MODEL 7610 SNMP DSU USER’S GUIDE Document No. 7610-A2-GB20-10 November 1997

MODEL 7610 SNMP DSU USER’S GUIDE Document No. 7610-A2-GB20-10 November 1997
MODEL 7610 SNMP DSU
USER’S GUIDE
Document No. 7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
Copyright 1996 Paradyne Corporation.
All rights reserved.
Printed in U.S.A.
Notice
This publication is protected by federal copyright law. No part of this publication may be copied or distributed,
transmitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or translated into any human or computer language in any form
or by any means, electronic, mechanical, magnetic, manual or otherwise, or disclosed to third parties without the
express written permission of Paradyne Corporation, 8545 126th Avenue North, P.O. Box 2826, Largo,
Florida 33779-2826.
Paradyne Corporation makes no representation or warranties with respect to the contents hereof and specifically
disclaims any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. Further, Paradyne Corporation
reserves the right to revise this publication and to make changes from time to time in the contents hereof without
obligation of Paradyne Corporation to notify any person of such revision or changes.
Changes and enhancements to the product and to the information herein will be documented and issued as a new
release to this manual.
Trademarks
All products and services mentioned herein are the trademarks, service marks, registered trademarks or registered
service marks of their respective owners.
Warranty, Sales, and Service Information
Contact your sales or service representative directly for any help needed. For additional information concerning
warranty, service, repair, spare parts, installation, documentation, or training, use one of the following methods:
Via the Internet: Visit the Paradyne World Wide Web site at http://www.paradyne.com
Via Telephone: Call our automated call system to receive current information via fax or to speak with a
company representative.
— Within the U.S.A., call 1-800-870-2221
— International, call 727-530-2340
Printed on recycled paper
A
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Contents
About This Guide
Document Purpose and Intended Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Document Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Product-Related Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
1
About the SNMP DSU
Model 7610 SNMP DSU Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
SNMP Management Capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
MIB Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Supported Link-Layer Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Typical SNMP DSU Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
User Interface Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Rear Panel Interface Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
2
Using the ATI
Accessing the ATI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Connecting to the Terminal Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Main Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Screen Format Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
What Affects Screen Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3
Screen Work Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Navigating the Screens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Keyboard Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-5
Screen Function Keys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-6
Switching Between Screen Work Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
Ending a Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7
7610-A2-GB20-10
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i
Contents
3
Customizing the SNMP DSU
Entering Device and System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
System Fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Identity Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Configuring the DSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Configuration Option Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Accessing and Displaying Configuration Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Saving Configuration Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Establishing Call Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Call Directories Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Call Setup Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
4
Security
Security Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Creating a Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Deleting a Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
ATI Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Effective Access Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Controlling SNMP Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Assigning SNMP Community Names and Access Levels . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Limiting SNMP Access through the IP Addresses
of the Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
5
IP Addressing
Selecting an IP Addressing Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
IP Addressing Scheme Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
IMC Connection – Same Subnet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2
Using Routers to Route DSU Management Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Assigning IP Addresses and Subnet Masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Choosing a Default Network Destination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
ii
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7610-A2-GB20-10
Contents
6
Monitoring the DSU
What to Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
DSU LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
System LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Network LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-3
Port LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
Unit Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
Viewing Health and Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-5
Self-Test Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Network Interface Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7
Network Performance Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-8
7
Testing
Detecting Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Tests Available . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
Network Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2
CSU or External Network Loopback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
DSU or Internal Network Loopback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
Send V.54 Up/Down Sequences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
511 Test Pattern for the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
Data Port Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
Local Loopback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
511 Test Pattern for the DTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
Lamp Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
Ending an Active Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
Test Status Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
Loopbacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
Device Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
8
Messages and Troubleshooting
Messages and Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Alarm Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
ASCII Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
ASCII Alarm Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Configuring SNMP Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Dialing Out SNMP Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3
Device Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5
7610-A2-GB20-10
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iii
Contents
A
Configuration Option Tables
Configuration Option Tables Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
System Options Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2
Network Interface Options Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5
Data Port Options Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9
User Interface Options Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11
Terminal Port Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-11
Management Port Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-13
External Device Options for the Management Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-15
Telnet Session Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-18
Alarms & Traps Options Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-20
SNMP & Communication Options Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-22
Communication Protocol Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-22
General SNMP Management Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-24
SNMP NMS Security Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-25
SNMP Traps Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-27
ASCII Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-29
B
Worksheets
Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
Configuration Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1
C
MIB Descriptions
MIB Description Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
MIB II – RFC 1213 and RFC 1573 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1
RS-232-Like MIB – RFC 1659 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
Enterprise MIB Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2
System Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-3
RS-232-Like MIB, RFC 1659 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-13
Enterprise MIB Objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-18
D
Standards Compliance for SNMP Traps
SNMP Traps Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
Trap: authentificationFailure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-1
Trap: warmStart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2
Traps: linkUp and linkDown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-2
Traps: Enterprise Specific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D-3
iv
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7610-A2-GB20-10
Contents
E
Cables and Pin Assignments
Cabling Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-1
Terminal Port EIA-232 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-2
Management Port EIA-232 Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-2
V.35 User Data Port Connector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-3
Standard EIA-232-D Crossover Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-4
LAN Adapter Converter and Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-5
Modular RJ48S DDS Network Interface Cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E-5
Glossary
Index
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
v
About This Guide
Document Purpose and Intended Audience
This guide contains information needed to set up, configure, and operate the
Model 7610 SNMP DSU and is intended for installers and operators.
Document Summary
7610-A2-GB20-10
Section
Description
Chapter 1
About the SNMP DSU. Describes the DSU features and
SNMP management capabilities with a typical configuration
example.
Chapter 2
Using the ATI. Provides instructions for accessing the user
interface and navigating the screens.
Chapter 3
Customizing the SNMP DSU. Provides procedures for
setting up the user interface, device information, call setup,
and DSU configuration steps.
Chapter 4
Security. Presents procedures for creating a login, setting
the effective access levels, and controlling SNMP access.
Chapter 5
IP Addressing. Provides details regarding IP addresses with
examples.
Chapter 6
Monitoring the DSU. Describes monitoring details about the
LEDs, DSU status, and network statistics.
Chapter 7
Testing. Provides details about available tests and test
setup.
Chapter 8
Messages and Troubleshooting. Provides information on
ASCII alarms, SNMP traps, device messages, and
troubleshooting.
November 1997
vii
About This Guide
Section
Description
Appendix A
Configuration Option Tables. Contains all configuration
options, default settings, and possible settings.
Appendix B
Worksheets. Contains all the configuration options, default
settings, and possible settings to use for planning.
Appendix C
MIB Descriptions. Provides all MIBs supported by the DSU.
Appendix D
Standards Compliance for SNMP Traps. Contains SNMP
trap compliance details.
Appendix E
Cables and Pin Assignments. Contains connector and
interface details.
Glossary
Defines acronyms and terms used in this document.
Index
Lists key terms, acronyms, concepts, and sections in
alphabetical order.
Product-Related Documents
Document Number
Document Title
7610-A2-GN10
Model 7610 SNMP DSU Startup Instructions
To order additional product documentation, refer to the Warranty, Sales, and
Service Information section on page A at the beginning of this User’s Guide.
viii
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
About the SNMP DSU
1
Model 7610 SNMP DSU Features
The SNMP DSU provides an interface between the customer premises
equipment (CPE) and a DDS network. Its features include:
SNMP ( Simple Network Management Protocol ) Management. Provides
network management via an industry-standard SNMP management system.
In-band Management Channel (IMC). Provides remote management via
SNMP or Telnet session capability over the DDS network.
Async Terminal Interface (ATI). Provides a menu-driven VT100-compatible
interface for configuring and managing the DSU locally or remotely by Telnet
session or External Modem.
Local Management. Provides local management via an:
— Async terminal connection through the Terminal port
— NMS connection through the Management port
Remote Management. Provides remote management:
— Out-of-band, using an external modem through the Terminal port or
Management port
— Via Telnet through the Management port or the In-band Management
Channel (IMC)
7610-A2-GB20-10
DDS Rates. Operates at 56 and 64 kbps CC (clear channel).
LADS Operation (Local Area Data Set). Operates at 56 and 64 kbps
full-duplex (also called a limited distance modem).
Autorating of Line Rate. Establishes the line rate from the network receive
signal and automatically adjusts to the detected line rate.
Data Port Rates. Supports the same rates as the DDS or LADS operating
rates, except when the IMC is enabled.
November 1997
1-1
About the SNMP DSU
8)
6)
(1
0
D
TR
(1
0
5)
C
TS
(1
0
RT
S
3)
XD
S
TX
D
(1
0
Network
N
O
O
F
O
O
S
D
M
M
TE
ST
AL
AR
O
K
System
56/64K
(1
0
7610 SNMP DSU
4)
Alarm Indication. Activates front panel LEDs and provides the capability of
attaching an ASCII terminal or printer to display/print alarm messages.
R
Port
496-15073
Diagnostics. Provides the capability to diagnose device and network
problems and perform tests, including digital loopbacks, pattern tests, and
self-test.
Device and Test Monitoring. Provides the capability of tracking and
evaluating the unit’s operation, including health and status, and error-rate
monitoring.
Two Customer-Specified Configuration Storage Areas. Allows quick
access to alternate sets of configuration options.
Security. Provides multiple levels of security, which prevents unauthorized
access to the DSU.
SNMP Management Capabilities
The DSU supports SNMP Version 1, and has the capability of being managed by
any industry-standard SNMP manager and accessed using SNMP protocol by
external SNMP managers.
MIB Support
The following MIBs are supported:
1-2
MIB II (RFC 1213 and RFC 1573) – Defines the general objects for use with
a network management protocol in TCP/IP internets and provides general
information about the DSU. MIB II is backward-compatible with MIB I.
RS-232-Like MIB (RFC 1659) – Defines objects for managing RS-232-type
interfaces (e.g., V.35, RS-422, RS-423, etc.) and supports synchronous data
ports and management communication ports on the DSU.
Enterprise MIB – Supports configuration, status, statistics, and tests on the
DDS network interface.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
About the SNMP DSU
Supported Link-Layer Protocols
The DSU supports two link-layer protocols for connection to an external SNMP
manager or network device:
Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP)
Serial Line Internet Protocol (SLIP)
Typical SNMP DSU Configurations
The following illustration shows a typical LAN/WAN interconnection application for
the DSU. The routers connected to the DSU at each location provide the LAN
interconnection.
DDS
Router
Digital
Data
Network
DDS
Router
SNMP
DSU
SNMP
DSU
497-15274
The SNMP DSU can also be used in a frame relay network.
DDS
Router
Frame
Relay
Network
DDS
Router
SNMP
DSU
SNMP
DSU
497-15275
Two SNMP DSUs can be connected back-to-back to act as Local Area Data Sets.
Table 3 in the Model 7610 DSU Startup Instructions shows the maximum
distances for LADS applications.
56 K bps
R outer
SNMP
DSU
7610-A2-GB20-10
or
64 K bps
November 1997
R outer
SNMP
DSU
497-15276
1-3
About the SNMP DSU
User Interface Types
There are three types of user interfaces for the SNMP DSU:
Menu-driven async terminal interface screens (see Using the ATI, Chapter 2).
SNMP NMS Access – Refer to the SNMP DSU Features section. Provides
the capability to access the DSU via an SNMP management system
connected to the Management port or remotely through the in-band
management channel (IMC) connection. Refer to IP Addressing, Chapter 5.
Front panel LED status indicators. Refer to Monitoring the DSU, Chapter 6.
Rear Panel Interface Connections
The following illustration shows the physical interfaces of the DSU. Information
about the installation of the DSU is contained in the Model 7610 DSU Startup
Instructions.
DTE
Modem
or
Terminal
NETWORK
POWER
TERMINAL
MANAGEMENT
D
T
E
Power
or
Router,
LAN Adapter,
or Modem
or
Network
NMS Host
1-4
ASCII Terminal
or Printer
November 1997
496-15085
7610-A2-GB20-10
Using the ATI
2
Accessing the ATI
You can communicate with the Asynchronous Terminal Interface (ATI) using one
of the following methods:
Direct connection through the Terminal port.
Dialing in through an external modem to the Terminal port.
Telnet session through the Management port (locally or via an external
modem).
Telnet session through the In-band Management Channel (IMC).
NOTE:
Only one asynchronous user interface session can be active at a time, and
another user’s session cannot be forced to end. To automatically log out a
user due to inactivity, enable the Inactivity Timeout option (see Terminal Port
Options, Table A-4).
The user interface is blank until activated. Press Return to activate the user
interface. Security can limit ATI access several ways. To setup security or a login
ID, refer to Security, Chapter 4.
Connecting to the Terminal Port
Verify that the settings of the device that you connect to the Terminal port match
these factory-loaded option default settings:
Data rate set to 9.6 kbps.
Character length set to 8.
Parity set to None.
Stop Bits set to 1.
To change the Terminal Port settings, refer to Terminal Port Options, Table A-4.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
2-1
Using the ATI
Main Menu
Entry to all of the DSU’s tasks begins at the Main Menu screen, which has four
menus or branches.
Select . . .
To . . .
Status
View diagnostic tests, network status of interfaces, statistics, LEDs, and
DSU identity information.
Test
Select and cancel tests for the DSU’s interfaces.
Configuration Display and edit the configuration options.
Control
Control the user interface for call setup, device naming, and login
administration, or to initiate a power-up reset of the DSU.
MAIN MENU
Status
Test
Configuration
Control
Load
Status
Test
• System and Test Status
• Network Interface Status
• Performance Statistics
• Display LEDs
• Identity
• Network Tests
• Data Port Tests
• Lamp Test
• Abort All Tests
Save
Configuration
Edit/Display
• System
• Network
• Data Port
• User Interface
• Alarms & Traps
• SNMP &
Communication
User Interface
• Terminal Port
• Management Port
• External Device
• Telnet Session
Control
• Call Setup
• Call Directories
• Device Name
• Administer Logins
• Reset Device
SNMP & Communication
• Communication Protocol
• General SNMP Management
• SNMP NMS Security
• SNMP Traps
496-14999-01
2-2
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Using the ATI
Screen Format Types
Three types of screen formats are available on the ATI.
Use the screen format . . . To . . .
Menu selection
Display a list of available functions for user selection.
Input
Add or change information on a screen.
Input or edit fields that have an Underline in the field value
or selection. See Screen Work Areas.
Display
Display configuration information and results from
performance and DSU-specific tests.
Display-only fields that have no underline in the field value.
What Affects Screen Displays
What appears on the screens depends on the:
7610-A2-GB20-10
Current configuration – How your DSU is currently configured.
Effective security access level – An access level that is typically set by the
system administrator for each interface and each user.
Data selection criteria – What you entered in previous screens.
November 1997
2-3
Using the ATI
Screen Work Areas
There are two user work areas:
Screen area – Provides the menu path, access level, menus, and input fields
above the dotted line. Refer to Entering Device and System Information in
Chapter 3.
The menu path appears as the first line on the screen. In this manual, the
menu path is presented as a menu selection sequence with the names of the
screens:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
User Interface → Terminal Port
Menu Path
Screen function key area – Provides functions available below the dotted
line based upon screen selection and access level. Refer to the Switching
Between Screen Work Areas section.
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
main/configuration/edit/user/term
Device Name:
Model: 7610
TERMINAL PORT OPTIONS
Screen
Function
Keys
Data Rate (Kbps):
Character Length:
Parity:
Stop Bits:
Monitor DTR:
9.6
8
None
1
Enable
Login Required:
Port Access Level:
Inactivity Timeout:
Disconnect Time(minutes):
Enable
Level 1
Enable
5
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Ctrl-a to access these functions, ESC for previous menu
MainMenu
Exit
Save
Select: 2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 14.4, 19.2, 28.8, 38.4
No Signal
System
Messages
Field Value
Choices
2-4
Input Fields
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Using the ATI
Navigating the Screens
You can navigate the screens by:
H
Using keyboard keys
H
Using screen function keys
H
Switching between the two screen work areas
Keyboard Keys
Use the following keyboard keys to navigate within the screen.
To . . .
Press . . .
Move cursor between the screen area and the screen function
keys area below the dotted line at the bottom of the screen
Ctrl-a
Return to the previous screen
Esc
Move cursor to the next field on the screen
Tab
Accept entry or display valid options on the last row of the screen
when pressed before entering data or after entering invalid data
Return (Enter)
Move cursor one position to the left
Ctrl-k
Select the next valid value for the field
Spacebar
Delete character that the cursor is on
Delete (Del)
Move cursor up one field within a column on the same screen
Up Arrow or Ctrl-u
Move cursor down one field within a column on the same screen
Down Arrow or Ctrl-d
Move cursor one character to the right if in edit mode
Right Arrow or Ctrl-f
Move cursor one character to the left if in edit mode
Left Arrow or Ctrl-b
Redraw the screen display, clearing information typed in but not
yet entered
Ctrl-l
To make a menu or field selection:
" Procedure
1. Press the tab key or the right arrow key to position the cursor on a menu or
field selection. Each selection is highlighted as you press the key to move the
cursor from position to position.
2. Press Return. The selected menu or screen appears.
3. Continue Steps 1 and 2 until you reach the screen you want.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
2-5
Using the ATI
The current setting or value appears to the right of the field name. You can enter
information into a selected field by:
Typing in the first letter(s) of a field value or command, using the DSU’s
character matching feature.
Switching from the screen area to the screen function area below the dotted
line and selecting or entering the designated screen function key.
If a field is blank and the Field Values screen area displays valid selections, press
the spacebar and the first valid value for the field will appear. Continue pressing
the spacebar to scroll through other valid values.
Screen Function Keys
All screen function keys located below the dotted line operate the same way
(upper- or lowercase) throughout the screens.
For the screen
Select . . . And press Return to . . .
function . . .
2-6
MainMenu
M or m
Return to the Main Menu screen.
Exit
E or e
Terminate the async terminal session.
New
N or n
Enter new data.
Modify
O or o
Modify existing data.
De l ete
L or l
Delete data.
Save
S or s
Save information.
Refresh
R or r
Update screen with current information.
Clear
C or c
Clear status messages for one-time events on the System
and Test Status screen.
ClrStats
C or c
Clear statistics and refresh the Network Performance
Statistics screen.
PgUp
U or u
Display the previous page.
PgDn
D or d
Display the next page.
ResetMon
R or r
Reset an active Monitor 511 test counter to zero.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Using the ATI
Switching Between Screen Work Areas
Selecting Ctrl-a allows you to switch between the two screen work areas to
perform all screen functions. To access the screen function area below the dotted
line:
Procedure
1. Press Ctrl-a to switch from the screen area to the screen function key area
below the dotted line. The available selections for the first input field appear
on the last line as shown below.
2. Select either the function’s designated (underlined) character or press the tab
key until you reach the desired function key.
Example:
To leave the current screen, enter e or E ( Exit).
3. Press Return. The function is performed.
4. To return to the screen area above the dotted line, press Ctrl-a again.
main/configuration/edit/user/mgmt
Device Name:
Model: 7610
MANAGEMENT PORT OPTIONS
Port Use:
Net Link
Port Type:
Synchronous
Clock Source:
Internal
Data Rate(Kbps):
9.6
Routing Information Protocol: None
Î
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Ctrl-a to access these functions, ESC for previous menu
MainMenu
Exit
Save
Select: None, Net Link, Alarms.
Ending a Session
Use the Exit function key from any screen to terminate the session.
Procedure
1. Press Ctrl-a to go to the screen function key area below the dotted line.
2. Save changes if you have altered your configuration.
3. Select Exit and press Return. The Main Menu appears.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
2-7
Customizing the SNMP DSU
3
Entering Device and System Information
Use the Device Name screen to input DSU device and SNMP system entries. To
access the Device Name screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Control → Device Name
main/control/device name
Device Name:
Model: 7610
DEVICE NAME
Device
System
System
System
Î
Name:
Name:
Location:
Contact:
NE815378
lllQJ98-001
Bldg. A412, 2nd Floor, Left cabinet
Joe Smith 800-555-5555 pager 888-555-5555
Clear
Clear
Clear
Clear
ÎÎ
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Ctrl-a to access these functions, ESC for previous menu
MainMenu
Exit
Save
Any printable ASCII characters are valid entries for all the Device Name screen
inputs. Refer to the ASCII Characters section in Appendix A. The Device Name
field is alphanumeric and provides for an input of 20 characters. The Device
Name entry appears on all ATI screens. The input on this screen is displayed on
the Identity screen. Refer to the Identity Information section.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
3-1
Customizing the SNMP DSU
System Fields
The three System entry fields are alphanumeric and provide 127 characters for
each field. The System entries appear on the Identity display as shown in the
next section. The SNMP System entry fields are:
System Name: The general SNMP system name
System Location: The physical location of the SNMP managed device
System Contact: Identification information, such as contact name, phone
number, or mailing address
Press Ctrl-a to switch to the screen function key area below the dotted line.
Select Save and press Return. When Save is complete, Command Complete
appears at the bottom of the screen.
Identity Information
The Identity screen provides identification information about the DSU. To view
information on the three System entries beyond the 40 characters on the screen,
place the cursor on the first or last character and press the left or right arrow.
To access the Identity screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Status → Identity
main/status/identity
Device Name: NE815378
Model: 7610
IDENTITY
Î
Î
3-2
System Name:
lllQJ98-001
System Location: Bldg. A412, 2nd Floor, Left cabinet
System Contact: Joe Smith 800-555-5555 pager 888-555-5555
Serial Number:
1234567
Model Number:
7610-A1-201
Software Revision:
01.00.00
Hardware Revision:
2048-80A
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Ctrl-a to access these functions, ESC for previous menu
MainMenu
Exit
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Customizing the SNMP DSU
Configuring the DSU
Configuration option settings determine how the DSU operates. Use the DSU’s
Configuration branch to display or change configuration option settings.
