FT-920 OPERATING MANUAL Downloaded by

FT-920 OPERATING MANUAL Downloaded by

FT-920

OPERATING

MANUAL

Downloaded by

RadioAmateur.EU

YAESU MUSEN CO., LTD.

1-20-2 Shimomaruko, Ota-Ku, Tokyo 146-8649, Japan

YAESU U.S.A.

17210 Edwards Rd., Cerritos, CA 90703, U.S.A.

YAESU EUROPE B.V.

Snipweg 3, 1118DN Schiphol, The Netherlands

YAESU UK LTD.

Unit 12, Sun Valley Business Park, Winnall Trading Estate

Winchester, Hampshire, SO23 0LB, U.K.

YAESU GERMANY GmbH

Am Kronberger Hang 2, D-65824 Schwalbach, Germany

YAESU HK LTD.

11th Floor Tsim Sha Tsui Centre, 66 Mody Rd.,

Tsim Sha Tsui East, Kowloon, Hong Kong

General Description ......................................................... 1

Specifications ................................................................... 2

Accessories & Options ................................................... 4

Plug Pinout ...................................................................... 5

Installation ........................................................................ 6

Preliminary Inspection ................................................. 6

DC Power Connections ............................................... 6

Transceiver Location ................................................... 8

Grounding .................................................................... 8

Antenna Considerations .............................................. 9

Memory Backup .......................................................... 9

Adjusting the Front Feet ................................................10

Safety Precautions............................................................ 11

1. Power Connections ................................................ 11

2. Ground Connections .............................................. 11

3. Electrical Shock Prevention ................................... 11

4. Antenna Precautions ................................................11

5. RF Field Exposure Advisory and Electromagnetic Compatibility .................. 12

Accessory Installation ..................................................... 13

1. Lineae Amplifier Interfacing ................................... 13

2. Digital Modem Interfacing (TNC, WeatherFax, etc.)...16

3. Other Digital/Recording Device Interfacing ...............17

4. CW Key/Paddle and Computer Keying

Interface Suggestions .................................... 18

Front Panel Controls, Switches, & Jacks ..................... 20

Display Panel Indicators and Icons ............................... 28

Rear Panel Connectors and Switches ........................... 32

Bottom Panel ................................................................... 34

Operation .......................................................................... 35

Before You Start ......................................................... 35

Receiving ..................................................................... 35

Antenna Selection ................................................. 35

Bandwidth Selection .............................................. 37

Amateur Band Selection ....................................... 37

Direct Keypad Frequency Entry ............................ 38

Stacked VFO System ........................................... 38

Frequency Navigation ............................................ 38

VFO Tuning Dial ............................................. 39

Shuttle Jog (VFO-A) ....................................... 39

Front Panel Up/Down Switches ...................... 39

MH-31B8 Hand MicU

P

/D

WN

/F

ST

Switches ...... 39

MD-100A8X Desk Microphone

Rotary Scanning Switch ............................ 39

L

OCK

Switches ................................................. 39

Operating Convenience Features ...........................40

Display Brightness Control .............................. 40

Keypad Beep Frequency/Level ....................... 40

Receiver Accessories ............................................ 41

Clarifier (Offset Tuning) ................................... 41

CW Center Tuning (Enhanced Tuning Scale) ...41

CW S

POT

......................................................... 41

RF Preamplifier Selections ............................. 41

AGC Selection ................................................ 42

Squelch ........................................................... 42

General Coverage Reception .......................... 42

Dealing with Interference ...................................... 43

S

HIFT

Control ................................................... 43

H

IGH

C

UT

/L

OW

C

UT

Controls (DSP) .................. 43

N

OTCH

Filter (DSP) .......................................... 44

RF G

AIN

Control .............................................. 44

IF Noise Blanker (NB) .................................... 44

DSP Noise Reduction (NR) ............................ 44

Tools for Strong-Signal andLow-Frequency Operation .................. 45

IPO (Intercept Point Optimization) .................. 45

ATT (Front End Attenuator) ............................ 46

Digital Voice Recorder Operation (DVR) ........ 46

Table of Contents

Transmitting ................................................................. 47

Automatic Antenna Matching ................................ 47

SSB Transmission ................................................. 49

Basic Operation ............................................... 49

VOX Operation ................................................ 49

Digital Speech Processor Operation ............... 49

DSP Voice Pattern Contours ......................... 50

Voice Monitor Operation ................................. 50

Digital Voice Recorder Operation (Transmit) .. 50

Linear Amplifier Tuning ............................................... 51

CW Transmission .................................................. 51

Straight Key Operation .................................... 51

Electronic Keyer Operation ............................. 52

Memory Keyer Operation ................................ 52

Tips for Successful CW Memory Keyer Operation ..... 53

Split Frequency Operation .................................... 54

TX C

LAR ifier Operation .................................... 53

Split VFO Operation ........................................ 54

Quick Split Feature ......................................... 54

Mode K Satellite Operation ............................. 55

Digital Mode Operation ......................................... 55

AFSK RTTY or Packet Operation .................. 56

FSK RTTY Operation ...................................... 56

AM Transmission .................................................. 57

Basic Operation ............................................... 57

FM Operation ........................................................ 58

Simplex (Non-Repeater) Operation ................. 58

Repeater Operation ......................................... 58

Memory Operation ........................................................... 59

QMB Channel Programming/Recall ............................. 59

Memory Operation on “Regular” Memory Channels

(Channel #1-01 to 1-99) ........................................ 60

Memory Operation on Split-Frequency Channels

(Channel #d-01 to d-10) ........................................ 62

Memory Operation on “CALL” Channels

(Channel #C-01 to C-11) ...................................... 63

Adding Alpha-Numeric Labels to Memory Channels .. 64

Memory Mode Accessories ......................................... 65

Moving Memory Data to VFO-A ........................... 65

Deleting Data from a Memory Channel ................ 65

Scanning Operation ......................................................... 66

Scanning Operation ..................................................... 66

Scan Skip Programming (Memory Mode Only) .......... 66

Programmable Memory Scan (PMS) Operation ......... 66

Scan-Resume Choices ................................................ 67

Dual Watch Operation ..................................................... 68

Menu Operation ............................................................... 69

Normal Menu Operation .............................................. 69

Panel Menu Operation ................................................ 70

Quick Menu Operation ................................................ 70

Menu Mode Selections and Settings .......................... 73

VHF/UHF Transverter Operation ..................................... 84

Phone Pacth Operation ................................................... 85

CAT

(Computer-Aided Transceiver) System Protocol ......... 86

CAT

Data Protocol .................................................... 88

Constructing Sending CAT Commands ...................... 88

Downloading FT-920 Data ........................................... 89

14-Byte Frequency Data Record Structure ................. 90

Memory Backup ............................................................... 91

Microprocessor Resetting ............................................... 92

Installation of Optional Accessories .............................. 93

Bottom Case Removal ................................................ 93

Installation of Optional Filters YF-116C/YF-116A ....... 94

Installation of High-Stability Oscillator TCXO-7 ........... 94

Installation of FM Unit FM-1 ....................................... 94

General Description

Congratulations on the purchase of your Yaesu FT-920! Whether this is your first rig, or if Yaesu equipment is already the backbone of your amateur radio station, it is our sincere hope that you will derive many years of operating enjoyment from your new transceiver.

The FT-920 is a state-of-the-art amateur transceiver incorporating a multitude of advanced features to give you the competitive edge in a wide variety of operating applications. The FT-920 offers up to 100 Watts of adjustable power output on all amateur bands between 160 meters and 6 meters (25 Watts carrier in the AM mode), utilizing rugged, low-distortion MOS FET final amplifier transistors. Operation in the SSB, CW, AM, AFSK, and

FSK modes is built in, and an FM module is available as an option.

Yaesu’s renowned Omni-Glow™ LCD display provides a wealth of information regarding transceiver status, and it includes enhanced tuning aids for many operating applications.

The built-in high-speed automatic antenna tuner may be utilized both on receive and transmit, providing improved impedance matching for the transmitter and protection from out-of-band signals on receive. A built-in

Digital Voice Recorder allows storage and playback of incoming signals, and also allows you to store up to four repetitive messages (such as “CQ Contest. . .”) of up to 16 seconds each. And the Electronic Memory Keyer also provides storage of CW messages, including incremented, imbedded contest numbers, to reduce operator fatigue in contests. Independent K

EY

jacks on the front and rear panels allow connection of keyer paddles to one jack and a computer or straight key to the other, for optimum contest work. A CW Pitch control and Spot tone provide efficiency in operating, and both full QSK and semi-break-in CW (VOX switching) are provided.

The receiver section is highlighted by the high-performance Digital Signal Processing filters, which provide razor-sharp selectivity, an automatic seeking Notch filter, and Noise Reduction. The high-intercept front end circuitry includes ten input bandpass filters with PIN diode switching, optimized RF preamplifiers for both high and low bands, and Intercept Point Optimization (IPO) for high-signal, high-noise environments. A separate receive-only antenna jack is provided, in addition to the two main TX/RX jacks, for connection of a Beverage or other low-noise receiving antenna.

Yaesu’s exclusive Shuttle Jog tuning dial provides simple yet quick frequency excursions around the band.

Independent tuning knobs for the two VFOs join direct keyboard frequency entry, one-touch band change, and extensive scanning capabilities to make the FT-920 a joy to use. And the FT-920’s extensive memory system, sporting 99 regular memories, ten split-frequency memories, five QMB (Quick Memory Bank) channels, and an easy-access “C

ALL

” channel for each band, provides the utmost in operating ease. Each of the memories (except the QMB channels) can be assigned an alpha-numeric label of up to seven characters, to aid in memory channel identification.

A host of convenience features is provided, including a Digital Speech Processor, SSB monitor circuit, all-mode

Squelch, VOX, and a continuously-variable RF power control. Yaesu’s CAT System for external computer control includes a built-in RS-232C level converter and DB-9 serial port on the rear panel, for easy connection to your home computer. And the extensive Menu system allow the owner to configure literally dozens of transceiver performance characteristics, such as voice audio response patterns, keyer weight, tuning steps, and power output to be applied to each antenna jack. The FT-920 clearly is the cost-performance leader in the Amateur

Radio industry today!

Please take some time to familiarize yourself with the many features available in the FT-920, as described in the pages to follow. At Yaesu, we appreciate your investment in this fine transceiver, and we hope that you will take the time to read this manual thoroughly so as to get the most out of your new FT-920!

FT-920 Operating Manual

1

2

Specifications

General

Receiving Frequency Range:

Transmitting Frequency Range:

Operating Temperature Range:

Frequency Stability:

Frequency Accuracy:

100 kHz ~ 30 MHz, 48 ~ 56 MHz

160 ~ 6 Meter Amateur Bands

-10º ~ +50º C

±10 ppm; ±2 ppm w/TCXO-7

< ±7 ppm (FM within ± 500 Hz) w/TCXO-7: < ±3.5 ppm (FM within ± 460 Hz)

Emission Modes:

Frequency Steps:

USB/LSB, CW, AM, FM, FSK, AFSK

1 Hz/10 Hz/100 Hz for SSB/CW/FSK/AFSK

10 Hz/100 Hz/1000 Hz for AM/FM

Antenna Impedance:

50

, unbalanced

Antenna Tuner Matching Range:

16.5

~ 150

Power Consumption: Input Rx (no signal) Rx (Signal present)

Supply Voltage:

Dimensions:

13.5 VDC 2.0A

2.5A

13.5 VDC (±10%), negative ground

410(W) x 135(H) x 316(D) mm

Transmitter

Tx (100W)

22A

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Power Output:

Modulation Types:

160 m ~ 10 m amateur bands

Adjustable up to 100 Watts (25 Watts AM carrier)

6 m amateur band

Adjustable up to 100/10 Watts (25/2.5 Watts AM carrier)

SSB: J3E Balanced, filtered carrier

AM: A3E Low-level (early stage), (w/optional YF-116A AM Filter)

FM: F3E Variable reactance PM

Maximum FM Deviation:

FSK Shift Frequencies:

Packet Shift Frequency:

Harmonic Radiation:

FSK: J1D/J2D Audio-Frequency-Shifted Keying

±2.5 kHz (narrow), ±5.0 kHz (wide)

170, 425, and 850 Hz

200 Hz

At least 50 dB below peak output (HF)

At least 60 dB below peak output (VHF)

SSB Carrier Suppression:

At least 40 dB below peak output

Undesired Sideband Suppression: At least 50 dB below peak output

Audio Response (SSB, DSP Off):

Not more than -6 dB from 400 to 2600 Hz

SSB 3rd-order IMD:

Microphone Impedance:

-31 dB or better @ 100 Watts PEP (14 MHz)

500

~ 600

FT-920 Operating Manual

Specifications

Receiver

Circuit Type:

Intermediate Frequencies:

Sensitivity:

IF Selectivity (-6/-60 dB):

Double-conversion Superheterodyne (FM: Triple-conversion)

68.985 MHz

8.215 MHz

455 kHz (FM)

Frequency

150 ~ 250 kHz

250 ~ 500 kHz

0.5 ~ 1.8 MHz

SSB/CW/Dig.(2.4 kHz) AM (6 kHz) FM (28 MHz +)

5 µV

4 µV

2 µV

40 µV

32 µV

16 µV

1.8 ~ 24.5 MHz 0.20 µV

24.5 ~ 54 MHz 0.13 µV

2 µV

1.3 µV

0.5 µV

0.25 µV

(With Preamp On, for 10 dB S+N/N or 12 dB FM SINAD)

SSB, CW, FSK, AFSK 2.4 kHz/5.0 kHz

CW 500 Hz/1.8 kHz (w/optional YF-116C CW Filter)

AM 6 kHz/14 kHz (w/optional YF-116A AM Filter)

FM 12 kHz/25 kHz (w/optional FM-1 FM Unit)

SSB/CW/Digital/AM: <2.0 µV

Squelch Sensitivity (IPO Off):

IF Rejection:

FM (28-56 MHz):

>70 dB (HF)

<0.32 µV

Image Rejection:

>50 dB (VHF)

>70 dB (1.8 ~ 56 MHz)

IF Shift Range:

±1.2 kHz

DSP Notch Depth:

>35 dB

Audio Output:

1.5 W into 4

with <10% THD (Speaker)

100 mV @ 600

(Digital, fixed level)

Audio Output Impedance (SPKR):

4

~ 8

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Automatic Antenna Tuner

Impedance Range:

16.7

~ 150

(1.8 ~ 30 MHz)

25.0

~ 100

(50 ~ 54 MHz)

Frequency Range:

160 m ~ 6 m amateur bands

Matching Time:

Matched SWR:

<30 seconds

<1.4:1

Specifications are subject to change, in the interest of technical improvement, without notice or obligation. Specifications are guaranteed only within Amateur bands.

FT-920 Operating Manual

3

Accessories & Options

Supplied Accessories

Item Quantity

MH-31

B8

Hand Microphone .................................. 1

DC Cable fused for 25 Amps ................................ 1

Spare 25 Amp Fuse .............................................. 1

Available Options

MD-100

A8X

FM-1

YF-116C

YF-116A

TCXO-7

FP-1025A

FP-1030A

Desk-Top Microphone

FM Unit

500 Hz CW Filter

6 kHz AM Filter

High-Stability Reference Oscillator Unit (2 ppm)

AC Power Supply, Switching Regulator Type (25A) (USA only)

AC Power Supply, Linear Type (25A)

YH-77STA

SP-8

FL-7000

VL-1000

Stereo Headphones

External Speaker w/Audio Filters

500 Watt Solid State HF Linear Amplifier

1000 Watt Solid State HF+50 MHz Linear Amplifier

E-767

RCA Connector

Band Data + T/R Switching Cable for FL-7000

(P/N P0090544)

2 Pin Miniature Plug

(P/N P0090034)

3 Pin Phone Plug

(P/N P0090008)

5 Pin DIN Plug

(P/N P0091006)

4

FT-920 Operating Manual

Plug Pinout

FT-920 Operating Manual

5

Installation

Preliminary Inspection

Inspect the transceiver upon opening the packing carton. Check that all controls and switches work freely, and inspect the cabinet for any cosmetic damage. Ensure that the accessory cable and fuses are included.

If any damage is found, document it completely, and contact the shipping company (or Dealer, if you purchased it over-the-counter) right away. Save the packing materials in case you need to return the set for service.

DC Power Connections

The FT-920 Transceiver is designed for operation from 13.5 Volts DC, negative ground, with the DC source being capable of providing 20 Amperes of continuous current. For base station installations, we recommend the matching Yaesu FP-1030A AC power supply, which was specifically designed for compatibility with your FT-920. You can, of course, use another DC source, so long as it is well regulated and meets the above voltage/current specifications. In any case, be extremely careful to avoid reversed polarity connections when installing your FT-920. See the

Caution box below.

If you are connecting the FP-1030A to the FT-920, before connecting power, check the label on the rear of the power supply which indicates the AC line voltage range for which the power supply is currently set.

If your AC line voltage is outside this range, the input voltage range will need to be re-configured. If you have any questions about the voltage setting for your power supply, consult with your dealer before proceeding, as improper connections could cause serious damage not covered by your warranty. See the documentation accompanying your power supply for details on the exact procedure required for power supply AC voltage re-configuration.

Connection of the DC line must be made according to the instructions below:

The R

ED

DC power lead connects to the Positive

(+) DC terminal; and The B

LACK

DC power lead connects to the Negative (-) DC terminal.

Make sure the FT-920’s P

OWER

switch is off, and plug the DC cable into the 6-pin Molex jack on the rear panel of the transceiver.

6

Caution

Serious damage can result if improper supply voltage is applied to this transceiver. Your Limited Warranty does not cover damage caused by the application of AC, reversed polarity DC, or DC outside the specified range of 13.5 V ±10%.

If you wish to use a power supply other than one of Yaesu manufacture, you must make certain that any

DC supply connector to the transceiver matches the FT-920 requirements. See the DC connector pinout on the previous page. Other manufacturers have power supplies with a physically matched con-

nector that is wired differently; this may cause serious damage to the FT-920.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Installation

FT-920 Operating Manual

7

8

Installation

Transceiver Location

To ensure long life of the transceiver’s components, be certain to provide adequate ventilation around the cabinet of the FT-920. The cooling system of the transceiver must be free to draw cool air in from the side of the transceiver and expel warm air from the rear exhaust port.

Do not install this transceiver on top of another heatgenerating device (such as a linear amplifier), and do not place equipment, books, or papers on top of the transceiver. Place the radio on a hard, flat, stable surface. Avoid heating vents and window locations that could expose the transceiver to excessive direct sunlight, especially in hot climates.

Grounding

The FT-920 HF transceiver, like any other HF communications apparatus, requires an effective ground system for maximum electrical safety and best communications effectiveness. A good ground system can contribute to station efficiency in a number of ways: r

It can minimize the possibility of electrical shock to the operator.

r

It can minimize RF currents flowing on the shield of the coaxial cable and the chassis of the transceiver; such currents may lead to radiation which can cause interference to home entertainment devices or laboratory test equipment.

r

It can minimize the possibility of erratic transceiver/accessory operation caused by RF feedback and/or improper current flow through logic devices.

An effective earth ground system make take several forms; for a more complete discussion, see an appropriate RF engineering text. The information below is intended only as a guideline.

Typically, the ground connection consists of one or more copper-clad steel rods, driven into the ground.

If multiple ground rods are used, they should be positioned in a “V” configuration, and bonded together at the apex of the “V” which is nearest the station location. Use a heavy, braided cable (such as the discarded shield from type RG-213 coaxial cable) and strong cable clamps to secure the braided cable(s) to the ground rods. Be sure to weatherproof the connections to ensure many years of reliable service.

Use the same type of heavy, braided cable for the connections to the station ground bus (described below).

Inside the station, a common ground bus consisting of a copper pipe of at least 25 mm (1”) diameter should be used. An alternative station ground bus may consist of a wide copper plate (single-sided circuit board material is ideal) secured to the bottom of the operating desk. Grounding connections from individual devices such as transceivers, power supplies, and data communications devices (TNCs, etc.) should be made directly to the ground bus using a heavy, braided cable.

Please note that some types of external power supplies (not of Yaesu manufacture), while otherwise being suitable for use with the FT-920, may be designed such that the Negative (black) DC output terminal is “floating” (not connected directly to ground).

This may cause erratic operation, especially when transmitting, due to the potential for ground loops to form between your antenna system, your station ground, and your power supply. This potential susceptibility is not unique to the FT-920, and the problem can usually be solved by directly grounding the

Negative DC terminal to the power supply chassis, which can then be bonded to earth ground; check first with the power supply manufacturer, though, to be certain that this grounding technique is acceptable to them.

Do not make ground connections from one electrical device to another, and thence to the ground bus. This so-called “Daisy-Chain” grounding technique may nullify any attempt at effective radio frequency grounding.

Inspect the ground system — inside the station as well as outside — on a regular basis so as to ensure maximum performance and safety.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Antenna Considerations

The FT-920 is designed for use with any antenna system providing a 50

resistive impedance at the desired operating frequency. While minor excursions from the 50

specification are of no consequence, the transceiver’s Automatic Antenna Tuner may not be able to reduce the impedance mismatch to an acceptable value if the Standing Wave Ratio (SWR) present at the Antenna jack is greater than 3:1.

Among the undesirable consequences that high SWR may produce are: r

The transceiver’s power amplifier protection circuitry will reduce power if the Automatic

Antenna Tuner is unsuccessful in reducing the

SWR.

r

Even if the Automatic Antenna Tuner successfully normalizes the impedance presented to the radio, feedline losses will escalate rapidly with high SWR at the higher operating frequencies, especially 28 MHz and 50 MHz.

r

Although high SWR itself does not cause feedline radiation, the sudden onset of high

SWR may well indicate a mechanical failure in a matching device, leading to an electrical condition which may cause excessive feedline radiation, which can cause interference to nearby home-entertainment devices.

Every effort should, therefore, be made to ensure that the impedance of the antenna system utilized with the FT-920 be as close as possible to the specified

50

value.

Installation

Any antenna to be used with the FT-920 must, ultimately, be fed with 50

coaxial cable. Therefore, when using a “balanced” antenna such as a dipole, remember that a balun or other matching/balancing device must be used so as to ensure proper antenna performance.

Use high-quality 50

coaxial cable for the lead-in to your FT-920 transceiver. All efforts at providing an efficient antenna system will be wasted if poor quality, lossy coaxial cable is used. Losses in coaxial lines increase as the frequency increases, so a coaxial line with only 0.5 dB of loss at 7 MHz may have 2 dB of loss at 28 MHz. For reference, the chart below shows approximate loss figures for typically-available coaxial cables frequently used in amateur radio installations.

Memory Backup

The lithium memory B

ACKUP

switch on the rear panel is turned on at the factory, allowing VFO, memory, and menu data to be retained while power is off.

Backup current is minuscule, so it is not necessary to turn the B

ACKUP

switch off unless the transceiver is to be stored for an extended period.

After five or more years of operation, the transceiver may fail to retain memories. At this point, the lithium battery should be replaced. Contact your dealer for procurement of the battery, and follow the instructions on page 91 for replacement of the battery.

Before completing installation of your FT-920 transceiver, please take the time to review the following safety guidelines.

Loss in dB per 30m (100 feet) for

Selected 50

Coaxial Cables

(Assumes 50

Input/Output Terminations)

Cable Ty pe

RG-5 8A a

RG- 58 Foa m a

RG-8 X a

RG-8 A , R G -213 a

RG -8 Foa m a

Loss: 2 MH z Los s: 1 5 MHz Los s: 2 8 MHz

0.55

1.75

2.60

0.54

0.39

0.27

0.22

1.50

1.07

0.85

0.65

2.00

1.85

1.25

0.88

Belden ® 991 3 a

0.18

0.50

0.69

RG-1 7A a

0.08

0.30

0.46

Loss figures are approximate; consult cable manufacturers’ catalogs for complete specifications.

Loss figures can increase significantly if high SWR is present on the transmission line.

FT-920 Operating Manual

9

Installation

Adjusting the Front Feet

The two front feet of the FT-920 can be set in either of two positions. By turning the knurled ring around a

(retracted) foot clockwise, the middle of the foot will extend about one centimeter. Turn the ring as far as it will go (about ¼ turn) to lock the extended foot in place. To retract an extended foot, turn the knurled ring counter-clockwise ¼ turn while pressing on the center of the foot.

10

FT-920 Operating Manual

1. Power Connections

Be certain to follow the guidelines on page 6 carefully so as to ensure that your AC power supply is configured for the AC line voltage used in your area.

When making DC connections, be absolutely certain to observe proper polarity in your wiring. Note that other manufacturers may use the same type of DC power connector as does Yaesu, but the wiring configuration of the other manufacturer’s plug may be different from that specified for your transceiver. Accordingly, you should verify the pin configuration of the plug before attempting to use a non-Yaesu DC cable of any kind.

2. Ground Connections

Besides following the guidelines presented on page

8 carefully, note that household or industrial gas lines must never be used in an attempt to establish an electrical ground. Cold water pipes may, in some instances, help in the grounding effort, but gas lines represent a significant explosion hazard, and should never be used.

3. Electrical Shock Prevention

Be certain that all station wiring is properly insulated so as to prevent short-circuits which could damage this transceiver and/or accessories connected to it.

Be sure to protect power cables from damage due to abrasion by ensuring that they cannot be walked upon nor crushed under rolling chairs, etc. Never route power cables near sharp metallic edges which might cut through protective insulation.

Never spill liquids into this transceiver, and do not drop sharp metallic objects into the transceiver enclosure. Electrical shock may result when you attempt to remove the object.

Unsupervised children should be kept away from any electrical apparatus such as the FT-920 transceiver and its accessories.

Safety Precautions

4. Antenna Precautions

Always install antennas such that they can

never

come in contact with outdoor power lines in the event of a catastrophic antenna support or power line support structure failure. An adequate safety margin is usually provided by separating power lines from the antenna and its support structure [1.5 times the height of the support] plus [the length of any antenna or guy wires attached to the support] plus [the height of the power line support pole].

Ground the antenna support structure adequately, so as to dissipate energy absorbed during a lightning strike. Install appropriate lightning arrestors in the antenna lead-in and rotator cable (if used) according to the arrestor’s instructions.

In the event of an approaching electrical storm, disconnect all antenna lead-in, rotator control, and power cables completely from the station, but only if the

storm is not immediately in your area. Do not allow disconnected cables to touch the case of your

FT-920 transceiver or accessories, as lightning can easily jump from the cable to the circuitry of your transceiver via the case, causing irreparable damage. If a lightning storm is in progress in your immediate area, do not attempt to disconnect the cables, as you could be killed instantly should lightning strike your antenna structure or a nearby power line.

If a vertical antenna is used, be certain that humans and/or pets or farm animals are kept away both from the radiating element (to prevent electrical shock and

RF exposure danger) and the ground system (in the event of an electrical storm). The buried radials of a ground-mounted vertical antenna can carry lethal voltages outward from the center of the antenna in the event of a direct lightning strike.

11

FT-920 Operating Manual

12

Safety Precautions

5. RF Field Exposure Advisory and

Electromagnetic Compatibility

This transceiver is capable of power output in excess of 50 Watts, so customers in the United States may be required to demonstrate compliance with

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) regulations concerning maximum permissible exposure to radio frequency energy. Compliance is based on the actual power output used, feedline loss, antenna type and height, and other factors which can only be evaluated as a system. Information regarding these regulations may be available from your Dealer, your local radio club, from the FCC directly (press releases and other information can be found on the FCC’s site on the World Wide Web at < http://www.fcc.gov >), or from the American Radio Relay League, Inc. (225

Main St., Newington CT 06111 or < http:// www.arrl.org>).

Remember to re-evaluate your station’s compliance with these regulations during portable operations such as Field Day or special-event stations. Note, also, that power output may be programmed to 50 Watts

(maximum) via Menu Items U-49 and U-50; see page

79 for details.

Regarding electromagnetic compatibility: if this transceiver is used with, or in the vicinity of, a computer or computer-driven accessories, you may need to experiment with grounding and/or Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) suppression devices (such as ferrite cores) to minimize interference to your communications caused by energy from the computer. Computer-generated RFI is usually a result of inadequate shielding of the computer’s cabinet or I/O and peripheral connections. While computer equipment may

“comply” with RF emission standards, this does not ensure that sensitive amateur radio receivers will not experience interference from the device!

Be certain to use only shielded cables for TNC-to-

Transceiver connections. You may need to install AC line filters on the power cord(s) of the suspected equipment, and decoupling ferrite toroidal chokes may be required on interconnecting patch/data cables. As a last resort, you can try installing additional shielding within the computer’s case, using appropriate conductive mesh or conductive shielding tape. Especially check “RF holes” where plastic is used for cabinet front panels.

For further information, consult amateur radio reference guides and publications relating to RFI suppression techniques.

FT-920 Operating Manual

1. Linear Amplifier Interfacing

The FT-920 can be used with the (optional) Yaesu

FL-7000 Linear Amplifier, which provides automatic band switching through the use of digital data sent via the B

AND

jack on the rear panel of the transceiver.

Most other commonly-used linear amplifiers may also be used with the FT-920, so long as the Tx/Rx switching voltages and timing (sequencing) for the amplifier’s control relay(s) are not extraordinary.

Tx/Rx Control Devices for Linear Amplifier Switching

Two control devices are provided in the FT-920 for

Tx/Rx control of an linear amplifier’s relay(s).



An open-collector transistor switch provides a solid-state, fast-acting closure to ground for low-voltage/low-current situations; maximum ratings are +50 V DC at 500 mA (maximum dissipation of 25W), and relays using negative

DC voltages or AC of any kind must not be used with the transistor switch.

The transistor switch’s “hot” lead is identified as T

X

G

ND

(since it closes to “G

ND

” on “T

X

”), and is provided on Pin 2 of the B

AND

(DIN) connector on the rear panel of the FT-920. It is also provided via the rear-panel T

X

G

ND

jack when the T

R

-R

Y

switch is set to the T

R

position.

‚

A mechanical relay is provided for high voltage/high-current applications, although the relay will not be fast enough for QSK (full breakin) CW operation; maximum ratings for the relay contacts are 220 V DC (maximum) at 270 mA, 30V DC at 2 A, or 125 V AC (maximum

AC voltage) at 500 mA (60 Watts total maximum dissipation).

The relay’s contacts may be accessed by connecting a shielded cable to the rear-panel T

X

G

ND

jack.

If the relay is being used, the T

R

-R

Y

switch adjacent to the T

X

G

ND

RCA jack must be set to the R

Y

position; conversely, if you are using the transistor switch, leave the T

R

-R

Y

switch in the T

R

position, so as to eliminate the clicking of the relay.

Accessory Installation

The relay provides a mechanical closure to Ground on Transmit, while the (NPN) transistor switch sinks its (open) collector to Ground on Transmit. Check with the manufacturer of your amplifier (or other device) to confirm the amplifier switching voltage and current, if they are not clearly stipulated in the documentation for your equipment.

