c00167044
PC Basics Guide
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Table of Contents
Introducing the PC .......................................................................... 1
Protecting Your PC ........................................................................................2
Using a Power Surge Suppressor ................................................................2
Using Virus Protection Programs .................................................................3
Using Windows Update ............................................................................3
Turning Off the PC ........................................................................................4
Standby Mode .........................................................................................4
Hibernation Mode ....................................................................................5
Automatic Standby or Hibernation ..............................................................5
Restarting the PC ..........................................................................................6
Using the Mouse...........................................................................................6
Using the Mouse Buttons............................................................................7
Scrolling ..................................................................................................7
Autoscrolling ............................................................................................8
Panning ...................................................................................................8
Switching Mouse Button Functions ..............................................................8
Changing Mouse Pointer Speed .................................................................8
Using the Keyboard ......................................................................................9
Keyboard Shortcuts...................................................................................9
Standard Keyboard Features......................................................................9
Adjusting the Monitor..................................................................................13
Using a TV as a Monitor..............................................................................13
Cables You May Need ............................................................................13
Viewing the PC Image on Your TV Screen ..................................................13
Using Speakers ..........................................................................................14
Adjusting Speaker Volume .......................................................................14
Using a Microphone ...................................................................................15
Adjusting Microphone Volume..................................................................16
Table of Contents
iii
Using Media Drives .................................................................................... 17
Using Your CD and DVD Drives................................................................ 17
Handling CDs and DVDs ......................................................................... 17
Inserting and Removing CDs and DVDs..................................................... 17
Using a Diskette (Floppy) Drive..................................................................... 19
Using a Printer ........................................................................................... 19
Introducing the Software .............................................................. 21
Learning More about Software ................................................................. 21
Using the Desktop....................................................................................... 21
Removing Desktop Icons .......................................................................... 22
Retrieving Desktop Icons.......................................................................... 22
Using the Start Menu .................................................................................. 23
Using the All Programs Menu ................................................................... 23
Organizing Your All Programs List ............................................................ 23
Using the Control Panel............................................................................... 24
Resizing Windows...................................................................................... 25
Working with Digital Images........................................................................ 26
Managing Files............................................................................. 27
Organizing Files with Folders ...................................................................... 27
Creating Folders..................................................................................... 28
Moving Files .............................................................................................. 28
Copying Files............................................................................................. 29
Finding Files .............................................................................................. 29
Renaming Files ........................................................................................... 30
Deleting Files ............................................................................................. 30
Getting Files Out of the Recycle Bin .............................................................. 30
Using the Internet......................................................................... 31
Connecting to the Internet............................................................................ 31
Connecting the Modem ........................................................................... 31
Setting Up the Ethernet Connection ........................................................... 32
About the Internet ....................................................................................... 32
Using a Browser......................................................................................... 33
Searching the Internet ................................................................................. 33
Restricting Internet Content........................................................................... 34
Sending and Receiving E-Mail...................................................................... 35
If Using Outlook Express.......................................................................... 35
If Your ISP Provides the E-Mail Program ..................................................... 36
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PC Basics Guide
Improving PC Performance........................................................... 37
Increasing Available Hard Disk Drive Space ..................................................37
Emptying the Recycle Bin .........................................................................38
Uninstalling Programs..............................................................................38
Cleaning Up Your Hard Disk Drive............................................................38
Consolidating Scattered Files and Folders......................................................39
Fixing Hard Disk Drive Errors .......................................................................40
Index ........................................................................................... 41
Table of Contents
v
vi
PC Basics Guide
Introducing the PC
NOTE: This guide contains details on options that may not be included with your
PC. Your PC may look different from the illustrations in this guide. The monitor and
the speakers are sold separately. Speakers may be included with the monitor
(select models only).
This section describes the PC by listing its internal and external components. It also
gives you useful information on using the mouse, the keyboard, the monitor,
speakers, a microphone, the media drives, and a printer.
WARNING: Please read “safety information” in your user
documentation before installing and connecting your PC to the
electrical power system.
PC Base Components
The PC consists of electronics and mechanical items housed in a chassis box
called a tower or base. Inside the PC are these items:
• The motherboard, which is an electronics board with the micro processing
unit (MPU), slots for memory and add-in cards, and connectors for the other
items in the base.
• The power supply.
• The hard disk drive, which is used to store the operating system, programs,
and files.
• The cabling between the motherboard, the base units, and the connectors on
the back and the front of the PC.
PC Operation
The user operates the PC by using a keyboard to enter text and commands, a
mouse to point and select items, and a display monitor. For example, the PC
shows the Windows desktop on the display screen, and when you move the
mouse, the PC causes the cursor to move across the Windows desktop on the
screen.
The minimum items required to operate your personal computer are the PC base
box, the keyboard, the mouse, and the monitor.
Introducing the PC
1
Additional PC Base Components
The PC base box may have other components, such as:
• Optical drives that play or record (burn) CD or DVD discs, depending on the
drive model.
• A memory card reader that reads or records the memory cards used in digital
cameras and other devices.
• A diskette (floppy) drive.
• A modem that connects the PC to a telephone line for a dial-up connection to
the Internet.
• An Ethernet connector that connects the PC to a network, such as a local area
network (LAN).
• Connectors and ports, such as USB, FireWire® (IEEE 1394), serial, parallel,
and others, such as for a joystick.
• Special features that may be on the motherboard or on separate add-in cards,
such as audio or sound cards, graphics or video cards, TV connectors and
tuner cards, and wireless LAN cards.
External PC Components
You may have external components added to the PC, connecting each to the PC
base through the connectors on the front or the back of the base. The connectors
on the front of the PC are usually used for quick, temporary connection.
Depending on the connectors on your PC, common peripheral components are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
A printer (using a serial, parallel, or USB port).
An external disk drive.
A digital camera.
Video devices, such as a VCR, video camera, DVD player, or Web camera.
An MP3 player.
A personal organizer.
Protecting Your PC
Using a Power Surge Suppressor
Power surges, for example, voltage spikes, power outages, or brownouts may
cause software problems.
Symptoms of voltage spikes include a flickering video display, unexpected PC
startups, and the PC not responding to your commands. A voltage spike can
occasionally corrupt or destroy files. Because of this, you should:
• Consistently make backup copies of your data files.
And
• Prevent damage from voltage spikes by installing a PC surge suppressor
between the electrical outlet and the PC power cord.
2
PC Basics Guide
Using Virus Protection Programs
HP provides a virus-scanning software program to help protect your PC (select
models only).
A PC virus can destroy information on the hard disk drive. You can get a virus
from infected files that you open from:
•
•
•
•
An e-mail message or attachment.
A file downloaded from the Internet.
A diskette (floppy disk).
A CD or DVD disc.
Some viruses affect your PC immediately, while others may activate only if you
open a certain file or do not delete the file before a certain date. New types of
viruses are invented all the time.
The virus-scanning software program on your PC has pre-set options that make
your PC safe. After you enable the virus-scanning program, it checks your PC files
for viruses.
The virus-scanning program manufacturer provides free virus definition updates
through your Internet connection for an initial period after your PC purchase. You
can purchase a subscription service for updates after the initial free period
expires.
You should take the following precautions to protect your PC:
•
•
•
•
Do not open unsolicited e-mail from unknown sources.
Download files only from sources you feel are safe.
Always scan documents for viruses before opening them.