Configuration Option Areas
The DSU is shipped with factory settings in the Default Factory configuration
option area. You can find default information by:
Referring to Configuration Option Tables, Appendix A, or Worksheets,
Appendix B.
Accessing the Configuration branch of the DSU menu.
The DSU offers four sets of configuration option settings located in the following
areas. The first three sets match the Default Factory Configuration options set
until modified and saved by the user.
If the factory default settings do not support your network’s configuration,
customize the configuration options for your application.
7610-A2-GB20-10
Configuration Option Area
Configuration Option Set
Current Configuration
The DSU’s active set of configuration options.
Customer Configuration 1
Use to set up and store a set for future use.
Customer Configuration 2
Use to set up and store a second set for future use.
Default Factory Configuration
A read-only configuration area containing the factory
default configuration options.
November 1997
3-3
Customizing the SNMP DSU
Accessing and Displaying Configuration Options
To display the configuration options, you must first copy one configuration option
set into the edit area.
Procedure
1. To load a configuration option set into the configuration edit area, follow this
menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From
2. Select one of the four configuration option areas listed. Press Return. The
selected configuration option set is loaded and the Configuration Edit/Display
menu screen appears.
No configuration edits are allowed when the effective access level is 2 or 3.
Configuration is read-only and allows viewing only of configuration option
settings. If the effective access level is not an access level of 1:
— The last line of the Load Configuration From screen reads:
Access Level is n, Configuration is read-only
— The Save prompt will not appear on any screens.
Refer to Security, Chapter 4.
Saving Configuration Options
When changes are made to the configuration options, the changes must be
saved to take effect. The Save key and Save Configuration To screen appear
when the user has an effective access level of 1. All other effective access levels
have read-only permission.
To save configuration options changes:
Procedure
1. Press Ctrl-a to switch to the screen function key area below the dotted line.
2. Select Save and press Return. The Save Configuration To screen appears.
3. Select one of the three configuration option areas on the screen and press
Return. When Save is complete, Command Complete appears in the
message area at the bottom of the screen.
NOTE:
When Exit is selected before Save, a Save Configuration screen appears
requiring a Yes or No response.
3-4
If you select . . .
Then . . .
Yes
The Save Configuration To screen appears.
No
The Main Menu appears and changes are not saved.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Customizing the SNMP DSU
Establishing Call Setup
From the Control menu, Call Setup is available for the Management port when
connected to an external device, such as a modem or an X.25 PAD. Before
completing the Call Setup screen entries, the phone numbers need to be entered
on the Call Directories screen.
Call Directories Screen
Use the Call Directories screen to enter or change the phone numbers used to:
Send out an ASCII alarm message to an ASCII terminal or printer.
Send out an SNMP trap message.
Connect to an NMS for dial-in management.
To access the Call Directories screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Control → Call Directories
main/control/directories
Device Name:
Model: 7610
CALL DIRECTORIES
Primary Directory:
Phone Number: xxxxxxx
Clear
Alternate Directory:
Î
Î
7610-A2-GB20-10
Phone Number: xxxxxxx
Clear
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Ctrl-a to access these functions, ESC for previous menu
MainMenu
Exit
Save
November 1997
3-5
Customizing the SNMP DSU
The Phone Number fields allow 40 characters. For valid Call Directory entries,
refer to Table 3-1.
After entering or changing a phone number, press Ctrl-a to go to the function key
area below the dotted line. Select Save and press Return.
Table 3-1. Call Directory Phone Number Entries
Characters Use
3-6
B
Blind dialing; do not wait for dial tone
P
Pulse dialing unless preceded by a B
T
Tone dialing unless preceded by a B
W
Wait for dial tone before dialing
, (comma)
Two-second pause; do not use in dial string
< > (space)
Readability; character ignored during automatic dial-out
– (hyphen)
Readability; character ignored during automatic dial-out
ASCII
Characters
Refer to Appendix A
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Customizing the SNMP DSU
Call Setup Screen
Use the Call Setup screen to:
Initiate or disconnect an active call with an external device. External Device
Commands option must be set to AT or Other (not to Disable). Refer to
External Device Options, Table A-6.
Display the phone number entered on the Call Directories screen.
To access the Call Setup screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Control → Call Setup
main/control/setup
Device Name:
Model: 7610
CALL SETUP
Directory: Primary
Phone Number: xxxxxxx
Dial
Disconnect
Î
ÎÎ
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Ctrl-a to access these functions, ESC for previous menu
MainMenu
Exit
Select: Primary, Alternate
After completing call setup, the Management port can be used to send out ASCII
alarms and SNMP traps. The Alarm & Trap Dial-Out option must be enabled.
Refer to Alarms & Traps Options, Table A-8.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
3-7
Security
4
Security Overview
The DSU provides several methods of security by limiting user access to the ATI
through option settings. Refer to the ATI Access section.
Enable the Login Required option to require a Login ID for the:
— Terminal Port
— Telnet Session via the IP interfaces (the Management port or the IMC)
Limit the access:
— Port Access Level option of 1, 2, or 3 for the Terminal port
— Session Access Level option of 1, 2 or 3 for the Telnet Session
Disable the access:
— Telnet Session option
— Management Port Use option
— In-Band Management Channel Rate (bps) option for the IMC
— Dial-In Access option for an External Device
Refer to Effective Access Levels, Table 4-1.
SNMP security is handled through Community Names with access levels and
IP address validation. Refer to the Controlling SNMP Access section.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
4-1
Security
Creating a Login
Logins apply to Terminal port and Telnet access to the ATI. Six login ID/password
combinations are available. Each Login ID and Password must be unique and
include an access level.
For additional information regarding the ATI access using the Login Required
option, refer to the ATI Access section.
Procedure
1. To create a login record, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Control → Administer Logins
2. Press Ctrl-a to switch to the screen function key area below the dotted line.
3. Select New and press Return.
4. Create the login by entering the following fields. For valid entries in the first
two fields, refer to the ASCII Characters section of Appendix A.
On the Administer
Logins screen, for the . . . Enter . . .
Login ID
1 to 10 ASCII printable characters
Password
1 to 10 ASCII printable characters
Access Level
Level 1, Level 2, or Level 3
NOTE:
Assign at least one Level 1 Access Level. Full access is necessary to
make configuration option changes and administer logins. If there is no
effective access level 1, refer to the Device Reset section of Chapter 7.
5. Press Ctrl-a to switch to the screen function key area below the dotted line.
Select Save and press Return.
6. When Save is complete, Command Complete appears at the bottom of the
screen. The cursor is repositioned at the Login ID field, ready for another
entry.
4-2
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Security
Deleting a Login
Procedure
1. To delete a login record, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Control → Administer Logins
2. Press Ctrl-a to switch to the screen function key area below the dotted line.
3. Select PgUp or PgDn and press Return to page through login pages / records
until you find the one to be deleted.
4. Once the correct record is displayed, select De l ete and press Return.
5. To complete the delete action, select Save and press Return.
When the deletion is complete, Command Complete appears at the bottom of
the screen. The number of login pages / records reflects one less record, and
the record following the deleted record appears.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
4-3
Security
ATI Access
Access to the ATI is available through either the Terminal port or a Telnet session.
Access to the ATI through the Terminal port can be limited. Refer to Terminal Port
Options, Table A-4, to:
Enable Login Required.
Assign a Port Access Level of 1, 2, or 3.
The ATI can be accessed remotely through a Telnet Session via either the
Management port or the IMC. The DSU provides several methods for limiting
access to the ATI through a Telnet session.
Refer to Telnet Session Options, Table A-7, to:
— Enable Login Required.
— Assign a Telnet Session Access Level of 1, 2, or 3.
— Disable Telnet access completely.
To prevent the Management port and IMC from supporting a Telnet session:
— Set the Port Use option to None or Alarms. Refer to Management Port
Options, Table A-5.
— Disable the IMC using the In-Band Management Channel Rate (bps)
option in Table A-2.
Effective Access Level
The ATI effective access level is the more restrictive between the Port/Session
access level and the Access level associated with the Login ID. For example, if a
login ID is created with an Access Level 1 and the Terminal Port is set for a Port
Access Level of 2, the effective access level to the ATI is 2.
Table 4-1. Effective Access Levels
4-4
ATI Access to Menu Functions
Effective
Effective
Effective
Access Level 1 Access Level 2 Access Level 3
Status
Read-Only
Read-Only
Read-Only
Test
Full Access
Full Access
No Access
Configuration
Full Access
Read-Only
Read-Only
Control
Full Access
No Access
No Access
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Security
When user access to the ATI is attempted through the Terminal port or a Telnet
session, the ATI response is based on the Login Required option and the
availability of the ATI.
Table 4-2. ATI Access Conditions
If access to the ATI
is through the . . .
7610-A2-GB20-10
Then . . .
What to do now?
Terminal port with
Security disabled with
the Login Required
option set to Disable.
(See Table A-4)
The Main Menu screen
appears.
Select a menu option to begin your
session.
Terminal port with
Security enabled with
the Login Required
option set to Enable.
(See Table A-4)
You are prompted for a
login ID and password.
If Invalid Password appears,
re-enter the password. After three
tries with an invalid password,
contact the system administrator.
The Main Menu screen
appears if the login ID is
not configured yet.
Select a menu option to begin your
session.
Terminal port and the
ATI is already in use
with a Telnet session
User Interface Already
In Use message appears
with the active user’s IP
address and Login ID.
Try again later. When the ATI is
available, the message User
Interface Idle appears.
Telnet session and the
ATI is currently in use
Connection Refused
message appears. The
DSU allows only one
connection at a time.
Try again later.
November 1997
4-5
Security
Controlling SNMP Access
There are three methods for limiting SNMP access.
Disable the SNMP management option.
Assign SNMP community names and access levels. The DSU supports
SNMP Version 1, which provides limited security through the use of
community names.
Limiting SNMP access through validation of the IP address of each allowed
SNMP manager.
Assigning SNMP Community Names and Access Levels
The DSU can be managed by an SNMP manager supporting the SNMP protocol.
The community name must be supplied by an external SNMP manager accessing
an object in the MIB.
To define SNMP community names, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
SNMP & Communication → General SNMP Management
Refer to General SNMP Management Options, Table A-10, to:
Enable SNMP Management.
Assign the SNMP community names of the SNMP Managers that are allowed
to access the DSU’s Management Information Base (MIB).
Specify read or read-write access for each SNMP community name.
Limiting SNMP Access through the IP Addresses of the Managers
The DSU provides an additional level of security through validation of the
IP addresses.
The SNMP Management option must be enabled. To control SNMP access with
IP addresses, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
SNMP & Communication → SNMP NMS Security Options
Refer to SNMP NMS Security Options, Table A-11. The SNMP access can be
limited by:
4-6
Enabling NMS IP address validation to perform validation checks on the
IP address of an SNMP management system attempting to access the DSU.
Specifying read or read-write access for each NMS authorized to access the
unit.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
IP Addressing
5
Selecting an IP Addressing Scheme
You can select from many IP addressing schemes to provide SNMP NMS
connectivity. Review the following information in preparation for selecting an
IP addressing scheme.
Assign IP addresses to:
— The Management port
— The IMC
Refer to the IP Addressing Scheme Examples section.
When the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) option is set to Proprietary,
IP routing information is automatically passed between interconnected DSUs
from the network side. Refer to Management Port Options, Table A-5.
However, verify that a route to the subnet(s) is set in the NMS’s or local
router’s routing table. This equipment will not automatically receive routing
information due to the proprietary protocol.
The gateway to subnet(s) is through the DSU connected to:
— The LAN using a LAN adapter, or
— A router, terminal server, or NMS via PPP or SLIP link-layer protocols
7610-A2-GB20-10
Each DSU’s routing table supports a maximum of 20 routes, even though a
single route is all that is needed to reach every device on a subnet.
Set a default route only for devices directly connected to the DSU’s
Management port.
Any legal host address is allowed for a given subnet; the address choice
within the subnet is completely arbitrary.
November 1997
5-1
IP Addressing
IP Addressing Scheme Examples
Management of IP addressing is based upon individual IP addresses assigned to
each interface. The IP interfaces for the unit are the:
Management port: Set the Port Use option to Net Link; see Management Port
Options, Table A-5.
IMC: Set the In-Band Management Channel Rate (bps) to 1600, 4000, or
8000 bps; see Network Interface Options, Table A-2.
NOTE:
For IP addressing, involve your Information Systems (IS) department since
the department decides on the IP addressing scheme used for your
organization.
The following illustrations and examples apply to IP management traffic only.
The subnet mask shown for these examples is 255.255.255.000.
IMC Connection – Same Subnet
In this example, DSU A is connected to:
The NMS, at the central site, via a LAN adapter
A remote unit, DSU B, through the proprietary IMC
NOTE:
Interconnected DSUs will automatically pass routing information between
each other using a proprietary protocol. However, a static route to
subnet 135.18.2.0 must be set in the routing table of the NMS Host.
Remote
Site
NMS Host
135.18.40.1
Ethernet
DSU B
IMC
Network
IMC Interface
135.18.2.2
Subnet 135.18.2.0
IMC Interface
135.18.2.1
LAN
Adapter
Subnet 135.18.40.0
Central
Site
Management Port
135.18.40.3
DSU A
Path of Management Data
5-2
November 1997
496-15087
7610-A2-GB20-10
IP Addressing
Using Routers to Route DSU Management Data
In this example, the DSUs:
Receive their management data through the Management port connection to
the AUX port of the router.
Do not route the data among themselves. Routers route management data
for the connected DSUs using the management data path between the
routers.
The illustration shows each DSU with its own subnet. This subnet is independent
of the subnet on the LAN, which is supported by the local router. This enables the
router to distinguish the data destined for the DSU from the data for the LAN.
Subnet 135.18.5.0
Subnet 135.18.1.0
NMS
Host
135.18.1.2
Management
Port
135.18.5.2
135.18.1.1
DTE
Port
AUX Port
135.18.5.1
DDS
Network
Router
Router
DTE
Port
AUX Port
135.18.4.1
135.18.2.1
To LAN
Subnet 135.18.2.0
Path of Management Data
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
Management
Port
135.18.4.2
Subnet 135.18.4.0
496-15086
5-3
IP Addressing
Assigning IP Addresses and Subnet Masks
Once you select an IP scheme, assign an address(es) to the DSU.
If using . . .
Then . . .
The Management port as a management
interface
Assign the Management port IP address
and subnet mask. Refer to Communication
Protocol Options, Table A-9.
An external modem connected to the
Management port, and you want to
configure an alternate IP address and
subnet mask for dialing out traps using the
alternate alarm directory
Enter the alternate Management port IP
address and subnet mask. Refer to
Communication Protocol Options,
Table A-9.
The IMC
Assign the IP address and subnet mask.
Refer to Network Interface Options,
Table A-2.
The SNMP NMS Security Options screen provides options to perform security
checking on the IP address of the SNMP management system attempting to
communicate to the DSU. Refer to SNMP NMS Security Options, Table A-11.
Choosing a Default Network Destination
You can route an SNMP or Telnet session to a default network destination. To
configure a Default Network Destination, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
SNMP & Communication → Communication Protocol
Refer to Communication Protocol Options, Table A-9.
5-4
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Monitoring the DSU
6
What to Monitor
This chapter presents information on how to access and monitor DSU status and
performance statistics on the DDS network. You can monitor DSU operations by
viewing:
LEDs on the ATI Status screen or the DSU’s front panel
Unit Status screen on the ATI
Highest priority Health and Status message displays on the right on the last
line of all screens.
Network Interface Status screen on the ATI
Network Performance Statistics screen on the ATI
NMS via SNMP MIB objects
Refer to MIB Descriptions, Appendix C, for the SNMP MIBs supported by the
DSU.
DSU LEDs
The DSU LEDs can be viewed on the Display LEDs Status screen. This ATI
status screen is available locally and remotely.
The 12 LEDs are organized in three groups:
7610-A2-GB20-10
System LEDs display the status of the unit
Network LEDs provide the status of the network interface
Port LEDs display the activity on the user data (DTE) port
November 1997
6-1
Monitoring the DSU
To view the LED status screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Status → Display LEDs
main/status/leds
Device Name:
Model: 7610
DISPLAY LEDS
SYSTEM
OK
Î
Î
ALARM
NETWORK
TEST
DM
OOS
OOF
DTE
NS
TXD
|
blinking
RXD RTS CTS
|
blinking
DTR
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
ESC for previous menu
MainMenu
Exit
Refresh
When viewed via the ATI, the status display screen is updated approximately
every 5 seconds. Use Refresh to obtain a current status of all LEDs.
System LEDs
OK:
ON – DSU is operational.
OFF – DSU is performing a power-up self-test, has detected a system
failure, or there is no power.
ALARM:
ON – DSU has detected an alarm condition locally or from
the network. Refer to the Troubleshooting section in
Chapter 8.
TEST:
ON – Test in progress. Test can be initiated locally, remotely,
or from the network. Includes power-up self-test.
6-2
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Monitoring the DSU
Network LEDs
DM – Data Mode:
ON – DSU (DDS network interface) is sending or
receiving data, or is in DMI condition
(all 1’s being received).
OFF – DDS network interface is receiving CMI codes.
OOS – Out of Service:
ON – The network has notified the DSU that
the remote unit is out of service.
Refer to Health and Status Messages,
Table 6-1.
OOF – Out of Frame:
ON – DSU is detecting an out of frame
condition. Refer to Health and Status
Messages, Table 6-1.
NS – No Signal:
ON – DDS network interface detects
no signal. Refer to Health and
Status Messages, Table 6-1.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
6-3
Monitoring the DSU
Port LEDs
TXD – Transmitted Data:
ON
– Receiving all 0s from the DTE.
OFF
– Receiving all 1s from the DTE.
Blinking – User data is being transferred.
RXD – Received Data:
ON
– Sending all 0s to the DTE.
OFF
– Sending all 1s to the DTE.
Blinking – User data is being transferred.
RTS – Request to Send:
ON – DTE is activating a control signal to
indicate readiness to transmit data.
CTS – Clear to Send:
ON – DSU is activating a control signal to
indicate to the DTE that it can start
sending data.
DTR – Data Terminal Ready:
ON – DTE is activating a control signal to
indicate readiness for operation.
6-4
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Monitoring the DSU
Unit Status
Status is a branch of the ATI main menu. From Status, the System and Test
Status screen is available and has three sections:
Health and Status – Displays messages in priority order (highest to lowest).
Refer to Health and Status Messages, Table 6-1.
Self-Test Results – Results of the Diagnostic test run on the device itself.
Refer to Self-Test Results Messages, Table 6-2.
Test Status – Currently active tests. Refer to Test Status Messages,
Table 7-1.
Viewing Health and Status
To view Health and Status information, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Status → System and Test Status
The following messages appear in the first column of the System and Test Status
screen. The highest priority Health and Status message also appears on all ATI
screens on the bottom right. The messages are listed from high to low priority in
Table 6-1.
Table 6-1. Health and Status Messages (1 of 2)
Message
What Message Indicates
What To Do
Cross Pair
Detection
The DDS Receive (RX) and
Transmit (TX) pairs are
crossed on the network
interface. Alarm LED is on.
Reverse the RX and TX pair at the
punchdown block or other
termination point.
No Signal
hhh:mm:ss 1
No signal is being received.
Local DSU network problem.
The Alarm and NS LEDs are
on and Network Performance
Statistics are active.
1. Verify that the network cable is
securely attached at both ends.
DSU is receiving out of
service code from the
network for the remote unit.
The Alarm and OOS LEDs
are on and Network
Performance Statistics are
active.
1. Verify that the remote site is in
service.
Out of Service
hhh:mm:ss 1
1
7610-A2-GB20-10
2. Contact network provider.
2. Contact network provider.
hhh:mm:ss indicates the amount of time the condition has existed in hours, minutes,
and seconds. When the maximum time has been exceeded, 255:59:59+ appears.
November 1997
6-5
Monitoring the DSU
Table 6-1. Health and Status Messages (2 of 2)
Message
What Message Indicates
What To Do
Out of Frame
hhh:mm:ss 1
DSU is detecting an out of
frame condition, associated
with:
1. Verify that the line rate matches
the configured rate.
2. Contact network provider.
Receiving out of frame
code from the network.
DSU detecting out of frame
errors with 64 kbps CC
data rate.
DSU unable to synchronize
local receiver circuit with
line signal.
Excessive BPVs
hhh:mm:ss 1
Data rates do not match or
network trouble causing
bipolar violations. Alarm LED
is on and Network
Performance Statistics are
active.
1. Verify that the network cable is
securely attached at both ends.
The IMC communication
between the local and remote
DSU is not working.
1. Verify that the remote unit has
IMC set at the same rate.
User Data Port
DTR Off
The DTE is not ready to
transmit or receive data. This
message will not appear
unless Monitor DTR is
enabled.
Check on the DTE status. Verify
that the DTE is powered up and
asserting DTR.
Net Mgmt Link
Down
Communications between the
DSU and an NMS are not
possible and the:
1. Check the devices in the
management path data and the
status of the NMS.
Management Port Use is
2. Try to access the unit remotely.
In-Band Fram Err
hhh:mm:ss 1
2. Contact network provider if
problem persists.
2. Contact network provider if
problem persists.
set to Net Link and/or
IMC is enabled.
