ug-prospectus

ug-prospectus
Undergraduate
Prospectus
7th
in the
UK for
employability
(Telegraph, 2015)
Contents
This is Stirling
05
What we offer
18
Academic excellence
29
Course list A-Z 33
Student experience 98
Support104
Entry requirements
108
Getting here
116
2
This is Stirling
www.stir.ac.uk
Welcome
Welcome to the
University of Stirling
With more than 120 nationalities represented
on campus, international partnerships in over
30 countries, and one in 10 of our students
spending part of their degree course overseas,
we are a University with a truly global outlook.
At the University of Stirling we take pride
in offering you an education based on
innovation and excellence – an inspiring
academic experience and a living and learning
environment that is second to none.
Our students are the beating heart of the
University. We recognise and value ability, and
will support you to ensure you achieve your
full potential. Stirling’s flexible degree courses
are attuned to the needs of employers and
will equip you with knowledge and expertise
in your chosen field, alongside lifelong
employability skills. Research excellence
informs our innovative, cross-disciplinary
approach to teaching, which means you
will also benefit from being taught by worldleading academics.
We are ranked in the world’s top 50
Universities under 50 years old and have a
5-star QS World University Ranking 2015. By
studying with us, you will gain a qualification
from a renowned institution where teaching,
employability, internationalisation, facilities
and inclusiveness are all rated 5 star.
We know you have a wide range of
universities to choose from, so we have gone
out of our way to make sure the Stirling
student experience meets your needs.
Accommodation on our scenic campus
underwent a recent £40 million investment,
and everything you need is within a few
minutes’ walk, from diverse catering outlets
and sports facilities, to our on-campus theatre
and art-house cinema.
If you like sport, you’ll love Stirling. We are
Scotland’s University for Sporting Excellence
and our students rated us first in Scotland
for sport facilities (The Times Higher
Education Student Experience Survey,
2015), which include a 50m swimming
pool and a golf course.
Our award-winning Students’ Union is the hub
of the University, providing entertainment and
welfare services, and supporting almost 100
clubs and societies – so settling into university
life couldn’t be easier.
I am delighted that you are considering
studying with us. I hope this prospectus whets
your appetite further and will encourage you
to attend one of our future Open Day events.
I wish you all the best with your studies
and look forward to welcoming you on
campus soon.
Professor Gerry McCormac
Principal and Vice-Chancellor
www.stir.ac.uk
3
4
5
This is
Stirling
6
This is Stirling
Quite simply a great
place to study
Welcome to the University of Stirling – a
modern, international University that puts
you at the centre of everything we do.
Studying here is an investment in your
future: 96% of our graduates are either
employed or in further education six
months after graduation and we’re ranked
second for employability in Scotland and
seventh in the UK*.
You’ll make memories and friends to last a lifetime,
thanks to a student experience that’s built around
you. Our beautiful, safe campus boasts its own
loch and castle, as well as flexible, contemporary
accommodation designed around your needs and your
budget. Our lively Students’ Union has over a hundred
societies, clubs and sports teams, as well as support
services. There are lots of ways to make your voice
heard and shape the way the University works.
Life’s about making
the most
of every opportunity.
*
HESA/Telegraph, 2015
www.stir.ac.uk
Students make up a fifth of Stirling’s population.
It’s a compact, lively city with lots to do and see.
Plus, the best that Scotland has to offer is within
easy reach – whether it’s shopping, nightlife, gigs,
culture or Scotland’s biggest music festival, T in the
Park – it’s all on your doorstep. We’re Scotland’s
University for Sporting Excellence too, which means
fantastic facilities, with specialised coaching and
support if you already compete at a high level.
With 120+ nationalities represented on campus, our
University is truly international. In fact, the opportunity
to study abroad is an integral part of most courses –
just one element of our flexible degrees delivered in an
internationally-renowned institution with a growing
reputation for global research excellence.
So, if you’re looking for a fantastic student experience
with great prospects for the future, read on – Stirling’s
got it all.
7
8
This is Stirling
City of Stirling
Studying in Stirling puts you at the very
centre of Scotland. Just a few minutes away
from campus, there’s plenty to do in a city
where our students help create a lively
atmosphere with an international feel.
A student city
There are loads of student-friendly bars, cafés and
restaurants, with some great student discounts
available too. There’s plenty of choice when it comes
to shopping, from the quirky independent shops in
the Victorian arcade, to the high street names in the
Thistle Centre.
If culture’s your thing, you’ll love the regular music,
comedy and theatre performances, as well as
Stirling’s very own Fringe Festival. There’s a multiplex
cinema in town, and our own on-campus Macrobert
Arts Centre showcases the best of current and
independent cinema.
If keeping active is important for you, it’s all on your
doorstep. From abseiling to zorbing (and everything
in between), there are lots of activities to try in and
around Stirling, as well as our on-campus facilities
and clubs.
In a city where 20% of the
population are students,
you’re never far from a friendly face
and a fantastic experience.
www.stir.ac.uk
A connected city
The old town’s cobbled streets and imposing, ancient
castle have witnessed some of the most turbulent
moments in Scotland’s history. Today, Stirling’s central
location means great transport connections to the rest
of Scotland. Glasgow and Edinburgh are both within
easy reach for a day’s shopping or night out – with
around 130 gigs a week in Glasgow and the world’s
biggest arts festival in Edinburgh. You’re not going to
want to miss out on either city. Within a 30-minute
drive, T in the Park, Scotland’s biggest and best
music festival, is on your doorstep.
For a change of pace, students love to wander in
nearby Bridge of Allan, a pretty market town with a
range of independent shops, delis, cafés, and its own
micro-brewery. And the Scottish Highlands are only a
train journey away – whether it’s skiing, wild swimming
or simply to enjoy the beauty of one of the world’s last
wild places, you should definitely add at least one trip
‘up North’ to your to-do list.
9
10
This is Stirling
Study at the centre
of Scotland
Studying at Stirling means experiencing the
best that Scotland has to offer. From our
beautiful campus, you’re only a few minutes
from lively Stirling – and the rest of Scotland
is just a short journey away.
Innovation
Scotland is famous for its inventions – penicillin, the
bicycle, the television, the telephone and animal
cloning all came from our nation of innovators. We’re
continuing the tradition. During your time here we’ll
encourage you to take part in work experience and
internships with the best and brightest start-ups, as
well as global and national organisations – who knows
what you’ll help discover?
Education
Scotland has more world-class universities per head
of population than anywhere else in the world. Our
19 acclaimed institutions offer unmatched quality and
choice, as well as having the highest rates of graduate
employment in the UK.
Culture
Scotland is, quite simply, beautiful. Mountains,
lochs, beaches, islands and castles offer wonderful
opportunities for cycling, climbing, walking, skiing,
swimming or simply having the space to sit and think.
Our towns and cities all have their own character
and Stirling’s central location means you’re never far
from a new adventure. We celebrate the creative
arts – there’s never long to wait for a festival, concert,
exhibition, play or screening. And travelling to the rest
of the UK and Europe is easy, with convenient and
cheap transport links.
Sport
The Scots invented golf and cycling, as well as having
a major impact in the development of rugby, hockey,
football and curling. The Glasgow Commonwealth
Games in 2014 cemented sport at the heart of
Scotland. With world-class facilities, strong community
links and of course our great outdoors just waiting for
you, why not take up a new sport or outdoor activity
when you’re at University? You’ll find lots to inspire you
in Scotland!
As a proudly
Scottish University
with an international
feel, we encourage
our students to make
the most of studying
in Scotland.
www.stir.ac.uk
11
12
This is Stirling
120+ nationalities
represented on campus
Awarded
5 QS
Stars
for internationalisation*
*QS Stars, 2015
www.stir.ac.uk
This is Stirling
54,000+
alumni in over
155 countries
TOP 200
most international universities
in the world**
Global research
excellence
**Times Higher Education World University Rankings, 2015-16
www.stir.ac.uk
13
14
This is Stirling
Global connections
World-class reputation
With over 80 international research partners, we have
a global reputation. In fact, almost three-quarters of
our research activity is rated either world-leading or
internationally excellent and we’ve been awarded five
QS Stars – the worldwide university ranking system
– for internationalisation. We’re also ranked in the
top 200 international universities in the world (Times
Higher Education World University Rankings, 2015-16).
That means thinking and working globally is part of our
daily teaching, learning and research practice. So your
degree will be outward-looking and full of possibilities
and potential. Studying at Stirling sets you up to be a
global citizen in an increasingly connected world.
And who knows – perhaps you’ll be inspired to follow
in their footsteps and study abroad as part of your
degree too? There’s a whole world out there – let us
help you discover it.
Diverse campus
We work hard to help our former students stay
connected with each other and the University and love
welcoming back our alumni as mentors, guest lecturers
and speakers, through our Ambassador programme.
Our alumni frequently host internships and work
experience, as well as offering work-based projects
for student placements to practise their skills in
real-life situations.
We welcome students from all over the world.
As well as international students who join us as
undergraduates and complete their entire degrees
here, our exchange partnerships mean students from
all over the world join our community for a year or
semester as part of their studies. That means an
exciting atmosphere on campus, with lots of chances
to meet new people and experience new cultures.
Lasting connections
Studying at Stirling is a truly connected experience.
When you graduate, you’ll automatically become a
member of our alumni organisation (it’s free too!).
That means you’ll join a vibrant network of over
54,000 former students, stretching right across the
world. It’s an amazing resource for mentoring, career
development, advice and support.
With 120+ nationalities
represented on campus, you’ll make
friends and memories that last a lifetime.
www.stir.ac.uk
15
16
This is Stirling
A career for life
Employers value graduates who make
the most of every opportunity their time
at university offers. Whether it’s getting
involved in the Students’ Union, studying
abroad, taking part in internships, or even
balancing part-time work with study; the
more you put in to your time here, the more
employable you’ll become.
We’re ranked seventh in the UK for graduate
employability and it is built in to every aspect of student
life, from your first semester to your final transcript
when you graduate. All modules help build the skills
you need for employment, and while each school has
developed its own unique approach, they all share one
thing: an unwavering commitment to help you reach
your potential.
International focus
In our friendly, international community you can’t help
building a fantastic network for the future. And if you
want to prove your worth to a future employer, you
won’t do better than studying abroad – it’s a brilliant
way to show you’re able to stand on your own two
feet and thrive in today’s increasingly international
job market.
Skills that last
We’ve built strong links with national and international
organisations, as well as the brightest and best small
businesses and start-ups flourishing around us.
That means all sorts of opportunities for you to test
your learning in real-life situations. Whether it’s an
internship, work experience or tackling a real business
issue in a work-based project, you’ll stretch yourself
and learn new skills, as well as starting to build a
picture of your interests and the things that
motivate you.
Reflecting on your personal and professional
development is important too. Our expert Career
Development Advisors can help with this, as well as
practical skills like CV writing and interview practice.
They’ll help you get to know yourself, your strengths,
your aspirations and the things you need to work on –
all essential skills for developing a career for life.
When graduation approaches, our innovative
MyStirling award will help you identify all the different
skills and attributes you’ve developed over your course,
bringing everything together in your own transcript.
So when it comes to proving your worth to potential
employers, it’s all in one place.
Around 300,000 people
graduate from university in the UK every year.
We’ll help you stand
out from the crowd.
www.stir.ac.uk
17
18
What we
offer
19
20
What we offer
A degree of flexibility
It may be a cliché, but it’s true – university
changes you. So why not have a degree
that changes with you?
As you go through your course, you’ll learn
about new things. That means your passions and
interests can change. So we’ve made flexibility part
of the curriculum.
Most students will study across a range of disciplines,
before choosing one or two subjects to graduate in. So
in Year 1 and Year 2 you’ll study three subjects in total,
including your named degree. You can spread your
net as widely as you want – if you’ve always fancied
having a shot at a language, be our guest; if you’re
intrigued by politics, give it a go. Alternatively, if you’re
already certain about your path, you can choose topics
to enhance your main subject – like accountancy with
business studies, or journalism with marketing.
Follow your interests
Our approach to flexibility is different. Unlike many
other universities, there are no restrictions – you’re
free to mix and match between disciplines.
www.stir.ac.uk
Then, once you know what you love, you choose the
degree combination you’ll graduate in.
But it goes deeper than that. We actively encourage
you to get the most out of your time here. We want
you to be open to every opportunity – and that means
being open to change. There’s always someone who’ll
be able to talk through your options and help work out
the best approach for you.
A broader degree
Typically, Scottish degrees last for four years instead
of three. This gives you an extra year of learning and
experiencing University life, which will stand you
in good stead when you leave. That doesn’t mean
funding will be an issue though – generally, if you are
funded for a three-year degree elsewhere in the UK,
you’ll be funded for four years in Scotland too.
That said, some courses also offer entry directly into
Year 2, depending on your qualifications. We also
offer part-time and flexible study as well as academic
preparation courses to get you ready for your time
here. It’s all designed to be as flexible as possible.
in the UK for
employability
1
Top
40
research intensive
University
in the UK
Scotland’s
University
for Sporting
Excellence
Telegraph, 2015 2REF 2014
1
2
University in
Scotland
for Health Sciences
2
Top
5
Top
7th
1
21
in the
UK
for Agriculture,
Veterinary
& Food Science 2
25
in the UK for
Business &
Management
2
22
What we offer
Study abroad
University is about broadening your
horizons, trying new things and finding
out who you are as a person. But studying
abroad takes the whole experience to
another level: imagine immersing yourself
in another culture for a semester, or even a
year. It’s life-changing!
Studying abroad helps you stand out in a competitive
world. It helps you develop confidence, self-reliance
and cultural awareness. It shows you’ve got what it
takes to thrive in an increasingly global workplace
and that you’re the kind of person who can handle
anything life throws at you. And it’s fun too!
The world is
at your feet
Students on most degree courses can apply to study
abroad (and it’s compulsory for students studying
French and Spanish) but competition is tough. It’s
important to start thinking about your plans early on in
your course – our friendly advisors can help.
A whole world to study
Studying abroad is an integrated part of each course,
rather than being a sandwich year or bolt-on. That
means, when you’re abroad you’ll still earn credits
towards your degree – and when you come back,
you’ll graduate at the same time as your friends.
Costs needn’t be a barrier. Because it counts as part of
your degree, tuition is funded in the normal way. And
because it doesn’t extend the length of your degree,
there’s no ‘extra’ time to fund either. Plus, there are
a range of grants and scholarships to help out with
living costs.
It may feel like a big step, but we’ll support you all the
way through the process, from helping you with your
application, through orientation, to helping you settle
back in when you return.
An international experience
With 120+ nationalities represented on campus, life’s
never dull! We have a reciprocal relationship with our
partner universities. That means students from all over
the world come to study in Stirling, adding a truly
international flavour to life on campus.
For more information, visit:
http://stir.ac.uk/f5
so get the most out
of your degree by
studying abroad.
www.stir.ac.uk
23
The year I spent
in Hawaii was lifechanging. Not only did
I gain a great cultural
exchange experience, but I
also dramatically expanded
my knowledge of my degree
subjects. It was one of the best
years of my life, and certainly
the most memorable.
Charlotte Rich, England
BSc (Hons) Ecology graduate, 2014
24
What we offer
Students’ Union
Your Students’ Union is here to make
students’ lives better. They do this by
representing your views and helping you
get the most out of your time at Stirling.
With three venues, a range of support
services and lots to do, the Union is the hub
of student life.
Be heard
Your Union is here to represent you, whether that’s
talking to the University about issues that affect you,
or campaigning about students’ issues at a local or
national level. If it matters to you, it matters to the
Students’ Union. Their work is organised into different
campaigns and there are lots of ways you can get
involved, either through a specific campaign, or by
becoming a Union representative yourself.
Have fun
The Union supports over 110 clubs, societies and sport
teams, ranging from wizarding to anime; athletics to
wheelchair sports; volunteering to rock music; and
American football to dance.
Joining a club, society or team is a great way to make
new friends and enjoy yourself – getting involved in
running one is also good for your CV. If you don’t
see your hobby listed on the Union notice boards or
website, why not start your own club? It’s easy to do
and the Union will support you every step of the way.
Switch on
If you have a passion for communication, there is a
channel for you. There are lots of ways to get involved
in student media:
• The Brig, the student newspaper
•Air3, the radio station, broadcasting student-made
programmes, plays and news
•AirTV, providing experience in film and TV acting,
production and writing.
A week to remember
Freshers’ Week is a time when the whole University
comes together to welcome new students to campus.
It’s an exciting time and the Students’ Union will make
sure it’s a week you’ll never forget!
For more information, visit:
www.stirlingstudentsunion.com
Make your voice heard
and make the most of your time
with your Students’ Union.
www.stir.ac.uk
25
26
What we offer
Somewhere to call home
Get student life off to the best start,
with safe, supported accommodation
for every budget.
Living away from home for the first time is exciting,
but it can bring challenges too. We’re here to help.
New students are prioritised when we allocate
accommodation and when it comes to settling in, our
friendly Operations Team are standing by to help. If
you need a listening ear, our Accommodation Liaison
Students – experienced undergraduates who live on
campus – are always on hand.
Student living is split between our campus and
nearby Stirling and Bridge of Allan – all beautiful,
safe places to live with excellent travel links to and from
campus. For sessions 2015-2016 the accommodation
costs ranged from £85-£155 per week, and included
utilities, Wi-Fi, insurance and bed linen. So all you have
to pay for is food and all you have to bring is cutlery,
crockery and a cooking kit (but if cooking’s not your
thing, there are lots of places to eat around campus).
On campus, everything is planned around you – so
you’ll find a supermarket, pharmacy, medical centre,
gym, bookshop and bank within a few minutes’ walk,
as well as all the facilities the University and Students’
Union have to offer.
Accessible housing
We can provide or adapt accommodation for a variety
of requirements and can also arrange pre-entry visits. If
you have any specific needs, please get in touch with
us as soon as you can and we’ll take it from there.
Find out more
Our accommodation application process is available
online on the University Portal, to which you’ll be given
access once you have a confirmed place. Applications
for new students usually start around April.
There is a number of different instalment plans
available for paying rent. First instalments are due
in October, so there’s time to settle in and sort out
your finances.
Built around your needs
We’ve invested £40 million in our student housing over
the last few years, listening to students at every step
of the way. All accommodation is single occupancy
and you can choose from a range of flats, chalets,
townhouses and family accommodation.
For more information, up-to-date costs and booking
details, visit: http://stir.ac.uk/5k
www.stir.ac.uk
27
28
29
Academic
excellence
30
Academic excellence
A University
of excellence
Our flexible, interdisciplinary approach to
teaching and research, and standards of
academic excellence mean at the University
of Stirling you gain a world-class degree built
around your interests and passions.
Flexible learning
Flexibility is built into the curriculum at Stirling.
In Year 1 and Year 2, you’ll study a range of subjects
across a variety of disciplines. We encourage you to cut
across traditional boundaries and study the things you
are passionate about. That may mean studying subjects
that naturally enhance your main degree topic, or
trying something completely new. Whatever you study
though, it all counts towards your final degree and
you’ll earn credits all the way through.
The middle of your second year is when we ask you
to bring together everything you’ve learned so far and
select your graduating subject. Again, this is completely
flexible – you can stick to your original subject choice,
add a second subject for joint Honours, or change path
completely. It’s up to you!
Why this emphasis on flexibility? We want every
student to get the most out of their time with us, so
our ethos is based on offering as many opportunities as
possible. Subject choice is a big part of that. Put simply,
you’re in control, so you have the chance to expand
on your interests as they develop and study the things
you love.
Academic excellence
Our academic disciplines are split across: education;
applied social science; natural sciences; management;
sport; arts and humanities; and health sciences. Each
academic area aims to develop graduates who are
knowledgeable and skilled, who will be sought-after
by employers and become active global citizens.
www.stir.ac.uk
Our campus is global – not only in terms of the
students who come to Stirling from all over the world,
but also in terms of the community of researchers,
academics and industry experts we attract.
Our community is diverse and exciting and so is our
teaching. We help every student not just survive, but
thrive in today’s increasingly interconnected world.
We’re proud that the University has been awarded five
QS Stars for Teaching and Inclusiveness (2015). Here
is just a selection of the other accolades awarded over
the last year:
The Guardian University Guide, 2016
• 3rd in Scotland for Economics
• 3rd in Scotland for Modern Languages and Linguistics
• 3rd in Scotland for Sports Science.
The Complete University Guide, 2016
• 2nd in Scotland for Marketing
• 2nd in Scotland for French
• 4th in the UK and 2nd in Scotland for Social Work.
The Times Good University Guide, 2016
•1
st in Scotland for Communication and
Media Studies
• 9th in the UK for Education
• 10th in the UK and 3rd in Scotland for Social Policy.
World-class research
We believe great ideas and ground-breaking research
transform society; they make the world a better
place. Our research makes a vital contribution to the
economic, social and cultural life of Scotland and
beyond: that’s why it’s such an important part of our
learning and teaching.
Academic excellence
Collaboration is at the very core of our approach
to research.
That means working with other universities, businesses,
the public sector and governments at home or
abroad, to deliver interdisciplinary research that makes
a difference. Whether it’s preventing work-related
cancer, or improving food security in Bangladesh, our
researchers are helping to solve real-world problems.
We’re one of the top research-led universities in the UK.
Almost three-quarters of our research activity has been
rated either world-leading or internationally relevant.
Many of our academic disciplines lead their fields: our
Aquaculture and Marine Biology courses are ranked
fourth in the UK for Agriculture, Veterinary and Food
Science (research). We’re first in Scotland and twelfth
in the UK for Health Sciences [research] and we’re in
the top twenty-five UK institutions for Business and
Management (research). 100% of our Psychology
impact case studies are classed as world-leading.
Academic disciplines
Applied Social Science
Health Sciences
Management
Criminology; Social Policy;
Sociology; and Social Work.
Adult Nursing and Mental
Health Nursing.
Arts and Humanities
Natural Sciences
Business Law; English Studies;
Film and Media; French;
Global Cinema; History;
International Management
Studies; International Politics;
Journalism Studies; Law (BA
and LLB); Literature and Culture;
Philosophy; Politics; PPE; Religion;
Scottish History; and Spanish and
Latin American Studies.
Animal Biology; Aquaculture;
Biology; Business Computing;
Cell Biology; Computing
Science; Conservation Biology
and Management; Ecology;
Environmental Geography;
Environmental Science;
Environmental Science/Geography
and Outdoor Education; Marine
Biology; Mathematics; Psychology;
and Software Engineering.
Accountancy; Business Studies;
Economics; Finance; Human
Resource Management;
Management; Marketing;
Retail Marketing; Sport Business
Management; and Sustainable
Events Management.
Education
Primary Education; Secondary
Education; and TQFE.
Sport
Sport and Exercise Studies;
and Sports Studies.
