TCF-10B-FSK PLC System Manual (For units shipped after 1-1

TCF-10B-FSK PLC System Manual (For units shipped after 1-1
TCF–10B
FREQUENCY-PROGRAMMABLE
FREQUENCY-SHIFT CARRIER
TRANSMITTER/RECEIVER
System Manual
CF44—VER05
(Replaces CF44—VER04)
Technologies, Inc.
4050 NW 121st Avenue
Coral Springs, FL USA 33065
1–800–785–7274
www.pulsartech.com
Printed December 2004
Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B
System Manual
Table
of
Contents
Product Description
1
Applications and Ordering Information
2
Installation
3
Test Equipment
4
Installation/Adjustment Procedures
5
Signal Path
6
Design Verification Tests
7
Maintenance
8
Power Supply Module
9
Keying Module
10
Transmitter Module
11
10W PA Module
12
RF Interface Module
13
Universal Receiver Module
14
Receiver Logic Module
15
Optional EM Output Module
16
Optional Voice Adapter Module
17
Optional Trip Test Unit Module
18
Technologies, Inc.
Important Change Notification
This document supersedes the TCF–10B Frequency-Programmable Frequency-Shift Carrier
Transmitter/Receiver System Manual CF44–VER04. The following list shows the most recent publication
date for each chapter. Publication dates in bold type indicate changes to that chapter since the previous
publication. For these chapters, the specific pages that have changed are listed for easy reference. Note that
only significant changes, i.e., those changes which affect the technical use and understanding of the
document and the TCF–10B equipment, are reported. Changes in format, typographical corrections, minor
word changes, etc. are not reported. Note also that in some cases text and graphics may have flowed to a
different page than in the previous publication due to formatting or other changes. The page numbers
below show the current pages on which the reported changes appear.
Each reported change is identified in the document by a change bar, || placed to its immediate left and/or
right, just like the ones on this page.
Chapter Number & Title
||
Publication Date
Pages with Changes
Front Section
December 2004
ii, v
|| 1. Product Description
December 2004
1, 8
|| 2. Applications and Ordering Information
December 2004
11, 16
|| 3. Installation
December 2004
5
4. Test Equipment
April 1997
|| 5. Installation/Adjustment Procedures
December 2004
5, 12, 13
|| 6. Signal Path
December 2004
5 (11x17)
|| 7. Design Verification Tests
December 2004
5
8. Maintenance
October 2001
|| 9. Power Supply Module
December 2004
1, 4, 5
||10. Keying Module
December 2004
1
||11. Transmitter Module
December 2004
1, 2, 3, 4
||12. 10W PA Module
December 2004
1, 4
||13. RF Interface Module
December 2004
1
14. Universal Receiver Module
October 2001
||15. Receiver Logic Module
December 2004
1, 3, 4, 7, 10, 13
||16. EM Output Module
December 2004
1
||17. Optional Voice Adapter Module
December 2004
1
||18. Optional Trip Test Unit
December 2004
3, 9
Note: due to design changes, nomenclature throughout this document indicating 300, 600 & 1200 Hz has been changed to 380,
800 & 1600 Hz respectively.
ii
December 2004
TCF–10B System Manual
!
IMPORTANT
We recommend that you become acquainted with the information in this manual before ener-
gizing your TCF–10B system. Failure to do so may result in injury to personnel or damage to
the equipment, and may affect the equipment warranty. If you mount the carrier set in a cabinet,
it must be bolted to the floor or otherwise secured before you swing out the equipment, to
prevent the installation from tipping over.
You should not remove or insert printed circuit modules while the TCF–10B is energized.
Failure to observe this precaution can result in undesired tripping output and can cause
component damage.
PULSAR does not assume liability arising out of the application or use of any product or circuit
described herein. PULSAR reserves the right to make changes to any products herein to improve
reliability, function or design. Specifications and information herein are subject to change
without notice. All possible contingencies which may arise during installation, operation, or
maintenance, and all details and variations of this equipment do not purport to be covered by
these instructions. If you desire further information regarding a particular installation,
operation, or maintenance of equipment, please contact your local Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
representative.
Copyright ©
By Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
PULSAR does not convey any license under its patent rights nor the rights of others.
ESD Warning!
YOU MUST BE PROPERLY GROUNDED, TO PREVENT DAMAGE FROM
STATIC ELECTRICITY, BEFORE HANDLING ANY AND ALL MODULES OR
EQUIPMENT FROM PULSAR.
All semiconductor components used, are sensitive to and can be damaged by the
discharge of static electricity. Be sure to observe all Electrostatic Discharge (ESD)
precautions when handling modules or individual components.
December 2004
iii
Technologies, Inc.
Preface
Scope
This manual describes the functions and features of the TCF–10B Power Line Carrier Transmitter/
Receiver. It is intended primarily for use by engineers and technicians involved in the installation,
alignment, operation, and maintenance of the TCF–10B.
Equipment Identification
The TCF–10B equipment is identified by the Catalog Number on the TCF–10B chassis nameplate. You
can decode the Catalog Number using the information in Chapter 2.
Production Changes
When engineering and production changes are made to the TCF–10B equipment, a revision notation (Sub
number) is reflected in the style number and related schematic diagrams. A summary of all Sub numbers
for the particular release is shown on the following page.
Warranty
Our standard warranty extends for 60 months after shipment. For all repaired modules or advance replacements, the standard warranty is 90 days or the remaining warranty time, whichever is longer. Damage
clearly caused by improper application, repair, or handling of the equipment will void the warranty.
Equipment Return & Repair Procedure
To return equipment for repair or replacement:
1. Call your PULSAR representative at 1–800–785–7274.
2. Request an RMA number for proper authorization and credit.
3. Carefully pack the equipment you are returning.
Repair work is done most satisfactorily at the factory. When returning any equipment, pack it in
the original shipping containers if possible. Be sure to use anti-static material when packing the
equipment. Any damage due to improperly packed items will be charged to the customer, even
when under warranty.
Pulsar Technologies, Inc. also makes available interchangeable parts to customers who are
equipped to do repair work. When ordering parts (components, modules, etc.), always give the
complete PULSAR style number(s).
4. Make sure you include your return address and the RMA number on the package.
5. Ship the package(s) to:
Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
Communications Division
4050 NW 121st Avenue
Coral Springs, FL USA 33065
iv
December 2004
TCF–10B System Manual
Overview of this Document
Chapter 1 – Product Description, including specifications
Chapter 2 – Applications and related catalog numbers for ordering purposes
Chapter 3 – Installation
Chapter 4 – Test Equipment
Chapter 5 – Installation/Adjustment procedures
Chapter 6 – Signal Path (for use during testing)
Chapter 7 – Design Verification procedures
Chapter 8 – Maintenance
Module circuit descriptions and troubleshooting procedures are in the remaining chapters.
The TCF–10B circuitry is divided into seven (7) standard modules. In addition, Voice Adapter, Electromechanical, and Trip Test Unit modules are available as options.
Contents of Carrier Set
The TCF–10B carrier set includes the style numbers, listed below, with appropriate sub numbers representing revision levels. (To determine related style numbers, you may also refer to Figure 2-25.)
Module
Style
Sub Number
||
Power Supply
1617C38 GXX
6
||
Keying
1606C50 GXX
9
||
Transmitter
C020-TXMNN-001
2
||
10W PA
1606C33 G01
21
||
RF Interface
1609C32 G01
9
||
Receiver/FSK Discriminator
C020-RXVMN-202
6
||
Universal Receiver
C020-RXVMN-203
7
||
Receiver Logic
CF20-RXLMN-0XX
6
||
EM Output
1606C53 G01
7
||
Voice Adapter
C020-VADMN-001
4
||
Transmitter w/Trip Test Unit
C020-TXMMN-102
2
December 2004
v
Technologies, Inc.
FIGURES
Figure No.
Page No.
1-1
TCF–10B Transceiver Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–5
1-2
TCF–10B Transmitter (only) Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–6
1-3
TCF–10B Receiver (only) Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–7
1-4
Front Panel for 2-Frequency, Transfer Trip or Unblock Applications . . . . . . . . . .1–8
1-5
Front Panel for 3-Frequency, Transfer Trip and Unblock Applications . . . . . . . . .1–8
1-6
Front Panel for 2-Frequency, Phase Comparison Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–8
2-1
Simplified Unblock Receiver Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–1
2-2
Transceiver Unit Connections, 2 Freq. set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–2
2-3
Basic Logic Diagrams for Directional Comparison Unblocking . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–2
2-4
Basic Logic Diagrams for Underreaching Transfer Trip Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–4
2-5
Basic Operation of the Dual Phase Comparison
Pilot Relaying System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–5
2-6
Basic Segregated Phase Comparison Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–7
2-7
Basic Operation of the Segregated Phase Comparison System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–9
2-8
Conventional Phase Comparison Response to an
Outfeed Condition Block Tripping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–9
vi
2-9
Typical Threshold Setting for Offset Keying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–9
2-10
Response of Segregated Phase Comparison System with Offset Keying . . . . . .2–10
2-11
Transceiver Unit Conn. 2 Freq. set (Single Channel DTT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–11
2-12
Direct Transfer Trip for Transformer Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–12
2-13
Direct Transfer Trip for Shunt Reactor Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–12
2-14
Dual Channel Direct Transfer Trip with Throwover to Single Channel . . . . . . . .2–13
2-15
Dual Channel Direct Transfer Trip with Throwover to Single Channel . . . . . . . .2–13
2-16
3-Frequency System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–15
2-17
Transceiver Unit Conn. 3 Freq. Set (Unblock Relaying and DTT) . . . . . . . . . . . .2–16
2-18
Three Terminal line application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–17
2-19
Hybrid Connections - Two Transmitters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–17
2-20
Hybrid Connections - Single Bi-Directional Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–17
2-21
Hybrid Connections - Dual Bi-Directional Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–19
2-22
Hybrid Connections - Four Transmitters (Equal Losses) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–19
December 2004
TCF–10B System Manual
FIGURES, Cont’d
2-23
Hybrid Connections - Four Transmitters (Unequal Losses) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–20
2-24
20 Vdc Auxiliary Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–23
2-25
Catalog Numbers / Module Style Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–24
3-1
Rear Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–2
3-2
Cable Termination Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–4
3-3
Mechanical Outline Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–9
3-4
Connection Drawing and Jumper Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–10
4-1
Extender Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4–2
6-1
Functional Block Diagram (11x17 Pull Out)
9-1
Power Supply Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9–1
9-2
Power Supply Component Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9–4
9-3
Power Supply Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9–5
10-1
Keying Module Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10–1
10-2
Keying PC Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10–6
10-3
Keying Module Internal Logic (G01 Shift down to trip) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10–7
10-4
Keying Module Internal Logic (G03 Shift up to trip) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10–8
10-5
Keying Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10–9
11-1
Transmitter Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11–1
11-2
Transmitter Component location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11–3
11-3
Transmitter Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11–4
12-1
10W PA Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12–1
12-2
10W PA Component location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12–3
12-3
10W PA Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12–4
13-1
RF Interface Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13–1
13-2
RF Interface Component location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13–3
13-3
RF Interface Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13–4
14-1
Universal Receiver Module — Simplified Signal Flow Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . .14–1
14-2
Universal Receiver/FSK Receiver Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14–2
14-3
Universal Receiver/FSK Receiver Location of SW1 Dip switch & J3 . . . . . . . .14–8
15-1
Simplified Signal Flow Diag. for 2-Frequency Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–1
15-2
Simplified Signal Flow Diag. for 3-Frequency Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–2
15-3
Front Panel for 2-Frequency Directional Comparison Applications . . . . . . . . . . .15–4
December 2004
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-5
vii
Technologies, Inc.
FIGURES, Cont’d
15-4
Front Panel for 3-Frequency Directional Comparison Applications . . . . . . . . . . .15–5
15-5
Front Panel for 2-Frequency Phase Comparison Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–5
15-6
Receiver Logic External (Rear Panel) Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–6
15-7
2-Frequency Directional Comparison Functional Block Diagram (11x17) . . . . . .15-7
15-8
3-Frequency Directional Comparison Functional Block Diagram (11x17) . . . . . .15-8
15-9
Phase Comparison Functional Block Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–9
15-10 Receiver Logic Component Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–21
15-11 Receiver Logic Schematic (Sheet 1 of 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–22
15-12 Receiver Logic Schematic (Sheet 2 of 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–23
15-13 Receiver Logic Schematic (Sheet 3 of 3) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–24
viii
16-1
EM Output Module Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16–1
16-2
EM Output Component location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16–3
16-3
EM Output Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16–4
17-1
Voice Adapter Module — Simplified Signal Flow Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–1
17-2
Voice Adapter Module Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–4
17-3
Voice Adapter Module Component location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–6
17-4
Voice Adapter Schematic (Sheet 1 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–7
17-5
Voice Adapter Schematic (Sheet 2 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–8
17-6
Connections for Remote Phone and External Alarm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–9
17-7
External Alarm Circuit for Use with Module Front Panel Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–9
17-8
Handset Schematic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–10
18-1
TTU Transmitter Front Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18–1
18-2
Interconnecting cables for TTUs in Receiver only/Transmitter only chassis . . . .18–5
18-3
Schematic of TTU Daughter Board (Sheet 1 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18–6
18-4
Schematic of TTU Daughter Board (Sheet 2 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18–7
18-5
Component Layout for TTU Daughter Board (Sheet 2 of 2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18–8
18-6
Transmitter Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18–9
18-7
TTU 2-Frequency Checkback Trip Timing Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18–10
18-8
TTU 2-Frequency Real Trip Timing Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18–11
18-9
TTU 3-Frequency Checkback Trip Timing Diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18–12
December 2004
TCF–10B System Manual
TABLES
Table No.
Page No.
1-1
System Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–9
1-2
Transceiver Chassis Alarms w/CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–11
1-3
Receiver Only Chassis Alarms w/CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–11
1-4
Transmitter Only Chassis Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–11
1-5
Electro Mechanical Outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–12
1-6
Electro Mechanical Output Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–12
1-7
Keying Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–12
1-8
Transmitter Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–13
1-9
Receiver Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–13
1-10
Power Requirement Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–14
1-11
Weight and Dimension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–14
1-12
Environmental Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–15
1-13
Altitude Dielectric Strength De-rating for Air Insulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–16
1-14
Altitude Correction for Maximum Temperature of Cooling Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–16
1-15
Voice Adapter Option Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1–17
2-1
Operation of the Directional Comparison Unblocking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–3
2-2
Operation of Underreaching Transfer Trip Schemes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–3
2-3
TCF–10B Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–21
2-4
TCF–10B Catalog Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2–22
3-1
Receiver (SW1 settings) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–7
3-2
Receiver (SW1-1 set to the OFF position) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3–7
4-1
Recommended Test Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4–1
7-1
Voltage Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–1
7-2
Voltage Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–3
7-3
Transmitter Output Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–3
7-4
Transmitter LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–3
7-5
Output Frequency Shifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–4
7-6
Keying Module Links, LEDs, Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–4
December 2004
ix
Technologies, Inc.
TABLES, Cont’d
Table No.
Page No.
7-7
FSK Receiver (SW1-1 settings) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–8
7-8
FSK Receiver (SW1-1 set to the OFF position) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–8
7-9
Phase Comparison Units (Only) Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–9
7-10
2-Frequency Directional Comparison Units (Only) Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–10
7-11
3-Frequency Directional Comparison Units (Only) Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7–12
9-1
1617C38 Styles and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9–1
10-1
1606C50 Styles and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10–1
10-2
Truth Tables for TCF–10B Keying Module (G01 - Shift down to trip) . . . . . . . .10–4
10-3
Truth Tables for TCF–10B Keying Module (G03 - Shift up to trip) . . . . . . . . . . .10–5
11-1
1610C01 /Styles and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11–1
12-1
1606C33 Styles and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12–1
13-1
1609C32 Styles and Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13–1
14-1
Universal Receiver Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14–1
14-2
Receiver System Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14–3
14-3
FSK Frequency Spacing Specifications (Minimum) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14–4
14-4
Universal Receiver (SW1 settings) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14–5
14-5
Universal Receiver (SW1-1 set to the OFF position) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14–5
15-1
CF20-RXLMN-00X Styles and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–1
15-2
Trip Delay Switch Settings for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications . . . . . . . . . . . .15–11
15-3
Trip Hold Time Switch Settings for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications . . . . . . . .15–12
15-4
Guard Hold Time Switch Settings for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications . . . . . .15–12
15-5
Unblock Time Switch Settings for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications . . . . . . . . .15–12
15-6
Noise Block of Unblock Switch Settings for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications .15–13
15-7
Guard Before Trip Switch Settings for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications . . . . . .15–13
15-8
Low Level Delay Switch Settings for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications . . . . . . .15–13
15-9
Trip Delay Switch Settings for POTT/UB 3F Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–14
15-10 Trip Hold Time Switch Settings for POTT/UB 3F Applications . . . . . . . . . . . .15–15
15-11 Guard Hold Time Switch Settings for POTT/UB 3F Applications . . . . . . . . . . .15–15
15-12 Unblock Time Switch Settings for POTT/UB 3F Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–15
15-13 Noise Block of Unblock Switch Settings for POTT/UB 3F Applications . . . . .15–16
x
December 2004
TCF–10B System Manual
TABLES, Cont’d
Table No.
Page No.
15-14 Guard Before Trip Switch Settings for POTT/UB 3F Applications . . . . . . . . . .15–16
15-15 Low Level Delay Switch Settings for POTT/UB 3F Applications . . . . . . . . . . .15–16
15-16 Trip Delay Switch Settings for DTT 3F Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–17
15-17 Trip Hold Time Switch Settings for DTT 3F Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–18
15-18 Guard Hold Time Switch Settings for DTT 3F Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–18
15-19 Checkback Trip Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–18
15-20 Polarity Switch Settings for Phase Comparison Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15–19
15-21 SPCU/SKBU Switch Settings for Phase Comparison Applications . . . . . . . . . .15–19
16-1
1606C53 Styles and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16–1
16-2
Output Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16–1
17-1
C020-VADMN Styles and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–1
17-2
Voice Adapter Module Electrical Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–3
17-3
DIP Switch Setting Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–5
17-4
Default (Normal) Settings for TCF-10B Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17–5
18-1
1610C01 Styles and Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18–1
18-2
TTU Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18–4
December 2004
xi
Technologies, Inc.
Trademarks
All terms mentioned in this book that are known to be trademarks or service marks are listed below.
In addition, terms suspected of being trademarks or service marks have been appropriately capitalized. Pulsar Technologies, Inc. cannot attest to the accuracy of this information. Use of a term in this
book should not be regarded as affecting the validity of any trademark or service mark.
This publication includes fonts and/or images from CorelDRAW 9 which are protected by the
copyright laws of the U.S., Canada and elsewhere. Used under license.
IBM and PC are registered trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation.
xii
December 2004
Chapter 1. Product Description
1.1
1
Standard Nomenclature
The standard nomenclature for PULSAR carrier protection equipment is as follows:
Cabinet – contains fixed-racks, swing-racks, or open racks
Rack – contains one or more chassis (e.g., the TCF–10B)
Chassis – contains several printed circuit boards, called modules (e.g., Transmitter or Receiver)
Module – contains a number of functional circuits (e.g., Oscillator or Synthesizer)
Circuit – a complete function on a printed circuit board
1.2
TCF–10B Chassis
The TCF–10B chassis specifications (see Figure 3-3) include standard dimensions of:
Height – 5.25” (133.35 mm), requiring 3 rack units, each measuring 1.75” (44.45 mm)
Width – 19.00” (482.6 mm)
Depth – 13.50” (342.9 mm)
Each chassis is notched for mounting in a standard relay rack.
1.3
TCF–10B Modules
The TCF–10B circuitry for the standard modules and the optional Voice Adapter, Electro-Mechanical
Output and Trip Test Unit modules is shown on the Functional Block Diagram in Chapter 6. Circuit
descriptions, with schematic diagrams or block diagrams for each module, are shown in Chapters 9
through 18, along with sub numbers indicating the current revisions for each module, as follows:
Chapter
Module
Schematic
Power Supply
1617C39-6
||
9.
||
10.
Keying
1606C50-9
||
11.
Transmitter
C030-TXMMN-2
||
12.
10W PA
1606C33-21
||
13.
RF Interface
1609C32-9
||
14.
Receiver
C030-RXVMN-7
||
15.
Receiver Logic
CF30-RXLMN-6
||
16.
EM Output Module
1606C53-7
||
17.
Voice Adapter
C030-VADMN-4
18.
TTU – Trip Test Unit
1614C25-3
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B System Manual
1.4
Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B Configurations
There are three different configurations (or sets) for the TCF–10B:
1) Transceiver (Transmitter with Receiver) set
2) Transmitter (only) set
3) Receiver (only) set
NOTE
See Chapter 2, Applications and Ordering Information, for ordering information.
See Chapter 3, Installation, for a summary of jumper controls.
1.4.1
Transceiver Set
The Transceiver set (see Figure 1-1) includes the following modules:
• Power Supply
• RF Interface
• EM Output (Optional)
• Keying
• Universal Receiver
• Voice Adapter (Optional)
• Transmitter
• Trip Test Unit (Optional)
• 10W PA
• Receiver Logic
1.4.2
Transmitter (only) Set
The Transmitter (only) set (see Figure 1-2) includes the following modules:
• Power Supply
• Transmitter
• RF Interface
• Keying
• 10W PA
• Trip Test Unit (Optional)
1.4.3
Receiver (only) Set
The Receiver (only) set (see Figure 1-3) includes the following modules:
• Power Supply
• Receiver Logic
• Trip Test Unit (Optional)
• RF Interface
• EM Output (Optional)
• Universal Receiver
Page 1–2
December 2004
Chapter 1. Product Description
1.5
TCF–10B Module Front Panels
The front (control) panel for each module could include the following types of controls:
• Switches
• LEDs
• Meter
• Potentiometers
• Test Jacks
• Push-buttons
1
All front panels are the same for all TCF–10B versions, with the exception of the Receiver Logic panel.
There are three different Receiver Logic front panels for the TCF–10B, based on the specific application.
1.5.1
2-Frequency, Transfer Trip/Unblock Receiver Logic Front Panel
This panel is shown in Figure 1-4.
Four LEDs provide signal indication for two-frequency, transfer trip/unblock applications:
• Good Channel
1.5.2
• Checkback Trip
• Trip
• Guard
3-Frequency, Transfer Trip/Unblock Receiver Logic Front Panel
This panel is shown in Figure 1-5.
Five LEDs provide signal indication for three-frequency, transfer trip/unblock applications:
• Good Channel
1.5.3
• Checkback Trip
• UB/POTT Trip
• DTT Trip
• Guard
2-Frequency, Phase Comparison Receiver Logic Front Panel
This panel is shown in Figure 1-6.
Three LEDs provide signal indication for two-frequency, Phase Comparison applications:
• Good Channel
December 2004
• Trip Positive
• Trip Negative
Page 1–3
TCF–10B System Manual
1.6
Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs)
A module’s printed circuit board (PCB) could include the following types of controls:
• Switches
• Jumpers
• Variable Capacitors
• Potentiometers
• Test Points
• Impedance Matching Jumpers
1.7
TCF–10B Rear Panel (“Mother Board”)
(See Chapter 3, Section 3.5 for a description of the Rear Panel.)
Page 1–4
December 2004
GOOD
CHANNEL
RCVR LOGIC
SET
LOWER
CANCEL / RAISE
FSK:
DETECT
LOW NOISE
SIGNAL
AM: MARGIN
–20
–15
–10
–5 dB
0
+5
+10
kHz
UNIVERSAL RECEIVER
Technologies, Inc.
MANUAL
CF44
C2N1B2END
10W POWER AMP
TRANSMITTER
Figure 1–1. TCF–10B Transceiver Set (1355D19).
RF INTERFACE
KEY
ALARM
CALLING
P.B.
VOICE ADAPTER
EM. OUTPUT
1
POWER SUPPLY
Technologies, Inc.
Figure 1–2. TCF–10B Transmitter (only) Set (1355D19).
GOOD
CHANNEL
RCVR LOGIC
SET
LOWER
CANCEL / RAISE
FSK:
LOW NOISE
SIGNAL
AM: MARGIN DETECT
–20
–15
–10
–5 dB
0
+5
+10
kHz
UNIVERSAL RECEIVER
Technologies, Inc.
MANUAL
CF44
Figure 1–3. TCF–10B Receiver (Only) Set (1355D19).
RF INTERFACE
EM. OUTPUT
1
POWER SUPPLY
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
RCVR LOGIC
GOOD
CHANNEL
TRIP
POSITIVE
RCVR LOGIC
TRIP
NEGATIVE
GOOD
CHANNEL
CHECKBACK
TRIP
UB/POTT
TRIP
DTT TRIP
Figure 1–4.
Front Panel for 2-Frequency,
Transfer Trip or Unblock
Applications.
GUARD
Figure 1–6.
Front Panel for 2-Frequency,
Phase Comparison
Applications.
Figure 1–5.
Front Panel for 3-Frequency,
Transfer Trip and Unblock
Applications.
Page 1–8
December 2004
Chapter 1. Product Description
1.8
Specifications
The TCF–10B meets or exceeds all applicable ANSI/IEEE standards as follows:
Proposed American National Standard
Requirements for Single Function Power-Line Carrier
Transmitter/Receiver Equipment
(ANS C93.5)
1.8.1
1
System
Table 1-1 lists the system specifications for the TCF–10B.
Table 1–1. System Specifications.
Frequency Range
30—535 kHz in 0.5 kHz (500 Hz) steps; transmitter selection in
100 Hz steps
4-Wire Receiver Input Impedance
5,000 Ω (1,000 Ω when strapped for high sensitivity)
RF Input Impedance
Nominal unbalanced 50 Ω, 75 Ω or 100 Ω
Output Power
10 W (max), 0.1 W (min), 50 or 100 W (with optional external
amplifier)
Modulation Type
Frequency-Shift Keyed (FSK); strappable for either two- or
three—frequency operation
Frequency Shift
Narrow Shift (– 100 Hz)
Wide Shift (– 250 Hz)
Extra Wide Shift (– 500 Hz)
Nominal Receiver Bandwidths
Narrow Band (380 Hz at 3 dB points)
Wide Band (800 Hz at 3 dB points)
Extra Wide Band (1,600 Hz at 3 dB points)
In-Band SNR
w/o voice 13 dB
w/voice 30 dB
Receive Sensitivity
Standard Setting
December 2004
High Setting
22.5 mV (min) to 70 V (max)
5 mV (min) to 17 V (max)
-20 dBm to +50 dBm @ 50 Ω
-35 dBm to +38 dBm @ 50 Ω
Page 1–9
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
Table 1–1. System Specifications (Cont’d).
Channel Speed Receiver set for
15 dB margin:
Narrow Band
7.5 ms*
Wide Band
5.9 ms*
Extra Wide Band
4.7 ms*
Frequency Spacing:
(For channels without voice; depends on application.)
Narrow Band
Unblock or Transfer Trip
(1-way, 500 Hz)
(2-way, 1,000 Hz)
Wide Band (Narrow or Wide Shift)
Unblock or Transfer Trip
(1-way, 1,000 Hz)
(2-way, 2,000 Hz)
Phase Comparison (SKBU-2A)
(60 Hz sq. wave keying)
(1-way, 1,500 Hz)
(2-way, 3,000 Hz)
Phase Comparison (SPCU-1A)
(60 Hz 3ms pulse keying)
(1-way, 2,000 Hz)
(2-way, 4,000 Hz)
Unblock or Transfer Trip
(1-way, 2,000 Hz)
(2-way, 4,000 Hz)
Phase Comparison (SKBU-2A)
(60 Hz sq. wave keying)
(1-way, 2,000 Hz)
(2-way, 4,000 Hz)
Phase Comparison (SPCU-1A)
(60 Hz 3ms pulse keying)
(1-way, 2,000 Hz)
(2-way, 4,000 Hz)
Minimum Channel Spacing
(2-way, 4,000 Hz)
Extra Wide Band
All Voice Applications
(See Section 1.8.10)
1-way represents transmitter to transmitter or receiver to receiver
2-way represents transmitter to receiver
* Times do not include logic trip delay or relay operate times.
† An external hybrid or other device offering at least 20 dB rejection of the adjacent channel must be used in the application.
Page 1–10
December 2004
Chapter 1. Product Description
1.8.2
Alarm & Level Options
This section provides three tables depicting the alarm and level options, broken down as follows:
• Transceiver Chassis Alarms w/CLI
• Receiver Only Chassis Alarms w/CLI
1
• Transmitter Only Chassis Alarms
Each alarm contact is rated 10 VA (Form A or B).
Table 1–2. Transceiver Chassis Alarms w/CLI.
Power Supply Module
Loss of dc power
Keying Module
Shift High/Shift Low (for guard or trip)
10W PA Module
Loss of Transmitter RF power output
Universal Receiver Module
Low-Signal; RF Signal Received; CLI output for External CLI
Meter (-20 dB to +10 dB; 0—100 A)
Table 1–3. Receiver Only Chassis Alarms w/CLI.
Power Supply Module
Loss of dc power
Universal Receiver Module
Low-Signal; RF Signal Received; CLI output for External CLI
Meter (-20 dB to +10 dB; 0—100 A)
Table 1–4. Transmitter Only Chassis Alarms.
Power Supply Module
Loss of dc power
Keying Module
Shift High/Shift Low
10W PA Module
Loss of Transmitter RF power output
December 2004
Page 1–11
TCF–10B System Manual
1.8.3
Technologies, Inc.
Electro-Mechanical Outputs
This section provides two tables depicting the Electro-Mechanical Output Module’s specifications, broken
down as follows:
• Electro Mechanical Outputs
• Electro Mechanical Output Timing
Table 1–5. Electro Mechanical Outputs.
Contacts
Output
Six (6) contacts for Guard
or Trip 1 or Trip 2
Make and carry rated 30 A for 1 second; 10 A continuous capability
break 50 W resistive or 25 W with L/R = .045 seconds
Table 1–6. Electro Mechanical Output Timing.
Typical Operate Time
1.8.4
Typical Release Time
NO Contact
Closes
NC Contact
Opens
NO Contact
Opens
NC Contact
Closes
3.0 ms
3.0 ms bounce
2.0 ms
2.8 ms
3.8 ms
4.0 bounce
Keying
Table 1-7 shows the TCF–10B keying specifications.
Table 1–7. Keying Specifications.
Five (5) optically-isolated keying inputs,
strappable at 15/20, 48, 125, 250 Vdc
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
Maximum input keying burden
10 mA
Manual keying
Recessed push-button switches for highand low-frequency keying, and power boost
Page 1–12
Unblock or Phase Comparison
Direct Transfer Trip
Power Boost or 52b Keying
RF Power On/Off
Voice Adapter
December 2004
Chapter 1. Product Description
1.8.5
Transmitter
Table 1-8 shows the TCF–10B transmitter specifications.
1
Table 1–8. Transmitter Specifications.
1.8.6
Harmonic and Spurious Output
55 dB below 10 W
Output Variation
– 1 dB over temperature and voltage range
Frequency Stability:
Narrow Shift
Wide Shift
Extra Wide Shift
– 10 Hz
Receiver
Table 1-9 shows the TCF–10B receiver specifications.
Table 1–9. Receiver Specifications.
Frequency Stability:
Narrow Band, Narrow Shift
Wide Band, Narrow Shift
Wide Band, Wide Shift
Extra Wide Band, Extra Wide Shift
– 10 Hz
Five 1 A isolated outputs for 15/20 Vdc
1) Unblock or Trip or Trip-Positive
or station battery circuits
2) Low-Level or Low Signal
3) Guard or Trip-Negative
4) Noise
5) Checkback Trip (not used with
Phase Comparison)
NOTE
An optional 20 V Power Supply is available for use with some Phase
Comparison and some Directional Comparison systems. For further information, please see TCF–10B Accessories under Chapter 2, Applications.
December 2004
Page 1–13
TCF–10B System Manual
1.8.7
Technologies, Inc.
Power Requirements
Table 1-10 shows the TCF–10B power requirement specifications.
Table 1–10. Power Requirement Specifications.
Transceiver
Supply Current (Amps)
At Nominal Voltage
Nominal
Battery
Voltage
Permissible
Voltage
Range
Receive/
Standby
1 Watt
Transmit
10 Watt
Transmit
48/60 Vdc
38—70 Vdc
0.630
0.940
1.600
110/125 Vdc
88—140 Vdc
0.240
0.360
0.600
220/250 Vdc
176—280 Vdc
0.120
0.180
0.300
Permissible ripple on incoming Vdc
5%
Maximum allowable frequency of ripple
120 Hz
Carrier frequency on dc input leads when transmitting 10 W
1.8.8
20 mV (max)
Weights and Dimensions
Table 1-11 shows the TCF–10B weight and dimension specifications.
Table 1–11. Weight and Dimension Specifications.
Net Weight
Equipment
Height
Width
Depth
Rack
lbs
Kg
inches
mm
inches
mm
inches
mm
Space
Transceiver
21
9.53
5.25
133.4
19.00
482.6
13.50
342.9
3 RU
Transmitter
14
6.35
5.25
133.4
19.00
482.6
13.50
342.9
3 RU
Receiver
12
5.45
5.25
133.4
19.00
482.6
13.50
342.9
3 RU
Page 1–14
December 2004
Chapter 1. Product Description
1.8.9
Environmental Requirements
This section provides three tables depicting the environmental requirement specifications, broken down as
follows:
• Environmental Requirements
1
• Altitude Dielectric Strength De-Rating for Air Insulation (Table 1-13)
• Altitude Correction For Maximum Temperature Of Cooling Air (ANS C93.5) (Table 1-14)
Table 1–12. Environmental Requirements.
Ambient temperature range
-20 to + 60¡C (derated per Table 1-14) of air-contacting
equipment
Relative humidity
Up to 95% (non-condensing) at 40¡C (for 96 hours
cumulative)
Altitude
Up to 1,500 m (without derating)
Up to 6,000 m (using Table 1-13 and Table 1-14)
Transient withstand capability
All external user interfaces meet SWC specifications of
ANS C37.90.1 (1989)
1-minute withstand
Only isolated inputs and outputs, and all alarms:
2,500 Vdc from each terminal to ground, derated per
Table 1-13.
Center conductor of coaxial
3,000 Vdc impulse level, cable to ground using 1.2 x 50
cable to ground msec impulse
Electro-Magnetic Interface Capability
IEEE Standard ANS C37.90.2
December 2004
Page 1–15
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
Table 1–13.
Altitude Dielectric Strength
De-Rating for Air Insulation
Altitude (Meters)
Correction Factor
1,500
1.00
1,800
0.97
2,100
0.94
2,400
0.91
2,700
0.87
3,000
0.83
3,600
0.79
4,200
0.74
4,800
0.69
5,400
0.64
6,000
0.59
Table 1–14.
Altitude Correction For Maximum
Temperature Of Cooling Air (ANS C93.5)
Temperatures (Degrees C)
Altitude (Meters)
Page 1–16
Short-Time
Long-Time
Difference
From Usual
Usual
1,500
55
40
Unusual
2,000
53
38
2
Unusual
3,000
48
33
7
Unusual
4,000
43
28
12
December 2004
Chapter 1. Product Description
1.8.10 Voice Adapter Option
Table 1-15 shows the specifications for the TCF–10B Voice Adapter option.
1
Table 1–15. Voice Adapter Option Specifications.
Modulation
Amplitude Modulation with compander
Transmission
Full-Duplex
Frequency Response
380 Hz to 2,000 Hz
Signaling
370 Hz AM with signaling push-button
If the Voice Adapter option is included, it will have an independent receiver of 4 kHz bandwidth, regardless of whether the system is operating at 1,600 Hz (extra wide band), 800 Hz (wide band), or 380 Hz
(narrow band).
December 2004
Page 1–17
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
USER NOTES
Technologies, Inc.
Page 1–18
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
2.1
Protective Relay
Applications Using
Frequency Shift Carriers
The TCF–10B carrier set is particularly suitable
for the following types of protective relay
systems:
• Directional Comparison Unblocking
• Permissive Overreaching Transfer Trip
(POTT)
• Permissive Underreaching Transfer Trip
(PUTT)
• Dual Phase Comparison Unblocking
• Segregated Phase Comparison Unblocking
• Direct Transfer Trip
2.1.1
Directional Comparison
Unblocking
The Directional Comparison Unblocking systems
transmit a continuous blocking signal, except
during internal faults. The channel is generally a
frequency-shift keyed (FSK) power line carrier.
For an internal fault, the FSK transmitter is shifted
to the “unblock” frequency. The transmitted
power in many applications is normally 1 W,
boosted to 10 W during unblock operation.
Figure 2-1. Under normal conditions, a block
frequency is transmitted and OR-1 has no input.