Device Fail
yyyyyyyy
An internal error has been
1. Provide the 8-digit failure code
shown ( yyyyyyyy ) to your service
detected by the operating
representative.
software. yyyyyyyy indicates
the 8-digit hexadecimal failure
2. Reset the DSU to clear the
code.
condition and message.
DSU Operational
DSU is functioning properly
and there are no status
messages to display.
1
6-6
No action needed.
hhh:mm:ss indicates the amount of time the condition has existed in hours, minutes,
and seconds. When the maximum time has been exceeded, 255:59:59+ appears.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Monitoring the DSU
Self-Test Results
The results of the last power-up or reset self-test appear in the middle column of
the System and Test Status screen.
Table 6-2. Self-Test Results Messages
Message
What Message Indicates
What To Do
Device Fail
One or more of the DSU’s integrated
circuit chips has failed device-level
testing.
1. Reset the DSU and try again.
Memory Fail
DSU failed memory verification.
Passed
The DSU has been plugged in or
reset and has passed the diagnostic
test. There are no other status
messages.
2. Call your service
representative for assistance if
the message reappears.
No action needed.
Network Interface Status
The network interface status fields are read-only:
Line Rate (Kbps). If the DSU is connected to an operating line and the Line
Rate (Kbps) shows Autobaud and does not change to a line rate within about
25 seconds, Line Rate (Kbps) may have to be reconfigured manually. Refer
to System Options, Table A-1.
Loop Loss (dB). The loop loss is the loss of signal strength of the receive line
signal from the local loop.
To view the Network Interface Status, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Status → Network Interface Status
Table 6-3. Network Interface Status Screen Contents
Field
Status
What the Status Indicates
Line Rate (Kbps)
56 Kbps
64 CC
64 LADS
Autobaud
Line rate on the network interface.
Autobaud indicates the DSU is
trying to determine the network line
rate. This should be a temporary
condition.
No Signal
No signal can be detected over the
network interface.
0 to – 65 dB
Amount of loop loss – loss of signal
strength of the receive line signal
from the local loop, measured in
decibels.
Inoperative
The line may be disconnected.
Loop Loss (dB)
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
6-7
Monitoring the DSU
Network Performance Statistics
Performance statistics for the network interface are available to:
Monitor the current status of the network operations.
View the DSU’s performance statistics, which:
— Assist you in determining the duration of specific conditions.
— Provide a historical context for problem detection and analysis.
To view the Network Performance Statistics, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Status → Performance Statistics
main/status/performance
Device Name:
Model: 7610
NETWORK PERFORMANCE STATISTICS
Î
Î
No Signal Count:
Out of Service Count:
Out of Frame Count:
Excessive BPV Count:
Invalid BPV Count:
101920
0
621
99830
87409
26:33:08
0:00:00
8:53:49
144:28:11
ÎÎ
ÎÎ
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
ESC for previous menu
MainMenu
Exit
ClrStats
Refresh
All counts show the number of occurrences since the last reset of the counters.
Invalid BPV is a raw count of the number of invalid Bipolar Violations. In the last
column, hhh:mm:ss indicates the amount of time the condition has existed in
hours, minutes, and seconds. When the maximum time has been exceeded,
255:59:59+ appears.
The screen appears with the cursor in the function area below the dotted line. To
update the performance statistics, select Refresh and press Return.
Select ClrStats and press Return to clear all statistics and refresh the screen.
ClrStats is not available for an Access level of 3.
6-8
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Testing
7
Detecting Problems
The DSU can detect and report problem conditions and perform diagnostic tests.
The DSU offers a number of indicators to alert you to possible problems:
LEDs – Refer to the DSU LEDs section in Chapter 6.
SNMP Traps – For information on traps, refer to the Configuring SNMP Traps
section in Chapter 8.
Health and status messages and network performance statistics. Refer to
Monitoring the DSU, Chapter 6.
Alarm Condition Indications.
The following table shows the available indicators of alarm conditions on the
network interface and the User Data port.
SNMP
Trap
Alarm Condition
ATI Status ASCII Alarm Alarm
Screen
(if configured) LED
Specific
LED
Crossed Pairs
Y1
Y
Y
Y
N
No Signal (NS)
Y1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Out of Service (OOS)
Y1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Out of Frame (OOF)
Y1
Y
Y
Y
Y
Excessive Bipolar
Violations (BPV)
Y1
Y
Y
Y
N
Inband Framing Error
N
Y
Y
Y
N
DTR Off
Y1
Y
N
N
Y
1
Link Up/Link Down Trap
To configure ASCII Alarms, use the Alarms & Traps options screen. Refer to
Alarms & Traps Options, Table A-8. For additional information regarding ASCII
alarm generation, refer to the Alarm Messages section of Chapter 8.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
7-1
Testing
Tests Available
From the Test menu, you can run network tests, data port tests, and a lamp test
for the front panel LEDs. Loopbacks can be initiated locally and remotely. Refer to
Loopbacks, Table 7-2.
The Test menu is limited to users with an access level of 1 or 2. To access the
Test menu, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Test
Network tests require the participation of your network service provider.
The DSU supports physical-level tests independently on a per-interface basis.
The CSU and DSU loopbacks and 511 test pattern send/monitor are
supported on the network interface.
The Local Loopback and 511 test pattern send/monitor are supported on the
DTE port.
Network Tests
To access the Network Tests screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Test → Network Tests
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
ÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎÎ
main/test/network
Device Name:
Model: 7610
NETWORK TESTS
Test
Command
Status
CSU Loopback:
DSU Loopback:
Start
Start
Inactive
Inactive
Send V.54 Up:
Send V.54 Down:
Send
Send
Sending
Inactive
Send 511:
Monitor 511:
Start
Stop
Inactive
Active
Result
0:00:00
0:00:00
0:00:00
125:08:48
Errors 99999+
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Ctrl-a to access these functions, ESC for previous menu
MainMenu
Exit
ResetMon
Use the Command column to start or stop a test by pressing Enter. The Result
column displays the test duration since the last device reset. When the Monitor
511 test is active, ResetMon is available to reset the error counter to zero.
Selecting the Stop command on the Network Test screen or Abort All Tests from
the Test menu will not disrupt a network-initiated loopback.
7-2
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Testing
CSU or External Network Loopback
CSU loopback is an external loopback that is located as close as possible to the
network interface. An active CSU loopback disrupts IP data going over the IMC.
DSU
DTE
Port
DTE
Interface
CSU
DDS
Network
Port
Aggregate
CSU Loopback
496-15144
DSU or Internal Network Loopback
DSU loopback is an internal loopback that is located as close as possible to the
customer interface serving the DTE.
An active DSU loopback initiated from the network disrupts IP data going over the
IMC. However, this test is not disruptive when initiated by the user (via ATI) or by
the NMS.
DSU
CSU
Aggregate
DTE
Port
DDS
Network
Port
DTE
Interface
DSU Loopback
496-15160
Send V.54 Up/Down Sequences
The local DSU can send an ITU-T V.54 Up or Down sequence to request the
activation or termination of a DSU (digital) loopback of a remote unit. This is the
same as the DSU Loopback shown above except the test is activated remotely.
The DSU can send:
In-band V.54 Up (activation) code to request a Remote DSU Loopback
(V.54 Loop 2) at the remote DSU or
In-band V.54 Down (deactivation) code to request the termination of a
Remote DSU Loopback (V.54 Loop 2) at the remote DSU
Refer to the Network Tests section for an example of the Network Tests screen.
Select Send. Sending appears in the Status column followed (after 3 seconds) by
Command Complete at the bottom of the screen.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
7-3
Testing
511 Test Pattern for the Network
This test sends or monitors the 511 test pattern over the network interface.
The Monitor 511 test also provides an error counter that can be reset. Refer to
the Network Tests section for an example of the Network Tests screen.
Data Port Tests
For an example of the fields on a test menu screen, refer to the Network Tests
section. To access the Data Port Tests screen, follow this menu selection
sequence:
Main Menu → Test → Data Port Tests
Local Loopback
Local Loopback loops the user data back to the DTE. This loopback is located as
close as possible to the User Data Port (DTE) interface.
DSU
DTE
Port
DTE
Interface Aggregate
Local Loopback
CSU
DDS
Network
Port
496-15145
511 Test Pattern for the DTE
This test sends or monitors a 511 test pattern over the User Data Port interface.
The 511 monitor expects the external equipment to provide the clock for the
511 pattern on the interchange circuit CT113 – Transmit Signal Element Timing –
DTE Source (XTXC or TT) for timing the incoming pattern. Refer to the
V.35 User Data Port Connector section of Appendix E.
Lamp Test
The DSU supports a Lamp test from the Test menu to determine whether all
LEDs are lighting and functioning properly.
During the Lamp test, all LEDs blink simultaneously every second. When you
stop the Lamp test, the LEDs are restored to their normal condition.
7-4
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Testing
Ending an Active Test
A test initiated by the user can be ended by the user.
A Test Timeout option is available to automatically terminate a user-initiated
Loopback or Pattern test (as opposed to manually terminating a test) after it
has been running a specified period of time. Refer to System Options,
Table A-1.
Test Timeout does not pertain to tests commanded by the:
— Network, such as the network-initiated CSU and DSU Loopbacks.
— DTE, such as the DTE-initiated Local Loopback.
On each test screen is a command column. Pressing Return when the cursor
is on the Start command stops the test.
Use the Abort All Tests selection from the Test menu to stop all tests running
on all interfaces, with the exception of network or DTE-initiated loopbacks.
Command Complete appears when all tests on all interfaces have been
terminated.
Test Status Messages
The Test Status Messages in Table 7-1 appear in the right-most column of the
System and Test Status screen. For additional information on loopbacks, refer to
Loopbacks, Table 7-2.
Table 7-1. Test Status Messages (1 of 2)
7610-A2-GB20-10
Test Status Message
Meaning
CSU Loopback Active
A CSU Loopback toward the network is currently active. Only
applies to a test initiated by the user via the ATI or the NMS.
DSU Loopback Active
A DSU Loopback toward the network is currently active. Only
applies to a test initiated by the user via the ATI or the NMS.
Lamp Test Active
The Lamp Test is active, causing the LEDs on the front panel to
light.
Local Loopback Active
A local loopback toward the DTE is currently active.
Monitoring 511 on
Network
DSU is monitoring a 511 test pattern on the network interface.
Monitoring 511 on Port
DSU is monitoring a 511 test pattern over the DTE port.
Network-init. CSU LB
Active
A CSU Loopback initiated by the network is currently active.
November 1997
7-5
Testing
Table 7-1. Test Status Messages (2 of 2)
Test Status Message
Meaning
Network-init. DSU LB
Active
A DSU Loopback initiated by the network is currently active.
If the network service is 56 kbps, the network loopback is
non-latching. A non-latching loopback ends when the
network activation codes stop.
If the network service is 64 kbps CC, the network loopback
is latching. This condition can only occur when the Network
Interface option Network-initiated DSU Loopback (64K CC)
is enabled. Refer to Network Interface Options, Table A-2.
No Test Active
Status message, indicating no local, remote, or network test in
progress.
Sending 511 on
Network
A 511 test pattern is being sent over the network interface.
Sending 511 on Port
A 511 test pattern is being sent over the DTE port.
V.54-initiated DSU LB
Active
A DSU loopback is active that was initiated by the detection of
a V.54 sequence originated by the remote unit. This condition
can only occur when V.54 Initiated DSU Loopback is enabled.
Refer to Network Interface Options, Table A-2.
Loopbacks
Loopbacks can be started from a variety of points in the network. Refer to
Table 7-2 for further information.
Table 7-2. Loopbacks (1 of 2)
Loopback Type
Initiated By
Notes
Bilateral Loopback
ATI
When enabled, running a DSU loopback
also automatically starts a local
loopback. Refer to Data Port Options,
Table A-3, to enable.
NMS
Remote unit sending
V.54 sequence
CSU Loopback
ATI (Network tests)
NMS
DDS Network, by
loop current reversal
DSU Loopback
(Digital)
ATI
Local Loopback
ATI
NMS
DTE via CT141
When initiated by the network, CSU
Loopback cannot be disabled by the
user. When IMC is enabled, the
aggregate data is looped back to the
network.
When IMC is enabled, only user data is
looped back to the network. Refer to
Data Port Options, Table A-3.
Control via CT141 can be disabled.
Refer to Data Port Options, Table A-3.
NMS
7-6
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Testing
Table 7-2. Loopbacks (2 of 2)
Loopback Type
Initiated By
Notes
Network-initiated
56 kbps DSU
Loopback (Nonlatching loopback)
DDS Network
When IMC is enabled, the aggregate
data stream is looped back to the
network. Cannot be disabled by user.
Network-initiated
64 kbps CC DSU
Loopback
(Latching loopback)
DDS Network
Includes optional data scrambling and
uses 25-second timer to detect the
network sequence. When IMC is
enabled, the aggregate data stream is
looped back to the network. Can be
disabled by user.
Remote Digital
Loopback
Remote unit sending
Same as a DSU Loopback but initiated
by a remote unit via V.54 sequence.
When IMC is enabled, only user data is
looped back to the network. Can be
disabled locally. Refer to Network
Interface Options, Table A-2.
V.54 Sequences to
remote unit
ATI
V.54 sequence
NMS
Control via CT140 can be disabled.
Refer to Data Port Options, Table A-3.
DTE via CT140
Device Reset
The DSU can be reset locally or remotely. From the Control menu, select Reset
Device and press Return. The DSU reinitializes itself, performing a Device
Self-Test. Refer to Self-Test Results Messages, Table 6-2.
Misconfiguring the DSU could make the user interface inaccessible, leaving it in a
state where an ATI session cannot be started through the Terminal port or via a
Telnet session. If this occurs, DSU connectivity can be restored with a terminal
that is directly connected and set for Terminal Port option defaults.
Two methods can be used to restore access to the ATI. Both methods cause a
device reset.
7610-A2-GB20-10
Reset Terminal Port – Allows you to only reset the configuration options
related to Terminal port usage. No security-related configuration options are
changed.
Reload Factory Defaults – Allows you to reload the Default Factory
Configurations, resetting all of the configuration areas and control settings for
security reasons. This method is useful when the user’s passwords have
been forgotten.
November 1997
7-7
Testing
Refer to Terminal Port Options, Table A-4. To reset Terminal port settings:
Procedure
1. At the async terminal connected to the Terminal port, verify that the Terminal
port options are set to the default settings:
— Data Rate(Kbps) to 9.6
— Character Length to 8
— Stop Bits to 1
— Parity to None
2. Power the DSU Off and back On. The DSU performs a power-up routine.
3. Immediately after the OK LED turns on, press the Return key 5 times quickly
in succession. The System Paused screen appears.
4. Tab to the desired method, and enter yes (or y) for the selected prompt.
If entering yes to prompt . . .
Then all . . .
Reset Terminal Port Options
Terminal port options are set to their factory
default values. Refer to Terminal Port Options,
Table A-4.
Reload Factory Defaults
Factory default settings contained in the Default
Factory Configuration area are loaded in Current,
Customer 1, and Customer 2 configuration areas.
Any changes to configuration and control settings
will be replaced by the factory defaults.
If no (or n) is entered, or if no selection is made within 30 seconds, the DSU
returns to the condition or operation it was in when the system pause was
initiated, with the Terminal port data rate returning to its configured rate.
5. If yes (or y) is entered, the DSU resets itself and initiates a Device Self-Test.
Connectivity is restored and the Main Menu screen appears.
7-8
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Messages and Troubleshooting
8
Messages and Troubleshooting
There are many messages available to assess the status of the device and
contribute to problem resolutions. Refer to the following sections:
Alarm Messages
— ASCII Alarms
— ASCII Alarm Messages
— Configuring SNMP Traps
— Dialing Out SNMP Traps
Device Messages
Troubleshooting
Alarm Messages
Alarm messages and SNMP traps are unsolicited messages sent out from the
DSU automatically when the DSU detects conditions set by the user.
ASCII Alarms
Alarm messages are sent out to an ASCII terminal or printer via the Management
port if:
7610-A2-GB20-10
Port Use is configured for Alarms. Refer to Management Port Options,
Table A-5.
Each ASCII Alarm Message to be generated has been enabled. Refer to
Network Interface Options, Table A-2, and System Options, Table A-1.
ASCII Alarm Messages option is enabled. Refer to Alarms & Traps Options,
Table A-8.
November 1997
8-1
Messages and Troubleshooting
When individually enabled, a specific alarm is sent at the start of the
corresponding alarm condition. If more than one alarm condition exists, only the
highest priority alarm will be sent. Any other alarms are sent out when the higher
priority alarm clears. An alarm cleared message is sent when the alarm
conditions no longer exist.
The dialing out of ASCII Alarm messages, via an external device (e.g. modem)
connected to the Management port, can only occur when, in addition to the
above, the:
External Device Commands is set to AT or Other. Refer to External Device
Options, Table A-6.
Alarm and Trap Dial-Out is enabled. Refer to Alarms & Traps Options,
Table A-8.
ASCII Alarm Messages
Refer to the Entering Device and System Information section of Chapter 3 for
device name information. Each ASCII alarm message is preceded by the device
name and a time stamp. The time stamp (ddd:hh:mm) represents the cumulative
number of days, hours, and minutes since the DSU’s last reset. The time resets
to zero on power up or reset. An ASCII alarm message displays similar to this
example:
NE815378
283:14:57
Crossed Pair condition has been detected
on the DDS Network Interface
The following messages can be generated by the DSU and are listed in high to
low priority order:
8-2
A Crossed Pair condition has been detected on the DDS Network Interface.
A No Signal (NS) condition has been detected on the DDS Network Interface.
An Out of Service (OOS) condition has been detected on the DDS Network
Interface.
An Out of Frame (OOF) condition has been detected on the DDS Network
Interface.
An Excessive Bipolar Violations (BPV) condition has been detected on the
DDS Network Interface.
An In-Band Framing Error condition has been detected on the DDS Network
Interface.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Messages and Troubleshooting
Configuring SNMP Traps
An SNMP trap can be automatically sent out the IMC or the Management port to
the SNMP manager when the DSU detects conditions set by the user. These
traps enable the SNMP manager to gauge the state of the network. Refer to
Standards Compliance for SNMP Traps, Appendix D, for details of SNMP traps
supported by the DSU.
To configure the DSU for SNMP traps, use the SNMP Traps Options screen to:
H
Enable SNMP traps.
H
Set the number of SNMP managers that receive SNMP traps from the DSU.
H
Enter an IP address and network destination for each SNMP manager
specified.
H
Select the type of SNMP traps to be sent from the DSU.
To configure SNMP Traps, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
SNMP & Communication → SNMP Traps
Refer to SNMP Traps Options, Table A-12.
Dialing Out SNMP Traps
Configure the SNMP traps before performing this procedure.
" Procedure
1. Configure the phone directories to use when dialing out SNMP traps through
the Management port and a connected external device. Refer to the Call
Setup section in Chapter 3.
2. Use the Alarms & Traps Options to enable the DSU’s automatic call initiation
to a remote device with Alarm & Trap Dial-Out, Call Retry, and Alternate
Dial-Out Directory. Follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
Alarms & Traps
Refer to Alarms & Traps Options, Table A-8.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
8-3
Messages and Troubleshooting
Device Messages
The Device Messages in Table 8-1, listed in alphabetical order, may appear in the
messages area at the bottom of the ATI screens.
Table 8-1. Device Messages (1 of 2)
Device Message
What Message Indicates
What To Do
Blank Entries
Removed
New had been selected
from the Administer Logins
screen, no entry was made,
and Save was selected.
No action needed.
Command Complete
Action requested has
successfully completed.
No action needed.
Invalid Character ( x ) 1
A nonprintable ASCII
character has been
entered.
Reenter information using valid
characters.
Password, and Access Level.
Invalid – Network
Network-initiated loopback
Initiated CSU (or DSU) was in progress when
Loopback Active
another selection was
made.
No action needed.
Invalid Password
Login is required and an
incorrect password was
entered; access is denied.
Try again.
[Test] can be a CSU, DSU,
or DTE Local Loopback, or
a Send 511 or Monitor 511.
The [test] was already in
progress when another
selection was made.
Allow test to continue.
A loopback or 511 pattern
test was in progress when
Start was selected to start
another test, or was active
on the same or another
interface when Start was
selected.
Wait until other test ends and
An attempt to enter a new
login ID was made, and the
limit of six login/password
combinations has been
reached.
1. Delete another login/password
combination.
Delete was selected from
the Administer Login
screen, and no security
records had been defined.
No action needed.
Invalid – [ Test ]
Already Active
Invalid Test
Combination
Limit of six Login IDs
reached
No Security Records
to Delete
1
8-4
Reenter the Login ID,
Contact your system
administrator to verify your
password.
Select another test.
Stop the test.
message clears.
Abort all tests from the Test
menu screen.
Stop the test from the same
screen the test was started
from.
2. Reenter the new login ID.
Enter a security record.
x is the character not being accepted.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Messages and Troubleshooting
Table 8-1. Device Messages (2 of 2)
Device Message
What Message Indicates
What To Do
Password Matching
Error – Re-enter
Password
Password entered in the
Re-enter Password field of
the Administer Logins
screen does not match
what was entered in the
Password field.
Try again.
Please Wait
Command takes longer
than 5 seconds.
Wait until message clears.
Test Active
A test is running and no
higher priority health and
status messages exist.
Contact service provider if test
Contact your system
administrator to verify your
password.
initiated by the network.
Wait until the other test ends
and message clears.
Cancel all tests from the Test
screen.
Stop the test from the same
screen the test was started
from.
