FM 11-55 MSE
Headquarters,
Department of the Army
FIELD MANUAL
11-55
Mobile Subscriber Equipment
(MSE) Operations
Distribution Restriction:
Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
*FM 11-55
Field Manual
No 11-55
Headquarters,
Department of the Army
Washington, DC 22 June 1999
Mobile Subscriber Equipment (MSE)
Operations
Contents
Page
Preface ................................................................................................................... iv
Chapter 1
OVERVIEW OF MSE SYSTEMS........................................................................... 1-1
Background........................................................................................................... 1-1
Employment .......................................................................................................... 1-1
Major Components................................................................................................ 1-2
MSE Range Extension......................................................................................... 1-11
Chapter 2
HOW TO FIGHT WITH MSE ................................................................................. 2-1
MSE Architecture .................................................................................................. 2-1
Doctrinal Impacts................................................................................................... 2-4
Technical Impacts .................................................................................................2-5
Task Organization .................................................................................................2-6
Weighting the Main Attack..................................................................................... 2-7
Command Relationships........................................................................................ 2-8
Support Relationships............................................................................................ 2-9
Offensive Operations............................................................................................. 2-9
Defensive Operations.......................................................................................... 2-10
Support of the Separate Maneuver Brigade and Regiment................................... 2-11
Area Support Concept......................................................................................... 2-11
Split-Based Operations........................................................................................ 2-12
Grid and Enclave Networks ................................................................................. 2-13
Distribution Restriction: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.
______________________________________
*This publication supersedes FM 11-30, 27 February 1991; FM 11-37, 14 November 1990; and FM 11-38, 04
April 1991.
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FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Page
Chapter 3
ORGANIZATION AND EQUIPMENT.....................................................................3-1
Corps Signal Brigade............................................................................................. 3-1
Corps Area Signal Battalion...................................................................................3-6
Corps Support Signal Battalion............................................................................3-10
Division Signal Battalion ...................................................................................... 3-11
MSE Employment Characteristics........................................................................3-15
System Control....................................................................................................3-20
Chapter 4
OPERATIONAL DEPLOYMENT ...........................................................................4-1
Deployment ...........................................................................................................4-1
Phased Deployment .............................................................................................. 4-3
Predeployment (Phase I) .......................................................................................4-5
Installing the Backbone (Phase II)........................................................................4-19
Installing Extensions (Phase III)...........................................................................4-25
Operational Management (Phase IV)...................................................................4-27
Chapter 5
NETWORK DATABASE MANAGEMENT ............................................................. 5-1
Management and Control ......................................................................................5-1
Database Development .........................................................................................5-1
Digitized Map Requirements..................................................................................5-3
High Point Data Requirements...............................................................................5-3
Preaffiliation List Requirements..............................................................................5-4
Profile List Requirements.......................................................................................5-7
Preprogrammed Conference List Requirements................................................... 5-23
Team Label Data File Requirements....................................................................5-24
MSE Frequency Management Requirements....................................................... 5-27
Frequency Management Parameters...................................................................5-28
Chapter 6
CONTINGENCY COMMUNICATIONS PACKAGE AND THE LIGHT
CONTINGENCY COMMUNICATIONS PACKAGE ................................................6-1
Doctrinal Impacts...................................................................................................6-1
Division Signal Battalion Structure .........................................................................6-1
Equipment Capabilities .......................................................................................... 6-3
Deployment ...........................................................................................................6-3
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Page
Chapter 7
TACTICAL PACKET NETWORK.......................................................................... 7-1
Packet Switching Network..................................................................................... 7-1
Tactical Packet Network Architecture..................................................................... 7-2
AN/TYC-20 Packet Switch..................................................................................... 7-3
AN/TYC-19 Gateway Switch.................................................................................. 7-4
CV-4206/TTC Signal Data Converter..................................................................... 7-4
Hosts..................................................................................................................... 7-4
Tactical Name Server and Message Transfer Agent.............................................. 7-4
Physical Interfaces ................................................................................................ 7-5
X.25 Interfaces...................................................................................................... 7-5
Internet Protocol Address...................................................................................... 7-6
Host Registration................................................................................................... 7-7
Network Management ........................................................................................... 7-8
Chapter 8
ASYNCHRONOUS TRANSFER MODE SWITCH.................................................. 8-1
Basic Asynchronous Transfer Mode Technology................................................... 8-1
Functions .............................................................................................................. 8-2
Deployment........................................................................................................... 8-3
Operational Software............................................................................................. 8-5
Operational Procedures......................................................................................... 8-5
Tactics and Techniques......................................................................................... 8-7
High-Speed Multiplexer ......................................................................................... 8-8
Enhanced Transmission Group Modem and Orderwire.......................................... 8-8
Appendix A
MSE SYMBOLOGY AND EQUIPMENT NOMENCLATURE................................. A-1
Appendix B
MSE INTEROPERABILITY .................................................................................. B-1
Appendix C
COMMUNICATIONS SECURITY OPERATIONS ................................................. C-1
Appendix D
HIGH-SPEED MULTIPLEXER ............................................................................. D-1
Glossary
................................................................................................................. Glossary-1
Bibliography
............................................................................................................Bibliography-1
Index
...................................................................................................................... Index-1
iii
Preface
This manual provides doctrine for planning the employment, deployment, and
management of Mobile Subscriber Equipment (MSE) networks. It builds on the
knowledge the reader has acquired on MSE from attending the Signal Officer Basic
Course (SOBC), Signal Officer Advanced Course (SOAC), and MSE System Control
Center-2 (SCC-2) Operations Course. It focuses on MSE at corps and division levels and
covers the intended use of equipment. Signal operations may be somewhat different from
one unit to the next, so this manual presents various types of operations.
Signaleers must be familiar with the doctrine described in Field Manual (FM) 100-5 and
FM 101-5 to maximize the communications services provided by the MSE system.
The proponent of this publication is the United States Army Signal Center. Send
comments and recommendations on DA Form 2028 directly to Commander, United
States Army Signal Center and Fort Gordon, ATTN: ATZH-CDD (Doctrine Branch), Fort
Gordon, Georgia 30905-5090 or via e-mail to doctrine@emh.gordon.army.mil. Key
comments and recommendations to pages and lines of text to which they apply. If
DA Form 2028 is not available, a letter is acceptable. Provide reasons for your comments
to ensure complete understanding and proper evaluation.
Unless this publication states otherwise, masculine nouns and pronouns
do not refer exclusively to men.
iv
Chapter 1
Overview of MSE Systems
This chapter gives a brief overview of the mobile subscriber equipment
(MSE) systems and range extension capabilities.
BACKGROUND
1-1. MSE is a common-user, switched communications system of linked
switching nodes. The nodes form a grid that provides the force with an area
common-user system (ACUS). It is one of the major communications systems
of an Army force at echelons corps and below (ECB). The other major
communications systems include combat net radio (CNR) and the Enhanced
Position Location Reporting System (EPLRS).
1-2. The MSE system is digital, secure, and flexible. It contains features that
compensate for link or functional element outages, overload in traffic, and
rapid movement of users. MSE provides voice and data communications on
an automatic, discrete-addressed, fixed-directory basis using the flood search
routing technique. MSE supports mobile and wire subscribers with a means
to exchange command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence
(C4I) information. A tactical packet network (TPN) is a packet switching
network that is overlaid on the circuit-switching network of MSE.
1-3. MSE mounts in shelters on high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles
(HMMWVs) and is easily transportable by roll-on and roll-off aircraft.
Organic tactical satellite (TACSAT) equipment and tropospheric scatter
(tropo) equipment provide range extension capabilities for MSE. Range
extension improves the employment capability of MSE.
1-4. Integrated system control (ISYSCON) enhances the system control
(SYSCON) component of MSE. ISYSCON provides the signal commander and
his staff with an automated capability to plan, engineer, and operate all
communications systems and networks available to the signal force.
ISYSCON also integrates the signal force structure into the Army Battle
Command System (ABCS) to support mission plan management (MPM).
EMPLOYMENT
1-5. MSE can support a corps of five divisions in an area of operations (AO)
up to 15,000 square miles by forming a grid network. For a division, the MSE
grid consists of four to six node centers (NCs) that make up the backbone of
the network. For the corps, the grid consists of 22 NCs. Throughout the
maneuver area, subscribers connect to the small extension nodes/large
extension nodes (SENs/LENs) by radio or wire. These extension nodes serve
as local call switching centers and provide access to the network by
connecting to the node center switch (NCS) at the NC.
1-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
1-6. The TPN supports data communications within the corps, joint task
force (JTF), adjacent forces, echelons above corps (EAC) assets, North
Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) forces, and commercial networks. See
Appendix A for MSE symbology and equipment nomenclature.
MAJOR COMPONENTS
1-7. MSE has various integrated components to ensure mobile and static
subscribers have voice, data, and facsimile capabilities. These capabilities
support the subscribers’ communications no matter where they are in the
MSE grid network of the AO. MSE major components include–
• NC.
• LEN.
• SEN.
• Radio access unit (RAU).
• ISYSCON.
• System control center-2 (SCC-2).
• Line-of-sight (LOS) radio system (components of the switches).
• Subscriber terminals.
• Mobile subscriber radiotelephone terminal (MSRT).
NC
1-8. NCs provide key switching, traffic control, and access points for MSE.
After determining the coverage area, NCs are allocated to establish a corps
MSE grid network. NCs are primarily linked by LOS radios to provide
communications throughout the system via the NCS. TACSAT and tropo are
connected to the NCs by cable. If one NC is disabled, the system
automatically routes communications through another NC.
1-9. The NCS serves as an access point for LENs, SENs, RAUs, SCC-2s, and
ISYSCON. Figure 1-1 shows NCS features. The NCS is the hub of the MSE
node and provides network interface for subscriber access elements. It
provides automatic subscriber finding features that allow permanent address
assignment and removes the requirement of knowing where the subscriber is
physically located. It is contained in three S-250 shelters: the switching
group, the operations group, and the node management facility (NMF). Each
shelter is mounted on an M-1097 HMMWV. The switching group provides the
external interface, circuit switching, and associated functions. The operations
group provides central processing and operator interface functions.
1-2
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
NCS, AN/TTC-47
Switching Group, ON-306/AN/TTC-47
Operations Group, OL-413/AN/TTC-47
NMF, AN/TSQ-154
TPN
• One gateway packet switch per NCS
• Two LAN ports (both 802.3 and X.25)
• 64 trunks of 16 kbps each on the 1024 kbps trunk group
between one NCS and another
External terminations
• Digital: Trunks and local loops
• Analog: NATO applications
• 16 DTGs, 15 of which are encrypted by TEDs
TGCs
• Five internodal.
• Six SEN TGCs (two local)
Two RAU TGCs (one local)
Four DTGs assignable to any combination of internodal, LEN, SEN,
SCC-2, or RAU TGCs
24 local loops for digital telephones
10 kW diesel generator, PU-753/M or PU-798
Figure 1-1. NCS Features
LEN
1-10. The LEN provides wired communications for personnel at large
command posts (CPs). A LEN enables up to 164 wired subscribers to
communicate freely through the large extension node switch (LENS) using
automatic flood search routing. Subscribers have access to the NCs and to the
rest of MSE via LOS radios that connect to the LENS by cable or super high
frequency (SHF) radio systems. Figure 1-2 gives the LENS features.
1-11. The LENS also provides automatic subscriber finding features that
allow permanent subscriber address assignment and removes the
requirement of knowing where the subscriber is physically located. It consists
of two S-250 shelters containing a switching group and an operations group.
Each shelter is mounted on an M-1097 HMMWV. The LENS is configured
basically the same as the NCS. Differences include the configurations for
terminating trunks. The LEN is not a tandem switch because it is not used
primarily as an intermediate switching point between other switching
centers. The LENS supports flood search routing. The switching group
provides the external interface, circuit switching, and associated functions.
The operations group provides central processing and operator interface
functions. The LENSs can enable CNR users to enter the MSE network and
can provide access to commercial networks.
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FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
LENS, AN/TCC-46
Switching Group, ON-305/AN/TTC-46
Operations Group, OL-412/AN/TTC-46
TPN
•
•
•
•
Two packet switches per LENS
Four LAN ports (both 802.3 and X.25)
Seven conditioned diphase X.25 ports
32 trunks of 16 kbps each or two 512 kbps trunk groups between the
LEN and two NCSs
External terminations
• Digital: Trunks and local terminations
• Analog: Commercial telephone
Three DTGs encrypted by TEDs, KG-194A
• Two DTGs to two different NCs
• One DTG assignable to a SEN
CNR interface capability
10 kW diesel generator, PU-753/M or PU-798
Figure 1-2. LENS Features
SEN
1-12. The SEN supports the communications needs of smaller CPs. The
AN/TTC-48(V1) can support 26 wired subscribers and the (V2) can support 41
subscribers. Users have access to NCs and to the rest of MSE via LOS radios
that connect to the small extension node switch (SENS) by cable or SHF radio
systems. Figure 1-3 gives SENS features.
1-13. The SEN also provides automatic subscriber finding features when
connected to an NCS or a LEN. These features allow permanent subscriber
address assignment, and they remove the requirement of knowing where the
subscriber is physically located. The SEN is in one S-250E shelter mounted
on an M-1097 HMMWV. The SEN consists of switching, multiplexing, and
communications security (COMSEC) equipment. It is available in two
versions: (V1) and (V2). Both versions provide two commercial office
interfaces and a secure digital net radio interface (SDNRI) using the SDNRI
unit (SDNRIU), KY-90. The SENS interfaces with the NCS and LENS
directly via CX-11230A/G cable, LOS multichannel radio, or multichannel
TACSAT.
1-4
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
SENS, AN/TCC-48
TPN
•
•
•
•
One packet switch per SENS
Two LAN ports (both 802.3 and X.25)
Five conditioned diphase X.25 ports
16 trunks of 16 kbps each on the 256 kbps trunk group between
the NCSs or LEN
External terminations
• Digital: Trunks and local terminations
• Analog: Commercial telephone
Two digital switch versions:
• Switch V1: 26 digital terminations
• Switch V2: 41 digital terminations
Two small switchboards (SB-4303)
One DTG
• Switch V1: 12 channels to NC or LEN
• Switch V2: 15 channels to NC or LEN
• Two commercial drops
CNR interface capability
10 kW diesel generator, PU-753/M
Figure 1-3. SENS Features
RAU
1-14. The RAU picks up signals from the MSRT and sends them to the NCs.
When a mobile user moves out of range of one RAU and into another, the
telephone service automatically transfers to the next (new) and into the
range of another RAU, thus providing automatic reaffiliation. Any
subsequent calls will be placed through the system via the new RAU
ensuring full and continuous functional affiliation throughout the AO. Figure
1-4 gives RAU features.
1-15. The RAU, AN/TRC-191, is a fully automatic radio interface for MSRT
subscribers. The RAU connects directly to the NC by cable or remotely via
LOS radio. Through the parent NC, the local RAU provides radio coverage by
automatically establishing secure and full-duplex communications between
the MSRT and the MSE network. The planning range between the MSRT
and RAU is 15 kilometers (9.3 miles). Terrain and weather will affect the
actual range.
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FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
RAU, AN/TRC-191
Eight digital radios, RT-1539
Capacity of eight simultaneous MSRT calls
One DTG of 256 kbps using 10 channels to NC
Frequency range
OCONUS:
30-88 MHz
CONUS:
30-50 MHz
30-35 MHz low band
40-45 MHz high band
Full duplex (uses high band/low band concept for simultaneous transmit/
receive)
5 kW diesel generator, PU-751/M or PU-797
Figure 1-4. RAU Features
ISYSCON
1-16. ISYSCON enables the commander to interact with ABCS by
exchanging common battle command information with the force commander
and his staff and by exchanging communications information with maneuver
force signal officers. ISYSCON uses common hardware and software (CHS)
for its workstations. The software meets the Department Information
Infrastructure (DII) common operating environment (COE) standards for
information exchange. ISYSCON is a suite of hardware and software in an S250 or a standard integrated command post system (SICPS) shelter, and it is
transported by heavy HMMWVs.
1-17. ISYSCON extends to other ISYSCONs through the NC from ECB to
EAC providing a complete, integrated network picture. ISYSCON will also
extend to the Theater Signal Command (Army) (TSC(A)) ISYSCON and to
the Joint Network Management System (JNMS). ISYSCON provides the
tools to perform the information management process by automating the
following functions:
• Network planning and engineering (NPE).
• Wide area network (WAN) management.
• MPM.
• Battlefield spectrum management (BSM).
• COMSEC management.
• System administration.
• Local area management (LAN).
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__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
SCC-2
1-18. The existing MSE SYSCON capability is the SCC-2, AN/TYQ-46(V). It
monitors, manages, and configures the MSE network (voice and data) for
optimum communications. Figure 1-5 gives SCC-2 features and capabilities.
SCC-2, AN/TYQ-46(V)
Large-screen display
Digitized topographical maps
TPN management/planning
Frequency management/planning/distribution
Automatic updating of standby SCC-2
Figure 1-5. SCC-2 Features and Capabilities
1-19. The SCC-2 is an integrated, computerized communications control
system that provides automated, near real-time system control to support
planning, configuring, reconfiguring, and monitoring the operation and
movement of MSE assets. The SCC-2 normally connects to an NCS or LENS
using CX-11230A/G pulse code modulation (PCM) cable.
1-20. The SCC-2 comes in two versions: (V1) and (V2). Version 1 at corps
consists of three shelters: one technical and two management/planning
shelters. Version 2 is a stand-alone workstation for the corps area and
support signal battalions. The SCC-2 at division consists of two shelters: one
technical and one management/planning.
1-21. The technical shelter contains a network management center (NMC)
workstation and a technical workstation that provides a near real-time
graphic display of the MSE network. The NMC monitors and controls the
TPN. The primary function of the technical workstation is to monitor and to
assign management functions. The network planners working inside the
management/planning shelter complete the following functions–
• Deployment management.
• SCC-2 supervision and management.
• Boundaries management.
• COMSEC key management.
• Very high frequency (VHF) management.
• Ultra high frequency (UHF)/SHF management.
• Subscriber database management.
• Message management.
1-22. The management/planning shelter houses two system management
workstations. These workstations provide a near real-time graphic display of
the MSE network and the automated tools necessary to create and change
databases required for MSE operations.
1-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
1-23. The network planning tool (NPT) with its planning and management
functions supports the SCC-2. The NPT provides improved NPE and
operational automated information management capabilities. The enhanced
NPE and operational functions of the NPT include–
• Environmental parameters.
• Digitized mapping.
• Radio/antenna system engineering.
• Terrain analysis profiling.
• System asset placement.
• Frequency assignment management (VHF, UHF, SHF).
• Team information.
• One-on-one interference analysis.
• Electronic warfare (EW) threat analysis.
• Subscriber list management.
• Word processing program.
• Spreadsheet program.
• Electronic mail (e-mail) program.
• Packet network monitoring.
1-24. The SCC-2 includes the following functional software tools:
• NPE for MSE assets.
• BSM.
• MSE WAN management.
• System administration.
• E-mail.
1-25. The ISYSCON program will field the system in a variety of
configurations. The ISYSCON(V1) will consist of two servers, four
workstations, and ten remotes. The ISYSCON(V1) will reside at the corps
signal brigade and the division signal battalions. The ISYSCON(V2) will
consist of two servers, two workstations, and five remotes. The ISYSCON(V2)
will reside at the corps area signal battalion. The ISYSCON(V1) will replace
the SCC-2.
LOS RADIO SYSTEM
1-26. The LOS radio system consists of versatile links that connect all NCs in
a grid network and provides automatic switched services to all wire and
mobile subscribers. This radio grid delivers wireless communications to areas
covering thousands of square kilometers. The LOS radio system, AN/TRC190(V), has four versions. Figure 1-6 shows its design features.
1-8
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
LOS Radio, AN/TRC-190(V)
Radio, AN/GRC-226(V) equipped with a digital group multiplexer
Two NATO frequency bands
• Band 1: 225-400 MHz
• Band 3: 1350-1850 MHz
Nominal range: 25-40 kilometers
5 kW diesel generator, PU-751/M
Four versions
• AN/TRC-190(V1)
• AN/TRC-190(V2)
• AN/TRC-190(V3)
• AN/TRC-190(V4)
Figure 1-6. LOS Radio Features
1-27. The AN/TRC-190(V1) is an LOS multichannel radio terminal. It
provides point-to-point UHF radio links using the AN/GRC-226(P) radio set
between various nodes of the MSE system. If the AN/TRC-190(V1) has an
AN/GRC-224(P) radio set installed, it can provide a short-range and a pointto-point SHF radio link. The SHF radio functions as a short-range, down-thehill (DTH) radio providing a low signature connection between the sheltered
CP site and the more exposed LOS terminal site. Each radio link supports a
single, full-duplex, group-level connection and a single digital voice orderwire
(DVOW) channel. The (V1) is equipped with one AB-1339 mast with Band I
and Band III antennas. The planning range of the UHF radio is 40
kilometers (28 miles). The (V1) typically deploys with the SENS or remote
RAU.
1-28. The AN/TRC-190(V2) is an LOS multichannel radio terminal. It
provides point-to-point UHF radio links using the AN/GRC-226(P) radio set
between various nodes of the MSE system. If the AN/TRC-190(V2) has an
AN/GRC-224(P) radio set installed, it can provide a short-range and a pointto-point SHF radio link. The SHF radio set operates in tandem with the
primary UHF radio link. Each radio link supports a single, full-duplex,
group-level connection and a single DVOW channel. The (V2) is equipped
with two AN/GRC-226(P) radio sets (one on-line and one spare) and one AB1339 mast with Band I and Band III antennas. The planning range of the
UHF radio is 40 kilometers (28 miles). The (V2) typically deploys as an
analog interface to NATO forces.
1-29. The AN/TRC-190(V3) is an LOS multichannel radio terminal. It
provides point-to-point UHF radio links using the AN/GRC-226(P) radio set
between various nodes of the MSE system. If the AN/TRC-190(V3) has an
AN/GRC-224(P) radio set installed, it can provide a short-range and a pointto-point SHF radio link. The SHF radio set operates in tandem with the
primary UHF radio link. The SHF radio functions as a short-range radio link
providing connectivity for CPs. Each radio link supports a single, full-duplex,
group-level connection and a single DVOW channel. The (V3) is equipped
1-9
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
with four AN/GRC-226(P) radio sets (two on-line and one spare) and three
AB-1339 masts with two Band I and two Band III antennas. The planning
range of the UHF radio is 40 kilometers (28 miles). The (V3) typically deploys
with the NCS and is a radio relay.
1-30. The AN/TRC-190(V4) is an LOS multichannel radio terminal. It
provides point-to-point UHF radio links using the AN/GRC-226(P) radio set
between various nodes of the MSE system. Each radio link supports a single,
full-duplex, group-level connection and a single DVOW channel. If the
AN/TRC-190(V4) has an AN/GRC-224(P) radio set installed, it can provide a
short-range, DTH, and a point-to-point SHF radio link. The (V4) is equipped
with two AN/GRC-226(P) radio sets (two on-line) and two AB-1339 masts
with Band I and Band III antennas. The planning range of the UHF radio is
40 kilometers (28 miles). The (V4) typically deploys with the LENS.
MSRT
1-31. MSE network users gain mobile access using the MSRT (AN/VRC-97)
through the RAU by affiliating onto the network. MSRTs can receive or send
voice, facsimile, or data traffic. The planning range between the MSRT and
RAU is 15 kilometers (9.3 miles). Terrain and weather will affect the actual
range.
SUBSCRIBER TERMINALS
1-32. MSE users initiate and end all communications by using subscriber
terminals. The terminals are described below.
1-33. The digital nonsecure voice terminal (DNVT), TA-1035-U, provides
voice and data access to the MSE network. Its features include–
• Handset.
• Keypad.
• Digital transmission (16 kilobits per second (kbps)).
• Four wire with data port to interface with computer/facsimile (FAX).
• Compatibility with other terminals.
1-34. The digital subscriber voice terminal (DSVT), KY-68, provides secure
access to MSE for all mobile or fixed subscribers. It functions closely to the
DNVT, and its features are the same.
1-35. The FAX terminal, AN/UXC-7, transmits critical information such as
overlays, diagrams, and handwritten messages over the system in seconds.
Ruggedized versions are usable with both DNVTs and DSVTs. Its features
include–
• Digital transmission (16 kbps).
• Black and white copy with eight shades of gray.
• Standard issue paper usage.
• Embedded memory with burst transmission.
• NATO interoperable.
1-10
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
FORCE ENTRY SWITCH (FES)
1-36. The FES combines the essential functions of the NCS/LEN/NMF
shelters and a RAU in one shelter. The FES combined with an LOS
AN/TRC-198 comprises the contingency communications package (CCP). The
connections between the FES and the LOS are by cable since no SHF is
supplied. The FES has packet switch capability, but it has no gateway
function. Therefore, it has no direct connections to adjacent corps or EAC.
The FES can be operator-controlled outside the shelter by a dismountable
node management facility (DNMF) remote terminal. Figure 1-7 gives the FES
features.
FES
One packet switch
Ports for two LANs and six X.25 local hosts
One dial-in port
Dismounted CNR interface
Downsized RAU capability for up to 25 subscribers
Figure 1-7. FES Features
1-37. The FES provides full flood search capability via the downsize routing
subsystem (RSS-D), an SHF interface capability, and a DSVT in the truck.
The line termination unit (LTU) provides modem/multiplex functions for the
local subscriber interface and is equipped with a rear terminal board to
permit direct connections instead of the J-1077.
1-38. The LOS AN/TRC-198 is similar to an LOS(V3), except that the LOS
AN/TRC-198 UHF radios operate on three separate link connections to the
FES (no multiplex) and all links operate on either band.
MSE RANGE EXTENSION
1-39. The corps signal brigade has a range extension company that allows
the grid network to flex with the dynamics of rapidly changing tactical
operations. Range-extension packages are organic to this company and deploy
according to mission, enemy, terrain, troops, and time available (METT-T)
needs. The range extension company has one TACSAT platoon and four tropo
platoons. Range-extension packages have two transmission media forms:
TACSAT and light tropo. Both are vehicular mounted, air transportable, and
have multichannel capability. Satellite availability determines the TACSAT
range. The tropo range is about 160.9 kilometers (100 miles).
1-11
Chapter 2
How to Fight with MSE
This chapter gives an architectural overview of the MSE system, and
covers the doctrinal and technical impacts it creates. It also covers the
techniques and procedures for tactical MSE employment which establish
its use as a combat multiplier. Success during the full range of military
operations, including military operations other than war (MOOTW),
requires synchronization to support the requirements of all automated
information systems (AISs). MSE provides a flexible, secure, and reliable
means for the warfighter to synchronize the activities of his force.
MSE ARCHITECTURE
2-1. As the corps commander maneuvers combat units, the MSE network
deploys to support these elements. The direction of maneuver and the
location of combat, combat support (CS), and combat service support (CSS)
units dictate the placement of communications units. MSE supports force
subscribers at echelons from corps through battalion CPs. However, as the
mission dictates, MSE will provide air defense artillery (ADA) support to
elements lower than battalion echelons.
2-2. The MSE network is a nodal switched voice and data communications
system that is extended by a radiotelephone to provide area coverage. MSE is
part of a three-tier communications network. It ties into the Tri-Service
Tactical Communications (TRI-TAC) tier supporting the EAC network at
selected NCs. MSE also provides CNR users with an interface to the ACUS
via SDNRIU. This capability links Single-Channel Ground and Airborne
Radio System (SINCGARS) users with telephone subscribers which provides
an added method of communication for maneuver units. FM 11-32 covers the
planning and operation of the SDNRI capability. Figure 2-1 shows the
architecture of the MSE network.
2-3. NCSs are arrayed from the corps rear boundary forward to the
maneuver brigade based on geographic and subscriber density factors. NCSs
provide the entire corps with connectivity and switching capability. NCs are
somewhat independent of the existing command structures. Normally, not all
NCs are committed at any given time. This gives SYSCON the flexibility to
change MSE to meet the operational mission. The corps signal brigade can
deploy 22 NCs, and each division signal battalion can deploy 4 to 6 NCs. Each
NC must connect to at least 3 other NCs to provide route path survivability.
This forms the backbone grid network.
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FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
ADJACENT
DIVISION
INSTALL INTERNODAL LINKS
EAC
ADJACENT
CORPS
XX
SCC-2
NRI
XXX
SCC-2
XXX
SNS
XX
SCC-2
SCC-2
LDR
PNS
XXX
NRI
NRI
NRI
LDR
XX
LDR
XX
X
EAC
SCC-2
ADJACENT
CORPS
NRI
Depicts NC Backbone
XX
NC
RAU
LEN
SEN
Area Node
TTC-39A(V1)
ADJACENT
DIVISION
Figure 2-1. MSE System Architecture
2-4. The standard five-division corps MSE network can serve up to 26,100
subscribers from battalion through corps. This includes–
• 8,200 DNVT subscribers.
• 1,900 MSRT subscribers.
• 16,000 data subscribers.
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2-5. Figure 2-2 shows the MSE architecture divided into three layers. The
upper layer is backbone structure that consists of interconnected NCs. The
middle layer consists of LENs and SENs that provide CPs with network
access. The bottom layer consists of static (wire line) and mobile subscribers.
Up to 264 SENs and 9 LENs can deploy to support the corps. Typically, a
SEN serves a brigade headquarters, separate battalion, or CP. Each of the
112 RAUs (13 in each division and 47 in the corps) support from 20 to 25
mobile subscribers.
XXX
XX
X
XX
XXX
X
X
XX
XX
= Backbone Structure
= Active Link
= Standby Link
NC
SEN
LEN
RAU
Figure 2-2. MSE Architecture Layers
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2-6. The NCs serve as hubs for the entire nodal system. The LENs and SENs
are extension nodes that branch off these NCs. The extension nodes provide
voice, data, and facsimile communications to corps, division, and brigade CPs.
LOS UHF radio links provide connectivity among NCs and from NCs to
LENs and SENs. This architecture furnishes all MSE subscribers with
automatic switching. Each NCS platoon has net radio interface (NRI)
capabilities.
2-7. A five-division corps MSE network has seven SCC-2s, two at the corps
signal brigade headquarters and one each in the division signal battalions.
The SCC-2 determines, with input from unit deputy G6/S6, where the NRI
can best serve the subscriber. A LEN or SEN can have the NRI installed. The
SCC-2 is an integral element of SYSCON. The SCC-2 directs network
management and connects to host NCs by cable.
2-8. Mobile subscribers with MSRTs can access the MSE network via a RAU.
Any subscriber in the network can be called by simply dialing the subscribers’
number regardless of location. The mobile subscriber can talk while on the
move, as long as one of the corps deployed RAUs is providing radio coverage.
While moving from one RAU’s range to another, the MSRT in the users
vehicle automatically searches for the nearest RAU’s beacon signal to
maintain affiliation. This does not require operator intervention.
DOCTRINAL IMPACTS
2-9. MSE supports the corps and divisions’communications requirements on
the battlefield. MSE also provides links with the theater communications
system and to EAC elements, as required. MSE furnishes CP
communications to maneuver brigades and mobile subscriber radiotelephone
service to maneuver battalions well forward into the maneuver area. It
provides continuous and in-depth communications during force and CP
movement. MSE small wire and cable requirements reduce CP setup and tear
down times. Flood search ensures network survivability in spite of damage,
overload, and changes in subscriber locations. The RAU provides MSRT
connectivity for mobile subscribers when extension nodes and CPs move.
2-10. MSE provides improved network access for units due to the increase of
node entry points over the previous ACUS. Units no longer need to cluster
together for system service as before. The essential user bypass (EUB) allows
continued subscriber services for critical users if their parent NCS cannot
provide call processing. Centralized network management helps the corps
signal brigade commander maintain technical control (TECHCON) over all
corps assets. Uniform technical operating standards for the corps network
must be developed through effective standing operating procedures (SOPs). A
solid working relationship among corps, division, and maneuver brigade
signal planning staffs is crucial for success.
2-11. MSE provides a seamless network between corps and divisions.
Common equipment and team structure allow corps elements to reinforce
division units. Signal planners must deploy MSE assets to best support the
intent of the corps and division commanders. The corps often operates in
division areas, proving the need for uniform SOPs throughout the corps.
Subscriber equipment is user owned and operated. The signal battalion or
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brigade is not responsible for customer education; however, signal officers
should be prepared to advise on how to accomplish customer education.
2-12. The maneuver brigade/battalion S6 performs critical functions for
signal network managers. These functions include–
• Training users.
• Defining customer needs.
• Coordinating detailed unit communications and data requirements.
• Distributing COMSEC keys and frequencies.
• Identifying subscriber problems accurately.
• Ensuring troubleshooting is a coordinated effort.
• Ensuring subscribers install WF-16 field wire properly.
• Coordinating all jump locations
2-13. The NPT provides automation support for many signal planning and
engineering functions. These include profiling, producing annexes for
operation orders (OPORDs) and fragmentary orders (FRAGOs), frequency
management, some network functions, some equipment/team status
functions, and some COMSEC functions. The SCC-2 further enhances the
NPE capability and provides for MPM. Effective MPM depends on
exchanging information between all signal staffs. Signal support platoon
leaders and the S6 customers must maintain a close working relationship to
provide efficient communications service.
TECHNICAL IMPACTS
2-14. In the MSE system, the hardware and software determine call routing,
switch trunk capacity, and signaling characteristics. This allows signal
planners to manage more assets. Only in special cases (such as non-MSE
gateways) do signal planners make these decisions.
2-15. Flood search routing will automatically route calls over the most
optimum path on a call-by-call basis between any two end points within the
area of coverage. This omits the need for switch routing tables. When a call
request is not on the switch’s directory list, a call initiate search message for
that number is sent out to each adjacent NCS and LENS. Thus, the
procedures discussed below are implemented.
2-16. Each NCS/LEN receiving a search message checks its subscriber
affiliation table for the called directory number. If the called party is not
affiliated at that switch, the search message is automatically forwarded to all
other connected NCSs.
2-17. Then, the NCS marks the path (but does not reserve it) for possible
routing. However, the LEN does not forward search messages received from
NCSs. This prevents tandem traffic through the LEN. At the terminating
switch, where the called party is affiliated, a return message is sent back
toward the originating switch over the marked routing path. The originating
switch then broadcasts end-of-routing messages to all connected nodes. In
turn, the uninvolved switches in the marked path can clear their routing
registers of the call attempt.
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FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
2-18. Imposed restrictions on the broadcast of search messages regulate
networkwide traffic and provide call precedence. A threshold level is
periodically determined for each interswitch link. Search messages are sent
only if the precedence level is equal to or higher than the current threshold
level for that link. Search messages are sent to connected switches in a mostidle or preemptable-trunk order that automatically selects the route. This
reduces network congestion. A search message is never sent over a link in
which trunks are not available.
2-19. Common-user switching uses a fixed numbering plan; however, units
must maintain and publish directories.
2-20. The MSE network has a packet switch network overlay called the TPN.
It provides needed data communications in the tactical environment at ECB.
The TPN is fully compliant with the US Army’s packet switch network. The
TPN is overlaid on the voice network without competing for access needed to
maintain MSE voice traffic.
2-21. MSE meets the requirements to interface with other communications
systems. See Appendix B for a detailed discussion of MSE interoperability.
These systems include–
• The Improved Army Tactical Communications System (IATACS).
• The TRI-TAC system.
• The Tactical Internet (TI).
• Joint services.
• Data communications systems.
• NATO systems.
• Allied military systems.
• Host-nation commercial telephone systems.
• The Defense Information System Network (DISN).
2-22. Signal network planners and managers must have a clear
understanding of MSE capabilities and limitations. TM 11-5800-216-10
volumes 1 through 4 contain technical information on MSE for planners and
managers. MSE assemblages meet the roll-on/roll-off requirement for air
movement. Existing aircraft can transport HMMWV mounted shelters
without structure or weight changes.
TASK ORGANIZATION
2-23. Signal assets should organize early in the planning process and should
deploy with their supported organization when appropriate. This ensures an
understanding of en route mission planning changes and provides immediate
communications to the supported unit. All units will have their SEN teams
linked before deploying. Selected CPs that depart ahead of all other assets
should link with their SEN teams before leaving their home station. The
maturity of the theater of operations will assist in determining the best
course of action for supporting the supported unit’s communications needs.