Make sure you have the latest version of your virus-scanning software.
Using Windows Update
The Microsoft Windows XP operating system has a Windows Update software
program that scans your PC, identifies necessary updates, and helps you to
download them. Install critical updates to maintain your PC security and
operation.
To open Windows Update, click Start on the taskbar, click Help and Support,
and then click Windows Update. Your PC must be connected to the Internet to
display the Windows Update home page. Click Yes if you are prompted to install
required software or controls. Click Scan for Available Updates and follow
the onscreen instructions.
Introducing the PC
3
Turning Off the PC
NOTE: For information about the Start button, see “Using the Start Menu” on
page 23.
For best results, turn off the PC using Windows without pressing any buttons on the
PC chassis.
1 Close any open software programs. To close programs, click the X at the
upper-right corner of each program window.
2 Click Start on the taskbar.
3 Click Turn Off Computer, at the bottom of the menu.
4 Click Turn Off.
5 Turn off the monitor.
As an alternative to turning off the PC, you can put the PC in either standby or
hibernation mode. To conserve power, you can set the power management timers
to put the PC automatically into standby and then hibernation. See the following
sections for more information on putting your PC in standby or hibernation mode.
Standby Mode
When the PC is in standby mode, it goes into a low-power state and the monitor is
blank as if it is turned off. The advantages of using standby mode include:
• You save time and electricity without having to wait for the PC to go through the
normal startup routine when you wake it again. The next time you use the PC,
any programs, folders, and documents that were open before you put the PC in
standby are available.
• Your PC can receive faxes while in standby mode, if you set it to do so.
• Your PC can retrieve e-mail messages and download information from the
Internet automatically, if you set it to do so.
To put the PC in standby mode manually:
1 Press the Standby button on the keyboard, if it is present.
The screen goes dark, and the PC goes into standby mode.
2 When you want to use the PC again, press the Esc key on the keyboard, or
press the Standby button. The screen display reappears just as you left it.
Another way to put the PC into standby mode is to:
1 Click Start on the taskbar.
2 Click Turn Off Computer.
3 Click Stand By.
4 To wake the PC from standby, press the Standby button or press the Esc key on
the keyboard.
4
PC Basics Guide
If the PC does not work properly when you wake it from standby, restart the PC:
1 Press and hold the On button on the front of the PC for approximately
5 seconds until the PC turns off.
NOTE: Using the On button to restart the PC is not recommended and should
be used only as a last resort. Instead, click Start, click Turn Off Computer,
and then click Restart.
2 Turn on the PC again.
Hibernation Mode
When the PC is in hibernation mode, it saves everything that is in PC memory to
the hard disk drive, turns off the monitor and the hard disk drive, and then turns
itself off. When you turn on the PC again, your programs, folders, and documents
are restored to the screen.
To put the PC into hibernation manually:
1 Click Start on the taskbar.
2 Click Turn Off Computer.
3 Press and hold down the Shift key on the keyboard, and click Hibernate.
NOTE: If Hibernate is not present, you can set up your PC for hibernation; refer
to steps 1 through 6 of “Automatic Standby or Hibernation” on page 5.
4 When you want to use the PC again after hibernation, press the On button on
the front of the PC.
If the PC does not work properly when you wake it from hibernation, follow these
steps to restart the PC:
1 Click Start on the taskbar.
2 Click Turn Off Computer.
3 Click Restart.
Automatic Standby or Hibernation
You can set your PC to go into standby or hibernation mode automatically when it
is idle for some number of minutes. To put the PC into standby or hibernation
mode automatically, modify the power management settings:
1 Click Start on the taskbar.
2 Click Control Panel.
3 Click Performance and Maintenance, if it is present.
4 Double-click Power Options.
5 Click the Hibernate tab and check the hibernation feature. If necessary,
enable the feature by clicking the Enable hibernation box so that a check mark
appears in it.
Introducing the PC
5
6 If you changed the Enable hibernation check box, click Apply.
7 Click the Power Schemes tab to set the timers for standby and hibernation.
In the Power Schemes box, select a power scheme from the drop-down list.
Choose the settings.
• To turn on automatic standby for the PC, click the time to elapse before
standby (such as After 20 mins) in the System standby list.
• To set the timer for automatic hibernation, click the time to elapse before
hibernation (such as After 1 hour) in the System hibernates list.
NOTE: If both standby and hibernation timers are set, the system hibernation
timer must be set for a longer time than the system standby timer.
8 Click OK.
Restarting the PC
When you restart the computer, the PC starts over using the operating system and
software in its memory. This is the simplest repair for your PC; just click Start,
choose Turn Off Computer, and then click Restart.
You may wish to install additional software programs or hardware devices on
your PC. Restart the PC after installation.
If the PC stops responding, use the Windows Task Manager to close any
programs not responding or to restart the PC:
1 Press the Ctrl, Alt, and Delete keys on the keyboard at the same time.
2 Select the program that is not responding, and click End Task.
Or
Click Shut Down, and then click Restart.
If this does not work, press the On button for 5 or more seconds to turn off the PC.
Then, press the On button.
NOTE: Using the On button to restart the PC is not recommended and should be
used only as a last resort. Instead, click Start, click Turn Off Computer, and
then click Restart.
Using the Mouse
Your PC includes a mouse for directing the cursor (pointer) on the Windows
desktop. The mouse uses a roller ball or optics (a light and sensor) to sense
movement and cause the cursor on the screen to move. Use the mouse on a
flat surface.
NOTE: The optical mouse cannot work on a glass, translucent, or reflective
surface.
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PC Basics Guide
A wireless mouse (select models only) is an optical mouse that uses a
receiver/transmitter, instead of a connector cable, to communicate with your PC.
A light on the receiver indicates receiver activity.
NOTE: The wireless mouse goes into a sleep or suspend mode after 20 minutes of
inactivity. Click a button on the mouse to wake it. (Moving the wireless mouse
does not wake it.)
Using the Mouse Buttons
The mouse has two or three buttons on the top:
• Click the left mouse button to position the cursor or to select an item.
• Click the right mouse button to display a menu of commands for the item you
clicked.
• On select models, use the scroll wheel button in the center for scrolling and
panning.
A Left button
B Scroll wheel button
(scrolling mouse only)
C Right button
Click means to press the left button on the mouse once.
B
Double-click means to press the left button on the mouse two
times in a row. To double-click, you click the button (press it
and then release it), and then quickly click it again.
A
C
Right-click means to press the right button on the
mouse once.
To select an item, click the item.
To select sequential items in a list or group, click the first
item in the list, and then press and hold the Shift key on the
keyboard while you click the last item.
To select non-sequential items, click the first item, and then
press and hold the Ctrl key on the keyboard while you click
the additional items.
NOTE: Your mouse may look different from the one shown here.
You can switch the function of the left and right buttons for left-handed use. Refer
to “Switching Mouse Button Functions” on page 8.
Scrolling
Click the left mouse button to place the cursor in a document, and then:
• To scroll toward the beginning of a document, roll the scroll wheel button up
(away from you).
• To scroll toward the end of a document, roll the scroll wheel button down
(toward you).
Introducing the PC
7
Autoscrolling
1 Place the cursor anywhere in the text, and press the scroll wheel button
once. An autoscroll icon appears.
2 Move the mouse in the direction you want to scroll. The farther you
move the mouse from the starting point, the faster the document scrolls.
