ComputerSystemsNewsletter_1978_Sep15_25pages_OCR

ComputerSystemsNewsletter_1978_Sep15_25pages_OCR
'WEINHARDTO HELMUT
FRANKFURT
IHPSA
Vol. 3, No. 21
Sept. 15, 1978
Worldwide SE Managers' Meeting
A Great Success ............... Page 23
DSD NEWS
Product News
HP 1000 System Support for
7925A Disc Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D. CawerIDSD [
Sales Alds
Customized Driver Required for
Tektronix Graphics Terminal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Correction - RTE-IV Software
Manual Package . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D. CawerIDSD [
S-t-r-e-t-c-h-i-n-gThat Multipoint Cable . . B. StevendDSD [
Order Processing
Extra Manuals for an
HP 1000 System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . M. Fox-RytandIDSD [
ASA 8580lTODS-Ill Training Schedule.. .P. EbersoleIDSD [
Automated Measurement News
What's New in ATS? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D. M a W D S D [
Status of Microwave ATE ............... D. MabeyIDSD [
How to Choose Switch Card Mix for a
Modular Switch? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A. MilldDSD [
Do You Need A Roving 2240A Demo?. . . . . D. KlineIDSD [
FCD NEWS
Dlvlslon News
FCD Products Group Organization . . . . . . . J. CarlsonIFCD [13]
21
21
21
31
31
4)
51
61
71
DTD NEWS
Dlvlslon News
2649 DTD Sales Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T. HaneyIDTD [ 81
Product News
GSA Contract For Terminals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B. SwiftIDTD [ 81
New From DTD In September.. . . . . . . .E. GrandjeanIDTD [ 91
HP-IB On The 2648.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . W. BrubakerIDTD [ 91
Sales Alds
Dig-i-tize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E. GrandjeanIDTD [lo]
2647A Used As a System Boot Loader . . M. TarendDTD [I 11
I
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
GSD NEWS
Product News
MTS/3000 Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . E. TurnerlGSD [I 51
Sales Alds
Buy Now-You Can't Afford to Wait.. . . . . G. NortonlGSD [15]
Customer Reference Database . . . . . . . . . . . B. KlaaslGSD [17]
Sales Appllcatlons
MFGl3000 Installation:
It's Easier Than You Think . . . . . . . . . . . . . J. ScribnerINSR [17]
Newspapers: Inside the Organization . . . . . . B. KlaaslGSD [18]
HPG NEWS
Dlvlslon News
Do You Know These Faces?. . . . . . . M-0. LaurencinIHPG [20]
Sales Alds
Marked Card BASIC and the 7260A . . . . . . P. StuarVHPG [20]
Product News
Great America and the HP 30708 . . . . . . . . J. WillettIHPG [21]
CSG NEWS
CSG News
Computer Advances Expands . . . . . . . . . C. ScheifelelCSG [22]
Worldwide SE Manager's Meeting
A Great Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J. DennylCSG [23]
FOR llNcrERNALUSE ONLV
-
Correction
RTE-IV Software
Manual Package
By: David CarverlDSD
HP 1000 System Support for
7925A Disc Drive
In announcing the new RTE-IV manuals package (July 15th
Issue of the CS Newsletter), we gave you the wrong
product number
By: David CarveriDSD
The correct number is 928268, price $200.00
As HP 1000 Systems move into bigger application areas
many of you are ask~ngfor support of the 7925 disc with its
125 Mbyte capacity.
As we said before, the package is a convenient way to get
all RTE-IV - related manuals with a single product number.
It includes all manuals associated with RTE-IV Systems
such as:
We have a project underway to provide this support. It
entails substantial modifications to the way RTE addresses
disc memory devices. In particular, the number of tracks per
subchannel must be expanded beyond 1,024 so that the
7925 with its 7400 tracks does not use up too much
Logical Unit addressing space. One of the RTE tables must
also be changed to allow for more sectors per track in
specifying the disc. These changes require modification of
several RTE programs, including the generator, the switch,
the disc driver, and the disc backup utilities.
Programming & Operating
Microprogramming
Manual
We expect to have all this work accomplished by Spring, 1979.
Batch Spool Monitor
Assembler
On-Line Generator
FORTRAN
Utilities
BASIC
Debug
IMAGE
Editor
etc.
Libraries
Supported Drivers &
Device Subroutines
S-T-R-E-T-C-H-I-N-G That Multipoint Cable
Customized Driver Required for
Tektronix Graphics Terminal
By: Bill StevenslDSD
By: A1 LiulDSD
Lets suppose your customer would lhke to locate the f~rst
2645A termlnal on an HP 1000 Mult~po~nt
da~sy-cha~nzd
communlcat~onslhne out In the sh~pp~nglrece~v~ng
area
Suppose also that thls area IS more than 100 feet from the
HP 1000 computer How do you s-t-r-e-t-c-hthat cable7
You don tl Rather advlse your customer to purchase an
HP 30037A Asynchronous Repeater Th~sproduct, recently
~ntroducedby General Systems IS compatible w~th,and has
Term~nal
been tested w~ththe 12790A HP 1000 Mult~po~nt
Interface The Asynchronous Repeater allows the f~rst
termlnal to be located up to 2000 feet away from the
computer and to operate at up to 9600 bps It also allows the
flrst term~nalon the multlpo~ntllne to be equ~ppedw~tha
13232T Power Protect Bypass Cable Fa~lureIn the f~rst
termlnal need not br~ngdown the whole lhne The actual
D ~ O ~ Uconflgurat~on
C ~
IS shown on the next page
Your customer may ask, "Can DVRIDVAOS drive a Tektronix
Graphics Terminal7". The answer is "NO". The reason is that
a Tektronix Graphics Terminal uses the "ENQ" character for
graphics control, whereas, the "ENQ-ACK" character
combination is used In the protocol between DVRIDVAOS
and the 26XX terminals. Because of this difference in "ENQ"
usage, a customer Insisting on using a Tektronix Graphics
Terminal must develop his own special driver for it.
Our best alternative is to sell them the 2648 Graph~cs
Terminal and the GRAPHICS11000 software package which
are already developed and are fully supported by DSD.
Volume 3 Number 21 September 15 1978
2
;QL4
[$j]7JE-J)Jw54L
fi&E (C3h!l:4Y?
8
purchase two 30037A Asynchronous Repeaters and the
requisite cables as below.
HP 1000
COMPUTER
SYSTEM
COMPUTER
12790A
12790A
13232P
CRT TERMINAL
HP 30037A
ASYNCHRONOUS
REPEATER
ELECTRICALLYEQUIVALENT
OR
ELECTRICALLY EQUIVALENT
CABLE MADE BY THE CUSTOMER
(UP TO 2000 FT)
CABLE MADE BY THE CUSTOMER
(UP TO 2000 FT).
I
13232Q
OR 13232T
13232R (100 FT)
OR
ELECTRICALLY
EQUIVALENT CABLE
MADE BY THE
CUSTOMER (UP TO
2000 FT)
2645N2648A
CRT TERMINAL
ASYNCHRONOUS
REPEATER
13232Q
13232T
CRT TERMINAL
2M5N2648A
CRT TERMINAL
Now let's suppose that the customer wants to locate the
second terminal on the multipoint line more than 2000 feet
away from the first terminal. How do you do it? You guessed
it! After ascertaining that the second terminal will be in the
same building as the first, recommend your customer
How much does the Async Repeater cost? Only $700!
GOOD SELLING!
only to HP 1000 System options - prices for line item manuals
must be computed separately.
Hope this answers your questions regarding documentation.
Extra Manuals for an HP 1000 System
ASA 8580lTODS-Ill Training Schedule
By: Melanie Fox-RytandiDSD
Yes, Virginia, you can order an extra set of manuals with an
HP 1000 System order! And it's easily done - simply specify
one opTion M78 with your system order (21 70A, 21 71A,
21 72A, 21 74A or 21 74B, 21 75A or 21 75B, 21 76A or 21 76B,
and 21 77A or 21 77B) for each extra set of manuals needed.
The price for one set is $500 plus an additional $20 for each
system option (including a "delete", cabinet, etc.) specified.