þ

Be absolutely certain to check the position of the

T

R

-R

Y

switch prior to connecting any external device to the T

X

G

ND

jack. Never connect an AC voltage, or a negative DC voltage, to the T

X

G

ND

jack if the T

R

-R

Y

switch is set to T

R

. The Limited

Warranty on this product does not cover damage caused by improper connections (excessive or improper voltage) to the rear panel jacks of the FT-

920.

About ALC

The FT-920 provides an external ALC jack on the rear panel (RCA-type jack) for input of Automatic

Level Control voltage from a linear amplifier.

ALC voltage is used to provide dynamic control of the output of the transceiver, so as not to provide more drive than is needed for full amplifier output.

The ALC control voltage range is 0 to -4 V DC, with the voltage going more negative as the amplifier’s drive requirements are approaching fulfillment.

The FT-920’s ALC system is very typical of designs in the amateur radio industry, and consequently is compatible with many manufactured and home-built amplifiers. However, ALC voltage may be generated by an amplifier in a manner incompatible with efficient ALC operation in the FT-920, and it is important that you recognize the differences in amplifier ALC circuits before proceeding with ALC line connection.

r

ALC circuits which detect Power Output from the amplifier, and generate negative-going ALC control voltage when maximum output power has been realized, will generally work properly with the FT-920. The exact amount of ALC voltage fed to the FT-920 can usually be adjusted via a potentiometer on the rear panel of the amplifier.

r

ALC circuits which detect

Amplifier Tube Grid

Current, and generate ALC voltage when excessive grid current is present, may not work well with the FT-920 and other similar trans-

13

FT-920 Operating Manual

14

Accessory Installation

ceivers, as the ALC voltage may be generated because of amplifier mis-tuning not related to an excessive-drive condition. With amplifiers deriving their ALC voltage in this manner, we recommend that you not connect the ALC line, and rather let the amplifier’s protection circuitry manage its ALC requirements internally.

One useful alternative to ALC interconnection may be considered: by entering Menu Item(s) U-49 and/ or U-50, you may define the maximum power output for the FT-920. So if your amplifier never requires more than 50 Watts of drive, just set the maximum power output to “50” via the menu system, and you will not have to worry about over-driving your amplifier. And since the power output may be set independently for each antenna port (use Menu Item U-49 for Antenna A, and U-50 for Antenna B), you may lower the power output on a port connected to your amplifier while retaining the full 100 Watts on the other antenna port.

Interconnection with QSK Amplifiers

If using a Yaesu FL-7000 amplifier, connect the (optional) cable CT-11 from the transceiver B

AND

jack to the amplifier’s ACC-2 jack. This provides automatic band selection for the linear, as well as QSK Tx/Rx switching control and sequencing. Also connect an

RCA-to-RCA patch cord (Yaesu Part #T9101296 supplied with the FL-7000) from the amplifier’s ALC jack to the transceiver’s E

XT

ALC jack, and connect an RF coaxial jumper (Yaesu Part #T9100980 - also supplied with the FL-7000) from the transceiver’s antenna jack (A or B) to the amplifier’s RF I

NPUT

jack.

If using another manufacturer’s QSK amplifier, and if it meets the 15 VDC/100 mA limitation for transistor switching described previously, connect the Tx/Rx switching line for the linear to Pin 2 of the B

AND

jack, and use Pin 3 for the shield of the cable. If the amplifier provides a closure to ground to confirm that its relays are properly seated, this “exciter-enable” line may be connected to Pin 8 of the B

AND

jack.

The B

AND

jack is a specialized, interlocked 8-pin DIN connector. When a suitable plug (Yaesu Part

#P0090160) is inserted into the B

AND

jack, it opens the interlock which, in the case of the FT-920, grounds

Pin 8. If no exciter-enable line is provided by your amplifier, connect a jumper between Pin 8 and Pin 3

(Ground); if you do not, the FT-920 will not allow itself to transmit.

If your QSK amplifier requires the exciter’s control circuits to switch more than 100 mA, or uses more than 15 VDC for Tx/Rx relay switching, you will have to provide a suitable external interface transistor, controlled by Pin 2 of the B

AND

jack.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Interconnection with non-QSK Amplifiers

(Yaesu FL-2100 Series or others)

The T

X

G

ND

jack on the rear panel of the transceiver provides for Tx/Rx switching of non-QSK amplifiers.

A schematic diagram of the FT-920’s internal relay circuit is shown below.

As the FT-920 is supplied from the factory, the internal relay is disabled, and a high-dissipation NPN transistor’s (open) collector is connected to the T

X

G

ND

jack. To enable the relay for use with amplifiers requiring it, move the rear panel T

R

-R

Y

switch, located in the hole near the center of the rear panel, to the R

Y

position. Use a thin, insulated object like a toothpick to move the switch. Then connect the cen-

Accessory Installation

ter contact of the T

X

G

ND

RCA jack to the amplifier’s relay control line, using the outer contact of the T

X

G

ND

jack for the shield. Connect the RF coaxial cable and, if compatible, the ALC cable as described in the

QSK amplifier interconnection section above. Refer to the drawing below for details.

With the relay enabled, the FT-920 can support non-

QSK linear Tx/Rx switching voltages of up to 220 VDC

(maximum permissible DC voltage) at 270 mA, 30

VDC at 2 A, or 125 VAC (maximum permissible AC voltage) at 500 mA.

Caution!

Do not exceed the maximum ratings of the switching circuitry (transistor or relay) of the

FT-920 made available via the B

AND

or T

X

G

ND

jacks. Your warranty does not cover damage caused by improper interconnections to linear amplifiers. When in doubt, it is always safest to utilize the T

X

G

ND

jack with the T

R

-R

Y

switch set to T

R

, as this configuration should handle the switching requirements of most all commonly-available amplifiers.

FT-920 Operating Manual

15

16

Accessory Installation

2. Digital Modem Interfacing

(TNC, WeatherFax, etc.)

The FT-920 provides several convenient interconnection points, as well as dedicated operating modes, for digital operation. While interfacing to commonlyavailable modems is simple and straightforward, it is important that you read the instructions below so as to understand the facilities that are provided on the

FT-920.

DATA Jack

This five-pin DIN connector is the primary interface port for most digital-mode operation. It provides the following connection points which may be required in your installation:

Pin 1 (AFSK Input):

Connect this pin to your TNC’s “AFSK Out” or “Mic

Audio” output line. The optimum input level is 30 mV rms, and the input impedance is 3 k

. Your

TNC’s audio output level potentiometer will allow you to set the level to the optimum value. This pin may be used either for 300 baud SSB-mode digital operation or for 1200-baud FM packet. The bandwidth and frequency response are not, however, suitable for 9600 baud operation. Be sure the AFSK-FSK switch on the rear panel is in the

AFSK position.

For FSK operation (whereby the TNC closes a line to ground to accomplish teletype keying), set the AFSK-FSK switch to FSK, and connect your

TNC’s FSK keying line to Pin 1.

Pin 2 (Ground):

Connect this to the shield(s) of the cable(s) used for connections between the TNC and the FT-920.

Pin 3 (PTT):

Connect this pin to the PTT line from the TNC.

This pin, when grounded by the TNC, places the

FT-920 into the Transmit condition.

Pin 4 (Audio Out):

Connect this pin to your TNC’s “RX Audio” input line. This is a constant-level (100 mV rms @ 600

) audio output line which is not affected by the position of the front-panel AF G

AIN

control.

Pin 5 (BUSY):

This is a “Squelch Status” pin not generally required for digital mode operation. This pin is held at +5V when the squelch is open, and is grounded when the receiver is muted by the squelch (“nosignal” condition).

K

EY

Jack (Rear Panel)

If you wish to send CW using your TNC and computer keyboard, the CW Key output line from your

TNC may be connected to the rear-panel K

EY

jack, according to the connection information provided on page 5.

Since a TNC’s keying output is electrically similar to that of a Straight Key, set the rear panel’s P

DL

-K

EY

switch to the P

DL

(Manual Key) position, and connect the TNC’s key line there. You can still connect your keyer paddle to the front panel K

EY

jack, and use the

FT-920’s built-in electronic keyer, for those situations where you wish to send using the paddle; there is no need to switch the internal keyer on and off.

FT-920 Operating Manual

3. Other Digital/Recording

Device Interfacing

AF O

UT

Jack

This is a 3.5 mm miniature phone jack which provides constant-level (100 mV @ 600

) for connection to a WeatherFax decoder, tape recorder, or other accessory. The audio output level is not affected by the setting of the front panel AF G

AIN

control, so you can turn the volume down, if you like, without affecting the audio level being presented to your decoding device.

The connection to the A

F

O

UT

jack is at the same level as the connection to Pin 4 of the D

ATA

jack. However, the two output ports use independent output buffer amplifiers, so you can freely connect and disconnect devices to/from these ports without concern over the impedances and levels.

Accessory Installation

PTT Jack

This RCA jack is wired in parallel with the D

ATA

jack’s

Pin 3, and may be used in conjunction with a computer or TNC’s PTT line, if desired.

P

ATCH

Jack

For transmit audio input for SSTV (Slow-Scan Television) operation, you may connect the SSTV terminal’s T

X

A

UDIO

line to the P

ATCH

jack. You will need to disconnect the microphone, however, during transmission, as the P

ATCH

jack is connected in a “Y” configuration along with the microphone input (from pin 8 of the M

IC

jack).

Downloaded by

RadioAmateur.EU

FT-920 Operating Manual

17

18

Accessory Installation

4. CW Key/Paddle and Computer

Keying Interface Suggestions

Features

The FT-920 includes a host of features for the CW operator, the functions of which will be detailed in the

“Operation” section later. These include:



A built-in electronic keyer with message memory;

‚

A front-panel K

EY

jack for connection of a keyer paddle; and

ƒ

A rear-panel K

EY

jack which may be connected to another keyer paddle or a straight key, TNC, or computer CW keying interface (for use with contest software, etc.).

Both K

EY

jacks on the FT-920 utilize “positive” keying voltage. Key-up voltage is approximately +5V DC, and key-down current is approximately 0.5 mA. When connecting a key or other device to the K

EY

jacks, use only a 3-pin (“stereo”) ¼” phone plug; a 2-pin plug will place a short between the ring and

(grounded) shaft of the plug, resulting in a constant

“key-down” condition in some circumstances.

Configuration Suggestions



For everyday operation using the internal electronic memory keyer, connect your paddle to the front panel K

EY

jack, and activate the front panel

K

EYER

switch. If you wish to keep the keyer paddle’s cable out of the way, connect the plug, instead, to the rear panel K

EY

jack, and set the rear-panel P

DL

-K

EY

switch to P

DL

.

‚

If two operators are using the FT-920 simultaneously (for a contest, Field Day, etc.), a second keyer paddle may be connected to the rear panel

K

EY

jack. Be sure that the rear panel’s P

DL

-K

EY

switch is set to P

DL

so that both operators have access to the internal electronic memory keyer, and switch the front panel K

EYER

switch on.

ƒ

If two operators are using the FT-920 simultaneously, but both wish to use a straight key, “bug,” or an outboard electronic keyer, the key plugs may be inserted into the front and rear panel K

EY

jacks; now turn the front panel’s K

EYER

switch off. Irrespective of the setting of the P

DL

-K

EY

switch, the tip connections on both Key plugs will serve as

“Straight Key” lines for accommodating this application.

„

If you are using a computer-driven CW keying interface (with contest software), but want to be able to send occasional “repeat” messages quickly using the FT-920’s internal keyer, connect your keyer paddle to the front panel K

EY

jack, and the keying interface line (which emulates a straight key) to the rear panel K

EY

jack. In this configuration, set the rear panel’s P

DL

-K

EY

switch to the

K

EY

position, which re-configures only the rear panel’s K

EY

jack to accept a “Manual” keying line.

Note that the rear-panel K

EY

jack carries the capability to support an external PTT line, if provided by your external keyer, TNC, or computer keying interface.

FT-920 Operating Manual

5. Antenna Connections

The FT-920’s three antenna connectors, plus innovative microprocessor-based memory and switching circuits, provide excellent flexibility in setting up your antenna connections.

Typical antenna configurations are shown below. Remember that Antenna A and Antenna B (which are

“SO-239” or “M” connectors) may be used for transmission and reception, while the RX Antenna port

(which is an “RCA” type connector) may only be used for reception.

Note

Regarding Large Receive Antennas

Although surge suppression is provided on all antenna ports, you may wish to consider building a simple external circuit which will disconnect, on TX, any antenna connected to the RX

A

NT

I

N

jack, particularly if you are using a very long wire antenna such as a Beverage. Very long antennas can build up very high RF and static voltages on them, and the circuit below may provide better protection for your receiver’s input circuitry.

Accessory Installation

6. Personal Computer Interfacing for Contest Software, etc.

The FT-920 features a built-in level converter, allowing direct connection from the rear-panel CAT jack to the serial port of your computer, without the need for any external converter box.

When your software requests serial port configuration information, set it for “4800,N,8,2” (4800 baud,

No Parity, 8 Data Bits, and 2 Stop Bits). Be certain to configure and activate any required “TSR” (Terminateand-Stay-Resident) utilities before beginning computer-controlled transceiver operation (your software’s instruction manual will describe any such requirement).

FT-920 Operating Manual

19

Front Panel Controls, Switches, & Jacks

20

(1) P

OWER

Switch

This latching-type switch turns the FT-920 on and off. Push it once to turn the transceiver on, and press it again to turn the power off.

(2) MOX Switch

This also is a latching-type switch, used to switch the

FT-920 manually into the transmit mode (instead of using the microphone Push-To-Talk (PTT) switch, for example). Press [MOX] once to activate the transmit mode, and press it again to release the FT-920 back into the receive mode.

Be sure to have an antenna or dummy load connected to the transceiver when this switch is pushed. Failure to do so may cause damage to the transmitter’s final amplifier stage.

(3) VOX Switch

This switch enables automatic voice-actuated transmitter switching in the SSB, AM, and FM modes, as well as “semi-break-in” CW. Press the [VOX] switch once to activate VOX, and again to disable VOX (and return to PTT operation).

(4) P

HONES

Jack

This ¼” 3-pin jack is used for connection of headphones. When a plug is inserted into this jack, the internal/external speaker will be cut off. This jack is optimized for use with 16

to 32

headphones, and will accept either monaural or stereo headphone types.

(5) K

EY

Jack

This ¼” 3-pin jack is used for connection of a CW keyer paddle or a straight key. Use only a 3-pin (“stereo”) plug in this jack; if you attempt to use a 2-pin plug, a constant CW carrier will be sent out. The pinout is shown on page 5.

(6) M

IC

Jack

This 8-pin connector accepts microphone input, as well as providing PTT, ground, and scanning control access. Proper microphone impedance is 500 ~ 600

.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Front Panel Controls, Switches, & Jacks

(7) M

ETER

S

ELECT

Switch

This switch is used to select the display function of the transmission multimeter, with the selections being provided in the following sequence:

ALC: ALC Voltage.

SWR: SWR as observed by the transmitter PA.

C

OMP

: Speech Processor Compression level.

V

OLT

: Final amplifier transistor supply voltag

(also displayed on receive).

A

MP

: Final amplifier transistor drain current.

ALC: ALC Voltage

(return to beginning of loop).

(8) IPO Switch

The Intercept Point Optimization button switches the receiver RF preamplifier on and off. When the switch is pressed, the “IPO” icon appears on the display panel, and the receiver RF preamplifier is bypassed.

When this switch is pressed again, “IPO” will disappear, and the RF preamplifier returns to operation.

Best receiver sensitivity occurs when “IPO” is off.

However, the RF preamplifier may not be necessary in noisy locations or on the lower frequencies, in which case the IPO feature will provide improved immunity from intermodulation.

(9) A

TT

Switch

This switch may be used to reduce the input receive signal in one S-Unit steps, starting at 0 dB (no attenuation), and sequencing through [6 dB]

Þ

[12 dB]

Þ

[18 dB]

Þ

[0 dB]. . .

The attenuation level is shown on the display panel.

Best sensitivity will, of course, occur when no attenuation is used.

(10) AGC Switch

This switch selects the recovery time for the receiver

AGC (Automatic Gain Control) system. The selections available are, in order:

AGC F

AST

: Fast receiver recovery time.

AGC S

LOW

: Slow receiver recovery time.

AGC O

FF

: AGC system disabled.

AGC F

AST

: Fast receiver recovery time

(return to beginning of loop).

The current receiver recovery time constant is shown on the display panel.

?

If “AGC O

FF

” is selected, the S-meter (which monitors AGC voltage) will cease to function.

(11) M

IC

G

AIN

Control

This control adjusts the microphone input level in the

SSB and AM modes. Clockwise rotation increases the microphone gain level.

(12) RF P

WR

Control

This control adjusts the transmitter’s power output, with a range of 10 ~ 100 Watts, and adjustment is available in all modes. Clockwise rotation increases the power output.

(13) AF G

AIN

Control

This control adjusts the receiver volume level presented to the speaker or headphones. Clockwise rotation increases the volume level.

?

Note that this control does not affect the audio level presented to the rear-panel AF O

UT

and D

ATA

jacks.

(14) RF G

AIN

Control

This control adjusts the gain of the receiver’s RF and

IF stages. Clockwise rotation increases the RF Gain level for best sensitivity, and the normal operating position for this control is fully clockwise.

?

Counter-clockwise rotation of the RF G

AIN

control, besides lowering the receiver gain level, will cause the S-meter to deflect upward, as though a strong signal were present.

(15) N

ARROW

Switch

This switch is used to activate optional narrow filters, for improved interference rejection. Press this switch to select the narrow filter; the “N

AR

” indicator will appear on the display panel.

(16) M

ODE

Switches

Pressing one of these switches selects the operating mode. Per the chart below, repeated presses of a particular switch may cause the precise mode to be selected from within a mode group (for example, pressing [SSB] repeatedly toggles between [USB] and [LSB].

Mode

CW

A vailable Mode S elect ions

Sw itch

SSB

LSB

Ö

USB

CW (LS B)

Ö

CW (USB)

AM

AM

FM

DATA

FM

DATA LSB

Õ

DATA USB

Õ

DATA FM

Õ

DATA LSB

Õ

(RTTY/FS K) (PK T/AFSK) (PKT/AFS K) (RT TY/FSK)

21

FT-920 Operating Manual

Front Panel Controls, Switches, & Jacks

22

(17), (18) Antenna Switches (A/B, RX)

These switches allow selection of antennas, per the information and illustration below.

(17) A/B Press this switch to toggle between antennas connected to the “A” and “B” connectors on the rear panel. The indicator “A

N T

[A]” or

A

NT

[B]” will appear on the display panel to indicate which antenna is in use. The antenna selection will be maintained in the VFO or Memory register in use.

(18) R

X

When this switch is pressed, the receiver’s input is connected to the receive-only

R

X

I

N

” RCA connector on the rear panel of the

FT-920. This feature allows connection of a lownoise receiving antenna or a VHF/UHF receive converter. When the R

X

button is pushed, the “R

X

A

NT

” indicator will appear on the display panel.See

the drawing on the next page for details.

(19) S

QL

(Squelch) Control

This control, active in all modes, may be used to silence background noise when no signal is present.

Most frequently used during FM operation, this control must be rotated fully counter-clockwise for most

SSB, CW, or AM operation.

(20) P

ROC

C

OMP

ression Level Control

This control is used to adjust the compression level of the digital speech processor during SSB operation. Clockwise rotation increases the compression level.

(21) P

ROC

Switch

Pressing this switch activates the digital SSB speech processor, for enhanced “talk power” under difficult conditions. The “P

ROC

” indicator will appear on the display panel when the speech processor is activated.

Press this switch again to turn the speech processor off.

(22) M

ONI

G

AIN

Control

This control is used to adjust the audio level of the voice monitor. Clockwise rotation increases the audio level.

(23) M

ONI

Switch

Pressing this switch activates the voice monitor, which allows the operator to monitor voice characteristics during adjustments. When the monitor is activated, the “M

ONI

” indicator appears on the display panel.

Press this switch again to turn off the monitor.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Front Panel Controls, Switches, & Jacks

(24) NB L

EVEL

Control

This control adjusts the blanking level for the IF Noise

Blanker. Clockwise rotation increases the degree of blanking.

(25) NB Switch

Pressing this switch activates the IF Noise Blanker.

When the Noise Blanker is activated, the ‘NB” indicator will appear in the display panel. Press this switch again to switch the Noise Blanker off.

?

The IF Noise Blanker may be used or alone or in conjunction with the DSP Noise Reduction feature.

(26) RX - (VFO-A) Indicator/Switch

This combination LED/Switch indicates the operating status of VFO-A in the receive mode. The LED appears green when the receiver is set up for the use of VFO-A.

This LED is also a switch; when the receiver is using

VFO-A, pressing the green LED will cause the receiver to be muted (the LED will now blink). Press the LED again to cancel the mute function.

(27) TX - (VFO-A) Indicator/Switch

This combination LED/Switch indicates whether or not VFO-A is being used to determine the transmit frequency. The LED appears orange when the transmitter is being controlled by VFO-A (this is the typical situation for transceive operation using VFO-A).

When the corresponding LED near the tuning dial for

VFO-B is pushed, the VFO-A [TX] LED will go out, showing that VFO-A has relinquished transmit frequency control. Pushing the VFO-A [TX] LED again will restore transmit frequency control to VFO-A.

If this LED is pushed while it is already illuminated, the FT-920 will be placed in the (reduced-power:

Approx. 10 W) “TX M

UTE

” mode. In this mode, the

Orange LED will blink.

(28) VFO-A Tuning Dial

This large knob is the main tuning dial for the transceiver, controlling the frequency of the (main) VFO-

A. Clockwise rotation of the knob increases the frequency, while counter-clockwise rotation decreases the frequency. The tuning steps of the rotary encoder coupled to the VFO-A Tuning Dial are shown below.

Operating

Mode

SSB , CW, D ATA(SS B)

AM, F M, D ATA( FM )

No rm al

10Hz

100Hz

STEP

Fast

100Hz

1k Hz

Fine

1Hz

10Hz

(29) S

TEP

Switch

Use the [S

TEP

] switch to enable fine or coarse tuning when using the VFO-A or VFO-B tuning dials, as well as the [U

P

s

] or [Down t

] switches. The [step] switch toggles the tuning steps through the following sequence:

Fast

Õ

Fine

Õ

Normal

Õ

Fast

Õ

. . .

The current setting will be indicated on the display panel.

(30) Shuttle Jog Control

The outer, concentric “Shuttle Jog” control behind the

VFO-A Tuning Dial allows fine or rapid frequency excursions with just a slight turn of your hand. Rotating the Jog ring slightly to the left or right initiates slow tuning in a downward or upward direction, respectively. The more you rotate the spring-loaded Jog dial, the faster the VFO will tune. The tuning rate of the

Shuttle Jog may be programmed via the Menu system.

FT-920 Operating Manual

23

Front Panel Controls, Switches, & Jacks

24

(31) L

OCK

Switch (A)

The [L

OCK

] switch locks the settings of the VFO-A

Tuning Dial and/or the Shuttle Jog. Press this switch momentarily to lock the Tuning Dial; press and hold it in for ½ second to lock the Shuttle Jog.

When either control is locked, the “L

OCK

” indicator below the “VFO-A” indicator on the display panel will be illuminated.

(32) D

ISPLAY

Switch

This switch changes the function of the VFO-B readout area of the display panel. In the normal mode, the VFO-B frequency is displayed. When this button is pushed, and you are operating in the MR (Memory

Recall) mode, any alphanumeric memos (“Alpha-

Tags”) you have programmed will be substituted in place of the frequency display on the VFO-B side.

Press this switch again to return to the frequency display mode.

(33) (VFO) A u

B Switch

Pressing and holding this switch in for ½ second causes the contents of VFO-A to be copied into VFO-

B, so that the two VFOs’ contents will be identical.

(34) (VFO) A B Switch

Pressing this switch momentarily to swap the contents of VFO-A with those of VFO-B.

(35) VFO/M

EM

Switch

Pressing this switch changes frequency control between the VFO and Memory systems.

Repeatedly pushing this switch causes frequency control to toggle between the two systems.

(36) RPT Switch

Pressing this switch, while on 28 MHz in the FM operating mode, causes a standard repeater shift (default: 100 kHz) to be applied to the operating frequency during transmission; additionally, a

(subaudible) CTCSS encode tone (default: 88.5 Hz) will be superimposed on your transmitted signal, for accessing repeaters requiring it.

Both the CTCSS tone frequency and repeater shift may be changed via the Menu system.

(37) DW Switch

Pressing this switch activates the Dual Watch feature.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Front Panel Controls, Switches, & Jacks

(38) V

u

M Switch

Pressing this switch for ½ second transfers the contents of VFO-A into a memory register.

(39) V

u

M Switch

Pressing this switch for ½ second transfers the contents of the currently-selected memory channel into

VFO-A.

(40) Keypad

The keypad is used for one-touch band selection, as well as direct frequency entry, during VFO operation.

During FM transmission, the Keypad also serves as a DTMF Encoding Keypad for Autopatch operation.

(41) QMB R

CL

Switch

This switch is used for one-touch recall of Quick

Memory Bank memories. Pressing this switch causes the QMB memories to be recalled sequentially.

(42) QMB S

TO

Switch

This switch is used for storing VFO-A frequencies into the QMB memory registers.

(43) R

EC

Switch

Pressing this switch causes the built-in Digital Recorder to start recording the contents of the receiver’s incoming audio. Pressing the R

EC

switch for ½ second, followed by the [1], [2], [3], or [4] key on the Keypad, causes the Digital Voice Message recorder to start recording.

(44) P

LAY

Switch

Pressing this switch initiates playback of the receiver’s

Digital Recorder.

(45) U

P

(

p

) / D

OWN

(

q

) Keys

Pressing these keys allows quick frequency jumps

(during VFO operation) or memory channel selection (during Memory Recall operation). Pressing either of these switches once (momentarily) causes the frequency or memory channel number to move upward or downward by one increment; pressing and holding a switch in causes continuous frequency or channel number change.

The increments for frequency change during VFO operation, using these switches, are shown below.

STEP SWITCH POSITION

NO RMAL FAST FINE

100kHz 1MHz 10kHz

(46) RX - (VFO-B) Indicator/Switch

This combination LED/Switch indicates the operating status of VFO-B in the receive mode. The LED appears green when the receiver is set up for the use of VFO-B.

This LED is also a switch; when the receiver is using

VFO-B, pressing the green LED will cause the receiver to be muted (the LED will now blink). Press the LED again to cancel the mute function.

(47) TX - (VFO-B) Indicator/Switch

This combination LED/Switch indicates whether or not VFO-B is being used to determine the transmit frequency. The LED appears orange when the transmitter is being controlled by VFO-B (this is a typical situation for “Split” operation using VFO-B for transmission while receiving on VFO-A).

When the corresponding LED near the tuning dial for

VFO-A is pushed, the VFO-B [TX] LED will go out, showing that VFO-B has relinquished transmit frequency control. Pushing the VFO-B [TX] LED again will restore transmit frequency control to VFO-B.

If this LED is pushed while it is already illuminated, the FT-920 will be placed in the (reduced-power:

Approx. 10W) “TX MUTE” mode. In this mode, the

Orange LED will blink.

(48) VFO-B Tuning Dial

This knob is the tuning dial controlling the frequency of the (Sub) VFO-B. Clockwise rotation of the knob increases the frequency, while counter-clockwise rotation decreases the frequency. The tuning steps of the rotary encoder coupled to the VFO-B Tuning Dial are shown below.

Operating

Mode

SSB , CW, D ATA(SS B)

AM, F M, D ATA( FM )

No rm al

10Hz

100Hz

STEP

Fast

100Hz

1k Hz

Fine

1Hz

10Hz

(49) M

EM

C

H

Switch

Pressing this switch changes the operating configuration for the VFO-B Tuning Dial.

If this switch is pressed, the VFO-B Tuning Dial will switch from VFO operation to Memory Channel selection. Press the switch again to return to VFO operation.

25

FT-920 Operating Manual

Front Panel Controls, Switches, & Jacks

26

(50) L

OCK

Switch (B)

This switch locks the settings of the VFO-B knob and/ or the front panel keys.

Pressing this switch momentarily locks the settings of the VFO-B Tuning Dial. Pressing and holding in this switch for ½ second causes all the keys on the front panel of the transceiver (except for the [L

OCK

] switches!) to be locked. When the L

OCK

function is engaged, the “L

OCK

” indicator will be shown on the display panel.

(51) M

ENU

Switch

Pressing this switch momentarily activates the “Menu” mode, which allows customization of many aspects of transceiver configuration.

(52) RX C

LAR

Switch

Pressing this switch activates the RX Clarifier (Offset Tuning from VFO-A frequency) feature. When this feature is activated, the VFO-B Tuning Knob is used for Clarifier tuning up to an offset of ±9.99 kHz.

(53) TX C

LAR

Switch

Pressing this switch activates the TX Clarifier feature, allowing the transmit frequency to be offset from the VFO-A frequency up to ±9.99 kHz. The TX Clarifier may be used in conjunction with the RX Clarifier, or the chosen offset may be applied either to the RX or TX frequency singly.

(54) C

LEAR

C

LAR

Switch

Pressing this switch clears any offset that has been established for the Clarifier, returning it to a “Zero

Offset” condition. Pressing this switch only cancels the offset; it does not turn the Clarifier itself off.

(55) S

POT

Switch

In the CW mode, this switch activates a spotting tone, used for precise zeroing in onto an incoming (RX) signal. By matching the pitch of the incoming signal exactly to the pitch of the Spot tone, your transmitter’s signal will be precisely aligned to a “Zero Beat” position relative to the other station’s signal.

FT-920 Operating Manual

(56) B

K

-I

N

Switch

Pressing this switch, in the CW mode, places the transceiver in the “Full Break-In” (“QSK”) mode.

(57) K

EYER

Switch

This is the On/Off switch for the built-in Electronic

Keyer.

(58) S

PEED

Control

This is the Speed control for the built-in Electronic

Keyer. Clockwise rotation increased the sending speed.

(59) P

ITCH

Control

This control adjusts the pitch of (A) the S

POT

tone,

(B) the corresponding pitch of your FT-920’s transmitted carrier, and (C) the center frequency of the receive passband. The available range of frequencies is 300 ~ 1050 Hz, in 50 Hz steps.

(60) S

IDE

T

ONE

Control

This control adjusts the level of the CW monitor sidetone. Clockwise rotation increases the monitor level.

(61) M

EM

G

ROUP

Switch

This switch is used to select the “Memory Group

Recall” mode of Memory operation. In this mode, only those memory channels within the designated group will be available for recall; this is useful in reducing channel selection time if you only are interested in watching a few particular channels.

(62) T

UNER

Switch

This is the On/Off switch for the FT-920’s Automatic

Antenna Tuner.

Pressing this switch momentarily places the Antenna

Tuner in line.

Pressing and holding in this switch for ½ second activates the Automatic Matching mode, in which a carrier is generated and the tuner ’s microprocessorbased circuitry selects values of inductance and capacitance so as to present a low SWR to the transmitter’s output port.