Because AND-1 and AND-2 are not satisfied, OR2 is not energized. For an internal fault, the block
frequency is removed. Assuming that the unblock
signal is shorted out by the fault, OR-1 provides a
direct input to AND-2 to satisfy its input requirements for 150 ms. AND-2 inputs to OR-2 to
operate the RR or to provide input to the AND
shown in Figure 2-3. Without an unblock signal,
150 ms is allowed for tripping. After this period,
lock out is initiated as one of the inputs to AND-2
is removed. This resets the RR or removes the
input to AND. If the unblock signal is received, it
inputs directly to OR-2 to energize the RR or to
provide input to AND. The unblock signal also
removes an input to AND-1 to stop the timer. A
channel failure (no block or unblock signal)
provides input to AND-1 and, after 150ms, locks
out the relaying and triggers an alarm. The
operation of the scheme shown in Figure 2-3 is
given in Table 2-1 for external and internal faults.
The phase and ground trip fault detectors at both
stations must operate for all internal faults; that is,
they must overreach the remote bus.
The dependability and security of Directional
Comparison Unblocking systems make them the
most attractive of the protective schemes for
transmission lines using power line carrier
The frequency-shift channel is monitored continuchannels. Over-tripping is avoided by continuous
ously to prevent tripping when a loss of channel
blocking and continuous channel monitoring.
occurs. The carrier receiver logic is shown in
Only an external fault
within 150 ms after
Lockout
channel failure can result
in over-tripping.
Block
Frequency
OR
1
AND
1
150
0
AND
2
OR
2
Unblock (Trip)
Frequency
To RR or
AND (See
Figure 2-2)
Figure 2–1. Simplified Unblock Receiver Logic.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
The scheme is most
appropriate for twoterminal lines, but is
applicable to multiterminal lines. Separate
channels are required
between each terminal
2
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
and the remote terminal(s). A sample schematic is
shown in Figure 2-2.
Another consideration is an open breaker
situation. When the remote breaker is open for an
extended period of time, the relay system must be
able to trip. The remote relay system sends a trip
signal when detecting a remote open breaker. If
this remote signal is received for 1,000 ms (1 sec)
or longer, the carrier receiver logic interprets this
as an open breaker and allows the local end to trip
You may conserve frequency spectrum by using a
narrow band frequency shift carrier, but at the
expense of channel speed (see Chapter 1,
Specifications).
TB3-3
Shift High
TB3-4
TB3-5
Shift Low
TB3-6
TB1-1
TB7-1
UB Trip
Received
DC Input
TB7-2
TB3-1
Xmtr On
TB3-2
TB2-5
Low Signal
TB2-6
TB7-3
DC Fail
TB7-4
TB4-5
UB Key
Transmitter
Checkback
Trip
TB1-4
TB1-8
Receiver Input
Note: All contacts are link selectable for normally open or closed.
TB4-6
Line Relay
Keying Output
Relay Terminals
TCF-10B Terminals
Figure 2–2. TCF-10B Transceiver Unit Connections, 2 Freq. set (Directional Comparison Unblock
Relaying) Typical Catalog: C2M1B2SND
Breaker 1 Trip Fault Detectors (P )
1
H
G
Protected Line
1
FI
Contact Logic (per Terminal)
P
F
E
Key Transmitter
to Unblock
2
Power Line Carrier
Channel f1 (G to H)
RR RR
Power Line Carrier
Channel f2 (H to G)
Trip
Coil
Breaker 2 Trip Fault Detector (P2)
52a
Solid State Logic (per Terminal)
P
AND
Unblock
(See Figure 2-1)
Timer
X
O
Channel
Signal
Receiver
(F1 at H,
F2 at G)
Trip
Note: (X) Normally 4 Ms.
Figure 2–3. Basic Logic Diagrams for Directional Comparison Unblocking.
Page 2–2
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
Table 2–1. Operation of the Directional Comparison Unblocking Scheme.
SCHEME FOR EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL FAULTS
Type of Fault
Events at Station G
External (FE)
Internal (FI)
Events at Station H
P1 operates.
P2 does not see fault.
f1 channel shifts to unblock.
f2 channel continues to
block.
Loss of block and/or receipt
of unblock (f1) operates RR
or inputs AND.
No trip.
No trip.
P1 operates.
P2 operates.
f1 channel to unblock.
f2 channel shifts to unblock.
Loss of block and/ or receipt
of unblock (f2) operates RR
or inputs AND.
Loss of block and/or receipt
of unblock (f1) operates RR
or inputs AND.
Trip.
Trip.
Table 2–2. Operation of the Underreaching Transfer Trip Scheme.
SCHEME FOR EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL FAULTS
Type of Fault
External (FE)
Internal (FI)
(Fault near station H)
Events at Station G
Events at Station H
P1 does not operate.
P2 does not operate.
No channel signal sent to H.
No channel signal sent to G.
No trip.
No trip.
P1 does not operate.
P2 operates and trips
directly.
No channel signal sent to H.
(FD1 operates).
Transfer-trip (f2) from station
H operates RR or inputs to
AND (or OR if non-permissive).
Transfer-trip signal keyed to
station G.
(FD2 operates).
Trip.
Trip.
† Omitted in non-permissive systems.
December 2004
Page 2–3
2
TCF–10B System Manual
whenever the local relays detect a
fault.
2.1.2
Breaker 1 Trip Fault Detectors (P1)
Permissive
Overreaching
Transfer Trip
Systems
Overreaching transfer trip systems
require a channel signal to trip, and
are used with a frequency-shift
audio tone, modulated on a
communication channel (e.g.,
public or private telephone lines).
These systems are generally not
used with power line carriers.
There are, however, successful
applications of power-line carrier
on POTT schemes where parallel
lines allow for cross-coupling of
the carrier signal.
2.1.3
Technologies, Inc.
Permissive and
Non-Permissive
Underreaching
Transfer Trip
Systems
For overreaching systems, the
directional phase and ground trip
fault detectors (P) must be set to
overlap within the transmission
line and not overreach any
terminals (see Figure 2-4).
That is, at least one trip fault
detector (P) must operate for all
internal faults, and none should
operate for any external fault. In
practice, distance relays are
normally required for both ground
faults and phase faults, although
directional instantaneous groundovercurrent relays might meet
these requirements in some cases.
Though it is the least complex, the
non-permissive system is rarely
used because of the high potential
for false outputs from the channel,
Page 2–4
Breaker 1 Permissive Fault Detectors (FD1)
H
G
FE
FI
Protected Line
1
2
Breaker 2 Trip Fault Detectors (P2)
Breaker 2 Trip Fault Detectors (P2)
Audio Tone
Receiver f2
Audio Tone
Transmitter f2
Channel
except Power Line Carrier
Audio Tone
Transmitter f1
Audio Tone
Receiver f1
Contact Logic (per Terminal)
Omit and Bypass
for Non-Permissive
Schemes
Audio
Tone
Receiver
RR
FD
P
RR
Key Audio Tone Transmitter
to Remote Station
Trip
Coil
52a
Solid State Logic (per Terminal)
Key Audio Tone Transmitter
to Remote Station
P
FD
Audio Tone
Receiver
Key Audio Tone Transmitter
to Remote Station
P
AND
Permissive Schemes
OR
Trip
Audio Tone
Recovery
OR
Trip
Non-Permissive Schemes
Figure 2–4. Basic Logic Diagrams for
Underreaching Transfer Trip Systems.
which would cause incorrect tripping. If a non-permissive system is
used, the channel considerations should be as described later for
direct trip systems. The system is made permissive by the additional
set of phase and ground overreaching fault detectors (FD), which
must operate for all internal faults (see Figure 2-4).
Operation of the underreaching transfer trip scheme shown in
Figure 2-4 is described in Table 2-2 for external and internal faults.
Because the trip fault detectors (P) do not operate for external
faults, underreaching transfer trip systems do not require external
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
2.1.4
Dual Phase
Comparison
Unblocking
Systems
Dual comparison systems require a
duplex channel: one frequency for
each line terminal. The TCF–10B
frequency-shift channel equipment
is available for this purpose;
normally used in an unblocking
system. Continuous channel monitoring is also provided, because
either a trip positive or trip
negative carrier signal is always
transmitted.
The transmitter is keyed to its trip
positive frequency when the
square wave from the filter goes
positive, and is keyed to its trip
negative frequency when the
square wave is at zero. There are
two outputs at the receiver: the trip
positive output is a square wave
that goes positive when a trip
positive frequency is received; the
trip negative output goes positive
when a trip negative frequency is
received.
Figure 2–5. Basic Operation of the Dual
Phase Comparison Pilot Relaying System.
fault-clearing coordination circuits (transient blocking) and are,
therefore, inherently simpler than any of the other schemes. You
obtain maximum security if you use additional permissive fault
detectors. These schemes also provide minimum operating times
for many faults that are tripped directly, without using the
channel.
December 2004
The basic operation of the Dual
Phase Comparison system is
shown in Figure 2-5. For internal
faults, the single phase outputs of
the sequence current networks are
essentially in phase, although such
output represents currents 180°
apart in the power system. The
network output goes through a
squaring amplifier that keys the
frequency shift transmitter. An
adjustable delay circuit delays the
local square wave by a time equal
to the channel delay time.
The network output is then used to
develop two complementary
square waves. One wave, which
has a positive state during the
positive half-cycle of the sequence
Page 2–5
2
TCF–10B System Manual
current network, is compared with the receiver’s
trip positive output. The other wave, which has
positive output during the negative half-cycle of
the sequence current network, is compared to the
receiver’s trip neg. output in a second comparison
circuit.
On internal faults, the positive half-cycle of the
local square wave lines up with the received trip
positive output to provide an AND-1 output (see
Figure 2-5). On the negative half-cycle, this local
square wave lines up with the received trip
negative output to provide an AND-2 output. If an
arming signal is received (FD2 and/or 21P) and
either AND-1 or AND-2 output exists for 4ms, an
input to the trip flip flop initiates breaker tripping.
The same operation occurs at both terminals,
tripping breakers 1 and 2 simultaneously on either
half-cycle of fault current.
For tripping, both the trip positive and trip
negative frequencies must be transmitted through
the internal fault via power line carrier channels.
If these frequencies are not received, the receiver
detects a loss of channel and clamps both outputs
to a continuous positive state. This loss of channel
clamp enables both comparison circuits, allowing
the system to trip on the local square wave input
only. After 150ms, the system output clamps these
to the zero state. At this point, the system cannot
trip and is locked out. An alarm indicates loss of
channel.
For external faults, the reversal of current at one
end shifts the square waves essentially 180°. As a
result, neither AND-1 nor AND-2 has the
sustained output required to operate the 4ms timer
(see Figure 2-5). No trip occurs at either line
terminal.
2.1.5
Segregated Phase Comparison
System
The Segregated Phase Comparison system has
been developed to improve pilot relay protection,
particularly for the long EHV series capacitorcompensated transmission lines. Long EHV series
capacitor-compensated lines are a source of
significant transients during the fault period.
Under these circumstances, sequence current
networks designed to operate at normal system
Page 2–6
Technologies, Inc.
frequency may present a problem. The experience
with these Phase Comparison systems has,
however, been remarkably good. Directional
Comparison systems, on the other hand, are
subject to mis-operation on series capacitorcompensated lines, particularly if the capacitor
gaps do not short the capacitors on faults.
Segregated phase comparison systems, which are
current-only, are independent of the following
phenomena:
• Power system frequency and wave form
• Effects of impedance unbalance between
the power system phase circuits.
• Maximum load/minimum fault current
margin.
The segregated phase comparison system can be
divided into two types: a two-subsystem scheme
and a three-subsystem scheme. In the twosubsystem scheme, one subsystem operates from
delta current (Ia-Ib) for all multi-phase faults, and
a ground (3I0) current subsystem operates for all
ground faults. The three-subsystem scheme has a
subsystem for each phase (Ia, Ib, and Ic). Each
subsystem consists of one channel (TCF–10B)
and one Phase Comparison relay.
Both segregated Phase Comparison systems
incorporate “offset keying,” enabling them to trip
for internal high-resistance ground faults and
internal faults with outfeed at one terminal. No
other system can clear these types of faults
without extra logic or channels. On a 500 kV line
with a 2,000:5 current transformer ratio, for
example, the three-subsystem scheme will operate
for ground-fault resistances up to about 100 Ω
primary impedance. Under the same conditions,
the two-subsystem scheme will operate up to
about 200 Ω primary fault resistance.
The two-subsystem package is suitable for all
applications except single-pole tripping, where the
three-subsystem package must be applied. The
basic operation of the scheme is illustrated in
Figure 2-6. Each current is fed through a noninductive resistor, supplying a voltage output to the
squaring amplifier (SA) that is exactly proportional to the primary currents. The output of these
amplifiers is used to key the individual channels
and, through the local delay timers (LDT), to
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
Protected Line
Station G
a
b
c
1
Station H
2
a
b
c
2
SA
SA
SA
Squaring Amplifiers
SA
SA
SA
LDT
LDT
LDT
Channel
Facilities
LDT
LDT
LDT
Logic Square Waves
Local Delay Timers
Logic Square Waves
Remote
Square
Waves Remote Square Waves
a) Three-Subsystem (1a 1b 1c) System
a
b
c
Protected Line
Station G
1
Station H
a
b
c
2
Squaring Amplifiers
SA
SA
Ia–Ib
SA
Channel Facilities
LDT
SA
Ia–Ib
LDT
LDT
LDT
Local Square Waves
Remote Square Waves
Local Square Waves
Remote Square Waves
b) Two-Subsystem (Ia Ib IG) System
Figure 2–6. Basic Segregated Phase Comparison Systems.
December 2004
Page 2–7
TCF–10B System Manual
provide the local square waves for comparison.
The timers are adjustable between 2 and 20ms to
compensate for the delay time of the channel. This
digital delay circuit translates the pulse train independently of the pulse width ratio, in contrast to
the ac phase angle shift used in the other systems.
The ac phase shift delay uses frequencydependent components, which are accurate only at
system frequency and can “ring” during transient
conditions.
The square wave comparison is made independently for each current in the separate subsystems.
Separate channels are required for each of the
subsystems. One of the comparison circuits is
shown in simplified form in Figure 2-7. In this
dual comparison circuit, AND-P is used for the
positive half-cycles and AND-N for the negative
half-cycles. As shown in Figure 2-7, the received
positive square wave corresponds to a “1” input to
AND-P, and the received negative square wave to
a “0” input, negated to “1”, into AND-N. Except
for this variation, operation is as shown by the
square wave blocks in the lower half of Figure
2-5.
To generate the local and keying square waves,
conventional phase comparison systems use
thresholds equivalent to (or very near) the zero
axis. As a result, an internal fault with outfeed
looks like an external fault to those systems (see
Figure 2-8). The offset keying technique permits
the relay system to trip for internal faults with
outfeed current out at one terminal. While the
outfeed condition is very unusual, it presents
difficult problems to the great majority of pilot
relaying systems when it does occur. Outfeed can
occur in any of the following cases:
• Series-capacitor-compensated
parallel
lines.
• Weak-feed or zero-feed applications,
particularly with heavy through load.
• Some multi-terminal applications.
• Series-compensated (line-end compensation) line with a source inductive
reactance smaller than series capacitor
reactance.
Page 2–8
Technologies, Inc.
• Some single-line-to-ground faults, occurring simultaneously with an open
conductor, where the fault is on one side of
the open conductor.
• Some single-line-to-ground faults with
high fault resistance and heavy through
load (such conditions can cause outfeed
only in the faulted phase current, not in the
ground subsystem).
The offset keying technique allows the relay
system to work like a true current differential
scheme. The scheme takes advantage of the fact
that, for the outfeed condition, the current into the
line is greater in magnitude than the current out of
the line for the internal fault.
This relationship is illustrated in Figure 2-8,
where IG equals IF plus IH. While the two terminal
currents may have any angular relationship with
one another, most outfeed conditions display a
nearly out-of-phase relationship. The out-of-phase
condition illustrated is the most difficult case for
phase comparison, as well as the most common
outfeed condition.
In the offset keying technique, the keying
threshold is displaced in the positive direction,
away from the zero axis. The local square wave
thresholds are displaced negatively. To maintain
security, the local thresholds are separated from
each other, providing “nesting” during external
faults. Typical settings are shown in Figure 2-9.
Figure 2-10 illustrates the square wave characteristics of offset keying for normal internal faults,
external faults, and internal faults with outfeed.
The segregated Phase Comparison scheme incorporates a high degree of security. Its design is
based on extensive field experience and the model
line tests for the very long, series capacitorcompensated EHV lines.
Output trip signals are supervised by an arming
input and a number of security checks (see
Figure 2-8). Phase arming is performed by a
current rate-of-change detector that responds to
sudden increases, decreases, or angular shifts in
current. It operates on current changes of 0.5 A or
more, with an operating time of 2 ms. Ground
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
Arming Input-Current Detector (CD)
Channel Security Checks
Remote
Square Waves
from Channel
X
Comparison
AND
Trip
0
2
AND
P
OR
Local
Square
Waves
Positive
Negative
Note:
X = 3 Milliseconds for the Phase Subsystems
4 Milliseconds for Ground
AND
N
Figure 2–7. Basic Operation of the Segregated Phase Comparison System.
Outfeed for an Internal Fault (See Text)
IG
Fault
IH
IF
Local
Square Wave
Remote
Square Wave
Keying
Square
Wave
External Line Up
Note: Comparison at Both Terminals sees Fault as External.
Figure 2–8. Conventional Phase Comparison Response to an Outfeed Condition Block Tripping.
Typical Settings
+3A
-2A
-4A
Trip Positive I
Trip Negative Key
Zero Axis
(1)
(0) Local Positive
(0) Local Negative
(1)
Trip Positive
Trip Negative
Local Positive 1
0
Local Negative 1
0
Keying Square Wave
Figure 2–9. Typical Threshold Setting for Offset Keying.
December 2004
Page 2–9
TCF–10B System Manual
arming is 3I magnitude—typically
0.8 A secondary.
Security checks to comparison
AND (see Figure 2-8) include (1)
low channel signal blocking, (2)
lockout for sustained low channel
signal, (3) channel noise clamp,
and (4) receive guard block. For
the phase subsystems, a trip signal
occurs if comparison AND has an
output for more than 3ms (4ms for
the ground subsystem).
Technologies, Inc.
G
H
F
Local Positive
Local Negative
Local Positive 1
0
Local Negative 1
0
Trip Positive
Trip Negative
Trip Coincidence
Remote Square Wave
Keying
Square
Wave
Trip Positive
Trip Negative
Shaded Portion is
Trip Coincidence
Note:
Similar Comparison Occurs
at Terminal H.
Internal Line Up
2.2
Direct TransferTrip Systems
Direct
transfer-trip
systems
provide circuit-breaker tripping at
remote or receiver terminals,
without any supervision by fault
detectors. The most important
consideration in a direct transfertrip system is the type of channel
applied. The communications
equipment must carry the total
burden of system security and
dependability.
a) Normal Internal Fault
G
H
F
IKey
Local Positive
Local Negative
Note:
Local Square
Waves "Nest" within
Remote Square Wave
to Provide Security
Local Positive 1
0
Local Negative 1
0
Trip Positive
Trip Negative
Trip Positive
Trip Negative
Trip Coincidence: None
Keying
Square
Wave
Note:
Similar Comparison Occurs
at Terminal H.
Remote Square Wave
External Line Up
Direct transfer-trip systems are
applied for:
• Line protection with nonpermissive under reaching
transfer-trip systems.
• Transformer
protection
where there is no circuit
breaker between the transformer and transmission
line.
• Shunt reactor protection.
• Remote breaker
protection.
failure
A sample schematic is shown in
figure 2-11.
b) External Fault
G
H
F
IKey
Local Positive
Local Negative
Local Positive 1
0
Local Negative 1
0
Trip Positive
Trip Negative
Trip Positive
Trip Negative
Trip Coincidence
Remote Square Wave
Internal Line Up
Shaded Portion is
Trip Coincidence
Keying Square Wave is
Steady Trip Negative
Note:
Similar Comparison Occurs
at Terminal H.
c) Internal Fault with Outfeed (Comparison at Strong Terminal)
Figure 2–10. Response of Segregated Phase Comparison
System with Offset Keying.
Page 2–10
December 2004
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
Page 2–11
Figure 2–11. TCF-10B Transceiver Unit Connections 2 Freq. set (Single Channel Direct Transfer Trip) Typical Catalog: C2N1B2END
2
TCF–10B System Manual
2.2.1
Technologies, Inc.
Transformer Protection
A typical transformer protection scheme is illustrated in Figure 2-12. A direct trip channel is
keyed to the trip state when the transformer
protective relays operate. The received trip signal
will then trip the remote end breaker and lock out
reclosing.
Although it is no longer widely used, you may use
a ground switch operated by the transformer
protective relays for transformer protection. In
this technique, a ground fault is initiated on the
transmission line at G, providing adequate fault
current for the ground relays at H to trip the
breaker at H. This system is slower but is widely
used on lower voltage systems and is fairly simple
and straightforward. It does not require any secure
communication medium between G and H. For
this type of application, the ground relays at H can
be set to operate for 100 percent of the line and not
overreach to bus G.
While a single switch on one phase is normally
applied, you may use a double switch on two
phases to initiate a double-phase-to-ground fault.
In the latter case, both phase and ground relays
can operate to ensure redundancy. Fault grounding
is not applicable to all systems because of high
short-circuit capacity.
2.2.2
Shunt Reactor Protection
Shunt reactors are frequently used on HV and
EHV lines. These line reactors are connected on
the line side of the circuit breakers (see
G
H
Transformer Bank
Shunt Reactor
Protection
87.50/51.63, etc.
+
+
Bi-Directional Direct
Transfer Trip Channel
DTT
DTT
52
TC
52
TC
52a
52a
–
–
Figure 2–13. Direct Transfer Trip for
Shunt Reactor Protection.
Figure 2-11). A remote trip channel is thus
required for a fault in the shunt reactor.
2.2.3
Remote Breaker-Failure
Protection
A remote breaker-failure system is necessary
where a multi-breaker bus, such as a breaker-anda-half or ring bus scheme, is applied at a
transmission line terminal. A direct transfer-trip
system will be a part of the remote breaker-failure
protection.
2.2.4
Direct Trip Channel
Considerations
The channel and its terminal equipment are major
factors in the proper operation of the direct
transfer-trip system. The channel must neither fail
to provide a correct trip signal nor provide a false
signal.
Transmission Line
87
+
DTT
Direct Transfer Trip Channel
52
TC
52c
–
Figure 2–12. Direct Transfer Trip for
Transformer Protection.
Page 2–12
While other types of modulation are possible,
frequency-shift keyed (FSK) equipment offers the
best compromise between noise rejection capability and equipment complexity. Two frequencies
are usually transmitted in an FSK system: the
“guard” frequency is transmitted during non-trip
conditions and the “trip” frequency is transmitted
when a breaker trip is required. Because a signal
is always present, the FSK system will allow the
channel to be continuously monitored. Continuous
channel monitoring is necessary in a direct trip
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
(+)
TB6-1
TB2-5
(+)
TB6-1
TB6-3
Channel 1 DTT
TB2-5
Channel 1 DTT
Loss of Channel 1
TB6-2
Channel 1 DTT
TB2-6
TB6-4
TB6-1
TB6-3
TB2-5
Loss of Channel 1
TB6-2
TB2-5
TB6-1
Loss of Channel 2
Loss of Channel 2
Channel 2 DTT
Channel 2 DTT
Channel 2 DTT
TB2-6
TB2-6
TB2-6
TB6-4
TB6-2
TB6-2
LOR
LOR
(–)
(–)
Figure 2–14.
Dual Channel Direct Transfer Trip with Throwover
to Single Channel.
Figure 2–15.
Dual Channel Direct Transfer Trip with Throwover
to Single Channel.
system, because breaker tripping is not supervised
by any local relays.
be as dependable as a narrower channel under
equal receive-level conditions.
As noise in the channel increases, a point is
reached where there is a high probability of false
tripping. The level of noise at which the channel
becomes unreliable must be determined by tests.
Signal-to-noise ratio monitors must then be
included with any direct trip channel, to block
possible false tripping. It is important, however,
not to get the noise monitors any more sensitive
than required, since their operation will prevent
tripping.
A dual channel system is recommended for direct
trip applications. Two FSK channels should be
used in series, so that both must trip before the
breaker is tripped. Many tests have indicated that
dual channels improve the security of the direct
trip system by several orders of magnitude. Use of
a dual channel system has very little effect on
dependability, even if both channels are on the
same transmission medium.
There are three important aspects to the application of FSK channels to direct trip systems:
channel bandwidth, dual channel systems, and
channel protection.
Although faults should be cleared in the shortest
possible time, speed is not the only criterion for
selecting equipment. It is important to use the
narrowest bandwidth equipment possible. A wide
bandwidth channel may give the desired speed,
but more noise enters the system. Thus, the
channel will block tripping sooner than a narrower
bandwidth channel with the same received signal
level. A wideband channel will consequently not
If you want to increase the dependability, you can
modify the dual channel transfer trip scheme to
allow a single channel trip when there is failure of
the other channel. A typical Dual Channel
Throwover to Single Channel Scheme is illustrated in Figures 2-14 & 2-15.
2.3
The TCF–10B frequency-shift equipment can
operate in either the two- or three-frequency
mode, but ordinarily operates as a two-frequency
system. The three basic frequencies are as follows
(see Figure 2-16):
fC
December 2004
Special Considerations
Center frequency
Page 2–13
2
TCF–10B System Manual
fH
fL
High-frequency, is a frequency shift (∆f)
above fC
Low-frequency, is a frequency shift (∆f)
below fC
The value of ∆f depends on the bandwidth of the
TCF–10B set. For a bandwidth of 1600 Hz, ∆f is
500 Hz. A bandwidth of 380 Hz yields a ∆f of
100 Hz, while the 800 Hz bandwidth ∆f can be
either 250 or 100 Hz, depending on the setting of
S5 on the Transmitter Board. The center channel
frequency (fC) can vary from 30 to 535 kHz (in
0.5 kHz steps).
In the two-frequency systems, only fH and fL are
used. The two frequencies function differently and
take on different labels when operating with the
different types of protective relay systems.
2.3.1
Directional Comparison
Unblocking (Two-Frequency)
The higher frequency (fH), or “Guard” frequency,
is transmitted continually as a blocking-type
signal during normal conditions, to indicate that
the channel is operative and to prevent remote
relay tripping when external faults occur.
For a fault sensed by the local overreaching pilot
relay, the transmitter is frequency-shifted to a low
frequency (fL), called “Unblock” frequency. The
transmitted power is normally 1 W, boosted to
10 W for the “Unblock” operation.
The Directional Comparison Unblocking system
will generally use the wide band, wide shift (800
Hz BW, ±250 Hz Shift) TCF–10B carrier set.
Also, the most common power output level used
will be the 1 watt block and 10 watt trip. The type
of carrier applied with this scheme may be varied
from the normal for special circumstances, e.g.,
when matching the new TCF–10B equipment at
one end of the line with the older TCF, TCF-10, or
TCF-10A equipment at the other end. In this case,
you must apply the wide band, narrow shift carrier
(800 Hz BW, ±100 Hz Shift) to match the older
carrier characteristics.
Page 2–14
Technologies, Inc.
2.3.2
Transfer Trip: Overreaching,
Underreaching or Direct (TwoFrequency)
The higher frequency (fH), or “Guard” frequency,
is transmitted continually during normal conditions. For a fault sensed by the overreaching (or
underreaching) pilot relay, the transmitter is
shifted to the low frequency (fL), called “Trip”
frequency.
When using the TCF–10B for any permissive
overreaching or underreaching line relay system,
you can apply any bandwidth set. However, the
best all around set to use will be the wide band,
wide shift (800 Hz BW, ±250 Hz Shift)
equipment. If signal-to-noise ratio is of concern,
however, you may use the narrow band set; on the
other hand, if relay speed is critical, you may
apply the extra wide band (1600 Hz, ±500 Hz
Shift) equipment. If, in direct transfer trip
systems, security due to S/N is of concern, we
strongly recommend that you apply only narrow
band equipment. In any of these systems, the usual
power level combination will be 1 watt for guard
and 10 watts for the trip signal.
2.3.3
Phase Comparison
Unblocking: Dual or
Segregated (Two-Frequency)
Phase Comparison relays use square wave signals
for operation. The transmitter is keyed to a “Trip
Positive” frequency when the relay square wave
goes positive, and is keyed to a “Trip-Negative”
frequency when the relay square wave is at zero.
The Trip Positive frequency is frequency-shifted
below fC; the “Trip Negative” frequency is
frequency-shifted above fC. Either frequency can
function as a trip or block, depending on the local
square wave.
For Phase Comparison systems, you can use only
the wide band with wide shift or extra wide band
TCF–10B. In the interest of conserving spectrum,
the wide band, wide shift channel is most
common. However, if speed is important, you may
apply the extra wide band set. The most often
applied power level will be 10 watts for both
“Trip-Positive” and “Trip-Negative”.
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
Amplitude
carrier unit, it will allow that heat to be outside of
either unit.
DTT Trip
(Trip 1)
fL (fC–f)
Unblock Trip
(Trip 2)
fC
fH (fC+f)
Figure 2–16. TCF–10B 3-Frequency System.
2.3.3.1 Phase Comparison Relaying and
20V Auxiliary Power Supply
When ordering a TCF-10B for use with phase
comparison relaying, a 20V auxiliary power
supply is provided.
The majority of interfaces between the relay and
the communications equipment are done at the
station battery. If the control battery is 125 Vdc,
then the carrier output will be powered up with
125 Vdc to provide station battery voltage to the
relay. However, in phase comparison relay
systems, the ratio, of the on and off state, of the
carrier circuit ouptut and the on and off state of the
relay’s keying circuit is critical to provide a square
wave that closely represents the power system ac
wave. Therefore, based on the type of inputs used
on the relay system at the point it interfaces with
the carrier system, this will determine what
voltage level is acceptable. This criticality is on
the order of 500 or less microseconds.
Due to the capacitors typically applied to output
circuits to dampen surges, the higher the voltage
applied, the longer it will take to dissipate the
energy. Therefore, to dissipate this energy quickly,
to adhere to the timing requirements for a secure
phase comparison relay system, the use of the
auxiliary 20V power supply is necessary.
Different relay manufacturers’ input circuits may
vary and can conceivably decay fast enough not to
hinder the security of the relay system operation.
However, the energy dissipated will also generate
a significant amount of heat. By utilizing the
auxiliary supply, mounted on the rear of the
December 2004
Pulsar strongly recommends the application of the
auxiliary power supply for two reasons; decay
time of the energy, and the heating caused by the
dissipation of energy.
2.3.4 Three-Frequency Systems
The TCF–10B also provides for three-frequency
system applications (see Figure 2-16), e.g.,
Directional Comparison Unblocking with Direct
Transfer Trip, or Permissive Overreaching
Transfer Trip with Direct Transfer Trip. All three
frequencies are closely-controlled discrete
frequencies within the equivalent spacing of a
single wideband or extra wideband channel. In
applying a three-frequency system, the Direct
Transfer Trip keying inputs shifts the channel low
(i.e., –250 Hz for 800 Hz bandwidth) and the
unblock key shifts the channel high (i.e., +250 Hz
for 800 Hz bandwidth).
See figure 2-17 for a sample schematic.
2.3.5 Three terminal line applications.
When a three terminal line protection requires
power line carrier equipment, each terminal must
have one transmitter and 2 receivers, since each
terminal must receive a signal from each of the 2
other ends of the line. Fig. 2-18 is a representation
of the transmitter/receiver complement required to
implement a single function: Hybrids or other
isolation devices are required between transmitters and transmitters to receivers. See the
following section for details.
2.4 Hybrid Applications
The purpose of the hybrid is to enable the connection of two or more transmitters together on one
coaxial cable without causing intermodulation
distortion due to the signal from one transmitter
affecting the output stages of the other transmitter.
Hybrids are also required between transmitters
and receivers, depending on the application. The
hybrid circuits can, of course, cause large losses in
the carrier path and must be used appropriately.
High/low-pass and band-pass networks may also
be used, in some applications, to isolate carrier
Page 2–15
2
Figure 2–17. TCF-10B Transceiver Unit Connections 3 Frequency Set
(Unblock Relaying and Direct Transfer Trip) Typical Catalog: C2M1B3END or C2M1B3ETD
Page 2–16
TCF–10B System Manual
December 2004
Technologies, Inc.
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
B
A
Transmitter
Receiver
F3
2
F1
Transmitter
C
Receiver
Transmitter
Receiver
F2
Receiver
F1
F2
F2
Receiver
F1
Receiver
F3
F3
Figure 2–18. Three terminal line application.
T1
T1
X Hybrid
To Line
Tuner
T2
Figure 2–19. Hybrid Connections – Two
Transmitters.
December 2004
X Hybrid
To Line
Tuner
R1
Figure 2–20. Hybrid Connections – Single BiDirectional Channel.
Page 2–17
TCF–10B System Manual
equipment from each other. Several typical applications of hybrids are shown in the following
diagrams, Figures 2-19 through 2-23. A summary
of some of the more important application rules
are given below:
1. All hybrids in a chain should be resistive
type hybrids except the last hybrid, that is,
the one connected to the line tuner.
2. The last hybrid in the chain should be the
reactance type hybrid or a skewed type.
3. When applying transmitters to reactance
type hybrids, the frequency spacing
between the widest spaced transmitters is
about 4% for frequencies below 50 kHz
and 6% for frequencies above 50 kHz. If
this rule is not followed then the hybrid
cannot be adjusted to provide the best
possible isolation between all transmitters.
4. When applying transmitters and receivers
to a reactance type hybrid the frequency
spacing between the transmitter group and
receiver group is of no concern; however,
all the transmitter frequencies must meet
the frequency spacing rule above. This rule
is based on receivers with high input
impedance.
5. When the last hybrid is a skewed type then
the receiver port should be terminated with
a 50Ω resistor to obtain proper isolation.
A few guidelines follow in order of importance:
1. The hybrids should be arranged with the
lesser losses in the transmitter path and the
greater losses in the receiver path to
provide more transmitter signal levels onto
the power line.
• Resistive Hybrid
Technologies, Inc.
2. Transmitters that are used with wide
bandwidth channels should be arranged
with lower losses and those of narrower
bandwidths should have the higher losses.
3. Narrow band systems are not as susceptible
to noise as wider band systems are,
therefore they can tolerate the higher loss.
If possible, transmitters used for common applications should be arranged for equal attenuation.
This would apply to systems that use dual
channels such as Direct Transfer Trip (DTT) or
Segregated Phase Comparison.
Following are the type of hybrids and their associated style numbers.
2.4.1 Examples
Following are several figures that illustrate
possible hybrid applications. A short description
of each follows.
In these illustrations, Resistive Hybrids are
denoted as R hybrids, Reactive hybrids as X
hybrids and Skewed hybrids as S hybrids. Fig. 219 illustrates two transmitters being combined
onto a single coax cable for connection to a line
tuner. This would be a typical application for a
dual channel, uni-directional trip system. The
receive end of the system would not require a
hybrid so that the receivers would be tied together
via coax cable before connection into the line
tuner.
When only one transmitter and one receiver are
required as in a single channel bi-directional
transfer trip system or a directional comparison
unblocking system Fig. 2-20 can be applied. A
skewed hybrid may be used in place of the
H1RB
6266D72G05
• Skewed Hybrid
H1SB-R 1609C45G03
with terminating resistor
• Reactance Hybrid
H3XB
6266D71G03
• 19” panel suitable for 3 Hybrids
670B695H01
For details, please refer to the Hybrids System manual, CH44.
Page 2–18
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
T1
R Hybrid
2
T2
To Line
Tuner
X Hybrid
R1
R2
Figure 2–21. Hybrid Connections – Dual Bi-Directional Channel.
T1
R Hybrid
T2
X Hybrid
To Line
Tuner
T3
R Hybrid
T4
Figure 2–22. Hybrid Connections – Four Transmitters (Equal Losses).
December 2004
Page 2–19
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
reactive hybrid (X hybrid). The skewed hybrid has
a designated transmit port and receive port.
transfer trip systems. This provides equal losses to
each transmitter.
When two transmitters and two receivers are
being applied to a single coax cable, as in a dual
channel bi-directional direct transfer trip system,
Fig. 2-21 is appropriate.
When different types of modulation and different
bandwidths are utilized, it is better to arrange the
transmitters and receivers as shown in Fig. 2-23.
This allocates loss based on performance factors
of the modulation type and bandwidth.