By: Phil EbersoleiDSD
1
1
October 16-20:
October 23-27:
Option M78 also applies to other Data Systems Division line
items, but you must check to see what manuals are supplied
with each line item and then compute the total price for all of
those manuals. The additional $20 mentioned above applies
Volume 3,Number 21, September 15, 1978
Due to popular demand, 'we have decided to schedule a
final set of ASA 8580 training classes at DSD before
the product is obsoleted (November 1) and support is
transferred to the Instrument Group Repair Center
in Mountain View. The schedule will be as follows:
ASA 8580 Class (92720A)
TODS-Ill Class (92722A)
Both classes will be held at DSD. Reservations can be
Please be sure to have
made through Pam Navarro (~2815).
your HEART order number ready when you call.
3
ffQR ~ ~ c E F W k U
dE
L?IE CDW!=v
~3MEASUREMENT
CONTROL
l!k
Automated
AUTOMATIC TEST SYSTEMS
Measurement
8 MEASUREMENT
News
AND
48
CONTROL PROCESSORS FROM DATA SYSTEMS DIVISION
VOL. 1
SEPTEMBER 1978
No. 4
Twoc new c a p a b i l i t i e s a r e now a v a i l a b l e i n HP-ATS.
o r d e r them:
H e r e ' s what t h e y a r e and how t o
WHAT'S NEW I N ATS?
By:
1)
Dawson Mabey
Instrument
003
HP 3044A Spectrum A n a l y z e r
1 ea
Racki ng/Cabl ing
Engi n e e r i ng U n i t s
5 ea
Conf /Tes t
Engi n e e r i ng U n i t s
10 ea
-110 Standard 3571A
-120 50Q 33308
O p t i o n 121, 75Q 3330B
may be s u b s t i t u t e d f o r
O p t i o n 120.
Note:
Above does n o t i n c l u d e c o n v e r s i o n o f any c a l c u l a t o r based s o f t w a r e t o BASIC.
HP-ATS systems o p e r a t i n g i n RTE-IV a r e now c o m p a t i b l e w i t h DS11000 D i s t r i b u t e d
2)
Customers o r d e r i n g a f u l l y c o n f i g u r e d HP-ATS system ( w i t h 93284A
System Software.
C o n f i g u r a t i o n l S y s t e m T e s t S e r v i c e ) , may a l s o o r d e r DS11000 and have i t i n c l u d e d i n
t h e c o n f i g u r e d s o f t w a r e as f o l l o w s :
91740B D i s t r i b u t e d System/1000
-020 Software on M i n i - C a r t r i d g e
12771A S e r i a l I n t e r f a c e K i t ( o t h e r k i t s o p t i o n a l )
The above may be e n t e r e d on Worksheet 9 o f t h e HP-ATS C o n f i g u r a t i o n Guide and a r e
s u b j e c t t o HP 93282A C o n s o l i d a t i o n S e r v i c e . No m a t e r i a l o r e n g i n e e r i n g u n i t s a r e
r e q u i r e d f o r HP 93283A Racking and Cab1 i n g S e r v i c e . One HP 93285A E n g i n e e r i n g
U n i t i s r e q u i r e d f o r HP 93284A C o n f i g u r a t i o n / S y s t e m T e s t S e r v i c e .
The DS11000 s o f t w a r e - f i r m w a r e w i l l be c o n f i g u r e d and d e l i v e r e d w i t h t h e HP-ATS
system. S p e c i f i c t e s t i n g (SFT) o r d e m o n s t r a t i o n o f DS/1000 i s n o t i n c l u d e d . A
f a c t o r y q u o t e i s r e q u i r e d f o r any customer d e s i r e d t e s t s o r d e m o n s t r a t i o n s .
Customers who w i s h t o c o n f i g u r e t h e i r own s o f t w a r e may o r d e r DS11000 s e p a r a t e l y
f r o m t h e HP-ATS system i n t h e normal manner. A l t e r n a t e l y t h e y may o r d e r i t f o r
Consolidation Service only, without ConfigurationlSystem t e s t service.
FOR HP INTERNAL USE ONLY
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
OF MICRoWAVE ATE
By:
-
8542C AUTOMATIC NETWORK ANALYZER
8589C AUTOMATIC SPECTRUM ANALYZER
Dawson Mabey
You a r e n o d o u b t i n t e r e s t e d i n t h e p l a n s r e g a r d i n g absolescence of t h e 8500 s e r i e s
microwave L e s t e r s s i n c e any computerized au t o m a t i c mi crowave t e s t e r s s o l d a f t e r
8500 s e r i e s obsolescence must be c o n f i g u r e d as an ATS.
(As y o u may know t h e Santa
Rosa D i v i s i o n w i l l announce 3 new Spectrum A n a l y z e r i n t h e n e a r f u t u r e s u i t a b l e f o r
ATS use.) A l s o DSD and SRD arl. p r e s e n t l y c o n v e r t i n g t h e 8409 t o a system 1000
c o n t r o l 1e r .
DSD p l a n s Lo d i s c o n t i n u e t h e m a n u f a c t u r e of t h e HP 8542B/C A u t o m a t i c Network
A n a l y z e r (ANA) and t h e HP 85;30B/C A u t o m a t i c Spectrum A n a l y z e r (ASA) s h o r t l y .
S p e c i f i c a l l y , H e w l e t t - P a c k a r d w i 11 b e g i n t h e l a s t phase o f o u r p r o d u c t l i f e c y c l e
f o r t h e s e p r o d u c t s e f f e c t i v e 1 November 1978. T h i s means t h e systems and r e l a t e d
p r o d u c t s a r e no l o n g e r m a n ~ f ~ ~ c t u reex dc e p t as needed t o s a t i s f y o r d e r s p r i o r t o
1 November. H e w l e t t - P a c k a r d w i l l c o n t i n u e t o s u p p o r t t h e systems w i t h r e p a i r
s e r v i c e s and r e p l a c e m e n t p a r t s f o r f i v e y e a r s f r o m t h i s d a t e . A f t e r f i v e y e a r s ,
s u p p o r t w i 11 be on a b e s t ef-'ort b a s i s .
You s h o u l d a l s o n o t e t h a t c e r t a i n r e l a t e d p r o d u c t s a r e u n i q u e t o t h e s e systems and
w i l l a l s o n~ol o n g e r be a v a i l a b l e .
I n t h e p a s t , t h e s e p r o d u c t s have been purchased
s e p a r a t e l y f o r u s e as spares i n s u p p o r t of e x i s t i n g systems. Here i s a l i s t of
these parts:
Network A n a l y z t ? r I n t e r f a c e
Aux. D e t e c t o r S e c t i o n
G r a p h i c s Console
Comb. G e n e r a t o r
System C o n t r o l U n i t
I F Section
I n t e r f a c e U n i t Graphics
F i e l d Add-ons
D i s p l a y Generator
Support K i t
C o n t r o l Panel
Support K i t
Input Control llni t
Support
I F Section
Cal K i t
RF/MW S e c t i o n
Cal K i t
Source C o n t r o l U n i t
Cal K i t
Frequence Reference
Cal K i t
Preselector/Preamp
Cal K i t
P r e s e l ector/Preamp
OPNODE
P r e s e l ector/Preamp
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
FOR IINUERNAL USE ONLY
Some o f t h e s e i t e m s w i l l c o n t i n u e t o be a v a i l a b l e e l s e w h e r e . F o r example, customers
who r e q u i r e t h e above c a l i b r a t i o n k i t s s h o u l d be d i r e c t e d t o an a1 t e r n a t e vendor,
such as:
Maury Microwave C o r p o r a t i on
8610 Helms Avenue
Cucamonga, CA 91730
( 7 1 4 ) 987-4715
Maury has been m a n u f a c t u r i n g c a l i b r a t i o n k i t s f o r use w i t h HP 8 5 4 0 - s e r i e s A u t o m a t i c
Network A n a l y z e r systems f o r many y e a r s . Your customer need o n l y p r o v i d e t h e HP
model number f o r t h e k i t d e s i r e d ( o r t h e HP p a r t number i f a s p e c i f i c d e v i c e i s
d e s i r e d ) and Maury w i l l t r a n s l a t e i t t o t h e i r number.
The l a s t u s e r t r a i n i n g c o u r s e s w i l l be h e l d a t H e w l e t t - P a c k a r d Data Systems D i v i s i o n
i n O c t o b e r . B o t h t h e HP 92720A ASA and HP 92722A TODS-I11 c o u r s e s w i l l be h e l d .