þ

Be certain to have an antenna or dummy load connected to the antenna jack on the rear of the transceiver before initiating Automatic Antenna Tuner matching procedures.

Front Panel Controls, Switches, & Jacks

(63) S

HIFT

Control

This control adjusts the receiver’s IF Shift feature, which adjusts the 8.2 MHz IF position relative to the center frequency of the selected IF filter (in all modes except FM). The default position for this control is at

12 o’clock, and an adjustment range of ±1.26 kHz is provided (the pitch of the incoming signals will not change).

(64) NR Control

This control adjusts the level of the DSP-based Noise

Reduction feature. Clockwise rotation of this control increased the degree of noise reduction.

(65) DSP Switch

This is the On/Off switch for the Digital Signal Processing circuitry.

(66) L

OW

C

UT

/H

IGH

C

UT

Controls

These controls adjust the passband cutoff frequencies of the receiver’s High-Cut and Low-Cut DSP filters. The inner control adjusts the Low-Cut characteristics, with a physical adjustment range over the left hemisphere. The outer control adjusts the High-

Cut characteristics, and its adjustment range is over the right hemisphere.

Do not attempt to adjust either of these controls past the 12 o’clock position.

(67) N

OTCH

Switch

This is the On/Off switch for the beat-canceling DSP

Notch filter.

27

FT-920 Operating Manual

Display Panel Indicators and Icons

28

(1) S/PO Meter

This meter scale indicates signal strength on receive, and power output on transmit. The characteristics may be changed between Instantaneous and Peak-

Hold by making the appropriate selection via Menu

Item U-07.

(2) Transmit Multimeter

In accordance with the corresponding setting of the

Meter Select switch, these meter scales provide display of the following transmitter performance parameters:

ALC: ALC Voltage.

SWR: SWR as observed by the transmitter PA.

C

OMP

: Speech Processor Compression level.

V

OLT

: Final amplifier transistor supply voltage

(also displayed on receive).

A

MP

: Final amplifier transistor drain current.

(3) [P

ROC

]

This icon indicates that the Digital Speech Processor is On.

(4) [IPO]

This icon indicates that the Intercept Point Optimization condition for the receiver is active, with the input preamplifier being bypassed.

(5) [A

TT

6 12 18]

This icon is illuminated when the receiver input preamplifier is On, and it displays the number of dB of attenuation.

(6) [AGC F S] [AGC OFF]

These icons indicate the current operating mode for the Automatic Gain Control circuitry.

(7) [T

RANSMIT

]

This icon becomes illuminated during transmission.

If you attempt to transmit outside of an authorized transmit range, this icon will disappear, and “ERROR” will appear on the main frequency display area.

(8) [B

USY

]

This icon is illuminated during reception so long as the receiver is unsquelched. By keeping the S

QUELCH control fully counter-clockwise, receiver audio will always be present and the [B

USY

] icon will stay lit.

(9) [S

PLIT

]

This icon is illuminated during “Split” operation using

VFO-A for reception and VFO-B for transmission, or vice-versa.

(10) [F

AST

]

This icon is illuminated when “Fast” synthesizer steps have been selected, for more rapid frequency navigation using the VFO-A and VFO-B Tuning Knobs, or the U

P

(

p

)/(

q

)D

OWN

switches. In the “Fast” mode, the frequency change is multiplied by a factor of 10.

(11) [N

AR

]

This icon is illuminated when a Narrow filter (in those modes where one is available) has been selected.

FT-920 Operating Manual

(12) [G

EN

]

This icon is illuminated when the transceiver is tuned to a frequency outside one of the 500 kHz segments containing an Amateur band. Transmission will be inhibited when the [G

EN

] icon is lit.

(13) [F

INE

]

This icon is illuminated when “Fine” synthesizer steps have been selected, for fine tuning using the VFO-A and VFO-B Tuning Knobs, or the U

P

(

p

)/(

q

)D

OWN

switches. The tuning rate, in the “Fine” mode, is 1/

10th the “Normal” rate.

(14) [NB]

This icon is illuminated when the IF Noise Blanker is turned on.

(15) VFO-A Mode

These icons display the operating mode in use on

VFO-A.

(16) [M

ONI

]

This icon is illuminated when the voice monitor is activated.

(17) Enhanced Tuning Scale

This meter scale provides a wide variety of information regarding the operation of the transceiver, depending on its configuration (via Menu Item U-10).

At the factory, the Enhanced Tuning Scale is set up so as to provide a visual representation of the DSP system’s bandwidth. Other configurations allow depiction of the Clarifier offset direction and magnitude, as well as tuning accuracy. See the discussion on page 74 for details.

Display Panel Indicators and Icons

(18) VFO-A Frequency Display

This is the main frequency display for the transceiver’s primary (A) VFO. Display resolution to 10 Hz is provided.

(19) [L

OCK

]

This icon is illuminated when the VFO-A “Lock” function is activated so as to prevent inadvertent frequency changes.

(20) [QMB]

This icon is illuminated when frequency data is recalled from the Quick Memory Bank.

(21) [VFO]

This icon is illuminated when frequency data is provided by the VFO system.

(22) [M

EM

]

This icon is illuminated when frequency data is recalled from the Memory system.

(23) [M

EM

T

UNE

]

This icon is illuminated when transceiver frequency control is in a pseudo-VFO mode known as “Memory

Tune,” whereby a memory channel is used as a starting point for tuning using the VFO-A Tuning Dial.

FT-920 Operating Manual

29

Display Panel Indicators and Icons

30

(24) [A

NT

] [A] [B] [RX A

NT

]

These icons indicate which antenna is currently in use.

(25) [TX] [C

LAR

] [RX]

These icons indicate the operating status of the Clarifier function. When the Receive Clarifier is on, [C

LAR

]

[RX] will be displayed; when the Transmit Clarifier is on, [TX] [C

LAR

] will be displayed.

(26) Multi-Panel

This panel of the display area provides quantitative data regarding transceiver operating status.

At the factory, this panel is set up to display the amount of Clarifier system frequency offset from the main

VFO frequency. Other available functions include display of CW Pitch and VFO-A/VFO-B Offset, utilizing

Menu Item U-09. See page 74 for details.

(27) [-] [RPT] [+]

These icons are illuminated during “Repeater” FM operation, typically on 29 MHz. When the repeater shift direction is negative, the [-] [RPT] icons are illuminated; when the repeater shift direction is positive, the [RPT] [+] icons are lit.

(28) [T]

This icon is illuminated when the CTCSS Tone Encoder is activated during FM Repeater operation.

(29) [SQL]

This icon is illuminated when the CTCSS Tone Decoder is activate during FM repeater operation.

(30) [W

AIT

]

This icon will be briefly illuminated during antenna tuning, before a satisfactory match has been achieved by the Automatic Antenna Tuner.

(31) [H

I

SWR]

If the Automatic Antenna Tuner is unable to achieve a satisfactory match, this icon will become illuminated.

Transmitter power output will be significantly reduced when the [H

I

SWR] icon is lit. You should check your antenna system, connectors, and cables to determine and repair the cause of the fault.

(32) [M C

K

]

This icon is illuminated when the “scratchpad”

Memory Check mode is activated. In this mode, you may inspect and select the memory channel to be used if and when the Memory Recall mode is selected.

(33) [G

ROUP

]

This icon is illuminated when the Memory system is restricted to the Memory Group mode. See page 61 for details.

FT-920 Operating Manual

(34) Memory Channel Display Field

This area of the display indicates the Memory Channel number.

(35) [O

FFSET

]

This icon is illuminated when the Multi-Display Panel is displaying the frequency offset of the Clarifier.

(36) VFO-B Mode

These icons display the operating mode in use on

VFO-B.

(37) [S

CAN

]

This icon will be illuminated, during Memory operation, when the currently-selected Memory Channel has been tagged for inclusion among the channels to be scanned.

(38) [R

X

] [T

UNER

] [T

X

]

These icons light up to indicate whether the Automatic Antenna Tuner is connected to the Receiver or

Transmitter stage, respectively.

(39) [

CAT

]

This icon will be illuminated when data is being passed to or from the transceiver’s (serial) DATA port. During operation using software which “polls” the radio’s status frequently, this icon may appear to be blinking.

Display Panel Indicators and Icons

(40) VFO-B Frequency Display

This is the main frequency display for the transceiver’s secondary (B) VFO. Display resolution to 10 Hz is provided.

(41) [L

OCK

]

This icon is illuminated when the VFO-B “Lock” function is activated so as to prevent inadvertent frequency changes.

(42) [B

K

-I

N

]

During CW operation, this icon will be illuminated if

Full Break-In (QSK) operation is selected.

(43) [K

EYER

]

This icon is illuminated, in the CW mode, when the built-in Electronic Keyer is turned on.

(44) [T

RACK

]

This icon will be illuminated during “VFO Tracking” operation, whereby VFO-A and VFO-B are “slaved” under control by the VFO-A Tuning Knob (press and hold in the VFO-A [L

OCK

] key while rotating the tuning dial to engage VFO Tracking).

(45) [NR]

This icon is illuminated when the DSP Noise Reduction circuitry is active.

FT-920 Operating Manual

31

Rear Panel Connectors and Switches

32

(1) B

AND

Connector

This 8-pin interlocked DIN connector includes Tx/Rx switching and bandswitching control lines for use with the Yaesu Model FL-7000 Linear Amplifier.

(2)

CAT

Port

This DB-9 connector is used for interconnection to a personal computer’s serial port to enable computerassisted operation. Use a standard (not “null modem”)

RS-232C serial data cable.

(3) K

EY

Jack

This jack may be used for connection to a straight key, an external electronic keyer, a computer-driven

CW keying interface, or a keyer paddle.

(4) P

DL

-K

EY

Switch

This switch changes the function of the rear-panel

K

EY

jack.

When the “P

DL

-K

EY

” switch is set to the “P

DL

” position, the rear-panel K

EY

jack will be connected in parallel with the front-panel K

EY

jack; when the “P

DL

-K

EY

” switch is set to “K

EY

,” the rear-panel Key jack will be changed so as to accept a straight key, external electronic keyer, or computer-driven keying interface while simultaneously allowing the front panel K

EY

jack to be connected to a keyer paddle for utilization of the built-in Electronic Keyer. See page 18 for configuration details and operating tips.

(5) PTT jack

This “RCA” female connector is used for connection of a footswitch or other external switch for Tx/Rx command control of the FT-920. This jack is wired in parallel with the front-panel MOX switch; shorting the

PTT jack to ground causes the FT-920 to be placed in the Transmit mode, while opening the connection to the PTT jack returns the radio to the Receive mode.

Open-circuit voltage is 13.5V DC, and short-circuit current is 15 mA.

(6) T

R

-R

Y

switch

This switch selects the switching device to be connected to the (adjacent) T

X

G

ND

jack, used for Tx/Rx control of peripheral devices such as linear amplifiers, etc. With the switch set to the R

Y

position, the T

X

G

ND

jack is connected to a mechanical relay; if the switch is set to T

R

, the T

X

G

ND

jack is connected to a switching transistor. The specifications for these devices are shown in the next section.

(7) T

X

G

ND

Jack

This RCA connector is connected to the switching device described above, for control of external devices. Please note the specifications for the two devices available via this jack:

The relay provides a mec h a n i c a l c l o s u r e t o

Ground on Transmit, while the (NPN) transistor switch sinks its (open) collector to ground on

RY

60 Wa tts max im um

(AC 125V max. at 500 mA,

DC 220V max. at 270 mA)

TR

25 Wa tts max im um

( Positive DC Vol tage Only, 50 V max. at 500 mA)

FT-920 Operating Manual

transmit. Check with the manufacturer of your amplifier (or other device) to confirm the switching voltage and current, if it is not clearly stipulated in the documentation for your equipment.

þ

Be absolutely certain to check the position of the

T

R

-R

Y

switch prior to connecting any external device to the T

X

G

ND

jack. Never connect an AC voltage, or a negative DC voltage, to the T

X

G

ND

jack if the T

R

-R

Y

switch is set to T

R

. The Limited

Warranty on this product does not cover damage caused by improper connections (excessive or improper voltage) to the rear panel jacks of the FT-

920.

(8) 13.5V Jack

This jack provides +13.5V DC at up to 200 mA for use with low-power peripheral devices. The jack is fused, and the current is limited by the size of the copper foil on the internal circuit boards; do not exceed the 200 mA current limitation.

(9) E

XT

S

P

Jack

This 3.5 mm, 2-pin jack provides speaker audio output for an external speaker. The audio output impedance at this jack is 4

~ 16

, and the level varies according to the setting of the front panel’s AF

G

AIN

control.

(10) A

F

O

UT

Jack

This is a fixed-level audio output jack for connection to a peripheral device such as a TNC, Morse code reader, or WeatherFax decoder. The audio output level provided is 100 mV at 600

, and the front-panel

AF G

AIN

control has no effect upon the audio level present at the A

F

O

UT

jack.

(11) P

ATCH

Jack

This RCA jack is wired in parallel with the front panel’s microphone input jack, providing a convenient input port for connection of a phone patch or other audio input. The audio input impedance is 600

, and the signal applied to the P

ATCH

jack is affected by the setting of the front panel’s M

IC

G

AIN

control.

(12) AFSK-FSK Switch

This switch determines the method of (transmit) Data input to Pin 1 of the D

ATA

jack (described below). If

AFSK is selected, then Pin 1 should be connected to the “TX Audio” line from the TNC. If FSK is selected, then Pin 1 should be connected to the “FSK Out” line from the TNC or TU.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Rear Panel Connectors and Switches

(13) D

ATA

Jack

This five-pin DIN jack accepts AFSK input or FSK

(closure to ground) input from a Terminal Node Controller (TNC) or Terminal Unit (TU); it also provides fixed-level Audio Output, PTT, and Ground lines. The optimum AFSK Input level is 30 mV at 3 k

, while the Audio Output level provided is fixed at 100 mV at

600

.

(14) E

XT

ALC Jack

This RCA type connector may be used for connection to a linear amplifier’s ALC cable. The specified control voltage range is 0V ~ -4V DC, with -4V corresponding to the maximum degree of power reduction being applied to the FT-920.

(15) RX A

NT

Jacks

These RCA connectors provide convenient access to the receiver input line for a number of applications.

They are active only when the front-panel [RX A

NT

] key is pressed.

The O

UT

jack is connected to the “RX” lead from the main T/R relay for the transceiver.

The I

N

jack is connected to the input port of the FT-

920 receiver section.

Accordingly, a separate receive-only antenna, or a

VHF receive converter’s 28 MHz output, may be connected to the I

N

jack. Alternatively, a receive preamplifier’s Input jack may be connected to the O

UT

jack, and the preamp’s Output jack may be connected to the I

N

jack. See page 35 for interface instructions and ideas.

(16) A

NT

Jacks (A - B)

These SO-239 (“M”) jacks should be connected to an appropriate coaxial connector for the antenna or a 50

dummy load. Antenna selection is made via the front-panel [A

NTENNA

A/B] switch.

(17) DC 13.5V Jack

This is the main DC input jack for the transceiver.

The specified voltage is 13.5V DC (negative ground) at 20 Amps.

(18) GND Lug

For best performance and safety, this Ground Lug should be connected to a good earth ground, using a short, heavy, braided cable.

33

Bottom Panel

The small adjustment hole, shown in the drawing, is used for adjustment of the “Beep” tone associated with front panel keystrokes.

34

FT-920 Operating Manual

Before You Start

Before you begin operation for the first time, preset the front panel controls and switches to the following positions:

P

OWER

, VOX, MOX: all off

M

IC

G

AIN

:

AF G

AIN

:

RF P

OWER

:

RF G

AIN

:

9 o’clock

9 o’clock fully clockwise fully clockwise

S

HIFT

:

NR:

L

OW

C

UT

:

H

IGH

C

UT

:

12 o’clock

12 o’clock fully counter-clockwise

(approximately 7 o’clock) fully clockwise

(approximately 5 o’clock)

SQL:

P

ROC

L

EVEL

:

M

ONI

L

EVEL

:

NB L

EVEL

:

S

PEED

:

P

ITCH

:

S

IDE

T

ONE

:

fully counter-clockwise fully counter-clockwise fully counter-clockwise fully counter-clockwise

12 o’clock

12 o’clock

12 o’clock

These represent typical starting points for operation; optimum setting procedures will be discussed later.

Note that a wide variety of transceiver characteristics may be optimized or adjusted using the Menu

System, discussed in detail beginning on page 69.

Connect your microphone and CW key/paddle to the appropriate jacks, then turn on your 13.5 Volt DC power supply.

Downloaded by

RadioAmateur.EU

Operation

Receiving

Press the P

OWER

switch to turn the transceiver on. Assuming that this is the first time you have used the FT-

920, the display should look like this:

Inspection of the display will show you that both VFO-

A and VFO-B are set to 7.000.00 MHz in the LSB mode. The (Green) [RX] and (Orange) [TX] LEDs associated with VFO-A should both be illuminated, indicating that all frequency control is being exercised by that VFO.

You should now be hearing background noise. Adjust the AF G

AIN

control for a comfortable listening level on the incoming background noise.

We will now discuss antenna selection, frequency navigation, and other aspects of FT-920 operation.

Antenna Selection

Two main antenna jacks are provided on the rear panel of the FT-920, allowing you to connect, for example, a triband Yagi to one jack and a multiband dipole or vertical to the other.

These “SO-239” or “M” type jacks, labeled A and B, may be selected by pressing the A

NTENNA

A/B switch on the left side of the transceiver’s front panel. This switch toggles between the two available main antenna ports.

Note that the maximum power output for each antenna jack may be set independently via Menu Items

U-49 (Antenna A) and U-50 (Antenna B). See page

79 for details.

An additional receive-only antenna jack (RCA type) may also be found on the rear panel of the transceiver, labeled R

X

I

N

. This jack may be connected to a specialized antenna, such as a loop or Beverage, for use in the receive mode; transmission will remain on the previously-selected A or B antenna if a receive-only antenna is used.

35

FT-920 Operating Manual

36

Operation

To engage the receive-only antenna, press the R

X

A

NTENNA

switch, located immediately under the A/B switch just described. Press the R

X

A

NTENNA

switch a second time to return receive operation to the main

(transmit) antenna (A or B).

þ

The antenna selection (A, B, and/or R

X

) will be maintained in the VFO or memory register in use.

Therefore, once you have set the transceiver up on each band of interest, you will not have to select the antenna manually (unless you want to change it) when you change bands or memories; the most recent setting will be retained.

Mode Selection

Press one of the Mode switches, located immediately to the left of the VFO-

A Tuning Dial, to select the operating mode. The available choices are SSB, CW,

AM, FM, and D

ATA

.

The SSB switch is a toggle function which allows the operator to choose between

USB (used, by convention, above 10 MHz) and LSB

(used below 10 MHz). Press the SSB switch, as necessary, to choose the appropriate SSB mode as we proceed with exploration of different bands.

The CW switch uses a toggle function to select between USB- and LSB-side injection (a.k.a. “CW-Reverse”). Although the default USB-side injection is typically used, you may wish to elect LSB-side injection below 10 MHz, particularly if you anticipate switching between LSB (voice) and CW frequently.

Special Note for CW Mode

Reverse CW Sideband

When you switch modes between CW and USB, you will observe that the frequency of the received signal stays the same (even though the displayed frequency may change slightly).You

will also observe that the pitch of the received signal decreases as you increase the frequency by rotating the Tuning Dial.

However, switching from CW to LSB requires retuning the desired station. This can be particularly inconvenient when working a station in the 75-meter voice band (LSB) and you ask him to move to CW on the same frequency.

To eliminate the need for retuning in this situation, you may switch the receiver CW carrier injection point to the “reverse” (LSB) side. When you press [CW], you should notice that the “USB” indicator (just above “CW” on the main display) will blink for a couple of seconds, while the “CW” indicator glows steadily. This indicates that USBside injection is currently in use. If you press[CW] once more, the “LSB” indicator will now blink, informing you that LSB-side injection is now in use.

When using LSB-side injection, you can freely switch between CW and LSB without having to retune the other station. Note that, in the LSB and CW/LSB modes, the received signal pitch now increases as you increase the

VFO frequency.

To return the receiver to the (default) USB-side injection method, just push [CW] again.

Operating Hint - An added benefit of this feature is the potential to eliminate interference. If you are experiencing QRM from a CW station that the IF Shift and/or DSP are unable to eliminate, you should try switching to the reverse CW sideband, retuning the desired CW signal, and adjust the IF Shift and/or DSP again.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Bandwidth Selection

Optional filters are available from your Yaesu dealer for providing selectable IF bandwidths in the CW and

AM modes. For CW, the optional YF-116C 500 Hz filter provides the narrow selectivity needed for today’s crowded bands, while on AM, the YF-116A filter provides a 6 kHz bandwidth for improved listening fidelity.

Pressing the [N

ARROW

] key on the front panel causes the narrower filter appropriate for that operating mode to be switched into the circuit. See the chart below for the bandwidths available in each mode:

N AR ROW

S wi tch

CW ( TX ) FM

OFF

ON

2.4kHz

0.5kHz

¦

( RX ) AM

Thr ough or

6.0kHz

¦

2.4kHz

WIDE FM

(± 2.5 kHz)

NA RROW FM

(± 5 kHz) r

CW “Narrow” and AM “6 kHz bandwidth” operation requires installation of an optional filter.

r

In the AM mode, when the optional AM filter is installed, the default bandwidth will be 6 kHz; pressing the [N

ARROW

] key engages the (SSB) 2.4

kHz filter.

r

In the FM mode, the action of the [N

ARROW

] switch affects only the transmitter. For 29 MHz NBFM work, be sure to press the [N

ARROW

] switch so as to set a maximum deviation of ±2.5 kHz, the statutory deviation limit on the 10-meter band. For 50

MHz, however, you will probably want to use the

“Wide” configuration, which provides ±5 kHz deviation.

Operation

Amateur Band Selection

VFO-A Band Selection

One-touch Amateur band selection is provided via the Keypad, located between the VFO-A and VFO-B

Tuning Knobs.

Press the [14] key to change VFO-A to the 14 MHz band. Initially, the operating frequency will be

14.000.00 MHz; rotate the VFO-A Tuning Knob to move around in the band. Press the [CW] key to set the operating mode to CW. Now press the [10] key; observe that the frequency is set to 10.000.00 MHz, and the mode is set to AM. Now press the [7] key, and observe that the mode has changed to LSB, the mode originally chosen on the 7 MHz band.. Press the [14] key, and observe that the mode has similarly reverted to CW, the last mode used on the 14 MHz band.

VFO-B Band Selection

By pressing and holding in the Keypad’s [G

EN

/CE] key for ½ second, frequency command control will be shifted from the VFO-A register to the VFO-B register.

For example, to set VFO-B to the 21 MHz band, press and hold in the [G

EN

/CE] key for ½ second; you will observe that the VFO-B frequency display area will blink. Within five seconds, press the Keypad’s [21] key. After pressing the [G

EN

/CE] key for ½ second, you may also change the mode of operation and/or the antenna to be used, if you like.

?

Note that pressing the [G

EN

/CE] key for ½ second does not, itself, choose VFO-B to be the receiving (or transmitting) VFO register. This action acts as a “scratchpad” function which allows VFO-B to be set on the frequency, mode, and antenna to be used when VFO-B is next activated.

FT-920 Operating Manual

37

38

Operation

Direct Keypad Frequency Entry

VFO-A Direct Frequency Entry

A starting point on a band may also be established using direct entry via the Keypad. This is accomplished using the[E

NT

] key as well as the individual numeric keys on the Keypad. For the purposes of direct frequency entry, use the numerals located on the lower right-hand side of a particular key.

For example, to set 24.905.33 MHz on VFO-A, press:

[E

NT

]

Þ

[2]

Þ

[4]

Þ

[9]

Þ

[0]

Þ

[5]

Þ

[3]

Þ

[3]

Þ

[E

NT

].

Trailing digits which are identical (or acceptable for the new setting) need not be entered. Therefore in the above example (which began with the initial 12meter band setting of 24.500 MHz), to set 24.900

MHz on the VFO-A register, one can simply press:

[E

NT

]

Þ

[2]

Þ

[4]

Þ

[9]

Þ

[E

NT

].

You can set the operating mode at the same time that you enter the frequency, if you need to make that change. To set VFO-A to 14.011.52 MHz CW, press:

[E

NT

]

Þ

[1]

Þ

[4]

Þ

[0]

Þ

[1]

Þ

[1]

Þ

[5]

Þ

[2]

Þ

[CW]

Þ

[E

NT

].

?

When entering a frequency below 10.000.0 MHz, you must enter the leading Zero of the desired frequency. That is, to enter 7.255.00 MHz, press:

[E

NT

]

Þ

[0]

Þ

[7]

Þ

[2]

Þ

[5]

Þ

[5]

Þ

[0]

Þ

[0]

Þ

[E

NT

].

VFO-B Direct Frequency Entry

Direct VFO-B frequency entry using the Keypad again requires that the [G

EN

/CE] key be pressed and held in for ½ second, as described previously. Then enter the desired frequency while the VFO-B display area is blinking.

For example, to set VFO-B to 18.095.20 MHz, CW mode, press:

[G

EN

/CE]( hold for ½ sec.)

Þ

[E

NT

]

Þ

[1]

Þ

[8]

Þ

[0]

Þ

[9]

Þ

[5]

Þ

[2]

Þ

[0]

Þ

[CW]

Þ

[E

NT

].

?

If you attempt to enter a frequency outside the operating range of the transceiver, the attempt will be ignored, and the transceiver will revert to the last frequency you were on before the attempted frequency entry.

Stacked VFO System

The FT-920 provides two VFO registers on each band for each Tuning Dial (“A” and “B”). These dual registers are most often use to establish “favorite frequency” presets in each Amateur band.

In the previous VFO-A example of direct frequency entry, for example, we set up VFO-A on 7.255 MHz.

Now press the [7] key momentarily. You will observe that “7.255.00” has disappeared, and another 7 MHz frequency (probably 7.000.00 MHz) is now displayed.

You may now retune this VFO register to any desired frequency. It may be desirable, for example, to set the new VFO register to 7.025 MHz CW, so you have one CW frequency and one SSB frequency in each band.

All settings of the frequency, mode, bandwidth, antenna selection, and antenna tuner adjustment are totally independent between the two registers on each band, so changing one VFO register’s bandwidth, for example, will have no effect on the alternate register’s settings.

Two VFO registers per band are also provided for

VFO-B. Just remember to push and hold in the [G

EN

/

CE] key for ½ second before pushing the [7] key to inspect and/or adjust the settings for the alternate 7

MHz register for VFO-B.

Frequency Navigation

Once you have made an initial setting on a band (using the one-touch band keys or direct frequency entry), you may tune around the band in search of signals.

Several tuning methods are available, depending on which VFO is in use.

r

For VFO-A frequencies:

- VFO-A Tuning Dial

- Shuttle Jog

- Front Panel [U

P

/D

OWN

] Switches

- Microphone [U

P

/D

OWN

] Switches r

For VFO-B frequencies:

- VFO-B Tuning Dial

FT-920 Operating Manual

VFO Tuning Dial

Rotating either VFO Tuning Dial tunes the transceiver according to the selected tuning step size. Due to the extremely fine steps synthesized by the Direct Digital

Synthesis (DDS) circuitry, the tuning action is as smooth as though an analog tuning VFO were being used.

By pushing the [S

TEP

] key, the tuning rate may be modified. The [S

TEP

] key toggles between three settings: F

INE

Þ

N

ORMAL

Þ

F

AST

Þ

F

INE

. . .

The steps available in each mode are shown below.

MODE

SSB, CW, D ATA (SS B)

AM, F M, D ATA( FM )

ST EP Sw itch

NO RMAL FAST

10Hz

100Hz

100Hz

1kHz

FINE

1Hz

10Hz

?

The [S

TEP

] switch affects the action of the VFO-A and VFO-B tuning dials, as well as the front panel and microphone [U

P

] and [D

OWN

] switches.

Finally, the number of tuning steps per revolution of the tuning dials may be changed via Menu Item U-

01; see page 73 for details.

Shuttle Jog (VFO-A)

The Shuttle Jog is an efficient way to achieve large frequency excursions, avoiding the need to spin the

VFO-A tuning dial to move quickly from one frequency to another.

Basically, the Shuttle Jog is a spring-loaded ring used for frequency change. Rotating the Shuttle Jog ring away from its center detent in either direction will initiate tuning. The farther the Shuttle Jog ring is moved from the center, the larger and faster the amount of frequency change which results (minimum steps with slight rotation of the Shuttle Jog ring are 10 Hz).

Front Panel U

P

/D

OWN

Switches

These switches may also be used for quick frequency excursions from one end of a band to another. In the

“Normal” position of the [S

TEP

] switch, for example, one touch of the [U

P

] switch will cause the frequency to jump upward by 100 kHz.

T h e f r e q u e n c y jumps available are shown at the right.

STEP SWITCH POSI TION

NO RMAL FAST FINE

100k Hz 1MHz 10kHz

Operation

MH-31B8 Hand Mic U

P

/D

WN

/F

ST

Switches

Pushing the MH-31B8’s U

P

or D

WN

switch will initiate tuning in an upward or downward direction, in frequency steps set in accordance with the selection made via the [S

TEP

] switch. Pushing the [F

ST

] key will switch tuning into the “Fast” mode, as though the front panel [S

TEP

] switch had been set to “Fast.” See the table below for a summary of the steps available in these modes of operation.

MOD E U P D WN

F ST

+

U P

F ST

+

D WN

SSB, CW,

DATA(SS B)

AM , FM ,

DATA( FM)

{

10Hz

|

10Hz

{

100Hz

|

100Hz

{

100Hz

|

100Hz

{

1kHz

|

1kHz

MD-100A8X Desk Microphone Rotary Scanning Switch

The (optional) MD-100A8X Desk Microphone features a Rotary Scanning Switch at the base of the microphone support stand. Rotating this switch to the left causes the frequency to scan lower, and rotating the switch to the right causes the frequency to scan higher. Rotating this switch fully to the left or right causes the scanning speed to switch to the “Fast” mode, as though you had pushed the [F

ST

] switch on the MH-31B8.

See the table below for a summary of the steps available in these modes of operation.

MOD E R ig ht Left

Fu lly

R ig ht

Fu lly

Left

SSB, CW,

DATA(SS B)

AM , FM ,

DATA( FM)

{

10Hz

|

10Hz

{

100Hz

|

100Hz

{

100Hz

|

100Hz

{

1kHz

|

1kHz

L

OCK

Switches

To guard against accidental changes in the settings of the Tuning Dials and/or the Shuttle Jog dial, use the Lock functions provided on the front panel.

The L

OCK

switches to the lower right of the VFO-A and VFO-B Tuning Dials have slightly different effects, depending on how each switch is pressed.

These switches may be used in combination to provide the desired locking control, as shown below.

L

OC K

(A) Sw itch

< 0 .5 sec

VFO -A Tuning Di al and S huttle Jog

> 0 .5 sec

None

L

OC K

(B) Sw itc h

VFO -B Tuning Di al

Al l Switc hes exp. POW ER, MOX , VOX

Switc hes

39

FT-920 Operating Manual

Operation

Operating Convenience Features

Display Brightness Control

The FT-920 is shipped from the factory with the display illumination set to its maximum level. Should you wish to reduce the illumination level of the display, use the following procedure.



