WRIA 16 Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Plan

WRIA 16 Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Plan
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
and Data Quality Management Plan for
the WRIA 16 Planning Area
Prepared for the
WRIA 16 Planning Area
Jefferson and Mason County, Washington
Prepared by:
Northwest Land & Water, Inc.
Seattle, Washington
www.nlwinc.com
206.525.0049
June 30, 2008
This report was prepared with funding from a Watershed Plan Implementation Grant provided
by the Washington State Department of Ecology Grant Number: G0800033
Approval Page for the
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
and Data Quality Management Plan for
The WRIA 16 Planning Area
___________________
Ecology Project Manager
___________________
Ecology Quality Assurance Officer
___________________
Grantee Representative
__________
Date
__________
Date
__________
Date
Table of Contents
1
About This Plan.......................................................................................... 1
2
Distribution................................................................................................. 1
3
Background................................................................................................. 1
3.1 Hydrogeology......................................................................................... 2
3.2 Previous Work........................................................................................ 2
4
Monitoring Program Description ............................................................. 3
4.1 Objectives............................................................................................... 3
4.2 Data Sources .......................................................................................... 4
4.3 Method ................................................................................................... 4
4.4 Implementing the Monitoring Program ................................................. 5
4.5 Duration of the Monitoring Program ..................................................... 6
5
Organization, Schedule, & Budget ........................................................... 6
5.1 Organization........................................................................................... 6
5.2 Schedule ................................................................................................. 7
5.3 Budget .................................................................................................... 7
6
Data Quality Objectives............................................................................. 8
6.1 MQOs..................................................................................................... 9
6.2 Ion-Balance Error................................................................................... 9
6.3 Completeness ......................................................................................... 9
6.4 Comparability....................................................................................... 10
7
Sampling Process Overview .................................................................... 10
7.1 Recommended Monitoring Wells ........................................................ 10
7.2 Parameters of Investigation.................................................................. 11
7.3 Other Available Data ........................................................................... 12
8
Sampling & Measurement Procedures .................................................. 12
8.1 Measuring Water Levels ...................................................................... 12
8.2 Collecting Water Samples.................................................................... 13
8.3 Measuring Water Quality Parameters in the Field............................... 14
8.4 Continuous Monitoring ........................................................................ 15
8.5 Recordkeeping ..................................................................................... 16
9
Quality Control ........................................................................................ 17
9.1 Procedures ............................................................................................ 17
9.2 Corrective Action ................................................................................. 18
10 Data Management Procedures................................................................ 19
11 Audits & Reports ..................................................................................... 19
12 Data Verification & Validation............................................................... 19
13 Data Usability Assessment....................................................................... 21
14 Cited References....................................................................................... 23
List of Tables
Table 1
Summary of Recommended Wells for WRIA 16 Ambient
Groundwater Monitoring Program
Table 2
Startup and Annual Budget for Tiers 1, 2, and 3
Table 3
Example Measurement Quality Objectives (MQOs)
Table 4
Analyte List, Analysis Frequency, and Method of Analysis
Table 5
Quality Control Procedures and Frequency
Table 6
Sample Containers, Preservation, and Holding Times
Table 7a
Field Names For Use in Data Management System - Location Data
Table
Table 7b
Field Names For Use in Data Management System - Result Data
Table
List of Figures
Figure 1
Locations of Recommended Monitoring Wells
List of Appendices
Appendix A—Sample Written Agreement with Well Owner to Monitor Well
Appendix B—Sample Field Data Collection Sheets
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
1
About This Plan
This plan has been prepared using Appendix B of Guidelines for Preparing
Quality Assurance Project Plans for Environmental Studies, a publication of
the Washington State Department of Ecology (DOE, 2004), and it is intended
to be used as the quality assurance project plan (QAPP) for the groundwater
monitoring program that this plan describes. The DOE guidelines follow a systematic planning process described by the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA).
This Plan only includes the pertinent elements specified in DOE’s guidelines,
which are designed to address a range of environmental studies. It does not include the rigorous, detailed elements required for contamination studies because we propose monitoring only constituents that occur naturally, at measurable concentrations, under both unimpacted and impacted conditions.
2
Distribution
Twenty-five copies of this monitoring plan have been distributed to the members of the WRIA 16 Planning Unit.
3
Background
The Skokomish-Dosewallips Basin, WRIA 16, is located on the Olympic Peninsula on the west side of Hood Canal (Figure 1). The southern part of WRIA
16 lies in Mason County and the northern part lies in Jefferson County. The
physiography ranges from the snow-capped mountains in the western part of
WRIA 16 to the flatlands of the Skokomish River Valley in the southeastern
part and to the hills and river valleys along the eastern shore of Hood Canal.
The WRIA 16 Planning Area includes the south shore of Hood Canal, which is
WRIA 14b. This is the portion of WRIA 14 (Kennedy / Goldsborough) that
drains north into the lower Hood Canal.
The principal drainages in WRIA 16 are the Dosewallips, Duckabush, Hamma
Hamma, and the Skokomish Rivers. Many smaller streams discharge into
Hood Canal.
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
3.1
Hydrogeology
In general, the hydrogeology of the area is characterized by glacial deposits
and basalt. Glacial deposits comprise permeable outwash, low-permeability
till, fluvially reworked glacial deposits, and low-permeability glaciolacustrine
silt and clay. Wells are completed in gravel units within the unconsolidated deposits or in fractured basalts. Uplands may be covered with a thin veneer of
glacial deposits overlying basalt. River valleys have a relatively thick sequence
of glacial deposits beneath alluvial deposits.
During 2002, the Planning Unit completed a draft Phase 2 Level 1 Technical
Assessment which describes what is known about water issues. A key finding
concludes that although much less than 1 percent of the total amount of available water is actually used, the watershed still faces serious availability problems during the low-flow summer months.
Development in the basin is primarily concentrated along the shorelines of
Hood Canal and Lake Cushman. Water supplies are needed for future development in the Brinnon area, most notably the Black Point area. Other “growth
areas” include Union, Hoodsport, and Lilliwaup. Some wells near the shore
have experienced seawater intrusion. A few are located inland in more remote
parts of the basin; access to these wells may be difficult or require lengthy
driving time.
3.2
Previous Work
Most of the water quality information available for the WRIA 16 Planning
Area is for surface water (streams and marine areas). For streams, concerns include nutrients (primarily nitrate), pH, and coliform. For marine waters, low
dissolved oxygen is the primary concern. Very little groundwater quality data
has been collected for wells throughout the WRIA 16 Planning Area. Some
data indicate that chloride is a constituent of concern in a few wells and may be
a result of seawater intrusion. Hydrogeologic Study of the Lower Dosewallips /
Brinnon Area reports that the chloride source is uncertain. The report recommends additional sampling to identify whether the chloride originates from
seawater intrusion or from connate groundwater.
A water supply and groundwater impact analysis was prepared as part of the
Draft Environmental Impact Statement prepared for the Pleasant Harbor Marina and Golf Resort. This analysis includes subsurface sections through the
Black Point peninsula in the Brinnon area (Subsurface Group, 2008).
The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has monitored shallow groundwater quality for nutrients along the South Shore of Hood Canal (Turney and Simonds,
2006; Simonds et al, 2008). Most of the USGS samples were collected from
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
temporaiy shallow piezometers that were installed for the study. However, neither the USGS nor any other agency has monitored ambient groundwater levels
or water quality in the WR.IA 16 Planning Area; consequently, we have no reasonable means to determine whether foture groundwater development will
cause unacceptable impacts on sti·eamflow, aquifer levels, an d water quality.
4
Monitoring Program Description
4.1
Objectives
The goal of this Plan is to provide a framework for implementing an ambient
monitoring program in WR.IA 16 Planning Area. Designed to addresses water
levels an d groundwater quality, this program uses a wide anay of wells to
cover a large geographic expanse that includes areas where foture development
is expected to occur. The monitoring data will not only serve as a basis for
characterizing the regional hydrogeology, but it will also help fill gaps that
were identified during eai·lier studies. Most impo1i antly, it will provide a basis
for predicting the impacts of foture proposed groundwater development an d
provide data for early detection of water quality and water quantity problems.
Planners can then make decisions that sustain adequate sh'eamflow, aquifer
levels, an d water quality. This plan specifies procedures an d protocols for
achieving several key objectives, as noted below.
Objective
Represent the range of hydrogeologic
conditions in the basin
Identify seasonal w ater level trends
Identify trends in concentrations of key
constituents
Provide data for evaluating possible
seawater intrusion
Collect data on a regular schedule from
private and water supply wells
Ensure greatest possible data accuracy
Approach
Select a set of monitoring wells in optimum locations
Monitor quarterly at selected w ells for at
least 2 years
Select an optimum suite of analytes for
reaular w ater samplina
Monitor chloride continuously at selected w ells
Develop cooperative relationships with
well owners that respect their time and
property
Collect samples and review lab results
using consistent protocols; maintain
data in a format consistent with DOE's
Environmental Information Management
System (EIMS) database
NORTHWEST
Land & Water,
INC.
Consu lting in Hydrogeology
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
4.2
Data Sources
This Plan uses information from many sources:
4.3
•
DOE well log database (1,712 wells within the WRIA 16 Planning Area)
•
Washington State Department of Health (DOH) database (116 Group A
wells and 137 Group B wells in the WRIA 16 Planning Area, in the form
of shapefiles)
•
Brinnon area hydrogeologic study (Aspect, 2005)
•
USGS nitrate study in South Hood Canal (Simonds et al, 2008)
•
Mason County PUD#1 wells
Method
4.3.1
Database
Well data was imported into an Access database after establishing project coordinates using GIS methods. Logs for the deepest wells in each section were
printed, summarized, and entered into Access. The database was then integrated with ViewLog, which allowed us to map the wells, create a set of crosssections, and view the wells and well logs in a three-dimensional system.