F u t u r e m a i n t e n a n c e t r a i n i n g i s n o t p l a n n e d a t p r e s e n t , b u t c o u l d be s c h e d u l e d if
s u f f i c i e n t demand i s p r e s e n t .
I n r e g a r d t o t h e ANAIASA s o f t w a r e , i t i s o u r i n t e n t t o make t h i s s o f t w a r e a v a i l a b l e
t o t h e Microwave Systems u s e r ' s g r o u p once t h e p r o d u c t s have e n t e r e d t h e l a s t phase
of t h e i r p r o d u c t l i f e c y c l e ( a f t e r 1 November). As has been o u r p o l i c y i n t h e p a s t ,
t h e s o f t w a r e w i l l be p r o v i d e d a t no charge, and w i t h o u t r e s t r i c t i o n .
HOW TO CHOOSE SWITCH CARD M I X FOR A MODULAR SWITCH???
By:
Andy M i l l s
One o f t h e q u e s t i o n s t h a t c o n s t a n t l y comes up i s :
a recomnended s w i t c h c a r d s e l e c t i o n !
What do I t e l l my c u s t o m e r a b o u t
T h e r e i s o b v i o u s l y no p a t answer t o t h i s q u e s t i o n because i t i s so h i g h l y dependent
F o r s t a r t e r s , however, t h i s a r t i c l e s u g g e s t s
on a c u s t o m e r ' s p a r t i c u l a r a p p l i c a t i o n .
p o s s i b l e s w i t c h c h o i c e s w h i c h a r e t y p i c a l o f w h a t o t h e r s have f o u n d s u i t a b l e . T h i s
c h a r t summarizes o u r 9510 s w i t c h s a l e s and c u r r e n t s a l e s o f 9411 m o d u l a r s w i t c h c a r d s :
9510 S w i t c h T y p i c a l C o n f i g u r a t i o n
% of S w i t c h Cards S o l d
100
16
32
1x16
Volume 3, Number 21. September 15, 1978
6
3 W i r e Channels
General Purpose R e l a y s
Reed R e l a y s
4 Wire D i s t r i b u t i o n
o@ji
,CsdLkj [ & ] ~ J ' E ~ ~ N
flJ:$E
,,~L
Based on t h e above and some " e d u c a t e d m o d i f i c a t i o n " t h e f o l l o w i n g c o n f i g u r a t i o n
c a n be deduced.
7-94120A
5-94120B
1-94120C
1-94120D
2-94120E
128
90
27
48
4
3 w i r e channels
G e n e r a l Purpose R e l a y s SPDT
Reed R e l a y s
NPN T r a n s i s t o r o u t p u t s
1x6 4 w i r e d i s t r i b u t i o n
T h i s c o n f i g u r a t i o n s e l e c t i c n conforms w i t h p r e v i o u s e x p e r i e n c e and l e a v e s y o u r
customer w i t h 9 c a r d s l o t s f o r s p a r e s , c u s t o m i z i n g and f u t u r e expansion.
a
Remember - we a r e n o t recommending t h i s as a s o l u t i o n t o any p a r t i c u l a r j o b , b u t
as a g e n e r a l p u r p o s e answer t o a customer who i s n o t s u r e what he wants
GOOD LUCK! ! !
DO YOU NEED A ROVING 2240A DEMO?
By:
Dave K l i n e
I f y o u r 2240 f i e l d demo u n i t s a r e n ' t r e a d i l y a v a i l a b l e , keep i n m i n d DSD has a
r o v i n g demo a v a i 1 a b l e t o y o u f o r 1 o r 2 week l o a n s . The Dayton o f f i c e borrowed
i t r e c e n t l y and showed i t t o 310 p e o p l e , r e s u l t i n g i n q u o t a t i o n s f o r 30 u n i t s .
E x p e r i e n c e shows demo's h e l p s e l l 2 2 4 0 1 s , and a s p a r e u n i t i s a v a i l a b l e t o y o u
when y o u r own r e g i o n a l demos a r e busy e l s e w h e r e . C o n t a c t Dave Hannebrink.
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
7
FOR UNIUERNAL USE ONLY
I
2649 DTD Sales Training
By T~rnHarteyjDTD
In November, we are organizing the very flrst dedicated
2649 sales tralr~~rlg
course This course, to be held on
November 20 21 and 22 I S being organized at the request of the Rockv~llesales staff Thls week was chosen
for the convenlence of ESR slnce they requested the class
and will be here the prevous week for their reg~onal
seminar
I
that your presence In class pre-supposes your cornmltment
to the required pre-study, tlme allocation and interest in
making the class beneficial to you.
and other
DTD I S comm~ttedto help our termlnal spec~al~sts
FE s to sell DTD OEM We would like for you to share that
cornmltment by letting us know about your Interest In such a
program
So, let's hear from you ASAP1
SELL OEM!!!
We plan to keep the class size down to ten people There
are currently four openlrlgs wtth prlorlty going to ESR The
class wlll follow the 2649 customer format with spec~al
emphas~son application conf~gurat~on,gotcha s and
capablllt~es Currently the customer class flts Into f~vedays
and stufflng most of that materral Into three days I S no easy
task
GSA Contract for Terminals
By B111 Swift DTD
The learning process will be easler ~f those people taklng
the class have some previous assembly language programmlng experience espec~ally8080, thoroughly study the
2645 manuals and user tape and read the 2649A 13290A
Reference Manual We will try to mlnlmlze the technical
jargon but to totally eliminate ~twould be ~mposs~ble
The
partlclpants w~llbe expected to do REAL HOMEWORK
STAY OFF THE PHONES and spend all day every day In
class I
Effective August 18 GSAIADTS accepted HP's proposal to
put HP 264X CRT term~nalsand HP 263X prlntlng terminals
on the GSA Class 70 Schedule wlth up to 21% d~scounts
The discounts are structured In three levels The base
dlscount IS 13% but by ordering Optlon A andlor B your
customer can qual~fyfor a full 21% d~scount
Optlon A lncrease d~scounts3% by deletlng the requlrement for standard of performance and Irquldated damages
Option B lncrease discount 5% by delet~nginstallat~on
and 90-day on-s~tesupport and subst~tute
30-day return to HP warranty
We have had some salespeople take the regular 2649
customer class wlth m~xedsuccess These classes are
oriented toward the customers appl~cat~ons
and problems
whlch means that we haven t been able to spend a great
deal of time w~thour own people Hopefully, w~thonly salespeople In class, we will be able to address some of your
speclflc problems If we are successful wlth thls class, we
classes at later dates
will offer add~t~onal
The GSA contract number is GS-00C-01224 and will be
valid through the end of September This IS a great
opportunity to plck up some add~t~onal
business from your
U.S. Government customers before the f~scalyear ends.
Keep in mlnd, however, that a new contract number w ~ l l
be asslgned for FY'79
We would apprec~atehearing from those of you who are
Interested in taking the 2649 class. Any suggestions concernlng the content of the course which would help us meet
your needs would be welcome. Please keep in mind that
the 2649 course by ~ t svery nature is quite techn~caland
Volume 3 Number 21, September 15, 1978
GOOD SELLING!
8
F o ~ 2~ N ~ J ' E L ~ N A L
F2
By: Eric GrandjeanlDTD
' c & p 5 ~' c & p 5 u 0 ~
Not unrelated to summertime activities, we have decided to
skip the September edition of the DTD Price Guide and
concentrate on the October edition.
dumps graphics to the printer
If an alphanumeric dump is all that is needed, simply
"copy" from the display to the alternate 110 device.
New Things From DTD in September
Example:
13296A Opt. 048 - 2648A Graphic Dump. When ordering
this option with the HF'-IB interface, you will get a ROM
for your 2648A which will allow graphic dump and restore
to and from cartridge, ,AND graphic dump on tip-IB device
7245A with Option 001
F3
copies alphanumeric from display to printer
Now that you know how to dump graphics memory, you
might be interested in how to get the IMAGE informat~on
from tape to the display. First of all select the desired
drawing mode using the 'c*m (parameter) A command.
(Set mode IS the default condition.) Then set up the data
path. To accomplish the restoration, just "MARK FILE"
on the "INSERT CHAR". The escape code to do this is
E c & p 5 u 5 ~Again,
.
a soft key will probably make your life
easier.
