rfc2020.txt
Network Working Group
Request for Comments: 2020
Category: Standards Track
J. Flick
Hewlett Packard
October 1996
Definitions of Managed Objects for IEEE 802.12 Interfaces
Status of this Memo
This document specifies an Internet standards track protocol for the
Internet community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
improvements. Please refer to the current edition of the "Internet
Official Protocol Standards" (STD 1) for the standardization state
and status of this protocol. Distribution of this memo is unlimited.
Table of Contents
1. Introduction ...............................................
2. Object Definitions .........................................
3. Overview ...................................................
3.1. MAC Addresses ............................................
3.2. Relation to RFC 1213 .....................................
3.3. Relation to RFC 1573 .....................................
3.3.1. Layering Model .........................................
3.3.2. Virtual Circuits .......................................
3.3.3. ifTestTable ............................................
3.3.4. ifRcvAddressTable ......................................
3.3.5. ifPhysAddress ..........................................
3.3.6. Specific Interface MIB Objects .........................
3.4. Relation to RFC 1643, RFC 1650, and RFC 1748 .............
3.5. Relation to RFC 1749 .....................................
3.6. Master Mode Operation ....................................
3.7. Normal and High Priority Counters ........................
3.8. IEEE 802.12 Training Frames ..............................
3.9. Mapping of IEEE 802.12 Managed Objects ...................
4. Definitions ................................................
5. Acknowledgements ...........................................
6. References .................................................
7. Security Considerations ....................................
8. Author’s Address ...........................................
1.
1
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
5
8
8
9
9
10
12
14
30
30
31
31
Introduction
This memo defines a portion of the Management Information Base (MIB)
for use with network management protocols in TCP/IP-based internets.
In particular, it defines objects for managing network interfaces
based on IEEE 802.12.
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2.
IEEE 802.12 Interface MIB
October 1996
Object Definitions
Management information is viewed as a collection of managed objects,
residing in a virtual information store, termed the Management
Information Base (MIB). Collections of related objects are defined
in MIB modules. MIB modules are written using a subset of Abstract
Syntax Notation One (ASN.1) [1] termed the Structure of Management
Information (SMI) [2]. In particular, each object type is named by
an OBJECT IDENTIFIER, an administratively assigned name. The object
type together with an object instance serves to uniquely identify a
specific instantiation of the object. For human convenience, we
often use a textual string, termed the descriptor, to refer to the
object type.
3.
Overview
Instances of these object types represent attributes of an interface
to an IEEE 802.12 communications medium. At present, IEEE 802.12
media are identified by one value of the ifType object in the
Internet-standard MIB:
ieee80212(55)
For this interface, the value of the ifSpecific variable in the MIBII [5] has the OBJECT IDENTIFIER value:
dot12MIB
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { transmission 45 }
The values for the ifType object are defined by the IANAifType
textual convention. The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA)
is responsible for the assignment of all Internet numbers, including
new ifType values. Therefore, IANA is responsible for maintaining
the definition of this textual convention. The current definition of
the IANAifType textual convention is available from IANA’s World Wide
Web server at:
http://www.iana.org/iana/
The definitions presented here are based on the IEEE Standard
802.12-1995, [6] Clause 13 "Layer management functions and services",
and Annex C "GDMO Specifications for Demand Priority Managed
Objects". Implementors of these MIB objects should note that the
IEEE document explicitly describes (in the form of Pascal pseudocode)
when, where, and how various MAC attributes are measured. The IEEE
document also describes the effects of MAC actions that may be
invoked by manipulating instances of the MIB objects defined here.
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October 1996
To the extent that some of the attributes defined in [6] are
represented by previously defined objects in the Internet-standard
MIB [5] or in the Evolution of the Interfaces Group of MIB-II [7],
such attributes are not redundantly represented by objects defined in
this memo. Among the attributes represented by objects defined in
other memos are the number of octets transmitted or received on a
particular interface, the MAC address of an interface, and multicast
information associated with an interface.
3.1.
MAC Addresses
All representations of MAC addresses in this MIB module, and in other
related MIB modules (like RFC 1573), are in "canonical" order defined
by 802.1a, i.e., as if it were transmitted least significant bit
first. This is true even if the interface is operating in token ring
framing mode, which requires MAC addresses to be transmitted most
significant bit first.
3.2.
Relation to RFC 1213
This section applies only when this MIB is used in conjunction with
the "old" (i.e., pre-RFC 1573) interface group.
The relationship between an IEEE 802.12 interface and an interface in
the context of the Internet-standard MIB is one-to-one. As such, the
value of an ifIndex object instance can be directly used to identify
corresponding instances of the objects defined herein.
3.3.
Relation to RFC 1573
RFC 1573, the Interface MIB Evolution, requires that any MIB which is
an adjunct of the Interface MIB, clarify specific areas within the
Interface MIB. These areas are intentionally left vague in RFC 1573
to avoid over constraining the MIB, thereby precluding management of
certain media-types.
An agent which implements this MIB module must support the
ifGeneralGroup, ifStackGroup, ifHCPacketGroup, and ifRcvAddressGroup
of RFC 1573.
Section 3.3 of RFC 1573 enumerates several areas which a mediaspecific MIB must clarify. In addition, there are some objects in
RFC 1573 for which additional clarification of how to apply them to
an IEEE 802.12 interface would be helpful. Each of these areas is
addressed in a following subsection. The implementor is referred to
RFC 1573 in order to understand the general intent of these areas.
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3.3.1.