Corps signal assets attached to division units should link as soon as possible.
However, signal planners must still consider the immature-theater and early
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entry at EAC and ECB. Task organizing too early may limit flexibility if the
main effort shifts from one maneuver unit to another. Pre-task organized
units IAW their SOP will minimize any risks. A solid understanding of the
corps’contingency plans (CONPLANs) is imperative to ensure all prospects
are considered before attaching significant numbers of communications
assets to any single division.
WEIGHTING THE MAIN ATTACK
2-24. The main attack must be weighted and can be done in many ways.
Weighting can be obtained by the direct support (DS) of additional NCs from
corps to division, DS of medium- and long-haul communications assets,
placement of additional assets in certain areas, and increasing network
connectivity. The theory is that it is easier to move a pre-positioned NC than
to jump one currently in use. However, an NC from another division can be
attached under the direction of the G3, if required. Then, the intent is to
leapfrog NCs to keep up with the tempo of the battle as shown in Figure 2-3.
RELIEF IN PLACE
X XX
XX
LEAPFROG
IN-ECHELON
SECTOR
LEAPFROG
OUT-OF-ECHELON
SECTOR
X XX
NC
Figure 2-3. Maneuver (Weighting the Main Attack)
2-25. Tropo and multichannel satellite terminals can terminate or extend
special circuits. They also can terminate long locals or dial and hold circuits
from EAC or joint service switches. These circuits include–
• Tactical Data Information Link (TADIL) to support ADA data
transfer.
• Contingency Tactical Air Control Planning System (CTAPS).
• Secure Internet Protocol Router Network (SIPRNET).
• Nonsecure Internet Protocol Router Network (NIPRNET).
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FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
• Joint Worldwide Intelligence Community System (JWICS).
• Automatic Digital Network (AUTODIN).
• DISN.
• Defense Messaging System (DMS), when fielded.
• Global Command and Control System-Army (GCCS-A).
COMMAND RELATIONSHIPS
2-26. Signal units must clearly understand the doctrinal terminology for
command relationships. FM 101-5-1 provides the Army definition for these
important terms. In most cases, the Army definition applies directly to signal
units. The terms attached and operational control (OPCON) are standard
Army terms. TECHCON is a new term that describes the situation unique to
signal operations. The terms are defined below.
ATTACHED
2-27. In signal operations, a signal company from a corps signal battalion
may attach to a division signal battalion. The gaining commander exercises
the same degree of command and control (C2) and the responsibility for the
attached unit, as he does over units organic to his command. Attachment
orders must clearly state additional responsibilities, such as the Uniform
Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) and administrative and support
responsibilities. When medium- or long-haul communications assets are
attached to division signal battalions from corps signal units, the gaining
commander maintains authority for their employment. While attachment is
usually temporary, careful consideration must be used in determining when
to attach signal assets. Once employed on the battlefield and integrated into
the network, it is not easy to shift control of previously attached units
immediately upon the revocation of attachment orders.
OPCON
2-28. This is the authority delegated to a commander to direct forces
assigned so the commander may accomplish specific missions or tasks that
are usually limited by function, time, or location; to deploy units concerned,
and to retain or assign tactical control of those units. Signal units primarily
use OPCON for movement. From both a division and corps perspective, NCs
are OPCONed to maneuver brigades, armored cavalry regiments (ACRs), or
other units for movement only. This occurs when these units are responsible
for movement along designated routes or corridors and must control all units
in their area for movement. Once NCs move forward and position in their
designated locations, the OPCON relationship terminates. Usually, OPCON
is not used for any other purposes.
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TECHCON
2-29. In signal operations, TECHCON provides the authority to control the
technical aspects of the engineering and operation of the assigned portion of a
communications network. There are several applications of TECHCON. NCs
have control over all links coming from their extension nodes and remote
RAUs. The link designator establishes control of internodal links. For
example, if the link designator for an internodal link is 0712, then NC 07 is
the controlling end of the link and has master control over the link. NCs can
be placed under battalion control (BATCON) of a signal battalion that is not
its parent. For instance, an NC from a corps signal battalion is placed under
the control of a different battalion and is considered TECHCONed to that
battalion. TECHCON gives the controlling battalion the authority over all
technical aspects of the NC operation. The term BATCON applies to the S3
staff operations of the battalions making up the corps signal brigade. The
controlling battalion under the area support concept normally provides
logistical support.
SUPPORT RELATIONSHIPS
2-30. Signal units must clearly understand doctrinal terminology for support
relationships. Effective support relationships are critical to the sustainment
of an effective communications network. FM 101-5-1 provides the Army
definition for these important terms. DS and general support (GS) are
defined below.
DS
2-31. In managing all communications networks, DS relationships are
frequently established. The doctrinal definition applies. Communications
assets can be placed in DS of other signal units. SENs are provided logistical
support by the supporting unit, but remain under the TECHCON of their
unit. Logistical support from the supported unit is typically coordinated on a
case by case basis.
GS
2-32. All NCs, remote RAUs, and their associated transmission media are in
GS of the corps or division. By definition, signal units who employ assets in
the network provide support to the total force and not to any particular
subdivision of the supported unit. Subordinate units of the corps and division
do not control signal assets that are in GS of the corps or division.
OFFENSIVE OPERATIONS
2-33. All operations are generally phased, and communications support for
each phase depends on many considerations. Different types of offensive
operations will dictate certain levels and types of support as shown below.
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FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
PLANNING
2-34. In preparing for offensive operations, division signal units should
maintain uploaded NCs ready for rapid movement behind the lead attack
elements. When possible, nodes and remote RAUs are positioned behind the
forward line of own troops (FLOT) far enough to protect them from threat
tube artillery. S2 staffs focus on threat artillery to minimize the threat to
assets. Remote RAUs are positioned forward to provide MSRT coverage to
maneuver battalion CPs. Maximum use of corps nodes in division areas
provides the springboard for the attack division to employ its MSE assets for
the offensive operation.
EXECUTION
2-35. During the attack, NCs follow advancing maneuver brigades with
known locations for emplacement. Several possible locations should be
identified to cover contingencies. Frequency modulated (FM) radios or singlechannel satellites will be the primary means of communications on-the-move.
In certain cases, remote RAUs will provide some MSRT coverage if
connectivity to a node can be established. Each node and extension team
should have various sets of team packet planning information to ensure
options exist if communications with the BATCON or SYSCON are not
possible. Using medium- and long-haul assets for range extension should be
planned to ensure division networks remain connected to the corps network
at all times. Usually, the division main and rear CPs will not move during
the initial phases of the attack and will remain connected to the network.
This is not true with the corps tactical CP. Communications links between
commanders are always essential. Planning involves multichannel satellites
linking the SEN, supporting the division tactical CP, to the corps network to
ensure this critical connectivity. SENs supporting maneuver brigades will not
install their links until the initial objectives are secured because tactical
operations centers (TOCs) move too fast. MSRT coverage in the division rear
areas is sacrificed to support forward operations.
DEFENSIVE OPERATIONS
2-36. Defensive operations are phased, and communications support for each
phase depends on several considerations. The defensive role described here
may not apply to all situations, but it will prove useful for most. The
elements of the defensive role are shown below.
PLANNING
2-37. Placement of nodes and remote RAUs must ensure MSRT coverage to
at least the forward deployed maneuver battalion CPs. They should be out of
the range of threat tube artillery. Additional locations for forward deployed
nodes and remote RAUs are required for survivability purposes, and several
locations should be identified for short-notice jumps. These contingency
locations should be within 5 kilometers (3.1 miles) of their deployed locations,
and all personnel should know the routes to each. Some nodes should be
uploaded and prepared to move forward with the counterattack. Assistance
from the corps is important when placing corps nodes in the division rear
areas. Close coordination with the G3 regarding penetrations, creating
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salients, and the locations of engagement areas is important for the
survivability of communications assets. Plans must be made for
synchronizing the movement of nodes and RAUs that fall into these areas.
Some medium- and long-haul assets should be held in reserve and remain
uploaded for movement with the counterattack.
EXECUTION
2-38. During the defense, signal commanders must be on the alert for rapid
changes in division or corps plans. Nodes that are in danger must move to
other locations when possible. RAU markers can be turned off in various
sequences to reduce the static electronic signature that emanates from
blanket RAU coverage. Maneuvers may dictate rapid jumps of RAUs. During
movements out of salient or engagement areas, assets taken out of the
system should remain uploaded and prepared to support the counterattack.
MSRT coverage in the division rear area should be sacrificed to support the
forward areas. Corps nodes and RAUs can again be placed in the division
rear area to help support division requirements.
SUPPORT OF THE SEPARATE MANEUVER BRIGADE AND
REGIMENT
2-39. The corps signal brigade will support the communications requirements
of the separate maneuver brigade, regiment, and separate EAC theater
missile defense (TMD) elements. These units have no organic MSE
equipment other than subscriber devices. To support this type of operation,
the supporting unit may have to dedicate almost one entire company (two
NCs, three to five SENs, and four RAUs). Units, such as the ACR, are usually
in a screening mission forward of or to the flank of the division. The ACR is
often the first unit in the theater and deploys great distances to conduct its
screening mission. Close coordination with division signal units is
imperative, as division boundaries are established behind or to the flank of
the ACR. Coordination is not only for network connectivity but also for
logistical and electronic maintenance support. It is necessary to dedicate
long-haul assets to the company supporting the separate brigade and
regiment. These assets sometimes provide internodal connectivity and, in
rarer cases, provide long-haul connectivity for a SEN at the regimental TOC.
The overriding consideration is to ensure effective communications to and
from the separate brigade, the regiment commander, and the corps
commander.
AREA SUPPORT CONCEPT
2-40. While area support is simple in theory, it can be complicated in
execution. Division and corps units must operate under the same rules. The
concept calls for geographical boundaries between the corps signal battalions
being jointly drawn by the brigade S3 and S4. Boundaries with the division
signal battalion usually follow the division rear boundaries unless otherwise
negotiated. Placement of corps nodes in division rear areas occurs often and
requires close coordination with division signal units and division movement
control activities. Control of corps assets in a division signal battalion AO
must be coordinated between the corps and division signal unit. Corps assets
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FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
can also be used as springboard platforms. When possible, division signal
units can remain uploaded to facilitate rapid movement to support offensive
operations. During early phases of operations, signal units must provide
communications support to assembly areas and ports. MSRT coverage should
be maximized along movement corridors, main supply routes (MSRs), and
other critical areas. Signal battalions are then responsible for all logistical
support for GS signal assets and electronic maintenance support for all signal
assets within the geographical boundary. Exceptions occur but must be
negotiated between responsible units. Battalions providing support must
take the lead in negotiating alternative solutions, when necessary. There is a
relationship between TECHCON and logistical support, but they may not
always be the same.
SPLIT-BASED OPERATIONS
2-41. Split-based operations place unique demands on the tactical
communications network. Split basing is downsizing the traditional
management elements like intelligence, logistics, and planning to the bare
bone requirements for forces in the forward deployed area. The intent is to
move data from the home base instead of deploying all C2 structure and
supporting personnel and facilities. Split basing saves lift assets, without
disrupting
operations,
by
current
communications
capabilities.
Communications planning must be carefully accomplished because normal
organic communications and logistics support may not be adequate. Signal
planners must analyze the mission to ensure that all the needs of forwarddeployed force’s, TMD assets, especially logistics, intelligence, and planning
functions, are adequately supported with communications. The
communications support package must contain its own logistical support to
ensure initial sustained system operation. To support the initial assault CP
into the forward deployed area, a robust communications package must be
identified and prepared to deploy with the division or corps staff. As a
minimum, a multichannel satellite link is required to provide long-local
service from an existing NC at home base using low-rate multiplexers (LRMs)
or remote multiplex combiners (RMCs). Alternatively, the satellite link could
provide connectivity for a SEN in the forward-deployed area for larger
contingency operations, as required. Connectivity to DISN systems and
support for possible special circuits must be considered in planning the
appropriate communications support package both within and between the
split bases.
GRID AND ENCLAVE NETWORKS
2-42. Signal doctrine focuses on fighting with a five-division corps that
demands grid employment of MSE throughout the AO (see Figure 2-1). While
the military situation in some theaters of operations still justify such an
employment of MSE, many scenarios dictate an AO consisting of enclaves
that are linked and require a modified grid for communications support. This
is true when considering joint and/or combined operations including
MOOTW. Figure 2-4 shows MSE enclave network deployment.
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MILITARY/COMMERCIAL
NC
SEN
Z
Z
Z
TSL
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
SUSTAINING
BASE
Z
Z Z Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
GATEWAY
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
AREAS OF
OPERATION
Z
Z
AFLOAT
COMMAND
Z
Z
Z
ENCLAVE
ENCLAVE
ISB
ENTRY
OPERATIONS
AIRFIELD
RANGE
EXTENSION
ENCLAVE
Figure 2-4. An MSE Enclave Network
2-43. FM 100-5 explains revised Army doctrinal approaches to fighting from
forward deployed forces to force projection forces with sanctuary CPs
remaining at home bases. Enclave networks frequently demand maximizing
medium- and long-range range extension communications assets and
flexibility in NPE. Planning should include using commercial and host nation
systems. Connectivity to the DISN and the digital NATO interface (DNI)
system is necessary, if appropriate. When using an enclave network, one
must consider:
• Command relationship.
• Control.
• Logistics (parent unit provides the technical assistance).
• Switch group (which SCC-2 controls which nodes).
• Internet protocol (IP) addresses.
2-44. The corps and division G3s must decide and coordinate these actions
before deployment. This information should be explained in the OPORD.
2-13
Chapter 3
Organization and Equipment
This chapter details the organizational structure and equipment of the
units responsible for installing, operating, and maintaining the MSE
network.
CORPS SIGNAL BRIGADE
3-1. The standard corps signal brigade is the center of the corps MSE
network (Figure 3-1). It consists of a headquarters and headquarters
company (HHC), one or more corps area signal battalions depending on the
size of the corps, a corps support signal battalion, a range extension company,
and a visual information company. It provides SYSCON of the corps area
MSE network and provides TECHCON of the division signal battalions’
installed components. The advantages of this arrangement are–
• Greater operational flexibility.
• Increased logistics support efficiency.
• Easier personnel management.
• Centralized MSE assets control.
CORPS
SIGNAL BRIGADE
(MSE)
HHC
CORPS AREA
SIGNAL BATTALION
RANGE EXTENSION
COMPANY
CORPS SUPPORT
SIGNAL BATTALION
VISUAL
INFORMATION
COMPANY
Note: The airborne corps signal brigade is
slightly different in organization and equipment.
Figure 3-1. Standard Corps Signal Brigade
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3-2. The HHC corps signal brigade consists of the brigade headquarters, the
headquarters company, and the corps signal office (Figure 3-2). Figure 3-3
lists the functions of the HHC.
HEADQUARTERS
COMPANY
BRIGADE
HEADQUARTERS
COMMAND
SECTION
ADMINISTRATIVE
SECTION
OPERATIONS/
INTELLIGENCE
SECTION
LOGISTICS
SECTION
PLANS/
INTELLIGENCE
SECTION
SIGNAL
ENGINEERING
BRANCH
UNIT
MINISTRY TEAM
CJA SECTION
CORPS COMSEC
OFFICE OF
RECORD
COMPANY
HEADQUARTERS
INFORMATION
SERVICE SUPPORT
OFFICE
CE MAINTENANCE
SECTION
MOTOR
MAINTENANCE
SECTION
SUPPORT
PLATOON
HEADQUARTERS
NETWORK
CONTROL
BRANCH
BRIGADE COMSEC
OFFICE OF
RECORD
TACSAT
SECTION
Figure 3-2. HHC Corps Signal Brigade
3-2
CORPS SIGNAL
OFFICE
MTCC
SECTION
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
HHC Functions
Directs and coordinates operations of the corps signal brigade including its
battalions.
Supervises the installation, operation, and maintenance of the corps
communications systems.
Provides the facilities the signal brigade commander uses to command and
control the brigade including the SCC-2s.
Provides a signal staff element (corps signal office) to advise the corps on
communications and COMSEC matters (corps and brigade COMSEC offices of
record).
Operates a semi-automated SYSCON (fully automated with the fielding of
ISYSCON).
Performs all signal management system functions for the signal brigade
commander (network control branch).
Installs, operates, and maintains TACSAT communications systems and
AN/TYC-39 message switches.
Figure 3-3. HHC Functions
3-3. The brigade headquarters has a command section, administrative
section, operations/intelligence section, and logistics section. The
operations/intelligence section consists of the plans/intelligence section,
signal engineering branch, network control branch, and the brigade
COMSEC office of record (BCOR). The brigade headquarters establishes the
SYSCON center as part of the brigade CP.
3-4. The plans/intelligence section is part of the S3/SYSCON for the brigade.
Figure 3-4 lists the functions of the plans/intelligence section.
Plans/Intelligence Section Functions
Plans, coordinates, and supervises the plans and intelligence requirements
for the brigade.
Develops training plans for the brigade’s defensive chemical operations.
Assesses chemical operations and training situations
Figure 3-4. Plans/Intelligence Section Functions
3-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
3-5. The signal engineering branch is part of the S3/SYSCON for the brigade.
Figure 3-5 lists the functions of the signal engineering branch.
Signal Engineering Branch Functions
Develops plans for establishing communications systems.
Determines equipment suitability, adaptability, and compatibility with existing
military communication systems.
Determines installation and employment for quality transmissions over installed
systems.
Responds to frequency requests and maintains associated records for brigade
units.
Integrates allied, joint, and commercial communications into the corps
communications network.
Analyzes traffic status reports.
Maintains direct coordination with the SCC-2/SYSCON in the network control
branch.
Informs the SCC-2/SYSCON of current and future facility needs throughout the
corps communications network.
Figure 3-5. Signal Engineering Branch Functions
3-6. The network control branch is part of the S3/SYSCON. Figure 3-6 lists
the network control branch functions. The network control branch installs,
operates, and maintains two SCC-2s: one active and one standby. The SCC-2s
facilitate network management and control tasks with computer-assisted
tools. These tools–
• Assist in issuing OPORDs and directives to node managers.
• Assist in receiving and processing messages and reports.
• Manage radio frequencies (RFs), COMSEC, equipment/personnel
status reports, system activation/deactivation, and reconfiguration
including network radio links.
3-7. The BCOR is part of the S3/SYSCON and is responsible for the brigade
COMSEC account. It also provides COMSEC logistics support for the control
and distribution of internal brigade and subordinate battalion COMSEC
material.
3-4
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Network Control Branch Functions
Provides MSE automated frequency management.
Performs terrain analysis and path profiling.
Conducts automated system engineering functions.
Provides equipment status reporting.
Performs COMSEC key management.
Provides link and network load status.
Maintains personnel management database.
Manages system traffic flow and grade of service.
Figure 3-6. Network Control Branch Functions
3-8. The headquarters company has a company headquarters,
communications-electronics (CE) maintenance section, motor maintenance
section, unit ministry team, and a Civil/Judge Advocate (CJA) section. It may
contain a support platoon headquarters that provides the TACSAT section
and a modular tactical communication center (MTCC). Figure 3-7 lists the
functions of the headquarters company.
Note: Signal brigades that have an organic company
do not require the TACSAT section in the brigade
HHC.
Headquarters Company Functions
Provides internal support to the brigade and to the company.
Maintains communications equipment for the brigade.
Maintains the vehicles for the brigade.
Figure 3-7. Headquarters Company Functions
3-9. The corps signal office has a corps COMSEC office of record (CCOR) and
an information service support office. The corps signal office is responsible for
performing signal management functions for the corps. These functions
provide adequate communications to the corps commander for commanding
and controlling his forces. Figure 3-8 lists the functions of the corps signal
office.
3-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Corps Signal Office Functions
Advises on command signal matters.
Prepares signal estimates, plans, and orders.
Supervises signal activities within the command.
Manages corps unit signal requirements.
Manages operational and contingency COMSEC matters.
Develops COMSEC operational plans and policies.
Plans, designs, and manages the integration and interconnectivity of tactical
and nontactical information networks and communications systems.
Figure 3-8. Corps Signal Office Functions
CORPS AREA SIGNAL BATTALION
3-10. The corps area signal battalion provides the signal facilities that
support the plans developed by the corps signal staff and the corps signal
brigade staff. The corps area signal battalion consists of an HHC, three
standard area signal companies, and a signal support company (Figure 3-9).
Figure 3-10 lists the functions of the corps area signal battalion.
3-11. The airborne corps area signal battalion has three variations. One
battalion has two contingency area companies and one standard area
company. A second battalion has two standard area companies and one
contingency area company. The third battalion has three standard area
companies. All battalions have an NC instead of a LEN in the support
company.
CORPS AREA
SIGNAL BATTALION
(MSE)
HHC
AREA SIGNAL
COMPANY
SIGNAL
SUPPORT
COMPANY
Figure 3-9. Typical Corps Area Signal Battalion
3-6
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Corps Area Signal Battalion Functions
Advises the signal brigade commander on all communication matters.
Directs the installation, operation, and maintenance of battalion communications systems and
facilities for implementing plans developed by the corps signal staff to support unit
communication requirements.
Operates the operations/intelligence section.
Plans and coordinates staff supervision of plans, requirements, and battalion training program.
Plans and supervises communications support for the signal brigade plan.
Prepares signal plans to incorporate into the signal brigade plans and orders.
Coordinates with other headquarters staff sections regarding their communication needs.
Exercises staff supervision over radio communication activities.
Prepares signal plans, orders, and radio communication SOI items.
Coordinates frequency allocation assignment and use.
Reports and processes interface problems.
Manages force integration of information system resources.
Plans and coordinates with higher headquarters for information systems upgrade, replacement,
elimination, and/or integration within units.
Plans AISs integration.
Provides staff supervision of analysis and software support and automated systems
troubleshooting.
Manages and supervises ADP related areas.
Designs and develops command information systems.
Monitors unique “application program”development.
Supervises maintenance of tactical databases.
Plans newly assigned or attached unit database integration.
Provides automated resources security training.
Figure 3-10. Corps Area Signal Battalion Functions
3-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
3-12. The HHC of the corps area signal battalion consists of the battalion
headquarters and a company headquarters (Figure 3-11). The battalion
headquarters has a command section, an administrative section, a logistics
section, an operations/intelligence section, a CE maintenance section, a motor
maintenance section, and a unit ministry team. The operations/intelligence
section coordinates the installation of NCs, LENs, SENs, and RAUs. The CE
maintenance section performs DS maintenance of all organic CE and
COMSEC equipment for the battalion. This section can send CE and
COMSEC maintenance contact teams to repair faulty equipment at deployed
sites.
HHC
CORPS AREA
SIGNAL BATTALION
COMPANY
HEADQUARTERS
BATTALION
HEADQUARTERS
COMMAND
SECTION
ADMINISTRATIVE
SECTION
CE
MAINTENANCE
SECTION
OPERATIONS/
INTELLIGENCE
SECTION
LOGISTICS
SECTION
MOTOR
MAINTENANCE
SECTION
UNIT
MINISTRY
TEAM
Figure 3-11. HHC Corps Area Signal Battalion
3-13. Each area signal company has a company headquarters and two nodal
platoons (Figure 3-12). Each nodal platoon consists of a platoon
headquarters, two NC sections, and two extension switch sections. The NC
section installs, operates, and maintains the NCS, four LOS(V3)s, and a local
RAU. The extension switch section deploys LOS assemblages to support the
SENS(V1) and (V2) and the remote RAU.
3-14. Each area signal company and each support company has one military
occupational specialty (MOS) 31F and one 31P, with a spares facility
(AN/TSM-183), to perform on-site MSE nodal maintenance. These personnel
were previously consolidated at the battalion HHC CE maintenance section.
3-8
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
AREA
SIGNAL
COMPANY
NODAL
PLATOON
COMPANY
HEADQUARTERS
PLATOON
HEADQUARTERS
NODE CENTER
SECTION
Figure 3-12. Area Signal Company
3-15. The typical signal support company (Figure 3-13) has a company
headquarters, large extension switch platoon, and an extension switch
support platoon. The large extension switch platoon has a platoon
headquarters, a large extension switch section, and a cable/wire section. The
extension switch support platoon has a platoon headquarters, an extension
switch support section, and a cable/wire section. Signal support companies
differ in the number of personnel and equipment they are authorized based
on its mission.
SIGNAL SUPPORT
COMPANY
COMPANY
HEADQUARTERS
EXTENSION SWITCH
SUPPORT PLATOON
LARGE EXTENSION
SWITCH PLATOON
PLATOON
HEADQUARTERS
PLATOON
HEADQUARTERS
LARGE EXTENSION
SWITCH
SECTION
EXTENSION SWITCH
SUPPORT SECTION
CABLE/WIRE
SECTION
CABLE/WIRE
SECTION
Figure 3-13. Corps Area Signal Battalion Signal Support Company
3-9
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
CORPS SUPPORT SIGNAL BATTALION
3-16. The corps signal brigade has a corps support signal battalion. It has an
HHC, two area signal companies, and a signal support company (Figure
3-14). The corps support signal battalion provides communication support
throughout the corps AO.
3-17. The airborne corps support signal battalion has one standard area
company, one contingency area company, one TRI-TAC company, and one NC
instead of a LEN in the support company.
CORPS SUPPORT
SIGNAL BATTALION
(MSE)
HHC
AREA SIGNAL
COMPANY
SIGNAL SUPPORT
COMPANY
Figure 3-14. Corps Support Signal Battalion
3-18. The support signal battalion’s HHC consists of a battalion
headquarters and a company headquarters (Figure 3-15). The battalion
headquarters consists of a command section, an administrative section, a
logistics section, an operations/intelligence section, a CE maintenance
section, a motor maintenance section, and a unit ministry team. The
operations/intelligence staff section coordinates the installation of NCs,
LENS, SENS, and RAUs. The CE maintenance section performs DS
maintenance of all organic CE and COMSEC equipment for the battalion.
This section can send CE and COMSEC maintenance contact teams to repair
faulty equipment at deployed sites.
3-19. The signal support company has a large extension switch platoon, a
company headquarters, and an extension switch support platoon (Figure
3-16). Each area signal company and each support company has one MOS
31F and one 31P, with a spares facility (AN/TSM-183), to perform on-site
MSE nodal maintenance. These personnel were previously consolidated at
the battalion HHC CE maintenance section. The structure and capabilities of
these platoons are similar to those of the area signal battalion support
company. The large extension switch platoon has a large extension switch
section and two cable/wire sections. The extension switch support platoon has
an extension switch support section and two cable/wire sections.
3-10
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
HHC
SUPPORT
SIGNAL BATTALION
COMPANY
HEADQUARTERS
BATTALION
HEADQUARTERS
COMMAND
SECTION
MOTOR
MAINTENANCE
SECTION
CE
MAINTENANCE
SECTION
OPERATIONS/
INTELLIGENCE
SECTION
LOGISTICS
SECTION
ADMINISTRATIVE
SECTION
UNIT MINISTRY
TEAM
Figure 3-15. HHC Support Signal Battalion
SIGNAL SUPPORT
COMPANY
LARGE EXTENSION
SWITCH PLATOON
LARGE EXTENSION
SWITCH SECTION
COMPANY
HEADQUARTERS
CABLE/WIRE
SECTION
EXTENSION
SWITCH SUPPORT
SECTION
CABLE/WIRE
SECTION
Figure 3-16. Signal Support Company, Corps Support Battalion
DIVISION SIGNAL BATTALION
3-20. The division signal battalion provides communication support to major
subscribers, CPs, and operational facilities in heavy and light divisions. The
battalion’s structure is similar to a corps area signal battalion. The typical
division signal battalion has an HHC, two area signal companies, and a
signal support company (Figure 3-17).
Note: The heavy division has three area signal
companies that are organized the same as in the
corps signal brigade.
3-11
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
DIVISION
SIGNAL BATTALION
(MSE)
HHC
AREA
SIGNAL
COMPANY
SIGNAL
SUPPORT
COMPANY
Figure 3-17. Division Signal Battalion
3-21. The division signal battalion’s personnel and staff sections are similar
to the corps. The G6 section and the operations/intelligence section ensure
quality communications throughout the division. The division signal
commander is designated as the G6 and is the principal advisor to the
division commander for all division communications. The G6 serves in the
dual role of commander of the signal battalion and as a member of the
general staff. These two functional roles are separate but related.
3-22. As the signal battalion commander, the G6 commands, directs, and
supervises the battalion’s efforts to complete their assigned missions. As a
member of the general staff, the G6 presents the communication aspects for
tactical operations for all staff planning. The G6 consults directly with the
Chief of Staff (CofS) on all communication matters.
3-23. The G6 performs management, operations, and maintenance of the
commands communication and information systems using the SCC-2. This
system assists the G6 and the deputy G6 in managing the division’s
communications systems by providing planning, management, and C2 of
tactical communications networks. The deputy G6 and the COMSEC officer
assist the G6 in these efforts. The deputy G6 locates at the division tactical
signal office and represents the G6 in providing communications support to
the division.
3-24. The G6 also conducts active liaison with the signal officers of higher
headquarters, adjacent headquarters, and military intelligence (MI) battalion
combat electronic warfare intelligence (CEWI) representatives.
3-25. The G6’s staff ensures COMSEC complies with the current regulations,
RF allocation and assignment, and division unit COMSEC logistics support.
The signal battalion performs only COMSEC logistics support for the
division.
3-12
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
3-26. The
division
signal
battalion’s
staff
sections
implement
communications planning and engineering, OPCON (in stand-alone mode),
and administrative and logistics direction. The staff uses the tasking from
the corps communications plan to develop the division network. When
operating in the stand-alone mode, it develops its own communications plan.
Active monitoring of the network’s operational status ensures that it meets
the corps' changing requirement and its own. This responsibility belongs to
the operations/intelligence section.
3-27. The division COMSEC office of record (DCOR) is responsible for the
division COMSEC account. It provides COMSEC logistics support for the
control and distribution of internal division COMSEC material. The division
signal battalion staff implements, manages, and maintains the division
COMSEC keys for the division.
3-28. The HHC consists of a battalion headquarters and a company
headquarters (Figure 3-18). The battalion headquarters has a command
section, an administrative/logistics section, an operations/intelligence section,
a division signal office, a motor maintenance section, a CE/COMSEC
maintenance section, and a DCOR. The operations/intelligence section
installs, operates, and maintains the division signal battalion’s SCC-2. The
division area signal company’s structure, personnel, and equipment are the
same as the corps area signal company. The CE maintenance section
performs DS maintenance of all organic CE and COMSEC equipment for the
battalion. This section can send CE and COMSEC maintenance contact
teams to repair faulty equipment at deployed sites.
COMPANY
HEADQUARTERS
BATTALION
HEADQUARTERS
COMMAND
SECTION
ADMINISTRATIVE/
LOGISTICS
SECTION
CE/COMSEC
MAINTENANCE
SECTION
DIVISION
SIGNAL
OFFICE
OPERATIONS/
INTELLIGENCE
SECTION
MOTOR
MAINTENANCE
SECTION
DIVISION COMSEC
OFFICE OF
RECORD
Figure 3-18. HHC Division Signal Battalion
3-13
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
3-29. The division signal support company has a company headquarters, an
EPLRS platoon, a TACSAT platoon, and a general support platoon (Figure 319). It is similar to the corps area signal battalion’s signal support company
in mission. Each area signal company and each support company has one
MOS 31F and one 31P, with a spares facility (AN/TSM-183), to perform onsite MSE nodal maintenance. These personnel were previously consolidated
at the battalion HHC CE maintenance section. However, its organization and
equipment are different. The EPLRS, TACSAT, and general support platoons
are described below.
DIVISION SIGNAL
SUPPORT COMPANY
COMPANY
HEADQUARTERS
EPLRS
PLATOON
TACSAT
PLATOON
PLATOON
HEADQUARTERS
PLATOON
HEADQUARTERS
EPLRS
SECTION
MULTICHANNEL
TACSAT
SECTION
GENERAL
SUPPORT
PLATOON
Figure 3-19. Division Signal Support Company
3-30. The EPLRS platoon includes a platoon headquarters and four EPLRS
sections. EPLRS provides the capabilities needed to support the data
distribution requirements of ABCS. It comprises the Army Data Distribution
System (ADDS) that supports the ABCS components listed below.
• Air Missile Defense Planning and Control System (AMDPCS).
• Maneuver Control System (MCS).
• Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System (AFATDS).
• All Source Analysis System (ASAS).
• Combat Service Support Control System (CSSCS).
• Force XXI Battle Command - Brigade and Below (FBCB2).
3-31. The TACSAT platoon includes a platoon headquarters and a
multichannel TACSAT section. The multichannel TACSAT extends the
distance of the ACUS by using strategic and tactical terminals for
transmitting multiplexed voice and data channels.
3-14
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
3-32. The typical general support platoon consists of a platoon headquarters,
an extension switch section, a wire section, and an FM retransmission section
(Figure 3-20). The wire section installs and maintains the RMC TD-1234, CX11230A/G and CX-4566 26-pair cables, J-1077 distribution boxes, WF-16, and
local telephones. The FM retransmission section has three teams that provide
single-channel retransmission stations for division level FM voice nets.
GENERAL
SUPPORT
PLATOON
EXTENSION
SWITCH
SECTION
FM
RETRANS
SECTION
Figure 3-20. General Support Platoon
MSE EMPLOYMENT CHARACTERISTICS
3-33. NCs are the hubs of the MSE network providing internodal
connectivity (Figure 3-21). The NCS is the main element of the NC. It
provides network access to local and mobile subscribers through the RAU.
Local subscribers consist of node and network management personnel. The
NCS provides network access for LENS and SENS. At least two internodal
links are made when providing a gateway between an adjacent MSE network
or to the EAC network. Division establishes at least one link to adjacent
division(s). NC deployment is based on serviced CP deployment,
topographical
considerations,
LOS
requirements,
and
network
interconnectivity requirements.
3-34. Rapid initial network deployment requires installing a preprogrammed
backbone system. The S3/SYSCON uses the information provided by the
deputy G6 to plan the backbone system. The designated area signal
companies provide the assets to install, operate, and maintain the NCs. In
the initial network, each NC must connect to at least three other NCs. As the
network matures, each NC should connect to three or four other NCs to
ensure optimum service and survivability.
3-35. The LENS serves 164 wire subscribers: 84 through local J-1077s and 80
through RMCs. The RMCs can be set out alone or two can link in series using
CX-11230A/G cable. They provide access for up to eight wire line subscribers
each. If the user unit requires access for more than eight subscribers, the
RMCs are used in a paired configuration. Units that are next to each other
and have eight or fewer subscribers use one RMC and CX-11230A/G cable
each. The LENS can terminate up to five RMC groups of two.
3-15
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
FAX
RAU
TP
FAX
DATA
DATA
SEN
TP
TP
NC
LEN
DATA
SEN
TP
NAI
SEN
NC
NC
RAU
SCC-2
FAX
NC
RAU
SEN
TP
DATA
RAU
Figure 3-21. Internodal Connectivity
3-16
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
3-36. The SEN or LEN can service CNR customers via a SDNRIU, TSEC/KY90 (Figure 3-22). After the operator completes the connection, the SDNRIU
functions automatically. Distribution of the TSEC/KY-90 is one per NC
platoon in each of the area signal companies.
FAX
CNR CUSTOMER
RAU
TP
FAX
DATA
DATA
SEN
SDNRIU
(KY-90)
TP
TP
NC
LEN
DATA
SDNRIU
(KY-90)
SEN
TP
NAI
SEN
NC
NC
RAU
SCC-2
FAX
NC
SEN
RAU
TP
DATA
RAU
Figure 3-22. CNR Interface with MSE
3-37. RAUs are used in local and remote configurations. However, it does not
mean both RAUs cannot be remoted; it depends on the availability of an LOS
assemblage. Because RAUs constantly emit marker beacons declaring
availability to affiliated MSRTs, those RAUs closest to the forward edge of
the battle area (FEBA) must use electronic protection (EP) techniques to
mask the emitter from the opposing force.
3-17
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
3-38. Deployment of the LOS assemblages must be considered to minimize
the radio signature of the node. As an internodal link, the LOS(V3) can
deploy on hills up to 400 meters from the node via CX-11230A/G cable. If the
distance exceeds 400 meters, the SHF radio link can be used up to 10
kilometers (6.2 miles) (see Figure 3-23). SHF radio distribution to the NCs
and LOS assemblages allows for remoting 50 percent of the radio links.
