. Professional employment by the university clearly presumes a commitment of time and
effort considerably beyond simply fulfilling such scheduled duties as meeting classes. Excessive
involvement in private outside employment of any kind must by definition have detrimental effects
upon the performance of professional duties. Such lowered performance levels by necessity affect
decisions regarding tenure, promotion, and salary.
1. Consulting. Consulting activities can contribute to the professional development and stature of
the faculty member, and thus may benefit the university as well as the faculty member, so long as
such activities are kept within reasonable bounds. The university, therefore, encourages
consulting activities, provided that they present no conflicts of interest and do not diminish the
quantity and quality of professional services rendered to the university as part of the faculty
member's normal duties and responsibilities. The primary safeguard is the requirement that the
faculty member secure advance approval for consulting activities from the department chair,
school director, and dean. Department chairs, school directors, and deans shall evaluate the
merits of each request to consult to ensure that the activity is beneficial to the university in that
no conflicts of interest exist, no conflict with university duties or responsibilities is present, and
the total amount of consulting by the faculty member is not excessive. Guidelines developed by
the dean of each college for use in this evaluation shall be provided to the faculty after review by
the Provost or designee to ensure consistency with this policy. (Also see page ix-3, Faculty
Consulting Policy)
2. Outside Activities. Outside activities are not viewed as beneficial to the university and are not
encouraged. If engaged in, they must pose no conflict of interest or result in any lessened
contribution by the faculty member to the university. The outside activities of part-time as well
as full-time faculty members must not impinge in any way upon the duties and responsibilities of
the faculty member to the university.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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3. Use of University Facilities and Equipment. University facilities and equipment shall not be
used in the furtherance of outside activities in any instance, and shall only be used in the
furtherance of consulting activities when: a) such facilities and equipment are not available
commercially, and b) approval in advance has been secured from the Assistant to the President.
4. Reporting Requirements. A form for securing approval in advance for consulting activities
must be submitted for any proposed consulting that is to occur during the faculty member's
period of employment. Faculty on nine-month appointments need not complete this form for
consulting that is to occur during the period in which they are not employed by the university.
Faculty are not required to secure advance approval for outside activities, but should be prepared
to disclose the nature and extent of such activities to their department chair, school director, and
dean if a possibility of conflict of interest or impingement upon the proper performance of duties
arises.
e.
External Communications: Media Relations
1. Responding to Media Inquiries. The university encourages administrators, faculty, and staff to
cooperate with and respond directly to news media representatives in discussing academic and
public service activities in the normal conduct of business. They should, however, keep the
Director of News Services informed of press contacts and about events, incidents, and
developments in which there is, or might be, a public interest. In responding to media requests, the
following guidelines will be helpful:
• Act in a friendly, responsive manner.
• Get the reporter's name and the publication or station represented.
• If the question is one that you can answer and it is within your area of academic, technical, or
professional expertise and responsibility, give the reporter your full cooperation.
• Refer the call to the Chief Public Affairs Officer or the Director of News Services if it
involves: a) questions of university policy, or those involving a university-wide concern or
controversy; b) questions to which a university response has already been prepared and that is
the only information to be released; and c) responses that call for coordination among two or
more administrative units.
• If you cannot (or do not wish to) comment, don't hesitate to say so. Refer the call to News
Services, which will answer for the university or refer the reporter to the appropriate source.
• Some reporters may ask you to comment on controversial matters “off the record" with the
promise that your name will not be used. Unless you know the reporter well, it is usually not
wise to do so. In any event, if you go "off the record," establish the ground rules before the
interview. Comments cannot be placed "off the record" retroactively.
• If you need to gather data or give the matter some thought, tell the reporter you will call back.
Then do so promptly. Deadline pressures are extremely tight in the news business.
• When you give a personal opinion on a subject, make sure the reporter knows you are speaking
for yourself, not for your colleagues or the administration.
• Don't assume you will see or hear the story before it appears. Unlike Department of News
Services staffers, the outside reporter is under no obligation to show you copy for approval.
• Keep your answers clear, concise, and factual. The broadcast media, particularly, need short
answers covering no more than one or two points. Decide which ones you want to emphasize
in advance, then stick with them.
2. Releasing Information to the Media. Although university faculty and staff are encouraged to be
responsive to media inquiries, they are discouraged from taking the initiative to contact the media
directly. It is university policy for all news releases to be issued by New Services. This makes good
sense and is good policy for several reasons:
•
The professional staff has extensive contacts and experience in dealing with the media, and
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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•
•
•
can package and “market” the story in a professional way that will be most usable to the
media. They work hard to maintain the media's respect and trust, and this works to the
university's benefit.
Media people are busy people, and the university needs to speak to them with one voice on
stories identified as priorities for that particular time period. Just as in fund raising, it is not in
the university's best interest to have contacts “hounded” by 10 Clemson people with 10
different requests in one day.