Troubleshooting
This DSU is designed to provide you with many years of trouble-free service. If a
problem occurs, however, refer to Table 8-2 for possible solutions.
Table 8-2. Troubleshooting (1 of 2)
Symptom
Possible Cause
Solutions
Alarm LED is on.
One of several alarm
conditions exists. Health
and Status displays the
alarm condition.
Refer to Health and Status
Messages, Table 6-1, for
recommended action.
Cannot access the
DSU via the ATI.
Login or password is
incorrect, Terminal port is
misconfigured, or the DSU
otherwise configured so it
prevents access.
1. Power the DSU on and off and
try again.
2. If problem recurs, try to access
the ATI through a Telnet session,
if enabled.
3. Do a Device Reset. Refer to the
Device Reset section of
Chapter 7.
Device Fail appears
on the System and
Test Status screen
under Self-Test
results.
7610-A2-GB20-10
The DSU detects an
internal hardware failure.
Power the DSU off and on and
try again.
Contact your service
representative.
November 1997
8-5
Messages and Troubleshooting
Table 8-2. Troubleshooting (2 of 2)
Symptom
Possible Cause
Solutions
An LED is not lit.
LED is burned out.
Run the Lamp test. If the LED in
question does not flash with the
other LEDs, then contact your
service representative.
No power, or the
LEDs are not lit.
The power cord is not
securely plugged into the
wall receptacle and into the
rear panel connection.
Check that the power cord is
securely attached at both ends.
The wall receptacle has no
power.
Check the wall receptacle power
by plugging in some equipment
that is known to be working.
Check the circuit breaker.
Verify that your site is not on an
energy management program.
Not receiving data;
DSU is not
responding.
DDS line rate/speed has
changed.
Excessive BPVs causing
DSU to become stuck in
Autobaud mode.
Excessive Loop Loss
causing DSU to become
stuck in Autobaud mode.
1. Verify that your subscriber loop is
running at 56 or 64 CC kbps.
2. Verify that the DSU is set to the
same rate as your subscriber
loop. The DSU’s rate is displayed
on the Network Interface Status
screen.
3. If getting Excessive BPVs, verify
that you do not have a bad cable.
If the cable is good, contact the
network provider.
4. If getting excessive Loop Loss
indications install a higher
(dB) indications,
quality cable. Refer to Model
7610 DSU LADS Connection
Distances, Table 3, in the
Start-Up Instructions.
5. If the DDS Line Rate (Kbps) field
shows Autobaud, the DSU may
be stuck in Autobaud mode.
Configure Line Rate (Kbps) for
56 or 64 kbps.
6. Run Loopback tests. Refer to the
Tests Available section of
Chapter 7.
Power-Up Self-Test
fails. Only Alarm
LED is on after
power-up.
8-6
The DSU has detected an
internal hardware failure.
Reset the DSU and try again.
Contact your service
representative.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Configuration Option Tables
A
Configuration Option Tables Overview
The tables in this appendix summarize the configuration options accessed when
you select Configuration on the Main Menu. The configuration options are
arranged into groups based upon functionality.
Select . . .
To Access the . . .
To Configure the . . .
System
System Options, Table A-1
General system
options
Network
Network Interface Options, Table A-2
DDS network interface
Data Port
Data Port Options, Table A-3
User data on DTE port
User Interface
Terminal Port Options, Table A-4
Access to the ATI
Management Port Options, Table A-5
External Device Options, Table A-6
Telnet Sessions Options, Table A-7
Alarms & Traps
Alarms & Traps Options, Table A-8
ASCII alarms and
SNMP traps initiated
by the DSU
SNMP &
Communication
Communication Protocol Options,
Management support
through SNMP and
Telnet session and
communication
protocols
Table A-9
General SNMP Management Options,
Table A-10
SNMP NMS Security Options, Table A-11
SNMP Traps Options, Table A-12
NOTE:
All changes to configuration options must be saved. Refer to the Saving
Configuration Options section of Chapter 3.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
A-1
Configuration Option Tables
MAIN MENU
Status
Test
Configuration
Control
Load
Save
Configuration
Edit/Display
User Interface
• System
• Network
• Data Port
• User Interface
• Alarms & Traps
• SNMP &
Communication
• Management Port
• External Device
• Telnet Session
• Terminal Port
SNMP & Communication
• Communication Protocol
• General SNMP Management
• SNMP NMS Security
• SNMP Traps
496-15178
System Options Menu
For System Options, refer to Table A-1. To access the System Options screen,
follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit → System
Table A-1. System Options (1 of 3)
Operating Mode
Possible Settings: DDS, LADS
Default Setting: DDS
The unit’s operating mode depends upon the DSU’s application.
DDS – Standard DDS network operation. The operating rate is either 56 kbps or
64 kbps CC.
LADS – The Local Area Data Set operating mode requires that the local and remote
units are connected directly to each other. This is a point-to-point application; also
known as LDM.
A-2
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Configuration Option Tables
Table A-1. System Options (2 of 3)
DDS Line Rate (Kbps)
Possible Settings: 56, 64CC, Autobaud
Default Setting: Autobaud
The unit starts up with Autobaud. When the DDS line rate obtained from the service
provider is detected, Autobaud is replaced with the actual rate.
DDS Line Rate (Kbps) option appears when Operating Mode is set to DDS.
NOTES: – Setting the actual data rate results in minimum power-up time. (If both
DSUs use Autobaud, the process can take several minutes.) Configure
the actual data rate after initial installation.
– The clock rates generated by the DSU at the DTE interface (TXC and
RXC) equal the operating rate minus the configured rate of 1600, 4000,
or 8000 bps for the IMC, if enabled. Refer to the In-Band Management
Channel Rate (bps) option in Table A-2.
56 – 56 kbps line rate.
64CC – 64 kbps Clear Channel on a 72 kbps circuit.
Autobaud – This setting is automatically changed to the actual operating line rate of
56 kbps or 64CC as soon as the signal is detected.
LADS Timing
Possible Settings: Internal, External, Receive
Default Setting: Internal
Determines the timing source for the unit.
LADS Timing option appears when Operating Mode is set to LADS.
Internal – Timing derived from the unit’s local clock. Use this setting for the LADS
primary timing unit that establishes the timing for both point-to-point units.
External – Timing is derived from the external clock provided by the DTE connected to
the V.35 interface on circuit CT113 (pins U, W).
NOTE:
The valid rate generated by the DTE must be equal to the LADS line rate
minus the configured rate of 1600, 4000, or 8000 bps for the IMC, if
enabled. Refer to the In-Band Management Channel Rate (bps) option in
Table A-2.
Receive – Timing is derived from the line receive signal unless the unit is running
diagnostic tests. During the tests, the timing source is the internal clock. This setting
should be used for a LADS secondary timing unit.
LADS Line Rate (Kbps)
Possible Settings: 56, 64
Default Setting: 64
Line operating rate for LADS operation.
LADS Line Rate (Kbps) option appears when Operating Mode is set to LADS.
56 – 56 kbps line rate. Provides increased distance for the LADS applications.
64 – 64 kbps line rate.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
A-3
Configuration Option Tables
Table A-1. System Options (3 of 3)
Test Timeout
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
Allows user-initiated tests to end automatically. Recommend enabling when the unit is
managed remotely through the IMC to avoid the requirement to terminate the test
manually.
Enable – User-initiated loopback and pattern tests end when test duration is reached.
Disable – Tests can be terminated manually from the Network Tests screen. Refer to
the Network Tests section of Chapter 7.
NOTE:
Tests commanded by the DTE or network-initiated tests are not affected by
this test timeout.
Test Duration (min)
Possible Settings: 1–120
Default Setting: 10
Number of minutes for a test to be active before automatically ending.
Test Duration (min) option appears when Test Timeout is enabled.
1 to 120 – Amount of time in minutes for a user-initiated test to run before terminating.
Security Violation Alarm
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
Issues an alarm when access to the unit is attempted and fails.
Enable – Alarm generated when a security violation is detected. Refer to the
Trap: authentificationFailure section of Appendix D for possible alarm causes.
Disable – No alarm generated for a security violation.
A-4
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Configuration Option Tables
Network Interface Options Menu
For Network Interface Options, refer to Table A-2. To access the Network
Interface Options screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit → Network
Table A-2. Network Interface Options (1 of 4)
Network-initiated DSU Loopback (64K CC)
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
Indicates whether the access unit responds to a DSU latching loopback sequence sent
by the network as specified by TR62310.
Network-initiated DSU Loopback (64K CC) option appears when Operating Mode
is set to DDS in Table A-1.
Enable – Responds to network-initiated commands to start and stop a latching DSU
loopback.
Disable – DSU will not respond to a DSU loopback initiated by the network.
Data Scrambling (64K CC)
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Data scrambling is used to suppress the possible simulation of network-initiated DSU
latching loopback commands by application data.
Data Scrambling (64K CC) option appears when Operating Mode is set to DDS in
Table A-1.
Enable – Enables data scrambling. The local and remote units must be set the same.
Disable – No data scrambling.
V.54 Initiated DSU Loopback
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
When enabled, user data is looped back to the network when a V.54 Loop Up sequence
is received. The DSU loopback ends when a V.54 Loop Down sequence is detected.
Enable – DSU loopback can be initiated or terminated by a remote unit sending in-band
V.54 Loop 2 Up or Down sequences.
Disable – V.54 Loop 2 sequences are ignored.
In-Band Management Channel Rate (bps)
Possible Settings: Disable, 1600, 4000, 8000
Default Setting: Disable
The IMC provides a non-disruptive management channel to the remote DSU and uses a
portion of the DTE line rate.
Disable – The IMC is inactive.
1600, 4000, or 8000 – Sets the amount of the line rate in bps to allocate to the IMC.
NOTE:
7610-A2-GB20-10
The local and remote units must be set the same.
November 1997
A-5
Configuration Option Tables
Table A-2. Network Interface Options (2 of 4)
IMC IP Address
Possible Settings: 000.000.000.000 – 223.255.255.255, Clear
Default Setting: 000.000.000.000
Specifies the Internet Protocol address used to access the unit via the IMC interface.
IMC IP Address option does not appear when the In-Band Management Channel
Rate (bps) is disabled.
000.000.000.000 – 223.255.255.255 – The range for the first byte is 000 to 223, with the
exception of 127. The range for the remaining three bytes is 000 to 255.
Clear – Clears the IMC IP address and sets to all zeros.
IMC Subnet Mask
Possible Settings: 000.000.000.000 – 255.255.255.255, Clear
Default Setting: 000.000.000.000
Specifies the subnet mask used to access the unit via the IMC interface.
IMC Subnet Mask option does not appear when the In-Band Management
Channel Rate (bps) is disabled.
000.000.000.000 – 255.255.255.255 – Set the IMC interface subnet mask. The range
for each byte is 000 to 255.
Clear – Clears the IMC Subnet Mask and sets to all zeros. When the subnet mask is all
zeros, the device creates a default subnet mask based on the class of IP address:
– Class A defaults to 255.000.000.000
– Class B defaults to 255.255.000.000
– Class C defaults to 255.255.255.000
IMC Routing Information Protocol
Possible Settings: None, Proprietary
Default Setting: Proprietary
The RIP routes IMC management information between devices.
IMC Routing Information Protocol does not appear when the In-Band Management
Channel Rate (bps) option is disabled.
None – No routing protocol.
Proprietary – Uses proprietary variant of RIP Version 1 to enable the routing of
IP traffic between Paradyne devices.
Cross Pair Detection Alarm
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
When a crossed pair condition is detected on the network interface, an ASCII alarm is
generated.
Cross Pair Detection Alarm option appears when the Operating Mode is set to
DDS in Table A-1.
Enable – Generates an ASCII alarm when a crossed pair condition is detected.
Disable – No ASCII alarm is generated.
NOTE:
A-6
Additional settings are required to send out an ASCII alarm. Refer to the
Alarm Messages section in Chapter 8.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Configuration Option Tables
Table A-2. Network Interface Options (3 of 4)
No Signal Alarm
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
When a NS condition is detected on the network interface, an ASCII alarm is generated.
Enable – Generates an ASCII alarm when a no signal condition is detected.
Disable – No ASCII alarm is generated.
NOTE:
Additional settings are required to send out an ASCII alarm. Refer to the
Alarm Messages section in Chapter 8.
Out of Service Alarm
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
When an OOS condition is detected on the network interface, an ASCII alarm is
generated.
Out of Service Alarm option appears when the Operating Mode is set to DDS in
Table A-1.
Enable – Generates an ASCII alarm when an out of service condition is detected.
Disable – No ASCII alarm is generated.
NOTE:
Additional settings are required to send out an ASCII alarm. Refer to the
Alarm Messages section in Chapter 8.
Out of Frame Alarm
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
When an OOF condition is detected on the network interface, an ASCII alarm is
generated.
Enable – Generates an ASCII alarm when an out of frame condition is detected on the
network interface.
Disable – No ASCII alarm is generated.
NOTE:
Additional settings are required to send out an ASCII alarm. Refer to the
Alarm Messages section in Chapter 8.
Excessive BPV Alarm
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
When a Bipolar Violation condition is detected on the network interface, an ASCII alarm
is generated.
Enable – Generates an ASCII alarm when an excessive BPV condition is detected.
Disable – No ASCII alarm is generated.
NOTE:
7610-A2-GB20-10
Additional settings are required to send out an ASCII alarm. Refer to the
Alarm Messages section in Chapter 8.
November 1997
A-7
Configuration Option Tables
Table A-2. Network Interface Options (4 of 4)
In-Band Framing Alarm
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
When an in-band framing condition is detected on the network interface, an ASCII alarm
is generated.
In-Band Framing Alarm option does not appear when the In-Band Management
Channel Rate (bps) is disabled.
Enable – Generates an ASCII alarm when a in-band framing condition is detected.
Disable – No ASCII alarm is generated.
NOTE:
A-8
Additional settings are required to send out an ASCII alarm. Refer to the
Alarm Messages section in Chapter 8.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Configuration Option Tables
Data Port Options Menu
For Data Port Options, refer to Table A-3. To access the Data Port Options
screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit → Data Port
Table A-3. Data Port Options (1 of 3)
Invert Transmit Clock
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
The DSU clock provided on Interchange Circuit CT114, Transmit Signal Element Timing
DCE source (TXC), is phase inverted with respect to Interchange Circuit CT103,
Transmitted Data (TXD). Recommended when data errors are occurring due to long
cable lengths.
Enable – The DSU-supplied clock is phase inverted with respect to the transmitted data
TXD.
Disable – The clock supplied by the DSU on TXC is normal (i.e., not inverted).
Port (DTE) Initiated Loopbacks
Possible Settings: Disable, Local, Remote, Both
Default Setting: Disable
Specifies whether the DTE can initiate and terminate local and/or remote loopbacks.
The DTE loopback control is done through the Interchange Circuits specified by the
V.54 standard.
NOTE:
Refer to the Loopbacks section of Chapter 7.
Disable – No local or remote loopbacks can be initiated by the DTE.
Local – A local loopback can be controlled by the DTE, via the Interchange Circuit LL
(CT141), as specified by V.54. The DTE port remains in loopback as along as LL
remains on. Aborting the loopback from the ATI has no effect.
Remote – A remote digital loopback can be controlled by the DTE, via Interchange
Circuit RL (CT140), as specified by V.54. The remote equipment must be able to detect
the in-band V.54 loopback sequence.
Both – Both the local and remote loopbacks can be controlled by the DTE.
Bilateral Loopback
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
When a DSU loopback is initiated, a local DTE loopback is also automatically initiated.
A Bilateral Loopback can be started by the ATI/NMS or by detection of a V.54 Loop 2 Up
sequence.
Enable – When Bilateral Loopback is enabled, running a DSU loopback also
automatically starts a local loopback. The local loopback ends when the DSU loopback
terminates.
Disable – Running a DSU loopback does not start a local loopback.
NOTE:
7610-A2-GB20-10
Refer to the Loopbacks and the Network Tests sections of Chapter 7.
November 1997
A-9
Configuration Option Tables
Table A-3. Data Port Options (2 of 3)
Carrier Control by RTS
Possible Settings: Constant, Switched
Default Setting: Constant
Simulates Constant or Switched Carrier operation.
Carrier Control by RTS option appears when In-Band Management Channel
Rate (bps) is disabled in Table A-2.
Constant – The internal RTS is forced on and the DSU is in a constant Data Mode on
the transmit line. The external RTS lead is ignored. The actual signal on the line is either
all ones (DMI) or DTE transmitted data.
Switched – RTS is monitored and CMI codes are transmitted when RTS is off.
CTS Control
Possible Settings: Standard, Follow RTS, Forced On, Circuit Assurance
Default Setting: Standard
Specifies the operation of the Interchange Circuit CT106, Clear to Send (CTS), which is
an output from the DSU.
Standard – CTS follows the internal RTS with a fixed delay, except that CTS will be off
when a network interface related alarm is detected or a test is active. The active test
may be initiated locally, remotely, or by the network.
Follow RTS – CTS follows the external RTS lead without delay, regardless of alarms
and tests.
Forced On – CTS is always forced on after the unit is powered up with a successful
self-test.
Circuit Assurance – With circuit assurance, CTS operates the same as the Standard
option, except that CTS will also be deasserted when CMI codes are being received.
RLSD Control
Possible Settings: Standard, Forced On
Default Setting: Standard
Specifies the operation of the Interchange Circuit CT109, Received Line Signal Detector
(RLSD or CD), which is an output from the DSU.
Standard – RLSD is asserted when Data Mode is on the receive line. RLSD deasserts
when a DDS facility alarm is detected or the DSU is receiving CMI codes.
Forced On – RLSD is forced on after the unit is powered up with a successful self-test.
DSR Control
Possible Settings: Standard, Forced On, On During Test
Default Setting: Standard
Specifies the operation of the Interchange Circuit CT107, Data Set Ready (DSR), which
is an output from the DSU.
Standard – DSR is always asserted, except when a DDS facility alarm is reported or
the DSU is in Test mode.
Forced On – DSR is forced on after the unit is powered up with a successful self-test.
On During Test – DSU operates the same as the Standard option, except that DSR
remains asserted when the DSU is in Test mode to allow the DTE to send test patterns.
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Table A-3. Data Port Options (3 of 3)
Monitor DTR
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
Indicates to the DSU whether to monitor the Interchange Circuit CT108, Data Terminal
Ready (DTR), from the DTE.
Enable – The DSU monitors the state of DTR on the User Data (DTE) port. Based on
the Link Traps option setting in Table A-12, the DSU uses the DTR circuit to trigger a
Link Up/Down SNMP trap and a Health and Status message.
Disable – DTR is not monitored by the DSU. Use when a DTE does not provide the
DTR lead at the interface.
User Interface Options Menu
The User Interface Options Menu includes the following:
Terminal Port Options, Table A-4
Management Port Options, Table A-5
External Device Options, Table A-6
Telnet Session Options, Table A-7
Terminal Port Options
To access the Terminal Port Options screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
User Interface → Terminal Port
Table A-4. Terminal Port Options (1 of 3)
Data Rate (Kbps)
Possible Settings: 2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 14.4, 19.2, 28.8, 38.4
Default Setting: 9.6
Data rate in kbps on the Terminal port.
2.4 to 38.4 – Selects a Terminal port data rate from 2.4 to 38.4 kbps.
Character Length
Possible Settings: 7, 8
Default Setting: 8
Specifies the number of bits needed to represent one character, including the parity bit.
7 or 8 – Sets the bits per character.
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-4. Terminal Port Options (2 of 3)
Parity
Possible Settings: None, Even, Odd
Default Setting: None
Specifies Parity for the Terminal port.
None – Provides no parity.
Even – Parity is even.
Odd – Parity is odd.
Stop Bits
Possible Settings: 1, 1.5, 2
Default Setting: 1
Provides the number of stop bits for the Terminal port.
1, 1.5, or 2 – Selects the number of stop bits.
Monitor DTR
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
Specifies monitoring of the Data Terminal Ready (DTR) control lead.
Enable – Standard operation of the DTR control lead.
Disable – DTR is ignored. Some external device connections may require this setting.
Login Required
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Used to secure access to the ATI through the Terminal port. Login IDs are created with
a password and access level.
Enable – Security is enabled. When ATI access is attempted through the Terminal port,
a screen appears that requires a Login ID and password.
Disable – Main menu appears with no Login required.
NOTE:
Refer to the Creating a Login section of Chapter 4.
Port Access Level
Possible Settings: Level 1, Level 2, Level 3
Default Setting: Level 1
The Terminal port access level is interrelated with the access level of the Login ID.
Level 1 – This is the highest access level. If Login Required is disabled, the Terminal
port access is level 1. If Login Required is enabled, the effective level is the Login ID
access level.
Level 2 – This access level overrides a Login ID with an access level 1. If a Login ID
has an access level of 3, the effective access level is 3.
Level 3 – This access level becomes the effective access level and overrides a Login
ID with an access level of 1 or 2.
NOTE:
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Refer to the ATI Access section of Chapter 4 for access level details.
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-4. Terminal Port Options (3 of 3)
Inactivity Timeout
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Provides automatic logoff of an ATI session through the Terminal Port. When the
session is closed, User Interface Idle appears on the screen and the unit toggles the
Terminal port DSR lead.
Enable – The ATI session terminates automatically after the Disconnect Time set in the
next option. When the session was occurring over an external modem connected to the
Terminal port, the modem will interpret the DSR toggle as DTR being dropped and
disconnect.
Disable – An ATI session through the Terminal port will remain active indefinitely.