4.3.2
Well Selection
Wells were selected based on location and depth to represent groundwater
conditions throughout the WRIA 16 Planning Area. The data set includes shallow and deep wells, wells completed in the basalt and unconsolidated deposits,
wells located on uplands and lowland areas, wells located near the shore, and
inland wells. Our selection criteria also emphasized “growth areas”—Brinnon,
Black Point, Triton, Lilliwaup, Hoodsport, the Lower Skokomish River valley,
Union, and the Sunset Beach area—where future groundwater development is
likely. A few remote wells were also selected for background conditions. To be
selected for continuous monitoring, a well had to meet one of two criteria: It
must lie within a growth area that is subject to seawater intrusion or it must lie
within an area where groundwater decline is an issue.
In general, shallow wells near streams were not considered because these wells
are likely already being monitored under DOH’s GWI program (groundwater
under the influence of surface water) and these wells are not as pertinent to the
issue of future groundwater development.
In general, the majority of the population and areas of anticipated growth occurs near the Hood Canal coastline. For these cases, potential for seawater intrusion is an important concern due to proximity to marine waters of Hood Ca-
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
nal. Therefore, while domestic wells occur within a broader part of the WRIA
16 Planning Area, most of the recommended wells occur near the canal’s
coastline.
4.4
Implementing the Monitoring Program
The tasks required to implement the Plan are summarized below. These tasks
would be conducted on a quarterly basis, unless stated otherwise. Detailed
monitoring procedures are given in Section 8, “Sampling & Measurement Procedures.”
For Startup:
•
Conduct a site visit to each well.
•
If it has not already been obtained, obtain a signed written agreement.
•
Locate well on a map using local streets or use a hand-held GPS unit to
identify spatial coordinates of the well. Update the land-surface and wellbottom elevation data in the database, using GPS elevation data or digital
elevation data with mapping software (GIS or ViewLog)
•
Confirm the ability to place a sounder down the well.
•
Identify and mark the measuring point on the well. Identify and describe
the sampling port.
•
Prepare a local map for each well and include any detailed descriptions
needed to describe clearly and concisely how to find and access the well,
the measuring point, and the sampling port.
•
Place the map in the field notebook.
For Quarterly Monitoring:
Step 1: Confirm the time and date of the site visit by telephone. If only water
level measurements will be made, request that the pump be shut off when you
arrive.
Step 2: Visit each well.
•
For wells with continuous monitoring, download data from the datalogger.
•
If applicable, collect a water sample from a spigot as close to the wellhead
as possible. Avoid sampling from garden hoses or from plumbing that receives water from a holding tank. Use the quality assurance protocols described in Section 8.2, “Collecting Water Samples.”
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
•
Shut the pump off, if necessary, and measure the depth to water. Keep
measuring until the water level stabilizes. Record this measurement using
the quality assurance protocols described in Section 8.3, “Measuring Water
Levels.”
Step 3: Store samples in an ice chest and bring them to the lab within the
shortest holding time of all the analytes. Alternatively, have the lab pick up the
samples.
Step 4: At the office, enter data into a spreadsheet or database.
Step 5: Review the quality control parameters to evaluate the data’s validity
and usability.
Step 6: Copy any continuous digital data to an Excel spreadsheet and update
the hydrograph for each well.
4.5
Duration of the Monitoring Program
The monitoring program should proceed according to this plan for at least two
years. After two years, the data should be evaluated to determine if the program should continued unchanged or be modified. The data should be reviewed to identify wells that could be eliminated from the program due to reduncy, wells that should be added due to new needs or information, and to
modify the analyte suite if needed. Similarly, water quality sampling frequency may be reduced if appropriate.
5
Organization, Schedule, & Budget
This section describes the project organization, schedule, and specific responsibilities. At this time, the Planning Unit has not identified who will conduct
and pay for the monitoring, or when the program would begin; therefore, this
Plan does not specify a start date or schedule. This section offers generic
guidelines but does not name individuals, institutions, or dates.
5.1
Organization
The Planning Unit will identify an individual within one of its participating
agencies (for example, Mason County) or hire a consultant to conduct the
monitoring. This individual(s) will answer to the Planning Unit and will be responsible for measuring water levels, collecting water quality samples, implementing quality control procedures, managing data, and reporting. We recom-
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
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mend that the Planning Unit designate one of its members to directly manage
the individual who manages the work described above.
5.2
Schedule
This monitoring plan describes a quarterly schedule for sampling, data review,
and data management activities. The final schedule will be determined by the
Planning Unit based on the available budget and/or other criteria. Quarterly
monitoring will be scheduled to optimize the recording of maximum seasonal
change.
5.3
Budget
At the request of the WRIA 16 Planning Unit, the budget for the monitoring
program has been prepared in three tiers.
•
Tier 1, the least expensive, attempts to minimize cost while maximizing
data collection.
•
Tier 3, the most expensive, is designed to obtain the best data for understanding ambient groundwater quality and quantity conditions, for tracking
trends in water level and conductivity at selected wells, and for documenting spatial variability.
•
Tier 2 offers an alternative that lies between the bare minimum of Tier 1
and the completeness of Tier 3.
Table 2 summarizes the tasks and costs to implement the monitoring program
for each tier. Startup costs are separate from annual costs for quarterly monitoring. The budgets allow the Planning Unit to modify the number of wells that
would be subject to quarterly water level measurements, water quality sampling, and continuous monitoring. In this way, the details of the monitoring
program can be adjusted to meet constraints based on budget or specific information needs.
Table 2 shows Tier 1 has 35 wells monitored for water level and 25 wells
monitored for water quality, while Tier 3 has 50 and 40 wells, respectively.
Because of the expense of laboratory analyses, fewer wells are monitored for
water quality than water level to reduce costs. The exact number of wells
monitored for water level and water quality can be modified as needed. More
wells would provide a greater range of spatial variability. Fewer wells, such as
30, would still provide a useful set of data. Fewer than 25 to 30 wells would
likely not provide an adequate representation of the hydrogeologic conditions.
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
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Startup costs reflect equipment and field hours needed to confirm location and
well access, identify the sampling port, and the office work needed to prepare
the field map and data sheets for each site. Annual costs reflect the field and
office hours needed to collect and manage the data and analytical laboratory
costs. Equipment costs include sales tax of 8.5% but do not include any handling fees.
Cost estimates were obtained from four labs in the area that are accredited with
DOE. Costs are shown on Table 2 and assume the cost for the low end of the
cost range. Analytical laboratory costs could increase by as much as several
thousand dollars per year if a more expensive laboratory is used. Laboratory
cost estimates do not include sales tax or handling fees. No sample transport
costs are included in the budget. Transport costs would need to be included if a
non-local lab is used.
Field and office hours assume a rate of $120/hr.
Additional budget should be considered to pay for the analytical laboratory
costs for the Skokomish Indian Tribe water supply wells so that they use the
same analytical methods and meet the same data review criteria as the data collected specifically for this project. These costs are included in the budget given
in Table 2. Therefore, for each tier, the number of wells associated with laboratory costs is increased by two more than the number of wells sampled.
6
Data Quality Objectives
The data collected under this plan will be useful for guiding future groundwater development but not for decision processes that outline critical, specific actions depending on the analytical results. Therefore, this section presents
measurement quality objectives (MQOs), which describe how good the data
must be to meet the objectives of the project. It does not include decision quality objectives (DQOs). Data that meet the objectives will be considered accurate and valid. Several types of errors will affect the quality of the data for this
monitoring program:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Errors in water level measurement
Errors in sampling (during collection of water samples)
Analyst errors during the measurement of field parameters
Equipment errors during the measurement of field parameters
Analyst and equipment errors during laboratory analysis of water samples
Data-entry errors during the data management process
The detailed sampling and measurement procedures described in Section 8,
“Sampling & Measurement Procedures,” address potential errors from sources
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
that are not related to labs or equipment. The MQOs described below, on the
other hand, are designed to identify whether the results reflect lab- or equipment-related errors; Section 9, “Quality Control,” offers procedures for reducing such errors.
In general, MQOs are used to evaluate quality control (QC) results; if the QC
results meet the MQOs, they are considered valid and it is inferred that the
sample results are also valid. However, the ion-balance error, which can be
calculated, provides a direct means to evaluate whether the major ion data is
valid for each sample. This section addresses the MQOs and ion balance separately.
6.1
MQOs
The MQOs are based on quality assurance criteria for method blanks, analytical duplicates, matrix spikes, and standard checking for each batch of samples.
MQOs are given in Table 3. While the quality control procedures (Section 10)
describe the required tests and their frequency, the control criteria establish the
acceptable results from these tests.
To evaluate bias, results for matrix spikes will be reviewed. To evaluate precision, results for analytical duplicates will be reviewed (DOE, 2004).
6.2
Ion-Balance Error
In water the charge of the anions (which is negative) must equal the charge of
the cations (which is positive). The accuracy of major dissolved-constituent
values can be checked using a cation-anion balance (Hem, 1985). The ionbalance error will be calculated for annual samples that have been analyzed for
a complete suite of routine ions (sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium,
chloride, sulfate, carbonate and bicarbonate). It should not exceed 10 percent.