Awarded
5 QS Stars
for teaching
www.stir.ac.uk
31
32
This is Stirling
www.stir.ac.uk
33
Course
List A-Z
Icon key
Study abroad opportunities available
Part-time study options available
Complete your Honours degree
in three years, subject to suitable
qualifications and/or experience
34
Accountancy
A
BAcc (Hons)
UCAS code: N400
This course is accredited by many professional bodies including
ACCA, CIMA, CIPFA and ICAS
The Division of Accounting is based in the University of Stirling Management School,
which is ranked in the top 25 UK institutions for Business and Management (REF).
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
When you study the Bachelor of Accountancy (BAcc) course, you will learn that
accounting involves the preparation, presentation and interpretation of financial
information to enable investors, lenders, management, employees, government and
others to make effective decisions.
Having our degree behind you will take you some way to achieving this, as you will
gain significant examination exemptions from professional bodies, enabling you to
progress quickly in your chosen area of professional study.
Many professional bodies recognise the BAcc as a relevant degree and offer significant
exemptions from their examinations. These include: ACCA, CIMA, CIPFA and ICAS.
Course content
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
Mathematics preferred.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Accountancy and
Economics. Preference given to
those with Mathematics.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
In Semesters 1-3, you study a series of core modules including: Accounting; Finance;
Economics; Business Management; and Business Law.
In Semesters 4-8, you develop a critical understanding and analytical approach to
subjects directly relevant to accountancy, including: Auditing; Advanced Financial
Accounting; Taxation; Personal Financial Planning; and External Reporting.
You will have numerous opportunities to develop appropriate work-related skills at
every stage of your studies, culminating in the Professional Development and Practice
module in Semester 8, which helps you to prepare to enter the workplace.
The BAcc degree may be taken as a three-year specialist degree or as a four-year
Honours degree (which includes writing a dissertation on an accounting topic).
BA (Hons) Accountancy and Finance is also available, which provides scope to include
more finance-based topics.
Career opportunities
Accountancy offers a wide choice of careers with organisations in every field, from
healthcare and sport, to charities and local and national governments. Careers
include: financial and management accounting; auditing; taxation; consultancy;
and financial services.
This course may be combined with:
Business Law (MN24); Business Studies (NNF4); Economics (LN14); Finance (NN43);
Marketing (NN45); Mathematics (GN14); Spanish (NR44); or Sports Studies (NC46).
Additional information
General entry requirements apply –
see page 108.
Mathematics National 5 (B),
Intermediate 2 (C), Standard Grade
(3), GCSE (C) or equivalent required.
www.stir.ac.uk
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/3r
35
Accountancy and Finance
A
BAcc (Hons)
The Division of Accounting is based in the University of Stirling
Management School, which is ranked in the top 25 UK
institutions for Business and Management (REF 2014)
Many professional bodies recognise the BAcc as a relevant degree and offer significant
exemptions from their examinations. These include ACCA, CIMA, CIPFA and ICAS.
The Bachelor of Accountancy (BAcc) in Accountancy and Finance course is designed
specifically for students planning a career in the Accountancy profession and/or the
wider financial sector.
You will learn that accounting concerns the preparation, presentation and
interpretation of financial information to enable investors, lenders, management,
employees, governments and others to make effective decisions. A degree in
finance will ensure that you gain a thorough understanding of the theoretical and
analytical skills needed for a career in corporate finance, investment management
or financial services.
Accountants are required to register and pass examinations of a recognised
professional accountancy body. Having our degree behind you will take you some way
to achieving this, as you will gain significant exam exemptions, allowing you to work at
an advanced level earlier.
Course content
In Semesters 1-3, you study a series of core modules including: Accounting; Finance;
Economics; Business Management; and Business Law.
In Semesters 4-8, you develop a critical understanding and analytical approach to
subjects directly relevant to accountancy and finance.
Core advanced modules include: Taxation; Personal Financial Planning; and External
Reporting. Further advanced modules in Accountancy and Finance are chosen from a
list of electives.
You will have numerous opportunities to develop appropriate work-related skills at
every stage of your studies, culminating in the Professional Development and Practice
module in Semester 8, which helps you prepare for entering the workplace.
Career opportunities
Accountancy offers a wide choice of careers with organisations in every field, from
healthcare and sport, to charities and local and national governments. Careers
include: financial and management accounting; auditing; taxation; consultancy;
and financial services.
Our Accountancy graduates are currently working in 21 countries around the world.
A wide range of opportunities are open to graduates in this field. These include
working as financial analysts for fund management institutions, as dealers on the stock
exchange, investment bankers or financial market regulators.
UCAS code: NN43
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
Mathematics preferred.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Accountancy and
Economics. Preference given
to those with Mathematics.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/f6
Mathematics National 5 (B),
Intermediate 2 (C), Standard Grade
(3), GCSE (C) or equivalent required.
www.stir.ac.uk
36
Animal Biology
A
BSc (Hons)
UCAS code: C300
Study at Scotland’s academic hub for animal conservation
How do animals adapt to cope in hostile environments? Why do many female animals
exhibit mate choice? What is the best way to conserve rare and endangered species?
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology, Chemistry,
Mathematics or Physics.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Biology and one of
Chemistry, Environmental Science,
Geography or Physics.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Study the enormous variety of animal life on Earth and discover the answers to these
and many other questions.
As the hub for animal conservation in Scotland, we have close links with many animal
conservation organisations based on campus and in the local area, including: the
Bumblebee Conservation Trust; British Trust for Ornithology; Butterfly Conservation
Trust; Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust; Royal Society for the Protection of Birds; and Blair
Drummond Safari Park.
You can focus on whole animal biology and conservation or integrate that study with
those investigating molecular and biochemical aspects of animal biology.
Fieldwork is an essential part of your training. In addition to fieldwork in Scotland, we
have a field site in the Cévennes in the South of France. This region, recognised as a
UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve, is home to wild boars, otters, three vulture species
and grey wolves.
Our integrated courses in Biological and Environmental Sciences are taught and
managed within one Academic School – a flexible approach which has developed a
wide range of combined degree courses with the natural and social sciences, and
the humanities.
Course content
Semesters 1-4 cover a range of core modules including: Cell Biology; Ecology;
Biodiversity; Practical Skills; plus additional modules in other disciplines.
Semesters 5-6 cover three core advanced modules: Animal Physiology; Animal Ecology;
and The Animal Cell; plus three optional modules from a defined list.
In Semesters 7-8, you undertake an independent research project and go on the
Cévennes field course.
You also take four advanced modules from nine options, for example: Immunology
and Disease (compulsory); The Evolution of Sex; Conservation Biology; Conservation
Management; and Cell Birth, Life and Death.
Career opportunities
Animal biologists work in the agriculture, pharmaceutical and biotechnology
industries, and in conservation management and environmental agencies. Other career
paths include: forensic sciences; teaching; the food industry; commercial analytical
laboratories; and, with further study, professions allied to medicine and in government
and industrial research laboratories.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/3s
www.stir.ac.uk
37
Aquaculture
A
BSc (Hons)
The Institute of Aquaculture is the leading international centre
in its field and the largest of its kind in the world
Keeping our aquatic environments healthy, protected and sustainable is vital for our
planet and the people living on it. The aquaculture industry already provides almost
50 percent of all fish and seafood for human consumption.
However, aquaculture – or aquatic agriculture – is more than just ‘fish farming’; it
includes the culture of many species, including crocodiles and turtles. Our Aquaculture
course will train you in all subjects relevant to global aquaculture.
In Semesters 5 and 6, you may benefit from an exchange programme with
various institutions across the world including Australia, Canada and the USA.
In Semester 7, you study specialist modules such as: Nutrition and Genetics, each
led by one of the Institute’s major research groups. In Semester 8, projects frequently
take place overseas, often in conjunction with our international research and
development activities.
The Institute of Aquaculture enjoys an international reputation in teaching, research,
contract research and consultancy. We provide disease and environmental
management services, project design and development expertise to organisations
operating in one of the most rapidly expanding food production sources in the world.
Course content
Semesters 1-3 cover core modules including: Our Blue Planet; Our Thirsty Planet; and
Evolution and Genetics.
During Semesters 4-8, Honours you will take 11 core modules, including: Science
of Diving; Biodiversity; Animal Physiology, together with specialised modules in
Aquaculture (covering nutrition, disease, genetics, and reproduction etc.) and an
Aquaculture field course.
Aquaculture is not available as a combined Honours degree; however, it shares a
common foundation with the degree course in Marine Biology, so the option to take a
degree in Marine Biology is retained until the end of Semester 5.
Career opportunities
As a graduate you will be well equipped to enter the expanding field of Aquaculture or
to work in fish farm, pharmaceutical and biotechnological companies.
Potential roles include: pollution control; environmental impact assessment; fisheries
management; governmental regulation; and conservation. There are also opportunities
in more general employment areas, such as: bioinformatics; health and clinical
sciences; forensic science; medical sales and alerting; science journals; and teaching.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
UCAS code: C164
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology, Chemistry,
Mathematics or Physics.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Biology and one
of Environmental Science,
Geography or Geology.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements apply –
see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/9j
www.stir.ac.uk
38
Biology
B
BSc (Hons)
UCAS code: C100
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology, Chemistry,
Geology, Mathematics or Physics.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Biology and one of
Chemistry, Environmental Science,
Geography, Geology or Physics.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Study abroad through our well-established connections with
several North American, Australian and European universities
This flexible degree allows the broadest possible perspective for the first two years,
then enables you to specialise in Year 3. The questions of biology are of great
importance today. As a Biology student, you will study the huge variety of living
organisms inhabiting the planet around us.
This degree course begins by keeping the broadest possible perspective through the
first two years. Then, towards the end of your degree, whether your interests lie at
the level of the biosphere, the whole organism, the cell, or the biomolecule, you can
specialise to reflect the strengths and interests you develop.
As you develop your practical skills and stimulate your curiosity with project work, you
will become involved with active research giving you the opportunity to contribute to
the biological discoveries of tomorrow.
As well as field work around Scotland, you can undertake a 10-day field course
in Ecology and Animal Biology in the Cévennes National Park (France) – a rugged
mountain landscape of huge biodiversity, which is recognised as a UNESCO World
Biosphere Reserve.
Course content
Semesters 1-4 cover core modules in: Cell Biology; Physiology; Genes and Evolution;
Ecology and Biodiversity; plus Practical Skills in the Natural Sciences and Quantitative
Techniques. You will take a field course in Ecology and Identification Skills, as well as
additional modules in other disciplines.
During Semesters 5-6, your module choices include: Plant Ecology and Physiology;
Animal Ecology; Marine Biology; Animal Cell Biology; Microbiology; Animal Physiology;
and Population & Community Ecology.
In Semesters 7-8, you undertake an independent research project and study between
four and six advanced modules from a range of module options from a defined list.
Career opportunities
Biology graduates progress to successful careers in the pharmaceutical, biotechnology
and agricultural industries. Many have employment in conservation management and
environmental agencies. Other career paths include: the civil service; forensic science;
teaching, the food industry, hospital analytical laboratories, and government and
industrial research laboratories.
This course may be combined with:
Mathematics (CG11); Professional Education (CX11); or Psychology (CC18).
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/3u
www.stir.ac.uk
39
Business Computing
B
BSc (Hons)
This course is fully accredited by the British Computer Society
In this course, you will examine just how critical computers are to business. The
emphasis is on organisations and how computers are used within them. In addition,
you’ll study the basic skills of designing and building software systems. You will gain
a broad base of skills by combining theory and practice – a skillset that resonates well
with employers, whether in the software industry itself or in a wider and more strategic
context, developing the use of IT in any business.
We help our students build a strong link with industry. During Year 3, you have the
option to partake in a three-month summer placement or a one-year placement.
BSc (Hons) graduates are fully accredited by the British Computer Society for the
educational requirements of being a Chartered Information Technology Professional
(CITP), which is the Society’s professional member level.
Course content
In Semesters 1-3, students from our three computing-related degrees take the same
core modules in Computing Science. Core modules include: Computational Thinking;
Programming Using Java; Social and Professional Issues; Usability and Accessibility
of Interfaces; and Data Structures, Objects and Algorithms. There are also three core
Business modules.
Additionally, you will take one further subject each semester.
Semesters 4-8 cover core computing and business modules:
• Computing: Information Systems, Database Principles and Applications
• Business: International Business, Entrepreneurship, together with optional
advanced modules such as Strategic Management and Business Analytics.
Final-year Honours students undertake an independent project, which typically involves
designing and developing a computer application within a business context.
Career opportunities
Our graduates have knowledge of both Business and Computing Science – a skills
combination highly valued by potential employers. You will be ideally placed to work
either in the software industry itself or in a more strategic role, developing the use of
IT in business.
Possible employers range from consulting firms to IT users, such as governments,
banks and insurance. Our industrial placements will ease your transition into the job
market. Recent destinations for graduates in business and financial services include
Prudential, Standard Life Assurance, Bank of Scotland, HSBC, as well as companies
such as KANA, Logica, Microsoft and Google.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
UCAS code: G510
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Computing and Business
Studies/Management and relevant
experience of Java or other
programming languages.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/3v
www.stir.ac.uk
40
Business Studies
B
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: N100
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
The University of Stirling Management School is ranked in
the top 25 UK institutions for Business and Management
(REF 2014)
Our focused, yet flexible approach to learning means you can undertake a single
Honours degree in Business Studies or one of a number of combined degree courses,
which include Business Studies and another subject. Students intending to specialise
in Business Studies are encouraged to take modules in related subject areas, such as:
Accountancy; Marketing; Retail Studies; Economics; or Computing Science.
Whichever route you choose, the knowledge, skills and competencies you will acquire
offer a firm foundation on which to continue developing your management expertise.
Our teaching staff are active in various areas of current management research, which
informs our teaching, making it relevant to current debates within business. Guest
speakers from a wide range of industries bring learning into the classroom. Several
modules use ‘live’ business simulations where you `manage’ a company.
Course content
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Semesters 1-2 provide you with a grounding in the subjects of Business
and Management, as well as analytical techniques that underpin business activity
and management.
Semesters 3-4 focus on business and management, including: the Organisation of
Business; Economics for Managers; and Accounting & Finance for Managers.
Semesters 5-8 encompass a series of interlinked core modules, which include:
International Business; Responsible Business; and Strategic Management. Elective
modules include Human Resource Management and Project Management.
You will have opportunities to develop appropriate, work-related skills throughout your
studies, culminating in the Professional Development and Practice module in Semester
8, which helps you prepare for entering the workplace. We also offer opportunities for
you to gain work experience via internships (short placements) with a number of local,
regional and national-based organisations.
Career opportunities
Business Studies graduates are well placed for a variety of jobs covering many different
business sectors. Our graduates have gone on to work in: communications; banking;
insurance; the public sector; human resources; information management; advertising;
retailing; international trade and research; and development.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
New courses:
BA Sport Business Management,
visit:➲ http://stir.ac.uk/16o
BA Sustainable Events
Management,
visit:➲ http://stir.ac.uk/16p
www.stir.ac.uk
This course may be combined with:
Accountancy (NNF4); Economics (LN11); English Studies (NQ13); Film and Media
(NP13); Finance (NN13); French (NRF1); Human Resource Management (NN16);
Law (MN11); Marketing (NN25); Modern Languages (NT19); Politics (LN21);
Professional Education (NX11); Professional Education and Computing Science
(NX21); Psychology (CN81); Spanish (NRF4); or Sports Studies (NC16).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/3w
41
Cell Biology
C
BSc (Hons)
Unique interdisciplinary training in areas which underpin
modern biology
The study of biological systems at the cellular and subcellular levels is key to
understanding how organisms develop, how they respond to their environment and
how the diseased state differs from the healthy state. Recent advances in cell biology
are enabling cell biologists to:
• detect, prevent and treat diseases in both animal and plant systems
• explore the processes associated with ageing
• improve the quality and quantity of important food crops
• develop novel and sustainable fuels
• assess the impacts of environmental changes on biological systems.
The Cell Biology degree at Stirling offers unique interdisciplinary training in areas which
underpin modern biology.
Course content
Semesters 1-4 cover the following core module options: Cell Biology; Physiology;
Genes and Evolution; Ecology; and Biodiversity. In addition to the core modules,
you will study Practical Skills in the Biological and Environmental Sciences and
Quantitative Techniques. You also take additional modules in other disciplines,
usually Environmental Sciences and Aquatic Sciences.
Semesters 5-6 cover modules in: Animal Physiology; Microbiology; Laboratory
and Field Techniques; and The Animal Cell. Students also take two modules
from the following options: Applied Immunology; Enzymes and their
Applications; and Plant Ecophysiology.
In Semesters 7-8, you undertake an independent research project and a number of
advanced modules from a range of options, which currently include: Cell Birth, Life
and Death; Genetic Engineering; Immunology and Disease; Molecular Techniques;
and Proteomics.
A research project is a major component of the final year and the project topics
offered to you reflect the active research interests of academic staff.
Career opportunities
Graduates of this degree enter careers in the pharmaceutical, healthcare and
biomedical, biotechnology and agricultural industries. Other career paths may include:
the civil service; forensic science; teaching; the food industry; and government and
industrial research laboratories.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
UCAS code: C130
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology,
Chemistry, Mathematics or Physics.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Biology and one of
Chemistry, Environmental Science,
Geography, Geology or Physics.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/3x
www.stir.ac.uk
42
Computing Science
C
BSc (Hons)
UCAS code: G400
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Computing and relevant
experience of Java or other
programming languages.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
This course is fully accredited by the British Computer Society
This degree teaches you how to design, build and analyse computer systems, in both
theory and practice. Your training will encompass how computers work, programming
them to make them do what we want and learning how they fit into their
environment. Our graduates are highly sought-after within the industry.
We help our students build strong links with industry with the option to partake
in a three-month summer placement or a one-year placement.
BSc (Hons) graduates are fully accredited by the British Computer Society for the
educational requirements of being a Chartered Information Technology Professional
(CITP), which is the Society’s professional member level.
Course content
In Semesters 1-3, students from our three computing-related degrees take the
same core modules in Computing Science. Core modules include: Computational
Thinking; Programming Using Java; Social and Professional Issues; Usability and
Accessibility of Interfaces; and Data Structures, Objects and Algorithms. You will also
take two further subjects. In Semester 1, you must take a Mathematics module.
Semesters 4-8 cover core compulsory modules including: Computer Systems
and Software Engineering; plus optional modules including: Computer
Security/Forensics; Artificial Intelligence; Web Services; and Telecommunications
and Games Development.
Honours students undertake an independent project in their final year, which
involves the development of a major piece of software from initial requirements
to final delivery.
Career opportunities
This degree will place you at the forefront of computing in a web-based world.
Our industrial placements will ease your transition into the job market.
Our graduates are well-equipped to enter either the software industry itself or one of
the many fields in which computer systems are extensively used and developed. Recent
destinations for our graduates include: Adobe Systems Inc.; Agilent (Hewlett Packard
Ltd); British Telecom; Google; HSBC; KANA; Logica; Microsoft; and Scottish Power.
This course may be combined with:
French (GR41); Mathematics (G4G1); Philosophy (GV45); Professional Education
(GX41); Professional Education/Business Studies (NX21); Professional Education/
Mathematics (GX91); or Spanish (GR44).
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/3y
www.stir.ac.uk
43
Conservation Biology
and Management
C
BSc (Hons)
Stirling is home to more environmental and conservation
organisations than any other UK city
UCAS code: CD14
Understanding the complex relationships between environments and their inhabitants
is vital so that environmental conservation and sustainable management may be
undertaken for the benefit of future generations.
Minimum requirements
Stirling is a superb area to study this. It is home to more environmental and
conservation organisations than any other UK city (for example: RSPB; Plantlife; Bat
Conservation Trust; SNH; and SEPA). We have strong links with all these organisations
and some of them are based at the University.
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
Our research is at the interface between the environment and society, and includes:
conservation biology; evolutionary ecology; ecosystem ecology; hydro-geomorphology;
and remote sensing.
AABB – two sittings
You will receive excellent practical training, hands-on experience, and preparation for a
range of careers in conservation.
IB Diploma:
32
Course content
Semesters 1-4 cover core modules in foundation subjects including: Ecology;
Biodiversity; Cell Biology and Physiology; Environmental Sciences; and
Practical Skills.
Semesters 5-6 cover advanced modules in: Environmental Policy and Management;
Population & Community Ecology; plus up to four modules from a defined list of
options including a field course to Spain.
Students doing Conservation Biology and Management have a four-week placement
in the summer between Years 3 and 4, working with a conservation organisation.
In Semesters 7-8, you undertake a research project and may choose to go on a field
course to the Cévennes National Park in Southern France. Students take up to six
modules from a range of options.
Students must pay a contribution towards costs of travel, accommodation and
subsistence for the Scottish field course in Year 2 and the optional field courses
in Years 3 and 4.
Career opportunities
There is high demand for well-qualified conservation graduates and our graduates
work with a range of UK employers, including: Scottish Natural Heritage, the RSPB and
the wildlife trusts, as well as environmental consultancies. Other students now work
overseas or are working towards a doctorate.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
GCE A-levels:
BBB
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology, Chemistry,
Environmental Science, Geography,
Geology, Mathematics or Physics.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Biology and one of
Environmental Science, Geography
or Geology.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/3z
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
www.stir.ac.uk
44
Criminology
C
BA (Hons)
Combined degree only
This course reflects the latest developments in social research,
taught by recognised experts in their chosen fields
Why and how do people break the law? How can the criminal justice system define
this and how do we police, prosecute and punish people?
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
This course looks at the motivations and careers of law-breakers, and at broader
questions of process and policy in criminal justice.
You will attain a strong training in criminology and the theory and methods of applied
social science. If you are considering a career in the police, prison service or human
rights agencies, this degree will provide a strong academic base.
Course content
In Semesters 1-4, you take the following core modules: Social Differentiation; Social
Problems; Understanding Social Policy: Historical and Theoretical Perspectives on
Welfare; and The Development of Social Theory: An Introduction to Classical and
Contemporary Social Theory. You will also take Crime and Criminal Justice, Scottish
Society and two additional modules in any subject.
In Semesters 5-8, you are required to take two core modules. Research Process is split
into two modules. The first is an introduction to a range of research methods and a
number of issues relating to the exploration of the social world. In the second, you will
gain a deeper practical and theoretical understanding of research methods in sociology
and social policy.
You will also select four advanced option modules, which may include: Crime, Risk and
Modernity; Crimes of the Powerful; Punishment and Society; Criminological Theories in
Context; or Gender, Crime and Justice.
Career opportunities
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
For full details please contact:
➲ [email protected]
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Criminology provides a good academic base if you are considering careers in the
police, the prison service, probation, social work, community care and law, and
regulatory fields such as the factory and tax inspectorates, human rights agencies,
charitable foundations and lobby groups.
