Issues 2011 - Magazine - Created: 18.05.2011 14:08:04

Issues 2011 - Magazine - Created: 18.05.2011 14:08:04
For users of Kongsberg Products and services
01/11
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The
FULL PICTURE
magazine
THEME Offshore Opportunities
FINNISH NAVY Hunt When You Can
OFFSHORE MARKET Norway Leads the Way
BP Built with Robustness
“Skarv has the largest gas
processing facility of any FPSO.”
– Tove Ormevik, Platform Manager for BP’s Skarv FPSO
BW Offshore Partnering for Success
BERGEN GROUP First Off
OFFSHORE WORKS An Almost Impossible Task
gentOpportun
Eng nes t es
THEME Inte
Offshore
THE FULL PICTURE MAGAZINE
01/11
Contents
Customer features 2 Remo a Ra s ng he Ba
6 NERC Voyage o D scove y
8
F nn sh Navy Hun When You Can
12 Roya Aus a an Navy Coo Heads
FPSO Features 16BP Bu
w h Robus ness
24BW O sho e Pa ne ng o Success
Offshore Features
28O sho e Ma ke No way Leads he Way
34C ean Des gn O sho e Vesse s Go G een
r&D feature
K-Master
36 SIMAR S mu a ng Comp ex y
40 Be gen G oup F s O
44
Awards
Tra n ng
You-Cen ed Des gn
48Des gn Awa d Success o Kongsbe g Ma
me
50Ocean R g Ep c T a n ng
52
Fu ECDIS T a n ng
As a Features 54 O sho e Wo ks An A mos mposs b e Task
58Sea T ucks G oup A Re ab e Pa ne
Customer Serv ce 62Se v ce ha Looks Fo wa d
63Cus ome Suppo G ow h n S ngapo e
Kong
berg
News
Th u P u M g n
m g n o
nd
u
o KONGSBERG p odu
o
omp m n
op o h m g n
p
on
Kong b g M
m AS
m u p u d o @ ong b g om
Th u P u M g n
o
b
n pd o m
www m ong b g om
64
Less Sound Less S ess
ED TOR AL STAFF
PR NT NG
Gun o H ng M d bø
Kong b g M
m V P d n
Commun
on
Gun o h ng m d bo@ ong b g om
Ed o n h
COPYR GHT
CONTR BUTORS
ADDRESS
Ch
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d@ ong b g om
S u T ewe n
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Ke n Reede
Ry n Sk nne
Kong be g M
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P O Bo 48
NO 3601 K
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T phon + 47 32 28 50 00
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+47 32 28 50 10
Km u p u d o @ ong b g om
MANAG NG ED TORS
ED TOR AL PRODUCT ON
& GRAPH C DES GN
SAY PR & Commun
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D n e Ben o Co
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COVER PHOTO
D g Kund en
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Kong be g M
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As the wor d s appet te for o and gas ncreases and esou ces
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The demand o FPSOs s nc eas ng BP s Ska v FPSO was bu w h
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cons uc on vesse s Offshore Works ecen y efi ed he O sho e
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S ephan u m he on y ded ca ed s a e-o - he-a Dynam ca y Pos oned
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D v ng Suppo Vesse n Ma ays a
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Remora s he company beh nd a new gene a on o o sho e oad ng
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sys
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K
ong
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Research
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Kongsbe g Ma me s comm men o des gn ha mee s he sa e y and
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Seizing Offshore Opportunities
se by ou cus ome s
Gunvor Hat ng M dtbø
Kong be g M
me
V e P e den – Commun
on
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
HILOAD,
RAISING
THE BAR
A groundbreaking offshore loading vessel has navigated
itself into the oil industry’s comfort zone.
:: On January 27, 2011, the residents of the island of
Stord in northern Norway were witness to a remarkable new species. Despite the word ‘Remora’
being on everyone’s lips, it wasn’t a fish, but a technological wonder that promises to revolutionise
the offshore loading and unloading of crude oil.
The locals weren’t alone either, their ranks
swelled with representatives from 13 curious oil
companies who had flown in to observe a 20-day
programme of sea trials, both in the confines of
Klosterfjord and in the open sea off Stord. The
outlandish L-shaped vessel all had come to see
shrugged off 2.5 metre waves and 40 knot winds,
moving nimbly around an Aframax tanker, the
SKS Tana. Smoothly hooking itself up to, manoeuvring, rotating and disconnecting from, the
tanker, HiLoad DP No. 1 was enjoying the attention.
Among those present was Peder Farmen, Chief
Executive of Remora, the company behind a new
generation of offshore loading systems and vessels, of which the HiLoad DP is the first example.
Farmen came to Oslo to meet The Full Picture and
explain, among other things, the company name.
2
Game changer
“The sea trial represents a milestone not only for
Remora, but the entire oil and offshore industry.
HiLoad DP will become a game changer,” claims
Farmen. How so? “It is a ground-breaking solution
for offshore loading into tankers of convenience.
The world has just 60 DP 2 shuttle tankers, as opposed to 1,600 regular tankers. Shuttle tankers
are always needed at the field, so they have to
offload to conventional tankers for long distance
transport. This ties up the fleet. But our HiLoad
DP vessel simply converts a conventional tanker
into a DP Tanker.”
The simplicity is impressive, as confirmed
by oil company executives at the sea trials
asking “why haven’t we thought of this before?” but the benefits are more so, as Farmen explains: “You can load onto your tanker
of choice and ship a cargo without having to
schedule the vessel’s return, you avoid building loading terminals both on- and offshore, you
reduce or avoid the use of tugs, and you vent less
NOx because there are fewer loading stages. So,
whether it’s long-haul crude out of West Africa, or
3
THEME Offshore Opportunities
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
“We are experiencing a
strong global interest,
especially in connection
with operations in West
Africa and Brazil.”
Remora CEO & President,
Peder E. Farmen
• Joined Remora in April 2009; 15 years of
shipping and offshore related industry
experience
• Former positions at Statoil, and Navion
(Managing Director of Navion Shipping
and President of Navion Inc.) and Teekay
(several senior positions)
Peder Farmen, Remora Chief Executive
• Served as board member in Teekay joint
ventures with Statoil and Maersk
• Holds an M.Sc. from the University of
Wisconsin and a BA from BI Norwegian
School of Management
HiLoad DP
Remora’s self-propelled docking and offloading terminal with DP.
• Accommodates any tanker, from Handymax
to VLCC
• Operation at any field, anywhere, any depth
•No modifications needed to tankers
• Parking on FPSO between loadings
from Brazil to the Mexican Gulf and China, you will
get improved fleet management and environmental performance and less need for infrastructure.”
The HiLoad unit connects to any type of tanker,
keeping it at a safe distance from the production
unit during loading. No special requirements or
equipment are required for the tankers. HiLoad is
selfpropelled and easily relocated, and with a DP2
compliant position-keeping system can operate
without assistance from other vessels such as tugs.
Symbiosis
And the name of the company? A Remora is a small
‘suckerfish’ that attaches itself to a larger host fish.
They live in symbiosis, the suckerfish feeding off
host leftovers and cleaning it of parasites. See the
highly manoeuvrable, self-propelled HiLoad DP
No. 1 attach itself to a tanker hull using the company’s suction technology and you quickly get the
picture. Though, unlike the fish, HiLoad can control the position of its host – any standard oil tan4
ker without thrusters or a DP system of its own.
Remora’s patented HiLoad Attachment System
uses a combination of suction cups and friction
pads to maintain a firm 5,000-tonne grip and a
powerful thruster and ballast system to hold a
tanker in position. It is the foundation for Remora’s HiLoad DP concept, which promises to bring
more flexibility and efficiency to offshore loading
and unloading.
“It takes time to evolve a concept like this and
bring it to market... but the suction technology
has worked from day one,” says Farmen.
The HiLoad DP No. 1 vessel is itself the result
of a strong technological and organisational symbiosis. Built at the Aibel Shipyard in Norway, it
features a wealth of sophisticated technology in
addition to Remora’s. Farmer refers to Kongsberg
Maritime’s Integrated Automation System (IAS)
as ‘the heart of HiLoad’. It integrates Dynamic
Positioning, marine automation, navigation, and a
fire, safety, and emergency shutdown system. The
K-Chief marine automation system alone monitors and controls ballast, power management,
thruster control, machinery and bilge systems.
“It’s an integrated package that works seamlessly and is Windows-based for easy use,” explains
Farmen. “We have a long standing relationship
with Kongsberg and a number of their former employees now work as captains for us. They are the
natural first choice for us on the systems side.”
Challenges of raising the bar
Remora and Kongsberg Maritime have overcome
a series of major technical challenges and developed a number of unique processes to bring the
HiLoad DP system to life: “We have enjoyed the
many challenges and mutual expansion of expertise,” explains Farmen.
Some 58 metres tall, HiLoad can handle tankers
from Aframax to VLCC size, and takes just seven
minutes to attach to a hull. However, handling the
massive change in displacement when HiLoad,
with a displacement of 5,300 tonnes, connects to
a tanker with up to 100,000 tonnes was just one
of the challenges that was successfully solved.
The innovative ballast control system uses custom automatic docking and undocking, based on
predefined sequences of valve and ballast pump
operation, with back pressure automatically controlled via integrated PID controllers.
Another major challenge was the power management system. This has to cope with the fact
that HiLoad is equipped with three propulsion
engines with shaft generators, all of which must
run in parallel to get enough power on the grid for
the large ballast pumps.
“We have invested eight years and close to $200
million to develop the portfolio, about 80 percent
of it on the design and construction of HiLoad
DP1,” says Farmen. “Just to indicate the level of
innovation involved, when HiLoad was approved
for commercial activities by Det Norske Veritas in
December, it was the first new ship design they
had approved in the last 10 years.”
Into the comfort zone
Although initially developed as an offshore loading system for crude oil, Remora’s HiLoad technology has given birth to a wide portfolio of solutions,
including import terminals for crude and petroleum, turret mooring for FSOs and FPSOs and add-on
propulsion units for semis, barges and tugs. Remora
offers the HiLoad solutions on a time charter basis
complete with crews of four, keeping capital spending at a minimum and making them financially
attractive for oilfields regardless of short or long
lifespan.
“We built HiLoad DP No. 1 on spec, just to
enter the market. New technology concepts
always experience some adoption time before they get into the industry’s comfort zone.
But with the success of the sea trials and a
week of demonstrations for potential clients,
we are getting there,” enthuses Farmen.
“With the company turning its focus from inno-
vation, development and construction to commercialisation and operations, my job is getting really
interesting!”
And the maritime industry, from tanker owners
and suppliers to FPSO operators and P&I Clubs,
also seems keen to explore new ground with Remora’s technology. “We are experiencing a strong
global interest, especially in connection with operations in West Africa and Brazil,” says Farmen,
“and we are now discussing HiLoad DP No. 1 doing
tailored operational tests for major customers, the
first in the North Sea in April and the next offshore Brazil in June.”