Figure 3-23. SHF Radio Link
3-39. The LOS(V2) supports the NATO analog interface (NAI) unit during
combined operations (Figure 3-24). The LOS(V2) does not have SHF radio
capability. The NAI locates at selected NCSs throughout the corps (Figure
3-25).
3-18
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
(Requires 110 VAC)
NATO ALLY
6-WIRE E&M
CONNECTIONS
LOS
(V3)
NAI
CV-4002/G
LOS 256 kbps
8 CHANNELS FDX
DIGITAL LINES
16 kbps
LOS
(V2)
Figure 3-24. NATO/MSE Interface using LOS(V2)
NCS
AN/TTC-47
POWER
UNIT
26-PAIR CABLE
CV-4002/G
NAI
NATO
STANDARD
CROSSOVER
CABLE
NATO
MSE
NAI
CV-4002/G
26-PAIR CABLE
Figure 3-25. NAI Deployment at an NCS
3-19
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
3-40. MSE network users gain mobile access using MSRTs. Figure 3-26
shows how the MSRT (AN/VRC-97) accesses the system through the RAU.
MSRTs can receive or send voice, facsimile, or data traffic. When a RAU is
deploying, it behaves like a mobile subscriber. The crew can place the DSVT
(TSEC/KY-68) in the cab of the vehicle, configure one of its eight radios as an
MSRT, and access another RAU.
SYSTEM CONTROL
3-41. The corps and division signal battalions deploy their MSE signal assets
under the overall direction of the corps signal brigade. However, operational
requirements may dictate an OPCON relationship between division signal
battalion MSE assets and corps/division assets.
3-42. The corps signal brigade manages and controls the corps MSE network
using the corps SCC-2. Within a corps MSE network, an active SCC-2 and a
standby SCC-2 are netted for primary/regulatory network databases,
displays, and processing services. This ensures continuity of operations. The
active SCC-2 performs all automated network planning, management, and
control for the corps. When in a corps network, the division SCC-2 functions
in an active role but remains under the TECHCON of the corps’active SCC-2.
3-43. The corps signal brigade and the division signal battalion coordinate
closely when moving and placing NCs. The respective division and corps
signal battalion commanders are responsible for moving these assets. The
corps signal brigade is responsible for maintaining network integrity,
coverage, and service. The brigade accomplishes this by reallocating nodes,
trunks, extension assets, and area responsibilities. In a division stand-alone
configuration, the division SCC-2 assumes these functions and appoints
responsibility for the division network elements.
3-44. Initial MPM is exercised through CNR nets. MPM decreases threat
radio electronic combat (REC) vulnerability.
3-20
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
FAX
RAU
TP
FAX
DATA
DATA
SEN
TP
TP
NC
LEN
DATA
SEN
TP
SEN
NC
NC
RAU
SCC-2
RAU
FAX
NC
SEN
TP
DATA
RAU
Note: All mobile subscribers are equipped with telephone
terminals and the capability for FAX data terminals.
MAST-MOUNTED
ANTENNA
WHIP ANTENNA
MSRT (AN/VRC-97)
ASSEMBLAGE
FAX
TERMINAL
OR
DSVT
KY-68
HVA-9
RAIDO SET
RT-1539(P)/G
RAU
(AN/TRC-191)
DATA
TERMINAL
Figure 3-26. Mobile Subscriber Interface
3-21
Chapter 4
Operational Deployment
This chapter describes the phased deployment process for the MSE
network. Signal support elements are located throughout the battlefield
in a typical corps AO. Since MSE provides an integrated ACUS with no
artificial boundaries, MSE deployment requires carefully coordinated
procedures throughout the supported battlefield.
DEPLOYMENT
4-1. The base requirement for establishing and controlling communications
remains from higher to lower, left to right, supporting to supported, and
reinforcing to reinforced. The element in the higher, left, or supporting
category coordinates frequency plans, COMSEC keys, software, and edition
and control mechanisms.
4-2. Corps signal elements may be scattered throughout the division area.
Divisions will support other divisions; thus, signal unit areas will become
interlocked and interconnected. Basic responsibilities of corps signal
elements are covered below.
4-3. The corps G6, as a staff planner, plans for adequate and continuous area
coverage throughout the corps area. In the division area, the organic four or
six nodes often require augmentation. The corps G6 provides the assets
needed to ensure area coverage. Normally, this requires two nodes. Allocation
to the division depends on corps wide commitments. The division signal
officer employs his assets to support the C2 needs of the division. He has
direct control of overall network assets and planning within the division
switching control group (SCG). The corps SYSCON provides centralized
control of the MSE network and is responsible for its effective installation
and operation. The division SYSCON works closely with the corps SYSCON
to provide effective TECHCON.
4-4. Each MSE NC connects to at least three other NCs. An internodal link is
a link established between two NCs or between an NC and an LEN.
4-5. Each MSE corps network needs at least two gateway connections to the
EAC communications network. There should be at least one link between
adjacent divisions and one between adjacent corps. The physical link
connections are independent of the physical boundaries between adjacent
units or echelons. Gateways are based on electronic boundaries.
4-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
4-6. The SCGs and the node switching groups (NSGs) define areas of
responsibility within the integrated corps network. SCGs are based on the
technical span of control of a corps or division SCC-2. In a corps network,
each division SCC-2 controls the planning, engineering, and executing all
signal support requirements and assets within the division SCG. The corps
SCC-2 provides TECHCON for the integrated corps network while assisting
the divisions, as required.
4-7. An NSG consists of an NC or LENs with a signal battalion responsible
for each. The NSGs provide a hierarchy of NC and LEN switches regarding
the management of COMSEC keys. The corps area signal battalion and the
division signal battalion provide all command, administrative, and logistical
support for the signal teams within their areas of control. Figure 4-1 shows
the area signal battalion and the division signal battalion NSGs and SCGs.
Figure 4-1. The Corps Area and Division Signal Battalions
4-8. Corps and division signal battalions provide service to subscribers in
their assigned areas. Deploying node and extension assets provide this
service. Within the corps, the CPs controlling close, deep, and rear operations
may be provided with dual network connectivity. Normally, this requires
assigning multiple extension assets to the division main CPs, the division
tactical CP, the corps main CPs, and the corps tactical CP. MSRT, SEN, or
LEN access provides all other CPs dual connectivity. Extension nodes and
CPs are encouraged to establish and maintain a habitual relationship. This
can occur within the division and corps units like ACRs, field artillery (FA)
brigades, and ADA brigades.
4-9. SYSCON exercises network management and control. In the corps
network, at the corps echelon, SYSCON designates an active and a standby
SCC-2. In a stand-alone division network, the single organic SCC-2 within
SYSCON assumes the active role.
4-2
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
4-10. The active SCC-2 manages the planning, engineering, and control
functions for a corps. Netting the standby corps SCC-2 and the division SCC2s technically support this. Each is subordinate to the active corps SCC-2.
4-11. In a corps network, at least two SCC-2s must simultaneously have the
primary network databases, displays, and processing services. Although one
SCC-2 actively manages the network, the standby SCC-2 can assume the
active SCC-2’s role at anytime. As the NCSs or LENSs update the active
SCC-2, the standby SCC-2’s database updates automatically. For the standby
SCC-2 to assume the active role, it should be involved in the physical
planning and monitoring of the network. In this way, the standby SCC-2
understands and can execute the commander’s intent when it becomes active.
SCC-2 teams should rehearse network control transfer often to keep the
teams proficient.
PHASED DEPLOYMENT
4-12. MSE deployment requires carefully coordinated procedures throughout
the corps. The MSE deployment procedures consist of four main phases,
which are broken down into subphases.
4-13. Predeployment (Phase I) includes the following subphases–
• User requirements.
• Interfaces.
• RAU/MSRT deployment plan.
• Other system considerations.
• Team packets.
• COMSEC.
• OPORD.
• Site reconnaissance.
• Database modifications.
4-14. Installing the backbone (Phase II) includes the following subphases–
• NC to NC connectivity.
• NC to LEN connectivity.
• Duplication and bypass.
• Bulk transfer (COMSEC).
• Database modification (as required).
4-15. Installing extensions (Phase III) includes the following subphases–
• SCC-2.
• RAU (local and remote).
• SEN.
4-16. Operational management (Phase IV) includes the following subphases–
• COMSEC.
• Subscribers.
4-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
• Frequencies.
• Switch database management.
• Teams and equipment.
4-17. Figure 4-2 shows the MSE predeployment planning flow in a corps
scenario.
Tactical Coordination
Corps G3
Corps
Units
G3 Ops
G3 Plans
Contingency
Plans/Battle
Concepts
Operations
Detailed Orders
Division
Units
Communication Requirements
Division G3
G3 Ops
G3 Plans
Contingency
Plans/Battle
Concepts
Operations
Detailed Orders
MSE Support
for the Battle
MSE Support
for the Battle
System Coordination
Frequency Management
COMSEC Management
CP Locations
G6
Battle Concepts
MSE Deployment
Solution
Operations
Detailed Orders
G6
Battle Concepts
MSE Deployment
Solution
Operations
Detailed Orders
Signal Brigade S3
System Coordination
Geographical Area
NCs Deployment
RAU Coverage
SEN Reinforcement
Systems Planning/SSC-2
RAU Frequency Plans
Key Generation
Key Distribution
Maneuver
Requirements
MSE Deployment
Options
BDE S3 - Planning Section
Signal Brigade S3
Maneuver
Requirements
MSE Deployment
Options
MSE Deployment
80% Solution
System Layout
Technical
Modifications
Technical Coordination
Team Packet
OPORD
BDE S3 - Ops Section
System Planning
Signal Battalions
System
Requirements
Team Packet
Production
Signal Brigade Corps Active SSC-2 + Signal Battalion SSC-2s Cabled to the PNS
Figure 4-2. MSE Predeployment Planning Flow in a Corps Scenario
4-4
Team Packet
OPORD
System Layout
Technical
Modifications
System
Requirements
Team Packet
Production
SIG BN S3 - Operations Officer
MSE Teams
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
PREDEPLOYMENT (PHASE I)
4-18. During predeployment, the G3 planners assess the tactical situation,
mission, and commander’s intent and develop this information into an
overlay. The overlay contains corps and division boundaries, maneuver units
down to battalion level, and dispersed support units down to platoon level.
The G3 planners use this overlay to assign equipment and to support the
predeployment subphases.
USER REQUIREMENTS
4-19. The MSE users identify their address basic and special communications
support requirements initially as a basis for further planning and execution.
4-20. The G6 planners, based on command guidance and in conjunction with
SYSCON, determine which headquarters will receive support. This
determines the method or type of signal support used to satisfy command,
control, and communications (C3) requirements. These requirements include
connectivity with adjacent units, EAC, and host nation’s communications
resources.
4-21. The SYSCON establishes and publishes communications priorities in
the OPORD or unit SOP. Installing the backbone has top priority. Once the
backbone has good connectivity, local and remote RAUs are then connected
followed by the major headquarters. Examples are the corps main CP, the
corps tactical CP, the division main CP, and the division tactical CP. Only
SYSCON can direct deviating from the assigned priorities.
4-22. The G6 planners need the initial locations of all units requiring support
and, if possible, any planned jump locations. They also need to know all
special requirements of the supported units, such as commercial access,
TACSAT, CNR, and preaffiliation list (PAL) numbers.
4-23. SYSCON ensures that backbone priorities are established for each NC.
SYSCON ensures an NC establishes priority links one at a time. Figure 4-3
shows an example of a priority listing.
INTERFACES
4-24. The MSE system can connect with a variety of non-MSE hardware.
Connections are interfaces that require changes to the standard database.
MSE has internal and external interfaces and both have special
considerations. The network planner determines the requirements for
database changes to the units involved in the interface. Normally, this occurs
at the signal technical conference before deployment. Habitual relationships
may result in the need to establish standard procedures to change the
database.
4-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
L16
LEN
3
1
4
NC
L16
NC
1
DB10
DB11
2
2
NC
NC
SSC-2
3
DB14
DB13
HOURS
NC/
TIME
1000
1100
1200
1300
DB10
1310
1014
10L16
1011
DB11
11L16
1311
DB13
1310
1311
1314
1014
1314
DB14
L16
11L16
1400
1500
1011
10L16
Figure 4-3. Priority Listing
4-25. Internal
interfaces
are
simply
interfaces
with
non-MSE
communications assets within MSE networks. Examples are combat net
radio interface (CNRI), commercial access, message switch (MS), and
TACSAT as a transmission means. The network planner considers the
requirements for interfaces and plans accordingly. Some critical planning
factors for internal interfaces are covered below.
• Due to the wide dispersion of users and scarcity of equipment,
carefully plot CNRI locations.
• Plot commercial access locations to ensure accessibility to the SEN
and LEN for authorized user access. Time is required for coordination
and reconnaissance.
4-6
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
4-26. The corps signal brigade determines MS locations to ensure support for
communications terminals throughout the corps.
4-27. The corps signal brigade coordinates TACSAT support for all
requirements. Data rates and multiplex digital transmission group (MDTG)
and digital transmission group (DTG) terminations must be determined to
leave NCs with maximum flexibility.
4-28. External interfaces are links between MSE and other various echelons
and organizations such as EAC, joint services, or allies. External interfaces
require detailed planning and coordination. Examples of these interfaces are
with EAC and joint services through the IATACS, tropo, TACSAT, Integrated
Digital Network Exchange (IDNX), and NATO. Critical planning issues are
covered below.
4-29. TACSAT planning includes–
• Date and time the satellite is available to support the mission from
the approved satellite access request (SAR).
• Type of satellite terminals used in the link and point-to-point or hubspoke relationship.
• Type of link (MSE, TRI-TAC, and ABCS), terminating equipment or
switches, group data rates, and any database changes.
• Coordination for COMSEC keys.
• Use of the NCS and LENS, which have very stable automatic timing
sources and should normally be designated as master when
master/slave relationships are required.
4-30. Tropo planning at EAC includes–
• Type of link (MSE, TRI-TAC), terminating equipment or switches,
group data rates, cable modulation, and any required database
changes.
• Coordinating trunk encryption device (TED) keys, common
interswitch rekey (CIRK), and area interswitch rekey (AIRK) for
MSE or TRI-TAC/EAC links.
• Locating each terminal, propagation mode (LOS, diffraction, tropo),
transmit and receive frequencies, bandwidth (3 or 7 MHz), antenna
azimuth, and horizon angle.
• Use of the AN/TRC-170 (tropo) that does not require timing from a
slave source and normally acts as the master.
4-31. Internal and external interfaces require close coordination between
gateways. This ensures signal timing relationships, DTG numbering and
channel assignments, digital editing, and COMSEC exchange for successful
switch interface. (See Appendix C for detailed discussion of COMSEC
operations.)
Note: Other considerations for links into other
echelons are physical location of both terminals and
frequencies. Make every effort to provide maximum
flexibility for both ends of the system. There is no
substitute for close coordination.
4-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
RAU/MSRT DEPLOYMENT PLAN
4-32. The RAU network provides system access to mobile subscribers in
planned corridors or areas. MSRT density is greatest along main routes of
march and around CP locations down to the maneuver battalion CP level. If
there is not enough equipment to cover 100 percent of the battlefield, holes in
coverage may occur where there are few or no subscribers. The RAU planning
factor is 20 to 25 MSRTs per RAU. The procedures discussed below support
RAU/MSRT deployment.
• Before deployment, the SCC-2/NPT generates the frequency plan and
transmits it to one or several RAUs for distribution. The NPT is used
only as a backup.
• The SCC-2 can generate up to 16 different plans (00-15). Only four
plans are downloaded to the RAUs and MSRTs, and only one plan is
in effect at any given time. Of the four plans downloaded, one plan is
active, one is preactive, and the last two are in reserve.
• The RAUs with the downloaded frequency plans are then positioned
to serve as filling stations to download frequency plans directly to
MSRTs via frequency fill cables provided with each MSRT.
• The S6 is responsible for downloading the frequency plans to their
units’MSRTs.
• SYSCON turns on the RAU’s marker beacon that identifies the RAU
and provides affiliation instructions after deployment. The RAU’s
marker beacon is turned off if the NCS or RAU’s extension link fails.
This allows the MSRTs affiliated off the RAU to automatically
reaffiliate with an operational RAU. If the NCS or LENS fails, the
MSRT user must reaffiliate.
OTHER SYSTEM CONSIDERATIONS
4-33. The present NCS software has a standard database. This database
determines the allocation of the DTGs at the NCS. Assigning DTGs is the
basis for planning the NC site layout for cabling and antenna configurations
as shown in Figure 4-4.
4-8
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
*
Legend:
LOS
Cable
Figure 4-4. NCS DTG/Trunk Group Cluster (TGC) Standard Database
4-34. The configuration also defines the assignment of the nine channel
multiplex-demultiplex (NCMD) chips. The NCMD assignment determines the
number of channels in each TGC. This assignment can be altered within
limits to meet operational requirements. The NCS operator’s manual and the
switch initialization procedures define the limitations. Database changes
should be the exception not the rule, because changes can cause control and
troubleshooting confusion. (See Table 4-1.)
4-9
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table 4-1. NCMD Chips
MDTG 25
TDSGM
Location
1
1
1
1
NCMD
9 & 10
5& 6
19 - 22
27 - 34
DTG
11
2
3
4
TGC
7
8
1
2
MDTG 26
TDSGM
Location
1
1
1
1
NCMD
23 & 24
35 & 36
7& 8
11 - 18
DTG
51
6
7
8
TGC
9
10
11
3
DTG
161
17
18
19
TGC
13
14
15
4
DTG
21
22
23
9
TGC
5
16
6
122
MDTG 27
TDSGM
Location
2
2
2
2
NCMD
9 & 10
5& 6
19 & 20
21 - 28
MDTG 28
TDSGM
Location
2
2
2
1
NCMD
29 - 36
7& 8
11 - 18
25 & 26
1
The low-speed DTG switches permit these DTGs to
bypass the MDTG.
2
Nonencrypted. Used for the local RAU. Not part of an
MDTG.
4-35. Complete all possible database modifications before deployment. The
large-switch operator can store up to ten database modifications on the Litton
disk drive. When modifying a database, always go from like data rate DTGs
such as SEN to RAU, or RAU to SEN, or higher to lower if possible.
4-36. The SYSCON staff and the NC officer in charge (OIC)/
noncommissioned officer in charge (NCOIC) use the DTG/TGC planning
diagram (Figure 4-5) and the NCS equipment assignment diagram (Figure
4-6) to set up site layouts. Each node manager prepares this diagram. The
SYSCON staff resolves any conflict.
4-10
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Figure 4-5. Site Layout Diagram
4-11
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
SIGNAL
ENTRY
PANEL
NCMD
TGC
2-9, 10
SEN
256
MDTG
27
RAU
256
SEN
256
NCS
1024
A7 A6 04
08-27
08-40
2-5, 6
A7 A6 01
14
2-19, 20
A7 A6 13
2-21-28
A7 A6 13
A7 A6 15
TED & TGMOW
13
07-45
07-53
15
4
9
16
10
17
11
10-28
11-42
TED/TGMOW
A7 A6 04
18
TED/TGMOW
A7 A6 05
19
TED/TGMOW
A7 A6 06
TSB 19
MUX
TED/TGMOW
A7 A6 O3
A5
MUX GM
TGMD
A7 A3
14
27
A3
MDTG 27
TGMOW
A7 A3 13
TO DVOW
PATCH PANEL 3
RCV
CLK XMT
SHF
CLK
LP
BK
GM
DVOW
SEN
256
MDTG
25
RAU
256
LEN
512
NCS
1024
1-9, 10
7
02-27
02-40
A6 A6 01
1-5, 6
A6 A6 01
1-19, 22
8
1
A6 A6 13
1-27-34
A6 A6 15
A6 A6 16
01-45
01-53
1
1
2
2
3
04-10
04-42
TSB 2
05-28
06-42
MUX
TED/TGMOW
A6 A5 O3
TED/TGMOW
A6 A5 04
3
TED/TGMOW
A6 A5 05
4
TED/TGMOW
A6 A5 06
5
5
TED/TGMOW
A5 A5 O9
A8
MUX GM
TGMD
A7 A3
04
25
MDTG 25
A1
TGMOW
A7 A3 03
TO DVOW
PATCH PANEL 1
RCV
CLK XMT
SHF
CLK
LP
BK
GM
DVOW
SCC-2
256
MDTG
26
SEN
256
SEN
256
1-23, 24
04-45
04-61
6
1-36, 36
A6 A6 01
10
1-7, 8
A6 A6 02
NCS
1024
9
A6 A6 13
1-11 16
A6 A6 03
A6 A6 04
11
3
06-45
06-58
6
7
02-09
02-22
TSB 3
02-46
03-60
TED/TGMOW
A5 A5 10
7
TED/TGMOW
A6 A5 11
8
TED/TGMOW
A6 A5 12
MUX
A6
MUX GM
TGMD
A7 A3
09
26
MDTG 26
A2
TGMOW
A7 A3 06
TO DVOW
PATCH PANEL 2
RCV
CLK XMT
SHF
CLK
LP
BK
GM
DVOW
NCS
1024
2-29, 36
A7 A6 15
A7 A6 16
5
SEN
256
2-7, 6
16
MDTG
28
NCS
1024
08-09
08-22
A7 A6 04
2-11, 16
A6 A6 04
A7 A6 06
TSB 17
11-46
12-60
6
TSB 16
08-46
09-60
13
21
14 TED/TGMOW
A7 A5 11
22
15
23
A4
TED/TGMOW
A7 A5 10
TED/TGMOW
A7 A5 12
MDTG 28
TGMD
A7 A3
17
28
TGMOW
A7 A3 18
TO DVOW
PATCH PANEL 4
RCV
CLK XMT
SHF
CLK
LP
BK
GM
DVOW
RAU
256
1-25, 26
A6 A6 15
12
05-09
05-17
9
TED/TGMOW
A7 A5 13
A7
Figure 4-6. NCS Equipment Assignment Diagram
4-37. A standard database in the LENS determines the allocation of DTGs.
Assigning DTGs is the basis for planning the LEN site layout for cabling and
antenna configurations. (See Figure 4-7.)
4-12
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
TED 1
TED 2
DTG 1
DTG 16
TGC 1
TGC 2
TED 3
DTG 5
TGC 3
RMC
NONENCRYPTED
DTG 27
RMC
RMC
NONENCRYPTED
DTG 26
NONENCRYPTED
RMC
DTG 25
J1 - J8
RMC
RMC
NONENCRYPTED
RMC
NONENCRYPTED
RMC
RMC
RMC
J-1077 (8 each)
Figure 4-7. LENS DTG/TGC Standard Database
4-38. The configuration also defines the assignment of the NCMD cards. The
NCMD assignment determines the number of channels in each TGC. This
assignment can be altered within limits to meet operational requirements.
The LENS operator’s manual and the switch initialization procedures define
the limitations. Use reassignment only when needed. (See Table 4-2.)
Table 4-2. LENS NCMD Cards
ENCRYPTED
TDSGM
Location
1
2
1
NCMD
15 - 18
15 - 18
19 & 20
DTG/TGC
1/1 NCS
16/2 NCS
5/3 SEN
NONENCRYPTED
TDSGM
Location
1
2
2
2
2
NCMD
25 & 26
19 & 22
25 & 26
31 & 32
13 & 14
DTG/TGC
9 RMC
25 RMC
26 RMC
27 RMC
28 RMC
4-13
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
4-39. The SYSCON staff and the LENS OIC/NCOIC use the LENS DTG/TGC
planning diagram (Figure 4-8) and the LENS equipment assignment diagram
(Figure 4-9) to set up site layouts. The node manager prepares these
diagrams. The SYSCON staff resolves any conflicts.
Figure 4-8. LENS Site Layout Diagram
4-14
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
GM
Switching Shelter
Signal Entry
Panel A4
DTG 1
SHF
TSB 1
N 1 RSC
S12 C 1 RSS
S 30 TRAFFIC
03-26
03-27
03-28
03-60
Loop Group Signaling Channel
256
S 1 OVERHEAD
E 13 TRAFFIC
N 2 UNUSED
04-04
R 1 SIGNALING
288 M 1 DUMMY
C 16 SUBSCRIBERS
TGC
1
TED/TGMOW
DTG 1
TGC
3
TED/TGMOW
DTG 5
05-06
05-09
A1
LP
BK
GM
DVOW
3
GM
TGMOW
DTG 3
GM
DVOW
2
GM
DTG 1
A2
SHF
GM
TSB 2
LP
BK
N 1 RSC
S12 C 1 RSS
S 30 TRAFFIC
09-26
09-27
09-29
09-60
R 1 SIGNALING
288
M 1 DUMMY
C 16 SUBSCRIBERS
10-08
10-09
R 1 SIGNALING
M 1 DUMMY
C 16 SUBSCRIBERS
11-08
11-09
TGMOW
DTG 26
GM
R 1 SIGNALING
M 1 DUMMY
C 16 SUBSCRIBERS
12-08
12-09
TGMOW
DTG 27
GM
R 1 SIGNALING
M 1 DUMMY
C 16 SUBSCRIBERS
09-08
09-09
TGMOW
DTG 28
GM
288
288
TGC
2
TED/TGMOW
DTG 16
TGMOW
DTG 25
GM
Switching Shelter
Signal Entry
Panel A8
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
288
J6
J7
J8
Figure 4-9. LENS Equipment Assignment Diagram
4-40. The DVOW provides secure digital voice communications between local
and distant LOS shelters, NCSs, LENSs, and SENSs. Use the following rules
when managing the DVOW’s 16 ring codes:
• SYSCON develops the initial ring code assignments for all links.
• Refer any ring code conflicts or duplications that affect the DVOW
system to SYSCON.
• All NMFs will keep local diagrams showing all ring code assignments
and changes to channel connections.
4-15
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
TEAM PACKETS
4-41. Team packets contain the information needed to open and install the
different elements of the MSE network. Team and equipment files require
updating before creating team packets. SYSCON generates and issues team
packets at least two days before deployment (one month for National Guard
units). NCs may exercise OPCON over extension nodes outside their
company. Team packets are initially distributed to their organizational unit.
The company issues team packets to each NC, LEN, remote RAU, and SEN.
As a minimum, team packets should include the items covered below:
• LOS frequencies.
§ Azimuths and polarizations.
§ Locations.
§ Activation times establish priorities.
§ System profile or margin.
§ Priority.
• Two copies of the OPORD for each NC and LEN. (One for the NCS
operator and one for the node manager.)
• An NC system recapitulation (RECAP) for platoon leaders.
• Team locations RECAP for each battalion administrative/logistics
operations center (ALOC).
COMSEC
4-42. The COMSEC custodian develops a sound key management plan that is
understood and practiced by all operators and taught to all subscribers.
Effective implementation of the plan includes the actions covered below.
4-43. The corps G6 and the division deputy G6 coordinate COMSEC key
distribution to all corps and division MSRT users. The teams receive prepositioned keys IAW the COMSEC key management plan on the day of
deployment or in the staging area.
4-44. The S3 ensures the brigade COMSEC custodian distributes the prepositioned key set to the battalion COMSEC custodian. MSE works when the
correct keys are in the correct places in all equipment. SYSCON coordinates
with adjacent corps and EAC for gateway keys before deployment.
4-45. COMSEC accountability helps locate keys throughout the network. It is
maintained for keys distributed to each element. Pre-positioned COMSEC
keys at specified locations ensure switches and users have their respective
keys. These keys are needed to operate specific equipment such as switches,
MSRTs, and RAUs. COMSEC work sheets help the COMSEC custodian plan
and conduct orderly distribution of COMSEC keys. Completed work sheets
also provide an accounting record for initial key distribution.
4-16
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
OPORD
4-46. At the end of the planning phase, the corps signal brigade OPORD is
produced and distributed. For example, each successful LOS path-profiling
project that is completed during the planning phase is printed and
distributed to units responsible for installation. In addition, the process
includes a planned schedule of events and the five-paragraph format of the
OPORD.
4-47. The planned schedule of events lets the signal commander know
exactly what is expected. The schedule should include–
• Concept briefing to commanders and staff by the S3.
• Site reconnaissance, if METT-T factors allow.
• Briefings with platoon leaders, platoon sergeants, and switch
supervisors.
• Back brief to the battalion commander/S3 by the company
commander.
• Final OPORD briefing to commanders, staff, and NC leadership. (At
this time issue the OPORD.)
• Final team packets issued to battalions for distribution to teams.
4-48. The five-paragraph format of the OPORD is used when publishing MSE
plans or annexes. Mandatory key points are–
• Database edition.
• COMSEC key distribution.
• Number of RAU/MSRT frequency plans and designation of the active
plan.
• Which NCS loads which PAL?
• Gateway area codes.
• Geographic priority of RAU coverage (where RAUs should provide
coverage).
SITE RECONNAISSANCE
4-49. When a team knows where it will deploy, it conducts a thorough
reconnaissance if METT-T factors permit it. For an NC, this usually includes
the platoon leader or platoon sergeant, LOS supervisor, and nuclear,
biological, and chemical (NBC) team. The NC’s reconnaissance must be
extremely detailed, as site selection and layout are critical to network
success. Ensure all site layouts are correct the first time. The platoon leader
completes NC reconnaissance when he fills out the NC diagram showing at
least–
• Antenna and LOS(V3) locations.
• RAU location.
• NCS/NMF locations.
4-50. The LOS has first priority of siting, the local RAU second, and the
NCS/NMF last.
4-17
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
DATABASE MODIFICATIONS
4-51. A platoon leader determines if the database needs modifying by
conducting a back brief to his command on his site layout. The back brief
includes accessibility, strip maps, dead zones for LOS radios, available area
for logistics support, SEN park area, and so on. SYSCON implements the
database change requirements.
NETWORK OPERATIONS
4-52. Network operations begin when planning is complete and the OPORD
is distributed. The MSE network must respond to the operational needs of
the Army, and it must support the maneuver commanders. Key factors in
network operation are covered below.
4-53. The signal brigade commander has TECHCON of all corps MSE assets.
Battalion commanders provide assets to support the corps’plan. They ensure
movement and installation, operation, and maintenance of their assets.
4-54. The division signal battalion commander manages his network and,
through his division’s mission, supports the corps network. The corps G6 may
designate certain areas of the battlefield to be technically controlled by a
division signal battalion commander. If so, the division battalion commander
must still request network changes through the corps active SCC-2. The
brigade SYSCON has final approval authority.
4-55. The corps area and signal support battalions have the network control
terminal (NCT), AN/GGC-66. (The ISYSCON(V2) will replace the NCT.) The
NCT sends and receives messages to and from the SCC-2. The battalions may
request information from the SCC-2 at any time. When an action takes place
concerning one of the MSE teams, the NCT receives an information copy of
the message.
4-56. SYSCON manages the MSE network, including COMSEC keys,
whether at corps or at the stand-alone division level. The COMSEC key
manager directs the initialization, generation, and activation of keys and
maintains records on their use and location.
4-57. The SCC-2 cannot generate or distribute keys. It directs the primary
node switch (PNS) to generate and transfer COMSEC keys. Normally, the
SCC-2 connects directly to the PNS. The corps also designates an alternate
NCS. Normally, this is where the standby SCC-2 is connected.
4-58. The stand-alone divisions designate an alternate NCS for key
generation. The second NCS is designated as possible backup if the PNS
cannot perform bulk transfer due to equipment or hardware problems.
However, the COMSEC custodian ensures the alternate NCS has all the
COMSEC keys needed to perform bulk transfer for each NCS.
4-18
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
INSTALLING THE BACKBONE (PHASE II)
4-59. The most critical element in MSE operations is establishing and
sustaining the backbone network (NC to NC link). The objective is for a
strong multilink system that allows the direct bulk transfer of key sets to all
NCSs/LENSs and RAU/MSRT frequency plans to all RAUs. Establishing a
strong backbone before allowing subscriber connectivity alleviates work
arounds due to switch software, hardware, or COMSEC problems. This is
also true for loading the PAL. All network managers, NCS supervisors, and
node OICs must remember that a PAL is loaded only once. Network
managers designate which NCSs will load and keep track of PALs (Figure
4-10).
INSTALL INTERNODAL LINKS
ADJACENT
DIVISION
ADJACENT
CORPS
EAC
XX
SCC-2
XXX
SCC-2
SNS
XXX
LDR
XX
SCC-2
SCC-2
PNS
LDR
LDR
XX
LDR
XX
X
SCC-2
EAC
ADJACENT
CORPS
XX
ADJACENT
DIVISION
Figure 4-10. Phased Deployment, Phase II, Internodal Links
4-19
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
4-60. OICs follow OPORD procedures for priority of backbone LOS
connectivity once deployed. All radio links may work at the same time;
however, only one link is engineered into the switch at a time. Duplication
and bypass follow the link priority list. (See Figure 4-11.) At this stage, node
OICs inform SYSCON of their NCs operation, including messages back to the
SCC-2. (See Figures 4-12 and 4-13.) All NCSs/LENSs keep the duplication
and bypass assignment printed and current. This information is vital when
nodal links fail, or as NCs move throughout the network, or when redirection
of duplication and bypass occur.
PERFORM DUPLICATION AND BYPASS
ADJACENT
DIVISION
ADJACENT
CORPS
EAC
XX
SCC-2
XXX
SNS
LDR
XXX
SCC-2
XX
SCC-2
SCC-2
PNS
LDR
"B" LINK
"A" LINK
"C" LINK
ALTERNATE PATH
LDR
XX
LDR
XX
X
SCC-2
EAC
ADJACENT
CORPS
XX
ADJACENT
DIVISION
Figure 4-11. Phased Deployment, Phase II, Duplication and Bypass
4-20
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
ORDERS
REPORTS
NC41:
OPEN ORDER
MOVE ORDER
OPEN LINK ORDER:
NC42
NC41
NC43
NC41
NC41
R40
E71
NC41
NC41
L40
RAU (R40):
OPEN ORDER
MOVE ORDER
OPEN LINK ORDER:
R40
NC41
OPEN LINK REPORTS:
NC41-NC42
NC41-NC43
NC41-R40
NC41-E71
NC41-L40
LEN (L40):
OPEN ORDER
MOVE ORDER
OPEN LINK ORDER:
NC41
L40
L40
NC42
SEN (E71):
OPEN ORDER
MOVE ORDER
OPEN LINK ORDER:
NC41
E71
Notes:
1.
Arrows point to
elements that receive the
orders from the SCC-2.
2.
Arrows point to
elements that receive the
orders from the SCC-2. The
NC or LEN relays the orders.
INITIAL DEPLOYMENT
Figure 4-12. Initial Deployment Orders and Reports
ORDERS
CLOSE ORDERS:
E71
L40
R40
NC41
REPORTS
CLOSE REPORTS:
E71
L40
R40
NC41
CLOSE LINK ORDERS:
NC42
NC41
NC41
NC43
R40
*NC41
*NC41
E71
L40
NC41
CLOSE LINK REPORTS:
NC41-E71
NC41-L40
NC41-R40
NC41-NC42
NC41-NC43
OPEN ORDERS:
NC41
R40
L40
E71
OPEN LINK REPORTS:
NC41-NC42
NC41-NC43
NC41-R40
NC41-L40
NC41-E71
MOVE ORDERS:
NC41
R40
L40
E71
*NC41 relays orders to
R40 and E71.
Figure 4-13. Displacement Orders and Reports
4-21
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
4-61. As the first backbone link is established (DTG status 13 and trunk
signaling buffer (TSB) 5), the NCS operator verifies link status. He uses the
display interswitch link (DIL) screen before preparing to send duplication
and bypass to another NCS. This ensures the link is initialized and a
transmission status of Y2 is established. Any other status is unacceptable.
4-62. Once established, each NCS duplicates all virtual trunk groups (32-40)
which contain affiliated, preaffiliated, and disaffiliated subscribers and TGCs
over the first backbone link. The exception is TGCs 1 through 6, unless
downsized for a SEN/RAU. (See Figure 4-14.) NCSs continue to follow their
priority list, and the second backbone link is established. The NCS operator
deletes all even-numbered TGCs and even virtuals from the first nodal link
and duplicates them over the second nodal link. (See Figure 4-15.)