As well as specific, subject-based knowledge, you will graduate with a wide range of
experience and skills, in particular communication skills, self-management skills and
interpersonal skills. These give graduates a competitive edge with employers across the
private, public and voluntary sectors.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
This course must be studied as a combined degree with:
Law (MM91); Philosophy (MV95); Politics (ML92); or Sociology (LM39).
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/16g
www.stir.ac.uk
45
Ecology
E
BSc (Hons)
This course offers fieldwork opportunities in Scotland,
France and Spain
Ecology is the science of relationships amongst organisms, and between organisms
and their environments. Ecology is a vital 21st-century science, as it underpins how
best we can interact with, use and conserve the planet’s natural resources. As the
basis of sustainable development, this subject is mainstream in policy development
and planning.
As well as providing training in essential field and laboratory techniques, this degree
provides a robust introduction to the science of sustainability, making it relevant to
real-life situations and improving students’ employability prospects.
We have strong contacts with external conservation and environmental organisations
and many students benefit from taking part in research programmes, ensuring that
they recognise the transferable nature of a science degree and how their learning
applies to the real world.
Fieldwork – an essential part of training – takes place in Scotland; in the Cévennes of
France (ten days); and there is an optional trip in Almeria, Spain (seven days). Students
may spend all or part of Year 3 studying abroad as part of an exchange programme
with the Canadian University of Guelph.
Course content
Semesters 1-4 cover core modules in: Biological Sciences; Environmental Sciences; and
Practical Skills in the Natural Sciences.
Semesters 5-6 cover the following advanced modules: Animal Ecology; Plant Ecology
and Physiology; Population & Community Ecology; plus further optional modules,
including the Spanish field-course.
In Semesters 7-8, students undertake an independent research project and attend the
overseas field course in France. They also take four to six advanced modules from a
defined list of options.
The research project in the final year takes up around a third of the timetable and is
strongly linked with the active research interests of academic staff in Biological and
Environmental Sciences.
Career opportunities
With this well-respected degree, our graduates have entered a range of jobs
in academic and applied ecology, including roles as university and government
researchers, nature reserve managers, policymakers with environmental agencies
and conservation bodies, and natural history filmmakers.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
UCAS code: C180
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology, Chemistry,
Mathematics or Physics.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Biology and one of
Environmental Science, Geography
or Geology.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/41
www.stir.ac.uk
46
Economics
E
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: L100
3rd in Scotland for Economics (The Guardian University Guide)
Almost every decision taken in our fast-moving social, commercial and technological
world is dictated by economic imperatives at regional, national and global levels.
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Economics.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Mathematics National 5 (B),
Intermediate 2 (C), Standard Grade
(3), GCSE (C) or equivalent required.
In the current economic climate, the role of the economist is becoming more crucial
with the welfare and prosperity of nations dependent upon their accurate
interpretations and responses to continually shifting economic realities.
Course content
We offer an Honours course in Economics and combined Honours courses with a
range of other subjects.
In Semesters 1-4, you will take the following core modules:
• Introductory Microeconomics: to analyse how individual markets work, how
prices are set, how resources are allocated in an economy and how firms and
households respond to changing market conditions
• Introductory Macroeconomics: which is concerned with issues relating to the
economy as a whole, such as the general standard of living, unemployment
and inflation.
You will move on to study Intermediate Microeconomics and Macroeconomics,
whilst taking Introduction to Quantitative Techniques for Economics and
Business in Semester 4.
In Semesters 5-8, all Honours students take core advanced modules designed to
develop their knowledge and understanding of the central methods of economic
analysis and major policy issues. These are: Using Economic Data; Advanced
Macroeconomics; Advanced Microeconomics; and Economic Policy.
In the final year, you write a dissertation of your choice. For the remainder of the
course you choose a number of options, on topics such as: Financial Economics;
Environmental Economics; Monetary Economics; and Energy Economics.
Career opportunities
A Which? University report (April 2015) highlights that Economics graduates rank 7th
in the top subjects for graduate starting salaries.
In addition to careers in business and governments, there is a wide range of jobs in
companies that directly use economics and seek holders of good degrees
in the discipline.
Our recent graduates have gone onto careers in management, accountancy and
banking, as well as economics itself; and surveys have regularly found economics to be
one of the top four subjects for graduate pay.
This course may be combined with:
Accountancy (LN14); Business Studies (LN11); Environmental Science (FL91);
Finance (LN13); Marketing (NL51); Mathematics (GL11); Politics (LL12); or
Politics/Philosophy (L0V0).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/42
www.stir.ac.uk
47
Education (Primary)
E
BA/BSc (Hons)
8th in the UK for Education (The Complete University Guide)
We offer a choice of three unique degrees in primary education, enabling you to
combine the study of pedagogy (the craft and practice of teaching) with a specialism
in either Early Years, the Environment, or Modern Languages.
Our degrees will equip you with the necessary knowledge and abilities to start a career
in one of the most rewarding professions.
Minimum requirements
Primary school teachers with such specialist knowledge and skills are held in high
regard. That is why a recent Scottish Government Report recommended that our
distinctive approach to teacher education should be adopted by other institutions.
Stirling pioneered this method of teaching and continues to be at the forefront of
primary education provision.
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
Our teaching is informed by the research undertaken by world-leading academics
and outstanding teachers who are seconded from school to work at the University.
This is a practice that Stirling established and one which ensures you have access to a
combination of cutting-edge practice and research throughout your study.
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
Course content
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Core Education modules cover a range of teaching skills and advanced modules
in your chosen specialism, including: Environmental Science/Geography; Modern
Languages; Psychology; Social Work; Social Sciences; and Nursing.
Essential subjects:
Higher English (B) or GCSE English
Language and English Literature (B) or
Communications 4 and Literature 1.
Years 2-3 contain two five-week school placements. Semester 7 includes a ten-week
school placement and supplementary taught classes. You will also work with groups of
school pupils, allowing you to have additional pupil contact. Finally, you will undertake
an educational research project on an aspect of teaching Early Years, Environmental
Science or Languages within a primary school setting.
Mathematics National 5 (B),
Intermediate 2 (C), Standard Grade
(2), GCSE (C) or equivalent.
There are additional requirements for
each specialisation.
Career opportunities
The majority of our graduates enter the Scottish Teacher Induction Scheme (TIS),
guaranteeing them employment for one year as a newly qualified teacher in a Scottish
Local Authority school. Others work throughout the rest of the UK or internationally.
Alternatively, roles in corporate training and development, museum and leisure
education are popular.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Entry requirements – additional required subjects
Early Years: XX13
To include an SQA Higher (B), A-level (C) or equivalent in Biology, Chemistry, French,
Mathematics, Physics, Psychology, Sociology or Spanish.
Additional information
Entry to these courses is provisional
until the end of Year 1 and subject
to interview and criminal record PVG
check. If you have a criminal record
you should contact the Admissions
Manager in confidence to discuss
entry to these courses.
Environment: XC11
To include an SQA Higher (B), A-level (C) or equivalent in Biology, Chemistry,
Environmental Science, Geography, Mathematics or Physics.
Modern Languages: XR18
To include an SQA Higher (B), A-level (C) or equivalent in one of French
or Spanish.
➲ +44 (0) 1786 467046
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/43
www.stir.ac.uk
48
Education (Secondary)
E
BA/BSc (Hons)
Combined degree only
Minimum requirements
Four-year Honours
(except Physical Education)
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels: BBB
IB Diploma: 32
BTEC (Level 3): DDM
Four-year Honours
Physical Education
SQA Highers:
AABB – one sitting
AAAB – two sittings
GCE A-levels: BBB
IB Diploma: 32
BTEC (Level 3): DDM
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
Essential subjects:
Higher English (B) or GCSE
English Language and English
Literature (B) or Communications
4 and Literature 1.
Mathematics National 5 (B),
Intermediate 2 (C), Standard Grade
(2), GCSE (C) or equivalent.
Some subjects have additional
requirements. Please consult the
relevant subject page(s).
Entry to these courses is provisional
until the end of Year 1 and subject
to interview and criminal record PVG
check. If you have a criminal record
you should contact the Admissions
Manager in confidence to discuss
entry to these courses.
➲ +44 (0) 1786 467046
www.stir.ac.uk
8th in the UK for Education (The Complete University Guide)
We offer a wide range of concurrent courses to prospective secondary school teachers
that enable you to study both pedagogy (the craft and practice of teaching) and your
subject specialism(s) simultaneously. Our pioneering approach gives you the time to
excel in teaching practice, to critically reflect and to grow in confidence.
You are taught the fundamental processes that underpin learning and teaching within
classrooms by a combination of world-leading academics, and outstanding teachers
who are seconded from school to work at the University.
You will graduate with a research-informed degree making you well equipped to enter
the world of secondary education immediately.
Course content
Semesters 1-2 cover core Education modules, with further core and advanced
Education modules taken in Semesters 3-6, including a range of teaching skills in
your chosen subjects.
To gain confidence prior to going out on teaching placements, you undertake
on-campus microteaching, which involves teaching small groups of children.
There is a two-week placement at the end of Semester 2, followed by two school
placements of three to five weeks between Semesters 3-4 and 5-6, and a further
four-week placement for Physical Education students. During Semester 6, you spend
five half days in schools.
Semester 7 includes a 10-week placement. Semester 8 Secondary students complete
their Enquiry into Practice and undertake further study in their main teaching subject.
Career opportunities
The majority of our graduates enter the Scottish Teacher Induction Scheme (TIS),
guaranteeing them employment for one year as a newly qualified teacher in a Scottish
Local Authority school.
Others have gained employment in schools throughout the rest of the UK or
internationally. Alternatively, graduates have opted for roles in corporate training and
development, museum and leisure education, as well as other routes less closely allied
to teaching.
This course may be combined with:
Biology (CX11); Business Studies (NX11); Business Studies/Computing Science
(NX21); Chemistry*; Computing; Science (GX41); Computing Science/Mathematics
(GX91); English Studies; (QX31); English Studies/History (QXHC); English Studies/
Religion (QXJ1); Environmental Geography; (FX81); French (RX11); French/
Spanish (RXD1); History (VX11); History/Politics (LX21); History/Sociology (VXD1);
Mathematics (GX11); Philosophy/Religion (VX53); Physics*; Religion (VX61);
Religion/History (VXC1); or Sport Studies, Physical Education and Professional
Education (CX61).
*Chemistry and Physics are taught in partnership with Heriot-Watt
University. For full details, including entry requirements, please visit
website below.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/44
49
English Studies
E
BA (Hons)
Improve your employment prospects and gain invaluable
transferable skills
Why study English? This course offers you the perfect chance to dedicate yourself to
reading and enjoying some of the great poems, plays and novels from across
the world.
Texts are all around us – from books and magazines to TV, email and the Internet. The
ability to analyse them and their often subtle meanings becomes ever more important.
Your own creative writing can form a part of this degree; we believe it aids your
understanding of literary style and technique, and develops your imagination.
Alongside our teaching and research staff, we have two Royal Literary Fund fellows
who help students with both their creative and essay writing. All of our assessments
are through coursework essays and research.
Staff in English Studies research and teach in areas from the medieval period to the
present day, as well as in linguistics and creative writing. We are also lucky to have the
Macrobert Arts Centre on campus, which runs an exciting theatre and film programme
throughout the semesters.
Course content
In Semesters 1-2, students take the compulsory modules: Author, Reader, Text; and
Texts and Contexts; plus four other module options. These could include Language in
Society and Foundations of Language.
In Semester 3, students study Meaning and Representation.
In Semester 4, there is a choice of core modules from: Writing and History; Writing
and Identity; and Writing and Language. In Semester 5, students choose from several
period-based modules, including: Modernism and Modernity; British Romanticism; and
Victorian Literature and Culture.
In Semesters 6-7, there is a choice from a range of option modules which may include:
Modern Gothic; Scottish Literature; Old English; Jane Austen; and Postcolonial Writing.
The final semester is spent writing your dissertation, supervised by your tutor.
Career opportunities
The ability to think and write clearly is extremely valuable in many careers and
professions. Our English Studies graduates are well versed in these transferable skills
and have an excellent success rate in finding rewarding employment in many fields.
This course may be combined with:
Business Studies (NX13); Film and Media (QP33); French (QR31); History (QV31);
History and Professional Education (QXHC); Journalism Studies (QP35); Philosophy
(QV35); Politics (QL32); Professional Education (QX31); Psychology (QC38); Religion
(QV36); Religion and Professional Education (QXJ1); or Spanish (QR34).
UCAS code: Q300
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include English.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/45
www.stir.ac.uk
50
E
Geography: Y21C
Env. Science: FX99
Environmental Geography/
Environmental Science and
Outdoor Education
BSc (Hons)
Minimum requirements
Combine our Environmental Geography/Science degree with
the Mountain Leader Award to prepare you for a wide range
of environmental, ecological and outdoor careers
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
Studying Outdoor Education with either Environmental Geography or Environmental
Science combines a solid foundation of theory with extensive hands-on practice, giving
you an in-depth understanding of environmental, geographical and ecological issues.
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology, Chemistry,
Environmental Science, Geography,
Geology, Mathematics or Physics.
In addition, you will gain the Mountain Leader Award, endorsed by the Mountain
Training Association, providing you with training in navigation, mountain hazards and
other outdoor leadership skills.
Lectures and tutorials are combined with practical, in-the-field learning, making this a
physically demanding course requiring a certain level of health, fitness and mobility.
Course content
Semesters 1-4 core modules include: Building Planet Earth; Environmental History;
Landscape Evolution; and Mountain Leader Training.
Environmental Science: additional modules include Leisure Studies and Sports Studies.
Environmental Geography: additional modules include Practical Science Skills and
People and the Environment.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
Semesters 5-8 core modules include: Field and Laboratory Techniques; Environmental
Hazards; Remote Sensing; and a Residential Field Class (Iceland or southern Spain).
Entry is possible, subject to approval
of individual qualifications.
Environmental Science: additional modules include Conservation Management and
Restoring Ecology.
Other qualifications
Environmental Geography: additional modules include Geographic Information
Systems and Glaciers and Landscape.
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For the Mountain Leader Award you must complete a minimum of 40 quality
mountain days, in your own time. Consequently this degree requires a high level
of commitment to hill and mountain walking. You must be at least 18 at the start of
the course.
Career opportunities
Graduates have found work as countryside rangers, guides and Environmental Science/
Geography educators – raising public awareness of environmental issues – and other
careers specific to Outdoor Education.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/47
www.stir.ac.uk
51
Environmental Science
E
BSc (Hons)
93% student satisfaction (National Student Survey)
UCAS code: F900
This course offers innovative, interdisciplinary training for those who want to address
the world’s most pressing environmental challenges.
The environmental systems on which society depends are complex and fragile. To
understand these systems, environmental scientists have to take an interdisciplinary
approach that combines knowledge of the physical, chemical and biological processes
and how these interact over space and time to shape our natural environment and its
interplay with human society.
We were one of the first universities to introduce an environmental science degree in
the UK and, as such, we have a long-established and highly respected track
record in providing students with the subject knowledge, laboratory and field
experience, and transferable skills necessary to find sustainable solutions to
critical environmental problems.
We are committed to training graduates in work-relevant skills demanded by
employers. A specialist skills module is included in each semester of our course
and regular careers sessions are embedded into core teaching. Field training is a
fundamental element which includes field courses in Scotland, Iceland and Spain.
Our exchange programme with institutions such as the University of Guelph in
Canada means that you can spend one or two semesters studying abroad during
Year 3.
Course content
Semesters 1-4 explore the science behind the global physical, chemical and biological
processes that shape our natural environment and provide training in laboratory and
field skills through a series of core and optional modules, including a residential field
trip to Aviemore or the Lake District.
Semesters 5-8 provide specialised training with core modules in: Environmental Policy
and Management; Geographical Information Systems; and Methods and Applications
in Environmental Science. These are complemented by a range of other modules.
Career opportunities
The focus on providing technical field and laboratory training as well as scientific
knowledge means our graduates are highly employable. They go on to work in a wide
range of organisations including water authorities, renewable energy companies,
conservation bodies, environmental consultancies, local authorities and government
agencies, or take up postgraduate study in education, environmental management,
and information technology.
This course may be combined with:
Economics (FL91); Mathematics (F9G1); Politics (FL92); or Professional Education
(Primary) with specialism in the Environment (XC11).
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology, Chemistry,
Environmental Science, Geography,
Geology, Mathematics or Physics.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Biology and one of
Environmental Science, Geography
or Geology.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult website
for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/46
Standard entry into the MSci course is
the equivalent of Year 2 of the standard
BSc course.
www.stir.ac.uk
52
Environmental Science
(Integrated Masters)
E
MSci
UCAS code: F7S4
Minimum requirements
Standard entry –
Four-year MSci
SQA Adv. Higher:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
This is the first Environmental Science MSci to be offered
in Scotland
Environmental Science has grown out of increasing concern for the environment and
the need for a scientific approach to the study of human impacts on natural resources.
Our course provides the necessary scientific grounding, science and technical training
to investigate these problems and identify solutions.
This is the first Environmental Science MSci to be offered in Scotland. It leads directly
to a postgraduate qualification and is designed specifically for students who want to
pursue a career in the environment sector. It offers an environmental placement and
an industrial linked final-year project, equipping you with the key knowledge, skills and
career awareness.
Course content
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology,
Environmental Science,
Geography or Geology.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Year 1 gives you the basic knowledge and analytical skills in environmental science,
geoscience, ecology and physical geography that underpin the degree.
In Year 2, you take more specialised modules in environmental systems, environmental
management and environmental technologies.
In Years 3 and 4, the choice of advance modules continues with a wide range of
subjects available. There is an emphasis on career development and employability skills
with core modules in professional development and a placement. You also organise
and present at a symposium on environmental careers for students in earlier years.
In your final year, you undertake a significant piece of independent research in
partnership with an environmental organisation and, alongside this, choose from
a range of specialist environmental management modules that are focused on the
energy, conservation and environmental sectors.
Career opportunities
This course is directly aimed at students who want to gain employment in the
environmental sector, whether that is in research institutes, environmental
consultancies, environmental protection agencies, water authorities, or conservation
bodies. Others may go on to further their careers through postgraduate research
culminating in the award of a PhD.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/12o
www.stir.ac.uk
53
European Film and Media
E
BA (Hons)
1st in Scotland for Communication and Media
(The Times Good University Guide)
This degree course explores how the media functions in different European contexts
while giving you a grounding in classic and contemporary European cinema and an
in-depth knowledge of French or Spanish.
Our lecturers have particular strengths in a wide variety of areas, including
transnational cinema and media, new media, and postcolonial cinema. They also enjoy
international reputations and have close connections with researchers and practitioners
in academia, television and radio production, and film production and exhibition.
Whilst gaining your excellent degree, you will also benefit from our on-campus cinema
and theatre – the Macrobert Arts Centre. Throughout the year, the centre hosts a
variety of film and cultural festivals covering a range of topics. In order to fully immerse
yourself within your chosen language you will also spend time studying at one of our
partner universities abroad.
UCAS code: P3R1
Minimum requirements
Honours degree
SQA Higher:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-level:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
Course content
In Semesters 1-3, you will take a combination of modules from a selection including:
The Moving Image; French or Spanish; Classic European Cinema; Media Impacts; and
The British Media.
In Semesters 4-8, you will continue the study of French or Spanish and choose from a
range of modules.
Options in Modern Languages and Film and Media may include: Quebec Cinema;
Screening the City; Video Drama Production; Advertising; Sport and the Media; and
Popular Culture. All students take the module Transnational Identities, which looks
at how issues such as globalisation, immigration, regional and national identity are
portrayed in film and media.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
In Semester 6, you study at an approved French or Spanish-speaking university to
develop your language skills.
Career opportunities
The attractive combination of skills developed by this course is highly sought-after by
employers, both in the UK and abroad. Further, you will gain a network of European
contacts that you can put to use in your future career. This course is a gateway to a
wide variety of careers in: publishing; academia; journalism; television; radio and film
production; translating; law; administration and management; advertising; and
public relations.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/48
www.stir.ac.uk
54
Film and Media
F
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: P300
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
1st in Scotland for Communication and Media
(The Times Good University Guide)
Our Film and Media department is one of the largest in the UK, as well as being
the longest established. We have been educators and researchers in this field
since 1978.
Our teaching focuses on the critical and theoretical study of: film; broadcasting;
journalism and the press; the Internet and new media; sport; advertising; and
public relations.
Scriptwriting is a popular strand of our course, along with audio and video production
work created in small groups.
As well as our excellent teaching and research you will also benefit from our
on-campus, multi-screen cinema and theatre, the Macrobert Arts Centre. This is an
excellent resource which offers a variety of different opportunities throughout the year,
including different film and cultural festivals.
Course content
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Year 1 will focus on Film and Media, and two other subjects.
Semesters 1-4 will cover five core Film and Media modules: Representation, Meaning
and Identity; The Moving Image; Digital Media and Culture; Reading Film and
Television; and Understanding Audiences.
Semesters 5-8 will cover selected modules from a range, including: The Body in Screen
Culture; Terrorism in the Media; and Experimental Cinema.
Your admission to the Production strand in Semester 5 will be on the basis of merit.
Career opportunities
Many Film and Media students have established successful careers in the media. These
include broadcast and print journalism; television, radio and film production; media
management; advertising and public relations; and education.
This course may be combined with:
Business Studies (NP13); English Studies (QP33); French (RP13); History (PV31);
Journalism Studies (PP35); Law (P3M1); Marketing (PN35); Philosophy (VP53);
Politics (PL32); Psychology (CP83); Religion (VP63); Sociology (LP33); Spanish (RP43);
or Sports Studies (CP63).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/49
www.stir.ac.uk
55
Finance
F
BA (Hons)
The University of Stirling Management School is ranked in
the top 25 UK institutions for Business and Management
(REF 2014)
Studying Finance involves the investigation of how company managers and investors
make financial decisions, how they manage risk and how financial markets function.
The course addresses issues such as: how do stock markets work? How can I make
money by trading futures and options? How can companies reduce foreign exchange
risk? Do shareholders benefit from corporate takeovers? Does corporate governance
matter? Why do financial crises occur? What types of securities should be included in
an investment portfolio?
You will gain a thorough grounding in the theoretical and analytical skills needed for a
career in corporate finance, investment management or financial services.
Course content
UCAS code: N300
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
In Semesters 1-3, students will study the core modules in Finance, Accounting, and
Economics and two other subjects per semester.
Semesters 4-8 cover core advanced modules, including: Mergers and Acquisitions;
International Finance; and Financial Analysis. Further advanced modules in
Accountancy and Finance are chosen from a list of electives or from those required by
the particular degree course being followed.
You will have numerous opportunities to develop appropriate, work-related skills at
every stage of your studies, culminating in the Professional Development and Practice
module in Semester 8 which helps you prepare for entering the workplace.