Information funneled through New Services is automatically shared by both internal and
external news editors. Internal communications vehicles such as Inside Clemson, the
faculty/staff Newsletter, Clemson World, and other such publications can be used in the total
public relations mix. New Services staff members are also involved in developing
information for the Visitors Center, Board of Visitors, Faculty-Staff orientation, etc., and
occasionally work on speeches and presentations by top university administrators.
As the media's primary source of information on Clemson, New Services needs to know as
much as it can about what's happening so it can effectively promote the university and inform
the public. Keep the news staff member assigned to your area fully informed about your
programs and activities. The news staff can help plan and set up news conferences,
announcements, media Q&A sessions, and interviews. Include them in your planning
process, and inform them at least 6-8 weeks in advance of events that need publicizing in the
media.
Exceptions to this general policy are made in cases of local contact between extension personnel
and news media at the county level. They are encouraged to establish and maintain close relations
with local media and supply them with public service information. Sports information activities are
also excepted, including the release of information about Clemson athletic programs and athletes,
by the Sports Information Office. However, News Services is responsible for handling media on
matters concerning university-wide athletic policy where the President or Vice President of Student
Affairs is the appropriate university spokesperson.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
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APPENDIX A
Clemson University Board of Trustees
2007-08
Leon J. (Bill) Hendrix Jr.
Chairman of CU Board
Chairman, Executive
Committee
340 Surfsong Road
Kiawah Island, SC 29455
(843) 243-8243
J.J. Britton
Vice Chair of CU Board
Sumter OB-GYN, P.A.
P.O. Box 1469
Sumter, SC 29151
(803) 775-8351 ext. 240
Bill L. Amick
CEO
The Amick Company
P.O. Box 2647
Batesburg-Leesville, SC
29070-2647
(803) 332-4001
Thomas C. Lynch Jr.
125 Fort Rutledge Road
Clemson, SC 29631
(864) 654-3009
Louis B. Lynn
President
ENVIRO AgScience, Inc.
P.O. Box 23285
Columbia, SC 29224
(803) 714-7290
Patricia H. McAbee
101 Covey Hill Court
Greenville, SC 29615
(864) 271-1381
term expires 2010
term expires 2010
term expires 2008
Faculty Manual – July 2007
viii
APPENDIX B
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVE TO THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES
The Clemson University Board of Trustees has approved the concept of a Faculty
Representative to the Board of Trustees using the process outlined below. This
individual is recognized as the official representative of the Faculty and is granted
privileges beyond those accorded to visitors to Board meetings. This includes receipt of
Minutes, Agendas, and attachments of all Board and Committee meetings and an
opportunity to be included on the Agenda upon approval of request.
Selection Procedures
A Faculty Representative to the Board of Trustees Selection Committee, composed of
one Distinguished Alumni Professor from each College, one Library representative, and
the President of the Faculty Senate, will solicit nominations for the Faculty
Representative to the Board of Trustees in the Fall, 1998, and every third year thereafter.
Any individual holding tenure at Clemson University will be eligible for nomination.
The nomination period will run for fourteen days from the date of the Call for
Nominations. Each nomination must include a complete curriculum vitae and a
statement of interest from the nominee.
The Faculty Manual Editorial Consultant will examine all nominations to verify the
faculty status of each nominee. The names of all eligible nominees will be distributed to
the members of the Selection Committee. The Committee will consider the nominations
and make the final selection based on nominee’s curriculum vitae and statement of
interest.
The Faculty Representative will serve a three-year term commencing with the first Board
meeting following selection.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xi
APPENDIX A
Leslie G. (Les) McCraw
Chairman and CEO, Retired
Fluor Corporation
100 Fluor Daniel Drive,
C107E
Greenville, SC 29607-2762
(864) 281-4750
E. Smyth McKissick III
CEO
Alice Manufacturing
Company, Inc.
P. O. Box 369
Easley, SC 29641
(864) 859-6323
Thomas B. McTeer Jr.
President
McTeer Real Estate, Inc.
P.O. Box 11923
Columbia, SC 29211
(803) 254-6260
Robert L. Peeler
President
Bob Peeler and Associates
LLC
P.O. Box 69
Lexington, SC 29071-0069
(803) 413-0072
William C. Smith Jr.
CEO
Holmes Smith
Developments, Inc.
P.O. Box 11334
Columbia, SC 29211
(803) 748-1252
Joseph D. Swann
President
Retired
Rockwell Automation
Power Systems
22 Craigwood Court
Greenville, SC 29607
(864) 277-1071
term expires 2008
term expires 2008
term expires 2010
David H. Wilkins
US Embassy
PO Box 5000
Ogdensburg, NY 13669
(613) 688-5200
Faculty Manual – July 2007
ix
APPENDIX A
Trustees Emeriti
Louis P. Batson Jr.
Chairman, Retired
Louis P. Batson Co.
P.O. Box 3978
Greenville, SC 29608
(864) 242-5262, Ext. 222
Fletcher C. Derrick Jr.
