SIOS Protection Suite for Windows Oracle Recovery Kit 8.2.1 Administration Guide

SIOS Protection Suite for Windows Oracle Recovery Kit 8.2.1 Administration Guide
SIOS Protection Suite for Windows
Oracle Recovery Kit
8.2.1
Administration Guide
January 2015
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Table of Contents
Chapter 1: Introduction
1
LifeKeeper Oracle
1
Oracle Overview
1
Oracle Services
2
Resource Hierarchy for Oracle
2
Recovery Kit Requirements
3
Chapter 2: Oracle Installation
4
Recovery Kit Installation
4
Upgrading Recovery Kit from Previous Version
4
Kit Removal
4
Installing and Configuring LifeKeeper with Oracle
Important Considerations
4
4
Before Installing Oracle
5
Replicated Storage Systems
5
On the Primary Server
5
On the Backup Server
5
On the Primary Server
5
Installing Oracle
6
On the Primary Server
6
On the Backup Server
6
On the Primary Server
7
Chapter 3: Oracle Resource Configuration Tasks
8
Creating an Oracle Hierarchy
8
Extending an Oracle Hierarchy
9
Unextending an Oracle Hierarchy
10
Table of Contents
i
Deleting an Oracle Hierarchy
10
Manage Oracle Database Configuration
11
Testing Your Oracle Resource Hierarchy
13
Chapter 4: Oracle Hierarchy Administration
14
Oracle Hierarchy Administration Guidelines
14
LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit Recovery Variables
14
Updating Oracle Username and Password for LifeKeeper
15
Manually Configure Oracle 11g DB Console
15
Chapter 5: Oracle Troubleshooting Tips
Create Hierarchy Failed
16
16
Suggestion
16
Bring In Service Failed
16
Suggestion
16
Oracle TNSListener Service is Not Started or Stopped as it Should Be
Suggestion
16
16
Server Not Responding
16
TCP/IP Client Cannot Access Server (Server Not Responding) After a Successful Switchover
by LifeKeeper
16
Insight
17
Suggestion
17
Remote Users Cannot Log In ORA 12504 or ORA 12514 or ORA 12541
17
Insight
17
Suggestion
17
Table of Contents
ii
Chapter 1: Introduction
LifeKeeper Oracle
The LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit provides a way to recover an Oracle database instance (version, 10g or 11g) from a failed server
to a backup server. You can also extend the protection of the database instance to other servers. Using the LifeKeeper GUI, you can
easily create a complete resource hierarchy so that the recovery operation includes all the disk resources used by the Oracle System
Identifier (SID) as well as the Named Pipe and/or IP socket resources used to access the database.
Oracle Overview
The LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit provides the ability to concurrently run Oracle database instances on other servers, and to
optionally place these instances under LifeKeeper protection. Such a configuration is known as Active/Active and allows LifeKeeper
servers to be fully utilized under normal operating conditions.
The LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit includes the ability to recover the database instance locally (local recovery) before trying to fail
over the database instance to a standby server.
The LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit protects the following Core/Standard Oracle services:
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Oracle Service
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Oracle TNS Listener
The LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit protects the following Optional Services for each release:
Optional 10g Services
Optional 11g Services
Oracle DB Console
Oracle DB Console
Oracle Job Scheduler
Oracle Job Scheduler
Oracle ISQL*Plus
Oracle SNMP Peer Encapsulator
Oracle SNMP Peer Master Agent
Oracle Cluster Service Note: This service is for Automatic Stor- Oracle Cluster Service Note: This service is for Automatic Storage Management (ASM) and is not available for protection under age Management (ASM) and is not available for protection under
LifeKeeper because LifeKeeper does not currently support ASM. LifeKeeper because LifeKeeper does not currently support ASM.
The typical Oracle resource hierarchy consists of the following resources:
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Oracle
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Shared communication resource (IP or LAN Manager alias name)
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Volume(s)
All Oracle data, log, and trace (core database) files for the protected SID are stored on shared or replicated volumes. Upon detecting a
failure, LifeKeeper switches the core database files, along with its associated data volumes and communication resources, to a
backup server. The recovery can be completely transparent to database users. Once LifeKeeper switches all dependent resources to
the backup server, it starts the Oracle service on that server.