Remora is also optimistic about landing long
contracts to enable the building of two more
HiLoad DPs: “Our goal is to have a fleet of HiLoad
DPs and to continue the development of HiLoad
vessels with Kongsberg Maritime as a key partner.
Remember, the next vessel will be faster to build
and cost much less, probably about $100 million,”
concludes a clearly confident Farmen. ::
5
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine :: Portrait by Charlotte Nexmark
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
The RRS Discovery
Hi-tech delivery
• Length of 99.7 metres,
breadth of 18 metres
•Delivery summer 2013
•Total project cost of
GBP 75 million
Kongsberg Maritime technology and systems
integration delivery contract: NOK 34 million.
Components:
• Hydrography – Deepwater Multibeam
EM122 (1ºx1º), medium water wideband
Multibeam EM710 (2ºx2º), single-beam
EA600 and for geophysics applications,
sub-bottom profiler SBP120
• Fishery Research – Simrad EK60 scientific
multi-frequency echosounder
Hi-tech integration
VOYAGE
OF DISCOVERY
The Full Picture met Vicente Carrasco, part of a large multidisciplinary Kongsberg
Maritime team helping to move the frontiers of oceanographic research.
Vicente Carrasco, Sales Manager, Kongsberg Maritime Subsea, Spain
:: Vicente Carrasco, Sales Manager at Kongsberg
Maritime’s Subsea Department in Spain, has been
following the contract for the construction of a remarkable oceanographic research vessel that will
provide a state-of-the-art platform for researchers to investigate some of the world’s most pressing environmental issues.
The hi-tech wonder is the result of collaboration
between leading scientists, ship designers, a shipbuilder and technologists from the UK, Norway
and Spain. When we meet Carrasco, he had just
left the Freire Shipyard in Vigo, Northern Spain
where the vessel’s first module is now on the slipway. His colleagues have already begun engineering, production and planning of the comprehensive integrated systems package that will be the
‘brains behind the brains’ aboard the ship.
6
Freire has been contracted to construct the RRS
Discovery, a floating mega-laboratory around a
hundred metres in length and 18 metres wide,
by the Natural Environment Research Council
(NERC), a leading UK research agency.
World’s most advanced
The RRS Discovery is designed to be the world’s
most advanced multirole oceanographic vessel. As
an enthusiastic Carrasco explains: “RRS Discovery
will be able to operate worldwide, from tropics to ice edge, and provide a superbly equipped
platform for researchers to address some of the
world’s most pressing environmental issues.”
Capable of working in high sea-states, it will
complement the work of NERC’s other multi-role
research vessel, the RRS James Cook. The ves-
L-R sitting: Robin William, Andrew Jeffries, Ed
Cooper from NERC, Michael Alvarez and Maria
Taboada from Freire shipyard. L-R standing: Kjetil
Aakjesaar, Vicente Carrasco, Jan Haug Kristensen,
Miguel Angel Lleches from Kongsberg Maritime,
Jorge Martin & Pilar Díaz-Pache from Freire
shipyard.
sel will be packed with 75 million euros worth of
state-of-the-art technology for investigating the
oceans’ role in climate change, mapping sea bottom terrains and exploring unique and undiscovered ecosystems across the planet.
NERC Chief Executive, Professor Alan Thorpe,
underlines the new ship’s importance for the scientific community: “The RRS Discovery will enable researchers to make measurements of the
oceans leading to vital evidence regarding climate change, marine ecosystems and underwater
earthquakes and landslides, which will, in turn,
support our mission to understand the role of the
oceans in the Earth system. I am very pleased that
UK science will continue to have vital world-class
facilities well into the future.”
A suite of cutting-edge hydro acoustic instruments is the largest delivery in an integrated package of Kongsberg Maritime technology (including
hydrographic, fishery research, geophysics, navigation, Dynamic Positioning and CCTV systems)
that the RRS Discovery is being fitted with.
Their benefits are many, as Carrasco explains:
“The hydro acoustics are advanced enough to
identify individual fish species; the manoeuvring
system uses dynamic positioning, allowing the
vessel to remain in exactly the same spot when
underwater vehicles or sensors are deployed. And
the hydro acoustic mapping system produces
large real-time 3D imaging of the seabed, with a
dimension corridor 11,000 metres deep and up to
42 kilometres wide.”
Although Kongsberg Maritime has provided
systems for many advanced research vessels,
the RRS Discovery is in a class of its own with
regard to complexity and systems integration: “It
has involved lots of advanced engineering,” says
Vicente. “The 121-square-metres of laboratory
has space for up to 28 scientists. In dialogue with
NERC, we have created intuitive interfaces that
allow flexible graphic presentation of research
data – so it’s hardly a standard delivery.”
In close co-operation with NERC, high levels of
integration have been developed across the entire
package. “We have become more than a systems
supplier for RRS Discovery, through working
closely with the shipyard and NERC during the
entire project,” comments Vicente. “We are providing the dedicated project management service
that this type of project demands.”
The collaboration between NERC and Kongsberg
Maritime to develop and integrate systems for
RRS Discovery is an exciting process for Carrasco
and his colleagues: “NERC is a highly advanced
organisation with highly specific needs; they represent the sort of challenge that brings out the
best in us... that focuses everyone on win-win
knowledge development.”
Kongsberg Maritime can deliver high-level integration because it is the only supplier with a full
portfolio of maritime systems, from bridge navigation to biomass monitoring: “The combination of
our integration experience and the interoperability
of our systems gives a shipyard complete confidence in our ability to deliver,” continues Carrasco.
Multi-disciplinary collaboration
Along with this focus on total solution delivery, the project also requires multidisciplinary
strength and reach, with people on the ground in
both the UK and Spain. Kongsberg Maritime sales
divisions, along with their local offices in the UK
and Spain, have worked closely together to ensure
success.
“We hold the reigns at the shipyard in Spain
and also collaborate with our units in Aberdeen
and Norway due to the CCTV camera equipment
part of the delivery,” explains Carrasco. “My
counterpart in the UK, Peter Bennett, and his
team take care of first-hand contact with NERC.”
“In conjunction with technically oriented organisations like NERC, we have developed a
wealth of knowledge on research systems and
integration,” adds Bennett, who is Kongsberg
Maritime Ltd’s Sales Manager Hydrography (UK
and Ireland). “Our experience from previous projects and close partnership with NERC will ensure that the RRS Discovery becomes a highly
sophisticated and effective tool for scientific research.”
Kongsberg also has a solid collaboration track
record with both the Freire Shipyard and Skipsteknisk AS in Norway, the designers of the RRS
Discovery. Freire has more than a century of experience in building hi-tech research, offshore,
merchant and fishing vessels. A leader in the design of sophisticated and noise-reduced research
vessels, Skipsteknisk also designed Discovery’s
sister ship, the RRS James Cook.
As Carrasco explains, “Hull design is important
for good vessel hydrodynamics, which is vital for
•Integration – K-Sync synchronising unit
•Navigation – K-Bridge Integrated Bridge
System
•Dynamic Positioning – K-Pos and C-Joy
with DP1 (AM)
•Video – Marine CCTV system
The Natural Environment
Research Council (NERC)
•The UK’s main agency for funding and
managing world-class research, training
and knowledge exchange in the environmental sciences.
•Coordinates research projects on issues
such as climate change, environmental influences on human health, the genetic
make-up of life on earth.
•Receives around GBP 400 million a year
from UK Government’s science budget,
which is used to fund independent research
and training in environmental sciences.
avoiding impairing performance of the onboard
hydro acoustics systems.”
A future view
The RRS Discovery is being built as a high technology replacement for NERC’s Royal Research
Ship, also named Discovery, which has been in
service since the early 1960s. The new vessel will
be operated by NERC’s National Marine Facilities
Sea Systems, based at the National Oceanography
Centre (NOC) in Southampton, on behalf of the
UK science community.
Although eager to get back to the project, Carrasco takes a moment to look ahead: “This project
points to the fact that the research vessel sector
seems to be heading for a boom, both due to the
peak oil situation, the rise in climatic research and
the need to do subsea research prompted by recent earthquakes and tsunamis,” he concludes. ::
7
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine :: Photos by Finnish Navy/Intermarine
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Hunt when
you can
“The system that the Finnish Navy is getting is
absolutely the latest in state-of-the-art. In terms
of area coverage rate and resolution, as well as
navigation accuracy, you can’t do better than this
in one package.”
The Finnish Navy’s newest range of mine-hunters – the Katanpää class – is state-of-the-art
in terms of mine localisation technology. They are among the first vessels in the world equipped
with Kongsberg’s HUGIN 1000 AUVs.
:: They say that mine-clearing vessels are the most sophisticated and difficult naval vessels to specify
and build, after submarines. Why? “The ship and
its systems have to be shock-proof and at the same
time the ship’s underwater signature has to be low
in terms of acoustic and electro-magnetic emission,” says Kristian Isberg of the Finnish Navy.
That’s a contradiction, as most of the measures
you would employ to make a ship shockproof,
would also make it noisy. In addition to this complex picture, the mine detection capabilities must
be robust, but with a small footprint.
Add to this contradiction the dual missions of
most mine-clearing vessels. During combat op8
erations, they localise and sweep mines; in peacetime, they must contribute towards bottom mapping and other hydrographic tasks. The two tasks
are related, but require flexibility from suppliers.
Enter Kongsberg. The company has worked closely with the Royal Norwegian Navy for over a decade on the HUGIN 1000 Autonomous Underwater
Vehicles. It was partially because of this naval experience, and the Finnish Navy’s own performance tests, that the Finnish Navy decided to select a
range of Kongsberg technologies for the three Katanpää class mine-countermeasure vessels.
“The system that the Finnish Navy is getting is
absolutely the latest in state-of-the-art. In terms
of area coverage rate and resolution, as well as
navigation accuracy, you can’t do better than this
in one package,” says Kongsberg’s Bjørn Jalving.
Significance to Kongsberg,
and to the Finnish Navy
When the Finnish Navy signed its contract with
Kongsberg Maritime and Kongsberg Defence &
Aerospace for its Mine Hunting Vessel Programme
in May 2007, it was a momentous occasion.
To Kongsberg Maritime, it was a major event for
three reasons:
• “This is the first delivery from Kongsberg Maritime Subsea Division in Horten, where multiple
Bjørn Jalving, Kongsberg
product lines are represented in the same project,
and fully integrated in a common mine-hunting
system.”
• The Finnish Navy is the first navy in the world
to fully integrate such a complex mine-hunting
system.
• This contract is the first HUGIN AUV contract
for Kongsberg in the naval market outside of Norway.