HP-IB on the 2648
By: Wend; BrubakerIDTD
You have all been waiting for raster dump capability on
the HP 2648. Well, wait no longer - it's here! As of
September lst, the HP-IB interface kit has a no-charge
option to give your customers HP-IB suppor:. Just order a
13296A with Option 0.48. (Can you guess how we came up
with the option number?)
The new ROM supplied by Option 048 will supercede one of
the ROM's in the Device Support Firmware. For your future
customers, ordering the 2648A with Device Support Firmware, the 13261A-003 or Option -007, after September 1,
the new ROM will be included automatically. You asked for
it, and you got it, at no charge!!
Let's look at what this new enhancement wi I provide for
you and your customers. First of all, the 2648 will be able
to dump the total graphics IMAGE memory to tape or
compatible HP-IB printer. It will also copy alphanumer~c
text on HP-IB printers from normal display rnemory. The
HP 7245-001 PrinteriPlotter is the only hardcopy device
today that can handle both the raster dump and the alphanumeric copy.
To actually do the graphics dump, the user must first
set up the data path from the display to the destination
device using the gold key or escape code:;. To initiate
the actual dump, "RE.WINDNthe alternate liCl devlce, which
is specified by hitting "INSERT CHAR". The escape
sequences could be put into a soft key.
L
Ec&p3S5dF
If you are not already on the CSG Database, be certain
to fill out the Information Change Notification card whic'n
appeared on the back cover of the last issue: of the
CS Newsletter.
0
L
New From DTD in September
I
Example:
using complement mode dumps left tape to display
The final combination is going from tape to printer. Let's
just look at an example:
I
Example:
F5
L
Ec&pls5dF
copies a file from the left tape to the printer
The HP-IB alternate 110 driver assumes that the printer has
an address of 6. Be certain to set up your equipment
accordingly.
You might be wondering why the key strokes and escape
sequences used to invoke a graphics dump or restore an
IMAGE are cryptic. With the use of soft keys, any confusion can be eliminated. The HP-IB driver was slipped lnto
a few vacant bytes of code and the keyboard for the 2648
has already been established so no new keys can be
added.
Example:
F,
L
dumps graphics to left tape
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
Now you have a reason to call your existing customers and
sell them a printer and maybe even another term~nal!
Dig-i-tize
By: Eric GrandjeaniDTD
I
"DIGITIZE, verb, trans
-
To put (as data) into digital notation"
I
I
I
In the July 15th issue of the CS Newsletter, we briefly referred to the newly-~ntroducedHP 9874A [fantastic]
digitizer.
To add excitement and some credibility to the article. as well as to give you an opportunity to demonstrate how it's done, we
would l~keto show you a working sample of a d~gitiztngprogram. (You could also call it a driver.)
Th~sshort (16 Ilne) program demonstrates the fundamental d ~ g ~ t ~ zcapabil~ty
~ng
of the 2647AJ9874A The models dig~t~zed
data will be read Into the 2647A lntell~gentGraph~csTerm~nalalphanumeric memory and be d~splayedIn alphanumer~c
mode It w~llalso be translated Into AGL graph~cvectors and displayed on the screen In graph~cmode You can always
~ n h ~ the
b ~ talphanumeric display ~f you only w~shto see the graph~crepresentation or Inversely
usage of either 2647A and or 9874A would of course be possible given the necessary in-depth knowledge
More soph~st~cated
We thought that glvlng you a rud~mentaryIdea of graphic dlg~t~zlng
would be
of each mach~ne'sadvanced capab~l~t~es
to talk about ~t and even show ~t ~f necessary
appropnate at this ttme and would put you In a better pos~t~on
Please remember that the 9874A has not been fully tested on the 2647A by DTD, and that we are not cla~mingfull subsystem
capabiltty at this t~me.
This sample (demo) program which was k~ndlycontributed by our lab, uses an HP-I6 address of 16 binarv. It will run on
~ a l demo level "f~rmware" I f you want continudus mode rather than single polnt mode, replace SG In lhne
your ~ n ~ t2647A
30 by CN
Please be adv~sedagan that a certain number of BASIC commands and funct~onswere not included but are fully safe to use
In your lnltial demo-level flrmware We will update this f~rmwareautomat~callyIn the next few weeks as we release newer and
flrmer versions and f~nallygo to ROM-based Main F~rmware
* * *
P
S
If you want to dig deeper into the subject of digitizing please get hold of The excellent 9874A Field Training Manual
PPOGPAM TO D I G I T I Z E PDIt{TS,CHECK STkTUS,AND
f i I SPLAY COOPfiI NATES ANE VECTOPS ON 2547A
...........................................
COMMENTS ( N o t p a r t o f p r o g r a m )
..............................
f?l
10 PLDTP :SETAP ( 1 . 2 9 ) : S C A L E (0,17400,0,13500)..Inlt.AGL a n d s c a l e s c r e e n s p a c e
20 ASSIGN "H#4#16" TO # I
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .L. l e f l n e 9 8 7 4 4 H P I B a d d r e s s t o 1 6
30 PPINT #1;"IN;SG"
...........................I n l t l a l l z e s l n g l e p o l n t mode
40 PPINT I 1 ; " L B ,
II
D l s p l a v "go" o n 9874A
5 0 PPINT t l :"ED 3 , 2 4 6 : ED 4,?5211
50 P P I t i T # l ; " O S "
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I n l t l a t e s t a t u s f r o m 9874A
70 PEAD # I ; A $
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .P e a d s t a t u s f o r "point r e a d y "
90 GOSUB 1 4 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Llecode s t a t u s b y t e
90 I F 1 0 4 THEN 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .I f 1 = 4 , d l g l t l : e d p o l n t 1s r e a d v
1 0 0 F P I t i T t l ;"Ofl"
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .O u t p u t d a t a
I
A
1
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pead d a t a
120 FLnT ( X , ? )
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .F l o t d a t a
130 GOTO 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L o o p
1 3 0 I=VAL(AB)
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. S u b r o u t e t o decode s t a t u s
150 1 = 1 MOP i
200 PETUPN
....................
-
Volume 3, Number 21. September 15, 1978
10
;,&]-;<<
[[$JLpS:i;$:LuL 8jjJzjE
0/~8',z;L7
1
,
L
L
I
1
I,
5
i
2647A Used as a System Boot Loader
By: Michael TarensIDTD
Potential Customer:
"I have a computer that needs to be boot loaded from a paper tape. This procedure not only takes a considerable
amount of time, but the paper tape reader i:; unreliable in some situations and also does not meet certain regulatory
safety requirements in my particular applicati~n.I also need to display graphic information once my CPU is up and running
Does HP have a solution that would satisfy my needs?"
HP Sales Rep:
"1 am glad you asked me that question. HP can actually provide you with a number of alternate solutions to solve your
problems. It appears to me, though, that you actually require a one-product solution that will allow you to boot load
your CPU and then interact with it as a graphics display terminal once the CPU is on-line. Our Data Terminals Division has
just come out with such a product."
Potential Customer:
"Is that really true? One product that will provide me with solutions to all the concerns I related to you?"
HP Sales Rep:
Potential Customer:
"What is it?"
HP Sales Rep:
"The product is a 2647A, which is an Intelligent Graphics Terminal. It not only would act as a paper tape emulator to boot
load your CPU from its own cartridge tape but it would then allow you to pass graphic information back to the 2647A fdr
visual display. Additionally, you would have the capability of programming some of the more mundane tasks on the 2647A in
the BASIC language, thus allowing your CPU to be used for more time-critical processing. Finally, the 2647A would meet
your reliability and safety requirements."
Potential Customer:
"That sounds fantastic! But how difficult w ~ u l dit be to program the 2647A with the boot loader program? I really don't
have the expertise to code up a sophisticated program."
HP Sales Rep:
"I am sure it is not a difficult task. Let me work on it tonight and come back tomorrow to demo it."
•
--NEXT DAY --HP Sales Rep:
"- - - and this is the program I wrote. It is actually only 11 statements long. See how easy it is to boot up your CPU?"
(CPU comes on-line.)
I
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
11
FOR NNT'ERh!AL L!EE
~~~~
Customer: (No longer "potential")
"This definitely sat~sf~es
my needs! I am very Impressed, not only with the product, but in the ease w~thwhich you solved my
dllemma How do I go about order~ngsome of your 2647's7"
-
(Thls 1s a flct~onalre-enactment of a real sales situation The actual ,Droaram 1s llsted here The 2647A was requlred to pass four
characters at a tlme upon receipt of a DCI from the CPU. Please contact me ~f you have questions or a similar
applicat~on.)