4-63. When problems occur, SYSCON is notified. The problems are corrected
before the RAUs turn on their marker beacon (signals). On direction from the
SYSCON, the NMF directs the RAU operator to turn on his marker beacon.
However, if the NCS fails, the NMF directs the RAU to turn off the marker
beacon. Once the NCS recovers, the operator verifies his mode of operation
and requests permission to turn on the marker beacon. Modes of operation
include automatic, forced, and inhibited.
4-64. RAU or SEN subscribers affiliated with a bypassed parent switch
automatically transfer to another designated NCS or LENS as a group if the
RAU or SEN group is marked for bypass. Setting up EUB tables are part of
the duplication process. They cannot be on separate DTGs. LEN operators set
up EUB and duplication data in both NCs to which they are linked.
4-65. Upon activating EUB, the adjacent NCS provides phone service. The
number of channels required determine the number of TGCs (1024) that are
bypassed. A SEN requires 13, a RAU requires 8, and the SCC-2 requires 8.
There are 58 channels per internodal TGC holding duplication. The NC can
have 58 EUB channels per 1024 link. The LEN can have 26 EUB channels
per 512 link.
4-66. When the duplication and bypass process is complete and the backbone
is operational, the NCS operator performs bulk transfer of COMSEC keys.
(See Figure 4-16.) To establish a COMSEC error-free network, the bulk
transfer of a master key set is sent directly into the correct hardened unique
storage (HUS) locations from the leader switch to the subordinate NCSs in
that NSG.
4-22
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Legend:
LOS
Cable
Figure 4-14. Duplication and Bypass, First Nodal Link
4-23
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Legend:
LOS
Cable
Figure 4-15. Duplication and Bypass, Second Nodal Link
4-24
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
PERFORM BULK TRANSFER (BT)
STEP 1: From the PNS to the NSG leaders.
ADJACENT
DIVISION
STEP 2: From the NSG leaders to the NCS and LENS.
EAC
ADJACENT
CORPS
XX
BT
BT
SCC-2
BT
XXX
SCC-2
BT
SNS
BT
XXX
LDR
BT
BT
BT
BT
PNS
BT
BT
-2
BT
BT
BT
BT
LDR
XX
BT
LDR
XX
X
BT
BT
BT
BT
SCC-2
EAC
S CC
BT
XXX
SCC-2
LDR
XX
BT
BT
ADJACENT
CORPS
XX
ADJACENT
DIVISION
Figure 4-16. Phased Deployment, Phase II, Bulk Transfer
INSTALLING EXTENSIONS (PHASE III)
4-67. After installing the backbone network, each NCS installs extension
links by priority. Install local and remote RAUs first as illustrated in Figure
4-17. The NMF notifies the RAU operator to affiliate the group logic unit
(GLU) and his DSVT.
4-68. Once the GLU is affiliated, the NMF generates a frequency plan
request message for each local or remote RAU to the SCC-2. This is not
required if frequency plans are already distributed before deployment. The
SCC-2/NPT then automatically sends the frequency plan to the GLU. If the
NMF is not available, the SCC-2/NPT can force a frequency plan to the GLU.
The RAU operator calls the call service position (CSP) of his NCS to ensure
the RAU can process calls. He then calls a CSP of a distant node to ensure
4-25
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
other keys are correct. This process ensures that the COMSEC keys are in
the proper HUS locations before providing mobile subscriber access into the
network.
ADJACENT
DIVISION
INSTALL EXTENSION NODES
EAC
ADJACENT
CORPS
XX
SCC-2
NRI
XXX
SCC-2
SNS
XXX
LDR
XX
SCC-2
SCC-2
LDR
PNS
NRI
XXX
NRI
NRI
LDR
XX
XX
X
EAC
SCC-2
ADJACENT
CORPS
NRI
Extension links (RAU/SEN) are installed by priority
(prior coordination between the G6 and S3s).
XX
Depicts NC Backbone
NC
RAU
ADJACENT
DIVISION
LEN
SEN
Area Node
TTC-39A(V1)
Figure 4-17. Phased Deployment, Phase III, Extension Nodes
4-69. When problems occur, SYSCON is notified. The problems are corrected
before the RAUs turn on their marker beacon (signals). On direction from the
SYSCON, the NMF directs the RAU operator to turn on his marker beacon.
However, if the NCS fails, the NMF directs the RAU to turn off the marker
beacon. Once the NCS recovers, the operator verifies his mode of operation
and requests permission to turn on the marker beacon. Modes of operation
include automatic, forced, and inhibited.
4-26
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
4-70. The SEN teams deploy to support CPs and to provide service for wire
subscribers. They install distribution boxes (J-1077) and enforce cable/wiretagging procedures. The SENS operator initializes the SENS, used in either a
stand-alone or MSE network configuration, and loads COMSEC keys
required for operation.
4-71. Once connectivity is established, the NCS calls the SENS operator over
the DVOW and directs him to affiliate his DNVT. The SENS operator
affiliates his DNVT and calls the NCS CSP to verify if it can process calls.
Then, the SENS operator notifies the S6 who notifies subscribers to affiliate
their phones.
4-72. The DSVT subscriber off a SEN loads the proper keys (U and M),
affiliates his telephone, hangs up, and waits for ring busy and nonsecure
warning (NSW) lights to flash. The DSVT subscriber is marked out-of-service
if he does not wait for the flashing ring busy and NSW lights. This requires
the NCS/LENS operator to restore service. If the SEN has a KY-90, the NCS
and SENS operators must ensure they can process calls.
4-73. At this stage, NCs use their priority list to install SENSs. NCs
coordinate priority list changes with SYSCON.
OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT (PHASE IV)
4-74. Operational management is maintaining an effective network that best
serves the subscribers and begins after establishing the network. Here, the
SCC-2 becomes an operations management tool for making additional
changes. The information flow between all elements, units, signal personnel,
and the SYSCON becomes more important as the network changes and
reconfiguration occurs. (See Figure 4-18.)
4-75. RAU coverage and frequency plans are checked continuously. Ensure
SYSCON is aware of all changes that affect the network. The NC’s NMF
reports frequency interference, equipment failure, COMSEC, and other
problems to SYSCON. To identify problems, several management screens at
the active SCC-2 need printing periodically. These printed screens help make
network decisions when subscribers jump and equipment fails.
4-76. RECAP screens are printed, reviewed, and stored in the station
logbook. This logbook should contain at least–
• Link data, RECAP of all planned and in-use internodal and extension
node links.
• Authorized and restricted LOS/SHF frequencies.
• Current RAU/MSRT frequency plans.
• Current locations of all assemblages.
• Subscriber management cell operations.
• SCC-2 SICPS layout diagram.
4-27
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
SEN/RAU
RR
LEN
NC
MASTER
NC
SLAVE
MESSAGE
OPEN NC
ORDER
MOVE NC
ORDER
SCC-2
PROJECT
OPEN
NC (FOR
PLANNING
IN NC).
RESPONSIBLE
ELEMENT
SCC-2
SCC-2
POSITION
STATUS
REPORT
NODAL PLT
LDR
(SLAVE NC)
OPEN LINK
ORDER
SCC-2
OPEN LINK
ORDER
OPEN LINK
REPORT
OPEN LEN
ORDER
MOVE LEN
ORDER
NODAL PLT
LDR
(MASTER NC)
PLANNING ACTIONS
Signal Bde or Bn S3 tells SCC-2
staff to plan an NC deployment to a
specific area of the corps battlefield.
SCC-2 staff finds best location for
NC within that given area. SCC-2
studies for future point (signal path
profile). SCC-2 designates which
NC deploys. (For initial deployment,
the SCC-2 develops the orders and
puts them in an envelope and gives
them to the Nodal Plt Ldr.) For
subsequent NC displacement, the
orders are sent via TTY or are hand
delivered from the SCC-2to the NC
Plt Ldr/Sgt in the NMF. SCC-2 GDU
and VDU are updated automatically
upon receiving NC status reports.
On order or IAW unit SOP, the NC
updates the SCC-2 with personnel/
equipment status reports.
SCC-2
SCC-2
POSITION
STATUS
REPORT
LEN
OPEN LINK
REPORT
SCC-2
OPEN LINK
ORDER
OPEN LINK
REPORT
NODAL PLT
LDR
(MASTER NC)
REQUEST
TO OPEN
SEN/RAU/RR*
SEN/REMOTE
RAU/RR/
OIC/NCOIC
OPEN
SEN/RAU/RR
ORDER
SCC-2
MOVE
SEN/RAU/RR
ORDER
SCC-2
POSITION
STATUS
REPORT
SEN/REMOTE
RAU/RR
OPEN LINK
ORDER
SCC-2
OPEN LINK
ORDER
SCC-2
OPEN LINK
REPORT
MASTER NC
Figure 4-18. Message Flow
4-28
SEN/Remote RAU/RR notifies
the SCC-2 (via NC or LEN) of
its future location and requests
to open and establish a radio link.
The SCC-2, using automated signal
path profiling, finds a way to link the
SEN, remote RAU, or RR to an NC.
Then, the SCC-2 creates the
appropriate project.
All message traffic to and from the
SEN/Remote RAU/RR must be
routed through an NCS.
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
4-77. The active SCC-2 issues orders to all NMFs. It receives reports from
the NMFs upon execution of these orders. Thus, the SCC-2 maintains control
of the network. The NMF’s OIC/NCOIC sends reports by the workstation or
other electronic means. This is the only means to update SCC-2 files without
manual input by SCC-2 operators. (See Figures 4-19 and 4-20.) All directives
and reports for SEN, RAU, NATO, NAI, and relay teams are routed to the
NMF and passed by orderwire, telephone, CNR, or courier.
HEADER
VZCZC
007561007
DE7561707/0250/250915Z/0061
TY SM
FM = SCC-2
TO NC = 61
INFO
BT
CONFIDENTIAL
TEXT
TRAILER
OBJ/OPEN/LINK = 61 L02
DTG = 251500Z
COORD/MASTER = PK283460
COORD/SLAVE = PK310443
AZ = 60
BAND = A
FREQ/XMIT = 310.125 MHz
FREQ/RCV = 240.750 MHz
MARGIN = 10
POLARIZATION = V
KEY LINK = 2
BT
Figure 4-19. Open Link Sent to NC 61
07561707
007561707
DE7561007/0086/251500Z/0061
TY SM
FM NC = 61
TO = SCC-2
INFO
BT
CLASSIFICATION
OBJ/OPEN/LINK = 61 L02
DTG = 251500Z
BT
Figure 4-20. Open Link Report from NC 61
4-29
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
4-78. The SCC-2 must have influence over COMSEC, subscribers,
frequencies, switches, and teams and equipment for a successful network.
(See Figure 4-21.)
COMSEC
TEAMS AND EQUIPMENT
SWITCHES
SUBSCRIBERS
FREQUENCIES
Figure 4-21. Five Major Areas of Phase IV Operational Management
4-79. COMSEC plans and operations do not change when the network
deploys. SYSCON directs changes once MSE assets are employed. After
installing the network, subscriber key mismatch may occur. COMSEC error
messages printed on the NCS/LENS printer identify most problems.
COMSEC messages, especially rekeyed terminated messages, are reported to
SYSCON to determine if a network COMSEC problem exists. Table 4-3
shows some reportable COMSEC messages.
4-80. Subscriber problems are channeled from the extensions to NMFs
through the SYSCON’s subscriber cell. The cell includes personnel in charge
of subscriber problems. The cell handles subscriber problems and passes
information down to the NMF. When the cell manages network problems, it
also looks for potential problems and fine-tunes the network. For MSRT
subscribers, SYSCON requires all NMFs to monitor RAUs using the display
group status (DGS) screens. NMFs report the number of subscribers affiliated
to their RAUs. With these reports, SYSCON determines if more RAU
coverage is needed.
4-81. SYSCON manages frequencies for all communications systems in the
corps/division, including all MSE LOS links and MSRTs/RAUs. Operators
absolutely must not flip-flop, swing, bootleg, or use unauthorized frequencies.
SYSCON cannot accurately perform frequency management if problems are
not reported. Interference problems occur when node OICs change or use
other than SCC-2 assigned frequencies. As the network grows, overriding the
SCC-2’s automatic frequency allocation feature causes interference problems.
The SYSCON OIC decides whether to input frequencies and override the
SCC-2 manually.
4-30
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Table 4-3. Reportable COMSEC Messages
Message
Indication
Command 42 failed, KG93xx
KG82nn did not SYNCH with xx-xx
DRCVR n.
Indicates U key mismatch with an MSRT.
KG82nn did not SYNCH with
DRCVR n.
Indicates wrong M key failure to SYNCH with an
MSRT.
KG82nn did not SYNCH with xx-xx,
DRCVR yy.
Indicates wrong M key in LD(X) position of wire line
DSVT.
Rekeyed terminated: n, [directory
number] LNXXXXX, [profile] nn.
Indicates M key mismatch between the switch and
an MSRT. This normally occurs with the KG82
message.
[Terminal address] xx-xx out of
service.
Indicates a wire line DSVT terminal address
marked out of service which occurs with M key
mismatch and prints with the KG82 failed to
SYNCH message.
4-82. All frequency margins should be at least +13 for internodal links and
+11 for extension links. These margins are only guidelines and may be
altered, depending on local conditions. Margins of +15 may cause over
modulation that degrades the link. Consider remoting the LOS with SHF to
obtain a higher margin.
4-83. RAU frequencies should contain as many frequency pairs as possible
(up to 96; recommended minimum is 40). The frequency manager determines
the number of frequency pairs. RAUs working within the same network use
20 percent of the frequency pairs of the active plan duplicated in the reserve
plan. This ensures that MSRT users can reaffiliate in the network during
frequency plan changes. RAUs working in different networks and occupying
the same area must have zero percent of frequency overlaps between active
frequency plans. The dialogue between the MSRTs and RAUs searches for a
frequency pair. If they match, there is a CRYPTO alarm on the MSRT
because of different M keys.
4-84. Switches assist SYSCON in managing the network by determining
network performance.
4-85. Traffic metering reports provide the node OIC with a detailed look of
the switch’s performance. These reports include–
• R1 - switch traffic report.
• R2 - node pair traffic report.
• R3 - summary for TGCs.
• R4 - precedence reports for TGCs.
4-31
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
• R5 - loop traffic report.
• R6 - DTG binary digit error rate report. (All DTGs should average
100 percent of the time at 10-6.)
4-86. Traffic load control (TLC) limits subscriber access at each switch during
low call completion rates, bad or busy trunks, or network/switch congestion.
The subscriber’s profile contains its TLC level. TLC levels are–
• 1 - no restrictions.
• 2 - restrict trunk access.
• 3 - restrict trunk access.
• 5 - restrict switch access.
Note: If TLC 2, 3, or 5 is implemented, telephones can
receive calls. However, they will not have a dial tone.
4-87. Gateways may become overloaded with traffic due to increased use or
reduced grade of service. Zone restriction limits groups of subscribers, based
on profile, access to certain gateways. Two zone restriction lists have a
maximum of 101 entries. The other six zone restriction lists have a maximum
of 33 entries. Restricted lists prevent subscribers from calling those zones on
the list, while permissive lists prevent subscribers from calling any zone that
is not on the list. Each entry contains–
• Entry number.
• Start code (defining a single zone or the start of a zone range).
• End code (either blank for a single zone or defining the end of the
zone range).
4-88. The zone range uses two entries in the database. The start or end codes
consist of a three-digit area code, a four-digit unit code, or a six-digit NATO
area code in the form NYX, LNXX, or 9YX XXX, where–
• N = any digit 2 through 9.
• L = any digit 1 through 7.
• X = any digit 0 through 9.
• Y = any digit 0 or 1.
• 9 = defines NATO subscriber.
4-89. NCS/LENS operators can temporarily change subscriber profile
assignments with approval from SYSCON. Profile reassignment must be
coordinated through the G6.
4-90. When the number of MSRTs affiliated to the RAU exceeds 25, SYSCON
should consider distributing the MSRT load to other RAUs or “shaking the
blanket.” This action requires the RAU operator to turn off the marker
beacon and report to the NMF when all radios are free. Shaking the blanket
is performed only when there is sufficient overlapping of RAU converge or
during low-traffic periods. The switch operator performs an assign
SEN/RAU/SCC-2 (ASR) database modification to indicate “absent” and places
the remaining subscribers in the absent subscriber mode. This forces active
MSRTs to transfer affiliation automatically to the strongest available RAU
marker. SYSCON notifies the NMF to turn on the marker beacon and
perform another DGS to determine the correct number of MSRTs. However, if
4-32
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
the numbers have not changed, SYSCON considers the importance of
subscribers and the use of RAU modes of operation. Modes of operation
include–
• Automatic: Six radios are for routine subscribers and two are
reserved for priority users.
• Forced: All radios are used for priority subscribers only.
• Inhibited: No radios are reserved; all subscribers can access any
radio.
4-91. The node OIC/NCOIC makes database changes for MSE links.
SYSCON provides assistance for non-MSE links. If problems occur, SYSCON
is notified. All changes are made as they are required.
4-92. SYSCON normally controls the movement of SENs or LENs. During
the rapid flow of battle, SENs or LENs may displace before notifying
SYSCON. If this occurs, the S6 coordinates with the corps or division deputy
G6 or SYSCON. Based on the S6’s coordination, the SCC-2 can engineer
systems to the extension node’s proposed location. If time permits, the SEN’s
NCOIC and the unit’s S6 perform reconnaissance for the proposed site. The
SEN NCOIC notifies the NC of information that is passed to SYSCON.
4-93. SYSCON generates team packet FRAGOs and sends them by message
to the gaining and losing NC. The SEN calls the losing NC by telephone for
permission to close the link. Before closing the link, the NC gives information
from the team packet to the SEN to install a link with the gaining NC. The
NC enters ASR/MODIFY/ABSENT before closing the link. The NC closes the
link and sends a close link report to the SCC-2. The SEN team reports
leaving the site to the losing NC by MSRT or FM radio. Once the SEN team
arrives on site, they report to the gaining NC who notifies SYSCON by
telephone. After establishing the link to the SEN, the gaining NC sends an
open link report to the SCC-2.
4-94. SYSCON takes immediate action on unexpected changes, such as
destroyed or failed NCs. SYSCON first determines if the NC is destroyed or
has failed. A destroyed NC can be identified if no communications can be
made to the NC by FM radio or its internodal links. A failed NC is identified
by contact being made from the NMF. SYSCON directs the extensions to rehome their LOS antennas to provide connectivity if the NC is inoperable for a
long time. For the SENS to regain access into the network, SYSCON finds an
NC that can handle the additional system. The SEN is contacted by FM radio
to reorient its LOS. It is not always possible to give all the extensions access
into the network. SYSCON determines which SEN is given network access.
Note: Re-homing links require the SCC-2/NPT to
generate a new project, assign new frequencies, and
create new team packets.
4-95. The SCC-2/NPT maintains team and equipment files. The files are
updated before and during each operation. This ensures the SCC-2/NPT has
the most current information available. It is important to update these files
because without updated information, teams could be committed to a mission
they are not equipped to accomplish. While in garrison, the operational
readiness report (ORR) is used to update the SCC-2/NPT files. Once
deployed, the node OIC must feed this information to the SCC-2 by report
messages.
4-33
Chapter 5
Network Database Management
This chapter describes database development and provides doctrinal
guidance to accomplish those tasks. The discussion includes developing
and managing an MSE database using the NPT. The NPT and the SCC-2
are used as the network status controller including the NMC for the TPN
operation and management.
MANAGEMENT AND CONTROL
5-1. The NPT, SCC-2, NCS, LENS, and their NMFs operate from a
standardized network database. The critical part of long-range planning is
initially generating the network database. The corps or the division G6, if
establishing a stand-alone division network, sets up network management
and control parameters for this process.
5-2. The signal brigade headquarters conducts management and control in
an MSE corps network. The division signal battalion headquarters conducts
management and control in a stand-alone division MSE network. Within
these headquarters, the SYSCON conducts MSE network planning and
operation. SYSCON maintains TECHCON of the network and is responsible
for–
• Planning, engineering, controlling, and maintaining the network.
• Assigning and reassigning variable network operating parameters.
• Distributing all operating parameters networkwide.
• Establishing relationships among network components.
DATABASE DEVELOPMENT
5-3. For signal planners, the supported unit's mission and planning guidance
determine the content of the database. Signal planners may prepare one
master database from which all missions evolve or prepare individual
mission databases to support specific contingencies. The number of databases
depends on the differences in force structure, missions, and geographical AO.
5-4. In operation plans (OPLANs), the force commander and staff define each
mission, contingency, and exercise. The force signal staff prepares the
databases and obtains the following information:
• Active and reserve component forces that require support.
• Radios to be used.
• Available MSE assets and unit information.
• Desired link reliabilities.
• Environmental parameters.
5-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
• Desired network-planning factors.
• Subscriber terminals to include–
§ Level of authorized precedence.
§ Type of authorized subscriber terminal and designation of tactical
unit where each terminal will deploy.
§ Type of service required by each user/office (for example,
progressive conference and commercial network access).
§ Preprogrammed conference participants.
§ Compressed dial participants.
• Expected joint and allied interface requirements, including units and
specific mission requirements.
• Expected geographical AOs.
• Authorized and restricted frequencies by range and type.
• Known competing, civilian emitters that could be in the AO, including
grid locations, operating frequencies, and transmit power.
• Potential EW emitters.
5-5. This information is then used to respond to one or more of the following
areas.
• Digitized maps.
• High point data.
• PALs.
• Profile lists (including compressed dial lists).
• Preprogrammed conference lists (PCLs).
• Team files.
• MSE frequency management.
5-6. The MSE database includes the global database (GDB), and it–
• Supports a seamless network architecture.
• Provides joint and service interoperability at EAC and ECB.
• Provides an effective communications network for any force projection
scenario.
5-7. The GDB identifies joint (Commander-in-Chief (CINC)) level, US Army,
US Air Force, US Navy, and US Marine organizations. The GDB manager
(GDB MGR) is located with the US Army Signal Center. The GDB includes–
• Nonduplicated PAL sublist numbers.
• Nonduplicated team label identification for switch and control
systems.
• Nonduplicated phone numbers.
• Global Standard Profile Matrix (GSPM) 255.
5-2
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
5-8. The NPT can develop the MSE network database, plan and engineer the
network, and distribute team information to all appropriate switches. The
SCC-2 acts as network status controller, and the NMC within the SCC-2
manages the operation of the TPN after it is initialized and loaded with the
database.
DIGITIZED MAP REQUIREMENTS
5-9. The MSE NPT uses two types of map data for its software applications.
Both are originally sourced from the National Imagery and Mapping Agency
(NIMA) and are available on compact disk-read only memory (CD-ROM).
5-10. The ARC-Digitized Raster Graphics (ADRG) is a digitized picture of
paper maps that clearly shows the terrain features (for example, rivers,
roads, lakes, hills). They are available in five forms.
• Joint Operations Graphics-Air (JOG-A), 1:250,000.
• Joint Operations Graphics-Ground (JOG-G), 1:250,000.
• Topographic Line Maps (TLM), 1:50,000.
• Tactical Pilotage Charts (TPC), 1:50,000.
• Operational Navigation Charts (ONC), 1: 1,000,000.
5-11. The digitized terrain elevation data (DTED), Level 1, provides the
terrain data applied to the digitized map for use in site location and radio
system profiling.
HIGH POINT DATA REQUIREMENTS
5-12. High points are developed using the high elevation retrieval option
within the network planning-frequency assignment application of the NPT. A
user-selected rectangular area, defined by coordinates of its southwest and
northeast corners, can be established using appropriate map data. This
rectangular area map plot can be divided into five rows of five columns
(equaling 25 cells) with up to five high points per cell, so that selected high
points may be chosen throughout the original map plot. When selecting high
points, a minimum separation value is applied to prevent all high points from
being on the same high piece of terrain (for example, single hilltop). With this
capability, the NPT can make a map reconnaissance of potential site
locations before making the physical reconnaissance.
5-13. Two other NPT software applications support high point refinement.
The interactive asset placement (IAP) application searches for high elevation
placement for particular radio links at a site that still profiles. The automatic
asset placement (AAP) application checks for the centroid of mass of switches
that an NC supports and identifies the highest ground within a 1-kilometer
area of a selected site.
5-14. Signal planners must consider all METT-T factors when selecting
potential high points. The final high point selection is coordinated with senior
headquarters SYSCON and the G3. Other weapons and communication
systems can have high points as key terrain.
5-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
PREAFFILIATION LIST REQUIREMENTS
5-15. The MSE database includes telephone numbers for fielded units
contained on the switch PAL. This database contains a unique telephone
number for each subscriber position. The database is updated annually
according to actual subscriber requirements that allocate a specific type of
terminal to each operational subscriber.
5-16. The PAL sublists identify subscribers’ numbers and the associated
profile service characteristics likely to be affiliated with the network. The
signal organization planner, through the US Army Signal Center GDB MGR,
manages the development of the PAL. A PAL database can have up to 1,000
PAL sublists (database designators DB000-DB999). Each PAL sublist can
contain a maximum of 200 subscribers. Each sublist is developed according to
the standard requirements code (SRC) assigned to each unit or entity within
a PAL database. The sublist may include command structure or community
of interest, such as division main (DMAIN), division tactical command post
(DTAC), or division rear (DREAR). PAL sublists are a part of the global PAL
(GLPAL) baseline that includes all joint and US military services.
5-17. The doctrinal guidelines for developing a PAL database are shown
below.
5-18. Assign unit or telephone prefixes (first part of the phone number)
according to the Global Block Numbering Plan (GBNP) approved in June
1995, and subsequently changed or defined by the GDB MGR.
5-19. Assign telephone numbers by using the prefix from the unitlist.dbf
and associating a suffix from the suffix.dbf based on the SRC or subscriber
template. The subscriber database is created from association and reviewed
by the network manager or PAL manager of the specific PAL database. Units
should use the subscriber database to develop telephone directories to meet
their requirements.
5-20. Ensure a subscriber’s telephone number is unique with a profile
assigned and placed only on one sublist.
5-21. Develop PAL sublists along task organized lines, depending on
requirements. A subscriber's DNVT and MSRT number may appear on
different PAL sublists. This depends on the way the network deploys and
supports the units.
5-22. Group GLPAL sublists for corps into DB000-DB999 signal technical
numbers as shown in Table 5-1.
5-23. Group GLPAL sublists for all other databases into DB000-DB099
signal technical numbers as shown in Table 5-2.
5-4
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Table 5-1. Corps GLPAL Sublists
Database Designators
DB000
DB001-DB009
DB010-DB019
DB020-DB029
DB030-DB039
DB040-DB049
DB050-DB059
DB060-DB069
DB070-DB079
DB080-DB089
DB090-DB094
DB095-DB099
Community of Interest
Area Brigade DBA00
Corps Signal Brigade SCC-2/
ISYSCON
Area Battalion DBA01 Corps
Area Battalion DBA02 Corps
Area Battalion DBA03 Corps
Area Battalion DBA04 Corps
(Support)
Division DBD01
Division DBD02
Division DBD03
Division DBD04
Division DBD05
Division DBD06
Division DBD07
Table 5-2. GLPAL Sublists for Other Databases
Database Designators
DB000
DB001-DB009
DB010-DB019
DB020-DB029
DB030-DB039
DB040-DB049
DB050-DB059
DB060-DB069
DB070-DB079
DB080-DB089
DB090-DB094
DB095-DB099
DB100-DB999
Community of Interest
Area Brigade DBA00
Command or Brigade ISYSCON
Area Battalion DBA01
Area Battalion DBA02
Area Battalion DBA03
Area Battalion DBA04
Area Battalion DBA05
Area Battalion DBA06
Area Battalion DBA07
Area Battalion DBA08
Area Battalion DBA09
Area Battalion DBA10
Area Battalion DBA11
As Required
5-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
5-24. Table 5-3 shows an example of the switch PAL.
Table 5-3. Switch PAL
Switch PAL Example
PA520597 contains 9 PALs
PAL Number 52001
I_CTSC 29 SC BN NCS 5201
9 entries:
5200100
5200101
5200102
5200103
5200104
5200105
5200106
5200110
5200111
184
190
190
190
190
190
190
190
190
5-25. Do not include data terminal adapter (DTA) numbers in switches on
PAL sublists or subscriber databases. The network uses these numbers to
communicate between switches. They follow the format of DB99907 (999 is
number 000-099 and 07 is standard for all flood search switches).
5-26. Group all signal battalion MSRT numbers on one PAL. This allows the
signal numbers needed for network control to activate in the first operational
NCS and ensures that signal managers have immediate access to the
evolving network. Other MSRT subscribers may use a similar rule, so they
may have phone service as soon as they enter the area.
5-27. The NPT can accept a PAL load disk with its PBOOKII software
application. Do not use PBOOKII software when modifying and updating a
PAL. The PBOOKII software application provides an electronic phone book to
support tactical switching. It also supports the 63 and 255 profile matrix
standards with version 2.01 and the GDB with version 2.02.
5-6
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
PROFILE LIST REQUIREMENTS
5-28. Profiles provide particular phone service and system features to wire
and mobile subscribers. The subscriber’s profile defines the level of
authorized service to each MSE subscriber. A method of developing profiles is
to classify the subscribers by type and/or position. Each subscriber is
assigned a permanent profile. This profile can be changed temporarily at the
switch; however, this is the exception not the rule. Signal planners must
consider area TMD communications support requirements, whereas TMD
assets require dial-hold (channel reassignment function) circuits through the
MSE network.
5-29. The US Army uses the GSPM 255 0895 matrix, which replaces the
earlier Army Standard Profile Matrix 0191. The GSPM 255 0895 matrix–
• Increases profiles from 63 to 255.
• Provides additional profiles to meet evolving subscriber service
requirements.
• Includes profiles for joint communications networks.
• Provides direct conversion from the 63 to the 255 matrix.
• Addresses the COMSEC rekey rule “250” limitation.
• Provides 19 subscriber features.
5-30. Six basic groups within the matrix are–
• 0 – Wireline subscribers (terminal type-3) DSVT.
• 1 – Mobile subscribers (terminal type-3) MSRT.
• 2 – DNVT subscribers (terminal type-13) DNVT.
• 3 – DTA (terminal type-15).
• 4 – GLU (terminal type-16).
• 5 – Analog/secure terminal unit (STU) (terminal type-248).
5-31. There are 50 subgroups which are categorized by profile and
precedence order. The COMSEC rekey rule states that a maximum of 250
mobile subscribers should be assigned on a single rekey ID within a network.
All wireline subscribers are assigned to one rekey ID-01. Fourteen mobile
groups with unique rekey IDs will assist in preserving the COMSEC limit of
250.
5-32. The GSPM contains the old profile numbers cross-referenced to the
GSPM profile. The US Army Signal Center initially converts all databases to
the GSPM profiles. Each signal organization network manager may review
each subscriber to determine if the new profile meets the subscriber’s
requirements. Each group for DSVTs converts to 03, 04, and 06, which
translates to 009, 010, and 015, respectively. MSRTs may convert directly to
MSRT groups 1-7 from old groups 1-7, or MSRT groups 1-7 for division slots
and MSRT groups 8-14 for corps troops. EAC and other databases may only
use MSRT groups 1-7.
5-33. Figure 5-1 shows the GSPM. The network manager must complete the
profile matrix to initiate the MSE network.