Since then, Kongsberg Maritime has acquired Hydroid, the company behind the REMUS AUVs. The
Kongsberg delivery to the Finnish Navy includes
two REMUS 100 AUVs. REMUS 100 is a man-portable AUV, designed for shallow water operations
and can be operated from RHIBs, or reinforced
hull inflatable boats. REMUS 100 has achieved
very good market acceptance and is in operation
for many navies. Hydroid also manufactures the
REMUS 600 AUV, a long range and versatile midrange solution. Kongsberg is actively working to
harmonise the HUGIN and REMUS product lines
to provide customers with operational synergies
and strengthened support and a technology base.
Isberg explains how the Finnish Navy settled on HUGIN 1000 from Kongsberg Maritime.
“When thisprogramme was still in the planning
phase, we invited 10 different navies from across
Europe to bring their mine-countermeasure ves-
sels to our waters. “Here we put them through
their paces. Twelve different sensor systems on
eleven different vessels were tested, including
those from leading Norwegian, Swedish, British,
French and Danish companies. What we found
was that some of the systems that excelled in the
Mediterranean and the North Sea didn’t work as
well in our Baltic Sea conditions,” says Isberg.
Finland’s Baltic waters are characterised by
more water layers, with different characteristics,
and extreme bottom temperatures. During the
tests, the Finnish Navy discovered that AUVs, like
HUGIN 1000, performed better than hull-mounted sonar systems.
9
THEME Offshore Opportunities
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
More about HUGIN 1000
The HUGIN 1000 is capable of performing
high-speed surveys with excellent navigation and payload data quality to a depth of
1,000, 3,000 or 4,500 metres, depending
on the configuration. It can be operated in
either operator-supervised or full autonomous
mode. Additional features of the HUGIN 1000
include a smaller physical size, while maintaining the ability to carry several different
types of high performance survey sensors for
synchronised and simultaneous operation.
The HUGIN concept allows integration of
alternative sensors for geophysical, search
and inspection purposes, subject to customer
demands.
“When this programme was still in the planning
phase, we invited 10 different navies from across
Europe to bring their mine-countermeasure
vessels to our waters.”
• Environmental monitoring
Kristian Isberg, Finnish Navy
• Hydrography
HUGIN 1000’s commercial applications:
• Offshore oil and gas geophysical survey
• Inspection of pipelines and underwater
engineering structures
• Marine research
HUGIN 1000’s naval applications:
• Mine countermeasures – MCM
• Rapid environmental assessment – REA /
Battlespace access
• Intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance
Norwegian Navy and FAT
The Finnish Navy’s decision to equip its latest
generation of mine-countermeasure ships with
HUGIN 1000 was taken independently of the experiences of the Royal Norwegian Navy, but contact with the Norwegians has provided a valuable
qualifier for the Finns.
“The HUGIN 1000 was demonstrated to us both
in Finland and in Norway,” says Isberg. “User experience during these exercises, and input from
the Norwegians, was useful to us, though we
didn’t set up any specific studies.”
The contract for the HUGIN 1000 (as well as the
EM 710 multibeam echosounder and HiPAP 500
acoustic positioning system) was formally signed
by Atlas Electronics of Germany, which was a
10
main supplier. (The Finnish Navy’s main partner
– basically, the shipbuilder – was Italy’s InterMarine.)
“We went to Norway in mid-2010 to take part in
the FAT at Horten together with Atlas Electronics
and InterMarine. We were all satisfied during this
visit that the equipment met the specifications
that we’d made,” says Isberg.
Current status
As of spring 2011, the first of the Katanpää-class
vessels (MHC Katanpaa) was just entering its sea
acceptance test phase. Isberg expects this testing
to last for three or four months in the Mediterranean, after which the ship will steam for formal
delivery to the Finnish Navy.
The second and third Katanpää-class vessels will
follow the first at approximately six month intervals. The three vessels will enter into the Finnish
Navy as key aspects of its task of ‘Securing the
sea and lines of communication’. Functions include: Bottom mapping and route survey, harbour
protection, localisation and neutralisation of bottom, moored and drifting mines.
The total price tag for the three Katanpää-class
vessels is 244 million euros, of which approximately 15 million euros included the systems
from Kongsberg Maritime and Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace. “We’re proud to report that
our deliveries have been according to schedule,”
says Jalving. ::
The Finnish Navy is, along with the
Norwegian Navy, a pioneer in the use of
long-range AUVs for mine-countermeasure
activities. Kongsberg’s Jalving describes three
core reasons that AUVs are on the rise for
these activities. They are inherently safer as
personnel can stay outside the minefield, they
have better data quality, and they have the
ability to do fast and efficient operations with
no surface visibility. For these reasons, Jalving
expects AUVs to be the dominant means of
conducting mine-countermeasure operations
in years to come.
11
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine :: Photos by Australian Defence
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Cool Heads
Whether manoeuvring a 3,500-tonne warship within 2,000 yards of other ships while under air attack, or closely
monitoring a ‘suspect vessel’ on the radar to detect possible piracy, watch keepers on the bridge of a naval vessel
must have the right skills to act quickly and accurately, with no room for error.
:: Developing those skills requires top-notch,
true-to-life training. Royal Australian Navy
(RAN) junior officers are getting exactly that
after the Navy opened a multi-million dollar upgrade of its bridge simulator training facility at
HMAS Watson in Sydney in March.
At the facility, one of the most advanced naval
training centres in the world, officers use Kongsberg Maritime’s computerised bridge simulator
to learn to pilot the next generation of warships.
Scenarios range from simple tasks, such as passage planning, ocean passage and coastal navigation, to more complex tasks, including berthing
and un-berthing, precise navigation and close
quarter manoeuvring.
The simulator can run a 24-hour/5-day a week
routine to imitate actual watches at sea and can
be reconfigured to match most of the classes
of ships in the RAN’s current fleet. A ship can
be positioned in any location, be subjected to a
variety of weather conditions, night or day, and
perform dangerous and difficult ship-handling
tasks – without the risks, costs and hazards that
go along with actually being out at sea.
“Over the past 10 years, we’ve seen ship bridges
become fully integrated systems. Because there
is so much information being accepted into the
systems, watch keepers have to be far more alert
to make sure that ‘information in’ is correct and
the end result is good ‘information out’. We have
a good ‘cross check and balance’ procedure in
place to make sure any erroneous information is
detected early and dealt with,” says Commander
Glenn Robinson, HMAS Watson.
12
“The bridge simulator capability is critical to
delivering the right officers with the right skill
sets to join the bridge of a warship and assimilate in a warfare climate quickly and sharply,” he
adds.
Anti-piracy feature
The simulator upgrade delivered to the RAN included an anti-piracy feature, one of the latest
and most relevant additions driven by the recent
wave of piracy in the Indian Ocean.
Last year a record 53 ships were hijacked and
1,181 seafarers were captured, the most in any
year since records began, according to Fairplay.
Somalia accounted for 9 out of 10 of the ships
seized in 2010, but now pirates are expanding
their territory and moving closer to India. Western
navies have adopted the ‘deterring and disrupting’ approach. Warships wait in ambush close to
the Somali coastline, intercepting the Somali pirate skiffs as they head out on their raids. Merchant
ships with valuable cargoes and crews (in terms
of ransoms), are important targets for the pirates.
Catching pirates operating in the vastness of
the Indian Ocean is no easy task, and the fact
that they have become much more organised and
sophisticated doesn’t make it any easier. Somali
pirates have taken to using radar and Automatic
Identification Systems (AIS) and are equipped
with GPS devices and satellite phones.
The waters off Somalia are busy with local
fishermen and traders, making intelligence vital.
That’s where the simulator’s anti-piracy functionality can play a key role. With this feature,
one can choose the environment (geographical
sailing area) and detect potential dangerous targets, such as small pirate boats or other typical
pirate vessels, in a relaxed, armed or surrender
situation, which is pre-determined by the instructor.
Bridge watch crew can detect, warn and engage
with a suspected pirate vessel. If short warning
shots don’t work, they can sink the vessel or release RHIBs, reinforced hull inflatable boats that
can go and intercept the suspect vessel.
Both merchant and naval customers, including
the US Navy and the Royal Norwegian Navy, are
using Kongsberg’s anti-piracy feature, which was
launched in 2009.
“Anti-piracy functionality is often requested in
our recent simulator deliveries. It is now commonplace to run extensive multi-ship exercises
in order to train navy staff in not just the practical sides of a hostile situation, but also in how to
work better as a team,” says Anne Voith, Marketing Coordinator for the Simulation & Training
Department at Kongsberg Maritime.
Kongsberg’s merchant customers include the
Dania Beach, Florida-based Simulation, Training,
Assessment and Research Centre (STAR), one of
the world’s largest maritime training facilities.
The captains and crew members going through
simulator training here learn key safety measures, such as securing doors to prevent pirates
from getting into a control room, activating a
long-range acoustic sound device loud enough to
deter an attacker and spraying a high-powered
fire hose at the pirates.
13
THEME Offshore Opportunities
In Denmark, the Marstal Navigation School is
also conducting anti-piracy training on Kongsberg’s Polaris ship’s bridge simulator. There are
as many as 70 different methods of preventing
pirates from boarding a vessel, none of which
involve having armed security on board. In
simulator training, merchant ships are known as
‘own ships’ and attack vessels, such as skiffs and
dhows, as ‘target ships’. Besides having access to
radar, electronic maps, news and other information, the bridge watch crew can also track and
monitor vessel movements using AIS, and the
identity, position, course and speed of the vessel
can be displayed on a screen or an ECDIS.
In simulation training, emphasis is placed on
differentiating between normal and suspect activities typical for an area. Ships that behave in
an irregular fashion, staying close to transit corridors where there is no reason to anchor or fish,
must be monitored closely, as well as vessels that
don’t send AIS signals.
The RAN is still testing out the anti-piracy feature for future courses and writing the scripts for
the new scenarios. “We are very confident it will
be a great addition to our suite of exercises and
of course align with our ‘Rules of Engagement’,”
Robinson says.
14
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Coveted award
The challenge facing the two teams in Australia and Norway was to have two Full Mission
Systems (FMS) installed and ready for use by
January 17, 2011 to allow the RAN to train an
increasing number of navigators and bridge officers. A loss of the FMS for more than two days
would have had a ‘critical’ impact on meeting
training requirements, while a loss of two weeks
or more would have had a ‘detrimental’ effect to
the throughput of officers entering the fleet, according to the RAN.
It was therefore decided to conduct the upgrade
in two phases to ensure that the Navy would
have available at all times an FMS throughout the installation process. The original system
wasn’t taken off line until the new FMS (and
Partial Mission Systems) had been installed,
tested and accepted.