Four transmitters used for similar applications can
be combined as shown in Fig. 2-22. This would be
representative of two dual channel uni-directional
T1/R1
ON-OFF
R Hybrid
T2
WIDE
BAND
FSK
R Hybrid
To Line
Tuner
R2
WIDE
BAND
FSK
T3
NARROW
BAND
FSK
R Hybrid
T4
NARROW
BAND
FSK
X Hybrid
R3
NARROW
BAND
FSK
R4
NARROW
BAND
FSK
Figure 2–23. Hybrid Connections – Four Transmitters (Unequal Losses).
Page 2–20
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
2.5
Ordering Information
The equipment identification number (catalog number) is located in the center of the TCF–10B front panel.
The TCF–10B catalog number comprises nine (9) characters, each in a specific position. This number
identifies the unit’s technical characteristics and capabilities, as well as any optional modules installed in
the unit.
Table 2-4 provides a complete listing of the options for ordering a TCF–10B, as well as a sample catalog
number. To order one or more TCF–10Bs, simply identify the features and optional modules you want for
each chassis. For example, the typical catalog number shown in Table 2-4 — C 2 N 1 B 2 E N D —
orders a TCF–10B with the following features:
Chassis: Transmitter/Receiver
Transmitter Power Output: 1/10 W
Bandwidth/Frequency Shift: 380 Hz BW ±100 Hz Shift (Direct Transfer Trip)
Power Supply: 110/125 Vdc battery input
Alarms & Carrier Level Indication: with alarms
Channel Type: 2-Frequency
Receiver Output Interface: Electro-mechanical (six contact outputs)
Voice Adapter/Trip Test Unit: No Voice Adapter Module
Receiver Logic: Directional Comparison (Unblock, POTT, PUTT, DUTT, or Direct Transfer Trip)
The TCF–10B accessories are listed in Table 2-3.
Table 2–3. TCF–10B Accessories.
Accessories for Voice Adapter
Module
Sonalert (2,900 Hz, 60–250 Vdc)
Style Number
SC250J
Telephone Hook switch
Assembly (panel mounting) with
Noise Cancelling Handset
(single prong plug)
205C266G01
Telephone Handset, Noise Cancelling
1353D88G02
Other Accessories
Module
Style Number
20 Volt Power Supply†
48 Vdc
1610C07G01
125 Vdc
1610C07G02
250 Vdc
1610C07G03
TC–10B/TCF–10B Extender Board
1353D70G01
† (For use with some phase comparison relaying equipment or older solid state equipment.)
December 2004
Page 2–21
2
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
Table 2–4. TCF–10B Catalog Numbers
Catalog Number Position
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Typical Catalog Number
C
2
N
1
B
2
E
N
D
Chassis
Transmitter only
Universal Receiver
Transmitter/Universal Receiver
T
S
C
Transmitter Power Output*
1/1 watt
1/10 watt
10/10 watt*
None (Receiver-only chassis)
1
2
3
6
Bandwidth/Frequency Shift
380 Hz BW –100 Hz Shift DOWN (Direct Transfer Trip)
380 Hz BW –100 Hz Shift UP (Direct Transfer Trip)
800 Hz BW –100 Hz Shift (Line relaying, use when matching up with existing
N
U
wideband TCF, TCF—10, or TCF—10A carrier at the remote end of the line)
W
M
P
800 Hz BW –250 Hz Shift (Line relaying)
1,600 Hz BW –250 Hz Shift (Phase comparison line relaying
1,600 Hz BW –500 Hz Shift (Directional comparison line relaying,
use when a higher than normal speed channel is desired)
Power Supply
48/60 Vdc battery input
110/125 Vdc battery input
220/250 Vdc battery input
X
4
1
2
Alarms and Carrier Level Indication
Transmitter alarms only
Receiver alarms and CLI only
Transmitter and Receiver alarms with CLI
T
R
B
Channel Types
2-Frequency
3-Frequency (Directional comparison line relaying plus transfer trip)
2
3
Receiver Output Interface
Solid state (Transistor outputs)
Electro-mechanical (six contact outputs)
No outputs (Transmitter-only chassis)
S
E
N
Voice Adapter / Trip Test Unit
Voice Adapter Module**
No Voice Adapter Module
Voice Adapter Module with Trip Test Unit**
Trip Test Unit w/o Voice Adapter Module
V
N
W
T
Receiver Logic
Directional Comparison (Unblock, POTT, PUTT, DUTT, or Direct Transfer Trip)
Phase Comparison
Telemetry (Slow speed Direct Transfer Trip; contains no noise processing or
channel logic; not recommended for line relaying applications)
No logic (Transmitter-only chassis)
D
P
T
N
*For 50 or 100 watt output, see Accessories
**Available in Transmitter/Receiver chassis only.
Page 2–22
December 2004
December 2004
Chapter 2. Applications and Ordering Information
Technologies, Inc.
Page 2–23
Figure 2–24. 20 Vdc Auxiliary Power Supply (1610C07; Sheet 1 of 2).
2
S, E, N
T, R , B
POWER SUPPLY 48V WITH ALARM RELAY
POWER SUPPLY125V WITH ALARM RELAY
POWER SUPPLY250V WITH ALARM RELAY
SHIFT UP TO TRIP
N , U , M , W , P, X
FSK RECEIVER / DISCRIMINATOR
V, N , W , T
4, 1, 2
2, 3
D , P, T, N
T, S , C
C
2
1
B
= item selected
1606C50G03
C020-VADMN-001
CF20-RXLMN-001
CF20-RXLMN-003
CF20-RXLMN-002
C020-RXVMN-202 or 203
N
2
E
N D
U
Figure 2–25. TCF–10B Catalog Numbers/Module Style Numbers (1355D19)
S
C
Technologies, Inc.
Chapter 3. Installation
3.1
Unpacking
3.4
If the TCF–10B is shipped unmounted, it is
packed in special cartons that are designed to
protect the equipment against damage.
Assembly
You can assemble the TCF–10B for use either in
one of the following configurations:
• Mounted in a fixed-rack cabinet.
• Mounted in a swing-rack cabinet
!
CAUTION
• Mounted on an open rack.
or in your own, customer-specified configuration.
Refer to Figure 3-3 for mounting dimensions.
UNPACK EACH PIECE OF EQUIPMENT
CAREFULLY SO THAT NO PARTS ARE LOST.
INSPECT THE CONDITION OF THE TCF-10B AS
IT IS REMOVED FROM ITS CARTONS. ANY
DAMAGE TO THE TCF-10B MUST BE
REPORTED TO THE CARRIER. DAMAGES ARE
THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE CARRIER, AND
ALL DAMAGE CLAIMS ARE MADE GOOD BY
THE CARRIER. PLEASE SEND A COPY OF ANY
CLAIM TO PULSAR TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
3.2
!
IF YOU ARE
SWING-RACK
THE CABINET
OPENING THE
USING THE TCF-10B WITH A
CABINET, MAKE SURE THAT
IS FIRMLY FASTENED BEFORE
RACK (TO PREVENT TIPPING).
Storage
If you are setting the equipment aside before use,
be sure to store it in its special cartons (in a
moisture-free area) away from dust and other
foreign matter.
3.3
CAUTION
Installation Location
3.5
TCF–10B Rear Panel
Connectors
The following connectors are accessible from the
Rear Panel (See Figure 3-1 and Figure 3-4):
• Terminal Blocks.
Install the TCF–10B in an area which is free from:
• Temperature exceeding environmental
limits (See “Environmental Requirements”
in Chapter 1)
• Cable Jacks
• Jumpers
• Input/Output Pins
• Corrosive fumes
• Dust
• Vibration
NOTE
Low-powered microprocessor relays housed in a solid metal case do not allow for the necessary
air circulation. If you are using this type of relay, make sure you provide one rack unit (1 RU) of
space on the top and bottom of the carrier set to ensure proper air circulation.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
3
Figure 3–1. TCF–10B Rear Panel (C020-BKPMN/1610C07).
C27
C28
C26
J13
C29
POS 1
POS 22
POS 20
CARRIER MOTHERBOARD
POS 18
POS 17
POS 14
C020BKPMN-001 REV 03
POS 5
POS 8
POS 12
SCHEMATIC C030BKPMN
PC BOARD C050BKPMN REV 02
Power Supply
mounted on rear of Chassis
Technologies, Inc.
POS 3
Chapter 3. Installation
3.5.1
Terminal Blocks
(Refer to Figure 3-4 for further information.)
• 10W PA (pins are to right of TB3)
• RF Interface (pins are to right of cable
jacks and jumpers)
TB7 Power Supply
(Terminals 1 thru 6)
TB6 EM Output
(Terminals 1 thru 9)
TB5 Voice Adapter
(Terminals 1 thru 9)
• CLI and Discriminator (pins are to left of
TB1)
TB4 Keying
(Terminals 1 thru 6)
• Receiver Logic (pins are to right of TB1)
TB3 10W PA
(Terminals 1 thru 6)
TB2 CLI and
Discriminator
(Terminals 1 thru 6)
TB1 Receiver Logic
(Terminals 1 thru 9)
3.5.2
3.5.5
Optional 20 Vdc Auxiliary
Supply
(See bottom of Figure 3–1)
Cable Jacks
J1
RF Interface module Transmitter, RF
output line, thru 2-wire coaxial cable
(UHF)
J2
RF Interface module Receiver, RF input
line thru 5,000Ω 4-wire coaxial cable
(BNC)
3.5.3
• Receiver (pins are to left of TB2)
Jumpers
JU1
UHF Chassis Grd (for J1 not installed)
JU2
BNC Chassis Grd (for J2 not installed)
• Battery Input (+, -)
• 20 V Output (+20 V, negative)
3.6
3.6.1
Connections
Safety Precautions
Read this Installation Section thoroughly before
making any connections to the TCF–10B. No one
should be permitted to handle any of the
equipment that is supplied with high voltage, or
connect any external apparatus to the
equipment, unless that person is thoroughly
familiar with the hazards involved.
Three types of connections are made:
• TCF–10B equipment ground
3.5.4
Input/Output Pins
Pins labeled C and A provide 16 input/output
connections per module (using even numbers 2
through 32 for all modules) as follows:
• Power Supply (pins are to right of TB7)
• EM Output (pins are to right of TB6)
• Voice Adapter (pins are to right of TB5)
• Keying (pins are to left of TB4)
• Transmitter (pins are to left of TB3)
December 2004
• DC power supply and other connections
• Coaxial cables
!
CAUTION
PRIOR TO MAKING CONNECTIONS, CLOSE
THE PROTECTIVE GROUND KNIFE SWITCH IN
THE CABINET.
Page 3–3
3
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
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Figure 3–2. Cable Termination Diagram (9651A13).
Page 3–4
December 2004
Chapter 3. Installation
3.6.2
TCF–10B Equipment Ground
In addition to the TCF–10B chassis ground
connection that is made through the cabinet or
rack, a ground connection is provided at the Rear
Panel Terminal Block (TB7). (See Figure 3-1 and
Figure 3-4.) A connection should be made
between TB7 Terminal 6 and the ground connection at the TCF–10B cabinet location.
3.6.3
DC Power Supply and Other
Connections
Input/Output terminals, on the rear of the
TCF–10B chassis, provide the connection points
for the power supply (48, 125, and 250 Vdc) and
customer interconnections. (See Figure 3-1 and
Figure 3-4). The terminal blocks on the rear of the
chassis can accept up to a 12 AWG wire with a
ring lug type Burndy YAV10C36 or YAV10 or
equivalent.
Any lead coming to or from the switchyard should
be shielded twisted pair to protect against transients.
3.6.4
Coaxial Cable
A coaxial cable is required for a low-impedance
path between the TCF–10B (Transmitter and
Receiver modules) and the Line Tuner (in the
switchyard). Connection jacks (J1 & J2), on the
Rear Panel, provide the point for coaxial cable
connection from the TCF–10B to the switchyard.
The type of coaxial cable we recommend is RG213/U (52Ωs, 29.5 pf/foot):
• Single-conductor
coaxial cable according to the following procedures:
1. Attach both ends of the coaxial cable in accordance with the Cable Termination Diagram
(see Figure 3-2, terminal block lugs, as
required).
2. In order to hold carrier loss to a minimum,
keep the cable the shortest possible length.
The minimum cable bending radius is six
times the cable diameter.
3. The copper braid of the cable must be
grounded at the end which connects to the
TCF–10B.
4. Without grounding the copper braid of the
cable, connect the cable to the ground
!
CAUTION
DO NOT GROUND THE END OF THE CABLE
THAT IS CONNECTED TO THE LINE TUNER.
terminal of the Line Tuner, at either of the
following:
• Impedance Matching Transformer
• Wideband Filter
If you are connecting the cable directly to the
line tuner, the cable connector can enter the
line tuner base either through the side or the
bottom of the base.
• #12 AWG
• 7 strand #21 copper
• Polyethylene insulator
• Copper shield
• Vinyl jacket (nominal O.D. 0.405 inch)
If the coaxial cable is to connect to related
cabinets enroute to the switchyard, you should
connect the RG-58A/U cable ||(and Amphenol
#83-58FCP or equiv. male UHF connector)|| from
J1 or J2 to the related cabinets, and RG-213/U
from the cabinets to the switchyard. Install the
December 2004
!
CAUTION
PRIOR TO ENERGIZING THE PLC TRANSMITTER, ENSURE THE TRANSMITTER COAX
(J1) IS CONNECTED TO A LOAD, EITHER THE
TUNED LINE TUNING EQUIPMENT OR A 50 OR
75Ω 25W IMPEDANCE.
Page 3–5
3
TCF–10B System Manual
3.7
Technologies, Inc.
High (NO or NC)
Disconnections
JU9
!
CAUTION
NEVER DISCONNECT THE CARRIER LEAD-IN
BETWEEN THE LINE TUNER AND THE
COUPLING CAPACITOR UNLESS THE LOW
POTENTIAL END OF THE COUPLING
CAPACITOR IS GROUNDED. BEFORE DISCONNECTING
THE
CARRIER
LEAD-IN
CONDUCTORS, CLOSE THE GROUNDING
SWITCH AT THE BASE OF THE COUPLING
CAPACITOR. IF THIS GROUND IS NOT
PROVIDED, DANGEROUS VOLTAGES CAN
BUILD UP BETWEEN THE LINE TUNER AND
COUPLING CAPACITOR.
3.8
Jumper Controls
Jumpers are set during installation, depending on
the particular TCF–10B features and applications
involved (see Figure 3-4).
3.8.1
JU10–
JU14 Input voltage selections for different
Keying inputs (15 V, 48 V, 125 V, or
250 V)
3.8.3
NOTE
JU1 is shipped in the “NC” state.
3.8.2
Keying PC Board
JU1
Power Off (NORM or INVERT)
JU2
Directional Comparison or Phase
Comparison (DCR or PCR)
JU3
1 W Guard, 10 W Trip or 10 W Guard,
10 W Trip (1/10 W or 10/10 W)
JU4
2-Frequency System or 3-Frequency
(Optional) System (2F or 3F)
JU6
Activates Shift High Contact Alarm
(IN or OUT)
JU7
Activates Shift Low Contact Alarm
(IN or OUT)
JU8
Selects NO or NC contact for Shift
Page 3–6
Transmitter PC Board
DIP switch S5 sets the frequency shift as follows:
• Position 1 = 50 Hz
• Position 2 = 100 Hz
• Position 3 = 200 Hz
• Position 4 = 400 Hz
3.8.4
10W PA PC Board
Jumper (JU1) for the optional Alarm Relay establishes loss of power condition (NO or NC).
NOTE
Power Supply PC Board
Jumper (JU1) for the optional Alarm Relay establishes contact type during loss of power condition
(NO or NC).
Selects NO or NC contact for Shift
Low (NO or NC)
JU1 is shipped in the “NC” state.
3.8.5
RF Interface PC Board
NOTE
JU1/JU5 are shipped in the “OUT” (4-wire)
state. JU4 is shipped in the 50Ω state.
Matching Impedance Jumpers:
JU4
50Ω
JU3
75Ω
JU2
100Ω
2-wire or 4-wire RF Termination:
JU1 and JU5
“IN” (2-wire)
JU1 and JU5
“OUT” (4-wire)
Attenuator Override Jumper (JU6):
• NORM Sensitivity (22.5mV to 70 V)
• HIGH Sensitivity (5mV to 17 V)
December 2004
Chapter 3. Installation
3.8.6
The Receiver Logic Module (style number CF20RXLMN-00X) has no jumpers on its PC board.
Instead, it provides three banks of DIP switches to
control its logic functions. Each board also
includes a pre-programmed, plug-in EPLD chip
for one of the following types of application:
• 2-Frequency Directional Comparison
Receiver/Discriminator & CLI
PC Board
Jumper J3 for low signal alarm relay establishes
NO or NC; the relay is energized when a receive
signal is present and above minimum sensitivity
setting. The module has an eight position DIP
switch. Please refer to Chap. 14 for details. The
DIP switch settings are provided here for your
convenience.
• 3-Frequency Directional Comparison
• 2-Frequency Phase Comparison
3.8.7 Receiver Logic PC Board
For complete information and instructions on
setting the DIP switches, please refer to “Setting
Table 3-1 Universal Receiver (SW1 settings).
SWITCH
SETTING
OFF
ON
SW1-1
FSK
AM
SW1-2
NO VOICE ADAPTER
VOICE ADAPTER
SW1-3
DTT (50ms D.O. on noise clamp)
UB (10 ms D.O. on noise clamp)
UB 2F or 3 Frequency
SW1-4
DIRECTIONAL COMPARISON RELAYING
PHASE COMPARISON RELAYING
SW1-5
SHIFT DOWN TO TRIP 2F or 3F
SHIFT UP TO TRIP 2F only
Note: It is recommended that the Receiver Logic pre-trip time delay be for at least a minimum of
4ms, preferably at the maximum the power system will allow for critical clearing times for Direct
Transfer Trip Applications. Refer to Receiver Logic Section for settings.
Table 3-2 Universal Receiver (SW1-1 set to the OFF position).
SW1-6
SW1-7
SW1-8
BANDWIDTH
SHIFT
2F/3F
OFF
OFF
OFF
380 Hz
100 Hz
2F
OFF
OFF
ON
800 Hz
250 Hz
2F
OFF
ON
OFF
1600 Hz
500 Hz
2F
OFF
ON
ON
800 Hz
250 Hz
3F
ON
OFF
OFF
1600 Hz
500 Hz
3F
ON
OFF
ON
800 Hz
100 Hz
2F
ON
ON
OFF
1600 Hz
250 Hz
2F
December 2004
Page 3–7
3
TCF–10B System Manual
the DIP Switches for Your Application” in Chapter
15. For a diagrammed overview of the possible
DIP switch settings and other signal flow information for each application, please refer to
Figure 15-7
(2-Frequency
Directional
Comparison), Figure 15-8 (3-Frequency
Directional Comparison), and Figure 15-9 (2Frequency Directional Comparison).
3.8.8
EM Output Board
There are six relays on the board; six jumpers
(JU1 thru JU6) determine the function of the
relays. The choice of functions are:
• Guard
• Trip 1
• Trip 2
• Off
There are six additional jumpers which provide
“NO” or “NC” contacts for the alarm relays as
follows:
• K1 (JU7)
Technologies, Inc.
3.8.9
Voice Adapter PC Board
A jumper and a DIP switch are provided, as
follows:
JMP1 Alarm Contacts (NO/NC)
When jumper is set in “NO” position,
and relay is de-energized, the alarm
contacts will be “OPEN”. When
jumper is in “NC” position, and relay
is de-energized, the alarm contacts will
be “CLOSED”.
SW1 User Functions
In the closed/down position the DIP
switch functions as follows;
• 1 Tone gives Alarm (TCF-10B)
• 2 Carrier gives Alarm (TC-10B)
• 3 Handset key mutes ear (TC-10B)
• 4 Beeper enabled (Both)
• K2 (JU8)
• K3 (JU9)
• K4 (JU10)
• K5 (JU11)
• K6 (JU12)
Page 3–8
December 2004
Figure 3–3. TCF-10B Mechanical Outline Drawing (1354D48).
3
Figure 3–4. TCF-10B Connection Drawing and Jumper Options.
TCFñ10B CHASSIS CONNECTIONS
MODULE
CORRESPONDING
TO TERMINAL
BLOCK
POWER
SUPPLY
E/M
OUTPUT
VOICE
ADAPTER
KEYING
10W PA
TB4
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
TB3
XMTR ON
1
CONTACT
2
3
SHIFT HI
4
CONTACT
5
SHIFT LO
6
CONTACT
7
8
9 NOT USED
RF
INTERFACE
RECEIVER
LOGIC
RECEIVER / FSK
DISCRIMINATOR
RS-232 FEMALE
NON-FUNCTIONAL
FOR FUTURE USE
J13
TB7
1 +
2 –
3
4
5
6
(Shows which terminals are wired for different catalog number options.)
D.C. INPUT
D.C. FAIL
ALARM
SPARE
CHASSIS GROUND
TB6
1 CONTACT 1-1
2
1-2
3
2-1
4
2-2 OUTPUT
5
3-1 CONTACTS
6
3-2
7
4-1
8
5-1
9
6-1
TB5
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
RCVR.
MIC
VOICE
COMMON
APPLICALARM C.O. ATIONS
ALARM C.O.
SIG. IN
CONTACT 4-2
OUTPUT
5-2
CONTACTS
6-2
DTT KEY
DTT RET.
PWR BOOST (PCR) /52b (DCR)
PWR OFF
UB/PC KEY
KEY COMMON
FOR SPECIAL TTU
USE ONLY. REFER
TO FIG. 18-6
J1
*
UHF
CONNECTOR
J2
*
TB2
1 + EX CLI
2 – 0-100 µA
3
SPARE
4
LOW SIGNAL
5
CONTACT
6
BNC
CONNECTOR
(REAR VIEW)
INTERNAL
JUMPER
TB1
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
+ V IN
GUARD (TRIP –)
NOISE
TRIP 2 (TRIP +) OR UNBLOCK
LOW SIGNAL OR LOW LEVEL
SPARE
SPARE
CHECKBACK TRIP
SPARE
3RU
4-WIRE
TRANSMIT
NOTES:
Only on sets with Electro-Mechanical outputs.
When Ju2, on the keying module, is in the DCR position, this input is used for 52b keying.
When JU2 is in the PCR position, this input is used for power boost.
4-WIRE
TRANSMITTER
(UHF)
Chassis Options
Transmitter Only
J1 and J2 coaxial connectors may be wired out to terminal blocks or connected to RF
hybrids. J1 is the 4-wire transmitter output. J2 is used for the 4-wire receive input only.
Receiver Only
These terminals do not need to be wired out.
In applications where 20 VDC is required and is not supplied from the interfacing relay, an
auxiliary power supply (style 1610C07G0_) can be supplied. It mounts on the back of the
chassis. (See Fig. 3-1)
Transceiver
(Transmitter and Receiver)
4-WIRE RECEIVE
(BNC)
Module Options
1. None (basic transmitter)
2. Voice adapter
1. None (basic transmitter)
2. Voice adapter
3. E/M outputs
(Combine options from above)
Terminal Blocks Used
TB4 (1-6), TB7 (1, 2, 6), TB3 (1-6), TB7 (3, 4)
TB5 (1-6)
TB1 (1-5, 8), TB7 (1, 2, 6), TB2 (1, 2, 5, 6), TB7 (3, 4)
TB1 (1-6, 8), TB7 (1, 2, 6)
TB6 (1-9); TB5 (7-9)
(See above)
Chapter 4. Test Equipment
Table 4-1 shows the equipment you should use to perform the Acceptance Tests (Chapter 5) and Routine
Adjustments (Chapter 6).
Table 4–1. Recommended Test Equipment.
Equipment
Application
High-Impedance Selective Level Meter, 380 Hz to 1 MHz
(Rycom 6021A)1
Impedance Matching
Transmitter Power Adjustment
Receiver Margin Setting
Current Meter (Simpson 260)1
Check dc Supply
Reflected Power Meter, Auto VLF Power SWR Meter
(Signal Crafter 70)1
Impedance Matching at Carrier Output
Oscilloscope (Tektronix)1,2
Transmitter Power
Adjustment for Optional Voice Adapter
Module
Frequency Counter, 80 MHz (H/P5381A)1,2
Transmitter Frequency
Non-Inductive Resistor, 50Ω, 25 W (Pacific)1
Transmitter Termination
Signal Generator (H/P 3325A, Signal Crafter Model 90)1,2
General ac output for lab measurements
Extender Board (1353D70G01)
(See Figure 4-1.)
!
CAUTION
WE RECOMMEND THAT THE USER OF THIS EQUIPMENT BECOME THOROUGHLY ACQUAINTED WITH
THE INFORMATION IN THESE INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE ENERGIZING THE TCF–10B AND ASSOCIATED
ASSEMBLIES. YOU SHOULD NOT REMOVE OR INSERT PRINTED CIRCUIT MODULES WHILE THE
TCF–10B IS ENERGIZED. ALL INTEGRATED CIRCUITS USED ON THE MODULES ARE SENSITIVE TO AND
CAN BE DAMAGED BY THE DISCHARGE OF STATIC ELECTRICITY. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS OBSERVE
ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE PRECAUTIONS WHEN HANDLING MODULES OR INDIVIDUAL COMPONENTS. FAILURE TO OBSERVE THESE PRECAUTIONS CAN RESULT IN COMPONENT DAMAGE.
1
Indicates “or equivalent” of the recommended equipment item.
2
Required only for the design verification test in Chapter 7.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
4
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
Figure 4–1. Extender Board.
Page 4–2
December 2004
Chapter 5. Installation/Adjustment Procedures
You perform routine adjustments in
the field for the following purposes:
• Verifying initial TCF–10B factory adjustments.
• Adapting the TCF–10B to your application.
• Setting the TCF–10B operating frequencies.
• Periodic maintenance.
5
Be sure to run the adjustment tests in
the following order:
1. Select the TCF–10B Center Frequency.
2. Review the Adjustment Data Sheets (at the end of this
chapter); you should complete the data sheets as you
perform the Adjustment Steps.
3. Select the TCF–10B Keying Conditions.
4. Select the TCF–10B Receiver Logic.
5. Select the TCF–10B Transmitter RF Output Impedance.
6. Check the Line Tuning and Matching Equipment.
7. Check the TCF–10B Transmitter Power Levels and
Frequency.
8. Set the TCF–10B margin and Internal and External CLI
Settings.
9. Check the TCF–10B Receiver Margin.
To prepare the TCF–10B for the
routine adjustment tests, perform the
following:
• Review the Test Equipment (Chapter 4).
• Review the Adjustment Data Sheets (at the end of this
chapter); you should complete the data sheets as you
perform the Adjustment Steps.
• Review the TCF–10B Block Diagram as described
under Signal Path (Chapter 6).
• Remove the cover from the front of the chassis. After
removing the cover, set it in a safe place.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B System Manual
!
Technologies, Inc.
CAUTION
MAKE SURE THAT THE POWER HAS BEEN
TURNED “OFF” USING THE POWER SWITCH
(S1) ON THE POWER SUPPLY MODULE; THE
INPUT (D3) AND OUTPUT (D11) LEDS SHOULD
NOT SHOW RED LIGHTS.
If you are using the optional Alarm Relay, set
jumper JU1 on the Power Supply Module.
Connect the system in accordance with the
connection diagram(s), at end of the Installation
section.
5.1 Select TCF–10B Center
Frequency and Shift
5.1.1 Transmitter Operating Frequencies
If the Transmitter Module is supplied with the
TCF–10B set, remove it from the TCF–10B
chassis and select the operating frequencies.
1. Using the module extractors, remove the
Transmitter Module.
2. Select the Transmitter center frequency
(between 30 and 535 kHz) by turning the four
Transmitter rotary programming switches (in
0.1 kHz steps) with a small screwdriver until
the desired frequency appears in the (four)
windows of the Transmitter Control Panel.
Position Settings
Frequency Shift
Settings
1
2
3
4
Shift
Narrow Band,
Narrow Shift
Up
Dwn
Up
Up
100 Hz
Wide Band,
Narrow Shift
Up
Dwn
Up
Up
100 Hz
Dwn
Up
Dwn
Up
250 Hz
Up
Dwn
Up
Dwn
500 Hz
Wide Band,
Wide Shift
Extra Wide Band,
Wide Shift
5.1.2 Receiver Center Frequency
If a Receiver Module is supplied with the
TCF–10B set, power up the TC-10B unit with the
appropriate dc power. With a small screwdriver,
depress the “SET” button on the front of the
receiver module. The frequency display will begin
to flash. Depress the raise or lower button until the
desired frequency is displayed. Depress “SET”
again to select this frequency. If you are not ready
to set the sensitivity, depress the “CANCEL”
button. If you are ready to set the sensitivity,
depress the “SET” button and proceed with the
steps listed in Section 5.7.
3. Set switch S5 for the appropriate frequency
shift, as shown in the following table.
4. Insert the module back into the TCF–10B
chassis by seating it with firm pressure.
Page 5–2
December 2004
Chapter 5. Installation/Adjustment Procedures
5.2 Select TCF–10B Keying
Conditions
JU3
This link allows you to select between
a 1W (Guard)/10W (Trip) or 10W
(Guard)/10W (Trip) operation by
placing the link in the 1/10W or
10/10W position, respectively. Select
the 1W/10W position.
JU4
Selecting the 2-frequency (2F)
position will set the Keying Module as
a two-frequency system. Selecting the
three-frequency (3F) position will set
the Keying Module in mode to
correctly operate as a three-frequency
system. Select the 3F position.
JU6
Placing JU6 to the IN position
activates the shift high contact; the
OUT position deactivates the shift
high contact.*
JU7
Placing JU7 to the IN position
activates shift low contact; the OUT
position deactivates shift low contact.*
JU8
Places shift high contacts in either the
normally open (NO) position or the
normally closed (NC) position.
JU9
Places shift low contacts in either the
normally open (NO) position or the
normally closed (NC) position.
5.2.1 Test Switches
Three push-button switches are provided for test
purposes:
S1
High-Level Power (HL)
S2
Shift High (SH)
S3
Shift Low (SL)
Each push-button is recessed, and can be activated
by sliding an object (e.g., a pen or pencil) through
each push-button access location on the Keying
Module front panel.
5.2.2 Keying Module LEDs
The LEDs at the bottom of the Keying Module
front panel indicate the Keying condition:
HL High-Level Key Output
SL
Shift High Key Output
SH
Shift Low Key Output
V
Voice-Level Key Output
TX Any Transmitter Key Output
5.2.3 Keying Module Jumpers
Remove the Keying Module from the chassis and
set jumpers (JU1 thru JU14) as desired.
JU1
JU2
Allows you to select between the
NORM/INVERT positions for Power
Off. Select the normal (NORM)
position to allow a Keying function in
the transmitter when proper voltage
level (15V, 48V, 125V, 250V) is
applied to the input terminals. Select
the invert (INV) position to allow a
Keying function in the Transmitter
when voltage is not present at the
input terminals. Set JU1 to invert
(INV).
Selects between a Directional
Comparison system and Phase
Comparison system. Set JU2 to DCR
(Directional Comparison).
December 2004
JU10–
JU14 Provides input keying voltage selections: 15/20V, 48V, 125V, 250V.
After setting the jumpers, insert the Keying
Module back into the TCF–10B chassis.
5.3 Select TCF–10B Receiver
Logic
Set the Receiver Logic PC Board switches (see
Section 15.3) in accordance with the TCF–10B
application:
• 2-Frequency, Directional Comparison
• 2-Frequency, Phase Comparison
• 3-Frequency, Directional Comparison
*Place in the “OUT” position when using with the Phase
Comparison relay systems.
Page 5–3
5
TCF–10B System Manual
5.4 Select TCF–10B Transmitter
RF Output Impedance
1. Configure the RF Output Impedance.
Remove the RF Interface Module from the
TCF–10B chassis and configure the output
impedance by setting jumpers:
• JU4 when set, provides 50Ω
• JU3 when set, provides 75Ω
• JU2 when set, provides 100Ω
2. Select 2- or 4-wire Receiver Input, using
jumpers JU1 and JU5:
• IN position for 2-wire (not normally used
for TCF–10B)
• OUT position for 4-wire (both JU1 and JU5
must be OUT)
3. If you are using an external hybrid chain, and
the receive signal is not high enough, a higher
sensitivity may be desirable. Set jumper JU6
to HIGH, if necessary.
4. Insert the RF Interface Module back into the
TCF–10B chassis.
5.5 Check Line Tuning and
Matching Equipment
1. Refer to the appropriate instructions for line
tuning equipment.
!
CAUTION
DO NOT ALLOW INEXPERIENCED PERSONNEL
TO MAKE THESE ADJUSTMENTS. PERSONNEL
MUST BE COMPLETELY FAMILIAR WITH THE
HAZARDS INVOLVED.
Technologies, Inc.
5.6 Check TCF–10B Transmitter
Power Levels and
Frequency
Turn “ON” the power and check the dc voltage
outputs from the Power Supply Module. Then,
turn “OFF” the power and remove the coaxial
cable connection to the Line Tuner and substitute
a 50, 75, or non-inductive 100Ω resistor termination (in accordance with the jumper settings in
5.4-1).
5.6.1 Check High-Level Output
1. Connect the Selective Level Meter to the 10W
PA Module control panel, at test jacks:
TJ1
Input - Top Jack
TJ2
Common - Bottom Jack
2. Tune the meter to the Transmitter frequency.
3. Turn power “ON” at the Power Supply
Module.
4. On the Keying Module control panel, press
and hold the top push-button (marked HL) to
key the Transmitter at High Level power.
The “HL” and “TX” LEDs should show
red.
5. Record the Selective Level Meter reading (at
TJ1, TJ2). The meter should measure .224
Vrms (0 dBm at 50Ω reference) for full HighLevel keying (10W power). If you measure 0
dBm, skip ahead to Step 8.
6. If the meter does not measure 0 dBm, turn the
power “OFF” at the Power Supply Module
and remove the Transmitter Module from the
chassis. Place the extender board into the
Transmitter Module position of the chassis.
Then plug the Transmitter Module onto the
extender board.
2. Perform the required adjustments.
Page 5–4
December 2004
Chapter 5. Installation/Adjustment Procedures
7. Turn the Power Supply “ON”. Turn the 10W
Adjust potentiometer R13 on the Transmitter
Module until the Selective Level Meter (at the
10W PA TJ1, TJ2) reads .224Vrms (0 dBm at
50Ω reference). Then place the Transmitter
Module back in the chassis.
If it is desirable to set full power at less than
10W, turn the 10W adjust potentiometer
(R13) accordingly. The level at the RF
Interface Module (TJ1, TJ2) is 40 dB higher
than at the 10W PA Module (TJ1, TJ2).
For example: If 22 dBm is desired at RF
Interface(TJ1, TJ2), set potentiometer R13 so
that 10W PA (TJ1, TJ2) reads -18 dBm. (The
PA gain is adjustable with R53 on the 10W PA
Module.)
8. Monitor the output of the 10W PA Module at
the RF Interface Module test jacks TJ1
(Line)/TJ2 (Line Common). On the 10W PA
Module, adjust potentiometer R53 INPUT
LEVEL SET for 22.4Vrms (10W) output
level.
9. On the Keying Module control panel, release
the (HL) push-button to reduce the
Transmitter power.
The “HL” LED should not be red; but the
“TX” LED should remain red.
and remove the Transmitter Module from the
chassis. Place the extender board into the
Transmitter Module position of the chassis.
Then plug the Transmitter Module onto the
extender board.
4. Turn the 1W Adjust potentiometer (R12) on
the Transmitter Module until the Selective
Level Meter (at the 10W PA TJ1, TJ2) reads
.0707Vrms (-10 dBm at 50Ω reference).
5. Repeat step 5.6.1-8 (above) at 7.07Vrms (1W)
output level.
6. Turn “OFF” the power supply.
7. Place the Transmitter Module back in the
chassis.
We recommend that you set the low level power
10 dB below full power. You may, however, use
any power level between 10W and 50mV.
|| 5.6.3 Adjusting Low-Level Output
for a Level Other Than 1W
Should you wish to adjust the low-level output for
a level other than 1W, use R12 on the transmitter
card to adjust to the level you desire. The
following chart gives you several levels that you
may use for reference.
Desired Power Output
(Watts)
Reading at 10W
PA TJ1, TJ2 (V rms)
0.5
0.05
1.5
0.0866
2.0
0.10
2.5
0.112
• Meter tuned to XMTR frequency
5
0.158
• Power “ON”
10
See Note
5.6.2 Check Low-Level Output
1. With the conditions the same as for the HighLevel Output check:
• Selective Level Meter at the 10W PA
Module control panel (TJ1, TJ2)
The “TX” LED should show red.