Press the [M

ENU

] key to enter the Menu mode of operation.

‚

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select Menu

Item U-08 (“D

IMMER

”).

ƒ

Press the [E

NT

] key to enter the “Menu Command” mode.

„

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to change the setting indicated in the main display window from “O

FF

” to “O

N

.”

…

Press the [M

ENU

] key once more to exit the

Menu mode and resume normal transceiver operation.

Keypad Beep Frequency/Level

The “Beep” tone which is heard when you press a key on the front panel may be adjusted, if you like.

To adjust the Beep Frequency:



Press the [M

ENU

] key to enter the Menu mode of operation.

‚

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select Menu

Item U-06 (“B

EEP

-F”).

ƒ

Press the [E

NT

] key to enter the “Menu Command” mode. At this point, the current beep tone frequency will be heard.

„

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to set the tone that you prefer. Just for your information, the exact tone frequency will be shown on the main display window.

…

Once you have found a satisfactory tone, press

[E

NT

] to exit the Menu mode and resume normal operation.

To set the Beep Level, you may adjust the Beep level potentiometer, which is accessible through a small adjustment hole on the bottom of the transceiver. Use a small insulated flat-blade alignment tool to set the level to the best amplitude for your operating needs.

40

FT-920 Operating Manual

Receiver Accessories

Noise, interference, changing signal characteristics, and changing propagation can all present difficult challenges to today’s operator. The FT-920, however, provides a wealth of features designed to enhance reception on our crowded bands. These features are described below.

Clarifier (Offset Tuning)

The Clarifier feature allows offset tuning from the current VFO frequency. The Clarifier provides several important capabilities: r

If the incoming signal begins to drift, the [RX

C

LAR

] may be activated so as to allow you to continue receiving the other station without requiring you to adjust both your transmit and receive frequencies (possibly causing interference to other nearby operators).

r

For DX pileup operation, the [TX C

LAR

] may be used to establish a split TX/RX frequency relationship, and the [RX C

LAR

] may be used to establish an optimum calling frequency.

r

If you frequently need to move a fixed amount of frequency excursion (such as “five up”), the

[TX/RX C

LAR

] control allows you to program this amount for instant recall and QSY to that frequency.

Press the [RX C

LAR

] key to activate the Receive Clarifier. The RX C

LAR

indicator will appear on the display, and the VFO-B Tuning Dial may now be used to move your receive frequency up to ±9.99 kHz. If you want the transmit and receive frequencies to follow the programmed offset, also push the [TX C

LAR

] key.

The amount of offset from the VFO frequency will be displayed in the Multi-Function Window of the display, and a graphical representation of the magnitude and direction of the offset can be provided in the

Enhanced Tuning Scale, with proper setup of Menu

Item U-10 (see page 74).

To turn the Clarifier off, push the [RX C

LAR

] (and/or

[TX C

LAR

]) again. The transceiver will revert to the original VFO frequency; however, the offset will not be wiped clean, but rather maintained at the current value on the assumption that you may want to hop back to the offset frequency again.

To set the Clarifier offset to Zero, press the [C

LAR

C

LEAR

] key.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Operation

CW Center Tuning (Enhanced Tuning Scale)

The Enhanced Tuning Scale may be used to provide a visual indication of precise frequency adjustment in the CW mode. Configuration of the Enhanced Tuning Scale is performed via Menu Item U-10 (page

74).

When CW Center Tuning has been selected, the CW passband center frequency (as determined by the setting of the P

ITCH

control) becomes the center point of the Enhanced Tuning Scale. Per the illustration below, when proper alignment of the incoming signal’s pitch is accomplished, your transmitter signal will precisely aligned in a “zero beat” with the frequency of the incoming signal.

CW S

POT

The CW Spot feature provides an audible method of aligning your FT-920’s transmitter to the frequency of an incoming signal (as opposed to the visual method provided by the Enhanced Tuning Scale).

By pressing the S

POT

key, you will activate a constant audio “sidetone” which is set to the pitch which matches (precisely) the pitch of your transmitted signal. The sidetone pitch frequency also corresponds to the center frequency of the receiver filter passband (with the IF S

HIFT

control centered in its default position). By aligning the CW Spot tone to match the pitch of an incoming station’s signal, you will cause your signal and the other station’s signal to be exactly on the same frequency.

The Spot tone’s center frequency may be adjusted to any value between 300 Hz and 1050 Hz (in 50 Hz steps) by rotation of the P

ITCH

control.

RF Preamplifier Selections

Two RF preamplifier circuits are provided on the FT-

920, each yielding particular benefits for the varying requirements throughout the operational range of this transceiver: r

A Junction FET (JFET) preamplifier includes high-Q selectivity for excellent protection from out-of-band energy.

r

A Dual-Gate MOSFET preamplifier provides high gain and low noise figure, particular beneficial on the higher bands.

Via Menu Item U-47, you may assign these preamplifiers on a band-by-band basis; the default selec-

41

Operation

42

tions are the JFET preamp on the 1.8 ~ 21 MHz bands, and the MOSFET preamp on the 24 ~ 50 MHz bands. We recommend that you use these settings initially, and only change them later if you have a particular need to do so.

?

Although the MOSFET preamplifier provides higher gain, the JFET preamplifier yields higher dynamic range with respect to out-of-band signals.

Switching to the MOSFET preamp on 40 meters will, undoubtedly, provide a higher S-meter reading. However, the useful sensitivity will probably not change. On the other hand, when using a

Beverage or small loop antenna for receiving on the low bands, the MOSFET preamp may be the better choice.

Remember: if you can hear background “band noise” appear when you connect your antenna, you already have adequate sensitivity. Any increase in front end gain beyond this point will not improve the signal-to-noise ratio on the incoming signal.

The preamplifier chosen will always be on, unless the [IPO] key is pushed. See the discussion of IPO operation below in the section regarding “

Tools for

Strong-Signal and Low-Frequency Operation.”

AGC (Automatic Gain Control) Selection

The AGC system of the FT-920’s receiver prevents potential ear damage and/or overload of receiver components by establishing an “AGC Threshold” of signal input. Once the AGC Threshold is reached, further increase in signal strength does not result in an increase in audio output.

The recovery time of the AGC system (the time required for the receiver to recover to full sensitivity) is variable, and you may select the AGC recovery time which provides the most operator comfort.

To select the AGC recovery time, press the front panel’s [AGC] switch repeatedly. You will observe the display icons cycling through the available selections:

AGC F

AST

Þ

AGC S

LOW

Þ

AGC O

FF

Þ

AGC F

AST

Þ

. . .

The AGC F

AST

position is usually preferable for CW and SSB contest work, while you may prefer AGC

S

LOW

for more casual voice work. AGC O

FF

is most often used for precise measurement of signals (when evaluating antenna patterns, etc.), but strong signals will sound very distorted with the AGC turned off.

Rotating the RF G

AIN

control counter-clockwise will help reduce the distortion.

Squelch

If you wish to mute the FT-920’s receiver during nosignal conditions, rotate the SQL (Squelch) control clockwise until the background noise just disappears.

This threshold point is the setting which produces the best sensitivity of the squelch to weak incoming signals.

When a signal is received which exceeds the threshold set by the SQL control the muting function will be disabled and normal receiver audio will flow. When the signal disappears, the receiver will again be muted.

The Squelch circuitry is most often used during FM operation, but the FT-920’s Squelch system is operational in all modes. It may be particularly useful while monitoring a 6-meter calling frequency (such as 50.125 MHz), or when waiting for a Mode-A (29

MHz downlink) satellite to come within range.

To disable the Squelch system’s muting capability, rotate the SQL control fully counter-clockwise.

General Coverage Reception

You may have noticed that, if you tune outside of one of the 500 kHz segments which contains an Amateur band, the [G

EN

] icon on the display becomes illuminated. This indicates that the transceiver is now receiving in the “General Coverage” mode. On such frequencies, the transmitter is disabled. If you try to transmit, “E

RROR

” will appear on the display.

Since the FT-920 is chiefly an Amateur transceiver, the one-touch band keys do not recognize non-Amateur bands. However, you may use direct frequency entry to establish a starting point in, for example, a shortwave broadcast band; you may then use the tuning dial(s) and/or the U

P

/D

WN

switches to move around the band. You may also program a “favorite frequency” in each broadcast band into memory, then recall it quickly as a starting point for memory tuning.

See the section on Memory operation, beginning on page 59, for details.

Otherwise, the FT-920’s receiver facilities completely support General Coverage reception, and you will

FT-920 Operating Manual

enjoy the many interesting aspects of shortwave listening. Among the transmission often encountered are:

International Shortwave Broadcasts

(see table below)

Maritime and Aeronautical Communications

(transoceanic airliners, etc.)

News Services and Diplomatic/Embassy Traffic

Military Communications

WeatherFax Transmissions

(satellite images, charts, and forecasts)

Me ter

Band

LW

MW

120

90

75

60

49

41

Popular Shotwa ve Broa dc ast B ands

Frequency Range

(MH z)

0.150~0.285

0.520~1.625

2.30~2.50

3.20~3.40

3.90~4.00

4.75~5.20

5.85~6.20

7.10~7.50

Me ter

Band

31

25

22

19

16

-

13

11

Frequency Range

(MH z)

9.35~9.90

11.55~12.05

13.60~13.90

15.10~15.70

17.55~17.90

18.90~19.30

21.45~21.85

25.67~26.10

Operation

Dealing with Interference

S

HIFT

Control

The front panel’s S

HIFT

control tunes the position of the IF passband relative to the frequency of the incoming signal in all modes except FM. This allows the operator to sweep (in effect) the current IF filter back and forth across the desired signal, eliminating interference in the process, without changing the pitch of the incoming signal.

The control is detented in the center (12 o’clock) position, which represents the “normal” passband center frequency. The S

HIFT

control is dedicated to the receive mode, and does not affect your transmitted signal characteristics (such adjustment of the transmitted signal is, however, provided via Menu Items

U-59, U-60, U-62, and U-63).

Rotate the S

HIFT

control to the left or right to eliminate the interference. Careful adjustment of the S

HIFT

control may also be useful in improving the recovered audio on excessively bassy SSB signals. Return the

S

HIFT

control to the center detented position to return to the normal default passband setting.

H

IGH

C

UT

/L

OW

C

UT

Controls (DSP)

The DSP system’s chief interference-fighting circuitry is the passband tuning feature, which features the

H

IGH

C

UT

and L

OW

C

UT

controls. These controls may be used to optimize the audio bandwidth so as to reduce interference and noise, and maximize signalto-noise ratio.

To activate the DSP passband filter, press the [DSP] key (located just below the S

HIFT

control). The [DSP] key contains an LED, which will glow green when the

DSP is on. Now rotate the H

IGH

C

UT

and L

OW

C

UT

to roll off interference and/or noise, or to enhance the sound of the incoming signal. A graphical representation of the relative width of the DSP passband can be displayed on the Enhanced Tuning Scale by making the appropriate configuration of Menu Item U-10.

See page 74 for details.

Press the [DSP] switch again to turn the DSP passband filter off.

Note: Since the DSP passband filter operates in the audio section, after the AGC detector, very strong signals inside the IF passband but outside the DSP

43

FT-920 Operating Manual

Operation

44

passband may cause interference to reception by

“pumping” the AGC, causing the desired signal to fade in and out rapidly. Engage the Narrow CW filter, if installed, or use the S

HIFT

control, to roll off the offending signal before it reaches the DSP stage.

N

OTCH

Filter (DSP)

Unwanted beat notes inside the RX filter passband can be effectively removed by utilization of the DSP

Notch function. The DSP system will detect the beat note, then automatically center a sharp notch filter to eliminate the beat note. If multiple beat notes are present the DSP will create multiple notch filters to eliminate them!

To activate the DSP Notch Filter, press the [N

OTCH

] key. To turn the filter off, press the [N

OTCH

] key once more.

Note: The DSP Notch filter should not be used in the

CW mode! The DSP system will interpret a CW carrier as being “interference,” and will notch out the incoming signal. Therefore, as you tune the band with the Notch Filter on, CW signals will appear for a moment, then disappear as they are notched out.

RF G

AIN

Control

The RF G

AIN

control is a highly useful interferencefighting control that is often overlooked.

When interference or background noise are severe, rotating the RF G

AIN

control counter-clockwise may, in some instances, improve reception. Counter-clockwise rotation of the RF G

AIN

control reduces the gain in the RF and IF stages by applying an increasing amount of AGC voltage; this causes the background noise and signal levels to decrease, and it also causes the “no-signal” indication of the S-meter to rise. Signals weaker than the minimum S-meter indication may still be plainly audible, but they will no longer be affecting the AGC system.

This may be exploited by the skillful operator, particularly with regard to the DSP system. Because the

DSP operates in the audio section of the receiver, after AGC detection is accomplished, rotating the RF

G

AIN

control counter-clockwise may reduce the detrimental effects of strong noise and interfering signals, and may render the DSP more effective at eliminating beat notes, adjacent-frequency interference, or noise. To do this, reduce the setting of the RF G

AIN

control until the S-meter hangs up approximately at the peak signal level of the interfering signal; this places the incoming signals below the AGC Threshold (described on page 42). Now engage or adjust the necessary DSP features, and you will, in many circumstances, find that interference rejection is improved.

For maximum sensitivity, the RF G

AIN

control should be set fully clockwise.

IF Noise Blanker (NB)

When automotive ignition noise, power-line noise, or other impulse-type noise is present, the IF Noise

Blanker feature may be engaged so as to minimize or eliminate the noise.

Press the [NB] switch so as to illuminate the NB icon on the display, then rotate the NB L

EVEL

control to the point of maximum noise elimination consistent with the maintenance of good signal quality. Press the [NB] switch again to turn off the IF Noise Blanker.

Note: Under extremely strong signal conditions on a crowded band, such as during a DX contest, etc., excessive advancement of the NB L

EVEL

control may cause somewhat degraded immunity from “splatter” from very strong nearby stations. This general tendency is typical of all IF noise blanker circuits, and the FT-920’s circuitry is carefully designed to minimize this characteristic. Try reducing the setting of the NB L

EVEL

control if this is observed, and try to utilize the DSP Noise Reduction to compensate (see below).

DSP Noise Reduction (NR)

The DSP system of your FT-920 includes a highlyeffective Noise Reduction circuit. The DSP Noise

Reduction is particularly helpful in enhancing signalto-noise ratio by lowering the overall level of background noise. The DSP Noise Reduction works to improve on the action of the IF Noise Blanker by eliminating lower-level, non-impulse-type noises that are difficult for the IF Noise Blanker to detect.

To activate the DSP Noise Reduction, rotate the NR control clockwise from its default position, which is fully to the left. Adjust the setting of the NR control until the best signal-to-noise ratio is achieved. Also try adjusting the setting of the RF G

AIN

, per the discussion previously, to see if reducing the RF/IF gain

FT-920 Operating Manual

level will enhance the performance of the DSP Noise

Reduction.

To turn the DSP Noise Reduction off, rotate the NR control fully counter-clockwise.

?

As you tune around the band while using the NR circuit, you may discover that the apparent “pitch” of the background noise changes somewhat after you encounter signals. The NR circuit is an adaptive filter which “form fits” around a signal, so this observation is completely normal.

Operation

Tools for Strong-Signal and

Low-Frequency Operation

Operation on the lower HF Amateur bands (160 through 30 meters) presents special challenges, including high atmospheric noise levels, strong local signals, and a lack of antenna directivity (compared with higher-frequency multielement beam antennas).

The FT-920 is particularly well equipped to assist the operator in maintaining reliable communications under these difficult conditions.

The receiver section front end includes a high-intercept doubly-balanced mixer, which provides excellent immunity from intermodulation. For protection against the ingress of out-of-band signals which can cause intermodulation, the receiver front end is protected by a bank of bandpass filters, including special high-Q filters for the 7, 14, 21, and 50 MHz bands.

And the built-in Automatic Antenna Tuner may be engaged on receive, as well as transmit, providing extra protection against strong signals outside the current band of interest.

Other features of interest to the operator in strongsignal environments include:

IPO (Intercept Point Optimization)

The IPO feature reduces the receiver front-end gain by bypassing the RF preamplifier. When the extra gain of the preamp is not needed (typically below about 10 MHz), engaging the IPO feature will reduce the background noise level and improve the receiver’s immunity by reducing the signal level presented to the first mixer. So long as background “band noise” is still audible, the useful sensitivity of the receiver will not have been reduced by activating the IPO.

To turn this feature on, press the [IPO] key, located just to the right of the [M

ETER

S

ELECT

] key on the left side of the front panel. The IPO icon on the display will become illuminated, and the background noise level should drop. If you have reduced the setting of the RF G

AIN

control previously, you may need to rotate it clockwise somewhat after turning on the IPO feature.

To re-activate the receiver front end’s preamplifier again, press the [IPO] key again.

45

FT-920 Operating Manual

46

Operation

ATT (Front End Attenuator)

Under conditions of extremely high signal levels, the front end attenuator may be engaged, either singly or in conjunction with the IPO feature, to reduce receiver sensitivity.

Pressing the front panel’s [ATT] key repeatedly causes the attenuator to cycle through the various levels of attenuation provided (in 1 S-Unit steps of 6 dB each):

6 dB

Þ

12 dB

Þ

18 dB

Þ

0 dB

Þ

6 dB

Þ

. . .

The “0 dB” position, of course, represents the “Attenuator Off” configuration.

Digital Voice Recorder Operation (DVR)

The FT-920 includes a built-in Digital Voice Recorder which you can use to record and then replay the incoming signal (from the VFO-A path) for a period of up to 16 seconds. In addition, the DVR may be used for storage and replay of repetitive (“CQ” type) messages in your voice. See the section on ‘Transmission” (page 50) for details of the latter feature.

Recording and playback of incoming signals is straightforward.



While receiving, press the [R

EC

] switch, then [0]

(50 MHz), to start recording. The recording level is set automatically, so you may leave the listening volume at a level which is comfortable for you.

During recording, the hyphen in the Memory

Channel display field will blink.

‚

To stop recording, press the [R

EC

] switch momentarily again. The last 16 seconds of incoming audio will now be stored. In this way, you can quickly confirm, for example, if a DX station correctly copied your callsign through a pile-up.

ƒ

To play back the stored audio, press [P

LAY

] then

[0] (50 MHz). For playback, the front panel’s [AF

G

AIN

] control sets the volume level. Incoming signals, however, will be cut off for the duration of the audio memory playback.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Transmitting

Now that you are familiar with receiver operation, we shall explore the FT-920’s capabilities in the transmit mode.

Important Note!

Whenever you transmit, be certain to have a suitable antenna or 50

dummy load connected to the antenna jack in use. Although the FT-920’s final amplifier protection circuitry will drastically reduce power if no load is present, there still is a slight chance of damage to your equipment in the unlikely event of a catastrophic protection-circuitry failure.

The transmitter can be activated within an amateur bands. When tuned to any other frequency, the transmitter will be disabled. You, as the station control operator, are responsible to restrict your transmissions to those frequencies on which you are authorized to operate.

Attempting to transmit outside of an amateur band segment will cause the “E

RROR

” diagnostic message to appear on the display.

Whenever the transmitter is activated, the FT-920’s built-in directional coupler detects any reflected power which appears at the final amplifier’s output port (due to antenna system impedance mismatch), and disables the transmitter if too much reflected power is found (in which case the [H

I

SWR] icon will become illuminated). You should cease transmission immediately, and determine the cause of the antenna system fault.

?

The upper limit of the transmitter’s power output can be set via Menu Items U-49 (for Antenna A) and U-50 (for Antenna B) separately for each antenna port. See page 79 for details.

Operation

Automatic Antenna Matching

The built-in automatic antenna tuner unit is capable of matching antenna systems presenting impedances within the range 16.5~150

, which corresponds to a maximum SWR or approximately 3:1. If the antenna(s) you re using exceed this SWR as configured, you must make adjustments (electrical and/or mechanical) so as to present an impedance closer to 50

to the FT-920’s A

NTENNA

jack(s). Remember that the net SWR as detected by the FT-920 may be different than the SWR at the antenna feedpoint, depending on the degree of impedance transformation which may occur in your feedline (if the feedpoint impedance is not very close to the coaxial cable’s 50

impedance).

Note that the FT-920’s automatic antenna tuner is not designed to cope with the wide variations in impedance presented by a random-length long wire antenna, unless you take specific steps to match the impedance at all frequencies of interest.

To use the FT-920’s automatic antenna tuner:



Turn the RF P

WR

control fully clockwise (the transceiver will automatically reduce its power to a maximum of 50 Watts during antenna tuning).

‚

Check to be certain that the frequency is clear before initiating antenna tuning.

ƒ

Press and hold in the T

UNER

switch for ½ second to activate the tuner. The RX T

UNER

TX

indicator will appear on the display.

„

A carrier will now be transmitted by the FT-

920. The automatic antenna tuner will now adjust itself so as to present a low SWR to the final amplifier stage. The “W

AIT

” indicator will appear on the display during tuning.

…

When tuning is completed, the “W

AIT

” indicator will disappear, and the FT-920 will revert to the receive mode. At this point, if the tuner achieved an SWR of less than 1.5:1, the tuner settings will be stored by the tuner’s memory system; these settings will be used the next time operation takes place on this frequency.

If the tuner was not able to achieve an SWR of

1.5:1 or lower (typically only when the “Tuner-

Off” SWR is above 3:1), the tuner’s memory system will ignore these settings, and the tuning procedure should be repeated the next time

47

FT-920 Operating Manual

Operation

you operate on this frequency; this feature prevents you from storing an undesirable setting

(such as that produced when you accidentally select the wrong antenna on a particular band).

†

Should you wish to take the antenna tuner out of line, press the T

UNER

switch momentarily.

The RX T

UNER

TX indication will disappear from the display.

48

How the Automatic Antenna Tuner Works

When the T

UNER

switch is pressed and the RX T

UNER

TX indicator is displayed, the following operations take place:

A. The tuner’s microprocessor reviews the current the tuning conditions (if any) stored in memory, and applies the settings for the frequency closest to the current frequency as a starting point for operation.

Note that a change in tuning conditions is produced for every change in operating frequency of approximately 10 kHz.

B. If transmission occurs (without the operator pressing the T

UNER

key), the tuner will begin adjustments if the SWR is found to be 3:1 or greater. Tuner settings will not be recorded in this instance. If, however, the T

UNER

key is pushed and held in for ½ second, the tuner settings will be stored in the tuner’s memory system.

C. If tuning is successfully accomplished, and the tuner settings stored into memory, the antenna system characteristics as seen from the transmitter’s perspective resemble curve (1) in the graph below. If you QSY to frequency (2) in the chart (where the SWR is above 3:1), the tuner will be automatically activated when you begin to transmit.

D. The automatic antenna tuner has 100 dedicated tuner memory registers, of which eleven are allocated

(one each) to the amateur bands covered by the FT-920. The other 89 record the most recent tuner settings, irrespective of the band in use, on a first-in, first-out basis.

E. The automatic antenna tuner is configured at the factory to be engaged both on receive and transmit.

It is possible, however, to configure it so that the tuner is only active on transmit. See Menu Item U-48, described on page 79.

F. The automatic antenna tuner only adjusts the apparent SWR as presented to the transceiver. No adjustments made by the tuner can, of course, affect the SWR present on the coaxial feedline. Therefore, every effort should be made to minimize SWR so as to ensure efficient power transfer to the antenna feedpoint (since feedline losses may escalate rapidly as SWR increases).

G. Because the impedance of such antennas varies widely depending on the band in use, please note that random-length long-wire and center-fed flat-top antenna systems generally will not be satisfactorily tuned by the FT-920’s automatic antenna tuner unless you make design provisions for ensuring that the impedance stays within the specified range of 16.5 ~ 150

.

FT-920 Operating Manual

SSB Transmission

Basic Operation



Connect your microphone to the front panel M

IC

jack.

‚

Preset the front panel controls as follows:

M

ODE

; LSB or USB (depending on band;

use USB on 14 MHz & higher bands)

M

ETER

S

ELECT

; ALC

M

IC

G

AIN

; 9 o’clock position

RF P

WR

; Fully clockwise

ƒ

Press the microphone’s PTT switch, and speak into the microphone at a normal voice level. The

T

RANSMIT

indicator in the display will be illuminated, and the ALC meter will deflect according to the peaks in your speech. Adjust the M

IC

G

AIN

control so that the ALC meter peak reading is along (but not beyond) the right edge of the ALC range on the meter.

„

Release the PTT switch to return to the receive mode.

…

For operation at lower power levels, rotate the RF

P

WR

control counterclockwise while watching the

PO scale on the meter so as to set the desired power level.

?

Counterclockwise rotation of the RF P

WR

control, or operation using an antenna with an impedance greatly different from 50

, may result in a higher reading on the ALC meter. Therefore, it is helpful to make initial adjustment of the M

IC

G

AIN

control into a 50

dummy load or carefully-matched antenna, and with the RF P

WR

control fully clockwise.

VOX Operation

When operating in the SSB, AM, or FM modes, you may use the VOX system to provide hands-free automatic change-over from receive to transmit. When the speech input from the microphone is detected by the VOX circuitry, an internal “PTT” switch will be activated to begin transmission; when speech input ceases, the VOX circuitry will release the transceiver back to the receive mode. Operation is quite simple:



Press the VOX switch.

‚

Without pressing the PTT switch on the micro-

FT-920 Operating Manual

Operation

phone, speak into the microphone at a normal voice level. The FT-920 should automatically switch into the transmit mode, and should return to receive when you quit talking.

ƒ

To cancel VOX and return to PTT operation, press the VOX switch once more.

The VOX system may require minor adjustment to optimize its parameters for your particular voice characteristics. These parameters are set via the Menu system as follows: r

If speaking in your normal voice level does not activate the transmitter, or if background noise in the operating room trips the VOX, the VOX sensitivity (V

OX

G

AIN

) may be adjusted via Menu

Item U-65, as described on page 81.

r

If the delay in returning to the receive mode is not suitable for your operating habits (too quick or too slow), the delay interval (V

OX

D

ELAY

) may be adjusted via Menu Item U-64, as described on page 81.

r

To prevent the speaker audio from activating the VOX circuitry, you may need to adjust the

VOX Antitrip setting. Use Menu Item U-66, described on page 82, to do this.

Digital Speech Processor Operation

The Digital Speech Processor provides two chief methods of enhancing your SSB “talk power:” r

Using digital audio compression methods, the

Digital Speech Processor increases your transceiver ’s average power output; and r

Using specially-designed digital equalization techniques, you may choose a DSP voice pattern contour which most closely matches your voice’s characteristics, so as to focus more of the available transmitter power into transmission of the most useful frequency components of your speech. Four different voice pattern contours are available.

Once you have correctly set the M

IC

G

AIN

control’s level, you may set up the Digital Speech Processor as follows:



Press the M

ETER

S

ELECT

switch so that the transmitter selection is set to C

OMP

.

‚

Press the P

ROC

switch once so that the P

ROC

indicator on the display becomes illuminated.

ƒ

Press the PTT switch, and speak into the microphone in a normal voice level. You will observe

49

Operation

the C

OMP

meter indication fluctuating according to your speech input. Now adjust the front panel’s

P

ROC

L

EVEL

control so that the reading on the C

OMP

scale peaks at or below 10 dB.

„

To deactivate the Digital Speech Processor, press the P

ROC

switch once more. The P

ROC

indicator on the display will disappear.

?

Raising the compression level generally raises talk power; however, excessive advancement of the

P

ROC

L

EVEL

control will cause the signal-to-noise ratio on your speech signal to deteriorate, thus reducing the effectiveness of the speech processor. Keeping the compression level below 10 dB will ensure that this does not occur.

DSP Voice Pattern Contours

If you wish to enhance the effectiveness of your speech processing system, you may choose from one of four voice pattern contours which are provided via

Menu Item U-51. See page 80.

OFF: DSP microphone equalization is disable.

1: Mid- and high-frequency components are enhanced .

2: A high-emphasis response is produced, ideal for pile-up or contest work.

3: Both low- ang high-emphasis response are produced.

4: A wide bandpass response is produced, emulating a “Broadcast” microphone audio characteristic.

Once you have selected the desired voice pattern contour, press the DSP switch to activate the Digital

Signal Processing (DSP) system. No further adjustment should be necessary.

?

The Voice Pattern Contour feature may be used alone, or in conjunction with the Digital Speech

Processor. Experiment with these systems singly and in combination to determine which setting provides the best talk power and audio quality in relation to your voice’s characteristics.

50

Voice Monitor Operation

The Monitor function allows you to observe the characteristics of your speech signal so as to make adjustments of the DSP, AM or FM modulation characteristics, etc.



Press the M

ONI

switch to activate the Voice Monitor; the M

ONI

indicator on the display will become illuminated. Now, when you speak, your voice will be audible from the speaker or headphones.

‚

Adjust the Monitor’s volume by rotating the M

ONI

L

EVEL

control. Clockwise rotation increases the volume level from the Monitor.

ƒ

Press the M

ONI

switch again to turn the Monitor off.

Digital Voice Recorder Operation (Transmit)

The FT-920’s Digital Voice Recorder can be used to store as many as four messages, in your own voice, of up to 16 seconds in length. Such messages may be used for repetitive “CQ” calling for contest work; you might also use the Digital Voice Recorder to store your callsign phonetically, then send it automatically in a pile-up situation late at night when you don’t wish to awaken other family members (you can also store

“Roger, roger, five nine, fifty-nine” plus your callsign to complete the contact).

Operation is similar to that described for receive-mode recording (see page 46), except that the [R

EC

] and

[P

LAY

] keys are pressed and held in for ½ second to accomplish the desired action (on receive, these switches are pressed momentarily).

The four message locations are designated by the

[1] ~ [4] B

AND

keys.



Press and hold in the [R

EC

] key for ½ second, then press the [1] key on the keypad to begin recording in DVR memory #1.

‚

Speak into the microphone in a steady voice level.

The recording volume level is set automatically, so the M

IC

G

AIN

control has no effect during DVR recording.

ƒ

Press the [1] key again to stop recording, if you elect not to use the full 16 seconds available.

„

Repeat this process for any of message locations

[2] ~ [4] into which you wish to store a message.

…

To review the message without transmitting it, press and hold in the [M

ONI

] key for ½ second.

The replay volume may be adjusted using the AF

G

AIN

control.

†

To transmit the stored message over the air, press and hold in the [P

LAY

] key for ½ second, followed immediately by the appropriate B

AND

key. The PTT circuitry will automatically engage, switching the

FT-920 into the transmit mode, and the transceiver will return to receive at the completion of the message.

FT-920 Operating Manual

The input level of your voice signal to the Digital Voice

Recorder may be adjusted by using the M

IC

G

AIN

control. The optimum settings for the Recorder may, however, be slightly different from those used in normal operation; this is normal.

