Lesman Catalog Section: Index and Reference

Lesman Catalog Section: Index and Reference
TABLE OF
CONTENTS
481
Thermometers
Index and Reference
Need to find a quick conversion table for flow measurements or pressure units? Want to look up the dielectric constant
for a liquid or solid? Confused about how IEC and NEMA ratings relate? Here’s where we store it all. We’ve expanded our
reference tables to include dielectrics, viscosities, and refractive indices, tubing compatibility with chemicals, and other
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We’ll be adding more of these tables to our website, so check there if you don’t see what you need in this section.
Index by Product
499
Conversion Factors and Multipliers
Capacity Conversions
Dewpoint/Temperature Calculations
Dry/Liquid Conversion
Flow Units
Fractions to Decimal Equivalents
Percent Range to Current
Pressure Units
Vacuum Range Values
Volume Conversion
Water Values Conversion
Weight Conversion
482
485
485
485
483
481
485
483
483
485
483
482
International Ratings Standards
Agency Approvals and Safety Ratings
Hazardous Location Classification Methodologies
IEC Ratings and Classifications
NEMA Ratings
Safety Integrity Levels
486
487
487
486
486
487
Media Properties
Chemical Compatibility of Parker Tubing
Chemical Resistance of Common Compounds
Dielectric Constants of Liquids and Solids
Emissivities of Common Materials
Properties of Common Flammable Gases
Properties of Common Toxic Gases
Properties of Saturated Steam
Refractive Index Table
Specific Gravities of Common Materials
Viscosities of Common Substances
488
494
492
488
488
493
491
485
489
490
489
Pipe and Wire Measurement
Dimensions of Flanges for Use with Steel Pipe
Pipe Sizes to Wall Thicknesses
Electrical Wire Attributes, AWG Gauge and Metric
484
484
484
484
Temperature Sensors and Transmitter Reference
Thermocouple Initial Material Tolerances
Thermocouple Type Color Codes
Wiring Diagrams for Thermocouples and Transmitters
495
495
495
495
Wireless Terminology
How to Wire Ethernet Cables
Wireless Antenna Terminology
Wireless Antenna Properties
496
497
498
498
Converting Fractions to Their Decimal Equivalents
1/64.................0.015625
1/32.................0.03125
3/64.................0.046875
1/16.................0.0625
5/64.................0.078125
3/32.................0.09375
7/64.................0.109375
1/8..................0.125
9/64.................0.140625
5/32.................0.15625
11/64...............0.171875
3/16.................0.1875
13/64...............0.203125
7/32.................0.21875
15/64...............0.234375
1/4..................0.25
17/64...............0.265625
9/32.................0.28125
19/64...............0.296875
5/16.................0.3125
21/64...............0.328125
11/32...............0.34375
23/64...............0.359375
3/8..................0.375
25/64...............0.390625
13/32...............0.40625
27/64...............0.421875
7/16.................0.4375
29/64...............0.453125
15/32...............0.46875
31/64...............0.484375
1/2..................0.5
33/64...............0.515625
17/32...............0.53125
35/64...............0.546875
9/16.................0.5625
37/64...............0.578125
19/32...............0.59375
39/64...............0.609375
5/8..................0.625
41/64...............0.640625
21/32...............0.65625
43/64...............0.671875
11/16...............0.6875
45/64...............0.703125
23/32...............0.71875
47/64...............0.734375
3/4..................0.75
49/64...............0.765625
25/32...............0.78125
51/64...............0.796875
13/16...............0.8125
53/64...............0.828125
27/32...............0.84375
55/64...............0.859375
7/8..................0.875
57/64...............0.890625
29/32...............0.90625
59/64...............0.921875
15/16...............0.9375
61/64...............0.953125
31/32...............0.96875
63/64...............0.984375
1....................1.0
Value-Added Services
506
Application Datasheets
Index by Brand
See
Page
Index and Reference
See
Page
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Due to manufacturer agreements, not all products are available in all geographic areas and markets.
CONVERSION
FACTORS
V 12.2013
482
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Conversion Factors
To Convert
To
Multiply By
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Value-Added Services
Index and Reference
Index and Reference
Atmospheres................................... Pounds per Square Inch................................... 14.697
........................................................ Kilograms per Square Inch.................................1.033
........................................................ Inches of Mercury..................................................29.92
........................................................ Millimeters of Mercury............................................ 760
........................................................ Inches of Water.......................................................... 407
........................................................ Feet of Water............................................................33.90
Barrels (Petroleum)....................... Gallons.............................................................................42
........................................................ Cubic Meters.......................................................0.15876
Barrels per day................................ Gallons per Minute............................................. 0.0292
°Celsuis.............................................. °Fahrenheit................................................(°C x 1.8) +32
Centimeters..................................... Inches...................................................................... 0.3937
........................................................ Feet........................................................................0.03281
........................................................ Meters.......................................................................... 0.01
........................................................ Yards......................................................................0.01094
Cubic Centimeters......................... Cubic Inches.......................................................0.06102
........................................................ Cubic Feet..................................................0.000035314
Cubic Feet........................................ Cubic Inches.............................................................1728
........................................................ Liters......................................................................28.3168
........................................................ Gallons..................................................................7.48055
........................................................ Barrels...................................................................0.17812
........................................................ Cubic Meters.................................................... 0.028317
Cubic Feet per Second................. Gallons per Minute...........................................448.833
Cubic Inches.................................... Cubic Centimeters.................................................16.39
........................................................ Cubic Feet............................................................0.00058
........................................................ Gallons............................................................... 0.004329
Cubic Meters................................... Cubic Inches.......................................................... 61025
........................................................ Pints.............................................................................1816
........................................................ Gallons.................................................................... 264.17
........................................................ Cubic Feet............................................................35.3165
........................................................ Barrels (Petroleum)............................................. 6.2989
........................................................ Cubic Yards...............................................................1.308
........................................................ Register Tons........................................................ 0.3532
Cubic Meters per Hour................ Gallons per Minute.....................................................4.4
Cubic Yards...................................... Cubic Meters.................................................... 0.764557
°Fahrenheit...................................... °Celsius..................................................(°F-32) x 0.5555
Feet..................................................... Meters..................................................................... 0.3048
........................................................ Yards........................................................................ 0.3333
........................................................ Centimeters.............................................................30.48
Feet of Water................................... Inches of Mercury..................................................0.882
........................................................ Pounds per Square Inch......................................0.433
........................................................ Inches of W.C......................................................... 11.987
Foot-Pounds.................................... BTU (British Thermal Units)......................... 0.001266
........................................................ Horsepower Hours.................................0.000000505
Gallons (US)..................................... Cubic Centimeters..................................................3785
........................................................ Cubic Feet............................................................0.13368
........................................................ Cubic Inches............................................................... 231
........................................................ Liters...........................................................................3.785
........................................................ Gallons (Imperial)...................................................0.833
Gallons (Imperial).......................... Cubic Inches............................................................277.4
........................................................ Gallons (US)........................................................... 1.2009
Gallons of Water............................. Pounds (at 70°F).....................................................8.328
Gallons per Minute (Liquid)....... Pounds per Hour Liquid (70°F)............. 500 x Sp. Gr.
Gallons per Minute....................... Cubic Feet per Second................................. 0.002228
Horsepower..................................... BTU per Minute.......................................................42.44
........................................................ Foot-Pounds per Minute................................... 33000
........................................................ Foot-Pounds per Second....................................... 550
........................................................ Kilowatts..............................................................0.74565
Horsepower (Boiler)...................... Pounds of Water per Hour Evaporation........... 34.5
........................................................ BTU per Hour......................................................... 33479
........................................................ Kilowatts...................................................................9.804
Horsepower Hours........................ BTU per Minute........................................................2547
To Convert
To
Multiply By
Inches................................................ Millimeters................................................................. 25.4
........................................................ Centimeters............................................................... 2.54
........................................................ Feet.......................................................................... 0.0833
........................................................ Meters..................................................................... 0.0254
........................................................ Yards......................................................................0.02778
Inches of Mercury.......................... Feet of Water............................................................1.133
........................................................ Pounds per Square Inch................................... 0.4912
........................................................ Atmospheres........................................................ 0.0334
........................................................ Kilograms per Square Centimeter................ 0.0345
Inches of Water............................... Pounds per Square Inch.................................0.03613
........................................................ Inches of Mercury.............................................0.07355
Kilograms......................................... Pounds.......................................................................2.205
........................................................ Short Tons (2,000 lbs.).................................. 0.001102
........................................................ Long Tons.......................................................0.0009842
........................................................ Ounces.......................................................................35.27
Kilograms per Minute.................. Pounds per Hour....................................................132.3
Kilograms/Sq. Centimeter.......... Pounds per Square Inch......................................14.22
........................................................ Atmospheres........................................................ 0.9678
........................................................ Inches of Mercury..................................................28.96
Kilogram Calories.......................... BTU.........................................................................3.96832
Kilometers........................................ Miles Nautical.....................................................0.53961
........................................................ Miles Statute.......................................................0.62137
Kilowatts........................................... Horsepower.............................................................1.341
Kilowatt Hours................................ BTU...............................................................................3415
Liters................................................... Cubic Centimeters..................................................1000
........................................................ Cubic Inches.......................................................61.0240
........................................................ Pints............................................................................1.816
........................................................ Quarts..................................................................... 1.0567
........................................................ Gallons.................................................................... 0.2642
........................................................ Cubic Feet......................................................... 0.035315
Liters per Hour................................ Gallons per Minute............................................. 0.0044
Meters................................................ Feet.............................................................................3.281
........................................................ Yards........................................................................ 1.0936
........................................................ Inches.........................................................................39.37
Pounds.............................................. Grams.........................................................................453.6
........................................................ Short Tons (2,000 lbs.)....................................... 0.0005
........................................................ Kilograms............................................................... 0.4536
........................................................ Metric Tons....................................................... 0.000454
........................................................ Ounces.............................................................................16
Pounds per Hour............................ Cubic Feet per Minute................................. 6.32/M.W.
Pounds per Hour Liquid.............. Gallons per Minute Liquid.................... 0.002/Sp. Gr.
Pounds per Hour Steam.............. BTU (Sea Level)........................................................1000
Pounds per Square Inch.............. Inches of Water.................................................... 27.684
........................................................ Feet of Water............................................................2.307
........................................................ Inches of Mercury..................................................2.036
........................................................ Kilograms per Square Centimeter................ 0.0703
........................................................ Atmospheres........................................................ 0.0680
........................................................ Millimeters of Mercury.........................................51.71
........................................................ Meters of Water................................................... 0.7037
Specific Gravity (Gas/Vapor)...... Molecular Weight (Gas/Vapor)..........................28.97
Square Centimeters...................... Square Inches....................................................... 0.1550
........................................................ Square Feet...................................................... 0.001076
Square Inches................................. Square Feet.........................................................0.00695
........................................................ Square Centimeters..............................................6.452
Tons (Short)..................................... Kilograms..................................................................907.2
Tons (Register)................................ Cubic Meters......................................................... 2.8316
Tons (Metric).................................... Short Tons.................................................................1.102
Tons (Metric) per Day................... Pounds per Hour...................................................... 91.8
Water (Cubic Feet)......................... Pounds (70°F)............................................................ 62.3
Yards................................................... Meters..................................................................... 0.9144
........................................................ Centimeters.............................................................91.44
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
CONVERSION
FACTORS
483
Thermometers
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Example
1 bar = 14.504 psi
Phys Atmosphere atm
Tech Atmosphere at
lb/inch2 psi
bar
Newton/m2 Pascals
cm H2O (+4°C)
inch H20 (+4°C)
Torr
cm Hg (0°C)
Inch Hg (0°C)
Physical
Atmosphere
atm
1
0.9678
0.068
0.9869
9.869x10-6
0.9678c10-3
2.458x10-3
1.3158x10-3
13.158x10-3
33.421x10-3
Technical
Atmosphere
lb/inch2
Newton/m2
cm H2O
at
psi
bar
Pascals
(+4°C)
1.0332
14.696
1.0133
101.33x103
1033.2
1
14.223
0.9807
98067
1000.03
0.0703
1
0.0689
6894.8
70.309
1.0197
14.504
1
105
1019.7
10.197x10-6 145.0x10-6
10-5
1
10.197x10-3
1x10-3
14.223x10-3 0.9806x10-3
98.064
1
-3
2.540x10
36.13x10-3 2.490x10-3
249.08
2.54
1.3594x10-3 19.34x10-3 1.333x10-3
133.32
1.3595
13.594x10-3
0.1934
13.33x103
1333.2
13.595
34.531x10-3
0.4912
33.86x10-3
3386.4
34.532
Inch H2O
(+4°C)
406.79
393.71
27.68
401.47
4.015x10-3
0.3937
1
0.5353
5.353
13.595
Torr
760
735.56
51.715
750.06
7.50x10-3
0.7355
1.868
1
10
25.4
cm Hg
(0°C)
76.0
73.556
5.172
75.0
0.75x10-3
73.55x10-3
0.1868
0.1
1
2.54
Inch Hg
(0°C)
29.92
28.96
2.036
29.53
0.2953x10-3
28.96x10-3
73.55x10-3
39.37x10-3
0.3937
1
Index and Reference
Conversion Table for Pressure Units (USA — Europe)
Value-Added Services
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Converting Vacuum Range Values
➝
➝
Europe
USA
1 GPSec
1 GPM
1 GPH
1 SCFSec
1 SCFM
1 SCFH
cm3/sec
3.788 x 103
63.09
1.0515
28.33 x 103
472.14
7.874
cm3/min
2.27 x 105
3.788 x 103
63.09
1.6989 x 106
28.329 x 103
472.14
cm3/h
13.64 x 106
2.27 x 105
3.788 x 103
102.04 x 106
1.6989 x 106
28.329 x 103
l/sec
3.788
0.0631
1.05 x 10-3
28.33
0.472
7.874 x 10-3
l/min
227
3.788
0.063
1.6989
28.329
0.472
l/h
13.64 x 103
227
3.788
102.04 x 103
1.6989 x 103
28.329
m3/sec
3.788 x 10-3
6.31 x 10-5
1.05 x 10-6
0.02833
4.72 x 10-4
7.874 x 10-6
m3/min
0.227
3.788 x 10-3
6.31 x 10-5
1.6989
0.02833
4.72 x 10-4
m3/h
13.64
0.227
3.788 x 10-3
102.04
1.6989
0.02833
Conversion Table for Flow Units (USA — Europe)
➝
USA
➝
Europe
1 cm3/sec
1 cm3/min
1 cm3/h
1l/sec
1l/min
1l/h
1 m3/sec
1 m3/min
1 m3/h
(USGPSec)
GPSec
0.264 x 10-3
4.403 x 10-6
7.338 x 10-8
0.26417
4.403 x 10-3
7.338 x 10-5
264.17
4.403
0.0733
(USGPMin)
GPM
1.585 x 10-2
2.6417 x 10-4
4.403 x 10-6
15.850
0.26417
4.403 x 10-3
15850.23
264.17
4.403
(USGPH)
GPH
0.951
1.585 x 10-2
2.6417 x 10-4
915.014
15.850
0.26417
9.51 x 105
1.585 x 104
264.17
(SCFSec)
SCFSec
3.53 x 10-5
5.886 x 10-7
9.8 x 10-9
0.035
5.886 x 10-4
9.8 x 10-6
35.31
0.588
9.8 x 10-3
(SCFMin)
SCFM
2.118 x 10-3
3.53 x 10-5
5.886 x 10-7
2.118
0.0353
5.886 x 10-4
2118.88
35.315
0.58858
(SCFH)
SCFH
0.127
2.118 x 10-3
3.53 x 10-5
127
2.118
0.0353
1.27 x 105
2118.88
35.315
Conversion Table for Water
1 Lb
1 Ft3
1 Gal
1 Lb/Hr
1 Ft3/Sec
1 GPM
0.016 Ft3
7.48 Gal
8.33 Lb
0.000004 Ft3/Sec
449 GPM
500 Lb/Hr
0.120 Gal
62.4 Lb.
0.134 Ft3
0.002 GPM
250,000 Lb/Hr
0.00223 Ft3/Sec
Index and Reference
Conversion Table for Flow Units (Europe — USA)
CONVERSION
FACTORS
V 12.2013
484
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Conversion Factors
Electrical Wire Attributes
Flanges for Use with Steel Pipe
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Value-Added Services
Flange
Nominal
Outside Bolt Circle
Pipe Size Diameter Diameter
Dimensions for 150 Lb. Flange
1”
4 1/4”
3 1/8”
1 1/4”
4 5/8”
3 1/2”
1 1/2”
5”
3 7/8”
2”
6”
4 3/4”
2 1/2”
7”
5 1/2”
3”
7 1/2”
6”
4”
9”
7 1/2”
6”
11”
9 1/2”
8”
13 1/2”
11 3/4”
10”
16”
14 1/4”
12”
19”
17”
Dimensions for 300 Lb. Flange
1”
4 7/8”
3 1/2”
1 1/4”
5 1/4”
3 7/8”
1 1/2”
6 1/8”
4 1/2”
2”
6 1/2”
5”
2 1/2”
7 1/2”
5 7/8”
3”
8 1/4”
6 5/8”
4”
10”
7 7/8”
6”
12 1/2”
1 5/8”
8”
15”
13”
10”
17 1/2”
15 1/4”
12”
20 1/2”
17 3/4”
Conductor Diameter
Number
of Bolts
Bolt Hole
Diameter
4
4
4
4
4
4
8
8
8
12
12
5/8”
5/8”
5/8”
3/4”
3/4”
3/4”
3/4”
7/8”
7/8”
1”
1”
4
4
4
8
8
8
8
12
12
16
16
3/4”
3/4”
7/8”
3/4”
7/8”
7/8”
7/8”
7/8”
1”
1 1/8”
1 1/4”
Pipe Size to Wall Thickness (Inches)
Index and Reference
Index and Reference
Pipe
Size
1/8
1/4
3/8
1/2
3/4
1
1-1/4
1-1/2
2
2-1/2
3
3-1/2
4
4-1/2
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
DN
6
8
10
15
20
25
32
40
50
65
80
90
100
115
125
150
—
200
—
250
300
350
400
450
500
550
600
OD
0.405
0.54
0.675
0.84
1.05
1.315
1.66
1.9
2.375
2.875
3.5
4
4.5
5
5.563
6.625
7.625
8.625
9.625
10.75
12.75
14
16
18
20
22
24
Wall Thickness
SCH 40
SCH 80
0.068
0.095
0.088
0.119
0.091
0.126
0.109
0.147
0.113
0.154
0.133
0.179
0.14
0.191
0.145
0.2
0.154
0.218
0.203
0.276
0.216
0.3
0.226
0.318
0.237
0.337
0.247
0.355
0.258
0.375
0.28
0.432
0.301
0.5
0.322
0.5
0.342
0.5
0.365
0.593
0.406
0.687
0.437
0.75
0.5
0.843
0.562
0.937
0.593
1.031
—
1.125
0.687
1.218
Ohms
AWG Gauge
Inches
mm
per
1000 Ft
0000
000
00
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
Metric 2.0
33
Metric 1.8
34
Metric 1.6
35
Metric 1.4
36
Metric 1.25
37
Metric 1.12
38
Metric 1
39
40
0.46
0.4096
0.3648
0.3249
0.2893
0.2576
0.2294
0.2043
0.1819
0.162
0.1443
0.1285
0.1144
0.1019
0.0907
0.0808
0.072
0.0641
0.0571
0.0508
0.0453
0.0403
0.0359
0.032
0.0285
0.0254
0.0226
0.0201
0.0179
0.0159
0.0142
0.0126
0.0113
0.01
0.0089
0.008
0.00787
0.0071
0.00709
0.0063
0.0063
0.0056
.00551
0.005
.00492
0.0045
.00441
0.004
.00394
0.0035
0.0031
11.684
10.40384
9.26592
8.25246
7.34822
6.54304
5.82676
5.18922
4.62026
4.1148
3.66522
3.2639
2.90576
2.58826
2.30378
2.05232
1.8288
1.62814
1.45034
1.29032
1.15062
1.02362
0.91186
0.8128
0.7239
0.64516
0.57404
0.51054
0.45466
0.40386
0.36068
0.32004
0.28702
0.254
0.22606
0.2032
0.200
0.18034
0.180
0.16002
0.16002
0.14224
.140
0.127
0.125
0.1143
0.112
0.1016
0.1000
0.0889
0.07874
0.049
0.0618
0.0779
0.0983
0.1239
0.1563
0.197
0.2485
0.3133
0.3951
0.4982
0.6282
0.7921
0.9989
1.26
1.588
2.003
2.525
3.184
4.016
5.064
6.385
8.051
10.15
12.8
16.14
20.36
25.67
32.37
40.81
51.47
64.9
81.83
103.2
130.1
164.1
169.39
206.9
207.5
260.9
260.9
329
339
414.8
428.2
523.1
533.8
659.6
670.2
831.8
1049
Max. Amps
per
km
for Chassis
Wiring
for
Power
Max
Frequency*
0.16072
0.202704
0.255512
0.322424
0.406392
0.512664
0.64616
0.81508
1.027624
1.295928
1.634096
2.060496
2.598088
3.276392
4.1328
5.20864
6.56984
8.282
10.44352
13.17248
16.60992
20.9428
26.40728
33.292
41.984
52.9392
66.7808
84.1976
106.1736
133.8568
168.8216
212.872
268.4024
338.496
426.728
538.248
555.61
678.632
680.55
855.752
855.752
1079.12
1114
1360
1404
1715
1750
2163
2198
2728
3440
380
328
283
245
211
181
158
135
118
101
89
73
64
55
47
41
35
32
28
22
19
16
14
11
9
7
4.7
3.5
2.7
2.2
1.7
1.4
1.2
0.86
0.7
0.53
0.51
0.43
0.43
0.33
0.33
0.27
0.26
0.21
0.20
0.17
0.163
0.13
0.126
0.11
0.09
302
239
190
150
119
94
75
60
47
37
30
24
19
15
12
9.3
7.4
5.9
4.7
3.7
2.9
2.3
1.8
1.5
1.2
0.92
0.729
0.577
0.457
0.361
0.288
0.226
0.182
0.142
0.113
0.091
0.088
0.072
0.072
0.056
0.056
0.044
0.043
0.035
0.034
0.0289
0.0277
0.0228
0.0225
0.0175
0.0137
125 Hz
160 Hz
200 Hz
250 Hz
325 Hz
410 Hz
500 Hz
650 Hz
810 Hz
1100 Hz
1300 Hz
1650 Hz
2050 Hz
2600 Hz
3200 Hz
4150 Hz
5300 Hz
6700 Hz
8250 Hz
11 kHz
13-k Hz
17 kHz
21 kHz
27 kHz
33 kHz
42 kHz
53 kHz
68 kHz
85 kHz
107 kHz
130 kHz
170 kHz
210 kHz
270 kHz
340 kHz
430 kHz
440 kHz
540 kHz
540 kHz
690 kHz
690 kHz
870 kHz
900 kHz
1100 kHz
1150 kHz
1350 kHz
1400 kHz
1750 kHz
1750 kHz
2250 kHz
2900 kHz
* For 100% Skin Depth for Solid Conductor Copper
Power Supply Capacities
Range
Current
Range
0 to 100% in mA 100 to 0%
35
9.6
65
40
10.4
60
45
11.2
55
50
12.0
50
55
12.8
45
60
13.6
40
65
14.4
35
Range
Current
Range
0 to 100% in mA 100 to 0%
70
15.2
30
75
16.0
25
80
16.8
20
85
17.6
15
90
18.4
10
95
19.2
5
100
20.0
0
The table shows the dewpoint temperature of the air in °F as a function of relative humidity. Example: At an air temperature of 86°F and a
relative humidity of 70%, the dewpoint temperature is 75.2°F.