6.3
Completeness
Completeness is a measure of the amount of valid data needed to be obtained
from the measurement system. The goal for this monitoring program is to sample at least 95% of the wells identified to be included. Ideally, 100% of the
wells identified for the program would be monitored each quarter.
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
6.4
Comparability
Comparability is the ability to compare the data with data from other studies.
Comparability is ensured by selecting and documenting standardized procedures for sampling and analysis. This plan strives to use consistent field and
analytical methods over the course of the groundwater monitoring program.
7
Sampling Process Overview
Wells will be sampled quarterly. If access allows, water levels will be measured in all wells, and water samples will be collected at selected wells. Several
parameters will be measured in the field at the time of sampling—specific
conductivity, pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen (DO). In addition to these
field parameters, water samples will be analyzed by a laboratory for chloride,
nitrate, dissolved oxygen, and total dissolved solids (TDS). Annually, samples
will be also be analyzed for sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sulfate,
and alkalinity. Table 4 summarizes the recommended analyte list and schedule
for the monitoring program. This table may be modified at the request of the
Planning Unit based on budget constraints or other criteria. Once finalized, the
list should be incorporated into both this Plan and the field notebook.
Selected wells may be instrumented with a datalogger and a sensor to record
frequent measurements of electrical conductivity and water level. Some wells
will be instrumented with a datalogger and sensor to record only water level in
wells where water level decline is the only significant concern. Recommended
data collection frequency should be about every half-hour. This would provide
sufficient data to identify tidal effects but not so much data that the data volume is unwieldy. Data from these wells will be downloaded quarterly, on the
same schedule as the other wells. Before setting the data collection frequency,
confirm that the datalogger memory can hold the number of records indicated
by the selected frequency. Manual water level measurements will be made at
each well before digital data are downloaded.
7.1
Recommended Monitoring Wells
Table 1 lists wells that should be considered for the monitoring program. A final set of monitoring wells will be selected from this table based not only on
budget constraints but also on the feasibility of negotiating an access agreement and measuring water levels using a sounder. Tier 1 would include the
minimum number of wells and would provide good spatial distribution of
wells within the populated area of the WRAI 16 Planning Area. Tier 3 would
include a larger number of wells, would provide a good spatial distribution of
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
wells, but would monitor more wells in the highest growth areas and would
have more shallow deep pairs.
Wells in Table 1 are grouped by nearest town and listed in order from the
northern part of the WRIA 16 Planning Area at Seal Point to the southern part
at Union and then east along the south shore of Hood Canal toward Belfair.
Each well is assigned a priority number of 1, 2, or 3 for water level and water
quality monitoring. Due to costs, fewer wells will be monitored for water quality than for water leve1. A priority of “1” indicates that the well should be considered for Tier 1. Since Tier 3 is more comprehensive than Tier 1, all wells in
Tier 1 would be included in Tiers 2 and 3. A priority of more than “1” indicates that the well’s inclusion will depend on which tier the Planning Unit selects and how many wells can be monitored. Wells with a “Y” in the “Definite” column should definitely be considered in Tiers 1, 2, and 3; verbal
agreement to monitor has already been made with the well owner or operator
for these wells.
Figure 1 shows the well location for the wells included on Table 1. Wells designated as definite are indicated with a different symbol than the rest of the
wells. The well numbers shown on Figure 1 are given in Table 1. Figure 1 illustrates that in areas where many wells are available, like Hoodsport and Union, the list includes more wells than needed, to provide plenty of options in
case access is a problem. Similarly, in Ayock, Hamma Hamma, and west of
Forest Beach. More wells than needed are provided in Table 1 in case the well
is not accessible or permission from the well owner is not provided. Therefore,
there are more wells with a priority of 1 than would be included in a Tier 1
program. The final list should include at least one well in each of these areas
for Tier 1. The final list could also include a well that is not currently on Figure 1 if it is deemed important by the Planning Unit.
Table 1 summarizes hydrogeologic information, the reason for the well’s inclusion, the status of verbal approval from the owner, and contact information.
In some cases, we have not yet successfully contacted well owners and we
therefore recommend a site visit to obtain approval. Site visits should be conducted for each well that is selected for monitoring to confirm adequate access.
Well owners must sign a formal statement of agreement to monitor; Appendix
A contains sample agreements.
7.2
Parameters of Investigation
Field parameters—pH, specific conductivity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen (DO)—will be measured at wells sampled for water quality. Collected
samples will be sent to the analytical laboratory for analysis of pH, TDS, nitrate, chloride, and dissolved oxygen. Annually, the samples will also be analyzed for calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, sulfate, and total alkalinity.
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
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If the pump has been shut down for more than a few hours, the pumping rate
will be estimated and the pumping duration prior to sampling will be recorded.
For consistency and comparability, all wells will be sampled within a 2-week
period during each quarterly sampling event.
7.3
Other Available Data
The Skokomish Tribe currently monitors groundwater beneath the Skokomish
Reservation from about nine shallow monitoring wells. In addition, supply
wells are monitored regularly for water quality. Although these wells will not
be part of the monitoring program, the Tribe will provide historical and future
monitoring data to the Planning Unit. These data should be included in the data
management aspect of the monitoring program so that data from the Skokomish River valley are included. Similar analytical methods should be used to
ensure comparability.
Mason County currently monitors two wells that are near to Webb Hill. Mason
County will continue to monitor these wells and provide the data to the project
manager of the monitoring program to be included in the data management
procedures. Mason County will conduct the quality assurance and quality control review of the data before providing the data to the project manager.
8
Sampling & Measurement Procedures
8.1
Measuring Water Levels
Step 1: Prepare
Before going out in the field, turn on the sounder and use the battery test to make sure it is working properly. Always carry spare
batteries for the sounder.
Step 2: Measure
Measure the water level. If possible, use the same sounder that
has been used for previous measurements. Turn the sounder on.
•
If the well has a sounder access tube, hold
the sounder tape between your thumb and
index finger and lower it into the tube until
the probe tip completes the circuit by
touching the water surface. You may need
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
to raise and lower the tape to find the surface. Read the measurement at the
top of the tube on the sounder tape.
•
If the well does not have a sounder access tube, lower the probe into the
well until it touches the water surface and completes the electrical circuit.
Be sure to lower it slowly and carefully to prevent the sounder from swinging and getting caught on something such as the riser pipe. Measure the
depth to water while holding the measuring tape at the top of the well casing or some other stationary location.
Take several measurements a few minutes apart to ensure that the water level
in the well is stable. Compare the measurement to the previous one to verify
that it makes sense. If not, measure again.
Step 3: Record
Record the date and time on the field data sheet for the well. Only record
measurements when water level stability is indicated. Record the final measurement as the depth to water.
Mark the spot on the casing (or other object) where you measured the water
level (for example, a particular location on the top of casing). Describe this location on the field data sheet and use your mark each time you measure that
well.
Step 4: Clean and decontaminate the sounder
The sounder will be cleaned as it is removed from the well, before being
wound onto the reel. The sounder tape will be wiped with a clean cloth using
either isopropyl alcohol or a weak bleach solution. To make a 0.5% solution
using standard household bleach (3.5%) use 1 part chlorine to 6 parts water.
The probe tip will be sprayed with the bleach solution before and after each
use. If at any time, after removing a sounder probe from a well, the probe
showns evidence of iron bacteria in the form of brown slime, with wire tape
and probe tip should be washed in soap to reomove the visible slime and then
rinsed or wiped down with alcohol or bleach solution.
8.2
Collecting Water Samples
Step 1: Purge
If the pump has been off for a while and you (or the owner) just turned it on for
sampling, pump the well until at least three borehole volumes have been
purged.
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Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
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To verify that the well has effectively been purged, monitor pH, temperature,
and conductivity. When these parameters stabilize (successive measurements
change by less than 10 percent), you can assume that formation water has entered the well. Measure the three parameters at 5-minute intervals, or less, and
document times and values on the field data collection sheet, which should reside in the field notebook with previous sheets for the well.
See Section 8.3, “Measuring Water Quality ,” for details about equipment and
procedures. See Section 8.5, “Recordkeeping,” for information on calculating
borehole volumes. Section 9.1 “Quality Control, Field” provides guidelines
for obtaining bottles form the analytical lab.
Step 2: Sample
Collect the sample only after the field parameters stabilize—even if three borehole volumes have already been purged. Document the time of sampling.
•
Collect samples from a spigot as close to the wellhead as possible.
•
Avoid sampling from a garden hose or from a point after the water has
moved into a holding tank.
•
Place samples directly into bottles provided by the analytical laboratory
and cap them immediately.
•
Take care to prevent overflow in bottles that contain a preservative.
•
When holding the sample bottle, keep your hands away from the opening
to prevent contamination. Do not touch the open edge of the sample bottle
with the spigot or anything else.
Step 3: Label
Label the samples clearly with the well name, date, time, and your name or initials.
Step 4: Preserve
Keep samples in a cooler with ice at 4 degrees centigrade or less from the time
of collection until delivery to the lab.
8.3
Measuring Water Quality Parameters in the Field
8.3.1
Specific Conductivity, pH, and Temperature
Specific conductivity, pH, and temperature should be measured using a field
instrument purchased specifically for this project. We recommend the portable
and waterproof Hanna HI 98129, which is reliable, easy to use, and relatively
inexpensive. The instrument should be calibrated according to the manufac-
14
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
turer’s instructions at the beginning of each day. Clean the probe after each
measurement by spraying it with distilled water, which you can buy at grocery
stores. Be sure to purchase distilled water—not purified water, which contains
dissolved constituents.