Not only were the two FMS installed, tested
and accepted by the deadline and on budget, but
the four Partial Mission Systems and ten Desk
Top Simulators were also available for training at
the end of the 12-month project.
The project, which involved close cooperation
between the two teams, identified risks ahead of
time and established mitigation strategies, won
a highly regarded Australian Defence Magazine
High Commendation Award for outstanding Project Management Skills.
“The award reflects the professionalism of the
team, both on the RAN and Kongsberg Maritime
sides, that has made the simulator upgrade at
HMAS Watson possible,” says Voith.
“The project was certainly a challenge: there was
an extremely tight schedule, everything had to
be compatible with the existing simulator installation, and it all had to be achieved with the minimum of impact on the RAN’s bridge simulator
training. The team has put together a world-class
simulator installation that will benefit RAN training across a wide range of disciplines,” she adds.
The upgrade will enable Training AuthorityMaritime Warfare (TAMW) to meet the current
and projected simulated bridge requirements,
expected to be upwards of 7,000 hours per year
within the next two years. New fleet acquisitions
such as the Landing Helicopter Dock (LHD) and
Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD) will enter service
in 2014 and beyond, and it is envisaged that
bridge simulated hours will steadily increase to
prepare the new bridge teams to meet the challenges ahead and get their ships to sea, Robinson
explains.
“The bridge simulator
capability is critical
to delivering the right
officers with the right
skill sets to join the
bridge of a warship
and assimilate in a
warfare climate quickly
and sharply.”
Commander Glenn Robinson, HMAS Watson
Training model
“The bridge simulator forms the fundamental
training ground in which the Navy’s warfare officers are identified and groomed to meet the
bulk of the Navy’s middle leadership and operational manpower requirements,” says Robinson.
“Therefore there is a strong focus on mariner and
warfare skills training for junior officers, advanced navigation courses for specialist officers and
honing all navigation and seamanship’s skills for
our future commanding officers. In addition, a
ship’s command team can utilise the facilities to refresh themselves in all types of operations, including anti-terror and counter piracy modules and
also test the skills of the boat’s crew,” he adds.
The RAN has established the best practice
training policy incorporating theory, simulated
modelling and training models. This approach to
training has been adopted by training organisations worldwide, including the United States
Coast Guard, the United Kingdom’s Royal Navy,
numerous airlines and most bodies who train
professional officers.
Real-life training using real-life equipment will
become increasingly important given the concern that the shortage of qualified personnel in
the maritime industry could threaten both qual-
ity and safety. Increased risk to personnel and
equipment and related escalating costs is also
raising the demand for simulation technology.
Due to the almost limitless possibilities provided
by simulation, better results can be achieved in a
safer, more efficient manner.
Given that more than 60 percent of the information available at any time to bridge personnel
is gathered through visual observation of what
goes on outside the bridge, it is important that
simulation training is highly realistic. Kongsberg
cutting-edge simulator technology uses adaptable 3D-graphics to depict true-to-life vessel models and exercise areas. The RAN has access to the
world’s largest library of exercise areas and over
50 special targets.
The RAN has been using Kongsberg simulation
equipment since 1998.
“Nothing will ever replace actual sea time, but
by controlling the environmental conditions – or
the time of day – an instructor can manipulate
the exercise scenario so that it’s the next best
thing,” Robinson says. “These experiences build
watch keepers’ confidence and self-esteem,
especially when an officer is faced with a real
navigation challenge or emergency situation and
responds well.” ::
15
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine :: Photos by Dag Knudsen
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Built with
Robustness
The world’s largest gas-producing harsh-water FPSO vessel will be well
equipped to deal with the uncompromising conditions of its new home in
the Norwegian Sea. BP’s Skarv FPSO has been fitted with the strongestever mooring system, robust barriers against major accidents and
state-of-the-art lifeboats.
Tove Ormevik, Platform Manager for BP’s Skarv FPSO
16
:: The close to 300 metre long, 50 metre wide vessel
– the largest and most advanced Floating Production, Storage and Offloading (FPSO) vessel
to be deployed in the Norwegian Sea – will produce and store oil and gas from the Skarv field
for more than two decades.
The 37.5 billion Norwegian kroner project has
been a truly global effort. Materials and equipment for the Skarv FPSO have been delivered
from at least 20 countries and all major suppliers, including Kongsberg, Aker Solutions, Vetco,
Technip and Dresser, have been involved.
Samsung Heavy Industries fabricated and
installed the hull and topside, Aker Solutions
designed the topside and hull, SBM Offshore
designed and fabricated the turret and mooring
system and Kongsberg delivered the control systems for safety and automation.
“This is one of the single biggest projects for
Kongsberg Maritime, involving many differ-
ent divisions – a true Full Picture project in the
Kongsberg spirit,” says Per Hægstad, Senior Project Manager, Automation Division, Kongsberg
Maritime. “It’s proven technology, but the sheer
size of the project and the complexity of the
Skarv FPSO were an extra challenge.”
Finishing touches
The Skarv FPSO was fully assembled in South
Korea and towed to Norway in a voyage that
took about 90 days. Not surprisingly for a vessel
characterised by many superlatives, Skarv had to
be towed via South Africa rather than the Suez
Canal because the flare, measuring 154 metres
from the top to the water surface, was too tall.
Three years after the first steel was cut, Skarv
is now docked at Aker Solutions’ Stord shipyard
on the west coast of Norway while workers put
on the finishing touches. The workers going in
and out of the elevators connected to the gigan17
THEME Offshore Opportunities
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
“This is one of the single
biggest projects for
Kongsberg Maritime,
involving many different
divisions – a true Full
Picture project in the
Kongsberg spirit.”
Per Hægstad, Kongsberg’s Project Manager
for the Skarv FPSO
tic orange-painted vessel look like little Lego
people, and the leisure boats in the fjord like toy
boats.
Pipes and equipment are still partly covered in
plastic, but paintings have already been hung on
the walls of each of the 13 decks of living quarters that can sleep up to 100 people in single-bed
cabins, each equipped with a flat-screen television.
Kongsberg delivered the equipment for the
control room, the brain of the FPSO that looks
deceptively normal with its rows of computers
and stacks of papers. “Everything happens from
this room,” says Tove Ormevik, the Skarv FPSO
Platform Manager at BP on duty during a tour
of the vessel.
Next to the control room is the so-called integrated operation room, where Ormevik will head
a team that will deal with emergency situations
that might occur, such as a gas leak or another
ship that’s off course and could be headed for a
collision with Skarv.
State-of-the-art lifeboats
While the Skarv FPSO has largely relied on proven technology, the lifeboats are based on new
technology developed through an initiative by
the BP Norge Skarv Project.
Because of the many problems with lifeboats
on the Norwegian continental shelf since 2005,
BP worked with Marintek in Trondheim, Norway
to develop innovative technology and invited
makers of lifeboats to collaborate. The lifeboats
have undergone both simulation and full-scale
testing and are about as robust as you can get.
They can operate safely in 100-year storm conditions.
“This is probably more advanced than rocket
science. A rocket launched into the air doesn’t
face the same challenge as a boat going from air
18
Per Hægstad, Senior Project Manager, Automation Division, Kongsberg Maritime
to sea. The challenge is the sudden high impact,
the slamming loads as it enters the sea and then
keeping it afloat,” says Bjørn Solheim, Process
Safety Engineer at BP.
Each of the state-of-the-art orange lifeboats
can fit 63 people. The manufacturer, Umoe Schat
Harding in Rosendal, has already sold many of
these lifeboats, for example to ConocoPhillips for
Ekofisk and to Eni Norge for Goliat, he adds.
New home
The FPSO will soon leave the yard on its final
voyage timed for the planned start of production
of the Skarv oil and gas field (discovered by BP
in 1998) in August.
Skarv’s permanent home in the Norwegian Sea,
some 50 kilometres below the Arctic Circle and
220 kilometres west of the Norwegian coast, will
be unforgiving. The Haltenbanken has one of the
most severe environments with waves of up to
30 metres and winds as strong as 40 metres per
second.
“If a FPSO built for calm seas was moved to the
Haltenbanken area, the structure would crack
from fatigue within a year or two,” Solheim says.
The turret-based mooring system will be anchored to the seabed at water depths of up to
450 metres. The turret allows the FPSO to rotate
around its mooring according to the direction of
the wind and current, heading into the wind to
reduce environmental forces on the moorings.
The turret is the only thing that stays in place.
Kongsberg delivered the control system for
Skarv’s five thrusters, which help keep the ship
in the right position, and also supplied the safety
and information management systems, the pro19
THEME Offshore Opportunities
cess and subsea control systems and the electric
and marine systems.
“Kongsberg has been involved in everything on
the FPSO that has to do with control and monitoring, from the heating and ventilation and the
processes controlling the subsea systems to the
ship’s movement and power station,” says Hægstad.
“It makes sense for the client to have one large
integrated control and monitoring system covering the entire vessel,” he adds.
Largest-ever turret
“What’s unique about the Skarv FPSO is the turret. It’s physically the world’s biggest,” says Nils
Lilleløkken, BP’s business manager for Skarv.
The turret alone weighs 7,400 tonnes. In fact,
it’s as big as the topside of a fixed platform. Not
only is the turret the largest, but once installed,
it will also have the highest-strength mooring
system. The 15 mooring lines have a fatigue life
of 8 times the FPSO’s 25-year service life. That
equates to 200 years.
20
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
The structure of the FPSO and its mooring
lines are designed to survive a total loss of FPSO
power and use of positioning thrusters (so-called
‘black ship’ scenario) in 100-year storm conditions, when the hull is not in its optimal position
with respect to environmental loads.
In other words, if power is cut off to the thrusters and positioning is lost, the mooring system
would be able to withstand loads of more than
5,000 tonnes. That’s more than twice the mooring force used when designing the turret for BP’s
Schiehallion FPSO in the late 1990s.
“The barriers are more robust with more structural steel and stronger anchor lines compared
with similar FPSOs to make us less vulnerable in
the event of a failure in the heading control system,” Solheim says.
Challenges
The turret presents challenges in terms of its
sheer size. Just how large the diameter can be
(in this case, it’s 17.8 metres) is limited, and the
15 anchor lines, the 10 oil and gas risers and the
3 subsea control system umbilicals must all fit
through this opening, making it very congested.
Another challenge is the swivel technology of
the turret, which is very complex and therefore
increases the chances that something could go
wrong: “The turret is difficult to design, build,
operate and maintain, and it’s very costly,” explains Solheim.
But given the lack of oil pipelines in the
Haltenbanken area, BP didn’t have any choice
but to use a FPSO with its turret-based mooring system: “If Skarv could have exported oil via
a pipeline, then we probably would have used
a semi-submersible,” says Solheim. “The turretbased FPSO was the most cost-effective solution.”