30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80%
RH
RH
RH
RH
RH
RH
78.8 89.6 96.8 104.0 109.4 113.0
71.6 80.6 89.6 96.8 100.4 105.8
64.4 73.4 80.6 86.0 91.4 96.8
57.2 64.4 69.8 77.0 82.4 87.8
50.0 57.2 64.4 69.8 75.2 78.8
41.0 50.0 55.4 60.8 66.2 69.8
33.8 41.0 48.2 53.6 57.2 60.8
26.6 33.8 39.2 44.6 48.2 51.8
19.4 26.6 32.0 33.8 39.2 42.8
12.2 19.4 23.0 28.4 32.0 35.6
6.8 12.2 17.6 21.2 24.8 26.6
-0.4
5.0
8.6 12.2 17.6 19.4
-7.6 -2.2
1.4
5.0
8.6 12.2
-14.8 -9.4 -5.8 -2.2
1.4
3.2
-25.6 -20.2 -16.6 -13.0 -11.2 -7.6
-32.8 -29.2 -25.6 -22.0 -20.2 -16.6
90%
RH
118.4
109.4
100.4
91.4
82.4
73.4
64.4
55.4
46.4
37.4
28.4
21.2
12.2
5.0
-5.8
-14.8
100%
RH
122.0
113.0
104.0
95.0
86.0
77.0
68.0
59.0
50.0
41.0
32.0
23.0
14.0
5.0
-4.0
-13.0
e
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.
om
at Lesman.c
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center for mor
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es
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Volume Measurements
1 cm3
0.061 in3
3
1 in
16.39 cm3
3
1 ft
0.0283 m3
3
1m
1.308 yard3
3
1 yard
0.7646 m3
1 liter
1.0567 qt liquid
1 quart dry
1.101 liters
1 quart liquid
0.9463 liters
1 liter
1.0567 quarts
1 gallon
3.78541 liters
1 peck
8.810 liters
1 hectoliter
2.8375 bushels
1.728 in3
1 ft3
3
27 ft
1 yard3
3
128 ft
1 cord (wood)
2,150.42 in3
1 standard bu.
231 in3
1 U.S. std gallon
PSIG
Capacity and Volume Conversions
Dry Measurements
2 pints
1 quart
8 quarts
1 peck
4 pecks
1 bushel
Liquid Measurement
4 gills
1 pint
2 pints
1 quart
4 quarts
1 gallon
31.5 gallons
1 barrel
2.5
5
7.5
15
100 mA
200 mA
300 mA
600 mA
Watts
Milliamps
@ 24 VDC
25
30
50
120
240
1000 (1A)
1300 (1.3A)
2000 (2A)
5000 (5A)
10000 (10A)
Absolute
Pressure
(psia)
Steam
Temp.
(°F)
Specific
Total
Heat of
Heat of Volume of
Latent
Sat.
Steam Sat. Liquid
Heat
Liquid
(Ft3/lb)
(BTU/Lb) (BTU/Lb) (BTU/Lb)
29.743 0.08854
29.515
0.2
27.886
1.0
19.742
5.0
9.562
10.0
7.536
11.0
5.490
12.0
3.454
13.0
1.418
14.0
0.0 14.696
1.3
16.0
2.3
17.0
5.3
20.0
10.3
25.0
15.3
30.0
20.3
35.0
25.3
40.0
30.3
45.0
40.3
55.0
50.3
65.0
60.3
75.0
70.3
85.0
80.3
95.0
90.3
105.0
100.0
114.7
110.3
125.0
120.3
135.0
125.3
140.0
130.3
145.0
140.3
155.0
150.3
165.0
160.3
175.0
180.3
195.0
200.3
215.0
225.3
240.0
250.3
265.0
300.0
400.0
450.0
500.0
600.0
900.0
1200.0
1500.0
1700.0
2000.0
2500.0
2700.0
3206.2
32.00
53.14
101.74
162.24
193.21
197.75
201.96
205.88
209.56
212.00
216.32
219.44
227.96
240.07
250.33
259.28
267.25
274.44
287.07
297.97
307.60
316.25
324.12
331.36
337.90
344.33
350.21
353.02
355.76
360.50
365.99
370.75
379.67
387.89
397.37
406.11
417.33
444.59
456.28
467.01
486.21
531.98
567.22
596.23
613.15
635.82
668.13
679.55
705.40
0.00
21.21
69.70
130.13
161.17
165.73
169.96
173.91
177.61
180.07
184.42
187.56
196.16
208.42
218.82
227.91
236.03
243.36
256.30
267.50
277.43
286.39
294.56
302.10
308.80
315.68
321.85
324.82
327.70
333.24
338.53
343.57
353.10
361.91
372.12
381.60
393.84
424.00
437.20
449.40
471.60
526.60
571.70
611.60
636.30
671.70
730.60
756.20
902.70
Gauge
Pressure
Inches of Vacuum
20%
RH
66.2
59.0
51.8
46.4
37.4
32.0
24.8
19.4
12.2
5.0
-2.2
-7.6
-14.8
-22.0
-31.0
-40.0
Milliamps
@ 24 VDC
Properties of Saturated Steam
Dewpoint Temperature Calculation
Air
10%
Temp RH
122°F 46.4
113°F 39.2
104°F 33.8
95°F
28.4
86°F
21.2
77°F
17.6
68°F
10.4
59°F
3.2
50°F
-2.2
41°F
-9.4
32°F -14.8
23°F -20.2
14°F -29.2
5°F
-34.6
-4°F -43.6
-13°F -49.0
Watts
1075.8
1063.8
1036.3
1001.0
982.1
979.3
976.6
974.2
971.9
970.3
967.6
965.5
960.1
952.1
945.3
939.2
933.7
928.6
919.6
911.6
904.5
897.8
891.7
886.0
880.0
875.4
870.6
868.2
865.8
861.3
857.1
852.8
844.9
837.4
828.5
820.1
809.0
780.5
767.4
755.0
731.6
668.8
611.7
556.3
519.6
463.4
360.5
312.1
0.0
1075.8
1085.0
1106.0
1131.0
1143.3
1145.0
1146.6
1148.1
1149.5
1150.4
1152.0
1153.1
1156.3
1160.6
1164.1
1167.1
1169.7
1172.0
1175.9
1179.1
1181.9
1184.2
1186.2
1188.1
1188.8
1191.1
1192.4
1193.0
1193.5
1194.6
1195.6
1196.5
1198.0
1199.3
1200.6
1201.7
1202.8
1204.5
1204.6
1204.4
1203.2
1195.4
1183.4
1167.9
1155.9
1135.1
1091.1
1068.3
902.7
Specific
Volume
Sat.
Steam
(Ft3/lb)
0.096022 3306.00
0.016027 1526.00
0.016136 333.60
0.016407
73.52
0.016590
38.42
0.016620
35.14
0.016647
32.40
0.016674
30.06
0.016699
28.04
0.016715
26.80
0.016746
24.75
0.016768
23.39
0.016830
20.09
0.016922
16.30
0.017004
13.75
0.017078
11.90
0.017146
10.50
0.017209
9.40
0.017325
7.79
0.017429
6.66
0.017524
5.82
0.017613
5.17
0.017696
4.65
0.017775
4.23
0.017850
3.88
0.017922
3.59
0.017991
3.33
0.018024
3.22
0.018057
3.11
0.018121
2.92
0.018183
2.75
0.018244
2.60
0.018360
2.34
0.018470
2.13
0.018602
1.92
0.018728
1.74
0.018896
1.54
0.019340
1.16
0.019547
1.03
0.019748
0.93
0.02013
0.77
0.02123
0.50
0.02232
0.36
0.02346
0.28
0.02428
0.24
0.02565
0.19
0.02860
0.13
0.03027
0.11
0.05053
0.05
Thermometers
Range
Current
Range
0 to 100% in mA 100 to 0%
0
4.0
100
5
4.8
95
10
5.6
90
15
6.4
85
20
7.2
80
25
8.0
75
30
8.8
70
485
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Converting % Range to Current
CONVERSION
FACTORS
Value-Added Services
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index and Reference
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Index and Reference
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
RATINGS &
STANDARDS
V 12.2013
486
Lesman Instrument Company
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Explaining Rating Standards
Comparing Specific Applications of NEMA-Rated Enclosures in Nonhazardous Locations
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Value-Added Services
Descriptions
Incidental contact with enclosed equipment
Falling dirt
Falling liquids and light splashing
Dust, lint, fibers, and flyings*
Hosedown and splashing water
Oil and coolant seepage
Oil or coolant spraying and splashing
Corrosive agents
Occasional temporary submersion
Occasional prolonged submersion
Incidental contact with enclosed equipment
Rain, snow, and sleet**
Sleet***
Windblown dust
Hosedown
Corrosive agents
Occasional temporary submersion
Occasional prolonged submersion
Outdoor NonIndoor
hazardous locations Non-hazardous locations
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
1
•
•
2
•
•
•
3
3R
3S
4
•
•
•
•
•
4X
•
•
•
•
•
5
•
•
6
•
•
•
•
•
•
6P
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
12
•
•
•
•
12K
•
•
•
•
13
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
* Nonhazardous materials, not considered the Class III type ignitable fibers or combustible flyings.
** External operating mechanisms are not required to be operable when enclosure is ice-covered.
11
•
•
•
*** External operating mechanisms are operable when enclosure is ice-covered.
Comparing NEMA and IEC Enclosure Ratings
Though the two systems seem to parallel each other, there is no direct conversion between them. The following shows the highest IEC rating equivalent to the
corresponding NEMA type. It should not be used to convert IEC to NEMA types.
Index and Reference
Index and Reference
NEMA
Type NEMA Definition
General Purpose: Protects against dust, light, and indirect splashing but is
1
not dust-tight; primarily prevents contact with live parts; used indoors and
under normal atmospheric conditions.
Drip-tight: Similar to Type 1, adding drip shields; used where condensation
2
may be severe (e.g., cooling rooms and laundries)
3, Weather-resistant: Protects against weather hazards such as rain and sleet;
3S used outdoors on docks, in construction work, and in tunnels and subways.
Intended for outdoor use: Provides a degree of protection against falling
3R rain and ice formation. Meets rod entry, rain, external icing, and rust-resistance design tests.
Watertight/weatherproof: Must exclude at least 65 GPM water from 1”
4,
nozzle, delivered from a distance no less than 10 feet for five minutes. Used
4X
outdoors on docks, in dairies, and in breweries.
Dust-tight: Provided with gaskets or equivalent to exclude dust; used in
5
high-dust atmospheres (steel mills and cement plants).
6, Submersible in water: For submerged operation under specified pressures
6P and time; used in quarries, mines, and manholes.
Hazardous: For indoor use in Class I, Groups A–D environments, as defined
7
in the NEC.
Hazardous: For indoor and outdoor use in locations classified as Class I,
8
Groups A–D environments, as defined in the NEC.
Hazardous: For indoor and outdoor use in locations classified as Class II, Div
9
1, Groups E–G environments (combustible dust), as defined in the NEC.
MSHA Explosion-Proof: Meets the requirements of the Mine Safety and
Health Administration, 30 CFR Part 18 (1978). Units designed to contain gas
10
or vapor explosions within the enclosure and prevent ignition of the surrounding atmosphere.
General Purpose: Protects against corrosive effects of liquids and gases.
11 Meets drip- and corrosion-resistance tests. Acid- or fume-resistant. Provides
for immersion of enclosed equipment in oil.
General Purpose: Intended for indoor industrial use, provides some protec12,
tion against dust, falling dirt, and dripping non-corrosive liquids. Meets drip-,
12K
dust-, and rust-resistance tests.
General Purpose: Primarily used to provide protection against dust, spray13 ing of water, oil, and non-corrosive coolants. Meets oil exclusion and dustresistance design tests.
IEC
Class
IP10
IP11
IP54
IP14
IP56
IP52
IP67
—
—
—
—
—
IP52
IP54
IEC/IP Enclosures and Classification Designations
IEC 529 outlines a classification system for the sealing effectiveness of electrical equipment enclosures. It uses a designation
of IP(ab), where (a) denotes the degree of protection against
contact and ingress of solid bodies and (b) denotes the degree
of protection against ingress of water.
(a) Solids Protection
0 No special protection.
1 Protection against ingress of solid objects, diameter >50mm.
2 Protection against penetration by solid objects, diam. >12mm.
3 Protection against ingress of solid objects, diameter >2.5mm.
4 Protection against ingress of solid objects, diameter >1 mm.
5Dust-protected.
6Dust-tight.
(b) Water Protection
0 No special protection.
1 Protection against dripping water falling vertically.
2 Protection against dripping water falling at 75° to 90° angles.
3 Protection against water being sprayed.
4 Protection against water being splashed.
5 Protection against water jets.
6 Protection against heavy seas.
7 Protection against the effects of immersion.
8 Protection against indefinite immersion.
Enclosure
NEMA 1
NEMA 2
NEMA 3
NEMA 3R
NEMA 3S
NEMA 4
NEMA 4X
NEMA 6
NEMA 12
NEMA 13
IP10
•
IP30
IP32
IP55
IP64
IP65
IP66
IP67
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Note: NEMA standards meet or exceed IEC standards; therefore, the conversion does
not work in the opposite direction.
What Is a Safety Integrity Level?
As a way of standardizing enclosure performance, worldwide organizations
use rating systems to identify an enclosure’s ability to resist external environmental influences.
NEMA, UL, and CSA are standard-writing organizations commonly recognized in North America. UL and CSA both require enclosure testing by qualified
evaluators. NEMA does not require independent testing and leaves compliance
completely up to the manufacturer.
A measure of the amount of risk reduction provided by hardware or systems,
based on a probability analysis of the failure of a device. SIL requirements prevent systematic failures (bugs) from being designed into a device. They can be
met by establishing a rigorous development process, or by establishing that the
device has sufficient operating history to argue that it has been proven in use.
NEMA
Type
Agency Approvals and Safety Ratings
1
2
3
Underwriters
Laboratories Inc.
(UL 50 and UL508)
Indoor use, primarily to provide
protection against contact with the
enclosed equipment and against a
limited amount of falling dirt.
Indoor use to provide a degree of
protection against limited amounts
of falling water and dirt.
Outdoor use to provide a degree of
protection against windblown dust
and rain; undamaged by the formation of ice on the enclosure.
3R Outdoor use to provide a degree
of protection against falling rain;
undamaged by the formation of ice
on the enclosure.
4
Either indoor or outdoor use to
provide a degree of protection
against falling rain, splashing water,
and hose-directed water, undamaged by the formation of ice on the
enclosure.
4X* Either indoor or outdoor use to
provide a degree of protection
against falling rain, splashing water,
and hose-directed water; undamaged by the formation of ice on the
enclosure; resists corrosion.
6
Canadian Standards
Association (Standard
C22.2 No. 94)
General purpose enclosure.
Protects against accidental contact
with live parts.
Indoor use to provide a degree of
protection against dripping and
light splashing of non-corrosive
liquids and falling dirt.
Indoor or outdoor use, provides a
degree of protection against rain,
snow, and windblown dust; undamaged by the external formation of
ice on the enclosure.
Indoor or outdoor use, provides a
degree of protection against rain
and snow; undamaged by the
external formation of ice on the
enclosure.
Indoor or outdoor use, provides a
degree of protection against rain,
snow, windblown, dust, splashing,
and hose-directed water; undamaged by the external formation of
ice on the enclosure.
Indoor or outdoor use, provides a
degree of protection against rain,
snow, windblown, dust, splashing,
and hose-directed water; undamaged by the external formation
of ice on the enclosure, resists
corrosion.
Indoor or outdoor use; provides a
degree of protection against the
entry of water during temporary
submersion.
Indoor or outdoor use to provide a
degree of protection against entry
of water during temporary submersion at a limited depth; undamaged
by the formation of ice on the
enclosure.
12 Indoor use to provide a degree of Indoor use; provides a degree of
protection against dust, dirt, fiber
protection against circulating dust,
flyings, dripping water, and external lint, fibers, and flyings; dripping and
condensation of non-corrosive
light splashing of non-corrosive liqliquids.
uids; not provided with knockouts.
13 Indoor use to provide a degree
Indoor use; provides a degree of
of protection against lint, dust
protection against circulating dust,
seepage, external condensation
lint, fibers and flyings, seepage and
and spraying of water, oil, and non- spraying of non-corrosive liquids,
corrosive liquids.
including oils and coolants.
* 4X rating only indicates that an enclosure can resist corrosion. It does not provide
information on how a specific corrosive agent will affect a given enclosure material.
Safety
Integrity Level
SIL4
SIL3
SIL 2
SIL 1
Safety
> 99.99%
99.9% to 99.99%
99% to 99.9%
90% to 99%
Probability of
Risk Reduction
Failure on Demand
Factor
0.001% to 0.01%
100,000 to 10,000
0.01% to 0.1%
10,000 to 1,000
0.1% to 1.0%
1,000 to 100
1.0% to 10%
100 to 10
Understanding Class/Division/Zone
Hazardous Location Classification Methodology
In the last several years, the standards and language for classifying hazardous
locations has changed. The following charts will help explain how to move from
older Class/Division/Group ratings to their equivalent Class/Zone/Group ratings.
Area Classification Table
Continuous Hazard
Intermittent Hazard
Zone 0
Zone 1
Division 1
Hazard Under
Abnormal Conditions
Zone 2
Division 2
Division Atmospheric Groups
Typical Hazard
Acetylene
Hydrogen
Ethylene
Propane
Division Groups
A
B
C
D
Zone Groups
IIC
IIB
IIA
Classes (Defining the material risk)
Class I
Class II
Class III
Area made hazardous due to the presence of flammable or
combustible gas.
Area made hazardous due to the presence of flammable or
combustible dusts.
Area made hazardous due to the presence of flammable or
combustible fibers or flyings.
Divisions/Zones (Addresses the risk, probability, and frequency the
material is present in hazardous concentrations)
Div 1
Explosive atmosphere is normally present, either continuously or
intermittently.
Div 2
Explosive atmosphere is present abnormally only.
Zone 0 Gaseous hazard is normally present, continuously.
Zone 1 Gaseous hazard is normally present, intermittently.
Zone 2 Gaseous hazard is present only in abnormal circumstances.
Zone 20 Dust hazard is normally present, continuously.