3 To stop autoscrolling, press the scroll wheel button again.
NOTE: Autoscrolling does not work with some software programs.
Panning
1 Press and hold down the center scroll wheel button.
2 Slowly move the mouse in the direction you want to pan. The farther you move
the pointer from the starting point, the faster the document pans.
3 To stop panning, release the scroll wheel button.
NOTE: Panning only works if the window’s horizontal scroll bar is active. Panning
does not work with some software programs.
Switching Mouse Button Functions
To switch the functions of the right and left mouse buttons:
1 Click the Start button.
2 Click Control Panel.
3 Click Printers and Other Hardware, if it is present.
4 Double-click Mouse.
5 Check Switch primary and secondary buttons on the Buttons tab.
6 Click Apply (using the new primary button), and then click OK.
Changing Mouse Pointer Speed
To change the speed of the cursor on the screen relative to the motion of
the mouse:
1 Click the Start button.
2 Click Control Panel.
3 Click Printers and Other Hardware, if it is present.
4 Double-click Mouse.
5 Click the Pointer Options tab.
6 In the Motion area, use the slider to adjust the pointer speed.
7 Click Apply, and then click OK.
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PC Basics Guide
Using the Keyboard
The keyboard is the primary way you enter text and commands for the PC. The
keyboard may connect directly to your PC or may be wireless.
Your keyboard has an arrangement of standard keys, indicator lights, and special
buttons (select models only). Your keyboard may vary from the illustrations. Some
keyboards do not have the Internet buttons shown here at the top of the keyboard,
and some use a different layout on the top right.
Keyboard Shortcuts
Keyboard shortcuts are combinations of keys that you press simultaneously to do
specific actions. For example, from the Windows desktop, press the Alt (alternate)
key, the Ctrl (control) key, and the S key (the letter s) to display support
information for the PC (including model number, serial number, and service ID).
You will see this combination of keys represented as Alt+Ctrl+S. In Windows,
press Ctrl+C to copy an item you’ve highlighted or selected, Ctrl+V to paste a
copied item, or press Ctrl+Z to undo the previous action. These shortcuts perform
the same actions you can perform through menus but save you time and mouse
clicks.
Standard Keyboard Features
Alphanumeric Keys
The alphanumeric keys are the main keys found on a standard typewriter.
Introducing the PC
9
Function Keys
The function keys, located above the main keys, are labeled F1 through F12.
• Pressing F1 displays a Help window for the software program being used.
• Pressing F3 displays a search window.
F1 and F3 are available at all times.
Other function key operations vary by software program.
Edit Keys
The edit keys are Insert, Home, Page Up, Delete, End, and Page Down. Use these
keys to insert and delete text and to quickly move the cursor on your screen. They
function differently with some software programs.
10
PC Basics Guide
Arrow Keys
The arrow keys are controls for up, down, right, and left. You can use these keys
instead of the mouse to move the cursor for navigation in a Web page, in a
document, or in a game.
Numeric Keys
Press the Num Lock key to lock and unlock the numeric key functions:
• When the Num Lock light on the keyboard is on, the numeric keys work in the
same way as the number keys and arithmetic functions found on a basic
calculator.
• When the Num Lock light on the keyboard is off, the numeric keys are
directional keys used to move the cursor or play games.
Keyboard Indicators
Each keyboard indicator is a light labeled with the name or icon for its status:
Icon
Name
Description
Num Lock
Numeric keys are locked as numbers keys and arithmetic
functions.
Caps Lock
Alphanumeric keys are locked to uppercase.
Scroll Lock
Scroll function is locked.
Introducing the PC
11
Special Keyboard Buttons
There are special buttons (select models only) at the top of the keyboard. (Some
models have some of these special buttons on the left side of the main keys.) These
buttons operate a CD or DVD player, control speaker volume, connect you to the
Internet, or provide quick access to specific functions.
Volume Control
The Volume knob increases speaker volume when turned clockwise and decreases
volume when turned counterclockwise. It can be turned indefinitely, even after
maximum sound has been reached.
The Volume Up
button increases volume, and the Volume Down
decreases volume.
button
The Mute button turns speaker sound on and off.
Media Control Keys
a Open and close disc
tray(s)
b Record
c Play or pause
d Stop
e Skip to the previous
track
f Skip to the next track
a
a
d
b
c
e
f
NOTE: The number, location, and labeling of buttons vary by keyboard model.
12
PC Basics Guide
Adjusting the Monitor
To change the screen resolution:
1 Right-click an empty area of the desktop and click Properties.
2 On the Settings tab, adjust the screen resolution.
• Moving the slide toward Less increases the size of text on your screen.
• Moving the slide toward More decreases the size of text.
3 Click Apply.
4 Click Yes, if it is present.
5 Click OK.
NOTE: You can connect more than one display device (CRT monitor, flat panel
monitor, TV, and so on) to the PC (select models only). You can quickly change
where the PC desktop appears by pressing Alt+F5. Each time you press the Alt+F5
key combination, the PC display appears on the next device. If Alt+F5 does not
work, restart the PC and try again.
Using a TV as a Monitor
Your PC may have TV-out (select models only) capability, which means you can
connect it to a television to view the computer image on a TV screen. With the
TV-out feature, you can view the computer image, watch DVD movies (if you have
a DVD player), or play games using your TV.
Cables You May Need
To connect a TV to the PC, you may need a video cable and an audio cable
(not provided; purchase separately). The type of video cable you need depends
on your TV:
• If your TV has an S-video jack, you need an S-video cable.
• If your TV has a composite video jack, you need a composite video cable, and,
depending on the jacks on the back of your PC, you may also need an S-video
adapter cable.
Viewing the PC Image on Your TV Screen
The type of video card on your PC determines how the PC selects the TV-out
option.
When you want to disconnect the TV from your PC, you may need to disable the
TV option to return your PC display to its original resolution.
Introducing the PC
13
Using Speakers
Speakers are included with the monitor (select models only), or are sold
separately. For details on connecting stereo speakers to the PC, see the quick
setup poster.
NOTE: Speakers may be passive (no power button and no power cord) or active
(power button or power cord). Your PC supports only active (powered) speaker
systems; the speaker system must have its own power cord.
A stereo speaker set is a left-right, two-channel speaker system. A multi-channel
audio speaker system is a system with more than two channels, and it may include
a subwoofer. For example, 5.1 channels, referred to as a six-speaker mode, uses
two front speakers (left-right), two rear speakers (left-right), a center speaker, and
a subwoofer.
If your PC has multi-channel audio speaker capacity (select models only), you can
connect four channels for four speakers output or six channels for 5.1 speakers
output.
Connect your speaker system to the PC and then configure the audio software for
sound output.
Adjusting Speaker Volume
Use the Volume icon on the taskbar to set speaker volume. Then you can
adjust the volume using:
• The Volume knob or buttons on the keyboard (select models only).
• The Volume knob on the speakers (select models only).
NOTE: If you do not see this Volume icon on the taskbar, click Start, choose
Control Panel, click Sounds, Speech, and Audio Devices, if it is present,
and then double-click Sounds and Audio Devices to open the Sounds and
Audio Devices Properties window. On the Volume tab, place a check in the Place
volume icon in the taskbar check box. Click Apply, and then click OK. The
Volume icon appears in the taskbar.