Operation

CW Transmission

The FT-920’s versatile design allows the CW operator unparalleled flexibility for operation using the internal electronic keyer, an external keyer, a computerdriven keying interface, or a straight key.

The best selections for interconnections and switch positioning will depend critically on your application.

See the configuration details beginning on page 18 for suggestions.

Straight Key Operation



Insert your key’s plug into either K

EY

jack. Set the other controls as follows:

M

ODE

; CW

K

EYER

; Off (No icon should appear on display).

RF P

OWER

; Fully clockwise.

S

IDE

T

ONE

; 12 o’clock position.

VOX; Off

B

K

-I

N

; Off

P

DL

-K

EY

; Confirm that

this rear panel switch is set to K

EY

.

If you close the key at this point, you will hear the

CW side tone in the background, but you will not be transmitting. This mode allows you to adjust the S

IDE

T

ONE

control for a comfortable volume level, and it is also useful if you wish to practice sending.

‚

For “Semi-Break-In” operation, press the VOX switch. Now, when you press on the key, the transmitter will automatically activated, and after you quit sending the FT-920 will return to the receive mode. The “Hang Time” for the CW “VOX” circuitry is adjustable (separately for the CW mode as opposed to SSB) via Menu Item U-24. See page

76.

ƒ

For “Full Break-In” (“QSK”) operation, turn the

VOX off and press the B

K

-I

N

switch. Now, pressing and releasing the key will cause instantaneous

TX/RX switching in tandem with your keying, allowing you to hear any incoming signals in the spaces between dots, dashes, and letters in your sending. This may be particularly helpful for message handling or contest operation.

?

When the VOX is on, pressing the B

K

-I

N

switch does not cause QSK operation to be activated, as the VOX command will override the Break-

In command. When both switches are pressed so these features are both on, the FT-920 will

51

FT-920 Operating Manual

52

Operation

remain in the Semi-Break-In mode.

„

For low-power operation, rotate the RF P

WR

control counter-clockwise until the desired power output is observed on the transmitter meter.

Electronic Keyer Operation

The built-in Electronic Keyer may be used alone, or in combination with an external keying device such as a computer-driven keying interface.



Connect your keyer paddle’s cable to the front panel’s K

EY

jack. If you wish to use the rear panel

K

EY

jack, connect the paddle’s cable to that jack, and set the rear panel’s P

DL

-K

EY

switch to P

DL

.

‚

Confirm that the controls and switches are set up as they were originally for Straight Key operation on the previous page.

ƒ

Press the K

EYER

switch to turn the electronic keyer on. The K

EYER

indicator will appear on the display.

„

Close the “Dot” contact on the paddle, and rotate the K

EYER

S

PEED

control to set the electronic keyer’s speed to the desired level. Clockwise rotation increases the sending speed.

…

Adjust the sidetone to a comfortable level by rotating the S

IDE

T

ONE

control.

†

Select Semi-Break-In or Full Break-In, as desired, as you did during Straight Key operation.

‡

The weight (proportion of dots to dashes) may be adjusted (each parameter individually) in the event you wish to modify the relationship from the default 1:1:3 Dot:Space:Dash ratio. Use Menu Items

U-21 and U-22 (see pages 75 and 76).

ˆ

A programmable delay in the keyer transmission may be added, when using an amplifier, so as to allow the amplifier’s relays a few extra milliseconds in order to become properly seated. This delay shifts the entire stream of dots and dashes without changing the weight. Use Menu Item U-

23 (see page 76).

‰

The function of the electronic keyer may be changed from “Keyer Without Space” to “Keyer

With Auto-Space” to “Bug Keying” via Menu Item

U-20 (see page 75).

Memory Keyer Operation

The FT-920 includes an easy-to-use CW Message memory system, which allows automated CW sending of repetitive messages (such as “CQ TEST” or

“CQ DX” etc.). The following functions are available through the CW Message Memory system: r

Up to six messages may be stored (four may contain up to 50 characters, while the other two may contain up to 20 characters).

r

A sequential contest number (001, 002, . . .) may be imbedded in a message, if desired.

r

The stored messages may be reviewed without transmission so the contents may be checked for accuracy.

r

The message(s) may be transmitted so as to reduce operator fatigue during long operating sessions, such as in a contest.

Message Memory Storage



Press the [R

EC

] switch, then one of the keypad keys numbered [1] ~ [4], [8], or [9] to store a message in one of those slots. Memories [1] ~ [4] will accommodate messages of up to 50 characters in length, while Memories [8] and [9] will accommodate messages of up to 20 characters in length.

Additionally, Memory [9] can accommodate a message within which a sequential contest number may be imbedded.

‚

After pressing one of the numbered keys, start sending the desired message (e.g. “CQ TEST

JA1YOE JA1YOE K”). The storage process will be terminated automatically.

ƒ

To imbed a contest serial number in a message, send three Question Marks at the desired point in a message assigned to the [9] key. For example, to send “599001,” “599002,” and so forth, store

“5NN???” into the special “Contest Number

FT-920 Operating Manual

Memory Register (Key #[9]). If the number gets out of sequence during the contest, you may set the number to an arbitrary value via Menu Item U-

25.

Review of Stored Messages

To review messages previously stored without sending them over the air, press and hold in the [P

LAY

] switch for ½ second, then press the desired number key on the keypad. You will hear the message via the

Sidetone circuit, so as to check it for accuracy.

Transmission of Stored Messages

Press the [P

LAY

] switch momentarily, then one of the number keys [1] ~ [4], [8], or [9] to play the message stored in that memory register. The transmitter will automatically be activated for message generation, after which the transceiver will automatically revert to the receive mode.

?

The CW Message Memory, and electronic keyer, only function in the CW mode. If you wish to practice sending, or check message memory contents, be certain to select the CW mode of operation.

Operation

Split Frequency Operation

DX operators frequently have need for split frequency operation, whereby a DX-pedition station may transmit on one frequency while listening over a segment of the same band. The FT-920 provides several means of efficient split frequency operations for DX operation and even certain satellite operating situations.

TX C

LAR

ifier Operation

For splits of up to ±9.99 kHz, the TX Clarifier provides a simple means of split operation.

Example:

DX1DX is transmitting on 14.024.0 MHz, listening

“Up 5” kHz:



With the Clarifier set to zero offset, tune in

DX1DX on 14.024.00 MHz using the Main VFO

Tuning Dial.

‚

Press the TX C

LAR

button, and rotate the Sub

VFO Tuning Dial so as to set up a Clarifier offset of -5.00 kHz.

ƒ

Push the RX C

LAR

button, and you will now be listening in the area of 14.029.0 MHz. You may hear a number of stations calling, and you may hear this station currently being worked by

DX1DX.

„

If you can hear the station being worked by

DX1DX, press the S

POT

key, and adjust the

VFO-B Tuning Dial so as to align the pitch of the station being worked by DX1DX with the pitch of your radio’s S

POT

tone; this action will place you exactly on the frequency currently being received by DX1DX.

…

Now press the RX C

LAR

key again to turn off the Receive Clarifier. You will now be back on

14.024.00 MHz, listening for DX1DX to send

“QRZ?” When you transmit, you will be approximately on 14.029 MHz, depending on how far you adjusted the offset so as to zero in on the station being worked by DX1DX.

†

If you don’t work DX1DX after one or two calls, again press the RX C

LAR

key and look around for the station being worked by DX1DX; then press RX C

LAR

again to return to 14.024.00

MHz for receiving DX1DX.

53

FT-920 Operating Manual

Operation

Split VFO Operation

Some pile-ups (especially on SSB) involve a split greater than ±9.99 kHz. In these cases, use the two

VFOs on the FT-920 for split frequency operation.

Example:

DX1DX is on 7.095.0 MHz, listening “210 to 220”

(7.210 ~ 7.220 MHz) for replies:



With the Clarifier(s) off, and TX/RX control on the Main Tuning Dial, tune in DX1DX on

7.095.0 MHz.

‚

Press and hold in the [A B] key for ½ second, then rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to set

VFO-B somewhere between 7.210 and 7.220

MHz (pressing [A B] ensures that both VFOs are on the same operating mode).

ƒ

Press the VFO-B [TX] indicator, which will glow

Orange after you press it. This indicates that

VFO-A is in charge of the receive frequency, while VFO-B is controlling the transmit frequency.

„

In the same manner as you did in the TX C

LAR

example previously, you may press the VFO-

B [RX] indicator so as to listen to the pile-up. If you find the station being worked by DX1DX, tune quickly onto that station’s frequency, then press the VFO-A [RX] indicator to return receive frequency control to VFO-A, so you can listen for DX1DX to say “QRZ?”

?

When operating Split via any means, in pile-up situations be absolutely certain not to press the

VFO-A [TX] indicator accidentally, as this will make you transmit on the DX station’s frequency, causing interference to others trying to work the DX.

54

Quick Split Feature

A user-programmed “Quick Split” may be utilized to provide a starting point for split operation. For example, if many of your DX pile-up operating situations require you to transmit 5 kHz higher than you are receiving, this feature may be useful to you. Here is the procedure for activating Quick Split:



Press the [M

ENU

] key to enter the Menu mode.

‚

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial so as to select

Menu Item U-04.

ƒ

Press the [E

NT

] key to enter the Menu Command mode.

„

Now rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select

5.0” (kHz) or whatever T

X

/R

X

split you desire.

…

Press the [M

ENU

] key once more to exit the

Menu mode.

†

While operating with both T

X

and R

X

control from VFO-A, press the [A u

B] key. You will observe that T

X

control has been shifted to

VFO-B, and that VFO-B’s frequency is 5 kHz higher than VFO-A’s.

‡

To cancel Quick Split, repeat the first four steps above; in step

„

, rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to “O

FF

” then press [M

ENU

] to exit the Menu mode and resume normal operation.

Mode K Satellite Operation

Although the FT-920 is not designed for full duplex satellite operation, Mode K satellite operation (uplink on 21.2 MHz, downlink on 29.4 MHz) is nonetheless possible, particularly on CW. Here is a generalized example of such an operating scenario; consult one of the many satellite operating journals for precise frequency information:



Set VFO-A to 29.430 MHz, CW mode, and disable (temporarily, at least) the Narrow filter, if currently on. Be sure that the VFO-A [RX] indicator is illuminated.

‚

Set VFO-B to 21.230 kHz, CW mode. Press the VFO-B [TX] key so that the switch/LED glows Orange.

ƒ

If you are using a typical triband or log-periodic antenna which covers both 15 and 10 meters, set up the two VFOs for operation on the same antenna. If you are using separate antennas on the two bands, connect the 15 meter antenna to antenna port B, and select

Antenna B for VFO-B; now connect the 10 meter antenna to antenna port A, and select antenna A for VFO-A.

„

Press the [B

K

-I

N

] switch to activate full CW break-in operation.

…

If the appropriate satellite is above the horizon, and the frequency is clear, you may now send a string of dots to allow you to find your downlink signal through the satellite. Because the break-in system allows you to listen between dots, the propagation delay through the satellite should allow you to hear traces of your signal, and you may adjust the appropriate

VFO for the exact pitch desired, a well as to follow Doppler shift.

†

Make a note of the TX/RX frequency differ-

FT-920 Operating Manual

ence by pressing the [D

SPLY

] key. You may use this display option to use the current offset as a starting point for setting the VFO-A/VFO-B relationship when tuning around the satellite transponder downlink segment. Remember, though, that Doppler shift will change during an operating session, so the initial offset will not be maintained indefinitely.

?

The function of the [D

SPLY

] key must be set to [O

FFSET

], via Menu Item U-09, for this function to work. See page 74.

‡

For SSB operation, be certain that each VFO is set to the correct sideband. Initially during a pass, it may be easier to establish the Uplink/

Downlink frequency offset on CW, then switch both VFOs back to SSB.

N

When operating on Mode K, take particular care to check your uplink frequency before transmitting, as your signal may be propagated over a long distance on the 21 MHz band, possibly causing harmful interference to other operators.

Operation

Digital Mode Operation

The FT-920 provides outstanding capabilities for digital mode operation, such as RTTY, packet, etc.

It is important that you understand the differences between the two keying methods provided on the FT-

920 for digital mode operation, so that the controls and switches may be set correctly.

r

Most operation is accomplished using

Audio

Frequency-Shifted Keying (AFSK), whereby the Terminal Node Controller (TNC) generates audio tones to be transmitted as data by the

FT-920. To activate this mode of operation, the front panel Mode selection must be set to

DATA-USB (even though “USB” may not be the actual sideband utilized in operation), and the rear panel AFSK-FSK switch must be set to AFSK.

r

The FT-920 can also accept input from a TNC or Terminal Unit (TU) operating in the FSK ( Frequency-Shifted Keying) mode, whereby a closure to ground of the FSK keying line causes the transmitted carrier to be shifted in frequency; no audio tones are produced by the

TNC or TU.

AFSK RTTY or Packet Operation

The AFSK configuration environment may be the easiest for you to use, as the TNC then has total control of the tone frequencies, Mark/Space relationship

(normal/inverted), and other aspects of digital operation which are critical to successful operation.



Connect your TNC to the FT-920’s D

ATA

jack per the instructions on page 16. Pin 1 of the D

ATA

jack should be connected to the TNC’s “M

IC

A

UDIO

” or

“T

X

A

UDIO

” line. Be sure to set the AFSK-FSK switch to AFSK.

‚

For AFSK RTTY (Baudot) or 300 bps HF Packet operation, press the [D

ATA

] mode key until “D

ATA

” and “USB” appear on the display. Now enter the

Menu system, and select Menu # U-46; set this

Menu Item for the frequency appropriate for your operating mode: r

For typical RTTY operation, select 2125-L; this sets the carrier injection up for an offset of

2.125 kHz in a pseudo-LSB mode, so that the transceiver actually is operating in the “LSB” mode (even though the display still indicates

D

ATA

-USB.

55

FT-920 Operating Manual

Operation

56

r

For Packet operation, you may leave Menu #

U-46 in its default 2125-U (pseudo-USB mode), or set it to 1700-U or some other value as required by the configuration of your TNC.

See the documentation provided with your

TNC’s communication software for details regarding defining the transmitted tones.

ƒ

The packet frequency display (offset) may also be modified via Menu # U-45, allowing you to have the radio’s display indicate either Mark or Space frequency, or the center frequency of the two tones.

„

At this point, you are ready to utilize your TNC’s software to begin operation. After loading the software, tune in an RTTY station so that it is properly decoded on your computer screen. When solid copy is obtained, you may press the appropriate key on your computer’s keyboard to activate the transmitter, and begin typing. See your TNC’s instruction manual for further details regarding actual operation.

…

The DSP High- and Low-Cut filter are particularly beneficial in reducing interference in RTTY pileup situations. A typical setting of the H

IGH

C

UT

control is at approximately 1 o’clock, while the L

OW

C

UT

control may be set approximately to 11 o’clock.

†

The CW Narrow filter may also be used for AFSK operation. Just press the [N

ARROW

] switch, then rotate the S

HIFT

control to peak the signal in the narrowed IF passband.

‡

Via Menu # U-10, the Enhanced Tuning Scale may be engaged so as to allow a visual representation of precise tuning pursuant to the tone frequency selected via Menu # U-46. However, since your

TNC may also have such a facility, and because the TNC is ultimately in control of the tone generation and decoding, you may wish to rely on the

TNC’s tuning indicator, and use the Enhanced

Tuning Scale of your FT-920 for other purposes.

ˆ

For 1200 bps FM packet, press the D

ATA

key until

D

ATA

and FM appear on the display.

FSK RTTY Operation

This mode utilizes the tone generator in the FT-920 for production of the required Mark and Space tones used for RTTY operation.



Follow the interconnection guidelines on page 17 for details on how to hook up your terminal equipment to the transceiver. Be certain to set the

AFSK-FSK switch on the rear panel of the transceiver to FSK. In this mode of operation, closing

Pin 1 of the D

ATA

jack to ground causes the carrier to shift; the magnitude of the shift (170/425/

850 Hz) is set via Menu # U-43, while the carrier’s offset from zero beat and its sideband (USB/LSB) can be set via Menu # U-42. Do not connect Pin 1 of the D

ATA

jack to any TNC/TU line which carries

“M

IC

A

UDIO

” or “T

X

A

UDIO

” as these lines are used for AFSK operation (see previous section).

‚

Press the front panel [D

ATA

] key to select the [D

ATA

]

[LSB] mode, which corresponds to “FSK” operation (remember, “D

ATA

USB” is used for “AFSK” operation).

ƒ

At this point, you are ready to utilize your TNC/

TU’s software to begin operation. After loading the software, tune in an RTTY station so that it is properly decoded on your computer screen or TU display. When solid copy is obtained, you may press the appropriate key on your computer’s keyboard to activate the transmitter, and begin typing. See your TNC/TU instruction manual for further details regarding actual operation.

„

As with AFSK operation, the CW filter may be engaged in the FSK mode by pressing the [N

AR

-

ROW

] key, and the DSP filters may also be used to reduce interference in crowded digital operating situations.

Operating Tips r

If you are hearing and decoding stations successfully in an AFSK environment, but stations cannot understand you, check to be certain that your

TNC’s software has not set a shift other than 170

Hz, and be sure that the tones have not been “inverted” in the software configuration.

r

If you are getting no shift (only a steady carrier) in

RTTY FSK operation, be sure that you have not connected Pin 1 of the D

ATA

jack to an AFSK output line from your TNC (use only the “FSK” line provided by your TNC). If the FSK line has been properly connected, check to be sure that you have the “FSK” mode properly enabled on your TNC, if the software requires you to do so.

r

If you are having trouble decoding HF packet stations, be sure that you have set Menu # U-46 to one of the settings which ends with “ U” (instead of “

L”), and that you have chosen a tone frequency compatible with the tones for which your TNC is configured.

FT-920 Operating Manual

AM Transmission

(Optional YF-116A AM Filter Required)

The FT-920 utilizes low-level modulation on AM, and the DSP system may be used to enhance your transmitted audio quality.

Remember that AM consists of the carrier signal plus two sidebands. Because the available power output is 100 Watts (total), the carrier power should be limited to 25 Watts so as to have power available for the modulation sidebands, which carry your voice signal.

Basic Operation



Connect your microphone to the M

IC

jack.

‚

Set the following controls as described below:

M

ODE

: AM

M

ETER

S

ELECT

: ALC

(The ALC indicator will appear on the display)

M

IC

G

AIN

: Fully Counter-clockwise

RF P

WR

: Fully Clockwise

ƒ

Press the microphone’s PTT switch. The T

RANS

-

MIT

indicator on the display will become illuminated.

„

Rotate the M

IC

G

AIN

control clockwise while speaking into the microphone. When you reach the setting of the M

IC

G

AIN

control which causes the power output indication to increase slightly on voice peaks, reduce the setting of the M

IC

G

AIN

control slightly; this will be the point of best audio quality.

?

The PO meter will fluctuate significantly for an instant at the start of a transmission; this is not abnormal. However, if the ALC meter fluctuates significantly on voice peaks, the M

IC

G

AIN

control may be set too high, and your transmitted signal quality may be degraded. Reduce the setting of the M

IC

G

AIN

control if this is observed.

…

The DSP, VOX, and Monitor features are operational during AM transmission. See page 50 for a description of the DSP Voice Pattern Contours, and page 49 for details regarding VOX operation.

Monitor operation is discussed on page 50.

†

For low-power operation, reduce the setting of the

RF P

WR

control.

Operation

FM Operation

(Optional FM-1 Unit Required)

FM operation is permitted only in the 29 and 50 MHz bands, due to bandwidth limitations. Be careful while operating in the 29 MHz band to operate only in the

FM sub-band above 29.5 MHz, so as to avoid harmful interference to satellite operations below 29.5 MHz.

Simplex (Non-Repeater) Operation



Connect the microphone to the M

IC

jack. Set the

M

ODE

switch to FM, and the RF P

WR

control fully clockwise.

‚

Close the microphone’s PTT switch to activate the transmitter. Speak into the microphone in a normal voice level. The microphone gain level is set automatically in the FM mode, and is not affected by the M

IC

G

AIN

control’s setting.

ƒ

Release the PTT switch to return to the receive mode.

„

The VOX, and Monitor features are operational during FM transmission. See page 49 for details regarding VOX operation. Monitor operation is discussed on page 50.

Repeater Operation

The FT-920 may also be used, in the FM mode, for repeater operation. Several convenient features make

FM repeater operation simple and efficient.



While operating in the FM mode on the 29 or 50

MHz bands, press the front panel [RPT] key to activate repeater operation. Pressing the [RPT] key causes two important functions to become activated: r

The transmitter frequency will be shifted by a default value (100 kHz on 29 MHz, 500 kHz on 50 MHz) so as to access the repeater input frequency; r

A repeater access tone will be superimposed on your signal, as many repeaters on these bands use CTCSS to prevent false activation of the repeater by random noise. Both

Subaudible (CTCSS) and Burst (1750 Hz) tones are available.

‚

If the above repeater shifts and/or access tone are not appropriate for your area, they may be set independently for each band. The Menu items which pertain to these functions are shown below.

r

To set the 29 MHz CTCSS Tone Mode (CTCSS/

Burst), use Menu Item U-35 (see page 77).

57

FT-920 Operating Manual

58

Operation

r

To set the 50 MHz CTCSS Tone Mode (CTCSS/

Burst), use Menu Item U-36 (see page 77).

r

To set your FT-920’s transmitted CTCSS tone

(Menu Item U-35/36 must be set to C

ONTI

), use

Menu Item U-37 (see page 78).

r

To set your FT-920’s CTCSS Decoder CTCSS tone, use Menu Item U-38. The default value is “Off,” which means that Tone Squelch

(CTCSS Decode) operation is not engaged.

Set this Menu item to the appropriate tone so as to keep your receiver quiet until the matching tone is received from the repeater.

r

To set the 29 MHz repeater shift, use Menu

Item U-39 (see page 78).

r

To set the 50 MHz repeater shift, use Menu

Item U-40 (see page 78).

ƒ

One press of the [RPT] key will have set the FT-

920 for “Minus Shift” operation. In this situation, you will observe both the “-” and “RPT” indicators on the display. If your repeater uses a positive shift

(instead of negative), press the [RPT] key again; the “+” indicator will replace the “-” indicator on the display, while “RPT” will remain illuminated.

?

The majority of repeaters on the 29 and 50

MHz bands use “-” shift.

„

Set the FT-920’s receiver to the repeater output

(downlink) frequency.

…

Close the [PTT] switch and speak into the microphone. You will observe that the transmitted frequency has shifted according to the setting of the

[RPT] key.

†

Release the [PTT] switch to return to the receive mode.

‡

Since FM is a continuous-duty mode, we recommend you rotate the RF P

WR

control counter-clockwise so as to use the minimum power necessary to gain access to the repeater. This will significantly reduce the amount of heat generated by the transmitter section.

?

Since repeaters do not all use the same access tone, we recommend that you load your favorite repeater frequencies into memory, to avoid the inconvenience of always having to reset the

CTCSS tone frequency. When a repeater frequency is stored into memory, the receive frequency, shift direction, shift magnitude, and tone information are all stored into the memory register. See page 59 for details of memory operation.

Linear Amplifier Tuning

A special feature of the FT-920 allows you to do lowduty-cycle tune-up of your linear amplifier by transmitting a high-speed pulse, instead of a continuous carrier.

Here is how to do this:



Press [M

ENU

] to enter the Menu mode.

‚

Select Menu Item U-55 by rotating the VFO-B

Tuning Dial, then press [E

NT

] and rotate the VFO-

B Tuning Dial to select the amount of time you want the pulser to be active (the default time period is 10 seconds). Now press [E

NT

] again.

ƒ

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select Menu Item

U-52 (“LI-TU-S”). When you press [E

NT

], the pulser will commence transmission. The number of seconds remaining in the transmission will appear on the main frequency display area.

„

Once the countdown is complete, the Menu display will say “OFF,” and you may either repeat the tune-up pulse transmission by pressing [E

NT

] again, or exit to normal operation by pressing

[M

ENU

].

The duration of the tune-up time may be adjusted via

Menu Item U-55. The length of the transmitted pulses is adjusted via Menu Item U-57 (default: 100 ms.), while the interval between pulses may be adjusted via Menu Item U-56 (default: 100 ms.). You therefore can adjust the duty cycle to your requirements. You may wish to reduce the interval time (via U-56) to a very low value, such as 10 ms., so as to make the transmitted pulses resemble a continuous carrier.

The power output used during this tune-up procedure can also be set independently for the Antenna-

A port and the Antenna-B port. The power output used during this tune-up procedure (not during regular operation) may be set via Menu Item U-53 (Antenna-

A) or U-54 (Antenna-B).

The FT-920 provides a wide variety of memory system resources. These include: r

99 “standard” memory channels, numbered

“01” through “99.”

FT-920 Operating Manual

r

Five QMB (Quick Memory Bank) channels, providing one-touch storage and recall of prime operating frequencies. The QMB channels are labeled “C-1” through “C-5.” r

Ten Split Frequency memory channels, used for storing frequency settings when the transmitter and receiver frequency are different. The

Split channels are labeled “d-01” through “d-

10.” r

Eleven Call channels, for storage and quick recall of one prime frequency on each amateur band. These channels are labeled “S-01” through “S-11.” r

One set of band-edge memories, also known as “Programmable Memory Scan” channels, labeled “LO” and “HI.”

These memories do not just store away the operating frequency; thanks to the enhanced memory space provided in the FT-920, the following data will be stored into each memory channel: r

Operating frequency r

Operating mode (LSB, USB, CW, etc.) r

Receiving filter bandwidth r

Clarifier information (offset direction and magnitude) except on PMS and CALL channels r

Antenna jack selection r

Automatic Antenna Tuner status (On/Off) except on QMB and CALL channels r

Repeater Shift information (except on QMB and PMS channels) r

Repeater CTCSS tone information (except on

QMB channels) r

Alphanumeric Labels (except on QMB channels) r

L

OCK

switch status (except on QMB channels)

Storage and recall of memory channels in the various memory systems is quite straightforward, thanks to the advanced ergonomic design of the FT-920.

These procedures are detailed below.

QMB Channel Programming/Recall

The QMB (Quick Memory Bank) memories are designed for urgent operating situations where very

Memory Operation

simple storage and recall procedures are desired.

QMB Channel Storage



While using VFO-A, tune in the desired frequency on the Main Tuning Dial.

‚

Press and hold in for ½ second the [QMB STO] key until the double beep is heard. The double beep provides audible confirmation that the memory storage was successful.

ƒ

As you dial up other frequencies in the VFO mode, repeating the procedure in‚ above causes the QMB memory system to cycle through the QMB channels in the following sequence:

C-1

Þ

C-2

Þ

C-3

Þ

C-4

Þ

C-5

Þ

C-1

Þ

C-2

Þ

....

Frequency data will be stored and purged on a first-in, first-out basis.

QMB Channel Recall



Press the [QMB RCL] key to recall the currentlyactive QMB channel. The “QMB” indicator on the display will become illuminated.

‚

Press the [QMB RCL] key repeatedly to cycle ough the QMB channels, in the same sequence as shown for QMB Channel Storage.

ƒ

While operating in the QMB Channel Recall mode, you are not “fixed” on the QMB channel; you may tune away from the QMB channel frequency, using the Main Tuning Dial, as though you were in the VFO mode. In this situation, the “QMB” indicator will be replaced by one which indicates “M

TUNE.” To return to the originally-stored QMB channel, press the [QMB RCL] key once.M

Memory Operation on

“Regular” Memory Channels

59

FT-920 Operating Manual

60

Memory Operation

(Channel #1-01 to 1-99)

Memory Channel Storage



While using VFO-A, tune in the desired frequency on the Main Tuning Dial. Set the operating mode, bandwidth, Clarifier mode and offset, and Antenna

(A or B) as desired. If using the Automatic Antenna Tuner, you may wish to touch up its alignment by pushing and holding in the [T

UNER

] key for ½ second.

‚

Press the [V u

M] switch momentarily to enter the “Memory Check” mode, which is used to find an unused memory channel. The “M CK” indicator on the display panel will blink, and the frequency stored (if any) on the current memory channel will be shown in the VFO-B display area.

Note: The VFO-B Tuning Dial may also be used for the “M CK” mode. See “Memory Channel Selection using VFO-B Tuning Dial” at the right.

ƒ

Use the [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] key to increment through the main channel bank. Frequency data stored previously in memory channels will be displayed in the VFO-B display area. If you have restricted memory operation to one channel group

(by pressing the [M

EM

G

ROUP

] key), memory storage will similarly be limited to the currently-selected memory group; just press [M

EM

G

ROUP

] again to allow unrestricted access to all memory channels for storage of your frequency data.

„

When you have selected the channel location into which to store the frequency information, press and hold in the [V u

M] key for ½ second, until you hear a double beep, which confirms that the frequency information was successfully stored.

Note: If information was previously stored on the channel into which you stored data in step

„ above, the previous data will be overwritten and lost!

Memory Channel Recall



If you currently are in the VFO tuning mode, press the[VFO/M

EM

] key once to enter the “Memory” mode (the “M

EM

” icon will appear below the main frequency display).

‚

To select another memory channel, press either the [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] key. Repeated pressing of one of these keys allows you to step through the memory channels one at a time, or you may hold in the [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] key to step through the channels in a “manual scan” mode.

Note: The VFO-B Tuning Dial may also be used for Memory Channel selection. See “Memory

Channel Selection using VFO-B Tuning Dial” below.

ƒ

To restrict your memory channel selection just to one memory group, press the [M

EM

G

ROUP

] key once (the “G

ROUP

” icon will appear above the chan-

Memory Channel Selection

Using VFO-B Tuning Dial

You may find it more convenient to use the

VFO-B Tuning Dial, instead of the [U

P

p

] and

[D

OWN

q

] keys, for memory channel selection.

Here’s how to do this:



Press the [M

EM

C

H

] key (located below and to the left of the VFO-B Tuning Dial) momentarily. The brackets surrounding the memory channel number display will start to blink.

‚

Now rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial. You will observe the channel numbers changing, and you may select the desired memory channel quickly in this manner.

ƒ

To revert to normal operation of the VFO-B

Tuning Dial, press the [M

EM

C

H

] key once more.

FT-920 Operating Manual

nel number). Now, only those channels within the current memory group (designated by the digit preceding the hyphen in the memory channel number) will be available for recall via step ‚ above.

To change memory groups, press the [M

EM

G

ROUP

] key again (so that the “G

ROUP

” icon disappears), then use the [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] key to step through the channels until you enter another group.

You may now press the [G

ROUP

] key again to restrict memory channel access to the newly-selected group.

„

Once you are operating on a memory channel, you may tune off of the original frequency (as though you were in the VFO mode). Just rotate the Main Tuning Dial; the “M

EM

” icon will be replaced by one which indicates “M

EM

T

UNE

,” indicating that you have now shifted into the “Memory

Tune” mode.

When operating in the Memory Tune mode, if you find another frequency you wish to store into another memory channel, just press the [V u

M] key momentarily (the channel number will blink), select a new memory channel via the [U

P

p

] or

[D

OWN

q

] key, then press and hold in the [V u

M] key for ½ second (until you hear the double beep).