IEEE 802.12 Interface MIB
October 1996
Layering Model
For the typical usage of this MIB module, there will be no sub-layers
"above" or "below" the 802.12 Interface. However, this MIB module
does not preclude such layering.
3.3.2.
Virtual Circuits
This medium does not support virtual circuits and this area is not
applicable to this MIB.
3.3.3.
ifTestTable
This MIB does not define any tests for media instrumented by this
MIB. Implementation of the ifTestTable is not required. An
implementation may optionally implement the ifTestTable to execute
vendor specific tests.
3.3.4.
ifRcvAddressTable
This table contains all IEEE addresses, unicast, multicast, and
broadcast, for which this interface will receive packets and forward
them up to a higher layer entity for consumption. In addition, when
the interface is using 802.5 framing mode, the ifRcvAddressTable will
contain the functional address mask.
In the event that the interface is part of a MAC bridge, this table
does not include unicast addresses which are accepted for possible
forwarding out some other port. This table is explicitly not
intended to provide a bridge address filtering mechanism.
3.3.5.
ifPhysAddress
This object contains
source-address field
Usually this will be
systems may set this
the IEEE 802.12 address which is placed in the
of any frames that originate at this interface.
kept in ROM on the interface hardware. Some
address via software.
In a system where there are several such addresses the designer has a
tougher choice. The address chosen should be the one most likely to
be of use to network management (e.g. the address placed in ARP
responses for systems which are primarily IP systems).
If the designer truly can not choose, use of the factory-provided ROM
address is suggested.
If the address can not be determined, an octet string of zero length
should be returned.
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The address is stored in binary in this object. The address is
stored in "canonical" bit order, that is, the Group Bit is positioned
as the low-order bit of the first octet. Thus, the first byte of a
multicast address would have the bit 0x01 set. This is true even
when the interface is using token ring framing mode, which transmits
addresses high-order bit first.
3.3.6.
Specific Interface MIB Objects
The following table provides specific implementation guidelines for
the interface group objects in the conformance groups listed above.
Use for an 802.12 Interface
ifIndex
Each 802.12 interface is represented by an
ifEntry. Interface tables in this MIB
module are indexed by ifIndex.
ifDescr
Refer to [7].
ifType
The IANA reserved value for 802.12 - 55.
ifMtu
The value of ifMtu on an 802.12 interface
will depend on the type of framing that is
in use on that interface. Changing the
dot12DesiredFramingType may have the effect
of changing ifMtu after the next time that
the interface trains. When
dot12CurrentFramingType is equal to
frameType88023, ifMtu will be equal to
1500. When dot12CurrentFramingType is
equal to frameType88025, ifMtu will be
4464.
ifSpeed
The speed of the interface in bits per
second. For current 802.12
implementations, this will be equal to
100,000,000 (100 million).
ifPhysAddress
See Section 3.3.5.
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Write access is not required. Support for
’testing’ is not required. Setting this
object to ’up’ will cause dot12Commands to
be set to ’open’. Setting this object to
’down’ will cause dot12Commands to be set
to ’close’. Setting dot12Commands to
’open’ will set this object to ’up’.
Setting dot12Commands to ’close’ will set
this object to ’down’. Setting
dot12Commands to ’reset’ will have no
effect on this object.
ifOperStatus
When dot12Status is equal to ’opened’, this
object will be equal to ’up’. When
dot12Status is equal to ’closed’, ’opening’,
’openFailure’ or ’linkFailure’, this object
will be equal to ’down’. Support for
’testing’ is not required, but may be used
to indicate that a vendor specific test is
in progress. The value ’dormant’ has no
meaning for an IEEE 802.12 interface.
ifLastChange
Refer to [7].
ifInOctets
The number of octets in valid MAC frames
received on this interface, including the
MAC header and FCS.
ifInUcastPkts
Refer to [7].
ifInDiscards
Refer to [7].
ifInErrors
The sum for this interface of
dot12InIPMErrors,
dot12InOversizeFrameErrors,
dot12InDataErrors, and any additional
internal errors that may occur in an
implementation.
ifInUnknownProtos
Refer to [7].
ifOutOctets
The number of octets transmitted in MAC
frames on this interface, including the MAC
header and FCS.
ifOutUcastPkts
Refer to [7].
ifOutDiscards
Refer to [7].
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ifOutErrors
The number of implementation-specific
internal transmit errors on this interface.
ifName
Locally-significant textual name for the
interface (e.g. vg0).
ifInMulticastPkts
Refer to [7]. When dot12CurrentFramingType
is frameType88025, this count includes
packets addressed to functional addresses.
ifInBroadcastPkts
Refer to [7].
ifOutMulticastPkts
Refer to [7]. When dot12CurrentFramingType
is frameType88025, this count includes
packets addressed to functional addresses.
ifOutBroadcastPkts
Refer to [7].
ifHCInOctets
64-bit version of ifInOctets.
ifHCOutOctets
64-bit version of ifOutOctets
ifHC*Pkts
Not required for 100 MBit interfaces.
Future IEEE 802.12 interfaces which operate
at higher speeds may require implementation
of these counters, but such interfaces are
beyond the scope of this memo.
ifLinkUpDownTrapEnable Refer to [7].
Default is ’enabled’.
