REGULAR AGENDA REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN ELECTORAL AREA ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING

REGULAR AGENDA REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN ELECTORAL AREA ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
ELECTORAL AREA ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEETING
Thursday, March 3, 2011
10:30 am
REGULAR AGENDA
A.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
1. Regular Agenda – March 3, 2010
(Opportunity for Introduction of Late Items)
RECOMMENDATION 1
That the Agenda of the March 3, 2011 Electoral Area Advisory Committee meeting
be approved as presented.
B.
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
1. Electoral Area Advisory Committee – February 3, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 2
Page 1
That the minutes of the February 3, 2011 Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Meeting be adopted as circulated.
C.
PETITIONS AND DELEGATIONS
1. Development Variance Permit Application
RUIGROK, Jake & Patricia
(File No. 10-0665-E-DVP)
(See Item F.1)
2. Development Variance Permit Application
Sugar Lake Resort Inc. c/o Larry Arcand
(File No. 10-0717-E-DP)
(See Item F.2)
D.
REPORTS
1. Advisory Planning Commission Meetings
- Electoral Area "E" – Meeting of January 31, 2011
- Electoral Area "E" – Meeting of February 28, 2011 (to be distributed at meeting)
RECOMMENDATION 3
That the minutes of the following meetings be received for information:
- Electoral Area "E" – Meeting of January 31, 2011
- Electoral Area "E" – Meeting of February 28, 2011
Page 7
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Agenda – Regular
-2-
March 3, 2011
2. Planning and Building – 4th Quarter Summary
- Report dated January 1, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 4
Page 9
That the report dated January 1, 2011 from General Manager, Planning and Building
regarding Planning and Building – 4th Quarter Summary be received for information.
3. Sustainability Program Report
- Report dated February 15, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 5
Page 17
That the March Sustainability Report dated February 15, 2011 be received for
information.
E.
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
F.
NEW BUSINESS
1. Development Variance Permit Application
Jake & Patricia Ruigrok (File No. 10-0665-E-DVP)
- Staff report dated January 24, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 6
Page 21
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that, upon consideration of input from
adjacent landowners, a Development Variance Permit be issued for the property legally
described as That Part of Lot 213, Shown on Plan B14147; Sec 15, Twp 57, ODYD,
Plan 663, and located at 3029 Creighton Valley Road, Electoral Area “E” to vary Table 1
of Division 1601 of the Regional District of North Okanagan Zoning Bylaw No. 1888,
2003 by reducing the principal farm building east side yard setback from 30 m to 1.13 m
as shown on the building location certificate and building elevations attached to the
Development Services Report dated January 20, 2011 subject to the following:
1. Eaves on the east facing side of the principle barn building may not project from the
exterior wall more than 0.10 m; and
2. Exhaust fans may not be located on the east, north or south facing side of the
principal farm building; and
3. Outdoor compost storage, solid agricultural waste and agricultural waste storage
facilities must be setback at least 30 metres from all property lines and domestic well
sources in accordance with Tables 3 and 4 of Division 1601 of Zoning Bylaw No.
1888, 2003.
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Agenda – Regular
-3-
March 3, 2011
2. Development Variance Permit Application
Sugar Lake Resort Inc. c/o Larry Arcand (File No. 10-0717-E-DP)
- Staff report dated February 17, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 7
Page 31
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that a Development Permit be issued
for the property legally described as District Lot 4608, ODYD and located at 1630 Sugar
Lake Road, Electoral Area “E” subject to the following:
1. no more than one seasonal single family recreation dwelling may be constructed per
‘share lot’ on the ‘share lots’ shown on the site plan attached to the Development
Services Information Report dated February 17, 2011;
2. vehicle parking should be in smaller clusters and the view from Sugar Lake of
parking areas should be screened with buildings, landscaping or natural vegetation;
3. the massing of buildings should be variable in form and should be incorporated
where practical, into smaller blocks which relate to the contours of the natural
landscape;
4. exterior design and finish should incorporate products which compliment the natural
setting.
3. Bylaw 2488 – Electoral Areas Emergency Program
- Staff report dated March 2, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 8
Page 39
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that Electoral Areas Emergency
Program Bylaw No. 2488, 2011 be given First, Second and Third readings; and further
That Electoral Areas Emergency Program Bylaw No. 2488, 2011 be Adopted.
4. Southern Interior Local Government Association 2011 Conference
- 2011 SILGA Conference Registration Form and Program
RECOMMENDATION 9
Page 49
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the attendance and any costs
related thereto be authorized for Electoral Area Directors wishing to attend the 2011
Southern Interior Local Government Association Conference scheduled for May 4-6,
2011 in Merritt, BC and that all costs be allocated to Electoral Area Services (021)
budget.
5. Meat Inspection Regulations
Page 55
- Letter dated February 17, 2011
- BC Ministry of Health Services has invited the Regional District to make a
submission to the BC Abattoir Inspection System Review Steering Committee,
specifically views on the current system of inspection. The deadline for the
receipt of submissions is March 18, 2011.
For discussion.
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Agenda – Regular
-4-
March 3, 2011
6. Strategic Planning for Community Works Fund Spending, Priority Projects List
- Staff report dated February 16, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 10
Page 59
That the Strategic Planning for Community Works Fund Spending, Priority Projects List
dated February 16, 2011 be received for information.
7. Community Works Fund Project #040 – Kidston Road Multi-Use Path District of
Coldstream
- Staff report dated February 15, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 11
Page 65
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the report dated February 15,
2011 from the Sustainability Coordinator regarding Community Works Fund Project #040
be received for information; and further;
That the amount of funding contributed to the Community Works Fund Project #040,
Kidston Road Multi-Use Path located in the District of Coldstream be reviewed and
discussed in context of the priority projects previously established by the Electoral Area
Advisory Committee.
8. Community Works Fund Project #046 – Silver Star Water Utility Cattle Fencing
- Staff report dated February 16, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 12
Page 71
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the installation of a fence and a
cattle guard to exclude cattle from the open reservoir capture zones of the Silver Star
Water Utility be funded from the Community Works Fund at a net cost of $17,000
excluding HST.
9. Community Works Fund Project #047 – Grindrod Water Intake Modification
- Staff report dated February 16, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 13
Page 77
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the screen modification work for
the Grindrod water intake be funded from the Community Works Fund at a net cost of
$32,500 excluding HST.
10. Community Works Fund Project #048 – Mabel Lake Water Utility Intake Screen
- Staff report dated February 16, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 14
Page 83
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the work required to increase the
size of the intake screen for the Mabel Lake Water Utility be funded from the Community
Works Fund at a net cost of $15,600 excluding HST.
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Agenda – Regular
-5-
March 3, 2011
11. Community Works Fund Project #049 – Coldstream Well 1 Backflow Prevention
Valve
- Staff report dated February 16, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 15
Page 89
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the installation of a backflow
prevention valve in Coldstream Well 1 be funded from the Community Works Fund at a
net cost of $18,000 excluding HST.
12. Community Works Fund Project #050 – Silver Star Water Utility UV Treatment
Facility
- Staff report dated February 16, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 16
Page 95
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the construction of a UV
Treatment facility for the Silver Star Water Utility be funded from the Community Works
Fund at a net cost of $200,000 excluding HST.
13. Community Works Fund Project #051 – Mabel Lake Septage Utility Monitoring
Wells (3)
- Staff report dated February 16, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 17
Page 101
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the installation of three monitoring
wells for the Mabel Lake Septage Utility be funded from the Community Works Fund at a
net cost of $22,000 excluding HST.
14. Community Works Fund Project #052 – Goose Lake Calcification
- Staff report dated February 16, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 18
Page 107
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the project of calcifying Goose
Lake to improve water quality be funded by providing $20,000, excluding HST, from the
Community Works Fund.
15. Residential Waste Collection Survey for Electoral Area Residents
- Staff report dated February 16, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 19
Page 113
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the Residential Waste Collection
Survey, attached as ‘Appendix A’ to the report from the Waste Reduction Coordinator
dated February 16, 2011 regarding Residential Waste Collection Survey, be approved
for distribution to all residences in Electoral Areas ”B”, “C”, “D”, and “F” where
residential curbside waste collection may be feasible to implement in future.
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Agenda – Regular
-6-
March 3, 2011
16. Bylaw 2485 – Electoral Area “D” and “E” Official Community Plan Amendment
- Staff report dated February 7, 2011
- Bylaw 2485
RECOMMENDATION 20
Page 117
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that Electoral Areas “D” and “E”
Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No. 2485, 2011 be given First reading and
considered in conjunction with the Regional District
(i) financial plan; and
(ii) waste management plan
pursuant to Section 882 of the Local Government Act; and further,
That staff and the consultant be directed to hold a public information meeting in
accordance with section 879 of the Local Government Act; and further
That Bylaw No. 2485, 2011 be referred to various agencies and First Nations in
accordance with Section 879 of the Local Government Act.
17. Electoral Area “B” Commonage Fire Protection
- Staff report dated February 7, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 21
Page 201
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the Area B, Commonage Fire
Protection Report dated February 7, 2011 be received for information: and further
That staff be directed to undertake a public communication process; and further
That following the public communication process, no further action be taken unless a
petition is received which collectively represents the support of greater than 50% of the
property owners representing greater than 50% of the converted Land and Improvement
value.
18. Bylaw 1915 – Open Burning Fire Regulation – Proposed Amendments
- Staff report dated February 18, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 22
Page 211
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that staff be directed to bring forward
changes to the “Open Burning – Fire Regulation Bylaw No. 1915, 2004” as described in
the report from the Bylaw Enforcement Officer dated February 18, 2011 and specifically,
that new provisions be added to:
- Extend the time period for open burning from October 31st in one year to April 30th of
the following year,
- Define two classes of burning:
 Class ‘A’: for machine-piled debris piles with a diameter larger than 3 meters but
less than 10 meters, resulting from land being cleared or partially cleared of
vegetation to help prepare the land for a non-farming use, (e.g. farmland to
residential, forest land to residential, forest land to open area or rural lands to
subdivisions, etc.) and
 Class ‘B’: for debris piles less than 3 meters in diameter that do not constitute
debris from land being cleared or partially cleared of vegetation to help prepare
the land for a different use.
- Provide for a Special Open Burning Permit if:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Agenda – Regular
-7-
March 3, 2011

-
an “air curtain incinerator” or other forced air assistance device is used to burn
debris from land being cleared or partially cleared of vegetation to help prepare
the land for a non-farming use, or