2. With the Transmitter keyed on LL, record the
Selective Level Meter reading (at TJ1, TJ2).
The meter should measure .0707Vrms (-10
dBm at 50Ω reference) for Low-Level keying
(1W power).
3. If the meter does not measure -10 dBm, turn
the power “OFF” at the Power Supply Module
December 2004
For a 10W low-level output, it is easier to move
jumper JU3 on the keying module to the 10/10W
position. ||
5.6.4 Check Voice-Level Output
Perform this procedure only if you are using the
Voice Level Output option.
Page 5–5
5
TCF–10B System Manual
1. With the conditions the same as for the HighLevel Output check:
• Selective Level Meter at the 10W PA
Module control panel (TJ1, TJ2)
• Meter tuned to XMTR frequency
• Power “ON”
2. Key the carrier set by lifting the handset from
its cradle, while muting the microphone, to
key the Transmitter at Voice-Level (4.3W
power, when the High-Level power is set to
10W).
The “V” and “TX” LEDs should show red.
3. Record the Selective Level Meter reading (at
TJ1, TJ2). The meter should measure .148
Vrms (-3.6 dBm at 50Ω reference) for Voice
Keying. If you measure -3.6 dBm, skip ahead
to Step 6.
4. If the meter does not measure -3.6 dBm, turn
the power “OFF” at the Power Supply Module
and remove the Transmitter Module from the
chassis. Place the extender board into the
Transmitter Module position of the chassis.
Then plug the Transmitter Module onto the
extender board.
5. Turn the Voice Carrier Adjust potentiometer
(R14) on the Transmitter Module until the
Selective Level Meter (TJ1, TJ2) reads .148
Vrms (-3.6 dBm at 50Ω reference). Then
place the Transmitter back in the chassis.
If using a full power level (other than 10W),
you should set the VF level accordingly, i.e.,
3.6 dB below the high-level value.
6. Monitor the output of the carrier set with an
oscilloscope at the 10W PA Module test jacks:
Technologies, Inc.
8. If the voltages above (.62/.20) do not approximate a ratio value of 3, adjust the AM
Modulation Adjust potentiometer (R11) on
the Transmitter, as follows:
• Clockwise if not enough signal (a value
less than 3).
• Counterclockwise if too much signal (a
value significantly greater than 3).
9. Un-key the Push-to-Talk switch (or handset).
5.6.5 Check Transmitter Frequency
1. At the Keying Module, push the recessed
push-button “SH” to shift the frequency
higher: (fC = center freq. set on front of
module)
fC + 100 Hz
Narrow Band or Wide Band,
Narrow Shift
fC + 250 Hz
Wide Band, Wide Shift
fC + 500 Hz
Extra Wideband, Wide Shift
If the frequency shift is incorrect on the
Transmitter Module, check the position of switch
S5 for the correct amount of shift.
2. At the Keying Module, release the “SH” pushbutton and push the “SL” push-button to shift
the frequency lower:
fC – 100 Hz
Narrow Band or Wide Band,
Narrow Shift
fC – 250 Hz
Wide Band, Wide Shift
fC – 500 Hz
Extra Wideband, Wide Shift
If the frequency is incorrect on the Transmitter
Module, check the position of switch S5 for the
correct frequency. Release push-button “SL”.
• TJ1
• TJ2
7. Voice key the Transmitter by lifting the
handset from its cradle and by whistling
loudly (about 1 kHz) to achieve the following
voltages:
• ~ .62V p-p (overall)
• ~ .20V p-p (valley)
Page 5–6
December 2004
Chapter 5. Installation/Adjustment Procedures
5.6.6 Restore Transmitter Module to
Normal
1. Turn the power “OFF” at the Power Supply
Module.
2. Remove the 50, 75, or 100Ω resistor termination and replace the coaxial cable connection
to the Line Tuner.
3. Move the Selective Level Meter to test jacks
marked “LINE” (on the RF Interface control
panel):
• TJ1 (Line)
• TJ2 (Common)
4. Turn the power “ON” at the Power Supply
Module.
5. On the RF Interface Module, configure output
impedance by setting a jumper. The Selective
Level Meter (TJ1, TJ2) should show a
maximum reading (Vrms) for 1W (+30 dBm)
power, as follows:
JU4
When set, provides 50Ω (7.07Vrms)
JU3
When set, provides 75Ω (8.6Vrms)
JU2
When set, provides 100Ω (10.0Vrms)
NOTES:
1. The foregoing procedure adjusts the
Receiver margin to the recommended 15 dB
value.
2. The Receiver bar graph CLI meter reading
should be 0 dB at this time.
6. If the above (Vrms) values are not achieved,
recheck the tuning of the coupling system, as
it is not presenting the Transmitter with the
proper termination.
5.7
Check TCF–10B Receiver
Margin Setting using
Remote Carrier Signal
1. At the Power Supply Module, turn the power
“ON”. If the frequency is not already set, refer
to section 5.1.2.
2. Arrange for a received signal from the remote
end,
3. Sensitivity setting:
On the Receiver module to complete the setting:
a) Hit “SET” twice until the display reads
“SET SENS?”
b) With the remote signal being received (at
the remote end, push the “LL button on the
keying module), depress “SET” again.
c) If you’re not adjusting the 15 dB margin,
depress “SET” again. If you are, then
depress “RAISE” or “LOWER” as
required to adjust it up or down 5 dB.
d) If you are not going to adjust an external
carrier level meter, depress “SET”.
Otherwise, press “RAISE” or “LOWER”
as required.
4. Set the external CLI.
3. In three-terminal line applications, the margin
adjustment procedure should use the weaker
of the two received signals.
Once you have completed the sensitivity
setting, the display scrolls this message: "Set
Ext CLI? – Hit Raise/Lower or Set when
done...”
4. When applying the TCF–10B with a phase
comparison relay, do not readjust the
Receiver level when keying with a square
wave signal. The CLI will read around -10 dB,
but this is an average reading of the on and
off square wave. The receiver will still
maintain the 15 dB margin. The CLI reading is
only accurate for a non-amplitude modulated
signal.
To calibrate the external CLI push the
CANCEL/RAISE or LOWER button. The
external CLI meter will move up and down
accordingly. The external meter is a 100µA
instrument. If it is calibrated in µA, the meter
should be set to read 67µA (this is equivalent
to 0 dB on the internal meter). The setting
should vary 3.3µA for each dB the margin
adjustment has been raised or lowered from
the 15 dB margin. If the meter is calibrated in
December 2004
Page 5–7
5
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
dB, set the meter to read equal to the internal CLI meter.
To accept the displayed level, push the SET button.
This completes the Receiver setting procedure.
5.8 Prepare the TCF–10B for Operation
Be sure that power is “ON” at the Power Supply Module.
1. Restore the Keying Module to the desired settings. (See the TCF–10B Adjustment Data Sheet near the
end of this chapter. This data sheet is to be completed by your settings department.)
2. Replace the cover on the TCF–10B control panel.
a) Secure the latch by pushing inward and sideways until the cover is secure.
b) You may lock the latches into place using meter seals.
This completes the “Routine Adjustment” procedure. The TCF–10B is ready to be put into operation.
NOTE
When placing the TCF–10B into service,
refer to the manual for the relay system you
are using with the TCF–10B System.
Page 5–8
December 2004
Chapter 5. Installation/Adjustment Procedures
TCF–10B ADJUSTMENT DATA SHEET
(1)
Power Supply
Test Jack
+20 Vdc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(+20V/Comm)
—20 Vdc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(—20V/Comm)
Input & Output LEDs ON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(2)
10W PA
Voice PA IN
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(Input/Common)
LLPA IN
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(Input/Common)
HLPA IN
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(Input/Common)
Transmit LED ON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(3)
5
——
RF Interface
XMTR Frequency, Shift High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(Line/Line Com)
XMTR Frequency, Shift Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(Line/Line Com)
XMTR Frequency, Center Freq. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(Line/Line Com)
Voice Level (if using a voice adapter) . . . . . . . . . .(Line/Line Com)
LL Level (guard) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(Line/Line Com)
HL Level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(Line/Line Com)
Received Frequency, Shift High . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(RCVR/RCVR Com)
Received Frequency, Shift Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(RCVR/RCVR Com)
Received Frequency, Center Freq. . . . . . . . . . . .(RCVR/RCVR Com)
Received Level
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(RCVR/RCVR Com)
Received Noise Level, w/Rem Transmitter off . . .(RCVR/RCVR Com)
(note bandwidth of meter when measuring noise level)
December 2004
Page 5–9
TCF–10B System Manual
(4)
Technologies, Inc.
Receiver/Discriminator (from other end)
bar graph meter w/LL Keyed
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(dB)
bar graph meter w/HL Keyed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(dB)
Noise LED Not Lit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . —
Low-Level LED Not Lit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . —
(5)
Receiver Logic
(a) 2 Frequency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Good Channel LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checkback Trip LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trip LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guard LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(b) 3 Frequency Logic
Good Channel LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Checkback Trip LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
UB/POTT Trip LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DTT Trip LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Guard LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(c) Phase Comparison
Good Channel LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trip Positive LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Trip Negative LED . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
(6)
Rear of Chassis
Reflected Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(J1)
(%)
Test Performed By _______________________________ Date ________________
Page 5–10
December 2004
Chapter 5. Installation/Adjustment Procedures
TCF–10B JUMPER & SWITCH SETTINGS
(1)
POWER SUPPLY
JU1
(2)
NO
U
NC
U
NORM
U
INV
U
DCR
U
PC
U
1 W/10 W
U
10 W/10 W
U
Power Alarm
KEYING
JU1
Power On/Off
JU2
Directional Comparison/
Phase Comparison
JU3
1W Guard, 10W Trip or
10W Guard — 10W/Trip
JU4
2-Frequency or 3-Frequency
2F
U
3F
U
JU6
Shift High Contacts
IN
U
OUT
U
JU7
Shift Low Contacts
IN
U
OUT
U
JU8
NO or NC for Shift High
NO
U
NC
U
JU9
NO or NC for Shift Low
NO
U
NC
U
JU10
DTT Keying Voltage
15V
U
48V
U
125V
U
250V
U
JU11
Ext. Voice Keying Logic
15V
U
48V
U
125V
U
250V
U
JU12
PWR Boost/52b Keying
Voltage
15V
U
48V
U
125V
U
250V
U
JU13
Power Off Keying Voltage
15V
U
48V
U
125V
U
250V
U
JU14
UB, POTT, PC Keying
Voltage
15V
U
48V
U
125V
U
250V
U
December 2004
5
Page 5–11
TCF–10B System Manual
(3)
Technologies, Inc.
TRANSMITTER
S5
Frequency—Shift Select (Down = Selected)
Position
Up
Down
1 (50 Hz)
2 (100 Hz)
3 (200 Hz)
4 (400 Hz)
(4)
10W POWER AMPLIFIER
JU1
(5)
(6)
Power Monitor
NO U
NC U
RF INTERFACE
(2-wire) IN U (4-wire) OUT U
JU1
2-Wire/4-Wire
JU2
Impedance-100Ω
IN U
OUT U
JU3
Impedance- 75Ω
IN U
OUT U
JU4
Impedance- 50Ω
IN U
OUT U
JU5
2-Wire/4-Wire
JU6
Sensitivity
(2-wire) IN U (4-wire) OUT U
HIGH U
NORM U
RECEIVER MODULE
FSK Receiver (TCF-10B):
Dip Switch (SW 1)
Pos 1
Pos 2
Pos 3
Pos 4
Pos 5
FSK
Bandwidth
T
300
T
600
T
1200
T
600
T
1200
T
600
T
1200
JU3
!Low Signal Contact
OPEN (Down or Off)
Closed (Up or On)
X FSK
T ON/OFF
T No voice
T Voice
T DTT 2F
T 3F or UB 2F
T DCR
T PCR
T Shift down to trip
T Shift up to trip*
Shift
2F/3F
Pos 6
Pos 7
Pos 8
100
2F
OFF
OFF
OFF
250
2F
OFF
OFF
ON
500
2F
OFF
ON
OFF
250
3F
OFF
ON
ON
500
3F
ON
OFF
OFF
100
2F
ON
OFF
ON
250
2F
ON
ON
OFF
T NO
T NC
||
|| *2F Only
|| ! = Inverted
Page 5–12
December 2004
Chapter 5. Installation/Adjustment Procedures
(7)
RECEIVER LOGIC - for information on the settings, please see Chapter 16
CF20-RXLMN-004: 2-FREQUENCY DIRECTIONAL COMPARISON LOGIC
5
December 2004
Page 5–13
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
CF20–RXLMN–002: 3-FREQUENCY DIRECTIONAL COMPARISON LOGIC
OPEN (OFF)
CLOSED (ON)
SW1–1
SW1–2
UB/POTT
TRIP DELAY
SW1–3
SW1–4
SW1–5
TRIP HOLD
SW1–6
SW1–7
GUARD HOLD
SW1–8
OPEN (OFF)
CLOSED (ON)
SW2–1
SW2–2
UNBLOCK TIME
SW2–3
NOISE ALLOWS UB TRIP
SW2–4
GUARD BEFORE TRIP
OPTIONS
SW2–5
SW2–6
SW2–7
SW2–8
DTT
TRIP DELAY
SW3–1
SW3–2
SW3–3
SW3–4
TRIP HOLD
GUARD HOLD
SW3–5
SW3–6
SW3–7
CHECKBACK #1 or #2
LOW LEVEL DELAY
SW3–8
Page 5–14
December 2004
Chapter 5. Installation/Adjustment Procedures
(8)
VOICE ADAPTER
U NO
JMP1
U NC
SW1 (Function active when in “ON” position)
5
POS 1 - Front Panel push-button gives alarms at opposite end TCF-10B
POS 2 - Carrier Alarm (TC-10B)
POS 3 - Push to talk function (TC-10B)
POS 4 - Beeper enabled (Both)
(9)
EM (RELAY) OUTPUT
JU1
Relay 1 Driver
Trip 1 (DTT for 3F) U
Trip 2 (UB/POTT, 3F) U
Guard U
JU2
Relay 2 Driver
Trip 1 (DTT for 3F)
U
Trip 2 (UB/POTT, 3F)
U
Guard U
JU3
Relay 3 Driver
Trip 1 (DTT for 3F)
U
Trip 2 (UB/POTT, 3F)
U
Guard U
JU4
Relay 4 Driver
Trip 1 (DTT for 3F)
U
Trip 2 (UB/POTT, 3F)
U
Guard U
JU5
Relay 5 Driver
Trip 1 (DTT for 3F) U
Trip 2 (UB/POTT, 3F)
U
Guard U
JU6
Relay 6 Driver
Trip 1 (DTT for 3F)
U
Trip 2 (UB/POTT, 3F)
U
Guard U
JU7
Relay 1 Contact
NO U
NC U
JU8
Relay 2 Contact
NO U
NC U
JU9
Relay 3 Contact
NO U
NC U
JU10
Relay 4 Contact
NO U
NC U
JU11
Relay 5 Contact
NO U
NC U
Relay 6 Contact
NO U
NC U
JU12
*JU13 Trip Delay _______________________________________
*JU14 Trip Delay _______________________________________
* On 1606C53G02 only
December 2004
Page 5–15
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
USER NOTES
Technologies, Inc.
Page 5–16
December 2004
Chapter 6. Signal Path
The following description of the TCF–10B signal path is in accordance with the Functional Block
Diagram (see Figure 6-1), and the rear panel previously shown (in Figure 3-1). The discussion of signal
path may be useful during Design Verification Testing (Chapter 7) or Installation/Adjustment (Chapter 5).
6.1 Power Supply Module
6.2 Keying Module
Terminal Block (TB7)
Voltage Inputs
TB7/1
Positive Vdc (also pins C/A-12)
+20 Vdc
Pins A-2 and A-4
TB7/2
Negative Vdc (also pins C/A-14)
-20 Vdc
Pins C-2 and C-4
Common
Pins C/A-30 and C/A-32
The Vdc is received from three (3) available
groups of station batteries:
• 38–70 Vdc (48 or 60 Vdc nominal)
Terminal Block (TB4)
TB4/1
DTT (Direct Transfer Trip) Key (to
pin A-10)
• 176–280 Vdc (220 or 250 Vdc nominal)
TB4/2
DTT Return (to pin C-10)
TB7/3
Failure Alarm Signal (also pins
C/A-16)
TB4/3
52b or Pwr Boost (to pin C-16)
TB7/4
Failure Alarm Signal (also pins
C/A-18)
TB4/4
Pwr Off (to pin A-16)
TB4/5
UB (Unblock)/PC (Phase Comparison) Key (to pin A-22)
TB4/6
Key Common return for Power
Boost, Power Off, and UB/PC key
(to pin C-22)
• 88–140 Vdc (110 or 125 Vdc nominal)
TB7/5
Spare
TB7/6
Chassis Ground
Voltage Output to All Other Modules
Positive voltage outputs (+20 Vdc) are
available at pins A-2 and A-4, while negative
voltage outputs (-20 Vdc) are available at pins
C-2 and C-4. Common to ground (pins C/A30 and C/A-32).
Optional low-voltage power alarm relay
outputs
Optional low-voltage power alarm relay
outputs are available at pins C/A-16 and
C/A-18.
Inputs
• External Voice Key (pins C/A-12)
• Optional Voice Key (pin C-24)
Outputs to Transmitter Module
• Shift Low (pin A-28)
• Shift High (pin A-26)
• High-Level 10W Key (pin A-8)
• Voice Key (pin A-6)
• Any Transmitter Key (pin C-6)
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
6
TCF–10B System Manual
Outputs to 10W PA Module
Technologies, Inc.
Terminal Block (TB3)
• Contact Shift Low (pins C/A-20)
TB3/1
TX (Transmitter) ON (pins C/A-12)
• Contact Shift High (pins C/A-14)
TB3/2
TX (Transmitter) ON (pins C/A-14)
TB3/3
Contact 1 Shift High, to alarms
TB3/4
Contact 2 Shift High, to alarms
TB3/5
Contact 1 Shift Low, to alarms
TB3/6
Contact 2 Shift Low, to alarms
Output to Receiver Module
Any Transmitter Key (pin C-6)
6.3 Transmitter Module
Voltage Inputs
+20 Vdc
Pins A-2 and A-4
-20 Vdc
Pins C-2 and C-4
Common
Pins C/A-30 and C/A-32
Input from Transmitter Module
0 dBm for 10W output or -10 dBm for 1W
output (pins C/A-28)
Output to RF Interface Module
1W, voice or 10W (pins C/A-16 and C/A-18)
Inputs from Keying Module (4V Standby,
19V Keyed)
• Shift Low (pins C/A-24)
6.5 RF Interface Module
• Shift High (pin C-10)
Voltage Inputs
• High-Level (10W) Key (pins C/A-8)
• Voice Key (pins C/A-6)
• Any Transmitter Key (pin A-10)
Input from Optional Voice Adapter Module
AM Voice (pin C/A-26)
Output to 10W PA Module
0 dBm for 10W or -10 dBm for 1W
Transmitter output power (pins C/A-28)
+20 Vdc
Pins A-2 and A-4
-20 Vdc
Pins C-2 and C-4
Common
Pins C/A-30 and C/A-32
Input from 10W PA Module
1W, voice, or 10W (pins C/A-16 and C/A-18)
Output to Receiver Module
RF Output Signal (pins C/A-28)
Other Outputs
6.4 10W PA Module
Voltage Inputs
+20 Vdc
Pins A-2 and A-4
-20 Vdc
Pins C-2 and C-4
Common
Pins C/A-30 and C/A-32
Page 6–2
1) Cable Jacks
• J1–RF Interface module (C/A-12 and C/A10) Transmitter RF output line, through
coaxial cable (UHF)
• J2–RF Interface module (C/A-24 and C/A22) Receiver RF input line coaxial cable
(BNC)
December 2004
Chapter 6. Signal Path
• Center Frequency (pin A-10)
2) Jumpers
JU1
UHF Chassis Ground (for J1, not
supplied)
JU2
BNC Chassis Ground (for J2, not
supplied)
• Noise (pin A-8)
6.7 Receiver Logic Module
Voltage Inputs
6.6 Receiver/Discriminator
Module
+20 Vdc
Pins A-2 and A-4
-20 Vdc
Pins C-2 and C-4
Voltage Inputs
Common
Pins C/A-30 and C/A-32
+20 Vdc
Pins A-2 and A-4
-20 Vdc
Pins C-2 and C-4
• Level (pins C/A-26)
Common
Pins C/A-30 and C/A-32
• High/Low Frequency (pins C/A-28)
Input from CLI/Discriminator Module
• Noise (pin C-8)
Any Transmitter Key (pin C-6)
Terminal Block (TB1)
Input from RF Interface Module
RF Output Signal (pin C-28)
TB1/1
+ V Input from pins C/A-12
TB1/2
Guard or Trip Negative from pins
C/A-14
TB1/3
Noise from pins C/A-16
TB1/4
Trip 2, Trip Positive or Unblock
from pin C-18
TB1/5
!Low Signal* or !Low Level* from
pin C-20
TB1/6
Common from pin C-22
TB1/7
Common from pin A-22
TB1/8
Checkback Trip from pin A-20
TB1/9
Unused
Output to Discriminator and CLI Module
20 kHz signal (pin A-28)
RF Output to Optional Voice Adapter
• 20 kHz signal through jumper JU4
• 5.02 MHz signal through jumper JU3
Terminal Block (TB2)
TB2/1
6
• Center Frequency (pin C-10)
Input from Keying Module
Optional External
(pins C/A-12)
CLI
TB2/2
Optional External
(pins C/A-14)
CLI
TB2/3
Noise + (pins C/A-16)
TB2/4
Noise - (pins C/A-18)
TB2/5
!Low Signal Contact (pins C/A-20)
Output to EM Output Module
TB2/6
!Low Signal Contact (pins C/A-22)
• Trip 1/Trip 2 (pin A-24)
!Low Signal = Not Low Signal
Meter
Meter
*! Low Signal means Not Low Signal
! Low Level means Not Low Level
• Guard (pin C-24)
Output to Receiver Logic Module
• Level (pin C-28)
• High/Low Frequency (pin A-28)
December 2004
Page 6–3
TCF–10B System Manual
6.8 EM Output Module
Voltage Inputs
Technologies, Inc.
6.9
Optional Voice Adapter
Module
+20 Vdc
Pins A-2 and A-4
Voltage Inputs
-20 Vdc
Pins C-2 and C-4
+20 Vdc
Pins A-2 and A-4
Common
Pins C/A-30 and C/A-32
-20 Vdc
Pins C-2 and C-4
Common
Pins C/A-30 and C/A-32
Input from Receiver Logic Module
• Trip 1/Trip 2 (pin C-20)
• Guard (pin A-20)
Terminal Block (TB6)
RF Input from Receiver Module
• 20 kHz signal through jumper JU4 to pin
C/A-26
• 5.02 MHz signal through jumper JU3 to pin
C/A-26
TB6/1
Contact 1-1 from pin A/C-8
TB6/2
Contact 1-2 from pin A/C-10
TB6/3
Contact 2-1 from pin A/C-12
TB6/4
Contact 2-2 from pin A/C-14
TB6/5
Contact 3-1 from pin A/C-16
TB6/6
Contact 3-2 from pin A/C-18
TB6/7
Contact 4-1 from pin C-22
TB6/8
Contact 5-1 from pin C-24
TB5/1
External receiver signal from C/A-8
TB6/9
Contact 6-1 from pin C-26
TB5/2
External
C/A-10
TB5/3
Common to A/C-12
TB5/4
Alarm contact to C/A-16
TB5/5
Alarm Contact to C/A-18
TB5/6
External signaling input to C/A-20
Output to Optional Voice Adapter Module
• Contact 4-2 (pin A-22)
• Contact 5-2 (pin A-24)
• Contact 6-2 (pin A-26)
Page 6–4
Output to Keying Module
Voice Key (pin C/A-22)
Output to Transmitter Module
AM Voice (pin A-28)
Terminal Block TB-5
microphone
input
to
December 2004
RECEIVER LOGIC OUTPUTS
TB1
2F
3F*
PHASE COMP.
1
+V INPUT
+V INPUT
+V INPUT
2
GUARD
UB/POTT GUARD
TRIP —
3
NOISE
NOISE
NOISE
4
TRIP
UB/POTT TRIP
TRIP+
5
!LOW LEVEL
!LOW LEVEL
!LOW LEVEL
8
CHECKBACK TRIP
CHECKBACK TRIP
—
* FOR 3F SYSTEMS, DTT TRIP & GUARD ARE AVAILABLE ON THE ELECTRO-MECHANICAL OUTPUT MODULE S TB6 & TB5
! = Inverted
Figure 6-1. TCF-10B Functional Block Diagram. (CF44-VER05)
Chapter 7. Design Verification Tests
It is not intended to perform the design verification tests at installation. If you need to verify the design
of the TCF-10B, you should perform the following design verification test.(See Test Equipment in Chapter
4, and Signal Path in Chapter 6) otherwise, see chapter 5.
If the TCF–10B is a Transmitter (only) set, perform the following segments: 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, and 7.4. If the
TCF–10B is a Receiver (only) set, perform segments 7.1, 7.2, 7.5, and 7.6. If the TCF–10B is a Transceiver
set, perform segments 7.1, 7.2, and 7.7.
7.1
7.1.1
Preliminary Checks
Checking the Chassis
Nameplate
Verify that the proper dc supply voltage and
module options are on the chassis nameplate.
Also, check for narrow, wide, or extra wide band;
Phase Comparison or Directional Comparison (2or 3-Frequency).
Check to ensure that all required modules are
supplied and are installed in the proper chassis
slots. The slots are labeled on the top edge of the
chassis.
!
TCF–10B Preliminary
Connections
1. Refer to the Block Diagram (see Chapter 6,
Signal Path) for keying and output connections.
Table 7-1. Voltage Specifications.
Specified
Group
48V
with Alarm Relay
G01
125V
with Alarm Relay
G02
250V
with Alarm Relay
G03
CAUTION
ALWAYS TURN “OFF” DC POWER WHENEVER
REMOVING OR INSTALLING MODULES.
7.1.2
7.2
Inspecting for the Correct dc
Voltage
With the power “OFF,” remove the Power Supply
module and inspect it for the correct dc voltage, as
specified in Table 7-1.
2. Connect the dc supply to the appropriate
terminals on the Rear Panel (see Figures 3-1
and 3-4, in Chapter 3, Installation).
NOTE
Perform Steps 3 and 4 only if the chassis
contains a transmitter.
3. Terminate the Transmitter output with a noninductive 50Ω, 25W resistor.
4. Connect the Selective Level Meter (Rycom
6021A) across the 50Ω resistor load.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
7
TCF–10B System Manual
7.3
TCF–10B Preliminary
Settings For Transmitter
(Only) Sets
Make the following preliminary jumper and
switch settings before proceeding with the tests.
Technologies, Inc.
2-Wire or 4-Wire RF Termination
JU1
(out, 4 wire)
JU5
(out, 4 wire)
Attenuator Override Jumper
JU6
7.3.1
Power Supply Module
JU1
7.3.2
(NORM, Sensitivity)
N.C. (G01, 02, or 03)
7.4
Keying Module
Tests of TCF–10B
Transmitter (Only) Sets
JU1
Invert
JU2
DCR
JU3
1W/10W
JU4
3 frequency
JU6
IN*
JU7
IN*
7.4.1
JU8
N.O
Remove all modules except power supply.
JU9
N.O
1. Turn “ON” dc power. Both LEDs (D3, Input
and D11, Output) on the Power Supply
Module should be “ON”. Measure dc voltage
at Power Supply test jacks:
JU10 Voltage per chassis nameplate
JU11 Voltage per chassis nameplate
!
CAUTION
ALWAYS TURN DC POWER “OFF” BEFORE
REMOVING
OR
INSTALLING
CHASSIS
MODULES.
Power Supply Module Tests
JU12 Voltage per chassis nameplate
• TJ1/TJ2 (+20 Vdc ± 1 Vdc)
JU13 Voltage per chassis nameplate
• TJ3/TJ2 (-20 Vdc ± 1 Vdc)
JU14 Voltage per chassis nameplate
If the voltage is not within the above limits, do
not proceed further. Have the power supply
repaired or replaced.
7.3.3
Transmitter Module
Set the four rotary switches to 250.0 kHz or the
desired frequency.
2. Turn “OFF” the dc power. The Input LED
(D3) should be “OFF”.
7.3.4
3. Place the current meter (Simpson 260 or
equivalent) in series with the input dc supply
and check the current for the appropriate
voltage source, according to the specifications
in Table 7-2:
10W PA Module
JU1
7.3.5
N.O
RF Interface Module
Matching Impedance Jumpers
JU2
(out)
JU3
(out)
JU4
(IN, 50 Ω)
*Place in the “OUT” position when using with the Phase
Comparison relay systems.
Page 7–2
4. Vary the input dc voltage to the minimum and
maximum levels per the following chart:
Nominal
Min
Max
48V
38V
70V
125V
88V
140V
250V
176V
280V
December 2004
Chapter 7. Design Verification Tests
Table 7-2. Voltage Specifications.
CURRENT (Amps)
VOLTAGE
TX Only
Key @ 1W
RCV
Only
TXCVR
Key @ 10W
48 Vdc
0.7 — 0.9
0.3 — 0.6
0.9 — 1.1
125 Vdc
0.2 — 0.4
0.15 — 0.25
0.3 — 0.5
250 Vdc
0.1 — 0.2
0.05 — 0.15
0.15 — 0.25
Table 7-3. Transmitter Output Levels.
Keyed
Level
10W PA
Input
Output Across
50Ωs
RF Interface
Line-Common ***
Normal (1W)
-10.2 to -9.8 dBm
(69.1 to 72.35mVrms)
29.8 to 30.2 dBm
(6.57 to 7.57 Vrms)
29.8 to 30.2 dBm
(6.57 to 7.57 Vrms)
HL (10W)**
-0.2 to + 0.2 dBm
(210 to 230mVrms)
39.8 to 40.2 dBm
(21.00 to 23.00Vrms)
39.8 to 40.2 dBm
(21.00 to 23.00Vrms)
10W PA*
Control
XMTR
Adjust
-
R12
Input
Level
R13
* Set the 10W PA control first, so that the output across 50Ωs is 40 dB greater than the input to the 10W PA.
Then adjust R12 (or R13) to obtain specified levels across 50Ω.
** Push HL test button on the Keying module to obtain a 10W level.
*** When strapped for 50Ω and terminated in 50Ω; values will be different for 75Ω and for 100Ω.
5. Observe the front panel voltages to make sure
they are as specified in Step 2 above. Both
LEDs should be “ON”.
6. Return to nominal dc voltage.
7.4.2
Transmitter Tests
Input/Output Levels
Use the Selective Level Meter to measure levels
per Table 7-3. If the 10W PA input level is not
within limits, place the Transmitter module on an
extender board (see Figure 4-1), and make the
adjustments with controls per Table 7-3.
Use the “SH” and “SL” buttons on the Keying
module to shift the output frequencies. The shift
should be in accordance with Table 7-5 (within ±
10 Hz).
If the shifts are incorrect, set the shift (with S5) on
the Transmitter module.
Observe the module LEDs shown in Table 7-4
below:
Table 7-4. Transmitter LEDs.
Keying
Transmitter Frequencies
Monitor the output frequency of the XMTR with
the Selective Level Meter. If this frequency is
incorrect by > ± 10 Hz, adjust the unshifted
frequency with C19 (on the Transmitter module)
to 250 kHz (or the required frequency) ± 1 Hz.
December 2004
10W PA
H.L.
“TX”
“TRANSMIT”
1W
OFF
ON
ON
10W
ON
ON
ON
Page 7–3
7
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
Harmonics
1. Use the Selective Level Meter to measure
values of the 2nd, 3rd, and 5th harmonics at
the set frequency.
Table 7-5. Output Frequency Shifts.
Type
2. Push the “HL” test button on the Keying
module; observe fundamental and harmonic
levels across the load to be:
Fundamental:
+40 dBm ±0.2 (22.4Vrms)
Harmonics:
Less than -15 dBm (55 dB
below fundamental level)
SH
SL
Narrow or Wide Band,
Narrow Shift
+100 Hz
-100 Hz
Wide Band,
Wide Shift
+250 Hz
-250 Hz
Extra Wide Band,
Extra Wide Shift
+500 Hz
-500 Hz
Table 7-6. Keying Module Links, LEDs and Output.
Inputs
PWR
OFF
Key
DTT
Key
TB4/4
Pos
to
TB4/6
Neg
Keying Module
LEDs
Keying Module Links
UB
POTT
PC
52b
Power
Boost
J
U
1
J
U
2
J
U
3
J
U
4
TB4/1
Pos
to
TB4/2
Neg
TB4/5
Pos
to
TB4/6
Neg
TB4/3
Pos
to
TB4/6
Neg
PWR
ON
NORM/
INV
DCR/
PCR
10 W/
10W
1W—
10 W/
10 W—
10 W
2F/
3F
0
0
0
0
NORM
DCR
1/10
0
0
1
0
NORM
DCR
1
0
0
0
NORM
1
1
0
0
1
0
1
1
1
1
XMTR
Output
Across
50Ω
J
U
6
J
U
7
J
U
8
J
U
9
D5
D4
D3
D2
D1
TX
V
SL
SH
HL
2F
IN
IN
N.O.
N.O.
0
0
0
1
0
1/10
2F
IN
IN
N.O.
N.O.
0
0
1
0
1
DCR
1/10
2F
IN
IN
N.O.
N.O.
1
0
0
0
0
1W
NORM
DCR
1/10
2F
IN
IN
N.O.
N.O.
1
0
1
0
1
10W
0
NORM
DCR
1/10
2F
IN
IN
N.O.
N.O.
1
0
1
0
1
10W
0
0
NORM
DCR
1/10
3F
IN
IN
N.O.
N.O.
1
0
1
0
1
10W
1
1
0
NORM
DCR
1/10
3F
IN
IN
N.O.
N.O.
1
0
0
1
1
10W
1
0
0
0
NORM
DCR
1/10
3F
IN
IN
N.O.
N.O.
1
0
0
0
0
1W
1
0
0
0
NORM
DCR
10/10
2F
IN
IN
N.O.
N.O.
1
0
0
1
1
10W
1
0
0
1
NORM
PCR
1/10
2F
IN
IN
N.O.
N.O.
1
0
0
1
1
10W
LEGEND:
0 — No Voltage Applied
1 — Battery Voltage Applied
Page 7–4
December 2004
Chapter 7. Design Verification Tests
Keying Logic
Set the Keying module links and apply keying
voltage inputs, per Table 7-6. Observe the output
levels and Keying module LEDs per Table 7-6.
Residual Noise Output
Pos. 3 OPEN
Pos. 7 OPEN
Pos. 4 OPEN
Pos. 8 OPEN
Set the center frequency to 535 kHz.
7.5.4
Receiver Logic Module
Phase Comparison (2 Frequency):
With the Transmitter unkeyed, observe the output
between 20 kHz and 2.0 MHz. There should be no
output indication, and the “noise floor” should be
less than -20 dBm (22.4 mVrms).
7.4.3
Final Jumper Positions
Place jumpers on the Power Supply, Keying, 10 W
PA, and RF Interface modules as required by the
final application (see Section 3, Installation, for
jumper summary). Set the four rotary switches on
the Transmitter Module to the correct frequency.
7.5
Directional Comparison or Direct
Transfer Trip (2-Frequency):
7
TCF–10B Preliminary
Settings for Receiver
(Only) Sets
Make the following preliminary jumper and
switch settings before proceeding with the tests.
7.5.1
JU1
7.5.2
Power Supply Module
N.C. (G01,02, or 03 only)
RF Interface Module
Matching Impedance Jumpers:
JU2
(OUT)
JU3
(OUT)
JU4
(IN, 50Ω)
Two-wire or four-wire RF Termination:
JU1
(OUT, 4 wire)
JU5
(OUT, 4 wire)
Attenuator Override Jumper:
JU6
7.5.3
(NORM, Sensitivity)
Receiver Module
DIP Switch (SW1)
Pos. 1 OPEN
Pos. 5 OPEN
Pos. 2 OPEN
Pos. 6 OPEN
December 2004
Page 7–5
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
Directional Comparison and Direct
Transfer Trip (3-Frequency):
SW1–1 OPEN (OFF)
SW1–2 OPEN (OFF)
SW1–3 OPEN (OFF)
UB/POTT
TRIP DELAY
= 0 ms
SW1–4 OPEN (OFF)
SW1–5 OPEN (OFF)
SW1–6 OPEN (OFF)
SW1–7 OPEN (OFF)
SW1–8 OPEN (OFF)
SW2–1 CLOSED (ON)
TRIP HOLD
= 0 ms
SW2–3 OPEN (OFF)
NOISE ALLOWS UB TRIP
SW2–4 CLOSED (ON)
GUARD BEFORE TRIP
WITHOUT OVERRIDE
DTT
TRIP DELAY
= 30 ms
SW3–3 OPEN (OFF)
SW3–4 OPEN (OFF)
TRIP HOLD
= 0 ms
SW3–5 OPEN (OFF)
GUARD HOLD
= 0 ms
SW3–6 CLOSED (ON)
CHECKBACK #2
SW3–7 OPEN (OFF)
LOW LEVEL DELAY
= DISABLED
SW3–8 OPEN (OFF)
7.5.5
N.O.