8.3.2
Dissolved Oxygen
Use CHEMets®—self-filling ampoules for visual colorimetric analysis—to
measure DO. These easy-to-use kits (and refills) are available online at
www.chemetrics.com/visprods/Oxygen.htm. Be sure to purchase separate kits
to cover the ranges from 0–1 ppm and 1–12 ppm. One set of refills should always be available in the field.
To use the CHEMets, immerse the ampoule in the sample and snap the tip. The
correct volume is drawn in by vacuum, leaving a small, inert gas bubble. To
mix the sample and reagent, tilt the ampoule so the bubble travels from end to
end. In 2 minutes or less, compare the resulting color to the standards that
come with the kit to quantify the result. Test first using the 1–12 ppm kit. If
concentrations are less than 1 ppm, test again using the 0–1 ppm kit.
8.4
Continuous Monitoring
Water levels and/or conductivity can be monitored continuously using a downhole sensor and a datalogger. Electrical conductivity is of particular interest
because it can be used as an indicator of seawater intrusion. Work by USGS
indicates that conductivity can range widely within a single well over a relatively short period and that values can vary with the tide. Occasional single
measurements provide limited information about seawater intrusion. Therefore,
it is important to observe trends over a relatively long period. Continuous
monitoring for at least 1 month will indicate the general range in conductivity.
To optimize resources, a single transducer can be moved to different wells at
different times during the study. The monitoring results, however, may reveal
one or more wells that would be good candidates for a dedicated transducer;
likewise, they may also show that “sharing” a transducer is the best approach.
It is may be useful to monitor a single well for one quarter and then switch to a
different well for the next quarter. In this way, one conductivity sensor and
datalogger could be used to monitor several wells.
Step 1: Record a baseline measurement.
Before installing a sensor and datalogger, measure the water level with a
sounder. Record the time and water level on the field data sheet. This measurement will be used to calibrate the digital data.
15
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
Step 2: Install the equipment and set the measurement interval.
Install the datalogger and sensor according to manufacturers’ instructions. Include a copy of the calibration data sheet in the field notebook. After installation, set the reading frequency to every minute. Collect data for a few minutes
and then download the data to verify that the datalogger is recording and
downloading properly. Once you establish that the equipment is functioning
properly, set the data measurement interval to 30 minutes to record 48 measurements per day.
8.5
Recordkeeping
Maintain a field notebook, either bound or loose leaf, for the monitoring program. The notebook should feature a separate section divider labeled for each
well. Each divider should contain a field data collection sheet for water level
and water quality monitoring. Example field data collection sheets are included
in Appendix B.
The water level sheet should document the name of field technician, monitoring well, date, and time; water level measurements will be recorded for each
well so they can be compared.
The water quality sheet should document the flow rate, purge time, and date /
time of sampling for each sampling event. It should also include the well
depth, diameter, and borehole volume calculations. The well depth and diameter are typically available on the well log, which should be incorporated into
the field notebook.
8.5.1
Calculating Purge Volumes
Use the following equation to calculate three borehole volumes of water:
Purge time = (3 x borehole volume) / flow rate
Borehole volume = 3.1416(inner diameter of well) x (well depth – water depth)
8.5.2
Initiating the Chain of Custody
Fill out chain of custody (COC) forms and keep a copy in the notebook. The
COC forms must accompany the samples to the lab. Take care to ensure that
you are the only person to handle the samples until they are delivered to the
lab. Both you and the lab personnel will sign the form at the time of delivery.
16
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
9
Quality Control
9.1
Procedures
9.1.1
Field
The pH/conductivity meter should be calibrated each day using fresh standards. Calibration results should be recorded in the field notebook.
9.1.2
Laboratory
The selected laboratory will be accredited by DOE. The quality control procedures in this plan rely heavily on this lab’s quality assurance program (See
Section 6, “Data Quality Objectives”). Table 5 summarizes these procedures
and the frequency at which the lab must conduct them. In general, standards
are checked daily and other quality control measures such as method blanks,
analytical duplicates, matrix spikes, and matrix spike duplicates are performed
once per batch. A batch of samples comprises no more than a set number of
samples—most commonly, ten.
The lab includes the results of its quality control procedures with each quarterly report of analytical results for the samples submitted. This report should
be reviewed by a designated individual to verify that they meet the MQOs for
the monitoring program.
Samples collected for specific analyses may require a minimum volume, or the
bottle may require special treatment. To minimize errors related to insufficient
sample size or preservation, the lab should provide the bottles. The field sampler will contact the lab and request a bottle order for the number of wells being sampled and for any field duplicates that are to be collected. The lab will
provide the correct bottles, along with any required preservatives for the requested analytes. Table 6 summarizes the sample bottles, preservation, and
holding times for the analytes being considered for this project. Table 4 shows
the analytical methods and reporting limits that should be used for the program. These analytical methods are approved by DOE. Methods different from
those shown on Table 4 should be approved by the quality assurance officer at
DOE.
9.1.3
Ion-Balance Error
Ion-balance errors will be calculated for each sample with major ion analyses.
The calculation should be automated using software features in Access or Excel, whichever is used for data management, using the following formula:
Percent ion balance error = [(cations – anions)/(cations + anions)]x100
17
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
Cations and anions are expressed in concentration units of milliequivalents per
liter.
9.1.4
Compare Field and Laboratory Results for TDS and DO
Field and lab measurements of TDS and DO will be compared using the following equation:
Percent error for field parameter = [(Field-Lab)/Lab]x100
If the difference is less than 5 percent of the laboratory results, then the frequency of laboratory measurements may be considered to reduce long-term lab
costs.
The DO is measured in the field as an inexpensive, semi-quantitative method
to identify low, moderate, or high concentration of dissolved oxygen. Since
low DO in marine waters of Hood Canal is a concern, approximate concentration for DO in groundwater in the WRIA 16 Planning Area is useful to better
understand the role of groundwater with regards to the low DO in Hood Canal.
Field measurements for DO will be compared to laboratory results to identify
if the field method is reliable for long-term use in this study in lieu of more expensive laboratory analysis.
9.2
Corrective Action
If the results for the laboratory quality control procedures are outside the quality control criteria, the lab’s project manager should be contacted and the results should be reviewed to identify the source of the problem. The lab must
follow prescribed procedures to resolve the problems. Such procedures may
include retrieving missing information, recalibrating the measurement system,
and/or reanalyzing the sample if the holding time has not been exceeded and if
the volume is sufficient.
If the ion balance error is greater than 10 percent and the results for the quality
control procedures meet the MQOs, consider adding other ions in the analysis
to account for the observed error. Note any pattern in the error and note
whether the error exceeds than 10 percent in more than one sample. If all the
errors are of the same charge (positive or negative), it is likely that a significant
ion has not been included in the analysis. If the errors are of different charges,
they are more likely analytical.
18
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
10
Data Management Procedures
This section addresses both field water level measurements and field and laboratory water quality data. All data will be maintained electronically; therefore,
field data must be converted to a digital format from the notebooks.
Water quality data should be maintained in a Microsoft Access database. Field
headers should be consistent with DOE’s EIMS database. Data entered using
these field names can then be easily uploaded into the DOE EIMS. Similarly,
data from the EIM could be easily incorporated into the project database. The
location data needs to be entered only once for each well. The results data
needs to be entered each time data is collected. These two tables are crossreference using the field (User_Location_ID).
Tables 7a and 7b summarize the headers that should be used for the location
and results data, respectively. To be consistent with the EIM requirements, all
the wells should have a DOE well tag identifier. Because some wells that we
recommend for monitoring (Table 1) are not included in the DOE database,
they do not currently have a well tag ID; DOE will need to provide a well tag
ID for these wells that are included in the program. In addition to using the
field headers provided in Tables 7a and 7b, it is important to use the information provided in these tables to fill these fields in correctly.
If data is uploaded to the EIMS, field results for dissolved oxygen and pH
should not be included since the analytical methods are different than recommended and would thus not provide adequate comparability.
11
Audits & Reports
The data will be made available electronically to anyone within the Planning
Unit who requests it, either as Excel workbooks or as an Access database. Hydrographs and water-quality trend plots will be produced annually.
12
Data Verification & Validation
Data verification involves examining the data for errors, omissions, and compliance with quality control (QC) acceptance criteria. The analytical laboratory
is responsible for performing the following functions:
•
Reviewing and reporting QC checks on instrument performance such as
initial and continuing calibrations.
19
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
•
Reviewing and reporting case narratives. This includes comparison of QC
results with method acceptance criteria such as precision data, surrogate
and spike recoveries, laboratory control sample analysis, and procedural
blanks.
•
Explaining flags or qualifiers assigned to sample results.
•
Reviewing and assessing the lab’s performance in meeting the conditions
and requirements set forth in this sampling plan.
•
Reporting the above information to the project manager or lead.
After measurement results have been recorded, the results are verified by the
office lead to ensure that:
•
Data are consistent, correct, and complete, with no errors or omissions.
•
Results of QC samples accompany the sample results.
•
Established criteria for QC results were met.
•
Data qualifiers are properly assigned where necessary.
•
Data specified in the Sampling Process Design were obtained.
•
Methods and protocols specified in the Quality Assurance Project Plan
were followed.
The analytical laboratory is responsible for verifying all analytical results. Reports of results and case summaries provide adequate documentation of the
verification process. Laboratory analytical data will be reviewed and verified
by comparison with acceptance criteria according to the laboratory’s established data review protocol. Appropriate qualifiers will be used to label results
that do not meet quality assurance requirements. An explanation for data qualifiers is provided.
The analytical laboratory will include in its report a comparison of the results
of quality control tests (described in Section 10) to the MQOs established in
Section 6. The laboratory data is considered valid if:
•
These tests meet the MQOs.