In the early phase of the project, BP also
looked at the possibility of using Sevan Marine’s
unique cylindrical hull-shaped FPSO, which is
also designed for harsh conditions but doesn’t
use a turret or swivel. However, the technology
at the time was still so new that BP decided to go
with proven technology.
21
THEME Offshore Opportunities
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
SKARV FPSO IN FIGURES
• 300 metres long, 50 metres wide
• 49,000 tonne hull and 7,400 tonne turret
• 15 mooring lines
• 16 subsea wells
• 100 single-bed cabins
• 85,000 barrels a day production
capacity for oil
• 19 million standard cubic metres a day
production capacity for gas
• 875,000 barrels onboard oil storage
capacity
“The barriers are more
robust with more
structural steel and
stronger anchor lines
compared with similar
FPSOs to make us
less vulnerable in the
event of a failure in the
heading control system.”
Bjørn Solheim, Process Safety Engineer at BP
Bjørn Solheim, Process Safety Engineer, BP
Luckily, there are no icebergs in the Haltenbanken area that BP and its partners in the
Skarv field – Statoil, E.ON and PGNiG – will
have to be deal with. FPSOs operating in areas
with icebergs, like outside of Newfoundland,
are equipped with a quick-release disconnecting turret mooring system to avoid colliding with
icebergs.
Because exporting oil via a pipeline wasn’t an
option, the Skarv FPSO will offload oil to shuttle
tankers, which will collect the oil from the vessel
every 10 days. The gas will be fed to a pipeline
via the Asgard Transport System to Norway’s
Kårstø terminal.
“Skarv has the largest gas processing facility
of any FPSO,” says Ormevik. It has a production
capacity of 19 million standard cubic metres a
day for gas and a production capacity of 85,000
22
barrels a day for oil. The vessel’s total storage capacity is 875,000 barrels of oil.
Bright future for FPSOs
FPSOs are the favoured option in frontier offshore regions, such as Haltenbanken, because
they are easy to install and do not require a local
pipeline to export oil. As oil and gas exploration
moves into deeper waters and more distant locations, the demand for FPSOs is also increasing.
The number of floating production units has
more than doubled over the past 10 years to 250
from 120 units in 2001, according to a March 28
report by the International Maritime Associates,
Inc. (IMA).
Order backlog, which now stands at 47 units,
will increase the inventory by another 20 percent over the next several years. Overall, the
IMA expects orders for production floaters to
average 24 to 35 units annually over the next
five years, and around 80 percent of the units
will be FPSOs.
“Deepwater fields are among the major sources
of hydrocarbons yet to be found or developed.
While no one knows the full extent of deepwater
potential, the magnitude is undoubtedly huge,”
the report states.
The demand for FPSOs and other floating units
is also being driven by growing global demand
for petroleum, increased offshore exploration
and development spending and oil prices above
$100 a barrel.
While Skarv is predominantly a gas field, oil
will be pumped out first. With oil prices as high
as they are, that could be a good omen for the
Skarv FPSO as it heads off on its final voyage. ::
23
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine :: Photos by Eugene Choy
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Partnering
for success
Expectations are high for BW Offshore’s latest Floating Production, Storage and Offloading
(FPSO) unit. BW Joko Tole is not only the company’s first FPSO project completely run from
Singapore, it’s also the first time that key parts of the Automation, Control, Engineering and
Telecom (ACET) package have been subcontracted to another company. This requires close
cooperation with all partners.
:: The Full Picture magazine was invited onboard
BW Joko Tole, which is currently being converted at Sembawang Shipyard in Singapore. So far
merely an empty hull, the interior of the vessel
is starting to take shape, and by June the first
topside systems, including an E-House supplied
by Kongsberg, will be installed. After completion
during the first quarter of next year, the FPSO
is contracted to operate until 2022 in the Terang
Sirasun Batur (TSB) fields in Indonesia, which
marks another first for the company.
“This is BW Offshore’s first FPSO contract in
Indonesia. It was signed in June last year with
Kangean Energy Indonesia (KEI), which is an
Indonesian company with primarily Japanese
owners. There are several stakeholders in this
project as the FPSO needs to fulfil all Indonesian statutory requirements and fly the Indonesian flag. It also needs class approval by both the
Indonesian classification society Biro Klasifikasi
Indonesia (BKI) and by the American Bureau of
Shipping (ABS). The project is subject to a lot of
attention since Indonesia really needs the gas
that we are going to produce,” explains Rolf Normann, Project Manager for the TSB FPSO project
for BW Offshore.
24
Choosing to go for a conversion rather than a
newbuilding is the result of both time and cost
considerations. Building a completely new FPSO
often takes too long to meet the delivery time.
However, getting hold of a used vessel in prime
condition overnight is not always straightforward. Just as BW Offshore was signing the TSB
contract, the Aframax tanker BW Genie was on
its last voyage to Singapore. Just a few weeks
after the contract was signed, the vessel was purchased, cleaned out and ready for its 12-month
upgrade at Sembawang.
Worldwide expansion
During its 25 years in the industry, BW Offshore has grown to become one of the world’s
leading global providers of floating production
services to the oil and gas industry. With the
acquisition of Prosafe Production in 2010, the
company currently has a fleet of 15 FPSOs and
two FSOs. This makes it the second largest contractor of its kind in the world.
“In the past few years, BW Offshore has gone
from being a quite small company to employing
approximately 1,900 people. At the same time,
we have developed from being a pure project-
oriented business to becoming a matrix organisation, meaning that we are now able to run
several FPSO projects simultaneously and bring
in the best competence from across our organisation for each specific project. This will increase
the capability, quality and efficiency of our operations,” continues Normann.
One result of this organisational change is
closeness to the client. Represented in all the
major oil regions worldwide, BW Offshore recently built up its capacity in Singapore to count
about 250 employees. The TSB project relies on
these new local resources.
“Although we mainly use a local team for this
project, we frequently exchange key resources
and expertise between our offices in Oslo and
Singapore,” says Normann.
Building up the company’s resources in Singapore reflects an outlook for increasing demand
for oil and gas related services in this region.
Market forecasts clearly show that there will be
a higher demand for new FPSOs in the years to
come.
“Traditionally, single hull tankers have been
used for converted FPSOs, and there are not
many of them left in the world. This means that
25
THEME Offshore Opportunities
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
“This is BW Offshore’s
first FPSO contract in
Indonesia. The project
is subject to a lot of
attention since Indonesia
really needs the gas
that we are going to
produce.”
Rolf Normann, Project Manager for the FPSO
project at BW Offshore
there will be an increase in newbuilding activity
for FPSOs in the near future. In addition, modern tanker design is typically more optimised using stronger, thinner and less steel and is therefore considered more environmentally friendly,”
explains Normann.
Go for quality
Technically, there should be few challenges
ahead for the TSB project team because the
FPSO is of moderate size with a storage capacity of 200,000 barrels, a fluids capacity of 7,000
barrels a day and a compression capacity of 340
million standard cubic feet per day of gas. Some
of the excitement lies in the fact that this is the
first time BW Offshore has chosen to leave the
main parts of the ACET engineering to someone
else. Just as BW Offshore was looking for suppliers for the TSB project, Kongsberg was building
up its engineering department and won the bid.
“We spent a lot of time talking to vendors a
year before we even knew if we had won the
project. When choosing vendors, we look at the
totality of what they can offer, such as quality,
price and experience. The package delivery for
this project is quite complicated, so we don’t
just choose the less expensive option. Selecting
Kongsberg as a vendor for this project was a result of an overall evaluation,” says Scott Bendiksen, Deputy Project Manager at BW Offshore.
26
A first in Singapore
A strong team
Closeness is key
This is also the first time Kongsberg is delivering
an engineering project completely run from Singapore. The delivery is an Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) contract for the
ACET-package, meaning that Kongsberg will do
everything from designing the installation and
procuring the necessary materials to constructing parts of it, either by itself or with the help of
subcontractors. This also involves carrying the
risk for the schedule as well as budget.
“This is the first time we have chosen an EPC
contract model for the ACET scope in one of our
FPSOs. Usually we shop around for various parts
from a number of vendors and put it together
ourselves at the shipyard. This time, we’ve let
someone else provide the ACET-package for us.
If this succeeds, we are very likely to continue
using this contracting model when doing these
types of projects in the future,” says Normann.
More specifically, Kongsberg Maritime’s delivery includes design, engineering, manufacturing,
testing and supply of all materials, equipment,
accessories and tools required for the complete
integrated automation control, E-House, electrical hardware and telecommunication systems.
The E-House is scheduled for delivery in the beginning of June and is critical for further deliveries. To be closer to the client, Kongsberg built up
an experienced FPSO team in Singapore for this
particular project.
“We have a good team, and so far we have met
our deadlines,” says Michael Warner, Engineering
Manager for the TSB project at Kongsberg. “There
are many phases in a project like this with many
subcontractors. When the subsystems come in,
it gets really busy with several processes going
on simultaneously. This demands a lot from our
team.”
Kongsberg Maritime now has an office of 127
employees in Singapore, covering its entire
product range, and engineering is a large part of
this. For the TSB project, this means closer connections with the client and the possibility of a
strong partnership between Kongsberg Maritime
and BW Offshore during the busy months ahead.
“The fact that Kongsberg is around when we are
running the project in Singapore is essential to
such a complex delivery containing a number of
interfaces. It would have been very challenging
to use a vendor placed only in Norway for a project like this. Closeness is important, and so far
we’ve had excellent cooperation and partnership
throughout the process,” concludes Normann. ::
27
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Norway
Leads the Way
Norway’s proud maritime traditions and innovative spirit have helped elevate its ship
owners to world leaders in the market for the most sophisticated offshore vessels.
:: “Norway has a unique cluster of seafarers, ship
owners, equipment manufacturers, ship builders
and ship designers that together are at the forefront of technological developments for offshore
support vessels,” says Farstad Shipping ASA
Chief Operating Officer Børge Nakken.
“Norwegian ship owners are traditionally
known to have a leading global position when it
comes to the most innovative and sophisticated
offshore vessels,” he adds.
The small Nordic country of 4.9 million people has one of the world’s largest fleets of offshore service vessels – the second largest after
the United States – as well as a leading position
when it comes to the largest and most advanced
ships.
Bigger and better
SevEn Havila
Support Vessel of the Year 2011
State-of-the-art diving support vessel
Length: 120 metres
Breadth: 23 metres
Accommodation: 120 people
28
Today more than 80 percent of contracts at Norwegian shipyards are for specialised vessels for
the offshore oil and gas industry, according to a
report published in February by Menon Business
Economics, an Oslo-based company offering analytical and consulting services.