the burn is for “farm practices” as defined in Right to Farm Regulations, or
 the burn is for forest pest or disease control, or
 the burn is for fire hazard reduction within Interface Areas
Require a debris pile inspection prior to the issuance of a Class ‘A’ Open Burning
Permit,
Revise the definition of permitted burning materials to remove the restriction on the
burning of vegetation debris that results from the clearing or partial clearing of land,
Reduce the debris drying period to 180 days,
Establish nominal fees for Class ‘B’ and Special Open Burning Permits,
Establish substantial fees for Class ‘A’ Open Burning Permit applications,
Establish fees for Class ‘A’ debris pile inspections,
Establish substantial fines for Class ‘A’ violations,
Establish a limit of one permit per property per year, and further
That staff be directed to investigate the development of an online Open Burning Permit
application process.
19. Proposed Legislative Changes
- Staff report dated February 22, 2011
RECOMMENDATION 23
Page 217
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the RDNO Administrator be
directed to bring forward the following proposed legislative changes at the March 23,
2011 Regional District CAO / CEO forum:
Direction requested to identify the top five priorities to be recommended to the
Board.
20. Building Department Review
- Verbal report from the General Manager, Planning and Building, Chief Building
Inspector and Organizational Development Consultant.
For discussion.
G.
IN-CAMERA
RECOMMENDATION 24
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the
Electoral Area Advisory Committee convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed
closed to the public in accordance with Section 90(1)(c), (f) and (g) of the Community
Charter.
H.
REPORT FROM IN CAMERA
I.
ADJOURNMENT
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EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM B.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
MINUTES of a REGULAR meeting of the ELECTORAL AREA ADVISORY COMMITTEE held
in the Board Room at the Regional District Office on Thursday, February 3, 2011
Members:
Director R. Fairbairn
Director E. Foisy
Director M. Gavinchuk
Director M. Macnabb
Director H. Halvorson
Electoral Area "D"
Electoral Area "E"
Electoral Area "B"
Electoral Area “C”
Electoral Area “F”
Staff:
L. Mellott
R. Smailes
K. Cameron
Acting General Manager, Corporate and
Electoral Area Services
General Manager, Planning and Building
Executive Assistant (taking Minutes)
Alt. Director D. Winskowski
Alt. Director J. Garlick
R. Morgan
Electoral Area “B”
District of Coldstream
Crime Prevention Coordinator, City of Vernon
Others:
Chair
Vice Chair
CALL MEETING TO ORDER
The Chair called the meeting to order at 10:39 a.m.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Regular Agenda – February 3, 2011
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Gavinchuk
That the Agenda of the February 3, 2011 Electoral Area Advisory Committee meeting be
approved with the following additions:
E.2
Silver Star Planning – Cost Apportionment
F.8
Community Works Fund – Okanagan Regional Library
F.9
Regional Board Voting Procedures – District of Coldstream
CARRIED
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Electoral Area Advisory Committee – January 6, 2011
Moved and seconded by Directors Foisy and Halvorson
That the minutes of the January 6, 2011 Electoral Area Advisory Committee Meeting be
adopted as circulated.
CARRIED
Page 1 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM B.1
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-2-
February 3, 2011
PETITIONS AND DELEGATIONS
Tuijtel, Johan – Development Variance Permit Application
No one was present to speak to this matter.
REPORTS
Advisory Planning Commission Meetings
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That the minutes of the following meetings be received for information:
- Electoral Area "C" – Meeting of January 26, 2011
- Electoral Area "D" – Meeting of January 27, 2011
CARRIED
Vernon / North Okanagan Safe Communities Unit
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That the January 2011 Vernon / North Okanagan Detachment – Safe Communities Unit report
be received for information.
CARRIED
The Committee was advised that the Safe Communities Manager position has been filled, and
the new manager will commence work in early March, 2011.
Bylaw Enforcement – 2010 Annual Report
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Foisy
That the report dated January 10, 2011 from the Bylaw Enforcement Officer regarding bylaw
enforcement in 2010 be received for information.
CARRIED
2010 Regional District of North Okanagan Noxious Weed Season Report
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the 2010 Regional District of North
Okanagan Noxious Weed Season Report dated December 31, 2010 prepared by the Weed
Control Offer be approved for submission to the Ministry of Agriculture and Lands (MAL) as per
MAL’s requirements.
CARRIED
Sustainability Program Report
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That the February Sustainability Report dated January 19, 2011 be received for information.
CARRIED
Page 2 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM B.1
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
-3-
February 3, 2011
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Halvorson
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that staff be directed to investigate the
possibility of utilizing Community Works Funds for the development of a safe walking/cycling
corridor along Silver Star Road.
CARRIED
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
Kingfisher Local Area Plan Official Community Plan Amendment, Bylaw 2484, 2011
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Foisy
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that Official Community Plan Amendment
Bylaw No. 2484, 2011 being the Kingfisher Local Area Plan, be given first reading and
considered in conjunction with the Regional District
(i)
financial plan and
(ii)
waste management plan
pursuant to Section 882 of the Local Government Act; and further,
That staff and the consultant be directed to hold a public information meeting in accordance with
section 879 of the Local Government Act; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that Bylaw No. 2484, 2011 be referred to
various agencies and First Nations in accordance with Section 879 of the Local Government
Act.
CARRIED
Silver Star Planning – Cost Apportionment
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Gavinchuk
That agreements with municipalities to share in the cost of Part 26 matters (Silver Star
Planning) include the following provisions:
• cost apportionment based on Converted Land and Improvements;
• three year term (January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2013).
CARRIED
NEW BUSINESS
Regional Board Voting Procedures – District of Coldstream
Alt. Director Garlick clarified the voting for establishment amendment bylaws, particularly
regarding governance issues within the Parks, Recreation and Culture function.
Development Variance Permit Application
TUIJTEL, Johan (File No. 10-0725-E-DVP)
Moved and seconded by Directors Foisy and Halvorson
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that, upon consideration of input from
adjacent land owners, a Development Variance Permit be issued for the property legally
described as Lot 1, Sec 33, Twp 45, ODYD, Plan KAP77645 and located at 1519 Highway 6,
Electoral Area 'E' to vary the following sections of the Regional District of North Okanagan
Zoning Bylaw 1888, 2003:
Page 3 of 220
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM B.1
-4-
February 3, 2011
1. Table 1 of Section 1601 of the Zoning Bylaw by decreasing the exterior side yard setback of
a principle farm building from 30 m to 7.2 m as shown on the site plan and building
elevations attached to the Development Services Report dated January 14, 2011;
2. Section 406.1 of the Zoning Bylaw by decreasing the major road setback of a principle farm
building from 30 m to 20.4 m as shown on the site plan and building elevations attached to
the Development Services Report dated January 14, 2011.
CARRIED
Application Under Section 17(3) and 21(2) of the Agricultural Land Commission Act
CHAMBERS, Arthur & Mona c/o Jason R. Shortt (File No. 10-0674-D-ALR)
Director Fairbairn stepped down as Chair. Director Foisy assumed the Chair.
Moved and seconded by Directors Fairbairn and Halvorson
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the application of Arthur & Mona
Chambers c/o Jason R. Shortt under Sections 17(3) and 21(2) of the Agricultural Land
Commission Act to subdivide a 0.6 ha portion of the property legally described as DL 16, ODYD,
Except Plan 25662 and located at 2520 Hwy 6, Electoral Area “D” and to include a 4.2 ha
portion of the property legally described as Lot 1, Sec. 5-6, Twp. 43, Plan 31087, Except Plan
31425 and located at 2524 Lumby Mabel Lake Road, Electoral Area “D” be authorized for
submission to the Agricultural Land Commission.
CARRIED
Director Foisy stepped down as Chair. Director Fairbairn assumed the Chair.
Southern Interior Local Government Association (SILVA) – Call for Resolutions
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that any outstanding resolutions that had
been forwarded to the Union of BC Municipalities (UBCM) in 2010 from the 2010 Southern
Interior Local Government Association (SILGA) be forwarded once again to SILGA for
consideration and submission to UBCM.
CARRIED
Union of BC Municipalities (UBCM) – 2011 Province-Wide Community to Community
Forum
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Gavinchuk
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the attendance and any costs related
thereto be authorized for Electoral Area Directors wishing to attend the 2011 UBCM ProvinceWide Community to Community Forum scheduled for March 1, 2011 in North Vancouver, BC.
CARRIED
Page 4 of 220
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM B.1
-5-
February 3, 2011
Okanagan Correctional Centre
Moved and seconded by Directors Gavinchuk and Foisy
That the December 7, 2010 letter from Rich Coleman, Solicitor General, regarding a request for
assistance in determining suitable sites for an Okanagan Correctional Centre be received for
information; and further
That the Regional District of North Okanagan Electoral Area Directors support Lumby being a
suitable site for a proposed Correctional Centre, subject to approval by the residents.
CARRIED
Community Works Fund Project #037 – Water Quality Monitoring on the Lower Shuswap
River
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Macnabb
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that funding for Community Works Fund
Project #037, Water Quality Monitoring on the Lower Shuswap River in the amount of
$53,544.00 be taken out of the $250,000.00 already allocated for the Shuswap River Watershed
Sustainability Plan (SRWSP).
CARRIED
2011 Sparkling Hill Masters World Cup of Cross Country Skiing – March 3-11, 2011 –
Request for First Medical Response
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Gavinchuk
That the letter dated January 18, 2011 from Robert Despault, First Aid Coordinator for the
Masters World Cup Cross Country Ski Event be received for information; and further
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the requested confirmation authorizing
the Silver Star Fire Department (SSFD) to respond to medical emergencies at the Sovereign
Lake Nordic Centre for this event be declined.
CARRIED
Community Works Fund – Okanagan Regional Library
Moved and seconded by Directors Macnabb and Halvorson
That the e-mail dated January 28, 2011 from the Okanagan Regional Library regarding the
consultant’s report on the feasibility of using geothermal heating and cooling for the Okanagan
Regional Library in Vernon be received for information; and further,
That use of geothermal heating and cooling for the Okanagan Regional Library in Vernon not be
pursued; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that funds previously approved for the
geothermal heating and cooling project revert to the Community Works Fund.
CARRIED
Page 5 of 220
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
Minutes – Regular
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM B.1
-6-
February 3, 2011
IN-CAMERA
Moved and seconded by Directors Halvorson and Foisy
That, pursuant to Section 92 of the Community Charter, the regular meeting of the Electoral
Area Advisory Committee convene In Camera to deal with matters deemed closed to the public
in accordance with Section 90(f)(k) of the Community Charter.
CARRIED
The regular meeting of the Electoral Area Advisory Committee adjourned to meet In Camera at
12:35 p.m.
The regular meeting of the Electoral Area Advisory Committee reconvened at 1:35 p.m.
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business the meeting was adjourned at 1:36 p.m.
Certified Correct:
Chair
Corporate Officer
Page 6 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.1
MINUTES of a meeting of the AREA “E” ADVISORY PLANNING COMMISSION held at The
Cherryville Hall on MONDAY, January 31, 2011
MEMBERS: Eugene Foisy, Director
Hank Cameron
Ian Eggen
Jamey Sanborn
Clint Whitecotton
Emil Lukat
John Guild
Members Absent: Alternate Director Charmaine Templeton
RECORDING SECRETARY Penny Stuyt
1.) Meeting was called to Order at 7:30 P. M .
PART A)
ELECTION OF CHAIR AND VICE CHAIR
Nominations were held and by acclaimation Clint Whitecotton is Chair Person and Ian Eggen is
Vice-Chair. All in favor.
PART B)
ADOPTION OF MINUTES:
1) APC AREA “E” MEETING – Adoption of Minutes of October 12, 2010
Minutes adopted as read
Moved by Ian Eggen Seconded by Hank Cameron
CARRIED
PART C)
PETITIONS AND DELEGATIONS
A review of the draft copy of the Electoral Area “D” and “E” Official Community Plan Bylaw
No. 2485, 2011 was presented by Jane Mastin of True Consulting and some discussion ensued,
One of the key drawbacks to the development of our area is the lack of high speed internet for
the many home-based businesses. This needs to br a “push” by NORD to help us get over this
hurdle and it is important that High Speed internet is part of our OCP. Also strengthening the
Management of the Environment.
It was agreed that the APC would look for “policy” sections, not the discussion areas. Ie
Sections 3.2 to 3.10.7. Wach for “may” or “shall” in the clauses. Also go over Special Use areas
like Ecovillages in Sec. 8.2.
Proposed Public Meeting for March or Early April.
PART D)
NEW BUSINESS
1) Elecoral Area “D” and “E” Official Community Plan Bylaw No. 2485, 2011
See above under Petitions and Delegations.
2) Development Variance Permit Application
Tuijel, J. (file No. 10-0725-E-DVP
The large parking lot is to be at the west end of the existing barn, where the cows are
presently fed.
Page 7 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.1
A motions was made to go along with the recommendations from Development
Services to allow the issuance of the permit
Motion by Ian Eggen
All in favor.
Seconded by Emil Lukat
3) Development Variance Permit Application
Ruigrok, J. (File No. 10-0665-E-DVP)
For a barn to raise rabbits for pet food. Rabbits to be shipped to Kelowna after
killing, along with the waste from the butchering.
The well on the property has a large volume of water. Encouraging him to keep
his neighbors happy regarding smells, especially in the summer.
Motion was made that we accept the recommendations of Development Services
to issue the permit as applied for.
Motion by John Guild
All in favor.
PART E)
Seconded by Ian Eggen
NEW BUSINESS
Discussion was brought forward by Ian Eggen regarding the new bag limits at the Land
Fill in Cherryville.
Motion was made that we, the Area E Advisory Planning Committee, request that RNO
REMOVE the minimum charge of 2 cans or bags for $3.00 for dumping fees ($3 for 1
bag, and then $4 for 3 bags, etc on an escalating scale at the Cherryville
Transfer Station. We feel that this minimum charge encourages people to stockpile
Garbage which is contrary to accepted practices for the prevention of adverse human/
Wildlife interactions. Also, at a time when we all encourage people to re-cycle as much
As possible, we feel that the minimum charge removes one incentive to recycle. People
Could feel that if they have to pay for a 3 can minimum anyway, why bother going to the
Trouble of separating their waste.
Motion by Ian Eggen
All in favor.
PART D )
Seconded by John Guild
ADJOURNMENT
There being no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 10:00 pm
Motion by Emil Lukat
Seconded by Jamey Sanborn
The next regular meeting is scheduled for Monday, February 28, 2011, at the Cherryville Community
Hall .
Signed : Chair Person ________________________________
Signed: Recording Secretary ________________________________
Page 8 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.2
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3010.06
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Rob Smailes, General Manager, Planning & Building
DATE:
January 1, 2011
SUBJECT:
Planning and Building – 4th Quarter Summary
RECOMMENDATION:
That the report dated January 1, 2011 from General Manager, Planning and Building regarding
Planning and Building 2010 - 4th Quarter Summary be received for information.
DISCUSSION:
1. Total Planning Applications [received from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010]:
182
a. Electoral Areas [includes Silver Star] – 107 total
Type of Planning Application
A.L.C.
Campground Permit
Development Permit
Development Variance Permit
Liquor License Permits
OCP / RZ
Rezoning
Subdivision
Text Amendment
Temporary Industrial Use
Legal Document*
Crown Land Referrals
Waiver Lot Frontage
TOTAL
B
1
C
1
4
1
12
CSS
4
1
D
4
E
2
3
1
2
2
F
5
1
8
2
1
8
4
1
8
15
1
1
2
1
34
1
7
8
1
1
2
2
10
23
1
3
5
20
TOTAL
13
1
29
10
1
4
3
31
1
1
5
7
1
107
4th qtr total comparison for 2009 and 2010 for Electoral Areas only:
Total
2009
157
2010
107
F:\3000-3699 LAND ADMIN\3010 - ADMINISTRATION\06 Operations Memorandums\Planning Dept Monthly Reports\2010\110101
RPT to EAAC re 4th QTR.docx
Page 9 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.2
th
Planning and Building – 4 Quarter Summary
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – January 1, 2011
Page 2
Development Services
Applications Received ‐ January ‐ December Comparison 09/10
Electoral Areas
WVR
TIU
TA
SUB
RZ
REF
OR
LIQ
LD
DVP
DP
CP
ALR
0
0
1
1
1
2
31
2
35
3
7
4
14
2010
8
2009
1
1
5
19
10
12
29
0
51
1
13
13
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
* Number of Applications Received to December 31
b. Municipal – 75 total
Type of Application
A.L.C.
Development Permit
Development Variance Permit
Liquor License Referrals
OCP / RZ
Rezoning
Subdivision
ARM
5
3
8
8
7
END
LUM
3
1
1
SPL
12
4
6
TOTAL
12
10
13
1
1
4
6
14
8
16
1
1
1
1
34
75
3
NOTE: Subdivision applications are processed by
the EA Planner
Text Amendment
Waiver Lot Frontage
Waiver Requests
TOTAL
31
7
4th qtr total comparison for 2009 and 2010 for Municipalities only:
Total
2009
71
2010
75
Page 10 of 220
3
th
Planning and Building – 4 Quarter Summary
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – January 1, 2011
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.2
Page 3
Development Services
Applications Received ‐ January ‐ December Comparison 09/10
Municipalities
WVR
1
TA
1
4
8
16
SUB
RZ
8
2
2010
OR
0
1
DVP
12
DP
7
ALR
7
0
2009
14
9
LIQ
21
5
13
10
12
10
15
* Number of Applications Received to December 31
20
25
2. Outstanding Planning Applications:
a. Electoral Areas [includes Silver Star]
i. Planning applications are processed in the order in which they are
received. There were 12 total outstanding as of December 31, 2010
[detailed below].
ii. Estimated time to process an application from receipt of application to
report being forwarded to the Advisory Planning Commission is
approximately 11 weeks.
Type of Planning Application
A.L.C.
Campground Permit
Development Permit
Development Variance Permit
Liquor License Permits
OCP / RZ
Legal Documents
Rezoning
Subdivision
Waiver Lot Frontage
TOTAL
B
C
CSS
1
D
1
E
2
1
2
1
F
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
12
1
2
1
3
3
TOTAL
1
Note: The above 'Outstanding' Electoral Area Planning applications count does not
include pending files [i.e. the application has been processed by Planning staff and
Page 11 of 220
th
Planning and Building – 4 Quarter Summary
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – January 1, 2011
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.2
Page 4
forwarded to the applicable APC for consideration or the application requires additional
information prior to completion]. The approximate number of pending Electoral Area
Planning applications is: 54 applications and 56 subdivision applications = 110 total
b. Municipal
i. Planning applications are processed in the order in which they are
received. There were 9 total outstanding as of December 31, 2010
[detailed below].
ii. Estimated time to process a planning application from receipt of
application to report being forwarded to the Municipal Administrator is
approximately 10 weeks.
Type of Application
A.L.C.
Development Permit
Development Variance Permit
Mobile Home Park
OCP / RZ
Rezoning
Subdivision
NOTE: Subdivision applications are
processed by the EA Planner
Text Amendment
Waiver Request
TOTAL
ARM
END
LUM
SPL
2
1
TOTAL
2
1
1
2
4
1
5
9
1
2
1
3
1
Note: The above 'Outstanding' Municipal Planning applications count does not include
pending files [i.e. all non-subdivision applications have been to Council for
consideration but require additional information prior to completion]. The
approximate number of pending 2009-10 Municipal applications is:
51
applications and 31 subdivision applications (Armstrong – 9, Enderby – 9,
Spallumcheen – 13) = 82 total.
3. Total Building Permit Applications [received from January 1, 2010 to December 31,
2010]: 405.
a. Electoral Areas [includes Silver Star] – 224 total
4th qtr total comparison for 2009 and 2010:
Total
2009
269
2010
224
b. Municipal – 181 total
4th qtr total comparison for 2009 and 2010:
2009
2010
Total
176
181
c. Total Electoral Areas and Municipal:
2009
2010
Total
445
405
Page 12 of 220
th
Planning and Building – 4 Quarter Summary
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – January 1, 2011
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.2
Page 5
4. Planning Department Personnel Matters
a. Staff in the Planning Department worked approximately 920 hours (118 person
days) of overtime to the end of December 2010. (The majority of this time is
that of the General Manager and the RGS Coordinator, and therefore there is no
additional cost).
b. 2010 Planning Hours [to December 31, 2010] for Inquiries and Applications only.
Municipal
Electoral Areas
Electoral Areas ALR
Silver Star
Total
Inquiries
676
1271
62
2009
Applications
1212
1541
275
139
3167
Applications
Total Hours
1888
2812
275
201
5176
Inquiries
Silver Star
5%
Silver Star
3%
Municipal
42%
Electoral Areas
53%
Municipal
34%
Electoral Areas
63%
c. The Planning department is operating with a staff of 2 clerical [Executive
Assistant and Clerk], 1 Planning Assistant, 1 Planning Technician, 1 Planning
Technologist, 2 Planners (includes Deputy Planning Manager) and 1 General
Manager/Planner [the Sr. Planning Technologist vacated his position in early
October, the vacancy has not yet been filled.] In addition, the Sustainability
Coordinator, Regional Growth Strategy Coordinator and Chief Building Inspector
report to the General Manager. General Manager time spent on Regional
Growth Strategy initiative to the end of December 2010 is 296 hours.
5. Building Department Personnel Matters
a. Staff in the Building Department worked approximately 20.5 hours (2.6 person
days) of overtime to the end of December 2010.
b. The Building department is operating with a staff of 1 clerical, 2 Building
Inspectors, 2 Sr. Building Inspectors and 1 Chief Building Inspector/Manager.
Page 13 of 220
th
Planning and Building – 4 Quarter Summary
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – January 1, 2011
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.2
Page 6
6. Planning
a. List of Planning Projects for 2010:
In addition to application processing, project management of the Kingfisher LAP
and Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP Review, there is also a resource
commitment to completing on-going projects such as the RAR Bylaws and the
Subdivision Servicing Bylaw.
At the May 12, 2010 Electoral Area Advisory Committee meeting, the top priority
planning projects for 2010 were discussed. It was finalized at the June 2, 2010
Board of Directors meeting, that the following projects be identified as the top
new priority planning projects for 2010, in addition to the projects underway from
2009:
1. Annexation Study to determine the impacts of incremental annexations on the
Electoral Areas;
Terms of reference for Annexation Study were reviewed at the August
Electoral Area Advisory Committee meeting, changes were requested and
were reviewed at the September Electoral Area Advisory Committee meeting
and were brought forward to the Board of Directors in October 2010. The
Board of Directors postponed consideration of the Terms of Reference until
staff from the Ministry of Community and Rural Development could review
and provide comment. Staff have issued a Request for Proposals and will be
bringing recommendations for moving forward in February 2011.
2. Shuswap River Planning.
The draft terms of reference for Shuswap River Planning were brought
forward at the September Electoral Area Advisory Committee meeting and
were approved by the Board of Directors at their October 6, 2010 meeting.
The detailed workplan is currently under development.
On October 6, 2010 the Board of Directors endorsed the Draft Terms of
Reference for the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan (SRWSP).
The planning process will be carried out over three phases. Phase One
involves stakeholder and public engagement as well as data collection.
Phases Two involves outlining short and long term objectives and strategies
which will result in our ability to reach the desired future condition for the river
and watershed. The third phase involves adoption, implementation and
monitoring.
On December 2, 2010 the initial SRWSP Stakeholders Workshop was held to
present the draft terms of reference for the plan, move towards creating a
vision statement for the plan as well as identify areas of importance and
concern within the watershed. A summary of the workshop proceedings and
draft vision statement has been sent out to all stakeholders and Electoral
Area Directors, as well as posted on the RDNO website for review. The next
steps in Phase One are to carry out a technical assessment of the watershed
which involves examining water quality and quantity as well as holding
additional public meetings to provide community members with the
opportunity to identify areas of interest and concern. Lastly, an Issues
Identification Paper will be prepared based on the review of current studies,
the technical watershed assessment and issues brought forward by
Page 14 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.2
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Page 16 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.3
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3046.01.04
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Laura Frank, (Interim) Sustainability Coordinator
DATE:
February 15, 2011
SUBJECT:
March Sustainability Report
RECOMMENDATION:
That the March Sustainability Report dated February 15, 2011 be received for information.
DISCUSSION:
Community Works Fund Projects
Zee Marcolin, RDNO Utilities Engineer, will be bringing forward seven Tier 2 CWF projects that have
been reviewed by the staff technical committee.
The RDNO received one community based application that was also reviewed by the staff technical
committee and will be brought forward in a separate report to the Electoral Area Advisory Committee
at the March 3, 2011 meeting; below is a summary of the recommendation:
Tier 2 :
District of Coldstream Kidston Road Multi-Use Path #040- Staff recommends the Electoral
Area Directors discuss the amount of funding they wish to contribute to the Kidston Road
Multi-Use Path.
Cost: $569,800.00. This is the first time a funding request has been received from another
local government within the RDNO for Community Works Funding. Staff is lacking a
framework which would provide a recommendation for cost sharing. Since the proposed trail
is located within the District of Coldstream and the majority of benefits will accrue to
Coldstream residents; it may be appropriate to assign an arbitrary percentage of funding, for
example 5% to 10%, to the costs of the project.
Remote Community Implementation Program Notice of Funding
On February 3, 2011 the Regional District of the North Okanagan received a notice of funding
from Tanya Hebron of the Fraser Basin Council on the Remote Community Implementation
(RCI) Program. The Program aims to develop, and distribute funding grants that support
remote communities to implement clean energy and energy efficiency projects. The program
is intended to support the implementation of projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions,
reduce dependence on fossil fuel resources, reduce energy costs and help meet a remote
community’s economic, social and physical sustainability goals.
The Sustainability
Coordinator investigated the eligibility of electoral area communities, specifically enquiring
about the possibility of funding being used for high speed internet expansion to Cherryville.
Page 17 of 220
March Sustainability Report
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – February 15, 2011
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.3
Page 2
Unfortunately none of our communities are considered remote; remote communities are
defined as both civic and First Nation communities that are not connected to the major natural
gas or electric grid.
Wilsey Dam Fish Passage Committee Meeting
On February 2, 2011 the Sustainability Coordinator attended the first Wilsey Dam Fish Passage
Committee meeting at the BC Hydro Vernon Office. The objectives of the meeting were to determine
the role of the committee, its goals, objectives, and schedule. Secondly, BC Hydro representatives
gave a presentation on the Fish Passage Framework and how it pertains to fish passage at Wilsey
Dam. At this meeting it was determined that the goal of the committee is to put together an
application for fish passage at Wilsey Dam that fits the requirements of BC Hydro’s Fish Passage
Framework. It was determined that the Ministry of Environment and Department of Fisheries and
Oceans would need to identify any data gaps that they feel are present that may inhibit them from
supporting the fish passage application. A second meeting has been scheduled for March 10, 2011
from 4:30 -7:00 p.m. at the Vernon BC Hydro Office.
Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP Review Update
The draft Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP Bylaw has been prepared. This bylaw will be brought
forward in a report to the EAAC at the March 3, 2011 meeting.
Two Public Open Houses have been scheduled for the first week of April 2011 at the Cherryville
Community Hall and the White Valley Community Centre. These meetings will provide an opportunity
for the public to give their feedback and ask questions about the draft plan.
Kingfisher Local Area Plan
Since posting and distributing the Kingfisher Local Area Plan, staff and the consultant have received
additional feedback from the public and developers in the community. A public meeting will be
scheduled for mid to late March where these additional concerns and or feedback will be addressed.
The meeting will be held at the Kingfisher Community Hall and once a date has been confirmed a
notice will be posted well in advance of the meeting in the local paper and on the RDNO website.
Inquisitive Clips
The RDNO, in conjunction with the City of Vernon, has launched a Film Competition titled Inquisitive
Clips. The film competition is dedicated to promoting sustainability throughout the region. Participants
are asked to tell us about innovative projects, dedicated community members, amazing adventures or
threatened ecosystems. We want them to “show us their greener side”. The competition will run from
January 17 to April 22, 2011. A number of the videos will be screened at the Environmental
Leadership Awards at which time the winner of the competition will be announced. This competition
will be funded by the City of Vernon and the RDNO Sustainability, Waste Reduction and Water
Quality programs at a cost of $7000.00.
Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan Next Steps
The next steps outlined in the terms of reference for the Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan
are to:
1. Host public open houses throughout the region to introduce the public to the planning
process as well as obtain feedback as to what their concerns and areas of interest are
within the watershed. These meeting are proposed to be held in mid March to early
April
2. Post a request for proposals for the technical assessment of the watershed which will
focus on establishing a baseline on water quality and water quantity within the river’s
watershed.
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EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM D.3
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Page 20 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.1
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
INFORMATION REPORT
DEVELOPMENT VARIANCE PERMIT APPLICATION
Date:
January 24, 2011
File No.:
10-0665-E-DVP
Applicant:
Jake & Patricia Ruigrok
Legal Description:
That Part of Lot 213, Shown on Plan B14147; Sec 15, Twp 57,
ODYD, Plan 663
P.I.D.#
012-168-521
Civic Address:
3029 Creighton Valley Road
Property Size:
3.95 ha (9.75 acres)
Zoning:
Non-Urban (N.U)
O.C.P. Designation:
Agricultural / Major Road
Proposed Use and
Variation:
Construction of a principal farm building requiring an interior side
yard setback variance.
DEVELOPMENT SERVICES RECOMMENDATIONS:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that, upon consideration of input from
adjacent landowners, a Development Variance Permit be issued for the property legally
described as That Part of Lot 213, Shown on Plan B14147; Sec 15, Twp 57, ODYD, Plan 663,
and located at 3029 Creighton Valley Road, Electoral Area “E” to vary Table 1 of Division 1601
of the Regional District of North Okanagan Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003 by reducing the
principal farm building east side yard setback from 30 m to 1.13 m as shown on the building
location certificate and building elevations attached to the Development Services Report dated
January 20, 2011 subject to the following:
1. Eaves on the east facing side of the principle barn building may not project from the exterior
wall more than 0.10 m; and
2. Exhaust fans may not be located on the east, north or south facing side of the principal farm
building; and
3. Outdoor compost storage, solid agricultural waste and agricultural waste storage facilities
must be setback at least 30 metres from all property lines and domestic well sources in
accordance with Tables 3 and 4 of Division 1601 of Zoning Bylaw No. 1888, 2003.
F:\3000-3699 LAND ADMIN\3066 - AREA E\3066 - APPLICATIONS\DVP\2010\10-0665-E-DVP - RUIGROK\10-0665-E-DVP RUIGROK - Info Sheet.docx
Page 21 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.1
Development Variance Permit Application
10-0665-E-DVP (Jake & Patricia Ruigrok)
Page 2
BACKGROUND:
This report relates to an application for a Development Variance Permit for the property located
at 3029 Creighton Valley Road. The applicant is proposing to legalize the construction of a
rabbit barn on the property. The location of the principal farm building requires a variance from
the 30 m interior side yard setback of the Regional District Zoning Bylaw as it is setback 1.13 m
to 1.36 m from the east side lot line.
Site Context
The subject property is located on the north side of Creighton Valley Road between Hammond
Road and Beaven Road in Electoral Area “E”. The property contains a single family dwelling
and a hay barn and is used to cultivate hay. The dwelling is located near the southeast corner
of the lot, approximately 45 m from the front property line. The hay barn is located behind the
dwelling, approximately 1.2 m from the east property line and 74 m to the rear of the dwelling.
Access to the property is gained from a driveway off Creighton Valley Road. The 3.95 ha
property is surrounded by similar sized parcels. The subject and surrounding properties are
zoned Non Urban (N.U) and are located within the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR). The
adjacent property to the east of the subject property is used to produce hay and is vacant of
buildings.
There are easements registered on the title that do not pertain directly to the subject property.
As well, there is a Building Scheme that was registered on the title of the property by A.A.
Ranch Ltd. in 1970. The Building Scheme states that no poultry farm, swine or hog farms, feed
lots, slaughter houses or saw mills shall be kept, maintained or operated on the lot. It should be
noted that the Regional District is not a party to the Building Scheme and that it has no
responsibility or authority to enforce it.
The Proposal
The rabbit barn was constructed without Building Permit in September 2010. On September 20,
2010 an inspection report was left on the property advising the property owner to apply for an
Authorization to construct or a Building Permit. On October 25, 2010 an application was
received for a Building Permit.
The rabbit barn is 371.55 m2 in size and measures 12.19 x 30.48 m. The barn is located 6 m to
the south of the existing barn, 38 m to the north of the existing house, and 1.13 to 1.36 m from
the east side lot line. The applicant chose the barn location to be generally ‘in line’ with the
existing hay barn, as shown on the attached plan, and so that the balance of the property could
be used to produce hay.
The rabbit barn is proposed to be heated and insulated. The exterior walls are proposed to be
covered with steel siding. The applicant proposes an open floor plan with no openings on the
east wall. Doors would be located on the north and south facing sides of the building. No fans
are proposed to be installed on the outer walls. Eaves are proposed to project from the building
in order to protect it from water damage from roof runoff.
Page 22 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.1
Development Variance Permit Application
10-0665-E-DVP (Jake & Patricia Ruigrok)
Page 3
Roughly 75% of the building would be used for raising rabbits and the remainder would be used
for storing feed, slaughtering the rabbits and separately freezing the rabbit meat and carcasses.
Every two months, both the frozen meat and carcasses would be shipped to a pet food
manufacturer in Kamloops. The barn would be cleaned daily as the rabbits are sensitive to
disease. Manure is proposed to be stored at least 30 m away from the barn to create compost
for bi-yearly spraying on the hay field.
Provincial Acts and Regulations
Staff contacted the Interior Health Authority as they administer the Food Safety Act/Meat
Inspection Regulations, who advised that the provisions of the Meat Inspection Regulation and
the Food Premises Regulation do not apply to the rabbit meat as it is not proposed to be
provided for public consumption.
The Ministry of Environment- Environmental Protection and Assurance Division commented that
a Meat By-Product Processing Industry which includes processing rabbit meat for non human
consumption is a regulated activity under the Environmental Management Act. The discharge
of waste from such a facility requires an authorization or unless it is authorized by a regulation
or a code of practice.
The Ministry of Agriculture commented in reference to the ‘Code of Agricultural Practice for
Waste Management’ that manure storage from the barn can be stored in the field, at least 30 m
away from the barn and any domestic water source, for up to 9 months.
ELECTORAL AREAS “D” AND “E” OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLAN:
The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan designates the land use of the property
as Agricultural. Creighton Valley Road is designated as a Major Road. The following policies
are applicable to this application:
 Lands designated as Agricultural are intended to be used for agricultural purposes and
associated uses as allowed by the Land Reserve Commission and the Regional District. All
uses and subdivision of ALR land shall be in accordance with the Agricultural Land Reserve
Act, regulations thereto or Orders and Policies of the Land Reserve Commission.
 The rural character of Electoral Areas “D” and “E” shall be maintained to encourage the
establishment of the widest range of agricultural activities.
ZONING BYLAW:
The subject property is zoned Non Urban (N.U). Uses permitted in the N.U zone include
accessory farm sales, intensive agricultural uses, resource uses, bed and breakfast uses,
boarding house uses, fruit and produce pickers’ cabins and work force housing units, home
occupations uses, packing houses, wineries and cideries, single and two family dwellings,
ancillary dwellings and manufactured homes. The proposal as compared to the N.U zone and
Agricultural building height and setbacks requirements for Principle Farm Buildings (including
rabbit barns) are as follows:
Page 23 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.1
Development Variance Permit Application
10-0665-E-DVP (Jake & Patricia Ruigrok)
CRITERIA
Building Height (max.)
Agricultural Setbacks (min.)
- Front
- Rear
- East Side
- West Side
Domestic water supply intake
Creighton Valley Road
Page 4
PROPOSAL
5.63 m
ZONE REQUIREMENTS
20 m
93.42 m
268 m
1.13 m – 1.36 m
86 m
60 m
>93.42 m
30 m
30 m
30 m
30 m
30 m
12.5 m (from centerline)
Other Setbacks
There are additional setback requirements for accessory farm buildings, structures and areas
under Tables 3 and 4 of Division 1601 of the Bylaw. In this regard, compost storage, solid
agricultural waste, and agricultural waste storage facilities must be located at least 30 m away
from all property lines. Staff have advised the applicant of these requirements.
PLANNING ANALYSIS:
The Zoning Bylaw requires that principal farm buildings that house animals be setback 30 m
from property lines in order to mitigate potential impacts on neighbouring properties. The
property most likely to be affected by the proposal is located to the east of the subject property.
This property is used to produce hay and is vacant of buildings. The subject property itself is
long and relatively narrow, making it difficult to achieve the required setbacks without placing
the barn in the middle of the property and impacting the existing farming operation.
In light of the above, Development Services raises no objections to the proposed variance
provided design limitations are included to mitigate any impact the barn may have on the
neighbouring property to the east. In this regard, it is recommended that the eaves on the east
side of the barn be allowed to project no more than 0.10 m. Such a restriction would help
ensure that snow shedding from the roof of the building be maintained on the subject property.
To address odour and noise that may be emitted from the building, staff also recommend that
exhaust fans not be allowed along the east, north and south facing walls of the barn.
The applicant is proposing to store compost and waste from the operation in accordance with
the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw. To be clear that approval of the proposed building
setback variance does not imply approval of variances associated with setback requirements
related to these activities, it is recommended that the Development Variance Permit state that
outdoor storage associated with these activities must comply with the Zoning Bylaw
requirements. The proposed rabbit operation appears to comply with applicable Provincial Acts
and Regulations. As the Regional District is not responsible for administering these regulations,
staff have advised the applicant to contact the various agencies listed in the background section
of this report regarding their specific requirements that may relate to the rabbit operation.
The application was referred to the Building Inspector, who has stated that the reduced setback
appears to present no problems based on a preliminary review of the Building Permit
application. Due to the proximity to the property line no openings would be allowed on the east
elevation to maintain adequate fire wall protection.
Page 24 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.1
Development Variance Permit Application
10-0665-E-DVP (Jake & Patricia Ruigrok)
Page 5
SUMMARY:
This is an application for a Development Variance Permit for the property located at 3029
Creighton Valley Road. The applicant is proposing to legalize the construction of a rabbit barn
that has been sited too close to the eastern property line of the property. Subject to input from
adjacent land owners, especially the one to the east, Development Services raises no
objections to the proposed Development Variance Permit provided certain design limitations are
placed on the construction of the building so as to limit the impact the building may have on the
use and enjoyment of the adjacent property to the east. In this regard, it is suggested that
exhaust fans on the east, north and south facing sides of the building be prohibited and that the
projection of eaves of the east side of the building be limited to ensure snow falling from the
building would be retained on the subject property. The applicant shall also give due
consideration to the potential odour from animal waste that may be deposited or stored outside
of the rabbit barn and only do so in compliance with agricultural setbacks for accessory farm
uses. Staff also suggest that the applicant does his due diligence to ensure that all appropriate
provincial regulations and requirements are understood and met where applicable.
REFERRALS:
The application has been referred to the following for their review and comment:
1. Electoral Area “E” Director
2. Electoral Area “E” Advisory Planning Commission
3. Electoral Area Advisory Committee
4. Ministry of Environment
January 19, 2011 – Environment Protection and Assurance Division comments that Meat
By-Product Processing Industry which includes processing rabbit meat for non human
consumption is a regulated activity under the Environmental Management Act. The
discharge of waste from such a facility requires an authorization or unless it is authorized by
a regulation or a code of practice. For more information the proponent should contact
Regional Environmental Protection Office in Penticton for further assistance.
5. Building Inspection Department
October 28, 2010 – A complaint was received on September 17, 2010. On September 20,
2010 an inspection report was left on the property advising the property owner to apply for
an Authorization to construct or a Building Permit. On October 18, 2010 a follow up letter
was sent again requesting that a permit be applied for. On October 25, 2010 an application
was received for a Building Permit. This building is currently framed (the roof sheathing is
not yet in place). There are no openings proposed on the (east) side elevation. The
building can be treated as a low hazard building and therefore there are no concerns with
the spatial separation and/or construction of the exposing building face. However, as the
roof trusses exceed a span of 40 feet a structural engineer is required to design and
oversee the construction of the building. The applicant has been advised of this in a letter
dated October 26, 2010.
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REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
INFORMATION REPORT
DEVELOPMENT PERMIT APPLICATION
Date:
February 17, 2011
File No.:
10-0717-E-DP
Applicant:
Sugar Lake Resort Inc. c/o Larry Arcand
Legal Description:
District Lot 4608, ODYD
P.I.D.#
011-947-403
Civic Address:
1630 Sugar Lake Road
Property Size:
63.13 ha
Servicing:
On-Site Well Water or Water licences and individual Septic
Sewage Disposal systems
Zoning:
Sugar Lake Seasonal Single Family Recreation Comprehensive
Development Zone (CD.6)
O.C.P. Designation:
Comprehensive Resort Development / Development Permit Area
for Form and Character of Commercial Development, the
Protection of the Natural Environment and the Protection of
Development of Hazardous Conditions.
Proposed Use:
Seasonal single family recreation dwellings and residential
accessory buildings
DEVELOPMENT SERVICES RECOMMENDATIONS:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that a Development Permit be issued for the
property legally described as District Lot 4608, ODYD and located at 1630 Sugar Lake Road,
Electoral Area “E” subject to the following:
1. no more than one seasonal single family recreation dwelling may be constructed per ‘share
lot’ on the ‘share lots’ shown on the site plan attached to the Development Services
Information Report dated February 17, 2011;
2. vehicle parking should be in smaller clusters and the view from Sugar Lake of parking areas
should be screened with buildings, landscaping or natural vegetation;
3. the massing of buildings should be variable in form and should be incorporated where
practical, into smaller blocks which relate to the contours of the natural landscape;
4. exterior design and finish should incorporate products which compliment the natural setting.
F:\3000-3699 LAND ADMIN\3066 AREA E\3066 - APPLICATIONS\DP\2010\10-0717-E-DP - SUGAR LAKE RESORT\10-0717-EDP - SUGAR LAKE RESORT - Info Sheet.docx
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Development Permit Application
10-0717-E-DP (Sugar Lake Resort c/o Larry Arcand)
Page 2
BACKGROUND:
This report relates to an application for a Development Permit for Form and Character of
Commercial Development on the property located at 1630 Sugar Lake Road. The property is
owned by a corporation whose members have interest in building up to 11 seasonal single
family recreation dwellings with up to two accessory buildings per dwelling on the property.
Prior to the issuance of Building Permits for the proposed development, the issuance of a
Development Permit is required as the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan
(OCP) designates the property as a Development Permit Area for Form and Character of
Commercial Development.
Previous Development Applications
In October 2009, the OCP land use designation of the subject property was changed from Large
Holdings to Comprehensive Resort Development. At the same time, the property was rezoned
from Large Holding (L.H) to Sugar Lake Seasonal Single Family Recreation Comprehensive
Development (CD.6). The CD.6 zone is unique to the subject property. As a condition of
changing the land use designation and zoning, a Section 219 Covenant was registered on the
title of the property to address wildfire hazard issues and to prohibit subdivision of the property.
Site Context
The subject property is 63.13 ha in size and is located on the southeast side of Sugar Lake.
The property does not have frontage on a highway and access to the property is gained from
Sugar Lake and private driveways that connect to a forest service road. To the south of the
property, the forest service road connects to the Sugar Lake Road. The property is mainly treed
and slopes upwards from Sugar Lake towards the east side of the property.
In addition to the covenant noted above, a second covenant is registered on the title of the
subject property which states that no natural vegetation may be removed and no building may
be constructed within 15 m of the natural boundary of Sugar Lake. The covenant also “Saves
Harmless” the Regional District from damages due to flooding, torrents or land slippage.
The subject property is zoned Sugar Lake Seasonal Single Family Recreation Comprehensive
Development (CD.6). The properties to the west are zoned Large Holdings (L.H); to the east,
north and south is crown land.
The Proposal
The owners of the subject property are proposing to construct one seasonal single family
recreation dwellings on each of the 11 ‘share lots’ shown on the attached site plan. The ‘share
lots’ range in size from 2.18 ha to 3.36 ha. The ‘common’ portion of the property is 33.8 ha.
The ‘share lots’ are not fee simple lots and the lines on the site plan are not property lines.
Access to the dwellings on each ‘share lot’ would be gained from Sugar Lake or private
driveways that connect to the above noted forest service road. No buildings or structures are
proposed to be constructed within 30 m of the natural boundary of Sugar Lake. The applicant
has not submitted building plans for the proposed development but instead states that the
exterior design and finishes will blend with the natural setting of the development.
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Development Permit Application
10-0717-E-DP (Sugar Lake Resort c/o Larry Arcand)
Page 3
ELECTORAL AREA “D” AND “E” OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLAN:
The subject property is designated in the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan
as Comprehensive Resort Development. The Comprehensive Resort Development Policies of
the OCP state that in accordance with the provisions of the Development Permit Section of this
OCP, land designated as ‘Comprehensive Resort Development’ is also designated as a
Development Permit Area in matters concerning the protection of the natural environment and
protection of development from hazardous conditions and in matters concerning the form and
character of commercial development.
Development Permit Area – Watersheds – Protection of the Natural Environment
The portion of the subject property within 30 m of the natural boundary of Sugar Lake is
designated in the OCP as a Development Permit Area for the Protection of the Natural
Environment. Issuance of a Development Permit in this regard is not required as no
development is proposed within 30 m of the natural boundary of Sugar Lake.
Development Permit Area – Floodplain – Protection of Development from Hazardous Conditions
The subject property is designated in the OCP as a Development Permit Area for the Protection
of Development from Hazardous (Floodplain) Conditions as it contains lands adjacent to Sugar
Lake. Issuance of a Development Permit in this regard is not required as there is no
development proposed within 30 m of the natural boundary of Sugar Lake, including any
alteration of land or removal of any vegetation and there is an existing covenant registered on
the title of the property that “Saves Harmless” the Regional District from damages due to
flooding, torrents or land slippage.
Development Permit Area – Commercial – Form and character of Development
The Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP states that the Regional District has the objective to
maintain the attractive rural setting and visual quality within the Electoral Areas and to ensure
that the form and character of commercial developments are appropriately integrated into this
rural setting and co-ordinated with existing developments in these areas. On reviewing a
Development Permit application, the Regional Board will consider the following guidelines:
1. vehicle parking should be encouraged at the rear or side of a building and should be in
smaller clusters and screened from view with landscaping or natural vegetation while still
maintaining sight distances for safe access and egress;
2. the massing of buildings should be variable in form and should be incorporated where
practical, into smaller blocks which relate to the contours of the natural landscape;
3. vistas should be respected where practical through the development to prominent natural
features beyond the subject land;
4. exterior design and finish should incorporate products which compliment the natural setting;
5. the form and character of development and landscaping should harmonize with the natural
setting and should reflect a low density of development.
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March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.2
Development Permit Application
10-0717-E-DP (Sugar Lake Resort c/o Larry Arcand)
Page 4
ZONING BYLAW:
The Sugar Lake Seasonal Single Family Recreation Comprehensive Development (CD.6) zone
allows for seasonal single family recreation dwellings, accessory buildings and structures and
nature trails. The density is restricted to eleven dwellings per lot and not more than two
accessory buildings or structures are permitted per dwelling. The seasonal use of the dwellings
may not exceed 182 days per year for the accommodation of persons for recreational or
vacation purposes. There are also use restrictions relative to unenclosed parking and storage
of commercial or recreational vehicles and storage of building materials. Building sites must be
at least 2000 m2 in area and not be over 30% natural slope. Access driveways must meet
minimum width and slope requirements.
The gross floor area for the dwellings units may not exceed 115 m2 and accessory buildings
may not exceed 25 m2. The height of the dwellings is restricted to the lesser of two stories or 9
m and on slopes greater than 5%, not more than 11 m. The height of garages and free standing
carports may not exceed 5 m above the driveway entrance. All other accessory buildings may
not exceed 5 m in height. Setbacks of 3 m apply to the access road and other buildings. There
is also a 15 m water body setback from the natural boundary of Sugar Lake. The bylaw also
stipulates under the floodplain restrictions that a minimum construction level of 604.72 m GSC
datum must be met. The floodplain covenant on title outlines the specific conditions.
RIPARIAN AREAS REGULATIONS:
The Regional District has adopted a policy that requires all residential, commercial and
industrial development within riparian assessment areas as defined under the Riparian Areas
Regulation to be subject to the Regulation. The Regulation dictates that local government must
not approve any residential, commercial or industrial development within a riparian assessment
area unless it has been notified by the Province that a Qualified Environmental Professional’s
assessment report has been received and that the development is allowed to proceed as per
Section 4(2) or (3) of the Regulation. In this case, an assessment report is not required as no
development is proposed within 30 m of the natural boundary of Sugar Lake. If any
development within 30 m of Sugar Lake were to be proposed after the issuance of a
Development Permit, an assessment report would be required to be filed with the Province.
PLANNING ANALYSIS:
The purpose of this application is to establish form and character conditions as required under
the commercial Development Permit guidelines of the Official Community Plan. The applicant
has submitted a site plan which demonstrates that one seasonal single family recreation
dwelling would be constructed on each of the 11 proposed ‘share lots’. The ‘share lots’ range in
size from 2.18 ha to 3.36 ha. No buildings or structures are proposed to be constructed within
30 m of the natural boundary of Sugar Lake. The applicant has not submitted building plans for
the proposed development but instead states that the exterior design and finishes will blend with
the natural setting of the development. The Zoning Bylaw restricts the gross floor area for the
dwellings units to a maximum of 115 m2.
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EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.4
2011 SILGA CONVENTION
MERRITT, BC
May 4th to 6th, 2011
Merritt Convention Centre, 1950 Mammette Avenue, Merritt, BC
Registration must be received in full by March 11, 2011 to be eligible for the Early Bird Prize
Early Bird winner will receive up to five (5) registrations for the 2012 SILGA Convention in Revelstoke, BC
__________________________________
First/Last Name:
(As shown on the name tag)
Municipality/RD/Organization:
Position
Email
Address:
City:
Telephone: (250)
Cell:
, BC Postal Code:
BREAKOUT SESSIONS May 4th
Wednesday morning – choose one (1) session
1. 11:00 AM SIR
2. 11:00 AM Small Water Systems
3. 11:00 AM Showcase Merritt
Wednesday afternoon – choose one (1) session in each time slot
1. 1:15 PM Conflict of Interest
1. 3:00 PM Communications/Media
2. 1:15 PM Community/Youth Engagement
2. 3:00 PM Community/Youth Engagement
Will you be attending Friday lunch?
Do you have any dietary restrictions?
REGISTRATION COST
$320.00 (Payment postmarked by March 11, 2011)
$360.00 (Payment postmarked after March 11, 2011)
GOLF REGISTRATION
18 Holes individual play start time 8:00 AM
9 Hole scramble play start time 9:00 AM
Cost $35.00
Cost $25.00
PARTNER’S PROGRAM – TO BE ANNOUNCED
The SILGA website will have full program details
Payment for the partner’s program will be accepted when delegates arrive in Merritt
Name of Partner:
Partner Attending:
Wednesday dinner/casino ($25.00)
Thursday banquet/dance ($50.00)
CANCELLATION/REFUND POLICY
Full refunds will be awarded if cancellation received before April 08, 2011 Exchanges within your Council will be accepted until April 15, 2011
City of Merritt HST No. 121391866
Subtotal
HST
Total Cost
Send registration form by e-mail to [email protected]
Cheque payable to: City of Merritt, PO Box 189, Merritt, B.C. V1K 1B8
For more information on the convention please go to www.silga.ca or contact Alison Slater
at (250) 374-3678 or by e-mail [email protected]
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SILGA - Southern Interior Local Government Association
Page 1 of 1
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.4
Convention Information > Accommodations
Registration for 2011
Convention
2/14/2011
Registration for the
2011 SILGA Convention
is now open. Please visit
the convention page on
the website for more
details.
2011 resolution
deadline
Accommodations
Blocks of rooms have been set aside for the convention at the following hotels. Please let them know you are
coming for the SILGA Convention.
Merritt Econo Lodge Rates from $79/room
Best Western Nicola Inn Rates from $99/room
Ramada Inn
1/4/2011
Deadline for submission
of 2011 resolutions will
be March 1st. All
resolutions received
after this date will be
considered late
resolutions.
Rates from $92/room
Super 8 Rates from $89/room
The Econolodge is very close to the convention centre, all other hotels are 2 km away. There will be a shuttle
service available on Wednesday and Thursday evenings.
2011 nomination
deadline
1/4/2011
If you are interested in
becoming a member on
the SILGA board,
nominations will be
accepted until March
1st. Please contact
Alison @ 250-374-3678
for more information.
2011 SILGA
Convention
6/4/2010
The 2011 SILGA
Convention will be held
in Merritt from May 4th
to 6th.
Page 50 of 220
http://www.silga.ca/siteengine/activepage.asp?PageID=22
2/17/2011
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.4
2011 SILGA Conference
Merritt, BC
May 4th to 6th
Draft Program of Events
February 9, 2011
Wednesday, May 4th ( Merritt Civic Centre)
8:00 am
18 holes of golf (individual play) at Merritt Golf and Country Club
9:00 am
9 holes of golf (scramble) at Merritt Golf and Country Club
9:00 am - 10:30 am
Registration opens - Merritt Civic Centre
9:00 am
Trade show set up starts
11:00 am
1. SIR – Cara McCurrach (general manager) - codling moth
2. Small water systems – Al Richmond, Cariboo RD
3. Showcase Merritt
12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Registration continues
12:00 pm – 1:15 pm
Lunch on own
1:15 pm – 2:15 pm
Breakout Sessions
1. Conflict of interest session – Jeff Locke, Fulton & Co.
2. LGLA educational session – Community engagement, including
youth engagement
2:15 pm – 2:30 pm
Nutritional Break
3:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Breakout Sessions
1. LGLA educational session – Community engagement, including
youth engagement
2. LGLA educational session – Communication and media relations
4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Registration continues (need help)
5:00 pm – 5:30 pm
SILGA Executive meeting (if needed)
6:30 pm
Dinner
8:30 pm
Casino
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EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.4
Thursday, May 5th (Merritt Civic Centre)
7:00 am – 8:00 am
Registration/Breakfast
8:00 am – 8:45 am
Opening Ceremonies
Includes
x SILGA Executive and Host Committee led in by the RCMP
x Singing of O Canada –
x Welcome Prayer –
x Blessing –
x SILGA President – Kevin Flynn
x Mayor Susan Roline – City of Meritt
x Chair Peter Milobar – TNRD
8:45 am – 10:00 am Keynote Speaker - Sami Jo Small, 2 time Olympic Gold Medalist,
Canada Women’s Hockey Team
10:00 am – 10:15 am Nutrition Break
10:15 am – 10:30 am Gold Sponsor Presentation
x Terasen Gas – Elvia Picco
10:30 am – 11:00 am AGM Opens
x
x
x
x
x
President’s report – Councillor Kevin Flynn
Adoption of 2010 AGM Minutes
Business Arising from the Minutes
Financial Report – Councillor Harry Kroeker
Nomination Report – Director Rhona Martin
including speeches from candidates for Table Officers and Electoral Area
Director.
11:00 am – 11:20 am Silver Sponsor Presentation
x Municipal Insurance Authority –
x WoodWORKSBC – Peter Moonen
11:20 am – 11:40 am UBCM Address – President Barbara Steele, City of Surrey
11:40 am – 12:30 pm UBCM response to CFIB report on fiscal spending
12:30 pm – 1:30 pm Lunch
x Voting for Table Officers/Electoral Area Director
Page 52 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.4
1:30 pm – 1:45 pm
Gold Sponsor Presentation
x TOTA, Glenn Mandziuk, Chief Executive Officer
1:45 pm – 3:20 pm
AGM continues
x Announcement of Table Officers/Electoral Area Director
election results
x Resolutions
3:20 pm – 3:30 pm
Silver Sponsor Presentation
x Municipal Finance Authority
3:40 pm – 3:55 pm
Nutrition Break
3:55 pm – 4:05 pm
Silver Sponsor Presentations
x Geoscience BC – ‘Lyn Anglin
x Association of Mineral Exploration of BC – Jonathan
Buchanan
x BC Mining – Zoë Carlson
4:05 pm – 5:00 pm
AGM continues - Resolutions
Speeches for Directors at Large
5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Voting for Directors at Large
6:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Reception
6:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Western Barbecue
7:30 pm – 8:15 pm
Merritt Theatre Group
8:45 pm – 11:30 pm Dance with DJ
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March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.4
Friday, May 6th (Merritt Civic Centre)
7:00 am – 8:00 am
Breakfast
8:00 am – 8:15 am
Gold Sponsor Presentation
x BCLC – Greg Walker
8:15 am – 8:45 am
Minister Stephanie Cadieux, Minister for Community, Sport and
Cultural Development
8:45 am – 9:15 am
Gold Sponsor Presentation
x BC Hydro – CEO
9:15 am – 10:15 am Keynote Speaker – Clarence Louie, Chief Osoyoos Band
10:15 am – 10:30 am Nutrition Break
10:30 am – 11:15 am Premier or Leader of Opposition
11:15 am – 12:00 pm Hon. Stockwell Day, Okanagan Coquihalla
Minister for the Treasury Board
12:00 pm – 12:05 pm SILGA President Elect
12:05 pm - 12:10 pm
2012 Host – Revelstoke Mayor – David Raven
12:10 pm – 1:00 pm Lunch and grand prize draw
Page 54 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.5
871758
February 17, 2011
Good day,
Here at the BC Ministry of Health Services, Health Protection Branch, we have had the pleasure
of working with you and other important partners in Regional District planning and development
services, both in Meat Inspection Regulation dialogue sessions and as part of the applications
process for Class D and E licences. We acknowledge that on-going dialogue on the Provincial
meat inspection system with the Regional Districts is critical to success of the system. Thank you
again for your participation.
At this time, the Ministry is actively reviewing the meat inspection system, in efforts to
modernize and improve the system for all of BC. The BC Abattoir Inspection System Review
(BCAISR) will involve an assessment of the meat inspection system currently in place in
provincially licensed “Class A” and “Class B” abattoirs, and an evaluation of potential
modification and alternative inspection models. A key component of the review is consultation
with stakeholders with a specific interest in meat inspection, including Regional District
planning and development services staff.
The objectives of the review are threefold: to ensure the abattoir inspection system responds to
the needs of BC’s meat industry, to ensure it operates in a cost effective manner, and to ensure
that any changes to the system uphold or improve upon existing provincial standards for
meat safety.
We wish to extend a “call for submissions” to parties whose work is directly or indirectly
impacted by or associated with meat inspection the meat inspection system in provincially
licensed slaughter facilities. We therefore are pleased to invite you/your organization to make a
submission to the BCAISR Steering Committee. In particular, we would like to get your views
on the current system of inspection and your advice/comments/recommendations for improving
the system of inspection in BC.
We are attaching a document which provides the parameters for the submissions.
The deadline for the receipt of submissions is March 18, 2011.
...2
Ministry of Health Services
Health Protection
Mailing Address
1515 Blanshard St 4-2
Victoria BC V8W 3C8
Page 55 of 220
Telephone: (250) 952-1724
Facsimile: (250) 952-1713
Website: www.gov.bc.ca/health
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.5
-2-
We encourage you to send us a submission and if you have any questions about the BCAISR,
please contact Anna Gardner with the Ministry of Health Services, by email at:
[email protected] or by phone at: 250-952-1716.
Yours sincerely,
Ron Duffell
Director of Food Protection
Ministry of Health Services
Z:\Health Protection\Protection\CORRESPONDENCE 280-30\2011\Director signatures\Ron
Duffell\871758 Phase 3_Invitation for Submissions to BCAISR Review of Meat Inspection - to
RD staff.doc
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EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.5
Guidelines for submissions:--for BCAISR review of meat inspection
Please include:
a) a brief overview of how the Provincial meat inspection system relates to your
organization;
b) a summary of the current strengths and challenges of the system from your perspective;
c) any advice and recommendations you might wish to make. Please make advice and
recommendations as concrete as possible. If you have advice on potential implementation
of these recommendations, this would also be helpful.
In addition,
d) Please include any relevant evidence, data, information or testimonials to support your
position and recommendations;
e) Please indicate whether the views presented are your own or if they reflect the views of
your organization.
Focus of submissions
The focus of the submissions should be on the operational or administrative aspects of the
delivery of meat inspection services in Class A or Class B provincially licensed facilities.
Related topics such as the new Class D and E slaughter licenses, slaughter waste disposal,
construction standards for licensed facilities, transition processes for Class C licenses, etc. are
beyond the scope of this review.
Further details for submissions:
We would respectfully ask that submissions be kept to a maximum of 10 pages (single spaced).
You may provide additional supporting information in appendices.
We prefer to have submissions provided to us electronically. All submissions should be sent to
Paul Pallan at [email protected] and Anna Gardner at [email protected] . To make other
arrangements (fax or post) please contact Anna Gardner with the Ministry of Health Services by
phone at: 250-952-1716 or by email at [email protected]
Submissions could become public documents. If you would like your submission to be kept
confidential, please clearly indicate your preference.
In you have questions or need additional information, please contact Anna Gardner at the above
contacts.
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EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.6
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3046.01.04
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Laura Frank, (Interim) Sustainability Coordinator
DATE:
February 16, 2011
Strategic Planning for Community Works Fund Spending, Priority
Projects List Reviewed
SUBJECT:
RECOMMENDATION:
That the Strategic Planning for Community Works Fund Spending, Priority Projects List Reviewed
dated February 16, 2011 be received for information.
DISCUSSION:
Background
The Community Works Fund (CWF) is a component of the New Deal for Cities and Communities
derived from federal gas tax revenues. The CWF is currently a nine year program, four years
remaining (program is up for review in 2014) from which the Regional District of North Okanagan
receives bi-annual payments based on Electoral Area population.
In January of 2009 the CWF expenditure procedure was adopted. The procedure was developed to
provide a comprehensive assessment of projects to be funded by the CWF, while still allowing for
prompt funding of small scale, eligible projects. The procedure employs a two-tier system; one for
small projects under $8000.00 and a second for larger, more costly projects over $8000.00.
Use of Community Works Fund Monies
The CWF has be used primarily to fund projects driven by the Regional District of North Okanagan,
but has allowed for the transfer of funds to eligible recipients in the community for projects that work
towards the goals of improving water quality, reducing greenhouse gases and managing solid waste.
To date funding has been spent on a number of projects that have supported local community-based
infrastructure improvements which have advanced the principles of sustainability within the North
Okanagan as well as increased the exposure of the Sustainability Program within the community.
Community Works Fund Priority Projects List
On March 9, 2011 the staff technical committee reviewed the Community Works Fund Project list
along with all other projects that had been received to date. This review was carried out in relation to
departmental work plans, based on this review it was determined that a number of the larger capital
projects will be put on hold until next year. Engineering has identified a number of up-grades that
need to be made to some of the smaller RDNO utilities. These projects will be brought forward by the
Engineering department.
Schedule A provides an up-date as to which of the larger capital projects will move forward in 2011
and those that will be revisited in the coming years.
Schedule C breaks down how much money each Electoral Area will receive by 2013, how much
money has currently been allocated and what funds are remaining.
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March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.6
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EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.6
Schedule A- Larger Projects to be Considered
Mandatory Projects
Department &
Estimated Cost
Electoral
Area
Sub
Regional
Regional
Feasibility
Tangible:
Closure of Pottery Road
Landfill
Engineering