Sell Graphics and Intelligence!
264763 USED AS A CPU PULIT L0ADE:H
5 DIM P $ [ ~ ~ I ~ K j ]
t t t SET P $ 7'0 A MAX LENGTH OF 255 CHARACTERS t t t
1 0 GE'TDCM ON
t t * GET I>A'T'ACUMH LI:NEZ FOH B A S I C
*tt
2 0 ASSIGN " R " 'TO # i
ttf ASSIGN I1IGkI'I' TAPE TO LUGI:(:AL U N I T 1.
tt#
3 0 UN END k i GO'T'O i 3 O
t t t A'T END OF F I L E !;('
7'(I
I 130
;$.'tt
4 0 I F ' NO'T GI.ITDCM(A'G) 'T'I.iEN 4 0
t t t XI::' DA'T'ACOMM I S NOT AVAIL..ABL.E, TRY A G A I N * t f
50 11- A % <>(:l-lR$(17> 'TI-IE1:N 4 0
t t * ]:I::' AS =: DC:I
CUN'l'INUE
El.-SE CI.iEO:I< A G A I N * * t
6 0 RE:M D C I HAS PEEN I"C)IJND, SEND CllJT 'THE 4 EY'TES
7 0 F' H 1:::: j, 7' O 4
* t t S1i:T LIP LOOI:' I:'ClI? SE:NDTNG 4 CI-IARACTERS
ttl
80 I F F$:::"" TIiEN L.]'N[JljT # i ; B $ ; GfJ'1.O 8 0
t t t 1:I::' B$ TS NlJLL, R1::AD NEX'I' RECClRD
ttt
YO IF: PLI'T'DC:M(PB)<I 'Tlllii:N 90
t t t SE1:ND CIIAHAC'TER DOWN I)R'I'ACOiYM
t*#
t t t I F : NOT SUC:CESSF:'UL-, SEND AEA:[N
t*t
1 0 0 11:; L E N ( Eft; ).:TtjEN
I
Erl;~:"" E:I.-SE B:b-E$ [ 2 , L.,EN ( B$ >1
t t t FI;
LAST I':IIARACTER,
S E : ' ~F{J; T O NUI-It**
,
,
t t t C:(INl'INUE L001:)
1 2 0 GOT0 4 0
t t t 4'T'l-I CHAHAC'I'ER HAS PEEN SENT,
t t t HE:'T'LIRN AND CHEiCK FOR DATACCIMM AND DC;1
1.30 PRIN'T' "ENI) OF F'1L.E .--. t'ROGRAM ENI>S, , , , , , ,
Volume 3,Number 21 September 15, 1978
12
#I#*
ttt
ttt
. , . , . , , . :,
:zo$ju
, , , , ,
.,,
~ ] ] r ~ u USE
~ i V ONLLV
~ ~
FCD Products Group Organization
By: J h CarisoniFCD
The FCD Product Group is organized into three major areas - the HP 250, Peripherals, and New Products
HP 250 Product Management consists of a tiree-man team with team members specializing in systems software and
data communications. In addition, each member of the team can backup other areas and answer general questions
on the HP 250. Peripherals and new products are currently staffed as one-man efforts.
Product Marketing Manager
I
Jim Carlson
Carolyn Gray
I
I
I
HP 250 TEAM
Dick Hanson
1
1
1 DATA COMMUNICAI-IONS 1
I
&
TERMINALS
Terry Anna
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
I
I
I
PERIPHERALS
1
I
Spence Ure
I
I
r
NEW PRODUCTS
I
Kerry i i e
I
Dick Hanson is the HP 250 Product Manager and heads up
the HP 250 team. He has been with FCD for almost 2 years,
initially as peripherals product manager and then as the
9896 product manager. He also has better than eight years'
selling experience - four with HP as a calculator FE
and four with CDC. Prior to CDC, Dick was with IBM in their
CE organization.
Ken P~kehas the responslbil~tyfor future ma~nframeproducts
from FCD He jolned FCD about a year ago after recelvlng
h ~ sMBA degree Prlor to golng back to school, he was
managlng an emlsslons testlng center for Ford Motor
Company uslng Xerox (XDS) computers Slnce jo~nlngHP,
Kerry was a product manager for the HP 250 and IS
currently collect~ng~nformat~on
on OEM competitors and new
markets for the HP 250
Since the Fort Collins Division does not have a sales support
group per se, you need to know who to call when you
have a question. Product questions should be directed to the
appropriate product manager; Software Bugs and suspected
software problems should be directed to Mike Chonle's
group wh~chprov~desSE training and support. Service
questions go to Jlrn Eller In John Forrnan's CE group;
and OEM questions or factory visits are handled by Ron
Vernon who IS in charge of the FCD OEM program.
Dick is responsible for the overall HP 250 program Including
promotions, product enhancements, NPT Tours, and
general product planning.
Terry Anna joined FCD this May and brings fve years'
experience as a computer SE In Denver. Terry has an
MSEE, and prior to joining HP he worked as a computer
R & D eqgineer. Terry handles all Terminals and Data
Commun~cationproducts on the HP 250. Call Terry to speak
about RS-232 and ENQ-ACK.
Phil Hutchlnson recently joined HP and is worklng on hls
Master's degree in lnformat~onSystems at CSU. He handles
for BASIC,
HP 250 on-line support and has respons~b~lity
IMAGE, QUERY, FORMS, and REPORT WRITER. Phil IS
also acting as Librar~anfor the HP 250 User Contributed
Library. Send your floppies to Phrl.
In the peripherals area, Spence Ure takes care of the 9871
printer (MASH) and the 9885 flexible disc dr~ve.These
peripherals are widely used on calculator products so he
spends much of his t~meon the telephone with SF06 types.
Spence has a Mechanical Eng~neeringdegree and eleven
years' experience as an HP mechanical designer He IS the
FCD marketing author~tyon 112 and 1 Mbyte flexible disc
drives and media. Contact Spence for your floppy disc
needs.
Volume 3 , Number 21 September 1 5 . 1978
14
Type of Question
Contact
Extension
Product Info, Product
Policy Enhancements,
successes, problems.
Dick Hanson - HP 250
Phil Hutchinson - O.S.
Terry Anna -Datacomm
2095
2105
2070
Spence Ure - 9871
9885
2100
Technical O.S.
Questions
Bug Reports
Mike Chonle
2735
Hardware Support
Questions
John Forman
Jack Gregg
Jim Eller
2140
2145
2150
OEM Related
Questions
Plant Visits
Ron Vernon
2125
Training Courses and
Schedules
Janet Beyers
2120
Gretchen Snowden
2625
MTSl3000 Applications
By: E d TurneriGSD
What do you do? Do you come back in two months? Do you
spend your vacation at home painting the house?
Customer satisfaction with a new product like MTSi3000
depends not only on the product but also on t7e anticipated
application. Multipoir~tterminals and point-to-point terminals
do not work in the same manner. Accordingly, some
applications may be more appropriate for use with the ATC
while others may operate better in the MTS environment.
Now, you've got a prospect who wants to buy from you, but
he is no longer sure he can afford it. Wouldn't you like to be
able to convince the president that not only can he pay for
the system but, the advantaaes of the terminal oriented
HP 3000 are even more important if his busine
for the worse?
The factory. support
team can help you guide your
. .
prospective customers and their systemdesigners to
choose the most appropriate method to implement their
applications.
Old Justification: No Sale
-
Let's continue this scenario:
Please ask your local Systems Engineer to call us in factory
support during your early proposal conversations with the
customer. We'd appreciate the opportunity to help your
customer find the best solution. A happy customer means
both repeat business and reduced local support expense!
1
Buy Now
- You Can't Afford to Wait
But suddenly growth is less certain and the sale is stalled.
So far, you've been selling to the president's expectations
of future growth. Figure I shows the growth of a "typical"
By: Greg NortonlGSD
Some Thoughts on Selling to a Reluctant Prospect
Ready for the Close
I
You've probablv been tellina the president, the DP
manager, and the users about the'features and advantages
of on-line data processing: fast response, flexibility, happier
users, the ease of adding new applications, and how they
will be able to maintain control as they grow. The president
saw that, as his company expanded, he could realize
significant cost savings by going on-line with the HP 3000
as well as improve the "quality" of his DP operations. 'They
probably had justified the system based mostly on cost
avoidance: the clerks they won't have to hire, the office
space they won't have to rent, the time managers won't have
to spend finding information, etc. They are convinced that the
HP 3000 is a good investment - if they grow.