N.O.
JU12
N.O.
N.O.
JU13*
100–200 ms
100–200 ms
JU14*
100–200 ms
100–200 ms
7.6
Optional EM Output Module
Tests of TCF–10B Receiver
(Only) Sets
!
CAUTION
ALWAYS TURN DC POWER “OFF” BEFORE REMOVING
OR INSTALLING MODULES IN THE CHASSIS.
Power Supply Module Tests
Repeat steps (1 thru 6) listed under Section 7.4.1,
Power Supply Module Tests.
7.6.2
SW3–1 CLOSED (ON)
SW3–2 OPEN (OFF)
JU11
7.6.1
SW2–6 CLOSED (ON)
SW2–8 CLOSED (ON)
N.O.
GUARD HOLD
= 0 ms
UNBLOCK TIME
= 500 ms
SW2–7 CLOSED (ON)
N.O.
*Only supplied on 1606C53G02.
SW2–2 CLOSED (ON)
SW2–5 OPEN (OFF)
JU10
Receiver Module Tests:
Preliminary Steps
Received Signal Path
1. Connect the Signal Generator to the RF
Interface module Receiver (J2) on the Rear
Panel and, with the power “ON”, set the
Signal Generator to 535 kHz at a level of 1.0
Vrms.
2. At the RF Interface module, measure (at
RCVR/RCVR COM terminals) .99 to
1.1Vrms; do not rely on the Signal Generator
display.
2 Frequency
3 Frequency
JU1
Guard
Guard
JU2
Guard
Guard
JU3
Guard
Trip 1
3. Using the Selective Level Meter, measure the
input signal level at the Receiver front panel
(at INPUT, COMMON terminals). The signal
level should be between 180 mV and 260 mV.
JU4
Trip 1
Trip 1
4. Turn the power “OFF”.
JU5
Trip 1
Trip 2
JU6
Trip 1
Trip 2
JU7
N.O.
N.O.
JU8
N.O.
N.O.
JU9
N.O.
N.O.
Page 7–6
NOTE
To prevent the cable’s capacitance from
affecting the measurement, do not use
coaxial cable for this measurement.
December 2004
Chapter 7. Design Verification Tests
7.6.3 Frequency & Sensitivity Setting
To change settings on the FSK receivers, complete
the following sequence:
1. Push the SET button.
This causes the frequency display to begin
flashing, indicating that the receiver is in the
“setting” mode.
If you do not touch any of the buttons for
approximately three minutes, the receiver exits
the setting mode and reverts to the previous
settings.
2. Set the frequency.
To keep the displayed frequency, press the SET
button again.
To increase the frequency, push the CANCEL/
RAISE button; to decrease it, push the LOWER
button. Pushing either button once and
releasing it raises or lowers the frequency by
the minimum increment, 0.5 kHz. Holding
down either button for more than two seconds
increases the incrementing speed. If you exceed
the maximum of 535 kHz, the display rolls over
to the lower end, 30 kHz, and continues
scrolling.
After you have the desired frequency
displayed, release the button. The display once
again flashes, indicating that it is still in the
“setting” mode and has not yet accepted the
new setting. Press the SET button to accept the
frequency setting.
3. Set the sensitivity.
After you set the frequency, the display scrolls
this message: "Set Sens?… – Hit Set or
Cancel…".
To keep the current sensitivity setting, press the
CANCEL/RAISE button.
To tell the receiver to automatically set the
sensitivity based on an incoming remote signal,
press the SET button. This sets the receiver for
a 15 dB margin and calibrates the CLI meter to
0 dB. While the receiver is setting the sensitivity, the display scrolls the message:
"Working…"
At first the bar graph is blank. Then it gradually
ramps up until it reaches approximately 0 dB.
December 2004
The display then tells you whether the sensitivity level is okay or if there is a problem, such
as a signal too weak to set for a minimum
pickup level.
After the display gives the "–OK–" message, it
then scrolls the message "Sens Adjust? – Hit
Raise/Lower or Set when done...” Here, you
can either accept the current setting or
manually adjust the receiver sensitivity.
To accept the current setting, press the SET
button. The receiver is now set for a 15 dB
margin, and the CLI reads approximately 0 dB.
To manually adjust the receiver sensitivity up
or down 10 dB, push the CANCEL/RAISE or
LOWER button. The CLI will track accordingly and remain at that level to indicate the
sensitivity is set that much below or above the
15 dB setting.
Sometimes the incoming signal may not be
strong enough to raise the margin the full 10
dB. If this happens, the display says "Warning:
signal too low for more gain - hit Set to
continue.." When this happens, push the SET
button. This lowers the sensitivity to an acceptable level and flashes the bar graph to remind
you that you are still in the “setting” mode.
To accept the displayed level, push the SET
button.
4. Set the external CLI.
Once you have completed the sensitivity
setting, the display scrolls this message: "Set
Ext CLI? – Hit Raise/Lower or Set when
done...”
To calibrate the external CLI push the
CANCEL/RAISE or LOWER button. The
external CLI meter will move up and down
accordingly. The external meter is a 100µA
instrument. If it is calibrated in µA, the meter
should be set to read 67µA (this is equivalent to
0 dB on the internal meter). The setting should
be varied 3.3µA for each dB the margin adjustment has been raised or lowered from the 15 dB
margin. If the meter is calibrated in dB, set the
meter to read equal to the internal CLI meter.
To accept the displayed level, push the SET
button.
This completes the FSK setting procedure.
Page 7–7
7
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
Table 7-7. FSK Receiver (SW1-1 settings).
SWITCH
SETTING
OFF
ON
SW1-1
FSK
AM
SW1-2
NO VOICE ADAPTER
VOICE ADAPTER
SW1-3
DTT (50 ms D.O. on noise clamp)
UB (10 ms D.O. on noise clamp)
UB 2F or 3 Frequency
SW1-4
DIRECTIONAL COMPARISON RELAYING
PHASE COMPARISON RELAYING
SW1-5
SHIFT DOWN TO TRIP 2F or 3F
SHIFT UP TO TRIP 2F only
Note: It is recommended that the Receiver Logic pre-trip time delay be for a minimum of 4 ms for
Direct Transfer Trip Applications. Refer to Receiver Logic Section for settings.
Table 7-8. FSK Receiver (SW1-1 set to the OFF position).
SW1-6
SW1-7
SW1-8
BANDWIDTH
SHIFT
2F/3F
OFF
OFF
OFF
380 Hz
100 Hz
2F
OFF
OFF
ON
800 Hz
250 Hz
2F
OFF
ON
OFF
1600 Hz
500 Hz
2F
OFF
ON
ON
800 Hz
250 Hz
3F
ON
OFF
OFF
1600 Hz
500 Hz
3F
ON
OFF
ON
800 Hz
100 Hz
2F
ON
ON
OFF
1600 Hz
250 Hz
2F
Receiver Logic Module
Place the Receiver Logic Module on an extender
board and set the input signal to 250 kHz, or the
required frequency, at a level of 112 mVrms,
making sure the carrier level meter reads 0 dB.
To test the Phase Comparison Units (Only),
complete the five steps depicted in Table 7-9.
To test the 2-Frequency Directional Comparison
Units (Only), complete the 11 steps depicted in
Table 7-10.
To test the 3-Frequency Directional Comparison
Units (Only), complete the six steps depicted in
Table 7-11. Use an input frequency of 250 kHz
or the center frequency.
† On 3-frequency units (OFF).
* Should just light at this level. This is a low signal clamp on a 10 dBm reduction of signal; you may set other levels as
required.
Page 7–8
December 2004
Chapter 7. Design Verification Tests
Table 7-9. Phase Comparison Units (Only) Testing.
Good
Channel
Rcvr Logic
LEDs
Trip –
Trip +
CLI/Discrim.
LEDs
Noise
Low Level
Solid State Outputs
Noise
Low
Signal
Trip –
Trip +
Contact
0V
0V
OPEN
1) Check initial LED, output, and contact states:
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
+ V*
+ V*
7
2) Remove input signal from chassis; observe states as follows:
OFF
ON
ON
ON
ON
+ V*
0V
+ V*
+ V*
CLOSED
0V
CLOSED
3) Open SW1-3 on Receiver Logic Module; observe states as follows:
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
+ V*
0V
0V
4) Close SW1-3 (SKBU) and re-connect input signal to chassis. Set input frequency to
250.500 kHz (EWB), or 250.250 kHz (WBWS); or required frequency + 500 Hz (EWB), or
required frequency + 250 Hz (WBWS). Observe states as follows:
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
0V
+ V*
+ V*
0V
OPEN
5) Set input frequency to 249.500 kHz (EWB), or 249.750 kHz (WBWS); or required frequency 500 Hz (EWB), or required frequency -250 Hz (WBWS). Observe states as follows:
ON
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
0V
+ V*
0V
+ V*
OPEN
* + V (Nominal) outputs equals the voltage applied to the TB1-1, usually station battery.
December 2004
Page 7–9
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
Table 7-10. 2-Frequency Directional Comparison or Direct Transfer Trip Units (Only) Testing.
Rcvr Logic
LEDs.
Good
Channel
CLI/Disc
LEDs
Optional
EM Outputs
Solid State Outputs
Cbk
Grd
Trp
Trp
Cbk
Noise LLev
1
2
3
4
5
6
Noise
)
+ V*
Trp
Low
Sig
Trp
Grd
2
Cont
0V
0V
0V
OP
1) Check initial LED, output, and contact states:
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
(
open
0V
2) Set input frequency to 250.500 kHz (EWB), or 250.250 kHz (WBWS), or 250.100 kHz (NB or
WBNS); or required frequency + 500 Hz (EWB), or required frequency + 250 Hz (WBWS), or
required frequency + 100 Hz (NB or WBNS). Observe states as follows:
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
CL CL CL OP OP OP
0V
+ V*
0V
+ V*
0V
OP
3) Set input frequency to 250.000 kHz. Then set input frequency to 249.500 kHz (EWB), or
249.750 kHz (WBWS), or 249.900 kHz (NB or WBNS); or required frequency -500 Hz (EWB), or
required frequency -250 Hz (WBWS) or required frequency -100 Hz (NB or WBNS). Observe
states as follows:
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
(
open
)
0V
+ V*
+ V*
0V
0V
OP
4) Set input frequency to 250.500 kHz (EWB), or 250.250 kHz (WBWS), or 250.100 kHz (NB or
WBNS); or required frequency +500 Hz (EWB), or required frequency +250 Hz (WBWS), or
required frequency +100 Hz (NB or WBNS). Then quickly shift input frequency to 249.500 kHz
(EWB), or 249.750 kHz (WBWS), or 249.900 (NB or WBNS); or required frequency -500 Hz
(EWB), or required frequency -250 Hz (WBWS), or required frequency -100 Hz (NB or WBNS).
Observe states as follows:
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OP OP OP CL CL CL
0V
+ V* + V*
0V
+ V*
* + V (Nominal) outputs equals the voltage applied to the TB1-1, usually station battery.
Page 7–10
December 2004
OP
Chapter 7. Design Verification Tests
Table 7-10. 2-Frequency Directional Comparison or Direct Transfer Trip Units (Only) Testing (Cont’d).
Rcvr Logic
LEDs.
Good
Channel
CLI/Disc
LEDs
Optional
EM Outputs
Solid State Outputs
Cbk
Grd
Trp
Trp
Cbk
Noise LLev
1
2
3
4
5
6
Noise
Trp
Grd
Trp
Low
Sig
2
Cont
5) Set input frequency to 250.500 kHz (EWB), or 250.250 kHz (WBWS), or 250.100 kHz (NB or
WBNS); or required frequency + 500 Hz (EWB), or required frequency + 250 Hz (WBWS), or
required frequency + 100 Hz (NB or WBNS). Remove signal from chassis. Observe the TRIP
LED on the Receiver Logic module, and the TRIP 2 SS Output. Neither should blink when
signal is removed. Observe states as follows:
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
ON
ON
(
open
)
+ V*
0V
0V
0V
0V
CL
7
6) Close SW2-4 and open SW2-5 (GBT without override). Reconnect the signal to the chassis.
Observe states as follows:
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
CL CL CL OP OP OP
0V
+ V*
0V
+ V*
0V
OP
0V
0V
OP
0V
+ V*
OP
0V
+ V*
OP
7) Set input frequency as shown in Step 3 (above). Observe states as follows:
ON
OFF
OFF
ON
OFF
OFF
(
open
)
0V
+ V* + V*
8) Set input frequency as shown in Step 4 (above). Observe states as follows:
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OP OP OP CL CL CL
0V
+ V* + V*
9) Set input frequency as shown in Step 3 (above). Observe states as follows:
ON
OFF
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OP OP OP CL CL CL
0V
+ V* + V*
10) Close SW2-1 and SW2-2 (500 ms). Set input frequency to 250.500 kHz (EWB), or 250.250 kHz
(WBWS), or 250.100 kHz (NB or WBNS); or required frequency +500 Hz (EWB), or required
frequency +250 Hz (WBWS), or required frequency +100 Hz (NB or WBNS). Observe states as
follows:
ON
ON
OFF
OFF
OFF
OFF
CL CL CL OP OP OP
0V
+ V*
0V
+ V*
0V
OP
11) Remove signal from chassis. Observe the TRIP LED and the TRIP 2 SS Output. Both must
blink when signal is removed.
OFF
* + V (Nominal) outputs equals the voltage applied to the TB1-1, usually station battery.
December 2004
Page 7–11
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
Table 7-11. 3-Frequency Directional Comparison and Direct Transfer Trip Units (Only) Testing.
Rcvr Logic
LEDs.
Good
Channel
CLI/Disc
LEDs
Optional
EM Outputs
Solid State Outputs
UB/
Cbk POTT DTT
Cbk
Trp Trip Trip Grd Noise LLev 1
2
3
4
5
6
Noise
Trp
Low
Sig
2
Cont
Trp
Grd
0V
+ V* 0V
1) Check initial LED, output, and contact states:
ON
OFF OFF OFF ON
OFF
OFF CL CL OP OP OP OP
0V
+ V*
OP
2) Remove the input signal from the chassis, and observe the following momentary occurrences:
a) UB/POTT LED must blink.
b) DTT LED must not blink.
Observe the following states:
OFF
OFF OFF OFF OFF
ON
ON OP OP OP OP OP OP
+ V*
0V
0V
0V
0V
CL
3) Re-connect signal input to chassis. Set input frequency to 250.500 kHz (EWB), or 250.250 kHz
(WBWS), or regular frequency +500 Hz (EWB), or required frequency +250 Hz (WBWS). Observe
the following states:
ON
ON
ON OFF OFF OFF
OFF CL CL OP OP CL CL
0V
+ V*
+ V*
0V + V* CL
4) Set input frequency to 249.500 kHz (EWB), or 249.750 kHz (EWB), or 249.750 kHz (WBWS), or
required frequency -500 Hz (EWB); or required frequency -250 Hz (WBWS). Observe the
following states:
ON
OFF OFF ON OFF OFF
OFF OP OP CL CL OP OP
0V
+ V*
0V
+ V* 0V
* + V (Nominal) outputs equals the voltage applied to the TB1-1, usually station battery.
Page 7–12
December 2004
OP
Chapter 7. Design Verification Tests
Table 7-11. 3-Frequency Directional Comparison and Direct Transfer Trip Units (Only) Testing (Cont’d).
Rcvr Logic
LEDs.
Good
Channel
CLI/Disc
LEDs
Optional
EM Outputs
Solid State Outputs
UB/
Cbk POTT DTT
Cbk
Trp Trip Trip Grd Noise LLev 1
2
3
4
5
6
Noise
Trp
Grd
Trp
Low
Sig
2
Cont
5) Set input frequency to 250.0 kHz. Then slowly decrease the input frequency to 249.500 kHz
(EWB), or 249.750 kHz (WBWS); or required frequency -500 Hz (EWB), or required frequency 250 Hz (WBWS), or required frequency -100 Hz (NB or WBNS). Observe the CLI module
NOISE LED and NOISE SS Output to go ON then OFF as the frequency is decreased.
When final frequency is reached, observe the following states:
ON
OFF OFF OFF OFF OFF
OFF CL CL OP OP OP OP
0V
+ V*
0V
+ V* 0V
OP
6) Slowly increase the input frequency to 250.500 kHz (EWB), or 250.250 kHz (WBWS); or required
frequency +500 Hz (EWB), or required frequency +250 Hz (WBWS). Observe the CLI module
NOISE LED and NOISE SS output to go ON then OFF twice as the frequency is increased.
When the final frequency is reached, observe the following states:
ON
ON OFF OFF OFF OFF
OFF CL CL OP OP OP OP
0V
+ V*
+ V*
0V
0V
OP
* + V (Nominal) outputs equals the voltage applied to the TB1-1, usually station battery.
December 2004
Page 7–13
7
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
7.6.3 Place Jumpers as Required
7.7.2
To test the Phase Comparison Units (Only),
complete the five steps depicted in Table 7-9.
Perform steps 1 through 6 of Section 7.4.1, Power
Supply Module Tests, except use the current
values in Section 7.4.1 Step 5.
Place jumpers and switches as required by the final
application (see 7.3 or 7.5).
7.7
7.7.1
TCF–10B Transceiver Tests
Voice Adapter in System
Check the preliminary settings (earlier in this
Section): 7.3.1 thru 7.3.5 and 7.5.1 thru 7.5.5. If the
!
CAUTION
ALWAYS TURN DC POWER “OFF” BEFORE
REMOVING OR INSTALLING MODULES IN THE
TCF–10B CHASSIS.
Voice Adapter Module is part of system, set the
following:
JMP1
N.O. or N.C.
SW1
1
ON
2
OFF
3
OFF
4
ON
Page 7–14
7.7.3
Power Supply Module Tests
Transmitter Module Tests
Perform the steps in Section 7.4.2, Transmitter
Tests, except set the transmitter frequency at
254 kHz.
7.7.4
Receiver Module Tests
Perform the steps in Section 7.6.2, Receiver Tests.
7.7.5
Voice Adapter Module Tests
(If Supplied)
1. Plug in the handset to the front panel (TJ1);
connect it to the rear panel (TB5) if it is a
remote handset. Key the carrier set with the
calling pushbutton. The Transmitter should be
keyed at voice-level (4.3 W when high-level is
10 W).
2. You may turn the “RECEIVE AUDIO” (P1)
adjustment as required to obtain a desirable
listening level.
December 2004
Chapter 8. Maintenance
When individual module maintenance is required, either at the factory or at the customer installation
(beyond the scope of routine alignment), the following procedures are applicable.
8.1 Precautions When Selecting
Test Equipment
(See Chapter 4, Test Equipment for test equipment
specifications.)
To prevent damage to solid-state components:
1) Use transformer-type signal generators,
VTVMs and signal tracers, which isolate
the test equipment from the power line.
Whenever the test equipment uses a transformerless power supply, use an isolation
type transformer. The test equipment
ground should be isolated from the ac
source ground.
2) Use multi-meters with at least 20,000Ωsper-volt sensitivity.
8.2 Precautions When Using
Test Equipment
1. Use a common ground between the chassis of
the test equipment and the transistor
equipment.
!
CAUTION
CIRCUITS
For example: When measuring the forward
resistance of a diode using a meter that has the
internal battery connected to the metering
circuit, be sure that:
• The lead marked ( – ) touches the diode
anode.
• The lead marked (+) touches the diode
cathode.
3. When checking circuits with an oscillographic
probe, be sure to discharge any built-up
capacitive voltage by touching the probe to a
ground before touching the circuit.
8.3 Periodic Checks
Every six months, take the following readings on
the TCF–10B Test Jacks (at the control panel).
We recommend that you keep a log book as a
visible record of periodic checks, as well as a
source for indicating any gradual degradation in a
module’s performance.
8.3.1
HIGH CURRENTS FROM A LOW-SENSITIVITY
METER CAN DAMAGE SOLID STATE DEVICES.
METERING TRANSISTOR
CAUSE DAMAGE.
2. When testing transistors and diodes, give
special attention to the polarity of the meter
leads.
CAN
FOR EXAMPLE: A BASE-TO-COLLECTOR
SHORT DURING TRANSISTOR OPERATION
CAN DESTROY THE TRANSISTOR.
Power Supply Module
• TJ1 (+20 Vdc)
• TJ2 (Common)
• TJ3 (-20 Vdc)
8.3.2
Keying Module
None.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
8
TCF–10B System Manual
8.3.3
Technologies, Inc.
Transmitter Module
•
Interference with proper heat dissipation from surfaces
•
Clogged air vents (air filters should
be removed and washed out)
None.
8.3.4
10W PA Module
• TJ1 (Input)
• Dust which may cause short circuits
• TJ2 (Common)
8.3.5
RF Interface Module
• TJ1 (Line In)
• TJ2 (Line Common)
• TJ3 (Receiver In)
• TJ4 (Receiver Common)
8.3.6
8.5.1
Preliminary Precautions
1. To avoid damage to circuits and components
from a current surge, disconnect power before
replacing or removing components or circuits.
Receiver Logic Module
2. Before placing new components into a
defective circuit, check the circuit so that it
cannot damage the new components.
None.
8.3.8
Use the following techniques when servicing solid
state equipment.
Receiver/Discriminator Module
None
8.3.7
8.5 Solid-State Maintenance
Techniques
EM Output Module
None.
8.3.9
Optional Voice Adapter Module
None.
8.4 Inspection
A program of routine visual inspection should
include:
• Condition of cabinet or other housing
• Tightness of mounting hardware and fuses
• Proper seating of plug-in relays and subassemblies
• Condition of internal and external wiring
(the location where external wiring enters
the cabinet should be sealed)
• Appearance of printed circuit boards and
components
• Signs of overheating in equipment:
Page 8–2
!
CAUTION
WE RECOMMEND THAT THE USER OF THIS
EQUIPMENT BECOME ACQUAINTED WITH THE
INFORMATION IN THESE INSTRUCTIONS
BEFORE ENERGIZING THE TCF–10B AND
ASSOCIATED ASSEMBLIES.
FAILURE TO OBSERVE THIS PRECAUTION
MAY RESULT IN DAMAGE TO THE EQUIPMENT.
YOU SHOULD NEITHER REMOVE NOR INSERT
PRINTED CIRCUIT MODULES WHILE THE
TCF–10B IS ENERGIZED. FAILURE TO
OBSERVE THIS PRECAUTION CAN RESULT IN
COMPONENT DAMAGE.
ALL INTEGRATED CIRCUITS USED ON THE
MODULES ARE SENSITIVE TO AND CAN BE
DAMAGED BY THE DISCHARGE OF STATIC
ELECTRICITY. BE SURE TO OBSERVE ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE PRECAUTIONS WHEN
HANDLING MODULES OR INDIVIDUAL COMPONENTS.
December 2004
Chapter 8. Maintenance
8.5.2
Trouble-Detection Sequence
1. Evaluate test jack readings and other records
of routine alignment.
2. Evaluate any symptoms detected audibly or
visually.
3. Replace suspected plug-in components.
4. Further isolation of faults includes:
• Voltage readings
• Resistance readings
• Signal injection
• Re-alignment
• Sensitivity measurements
• Gain measurements
5. Replace suspected faulty components.
6. Check-out and adjust affected circuits.
December 2004
8.5.3
Servicing Components
Soldered Directly to Terminals
1. Avoid overheating from soldering by using a
low-wattage soldering iron (60W maximum).
2. Make sure there is no current leakage from the
soldering iron.
You may use an isolation transformer to
prevent current leakage.
3. When soldering leads from transistors or
diodes, use heat sinks, e.g., alligator clips.
4. You can remove molten solder from the board
with a solder-sucker.
5. When removing a multi-lead component from
a printed circuit board, first cut all leads and
then remove the leads individually (to prevent
overheating). If there are only a few leads,
you can use a broad-tip soldering iron.
8
Page 8–3
TCF–10B System Manual
8.5.4
Technologies, Inc.
Servicing Components
Mounted Directly on Heat
Sinks
8.5.5
1. Remove the heat sink and bracket from the
chassis by loosening the securing devices.
2. Remove the transistor, diode, or other device
from the heat sink.
3. When replacing the transistor, diode, or other
device, make certain that the device and the
heat sink make secure contact for good heat
dissipation. Mount a device first on the heat
sink, and then on the board. Also, make sure
that you replace all insulators, washers, spring
washers and other mounting hardware as you
originally found them.
Servicing Metal Oxide
Semiconductor (MOS) Devices
MOS devices may be vulnerable to static changes.
Be sure to observe the special precautions
described below both before and during assembly.
Precautions to take before assembly:
• Avoid wearing silk or nylon clothing, as
this contributes to static buildup.
• Avoid carpeted areas and dry environments.
• Discharge body static by placing both
hands on a metal, earth-grounded surface.
Precautions to take during assembly to avoid the
possibility of electrostatic discharge:
We recommend a very light coating of DC-4
(Dow-Corning 4 Compound Silicon Lubricant) for transistors and diodes that are
mounted on heat sinks.
• Wear a ground strap during assembly
• Avoid touching electrically-conductive
circuit parts by hand
• When removing a module from the chassis,
always place it on a conductive surface
which is grounded through a resistance of
approximately 100 KΩ
• Make sure that all electrically-powered test
equipment is properly grounded.
NOTE
Before touching a module with a test probe,
connect the ground lead from the test
equipment to the module. Always disconnect
the test probe before removing the ground
lead equipment.
Page 8–4
December 2004
Chapter 9. Power Supply Module
Table 9–1. 1617C38 Styles and Descriptions.
Group
Schematic
9.1
Description
G01
48V WITH ALARM RELAY
G02
125V WITH ALARM RELAY
G03
250V WITH ALARM RELAY
1617C38-6 ||
Power Supply Module
Description
The Power Supply Module for the TCF–10B has
dual dc/dc high-frequency switching regulators
which generate regulated voltage outputs of ±20
Vdc (between 1.5A and 2.0A) for operation of the
TCF–10B modules. It also provides protection
from battery surge, transients, short circuits, and
reverse voltage. The Power Supply Module can
receive inputs from three available groups of
station batteries: 38-70 Vdc, 88-140 Vdc, and
176-280 Vdc.
9.1.1
9
Power Supply Control Panel
(This panel is shown in Figure 9-1.)
Front panel controls are as follows:
1) Push-button Switch (with power-on
indicator), ON/OFF (S1).
2) LEDs for indicating power:
•
INPUT, Red (LED1)
•
OUTPUT, Red (LED2)
3) Test Jacks:
•
+20 Vdc, Red (TP3)
•
Common, Green (TP2)
•
-20 Vdc, Black (TP1)
Figure 9–1. Power Supply Module – Front Panel.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
A low-voltage alarm relay, which indicates loss of
power, is available. The relay is energized when
input power is present and the power supply is
funcional.
9.1.2
Power Supply PC Board
Figure 9-2 shows component locations for the
Power Supply Module.
Control is as follows:
NOTE
JU1 is shipped in the NC state.
Power Supply Circuit
Description
• Fuses
• ON/OFF Switch
• Input Filter
• Power Alarm Failure Relay
• K1 - Alarm Relay
• J1 - Jumper (NO/NC)
The field-selectable option can change the alarm
contact de-energized state to NO or NC. (It is
currently shipped in the NC de-energized state,
and can be changed to NO if desired.)
The two dc/dc converters (PS1 and PS2) operate
at a maximum of 1 MHz and, as a result,
switching noise is outside the 30-535 kHz range of
the TCF–10B. The converter outputs, +20 Vdc
and -20 Vdc, is fed to the output filter. (See Figure
9-3.)
Output Filter
• dc/dc Converter (2)
The output filter for the +20V consists of C4, C6,
C8, and Z4. The output filter for the -20V consists
of C5, C7, C9, and Z3.
• Output Filter
Fuses
48 V
125 V
250 V
3A
1.6A
3/4A
ON/OFF Switch
S1 - Push-button Switch (DPDT)
When in the “ON” position (pins 1 and 4), dc
current flows through the input filter to the dc/dc
converter.
Page 9–2
Power Alarm Failure Relay
DC/DC Converter
The module comprises the following circuits:
F1, F2
The input filter (C1, C2, C3) contains zener diodes
(Z1, Z2) that provide protection against surges, a
diode (D1) that provides protection against
reverse polarity, a differential choke XFMR (L1),
and the Red Input LED1.
This circuit includes:
Jumper J1 for Alarm Relay; establishes loss of
power condition (NO/NC).
9.2
Input Filter
!
CAUTION
BE CAREFUL NOT TO MISPLACE SCREWS,
SPRING WASHER OR INSULATING WASHER
USED FOR MOUNTING TRANSISTORS.
December 2004
Chapter 9. Power Supply Module
9.3
Power Supply
Troubleshooting
The three test jacks on the control panel:
• TP3 (+20 Vdc)
• TP2 (Common)
• TP1 (-20 Vdc)
can be used to determine if the two voltages (+20
Vdc, -20 Vdc) are present. In addition, the LED2
output indicates that the dc/dc converters are
generating voltage. The LED1 input indicates that
voltage is present at the input of the dc/dc
converter.
For basic troubleshooting, perform the following
procedure:
1. If LED1 is not on with the module energized,
remove and check the fuses (F1, F2) with an
ohmmeter.
2. With the module de-energized, check the
ON/OFF switch (S1) with an ohmmeter to be
sure it opens and closes accordingly..
3. If LED2 is not on with the module energized,
check the +20V and -20V outputs at TP3 and
TP1, respectively. The one with voltage
absent will require replacement of the associated dc/dc converter.
9
December 2004
Page 9–3
Figure 9–2. TC–10B/TCF–10B Power Supply Component Location (1617C38 rev. 6).
Figure 9–3. TC–10B/TCF–10B Power Supply Schematic (1617C39 rev. 6).
9
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
USER NOTES
Technologies, Inc.
Page 9–6
December 2004
Chapter 10. Keying Module
Table 10–1. 1606C50 Styles and Descriptions.
Schematic
1606C50-9 ||
10.1 Keying Module Description
The TCF–10B Keying Module controls the
Transmitter Module as follows:
• Direct Transfer Trip (DTT) Key
Group
Description
G01
2- or 3-Frequency w/relay contacts
G03
2 - Frequency w/relay, shift up to trip
Shift High
(D2)
Shift Low
(D3)
Voice
(D4)
Any Transmitter Key
(D5)
• 52b Keying or Power Boost (depending on
application)
KEY
• Power OFF
• Unblock (UB) or Phase Comparison (PC)
Key (depending on application)
10
• Voice Key (External or Internal)
Keying Module outputs are as follows:
• High-Level (10W), pin A-8
HL
T
E
S
T
SH
SL
• Any Transmitter Key, pin C-6
• Voice, pin A-6
HL
• Shift High, pin A-26
• Shift Low, pin A-28
10.1.1 Keying Control Panel
(This panel is shown in Figure 10-1.)
K
E
Y
I
N
G
(S1)
Shift High
(S2)
Shift Low
(S3)
SL
V
TX
Push-Button Switches (recessed):
High-Level (HL) Power
SH
LEDs for indicating Keying condition:
High-Level (10W)
(D1)
Figure 10–1. Keying Module – Front Panel.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
10.1.2 Keying PC Board Jumper
Controls
(The Keying PC Board Jumper Controls are
shown in Figure 10-2.)
JU1
Power “OFF” (NORM/INVERT)
JU2
Directional
Comparison
JU3
1W (Guard), 10W
(Guard), 10W (Trip)
JU4
2-Frequency System/3-Frequency
(Optional) System
JU6
Activates Shift
(IN/OUT)
High
JU7
Activates Shift
(IN/OUT)
Low
JU8
Selects NO or NC contacts for Shift
High
JU9
Selects NO or NC contacts for Shift
Low
Comparison/Phase
(Trip)/10W
52b Keying or Power Boost
With jumper JU12 set, input will be power boost
initiated when the appropriate voltage level (15V,
48V, 125V or 250V) is applied to pins C-16/C-22.
Power Off
With jumper JU13 set, when jumper JU1 is in
NORM position, the transmitter will be keyed
“ON” when proper voltage level (15V, 48V, 125V
or 250V) is applied to pins A-16/C-22. When JU1
is in the INVERT position, the transmitter will be
keyed “ON” when voltage is removed from input
A-16/C-22.
Contacts
UB or PC Key
Contacts
JU10–
JU14 (Input Keying voltage selections:
15V, 48V, 125V, 250V)
10.2 Keying Circuit Description
The Keying Module (see Figure 10-4, Schematic
1606C50S) provides an optically-isolated
interface between the carrier and the relay system
and controls the operation of the Transmitter
Module.
With jumper JU14 set, input will be initiated when
the appropriate voltage level (15V, 48V, 125V or
250V) is applied to pins A-22/C-22.
External Voice Key
With jumper JU11 set, input will be initiated when
the appropriate voltage level (15V, 48V, 125V or
250V) is applied to pins A-12/C-12.
Internal Voice
This input (C-24) will be initiated when the
optional voice adapter is installed, and the pushto-talk button switch is pushed.
10.2.2 Jumper Selections
The following jumper selections are available:
JU1
Allows selection between NORM/
INVERT. Selecting the normal
(NORM) position will turn “ON” the
Transmitter when proper voltage level
(15V, 48V, 125V, 250V) is applied to
pins A-16/C-22. Selecting the invert
(INV) position will turn “ON” the
Transmitter when voltage is removed
from input pins A-16/C-22.
JU2
Selects between a directional comparison system and a phase comparison
system.
10.2.1 Customer Inputs
Customer inputs operate as described below (see
Figure 10-3):
DTT Key
With jumper JU10 set, input will be initiated when
the appropriate voltage level (15V, 48V, 125V or
250V) is applied to pins A-10/C-10.
Page 10–2
December 2004
Chapter 10. Keying Module
JU3
JU4
This link allows selection between 1W
(Guard)/10W
(Trip)
or
10W
(Guard)/10W(Trip) operation by
placing link in 1/10W or 10/10W
position, respectively.
Selecting the 2-frequency (2F)
position will set the Keying Module in
mode to correctly operate as a 2frequency system. Selecting the
3-frequency position will set the
Keying Module in mode to correctly
operate as a 3-frequency system.
JU6
Placing JU6 to IN position activates
the shift high contact; the OUT
position deactivates the shift high
contact.*
JU7
Placing JU7 to IN position activates
shift low contact; OUT position deactivates shift low contact.*
JU8
Places shift high contacts in either
normally open (NO) position or
normally closed (NC) position.
JU9
Places shift low contacts in either
normally open (NO) position or
normally closed (NC) position.
JU10–
JU14 Provides input keying voltage selections: 15V, 48V, 125V, 250V.
10.2.3 Testing
You can also initiate a high-level test by pressing
the (recessed) push-button switch (S1) on the front
panel. You can also initiate a shift high test by
pressing the (recessed) push-button switch (S2) on
the front panel. You can also initiate a shift low
test by pressing the (recessed) push-button switch
(S3) on the front panel.
10.2.4 Voltage Regulation
Zener diodes D10, D12, D14, D16, and D18 limit
the input voltage to the optical isolators (I5, I6, I7,
I8, and I9, respectively) and also provide reverse
voltage protection. Zener diodes D6 and D7
regulate primary power (pins A-2/4, A-30/32,
C-30/32) down to 15V, and also provide reverse
voltage protection.
10.3 Keying Troubleshooting
Should a fault occur in the Keying Module, place
the module on an extender board.
You may test the five optical isolators (I5 through
I9) using the on-board +18.6 Vdc source (D6
cathode). When a logic “1” is applied to any of the
15V inputs (R43, R46, R40, R34, R37), with the
jumper removed, pin 5 of the selected optical
isolator (I5, I6, I7, I8 or I9) will go high.
!
CAUTION
DO NOT ATTEMPT TO FORCE A LOGIC “1”
(+18.6VDC) ON ANY OUTPUTS OR INPUTS
CONNECTED TO OUTPUTS. THIS COULD
DAMAGE AN IC. SEE FIGURE 10-3 FOR
INTERNAL LOGIC.