641 St. Andrews Blvd.
Charleston, SC 29407
(843) 766-9747
W.G. DesChamps Jr.
President
Bishopville Petroleum Co., Inc.
P.O. Box 347
Bishopville, SC 29010
(803) 484-6416
Lawrence M. Gressette Jr.
Chairman and CEO, Retired
SCANA Corporation
1400 Lady Street
Mail Code E-25
Columbia, SC 29201
(803) 217-9584
Harold D. (Doug) Kingsmore
107 Lewis Road
Clemson, SC 29631
(864) 653-5823
Paul W. McAlister
Retired
104 Creek Drive
Laurens, SC 29360
D. Leslie Tindal
Retired
S.C. Commissioner of
Agriculture
1322 Les Tindal Road
Pinewood, SC 29125
(803) 452-5161
Allen Wood
Retired
523 Wisteria Drive
Florence, SC 29502
(843) 669-8266
Faculty Manual – July 2007
x
APPENDIX C
FORM CUFM-1001
APPOINTMENT OF ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATOR
Position: _______________________________________
College (if applicable): ____________________________
Reporting to: ____________________________________
I. Search committee Members:1 (Elected Members)
(Appointed Members)
II. Search Committee list of Nominees was forwarded for review:
By: (Search Committee Chair)
Date
III. Check one:
___ I hereby appoint __________________________________________ from the list
of nominees submitted to me by the Search Committee.
___ An appointment cannot be made from the list of nominees submitted.
By:
For Groups I, II, & III - Dean
For Groups IV & V - Provost
IV. I hereby approve the appointment made in Section III hereof.
By:
Provost (For Groups I, II, & III)
By:
President (All Groups)
(NEXT)
Faculty Manual – August 2006
xii
APPENDIX C
FORM CUFM-1001
APPOINTMENT OF ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATOR
Search Committee Membership
Group I: For academic department chair or other departmental academic administrator within a
department, the department faculty chooses the majority. Dean appoints minority. Must have
student member.
1
Group II: For assistant dean, associate dean, or director within college, faculty of the college or
equivalent administrative unit chooses majority; college dean (or comparable administrator)
appoints minority. Must include one student member. (For the Dean and Director of the
Cooperative Extension Service, majority chosen by the Extension Senate.)
Group III: For academic administrator of an off-campus program, majority and minority
appointees shall represent both off-campus program and associated on-campus academic area.
Affected faculty appoints committee majority; dean may appoint minority.
Group IV: For a college or Library dean, affected faculty chooses majority, and Provost may
appoint minority. Committee must include at least one student, one department chair from
within college, and either a dean from another college or an off-campus representative from an
appropriate profession.
Group V: For Vice Provost, academic dean (other than college) or otherwise unspecified
academic administrators reporting directly or indirectly to the Provost, the Provost appoints
search committee (after consulting with the Advisory Committee of the Faculty Senate). One
student must be included. (Include a county extension agent if the position is Vice President
and Vice Provost for Agriculture and Natural Resources.)
Faculty Manual – August 2006
xiii
APPENDIX D
FORM FOR THE EVALUATION OF ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATORS
CLEMSON UNIVERSITY
Faculty of _____________________________________________________________________________________________
As mandated by the Faculty Manual, a review of _____________________________________ is underway. As part of this
process, the input of all personnel in your administrative unit is sought. Therefore, please take the time to fill out this
questionnaire, and feel free to use additional sheets if necessary. Your responses will remain anonymous.
Please check your position in the unit (optional).
_____ Professor
_____ Associate Professor
_____ Assistant Professor
_____ Instructor
_____ Staff
_____ Other: _______________________________________________
1. Please rate _______________________________________ on each of the following:
(administrator)
Excellent
Administration of academic programs
Extension and outreach programs
Seeking external funding
Alumni and constituent relations
Human resources
General administrative support
2.
5
5
5
5
5
5
Very
Good
4
4
4
4
4
4
Good
Fair
Poor
Unknown
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
U
U
U
U
U
U
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
Please rate _______________________________________ on each of the following:
(administrator)
Excellent
Academic Leadership Areas
Academic Standards
Advocacy for the Unit
Encouragement of effective teaching
Encouragement of research
Support for the mission of the Unit
Handling of promotion and tenure matters
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Excellent
Personal Leadership Areas
Communication and listening skills
Dedication/Commitment
Administrative style
Delegation and follow through
Conflict resolution
Fairness/Equity
Advocacy for support staff
Faculty Manual – July 2007
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
5
Very
Good
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Good
Fair
Poor
Unknown
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
Very
Good
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Good
Fair
Poor
Unknown
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
U
xiv
APPENDIX D
3.
What are the strengths of this administrator?
4.
What are the weaknesses of this administrator?
5.
What specific recommendations do you have to improve the performance of ___________________________________ ?
(administrator)
6.
On a scale of 5 (high) and 1 (low), how would you rate ___________________________ in terms of overall effectiveness?
(administrator)
5
7.