The speed of the interface in millions of
bits per second. For current 802.12
implementations, this will be equal to 100.
ifPromiscuousMode
Reflects whether the interface has
successfully trained and is currently
operating in promiscuous mode.
dot12DesiredPromiscStatus is used to select
the promiscuous mode to be requested in the
next training attempt. Setting
ifPromiscuousMode will update
dot12DesiredPromiscStatus and cause the
interface to attempt to retrain using the
new promiscuous mode. After the interface
has retrained, ifPromiscuousMode will
reflect the mode that is in use, not the
mode that was requested.
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This will normally be ’true’.
ifStackHigherLayer
ifStackLowerLayer
ifStackStatus
Refer to section 3.3.1
ifRcvAddressAddress
ifRcvAddressStatus
ifRcvAddressType
Refer to section 3.3.4.
3.4.
ifConnectorPresent
October 1996
Relation to RFC 1643, RFC 1650, and RFC 1748
An IEEE 802.12 interface can be configured to operate in either
ethernet or token ring framing mode. An IEEE 802.12 interface uses
the frame format for the configured framing mode, but does not use
the media access protocol for ethernet or token ring. Instead, IEEE
802.12 defines its own media access protocol, the Demand Priority
Access Method (DPAM).
There are existing standards-track MIB modules for instrumenting
ethernet-like interfaces and token ring interfaces. At the time of
this writing, they are: STD 50, RFC 1643, "Definitions of Managed
Objects for Ethernet-like Interface Types" [8]; RFC 1650,
"Definitions of Managed Objects for Ethernet-like Interface Types
using SMIv2" [9]; and RFC 1748, "IEEE 802.5 MIB using SMIv2" [10].
These MIB modules are designed to instrument the media access
protocol for these respective technologies. Since IEEE 802.12
interfaces do not implement either of these media access protocols,
an agent should not implement RFC 1643, RFC 1650, or RFC 1748 for
IEEE 802.12 interfaces.
3.5.
Relation to RFC 1749
When an IEEE 802.12 interface is operating in token ring framing
mode, and the end node supports token ring source routing, the agent
should implement RFC 1749, the IEEE 802.5 Station Source Routing MIB
[11] for those interfaces.
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3.6.
IEEE 802.12 Interface MIB
October 1996
Master Mode Operation
In an IEEE 802.12 network,
controllers to decide when
to transmit. These master
controller devices such as
"master" devices act as network
to grant requesting end-nodes permission
devices may be repeaters, or other active
switches.
Devices which do not act as network controllers, such as end-nodes or
passive switches, are considered to be operating in "slave" mode.
The dot12ControlMode object indicates if the interface is operating
in master mode or slave mode.
3.7.
Normal and High Priority Counters
The IEEE 802.12 interface MIB does not provide normal priority
transmit counters. Standardization of normal priority transmit
counters could not be justified -- ifOutUcastPkts,
ifOutMulticastPkts, ifOutBroadcastPkts, ifOutOctets,
dot12OutHighPriorityFrames, and dot12OutHighPriorityOctets should
suffice. More precisely, the number of normal priority frames
transmitted can be calculated as:
outNormPriorityFrames = ifOutUcastPkts
+
ifOutMulticastPkts
+
ifOutBroadcastPkts
dot12OutHighPriorityFrames
The number of normal priority octets transmitted can be calculated
as:
outNormPriorityOctets = ifOutOctets
dot12OutHighPriorityOctets
On the other hand, normal priority receive counters are provided.
The main reason for this is that the normal priority and high
priority counters include errored frames, whereas the ifIn*Pkts and
ifInOctets do not include errored frames. dot12InNormPriorityFrames
could be calculated, but the calculation is tedious:
inNormPriorityFrames = ifInUcastPkts
ifInMulticastPkts
ifInBroadcastPkts
dot12InNullAddressedFrames
ifInErrors
ifInDiscards
ifInUnknownProtos
dot12InHighPriorityFrames
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dot12InNormPriorityOctets includes octets in unreadable frames, which
is not available elsewhere. The number of octets in unreadable
frames can be calculated as:
octetsInUnreadableFrames = dot12InNormPriorityOctets +
dot12InHighPriorityOctets ifInOctets
Also, the total traffic at this interface can be calculated as:
traffic = dot12InNormPriorityOctets +
dot12InHighPriorityOctets +
ifOutOctets
In other words, the normal priority receive counters were deemed
useful, whereas the normal priority transmit counters can be easily
calculated from other available counters.
3.8.
IEEE 802.12 Training Frames
Training frames are special MAC frames that are used only during link
initialization. Training frames are initially constructed by the
device at the lower end of a link, which is the slave mode device for
the link. The training frame format is as follows:
+----+----+------------+--------------+----------+-----+
| DA | SA | Req Config | Allow Config |
Data
| FCS |
+----+----+------------+--------------+----------+-----+
DA = destination address (six octets)
SA = source address (six octets)
Req Config = requested configuration (2 octets)
Allow Config = allowed configuration (2 octets)
Data = data (594 to 675 octets)
FCS = frame check sequence (4 octets)
Training frames are always sent with a null destination address. To
pass training, an end node must use its source address in the source
address field of the training frame. A repeater may use a non-null
source address if it has one, or it may use a null source address.
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The requested configuration field allows the slave mode device to
inform the master mode device about itself and to request
configuration options. The training response frame from the master
mode device contains the slave mode device’s requested configuration
from the training request frame. The currently defined format of the
requested configuration field as defined in the IEEE Standard
802.12-1995 standard is shown below. Please refer to the most
current version of the IEEE document for a more up to date
description of this field. In particular, the reserved bits may be
used in later versions of the standard.