To exit the Memory Tune mode, press the

[VFO/M

EM

] key as follows: r

One touch of [VFO/M

EM

] returns you to the original memory frequency. The “M

EM

T

UNE

” indicator will be replaced by “M

EM

.”

Memory Operation

r

A second touch of [VFO/M

EM

] will cause you to exit the Memory mode and return to the VFO mode (the “M

EM

” indicator will be replaced by

VFO”).

…

Note that repeater offsets (used on 29 MHz and

50 MHz FM) can be stored into “regular” memory channels; there is no need to utilize the “Split” memories described later for repeater operation.

Moreover, Clarifier data is also stored into “regular” memory locations, so small (<9.99 kHz) Tx/

Rx splits can be accommodated using the Clarifier.

Memory Operation on

Split-Frequency Channels

Memory Group Information

The FT-920’s main memory area may be divided into as many as four groups. These groups may, in some instances, provide more efficient or intuitive memory operation; for example you might wish to segregate memories according to operating objectives, such as: r

AM Broadcast Stations r

Shortwave Broadcast Stations r

HF Amateur Stations r

50 MHz Amateur Stations

Once you have determined how many memories are to be designated in each group (see Menu Items U-

11 ~ U-14), you may restrict memory operation just to one group, or you may allow the memory channels to be selected without regard to memory group boundaries.

The complete memory channel number is composed of two sets of numbers, separated by a hyphen. The single digit before the hyphen is the memory group number (1, 2, 3, or 4). The second, two digit number is the channel number itself (1 to 99). Therefore, if channel #34 is assigned to group #1, its channel number is “1-34.” If you have created four channel banks of 24~25 channels each, channel #34 would be designated “2-34” since it falls within channel group #2.

FT-920 Operating Manual

61

62

Memory Operation

(Channel #d-01 to d-10)

Some operating circumstances require the receive and transmit frequencies to be separated by a frequency range in excess of that provided by the Clarifier feature (>9.99 kHz). For example, international

SSB operation on the 7 MHz band may require one station to transmit in the frequency range 7.040 ~

7.100 MHz, while the other station must transmit in the 7.150 ~ 7.300 MHz range. The FT-920 provides ten special memories for such operating instances.

Storage and recall are similar to that described previously.

Split Frequency Memory Channel Storage



Set VFO-A to the required receive frequency and mode, and set VFO-B to the required transmit frequency and mode.

‚

Press the (Orange) VFO-B “TX” LED/Switch to activate the Split mode, previously discussed on page 54.

Note: It is also acceptable to store the transmit frequency on VFO-A and the receive frequency on VFO-B, if you prefer. In this case, in step‚ above, press the VFO-B “RX” LED/Switch to set up the appropriate Tx/Rx relationship between the two

VFOs.

ƒ

Press the [V u

M] switch momentarily to enter the Memory Check mode (the “M CK” indicator will blink), then use the [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] key to select the memory channel you wish to use (from the special “Split” memories numbered “d-01” through “d-10”).

„

When you have chosen the desired memory channel, press and hold in the [V u

M] key for ½ second to lock the split frequency data into the chosen memory location. As usual, a double beep will indicate when you have held in the [V u

M] key long enough.

Split Frequency Memory Channel Recall



While operating in the VFO mode, press the [VFO/

M

EM

] key once to enter the Memory mode. The

M

EM

” indicator will appear on the display, replacing the “VFO” indicator. It does not matter whether or not you are operating in the “Split” mode at this time.

‚

Next, press either the [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] key to select the desired channel from within the d-01 ~ d-10 Split Memory bank. The (differing) transmit and receive frequencies will be indicated on the left and right sides of the frequency display, and the VFO-A and VFO-B Tx and Rx LED/Switches will be illuminated according to the relationship you programmed.

ƒ

Particularly during 7 MHz pile-up situations, it may be necessary to adjust your transmit frequency

(which usually will be stored in VFO-B). The

Memory Tune function is active with respect to either the VFO-A or VFO-B Tuning Dial, so you may adjust either dial freely, as desired, if you need to retune. The “M T

UNE

” indicator will appear, and you may, as described earlier, store the retuned frequency into another memory, if desired. Alternatively, press the [VFO/M

EM

] key once to return to the original split frequency pair, and press it once more to exit the memory and return to VFO operation.

„

As a convenience during Memory operation, once you have recalled a channel within the Split

Memory Bank (channel #d-10 ~ d-10), you may press the [M

EM

G

ROUP

] key to restrict memory access only to the Split Memory Bank. Press the

[M

EM

G

ROUP

] key again to restore free memory channel access.

Memory Operation on

“C

ALL

” Channels

Downloaded by

RadioAmateur.EU

FT-920 Operating Manual

(Channel #C-01 to C-11)

The “C

ALL

” channels are easy-access memories which may serve as convenient starting points for operation. Many operators use them for quick recall of favorite frequencies in each band.

There is no requirement that you assign one frequency per band. However, the C

ALL

Channel feature includes a simple method of recalling these special memories (described later) which involves the pressing of one of the [B

AND

] keys. Therefore, the procedure for storing memories band-by-band will be described below for illustrative purposes.

Storing Data in C

ALL

Channels



While operating on VFO-A, select the “favorite frequency” you wish to have stored as your “C

ALL

” frequency on the current band.

‚

Press the [V u

M] key once momentarily; the

M CK” indicator will blink, and the frequency store in the current memory channel will be shown in the VFO-B display area.

ƒ

Now press either the [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] key (or use the VFO-B Tuning Dial by pressing the

[M

EM

C

H

] key first) to select the C

ALL

Channel memory assigned to the band currently in use.

See the table below for a listing of the bands and their assigned memory locations for the C

ALL

Channel function. The C

ALL

Channels are assigned memory locations “C-01” through “C-11.”

„

Next, press and hold in the [V u

M] key for ½ second (until you hear the double beep) to lock the frequency into the chosen memory location.

…

You may now repeat this process for the other

C

ALL

Channels, preferably assigning one such channel per band.

Note: Channel “C-10” already is programmed (at the factory) with the following frequency:

C-10: 51.000.00MHz (FM)

Memory Operation

in the [S

TEP

] key (below and to the left of the VFO-

A Tuning Dial) and press the [B

AND

] key (on the keypad) corresponding to the desired band.

For example, to recall the 40-meter C

ALL

Channel, press and hold in [S

TEP

], then press the

[7 MHz] key while you are holding in [S

TEP

]. To recall the 12-meter C

ALL

Channel, press and hold in [S

TEP

] and press [24.5 MHz].

Note: If you are operating in the “Memory Tune” mode, activating the C

ALL

Channel system will cancel the Memory Tune function, and place the transceiver directly into the Memory mode.

‚

Since the C

ALL

Channels are not segregated into an isolated memory band, like the QMB memories, you also may access these memories via the

[U

P

p

] and [D

OWN

q

] keys, or via the VFO-B Tuning Dial, as with “regular” memories.

ƒ

When operating on a C

ALL

Channel, it is possible to utilize the Memory Tune mode in a manner similar to that used on “regular” memories. Just rotate the VFO-A Tuning Dial, as desired, to tune off of the pre-programmed C

ALL

Channel frequency. The new frequency may be stored in another memory, if desired, as described on page

60.

To cancel Memory Tune operation, press the

[VFO/M

EM

] key once (or press and hold in [S

TEP

] and press another [B

AND

] key for another C

ALL

Channel).

Adding Alpha-Numeric Labels to

Memory Channels

Each of the memory channels in the FT-920, except

Recall of C

ALL

Channel Memories



Whether in VFO or Memory operation, recall of

C

ALL

Channels is very easy. Just press

and hold

63

FT-920 Operating Manual

64

Memory Operation

for the QMB channels, may be appended with a seven-digit Alpha-Numeric Label which may aid in memory channel recognition. Such Labels can be particularly useful for identifying Shortwave Broadcast stations stored in memory, especially because identification can be difficult if they are broadcasting in a foreign language you do not understand. Alpha-

Numeric Label programming is simple to accomplish using the front panel knobs and/or the keys.



First recall the memory channel to which the Label is to be appended.

‚

Press the [D

ISPLAY

] key (located immediately to the right of the VFO-A [TX] LED/Switch); any previously-stored Label will be displayed in place of the VFO-B frequency display.

ƒ

Now press the [E

NT

] key on the keypad. The first

“dash” in the VFO-B display area will now blink, signaling you that Alpha-Numeric entry may begin.

„

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select the letter or number you wish to enter into the first Label slot. You may also use the [B

AND

] keys by pressing repeatedly on a particular key until one of the letters or the number stamped on the key appears

(for example, repeatedly pressing the [7 MHz] key toggles between D

Þ

E

Þ

F

Þ

3). Rotating the

VFO-B Tuning Dial is usually faster, however.

…

After you have chosen the first letter/digit for the

Label, press the [U

P

p

] key. A blinking “dash” will appear to the right of the first digit. Choose the next letter/digit as in the previous step. Press the

[U

P

p

] key to advance the entry position as you fill up the Label register, up to a maximum of seven characters.

†

When entry is complete, press the [E

NT

] key. You will hear a double beep, which confirms that the

Label storage process was successful.

‡

If you make a mistake during entry, you may use the [D

OWN

q

] key to step backward through the

Label field. If you wish to leave a blank space, just press the [U

P

p

] key without choosing a letter. To create a space where a letter/digit exists from a previous entry, the character one increment counterclockwise from the “A” on the VFO-

B Tuning Dial will inject a space; you may also use the third selection on the [50 MHz] key (“_”), if you prefer keyboard entry.

ˆ

Press the [D

ISPLAY

] key to revert to display of the operating frequency, instead of the Alpha-Numeric

Label. Press [D

ISPLAY

] once more to return to display of the Label.

‰

Labels generally are not appended to Split Frequency channels, as they are usually stored for 7

MHz SSB applications where one or both frequencies may change often. If you must store a Label on a Split channel, the Label will, of course, obscure the display of the VFO-B frequency (usually the Tx frequency). However, if you move the

VFO-B Tuning Dial (thus entering the Memory

Tune mode) so as to adjust your Tx frequency, the display will instantly revert to indication of the frequency, and will stay in that condition for about four seconds after tuning has stopped. Then the

Label will return.

Memory Mode Accessories

Moving Memory Data to VFO-A

Data stored on memory channels can easily be moved to VFO-A, if you like.

FT-920 Operating Manual



First use the [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] key (or the VFO-

B Tuning Dial, after pressing [M

EM

C

H

]) to select the memory channel containing the frequency data to be moved to VFO-A.

‚

Next, press and hold in the [M u

V] key for ½ second until you hear a double beep. The data will now have been copied to VFO-A, although the original memory contents will remain intact on the previously-stored channel.

ƒ

If a Split Frequency Memory Channel was transferred, the Rx/Tx frequency relationship will not be changed by the action in the previous step.

That is, if the Tx frequency was originally stored via VFO-A and the Rx frequency stored via VFO-

B, that relationship will remain unchanged after the Memory-to-VFOtransfer process.

Deleting Data from a Memory Channel

Frequency data stored on a memory channel can be deleted from a memory channel, if desired. The de-

Memory Operation

letion process is not a “hard” erasure, so if you erase a channel by mistake using this procedure, the memory channel contents can be recovered.



First use the [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] key (or the VFO-

B Tuning Dial), from the Memory mode, to select the memory channel containing the data to be deleted.

‚

Next, press and hold in the [V u

M] key for ½ second until you hear the double beep. At this point, the memorized frequency and other data will disappear. The data is now “masked” and will not be available for operation.

ƒ

To restore the masked frequency data, repeat steps



and

‚

above. However, if you store new frequency information on a channel containing masked data, the masked data will be over-written and lost.

The FT-920 contains a wide variety of scanning capabilities. Whether you are in the VFO mode or one of the Memory modes, scanning operation is funda-

FT-920 Operating Manual

65

Scanning Operation

66

mentally identical in all modes of operation, but with the following differences: r

In the VFO mode, scanning causes the transceiver to sweep up or down the band, pausing or halting on any signal encountered; r

In the QMB mode, the scanner will scan only the QMB memory bank; r

In the “regular” Memory mode, the scanner will scan the programmed memories, and can be instructed to skip certain memories during scanning; r

In the “regular” Memory mode, with “Group”

Memory activated, the scanner will scan only the memories within the current group; and r

In the Programmable Memory Scan (PMS) mode, the scanner will scan the band within user-programmed frequency limits.

Scanning operation is easy to perform:



Set the [SQL] (Squelch) control to the point where background noise is silenced. A typical setting, for effective scanning operation, will be at 12 o’clock or slightly clockwise from this position.

‚

Set the transceiver into the operating configuration in which you wish to scan (VFO, Memory,

QMB, etc.).

ƒ

Press and hold in either the [U

P

] or [D

OWN

] switch on the microphone to initiate scanning. On the MD-

100A8X, rotate the scanning ring to the left for downward scan, or to the right for upward scan.

Note: If you are scanning in the VFO mode, note that complete rotation of the scanning ring to the end of its travel will place the radio in a “fast scan” mode which may aid you in navigating quickly across a band.

„

The scanner will now cause the transceiver to increment in the chosen direction until a signal is detected. When a signal is encountered which opens the Squelch, the scanner will pause until the signal disappears (at the end of the other station’s transmission), at which point the scanner will resume. While the radio is in the “Pause” condition, the decimal points in the Main VFO-A frequency display area will blink. See “Scan-Resume Choices” below for details of how to customize the resumption of scanning.

…

Press the [PTT] switch on the microphone to cancel scanning and return to normal Tuning Dial operation.

Scan Skip Programming (Memory Mode Only)

Among the memories you have programmed, there may be some stations which you do not wish to scan.

For example, standard time stations like WWV, JJY,

CHU, LOL, RWM, or VNG transmit a continuous carrier which might always stop the scanner (thus preventing you from encountering a different station).

Therefore, you may designate certain memory channels to be skipped during scanning, but otherwise left intact for manual channel selection.

Here’s how to remove a channel from the scanning loop:



Recall the memory channel to be skipped.

‚

Press and hold in the [M

EM

G

ROUP

] key for ½ second, until the “S

CAN

” indicator on the display panel goes off; this shows that this channel is now not eligible for scanning.

ƒ

Repeat steps



and

‚

as many times as necessary to skip all the channels you do not wish to scan.

„

Initiate memory scanning (as described previously), and you will observe that the channels you marked to be skipped are not included in the scanning loop. Press the [PTT] switch to stop the scan; now use the front panel or microphone [U

P

] or

[D

OWN

] key to step through the channels manually - one at a time - and you will observe that the

“skipped” channels are, nonetheless, available for recall by manual means.

…

You may restore a previously-skipped channel to the scanning loop by selecting the channel manually; then press the [M

EM

G

ROUP

] switch for ½ second until the “S

CAN

” indicator is restored to the frequency display panel.

Programmable Memory Scan (PMS) Operation

The PMS scanning mode allows you to set up band limits within which to scan. For example, you might elect to scan 50.0 to 50.4 MHz in USB mode, watching for activity. The procedure for establishing such band limits is quite easy:



First, store the lower frequency limit in the “P-Lo” memory channel, and the upper frequency limit in the “P-Hi” memory channel. In the above example, you would store 50.000 MHz in “P-Lo,” and 50.400

MHz in “P-Hi.”

‚

Next, switch from the VFO mode to the Memory mode by pressing [VFO/M

EM

].

FT-920 Operating Manual

ƒ

Now activate the “Memory Tune” mode by rotating the VFO-A Tuning Dial slightly either direction. You will observe the [M T

UNE

] indicator on the display.

„

Rotate the [SQL] control until the background noise is silenced, then press the microphone [U

P

] or [D

OWN

] switch (or rotate the scanning ring, if using the MD-100A8X Desk Microphone) to initiate scanning. The transceiver will now scan within the range 50.000 to 50.400 MHz, halting on any signals received, then resuming its scan based on the setting of Menu Item U-15 (see below).

…

Note that these band limits do not apply just to scanning; they are also applied to the operation of the VFO-A Tuning Dial, so the PMS feature makes it easy to stay within a particular band of operation whether tuning manually or scanning!

Scan-Resume Choices

Scanning operation requires that you have the FT-

920’s audio squelched. The transceiver then assumes that the opening of the squelch corresponds to the discovery of a signal you may wish to listen to.

Once the scan has been halted, one of three things may happen: r

The default action is that the transceiver pauses on the signal and stays locked on its frequency until the other station’s transmission ceases (at which point the squelch will close).

One second after the squelch closes, scanning resumes automatically. The resumption interval is adjustable from 0 to 10 seconds via

Menu Item U-17 (see page 75).

r

Another option is that the scanner will halt, when the squelch opens, for a fixed time period (default = 5 seconds). Thereafter, scanning will resume whether or not the other station’s transmission has ended. The “hold” time is adjustable from 1 to 60 seconds via

Menu Item U-16 (see page 75).

r

The scanner can also be programmed to stop when it finds a signal, and lock on that frequency without resuming the scan at some point.

The scan-resume choices may be selected via Menu

Item U-15 (SCN-STP); see page 75 for details.

Scanning Operation

Scanning is chiefly useful in the FM mode, when you are monitoring a number of repeater or simplex channels. When operating on the 50 MHz band, the number of channels per second may be adjusted via Menu

Item U-19; the default value is 10 channels per second.

When scanning in a narrow-band mode such as SSB or CW, a signal may occupy a number of synthesizer steps over its entire bandwidth. Tuning across a CW signal in, for example, 2.5 Hz steps, will take a considerable amount of time at 1 step per second, especially if the signal is strong. But until the signal is fully passed, the squelch will stay open, thinking that it is finding a new station every 2.5 Hz! Therefore, when scanning a band in anticipation of a band opening, you may wish to press the [FAST] key, and reduce the Pause Time (Menu U-16) to about 1 second, so as to reduce the holding time on a signal which is encountered.

Dual Watch is similar, in some respects, to scanning.

In Dual Watch, however, the transceiver monitors

(squelched) on the Main R

X

frequency (typically VFO-

67

FT-920 Operating Manual

68

Dual Watch Operation

A) while periodically checking the Sub VFO (typically

VFO-B) for activity. A typical example might be for you to set VFO-A to 50.110 MHz, watching for DX stations who might call CQ on that frequency, while periodically checking 28.885 MHz for stations reporting band openings on 6 meters.

To activate Dual Watch:



Set up transmit and receive operation on VFO-A, establishing your primary monitoring frequency.

Set up the frequency to be checked periodically on VFO-B.

‚

Verify that the correct antenna (A or B) has been selected for VFOs A and B, if they are on different bands. The Dual Watch feature will automatically switch antennas for you during the VFO-A/B switching process.

ƒ

Rotate the [SQL] control until the background noise is silenced.

„

Press the [DW] key. The decimal points in both frequency displays will blink, and you will observe that, every few seconds, the green “RX’ indicator for VFO-B will become illuminated for an instant.

This shows you when VFO-B is being checked for activity.

…

If a station is detected on the VFO-B frequency, the FT-920 will pause on the VFO-B frequency, and stay there according to the Menu selections you made per the “Scan-Resume Choices” earlier.

†

Press [DW] again to cancel Dual Watch. Note that pressing the [PTT] switch on the microphone does not cancel Dual Watch operation.

The time interval between Dual Watch excursions to

VFO-B may be adjusted, via Menu Item U-18, to any value between 3 and 15 seconds. The default setting is 10 seconds.

The VFO-A register need not be in the “VFO” mode; it may also be set to a Memory Channel or a QMB channel, if you like.

Note also that the active R

X

VFO at the time that [DW] is pushed will be the one on which the transceiver will hold, checking the opposite VFO periodically.

Therefore, if the green “RX” LED for VFO-B is illuminated when you push [DW], the FT-920 will hold on

VFO-B, then check VFO-A periodically for activity.

Remember that the squelch must be engaged in order for Dual Watch to function. During Dual Watch, transmitting remains enabled, and the VFO frequencies may be changed.

The FT-920’s Menu System allows you, the owner, to customize a wide variety of transceiver performance aspects and operating characteristics. Such

FT-920 Operating Manual

a large number of adjustments would ordinarily require dozens of additional knobs on the front panel of the transceiver, thus complicating operation hopelessly. The Ergonomics Design Team at Yaesu Musen

Co., Ltd. therefore created the Menu System such that virtually all Menu items are of the “set and forget” variety, not requiring revision during day-to-day operation.

Three Menu operating modes are provided, allowing different avenues of access to the Menu System.

These are: r

Normal Menu operation (73 selections), accessed by pressing the [M

ENU

] key.

r

Panel Menu operation (5 fixed selections), accessed by holding in the [S

TEP

] key plus one additional key, providing instant access to critical Menu items.

r

Quick Menu operation (5 user-selected items), accessed by pressing the [M

ENU

] key after activation via Menu Item U-67. When Quick Menu has been activated, Normal Menu operation is activated by pressing and holding in the [M

ENU

] key for ½ second.

Here are operating procedure summaries for each

Menu mode.

Normal Menu Operation



Press the [M

ENU

] key once momentarily. The Menu

Menu Operation

Item number will start blinking, and a brief title for the Memory Item will appear at the far right side of the display.

‚

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select the Menu

Item you wish to work on.

ƒ

When you have chosen the desired Menu Item number, press [E

NT

] on the keypad momentarily.

The current value or condition for the Menu Item chosen will be shown in the main frequency display area.

„

Again rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial, or press the front panel [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] keys, to change the value or condition for the Menu Item.

…

When you have made your selection, press [E

NT

] to lock in your setting. You may now select another Menu Item number to work on (by rotating the VFO-B Tuning Dial) or press [M

ENU

] to exit and resume normal operation.

Panel Menu Operation

Five more-frequently-used Menu Items have been

FT-920 Operating Manual

69

70

Menu Operation

stored in a special Menu Bank which allows you to recall them quickly by pressing and holding in the

[S

TEP

] key while pressing another key. These Menu

Items are shown below:

For example, here is how to use the Panel Menu fea-

Me nu #

U-0 8

U-0 9

U-1 0

U-2 4

U-3 7

Func tion D e scri pt ion

Display Dimmer On/Off

Mul ti Panel Display Choice

Enhanced Tuning Scale

Display

"V OX" Hang Time i n CW

Mode

(TX) CTCSS Tone

Fr equency

P re ss this ke y whi le

Holdi ng in [ S

TE P

] ke y

[

D

ISP LA Y

] K ey

[

A B

] key

[

M

E TER

S

E LEC T

] K ey

[

B

[

K

R

-I

P T

N

] K ey

] K ey ture to activate the Display Dimmer:



Press and hold in the [S

TEP

] key.

‚

While you are holding in the [S

TEP

] key, press the

[D

ISPLAY

] key. Menu U-08 will appear just to the left of the “DIMMER” title, and “oFF” will blink in the main display area. This means that the current condition of the Dimmer is Off.

ƒ

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select “on;” you will note that the display just got darker.

„

Press the [ENT] key on the keypad. You may now rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial if you want to change some other Menu Item, or just press [M

ENU

] to exit the Menu System and resume normal operation.

Quick Menu Operation

The Quick Menu feature allows you to select certain

Menu Items you feel the need to change more frequently. These are assembled into Quick Menu bank which operates almost identically to the “Normal”

Menu mode. However, access is very slightly different: r

When you have created a Quick Menu, you activate it by pressing [M

ENU

] momentarily (as described above in the “Normal Menu Operation” section). You now only have access to the Quick menu Items.

r

To gain access to the other “Normal” Menu

Items, press [M

ENU

] and hold it in for ½ second (instead of pressing it momentarily).

After you have done one of the above actions with the [M

ENU

] key, operation is identical to that described in the “Normal Menu Operation” section.

The Quick Menu bank is set up by first accessing

Menu Item U-67 via Normal Menu operation. For illustrative purposes, we shall create a Quick Menu bank consisting of Menu Items U-01, U-02, and U-

03:



Press the [M

ENU

] key momentarily to enter the

Menu mode.

‚

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select Menu Item

U-67. The Title for this item is “Q MENU,” and the default value is “U-01 oFF.”

ƒ

Press the [E

NT

] key to enter the Menu Item Command mode. The “U-01 oFF” display will blink.

„

Now press the [U

P

p

] key to change the “oFF” to

on” relative to U-01.

…

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select Menu Item

U-02 . Again press [U

P

p

] to change the “oFF” to

on.”

†

Rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select Menu Item

U-03. Again press [U

P

p

] to change “oFF” to “on.”

‡

Press the [E

NT

] key to lock in the new settings for

U-67, then press [M

ENU

] to exit.

ˆ

Now press [M

ENU

] momentarily, and rotate the

VFO-B Tuning Dial. You will see that you have access only to Menu Items U-01, U-02, and U-03.

Press [M

ENU

] to exit.

‰

Press and hold in the [M

ENU

] key for ½ second, then rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial. You will see that you now have access to all Menu Items. Press

[M

ENU

] to exit.

We will now provide a summary chart showing the

Menu Items available, followed by a more comprehensive description of each Menu Item and the choices available.

Menu Mode Summary Chart

FT-920 Operating Manual

Menu Operation

Menu Mode Selections and Settings

M e nu #

U -2 6

U -2 7

U -2 8

U -2 9

U -3 0

U -1 8

U -1 9

U -2 0

U -2 1

U -2 2

U -2 3

U -2 4

U -2 5

U -3 1

U -3 2

U -3 3

U -3 4

U -3 5

U -3 6

U -1 0

U -11

U -1 2

U -1 3

U -1 4

U -1 5

U -1 6

U -1 7

U -0 1

U -0 2

U -0 3

U -0 4

U -0 5

U -0 6

U -0 7

U -0 8

U -0 9

F unc tio n of M e nu Item

VF O Di al S pee d

Up /D o w n Sw it ch S teps

St ep S w itc h F un ctio n

Q uic k S pl it O f fset

TX W hen Spo t is Pre s se d

Be ep Fr equ ency

"P eak H o ld" M eterin g

D isplay D im m e r C on tr ol

M ulti-Pa nel D isplay Item

E nha nc ed Tu ning Sc a le

M em o ry C han nel Gro up 1

M em o ry C han nel Gro up 2

M em o ry C han nel Gro up 3

M em o ry C han nel Gro up 4

Sc an ning M od e

H ol d T im e for "D ela y " S ca n

R e su m e T im e a fter C arrie r D ro p

Du al W atc h P olli ng I nt e rval

Sc a nnin g S pee d

E lec tron ic K ey e r M od e

K ey er D ot :S pac e R atio

Ke ye r D as h :S pace R atio

Ke y er E nv elo pe D e lay

Se m i-Br eak-in P TT H ol d T im e

C ontest N um be r

C ontest N um b er " 0" Fo rm at

C ontest N um b er " 1" Fo rm at

C ontest N um b er " 2" Fo rm at

C ontest N um b er " 3" Fo rm at

C ontest N um b er " 5" Fo rm at

C ontest N um b er " 7" Fo rm at

C ontest N um b er " 8" Fo rm at

C ontest N um b er " 9" Fo rm at

C ontest N um b er S iz e/ Fo rm at

HF R e pea te r Ton e T yp e

V HF R e pea te r Ton e T yp e

Av a ila ble C ho ices

X 2, X 4

0.5 kH z ~ 100 0 k H z /S te p

Tog gle/ M om e nt ary

O ff/ -10 0 k H z ~ +1 00 kH z

O n /O ff

O ff/ 22 0 H z ~ 704 0 H z

0(O ff) ~ 20 00 m s.

O n /O ff

C lar ifie r/P itc h/O ffs et

C lar./D S P /Tun ing /Fine Tu nin g

1 ~ 9 9

{(L ast # in G r p. 1)+ 1} ~ 9 9

{(L ast # in G r p. 2)+ 1} ~ 9 9

{(L ast # in G r p. 3)+ 1} ~ 9 9

C arri er D ro p/D elay/ H alt

1 ~ 60 Seco nds

0 ~ 10 Seco nds

3 ~ 15 Seco nds

1 ~ 10 0 m s ./S te p

K ey er 1/K eye r 2/B u g

0 (0:1 ) ~ 127 (12 .7 :1 )

0 (0:1 ) ~ 127 (12 .7 :1 )

0 ~ 30 m s.

0 ~ 51 00 m s. (5 .1 s ec on ds)

0 000 ~ 999 9

0 (Z er o)/T /O (O h )

1/A

2/U

3/V

5/E

7/B

8/D

9/N

N o L ead ing 0/nnn /n nnn /O ff

C TC S S /B ur st

C TC S S /B ur st

D e fau lt

C arrie r D ro p

5 S ec o nds

1 S ec on d

10 Seco nds

10 m s.

K ey er 1

1 0 (1 :1 )

3 0 (3 :1 )

5 m s.

0 m s.

000 0

0 (Z ero )

A

2

3

5

7

8

9

N o L ead ing 0

C TC S S

C TC S S

X 4

1 00 kH z

To gg le

O ff

O ff

88 0 H z

O ff

O ff

C lar ifie r

D S P

9 9

O ff

O ff

O ff

FT-920 Operating Manual

71

Menu Operation

72

Menu Mode Summary Chart

M e nu #

U -3 7

U -4 6

U -4 7

U -4 8

U -4 9

U -5 0

U -3 8

U -3 9

U -4 0

U -4 1

U -4 2

U -4 3

U -4 4

U -4 5

U -5 1

U -5 2

U -5 3

U -5 4

U -5 5

U -5 6

U -5 7

U -5 8

U -6 4

U -6 5

U -6 6

U -6 7

U -6 8

U -6 9

U -7 0

U -7 1

U -5 9

U -6 0

U -6 1

U -6 2

U -6 3

U -7 2

U -7 3

F unc tio n of M e nu Item

(T X ) To ne Fr equ enc y

(R X ) To ne Fr equ enc y

H F R ep eater S h ift

VH F R ep eat er S h ift

A u to ma ti c A nt en na Sele ctio n

RT T Y G en era to r Tone P a ir

R TT Y S h ift

S hif t P o lari ty

Pa cke t F re q. D is pla y Of fset

P ac ket S ubc ar rier Fr equ enc y

R F Prea m p ( B an d-by-B and )

AT U E nab ling on R X

M ax . P O : Anten na- A

M ax . P O : Anten na- B

DS P V o ice E q ual ize r

Line ar Tun ing S tart

Lin ear Tun ing P O : A nt . A

Lin ear Tun ing P O : A nt . B

Lin ea r Tu nin g Tim e

Line ar Tun ing S pa ce T im e

Lin ear Tu ning P u lse T im e

R x LS B C ar rier Of fs et

Tx LS B C ar rier Of fset

Pr oc ess or L SB Of fset

R x U S B C ar rier O ffs et

Tx U S B C ar rier O ffs et

P roc ess or U S B O ffs et

VO X H an g T im e

V OX G a in

V O X An ti-Tr ip

Q uic k M en u

FM S ca nni ng S t eps

CW F ilte r

A M Filte r

AT U A ut o- Re tu nin g

AT U F as t Tu nin g

R X Ant. Jac k C irc uit P at h

Av a ila ble C ho ices

O ff/ 67.0 ~ 25 0.3 H z /175 0 H z

O ff /6 7.0 ~ 25 0.3 H z

0 ~ 5 M H z

0 ~ 5 M H z

A u to /M a nua l/O ff

212 5/ 127 5 U S B /2 125 /1 275 LS B

170 /4 25/85 0 H z

N orm al /R ev e rse

-3.0 ~ + 3.0 kH z

11 70/ 17 00/21 25 /2 210 U S B/ LS B

J FE T /M O SF E T

O n /O ff

10 0/50/ 10 W

10 0/50/ 10 W

H i/M id/ Lo w/ Ba ndp ass /O ff

B e gin s w hen [E nt ] is pre s se d

10 0/50/ 10 W

10 0/50/ 10 W

3 ~ 60 Seco nds

0 ~ 30 00 m s.