4
3
2
1
U
On a scale of 5 (high) and 1 (low), indicate your level of enthusiasm for the continuance/reappointment of
______________________.
(administrator)
5
Faculty Manual – July 2007
4
3
2
1
U
xv
APPENDIX E
BEST PRACTICES FOR A PERFORMANCE REVIEW SYSTEM
FOR FACULTY
1. The performance review system must meet the “Criteria and Procedures for
Evaluation: (4.8.10) of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools which
stipulate that: (1) an institution must conduct periodic evaluations of individual
faculty members; (2) the evaluation must include a statement of the criteria against
which the performance of each faculty member will be measured; (3) the criteria must
be consistent with the purpose and goals of the institution and be made known to all
concerned; and (4) the institution must demonstrate that it uses the results of this
evaluation for improvement of the faculty and its educational program.
2. The performance review system should be both formative (designed to be a
supportive process that promotes self-improvement) and summative (accesses and
judges performance).
3. The performance review system process and criteria should be explained to new
hires.
4. All faculty, including tenured faculty at all ranks, are reviewed annually and receive a
written performance evaluation. In this way, for those institutions with a tenure
system, the performance review should not pose a threat to the tenure system but
extends and enlarges it.
5. The performance review system should have been developed jointly by the faculty
and administrators of an institution.
6. The performance review system should allow for discipline-specific components.
7. The performance review system should provide opportunities for reflection, feedback,
and professional growth whose goal is to enhance instruction at the institution.
8. The performance review system should include written performance evaluation data
from four sources:
a. Annually, instruction and course evaluation forms completed anonymously by
students through a standardized process and submitted for each course (not
section) taught;
b. Annually, administrative evaluation which includes assessments from the
department chair and/or dean;
c. Annually for untenured faculty and at least every three years for tenured faculty,
internal peer evaluation, i.e. evaluation of faculty by their peers within the
institution of higher learning;
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xvi
APPENDIX E
d. At least every six years, input from peers external to the department and/or
institution as appropriate to the role and function of each faculty member.
External evaluators to the institution include national peers from the same field of
expertise from other institutions of higher education, professional organizations
and societies, federal agencies, etc. Specialized national accreditations and the
CHE program reviews, which include external reviewers’ assessments, could be
incorporated into the external peer review component, where appropriate.
9. At an institutional level, the performance review system must include the following
criteria as appropriate to the institution’s mission:
Instruction/teaching; advisement and mentoring of students; graduate student
supervision; supervision of other students (teaching assistants, independent study
students); course/curriculum development; research/creative activities; publications;
service to department; service to institution; service to community; participation in
professional organizations/associations; honors, awards, and recognitions; selfevaluation; participation in faculty development activities/programs; activities which
actively support the economic development of the region or State.
10. The results of each performance review, including post-tenure review, must be used
by the institution as part of the faculty reward system and faculty development
system, and the system should include a plan for development when deficiencies are
indicated in the review. Specifically:
a. When an instructor (in the Tech system) or untenured faculty member receives an
overall rating of unsatisfactory on the annual performance review, the faculty
member may be subject to nonreappointment;
b. When an instructor (in the Tech system) or tenured faculty member receives an
overall rating of unsatisfactory on the annual performance review, the faculty
member is immediately subject to a development process, developed by the
specific unit, whose goal is to restore satisfactory performance. The development
process will include a written plan with performance goals in deficient areas, with
appropriate student and peer evaluation of performance.
c. When an instructor (in the Tech system) or a tenured faculty member fails to
make substantial progress towards the performance goals at the time of the next
annual review or fails to meet the performance goals specified in the development
plan within a specified period, that faculty member will be subject to dismissal (in
the Tech system) or revocation of tenure for habitual neglect of duty under the
terms of the senior institution’s faculty manual.
11. The institution should develop an appeals procedure for those faculty who do not
agree with the results of the performance evaluation and/or the resulting
recommendations for requirements for improvement.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xvii
APPENDIX F
GOALS, ACCOMPLISHMENTS, AND EVALUTION FORMS 1, 2 and 3
FORM 1
PROFESSIONAL GOALS AND DUTIES
Name of Faculty Member
Date
Area of Responsibility and % of total responsibilities:
Spring
Sum 1
Sum 2
Fall
Coursework
Other Instructional Activities
Administrative Assignment
University Public Service
Librarianship
Research and Scholarship
Student Advising
Honors and Graduate Committees
Department, College, and University Committees
Professional Service
Professional and Personal Development
Other
SIGNATURES:
Faculty Member: I concur with the proposed distribution of effort and attached goals.
Signature: _______________________________________________________ Date:________________
I have filled a disclaimer to the proposed distribution and/or the attached goals.
Signature: _______________________________________________________ Date:________________
Department Chair:
Signature: _______________________________________________________ Date:________________
GOALS: A statement of goals for each appropriate area of responsibility (Coursework, Instructional
Activities, Administrative Assignments, etc.) should be attached. The guidelines in Appendix C may
be used as an outline.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xviii
APPENDIX F
Faculty Activity System (FAS) Descriptions
Coursework – Courses are loaded from the Course Scheduling System automatically. Please direct all questions about these to
your course scheduler. If applicable, please indicate which courses are taught as comp ensated over loads.