Career opportunities
Many significant decisions made by companies, individuals and financial institutions
require the analytical skills and professional judgment developed by studying Finance.
Accordingly, a wide range of exciting and prestigious career opportunities are available
to graduates in this discipline.
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
Mathematics preferred.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
These include working as financial analysts for fund management institutions, as
dealers on the stock exchange, as financial planners, investment bankers or financial
market regulators.
Essential subjects:
To include Accountancy and
Economics. Preference given
to those with Mathematics.
The BA (Hons) Finance degree may also be studied by those wishing to embark on a
career in accountancy.
Other qualifications
Students who study the requisite Business Law and Economics modules may be
exempt from examinations of professional accounting bodies.
This course may be combined with:
Accountancy (NN43); Business Studies (NN13); Economics (LN13); or
Mathematics (GN13).
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4a
Mathematics National 5 (B),
Intermediate 2 (C), Standard Grade
(3), GCSE (C) or equivalent required.
www.stir.ac.uk
56
French
F
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: R120
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To apply for a combined degree with
French and Spanish you will require
one of these languages at Higher or
A-level (or equivalent).
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
2nd in Scotland (The Complete University Guide and
The Times Good University Guide)
French at Stirling offers a broad understanding of the French language and culture
through various historical and geographical contexts. We focus on how encounters
with other cultures transform French language, culture and society. You will explore
ethnic diversity in contemporary France and the complexity of Francophone cultures in
places as diverse as Quebec, the Maghreb and sub-Saharan Africa.
Course content
You can begin your studies in French either in our Advanced stream (for all students
who have a Higher French or equivalent) or in our Beginners’ stream. The two strands
merge by the end of Year 2.
For students in the Beginners’ stream, the focus is first and foremost on intensive
language learning and on building written and spoken language skills across the first
semesters of study.
Students in our Advanced stream will combine written language classes, spoken
language classes and the study of aspects of French and Francophone culture, politics
and society from Semester 1 onwards. These modules examine the language, culture
and society of 20th and 21st century French and the wider French-speaking world
through the analysis of texts, films and online materials.
The Beginners’ and Advanced streams merge from Semester 4 onwards.
In Semesters 5-8, students take core language modules in spoken and written French,
and choose specialisms from a range of modules, including: French Detective Film and
Fiction; Women Writers on Women; the Cinema of the Fantastic; Quebec Cinema; and
Black France.
In most degree combinations, including French, Semester 6 is an integral and
compulsory period of Study Abroad, spent at one of our wide range of partner
institutions across France, but also in Switzerland, Morocco or Quebec. All students of
French will be required to spend some time abroad as part of their degree course.
Career opportunities
Other qualifications
Language graduates are confident communicators, and the growing European
integration offers increasing job opportunities. Many progress to careers in: publishing;
journalism; television; advertising; translating; law; teaching in French or English as a
foreign language; administration; and management.
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
For the majority of modern language degrees, there is a compulsory period of study
abroad. For full details, please see specific course entry.
Essential subjects:
To include French.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
This course may be combined with:
Business Studies (NRF1); Computing Science (GR41); English Studies (QR31);
Film and Media (RP13); History (RV11); Human Resource Management (NRP1);
Journalism Studies (RP15); Law (RM11); Marketing (N5R1); Mathematics (GR11);
Philosophy (RV15); Politics (LR21); Professional Education (Primary) with Modern
Languages (XR18); Professional Education (Secondary) (RX11); Religion (RV16);
Spanish (RR14); or Spanish and Professional Education (Secondary) (RXD1).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4b
www.stir.ac.uk
57
Geography –
Environmental Geography
G
BSc (Hons)
93% student satisfaction (National Student Survey)
This is a unique course rooted in the real world that equips our graduates with the
skills to face global challenges in the 21st century.
Environmental Geography is the integrated study of the world, its landscapes, places,
people and their relationship with the environment. It seeks to make sense of the
world we live in and is unique in bridging the environmental and social sciences.
While Physical Geography and Human Geography are disciplines in their own right,
Environmental Geography combines these subjects to provide a much-needed
capability to study and understand interactions between people, and between people
and the environments in which they live.
Environmental geographers have expert knowledge and skills to research, analyse
and communicate how the changing environment affects our lives. They visualise
geographical issues at different spatial scales, from global to local, and to offer
solutions to some of our most pressing environmental problems.
Course content
Semesters 1-4 cover eight core modules including: Geology; Physical Geography;
Ecology; People and the Environment; and Statistical Techniques; plus additional
modules from a defined range.
Semesters 5-8 offer increased specialisation. You study advanced modules such as:
Environmental Hazards; Geographical Information Systems; Glaciers and Landscape;
and a further element of the course is a residential field class in Spain or Iceland.
Career opportunities
Environmental Geography graduates are equipped with a unique combination of
subject-specific and transferable skills enabling them to develop their understanding
of the relationships between environment and people, their spatial awareness,
and their skills in areas such as field investigation, problem-solving, teamworking,
communication and geographical information technology. This makes them highly
sought after by a wide range of industrial, commercial and public-sector employers.
This course may be combined with:
Environmental Geography and Professional Education (FX81); or Environmental
Geography and Outdoor Education (Y21C).
UCAS code: FL97
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology, Chemistry,
Environmental Science, Geography,
Geology, Mathematics or Physics.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include one of Environmental
Science, Geography or Geology
and one of Biology, Chemistry,
Economics, Mathematics, Physics,
Politics or Sociology.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4c
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
www.stir.ac.uk
58
Global Cinema
G
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: P390
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
1st in Scotland for Communication and Media
(The Times Good University Guide)
What can films and other types of artistic representation tell us about our globalised
world? What impact has our increasing nations’ interconnectedness had on our
cultural forms and practices, and in the way we perceive and depict the realities of
others and ourselves?
This innovative, combined degree course is unique in that it dovetails the study of
cultural theory with the study of cinema and other visual media. Cutting across
traditional disciplinary boundaries, it draws on several areas of expertise in visual
culture across the humanities.
You will learn how to interpret cultural texts and practices from throughout the
world, gaining a solid grounding in film and textual analysis, cultural studies and area
studies. You will study under the guidance of a vibrant and friendly team, with close
international ties and a reputation for cutting-edge research and high-quality teaching.
Course content
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
When studying this degree you will choose to study from a wide range of modules
from Languages, Cultures and Religions to Communications, Media and Culture,
allowing you the scope to specialise.
In Semesters 1-3, you will take core modules in: Global Cinema; Post-War European
Cinema; and Classic European Cinema.
In Semesters 4-8, you will develop a critical understanding and analytical approach
to global cinema and culture, including analysis of various non-European cultures.
Core advanced modules include: Global Cinema and Culture Theory; and
Dissertation Preparation.
Advanced option modules include Transnational Identities; African Literature and
Cinema; The Cinema of the Fantastic; Sexuality and Gender in Film; Postcolonial
France; and Latin American Cinema and Culture.
Related degrees:
Literature and Cinema.
Career opportunities
The attractive combination of skills developed by this course is highly sought-after by
employers, both in the UK and abroad. Graduates are prepared for a wide variety of
careers in: publishing; journalism; television; radio and film; academia; administration
and management; advertising and public relations.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/16h
www.stir.ac.uk
59
History
H
BA (Hons)
92% student satisfaction (National Student Survey)
UCAS code: V100
If you really want to understand the modern world, it is essential to understand the
past. Here at Stirling we have developed different ways to help you do that.
In Semester 3, one of our core modules – Reputations in History – offers a riveting
insight into famous Scottish and international, male and female historical characters
from a thousand years of history, including William Wallace and Nelson Mandela.
In your final year, at advanced level, you have a choice of special subjects for a
year-long intensive module, which will run alongside your dissertation. However, you
will be helped along by the enthusiasm, encouragement, and, of course, the most
recent research from staff members interested in your subject.
Course content
In Semesters 1-3, students take History plus two other subjects.
Then, in Semesters 4-6, you will choose one, two or three modules per semester
from a varied list of History topics such as: environmental; computing; social; political;
African; European; American; British; and Scottish.
In Semesters 7-8, Honours students take a `special subject’, which involves the use of
printed documentary collections and other source material, from a choice of five or six,
such as Revolutionary Europe or Immigration to Britain, 1800-1971.
Single Honours History students also write a supervised dissertation of between
14,000 and 16,000 words on a research topic of their choice.
Careers opportunities
A History degree sets the kind of intellectual challenges and fosters particular
skills, which employers have always recognised and valued. These include: the
ability to argue a persuasive case; a capacity for independent work and effective
time management; an ability to organise and solve problems; and a capacity to
communicate clearly, both in writing and speech.
This is why our History graduates have been successful in obtaining a wide variety
of posts – some in history-related areas, such as teaching or work in museums and
libraries, and others in fields such as: administration; commerce; the civil service;
banking; and insurance.
This course may be combined with:
English Studies (QV31); English Studies/Professional Education (QXHC); Film and
Media (PV31); French (RV11); Journalism Studies (VP15); Law (MV11); Philosophy
(VV15); Politics (LV21); Politics/Professional Education (LX21); Professional Education
(VX11); Religion (VV16); Religion/Professional Education (VXC1); Sociology (LV31);
Sociology/Professional Education (VXD1); Spanish (RV41); or Sports Studies (VC16).
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include History.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: As in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4e
www.stir.ac.uk
60
Human Resource
Management
H
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: N600
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
100% student satisfaction (National Student Survey)
Human Resource Management (HRM) deals with the management of an
organisation’s workforce, from the most junior member of staff to the chief
executive. HRM specialists work closely with operational managers to manage the
employment relationship, enhance individual and team performance, and ensure
that workers are fairly treated. HRM also attempts to increase the organisation’s
ability to adapt within its environment through broadening the skills of the
workforce. As such, HR specialists also need to have a good understanding
of the labour market and their organisation’s wider social, economic and
political environments.
Course content
In Semesters 1 and 2 you will be taught core modules, which are designed to give
you a solid grounding in the general principles of business, management, marketing,
human resources and organisations. Additional modules are taken from elsewhere in
the University, though many students choose related subjects such as: Business Law;
Economics; Psychology; or Sociology.
From Semester 4, you take specialist modules in Human Resource Management
covering areas such as: techniques and policy within HRM; strategic HRM; learning
and development; employment relations; and contemporary issues and change in
HRM, work and employment.
In addition to specialist HRM modules, optional modules are chosen from Business
Studies, Management or from one of the other subjects you are qualified in, for
example, Marketing. You are encouraged to take electives in Accounting & Finance
for Managers and Economics for Managers.
You will have numerous opportunities to develop appropriate work-related skills
at every stage of your studies, culminating in the Professional Development and
Practice module in Semester 8 which helps you prepare for entering the workplace.
Career opportunities
Students completing this degree are well qualified for specialist careers both in
HRM and general management. In fact, the increasing importance of individual
performance to organisational success suggests that all managers should possess
HRM skills.
Focusing on understanding employment in the widest sense, this degree also
enables graduates to take up roles in trade unions, employment-related charities,
government departments, non-governmental organisations and employment
research bodies.
This course may be combined with:
Business Studies (NN16); French (NRP1); Law (MN16); Marketing (NN65);
Psychology (NC68); or Spanish (NR64).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4f
www.stir.ac.uk
61
International Management
Studies and Intercultural
Studies (IMIS)
I
UCAS code: NLR0
Develop high-level language skills and study management
subjects in an international context
Growing integration and increased global mobility provide ever increasing
opportunities for graduates with advanced business and marketing skills, and with
high-level knowledge of foreign languages and cultures.
Course content
IMIS is a unique course available in conjunction either with the Ecole de Management
in Strasbourg, France, or the University of Passau in Bavaria, Germany (the latter is
open to native or near native speakers of German only), which can lead to a double
degree and integrated Masters.
In both, the course leads to the award of an undergraduate degree from Stirling
as well as either a Masters in International Cultural and Business Studies from the
University of Passau or a Master Grande Ecole from Strasbourg. There is also the
possibility of graduating with an undergraduate degree from Stirling and a Bachelor in
European Management from Strasbourg.
Both courses involve the study of three subjects to advanced level. Students studying
for the double degree with Strasbourg take French, Business Studies or Marketing, and
have a choice of a third subject, which can be either Spanish, Economics or Politics.
Native or near native speakers of German studying for the integrated Masters with
Passau take French or Spanish, Business, and History or Politics.
The integrated Masters with Passau has two variants.
Variant A, for native or near-native speakers of German who begin their studies at the
University of Stirling, involves five semesters of study in Stirling, followed by a semester
studying in France or Spain and then a year studying at Passau. You then return to
Stirling to complete your degree and graduate from both universities on completion of
your degree at Stirling.
Variant B, for students who begin their studies in Germany, involves six semesters of
study at Passau or another German university, two semesters at Passau, followed by
the final two semesters in Stirling.
Students on the integrated Masters with EM Strasbourg study French, Business Studies
or Marketing, and either Spanish, Economics or Politics for Semesters 1-4. Students
studying two languages spend Semester 6 on Study Abroad in Spain, return to
Stirling for Semesters 7 and 8, then go to EM Strasbourg to study there for two
further semesters.
Students who only study French continue with the three subjects in Semester 5, before
spending Semester 6 at one of our many French-language partner institutions in
France, Morocco, Quebec or Switzerland. They then return to Stirling for a year and
spend a fifth year of study in Strasbourg working towards the Master Grande Ecole.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
Minimum requirements
Standard entry
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Career opportunities
Graduates will be ideally equipped
for a career in international business
or marketing. Not only will they
have developed high-level language
skills, but their study of the
management subjects will have
been deliberately orientated
towards the international context.
Recent Stirling management
graduates secured positions with
leading manufacturers and retailers,
communications companies, and
financial institutions, as well as
with a variety of small and
medium-sized businesses.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/5b
www.stir.ac.uk
62
I
UCAS code: N2R9
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
International Management
Studies with European
Languages and Society
BA (Hons)
You have the opportunity to study abroad in French and
Spanish-speaking countries
Graduates with business and marketing skills, combined with a strong knowledge of
European languages and society, are highly sought-after in the job market. Choosing
this course could be your first step to an international career.
You will combine aspects of international business and marketing with the study of
either French or Spanish – together with the economic, political, social and cultural
environment in which international business is conducted. There is also the option
to study a second language or alternative modules in Law, Politics, Accountancy
or Economics.
You will spend Semester 6 studying either in Spain or Latin America, or at one of our
French language partners across France, Switzerland, Quebec or Morocco.
Other qualifications
Students taking two languages may take a year out at the end of Year 2 to work
as language assistants in France (or another Francophone location), Spain or
Latin America.
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
They then spend Semester 6 in the country of their second language, ensuring that
two lengthy periods are spent in French and Spanish-speaking countries.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Course content
You will study three subjects. There are two compulsory pathways, namely a language
(either French or Spanish) and a Business/Marketing pathway. A third pathway
comprises various module options, all with international or European content.
Semesters 1-4 cover: French or Spanish; Business or Marketing; plus one of: a second
language; Politics; Accountancy/Finance; Business Law; and Economics.
Semesters 5-8 follow the same pathways but with further module options offering
increased specialisation in each of the broad subject areas.
Semester 6 is a compulsory Study Abroad semester.
Career opportunities
Our graduates have a command of one or more languages and have studied
management subjects within an international context, with a particular focus on the
EU. They are ideally equipped for international business or marketing careers.
Recent graduates have progressed to positions in advertising, marketing, banking and
management, securing positions with leading manufacturers and retailers, financial
institutions and communications companies.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/5c
www.stir.ac.uk
63
Journalism Studies
J
BA (Hons)
1st in Scotland for Communication and Media
(The Times Good University Guide)
With over 30 years’ experience in research and teaching in journalism studies,
Stirling has established itself as one of Scotland’s top institutions in the field.
Jon Snow, the successful and widely respected broadcaster and journalist, described
us as “a breed apart”.
The course covers both theoretical and practical aspects of journalism studies and
offers students an in-depth, critical understanding of the practice. As part of your
modules, you will work individually and in groups to: write articles and prepare
portfolios; create pages for print and online news; create and edit visuals; do
presentations in class; contribute to class blogs; produce material for broadcast
media; as well as write essays and exams.
Course content
In both Semester 1 and 2, you will take modules that introduce you to the craft,
practice and context of journalism in the 21st century. In Introduction to Journalism
Studies in Semester 1, you will study key concepts and debates in the media and
journalism whilst in Ethical Issues in Journalism in Semester 2 you will consider the
ethical dimensions of the news industry and its products. You will also choose two
other modules of your preference from a range of subjects.
In Semester 3, Journalism Research and Analysis introduces you to the techniques
and resources used by professional journalists to identify, verify and interrogate
information in the digital era.
The Semester 4 core module, Writing for Journalists, develops the skills needed to
write and also critique journalistic content.
Semesters 5-8 offer a choice of advanced Journalism Studies modules, such as: Print
and Photo Journalism; Advanced Reporting; Law and Government for Journalists;
and Journalism and Society. You can also choose from a selection of Film and Media
modules such as: Public Relations; Advertising; or Gender and Representation. You
may also be eligible for a work experience module in which you gain first-hand
exposure to the modern media workplace.
UCAS code: P500
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Career opportunities
We have extensive links with the media industry and many of our graduates have
pursued successful careers in print, broadcast and online journalism.
The BA Journalism Studies degree also offers a foundation for vocational
postgraduate study in journalism and related fields such as public relations and
media management.
This course may be combined with:
English Studies (QP35); Film and Media (PP35); French (RP15); History (VP15);
Law (P5M1); Politics (PL52); Spanish (PR54); or Sports Studies (PC56).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/5z
www.stir.ac.uk
64
Law: BA
L
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: M110
Minimum requirements
96% of Stirling students are in employment or further study
within six months of graduation
At Stirling, you are spoilt for choice, with two BA (Hons) degrees – one in Business
Law, the other in Law – both of them set against a wider social or business context,
which clearly demonstrates the Law sector’s importance across the board.
While this degree gives you a thorough understanding of how law and regulation
shape and influence business, you also learn how law interacts with society.
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
In addition, you can take advantage of our unique system, which allows students
to take second and third subjects in Years 1 and 2. Single Honours students then
specialise entirely in Law or Business Law, while those on combined degrees develop
both Law and their second chosen specialism together.
This means that even Single Honours students will also study other subjects from
a range, including: languages; management; economics; criminology; psychology;
politics; the environment; and much more in the early stages of their degree.
Course content
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Advanced entry:
Please consult website for details.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Tailored for students who want a business career, Semesters 1-3 of the Business Law
degree introduce the building blocks of business law, with core modules including
coverage of contract law, company law and corporate insolvency.
In Semesters 4-8, you choose advanced modules from nine specialist legal topics,
including: Law of Banking and Finance; Sports Law; and Competition Law.
The Law degree provides broad understanding of a wide range of areas such as
crime, the family and government. Semesters 1-3 introduce the subject through core
modules, which include: Criminal Law; Family Law; and Law and Government.
In Semesters 4-8, you will select advanced modules from a range of specialist
legal topics. Shared with the BA Business Law, these include: Environmental Law;
Sports Law; Prejudice, Discrimination and the Law.
Career opportunities
Our graduates go on to successful careers in management, banking, financial services
and accounting, with some of the most high-profile and prestigious organisations in
these industries.
This course may be combined with:
Accountancy (with Business Law) (MN24); Business Studies (MN11); Criminology
(MM91); Film and Media (P3M1); French (RM11); History (MV11); Human Resource
Management (MN16); Journalism (P5M1); Marketing (MN15); Politics (ML12); or
Spanish (MR14).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4i
www.stir.ac.uk
65
Law: LLB
L
LLB
This course is accredited by the Law Society of Scotland and
the Faculty of Advocates
UCAS code: M114
This is a prestigious degree and your first step to becoming a lawyer or highly
sought-after by a range of professions.
The Stirling LLB is accredited by the Law Society of Scotland and the Faculty of
Advocates, which are the professional bodies for Scots lawyers. It is a specialist degree,
covering all aspects of law, and is intellectually challenging and rewarding.
The Stirling LLB provides in-depth knowledge and understanding of legal principles,
theories, institutions and rules; and the wider social and political context in which
law operates.
Available as an undergraduate degree and as a two-year accelerated graduate degree,
the Stirling LLB is a well-rounded qualification that can be your first step towards
becoming a Scots lawyer or entering other prestigious professions.
Course content
There are eight semesters in total. Semesters 1-5 cover 10 core modules which
introduce the fundamental areas of law, including: Criminal Law; Family Law; and
Commercial Law.
From Semester 5 onwards, you select advanced modules from a range of specialist
legal topics, including: Child Law; Environmental Law; Discrimination Law; and
Intellectual Property.
Career opportunities
Graduation with the Stirling LLB will enable those who wish to become Scots lawyers
to apply for entry to the Diploma in Professional Legal Practice, which is offered by a
number of universities. That is the next stage in qualifying as a lawyer in Scotland.
Those wishing to practise law in England and Wales will have to complete a
postgraduate conversion course. The LLB is also recognised as a rigorous degree
that develops important intellectual and personal skills, which makes graduates
attractive to employers in a wide range of other professions. Many LLB graduates,
therefore, choose to pursue careers in areas such as banking, insurance, accounting,
management, the civil service and education.
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
AABB – one sitting
AAAB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
36
BTEC (Level 3):
DDD
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: As in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Accelerated Degree
Graduate entrants can obtain the LLB after two years of study, concentrating on the
core modules. For further information, please contact Admissions.
For information on the LLB (Accelerated Graduate Course), visit: http://stir.ac.uk/16l
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4j
www.stir.ac.uk
66
Literature and Cinema
L
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: QP3H
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
An innovative combined degree course that cuts across
traditional disciplinary boundaries
The Literature and Cinema degree combines the study of literature with the study
of global cinema and culture. This innovative combined degree course cuts across
traditional disciplinary boundaries, drawing on visual and literary texts in English
Studies, languages, and across the humanities. You will gain a solid grounding in the
study of films, textual analysis and visual culture, learning how to interpret literature
and cinema from around the world. You will study under the guidance of a vibrant and
friendly team, with strong international ties and a reputation for cutting-edge research
and high-quality teaching.
Course content
In Semesters 1-3, you will take core modules in: Global Cinema; Post-War European
Cinema; and Classic European Cinema.
In Semesters 4-8, you will develop a critical understanding and analytical approach to
global cinema and culture, including analysis of various non-European cultures.
Core advanced modules include: Global Cinema and Culture Theory; and Dissertation
Preparation. Advanced option modules include: Transnational Identities; African
Literature and Cinema; The Cinema of the Fantastic; Sexuality and Gender in Film;
Postcolonial France; and Latin American Cinema and Culture.