Zone 21 Dust hazard is normally present, intermittently.
Zone 22 Dust hazard is present only in abnormal circumstances.
Groups (Identifies the possible gas hazards)
Group A (IIC)
Group B (IIC)
Group C (IIB)
Group D (IIA)
Group E
Group F
Group G
Acetylene
Hydrogen
Ethylene
Propane
Metal (conductive) dusts
Carbon-rich dusts
Grain dusts
Thermometers
487
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
RATINGS &
STANDARDS
Value-Added Services
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index and Reference
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Index and Reference
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
MEDIA
PROPERTIES
V 12.2013
488
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Media Properties
Dielectric Constants for Common Materials
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Value-Added Services
Index and Reference
Temp.Dielectric
Material
°F/°CConstant
Acetal ....................................................................................3.6
Acetoaldehyde ............................................................... 22.2
Acetoanilide, granules ....................................................2.8
Acetone.............................................................................. 21.4
Acetyl methyl hexyl ketone ...........................................28
Acrylic resin ............................................................... 2.7 to 6
Alcohol .......................................................................16 to 31
Aluminium carbonate .....................................................5.6
Aluminium chlorate .........................................................5.1
Aluminium ether ..............................................................3.1
Aluminium powder .............................................1.6 to 1.8
Ammonia..................................... -27/-332........................2.4
Ash (flyash) .............................................................1.9 to 2.6
Bakelite .....................................................................4.5 to 5.5
Barley, powder .......................................................3.4 to 4.0
Benzene................................................................................2.3
Benzil..............................................202/94..........................13
Bleaching powder ................................................1.8 to 2.0
Bromine................................................................................3.1
Butane............................................. 30/-1...........................1.4
Calcium carbonate ...............................................1.8 to 2.0
Carbon dioxide ..................................................................1.6
Carbon tetrachloride........................................................2.2
Castor oil.........................................60/16..........................4.7
Cellophane ................................................................. 7 to 7.7
Celluloid ...............................................................................4.1
Cellulose ..............................................................................6.7
Chlorine........................................... 32/0............................... 2
Chlorine ...............................................................................2.1
Chloroform..................................... 32/0............................5.5
Coal ............................................................................1.2 to 1.8
Coke, powder .........................................................1.1 to 2.2
Colophonium .........................................................2.5 to 2.6
Corn ...........................................................................2.3 to 2.6
Cyclohexane........................................................................... 2
Dimethylheptane..............................................................1.9
Dimethylpentane................................................................. 1
Dolomite ..............................................................................8.8
Dowtherm......................................70/21..........................3.3
Temp.Dielectric
Material
°F/°CConstant
Ethanol............................................77/25....................... 24.3
Ethyl acetate........................................................................6.4
Ethyl alcohol ........................................................................23
Ethyl benzene.....................................................................2.5
Ethyl ether............................................................................4.3
Ethyl toluene ......................................................................2.2
Ethylene chloride........................................................... 10.5
Ethylene glycol ...................................................................37
Ferric oxide .............................................................1.4 to 1.8
Fluorine resin ................................................................2 to 8
Formic acid....................................60/16....................... 58.5
Freon .....................................................................................2.2
Freon 12..........................................70/21..........................2.4
Glass raw material ................................................2.0 to 2.5
Glass-silicon plate .................................................3.5 to 4.2
Glycerine ...............................................................................47
Glycol .....................................................................................36
Heptane................................................................................1.9
Hexane..................................................................................1.9
Hydrogen chloride......................82/28..........................4.6
Iodine.............................................224/107...................... 118
Kerosene.........................................70/21..........................1.8
Manganese dioxide .............................................5.0 to 5.2
Margarine, liquid ...................................................2.8 to 3.2
Melamine resin ................................................... 4.7 to 10.2
Methanol........................................77/25....................... 33.6
Methyl acetate ...................................................................7.3
Methyl alcohol................................................................. 33.1
Methyl ether..................................78/26............................. 5
Methyl salycilate .................................................................. 9
Mica ...........................................................................4.5 to 7.5
Napthalene..........................................................................2.5
Nylon ................................................................................4 to 5
Octane...................................................................................... 2
Oil, mineral ..............................................................2.2 to 2.4
Oils, petroleum ......................................................1.8 to 2.2
Oils, vegetable .......................................................2.5 to 3.5
Olefin ....................................................................................3.2
Oleic acid .............................................................................2.5
Index and Reference
Emissivities of Common Materials
MaterialEmissivity
Aluminum, polished.............................0.05
Aluminum, rough surface...................0.07
Aluminum, strongly oxidized............0.25
Asbestos board......................................0.96
Asbestos fabric.......................................0.78
Asbestos paper.......................................0.94
Asbestos slate.........................................0.96
Brass, dull, tarnished.............................0.22
Brass, polished........................................0.03
Brick, common........................................0.85
Brick, glazed, rough...............................0.85
Brick, refractory, rough.........................0.94
Bronze, porous, rough..........................0.55
Bronze, polished.....................................0.10
Carbon, purified.....................................0.80
Cast iron, rough casting......................0.81
Cast iron, polished.................................0.21
Charcoal, powdered.............................0.96
Chromium, polished.............................0.10
Unless stated otherwise, values are measured at 68°F
MaterialEmissivity
Clay, fired..................................................0.91
Concrete...................................................0.54
Copper, polished,...................................0.01
Copper, commercial burnished........0.07
Copper, oxidized....................................0.65
Copper, oxidized to black...................0.88
Electrical tape, black plastic...............0.95
Enamel (80.6°F)......................................0.90
Formica.....................................................0.93
Frozen soil................................................0.93
Glass...........................................................0.92
Glass, frosted...........................................0.96
Gold, polished.........................................0.02
Ice................................................................0.97
Iron, hot rolled........................................0.77
Iron, oxidized...........................................0.74
Iron, sheet galvanized, burnished....0.23
Iron, sheet, galvanized, oxidized.......0.28
Iron, shiny, etched..................................0.16
Temp.Dielectric
Material
°F/°CConstant
Paraffin .....................................................................1.9 to 2.5
Pentane.................................................................................1.8
Phenol............................................118/47.........................9.9
Phenolic resin ............................................................ 4 to 12
Phosgene........................................ 32/0............................4.7
Polyacetal resin .....................................................2.6 to 3.7
Polyamide resin .....................................................2.5 to 2.6
Polycarbonate resin ................................................ 2.9 to 3
Polyester resin .......................................................2.8 to 4.5
Polyethylene resin ................................................2.2 to 2.6
Polystrene resin .....................................................2.2 to 2.6
Propane............................................ 32/0............................1.6
Pyridine.............................................................................. 12.5
Rubber, raw .............................................................2.1 to 2.7
Rubber, vulcanized ...............................................2.0 to 3.5
Sand .................................................................................3 to 5
Sesame, powder ....................................................1.8 to 2.0
Silica sand ................................................................2.5 to 3.5
Silicon ...................................................................................2.4
Silicon resin ................................................................ 3.5 to 5
Silicon tetrachloride ........................................................2.4
Soap, powder .........................................................1.2 to 1.5
Sodium carbonate ...............................................5.3 to 8.4
Sodium nitrate ...................................................................5.2
Soybean ...................................................................1.8 to 2.0
Steatite .....................................................................5.3 to 6.8
Styrene (styrol resin)..................77/25..........................2.4
Sugar ........................................................................................ 3
Sulfur monoxide ...............................................................4.8
Sulfur, powder ........................................................1.5 to 1.8
Teflon ....................................................................................... 2
Toluene.................................................................................2.4
Trichloethylene .................................................................3.4
Urea .......................................................................................3.5
Urethane ..................................................................6.5 to 7.1
Vinyl ether............................................................................3.9
Water ......................................................................................80
Wheat, powder ......................................................... 2.5 to 3
Xylene....................................................................................2.4
Emissivities of most materials are measured at 32°F (0°C)
but do not differ significantly at room temperature.
MaterialEmissivity
Iron, wrought, polished.......................0.28
Lacquer, Bakelite....................................0.93
Lacquer, black, dull................................0.97
Lacquer, black, shiny.............................0.87
Lacquer, white.........................................0.87
Lampblack...............................................0.96
Lead, gray.................................................0.28
Lead, oxidized.........................................0.63
Lead, red, powdered.............................0.93
Lead, shiny................................................0.08
Mercury, pure..........................................0.10
Nickel, on cast iron................................0.05
Nickel, pure polished............................0.05
Paint, silver finish (77°F).......................0.31
Paint, oil, average...................................0.94
Paper, black, shiny..................................0.90
Paper, black, dull.....................................0.94
Paper, white.............................................0.90
Platinum, pure, polished.....................0.08
MaterialEmissivity
Porcelain, glazed....................................0.92
Quartz........................................................0.93
Rubber.......................................................0.93
Shellac, black, dull..................................0.91
Shellac, black, shiny...............................0.82
Snow..........................................................0.80
Steel, galvanized....................................0.28
Steel, oxidized strongly.......................0.88
Steel, rolled freshly................................0.24
Steel, rough surface..............................0.96
Steel, rusty red........................................0.69
Steel, sheet, nickel plated...................0.11
Steel, sheet, rolled..................................0.56
Tar paper...................................................0.92
Tin, burnished.........................................0.05
Tungsten...................................................0.05
Water..........................................................0.98
Zinc, sheet................................................0.20
489
Refractive Indices of Common Materials
Refractive
MaterialIndex
Acetaldehyde..................................... 1.3316
Acetic Acid.......................................... 1.3717
Acetic Anhydride.............................. 1.3904
Acetone................................................ 1.3588
Acetonitrile......................................... 1.3441
Acrylic Acid......................................... 1.4224
Aluminum................................................1.39
Amyl Acetate...................................... 1.4012
Aniline.................................................. 1.5863
Beer..........................................................1.345
Benzaldehyde.................................... 1.5463
Benzene............................................... 1.5011
Benzyl Alcohol................................... 1.5396
Benzylamine....................................... 1.5401
Bromoaniline (m).................................1.626
Butyl Acetate...................................... 1.3951
Butyl Alcohol...................................... 1.3993
Butyl Chloride (n).............................. 1.4021
Butylene............................................... 1.3962
Carbon Disulfide............................... 1.6295
Carbon Tetrachloride...................... 1.4631
Carbonated Beverages..........1.34 - 1.356
Chlorine, Liquid....................................1.385
Chlorobenzene.................................. 1.5248
Chloroform......................................... 1.4464
Copper.......................................................2.43
Cranberry Juice (25%) .......................1.351
Cycloheptane........................................1.444
Cyclohexane....................................... 1.4262
Cyclohexanone.................................. 1.4503
Cyclopentane..................................... 1.4065
Decane...............................................1.41203
Decane......................................................1.41
Dichlorobenzene (o)....................... 1.5514
Dichloromethane............................. 1.4241
Refractive
MaterialIndex
Di-Ethyl Benzene.............................. 1.4955
Di-Ethyl Ether..................................... 1.3497
Dimethyl Acetamide....................... 1.4384
Dimethyl Benzene............................ 1.4972
Dimethyl Sulfoxide.......................... 1.4793
Dimethylaniline................................. 1.5582
Dodecane.................................................1.41
Ethanol......................................................1.36
Ethyl Acetate...................................... 1.3722
Ethyl Alcohol...................................... 1.3624
Ethyl Benzene.................................... 1.4952
Ethyl Bromide.................................... 1.4239
Ethyl Ether........................................... 1.3524
Ethylene Dichloride......................... 1.4448
Ethylene Glycol ................................. 1.4627
Formamide......................................... 1.4453
Formic Acid......................................... 1.3714
Freon R-11................................................1.37
Freon R-12................................................1.29
Freon R-22................................................1.26
Furan..........................................................1.47
Glycerol (Glycerin)............................ 1.4729
Glycol.................................................... 1.4318
Gold............................................................0.47
Heptane............................................... 1.3876
Hexane................................................. 1.3749
Hexanol................................................ 1.4135
Hydrazine.................................................1.47
Hydrogen Chloride.............................1.256
Ice..............................................................1.309
Isobutyl Alcohol................................ 1.3959
Iso-Octane........................................... 1.3914
Isopentane.............................................1.355
Isopropyl Acetate................................1.377
Isopropyl Alcohol............................. 1.3772
Refractive
MaterialIndex
Isopropyl Myristate.......................... 1.4332
Lead Tetraethyl.................................. 1.5198
Menthol..................................................1.458
Methyl Alcohol.................................. 1.3288
Methyl Ethyl Ketone........................ 1.3788
Methyl Iodide..................................... 1.5293
Methyl Isoamyl Ketone......................1.407
Methyl Isobutyl Ketone.................. 1.3957
Methyl n-Propyl Ketone................. 1.3901
Methyl t-Butyl Ether........................ 1.3689
Methylacetate.................................... 1.3594
Nickel.........................................................1.08
Nitric Acid...............................................1.397
Nitrobenzene..................................... 1.5529
Nitromethane.................................... 1.3818
Nitrotoluene(o)................................. 1.5474
N-Methylpyrolidone.............................1.47
Nonane................................................. 1.4055
Octane.................................................. 1.3975
Oil, vegetable (50° C)............................1.47
Pentane................................................ 1.3575
Perchloroethylene............................ 1.5053
Petroleum Ether...................................1.365
Phenol.................................................. 1.5425
Platinum...................................................2.33
Pronanol(iso)...................................... 1.3776
Propane.....................................................1.34
Propyl Alcohol (n)............................. 1.3856
Propyl Bromide.................................. 1.4341
Propylene.................................................1.36
Propylene Carbonate.........................1.421
Propylene Glycol (100%)...................1.433
Pyridine................................................ 1.5102
Silver...........................................................1.35
Styrene................................................. 1.5434
Refractive
MaterialIndex
Sulfuric Acid..........................................1.834
Tetrahydrofuran................................ 1.4072
Titanium....................................................2.16
Toluene................................................ 1.4969
Toluidine(o)........................................ 1.5728
Trichlorofluoroethane (Freon 113).. 1.36
Tricholoroethane.............................. 1.4377
Triethylamine........................................1.401
Trifluoroacetic Acid.............................1.285
Turpentine.............................................1.472
Turpentine (wood)................................1.47
Water........................................................1.333
Water (0° C).......................................1.33346
Water (100° C)..................................1.31766
Xylene(o).............................................. 1.5055
Brix Scale (% Sugar Content)
0% Brix.................................................. 1.3330
5% Brix.................................................. 1.3403
10% Brix............................................... 1.3479
15% Brix............................................... 1.3557
20% Brix............................................... 1.3639
25% Brix............................................... 1.3723
30% Brix............................................... 1.3811
35% Brix............................................... 1.3902
40% Brix............................................... 1.3997
45% Brix............................................... 1.4096
50% Brix............................................... 1.4200
55% Brix............................................... 1.4307
60% Brix............................................... 1.4418
65% Brix............................................... 1.4532
70% Brix............................................... 1.4651
75% Brix............................................... 1.4774
80% Brix............................................... 1.4901
85% Brix............................................... 1.5003
Thermometers
MEDIA
PROPERTIES
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Value-Added Services
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Index and Reference
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Viscosity Centistokes= Centipoise/Specific Gravity (SG)
Conversion: Centipoise= 0.22 x SG x SSU - (180 x SG/SSU)
SSU= Viscosity in Saybolt Seconds Universal
Approx.
Medium @68°F
Viscosity
Ketchup...........................................................................................................................50,000 cP
Light machine oil...............................................................................................................102 cP
Mercury............................................................................................................................. 1.554 cP
Methyl Alcohol............................................................................................................... 0.597 cP
Molasses...................................................................................................................100,000.0 cP
Neon............................................................................................................................. 0.031 11 cP
Olive Oil ...............................................................................................................................84.0 cP
Pancake Syrup................................................................................................................ 2,500 cP
Peanut Butter............................................................................................................. 250,000 cP
SAE 10 Motor Oil............................................................................................................ 100.0 cP
Soybean Oil........................................................................................................................69.3 cP
Tar or Pitch....................................................................................................30,000,000,000 cP
Air  @ 18°C.....................................................................................................................0.018 2 cP
Air @ 229°C................................................................................................................ 0.026 38 cP
Liquid Air @ -192.3°C.................................................................................................... 0.173 cP
Water.................................................................................................................................. 1.002 cP
Water @ 99°C.................................................................................................................0.2848 cP
Water Vapor @100°C....................................................................................................... 0.125 5
Index and Reference
Viscosities of Common Substances
Approx.