Other Instructional Activities – Include here any instructional activities that are not formally associated with instruction for a
course. These may include curriculum or new course development, service learning, supervision of undergraduate research, or
other pedagogical activities as well as lectures.
Administrative Assignments – Include here any formal administrative assignment, such as chair, director, or leader of a
department or program.
University Public Service – Include all public service activities associated with formal responsibilities in your discipline. A
formal responsibility is usually connected to salary dollars for public service activities. Cooperative Extension Service activities
will be provided from the CUMIS system at the time of annual reviews. Those with Cooperative Extension Service appointments
should indicate their general goals and expect that the project information will be included separately to your Chair.
Librarianship – This section is primarily designed for the library faculty. Include all activities associated with the library
operation and academic support from the library system.
Research and Scholarship – Include research activities, publications, presentations and patents here as well as descriptions of
research programs not reported to the Office of Sponsored Research. Awards and proposals processed through the Office of
Sponsored Research are loaded automatically. Please direct all questions about these records to this office for corrections.
Student Advising – Include all activities associated with student advising and degree advisory committees.
Honors and Graduate Committees – The graduate thesis/dissertation committees are loaded from the Graduate School based
upon filings by the candidates. Please encourage early filing by your students and direct questions about these records to the
Graduate School for correction. FAS records will be updated periodically from the Graduate School records.
Department, College, and University Committees – Include all standing department, college, and University committees, like
curriculum, promotion and tenure, and administrative advisory committees. Committee chairs should name each committee and
include a list of members. Report on student advisory committees under Student Advising / Honors and Graduate Committees.
Department Committees
College Committees
University Committees
Professional Committees
Public Service Committees
Other Committees
Professional Service – Include here all professional service activities that are not a formal responsibility of your position.
Professional service would include any service you provide based on your academic discipline that is not required by your job
responsibilities. Examples may include activities such as testimony before a legislative committee, judging at a science fair,
appointment as a journal editor, or service on a national board.
Professional and Personal Development – Include all activities you undertake to improve your skills or knowledge either
through continuing education or professional organizations. Report sabbatical activities here. This may include attending
professional meetings, taking short courses, or visiting a colleague’s laboratory to learn new techniques.
Honors and Awards – Include all honors and awards received during the current year.
Other – anything not included above.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xix
APPENDIX F
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xx
APPENDIX F
FORM 2
ANNUAL REPORT OF PROFESSIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Date
Academic Year
Name
Rank
Last Degree/Date
Area of Responsibility and % of total responsibilities:
Spring
Sum 1
Sum 2
Fall
Coursework
Other Instructional Activities
Administrative Assignment
University Public Service
Librarianship
Research and Scholarship
Student Advising
Honors and Graduate Committees
Department, College, and University Committees
Professional Service
Professional and Personal Development
Other
SUMMARY OF NOTEWORTHY ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Attach narrative of accomplishments during the academic year. Respond to each area from Form 1. Add
and identify others not added.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xxi
APPENDIX F
FORM 3 Evaluation Summary
EVALUATION OF ACADEMIC PERSONNEL
Name
Rank
Department
College
I. Narrative of Evaluation (attach additional sheets as necessary)
II. Total Performance Rating
Excellent
Very Good
Good
Fair
Marginal
Unsatisfactory
The Faculty member’s record of scholarly research or creative activity and record of substantial achievement in publication,
presentation, or other means of making work available for peer review is characteristic of the discipline and qualifies the member
or No
to teach and advise at the graduate level. Yes
Date
Evaluated by
(Chair’s signature)
I have read the Chair’s evaluation
Date
(faculty member’s signature)
Date
I have filed a disclaimer to the Chair’s evaluation
(faculty member’s signature)
Date
Read by Dean
(Dean’s signature)
Dean’s Comments
Date
I have read the Dean’s comments
(faculty member’s signature)
Date
I have filed a disclaimer to the Dean’s comments
(faculty member’s signature)
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xxii
APPENDIX F
FACULTY EVALUATION FLOW CHART
Chair/director writes evaluation (Spring semester, week 7)
10 days
Faculty member responds to evaluation
No disclaimer
Disclaimer
Chair/director responds to disclaimer*
Faculty member responds to chair/director
10 days
Dean receives evaluation/disclaimers/responses (if any)
3 weeks
Dean responds to evaluation including any disclaimer and response
10 days
Faculty member responds to dean**
No disclaimer
Disclaimer***
Dean Responds to disclaimer
Faculty member responds to dean
Packet forwarded to Provost
*Chair’s response may involve revising the evaluation.
**If there is to be a grievance, the time of grievable event is the acknowledgement by signature of
faculty member on Form 3 that he/she has read Dean’s comments.