0 ~ 30 00 m s.

- 300 ~ +50 0 H z

- 300 ~ +50 0 H z

- 300 ~ +50 0 H z

- 300 ~ +50 0 H z

- 300 ~ +50 0 H z

- 300 ~ +50 0 H z

0 ~ 3 S ec o nds

0 ~ 15 (A rb itrary s c ale )

0 ~ 15 (A rb itrary s c ale )

A ll M e nu Item s

O ff/0 .5 ~ 50 kH z

O n /O ff

O n /O ff

O n /O ff

O n /O ff

O p en/C onn ec ted o n T x

D e fau lt

O ff

O ff

1 00 kH z

5 00 kH z

A ut o

2 125 LS B

17 0 H z

N or m al

+2 .1 25 kH z

21 25 U S B

J FE T (16 0-1 5m )

O ff

100 W

100 W

O ff

100 W

100 W

10 Seco nds

1 00 m s.

1 00 m s.

0

0

0

0

0

0

1 S ec on d

1 5

5

O ff

10 kH z

O ff

O ff

O n

O ff

O pe n

FT-920 Operating Manual

U-01 (

DIAL-S )

Function: VFO-A/VFO-B Tuning Dial Speed

Available Values:

4

/

2

Default:

4

You may choose between two speeds for the tuning dials. Selecting “

2

” cuts the tuning rate in half compared to the default value.

U-02 (

UP/DN-S )

Function: U

P

/D

OWN

Switch Steps (front panel)

Available Values:

0.5

~

1000

(kHz/Step)

Default:

100

kHz/Step

The default value is ideal for quick navigation from one end of a band to the other. For quick tuning around within a band segment, a value like 1 kHz may be preferable.

U-03 (

STEPSET )

Function: S

TEP

Switch Function

Available Values:

LoC

/

no-LoC

Default:

LoC

The

LoC

(Lock) position allows toggling of the Fast

Þ

Fine

Þ

Normal tuning rate. If no-LoC

is chosen, you must hold the [S

TEP

] key in while the “Fast” or

“Fine” indicator is illuminated in order for those tuning rates to be chosen. After releasing the [S

TEP

] key, the tuning rate will return to “Normal.”

U-04 (

QCK SPL )

Function: Activation/Setting of Magnitude of Quick Split

Available Values: oFF

or

-100

~

100

kHz

Default: oFF

If the Quick Split Menu Item is set to anything other than Off, pressing the [A u

B] key will put the transceiver in the “Split” mode, with T

X

on VFO-B and R

X on VFO-A. Additionally, a frequency offset (referenced to the R

X

frequency) will be applied, per your setting of this Menu Item.

U-05 (

SPOT-TX )

Menu Operation

Function: Activation/De-activation of T

X

when the

[S

POT

] key is pushed

Available Values: on

/ off

Default: off

Normally, pressing the [S

POT

] key only causes you to hear an audible tone corresponding to the pitch of your own transmitted signal (in the CW mode). By setting this Menu Item to On, however, you can also cause the FT-920 to transmit when the [\

SPOT

] key is pressed.

U-06 (

BEEP-F )

Function: Setting of Key Beeper Frequency

Available Values: oFF

or

220

~

7040

Hz

Default:

880

Hz

The Menu Item allows you to set the tone of the front panel key Beep tone generator to whatever value is comfortable. It also allows you to disable the Beep tone, if desired.

U-07 (

MTR-PH )

Function: Enabling/Disabling of the “Peak-Hold” function of the S/PO meter.

Available Values:

0

(off) ~

2000

ms.

Default:

0

(off)

U-08 (

DIMMER )

Function: Adjustment of illumination level for front panel display

Available Values: on

/ oFF

Default: oFF

In low-light situations, activating the Dimmer may reduce excess brightness in the display. For normal room lighting, however, this Menu Item should be set to Off for best visibility.

73

FT-920 Operating Manual

Menu Operation

74

U-09 (

DISPLAY )

Function: Selection of display Multi-Panel characteristics

Available Values:

CLAr

/

PitTCh

/ oFFSEt

Default:

CLAr

This Menu Item allows you to choose which selection will be displayed in the small Multi Panel, located immediately to the right of the VFO-A frequency display. The choices are:

CLAr

Display of the Clarifier offset (in kHz) from the VFO-A frequency.

PitTCh

Display of the CW Pitch (in Hz) oFFSEt

Display of the amount of frequency difference between VFO-A and VFO-B.

U-10 (

E-DISPL )

Function: Selection of Enhanced Tuning Scale choices

Available Values:

CLAr

/ dSP

/ tUnE

/

FInE

Default: dSP

The Enhanced Tuning Scale, located immediately above the VFO-A frequency display, may be used to provide a visual indication of several transceiver operating characteristics:

CLAr

When the Clarifier is active, a small dot below the horizontal Enhanced Tuning dSP

Scale shows the relative offset of the

Clarifier from the displayed VFO-A frequency. Note that this small dot will be observed on Receive when the R

X

Clarifier is on, but only on transmit when the T

X

Clarifier is on.

When the DSP is On, this scale provides a relative indication of the bandwidth currently set via the High-Cut and

Low-Cut knobs.

tUnE

In this mode, an arrow indicates which direction you should tune on CW in order to center an incoming tone on the “zero beat” point with your own signal.

FInE

When tuning in steps less than 10 Hz, this scale will expand rapidly as you tune quickly, but as you tune slowly you will be able to measure frequency steps as fine as 1 Hz, thanks to the 1

Hz calibration dots on the Enhanced

Tuning Scale. This feature will be disabled when tuning steps are 10 Hz or larger.

U-11 (

GROUP1 )

Function: Select the number of Memory Channels in Group 1

Available Values:

01

~

99

Default:

99

(All Memory Channels are in Group 1 by default)

Memory Group 1 may be left at 99 channels, in which case there will be no partitioning of the Memory System. Otherwise, you may set any number less than

99 for inclusion in Group 1 if you wish to partition the memories.

U-12 (

GROUP2 )

Function: Select the number of memories in Group 2

Available Values: The last digit in Group 1 plus 1 is the bottom end of Group 2; 99 maximum

Default: oFF

If, for example, there are 25 memories in Group 1,

Group 2 starts at Memory #26.

U-13 (

GROUP3 )

Function: Select the number of memories in Group 3

Available Values: The last digit in Group 2 plus 1 is the bottom end of Group 3; 99 maximum

Default: oFF

If, for example, Group 2 contains Memory Channels

26 through 40, Group 3 begins with

Memory #41.

U-14 (

GROUP4 )

Function: Select the number of memories in Group 4

Available Values: The last digit in Group 3 plus 1 is the bottom end of Group 4; 99 maximum

Default: oFF

You do not have to use all 99 memories. Just set the upper limit of this Menu Item to some value less than

99.

FT-920 Operating Manual

U-15 (

SCN-STP )

Function: Select the desired Scan-Resume mode.

Available Values:

PAUS

/

5SEC

/

StoP

Default:

PAUS

This Menu Item allows you to select your favorite method of scan-restart after the scanner has stopped on an incoming signal (when the Squelch opens). The choices are:

PAUS

The scanner will hold until the signal disappears, then will resume after a delay set via Menu Item U-17.

5SEC

The scanner will hold for a fixed length of time, set via Menu Item U-16, then resume whether or not the other station is still transmitting.

StoP

The scanner will stop when a signal is received, and will not restart.

U-16 (

PAUSE-T )

Function: Set the delay time for scan resumption in the “5SEC” scan condition described in Menu Item

U-15.

Available Values:

1

~

60

Seconds

Default:

5

Seconds

This Menu Item defines the length of time the scanner will dwell on a frequency when in the “5 Second” mode, so named after its default value. After the time period set via this Menu Item, the scanner will resume irrespective of the presence or absence of a signal on the current frequency.

U-17 (

SCN-RES )

Function: Set the delay time for scan resumption in the “PAUS” scan condition described in Menu Item

U-15.

Available Values:

0.0

~

10.0

Seconds

Default:

1.0

Second

You will generally want to set a fairly short value for this Menu Item, so as not to delay the resumption of scanning after a signal disappears.

Menu Operation

U-18 (

DW-TIME )

Function: Set the polling interval for the Dual Watch system

Available Values:

3

~

15

Seconds

Default:

10

Seconds

This Menu Item defines the amount of time the Dual

Watch system will dwell on VFO-A before checking

VFO-B for activity.

U-19 (

SCNSP-V )

Function: Set the amount of time per synthesizer step in the VFO/PMS Scan modes

Available Values:

1

~

100

ms (in 1 ms. steps)

Default:

10

ms.

Use this Menu item to select the amount of time each step of the synthesizer will be allocated during VFO

Scan or PMS operation.

U-20 (

EL-SET )

Function: Select the keyer paddle operating mode

Available Values:

EL1

/ bUG

/

EL2

Default:

EL1

This menu Item allows selection of the preferred keying action of your paddle. The choices available are:

EL1

Iambic keying with Automatic Character

Spacing disabled.

bUG

Mechanical “Bug” key emulation. The “dot” paddle contact produces automatically-generated dots, while the “dash” contact produces dashes of a length produced manually.

EL2

Iambic keying with Automatic Character

Spacing enabled. This selection is best when programming message memories.

U-21 (

DOTSIZE )

Function: Set the Dot:Space ratio for the built-in electronic keyer

Available Values:

0

~

127

(0:1 ~ 12.7:1 Dot:Space ratio)

Default:

10

(corresponds to 1:1 Dot:Space ratio)

Use this Menu item to set the Dot weighting for the internal keyer. It is not recommended that you exceed a value of “

20

” for this setting.

75

FT-920 Operating Manual

76

Menu Operation

U-22 (

DSHSIZE )

Function: Set the Dash:Space ratio for the built-in electronic keyer

Available Values:

0

~

127

(0:1 ~ 12.7:1 Dash:Space ratio)

Default:

30

(corresponding to 3:1 Dash:Space ratio)

Note that the Dot:Space:Dash ratio, using the default values, is a perfect 1:1:3.

U-23 (

QSK-DLY )

Function: Provide an envelope delay when using the internal keyer

Available Values:

0

~

30

ms.

Default:

5

ms.

This Menu Item allows shifting of the entire CW transmission string in time, so as to avoid sequencing difficulties with external linear amplifiers, etc. The delay is applied to the entire keyed signal (no truncation on either “make” or “break”) to preserve the full values of weighting set via Menu Items U-21 and U-22.

U-24 (

KYR-DLY )

Function: Set the pseudo-VOX hang time for transmission during semi-break-in CW

Available Values:

0.00

~

5.10

Seconds

Default:

0

Increasing this value somewhat above its default will allow the FT-920 to stay in the “transmit” mode between word spaces. This function is analogous to the

“VOX Delay” function on voice modes.

U-25 (

QSO-NO )

Function: Set the starting value for the Contest Number used by the message memory

Available Values:

0000

~

9999

Default:

0000

If you should get out of sync with the automatic contest number incrementation of the message memory, you may reset the number via this Menu Item. In a contest, this may be a good candidate for assignment to an exclusive “Quick Menu” position.

U-26 (

0-FORM )

Function: Define the desired truncation for the Ø figure used in contest numbers

Available Values:

0

(0:

— — — — —

) o

(o:

— — —

) t

(T:

—

)

Default:

0

(0:

— — — — —

)

Use this Menu Item to shorten the number “zero” in a contest number.

U-27 (

1-FORM )

Function: Define the desired truncation for the 1 figure used in contest numbers

Available Values:

1

(1:

• — — — —

)

Default:

A

(A:

• —

)

1

(

• — — — —

)

Use this Menu Item to shorten the number “one” in a contest number.

U-28 (

2-FORM )

Function: Define the desired truncation for the 2 figure used in contest numbers

Available Values:

2

(2:

• • — — —

)

Default:

U

(U:

• • —

)

2

(

• • — — —

)

Use this Menu Item to shorten the number “two” in a contest number.

U-29 (

3-FORM )

Function: Define the desired truncation for the 3 figure used in contest numbers

Available Values:

3

(3:

• • • — —

)

Default: u

(V:

• • • —

)

3

(

• • • — —

)

This truncation is seldom used in contest numbers, as it may cause confusion with the number 4.

FT-920 Operating Manual

U-30 (

5-FORM )

Function: Define the desired truncation for the 5 figure used in contest numbers

Available Values:

5

(5:

• • • • •

)

Default:

E

(E:

•

)

5

(

• • • • •

)

This truncation is seldom used in incremented contest numbers, although it frequently is used in the truncated form of the “599” signal report, which may be shortened to “ENN” (

• — • — • — •

) ahead of the incremented contest number (001, 002,

. . . ).

U-31 (

7-FORM )

Function: Define the desired truncation for the 7 figure used in contest numbers

Available Values:

7

(7:

— — • • •

)

Default: b

(B:

— • • •

)

7

(

— — • • •

)

This truncation is seldom used in contest numbers, as it may cause confusion with the number 6.

U-32 (

8-FORM )

Function: Define the desired truncation for the 8 figure used in contest numbers

Available Values:

8

(8:

— — — • •

)

Default: d

(D:

— • •

)

8

(

— — — • •

)

Use this Menu Item to shorten the number “eight” in a contest number.

U-33 (

9-FORM )

Function: Define the desired truncation for the 9 figure used in contest numbers

Available Values:

9

(9:

— — — — •

)

Default: n

(N:

— •

)

9

(

— — — — •

)

This is perhaps the most-commonly-truncated number used in CW contests.

Menu Operation

U-34 (

NR-SIZE )

Function: Set the number of digits in a contest number

Available Values: non

/

999

/

9999

/ oFF

Default: non

The default value places a contest number without leading zeroes in the contest number message memory location (at the point where “???” is inserted).

The other choices are:

999

A full three-digit contest number, including zeroes. This will switch automatically to four digits after QSO number 999.

9999

A full four-digit contest number, including zeroes. If you reach 9999 QSOs, you probably already won the contest, and can now quit!

oFF

In this mode, the contest number generator is disabled.

U-35 (

HF-TONE )

Function: Define the type of repeater-access tone to be transmitted on 28 MHz during FM “RPT” operation.

Available Values:

CtCSS

/ bUrSt

Default:

CtCSS

The default value causes a tone (set via Menu Item

U-37) to be transmitted continuously when the “RPT”

FM mode is in use. The BURST option transmits the selected tone for an interval of only 500 milliseconds, and typically only the 1750 Hz tone selection would be applicable for BURST operation.

U-36 (

VHF-TONE )

Function: Define the type of repeater-access tone to be transmitted on 50 MHz during FM “RPT” operation.

Available Values:

CtCSS

/ bUrSt

Default:

CtCSS

The default value causes a tone (set via Menu Item

U-37) to be transmitted continuously when the “RPT”

FM mode is in use. The BURST option transmits the selected tone for an interval of only 500 milliseconds, and typically only the 1750 Hz tone selection would be applicable for BURST operation.

77

FT-920 Operating Manual

78

Menu Operation

U-37 (

TX-T-F )

Function: Set the desired repeater access (T

X

) tone.

Available Values: OFF/Values per chart below/1750

Hz

Default: OFF

Use this Menu Item to set the frequency of your encoding tone, used for repeater access in the FM “RPT” mode.

U-38 (

RX-T-F )

Function: Set the desired Tone Decoder frequency for your receiver

Available Values: OFF/Values per chart below

Default: OFF

Use this Menu Item to set the frequency of your transceiver’s CTCSS Decoder, if used. The Decoder is activated by setting this Menu Item to any value other than OFF, and your receiver will be silent on

FM/RPT until a matching tone is received (superimposed on the carrier of an incoming signal).

U-39 (

HF-RPT )

Function: Set the desired repeater shift magnitude for 29 MHz operation

Available Values:

0.0

~

5000.0

kHz

Default:

100.0

kHz

This Menu Item sets the 29 MHz shift separately from the 50 MHz shift.

U-40 (

VHF-RPT )

Function: Set the desired repeater shift magnitude for 50 MHz operation

Available Values:

0.0

~

5000.0

kHz

Default:

500.0

kHz

The default shift represents the standard value used in most of the United States.

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RadioAmateur.EU

6 7.0

6 9.3

7 1.9

7 4.4

7 7.0

7 9.7

8 2.5

8 5.4

8 8.5

9 1.5

CT CSS Tone Frequency (Hz)

9 4.8

9 7.4

10 0.0

10 3.5

10 7.2

110. 9

114. 8

118. 8

12 3.0

12 7.3

13 1.8

13 6.5

14 1.3

14 6.2

15 1.4

15 6.7

16 2.2

16 7.9

17 3.8

17 9.9

18 6.2

19 2.8

20 3.5

21 0.7

21 8.1

22 5.7

23 3.6

24 1.8

25 0.3

U-41 (

ANT-SEL )

Function: Define the operating function for the [A

N

-

TENNA

A/B/RX] switch

Available Values:

Auto

/ on

/ oFF

Default:

Auto

The available choices are:

Auto

The selection of Antenna-A, Antenna-B, or RX is stored in VFO or Memory registers, so no operator intervention is needed when changing bands or memories insofar as antenna selection is concerned.

on

The [A

NTENNA

A/B/RX] switch is functional, but the settings are not stored in VFO or

Memory registers. You must manually choose the antenna selection yourself.

oFF

Only Antenna-A is available. There is no path provided to Antenna-B nor the RX-

Only antenna.

U-42 (

RTTY-TN )

Function: Select the offset frequency and injection sideband for the “Mark” tone produced by the internal RTTY generator

Available Values:

Hi 2125U

/

Lo 1275U

/

Default:

Hi 2125L

Hi 2125L

/

Lo 1275L

The available choices include:

Hi 2125U

The Mark tone is offset 2.125 kHz,

USB injection

Lo 1275U

The Mark tone is offset 1.275 kHz,

USB injection

Hi 2125L

The Mark tone is offset 2.125 kHz,

LSB injection

Lo 1275L

The Mark tone is offset 1.275 kHz,

LSB injection

The Shift tone’s frequency is offset from the Mark tone by an amount determined by the next Menu Item,

U-43 (RTTY Shift).

U-43 (

RTTY-SH )

Function: Set the desired RTTY Mark-Space frequency shift

Available Values:

SFt 170

/

SFt 425

/

SFt 850

Default:

SFt 170

This Menu Item determines the amount of shift to be applied from the Mark tone frequency, which was programmed via Menu Item U-42 (RTTY Tones).

FT-920 Operating Manual

U-44 (

SFT-POL )

Function: Define whether Mark or Space shall be the idling (key up) tone

Available Values: noAL

/ rES

Default: noAL

The above abbreviations are defined as: noAL

(Normal) The idling tone is Space.

rES

(Reverse) The idling tone is Mark.

U-45 (

PK-DISP )

Function: Define the Packet displayed frequency offset

Available Values:

-3.000

~

3.000

kHz

Default:

-2.125

kHz

You can have the display show the (suppressed) carrier frequency or the center frequency between the two Packet tones, for example.

U-46 (

PKT-FRQ )

Function: Align the transceiver to the frequency of the tone pair defined by the TNC.

Available Values:

1170-U

/

1700-U

/

2125-U

/

2210-U

/

1170-L

/

1700-L

/

2125-L

/

2210-L

Default:

2125-U

The above designations of the available values represent the center frequency of the Packet tone pairs, plus their injection sideband (L =LSB, U=USB).

U-47 (

RF AMP )

Function: Determine which receiver input preamplifier is to be used on each band

Available Values:

A1

/

A2

Defaults:

A1

(1.8 ~ 24.49 MHz),

A2

(24.5 ~ 54 MHz)

These preamplifier choices allow the user to customize the preamplifier choice for each amateur band.

Preamplifier

A1

is a Junction FET type, providing superior strong-signal-handling capability, while preamplifier

A2

is a Dual-Gate MOS FET, providing best Noise Figure. Note that the total gain of the J-

FET amplifier is somewhat lower than for the MOS

FET preamp, but on the lower frequency bands the additional gain is not needed.

The gain of the J-FET amplifier rolls off above 30

MHz, as does the gain of the MOS FET amplifier below about 7 MHz; accordingly, we do not recommend these amplifiers be used outside of the recommended frequencies.

FT-920 Operating Manual

Menu Operation

U-48 (

ATU-RX )

Function: Enable/Disable the use of the Automatic

Antenna Tuner in the Receive mode

Available Values: on

/ oFF

Default: oFF

Engaging the Antenna Tuner in the Receive mode helps protect the receiver circuitry from strong outof-band signals; it acts as an additional bandpass filter ahead of the fixed bandpass networks already protecting the receiver. There is a very slight reduction in sensitivity when this feature is ON, which should prove insignificant in everyday operation.

U-49 (

A-MAXPO )

Function: Set the maximum power level for the “A” antenna terminal

Available Values:

Default:

100

100

/

50

/

10

This convenience feature allows you to limit the power applied to the “A” antenna port, in case you wish to excite a low-drive linear amplifier, for example. You may use the other antenna port for full-power operation, of course.

U-50 (

B-MAXPO )

Function: Set the maximum power level for the “B” antenna terminal

Available Values:

Default:

100

100

/

50

/

10

This convenience feature allows you to limit the power applied to the “B” antenna port, in case you wish to excite a low-drive linear amplifier, for example. You may use the other antenna port for full-power operation, of course.

79

Menu Operation

U-51 (MIC-EQ)

Function: Set the DSP microphone equalization pattern, if desired

Available Values: oFF

/

1

/

2

/

3

/

4

Default: oFF

This Menu Item allows you to tailor, via the DSP, the audio response of the transceiver to match your voice characteristics. This focuses the available power of the transceiver into the frequency spectrum occupied by your voice, thus increasing useful power output.

The choices are: oFF

This function is disabled.

1

Mid- and high-frequency components are enhanced with this setting.

2

A high-emphasis response is produced, ideal for pile-up or contest work.

3

Both low- and high-emphasis responses are produced.

4

A wide bandpass response is produced, emulating a “broadcast” microphone audio characteristic.

The [DSP] key on the front panel does not have to be on for this feature to work, as On/Off control is implicit in the menu selections provided. Use the “Monitor” feature to select the audio response most suited for your voice.

U-52 (

LI-TU-S )

Function: Activate the Linear Amplifier Tuning pulser

Available Values: N/A

Default: oFF

After selecting this Menu Item, pressing the [E

NT

] key activates the pulser for a time duration established via Menu Item U-55, and the time remaining will count down on the U-52 status screen. The characteristics of the pulser are set via Menu Items U-53 ~ U-57.

This feature may be ideal for inclusion as a “Quick

Menu” item.

80

U-53 (

LI-A-PO )

Function: Set the power output for the Linear Amplifier Tuning pulser via Antenna-A

Available Values:

Default:

100

100

/

50

/

10

If you have different amplifiers for different bands, each with unique drive requirements, you may use this setting to define the tune-up power level via the

A antenna port.

U-54 (

LI-B-PO )

Function: Set the power output for the Linear Amplifier Tuning pulser via Antenna-B

Available Values:

100

/

50

/

10

Default:

100

If you have different amplifiers for different bands, each with unique drive requirements, you may use this setting to define the tune-up power level via the

B antenna port.

U-55 (

LI-TIME )

Function: Define the duration of the Linear Amplifier

Tuning pulser’s tune-up period

Available Values:

3

~

60

Seconds

Default:

10

Seconds

When the [ENT] key is pressed while in Menu Item

U-52, a pulsed signal will be transmitted for a number of seconds, after which the transceiver will return to the Receive mode. The tuning time period is set via this Menu Item.

U-56 (

LI-SPAC )

Function: Set the length of the spaces between the

T

X

pulses defined in Menu Item U-57

Available Values:

0

~

3000

ms.

Default:

100

ms.

A lower value set in this Menu Item makes the pulser’s action more closely appear to resemble a continuous “key-down” tone. The duty cycle is lower, though, depending on the pulse length set via Menu Item U-

57.

U-57 (

LI-MARK )

Function: Set the length of the T

X

pulse for the Linear Amplifier Tuning pulser

Available Values:

0

~

3000

ms.

Default:

100

ms.

A lower value set in this Menu Item reduces the duty cycle of the transceiver/amplifier during linear amplifier tune-up.

FT-920 Operating Manual

U-58 (

RLSBCAR )

Function: Set the R

X

Carrier Point for LSB

Available Values:

- 0.300

~

0.500

kHz

Dafault:

0.000

Changing this value is analogous to rotating the IF

S

HIFT

control, allowing you to preset the frequency response of the receiver during LSB operation. The effect of the adjustment can be heard if you turn the volume up while rotating the VFO-B Tuning Dial to adjust the setting.

U-59 (

TLSBCAR )

Function: Set the T

X

Carrier Point for LSB

Available Values:

- 0.300

~

0.500

kHz

Dafault:

0.000

This is the same function as that of Menu Item U-58, as applied to your voice response on LSB (T

X

). The effect may be difficult to discern, however, depending on the settings of the TX Equalizer via Menu Item

U-51.

U-60 (

PROCLSB )

Function: Set the T

X

Carrier Point for LSB when the

Speech Processor is on

Available Values:

- 0.300

~

0.500

kHz

Dafault:

0.000

This is the same function as that of Menu Item U-59, but is applied to your voice response on LSB (T

X

) when the Speech Processor is on. Therefore, it is possible to set two different response characteristics for your voice, one for “Processor-On” and one for

“Processor Off.”

U-61 (

RUSBCAR )

Function: Set the R

X

Carrier Point for USB

Available Values:

- 0.300

~

0.500

kHz

Dafault:

0.000

Changing this value is analogous to rotating the IF

S

HIFT

control, allowing you to preset the frequency response of the receiver during USB operation. The effect of the adjustment can be heard if you turn the volume up while rotating the VFO-B Tuning Dial to adjust the setting.

Menu Operation

U-62 (

TUSBCAR )

Function: Set the T

X

Carrier Point for USB

Available Values:

- 0.300

~

0.500

kHz

Dafault:

0.000

This is the same function as that of Menu Item U-58, as applied to your voice response on USB (T

X

). The effect may be difficult to discern, however, depending on the settings of the TX Equalizer via Menu Item

U-51.

U-63 (

PROCUSB )

Function: Set the T

X

Carrier Point for USB when the

Speech Processor is on

Available Values:

- 0.300

~

0.500

kHz

Dafault:

0.000

This is the same function as that of Menu Item U-59, but is applied to your voice response on USB (T

X

) when the Speech Processor is on. Therefore, it is possible to set two different response characteristics for your voice, one for “Processor-On” and one for

“Processor Off.”

U-64 (

VOX-DLY )

Function: Set the “hang time” for the VOX circuitry

Available Values:

0

~

15

Default:

5

(Corresponding to 1 second)

The above scale of 1 ~ 15 is in 0.2 second increments, allowing precise setting of the desired VOX recovery time.

U-65 (

VX-GAIN )

Function: Set the gain of the VOX circuitry’s input audio detector

Available Values:

0

~

15

Default:

15

The adjustment values are an arbitrary scale. Set the

VOX Gain to the level which quickly activates the transmitter, yet does not pick up extraneous noises in your operating room.

81

FT-920 Operating Manual

82

U-66 (

VX-ANTR )

Function: Set the level of the “Anti-Trip” circuitry of the VOX system

Available Values:

0

~

15

Default:

15

This adjustment scale is also arbitrary. This Menu

Item should be set to the point where loud speaker volume does not activate the VOX.

U-67 (

Q MENU )

Function: Define which items are to be included in the “Quick Menu” bank

Available Values: All Menu Items

Default: OFF

After pressing [E

NT

] while using this Menu Item, rotate the VFO-B Tuning Dial to select the Menu Item to be included/excluded from Quick Menu, then use the front panel [U

P

p

] or [D

OWN

q

] key to change the setting for that Menu Item to ON or OFF.

The default setting for this Menu Item is OFF, which means that there is no Quick Menu feature active.

When this is the case, a momentary press of the

[M

ENU

] key activates “Normal Menu” operation. When one or more items have been designated for “Quick

Menu” use, however, a momentary press of [M

ENU

] activates the Quick Menu; pressing and holding

[M

ENU

] in for ½ seconds activates “Normal menu” operation in this case.

U-68 (

FM STEP )

Function: Set scanning steps/ to be used during FM operation

Available Values:

OFF

/

0.5

~

50 kHz

Default:

10

kHz

This Menu Item sets the scanning steps for FM work when the “FAST” synthesizer-step mode is selected.

It allows the radio to be used in a “channelized” mode according to the channel spacing utilized in your country.

U-69 (

CW-NAR )

Function: Enable/Disable the signal path through the optional YF-116C CW filter

Available Values: on

/ oFF

Default: oFF

When the CW filter is installed, the signal path must be enabled (or the FT-920 will not “know” that the filter is there). Conversely, if the filter is not installed, erroneously setting this Menu Item to “ on

” will result in a “dead” receiver if the [N

ARROW

] key is pressed during CW operation.

U-70 (

AM-WIDE )

Function: Enable/Disable the signal path through the optional YF-116A AM filter

Available Values: on

/ oFF

Default: oFF

When the AM filter is installed, the signal path must be enabled (or the FT-920 will not “know” that the filter is there). Set this Menu Item to “ on

” to enable the signal path to the Wide filter. The stock 2.4 kHz

(SSB) filter then becomes the “Narrow” filter during

AM operation.

U-71 (

AUTOTUN )

Function: Enable/Disable automatic retuning of ATU settings when SWR increases

Available Values: on

/ oFF

Default: on

This feature instructs the Automatic Antenna Tuner to re-adjust its settings, without operator intervention, should the SWR present at the antenna jack increase above a value of 3:1.

U-72 (

FASTTUN )

Function: Enable/Disable high-speed antenna tuning

Available Values: on

/ oFF

Default: oFF

The higher-speed tuning option reduces the tuning time slightly for the ATU. The SWR obtained at the completion of “Fast” tuning may be slightly higher than in the “Normal” mode, but this should present no problems in typical operation.

FT-920 Operating Manual

U-73 (

T-RXANT )

Function: Enable/Disable protection relay in line from

“RX A

NTENNA

” jack

Available Values: on

/ oFF

Default: on

When the [RX A

NTENNA

] key is pressed, activating the Receive-only antenna port, protection for the receiver circuits from high RF voltage is afforded by a small relay which, in the default condition, opens the

RX Antenna line during transmission. If only very low

RF voltage is present in your installation during transmission, this Menu Item may be turned OFF.