$125,000.00
Septage Facility Upgrade
Funding will come out of the
Solid Waste Budget

Engineering
On hold
$200,000.00
Silver Star Water Utility
Engineering Studies: Source
Water Assessment,
Groundwater Protection
Plan, Strategic Plan Update
Engineering
Grindrod & Mabel Lake
Water Up-grades
Engineering
Approved by the board on
Sept 1st 2010
EA C
$57,417.00
Supported by Staff and will be
brought forward by the
Engineering Department
EA F
Voluntary Projects:
Tangible:
Organic Waste Collection
Pilot
Project

Solid Waste
Management
On hold until 2013
$245,000.00
Mabel Lake Sewer
Extensions (consideration of
the Westside)
Engineering
$350,000.00
Wilsey Dam Fish ladder
(may qualify)
Extension of Greater Vernon
Water Utility to west side of
Highway 97 at Stickle Road
Not currently a priority
EA F
EA D
Engineering

EA B
Page 61 of 220
On hold until an amount is
identified and the project is
given approval from BC Hydro
Not a priority project refer to
Memo Schedule B
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.6
Soft (Studies):
Shuswap River Watershed
Sustainability Plan

Planning
Approved by the Board
Nov 3rd, 2010
$250,000.00
to
$300,000.00
RDNO Sustainability
Strategy
Planning
$100,000.00
Annexation Study (may
qualify)
Planning
$50,000.00
Total
$1,427,417.00
Page 62 of 220


On Hold
Does not fit within the
Community Works Fund
eligibility requirements
(Different funding source will
be used)
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.6
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March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.6
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EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.7
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3046.01.04
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Laura Frank, (Interim) Sustainability Coordinator
DATE:
February 15, 2011
Community Works Fund Project # 040 Kidston Road Multi-Use Path
District of Coldstream
SUBJECT:
RECOMMENDATION:
That the report dated February 15, 2011 from the Sustainability Coordinator regarding Community
Works Fund Project #040 be received for information; and further;
That the amount of funding contributed to the Community Works Fund Project #040, Kidston Road
Multi-Use Path located in the District of Coldstream be reviewed and discussed in context of the
priority projects previously established by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee.
DISCUSSION:
On January 13, 2011 the General Manager of Planning & Building received a letter from Trevor
Seibel, Director of Financial Administration, District of Coldstream for a funding request for the Kidston
Road Multi-Use Path. The proposed project is to construct a Multi-Use Path adjacent to Kidston Road
which will connect to existing trails at the north end of the road (Palfrey Drive West trail) as well as
with the existing path and trail network at the “Red Gate” which is one of the entrances to Kalamalka
Lake Provincial Park. It is anticipated that the primary users of the proposed trail would be
Coldstream residents that are immediately adjacent to the trial although it will provide a benefit to park
users. The estimated total cost of this project is $569,800.00; although no specific funding amount
from the Electoral Areas has been identified.
An assessment of the project has been carried out utilizing the Regional District of North Okanagan
Community Works Fund Tier 2 project assessment which is attached to this report (Schedule A) for
your review and information.
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:
The Multi-Use Path has been identified in the District of Coldstream Bicycle and Pedestrian Master
Plan. This Plan is part of a larger regional system known as “Ribbons of Green” which is endorsed in
the Greater Vernon Parks and Recreation Master Plan. The Multi-Use Path will allow Coldstream
residents and tourists who frequent Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park to access the network of trials
within the Park without having to drive their vehicles. The Multi-Use Path will connect existing paths
and trails to the north and south to allow a seamless connection for walkers, joggers, bikers and
horseback riders using the park. The Multi-Use Path will also offer an alternative mode of
transportation to the park for approximately 160 homes in the immediate area. It is important to note
Page 65 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.7
Page 66 of 220
Community Works Fund Project # 040
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – February 15, 2011
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.7
Page 3
Schedule A
Community Works Fund Project Assessment – Tier 2
Over $8,000
Date: January 26, 2011
Project #:040 Kidston Road Multi-Use Path
Recipient: District of Coldstream
Project Cost: $569,800.00
Project Description: The proposed project is to construct a Multi-Use Path adjacent to Kidston Road
(Palfrey Drive West trail) with the existing path and trail network at the “Red Gate” which is one of the
entrances to Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park. The path and trail network in Kalamalka Lake
Provincial Park is a regional draw and is frequently used by joggers, naturalists, bird watchers,
walkers, bikers and horseback riders. Currently, the stretch of road between Palfrey Drive West and
the Red Gate is very scenic but does not have bike lanes and is very narrow with steep shoulders;
this forces people to drive their vehicles to the park. The construction of the Multi-use Path will
provide a non-vehicular connection to the park for residents living adjacent to Kalamalka Lake
Provincial Park thereby reducing their greenhouse gas emissions and reducing dependency on
vehicular traffic.
Project Eligibility
Yes
Eligible funding recipient?

Eligible costs?

Explanation
District of Coldstream
Paths and Trails
If project is related to a building,
is the building primarily used for
public good?
Benefits of the Project
Yes

Benefit to local community
Explanation
The proposed Multi-Use path is located within
the District of Coldstream. The majority of
benefits will be to the residents living adjacent
to Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park; although
other park users will experience increased
connectivity of trails within the park trial
network.
Benefit to Electoral Area
Benefit to more than one
Electoral Area
Benefit to all Electoral Areas
Page 67 of 220
Community Works Fund Project # 040
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – February 15, 2011
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.7
Benefit to entire Regional
District
Does the Project meet funding agreement categories?
Project Category
Yes

Public Transit
Sub Category
Projects that: Develop or improve public
transit system (includes cycling and
pedestrian infrastructure) as well as road
system improvements that encourage a
reduction in car dependency (bike paths) are
eligible.
Community Energy Systems
Water and Wastewater
Solid Waste Management
Capacity Building
Does the Project work towards achieving the three key environmental outcomes?
Fund Priorities
Yes

Explanation
By providing alternative transportation
infrastructure we could expect to see a
reduction in vehicle trips. Using the BC GHG
Emissions guide for transportation
benchmarks, it is estimated that annually
approximately 940 vehicle trips could be
converted to cycling. Using an average
round trip of 10 km’s per vehicle and GHG
factor of 0.000277 tonnes of CO2/km we
could expect a 2.6 tonne reduction annually.