14
PC Basics Guide
The two ways to use the Volume icon are:
1 Click the Volume icon on the taskbar.
2 Adjust the volume.
3 When you are satisfied with the sound level, click outside the Volume window
to close this window.
Or
1 Double-click the Volume icon on the taskbar. The Volume Control settings
window opens.
2 Adjust the volume.
3 When you are satisfied with the sound level, click the Close box (the X in the
upper-right corner) to close this window.
Using a Microphone
Your PC comes with one microphone connector in the back of the PC. Some
models have a second microphone connector in the front of the PC. Only one
microphone connector works at a time, and the back connector is ready to use
unless you have the multi-channel audio speakers option. For PCs with the
multi-channel audio speakers option, the microphone connector in the front of
the PC, if present, is ready to use.
To use a microphone connected to the front of your PC (select models only), select
the working microphone.
NOTE: If you connect your microphone to the back of your PC, you do not need to
perform this procedure.
1 Double-click the Volume icon on the taskbar. The Volume Control settings
window opens.
NOTE: If you do not see this Volume icon, click Start, click Control Panel,
click Sounds, Speech, and Audio Devices, if it is present, and then
double-click Sounds and Audio Devices to open the Sounds and Audio
Devices Properties window. On the Volume tab, place a check in the Place
volume icon in the taskbar check box. Click Apply, and then click OK. The
Volume icon appears in the taskbar.
2 Select Options and click Properties.
3 In Adjust volume for, click Recording.
4 In Show the following volume controls, place a check in the Microphone
check box.
Introducing the PC
15
5 Click OK.
6 Click the Advanced button in the Microphone column. If you do not see the
Advanced button, select Options from the Recording Control window, and
then click Advanced Controls.
7 Place a check in the Alternate Microphone check box. (This box may be
labeled Mic2 Select or 1 Mic Boost.)
8 Click Close.
9 Click the X (Close) at the upper-right corner of the Recording Control window.
Adjusting Microphone Volume
If you need to adjust the volume of the microphone, follow the procedure below:
1 Double-click the Volume icon on the taskbar. The Volume Control
window opens.
2 Select Options and click Properties.
3 In Adjust volume for, click Recording.
4 In Show the following volume controls, place a check in the Microphone
check box.
5 Click OK.
6 Adjust the volume for Microphone. If the volume is now acceptable, proceed
directly to step 10.
NOTE: If you do not see the Advanced button, select Options from the
Recording Control window, and then click Advanced Controls.
7 To make finer adjustments to the sound, click the Advanced button, and then
select the (Microphone) 1 Mic Boost check box.
8 Click Close.
9 Repeat step 6, if needed.
10 Click the X (Close) at the upper-right corner of the Volume Control window.
16
PC Basics Guide
Using Media Drives
Using Your CD and DVD Drives
Your PC can come with several types of CD or DVD drives that allow you to do
different tasks. What you can do depends on what kind of drive you have.
Allows you to:
Read data from CDs
Play music CDs
Read DVDs
CD-ROM
•
•
Record (burn) data or music
to discs
Play DVD movies
CD-RW
•
•
DVD-ROM
•
•
•
DVD+RW/+R
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Record (burn) DVD movies
The combination (combo) drive is available on select models only. It combines the
functions of two drives into one: either a DVD+RW/+R drive (dvd writer) and a
CD-RW drive (cd writer), or a DVD-ROM drive and a CD-RW drive.
Handling CDs and DVDs
To avoid damaging a disc, follow these guidelines:
• Return the disc to the case when you are finished using it.
• Handle the disc by its outside edges or center hole only.
• Do not touch the unlabeled side of a disc or place the unlabeled side down on
your desk. Doing so could scratch the surface of the disc.
• Store discs at room temperature.
Inserting and Removing CDs and DVDs
CAUTION: Use only standard-shaped (circular) discs in your drives.
Using non-standard discs, such as heart-shaped discs or business
card discs, may damage your drive.
To insert a CD or DVD:
1 With your PC turned on, press the Eject button near the front of the drive to
open the disc tray.
NOTE: On some PCs, the drive is located behind a door on the front of the PC.
2 Remove the CD or DVD from its case, holding the disc edges or center
hole only.
Introducing the PC
17
3 Gently place the disc in the tray with the label facing up.
NOTE: On a double-sided DVD, read the text around the center hole to
determine which side (A versus B or Standard versus Widescreen) to play.
Place the disc in the tray with the label facing up for the side you want to play.
4 Close the disc tray by:
• Gently pushing the tray into the PC.
Or
• Clicking the open/close button on the control panel for the program that
controls the drive.
Or
• Pressing the media control open/close button or Eject button on the
keyboard (select models only).
Or
• Pressing the Eject button on the drive, if it is accessible.
To remove a CD or DVD:
1 With the PC turned on, open the disc tray by pressing the Eject button.
2 Holding on to the disc edges or center hole only, lift the CD or DVD out of
the tray.
3 Place the disc in its case.
4 Close the disc tray by gently pushing the tray into the PC.
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PC Basics Guide
Using a Diskette (Floppy) Drive
The diskette (floppy) drive is available on select model PCs. If your PC does not
already have a diskette drive, you cannot add one to the PC chassis as an internal
drive. Instead, purchase an external USB diskette drive or other external storage
device to suit your needs.
If your PC has a diskette drive (select models only), you can use a 3.5-inch diskette
(floppy disk) to store files:
1 Insert the diskette with the round metal disk facing down and the arrow on the
top pointing into the drive.
2 Gently push the diskette into the drive until it locks in place.
3 You can copy files from or to the diskette.
CAUTION: Removing a diskette when the drive is reading from or
writing to the diskette can damage the diskette or the information
stored on it.
4 When you are ready to remove the diskette, make sure that the light on the
drive is off. When it is off, the PC is not reading from or writing to the diskette.
5 Press the Eject button on the PC to remove the diskette. Remove the diskette
from the drive prior to turning off the PC.
Using a Printer
Refer to the user manual that came with your printer for instructions on connecting
and using the printer.
Printers receive instructions from your PC via software called printer drivers. In
many cases your PC automatically finds the printer driver necessary for the printer
to work with your PC. If it does not, follow instructions that come with your printer
to install the specific printer driver that it requires.
You can print text and graphics from most software programs and Internet sites if
you have a printer connected to your PC and the necessary software installed for
the printer.
To print:
1 Click File on the menu bar.
2 Click Print.
3 Select your printing options:
• Select the printer.
• Choose the page range (for example, all pages, current page, range of
pages).
• Determine the number of copies.
• Select all, odd, or even pages in a range.
4 Click OK.
Introducing the PC
19
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PC Basics Guide
Introducing the Software
The operation of your PC is controlled by two kinds of software:
• The Microsoft Windows XP operating system, which displays the desktop on
the monitor and controls your PC’s hardware, peripherals, and software
applications.
• Software programs that perform specific functions, such as a word processing
program.
Software programs included with the PC may vary by model and by
country/region.
Learning More about Software
Information about using software and about the Microsoft Windows XP operating
system is in the printed manuals and onscreen Help. The Microsoft Windows XP
guide is included with your PC documentation. For Microsoft Windows, you can
also press the Help button, labeled with a question mark icon on your keyboard
(select models only), to open the built-in Help and Support Center, or you can click
Start on the taskbar and then click Help and Support. For help with specific
software, refer to the onscreen Help within the program.