Menu Operation

FT-920 Operating Manual

83

VHF/UHF Transverter Operation

Although the FT-920 does not have a dedicated

“Transverter” jack per se, the flexibility provided by the multiple antenna ports and the Menu system will generally provide easy interfacing to VHF and UHF transverters.

The recommended interconnection points are described below: r

For transceive converters (where both transmit and receive converter circuits use a common RF input/output line), connect the coaxial cable from the transverter to the [B] antenna jack.

r

For separate receive and transmit converter units, connect the transmit converter’s coaxial cable to the [B] antenna jack, and the receive converter’s coaxial cable to the [R

X

A

NT

I

N

] RCA jack on the rear panel of the FT-920.

r

Select Antenna-B by pressing the [A

NTENNA

A/

B] switch, if needed.

r

Press VFO-A’s Orange “T

X

” LED/Switch for ½ second to activate the “TX Mute” mode, which provides a maximum power output of 10 Watts.

r

Now rotate the RF P

WR

control fully counterclockwise. At this setting, power output will be essentially zero, and you may then adjust the

RF P

WR

control slightly clockwise so as to

Important Note: Even though you might mistakenly assign a different band to Antenna B, or forget to turn the RF P

WR

control fully counter-clockwise, the maximum power which will appear at the Antenna B port will be 10 watts. If you design an input protection attenuator network correctly, you should easily be able to provide “fail-safe” protection for your

VHF/UHF transverter.

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84

FT-920 Operating Manual

Phone Patch Operation

Overview

Phone patch operation allows linking your FT-920 to the public telephone system to provide two-way simplex communications on behalf of third parties. The

FT-920 may be used with the LL-7 phone patch unit installed in the optional SP-8 external loudspeaker, or with phone patch units from other manufacturers.

The diagram at the bottom of the page shows interconnection for the SP-8/LL-7 combination; be sure to consult the documentation provided with units of non-Yaesu manufacture for installation instructions.

Operation

Phone patch Tx/Rx switching may be done manually using the PTT method, or automatically using the

VOX circuitry of the transceiver. While the manual

(“PTT”) method does not require careful balancing of the LL-7’s bridge circuit, it does require more work by the operator (you must manually switch the PTT or MOX switch every time someone in the patched conversation says “Over”). Therefore, most operators prefer to use the VOX method whenever the telephone signal-to-noise ratio permits. If the telephone line noise level is high, however, the PTT method may still be necessary, so you should become familiar with both methods.

Note

You may need to contact your telephone company for permission to connect an external device, such as a phone patch, to the telephone system’s lines. Also, you should procure and use a suitable 600

, three-way transformer if connecting the LL-7 and a telephone handset to the same telephone line.

Regardless of which patch Tx/Rx control method is used, you may need to instruct the person on the telephone to speak slowly in a clear, steady voice level, and to say “Over” when a response is expected from the other party. This will serve as a notice to you

(if you are using PTT control) to switch to receive while signaling the other station to go ahead and transmit, so as to avoid “doubling” with the other station.

During all phone patch operation, you should monitor both sides of the conversation at all times (this may be required by law); this will, of course, require a telephone at the operating position.

FT-920 Operating Manual

85

CAT (Computer-Aided Transceiver) System Protocol

The

CAT

System in the FT-920 provides control of frequency, VFO, memory, and other settings through the use of command codes sent from an external personal computer. This allows multiple control operations to be fully automated as a single mouse click, or it allows a third-party software package (such as contest logging software) to communicate with the

FT-920 without operator intervention.

The FT-920 has a built-in level converter, allowing direct connection from the rear panel

CAT

jack to the serial port of your computer, without the need for an external RS-232C level converter box.

Yaesu Musen does not produce

CAT

System operating software, due to the wide variety of personal computers, operating systems, and applications in use today. However, the FT-920 (and other Yaesu products) are widely supported by third-party software packages, and we recommend that you contact your dealer for advice, or check advertisements in amateur radio journals. Most software vendors also have

Home Pages on the World Wide Web containing a wealth of information on the features and radio support for their software packages.

You will need a serial cable for connection to the (RS-

232C) COM port of your computer. Purchase or construct a standard serial cable (not the so-called “null modem” type), ensuring it has the correct gender and number of pins for connection to your system.

The information presented in this section will allow the programmer to understand the command structure and opcodes used in the FT-920’s

CAT

System.

86

5

6

7

8

#

3

4

1

2

9

1 3

1 4

1 5

1 0

11

1 2

1 6

1 7

1 8

1 9

Com ma nd Title

S PLIT On/O ff

Recall Memory

Memory Op erations

Recall V FO

Copy Memory Data to VFO- A

Clarifier Op erations

Set V FO-A Fr equency

Mode Setting

Update IntervalPacing

Status Update

Keyer Commands

Tuner On/Off

Tuner Start

Repeater Shift

Set V FO-B Fr equency

B andwi dth

Tone Fr equ ency

Read Meter

Read Status Flags

10H

70H

81H

82H

84H

8AH

8CH

90H

F7H

FAH

Opcode Command Chart

O pcode

01H

02H

03H

05H

06H

09H

0AH

0CH

P 1

P 1

P 1

P 1

P 1

P 1

P 1

P 1

Pa ra me ter

xx xx xx xx

P 2 xx xx

P 2

P 2 xx

P 3 xx xx xx xx

P 3 xx

P 4

P 4 xx xx xx xx xx

0EH P 1 xx xx xx

P1=00 : Off, P1=01: On

See Note 1

Com me nt s

See Note 2

P1=00: VFO- A, P1=01: VFO- B

See Note 3

See Note 4

See Note 5

See Note 6

P=00~ FF(H) in 1 ms. steps. A dds delay between each byte of all downlo aded data from the FT-920

See Note 7

See Note 8

P1=00 : Off, P1=01: On

P 1

1B

P 1 xx

P 1

P 1

P 1

P 1

P 1

01 xx

01 xx xx xx

P 2 xx

P 2 xx xx xx

P 3 xx xx xx

P 3 xx xx xx xx

P 4 xx xx xx xx

P 4

P 4 xx xx xx

P1=00 : SIMPLE X, P1=01: M inus Shift, P1=02: Plus Shift

See Note 9

See Note 10

S ee Note 11

See Note 12

FT-920 Operating Manual

CAT (Computer-Aided Transceiver) System Protocol

Notes to Opcode Command Chart

Note 1:

P1 = 01~7A: Memory Channel Number (Hex)

01~63: Memory Channels 1-01~1-99

64~6D: Memory Channels d-01~d-10

6E~78: Memory Channels C-01~C-11

79~7A: Memory Channels P-Lo~P-Hi

Note 2:

P1 = 01~7A: Memory Channel Number (Hex)

01~63: Memory Channels 1-01~1-99

64~6D: Memory Channels d-01~d-10

6E~78: Memory Channels C-01~C-11

79~7A: Memory Channels P-Lo~P-Hi

Note 8:

P3 = 00: Keyer Memory 0

P3 = 01: Keyer Memory 1

P3 = 02: Keyer Memory 2

P3 = 03: Keyer Memory 3

P3 = 04: “ID” Memory

P3 = 05: “Contest Number” Memory

P3 = 06: Keyer Memory Down

P3 = 07: Keyer Memory Up

P3 = 08: Keyer Memory Playback (no Tx)

P3 = 09: Write Memory

P2 = 00: Memory Store

P2 = 01: Memory Clear

P2 = 02: Memory Recall

Note 3:

P1 = 01~7A: Memory Channel Number (Hex)

01~63: Memory Channels 1-01~1-99

64~6D: Memory Channels d-01~d-10

6E~78: Memory Channels C-01~C-11

79~7A: Memory Channels P-Lo~P-Hi

Note 9:

The frequency is converted to its BCD-coded components.

For example: to convert 14.256.78 MHz

P1 P2 P3 P4

¯ ¯ ¯ ¯

5 Byte Block = 8A, 01, 42, 56, 78

­

Opcode

Note 4:

P1 = 00: RX Clarifier Off

P1 = 01: RX Clarifier On

P1 = 80: TX Clarifier Off

P1 = 81: TX Clarifier On

P1 = FF: Set Clarifier

P2 = 00: Clarifier Offset (+)

P2 = FF: Clarifier Offset (-)

P3 = 00~09 (kHz)

P4 = 00~00 (100/10 Hz)

Note 10:

VFO-A Mode Parameters

P1 = 00: Wide

P1 = 01: Wide

P1 = 02: Narrow

P1 = 03: Narrow

P1 = 04: Wide

VFO-B Mode Parameters

P1 = 80: Wide

P1 = 81: Wide

P1 = 82: Narrow

P1 = 83: Narrow

P1 = 84: Wide

Note 11:

P1 = 00~28: Tone Encoder Frequency (Hex)

Note 5:

The frequency is converted to its BCD-coded components.

For example: to convert 14.256.78 MHz

P1 P2 P3 P4

¯ ¯ ¯ ¯

5 Byte Block = 0A, 01, 42, 56, 78

­

Opcode

P2 = 00~27: Tone Decoder Frequency (Hex)

Note 12:

A digitized meter deflection indication is returned, with value between 0 and FFH; four sets of this data are sent, plus one padding byte (0F7H), as follows:

Met er Byt e Met er Byt e Met er Byt e Met er Byt e F7H

P1 = 00: S/PO, ALC, VOLT, AMP

P1 = 01: FWD, REV, SHIFT, PITCH

P1 = 02: Dummy byte, SQL, HPF, LPF

P1 = 03: NR, PROC, DISC, RMC

Note 6:

VFO-A Mode Parameters

P1 = 00: LSB

P1 = 01: USB

P1 = 02: CW-USB

P1 = 03: CW-LSB

P1 = 04: AM

P1 = 05: AM

P1 = 06: FM

P1 = 07: FM-N

P1 = 08: DATA-LSB

P1 = 09: DATA-LSB

P1 = 0A: DATA-USB

P1 = 0B: DATA-FM

VFO-B Mode Parameters

P1 = 80: LSB

P1 = 81: USB

P1 = 82: CW-USB

P1 = 83: CW-LSB

P1 = 84: AM

P1 = 85: AM

P1 = 86: FM

P1 = 87: FM-N

P1 = 88: DATA-LSB

P1 = 89: DATA-LSB

P1 = 8A: DATA-USB

P1 = 8B: DATA-FM

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Note 7:

Status Update Data

P1 = 01: Memory Channel Number (1 byte)

P1 = 02: Current Operating Data for VFO/Memory (28 bytes)

P1 = 03: VFO-A and VFO-B Data (28 bytes)

P1 = 04: Memory Channel Data: (14 bytes)

P4 = 01~89 Memory Channel Number (used when P1 = 04)

01~63: Memory Channels 1-01~1-99

64~6D: Memory Channels d-01~d-10 (VFO-A)

6E~78: Memory Channels C-01~C-11

79~7A: Memory Channels P-Lo~P-Hi

7B~84: Memory Channels d-01~d-10 (VFO-B)

85~89: QMB Memories S-01~S-05

P 1

P 2

06h

07h

08h

09h

0Ah

00h

01h

02h

03h

04h

05h

Freq .

(Hz )

79.7

82.5

85.4

88.5

91.5

OFF

67.0

69.3

71.9

74.4

77.0

P 1

P 2

11h

12h

13h

14h

15h

0Bh

0Ch

0Dh

0Eh

0Fh

10h

CTCSS Tone Data

Freq .

(Hz )

94.8

97.4

100.0

103.5

107.2

110.9

114.8

118.8

123.0

127.3

131.8

P 1

P 2

1Ch

1Dh

1Eh

1Fh

20h

16h

17h

18h

19h

1Ah

1Bh

Freq .

(Hz )

136.5

141.3

146.2

151.4

156.7

162.2

167.9

173.8

179.9

186.2

192.8

P 1

P 2

21h

22h

23h

24h

25h

26h

27h

28h*

Freq .

(Hz )

203.5

210.7

218.1

225.7

233.6

241.8

250.3

1750

* 28h = P1 only

FT-920 Operating Manual

87

88

CAT (Computer-Aided Transceiver) System Protocol

CAT

Data Protocol

Serial data is passed via the

CAT

jack on the rear panel of the transceiver at 4800 bps. When data is being transferred, the

CAT

indicator on the front panel display is illuminated momentarily, disappearing when the data flow is terminated. All commands sent from the computer to the transceiver consist of five-byte blocs, with up to 200 ms between each byte.

The last byte in each block is the instruction opcode, while the first four bytes of each block are arguments

(either parameters for that instruction, or dummy values required to pad the block out to five bytes).

Constructing and Sending

CAT

Commands

Example #1:

Set VFO-A to 14.250.00 MHz r

Per the CAT Command Table, the opcode for “Set

VFO-A Frequency” is “0AH.” Note that the “H” following each byte value indicate hexadecimal

(base 16) values. Placing the opcode into the fifth data bit position, we then enter the frequency into the first four data bit positions:

10's

Hz

0

00

B yt e 1

100's

Hz

0

1's kHz

0

50

B yt e 2

10's kHz

5

100's kHz

2

42

B yt e 3

1's

MHz

4

10's

MHz

1

100's

MHz

01

B yt e 4

0

Byte 1

Argument

Byte 2

Argument

Byte 3

Argument

Byte 4

Argument

CAT 5 -B YTE COMMA ND STR UCTIU RE

Byte 5

Instruction

OPCODE

Each byte sent consists of one start bit, 8 data bits, no parity bit, and two stop bits:

Start

Bit

0 1 2 3 4 5 6

CAT DATA BY TE FORMAT

7

St o p

Bit

St o p

Bit

The four argument byte values are constructed from the decimal value by breaking the frequency into 2-digit blocks (in BCD “packed decimal” format). Leading zeroes are required in the hundreds-of-MHz place as well as the tens-of-MHz place (when below 10 MHz).

r

We now insert the four-byte BCD-coded frequency

(00, 50, 42, 01) into the five-byte block along with the parameter byte, resulting in a complete command string in hex format:

B yt e 1

00

B yt e 2

50

B yt e 3

42

Data /A rgument Bytes

B yt e 4

01

B yt e 5

0AH

Opcod e

There are nineteen instruction opcodes for the FT-

920, listed in the chart on page 86. Most of these duplicate front panel operations, while some replicate

Menu functions. Note that most commands require one or more parameters to be set; however, regardless of the number of parameters present, every

Command Block sent must consist of five bytes.

Accordingly, any

CAT

control program must construct the five-byte block by selecting the appropriate instruction opcode, organizing the parameters, if any, and providing unused “dummy” argument bytes to pad the block to its required five-byte length (the dummy bytes can contain any value). The resulting five bytes are then sent, opcode last, from the computer to the FT-920 CPU via the computer’s serial port and the transceiver’s

CAT

jack.

Send these five bytes to the transceiver, in the order shown in the table above, left to right:

00

50 42 01 0AH

Example #2:

Store the above frequency (14.250 MHz) into Memory

Channel #1-48 r

Memory operation is exercised by Opcode 03H.

In base 16 (hexadecimal), Memory Channel #48 is channel 30. And, pursuant to Note #2 associated with Opcode 03H, parameter P2 (Memory

Set) must be set to value “00.” Therefore, the corresponding five-byte command/parameter block would be

00 00 00 30 03H

.

B yt e 1

00

B yt e 2

00

B yt e 3

00

Data /A rgument Bytes

B yt e 4

30

B yt e 5

03H

Opcod e

In sum, commands are sent in the following general format:

B yt e 1

P 4

B yt e 2

P 3

B yt e 3

P 2

B yt e 4

P 1

B yt e 5

Opcode

FT-920 Operating Manual

CAT (Computer-Aided Transceiver) System Protocol

Downloading FT-920 Data

On command, the FT-920 will download some or all of its operational data. By regular polling of the transceiver, your software can be kept continuously updated on the status of the FT-920 operating environment.

The following commands cause the FT-920 to download various components of its operational status:

Status Update (10H): this Opcode causes the transceiver to download frequency and memory channel data, per the parameter data supplied in the Status Update request (parameters P1 & P4).

Status Flags Request (FAH): this Opcode instructs the transceiver to download eight status flag bytes.

Read Meter (F7H): this Opcode causes the transceiver to download meter deflection data in packs, pursuant to Note 12 following the “Opcode Command Chart on page 86.

Pacing (0EH): this Opcode sets the delay between bytes of data when you request a download of data. This delay is set to zero initially, but resetting it to a higher value will allow slower computers to read and process data returned by the radio. However, the download time will be significantly increased if a high value is used in this command’s “P1” argument.

These Opcodes are detailed below.

Status Update (10H)

Depending on the value of parameter P1, this command will return:

• One byte containing the current Memory

Channel Number (P1=01);

• Two 14-byte records of the current operating frequency (VFO or Memory; P1-02);

• One each 14-byte record for VFO-A and VFO-

B (P1=03); or

• One 14-byte record of Memory Channel data

(P1=04).

When P1 is set to value 04, parameter P4 may be set to a hexadecimal value between 00 and 89 to prompt the transceiver to download frequency information on any of the memories, as shown in Note 7 on previous page. So P1=04 instructs the radio to download memory data, and P4’s value defines which memory channel’s data is to be downloaded.

The format for the 14-byte frequency data records is shown at the end of this sub-section.

Status Flags Request (FAH)

The format for the eight Status Flags is shown below:

Bit O ffse t

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Bit O ffse t

0

1

4

5

2

3

6

7

Bit O ffse t

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

FT-920 Operating Manual

S tat us Fla g Byte #0 Conte nt s

Split Operatio n active with VFO-B on TX

Split Operation active with VFO-B on RX

Antenna Tun er On/tuning

CAT

System ope ration in progres s

VFO-B In Us e (both TX and RX on VFO-B)

Direc t Keypa d Entry in progress

VFO-A is Mu ted

Tran smission in progress (PTT line g rounded )

8-Byte Status Flags Record Table

Bit O ffse t

0

1

4

5

2

3

6

7

S tat us Fla g Byte #1 Conte nt s

5-sec ond "Memory Ch eck" countdown in progress

Memory Checking in progres s

Dual VFO Tracking active

Quic k Memo ry Bank (QMB) s elected

Memory Tuning in progress

VFO Operatio n selec ted

Memory Mod e selecte d

General Cov erage Reception active

Bit O ffse t

0

1

4

5

2

3

6

7

S tat us Fla g Byte #3 Conte nt s

Not Used

Alph a-Numeric Memo ry Lavel selecte d

Not Used

Linear Amplifier Tuni ng Pulser active

PTT grounded via

CAT

command

Transmit "Inh ibit" is active

Key Release Timer ac tve

PTT inhibit

S tat us Fla g Byte #6 Conte nt s

Dual Watch active

Not Used

Quic k Menu Mode ac tive

BUS Y lamp is on

Fine Tuning active

Not Used

VFO -B Tx Mu te activ e

VFO -A Tx Mu te activ e

Bit O ffse t

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

Bit O ffse t

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

S tat us Fla g Byte #4 Conte nt s

RTTY space (TX Idle )

Not Used

All Front Pan el Controls locke d

Group Memory Mode active

Antenna B s elected

Rx A ntenna selected

Not Used

Not Used

S tat us Fla g Byte #7 Conte nt s

Not Used

Menu Setting in progress

CTCSS/Tone Burst active

Not Used

Not Used

Linear Amplifier Tuning Pulse being transmitte d

DTMF Tone are being transmitted

VOX is active

Bit O ffse t

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

S tat us Fla g Byte #2 Conte nt s

Fast Tuning is active

Antenna Tuner is in-line

VFO-B is loc ked

VFO-A is loc ked

Squelch is c losed

Up s canning is active

Sca nning is paused

Scanning is active

S tat us Fla g Byte #5 Conte nt s

VFO-A is mu ted

VFO-B is mu ted

Not Used

Tx activated via Spot switch comman d

Not Used

Not Used

Ante nna Tuner's Wait light is on

High SWR detected

89

90

CAT (Computer-Aided Transceiver) System Protocol

Read Meter (F7H)

Sending this command with the parameters shown below causes a variety of transceiver metering data to be downloaded. The values are within the range 0 and FFH, and the data is returned in the following format:

Parameter

P1 = 00

P1 = 01

P1 = 02

P1 = 03

Me ter

Byt e

S/P O

FWD

Dummy

NR

Me ter

Byt e

ALC

RE V

SQL

PROC

Me ter

Byt e

VOLT

SHIFT

HPF

DISC

Me ter

Byt e

AMP

PITCH

LPF

RMC

Pad

F7H

F7H

F7H

F7H

The “dummy” data above is meaningless, and may be ignored.

Ch.

1-11

1-12

1-13

1-14

1-15

1-16

1-17

1-18

1-19

1-20

1-21

1-22

1-23

1-24

1-25

1-26

1-27

1-28

1-29

1-30

1-31

1-01

1-02

1-03

1-04

1-05

1-06

1-07

1-08

1-09

1-10

1-Byte Memory Channel Number

Data Structure (For Opcode 10H, etc.)

He x

0BH

0CH

0DH

0EH

0FH

10H

11H

12H

13H

14H

15H

16H

17H

18H

19H

1AH

1BH

1CH

1DH

1EH

1FH

01H

02H

03H

04H

05H

06H

07H

08H

09H

0AH

Mem ory Cha nne l Data (H ex Codes )

Ch.

1-42

1-43

1-44

1-45

1-46

1-47

1-48

1-49

1-50

1-51

1-52

1-53

1-54

1-55

1-56

1-57

1-58

1-59

1-60

1-61

1-62

1-32

1-33

1-34

1-35

1-36

1-37

1-38

1-39

1-40

1-41

He x

30H

31H

32H

33H

34H

35H

36H

37H

2AH

2BH

2CH

2DH

2EH

2FH

38H

39H

3AH

3BH

3CH

3DH

3EH

20H

21H

22H

23H

24H

25H

26H

27H

28H

29H

Ch.

1-79

1-80

1-81

1-82

1-83

1-84

1-85

1-86

1-73

1-74

1-75

1-76

1-77

1-78

1-87

1-88

1-89

1-90

1-91

1-92

1-93

1-63

1-64

1-65

1-66

1-67

1-68

1-69

1-70

1-71

1-72

He x

4FH

50H

51H

52H

53H

54H

55H

56H

49H

4AH

4BH

4CH

4DH

4EH

57H

58H

59H

5AH

5BH

5CH

5DH

44H

45H

46H

47H

48H

3FH

40H

41H

42H

43H

Ch.

C-01

C-02

C-03

C-04

C-05

C-06

C-07

C-08 d-05 d-06 d-07 d-08 d-09 d-10

1-94

1-95

1-96

1-97

1-98

1-99 d-01 d-02 d-03 d-04

C-09

C-10

C-11

P-Lo

P-Hi

He x

6EH

6FH

70H

71H

72H

73H

74H

75H

68H

69H

6AH

6BH

6CH

6DH

5EH

5FH

60H

61H

62H

63H

64H

65H

66H

67H

76H

77H

78H

79H

7AH

Byt e

7

8

5

6

3

4

1

2

9

A

B

C

D

E

14-Byte Frequency Data

Record Structure

The following tables outline the 14-byte data record structures used for the Operating Data, VFO-A, VFO-

B, and Memory Frequency data records.

1 4-Byt e Dat a Rec ord As signm ent

Band Selection

Oper ating Fr equency

Clarifier Offset

( 2 Bytes, see bel ow)

Mode Data

Flag

Filter Data 1

Filter Data 2

CTCSS Encoder Data

CTCSS Decoder Data

Memory Recall Flag

P 1

P 2

00 h

01 h

02 h

03 h

04 h

05 h

06 h

07 h

08 h

Freq .

(Hz )

Tone Frequency Codes

P 1

P 2

OFF 09 h

6 7. 0 0A h

6 9. 3 0B h

7 1. 9 0 Ch

7 4. 4 0 Dh

7 7. 0 0E h

7 9. 7 0Fh

8 2. 5 10 h

8 5. 4 11 h

Freq .

(Hz )

P 1

P 2

8 8. 5 12 h

9 1. 5 13 h

9 4. 8 14 h

9 7. 4 15 h

10 0. 0 16 h

10 3. 5 17 h

10 7. 2 18 h

11 0.9

19 h

11 4.8

1A h

Freq .

(Hz )

P 1

P 2

11 8.8

1B h

12 3. 0 1 Ch

12 7. 3 1 Dh

13 1. 8 1E h

13 6. 5 1Fh

14 1. 3 20 h

14 6. 2 21 h

15 1. 4 22 h

15 6. 7 23 h

Freq .

(Hz )

P 1

P 2

16 2. 2 24 h

Freq .

(Hz )

22 5. 7

16 7. 9 25 h

17 3. 8 26 h

17 9. 9 27 h

18 6. 2 2 8h*

19 2. 8

23 3. 6

24 1. 8

25 0. 3

175 0

20 3. 5

21 0. 7

21 8. 1 * 28h = P1 o nly

FT-920 Operating Manual

The FT-920’s memory data is maintained, even when

DC power it turned off, via a lithium backup battery with an estimated lifetime of approximately five years.

No data essential to the fundamental operation of the radio is stored in “volatile” memory, so when the battery’s voltage ultimately is exhausted the transceiver will not be disabled; you will just observe that your memories have disappeared.

In some cases of erratic operation, it may be advisable to reset the microprocessor to its factory default condition, so as to determine whether or not a part failure has caused improper action, as opposed to some operational error.

This section describes the procedures to be used for these situations.

Memory Backup

Backup Battery Replacement

The backup battery is a standard Sony™ CR2032

(or equivalent), which is installed in a socket on the bottom side of the transceiver. Replacement of the battery is easy to accomplish:



Remove the bottom cover of the transceiver (see page 93).

‚

Locate the backup battery, per the illustration, located near the front panel in the vicinity of the bright silver enclosure on the left side. Remove the original backup battery, and replace it with a fresh one

(be sure the replacement battery shows at least 3

Volts on a Voltmeter).

ƒ

Before closing the case, be certain to check that you have not accidentally changed the position of the B

ACKUP

switch, located near the backup battery but immediately adjacent to the above-referenced silver enclosure. This switch must be in the

O

N

position for the backup system to work.

„

Close up the case, replacing the six screws on the bottom, then tightening the four screws on the side panels. Be careful not to pinch any wires while re-assembling the radio.

FT-920 Operating Manual

91

Microprocessor Resetting

Microprocessor Reset Procedures

Three levels of microprocessor resetting are available, only two of which are typically used. These are: r

A reset of all memories, antenna tuner data, and

VFO frequencies to their factory defaults. Menu settings are not affected by this procedure. To do this, turn the transceiver off, then press and hold in the [G

EN

] and [E

NT

] keys on the keyboard and hold them in while you turn the [P

OWER

] switch back on. The VFO-B frequency display area will indicate “I

NITIAL

” and a series of “Dashes” will slowly disappear across the middle of the VFO-A frequency display area. When the initialization procedure is complete, the frequency displays, newly reset to 7.000 MHz in the LSB mode, will reappear.

r

A reset of just the Menu settings is also possible.

This will not wipe out any other memories, but will allow you to clear all Menu settings to their original factory default values. To do this, turn the transceiver off., then press and hold in the [M

ENU

] and

[C

LEAR

C

LAR

] keys and hold them in while you turn the [P

OWER

] switch back on.

r

If the transceiver’s microprocessor still is behaving erratically, you may need to perform a complete, “hard” reset of the CPU. To do this, remove the bottom cover of the transceiver as described previously. Now set the B

ACKUP

switch to the O

FF

position. Wait about 30 seconds, then plug the

DC cable back into the rear panel DC jack. Turn the transceiver on, then carefully turn the B

ACKUP

switch on using a non-conducting alignment tool or a toothpick. The transceiver may now be turned off, the DC cable removed, and the bottom cover replaced.

Important Note!

Be extremely careful not to come in contact with any transceiver internal circuitry while the bottom case is removed, as possibly dangerous voltages may exist inside the case.

92

FT-920 Operating Manual

Installation of Optional Accessories

Bottom Case Removal



Turn the transceiver off, and remove all cables connected to it.

‚

Turn the transceiver upside down, and remove the six screws affixing the bottom panel of the radio. Loosen the four screws on the sides of the upper case, but do not remove them.

ƒ

Now fold the rear of the bottom panel slightly away from the chassis, and remove the bottom panel by sliding it rearward.

„

To close up the case, replace the six screws on the bottom, then tighten the four screws on the side panels. Be careful not to pinch any wires while re-assembling the radio.

Figure 1

FT-920 Operating Manual

Figure 2

93

Installation of Optional Accessories

94

Installation of

Optional Filters YF-116C/YF-116A



Remove the bottom case of the transceiver (see previous page).

‚

Refer to Figure 2 on the previous page, and locate the mounting positions for the CW (YF-116C) and/or AM (YF-116A) filters on the M

AIN

Unit.

ƒ

Refer to Figure 3, and push the optional filter board onto the pins corresponding to its assigned mounting location on the radio. Gently press the board down until it is firmly seated in its connectors.

„

Replace the bottom case of the transceiver.

…

Turn the transceiver on, and enter the Menu mode.

Per the chart below, change the setting of Menu

Item U-69 to “O

N

” if installing the YF-116C CW filter, and/or change the setting of Menu Item U-

70 to “O

N

” if installing the YF-116A AM filter.

†

Filter installation is now complete.

Installation of

High-Stability Oscillator TCXO-7



Remove the bottom case of the transceiver (see previous page).

‚

Refer to Figure 2 on the previous page, and locate the mounting position for the TCXO-7, which currently is occupied by the “R

EF

O

SC

U

NIT

.”

ƒ

Refer to Figure 4, and remove the R

EF

O

SC

U

NIT

, replacing it with the TCXO-7.

„

Installation is now complete, as the TCXO-7 has been carefully aligned at the factory and should require no adjustment after installation. Replace the bottom case of the transceiver.

Installation of FM Unit FM-1



Remove the bottom case of the transceiver (see previous page).

‚

Refer to Figure 2 on the previous page, and locate the mounting positions for the FM-1 on the

M

AIN

Unit.

ƒ

Refer to Figure 5, and push the optional FM-1 board onto the pins corresponding to its assigned mounting location on the radio. Gently press the board down until it is firmly seated in its connectors.

„

Installation is now complete, as the FM-1 has been carefully aligned at the factory and should require no adjustment after installation. Replace the bottom case of the transceiver.

FT-920 Operating Manual

CAUTION !

Changes or modifications to this device not expressly approved by Yaesu

Musen could void the user’s authorization to operate this device.

1. This device complies with part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions; (1) this device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference including interference that may cause undesired operation.

2. The scanning receiver in this equipment is incapable of tuning, or readily being altered, by the User to operate within the frequency bands allocated to the Domestic public Cellular Telecommunications Service in Part 22.

This device complies with RSS-210 of Industry Canada. Operation is subject to the following two condition; (1) this device not cause interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference, including interference that may cause undesirable operation of the device.

.... leading the way.

SM

Copyright 1997

Yaesu Musen Co., Ltd.

All rights reserved.

No portion of this manual may be reproduced without the permission of

Yaesu Musen Co., Ltd.

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