Medium @68°F
Viscosity
Ammonia.................................................................................................................... 0.009 82 cP
Argon........................................................................................................................... 0.022 17 cP
Benzene............................................................................................................................ 0.652 cP
Benzyl Ether........................................................................................................................5.33 cP
Caster Oil..............................................................................................................................986 cP
Chloroform.........................................................................................................................0.58 cP
Chocolate Syrup...........................................................................................................25,000 cP
Confectioners’ Glucose.................................................................................... 1,000,000.0 cP
Corn Syrup................................................................................................................. 10,000.0 cP
Ether................................................................................................................................... 0.233 cP
Ethyl Alcohol........................................................................................................................ 1.2 cP
Glycerin............................................................................................................................. 1,490 cP
Glycol....................................................................................................................................19.9 cP
Heavy Machine Oil............................................................................................................233 cP
Honey..............................................................................................................................10,000 cP
Hydrogen......................................................................................................................0.008 6 cP
Kerosene..............................................................................................................................10.0 cP
MEDIA
PROPERTIES
V 12.2013
490
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Media Properties
Specific Gravities for Common Materials
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Value-Added Services
Index and Reference
Index and Reference
Fluid.......................................... Temp °F............. SG
Acetaldehyde CH3CHO........................61..................0.790
Acetaldehyde CH3CHO........................68..................0.760
Acetic acid, 10%......................................59..................1.014
Acetic acid, 50%......................................59..................1.061
Acetic acid, 80%......................................59..................1.075
Acetic acid, concentrated....................59..................1.055
Acetic acid 5%, vinegar.........................59..................1.006
Acetic acid anhydride (CH3COO)2O.59.................1.087
Acetone......................................................77..................0.787
Acetone CH3COCH3..............................68..................0.792
Acetylene, liquid...................................-121................0.620
Acetylene, liquid.....................................70..................0.380
Adipic acid......................................................................0.720
Alcohol, allyl.............................................68..................0.855
Alcohol, butyl-n.......................................68..................0.810
Alcohol, ethyl (grain).............................68..................0.789
Alcohol, ethyl (grain)........................... 104................0.772
Alcohol, methyl (wood)........................68..................0.790
Alcohol, methyl (methanol)................77..................0.791
Alcohol, propyl........................................68..................0.804
Aluminum sulfate 36% solution........60..................1.055
Ammonia....................................................0...................0.662
Ammonia (aqua).....................................77..................0.826
Aniline........................................................68..................1.022
Auto crankcase oil SAE-5W-50W.......60.......... 0.88-0.94
Auto gear oil SAE-75W-150W............60.......... 0.88-0.94
Beer.............................................................60..................1.010
Benzene (benzol) C6H6........................32..................0.899
Benzene (benzol) C6H6........................60..................0.885
Benzil..........................................................77..................1.084
Bone oil......................................................60..................0.918
Boric acid H3BO3..................................46.4................1.014
Bromine.....................................................32..................2.900
Bromine.....................................................77..................3.120
Butane, liquid...........................................77..................0.601
Butane-n....................................................60..................0.584
Butyric acid...............................................68..................0.959
Calcium chloride 25%...........................60..................1.230
Calcium chloride 5%.............................65..................1.040
Caproic acid..............................................77..................0.924
Carbolic acid (phenol)...........................65..................1.080
Carbon disulfide CS2.............................32..................1.293
Carbon disulfide CS2.............................68..................1.263
Carbon tetrachloride CCl4...................68..................1.594
Carene........................................................77..................0.860
Castor Oil...................................................68..................0.960
Castor Oil................................................. 104................0.950
China wood oil........................................60..................0.943
Chloride.....................................................77..................1.560
Chlororm...................................................77..................1.469
Citric acid...................................................77..................1.665
Coconut Oil...............................................59..................0.927
Cod liver oil...............................................59......0.920-0.925
Corn oil.......................................................60..................0.924
Cotton Seed Oil.......................................59..................0.929
Creosote.....................................................59..................1.070
Cresol..........................................................77..................1.027
Crude oil 32.6° API..................................60..................0.832
Crude oil 32.6° API................................ 130................0.840
Crude oil 35.6° API..................................60..................0.847
Crude oil 35.6° API................................ 130................0.824
Crude oil 40° API.....................................60..................0.825
Crude oil 40° API................................... 130................0.805
Fluid.......................................... Temp °F............. SG
Crude oil 48° API.....................................60..................0.790
Crude oil 48° API................................... 130................0.760
Crude oil Salt creek................................60..................0.843
Crude oil Salt creek.............................. 130................0.820
Crude oil, California................................60..................0.918
Crude oil, Mexican..................................60..................0.976
Crude oil, Texas........................................60..................0.876
Cumene......................................................77..................0.862
Decane-n...................................................68..................0.730
Diesel Fuel Oil 2D/3D/4D/5D.............60.......... 0.81, 0.96
Diethyl ether............................................68..................0.714
Diethylene glycol....................................60..................1.120
Diphenylamine..............................................................1.160
Dodecane..................................................77..................0.757
Dowtherm.................................................77..................1.056
Ethane....................................................-128.2..............0.572
Ether............................................................77..................0.716
Ether, sulfuric..................................................................0.720
Ethyl acetate CH3COOC2H3...............68..................0.900
Ethyl bromide C2H3Br..........................59..................1.450
Ethylamine............................................... 0.8.................0.683
Ethylene bromide...................................68..................2.180
Ethylene chloride...................................68..................1.246
Ethylene glycol........................................60..................1.125
Ethylene glycol........................................77..................1.100
Fluoric acid......................................................................1.500
Fluorine (freon) refrigerant R-11.......77..................1.480
Fluorine refrigerant R-12.....................77..................1.315
Fluorine refrigerant R-22.....................77..................1.197
Formaldehyde....................................... 113................0.815
Formic acid, 10%.....................................68..................1.025
Formic acid, 50%.....................................68..................1.121
Formic acid, 80%.....................................68..................1.186
Formic acid, concentrated...................68..................1.221
Freon, 11....................................................70..................1.490
Freon, 12....................................................70..................1.330
Freon, 21....................................................70..................1.370
Fuel oil........................................................60..................0.893
Fuel oils 1/2/3/5A/5B/6........................60.......... 0.82-0.95
Furan...........................................................77..................1.421
Furfurol.......................................................68..................1.159
Gas oils.......................................................60..................0.890
Gasoline, natural.....................................60..................0.713
Gasoline, Vehicle.....................................60..................0.739
Glucose......................................................60.......... 1.35-1.44
Glycerine 100%.......................................68..................1.260
Glycerine 50% water.............................68..................1.130
Glycerol......................................................77..................1.129
Heptane-n.................................................60..................0.688
Hexane-n...................................................60..................0.664
Hexanol......................................................77..................0.813
Hexene.......................................................77..................0.673
Hydrazine..................................................77..................0.797
Ink printers................................................60............... 1.0-1.4
Jet fuel........................................................60..................0.820
Kerosene....................................................60..................0.820
Lard..............................................................60..................0.960
Lard oil........................................................60.......... 0.91-0.93
Linolenic Acid..........................................77..................0.902
Linseed Oil................................................77..................0.932
Mercury......................................................60............... 13.600
Methane................................................-263.2..............0.466
Methyl acetate.........................................68..................0.930
Unless stated otherwise, values are measured at 68°F
Fluid.......................................... Temp °F............. SG
Methyl iodide...........................................68..................2.280
Milk..............................................................60..................1.035
Mineral oil.......................................................................0.920
Molasses A first........................................60.......... 1.40-1.46
Molasses B second.................................60.......... 1.43-1.48
Molasses C blackstrap...........................60.......... 1.46-1.49
Muriatic acid...................................................................1.200
Naphtha, Petroleum Naphtha............59..................0.667
Naphthalene............................................68..................1.145
Napthalene...............................................77..................0.963
Neatsfoot oil.............................................60..................0.917
Nitric acid........................................................................1.500
Nitrobentzene.........................................68..................1.203
Nonane-n..................................................60..................0.722
Nonane-n..................................................68..................0.718
Nonanol.....................................................77..................0.823
Octane-n....................................................60..................0.707
Oil, Castor..................................................77..................0.959
Olive Oil......................................................59..................0.703
Oxygen...................................................-297.4..............1.140
Palm oil.......................................................60..................0.924
Palmitic Acid.............................................77..................0.853
Parole..........................................................77..................0.969
Peanut oil..................................................60..................0.920
Pentane......................................................77..................0.755
Pentane-n..................................................32..................0.650
Pentane-n..................................................60..................0.631
Petroleum oil..................................................................0.820
Phenol........................................................77..................1.075
Phosgene..................................................32..................1.381
Phosphoric acid............................................................1.780
Phytadiene................................................77..................0.826
Pinene.........................................................77..................0.858
Potassium hydrate.......................................................1.240
Propane.....................................................-40.................0.585
Propane......................................................77..................0.495
Propylene..................................................77..................0.516
Propylene glycol.....................................77..................1.036
Pyridine......................................................77..................0.968
Rape oil............................................................................0.920
Resorcinol..................................................77..................1.272
Sabiname..................................................77..................0.814
Sea water...................................................77..................1.028
Silane..........................................................77..................0.719
Sodium chloride...........................................................1.190
Sodium hydrate............................................................1.270
Sorbaldehyde...........................................77..................0.898
Stearic Acid...............................................77..................0.941
Styrene.......................................................77..................0.906
Sulphuric acid................................................................1.840
Tar......................................................................................1.000
Terpinene..................................................77..................0.850
Toluene......................................................77..................0.865
Tuluol................................................................................0.870
Turpentine................................................77..................0.871
Turpentine oil................................................................0.870
Vinegar.............................................................................1.080
Water, pure..............................................39.2................1.000
Water, sea...................................................77..................1.025
Whale oil..........................................................................0.920
Wood...........................................................77..................0.701
Xylene...............................................................................0.870
Upper explosive limit/Upper flammable limit
(UEL/UFL) is the highest concentration at
which a mixture would be flammable. Above
this point, the mixture is too rich, and lacks
the sufficient oxygen to burn.
Common
Toxic Gases
8-Hour TWA is a long-term exposure limit
based on a time-weighted average exposure
to the toxic substance.
STEL is based on a short-term, typically
15-minute, exposure to the toxin.
Threshold limit value is defined by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial
Hygienists (ACGIH) as an exposure limit to
which it is believed nearly all workers can be
exposed day after day for a working lifetime
without ill effect.
Ceiling is the concentration that should not
be exceeded during any part of the workday
exposure.
Common Name
Ammonia
Carbon Monoxide
Chlorine
Ethylene Oxide
Hydrazine
Hydrogen
Hydrogen Chloride
Hydrogen Cyanide
Hydrogen Peroxide
Hydrogen Sulfide
Nitric Acid
Nitric Oxide
Nitrogen Dioxide
Ozone
Phosgene
Phosphine
Sulfur Dioxide
Toluene
Diisocyanate
CAS
Number
7664-41-7
630-08-0
7782-50-5
75-21-8
302-01-2
1333-74-0
7647-01-0
74-90-8
7722-84-1
7783-06-4
7697-37-2
10102-43-9
10102-44-0
10028-15-6
75-44-5
7803-51-2
7446-09-5
584-84-9
EH40 Workplace
Exposure Limits
8-Hour TWA
ppm
mg.m-3
25
18
30
35
0.5
1.5
5
9.2
0.02
0.03
1
2
1
5
2
1.4
7
5.2
0.02
0.08
EH40 Workplace
Exposure Limits
15-Minute STEL
ppm
mg.m-3
35
25
200
232
1
2.9
0.1
0.13
5
10
2
10
4
8
11
2.8
14
10
0.2
0.06
0.3
0.4
0.25
0.42
0.02
(ceiling)
0.14
(ceiling)
LFL
%v/v
2.50
2.30
1.20
1.40
1.80
1.20
2.70
2.50
3.10
2.20
2.30
2.60
1.00
4.00
1.30
0.70
4.40
5.50
2.40
4.20
5.00
1.40
1.70
1.20
2.00
1.10
1.10
2.60
1.00
Flammable Limits
UFL
LFL
%v/v mg/L
13.00
80
100.00
24
8.60
39
9.30
33
42
8.30
40
32.00
51
15.50
31
19.00
59
11.00
81
36.00
26
100.00
47
8.40
35
77.00
3,4
9.80
31
5.00
17.00
29
38.00
73
25.00
85
20.70
55
23.00
125
7.80
42
71
8.00
11.00
35
8.00
48
7.60
42
13.40
93
7.60
44
OSHA Permissible
Exposure Limits
8-Hour TWA
ppm
mg.m-3
50
35
50
55
1 (ceiling) 3 (ceiling)
1
1
1.3
5 (ceiling) 7 (ceiling)
10
11
1
1.4
20 (ceiling)
2
5
25
30
5 (ceiling) 9 (ceiling)
0.1
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.3
0.4
5
13
UFL
mg/L
316
1,092
280
225
290
610
194
359
406
423
1,848
290
63
236
113
484
903
270
580
236
194
350
300
478
335
ACGIH
Threshold
Limit Value
ppm
25
25
0.5
1
0.01
Asphyxiant
2 (ceiling)
4.7 (ceiling)
1
10
2
25
3
100 ppb
100 ppb
300 ppb
2
0.005
Thermometers
CAS
Mol.
Vapor Boiling
Flash Ignition
Common Name
Number Weight Density Point °C Point °C Temp °C
Acetone
67-64-1
58.08
2.00
56
<–20
535
Acetylene
74-86-2
26
0.90
-84
305
Benzene
71-43-2
78.1
2.70
80
-11
560
Butane
106-97-8
58.1
2.05
-1
372
Cyclobutane
287-23-0
56.1
1.93
13
Cyclohexane
110-82-7
84.2
2.90
81
-18
259
Dimethyl Ether
115-10-6
46.1
1.59
-25
-42 gas
240
Ethane
74-84-0
30.1
1.04
-87
515
Ethanol
64-17-5
46.1
1.59
78
12
363
Ethyl Acetate
141-78-6
88.1
3.04
77
-4
460
Ethylene
74-85-1
28.1
0.97
-104
425
Ethylene Oxide
75-21-8
44
1.52
11
<-18
435
Hexane (Mixed Isomers)
110-54-3
86.2
2.97
69
-21
233
Hydrogen
1333-74-0
2
0.07
-253
560
Isobutane
75-28-5
58.12
2.00
-12
gas
460
Kerosene
8008-20-6
150
38
210
Methane (Firedamp)
74-82-8
16
0.55
-161
537
Methanol
67-56-1
32
1.11
65
11
386
Methyl Acrylate
96-33-3
86.1
3.00
80
-3
415
Methylamine
74-89-5
31.1
1.00
-6
-18 gas
430
Methyl Formate
107-31-3 60.05
2.07
32
-20
450
Pentanes (Mixed Isomers) 109-66-0
72.2
2.48
36
-40
258
Pentane-2,4-Dione
123-54-6 100.1
3.50
140
34
340
Petroleum
2.80
<-20
560
Propene
115-07-1
42.1
1.50
-48
455
Styrene
100-42-5 104.2
3.60
145
30
490
Toluene
108-88-3
92.1
3.20
111
4
535
Vinyl Acetate
108-05-4 86.09
3.00
72
-8
425
Xylenes
1330-20-7 106.2
3.66
144
30
464
491
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Lower explosive limit/lower flammable
limit (LEL/LFL) is the lowest concentration
at which a mixture is able to produce an
explosion. Below this point, the mixture is
too lean (insufficient oxygen).
MEDIA
PROPERTIES
Value-Added Services
Ignition temperature is the point at which
a gas will ignite, even without an external
spark or flame ignition source.
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index and Reference
Flash point is the lowest temperature at
which the surface of a liquid emits sufficient
vapor to be ignited by a small flame.
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Index and Reference
Common
Flammable Gases
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
MEDIA
PROPERTIES
V 12.2013
492
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Chemical Resistance of Common Compounds
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Aluminum Oxide
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Neoprene
Index and Reference
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NBR
Index and Reference
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EPDM
Value-Added Services
Acetic Acid 30%
Acetic Acid 100%
Aluminum Chloride
Aluminum Nitrate
Aluminum Sulphate
Ammonium Bromide
Ammonium Chloride
Ammonium Fluoride
Ammonium Hydroxide
Ammonium Nitrate
Ammonium Sulphate
Arsenic Acid
Barium Chloride
Barium Hydroxide
Beer
Benzoic Acid
Boric Acid
Bromine
Butyl Alcohol
Butyric Acid
Calcium Chloride
Calcium Fluoride
Calcium Hydroxide
Calcium Hypochlorite
Calcium Nitrate
Calcium Phosphate
Calcium Sulphate (Gypsum)
Camphoric Acid
Carbonic Acid
Chlorine
Chlorine Dioxide
Chromic Acid
Citric Acid
Copper (II) Chloride
Copper Sulphate
Diesel Oil
Ethanol/Ethyl Alcohol
Ferric Chloride
Ferric Nitrate
Formaldehyde
Formic Acid
Fruit Juice
Hydrobromic Acid
Hydrochloric Acid
Hydrochloric Acid, 0.1%
Hydrochloric Acid, 1.0%
Hydrochloric Acid, 10%
Hydrochloric Acid, 20%
Hydrochloric Acid, 37%
Hydrocyanic Acid
Hydrofluoric Acid
Hydrogen Peroxide
PFA
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Table is valid for pure solutions (unless other
percentage stated) at 68°F (20°C.).
PTFE
▲ High resistance
◆ Moderate resistance
▼ No resistance
Linatex
Corrosion and degradation depend on many parameters: Temperature, pressure, concentration, impurities, pH value, materials
and surface characteristics, joinings (welding or soldering), and mechanical stress of materials.This table should be used as a guide
only.The final responsibility of material selection resides with the end user, who knows the specific process conditions.
Ebonite
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
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◆1
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Exception Codes
1 No Air
2 Max Boiling Point
3 No Stagnation
4 Max 40°C (104°F)
5 Max 45°C (113°F)
6 Max 50°C (122°F)
7 Max 55°C (131°F)
8 Max 60°C (140°F)
9 Max 65°C (149°F)
10 Max 75°C (167°F)
11 Max 80°C (176°F)
12 Max 85°C (185°F)
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
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▲2
▲2
▲12
▲2
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▲2
▲7
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Value-Added Services
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▲2
▲2
▲2
▲11
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▲2
▲2
▲13
▲11
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Index and Reference
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13 Max 95°C (203°F)
14 Max 110°C (230°F)
Index and Reference
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Graphite
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Monel
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Platinum
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Hastelloy C276
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◆
◆
Hastelloy C22
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Hastelloy C4
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Tantalum
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Titanium
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AISI316
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493
Aluminum Oxide
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MEDIA
PROPERTIES
Zirconium Oxide
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PVDF (Kynar)
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FKM/FPM
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Neoprene
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NBR
PFA
Hydroiodine Acid
Iodine
Kerosene
Lactic Acid
Magnesium Chloride
Magnesium Hydroxide
Magnesium Nitrate
Magnesium Sulphate
Manganese Chloride
Methanol/Methyl Alcohol
Methylene Chloride
Nitric Acid
Nitric Acid, 1.0%
Nitric Acid, 10%
Nitric Acid, 50%
Nitric Acid, 70%
Nitric + Hydrofluoric Acids (1:1)
Oxalic Acid
Petrol/Gasoline
Phosphoric Acid
Phosphoric Acid, 1.0%
Phosphoric Acid, 10%
Phosphoric Acid, 50%
Phosphoric Acid, 80%
Phosphoric/Hydrofluoric/Nitric Acids
(1:1:1)
Phosphoric/Sulfuric/Nitric Acids (1:1:1)
Phosphoric + Sulfuric Acids (1:1)
Phosphoric + Hydrofluoric Acids (1:1)
Potassium Chloride
Potassium Cyanide
Potassium Hydroxide
Potassium Nitrate
Potassium Sulphate
Sea Water/Salt Water
Sodium Chloride
Sodium Hydroxide
Sodium Hypochlorite
Sodium Nitrate
Sodium Sulphate
Sulfuric Acid
Sulfuric Acid, 1.0%
Sulfuric Acid, 10%
Sulfuric Acid, 20% (Oleum)
Sulfuric Acid, 50%
Sulfuric Acid, 100%
Sulfuric + Nitric Acids (1:1)
Tin Chloride (Stannous Chloride)
Toluene
Water, Deionized
Water, Potable
Zinc Chloride
EPDM
Table is valid for pure solutions (unless other
percentage stated) at 68°F (20°C.).
PTFE
▲ High resistance
◆ Moderate resistance
▼ No resistance
Linatex
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
V 12.2013
Lesman Instrument Company
Ebonite
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
V 12.2013
TUBING
494 COMPATIBILITY
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Chemical Compatibility of Parker Tubing
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
• Results below are simplified ratings based on immersion tests at 75°F. Higher
temperatures tend to reduce ratings. True ratings depend on pressure, fluid
and ambient temperature, and other factors.
• Ratings do not imply compliance with codes such as FDA, NSF, AGA, or UL, and
do not cover possible fluid discoloration, taste, or odor effects. Ratings do not
imply low permeation rates.Call Lesman for a recommendation for your specific
application requirement.
• While Teflon (TFE) tubing is compatible with some chemicals, extreme caution
must always be used in dealing with chemicals that can cause severe injury.
▲Good to excellent. Little or no swelling, tensile or surface changes.
◆ Marginal or conditional. Noticeable effects, but not necessarily indicating lack
of serviceability. Further testing may be required for specific applications.
Long-term effects such as stiffening should be evaluated.
▼Poor or unsatisfactory. Not recommended without extensive testing realistic
to specific application.
Blank field indicates that chemical was not tested with this tubing.
No performance guarantee is expressed or implied through this table.
Chemical
Chemical
Tubing E PP N PV U FRPEPFA TFE
See Page 400 403402403401Call 404404
Value-Added Services
Index and Reference
Index and Reference
Acetone
Acetal Bromide
Acetal Chloride
Air
Alcohols
Aluminum Salts
Ammonia
Amyl Acetate
Aniline
Animal Oils
Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Arsenic Salts
Barium Salts
Benzaldehyde
Benzene
Benzyl Alcohol
Bleaching Liquors
Boric Acid Solutions
Bromine
Butane
Butanol
Butyl Acetate
Calcium Hypochlorite
Calcium Salts
Carbon Dioxide
Carbon Disulfide
Carbon Tetrachloride
Caustic Potash
Caustic Soda
Chloracetic Acid
Chlorine (Dry)
Chlorine (Wet)
Chlorobenzene
Chloroform
Chromic Acid
Copper Salts
Cresol P
Cyclohexanone
Ethers
Ethyl Chloride
Ethyl Acetate
Ethyl Alcohol
Ethyl Bromide
Ethylamine
Fatty Acids
Ferric Salts
Formaldehyde
Formic Acid
Freon
Gasoline
Glucose
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▲ ▲
◆ ▼ ◆ ▲
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◆ ▲ ◆ ▲
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◆ ▼ ▼
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▼▼
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▲ ▲
Tubing E PP N PV U FRPEPFA TFE
See Page 400 403402403401Call 404404
Glycerin
Hydriodic Acid
Hydrochloric Acid (Conc.)
Hydrochloric Acid (Med Conc.)
Hydrofluoric Acid
Hydrogen Peroxide (Conc.)
Hydrogen Peroxide (Dil.)
Hydrogen Sulfide
Iodine
Kerosene
Ketones
Lacquer Solvents
Lactic Acid
Lead Acetate
Linseed Oil
Magnesium Salts
Naphtha
Natural Gas
Nickel Salts
Nitric Acid (Conc.)
Nitric Acid (Dil.)
Nitrobenzene
Nitrogen Oxides
Nitrous Acid
Oils (Animal and Mineral)
Oils (Vegetable)
Oxygen
Perchloric Acid
Phenols
Potassium Salts
Pyridine
Silver Nitrate
Soap Solutions
Sodium Salts
Stearic Acid
Sulfur Chloride
Sulfuris Acid (Conc.)
Sulfuris Acid (Dil.)
Sulfurous Acid
Tannic Acid
Tanning Extracts
Titanium Salts
Toluene
Trichloracetic Acid
Trichloroethylene
Turpentine
Urea
Uric Acid
Water
Xylene
Zinc Chloride
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THERMOCOUPLE
495
WIRING
Standard Wiring Diagrams for T/Cs and Transmitters
Single Thermocouple
+
—
Thermocouple/Two Receivers
+
—
T/C
XMTR
Notes: Transmitters typically transmit a current signal of
4–20 mA. Each transmitter needs a power supply to operate.
A thermocouple is NOT considered a transmitter. See above
for more information.
DC Power
+ Supply
—
–
Loop Powered Two-Wire
4–20 mA Transmitter
XMTR
+
–
–
+
Com
+
–
+
XMTR
Signal Out
Instrument
+
–
–
–
Signal Out
+
Power
+
XMTR
—
DC Power Supply
4–20 mA Output/Two Receivers
+
Instrument A
—
+
+
+
–
T/C 3
Standard Limits of Error
Error
°C Range
°F Range
–
+
–
Need a T/C
Switch?
Call Lesman.