Norway’s strong position in the most advanced
segments of the offshore service vessel (OSV)
market is paying off. Petroleum development
and production is moving into deeper and more
exposed waters, driving the need for larger,
more powerful and more complex vessels that
are replacing the simpler vessels designed for
shallow-water wells. At the same time, oil fields
are moving further away from shore, also requiring larger vessels able to carry more cargo during
longer voyages.
A large anchor handing tug supply (AHTS)
vessel today is in the 25,000-35,000 horsepower
range, and a large platform supply vessel (PSV)
has more than 5,000 tonnes deadweight and
more than 1,000 square metre net deck area, according to Farstad’s Nakken.
Farstad Shipping, which has a fleet of 58 vessels and four newbuilds, is focusing on the segment of the supply vessel market that demands
the largest and most advanced tonnage, which is
also where the greatest growth has taken place
in recent years. The Ålesund-based company has
offices in Scotland, Australia, Singapore and Brazil and also has a presence in Angola through a
joint venture.
Nakken says future demand for the different
types of OSVs will vary depending on the type
of oil field development. For subsea installations,
inspection, maintenance and repair (IMR) vessels and offshore construction vessels (OCVs)
will be in demand, while for floating platforms
or platforms sitting on the seabed, AHTS vessels
and PSVs will be in higher demand, he says.
Clean vessels
Safe and efficient operation in the harsh and
demanding conditions that often characterise
deepwater fields is vital. This has put new demands on vessels’ engine capacities, manoeuvring capability, deck area, noise level, fuel
consumption, tank capacities, cranes and winch
capacities (for AHTS vessels).
“Building safe work places and environmentally friendly offshore support vessels will become increasingly important. It’s now becoming
more common to build clean design vessels with
double hull and no oil tanks toward the skin, as
well as stricter requirements for emissions,” says
Nakken.
Another challenge that will gain importance
when it comes to offshore support vessels design
and construction is the many different products
the ships have to carry – such as chemicals and
drill fluids used in oilfield production, he adds.
Brazil is catching up
“The greatest demand for offshore support vessels in the years to come will be from Brazil, West
Africa and the Far East because that’s where the
biggest growth in offshore oil and gas development and production in coming years is expected,” says Nakken.
While Norway remains the world’s largest offshore market, at least for the time being, Brazil is
quickly catching up. Brazil is the world’s fastest
growing offshore market, representing almost 50
percent of new oil discoveries.
About 25 percent of special-purpose vessels
serving the Brazilian continental shelf are already Norwegian owned. And that figure is likely
to increase, given that Brazilian state-controlled
Petrobras’ need for offshore service vessels is
expected to double to more than 500 by 2020
compared with 254 at present.
The new technologies developed by Norwegian
companies over the past several decades grew
out of a need to profitably develop the country’s
offshore oil and gas fields. Brazil is in the process
of doing the same, but in even deeper waters,
and is now looking to Norway for expertise.
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THEME Offshore Opportunities
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
THE LARGEST
OFFSHORE MARKETS
2011 2012 2013 2014
* US BILLION
*US BILLION
“Norway has a unique
cluster of seafarers,
ship owners, equipment
manufacturers, ship
builders and ship
designers that together
are at the forefront
of technological
developments for
offshore support
vessels.”
CHINA
INDIA
RUSSIA
MALAYSIA
0
INDONESIA
0
ANGOLA
30
MEXICO
30
NIGERIA
60
AUSTRALIA
60
UKCS
90
BRAZIL
90
US GoM
120
NORWAY
120
investments
* Forecast
Source: INTSOK Market Report - Rystad Energy
Børge Nakken, Farstad Shipping ASA Chief
Operating Officer
“Brazil is a difficult market to enter, but it has
huge potential once you’re in,” says Rune Norseng, Regional Director for Brazil and Canada at
INTSOK, an organisation of Norwegian oil and
gas partners. “There are already many Norwegian offshore equipment and technology companies in Brazil, and Norwegian ship owners are
well established over there.”
Humble roots
Many of the Norwegian ship owners who are
now world leaders in building and equipping the
most technologically advanced offshore service
vessels – whether for Brazil or other markets –
have humble roots in small fishing communities
along the country’s coast. Their ability to innovate enabled them to seize early on the new
opportunities that opened up when Norway discovered oil in the North Sea in 1969.
“When the oil came to Norway, fishing vessel
owners saw a market opportunity. The offshore
oil and gas industry needed boats that could tolerate rough seas, high waves and harsh weather
conditions,” says Oddmund Oterhals, Research
30
Director Logistics at Møreforsking Molde AS, a
research institute located in Molde on the west
coast of Norway.
“A trawler is a bit like an offshore vessel, both
in terms of appearance and functionality, so they
were able to transfer their competence from fishing to offshore vessels,” he adds.
Decades ago ship owners in the port city of
Ålesund on Norway’s west coast rebuilt their
fishing vessels to serve the fledging oil and gas
industry. Now their offshore vessels are among
the biggest and the best in the world.
Ålesund’s leading position
The Ålesund region has Norway’s largest concentration of owners of offshore service vessels.
The region is home to 19 offshore ship owners
who together own about 200 vessels.
These companies are Farstad Shipping, Bourbon Offshore, Havila Shipping, Olympic Shipping, Island Offshore, Rem Offshore, Trico Supply, Remøy Management, Remøy Shipping,
Remøy Rederi, Neptune Offshore, Hagenæs
Shipping, Golden Energy Offshore, Uksnøy &
Co, Aries Offshore Services, P&O Offshore Services, Volstad Shipping, Volstad Maritime and
Sanco Holding.
The Ålesund area, like other regions in Norway,
also makes OSVs that are among the world’s most
advanced. More than 75 percent of the world’s
large high-tech offshore vessels are designed
there, while about 40 percent of the world’s most
advanced offshore fleet is controlled by the region’s ship owners, giving the region the status
of Norwegian Center of Expertise – Maritime because of its strong global position and strength
in innovation.
This status also became evident when the coveted Offshore Support Journal Awards were announced in London in February, with companies
from the Ålesund region winning three of the
four top awards. Havila Shipping – based in Fosnavåg, not far from Ålesund – along with Subsea
7, shared the award for Support Vessel of the
Year, which is given to the owner, designer and
builder of an offshore support vessel delivered
in the past year that has set an industry benchmark through innovative design and efficient
operation. Havila’s Chairman Per Sævik won the
Lifetime Achievement Award. The Shipowner of
the Year award went to Bourbon Offshore, also
based in Fosnavåg.
Maritime clusters
The Ålesund region is not alone. It is just one of
nine regional maritime centres in Norway and an
example of increased regional specialisation of
the maritime industry in the country. For example, Bergen – part of the Hordaland region – is a
typical maritime city with large ship owners like
Grieg Star Shipping and Odfjell. The Oslo area,
previously dominated by ship owners, is now a
leading maritime financial centre offering financial, legal, classification, insurance, charter, design and management services to the shipping
industry.
These maritime clusters, whether in the Oslo or
Ålesund area, have increased competition, while
also allowing the companies within the different market segments to benefit from the broad
knowledge base within each cluster. This has
given the companies a competitive edge as they
move far beyond the waters of the North Sea to
offshore markets in other parts of the world.
It’s difficult to put an exact figure on the number of Norwegian owners of offshore service
vessels because some are small, one-vessel
businesses. There are about 27 large Norwegian
owners of offshore service vessels and numerous
other small companies, according to the Norwegian Shipowners’ Association.
Norway’s offshore vessel owners have also
been helped by high oil prices and high investment by oil companies, which led to a boom in
new orders of all types of vessels until the global
financial crisis hit in 2008. The price of crude and
investment levels of oil companies will also influence the future of these companies.
“As of today there is an oversupply in the offshore support vessel market. How this will be in
the future is difficult to say. Much will depend on
the oil price and consequently the development
and production budgets among the oil companies,” Nakken says. ::
31
REMØY SHIPPING AS
VOLSTAD MARITIME AS
TANANGER OFFSHORE AS
SIMON MØKSTER SHIPPING AS
MELING & CO AS
GULF OFFSHORE NORGE AS
STAVANGER REGION:
TAUBÅTKOMPANIET AS / BOA
OFFSHORE AS
TRONDHEIM REGION:
REMØY MANAGEMENT AS
ARIES OFFSHORE SERVICES A/S
VOLSTAD SHIPPING AS
NEPTUNE OFFSHORE AS
REM OFFSHORE ASA
Location: Fosnavåg
Ownership: Rem Maritime AS was founded
in 1996 with Åge Remøy as owner after a
spin-off from a family company. Rem
Offshore ASA and Remøy Fiskeriselskap AS
are the main companies for the offshore
and fishery activities.
Fleet: Rem Offshore has 10 vessels in
operation, consisting of 4 MPSVs, 5 PSVs
and 1 AHTS / ROV vessel. The company
also has 4 PSV vessels under construction.
www.rem-maritime.no
OLYMPIC SHIPPING AS
Location: Fosnavåg
Ownership: Olympic Shipping AS was
founded in 1996 by captain Stig Remøy and
Bjørn Kvalsund. The Olympic group of
companies is privately owned and the
founder is the main shareholder.
Fleet: The company has a fleet of 18 OSVs,
including 4 new builds, 1 research vessel, 1
krill vessel and 2 modern deep sea trawlers.
www.olympic.no
ISLAND OFFSHORE GROUP
Location: Ulsteinvik
Ownership: The Island Offshore Group is
privately owned and the majority
shareholder is Island Offshore Shipholding
LP, which is jointly owned by the Ulstein
and Chouest families on a 50/50 basis.
Fleet: The group has a fleet of 17
operating vessels, including PSVs, AHTS
vessels, Subsea Construction Vessels and
Light Well Intervention Vessels. It also has
several vessels under construction.
www.islandoffshore.com
FARSTAD SHIPPING ASA
Location: Ålesund
Ownership: Farstad Shipping currently
consists of 4 wholly-owned operating
companies in Norway, Scotland, Australia
and Singapore. It also has ownership
interests in two joint ventures, one in Brazil
(50/50) and the other in Angola (49/51).
Fleet: The fleet consists of 32 AHTS
vessels, 24 PSVs, 2 subsea vessels and 4
newbuilds.
www.farstad.com
“K” LINE OFFSHORE AS
GDV MARITIME AS
DEEP SEA SUPPLY MANAGEMENT AS
CECON ASA
ARENDAL REGION:
STAD OFFSHORE MANAGEMENT AS
NORTH SEA SHIPPING AS
SIEM OFFSHORE AS
Location: Kristiansand
Ownership: Siem Offshore was established
as a stand-alone company in July 2005
following a spin-off from Subsea 7 Inc.
Fleet: It has a fleet of 45 vessels, including
2 third-party vessels operated through a
pool agreement. Nine of the vessels are
under construction. The fleet includes
AHTS vessels, PSVs and other support
vessels.
www.siemoffshore.com
KRISTIANSAND REGION:
ØSTENSJØ REDERI AS
Location: Haugesund
Ownership: Private company established
in 1973.