•
Ion-balance error is less than 10 percent. Under this condition, it can also
be assumed that all significant ions have been analyzed.
Comparing the field data to the laboratory data:
•
If after 1 year, the field measurements for TDS and dissolved oxygen are
within than 5 percent of the lab measurements, then the field measurements
could be considered valid and the lab measurements can be discontinued to
save costs.
20
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
Field results will also be verified by field staff before leaving the site after
measurements are made. As described in Section 8.5 Recordkeeping, detailed
field notes will be taken to meet the requirements for documentation of field
measurements. The field lead is responsible for checking that field data entries
are complete and error free. The field lead should check for consistency within
an expected range of values, verify measurements, ensure measurements are
made within the acceptable instrumentation error limits, and record anomalous
observations.
13
Data Usability Assessment
Data usability assessment follows verification. To analyze data for its usability,
the project lead will consider precision, bias, completeness, comparability, and
documentation of adherence to protocols. This involves a detailed examination
of the data package using professional judgment to determine whether the
method quality objectives (MQOs) have been met. The project manager examines the complete data package to determine compliance with procedures outlined in this Plan. The project manager is also responsible for the data usability
assessment by ensuring that the MQOs for precision, bias, and sensitivity are
met.
Part of this process is an evaluation of precision. Precision will be assessed by
calculating relative percent difference (RPDs) for field and laboratory duplicates. Laboratory duplicates will yield estimates of precision performance at
the laboratory only. Field duplicates will indicate overall variability (environmental + sampling + laboratory). Acceptable precision performance is outlined
in the MQOs (Table 3).
Completeness will be assessed by examining:
•
number of samples collected compared to the sampling plan;
•
number of samples shipped and received at the laboratory in good condition;
•
the laboratory’s ability to produce usable results for each sample; and
•
sample results accepted by the project manager.
Data will also be examined for extremes (i.e., against historical records and
against the distributions of these project data). Extreme values will require
logical explanations. Identified sources of bias will be described. After the assessment described above, usability will be identified:
21
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
•
If the MQOs are met and the RPDs are acceptable, documentation is thorough, the sample data will be identified as useable.
•
If the ion balance error is acceptable, yet the MQOs and RPDs are unmet,
the data will still be considered useable.
•
All data submitted to DOH and included in its database will be considered
useable.
•
Data collected by the Skokomish Tribe will be considered useable if it
meets tribal data quality objectives. All efforts should be made to encourage the analytical methods used by the Tribe are the same as those used as
part of this program.
22
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
14
Cited References
DOE, 2005. Quality Management Plan: Agency Plan to Implement, Document, and
Assess the Effectiveness of the Quality System Supporting Environmental Data
Operations. Publication 05-03-031, compiled by Cliff Kirchmer, September 2005.
DOE, 2004. Guidelines for Preparing Quality Assurance Project Plans for Environmental Studies. Publication No. 04-03-030, revision of Publication No. 01-03-003,
July 2004, by Stewart M. Lombard and Cliff J. Kirchmer.
Aspect Consulting LLC, 2005. Hydrogeologic Study of the Lower Dosewallips /
Brinnon Area. Prepared for the WRAI 16 Planning Unit, Project No. 030116-00105, dated March 30, 2005.
Golder Associates, Inc., 2002. Draft Report on Skokomish-Dosewallips Watershed
(WRIA 16), Phase II-Level 1 Assessment, Data Compilation and Preliminary Assessment. Prepared for the WRIA 16 Planning Unit Steering Committee. Report
023-1076.150, dated August 8, 2002.
Hem, John, 1985. Study and Interpretation of the Chemical Characteristics of Natural
Water. USGS Water-Supply Paper 2254.
Subsurface Group, LLC, 2008. Pleasant Harbor Marina and Golf Resort – Water Supply and groundwater impact analysis. As a section of the Pleasant Harbor Marina
and Golf Resort Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Jefferson County Department of Community Development, September 5, 2007.
Simonds, et at., 2008. Estimates of Nutrient Loading by Ground-Water Discharge into
the Lynch Cove Area of Hood Canal, Washington. USGS report 2008-5078.
Turney, G.L., Paulson, A.J., and Simonds, F.W., 2006. Estimates of Nitrogen Loading
and Groundwater Discharge to Hood Canal: Presentation by the U.S. Geological
Survey at the Lower Hood Canal Watershed Coalition, Hood Canal Clean Water
Festival, Belfair, Washington, July 22, 2006. Accessed online at
http://wa.water.usgs.gov/projects/hoodcanal/data/HC072206LHCWC.pdf
DOE, 2006. Watershed Management Plan, Skokomish-Dosewallips Water Resource
Inventory Area (WRIA 16), including the WRIA 14 South Shore Sub-basin, May
11, 2006, as adopted by the WRIA 16 Planning Unit.
23
3
1
1
1
2
2
2
51352
53498
301343 AFS634
51046
337602 AGP368
276285 AHB685
AHB685
site visit
call
call
1
1
1
1
1
1
ABZ526
call
call
site visit
S. Taylor
S. Taylor
S. Taylor
S. Taylor
yes
S. Taylor
S. Taylor
Yes
site visit
S. Taylor
site visit
S. Taylor
site visit
site visit
site visit
S. Taylor
data
yes
yes
yes
yes
data
data
S. Taylor
S. Taylor
yes
S. Taylor
S. Taylor
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
3
3
3
2
2
AHA962
Y
Y
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
PLEASANT TIDES WATER CO OP
TRITON COVE ESTATES
CAMP ROBINSWOLD GIRL SCOUT WELL #2
PARADISE COVE CLUB, INC. WTR SYS WELL #1
OLYMPIC CANAL TRACTS
HUNGRY BEAR CAFE
CANAL VIEW. WELL #1
Brinnon
Triton
Triton/Eldon
Duckabush/Trito
Duckabush
Eldon
Eldon
call
likely
yes
likey
site visit
site visit
call
Hamma
Hamma
Ayock
EAGLE CREEK TAVERN WATER SYSTEM
Ayock
COLONY SURF WATER SUPPLY
Ayock
GERALDINE ANDERSON
Ayock
MASON COUNTY PUD #1
Lilliwaup
CANAL MUTUAL WATER Well 1 North
Lilliwaup
CANAL MUTUAL WATER Upper
Lilliwaup
CANAL MUTUAL WATER Well 2 South
Lilliwaup
TAHJA II WS Well #1 AHA964 TAHJA II
Hoodsport/Lilli
CANAL BEACH TRACTS MUTUAL WTR CO WELL #1 Hoodsport
HOODSPORT SUNCREST WELL (85204)
Hoodsport
MASON CO. PARKS
Hoodsport
LAUBER HOME TRACTS A
Hoodsport
HOODSPORT REEDER WELL
Hoodsport
JOHN HUBEN
Hoodsport
BETTY GOODPASTER
Hoodsport
THOMAS AND MARY CARR
Hoodsport
KEITH HALLER
Hoodsport
ROGER MAHLENDORF
lower Cushman
POTLATCH BEACH MUTUAL WS WELL #2
Potlatch
SKOKOMISH INDIAN RESERVATION
Skokomish R. Va
MIKE PETZ
Skokomish R. Va
RON GOLD
Skokomish R. Va
MINERVA TERRACE Well #1
Brockdale/Union
MOOREVIEW HEIGHTS WS Well #1
Brockdale/Union
MARK BISER
Webb Hill
GERALD WILLIAMS
Webb Hill
ALDERBROOK WATER CO WELL #2
Union
MADRONA BEACH SUPPLY WELL #1
Union
VUECREST Well #1
Union
HOOD CANAL WATER COMPANY B WELL #1 ACO40Union
UNION WATER SYSTEM Well #2
Union
49 UNION WATER SYSTEM Well #1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
WDOE
DOH
Well
WDOE Source
Log ID Well Tag
ID
51013
48486
277293
333122 AFT796
43970 ACM513
341555 AFB551
Y
47629
Y
Y
54546 ABB199
499850 BAC353
AHA959
44919 AHA960
AHA964
Y
Y
3410003
6905002
249728 ABG515
1
1
1
1
49637
54377 AAW361
1403194 874545.9
1412387 875734.9
1412470
878359
1385552
866085
1405037
854912
1408058 870532.9
1405713
858742
210
443
280
28
562
240
157
315
30
92
3
128
72
-53
-128
-250
64
-559
-112
1402493
857477 Black Point, nested with American CG
1385800
840771 Basalt deep near shore
1383065 831726.9 deep basalt near shore
1393274
846348 shallow, nr shore same as 48482
1399442
850736 deep well, Group A
1374523 819559.1 deep basalt nr shore swi
1374382 819314.2 location
73
75
2
1371906 812832.1 location, select only one from Hamma
1367065
807656 location,, select onlyy one from Hamma
1368262 802980.5 Ayock
ocat o vicinity
, se ect o y o e o t o o
1362043 795662.9 Ayock vicinity
1363388 799874.2 location, select only 1 or 2 from Ayock
1368094 805701.2 Ayock vicinity
1350271 781187.3 deep basalt
1352464 779559.3 seawater intrusion
1351599 781238.3 other Canal Mutual
1354982 778719.2 seawater intrusion
1352421 779626.4 shallow, near water
1348918 771897.9 monitor w/ tribe, was Glen Ayr
1341857 765321.8 mon. with deeper Reeder well?