5-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
FO
F
I
P
P
R
R
R
R
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
2
3
3
P
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
R
V
V
V
V
V
Figure 5-1. GSPM
5-8
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
0
0
1
2
2
4
4
4
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
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1
2
4
4
0
0
0
0
0
01
01
01
01
01
01
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
02
02
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
N
N
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
27
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
27
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
02
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
N
BAR CALL
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
5
0
0
1
2
2
4
4
4
5
BAR TRUNK ACCESS
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
01
01
01
01
01
01
NET ID B
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
0
0
0
0
0
0
NET ID A
FO
F
I
P
P
R
R
R
R
0
0
1
2
4
4
OLD RKEY ID
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
REKEY ID
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
5
DIRECT ACCESS SERVICE
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
GROUP: 001 WIRELINE CD0
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
0
N
Y
N
N
N
0
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
0
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
0
N
Y
N
N
N
0
N
Y
Y
Y
N
0
GROUP: 002 WIRELINE CD1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
N
N
N
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
1
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
1
GROUP: 003 WIRELINE CD2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
N
N
N
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
2
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
2
GROUP: 004 WIRELINE CD3
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
3
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
3
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
3
N
N
Y
N
N
N
3
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
3
ZONE RESTRICTION
N
N
N
N
N
N
COMPRESSED DIALING LIST
V
V
V
V
V
V
ESSENTIAL USER BYPASS
F
I
I
P
R
R
COMMERCIAL ACCESS
P
P
P
P
P
P
CALL FORWARDING
1
1
1
2
3
3
PROGRESSIVE CONFERENCE
11
3
3
3
3
3
3
NET RADIO INTERFACE
10
MSG SWITCH COMPATIBLE
07
08
09
TERMINAL CHARACTERISTICS
06
PRECEDENCE LEVEL
025
026
027
028
029
05
SECURITY LEVEL
016
017
018
019
020
021
022
023
024
01
02
03
04
TRAFFIC LOAD CONTROL
007
008
009
010
011
012
013
014
015
TERMINAL TYPE
OLD PROFILE
PROFILE NUMBER
001
002
003
004
005
006
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
3
4
P
P
P
P
P
055
056
057
058
059
33
34
35
36
01
01
01
01
01
02
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
27
N
N
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N
01
01
01
01
01
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02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
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N
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01
01
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02
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02
02
27
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
N
01
01
01
01
01
01
23
18
19
20
21
Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)
5-9
BAR CALL
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
2
3
5
BAR TRUNK ACCESS
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
NET ID B
042
043
044
045
046
047
048
049
050
051
052
053
054
N
N
N
N
N
NET ID A
P
V
V
V
V
V
OLD RKEY ID
1
GROUP: 005 WIRELINE CD4
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
4
0
0
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
4
1
0
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
4
2
0
N
Y
N
N
N
4
4
0
N
Y
Y
Y
N
4
4
0
GROUP: 006 WIRELINE CD5
F
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
5
0
0
I
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
5
1
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
5
2
0
R
V
N
N
Y
N
N
N
5
4
0
R
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
5
4
0
GROUP: 007 WIRELINE NRI
I
V
N
Y
N
N
N
N
0
0
0
GROUP: 008 WIRELINE Air Force Packet Ô Army
F
M N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
0
GROUP: 009 WIRELINE Data/Voice
FO
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
0
F
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
0
F
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
1
0
F
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
I
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
1
0
I
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
I
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
P
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
2
0
P
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
P
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
R
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
4
0
R
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
6
0
R
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
6
0
GROUP: 010 WIRELINE Data/Only
FO
D
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
0
F
D
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
0
I
D
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
1
0
P
D
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
2
0
R
D
N
N
N
N
N
N
0
4
0
F
I
P
R
R
REKEY ID
3
DIRECT ACCESS SERVICE
041
ZONE RESTRICTION
P
COMPRESSED DIALING LIST
2
ESSENTIAL USER BYPASS
3
38
COMMERCIAL ACCESS
P
P
P
P
P
CALL FORWARDING
1
1
2
3
3
PROGRESSIVE CONFERENCE
3
3
3
3
3
NET RADIO INTERFACE
035
036
037
038
039
MSG SWITCH COMPATIBLE
SECURITY LEVEL
P
P
P
P
P
TERMINAL CHARACTERISTICS
TRAFFIC LOAD CONTROL
1
1
2
3
3
PRECEDENCE LEVEL
TERMINAL TYPE
3
3
3
3
3
040
OLD PROFILE
PROFILE NUMBER
030
031
032
033
034
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
E
E
E
E
E
E
E
3
3
1
1
E
E
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
2
5
P
P
P
P
P
P
39
40
079
080
081
082
083
084
085
086
01
02
03
04
05
06
Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)
5-10
24
25
01
01
02
03
04
05
02
02
02
27
27
27
N
N
N
02
02
02
27
27
27
N
N
N
02
02
02
27
27
27
N
N
N
02
02
02
27
27
27
N
N
N
02
02
02
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
02
02
27
27
N
N
02
02
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
N
N
BAR CALL
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
BAR TRUNK ACCESS
072
073
074
075
076
077
078
NET ID B
E
E
E
22
NET ID A
1
1
1
GROUP: 011 WIRELINE DAS Preferred/Voice (P/V)
F
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
01
I
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
01
P
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
01
GROUP: 012 WIRELINE DAS Required/Multimode (R/M)
F
M N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
01
I
M N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
01
P
M N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
01
GROUP: 013 WIRELINE DAS Required/Voice (R/V)
F
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
01
I
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
01
P
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
01
GROUP: 014 WIRELINE TOP SECRET/Voice (TS/V)
F
V
N
N
Y
Y
N
Y
1
0
0
01
I
V
N
N
Y
Y
N
Y
1
1
0
01
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
N
Y
1
3
0
01
GROUP: 015 WIRELINE TOP SECRET/Multimode (TS/M)
I
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
1
0
01
P
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
2
0
01
I
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
1
0
0
01
I
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
1
0
0
01
P
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
1
2
0
01
I
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
2
1
0
01
P
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
2
2
0
01
GROUP: 016 WIRELINE TOP SECRET/Data (TS/D)
I
D
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
2
0
01
P
D
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
4
0
01
GROUP: 117 MOBILE CD1
FO
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
0
0
02
F
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
0
0
02
I
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
1
0
02
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
2
0
03
R
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
4
0
04
R
V
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
1
5
0
05
OLD RKEY ID
3
3
3
REKEY ID
069
070
071
DIRECT ACCESS SERVICE
R
R
R
ZONE RESTRICTION
1
1
2
COMPRESSED DIALING LIST
3
3
3
ESSENTIAL USER BYPASS
066
067
068
COMMERCIAL ACCESS
R
R
R
CALL FORWARDING
1
1
2
PROGRESSIVE CONFERENCE
3
3
3
NET RADIO INTERFACE
063
064
065
37
MSG SWITCH COMPATIBLE
SECURITY LEVEL
P
P
P
TERMINAL CHARACTERISTICS
TRAFFIC LOAD CONTROL
1
1
1
PRECEDENCE LEVEL
TERMINAL TYPE
OLD PROFILE
PROFILE NUMBER
3
3
3
060
061
062
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
15
16
17
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
5
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
V
V
V
V
100
101
102
103
18
19
20
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
5
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
V
V
V
V
104
105
106
107
21
22
23
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
5
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
V
V
V
V
108
109
110
111
24
25
26
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
5
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
V
V
V
V
112
113
114
115
27
28
29
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
5
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
V
V
V
V
0
1
2
4
5
0
0
0
0
0
02
02
06
07
08
06
07
08
09
10
02
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
09
09
09
09
11
11
11
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
10
10
10
10
12
12
12
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
11
11
11
11
13
13
13
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
12
12
12
12
14
14
14
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
13
13
13
13
15
15
15
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
14
14
14
14
16
16
16
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)
5-11
BAR CALL
096
097
098
099
BAR TRUNK ACCESS
V
V
V
V
NET ID B
F
I
P
R
NET ID A
P
P
P
P
OLD RKEY ID
1
1
1
5
REKEY ID
3
3
3
3
DIRECT ACCESS SERVICE
12
13
14
GROUP: 118 MOBILE CD2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
2
GROUP: 119 MOBILE GROUP 1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
1
GROUP: 120 MOBILE GROUP 2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
1
GROUP: 121 MOBILE GROUP 3
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
1
GROUP: 122 MOBILE GROUP 4
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
1
GROUP: 123 MOBILE GROUP 5
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
1
GROUP: 124 MOBILE GROUP 6
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
1
ZONE RESTRICTION
092
093
094
095
COMPRESSED DIALING LIST
V
V
V
V
V
ESSENTIAL USER BYPASS
F
I
P
R
R
COMMERCIAL ACCESS
P
P
P
P
P
CALL FORWARDING
1
1
1
2
5
PROGRESSIVE CONFERENCE
SECURITY LEVEL
3
3
3
3
3
NET RADIO INTERFACE
TRAFFIC LOAD CONTROL
07
08
09
10
11
MSG SWITCH COMPATIBLE
TERMINAL TYPE
TERMINAL CHARACTERISTICS
OLD PROFILE
PRECEDENCE LEVEL
PROFILE NUMBER
087
088
089
090
091
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
1
1
1
5
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
V
V
V
V
128
129
130
131
18
19
20
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
5
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
V
V
V
V
132
133
134
135
21
22
23
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
5
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
V
V
V
V
136
137
138
139
24
25
26
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
5
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
V
V
V
V
140
141
142
143
27
28
29
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
5
P
P
P
P
F
I
P
R
V
V
V
V
Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)
5-12
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
15
15
15
15
17
17
17
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
16
16
16
16
11
11
11
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
17
17
17
17
12
12
12
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
18
18
18
18
13
13
13
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
19
19
19
19
14
14
14
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
20
20
20
20
15
15
15
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
0
1
2
5
0
0
0
0
21
21
21
21
16
16
16
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
BAR CALL
3
3
3
3
BAR TRUNK ACCESS
15
16
17
NET ID B
124
125
126
127
NET ID A
V
V
V
V
OLD RKEY ID
F
I
P
R
REKEY ID
P
P
P
P
DIRECT ACCESS SERVICE
1
1
1
5
GROUP: 125 MOBILE GROUP 7
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
1
GROUP: 126 MOBILE GROUP 8
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
2
GROUP: 127 MOBILE GROUP 9
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
2
GROUP: 128 MOBILE GROUP 10
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
2
GROUP: 129 MOBILE GROUP 11
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
2
GROUP: 130 MOBILE GROUP 12
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
2
GROUP: 131 MOBILE GROUP 13
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
2
ZONE RESTRICTION
3
3
3
3
COMPRESSED DIALING LIST
12
13
14
ESSENTIAL USER BYPASS
120
121
122
123
COMMERCIAL ACCESS
V
V
V
V
CALL FORWARDING
F
I
P
R
PROGRESSIVE CONFERENCE
P
P
P
P
NET RADIO INTERFACE
1
1
1
5
MSG SWITCH COMPATIBLE
SECURITY LEVEL
TERMINAL CHARACTERISTICS
TRAFFIC LOAD CONTROL
PRECEDENCE LEVEL
TERMINAL TYPE
OLD PROFILE
PROFILE NUMBER
30
31
32
3
3
3
3
116
117
118
119
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
1
1
1
2
3
4
3
3
4
5
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
171
172
173
174
13
13
13
13
1
1
1
1
P
P
P
P
22
22
22
22
17
17
17
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
23
23
23
23
18
19
20
21
02
02
02
02
27
27
27
27
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)
5-13
BAR CALL
P
P
P
BAR TRUNK ACCESS
1
1
1
58
NET ID B
13
13
13
158
159
160
NET ID A
P
P
P
V
V
V
V
OLD RKEY ID
1
1
1
GROUP: 132 MOBILE GROUP 14
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
0
0
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
1
0
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
2
0
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
2
5
0
GROUP: 133 MOBILE DATA
F
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
I
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
P
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
R
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
6
0
GROUP: 234 DNVT DAS Air Force
I
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
P
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
R
V
N
N
N
N
N
N
0
0
1
GROUP: 235 DNVT DAS Preferred/Multimode (P/M)
F
M N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
I
M N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
1
1
P
M N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
3
1
GROUP: 236 DNVT DAS Preferred/Voice (P/V)
F
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
I
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
P
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
1
GROUP: 237 DNVT DAS Preferred/Voice (P/V)
FO
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
0
0
F
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
0
0
I
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
1
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
3
2
0
P
V
N
N
N
N
N
Y
3
2
0
R
V
N
N
N
N
N
N
3
3
0
R
V
N
N
N
N
N
N
4
3
0
R
V
N
N
Y
N
Y
N
4
4
0
R
V
N
N
N
N
N
N
4
3
0
R
V
N
N
Y
N
N
N
4
3
0
GROUP: 238 DNVT Preferred/Voice (P/V) CD0
F
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
0
0
0
I
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
0
1
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
0
3
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
0
3
0
F
I
P
R
REKEY ID
13
13
13
DIRECT ACCESS SERVICE
155
156
157
ZONE RESTRICITON
N
N
N
COMPRESSED DIALING LISTS
1
2
3
ESSENTIAL USER BYPASS
13
13
13
COMMERCIAL ACCESS
152
153
154
CALL FORWARDING
P
P
P
P
PROGRESSIVE CONFERENCE
2
2
3
3
NET RADIO INTERFACE
3
3
3
3
MSG SWITCH COMPATIBLE
SECURITY LEVEL
33
34
35
36
TERMINAL CHARACTERISTICS
TRAFFIC LOAD CONTROL
P
P
P
P
PRECEDENCE LEVEL
TERMINAL TYPE
1
1
1
5
148
149
150
151
OLD PROFILE
PROFILE NUMBER
30
31
32
3
3
3
3
144
145
146
147
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
BAR CALL
BAR TRUNK ACCESS
5-14
NET ID B
Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)
NET ID A
GROUP: 238 DNVT Preferred/Voice (P/V) CD0 (continued)
R
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
0
4
0
R
V
N
N
N
N
N
N
0
0
0
R
V
N
N
N
N
N
N
0
1
0
R
V
N
N
N
N
N
N
0
2
0
R
V
N
N
N
N
N
N
0
0
0
R
V
N
N
N
N
N
N
0
1
0
R
V
N
N
N
N
N
N
0
2
0
GROUP: 239 DNVT Preferred/Voice (P/V) CD1
FO
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
0
0
F
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
0
0
I
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
1
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
2
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
N
Y
1
3
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
1
3
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
3
0
R
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
1
4
0
R
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
1
4
0
R
V
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
1
5
0
GROUP: 240 DNVT Preferred/Voice (P/V) CD2
FO
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
0
0
F
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
0
0
I
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
1
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
2
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
N
Y
2
3
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
2
3
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
2
3
0
R
V
N
N
Y
N
Y
N
2
4
0
R
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
2
4
0
R
V
N
N
Y
N
N
N
2
5
0
GROUP: 241 DNVT Preferred/Voice (P/V) CD3
F
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
3
0
0
I
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
3
1
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
3
3
0
P
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
3
3
0
R
V
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
3
4
0
OLD RKEY ID
P
P
P
P
P
REKEY ID
1
1
1
1
3
DIRECT ACCESS SERVICE
13
13
13
13
13
ZONE RESTRICTION
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
COMPRESSED DIALING LIST
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
5
ESSENTIAL USER BYPASS
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
COMMERCIAL ACCESS
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
CALL FORWARDING
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
PROGRESSIVE CONFERENCE
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
NET RADIO INTERFACE
53
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
MSG SWITCH COMPATIBLE
52
1
2
2
2
4
4
4
TERMINAL CHARACTERISTICS
48
49
50
51
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
PRECEDENCE LEVEL
202
203
204
205
206
46
47
SECURITY LEVEL
192
193
194
195
196
197
198
199
200
201
41
42
43
44
45
TRAFFIC LOAD CONTROL
182
183
184
185
186
187
188
189
190
191
TERMINAL TYPE
OLD PROFILE
PROFILE NUMBER
175
176
177
178
179
180
181
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)
5-15
BAR CALL
BAR TRUNK ACCESS
NET ID B
2
3
3
GROUP: 243 DNVT Required/Voice (R/V) Air Force CD1
FO
V N N
Y
Y
N
Y
1
0
0
F
V N N
Y
Y
N
Y
1
1
0
I
V N N
Y
Y
N
Y
1
1
0
P
V N N
Y
Y
N
Y
1
1
0
R
V N N
Y
Y
N
Y
1
1
0
R
V N N
N
N
N
N
1
3
0
GROUP: 244 DNVT Required/Voice (R/V) Air Force CD2
R F
V N N
Y
Y
N
Y
2
1
0
R I
V N N
Y
Y
N
Y
2
1
0
R P
V N N
Y
Y
N
Y
2
1
0
GROUP: 245 DNVT Required/Multimode (R/M) AirForce ADI
R F
M N N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
GROUP: 246 DNVT Required/Multimode (R/M) Air Force
R I
M N N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
R P
M N N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
R R
M N N
N
N
N
N
0
6
NET ID A
13
13
13
GROUP: 242 DNVT Preferred/Multimode (P/M)
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
0
0
M N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
1
0
M N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
Y
0
3
0
M N
N
N
N
N
Y
0
6
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
4
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
1
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
2
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
4
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
5
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
4
0
M N
N
N
N
N
N
0
6
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
1
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
2
0
M Y
N
N
N
N
N
0
5
0
OLD RKEY ID
234
235
236
REKEY ID
1
DIRECT ACCESS SERVICE
13
ZONE RESTRICTION
233
COMPRESSED DIAL LIST
1
1
1
ESSENTIAL USER BYUPASS
13
13
13
COMMERCIAL ACCESS
230
231
232
CALL FORWARDING
R
R
R
R
R
R
PROGRESSIVE CONFERENCE
1
1
1
1
1
2
57
NET RADIO INTERFACE
13
13
13
13
13
13
56
FO
F
F
I
I
P
P
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
R
MSG SWITCH COMPATIBLE
SECURITY LEVEL
224
225
226
227
228
229
55
13
13
13
TERMINAL
CHARACTERISTICS
PRECEDENCE LEVEL
TRAFFIC LOAD CONTROL
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
P
54
TERMINAL TYPE
OLD PROFILE
PROFILE NUMBER
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
13
1
1
2
1
2
1
3
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
4
4
4
207
208
209
210
211
212
213
214
215
216
217
218
219
220
221
222
223
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
248
248
248
248
248
248
248
248
248
248
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
5
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
F
I
I
I
P
P
P
R
R
R
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
61
0
N
0
N
0
0
0
1
0
3
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
0
0
1
1
0
3
3
0
5
5
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Figure 5-1. GSPM (Continued)
5-34. Profile 238 is used for the RAUs GLU and 237 is used for the DTAs.
The other 253 profiles for subscriber equipment contain all five levels of
precedence for operation and control purposes. Table 5-4 shows the
percentage of precedence category calls a network will contain.
Table 5-4. Percentage of Precedence Category Calls
Percentage
Precedence
0.0%
Flash Override (FO)
0.2%
Flash (F)
4.0%
Immediate (I)
27.8%
Priority (P)
68.0%
Routine (R)
Note: Source is Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Memorandum (CJCSM) Publication 6231.07A
series.
5-16
BAR CALL
FO
F
I
I
P
P
R
BAR TRUNK ACCESS
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
NET ID B
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
NET ID A
248
248
248
248
248
248
248
OLD RKEY ID
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
REKEY ID
M
N
DIRECT ACCESS SERVICE
FO
GROUP: 347 DTA
N
N
N
Y
0
GROUP: 448 LG1
N N
N
N
N
Y
0
GROUP: 549 ALOG/STU CD1
N N
Y
Y
Y
N
1
N N
Y
Y
Y
N
1
N N
Y
Y
Y
N
1
N N
N
N
N
N
1
N N
Y
Y
Y
N
1
N N
N
N
N
N
1
N N
N
N
N
N
1
GROUP: 550 ALOG/STU CD2
N N
Y
Y
Y
N
2
N N
Y
Y
Y
N
2
N N
N
N
N
N
2
N N
N
N
Y
N
2
N N
Y
Y
Y
N
2
N N
N
N
N
N
2
N N
N
N
Y
N
2
N N
Y
Y
Y
N
2
N N
N
N
N
N
2
N N
N
N
Y
N
2
N
ZONE RESTRICTION
P
COMPRESSED DIAL LIST
1
ESSENTIAL USER BYPASS
16
COMMERCIAL ACCESS
238
CALL FORWARDING
D
PROGRESSIVE CONFERENCE
FO
NET RADIO INTERFACE
P
MSG SWITCH COMPATIBLE
SECURITY LEVEL
1
60
TERMINAL
CHARACTERISTICS
PRECEDENCE LEVEL
TRAFFIC LOAD CONTROL
15
59
TERMINAL TYPE
OLD PROFILE
PROFILE NUMBER
237
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
5-35. Table 5-5 shows the class marks, which make up a subscriber’s profile
and the input codes associated with each class mark.
Table 5-5. Class Mark Input Codes
CLASS MARK
VALID INPUTS
INPUT CODES
Terminal Type
DSVT
DNVT
DTA
SCC-2
LG-1
ANALOG
3
13
15
84
16
251
Traffic Load Control
Most Essential
More Essential
Essential
Less Essential
Least Essential
Not Applicable
1
2
3
4
5
N/A
Security Level
Security Required
Security Preferred
End-To-End
R
P
E
Maximum
Precedence
Flash Override
Flash
Immediate
Priority
Routine
FO
F
I
P
R
Terminal
Characteristics
Voice
Multimode
Data
V
M
D
Message Switch
Compatible
Yes
No
Not Applicable
Y
N
N/A
NRI
Yes
No
Y
N
Progressive
Conference
Yes
No
Y
N
Call Forwarding
Yes
No
Y
N
Commercial Network
Access
Yes
No
Y
N
Essential User
Yes
No
Y
N
5-17
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table 5-5. Class Mark Input Codes (Continued)
5-18
CLASS MARK
VALID INPUTS
INPUT CODES
Compressed Dialing
List
Not Authorized
CD list 1
CD list 2
CD list 3
CD list 4
CD list 5
0
1
2
3
4
5
Zone Restriction
No Restriction
ZR list 1
ZR list 2
ZR list 3
ZR list 4
ZR list 5
ZR list 6
ZR list 7
ZR list 8
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Direct Access
Yes
No
Y
N
Rekey
1
25
1
25
Net ID A
2
26
2
26
Net ID B
27
51
27
51
Bar Trunk Access
Yes
No
Y
N
Bar Call
Yes
No
Y
N
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
5-36. The different subscriber terminal types within MSE can include–
• Terminal type 3 (DSVT) – identifies the KY-68 or KY-90.
• Terminal type 13 (DNVT) – a TA-1035/U or a TA-1042 with a data
port to provide for data input.
Note: DNVTs or MSRTs must connect to a switch
and have an individual directory number.
• Terminal type 15 (DTA) – allows data to flow to and from the SCC-2.
• Terminal type 248 – an analog circuit.
• Terminal type 16 (GLU) – enables it to receive and distribute
frequency plans and manage the eight radios in the RAU.
• Terminal type 84 (SCC-2 network interface device) – provides the
four transmit and four receive lines to the network.
5-37. TLC reduces network traffic during busy periods by efficiently using
available switching and transmission resources. TLC restricts trunk access
and local calling to class marked subscribers. Subscribers should be class
marked for one of the five TLC levels shown in Table 5-6. The switch’s TLC
restrictions rule how the subscriber’s TLC class mark is used in the MSE
system. Table 5-6 explains how the switch uses class marks.
Table 5-6. TLC Application
TRAFFIC
LOAD
CONTROL
LEVEL
SUBSCRIBER CLASS MARK
1
2
3 (TRUNK
RESTRICTION)
NO
RESTRICTIONS
NO
RESTRICTIONS
2 (TRUNK
RESTRICTION)
NO
RESTRICTIONS
5 (SWITCH
RESTRICTION)
4 (SWITCH
RESTRICTION)
3
4
5
NO TRUNK
CALLS
PERMITTED
(NOTE)
NO TRUNK
CALLS
PERMITTED
(NOTE)
NO TRUNK
CALLS
PERMITTED:
LOCAL CALLS
ONLY (NOTE)
NO TRUNK
CALLS
PERMITTED:
LOCAL CALLS
ONLY (NOTE)
NO TRUNK
CALLS
PERMITTED:
LOCAL CALLS
ONLY (NOTE)
NO TRUNK
CALLS
PERMITTED:
LOCAL CALLS
ONLY (NOTE)
NO TRUNK
CALLS
PERMITTED
(NOTE)
NO
RESTRICTIONS
NO
RESTRICTIONS
NO
RESTRICTIONS
NO
RESTRICTIONS
NO CALLS
PERMITTED
NO
RESTRICTIONS
NO
RESTRICTIONS
NO
RESTRICTIONS
NO CALLS
PERMITTED
NO CALLS
PERMITTED
Note: A local- or long-loop subscriber or private branch exchange (PBX) trunk attempting a trunk
call is returned a line-busy tone. The call is not completed. Time-out actions on sending a linebusy tone is IAW the specific requirements of the particular loop or trunk. (See individual signaling
and supervision appendices for details.) A digital in-band trunk signaling (DIBTS) trunk attempting
a call is returned a call incomplete (all trunks busy from tandem switch).
5-19
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
5-38. The three security level class marks are security required (R), security
preferred (P), and end-to-end (E). In profile development, only preferred and
end-to-end are used.
5-39. Security required is used when a subscriber can only complete calls
over secure links to approved loops or to a DSVT.
5-40. Security preferred are calls extended as secure, if possible; otherwise,
the call is completed in a nonsecure mode. Most terminals are class marked
as security preferred. Security preferred is for access to commercial networks
and to the DISN.
5-41. End-to-end applies only to DSVTs. DSVT subscribers can only call
other DSVT subscribers.
5-42. All five precedence levels can be assigned. The maximum precedence
entry specifies the highest precedence level a subscriber may impose on a
call. The national command authority (NCA) and/or the theater commander
authorize assigning a particular precedence to a user.
5-43. The terminal characteristics entry specifies subscriber terminal
characteristics. The three different terminal characteristics are voice (V),
multimode (M), and data (D). NCTs and ABCS computer terminals, such as
the MCS terminal, using the DSVT are class marked as data if the DSVT is
used with MCS only; otherwise, it is class marked “M” for voice and data.
Terminals without communication terminals (CTs) and with facsimile are
class marked voice only.
5-44. The MS compatible entry specifies whether a subscriber in the data
mode is compatible with the AN/TYC-39 (yes [Y] or no [N], and has access
privilege for record traffic users with the CT (AN/UGC-144).
5-45. The NRI entry is only for the KY-90, and all subscribers have access by
dialing the KY-90 phone numbers. The NRI is given a precedence to support
contingencies.
5-46. The progressive conference entry specifies whether the subscriber is
authorized to initiate a progressive conference (Y or N). With this authority,
the subscriber may dial the selected subscribers for his conference. A
conference call can have a maximum of 14 subscribers. The PCL must be
loaded in the switches with subscribers needing this service.
5-47. The call forwarding entry specifies whether the subscriber can forward
incoming calls to another terminal (Y or N). Do not confuse call forwarding
with call transfer. Call transfer is transferring a connected call to another
number and is not an MSE capability.
5-48. The commercial network access entry specifies whether the subscriber
is authorized to initiate calls to commercial networks (Y or N).
5-49. The EUB class mark specifies essential users terminated at an NCS or
LENS for bypass to another NCS if the subscriber’s parent NCS cannot
provide call processing because of processor failure (Y or N).
5-20
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
5-50. Compressed dialing lists (CDLs) allow selected subscribers to quickly
dial frequently called people. The compressed dialing entry specifies whether
the subscriber is authorized to use the compressed dialing feature. A zero
shows that the subscriber cannot use compressed dialing. A digit (1-5)
indicates that the subscriber can call anyone on the same CDL. There are five
compressed dialing lists each containing up to 80 subscribers. Each entry is
assigned a number between 20 and 99, which then becomes the compressed
dialing number. Figure 5-2 shows a CDL.
5-51. Zone restriction lists (ZRLs) may be permissive or restrictive. ZRLs
either allow a subscriber access to anywhere in the network or restrict access
to certain areas. The restrictive list is for routine users only and limits them
to calls within the corps network. Changes to this list are made at the NPT
and sent by technical message to the NCS/LENS.
5-52. MSE wire subscribers may be class marked for direct access service
(DAS). An NCS or LENS can have up to 60 assigned subscribers, and a SENS
can have up to 10 subscribers. DAS can be assigned as a paired operation,
where subscriber A can only call subscriber B and vice versa. DAS can also be
assigned as a one-way operation, where subscriber A can only call subscriber
B, but subscriber B can call any MSE subscriber. One-way operation is
mainly used; it can also be used as the initiator of a preprogrammed
conference. When a DAS subscriber initially connects to a switch, he must
contact the switch operator and provide the directory number to which he
desires direct access. Once the operator programs the switchboard, service is
automatically provided. When the subscriber no longer requires DAS, he
must contact the switch operator to disconnect this service.
5-53. The rekey ID 1 entry is valid with wireline DSVT-like devices only.
Rekey IDs 2-23 are used for MSRTs only. Rekey IDs 24 and 25 are not
assigned in the GSPM 255. Each ID (1-25) identifies the rekey variable of a
DSVT-like net (recommended maximum of 90 terminals).
• Net IDs A and B are not used.
• Bar truck access and bar call were added with the GSPM 255.
• The network manager must use the GSPM 255 to assign profiles to
subscribers.
Note: The NPT using the PBOOKII software application
supports both the 63 and the 255 profile matrix. The
subscriber list management (SLM) application of the
NPT can manage the subscriber database, including the
PAL, CDL, and ZRL.
5-21
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
COMPRESSED DIALING LIST
UNIT: 1st DIV
COMPRESSED DIALING
NUMBER
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
1 OF 5
DIRECTORY
NUMBER
3401019
3401389
4601019
4401019
4201019
4202019
POC: SGT Lane
PHONE:
COMPRESSED DIALING
NUMBER
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
DIRECTORY
NUMBER
LE
P
M
A
S
THIS FORM MAY BE REPRODUCED
TO DEVELOP UP TO FIVE LISTS.
Figure 5-2. CDL
5-22
791-1600
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
PREPROGRAMMED CONFERENCE LIST REQUIREMENTS
5-54. Authorized PCL members can initiate a conference call with members
of the PCL list (Figure 5-3). There can be a total of 20 PCLs numbered from
20 to 39, and each list can contain up to 14 subscribers. It is also possible to
have four PCLs with a maximum of five subscribers each if there are enough
bridge terminal cards in service at the switch. At the top of each list, YES or
NO is circled to indicate whether security is required for the conference list.
A YES entry requires a loop key generator (LKG) per instrument per call.
Each DSVT/MSRT (whether security is circled YES or NO) requires an LKG
per instrument per call. Therefore, the standard for programmed conferences
should be DNVT telephone numbers and a security NO entry. Multiple
conferences outside the standard will degrade service at the NCS.
PREPROGRAMMED CONFERENCE LIST 31 OF 39
UNIT: 1st DIV
POC:
SGT Lane
791-1600
PHONE:
SECURITY REQUIRED
(YES OR NO)
ENTRY
DIRECTORY
SUBSCRIBER AUTHORIZED
NUMBER
NUMBER
TO INITIATE CONFERENCE
(YES OR NO)
1
3401019
YES
2
3401389
YES
3
4601019
NO
4
4401019
NO
5
4201019
NO
6
4202019
NO
7
8
9
10
11
S
L
P
AM
E
12
13
14
The preprogrammed conference lists
must be numbered from 20 to 39.
This form may be reproduced to develop
up to 20 lists.
Figure 5-3. PCL
5-55. There are 20 corps common PCLs numbered 20 through 39. Only
coordination with and approval of the corps signal office can change these
PCLs. Any temporary change for a particular exercise does not require a
change to the tactical standing operating procedure (TSOP), but it does
require updating a work sheet for that period. Table 5-7 shows an example of
the corps PCL assignment.
5-23
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table 5-7. Example of the Corps PCL Assignment
Preprogrammed
Conference List
Used For
20
21
Corps Command
22
23
Corps Administrative/
Logistics
24
25
Corps Operations
26
27
Corps Support Command
(COSCOM)
28
29
Corps Reserved
30
1st Division
32
33
2d Division
34
35
3d Division
36
37
4th Division
38
39
5th Division
TEAM LABEL DATA FILE REQUIREMENTS
5-56. The US Army Signal Center enters team label data into the team label
data file (TLDF). The signal organization network manager or PAL manager
for that database validates the TLDF. All teams are included in the TLDF.
All MSE signal teams are assigned team labels according to the global team
labeling scheme (Figure 5-4.) Table 5-8 shows the resulting corps standard
team designation chart, which is used for team C2. Table 5-9 shows an
example of the 1st Division’s team labels.
5-24
HCLOS
MRC-143 MC
STAR-T (ALL SERVICES)
DET SW 39A1
USASOC
ADA EAC THAAD/PAT
ADA ECB THAAD/PAT
410/11
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Figure 5-4. Global Team Labeling Scheme
5-25
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table 5-8. Corps Global Standard Team Designation Chart
CORPS AREA SIGNAL BN
TEAM LABELS AND SLOTS
DB01-DB09 DBA01
DB10-DB19 DBA02
DB20-DB29 DBA03
DB30-DB39 DBA04
DIVISION SIGNAL BN TEAM LABELS AND SLOTS
DB40-DB49
DBD01
DB50-DB59
DBD02
DB60-DB69
DBD03
DB70-DB79
DBD04
DB80-DB89
DBD05
DB90-DB94
DBD06
DB95-DB99
DBD07
Note: SENs are designated with a letter team designator (A-K).
AREA BN SLOTS:
DIVISION BN SLOTS:
DBA01-DBA69
DBA01
DBA70-DBA99
DBB01-DBB69
DBA02
DBB70-DBB99
DBC01-DBC69
DBA02
DBC70-DBC99
DBD01-DBD69
DBA04
DBD70-DBD99
SEN(V1)
SEN(V2)
SEN(V1)
SEN(V2)
SEN(V1)
SEN(V2)
SEN(V1)
SEN(V2)
DBE01-DBE69 SEN(V1) DBD01
DBE70-DBE99 SEN(V2)
DBF01-DBF69 SEN(V1) DBD02
DBF70-DBF99 SEN(V2)
DBG01-DBG69 SEN(V1) DBD03
DBG70-DBG99 SEN(V2)
DBH01-DBH99 SEN(V1) DBD04
DBH70-DBH99 SEN(V2)
DBI01-DBI69 SEN(V1) DBD05
DBI70-DBI99 SEN(V2)
DBJ01-DBJ69 SEN(V1) DBD06
DBJ70-DBJ99 SEN(V2)
DBK01-DBK69 SEN(V1) DBD07
DBK70-DBK99 SEN(V2)
Note: The LEN section is combined with the NCS section.
Note: Remote radio access units (RRAUs) are designated with an R -Team designator, and
local radio access units (LRAUs) are designated with a U -Team designator.
RRAU:
RRAU:
DBR01-DBR09
DBR10-DBR19
DBR20-DBR29
DBR30-DBR39
DBA01
DBA02
DBA03
DBA04
DBR40-DBR49
DBR50-DBR59
DBR60-DBR69
DBR70-DBR79
DBR80-DBR89
DBR90-DBR94
DBR95-DBR99
DBD01
DBD02
DBD03
DBD04
DBD05
DBD06
DBD07
LRAU:
DBU01-DBU09
DBU10-DBU19
DBU20-DBU29
DBU30-DBU39
DBA01
DBA02
DBA03
DBA04
LRAU:
DBU40-DBU49
DBU50-DBU59
DBU60-DBU69
DBU70-DBU79
DBU80-DBU89
DBU90-DBU94
DBU95-DBU99
DBD01
DBD02
DBD03
DBD04
DBD05
DBD06
DBD07
Note: Refer to the global team labeling scheme for details on the team labels for local LOSs.
Both are designated with 0-9, Z-Team designators.
Note: NATO interface teams, LOS(V2)s with NAI are designated with N -Team designators
DBN01-DBN99.
Note: Network management systems (SCC-2/ISYSCON, CSCE) are designated with a W-Team
designator.
5-26
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Table 5-9. Example of the 1st Division’s Team Labels
Team Name
NCS
SEN(V1)
SEN(V1)
SEN(V1)
SEN(V2)
RRAU
LRAU
TST (TACSAT)
TRT (TROPO)
LOS (LOS1-LOS8)
Signal Support
LEN
RRAU
LOS
TST (TACSAT)
TRT (tropo)
Team Label
DB40
DB41
DBE11
DBE21
DBE12
DBE22
DBE13
DBE23
DBE71
DBE72
DBR40
DBR41
DBU40
DBU41
DBS41
DBS43
DBX41
DBX43
DB441
DB443
Team Label
DB42
DB43
DBE31
DBE41
DBE32
DBE42
DBE33
DBE43
DBE73
DBE74
DBR42
DBR43
DBU42
DBU43
DBS41
DBS43
DBX41
DBX43
DB441
DB443
Company C
DB44
DBR44
DB444
DBS44
DBX44
MSE FREQUENCY MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENTS
5-57. MSE is the primary element of the ACUS, and its frequency
management is an important task on the force-projection battlefield.
However, it is only part of the total frequency management process. Both the
CNR system and the ADDS also require frequency management support.
These three systems are not mutually exclusive. The NPT provides an
effective capability to manage the frequency spectrum for all three
communications systems, while ensuring that the corps and its associated
divisions can engage in a combat situation with minimum frequency
interference. The NPT uses authorized frequencies obtained by the frequency
manager to support VHF, UHF, and SHF spectrum requirements. The NPT
tactical frequency assignment model (TACFAM) application develops
frequency assignments for LOS radio links and performs link and site
engineering and deconfliction based on selected parameters. Table 5-10
shows the number of MSE emitters in the corps AO. Table 5-11 shows the
NPT frequency management capabilities.
5-27
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table 5-10. Number of MSE Emitters
Number of MSE
Emitters
Element
RAU
MSRT
LOS Node Center
LOS (Extension Node/RAU)
LOS (EAC/NATO/MISC)
SHF
736
1900
504
554
12
428
Table 5-11. NPT Frequency Management Capabilities
Radio Equipment
LOS Radio, AN/GRC-226(V)
(VHF)
Radio, AN/GRC-224(P)
(SHF)
Mobile Subscribers, RT-1539(P)/G
(VHF)
Frequency Assignment
• One set of frequencies per LOS radio link
• Two frequency plans
• Two frequency bands:
§ 225.0 to 400.0 MHz
§ 1350 to 1850 MHz
• One set of frequencies per SHF radio link
• One frequency plan (14.50 to 15.35 GHz)
• Frequency subband L and M
• One active frequency plan per corps
• Up to 96 sets of frequencies per plan (3
subplans of 32 sets)
• One frequency band (30 to 88 MHz) OCONUS
• Two frequency bands:
§ 30-50 MHz (training)
§ 30-88 MHz (operations)
5-58. The NPT VHF planning/management application uses the VHF input
to develop the RAU/MSRT frequency plan. Coordination is then made with
the system planner for distributing the frequency plan throughout the corps.
The Revised Battlefield Electronics Communications-Electronics Operating
Instructions (CEOI) System (RBECS) is the primary SOI management tool.
FREQUENCY MANAGEMENT PARAMETERS
5-59. The following paragraphs cover UHF parameters, SHF parameters,
and LOS antenna polarization.
UHF PARAMETERS
5-60. The UHF radio (AN/GRC-226) operates in two frequency bands. Band I
is known as Band A and covers the frequency range from 225 to 400 MHz.
Band III is known as Band B and covers the frequency range from 1350 to
1850 MHz. The SCC-2 system manager(s) select(s) the appropriate frequency
band when preparing the open LOS radio link project.
5-28
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Signal-to-Interference Ratio
5-61. Table 5-12 provides AN/GRC-226 signal-to-interference ratios. This
data represents operation at the highest (1,024 kbps) data rate. The data
assumes a signal level at the terminal to the receiver unit at -88 dBm.
Signal-to-interference ratios corresponding to various frequency separations
between the received signal and the interference signal are given. The data
applies to operation in either frequency Band I or III, respectively.
Table 5-12. AN/GRC-226 Radio Signal-to-Interference Ratio
Signal-to-Interference
Frequency Spacing
(MHz)
0
±1.0
±2.0
±3.0
±9.0
1
Signal-to-Interference Radio
Limitation 1
(dB)
±21
±16
-1
-36
-70 (and lower)
+ Means signal power > interference power.
- Means signal power < interference power.
Cable Loss Value
5-62. The following transmit and receive cable loss values represent the
maximum attenuation for each of the two frequency bands.
• At 400 MHz 3.5 dB.
• At 1850 MHz 8.5 dB.
5-63. If frequency scaling is used within the computer program, the following
adjustment factors can be used:
• Within the 225 to 400 MHz band, cable attenuation increases at 1.25
dB/octave from a minimum of 2.4 dB at 225 MHz to a maximum of 3.5
dB at 400 MHz.
• Within the 1350 to 1850 MHz band, cable attenuation increases at 3.0
dB/octave from a minimum of 6.5 dB at 1350 MHz to a maximum of
8.5 dB at 1850 MHz.
5-64. Otherwise, the maximum values given above are used throughout the
respective bands.