A reduction in vehicle emissions improves air
quality.
Greenhouse Gas Reductions
Cleaner Air
Cleaner Water
Does the Project incorporate principles of Sustainability?
Principles of Sustainability
Social
Yes

Explanation
Walking, jogging, biking and other nonvehicular modes of transportation encourage
healthy living and increase the opportunities
for social interaction; this can help foster a
stronger Sense of Community amongst
inhabitants.
Page 68 of 220
Page 4
Community Works Fund Project # 040
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – February 15, 2011
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.7
Page 5

Promoting alternative modes of transportation
works towards decreasing GHG emissions
and lessens our impact on the environment.
Yes
Explanation
Environmental
Economic
Other benefits of the Project
Project Benefits
Education value
Public Awareness (media
opportunities)
Leverage of additional funds
External Group Driven Projects
Is the project a building retrofit?
Yes
No 
Integration with other Regional District of North Okanagan initiatives
This project is identified in the District of Coldstream Bicycle and Pedestrian Master
Plan. This plan is part of a larger regional system known as the “Ribbons of Green”
which is endorsed in the Greater Vernon Parks and Recreation Master Plan.
Justification for prioritisation of project
The proposed Multi-Use Path is within the District of Coldstream boundaries and the
majority of benefits of the path will be to residents living adjacent to Kalamalka Lake
Provincial Park. North Okanagan residents who frequent the park will experience
increased connectivity of trails within the park trial network; however, the proposed
Multi-Use path does not currently contribute to cross jurisdictional linkages of existing
or proposed regional trail networks.
Staff Recommendation
That the amount of funding contributed to the Community Works Fund Project #040,
Kidston Road Multi-Use Path located in the District of Coldstream be reviewed and
discussed in context of the priority projects previously established by the EAAC and
remaining funding not already allocated.
Page 69 of 220
Community Works Fund Project # 040
Report to Electoral Area Advisory Committee – February 15, 2011
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.7
Page 6
Schedule B: Larger Projects to be Considered
Department &
Estimated Cost
Mandatory Projects
Electoral
Area
Sub
Regional
Regional
Tangible:

Engineering
Closure of Pottery Road Landfill
$125,000.00
Engineering

Septage Facility Upgrade
$200,000.00
Engineering
Silver Star Water Utility Engineering Studies:
Source Water Assessment, Groundwater
Protection Plan, Strategic Plan Update
$57,417.00
EA C
(approved by the board on Sept 1st 2010)
Engineering
Grindrod & Mabel Lake Water Up-grades
EA F
Voluntary Projects:
Tangible:
Solid Waste
Management
Organic Waste Collection Pilot
Project

$245,000.00
Engineering
Mabel Lake Sewer Extensions (consideration
of the Westside)
EA F
$350,000.00
Wilsey Dam Fish ladder (may qualify)
EA D/E

Engineering
Extension of Greater Vernon Water Utility to
west side of Highway 97 at Stickle Road
EA B
Soft (Studies):
Planning
Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan
$250,000.00
to
$300,000.00

Planning
RDNO Sustainability Strategy
$100,000.00

Planning
Annexation Study (may qualify)
$50,000.00
Total
$1,427,417.00
Page 70 of 220

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March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.8
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March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.9
REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 5643.2.1
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Zee Marcolin, Utilities Engineer
DATE:
February 16, 2010
SUBJECT:
Community Works Fund Project # 047
RECOMMENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the screen modification work for the Grindrod
water intake be funded from the Community Works Fund at a net cost of $32,500 excluding HST.
DISCUSSION:
This project will initiate screen modification of the Grindrod intake screen similar to the City of
Enderby, which included redesign of the intake screen with air purging to reduce sediment build up in
the screen. As the screen is within a fisheries sensitive river, an environmental assessment has also
been included in the cost estimate in the event that the Department of Fisheries requires this
assessment. The estimated costs to undertake this project is $32,500 excluding HST.
Grindrod is within Area "F" and these improvements will improve the water quality for the community
of Grindrod and potentially assist in reducing long-term operating costs of the Grindrod Water Utility.
An assessment of the project has been carried out utilizing the Regional District of North Okanagan
Community Works Fund Tier 2 project assessment which is attached to this report for your review and
information.
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:
Grindrod Water Utility's intake is within the Shuswap River and since construction, sand has entered
the intake screen and has caused consistent operational and water quality issues for this system. In
2005, vortex sand separators were installed before the treatment plant, reducing issues for the plant,
however, sand still enters the wet well, which has resulted in pump failures and water quality issues.
It is also probable that screen intake velocities do not meet Department of Fisheries entrance velocity
for fisheries.
FINANCIAL/BUDGETARY CONSIDERATIONS:
The total project cost is $32,500 excluding HST.
PERSONNEL IMPLICATIONS:
Zee Marcolin, Utilities Engineer, is the main contact for this project.
Page 77 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.9
File No.: 5643.2.1
Re: Community Works Fund Project # 047
Dated: February 16, 2011
Page 2 of 3
SUMMARY:
It is recommended that funding for screen modification work for the Grindrod Water Utility intake be
funded from the Community Works Fund at a net cost of $32,500 excluding HST.
Attachment: Community Works Fund Project Assessment: Project #:047
Arnb1d'~Baake, P.Eng.
General Manager Engineering
Re'iewed and endor ~d by/1
. '
~1J/IU'
aura Frank, MA Ian.
(Interim) Sustainability Coordinator
Greg Betts
Administrator
Page 78 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.9
Community Works Fund Project Assessment - Tier 2
Over $8,000
Date: January 28, 2011
Project #:047
Recipient: Grindrod Water - Modification of Intake
Project Cost: $32,500
Project Description: Grindrod Water Utility's intake is within the Shuswap River and
since construction, sand has entered the intake screen and has caused consistent
operational and water quality issues for this system. In 2005, vortex sand separators were
installed before the treatment plant, reducing issues for the plant, however, sand still
enters the wet well, which has resulted in pump failures and water quality issues. It is
also probable that screen intake velocities do not meet Department of Fisheries entrance
velocity for fisheries. RDNO would like to initiate screen modification similar to the
City of Enderby, which included redesign of the intake screen with air purging to reduce
sediment build up in the screen.
Project Eligibility
Yes
Eligible funding recipient?
,/
Eligible costs?
,/
Explanation
Area F
CWF Agreement - Schedule B -1.1 b)
If project is related to a building,
is the building primarily used for
public good?
Benefits of the Project
Yes
,/
Benefit to local community
Explanation
These improvements will improve the water
quality for Grindrod.
Benefit to Electoral Area
Benefit to more than one
Electoral Area
Benefit to all Electoral Areas
Benefit to entire Regional
District
Does the Project meet funding agreement categories?
Project Category
Yes
Public Transit
Page 79 of 220
Sub Category
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.9
Community Energy Systems
¥'
Water and Wastewater
Improved drinking water quality.
Solid Waste Management
Capacity Building
Does the Project work towards achieving the three key environmental outcomes?
Fund Priorities
Yes
Explanation
¥'
Will provide cleaner water to Grindrod
residents.
Greenhouse Gas Reductions
Cleaner Air
Cleaner Water
Does the Project incorporate principles of Sustainability?
Principles of Sustainability
Yes
¥'
Social
¥'
Environmental
¥'
Economic
Explanation
Provide better quality water to residents and
potentially reduce fee hikes in the future by
reducing operational costs.
Reducing screen entrance velocity will protect
fisheries.
Grindrod experienced a 99% fee hike in 2011
and will experience another significant hike in
2012 due to increased operational
maintenance from the sand issue, remedying
the issue may alleviate the fee hikes required.
Other benefits of the Project
Project Benefits
Education value
Public Awareness (media
opportunities)
Leverage of additional funds
Yes
Explanation
External Group Driven Projects
Is the project a building retrofit?
Ifso,
Page 80 of 220
Yes
No
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.9
a) what are the predicted annual energy and/or water savings associated with
the project?
b) What is the proponent contribution (can be volunteer time)?
c) Is the building insured against loss/damage? Yes
No
Integration with other Regional District of North Okanagan initiatives
Justification for prioritisation of project
Grindrod Water Utility experienced a 99% fee increase in 2011, which only allows a
balanced budget and can not afford to finance improvement of capital works in the next
couple of years.
Staff Recommendation
That the project to modify the screen intake for the Grindrod Water Utility be funded
from the Community Works Fund.
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REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 5643.2.1
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Zee Marcolin, Utilities Engineer
DATE:
February 16, 2010
SUBJECT:
Community Works Fund Project # 050
RECOMMENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that the construction of a UV Treatment facility for
the Silver Star Water Utility be funded from the Community Works Fund at a net cost of $200,000
excluding HST.
DISCUSSION:
A UV feasibility study for Silver Star Water has estimated the construction of a UV Treatment facility at
$850,000 and construction is slated to start this summer (2011). To fund the project, a $400,000
grant was provided by Build Canada, $200,000 will be provided by Silver Star Development Cost
Charges. With a $200,000 grant from the Community Works Fund the remaining $50,000 will be
funded by the Silver Star Water Utility rate payers.
Silver Star is within Area "C", however, Silver Star Resort benefits other electoral areas as many
residents of Vernon, Coldstream and other areas work and recreate at Silver Star resort. Silver Star
also provides economic benefits to the area from tourism.
An assessment of the project has been carried out utilizing the Regional District of North Okanagan
Community Works Fund Tier 2 project assessment which is attached to this report for your review and
information.
BACKGROUND/HISTORY:
Interior Health (IH) requires two forms of disinfection to satisfy their 43210 drinking water objectives.
Currently the Silver Star Water Utility chlorinates the water but still requires a second form of
disinfection and UV disinfection is required in order to meet the IH 43210 objectives.
FINANCIAL/BUDGETARY CONSIDERATIONS:
The total project cost is $851,000 however; we are requesting $200,000 to assist in the construction
of the UV Treatment facility.
PERSONNEL IMPLICATIONS:
Rod Pleasance, RDNO Project Engineer, will oversee the construction of the UV Treatment facility on
behalf RDNO and is the main contact for this project.
Page 95 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.12
File No.: 5643.2.1
Re: Community Works Fund Project # 050
Dated: February 16, 2011
Page 2 of 3
SUMMARY:
It is recommended that funding for the construction of a UV Treatment facility for the Silver Star Water
Utility be funded from the Community Works Fund at a net cost of $200,000 excluding HST.
ArnolCiBadke, P.Eng.
General Manager Engineering
Reviewed and endoJ-Sed by: /
~/v .~u:id/;1L
Laura Frank, A Plan.
(Interim) Sustainability Coordinator
Approved for inclusion:
1-/)"f"
",ti
./.,j)C.
Greg Betts
Administrator
Page 96 of 220
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.12
Community Works Fund Project Assessment - Tier 2
Over $8,000
Date: January 28, 2011
Project #:050
Recipient: Silver Star Water - UV Treatment
Project Cost: $851,000 requesting $200,000
Project Description: Interior Health (IH) requires two forms of disinfection to satisfy
their 43210 drinking water objectives. Silver Star Water requires UV disinfection in
order to meet the IH 43210 objectives. A UV feasibility study for Silver Star Water has
estimated the construction of a UV Treatment facility at $851,000 and construction is
slated to start this summer.
Project Eligibility
Yes
Eligible funding recipient?
../
Eligible costs?
../
If project is related to a building,
is the building primarily used for
public good?
Explanation
Area C
CWF Agreement - Schedule A -1.1 a)
../
An addition to the Mid T facility will be
required, which is part of the public utility
Benefits of the Project
Yes
Benefit to local community
../
Explanation
Improve water quality to Silver Star Village
../
Silver Star is a tourist designation with
positive implications to the local economy
../
Silver Star is a tourist designation with
employees living in Vernon, Coldstream and
other surrounding electoral areas as well as
local business that support Silver Star.
Benefit to Electoral Area
Benefit to more than one
Electoral Area
Benefit to all Electoral Areas
Benefit to entire Regional
District
Does the Project meet funding agreement categories?
Project Category
Yes
Public Transit
Community Energy Systems
Page 97 of 220
Sub Category
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.12
,;'
Water and Wastewater
Improves drinking water quality
Solid Waste Management
Capacity Building
Does the Project work towards achieving the three key environmental outcomes?
Fund Priorities
Yes
Explanation
,;'
Will reduce the risk of Crypotosporidium and
Giarda contamination
Greenhouse Gas Reductions
Cleaner Air
Cleaner Water
Does the Project incorporate principles of Sustainability?
Principles of Sustainability
Yes
,;'
Social
Explanation
UV Treatment will increase the confidence in
the drinking water at Silver Star.
,;'
Increase the confidence in the drinking water
at Silver Star should lead to reduced
dependency on bottled water.
Yes
Explanation
,;'
Public awareness opportunities are available
to discuss UV treatment and the water utility
in general
,;'
A $400,000 grant was provided by Build
Canada, $200,000 is provided by Silver Star
DCCs, $50,000 by SSW rate payers
Environmental
Economic
Other benefits of the Project
Project Benefits
Education value
Public Awareness (media
opportunities)
Leverage of additional funds
External Group Driven Projects
Is the project a building retrofit?
Page 98 of 220
Yes
No
EAAC - REGULAR AGENDA
March 3, 2011 - ITEM F.12
Ifso,
a) what are the predicted annual energy and/or water savings associated with
the project?
b) What is the proponent contribution (can be volunteer time)?
c) Is the building insured against loss/damage? Yes
No
Integration with other Regional District of North Okanagan initiatives
Justification for prioritisation of project
The UV treatment is required by IHA and needs to be constructed this summer.
Staff Recommendation
That the construction ofUV Treatment for Silver Star Water Utility be funded from the
Community Works Fund.
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REGIONAL DISTRICT
of
NORTH OKANAGAN
REPORT
File No.: 3046.01.04
TO:
Electoral Area Advisory Committee
FROM:
Laura Frank, (Interim) Sustainability Coordinator
DATE:
February 7, 2011
Bylaw 2485, 2011 [Electoral Area “D” & “E” Official Community
Plan Amendment]
SUBJECT:
RECOMMENDATION:
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that Bylaw No. 2485, 2011 being the Electoral
Area “D” & “E” Official Community Plan, be given first reading and considered in conjunction
with the Regional District
(i)
financial plan and
(ii)
waste management plan
pursuant to Section 882 of the Local Government Act; and further,
That staff and the consultant be directed to hold a public information meeting in accordance with
section 879 of the Local Government Act; and further,
That it be recommended to the Board of Directors that Bylaw No. 2485, 2011 be referred to
various agencies and First Nations in accordance with Section 879 of the Local Government
Act.
BACKGROUND:
The report to the Electoral Area Advisory Committee from the Sustainability Coordinator, dated
October 6, 2009, identified the review of the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community
Plan (OCP) as a priority project at the Regional Board Priority Setting workshops held on
January 8 and 9, 2009.
At the November 4th, 2009 Regional Board meeting the following resolution was passed;
That as recommended by the Electoral Area Advisory Committee, the Terms of Reference
attached to the report dated October 6, 2009 from the Sustainability Coordinator for the review
of Electoral Areas ‘D” and ‘E” Official Community Plan be endorsed;
And further, that staff be authorized to issue a call for proposals for the review of Electoral Areas
‘D’ and ‘E” Official Community Plan based on these Terms of Reference;
And further, that funding be included in the 2010 financial plan for a review of Electoral Areas ‘D’
and ‘E’ Official Community Plan;
And further, that the project be funded from the Community Works Fund.
Page 117 of 220
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Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community Plan, Bylaw 2485, 2011
Report to EAAC – February 7, 2011
Page 2
It was also recommended that due to limited capacity within the Planning and Building
Department the review of the Electoral Areas “D” and “E” OCP be carried out by a consultant.
At the Regular Meeting of February 3, 2010, the Board of Directors recommended that True
Consulting Group be commissioned to conduct the review of the Electoral Area “D” and “E”
OCP at a cost of $69,630.00.
On March 18, 2010 the consultant met with both the Area “D” & “E” Advisory Planning
Commissions to introduce herself as well as outline the OCP review process. On April 14, 2010
and April 28, 2010 the first public open houses were held at the Cherryville Community Hall and
the White Valley Community Centre. The goal of these open houses was to provide an
opportunity for residents to become familiar with the OCP process and identify community
issues and opportunities. A number of display boards were on hand to provide residents with
information on the OCP process, new legislative requirements, the area’s population profile,
housing counts and development opportunities. Prior to these meetings area residents were
mailed a newsletter/questionnaire to get them to identify what they want the area to be like in
twenty years.
Based on the feedback obtained in the first phase of public consultation the draft OCP was
created. Due to consultant delays the OCP review is currently six months behind schedule. A
concerted effort is being made to carry out the remainder of the review in a timely manner. Two
additional public open houses will be held in April 2010 to provide area residents with an
opportunity to give feedback on the proposed policies. Based on the second phase of public
consultation the document will be revised as required. The finalized OCP document will be
distributed to staff, Areas “D” & “E” Advisory Planning Commissions and posted on the RDNO
website.
DISCUSSION:
After the first phase of the public consultation process which involved two public meetings two
joint Area “D” & “E” Advisory Planning Commission meetings and the solicitation of written and
verbal correspondence from area residents, True consulting presented the draft Electoral Area
“D” and “E” OCP to RDNO staff on January 19, 2011. The plan has since been posted on our
website for review.
The draft Electoral Area “D” and “E” OCP contains policies that address: Environmental Issues,
Agricultural & Resource Use, Rural, Rural Residential & Residential Land Use, Commercial,
Industrial and Special Land Use Areas, Quality of Life, Transportation & Servicing, Economy,
and Development Permit Areas.
SUMMARY:
Although the Electoral Area “D” and “E” OCP and process has been delayed the work carried
out to date has been delivered in accordance with the Terms of Reference which called for the
consultant to:
1)
Establish a meaningful public participation program with the citizens of Rural
Lumby and Cherryville with the intent to establish if community priorities have
changed since the last OCP was adopted.
2)
Revisit the appropriateness of policies guiding the location and type of
commercial, agricultural-industrial and rural residential land use.
3)
Review existing OCP policies and Development Permit Criteria within the
context of Provincial legislative requirements including the Riparian Areas
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REGIONAL DISTRICT OF NORTH OKANAGAN
BYLAW NO. 2485
A Bylaw of the Regional District of North Okanagan to adopt
an Official Community Plan for Electoral Areas “D” and “E”
WHEREAS pursuant to Section 876 [Authority to adopt a bylaw] of the Local
Government Act, R.S.B.C., 1996, Chapter 323, as amended, and Regulations passed
pursuant thereto, the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan may, by Bylaw,
adopt one or more official community plans;
AND WHEREAS the said Official Community Plan shall be prepared in accordance with
Section 877 of the Local Government Act, R.S.B.C.;
AND WHEREAS the said Official Community Plan may include policy and context
statements in accordance with Section 878 of the Local Government Act, R.S.B.C.;
AND WHEREAS the said Official Community Plan may be expressed in maps, plans,
reports, or any combination thereof;
AND WHEREAS the Regional Board has caused to be carried out a report outlining the
general planning objectives and development policies for the Regional District of North
Okanagan.
NOW THEREFORE, the Board of the Regional District of North Okanagan, in open
meeting assembled, hereby ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:
GENERAL
1. This Bylaw may be cited as “ Official Community Plan Amendment Bylaw No.
2485, 2011 “.
2. The Official Community Plan Report marked Schedule "A", together with the
Official Community Plan Maps marked Schedule "B", “C”, “D” attached hereto
and forming part of this Bylaw, are hereby designated as the Official Community
Plan for Electoral Areas "D" and “E” of the Regional District of North Okanagan.
3. Bylaw No. 1690 being the "Electoral Areas “D” and “E” Official Community
Plan Designation Bylaw No. 1690, 2001", and all amending bylaws thereto, are
hereby repealed.
Read a FIRST time
this
day of
, 2011
Bylaw considered in conjunction with the Regional District Financial Plan and Waste
Management Plan this ___________ day of ____________________, 2011.
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F.16
2
Bylaw No. 2485
Read a SECOND time
Advertised on
this
day of
the
day of
, 2011, and
the
day of
, 2011
, 2011
Public Hearing held pursuant to the provisions of Section 890 of the Local Government
Act on
the
day of
, 2011
Received the approval of the Minister of Community, Sport and Cultural
Development pursuant to Section 882 of the Local Government Act
this
day of
, 2011
Read a THIRD time
this
day of
, 2011
ADOPTED
this
day of
, 2011
Approval No.
Minister of Community, Sport and
Cultural Development
CHAIR
CORPORATE OFFICER
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n
a
l
P
y
t
i
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m
m
o
C
l
a
i
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f
O
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A
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F
Regional District of the North Okanagan
Electoral Area ‘D’ (Rural Lumby)
and
Electoral Area ‘E’ (Cherryville)
OFFICIAL COMMUNITY PLAN
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CONTENTS
1
INTRODUCTION
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
2
3-1
Context
Environmentally Sensitive Areas Policies
Watercourses and Riparian Areas Policies
Wildlife Polices
Floodplains and Alluvial Fans Policies
Wildfire Policies
Tree Retention and Tree Expansion Policies
Hazardous Conditions Policies
Energy and Conservation Policies
Climate Change Policies
5-1
Rural Land Use Policies
Rural, Residential Policies
COMMERCIAL
6.1
6.2
4-1
Introduction
Agriculture Policies
Resource Policies
Forestry Policies
Sand, Gravel and Other Mineral Extraction Policies
RURAL, RURAL RESDIENTIAL, & RESIDENTIAL
5.1
5.2
6
Demographics and Growth Trends
Housing
Development Inventory and Opportunities
Health and Socio-Economic Indicators
First Nation Communities
Planning Considerations
AGRICULTURAL & RESOURCE USE
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
5
2-1
ENVIRONMENT
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
3.9
3.10
4
Legislative and Regulatory Content
Community Consultation
Community Vision
Planning Principles
The Sustainability Lens
Acronyms
Related Documents & Jurisdictions
PLANNING CONTEXT
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
3
1-1
6-1
Context
Commercial Policies
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7
INDUSTRIAL
7.1
7.2
8
9-1
Context
Parks and Open Space Policies
Heritage Conservation Policies
School Facilities and Other Community Services Policies
Police and Fire Protection Policies
Community Accessibility and Inclusion Policies
Seniors and Special Needs Policies
Arts and Culture Policies
Community Health Policies
11-1
Context
Economic Policies
DEVELOPMENT PERMIT AREAS
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
10-1
Context
Transportation Policies
Water Policies
Sewage Collection and Disposal Policies
Drainage Collection and Disposal Policies
Solid Waste Disposal Policies
Other Utility Service Policies
ECONOMY
11.1
11.2
12
Context
Special Use Area Policies
Comprehensive Resort and Ecovillage Development Overview
Comprehensive Resort and Ecovillage Development Policies
TRANSPORTATION & SERVICING
10.1
10.2
10.3
10.4
10.5
10.6
10.7
11
8-1
QUALITY OF LIFE
9.1
9.2
9.3
9.4
9.5
9.6
9.7
9.8
9.9
10
Context
Industrial Policies
SPECIAL USE AREAS
8.1
8.2
8.3
8.4
9
7-1
General
Riparian Development Permit Area
Hazardous Lands Development Permit Area
Commercial and Industrial Development Permit Areas
SCHEDULES
Schedule B
Schedule C
Schedule D
Land Use
Environmentally Sensitive Areas
Hazardous Conditions
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Acknowledgements
The Development of the North Okanagan Electoral Areas ‘D’ and ‘E’
Official Community Plan has been a collaborative process, with the
general public as vital contributors. Their input throughout the
planning process has helped shape the plan. Regional District staff,
at all levels, also provided an important role and critical expertise.
The following are especially acknowledged:
Electoral Area Directors