First Octet:
Second Octet:
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|v|v|v|r|r|r|r|r|
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|r|r|r|F|F|P|P|R|
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
vvv: The version of the 802.12 training protocol with which
the training initiator is compliant. The current version
is 100.
r:
Reserved bits (set to zero)
FF: 00 = frameType88023
01 = frameType88025
10 = reserved
11 = frameTypeEither
PP: 00 = singleAddressMode
01 = promiscuousMode
10 = reserved
11 = reserved
R:
0 = the training initiator is an end node
1 = the training initiator is a repeater
The allowed configuration field allows the master mode device to
respond with the allowed configuration. The slave mode device sets
the contents of this field to all zero bits. The master mode device
sets the allowed configuration field as follows:
First Octet:
Second Octet:
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|v|v|v|D|C|N|r|r|
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|r|r|r|F|F|P|P|R|
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
vvv: The version of the 802.12 training protocol with which
the training responder is compliant. The current version
is 100.
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D:
C:
N:
r:
FF:
PP:
R:
IEEE 802.12 Interface MIB
October 1996
0
1
0
= No duplicate address has been detected.
= Duplicate address has been detected
= The requested configuration is compatible with the
network.
1 = The requested configuration is not compatible with
the network. In this case, the FF, PP, and R bits
indicate the configuration that would be allowed.
0 = Access will be allowed, providing the configuration
is compatible (C = 0).
1 = Access is not granted because of security
restrictions
Reserved bits (set to zero)
00 = frameType88023 will be used
01 = frameType88025 will be used
10 = reserved
11 = reserved
00 = singleAddressMode
01 = promiscuousMode
10 = reserved
11 = reserved
0 = Requested access as an end node is allowed
1 = Requested access as a repeater is allowed
Again, note that the most recent version of the IEEE 802.12 standard
should be consulted for the most up to date definition of the
requested configuration and allowed configuration fields.
The data field contains between 594 and 675 octets and is filled in
by the training initiator. The first 55 octets may be used for
vendor specific protocol information. The remaining octets are all
zeros. The length of the training frame combined with the
requirement that 24 consecutive training frames be received without
error to complete training ensures that marginal links will not
complete training.
3.9.
Mapping of IEEE 802.12 Managed Objects
The following table lists all the managed objects defined for
oEndNode in the IEEE 802.12 Standard, and the corresponding SNMP
objects.
IEEE 802.12 Managed Object
Corresponding SNMP Object
oEndNode
.aBroadcastFramesReceived
.aBroadcastFramesTransmitted
.aDataErrorFramesReceived
.aDesiredFramingType
IF-MIB - ifInBroadcastPkts
IF-MIB - ifOutBroadcastPkts
dot12InDataErrors
dot12DesiredFramingType
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.aDesiredPromiscuousStatus
.aFramesTransmitted
.aFramingCapability
.aFunctionalAddresses
.aHighPriorityFramesReceived
.aHighPriorityFramesTransmitted
.aHighPriorityOctetsReceived
.aHighPriorityOctetsTransmitted
.aIPMFramesReceived
.aLastTrainingConfig
.aMACID
.aMACStatus
.aMACVersion
.aMediaType
.aMulticastFramesReceived
.aMulticastFramesTransmitted
.aMulticastReceiveStatus
.aNormalPriorityFramesReceived
.aNormalPriorityOctetsReceived
.aNullAddressedFramesReceived
.aOctetsTransmitted
.aOversizeFramesReceived
.aReadableFramesReceived
.aReadableOctetsReceived
.aReadMulticastList
.aReadWriteMACAddress
.aTransitionsIntoTraining
.acAddGroupAddress
.acClose
.acDeleteGroupAddress
.acExecuteSelftest
.acInitializeMAC
.acOpen
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dot12DesiredPromiscStatus
IF-MIB - ifOutUCastPkts +
ifOutMulticastPkts +
ifOutBroadcastPkts
dot12FramingCapability
IF-MIB - ifRcvAddressTable
dot12InHighPriorityFrames
dot12OutHighPriorityFrames
dot12InHighPriorityOctets or
dot12InHCHighPriorityOctets
dot12OutHighPriorityOctets or
dot12OutHCHighPriorityOctets
dot12InIPMErrors
dot12LastTrainingConfig
IF-MIB - ifIndex
dot12Status
dot12TrainingVersion
<not yet mapped>
Tranceiver MIB issue
IF-MIB - ifInMulticastPkts
IF-MIB - ifOutMulticastPkts
IF-MIB - ifRcvAddressTable
dot12InNormPriorityFrames
dot12InNormPriorityOctets or
dot12InHCNormPriorityOctets
dot12InNullAddressedFrames
IF-MIB - ifOutOctets or
ifHCOutOctets
dot12InOversizeFrameErrors
IF-MIB - ifInUcastPkts +
ifInMulticastPkts +
ifInBroadcastPkts
IF-MIB - ifInOctets or
ifHCInOctets
IF-MIB - ifRcvAddressTable
IF-MIB - ifPhysAddress
dot12TransitionIntoTrainings
IF-MIB - ifRcvAddressTable
dot12Commands: ’close’
IF-MIB - ifRcvAddressTable
IF-MIB - ifAdminStatus
dot12Commands: ’reset’
dot12Commands: ’open’
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October 1996
Definitions
DOT12-IF-MIB DEFINITIONS ::= BEGIN
IMPORTS
transmission, Counter32, Counter64, OBJECT-TYPE,
MODULE-IDENTITY
FROM SNMPv2-SMI
MODULE-COMPLIANCE, OBJECT-GROUP
FROM SNMPv2-CONF
ifIndex
FROM IF-MIB;
dot12MIB MODULE-IDENTITY
LAST-UPDATED "9602220452Z" -- February 22, 1996
ORGANIZATION "IETF 100VG-AnyLAN MIB Working Group"
CONTACT-INFO
"
John Flick
Postal: Hewlett Packard Company
8000 Foothills Blvd. M/S 5556
Roseville, CA 95747-5556
Tel:
+1 916 785 4018
Fax:
+1 916 785 3583
E-mail: johnf@hprnd.rose.hp.com"
DESCRIPTION
"This MIB module describes objects for
managing IEEE 802.12 interfaces."