Using the Desktop
The desktop is the work area that appears on the display monitor. It has the
taskbar (along one edge) and shortcut icons that make it easy to find the things
you need.
The taskbar shows the Start button, a button for each open window so you can
switch between programs, and the notification area that includes the time.
A shortcut icon is a small picture that you click to open a folder or start a
program. One icon on the desktop performs a special function; the Recycle Bin
collects files that you delete. You can retrieve files from the Recycle Bin until you
empty it. When you empty the Recycle Bin, the files are permanently deleted.
Introducing the Software
21
Removing Desktop Icons
You can remove most desktop icons by either deleting them or moving them to an
unused icons folder.
CAUTION: Do not delete unfamiliar desktop icons. Instead, follow
the steps to move unfamiliar desktop icons to the Unused Desktop
Shortcuts folder.
Delete a desktop icon by right-clicking the icon and then selecting Delete.
To move a desktop icon to the Unused Desktop Shortcuts folder:
1 Click Start.
2 Click Control Panel.
3 Click Appearance and Themes, if it is present.
4 Double-click Display.
5 On the Desktop tab, click Customize Desktop.
6 Under Desktop cleanup, click Clean Desktop Now.
7 Follow the onscreen instructions.
8 Click OK to close the Desktop Items window, and click OK again to close the
Display Properties window.
Retrieving Desktop Icons
Retrieve a desktop icon by opening the Unused Desktop Shortcuts folder on your
desktop and dragging the icon onto the desktop.
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PC Basics Guide
Using the Start Menu
Click the Start button to open the start menu and:
•
•
•
•
•
A Start button on the
taskbar
B Log Off button
C Turn Off Computer
button
D All Programs
Select programs or documents.
Open the Help and Support Center.
Start a search.
Run a program.
Open the Control Panel to view or change settings.
D
A
B
C
The Start menu also displays the buttons Log Off and Turn Off Computer:
• Click the Log Off button to end your current PC session and to switch between
users.
• Click the Turn Off Computer button to turn off the PC or to restart it.
Using the All Programs Menu
To find the software programs on your PC:
1 Click Start.
2 Choose All Programs.
Organizing Your All Programs List
You see folders organized according to task (select models only) when you:
1 Click Start.
2 Choose All Programs.
A folder contains a list of items. Each item is actually a shortcut, or link, to a
program, a document, or another folder. The Music folder, for example, contains
shortcuts to the programs you use to play music CDs.
Introducing the Software
23
To change the name of an item:
1 Right-click the item.
2 Select Rename.
3 Type the new name, and press Enter on the keyboard.
4 Click Yes in the message box.
To move an item by using the drag-and-drop technique:
1 Left-click an item in All Programs or in a folder, and hold down the mouse
button.
2 Move the mouse pointer to where you want the item, and then release the
mouse button.
(If you have problems dropping the item into a folder, drag it to your desktop,
and then drag it to the folder.)
To copy an item:
1 Right-click the item.
2 Select Create Shortcut. A copy of the item (shortcut) appears in the folder.
3 Drag the item or the copy into the All Programs list or into another folder.
If you use Add or Remove Programs in the Control Panel to delete a software
program, the shortcut in All Programs may not be removed. To remove a shortcut:
1 Click Start.
2 Choose All Programs.
3 Select the folder.
4 Right-click the shortcut, and then select Delete. Click Delete Shortcut to
confirm you want to delete the shortcut.
Using the Control Panel
The control panel is where you can set up or change properties and settings for
the display, the keyboard, the mouse, the modem, a network connection, and
other components and features of the PC. The control panel also provides tools
to change system performance, add hardware, add or remove programs, and
other tasks.
To open the control panel, click Start on the taskbar, and then click
Control Panel.
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PC Basics Guide
Resizing Windows
All windows have some buttons in the upper-right corner.
The middle button is either the Maximize button or the Restore
Down button.
Feature
Name
Description
Minimize
Collapses the window to the task bar (but does not close
it). The window is still accessible. To bring the window
back up, click the button with the name of the window on
the task bar.
Maximize
Expands the window to the full screen.
Restore
Down
Reduces the window from full-screen to covering a portion
of the screen.
Close
Closes the window and stops the program or task.
Resize
Resizes a window (not available when window is
maximized). Move your mouse cursor over any window
border until the cursor becomes a double-headed arrow.
Click and hold the left mouse button. Drag the border to
the left or to the right to change the width. Drag the border
up or down to change the height.
Scroll bar
A scroll bar appears on a window when the information
does not fit on one screen. Clicking and dragging on a
vertical scroll bar moves the screen up and down. Clicking
and dragging on a horizontal scroll bar moves the screen
left and right.
Introducing the Software
25
Working with Digital Images
You can connect a digital image source, such as a digital camera or a digital
video camera, directly to the PC or through a docking station. Digital picture files
you copy or download from the device appear in the My Pictures folder. You can
copy digital picture files from the memory cards used by digital cameras and other
digital imaging devices by using the memory card reader (select models only).
Digital cameras and other digital imaging devices use memory cards, or media, to
store digital picture files.
26
PC Basics Guide
Managing Files
A file is any unit of information that is named and stored on your PC hard disk
drive or other electronic storage, such as a CD, floppy diskette, or even in a
digital camera. A file can be an application program, a picture, music or
sounds, a document, or data. Almost everything you do on your PC involves
working with files.
The PC can copy files to other storage media within component drives, such as
diskettes, memory cards, CDs or DVDs, or to output devices, such as a printer.
Organizing Files with Folders
In Windows, folders make it possible for you to organize the files on your PC.
Similar to paper folders within a filing cabinet, folders on your PC are a way to
group related files together.
A folder can contain any type of file and can even contain other folders. Each file
within a folder must have a unique name, but two different folders can have files
with the same name.
There are two methods for working with the files and folders on your PC:
• My Computer provides an easy-to-use view of the files and folders within a
specific folder on your PC. It also has links to common tasks for managing your
files, such as copying, moving, deleting, and renaming. To open My Computer,
click the Start button and then click My Computer.
• Windows Explorer allows you to quickly see all the folders and files on your
PC. It is easy to move or copy files from one folder to another in Windows
Explorer. To open Windows Explorer, right-click the Start button and select
Explore.
To navigate around in the My Computer and Windows Explorer views,
double-click folders to open and display their contents. Use the Back arrow
button to retrace your path through the opened folders.
Managing Files
27
Creating Folders
Using My Computer:
1 Click Start on the taskbar and click My Computer.
2 Navigate to the location where you want the new folder.
3 Under File and Folder Tasks, click Make a new folder.
4 Type a name for the folder, and then press Enter.
Using Windows Explorer:
1 Right-click Start on the taskbar and click Explore.
2 Navigate to the location where you want the new folder, and select the folder
or device that will contain the new folder. For example, to create a new folder
in the My Documents folder, you would select that folder.
3 Click the File menu, select New, and then click Folder.
4 Type a name for the folder, and then press Enter on your keyboard.
Moving Files
CAUTION: Moving any file that is part of an installed program can
cause the program to be unusable.
Using My Computer:
1 Click Start on the taskbar and click My Computer.
2 Find the file you want to move and select it by clicking the file.
3 Click Move this file.
4 In the Move Items window, click the folder where you want to put the file.
5 Click Move.
Using Windows Explorer:
1 Right-click Start on the taskbar and click Explore.
2 Find the file you want to move and select it by clicking the file.
3 Click the Edit menu and click Cut.
4 Find and open the folder where you want to put the file.
5 Click the Edit menu and click Paste.
NOTE: You can also move files by dragging and dropping them into a new
location. Select an item in My Computer or in Windows Explorer and then press
and hold the mouse button while moving the item to another folder. Release the
mouse button to place the item in the new location.