Career opportunities
The attractive combination of skills developed by this course is highly-sought after by
employers, both in the UK and abroad. Graduates are prepared for a wide variety of
careers in publishing, journalism, television, radio and film, academia, administration
and management, advertising and public relations.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/16i
www.stir.ac.uk
67
Management
M
BSc (Hons)
The University of Stirling Management School is ranked among
the top 25 in the UK for Business and Management (REF 2014)
UCAS code: N200
Do you enjoy teamwork but you are a natural leader? Do you like what you see in
the world of commerce – its pace, unpredictability, risks and rewards?
The study of Management equips you with two things. The first is a broad
understanding of business today. The second is a set of practical management skills
with which to become an effective manager.
You will gain an understanding of the internal functions and structures of
organisations and the contexts within which business operates. You will develop
the analytical skills needed both to solve a range of management problems and to
competently use a number of management software packages.
You will also develop your individual skills of critical thinking, teamwork and
leadership, be competent in analysing quantitative data and have the
communication skills vital for translating good ideas into action.
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
Course content
Semesters 1 and 2 are designed to provide you with a broad grounding in the
subjects of Business and Management and include: the history of management;
management practice; organisational behaviour; decision-making for business; and
change and business innovation.
Modules will be taught alongside students from Business Studies, Human Resource
Management, Marketing and Retail Marketing.
In Semesters 3-7, compulsory core modules provide theory and applications of
management. They may include: Fundamentals of Management; Operations
Management; Leadership and Management; Responsible Business/Ethics; Project
Management; and Strategic Management. You are encouraged to take electives in
Accounting and Finance for Managers and Economics for Managers.
You will have numerous opportunities to develop appropriate work-related skills
at every stage of your studies, culminating in the Professional Development and
Practice module in Semester 8 which helps you prepare for entering the workplace.
Career opportunities
Our Management graduates have progressed to a variety of areas, including
line management, planning or business analysis roles, while others have joined
consultancies offering specialist skills.
Companies that have recruited our Management students include: IBM,
Bank of Scotland, NHS, British Airways and M&S.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers. ABB
GCE A-levels: ABB
IB Diploma: 35
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
New courses:
BA Sport Business Management,
visit:➲ http://stir.ac.uk/16o
BA Sustainable Events
Management,
visit:➲ http://stir.ac.uk/16p
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4l
www.stir.ac.uk
68
Marine Biology
M
BSc (Hons)
UCAS code: C160
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology, Chemistry,
Mathematics or Physics.
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Biology and one of
Environmental Science,
Geography or Geology.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Study in the leading international institute in its field and the
largest of its kind in the world
Fascinated by our oceans? Then study the unique problems and solutions
of the specialised plants and animals that exist in this amazing physical and
chemical environment.
Our multi-disciplinary course draws on other biology disciplines, including ecology and
the physical and environmental sciences, to understand a habitat that covers around
71 percent of the Earth’s surface.
Through the study abroad scheme, our students often spend all or part of Year 3
studying abroad, for example, in the USA (including Hawaii and California) or
Australia (including Adelaide).
The final study year involves an independent research project, often carried out with
external organisations. Overseas projects in Semester 8 are encouraged and have
previously been located throughout Europe, North and South America, the Indian
subcontinent, Asia, and Oceania.
Stirling’s Institute of Aquaculture, which runs this course, is the leading international
centre in its field and the largest of its kind in the world, with an excellent international
reputation in teaching, research, contract research and consultancy. We collaborate
with academic research institutions throughout Europe and beyond, including India,
Thailand, Mexico and Japan, and provide design, development and management
services to organisations involved in this field.
Course content
Semesters 1-3 cover core modules including: Our Blue Planet; Our Thirsty Planet;
and Evolution and Genetics. During Semesters 4-8, Honours students take 11 core
modules, including: Science of Diving; Biodiversity; Animal Physiology; together with
specialised modules in Marine Mammal and Turtle Biology (field course), and Marine
Systematics and Taxonomy.
Marine Biology is not available as a combined Honours degree; however, it shares a
common foundation with the degree course in Aquaculture, so the option to take
a degree in Aquaculture is retained until the end of Semester 5.
Career opportunities
Our graduates are sought-after in relevant areas of employment such as:
environmental protection; environmental impact assessment; environmental and
conservation fields; pollution control; water companies; fisheries management;
governmental regulatory departments; and the aquaculture sector.
Many pursue second degrees (MSc or PhD) which are often required for more senior
research posts. This degree is also an excellent passport to careers outside of science.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4n
www.stir.ac.uk
69
Marketing
M
BA (Hons)
Marketing is ranked 2nd in Scotland and among the top 20 in
the UK (The Complete University Guide)
Every business has end users – or customers – and every successful business correctly
identifies its customers and strives to deliver what they want, in order to keep them. If
you combine logical analysis with creative intuition, then Marketing may be the right
degree for you.
Marketing is at the centre of what businesses do. It helps organisations work out how
they can identify and satisfy customer needs using strategic thinking, business acumen
and carefully designed communications.
The teaching options available reflect the specialist expertise of staff who have an
active interest in particular topic areas, such as: social marketing and consumers,
cultures and society, which contribute to the contemporary, international perspective
of the degree courses.
Course content
Semesters 1 and 2 are designed to provide a background in business-related modules
which will be taught alongside other Management students. These modules are
designed to familiarise you with the general principles of industry, management,
marketing, human resources and organisations. Semesters 3 and 4 will further your
understanding of marketing, in addition to taking four elective modules.
Year 2 entry is available for suitably qualified candidates who can expect a seamless
transition into Semester 3.
Semesters 5-8 modules include: Understanding Consumers; Strategic Management;
Marketing and the Supply Chain; along with elective specialisms drawn from current
marketing activities.
You will also undertake a Marketing and Retail Consultancy project which is designed
to engage you with contemporary ‘live’ business practices.
You will have numerous opportunities to develop appropriate work-related skills at
every stage of your studies, culminating in the Professional Development and Practice
module in Semester 8 which helps you prepare for entering the workplace.
Career opportunities
Marketing students acquire a comprehensive range of analytical, problem-solving and
professional skills, which are increasingly valued in industry, commerce, education,
government and non-profit making organisations.
As your acquired skills have applications in most walks of life, a Marketing degree
can become your entry to a specialised marketing career or to a more general
management career in a wide range of sectors.
This course may be combined with:
Accountancy (NN45); Business Studies (NN25); Economics (NL51); Film and Media
(PN35); French (N5R1); Human Resource Management (NN65); Law (MN15);
Psychology (CN85); Sociology (LN35); Spanish (N5R4); or Sports Studies (NC56).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4o
UCAS code: N500
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers: ABB
GCE A-levels:ABB
IB Diploma: 35
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult website
for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
The combined Sports Studies and
Marketing course may also be studied
with our partners in Singapore, the
Singapore Institute of Management.
New courses:
BA Sport Business Management,
visit:➲ http://stir.ac.uk/16o
BA Sustainable Events
Management,
visit:➲ http://stir.ac.uk/16p
www.stir.ac.uk
70
Mathematics –
Applied Mathematics
M
BSc (Hons)
UCAS code: G120
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include Mathematics
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Mathematics.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
91% student satisfaction (National Student Survey)
Do you enjoy numbers the way others enjoy music, poetry or art? Mathematical
training develops both specific skills and broad analytical expertise, which are valued
across all professions; and there is a particular demand for graduates who not only
have quantitative skills, but also know how to use them.
Our course delivers that sought-after combination – both through our teaching
style and our focus on real-world applications of both mathematical and statistical
techniques. For instance, you will use the mathematics computing laboratories as
an integral part of your learning process, making your study as much experimental
as theoretical.
Our Mathematics and Statistics department provides a stimulating and supportive
learning environment and we have a strong and active research group. Its major
interest is the application of mathematics to biology, economics and life sciences,
and we offer combined Honours degrees in the relevant disciplines.
Course content
In Semesters 1-3, you take Mathematics plus two other subjects. Material covered at
secondary level is reviewed and applied before being developed further, ensuring a
smooth transition from a school teaching approach to a university one.
You take core modules in: Discrete Mathematics; Calculus of One and Several
Variables; Vectors, Matrices, Complex Numbers and their Application in Geometry
and Systems Theory; and Statistics and Probability.
In Semesters 4-8, the Mathematics Honours course covers a broad range of skills.
Advanced modules cover the following key areas: mathematical techniques for
solving a wide range of problems; the theory underlying these mathematical
techniques; and model-building, i.e. converting real-world problems into
mathematical form.
Career opportunities
There is a growing need for graduates with mathematical skills in business, research
and the sciences, and this degree provides both the theoretical background and the
quantitative skills required for the solution of real-world problems.
This course may be combined with:
Accountancy (GN14); Biology (CG11); Computing Science (G4G1); Economics
(GL11); Environmental Science (F9G1); Finance (GN13); French (GR11);
Professional Education (GX11); Professional Education/Computing Science
(GX91); or Psychology (CG81).
Related degrees: Mathematics (G100) (three-year degree).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4p
www.stir.ac.uk
71
Modern Languages
M
BA (Hons)
Opportunities to combine your study with living and working
in France, Spain and beyond
While English may be an international language, it is far from being the only one. As
powerful players within the European Union, and with long-established relationships
in other parts of the globe, France and Spain are truly international forces, and French
and Spanish are languages spoken all over the world.
This is why we study them from a global perspective at Stirling, exploring wide-ranging
perspectives and opportunities on offer to study, live and work in other countries.
In Semester 6, Honours students spend a period of residence abroad, studying at a
university or business school in France, Spain, Morocco, Switzerland, Quebec or Latin
America. Additionally, you have the option of spending a year abroad as language
assistants between Semesters 4 and 5, via a British Council-run scheme.
We also offer several innovative, integrated degree courses, including an integrated
Masters programme with Ecole de Management Strasbourg in International
Management and Intercultural Studies and a degree in International Management
Studies with European Languages and Society.
Course content
Since we recognise that you may not have studied a language before, we enable you
to start your study of French or Spanish from beginners, as well as advanced level.
During Year 2, both streams merge and students graduate at the end of their degree
with full language skills. Modern Languages and Business (NT19) combines the
study of French or Spanish with Management. At the end of Year 2, you continue to
specialise in Business Studies, as well as continuing the study of two languages.
International Management Studies with European Languages and Society (N2R9)
follows two pathways, namely French or Spanish with either Business or Marketing.
The third strand is chosen from one of Economics, Finance, Business Law, Politics or a
second language. You will study modules with international or European content.
International Management and Intercultural Studies (NLR0) leads to the award of an
undergraduate degree from Strasbourg and either a Master Grande Ecole from the
Ecole de Management in Strasbourg or an MA in International Cultural and Business
Studies from the University of Passau in Germany (the latter for native or near native
speakers of German only).
European Languages and Psychology (CR89) combines the study of French or Spanish
with Psychology. Teaching is supported by our renowned Psychology department.
French/Spanish and Education is a combined Honours degree which allows graduates
to teach either Primary or Secondary level – see pages 47-48.
International Politics and Languages (RL92) builds on the importance of
European politics.
For the majority of modern language degrees, there is a compulsory period of study
abroad. For full details, please see specific course entry.
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To apply for a combined degree with
French and Spanish you will require
one of these languages at Higher or
A-level (or equivalent).
NB: for specific course information,
please consult individual
course pages.
Career opportunities
Language graduates are confident
communicators and a growing
European integration offers increasing
job opportunities. The combinations of
subjects available with either French or
Spanish, or in some cases both, allow
students to go on to a wide variety
of careers in: publishing; journalism;
television; advertising; translating;
law; teaching in French or English as a
foreign language; administration;
and management.
Graduating students, having studied
French and/or Spanish to the highest
level, are well placed for jobs in the UK
and in an international context.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4q
www.stir.ac.uk
72
Nursing (Adult)
N
BSc
UCAS code: B740
Minimum requirements
Three-year degree
SQA Higher: BBB.
GCE A-level:
CCC.
IB Diploma:
28.
Other qualifications
HNC/HND
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements apply
– see page 108.
Mathematics Standard Grade (3),
National 5 (C), Intermediate 2 (C),
GCSE (C) or equivalent required.
1st in Scotland for Health Sciences (REF 2014)
We have the expertise to lead you on your initial steps into nursing and help you
realise your ambitions. It is led by a group of world-leading academics with strong
and established research records, real nursing experience and a wealth of
world-class publications.
Our research is world-class and is recognised for its quality and innovation. The
teaching is informed by the research undertaken by our staff and this permeates the
nursing courses offered.
A degree in Nursing (Adult) equips you with the necessary skills and confidence to
develop into a multi-skilled nurse, capable of providing effective care in a range of
settings, including acute care and community nursing. Our curriculum is informed by
the Scottish Government’s Healthcare Quality Strategy for NHS Scotland, ensuring that
you are well placed to acquire the skills needed for the nurse of tomorrow.
We have excellent relationships with each of the main partner NHS Boards associated
with our campuses – NHS Forth Valley, NHS Highland and NHS Western Isles –
ensuring our course remains clinically excellent.
Course content
The course utilises a range of teaching and learning experiences including lectures,
small group work, skills, simulation lab and oral presentations.
Each year comprises an academic and a practice learning component. This meets the
Nursing & Midwifery Council (NMC) requirement of 50% theory and 50% practice –
all of which must be completed in full to allow you to graduate and gain entry to the
NMC register.
Excellent clinical skills facilities, accommodation, a sense of community and dedicated
staff are central to the student experience when you study Nursing with the University
of Stirling.
Clinical placements may take place with our three partner trusts: NHS Forth Valley, NHS
Highland and NHS Western Isles.
Career opportunities
A wide range of clinical skills are embedded throughout the course to help you acquire
key skills in assessment, diagnosis and decision-making, essential skills for a graduate
nurse. You will leave University with an academic qualification and NMC registration.
Careers in nursing are dynamic, as the healthcare sector responds to developments
in health and emerging health priorities, rising expectations among users and
carers and changing societal attitudes. Through the use of clinical scenarios and
extensive skills training, we will prepare you for working in an ever-changing
healthcare environment.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/16m
www.stir.ac.uk
73
Nursing (Mental Health)
N
BSc
1st in Scotland for Health Sciences (REF 2014)
A degree in Nursing (Mental Health) is derived from the firm belief that Mental
Health and Wellbeing services are required to provide excellent services which respect
the intrinsic value of people and their individuality (Repper and Perkins, 2004). This
philosophy is firmly held by all members of the team and underpins the whole mental
health course.
Advances in knowledge require that Mental Health Nurses continually incorporate new
research findings into their practice; this awareness is embedded in our course.
The content, structure and delivery of our course support your journey to become an
independent, lifelong learner.
UCAS code: B760
Minimum requirements
Three-year degree
SQA Higher:
BBB.
GCE A-level:
CCC.
Course content
Each year comprises an academic and practice learning component of 50% theory
and 50% practice – all of which must be completed in full to allow you to graduate
with a degree in Nursing (Mental Health) and gain entry to the Nursing & Midwifery
Council (NMC) register.
You will have the opportunity to have practice learning experiences in a variety of
settings in any of the geographical areas covered by the campus sites – NHS Western
Isles, NHS Highland and NHS Forth Valley. Placements could also take place in other
NHS boards as appropriate.
Collaborative partnerships between the campuses and relevant NHS Boards ensure
that you have access to a wide range of clinical experiences, a central part of
this course.
Studying with the University of Stirling provides you with excellent clinical skills
facilities, accommodation, a sense of community and dedicated staff.
Clinical placements may take place with our three partner trusts: NHS Forth Valley, NHS
Highland and NHS Western Isles.
IB Diploma:
28.
Other qualifications
HNC/HND
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements apply –
see page 108.
Mathematics Standard Grade (3),
National 5 (C), Intermediate 2 (C),
GCSE (C) or equivalent required.
Career opportunities
This course develops your clinical skills and knowledge to work within the full spectrum
of health and social care settings. A wide range of clinical skills are embedded
throughout the course to help you acquire key skills in assessment, diagnosis and
decision-making, essential skills for a graduate nurse. You will leave University with an
academic qualification and NMC registration.
Careers in nursing are dynamic, as the healthcare sector responds to developments in
health and emerging health priorities, rising expectations among users and carers and
changing societal attitudes. Through the use of clinical scenarios and extensive skills
training, we will prepare you for working in an ever-changing healthcare environment.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/16n
www.stir.ac.uk
74
Philosophy
P
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: V500
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Philosophy.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
92% for student satisfaction (National Student Survey)
“I think that I am in control of what I do, but why do I do the things I do? I do them
because of things to do with my upbringing, my circumstances, and my biological
make-up. But these are things over which I have no control. If they determine what I
do, how can I have any control over what I do?”
This is just one example of the kind of questions that philosophers ask. It is possible
that you have asked some or all of them yourself at some point in your life.
Philosophy is the activity of thinking seriously, creatively and very carefully about
these and similar questions. Engaging in this activity is not only fascinating in itself,
but also an excellent way to sharpen and improve your mind.
Course content
In Semesters 1-3, you take courses in Philosophy and two other subjects. These
include the following three core modules which introduce central philosophical
problems and issues:
• Philosophy: What is it all about? – An introduction to central philosophical
problems concerning, for instance, knowledge, mind and body, freedom and
determinism, morality and justice
• Mind, Value and Reality – An introduction to key metaphysical and ethical issues.
What is it to be a person? Are we responsible for what we do? Can we be
motivated by anything other than our own self-interest? These and other topics
will be considered and some ethical implications explored
• From Plato to Existentialism – A philosophical examination of the relationship
between the individual and society, looking at works by Plato, Hobbes, Mill
and Sartre.
In Semesters 5-8, you will take optional modules from a broad list, including:
Knowledge and Reality; Environmental Ethics; Philosophy of Language; Philosophy of
Biology; Political Philosophy; and Aesthetics.
In Year 4, there are opportunities for directed independent study, including dissertation
projects and supervised independent study of a particular topic, theme or book.
Career opportunities
Philosophy graduates are currently contributing to the performance of the
following organisations: Scottish Enterprise; BAE Systems; Deveaux, Australia; HM
Government; Justice Publishing; and Scottish Equitable.
Additional information
This course may be combined with:
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Computing Science (GV45); Criminology (MV95); English Studies (QV35); Film
and Media (VP53); French (RV15); History (VV15); Politics (LV25); Politics and
Economics (L0V0); Professional Education/Religion (VX53); Psychology (CV85); or
Religion (VV56).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4s
www.stir.ac.uk
75
Politics
P
BA (Hons)
96% of Stirling students are in employment or further study
within six months of graduating
Politics permeates every aspect of people’s lives: shaping their opinions, informing their
decisions, guiding their alliances and enabling their understanding of others’ beliefs
and motivations at individual, organisational and cultural levels.
Studying this subject will increase your awareness of the different political systems,
ideologies and policies, which impact people’s lives at regional, national and
global levels.
Our Politics department is highly regarded and you benefit from a strong, research-led
approach to teaching.
If you would like to conduct part of your study abroad, our exchange programme
with Sweden’s University of Gothenburg allows you to spend Semester 6 there, on the
condition that you meet the grade requirements and pass the interview.
Course content
UCAS code: L200
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
You will take Politics plus two other subjects in Semesters 1-3.
Semesters 1-3 cover the study of three core modules: The Politics of the British Isles;
Political Concepts and Ideas; and Introduction to International Politics.
Semester 4 modules are: Great Political Thinkers, and Comparative Politics – Power and
Representation in Western Europe.
In Semesters 5-8, you can choose from a wide range of module options, such as:
British Territorial Politics; Regionalism in Europe; and Political Communications. In
addition, Single Honours Politics students complete the Semester 6 module, Research
Methods, and a final-year Politics dissertation.
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Career opportunities
Degree courses in Politics encourage you to develop intellectual, communication and
analytical skills, which are invaluable to many employers. These include the ability to:
critically evaluate data and information; work independently; develop effective time
management skills; organise and solve problems; and communicate clearly, both in
writing and speech.
Our graduates have developed these transferable skills, which is why they become
successful in commerce and industry, as well as the civil service, journalism, law,
teaching, and in politics, of course, in both research and representative capacities.
This course may be combined with:
Business Studies (LN21); Criminology (ML92); Economics (LL12); English Studies
(QL32); Environmental Science (FL92); Film and Media (PL32); French (LR21); History
(LV21); History/Professional Education (LX21); Journalism Studies (PL52); Law
(ML12); Philosophy LV25); Philosophy and Economics (L0V0); Psychology (LC28);
Social Policy (LL24); or Sociology (LL23).
Essential subjects:
To include Politics, Government and
Politics or Modern Studies.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4t
www.stir.ac.uk
76
Politics (International)
P
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: L240
Minimum requirements
96% of students are in employment or further study within six
months of graduation
If you are contemplating a future in the world of politics, then you need to understand
issues of power, alliances, conflict and peace, the workings of influential organisations
and the processes surrounding international decision-making.
Don’t worry if this sounds daunting because we will help you. Our Politics department
is highly regarded and you benefit from a strong, research-led approach to teaching.
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Politics, Government and
Politics or Modern Studies.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
In addition to being able to participate in a range of University-wide study abroad
options, our exchange programme with the Politics department in the University of
Gothenburg, offers you the opportunity to study in Sweden in Semester 6 (you are
required to pass an interview and meet the grade requirements).
Course content
In Semesters 1-3, you will take Politics plus two other subjects.
In Semesters 1-4, you will have five core modules including: The Politics of the British
Isles; Introduction to International Politics; and Comparative Politics – Power and
Representation in Western Europe.
In Semesters 5-8, you will study at least five International Politics modules, including:
Authoritarianism and After; Issues in International Politics and Stability; and
Disintegration of States. In addition, you must complete the Semester 6 module,
Research Methods, and the final year International Politics dissertation.
Career opportunities
The study of International Politics equips you with the kind of intellectual and
analytical skills that are attractive to many employers. These include the ability to:
critically evaluate data and information; work independently; develop effective time
management skills; organise and solve problems; and communicate clearly, both in
writing and speech.
Having developed these transferable skills, Stirling Politics graduates are to be found in
commerce and industry, as well as the civil service, journalism, law, teaching,
and in politics, of course, in both research and representative capacities.
This course may be combined with:
Languages (French or Spanish) (RL92).
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/5y
www.stir.ac.uk
77
Politics, Philosophy and
Economics: PPE
P
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: L0V0
This exciting degree is the first of its kind in Scotland
Whether you are aiming for a political, civil service or journalistic career, background
knowledge in the humanities and social sciences would be of great value. In which
case this degree course – the first of its kind in Scotland – is the one for you.
Rooted in three separate disciplines, it combines intellectual stimulation with a
down-to-earth understanding of how things work in the real world.
Course content
You will study nine modules in Semesters 1-3, including: Politics of the British Isles;
Introductory Microeconomics; and Philosophy – What is it all about?
In Semesters 4-8, you will study the following core modules: Politics: Great Political
Thinkers; Philosophy: Moral Theory; and Economics: Intermediate Macroeconomics.