J
32° to 559°
559° to 1400°
±4°
±0.75%
Special Limits of Error
Error
°C Range
Error
°F Range
±2.2°
±0.75%
32° to 527°
527° to 1400°
±2°
±0.4%
K
-328° to -166°
-166° to 32°
32° to 559°
559° to 2282°
±2%* -200° to -110° ±2%*
±4°*
-110° to 0°
±2.2°
±4°
0° to 293°
±2.2°
±0.75% 293° to 1259° ±0.75%
32° to 527°
527° to 2282°
±2°
0° to 275°
±1.1°
±0.4% 275° to 1250° ±0.4%
T
-328° to -89°
-89° to 32°
32° to 271°
271° to 662°
±1.5%*
±1.8°*
±1.8°
±0.75%
-200° to -67°
-67° to 0°
0° to 133°
133° to 350°
±1.5%*
±1°
±1°
±0.75%
32° to 257°
257° to 662°
±0.9°
±0.4%
0° to 125°
125° to 350°
±0.5°
±0.4%
E
-328° to -274°
-274° to 32°
32° to 644°
644° to 1652°
±1%*
±3.1°*
±3.1°
±0.5%
-200° to -170°
-170° to 0°
0° to 340°
340° to 900°
±1%*
±1.7°
±21.7°
±0.5%
32° to 482°
482° to 1652°
±1.8°
±0.4%
0° to 250°
250° to 900°
±1°
±0.4%
R
32° to 1112°
±2.7°
0° to 600°
±1.5°
32° to 1112°
±1.1°
0° to 600°
±0.6°
1112° to 2642° ±0.25% 600° to 1450° ±0.25% 1112° to 2642° ±0.1% 600° to 1450° ±0.1%
S
32° to 1112°
±2.7°
0° to 600°
±1.5°
32° to 1112°
±1.1°
0° to 600°
±0.6°
1112° to 2642° ±0.25% 600° to 1450° ±0.25% 1112° to 2642° ±0.1% 600° to 1450° ±0.1%
1472° to 3092° ±0.5% 800° to 1700° ±0.5% 1472° to 3092°
—
800° to 1700°
—
Instrument B
—
T/C
Alloy Combinations
T
Copper
Constantan
J
Iron
Constantan
E
Chromel
Constantan
K
Chromel
Alumel
S
R
B
4–20 mA
Output
–
+
–
Instrument
0° to 293°
293° to 760°
0° to 275°
275° to 760°
Error
±1.1°
±0.4%
Thermocouple Type Color Codes
Four-Wire 4–20 mA Transmitter
+
+
T/C 2
Type
B
DC Power
Supply
+
* Thermocouples and thermocouple materials are supplied to meet the limits of error specified for temperatures
above 0°C (32°F). May not conform to the published sub-zero limits unless specified at time of purchase.
Three-Wire 4–20 mA Transmitter
Instrument
+
–
(Selects one of several
T/Cs)
Thermocouple Initial Material Tolerances
Instrument
—
+
Instrument
A
Instrument
B
Warning: Not acceptable in critical,
redundant safety appli­cations.
Each receiver needs its own thermocouple.
Transmitter Symbol
+
Red
Switch
—
Magnetic
Plug and
Yes No Thermocouple-Grade Wire Extension-Grade Wire
Jack
•
•
+
–
Blue
Red
+
–
Blue
Red
Blue
•
+
–
White
Red
+
–
White
Red
Black
•
•
+
–
Purple
Red
+
–
Purple
Red
Purple
•
+
–
Yellow
Red
+
–
Yellow
Red
Yellow
Platinum 10% Rhodium
Pure Platinum
•
•
+
–
Black
Red
+
–
Black
Red
Green
Platinum 13% Rhodium
Pure Platinum
•
•
+
–
Black
Red
+
–
Black
Red
Green
Platinum 30% Rhodium
Platinum 6% Rhodium
•
•
+
–
Gray
Red
+
–
Gray
Red
•
•
Compensated
Cable
White
Uncompensated
When wiring thermocouples, the red wire is always negative.
Value-Added Services
T/C
+
–
T/C 1
Index and Reference
Diagram Color: Red wire is
always negative.
Notes: Thermocouple wire or
thermocouple extension
wire required. Do NOT use
copper wire.
Switch contacts need not
be T/C material. But, any
difference in temperature
between + and – switch
contacts becomes an error
in the signal.
Multiple Thermocouples/One Receiver
Instrument
+
–
Index and Reference
Thermocouple
Symbol: T/C
Thermometers
V 12.2013
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Lesman Instrument Company
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
GLOSSARY
OF TERMS
V 12.2013
496
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Wireless Terminology
0123
10Base-T: Common Ethernet wiring standard. Uses
twisted pair wiring, runs at 10 Mbps, uses a star
network topology, and is limited to a segment
length of 100 meters max.
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
802.11: Family of wireless networking standards
developed by the IEEE. 802.11a provides up to 54
Mbps on the 5GHz band. 802.11b hits 11 Mbps
in the 2.4GHz band. 802.11g provides over 20
Mbps on the 2.4GHz band. Both 802.11b and g
have effective ranges of about 300 feet; 802.11a’s
higher frequency limits its range to about 60 feet.
Other standards in this family include 802.11e,
h, and n.
A
Value-Added Services
Access point (AP): The hub of a wireless network. Also
called wireless router, wireless gateway, or base
station. Wireless clients connect to it, and traffic
between clients must travel through it.
Amplifier: A device connected to an antenna to
increase the signal strength and amplify weak
incoming signals.
Antenna: A device connected to a wireless transceiver
that concentrates transmitted and received radio
waves to increase signal strength, and increase the
effective range of a wireless network.
Direct sequence spread spectrum (DSSS): One of
two approaches (with frequency hopping spread
spectrum) for sorting out overlapping data signals
transmitted via radio waves. DSSS generates a
redundant pattern for each bit to be transmitted,
called a chipping code. Using this, the signal is split
over several frequencies, and the different parts are
sent concurrently. DSSS is faster than FHSS, but is
more sensitive to environmental factors. WiFi and
802.11b use DSSS.
E
Latency: Length of time between a packet being sent
and the response to it being returned.
Ethernet backbone: Wired 802.3 network that
connects access points in a roaming network.
Line of sight: A clear, unobstructed line of vision from
one antenna to another in a wireless network.
Necessary for a long-range network to connect.
F
File transfer protocol (FTP): A common way of
transferring files on the Internet, primarily used
for uploading and downloading large files in
secure areas.
Index and Reference
Frame: A packet encapsulated to travel on a physical
medium, like Ethernet or WiFi. A packet is like a
shipping container; a frame is the boat on which
the shipping container is loaded.
Bandwidth: The capacity of a network, or how much
data a network can transfer. Bandwidth is often
measured in bits per second.
Frequency hopping spread spectrum (FHSS): One
of two approaches (with DSSS) for sorting out
overlapping data signals transmitted via radio
waves. FHSS changes, or hops, frequencies in a
pattern known to both sender and receiver. FHSS
is little influenced by radio stations, reflections, or
other environmental factors, but it is much slower
than DSSS.
Index and Reference
Collision: The interference that results when two
devices on a network start transmitting at the
same time.
D
Data rate: Speed at which data can pass through a
wireless network when transferred at its maximum
pace. Different than the throughput rate and is
almost always higher.
Decibels (dB): Unit of measure for antenna gain. Also
noted as dBm (relative to a reference level of 1
milliwatt) and dBi (relative to an isotropic radiator,
or a single point antenna).
Dipole Antenna: An antenna type that offers omnidirectional coverage, but low gain.
K
Ethernet: The most common networking standard in
the world, formally known as IEEE 802.3.
Band: Another term for spectrum, used to indicate a
particular set of frequencies. Wireless networking
protocols work in either the 2.4 GHz or the 5 GHz
bands.
Channel: A specific portion of the radio spectrum.
E.g., the channels allotted to one of the wireless
networking protocols. 802.11b/g use 14 channels
in the 2.4 GHz band. In the 5 GHz band, 802.11a
uses eight channels for indoor use and four others
for outdoor use.
IP address: The numeric address (like 192.168.1.1) that
identifies the unique location of each device in a
TCP/IP network.
Kbps: A measure of bandwidth. Kilobits (thousands
of bits) per second.
Firmware: The internal software that runs dedicated
hardware devices.
C
Internet protocol (IP): Method by which data is sent
from one device to another on the Internet.
Encryption: The process of transforming information
using an algorithm to make it unreadable to anyone
except those possessing the encryption key. Used
to protect data in transit, for example data being
transferred via networks.
B
Bridge: Allows the connection of devices on a wired
Ethernet network to a wireless network, and acts as
the connection point to the Wireless LAN. Wireless
bridge devices work in pairs (point-to-point), one
on each side of the bridge. There can be many
simultaneous bridges using one central device
(point-to-multipoint).
I
IEEE: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.
(Pronounced I-triple-E). The organization develops
standards for the computer and electronics
industry, such as WiFi.
Fresnel zone: An elliptical area on either side of the
straight line of sight that must also be clear for a
long-range wireless network to work.
G
Gain: The amount by which an antenna concentrates
signal strength in a wireless network.
Gateway: Device that joins two networks together.
Most commonly implemented as a software set
residing on a wireless access point or router.
Gigahertz (GHz): A measure of electromagnetic wave
frequency, in complete cycles per second, equal
to one billion hertz. Used to specify the radio
frequency used by wireless devices.
H
Header: Address information on packets that says
where the data should go.
High-gain antenna: An antenna that significantly
increases signal strength. Necessary for long-range
wireless networks.
Hub: The central device in a star network, whether
wired or wireless. Wireless access points act as
hubs in wireless networks.
L
Local area network (LAN) : The computers at one
physical site, connected via Ethernet or WiFi.
M
Mbps: A measure of bandwidth. Megabits (millions
of bits) per second.
Megahertz (MHz): A measure of electromagnetic
wave frequency equal to one million hertz. Used
to specify the radio frequency used by wireless
devices.
Mesh networking: A type of network where each
node may act as a router, regardless of whether it
is connected to another network or not. It allows
for continuous connections and reconfiguration
around broken or blocked paths by“hopping”from
node to node until the destination is reached.
Modem: Short for modulator/demodulator. Converts
outgoing digital data into analog signals so they
can be sent over copper phone lines, and converts
incoming analog signals into digital.
Multiplex: Transmitting multiple signals over a single
channel. A WiFi connection uses Orthogonal
Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), which
spreads the signal power over a large band. It breaks
the signal into parts, enabling a fast transmission
that is sent as several slower transmissions
simultaneously, using different frequencies.
N
Network: A collection of interconnected computers
and associated devices. Networks can be
characterized by the protocols they use (TCP/
IP) or by the geographic area they cover (LAN
and WAN).
Network adapter: The removable card or built-in
hardware used in a computer or handheld device to
connect to a network, whether wired or wireless.
Network diagram: A rough picture of the structure
of a network. Network diagrams are useful for
planning new networks and for troubleshooting
problems with existing networks.
Network segments: Physically and logically separate
sections of a network. Breaking a network into
segments increases bandwidth by reducing the
amount of traffic that each device must listen to.
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
GLOSSARY
OF TERMS
497
Thermometers
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
How to wire Ethernet cables
Strip the end of a Category 5 cable and separate the
four twisted pairs (left) into individual wires.
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
A straight-through (standard network) cable has
matching ends. Set the wires in pin order from 1
to 8, so that both RJ-45 connector ends follow the
top diagram.
A crossover cable has dissimilar ends,where the green
and orange pairs are swapped. Set the wires in pin
order so that one end follows the top diagram, and
the other end follows the bottom.
Panel antenna: An antenna type that radiates in only
a specific direction. Panel antennas are commonly
used for point-to-point applications. Also called
patch antennae.
Parabolic antenna: Antenna type that radiates a very
narrow beam in a specific direction. Parabolic
antennae offer the highest gain for long-range
point-to-point situations.
Pigtail: A thin cable that connects an antenna to
a wireless network adapter, usually converting
between plug types in the process.
Point-to-multipoint: A wireless network in which
the access point serves multiple other points
around it. Indoor wireless networks are all pointto-multipoint. Long-range wireless networks
that serve multiple clients usually employ either
a single omni directional antenna or multiple
sector antennas.
Point-to-point: A long-range wireless network
between two points. Point-to-point wireless
networks use directional antennas.
Port: Either a physical jack on a network device or a
way of identifying the type of data being sent in
an Internet connection. Every Internet service has
its own port number.
R
Radio Frequency Identification (RFID): A technology
used to uniquely identify objects. A transceiver
sends out a signal that activates a transponder,
which sends data back to the transceiver.
Received signal strength indication (RSSI): The power
present in a received radio signal. RSSI can be used
in a wireless networking card to determine when
the amount of radio energy in the channel is below
a certain threshold at which point the network card
is clear to send (CTS). Once the card is clear to send,
a packet of information can be sent.
Remote access point: One of a number of secondary
access points in a wireless network that uses WDS
to extend its range. Remote access points, also
called relay access points, connect to a master
access point.
RJ-45: A plug type for eight-wire twisted pair
connections, used in Ethernet networks.
Router: An intelligent network device that converts
address-based protocols to describe how packets
move from one place to another. In practice, this
generally comes down to translating between IP
addresses and MAC addresses for data flowing
between your local network and the Internet.
S
Service set identifier (SSID): Identifying name of a
wireless network. Extended SSID (ESSID) is the
unique name for a wireless network with an
access point.
Signal loss: The amount of signal strength that’s lost
in antenna cable, connectors, and free space,
measured in decibels.
Signal strength: The strength of the radio waves in a
wireless network.
Specification: A formal language used by different
devices to communicate. Term is generally
interchangeable with “protocol.”
Spectrum: A range of electromagnetic frequencies.
Spread spectrum: A form of wireless communication
in which a signal’s frequency is deliberately varied.
This increases bandwidth and lessens the chances
of interruption or interception of the transmitted
signal.
Star network: A network topology in which all traffic
goes through a central hub. Most wireless networks
are star networks.
Switch: A specific type of network routing device
that isolates the communications between any
two computers from the rest of the network, thus
increasing throughput.
T
Throughput: Amount of data that can be transmitted
in a given amount of time. Commonly measured
in bits per second.
Topology: The specific layout of a network.
Transmit power: Amount of power used by a radio
transceiver to send the signal out. Generally
measured in milliwatts, which you can convert
to dBm.
Twisted pair: A wiring type in which each pair of wires
twists in a certain way to reduce electromagnetic
interference. 10Base-T, 100Base-T, and Gigabit
(1000Base-T) Ethernet all use twisted pair wires.
U
Unshielded twisted pair: The most common type of
twisted pair wiring. Unshielded twisted pair lacks
a shield to act as a ground. Unshielded twisted pair
is often abbreviated to UTP.
W
Wide area network (WAN): A collection of local area
networks connected by a variety of physical means.
The Internet is the largest and most well known
wide area network.
Wi-Fi (Wireless fidelity): Wireless Internet delivered to
Web-enabled devices using the IEEE 802.11 group
of wireless standards. Access to a Wi-Fi connection
is generally limited to small geographical spaces,
such as your home or a coffee shop, and can often
be expanded to the size of plant campuses.
Wi-Fi protected access (WPA): Wireless security
technology builds off WEP (Wired equivalent
privacy), to deliver stronger authentication and
encryption features. WPA 2 is the next level of
wireless security above WPA, and it comes as either
enterprise- or personal-grade protection.
Wireless local area network (WLAN): Links devices via
a wireless distribution method (typically spreadspectrum or OFDM radio), and usually provides a
connection through an access point to the wider
internet. This gives users the mobility to move
around within a local coverage area and still be
connected to the network.
Wired equivalent privacy (WEP): A type of encryption
used to secure wireless networks.
Y
Yagi antenna: An antenna type that radiates in only a
specific direction. Yagi antennas are used only in
point-to-point situations.
Index and Reference
Packet: A discrete chunk of data, being transferred on
a TCP/IP or other addressable network.
RJ-11: A plug type for four- or six-wire connections,
used for phone cables.
Index and Reference
P
Value-Added Services
Crimp each end to be sure the cable is secure,and test
your cable to make sure it can transmit properly.
GLOSSARY
OF TERMS
V 12.2013
498
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Wireless Antenna Terminology
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Antenna: That part of a transmitting or receiving
system which is designed to radiate or to receive
electromagnetic waves. An antenna can also be
viewed as a transitional structure (transducer)
between free-space and a transmission line. An
important property of an antenna is the ability to
focus and shape the radiated power in space e.g.:
it enhances the power in some wanted directions
and suppresses the power in other directions.
Efficiency: The total antenna efficiency accounts for
the following losses: (1) reflection because of
mismatch between the feeding transmission line
and the antenna and (2) antenna conductor and
dielectric losses.
Antenna Pattern: A three-dimensional graphical
representation of antenna radiation as a function
of angular direction. Radiation performance is
measured and recorded in two orthogonal planes,
plotted in polar or rectangular coordinates.
Front-to-Back (F/B) Ratio: The ratio of the maximum
directivity of a wireless antenna to its directivity
in a specified rearward direction. Sometimes, the
directivity in the rearward direction is taken as the
average over an angular region.
Directional Antenna: An antenna having the property
of radiating or receiving electromagnetic waves
more effectively in some directions than others.
Value-Added Services
Directivity: Directivity of a wireless antenna is given
by the ratio of the maximum radiation intensity to
the average radiation intensity.
Effective radiated power (ERP): The relative gain of a
transmitting antenna with respect to the maximum
directivity of a half-wave dipole multiplied by
the net power accepted by the antenna from the
connected transmitter.
Frequency Bandwidth: The range of frequencies
within which the performance of the antenna,
with respect to some characteristics, conforms to
a specified standard.
Gain: Maximum gain of a wireless antenna is defined
as the product of the directivity by efficiency. If the
efficiency is not 100%, the antenna gain is less than
the directivity. Gain is expressed in dBi. The gain of
any antenna is proportional to its size.
Half-Wave Dipole: A wire antenna consisting of two
straight collinear conductors of equal length,
separated by a small feeding gap, with each
conductor approximately a quarter-wave length.
Isolation: A measure of power transfer from one
antenna to another. The ratio of the power input
to one antenna to the power received by the other
antenna, expressed in decibels (dB).
Linear Array: A set of radiating elements (e.g. dipole
or patch) arranged along a line. Radiating elements
have dimensions comparable to a wavelength. A
linear array has a higher gain than a single radiator,
and its radiation pattern can be synthesized to meet
various antenna performance requirements such
as upper side lobe suppression and null fill.
Parabolic Reflector Antenna: Consists of a parabolic
metal surface (dish) with a feed antenna in front. The
feed antenna consists of a directive antenna such
as a dipole and reflector, log-periodic dipole array
or horn antenna. Capable of producing extremely
high gains, usually in the 20 - 30 dBi range.
Power Handling: The ability of a wireless antenna to
handle high power without failure. High power
can cause voltage breakdown and excessive heat
which would result in an antenna failure.
Radiation Efficiency: Ratio of the total power radiated
by a Wireless LAN antenna to the net power
accepted by the antenna from the connected
transmitter.
Antenna properties
Index and Reference
Index and Reference
At its most basic, an antenna is a length of conductive metal that
radiates radio signals into the air. Most common antennae are designed
to be one-quarter or one-half the wavelength of the radio signals they
are transmit or receive.
An antenna has three fundamental properties: gain, direction, and
polarization.
Every antenna is designed to raise the power in the wanted direction and reduce it in unwanted directions. Gain, measured in decibels
(db), is the term used to describe an increase in an antenna’s ability
to focus its signal in the desired direction. The antenna with a higher
gain is more effective in its radiation pattern.
Direction is the shape of the wireless signal after leaving the antenna.
Omnidirectional antenna radiate power equally in 360°. Directional
antenna, like the Yagi or parabolic dish, focus the radiant power to
increase performance and reduce interference.
Polarization is the orientation of wireless signal relative to the
earth. It can be vertical, horizontal, circular or combinations of these.
In WiFi networks most signals are vertically polarized. For best
performance, you’ll need to match up the polarization of your
transmitting and receiving antennae.
Objects (metallic, water and glass) that reflect signals can also
affect polarization.
Omnidirectional antenna
The omnidirectional antenna provides a signal in a full 360°
radius, and can be used in either indoor or outdoor applications.
This antenna type usually has the lowest gain and is used in point
to multipoint links.
It’s ideal for applications where you want to transmit from a
central node to users scattered all around the area, or for picking
up wireless signals within a 360° radius of your position.
Fiberglass construction provides great protection to the
antenna from outdoor weather conditions.
Yagi-Uda array antenna
Known as the Yagi, this is a semi-directional
antenna used for point-to-point network topology.
It’s sometimes used for point-to-multipoint, if long
distance must be achieved.
A Yagi antenna is made of an array of elements running parallel to each other. The longest
element in this array is the reflector. Next is the
driven element, the one that actually transmits
electromagnetic waves. The other elements are
called directors.
The antenna propagates signal in the direction
from the reflector to the directors.
The director elements are set at a precise distance
apart, and precise lengths (about half wavelength)
to cause the antenna to operate most efficiently for
a given radio frequency. A Yagi with more directors
has a greater gain and antenna becomes longer.
Parabolic dish antenna
This highly directional antenna type transmit/receives signals in a very narrow angle, so
it is ideal for long distance and point to point
network connections.
The parabolic dish has a solid main reflector surface that is shaped like a paraboloid or
sphere with an active element at its focus. That
way, the surface can reflect parallel signals to a
single focal point.