::= { transmission 45 }
dot12MIBObjects
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dot12MIB 1 }
dot12ConfigTable OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
SEQUENCE OF Dot12ConfigEntry
MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"Configuration information for a collection of
802.12 interfaces attached to a particular
system."
::= { dot12MIBObjects 1 }
dot12ConfigEntry OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Dot12ConfigEntry
MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
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"Configuration for a particular interface to an
802.12 medium."
INDEX
{ ifIndex }
::= { dot12ConfigTable 1 }
Dot12ConfigEntry ::=
SEQUENCE {
dot12CurrentFramingType
dot12DesiredFramingType
dot12FramingCapability
dot12DesiredPromiscStatus
dot12TrainingVersion
dot12LastTrainingConfig
dot12Commands
dot12Status
dot12ControlMode
}
INTEGER,
INTEGER,
INTEGER,
INTEGER,
INTEGER,
OCTET STRING,
INTEGER,
INTEGER,
INTEGER
dot12CurrentFramingType OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
INTEGER {
frameType88023(1),
frameType88025(2),
frameTypeUnknown(3)
}
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"When dot12DesiredFramingType is one of
’frameType88023’ or ’frameType88025’, this is the
type of framing asserted by the interface.
When dot12DesiredFramingType is ’frameTypeEither’,
dot12CurrentFramingType shall be one of
’frameType88023’ or ’frameType88025’ when the
dot12Status is ’opened’.
When the dot12Status is
anything other than ’opened’,
dot12CurrentFramingType shall take the value of
’frameTypeUnknown’."
::= { dot12ConfigEntry 1 }
dot12DesiredFramingType OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
INTEGER {
frameType88023(1),
frameType88025(2),
frameTypeEither(3)
}
MAX-ACCESS read-write
STATUS
current
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DESCRIPTION
"The type of framing which will be requested by
the interface during the next interface MAC
initialization or open action.
In master mode, this is the framing mode which
will be granted by the interface. Note that
for a master mode interface, this object must be
equal to ’frameType88023’ or ’frameType88025’,
since a master mode interface cannot grant
’frameTypeEither’."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aDesiredFramingType."
::= { dot12ConfigEntry 2 }
dot12FramingCapability OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
INTEGER {
frameType88023(1),
frameType88025(2),
frameTypeEither(3)
}
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"The type of framing this interface is capable of
supporting."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aFramingCapability."
::= { dot12ConfigEntry 3 }
dot12DesiredPromiscStatus OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
INTEGER {
singleAddressMode(1),
promiscuousMode(2)
}
MAX-ACCESS read-write
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is used to select the promiscuous
mode that this interface will request in the next
training packet issued on this interface.
Whether the repeater grants the requested mode
must be verified by examining the state of the PP
bits in the corresponding instance of
dot12LastTrainingConfig.
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In master mode, this object controls whether or
not promiscuous mode will be granted by the
interface when requested by the lower level
device.
Note that this object indicates the desired mode
for the next time the interface trains. The
currently active mode will be reflected in
dot12LastTrainingConfig and in ifPromiscuousMode."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aDesiredPromiscuousStatus."
::= { dot12ConfigEntry 4 }
dot12TrainingVersion OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
INTEGER (0..7)
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"The value that will be used in the version bits
(vvv bits) in training frames on this interface.
This is the highest version number supported by
this MAC."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aMACVersion."
::= { dot12ConfigEntry 5 }
dot12LastTrainingConfig OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
OCTET STRING (SIZE(2))
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This 16 bit field contains the configuration
bits from the most recent error-free training
frame received during training on this interface.
Training request frames are received when in
master mode, while training response frames are
received in slave mode. On master mode interfaces,
this object contains the contents of the
requested configuration field of the most recent
training request frame. On slave mode interfaces,
this object contains the contents of the allowed
configuration field of the most recent training
response frame. The format of the current version
of this field is described in section 3.8. Please
refer to the most recent version of the IEEE
802.12 standard for the most up-to-date definition
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of the format of this object."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aLastTrainingConfig."
::= { dot12ConfigEntry 6 }
dot12Commands OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
INTEGER {
noOp(1),
open(2),
reset(3),
close(4)
}
MAX-ACCESS read-write
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"If the current value of dot12Status is ’closed’,
setting the value of this object to ’open’ will
change the corresponding instance of MIB-II’s
ifAdminStatus to ’up’, cause this interface to
enter the ’opening’ state, and will cause training
to be initiated on this interface. The progress
and success of the open is given by the values of
the dot12Status object. Setting this object to
’open’ when dot12Status has a value other than
’closed’ has no effect.
Setting the corresponding instance of ifAdminStatus
to ’up’ when the current value of dot12Status is
’closed’ will have the same effect as setting this
object to ’open’. Setting ifAdminStatus to ’up’
when dot12Status has a value other than ’closed’
has no effect.