...
Suppose you make a call on one of your prcspects -the one
e System
you had spent four months convincing to r e ~ ~ l a chis
3 with an HP 3000, the one you had planned to close this
month, the one whose commission was going to pay for your
vacation -and the DP manager looks unhappy and says to
you: "You know, we really like your machine, and we want to
do business with you, but . . . ." When was the last time this
happened to you?
I
Time
So you ask him "Why?" and he says, "We1 , the economy is
uncertain and our market doesn't look as good as we
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
Figure I. Corporate Growth Cycle
15
FOR KNTERNAL USE ONLY
I
company; the pres~denthad thought he was at "A", in the
middle of a long period of growth. The company may, in fact,
still be a "A" but now the president thinks ~t m~ghtbe
approaching "B" when sales w11lturn down, and you have
to sell to his concerns. Show him how the HP 3000 can help
during a downturn and subsequent recovery
The President's Concerns:
A company worrres more about cash when sales fall off than
at any other tlme Sales and profits are down I f profits drop to
nothrng or ~f the frrm begins to lose money cash stops
flowlng In and starts flowlng out When cash runs out the flrm
can borrow but eventually the banks will refuse to lend any
more If the company runs out of cash entrrely and cannot pay
~tsb~llsor meet the payroll ~t w~llbe forced Into bankruptcy
By purchas~nga new computer your prospects president
l tie~ngup a b ~ chunk
g
of h ~ cash
s
as well as
knows he w ~ lbe
lncurrlng conversron costs Even ~f he leases, he acqulres a
The
long term commitment whlch reduces h ~ sflex~b~lity
pres~dentrs uncertain about the future and feels he cannot
afford the risk You have to turn him around
I
I
I
New Situation, New Justification:
How the HP 3000 fits:
How long does this take? Suppose shipping sends papers
to Order Processing at the end of the day OP forwards
them to Account~ngat the end of the next day Key Punchlng
takes another day then you wait for the weekly bill~ngrun
l sent out the
on the computer By the tlme the b ~ l IS
receivable 1s already five or six days old1
Accounts Receivable:
When your prospect ships a product, he records a sale on
his books, but he is not paid by his customer rmmed~ately.
Sales which have been sh~ppedbut not paid for are called
accounts receivable. An unpaid bill is really a loan to a
customer: he has the product, you've already paid to build it
(bought the parts and paid the people), and he has not p a ~ d
you. He has the cash and you have an account rece~vable.
What you'd really like IS to be paid.
What ~f your prospect has a term~nalin the shipplng department? By enter~ngthe sh~pplnginformat~onon-l~ne,the
order processing, accounts rece~vableand billlng files
could be updated lmmed~atelyand the pr~ntedlnvolce
could go out the next day or maybe even with the sh~pmentl Thls alone could reduce the collect~onper~odby four
or flve days (assum~ngcustomers, on the average, Walt a
set amount of tlme after receipt of the bill before ma~ling
the check) as well as reduce the clerlcal expense As we
n
1s over
saw above four days for our $10 m ~ l l ~ ocompany
$100K, for a $50 milllon company, t h ~ s1s $500KI
How much money does your prospect have tied up In
accounts receivable? If ~t is a publicly held company, you
can find it in the annual report. In any event, you can bet
your commission the controller knows! Figure out his
collection period in days. This 1s accounts rece~vable
drvided by annual sales, t~mesdays in a year:
Furthermore, by keeplng track of the age of the receivables,
it is easy to know whlch customers are late and should
be pressured for payment. Using QUERY ~t is s~mpleto
get a report of all outstanding b~llssent before a certaln
date.
x 365 = Collection Period
Collection period is the average time between shipment and
receipt of payment.
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
million in accounts rece~vable( Ex $10 million) or
365
$26 000 for each day ($1 6 mrll~on60 days) lnc~dentally
this 1s the f~rms average dally s h ~ p p ~ nrate,
g assumlng he
shlps seven days a week For every day th~s$10 m ~ l l ~ o n
firm shortens its collect~onper~od~t gets $26 000 ~t can
Invest In productive assets, or $26 000 ~t does not have to
borrow to get through the downturn If the firm has $20
mllllon In annual sales, the savlngs IS $52,000 Big bucks1
What does your prospect do now? Ask h ~ m He'll
!
probably
tell you that the shlpplng department forwards coples of the
shipping papers to Order Processing where the order 1s
recorded as sh~pped,and then forwarded to accounting.
Account~ngrecords it as an account rece~vableand notifres
billing. Billing prepares a bill and mails ~t If this 1s automated, account~nghas the information key punched and run
through the computer for accounts receivable updating and
bill print~ng.
I'm golng to talk about two areas of a business where the HP
3000 can generate sign~f~cant
CASH savings Accounts
Recervable and Inventory. How much cash? In f~scalyear
1974, when we had sales of $880 million, Hewlett-Packard
freed up over $100 m~llionby improved management of
of our
accounts receivable and Inventory. That was one-s~xth
total corporate assets. Let's look at how thls can apply to your
prospect.
Dunn and Bradstreet Inc. publishes a list of "Key Business
Ratios" which includes collection periods for various indus-
A $10 mllllon flrm w ~ t ha 60-day collection per~odhas $ 1 6
Okay, so reduclng accounts rece~vablehelps your prospect's cash positlon What does th~smean to you7Show h ~ m
how putting his shrpplng and blllrng procedures on-l~neon
the HP 3000 can help hlm do ~t
As mentroned before, be~ngthe good salesman that you are,
you have already succeeded in getting this prospect to want
to buy from you. But he justifled the purchase based on future
growth and qual~tatrvefactors. Now the future doesn't look so
good.
A/R
Sales
trles Typical manufacturers have collect~onper~odswh~ch
range from 20 days to 90 days Wholesalers and distr~butors range from 10 to 50 days For example, of the 57
flrms manufacturlng office computing and account~ng
mach~nesthe average collect~onper~odis 78 days Among
the 81 firms manufactur~ngelectronic components and
assembiles the average 1s 56 days Hewlett-Packard s IS
73 days (1977 annual report) ev~dentlyour customers don t
always pay on t~mel(Remember, we quote Net 3 0 )
I
16
An office product distr~butorin Denver put rts order processingibilling on the HP 3000 and cut the time to process
~2'7
3Ly>
; j [JN7fEl&j)JAL~
F
;-
$3)NrL)7
As a place to start, this company ordered all three
MFGl3000 products with the training and consulting services that are defined for each product. This adds up to:
an order (including inventory updating and billing) from
hours to less than three minutes. This means that the invoice
typically goes with the shipment, which also sa.ves the cost
of mailing. Overall, they have reduced their collection period
by 10 days from 48 days to 38 days. We can't guarantee
these results for every customer, but get your prospect
in touch with reference accounts in your area - have
them show him what can be done with the h P 3000.
1 Training course and
3 Consulting days
per product
One major concern I had about installing an application
product was the amount of extra support that might be
required to help the customer be successful. The company
has been in a post-implementation phase for about two
months now, and I can happily say that they required
no more support than is recommended.
As I mentioned before, in 1974, Hewlett-Packard raised
over $100 million by reducing accounts receivable and
inventory. We were about to raise the $100 million through
long term debt, but Bill and Dave decided that by better
managing our "Business Basics" we could raise the cash
internally. We cut our collection period from 102 days to
79 days - equivalent to $57 million.
The Implementation Process
Next issue, we'll find out what you're going l o be able to
show Reluctant Ralph, the president, about improving
inventories with the HP 3000.
The implementation process at this company broke down
into the four major steps I had come to expect from my
specialist training.
First, the company was eager to get started, so once they
ordered their HP 3000 and MFGl3000 in early April, they
began using our demo system to begin loading their EDC
database. Even before their system arrived, they were able
to begin verifying their material lists and product structures.
GOOD SELLING!
Customer Reference Database
By: Barry KlaaslGSD
Second, I began weekly visits as part of the 9 days of
implementation consulting that they had purchased. (By the
way, the company is located over 150 miles from my office.)