You will take modules in each of the three disciplines in Semester 5, and in Semester 6,
you can either continue to study in each of the three subjects or choose from only two
of them.
Semesters 7-8 have further specialisation – see entries on Economics, Philosophy and
Politics respectively. In your final year, you will bring together the different skills you
have acquired in a dissertation, which covers at least two of the subject areas.
Career opportunities
You will graduate with in-depth knowledge of how private and public enterprises
function and how resources are allocated. You will be skilled in argument evaluation,
whilst enjoying the ability to effectively express your own viewpoints. You will also
have developed valuable insight into the cultural, intellectual and moral pressures on
decision-makers.
This broad-ranging ability and understanding will ensure that you are effective,
whether you choose to work with the public sector, private companies, voluntary
organisations or the media.
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Politics, Philosophy
and Economics.
Other qualifications
This course is not available as a combined degree.
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4v
www.stir.ac.uk
78
Psychology
P
BA (Hons)/BSc (Hons)
BA (Hons): C801
BSc (Hons): C800
100% of Psychology case studies rated ‘world-leading’
(REF 2014)
If you are interested in the mind and human behaviour then Psychology is for you.
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Psychology.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
In our last accreditation review, the British Psychological Society described us as ‘at the
forefront of the student-led teaching experience... in psychology across the UK’, and
commended our staff who ‘clearly care about the wellbeing and development of their
students, and provide a nurturing learning environment’.
We recently received the inaugural Award for Innovation in Psychology Programmes
from the British Psychological Society for our innovative, student-led teaching initiatives
and commitment to integrating employability.
Course content
Semesters 1-2 comprise an introduction to psychology as a biological and social
science, including: Developmental Psychology; Brain and Behaviour; Language and
Thinking; Animal Behaviour; and Cognitive Psychology, plus two other subjects.
In Semesters 3-4, the taught modules are designed to emphasise the links between
different parts of the subject: a module on The Social Mind explores the psychology
of human and non-human communication; a module on the Brain and Behaviour
– Clinical Perspectives explores abnormal psychology from the perspectives of
Neuroscience and Clinical Psychology.
In Semesters 5-8, you will take advanced modules in all of the core areas: Social
Psychology; Biological Psychology; Developmental Psychology; Clinical and Health
Psychology; Individual Differences (including personality differences); and Cognition
and Neuroscience.
In your final year, as well as an individual research project, you will choose from a
variety of electives to allow you to explore topics that interest you.
Career opportunities
The breadth of Psychology provides an excellent foundation for a wide range of
careers. Studying Psychology develops skills that are highly valued by employers,
such as interpersonal and communication skills, numeracy and computer literacy,
presentation and time management skills, and critical thinking.
An estimated 15-20 percent of Psychology graduates eventually become professional
Psychologists. Psychologists employed in a range of specialisms such as Clinical
Psychology, Educational Psychology, and Forensic Psychology in the Criminal
Justice System.
This course must be studied as a combined
degree with:
Biology (CC18); Business Studies (CN81); English Studies (QC38);
French or Spanish (CR89); Film and Media (CP83); Human
Resource Management (NC68); Marketing (CN85); Mathematics
(CG81); Philosophy (CV85); Politics (LC28); Sociology (CL83); or
Sports Studies (CC68).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/57
www.stir.ac.uk
79
Religion
R
BA (Hons)
Develop key transferable skills in critical thinking, research,
communication, organisation and self-motivation
Religion at Stirling is distinguished by its critical approach. It is critical because it
questions the fundamental category of `religion’. It is critical because we aim to
understand the problem behind the very idea of religion, and we engage in our work
with a view of showing how we might reconsider the term `religion’ in light of other
social and cultural spheres.
Not only do we find engagement with the idea of `religion’ in the contexts of
religious institutions and conventional educational spaces such as `religion’ classes
and lectures, but we engage with it in the fields of literature, history, gender studies,
hermeneutics, visual art, anthropology, politics, philosophy and business studies.
We expect a lot from our students, since our critical approach demands a grasp of
many different subjects, methods and discourses. The course is, therefore, rigorous
and intellectually challenging. But it is also deeply rewarding on numerous levels.
Combined degree only
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
Course content
Religion is studied as a combined degree and is taken with two other subjects in
Years 1 and 2.
Semesters 1-4 cover four core modules, examining issues such as conflict, colonialism
and nationalism, representation, and historical methods of studying religion.
In Semesters 5-8, advanced core modules are taken, including: Religion and
Postcolonialism; Religion and Theory; and Dissertation Presentation. You may also
choose advanced modules, such as: Religion and Literature; Gender and Religion;
Political Islam; and Culture and Religion.
In Semester 8, Honours students in their final semester will write a dissertation on a
topic chosen with an individual supervisor.
Career opportunities
The key transferable skills gained by studying Religion – critical thinking, research,
communication, organisation and self-motivation – make our graduates an
invaluable resource in their chosen careers.
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Recent graduates have gone on to work in: the civil service; social work; hospital and
prison management; banking and insurance; music production; commerce, including
commercial research; the police; armed services; publishing and the media; as well as
the perhaps more traditional career pathway of teaching and academic research.
This course must be studied as a combined degree with:
English Studies (QV36); Film and Media (VP63); French (RV16); History (VV16);
Philosophy (VV56); Philosophy/Professional Education (VX53); Professional
Education (VX61); Professional Education/English Studies (QXJ1); Professional
Education/History (VXC1); or Sociology (LV36).
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4w
www.stir.ac.uk
80
Retail Marketing
R
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: N550
The Institute for Retail Studies is recognised as a UK Centre
of Excellence
The retail industry is huge, diverse, innovative and competitive. As a consumer, many
aspects of your everyday life are directly and indirectly affected by this industry.
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
In recent years, retailers have had to deal with increased levels of competition. As a
result, managers need the necessary skills to tackle and meet these challenges.
This degree, delivered by the Institute for Retail Studies (recognised by the Department
of Trade and Industry as a `Centre of Excellence’ – for its education and training), gives
you a solid grounding in the general principles of industry, management, marketing,
human resources and organisations. You develop extensive knowledge and skills in
consumer behaviour, international business, logistics and related subjects.
Our lecturers are high profile academics with excellent international reputations, and
our teaching reflects current thinking and research. You benefit from our extensive
contacts with leading UK retailers, in terms of guest lectures and field trips.
Course content
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
This course may also be studied
with our partners in Singapore, the
Singapore Institute of Management.
Semesters 1 and 2 are designed to provide a background in business related modules
which will be taught alongside students from Marketing, Business Studies, Human
Resource Management and Management.
These modules are designed to give you a solid grounding in the general principles of
industry, management, marketing, human resources and organisations.
In Semesters 5-8, seven core modules in retailing and marketing are studied alongside
a selection of elective modules. These core modules may include: Understanding
Consumers; Retail Operations; Marketing and the Supply Chain; Business and
Management Research Methods; and Professional Development and Practice. You
will also undertake a Marketing and Retail Consultancy Project, which is designed to
engage students with contemporary ‘live’ business practices.
Recommended elective modules include: Buying and Visual Merchandising;
Multi-Channel Retail Marketing; and Branding and Communications. You will have
numerous opportunities to develop appropriate work-related skills at every stage of
your studies, culminating in the Professional Development and Practice module in
Semester 8 which helps you prepare for entering the workplace.
Career opportunities
You acquire a comprehensive range of analytical, problem-solving and professional
skills. These are not only valued in the retail industry, but increasingly in other areas of
commerce, education, government and non-profit making organisations.
This degree can prove key to pursuing either a specialised retail career or a more
general management career, and many of our Retail Marketing graduates are
now in senior industry positions.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4x
www.stir.ac.uk
81
Scottish History
S
BA (Hons)
92% student satisfaction (National Student Survey)
UCAS code: V211
Scottish History is dark and dramatic, not dry and dusty. At Stirling, we bring it to life
for you in unique ways not explored at other universities.
For instance, one of our core modules, ‘Reputations in History’, offers a riveting insight
into famous Scottish and international, male and female historical characters from a
thousand years of history, including William Wallace and Nelson Mandela.
At advanced level, in your final year, you have a choice of special subjects for a yearlong intensive study module (which runs alongside the dissertation) that must be taken
by all Scottish History Honours degree students.
However, you will be helped along by the enthusiasm, encouragement, and,
of course, the most recent research from staff members with special interest in
your subject.
Course content
Scottish History can either be taken as a single Honours degree or in a number of
combined degrees in a Scottish History stream of the History degree.
In Semesters 1-3, students study Scottish History plus two other subjects. In Semesters
4-6, you will take at least five Scottish History modules from a choice which includes:
Scotland in the Age of Wallace and Bruce; The Birth of Modern Europe, 1500-1700
(with Scotland at the centre); and 19th Century Scotland.
Additionally, Single Honours students must take the Semester 6 module, Approaches
and Methods, which prepares you for your final-year dissertation.
In Semesters 7-8, Honours students take a ‘special subject’ from a choice of five or six.
This module involves using printed documentary collections and other source material.
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Related degrees:
BA (Hons) History – within this, it is possible to pick up some Scottish History modules.
Career opportunities
Graduates in Scottish History find opportunities for a wide variety of posts within and
outside of Scotland.
Some are in history-related areas, such as teaching and work in museums and
libraries. Others find employment in administration, commerce, the civil service,
banking and insurance.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
Essential subjects:
To include History.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4y
www.stir.ac.uk
82
Social Work
S
BA (Hons)
UCAS code: L500
4th in the UK for Social Work (The Complete University Guide)
Upon completing your degree, you are eligible to register as a qualified social worker
throughout the UK.
Minimum requirements
Do you dream of a future working in a variety of different settings, making a difference
to individuals, families, groups and communities? If so, consider joining this stimulating
and challenging course.
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
Our staff members are qualified social workers and members of various national
and international social work organisations. Additionally, our partnerships with local
agencies promote knowledge exchange between academia and practice.
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
We use various assessment methods, including DVD-recorded assessment of practice
skills, an oral examination, class presentations, placements and essays.
AABB – two sittings
Our Social Work degree requires you to undertake a piece of empirical research as part
of your Honours dissertation, as we believe you should have experience undertaking
research to fully understand its relevance to practice.
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Personal, voluntary or paid
experience of Social Work or related
activity is essential.
Upon completing your degree, you are eligible for registration as a qualified social
worker by the Scottish Social Services Council. Scotland, England, Wales and Northern
Ireland each have their own registration body and all accept this degree.
Course content
During Semesters 1-3, you will follow an introductory course in Sociology and Social
Policy. These two core modules introduce social work knowledge and skills. You will
also choose a further three modules.
In Semesters 4-8, undergraduate students benefit from working alongside
postgraduate students, studying social work at MSc level. You will undertake
six University-based modules focusing on the application of knowledge, theory and
research to practice the development of specific skills required for social work.
There are two professional practice learning placements in Semester 5 (70 days) and in
the summer between Semesters 6 and 7 (100 days). During these placements, you will
work directly with people who use services, and will receive supervision from qualified
social workers and other professionals, before having your practice assessed.
Career opportunities
This degree will equip you for social work jobs throughout the UK, in a variety of
settings, including: local authorities; prisons; hospitals; and voluntary organisations.
The nature of the work is extremely varied and there is capacity to move between
different work settings throughout your career.
Currently, most students find social work jobs within six months of graduating.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/4z
www.stir.ac.uk
83
Sociology and Social Policy
S
BA (Hons)
Opportunities to study abroad in Europe, Australia, Canada
or the USA
UCAS code: L431
Do you want to understand better how society works? Are you keen to know more
about the purpose, processes and outcomes of social welfare, both here and abroad?
Its international and comparative approach offers topics that analyse society and
welfare issues in various countries. We have particular expertise covering Scotland,
the UK, the EU, Western and Central Europe, Australasia, North America and
Latin America.
Our course modules reflect the latest developments in social research, taught by
recognised experts in their chosen fields, who raise real-world issues in a critical,
informed and engaging manner.
You benefit from strong links between teaching and research – the latter in
conjunction with the on-campus organisations, Scottish Centre for Crime Justice
Research, the Scottish Addiction Studies Research Group and the Dementia Centre.
The first two years of our degree structure are flexible, allowing students to experiment
with new subjects and you can apply to spend Semester 6 at another university in
Europe, Australia, Canada or the USA.
For Year 3 students entering Honours, a mentoring system is in place.
Course content
In Semesters 1-3, you take core modules in: Social Differentiation; Social Problems; and
Understanding Social Policy; as well as two other subjects per semester.
In Semesters 4-8, you must take core advanced modules in Development of Social
Theory and The Research Process. Additionally, you take optional modules from a list of
18, including: Housing Policy; Ageing; Society and Social Policy; Scottish Society; and
Urban Society.
Final-year Honours students are also required to undertake a dissertation and
Honours seminar.
Career opportunities
Our Sociology and Social Policy graduates have a high UK employment rate
in degree-relevant careers. They go on to work in the private, public and
voluntary sectors.
Sociology may be combined with:
Criminology (LM39); Film and Media (LP33); History (LV31); History and Professional
Education (VXD1); Marketing (LN35); Politics (LL23); Psychology (CL83);
Religion (LV36); Spanish (LR34); or Sports Studies (CL63).
Social Policy may be combined with: Politics (LL24).
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Sociology.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/50
www.stir.ac.uk
84
Software Engineering
S
BSc (Hons)
UCAS code: G600
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Computing and relevant
experience of Java or other
programming languages.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
Fully accredited by the British Computer Society
Fascinated by technology and software, and keen to work with colleagues in the
creative process? Well, teamwork is the secret of the Software Engineering industry
because the complex systems which software engineers design and build are often
too large for a single person to develop alone.
On this course, you will study techniques for real-world software design and associated
programming technologies.
You will learn how to reason logically, analyse problems, and resolve them by building
effective computer systems. The course ensures you are well prepared for an IT career
with our graduates being highly sought-after in the industry.
We help our students build strong links with the industry through three-month
summer placements and one-year placements, both offered to Year 3 students.
Placement opportunities exist with local SME as well as large corporates. Graduates are
fully accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS) for the educational requirements
of being a Chartered Information Technology Professional (CITP), which is the Society’s
professional member level.
Course content
During Semesters 1-3, students from all three of our computing-related degrees
take the same core modules in Computing Science, plus two other subjects. Core
modules include: Computational Thinking; Programming Using Java; Social and
Professional Issues; and Data Structures, Objects and Algorithms. In Semester 1,
Software Engineering students must take a Mathematics module.
Semesters 4-8 cover compulsory core modules, including: Computer Systems; Software
Engineering; plus optional modules including: Computer Security/Forensics; Artificial
Intelligence; Web Services; Telecommunications; and Games Development.
Honours students undertake an independent project in their final year, which
involves the development of a major piece of software from initial requirements
to final delivery.
Career opportunities
You will have a knowledge of Software Engineering as a coherent discipline, together
with a wide range of IT skills. Our industrial placements will ease your transition into
the job market. You will be well-equipped to enter the software industry itself, or
any of the fields in which computer systems are extensively used. Typical career paths
include: software engineering, analyst programming and IT consultancy.
Recent destinations for our graduates include: Adobe Systems Inc, Agilent (Hewlett
Packard Ltd), British Telecom, Google, HSBC, Logica, Microsoft and Scottish Power.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/51
www.stir.ac.uk
85
Spanish and Latin
American Studies
S
BA (Hons)
Opportunities to combine your study with living and working
in Spain and beyond
This course offers Spanish for all – from complete beginners to advanced speakers.
Combining the studies of language and culture, the course encourages students
to develop a critical awareness of the Spanish and Latin American realities, whilst
acquiring the ability to transmit their acquired skills and learning experiences to
other fields of study and practical work.
The very strong connection between our lecturers’ individual research interests and the
diversity of disciplines makes this course unique – offering language with stimulating
combinations of film studies, literature, history, social sciences and anthropology.
Course content
In Semesters 1-4, you take Spanish at beginner or advanced level, plus two
other subjects. The advanced course comprises tuition in written and spoken Spanish,
plus an introduction to modern Spanish and Latin American cultures. Beginners focus
exclusively in the first two semesters on developing their Spanish with a dedicated
language course.
During Semesters 3 and 4, beginners continue with learning the language while
studying Spanish and Latin American cultures.
In Semesters 5-8, you continue the study of language in written and spoken form and
choose from a variety of option modules, including: the Culture of the Andes; the
Representations of War in Spanish Culture; and the Depiction of Gender and Politics
in Argentina.
For many of our Spanish degrees, there is a compulsory period of study abroad for
up to a full year in a Spanish-speaking country. In your final study year you may write
a dissertation on your chosen subject, in place of taught modules. If you are taking
Single Honours in Spanish and Latin American Studies, writing a dissertation
is mandatory.
Career opportunities
Language skills are highly sought after by employers and open up a wide range of
careers. Graduates have secured jobs in teaching both in Spanish and English as a
foreign language abroad, in translating and interpreting, finance, the civil service,
industry and commerce, marketing, administration, publishing and public relations,
as well as academia.
This course may be combined with:
Accountancy (NR44); Business Studies (NRF4); Computing Science (GR44); English
Studies (QR34); Film and Media (RP43); French (RR14); French and Professional
Education (Secondary) (RXD1); History (RV41); Human Resource Management
(NR64); Journalism Studies (PR54); Law (MR14); Marketing (N5R4); Professional
Education (Primary) with Modern Languages (XR18); or Sociology (LR34).
UCAS code: R410
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To apply for a combined degree with
Spanish and French you will require
one of these languages at Higher or
A-level (or equivalent).
Year 2 entry – Three-year
Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
To include Spanish.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/52
www.stir.ac.uk
86
Sport and Exercise Science
S
BSc (Hons)
UCAS code: CC61
3rd in Scotland for Sports Science (The Guardian University Guide)
How do our body systems respond to acute exercise and adapt to training? What
influences our participation in physical activity and the ability to benefit from it? How
can physical activity affect our health and wellbeing?
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Biology, Chemistry,
Mathematics or Physics.
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
Scotland’s University for Sporting Excellence brings a cross-disciplinary approach
which encompasses sport, health and biological sciences. Studying biological sciences
teaches you the disciplines underpinning Sport and Exercise Science, develops your
knowledge of scientific methods, and explains the role of exercise and training in
improving health and athletic performance.
Course content
Teaching is delivered in eight semesters, with an extensive research project conducted
in the final year.
In Year 1, you will gain a strong grounding in biological science and an introduction to
the study of sport and exercise, with further outline modules in cell biology, physiology
and sports studies. Both field and laboratory skills will also be introduced that year.
Year 2 considers issues and concepts of sports studies and the psychology of sport,
examining the relationship between stress and sport performance. You will also
further develop your knowledge and skills in biological science and sport and
exercise sciences.
Subjects such as human anatomy and physiology; genetics and evolution; and
statistical techniques (learning how to analyse scientific data sets) are studied.
Further advanced level modules are delivered in Year 3, studying areas such as the
physiology of sport and exercise, which considers adaptations to exercise training
and the challenges of environmental extremes. Animal cell biology looks at the basic
components of animal cells, their functions and how these functions are regulated in
health and disease.
Understanding exercise and diet in developing a healthy lifestyle is also explored
during Year 3, considering medical issues which affect physical activity. Applied
exercise physiology is studied in the laboratory, and psychology of exercise considers
the factors which influence a person’s decision to exercise.
The Honours year offers further modules in proteomics and molecular techniques as
well as discovering the techniques and methodological assumptions underpinning
sport and exercise science research – before undertaking a dissertation.
Career opportunities
Careers in the sport sector account for around three percent of all jobs in Scotland.
Our graduates progress to postgraduate study and research, various roles in the sport
and leisure sector, sports science support of athletes, health and fitness monitoring,
physical activity promotion and coaching – as well as into the teaching profession,
physiotherapy, and commissioned officers in the armed forces.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/53
www.stir.ac.uk
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Sports Studies
S
BA (Hons)
The University of Stirling is Scotland’s University for
Sporting Excellence
Here, at Scotland’s University for Sporting Excellence, we have integrated our academic
courses with our world-class sports facilities and services. The result is a unique
studying and sporting environment.
Our Sports Studies course is flexible, with a wide variety of module options. It can
form part of a Combined Honours course alongside a range of subjects including
Journalism, Marketing and Psychology.
You can choose from three core subject areas – Sports Policy and Management;
Physical Activity and Health; and Sport, Culture and Society. In addition, our
extra-curricular volunteering enrichment schemes enable students to earn
qualifications and gain valuable event management experience alongside their
academic degree.
We enjoy strong partnerships with many national governing bodies of sport (several
based on campus), so you benefit from seminars with industry experts.
Course content
You are introduced to the core Sports Studies modules in Year 1 covering aspects of
sport in society; patterns of participation in sport and physical activity; the foundations
of sport and exercise science; and sports business, finance and management.
Year 2 considers issues and concepts in sport, reflecting on the historical development
and the psychology of sport, again with the option to study further subjects.
In Year 3, as well as completing a Research Methods module, students can specialise
in their preferred area, choosing modules such as Sports Marketing; Sports Medicine,
Health and Wellbeing; Doping in Sport; or Sports Coaching and Leadership. A work
experience module is also available in Years 3-4 for selected students.
Career opportunities
Many of our graduates are equipped to fulfil various roles, and many work as sports
coaches, teachers, consultants, managers and administrators, for employers including
local authorities, commercial and voluntary sport organisations and governing bodies
of sport.
This course may be combined with:
Accountancy (NC46); Business Studies (NC16); Film and Media (CP63); History
(VC16); Journalism Studies (PC56); Marketing (NC56); Psychology (CC68); or
Professional Education and Physical Education (CX61).
UCAS code: C600
Minimum requirements
Year 1 entry –
Four-year Honours
SQA Highers:
ABBB – one sitting
AABB – two sittings
GCE A-levels:
BBB
IB Diploma:
32
BTEC (Level 3):
DDM
Year 2 entry –
Three-year Honours
SQA Adv Highers:
ABB
GCE A-levels:
ABB
IB Diploma:
35
Essential subjects:
Please consult the website for
information:➲ http://stir.ac.uk/54
Other qualifications
Scottish HNC/HND:
Minimum entry: Bs in graded unit.
Advanced entry: Please consult
website for details.
Access courses:
See page 111.
Additional information
General entry requirements
apply – see page 108.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/54
The combined Sports Studies
and Marketing course may also
be studied with our partners in
Singapore, the Singapore Institute
of Management.
www.stir.ac.uk
88
T
UCAS code: C600
Teaching Qualification in
Further Education (TQFE)
In-service/Pre-service
BA
8th in the UK for Education (The Complete University Guide)
Minimum requirements
University Diploma
Students must have a relevant Higher
National Certificate (HNC) at Level 7
on the Scottish Credit Qualification
Framework (SCQF) or equivalent.