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PC Basics Guide
Copying Files
Using My Computer:
1 Click Start on the taskbar and click My Computer.
2 Find the file you want to copy and select it by clicking the file.
3 Under File and Folder Tasks, click Copy this file.
4 In the Copy Items window, open the folder where you want to put the file copy.
5 Click Copy.
Using Windows Explorer:
1 Right-click Start on the taskbar and click Explore.
2 Find the file you want to copy and select it by clicking the file.
3 Click the Edit menu and click Copy.
4 Find and open the folder where you want to put the file copy.
5 Click the Edit menu and click Paste.
NOTE: You can also copy files by dragging and dropping them into a new
location. Select an item in My Computer or in Windows Explorer and then press
and hold the right-mouse button while moving the item to another folder. Release
the mouse button and select Copy Here to place the item in the new location.
Finding Files
1 Click Start on the taskbar and click Search.
2 Under what do you want to search for?, click All files and folders.
3 Under Search by any or all of the criteria below, type the name of the file or
folder your want to find.
NOTE: You can also search for files containing a specific word or phrase.
4 Click the Look in drop-down menu and select where you want to search.
NOTE: If you don’t select an area to search, the entire hard disk drive is
searched.
5 Click Search.
The results of your search appear in the Search Results window.
Managing Files
29
Renaming Files
1 Find the file you want to rename and select it by clicking the file.
2 Click the File menu and click Rename.
NOTE: Do not change the filename extension (the last three characters after the
period in a filename). Changing the extension could make the file
unrecognizable to the PC.
3 Type the new filename and press Enter.
NOTE: Another way to rename a file is to right-click the file and then click
Rename.
Deleting Files
CAUTION: Do not delete any file that is part of an installed
program. It can cause the program to be unusable.
1 Find the file you want to delete and select it by clicking the file.
2 Click the File menu and click Delete.
3 Click Yes to confirm the delete and send the file to the Recycle Bin.
If you make a mistake and need to get the deleted file back, see “getting files out
of the recycle bin.”
NOTE: Another way to delete a file is to right-click the file and then click Delete.
Getting Files Out of the Recycle Bin
If you discover that you need a file that you have deleted, you can usually retrieve
the file from the Recycle Bin. When a file is deleted, it goes to the Recycle Bin and
stays there until the Recycle Bin is emptied or is cleared to make room for more
recently deleted files.
1 Double-click the Recycle Bin icon on your desktop.
2 Find and click the file you want to retrieve.
3 Click the File menu and click Restore.
The file is removed from the Recycle Bin and goes back to its previous location.
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PC Basics Guide
Using the Internet
This chapter describes connecting to the Internet and using the Internet, including
how to use a browser and e-mail.
Use the Internet to search for and to find information or services on the Web, or to
use an e-mail program to get, read, or send electronic mail messages.
Connecting to the Internet
Hardware and software programs provided on your PC may vary. Your PC may
come with:
•
•
•
•
•
Other Ways to
Connect
There are other ways to
connect to the ISP that
do not use the telephone
modem, such as a
LAN (local area
network) or DSL (digital
subscriber line). Check
with your ISP for
specifics on your
connection.
A Modem connector
B Back of PC
A 56K modem and modem software (upgrade ready).
An Ethernet connector.
Special keyboard buttons to access the Internet.
The Internet Explorer Web browser program.
The Outlook Express e-mail software program.
Connecting the Modem
The modem is used for connecting to an ISP that provides telephone dial-up
connection to the Internet.
NOTE: Your PC may not come with a modem.
Before you can connect to the Internet and send or receive e-mail and faxes using
telephone dial-up, you must connect your telephone service line to the modem (A),
which is inside the PC (B). The setup poster shows you how to plug in a
modem/telephone cable into the PC modem connector and into your telephone
service line wall jack connector.
A
B
Using the Internet
31
Setting Up the Ethernet Connection
The Ethernet connection (may be called a network interface adapter, a Network
Interface Card, or a NIC ) provides a high-speed, or broadband, connection to an
Ethernet (10BaseT ) or Fast Ethernet (100BaseT ) network. After this interface is
connected to a network such as a LAN (local area network ), you can connect to
the Internet through the LAN. This network connection also allows you to share
printers, data, and other devices among your PCs.
NOTE: Your PC may not come with an Ethernet connector.
A Ethernet connector
(RJ-45 port)
B Ethernet indicator
lights
B
A
With the PC turned on, check the lights (B) next to the Ethernet connector
for status:
• ACTIVITY — Lit yellow during network data transfer activity
• LINK — Lit green with valid network connection
About the Internet
The Internet is a group of computers that communicate with each other through
telephone lines, digital service, or cable lines. Each Internet computer is
independent, and its operators choose which files to make available to users of
the Internet. To connect your PC to the Internet and use the information and
services available there, you need an Internet Service Provider (ISP).
ISPs are businesses that give you access to the Internet, and most of them provide
electronic mail (e-mail) service. ISPs usually charge a monthly fee for their services.
When your PC connects to the Internet, it is actually communicating with the ISP’s
Internet computer. The ISP verifies your account and then provides you access to
the Internet. You use a Web browser program to search, find, and display Web
site information. Some ISPs allow you to choose a browser program, while others
provide their own browser.
Your connection to an ISP may be through a traditional telephone dial-up modem,
a LAN (local area network), cable modem, DSL (digital subscriber line) or ADSL
(asymmetric digital subscriber line). (DSL, ADSL, and cable ISPs are not available
in all countries/regions.)
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PC Basics Guide
The World Wide Web (WWW), also called the Web, is a public part of the
Internet used by individuals, companies, governments, and organizations. These
individuals and groups have created millions of Web pages in support of their
activities. A Web page is a file or group of files that a user can access by
entering the Web page’s file location, or URL.
The URL (Uniform Resource Locator) identifies a Web site location, typically
in the form http://www.name.extension (for example, http://www.hp.com). The
URL may include the path to a specific file within that site. Each period, or dot, in
the URL separates elements within the address. For example, you will see the URL
extension .com used by companies. When you enter the URL into your browser
address box and press the Enter key on your keyboard, the browser contacts that
location and displays the Web page for you.
Imagine you are reading a newspaper. On page 1, you may read something like
“For more details, see page 3, column 2.” You turn the page for more
information. A hyperlink on a Web page works the same way, except that you
click the mouse with your cursor over the link to move to the page or the Web site.
The way that a hyperlink links files together is what gives the Web its name,
because the Web weaves and connects idea to idea all over the world.
Your e-mail address identifies the electronic post office box where people can
send you electronic mail. E-mail addresses have the form
name@domain.extension. The domain is usually the name of the ISP or
organization. The extension usually identifies the type of organization. For
example, if your name is Jane Jones, and XYZ is your ISP, your e-mail address
might be JaneJones@xyz.com, with the extension .com indicating that XYZ is a
business. For information on using e-mail, see “Sending and Receiving E-Mail” on
page 35.
Using a Browser
A Web browser program searches for, finds, and displays Web site information.