Rick Fairbairn - Electoral Area ‘D’
Eugene Foisy - Electoral Area ‘E’
Advisory Planning Committees - Area ‘D’ Area ‘E’
North Okanagan Regional District Planning Staff
TRUE Consulting
Preamble
It is recognized that the Plan Area is within the traditional territory of the
Okanagan First Nation and the Shuswap First Nation. This plan is without
prejudice to and cannot be used to define and/or limit Aboriginal and Treaty
Rights and Aboriginal Title of First Nations in British Columbia.
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INTRODUCTION
1.1
1
LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY CONTEXT
The Province of British Columbia (BC) was divided into Regional Districts in 1965 in order to provide a
form of local government for areas that are not part of a municipality (unincorporated areas). This
Official Community Plan applies to a portion of the Regional District of North Okanagan (RDNO)
covering parts of Electoral Areas ‘D’ and ‘E’ as shown on Figure 1.1.
The Regional District operates within the context of the legislation of the Province of British Columbia.
The Local Government Act and the Community Charter provide legislation for Community Plans and
outline the tools available to local governments to plan and regulate land uses.
This plan builds upon the policies and principles of the OCP adopted by By-law 1690, 2001. The
planning process started in 2010 and has expanded the OCP policies to ensure consistency with
current legislation and to reflect the current community vision.
This Official Community Plan provides a general statement of the policies of the North Okanagan
Regional District about the form and character of land uses and servicing requirements in the plan
area. The plan policies will guide decisions to be made by the Board of Directors when considering
applications for various types of development. The Official Community Plan:
a. expresses a community vision, developed through the planning process;
b. provides an understanding of how the Regional District plans to work co-operatively with
other jurisdictions, particularly the City of Vernon; District of Coldstream; Village of Lumby;
First Nations; provincial government agencies; developers and community groups;
c. contains statements regarding the Regional District’s plans to accommodate future growth
and to integrate various land uses such as: residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural,
institutional and recreational uses;
d. provides statements regarding options for servicing new areas and levels of servicing that
are appropriate for different types and levels of development;
e. recognizes the different growth pressures experienced within the plan area;
Electoral Areas ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) & ‘E’ (Cherryville) Official Community Plan
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f.
provides policies relating to the preservation and protection of the natural environment, its
ecosystems and biological diversity;
g. provides policies relating to avoiding hazards and promoting safety of humans and security
of land improvements;
h. contains policies respecting affordable, rental and special needs housing;
i.
contains targets for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and actions to achieve
identified targets; and
j.
other discretionary statements referred to in Section 878 of the Local Government Act, in
particular a Regional Context Statement, and where appropriate Part 27 of the Local
Government Act dealing with Heritage Conservation.
Figure 1.1: Plan Area Context
Electoral Areas ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) & ‘E’ (Cherryville) Official Community Plan
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The Official Community Plan uses population data from the 2006 Census of Canada and provides
both short-term and long-term directions for the Regional District’s future. Updates of the plan are
recommended every 5-10 years to evaluate whether or not the plan is still accurate in reflecting
community trends, needs and desires.
Finally, the Official Community Plan provides a foundation for financial planning. Specifically, land
use and servicing strategies create requirements for the years ahead and this information can be
incorporated into the Regional District’s financial planning and direct applications for supportive
funding.
1.2
COMMUNITY CONSULTATION
Pursuant to Section 879 of the Local Government Act, the Official Community Plan process was a
consultative exercise with opportunities for public input at several stages. The consultation process
included meetings with the relevant Advisory Planning Commissions as well as public information
meetings at key points in the planning process. The District has also maintained a web site that
contains information on the OCP review process and draft documents. Stages in the planning
process are outlined as follows.
Official Community Plan Process
Background Research and Review
Draft Vision, Issues and Opportunities
Consultation
Draft OCP
Consultation and Agency Referral
Board Consideration and Approvals
Implementation
Electoral Areas ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) & ‘E’ (Cherryville) Official Community Plan
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1.3
COMMUNITY VISION
A community vision has been developed as part of the planning process to set direction for the future
of the area in a manner that reflects the desires and aspirations of a broad cross-section of interests
across the region.
Official Community Plan Vision
“Area ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) and Area ‘E’ (Cherryville) are comprised
of diverse, distinct and liveable rural areas where people live,
learn, work and play in harmony with each other and the natural
environment.
We are a unique area within the Regional District and plan to
protect and enhance that uniqueness.
We are leaders in fostering social integrity, economic
development, and environmental sustainability, where the
principles of independence and self-sufficiency are valued.
We are known as an area where the natural environment is
carefully managed as both a “natural” area and a “working”
environment that will be sustained in this balance for future
generations.”
1.4
PLANNING PRINCIPLES
Planning principles were developed to articulate key themes and values that emerged from the
research and consultation process. These principles are the basis of ‘who we are’, ‘what we believe
in’ and ‘where we would like to go’ as a community. The Official Community Plan is guided by these
principles.
Principle 1 –
Cultivate
Partnerships
Principle 2 –
Citizen
Engagement
Principle 3 –
The Regional District with seek out and develop and nurture partnerships with
federal, provincial and regional government agencies, First Nations, businesses,
non-governmental organizations, community associations, and others to assist in
achieving the shared community vision.
The Regional District is committed to providing opportunities for its citizens to
engage in meaningful participation in the community decision-making process.
Ensure the protection, restoration and management of the region’s natural and
Environmental agricultural environments for present and future generations. There are natural
environments that are highly valued for their unique and vital ecosystems
Stewardship
(including contributing to supply of clean water), scenic beauty, outdoor
recreation, and support of a resource based economy. Minimize conflicts by
developing and applying clear growth management and land use policies.
Principle 4 –
Natural
Resource
Conservation
Support the wise use of energy and material resources by endorsing sustainable
design and land and management practices.
Electoral Areas ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) & ‘E’ (Cherryville) Official Community Plan
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Principle 5 –
Encourage economic development as a key to prosperity for the entire
community through: the designation of employment lands; supporting
diversification of employment through business development; providing
educational opportunities to residents; and maintaining the integrity of resource
lands used for agriculture, forestry and mining.
The Regional District will strive to enable a high quality of life for its residents,
Principle 6 –
Community
where everyone enjoys a safe, vibrant and healthy community and has access to
Livability
education, jobs, public services, culture, heritage, recreation and the natural
environment. This is an area with a strong sense of community.
Support a wide range of housing types and tenures that will help ensure that
Principle 7 –
people of all ages, abilities, household types and incomes have a diversity of
Housing
housing choices and those residents and their families can continue to live in the
Diversity
area.
Recognizing the transportation challenges associated with the dispersed
Principle 8 –
Transportation settlement pattern in the plan area, the Regional District will work with Provincial
authorities and support strategies to encourage transit, cycling, pedestrian and
Choice
other modes of travel that minimize greenhouse gas emissions and ensure safe
and efficient movement between communities and settlement areas.
Principle 9 –
Infrastructure will be efficient, scaled appropriately and include suitable
sustainable alternatives and technologies. The Regional District will not provide
Responsible
or allow services that are inconsistent with sustainable land management
Provision of
practices.
Services
The Regional District will provide ongoing leadership through adherence to the
Principle 10 –
Community
Guiding Principles, sustainable land management and the policies contained
Leadership
within the Official Community Plan when making land use decisions.
Local
Economic
Resilience
1.5
THE SUSTAINABILITY LENS
The community has a desire to see the area developed in a manner that is sustainable –
environmentally, fiscally, economically and socially – so that children and grandchildren can satisfy
their needs in the future and continue to enjoy the opportunities and amenities that the area has to
offer. This commitment requires balancing the protection of the environment with the needs of a
changing population and economy. The principles, objectives and policies contained within the plan
reinforce a commitment to sustainability. Examples of sustainability principles that have been
considered as part of the planning process include:
Options to the car are emphasized.


Enhance connectivity between roads and trails.
Local services (e.g. Cherryville commercial area, recreation areas) are supported where
feasible.
Work in harmony with the natural systems.




Protect watercourses and environmentally sensitive areas (Development Permits and Building
Permits used to trigger reviews and approvals).
Adopt and enforce anti-sprawl land use policies (Lumby is the nearest centre for higher order
retail services, regional/urban cultural and recreation services and higher density residential
development).
Understand groundwater and its capacity to support development (set clear conservative
subdivision requirements for proof of water).
Encourage and support the use of clean, alternative and renewable energy sources.
Electoral Areas ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) & ‘E’ (Cherryville) Official Community Plan
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








Consider opportunities to support re-cycling.
Support and encourage community forests.
Encourage water conservation.
Consideration of wildfire interface areas.
Direct development away from areas of high natural hazards to areas of no or low natural
hazards.
Support best practices to manage surface water, drainage and groundwater consistent with
the principles of sustainability.
Consider the development of best management practices to protect the supply and quality of
water resources.
Establish a Regional Sustainability Committee.
Support Environmental Farm Plans for cattle ranches (livestock) on unprotected creeks.
Buildings and infrastructure are greener, smarter and cheaper





Education on green alternatives
Discourage sprawl
Support local agriculture including ALC initiatives to support agricultural diversity (e.g. tourist
accommodation where applicable).
Preserve agricultural land by supporting the retention of land within the Agricultural Land
Reserve where ALR lands have suitability and capability for agriculture (e.g. large parcel size,
suitable soils and compatible neighbouring land uses).
Investigate the need for a regional water conservation strategy, aimed at educating residents
on water conservation methods and reducing water consumption.
Jobs are close to home


Better internet service allows residents to work at home and reduce their carbon footprint.
Land use designations support home occupations.
The spirit of the community is honoured







Principles of independence and self-sufficiency are valued.
Respect sacred First Nation sites.
Value heritage resources.
Support community driven initiatives (e.g. community recreation and culture)
Recognize, acknowledge and support the ongoing contributions of voluntary organizations and
individual volunteers who improve the communities’ well-being.
Community services will be provided to a rural standard (e.g. community hall, parks, open
space, solid waste, fire suppression). Residents will access urban services through
neighbouring communities (schools, pools, libraries).
Ensure a safe community with programs for emergency preparedness.
Everyone has a voice.


Planning processes engage the public.
Maintain connections between RDNO and local groups (e.g. APC, Stewardship Groups).
Electoral Areas ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) & ‘E’ (Cherryville) Official Community Plan
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1.6
ACRONYMS
The following Acronyms are used throughout the report.
1.7
ALC
Agricultural Land Commission
ALR
Agricultural Land Reserve
DFO
Department of Fisheries & Oceans
HADD
Harmful Alteration, Disruption or Destruction
HLDPA
Hazardous Lands Development Permit Area
LEED
Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design
LGA
Local Government Act
LHA
Local Health Area
MOE
Ministry of the Environment
MOTI
Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure
OCP
Official Community Plan
QEP
Qualified Environmental Professional
RAR
Riparian Areas Regulation
RCMP
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
RDNO
Regional District of North Okanagan
RDPA
Riparian Development Permit Area
RELATED DOCUMENTS & JURISDICTIONS
Key RDNO Policy Documents and Studies




RDNO, Transportation Options for Rural Residents Study, 2009, prepared by Stantec
Consultants
RDNO Zoning Bylaw No. 1880, 2003
Labour Force Supply and Demand Forecast: 2006 – 2031, North Okanagan Regional
District, prepared by Peak Solutions Consulting, 2010
White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Master Plan, North Okanagan Regional
District, prepared by Yates, Thorn, & Associates, 2010
General Provincial and Federal Legislation and Policy Documents



Local Government Act and Community Charter
Bill 27, Local Government (Green Communities) Statutes Amendment Act, 2008
The British Columbia Climate Action Charter, which commits local governments to taking
action on climate change, including planning liveable, sustainable communities,
encouraging green developments and transit-oriented developments, pedestrian and
cycling facilities, and implementing innovation infrastructure technologies

Agriculture Land Commission Act
Electoral Areas ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) & ‘E’ (Cherryville) Official Community Plan
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Other Resources









A Guide to Green Choices: Ideas and Practical Advice for Land Use Decisions in BC
Develop with Care: Environmental Guidelines for Urban and Rural Land Development in
BC
Resources from Waste: A Guide to Integrated Resource Recovery
Smart Growth
Green Bylaws Toolkit for Conserving Sensitive Ecosystems and Green Infrastructure
The Dock Primer, The Shore Primer, Land Development Guidelines for the Protection of
Aquatic Habitat (DFO) (and other documents on the DFO website)
Environmental Guidelines for Urban and Rural Land Development in BC, Ministry of
Environment, 2006
Planning for the Future; Age-friendly & Disability-friendly Official Community Plans,
Rebekah Mahaffey
Protect our Forests and Rangeland, BC Government Brochure
Where the RDNO does not have jurisdiction, the OCP may only state broad goals related to the topic.
The following regulatory bodies have jurisdiction on certain matters and have been consulted in the
OCP preparation process:












Agricultural Land Commission,
Fisheries and Oceans Canada,
Interior Health Authority/Ministry of Health Services,
Ministry of Agriculture,
Ministry of Community, Sport and Cultural Development
Ministry of Energy,
Ministry of Environment,
Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands,
Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure,
Ministry of Tourism, Trade and Investment,
School District No. 22, and
First Nations – Okanagan Indian Band and Splatsin (Spallumcheen) Indian Band.
The Growth Strategies Act and the Local Government Act provide mechanisms to link local
community plans with regional plans. At the time this OCP was written, the RNDO had not yet
adopted its Regional Growth Strategy.
Electoral Areas ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) & ‘E’ (Cherryville) Official Community Plan
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PLAN CONTEXT
2.1
2
DEMOGRAPHICS AND GROWTH TRENDS
The most comprehensive statistical profile of the plan area is collected by Statistics Canada every
5 years. The most recent census was done in 2006. As shown in Figure 1.1, Electoral Areas ‘D’ and
‘E’ cover a larger geographic area than the plan area; however the census data is representative
because most of the population resides within the plan area boundary.
Population growth trends are summarized in Figure 2.1. Statistics Canada reports a combined 2006
population for the two Electoral Areas of 3771. This reflects a 5% decline from 1996 when the census
reported 3,969 persons in the 2 Electoral Areas. This population decline contrasts the +5.2% growth
rate for the whole of BC in the same period. Reasons attributed to the population decline include: an
aging population; smaller household size; fewer job opportunities in the resource sector resulting in an
exodus from the area of young families; and potentially, changes in the Census Canada reporting
system that affect data comparability across years.
Figure 2.1: Growth Trends
Source: Statistics Canada Census 1971 - 2006
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Figure 2.2 provides an overview of the current population and shows an area where: “family”
household size is similar to the provincial average; most families are married or common-law families;
and, there is a low mobility rate (persons moving). It is significant that there are a high percentage of
households with two adults and no children. Likely these are households that have raised their
children and are remaining in the family home.
Figure 2.2: Population Overview, 2006
Population
Characteristics
Private occupied dwellings
Census families
Married or common-law
families
Persons (avg.) in census
families
Households (married or
common-law) containing
children
Mobility status:
 population
 Lived at same address
1 year ago
ELECTORAL AREA
D
E
1088
920
785
393
265
240
2.8
2.8
330
365
2837
934
2465
895
BC
2.9
Figure 2.3: Population Profile
Source: Statistics Canada Census, 2006
Electoral Areas ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) & ‘E’ (Cherryville) Official Community Plan
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Figure 2.3 reveals the following demographic characteristics:
 higher than average number of teens
 fewer people 20 to 44 years
 higher than average numbers of older adults 45 – 64
Although many of the area’s households still contain children, the aging of the population generally
means a trend towards smaller household sizes. Over time (5 – 10 years) this may be followed by
some household downsizing and/or a demand for new services to support the changing household
demographic (e.g. home support services for seniors).
2.2
HOUSING
The 2006 Census data for RDNO, Electoral Areas ‘D’ and ‘E’ indicate the following general trends
related to housing.
 Total number of private dwellings—1654
 Total number of owned dwellings—1315
 Total number of rented dwellings—170
 Number of dwellings constructed before 1986—945 (64%) (in BC as a whole – 62%)
 Number of dwellings constructed after 1986—540 (36%)
 Dwellings requiring major repair as a % of total occupied private dwellings—Area ‘D’ 14.8%;
Area ‘E’ 5.5% (7.4% in BC as a whole)
 Average value of owned dwelling – Area ‘D’ $328,952; Area ‘E’ $254,292 ($418,703 for BC
as a whole)
 Average number of rooms per dwelling—Area ‘D’ 7.2 rooms; Area ‘E’ 5.9 rooms (6.4 rooms
in BC as a whole)
Electoral Area
Housing
D
Single detached housing as a
% of total occupied dwellings
89.7%
Median Monthly Payments
 Rented dwelling
 Owner-occupied dwellings
$501
$617
E
BC
49.2%
$527
$358
$752
$876
Source: Statistics Canada Census, 2006
It is significant that the area contains a very high percentage of single family homes and that in
Cherryville, particularly; this housing is affordable relative to provincial averages. Although this area
does not have a large supply of rental housing, this housing is more affordable than in BC as a whole.
It is also evident that the bulk of the housing was built before the mid 1980’s.
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2.3
DEVELOPMENT INVENTORY AND OPPORTUNITIES
Figure 2.5 provides an inventory of lots in the plan area based on current OCP land use designations
and the 2010 BC Assessment data. For the purpose of this inventory, vacant lots are lots with no
assessed value. The inventory does not include vacant lots in the ALR because these lands are used
for agriculture (e.g. Richlands) and are generally unavailable for residential development. As shown
in Figure 2.5, the majority of vacant land with development potential is located in areas designated for
Country Residential use (>2 ha). This supply can meet the most optimistic growth trend presented in
Figure 2.1. With growth at 1.5% over 20 years there would be a demand for an additional 475 units
(at 2.8 persons per unit).
Figure 2.5: Existing Development Opportunities


Land Use
Designation
Development Area
McInnes Road/ Rawlings
Lake Road
Cherryville: Aumond Road/
Sugar Lake Road

Lumby: Lady Slipper Road/
Birch Road

Lumby: Hart Road/Mabel
Lake Road
Total
Country
Residential
Country
Residential &
Small Holdings
Country
Residential &
Small Holdings
Country
Residential &
Small Holdings
Existing Units
(est.)
Potential Units
(est.)
Total
100
60
160
40
20
60
80
10
90
300
220
520
80
130
210
Figure 2.6 summarizes building permit activity in the plan area as an estimate of current development
activity. The building data incudes all types of construction (e.g. renovations, accessory buildings and
non-residential uses) and there are often multiple permits for a single property. The data, therefore
over represents development activity and yet is similar to our projection for optimistic growth
conditions (23 units/year at 1.5% growth).
Figure 2.6: Recent Building Permits (BP) and Authorizations to Construct (AC)1
Year Received
2009
2008
2007
Application
AC
BP
AC
BP
AC
BP
Area D
10
14
13
17
13
25
Area E
7
0
8
2
10
5
14
21
19
23
Total
1
17
31
40
53
30
Includes all permits and authorizations including construction, renovations, accessory buildings, etc. over
$25,000.
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2.4
HEALTH AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC INDICATORS
Figure 2.7 demonstrates that while average household incomes are generally lower in the plan area
than provincially, low income households (e.g. failing to meet housing affordability criteria) are
proportionally less frequent in Area ‘E’ (6.7%) than in British Columbia as a whole (13.1%)(Figure
2.8). It is likely that less expensive housing and lower operating costs are contributing to more
affordable living conditions.
Income ($)
Figure 2.7: Income (2005) (Median after tax income – all private households)
$50,000
$45,000
$40,000
$35,000
$30,000
$25,000
$20,000
$15,000
$10,000
$5,000
$‐
$46,472 $39,055 $30,852 Area D
Source: Statistics Canada, 2006
Area E
British Columbia
Area
Figure 2.8: Housing Affordability (% of households in low income positions after tax)
14.0%
13.1%
13.1%
Area D
British Columbia
12.0%
Percent
10.0%
8.0%
6.7%
6.0%
4.0%
2.0%
0.0%
Area E
Source: Statistics Canada, 2006
Area
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The two largest employment sectors in Area ‘D’ and ‘E’ are agriculture/resources and services. The
resource sectors have been negatively impacted by global recessions in the past three years and
changes in the structure of the forest industry. The community is interested in strategies to raise
employment opportunities in the plan area.
2.5
FIRST NATION COMMUNITIES
There are no reserves within or adjacent to the plan area. The two nearest neighbouring reserves
belong to the Okanagan Indian Band and the Splatsin (Spallmucheen) Indian Band.
The Okanagan and Splatsin Bands have lived on the lands in their traditional territory for thousands of
years. Both Bands maintain traditional spiritual and practical interest in the lands within the plan area
and have an interest in the planning process and policies.
2.6
PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS
The review of the plan area identifies several trends and conditions to be considered in planning for
the future.

There will be fewer young people and many will continue to leave the area to find work or to
further their education.

There is a loss of job opportunities in traditional resource sectors.

Older workers will be retiring, and their well-paying senior positions may not remain

The proportion of seniors will continue to rise but older seniors have not traditionally stayed in
this area. New opportunities for specialized housing and services are necessary to keep
seniors.

Housing is affordable for existing residents but it may not be affordable for new home
purchasers.

The area will continue to be a good place to raise children, but a ‘family friendly’ community
requires good access to education. There has been a recent increase in young (0-4 years) but
this will not offset the declining number of older teenaged students.

Regional projections anticipate that in-migration to the Okanagan region will be the largest
driver of growth. Most of this growth is projected for the urban areas (Vernon, Lumby,
Coldstream and Electoral Areas ‘B’ & ‘C’).

An increase of home based business may provide local employment and drive a demand for
more local support services.
Over the last 10 years there have been many important local, regional, provincial and global changes
that affect the way we plan our communities:

Global awareness of climate change and potential local impacts.

Fewer births than deaths throughout the western world with the result that the population is
rapidly aging.

Large scale recession and pull-back in the markets.
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
Heightened awareness of the importance of “sustainability”, in all forms—financial, social,
economic, physical.

Legislative changes in BC that give local governments more tools and more responsibilities
(including planning for energy, water conservation and Green House Gas reduction).

Changes in the role that resource industries play in the local economy.

Changes in the level of services available (e.g. water supply) and
servicing expected.