The narrow beam width of a parabolic dish
antenna provides minimum interference with
other wireless networks, longest signal distance,
and fastest links.
INDEX BY
PRODUCT
499
Index by Product
4-20mA Loop
Calibrators...........................................................364
Indicators............................... 226–230, 232–235
I/P Transducer....................................................359
Loop Accessories.................................... 359–364
Power Supplies...............................128, 362–363
Proportional Motors/Actuators......... 333–338
Camera, Ethernet IP Surveillance.......... 141
Capillary Tubing...................................... 433
Catalytic Bead Sensors....................546-548
Chart Paper........................... 238 and
Chart Recorders......................See Recorders
Check Valves........................................... 318
Balometer.........................................517, 580
CIP Systems............................................. 570
Absolute Pressure
Transmitters.....................................78, 81, 90–91
Barbed Fittings....................................... 452
Clean In Place.......................................... 570
Barriers, Intrinsic Safety......................... Call
Coil Syphon............................................. 433
Accumass................................................. 193
Batch Control Software.............................15
Combustion Analyzers...540–543, 562–563
Acoustic Solids Flow Sensor.......... 186–187
Batch Controller/Indicator............. 230–231
Actuators
Control Valve..........................281, 285–286, 309
Electric Motor.................................285, 333–338
Linkage Software.............................................337
Belt Scales....................................... 190–191
Belt Speed Sensors................. 188–189, 191
Combustion Efficiency............540-543, 584
Commercial Analyzers........................... 540-541
Industrial Analyzers.......................541-543, 584
Residential Analyzers......................................540
Bimetallic Thermometers............... 441–444
Combustion Tuning.........................540-543
Aerosol Particulate
Monitor.......................... 512-515, 578-579
Block and Bleed Valves... 341–343, 347, 348
Boiler Combustion Controls.......... 259–277
Aerotrak...................................514-514, 578
Boiler Service Gauges............................ 430
Air Bubbler.................................................18
Brass Fittings............................. See Fittings
Air Duct Testing.......................516-518, 580
Brix Monitor.................................... 176–177
Air Sampling............................523-525, 581
Bubbler for Liquid Level............................18
Air Velocity Meter............................516, 580
Bulbs — See also RTDs
RTDs..................................................... 98–100, 122
Temperature Switch........... 370–373, 385–388
Thermocouples..............................101–109, 122
Thermometer........................................... 441–442
Communications
Ethernet............... 117–121, 131, 138–139, 161,
164–165, 198–209, 214, 216–224, 247–256
Handheld HART Communicator................... 95
Radio Modem.................................131, 138–139
Remote I/O Modules.......................................361
SCADA Software...............................................224
SmartLinx Interface Modules.......................Call
USB to HART Modem........................................ 96
Web-Based.. 118, 161, 164–165, 222–223, 256
Wireless...................................................... 123–158
AiRanger.............................................. 32–33
Airborne Particle
Counters......................... 512-515, 578-579
Airset....................................................... 358
Alarm Annunciators............................... 236
AMS 2750D.............................................. 255
Analytical Systems
Concentration.......................................... 176–179
Combustion (Oxygen)....... 540–543, 562–563
Conductivity.................161, 164–168, 173–175
Dissolved Oxygen.................................. 162–167
Humidity.................................................... 180–184
pH/ORP...................................................... 160–172
Process Gas Analytics............................ 559–568
Process Liquid Analytics................................569
Annunciators.......................................... 236
Application Selection Guides
(See Technology Selection Guides)
Aqueous Concentration................. 176–179
Armored Capillary Tubing...................... 433
Back Pressure Regulator.................300, 317
Backflow Prevention Test Kit................. 366
Bump Test System................................... 535
Burner Controls............................... 259–277
Burner Ionization Pilots......................... 292
Burners, Industrial.......................... 290–291
Butterfly Valves
Dual Offset.......................................286, 310–311
Quadruple Offset.................................... 314–315
Triple Offset.............................................. 312–323
CALgrafix................................................. 212
Calibrators
4-20 mA Process Signal..................................364
Air Flow.......................................................525, 581
HART®..................................................................... 95
Magmeter (Verificator)..................................... 67
Personal Gas Detector....................................535
Portable Pneumatic.........................................364
Pressure...............................................................364
Sampling Pump.......................................525, 581
Sound Instrument...................................520, 585
Temperature............................................. 364–365
Test Gauges........................................................431
CompresaMatic............................... 460–461
Compress-Align.............................. 458–459
Compression Fittings..................... 458–461
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
3-Valve Manifolds........................... 344–345
Ball Valves
General Purpose...............................................332
Firesafe, Flanged..................................... 326–329
Multiport.............................................................332
Sanitary................................................................318
Two Piece.........................................320, 322–323
Three Piece............................ 320–321, 324–325
V-Type for Control............................................308
Value-Added Services
2-Valve Manifolds........................... 344–345
Thermometers
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index and Reference
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Concentration Monitor.....................176–179
Conductivity............. 161, 164–168, 173–175
Configuration
Actuator Linkage Configurator...................337
CALgrafix.............................................................212
Datasheets....................................475 and
Dolphin Plus......................................................... 32
HART Communicator................................. 94–96
HC900 Control Station Designer................222
Hybrid Control Designer................................221
MC Toolkit for Pocket PC.................................. 95
PACTWare HART® Software............................ 94
SCT Transmitter Configuration Toolkit........ 95
SIMATIC PDM....................................................... 96
Trendview/X-Series GR Recorders..............256
Control Station 900........................ 222–223
Index and Reference
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
INDEX BY
PRODUCT
V 12.2013
500
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index by Product
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Control Valves
Aseptic Service..................................................319
Butterfly..................................................... 310–315
Cage......................................................................304
Firesafe, Ball.............................................. 326–329
Fractional Flow........................................ 306–307
Globe.......................................................... 305–306
Low Flow................................................... 306–307
Sanitary...................................................... 316–319
Sliding Gate.............................................. 303–304
Value-Added Services
Index and Reference
Controllers
1/8, 1/16 and 1/32 DIN.................196, 210–213
Batch........................................................... 230–231
Combustion........ 259–267, 270–271, 274–277
Dissolved Oxygen.................................. 163–167
Hybrid......................................................... 216–224
Level......................................... 226–229, 232–235
Limit.................................196, 198–201, 210, 213
PAC............................................................... 215–223
pH................................................................ 161–167
PID............................................................... 196–220
Pump..................................... 11, 28–33, 226–229
Pressure, Mechanical............................. 374–384
Process....................................................... 215–224
Setpoint Programmer.....................................214
Temperature, Mechanical.................... 385–388
Temperature,
Microprocessor-Based...................... 198–220
Dial
Customized for OEMs.....................................424
Thermometer........................................... 441–444
Diaphragm Seals............................ 434–435
Dielectric Constant Table....................... 488
Differential Pressure
Gauges....................................................... 436–438
Manifold Valves....................................... 344–345
Switches.................................. 370–373, 381–384
Transmitters.................................................. 84–89
Digital
Communications.......... (see Communications)
Controllers.......... 195–224, 549–554, 558–559
Indicators.........................................225–236, 445
Infrared Thermometers.........................526, 584
Pressure Gauges...............................................424
Thermal Imaging Camera.....................526, 584
Thermometers................................441–442, 445
Flame Rods.............................................. 268
DirectLine........................................ 166–167
Dissolved Oxygen........................... 164–167
Dolphin Plus...............................................32
Drain Valves............................................ 348
Drives, Pneumatic................................... Call
Index and Reference
Conversion Tables.......................... 482–485
Echomax Transducers......................... 34–35
Coriolis Flowmeter........................64, 70–71
Electrochemical Cell, Fixed............ 546–548
Cooler, Sample...............................................
318
Electrodes: pH, DO, Conductivity,
TDS........................160, 162–163, 169–175
Current
AC Transmitter...................................................360
Indicator..............................................................227
Pneumatic Transducers (I/P).........................359
Relays....................................................................360
Transducers (CT)...............................................360
Emissions Monitor, Portable...........540-543
Cyclops....................................................440
eZtrend Paperless Recorder.......... 248–249
Damper Drives........................................ Call
Field Device Access Point (FDAP).......... 150
Data Acquisition
Multichannel Rack Mount................... 216–224
Recorder with Interface....................... 247–256
Filter Regulators..................................... Call
Dataloggers
Humidity..............................................................182
Temperature.................................... See Recorders
Fire Sentry............................................... 556
Delphi Combustion Panel...................... 260
Dewpoint................................................. Call
Flame Detectors.............. 268–269, 272–277
Flame Ionization Detector......539, 564, 583
DustTrak........................... 512-513, 578-579
DC Voltmeters..................................227, 361
Flame Detection System, Fixed............. 556
Digi-Stem................................................ 445
ControLinks............................ 259, 262–263
DC Power Supplies.................. 122, 362–363
Fittings (continued)
For Pipe
Brass Fittings....................................... 464–466
For Plastic Tubing
Nylo-Seal — Nylon......................................453
Poly-Flo, Poly-Tite.............................. 448–449
Push-to-Connect (PrestoLok)........ 450–451
Quick-Coupler...............................................449
Emissivity Table...................................... 488
Enclosure..........................132, 138, 236, 362
Exposure Monitoring Badges................ 532
Extractive Gas Analyzers.................560-564
Fire and Flame Detection, Fixed............ 556
Firing Rate Valves................... 282, 285–286
Fittings
For Hose
Barbed, Push-On..........................................452
For Metal Tubing, Brass
45° Flare................................................ 462–463
Compression....................................... 458–461
Integral Ferrule..................................... 458–459
Flame Safeguard Controls............. 257–292
Flammable Gas Properties..................... 491
Flare Fittings................................... 462–463
Flaring Tools............................................ 467
Float-Type Level Switches...........................2
Flow Control, Solids
Alarm, Controller, Switch...................... 186–189
Belt Scales................................................. 190–191
Integrators..........................................................193
Solids Flowmeters............................................194
Speed Sensors......................................... 188–189
Weighfeeders........................................... 192–193
Flow Elements
Bluff Body and Taylor Wedge......................... 62
Orifice Plates and Flange Unions.................. 62
Pitot Tube and Venturi Flow Tube................ 62
Flow Recorders
Circular....................................................... 239–246
Digital, Paperless.................................... 247–256
Flow Sensors/Transmitters
Coriolis..................................................... 64, 70–71
DP............................................................... 63, 84–89
Float................................................................. 56–58
Magmeter............................................... 64, 66–69
Open Channel Flow........................................... 76
Paddlewheel........................................................ 58
Pitot Tube.............................................................. 62
Rotameter............................................................. 58
Thermal, Mass Flow........................................... 61
Thermal, Temperature Compensated......... 57
Vortex..................................................................... 65
Flow Switches
Float................................................................. 56–58
Paddle..................................................................... 56
Shuttle.................................................................... 58
Solids.......................................................... 186–187
Temperature Compensated........................... 57
Thermal............................................................57, 61
Flow Totalizers........................ 230–231, 235
GilAir.........................................523-524, 581
Infrared Serial Adapter.......................... 207
Handheld Airborne
Particle Counters........... 512-515, 578-579
Infrared Thermal Scanner.............. 119–121
Hand Pumps............................................ 364
Hand Valves............................. 341–348, 433
HART®
Communications Software.......................94, 96
Handheld Communicator............................... 95
HART Modem................................................94, 96
Wireless Instruments............................. 143–145
Formaldehyde Meter.......................534, 583
HC900 Hybrid Control System....... 216–223
Frequency/Rate Indicator.............. 230–231
Heat Stress Monitors.......................544, 579
Frequency Converter.............................. 361
Heat Trace RTDs...................................... Call
FRL........................................................... Call
HercuLine........................................ 335–337
FTIR Analyzer.......................................... 539
Hi-Duty Brass Fittings............................ 464
Furnace Temperature Sensors....... 106–108
HMI Panel........................................ 222–223
Gas Analyzers
Corrosive Gas............................................560, 562
Flame Ionization Detection.................564, 583
Fixed Systems..................................560-565, 568
Hydrocarbon....................................561, 563, 564
Non-Corrosive Gas...........................................560
Oxygen...............................................561-563, 565
HMI Software.......................................... 224
Gas Detection
Controllers.............................. 549–554, 557-558
Leak Detector...........................................534, 583
Transmitters.............................................. 546-548
Personal/Portable Units..... 523-539, 582–583
Hybrid Controller............................ 216–223
Gauges, Pressure
Boiler Service.....................................................430
Differential................................................ 436–438
Digital...................................................................424
Filter......................................................................436
General Purpose............................422–423, 431
Liquid-Filled............................................. 424–427
Low Pressure......................................................431
Mechanical Contractor’s (HVAC).................430
Panel Mount.......................................................423
Pressure/Temperature Combo....................430
Sanitary................................................................432
Sprinkler..............................................................430
Test........................................................................431
Welding/Compressed Gas............................430
Infrared Thermal Imaging System......... 121
Infrared
Thermometers...... 117–121, 440, 526, 584
Inspection Scope, Digital....................... 584
Instrument Valves................... 339–348, 433
Intrinsic Safety Barriers.......................... Call
I/O Modules...... 129, 134–137, 139, 220, 361
Ionization Pilots for Gas Burners........... 292
I/P Transducers........................................ 359
Kwik-Connect.......................................... 449
LandScan IR Scanner.............................. 119
Level
Application Datasheet..............476 and
Batch Process Management........................... 15
Bubbler Kit............................................................ 18
Capacitance/RF, Point...................................5–10
Capacitance/RF, Continuous.................... 22–23
Flange Mount Transmitter ...................... 20–21
HygroClip........................................ 180–194
Level (continued)
Float Switches.........................................................2
Load Cells....................................................... 12–14
Open Channel Flow........................................... 76
Point....................................................................2–11
Radar, Guided Wave.................................... 48–49
Radar, Tank..................................................... 36–54
Rotating Paddle (Solids)......................................3
Servo Gauge.................................................. 50–51
Submersible Transmitter.......................... 16–17
Tank Switch......................................................2–11
Ultrasonic................................................ 10, 24–35
Vibrating Fork (Solids).........................................4
Hygrometers................................... 180–183
Level Indicators...............226–229, 232–235
IAQ....................................................519, 580
Limit
Controller.............. 196, 198–201, 210, 213
Hose Fittings........................................... 452
Human Vibration Meter......................... 584
Humidity
Dataloggers........................................................182
Transmitters/Sensors............................ 180–184
Hydronic Manometer............................. 518
HydroRanger..............................................31
In-Situ Gas Analyzers......................565, 568
Indicators, Panel or Field Mount
Annunciator.......................................................236
Digital Readout....................................... 226–236
High Voltage......................................................227
Intrinsically Safe...................................... 233–235
Large Display...................................226, 232, 235
Level......................................... 226–229, 232–235
Modbus...................................................... 227–231
pH Indicator/Controller........................ 161–168
Process....................................................... 226–236
Temperature..................226–229, 232, 235, 445
Totalizer/Rate Meter............230–231, 233, 235
Indoor Air Quality Meter.................519, 580
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Handheld Communicator
Meriam HART Handheld.................................. 95
Siemens IS Programmer...............26–33, 36–47
Thermometers
Infrared Gas Detection Sensors......546-548
HB pH Probe.................................... 170–171
Gauge Valves........................... 341–342, 348
501
Geiger Counter....................................... 585
Force Gauge............................................ 584
Gauge Protectors, Pressure................... 433
INDEX BY
PRODUCT
Limit Switch, Combustion....... 263, 288–289
Linearizers.......206–209, 215–220, 228–231
Linescanners........................................... 119
Liquid Analyzer, Fixed............................ 569
Liquid-Filled Pressure Gauges....... 424–427
Liquid-Filling Service............................. 434
Load Cells............................................ 12–14
Loop Accessories............................ 349–366
Loop Controllers............ See PID Controllers
Value-Added Services
Flowmeters
Calibrator/Verificator........................................ 68
Clamp-On Ultrasonic.................................. 72–75
Coriolis..................................................... 64, 70–71
Direct Reading (Integral Orifice)................... 59
Magnetic................................................. 64, 66–69
Mass, Coriolis.......................................... 64, 70–71
Mass, Multivariable............................................ 63
Mass, Vortex.......................................................... 65
Open Channel .................................................... 76
Rotameters........................................................... 58
Solids............................(See Flow Control, Solids)
Thermal Dispersion.....................................57, 61
Turbine................................................................... 60
Ultrasonic Clamp-On.................................. 72–75
Vortex..................................................................... 65
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index and Reference
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Index and Reference
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
INDEX BY
PRODUCT
V 12.2013
502
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index by Product
Loop and Logic
Controllers.................... 211, 215, 216–223
Loop-Powered Indicators....................... 233
Magnehelic.............................................. 438
Magnetic Field Exposure Level Tester... 585
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Magnetic Flowmeter.....................64, 66–69
Manifold Valves.............................. 344–345
Manometer...............................518-519, 580
Mask Adapters.................................531, 586
Mask Fit Testing.......................528-531, 586
Mask Integrity Test Accessory............... 530
Value-Added Services
Mass Flow
Coriolis Meter........................................ 64, 70–71
Multivariable Transmitter................................ 63
Thermal Flowmeters......................................... 61
Vortex Meter........................................................ 65
MC Toolkit..................................................95
Mercury Vapor Monitor...................534, 583
Meters
Indicators, Panel Mount........................ 225-236
Handheld, Milliamp Test.................................355
Non-Dispersive Infrared (NDIR)......561, 563
Nylon Tubing........................................... 455
Nylo-Seal................................................. 453
OCM-III Replacement................................76
Omega Flo....................................... 450–451
One Series Switches....................... 370–373
OneWireless XYR6000.................... 146–158
Open Path Gas Detection Systems........ 553
Optical Particle Counter..........515, 578-579
Orifice Plates, Flange Unions....................62
ORP............................................. See pH/ORP
Oxygen
Combustion..................540–543, 546–548, 558
Dissolved Oxygen.................................. 162–167
Pancake, Level-by-Weight.................. 12–13
Panel Meters...........................See Indicators
Paperless Recorders...............See Recorders
Index and Reference
Index and Reference
Minitrend Video Recorder.............. 250–254
Perimeter Dust Monitoring.................... 579
Modbus Meter................................. 227–231
Personal Aerosol Monitor.......514, 578-579
Modulair FRLs......................................... Call
Personal Heat Stress Monitors.......544, 579
Modutrol Actuator Motors..............285, 338
Personal Noise Monitor...........520-521, 585
Motion Switches............................. 188–189
Personal Sampling Pumps......523-524, 581
Motors............................. 281, 285, 333–338
pH/ORP............................................ 160–172
Motors, Damper Drive............................ Call
Photohelic............................................... 438
Mounting Brackets for
Level Transducers....................................35
Photoionization Detector...............538, 583
Nanoparticle Counter............................. 515
Natural Gas Analyzer.............................. Call
Needle Valves.................................. 346–347
NEMA/IEC Enclosure Ratings......... 486–487
Next Generation............................. 395–397
Noise Dosimeters.....................520-521, 585
Noise Monitoring.....................520-522, 585
PortaCount...............................529-531, 586
Potable Water Valve................................ 405
Position Indicator, Solenoid................... 407
Positioner........................................ 350–353
Power Sensor/Transmitter............. 360–361
Power Supplies............................... 362–363
Precision Test Gauges............................. Call
Peeper..................................................... 269
Multitrend Video Recorder............ 250–254
Poly-Tite (Poly-Flo)......................... 448–449
PAC (Process Automation
Controller)....................206–209, 215–223
Minipeeper.............................................. 269
MultiRanger...............................................30
Poly-Flo Tubing....................................... 454
Primary Flow Calibrator..................525, 581
PDM (SIMATIC) Software...........................96