The LifeKeeper GUI display shown below depicts a typical resource hierarchy. The Oracle resource is the topmost resource in the
hierarchy tree. It is responsible for starting and stopping the dependent resources (communication and volume resources) in the
correct order.
This particular Oracle hierarchy uses only IP for its communication/Listener resource.
Oracle Services
The LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit protects the following Core/Standard Oracle services:
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Oracle Service
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Oracle TNS Listener
The LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit protects the following Optional Services for each release:
Optional 10g Services
Optional 11g Services
Oracle DB Console
Oracle DB Console
Oracle Job Scheduler
Oracle Job Scheduler
Oracle ISQL* Plus
Oracle SNMP Peer Encapsulator
Oracle SNMP Peer Master Agent
Oracle Cluster Service
Oracle Cluster Service
Note: This service is for Automatic Storage Management
(ASM) and is not available for protection under LifeKeeper
because LifeKeeper does not currently support ASM.
Note: This service is for Automatic Storage Management
(ASM) and is not available for protection under LifeKeeper
because LifeKeeper does not currently support ASM.
Resource Hierarchy for Oracle
The typical Oracle resource hierarchy consists of the following resources:
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Oracle
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Shared communication resource (IP or LAN Manager alias name)
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Volume(s)
All Oracle data, log, and trace (core database) files for the protected SID are stored on shared or replicated volumes. Upon detecting a
failure, LifeKeeper switches the core database files, along with its associated data volumes and communication resources, to a
backup server. The recovery can be completely transparent to database users. Once LifeKeeper switches all dependent resources to
the backup server, it starts the Oracle service on that server.
The LifeKeeper GUI display shown below depicts a typical resource hierarchy. The Oracle resource is the topmost resource in the
hierarchy tree.It is responsible for starting and stopping the dependent resources(communication and volume resources) in the correct
order.
This particular Oracle hierarchy uses only IP for its communication/Listener resource.
Restriction: If you are configuring multiple ORACLE instances, then you must configure each listener to listen on a unique virtual IP
address.
LifeKeeper will not allow you to configure multiple listeners to listen on the same virtual IP address with different ports.
Recovery Kit Requirements
Before installing and configuring the LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit, be sure that your configuration meets the following requirements:
Operating System software. LifeKeeper supports the following versions of Windows operating systems:
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Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 2012, Standard, Enterprise, Datacenter Editions (64-bit versions)
LifeKeeper software. You must install the same version of LifeKeeper software and any patches on each server. Please refer to
the Release Notes for specific LifeKeeper requirements.
SIOS DataKeeper software (optional). If you plan to use Oracle with replicated volumes rather than shared storage, you should
install the SIOS DataKeeper for Windows software on each server.
Oracle Database. The recovery kit supports Oracle versions 10g or 11g.
Chapter 2: Oracle Installation
The LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit is available via ftp download. Installation is simple and quick using InstallShield to provide a
standard installation interface.
Recovery Kit Installation
Before installing the LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit, be sure you are familiar with the product prerequisites listed above, as well as
the installation/configuration procedure outlined in the section Installing and Configuring LifeKeeper with Oracle.
Upgrading Recovery Kit from Previous Version
You may upgrade from the previous version of the LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit software while preserving your resource
hierarchies.
Note: You must close and restart the LifeKeeper GUI after upgrading the LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit.
Kit Removal
To remove the LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit software, choose the "LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit vX.X" in the Program and
Features applet in the control panel.
Installing and Configuring LifeKeeper with Oracle
The LifeKeeper with Oracle installation and configuration procedure differs slightly for replicated storage systems and shared stored
systems. We have created separate sections in this document for each type of storage configuration in an effort to clarify the
installation and configuration process.
For the most efficient setup, perform the following tasks to create an Oracle database instance first on the primary server and then on
the secondary server.
Important Considerations
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When working on a particular server, switch the communication resource on that particular server, e.g. if working on the backup
server, the communication resource should be switched to the backup server.