This pathway is for students where
an HNC is the highest qualification
available in the UK in that
subject area.
BA Degree
Students must have a relevant Higher
National Diploma (HND) at Level 8
on the Scottish Credit Qualification
Framework (SCQF) or equivalent.
Equivalent recognised
qualifications are:
• A Part III, full
technological certificate
• Licentiateship
• Senior Award from the City &
Guilds of London Institute
• In certain areas, other
qualifications which are of
equivalent standard to those
listed above.
Candidates for both qualifications
must also have both literacy and
numeracy skills which meet the
demands of the course. The normal
entry requirements are:
• A National Qualification Course
award in English at level 6 on the
SCQF (or suitable evidence of
being able to attain this standard)
or SQA communication level III
• A National Qualification
Course award in numeracy or
Mathematics at level 4 on the
SCQF (or suitable evidence of
being able to attain this standard).
Candidates should have
Information and Communication
Technology (ICT) skills equivalent
to Intermediate 2 (i.e. level 5
on the SCQF). This level of skill
in the use of ICT is required
partly in order to be able to fully
participate on the TQFE course
and partly in order to be able
to function effectively in the
working environment.
Additional information
Please contact the University
directly for an application form:
➲ [email protected]
www.stir.ac.uk
If you are a lecturer in Further Education or aspire to be one, you will need this
qualification – we are one of only three Scottish universities endorsed to offer it.
This TQFE degree has two offerings, the suitability of which will depend on your
employment status:
• In-service – designed specifically for those working in a college environment
with five years’ experience of your subject area and at least two years’ training,
teaching or coaching experience at an appropriate level
• Pre-service – a course unique to the University of Stirling and is tailored to those
students who aspire to a career in the FE sector.
Our course is unique for several reasons. Firstly, all undergraduates who arrive with an
HND will graduate with a BA in Tertiary Education with TQFE. Secondly, our ‘blended
learning’ approach combines face-to-face and online learning with teaching.
The TQFE award is validated by the General Teaching Council of Scotland (GTCS) and
graduates can gain GTC registration.
Course content
In-service: The following modules are taken over the course of the academic year:
Learner Identity and Diversity; Teaching and Assessment; and Professional Practice or
Professional Experiential Learning. Applicants working in the post-compulsory sector
undertake the award on a part-time basis – their workplace teaching forming an
important part of course study.
Pre-service: The following modules are taken over the course of the academic year:
Learner Diversity; Teaching and Assessment 1 and 2; Link Practice; and Professional
Development. This full-time course consists of 20 on-campus taught days in addition
to 120 hours of teaching practice on placement at a local college. We have strong
links with the college sector, enabling us to arrange placements with various partner
colleges throughout Scotland.
Career opportunities
The course provides graduates with a highly relevant and marketable qualification,
and the confidence and skills to successfully gain employment as further education
lecturers or adult learning tutors for a variety of training providers.
The course also attracts students from beyond the college sector. Some of our students
come from adult learning organisations, the police, fire and ambulance
services, as well as charities and other training providers. Graduates
may also consider the option of studying a Masters level qualification.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/q4
89
90
91
Twogether
University of Stirling
and Forth Valley
College Partnership
Working together to ensure graduates
are work-ready and meet the critical
skills requirements of key sectors
in the Scottish economy.
92
Twogether
Working Twogether
Working in partnership, the University
of Stirling and Forth Valley College
have developed four, innovative skills
programmes in Applied Biological Sciences;
Applied Computing; Digital Media; and
Heritage and Conservation.
All students are undergraduates of a four-year
degree programme from day one and enrolled in
both institutions, embedding the expectation of
progression from the outset, improving retention
of students throughout the four-year degree and
developing their sense of identity as both a College
and University student.
All programmes integrate the development of technical
skills, industry and entrepreneurship awareness,
industrial experience and academic excellence. The
overarching aim is to ensure that graduates are
work-ready and meet the critical skills requirements
of key sectors in the Scottish economy.
All students have full access to all online and on-site
facilities at the College and University.
The curriculum for all programmes is being driven
by the needs of the Life Science; Heritage,
Conservation, Tourism; Media and ICT sectors.
Companies such as Diageo, VisitScotland and Historic
Scotland have identified real challenges when recruiting
appropriately-skilled graduates into these industries.
These key Scottish sectors are both critical to the Scottish
economy and ambitious in their plans for growth.
An integrated approach
Forth Valley College and the University of Stirling have
transformed the traditional ‘2+2’ articulation model.
These degrees are wholly integrated; jointly designed,
developed and delivered by the College, University
and industrial partners, with additional value added,
embedded employability and industrial awareness.
Students are based mostly at Forth Valley College in
Years 1 and 2, and then at the University of Stirling in
Years 3 and 4.
A shared delivery arrangement between the University
and College produces a much more effective utilisation
of learning resources.
The partnership will share learning resources
incrementally as the programmes progress – including
staff and facilities – in order to develop and deliver
common learning modules utilised by both College and
University learners.
Both institutions are committed to extending this
integrated model to develop further new programmes
over time.
The Scottish Life Sciences sector is
calling out for highly skilled graduates
with hands-on experience. An
integrated degree will provide the
practical and research skills required
to produce ‘work-ready’ graduates.
David Wotherspoon
Diageo
www.stir.ac.uk
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94
Twogether
UCAS code: 8C93
Minimum requirements
Applied Biological Sciences
SQA Highers:
BBB
GCE A-level:
BB
Applied Biological Sciences
BSc (Hons)
Become a work-ready graduate and excel in the thriving Life
Sciences sector
Scotland is internationally recognised in the Life Sciences arena with capabilities in
drug discovery and development, contract research, medical technologies, stem
cells, specialised bio-manufacturing and bioinformatics. It is a thriving sector, which
contributes over £3.2 billion to the Scottish economy each year and requires highly
skilled graduates.
The Life Sciences industries have identified particular problems in recruiting work-ready
science graduates. Life Sciences constitutes a highly regulated industry and current
graduates do not have a good understanding of industry regulation or compliance
with these standards.
This course will ensure its students have industrial awareness, strong technical expertise
and are proficient in vital `hand skills’ (laboratory techniques and skills), which are
much sought-after by employers.
IB:
28
BTEC (level 3):
MMM
Essential subjects:
To include one of
Biology or Chemistry.
Other qualification
Access courses and other UK/EU
and international qualifications
are also welcomed.
Additional information
Please note that selection will be
made via successful interview.
Delivering technical skills and industrial awareness will ensure Scotland has graduates
with the skills, competence and education required by industry while supporting
realistic graduate expectations and promoting staff retention rates. We have developed
a four-year, fully integrated degree course in Applied Biological Sciences.
Academics from the University and College will work together, alongside employers,
to deliver the most up-to-date and industry relevant curriculum. All undergraduates of
this course will have dual student status and be fully enrolled within both institutions.
Students will have full access to all of the University and College online and on-site
facilities from Year 1 onwards.
Course content
Semesters 1-4 will be delivered by Forth Valley College at their Falkirk Campus with
some key subject tutorials delivered at the University of Stirling. Subjects will include:
microbiology; immunology; fundamental chemistry; instrumental techniques and
quality; and health and safety systems in science industries. All modules will have an
applied and practical skills focus.
You will then progress onto the University of Stirling for Years 3 and 4 of the
programme. Subjects during Semesters 5-8 will include: cell biology; enzymes
and applications; molecular techniques; and evolution and genetic engineering
for the future.
Students will also complete an industrial placement module during Semester 6.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/e0
www.stir.ac.uk
95
Applied Computing
BSc (Hons)
A highly practical degree developed in partnership with the
Scottish IT industry which includes a three-month industrial
work placement
A major skills gap is opening up in Scotland’s Computing sector. The 2013 survey
from Trade Body Scotland IS suggested that the gap is growing four times faster
than in any other sector in Scotland, and it calculated that an additional 45,000 IT
professionals would be required over the next five years. This trend is confirmed by
the latest survey (2015) stating that ‘The demand for graduates continues to rise with
74% of businesses being likely to recruit in 2015. This is up 8% from last year.’
The BSc (Hons) in Applied Computing is a unique course developed to meet the
identified skills shortages within the industry by allowing students to develop skills in
key areas identified by Scottish ICT employers.
Twogether
UCAS code: 8V74
Minimum requirements
Applied Computing
SQA Highers:
BBB
GCE A-level:
BB
There is a strong focus on employability and industrial awareness throughout the
four-year degree.
Course content
You will spend the first two years of this four-year programme at Forth Valley College
before transferring to the University for Years 3 and 4. During Year 2 at the college,
the students will also take a module at the University to support the transition from the
College to the University environment. The programme contains a compulsory threemonth industrial work placement after Year 3.
During this course, you have the opportunity to study the following modules:
IB:
28
BTEC (level 3):
MMM
Essential subjects:
To include one of Chemistry,
Computing, Mathematics or Physics.
Other qualifications
Semesters 1-4, based at Forth Valley College, cover modules in: Computer Systems
Fundamentals; Professionalism and Ethics in Computing; Mathematics: Calculus and
Matrices for Computing; Software Development: Programming Foundations; Software
Development – OOP; Systems Development – Object Oriented Analysis & Design; and
XML (taught at the University).
Access courses and other UK/EU
and international qualifications
are also welcomed.
Semesters 5 and 6 at the University cover modules in: Software Engineering;
Multimedia and Human Computer Interaction; Database Principles and Applications;
Computer Game Technologies; and Information Systems.
Please note that selection will be
made via successful interview.
Additional information
In Semesters 7 and 8, modules include: Big Optimisation Spaces; Concurrent
and Distributed Systems; Technologies for e-commerce; Artificial Intelligence;
Internetworking on the Wide Scale; and Enterprise Portals.
You will undertake an independent project in their final year which provides the
opportunity to develop a major piece of work from initial requirements to final delivery.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/nd
www.stir.ac.uk
96
Twogether
UCAS code: 8C93
Minimum requirements
SQA Highers:
BBB
GCE A-level:
BB
IB:
28
BTEC (level 3):
MMM
Essential subjects:
To include English.
Other qualification
Digital Media
BA (Hons)
This innovative undergraduate degree will produce highly
skilled, work-ready graduates with advanced digital literacy
abilities for the media sector
As the speed of change in the digital media sector continues to accelerate, the
demand for new products, innovative technology and enhanced methods of delivery
also grows. The digital media sector in Scotland, according to Scottish Development
International, employs over 42,000 people and contributes £4.93 billion annually to
the country’s economy.
The industry requires graduates with the relevant skills and an awareness of
innovations and sector demands to maintain and build upon these successes.
This programme provides learners with a rigorous and challenging training in the
tools, applications and possibilities of the digital environment from the preparation of
multimedia content to its effective display and dissemination across television, film,
radio, print, online and beyond.
The overarching aim of the course is to ensure graduates are work ready and will meet
the critical skills requirements of the media industry.
Course content
Access courses and other UK/EU
and international qualifications
are also welcomed.
The course combines the applied technological and media-oriented skills of Forth
Valley’s programme with the advanced academic training and up-to-date digital
expertise of the University. Students will be equipped not only with the skills to be
creative and productive in the digital era, but will also understand the ethical, legal and
theoretical dimensions of this training.
Additional information
During this course, you have the opportunity to study the following modules:
Please note that selection will be
made via successful interview.
Semesters 1-4, based at Forth Valley College, cover modules in: Creative Industries:
Introduction; Writing for the Media; Communication: Using IT and DTP; Journalism
Skills: Introduction; Law and the Media; Scripting and Presenting for Radio News; Web
Design: An Introduction; Television Planning and Production; and Communication:
Promoting and Pitching.
Core modules in Semesters 5 and 6 include: Digital Creativity; Production: Online
Content; and Social Media Marketing: Histories, Contexts and Strategies.
In Semesters 7 and 8, you will select advanced modules in: Digital and Data Literacy;
Production: Content Development and Research; Researching the Media and Culture;
Advanced Reporting; and Digital Journalism.
As part of their final-year Honours project, you must also complete a
digital/publishing project, documentary production, digital media dissertation
or journalism project.
Graduates will be well-rounded, informed, highly-skilled and digitally-literate
individuals ready to drive the local and international economy forward.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/ne
www.stir.ac.uk
97
Heritage and Tourism
BA (Hons)
A innovative degree designed for the tourism, conservation
and heritage sectors
Twogether
UCAS code: 8V74
Tourism is vital to Scotland, contributing £5.2 billion to the Scottish economy and
attracting 15 million visitors last year alone.
The economic value of the historic environment to Scotland is conservatively estimated
at over £2.3 billion GVA, directly supporting over 41,000 full-time equivalent jobs.
The value of nature-based tourism to Scotland’s economy is £1.4 billion per year.
The University has joined forces with Forth Valley College to create a new innovative
degree that will produce highly-skilled, work-ready graduates for the Tourism,
Conservation and Heritage sector. This degree course is supported by organisations
such as VisitScotland and Scottish Canals.
This course combines the applied tourism and business skills of Forth Valley College’s
Travel and Tourism programme, with the advanced academic skills in areas such as
heritage, history, literature and creative writing, exhibition design, and marketing at the
University. It is designed to equip students with sector-specific applied business skills
alongside academic theory, which is appropriate for an understanding of contemporary
heritage management issues and promotional and interpretative methods and
techniques. This will provide you with a knowledge, understanding and experience
relevant to careers within the tourism, conservation and heritage sector.
Throughout the four years, there will be an integrated approach to teaching.
Academics from the College and the University will work together, alongside
employers, to deliver the most up-to-date and industry-relevant curriculum.
Minimum requirements
SQA Highers:
BBB
GCE A-level:
BB
IB:
28
BTEC (level 3):
MMM
Other qualifications
Access courses and other UK/EU and
international qualifications are
also welcomed.
Additional information
Please note that selection will be
made via successful interview.
Course content
Semesters 1-4 will be delivered by Forth Valley College at the new Stirling campus on
the banks of the River Forth.
Within the College environment, students will develop the key skills required to work
within the tourism, heritage and conservation sector.
Employability themes are embedded throughout the programme with subjects such
as: marketing; customer care; visitor attraction management; countryside access and
management; planning and sustainable tourism; and heritage studies.
You will then progress onto the University of Stirling for Semesters 5-8, when you
have the opportunity to develop specialisms within a heritage context in such areas
as: interpretation; history; film; media and journalism; and education.
Core and selective modules include: Heritage Protection: Theory and Practice; Small
Nations on Screen; Stewart Scotland 1406 to 1488; Interpretation and Exhibition
Design; Creative Writing; Remote Sensing; Social Media Marketing; and Environmental
Science in the Primary School. There will also be the opportunity to undertake an
industrial placement within a relevant company.
This course is not available as a combined degree.
For more information about this course,
visit: http://stir.ac.uk/16q
www.stir.ac.uk
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Student
experience
99
100
Student experience
Our campus
With everything you need right here on
campus, you can focus on getting the most
out of your University experience.
Space to study
Our newly-refurbished, modern library has a range
of different study spaces to suit your needs whether
you’re studying on your own or with a group. With
late opening hours and investment in the latest
technologies, we’d help you make the most of your
study time.
Culture
There’s always something going on at our Macrobert
Arts Centre. The cinema shows a range of new
releases, foreign films, documentary and classics, while
the live programme includes theatre, dance, comedy
and music, all with a contemporary twist.
The University’s Art Collection includes paintings,
sketches, tapestries and sculptures. You’ll find examples
all over campus as well as a main collection in the
Pathfoot Building.
The Atrium
➲www.macrobert.org
➲www.artcol.stir.ac.uk
The Atrium is the social hub of the University. You’ll
find the Students’ Union where you can relax with a
coffee during the day, catch up with friends, or socialise
into the wee small hours. There’s also a shopping
precinct with a bank, pharmacy, mini-market and
bookshop, as well as a wide selection of food outlets
to suit every taste and budget.
The campus and new library
are awesome, and I love how
compact the campus is so you
always meet people you know
and feel at home.
Lelde Benke, Latvia
BA (Hons) French and
Journalism Studies graduate, 2011
www.stir.ac.uk
Student experience
Your Students’ Union
Making students’ lives better
The Students’ Union is not just about clubs and
societies, they are also here to support all students
from Year 1 undergraduates to postgraduates. It
offers independent, confidential and non-judgmental
information, support and guidance – if you’re
struggling with your studies, or you’re unhappy
with any aspect of your University experience,
they’re there to help.
Completely independent from the University, the
Union representatives are there to listen, advocate and
represent students’ views. This ranges from offering
support on an individual basis to representing the views
of the student body on issues that affect all students.
The Union keeps all students up to date about their
rights and help you make informed choices, as well as
signposting to the right services in the University and
elsewhere. If you don’t know where to go or who to
ask, they can point you in the right direction.
Your Union is here for you. It exists to make students’
lives better, so no matter how trivial or how serious the
issue seems, you won’t have to deal with it on your
own – they can help.
➲www.stirlingstudentsunion.com
The Union offers a dedicated academic representation
service, which can guide and support you through
the process for appeals, complaints, exam deferrals,
extenuating circumstances and leave of absence
requests. They can also support you during meetings
with the University if required.
www.stir.ac.uk
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Student experience
Sport at Stirling
We’re Scotland’s University for Sporting
Excellence, with one of the best reputations
for sport of any UK university.
Outstanding facilities
Our facilities are fantastic. The Gannochy National
Tennis Centre has six indoor courts, two outdoor
all-weather floodlit courts and two outdoor clay
courts. The National Swimming Academy houses a
50-metre, six-lane pool and land conditioning room.
The MP Jackson Fitness Centre has a great range of
cardiovascular and resistance equipment, with two free
weights areas containing many lifting platforms.
You can also enjoy:
•an eight-court sports hall and three squash courts
•an air-conditioned dance and fitness studio
•a 400m all-weather running track
•two artificial pitches and seven grass pitches
•a nine-hole, par-three golf course, putting green,
driving ranges, pavilion and video analysis suite.
Our beautiful loch is at the centre of our campus and is
great for canoeing and kayaking. And beyond campus,
Scotland’s spectacular landscape brings endless
opportunities for outdoor activities.
What can I do?
You can use the facilities as an individual or with a
group of friends, or why not get involved with one of
our sports teams? There are over 40 to choose from,
covering all sorts of individual and team sports.
If you want to compete, we’ve a great track record
against other universities at home and abroad, and
have regularly brought home the silverware for golf,
tennis, swimming, football, rugby, triathlon and
American football.
I already compete at a high level
– can you help?
Absolutely! Our International Sports Scholarship
Programme is for both UK and overseas students
competing at national level or above. It includes
financial help and access to top-level coaching, as well
as options to extend the time taken for your degree to
compensate for time-out for competitions.
Scholarships are awarded for:
•Football
•Golf
•Swimming
•Tennis
•Triathlon.
For more information about sports
scholarships, contact:
➲R
aleigh Gowrie
Sports Performance Manager
[email protected]
+44 (0)1786 466901
Partners on campus
Thanks to our great environment and facilities,
we share our campus with a number of agencies,
including:
• sportscotland institute of sport
• Commonwealth Games Council for Scotland
• Scottish Swimming
• Triathlon Scotland
• Scottish Football Association (central region).
➲h
ttp://stir.ac.uk/a9
➲www.stirlingstudentsunion.com/clubssocieties
www.stir.ac.uk
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104
Support
Support
University is about finding your own
way but you won’t be on your own – our
support services will be there to help you.
Personal Tutors
Each student is assigned a Personal Tutor. You’ll meet
with them regularly and they can offer guidance and
support at any point during your studies.
Student Money Advice
Our Student Money Advisors help with budgeting and
money management. They can also help you apply for
additional funding or financial support.
➲[email protected]
Counselling and Wellbeing
We offer a free, confidential service to talk about
anything that is troubling you.
Disability Service
Our Disability Advisors offer one-to-one
needs assessments for all your learning and
support requirements, implementing a tailored
support package.
➲[email protected]
Your needs
Even before you apply, if you need any additional
support then please get in touch. We’ll be happy to
discuss your needs and requirements and arrange
an on-campus visit, if you need one. We highly
recommend an early pre-entry visit for students with
mobility or sensory impairments.
➲[email protected]
Training opportunities
➲[email protected]
We offer a range of training modules, including:
IT Skills; Data Skills; Employability Skills; Personal
Development Planning; and Student Learning.
Care experienced young people
➲http://stir.ac.uk/5l
If you have experience of being looked after (by kinship
or foster carers, at home under a supervision order or in
residential care), there is a range of individual support
we can offer. We can help with all aspects of the
application process, including what and where to study.
In addition, we offer tailored support including money
advice and a guarantee of 52-week accommodation
from the start of your course.
➲http://stir.ac.uk/s2
➲c [email protected]
Young carers
We provide a dedicated information and advice service
for any young person who helps to look after someone
with a disability, illness, mental health condition, or
a drug or alcohol dependency. We can help support
you throughout the application process through our
dedicated advisors.
➲ [email protected]
Religion
The multi-faith Chaplaincy and Faith Centre
organises programmes of worship, discussion and
social events. The Chaplaincy also supports Friends
International Stirling, linking international students
with local host families. We have a dedicated prayer
room for Muslim students.
➲+44 (0)1786 467164
Career Development Centre
Your one-stop shop for career guidance. We offer
one-to-one interviews, regular newsletters, mock job
interviews and a drop-in service, plus:
• Job Shop
• careers fairs and employer presentations
• credit-bearing career management modules
• seminars to develop employability skills
• online vacancy facility for graduates.
➲[email protected]
www.stir.ac.uk
105
106
We are
One
The University of Stirling and the University of
Stirling Students’ Union believe in equality for
all. No one should be denied opportunities
because of age, disability, gender, race,
religion or belief, or sexual orientation.
OneStirling is a new initiative to outline
our commitment to equality and diversity
in every area of the University’s activities
and to ensure that students and staff
are treated with respect at all times.
Student experience
I decided to do nursing as I love the aspect of
caring for people and helping out. I think it is
important for males to become nurses as it shows
that no matter who you are, you are able to care
for people.
Jakub Orlowski, Scotland
BSc Adult Nursing
I am launching the first think tank at the University
of Stirling. Stirling Symposium aims to enhance
students’ career prospects and future planning by
bringing together professionals and students. I want to
demonstrate that the University is a world-class and
innovative institution.
Robert Hester, Isle of Man
BA Politics, Philosophy and Economics
I study law because whilst I grew up in a safe area
the country was, and still is, unjust. I wanted to learn
about the issues, and I hope for social equality. There
is a lot of corruption and there is no freedom of
speech. Growing up in such a world made me want
to change it. I want to be a voice for people who
have no voices.
Tanaka Musakambeva, Zimbabwe
BA Law and French
I am the first to study Biology in my family. My goal
is to get into medical research such as stem cell or
cancer research. One day I hope to make a medical
breakthrough, and make a difference in the world.