You can check other components on the PC Board
by conventional means.
When the appropriate jumper is in place on the
board, jumpers JU10, JU11, JU12, JU13, and
JU14 provide logic “1” or “0” inputs. Logic “1” is
+18.6 Vdc; logic “0” is +8.6 Vdc. See Table 10-2,
Truth Tables for TCF–10B Keying Modules,
which describes the operation of the logic blocks
used. Proper voltage levels of these input
commands must be observed.
*Place in the OUT position when using with the
Phase Comparison relay systems.
December 2004
Page 10–3
10
Page 10–4
0
0
0
0
52B
PWR
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
52B
PWR
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
JU1
LINK
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
JU1
LINK
INV
INV
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
INT
VOICE
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
Link Change
0
1
0
0
DTT
EXT
KEY VOICE
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
DTT
EXT
INT
KEY VOICE VOICE
* Used for G01, G03 Only
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
UNBLK
KEY
0
0
PWR
OFF
UNBLK
KEY
PWR
OFF
PCR
PCR
PCR
PCR
JU2
LINK
PCR
PCR
PCR
PCR
PCR
PCR
PCR
DCR
DCR
JU2
LINK
1/10
1/10
1/10
1/10
JU3
LINK
1/10
1/10
1/10
1/10
1/10
10
10
1/10
1/10
JU3
LINK
2F
2F
2F
2F
JU4
LINK
2F
2F
2F
3F
3F
2F
2F
2F
2F
JU4
LINK
IN
IN
IN
IN
IN
1
0
0
0
NO
NO
NO
NC
NC
NO
NO
NO
NO
*JU8
LINK
0
1
0
0
S2
PANEL
SH
OUT
IN
IN
IN
*JU7
LINK
S1
FRONT
HL
IN
IN
IN
IN
IN
IN
OUT
IN
IN
*JU6
LINK
0
0
1
0
S3
SWITCH
SL
N0
N0
NO
NC
NC
NO
NO
NO
NO
*JU9
LINK
1
0
0
1
CONT
*HI
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
D5
TX
KEY
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
D4
VOICE
KEY
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
D5
D4
CONT TX VOICE
*LO KEY
KEY
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
1
0
CONT CONT
*HI
*LO
Table 10–2. Truth Tables for TCF–10B Keying Modules. (G01 - shift down to trip)
0
1
1
0
D3
SHFT
LO
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
D3
SHFT
LO
1
0
0
1
D2
SHFT
HI
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
D2
SHFT
HI
1
0
0
0
D1
HL
KEY
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
D1
HL
KEY
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
December 2004
December 2004
0
0
0
0
52B
PWR
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
52B
PWR
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
JU1
LINK
INV
INV
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
NORM
PCR
PCR
PCR
PCR
JU2
LINK
PCR
PCR
PCR
PCR
PCR
PCR
PCR
DCR
DCR
JU2
LINK
1/10
1/10
1/10
1/10
JU3
LINK
1/10
1/10
1/10
1/10
1/10
10
10
1/10
1/10
JU3
LINK
2F
2F
2F
2F
JU4
LINK
2F
2F
2F
3F
3F
2F
2F
2F
2F
JU4
LINK
NO
0
IN
IN
NO
1
IN
IN
NO
1
IN
IN
NC
0
IN
IN
NC
0
IN
IN
NO
0
OUT
IN
NO
0
IN
OUT
NO
0
IN
IN
NO
S2
PANEL
SH
IN
IN
*JU8
LINK
S1
FRONT
HL
*JU7
LINK
*JU6
LINK
0
0
1
0
S3
SWITCH
SL
N0
N0
NO
NC
NC
NO
NO
NO
NO
*JU9
LINK
0
1
1
0
CONT
*HI
0
0
1
1
0
1
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
D5
TX
KEY
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
D4
VOICE
KEY
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
D5
D4
CONT TX VOICE
*LO KEY
KEY
1
1
0
0
1
1
1
0
1
CONT CONT
*HI
*LO
Table 10–3 Truth Tables for TCF–10B Keying Modules. (G03 - shift up to trip)
0
0
0
0
JU1
LINK
NORM
INT
VOICE
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
Link Change
0
1
0
0
DTT
EXT
KEY VOICE
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
DTT
EXT
INT
KEY VOICE VOICE
* Used for G01, G03 Only
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
UNBLK
KEY
0
0
PWR
OFF
UNBLK
KEY
PWR
OFF
1
0
0
1
D3
SHFT
LO
1
1
0
1
0
0
1
0
1
D3
SHFT
LO
0
1
1
0
D2
SHFT
HI
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
1
0
D2
SHFT
HI
1
0
0
0
D1
HL
KEY
1
1
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
D1
HL
KEY
Chapter 10. Keying Module
Page 10–5
10
Figure 10–2. TCF–10B Keying PC Board (1606C50S).
VCC
INV.
(PIN 11)
JU1
NORM
1
PWR OFF
(PIN 4)
1
3 1A
3
3A
2
2
TX KEY
(PIN 15)
VCC
SH
1
2
8
UB, POTT
OR PC KEY
(PIN 3)
1
5
1
2
4
1B
4A
3
1
2
3
2A
10
DTT KEY
(PIN 8)
1
7
6
1C
1
2
VCC
5B
6
(PIN 14)
12A
9 7D
1
2
8
8
5
6
10
52b OR
PWR BOOST
PIN 2)
2
8
9
8C
10
9
15
1F
9
2C
10
4
4C
10
1
2
6A
3
1 5
7B
10A
10A
6
SHIFT LOW
(PIN 17)
9
6
9
2
3
4
5
HL
12
9A
13
1
11
4D
10W KEY
(PIN 18)
7
5
VCC
10/10W
JU3
1/10W
VOICE KEY
(PIN 9)
11B
SHIFT HIGH
(PIN 16)
VCC
8B
1
2
6
6
1 3
7A
3
4
5
9
SL
14
(PIN 12)
11A
VCC
VCC
DCR
JU2
PCR
1
2
8
9
4
12
11 1E
1
2
10
9
5
3F
JU4
2F
5C
9
1D
3
5A
8
9
10A
2B
4
7C
8
(PIN 13)
12
13
4
Figure 10–3. TCF–10B Keying Module Internal Logic G01 Shift down to trip
8D
11
VOICE KEY
(PIN 19)
10
Figure 10–4. TCF–10B Keying Module Internal Logic G03- Shift up to trip
VCC
INV.
(PIN 11)
JU1
NORM
1
PWR OFF
(PIN 4)
1
3 1A
3
3A
2
2
TX KEY
(PIN 15)
VCC
SH
1
2
8
UB, POTT
OR PC KEY
(PIN 3)
1
5
1
2
4
1B
4A
3
1
2
3
2A
10
DTT KEY
(PIN 8)
1
7
6
1C
1
2
VCC
5B
6
(PIN 14)
12A
4
9 7D
5
6
10
52b OR
PWR BOOST
PIN 2)
2
8
9
8C
10
9
8B
15
1F
9
2C
1
2
8
10
4
4C
10
1
2
6A
3
VCC
10/10W
JU3
1/10W
VOICE KEY
(PIN 9)
1 5
7B
4
11B
SHIFT LOW
(PIN 17)
10A
6
SHIFT HIGH
(PIN 16)
9
VCC
1
2
6
6
1 3
7A
3
4
5
9
SL
8
14
(PIN 12)
11A
9
VCC
DCR
JU2
PCR
1
2
8
VCC
12
11 1E
1
2
10
9
5
3F
JU4
2F
5C
9
1D
3
5A
8
9
10A
(PIN 13)
10A
HL
12
9A
13
1
11
4D
10W KEY
(PIN 18)
7
5
6
9
2
3
4
5
2B
4
7C
8
12
13
8D
11
VOICE KEY
(PIN 19)
Figure 10–5. TCF–10B High Threshold Keying Schematic (1606C50-6).
10
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
USER NOTES
Technologies, Inc.
Page 10–10
December 2004
Chapter 11. Transmitter Module
Table 11–1. C020-TXMMN Styles and Descriptions.
Group
Schematic
C030-TXMMN-2 ||
Description
001
TRANSMITTER 2- OR 3-FREQUENCY
102
TRANSMITTER 2- OR 3-FREQUENCY
W/Trip Test Unit
11.1 Transmitter Module
Description
The function of the TCF–10B Transmitter Module
is to provide the RF signal which drives the 10W
PA Module. The Transmitter’s frequency range is
from 30 kHz to 535 kHz, programmable in
0.1 kHz (100 Hz) steps by four rotary switches on
the Transmitter. The Transmitter is slaved to a
crystal oscillator.
TRANSMITTER
The TCF–10B Transmitter Module operates from
keyed inputs (set by jumpers at the Keying
Module):
5
• High-Level Key
• Any Transmitter Key
• Voice Key
0
• Shift High (TCF–10B only)
• Shift Low (TCF–10B only)
The Transmitter Module also operates with a
signal from the Optional Voice Adapter Module:
11
2
F
R
E
Q
U
E
N
C
Y
X
1
0
0
H
Z
0
• AM Voice
The Transmitter Module operates with either no
shift or one of three different frequency shifts,
selectable by a four-position DIP switch (S5).
Figure 11–1. Transmitter Module – Front Panel.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B System Manual
11.1.1 Transmitter Control Panel
(This panel is shown in Figure 11-1.)
Operator controls consist of four thumbwheel
switches (with indicator windows), representing
the frequency range:
Technologies, Inc.
11.2 TRANSMITTER
TROUBLESHOOTING
Should a fault occur in this module, call the
factory for an RMA. ||
• SW1 (x 100 kHz)
• SW2 (x 10 kHz)
• SW3 (x 1 kHz)
• SW4 (x 0.1 kHz)
After pulling the module, use a screw driver to set
the thumbwheel switches: CW for higher
frequency, CCW for lower frequency.
11.1.2 Transmitter PC Board
(The Transmitter PC Board is shown in
Figure 11-2.)
Operator controls are as described below.
Potentiometers
R13
Adjusts high-level (10W) output
R12
Adjusts low-level (1W) output
R14
Adjusts voice (4.3W) output level
R11
Adjusts modulation of transmitter
signal (peak-to-valley ratio of signal
envelope)||
Switch
S5
Frequency-shift select
Page 11–2
December 2004
Figure 11–2. TC–10B/TCF–10B Transmitter Component location (C020-TXMMN).
11
Figure 11–3. TCF–10B Transmitter Block Diagram.
Chapter 12. 10W PA Module
Table 12–1. 1606C33 Styles and Descriptions.
Schematic
1606C33-21 ||
Group
G01
Description
WITH POWER ON RELAY
12.1.2 10W PA PC Board
12.1 10W PA Module
Description
(The 10W PA PC Board is shown in Figure 12-2.)
The function of the TCF-10B 10 W PA Module is
to amplify a 0 dBm (1mW) input to an output
power level of 10W. You may also adjust the 10W
PA for input power levels from 0.5mW to 2mW.
Operator controls consist of a Jumper (JU1) for
the transmitter on Alarm Relay (NO/NC). The
relay is energized if RF power (1W or more) is
present.
The 10W PA Module operates in a 30 to 535 kHz
range without tuning. The amplifier has a fixed
gain of approximately 49 dB (class A, complementary symmetry push-pull stage). Negative
feedback is used to derive a nominal output
impedance of 50Ω.
12.1.1 10W PA Control Panel
10W POWER AMP
TRANSMIT
The front panel is shown in Figure 12–1. Operator
controls are described here.
12
INPUT
LEVEL
SET
Potentiometer (R53) INPUT LEVEL SET
Adjusts power output level to 10W with 1mW
input.
LED, TRANSMIT, RF Power Indication,
Red (D6)
INPUT
Test Jacks
• INPUT
(TJ1)
• COMMON
(TJ2)
COMMON
Relay alarm for RF voltage
Figure 12–1. 10W PA Module – Front Panel.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B System Manual
12.2 10W PA Circuit Description
The function of the 10W PA Module (see Figure
12-3, Schematic 1606C33S) is to amplify a 0 dBm
(1mW) input to an output power level of 10W.
The input from pins C28/A28 passes thru a 700
kHz low pass filter (LPF) consisting of L1 and C1.
Potentiometer (R53), labeled “INPUT LEVEL
SET” on the front panel, is used to adjust the
power level to 10W output with 1mW applied at
the input.
The 10W PA Module operates in a 30 to 535 kHz
range without tuning. The amplifier has a
maximum gain of approximately 49 dB (class A,
complementary symmetry push-pull stage).
Negative feedback is used to derive a nominal
output impedance of 50Ω.
All bypassing is done to common (pins A30/C30,
A32/C32). Transistors QN1, QN2 and QN3 are 14
pin DIPs, each containing four individual transistors; QN1 is PNP, while QN2 and QN3 are NPN.
The LPF output drives the amplifier QN1 and
QN2. QN1A/QN1B and QN2A/QN2B are configured as a differential amplifier, while QN1C and
QN2C are constant current sources. The input
signal is applied to the bases of QN1A and QN2A.
Negative feedback is applied to the bases of
QN1B and QN2B. At the positive side (QN2), the
differential output from QN2A and QN2B is
amplified by QN2D and Q2. At the negative side
(QN1), the differential output from QN1A and
QN1B is amplified by QN1D and Q1. The
positive side power output transistor (Q6) is
driven by Q5; the negative side power output transistor (Q7) is driven by Q4.
The no-load feedback is from transformer (T1)
back thru the RC network of R21, C7, C2, C5 and
R18 to the junction of R16 and R17, for the
purpose of stability. The loaded feedback is
derived from a sampling resistor (R33, R35, R36,
R37, R38, and R39, all in parallel) and fed back
thru C28, C29 and R23. The overall no-load
voltage gain is approximately 282. The overall
loaded voltage gain is approximately 141. The
partial loaded gain, between C28/A28 and the
primary of T1, is approximately 38.
Page 12–2
Technologies, Inc.
The alarm circuit (loss of RF signal condition)
consists of QN3, Q8, K1 and associated components. The RF signal is monitored by C22, at T1
pin 1. The signal sample is amplified in QN3A and
fed to QN3B and QN3C (QN3B and QN3C are
configured as diodes). A voltage doubler is formed
from C30, QN3C and QN3B. The output of QN3B
drives QN3D, via R44 and R45. QN3D is
saturated for an input of 1W to C22 (with
reference to T1 secondary). As QN3D saturates,
Q8 conducts, driving the front panel LED (D6,
power monitor), causing K1 to energize (or deenergize), indicating loss of signal condition.
Jumper JU1 allows the selection of an open circuit
or a closed circuit for the loss of signal condition.
The +20 Vdc line (leading to the alarm circuit,
etc.) is filtered by C10, C11, L2, L4, C19, C20 and
!
CAUTION
THE 10W PA IS, BASICALLY, AN OP-AMP PROVIDING
VERY HIGH GAIN WITH NEGATIVE FEEDBACK. TRANSISTORS Q1 THROUGH Q5, Q6, AND Q7 ARE
THERMALLY CONNECTED, I.E., THEY ARE MOUNTED
ON THE SAME PART OF THE HEAT SINK. ANY FAILING
TRANSISTOR MAY AFFECT OTHER TRANSISTORS.
CHECK EACH TRANSISTOR SEPARATELY. IF NO
FAULTS ARE FOUND, CHECK OTHER COMPONENTS.
BE CAREFUL NOT TO MISPLACE SCREWS, SPRING
WASHER OR INSULATING WASHER USED TO MOUNT
Q1 THROUGH Q8. DAMAGED SCREWS OR INSULATORS
SHOULD NOT BE USED.
C21. The -20 Vdc (leading to C2/C4) is filtered by
C12, C13, L3, C16, C17, C18 and L5.
12.3 TROUBLESHOOTING
To check individual transistors, e.g., Q1 thru Q8,
QN1, QN2 and QN3, remove them first from the
PC Board. Ohmmeter measurements of the transistors while in the PC Board are misleading
because of other paths on the board.
You may remove the heat sink by unscrewing the
four (4) corner screws and the hold-down screws
for Q1 thru Q8. The 10W PA Module can operate
at no-load conditions without the heat sink for
short periods of time while you are troubleshooting.
December 2004
Figure 12–2. TC-10B/TCF-10B 10W PA Component location (1495B73).
12
Figure 12–3. 10W PA Schematic (1606C33).
Chapter 13. RF Interface Module
Table 13–1. 1609C32 Styles and Descriptions.
Schematic
1609C32-9 ||
13.1 RF Interface Module
Description
The RF Interface Module, used with the
TCF–10B, has several functions:
• Receives RF input from 10W PA Module.
• Matches output impedance at 50, 75, or
100Ω.
• Low-pass filter covers RF spectrum up to
550 kHz.
Group
Description
G01
RF Interface
2-wire or 4-wire RF Termination
JU1/JU5
“IN”
2-wire
JU1/JU5
“OUT”
4-wire
Attenuator Override Jumper (JU6)
NORM Sensitivity 70Vrms at 5,000Ω
HIGH Sensitivity
17Vrms at 1,000Ω
RF INTERFACE
• Permits 2- or 4-wire operation.
• Protects against line surges with a gas tube
device.
13.1.1 RF Interface Control Panel
(This panel is shown in Figure 13-1.)
Operator controls consist of Test Jacks:
LINE
LINE
COM
13
TJ1
Line In
TJ2
Line Common
TJ3
Receiver In
TJ4
Receiver Common
13.1.2 RF Interface PC Board
RCVR
(The RF Interface PC Board is shown in
Figure 13-2.)
RCVR
COM
Operator controls are as follows:
Matching Impedance Jumpers
JU4
50Ω
JU3
75Ω
JU2
100Ω
Figure 13–1. 10W PA Module – Front Panel.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
13.2 RF Interface Circuit
Description
13.3 RF Interface
Troubleshooting
This module receives RF input from the 10W PA
Module at pins A16/C16 and A18/C18, and feeds
the power through a balanced low-pass filter with
a 550 kHz cutoff (L3, L4, L1, L2 and associated
components). RF is fed through transformer T1,
for matching 50Ω (JU4), 75Ω (JU3), or 100Ω
(JU2) resistance to the RF line output (45Vrms
maximum) at pins 12A/12C and 10A/10C, which
provide the two-wire UHF (J1) connection on the
Rear Panel.
With the PC Board plugged into the chassis, you
can monitor the voltage output to the RF line at
TJ1 and TJ2. You can monitor receiver input at
TJ3 and TJ4.
Four-Wire Receiver input is provided at pins 24
A/C and 22 A/C via the 4-wire BNC (J2)
connector on the Rear Panel. Jumpers JU1 and
JU5 simultaneously connect the four-wire
Receiver input to RF line output:
• IN settings for 2-wire operation
• OUT settings for 4-wire operation
Isolation transformer T2, together with series
resistor R1, forms an attenuator with 13 dB loss.
Receiver input (at pins 28 A/C) is adjusted by
jumper JU6:
Should a fault occur in the RF Interface Module,
you can remove the PC board and check the
components by conventional means.
13.3.1 Capacitors
Remove from the circuit with jumpers JU2, JU3
and JU4 and check for shorts, dissipation factor,
and capacitance. (Perform checks using a signal of
10 kHz or higher.)
13.3.2 Inductors
Check with an ohmmeter.
13.3.3 Transformers
Check for open circuits.
• When in the NORM position, Receiver
maximum input is 70Vrms at 5,000Ω
• When in the HIGH position, JU6 overrides
the attenuator, providing lower input
impedance (Receiver maximum input is
17Vrms at 1,000Ω).
Page 13–2
December 2004
Figure 13–2. TC–10B/TCF–10B RF Interface Component location (1609C32).
13
Figure 13–3. TC–10B/TCF–10B RF Interface Schematic (1609C32).
Ch. 14 Universal Receiver Module
Table 14–1. Receiver Styles.
The Universal Receiver is pin-for-pin
compatible with the previous version of the
Receiver and Discriminator modules.
Function
Style
Receiver/FSK Discriminator
CO20-RXVMN-202
Universal Receiver
C020-RXVMN-203
Discriminator modules. The single Universal
Receiver with 2 boards replaced the 2 previous
separate modules (Receiver, 1606C32GXX &
Discriminator, 1606C51GXX). With the new
Universal receiver, however, you do not need
extender cards to make adjustments or change
settings. You can perform all necessary settings
and adjustments directly on the front panel (see
Figure 14-2).
14.1 Receiver Module
Description
The Universal Receiver Module comes in two
styles/versions: the Receiver/FSK Discriminator
for the TCF–10B and the Receiver/AM Detector
for the TC–10B. To change versions, simply push
switch SW1-1.
The Receiver Module comprises two boards. The
main (top) board contains all the circuitry required
for the filtering and A/D conversions necessary to
process the incoming RF signal. The auxiliary
(bottom) board contains DC-voltage regulators
and components specific to the Receiver/FSK
Discriminator.
The Receiver Module is driven by the output of
the RF Interface Module. The output of the
Receiver Module drives the necessary output
module. The (primary) output module for the
TCF-10B is the Receiver Logic Module, as shown
in Figure 14–1. The module’s audio output drives
the optional Voice Adapter Module, if it is
installed.
The module’s double board combination slides
into the same slots as the previous Receiver and
A28
RF INTERFACE
MODULE
C28
UNIVERSAL
OR FSK
C10 RECEIVER
A10
LOGIC
RECEIVER
Low Signal C/A MODULE
MODULE
C28
26
*
*Link Selectable
N.O./N.C.
C/A28
Center
Frequency
Receive
RF
C/A
28
High/Low
Frequency
A8
C/A C/A C/A C/A
C/A
12 14
20 22
24
+
–
External
Low
CLI
Signal
(100mA
Contact
Output
meter)
Noise
C8
Audio
VOICE ADAPTER
MODULE
(OPTIONAL)
C/A
26
Figure 14–1. Receiver / FSK Discriminator Module — Simplified Signal Flow Diagram.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
14
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
The receiver outputs are shown below.
Alarms
Receiver/FSK Discriminator:
The alarm for the FSK receiver is:
• Noise
• Low Signal
• Center Frequency
• High/Low Frequency
14.2 Front Panel Controls and
Displays
The controls and displays, for the Universal
Receiver, along with the two alarm indicators at
the bottom of the panel are shown in Figure 14–2.
These controls and displays are described below.
(Please see “Frequency & Sensitivity Setting”
later in this chapter for setting instructions.)
LOW SIGNAL—Low signal alarm relay:
selectable normally open (NO) or normally
closed (NC) contact; relay is energized
when RF signal is present and above
minimum sensitivity setting. Use J3 on the
bottom board to set the NO or NC position
please see Figure 14–3.
14.3 Specifications
The Universal Receiver Module’s technical specifications are shown in Table 14–2.
The module’s FSK frequency spacing specifications are shown in Table 14–3.
Frequency Display
The frequency display is at the top right of the
module’s front panel. It is a four- (4-) digit green
LED numeric display. During normal operation, it
shows the current receiving frequency. When in
the “setting” mode, it displays instructions and
various messages.
UNIVERSAL RECEIVER
2500
kHz
Carrier Level Indicator
The Carrier Level Indicator is directly beneath the
frequency display. It provides a tri-color bar graph
showing a range of -20 to +10 dB, in 5 dB increments. There is also an external CLI circuit to
drive a remote 0-100µA external meter, 10 to 350
Vdc.
Push-button Controls
+10
+5
CANCEL / RAISE
0
LOWER
–5 dB
SET
–10
The recessed, push-button controls are as follows:
–15
CANCEL/RAISE—When in the “Setting”
mode, this button raises the frequency,
sensitivity, or external CLI settings. It also
lets you skip the sensitivity setting option
after you set the frequency.
–20
LOWER—This button lowers the frequency,
sensitivity, or external CLI settings.
SET—This button initiates the “Setting”
mode and accepts the displayed settings,
Page 14–2
AM: MARGIN
FSK:
LOW
SIGNAL
DETECT
NOISE
Figure 14–2. Universal Receiver/FSK Receiver
Front Panel.
December 2004
Chapter 14. Universal Receiver Module
Table 14–2. Receiver System Specifications.
Frequency Range
30 to 535 kHz, in .5 kHz increments
4-Wire Receiver Input Impedance
5,000Ω or 1,000Ω (high sensitivity strapping)
Modulation
CO20-RXVMN-202
Frequency Shift
Frequency Shift Keyed (FSK), two or three
frequency
Narrow shift (– 100 Hz)
Wide shift (– 250 Hz)
Extra Wide Shift (– 500 Hz)
Nominal Bandwidths
Narrow Band (380 Hz at 3 dB points)
Wide Band (800 Hz at 3 dB points)
Extra Wide Band (1600 Hz at 3 dB points)
Receive Sensitivity (Narrow, Wide
Band, or Extra Wide Band)
22.5mV (min) to 70V (max) Standard Setting
5mV (min) to 17V (max) High setting
CHANNEL SPEED*
(FSK)
Narrow Band (380 Hz)
7.5ms
Wide Band (800 Hz)
5.9ms
Extra Wide Band (1,600 Hz)
4.7ms
14
*Receiver set for 15 dB margin, no time delay, solid state output)
December 2004
Page 14–3
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
Table 14–3. FSK Frequency Spacing Specifications (Minimum).
Narrow Band
Unblock or Transfer Trip
1 way, 500 Hz
2 way, 1,000 Hz
Wide Band (Narrow or Wide
Shift)
Unblock or Transfer Trip
2 way, 2,000 Hz
Phase Comparison
(60 Hz sq. wave keying)
Phase Comparison
(60 Hz 3ms pulse keying)
Extra Wide Band
1 way, 1,000 Hz
Unblock or Transfer Trip
1 way, 1,500 Hz
2 way, 3,000 Hz
1 way, 2000 Hz
2 way, 4,000 Hz
1 way, 2,000 Hz
2 way, 4,000 Hz
Phase Comparison
(60 Hz sq. wave keying)
Phase Comparison
(60 Hz 3ms pulse keying)
All Voice Applications
Page 14–4
Minimum Channel Spacing
1 way, 2,000 Hz
2 way, 4,000 Hz
1 way, 2,000 Hz
2 way, 4,000 Hz
2-way, 4,000 Hz
December 2004
Chapter 14. Universal Receiver Module
14.4 Switch Settings
Tables 14–4 and 14–5 show the DIP switch settings for the Receiver/FSK Discriminator.
Table 14–4. Universal Receiver (SW1 settings).
SWITCH
SETTING
OFF
ON
SW1-1
FSK
AM
SW1-2
NO VOICE ADAPTER
VOICE ADAPTER
SW1-3
DTT (50 ms D.O. on noise clamp)
UB (10 ms D.O. on noise clamp)
UB 2F or 3 Frequency
SW1-4
DIRECTIONAL COMPARISON RELAYING
PHASE COMPARISON RELAYING
SW1-5
SHIFT DOWN TO TRIP 2F or 3F
SHIFT UP TO TRIP 2F only
Note For Direct Transfer Trip Applications:
It is recommended that the Receiver Logic pre-trip time delay be for at least a minimum of 4 ms,
preferably at the maximum the power system will allow for critical clearing times. Refer to
Receiver Logic Section for settings.
Table 14–5. Universal Receiver (SW1-1 set to the OFF position).
SW1-6
SW1-7
SW1-8
BANDWIDTH
SHIFT
2F/3F
OFF
OFF
OFF
380 Hz
100 Hz
2F
OFF
OFF
ON
800 Hz
250 Hz
2F
OFF
ON
OFF
1600 Hz
500 Hz
2F
OFF
ON
ON
800 Hz
250 Hz
3F
ON
OFF
OFF
1600 Hz
500 Hz
3F
ON
OFF
ON
800 Hz
100 Hz
2F
ON
ON
OFF
1600 Hz
250 Hz
2F
December 2004
14
Page 14–5
TCF–10B System Manual
14.5 Frequency & Sensitivity
Setting
To change settings on the FSK receiver, complete
the following sequence:
14.5.1. Push the SET button.
This causes the frequency display to begin
flashing, indicating that the receiver is in the
“setting” mode.
If you do not touch any of the buttons for
approximately three minutes, the receiver
exits the setting mode and reverts to the
previous settings.
14.5.2. Set the frequency.
To keep the displayed frequency, press the
SET button again.
To increase the frequency, push the CANCEL/
RAISE button; to decrease it, push the
LOWER button. Pushing either button once
and releasing it raises or lowers the frequency
by the minimum increment, 0.5 kHz. Holding
down either button for more than two seconds
increases the incrementing speed. If you
exceed the maximum of 535 kHz, the display
rolls over to the lower end, 30 kHz, and
continues scrolling.
After you have the desired frequency
displayed, release the button. The display
once again flashes, indicating that it is still in
the “setting” mode and has not yet accepted
the new setting. Press the SET button to
accept the frequency setting.
Page 14–6
Technologies, Inc.
14.5.3. Set the sensitivity.
After you set the frequency, the display scrolls
this message: "Set Sens?… – Hit Set or
Cancel…".
To keep the current sensitivity setting, press
the CANCEL/RAISE button.
To tell the receiver to automatically set the
sensitivity based on an incoming remote
signal, press the SET button. This sets the
receiver for a 15 dB margin and calibrates the
CLI meter to 0 dB. While the receiver is
setting the sensitivity, the display scrolls the
message: "Working…"
At first the bar graph is blank. Then it
gradually ramps up until it reaches approximately 0 dB. The display then tells you
whether the sensitivity level is okay or if there
is a problem, such as a signal too weak to set
for a minimum pickup level.
After the display gives the "–OK–" message,
it then scrolls the message "Sens Adjust? – Hit
Raise/Lower or Set when done...” Here, you
can either accept the current setting or
manually adjust the receiver sensitivity.
To accept the current setting, press the SET
button. The receiver is now set for a 15 dB
margin, and the CLI reads approximately 0
dB.
To manually adjust the receiver sensitivity up
or down 10 dB, push the CANCEL/RAISE or
LOWER button. The CLI will track accordingly and remain at that level to indicate the
sensitivity is set that much below or above the
15 dB setting.
December 2004
Chapter 14. Universal Receiver Module
Sometimes the incoming signal may not be
strong enough to raise the margin the full 10
dB. If this happens, the display says
"Warning: signal too low for more gain - hit
Set to continue.." When this happens, push the
SET button. This lowers the sensitivity to an
acceptable level and flashes the bar graph to
remind you that you are still in the “setting”
mode.
To accept the displayed level, push the SET
button.
14.5.4. Set the external CLI.
Once you have completed the sensitivity
setting, the display scrolls this message: "Set
Ext CLI? – Hit Raise/Lower or Set when
done...”
To calibrate the external CLI push the
CANCEL/RAISE or LOWER button. The
external CLI meter will move up and down
accordingly. The external meter is a 100µA
instrument. If it is calibrated in µA, the meter
should be set to read 67µA (this is equivalent
to 0 dB on the internal meter). The setting
should be varied 3.3µA for each dB the
margin adjustment has been raised or lowered
from the 15 dB margin. If the meter is calibrated in dB, set the meter to read equal to the
internal CLI meter.
To accept the displayed level, push the SET
button.
This completes the FSK setting procedure.
14
December 2004
Page 14–7
Figure 14–3. TCF–10B Universal Receiver Location of SW1 Dip switch & J3
Page 14–8
TCF–10B System Manual
December 2004
Technologies, Inc.
Chapter 15. Receiver Logic Module
Table 15–1. CF20-RXLMN-00X Styles and Descriptions.
Style
Schematic
CF30-RXLMN-6 ||
Description
004 ||
2-FREQUENCY UB, PORTT, OR DTT
003
2-FREQUENCY PHASE COMPARISON
002
3-FREQUENCY DUAL UB/PORTT & DTT
15.1 Module Description
This version of the Receiver Logic Module —
model CF20-RXLMN-00X — replaces the
previous version — model 1606C52G0X — in all
later TCF–10B carrier sets. This model is pin-forpin compatible with the previous version,
allowing for easy replacement/upgrading. It
provides all of the same functions as the previous
version, but with added flexibility.
CF
LF
N
SOR
CES Y
O
PR RELA
RO
MIC ASED
B
RD
GUA
P
TRI
HF
RECEIVER
UNIVERSAL
/ FSK
DISCRIMINATOR
RECEIVER
MODULE(S)
MODULE
Instead of just selecting the amount of time for a
timer setting (e.g., trip delay, guard hold time, trip
hold time), you now have the option of disabling,
or not using, it. You can set any of the timers — or
other options — for your application using the
module’s three banks of DIP switches (see
“Setting the DIP Switches for Your Application”
later in this chapter).
RECEIVER
LOGIC
MODULE
ISE
NO
LL
P
TRI
CB
15
LL
OR
(Op
tion
al)
2-FREQUENCY
OPERATION
EM OUTPUT
MODULE
ELECTRO-MECHANICAL
TYPE RELAY
Figure 15–1. Simplified Signal Flow Diagram for 2-Frequency Operation.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
tables are accompanied by descriptions of each
type of setting and explanations of their effect.
The module now uses a programmable logic array,
in the form of an EPLD plug-in chip, to control the
module’s logic functions. The chip that comes
with each module is already programmed for the
functions used in one of the following types of
application:
• 2-Frequency Directional Comparison
Also with this model, the module’s output is no
longer limited to a 20 Vdc power source. The
output is a 1 Amp, switched transistor output that
you can drive from the station battery using 250,
125 or 48 Vdc. This means that you no longer
need the auxiliary power supply (1610C07GXX),
unless you are interfacing with a 20V based relay
system, such as Uniflex or SKDU/SKBU, or most
phase comparison relaying systems.
• 3-Frequency Directional Comparison
• 2-Frequency Phase Comparison
The Receiver Logic Modules installed in all
TCF–10B carrier sets are identical except for the
EPLD plug-in chip controlling its logic functions
and the front panel, which provides LEDs specific
to one of the application types listed above.
15.1.1 How It Works
During operation, the Receiver Logic Module
takes the incoming signal from the Universal
Receiver Module and, after determining the
proper response, generates the appropriate guard
and trip outputs. The module provides both the
1A, optically isolated, transistor switched (solid
state) output for microprocessor based relays and,
for electro-mechanical relay systems requiring
contact outputs, a signal to the EM (ElectroMechanical) Output Module.
Your TCF–10B Receiver Logic Module is shipped
already customized for your application. That is,
the front panel has the appropriate LEDs for your
application and an EPLD chip that is already
programmed with the relevant logic and functions.
Likewise, the module’s DIP switches are preset to
the most secure settings for your application. For
a complete set of tables showing you the DIP
switch settings for the different types of application, as well as the default, or shipped, settings,
please see the “Setting the DIP Switches for Your
Application” section later in this chapter. These
HF
RECEIVER
UNIVERSAL
/ FSK
DISCRIMINATOR
RECEIVER
MODULE
CF
LF
N
RECEIVER
LOGIC
MODULE
The possible inputs the module receives from the
Universal Receiver Module include the high
frequency, center frequency, and low frequency
SOR
CESAY
O
PR REL
RO
MICBASED
TT)
/PO
(UB
D
T)
AR
GU
POT
UB/
(
P
TRI
ISE
NO
LL
CB
P
TRI
LL
TRIP
(DTT)
AND
GUARD
(DTT)
ed)
quir
(Re
3-FREQUENCY
OPERATION
EM OUTPUT
MODULE
ELECTRO-MECHANICAL
TYPE RELAY
Figure 15–2. Simplified Signal Flow Diagram for 3-Frequency Operation.
Page 15–2
December 2004
Chapter 15. Receiver Logic Module
signals, as well as (line) noise and low level
signals.
The specific outputs the Receiver Logic Module
generates are determined by the type of application (see “Receiver Logic Output Signals” below),
the conditions of the input signal, and the settings
of the module’s DIP switches.
2-Frequency Phase Comparison Outputs
All 2-Frequency Phase Comparison output signals
are 1 A switched transistor (solid state). These four
output signals are:
• Trip Positive
• Trip Negative
• !Low Level
15.1.2 Upgrade Information
The version (CF20-RXLMN) of the Receiver
Logic Module is-pin for pin compatible with the
previous version (1606C52G01). We have also
kept all the functions of the previous version. This
lets you take advantage of the added features and
flexibility of the new version without having to
reconfigure your system.
Upgrading to the newer version of the Receiver
Logic Module is as easy as 1–2–3:
1. Remove your old Receiver Logic Module.
• Noise
2-Frequency Directional Comparison
Outputs
For 2-Frequency Directional Comparison applications, the module provides both 1 A switched
transistor (solid state) and electro-mechanical
output signals.
The five 1A, switched transistor (solid state)
output signals are:
2. Verify that the DIP switch settings on the
new module are set correctly for your
application (see “Setting the DIP Switches
for Your Application”).