On the first of these visits, their implementation team and I
established an overall plan with schedules for major
milestones. On subsequent visits, we reviewed progress
with the plant manager who was spearheading the manufacturing implementation. I also helped the company users
to learn about the system on these visits. After the first
five visits, the frequency has fallen off to one visit every 2-3
weeks as their need for consulting has diminished.
As you've noticed when you ask us for references like
"Do we have any customers in the clothing manufacturing
business where the primary application of the HP 3000 is
inventroy control and where we replaced ar- IBM Sl3 or
1130?" there is a slight pause and usually an immediate
answer. The pause a.llows your GSD Sales Development
Engineer enough time to launch a QUERY F n d and Report
request and get a reply. The answer comes from an on-line
search of our HP 3000 Customer Reference Database.
I
, have
Thanks to the efforts of you, our field sales f ~ x c ewe
captured a lot of meaningful information about the HP 3000
customers, competition at sale time, the applications, and
the latest hardware and software configuration. At this point,
the database update is about 80% complefed and has
proven its value many times.
Third, in late April, shortly before their system arrived, a
group of users attended their first class on EDCl3000 at
GSD. This class formalized their training and cemented
many of the concepts and skills they had been learning
on the demo system. Later courses for IOSl3000 and
MRPl3000 did the same for these products. The plant
manager commented after the classes that they were one
of the best training courses he had ever seen delivered.
We're here to help you be more successful. Fast, accurate
answers to your reference account question:; is just another
reason you will be successful selling HP 3000's. Call
your GSD Regional Sales Development Engineer for
references.
Fourth, once their system arrived in early May, I loaded
their EDC database from the demo system onto their own
system. Once they had taken a physical inventory, they
loaded their IOSl3000 database and began operation of a
stockroom system. In mid-June, they were ready for MRP.
They prepared for their first run with some cheerleading and
fine tuning from myself.
Results
MFGl3000 Installation: It's Easier
Than You Think
So, how did it all go and how long did this process take?
Well, within four months of starting, the company was ready
to begin measuring the paybacks of installing MFGl3000.
Since mid-June, they have been running MRP weekly and
have begun to develop a well-thought-out materials procurement plan.
By: John ScribneriNSR Fullerton
What's it take to install an MFGl3000 customer site? To
give you an idea of what is involved, I thobght I'd jot down
my experiences at my first MFGl3000 custcmer installation.
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
17
FOR IINTE8NAL USE ONLY
HP Computer Museum
www.hpmuseum.net
For research and education purposes only.
COWPLJTER 5V'STEMS NEWSLETTER
I
Benefits
I
Even more important than the smooth implementation is the
fact that on my last vls~tIn early August, I not~ceda
significant change wlth the buyers and schedulers. They
weren't having any part shortages. Where they once spent
many hours chasing down parts needed to keep the production l~nesrunnlng, buyers were now spend~ngtime with
vendors scheduling purchases and deliver~esT h ~ sI S allowing them to buy more economic quantit~esand take
advantage of prlce breaks
A qulck lmplementatlon and payback I S one of the major
customer beneflts of lnstalllng MFGl3000 My experience
has shown me that it IS ach~evablew ~ t hno more than the
standard consulting and tra~nlngdeflned wlth the product
-
I
*
lnterested in more spec~ficsabout MFG13000 implementat1on7 Contact John at Neely Fullerton lnterested in using
this customer as a reference account' Call Dick Knudtsen
at General Systems Sales Development for the Buslness
Systems Program for deta~ls.
Newspapers: Inside the Organization
By Barry KlaaslGSD
/
A number of you have asked about who you call on and what to say when you have a newspaper for a lead Let's take a look at
how a newspaper 1s organized to answer this question:
ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE
Board of D~rectors
I
President
I
1
**Publisher
I
I
I
'*General Manager
I
I
Controller
and
Accounting
r
I
1
Secretary
-
- - - *Bus~nessManager
--I
I
I
I
,
-,
-1
----I,
I
1
Productton Mechan~cal
(Produces the paper)
Newroom Ed~tor~al
(Supplies stor~esl
News)
*C~rculat~on
Advertts~ngiMarket~ngData Process~ng
(Tells ~roductlon (Sells and produces
(Prov~desD P
how many to print advert~s~nglsource servlces for
& where to send
of revenue)
all depts )
them)
Product~onManager
Execut~veEd~tor
*Circulat~on
Director
*Advertising Director
**Data Processing Director
(Staff of 2 to 10)
*Respons~blefor C~rculat~on
(D~rectlyor ~nd~rectly)
k
**Where to call
k
Gett~ngout a newspaper every day requires a large Investment senstive as well as demanding management and an
organlzatlon geared to h ~ g volume
h
and fast reactlon Slnce the mlddle slxtles newspapers have been placing more and more
emphasls on the bottom lrne
prof~tsll
In recent years management style has orlented Itself more to prof~tthan to ed~tor~al
posture Heavy investment In newsroom
and production systems has pa~d-offhandsomely Newsroom staffs In partcuar are typically half of what they used to be
Today s promoted publ~shersand general managers qu~teoften are those who espoused the value of computer-based
systems and were assoc~atedclosely wlth thelr successful use In the late slxtres and seventies
Now that the key cost centers are In control the focus IS sh~ftlngto what can be done to Increase revenue Revenue I S the
responslbll~tyof the c~rculat~on
and advertising departments That IS where you re golng to suggest revenue increasing
Improvements and the HP 3000 I S what they re ready for
Volume 3, Number 21. September 15, 1978
f-3
CQMPUTER S Y S T E M S NEWSLETTER
The key people you w ~ l talk
l
to are the:
Publisher . . . . . . . .
Top manager, the real decision maker, combination newsman and businessman.
General Manager
Second-in-command, tough businessman, heir-apparent to
the publisher, combination recommender and decision
maker.
Circulation Manager
Came up through the ranks, understands what he can see.
Not a decision maker but you'll need his blessing.
Data Processing Manager . . . . . . . . .
Will be the key evaluator and recommender; the larger the
paper, the more weight he will carry in the decision
process. May already know HP through other papers or
through a 21MX-based Test II editing system; may be
quite experienced outside of newspapers as well.
Advertising Manager
.. ... . ........
Business Manager . . . . . . . . . . . .
. ..
Wants a database to anlayze subscriber and non-subscriber
data to help sell advertising. He'll love QUERY; an ally and
recommender, more sophisticated than the circulation
manager but probably came up through the ranks as well.
Contracts and financing are his; usually position exists on
larger papers only; more of an evaluator and recommender
than decision maker.
Chains
In addition to the local newspaper people, you may be in contact with the information systems staff of the headquarters
l
been assessed as
of the chain. When VEUIEOM agreements are signed, the total potential business of the chain w ~ l have
well as a thorough further evaluation of our HP 3000 solution and HP itself.
While most chain owners want to allow a la,ge degree of free enterprise by their membership of newspapers, they are
certain to recoanize the ~rofitabilityof common information systems throughout the chain. The chain headquarters may invest
substantially inUdevelop&ent of applications and supply programmer resources to aid the local newspaper's evolving
development.
1
Selling Benefits to the Key Person
I
The publisher is the key person to your success. He is not readily accessible, but sell him (or her) and you'll get the
order. He's wise and shrewd, and usually a very good businessman. He's also a real entrepreneur when it comes to finding
ways to improve the bottom line of his paper's P & L statement. That's where you come in.
You're going to help him get more advertising revenue . . . his newspaper's "life blood". You're going to open his eyes to
the new selective advertising services he can offer his advertisers by maintaining "demographics" on a newspaper
readership database. For example, delivery of a flyer insert only to readers from a specific part of town or only to
fam~ieswith teenagers . , , or delivery of the advertiser's flyer to non-subscribers over 50 years old within 4 miles of the
location of the stores in the area. The non-subscribers' and the subscribers' database is usually built from census tract
information available from the government census bureau.
You're going to help him improve his customers' satisfaction by implementing "starts" and "stops" more rapidly and
accurately through terminals . . . and to identify trouble spots earlier so customer complaints can be handled more rapidly
and customers advised of reasons for such things as delivery problems due to a carrier being sick - things that will
keep his subscribers in the fold.
You're going to help improve his cash flow and lower his uncollectibles. With a circulation database he can go to a paid-in-advance
billing system (or at least a one-month in advancelone month in arrears billing). It will improve cash flow from
subscribers, minimize or eliminate subscriber uncollectibles, eliminate the middleman profits in collections, give more time
to carriers to do what they do best (delive"!) and keep meaningful statistics on starts and stops which often only the
delivery boy knows
You will put him in control of his circulatiorl system by supplying him with a terminal-oriented database management
computer from you and HP.