5-29
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Receiver Sensitivity
5-65. The minimum receiver sensitivity for each of the two frequency bands
is–
• 225 to 400 MHz -90 dBm.
• 1350 to 1850 MHz -89 dBm.
These values represent performance limits for the maximum data rate used.
The maximum energy delivered by the transmitter for each of the two
frequency bands is–
• 225 to 400 MHz band, +10 dBw at 1024 kbps.
• 1350 to 1850 MHz band, +7 dBw at 1024 kbps.
SHF PARAMETERS
5-66. The SHF radio AN/GRC-224(P) operates in a single frequency band.
This band is 14,500 to 15,341 MHz and is divided into eight subbands. The
subbands are paired to each other for the assignment of transmit and receive
frequencies. The frequency manager selects the SHF frequency band when
preparing the open LOS radio link project. Table 5-13 shows SHF and
channel allocations for bands L and M. Band L is assigned to switches and
Band M is assigned to LOS radio terminals. The following values
characterize the performance of the SHF radio relative to the system
communications margin computation.
• Maximum transmitter power at the antenna, operating at 4,096 kbps:
+13 dBm.
• Transmitter and receiver are located directly at the antenna;
therefore, no cable loss.
• Receiver sensitivity, operating at 4,096 kbps: -77 dBm. No
quantitative data is available on the SHF radio’s signal-tointerference performance. Table 5-14 shows estimated SHF radio
signal-to-interference ratios. This estimated data is used until more
accurate data can be provided.
LOS ANTENNA POLARIZATION
5-67. The antennas can operate at either vertical or horizontal polarization.
The NPT selects the antenna polarization for each LOS radio link by either
an automatic or a manual mode.
5-30
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Table 5-13. SHF Bands L and M Frequency (in MHz) and Channel Allocations
Band L Channel Frequency
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
14648.0
14651.5
14655.0
14658.5
14662.0
14665.5
14669.0
14672.5
14676.0
14679.5
14683.0
14686.5
14690.0
14693.5
14697.0
14700.5
14704.0
14707.5
14711.0
14714.5
14718.0
14721.5
14725.0
14728.5
14732.0
14735.5
14739.0
14742.5
14746.0
14749.5
14753.0
14756.5
14760.0
14763.5
14767.0
14770.5
14774.0
14777.5
14781.0
14784.5
14788.0
14791.5
14795.0
14798.5
14802.0
14805.5
14809.0
14812.5
14816.0
Band M Channel Frequency
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
15033.0
15036.5
15040.0
15043.5
15047.0
15050.5
15054.0
15057.5
15061.0
15064.5
15068.0
15071.5
15075.0
15078.5
15082.0
15085.5
15089.0
15092.5
15096.0
15099.5
15103.0
15106.5
15110.0
15113.5
15117.0
15120.5
15124.0
15127.5
15131.0
15134.5
15138.0
15141.5
15145.0
15148.5
15152.0
15155.5
15159.0
15162.5
15166.0
15169.5
15173.0
15176.5
15180.0
15183.5
15187.0
15190.5
15194.0
15197.5
15201.0
5-31
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table 5-14. Estimated SHF radio signal-to-interference limitations
Signal-to-Interference
Frequency Spacing
(MHz)
0
± 4.0
± 8.0
±12.0
±36.0
1
5-32
Signal-to-Interference Radio
Limitation 1
(dB)
±21
±16
-1
-36
-70 (and lower)
+ Means signal power > interference power.
- Means signal power < interference power .
Chapter 6
Contingency Communications Package and the Light
Contingency Communications Package
The CCP and the light CCP (LCCP) improves the operational capability
and flexibility of the MSE network to support contingency missions.
Airborne, air assault, light forces, and early entry TMD assets conduct
these missions. The CCP and LCCP have the capabilities and functions of
several standard MSE shelters. The CCP can deploy by air, land, or sea.
The LCCP deploys with its supported force into the operational area by
air transport. This chapter covers the battalion structure, equipment
capabilities, and deployment of the CCP and the LCCP.
DOCTRINAL IMPACTS
6-1. Standard MSE configurations exceed air-sortie allocations, and area
communications requirements exceed single-channel radio capabilities.
Therefore, the CCP and the LCCP can support airborne, air assault, light
forces, and early entry TMD assets in entry operations. The CCP and LCCP
can deploy to operational areas as predesigned support packages in up to two
C-141 sorties or C-130 equivalents. The CCP and LCCP provide connectivity
to the sustaining base from the entry position via multichannel TACSAT
within one-half hour of deployment. The CCP and LCCP also allow
interconnectivity to a second CCP or LCCP at a different entry position using
LOS links if possible and satellite if not.
6-2. Each CCP or LCCP can support a task force CP/airfield and maneuver
brigade headquarters to include the brigade main and jump CPs. At the task
force CP/airfield, signal support provides parent switching with static and
mobile subscriber access and NRI. Additional signal support provides
multichannel TACSAT connectivity to the sustaining base or other task force
CPs. At the brigade headquarters, signal support provides extension
switching, mobile subscriber access, and NRI and LOS connectivity.
DIVISION SIGNAL BATTALION STRUCTURE
6-3. Under the CCP or LCCP concept, the division signal battalion is
reconfigured as follows:
6-4. The HHC and A Company retain their standard MSE table(s) of
organization and equipment (TOE).
6-5. B Company, Contingency Area Communications Company, consists of a
headquarters platoon, one standard nodal platoon, and one contingency nodal
platoon (one CCP). The CCP consists of one contingency communications
6-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
parent switch (CCPS) and two contingency communications extension
switches (CCESs) called FESs.
6-6. C Company, Signal Support Company (MSE), Airborne/Air Assault,
consists of a headquarters platoon, one standard nodal platoon, one
multichannel TACSAT platoon, and four FM retransmission teams normally
associated with the Light Forces Signal Support Company (MSE).
6-7. The reconfigured MSE CCP and LCCP replace existing MSE
assemblages within the division signal battalion.
6-8. The CCP in the airborne division replaces–
• One LENS.
• One NCS.
• Four SENSs.
• Three RAUs.
• Six LOS(V1)s.
• Four LOS(V3)s.
• One LOS(V4).
6-9. The LCCP in the light division replaces–
• One LENS.
• One NMF.
• One LEN support vehicle.
• One RAU.
• One LOS(V1).
• One LOS(V4).
6-10. Basis of allocation for the CCP is four CCPs to the XVIII Airborne
Corps (35th Signal Brigade) and two CCPs each to the 82d Airborne Division
(82d Signal Battalion) and the 101st Air Assault Division (501st Signal
Battalion). The CCP consists of–
• One CCPS (communications central (with LTU), AN/TTC-50).
• Two CCESs (communications central (without LTU), AN/TTC-50).
• One dismounted extension switch (DES) (communications switching
set, AN/TTC-51).
• Two AN/TRC-198(V1)s (similar to an LOS(V3)).
• Two dismounted LOS (DLOS) AN/TRC-198(V2)s.
6-11. Basis of allocation for the LCCP is two LCCPs each to the selected light
infantry division signal battalions (10th and 125th). The LCCP consists of–
• One parent switch (communications central, AN/TTC-50).
• Two DESs (communications switching set, AN/TTC-51).
• Two LOS AN/TRC-198(V1)s.
• Four DLOS AN/TRC-198(V2)s.
6-2
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
EQUIPMENT CAPABILITIES
6-12. The CCPs can support local switching, tandem trunking, flood search
routing, and database maintenance for extension switches and RAUs.
6-13. At the task force CP/airfield, the CCP can support 12 local RAU
subscribers, 117 local wire subscribers, 8 defense switching networks (DSNs)
or 8 commercial access trunks, and 7 packet switch hosts.
6-14. At the brigade headquarters, the CCP can support 15 local RAU
subscribers, 47 local wire subscribers, 8 DSNs or 8 commercial access trunks,
and 7 packet switch hosts.
6-15. The CCP and LCCP are fully interoperable with other MSE systems.
Two C-141B aircraft sorties can transport each CCP or LCCP.
DEPLOYMENT
6-16. The following paragraphs cover CCP and LCCP deployment.
CCP INITIAL DEPLOYMENT
6-17. As the CCP initially deploys, connectivity is maintained to the
sustaining base, to an adjacent CP/airfield if present, and to a brigade
headquarters. Connectivity to the sustaining base is maintained through
multichannel TACSAT. Connectivity to the adjacent CP/airfield is
maintained through LOS multichannel or through multichannel TACSAT. As
the brigade headquarters deploys, connectivity is maintained through the
DLOS. (See Figure 6-1.)
Figure 6-1. CCP Initial Deployment
6-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
CCP FULL DEPLOYMENT
6-18. As the network matures, the CCP supports the deployed brigade
headquarters and a jump brigade headquarters and maintains connectivity to
an adjacent CP/airfield and to the sustaining base. Connectivity to the
adjacent airfield is supported by another CCP and maintained through LOS
if possible. Connectivity to the sustaining base is maintained through
multichannel TACSAT. (See Figure 6-2.)
Figure 6-2. CCP Full Deployment
6-4
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
CCP CONVENTIONAL MISSION
6-19. In a conventional entry operations mission, the MSE CCP maintains
connectivity to two NCs and two brigade headquarters. Connectivity is
maintained using LOS multichannel communications. (See Figure 6-3.)
NC
NC
Figure 6-3. CCP Conventional Mission
LCCP INITIAL DEPLOYMENT
6-20. As the LCCP initially deploys, connectivity is maintained to the
sustaining base, to an adjacent CP/airfield if present, and to a brigade
headquarters. Connectivity to the sustaining base is maintained through
multichannel TACSAT. Connectivity to the adjacent CP/airfield is supported
by another CCP and maintained through LOS multichannel or through
multichannel TACSAT. As the brigade headquarters deploys, connectivity is
maintained through the DLOS to the DES. LOS is also used to maintain
connectivity to a RAU at the brigade headquarters. (See Figure 6-4.)
6-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
DES
LTU
LTU
Figure 6-4. LCCP Initial Deployment
LCCP FULL DEPLOYMENT
6-21. As the network matures, the CCPS supports two deployed brigade
headquarters and two RAUs, located at the brigade headquarters, and
maintains connectivity to an adjacent CP/airfield and to the sustaining base.
Connectivity to the adjacent airfield is supported by another CP and
maintained through LOS if possible. Connectivity to the sustaining base is
maintained through multichannel TACSAT. Connectivity to the brigade
headquarters is maintained through LOS terminals at the CP/airfield and
through the DES at the brigade headquarters. (See Figure 6-5.)
6-6
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
DES
BRIGADE
HEADQUARTERS
(LCCES)
TACSAT
CP/AIRFIELD
(CCPS)
DES
LTU
BRIGADE
HEADQUARTERS
(LCCES)
LTU
SWITCH
Figure 6-5. LCCP Full Deployment
LCCP CONVENTIONAL MISSION
6-22. In a conventional MSE mission, the CCP maintains connectivity to two
NCs and two brigade headquarters. Connectivity is maintained using LOS
multichannel communications. (See Figure 6-6.)
6-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
NCS
DES
LCCES
CCPS
LTU
DES
LTU
LCCES
Figure 6-6. LCCP Conventional Mission
6-8
Chapter 7
Tactical Packet Network
This chapter introduces packet switching and covers the Army TPN
architecture which contains the network’s hardware and software. It also
covers TPN employment and management.
PACKET SWITCHING NETWORK
7-1. Packet switching is a standard for interconnecting many computers. (See
Figure 7-1.) Packet switching transmits data from one location (host) to
another, just as circuit switching transmits voice from one location to
another. Packet switching breaks the data into small packets with addresses
and routes each packet to its destination through the network across the
quickest and shortest path. The packet switching network uses the
established paths of the circuit switch network rather than engineering the
same links. Dedicating some trunk group channels to packet switching allows
the packet switching network to take advantage of alternative path routing.
Figure 7-1. TPN Overview
7-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
TACTICAL PACKET NETWORK ARCHITECTURE
7-2. The TPN includes packet-switching overlays to the MSE circuit switched
network at ECB and EAC. The MSE overlay at ECB (the MPN) and the TRITAC packet overlay at EAC are basically identical and comprise the Army
TPN. Typically, a data system must have four essential items to take
advantage of the packet network capabilities. These are–
• A physical interface.
• Department of Defense (DOD) standard protocols.
• Tactical name server (TNS) registration software.
• A user application program written with packet access in mind.
7-3. The MPN is implemented with packet switches in the NC, SEN, LEN,
FES, and NMT. The EAC packet overlay is implemented with packet
switches in the TTC-39Ds, SENS, and LENS. An NMC manages the network.
It is installed in the NMT at ECB and collocated with the CSCE at EAC.
Other major components include the interworking gateways and the
TNS/message transfer agent (MTA). Figure 7-2 shows the TPN WAN.
LEN
LEN
EAC
LEGEND
SEN
39D
39D
SEN
39D
39D User Access For:
8 x Direct Connect Hosts
4 x LANs Network
Switching
SEN
SEN
SEN Access For:
5 x Direct Connect Hosts
2 x LANs
LEN
LEN Access For:
7 x Direct Connect Hosts
4 x LANs
SEN
SEN
39D
39D
39D
ECB
NC
NC
FES
LEN
NC
FES
NC
NC
SEN
SEN
LEN
SEN
FES
FES
SEN
Figure 7-2. TPN WAN
7-2
NC
NC Limited User Access
Network Switching:
1 x LAN
FES Limited User Access
Network Switching:
1 x LAN
6 x Direct Connect Hosts
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
AN/TYC-20 PACKET SWITCH
7-4. The AN/TYC-20 is a self-contained unit and is the packet switch used in
the TPN. The switch provides user access and routes packets through the
MSE network. To accomplish this, the switch contains two separate
processors. One processor is the main processor which automatically switches
and routes data as packets. The other processor is the integral gateway
(IGW) (the IGW-side) which acts as a transparent gateway to all LAN hosts.
7-5. One packet switch locates in the NCS, SEN, NMT, and FES shelters.
Two packet switches locate in the LEN shelter and the TTC-39D. In MSE and
TRI-TAC networks, a small portion of the trunking is dedicated to support
the packet overlay. The SEN to NCS/TTC-39D trunks are at 16 kbps, while
backbone trunking (NCS/TTC-39D to NCS/TTC-39D, NCS/FES/TTC-39D)
and LEN to NCS/TTC-39D trunking are at 64 kbps. This data overlay of
packet switches is implemented with almost no impact on voice user grade-ofservice. The SEN, LEN, TTC-39D, and FES packet switches are mainly used
for host connections and host access into the TPN backbone. The NCS packet
switch, however, acts primarily as the backbone trunking packet switch for
the TPN.
7-6. The IGW in the AN/TYC-20 acts as a transparent gateway and reverse
address resolution protocol (RARP) server for all LAN hosts. The IGW
contains two ports for LAN connections: LAN 0 and LAN 1. Both ports pass
through separate Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
802.3 transceivers and the shelter’s signal entry panel (SEP). The IGW
allows all connected TPN LAN hosts to send off LAN IP datagrams without
any knowledge of the present TPN topology.
7-7. The TPN packet switch can connect up to 64 hosts on each of its LAN
ports. However, with the AN/TYC-20, the IGW is considered one host per
LAN appearance. Therefore, only a maximum of 63 hosts can connect to each
LAN of the TPN. The IEEE 802.3 standard is 30 LAN hosts per 185 meters of
RG-58 Thinlan cable. If using the LAN to full capacity, a repeater should be
placed after the first and second 185-meter segment containing 29 or 30
hosts. If using only one segment of 185-meter cable, the TPN can connect only
30 hosts minus the IGW.
7-8. In the NCS, TTC-39D, and FES, there is a further limitation on LAN 0.
The switch workstation is connected to LAN 0 and is considered connected to
host port 56 at all times. Therefore, LAN 0 at the NCS, TTC-39D, and FES is
not used in either shelter. The switch workstation contains the TNS and the
MTA. If a user improperly connects to LAN 0, the workstation may be
disconnected causing the TNS and the MTA to function incorrectly. This is
highly undesirable; therefore, the user community should not connect to this
LAN.
7-9. The TPN has two general configurations of the packet switch: the six
port and the twelve port. The different configurations allow the various MSE
and EAC shelters to accommodate distinct arrays of hosts and trunks. The
SEN, LEN, and NMT contain the six-port configuration. The six-port
configuration has twelve physical ports on the packet switch back plane;
however, only six of these ports are configured in the packet switch software
7-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
and are physically realized on the input/output (I/O) circuit card assembly
(CCA). The NCS, FES, and TTC-39D contain the twelve-port configuration.
There are twelve physical ports on the packet switch and all ports are
configured for operational use.
AN/TYC-19 GATEWAY SWITCH
7-10. The AN/TYC-19 or the T-20 gateway IP router is a communications
gateway processor. As a stand-alone device, it resides only in the NCS and
TTC-39D as part of its packet switching equipment. The gateway
interconnects three different IP networks. These different networks may be
networks with different net identifications (IDs) or other types of LANs and
WANs (Internet or DISN). The T-20 router provides up to three port
interfaces, hence the interconnection of three different packet switch
networks. The gateway also supports direct trunk lines to other T-20
gateways.
CV-4206/TTC SIGNAL DATA CONVERTER
7-11. The LEN, SEN, FES, and TTC-39D configurations can connect a wired
subscriber to the packet switching network, but they require a signal
conversion. The signal data converter (SDC) performs this function. It
converts four-wire data into a conditioned diphase (CDP) stream in one
direction, and converts the CDP stream into data in the opposite direction.
The SDC enables hosts to operate at distances of up to 4 kilometers (2.4
miles).
HOSTS
7-12. Hosts can be any type of computer that meets the specifications of the
TPN and can operate with the protocols prescribed by the network. These
hosts can connect through an X.25 interface or as part of a LAN. Hosts
classify as either standard hosts or high priority hosts. The high priority
hosts are normally LAN hosts because the packet switch does not monitor
LAN hosts and the IGW provides the interface, whereas the X.25 hosts
connect directly to the packet switch.
TACTICAL NAME SERVER AND MESSAGE TRANSFER AGENT
7-13. The TNS and the MTA are combined on a single workstation in the
NCS, FES, LEN, and TTC-39D. However, the TNS and MTA are running
only in the NCS and the TTC-39D, and possibly the FES (if it is configured as
an NCS). The TNS and MTA are not running in the LEN or the FES if the
FES is configured as a LEN, unless the LEN is booted as an NCS.
7-14. The TNS is a dynamic database consisting of registered hosts and
mailboxes whose main function is to answer queries from hosts and from the
MTA. The database is dynamic due to the ability of a host or mailbox to
relocate anywhere in the TNS network. Thus, when a host relocates, the local
TNS receives the new registration information and transmits it to the other
TNSs.
7-4
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
7-15. The TNS provides an automatic affiliation process similar to voice
users. It performs host address resolution and user registration and provides
a means for users to determine the current network location of other users on
the network. The TNS network may consist of one or more IP networks. This
is because occasionally one network cannot contain all the necessary packet
switches.
7-16. The MTA is the e-mail component of the network. It performs e-mail
store and forward, absent host coverage, and multiple addressing. The TNS
and MTA combine to support mobile users in a tactical environment.
PHYSICAL INTERFACES
7-17. The two physical interfaces to the packet network are Thinlan (IEEE
802.3 or Ethernet) and four-wire CDP (for X.25 users). Access via IEEE
802.3/Ethernet is by a standard LAN card with the transmission control
protocol (TCP)/IP. The length of the coaxial cable cannot exceed 185 meters
without a repeater (not supplied with the system) at a maximum access rate
of 9.6 kbps. The alternative to IEEE 802.3/Ethernet is X.25 access via a fourwire CDP connection (WF-16 field wire). The four-wire connection provides
access at a range of up to 4 kilometers (2.4 miles) with an access data rate of
16 kbps. Figure 7-3 shows user connectivity to a SEN.
X.25 INTERFACES
7-18. Direct X.25 connection of the TCP/IP host computer to the TPN fourwire CDP X.25 port requires a special interface. Commercial X.25 cards do
not support four-wire CDP output, but most cards support synchronous RS232 signaling levels. Three interface solutions can convert the RS-232 output
of a commercial X.25 card to four-wire CDP. These solutions are used to
connect TCP/IP hosts to the TPN.
7-19. The first solution is the tactical packet adapter (TPA). It is a selfcontained external device and a simple, low-cost synchronous RS-232 to fourwire CDP converter. The installation of the TPA requires only a cable
connection to the computer network adapter to the TPA and the connection of
the CDP lines to the binding post.
7-20. The second solution is the MSE data interface device (MDID) (all
models). The MDID is a simple, low-cost synchronous RS-232 to four-wire
CDP converter.
7-21. The third solution is the tactical terminal adapter (TTA). It is a simple,
low-cost synchronous RS-232 to four-wire CDP converter.
7-22. Host computers still require X.25 and TCP/IP to use the TPN. Host
registration software is also required to take full advantage of the TPN.
7-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
185 meters
LAN
AIS
AIS
LAN
J-BOX
AIS
AIS
AIS
AIS
AIS
5 WF-16 X.25 lines
Maximum distance from packet
switch is 4 kilometers.
4 kilometers
Figure 7-3. User Connectivity to a SEN
INTERNET PROTOCOL ADDRESS
7-23. IP is the protocol used in layer three (or four) of the International
Standards Organization (ISO) seven layer stack model. This protocol builds a
message into an IP datagram. The datagram contains a header, a source
address, a destination address, the data, and an error-checking mechanism.
7-24. An IP address (source or destination) is composed of four bytes (or
octets). It is constructed in the following format: Xl. X2. X3. X4, where "X" can
take the values of 0-255. This address form is the decimal dot notation or
simply the IP address. The TPN supports both Class A and Class B IP
addresses. Networks that have more than 65,536 but less than 16,777,216
hosts use Class A addresses. Networks that have more than 256 hosts but
less than 65,536 hosts use Class B addresses. The TPN is licensed legally to
use only the Class B addresses.
7-6
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
7-25. The IP address in the TPN is similar to the telephone number of the
circuit switch network. The switches have to know a user’s IP address and/or
number to route information from one user to another. In the TPN, the
packet switch node can automatically assign the connecting host an IP
address. Hosts connecting to a packet switch, however, must have the
required software for the automatic assignment of an IP address. If the host
does not have this software, the switch operator must manually assign an IP
address. Whereas, if the required software is present, the IP address is
obtained without any user knowledge of the TPN topology.
7-26. An X.25 host should have Auto X.25 functions, and a LAN host should
have RARP functions for automatic assignment of IP addresses, respectively.
TPN X.25 hosts obtain their IP address from their connecting packet switch
by sending a CALL REQUEST packet. The packet switch responds to the
CALL REQUEST packet with an INCOMING CALL packet.
7-27. Once the host obtains its address, it can begin talking with the rest of
the network and can register itself with the TNS. This is a nonstandard
implementation for TPN users. User communities must develop and
implement the software to perform this automated method of attaining an IP
number.
7-28. For LAN hosts, the TPN can connect up to 63 host port numbers per
user LAN. Again, only 29 hosts may connect per 185-meter segment of
Thinlan cable. TPN LAN hosts automatically obtain their IP address from
the IGW by using the RARP. A low-level protocol binds addresses
dynamically instead of using a static table that lists each host’s physical
address and corresponding IP address. The IGW is the RARP server for all
TPN LAN hosts. No other RARP server may attach to the TPN LANs. There
are multiple times at which the host may send a RARP request. One of the
most common procedures is to send a RARP request to the IGW for an IP
address as the host is booting up.
7-29. A new IP address is required each time a host obtains a new physical
connection to the TPN, or if the host is reconnected to a LAN after having
powered down, or if the host is otherwise disconnected from the LAN. The
RARP request contains the requesting host’s 48-bit hardware IP address. The
IGW responds to the RARP request with a RARP response to the requesting
host. The RARP response includes the IP address and hardware address for
the originator and the IGW. The IGW RARP server assigns IP addresses from
highest port to lowest port; therefore, if hosts do not have RARP or the
requirement is to assign IP addresses manually, the assignment is from
lowest to highest. (See Figure 7-4.)
HOST REGISTRATION
7-30. Registration allows a host and associated mailboxes to register with the
TNS allowing the host to communicate with all hosts in the network. After
the host receives its name, registration involves two separate processes. The
first is to obtain the host’s IP address from the packet switch network. The
second is to register the host and associated mailboxes with the TNS as
described in SR-43A and SR-45. (See Figure 7-4.)
7-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Asks the Network for
an IP Address
(1)
TPN
PROTOCOLS:
X.25 - Special Facilities Request
PSN
Network Provides
IP Address
802.3 (LAN) - Reverse Address
Resolution Protocol
(RARP)
(2)
MB
Registers with TNS
TPN
MB
MB
NAME MAILBOXES
IP #
TNS
Confirmation
Refreshes every
20 Minutes
DeRegisters when
Host Moves
Figure 7-4. Host Address Assignment and Registration with the TNS
NETWORK MANAGEMENT
7-31. The NMC (AN/TYQ-54) manages the network, and it is a
comprehensive real-time network monitoring and control system for the TPN.
It is a computer workstation that monitors and controls the packet switching
equipment. The NMC’s hardware components include a central processing
unit (CPU), a color monitor, a keyboard, and a trackball. Its software, known
as the Integrated Management System (IMS), enables the NMC operator to
observe activity in a tactical network and to diagnose any problems that may
arise. (See Figure 7-5 and Figure 7-6.)
MONITORING:
• Constant watch on network components.
• Recording and displaying device status changes and network events.
• Operator querying of specific network components real-time status.
CONTROL:
• Network operators can remotely issue commands to control network
components (for example, diagnostics, throughput, and software
downloads).
STATISTICS COLLECTION:
• Gathers statistical data for further processing.
REPORTING:
• Processes statistics and monitors information to produce management
reports.
Figure 7-5. Packet NMC Functions
7-8
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
TECHNICAL
SHELTER
16 kbps
To Node
Center
PLANNING/
MANAGEMENT
SHELTER
X.25
Packet
Switch
Direct
Connection
IGW
Packet
NMC
SCC-2
System
Workstation
PRINTER
IEEE 802.3
LAN
SCC-2
Sytem
Workstation
SCC-2
System
Workstation
PRINTER
PRINTER
Figure 7-6. Packet NMC in the NMT
7-9
Chapter 8
Asynchronous Transfer Mode Switch
This chapter gives an overview of the asynchronous transfer mode (ATM)
switch for high-speed data switching.
BASIC ASYNCHRONOUS TRANSFER MODE TECHNOLOGY
8-1. ATM technology provides a highly efficient communication system for
high-speed data switching. This capability transmits voice, video, and data in
a single communication link. Figure 8-1 shows the basic ATM switch
technology. The system can also transmit still photography, images, and
graphics.
ATM VPI/VCI SYSTEMS
ATM Cells
Multimedia
Voice
Voice Video Data
Multimedia
Video
Multimedia
Data
MSE
Voice
TPN
ATM Virtual Path
ATM Virtual Circuits
Figure 8-1. ATM Switch Technology
8-2. The ATM basic technology concept involves using a virtual path
identifier (VPI) and a virtual circuit identifier (VCI). The VPI and VCI are
used for ATM address assignment. The VPI directs the data to the correct
receiver, and the VCI identifies the different cell streams within a
transmission. Virtual circuits are one-way ATM connections from source to
destination, which means that two connections are required for full-duplex
(two-way) communications.
8-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
8-3. ATM technology offers additional advantages that include–
• More efficient use of radio bandwidth because it dynamically assigns
bandwidth as needed.
• Ability to assign priority and precedence for designated users,
allowing data from high priority users to be sent out first.
8-4. ATM switching shows significant potential, especially for large
throughput and fast speed of service. The ATM hub switch provides the
tactical ATM backbone switching support for all tactical users. The switch
terminates wideband fiber optics, synchronous optic network (SONET)
radios, and currently employed tactical digital radios and DTG network
interfaces. It has an adaptive forward error correction (FEC) capability that
improves the quality and reliability of the DTGs.
FUNCTIONS
8-5. The ATM switch package provides a multimedia and a video
teleconference (VTC) capability for commanders in the field. ATM technology
applies to selected switches in the MSE ACUS. ATM switches support
workstations where key commanders participate in VTCs using the MSE
network as a transmission medium. ATM cells created at the workstation
and those created in the ATM switch are transmitted across MSE links
according to designated addresses.
8-6. The ATM switch package is the Integrated Systems Technology (IST)
Model LDR-100 ATM switch card, which has two versions. The first is the
LDR-100C compact version installed in the SENs. The other is the LDR-100S
standard version installed in the AN/TTC-47 NCS. The LDR-100–
• Uses the Lucent Limitless ATM Network (LANET) ATM protocol that
puts ATM cells into frame for synchronization and ease of
identification.
• Provides cell leader error correction that allows address mapping
according to possible errors if a header or address contains error data
(bits).
• Supports ATM and non-ATM links that supports VTC, multimedia,
MSE voice, and TPN traffic.
• Contains special buffers to minimize the delay of constant-bit-rate
(CBR) traffic and to allow peak data rates for variable-bit-rate traffic.
• Supports up to 4,095 independent ATM addressees for each port.
• Uses four serial ports using the Communications-Electronics
Command (CECOM) Quad-Serial Card. This card supports
programmable data rates of 300 bytes per second (bps) to 1.544
megabytes per second (mbps) using serial protocols (RS-232 or
RS-422) and the transmission of cell-bearing and non-cell bearing
data. The Quad-Serial Card interfaces the ATM switch with the MSE
system.
8-2
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
• Uses one transparent asynchronous transceiver interface (TAXI) card
to support connections for one serial system and one parallel port. It
allows programmable data rates for each port and supports the
transmission of cell-bearing and non-cell bearing data.
• Uses a TAXI card to connect the user’s VTC workstation to the ATM
switch.
• Uses an interface card that has its own CPU. The CPU stores the
configuration and settings for that interface card, and it allows
preconfiguration of ATM switches during the predeployment phase.
DEPLOYMENT
8-7. The ATM switch package is embedded in selected NCs, LENs, and SENs
of the MSE network. Figure 8-2 shows the NC and LEN switch configuration.
Figure 8-3 shows the SEN switch configuration.
SYSTEM CONFIGURATION
To TDM
Switch
Matrix
Serial
TP Ethernet
ATM
Switch
S
E
P
TGMOW
TED 1
Single DTG or
TGMD
To TDM
Switch
Matrix
Serial
Fiber
(for TOC at LEN)
Control Platform
(SPARC Laptop)
TED 2
TGMOW
and
TGMD
S
E
P
NC/LEN Components
Switching Shelter
1 each ATM Switch
1 each per ATM Link
Serial Cable for TDM
(Red side of TED 1)
1 each per ATM Link
Serial Cable for TDM
(Red side of TED 2)
1 each Control Platform
1 each Ethernet Cable
VTC Workstation
Figure 8-2. ATM Switch Configuration for NC/LEN
8-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
ATM INSERTION AT SEN
(for TOC at LEN)
VTC Workstation
(and Control Platform)
Fiber
TP Ethernet
ATM
Switch
Loop
Group
MUX
Serial
OCU
TMG
Serial
TED 1
Orderwire
Control
Unit
TxPT TxCK RxPT RxCK BSC
Group
Modem
Control Platform
(SPARC Laptop)
S
E
P
SEN Components
Switching Shelter
1 each ATM Switch
1 each per ATM Link
Serial Cable for TDM
(Red side of TED 1)
1 each per ATM Link
Serial Cable for TDM
(Red side of TED 2)
1 each Control Platform
1 each Ethernet Cable
TxPT TxCK RxPT RxCK BSC
Figure 8-3. ATM Switch Configuration for SEN
8-8. ATM-enabled MSE switches are positioned according to the factors of
METT-T to best support the commander’s concept of the operation. ATM
switches usually locate with the DTAC, the brigade TOC, the aviation TOC
(AVTOC), and the brigade rear TOC. ATM-enabled MSE switches also locate
as needed with the Army Air Missile Defense Command (AAMDC), Air and
Missile Defense Planning and Control System (AMDPCS), and Air and
Missile Defense Task Force. Figure 8-4 shows an example of a typical
deployment of the MSE network with ATM-enabled NCSs and SENSs.
NC
NC
ATM
ATM
SEN
ATM
SEN
ATM
BDE TOC 1
BDE TOC 2
SEN
SEN
ATM
ATM
SEN
4TH FSB
ATM
AVTOC
DIV HQ
SEN
ATM
DTAC
Figure 8-4. Deployment of the MSE Network with ATM-Enabled NCSs and SENSs
8-4
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
OPERATIONAL SOFTWARE
8-9. Sun Net Manager is the operational software used and is contained in a
laptop computer. To support the operational requirements for efficient highspeed data switching, the ATM switch applies the advanced ATM technology
in its operational software design. Figure 8-5 shows that the data being
transferred is broken down into very small pockets (53 bytes) called cells and
given specific addresses for their destination. Each cell contains a 5-byte
leader for control purposes and 48 bytes for the data payload. The software
design supports the transmission of video, audio, and data from their sources
to their destinations within the MSE architecture.
V
Empty ("Null") cells are not switched
but regenerated at interface.
V
Video
Source
V
A
V
A
D
A
-
V
A
-
D
V
ATM
Switch
Audio
Source
Synchronous Channel Signaling
D
Data
Source
D
D
Fixed Cell Size (53 bytes)
Header:
5 bytes
Payload: 48 bytes
Fixed Cell Transmission Rate
Asynchronous
Information
Sources
Figure 8-5. ATM Source Multiplexing Function
OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES
8-10. Operational planning for the ATM network focuses on ensuring the
required communication capabilities are available and tailored to the
commander’s requirements. ATM facilities and capabilities are tuned to
support the operational requirements of the mission. ATM connections and
naming requirements are determined well before deployment. Figure 8-6
shows a typical DTG path for ATM-enabled telephone circuits.
8-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
To other
NC
To other
NC
NC
NC
4
LOS
ATM Cells
MSE
(non-ATM)
ATM
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
LOS
ATM
switch
6
ATM
switch
3
MSE
2
MSE (non-ATM) 7
5 MSE (non-ATM)
9.
10.
11.
ATM Cells
LOS
8
ATM
switch
LOS
ATM Cells
MSE DNVT sends calls to MSE SEN.
9
MSE traffic multiplexed with multimedia traffic.
Single ATM-enhanced linked with both MSE and multimedia.
MSE traffic demuxed out and switched by MSE NC.
LOS
Since internodal linked is ATM-enhanced, MSE traffic
multiplexed with other traffic.
ATM
ATM-enabled internodal link with both MSE and multimedia.
switch
MSE traffic demuxed and switched by MSE NC.
Since SEN link is ATM-enhanced, MSE traffic multiplexed
MSE 10
with other traffic.
(non-ATM)
MSE traffic multiplexed with multimedia traffic.
MSE traffic demuxed and sent to MSE SEN.
MSE switch forwards calls to appropriate DNVTs.
SEN
SEN
MSE
11
1
Figure 8-6. DTG Path for MSE Telephone Circuits
8-11. Data rates between an NC and a SEN are increased from 256 kbps to
1024 kbps. This allows 256 kbps for MSE switching and the TPN; and 786
kbps to support user VTC, whiteboarding, and high-data requirements
through the ATM switch. Links between two NCs (internodal links) will
operate at 1024 kbps. The NCS will configure their databases to operate at
512 kbps. This allows 512 kbps for VTC/whiteboarding workstation
connections and MSE switching and TPN data. Figure 8-7 shows the use of
two DTGs for the ATM. Network planning factors include workstation needs
to operate within hardware and software parameters. For example, ATM
network interface cards (NICs) in the workstations listen only for ATM
connections addressed with O as the VPI.
8-6
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Multimedia
Multimedia
MSE
256 kbps
ATM
256 kbps
DTG 1
MSE
NC
DTG 2
(ATM cells)
1024 kbps
SEN
Multimedia
Multimedia
TED
At NC
DTG 2
(ATM cells)
1024 kbps
MSE
TED
At SEN
MSE LOS
ATM cells
over LOS
MSE LOS
Group
Modem
MSE LOS
radios at 1024 kbps
MSE
Multimedia
Figure 8-7. Using Two DTGs for an ATM Solution
TACTICS AND TECHNIQUES
8-12. The current ATM-enabled MSE switch contains limitations that affect
employment techniques in the field. ATM technology relies on LOS radios
operating at 1024 kbps. Potential frequency allocation problems are due to
the number of frequencies available within the battlespace. Current MSE
systems were designed for 1024 kbps for internodal links between NCs and
512 kbps for links for LENs and SENs (256 kbps was typically used for links
leading from SENs). The requirement for increasing the bandwidth for all
links to support ATM switching can lead to frequency allocation problems.