How you explore the Internet depends on whether you are using an ISP that
provides the browser or an ISP that allows you to use any browser.
Once you are connected to the Internet, your browser displays the home Web
page. You can go to a different Web site by entering its address (such as
http://www.hp.com) in the address box in the Web browser and pressing Enter
on your keyboard. Or, you can use the browser Search tool to search for
references to a specific word or phrase on the Web.
Searching the Internet
Most browser programs include a search feature. You may need to click a button
or select from a menu to display the search feature, depending on the type of
browser program. Type a question or a word that describes the information you
want to find into the Search box, and then press Enter.
Using the Internet
33
The Windows search feature includes direct use of the Internet Explorer Search. (If
your ISP provides the browser, you may not be able to use Internet Explorer to
search the Internet.)
To begin a search:
1 Click Start on the taskbar.
2 Click Search.
3 Click Search the Internet. (You may have to scroll down in the list to see
this option.)
4 Type a word or question into the Search box.
5 Click Search.
The PC connects to the Internet (if needed), performs the search, and displays the
results. Click a link in the results list to display the Web page.
There are also Web sites specifically created for searching the Internet. These are
called search engines.
Restricting Internet Content
The Internet provides you with a wide variety of information, but some information
may not be suitable for every viewer. With Content Advisor (a feature of
Windows XP), you can:
•
•
•
•
Control Internet access.
Set up a password.
Set up a list of Web sites that people who use your PC cannot view.
Adjust the type of content people can view with or without your permission.
Once you set up restricted rating levels in Content Advisor, users can view Web
sites and other pages that you have specified under the rating setup. However, to
view unrated Web sites or pages, they must enter the Content Advisor password
that you have set. This means that any unrated page, even Help and Support or
Internet Explorer, is not viewable if the user doesn’t know the password. To allow
access to an unrated site or page you approve of, open it and, when the
password window appears, select the option always allow viewing or allow
viewing only this time.
To use Content Advisor:
1 Click Start on the taskbar, and then click Control Panel.
2 Click Network and Internet Connections, if it is present.
3 Double-click Internet Options.
4 Click the Content tab.
5 In the Content Advisor area, click Enable.
6 On the Ratings tab, click a category in the list, and then click and drag the
slider bar until the rating level is set to the limit you want to use.
34
PC Basics Guide
7 Repeat step 6 for each category you want to limit.
8 Click Apply, and then click OK.
9 Type a password into the Password box and the Confirm password box, and
then click OK.
NOTE: If you want to change the settings after the initial setup, click Settings in
the Content Adviser area instead of Enable. The Enable button works as a toggle
to turn the Content Advisor on and off.
Sending and Receiving E-Mail
E-mail (electronic mail) allows you to send and receive letters, pictures, postcards,
and even music and video clips.
NOTE: E-mail may contain a virus in the e-mail message or as an attachment. To
protect your PC, do not open any message from sources you do not know or that
appears suspect to you. Instead, delete such messages.
Your PC comes with an e-mail program from Microsoft called Outlook Express
(select models only). You may also use e-mail programs from other vendors. Some
ISPs provide their own e-mail programs. You use an e-mail program to send,
receive, and organize your messages. You can organize, read, and create new
messages even when you are off-line (not connected to the Internet).
NOTE: Some models come with Microsoft Outlook instead of Outlook Express. For
details on using Microsoft Outlook, open the Outlook program and select Help.
If Using Outlook Express
The first time you start Outlook Express, the Internet Connection Wizard window
opens if you are not already connected to the Internet.
The Wizard will ask for connection information such as an account name and
password and the names of an incoming and an outgoing mail server. If you need
help with any of this information, contact your ISP.
After the first time you sign up and connect through an ISP, you can run Outlook
Express from the Start menu.
Sending E-Mail Messages with Outlook Express
1 Click Start on the taskbar, choose All Programs, and select Outlook
Express.
NOTE: You can also press the E-Mail button on the keyboard to open Outlook
Express (select models only).
Using the Internet
35
2 Click the Create Mail icon.
3 Type in, or select from an address book, the address of each recipient.
NOTE: E-mail addresses contain no spaces and have a period after the server
name. Dashes and underscores are sometimes used. Capital letters may be
required.
4 Type your message in the New Message window.
5 Type the message title in the Subject box.
6 Click the Send button on the toolbar when you are finished.
7 If necessary, click the Send/Recv tool on the toolbar to send any messages
stored in the Outbox.
NOTE: When you compose a message without being connected to the Internet,
the message is stored in the Outbox until the next time you log on to the Internet
and connect to your ISP.
Receiving E-Mail Messages with Outlook Express
Your ISP receives e-mail messages for you automatically, even when your PC is
turned off. The ISP then stores your messages until you connect to the Internet and
open your e-mail program to read them.
1 Start Outlook Express.
2 If necessary, click the Send/Recv tool on the toolbar to have your e-mail
program get the new messages from all listed e-mail accounts.
3 Click the Inbox folder to view the list of incoming messages. Messages not yet
read appear in bold on the screen.
NOTE: In Outlook Express, the messages stay in your Inbox until you delete
them or move them to another folder.
4 Click a message once to view it, or double-click the message to expand it and
read it in its own window.
For more information about using your e-mail program, go to the Help menu
within the program.
If Your ISP Provides the E-Mail Program
Follow the ISP’s instructions to install its Web browser and e-mail program and to
set up and use your e-mail account. You will then be able to send and receive
e-mail when your PC is connected to your ISP.
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PC Basics Guide
Improving PC Performance
Over time, the availability of system resources on your PC can decrease, slowing
down the performance of the PC. To improve the performance of your PC, try:
• Closing program windows; keep only one version of a program open at a time.
• Restarting the PC; click Start, click Turn Off Computer, and then click
Restart.
•
•
•
•
Increasing memory by adding or upgrading memory modules in the chassis.
Increasing available hard disk drive space.
Consolidating scattered files and folders on the hard disk drive.
Fixing hard disk drive errors.
Increasing Available Hard Disk Drive
Space
Your PC comes with a hard disk drive with preloaded software programs and
a partition within the drive that takes up a certain amount of space on the hard
disk drive.
Viewing the Amount of Used and Free Disk Space
1 Click Start on the taskbar.
2 Click Control Panel.
3 Click Performance and Maintenance, if it is present.
4 Double-click Administrative Tools.
5 Double-click Computer Management. The Computer Management window
opens.
6 Double-click Storage.
7 Double-click Disk Management (Local).
Information displays for each drive on your PC. You may need to scroll the
window to the right to see the capacity and free space sizes.
Improving PC Performance
37
Emptying the Recycle Bin
When you delete a file from the hard disk drive, it goes to the Recycle Bin on your
Windows desktop. You can retrieve files from the Recycle Bin until you empty it.
When you empty the Recycle Bin, the files are permanently deleted.
1 Double-click the Recycle Bin icon on your Windows desktop.
2 On the File menu, click Empty Recycle Bin to delete all files.
3 Click Yes to confirm the deletion.
Uninstalling Programs
CAUTION: Do not uninstall an unfamiliar program. If you need it,
you may not be able to recover it using Application Recovery.
1 Click Start.
2 Click Control Panel.
3 Double-click Add or Remove Programs.
4 Click the Change or Remove Programs icon on the left of the screen, if it
is not already selected.