1339332 766567.3 Deep, upland
1346785 764439.3 near shore, deep gravel
1342848 764915.5 gravel, nr river, swi, deep
1343630 775761.3 upland, inland, basalt
1347503 769174.3 very shallow, upland
1349011 775760.3 deep upland, shale, nr river
1346339 775787.3 deep, shale, upland
1336709 766657.3 upland, uncon, inland, deep
1343125 757765.5 Location, availability
1341380 740088.4 River valley, gravel not right to nex
1327075
735433 Skokomish River Valley
1312402 739397.4 upper Skokomish River Valley
1340007 745263.2 far shore deep gravel
1342846 727069.1 far shore deep gravel
1347350 724137.5 offsite Webb Hill monitoring well
1347300
726700 Webb Hill
1365035 740671.7 nested site; unconsol, upland
1360093 748111.6 location
1356425 739832.3 deep, unconsol
1359830 746408.6 spatial variability, nested with Well B
1356856 746885.4 below sea level, location, available
available, nested site with Union Well
1357727 746904.6 1
location, availability, depth, nest with
1361650 744348.7 Well A
1360825 739018.2 nested site; unconsol, upland
1356135 743865.4 avaiable, deep
1362072 737580.8 spatial variability
1358115 741095.6 location, deep, upland, slight inland
282
420
76
515
70
68
101
167
518
203
270
220
33
278
380
515
99
92
40
42
450
305
110
279
430
10
302
0
16
26
279
515
0
243
725
161
259
351
640
121
20
43
118
66
400
358
-3
10
-66
-213
-70
-52
-75
112
-3
-203
-27
505
128
-19
-29
125
22
-72
3
76
-384
95
248
105002
4995001
1863701
ACO407 AA41801
51015
5192002
600
200
490
222
298
518
0
531
164
239
-82
-200
41
-58
-59
5192001
166
210
44
3405001
105001
242
292
376
262
393
52
469
246
374
544
-190
177
-130
112
151
115
328
213
1 Y
50234
50
51
52
53
54
HOOD CANAL WATER COMPANY A HOOD CANAL WUnion
ALDERBROOK WATER CO WELL #1
Union
Don H. Knudsen Pole Co.
Union
ALDERBROOK WATER CO WELL #3
Union
HIGHLAND PARK Well #1
Union
S. Taylor
S. Taylor
S. Taylor
S. Taylor
S. Taylor
Y
Y
1
1
2
2
3
2
1
3
3
3
46186
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
SCHMITZ WELL WELL
Union
SHADY BEACH WATER ASSN UNNAMED SPRING w. of Forest B.
JENN S WAY WATER SYSTEM WELL #1
w. of Forest B.
ROY TRELOOR
w. of Forest B.
SOUTH SHORE WATER SYSTEM WELL #1
w. of Forest B.
DAVIS, ROBERT P WS WELL #1
w. of Forest B.
SHADY BEACH FOUR WELL #1
w. of Forest B.
SHANNON DAHL
Forest Beach
TWANOH HEIGHTS COMMUNITY CLUB WELL #1
Forest Beach
TRAILS END WATER DISTRICT WS Well #3 AAB644 Forest Beach
TWANOH STATE PARK WELL #1
Forest Beach
REID REALITY - Twanoh Heights Community Well #2 Forest Beach
SUNSET BEACH WATER SYSTEM WELL A
Sunset Beach
LAKEWOOD COMMUNITY WATER SYSTEM WELL # Sunset Beach
LAKEWOOD HEIGHTS Well #1 Lakewood
Rose Point
BELFAIR WATER DISTRICT 1 WS WELL #3 HUMMIN Rose Point
BELFAIR SOUTH WATER SYSTEM WELL #2
Belfair
yes
call
call
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
2
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
3
2
3
1
3
1
Y
5507001
767701
46061
105003
3282001
5701
7770501
460701
126
561
435
6655001
1879501
590501
55892 ACN378
AHA905
AAB664
15301
8905503
SP94001
51796
15302
8604001
4548001
1799901
AHA956
535003
468702
Monitoring Reason
monitor seawater intrusion, deep
basalt
Deep Basalt nrt shore
deep basalt
Inland, unimpacted source
deep, Black Point well
monitored by Aspect
Black Point, nest with American CG
-393
-500
-192
196
-96
-26
-16
1
1
2
2
1
1 Y
1
*:
1099902
305201
668901
3410004
y-coord
State
Plane
NAD 27
92
3
90
321
174
30
72
1075601
1408001
1099901
x-coord
State
Plane
NAD 27
485
503
282
125
270
56
88
1364501
49033
55200 ABQ797
392945 AKA909
412583 AKJ033
52329
Y
Y
1094502
3368101
50222
49715
S. Taylor
Y
3313
Well
LSE, Bottom
feet Elev, feet
msl
msl
586701
345001
Union
call
call
call
site visit
S. Taylor
call
call
S. Taylor
call
call
S. Taylor
call
yes
18746
Depth, feet
3
1
1
1
1
1
3
yes
if found
yes
yes
call
likely
call
Conductivity
Transducer
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
Brinnon
Brinnon
Brinnon
Brinnon
Brinnon
Brinnon
Brinnon
Definite
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
JEFFERSON COUNTY PUD #1
JEFFERSON COUNTY PUD #1
J. W. & ROSANNE OLSEN
US OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK
AMERICAN CAMPGROUND
BRINNON SCHOOL DISTRICT
PLEASANT HARBOUR MARINA PRIMARY WELL
15 NANCY HANSEN
16 HAMMA RIDGE WATER SYSTEM WELL #1
17 AYOCK BEACH IMPROVEMENT WS
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
Water Quality
Priority
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
City
Water Level
Priority
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Well Owner
Verbal
Agreement *
# on Figure 1
Table 1. Summary of Recommended Wells for WRIA 16 Monitoring Program
77
290
118
327
16
341
344
20
341
39
85
305
13
141
-61
51
223
-22
1367246
1386053
1382054
1379246
1382096
1375279
1383655
1398808
1396384
1408966
1387433
1397400
1409726
1411977
1414435
1418170
1421185
744537.1
751038.8
750029.9
746676.3
751346
747515.6
753614.1
758387.3
754062.2
757739.8
755282
755808.3
764611.1
766051.9
764248.2
773212.7
773646.4
Geology
Basalt
Basalt
basalt
basalt
unconsol
unconsol
Contact Name or Agency
Jefferson Cty PUD#1
Jefferson Cty PUD#1
US Forest Service
Contact Name
Bill Graham
Bill Graham
Abandoned
Kyle Nobel
PO BOX 91597 Portland, OG PALMER BYRKIT
308913 HWY 101 BRINNODIANE COLEMAN
unconsol
Basalt
Basalt
unconsol
basalt
basalt
PO BOX 91 Brinnon WA 9832761 RHODODENDRON LNDONALD HERRIN
Jefferson Cty PUD#1
Bill Graham
Camp Robbinswold
N 39580 HWY 101
Jim Messmer
Paradise Cove Pres.
119 17TH AVE SW
David Bianchi
3485 DOSEWALLIPS RD
Rahn Redmon
41 N TEAL PL
PO BOX 542
Comment
Phone
(360) 385-5800 may have some port access issues , swi? Bill woul
(360) 385-5800 Call Bill Graham, they need to find it
WQ, no WL, said well is sealed and inaccessible
360-956-2332
(503) 297-4180
360-796-4646 called twice, waiting for reply, call again
(360) 796-4611 no log in WDOE database
(360) 796-4433
(360) 385-5800
(360) 877-5455
206-852-0828
(360) 796-4886
360-765-3500
(360) 877-9073
Get confirmation approval from Bill Graham
[email protected]
very deep well, try to get
same locn as Norma Jean Jaspar, either one is fine
(360) 357-3277
(360) 427-0654
H2O Mngmt. Services
(360) 337-5777
(360) 877-5434
unconsol
Basalt
unconsol
basalt
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
Mason County PUD 1
21971 N HWY 101
Mason County PUD 1
21971 N HWY 101
Mason County PUD 1
21971 N HWY 101
Mason County PUD 1
21971 N HWY 101
PO box 125 Hoodsport 98548 PO BOX 323
Mason County PUD 1
21971 N HWY 101
Mason County PUD 1
21971 N HWY 101
Mason County Parks
Tracy Colard or Roy
Tracy Colard or Roy
Tracy Colard or Roy
Tracy Colard or Roy
Don Misner
Tracy Colard or Roy
Tracy Colard or Roy
John Keat
(360) 877-5249
(360) 877-5249
(360) 877-5249
(360) 877-5249
(360)-229-6844
(360) 877-5249
(360) 877-5249
(360) 427-9670
Mason County PUD 1
Tracy Colard or Roy
(360) 877-5249
21971 N HWY 101
a good well for continuous monitoring?