Careful planning is required to allow adequate bandwidth and frequency
allocation.
8-13. Within the NCs, it is impossible to use the same DTG for interface in
and out of the ATM switch. This is because the transmission group modem
and orderwire (TGMOW) card in the NCs cannot support multiple data rates.
The TGMOW card provides the interface to both the plain text and cipher
test sides of the TED. On the plain text side of the TGMOW, the card creates
and manages the framing channel to the DTG. On the cipher text side, the
TGMOW provides a reclocking buffer to adjust for differences between
network and switch timing. Although both sides are running synchronous
interfaces (clock and data), the two sides are not independent of each other.
The TGMOW card requires a common clock for both sides and must operate
at different data rates.
8-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
8-14. The necessity to run the TGMOW at two different rates is due to
inherent properties of CBR cell encapsulation. The CECOM Quad card
provides two modes: a non-cell bearing CBR RS-442 access and cell bearing
DTG trunk. The access modes on the CECOM Quad card encapsulate
incoming data into ATM cells. This process takes the CBR data, regardless of
content, and places it within the payload of an ATM cell.
8-15. The resulting output has an additional 10 percent in ATM header
information in addition to the data. This results in a higher data rate on the
cell-bearing side of the CECOM Quad card. To resolve the multiple data rate
problem, a second DTG is set up to interface to the output of the CECOM
Quad card at the cell-bearing rate while the DTG connected to the switch
matrix will run at the access data rate. This keeps the TGMOWs in
agreement with the input and output rates at the ATM switch. NCs must
also modify the database so that the TED corresponding to the actual DTG
used is consistent with the setup. This way, the COMSEC controller card
knows which TED to control if an AUTO-RESYNC COMMAND occurs.
8-16. An ATM-enabled SEN does not have the same problem as the NCs with
the TGMOW card. The ATM-enabled SEN can only connect to an ATMenabled NC. This reduces the flexibility of reconfiguring the MSE network
during movement across the battlefield. The ATM-enabled NCs must have a
CECOM Quad card and two DTGs available before it can connect the SEN
into the MSE system. Network planners must know the contents and
configuration information of the NCs database and the ATM switch
configuration to reconfigure the network.
HIGH-SPEED MULTIPLEXER
8-17. A high-speed multiplexer (HSMUX) circuit card that replaces the
multiplexer-demultiplexer (MXDMX) card in MSE switch modems provides
video and high-speed data access through the MSE network at ECB and the
TRI-TAC network at EAC. The HSMUX expands the group rate from 256 to
512 kbps and provides a port for local connections and four high-speed ports
that support data rates of 64, 128, and 256 kbps. The HSMUX enables highspeed data access over the existing backbone network. Circuit configuration
is via the channel reassignment function (CRF) that allows the switch
operator to configure automatic connection for VTC service. An enhancement
option will allow automatic circuit configuration through programming
software. Appendix D provides a more detailed description of the HSMUX.
ENHANCED TRANSMISSION GROUP MODEM AND ORDERWIRE
8-18. The enhanced transmission group modem and orderwire (ETGMOW)
cards will be an interim solution to increased data capabilities prior to the
Warfighter Information Network (WIN). The ETGMOW and HSMUX II cards
alleviate customizing the standard database (channel reassignment) at the
NC and assigning multiplexers that reduce extension capabilities.
8-8
Appendix A
MSE Symbology and Equipment Nomenclature
This appendix gives the current symbology and equipment nomenclature
for MSE including the ISYSCON symbols.
MSE SYMBOLOGY
Table A-1 contains symbols that represent joint symbology for tactical
communications. They are derived from the Global Team Labeling (GTEAM)
data file of the GDB. The left-hand column of the table shows the symbol and
the right-hand column lists the equipment nomenclature associated with the
symbol. The standard team name is identified above the symbol. The team
label is identified below the symbol and is either a four or a five character
field. The symbol is associated with the team type in the GTEAM data file.
Table A-1. Joint Symbology for Tactical Communication Systems
Symbol
NC
XXXX
FES
XXXX
FES
XXXX
LEN
Nomenclature
NC
TTC-47
FES Airborne (ABN) (CCES)
TTC-50
FES CCPS
TTC-50
LEN
TTC-46 ECB
XXXX
A-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table A-1. Joint Symbology for Tactical Communication Systems (Continued)
Symbol
LEN
XXXX
SENX
XXXXX
DES
XXXXX
3865
XXQXX
RAU
XXRXX
39D
XXXX
A-2
Nomenclature
Medium Extension Node
(TTC-46 and GSQ-80)
EAC
SEN
TTC-48(V1) (SEN1)
TTC-48(V2) (SEN2)
DES
TTC-51
SB-3865
Air Force (AF)/
United States Marine Corps (USMC)
RAU
Area Node
TTC-39D
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Table A-1. Joint Symbology for Tactical Communication Systems (Continued)
Symbol
39A4
XXXX
39A3
XXXX
39A1
XXVXX
CDS
XXXX
39E
Nomenclature
Area Node
TTC-39A(V4)
Area Node
TTC-39A(V3)
Area Node
TTC-39A(V1)
Area Node
Compact Digital Switch (CDS)
Area Node
TTC-39E
XXXX
39E1
Area Node
TTC-39E(V1)
SOF Shelter Node
XXXX
42
TTC-42
(AF/USMC)
XXMXX
A-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table A-1. Joint Symbology for Tactical Communication Systems (Continued)
Symbol
DS
XXXX
SMU
XXXX
ALOG
Label
41x or 3614
XXPXX
CDIG
Label
LOSx
XXZXX
RLOS
XXLXX
A-4
Nomenclature
DS
AF Digital Switch
Switch Multiplex Unit (SMU) is planned to be
used in Standard Tactical Entry Point (STEP),
Super High Frequency Tri-Band Advanced
Range Extension Terminal (STAR-T), and
aboard ships.
Analog Switch (ALOG)
ALOG Switch (Tandem)
TTC-41(V1) (411 through 414)
SB-3614 (3614)
Commercial Digital (CDIG)
Radio Relay (RR)
LOS(V1-V4) (LOS1-LOS4)
Remote LOS (RLOS)
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Table A-1. Joint Symbology for Tactical Communication Systems (Continued)
Symbol
TYC
Label
TYC
Label
MSC
Nomenclature
Message Center
TYC-39
TYC-39A
Message Center
TYC-17
Message Center MSC-63
R or Y in center of symbol
Label
ISYS
Network Manager System (SCC-2, ISYSCON,
CSCE and CSS)
XXWXX
TECHCON
Label
ATM
Label
SMUX
Technical Control (TECHCON)
TSQ-188
TSQ-111
TSQ-84
ATM Switch
SMART MUX (SMUX)
Integrated Digital Network Exchange (IDNX)
TIMEPLEX
Label
A-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table A-1. Joint Symbology for Tactical Communication Systems (Continued)
Symbol
Nomenclature
LTU
LTU
Label
RMC
RMC
Label
RGLM
Remote Loop Group Multiplexer (RLGM)
Label
TGM
Tactical Group Multiplexer (TGM)
Label
NAI
NAI
XXNXX
TMIF
Label
A-6
Tactical MSE Interface Family Digital Modem
(TMIF)
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Table A-1. Joint Symbology for Tactical Communication Systems (Continued)
Symbol
ADI
Nomenclature
Air Defense Interface (ADI)
XXTXX
TPS
Tactical Packet Switch (TPS)
Label
IPR or GW
Internet Protocol Router (IPR)/Gateways (GW)
also Tactical Multinet Gateway (TMG) and
Internet Controller (INC)
Label
D
Data Terminal or Computer Terminal
Label
DNS or TNS
Domain Name System (DNS) or TNS
Label
MLS
Multilevel Security (MLS) Device
I
INE
G
Guard
F
Firewall
X
Other
Label
A-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table A-1. Joint Symbology for Tactical Communication Systems (Continued)
Symbol
KG
Nomenclature
Encryption Device
(KG-194, KG-84)
Label
EGRU
EPLRS Relay
Enhanced Grid Reference Unit (EGRU)
Label
EPLRS
EPLRS NCS
Label
TST
TST
Label
TRT
TRT
Label
JAM
Jammer
Label
A-8
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Table A-1. Joint Symbology for Tactical Communication Systems (Continued)
Symbol
HFR
Nomenclature
HF Radio (HFR)
Primary/Alternate
Label
LOS Link (LOSL)
TACSAT Link (TSL)
Tropo Link (TRL)
Cable Link
A-9
Appendix B
MSE Interoperability
This appendix focuses on the three methods used to interface the ACUS
and the Army Tactical Communications System (ATACS) equipped units,
and it also covers data communications. Interoperability and connectivity
between an MSE equipped corps/division and one unequipped
corps/division are accomplished in several ways. The three methods
covered show how an MSE SENS (AN/TTC-48) interfaces with an
IATACS switch (AN/TTC-41). Interfacing requires slight modifications to
the AN/TTC-41 and AN/TTC-48. The three methods of making this ACUS
interconnection are–
• Method 1: Type V circuit card to Type I circuit card.
• Method 2: Type V circuit card to Type II circuit card.
• Method 3: Type VI circuit card to Type VI circuit card (the preferred
method).
INTERFACE METHOD 1 - TYPE V TO TYPE I
B-1. Method 1 interfaces the IATACS switch card to the SENS. (See Figure
B-1.) The database entries for method 1 are very minor, but require extensive
operator intervention.
AN/TTC-47
MSE NETWORK
TYPE V -
2V DC CLOSURE DIAL PULSE
OR DTMF TRUNK
TYPE I -
2V RINGDOWN TRUNK
TA-312
DATA TERMINAL MUST BE CONFIGURED
FOR DIGITAL CONNECTION TO DSVT/DNVT.
DATA TERMINAL MUST BE CONFIGURED
FOR ANALOG MODEM CONNECTION.
**ANALOG 2-WIRE TRUNKS CAN BE EXTENDED WITH THE AN/TRC-145/151.
Figure B-1. MSE-IATACS Interface Method 1 - Type V to Type I
B-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
B-2. Method 1 achieves reliable voice communications across the
MSE/IATACS boundary. The MSE operator must use a TA-312 telephone
that is wired in parallel with the SENS dial central office (DCO) terminal.
This sends a ringdown signal to the IATACS operator. Telephone calls cannot
be automatically routed across the networks, and both operators must
intercept and extend calls. Method 1 has the disadvantage that the SENS
loses its ability to interface with a public switch.
B-3. Method 1 does not achieve data communications across the
MSE/IATACS boundary. Data communications are from computer-tocomputer. With MSE, the computers are configured for digital connection to
the DSVT or DNVT. With IATACS, the computers are configured for analog
modem connection. These configurations are not compatible with each other.
B-4. The following procedures network IATACS with MSE using interface
method 1:
• The two switchboards are connected with field wire. A TA-312 is
attached to the same terminals that send a ringdown signal to the
SB-3614A. The signal alerts the IATACS operator that a call is
coming in from the MSE operator.
• This interface does not allow automatic routing between the two
networks. MSE network subscribers are given the SENS CSP number
(LNXXXXX) and must place calls to the IATACS network through the
SENS operator. IATACS network subscribers are given the MSE
network area code (November Yankee X-ray [NYX]) and the
designated MSE interface number assigned to the DCO line. They
must place calls to the MSE network through the IATACS operator.
The MSE operator intercepts all calls from the IATACS network on
the DCO lines. The SENS operator extends calls into the MSE
network in the normal manner.
• This method does not require any additional circuit cards, but does
require a TA-312 (from the IATACS network) and some database
changes.
NOTE: See TM 11-5800-216-10-1.
B-5. MSE system planning required for operation is as follows:
• Publish the SENS CSP DNVT phone number as the operator accesses
the AN/TTC-41 network.
• Provide the SENS operator with phone directories for the AN/TTC-41
network and the MSE network, since calls from both networks are
intercepted at the SENS.
• Determine if the adjacent network meets security requirements.
Instruct gateway SENS to clear NSW tone when appropriate.
B-6. IATACS system planning required for operation is as follows:
• Publish the area code of the MSE network.
• Publish the directory number of the Type I terminals as another
access to the MSE SENS operator. A fixed directory number could be
assigned to simplify the dialing instructions for the network.
B-2
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
• The AN/TTC-41 operator should provide the SENS operator with
directory assistance in the AN/TTC-41 network.
INTERFACE METHOD 2 - TYPE V TO TYPE II
B-7. Method 2 is similar to method 1. (See Figure B-2.) Method 2 interfaces
the SB-3614A (AN/TTC-41) with the SENS (AN/TTC-48). The database
entries for method 2 are minor, but they require significant SENS operator
intervention.
AN/TTC-47
MSE NETWORK
TYPE V - 2V DC CLOSURE DIAL PULSE OR
DTMF TRUNK
TYPE II - 2V COMMON BATTERY PULSE DIAL
OR DTMF PHONE INTERFACE LINE CARD
NC
IATACS NETWORK
VOICE
MCS
TACCS
VOICE
TYPE
VII
AN/TTC-48
SENS
DATA TERMINAL MUST BE CONFIGURED FOR
A DIGITAL CONNECTION TO THE DSVT/DNVT.
TYPE
V
TYPE
II
AN/TTC-41
TYPE
II
SB-3614A
MCS
TACCS
DATA TERMINAL MUST BE CONFIGURED
FOR AN ANALOG MODEM CONNECTION.
**ANALOG 2-WIRE TRUNKS CAN BE EXTENDED WITH THE AN/TRC-145/151.
Figure B-2. MSE-IATACS Interface Method 2 - Type V to Type II
B-8. Method 2 also achieves reliable voice communications across the
MSE/IATACS boundary. The telephone calls cannot be automatically routed
across the networks. The SENS operator must extend all calls from or into
the IATACS network. Method 2, like method 1, has the disadvantage that the
SENS loses its ability to connect to a DCO.
B-9. Method 2 does not achieve data communications across
MSE/IATACS boundary for the same reasons described for method 1.
the
B-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
B-10. MSE system planning required for operation is as follows:
• Publish the SENS CSP DNVT phone number as the operator accesses
the IATACS network.
• Provide the SENS operator with phone directories for the IATACS
network and the MSE network since the SENS intercepts all calls
from both networks.
• Determine if the adjacent network meets security requirements.
Instruct gateway SENS to clear NSW tone when appropriate.
B-11. IATACS system planning required for operation is as follows:
• Publish the NYX area code of the MSE network. Assign digits that
are easy to remember.
• Publish the directory number of the Type II terminals as another
access to the MSE SENS operator. A fixed directory number could be
assigned to simplify the dialing instructions for the network.
• The AN/TTC-41 operator should provide the SENS operator with
directory assistance in the IATACS network.
INTERFACE METHOD 3 -TYPE VI TO TYPE VI
B-12. Method 3 interfaces the MSE SENS to an IATACS network using Type
VI tone burst confirmation trunking cards in both systems (NCS MSE version
or lower software). (See Figure B-3.) The database entries for method 3 are
significant.
AN/TTC-47
MSE NETWORK
TYPE VI -
4V TONE BURST CONFIRMATION TRUNKS
NC
IATACS NETWORK
VOICE
VOICE
TYPE
VII
MCS
AN/TTC-48
TYPE
VI
TYPE
VI
SB-3614A
SENS
TACCS
AN/TTC-41
TYPE
VI
TYPE
II
MCS
TACCS
TYPE
VI
TYPE
II
MCS
TACCS
STU-III
NOTE: CONFIGURATION 4-WIRE TRUNKS
CAN BE EXTENDED WITH THE AN/TRC-145/150.
BOTH DATA TERMINALS ARE
CONFIGURED FOR ANALOG
MODEM CONNECTION.
Figure B-3. MSE-IATACS Interface Method 3 - Type II to Type VI
B-4
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
B-13. Method 3 achieves reliable voice communications across the MSE/
IATACS boundary. It allows calls to route automatically between the
networks without operator intervention. Implementing this method requires
installing additional circuit cards into the SENS. The IATACS network
furnishes these cards. This method has the advantage of automatically
routing calls across the networks and retaining the SENS ability to interface
with a public switch. It also extends the distance between the SENS and
IATACS switches.
B-14. Method 3 provides the SENS with analog subscriber loop ability. This
allows computers in both networks to be configured for analog modem
connection; therefore, protocols would be compatible. Using this method, the
Tactical Army Combat Service Support (CSS) Computer System (TACCS)
data communications across the MSE/IATACS boundary are successful, but
MCS data communications are not. The MCS software aborts the data
transmission before the communication systems achieve terminal connection.
When the MSE system is expanded, TACCS data communications across the
MSE/IATACS boundary become marginal. (See Figure B-4.)
TA-838
TACCS
AREA CODE
=
404
AN/TTC-47
LOS(V1)
LOS(V3)
II
AN/TTC-48
SENS
VII
LOS(V3)
XXX
MCS
LOS(V3)
TA-838
AN/TTC-41
II
II
AN/TTC-48
SENS
II
VI
J-1077
TACCS
II
AN/TTC-47
TCT
TA-838
DSVT
MCS
SB-3614A
DNVT
TACCS
TACCS
AREA CODE = 814
MSE NETWORK
AREA CODE = 301
IATACS NETWORK
Figure B-4. MSE/IATACS Expanded Network
B-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
DATA COMMUNICATIONS
B-15. MCS data communications do not work across the MSE/IATACS
boundary (digital/analog). TACCS communications are marginal due to
frequency repeatability degradation above 2000 hertz (Hz). For passing data
across the MSE/IATACS boundary, unused channels of the multichannel
system connecting the MSE and IATACS switches are used. Method 3
provides four common-user analog trunks for MSE/IATACS connectivity
which leaves eight unused channels that could be dedicated to MCS or
TACCS gateway functions. CNR could also be used as a gateway to bridge the
MSE/IATACS boundary.
B-16. If an MCS in the MSE network wanted to send a message to an MCS in
the IATACS network, it would send the message to the MSE gateway MCS.
The IATACS gateway MCS will examine the message header and nodal
address and automatically route the call over channel 1 to the appropriate
MCS user in the IATACS network.
B-17. Figure B-5 shows the setup for single MCS gateways.
IATACS
(Analog)
MSE
(Digital)
MCS
GATEWAY
Figure B-5. Single MCS Gateway
B-18. Figure B-6 shows the setup for the dual MCS gateway.
IATACS
(Analog)
MSE
(Digital)
2- or 4Wire
(CDP or FSK)
GATEWAY
GATEWAY
Figure B-6. Dual MCS Gateway
B-6
Appendix C
Communications Security Operations
This appendix gives an overview of COMSEC operations.
SECURE COMMUNICATIONS
C-1. The MSE network provides secure voice and data communications up to
the SECRET level with special provisions for TOP SECRET/sensitive
compartmented information (TS/SCI). This is accomplished by using a
combination of physically protected wire lines and cryptographic equipment.
Note: When exchanging classified communications
with a subscriber outside the MSE system but
interfaced with MSE, MSE subscribers should ensure
the distant user is communicating within an
approved protective communications configuration.
PROTECTED WIRE LINES
C-2. Wire lines between subscribers and MSE switchboards are considered
approved loops. Operators and users must monitor these wire lines to ensure
only authorized subscribers access the network.
CRYPTOGRAPHIC SECURITY
C-3. Overall cryptographic security is the result of netted protection in trunk,
orderwire, switch, and subscriber areas. Table C-1 describes equipment
architecture and lists equipment allocations.
Trunk
C-4. Throughout the system,
transmission between switches.
TEDs
(KG-194/A)
encrypt
DTGs
for
Orderwire
C-5. The VINSON (KY-57) and the orderwire control unit (OCU) or
communications modem (CM) provide secure, half-duplex communications to
radio and cable links. The system also provides over-the-air rekey (OTAR) for
MSE assemblages.
Switch
C-6. The automatic key distribution center (AKDC) (KGX-93A) provides the
generation, storage, and transfer of COMSEC keys. Loop key generators
(KG-112s) provide secure communications between the NC/LEN and
MSRTs/wire line DSVT. They also protect the transfer of keys between NCs
and LENs.
C-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table C-1. COMSEC Equipment Allocations
Assemblage/COMSEC
Equipment
NCS
LENS
SENS
RAU
LOS
AKDC, KGX-93A
1
1
LKG, KG-112
8
8
TED, KG-194A
15
3
1
1
1(V2)
VINSON, KY-57
1
1
1
1
1
DSVT, KY-68
MCU
1
SDNRIU, KY-90
NCD, KYX-15
1
1
MSRT
1
1
8
1
1
1
1
ETD, KYK-13
1
1
1
1
2
KOK-12 or KOK-16
2
1
Has provisions for the KY-90.
2
Two per signal battalion.
Subscriber
C-7. The MSRT consists of an RT-1539(P)/G radio, mobile COMSEC unit
(MCU), and a DSVT (KY-68). The X key overrides the M key and secures the
signaling between the NCS and the DSVT. It does not encrypt the voice
traffic transmission. The DSVT secures the connection to the NC/LEN. The
SDNRIU (KY-90) provides a secure link between the MSE system and the
secure CNR nets.
C-8. Additional crypto devices are allocated for generation, storage, transfer,
and verification of crypto keys (see Table C-1).
NET CONTROL DEVICE (NCD)
C-9. The NCD (KYX-15) is used at NCSs and LENSs and stores 16 keys.
ELECTRONIC TRANSFER DEVICE (ETD)
C-10. The ETD (KYK-13) is used at all other locations and can store six keys.
SMART FILL DEVICE
C-11. The smart fill device (KOK-12 or KOK-16) is used for COMSEC key
management at signal brigades and battalions. The KOK-12 or KOK-16 can
identify COMSEC keys by displaying the assigned key tag number on its
liquid crystal display (LCD) screen. The KOK-12 or KOK-16 can also store
and transfer up to 160 COMSEC keys.
C-2
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
EQUIPMENT USE
C-12. The SCC-2 COMSEC key manager controls key management and
distribution within the corps. He directs the PNS to generate all system
common and user keys. Then, through a courier distribution system, certain
keys are pre-positioned to leader NCs within the corps. Leader NC key
managers, in turn, distribute a pre-positioned set to their supported
NC/LENs. Each master NC/LEN link generates the unique TED internodal
keys. The leader NC key manager directs the bulk transfer of these keys to
the slave NC/LENs. Once the backbone network is stable, the SCC-2
COMSEC key manager directs the bulk transfer of all keys to each leader
switch that does the same for their supported NC/LENs. Unit couriers pick
up user keys from the corps key manager.
C-13. All key transactions except bulk transfer are recorded manually on
COMSEC key management logs and reported through the distribution
channels. Bulk transfer transactions are recorded automatically in each
NC/LEN database and can be retrieved if necessary. Trunks are bulk
encrypted through the TED (KG-194/A).
C-14. The Army Key Management System (AKMS) program consists of two
systems that provide cryptographic keys, SOIs, and fills for CNRs. The
Automated COMSEC Management and Engineering System (ACMES)
software resides on laptop computers and is used by both theater and tactical
units. The Army Electronic Generation and Distribution System (AEGADS)
software resides on desktop computers and is used by strategic and
sustainment base units. Both systems use automated net control devices
(ANCDs) and key distribution devices (KDDs) to distribute SOIs and
COMSEC variables and keys. The AKMS greatly reduces current dependence
on paper-based keying materials.
C-15. Switch COMSEC functions include generating, storing, transferring,
and activating COMSEC keys and providing traffic encryption. This is done
in the NCS (LENS in an emergency only) using the LKG, AKDC, and TED
during the key generation, distribution, and activation phases. The AKDC in
the NCS generates, transfers, and activates keys. The AKDC is driven by
software commands using the video display unit (VDU). The operator can
also generate and transfer keys directly from the AKDC. Electronic keys are
stored in the HUS. The HUS can store up to 512 variables (256 active and
256 reserve). The LKGs in the NCS and LENS provide key control and key
transfer to support end-to-end encryption for DSVT subscribers on a per–call
basis.
C-16. MSRT/subscriber COMSEC functions operate through a key loaded
MCU within the RT-1539(P)/G radio and embedded COMSEC within the
DSVT. Subscriber COMSEC functions include encrypting radio frequency
signaling using the MCU. The DSVT COMSEC encrypts the subscriber’s
traffic. COMSEC protection at the secure subscriber level begins with the
COMSEC keys. The subscriber’s ETD (KYK-13) electronically loads the keys
into the radio’s MCU and the DSVT.
C-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
C-17. The analog engineer orderwire (EOW), inherent in each LOS radio, is
used only for initializing the system. The orderwire is not encrypted and
should only be used for unclassified traffic. After establishing the link, the
operator switches to the DVOW. The orderwire voice is then encrypted
through the VINSON (KY-57) located in the NCS, SENS, LENS, RAU, and
LOS assemblages. The DVOW is also used for OTAR or transfer of COMSEC
keys. However, this method is only used on an exceptional basis. When using
the encrypted DVOW, traffic is not to exceed the SECRET level. When using
DVOW for OTAR, a key encryption key (KEK) is used to pass the key.
KEY DESCRIPTION, DISTRIBUTION, INITIALIZATION, AND
ACCOUNTABILITY
C-18. The AKDCs generate keys (except the S key) for the MSE system. Table
C-2 lists the different types of keys. It also identifies the key, its use (such as
subscriber’s KY-68), the type of numeric or key encryption, its distribution,
and a short description.
DISTRIBUTION
C-19. The courier method is used for initial key distribution. The S key
distribution is a user responsibility. Used with the KOI-18s and KOK-16s,
properly cleared personnel physically deliver electronic keys. Reliance on
courier delivery will decrease as the AKMS is fielded.
C-20. The bulk transfer method results in the electronic transfer of keys from
the designated HUS location(s) of one AKDC to the same type of HUS
location(s) of another AKDC.
C-21. The OTAR method transfers keys to various assemblages. The DVOW
encrypts the keys by using remote keying encryption (K key). Used with the
NCD (KYX-15), the KY-57 can transfer keys to another KY-57 or to an ETD
(KYK-13).
C-22. The electronic method is an operation, transparent to users, that
downloads the X and V keys to the DSVT (using the U key).
C-23. The PNS generates corps common system operational keys.
INITIALIZATION
C-24. The
division
COMSEC
material
direct
support
activity
(CMDSA)/DCOR stores the pre-positioned keys required for system
initialization. On deployment, the trunk key establishes internodal links and
the master switch is the controlling NCS. Once the TN key is loaded in each
TED, the link is activated.
C-25. The COMSEC key manager oversees the generation of all COMSEC
keys. He stores and distributes the keys to teams before deployment. Tables
C-3 through C-7 show the appropriate key sets.
C-4
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Table C-2. Key Descriptions
C-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Table C-3. NC Key Set
KEY
TI
BTc
N
K
AIRK
MSRV
MSNV
TG
CNV
RKV
USE
TED
Switch-to-switch (AKDC)
DVOW Traffic
DVOW Rekey
As Required
As Required
As Required
As Required
FM
FM
Table C-4. LEN Key Set
KEY
TI
BTc
N
K
USE
U
TED
Switch-to-switch (AKDC)
DVOW Traffic
DVOW Rekey
RT-1539(P)/G
DSVT (LD(U))
CNV
RKV
FM
FM
Table C-5. SEN Key Set
KEY
TE
N
K
M
U
CNV
CNV
RKV
USE
TED
DVOW Traffic
DVOW Rekey
KY-90 (if required)
KY-90 (if required)
CNRI
FM
FM
Table C-6. RAU Key Set
KEY
TEc
N
K
CNV
RKV
C-6
USE
TED
DVOW Traffic
DVOW Rekey
FM
FM
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
Table C-7. Subscriber Key Set
KEY
M
USE
DSVT (LD(X))
RT-1539(P)/G
DSVT (LD(U))
*
U(I)
*
I = U Net ID.
C-26. The PNS directs initial start-up. The SYSCON switch technician
assumes COMSEC key management tasks once the system is activated.
Predeployment
• The PNSs load network keys in the HUS locations.
• The pre-positioned keys stored in the KYX-15s are issued to
NCSs/LENSs.
• Subscriber keys are issued to users IAW their COMSEC account
numbers.
• The S6 stores keys in the user’s KYK-13.
• Pre-positioned keys for the SEN, RAU, and LOS are issued.
• The NCS and LENS load pre-positioned keys in the HUS locations.
Deployment
• NCSs and LENS deploy and establish internodal links using T keys.
• The SENs deploy to support units.
• The RAUs deploy
concentrations.
to
support
areas
of
mobile
subscriber
• Subscribers begin affiliation.
ACCOUNTABILITY
C-27. The MSE system requires key accountability for all key generation,
transfer, and activation. The accountability process helps the manager
accurately determine where the keys are maintained throughout the
network. Accountability is accomplished through a combination of SCC-2
project screens, messages, and log entries.
C-28. Project screens within the SCC-2 display the cryptographic state of the
network. Whenever a COMSEC project is approved, a record is created on the
logbook teletype.
C-29. At the NCSs and LENSs, three screens allow the node COMSEC OIC
to–
• Maintain key accountability.
• Use the display incoming transfer (DIT) and the display outgoing
transfer (DOT) screens.
• Assign bulk transfer (ABT).
C-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
• Assign transfer list (ATL).
• Print copies of these screens.
C-30. Manual transfer of keys requires marking the fill device and creating
and recording information on a log entry.
C-31. COMSEC key records (classified CONFIDENTIAL) are maintained for
an appropriate period and then destroyed.
TASK ORGANIZATION
C-32. If task organization requires attaching units not previously aligned, all
corps common keys and gateway keys must be either physically or
electronically
transferred
(through
secure
means)
to
establish
communications. (See Table C-1.)
AUTOMATIC KEY DISTRIBUTION CENTER
C-33. The AKDC houses all the keys generated at the NCS/LENS. Table C-8
shows an example of HUS locations and key tag assignments. Keys have A
and B locations. The active key is on side A and the reserve key is on side B.
SYSCON may authorize storing keys other than those listed.
Table C-8. Example of HUS Locations and Key Tag Assignments
KEY TAG
A
C001
U003
K028
N029
B032
T100
A126
M224
X225
C-8
HUS
B
001
002
003
028
029
032
100
126
224
225
257
258
259
284
285
288
356
382
480
481
USE
CIRK
Spare
Rekey 1
KEK - OCU
TEK - OCU
BT Storage
T Key
AIRK
M Key
X Key
Appendix D
High-Speed Multiplexer
Fast and reliable access to data information is critical to a commander’s
success. The HSMUX card enhances the warfighters’ ability to process
data information on the battlefield. Enhanced NCs and SENs equipped
with the HSMUX card have additional data ports and higher data rate
terminations than non-enhanced NCs and SENs. This appendix covers
the HSMUX card and the enhanced configurations of the SEN and NC.
HIGH-SPEED MULTIPLEXER CARD
D-1. The HSMUX card enhances the capabilities of the CM and provides the
capability to terminate data rates higher than 512 kbps. The HSMUX
provides up to four additional ports within a standard DTG. Depending on
the configuration, these ports can provide up to four synchronous data
circuit-terminating equipment (DCE) RS-422 (balanced) serial data links at
64, 128, or 256 kbps. Figure D-1 shows the HSMUX SEN configuration.
512 kbps 1024 kbps
Group to NC
MD-1270
CM
Group MUX
HSMUX
Loop MUX (P0)
Port 1
16 kbps
256 kbps
Serial
13 Trunks
SB-4303
Switchboard
Packet
Switch
12 3 4 5
To Telephones
Router
X.25
LAN
0 1
Port 2 Port 3
2 each
256 kbps
Serial
CSU/DSU
To VTC Suite
To LAN
Figure D-1. HSMUX SEN Configuration
D-2. The HSMUX performs an inverse multiplexer function by taking the
aggregate port rate (256 kbps) of each serial data circuit (router) and breaks
it into individual 16 or 32 kbps channels on the DTG. Figure D-2 shows the
inverse multiplexer.
D-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Subscriber Side
Network Side
HSMUX
Reformats 64, 128,
or 256 kbps data into
16 kbps MSE compatible
data channels.
4 each
RS-422
Serial Ports
Figure D-2. Inverse Multiplexer
D-3. The HSMUX card replaces the A10 multiplexer (MX)/demultiplexer
(DMX) card in the CM, and it provides four additional serial ports. The back
plane of the A10 card is not wired for access outside the CM. The individual
Diphase Loop Modem-A (DLPMA) card provides access to the patch panel for
the original SEN trunks. A high-speed balanced interface card (HSBIC)
provides access to the new high-speed ports without modifying the CM or
LTU. The HSBIC replaces one of the DLPMA cards in the CM. The HSBIC
terminates two of the four HSMUX ports and extends them to the patch
panel instead of the four voice trunks. These serial circuits are then patched
over to the line side of the patch panel so the circuit can be extended over 26
pair to a J-Box. Figure D-3 shows the HSMUX/HSBIC SEN signal flow.
ENHANCED SEN CONFIGURATION
D-4. The HSMUX enhancement provides standard MSE connectivity and two
high-speed ports that terminate in a router and a channel service unit
(CSU)/data service unit (DSU) used for serial video teleconferencing. The
router and the CSU/DSU are safeguarded by a universal power supply (UPS).
The UPS provides battery backup and acts as a DC inverter, drawing power
off the vehicle's 24-volt electrical system. Figure D-4 shows the enhanced
SEN configuration.
D-2
_________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
J14
SB-4303
SB-4303
DNVT
J13
S
E
P
J16
Push Pins
P2
P
a
n
e
l
J14
P0
16 kbps PS Trunk Ch 15
2 DCO
J15
J5
P
a
t
c
h
CM
MD-1270
HSMUX
A10
A1
A2
HSBIC
A4
A11
A13
T
J13
G J4
G
M TED
M
O
W
P1
S1
P3
P4
1024 kbps J1
DTG
J6 J7
1024 kbps DTG
CX-11230
CDP
X.25 Hosts (J1)
1-1
SDC
S
E
P
LAN 0 (A1)
J2
1-0
Packet Switch
TYC-20
Patch Panel
1-5
XCVR 0
LAN 1 (A2)
XCVR 1
Figure D-3. HSMUX/HSBIC Signal Flow
J14
2 DCO
DNVT
T1
J13
P
a
n
e
l
J14
J15
J16
Push Pins
S
E
P
J5
V.35
P0
256 kbps Serial
RS-422 P2
A11
S1
RS-422 P3
RS-422 P4
J6 J7
1024 kbps DTG
RS-449
DTE
CX-11230
CDP
X.25 Hosts (J1)
S
E
P
J2
1-0
1-1
SDC
1-5
XCVR 0
Packet Switch
TYC-20
Patch Panel
LAN 1 (A2)
A13
T
J13
G J4
G
M TED
M
O
W
RS-422 P1
1024 kbps J1
DTG
LAN 0 (A1)
CM
MD-1270
HSMUX
A10
256 kbps PPP
P
a
t
c
h
A1
A2
A2
A4
16 kbps PS Trunk Ch 15
SB-4303
CSU/DSU
SB-4303
S0
RS-232
S1
Router
DCE
E0
E1
XCVR 1
Figure D-4. Enhanced SEN Configuration/Signal Flow
D-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
D-5. The router is configured for two serial connections and two Ethernet
connections. Ethernet transceivers (E0 and E1) connect to the router
attachment unit interface (AUI) ports allowing for 10Base2 coaxial cable to
extend into the TOC. LAN cables are routed behind the equipment rack to
the inside cover of the LAN’s SEP. The packet switch (IGW) connections to
the SEP are disconnected, allowing the new coaxial cable from the router to
have access to the outside LAN 0 and LAN 1 Bayonet Neill Concelman (BNC)
connectors.
D-6. The router serial connections provide access to the backbone high-speed
data network and the legacy TPN. Port 1 on the HSMUX card directly
connects to Serial 0 on the router. The HSBIC is not used in this
configuration to save the four voice trunks. A flat ribbon cable is fabricated to
connect Port 1 of the HSMUX and is routed out the front cover of the CM.