Disconnect Time(minutes)
Possible Settings: range 1 – 60
Default Setting: 5
Number of minutes of inactivity before the ATI session terminates automatically.
Timeout is based on no keyboard activity.
Disconnect Time(minutes) option appears when Inactivity Timeout is enabled.
1 to 60 – The ATI user session is closed after the selected number of minutes.
Management Port Options
To access the Management Port Options screen, follow this menu selection
sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
User Interface → Management Port
Table A-5. Management Port Options (1 of 3)
Port Use
Possible Settings: Net Link, Alarms, None
Default Setting: Net Link
The Management port provides a choice of functions.
Net Link – The Management port is the network communication link and provides
connectivity to an IP network to support SNMP managers and Telnet sessions.
Alarms – The Management port is dedicated as an alarm port and sends out ASCII
alarm messages.
None – Disables the Management port.
No other fields in this table will appear when set to None.
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-5. Management Port Options (2 of 3)
Port Type
Possible Settings: Asynchronous, Synchronous
Default Setting: Synchronous
Establishes asynchronous or synchronous communication for the Management port.
Port Type option can be changed only when Port Use is set to Net Link.
Asynchronous – Port set for asynchronous communication.
Asynchronous displays when Port Use is set to Alarms and cannot be changed.
Synchronous – Port set for synchronous communication.
Clock Source
Possible Settings: Internal, External
Default Setting: Internal
Specifies internal or external clocking.
Clock Source option appears when Port Type is set to Synchronous.
Internal – Clocking is provided internally.
External – Clocking is provided externally. The Management port is always defined as a
DCE. This option setting forces the Management port to use external transmit clocking
(XTXC or TT) from a connected device (DTE).
Data Rate (Kbps)
Possible Settings: 2.4, 4.8, 9.6, 14.4, 19.2, 28.8, 38.4
Default Setting: 9.6
Specifies the Management port data rate in kbps.
Data Rate (Kbps) option does not appear when Port Type is set to Synchronous
with Clock Source set to External.
2.4 to 38.4 – Selects a Management port data rate from 2.4 to 38.4 kbps.
2.4 kbps and 4.8 kbps only appear when Port Type is set to Asynchronous.
Character Length
Possible Settings: 7, 8
Default Setting: 8
Specifies the number of bits needed to represent one character.
Character Length option appears when Port Type is set to Asynchronous.
7 or 8 – Sets the bits per character.
Parity
Possible Settings: None, Even, Odd
Default Setting: None
Specifies the Parity on the Management port.
Parity option appears when Port Type is set to Asynchronous.
None – Provides no parity.
Even – Parity is even.
Odd – Parity is odd.
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-5. Management Port Options (3 of 3)
Stop Bits
Possible Settings: 1, 1.5, 2
Default Setting: 1
Provides the number of stop bits for the Management port.
Stop Bits option appears when Port Type is set to Asynchronous.
1, 1.5, or 2 – Selects the number of stop bits.
Monitor DTR
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
Specifies monitoring of the Data Terminal Ready (DTR) control lead.
Monitor DTR option appears when Port Type is set to Asynchronous.
Enable – Standard operation of the DTR control lead.
Disable – DTR is ignored. Some external device connections may require this setting.
Routing Information Protocol
Possible Settings: None, Proprietary
Default Setting: None
Specifies the routing protocol between devices through the Management port.
Routing Information Protocol appears when Port Use is set for Net Link.
None – No routing protocol; use None when the device connected to the Management
port is not a Model 7610.
Proprietary – Uses proprietary variant of RIP Version 1 to enable the routing of IP
traffic between Paradyne devices.
External Device Options for the Management Port
To access the External Device Options screen, follow this menu selection
sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
User Interface → External Device
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-6. External Device Options (1 of 3)
External Device Commands
Possible Settings: Disable, AT, Other
Default Setting: Disable
Specifies the type of external device commands to be sent out the Management port.
NOTE:
The Management port DTR lead is monitored to detect loss of the external
device connection. The external device DSR lead must be connected to the
Management port’s DTR lead, via a standard EIA-232 crossover cable, and
the device must be configured to wink DSR on disconnect.
Disable – No external device commands will be sent out the Management port.
No other options in this table will appear.
AT – Standard AT commands are sent out the Management port to control an external
device, such as a modem. When establishing a connection, the AT dial command “ATD”
will precede the phone number from the dial directory.
The next option, Dial-In Access, is available when External Device Commands is
set to AT; no other options in this table will appear.
Other – Commands configured by the user are sent out the Management port.
Dial-In Access
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Controls external device dial-in access through the Management port.
Dial-In Access option appears when External Device Commands is set to AT.
Enable – Answers incoming calls from an external device and establishes a connection
to a remote terminal or IP network. Refer to the Port Use option in Table A-5 for the
Management port functions.
Disable – Incoming calls from an external device are not answered.
Connect Prefix
Possible Settings: ASCII Text, Clear
Default Setting: [blank]
The connect prefix and directory phone number are used to establish a connection. The
connection can be initiated by the user or automatically established for dial out of ASCII
alarms or SNMP traps.
Connect Prefix option appears when External Device Commands is set to Other.
ASCII Text – Places a prefix in front of the phone number. Enter a maximum of
20 characters. Refer to the ASCII Characters section.
Clear – Clears the field and sets to none.
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-6. External Device Options (2 of 3)
Connect Indication String
Possible Settings: ASCII Text, Clear
Default Setting: [blank]
Determines if a connection is established. The DSU searches the Management port
receive data stream for the connect indication string, and if not received within one
minute, the connection times out. The connection can be initiated by the user or
automatically established to dial out ASCII alarms or SNMP traps.
Connects Indication String option appears when External Device Commands is set
to Other.
ASCII Text – Enter a maximum of 20 characters. Refer to the ASCII Characters section
for valid ASCII characters and control sequences.
Clear – Clears the field and sets to no string. The port’s RTS lead will be used to
determine that a connection has been established.
Escape Sequence
Possible Settings: ASCII Text, Clear
Default Setting: [blank]
When an external device connection is established, the Escape Sequence can be used
to switch an external device to command mode before sending the disconnect
command. Refer to Escape Sequence Delay (sec) for delay before and after the Escape
Sequence.
Escape Sequence option appears when External Device Commands is set to
Other.
ASCII Text – Enter a maximum of 20 characters. Refer to the ASCII Characters section
for valid ASCII characters and control sequences.
Clear – Clears the field and sets the escape sequence to none.
Escape Sequence Delay (sec)
Possible Settings: None, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0
Default Setting: None
Amount of delay before sending the first character of the escape sequence and after
sending the last character. The escape sequence is entered in the previous option.
During this delay, no data is sent out the Management port.
Escape Sequence Delay (sec) option appears when External Device Commands
is set to Other.
None – No Management port escape sequence delay.
0.2 to 1.0 – Amount of delay in seconds before and after an escape sequence. The
delay must be equal to or greater than the escape guard time of the external device.
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-6. External Device Options (3 of 3)
Disconnect String
Possible Settings: ASCII Text, Clear
Default Setting: [blank]
The Disconnect String specifies the command used to disconnect an external device.
The external device must be in command mode, so the Escape Sequence is always
sent before the Disconnect String.
Disconnect String option appears when External Device Commands is set to
Other.
ASCII Text – Enter a maximum of 20 characters. Refer to the ASCII Characters section
for valid ASCII characters and control sequences.
Clear – Clears the field and sets to no string. The Management port DSR lead is used
to force a disconnect.
Telnet Session Options
To access the Telnet Session Options screen, follow this menu selection
sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
User Interface → Telnet Session
Table A-7. Telnet Session Options (1 of 2)
Telnet Session
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Specifies if the DSU will respond to a Telnet session request from a Telnet client on an
interconnected IP network.
Enable – Allows Telnet sessions between the unit and a Telnet client.
Disable – No Telnet sessions allowed.
Login Required
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Used to secure access to the ATI through a Telnet session. Login IDs are created with a
password and access level. Refer to the Creating a Login section of Chapter 4.
Enable – Security is enabled. When access is attempted via Telnet, the user is
prompted for a Login ID and password.
Disable – No Login required for a Telnet session.
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-7. Telnet Session Options (2 of 2)
Session Access Level
Possible Settings: Level 1, Level 2, Level 3
Default Setting: Level 1
The Telnet session access level is interrelated with the access level of the Login ID.
Level 1 – This is the highest access level. Access level is determined by the Login ID. If
Login Required is disabled, the session access is level 1.
Level 2 – This access level overrides a Login ID with an access level 1. If a Login ID
has an access level of 3, the effective access level is 3.
Level 3 – This access level provides the effective access level and overrides the
access level of a Login ID.
NOTE:
Refer to the ATI Access section of Chapter 4 for access level details.
Inactivity Timeout
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Provides automatic logoff of a Telnet session.
Enable – The Telnet session terminates automatically after the Disconnect Time set in
the next option.
Disable – A Telnet session will not be closed due to inactivity.
Disconnect Time (minutes)
Possible Settings: range 1 – 60
Default Setting: 5
Number of minutes of inactivity before a Telnet session terminates automatically.
Timeout is based on no keyboard activity.
Disconnect Time (minutes) option appears when Inactivity Timeout is enabled.
1 to 60 – The Telnet session is closed after the selected number of minutes.
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Configuration Option Tables
Alarms & Traps Options Menu
For Alarms & Traps Options, refer to Table A-8. To access the Alarms & Traps
Options screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
Alarms & Traps
Table A-8. Alarms & Traps Options (1 of 2)
ASCII Alarm Messages
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Controls the generation and routing of ASCII alarm messages to an ASCII terminal or
printer connected to the Management port. Refer to the Alarm Messages section of
Chapter 8.
Enable – ASCII alarm messages are generated and sent out when the Management
port is configured for Alarms in Management Port Options, Table A-5.
The messages are sent out immediately if there is:
– No DCE (e.g., modem or PAD) connected to the Management port and
External Device Commands option is set to Disable in Table A-6 or
– An active connection is already established via an external DCE.
If an external device is connected to the Management port with no active
connection, the message control is based on the next option, Alarm & Trap
Dial-Out. External Device Commands must be configured for AT or Other in
External Device Options, Table A-6.
Disable – ASCII alarm messages are not generated or sent.
Alarm & Trap Dial-Out
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
When there is no active connection, this option controls whether generating an ASCII
alarm or SNMP trap results in automatic call initiation.
Enable – Automatically places a call via the external device connected to the
Management port.
To send out SNMP traps, SNMP Management must be enabled in Table A-10.
When Port Use is set to Net Link in Table A-5, up to ten SNMP traps are queued
at the interface.
The Primary Directory phone number is dialed. Refer to the Call Setup section of
Chapter 3.
Refer to the Call Retry option for handling of incomplete call attempts.
Disable – Automatic call initiation is disabled and alarm messages are discarded.
SNMP traps are retained until a connection is established.
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-8. Alarms & Traps Options (2 of 2)
SNMP Trap Disconnect
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Enable
Determines if a Management port external device connection is dropped after sending
an SNMP trap.
A call established to send out an ASCII alarm always disconnects automatically if
the call was initiated automatically.
Enable – The external device disconnects after sending out an SNMP trap.
Disable – The external device remains connected and must be disconnected by remote
modem or manually. This allows the NMS to poll the DSU after receiving an SNMP trap.
Call Retry
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Specify if an unsuccessful call is retried.
Enable – The call is retried up to five times for each ASCII alarm and each SNMP trap.
The following options, Dial-Out Delay Time (min) and Alternate Dial-Out Directory,
affect the amount of time before a retry and the number of retries.
Disable – No retry of an unsuccessful call.
Dial-Out Delay Time (min)
Possible Settings: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Default Setting: 5
This delay applies to both the number of minutes before a new call is initiated for a
different alarm and the number of minutes between call retries. Refer to the previous
option, Call Retry.
1 to 10 – Number of minutes before a call is initiated or retried.
Alternate Dial-Out Directory
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Specifies whether an incomplete call initiated for an ASCII alarm or SNMP trap is
attempted using the Alternate Directory phone number.
Both Alarm & Trap Dial-Out and Call Retry options must be enabled.
Enable – After attempting to reach the Primary Directory phone number five times, the
alternate dial-out directory phone number is dialed five times.
NOTE:
The Alternate Directory phone number is dialed. Refer to the Call Setup
section of Chapter 3.
Disable – No alternate phone number is used.
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Configuration Option Tables
SNMP & Communication Options Menu
The SNMP & Communications Menu includes the following:
Communication Protocol Options, Table A-9
General SNMP Management Options, Table A-10
SNMP NMS Security Options, Table A-11
SNMP Traps Options, Table A-12
Communication Protocol Options
To access the Communication Protocol Options screen, follow this menu
selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
SNMP & Communication → Communication Protocol
Table A-9. Communication Protocol Options (1 of 2)
Management Port IP Address
Possible Settings: 000.000.000.000 – 223.255.255.255, Clear
Default Setting: 000.000.000.000
Specifies the Internet Protocol address for the Management port.
Port Use option must be set to Net Link in Table A-5 for the Management Port IP
Address to be effective.
000.000.000.000 – 223.255.255.255 – Sets the Management port IP address. The
range for the first byte is 000 to 223, with the exception of 127. The range for the
remaining three bytes is 000 to 255.
Clear – Clears the IP address and sets to all zeros.
NOTE:
This IP address is also used if the Alternate Directory Phone Number is
attempted and the Alternate Mgmt Port IP Address option is all zeros.
Management Port Subnet Mask
Possible Settings: 000.000.000.000 – 255.255.255.255, Clear
Default Setting: 000.000.000.000
Specifies the subnet mask needed to access the Management port.
000.000.000.000 – 255.255.255.255 – Set the Management port subnet mask. The
range for each byte is 000 to 255.
Clear – Clears the subnet mask and sets to all zeros. When the subnet mask is all
zeros, the device creates a default subnet mask based on the class of IP address:
– Class A defaults to 255.000.000.000
– Class B defaults to 255.255.000.000
– Class C defaults to 255.255.255.000
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-9. Communication Protocol Options (2 of 2)
Management Port Link Protocol
Possible Settings: PPP, SLIP
Default Setting: PPP
Specifies the link layer protocol for the Management port.
Port Use option must be set to Net Link in Table A-5 for the Management Port Link
Protocol to be effective.
PPP – Point-to-Point Protocol.
SLIP – Serial Line Internet Protocol.
Port Type option must be set to Asynchronous in Table A-5.
Alternate Mgmt Port IP Address
Possible Settings: 000.000.000.000 – 223.255.255.255, Clear
Default Setting: 000.000.000.000
IP address to use when a call is initiated using the Alternate Directory Phone Number. If
this address is all zeros, the Management Port IP Address is used.
000.000.000.000 – 223.255.255.255 – Sets the alternate Management port IP address.
The range for the first byte is 000 to 223, with the exception of 127. The range for the
remaining three bytes is 000 to 255.
Clear – Clears the IP address and sets to all zeros.
Alternate Mgmt Port Subnet Mask
Possible Settings: 000.000.000.000 – 255.255.255.255, Clear
Default Setting: 000.000.000.000
Specifies the alternate subnet mask used to access the Management port. Used with
the previous option, Alternate Management Port IP Address.
000.000.000.000 – 255.255.255.255 – Sets the management port alternate subnet
mask. The range for each byte is 000 to 255.
Clear – Clears the alternate subnet mask and sets to all zeros. The device creates a
default alternate subnet mask based on the class of IP address:
– Class A defaults to 255.000.000.000
– Class B defaults to 255.255.000.000
– Class C defaults to 255.255.255.000
Default Network Destination
Possible Settings: None, Mgmt, IMC
Default Setting: None
Specifies where the default network is connected. The routing protocol uses this option
to route data with no specific route.
WARNING: Unroutable data is discarded if the Default Network Destination
becomes disabled or the option is set to None. Change the default
network destination if the default route is not operational.
None – No default network destination; unroutable data is discarded.
Mgmt – The Management port is the default network destination.
Port Use option must be set to Net Link in Table A-5.
IMC – The In-Band Management Channel is the default network destination.
In-Band Management Channel Rate(bps) option must be set to 1600, 4000, or
8000 bps in Table A-2.
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Configuration Option Tables
General SNMP Management Options
To access the General SNMP Management Options screen, follow this menu
selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
SNMP & Communication → General SNMP Management
Table A-10. General SNMP Management Options (1 of 2)
SNMP Management
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Specifies if the DSU can be managed by an SNMP NMS or send out SNMP traps.
Enable – Enables SNMP management.
Disable – DSU does not respond to SNMP messages or send out SNMP traps.
Community Name 1
Possible Settings: ASCII Text, Clear
Default Setting: Public
Community Name of external SNMP Managers allowed access to the DSU’s MIB. This
community name must be supplied by an external SNMP manager attempting to access
a MIB object. Level of access is set in the next option, Name 1 Access.
ASCII Text – Enter a maximum of 255 ASCII printable characters. Refer to the ASCII
Characters section.
Clear – Clears the Community Name 1 field.
Name 1 Access
Possible Settings: Read, Read/Write
Default Setting: Read
Set the access level for the Community Name 1 created in the previous option.
Read – Allows a read-only access (i.e. SNMP Get) to accessible MIB objects.
Read/Write – Allows both an SNMP Get and Set to MIB objects. Write access allowed
to all MIB objects specified as read-write in the MIB RFC.
Community Name 2
Possible Settings: ASCII Text, Clear
Default Setting: [blank]
Community Name of external SNMP Managers allowed access to the DSU’s MIB. This
community name must be supplied by an external SNMP manager attempting to access
a MIB object. Level of access is set in the next option, Name 2 Access.
ASCII Text – Enter a maximum of 255 ASCII printable characters. Refer to the ASCII
Characters section.
Clear – Clears the Community Name 2 field.
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-10. General SNMP Management Options (2 of 2)
Name 2 Access
Possible Settings: Read, Read/Write
Default Setting: Read
Set the access level for the Community Name 2 created in the previous option.
Read – Allows a read-only access (i.e. SNMP Get) to accessible MIB objects.
Read/Write – Allows both an SNMP Get and Set to MIB objects. Write access allowed
to all MIB objects specified as read-write in the MIB RFC.
SNMP NMS Security Options
To access the SNMP NMS Security Options screen, follow this menu selection
sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
SNMP & Communication → SNMP NMS Security
Table A-11. SNMP NMS Security Options (1 of 2)
NMS IP Validation
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Determines if security checks are performed on the IP address of any SNMP
management system that attempts to access the node.
Enable – Performs security checking. Allows access only if the sending manager’s
IP address has been entered on the NMS IP address list below.
Disable – No security checking of incoming SNMP messages.
Number of Managers
Possible Settings: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Default Setting: 1
Set the number of SNMP managers that are authorized to send SNMP messages. The
IP address of each SNMP management system must be entered in the next option.
1 to 10 – Specifies the number of SNMP managers allowed to send SNMP messages.
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Configuration Option Tables
Table A-11. SNMP NMS Security Options (2 of 2)
NMS n IP Address
Possible Settings: 000.000.000.000 – 223.255.255.255, Clear
Default Setting: 000.000.000.000
Enter an IP address for each of the managers set in the previous option. “n” is the
number of the manager (1 to 10). Use the next option to establish the security level for
each SNMP manager.
NOTE:
When an SNMP message is received from an IP address that does not
match the IP address entries in this option, access is denied and an
“authenticationFailure” trap is generated.
000.000.000.000 – 223.255.255.255 – Sets the NMS IP address. The range for the first
byte is 000 to 223, with the exception of 127. The range for the remaining three bytes is
000 to 255.
Clear – Clears the IP address and sets to all zeros.
Access Level
Possible Settings: Read, Read/Write
Default Setting: Read
Set the access level for each IP address created in the previous option.
Read – Allows a read-only access (SNMP Get) to accessible MIB objects.
Read/Write – Allows both an SNMP Get and Set to MIB objects. Write access allowed
to all MIB objects specified as read-write in the MIB RFC. This access level is overriden
by the Community Name’s access level for the SNMP Manager, if the Community Name
access level is Read.
A-26
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Configuration Option Tables
SNMP Traps Options
To access the SNMP Traps Options screen, follow this menu selection sequence:
Main Menu → Configuration → Load Configuration From → Edit →
SNMP & Communication → SNMP Traps
Table A-12. SNMP Traps Options (1 of 2)
SNMP Traps
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
Controls the generation of SNMP trap messages. The options for addresses and types
of traps are located in this table.
SNMP Management must be enabled in Table A-10.
Enable – SNMP trap messages are sent out to SNMP managers.
If the destination is the Management port and an external device is attached to the
Management port, the messages are sent immediately if there is an active
connection. Automatic call initiation is based on the Alarm & Trap Dial-Out option
in Table A-8. The destination is set with the Trap Manager Destination option.
Disable – No SNMP trap messages are sent out.
Number of Trap Managers
Possible Settings: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Default Setting: 1
Sets the number of SNMP management systems that will receive SNMP traps.
1 to 6 – Number of trap managers. An NMS IP address is required for each manager.
Trap Manager “n” IP Address
Possible Settings: 000.000.000.000 – 223.255.255.255, Clear
Default Setting: 000.000.000.000
Specifies the Internet Protocol address used to identify each SNMP trap manager.
“n” represents the number of the manager (from 1 to 6).
000.000.000.000 – 223.255.255.255 – Enter an address for each SNMP trap manager.
The range for the first byte is 000 to 223, with the exception of 127. The range for the
remaining three bytes is 000 to 255.
Clear – Clears the IP address and sets to all zeros.