***Forwarded to provost if there is a disclaimer to either chair/director’s or dean’s evaluation
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xxiii
APPENDIX G
FLOW CHART FOR TENURE AND PROMOTION RECOMMENDATIONS
TBA
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xxiv
APPENDIX H
BEST PRACTICES FOR POST – TENURE REVIEW
1. A post-tenure review system should incorporate all the indicators identified in the “Best
Practices for a Performance Review System for Faculty” document.
2. The post-tenure review should be as rigorous and comprehensive in scope as initial tenure
review.
3. The post-tenure review should incorporate annual performance reviews accumulated since
the initial tenure review or since the last post-tenure review.
4. Whereas the focus of an initial tenure review tends to be on past performance, equal emphasis
should be given to future development and potential contributions in the post-tenure review.
5. Statewide, each tenured faculty member will have a post-tenure review conducted at preestablished, published intervals of no more than six years, unless the faculty member is
participating in a development/improvement process in which case the review may be
conducted more frequently.
6. If reviews for promotion (e.g., a tenured associate professor is reviewed for promotion to
tenured full professor) fall within the appropriate time interval and encompasses all the
indicators in this document and in the “Best Practices for a Performance Review System for
Faculty” document, they may constitute a post-tenure review.
7. The post-tenure review must include evaluations from peers external to the department and/or
institution as appropriate to the role and function of each faculty member (usually to evaluate
the quality of research), as well as internal peer evaluations, student evaluations, and
administrative evaluations.
8. The post-tenure review must provide detailed information about the outcomes of any
sabbatical leave awarded during the six-year post-tenure review period.
9. The institution must identify the means by which the post-tenure review is linked with faculty
reward systems, including merit raises and promotion.
10. The institution must display a commitment to provide funds to reward high achievers on posttenure reviews as well as to provide assistance to faculty members needing improvement.
11. If a faculty member receives an unfavorable post-tenure review, the faculty member is
immediately subject to a development process as described in the “Best Practices for a
Performance Review System for Faculty”, as outlined in 10 (b) and 10 (c) of that document.
12. The institution should develop an appeals procedure for those faculty who do not agree with
the results of the post-tenure review evaluation and/or the resulting recommendations or
requirements for improvement.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xxv
APPENDIX I
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE I PETITION
Name of Petitioner ___________________________________________
In order for the Faculty Senate Advisory Committee to determine whether or not a
matter is grievable under Grievance Procedure I, you are requested to provide the
information indicated below:
1. The name(s) of the specific individuals against whom the grievance is filed.
2. The dates upon which the grievable matter occurred. ___________________________
3. The specific category or categories for Grievance Procedure I under which you believe
the matter to be grievable (please check the appropriate blank(s):
____a. Dismissal from employment with the University
____b. Termination from appointment by the university of a faculty member with tenure,
or of a non-tenured faculty member before the end of a specified term of appointment
____c. Unlawful discrimination in compensation, promotion, and/or work assignments
____d. Discrimination based on age, gender, disability, race, religion, national origin or
sexual orientation, or status as a disabled veteran or a veteran of the Vietnam era, or
discrimination prohibited by federal law or regulation.
____e. Violation of academic freedom. In addition to a. and b. above, any non-tenured
faculty member who alleges that violations of academic freedom significantly contributed
to a decision to cease, in any manner, his/her appointment with the university may file a
grievance under this grievance procedure.
4.
Please list below the supporting documents that are appended to this petition.
5. Please indicate the specific relief sought.
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xxvi
APPENDIX J
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE II PETITION
Name of Petitioner ___________________________________________
In order for the Grievance Board and/or the Provost to determine whether or not a matter is grievable you are
requested to provide the information indicated below:
1. The name(s) of the specific individuals against whom the grievance is filed.
2. The dates upon which the grievable matter occurred.
3. The specific provision(s) of Grievance Procedure II under which you believe the matter to be grievable (please
check the appropriate blank(s):
___a) the improper or unfair (to the complainant) implementation of departmental, college, or University policies
or procedures by persons authorized to implement such policies or procedures. (Please reproduce below or
provide a citation for the specific policies or procedures involved.)
___ b) the improper or unfair (to the complainant) application of recognized criteria or guidelines used in
formal review processes by persons authorized to conduct such reviews. (Please specify below or
provide a citation for the criteria or guidelines involved.)
___ c) the improper or unfair (to the complainant) assignment of professional duties by an administrator. (Please
indicate below the specific duties assigned.)
___ d) the improper or unfair appraisals (by an administrator) of the complainant's performance. (Please
indicate below the elements of performance, i.e., teaching, research, service, that have been improperly
or unfairly appraised.)
___ e) the improper or unfair denial (by an administrator) of the complainant's access to departmental, college, or
University resources. (Please specify below the nature of the resources that have been denied.)
___ f) the improper or unfair determination (by an administrator) of the complainant's salary increment.
(Please append any relevant data on this subject.)