Increased challenges for lower income households in the region, manifesting itself particularly
in the cost of housing, both rental and ownership.
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ENVIRONMENT
3.1
3
CONTEXT
Electoral Area ‘D’ and ‘E’ encompass the rural areas surrounding Lumby and Cherryville in the middle
Shuswap River Watershed. These two electoral areas take in Sugar Lake, the Shuswap River valley
as it courses south, west and north into Mabel Lake (and includes the south end of the lake). These
areas have a strong rural character focusing on agricultural and forestry sectors, as well as tourism
and the recreation opportunities afforded by mountains, lakes, rivers and pastoral settings.
The area is geographically diverse with flat-bottomed river valleys, steep hillsides, forest lands, lands
with high agricultural capability, and lands with low capability. There are also broad expanses of land
at higher elevations such as Trinity Valley and Richlands.
There are several physical factors that limit options for community development. Steep hillsides and
floodplain areas severely restrict areas where community growth can safely be accommodated. Also,
it should be noted that regulatory factors such as the Agricultural Land Reserve place further limits on
where the community can provide housing and other developments that are essential for the
community.
The Community Plan area contains a diversity of natural features such as lakes, streams, hills,
valleys, forests and open space within a small area. These features exemplify the interesting and
unique landscape of this part of the Regional District. The biogeoclimatic zones start with Interior
Douglas Fir forests on the valley bottoms and go through several transitions as elevations increase.
Forest types include Cedar-Hemlock, Montane Spruce, Englemann Spruce / sub-alpine fir and even
alpine tundra on the top of several mountains. These diverse natural conditions are strong factors for
attracting people to the area.
Many of the natural features are in a delicate balance that may be easily disturbed by pollution, and
unsightly development. Natural features may be retained by ensuring thoughtful development. The
plan area contains several significant natural features that not only are important landmarks; they help
define the community and its landscapes.
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Rawlings Lake
The lake and surrounding marsh are very prolific for waterfowl production. On the Canada Land
Inventory, this area is rated as Class 1, the highest rating.
The lake and marsh should be protected by retaining the zoning in large parcels.
Camel’s Hump
Camel’s Hump is a prominent mountain east of Lumby which resembles a camel’s hump, and which is
often climbed by hikers and climbers. Access to it is from Creighton Valley Road, and across private
land.
Public access to Camel’s Hump should be continued in order that the public can walk to the top of this
mountain.
Shuswap Falls
The falls are unique in the Okanagan as the whole Shuswap River drops 21 metres over a series of
falls. Although some of the flow goes through the penstocks to create electricity, at periods of high
water or generator shutdown there is a large flow over the falls.
The falls are a natural feature, but in 1929 a dam was constructed to raise the water level, and
penstocks and a generating station were installed to provide electrical power for Lumby and Vernon.
Prior to that time, fish may have been able to ascend the falls, but now the dam prohibits that
movement.
The falls are accessible from a day use park and observation platform provided for and maintained by
B.C. Hydro. In addition, Hydro provides a canoe landing area and portage around the falls. The
penstocks and generating station are not accessible to the public, although they are a rare example of
small-scale hydroelectric power development that was common in the early part of this century.
RDNO requires developers to consider flood hazards and provide appropriate building setbacks and
elevations. Developers may be required to assess flood hazard potential as part of their development
application process.
In 2007, the British Columbia Climate Action Charter was introduced creating a partnership between
the Province and local governments to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and positively affect
climate change. The Regional District of North Okanagan became a signatory of the Climate Action
Charter.
In 2008, Bill 27, The Local Government (Green Communities) Statutes Act, was introduced by the
Province mandating all local governments to include GHG reduction targets, policies and actions in all
Official Community Plans and Rural Land Use Bylaws committing local governments to influence the
reduction of community-wide emissions through various planning tools.
The RDNO has reviewed regional target options and has concluded that a conservative regional
target of 25% by 2020 is realistic, with potential to achieve a more aggressive target of 33%.
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3.2
ENVIRONMENTALLY SENSITIVE AREAS POLICIES
3.2.1
Limited mapping is presently available to record
environmentally sensitive areas in the plan area. The
RDNO supports efforts to prepare a Sensitive
Ecosystem Inventory (SEI) for the plan area.
Sensitive environments may include:
a. lands with ecological significance as habitat for
pants and animals that are rare or endangered
species (blue listed species mapped on
Schedule C);
b. habitat that supports a cluster of rare species or great biodiversity
c. land that is distinctive from surrounding areas that do not have the same
characteristics of ‘sensitivity’;
d. land that is easily damaged or erodible (e.g. grasslands);
e. wetlands or areas within a specified distance of a wetland (see riparian area
policies); and,
f. lands that have limited resiliency to disturbances or demonstrate slow rates of
natural recovery after disturbance.
3.2.2
Where appropriate, the Regional District may use one or more of the following tools to
direct development away from Environmentally Sensitive Areas:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
3.2.3
Development Permit Areas;
covenants registered under section 219 of the Land Titles Act;
bare land strata to allow flexibility in conserving the feature or area;
density bonus transfer or density averaging, to the developable portion of the site;
development variance permits to vary conditions other than use or density; and/or
voluntary stewardship such as contracts, leases or trusts to protect the feature or
area.
For OCP Amendment Applications and/or Rezoning Applications, the RDNO may
request a detailed Environmental Review of environmentally sensitive areas consistent
with the regulations of the LGA 920.1(1) and as specified in a Development Approval
Information Bylaw adopted by the RDNO. The environmental review shall be
conducted by a Qualified Environmental Professional (QEP) and the review should
include recommendations on the management of sensitive conditions relating to the
natural environment of the area affected. Environmental management mechanisms
that may be considered are;
a. The establishment of an Environmental Reserve designation where development
on private lands in sensitive areas is protected from adverse development.
Passive uses, with minimal impact on the applicable area would be supported
within the Environmental Reserve designation. Developments acceptable in the
reserve area would include trails, interpretive signs, benches and other similar
types of passive recreation, conservation or environmental protection and
management purpose or represent some other public benefit to the community that
would not compromise the environmental sensitivity of the area.
b. The use of Conservation Agreements, with the Regional District as a party to the
agreement, to protect sensitive areas and implement conditions and
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recommendations of any environmental reviews conducted through the
development approval process.
c. A Conservation Zone or Environmental Reserve designation may be assigned to
land covenanted or deeded against further development or use, including common
property in strata title subdivisions.
d. Owners entering into Conservation Agreements and placing voluntary conservation
covenants on their land shall not be deprived of the privilege to enjoy land as their
own but they may not close, fence or otherwise obstruct any adjoining public route
of access. Developments acceptable in the covenanted area could include trails,
interpretive signs, benches and other similar types of passive recreation,
conservation or environmental protection and management purpose or represent
some other public benefit to the community and not compromise the environmental
sensitivity of the area.
e. The Regional District has a park function and may take responsibility for the long
term management of the lands that are designated as parkland and protected
through Conservation Agreements.
3.3
3.2.4
Areas of major importance to wildlife as inventoried on Schedule C should be protected
by retaining the parcels as large lots Large Holdings or Non-Urban designations).
3.2.5
Support the efforts of community organizations such as North Okanagan Parks and
Natural Areas Trust (NOPNAT), an organization dedicated to preserving the natural
areas of the North Okanagan for the enjoyment of present and future generations.
3.2.6
The Regional District considers that the Shuswap River Watershed, including Sugar
Lake, Mabel Lake, the Shuswap River, and other watercourses and water bodies
shown on Schedule C are environmentally sensitive to development. Disturbances
caused by development in these areas can have long lasting and negative effects on
the ecosystem if development is not managed properly.
WATERCOURSES AND RIPARIAN AREAS POLICIES
In 2010 the Regional District launched the
Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan and
process. The goal is to work with rural residents,
community citizens, local organizations, municipal,
provincial & federal governments, first nations and
non-governmental agencies to achieve the
sustainable management of the watershed. One
of the main objectives is to protect and manage
the quality and quantity of water within the
watershed to ensure long-term preservation of the
water resource. A number of the following policies
will be addressed in the planning process.
3.3.1
Encourage federal and provincial agencies to continue monitoring issues of
environmental importance, particularly water quality in local watercourses.
3.3.2
Programs that enhance the fish capability of watercourses should be encouraged,
including installation of fish ladders at BC Hydro’s Shuswap Falls facility.
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3.3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
Co-operate with senior governments to provide a coordinated strategy for the
stewardship of watercourses to ensure that no harmful alteration, disruption and/or
destruction of fish habitat occurs recognizing the framework of the Provincial Riparian
Areas Regulation. The Regional District designates all watercourses as part of the
Riparian Development Permit Area. Schedule C identifies known watercourses in the
plan area using the Provincial TRIM 1:20,000 map but may not include all watercourse
locations. Accordingly, the Regional District may require additional technical research
as part of the approval process. Given the lack of comprehensive watercourse data, it
is recommended that in situations where a property owner maintains that development
is outside of a watercourse area, the Regional District may require confirmation from a
Qualified Environmental Professional (QEP) that the proposed development is not
within a riparian watercourse area.
WILDLIFE POLICIES
3.4.1
Work co-operatively with the Federal and Provincial government agencies to protect
wildlife and wildlife habitat.
3.4.2
Consider developing a Bear Aware Strategy to minimize the potential of bear/human
interactions.
3.4.3
Require the connectivity and movement of threatened and endangered species be
considered as part of neighbourhood planning projects and OCP Amendment
applications or rezoning applications. This process will assess opportunities to use
such tools as the transfer of density, density bonusing, land trusts, covenants, parkland
dedication or development agreements to conserve corridors of “sensitive
ecosystems”.
FLOODPLAINS & ALLUVIAL FANS POLICIES
3.5.1
When mobile homes or buildings to be used for habitation, business, the storage of
goods damageable by floodwaters or materials that can pollute watercourses, are to be
located or constructed in any area subject to flooding, such buildings or mobile homes
shall be flood proofed in accordance with the flood proofing requirements of the
relevant governing agency. These requirements shall be contained in the appropriate
implementing bylaws.
3.5.2
Alluvial fans and the floodplains of the Shuswap River, Bessette Creek and Duteau
Creek and as shown on Schedule C are considered Hazardous Lands Development
Permit Areas and are subject to the guidelines established in the Development Permit
Section of this Plan (Section 12.3).
WILDFIRE POLICIES
3.6.1
The Regional District will, in co-operation with the appropriate agencies, continue to
work towards developing strategies and procedures to prevent interface fires.
3.6.2
It is recognized that all areas within the OCP plan area are generally susceptible to
wildfire risks and development should be consistent with provincial Best Practices for
reducing risk of loss from wildfires.
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3.6.3
Work with the Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands to establish wildfire risk mapping
for the plan area and subsequently evaluating and approving new developments in
areas where fire hazard is high.
a. Prior to undertaking any subdivision or land use development that will create four or
more parcels or dwelling units within a high wildfire hazard area, the landowner
shall provide the Regional District with a Wildfire Hazard Assessment Report for
the proposed development, prepared by a Registered Professional Forester
licensed in BC or an equivalent quality professional. The Wildfire Hazard
Assessment Report shall: assess the current wildfire hazard, assess conditions on
the site and neighbouring lands, evaluate the proposed development for wildfire
susceptibility, and provide Fire Smart wildfire hazard mitigation recommendations
to reduce the hazard of wildfire for the land and buildings to moderate or lower.
The recommendations of the Wildfire Hazard Assessment Report shall be
implemented during development and written into a restrictive covenant to be
registered on a property title advising the property owner of the ongoing
responsibility to manage their land and buildings in accordance with the
recommendations of the Wildfire Hazard Assessment Report.
b. For any subdivision or land use development that will create fewer than four
parcels or dwelling units in a high wildfire hazard area, and for any subdivision or
land use development in a moderate wildfire hazard area, the property owner
should register a standard restrictive covenant on the property title outlining specific
wildfire mitigation practices for building construction and land management that the
landowners should implement over the long term to reduce wildfire hazard in their
development.
3.7
3.6.4
Continue to work on education related to Fire Smart and appropriate codes of conduct
related to wildfire in rural areas.
3.6.5
Encourage new construction using “fire smart” principles, balanced with interests in
maintaining rural character.
3.6.6
Encourage harvesting of health-damaged trees and replanting of infected or damaged
forest areas.
3.6.7
Work with community and other government groups to ensure evacuation plans are
prepared and implemented and kept up to date.
TREE RETENTION AND TREE EXPANSION POLICIES
3.7.1
Encourage, where possible, developers to retain and expand natural tree cover when
developing their properties while being consistent with policies above. Tree retention
and expansion is particularly encouraged along road frontages, natural watercourses
and areas that are visually significant or where riparian areas can be enhanced.
3.7.2
As a result of a QEP assessment, the Regional District may recommend against the
removal of vegetation on lands considered to be environmentally sensitive or where
such removal may increase hazards such as rock fall, landslide, soil instability or
flooding as part of the Development Permit process. In some instances, the Regional
District may encourage planting to stabilize and enhance such lands.
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3.8
HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS POLICIES
3.8.1
Hazardous conditions of concern to the Regional District include:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
3.8.2
areas of steep slopes (slopes in excess of 30%);
rockfall/rolling rock hazard areas;
landslides, land slip, subsidence or avalanche areas;
floodplains; and,
alluvial fans
All lands subject to hazardous conditions within the plan area are subject to the
Hazardous Area Development Permit Area. A Development Permit may be required
prior to subdivision or building permit applications.
a. A rezoning application may require an overall assessment of the site for
development suitability (from conditions both on and off the site) prepared by a
professional engineer and geoscientist licensed in BC specializing in geotechnical
issues. Further detailed information may be required as a result of the assessment.
b. A subdivision application may require a detailed Hazard Report (from conditions
both on and off the site) specifying ways to reduce that hazard to a safe level and
prepared by a professional engineer or geoscientist licensed in BC specializing in
geotechnical assessment. The professional engineer will be required to determine
an adequate level of safety given the type of hazard and the land use proposed.
Completion of works that reduce the hazard may be required prior to subdivision
approval depending upon the content of the report.
3.8.3
3.9
Responding to the referral of an application for Crown Land tenure, the Regional
District may request a detailed Hazard Report for the site itself and the effect upon
development in areas neighbouring the site.
ENERGY AND CONSERVATION POLICIES
3.9.1
Encourage collaboration with other levels of government and utilities to address energy
and emissions management and promote best practices in energy efficiency.
3.9.2
Endeavour to participate in senior government programs and initiatives that address
climate change impacts and energy management that help plan for local-scale impacts
of climate change.
3.9.3
Encourage planning, design and construction strategies to minimize greenhouse gas
emissions.
3.9.4
Encourage developers to follow best practices in sustainable development – seeking
out leading edge technologies.
3.9.5
Consider creating incentives for responsible development practices by creating an
incentive for green building policy that exchanges developer investment in green
technology for density bonusing, modified development standards or other appropriate
mechanisms. As a performance benchmark the Regional District may choose to adopt
the Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design (LEED) standards.
3.9.6
Explore strategies to increase recycling options in areas not serviced by the blue bag.
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3.10
3.9.7
New developments and redevelopments of property should consider the
“Environmental Best Management Practices for Urban and Rural Land Development”
(Ministry of Environment) and “Develop with Care: Environmental Guidelines for Urban
and Rural Land Development in British Columbia” where applicable.
3.9.8
Encourage and support initiatives to upgrade wood-burning appliances through the
woodstove exchange program.
CLIMATE CHANGE POLICIES
3.10.1 Bill 27, the Local Government Act, was amended in 2008 to require local government
to integrate targets, policies and strategies for greenhouse gas emissions into their
Official Community Plans by May 2010.
562.01 An official development plan under section 562 must include targets for
the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in the area covered by the
plan, and policies and actions of the Council proposed with respect to
achieving those targets.
GHG emission targets will be consistent with the overall target of the Regional District,
more particularly, reducing GHG emissions by 25% by the year 2030. Strategies that
will support GHG reductions include:
a. promoting pedestrian and cycling facilities and routes as alternative transportation
options;
b. encouraging home-based businesses and encouraging changes in travel patterns;
c. support provincial and federal programs to encourage energy retrofits;
d. support the agricultural sector in developing ways to manage and recover energy;
e. encourage the reduction of landfill waste;
f. supporting local food security through local agricultural uses and food processing
and by encouraging community gardens farmers markets to create more food
independence;
g. creating partnerships with local environmental groups to promote and support
energy conservation and climate change initiatives within the Regional District;
h. a pilot transit project that would support rural residents(e.g. Cherryville) traveling to
Vernon for work or services;
i. supporting Smart Growth planning principles as applicable to rural areas; and
j. protection of ecosystems that perform essential ecosystem services such as
cleaning air and purifying water, with no net loss of forest land.
3.10.2 As a signatory to the Climate Action Charter, the Regional District will take steps to
address and support the goals of the Charter, including becoming carbon neutral in
respect of its corporate operations by 2012.
3.10.3 The Regional District recognizes the need to take a region-wide approach to energy
and emissions planning and may complete a Climate Action Plan and may include
targets, policies and actions in the Regional Growth Strategy.
3.10.4 Adopt a “lead by example” approach to energy and emissions planning and will commit
to setting corporate targets, by:
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a. seeking funding support for measuring the Regional District’s carbon footprint by
mapping operations, collecting emissions data and calculating a corporate
footprint, and,
b. identifying best carbon reduction opportunities and setting specific reduction
targets.
3.10.5 Incorporate strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions when engaged in major
infrastructure planning and design projects or new facility construction.
3.10.6 Determine which provincially funded initiatives that target the reduction of greenhouse
gas emissions are available to the Regional District.
3.10.7 The Regional District will explore new economically feasible policies, strategies and
initiatives – passing bylaws when needed, that aim to reduce greenhouse gas
emissions and build environmentally sustainable communities.
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AGRICULTURAL & RESOURCE USE
4.1
4
INTRODUCTION
The natural resource sector has traditionally been the basis for jobs and economic development in the
plan area. Forestry, particularly logging and forest production have been a significant source of
employment and income. The Regional District does not have direct management responsibility of
forest resources but can have a role in working with the province and to support initiatives that help to
maintain jobs while protecting resources for future generations.
The plan area contains a significant amount of land that is designated for Agricultural Use and is
within the Agricultural Land Reserve. These lands typically support land extensive agricultural uses
such as forage and livestock production and contribute to the rural character of the area. These lands
continue to be under pressure for rural residential development however, there is also increasing
recognition of their role in contributing to a more sustainable future.
4.2
AGRICULTURE POLICIES
4.2.1
Agricultural lands are designated on Schedules B, B1 & B2 and are within the ALR and
the Agricultural Land Commission Act will take precedence.
4.2.2
Lands designated Agricultural and within the ALR are intended to be used for
agricultural purposes and associated uses as allowed by the Land Reserve
Commission and the Regional District. All uses and subdivision of Agricultural Land
Reserve land, shall be in accordance with the Agricultural Land Commission Act,
regulations thereto or Orders and Policies of the Land Reserve Commission.
4.2.3
The minimum parcel size for Agricultural lands shall be 30.5 ha. Large parcel sizes
and setbacks are encouraged to minimize the potential for land use conflicts and to
support long term agricultural use consistent with ALR objectives.
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4.2.4
Support the Agricultural Land Commission in its efforts to protect and enhance
farmland. Where land is in the ALR, minimum parcel sizes shall apply only when the
land is:
a. excluded from the ALR; or
b. approved for subdivision within the ALR pursuant to the Agricultural Land
Commission Act, regulations thereto, or orders of the Commission; or
c. exempted by the Agricultural Land Commission Act, regulations thereto, or orders
of the Commission.
4.2.5
Agricultural Industrial land uses that support local farm production should be
encouraged. This type of agricultural use shall process or manufacture agricultural
products, shall not be intrusive nor offensive to the surrounding area, shall be located
sensitively to avoid high capability soils and shall not contaminate ground or surface
water
4.2.6
Agricultural Industrial uses may be permitted on lands designated as Agricultural
providing these uses are in compliance with the Agricultural Land Commission Act and
the Regional District Zoning Bylaw, decisions of the Land Reserve Commission and
standards of the Ministry of Agriculture.
4.2.7
The Land Reserve Boundaries underwent a full comprehensive review through the
2001 OCP process and the revised boundaries are reflected on Schedule B, B1 & B2.
Having successfully completed this review, the RDNO is unlikely to advance additional
requests for exclusions. If an exclusion application is advanced, the application will
need to be supported by a soil analysis conducted by a professional agrologist or a soil
scientist, concluding that the land is physically incapable of supporting agriculture as
evaluated. Additionally it must be demonstrated that there are no negative impacts on
agriculture. This information is to be provided at the expense of the landowner.
4.2.8
The rural character of Electoral areas ‘D’ and ‘E’ shall be maintained to encourage the
establishment of the widest range of agricultural activities. Support of programs which
have a positive effect on agricultural activities such as noxious weed control, dog
control, and routing of major roads and utilities to avoid farm severance’s, shall be
considered.
4.2.9
Where a non-Agricultural property is adjacent to a property which is in the ALR and a
Subdivision or Development Permit application has been received for the nonAgricultural property, an appropriate buffer strip will be established and protected by
Covenant on the non-Agricultural property following the “Landscape Buffer
Specifications” published by the Land Reserve Commission. The covenant is also
intended to increase awareness of the right to farm in these areas and to increase
awareness of the presence of neighbouring agricultural uses and thereby help to
reduce the potential for future land use conflict.
4.2.10 The Regional District will strongly encourage the Ministry of Agriculture and the
Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands to work with area ranchers to improve range land
management practices with a goal to improve water quality.
4.2.11 Notwithstanding the minimum parcel size required under the present bylaw (30.5 ha),
the Zoning Bylaw may indicate a future minimum lot area for these subdivisions based
on other land development considerations (e.g. 1.0 ha to support onsite septic disposal
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systems). The Zoning Bylaw may make provisions for smaller lots with the approval of
the ALC for such purposes as roads.
4.2.12 Support ALC policies regarding agri-tourism businesses. An amendment to the Zoning
Bylaw is recommended to ensure consistency between different RDNO areas.
4.2.13 Support the Province’s general policy of integrated multiple use land management
such as grazing and timber management recognizing that the subdivision of lands is
not supported for these separate uses.
4.2.14 Minimize
conflicts
between
agricultural
residential/recreational) through the use of:
and
other
land
uses
(e.g.
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
agricultural setbacks as specified in Schedule G, Division 16, Zoning Bylaw 1888;
supporting public access restrictions where appropriate;
minimum distance setbacks for intensive agricultural operations;
fencing requirements and landscape buffers;
covenants that are registered with new rural subdivisions that recognize existing
neighbouring agricultural use, as applicable:
f. continued liaison with Provincial Ministries and Crown agencies in the planning,
disposition, and management of Crown lands; and
g. compliance with the Farm Practices Protection Act (FPPA).
4.2.15 Encourage all farming operations to comply with the following regulations and
guidelines as administered by the province
a. environmental guidelines for farming practices as produced by the provincial
ministries;
b. regulations pertaining to agricultural waste control; and
c. code of Agricultural Practice for Waste Management (Waste Management Act;
Health Act).
4.2.16 Recognize the importance of local food production, processing, distribution and sale of
locally grown products. Efforts to improve the local agricultural economy may include:
a.
b.
c.
d.
strategically locating a farmers market;
initiatives to increase agricultural awareness;
development of community gardens;
density bonusing for projects providing opportunities for local food production (e.g.,
community gardens or greenhouses); and
e. liaison with the Ministry of Agriculture regarding opportunities for hosting local
workshops on ways to enhance opportunities for growing and marketing
economically viable, local agricultural products.
4.2.17 Encourage strategies that will see large agricultural land holdings retained and parcels
consolidated and operated as single agricultural operations rather than broken up as
individual land tenures with multiple ownership.
4.2.18 Wherever possible, future major roads, utility or communication corridors should be
directed away from and around land within the ALR.
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4.2.19 Support local agriculture through favourable consideration of proposals that enhance
local agriculture through the strengthening of agricultural practices, support of local
food systems and the expansion of local markets and agri-tourism.
4.3
4.4
RESOURCE POLICIES
4.3.1
Lands designated for Resource Use on Schedule B, B1 and B2 are the large areas of
crown land and undeveloped areas bordering the settled community area.
4.3.2
Subdivision of these areas is discouraged.
4.3.3
The Regional District will work with the relevant provincial agencies to ensure that local
community interests are considered as part of the future decision making process
relating to these lands. Interests can include such topics as recreation and watershed
concerns.
FORESTRY POLICIES
4.4.1
Provincial forests within the Resource designation shall be encouraged to be managed
in accordance with economic, environmental and social objectives identified in this
Plan and the objectives and strategies of the Okanagan Shuswap Land and Resource
Management Plan (LRMP).
4.4.2
Lands within the Community Plan area having potential for forest use and wood lot
licences should be maintained in large parcels.
4.4.3
New and existing Community Forests and other forestry tenures are a permitted use
under the Resource designation. The action items for the Cherryville Community
Forest stewardship group are as follows:
a. work with MOE to develop a water quality monitoring program for Cherry Creek,
Ferry Creek and the Shuswap River to establish a water quality base line.
b. implement an education program to raise awareness of the impacts of actions or
water quality.
c. identify riparian areas in need of protection.
d. conduct a hydrological mapping exercise to identify potential impacts of logging on
the water supply.
4.4.4
Promote a wood friendly culture. One strategy to signify this culture is to adopt a
“wood first” policy designed to link to the Province of British Columbia’s Wood First Act.
A wood first policy could contain a number of directives including conditions that
require:
a. all publicly funded buildings to include a detailed description of how wood will be
used as a primary building material.
b. giving favourable consideration to design proposals for publicly funded buildings
that demonstrate a more substantial and/or innovative use of wood content as a
primary building material.
c. support local value added wood industries.
d. encourage and support education opportunities such as those sponsored through
Wood Works BC or local academic institutes.
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4.4.5
Recognize the significant role of independent operators within the local forestry
industry. In many cases their operations will be home-based industries. The Regional
District will give favourable considerations to new initiatives were operators can
successfully mitigate impacts on neighbouring rural properties.
4.4.6
Support the establishment of Community Forests in cooperation with the Ministry of
Forests, Mines and Lands that are based on sustainable local forest practices and the
enhances the local forest industry (e.g. new jobs, better use of resources) for the long
term benefit of the community.
4.4.7
The Regional District will work with the Ministry of Forests, Mines and Lands and other
stakeholders in the forest industry to protect the forest land base and promote
sustainable forest operations while balancing recreation and other interests.
4.4.8
Support public education efforts concerning the value of local agricultural production,
forestry, composting, and water conservation.
4.4.9
Forestry uses shall implement Best Management Practices including practices that
preserve critical watersheds and view sheds and mitigate erosion.
4.4.10 The minimum parcel size for lands supporting Forestry uses and designated for
Resource Use designation shall be 30.5 ha. Large parcel sizes and setbacks are
encouraged to support large scale resource activities (e.g. rangeland) and to minimize
land use conflicts.
4.4.11 Recognize the role of Woodlot Licences as a technique for managing small parcels of
crown land together with private holdings, for forestry purposes. The RDNO may
assist the community in working with relevant provincial agencies through term tenure
management where there are community interests on crown lands (e.g. trails).
4.4.12 When considering the addition of new “industrial” resource uses (e.g. mineral
extraction and large scale wood processing) the Regional District may require a
vegetated natural buffer area, that is a minimum of 6m between neighbouring rural
uses. New and Industrial Forest uses may also be subject to the Commercial and
Industrial Permit Area if located on private land.
4.5
SAND, GRAVEL AND OTHER MINERAL EXTRACTION POLICIES
4.5.1
Land covering areas of high mineral and aggregate potential shall be retained in large
parcels (Resource, Non-Urban and Large Holding Zones) to allow for extraction with
minimum conflicts.
4.5.2
Extraction of mineral resources shall be followed by reclamation.
4.5.3
The Regional District recognizes that certain properties within the plan area as shown
on Figure 4.1, including areas on Trinity Valley Road and along the boundary of the
District of Coldstream have aggregate potential. The Regional District will have due
regard for these resource values when considering land development proposals within
the general vicinity of these deposits.
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4.5.4
The Ministry of Energy encourages the Regional District to undertake an evaluation of
aggregate resources including supply and demand. Figure 4.1 is based on partial
information. More areas than shown probably have a high aggregate potential.
4.5.5
All mineral exploration and mining activities will continue to be subject to the Mines Act,
Mineral Tenure Act and associated regulations. The Regional District recognizes that
the Ministry of Energy is the primary agency responsible for managing mining activities
on Crown and private lands.
4.5.6
Sand and gravel extraction and processing may be permitted on large lots (Resource,
Non-Urban, Large Holdings) subject to consistency with Zoning Bylaw regulations.
New uses will require a site specific amendment application and will need to
demonstrate that proposed activities can be conducted in a manner that limits impacts
on neighbouring properties, including: control of hours of operation; dust control;
screening; access; traffic circulation and site reclamation.
Figure 4.1 Aggregate Deposits and Mineral Claims
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RURAL, RURAL RESIDENTIAL, & RESIDENTIAL
5.1
5.2
5
RURAL LAND USE POLICIES
5.1.1
Low density Rural lands are those used for, or having a potential for resource
extraction and that are not suitable for intensive development because of limitations.
These limitations include but are not limited to, elevation, slope, water, accessibility,
distance to community services, disruption of existing resource or agricultural uses, or
interference with watershed conservation and are designated in the locations shown on
Schedules B, B1 and B2 as Large Holdings (LH) and Non-Urban (NU).
5.1.2
The minimum parcel size for low density Rural use shall be appropriate to the use, but
in no case shall the minimum parcel size be less than that of the Non-Urban zone (7.2
ha) except in those cases where subdivision of a smaller lot is permitted by virtue of a
road severance under the provisions of the Regional District Zoning Bylaw or Section
946 of the Local Government Act.
RURAL RESIDENTIAL POLICIES
5.2.1
Rural Residential lands are intended to provide an alternate to urban living with lots 1.0
hectare or larger. These lots emphasize an attachment to the lands and utilization for
rural and agricultural uses, but with lesser services and greater distances to community
facilities and shopping. Lands that may be suitable for rezoning to accommodate Rural
Residential land use (subject to policies of this section) are shown on Schedules B, B1
and B2 as Country Residential (CR) and Small Holdings (SH). The minimum parcel
size for CR is 2 ha and for SH is 1 ha.
5.2.2
Rural residential lands should conform to the following requirements:
a. outside the Agricultural Land Reserve;
b. not in an area with excessive slopes;
c. not in an area that has high capacity for other uses such as gravel extraction,
mining, or forest development;
d. not subject to flooding or in an area with a high water table;
e. not subject to excessive expenditures for services such as roads, electric power
and school bussing;
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f.
g.
h.
i.
j.
5.2.3
contains suitable building sites;
contains sewage disposal areas;
contains adequate water supplies;
does not destroy or alienate important habitat for fish and wildlife; and;
does not detrimentally affect neighbouring properties and the community as a
whole.
Future Small Holdings (SH) developments are restricted to areas identified on
Schedules B, B1 and B2. Applications to amend the Zoning Bylaw for the Small
Holdings (SH) Zone should conform to the following requirements:
a. be located in close proximity to local areas with similar residential densities and
services; and
b. the form and character of development should not detract from the rural character
of the built and natural environment.
5.2.4
Upon receipt of a rezoning application for Rural Residential developments, the
Regional Board will give consideration to the fire protection issues in the local area.
5.2.5
Subdivision for Rural Residential housing shall be in a manner that will conform to the
physical site characteristics and not produce a continuous expanse of housing.
5.2.6
At the Regional Boards’ discretion, clustering shall be permitted to allow lots smaller
than the minimum of the applicable zone provided that the number of lots in the cluster
does not defeat the objectives of maintaining a rural area and the overall density is
maintained.
5.2.7
Within the plan area there are three (3) areas that currently support existing residential
densities; Whitevale; North of Lumby; and, the trailer park in Cherryville. These
developments are not representative of the rural development supported in this plan
and new designations are NOT contemplated except as outlined in 5.3.3. Challenges
facing these development formats in rural areas include:
a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
5.2.8
transportation- focus on personal automobile
amenity space – local public spaces are limited
servicing – densities require community water and sewer
public opinion – neighbours do not support higher densities
energy – sustainability policies encourage concentrated, infill development and
discourage sprawl.
Pursuant to Section 904 of the Local Government Act, the Regional Board may apply a
bonus density to a maximum of 20% for Small Holdings (SH) designations without
amendment to this Plan where application for amendment to the Zoning Bylaw
proposes a minimum of 10% of additional land is dedicated for the following community
or site amenities:
a. dedication of parkland, linear parkland and/or Greenways where their location
conforms to Parks dedicated on Schedules B, B1 and B2.
b. long-term security and management of significant areas of mature, natural
vegetation, or any other significant habitat amenity;
c. the maintenance of substantial buffer zones adjacent to major roads; or where the
owner of property provides for the conservation or provision of any other amenities.
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d. a road and trail fund has been established by the RDNO and is supported by a trail
network plan.
5.2.9
Rural Residential land development that proposes to create more than 2 new lots shall
not be considered for rezoning until a comprehensive plan consistent with the rural
residential policies is provided, and until the roads and services adequate for the
development are either in place or financial guarantees regarding their installation are
provided.
5.2.10 Due to the importance of an adequate water supply in Rural Residential areas, and the
uncertainty about water supply in some areas, assurances about the water supply shall
be provided prior to the zoning of land for Rural Residential use.
5.3
5.4
RESIDENTIAL LAND USE POLICIES
5.3.1
In accordance with provincial recommendations and standards, no lots will be created
less that 1.0 hectare unless connected to a community sewer system. Lots less than
this size have been determined to be not acceptable for septic effluent disposal. There
are three existing Residential developments in the plan area that were established
prior to this policy.
5.3.2
Residential use is development on lots less than 1 ha in size and is encouraged to be
located within the Village of Lumby and not within the plan area.
5.3.3
Notwithstanding the above, the Regional Board may consider Residential development
in the “downtown” Cherryville area upon receipt of a comprehensive plan showing
servicing details. Such a development would require a community sewer system.
AFFORDABLE HOUSING POLICIES
5.4.1
The Regional Board supports the provision of secondary suites as a form of affordable
housing that is regulated through the Zoning Bylaw.
5.4.2
Manufactured Homes are recognized as another source of affordable housing and will
be treated equivalent to site built homes with respect to where they are permitted and
their siting on a lot, but with restrictions as may be established by the Zoning Bylaw.
5.4.3
The Regional District recognizes that affordable housing and social housing projects
benefit from close proximity to other services, therefore an urban location (e.g. Lumby)
is considered more suitable than rural locations within the plan area. The Regional
District will collaborate with the Village of Lumby on efforts to encourage affordable
housing for the local community.
5.4.4
The Zoning Bylaw conditionally supports a second dwelling in some zones for family
members as a strategy to provide affordable housing and support aging in place.
Additional considerations that may be integrated into the Zoning Bylaw provisions
include:
a. Registration of a Housing Agreement specifying that the property shall not be
subdivided and the second dwelling is intended for family members;
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b. In accordance with the regulations of the Agricultural Land Reserve Act;
c. In accordance with health regulations relating to the provision of water supply and
sanitary sewer service permits.
5.5
HOME BASED BUSINESSES/ HOME OCCUPATIONS POLICIES
5.5.1
Continue to support home occupations, including bed and breakfasts in association
with a residential dwelling in all land use areas subject to the relevant requirements for
home occupations specified in the Zoning Bylaw. Permitted uses should not cause land
use conflicts or place excessive demands on services. Generally, these businesses
are small scale, incubator businesses and when they reach sufficient size they may
need to relocate to a more appropriate area. The RDNO may review the existing
regulations should the area obtain high speed internet and expand opportunities for
new home based businesses.
5.5.2
It is recognized that within the plan area home occupations typically will be on large
lots (> 1 ha) with a strong association to the agriculture and resource basis of the local
economy. As such, the Zoning Bylaw makes special provision for home occupations in
the plan area.
5.5.3
Farm sales that are ancillary to the agricultural use of land within the Agricultural Land
Reserve and are consistent with the provisions of the Zoning Bylaw, Minister of
Agriculture standards and the Agricultural Land Commission Act will continue to be