• UB/POTT/DTT (Trip 1)
3. Insert your new Receiver Logic Module.
• Checkback Trip 1
15.1.3 Receiver Logic Output Signals
The module provides output signals for the
following types of application:
• 2-Frequency Directional Comparison
||(CF20-RXLMN-004)
• 3-Frequency Directional
||(CF20-RXLMN-002)
Comparison
• 2-Frequency Phase Comparison ||(CF20RXLMN-003)
Functional block diagrams are shown for each of
these applications in Figures 15-7 (2-Frequency
Directional Comparison), 15-8 (3-Frequency
Directional Comparison), and 15-9 (2-Frequency
Phase Comparison). The diagrams include the
logic, inputs, outputs, DIP switch settings, and
external (TCF–10B rear panel) connections for
each application.
• Guard
• !Low Signal 1
• Noise
The two electro-mechanical output signals are:
• Trip 1
• Guard 1
3-Frequency Directional Comparison
Outputs
For 3-Frequency Directional Comparison applications, the module provides both 1 A switched
transistor (solid state) and electro-mechanical
output signals.
The five 1 A switched transistor (solid state)
output signals are:
• UB/POTT (Trip 2)
• Guard 2 (UB/POTT)
• !Low Signal
• Checkback Trip
• Noise
December 2004
Page 15–3
15
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
The two electro-mechanical output signals are:
• Trip 1 (DTT)/Trip 2 (UB/POTT)
• Guard 1 (DTT)
15.1.4 Receiver Logic Front Panels
The front panel front panel of the TCF–10B
Receiver Logic Module comes in three variations,
one for each of the three application types
(2-Frequency
Directional
Comparison,
3-Frequency Directional Comparison, and
2-Frequency Phase Comparison). Your module
comes with a front panel that fits your application.
2-F Directional Comparison Front Panel
The front panel for 2-Frequency Directional
Comparison applications is shown in Figure 15-3.
Its four LEDs provide the following signal indications:
GOOD CHANNEL (this green LED is lit to
indicate an absence of noise and low level)
CHECKBACK TRIP (this red LED is lit to
indicate a low frequency is received; this
will be the only LED lit when a low
frequency is received after a loss-ofchannel without a guard return)
TRIP (this red LED is lit to indicate a low
frequency is received, i.e., the frequency
shifts low)
GUARD (this red LED is lit to indicate a high
frequency is received, i.e., the frequency
shifts high)
3-F Directional Comparison Front Panel
The front panel for 3-Frequency Directional
Comparison applications is shown in Figure 15-4.
Its five LEDs provide the following signal indications:
GOOD CHANNEL (this green LED is lit to
indicate an absence of noise and low level)
CHECKBACK TRIP (this red LED is lit to
indicate a low frequency or high frequency
is received, depending on the position of
SW3-6; this LED will be lit without its
corresponding trip LED when the high or
Page 15–4
Figure 15–3.
Front Panel for 2-Frequency
Directional Comparison
(Transfer Trip/Unblock)
Applications.
low frequency is received following a lossof-channel without a guard return))
UB/POTT TRIP (this red LED is lit to
indicate a high frequency is received, i.e.,
the frequency shifts high)
DTT TRIP (this red LED is lit to indicate a
low frequency is received, i.e., the
frequency shifts low, indicating a direct
transfer trip)
GUARD (this red LED is lit to indicate the
center frequency is received, i.e., no
frequency shift; the operation is normal)
December 2004
Chapter 15. Receiver Logic Module
2-F Phase Comparison Front Panel
The front panel for 2-Frequency Phase
Comparison applications is shown in Figure 15-5.
Its three LEDs provide the following signal indications:
GOOD CHANNEL (this green LED is lit to
indicate an absence of noise and low level)
TRIP POSITIVE (this red LED and the Trip
Negative LED alternately flash back and
forth very rapidly — approx. 60 times a
second each — to indicate normal
operation of comparing phases)
TRIP NEGATIVE (this red LED and the Trip
Positive LED alternately flash back and
forth very rapidly — approx. 60 times a
NOTE:
SKBU/SPCU SYSTEM CONVENTION: (S1-2 in Normal)
Non-keyed state = High freq. (Trip Positive) Keyed state = Low Freq. (Negative)
RCVR LOGIC
GOOD
CHANNEL
RCVR LOGIC
GOOD
CHANNEL
CHECKBACK
TRIP
UB/POTT
TRIP
TRIP
POSITIVE
DTT TRIP
GUARD
TRIP
NEGATIVE
15
Figure 15–4.
Front Panel for 3-Frequency
Directional Comparison
(Transfer Trip/Unblock)
Applications.
December 2004
Figure 15–5.
Front Panel for 2-Frequency
Phase Comparison
Applications.
Page 15–5
TCF–10B System Manual
second each — to indicate normal
operation of comparing phases)
15.1.5 Rear Panel Connections
Figure 15-6 shows the connection points for
terminal block TB1 on the rear panel of your
TCF–10B carrier set. It also shows the function of
each position, or connection point. You make all
your relay connections for both microprocessor
based and electro-mechanical type relays to this
terminal block.
For additional diagrams showing all the external
(rear panel) connections for your TCF–10B,
please refer to Figure 3-4 in Chapter 3 and Figure
6-1 in Chapter 6. For DIN connector pinouts for
Technologies, Inc.
each application, please see Figure 15-7 (2-F
Directional Comparison).
15.2 Receiver
Paths
Logic
Signal
The Receiver Logic Module has a different signal
flow for each type of application. This is due
primarily to the different plug-in EPLD chips
used. The input signal (from the Universal
Receiver Module) and your DIP switch settings
also play a role. Figures 15-7, 15-8, and 15-9
provide functional block diagrams showing the
logic and signal path for each application (2-F
Directional Comparison, 3-F Directional
Comparison, and 2-F Phase Comparison, respectively).
TB1
1 –
+ V Input from pins C/A-12
2 –
Guard or Trip Negative from pins C/A-14
3 –
Noise from pins C/A-16
4 –
Trip Positive or Unblock/POTT from pin C-18
5 –
!Low Signal or !Low Level from pin C-20
6 –
Not Used
7 –
Not Used
8 –
Checkback Trip from pin A-20
9 –
Not Used
These three figures also show
the logic states for the input
from the Universal Receiver
Module and (for the Directional
Comparison applications) the
output to the EM Output
Module, the DIP switch
settings, and the DIN connector
pinouts — providing a comprehensive look at the module’s
signal flow.
Figure 15–6. Receiver Logic External (Rear Panel) Connections.
Note: ! = inverted signal
Page 15–6
December 2004
Figure 15–7. 2-Frequency Receive Logic Functional Block Diagram (CF44-VER05)
DRIVES ISO OUT 2
NOISE OUT
GBT OVERRIDE TIMER
U13
1000
_______
0
GUARD BEFORE TRIP
U6
N = 0-30 MS,
2 MS STEPS.
AND2
U1
2
NOISE IN
1
2
NOR2
120
______
0
NOT
TRIP 2 OUT
OR3
200
______
0
UB/POTT
TRIP
NOR2
U19
DRIVES ISO OUT 1
GUARD 2 OUT
N = 10, 50, 100 MS,
OR TIMER CAN BE
DISABLED
U3
U2
OR2
UB
GUARD
DIN
OR2
AND4
CONNECTOR
U31
HF = 1
U14
GBT RESTORE TIMER
D2
TRIP 2
0
______
N
1
NOT
DRIVES ISO OUT 3
GUARD HOLD TIMER
U16
TRIP AFTER GUARD
WINDOW TIMER
U17
NOISE = 1
NOR2
U18
N = 10, 50, 100 MS,
OR TIMER CAN BE
DISABLED
NOR2
AND4
LOW LEVEL IN
TRIP HOLD TIMER
0
______
N
U15
120
______
0
N
______
0
UB
TRIP
LOW LEVEL = 0
TIMER
PRE-TRIP TIMER
U5
HF IN
UB/POTT
TRIP
J1
LOW LEV DELAY TIMER
OR3
U4
2
U34
N
______
0
1
DRIVES ISO OUT 5
2
N = 50, 75, 100 MS,
NOT
VCC
OR TIMER CAN BE
LF = 1
1
NOT
LOW LEVEL
LOW LEV. = OFF
DISABLED
LF IN
U29
4
DTT TRIP
2
U28
3
D
Q
P
R
5
DIFF AMP
Q
6
UNBLOCK TIMER
______
0
D FF
U20
N
1
U30
CF = 1
DRIVES EM TRIP OUTPUT
TRIP 1 / 2 OUT
CLK
C
L
AND2
U27
150, 300, 500 MS,
CF IN
OR FUNCTION CAN
BE DISABLED
GUARD
U33
D6
DRIVES EM GUARD OUTPUT
GUARD 1 OUT
RCVD.
SIG. OK
NOR2
VCC
GBT DISABLED
OFF
VCC
NORMAL GBT
ON
CB1
UB NOISE BLOCK
SEE DIP SWITCH
S2-3.
U7
DRIVES ISO OUT 4
CB 1 / 2 OUT
U11
CB2
CB 1 / CB 2
SEE DIP SWITCH
S3-6.
GBT
OVERRIDE
C4
A6
C6
A8
C8
A10
C10
A12
C12
A14
-20V IN
A18
C18
A20
C20
A22
C22
A24
C24
A26
C26
A28
DTT GUARD
TRIP 1 SETS TIMER TO "N"
(TIMER OUTPUT THEN = 0).
+20V IN
-20V IN
+20V IN
C14
A16
C16
AND3
NOR2
A2
C2
A4
OR2
NOISE IN
CENT FREQ IN
ISO OUT COMMON (+)
ISO OUT COMMON (+)
ISO OUT 1 (-)
ISO OUT 1 (-)
ISO OUT 2 (-)
ISO OUT 2 (-)
ISO OUT 3 (-)
ISO OUT 4 (-)
ISO OUT 5 (-)
C28
A30
C30
EM TRIP OUT
EM GUARD OUT
LOW LEV IN
LOW LEV IN
H/L FREQ IN
H/L FREQ IN
CONNON
COMMON
A32
C32
COMMON
COMMON
D4
SELECTED CB
SEE DIP SWITCHES S2-4 AND 5.
OR2
DIP SWITCHES
CF GUARD
OR HF
U12
S1
TRIP DELAY, 0-30 MS,
2 MS PER STEP.
" " "
" " "
TRIP HOLD TIME, D, 10,
50, 100 MS.
GUARD HOLD TIME, D, 10,
50, 100 MS.
1
2
GUARD BEFORE TRIP
OR2
PRE-TRIP TIMER
U9
TIMER
U10
DTT
TRIP
AND2
U22
D5
DTT TRIP
N
N = 10, 50, 100 MS,
OR TIMER CAN BE
DISABLED
NOR2
N = 2-30 MS,
2 MS STEPS.
U26
0
______
120
______
0
N
______
0
AND4
TRIP HOLD TIMER
TRIP 1
OR2
3
4
5
6
7
8
U
B
/
P
O
T
T
TRIP AFTER GUARD
ANY VALID
FREQUENCY
U24
1
2
GUARD OR
UB TRIP
NOT
U23
WINDOW TIMER
GUARD HOLD TIMER
0
______
120
______
0
N = 10, 50, 100 MS,
OR TIMER CAN BE
DISABLED
0
_______
40
DTT
GUARD
U32
1
2
U25
N
NOR2
U21
U8
NOISE HOLD TIMER
S2
OR2
1
2
UB TIME, D, 150,
300, 500 MS.
NOISE BLOCKS UB TRIP.
GBT OFF, ON, OVERRIDE.
" " "
TRIP DELAY, 2-30 MS,
2 MS PER STEP.
" " "
3
4
5
6
7
8
OR2
D
T
T
AND4
NOT
S3
NO NOISE
1
2
3
NO L L
RECEIVE IN & EM OUT
INPUT FROM RECEIVER:
U35
U36
2
AND5
1
NOT
U37
2
1
NOT
U38
2
1
50, 100 MS.
GUARD HOLD TIME, D, 10,
50, 100 MS.
CB 1 / 2 TO ISO OUT 4
LOW LEV DELAY TIME, D,
50, 75, 100 MS.
7
8
LOGIC STATES
DIP SWITCH NOTES:
D3
GUARD
" " "
TRIP HOLD TIME, D, 10,
4
5
6
NOISE = +15V. NOT NOISE = 0V.
LOW LEVEL = 0V. NOT LOW LEVEL = +15V.
HF/LF = +15V FOR HF, -15V FOR LF,
OR 0V FOR NOT HF OR LF.
CF = +15V. NOT CF = 0V.
UB/POTT TRIP = HF. DTT TRIP = LF.
TRIP 1 = LF. TRIP 2 = HF.
GUARD FOR UB/POTT = CF OR LF.
GUARD FOR DTT = CF OR HF.
"D" MEANS FUNCTION IS DISABLED.
OUTPUT TO EM MODULE:
GUARD = +15V. NOT GUARD = 0V.
TRIP 1 = +15V. TRIP 2 = -15V.
NOT TRIP 1 OR TRIP 2 = 0V.
TIME SWITCHES ARE BINARY. HIGHEST SWITCH
NUMBER IS MS BIT. FIRST TIME SHOWN IS
00B (OFF, OFF). EXAMPLES: FOR UB/POTT
PRE-TRIP TIME = 10MS, S1-4=OFF, S1-3=ON,
S1-2=OFF, S1-1=ON. FOR UB TIMER DISABLED,
S2-2=OFF, S2-1=OFF.
FOR NOISE TO BLOCK UB TRIP, S2-3=ON.
FOR NO GBT, S2-5=OFF, S2-4=OFF.
FOR NORMAL GBT, S2-5=OFF, S2-4=ON.
FOR GBT OVERRIDE, S2-5=ON, S2-4=OFF.
FOR ISO OUT 4 = TRIP 1 CB, S3-6=ON.
FOR ISO OUT 4 = TRIP 2 CB, S3-6=OFF.
NOT
Figure 15–8. 3-Frequency Receive Logic Functional Block Diagram
UB /
POTT
2
U19
LE1
1
3
RECEIVE IN LOGIC STATES
GOOD
CHANNEL
NOR2
LOW LEVEL = 0 V; LOW LEVEL = +15 V.
HF/LF = +15 V FOR HF; –15 V FOR LF,
DRIVES ISO OUT 2
NOISE OUT
NOISE = 1
NOISE IN
U4
OR 0 V FOR HF OR LF.
DRIVES ISO OUT 5
LOW LEVEL OUT
LOW LEV. = OFF
SKBU
1
2
DIP SWITCHES
NOISE = +15 V; NOISE = 0 V.
CF = +15 V; CF = 0 V.
FOR 2F: HF = TRIP –; LF = TRIP +.
S1
2F = OFF; 3F = ON
ON = NORMAL; OFF = REVERSED
SPCU = OFF; SKBU = ON
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
S2
NOT
U3
2
U2
2
3
4
1
1
2
U5
1
3
NOT
AND3
AND2
LOW LEVEL = 0
LOW LEVEL IN
2
2
3
4
1
1
2
2
2
U14
1
2
3
4
U8
U18
DRIVES ISO OUT 1
TRIP – OUT
1
OR3
1
2
AND2
TRIP –
U9
1
AND2
2
U15
1
NOT
RM
AL
OR2
0/18
DRIVES EM TRIP OUTPUT
TRIP OUT
0/18
DRIVES EM GUARD OUTPUT
GUARD OUT
2F
U16
VCC
2
NOT
VCC
NO
POLARITY
SEE S1-2
AND2
1
0
1
3
U13
REVERSED
2
1
2
3
J1
+20 V IN
–20 V IN
+20 V IN
–20 V IN
NOISE IN
U12
3
DIN
CONNECTOR
LE5
AND2
LF = 1
LF IN
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
OR2
1
3
S3
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
U7
3
1
3
U11
LE3
TRIP +
AND2
U10
AND2
CF = 1
CF IN
OR3
1
3
3
DRIVES ISO OUT 3
TRIP + OUT
1
NOTE: ALL UNUSED SWITCHES MUST BE OFF.
2
2
U17
AND2
AND3
HF = 1
HF IN
2
3
4
U6
3
U1
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
NOT USED
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
SPCU
SPCU / SKBU
SEE S1-3
2F / 3F
SEE S1-1
3F
Figure 15–9. Phase Comparison Functional Block Diagram.
CENT FREQ IN
ISO OUT COMMON (+)
ISO OUT COMMON (+)
ISO OUT 1 (–)
ISO OUT 1 (–)
ISO OUT 2 (–)
ISO OUT 2 (–)
ISO OUT 3 (–)
ISO OUT 4 (–)
ISO OUT 5 (–)
EM TRIP OUT
EM GUARD OUT
LOW LEV IN
LOW LEV IN
H/L FREQ IN
H/L FREQ IN
COMMON
COMMON
COMMON
COMMON
A2
C2
A4
C4
A6
C6
A8
C8
A10
C10
A12
C12
A14
C14
A16
C16
A18
C18
A20
C20
A22
C22
A24
C24
A26
C26
A28
C28
A30
C30
A32
C32
STATION
BATTERY POSITIVE
TRIP –
NOISE
TRIP +
LOW LEVEL
15
TCF–10B System Manual
15.3 Receiver Logic
2-Frequency Directional
Comparison Logic
This logic can be configured for a typical Direct
Transfer Trip or Directional Comparison Unblock
System.
To provide the utmost security, this logic provides
for 120ms of guard before trip logic. It requires
that after loss of signal, there must be at least
120ms of guard before the system is allowed to
trip. This may be disabled or overridden according
to system requirements. Details follow.
There is also a 120ms trip after guard requirement
that requires within 120ms of losing guard, trip is
received, otherwise the channel locks out from
tripping.
Hold timers are available for both the trip and
guard outputs that can be selected for 10, 50 or
100ms or be disabled. These timers are on the
output side of the logic and therefore only affect
the solid state or electromechanical outputs. They
have no affect on the functionality of the internal
logic.
The pre-trip timer allows for higher security by
delaying the trip output by the time set. Unblock
functions will typically be 0ms but DTT functions
will typically be on the order of 20 or 30ms.
The logic also provides for line protection of the
transmission line when the remote end’s breaker is
open. Upon receiving a trip signal from the other
end for longer than 1000ms, indicating an open
breaker, the logic disables the guard before trip
requirement such that if the channel is lost and
returns in the trip state, the line relay system will
be allowed to trip for a fault. To allow for this
scenario, the guard before trip should be set for
“override”. After guard is restored, the logic is
reset after 200ms. Typical line relaying or DTT
systems do not disable guard before trip logic.
Unblock logic is provided in the TCF-10B to force
a trip on loss of channel. If a fault causes a loss of
channel there is a window selectable between 150,
300 or 500ms that will produce a trip output. After
this time, the channel is locked out from tripping
until it receives 120ms of guard. The assertion of
Page 15–10
Technologies, Inc.
the trip output for unblock can be delayed by 10,
15, 20 or 40 ms if desired ||. Typical permissive
overreaching transfer trip systems used over
Power Line Carrier take advantage of the Unblock
Logic and are called Directional Comparison
Unblock systems.
A checkback trip output is provided for testing
purposes. The checkback trip will always assert
anytime a trip is asserted by the logic. However if
a trip frequency is received after a loss of channel
(without guard return), then only a checkback trip
is asserted.
15.4 3-Frequency Directional
Comparison Logic
This logic is similar to the 2-frequency logic
except with the addition of logic to handle the
Direct Transfer Trip logic separately, in addition
to providing for a Directional Comparison
Unblock System.
The Guard Before Trip and Trip After Guard is
duplicated for the DTT portion as well as the Trip
hold and Guard hold timers.
The outputs available for the Unblock portion of
the logic are the 1A transistor switch outputs (TB1) as noted in section 15.1.3 The outputs available
for the DTT portion of the logic are only available
from the E/M Output module (TB5&6) shown in
Chapter 16. Additionally either the trip1
(DTT)/trip2(Unblock) signal or the guard 1 signal
drives the electromechanical outputs. To assert an
e/m relay with the DTT trip (Trip 1), the input is
driven by a +15V signal. To assert it with the
Unblock trip (trip 2), the input is driven by a -15V
signal. The Guard 1 signal that is applied to the
e/m relay card is the DTT guard signal. To
monitor the Unblock guard signal, use the 1A
transistor switch output from the logic card itself.
Note that when the 3-frequency system goes to an
Unblock trip, the Guard 1 (DTT) does not drop
out but the Guard 2 (Unblock) does. Likewise on
a DTT Trip the Guard 2 does not dropout but the
Guard 1 does. Further explanation of the timer
settings are explained in section 15.5.
December 2004
Chapter 15. Receiver Logic Module
15.5 Setting the DIP Switches for Your Application
As noted earlier, the Receiver Logic Module uses a plug-in EPLD chip to control its logic functions. Your
Receiver Logic Module comes to you with the EPLD chip for your type of application already installed.
The only adjustments you need to consider are the module’s DIP switch settings. Following are three sets
of tables showing you all the DIP switch settings that apply to each type of application. The tables also
show you the default, or shipped, setting for each switch. These are the most secure settings for your application. Accompanying each table is a description of that switch setting and an explanation of its effect.
15.5.1 Switch Settings for 2-Frequency Directional Comparison (POTT/DTT/UB)
Applications
Pre-Trip Timer (POTT/DTT/UB 2F)
The Pre-Trip Timer does not allow tripping until the trip signal has been present for the time you set. You
can set this timer from 0 to 30ms in 2ms increments. A typical application of this timer in Direct Transfer
Trip systems is to set it for the maximum delay possible. Limitations on the critical clearing time of the
power system will
have a direct impact
Table 15–2. Trip Delay Switch Settings for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications.
on this setting. In
Directional
TIME IN ms
SW1-1
SW1-2
SW1-3
SW1-4
Comparison
Unblock/POTT
0
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
systems, you set this
2
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
timer for 0ms.
4
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
6
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
8
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
10
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
12
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
14
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
16
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
18
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
20
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
22
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
24
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
26
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
28
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
30
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
December 2004
The trip delay time
switch settings are
listed in Table 15-2.
15
Position
when
shipped
Page 15–11
TCF–10B System Manual
Trip Hold Timer
(POTT/DTT/UB 2F)
The Trip Hold Timer lets you stretch
the trip output. You can set it for 10,
50, or 100ms or disable (0ms) it. We
recommend that you use the disabled
setting in the Unblock/POTT to avoid
problems with transient blocking.
The trip hold time switch settings are
listed in Table 15-3.
Guard Hold Timer
(POTT/DTT/UB 2F)
The Guard Hold Timer stretches the
guard output by the amount you set.
You can set it for 10, 50, or 100ms or
disable (0ms) it. The disabled setting
is appropriate for most applications.
The guard hold time switch settings
are listed in Table 15-4.
Unblock Timer
(POTT/DTT/UB 2F)
The Unblock Timer provides a trip
output for the time set on loss of
channel, which is defined as low level
and loss of guard. You can set it for
150, 300, or 500ms. The normal
setting is 150ms in the Unblock
system and disabled for all other
applications. This is what differentiates the Unblock system from the
POTT.
Technologies, Inc.
Table 15–3. Trip Hold Time Switch Settings
for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW1-5
SW1-6
DISABLED
OPEN
OPEN
10
CLOSED
OPEN
50
OPEN
CLOSED
100
CLOSED
CLOSED
Table 15–4. Guard Hold Time Switch Settings
for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW1-7
SW1-8
DISABLED
OPEN
OPEN
10
CLOSED
OPEN
50
OPEN
CLOSED
100
CLOSED
CLOSED
Position
when
shipped
Table 15–5. Unblock Time Switch Settings
for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW2-1
SW2-2
DISABLED
OPEN
OPEN
150
CLOSED
OPEN
300
OPEN
CLOSED
500
CLOSED
CLOSED
The unblock time switch settings are
listed in Table 15-5.
Page 15–12
December 2004
Chapter 15. Receiver Logic Module
Noise Block of Unblock
(POTT/DTT/UB 2F)
With this switch (SW2-3) closed,
noise will disable the Unblock trip
output. Normal application is with
this switch opened.
The noise block of unblock switch
settings are listed in Table 15-6.
Guard before Trip
(POTT/DTT/UB 2F)
With this function set to “on without
override”, the logic requires guard to
be received for 120 ms before the
system is allowed to trip. With it set to
“on with override”, the 120 ms guard
return is required except where trip
has been received for over 1,000 ms;
if there is a loss of channel, then the
guard is not required prior to tripping.
Typically, you would use this where
open breaker keying is required.
Table 15–6. Noise Block of Unblock Switch
Settings for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications.
FUNCTION
SW2-3
NOISE ALLOWS UB TRIP
OPEN
NOISE BLOCKS UB TRIP
CLOSED
Table 15–7. Guard Before Trip Switch Settings
for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications.
FUNCTION
SW2-4
SW2-5
OFF
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
ON W OVER
OPEN
CLOSED
NOT USED
CLOSED
CLOSED
ON W/O OVER
Position
when
shipped
The guard before trip time switch
settings are listed in Table 15-7.
Table 15–8. Low Level Delay Switch Settings
for POTT/DTT/UB 2F Applications.
Low Level Delay Timer
(POTT/DTT/UB 2F)
The Low Level Delay Timer delays
the Unblock timer from initiating a
trip output on loss of channel; it also
delays the low level output. You can
set it for 10, 15, 20 or 40 ms or disable
(0 ms) it.
The low level delay time switch
settings are listed in Table 15-8.
TIME IN ms
SW3-6
SW3-7
SW3-8
DISABLED
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
10
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
15
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
20
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
40
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
These time selections are only
available on the RCVR LOGIC-A
module (CF20-RXLMN-004). ||
NOTE: ||
SW2-6 through SW2-8 and SW3-1 through SW3-5
are not used in the 2-Frequency Directional
Comparison logic program.
December 2004
Page 15–13
15
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
15.5.2 Switch Settings for POTT/UB Portion 3F Applications
Pre-Trip Timer (POTT/UB 3F)
The Pre-Trip Timer does not allow tripping until the trip signal has been present for the time you set. You
can set this timer from 0 (disabled) to 30ms in 2ms increments. A typical application of this timer in Direct
Transfer Trip systems is to set it for the maximum delay possible. Limitations on the critical clearing time
of the power system will have a direct impact on this setting. In Directional Comparison Unblock/POTT
systems, you set this timer for 0ms.
The trip delay time switch settings are listed in Table 15-9.
Table 15–9. Trip Delay Switch Settings for POTT/UB 3F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW1-1
SW1-2
SW1-3
SW1-4
0
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
2
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
4
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
6
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
8
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
10
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
12
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
14
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
16
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
18
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
20
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
22
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
24
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
26
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
28
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
30
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
Page 15–14
Position
when
shipped
December 2004
Chapter 15. Receiver Logic Module
Trip Hold Timer (POTT/UB 3F)
The Trip Hold Timer lets you stretch
the trip output. You can set it for 10,
50, or 100ms or disable (0ms) it. We
recommend that you use the disabled
setting in the Unblock/POTT to avoid
problems with transient blocking.
The trip hold time switch settings for
3-frequency UB/POTT applications
are listed in Table 15-10. The trip
hold time switch settings for 3frequency DTT applications are listed
in Table 15-17.
Guard Hold Timer
(POTT/UB 3F)
The Guard Hold Timer stretches the
guard output by the amount you set.
You can set it for 10, 50, or 100ms or
disable (0ms) it. The disabled setting
is appropriate for most applications.
The guard hold time switch settings
for 3-frequency UB/POTT applications are listed in Table 15-11. The
guard hold time switch settings for
3-frequency DTT applications are
listed in Table 15-18.
Table 15–10. Trip Hold Time Switch Settings
for POTT/UB 3F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW1-5
SW1-6
DISABLED
OPEN
OPEN
10
CLOSED
OPEN
50
OPEN
CLOSED
100
CLOSED
CLOSED
Table 15–11. Guard Hold Time Switch Settings
for POTT/UB 3F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW1-7
SW1-8
DISABLED
OPEN
OPEN
10
CLOSED
OPEN
50
OPEN
CLOSED
100
CLOSED
CLOSED
Position
when
shipped
Unblock Timer (POTT/UB 3F)
The Unblock Timer provides a trip
output for the time set on loss of
channel, which is defined as low level
and loss of guard. You can set it for
150, 300, or 500ms. The normal
setting is 150ms in the Unblock
system and disabled for all other
applications. This timer is what
differentiates the Unblock system
from the POTT.
The unblock time switch settings are
listed in Table 15-12.
December 2004
15
Table 15–12. Unblock Time Switch Settings
for POTT/UB 3F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW2-1
SW2-2
DISABLED
OPEN
OPEN
150
CLOSED
OPEN
300
OPEN
CLOSED
500
CLOSED
CLOSED
Page 15–15
TCF–10B System Manual
Noise Block of Unblock
(POTT/UB 3F)
With this switch (SW2-3) closed,
noise will disable the Unblock trip
output. Normal application is with
this switch opened.
The noise block of unblock switch
settings are listed in Table 15-13.
Technologies, Inc.
Table 15–13. Noise Block of Unblock Switch
Settings for POTT/UB 3F Applications.
FUNCTION
SW2-3
NOISE ALLOWS UB TRIP
OPEN
NOISE BLOCKS UB TRIP
CLOSED
Guard before Trip
(POTT/UB 3F)
With this function set to “on without
override”, the logic requires guard to
be received for 120ms before the
system is allowed to trip. With it set to
“on with override”, the 120ms guard
return is required except where trip
has been received for over 1,000ms; if
there is a loss of channel, then the
guard is not required prior to tripping.
Typically, you would use this where
open breaker keying is required.
Table 15–14. Guard Before Trip Switch Settings
for POTT/UB 3F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW2-4
SW2-5
OFF
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
ON W OVER
OPEN
CLOSED
NOT USED
CLOSED
CLOSED
ON W/O OVER
Position
when
shipped
The guard before trip time switch
settings are listed in Table 15-14.
Low Level Delay Timer
(POTT/UB 3F)
Table 15–15. Low Level Delay Switch Settings
for POTT/UB 3F Applications.
The Low Level Delay Timer delays
the Unblock timer from initiating a
trip output on loss of channel; it also
delays the low level output. You can
set it for 50, 75, or 100ms or disable
(0ms) it.
TIME IN ms
SW3-7
SW3-8
DISABLED
OPEN
OPEN
50
CLOSED
OPEN
75
OPEN
CLOSED
100
CLOSED
CLOSED
The low level delay time switch
settings are listed in Table 15-15.
NOTE:
Your Receiver Logic Module is shipped to you with SW3-6 set to the CLOSED position. This is
currently the only active setting for this switch, so be sure to leave it in the CLOSED position.
Page 15–16
December 2004
Chapter 15. Receiver Logic Module
15.5.3 Switch Settings for DTT Portion of 3F Applications
Pre-Trip Timer (DTT 3F)
The Pre-Trip Timer does not allow tripping until the trip signal has been present for the time you set. You
can set this timer from 2 to 30ms in 2ms increments. A typical application of this timer in Direct Transfer
Trip systems is to set it for the maximum delay possible. Limitations on the critical clearing time of the
power system will have a direct impact on this setting.
The trip delay time switch settings are listed in Table 15-16.
Table 15–16. Trip Delay Switch Settings for DTT 3F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW2-6
SW2-7
SW2-8
SW3-1
2
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
2
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
4
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
6
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
8
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
10
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
12
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
14
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
16
OPEN
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
18
CLOSED
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
20
OPEN
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
22
CLOSED
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
24
OPEN
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
26
CLOSED
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
28
OPEN
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
30
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
CLOSED
December 2004
15
Position
when
shipped
Page 15–17
TCF–10B System Manual
Trip Hold Timer (DTT 3F)
The Trip Hold Timer lets you stretch
the trip output. You can set it for 10,
50, or 100ms or disable (0ms) it.
The trip hold time switch settings are
listed in Table 15-17.
Technologies, Inc.
Table 15–17. Trip Hold Time Switch Settings
for DTT 3F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW3-2
SW3-3
DISABLED
OPEN
OPEN
10
CLOSED
OPEN
50
OPEN
CLOSED
100
CLOSED
CLOSED
Position
when
shipped
Guard Hold Timer (DTT 3F)
The Guard Hold Timer stretches the
guard output by the amount you set.
You can set it for 10, 50, or 100ms or
disable (0ms) it. The disabled setting
is appropriate for most applications.
The guard hold time switch settings
are listed in Table 15-18.
Checkback Trip Output
Checkback trip is available for either
the Unblock Application (CB1) or the
DTT Application (CB2). Set SW3-6
for the appropriate setting. The
Checkback trip output settings are
listed in Table 15-19.
Page 15–18
Table 15–18. Guard Hold Time Switch Settings
for DTT 3F Applications.
TIME IN ms
SW3-4
SW3-5
DISABLED
OPEN
OPEN
10
CLOSED
OPEN
50
OPEN
CLOSED
100
CLOSED
CLOSED
Table 15–19. Checkback Trip Output Settings.
CB Trip
SW3-6
CB1
OPEN
CB2
CLOSED
December 2004
Chapter 15. Receiver Logic Module
15.5.4 Switch Settings for Phase Comparison 2F Applications
Polarity
This switch lets you define the high frequency as
trip positive and the low frequency as trip negative.
The “NORMAL” setting sets the high frequency as
trip negative and the low frequency as trip positive.
The polarity switch settings are listed in Table
15-20.
Table 15–20.
Polarity Switch Settings for
Phase Comparison Applications.
POLARITY
SW1-2
NORMAL
CLOSED
REVERSED
OPEN
Position
when
shipped
SPCU/SKBU
This switch lets you define what the logic does for
a low level. In the SPCU, a low level or noise
clamps trip positive and trip negative to a logical
zero. In SKBU, a low level clamps trip positive and
trip negative to a logical one.
The SPCU/SKBU switch settings are listed in
Table 15-21.
Table 15–21.
SPCU/SKBU Switch Settings for
Phase Comparison Applications.
PHASE
COMPARISON
TYPE
SW1-3
SPCU/REL350
OPEN
SKBU/REL352
CLOSED
15
NOTE:
Your Receiver Logic Module is shipped to you with SW1-1 set to the OPEN
position. This is currently the only active setting for this switch, so be sure to
leave it in the OPEN position. SW1-4 through SW1-8, SW2-1 through SW2-8 and
SW3-1 through SW3-8 are not used in the 2-Frequency Phase Comparison logic
programs.
December 2004
Page 15–19
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
15.6 Troubleshooting
You can use your normal troubleshooting techniques to isolate and check faulty components.
Page 15–20
December 2004
Figure 15–10. TCF–10B Receiver Logic Component Location. (CF50RXLM)
15
Figure 15–11 TCF-10B Receiver Logic Schematic (Sheet 1 of 3).
Technologies, Inc.
OVERLAY
+5V
PC BOARD
+5 V
U5
1
LE5 GUARD
RN4
GUARD
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
TRIP –
LE4
DTT
LE3
UB/
POTT
TRIP 1
TRIP +
LE2 CB TRIP
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
LED_ANO
2
LED_CAT
3
NC
R3
FET_SOU 5
FET_DRA2 4
301
D7
R17
10
Q9
BUL45
MO3
365 V
C6
R25
.1 µ F
100
330
ISOOUTCOM
1N5408
Q1
MJE5731
AQV254H
400 V
U6
1
CB TRIP
2
LED_ANO
LED_CAT
NC
LE1 GOOD CHANNEL
FET_DRA
6
FET_SOU 5
FET_DRA2 4
D8
R6
301
1N5408
Q2
MJE5731
C
AQV254H
R15
10
Q7
BUL45
MO4
365 V
C7
R16
.1 µ F
100
NOISE
ISOOUT2
400 V
+5 V
U1
PN[1:86]
UB/POTT
DTT
PN15
PN16
PN17
PN18
PN19
PN20
PN85
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
1B
2B
3B
4B
5B
6B
7B
E
U7
RN3
1C
2C
3C
4C
5C
6C
7C
CLAMP
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
+5 V
1
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
(3F-GUARD
FOR
UB/POTT)
GUARD
ISOOUT1
+5V
TRIP 2
3
R G
6
FET_DRA
2
3
LED_ANO
LED_CAT
NC
6
R7
5
FET_SOU
FET_DRA2 4
301
FET_DRA
D9
1N5408
Q3
R18
10
MJE5731
AQV254H
Q8
100
BUL45
ULN2003A
365 V
C8
R26
.1 µ F
100
PN86
MO5
UB/POTT
ISOOUT3
400 V
+5 V
U3
1
2
3
LED_ANO
LED_CAT
NC
6
R4
5
FET_SOU
FET_DRA2 4
301
FET_DRA
D5
1N5408
R19
Q4
10
MJE5731
AQV254H
Q10
BUL45
MO1
365 V
C9
R27
.1 µ F
100
CB TRIP
ISOOUT4
400 V
+5 V
U4
1
2
3
LED_ANO
LED_CAT
NC
FET_DRA
6
5
FET_SOU
FET_DRA2 4
AQV254H
D6
R5
301
1N5408
Q5
R14
10
MJE5731
Q6
BUL45
R24
100
MO2
365 V
C5
.1 µF
400 V
LOW LEVEL
ISOOUT5
Figure 15–12 TCF-10B Receiver Logic Schematic (Sheet 2 of 3).