Setting the value of this object to ’close’ will
move this interface into the ’closed’ state and
cause all transmit and receive actions to stop.
This object will then have to be set to ’open’ in
order to reinitiate training.
Setting the corresponding instance of ifAdminStatus
to ’down’ will have the same effect as setting this
object to ’close’.
Setting the value of this object to ’reset’ when
the current value of dot12Status has a value other
than ’closed’ will reset the interface. On a
reset, all MIB counters should retain their values.
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This will cause the MAC to initiate an
acInitializeMAC action as specified in IEEE 802.12.
This will cause training to be reinitiated on this
interface. Setting this object to ’reset’ when
dot12Status has a value of ’closed’ has no effect.
Setting this object to ’reset’ has no effect on the
corresponding instance of ifAdminStatus.
Setting the value of this object to ’noOp’ has no
effect.
When read, this object will always have a value
of ’noOp’."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.2,
acOpen, acClose, acInitializeMAC.
Also, RFC1231 IEEE802.5 Token Ring MIB,
dot5Commands."
::= { dot12ConfigEntry 7 }
dot12Status OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
INTEGER {
opened(1),
closed(2),
opening(3),
openFailure(5),
linkFailure(6)
}
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"The current interface status with respect to
training. One of the following values:
opened
- Training has completed
successfully.
closed
- MAC has been disabled by
setting dot12Commands to
’close’.
opening
- MAC is in training. Training
signals have been received.
openFailure - Passed 24 error-free packets,
but there is a problem, noted
in the training configuration
bits (dot12LastTrainingConfig).
linkFailure - Training signals not received,
or could not pass 24 error-free
packets.
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Whenever the dot12Commands object is set to
’close’ or ifAdminStatus is set to ’down’, the MAC
will go silent, dot12Status will be ’closed’, and
ifOperStatus will be ’down’.
When the value of this object is equal to ’closed’
and the dot12Commands object is set to ’open’ or
the ifAdminStatus object is set to ’up’, training
will be initiated on this interface. When the
value of this object is not equal to ’closed’ and
the dot12Commands object is set to ’reset’,
training will be reinitiated on this interface.
Note that sets of some other objects (e.g.
dot12ControlMode) or external events (e.g. MAC
protocol violations) may also cause training to be
reinitiated on this interface.
When training is initiated or reinitiated on an
interface, the end node will send Training_Up to
the master and initially go to the ’linkFailure’
state and ifOperStatus will go to ’down’.
When the master sends back Training_Down,
dot12Status will change to the ’opening’ state,
and training packets will be transferred.
After all of the training packets have been
passed, dot12Status will change to ’linkFailure’
if 24 consecutive error-free packets were not
passed, ’opened’ if 24 consecutive error-free
packets were passed and the training
configuration bits were OK, or ’openFailure’ if
there were 24 consecutive error-free packets, but
there was a problem with the training
configuration bits.
When in the ’openFailure’ state, the
dot12LastTrainingConfig object will contain the
configuration bits from the last training
packet which can be examined to determine the
exact reason for the training configuration
failure.
If training did not succeed (dot12Status is
’linkFailure’ or ’openFailure), the entire
process will be restarted after
MAC_Retraining_Delay_Timer seconds.
If training does succeed (dot12Status changes to
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’opened’), ifOperStatus will change to ’up’. If
training does not succeed (dot12Status changes to
’linkFailure’ or ’openFailure’), ifOperStatus will
remain ’down’."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aMACStatus."
::= { dot12ConfigEntry 8 }
dot12ControlMode OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
INTEGER {
masterMode(1),
slaveMode(2),
learn(3)
}
MAX-ACCESS read-write
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is used to configure and report
whether or not this interface is operating in
master mode. In a Demand Priority network, end
node interfaces typically operate in slave mode,
while switch interfaces may control the Demand
Priority protocol and operate in master mode.
This object may be implemented as a read-only
object by those agents and interfaces that do not
implement software control of master mode. In
particular, interfaces that cannot operate in
master mode, and interfaces on which master mode
is controlled by a pushbutton on the device,
should implement this object read-only.
Some interfaces do not require network management
configuration of this feature and can autosense
whether to use master mode or slave mode. The
value ’learn’ is used for that purpose. While
autosense is taking place, the value ’learn’ is
returned.
A network management operation which modifies the
value of dot12ControlMode causes the interface
to retrain."
::= { dot12ConfigEntry 9 }
dot12StatTable OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
SEQUENCE OF Dot12StatEntry
MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
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STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"Statistics for a collection of 802.12 interfaces
attached to a particular system."
::= { dot12MIBObjects 2 }
dot12StatEntry OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Dot12StatEntry
MAX-ACCESS not-accessible
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"Statistics for a particular interface to an
802.12 medium. The receive statistics in this
table apply only to packets received by this
station (i.e., packets whose destination address
is either the local station address, the
broadcast address, or a multicast address that
this station is receiving, unless the station is
in promiscuous mode)."
INDEX
{ ifIndex }
::= { dot12StatTable 1 }
Dot12StatEntry ::=
SEQUENCE {
dot12InHighPriorityFrames
dot12InHighPriorityOctets
dot12InNormPriorityFrames
dot12InNormPriorityOctets
dot12InIPMErrors
dot12InOversizeFrameErrors
dot12InDataErrors
dot12InNullAddressedFrames
dot12OutHighPriorityFrames
dot12OutHighPriorityOctets
dot12TransitionIntoTrainings
dot12HCInHighPriorityOctets
dot12HCInNormPriorityOctets
dot12HCOutHighPriorityOctets
}
Counter32,
Counter32,
Counter32,
Counter32,
Counter32,
Counter32,
Counter32,
Counter32,
Counter32,
Counter32,
Counter32,
Counter64,
Counter64,
Counter64
dot12InHighPriorityFrames OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of high priority frames
that have been received on this interface.