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The resource hierarchy will be preserved on an upgrade
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Only one SID is supported per Oracle Home directory
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Special consideration is required when the Oracle Home is not installed to the same LifeKeeper protected volume as the
database (SID). If Oracle Home is installed on a different shared or replicated volume, that volume must be LifeKeeper
protected and manually added as a dependent resource in the Oracle resource hierarchy. If Oracle Home is not installed on a
LifeKeeper protected volume no changes are necessary.
l
Use Windows disk management tools to configure the disk resources and the volumes. Use Oracle tools, e.g. Net Manager, to
configure network protocols
Before Installing Oracle
Before you install the Oracle software, the servers and storage must be configured and LifeKeeper must be installed on each server in
the cluster. By doing so, you can then install Oracle onto a volume that is already LifeKeeper-protected.
Replicated Storage Systems
On the Primary Server
1. Use the Windows Disk Management tool to configure your disk resources and define the replicated volumes that you want to
use. (Be sure the volume size is adequate.)
2. It is recommended that you use Windows Explorer to unshare from the network all volumes to be used by the Oracle SID.
3. Configure your networking to support the LifeKeeper TCP/IP comm path(s) and, if applicable, the switchable IP address.
4. Install the LifeKeeper Core software on a local disk followed by the LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit.
5. If you have a very large Oracle database, you should review the MAXWAIT value and consider increasing it.
6. Install the SIOS DataKeeper software to the local disk now. Refer to the SIOS Protection Suite Installation Guide for more
details.
On the Backup Server
1. Bring up the backup server and use the Disk Management utility to assign the same drive letter to the replicated volume as
assigned on the primary server.
2. Install the LifeKeeper Core software on a local disk followed by the LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit.
3. If you have a very large Oracle database, you should review the MAXWAIT value and consider increasing it.
4. Install the SIOS DataKeeper software.
On the Primary Server
Now that you have LifeKeeper installed on both servers, go back to the primary server and do the following:
1. Using the LifeKeeper GUI, create comm paths between the primary and backup servers.
2. In LifeKeeper, create your communication resources (including either IP, LAN Manager or both) and extend them to the backup
server. Later, when you create your Oracle resource hierarchy, LifeKeeper will automatically bring these resources into the
hierarchy as dependencies.
Note: When the Oracle Hierarchy is created, the SIOS DataKeeper resource will automatically be created and brought into the Oracle
resource hierarchy as a dependency.
Installing Oracle
Once you have installed LifeKeeper and configured the volume and communication resources, you are ready to install Oracle to the
protected volume(s).
On the Primary Server
1. Install the Oracle software to the protected shared volume. This creates the Oracle SID. Note that all files related to this Oracle
SID (including log,trace, control, and data files) must be located on protected volumes.
2. Stop the default TNSListener service Oracle<OraHome>TNSListener and set the startup mode to Manual. (You will create a
new Listener for the SID to be protected in a later step.)
3. Using Oracle Net Manager, configure Oracle to use the LifeKeeper-protected communication resource(s) as follows:
a. Create a new TNSListener Service using the SID name. Configure Listening Locations designating the LifeKeeperprotected IP address and/or named pipe (LAN Manager alias name). Then configure the Database Services specifying
the Oracle Home directory and SID.
b. Modify the Oracle Service for your SID. For TCP/IP, change the host name to the protected IP address. For Named
Pipes, change the machine name to the LAN Manager alias.
4. Create a separate TNSListener Service instance for the SID to be protected under LifeKeeper. The service should be created
using the lsnrctl Start <SID> command. This will create a service with the name
Oracle<OraHome>TNSListener<SID>.
5. Use the Services tool to test your Oracle services as follows:
a. Verify that the new TNSListener service can be stopped and started successfully.
b. Ensure that the OracleService<SID> service has been created by Oracle.
c. Stop all Oracle services.
On the Backup Server
1. In LifeKeeper, bring the protected volume in service on the backup server.
2. Remove the Oracle inventory directory and rename the directory or directories that contain the Oracle data files. If this is a new
installation you can delete the data files.
3. Install the Oracle software to the protected volume. Use EXACTLY the same installation options as on the primary server (the
Oracle Home, SID name and paths must be identical). If prompted, choose to overwrite the existing Oracle configuration. Note:
Ignore errors regarding moving files to *.bak.