I
a
And he wants quality, reliability, and reputati'm behind his solution . . . and you're going to smile and tell him the HP philosophy.
He'll also ask for references at other newspapers and you can bet he'll check them out. We've got really great references
that will give him the insider's point of view. Publishers are a well-informed, tightknit fraternity and chances are he (or she)
will be able to find out enough about HP to make a favorable decision within a day.
HP 3000's are selling very well at newspapers!
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
FOR llNcrERNALUSE ORIRV
..+
fie ( ! I n 1 11'
I s ne:ess;~-,
(se:In(! e f t c . e , , ~ I ( ! , +.'IAS
e f f :en:,
n.r)(!,:e
r < - j r r l , R(,,,.~,.
r.er
;Ippre: ales
11
Marie-Odile Laurencin (second r~ght)IS responsible for
Spa~n
Germany
UK
Dally and monthly statlstrcs and also OEM contracts
Do You Know These Faces?
By Mane-Odiie Laurencin HPG
Marked Card BASIC and the 7260A
By Peter Stuart HPG
Remember the 7260A can be used w t h timeshare systems
to o b t a ~ nvery low-cost data preparation and data entry
We have received a letter from
The happy folks above all belong to Grenoble s Order
Processing Group whlch has been completely renewed in
one year (Annle Barbe arid Catherine Ceili have found other
jobs In HPG ) They have been replaced by Marie-Francoise
Genevo~x(left) and Roselyne Rlpert (rlght)
Mr Thomas H Johnson
Blshop McNamara H ~ g hSchool
6800 Marlboro Plke
Forestv~lle Maryland 20028
Mane-Fran~oise1s deal~ngwlth IIC-(U.S and Europe)
Italy
Scandinavia
ICON
HPSA
who took a copy of our program for lnterpretlng student
marked cards Into a BASIC language program
Switzerland
Mr. Johnson has Improved the program to w e e d L!D data
transmlssron tlme and use less flle space He 1s super
enthusiastic about h s HP 2000 Access System and the
7260A, and would be happy to supply a copy of h ~ program
s
to any other school whlch contacts h ~ m
Austrla
She's also respnns~blefor updating the avalabllty schedule
Roseiyne joined us rn August She 1s In charge of
France
Holland
Belglum
Board Exchange Program Orders
Volume 3 Number 21 September 15 1978
So, r f you have a potentral prospect for an Optical Mark
reader ~n a school, why not refer them to thls super
reference account7
20
2j
UNITEAN~~J~L
YJSE ONLY
Great America and the HP 30708
By: John WillettiHPG
[)R I
R
2
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;I
7
= s : : - I
5 n - r r . -. f i r ] rn
,
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-
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1 7 0
5 ,TggL;I
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standard clock
marks
actual size.
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Clock marks designed by someone
who has just enjoyed Great
America - actual size!
During a recent visit to the USA, Peter Stualt and I spent one evening on an applications research visit to Marriott's Great
America (for those who don't know about Great America, it's an "amusement" park where one is supposed to enjoy oneself on
a numbe; of mechanical devices salvaged from the Spanish Inquisition). ~ n ' ~ won
a entry
~ , to the amusement park, we were
handed a mark sense card, pre-printed with questions, boxes and clock marks (clock-on-data), and a small pencil (they think
of everything). The card was obviously intended for c;ollecting statistical data from visitors.
It asked such quest~onsas "Zip code?, Age?, Number of previous visits?" (You mean people actually go there more than
once??.) The really interesting feature of the card was the quality of the pre-printed clock marks; they were a collection of black
blocks of totally different shapes and sizes!
We kept the card artd, on returning to Grenoble, we tested it in the 30706 multifunction reader. It worked perfectly without
t
that we normally quote concerning clock marks, this is quite a
data error! Every tirne! Considering the t i g ~ specifications
remarkable feat. Not only will the 30706 multifunction reader read dirty, bent punched cards, but it can sometimes also read
cards with clock-on-data clock marks of widely differing shapes and sizes. This is well worth remembering when someone asks
you if the 30708 will read their particular c.ards.
Computer Advances Expands
By: Carol ScheifelelCSG
The SeptemberlOctober Issue of Computer Advances IS the largest one ever Major product announcements prompted thls
unprecedented coverage - namely the HP 3000 Ser~esIll and the HP 250
64
Appearances
September
- Datamation
September 17 - Computenvorld
Direct Mail will go out the week of September 11th.
More copies of this issue are available. (They are ideal for seminars or direct mail programs). You can order 5953-3030(D) from
Corporate Literature Distribution in Palo Alto to get additional copies.
Volume 3 Number 21 September 15 1978
22
uyo~3]
[fiy]fE
lJsE
COLMIPuTER
S b 7 S T Z & 4 SNEWSLETTER
Worldwide SE Manager's Meeting a Great Success
By: Jay DennylCSG
As you can see from the agenda above, the week of August 21st was a busy and productive time for the forty-five SE Managers
who attended the recent Worldwide CSG SE Manager's meeting. "How to effectively manage SE's and SEO's" was the theme
of the meeting.
John Young as keynot<espeaker got us off to a good start with his excellent presentation on the value of the first-level supervisor
at HP. Other significant presentations were given by Carl Cottrell (CSG) on "Customer Satisfaction", Bill Richion (CSG) on
"Territory Management", Larry Amsden (CSG) on "Recruiting and Training" and Ken Coleman (GSD) on "Development of
a Staff Engineer."
A series of highly-participative workshops was given, ably chaired by the following key HP managers:
"Customer Satisfac:tionV - Marc Hoff (ESR)
- Bruce Campbell (NSR)
"Territory Management"
- George
- Gary
"Recruiting and Training"
-
Tibaldl (ESR)
Gujral (NSR)
Gary Davis (MSRIE)
Paul Myhre (MSRIW)
"Staff Engineering Development" - Paul Cherry (SSR)
- Fritz Joern (HPSA)
"Coaching SE's"
- Ben Menold (NSR)
-John Podkomorski (MSRIW)
"The Area Management Team"
-
6111Shellooe (HPIC)
- John
Kemper (NSR)
By all reports the Seminar was a great succctss. All the participants came away with a greater appreciation of the key role
which the SE Management Team plays in the success of Hewlett Packard.
FIRST I'LL PlCK
FACTORY SUPPORT? . . . .
JA,, JA, DAS IST GUT
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
TWO SIX-PACKS IN
WATSONVILLE . . . .
AND POKER CHIPS
IN WATSONVILLE . . . .
FOR IINIUERNIAL USE ONILV
C O M P U T E R S Y S T E M S NEWSLETTER
/
WE'VE TRIED
THAT ALREADY
IF I CAN
KEEP THEIR
IT WAS A LONG
NEVER WORK
IN NEELY!
LAST NIGHT, BUT IT
SURE WAS WORTH IT!
JACK WENT LOW
WITH A FULL HOUSE . . . .
THAT'S ABSOLUTELY
THE LAST TIME I'LL PLAY
OKER UNTIL 4 AM!
HEWLElT-PACKARD COMPUTER SYSTEMS GROUP
11000 W o l f e Road. Cupertmo. C a l ~ f o m ~95014
a
USA
-
Bob LlndrrylCS Group Edltor
LILLIAN BLANKlNSHlPiBOlSE - Ed~tor
OLEN MORAINICSD - Edltor
SON1 HOGANIDTD - Ed~tor
LlANA CLAYMORWFCD - Ed~tor
APRIL KILPATRICWGSD - Ed~tor
CATHERINE CLAYIHPG - Ed~tor
Volume 3, Number 21, September 15, 1978
24
CHUCK ULFERSIBOISE - Techn~calEd~tor
TOM LAUHONICSD - Technlcal Ed~tor
BOB HOKEIDMD - Technlcal Ed~tor
JOE SCHOENDORFIDSD - Technical Ed~tor
STEVE STARK DTD - Technical Edllor
MIKE CHONLWFCD - Techn~calEdltor
JERRY PETERSONIGSD - Techn~calEdltor
PIERRE ARDICHVILVHPG - Techn~calEd~tor
'FOR IINUERNAL USE ONILV
i
1
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