5 Select the program to uninstall.
6 Click the Change/Remove button, and then follow the onscreen instructions.
Cleaning Up Your Hard Disk Drive
As you use your PC and store files, the hard disk drive fills up and becomes
cluttered, affecting performance. To manage this, delete files you are not using.
1 Close all open programs.
2 Click Start on the taskbar.
3 Click My Computer.
4 Right-click the hard disk drive you want to clean, and click Properties.
5 On the General tab, click Disk Cleanup.
6 Wait for the calculations to complete.
CAUTION: Do not delete unfamiliar files. If in doubt, do not delete.
7 Select the types of files you want to delete, click OK, and then click Yes.
8 Click OK to close the window.
38
PC Basics Guide
Consolidating Scattered Files and Folders
Over time, as you add, move, and remove files and folders on your PC, the bits
of data become scattered over the hard disk drive. This can slow down the
performance of the PC. With the Disk Defragmenter program, you can gather
these bits of data together. This improves PC performance. Gathering your files
and folders with the Disk Defragmenter does not affect the way you have them
organized on your PC.
NOTE: Using the Disk Defragmenter to gather the data on your PC may take a
long time to complete.
1 Close all programs running on your PC. This includes background programs,
such as virus scanners.
2 Click the Start menu, choose All Programs, choose Accessories, choose
System Tools, and then click Disk Defragmenter.
3 Click Defragment.
4 Follow the onscreen instructions.
NOTE: If Disk Defragmenter starts itself over and over, this means a hidden
background program is still running. To fix this issue, restart the PC and press F8
on your keyboard as soon as the first logo screen appears. On the Windows
Advanced Options menu, use the arrow keys to select Safe Mode and press
Enter. Press Enter again to select the operating system. Log on to Windows. When
the Desktop message appears, click Yes to continue in Safe Mode. After
Windows starts up, use the steps above to start Disk Defragmenter.
Improving PC Performance
39
Fixing Hard Disk Drive Errors
The Microsoft ScanDisk program searches your hard disk drive for errors and is
able to fix some errors. Fixing hard disk drive errors can improve PC
performance.
NOTE: Using ScanDisk to check for hard disk drive errors may take a long time to
complete.
1 Click the Start button and then click My Computer.
2 Right-click the icon for the hard disk drive (usually labeled C:).
3 Click Properties, and then click the Tools tab.
4 Click Check Now.
5 Place check marks in all of the check boxes.
6 Click the Start button, and then click Yes to schedule a full disk scan for when
the PC is restarted.
7 Click OK.
8 Click the Start button, click Turn Off Computer, and then click Restart.
ScanDisk starts as soon as the PC starts up again.
40
PC Basics Guide
Index
5.1 speakers, 14
A
adjusting microphone volume, 16
adjusting speaker volume, 14
ADSL (asymmetric digital
subscriber line), 32
All Programs menu, 23
autoscrolling, mouse, 8
available hard disk drive space
increasing, 37
B
browsing the Internet, 34
buttons
mouse, 7
mouse scroll wheel, 7
Mute, 12
Off. See turning off PC
special keys, 12
Start, 23
C
cables, for connecting a TV, 13
CD
keyboard button, 12
chassis components, 1
connecting
a TV, 13
Ethernet, 32
Control Panel, 24
opening, 23
D
desktop, 21
desktop icons, removing, 22
digital pictures, 26
Disk Cleanup utility, 38
disk space
viewing, 37
diskette
inserting, 19
diskette (floppy) drive, 19
domain name, 33
double-click, 7
drag-and-drop
copying items, 29
move an item, 24
moving items, 28
DSL (digital subscriber line), 32
DVD
keyboard button, 12
E
e-mail
address, 33
defined, 33
receiving, 35, 36
sending, 35
using Outlook Express, 35
errors
fixing hard disk drive, 40
Ethernet
about, 32
connecting, 32
F
faxes, standby mode, 4
file shortcut
copy, 24
delete, 24
files
consolidating, 39
finding software programs, 23
Index
41
floppy disk. See diskette
floppy drive, 19
free hard disk drive space
viewing amount, 37
H
hard disk drive
fixing errors, 40
scan for errors, 40
hard disk drive cleanup, 38
hard disk drive space, increasing, 37
hibernation mode, 5
automatic, 5
high-speed Internet connection, 32
home Web page, 33
hyperlink, defined, 33
I
indicators, keyboard, 11
Internet
about, 32
browser programs, 33
browsing the Web, 34
connecting to, 31
restricting content, 34
searching the, 33
Internet connection, high speed, 32
Internet Service Provider (ISP),
defined, 32
K
keyboard
indicators, 11
shortcuts, 9
types of buttons, 12
using, 9
keyboard keys
alphanumeric, 9
arrow, 11
edit, 10
function keys, 10
numeric, 11
L
logging off, 23
M
microphone
adjusting volume, 16
using, 15
modem
connecting, 31
setting up, 31
42
PC Basics Guide
monitor
changing resolution, 13
changing where desktop displays, 13
selecting, 13
mouse
autoscroll feature, 8
buttons, 7
double-click, 7
left-handed, 8
optical, 6
panning feature, 8
pointer speed, adjusting, 8
scrolling, 7
using, 6
wireless, 7
multi-channel speakers, 14
Mute button, 12
N
Net. See Internet, about
network interface
about, 32
O
Off button. See turning off PC
operating system, 21
Outlook Express, 35
receiving e-mail, 36
P
panning, scrolling mouse, 8
PC
chassis components, 1
hibernation mode, automatic, 5
improving performance, 37
settings, 23
sleep mode. See hibernation mode
standby mode, about, 4
standby mode, automatic, 5
standby mode, manual, 4
turning off, 4
performance
improving PC, 37
pointer speed, adjusting, 8
power management settings,
modifying, 5
printer
using, 19
programs, uninstalling, 38
R
receiving e-mails, 35
recording volume, adjusting
microphone, 16
recycle bin
emptying, 38
getting files out of the recycle bin, 30
removing desktop icons, 22
removing unneeded software, 38
resizing a window, 25
resolution, monitor, 13
restricting Internet content, 34
S
saving electricity, 4, 5
ScanDisk, 40
scrolling mouse, 7
searching
for files or folders, 23
the Internet, 33
selecting programs or documents, 23
sending an e-mail, 35
settings
viewing or changing, 23
Volume Control, 15
shortcut icons, 21
shortcuts, keyboard, 9
show Volume icon in taskbar, 14
shutting down PC, 4
sleep mode. See hibernation mode
software
finding, 23
uninstalling, 38
sound manager, multi-channel, 14
speaker volume, adjusting, 14
speakers, 14
multi-channel, 14
standby mode
automatic, 5
manual, 4
Start button, 23
Start menu contents, 23
surface, using mouse on, 6
T
television, viewing PC image
on a TV, 13
turning off PC, 4
TV
connecting, 13
TV-out, 13
cables, 13
disabling TV option, 13
U
uninstalling software, 38
update Windows operating system, 3
URL, defined, 33
V
virus protection, 3
volume
adjusting, 14
adjusting microphone, 16
controls, 12
show Volume icon on taskbar, 15
Volume Control settings window, 15
Volume icon, show, 14
volume, displaying icon in
taskbar, 14, 15
W
Web. (See also Internet)
browser programs, 33
page, 33
searching the, 34
window, resizing, 25
Windows Update, 3
Windows XP, 21
wireless mouse, 7
Index
43
Printed in
#5990-8024#
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