Fleet: A fleet of 31 vessels, including 10
OSVs. The other vessels are tugs.
www.ostensjo.no
EIDESVIK OFFSHORE ASA
Location: Bømlo
Ownership: Eidesvik Offshore ASA is the
parent company of the Eidesvik group.
Fleet: Eidesvik Offshore operates 25
vessels, including 4 under construction,
within the supply, subsea and seismic
survey segments.
www.eidesvik.no
HAUGESUND REGION:
VARADA MARINE AS
VIKING SUPPLY SHIPS AS
Location: Kristiansand
Ownership: Viking Supply Ships AS (VSS)
is owned by Kistefos AS. It is also the
majority shareholder in Rederi AB
Transatlantic in Skarhamn Sweden. SBS
Marine Limited is a wholly-owned
subsidiary of VSS, and Viking Barges DA is
managed and operated by Viking Supply
Ships.
Fleet: The company has a fleet of 6 PSVs.
www.vikingsupply.com
TRICO MARINE GROUP / DEEPOCEAN
SOLSTAD OFFSHORE ASA
Location: Skudeneshavn
Ownership: Solstad Offshore owns about
56.4% of NOR Offshore Ltd. in Singapore.
Fleet: The fleet consists of 48 fully
owned/jointly owned and leased vessels as
well as 2 vessels under construction. It also
has 2 new builds in Norway, including 1
CSV and 1 LNG PSV.
www.solstad.no
OFFSHORE HEAVY TRANSPORT AS
OSLO REGION:
SATOR OFFSHORE MANAGEMENT AS
FORLANDS REDERI, ELLEN
OCEANTEAM SHIPPING ASA
GC RIEBER SHIPPING AS
Location: Bergen
Ownership: GC Rieber AS is a privatelyowned company with three business areas:
industry, shipping and property.
Fleet: GC Rieber Shipping owns 6 and
operates 7 advanced multifunctional
special purpose vessels. It also has 2
subsea IMR/CSV newbuilds and 1 IMR
newbuild. GC Rieber Shipping also owns
65% of Armada Seismic, which owns 1
high-capacity seismic vessel and has 1
newbuild.
www.rieber-shipping.no
List of acronyms:
AHTS – Anchor Handling Tug Supply Vessels
CSV – Construction Supply Vessels
IMR – Inspection, Maintenance, Repair
MPSV – Multi Purpose Supply Vessels
OSV – Offshore Service Vessels
PSV – Platform Supply Vessels
ROV – Remotely Operated Vehicles
Source:
Norwegian Shipowners’ Association and company websites.
DOF ASA
Location: Storebø
Ownership: The DOF fleet is owned by
the following companies: DOF ASA,
Norskan Offshore, DOF Subsea AS, DOF
Installer ASA and Aker DOF Deepwater AS.
DOF Management AS is responsible for the
management of vessels owned by the DOF
group and other ship-owning companies.
Fleet: DOF has a fleet of 70 vessels, both
partly and wholly owned, consisting of 23
AHTS vessels, 22 PSVs and 25 CSVs,
including newbuilds. It also owns 45 ROVs.
www.dof.no
BERGEN REGION:
TROMS OFFSHORE AS
BOURBON OFFSHORE NORWAY AS
Location: Fosnavåg
Ownership: The company is part of the
Bourbon group.
Fleet: The company owns or operates 20
OSVs, of which 4 are AHTS vessels, 8 are
PSVs and 8 are MPSVs. It also has 4 large
PSVs under construction.
www.bourbon-offshore.no
HAVILA SHIPPING ASA
Location: Fosnavåg
Ownership: Partnership with PACC
Offshore in Singapore.
Fleet: The company operates 27 vessels,
including PSVs, AHTS vessels and rescueand recovery vessels. It has 2 newbuilds.
www.havila.no
TROMSØ REGION:
ÅLESUND REGION:
Norwegian owners of offshore service vessels are spread throughout different regions, with the Ålesund region housing the largest concentration. The following representation
is based on a list of the largest Norwegian owners of offshore vessels from the Norwegian Shipowners’ Association, with a few additions. It is difficult to provide an exact list because
of the numerous small companies, including one-vessel owners. Seismic vessel owners, such as Petroleum Geo-Services, TGS and EMGS, have not been included. Companies
that are headquartered overseas but have offices in Norway, such as Subsea 7, have also not been included
NORWAY’S LARGEST OWNERS
OF OFFSHORE SERVICE VESSELS
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Offshore
Vessels
Go Green
Kongsberg Initiatives
to Make a Cleaner DP Ship
SOx
CLEAN:
3.0% S Worldwide
CLEAN DESIGN: 2.5%
worldwide.
Both: 1.0% in ECA and
harbour 0.1% at berth in EU
Oil majors are fuelling the push for offshore service vessels with the CLEAN DESIGN
class notation, and port authorities are adding further incentives by offering
reductions in fees for ships with low emissions.
:: Over a decade ago, Oslo-based Det Norske Veritas (DNV), one of the world’s four largest ship
classification companies, created the so-called
CLEAN and CLEAN DESIGN voluntary environmental class notations as a way to award owners
and operators who choose to design and operate their ships in an environmentally sustainable
manner. The aim is to reduce the emissions from
each vessel so that the overall environmental
burden from shipping is reduced.
Now more than 650 ships sailing around the
world carry the DNV CLEAN or CLEAN DESIGN
notation, in addition to another 450 newbuilds,
bringing the total to over 1,100. Roughly half of
these are offshore vessels.
“One of the reasons there are so many offshore
vessels with CLEAN or CLEAN DESIGN is that
major oil companies are requiring that offshore
vessels have these notations to charter them,”
says Atle Grønlie, Senior Approval Engineer at
DNV.
Port fee reductions
Port authorities are also catching on to the clean
ship trend. Many ports, including Amsterdam,
Rotterdam, Oslo, Hamburg, Bremerhaven and
Vancouver, are offering a reduction in port fees
for vessels that can prove they have low emissions, Grønlie explains.
Spain has also recently issued a ‘Service Instruction’, in which substantial deductions in
port fees can be granted to vessels that produce
reduced amounts of residues due to their environmental management system, their design,
the equipment on board, and their operational
conditions.
CLEAN DESIGN, which applies in principle to
all types of vessels, reduces a ship’s environmental impact from air emissions, sea discharges
and accidental damage to its hull.
This protective design covers systems for preventing accidents and limiting their consequenc34
es, including fuel tank protection from grounding damage; handling of cargo, sewage, bilge,
garbage, ballast water and fuel oil; environmentally friendly antifouling; combustion machinery
emissions; use of refrigerants; and Inventory of
Hazardous Materials for crew awareness and recycling of the ship.
CLEAN versus CLEAN DESIGN
The CLEAN notation sets limits on nitrogen oxide and sulphur oxide emissions from ship exhausts identical to the levels stipulated in Annex VI of the International Convention for the
Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL),
which entered into force in 2005.
Ships that have the DNV Class notation CLEAN
DESIGN have more stringent levels for emissions
to the air and discharges to the sea than what
either the International Maritime Organisation
(IMO) or most flag states require. The CLEAN
DESIGN notation must comply with additional
requirements compared with the CLEAN notation, including design requirements for avoiding
and limiting the consequences from accidents.
Examples of additional requirements for CLEAN
DESIGN versus CLEAN are:
• Double hull protection of oil tanks
• Navigational aids
• Alternative propulsion
• Inventory of hazardous materials /
‘Recyclable’ notation
• Compliance with the Ballast Water
Convention
• Stricter requirements for discharge of bilge
water
• Water lubrication or bio-degradable
lubrication in stern tube
• Maximum sulphur content in fuel oil 2.5
percent worldwide
• Sewage treatment plant
• Stricter requirement for the leakage
of greenhouse gases
GreenDP®
VOC
Cargo vapour control
Refrigerants
Global warming potential
NOx
CLEAN and
CLEAN DESIGN: Tier II
Collision Risk
CLEAN DESIGN:
Navigational aids and
redundant propulsion
New criteria
The DNV rules for CLEAN DESIGN will be upgraded with new criteria from July 1 2011.
The main changes will be:
• The class notation no longer requires that
the vessel holds the Class Notation E0
or OPP-F
• Sewage: All grey water shall be treated in
addition to black water
• IHM/Recyclable: Compulsory only for
CLEAN DESIGN
• Stern tube lubrication: Only water lubrication or bio-degradable lubrication
• Sulphur content: 2.5 percent sulphur
worldwide
• Bilge water and sludge: Type Approval
by DNV of the 5 ppm oil water separator
and minimum capacity of the bilge water
tanks
• Garbage: Food waste not to be discharged
into the sewage treatment plant
• Double hull protection: Oil tanks with capacity below 10 m3 can be located in the double
bottom provided that the total capacity of
these unprotected tanks will be less than
40 m3
• Cold Ironing: Added optional requirements
to electrical shore side connections as alternative to low sulphur in port
Solstad and climate-neutral ships
Solstad Offshore ASA, one of Norway’s largest
suppliers of offshore vessels, says 18 of its 48
fully and joint owned vessels meet the CLEAN
DESIGN notation as well as the two vessels it
currently has under construction.
“We are using only CLEAN DESIGN as this is
the most stringent regulation. It’s anticipated
that the market will demand CLEAN DESIGN
vessels in the future,” says Tor Inge Dale, Environmental Engineer at Solstad Shipping AS, the
operating company for Solstad Offshore.
NOx reductions
Sewage
CLEAN:
Treatment/holding tank
CLEAN DESIGN: Treatment
of grey water included
Reduced risk of spill
Emergency response
CLEAN DESIGN:
Double hull and side for
tanks containing oil
Bilge
CLEAN DESIGN:
Type approval 5ppm oil
Recycling
IHM/Recyclable
Ballast water
CLEAN: Treated or exchanged
CLEAN DESIGN: Treated
Responsibility
Designated officer
Garbage
Sorting and managing
Based on latest rules issued January 2011
Although the notation is very positive in terms
of reducing the impact of shipping on the environment there is too little focus on actual energy
efficiency in CLEAN DESIGN today. “The DNV
CLEAN and CLEAN DESIGN notations (or any
other regulation) do not require the vessel to be
operated in the most energy efficient and environmental way,” Dale says.
To ensure that the use of energy and fuel
is kept to a minimum, the company launched
the Solstad Green Operations (SGO) campaign,
which can reduce the fleet’s fuel consumption by
as much as 20 percent.