Omar Salem, Egypt
BSc Cell Biology
I am a Muslim. Sugandh is Hindu and she is my
best friend. It is not like it’s portrayed in the media.
I think we have overcome the barrier of religion,
and we bond over our nationality more. Religion
and traditions don’t really matter; we are one,
we are Pakistani.
Aamer Arif Rao, Pakistan
BSc Management
(pictured with Sugandh Bharvani, Pakistan, BAcc Accountancy and Finance)
www.stir.ac.uk
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108
Entry requirements
General entry
requirements
To study at Stirling, every student needs to
meet our general requirements. Each course
also has specific entry requirements.
Curriculum for Excellence
General requirements
➲http://stir.ac.uk/g7
These are the minimum requirements for entry to the
University. You should also check the subject-specific
pages for any other grade and subject requirements.
Applicants must have one of the following:
• a minimum of four passes at SQA Higher Grade or
three A-levels*
• an acceptable pass in approved entry subjects in
the IB Diploma, HNC/D, BTEC National Diploma, or
Advanced Diploma
• a pass in an approved Access Course.
School leavers’ qualifications from the European
Union (EU), a degree from a university in the
United Kingdom or EU, plus many other
international school qualifications also satisfy
the general entrance requirements.
For country-specific information and to check the
grades required:
➲http://stir.ac.uk/2x
Subjects approved for entry
All graded SQA, GCE and GCSE examination subjects
are acceptable for entry.
Passes in two subjects with a high amount of material
in common may not be counted separately (e.g.
Biology and Human Biology). If your subjects ‘overlap’
like this, contact Admissions for advice.
➲a [email protected]
+44 (0) 1786 467044
*Excludes Nursing courses and Twogether programmes.
www.stir.ac.uk
We welcome the Senior Phase of the Curriculum
for Excellence and have reviewed our entry
requirements accordingly:
Variations to published grade requirements
The required grades are listed on the individual subject
pages for guidance only. Check with the University for
the latest minimum grades needed before you apply.
If you are re-sitting or upgrading some subjects, you
may be asked for a higher grade.
English language
If English is not your first language, you need to
demonstrate a suitable level of English language.
We accept IELTS, TOEFL, the SQA ESOL qualification
and many others.
• IELTS: 6.0 (minimum of 5.5 in each category)
• TOEFL: 21 Listening; 22 Reading; 23 Speaking;
21 Writing.
➲http://stir.ac.uk/3f
Entry requirements
Entrance with UK qualifications
Award of credit for existing qualifications
Scottish qualifications
We award credit on admission for certain qualifications
gained before coming to Stirling. That means you
may be able to shorten the length of time you need
to spend at University to get your degree. We’ll award
credit automatically on application if your qualifications
are suitable.
We make offers based on your Higher grades, though
Advanced Highers can also be a way of meeting the
entry requirements. Grade C or above in an Advanced
Higher counts as an upgrade to the original Higher
grade achieved. If you have an Advanced Higher
only (without the relevant Higher), you’ll be asked
for grade B in the Advanced Higher. We accept
Highers taken over two sittings, although you may
be asked for a higher grade if you have repeated or
upgraded examinations.
Other UK qualifications
If you want to request credit for any other professional
qualifications, contact Admissions before entry. Credit
can’t be awarded retrospectively once you’ve started
your course.
➲a [email protected]
+44 (0) 1786 467044
A-levels/VCE
Terms and conditions
We make offers based on your A-level grades. If you
are re-sitting or upgrading some A-levels we may
increase our normal grade requirements.
➲http://stir.ac.uk/a2
Any student being offered a place will be subject to the
University’s Terms and Conditions.
BTEC
BTEC Level 3 Extended Diplomas are considered.
Successful applicants will typically require a grade of
DDM in their final Diploma.
College students
We will consider applications from a range of college
courses, including Access, HNC and HND. For further
information turn to page 111.
➲http://stir.ac.uk/9v
Other UK qualifications
Other UK qualifications can satisfy the general entrance
requirements, for example degrees from other UK
universities, including the Open University, and some
professional qualifications.
www.stir.ac.uk
109
110
Entry requirements
Get ready with INTO
University of Stirling
Our vibrant community welcomes students
from all over the world. With over 120+
nationalities represented on campus,
we want to make sure our international
students are supported and ready for study.
We’ve partnered with INTO University Partnerships
to offer academic preparation courses and English
language programmes especially for international
students. They’ll help you get ready to start your
studies and enjoy the University environment.
Direct entry
We offer two programmes – the International
Foundation and the International Diploma, designed
to get you ready for entry into a wide range of
undergraduate courses for Year 2 or Year 3.
Improving your English
If you already have the right qualifications but want to
improve your English, we offer short, intensive courses
focusing on academic English:
•improve your English in the core areas of
listening, speaking, reading and writing
•use subject-related work in your chosen area
of study
• help you to study independently online.
Depending on your current language level and degree
requirements, you’ll study either a 12-week (June to
August) or six-week (July to August) course. There is
also a three-week (August) course if you already have
an unconditional offer.
For further information on the full range of courses
including English language programmes offered by
INTO University of Stirling, please visit:
➲ http://stir.ac.uk/q7
www.stir.ac.uk
Entry requirements
Alternative access
We welcome students from all backgrounds
and offer a variety of access routes to help
you start your course.
Part-time study
Most of our degrees are offered on a part-time basis.
Typically, part-time students study one or two modules
each semester. You’ll work alongside full-time students,
so you benefit from support and peer-to-peer learning.
Further information and how to apply:
➲www.stir.ac.uk/flexible
Mature students
We have an active mature student community and
welcome applications from mature students of all
backgrounds. We can support you through the
application process too.
Our access courses have been specially designed to
offer tailored support to mature students, with no
qualifications, who want to access a degree course. We
offer a part-time evening access programme, based on
campus and run by current University lecturers. If you
complete this successfully with the required grades,
you’ll be guaranteed a place on a degree course.
➲ http://stir.ac.uk/g4
The University is a member of the Scottish Wider
Access Programme (SWAP), offering dedicated access
courses for mature students at local further education
colleges. We warmly welcome SWAP students who
complete their course with the required grades to all of
our degree courses.
For more information, visit the SWAP website:
➲www.scottishwideraccess.org
If you already have some qualifications, contact our
mature student advisers – your qualifications may be
enough to get you a place on a degree course.
➲[email protected]
+44 (0)1786 467046
College students
We have a strong tradition of students progressing
from college to degree courses. We also offer a range
of advanced entry options, which means if you’ve
completed an HNC or HND at college you could, if you
want to apply for advanced entry, simply change the
year of entry on your UCAS form. Not all our degrees
have advanced entry, so check our website first. If in
doubt, get in touch with our college advisers.
➲[email protected]
➲ http://stir.ac.uk/mw
+44 (0)1786 467046
www.stir.ac.uk
111
112
Entry requirements
How to apply
UCAS – full-time undergraduate
Deferred entry
How to apply
Deferred applications should be made through UCAS
by the 2017 deadline for entry in September 2018.
Please note, it may take us slightly longer to make
decisions on deferred applications because we process
entries for 2017 first.
If you’re applying for a full-time undergraduate degree,
use the UCAS online application system. UCAS starts
receiving applications for entry in autumn 2017 on
1 September 2016.
You can apply for up to five different courses – there’s
no need to rank your choices as universities don’t see
your other choices. You can track your applications
online and see any offers as soon as they are made.
UK and EU applicants have to apply by 15 January
2017. All universities will consider applications received
on time on an equal basis. Apply as early as you can –
don’t leave it until the last day!
➲www.ucas.com
International students
International applicants have until 30 June 2017
to apply. Our overseas agents can help with your
application – visit our country-specific information
pages for details:
➲http://stir.ac.uk/2x
UCAS application fee
You have to pay an application fee to UCAS, based on
the number of courses you apply for. If you only apply
for one course, it costs £12. If you apply for two or
more courses, there’s a one-off fee of £23.
www.stir.ac.uk
Part-time undergraduate
Applications for part-time courses are made directly to
the University – please contact Admissions directly.
➲a [email protected]
+44 (0) 1786 467044
North America – Common Application
As well as applying through UCAS, applicants from
North America can apply through the Common
Application. We accept both methods and don’t have
a preferred option. Speak to your school counsellor to
decide what method would be best for you.
➲http://stir.ac.uk/fl
Entry requirements
Support for applicants
We offer additional support to specific
groups of applicants throughout the
application process depending upon your
background and circumstances. This includes
support when you arrive to make the
transition into University easier.
College and mature students
Our dedicated team offers support through the entry
process, including:
•subject-specific visits for college students, giving you
the chance to see our campus and meet our staff
•support for advisers within colleges with information,
advice and guidance on how best to support
your students
•tailored induction days for advanced entry and
mature students
•support modules in Semester 1, tailored to the needs
of your degree or school
•general orientation sessions including: timetabling;
using the library; and the Students’ Union.
Care experienced and looked after
young people
Our team of advisers offer one-to-one, confidential
pre-application and transitional support, and can
include:
•help to choose a course and/or find the right route
into University
• how to fill in your UCAS form
•support at our Open Days and Applicant Days to
make sure you get the most out of the experience
•individual visit to the campus for you and a
friend, adviser or parent/guardian to find out
more about courses
•tailored support through induction and your first
weeks at University.
➲ [email protected][email protected][email protected]
www.stir.ac.uk
113
114
Entry requirements
Money matters
If you have the talent, ability and drive to
study with us then we’ll help you succeed,
regardless of your financial circumstances.
Fees
Fees vary depending on your permanent place of
residence; so does the funding you can get.
Tuition fees for full-time BA/BSc/BAcc (Hons)
courses (excluding Nursing)
Scottish/EU students
You won’t have to pay tuition fees. The Scottish
Government pays these on your behalf, through the
Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS). You must
apply for this funding every year.
UK students (living outside Scotland)
Tuition fees: £6,750pa. A tuition fee loan is available
to pay for these costs. Applications are made through
your relevant funding body.
International students (living outside the EU)
The annual tuition fee for new students entering
the current academic year 2016/17 is £11,555 for
classroom-based courses and £13,760 for laboratorybased courses.
Cost of living
Scottish/UK students
As well as financial support towards your tuition
fees, you can usually apply to your relevant funding
body for help with living costs. This usually takes the
form of student loans, grants or bursaries, and the
amount awarded usually depends on your personal
circumstances and household income.
EU/International students
Typically, you won’t be able to claim support for
living costs through SAAS or other UK public funds.
Contact the relevant authority in your own country
to find out more.
UK Funding Bodies
Scotland
➲www.saas.gov.uk
England
➲www.gov.uk/studentfinance
Wales
➲www.studentfinancewales.co.uk
Visit the course pages for current fees:
Northern Ireland
➲www.studentfinanceni.co.uk
➲http://stir.ac.uk/5e
Nursing students
Part-time students in Scotland
You will be required to pay tuition fees, however, fee
waivers and support from SAAS may be available,
depending on your circumstances:
➲[email protected]
www.stir.ac.uk
SASS pays tuition fees for all UK and EU students on
pre-registration courses. There’s also a non-means
tested bursary of £6,578 (in 2015/16). Bursaries are not
normally available to EU students, although their fees
are paid by the Scottish Government. Non-EU students
pay their own fees and are not eligible for bursaries.
Entry requirements
Additional sources of funding
University Scholarship Finder
Different trusts and bodies provide additional funding
for students, for a variety of reasons, including
academic attainment, background and area of study.
These additional sources of funding include:
This easy-to-use facility lets you search for available
scholarships and bursaries:
Carnegie Trust
➲www.carnegie-trust.org
Educational Grants Advisory Service (EGAS)
➲www.egas-online.org.uk
Association of Charitable Foundations
➲www.acf.org.uk
Stirlingshire Educational Trust
(local students only)
➲www.stirlingeducationaltrust.org.uk
➲www.stir.ac.uk/scholarships
Student Support Services:
If you run into financial problems, we can help. We
offer a range of services, including trained Student
Money Advisers and access to discretionary and
childcare funds.
➲http://stir.ac.uk/5v
Cost of living
The cost of living in Stirling is one of the lowest in the
UK. This breakdown shows you the potential costs of
living away from home – but remember, the amount
you actually spend will depend on your lifestyle.
Typical cost of living
Rent
Food/household goods
Leisure/entertainment
Insurance
Clothing
Books/stationery
Phone
TV licence
Travel**
Utility bills***
Total
Monthly
£304-£532
£130
£120
£12
£30
£25
£25
£12
Two semesters
£2,736-£4,788
£1,170
£1,080
£108
£270
£225
£225
£145 annually*
£30
£270
£40
£728-£956
£360
£6,589-£8,641
* You may be able to claim a refund of around £37 if you move out of your term-time accommodation
during the summer months
** This does not include any travel home
*** Not applicable for on-campus student accommodation
www.stir.ac.uk
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116
Getting here
Getting here
Journey by air: to Edinburgh/Glasgow Airports
Stornoway
Stirling
Inverness
Glasgow
Edinburgh
Belfast: 50mins
Birmingham: 1hr 20mins
Bristol: 1hr 10mins
Cardiff: 1hr 30mins
Exeter: 1hr 35mins
London: 1hr 15mins
Manchester: 1hr 5mins
Norwich: 1hr 30mins
Journey by train: to Stirling
Birmingham: 5hrs
Edinburgh: 55 mins
Glasgow: 35 mins
Leeds: 4hrs
Newcastle
Belfast
Leeds
Manchester
Birmingham
Cardiff
Journey by car: to Stirling
Norwich
Bristol
London: 5hrs 30mins
Manchester: 4hrs 20mins
Newcastle: 2hrs 30mins
Norwich: 6hrs 30mins
London
Exeter
Getting around the city
It’s easy to get from Stirling to the campus – you can
walk, cycle or hop on a bus.
Travelling by car
If you drive to campus you have to pay for parking.
You can either buy a permit or use the Pay and Display
machines. Year 1 students living on campus aren’t
allowed to bring a car onto campus.
Travelling by bus
There are Uni Link bus services between the University
and city centre at least every ten minutes during
semester time, as well as other local bus services.
National bus operators also offer frequent services to
destinations including Edinburgh, Glasgow, Inverness
and Aberdeen.
Birmingham: 4hrs 30mins
Cardiff: 6hrs 30mins
Exeter: 7hrs
Leeds: 4hrs
London: 7hrs
Manchester: 3hrs 45mins
Newcastle: 3hrs
Norwich: 7hrs
Journey by ferry and car: from Belfast to Stirling
Ferry: 2hrs 15mins
Car (from Cairnryan to Stirling): 2hrs 30mins
Other useful websites
➲www.skyscanner.net
➲www.thetrainline.com
➲www.citylink.co.uk
➲www.nationalexpress.com
➲www.traveline.info
Jump on a train
There are frequent services across Scotland. On average
there’s a train to Glasgow or Edinburgh every 30
minutes – more at peak times. From there, you can
travel to almost the whole of the UK by train.
Travelling further
Scotland’s two main international airports are less than
an hour away by car; you can reach either airport in
around the same time by public transport too.
There’s also a direct transfer service provided by Stirling
Direct, the University’s airport pick-up service.
www.stir.ac.uk
Getting here
Flights to Scotland
Edinburgh and Glasgow International Airports are
served by a wide range of flights and it’s easy to get to
Stirling from either airport.
Oslo
If you are an international student flying in to
Edinburgh or Glasgow International Airport, you
can use Stirling Direct, the University’s airport
pick-up service:
Edinburgh
1¾ Hrs
Stockholm
Edinburgh
2½ Hrs
➲http://stir.ac.uk/a1
Useful websites
➲www.edinburghairport.com
➲www.glasgowairport.com
➲www.stirlingdirect.org
➲www.thetrainline.com
Belfast
Edinburgh/
Glasgow
50 mins
5½ Hrs
Dublin
Edinburgh/
Glasgow
1 ¼ Hrs
7 ½ Hrs
Berlin
London
Edinburgh/
Glasgow
1¼ Hrs
Brussels
Edinburgh/
Glasgow
1½ Hrs
Edinburgh/
Glasgow
1½ Hrs
Paris
Edinburgh/
Glasgow
1½ Hrs
Rome
Madrid
Edinburgh/
Glasgow
2½ Hrs
Edinburgh
3½ Hrs
www.stir.ac.uk
117
118
Index
Index
Academic disciplines 31
Access courses 111
Accommodation 26-27
Accountancy 34, 35
Accountancy and Finance 35
Agents 112
Alternative access 111
Alumni 15
Animal Biology 36
Applicant Days 120
Application process 112-113
Applied Biological Sciences 94
Applied Computing 95
Applied Mathematics 70
Aquaculture 37, 68
Aquatic Sciences 37, 68
Biology 36, 37-38, 41, 43, 68, 94
Business Computing 39
Business Studies 40
Campus 04-07, 100
Campus facilities 100
Care experienced and
young carers 104, 113
Careers 17, 104
Careers Development Centre 17, 104
41
Cell Biology Chaplaincy 104
Cinema 58, 66
City of Stirling 08-09, 116
College students 109, 111, 113
112
Common Application Computing 39, 42, 84, 95
42
Computing Science Conservation Biology and
Management 43
Cost of living 115
Counselling and wellbeing 104
Criminology 44
Deferred entry 112
Degree structure 20, 30
Digital Media 96
Disability Service 104
Diversity at Stirling 106-107
Ecology 45
Economics 46, 77
www.stir.ac.uk
Education (Primary) 47
Education (Secondary) 48
Education 47-48, 88
English language courses 110
English language requirements 108
English Studies 49
Entry requirements, General 108-109
Environmental Geography /
Environmental Science and
Outdoor Education 50
Environmental
Geography 50, 57
Environmental Science
(Integrated Masters) 52
Environmental Science 50-52
ERASMUS 22
European Film and Media 53
Exchange programmes 22
Fees 114-115
Film and Media 53-54
Finance 103-104,114-115
Finance 35, 55
Flexible degree 20, 30
Forth Valley College Partnership,
Twogether 91-97
56, 61-62, 71
French 114-115
Funding Funding bodies 114
General entry requirements 108-109
Geography – Environmental
50, 57
Geography Getting here 116-117
Global Cinema 58
Global connections 12-15
Halls of Residence 26-27
Heritage and Tourism 97
History 59, 81
How to apply 112
Human Resource
60
Management International applicants 112
International Management
Studies and International
61
Studies (IMIS) International Management
Studies with European
Languages and Society 62
International Politics 76
INTO University Partnerships 110
Journalism Studies 63
Languages 56, 61-62, 71, 85
Law 64-65
Literature and Cinema 66
LLB 65
Macrobert Arts Centre 100
Management 43, 61-62, 67
Map 116-117
Marine Biology 37, 68
Marketing 69, 80
Mathematics – Applied
Mathematics 70
Mature students 111, 113
Media 53-54, 63, 96
Modern Languages 56, 61-62,
71, 85
Money 103-104, 114-115
Money advice 104
Nursing (Adult) 72
Nursing (Mental Health) 73
120
Open Days Inside front, Part-time study 111-112
Personal Tutors 104
Philosophy 74, 77
Physical Education 48
Politics (International) 76
Politics 75-77
Politics, Philosophy and
77
Economics: PPE Primary Education 47
Psychology 78
Religion 79
Religion at Stirling 104
Retail Marketing 80
Scholarships 103, 115
Scottish History 81
Secondary Education 48
Singapore Institute
of Management 80, 87
Social Policy 83
Index
Social Work 82
Sociology and Social Policy 83
Software Engineering 84
Spanish 62, 71, 85
Spanish and Latin American
Studies 85
Sport 10, 103
Sport 86-87
Sport and Exercise Science 86
Sports facilities 103
Sports scholarships 103
Sport Business
40, 67, 69
Management Sports Studies 87
Stirling, City of 08
Student accommodation 26-27
Student Support Services 104, 115
Students’ Union 25, 101, 103
Study abroad 22-23
Support and advice 104
SWAP 111
Sustainable Events
Management 40, 67, 69
Teaching Qualification in
Further Education (TQFE) 88
Tourism and Heritage 97
TQFE 88
Travel 116-117
Tuition fees 114-115
Twogether 91-97
UCAS 112
Union, Students’ 25, 101, 103
Virtual Tour 120
Visit the University Inside front, 120
Young carers 104
Design and production
www.sterlingsolutions.co.uk
Photography
For a full list of photographers used by
the University, visit: http://stir.ac.uk/175
Photos on pages 14, 24, 32, 102 and 108
taken by Stirling graduate Thea Brønlund.
Prospectus
production
This prospectus is printed
on Chromolux and UPM
Fine Offset.
These papers are
environmentally friendly
having come from
sustainable forests.
DISCLAIMER: The publisher acknowledges the right of all copyright holders. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information given in this publication, but the University can accept no responsibility
for any errors or omissions.
University courses, services and procedures are continually reviewed, enhanced and revised and this may result in some changes between the time of publication and the date when the student enters the University.
Where any changes will affect an applicant, the University will keep the applicant fully informed.
National Student Survey/Unistats and Higher Education Statistics Agency (Destination of Leavers Survey) results are taken from the most recent survey in 2014/15 and 2013/14 respectively.
Statistics from The Guardian University Guide, The Complete University Guide and The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide, 2016.
Research Excellence Framework results based on REF 2014.
The University of Stirling is ranked 7th in the UK for graduate employability with 96% of our graduates in employment, or further study, within six months of graduating. (Telegraph/HESA, 2015)
Accreditations are awarded and reviewed periodically in line with the relevant regulatory body’s policies and procedures. Accreditations provided against course information are correct at time of print. For current
accreditations, please consult the University website, www.stir.ac.uk
The University of Stirling is a charity registered in Scotland, number SC 011159.
Publication date: 02/16
www.stir.ac.uk
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Visit us
See for yourself
Almost everyone who visits us falls in love
with the University. Visiting our campus
gives you a great idea of what it’s like to
study at Stirling.
Stirling campus Open Days
See what we’ve got to offer and get an insight into
student life. You’ll tour the campus, meet current
students, talk to teaching and support staff, find out
what our Admissions team are really looking for on
your UCAS form, and much more.
Dates:
• Saturday 18 June 2016
• Saturday 17 September 2016
• Saturday 29 October 2016.
Find out more and book your place:
➲http://stir.ac.uk/5f
www.stir.ac.uk
Other chances to visit
Don’t worry if you can’t make an Open Day, there are
lots of other chances to visit through the year.
Find out when and book your place:
➲http://stir.ac.uk/5q
Applicant Days
When we make you an offer, we’ll invite you to one
of our Applicant Days. It’s a great way to find out
more about the campus, the student experience, your
course and to ask any questions you may have. It’s a
worthwhile day and we do recommend you take up
the opportunity. Full booking details will be sent with
your invitation.
Virtual tour
Explore our campus:
➲www.stir.ac.uk/tour
www.stir.ac.uk
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