15
Figure 15–13 TCF-10B Receiver Logic Schematic (Sheet 3 of 3).
Chapter 16. Optional Electro-Mechanical (EM) Output Module
Table 16–1. 1606C53 Styles and Descriptions.
Schematic
1606C53-7 ||
16.1 EM Output Module
Description
This module provides six (6) contact sets, for the
TCF–10B, for Trip or Guard output, as follows:
Group
Description
G01
Without Trip extension
G02
With Trip extension
K5
JU5, JU11, D13, D15, Q5, Q11
K6
JU6, JU12, D16, D18, Q6, Q12
Jumpers JU13 and JU14 provide selectable “Trip
Delays” for Trip 1 and Trip 2.
Table 16–2. Output Options.
Board
Label
2F
Functions
3F
Functions
Trip 1
DTT/POTT/UB
DTT Trip
Trip 2
—
UB/POTT
TRIP
Guard
Guard
DTT Guard*
EM OUTPUT
* only available on EM Ouput TB
16.1.1 EM Output Front Panel
The front panel is without operator controls as
shown in Figure 16-1.
16.1.2 EM Output PC Board
(The EM Output PC Board is shown in
Figure 16-2.)
16
Jumpers JU1 through JU6 are used to select Trip
1, Trip 2, or Guard signals. Jumpers JU7 through
JU12 set the output relay contacts at either the NO
or NC position. The following jumpers and associated components work with each of the six
relays:
K1
JU1, JU7, D1, D3, Q1, Q7
K2
JU2, JU8, D4, D6, Q2, Q8
K3
JU3, JU9, D7, D9, Q3, Q9
K4
JU4, JU10, D10, D12, Q4, Q10
Figure 16–1. EM Output Module – Front Panel.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B System Manual
16.2 EM Output Circuit
Description
The EM Output Module provides six (6) relay
contacts for trip or guard output (see Figure 16-3).
The contacts are rated to make and carry 30A for
100ms at 250 Vdc. Continuous switching of
125 Vdc at 0.5A or 250 Vdc at 0.25A is provided.
The three-state voltage output from the Receiver
Logic Module is as follows:
• Trip 1 (+20V)
• Trip 2 (-20V)
• Guard (+20V)
The trip input (pin C-20) and guard input (pin A20) is applied to voltage comparators and
associated components, as follows:
• Trip 1 (I2b)
• Trip 2 (I2a)
• Guard (I2c)
A trip voltage comparison occurs at 10 Vdc, with
10% hysteresis for noise immunity. The
comparator output goes low (-14 Vdc) when the
correct voltage is applied.
NOTE
The following paragraph applies only to
style G02 modules, not to style G01
modules.
The outputs of I2a and I2b drive I4a and I4b
monostable multi-vibrators (one shots). These
“one shots” extend the length of the trip output.
The trip extension (not normally used in the U.S.,
but routinely used in some overseas applications)
Page 16–2
Technologies, Inc.
is selectable from 0 to 400 milliseconds.
Typically, you achieve a trip extension of 100ms
by placing JU13 and JU14 in 100–200ms and
adjusting R45 and R46 to the maximum counterclockwise position. If you place JU13 or JU14 in
the 0–100ms position, you should not adjust R45
or R46 to less than 1KΩ to prevent over dissipating I4a and I4b.
The outputs of I2a and I2b for style G01 modules
(or the outputs of I4a and I4b for style G02
modules) turn “ON” the PNP transistor (QN1c for
Trip 1 or QN1d for Trip 2), which then supplies a
+15 Vdc voltage to jumpers JU1 through JU6. The
guard input turns “ON” PNP transistor QN1b,
which also supplies a +15 Vdc voltage to jumpers
JU1 through JU6.
Jumpers JU1 through JU6 work, basically, the
same. Using JU1 as an example, the +15 Vdc
voltage flows through resistor R22 to the base of
Transistor Q7, turning Q7 “ON”. When the
current reaches 42mA at the Q7 emitter, Q1 turns
“ON”, removing the base drive to Q7. This allows
Q7 to operate as a constant current source. The
high-speed operation of relay K1 is achieved by
operating the 12V relay at 40V with this current
source.
Diodes D1, D2, and D3 provide snubbing circuits
(eliminates spikes and return currents) for relay
K1.
16.3 EM Output
Troubleshooting
You can use normal troubleshooting techniques to
isolate and check faulty components.
December 2004
Figure 16–2. TCF–10B EM Output Component location (1498B15).
16
Figure 16–3. TCF–10B EM Output Schematic (1606C53).
Chapter 17. Optional Voice Adapter Module
Table 17–1. C020-VADMN Styles and Descriptions.
Schematic
Group
C030-VADMN-4 ||
G01
Description
Optional Voice Adapter Module
17.1.1 TCF-10B Operation (FullDuplex)
17.1 Voice Adapter Module
Description
The Voice Adapter Module provides voice
communications between terminals of the TC10B and TCF-10B carrier systems. You can use
the same module in either type of system simply
by changing the DIP switches (see the "DIP
Switch Settings" section later in this chapter). This
chapter describes the module's use in TCF-10B
carrier systems. (For complete information on
using the module with a TC-10B carrier system,
please refer to the TC-10B System Manual.)
The Voice Adapter Module also provides
signaling, which includes an on-board audible
alarm and LED to indicate incoming calls. For the
TCF-10B, voice communication is in full-duplex
mode. That is, you can send and receive at the
same time, just like talking and listening on your
home telephone. This is because, in a TCF-10B
system, the module transmits on one frequency
and receives on another.
Figure 17-1 provides a simplified look at how the
Voice Adapter Module operates when used in a
TCF-10B carrier system. It works like this:
Receive Direction
1. The Universal Receiver Module in the
TCF-10B system outputs an audio signal to
the Voice Adapter Module.
2. The Voice Adapter Module filters the audio
signal and runs it through an expandor.
3. The Voice Adapter Module then amplifies
the audio signal and sends it to the handset.
(You can adjust the receive audio level by
turning the RECEIVE AUDIO potentiometer on the module's front panel.)
Transmit Direction
1. The Voice Adapter Module filters the audio
signal coming from the handset and runs it
through a compressor.
2. The Voice Adapter Module then amplifies
the audio signal and sends it to the Keying
Module.
17
Local Audio
Out
TCF-10B Keying Module
&
Voice Adapter
Module
&
Voice Key
&
Receiver/FSK Discriminator
Remote
Audio
In
Remote
Audio Out
Local
Audio In
Handset
Figure 17–1. Voice Adapter Module – Simplified Signal Flow Diagram.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
TCF–10B System Manual
17.1.2 Handset Operation
You can connect the handset (without a push-totalk switch) to the TCF-10B in two different ways:
Option 1: Local Connection
Plug the handset into the Voice Adapter
Module at the front panel "HANDSET"
jack.
Option 2: Remote Hookswitch Connection
Remotely connect a hookswitch assembly
which supports a handset to the TCF-10B
rear panel (see Figure 17-6).
Option 1: Using the Local Handset
Configuration
To configure your system for this option:
1. Set the DIP switch (SW1) to its normal, or
default, settings as shown in Table 17-4.
2. Connect an external alarm circuit in series
with the TB5 terminal block on the TCF10B rear panel. Use the wiring diagram in
Figure 17-7 as a guide.
To initiate signaling with this option:
Technologies, Inc.
Option 2: Using the Remote Hookswitch
Configuration
To configure the Voice Adapter Module for this
option:
1. Set the DIP switch (SW1) to its normal, or
default, settings as shown in Table 17-4.
2. Cradle a handset (without a push-to-talk
switch) on a hookswitch assembly in a
location remote from the TCF-10B Voice
Adapter Module.
3. Connect the hookswitch assembly in series
with both the external alarm circuit and the
TCF-10B rear panel terminal block TB5.
Use Figure 17-6 (hookswitch assembly)
and Figure 17-7 (external alarm circuit) as
guides.
4. Install a separate calling push-button in the
remote location, near the handset. Use
Figure 17-6 as a guide.
To initiate signaling with this option:
1. Lift the handset from the hookswitch
assembly.
2. Press the calling push-button, labeled
"CALLING P.B.", on the Voice Adapter
Module's front panel (see Figure 17-2).
1. Plug the handset (without a push-to-talk
switch) into the Voice Adapter Module at
the front panel "HANDSET" jack.
This rings the other end of the system.
2. Press the calling push-button, labeled
"CALLING P.B.", on the Voice Adapter
Module's front panel (see Figure 17-2).
To answer a ring (at the receiving end) with this
option, lift the handset from its cradle. This stops
the ringing by turning off the alarm circuit(s).
This rings the other end of the system.
To answer a ring (at the receiving end) with this
option, plug a handset (without a push-to-talk
switch) into the Voice Adapter Module's front
panel "HANDSET" jack. This stops the ringing by
turning off the alarm circuit(s).
Using a Handset with a Push-To-Talk
Button
If you are using a handset with a push-to-talk
button in either of the above configurations, you
initiate signaling by:
1. Lifting the handset from the hookswitch
assembly.
2. Pressing the push-to-talk switch and the
calling push-button simultaneously.
Page 17–2
December 2004
Chapter 17. Optional Voice Adapter Module
17.1.3 Electrical Characteristics
The Voice Adapter Module's electrical characteristics are shown in Table 17-2.
Table 17-2. Voice Adapter Module Electrical Characteristics.
Feature
Specification
Operating Temp Range
-20¡ to +60¡ C (Ambient)
Audio Frequency Response
300 to 2,000 Hz (-3 dB)
Receiver Sensitivity
-74 dBm (50Ω)
AGC Dynamic Range
40 dB min Audio output – 0.5 dB for R.F. level change -74 dBm to 34 dBm
Signaling Tone
370 Hz – 7 Hz
Signaling Tone Detector
370 Hz – 7 Hz
Transmit Audio
3.2V p-p (in limit) into 600Ω
Receive Audio Squelch
When RF input is below -80 dBm (Also jumper selectable to squelch
with "push-to-talk" switch)
Powering
Module powered from +20V, common, and -20V power supply.
Supply current is approximately 40mA from each supply.
External Handset & Signaling
Meets IEEE impulse and IEEE SWC tests (ANSI C37.90.1).
Inputs
Alarm Terminals
Passes 2,500 Vdc hi-pot for one minute (normal open/normal
closed, jumper selectable).
17
December 2004
Page 17–3
TCF–10B System Manual
17.2 Voice Adapter Front Panel
The Voice Adapter Module's front panel is shown
in Figure 17-2. It provides the following operator
controls:
Calling Push-button (SW2)
This push-button, labeled "CALLING P.B.",
activates the signaling oscillator.
Alarm LED (LE1)
This LED, labeled "ALARM", indicates when an
incoming call is being received. At the same time
the incoming signal activates this LED, it also
activates the alarm relay and, if enabled, the
audible alarm.
Technologies, Inc.
17.4 Voice Adapter Module
Settings
The Voice Adapter Module has three types of userconfigurable settings. These include the jumper
JMP1 and the DIP Switch SW1 on the PC board
and the RECEIVE AUDIO potentiometer on the
module's front panel.
17.4.1 Receive Audio Level Setting
You can adjust the receive audio level by turning
the RECEIVE AUDIO potentiometer (P1) on the
module's front panel. Turn it clockwise to increase
the receive audio level; counter-clockwise to
decrease it.
Receive Audio Level Adjustment (P1)
This potentiometer, labeled "RECEIVE AUDIO",
adjusts the receive audio level.
Handset Jack (J2)
This jack, labeled "HANDSET", is for connecting
the handset to the Voice Adapter Module. The
handset schematic is shown in Figure 17-8.
VOICE ADAPTER
CALLING
P.B.
17.3 Rear Panel Connections
The terminal block connections for the Voice
Adapter Module are on the rear panel of the TCF10B chassis. They are shown in Figure 3-4.
The Voice Adapter Module's terminal block
connections are used as follows:
TB5-1 External receiver output
ALARM
RECEIVE
AUDIO
TB5-2 External microphone input
TB5-3 Common
TB5-4 Alarm signal (NO or NC)
HANDSET
TB5-5 Alarm signal (NO or NC)
TB5-6 Signaling input (external calling
switch, to be returned to common when
signaling).
Figure 17–2. Voice Adapter Module – Front Panel.
Page 17–4
December 2004
Chapter 17. Optional Voice Adapter Module
17.4.2 Jumper Setting
The jumper JMP1 setting determines whether the external alarm connected to the rear panel (TB5-4, TB55) is normally open (NO) or normally closed (NC). The factory default is normally open.
17.4.3 DIP Switch Settings
The DIP switch (SW1) on the module's PC board lets you enable or disable several functions. Table 173 shows the function that is enabled for each of the four DIP switch positions when they are DOWN
(CLOSED). When a switch position is UP (OPEN), its function is disabled. Table 17-4 shows the default
settings when using the Voice Adapter Module in a TCF-10B carrier system.
Table 17-3. DIP Switch Setting Functions.
Position
Function when DOWN (CLOSED)
SW1-1
Pushing "CALLING P.B." (on front panel) generates a tone that gives an alarm
SW1-2
Receiving a carrier signal gives an alarm
SW1-3
When the handset is keyed, the earphone is muted
SW1-4
Enables the audible internal alarm (beeper)
Table 17-4. Default (Normal) Settings for TCF-10B Operation.
Position
December 2004
Default (Normal) Setting
SW1-1
DOWN
SW1-2
UP
SW1-3
UP
SW1-4
DOWN
17
Page 17–5
Figure 17–3. Voice Adapter Module Component location (C020VADMN).
C3
R11
R8
R9
10K
10K
7.50K
2
3
+
+20VIN
M1
.056µf
6
1
U1
-
5
+5V
7
U1
+
R5
R6
13
3.32K
15.0K
499
1N4148
8
U1
+
1
8
2
7
3
4
R2
C4
-5V
SIGNAL= +5V;4
SIGNAL= -5V;11
4.99K
.1µf
.056µf
113K
14
U1
TLC2274
C1
100K 1.0µf
TLC2274
R7
R1
ALARM TONE FILTER AND DETECTOR
+20VIN
6
R27
4.99K
R28
5
SWITCH IN UP
POSITION = ON
S1-1 ON = RCVD ALARM TONE
ACTIVATES ALARM RELAY
S1-2 ON = RCVD CARRIER
ACTIVATES ALARM RELAY
S1-3 ON = HANDSET KEY
MUTES EARPHONE
S1-4 ON = BEEPER ENABLED
R26
750
10K
J1
24
J1
9
J1
25
J1
A16
C16
JMP1
2
4
1
-
332
8
1
5
D4
1N4148
R29
Q1
2N2222A
750
SW1
+
ALARM
6.8V
R18
-
12 +
9
C2
2.74K
BEEPER
D1
R4
10 +
D6
.1µf
7.50K
6
2
NEG
C5
R12
8.87K
R3
1.0M
TLC2274
R10
TLC2274
POS
K1
LE1
R30
3
A18
C18
3
Q2
2N2222A
+5V
J1
27
R49
TX VOICE KEY
C22
J1
11
A22
1.82K
R50
825
RCV 2.5KHZ LOWPASS FILTER
R35
R34
38.3K
13.0K
C38
6800PF
C41
680PF
C6
.1µf
.027µf
R46
150
R56
19.1K
6
R62
C16
4700PF
5
-
C37
470PF
R36
4.99K
46.4K
U5
TLC2274
7
+
13.0K
R40
C23
.027µf
+20VIN
C14
SIGNAL= +5V;4
SIGNAL= -5V;11
C39
150PF
Q5 E
2N2907A
R48
9
SHT.2
VOICE IN
49.9K
10
+
R41
38.3K
13.0K
13.0K
R42
19.1K
C22
6800pf
C42
680pf
13
U5
TLC2274
-
14
12 +
C15
470pf
C40
150pf
R45
57.6
XMIT 2.5KHZ LOWPASS FILTER
D3
+20VIN
E
Q4
2N2907A
B
Q3
2N2907A
B
C
8
R47
30.1K
3
1
+5V
E1
C
U5
TLC2274
R38
C
576
+5V
R31
C12
.1µf
B
R43
D7
A2
D8
OUT
1N4148
J1
2 J1
1N4007
+
1N4148
R60
3.16K
C34
.33µf
+
C11
10µf
A4
IN
C13
4.7µf
GND
U4
LM7805
R61
499
+
C33
47µf
SHT.2
RCV_LP_FILT
6
J1
SHT.2
HSKEY
22
J1
SHT.2
RING BRK
16
J1
32
J1
-20VIN 17
J1
18
J1
A12
C12
A32
C32
SHT.2
XMIT_LP_FILT
D2
SHT.2
TIP
-5V
1N4007
OUT
C36
10µf
+
Figure 17–4. Voice Adapter Module Schematic (C030VADMN1) Sheet 1 of 2.
IN
GND
U3
7905
C21
4.7µf
+
C2
C4
17
Figure 17–5. Voice Adapter Module Schematic (C030VADMN2) Sheet 2 of 2.
SHT.1
VOICE_IN
C17
13
J1
29
J1
14
J1
A26
100pf
R24
R23
R14
R13
R16
10K
10K
49.9K
150K
1.10K
VOICE_OUT
C26
A28
R44
C7
R22
2
3
-
C9
7.50K
U2
TLC2274
6
1
5
+
+
U2
TLC2274
13
12
R21
R19
R20
R15
499K
7.50K
20K
4.99K
9
-
10
+
R37
P1
10.0K
100K
CW
-
1
U2
TLC2274
J1
R33
C10
2
4.99K
3
-5V
U2
TLC2274
EARPHONE VOLUME
14
8
+
R17
93.1K
100pf
.1µf
7
SIGNAL = +5V;4
SIGNAL = -5V;11
C8
.056µf
+5V
.056µf
-
SHT.1
XMIT_LP_FILT
30.1K
C18
+
J1
750
HANDSET_MIC
A10
J1
EARPHONE AMPLIFIER
C19
-5V
J1
C8
U5
TLC2274
C20
.1µf
A8
HANDSET_REC
R32
C10
+5V
R25
.1µf
.1µf
215K
SHT.1
RCV_LP_FILT
ALARM TONE GENERATOR
R39
4.99K
SHT.1
TIP
SHT.1
RING BRK
1
R
2
RB
+5V
U6
+
2
7.15K
3
1.0µf
C27
4
+
C31
R59
100K
10µf
+
.33µf
C25
2.2µf
5
6
7
GCI N1
VCC
CCAP2
RIN1
CIN
ECAP
EOUT
CCAP1
VREF
RIN2
IREF
GND
GCI N2
COUT
14
R55
13
49.9
12
3
J2
TB
4
C28
5
1.0µf
11
10
R58
9
7.15K
D10
24V
C32
10µf
+ C24
+ C26
2.2µf
2.2µf
D9
10V
8
S
HANDSET JACK
J1
D5
+
1
R57
+
C29
A20
R54
C20
100
SA576
10V
J1
ALARM_TONE
C35
.33µf
Q6
2N2222A
U8
1
2
3
-5V
R53
100K
4
V+
NO1
IN1
COM 1
IN2
COM
V-
NO2
MAX320
8
+5V
7
R51
6
49.9K
R52
TX ALARM TONE
R63
2.21K
4.99K
C30
5
.1µf
NC
ON
+5V
SW2
COMM
SHT.1
HSKEY
Chapter 17. Optional Voice Adapter Module
Figure 17–6. Connections for Remote Phone & External Alarm (9651A87).
17
Figure 17–7. External Alarm Circuit for Use with Module Front Panel Jack (9651A88).
December 2004
Page 17–9
Figure 17–8. Handset schematic.
Page 17–10
TCF–10B System Manual
December 2004
Technologies, Inc.
Chapter 18. Optional Trip Test Unit (TTU) Module
Table 18–1. 1610C01 Styles and Descriptions.
Schematic
Group
Description
G02
Optional Trip Test Unit Transmitter
1614C25-3
18.1 TTU Description
The optional Trip Test Unit is designed to test
two-frequency or three-frequency transfer trip
units using the TCF–10B. Two TTU transmitters,
one at each end of the line, are needed to perform
this testing function. The schematic diagram of
the TTU board (daughter board on the Transmitter
Module) is shown at the end of this chapter. This
board plugs onto the main Transmitter board (see
Figure 18-6). The backplane PC board for the
TC/TCF–10B has been modified to bring out the
extra inputs and outputs needed for the TTU
operation. Note, however, that backplanes
(1353D62G01) having a sub lower than five (5)
cannot be used with the TTU.
The Timing Diagrams for the TTU are shown at
the end of this chapter.
The Trip Test Unit can be used to functionally test
the transmitters and receivers at both ends of a two
terminal line with having only a person at one end.
Please note it is not applicable to three terminal
lines.
The Trip Test Unit on the transmitter works in
conjunction with the local receiver as well as the
remote receiver and transmitter to test the ability
of the system to shift to the trip frequency and
receive the trip frequency at the opposite end.
Available outputs are two relays with jumper
selectable contacts (normally open or normally
closed), one for trip sent and one for trip received.
Trip Sent is available on TB4-8, and TB4-9. Trip
Received is available on TB3-7 and TB3-8.
Backplane connections are shown in Figure 3-4.
For 2-frequency TCF-10B systems, the Trip Test
Unit can be set for a “real” trip or a “checkback”
!
CAUTION
• IF THE UNIT IS SET FOR A REAL TRIP, THEN CAUTION
SHOULD BE TAKEN TO OPEN THE TRIP CIRCUIT PATH SO AS
NOT TO MISTAKENLY TRIP OUT A BREAKER OR LOCKOUT
RELAY ON A DIRECT TRANSFER TRIP SYSTEM.
• THE RECEIVER LOGIC MODULE MUST BE SET FOR “GUARD
BEFORE TRIP” LOGIC (SW2-4 OR SW2-5 SET DOWN)
TRANSMITTER
TRANSMIT
TRIP 1
2
F
R
E
Q
U
E
N
C
Y
RECEIVE
TRIP 1
5
TRANSMIT
TRIP 2
X
1
0
0
H
Z
0
RECEIVE
TRIP 2
0
TT INITIATE
Figure 18–1. TTU Module – Front Panel.
Copyright © 2004 Pulsar Technologies, Inc.
18
TCF–10B System Manual
trip. The “real” trip will produce an output of the
receiver logic card TRIP and the electromechanical output card relays programmed for TRIP. A
“Checkback” Trip setting will provide only a
checkback trip output from the receiver logic card,
which can be used to pick up an auxiliary relay or
indicating light. Only the “checkback” trip setting
can be used for 3-frequency systems.
Technologies, Inc.
LEDs on Receiver Logic Module:
Local:
1. Good Channel & Guard,
2. Good Channel, Checkback Trip &
Trip
Remote: 1. Good Channel & Guard
2. All LEDs off
3. Good Channel & Checkback Trip
This setting is made at the time of manufacturing
per the customer’s request. Should you desire to
change the setting, the jumpers JU6 through JU9
must be changed as well as the timer setting
modified.
18.1.2 Two Frequency Application
Checkback Trip Scenario
18.1.1 Two Frequency Applications
Real Trip Scenario
JU6, JU7 & JU8 set in position 1-2, JU9 set in
position 2-3, P4 set for 7 seconds.
In this application, the local end, at which you
initiate a Trip Test, will receive a real TRIP as well
as a CHECKBACK TRIP, but the remote end will
only produce a CHECKBACK TRIP. When using
this application the end that initiates the trip would
have to be disconnected from the trip relays.
Refer to the timing diagrams at the end of this
chapter.
JU6, JU7, JU8 & JU9 set in position 2-3, P4 set
for 3 seconds.
Refer to the timing diagrams at the end of this
chapter.
When a trip test is initiated, the local transmitter
shuts down for 2 seconds. The remote end receiver
will see this as a loss of channel. After 2 seconds,
the local transmitter then keys to the trip
frequency for 2 seconds. The remote end recognizes this as a TTU command and the remote
receiver will then produce a CHECKBACK TRIP
and key the remote transmitter to the trip
frequency for 2 seconds. The local end receiver
sees that as a REAL TRIP and produces a TRIP
and CHECKBACK TRIP output from the logic
card and the electromechanical card.
The following is the response of the TTU
Transmitter & Receiver Logic front panel LEDs
when a trip test is initiated locally.
LEDs on TTU Transmitter:
Local:
Transmit Trip 1 on 2 sec.
Remote:
1. Receive Trip 1 on 0.5 sec
2. Transmit Trip 1 on 2 sec.
Page 18–2
In this application, both the local and remote ends
shift to “checkback” trip. No trip outputs have to
be disconnected.
When a trip test is initiated, the local transmitter
shuts down for 1.5 seconds. The remote end
receiver will see this as a loss of channel. After 1.5
seconds, the local transmitter then keys to the trip
frequency for 0.5 second. The remote end recognizes this as a TTU command and the remote
receiver will then produce a CHECKBACK TRIP
and shut down the remote transmitter for 2
seconds. The remote transmitter is then keyed to
the trip frequency for 0.5 second. This in turn
produces a loss of channel and CHECKBACK
TRIP (without a real TRIP) at the local end.
The following is the response of the TTU
Transmitter & Receiver Logic front panel LEDs
when a trip test is initiated locally.
LEDs on TTU Transmitter:
Local:
1. Transmit Trip 1 on 0.5 sec.
2. 1.5 sec. with no LEDs,
3. Receive Trip 1 on 0.5 sec.
Remote:
1. Receive Trip 1 on 0.5 sec.
2. Transmit Trip 1 on 0.5 sec.
LEDs on Receiver Logic Module:
Local:
1. Good Channel & Guard
2. All LEDs off
3. Good Channel & Checkback Trip
December 2004
Chapter 18. Optional Trip Test Unit (TTU)
Remote: 1. Good Channel & Guard
2. All LEDs off
3. Good Channel & Checkback Trip
Remote:
18.1.3 Three Frequency Applications
Checkback Trip Scenario
In this application, both the local and remote ends
shift to “checkback” trip. No trip outputs have to
be disconnected. Both trips (DTT &
unblock/POTT) are checked. DTT is Trip 1 (LF)
and unblock/POTT trip is Trip 2 (HF).
JU6, JU7, JU8 & JU9 set in position 1-2, P4 set
for 7 seconds.
Refer to the timing diagrams at the end of this
chapter.
When a trip test is initiated, the local transmitter
shuts down for 1.5 seconds. The remote end
receiver will see this as a loss of channel. After 1.5
seconds, the local transmitter then keys to the
lower trip frequency for 0.5 second. The remote
end recognizes this as a TTU command and the
remote receiver will then produce a
CHECKBACK TRIP1 and shuts down the remote
transmitter for 2 seconds. The remote transmitter
is then keyed to the lower trip frequency for 0.5
second. This in turn produces a loss of channel
and CHECKBACK TRIP1 (without a TRIP1) at
the local end’s receiver. Then the system needs to
check for the TRIP2 function. In a similar way,
the local end will send a CHECKBACK TRIP2 to
the remote and the remote receives and then
returns a CHECKBACK TRIP2 to the local
receiver.
The following is the response of the TTU
Transmitter & Receiver Logic front panel LEDs
when a trip test is initiated locally.
LEDs on TTU Transmitter:
Local:
1. Transmit Trip 1 on 0.5 sec.
2. 1.5 sec. with No LEDs
3. Receive Trip 1 on 0.5 sec.
4. 1.5 sec. with No LEDs
5. Transmit Trip 2 on 0.5 sec.
6. 1.5 sec. with No LEDs
7. Receive Trip 2 on 0.5 sec.
December 2004
1. Receive Trip 1 on 0.5 sec
2. Transmit Trip 1 on 0.5 sec.
3. 1.5 sec. with No LEDs
4. Receive Trip 2 on 0.5 sec.
5. 1.5 sec. with No LEDs
6. Transmit Trip 2 on 0.5 sec.
LEDs on Receiver Logic Module:
Local:
1. Good Channel & Guard
2. All LEDs off ||
3. Good Channel & Checkback Trip
Remote: 1. Good Channel & Guard
2. All LEDs off
3. Good Channel & Checkback Trip
18.1.4 TTU Inputs & Outputs
There is one input and two outputs.
Input: You initiate a test sequence either by
pressing S1 (TT initiate) on the front panel or by
applying the appropriate voltage to terminals 6 &
7 of TB-4 on the backplane. Jumper J5 must be set
to the appropriate external keying voltage when
external keying is used.
Ouputs: There is a Receive Trip contact output on
terminals 7 & 8 of TB-3. It is energized by the
receipt of Trip 1 or Trip 2. There is a Transmit Trip
contact output on terminals 8 & 9 of TB-4. It is
energized when either Trip 1 or Trip 2 is sent.
18.1.5 Receiver Only/Transmitter
Only Chassis Applications
When you use the TTU with a TCF–10B transceiver, the TTU Transmitter module (Figure 18-5)
is all that is required to provide the trip test
function. When you are using a TCF–10B receiver
only chassis or a TCF–10B transmitter only
chassis, an additional plug-in jumper board is
required in each chassis. The TCF-10B transmitter
only chassis requires a “CLI & Discriminator”
jumper board (1614C59G01) to be plugged into
the CLI Discriminator slot (3rd from left side) of
the chassis. The TCF-10B receiver only chassis
requires a “Transmitter” jumper board
(1614C59G02) to be plugged into the transmitter
slot of the chassis. Use two, 2-wire shielded
cables,or a four-wire shielded cable to interconnect the receiver only and the transmitter only
Page 18–3
18
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
chassis. The jumper board information and interconnecting cables are shown on the following
pages.
Table 18–2. TTU Jumper boards.
For TTU use with
TCF-10B (Receiver Only)
TCF-10B (Transmitter Only)
1. TRANSMITTER JUMPER BOARD GOES
JUMPER
A/C32
TO
C30
A14
TO
A30
C12
TO
C20
A12
TO
A20
C14
TO
A22
IN RECEIVER ONLY CHASSIS.
COMMON
TB3-8
NOISE
TB3-7
CENT. FREQ.
TB4-9
HI/LO FREQ.
TB4-8
LOW LEVEL
TB4-7
2. CLI & DISCRIMINATOR JUMPER BOARD GOES IN TRANSMITTER ONLY CHASSIS.
JUMPER
A/C30
TO
C/A20
COMMON
TB2-5
A8
TO
C/A18
NOISE
TB2-4
A10
TO
C/A16
CENT. FREQ.
TB2-3
A28
TO
C/A14
Hi/LO FREQ.
TB2-2
C28
TO
C/A12
LOW LEVEL
TB2-1
Page 18–4
December 2004
TB4
RECEIVER ONLY
7
8
9
J2
RX
Connecting Cable
for Trip Test Unit.
7
8
Use 3532A50H01
2 Conductor
Shielded Pair.
TB3
TO
LINE
SKEWED
HYBRID
TB2
TRANSMITTER ONLY
1
2
J1
LOW LEVEL
HI/LO FREQ.
CENT. FREQ
3
TX
4
5
TB4 6 7 TB3 7
8
8
NOISE
COMM
TRIP SENT
9
TB4
TRIP
TRIP
RCVD
TEST
INITIATE
18
Figure 18–2. Interconnecting cables for TTUs in Receiver only/Transmitter only chassis.
Figure 18–3. Schematic of TTU Daughter Board (1614C25; Sheet 1 of 2).
18
Figure 18–4. Schematic of TTU Daughter Board (1614C25; Sheet 2 of 2).
Figure 18–5. Component Layout for TTU Daughter Board (1614C26; Sheet 2 of 2).
001
Figure 18–6. Transmitter Board (C020-TXMMN).
102
18
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
LOCAL TTU
TP4 – SETUP 7 SEC.
TTU PERIOD
TP5 – START TTU CYCLE
7 SEC.
2 SEC.
EXCLUSIVE
OR
TP8 – ALLOW TRANSMIT
TRIP 2
P1-17 – UNKEY
TRANSMITTER
ALWAYS LOW
2 SEC.
TP7 – TRANSMIT TRIP 1
RED LED
TP1 – ALLOW FREQUENCIES
TO BE RECEIVED BY TTU
1 SEC.
1.5 SEC.
DELAY
U6.2-4 – RECEIVE TRIP 1
RED LED
REMOTE TTU
TP1 – ALLOW FREQUENCIES
TO BE RECEIVED BY TTU
1.5 SEC.
DELAY
U6.2-4 – RECEIVE TRIP 1
RED LED
TP5 – START TTU CYCLE
2 SEC.
P1-17 – UNKEY TRANSMITTER
2 SEC.
TP7 – TRANSMIT TRIP 1
RED LED
1 SEC.
TTU SETTINGS: P4 SET FOR 7.0 SEC, J6-8 SET FOR POS.1-2, J9 SET FOR POS. 2-3
Figure 18–7. TTU 2-Frequency Checkback Trip Timing Diagram.
Page 18–10
December 2004
UNKEY
XMTR
Chapter 18. Optional Trip Test Unit (TTU)
LOCAL TTU
TP4 – SETUP 3 SEC.
TTU PERIOD
TP5 – START TTU CYCLE
3 SEC.
2 SEC.
EXCLUSIVE
OR
TP8 – ALLOW TRANSMIT
TRIP 2
P1-17 – UNKEY
TRANSMITTER
ALWAYS LOW
2 SEC.
TP7 – TRANSMIT TRIP 1
TP1 – ALLOW FREQUENCIES
TO BE RECEIVED BY TTU
UNKEY
XMTR
2 SEC.
RED LED
ALWAYS LOW
U6.2-4 – RECEIVE TRIP 1
2 SEC.
REMOTE TTU
TP1 – ALLOW FREQUENCIES
TO BE RECEIVED BY TTU
1.5 SEC.
DELAY
U6.2-4 – RECEIVE TRIP 1
RED LED
TP5 – START TTU CYCLE
ALWAYS LOW
P1-17 – UNKEY TRANSMITTER
ALWAYS LOW
TP7 – TRANSMIT TRIP 1
2 SEC.
RED LED
1 SEC.
18
TTU SETTINGS: P4 SET FOR 3.0 SEC, J6-9 SET FOR POS.2-3
Figure 18–8. TTU 2-Frequency Real Trip Timing Diagram.
December 2004
Page 18–11
TCF–10B System Manual
Technologies, Inc.
LOCAL TTU
TP4 – SETUP 7 SEC.
TTU PERIOD
TP5 – START TTU CYCLE
7 SEC.
2 SEC.
EXCLUSIVE
OR
TP8 – ALLOW TRANSMIT
TRIP 2 (HF)
P1-17 – UNKEY
TRANSMITTER
UNKEY
XMTR
2 SEC.
2 SEC.
2 SEC.
TP7 – TRANSMIT TRIP 1 (LF)
RED LED
TP1 – ALLOW FREQUENCIES
TO BE RECEIVED BY TTU
1 SEC.
1 SEC.
1.5 SEC.
DELAY
1.5 SEC.
DELAY
U6.2-4 – RECEIVE TRIP 1 (LF)
RED LED
U7.2-10 - TRANSMIT TRIP 2 (HF)
U6.4-11 - RECEIVE TRIP 2 (HF)
REMOTE TTU
TP1 – ALLOW FREQUENCIES
TO BE RECEIVED BY TTU
1.5 SEC.
DELAY
1.5 SEC.
DELAY
U6.2-4 – RECEIVE TRIP 1 (LF)
RED LED
U6.4-11 - RECEIVE TRIP 2 (HF)
7 SEC.
TP4 - SETUP 7 SEC. TTU PERIOD
TP5 – START TTU CYCLE
2 SEC.
P1-17 – UNKEY TRANSMITTER
2 SEC.
2 SEC.
TP7 – TRANSMIT TRIP 1 (LF)
RED LED
U7.2-10 - TRANSMIT TRIP 2 (HF)
1 SEC.
TTU SETTINGS: P4 SET FOR 7.0 SEC, J6-9 SET FOR POS.1-2
Figure 18–9. TTU 3-Frequency Checkback Trip Timing Diagram.
Page 18–12
December 2004
Technologies, Inc.
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