4. Stop the default TNSListener service Oracle<OraHome>TNSListener, and set the startup mode to Manual.
5. Using Oracle Net Manager, configure Oracle to use the LifeKeeper-protected communication resource(s) as follows, if
required:
a. Create a new TNSListener Service using the SID name. Configure Listening Locations, designating the LifeKeeperprotected IP address and/or named pipe (LAN Manager alias name). Then configure the Database Services, specifying
the Oracle Home directory and SID.
b. Modify the Oracle Service for your SID. For TCP/IP, change the host name to the protected IP address. For Named
Pipes, change the machine name to the LAN Manager alias.
6. Create a separate TNSListener Service instance for the SID to be protected under LifeKeeper. The service should be created
using the lsnrctl Start <SID> command. This will create service with the name
Oracle<OraHome>TNSListener<SID>.
7. Use the Services tool to test your Oracle services as follows:
a. Verify that the new TNSListener Service can be stopped and started successfully.
b. Ensure that the OracleService<SID> service has been created by Oracle.
c. Stop all Oracle services on the backup server.
On the Primary Server
1. Bring the volume resource back in service on the primary server.
2. Start the OracleService<SID> service on the primary server.
3. Create the Oracle hierarchy on the primary server and extend it to the backup server. See Creating an Oracle Hierarchy for
details.
4. Test the new Oracle hierarchy by performing a manual failover.
Chapter 3: Oracle Resource Configuration Tasks
Once you have completed the setup tasks as described in the previous section, you are ready to create and extend your Oracle
resource hierarchies.
The following four tasks are described in this guide, as they are unique to an Oracle resource instance and different for each Recovery
Kit.
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Create a Resource Hierarchy Creates an application resource hierarchy in your LifeKeeper cluster.
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Extend a Resource Hierarchy Extends a resource hierarchy from the primary server to a backup server.
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Unextend a Resource Hierarchy Unextends (removes) a resource hierarchy from a single server in the LifeKeeper cluster.
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Delete a Resource Hierarchy Deletes a resource hierarchy from all servers in your LifeKeeper cluster.
The following tasks are described in the GUI Administrative Tasks section within the LifeKeeper Online Product Manual, because they
are common tasks with steps that are identical across all recovery kits.
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Create a Resource Dependency. Creates a parent/child dependency between an existing resource and another resource
instance and propagates the dependency changes to all applicable servers in the cluster.
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Delete a Resource Dependency. Deletes a resource dependency and propagates the dependency changes to all applicable
servers in the cluster.
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In Service. Brings a resource hierarchy into service on a specific server.
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Out of Service. Takes a resource hierarchy out of service on a specific server.
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View/Edit Properties. View or edit the properties of a resource hierarchy on a specific server.
Note: Throughout the rest of this section, configuration tasks are performed using the Edit menu. You can also perform most of these
tasks:
l
from the toolbar
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by right clicking on a global resource in the left pane of the status display
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by right clicking on a resource instance in the right pane of the status display
Using the right-click method allows you to avoid entering information that is required when using the Edit menu.
Creating an Oracle Hierarchy
After you have completed the necessary setup tasks, use the following steps to define the Oracle Server hierarchy to protect your
database(s).
1. From the LifeKeeper GUI menu, select Edit, then Server. From the menu, select Create Resource Hierarchy.
2. The Create Protected Application dialog box will display. Select the appropriate Primary and Backup Servers from the pulldown list. Select Next to continue. A window will display with a list of all the recognized Recovery Kits installed within the
cluster
3. Select Oracle and click NEXT.
4. You will be prompted to enter the following information. When the Back button is active in any of the dialog boxes, you can go
back to the previous dialog box. This is helpful should you encounter an error requiring you to correct previously entered
information. You may click Cancel at any time to cancel the entire creation process.
Field
Tips
Select the Oracle
Home directory
Select the appropriate Oracle Home directory for this hierarchy.
Select the Oracle SID
Select the Oracle SID that you wish to place under LifeKeeper protection.
Enter the Oracle User
Name
Enter the administrative user name for Oracle. This user account must have system permissions to
the database.
Enter Password
Enter the system password for the Oracle administrative user.