Maybe can remain as a monitoring well, discuss wit
may not be necessary cuz lots of wells in the area
good nested pair
get key from John, well near caretaker residence a
Maybe don't need cuz have so many wells here
maybe not necessary
unconsol
Gravel
only if other Hoodsport wells aren't available
site visit
Mason County PUD 1
2360 Skokomish Valley Rd
Unconsol
unconsol NW Water Systems
unconsol NW Water Systems
21971 N HWY 101
PO BOX 123
PO BOX 123
Tracy Colard or Roy
Frank Cousins
Mike Petz
Ron Gold
Reg Hearns
Reg Hearns
(360) 877-5249
(360) 877-2110
(360) 877-2345
(360) 876-0958 call to arrange with technician
(360) 876-0958 call to arrange with technician
unconsol
NO LOG
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
Mason County DCD
Mason County PUD 1
Mason County PUD 1
Mason County PUD 1
Mason County PUD 1
Mason County PUD 1
21971 N HWY 101
21971 N HWY 101
21971 N HWY 101
21971 N HWY 101
21971 N HWY 101
Pam Bennett-Cummin (360) 427-9670 Mason Cty to monitor and provide data
(360) 877-5249
Tracy Colard or Roy (360) 877-5249 No log from Mason PUD #1
Tracy Colard or Roy (360) 877-5249 may not be necessary cuz lots of wells in the area
Tracy Colard or Roy (360) 877-5249
Tracy Colard or Roy (360) 877-5249
unconsol
Mason County PUD 1
21971 N HWY 101
Tracy Colard or Roy
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
Mason County PUD 1
Mason County PUD 1
Mason County PUD 1
Mason County PUD 1
Mason County PUD 1
NO LOG
Ferdie Schmitz
21971 N HWY 101
Tracy Colard or Roy
21971 N HWY 101
Tracy Colard or Roy
21971 N HWY 101
Tracy Colard or Roy
21971 N HWY 101
Tracy Colard or Roy
21971 N HWY 101
Tracy Colard or Roy
PO BOX 607; 7651 Highway 106 or 9422 NE
14th, Clyde Hill
E 11553 HWY 106
912 E JENNS WAY
(360) 898-3275
(800) 827-1110
(360) 898-0200
E 10921 HWY 106
E 8960 HWY 106
1301 SPRING ST 14F
(360) 898-4945
(360) 898-2998
(206) 329-2424
21971 N HWY 101
Tracy Colard or Roy
1550 E TRAILS END DR
2840 Riverwalk Drive S.E.
(360) 877-5249 same as 51799
(360) 731-6444
(253) 288-2565
good to compare two depths?
(360) 275-6259
(360) 427-0654
(360) 877-5249
(360) 275-3008
(360) 876-0958 call to arrange with technician
location
location
location
location
location
near shore, USGS study, 77 feet
Location, availability
location
usgs , likely available
affect of depth at same location
location, near shore
inland, location
location, depth, upland, far shore
location
location
Contact Address
unconsol
unconsol
unconsol
Mason County PUD 1
Unconsol
unconsol
H2O Mngmt. Services
Mason County PUD 1
NW Water Systems
PO BOX 521
151 LEISURE LANE
21971 N HWY 101
PO BOX 563
PO BOX 123
Tracy Colard or Roy
Reg Hearns
(360) 877-5249
(360) 877-5249
(360) 877-5249
(360) 877-5249 may not be necessary cuz lots of wells in the area
(360) 877-5249 PUD didn't provide log, available?
(360) 877-5249
yes - verbal agreement has been provided by the well owner, contact the owner at the contact phone number or address to confirm
data - these wells will not be monitored as part of this program, but the data will be provided to the program and included in the database and the data management procedures for this program
call - communication has not yet been established with the well owner, call the contact phone number
S. Taylor - verbal agreement has been provided by Mason County, but final approval of the agreement must be provided by Steve Taylor, Mason County PUD 1
site visit - no phone number is available for this well owner, site visit must be made
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
and Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
Table 2. Startup and Annual Budget for Tiers 1, 2, and 3
Tier 1
Task
Startup Tasks
Hours
Per Well
Per
Hour
Rate
Equipment purchase
pH/conductivity meter, Hanna combo
sounder, Waterline 500 feet
pressure transducer/datalogger, Geokon 200 feet cable
conductivity and pressure sensor/datalogger 200 feet cable
Field Work
Visit site, confirm well access, refine location, ID sampling port
$
$
$
$
1.5 $
120
$
120
120
120
120
120
Startup
Costs
Individual Item
Costs
168
502
1,330
3,033
#of
wells
$
$
$
$
168
502
2,660
3,033
2
1
$
6,300
35
Labor
Cost
Other
Costs
sample
events
per year
Annual
Costs
Total Startup
Annual Tasks
Field Work
Measure water level at well, record in field notebook
Collect water sample at well, field wq measurements
Download data from water level datalogger
Download data from conductivity datalogger
Deliver samples to lab
Lab analysis of routine constituents, DO, TDS, nitrate, pH
Lab analysis of nitrate, DO, chloride, pH, TDS
Office Wor k
Enter quarterly data into spreadsheets/database
Manage water level data from water level datalogger
Prepare hydrographs
QA water quality data
Manage conductivity data from conductivity datalogger
Enter water quality data into database (includes data for Skokomish
Tribe wells and Mason County Webb Hill monitoring wells)
Total f or Office and Field
1
0.75
0.5
0.5
1.5
$
$
$
$
0.1 $
1.5 $
0.5 $
$
0.25 $
1 $
0.2 $
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
Chemets
$
2
Jab
Jab
$
$
200
90
35
25
2
1
16,800
9,200
480
240
1
3
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
420
360
2100
4
4
4
$
$
$
1,680
1,440
8,400
750
120
696
4
4
4
$
$
$
3,000
480
2,784
27
27
4200
2250 $
50
120 $
60 $
180
$ 5,400
$ 2,430
35
2
35
25
1
29
4
4
4
4
$ 12,663
First Year: Startup+ Annual Costs=
5,400
7,290
$
57,194
$
69,857
NORTHWEST
Land & Water, me.
1 of3
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
and Data Quality Management Plan For WRIA 16 Planning Area
Table 2. Startup and Annual Budget for Tiers 1, 2, and 3
Tier2
Task
Startup Tasks
Hours
Per Well
Per
Hour
Rate
Equipment purc hase
pH/conductivity meter, Hanna combo
sounder, Waterline 500 feet
pressure transducer/datalogger, Geokon 200 feet cable
conductivity and pressure sensor/datalogger 200 feet cable
Field Work
Visit site, confirm well access, refine location, ID sampling port
$
$
$
$
1.5 $
120
$
120
120
120
120
120
Startup
Individual Item
Costs
Costs
Labor
Cost
#of
wells
168 $
502 $
1,330 $
3,033 $
168
502
3,990
3,033
3
1
$
7,200
40
Other
Costs
sample
events
per year
Annual
Costs
Total Startup
Annual Tasks
Field Work
Measure water level at well, record in field notebook
Collect water sample at well, field wq measurements
Download data from water level datalogger
Download data from conductivity datalogger
Deliver samples to lab
Lab analysis of routine constituents, DO, TDS, nitrate, pH
Lab analysis of nitrate, DO, chloride, pH, TDS
1
0.75
0.5
0.5
1.5
$
$
$
$
Chemets
$
2
lab
lab
$
$
200
90
40
30
3
1
$
$
$
$
$
32
32
4,800
2,700 $
60
180
60
180
$ 6,400
$ 2,880
4
4
4
4
1
3
19,200
11 ,040
720
240
0
6,400
8,640
Office Work
Enter quarterly data into spreadsheets/database
Manage water level data from water level datalogger
Prepare hydrographs
QA water quality data
Manage conductivity data from conductivity datalogger
Enter water quality data into database (includes data for Skokomish
Tribe wells and Mason County Webb Hill monitoring wells)
Total for Office and Field
0.1 $
1.5 $
0.5 $
$
0.25 $
1 $
0.2 $
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
40
3
40
$
$
$
480
540
2,400
4
4
4
1920
2160
9600
30
1
34
$
$
$
900
120
816
4
4
4
3600
480
3264
$ 14,893
First Year: Startup+ Annual Costs=
67,264
$ 82,157
$
NORTHWEST
Land & Water, rnc.
Consulting i..a Hyd.rogeoto31
2 of 3
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
anel Data Quality Management Plan For WRIA 16 Planning Area
Table 2. Startup and Annual Budget for Tiers 1, 2, and 3
Tier 3
Task
Hours
Per Well
Per
Hour
Rate
Startup
Costs
Individual Item
Costs
#of
wells
Labor
Cost
other
Costs
sample
events
per year
Annual Costs
Startup Tasks
Equipment purchase
pH/conductivity meter, Hanna combo
sounder, Waterline 500 feet
pressure transducer/datalogger, Geokon 200 feet cable
conductivity and pressure sensor/datalogger 200 feet cable
Field Work
Visit site, confirm well access, refine location, ID sampling port
$
$
$
$
1.5 $
168 $
502 $
1,330 $
3,033 $
168
502
5,319
6,065
4
2
$
9,000
50
120
Total Startup
Annu al Tasks
Field Work
Measure water level at well, record in field notebook
Collect water sample at well, field wq measurements
Download data from water level datalogger
Dow nload data from conductivity datalogger
Deliver samples to lab
Lab analysis of routine constitu ents, DO, TDS, nitrate, pH
Lab analysis of nitrate, DO, chloride, pH, TDS
Office Work
Enter quarterly data into spreadsheets/database
Manage water level data from water level datalogger
Prepare hydrographs
QA water quality data
Manage conductivity data from conductivity datalogger
Enter water quality data into database (includes data for Skokomish
Tribe wells and Mason County Webb Hill monitoring wells)
Total fo r Office and Field
1
0.75
0.5
0.5
1.5
$
$
$
$
$
0.1 $
1.5 $
0.5 $
$
0.25 $
1 $
0.2 $
120
120 Chemets
120
120
120
lab
lab
120
120
120
120
120
120
120
50
$
2
40
4
2
$
$
200
42
42
90
$ 6,000
$ 3,600
$ 240
$ 120
$ 180
s
80
$
$
8,400
3,780
4
4
4
4
3
24,000
14,720
960
960
0
8,400
11,340
1
50
4
50
$ 600
$ 720
$ 3,000
4
4
4
2400
2880
12000
40
2
44
$ 1,200
$ 240
$ 1,056
4
4
4
4800
960
4224
$ 21 ,055
First Year: Startup+ Annual Costs=
87,644
$
$ 108,699
NORTHWEST
Land & Water, me.