Multipoint Temperature Sensors.......... 109
Pointek Point Level................................5–11
Ozone Spot Checker............................... 583
Minimux.................................................. 236
Multigas Detector....................536-537, 582
Pneumatic (continued)
Positioner.................................................. 350–353
Pressure Calibrator...........................................364
Solenoid Valves....................................... 389–420
Tube Fittings......................... 448–453, 457–466
Tubing........................................................ 454–456
Pressure
Alarming Monitor.............................................384
Calibrators...........................................................364
Controllers, Mechanical...............288, 374–384
Electronic Switch.................................... 370–373
Gauges....................................................... 421–348
Limiters................................................................433
Regulators...........................................................358
Snubbers.............................................................433
Switches..................................................... 370–384
Switches, Gas Train........................262, 288–289
Transmitters.................................................. 77–96
Pressure Regulator
Air...........................................................................352
Process....................................................... 296–299
Sanitary................................................................317
Prestolok......................................... 450–451
PID Controllers................................ 195–220
Probes — See Temperature Sensors, pH/
ORP, Conductivity, Dissolved Oxygen
Pigtail Syphons....................................... 433
Process Chemical Analyzer.................... 569
Pipe Fittings.................................... 464–466
Process Gas Analytics......................559-568
Pitot Tube...................................................62
Process Liquid Analytics........................ 569
Plastic Tubing.................................. 454–456
Process Signal (4-20 mA)
Calibrators...........................................................364
Controllers................................................ 195–220
Indicators.................................................. 225–236
PLC Annunciator..................................... 236
PLC Process Controller................... 216–224
Pneumatic
Bubbler for Liquid Level................................... 18
Control Valves..............303–315, 317, 321–332
Damper Drives..................................................Call
Gauges....................................................... 422–423
I/P...........................................................................359
Programmer, Setpoint............................ 214
PS2 Positioner................................. 352–353
P-Trak................................................515, 578
Pump, Hand............................................. 364
Pump Controllers..................See Controllers
Rotameters.................................................56
Purge Timer Card.................................... 266
Rotary Impingement.............................. 570
Purple Peeper......................................... 269
Safeties.........................See Limit Controllers
Pyrometers........See Infrared Thermometers
Safety Shutoff Valve
(SSOV)........................................... 278–284
SIL-Rated Instruments
Flame Scanner...................................................272
Hybrid Control System...............................60-67
Level Transmitters........................................20-21
Pressure Switch........................................ 370-373
Temperature Switch............................... 370-373
Sample Cooler, Sanitary......................... 318
Single Gas Detector.................533, 535, 582
Sampling Pumps, Air...............523-524, 581
Slidewire Motors............................. 333–338
Smart Transmitters
Absolute Pressure....................................... 90–91
Differential Pressure................................... 84–89
Flow, Multivariable............................................. 63
Gage Pressure............................................... 92–93
Level.......................................................... 18, 20–21
Pressure.......................................................... 84–93
Temperature............................................. 111–116
Regulator................................................. 295
Airset.....................................................................358
Back Pressure............................................300, 317
Bubbler.................................................................. 18
Hygienic...............................................................317
Pilot-Operated...................................................298
Pressure..................................................... 296–299
Sanitary................................................................317
Temperature.......................................................301
Sanitary
Ball Valve..............................................................318
Check Valve.........................................................318
Chemical Seals, Pressure...................... 434–435
Concentration Refractometer............ 176–177
Conductivity Probes...............................173, 175
Control Valve............................................ 316–319
Coriolis Flowmeters.....................................64, 71
Durafet pH Electrode.............................169, 172
Flow Switches....................................................Call
Load Cells for Level............................................ 14
Level Switches, Capacitive.............................6–7
Level Transmitters, Capacitive........................ 23
Level Transmitter, Radar............................ 40–41
Magmeters............................................. 64, 66–69
Pressure Gauges...............................................432
Pressure Regulators.........................................317
Pressure Transmitters..................................79, 81
Recorder, HTST Dairy............................. 244–246
Recorder, Pasteurization Flow ........... 244–246
Refractometer (Concentration)......... 176–177
RTDs......................................................................100
Sample Cooler...................................................318
Sight Glass..........................................................318
Steam Trap..........................................................318
Thermal Mass Flowmeters.............................. 61
Thermometers...................................................Call
Thermostatic Disc Trap...................................318
Toroidal Conductivity Probe........................175
Turbine Flowmeters........................................Call
Vortex Flowmeters............................................. 65
Relative Humidity (RH)............ See Humidity
SCADA Software..................................... 274
Remote Seals............... See Diaphragm Seals
Scanner, Infrared Thermal...................... 119
Repeater
4-20 mA...............................................................361
Wireless....................................127, 131, 134–137
Screen Designer...................... 222–223, 254
Q-Trak...............................................519, 580
Qualitative Fit Testing............................ 528
Quantitative Fit Testing...........529-531, 586
QuesTemp........................................544, 579
QX Recorder.................................... 250–254
Radar Tank Level Gauge..................... 52–54
Radiation Alert Detector........................ 585
Radio Modems...........................See Wireless
Rate Meters............................. 230–231, 235
Recorders
Chart Paper.........................238, 240, and
Circular Chart........................................... 239–246
Dewpoint/Humidity........................................182
Paperless (Video).................................... 247–254
Stripchart............................................................Call
Temperature Labels.........................................446
Refractive Index Table............................ 489
Refractometer................................. 176–179
Refrigerant Gas Monitor........................ 557
Refrigerant System Tester...................... 518
Respirator Fit Testing..............528-531, 586
Rotorflow....................................................58
RTDs: Resistance Temperature Detectors
Accessories.........................................................105
Assembly Kit.......................................................122
Calibrators................................................. 364–365
Sensor Assemblies....................................98–100
Transmitter with Dial Thermometer..........444
Wire.......................................................................105
Seals............................. See Diaphragm Seals
SMV Smart Multivariable..........................63
Snooper Meter........................................ 227
Snubbers
Electronic/Relay, Quencharc.........................211
Pressure............................................................ 4333
Software
900 Control Station Designer.............. 222–223
Actuator Linkage (HAL, Honeywell)...........337
AMS 2750D Data Analysis.............................255
Batch Control.............................................. 15, 256
CALgrafix.............................................................212
DataView for Clamp-On Ultrasonic.............. 74
Dolphin Plus (Milltronics Level)..................... 32
Hybrid Control Designer (HC900)..............221
iConfig for Siemens 353.................................215
Meriam DPC HART® DD Management....... 95
OneWireless Software....................................149
Process Instrument Explorer (UDCs).........207
RadLink Data Radio (Phoenix Contact)....137
Screen Designer, Paperless Recorders......254
SCT Transmitter Configuration Toolkit........ 95
SIMATIC PDM (HART®)...................................... 96
SITRANS Connection......................................... 75
TrendView Data Acquisition................254, 256
USB to HART Modem........................................ 96
XYR5000 Wireless
Management Toolkit..................................Call
Sensors — See Temperature Sensors, pH/
ORP, Conductivity, or Dissolved Oxygen
Solar Power..............................128, 132, 139
Services........................... 109, 434, 469–474
Solfrunt Gauges.............................. 428–429
Servo Tank Gauges............................. 50–51
Solids Flowmeter..... See Flow Control, Solids
Setpoint Programmers........................... 214
SoloNet.................................................... 118
Sight Glass, Sanitary............................... 318
Sound Level Meter...........................522, 585
Signal Conditioners................................ Call
Speed Switches............................... 188–189
Solenoid Valves...............278–280, 389–420
Thermometers
503
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
INDEX BY
PRODUCT
Value-Added Services
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index and Reference
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Index and Reference
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
INDEX BY
PRODUCT
V 12.2013
504
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index by Product
Stack Gas
Analyzers..............276, 540–543, 345–346
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Steam Trap...................................... 354–357
Capsule Type......................................................356
Delta Element.......................................... 354–355
Float Type............................................................356
Inverted Bucket.................................................357
Thermostatic Disc...................................318, 356
Sanitary.......................................................318, 357
Strain Gauge Meter................................ 229
Strainer, Y-Type....................................... 309
Stripchart Recorders.............................. Call
Value-Added Services
Switches
Differential Pressure........... 370–373, 381–384
Flow.................................................................. 56–58
Level....................................................................2–11
Pressure..................................................... 370–384
Proximity (Presence/Absence).....................5–7
Rotary Motion/Speed........................... 188–189
Solids Flow................................................ 186–187
Temperature.......................... 370–373, 385–388
Ultra Low Pressure...........................................384
Submersible Transmitters.................. 16–17
SX Recorder............................. 247, 250–254
Index and Reference
Syphons................................................... 433
Index and Reference
Tank Level Monitoring....................... 36–54
Tail Gas Analyzer.................................... 568
Tank Cleaning System............................ 570
Tank Level Control Systems
Capacitance................................................... 22–23
Load Cell......................................................... 12–14
Microwave/Radar........................................ 36–54
Servo Gauges................................................ 50–51
Ultrasonic....................................................... 24–35
Tank Temperature Sensors.................... 109
Technology Selection Guides
Actuator Motors................................................334
Analytical Systems................................. 162–163
Ball Valves............................................................320
Belt Scale Systems............................................190
Bulk Solids Flowmeters..................................194
Burner Controls.................................................264
Circular Chart Recorders................................239
Control Valves....................................................302
Digital Controllers...................................197, 203
Fitting/Tubing Compatibility.......................451
Flame Detectors.......................................268, 272
Flow Instrumentation....................................... 57
Industrial Burner Systems.............................290
Industrial Flame Monitors.............................275
Instrument Valves.............................................340
Technology Selection Guides (continued)
Integrators, Solids Flow..................................193
Level Instrumentation............19, 37, 43, 51, 54
Paperless (Video) Recorders................247, 256
Pressure/Temperature Switches....... 368–369
Radar Level Instruments............................37, 43
Regulators...........................................................295
Solenoid Valves.....................278, 390–393, 410
Solids Flowmeters............................................194
Speed Sensors...................................................191
Steam Traps........................................................354
Temperature Transmitters.............................110
Tube Fittings and Tubing...............................451
Ultrasonic Flowmeters...................................... 72
Ultrasonic Level................................................... 24
Weighfeeder Systems.....................................192
Wireless Ethernet Radios...............................138
Wireless Radio Antennae...............................142
Wireless Transmitters......................................125
Temperature
Alarm Systems...................................................236
Calibrator................................................... 364–365
Controllers................................................ 195–224
Dial Thermometers................................ 441–444
Indicators.......................226–227, 229, 232, 235
Infrared..............................................117–121, 440
Multipoint Sensors...........................................109
Recording Labels..............................................446
Regulator.............................................................301
Sensors..........................................................98–109
Switches.................................. 370–373, 385–388
Thermal Imaging.........120–121, 440, 526, 584
Thermometers......................................... 439–446
Transmitters. 99, 110–116, 129–131, 145, 153
Tubeskin Sensors.................................... 106–108
Uniformity Survey Recorders.......................255
Temp-Plate.............................................. 446
Test Gauges............................................. 431
Thermal Imaging
Camera.................. 120–121, 440, 526, 584
Thermocouple Health/Drift Detection
HC900 Hybrid Control System........... 216–223
Trendview (X-Series GR) Recorders.. 247–256
UDC Controllers...................................... 196–209
Thermocouples
Assemblies............................. 101–104, 106–107
Custom Assemblies.........................................Call
Flame Detection...............................................268
Tolerances, Color Codes.................................495
Transmitters............................................. 110–116
Wire and Accessories......................................105
With Dial Thermometer.................................444
Thermometers
Bimetallic................................................... 442–444
Dial............................................................... 441–444
Digital................................................440–442, 445
Industrial................................................... 442–445
Infrared,
Non-Contact.............117–121, 440, 526, 584
Pocket...................................................................441
Recording Labels..............................................446
Remote Reading...............................................444
Solar Powered....................................................442
Surface.................................................................442
Thermoplastic Tubing.................... 454–456
Thermostatic Disc Trap....................318, 356
Thermowells.........................99, 13, 387, 442
Totalizers
Hybrid Controller/PAC.......................... 216–220
Indicating.................................................. 230–231
Recording.................................................. 239–254
TouchTemp II.......................................... 116
Toxic Gas Properties............................... 491
Toxic/Combustible Gas Monitor............ 558
Transducers
I/P Current to Pressure....................................359
Level, Echomax Ultrasonic....................... 34–35
Two-Wire Current (CT)....................................360
Transmitters
Concentration.......................................... 176–179
Conductivity............................................. 161–168
Current, Electrical................................... 360–361
Differential Pressure................................... 84–89
Dissolved Oxygen.................................. 162–167
Draft Range................................................... 88–89
Flange Mounted, Level.............................. 20–21
Flow, Magnetic...................................... 64, 66–69
Flow, Turbine........................................................ 60
Flow, Thermal.................................................57, 61
Flow, Open Channel.......................................... 76
Frequency...........................................................361
Humidity.................................................... 180–184
Level................................................................. 16–54
Load Cell......................................................... 12–14
Mass Flow.................................. 61, 63–64, 70–71
Multivariable (Mass Flow)................................ 63
Oxygen, Combustion/Stack..........................Call
pH................................................................ 161–168
Pressure..............................16–18, 20–21, 78–93
Smart............................... See Smart Transmitters
Temperature............................................. 110–117
Voltage/Potential.............................................361
TrendManager Software Suite.............. 256
TrendServer Pro...................................... 256
Trident..................................................... 226
Truline.............................................. 244–246
Tube Fittings.............................. See Fittings
Tube Working Tools................ 456, 467–468
Tubeskin Sensors............................ 106–108
Tubing Compatibility Table............451, 494
Tubing, Plastic................................. 454–456
Type 1/2 Sound Level Meters..........522, 585
Ultrasonic
Flowmeter, Clamp-On................................ 72–75
Level Controller/Transmitter............ 11, 24–35
Open Channel Flow........................................... 76
Transducer/Sensor...................................... 34–35
UDA Analytical Analyzer................ 164–165
UDC Loop Controllers..................... 196–209
UL-Approved Limit
Controllers.... 196, 198–201, 210–211, 213
UV Detectors...268–269, 272–274, 276–277
Vacuum
Gauges..............................................422–430, 432
Switches............................................374, 376–380
Transmitter....................... See Absolute Pressure
Valve Actuators............... 281, 285–286, 309
Valve Position..................................157, 361
Valves, Ball............................. See Ball Valves
Valves, Control
Aseptic Service..................................................319
Butterfly..................................................... 310–315
Cage......................................................................304
Firesafe, Ball.............................................. 326–329
Fractional Flow........................................ 306–307
Globe.......................................................... 305–306
Low Flow................................................... 306–307
Sanitary...................................................... 316–319
Sliding Gate.............................................. 303–304
Valves, Firing Rate.................. 282, 285–286
Valves, Instrument
Bleed.....................................................................343
Block......................................... 341–343, 347–348
Drain.....................................................................348
Gauge Shut-Off..............................341–342, 348
Instrument Manifold............................. 344–345
Needle, Shut-Off............................346–347, 438
Power....................................................................348
Root..............................................................341, 348
Syphon.................................................................347
Valves, Sanitary/Aseptic................. 316–319
Valves, Solenoid
Accessories.........................................................420
Air and Water, Three Way...............................414
Dust Collector....................................................408
Food Safe.............................................................405
Fuel Oil.................................................................409
Gas Fuel Shut-Off.............................................411
General
Service......400, 402–403, 412–413, 418–419
High Pressure.....................................................404
Hot Water and Steam......................................401
Intrinsically Safe................................................417
Lead-Free.............................................................405
Low Pressure............................................ 398–399
Pad Mount..........................................................417
Pilot-Operated, Slow-Closing.......................405
Potable Water....................................................405
Quick Exhaust....................................................415
Spool Valves.......................................................416
Severe Duty Piston................................. 406–407
Vari-Damp............................................... 433
V-Cone........................................................62
VelociCalc.........................................516, 580
Verificator, Magmeter................................68
Ventilation Test Hood......................517, 580
Ventilation Test Instrument....516-518, 580
Vibra-Lok................................................. 463
Vibration Meter...................................... 584
Viscosity Table........................................ 489
Volatile Organic Compound
Detector.........................................538, 583
Video
Camera, Surveillance.......................................141
Camera, Thermal Imaging...........440, 526, 584
Recorders.................................................. 247–256
Vortex Flowmeter......................................65
Web-Enabled
Analytical Systems................................. 164–165
Experion DCS, HMI, and
SCADA Systems............................................224
HC900 Control Station HMI................ 222–223
Infrared Thermometry...........................118, 121
Recorders.................................................. 247–256
Weighfeeders.................................. 192–193
Wireless
802.11.......................................131, 138–139, 146
Accessories, Cables, Connectors.........132, 138
Antennae....................................................132, 142
Battery-Power..................................128, 132, 554
Bluetooth I/O.....................................................141
Cameras, Surveillance.....................................141
Cellular Industrial Wireless............................140
DeviceNet...........................................................146
Ethernet.........................131, 138–139, 554–555
Field Device Access Point..............................150
Field Enclosures.......................................132, 138
Foundation Fieldbus.......................................146
Gas Detection Systems................554–555, 557
Gateways..................................128, 131, 144, 555
GSM.......................................................................140
HART® Wireless..............................143–145, 151
I/O (Input/Output).....127, 129–130, 134–137
ISA100 Compatible................................ 146–158
Mesh........................................................... 146–147
Modbus Gateway.............................................131
Modbus Modem..................................... 136–139
Multiplexer, I/O...............................136–137, 141
OneWireless............................................. 146–158
Pre-Mapped Radio Kit.....................................127
Radio Modems..................... 136–137, 140–141
Repeaters................................127, 131, 134–137
Sensors..............................................152–158, 554
Serial Modbus Server...................131, 136–139
Serial Sensors.....................................................131
Solar Power.......................................128, 132, 139
Transmitters/Transducers...........152–158, 554
Trusted Wireless...................................... 134–139
WiFi.............................................................. 138–139
Wired-In/Wired-Out.............................. 134–137
Wireless Device Manager..............................149
WirelessHART®........................................ 143–145
Wireless Management Toolkit (WMT)......Call
XYR5000 Battery-Powered Sensors...........Call
XYR6000 Transmitters........................... 152–158
Wiring, Standard Diagrams.................... 495
XYR Family Wireless Transmitters
XYR5000 Transmitters.....................................Call
XYR6000 Transmitters........................... 152–158
XNX.................................................. 546–547
Y-Type Strainer....................................... 309
Zero Speed Switch.................................. 189
Can’t find what you need? Visit www.Lesman.com or call
Lesman inside sales at 800-953-7626.