Trap Manager “n” Destination
Possible Settings: Default, Mgmt, IMC
Default Setting: Default
Provides the network destination path of each trap manager. “n” is the number of the
manager (from 1 to 6).
Default – Uses the address set in the Default Network Destination in Table A-9.
Mgmt – The Management port is the network destination.
Port Use option must be set to Net Link in Table A-5.
IMC – The In-Band Management Channel is the default network destination.
In-Band Management Channel Rate(bps) option must be set to 1600, 4000, or
8000 bps in Table A-2.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
A-27
Configuration Option Tables
Table A-12. SNMP Traps Options (2 of 2)
General Traps
Possible Settings: Disable, Warm, AuthFail, Both
Default Setting: Both
Determines which SNMP traps are sent to each trap manager.
Disable – No general trap messages are sent.
Warm – Sends trap message for “warmStart”.
AuthFail – Sends trap message for “authenticationFailure”.
Both – Sends both trap messages.
NOTE:
Refer to Standards Compliance for SNMP Traps, Appendix D.
Enterprise Specific Traps
Possible Settings: Enable, Disable
Default Setting: Disable
This option is used to determine if SNMP traps are generated for enterprise-specific
events.
Enable – SNMP traps are generated for enterprise-specific events.
NOTE:
Refer to the Traps: Enterprise Specific section of Appendix D.
Disable – No enterprise-specific event traps are sent.
Link Traps
Possible Settings: Disable, Up, Down, Both
Default Setting: Both
This option is used to determine if SNMP traps are generated for link up and link down
for one of the communication interfaces.
Disable – No linkUp or linkDown SNMP traps are generated.
Up – A linkUp trap is generated when the DSU recognizes that one of the
communication interfaces is operational.
Down – A linkDown trap is generated when the DSU recognizes a failure in one of the
communication interfaces.
Both – Sends trap messages for detection of both linkUp and linkDown.
NOTE:
Refer to the Traps: linkUp and linkDown section of Appendix D.
Link Trap Interfaces
Possible Settings: Network, Port, Both
Default Setting: Both
This option determines if the SNMP linkUp, SNMP linkDown, and interface-related
enterprise-specific traps are generated for the DDS Network Interface and/or User Data
(DTE) port.
NOTE:
These traps are not supported on the Management port and Terminal port.
Network – SNMP trap messages are generated for the DDS network interface.
Port – SNMP trap messages are generated for the User Data (DTE) port.
Both – SNMP trap messages are generated on both the DDS network interface and the
User Date (DTE) port.
A-28
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Configuration Option Tables
ASCII Characters
ASCII characters are divided into ASCII printable characters and ASCII
non-printable control sequences.
ASCII printable characters include:
Numeric 0–9
Upper or lower case A-Z
< > space
All ASCII symbols except the ^ (caret)
ASCII printable characters are valid entries for the following:
Device Name screen. Refer to the Entering Device and System Information
section in Chapter 3.
— Device Name field
— System Name field
— System Location field
— System Contact field
Call Directories screen. Refer to the Call Setup section in Chapter 3.
— Phone Number field
Administer Logins screen. Refer to the Creating a Login section in Chapter 4.
— Login ID field
— Password field
External Device Options, Table A-6
— Connect Prefix option
— Connects Indication String option
— Escape Sequence option
— Disconnect String option
General SNMP Management Options, Table A-10
— Community Name 1 option
— Community Name 2 option
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
A-29
Configuration Option Tables
Table A-13 contains non-printable ASCII characters. To form a control sequence,
the caret (^) must be followed by one character. In addition to ASCII printable
characters, these control sequences are also valid entries in the following:
Call Directories screen. Refer to the Call Setup section in Chapter 3.
— Phone Number field
External Device Options, Table A-6
— Connect Prefix option
— Connects Indication String option
— Escape Sequence option
— Disconnect String option
Table A-13. ASCII Non-Printable Characters
A-30
Sequence ASCII
Hex
Sequence ASCII
Hex
^A or ^a
SOH
0x01
^Q or ^q
DC1
0x11
^B or ^b
STX
0x02
^ R or ^r
DC2
0x12
^C or ^c
ETX
0x03
^S or ^s
DC3
0x13
^D or ^d
EOT
0x04
^T or ^t
DC4
0x14
^E or ^e
ENQ
0x05
^U or ^u
NAK
0x15
^F or ^f
ACK
0x06
^V or ^v
SYN
0x17
^G or ^g
BEL
0x07
^W or ^w
ETB
0x17
^H or ^h
BS
0x08
^X or ^x
CAN
0x18
^I or ^i
HT
0x09
^Y or ^y
EM
0x19
^J or ^j
LF or NL
0x0A
^Z or ^z
SUB
0x1A
^K or ^k
VT
0x0B
^{ or ^[
ESC
0x1B
^L or ^l
FF or NP
0x0C
^\ or ^|
FS
0x1C
^M or ^m
CR
0x0D
^] or ^}
GS
0x1D
^N or ^n
SO
0x0E
^^ or ^~
RS
0x1E
^O or ^o
SI
0x0F
^-
US
0x1F
^P or ^p
DLE
0x10
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Worksheets
B
Overview
The worksheets in this appendix summarize the configuration options accessed
when you select Configuration on the Main Menu. The possible menu selections
are displayed with the default settings and the possible settings.
Configuration Worksheets
System
7610-A2-GB20-10
Configuration Option
Settings
Operating Mode
[DDS], LADS
DDS Line Rate (Kbps)
56, 64CC, [Autobaud]
LADS Timing
[Internal], External, Receive
LADS Line Rate (Kbps)
56, [64]
Test Timeout
[Enable], Disable
Test Duration (min)
1–120, [10]
Security Violation Alarm
[Enable], Disable
November 1997
Default in [Bold]
B-1
Worksheets
Network Interface
Configuration Option
Settings
Network-initiated DSU Loopback (64K CC)
[Enable], Disable
Data Scrambling (64K CC)
Enable, [Disable]
V.54 Initiated DSU Loopback
Enable, [Disable]
In-Band Management Channel Rate (bps)
[Disable], 1600, 4000, 8000
IMC IP Address
[000.000.000.000] – 223.255.255.255
IMC Subnet Mask
[000.000.000.000] – 255.255.255.255
IMC Routing Information Protocol
None, [Proprietary]
Cross Pair Detection Alarm
[Enable], Disable
No Signal Alarm
[Enable], Disable
Out of Service Alarm
[Enable], Disable
Out of Frame Alarm
[Enable], Disable
Excessive BPV Alarm
[Enable], Disable
In-Band Framing Alarm
[Enable], Disable
Default in [Bold]
Data Port
B-2
Configuration Option
Settings
Invert Transmit Clock
Enable, [Disable]
Port (DTE) Initiated Loopbacks
[Disable], Local, Remote, Both
Bilateral Loopback
Enable, [Disable]
Carrier Control by RTS
[Constant], Switched
CTS Control
[Standard], Follow RTS, Forced On,
Circuit Assurance
RLSD Control
[Standard], Forced On
DSR Control
[Standard], Forced On, On During Test
Monitor DTR
[Enable], Disable
November 1997
Default in [Bold]
7610-A2-GB20-10
Worksheets
User Interface
Configuration Option
Settings
Default in [Bold]
Terminal Port
Data Rate (Kbps)
2.4, 4.8, [9.6], 14.4, 19.2, 28.8, 38.4
Character Length
7, [8]
Parity
[None], Even, Odd
Stop Bits
[1], 1.5, 2
Monitor DTR
[Enable], Disable
Login Required
Enable, [Disable]
Port Access Level
[Level 1], Level 2, Level 3
Inactivity Timeout
Enable, [Disable]
Disconnect Time(minutes)
range 1 – 60 [5]
Management Port
Port Use
[Net Link], Alarms, None
Port Type
Asynchronous, [Synchronous]
Clock Source
[Internal], External
Data Rate (Kbps)
2.4, 4.8, [9.6], 14.4, 19.2, 28.8, 38.4
Character Length
7, [8]
Parity
[None], Even, Odd
Stop Bits
[1], 1.5, 2
Monitor DTR
[Enable], Disable
Routing Management Protocol
[None], Proprietary
External Device
External Device Commands
[Disable], AT, Other
Dial-In Access
Enable, [Disable]
Connect Prefix
ASCII Text
Connects Indication String
ASCII Text
Escape Sequence
ASCII Text
Escape Sequence Delay (sec)
[None], 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0
Disconnect String
ASCII Text
Telnet Session
7610-A2-GB20-10
Telnet Session
Enable, [Disable]
Login Required
Enable, [Disable]
Session Access Level
[Level 1], Level 2, Level 3
Inactivity Timeout
Enable, [Disable]
Disconnect Time (minutes)
range 1 – 60 [5]
November 1997
B-3
Worksheets
Alarms & Traps
Configuration Option
Settings
ASCII Alarm Messages
Enable, [Disable]
Alarm & Trap Dial-Out
Enable, [Disable]
SNMP Trap Disconnect
[Enable], Disable
Call Retry
Enable, [Disable]
Dial-Out Delay Time (min)
1, 2, 3, 4, [5], 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
Alternate Dial-Out Directory
Enable, [Disable]
Default in [Bold]
Management
Configuration Option
Settings
Default in [Bold]
Communication Protocol
Management Port IP Address
[000.000.000.000] – 223.255.255.255
Management Port Subnet Mask
[000.000.000.000] – 255.255.255.255
Management Port Link Protocol
[PPP], SLIP
Alternate Mgmt Port IP Address
[000.000.000.000] – 223.255.255.255
Alternate Mgmt Port Subnet Mask
[000.000.000.000] – 255.255.255.255
Default Network Destination
[None], Mgmt, IMC
General SNMP Management
SNMP Management
[Disable], Enable
Community Name 1
ASCII Text, [Public]
Name 1 Access
[Read], Read/Write
Community Name 2
ASCII Text
Name 2 Access
[Read], Read/Write
SNMP NMS Security
NMS IP Validation
Enable, [Disable]
Number of Managers
[1], 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
NMS “n” IP Address
[000.000.000.000] – 223.255.255.255
Access Level
[Read], Read/Write
SNMP Traps
B-4
SNMP Traps
Enable, [Disable]
Number of Trap Managers
[1], 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Trap Manager “n” IP Address
[000.000.000.000] – 223.255.255.255
Trap Manager “n” Destination
[Default], Mgmt, IMC
General Traps
Disable, Warm, AuthFail, [Both]
Enterprise Specific Traps
Enable, [Disable]
Link Traps
Disable, Up, Down, [Both]
Link Trap Interfaces
Network, Port, [Both]
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
MIB Descriptions
C
MIB Description Overview
The following sections show generally how the SNMP DSU supports MIB objects
relative to their RFC description. MIBs are available on the World Wide Web site
listed on Page A (the reverse side of the title page of this document).
MIB II – RFC 1213 and RFC 1573
The unit supports the following MIB II object groups as defined in RFC 1213 and
RFC 1573:
System Group Objects
Interfaces Group Objects – Supported for the DDS network interface, User
Data (DTE) port, Terminal port, Management port, and the IMC as defined in
RFC 1573, the Evolution of the Interfaces Group.
— Interfaces Group Objects
— Extension to Interface Table (ifXTable)
— Interface Stack Group Objects
— Interface Test Group Objects
7610-A2-GB20-10
IP Group Objects
ICMP (Internet Control Management Protocol) Group
TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) Group
UDP ( User Datagram Protocol ) Group
Transmission Group Objects. Supported on the DDS network interface using
the DDS Enterprise MIB. Supported on the User Data (DTE) port, Terminal
port, and Management port using the RS-232-like MIB.
SNMP Group
November 1997
C-1
MIB Descriptions
The following MIB II groups are not supported:
Address Translation Group
Exterior Gateway Protocol ( EGP) Group
RS-232-Like MIB – RFC 1659
The unit supports RS-232-Like MIB, RFC 1659:
Number of RS-232-Like Ports Object.
General Port Table Objects
Asynchronous Port Table Objects. Not supported for the User Data port.
Synchronous Port Table Objects. Not supported for the Terminal port.
Input Signal Table Objects. Not supported for the Management port or
Terminal port.
Output Signal Table Objects. Not supported for the Management port or
Terminal port.
Enterprise MIB Objects
The following Paradyne Enterprise MIB Objects are supported by the unit:
C-2
Device Configuration Variable
Port Usage Table, attp-devPortUsage (attp-interfaces 3)
DDS Interface Specific Definitions, attp-dds (attp-interfaces 2)
Device Security, attp-security (att-common 8)
Device Traps, attp-traps (att-common 9)
Device Control, attp-control (attp-common 10)
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
MIB Descriptions
System Group
System Group objects are fully supported by the unit.
Table C-1. System Group Objects
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
sysDescr
( system 1)
Provides a full name and
version identification for the
system’s hardware and
software.
PARADYNE DDS Leased Line DSU;
Model: 7610-A1-201;
S/W Release: yy.yy.yy;
H/W Revision: zzzz-zzz;
Serial Number: sssssss
sysObjectID
( system 2)
Identifies the network
management subsystem.
1.3.6.1.4.1.1795.1.14.2.5.1.1
sysContact
(system 4)
Provides the textual
identification of the contact
person for this managed unit.1
ASCII character string, as set by the
user.
sysName
(system 5)
Provides an
administratively-assigned
name for this managed unit.1
ASCII character string, as set by the
user.
sysLocation
(system 6)
Provides the physical location ASCII character string, as set by the
for this managed unit.1
user.
sysServices
( system 7)
Functionality supported:
Object is set to 1+2+4+8 (15).
physical (1 ) – Layer 1
functionality for all
interfaces.
datalink/subnetwork ( 2 ) –
Layer 2 functionality
( SLIP/ PPP ) for all
management links.
internet ( 4 ) – Layer 3
functionality ( IP ) for all
management links.
end-to-end ( 8 ) – Layer 4
functionality ( TCP/ UDP )
for all management links.
1
7610-A2-GB20-10
The unit supports a 127-character string for this object. An error message is sent to
the NMS if an attempt is made to write (set) more than 127 characters.
November 1997
C-3
MIB Descriptions
Interfaces Group
The Interfaces Group as defined in RFC 1573 consists of an object indicating the
number of interfaces supported by the unit and an interface table containing an
entry for each interface. Since RFC 1573 is an SNMPv2 MIB, it is converted to
SNMPv1 for support by the unit. The following table provides clarification for
objects contained in the Interfaces group when it is not clear how the object
definition in RFC 1573 is supported by the unit.
Table C-2. Interfaces Group Objects (1 of 4)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
ifNumber
( interfaces 1)
Specifies the number
of interfaces for this
unit in the ifTable.
5
ifIndex
( ifEntry 1)
Provides the index to
the interface table
( ifTable ) and to other
tables as well.
Indexes and values:
When an unsupported
index is entered (e.g.,
3 and 5), noSuchName
is returned.
4 – DDS network interface
Supplies text for each
Interface:
Text Strings for each interface:
Management
“Management Port; PARADYNE DDS
ifDescr
( ifEntry 2)
1 – Management port
2 – Terminal port
6 – User Data (DTE) port
7 – In-band Management Channel
Leased Line DSU; Hardware Version
[Hardware Revision]”; Software Version:
[Software Revision].
Terminal
“Terminal Port; PARADYNE DDS Leased
Line DSU; Hardware Version [Hardware
Revision]”; Software Version: [Software
Revision].
DDS Network
“DDS Network; PARADYNE DDS Leased
Line DSU; Hardware Version [Hardware
Revision]”; Software Version: [Software
Revision].
User Data Port
“User Data Port; PARADYNE DDS Leased
Line DSU; Hardware Version [Hardware
Revision]”; Software Version: [Software
Revision].
In-band
Management
Channel
C-4
November 1997
“In-band Management Channel;
PARADYNE DDS Leased Line DSU;
Hardware Version [Hardware Revision]”;
Software Version: [Software Revision].
7610-A2-GB20-10
MIB Descriptions
Table C-2. Interfaces Group Objects (2 of 4)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
ifType
( ifEntry 3 )
Identifies the interface
type based on the
physical/link
protocol(s), right below
the network layer.
Supported values:
other( 1 ) – Used for the DDS network.
ppp( 23 ) – Used for the In-band
Management Channel and for the
Management port, when configured for
PPP.
slip( 28 ) – Used for Management port,
when configured for SLIP.
rs232( 33 ) – Used for the Terminal port
and the Management port, when not
configured as Net Link.
v35( 45 ) – Used for the User Data port.
ifMtu
( ifEntry 4 )
Identifies the largest
datagram that can be
sent or received on an
interface (Management
port or IMC).
Number of octets.
ifSpeed
( ifEntry 5 )
Provides the current
bandwidth for the
interface in bits per
second.
Management port – Configured data rate
for the port.
Terminal port – Configured data rate for
the port.
DDS – Line rate of 56,000 or 64,000 bps,
reflecting the line rate detected by the unit.
User data (DTE) port – Current data rate of
the port (DDS operating rate minus IMC
rate).
In-band Management Channel –
Configured data rate for the In-band
Management Channel.
ifAdminStatus
( ifEntry 7 )
7610-A2-GB20-10
Provides interface
status. Supported as
read-only.
November 1997
up(1) – The interface is enabled.
down(2) – The interface is disabled.
C-5
MIB Descriptions
Table C-2. Interfaces Group Objects (3 of 4)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
ifOperStatus
( ifEntry 8 )
Specifies the current
operational state of the
interface.
Management port. When configured as
Net Link, up(1) and down(2) are based on
the current state of the link-layer protocol.
When configured for Alarms, the interface
is always up(1). Never in testing(3) state.
Terminal port. Always up(1); never in
testing(3) state.
User Data Port
– up(1) – No alarms
– down(2) – Alarms
– testing(3) – Test active
DDS Network Interface
– up(1) – DTR on, if supported by the
DTE
– down(2) – DTR off, if supported by the
DTE
– testing(3) – Test active
In-band Management Channel. When
enabled, up and down are based on the
current state of the physical and link layer
protocols.
– up(1) – Operational and no active test
on the DDS network interface
– down(2) – Not operational or disabled
– testing(3) – Test active on DDS network
interface
ifLastChange
( ifEntry 9 )
Indicates the amount
of time the interface
has been up and
running.
Contains the value of sysUpTime object at
the time the interface entered its current
operational state.
ifInOctets
(ifEntry 10)
Collects input statistics
on data received by
the interface.
interface
An integer number.
ifInUcastPkts
(ifEntry 11)
ifInDiscards
(ifEntry 13)
ifInErrors
(ifEntry 14)
ifInUnknown
Protos
(ifEntry 15)
C-6
Applies to the IMC and
the Management port,
if configured for Net
Link. When the
Management port is
not configured as a Net
Link, these statistics
will not be collected,
collected
and an error status will
be sent if access is
attempted.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
MIB Descriptions
Table C-2. Interfaces Group Objects (4 of 4)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
ifOutOctets
(ifEntry 16)
Collects output
statistics on data
received by the
interface.
An integer number.
ifOutUcastPkts
(ifEntry 17)
ifOutDiscards
(ifEntry 19)
ifOutErrors
(ifEntry 20)
Applies to the IMC and
the Management port,
if configured for Net
Link When the
Link.
Management port is
not configured as a Net
Link,, these statistics
will not be collected,
collected
and an error status will
be sent if access is
attempted.
Extension to Interface Table (ifXTable)
This extension contains additional objects for the interface table. Supports only
the following objects.
Table C-3. Extension to Interface Table (ifXTable)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
ifName
(ifXEntry 1)
Provides name of the
interface.
Interface text strings:
Management Port
Terminal Port
DDS Network
User Data Port
In-band Management Channel
ifLinkUpDownTrapEnable
(ifXEntry 14)
Indicates whether the link is
up or down, or enterprisespecific traps should be
generated.
Only supports DDS network and User
data port.
ifHighSpeed
(ifXEntry 15)
Reflects the ifSpeed setting
for the interface.
This object is supported as read-only.
ifConnectorPresent
(ifXEntry 17)
Indicates whether there is a
physical connector for the
interface.
true(1) – Will always have this value for
the DDS network, Management port,
Terminal port, and User Data port.
SNMP Traps must be enabled for the
unit. See SNMP Traps Option,
Table A-12.
false(2) –Will always have this value for
the In-band Management Channel.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
C-7
MIB Descriptions
Interface Stack Group
The Interface Stack Group is used by the unit to show the relationship between a
logical interface and a physical interface. The following table provides clarification
for objects contained in the Interface Stack group when it is not clear how the
object definition in RFC 1573 is supported by the unit.
Table C-4. Interface Stack Group Objects
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
ifStackHigherLayer
(ifStackEntry1)
Provides the index that
corresponds to the higher
sublevel specified by
ifStackLowerLayer.
When the In-band Management Channel
is enabled, this object for the DDS
network interface is set to the ifIndex of
the In-band Management Channel. All
other ifStackHigherLayer objects will
have a value of zero.
ifStackLowerLayer
(ifStackEntry2)
Provides the index that
corresponds to the lower
sublevel specified by
ifStackHigherLayer.
When the In-band Management Channel
is enabled, this object for the In-band
Management Channel is set to the
ifIndex of the DDS network interface. All
other ifStackLowerLayer objects will
have a value of zero.
ifStackStatus
(ifStackEntry3)
Specifies the stack group’s
status compared to the
interface’s ifOperStatus.
When ifStackStatus set to active –
Supported as a read-only
variable.
When ifStackStatus set to not in
maps to ifOperStatus set to up(1) or
testing(3).
service – maps to ifOperStatus set to
down(2).