___ g) improver or unfair treatment by faculty colleagues or supervisors that reflect serious, aggravated lack of
civility and/or lack of professional responsibility, that is ,actions, activities or behaviors which seriously
disrupt the normal workday or educational mission
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xxvii
APPENDIX J
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE II PETITION
___ h) other matters that the Provost together with the Grievance Board may determine are grievable. (Attach
proof with respect to the alleged unfairness.)
4. If one or more administrators are involved in your response to 3, above, please specify the element(s) of
impropriety or unfairness that entered into the exercise of his or her (or their) judgment(s) (e.g., favoritism to
others, prejudiced opinion of your teaching or research specialty, etc.)
5. Please list below the supporting documents that are appended to this petition.
6. Please indicate below the specific relief sought.
7. Please indicate below whether you wish this petition to be reviewed initially by the
Grievance Board or by the Provost (if reviewed by the Grievance Board, it will be later reviewed by the
Provost with the benefit of the Board's findings and recommendations).
8. Please indicate dates of the meetings with the Department Chair and the Dean.
Grievance Board _____
Provost _____
Department Chair: ___________________
Faculty Manual – July 2007
Dean: __________________________
xxviii
Grievance II
Flow Chart
45 days *
60 days
Request Meeting with Chair
Grievance Petition to Provost
15 days
Ask Provost to Decide
30 days
Refer to Grievance Board
30 days
Meet With Chair
15 days
Matter Not Resolved
Matter Resolved
Petitioner Accepts
15 days
Matter Not Resolved
Grievance Board meets and determines
**
7 days
Appeals to President
Grievable
Not Grievable
Request Meeting with Dean
7 days
15 days
30 days
Appendix J
15 days
Panel holds 1st meeting
President decides
Meeting with Dean
Panel concludes hearing phase
Matter Not Resolved
Matter Resolved
15 days
Findings and recommendations to Provost
15 days
Provost’s Decision
7 days
Appeal to President
Triple boxed items represent termination of process.
Petitioner accepts
7 days
**The Grievance process may be continued during the summer only if deemed of sufficient urgency by the Provost.
*Can be used only for non-reappointment, tenure or promotion.
President Decides
Faculty Manual – July 2007
xxix
Index
AAUP, III-1, III-2, IX-3
academic advising, VII-2, IX-5
Academic Council, VI-2, VI-4, VII-1, VII-2,
VII-4, VII-16, IX-1
academic freedom, III-1, III-2, III-3, IV-9, V-2,
VI-3, VIII-5, IX-4, IX-7
academic integrity, IX-5
Academic Integrity Committee, VII-3
Accident Review Board, VII-15
adjunct faculty, III-4
Administrative Council, VII-6
Admissions Committee, VII-3
advising, IX-5
Advisory Committee of Budget Center
Representatives, VII-15
Affirmative Action, IV-1, IV-2, VI-3, VI-4, VI6, X-1
Alcohol and Other Drugs Task Force, VII-13
Alumni Distinguished Professors, III-6, VI-1
Animal Research Committee, VII-12
annual leave, X-3
annual performance evaluation, IV-5
Assessment Committee, VII-11
assistant professor, III-4
associate professor, III-4
Athletic Council, VII-6, VII-7
attendance policy, IX-2
Board of Trustees, I-1, II-1, II-2, III-6, V-1, V-6,
VI-1, VI-2, VI-5, VI-7, VI-9, VII-1, VII-6,
VII-16, VII-17, VIII-1, VIII-5, VIII-7, X-2,
X-3
Bookstore Advisory Committee, VII-15
Calhoun Honors College Committee, VII-3
Campus Names Committee, VII-9
Chief Business Officer, VII-15
Classified Staff Senate, VI-6, VII-2, VII-6, VII8, VII-9, VII-10, VII-11, VII-14, VII-15, VII16
Clemson Will, I-1
college bylaws, VII-3, VII-16, VII-17, VII-18,
VIII-6
Commission on the Status of Black Faculty and
Staff, VII-10
Commission on the Status of Women, VII-8
consulting, X-4, X-12
Continuing Enrollment Committee, VII-3
copyright policy, X-4
Council on Graduate Studies, VII-4
Council on Undergraduate Studies, VII-2
court leave, X-4
Curriculum Committees, VII-17, VIII-1, VIII-2,
VIII-6
Faculty Manual – July 2007
Dean of Libraries, VI-2, VI-4
Dean of the Graduate School, VI-3, VII-2, VII-4,
VII-5, VII-11, IX-9
Dean of Undergraduate Studies, VI-2, VI-3, VII2, VII-11, VIII-6
deans of the colleges, VI-3
department chair, III-5, III-7, III-8, IV-1, IV-3,
IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, IV-8, IV-9, IV-10,
VI-4, VI-4,6, VI-7, VI-8, VII-17, VII-16, 18,
IX-1, IX-3, IX-8, IX-9, X-10, X-11, X-12
departmental bylaws, III-5, IV-1, IV-9, IV-10,
VI-5, VII-17
dismissal, IV-10, IV-11, IV-12
drug and alcohol policy, X-2
dual employment, IX-8
emeritus faculty, III-8, VIII-1, VIII-3
endowed chairs and titled professorships, III-6,
III-7
equal opportunity policies, X-1
ethics, IV-11
Ethics Commission, III-3
examinations and grading, IX-3
extension faculty, III-5
Faculty Activity System (FAS), IV-5
Faculty Athletics Representative, VII-7
faculty awards, III-8
Faculty Manual Editorial Consultant, II-1
Faculty Senate, V-1, V-2, V-4, V-5, V-7, VIII-6
Faculty Senate Advisory Committee, V-4
funeral leave, X-3
Graduate Academic Integrity Committee, VII-5
Graduate Admissions and Continuing
Enrollment Appeals Committee, VII-4
Graduate Advisory Committee, VII-5
Graduate Curriculum Committee, VII-4
Graduate Fellowships and Awards Committee,
VII-4
graduate study by faculty, IX-9
graduation, IX-7
Grievance Board, V-4, VIII-6
grievance procedures, V-1
holiday leave, X-4
Honorary Degrees Committee, VII-9
Human Subjects Committee, VII-12
humane care and use of animals, X-5
Innovation Fund Awards Committee, VII-11
Institutional Biosafety Committee, VII-12
instructor, III-3
Intellectual Property Committee, VII-13
Interdisciplinary curricular proposals, VII-2
lecturer, III-5
Libraries Advisory Committee, VII-10
xxix
library faculty, III-4, VI-4
Media Advisory Board, VII-13
media relations, X-12
military leave, X-4
nepotism plicy, X-2
nonacademic administration, VI-8
office hours, IX-2
Office of Access and Equity, IV-1, IV-2, IV-3,
VII-6, X-2, X-4
Office of Disability Services, IX-6
ombudsman, V-1, V-2
Parking Advisory Committee, VII-14
Parking Review Board, VII-10
part-time faculty, III-6
patent policy, X-5
post-doctoral research fellow, III-6
post tenure review, IV-8
President of the Faculty Senate, II-1, II-2, III-8,
VI-5, VII-2, VII-6, VII-8, VII-11, VII-14,
VII-16, VIII-3, VIII-4, VIII-5, X-9
President of the University, IV-7, V-2, VI-1, VI2, VI-5, VI-6, VI-8, VII-1, VII-7, VII-8, VII16, IX-8, X-9
President's Cabinet, VII-6
privacy of students, IX-4
private outside employment, X-12
professional responsibilities, IX-6
professional travel, X-4
professor, III-4
promotion, IV-10
Provost, II-1, II-2, III-3, III-4, III-5, III-6, III-7,
III-8, IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-6, IV-7, IV8, IV-10, IV-11, V-2, V-5, VI-2, VI-3, VI-4,
VI-5, VI-6, VI-8, VII-1, VII-2, VII-4, VII-10,
VII-11, VII-15, VII-16, VIII-1, VIII-2, VIII-4,
VIII-6, VIII-7, IX-9, X-3, X-12
R.O.T.C. faculty, III-4
racial harassment policy, X-2
regular faculty ranks, III-3
renewal and non-renewal of appointments, IV-6
Research Council, VII-12
research ethics, X-9
research faculty, III-5
Research Grants Committee, VII-13
resignation, IV-11
retired faculty, III-8
review of academic administrators, VI-7
sabbatical leave, IX-8
salary determination, IV-10
Scholarships and Awards Committee, VII-3
search-and-screening committee, III-6, III-7, IV1, IV-2, IV-4, VI-2, VI-6
sexual harassment policy, X-2
sick leave, X-3
Faculty Manual – July 2007
special faculty ranks, III-4
Student Affairs Student Advisory Board, VII-15
student evaluation of teaching, IV-5, IV-9, IX-6
students with disabilities, IX-6
summer employment, IX-7
syllabus, IX-2, IX-3
teaching practices, IX-2
tenure, III-3, III-4, III-5, III-7, IV-1, IV-3, IV-4,
IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, IV-8, IV-10, IV-11, VI-2,
VI-3, VI-4, VI-7, VI-8, VII-1, VII-2, VII-11,
VII-13, VII-17, VIII-1, VIII-5, VIII-6, IX-6,
X-12
TERI (Teacher and Employee Retention
Incentive), III-7
termination, IV-11, V-2
terms of appointment, IV-3
Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, VI-3,
VII-2, VII-17, VIII-6, IX-1
University Facilities Advisory Committee
(UFAC), VII-15
updating the Manual, II-1
Vending Machine Committee, VII-16
Vice President for Research and Economic
Development, VI-9, VII-11, VII-12, VII-13,
X-7, X-11
Vice President for Student Affairs, VI-8, VII-11,
VII-13, VII-14, VII-15, VII-16, IX-5
violations of the Manual, II-2
visiting faculty, III-4
workload, IX-1
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