Optional Services
Select the optional services to be protected with this hierarchy. The list includes only those services
that are eligible for LifeKeeper protection.
Oracle Tag Name
Enter a unique tag name, or you can accept the default tag name offered by LifeKeeper.
5. After you click Next, the Create Resource Wizard will create your Oracle resource. LifeKeeper will validate the data entered.
If LifeKeeper detects a problem, an error message will appear in the information box.
6. Another information box will appear indicating that you have successfully created an Oracle resource hierarchy, and you must
extend that hierarchy to another server in your cluster in order to achieve failover protection. Click Next.
7. After you click Next, LifeKeeper will launch the Pre-Extend Wizard. Refer to Extending An Oracle Hierarchy for details on how
to extend your resource hierarchy to another server.
Extending an Oracle Hierarchy
This operation can be started from the Edit menu or initiated automatically upon completing the Create Resource Hierarchy option in
which case you should refer to Step 2 below.
1. On the Edit menu, select Resource, then Extend Resource Hierarchy. The Pre-Extend Wizard appears. If you are
unfamiliar with the Extend operation, click Next.
2. The Pre-Extend Wizard will prompt you to enter the following information.
Field
Tips
Enter a number between 1 and 999 to specify the target server's priority in the cascading failover sequence for this
Backup
resource. A lower number means a higher priority. LifeKeeper offers a default of 10 for the first server to which a
Priority
hierarchy is extended.
3. After receiving the message that the pre-extend checks were successful, click Next.
4. Depending upon the hierarchy being extended, LifeKeeper will display a series of information boxes showing the Resource
Tags to be extended, which cannot be edited. Click Extend.
Unextending an Oracle Hierarchy
To remove a resource hierarchy from a single server in the LifeKeeper cluster, do the following:
1. On the Edit menu, select Resource, then Unextend Resource Hierarchy.
2. Select the Target Server where you want to unextend the Oracle resource. It cannot be the server where the Oracle resource is
currently in service. (This dialog box will not appear if you selected the Unextend task by right-clicking on a resource instance
in the right pane.) Click Next.
3. Select the Oracle hierarchy to unextend and click Next. (This dialog will not appear if you selected the Unextend task by rightclicking on a resource instance in either pane).
4. An information box appears confirming the target server and the Oracle resource hierarchy you have chosen to unextend. Click
Unextend.
5. Another information box appears confirming that the Oracle resource was unextended successfully. Click Done to exit the
Unextend Resource Hierarchy menu selection.
Deleting an Oracle Hierarchy
Before deleting an Oracle hierarchy or instance, make sure that the hierarchy is active (green) on its primary server. You may also
wish to remove the dependencies before deleting the hierarchy; otherwise, the dependencies will be deleted also.
Deleting an Oracle hierarchy accomplishes the following:
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Stops the Oracle services.
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Deletes the Oracle hierarchy and all dependencies.
Notes:
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Make sure both servers are active when a delete is initiated for LifeKeeper to properly withdraw the databases from the backup
server.
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If you want the IP address and volume to remain under LifeKeeper protection, you should delete volume and TCP/IP
dependencies prior to deletion.
To delete a resource hierarchy from all the servers in your LifeKeeper environment, complete the following steps:
1. On the Edit menu, select Resource, then Delete Resource Hierarchy.
2. Select the Target Server where you will be deleting your Oracle resource hierarchy and click Next.. (This dialog will not appear
if you selected the Delete Resource task by right clicking on a resource instance in either pane.)
3. Select the Hierarchy to Delete. (This dialog will not appear if you selected the Delete Resource task by right clicking on a
resource instance in the left or right pane.) Click Next.
4. An information box appears confirming your selection of the target server and the hierarchy you have selected to delete. Click
Next.
5. Another information box appears confirming that the Oracle resource was deleted successfully.
6. Click Done to exit.
Manage Oracle Database Configuration
To administer a protected Oracle resource from the LifeKeeper GUI, right-click on the Oracle resource (on the right-hand side of the
LifeKeeper GUI) and select properties, then select the Oracle Database Configuration tab. Use the Oracle Database
Configuration page to view or change information about your Oracle resource.
User Management:
This menu allows users to manage the Oracle DBA user that will be used during LifeKeeper operations.