Interface Test Table
The unit uses the Interface Test table to provide access to additional tests such
as loopbacks and pattern tests, which are not included in the Interfaces Group of
MIB II.
Table C-5. Interface Test Group Objects (1 of 2)
C-8
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
ifTestID
(ifTestEntry 1)
Provides a unique identifier
for the current request of
the interface’s test. Ensures
that the results of the test
are for that request. This
handles the rare condition
where another SNMP
Manager starts a test
immediately after
completion of a previous
test, but before the
previous test results are
received by the first SNMP
manager.
Set by an SNMP Manager before the
test is started. The unit then increments
the previous value. The value is then
checked after the test has completed.
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
MIB Descriptions
Table C-5. Interface Test Group Objects (2 of 2)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
ifTestStatus
(ifTestEntry2)
Indicates the test status of
the interface.
Set to inUse(2) by an SNMP
Manager before a test is started.
Set to notInUse(1) by the unit when
the test has completed. Also set to
notInUse(1) by the unit if the SNMP
Manager fails to set an ifTestType
within 5 minutes.
ifTestType
(ifTestEntry 3)
A control variable used to
start/stop user-initiated
tests on the interface.
Provides the following
capabilities:
Start/stop user data port
loopback
Start/stop send pattern
on the user data port
Start/stop the monitor
test pattern on the user
data port
ifTestCode
(ifTestEntry 5)
Contains a code which is
more specific about the test
results.
The following objects use identifiers to
control tests on the User Data port
interface:
noTest (0 0) – Stops the test in
progress on the interface.
testLoopDTE (ifTestType 2) – Starts
a Local Loopback (DTE) on the
interface.
testMon511 (ifTestType4) – Starts a
Monitor 511 test on the interface.
testSend511 (ifTestType6) – Starts a
Send 511 test on the interface.
Supports the following values:
none (ifTestCode 1) – No further
information is available. Used for
send pattern/code and loopback tests.
inSyncNoBitErrors (ifTestCode 2) –
A 511 monitor pattern test has
synchronized on the pattern and has
not detected any bit errors.
inSyncWithBitErrors
(ifTestCode 3) – A 511 monitor pattern
test has synchronized on the pattern
and has detected bit errors.
notInSync (ifTestCode 4) – A 511
monitor test pattern has not
synchronized on the requested
pattern.
ifTestOwner
(ifTestEntry 6)
7610-A2-GB20-10
Used by an SNMP
Manager to identify the
current owner of the test for
the interface.
November 1997
The SNMP Manager sets the object to
its IP address when setting ifTestID and
ifTestStatus.
C-9
MIB Descriptions
Generic Receive Address Table
Not supported by the unit.
IP Group
The Internet Protocol Group objects are supported by the unit for all data paths
that are currently configured to carry IP data to/from the unit. All of the objects in
the IP Group, except for the IP Address Translation table, are fully supported.
The following table provides clarification for objects contained in the IP group
when it is not clear how the object definition in MIB II is supported by the unit.
Table C-6. IP Group Objects (1 of 2)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
ipForwarding
(ip1)
Specifies whether the unit
is acting as an IP gateway
for forwarding of datagram
received by, but not
addressed to, the unit.
Supports only the following value:
ipAddrTable
(ip20)
The address table.
Supported.
ipAdEntAddr
(ipAddrEntry 1)
An IP address supported by Indexes for tables must be unique.
the unit which serves as an Therefore, only one ifIndex can be
index to the address table.
displayed for each IP address supported
by the device. If the same IP address is
configured for multiple interfaces, or for
default IP addresses, the ipAddrTable
will not display all of the interfaces that
support a particular IP address.
ipAdEntIfIndex
(ipAddrEntry 2)
If this object has a greater
value than the ifNumber,
then it refers to a
proprietary interface not
currently implemented by
the MIB II Interface Group.
None
ipRouteTable
(ip21)
Supported as read/write.
However, use caution when
adding or modifying routes.
To delete a route, set object to invalid.
If it is absolutely necessary
to add a route, the route
should only be added to the
connected device (device
closest to the destination).
Internal routing will continue
the route to the other
devices.
C-10
November 1997
forwarding(1) – The unit is acting as
a gateway.
To modify a route, change fields in the
desired entry of the routing table
(indexed by ipRouteDest).
To add a route, specify values for a table
entry for which the index (ipRouteDest)
does not already exist. The following
objects must be specified:
ipRouteDest – Serves as an index to
the routing table. Only one route per
destination can appear in the table. To
ensure that no duplicate destinations
appear in the routing table, the
ipRouteDest object will be treated as
described in the IP Forwarding Table
MIB (RFC 1354).
7610-A2-GB20-10
MIB Descriptions
Table C-6. IP Group Objects (2 of 2)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
ipRouteIfIndex – If this object has a
ipRouteTable
(ip21)
(Continued)
greater value than the ifNumber, then
it refers to a proprietary interface not
currently implemented by the MIB II
Interface Group. Do not delete route
entries with an unrecognized
ipRouteIfIndex. When setting this
object via SNMP, the ipRouteIfIndex
value can only assume an appropriate
value of IfIndex defined for a
particular device type.
Objects that will be set to the default
value if not specified in the Set PDU
used to add a route:
ipRouteMetric1 – Defaults to 1 hop.
ipRouteType – Defaults to indirect.
ipRouteMask – Defaults to what is
specified in the MIB description.
Objects that are not used by this unit:
ipRouteMetric2, ipRouteMetric3,
ipRoutemetric4, ipRoutemetric5 –
Default to –1.
0000
ipRouteNextHop – Defaults to 0.0.0.0.
Do not specify the following read-only
objects in the Set PDU used to add a
route:
ipRouteProto – Set to netmgmt(3) by
the software. May have the following
values:
– other(1) – Temporary route added
by IP.
– local(2) – Route added or changed
due to User configuration.
– netmgmt(3) – Route added or
changed by SNMP set.
– icmp(4) – Route added or changed
by ICMP.
– rip(8) – Route added or changed
by RIP (or similar proprietary
protocol).
ipRouteAge – Reflects the value of
the time-to-live for the route (in
seconds). Defaults to 999 (permanent
route).
ipRouteInfo – Unused; set to {0, 0}.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
C-11
MIB Descriptions
ICMP Group
The ICMP (Internet Control Management Protocol) Group objects are fully
supported.
TCP Group
The TCP Group objects are fully supported, with the exception of tcpConnState
object, which will be read-only, since deleteTCB (12) is not supported and is the
only value which can be set.
UDP Group
The UDP Group objects are fully supported.
Transmission Group
Objects in the Transmission Group are supported on the DDS network interface,
User Data port, Management port, and Terminal port. These objects are defined
through other Internet-standard MIB definitions rather than within MIB II.
Table C-7. Transmission Group Objects
Object
Description
rs232
( transmission 33 )
Supported on the User Data port, Management port, and
Terminal port. Defined by the RS-232-like MIB (RFC 1659).
enterprise
(transmission 22 )
Supported on the DDS network interface by Paradyne
Enterprise MIB.
SNMP Group
The SNMP Group objects that apply to a management agent are fully supported.
The following objects apply only to an NMS and return a zero value if accessed.
C-12
snmpInTooBig (snmp 8)
snmpInNoSuchNames (snmp 9)
snmpInBadValues (snmp 10)
snmpInReadOnlys (snmp 11)
snmpInGenErrs (snmp 12)
snmpInGetResponses (snmp 18)
snmpInTraps (snmp 19)
snmpOutGetRequests (snmp 25)
snmpOutGetNexts (snmp 26)
snmpOutSetRequests (snmp 27)
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
MIB Descriptions
RS-232-Like MIB, RFC 1659
Supported for the User Data port, the Management port, and the Terminal port.
RFC 1659 is an SNMPv2 MIB, but is converted to an SNMPv1 MIB to support
this unit. This MIB consists of one object and five tables.
Number of RS-232-Like Ports Object
Supported as documented in the RFC.
General Port Table Objects
The General Port Table Objects contains configuration options for the
RS-232-Like interfaces. Clarification for objects contained in this table as it
applies to the unit is provided below.
Table C-8. General Port Table Objects (1 of 2)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
rs232PortType
(rs232PortEntry 2 )
Identifies the port hardware
type.
Supports only the following values:
rs232(2) – Identifies the
Management port and Terminal port.
v35(5) – Identifies the synchronous
User Data port which is compatible
with the V.35 standard.
rs232PortInSig
Number
(rs232PortEntry 3 )
Contains the number of
input signals (in the input
signal table) that can be
detected.
The value is 2 for synchronous user
data port and 0 for both the
Management port and Terminal port.
rs232PortOutSig
Number
(rs232PortEntry 4 )
Contains the number of
output signals (in the output
signal table) that can be
asserted.
The value is 3 for synchronous User
Data port and 0 for both the
Management port and Terminal port.
rs232PortInSpeed
(rs232PortEntry 5 )
Contains the port’s input
speed in bits per second.
Supports the following speeds for
the:
User data port: 64,000, 62,400,
60,000, 56,000, 54,400, 52,000,
48,000.1
Management port: 24002, 48002,
9600, 14,400, 19,200, 28,800,
38,400.
Terminal port: 2400, 4800,
9600,14,400, 19,200, 28,800,
38,400.
1
The User Data port speed is a read-only value that can only differ from the DDS
network speed if the In-band Management Channel is enabled.
2 This speed is only valid when the port is configured for asynchronous operation.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
C-13
MIB Descriptions
Table C-8. General Port Table Objects (2 of 2)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
rs232PortOut
Speed
(rs232PortEntry 6 )
Contains the port’s output
speed in bits per second.
Supports the following speeds for
the:
The rs232PortOutSpeed
object has the same values
as the rs232PortInSpeed
object.
User data port: 64,000, 62,400,
60,000, 56,000, 54,400, 52,000,
48,000.1
Management port: 24002, 4800,2
9600, 14,400, 19,200, 28,800,
38,400.
Terminal port: 2400, 4800,
9600,14,400, 19,200, 28,800,
38,400.
1
The User Data port speed is a read-only value that can only differ from the DDS
network speed if the In-band Management Channel is enabled.
2 This speed is only valid when the port is configured for asynchronous operation.
The following are not supported:
rs232PortInFlowType (rs232PortEntry 7)
rs232PortOutFlowType (rs232PortEntry 8)
Asynchronous Port Table Objects
The Asynchronous Port Table Objects contains an entry for the Management port
when the port is configured for asynchronous operation and for the Terminal port.
For this unit, entries in the table that are counters (rs232AsyncPortEntry 6–8) are
used to collect statistics only and are not supported.
Table C-9. Asynchronous Port Table Objects (1 of 2)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
rs232AsyncPort
Bits
(rs232Async
PortEntry 2 )
Specifies the number of bits Supports only the following values:
in a character.
7 – 7-bit characters
rs232AsyncPort
StopBits
(rs232Async
PortEntry 3 )
Specifies the number of
stop bits supported.
8 – 8-bit characters
Supports only the following values:
one(1) – One stop bit
two(2) – Two stop bits
one-and-half(3) – One and a half stop
bits
C-14
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
MIB Descriptions
Table C-9. Asynchronous Port Table Objects (2 of 2)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
rs232AsyncPort
Parity
(rs232Async
PortEntry 4 )
Specifies the type of parity
used by the port.
Supports only the following values:
none(1) – No parity bit
odd(2) – Odd parity
even(3) – Even parity
rs232AsyncPort
AutoBaud
(rs232Async
PortEntry 5 )
Specifies the ability to
automatically sense the
input speed of the port.
Supports only the following values:
disabled(2) – Does not support
Autobaud.
Synchronous Port Table Objects
The Synchronous Port Table Objects contains an entry for the synchronous user
data port and the Management port when this port is configured for synchronous
operation. For this unit, entries in the table that are counters (rs232SyncPortEntry
3–7) are used to collect statistics only and are not supported. Clarification for
objects contained in this table as it applies to the unit is provided below.
Table C-10. Synchronous Port Table Objects (1 of 2)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
rs232SyncPort
ClockSource
(rs232Sync
PortEntry 2 )
Specifies the clock source
for the port.
Supports only the following values:
internal(1) – The port uses an internal
clock.
split(3) – The port uses an external
transmit clock and internal receive clock.
rs232SyncPort
Role
(rs232Sync
PortEntry 8 )
Specifies whether this
device interface is a DTE or
DCE.
Supports only the following value:
rs232SyncPort
Encoding
(rs232Sync
PortEntry 9 )
Specifies the bit encoding
technique that this port
uses.
Supports only the following value:
rs232SyncPort
RTSControl
(rs232Sync
PortEntry 10 )
Specifies the method used
to control the RTS signal.
Refer to Data Port Options,
Table A-3.
Supports only the following values:
dce(2) – The port acts as a DCE.
nrz(1) – The port uses non-return to
zero encoding.
controlled(1) – For User Data port, this
value is used when the Data Port option
Carrier Control by RTS is set to
Switched.
constant(2) – For User Data port, this
value is used when the Data Port option
Carrier Control by RTS is set to
Constant. This is the only valid value for
the Management port.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
C-15
MIB Descriptions
Table C-10. Synchronous Port Table Objects (2 of 2)
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
rs232SyncPort
RTSCTSDelay
(rs232Sync
PortEntry 11 )
Reports the interval (in
milliseconds) that the port
waits after RTS is asserted
before asserting CTS.
Supports only the following read-only
values:
0 – The port does not have to wait. Only
valid for Management port.
integer number – represents
milliseconds. It is only valid for the user
data port, when Carrier Control by RTS
is set to Switched and corresponds to
approximately 21 bit time intervals at the
operating DDS rate.
rs232SyncPort
Mode
(rs232Sync
PortEntry 12 )
Specifies the port’s mode of Supports only the following value:
data transfer.
fdx(1) – Full-duplex
The following are not supported:
rs232SyncPortIdle Pattern (rs232SyncPortEntry 13)
rs232SyncPortMinFlags (rs232SyncPortEntry 14)
Input Signal Table Objects
The Input Signal Table Objects contains entries for the input signals that can be
detected by the unit for the synchronous user data port. Clarification for objects
contained in this table as it applies to the unit is provided below.
Table C-11. Input Signal Table Objects
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
rs232InSigName
(rs232InSigEntry 2 )
Contains the identification
of a hardware input signal.
Supports only the following values:
rts(1) – Request To Send
dtr(4) – Data Terminal Ready
rs232InSigState
(rs232InSigEntry 3 )
Contains the current signal
state.
Supports only the following values:
on(2) – The signal is asserted
off(3) – The signal is deasserted
rs232InSigChanges
(rs232InSigEntry 4 )
C-16
Indicates the number of
times that a signal has
changed from on to off, or
off to on.
November 1997
The object is incremented each
time that the signal is sampled
(every 100 ms) and the signal state
is different from the previous state.
7610-A2-GB20-10
MIB Descriptions
Output Signal Table Objects
The Output Signal Table Objects contains entries for the output signals that can
be asserted by the unit, for the synchronous User Data port. Clarification for
objects contained in this table as it applies to the unit is provided below.
Table C-12. Output Signal Table Objects
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
rs232OutSigName
(rs232OutSigEntry 2 )
Contains the identification
Supports only the following
of a hardware output signal. values:
cts(2) – Clear To Send
dsr(3) – Data Set Ready
dcd(6) – Received Line Signal
Detector
rs232OutSigState
(rs232OutSigEntry 3 )
Contains the current signal
state.
Supports only the following
values:
on(2) – The signal is asserted
off(3) – The signal is deasserted
rs232OutSigChanges Indicates the number of
(rs232OutSigEntry 4 ) times that a signal has
changed from on to off, or
off to on.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
Increments the object each time
that the signal is sampled (every
100 ms) and the signal state is
different from the previous state.
C-17
MIB Descriptions
Enterprise MIB Objects
The following lists the Paradyne Enterprise specific MIB Objects supported by the
unit.
Device Configuration Variable (pdn-common 7)
The variable devConfigAreaCopy in the devConfigArea group is supported. This
variable allows the entire contents of one configuration area to be copied into
another configuration area. The unit only supports the following values.
Table C-13. Device Configuration Variable
Object
Description
Setting/Contents
devConfig
g
AreaCopy
A “get” of this object will always return noOp. noOp(1)
Copy from active area to customer 1 area.
active-to-customer1(2)
Copy from active area to customer 2 area.
active-to-customer2(3)
Copy from customer 1 area to active area.
customer1-to-active(4)
Copy from customer 1 area to customer 2
area.
customer1-to-customer2(5)
Copy from customer 2 area to active area.
customer2-to-active(6)
Copy from customer 2 area to customer 1
area.
customer2-to-customer1(7)
Copy from factory area to active area. There
is only one factory area for the unit.
factory1-to-active(8)
Copy from factory area to customer 1 area.
factory1-to-customer1(9)
Copy from factory area to customer 2 area.
factory1-to-customer2(10)
Port Usage Table, pdn-devPortUsage (pdn-interfaces 3)
The Port Usage Table specifies whether the Management port is configured for
ASCII alarms, as an SNMP management link, or is disabled. Supports the values
alarm(1), netLink(3), and none(5).
DDS Interface Specific Definitions, pdn-dds (pdn-interfaces 2)
The DDS Interface Specific Definitions contain objects that are used to manage
the DDS Network Interface. Fully supported by the unit.
Device Security, pdn-security (pdn-common 8)
Use the Device Security table to control the number of SNMP managers that may
access the unit, as well as the unit access level (read or read/write). Fully
supported by the unit.
Device Traps, pdn-traps (pdn-common 9)
Controls the SNMP managers to which the unit reports traps. Fully supported by
the unit.
Device Control, pdn-control (pdn-common 10)
Uses the devControlReset object to reset the unit. Fully supported by the unit.
C-18
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Standards Compliance for
SNMP Traps
D
SNMP Traps Overview
This section describes the unit’s compliance with SNMP standards and any
special operational features for the SNMP traps supported. The unit supports the
following user interface traps, along with several enterprise-specific traps:
authenticationFailure
warmStart
linkUp
linkDown
Trap: authentificationFailure
SNMP Trap
Description
Possible Cause
authenticationFailure
Failed attempts to access
the unit.
SNMP message not properly
authenticated.
Three unsuccessful attempts
were made to enter a correct
login/password combination.
IP address security is
enabled, and a message was
received from SNMP manager
whose address was not on the
list of approved managers.
There are no variable-bindings.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
D-1
Standards Compliance for SNMP Traps
Trap: warmStart
SNMP Trap
Description
Possible Cause
warmStart
The unit has reinitialized
itself.
Reset command.
Power disruption.
The trap is sent after the
unit resets and stabilizes.
There are no
variable-bindings.
Traps: linkUp and linkDown
The link SNMP traps are:
linkUp – The unit recognizes that one of the failed communication interfaces
is operational (up).
linkDown – The unit recognizes a failure in one of the communication
interfaces.
The following table describes the conditions that define linkUp and linkDown for
each interface:
Interface
linkUp/Down
Variable-Bindings
Possible Cause
Physical Sublayer – Represented by the entry in the MIB II Interfaces Table.
DDS network
ifIndex (RFC 1573)
(Supported by the
media-specific DDS
Enterprise MIB.)
ifAdminStatus
(RFC 1573)
ifOperStatus (RFC 1573)
ifType (RFC 1573)
ddsStatus (DDS
Enterprise MIB)
linkDown – One or more
alarm conditions are active on
the interface.
Alarm conditions include:
– No Signal
– Out of Service
– Out of Frame
– Crossed Pair Detected
– In-band Framing Error
– Excessive Bipolar Violations
(BPVs)
linkUp – No alarms on the
interface.
Synchronous User
Data Port
(Supported by the
media-specific
RS232-Like MIB.)
ifIndex (RFC 1573)
ifAdminStatus
(RFC 1573)
ifOperStatus (RFC 1573)
ifType (RFC 1573)
linkDown – The Alarm
condition active on the
interface is DTR Off . The DTR
alarm condition only generates
a linkUp/linkDown trap if the
DTE supports the DTR lead.
linkUp – No alarm on the
interface.
D-2
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Standards Compliance for SNMP Traps
Traps: Enterprise Specific
The enterpriseSpecific trap indicates that an enterprise-specific event has
occurred. The Specific-trap field in the Trap PDU identifies the particular trap that
occurred. The following table lists the enterprise specific traps supported by the
unit:
Trap
What It Indicates
Possible Cause
enterpriseSelfTestFail(2)
A hardware failure of the
unit is detected during the
unit’s self-test. The trap is
generated after the unit
completes initialization.
Failure of one or more of the
unit’s hardware components.
enterpriseDeviceFail(3)
An internal device failure.
Operating software has
detected an internal device
failure.
enterpriseTestStart(5)
A test is running.
At least one test has been
started on an interface.
enterpriseConfigChange(6)
The configuration changed
via the user interface or an
SNMP manager. The trap is
sent after 60 seconds have
elapsed without another
change. This suppresses
the sending of numerous
traps when multiple
changes are made in a
short period of time, as is
typically the case when
changing configuration
options.
Configuration has been
changed via the user
interface or an SNMP
manager.
enterpriseTestStop(105)
All tests have been halted.
All tests have been halted
on an interface.