Includes both good and bad high priority frames,
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as well as high priority training frames. Does
not include normal priority frames which were
priority promoted."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aHighPriorityFramesReceived."
::= { dot12StatEntry 1 }
dot12InHighPriorityOctets OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of the number of octets
contained in high priority frames that have been
received on this interface. This counter is
incremented by OctetCount for each frame received
on this interface which is counted by
dot12InHighPriorityFrames.
Note that this counter will roll over very
quickly. It is provided for backward
compatibility for Network Management protocols
that do not support 64 bit counters (e.g. SNMP
version 1)."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aHighPriorityOctetsReceived."
::= { dot12StatEntry 2 }
dot12InNormPriorityFrames OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of normal priority frames
that have been received on this interface.
Includes both good and bad normal priority
frames, as well as normal priority training
frames and normal priority frames which were
priority promoted."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aNormalPriorityFramesReceived."
::= { dot12StatEntry 3 }
dot12InNormPriorityOctets OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
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MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of the number of octets
contained in normal priority frames that have
been received on this interface. This counter is
incremented by OctetCount for each frame received
on this interface which is counted by
dot12InNormPriorityFrames.
Note that this counter will roll over very
quickly. It is provided for backward
compatibility for Network Management protocols
that do not support 64 bit counters (e.g. SNMP
version 1)."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aNormalPriorityOctetsReceived."
::= { dot12StatEntry 4 }
dot12InIPMErrors OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of the number of frames
that have been received on this interface with an
invalid packet marker and no PMI errors. A
repeater will write an invalid packet marker to
the end of a frame containing errors as it is
forwarded through the repeater to the other
ports. This counter is incremented by one for
each frame received on this interface which has
had an invalid packet marker added to the end of
the frame."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aIPMFramesReceived."
::= { dot12StatEntry 5 }
dot12InOversizeFrameErrors OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of oversize frames
received on this interface. This counter is
incremented by one for each frame received on
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this interface whose OctetCount is larger than
the maximum legal frame size. The frame size
which causes this counter to increment is
dependent on the current framing type."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aOversizeFramesReceived."
::= { dot12StatEntry 6 }
dot12InDataErrors OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of errored frames
received on this interface. This counter is
incremented by one for each frame received on
this interface with any of the following errors:
bad FCS (with no IPM), PMI errors (excluding
frames with an IPM as the only PMI error),
undersize, bad start of frame delimiter, or bad
end of packet marker. Does not include frames
counted by dot12InIPMErrors,
dot12InNullAddressedFrames, or
dot12InOversizeFrameErrors.
This counter indicates problems with the cable
directly attached to this interface, while
dot12InIPMErrors indicates problems with remote
cables."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aDataErrorFramesReceived."
::= { dot12StatEntry 7 }
dot12InNullAddressedFrames OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of null addressed frames
received on this interface. This counter is
incremented by one for each frame received on
this interface with a destination MAC address
consisting of all zero bits. Both void and
training frames are included in this counter.
Note that since this station would normally not
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receive null addressed frames, this counter is
only incremented when this station is operating
in promiscuous mode or in training."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aNullAddressedFramesReceived."
::= { dot12StatEntry 8 }
dot12OutHighPriorityFrames OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This counter is incremented by one for each high
priority frame successfully transmitted out this
interface."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aHighPriorityFramesTransmitted."
::= { dot12StatEntry 9 }
dot12OutHighPriorityOctets OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This counter is incremented by OctetCount for
each frame counted by dot12OutHighPriorityFrames.
Note that this counter will roll over very
quickly. It is provided for backward
compatibility for Network Management protocols
that do not support 64 bit counters (e.g. SNMP
version 1)."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aHighPriorityOctetsTransmitted."
::= { dot12StatEntry 10 }
dot12TransitionIntoTrainings OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter32
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of the number of times
this interface has entered the training state.
This counter is incremented by one each time
dot12Status transitions to ’linkFailure’ from any
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state other than ’opening’ or ’openFailure’."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aTransitionsIntoTraining."
::= { dot12StatEntry 11 }
dot12HCInHighPriorityOctets OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter64
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of the number of octets
contained in high priority frames that have been
received on this interface. This counter is
incremented by OctetCount for each frame received
on this interface which is counted by
dot12InHighPriorityFrames.
This counter is a 64 bit version of
dot12InHighPriorityOctets. It should be used by
Network Management protocols which support 64 bit
counters (e.g. SNMPv2)."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aHighPriorityOctetsReceived."
::= { dot12StatEntry 12 }
dot12HCInNormPriorityOctets OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter64
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This object is a count of the number of octets
contained in normal priority frames that have
been received on this interface. This counter is
incremented by OctetCount for each frame received
on this interface which is counted by
dot12InNormPriorityFrames.
This counter is a 64 bit version of
dot12InNormPriorityOctets. It should be used by
Network Management protocols which support 64 bit
counters (e.g. SNMPv2)."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aNormalPriorityOctetsReceived."
::= { dot12StatEntry 13 }
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dot12HCOutHighPriorityOctets OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX
Counter64
MAX-ACCESS read-only
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"This counter is incremented by OctetCount for
each frame counted by dot12OutHighPriorityFrames.