Select Management Action:
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Show Current User - Display the current user name used by the protected resource hierarchy.
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Change Password - Update the user password for the current user associated with the protected resource hierarchy.
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Change User and Password - Update both the Oracle DBA user and password to be used during LifeKeeper operations to
administer and monitor the Oracle instance. The user must have DBA privileges for all databases under protection.
Field
Enter User
Name
Tips
Enter the administrative user name. This user account must include DBA permissions to all databases under
LifeKeeper protection.
Field
Enter
Password
Tips
Enter the administrative password for the user account being updated.
Service Management:
This menu allows users to modify the list of optional Oracle Services that are protected under the resource hierarchy. LifeKeeper will
monitor all protected optional services.
Select Service Action:
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Add Service - Add an additional service to the protected configuration. LifeKeeper will start monitoring added optional Oracle
service.
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Delete Service - Remove a service from the protected configuration. LifeKeeper will stop monitoring optional Oracle service.
Field
Tips
Service Enter the service name for the service to Add or Delete from the protected configuration. For Add operations, enter
Name the service name. For Delete operations, choose the service name to remove from the list provided.
Update Select Yes to update all systems in this cluster. Otherwise, select No to only update the current system. If you
Cluster chose No, you must manually add the service to the backup servers.
Testing Your Oracle Resource Hierarchy
You can test your Oracle resource hierarchy by initiating a manual switchover. This will simulate a failover of a resource instance from
the primary server to the backup server.
You can select Edit, then Resource, then In Service. For example, an In Service request executed on a backup server causes the
application hierarchy to be taken out of service on the primary server and placed in service on the backup server. At this point, the
original backup server is now the primary server and original primary server has now become the backup server.
If you execute the Out of Service request, the application is taken out of service without bringing it in service on the other server, and
the Oracle services are stopped.
Chapter 4: Oracle Hierarchy Administration
The topics in this section assist in the administration of Oracle hierarchies.
Oracle Hierarchy Administration Guidelines
Follow these guidelines for administering your Oracle hierarchy:
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Access via protected communication paths. To ensure that users can access the Oracle SID, regardless of the physical
system on which it is running, all remote access of the database should be done through the protected Named Pipe (LAN
Manager alias) or IP addresses, which are part of the Oracle hierarchy. LifeKeeper automatically makes protected
communication paths available on the backup system in case of a switchover.
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Reserve volumes for exclusive Oracle use. Reserve volumes containing the Oracle database files for use exclusively by
Oracle. They should not be shared for users to access via LAN Manager, and should not be accessed by any other local
applications. This is because LifeKeeper operations that remove a volume resource from service, for example in a failover, can
fail if a remote user is accessing one of the volumes over the network or if a local process has done an open for write access on
the volume.
Local processes that have read-only access to volumes do not prevent removal of a resource from service, but the read-only
access may cause a restore to fail when you attempt to switch the resource back. Examples of processes with read-only
access are the Performance Monitor, which periodically polls each volume, or any running process which is installed on the
shared volume.
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Start and Stop Oracle Through LifeKeeper. Although much of your administration of Oracle databases is done through the
Oracle tools, use the LifeKeeper Out of Service function to stop the Oracle SID and use the In Service function to start the
Oracle SID. When LifeKeeper stops and starts the SID, it maintains a consistent view of the server on all nodes in the
configuration.
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Protect volume resources before adding to Oracle SID. As your environment grows, if you need to add new volumes to
the Oracle SID already under LifeKeeper protection, you should do the following:
1. Protect the volume first (create a volume resource).
2. Add the volume to the SID.
3. Manually create a dependency between the Oracle resource and the volume resource.
LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit Recovery Variables
The LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit installation creates 3 registry entry variables stored in the following registry key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\SIOS\LifeKeeper\RK\ORAapp
MAXWAIT is a decimal integer that specifies the number of seconds that the recovery kit will wait for a single Oracle service to start or
stop. If the service has not started within the specified time frame, LifeKeeper will mark the resource as failed. The default value for
MAXWAIT is 300; however, it is possible that for extremely large databases, 300 seconds might not be enough time for the database
services to reach the STARTED or STOPPED state. If this is the case, change this registry entry to a reasonable value.