Thermometers
505
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Triac Valves......................310–313, 322–332
Valves, Safety
Shutoff........................................... 278–284
INDEX BY
PRODUCT
Value-Added Services
TrendView....................................... 247–256
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index and Reference
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Index and Reference
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
INDEX BY
BRAND
V 12.2013
506
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index by Brand
R 3M Quest
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Noise Dosimeters and Indicators................................520-521, 585
Sound Level Meters.................................................................. 522, 585
Detection Management Software...................................... 520, 585
Heat Stress Monitors................................................................ 544, 579
Particulate/Air Quality Monitor............................................ 512, 578
L A-T Controls (Triac Controls)
Value-Added Services
Butterfly Valves...........................................................................310–313
Fire Safe Flanged Ball Valves..................................................326–329
FM-Approved Butterfly Valves
for Safety Shutoff...............................................282–283, 330–331
Manual and Automated Ball Valves....................................322–332
L Absolute Process Instruments (APi)
Process Signal Conditioners and Transmitters.........................361
R Alnor (a TSI Company)
See TSI
L Ametek Land
Cyclops Portable Digital Infrared Thermometers....................440
Digital Industrial Infrared Thermometers.........................117–118
Infrared Process Imaging and Scanning...........................119–121
Index and Reference
L Ametek US Gauge
Index and Reference
Digital Temperature Indicators (DT-8310)........................ 232, 445
General Purpose and Utility Gauges
P500 Low Cost Drawn Steel and Brass Gauges....................422
P590 ABS Plastic and Brass Gauges.........................................421
P844U/P845FF/P562U Panel Mount Gauges........................423
Glass Tube Thermometers................................................................441
Liquid-Filled Gauges
1550 Series 1.5” to 4” Stainless Steel Gauges........................425
656 Series 2.5” or 4” Stainless Steel Gauges..........................427
Solid Front Process Gauges.............................................................428
Special Application Gauges
Boiler Service Gauges...................................................................430
HVAC Contractor’s Gauge............................................................430
Low Pressure Diaphragm Gauges............................................430
Portable 3” Test Gauges................................................................431
Stainless Steel Pressure Gauges...................................... 427, 431
Welding and Compressed Gas Regulator Gauges..............430
L Anderson Greenwood & Company
Crossover to Equivalent Hex Valve Products..............................340
R Applied Analytics
Tail Gas/Air Demand Analyzer........................................................568
Process Liquid Chemical Analyzer................................................569
L AquaMetrix (by Water Analytics)
2300 Multi-Input Analytical Controller........................................161
Conductivity Cells...............................................................................173
Differential Measurement pH/ORP Replacement Probes.....160
Shark Transmitters and Analyzer/Controllers............................161
L ASCO Valve Co
Adjustable Electronic Timer............................................................420
Adjustable Flow Control Valves......................................................420
Air and Water Solenoid Valves........................................................414
Aluminum Body Solenoid Valves...................................................399
Combustion System Solenoid Valves........................278, 410–411
Direct-Mount Inline Spool Valves..................................................416
Dust Collector Solenoid Valves.......................................................408
Exhaust Mufflers..................................................................................420
Fuel Oil Solenoid Valves....................................................................409
Gas Safety Shutoff Valves..............................................279, 410–411
General Service
Solenoid Valves......................400, 402–403, 412–413, 418–419
High Pressure Solenoid Valves.......................................................404
Hot Water and Steam Solenoid Valves.........................................401
Intrinsically Safe Solenoid Valves...................................................417
Lead-Free Composite Solenoid Valve
for Potable Water Use....................................................................405
Low Pressure Solenoid Valves.........................................................398
Miniature Solenoid Valves......................................................402–403
Next Generation Low Power Solenoid Valves.................395–397
Pad Mount (Directly on Actuator) Solenoid Valves.................417
Pilot-Operated, Slow-Closing Solenoid Valves..........................405
Quick Exhaust Solenoid Valves.......................................................415
Severe Duty Piston Valves......................................................406–407
Two-Way Strainers..............................................................................420
L Banner Engineering
Surecross Wireless I/O Field Devices..................................126–130
DX80 Electrician’s Pre-Mapped Radio Kits.................................127
Wireless Ethernet Data Radios.................................................... 1331
Wireless Antenna, Power, and Enclosure Kits............................132
L Bestobell Steam
Steam Traps.................................................................................354–357
R BW Technologies by Honeywell
MicroDock II Test and Calibration Station..................................535
Portable/Personal Gas Detectors.....................535–537, 582–583
L CAL Controls (See West Controls)
L Cecomp
DPG1000 High Accuracy Digital Pressure Gauges..................424
L Chicago Stainless Equipment
3.5” and 5” Sanitary Gauges.............................................................432
L Cooper-Atkins
Digital Type K Thermocouple Thermometers...........................441
L C R Magnetics
Current Transmitters/Indicators/Relays.......................................360
R Enmet Corp
Handheld Formaldehyde Monitor...................................... 534, 583
L Fireye
Burner Control Systems..........................................................270–271
Flame Scanners..........................................................................272–273
R Gamajet
Tank Cleaning Systems......................................................................570
R Gasmet Technologies
FTIR Ambient Air Gas Analyzer.......................................................539
L Gayesco (A WIKA Company)
Multipoint Temperature Sensors...................................................109
Services for Tubeskin Sensor Installations.................................108
Tubeskin Temperature Sensors............................................106–107
L GEMS Sensor
Flowmeters and Switches.................................................................. 58
Float-Type Level Switches.....................................................................2
L Graphic Controls
Recorder Charts and Pens IN STOCK at Lesman.......................238
L Hex Valve
Crossover from Anderson-Greenwood Series..........................340
Block Valves................................................................................. 341, 348
Gauge Block and Bleed Valves..............................................342–343
Needle Valves.....................................................................346–347, 433
Sample and Drain Valves..................................................................348
Valve Manifolds..........................................................................344–345
R Honeywell Analytics
Commercial Gas Detection Controllers.............................557–558
Fire Sentry Fire and Flame Detectors...........................................556
Fixed Gas Detection Transmitters...............................546–548, 552
Industrial Gas Detection Controllers..................................549–553
L Honeywell Process Solutions
Actuator Motors...................................................................................334
HAL Actuator Motor Linkage Analysis Software.................337
HercuLine® 10260A Rotary Actuator Motors.............336–337
HercuLine® 10260S Smart Actuator Motors.........................336
HercuLine® 2000 Precision Smart Actuators........................335
Modutrol IV Rotary Actuator Motors............................. 285, 338
Analytical Measurement Systems.......................................162–163
APT2000/APT4000 Analytical Process Transmitters...........168
Conductivity Cell Assemblies...........................................174–175
DirectLine Analytical Systems..........................................166–167
DL5000 Equilibrium Probe for Dissolved Oxygen .............167
HB/HBD Series Rugged pH/ORP Electrodes...............170–171
pH Electrode Mountings..............................................................172
Replacement Electrodes for pH/ORP Measurement.........169
UDA2182 Multiparameter Analyzer Controller.........164–165
Thermometers
507
L Honeywell Process Solutions (continued)
Configuration and Analysis Tools
HAL Actuator Motor Linkage Analysis Software.................337
HC900 Hybrid Control Designer Software............................221
MC Toolkit Pocket PC-Based DE/HART® Configurator........ 95
Process Instrument Explorer Configuration Software.......206
Screen Designer Software for Trendview Recorders.........254
SCT3000 SmartLine Configuration Toolkit.............................. 95
TrendManager and TrendServer Suite
for X-Series GR Paperless Recorders...................................256
DPR Series Digital Stripchart Recorders......................................Call
Charts and Pens..............................................................................238
DR Series Digital Circular Chart Recorders.................................239
Charts and Pens..............................................................................238
DR4300 10” Circular Chart Recorders............................240–241
DR4500 12” Classic Circular Chart Recorder................242–243
DR4500 12” Truline Circular Chart Recorders..............244–246
Experion Control Systems
Experion LX DCS for Process Management..........................224
Experion HS for HMA and SCADA Applications..................224
HC900 Hybrid Control System..............................................216–220
HC900 Hybrid Control Designer Software............................221
900 Control Station Operator Interface........................222–223
LeaderLine Universal Digital Controllers....................................197
UDC100 1/4 DIN Temperature Controller..............................197
UDC1200 1/16 DIN Universal Digital Controller..................196
UDC1700 1/8 DIN Universal Digital Controller....................196
UDC2500 1/4 DIN Universal Digital Controller..........198–201
UDC3200 1/4 DIN Universal Digital Controller..........202–205
UDC3500 1/4 DIN Universal Digital Controller..........206–209
Ramp/Soak Digital Controller Programmers.............................Call
SmartLine Smart Transmitters
Absolute Pressure......................................................................90–91
Differential Pressure.................................................................86–89
Flange Mounted for Liquid Level.........................................20–21
Gauge Pressure..........................................................................92–93
SMV3000 Smart Mass Flowmeter............................................... 63
Temperature...........................................................................111–113
VersaFlow Flowmeters.................................................................64–65
X-Series GR Paperless Video Recorders.............................247–256
eZtrend GR 5” Display Paperless Recorder..................248–249
Minitrend GR 5.5” Display Paperless Recorder...........250–254
Multitrend GR 12.1” Display Paperless Recorder.......250–254
XYR5000 Wireless Transmitter Systems.......................................Call
XYR6000 Wireless Transmitters
OneWireless Wireless Device Manager...................................149
OneWireless Field Device Access Point..................................150
OneWireless HART® Adapter......................................................151
XYR6000 Wireless Field-Mount Transmitters..............152–158
Looking for a product that’s not listed in our catalog? Need more
complete information on an instrument or manufacturer’s offering?
Call your local sales office or visit www.Lesman.com.
L Lesman Manufacturer Partner
R RAECO and RAECO Rents Manufacturer Partner
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Helic® Series Low Differential Pressure Gauges.......................438
INDEX BY
BRAND
Value-Added Services
L Dwyer
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index and Reference
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Index and Reference
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
INDEX BY
BRAND
V 12.2013
508
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index by Brand
A Division of Jordan Valve
L Honeywell Combustion Products
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Value-Added Services
Index and Reference
Burner Controls
7800 Series Burner Control Plug-In Modules.......................267
7800 Series Microprocessor Burner Controls.............264–265
ControLinks™ Integrated Combustion Panels.....................259
ControLinks™ Linkageless Fuel Air Ratio Controls.....262–263
Delphi Combustion Efficiency Panel.......................................260
Intermittent Pilot Ignition Control...........................................288
IRIS Signal Processors for Industrial Burners...............275–277
Q7800 Wiring Subbases...............................................................265
Q5460 Modbus RTU Gateway....................................................267
R78 Series Flame Signal Amplifiers..........................................266
RA890 Protectorelay® Primary Controls.................................265
ST7800 Plug-In Purge Timer Cards...........................................266
Flame Detectors.........................................................................269–269
IRIS Industrial Flame Detectors........................................275–277
Modutrol IV Low-Torque Rotary Actuator Motors......... 285, 338
Sensors and Switches
C437 Mercury-Free Pressure Limit Switches.........................288
C6097 Safety Limit Switches......................................................288
L404F Pressuretrol® Operating Controls................................288
P7810C Pressuretrol® Pressure Controllers...........................263
T6051 Line Voltage Thermostat.................................................287
T631 Airswitch Controller............................................................287
T675A Remote Bulb Temperature Controller.......................287
T775 Digital Temperature Controllers.....................................287
Valves and Actuators
V4055 On-Off Gas Valve Actuators...........................................281
V5055 Gas Safety Shutoff Valves...............................................281
V51E Firing Rate Gas Valves........................................................285
L Honeywell Enraf
854ATG/854XTG Servo Gauges.................................................50–51
SmartRadar 970 Series for Storage Tank Monitoring............... 54
SmartRadar Flexline Tank Gauging System............................52–53
L IDEC
Index and Reference
Switching DC Power Supply.................................................. 122, 363
L Imperial Stride Tools
Flaring Tools for Metal Tubing........................................................467
Tube Cutting and Bending Tools......................................... 456, 468
R Inficon (Photovac)
Portable Flame Ionization Detector for VOCs................. 539, 582
R IN USA
Portable Ozone Spot Checker........................................................583
R Ion Science
GasCheck Gas Leak Detector................................................ 534, 583
Photoionization Detectors for VOC Monitoring............. 538, 583
Portable Mercury Vapor Monitor......................................... 534, 583
L Jordan Valve
Process Regulators....................................................................295–301
Process Control Valves.............................................................302–305
L K-Patents
Process Refractometers for Concentration....................... 176–179
L Kobold
Flow Switches and Transmitters...............................................56–57
Level Switches...........................................................................................2
L Kromschroder
Butterfly Valves and Actuators.......................................................286
Ionization Pilots for Industrial Burners........................................282
Pressure Switches for Gas Applications......................................289
Flame Relays and Burner Control Modules................................274
Ultraviolet Flame Detector...............................................................274
Valvario Solenoid Valves...................................................................280
L LowFlow (a Division of Jordan Valve)
Fractional Flow Control Valves.............................................306–307
Pressure Regulators............................................................................299
R Mark-10
Handheld Digital Force Gauge.......................................................584
L Marsh Bellofram
Air Flow Regulators.............................................................................358
I/P Current to Pressure Transducers..............................................359
L Marwin Valve
V-Ball Type Control Valves......................................................308–309
Y-Type Line Strainers.........................................................................309
Ball Valves.....................................................................................320–321
L Maxon: A Honeywell Company
Burner Systems for Industrial Applications......................290–201
Flow Control, Vent, and Safety Shutoff Valves...........................284
SMARTFIRE® Intelligent Combustion Control System...........261
SMARTLINK® MRV Micro Ratio Valve............................................330
SMARTLINK® Thermal Mass Flowmeter......................................261
L Meriam: A Scott Fetzer Company
MFC4150 HART® Handheld Communicator................................ 95
L Mid-West Instrument
Differential Pressure Gauges.................................................436–437
Differential Pressure Indicators for OEM Use............................436
Model 830/845 Backflow Prevention Test Kits..........................366
Pressure Snubbers and Limiting Valves......................................433
R Morphix Technologies
Direct-Read Gas Monitoring Badges............................................532
Looking for a product that’s not listed in our catalog? Need more
complete information on an instrument or manufacturer’s offering?
Call your local sales office or visit www.Lesman.com.
R MSA Safety
Personal Multigas Detectors...........................................................582
L PACTWare
Configuration Software...................................................................... 94
L Palmer Wahl
DIGI-STEM Field-Mount Digital Thermometers........................445
Temp-Plates® Temperature Recording Labels..........................446
L Parker
Barbed Brass Push-On Couplings..................................................452
Brass Pipe Fittings ....................................................................465–466
Compress-Align Fittings.........................................................458–459
Compression Fittings...............................................................460–461
Hi-Duty® Brass Fittings......................................................................464
Hose Barb Brass Fittings....................................................................452
Other Parker Fittings Available Through Lesman....................457
Parker Needle Valves..........................................................................449
Thermoplastic Tubing..............................................................454–456
Poly-Tite® Fittings.....................................................................448–449
PrestoLok Plus Push-to-Connect Brass Fittings..............450–451
SAE 45° Flared Brass Fittings ................................................462–463
Vibra-Lok Brass Fittings.....................................................................463
L Phoenix Contact
DC Power Supplies............................................................ 122, 362–363
Bluetooth Wireless MUX I/O Multiplexer....................................141
GSM and Bluetooth Wireless Modems..............................140–141
Intrinsically Safe Isolation Barriers................................................Call
Signal Conditioners and Input/Output Modules.....................359
Solar Interface Systems for Remote Power................................139
Uninterruptible Power Supply........................................................362
Wireless Antenna Options..................................................... 137, 142
Wireless Ethernet Radios........................................................138–139
Wireless HART® Gateway and Adapter........................................143
Wireless I/O for Monitoring and Control..........................134–137
L Practical Instrument Electronics (PIE)
Handheld Digital Calibrators.................................................364–365
L Precision Digital
Alarm Annunciators and Scanners...............................................236
Explosion-Proof Digital Indicators......................................234–235
Flow Rate/Totalizers...............................................230–231, 233, 235
Large Display Digital Process Indicators........................... 226, 232
Level Indicator (in Feet/Inches)......................................................236
Loop-Powered Process Indicators.................................................233
Meter Enclosures.................................................................................236
Process Indicators and Panel Meters..................................226–235
ProVu Dual Line Advanced Indicators...............................228–231
Special Application Indicators
DC Voltage Meters..........................................................................227
Modbus® Serial Input Meter.......................................................227
Temperature Indicators.................................................. 227, 229, 235
Trident and Trident X2 Universal Input Meters...............226–227
Thermometers
509
L Pyragon
TouchTemp II Programmable Temperature Transmitter.......116
L Pyromation
Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs)......................... 98–100
Temperature Assembly Parts and Accessories.........................104
Thermocouple and RTD Wire..........................................................105
Transmitter Assemblies....................................................................... 99
Thermocouples..........................................................................102–103
L Quadax Valve
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Handheld Magnetic Field Exposure Level Tester.....................585
INDEX BY
BRAND
Quad Offset Butterfly Valves.................................................314–315
R RAE Systems
Handheld Digital Photoionization Detector.............................583
MeshGuard Wireless Gas Detection System....................544–545
L RCM Industries
Direct Reading Flowmeters for Liquids, Air, or Gas.................... 59
L Reotemp
Vapor-Actuated Remote Reading Dial Thermometers..........444
L Rotronic Instrument
Handheld Humidity/Temperature Indicator.............................183
Humidity Probes..................................................................................184
Humidity/Temperature Dataloggers............................................182
Humidity/Temperature Transmitters.................................180–181
L Sartorius (formerly GWT)
Contego Hygienic Weighing System.............................................. 14
PanCake® Load Cells for Level by Weight..............................12–13
ProBatch+ Batch Processing Software.......................................... 15
L SED Flow Control
Value-Added Services
R NARDA Safety Test Solutions
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index and Reference
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Aseptic Service Diaphragm Valves................................................319
R SE International
Digital Radiation Detector...............................................................585
L Seal Plastics
Nylo-Seal Flareless Tube Fittings...................................................453
R Sensidyne (Gilian)
AP-20S Gas Detection Pump and Sampling Tubes....... 533, 582
Personal Air Sampling Pumps.....................................523–524, 581
Pump Calibrators....................................................................... 525, 581
R Siemens Industry Inc. (Process Analytics)
Extractive Process Gas Analyzers.........................................560–564
In-Situ Process Gas Analyzers.........................................................565
L Lesman Manufacturer Partner
R RAECO and RAECO Rents Manufacturer Partner
Index and Reference
Lesman Instrument Company
V 12.2013
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
INDEX BY
BRAND
V 12.2013
510
Thermometers
Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, and Iowa
Phone: 800-953-7626 • 630-595-8400
Fax: 630-595-2386
Lesman Instrument Company
www.lesman.com
sales@lesman.com
Wisconsin, and Upper Peninsula Michigan
Phone: 800-837-1700 • 262-923-1790
Fax: 262-923-1797
Index by Brand
L Siemens Industry Inc.
Parker Tubing
and Tube Fittings
Value-Added Services
Index and Reference
Index and Reference
353 Process Automation Controller.............................................215
Bubbler System for Liquid Level...................................................... 18
Bulk Solids Flow and Motion Systems
Belt Scales and Accessories...............................................190–191
Digital Integrators for Belt Scales and Weighfeeders........193
MFA 4p Motion Failure Alarm Monitor.........................188–189
SITRANS AS100/CU-02 Acoustic Flow System...........186–187
SITRANS WM100 Zero Speed Switch.......................................189
Solids Flowmeters..........................................................................194
Weighfeeder Systems and Accessories........................192–193
Capacitance Continuous Level Measurement Systems...22–23
Capacitance Point Level Detection Systems
CLS100 Two-Wire Level Switch.......................................................5
CLS200 Point Level Detection Switches.................................6–7
CLS300 Point Level Switch..........................................................8–9
CLS500 Point Level Switch............................................................ 10
Flow Instruments
SITRANS LUT400 Open Channel Flow Controller.................. 76
SITRANS FC Coriolis Mass Flowmeters...............................70–71
SITRANS FM Magnetic Flowmeters.....................................66–69
SITRANS F US Clamp-On Ultrasonic Flowmeters...........72–75
Mechanical Point Level Detection for Bulk Solids...................3–4
Radar Continuous Level Measurement Systems.................. 36, 43
SITRANS LG200 Guided Wave Radar System.....................48–49
SITRANS LR250 Radar for Liquid Storage Levels..............38–39
SITRANS LR260 Radar for Dry Bulk Solids Level...................... 44
SITRANS LR400 FM Radar for Harsh Applications.................. 42
SITRANS LR460 FM Radar for Bulk Solids................................... 45
SITRANS LR560 FM Radar for Bulk Solids............................46–47
SITRANS Probe LR/LR200 Radar for Liquid Tanks............40–41
SIMATIC PDM Configuration Software Utility............................. 96
ULS200 Ultrasonic Point Level Detection Switch...................... 11
Ultrasonic Continuous Level Detection Systems
Echomax Transducers and Accessories...............................34–35
HydroRanger 200 Wastewater Monitoring System............... 31
MultiRanger 100/200 Transceivers............................................... 30
Probe Transmitter for Liquid Level............................................... 25
SITRANS LU01/LU02 Long Range Transceivers........................ 32
SITRANS LU10 Multipoint Long Range Transceiver............... 33
SITRANS LUT400 Ultrasonic Controller................................28–29
SITRANS Probe LU Transmitter for Liquid Level...............26–27
Transmitters
SITRANS P DS III Differential Pressure Transmitter..........84–85
SITRANS P DS III Gauge Pressure Transmitter............18, 82–83
SITRANS P MPS Submersible for Liquid Level.......................... 17
SITRANS P300 Sanitary Pressure Transmitters......................... 81
SITRANS T Temperature Transmitters..............................114–116
Valve Positioners
760 Pneumatic Valve Positioners....................................350–351
SIPART PS2 Electropneumatic Valve Positioner.........352–353
Wireless Instruments
WirelessHART® Adapters and Gateways................................144
WirelessHART® Field Transmitters............................................145
L Steriflow (a Division of Jordan Valve)
Sanitary Process Valves and Accessories..........................316–318
R Svantek
Human Vibration Meter....................................................................584
L Taylor
Digital, Dial, and Glass Bulb Thermometers...............................441
Panel Mount Digital Thermometer...............................................445
Pneumatic Pressure Calibrator with Indicating Gauge..........364
R Testo
Digital Inspection Scope..................................................................584
Digital Thermal Imaging Cameras....................................... 526, 584
Portable Combustion Efficiency Analyzers.............540–543, 584
L Thermal Instrument Company
Inline and Insertion Mass Flowmeters........................................... 61
R TSI
Aerosol Particle Monitors....................................512–515, 578–579
IAQ Measurement Instruments............................................ 519, 580
Perimeter Monitoring Systems............................................. 513, 579
Primary Flow Calibrators........................................................ 525, 581
Respirator Fit Testing Systems......................................528-531, 586
Ventilation Test Instruments........................................516–518, 580
L United Electric Controls
Differential Pressure Switches...........................370–373, 381–384
Thermocouples and RTDs................................................................122
One Series Electronic Switches............................................370–373
Pressure Switches......................................................................370–380
Precision Sensors’ Pressure-Alarming Monitors.......................384
Temperature Switches..........................................370–373, 385–388
TX200 Pressure Transmitter for Harsh Environments............... 81
Wells and Union Connectors...........................................................387
L West Controls (including CAL/Partlow/PMA)
CAL PID Autotune Temperature Controllers...................210–211
CAL9500P 1/6 DIN Programmable Process Controller..........212
CALgrafix Configuration and Analysis Software......................212
CALopc Server Software for SCADA Connectivity..................212
CAL 9000 Series Digital Temperature Controllers...................211
West Plus Series Single Loop PID and Limit Controllers........213
West ProVu 4 Advanced Temperature Controller....................214
L WIKA
Liquid Filled Industrial Gauges............................................. 424, 426
Bimetallic and Industrial Thermometers..........................442–444
Pressure Transmitters....................................................................78–81
Sanitary Service Pressure Transmitters..................................... 79
Special Service Gauges
111.10SP Sprinkler System Gauges.........................................430
611.10 Low Pressure Diaphragm Gauges..............................431
Submersible Transmitter for Liquid Level..................................... 16
Liquid Filled Chemical Seals for Pressure Gauges.........434–435
Loop-Powered Digital Indicator....................................................... 78
Solar-Powered Digital Thermometers.........................................442
Solid Front Process Gauges...................................................428–429
WMI Magnetic Liquid Level Indicator............................................ 19
R Zefon
Handheld Particulate Sampling Pump........................................581
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