3 of 3
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
and Data Quality Management Plan For WRIA 16 Planning Area
Table 3. Example Measurement Quality Objectives
Parameter
PH
dissolved oxygen
nitrate
Calcium
magnesium
potassium
sodium
chloride
sulfate
alkalinity
total dissolved solids
Check
Standard Duplicate
(LCS)
samples
%
recovery
limits
RPO
90-110
N/A
80-120
80-120
80-120
80-120
80-120
80-120
80-120
80-120
N/A
10
10
15
15
15
15
15
15
15
20
10
Matrix
spikes
%
recovery
limits
Lowest
Matrix spike Surrogate concentrations
duplicates standards
of interest
N/A
N/A
RPO
N/A
N/A
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
70-130
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
% recovery
limits
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
units of
concentration
oH units
mg/L
mq/L
mg/L
mg/L
mq/L
mg/L
mg/L
mq/L
mg/L
mg/L
NOR T HW E S T
Land & Water,
INC.
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
and Data Quality Management Plan For WRIA 16 Planning Area
Table 4. Analyte List, Analysis Frequency, and Method of Analysis
Example of completed table, all are for a sample matrix of groundwater
I'
reporting
Analyte
DH
dissolved oxvaen
nitrate
chloride
TDS
calc ium
magnesium
potassium
sodium
sulfate
total alkalinity
frequency
quarterly
auarterly
quarterly
quarterly
quarterly
annually
annually
annually
annually
annually
annually
limit
N/A
0.05 mall
0.25 mg/I
0.25 mg/I
10 mg/ I
0.1 ma/I
0.1 mg/I
0.5 mg/I
0.1 ma/I
5 mg/I
1 mg/I
sample
preparation II
method
per method
per method
per method
per method
per method
per method
per method
per method
per method
per method
per method
Analytical method
SM 4500-H+
SM 4500G
EPA Method 300.0 or 300.1 or SM 4500-N03-F
EPA Method 300.0 or 300.1 or SM 4500-Cl-D
SM 2540C
EPA 200.7 or SM 3120 (ICP)
EPA 200.7 or SM 3120 (ICP)
EPA 200.7 or SM 3120 (ICP)
EPA 200.7 or SM 3120 (ICP)
EPA Method 300.0 or 300.1 or SM 4500-S04-E
SM 2320 B
CAS number
7782-44-7
84145-82-4
16887-00-6
8047-59-4
7439-95-4
24203-36-9
17341-25-2
14808-79-8
71-52-3
NORTHWES T
Land & Water,
INC.
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
and Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
Table 5. Quality Control Procedures and Frequency
Example of completed table.
All are for a sample matrix of groundwater
field
Parameter
PH
conductivity
dissolved oxygen
nitrate
calcium
magnesium
potassium
sodium
chloride
sulfate
alkalinity
TDS
Check
standards
1/dav*
1/day*
N/A
Blanks
N/A
NIA
N/A
laboratory
Replicates
Check
standards
Method
blanks
Analytical
duplicates
Matrix
Spikes
Matrix
Spike
Duplicate
Lab Control
Sample
until stable
until stable
1/day
per method **
per method **
per method **
per method **
per method **
per method **
per method **
per method **
per method **
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
of 10
of 10
of 10
of 10
of 10
of 10
of 10
of 10
of 10
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch of 20
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
1/batch
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
of 20
*calibrate meter using standards at the beginning of the day, before using the meter on samples
** on opening and closing and as needed based on number of samples analyzed and the method requirements
NORTHWEST
Land & Water,
INC.
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
and Data Quality Management Plan For WRIA 16 Planning Area
Table 6. Sample Containers, Preservation, and Holding Times
Example of completed table
Minimum
quantity
Parameter
PH
dissolved oxygen
nitrate
calcium
magnesium
potassium
sodium
chloride
sulfate
alkalinity
TDS
matrix
Water
Water
Water
Water
Water
Water
Water
Water
Water
Water
Water
required
250ml
SOOmL
250ml
250ml
250ml
250ml
250ml
250ml
250ml
250ml
250ml
Holding
Container
Polv
Poly
Poly
Poly
Poly
Polv
Poly
Poly
Polv
Poly
Poly
Preservative
Cool to4 C
Cool to4 C
Cool to4 C
None
HN03-Cool 4C 6 months
HN03-Cool 4C 6 months
14 Days
None
None
None
Cool to4 C
Cool to4 C
Time
24 Hours
24 Hours
48 Hours
28 Days
28 Days
28 Days
28 Davs
14 Days
7 Days
NORTH W ES T
Land & Water, INC.
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
and Data Quality Management Plan For WRIA 16 Planning Area
-
O Definite Wells to be included in all Tiers
•
D
~
D
IC
~
-
Other Available Wells
Candidate wells for conductivity monitoring
Sections
WRIA 16 Planning Area
0
N
A
2
Figure 1.
Recommended Wells For
Water Level and Water Quality Monitoring
4
Miles
Highways
WRIA 16 Planning Area
NORTHWEST
Land & Water.
·~ Refer to Table 1 for well number/name association
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Plan
~ l...ia~nd~ot~he~r~in~ro~r~m~at~io~n~d~et~a~ils~------------------.:.;;,:.:.:.,;,:,______________....;.________________.
INC.
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
Appendix A: Example Written Agreements
to Monitor Individual Wells
WELL ACCESS AGREEMENT
Purpose:
This Access Agreement is entered into between a representative of Mason and Jefferson
counties, (hereafter referred to as the “representative”) and the well owner, (hereafter referred to as “the Owner”), for the purpose of obtaining access to, and groundwater level
measurements in, water wells operated by the Owner. This agreement describes the nature
of measurements to be collected by the representative and, by signature of the Owner, provides permission to the representative for temporary access to the Owner’s well(s). This Access Agreement also serves to indemnify the representative for all damages that may occur
to the Owner’s well(s) during the measurement of water levels by the representative.
Introduction:
As part of ongoing watershed planning efforts, Mason and Jefferson Counties have contracted a representative to measure groundwater levels in wells within selected areas of Water Resource Inventory Area (“WRIA”) 16, which includes parts of Mason and Jefferson
Counties. These measurements will be used to develop water-table maps for the area. Wells
of interest include those used for drinking water supplies (private-residential and publiccommunity), irrigation, industrial supplies, dewatering, testing, and environmental monitoring. Mason and Jefferson Counties, and the WRIA 16 Planning Unit encourage all water
well owners and operators to assist the field staff in locating and accessing these wells.
Data Collection:
The representative will measure groundwater levels using an electric water-level sounder
manufactured specifically for the water-well industry. All “downhole” components of
sounder will be cleaned before and after use in each well. These components, which consist
of a 1/4-inch-diameter probe attached to plastic-coated electrical wire, transmit signals to an
indicator switch at the land surface. The sounder will be lowered into the well until it contacts the water surface and depth to water is recorded. After collecting the water level data,
the sounder will be removed from the well. The Owner’s well cap will be reinstalled at the
Page 1
WELL ACCESS AGREEMENT
completion of the representative’s water level survey. The representative’s work will be performed in accordance with standard accepted hydrogeologic practices.
The representative may also collect a water sample to analyze it for fundamental water quality parameters. If a sample is collected, the water sample will be collected from the nearest
faucet or spigot. The sample bottle containers will not contact the faucet or the spigot. The
representative will need to make sure that the well has pumped at lest three borehole volumes before collecting a sample. The representative will calculate the pumping time required
to do this based on the water level information and well information and the pumping rate.
The representative will estimate the pumping rate using a stopwatch and a container of
known volume.
Agreement:
The Owner agrees to provide the representative access to water wells for the purpose stated
above. Although the chance of damage to the Owner’s well is extremely small, the Owner
agrees to indemnify the representative for all damages to the Owner’s property that may occur while obtaining water level measurements. The representative will coordinate with the
Owner in collecting all water level information at a time that is suitable to the Owner. The
undersigned agree to the terms stated in this Access Agreement.
DATED this ________________ day of ________________________, 2008.
OWNER OF WELL
___________________________________
___________________________________
(Printed Name)
(Signature)
Page 2
Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program and
Data Quality Management Plan for the WRIA 16 Planning Area
Appendix B: Field Data Collection Sheets
WRIA 16 Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
Manual Water Level Measurement Data Sheet
Well Depth:
Well Name:
_ _ _ ft
Well Location:
Description of Measuring Point Location:_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
(ie: marked spot on top of casing)
Date
Time
Depth to
water,
ft
Technician
Initials
Comments
WRIA 16 Ambient Groundwater Monitoring Program
Field Water Quality Data Sheet
Date:
Sampler:
Well Name:
________________________________
Well Location: ________________________________
Well Depth:
______ ft
Well Diameter: ______ inches
Description of Sampling Point Location:____________________________________________
(ie: spigot south of well head)
Time:
DTW: ____________
Calculated Height of Water (H): Well Depth - DTW = ___
Purge Volume (3 casings) = ((Well Diam/2)/12) 2*(Pi*H)*3 = ________ft3, or x7.48 = ________ gal
To calculate pumping rate:
Pump start time: ______
Duration:________
Volume (gal): ________
Q (pumping rate, in gpm) = volume in gal/duration in minutes = ______gpm
Purge time: 3 casing volumes/Q:
Time
Sample time:
Comments:
pH
SC (us)
TDS
turbidity (NTtemp (deg C)
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