This counter is a 64 bit version of
dot12OutHighPriorityOctets. It should be used by
Network Management protocols which support 64 bit
counters (e.g. SNMPv2)."
REFERENCE
"IEEE Standard 802.12-1995, 13.2.5.2.1,
aHighPriorityOctetsTransmitted."
::= { dot12StatEntry 14 }
-- conformance information
dot12Conformance
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dot12MIB 2 }
dot12Compliances
dot12Groups
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dot12Conformance 1 }
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dot12Conformance 2 }
-- compliance statements
dot12Compliance MODULE-COMPLIANCE
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"The compliance statement for managed network
entities that have 802.12 interfaces."
MODULE -- this module
MANDATORY-GROUPS { dot12ConfigGroup, dot12StatsGroup }
OBJECT
dot12DesiredFramingType
MIN-ACCESS
read-only
DESCRIPTION
"Write access to this object is not required."
OBJECT
dot12DesiredPromiscStatus
MIN-ACCESS
read-only
DESCRIPTION
"Write access to this object is not required."
OBJECT
MIN-ACCESS
DESCRIPTION
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"Write access to this object is not required."
OBJECT
dot12ControlMode
MIN-ACCESS
read-only
DESCRIPTION
"Write access to this object is not required."
::= { dot12Compliances 1 }
-- units of conformance
dot12ConfigGroup OBJECT-GROUP
OBJECTS
{ dot12DesiredFramingType,
dot12FramingCapability,
dot12DesiredPromiscStatus,
dot12TrainingVersion,
dot12LastTrainingConfig,
dot12Commands, dot12Status,
dot12CurrentFramingType,
dot12ControlMode }
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"A collection of objects for managing the status
and configuration of IEEE 802.12 interfaces."
::= { dot12Groups 1 }
dot12StatsGroup OBJECT-GROUP
OBJECTS
{ dot12InHighPriorityFrames,
dot12InHighPriorityOctets,
dot12InNormPriorityFrames,
dot12InNormPriorityOctets,
dot12InIPMErrors,
dot12InOversizeFrameErrors,
dot12InDataErrors,
dot12InNullAddressedFrames,
dot12OutHighPriorityFrames,
dot12OutHighPriorityOctets,
dot12TransitionIntoTrainings,
dot12HCInHighPriorityOctets,
dot12HCInNormPriorityOctets,
dot12HCOutHighPriorityOctets }
STATUS
current
DESCRIPTION
"A collection of objects providing statistics for
IEEE 802.12 interfaces."
::= { dot12Groups 2 }
END
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IEEE 802.12 Interface MIB
October 1996
Acknowledgements
This document was produced by the IETF 100VG-AnyLAN Working Group.
It is based on the work of IEEE 802.12.
6.
References
[1]
Information processing systems - Open Systems Interconnection Specification of Abstract Syntax Notation One (ASN.1),
International Organization for Standardization. International
Standard 8824 (December, 1987).
[2]
SNMPv2 Working Group, Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M., and
S. Waldbusser, "Structure of Management Information for Version
2 of the Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMPv2)", RFC 1902,
SNMP Research, Inc., Cisco Systems, Inc., Dover Beach
Consulting, Inc., International Network Services, January 1996.
[3]
SNMPv2 Working Group, Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M., and
S. Waldbusser, "Textual Conventions for Version 2 of the Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMPv2)", RFC 1903, SNMP Research,
Inc., Cisco Systems, Inc., Dover Beach Consulting, Inc.,
International Network Services, January 1996.
[4]
SNMPv2 Working Group, Case, J., McCloghrie, K., Rose, M., and
S. Waldbusser, "Conformance Statements for Version 2 of the
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMPv2)", RFC 1904, SNMP
Research, Inc., Cisco Systems, Inc., Dover Beach Consulting,
Inc., International Network Services, January 1996.
[5]
McCloghrie, K., and M. Rose, "Management Information Base for
Network Management of TCP/IP-based internets - MIB-II", STD 17,
RFC 1213, Hughes LAN Systems, Performance Systems International,
March 1991.
[6]
IEEE, "Demand Priority Access Method, Physical Layer and
Repeater Specifications for 100 Mb/s Operation", IEEE Standard
802.12-1995"
[7]
McCloghrie, K., and Kastenholz, F., "Evolution of the Interfaces
Group of MIB-II", RFC 1573, Hughes LAN Systems, FTP Software,
January 1994.
[8]
Kastenholz, F., "Definitions of Managed Objects for the
Ethernet-like Interface Types", STD 50, RFC 1643, FTP Software,
Inc., July, 1994.
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Kastenholz, F., "Definitions of Managed Objects for the
Ethernet-like Interface Types using SMIv2", RFC 1650, FTP
Software, Inc., August, 1994.
[10] McCloghrie, K., and Decker, E., "IEEE 802.5 MIB using SMIv2",
RFC 1748, Cisco Systems, Inc., December, 1994.
[11] McCloghrie, K., Baker, F., and Decker, E., "IEEE 802.5 Station
Source Routing MIB using SMIv2", RFC 1749, Cisco Systems, Inc.,
December, 1994.
7.
Security Considerations
Security issues are not discussed in this memo.
8.
Author’s Address
John Flick
Hewlett Packard Company
8000 Foothills Blvd. M/S 5556
Roseville, CA 95747-5556
Phone: +1 916 785 4018
Email: johnf@hprnd.rose.hp.com
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