supported by the Regional Board.
5.5.4
Requests to increase the size of home based business beyond that permitted in the
Zoning Bylaw are not encouraged as these uses will be in direct conflict with the
Commercial and Industrial Policies of this Plan.
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COMMERCIAL
6.1
6
CONTEXT
Vernon has developed as the regional commercial business and service centre for the North
Okanagan Regional District. The commercial policies in this plan reinforce the centralization of
services while recognizing that some services, particularly tourist and local convenience services,
should be provided at the local level. The rationale for local services includes building a sense of
community and helping to reduce GHG emissions.
In the future, ,commercial uses will continue to be encouraged to locate as infill development in larger
communities, however, small scale commercial uses are supported where they are consistent with
rural character (e.g. home based, agricultural, forestry).
6.2
COMMERCIAL POLICIES
6.2.1
Major Retail and Service Commercial uses should be encouraged to locate within the
Village of Lumby and other nearby urban centres.
6.2.2
Neighbourhood Commercial uses to supply goods and services to serve local needs
should be permitted at locations to serve existing or future residential areas. Existing
commercial lands are designated on Schedules B, B1 and B2. Applications for new
neighbourhood commercial developments should address the following:
a. Minimizing impacts on adjacent land uses;
b. Strengthening an existing community focal point (e.g. in close proximity to existing
commercial developments or community uses – “Downtown Cherryville”)
c. Contributing to more sustainable land use patterns, minimizing trip generations and
thereby reducing GHG emissions and supporting the sale of local products and
foods, including local restaurants and famers markets;
d. Provide safe access for both pedestrians and vehicles; and
e. Consider alternative transportation options, including potential for connections to a
local trail network.
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6.2.3
Highway and Tourist Commercial, and Recreation Commercial uses may be permitted
at suitable locations subject to a successful OCP Amendment and Rezoning
Application and the following conditions:
a.
b.
c.
d.
sewage disposal, water supply, drainage and access shall meet the requirements
of the authority having jurisdiction and any additional requirements of the Regional
Board;
the proposed use shall not adversely affect the environment or adjacent land uses;
the site should be outside of the Agricultural Land Reserve unless prior approval
has been obtained from the Land Reserve Commission; and
include public consultation in the planning process. All OCP Amendment
applications for Commercial uses shall be subject to a Public Information Meeting
to be hosted in the community by the applicant prior to scheduling of a Public
Hearing.
6.2.4
In accordance with Development Permit Sections of this Plan, land designated as
Commercial, including resort developments, is also designated as a Commercial and
Industrial Development Permit Area (Section 12.4) in order to establish requirements
respecting the form and character of development.
6.2.5
The Regional Board supports development of Recreation Commercial accommodation
uses, including rental cabins and campgrounds that are oriented towards tourists. To
ensure availability of these uses for tourists and the general public, the Regional Board
may require covenants to restrict further subdivision as a condition precedent to
approvals when considering rezoning applications.
6.2.6 The Regional Board encourages and supports new development proposals in Ecotourism and adventure tourism that seek to provide wilderness and natural experiences
and education in a sustainable manner with the least amount of impact on the
environment.
6.2.7
Temporary Permits pursuant to Section 921 of the Local Government Act, including
appropriate designations, may be considered for a commercial use of a short-term
duration on a parcel designated Resource, Agricultural, Non-Urban, Rural, Small
Holdings or Country Residential.
6.2.8
The Regional Board supports, in principle, the development of tourist-related
agricultural businesses such as vacation farms, farm bed and breakfast operations,
farm-gate marketing, winery, etc. on agricultural lands subject to ALR regulations.
6.2.9
The Regional district will consider developing a sustainability checklist for new
commercial development applications to encourage sustainability issues to be
considered in the review process.
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INDUSTRIAL
7.1
7
CONTEXT
The plan area is part of a larger regional industrial sector and it is important that going forward, the
RDNO and the neighbouring municipalities work collaboratively in supporting the region’s industrial
base.
The plan area contains many large rural residential properties that may be regarded as viable
locations for land extensive industrial activities. The Regional District may consider new industrial
activities in a rural context but requires applicants to participate in a detailed review and consultation
process.
7.2
INDUSTRIAL POLICIES
7.2.1
Lands designated for industrial use are recognized in the plan document and mapped
on Schedules B, B1 and B2.
7.2.2
Electoral Areas ‘D’ and ‘E’, in association with the Vernon, Village of Lumby and the
District of Coldstream, should identify appropriate land resources for short and long
term industrial development. Research and priority setting should include both vacant
greenfield sites and brownfield sites (e.g. Lavington glass plant).
7.2.3
Industrial land shall be serviced with potable water supplies, proper approved sanitary
sewage disposal facilities, and suitable storm water drainage collection, treatment and
disposal systems.
7.2.4
Industry should be encouraged, particularly those industries which take advantage of
local conditions, local resources and employ local people.
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7.2.5
Electoral Areas ‘D’ and ‘E’ should take advantage of possible grants available to aid in
servicing industrial land.
7.2.6
Major industrial land developments shall not be considered for rezoning until a
comprehensive plan in accordance with the industrial policies is provided, and until the
roads and services adequate for the development are either in place, or financial
guarantees regarding their construction and installation are provided. Applications for
new industrial developments will require a comprehensive review process including a
traffic study that is conducted to review the impacts of the development on the rural
road network.
7.2.7
Industry emissions shall not adversely affect the land, water or air environment, either
in the short term or cumulatively in the long term. Further, that noise, light and dust
from industrial activities are kept at a level so as not to be a nuisance to surrounding
areas.
7.2.8
Agricultural Industrial uses shall be permitted in accordance with the provisions of the
agricultural policies of this Plan. Agriculture is recognized as a regional growth
opportunity and the Regional District supports more intensive use of agricultural lands
in the ALR subject to relevant provincial regulations.
7.2.9
In accordance with Section 12.4 land designated as “Industrial” is also designated as
part of the Commercial and Industrial Development Permit Area in order to establish
requirements respecting the form and character of development.
7.2.10 Future industrial uses will not be supported in areas subject to flooding or other
hazards, or in areas that will cause disruption to the established community.
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SPECIAL USE AREAS
8.1
8
CONTEXT
From time to time, extraordinary land uses arise which do not conform with the usual residential,
industrial, commercial, or open space land use categories. These include specialized and unique
uses which have widely varying, site specific location requirements. In some instances these are
public uses such as waste disposal sites, airports, health clinics, and minimum-security work camps.
Special uses may also include uses that because of their unique development strategy may not be
accommodated under other land use designations (e.g. comprehensive resorts and eco villages).
Because of their uniqueness and special requirements, it is not possible to pre-designate specific
areas for these uses. Nevertheless, it is essential that the need for such areas be recognized in the
Plan.
8.2
SPECIAL PUBLIC USE AREA POLICIES
8.2.1
Special Public Uses that are intended to accommodate extraordinary public land uses
shall be recognized and considered for rezoning without specific designation on the
Official Community Plan Land Use Map, Schedules, B, B1 and B2.
8.2.2
In rezoning of land to a Special Public Use, consideration shall be given to the
following;
a.
b.
c.
d.
the protection of the interests of adjacent land owners;
the implementation of sustainability practices wherever possible;
regulations, policies and guidelines of government agencies; and
the incorporation of extraordinary development requirements by zoning, covenant,
agreements, or development permit.
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8.3
COMPREHENSIVE RESORT AND ECOVILLAGE DEVELOPMENTS OVERVIEW
Comprehensive Resort and Ecovillage Developments may be considered as Special Uses. These
uses are recognized as potentially appropriate for the plan area however to ensure that they are
consistent with the OCP’s overall planning principles and objectives they must be considered through
individual OCP and Rezoning application processes.
Comprehensive Resort developments are considered to be land uses that may have a residential
component but the primary rationale for their development in the plan area is to support a recreational
use (e.g. golf, fishing, skiing, eco-tours). These uses will contribute to the economy through job
creation and may also provide specialized accommodation.
Ecovillages are intentional communities formed with the goal of becoming more socially, economically
and ecologically sustainable. Rural ecovillages are usually based on organic farming, and other
approaches which promote ecosystem function and biodiversity. Some of the components of an
ecovillage are:
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educated commitment to principles
opportunities for local purchasing
alternatives to purchasing of global energy (e.g. oil)
local food
moral purchasing and decision making
respect diversity
sustainable design practices
Overall an ecovillage is driven by a collective commitment to create an alternative, sustainable
lifestyle. Applicants seeking approvals for these projects will need to clearly demonstrate a
commitment to sustainability principles and to ensure that the project is consistent with the principles
of growth management and rural protection. These uses are not an opportunity for satellite, market
driven housing development.
8.4
COMPREHENSIVE RESORT AND ECOVILLAGE DEVELOPMENT POLICIES
8.4.1
Comprehensive Resort or Ecovillage Developments must be recognized through site
specific amendments to the Official Community Plan and shall only be considered in
conjunction with rezoning to a Comprehensive Development Zone which will define the
uses and development regulations specific to the lands in question. As part of the
development application review process, or in advance of the application, the RDNO
will work with stakeholders to define the terms of development approvals for unique
comprehensive resort or ecovillage proposals. Potential stakeholders may include:
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the Agricultural Land Commission
neighbourhood / community associations
Ministry of Health
Local Health Authority
School District
Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure
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The goal of this review process will be to ensure that new developments contribute
positively to sustainable rural character in the plan area.
8.4.2
Comprehensively Resort and Ecovillage Developments must establish efficient, cost
effective wastewater management systems. While conventional septic disposal
systems may be appropriate for rural, large lot areas, it is no longer viewed as an
acceptable means of wastewater management for new or expanded resort and
ecovillage developments. Ecovillages may elect to pursue alternative development
strategies but will need to clearly demonstrate the long term viability of such initiatives,
providing the appropriate supporting professional reports.
8.4.3
Comprehensive Resort and Ecovillage Developments need to protect the quality of
surface and ground water sources, while achieving an economically viable level of
development without adding to the financial burden of taxpayers.
8.4.4
Without diminishing the role of the City of Vernon or the Village of Lumby as the
principal and secondary commercial and service centres in this area, resort and
ecovillage developments may include limited commercial and personal services to
provide visitors and residents with a full service resort or sustainable community
experience.
8.4.5
Comprehensive developments in or adjacent to agricultural land should be avoided or
heavily buffered except for “Bed and Breakfast” operations and “Agro-tourism” in
accordance with Land Reserve Commission regulations and Ministry of Agriculture
standards.
8.4.6
Comprehensive developments within this designation shall be largely self-contained
and shall not facilitate nor be deemed to encourage further development on adjacent
lands.
8.4.7
In accordance with the provisions of the Development Permit Section of this Plan, land
designated as ‘Comprehensive Resort or Ecovillage Development’ is also designated
as a Development Permit Area in matters concerning the protection of the natural
environment, protection of development from hazardous conditions, and matters
concerning the form and character of commercial and industrial development. The
establishment of objectives for the form and character of intensive residential
development may also be required.
8.4.8
The design of new and expanded comprehensive resort and ecovillage developments
shall be responsive to the natural environment such that site grading and visual
impacts from lands beyond are minimized.
8.4.9
The Regional Board may require the developer to provide a Traffic Impact Assessment
prepared by a professional engineer that addresses the potential for impacts the
development may have on traffic patterns, safety and volumes in the surrounding
community. The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure must agree to the Terms
of Reference for a Traffic Impact Assessment prior to preparation.
8.4.10 The Regional Board may require the developer to provide an Environmental Impact
Assessment prepared by a qualified environmental consultant to address potential
impacts the development may have on the quality of the natural environment.
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8.4.11 Where a comprehensive development proposes a non-traditional land tenure system,
such as ecovillage co-housing or cooperative ownership, the Regional Board may
address the specialized nature of the ownership as part of the approval process to
ensure that specialized ownership conditions are recognized over the long term (e.g.
by future owners and neighbours).
8.4.12 The Regional Board will require the developer to demonstrate how services can be met
by the developer for such services as schools so that there are no indirect public costs
(e.g. school buses).
8.4.13 Developments which implement water conservation and re-use strategies are
encouraged.
8.4.14 Proposals for a Comprehensive Resort and Ecovillage Development projects shall
demonstrate how storm-water and wastewater shall be managed on the site such that
water quality and surrounding properties are not negatively impacted by the
development.
8.4.15 The level of servicing appropriate to each proposal shall be defined for consideration
by the Regional Board, however, it is noted that all development must be serviced with
a water system meeting the requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Regulation.
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QUALITY OF LIFE
9
Parks, Open Space Recreation, Heritage, Culture and Institutional
9.1
CONTEXT
The residents of the plan area pride themselves on the easy access to outdoor recreation
opportunities. As the population increases and there are additional demands placed on the area’s
resources, the Regional District may need to become more involved in the protection of existing
amenities and meeting the new demands of a changing community.
Parks and recreation are governed by the Regional District through the White Valley Parks,
Recreation and Culture Advisory Committee whose members are one representative from each of
three jurisdictions (Electoral Areas D and E and the Village of Lumby). The administration function is
currently managed by the Village of Lumby who provide services under contract to the North
Okanagan Regional District.
Local community associations are also key participants in the delivery of services to the residents of
the plan area managing such facilities as the Cherryville Community Hall. Local and grassroots
organizations such as the Cherryville Community Club and the Mabel Lake Community Association
are formed into “not for profit” societies - representing the “doers” of the community – creative people
matching community needs to appropriate activities.
Throughout the plan area there are many trails that are used regularly by both residents and tourists.
These trails include traditional use paths, formally designated and signed trails and forestry roads.
The community is interested in protecting and developing this trail network with an emphasis on such
aspects as integrated multiuse management and the development of alternate transportation
networks.
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Many of the community services used by residents in the plan area (high schools, hospitals, health
clinics, recreation facilities) are located in nearby communities where higher population densities are
available to support these services. The plan area policies support the continued centralization of
these services however, residents also recognize that local, rural services can help create a sense of
place, contribute to employment within the community and support other industries such as tourism.
Residents would like to encourage local services to the greatest extent possible.
The Plan area also contains historical and archaeological features which should be preserved,
protected, and designated so that the public is aware of their significance. History helps communities
to achieve maturity by making its citizens aware of past conditions and the contributions of pioneers to
the community. Settlement by non-natives in this area began over one hundred years ago and was
fostered by the search for gold. As the earliest pioneers searched for valuable minerals, the
agriculture and forestry industries developed. These factors are important in the context of this plan as
they are essential to the identity of the communities within the plan area (see Cherryville and Area
History inset). Objectives and policies focusing on conservation of important heritage resources will
be addressed in this plan. In addition to several historical buildings, other significant heritage features
include:
Indian Rock Paintings (Pictographs)
There are two known locations of Indian rock paintings in the Community Plan area, both of which are
described in the book "Pictographs in Interior British Columbia" by John Corner. The first is on the
south side of Highway No. 6 about three kilometres west of the Sugar Lake Road in Section 26,
Township 57, while the second is on the north side of Creighton Valley Road about 13 km south and
east of Highway No. 6, in Section 13, Township 41.
Cherryville Gold Diggings
The earliest exploration in the Lumby area was associated with the search for gold on Cherry and
Monashee Creeks over a hundred years ago. Some of the workings are still visible on Monashee
Creek in Section 1, Township 57.
Archaeological Sites
The Community Plan area contains eight recorded archaeological sites, most of which are either
former Indian dwellings or places in which rock tools were shaped. These sites are located along the
Shuswap River, a short distance upstream or downstream from Shuswap Falls, or at Rawlings Lake.
In addition, there may well be other sites uncovered in the future. Archaeological sites are protected
under the Heritage Conservation Act and should not be disturbed without approval from the
appropriate provincial ministry.
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Cherryville and Area History
In 1863 Mr. W.C. Young, then stationed in Osoyoos, was instructed by Governor Douglas to
visit Okanagan Gold strikes. Two miles from the mouth of Cherry Creek, he found a budding
and as yet unnamed settlement, consisting of two houses and another being built. A mile
further along the creek was a cabin and the discovery claim of partners, Pion and Louis.
Between 1863 and 1895 the original town, of what we know as Cherryville, was merely a small
mining camp, located deep within the canyon walls of Cherry Creek. It boasted a population of
nearly 100 people, half of which were Chinese miners. Every possible method of extraction
was tried to get the gold and silver from the area.
With more and more miners heading into the Cherry Creek area, a road was built from Lumby
in 1877. According to the B.C. Department of Public Works and under supervision of C.A.
Vernon, the route came through Blue Springs Valley. It was about eight feet wide. With a road
to the area, families began to arrive. Like all communities, in the 1800’s they were known by
the Post Office name. The first known post office in the area was listed as the Cherry Creek
Post Office. The community of Cherryville was christened when Olava Handon became
postmaster. She submitted three names into Ottawa, one being Cherry Creek, another
Cherryville and the third one, no one can recall. Ottawa choose Cherryville. It was always felt
that Cherry Creek and Cherryville were named after the wild Choke Cherries that grew
abundantly, along the banks of the creek, as there were no cherry trees in the area.
In the 1900’s, the town site of Hilton, at Richlands Estates, was located on what is now the
corner of Creighton Valley Road and Holmes Road. It was originally sold to wealthy
Englishmen, as an area with a mild climate, suitable for orchards. The Settlement quickly grew
with money coming from England. It had a post office, hotel, livery stable, barber shop, grocery
store, hardware store, butcher shop and blacksmith shop. Many orchards were established
and irrigation was put in. While the area was beautiful it was not the same as the South
Okanagan and quick fortunes failed to materialize. The community dwindled, when the First
World War began and the money stopped coming from England. Some of the people remained
in the area, finding other ways of making a living. The original Richlands School House, now
used by the Seventh Day Adventist Church, is the only building left at the Hilton site. There are
still two of the old homes remaining; one at the Burnyeat Ranch and the other at the Neil
place. Neither is habitable.
The Hilton School was built in 1907 and kept is name until 1948, when the new school was
built beside it and renamed Cherryville School. The area grew. Ranches and farms sprang up.
A mill was built in 1948 on Sugar Lake Road (Ferguson Mill). Logging remains a major
industry in the community. As of 1998, Cherryville remains unincorporated and has a
population of 1,000 people. It has two general stores, both carrying gas and propane – with one
of them being a liquor vender. It also has a golf course, three restaurants, a library, a quilt
shop, a campground, a gun club, and two churches. It also boasts of some of the most
beautiful scenery in B.C.
Source: Provided by the Cherryville Historical Society for the 2001, Official Community Plan
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9.2
PARKS AND OPEN SPACE POLICIES
9.2.1
Areas recognized as having value for public recreation and
protected natural areas are designated as Parks and Open
Space on Schedules B, B1 and B2.
9.2.2
The White Valley Parks, Recreation and Culture Master Plan
provides comprehensive planning and service delivery
strategies for the plan area. This document has not been
formally adopted by the RDNO and does not provide specific
park designations for the plan area but does provide guidance
to direct future decision making.
9.2.3
Support a community planning process to determine the short-term and long-term
goals and objectives to establish Hanson Park as the civic focal point of the community
of Cherryville.
9.2.4
Encouraged strategies to protect McIntyre Lake including designation as a BC Park,
designation as a conservation area, transfer of ownership to the Regional District of
North Okanagan. Land use management should consider multi use options including
supporting recreation and protecting wildlife.
9.2.5
Work with the relevant provincial agencies to ensure that those key crown land
holdings which are currently used for recreation or which need to be safeguarded for
ecological reasons be secured. Lands of particular interest to the community include
the Meadows and Richlands.
9.2.6
The concept of a recreation plan for the Shuswap River will be considered in the
Shuswap River Watershed Sustainability Plan and process which is being developed in
collaboration with BC Hydro, First Nations, members of the community and applicable
government agencies.
9.2.7
The Regional Board, through White Valley Parks and Recreation, will undertake a
comprehensive inventory of undeveloped public access points to the Shuswap River,
Mabel Lake and Sugar Lake.
9.2.8
The Regional Board, through White Valley Parks and Recreation, and in co-ordination
with local groups and organizations will support a Trails Master Planning process,
including an inventory of existing resources. The community is heavily dependent on
the private automobile for its transportation needs; however, there is an interest in
supporting trail development for alternate transportation use, local recreation use, and
tourism development (e.g. to support a burgeoning local horse industry).
9.2.9
If practical, parks and recreational trails should not be situated in or adjacent to
agricultural lands. If there are no alternative locations, these areas should be buffered
to protect park users from agricultural activities and agriculture from park users and
their pets.
9.2.10 The Regional Board, through Whitevalley Parks and Recreation, may initiate a
community process to determine the best use of the “Meadows” on Sugar Lake Road
and the “gravel pits” on Highway 6.
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9.2.11 Joint development and use of school and park sites by School District No. 22 and the
Regional District should be continued, and when required, site specific formal
agreements may be concluded to provide for integrated development and use.
9.2.12 The Regional District will work with School District No. 22 to support multi-use options
for schools. In particular, schools with declining enrolment may have vacant floor
space that can support new community activities. Opportunities may include
partnerships with local community groups for activities and services, such as: day
cares, after school programs, recreation and cultural activities and private education
initiatives.
9.2.13 Where applicable, parkland, or money in lieu of parkland, shall be provided to the
Regional District pursuant to Part 26: Division 10 Development Cost Charge Recovery
and 10.1 School Site Acquisitions Charges of the Local Government Act. The parkland
or money in lieu shall be provided as a condition precedent to subdivision within the
Plan area.
9.2.14 Review The White Valley Parks and Recreation Development Cost Charge Bylaw
1390, 1996 to ensure that the regulations and fees are relevant to the current
objectives for parks planning.
9.2.15 Development Cost Charges that are payable for parks purposes as a condition
precedent to subdivision approval, shall be waived if the value of the parkland, or the
amount of the money in lieu of parkland, required to be provided pursuant to the
provisions of Part 26: Division 10 – Development Cost Charge Recovery of the Local
Government Act, is equal to or exceeds the amount of the applicable Development
Cost Charge. If the value of the parkland, or the amount of payment in lieu of parkland,
is less than the applicable Development Cost Charge, then the balance of the
Development Cost Charge shall be paid as a condition precedent to subdivision
approval.
9.2.16 Waterfront properties that have long range potential as public access should be
protected by acquiring where possible the right of first refusal in favour of the Regional
District.
9.2.17 In the acquisition and development of open spaces, quality of the recreation
experience should be considered the number one priority in the planning process as
well as in the management of the site in the future. The focus should be on the values
of specific additions to the present opportunities.
9.2.18 Address the need for trail connectivity and trail extensions as part of the review
process for new subdivisions.
9.2.19 Work with local organizations to support community research, planning and
management of parks, stewardship projects and trails. Support community grass roots
organizations in their effort to secure funding for these projects.
9.2.20 Encourage co-ordination of the efforts of different levels of government who provide
public outdoor space. The emphasis for future outdoor recreation space in the
Community Plan area should be on the provision of resource-based facilities (i.e.
hiking, historical, scenic and natural interest, etc.).
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9.2.21 Continue to recognize the role of local grass root organizations in the local provision of
sustainable cultural and recreational services. The Regional District supports efforts to
secure funding for these projects and has also played an important role in supporting
sustainable upgrades to local community facilities.
9.3
HERITAGE CONSERVATION POLICIES
9.3.1
Recognize the importance of heritage resources in the plan area as representative of
its history and key to its identity, character and sense of place, and seek to integrate
heritage conservation, and awareness about heritage into planning and day-to-day
decisions.
9.3.2
Pursuant to section 953 of the Local Government Act, The Regional Board may, by
bylaw, appoint a Heritage Advisory Commission for all, or part of the Electoral Areas.
Furthermore, the terms of reference to be established by the Board for the Commission
will include, but not be limited to: a mandate to advise the Board on heritage matters
and other matters referred to it by the Board; and direction to undertake activities
specified in the terms of reference.
9.3.3
Pursuant to section 954 of the Local Government Act, the Board may, by resolution,
establish a Community Heritage Register for purposes of identifying heritage properties
within the Plan area.
9.3.4
The Regional Board will cooperate with property owners seeking heritage designation
or other heritage recognition for their properties by employing the following policies and
the associated potential regulatory mechanisms for conserving and protecting the
heritage resources within the Plan area.
a. The Board may consider Conservation Covenants under Section 219 of the Land
Title Act for buildings with established heritage value.
b. The Board may, when conditions warrant creative solutions not possible within
existing regulatory frameworks, enter into Heritage Revitalization Agreements with
property owners for the preservation of heritage resources. Utilization of these
agreements will be pursuant to section 966 of the Local Government Act.
c. Pursuant to section 967 of the Local Government Act, The Board may, by Bylaw,
designate real property, in whole or in part, considered to have heritage value or
character, or is deemed necessary or desirable for the conservation of protected
heritage resources. The Board will emphasize and encourage voluntary
designation over imposed designation recognizing constraints associated with such
designation. Furthermore, the terms and conditions for such designation will
include guidelines and policies regarding the issuance of a Heritage Alteration
Permit.
d. The Board recognizes the particular vulnerability of heritage resources currently
located within the Provincial Agricultural Land Reserve and will cooperate with the
Provincial Land Reserve Commission to protect these resources through
designation or other mechanisms.
9.3.5
The Regional Board will work with the community and landowners to ensure the
Chinese Diggings and miners’ cabins along Cherry Creek are preserved. The general
locations of these resources are shown on Schedule B2.
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9.4
9.5
9.3.6
The community plan area contains numerous native archaeological sites including rock
paintings, former dwellings and places where rock tools where shaped. The general
locations of these sites are shown on Schedules B, B1 and B2. These sites are
protected under the Heritage Conservation Act which provides that designated heritage
sites shall not be disturbed without permission of the Archaeological Branch. The
Regional District would also provide a referral to the Splatsin and Okanagan Indian
Bands should an application be received in the vicinity of these resources.
9.3.7
The Regional Board will work with the community and the agencies having jurisdiction
to ensure that landmarks such as creeks and mountains represent the historical names
given when the area was first settled.
SCHOOL FACILITIES AND OTHER COMMUNITY SERVICES POLICIES
9.4.1
Public service, assembly and civic uses such as schools, community halls, health
clinics, churches and fire halls are permitted in all areas and land use designations
except in the Residential Single Family designations; except that Assembly uses
pursuant to the Community Care and Assisted Living Act of B.C. shall also be
permitted in areas designated for Single Family use consistent with the Zoning Bylaw
where appropriate siting, parking, buffering and setbacks standards can be met.
9.4.2
Pursuant to the Parks and Open Space policies of this Plan, the Regional District
encourages the joint use and development of school sites in co-operation with School
District No. 22.
9.4.3
When determining the location for any new school facilities, the siting in or adjacent to
agricultural land should be avoided.
POLICE AND FIRE PROTECTION POLICIES
9.5.1
Continue to recognize the plan area as a rural area where residents acknowledge and
accept that beyond a very limited area close to the village of Lumby fire protection
services are not provided by either the Regional District through local volunteer fire
departments. The only fire department with the plan area is located in Lumby and it
does service a limited part of Area D. The Regional District will continue to provide
emergency services throughout the plan area as part of a region-wide service delivery
model.
9.5.2
Support and encourage the application of Fire Smart principles for existing and new
development.
9.5.3
Continue to support and work closely with the RCMP. This may include the formation
of citizen support groups such as Neighbourhood Watch through the Safe
Communities Program (where densities warrant this type of program), as a proactive
step in the reduction of crime.
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9.6
9.7
COMMUNITY ACCESSIBILITY AND INCLUSION POLICIES
9.6.1
Support opportunities for balanced, active and diverse lifestyles where housing, public
services and amenities are affordable, accessible and inclusive.
9.6.2
Encourage land use patterns, community activities and events that generate intergenerational and inter-cultural interest, participation and social integration.
9.6.3
Consider establishing a region-wide committee to provide feedback and direction to
elected officials and staff on aging and disability issues. This feedback may include
facilitating the preparation of an age-friendly assessment of the community to discover
what is working around accessibility and inclusion and what needs improvement.
SENIORS AND SPECIAL NEEDS POLICIES
9.7.1
The essential role of pioneers, founding families, elders and other seniors in the
settlement of this area is gratefully acknowledged. It is important that their changing
housing needs and requirements for support services be recognized and addressed
within the community.
9.7.2
Support local strategies and partnerships to deliver seniors’ care, assisted living
services and residential based services for persons with special needs.
9.7.3
Access for persons with special needs should be considered in the design of public
buildings and transportation facilities (including trails).
9.7.4
Support local initiatives to become more involved in the Age-Friendly Communities
Program. Currently this has been a Lumby led initiative but there is potential for
benefits throughout the plan area. Improved communications (high speed internet and
broader cell phone coverage) are essential for a successful age-friendly community,
supporting all age groups with such services as: remote educational opportunities,
particularly for children and youth; home occupations; and services for seniors
choosing to age in place.
9.7.5
When reviewing new development applications, the Regional District will apply an agefriendly lens to the review process to support a local population that hopes to age in
place. While many of the health and support services needed by seniors are outside
the jurisdiction of the Regional District the community can benefit from a greater
awareness of age-friendly features and barriers. (See age-friendly features and
barriers in information box following).
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An Age-Friendly Lens:
Considerations for Planners, Developers and Service Providers
Suggestions for improving age-friendliness in rural areas . . .
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9.8
For Information Only
ARTS AND CULTURE POLICY
9.8.1
9.9
Support programs that use retired professionals (e.g., pharmacists, nurses,
teachers) to provide volunteer support for seniors’ in their homes —for example,
to explain medication and health care issues.
Work with the local Health Authority and the Provincial government to identify
programs appropriate to the area.
Support a Safely Home Program—a program developed for cognitively impaired
people through the Alzheimer Society.
Provide cooking services to seniors living on their own.
Support the efforts of the Interior Health Authority to attract more rural doctors.
Support daycare services that offer respite services for caretakers.
Support a home visit program to provide social visits to seniors.
Families can learn about available community programs and services.
It is recognized that the region’s larger urban
centres (e.g. Vernon) will be the focal point for
regional cultural expression and diversity but the
Regional District will work with
regional
institutions and associations to support cultural
amenities and/or programs at the local level.
Vacant classrooms, for example, may provide an
opportunity for local programs, special events,
celebrations support for local artists.
COMMUNITY HEALTH POLICIES
9.9.1
Recognize the importance of open spaces, parks, cultural and artistic events and
recreational opportunities in enhancing the quality of life of residents.
9.9.2
Support medical facilities that operate on smaller scales (e.g. palliative care homes) in
rural residential land use designations. It is anticipated that these smaller specialized
facilities may be more “footloose” in terms of their locational decision and able to
succeed in a rural area where they can integrate an attractive rural setting into their
overall service delivery model.
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TRANSPORTATION & SERVICING
10.1
10
CONTEXT
Highway 6 is the main highway corridor in the plan area. Over the years efforts have been made to
plan a transportation network with efficient linkages between and within the rural areas as shown on
the Land Use Plan (Schedules B, B1 and B2). The development of these connections has been
limited, restricted by: a lack of funding; a slow rate of new development and developer driven
investment; and, competing jurisdictions (e.g. ALR).
A network of secondary roads provides access to many of the settled areas within the plan area.
These roads were typically constructed to a rural standard to accommodate lower traffic volumes and
are characterized by narrower travel lanes, ditches for storm water and they lack designated space for
pedestrian or bicycle travel. Some of the local roads are in reasonable condition but many roads are
minimally maintained and surfaced with dirt or gravel.
In 2007, the Province of British Columbia passed the Climate Action Charter which commits all
communities in the province to significantly reduce their greenhouse gas emissions by 2012.
Reducing personal vehicle traffic through alternative forms of transportation is one of the key ways to
meet this goal; however, it is difficult to implement these types of “urban” conservation strategies
where there is a dispersed settlement pattern and no public transit.
The plan area contains a mix of small “urban” lots, primarily located close to Lumby and serviced with
community water, and large “rural” lots with independent water and sewer systems. For the term of
this plan, policies support planning strategies that will see this area continue to be a “rural” area with
larger rural lots on independent water and sewer systems.
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The plan area is within the area that was examined as part of the Groundwater Assessment in the
The primary
Okanagan Basin (GAOB) project that was initiated in 2004 and completed in 2009.1
objective of the GAOB project was to characterize and provide sound scientific understanding of
groundwater resources in this region and to assist communities with long-rang planning for the
continued provision of safe and sustainable water supplies. The recommendations of this study reenforce the need for continued groundwater research and monitoring and the use of this information
in land use planning and decision making.
The community has expressed interest in new development opportunities that utilize alternative green
energy and servicing strategies. Green infrastructure and servicing may be a good companion for
new rural development in this area; however the Regional District should proceed cautiously to ensure
that these developments are sustainable over the long term, in terms of social, environmental and
economic costs.
10.2
1
TRANSPORTATION POLICIES
10.2.1
The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, the Land Reserve Commission and
the North Okanagan Regional District should perform a detailed review of the “Major
Street Network Plan” to ensure that long term goals can be achieved. This review
should coincide with the preparation of a Bicycle and Trail Network Plan to consider
crossovers between the road and trail network plans. Planning should also consider
the opportunities for alternative transportation modes including: bicycle routes, trails,
a Handidart, community van, carpool and car co-operatives.
10.2.2
Until the above mentioned review is undertaken, the existing and proposed major
roads designated on Schedules B, B1 and B2 are endorsed as the long term major
routes for movement of traffic, and shall have a minimum width of 25 metres. The
location of proposed routes within the Agricultural Land Reserve is not to be
construed as having the endorsement of the Land Reserve Commission. The
construction, upgrading, or dedication of these routes may not proceed without the
approval of the Commission. However, it is recognized that Provincial Agricultural
Land Commission Resolution #1625/83 permits some upgrading without additional
approvals being required.
10.2.3
New roads and major improvements to existing roads shall be located so as to
provide minimum disruption to agricultural uses.
10.2.4
Planning for future roads and subdivisions shall take into consideration the needs of
public transit, school buses, pedestrians, farm equipment and bicycle routes and
other environmentally sensitive transportation methods.
10.2.5
For developments in which road upgrading will be required as a result of the
development, the development will not occur until roads adequate for the
development are in place.
Carmichael, V., Kenny, S., Allen, D., and Gellein, C. 2009 “Compendium of Aquifer Hydraulic Properties from Re‐
evaluated Pumping Tests in the North Okanagan, British Columbia” , B.C. Ministry of the Environment and Simon Fraser University. Electoral Areas ‘D’ (Rural Lumby) & ‘E’ (Cherryville) Official Community Plan
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10.2.6
Access to crown lands and water-bodies shall be provided wherever necessary
under the appropriate subdivision regulations or as a condition precedent to
rezoning.
10.2.7
Local roads shall have a minimum right of way of 20 meters.
10.2.8
Continuous strip development along highways will be discouraged for safety,
aesthetic and functional reasons.
10.2.9
The Regional Board supports the
concept of an all-weather road to link
the Village of Lumby with Silver Star
Village. The new road is to function
as the “connector” of different
geographic areas (e.g. White Valley
to Silver Star to Vernon). It is not
intended to function as a local road
and catalyst for new development.
Should the road be constructed, the
area would continue to support large
lots for rural or resource use.
10.2.10 Proposed
transportation
routes
should avoid wetlands and streams
and consider the impacts of roads on
sensitive natural ecosystems, if
possible.
Environmental
Impact
Assessments may be necessary, at
the discretion of relevant government
agencies.
(see
“Road
Design
considerations to minimize impacts
on Watercourses for information
only).
Road Design Considerations
to Minimize Impacts on
Watercourses
In low-gradient terrain, for example,
alternative
design
and
maintenance
practices could maintain phosphorus
delivery from roads to receiving waters at
lower rates than is presently the case. Some
approaches to achieve this objective are as
follows:

implement
strict
erosion
and
sedimentation control practices during
road construction;

design local road systems to avoid
riparian areas and to minimize surface
runoff and erosion susceptibility;

maintain natural drainage patterns;

minimize ditch length connected to the
natural surface drainage network;

employ infiltration systems where
required to control surface runoff and
sediment transport; and
10.2.11 Encourage
the
Ministry
of
Transportation and Infrastructure and
 minimize soil exposure caused by ditch
Infrastructure (MoTI) to consider the
maintenance operations.
needs of pedestrians and cyclists
For Information Only
when approving new roads or
upgrading existing roads. New road
designs, for example, can support alternative transportation options with the addition
of wider shoulders for pedestrian travel or a wider paved travel surface that can
become a designated bicycle route.
10.2.12 New roads shall be encouraged to connect into the existing road network plan as
shown on Schedules B, B1 & B2.
10.2.13 Transportation planning may be required as part of the development review process
to ensure that traffic issues and impacts are considered in relation to a new
development proposal.
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10.2.14 Recognize the importance of accessibility for seniors and the mobility impaired and
support designs that accommodate these user groups.
10.3
WATER POLICIES
10.3.1 Potable water shall be provided through community water systems for comprehensive
residential, recreational, industrial and commercial developments within the
Community Plan area.
10.3.2 Development of land (where more than 1 additional lot is created) that is dependent
upon subsurface groundwater supplies shall be subject to certification by a
professional engineer, or a groundwater geologist, or by a hydrogeologist as to the
quality and quantity of water available prior to rezoning or subdivision approval as the
case may be. The Regional Board may request information that demonstrates the
impact to neighboring wells of such a development. Proven wells with registered well
logs may be exempt from the above certification.
10.3.3 The Regional District should work with the provincial government to ensure data
collected through the development review process contributes the understanding of
water resources over the long term (e.g. can be integrated into the numerical flow
models for aquifer characterization). This may require a review of the Subdivision
Bylaw to ensure that the data collected and tests conducted can be effectively used in
the decision making process. It is important that this information provide both an
understanding of impacts of the proposed development on the existing water supply
and provide a reliable predictive assessment of the availability of the water supply to
accommodate the proposed development.
10.3.4 Encourage water conservation for all land uses, including residential, commercial,
industrial and agriculture. The Regional District will encourage public acceptance of
water conservation when designing homes, such as low water consumption plumbing
fixtures and consideration of water confinement measures such as cisterns or water
storage facilities to capture rainwater and snowmelt so as to provide for irrigation and
perhaps a water source for firefighting.
10.3.5 Encourage and support public education on water supply and a drop-off facility for
water testing.
10.4
SEWAGE COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL POLICIES
10.4.1 A study of subsurface soil conditions (the terms of reference established with
assistance of the North Okanagan Health Region) shall be undertaken to determine the
best method of sewage treatment and disposal for new development (where more than
1 additional lot is created). The study shall be carried out prior to rezoning or
subdivision approval as the case may be.
10.4.2 Holding tanks shall not be permitted as a method of sewage disposal except for
commercial and industrial uses pursuant to the Regional District of North Okanagan
Holding Tank Sewage Disposal Bylaw No. 671, 1985 and amendments thereto, and in
an emergency to replace malfunctioning septic tanks on a temporary basis.
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10.4.3 Sewage treatment facilities proposed to be utilized for commercial developments which
propose direct discharge of effluent into watercourses or water bodies shall not be
supported.
10.5
DRAINAGE COLLECTION AND DISPOSAL POLICIES
10.5.1 The Regional Board may request a study of the drainage requirements for developable
lands located within the Community Plan area to be undertaken before development
approvals are considered. This study shall include the works required, and the method
of treatment and disposal, and should consider innovative methods of handling and
treatment.
10.5.2 Adequate drainage works, that are consistent with the “Land Development Guidelines
for the Protection of Aquatic Habitat (1992)”, shall be provided in conjunction with new
development to ensure that erosion and siltation of receiving creeks and streams is
prevented. Such works will also serve to prevent damage to property, including
agricultural lands, by peak drainage run-offs.
10.5.3 The Regional District has limited capacity to manage stormwater but supports
alternative stormwater management solutions that are both cost effective and
environmentally sustainable. This may include strategies to reduce and control run-off
such as storm water detention ponds, limiting impervious surfaces, retaining open
ditches. Provision shall be made to manage all stormwater safety without offsite
impacts to other properties.
10.5.4 Encourage public acceptance of water conservation when designing homes, such as
low water consumption plumbing fixtures and consideration of water confinement
measures such as cisterns or water storage facilities to capture rainwater and
snowmelt so as to provide for irrigation and perhaps a water source for fire-fighting.
10.5.5 In rural areas, retain low areas, water bodies, and ditches as part of the rainwater and
stormwater drainage system.
10.5.6 Strongly encourage measures to limit runoff to minimize the release of substances
harmful to the environment. This may include the requirement of preventative
measures such as implementation of an erosion and sediment control plan or
treatment like stormwater interceptors. Commercial and industrial may require oil
interceptors to mitigate contamination of water sources. This is standard practices but
may not be required owing to limited development of this nature.
10.6
SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL POLICIES
10.6.1 Diversion of a variety of materials from the waste stream is encouraged through
recycling facilities and backyard composting with special attention paid to the 3R
hierarchy of waste management: Reduce-Reuse-Recycle.
10.6.2 Support implementation of the policies in the RDNO’s 2007 Solid Waste Management
Plan.
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10.7
OTHER UTILITY SERVICE POLICIES
10.7.1 The co-operation of the B. C. Hydro and Power Authority shall be solicited in improving
the appearance of the structures and rights-of-way of their transmission lines.
10.7.2 The Zoning bylaw shall continue to allow the installation of servicing equipment in
locations where it is required and where it is not offensive because of size,
appearance, noise, or odour.
10.7.3 When considering bonus density policies pursuant to Section 904 of the Local
Government Act and set out in Section 2 of this plan, where an owner provides land
associated with the provision of a local utility the Regional District may consider this a
kind of amenity.
10.7.4 Encourage the provision and expansion of telecommunications coverage, and
provision of natural gas service.
10.7.5 Encourage new developments to consider generating some of their own energy with
methods such as solar, wind or geothermal energy. Support the establishment of small
scale green energy development projects that use water, wind, sunlight, biomass or
geothermal energy to generate electricity for sale into the electrical transmission and
distribution infrastructure when those facilities:
a. have been property evaluated and are shown to be technically sound,
environmentally sensitive and socially responsible;
b. are located, designed, constructed and operated in a manner that is consistent with
the overall vision for the region, e.g. does not negatively impact environmental
quality;
c. can be connected into the existing transmission and distribution infrastructure with
minimal impact and does not require the development of any new major
transmission corridors; and
d. provides tangible community benefits comparable to projects currently under
development.
10.7.6 Discourage the creation of lots straddling utility rights-of-ways.
10.7.7 All land use designations (except Single Family Residential) permit facilities for Public
Utilities and Services.
10.7.8 The Regional District encourages initiatives exploring new sustainability practices that
would lead to alternative servicing standards, recognizing that approvals for alternative
practices may rest with other jurisdictions.
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ECONOMY
11.1
11
CONTEXT
The 2006 Census data for the plan area reflect high employment in the primary industries, especially
forestry – the provincial average is 5%, while the plan area is at 15%. Over the last decade there has
been a shrinking in the area’s total labour force, and the role of the forestry industry has also declined.
In 2001, for example, primary industry represented 20% of the total occupations.
Other sectors
where the economy is focused is on processing and manufacturing, trades and transport, and sales
and service.
Within the plan area the residents are concerned about the future
employment opportunities and have been exploring new ways to
diversify the economy and create a more sustainable future.
Opportunities in agriculture, tourism, home-based businesses,
industrial land development and the service sector are among the
options being considered. Due to the remote location of many of the
areas’ residents and communities there are challenges in establishing
efficient home based businesses as a result of the lack of high speed
internet access and cell phone coverage.
A sustainable local economy
can grow around a
consciousness that treasures
our piece of the earth.
Visioning Workshop 2010
A healthy environment is essential for a healthy economy that is based on natural resources. While
the plan area has expanded to include some areas of crown land, there is a large crown land base
outside of the plan area that is tightly linked to the future of the area and the local economy. Much of
this land base is outside the scope of the local government but local government and the community
can become engaged on key issues such as recreation and community forests, and forest reserves.
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11.2
ECONOMIC POLICIES
11.2.1 Recognize the importance of communication
connectivity for businesses and families in rural
areas and work with community groups to explore
options for improving the level of communication
services specifically cell phone coverage and high
speed internet access.
11.2.2 Support the innovative and sustainable use of local
wood and consider adopting a Wood First Policy
and supporting other Wood Products Initiatives to
capitalize on the area’s natural assets.
Without modernization of
communication services,
Cherryville will stay in the same
stagnation it is currently
experiencing with the decline of
the forest industry, etc.
Visioning Workshop 2010
11.2.3 Support initiatives that increase local food production and agricultural activities in the
community.
11.2.4 Continue to support activities that promote local food production and provide
opportunities for the sale of produce and other local food products such as the
seasonal Farmers Market or similar opportunities.
11.2.5 Participate in the multiparty efforts to address region-wide economic sustainability,
economic diversification and adjustments, and issues associated with changes in the
local forestry based economy.
11.2.6 As part of the diversification of the local economy, recognize the role of new regional
educational facilities, and encourage these institutions to consider research and
educational opportunities to focus on regional issues, including: research on
agricultural opportunities; forest sector diversification, water conservation.
11.2.7 Work with other agencies and organizations to promote tourism development in
Electoral Areas ‘D’ and ‘E’ and build on the potential associated with:



innovative home-based employment/business opportunities;
travel corridors; and
tourism experiences associated with a high quality natural environment such as
sport-tourism and eco-tourism where the environment and natural surroundings are
protected, enjoyed and respected.
11.2.8 Promote the region as a sustainable rural environment, where planning considers the
environment, social and economic aspects of the community. This environment is
anticipated to be a strong draw for new business opportunities that require a healthy,
clean natural environment such as: health retreats, and natural or organic farming.
11.2.9 The Regional District will continue to support and encourage annual sporting and
artistic events and festivals (e.g. Cherryville Days) as important economic benefits to
the community.
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DEVELOPMENT PERMIT AREAS
12.1
12
GENERAL
12.2.1 Where land is subject to more than one Development Permit Area designation, a single
development permit is required. The application will be subject to the requirements of
all applicable Development Permit Areas, and any development permit issued will be in
accordance with the guidelines of all such areas.
12.2.2 Certain developments in designated development permit areas may be expedited by
the issuance of delegated development permits. Delegated development permits will
be issued by Regional District staff where:
i. variances will not be required to any community plan, Zoning Bylaw or
subdivision bylaw of the Regional District of North Okanagan; and
ii. in development permit areas designated as Riparian Areas or Hazardous
Lands, the use is low density residential or agricultural only, and

The proposed building or use of land conform with flood plain setbacks
and Flood Construction Levels contained in the Regional District Zoning
Bylaw; and

The use will not involve the bulk storage of fuel oil, gasoline or other
substances that could result in the pollution of the environment; and

Where no existing land clearing, placement of fills, or other works or
undertakings have occurred on the lands in question that may have
resulted in the harmful alteration, disruption or destruction (HADD) and
is in accordance with the Riparian Areas Regulation.
12.2.3 The Regional District recognizes that variances may be considered as part of the
Development Permit process, but not necessarily approved, for new developments
where site specific conditions warrant reduced setback standards such as, but not
limited to, situations where topographical constraints would necessitate environmental
modification.
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12.2.4 The Regional District may establish Development Permit Area designations and
guidelines pursuant to the Local Government Act section 919.1(g) to guide the form
and character of development in a resort area such as Comprehensive Developments
and Ecovillage Developments if one is proposed to be established through applications
to amend this Official Community Plan. For properties designated Comprehensive
Development or Ecovillage Development a development permit following the
guidelines of 12.5 Commercial and Industrial Development Permit Area will apply.
12.2.5 Where new information is received concerning areas that may be hazardous or where
protection of the natural environment is justified, the Regional District will consider
designation of these areas within a Development Permit Area.
12.2
RIPARIAN DEVELOPMENT PERMIT AREA
Designation
12.2.1 The Riparian Development Permit Area (RDPA) is designated under
The primary objective of the
Section 919.1(1)(a) of the Local Government Act,.
Riparian Development Permit Area designation is to regulate development activities in
watercourses and their riparian areas in order to preserve natural features, functions
and conditions that support natural processes. The RDPA will assist the RDNO in
implementing the Provincial Riparian Areas Regulation, which applies to
“development” involving:
a) removal, alteration, disruption or destruction of vegetation;
b) disturbance of soils;
c) construction or erection of buildings and structures;
d) creation of non-structural impervious or semi-impervious surfaces;
e) flood protection works;
f) construction of roads, trails, docks, wharves, and bridges;
g)provision and maintenance of sewer and water services;
h) development of drainage systems;
i) development of utility corridors;
j)subdivision as defined in Section 872 of the Local Government Act;
within a “riparian assessment area” as defined in 12.2.3.
Area
12.2.2 The Regional District considers that the Shuswap River Watershed, including Sugar
Lake, Mabel Lake, Rawlings Lake, the Shuswap River and all other watercourses as
subject to the Riparian Areas Regulations.
12.2.3 Riparian Assessment Area (Figure 12.1),is defined under the Provincial Riparian Areas
Regulation (RAR) as:
a. for a stream, the 30 metre strip on both sides of the stream measured from the
high water mark,
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b. for a ravine less than 60 metres wide, a strip on both sides of the stream
measured from the high water mark to a point that is 30 metres beyond the top of
the ravine bank; and
c. for a ravine 60 metres wide or grater, a strip on both sides of the stream
measured from the high water mark to a point that is 10 metres beyond the top of
the ravine bank.
Figure 12.1: Riparian Assessment Area:
Source: British Columbia Ministry of Water, Land & Air Protection, Riparian
Areas Regulation Implementation Guidebook, March 2005
12.2.4 High water mark is defined under the Regulations (RAR) as the visible high water mark
of a stream where the presence and action of the water are so common and usual, and
so long continued in all ordinary years, as to mark on the soil of the bed of the stream a
character distinct from that of its banks, in vegetation, as well as in the nature of the
soil itself, and includes the active floodplain.
12.2.5 Stream is defined under the Regulations (RAR) as any of the following that provides
fish habitat:
a. a watercourse, whether it usually contains water or not;
b. a pond, lake, river, creek or brook;
c. a ditch, spring or wetland that is connected by surface flow to something referred to
in paragraph a) or b).
12.2.6 Ravine is defined under the Regulations (RAR) as a narrow, steep sided valley that is
commonly eroded by running water and has a slope grade greater than 3:1.
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