RESTORE_DEEPCHK_MAX_RETRY is a decimal integer that allows multiple attempts to verify the Oracle service state during a
restore or local recovery operation. On a server that is unexpectedly heavily loaded, the default service state check time may not
always be sufficient to verify that protected Oracle services are in the RUNNING state. The default value for this variable is 0 and
normally only 1 Oracle service state check attempt is performed for each service. This value can be changed if extra attempts may be
needed to verify the Oracle service state.
RESTORE_DEEPCHK_SLEEP is a decimal integer, measured in seconds, to insert sleep intervals between each extra attempt to
verify the Oracle service state during a restore or local recovery operation. This option is enabled if the RESTORE_DEEPCHK_MAX_
RETRY option described above is used. The default value for this variable is 0 and normally no sleep times are inserted between extra
Oracle service state check attempts. If the RESTORE_DEEPCHK_MAX_RETRY variable is set, it is highly recommended that the
RESTORE_DEEPCHK_SLEEP variable be set as well to improve the reliability and performance of Oracle service state checks.
Updating Oracle Username and Password for LifeKeeper
During the creation of a LifeKeeper Oracle resource, the user must enter an Oracle user name and password for that instance of
Oracle. Should the password of this user name change at some point in the future, the LifeKeeper Oracle resource must be updated on
all systems in the cluster with this new password. Failure to do so will leave the Oracle resource out of sync and will prevent it from
coming in and out of service properly. LifeKeeper will log an error message to the Application Event Log stating that LifeKeeper
cannot remove or restore the resource during any subsequent failover or manual switchover.
The LifeKeeper GUI provides an interface to manage the user account associated with the Oracle resource. See the section on
Manage Oracle Database Configuration for more information.
Manually Configure Oracle 11g DB Console
You must manually configure Oracle 11g DB Console to use the protected virtual IP address or LAN Manger Alias so that the service
will start successfully on all systems in the cluster.
On the primary, edit <ORACLE_HOME>\<SYSTEM_NAME>_<ORACLE_SID>\sysman\config\emoms.properties
Set the property oracle.sysman.emSDK.svlt.ConsoleServerHost=<virtual IPaddress> or <LAN Manager Alias>.
Chapter 5: Oracle Troubleshooting Tips
This section is intended to provide suggestions and insights into occurrences that are not specifically related to the LifeKeeper
software, but have a relationship with the total environment.
Create Hierarchy Failed
Suggestion
Check the following:
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All volumes and communications resources (IP and/or LAN Manager) associated with the SID should already be under
LifeKeeper protection.
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All the shared or replicated volumes are available to the primary server and all volumes are mapped to the same drive letters on
each server.
Bring In Service Failed
Suggestion
Check to see if any other Oracle resource is already in service on the system you are trying to bring in service and/or that shared
volumes can be accessed from this system.
If additional time is required for the Oracle service to reach the running state, consider using the LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit
Variables in the registry to extend the allowed service startup time interval. LifeKeeper Oracle Recovery Kit Variables
Oracle TNSListener Service is Not Started or Stopped as it Should Be
Suggestion
Do the following:
l
Check if at least one TCP/IP or LAN Manager resource is part of the Oracle hierarchy.
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Take hierarchy out of service and bring back in service to start Oracle<OraHome>TNSListener<SID>.
Server Not Responding
TCP/IP Client Cannot Access Server (Server Not Responding) After a Successful Switchover by
LifeKeeper
Insight
The client system has old information in its IP-to-Physical address translation table used by address resolution protocol (arp).
Suggestion
The IP address being used to access the server must be reset. To reset this address, issue the command arp -d server_ip_address.
This deletes the address from the translation table. On the next request of that IP address, the table entry will be filled.
Remote Users Cannot Log In ORA 12504 or ORA 12514 or ORA 12541
Insight
Oracle connect issues indicate Oracle TNS setup issues are not caused by LifeKeeper.
Suggestion
Do the following:
l
Read the specific Oracle error and message
l
Using Oracle Net Manager, make certain that the listener and the TNS names are configured correctly.
l
Make certain the service is configured using the IP or LAN Manager alias created.
l
Use TNSPING to reach the service.
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