There are no variable-bindings for enterpriseSelfTestFail, enterpriseDeviceFail,
and enterpriseConfigChange.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
D-3
Standards Compliance for SNMP Traps
The tests that affect the enterpriseTestStart, enterpriseTestStop, and the
variable-binding are different for each particular interface. Diagnostic tests are
only supported on the physical DDS network and user data port interfaces. The
specific tests and variable-bindings are described in the following table:
Interface
enterpriseTestStart/Stop
Variable-Bindings
Possible Cause
ifIndex (RFC 1573)
enterpriseTest Start – Any one
Physical Sublayer
DDS network
ifAdminStatus
(RFC 1573)
ifOperStatus (RFC 1573)
ifType (RFC 1573)
ddsTestType (DDS
Enterprise MIB)
of the following tests is active
on the interface:
– DSU Loopback
– CSU Loopback
– Send 511 pattern
– Monitor 511 pattern
enterpriseTest Stop – No
longer has any tests running
on the interface.
Synchronous User
Data Ports
ifIndex (RFC 1573)
ifAdminStatus
(RFC 1573)
ifOperStatus (RFC 1573)
ifType (RFC 1573)
ifTestType (RFC 1573)
enterpriseTest Start – Any one
of the following tests is active
on the port:
– Local Loopback (DTE)
– Send 511 pattern
– Monitor 511 pattern
enterpriseTest Stop – No
longer has any tests running
on the port.
D-4
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Cables and Pin Assignments
E
Cabling Overview
The following sections provide pin assignments:
7610-A2-GB20-10
Terminal Port EIA-232 Connector
Management Port EIA-232 Connector
V.35 User Data Port Connector
Standard EIA-232-D Crossover Cable
LAN Adapter Converter and Cable
Modular RJ48S DDS Network Interface Cable
November 1997
E-1
Cables and Pin Assignments
Terminal Port EIA-232 Connector
The Terminal port connects to a PC or VT100-compatible terminal.
Signal
Direction
Transmit Data ( TXD )
To DSU ( In )
2
Received Data ( RXD )
From DSU ( Out )
3
Request to Send ( RTS )
To DSU ( In )
4
Clear to Send ( CTS )
From DSU ( Out )
5
Data Set Ready (DSR)
From DSU ( Out )
6
Signal Ground ( SG )
—
7
Carrier Detect ( CD )
From DSU ( Out )
8
Data Terminal Ready ( DTR ) To DSU ( In )
Pin #
20
Management Port EIA-232 Connector
The following table shows the signals and pin assignments for the Management
port connector.
E-2
Signal
Direction
Pin #
Transmit Data ( TXD )
To DSU ( In )
2
Received Data ( RXD )
From DSU ( Out )
3
Request to Send ( RTS )
To DSU ( In )
4
Clear to Send ( CTS )
From DSU ( Out )
5
Data Set Ready (DSR)
From DSU ( Out )
6
Signal Ground ( SG )
—
7
Carrier Detect ( CD )
From DSU ( Out )
8
Transmit Clock ( TXC )
From DSU ( Out )
15
Received Clock ( RXC )
From DSU ( Out )
17
Data Terminal Ready ( DTR ) To DSU ( In )
20
External Tx Clock (XTXC)
24
To DSU ( In )
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Cables and Pin Assignments
V.35 User Data Port Connector
The following table provides the pin assignments for the 34-position
V.35 connector to the User Data terminal equipment.
7610-A2-GB20-10
Signal
ITU
CT#
Direction
34-Pin
Socket
Connector
Signal Ground/Common
102
—
B
Request to Send ( RTS )
105
To DSU (In)
C
Clear to Send ( CTS )
106
From DSU (Out)
D
Data Set Ready ( DSR )
107
From DSU (Out)
E
Received Line Signal Detector
( RLSD or LSD )
109
From DSU (Out)
F
Data Terminal Ready ( DTR )
108/1, /2 To DSU (In)
H
Remote Loopback ( RL )
140
To DSU (In)
N
Local Loopback ( LL )
141
To DSU (In)
L
Transmitted Data ( TXD )
103
To DSU (In)
P (A)
S (B)
Received Data ( RXD )
104
From DSU (Out)
R (A)
T (B)
Transmitter Signal Element Timing —
DTE Source ( XTXC or TT )
113
To DSU (In)
U (A)
W (B)
Receiver Signal Element Timing —
DCE Source ( RXC )
115
From DSU (Out)
V (A)
X (B)
Transmitter Signal Element Timing —
DCE Source ( TXC )
114
From DSU (Out)
Y (A)
AA ( B )
Test Mode Indicator ( TM )
142
From DSU (Out)
NN
November 1997
E-3
Cables and Pin Assignments
Standard EIA-232-D Crossover Cable
A standard crossover cable can be used to connect either the Terminal port or the
Management port to an external modem.
Pin 14
P1
Plug
Pin 1
Pin 1
P2
Plug
Pin 14
Pin 25
Pin 13
Pin 25
Pin 13
Pin
Pin
Chassis Ground
1
1
Chassis Ground
P1
P2
TXD
2
2
TXD
RXD
3
3
RXD
RTS
4
4
RTS
5
5
DSR
6
6
DSR
Signal Ground
7
7
Signal Ground
CD (RLSD)
8
8
CD (RLSD)
9
9
10
10
11
11
12
12
13
13
14
14
15
15
16
16
17
17
18
18
19
19
20
20
21
21
22
22
23
23
24
24
25
25
RXC
DTR
XTXC
RXC
DTR
XTXC
496-15180
E-4
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Cables and Pin Assignments
LAN Adapter Converter and Cable
The following figure shows the:
Pin assignments for the DB25 plug to modular jack converter between the
Management port and the 8-conductor LAN Adapter cable and
Pin assignments for the custom 8-conductor cable (with modular plugs on
both ends) between the converter and the LAN Adapter.
Plug-to-Modular
Jack Converter
Management
Port (DB25 Plug)
Cable
8-Position
Modular Jack
Plug to
Modular Jack
Plug to
LAN Adapter
Tx Clock 15
1
1
1 Unused
Rx Data 3
2
2
2 DTR
Signal Ground 7
3
3
3 Tx Data
Tx Data 2
4
4
4 Signal Ground
DTR 20
5
5
5 Rx Data
CD 8
6
6
6 CTS
RTS 4
7
7
7 Frame Ground
Rx Clock 17
8
8
8 Unused
496-15179
Modular RJ48S DDS Network Interface Cable
Network access is via a 14-foot modular cable with an RJ48S keyed plug
connector on each end.
RJ48S DDS Network
Interface Cable Functions
7610-A2-GB20-10
Circuit Pin #
Transmitted data to the local loop
R
1
Transmitted data to the local loop
T
2
Received data from the local loop
T1
7
Received data from the local loop
R1
8
November 1997
E-5
Glossary
agent
A software program housed within a device to provide SNMP functionality. Each SNMP
agent stores management information and responds to the manager’s request.
aggregate
A single bit stream that combines two or more bit streams.
ASCII
American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A 7-bit code that establishes
compatibility between data services. ASCII is the standard for data transmission over
telephone lines.
ASCII Terminal or
Printer
Devices that can be attached, either locally or remotely, to display or print the DSU’s alarm
messages.
asynchronous
A data transmission that is synchronized by a transmission start bit at the beginning of
a character (five to eight bits) and one or more stop bits at the end.
AT Command Set
Attention Command Set. A group of commands, issued from an asynchronous DTE, that
allows control of the modem while in Command mode. All commands must begin with the
characters AT and end with a carriage return.
ATI
Asynchronous terminal interface. This feature allows a device to be controlled from an
async (asynchronous) terminal like an ASCII (VT100-compatible) terminal.
autobaud mode
An operational mode in which the DSU forces automatic setting of the DDS line rate/speed
(56 or 64 kbps) as soon as a valid DDS network signal is detected.
AUX port
The auxiliary communications port on a router.
BPV
Bipolar Violation. A modified bipolar signaling method in which a control code is inserted.
CCA
Circuit Card Assembly. A printed circuit board to which separate components are attached.
CCITT
Consultative Committee on International Telegraphy and Telephony. See ITU.
CD
Carrier Detect. A signal indicating that energy exists on the transmission circuit.
Associated with Pin 8 on an EIA-232 interface.
channel
An independent data path.
CMI
Control Mode Idle. A control signal sent over the DDS line to indicate that no data is being
sent.
COM port
Communications port. A computer’s serial communications port used to transmit to and
receive data from a DCE. The DCE connects directly to this port.
configuration option
Device software that sets specific operating parameters for the DSU.
CPE
Customer Premises Equipment. Terminating equipment supplied by either the customer or
some other supplier that is connected to the telecommunications network (e.g., DSUs,
terminals, phones, routers, modems).
CSU
Channel Service Unit. The function of the DSU that protects the T1 line from damage and
regenerates the T1 signal.
CTS
Clear to Send. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 106; an output signal
(DCE-to-DTE).
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
GL-1
Glossary
DCE
Data Communications Equipment. The equipment that provides the functions required to
establish, maintain, and end a connection. It also provides the signal conversion required
for communication between the DTE and the network.
DDS
Digital Data Service. Provides digital communication circuits.
DMI
Data Mode Idle. Refers to a sequence of ones transmitted or received on the DDS
network.
DSR
Data Set Ready. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 107; an output signal
(DCE-to-DTE).
DSU
Data Service Unit. Data communications equipment that provides an interface between the
DTE and the digital network.
DTE
Data Terminal Equipment. The equipment, such as computers and printers, that provides
or creates data.
DTR
Data Terminal Ready. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 108; an input signal
(DTE-to-DCE).
EIA
Electronic Industries Association. This organization provides standards for the data
communications industry to ensure uniformity of interface between DTEs and DCEs.
EIA-232
The EIA’s standards defining the 25-pin interface between the DTE and DCE.
Enterprise MIB
MIB objects unique to Paradyne devices.
excessive BPV
An excessive bipolar violation condition results when at least one invalid bipolar violation
has occurred every 20 milliseconds for 2 seconds.
factory defaults
A predetermined set of configuration options for general operation.
FCC
Federal Communications Commission. Board of Commissioners that regulates all U.S.
interstate, intrastate, and foreign electrical communication systems that originate from the
United States.
frame relay
A switching interface that is designed to get frames from one part of the network to another
as quickly as possible.
full-duplex
The capability to transmit in two directions simultaneously.
HDLC
High-Level Data Link Control. A communications protocol defined by the International
Standards Organization (ISO).
ICMP
Internet Control Management Protocol. Internet protocol that allows for the generation of
error messages, tests packets, and information messages related to IP.
IMC
In-band Management Channel. A proprietary TDM channel used for IP connectivity.
interface
A shared boundary between functional units.
IP
Internet Protocol. The TCP/IP standard protocol that defines the unit of information passed
across an Internet and provides the basis for packet delivery service. IP includes the ICMP
control and error message protocol as an integral part. The entire protocol suite is often
referred to as TCP/IP because TCP and IP are the two most fundamental protocols.
IP address
The IP address has a host component and a network component. The address is assigned
to hosts or workstations with direct Internet access to uniquely identify entities on the
Internet.
ITU
International Telecommunication Union, formerly known as CCITT . An advisory committee
established by the United Nations to recommend communications standards and policies.
LADS
Local Area Data Set is used to provide a point-to-point link between two devices (also
called LDM – limited distance modem).
GL-2
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Glossary
LAN
Local Area Network. A network designed to connect devices over short distances, like
within a building.
latching loopback
A latching loopback can only be initiated or terminated by the 64 kbps clear channel
network service provider.
LED
Light Emitting Diode. A status indicator that responds to the presence of a certain
conditions.
link layer protocol
The protocol that regulates the communication between two network nodes.
LL
Local Loopback. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 141; an input signal
(DTE-to-DCE).
loopback
Used to test various portions of a data link in order to isolate an equipment or data line
problem. A diagnostic procedure that sends a test message back to its origination point.
LSD
Line Signal Detect. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 109; an output signal
(DCE-to-DTE).
manager (SNMP)
The device that queries agents for management information, or receives unsolicited SNMP
trap messages indicating the occurrence of specific events.
MIB
Management Information Base. The set of variables a device running SNMP maintains.
Standard, minimal MIBs have been defined, and vendors often have private enterprise
MIBs. In theory, any SNMP manager can talk to any SNMP agent with a properly defined
MIB. MIB-II refers to an extended management database that contains variables not
defined in the original MIB I.
multiplexing
A method for interleaving several access channels onto a single circuit for transmission
over the network.
NMS
Network Management System. A computer system used for monitoring and controlling
network devices.
node
A connection or switching point on the network.
non-latching
loopback
A non-latching loopback can only be initiated or terminated by the 56 kbps network service
provider.
NS
No Signal. A network-reported condition.
object (SNMP)
A specific item within the Management Information Base (MIB).
OOF
Out Of Frame. An error condition in which frame synchronization bits are in error. A
network-reported condition.
OOS
Out of Service. A digital network trouble signal.
PAD
Packet Assembler/Diassembler.
point-to-point circuit
A data network circuit with one control and one tributary device.
PPP
Point-to-Point Protocol. A link-layer protocol used by SNMP.
protocol
The rules that govern how devices exchange information on a network. It covers timing,
format, error control, and flow control during data transmission.
PSTN
Public Switched Telephone Network. A network shared among many users who can use
telephones to establish connections between two points.
reset
A reinitialization of the device that occurs at power-up or in response to a reset command.
RFC
Request for Comments. The set of documents that describes the standard specifications
for the TCP/IP protocol suite.
7610-A2-GB20-10
November 1997
GL-3
Glossary
RIP
Routing Information Protocol. Specifies the routing protocol used between DSUs.
RLSD
Receive Line Signal Detect. See CD.
router
A device that makes decisions about the paths network traffic should take and forwards
that traffic to its destination. A router helps achieve interoperability and connectivity
between different vendor’s equipment, regardless of protocols used.
RS-232
An EIA standard for the 25-pin DCE/DTE interface. Same as EIA-232.
RTS
Request to Send. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 105; an input signal
(DTE-to-DCE).
RXC
Received Clock. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 115; an output signal
(DCE-to-DTE).
RXD
Received Data. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 104; an output signal
(DCE-to-DTE).
SDLC
Synchronous Data Link Control. A standard data link protocol.
SLIP
Serial Line Internet Protocol. A link layer protocol being used over serial lines by IP.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol. A generic internet network management protocol
that allows the device to be managed by any industry-standard SNMP manager.
subnet
An IP addressing standard in which a portion of the host address can be used to create
multiple network addresses that are logically a subdivision of the network address.
subnet address
The subnet portion of an IP address. In a subnetted network, the host portion of an IP
address is split into a subnet portion and a host portion using a subnet address mask. This
allows a site to use a single IP network address for multiple physical networks.
subnet mask
An integer used with the IP address of the host to determine which bits in the host address
are used in the subnet address.
synchronous
Data transmission that is synchronized by timing signals. Characters are sent at a fixed
rate.
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. Refer to IP.
TDM
Time Division Multiplexer. A device that enables the simultaneous transmission of multiple
independent data streams into a single high-speed data stream.
Telnet
Virtual terminal protocol in the Internet suite of protocols. Allows the user of one host
computer to log into a remote host computer and interact as the user for that host.
TM
Test Mode. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 142; an output signal ( DCE-to-DTE ).
TXC
Transmit Clock. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 114; an output signal
(DCE-to-DTE).
TXD
Transmit Data. An EIA-lead standard for V.24 circuit CT 103; an input signal
(DTE-to-DCE).
UDP
User Datagram Protocol. An Internet protocol.
V.35
ITU-T standard for a high-speed, 34-pin, DCE/DTE interface.
WAN
Wide Area Network. A network that operates over long distances and spans a relatively
large geographic area (e.g., a country).
GL-4
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Index
Numbers
511 test pattern, 7-4– 7-5
A
access
effective level, 4-4
SNMP, 1-4, 4-6
to the ATI, 4-1– 4-5
administer login, 4-2
alarm
condition, 7-1
LED, 6-2
messages, 8-1– 8-3
alarms & traps, options, A-1, A-20– A-22
alternate directory, 3-5– 3-7
ASCII
alarm, 7-1
alarm messages, 3-5, 8-1
characters, 3-1, A-29– A-30
async terminal interface. See ATI
ATI
access, 4-4
initiating, 2-1– 2-8
management, 1-1
monitoring, 6-1
C
cables, rear panel, E-1– E-5
cables to order. See Start-Up Instructions
call, setup, 3-5– 3-7
communication protocol options, A-1, A-22
community names, for SNMP, 4-6
configuration
menu, 2-2– 2-3
option areas, 3-3– 3-4
option tables, A-1– A-26
option worksheets, B-1– B-4
7610-A2-GB20-10
configuration examples, 1-3
connectors, rear panel, E-1– E-5
control, menu, 2-2– 2-3
create login ID, 4-2
crossover EIA-232 cable, E-4
CTS, clear to send LED, 6-4
customer, configuration areas, 3-3
D
data port. See DTE
data port options, A-1, A-9– A-11
data port tests, 7-4
defaults
configuration option, 3-3– 3-4
reload factory, 7-7
device
messages, 8-4– 8-5
name, 3-1
reset, 7-7
dial-in
external device access, 4-1– 4-5
NMS management, 3-5
dialing out, SNMP traps, 8-3
directory, call, 3-5– 3-7
displaying, configuration options, 3-4
DM, data mode LED, 6-3
DTE test, 7-4
DTR, data terminal ready LED, 6-4
E
effective access, to ATI, 2-3, 4-4
EIA-232 pin assignments, E-2– E-4
enterprise
MIB objects, C-2, C-18– C-19
SNMP traps, D-3– D-4
external device
access, 4-1– 4-5
options, A-1, A-15
November 1997
IN-1
Index
F
M
factory defaults, for configuration options, 3-3– 3-4
main menu, 2-2– 2-3, A-1– A-2
management
of SNMP DSU, 1-1
port access, 4-1– 4-5
port options, A-1, A-13– A-17
messages
alarm and device, 8-1– 8-6
health and status, 6-5– 6-6
self-test results, 6-7
test status, 7-5
MIB
descriptions, C-1– C-18
support, 1-2
G
glossary, GL-1–GL-4
H
health and status, messages, 6-5– 6-6
I
identity, 3-1– 3-2
IMC
access, 4-1– 4-5
remote management, 1-1
subnet connection, 5-2
in-band management channel. See IMC
installing rear connectors. See Start-Up Instructions
interface
connections, 1-4
network status, 6-7– 6-8
IP addresses, 5-1– 5-4
for SNMP managers, 4-6
IP interfaces, 4-1– 4-6, 5-2
K
keyboard functions, 2-5
L
LADS connection distances. See Start-Up Instructions
lamp test, 7-4
LAN
adapter, 5-1– 5-4
adapter and cable, E-5
LEDs, 6-1– 6-4
link-layer protocols, 1-3, 5-1– 5-4
login ID, 4-1– 4-3
loopbacks, 7-3– 7-7
IN-2
N
navigating the screens, 2-5
network
default destination, 5-4
interface cable, E-5
interface LEDs, 6-3
interface options, A-1, A-5– A-8
interface status, 6-7– 6-8
loopbacks, 7-3
performance statistics, 6-8
tests, 7-2
NMS
dial-in management, 3-5
SNMP access, 4-6
SNMP connectivity, 5-1– 5-4
SNMP security options, A-25
NS, no signal LED, 6-3
O
objects for MIBs, C-1– C-18
OK, LED, 6-2
OOF, out of frame LED, 6-3
OOS, out of service LED, 6-3
options
configuration areas, 3-3
configuration tables, A-1– A-26
configuration worksheets, B-1– B-4
November 1997
7610-A2-GB20-10
Index
P
package checklist. See Start-Up Instructions
performance, network statistics, 6-8
phone number, for call directory, 3-6– 3-7
pin assignments, E-1– E-5
port
access, 4-1– 4-5
LEDs, 6-4
primary directory, 3-5– 3-7
protocols, link-layer, 1-3
R
rear panel, connections, 1-4
reset device, 7-7
RFCs, MIB descriptions, C-1– C-17
RIP option, 5-1– 5-4
RJ48S network interface cable, E-5
router, management data, 5-3
routing information protocol. See RIP
RS-232-Like MIB, C-2
RTS, request to send LED, 6-4
RXD, received data LED, 6-4
S
safety instructions. See Start-Up Instructions
saving option changes, 3-4– 3-5
screens, for user interface, 2-1– 2-6
security, 4-1– 4-6
self-test results, 6-7
session, telnet access, 4-1– 4-5
SNMP
access, 4-6
features, 1-4– 1-6
setup traps, 8-3
system entries, 3-1
traps, 3-5, 7-1, D-1– D-4
SNMP & communication, options, A-1, A-22
start-up
ATI, 2-1
instructions. See Document 7610-A2-GN10
statistics, of network performance, 6-8
status
menu, 2-2– 2-3
network interface, 6-7– 6-8
of DSU, 6-5– 6-6
test messages, 7-5
7610-A2-GB20-10
subnet, IP addresses, 5-1– 5-4
system
device name fields, 3-1
LEDs, 6-2
options, A-1– A-4
T
technical specifications. See Start-Up Instructions
telnet session
access, 4-1– 4-5
options, A-1, A-18
to initiate ATI, 2-1
terminal port
access, 4-1– 4-3
direct connection, 2-1
options, A-1, A-11– A-13
reset, 7-7
test
DTE, 7-4
LED, 6-2
menu, 2-2– 2-3
network, 7-2
status messages, 7-5
testing, 7-1– 7-8
traps, SNMP, 8-3, D-1– D-4
troubleshooting, 8-5
TXD, transmitted data LED, 6-4
U
user interface, 1-4
access, 2-1
async terminal, 2-1
configuration options, A-1
V
V.35 connector, E-3
V.54 sequences, 7-3
VT100 compatible terminal. See async terminal
W
worksheets, option configuration, B-1– B-4
November 1997
IN-3
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