The ribbon cable is flat enough to allow the CM cover to partially close. This
configuration provides 256 kbps data to the backbone routing network at the
NC. This connection is via a channel reassignment of 16 channels (17-32) on
the extension link DTG. The HSMUX at the SEN and NC provide the inverse
multiplexing function and combine these channels to support a 256 kbps
aggregate rate.
D-7. The packet switch is still used; however, a packet switch port (P0) now
directly connects to the router (S1) via a DCE serial interface cable. This does
require the packet switch port to be re-jumpered for slaving timing off the
router. This packet switch to router connection provides a backdoor to the
router from the TPN. However, the primary route for all data out of the SEN
is via the serial interface (S0) to the HSMUX card Port 1.
D-8. The CSU/DSU is configured to terminate and/or extend up to four ports
of the HSMUX. Presently, HSMUX Port 2 is terminated by the CSU/DSU
using V.35 interface. The CSU/DSU converts this eight-wire balanced
nonrestrictive zone (NRZ) circuit into a two-wire circuit that can extend up to
2 miles over standard WF-16. This does require a CSU/DSU at the TOC to
terminate the circuit and convert the two-wire signal back to RS-422, which
is required by the VTC system. The two wires leaving the CSU/DSU inside
the SEN are presently spliced into a patch cord that allows the circuit to be
patched down a 26-pair via the patch panel.
D-9. The HSMUX multiplexes the 256 kbps router data, the 256 kbps VTC
data, and the SEN standard trunks into a 1024 kbps DTG. The settings of the
HSMUX, the CM, and the LOS radio must be changed to reflect this data
rate/configuration. The HSMUX card (A10) is manually configured from a
predefined set of port options. A set of DIP SWITCHES (label S1) on the card
determines the group rate of the DTG and each individual port rate. See
Table D-1 for S1 settings with appropriate port/channel assignments.
D-4
_________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
D-10. The HSMUX card has several peculiarities. It has two 21-pin
connectors (J2 and J4) that provide access to the data ports. Each connector
provides access to two ports. Each port provides an eight-wire balanced NRZ
full-duplex data and timing interface. The ports are configured as DCE,
which provide transmit and receive timing for the terminal device. This
requires the connecting circuit (data terminal equipment (DTE)) to slave
timing from the HSMUX. The connector to each port is easily misaligned
considering there is no set keying. Each internal cable has either an 8- or 10socket box connector at each end. If a 10-socket head is used, two sockets on
the box connector remain empty. These two empty sockets should always be
to the TOP. Extreme caution should always be used to connect the box
connector to these extremely fragile pins. As mentioned earlier, the ports are
manually configurable by DIP SWITCHES (S1) on the HSMUX card and
these switches are read right to left. Figure D-5 gives the layout of the
HSMUX card.
Table D-1. HSMUX (16 kbps Channel Rate) Port Options
S1 Settings
87654321
Group
Rate
P01
00100000
256K
00100010
288K
00000010
00000001
P1
P2
P3
P4
ACR
P1
11
64K
----
----
----
13-16
9
128K
----
----
----
11-18
512K
15
256K
----
----
----
17-32
512K
15
128K
128K
----
----
17-24
25-32
00000011
512K
15
128K
64K
64K
----
17-24
25-28
00000100
576K
3
256K
256K
----
----
5-20
21-36
00000101
576K
3
128K
128K
128K
128K
5-12
13-20
21-28
29-36
33-36
ACR
P2
ACR
P3
ACR
P4
29-32
00000110
576K
19
64K
64K
64K
64K
21-24
25-28
29-32
0 0 0 1 1 0 1 02
1024K
15
256K
256K
256K
----
17-32
33-48
49-64
00011011
1024K
31
128K
128K
128K
128K
33-48
49-56
57-64
00011101
1152K
7
256K
256K
256K
256K
9-24
25-40
41-56
57-72
00111111
2048K
35
256K
256K
256K
256K
37-52
53-68
69-84
85-100
1
P0 is standard SEN channels (not trunks) not including Channel 1 Loop Signaling Channel (TT-119).
2
The bolded line is our present standard which provides three ports at 256 kbps while continuing to
support the SEN's normal trunk capability (13 voice/1 packet).
D-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Edge Connector
COMPONENT SIDE
Ensure port connectors are aligned on TOP or
BOTTOM with one pin separating connectors.
J2
21
PORT 2
PORT 1
1
*S1
21
PORT 4
1024 kbps
P1
256
P2
256
P3
256
P4
0
PORT 3
1
J4
*S1 is the label for the DIP SWITCHES.
Figure D-5. HSMUX Card Layout
ENHANCED NC CONFIGURATION
D-11. The NC is an integral piece to the enhanced SEN configuration. The
output of the HSMUX card is a 1024 kbps time-division multiplexed DTG (16
kbps 64 channels). The NC processes the DTG as a normal group with
channels 2-14 terminated as SEN trunks (TT-86) and channel 15 as a packet
trunk. The remaining 48 channels must be extended to their predetermined
destination via channel reassignments. The HSMUX card at the SEN
allocates channels 17-32 on the DTG for the router serial port 1. This port is
predetermined to terminate on Serial 0, 1, 2, or 3 of the NC's router and is
appropriately channel reassigned to the NC HSMUX dedicated for router
connectivity. The HSMUX card at the SEN could also allocate channels 33-48
on the DTG for the VTC circuit. This circuit is usually destined for another
SEN either off the same NC or one across the network. These channels are
reassigned to the appropriate internodal (channels 49-64) or extension link
DTG (channels 33-48).
D-12. The NC HSMUX configuration is significantly different than a SEN.
The mission of the HSMUX in the NC is to inverse multiplex the individual
channels from a SEN/NC DTG to an aggregate 256 kbps serial link. These
links provide data connectivity between various network routers. This
configuration provides a robust data network compared to the TPN. The CM
in the NC can only terminate four HSMUX ports and one packet switch host
trunk interface (PSHTI) port. Potentially, two ports for internodals, two ports
for HSMUX extension links, and a port for a T-20 interface. See Figure D-6
for the NC HSMUX configuration.
D-6
_________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
TPN GW
RAU
HS SEN
SEN
NMT
SEN
LEN
HS SEN
SEN
RAU
HS NC
SEN
NC
S
W
I
T
C
H
T
G
M
O
W
CX-11230G
GM
GM
HSMUX
DTG
Group MUX
M
A
T
R
I
X
HSMUX
PSHTI
4 each
256 kbps
Serial
SEN
HS NC
64 kbps to PSHTI
card for TPN GW
(BGP-4).
Switching Shelter
ROUTER
* Depending on # of Serial modules.
Operations Shelter
Figure D-6. NC HSMUX Configuration
D-13. The NC’s CM requires a local DTG at 1152 kbps (depending on port
configuration). The DTG is used to channel reassign internodal and/or
extension link HSMUX router ports to the NC. The DTG comes off the
switching shelter SEP and extends to the operations shelter via CX-11230.
This does require special modification to the operations shelter's SEP.
D-14. The NC (unlike the SEN) CM uses two HSBICs in slots A3 and A4.
These two HSBICs extend the four HSMUX ports out the back of the CM to
the J5 connector. Cables are also fabricated to extend these connectors to the
router's DCE serial cables. A separate cable connected to J14 extends the
PSHTI card in slot A1 to Serial 7 of the router. Figure D-7 shows the NC
signal flow.
D-15. A HSMUX network does require multiple changes to the MSE standard
database to accommodate high-speed extension links above 256 kbps and the
local CM. Figure D-8 shows a proposed HSMUX standard database.
D-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
Operations Shelter
S0
A1
S1
J14
PSHTI
P2
S2
S3
P0
P2 9-24
A3
P1
P1 25-40
S1
J5
S4
P3
P3
S5
HSBIC
P4
A4
S6
A11
A13
T
G
M
O
W
G
M
HSBIC
41-56
DTG 5 (1152 kbps)
P0
P1
P2
P3
P4
P4 57-72
2-5
9-24
25-40
41-56
57-72
T-20
SEN
SEN G11
SEN G12
S7
E0
E1
HSMUX
A10
Router
CM
MD-1270
Communications Modem
Figure D-7. NC Signal Flow
SEN
(4)
19-26
DTG 4
DTG 22
CM
(8)
27-30
DTG 3
25
28
DTG 23
DTG 5
LEN
(8)
11-18
DTG 21
DTG 2
5-12
SCC-2
(2)
DTG 1
NC 60
NC
(8)
NC
(8)
29-36
DTG 16
1-2
SEN
(6)
DTG 7
DTG 19
DTG 8
SEN
(4)
21-28
DTG 9
13-18
DTG 6
27
26
6 Phones
2 HS Pkt
3 LS Pkt
3-4
RAU
(2)
35-36
12 Phones
4 HS Pkt
3 LS Pkt
2 T-19
1-4
DTG 18
LH NCMD 19 thru 36
Items in ( ) indicate the number of 9 channel
muxes assigned to DTG. Either (6) or (8) are
at a 1024 kbps group rate.
RH NCMD 5 thru 18
RH NCMD 19 thru 36
Figure D-8. HSMUX Standard Database
D-8
RAU
(2)
19-20
DTG 17
31-34
LH NCMD 5 thru 18
NC
(8)
SEN
(6)
5-10
Glossary
AAMDC
AAP
ABCS
Army Air Missile Defense Command
automatic asset placement
Army Battle Command System
ABN
airborne
ABT
assign bulk transfer
ACMES
ACR
ACUS
ADA
ADDS
ADI
ADP
ADRG
AEGADS
AF
AFATDS
AIRK
AIS
Automated COMSEC Management and Engineering System
armored cavalry regiment
Area Common User System
air defense artillery
Army Data Distribution System
Air Defense Interface
automatic data processing
ARC-Digitized Raster Graphics (ARC is a term used to designate
linear features on a digital map.)
Army Electronic Generation and Distribution System
Air Force (USAF)
Advanced Field Artillery Tactical Data System
area interswitch rekey
automated information system
AKDC
automatic key distribution center
AKMS
Army Key Management System
ALOC
administrative/logistics operations center
ALOG
analog switch
A&MD
air and missile defense
AMDPCS
ANCD
Air and Missile Defense Planning and Control System
automated net control device
AO
area of operations
AR
Army; Army regulation (when followed by a number)
ARC
ASAS
A term used to designate linear features on a digital map.
All Source Analysis System
Glossary-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
ASB
area signal battalion
ASR
assign SEN/RAU/NMT
ATACS
ATL
assign transfer list
ATM
asynchronous transfer mode
attn
attention
AUI
attachment unit interface
AUTODIN
automatic digital network
AVTOC
az
BAM
BATCON
bde
BCOR
bn
BNC
bps
BSM
aviation tactical operations center
azimuth
basic access module
battalion control
brigade
brigade COMSEC office of record
battalion
Bayonet Neill Concelman [Electronics] (connector used with coaxial
cable, named after inventor)
bytes per second
battlefield spectrum management
BT
bulk transfer
C2
command and control
C3
command, control, and communications
C4I
CBCS
command, control, communications, computers and intelligence
common battery circuit switching
CBR
constant bit rate
CCA
circuit card assembly
CCOR
corps COMSEC office of record
CCES
contingency communications extension switch
CCP
CCPS
CD
CDIG
CD-ROM
CDL
Glossary-2
Army Tactical Communications System
contingency communications package
contingency communications parent switch
compressed dial
commercial digital
compact disk-read only memory
compressed dialing list
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
CDP
conditioned diphase
CDS
compact digital switch
CE
CECOM
communications-electronics
Communications-Electronics Command
CEOI
communications-electronics operating instructions
CEWI
combat electronic warfare intelligence
Ch
CHS
channel
common hardware and software
CINC
Commander-in-Chief
CIRK
common interswitch rekey
CJA
CJCSM
Civil/Judge Advocate
Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff Memorandum
ckv
common key variable
clk
clock
CM
communications modem
cmd
CMDSA
CNCE
CNR
CNRI
command
COMSEC material direct support activity
communications nodal control element
combat net radio
combat net radio interface
CNV
common net variable
COE
common operating environment
CofS
Chief of Staff
comm
COMSEC
CONPLAN
CONUS
coord
COSCOM
CP
commercial
communications security
contingency plan
continental United States
coordinate(s)
corps support command
command post
CPU
central processing unit
CRF
channel reassignment function
CS
CSCE
combat support
communication system control element
Glossary-3
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
CSP
call service position
CSS
combat service support
CSSCS
CSU
CT
CTASC-I
CTAPS
channel service unit
communications terminal
Corps/Theater Automatic Data Processing Service Center Phase-I
Contingency Tactical Air Control Planning System
CZ
canal zone
DA
Department of the Army
DAS
direct access service
DB
database designator
dB
decibel(s)
dBm
decibels above (or below) one milliwatt
dBw
decibels referred to one watt
DC
DCE
DCNRI
DCO
DCOR
desig
direct current
data circuit-terminating equipment
dismounted combat net radio interface
dial central office
division COMSEC office of record
designator
DES
dismounted extension switch
DET
Detachment
DGS
display group status
DIBTS
DIG
digital in-band trunk signaling
digital
DII
Defense Information Infrastructure
DIL
display interswitch link
DISCOM
DISN
DIT
div
division support command
Defense Information Systems Network
display incoming transfer
division
DLPMA
Diphase Loop Modem-A
DLOS
dismounted line-of-sight
DMAIN
Glossary-4
combat service support control system
division main (command post)
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
DMS
DNI
DNMF
DNS
DNVT
Defense Messaging System
digital NATO interface
dismountable node management facility
domain name server
digital nonsecure voice terminal
DOD
Department of Defense
DOT
display outgoing transfer
DREAR
DS
division rear
direct support
DSB
division signal battalion
DSN
Defense Switching Network
DSU
data service unit
DSVT
DTA
DTAC
DTE
DTED
digital secure voice terminal
data terminal adapter
division tactical (command post)
data terminal equipment
digitized terrain elevation data
DTG
digital transmission group
DTH
down-the-hill
DTMF
dual-tone multifrequency
DVOW
digital voice orderwire
ea
each
EAC
echelons above corps
ECB
echelons corps and below
EGRU
EOW
EP
e-mail
EPLRS
EPLRS grid reference unit
engineer orderwire
electronic protection
electronic mail
Enhanced Position Location Reporting System
E&M
ear and mouth (receive and transmit leads of a signaling system)
ETD
electronic transfer device
ETGMOW
EUB
EW
enhanced transmission group modem and oderwire
essential user bypass
electronic warfare
Glossary-5
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
ext
extension
FA
field artillery
FAADC3I
FAX
FBCB2
FDX
FEBA
facsimile
Force XXI Battle Command - Brigade and Below
full duplex
forward edge of the battle area
FEC
forward error correction
FES
force entry switch
FLOT
FM
FRAGO
forward line of own troops
frequency modulated; field manual (when followed by a number)
fragmentary order
freq
frequency
FSB
fire support battalion
FSEN
FSK
future small extension node
frequency shift keying
G1
Assistant Chief of Staff, G1 (Personnel)
G2
Assistant Chief of Staff, G2 (Intelligence)
G3
Assistant Chief of Staff, G3 (Operations and Plans)
G6
Assistant Chief of Staff, G6 (Principal Staff Officer)
GBNP
GCCS-A
GDB
GDB MGR
GDU
Global Block Numbering Plan
Global Command and Control System-Army
global database
global database manager
graphic display unit
GE
Germany
GHz
gigahertz
GLPAL
GLU
GM
GS
Glossary-6
Forward Area Air Defense Command, Control, Communications,
and Intelligence
global preaffiliation list
group logic unit
group modem
general support
GSPM
Global Standard Profile Matrix
GTE
General Telephone and Electric
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
GTEAM
GW
HCLOS
Global Team Labeling
gateway
high capacity line of sight
HFR
high frequency radio
HHC
Headquarters and Headquarters Company
HMMWV
high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle
HQ
headquarters
HS
high speed
HSBIC
HSMUX
high-speed balanced interface card
high-speed multiplexer
http
HyperText Transfer Protocol
HUS
hardened unique storage
HVA
high voltage assembly
Hz
IAP
IATACS
IAW
ICAP
ID
hertz
interactive asset placement
Improved Army Tactical Communications System
in accordance with
Integrated Communications Access Package
identify/identification
IDNX
Integrated Digital Network Exchange
IEEE
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
IGW
integral gateway
IMS
Integrated Management System
INC
internet controller
info
information
IP
internet protocol
IPR
internet protocol router
ISB
initial staging base
IST
Integrated Systems Technology
ISYSCON
I/O
integrated system control
input/output
JCSE
Joint Communications Support Element
JITC
Joint Interoperability Testing Center
JNMS
Joint Network Management System
Glossary-7
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
JOG-A
Joint Operations Graphics-Air
JOG-G
Joint Operations Graphics-Ground
JTF
JTIDS
Joint Tactical Information Distribution System
JWICS
Joint Worldwide Intelligence Community System
kbps
kilobits per second
KDD
key distribution device
KEK
key encryption key
km
KOK
Kw
LAN
LANET
LBS
LCCES
LCCP
kilometer(s)
key operating key
kilowatt(s)
local area network
Lucent Limitless ATM Network
local base station
light contingency communications extension switch
light contingency communications package
LCD
liquid crystal display
LDR
leader
LEN
large extension node
LENS
large extension node switch
LH
left hand
LG
loop group
LKG
loop key generator
LOS
line-of-sight
LOSH
line of sight (high capacity)
LOSL
line-of-sight link
LOSM
line of sight (Marine Corps)
LP BK
loop back
LPVM
legacy PTT voice module
LRAU
local radio access unit
LRM
LS
Glossary-8
joint task force
low-rate multiplexer
low speed
LTU
line termination unit
mbps
megabytes per second
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
MC
Marine Corps
MCS
Maneuver Control System
MCU
mobile COMSEC unit
MDID
MSE data interface device
MDTG
multiplex digital transmission group
Mech
METT-T
mgt
MHz
MI
mechanized
mission, enemy, terrain, troops, and time available
management
megahertz
military intelligence
misc
miscellaneous
MLS
multilevel security
MOOTW
military operations other than war
MOS
military occupational specialty
MPM
mission plan management
MS
MSE
msg
MSNV
MSR
message switch
mobile subscriber equipment
message(s)
message switch net key
main supply route
MSRT
mobile subscriber radiotelephone terminal
MSRV
message switch rekey
MTA
MTCC
mux
MX/DMX
message transfer agent
modular tactical communications center
multiplex/multiplexer
multiplexer/demultiplexer
N/A
not applicable
NAI
NATO analog interface
NATO
NBC
NC
North Atlantic Treaty Organization
nuclear, biological, chemical
node center
NCA
National Command Authority
NCD
net control device
NCMD
nine-channel multiplex-demultiplex
Glossary-9
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
NCOIC
NCS
node center switch
NCT
network control terminal
NG
Army National Guard
NIC
network interface card
NIMA
NIPRNET
National Imagery and Mapping Agency
Nonsecure Internet Protocol Router Network
NMC
network management center
NMF
node management facility
No
number
NPE
network planning and engineering
NPT
network planning tool
NRI
net radio interface
NRZ
nonrestrictive zone
NS
node switch
NSG
node switching group
NSW
nonsecure warning
obj
OCONUS
OCU
OIC
ONC
object
outside Continental United States
orderwire control unit
Officer in Charge
Operational Navigation Charts
OPCON
operational control
OPLAN
operation plan
OPORD
operation order
ops
ORR
OTAR
operations
operational readiness report
over-the-air rekey
PAL
preaffiliation list
PBX
private branch exchange
PAT
Patriot
PCL
preprogrammed conference list
PCM
pulse code modulation
ph
Glossary-10
Noncommissioned Officer in Charge
telephone
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
pkt
packet
plt
platoon
PNS
primary node switch
POC
point of contact
pol
PPP
PS
PSHTI
polarization
point-to-point protocol
packet switch
packet switch host trunk interface
PSN
packet switch network
PUB
Publication
QDISPL
RARP
Queue Display
reverse address resolution protocol
RAS
remote access switch
RAU
radio access unit
RBECS
rcv
Revised Battlefield Electronics CEOI (Communications-Electronics
Operating Instructions) System
receive
RBS
remote base station
REC
radio electronic combat
RECAP
recon
ref
recapitulation
reconnaissance
reference
retrans
retransmission
RF
radio frequency
RH
right hand
RKV
RLGM
RLOS
RMC
RR
rekeying variable
remote loop group multiplexer
remote line-of-sight
remote multiplexer combiner
radio relay
RRAU
remote radio access unit
RSC
remote switching center
RSS
routing subsystem
RSS-D
downsize routing subsystem
Glossary-11
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
S2
Intelligence Officer (US Army)
S3
Operations and Training Officer (US Army)
S4
Supply Officer (US Army)
S6
Communications Officer (US Army)
SAR
sat
satellite
SB
switchboard
SC
Signal Corps
SCC
system control center
SCC-2
system control center-2
SCG
switching control group
SDC
signal data converter
SDNRI
SDNRIU
SEN
SENS
secure digital net radio interface
secure digital net radio interface unit
small extension node
small extension node switch
SEP
signal entry panel
SGT
Sergeant
SHF
super high frequency
SICPS
sig
SINCGARS
SIPRNET
SLM
SMART-T
SMU
SMUX
SNS
standard integrated command post system
signal
Single-Channel Ground and Airborne Radio System
Secure Internet Protocol Router Network
subscriber list management
Secure Mobile Antijam Reliable Terminal - Tactical
switch multiplex unit
SMART mux
secondary node switch
SOAC
Signal Officer Advanced Course
SOBC
Signal Officer Basic Course
SOF
Special Operations Forces
SOI
signal operating instructions
SONET
SOP
Glossary-12
satellite access request
synchronous optic network
standing operating procedure
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
SPARC
spt
Scalable Processor ARChitecture (Laptop)
support
SRC
standard requirements code
SSI
standing signal instructions
SSS
signal shelter switch
STANAG
STAR-T
STEP
Standardization Agreement
Super High Frequency Tri-band Advanced Range Extension
Terminal
Standardized Tactical Entry Point
STU
secure terminal unit
SVM
secure voice module
sw
SYNCH
sys
SYSCON
TACCS
TACFAM
TACSAT
TADIL
TAXI
TC
switch
synchronize/synchronization
system
system control
Tactical Army Combat Service Support (CSS) Computer System
tactical frequency assignment model
tactical satellite
Tactical Data Information Link
transparent asynchronous transceiver interface
technical control
TCP
transmission control protocol
TCT
tactical communications terminal
TDM
TDSG
TDSGM
TECHCON
time division multiplex
time division switching group
time division switching group (modified)
technical control
TED
trunk encryption device
TEK
trunk encryption key
TG
trunk group
TGC
trunk group cluster
TGM
tactical group multiplexer
TGMD
TGMOW
trunk group multiplex/demultiplex
transmission group modem and orderwire
Glossary-13
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
THAAD
TLC
TI
TLDF
TLM
TM
traffic load control
Tactical Internet
team label data file
topographic line maps
technical manual
TMD
theater missile defense
TMG
tactical multinet gateway
TMIF
Tactical MSE Interface Family Digital Interface
TNS
tactical name server
TOC
tactical operations center
TOE
table(s) of organization and equipment
TP
telephone
TPA
tactical packet adapter
TPC
tactical pilotage charts
TPN
tactical packet network
TPS
tactical packet switch
TRADOC
Training and Doctrine Command
TRI-TAC
Tri-Service Tactical Communications
TRL
tropo
TRT
TSC(A)
TSOP
TS/SCI
tropospheric link
tropospheric scatter
tropospheric terminal
Theater Signal Command (Army)
tactical standing operating procedure
TOP SECRET/sensitive compartmented information
TSB
trunk signaling buffer
TSL
tactical satellite link
TST
tactical satellite terminal
TTA
tactical terminal adapter
tty
UCMJ
teletype
Uniform Code of Military Justice
UHF
ultra high frequency
UPS
universal power supply
US
Glossary-14
Theater High Altitude Air Defense
United States (of America)
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
USAF
United States Air Force
USAR
United States Army Reserve
USARSO
United States Army Forces Southern Command
USASOC
United States Army Special Operations Command
USMC
USN
v
VAC
VCI
United States Marine Corps
United States Navy
volt(s)
volts of alternating current
virtual circuit identifier
VDU
visual display unit
VHF
very high frequency
VMLI
line interface card
VPI
virtual path identifier
VTC
video teleconference
WAN
WIN
WIN-T
WWW
wide area network
Warfighter Information Network
Warfighter Information Network - Terrestrial
World Wide Web
xcvr
receiver
xmit
transmit
ZR
ZRL
zone restriction
zone restriction list
Glossary-15
Bibliography
AR 5-12. Army Management of the Electromagnetic Spectrum. 1 October 1997.
AR 25-1. The Army Information Resources Management Program.
1997.
25 March
AR 310-25. Dictionary of United States Army Terms (short title: AD) (reprinted
w/basic incl C1). 15 October 1983.
AR 310-50. Authorized Abbreviations and Brevity Codes. 15 November 1985.
AR 380-5. Department of the Army Information Security Program. 25 February
1988.
AR 380-19. Information Systems Security. 27 February 1998.
AR 380-40. (O) Policy for Safeguarding and Controlling Communications Security
(COMSEC) Material (U). 1 September 1994.
DA Form 2028. Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms.
1 February 1974.
DA Pam 25-30. Consolidated Index of Army Publications and Blank Forms
(Issued Quarterly) (CD-ROM) (No printed copies exist). 1 January 1999.
DA
Pam 310-35. Index
15 December 1978.
of
International
Standardization
Agreements.
CJCSM 6321.07A series. Manual for Employing Joint Communications and
Systems Joint Network Management and Control. 24 January 1997.
FM 11-32. Combat Net Radio Operations. 15 October 1990.
FM 11-41. Signal Support: Echelons Corps and Below (ECB). 18 December 1991.
FM 11-43. The Signal Leader’s Guide. 12 June 1995.
FM 11-50. Combat Communications Within the Division (Heavy and Light).
4 April 1991.
FM 12-6. Personnel Doctrine. 9 September 1994.
FM 24-1. Signal Support in the AirLand Battle. 15 October 1990.
FM 24-11. Tactical Satellite Communications. 20 September 1990.
FM 24-17. Tactical Records Traffic System (TRTS). 17 September 1991.
FM
24-18. Tactical Single-Channel
30 September 1987.
Radio
Communications
Techniques.
FM 24-22. Communications-Electronics Management System (CEMS). 30 June
1977.
FM 24-24. Signal Data References: Signal Equipment. 29 December 1994.
Bibliography-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
FM 24-33. Communications Techniques: Electronic Counter-Countermeasures.
17 July 1990.
FM 24-35. (O) Signal Operation Instructions “The SOI.” 26 October 1990.
FM 24-40. Tactical Visual Information Doctrine {FMFM 3-8}. 12 December 1991.
FM 25-100. Training the Force. 15 November 1988.
FM 71-100. Division Operations. 28 August 1996.
FM 100-5. Operations. 14 June 1993.
FM 100-15. Corps Operations. 29 October 1996.
FM 100-16. Army Operational Support. 31 May 1995.
FM 100-20. Military Operations in Low Intensity Conflict {AFP 3-20}.
5 December l990.
FM 101-5. Staff Organization and Operations. 31 May 1997.
FM 101-5-1. Operational Terms and Graphics {MCRP 5-2A}. 30 September 1997.
FM 700-80. Logistics (reprinted w/basic incl C1). 15 August 1985.
Joint Pub 0-2. Unified Action Armed Forces (UNAAF). 24 February 1995.
Joint Pub 1. Joint Warfare for the US Armed Forces. 10 January 1995.
TM 11-5800-216-10-1. System Manual for Mobile Subscriber Equipment MSE
(reprinted w/basic incl C1-C4). 1 September 1991.
TM 11-5800-216-10-2. System Manual for Mobile Subscriber Equipment MSE
(reprinted w/basic incl C1-C2). 1 September 1991.
TM 11-5800-216-10-3. (C) System Manual for Mobile Subscriber Equipment
Appendix K COMSEC Key Management (U) MSE. 1 November 1994.
TM 11-5800-216-10-4. System Manual for Mobile Subscriber Equipment MSE
(reprinted w/basic incl C1-C3). 1 November 1992.
TC 24-20. Tactical Wire and Cable Techniques. 3 October 1988.
STANAG 5040. NATO Automatic and Semiautomatic Interfaces Between the
National Switched Telecommunications Systems of the Combat Zone and
Between These Systems and the NATO Integrated Communications
System (NICS), Period 1975 to 1990s, Edition 3. 23 October 1985.
STANAG 5042. Military Telecommunications - Diagrams Symbols, Edition 2.
9 November 1993.
SR-43A. System Specification Requirement Document (GTE). June 1990.
SR-45. System Specification Requirement Document (GTE). June 1990.
Bibliography-2
Index
A
AN/GRC-226, 5-29
AN/TCC-46, 1-4
AN/TCC-48, 1-5
AN/TRC-190(V), 1-8 - 1-10
AN/TRC-191, 1-6
AN/TTC-47, 1-3
AN/TYC-19, 7-4
AN/TYC-20, 7-3 - 7-4
AN/TYQ-46(V), 1-7
contingency communications
package (CCP), 6-1 - 6-8
deployment, 6-3 - 6-5
division signal battalion
structure, 6-1 - 6-2
equipment capabilities, 6-3
corps area signal battalion,
3-6 - 3-9
AN/VRC-97, 1-10
CV-4206/TTC, 7-4
enhanced transmission
group modem and
orderwire (ETGMOW),
8-8
functions, 8-2 - 8-3
high-speed multiplexer
(HSMUX), 8-8, D-1 - D-8
operational procedures,
8-5 - 8-6
operational software, 8-5
tactics and techniques, 8-7 8-8
technology, 8-1 - 8-2
class mark, 5-17 - 5-22
compressed dialing list (CDL),
5-21 - 5-22
communications security
(COMSEC) operations, C-1 C-8
F
force entry switch (FES), 1-11
frequency management, 5-27 5-32
requirements, 5-27 - 5-28
parameters, 5-28 - 5-32
G
D
database development, 5-1 5-3
defensive operations, 2-10 2-11
digitized map requirements,
5-3
deployment, 4-1 - 4-33, 6-1,
8-3
operational, 4-1 - 4-33
phased, 4-3 - 4-4
phase I, 4-5 - 4-18
phase II, 4-19 - 4-25
phase III, 4-25 - 4-27
phase IV, 4-27 - 4-33
C
enhanced transmission group
modem and orderwire
(ETGMOW), 8-8
features, 1-11
corps signal brigade, 3-1 - 3-6
AN/UXC-7, 1-10
deployment, 8-3 - 8-4
enclave networks, 2-12 - 2-13
doctrinal impacts, 6-1
corps support signal battalion,
3-10 - 3-11
asynchronous transfer mode
(ATM) switch, 8-1 - 8-8
E
division signal battalion, 3-11 3-15
global standard profile matrix
(GSPM), 5-7 - 5-16
grid networks, 2-12
H
high point data requirements,
5-3
high-speed multiplexer
(HSMUX), 8-8, D-1 - D-8
I
integrated system control
(ISYSCON), 1-6, 1-8
interoperability (MSE), B-1 B-6
data communications, B-6
interface method 1, B-1 B-3
interface method 2, B-3 B-4
interface method 3, B-4 B-5
Index-1
FM 11-55__________________________________________________________________________________
installing the backbone, (phase
II), 4-19 - 4-25
bulk transfer, 4-25
displacement
orders
and
reports, 4-21
duplication and bypass,
4-20, 4-23, 4-24
internodal links, 4-19
installing extensions
III), 4-45 - 4-27
(phase
M
mobile subscriber equipment
(MSE), 1-1 - 1-11, 2-1 2-13,
architecture, 2-1 - 2-4,
area support concept, 2-11
background, 1-1
command relationships,
2-8 - 2-9
defensive operations, 2-10
extension nodes, 4-26
deployment, 4-1 - 4-33
employment, 1-1, 3-15 3-20
K
KY-68, 1-10
characteristics, 3-15 - 3-20
L
equipment, 3-1 - 3-21, A1 -A-9
large extension node (LEN),
1-3, 1-4
how to fight with, 2-1 2-13
large extension node switch
(LENS), 1-4, 4-12 - 4-16
interoperability, B-1 - B-6
major components, 1-2 1-11
equipment assignment
diagram, 4-15
N
network database
management, 5-1 - 5-32
development, 5-1 - 5-3,
digitized map
requirements, 5-3
high point data
requirements, 5-3
management and control,
5-1
preaffiliation list (PAL)
requirements, 5-4 - 5-6
preprogrammed
conference list (PCL),
5-23 - 5-24
profile list requirements,
5-7 - 5-22
team label data file
requirements, 5-24 5-27
frequency management
requirements, 5-27 5-28
features, 1-4
offensive operations, 2-9 2-10
NCMD cards, 4-13,
organization, 3-1 - 3-21
site layout diagram, 4-14
overview, 1-1 - 1-11
standard database, 4-12 4-15
range extension, 1-11
node center (NC), 1-2 - 1-3
split-based operations,
2-12
node center switch (NCS), 1-2,
1-3, 4-8 - 4-12,
light contingency
communications package
(LCCP), 6-1 - 6-8
deployment, 6-3, 6-5 - 6-8
division signal battalion
structure, 6-1 - 6-2
doctrinal impacts, 6-1
equipment capabilities, 6-3
line of sight (LOS)
system, 1-8 - 1-10
features, 1-9
radio
support relationships, 2-9
symbology, A-1 - A-9
task organization, 2-6 2-7
technical impacts, 2-5 2-6
weighting the main attack,
2-7, 2-8
mobile subscriber
radiotelephone (MRST),
1-10
Index-2
frequency management
parameters, 5-27 - 532
equipment assignment
diagram, 4-12
features, 1-2, 1-3
NCMD chips, 4-10
site layout diagram, 4-11
standard database, 4-8 4-12
__________________________________________________________________________________FM 11-55
O
OPORD, 4-17
T
offensive operations, 2-9 - 2-10
network operations, 4-18
TA-1035-U, 1-10
operational management
(phase IV), 4-27 - 4-33
priority listing, 4-6
tactical packet network, 7-1 -
RAU plan, 4-8
COMSEC messages,
4-30 - 4-31
site reconnaissance, 4-17
five major areas, 4-30 4-33
user requirements, 4-5
message flow, 4-27 - 4-31
open link reports, 4-29
operations, 2-9 - 2-12
team packets, 4-16
preprogrammed conference list
requirements, 5-23 - 5-24
profile list requirements, 5-7 5-22
defensive, 2-10 - 2-11
offensive, 2-9 - 2-10
split-based, 2-12
R
radio access unit (RAU), 1-5 1-6
P
S
packet switching network, 7-1
signal data converter, 7-4
phased deployment, 4-3 - 4-4
small extension node (SEN),
preaffiliation list requirements,
5-4 - 5-6
predeployment (phase I), 4-5 4-18
COMSEC, 4-16
database modifications,
4-18
interfaces, 4-5 - 4-7
MSRT plan, 4-8
1-4
small extension node switch
(SENS), 1-5
7-9
AN/TYC-19
switch, 7-4
gateway
AN/TYC-20
packet
switch, 7-3 - 7-4
architecture, 7-2
CV-4206/TTC signal data
converter, 7-4
host registration, 7-7 - 7-8
hosts, 7-4
internet protocol address,
7-6 - 7-7
message transfer agent
(MTA), 7-4 - 7-5
network management,
7-8 -7-9
overview, 7-1
physical interfaces, 7-5
split-based operations, 2-12
tactical
name
server
(TNS), 7-4 - 7-5
subscriber terminals, 1-10
X.25 interfaces, 7-5
symbology, A-1 - A-9
system control, 3-20
system control center (SCC-2),
1-7, 1-8
team label data file
requirements, 5-24 - 5-27
traffic load control (TLC), 5-19
Index-3
FM 11-55
22 JUNE 1999
By Order of the Secretary of the Army:
Official:
ERIC K. SHINSEKI
General, United States Army
Chief of Staff
JOEL B. HUDSON
Administrative Assistant to the
Secretary of the Army
9911308
DISTRIBUTION:
Active Army, Army National Guard, and U. S. Army Reserve: To be distributed in
accordance with the initial distribution number 115275, requirements for FM 11-55.
PIN: 077372-000
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