Solstad also aims to be the first shipping company to provide climate-neutral services, mean-
Kongsberg has developed a unique dynamic
positioning (DP) control system (GreenDP®
control), which reduces fuel consumption,
and hence also CO2 emissions, by as much as
20 percent. The GreenDP® control secures
the vessel, allowing it to stay within a specified area of operation. This new approach
is based on forecasting the vessel’s motion,
rather than acting on present conditions,
using a method called ‘nonlinear model predictive control’, which optimises the predicted
vessel offset against the use of thrusters. By
doing so, small and short-term disturbances
that do not force the vessel out of its operational boundary are ‘filtered out’. This allows
for very smooth control, dramatically lowering peak loads and significantly reducing the
wear and tear on thrusters.
ing emissions are reduced to a minimum through
SGO, they are documented and published and
the remaining CO2 emissions are compensated
for through the purchase of emission credits.
“Several major clients are very interested in
this arrangement. We’re currently working on
different potential contracts, although no firm
contract has been signed yet,” says Dale. The
arrangement will cover one or more vessels per
contract/client and will cover compensation for
engine carbon emissions to the air,” he explains.
“The focus must be on how to operate with a
minimum of energy. Solar power is not relevant
as it gives too little power. Heat recovery and LNG
engines may be the future,” concludes Dale. ::
Some modern DP vessels are equipped with
catalysts to reduce NOx emissions. Due to
operational requirements (DP class 2 and 3),
more thrusters and generators must be running than what is necessary for actual weather conditions. Class 3 operations requiring
switchboards to be isolated from each other
are especially demanding. The vessel must be
able to handle the worst-case single failure,
typically the loss of one switchboard.
Under normal weather conditions, this means
that diesel generators often run at very low
loads. As a consequence, exhaust temperatures become so low that the catalysts do
not work. NOx reductions can be achieved by
running one switchboard on higher loads and
others at lower or idle loads. KONGSBERG
has developed a special control strategy,
which minimises NOx by optimising the combined fuel consumption and NOx emissions.
By only minimising NOx emissions, fuel consumption will be too high. Experience shows
that a reduction in NOx emssions of more
than 45 percent can be achieved. The reduction will come at the expense of 5 percent
higher fuel consumption.
35
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
SIMULATING
COMPLEXITY
A groundbreaking R&D programme will use cutting-edge
psychological insight to push the maritime training envelope.
The Full Picture Magazine met Professor Kjell Ivar Øvergård
to get a fix on the human factor.
:: Imagine a scenario: an ultra large crude carrier is
manoeuvring in a tight harbour when an engine
fails. No reason to panic. However, the helmsman
was injured the day before, so the captain has to
handle a lot of extra information – too much. A
combination of factors like this can have unexpected and catastrophic consequences.
At any hour of the day there are vessels at
sea encountering critical, unexpected situations.
Most crews are well trained and 99.9 percent
of the time there is no collision, no oil spill, no
36
grounding. However, the complexity of shipping
and maritime operations is increasing exponentially and it is common for bridge crew to have
to manage factors like steering capabilities, green
shipping regulations, traffic, alternative routes,
weather conditions and fuel economy simultaneously as they navigate from port to port.
The use of simulators to train crews for critical
situations and reduce accidents is becoming increasingly common. However, rapid technological
development often leaves designers of simulators,
and the learning scenarios they use, scrambling to
keep up. To remedy this, Kongsberg Maritime’s
simulation & training unit has created a userdirected research programme to take simulator
training to the next level.
Training for seafarers
“We have used our market and operational competence in combination with our simulator hardware and software expertise to provide high
quality training for seafarers since the seventies,”
comments Terje Heierstad, Kongsberg Maritime’s
Product & Technology Manager for Simulation &
Training. “Technology has developed fast and we
are now offering incredible degrees of realism, so
we are keen to push development of the learning
aspects and human factors in simulation training.”
The SIMAR (Simulation of Demanding Maritime
Operations) programme is a bold attempt to combine state-of-the-art simulator technology with
cutting-edge knowledge of human behaviour to
improve simulation training for demanding and
risky maritime operations. There is currently very
little research in this field, so the project brings together leading R&D expertise from Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden and the universities of Vestfold and Oslo in Norway to explore
new ground for the maritime industry.
Risk and cost
Marius Imset, leader of the Faculty of Technology and Maritime Science at Vestfold University
College (HiVe), explains: “Knowledge of how new
information technology and instrumentation can
contribute to increased safety and efficiency
within the maritime sector is a priority area for
us. In our research on how human factors work
together with technology and organisational factors, the use of advanced simulators provides new
and exciting possibilities.”
One of the people heading the research project
at Vestfold University College (HiVe) is Professor
Kjell Ivar Øvergård, an expert on human-machine
interaction. “If we can use simulators to improve
37
THEME Offshore Opportunities
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
The SIMAR (Simulation of
Demanding Maritime
Operations) programme
• Project completion Q1 2013
• Budget of NOK 11.4 million (Kongsberg
Maritime 55 %, The Research Council of
Norway 45 %).
• 2.73 million NOK used to purchase FOU
services from Vestfold University College.
• 1.2 million NOK used to purchase FOU
services from University of Oslo and
Chalmers University, respectively
training by just 1 percent, the number of unexpected situations crews will be able to handle successfully will be huge, due to the sheer number of
man hours aboard vessels on a worldwide basis,”
says Øvergård, who underlines that the cost of
safety and training is nothing compared with the
cost of an accident.
The SIMAR programme aims to assess the effect of simulator training, both in the simulator (in
terms of specific learning objectives) and during
actual maritime operations (in terms of reduced
risk, accidents and costs, and more efficient operations). However, as Øvergård is painfully aware,
measuring the effect of training is immensely difficult: “This type of training is usually done for
specific situations and technologies, which means
it is difficult to generalise the results. The military
has done lots of research on training for high-risk
scenarios but it is not directly transferable to the
38
commercial shipping industry; we can only employ some principles.”
The human factor
Today, the success or failure of simulator training depends on the quality of the psychological
teaching principals used and the psychological
data integrated in the simulator software – the
human factors. This is about understanding the
nature of human capability and the way we relate
to the world around us, and applying this to the
design, development and deployment of systems
and services.
As a specialist in work and organisational psychology focusing on the experience and execution of control in human-technology systems,
Øvergård applies refined theoretical understanding from cognitive and ecological psychology
as well as cognitive systems engineering. Asked
to distill this down for the layman, he explains:
“Grasping how the mind works – how we perceive, understand and experience things, how
we learn and develop – is of vital importance for
designing successful work environments, organisations, technology and social relations... and the
interfaces between them. If we are to support the
people at the sharp end of the business we have
to know how people think and act.”
Throw technology at it!
As future organisations and systems become increasingly complex and efficiency and financial
requirements get tougher, one solution can be to
throw technology at it. But according to Øvergård,
more technology is not always purely a blessing.
“Consider the consequences of implementing
new automated flight control technology aboard
airplanes in commercial aviation in the 1980s.
Accidents and several critical incidents occurred
because the pilots did not know what the systems
were doing. If you change the technology used,
you also change the work processes themselves
and the learning needed to cope with them. The
challenge is therefore to design new interfaces that
present information in new ways that are possible
for human operators to understand and use.”
On the plus side, explains Øvergård: “By taking
complex situations and running them as scenarios
in a simulator, we can not only train staff to handle critical situations but also help to improve the
technical interfaces onboard vessels and to design
maritime control rooms that enable people to do
their jobs more efficiently. Consequently, the collaboration between KONGSBERG and the R&D
work at HiVe provides a sound basis for developing maritime systems and organisations that are
both safer and more effective and eco-friendly.” ::
39
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine :: Photos by playfilms The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
“We’re working on
a lot of projects so
the next few years
look promising. We’re
submitting bids for three
or four large offshore
new build projects and
are comfortable with the
outlook for the yard –
both in the short term
and in the long term.”
Terje Sjumarken, Managing Director of
Bergen Group BMV
First Off
Bergen Group BMV is the first shipyard to deliver a vessel equipped with Kongsberg’s
new K-Master workstation, which allows the seated operator to control all major
systems within easy reach and make quick, critical decisions, ensuring safe operations.
This is just one of 10 such projects in the pipeline for Kongsberg.
Terje Sjumarken, Managing Director, Bergen Group BMV
:: Bergen Group BMV is one of the three units in the
shipbuilding business of the Bergen Group and a
leading supplier of state-of-the-art specialised
vessels for the oil and offshore industries.
The shipyard delivered the offshore construction vessel Fugro Symphony to Fugro in early May.
The 130-metre long, 24-metre wide vessel has a
handling tower for the installation of sophisticated equipment to be installed on the seabed
with the help of a remotely operated vehicle. The
average market value for an offshore construction vessel is roughly 700 million to 900 million
Norwegian kroner.
“Bergen Group BMV has chosen Kongsberg to
deliver integrated solutions, dynamic positioning
(DP) systems and automation for many years based on price and technical content,” says Terje Sjumarken, Managing Director of Bergen Group BMV.
Kongsberg also supplied all the control and
monitoring systems for the Fugro Symphony,
40
such as the automation for the ballast, alarm,
thruster control, DP, and Independent Joystick
systems in addition to critical sensors including
GPS, HIPAP High Precision acoustic system, and
the Seapath system. The K-Master was the keystone.
“Now that we put everything on the chair, the
operator doesn’t need to move to control all the
different systems,” says Stein-Roar Veberg, Project Manager at Kongsberg. “Everything is an
arm’s length away.”
Good timing
The timing was good. The K-Master, which can be
delivered to all types of ships using DP systems,
came onto the market just as Fugro Symphony
was being built. The decision to add K-Master was
taken after talks with Fugro, the ship’s owner.
“We wanted to get the most modern and best
equipment for the ship. The K-Master will make
life easier for the operator because everything is
integrated into the chair,” says Sjumarken.
The first Kongsberg DP system was installed on
one of Bergen Group’s vessels in 1991. But the relationship between the two companies goes back
even further, to 1986, when the first fish-finding
equipment from Kongsberg was delivered.
That’s the same year Sjumarken began his career with Mjellem & Karlsen Verft, a shipyard
that specialised in research, seismic, fishery
and offshore vessels. The yard went bankrupt
in 2002 and was bought up by Magnus Stangeland in the first of many acquisitions that led to
the formation of Bergen Group, earlier known as
Bergen Yard Holding.
Bergen Group has transformed itself from a
traditional shipbuilding yard to an offshore and
technology-based industrial group. The group,
whose shipbuilding activities date back more
than 100 years, delivered the world’s largest
seismic vessel in 2007. Last year, the two newbuilding yards in Bergen Group delivered a total
of five state-of-the-art offshore vessels to international customers.
Most advanced
“We try to stay within the most advanced segment of the offshore market,” says Sjumarken.
“We will need oil for many decades to come and
companies are going to newer places and more
harsh environments to try to find it, including
further north like Greenland and the Barents
Sea, as well as in deeper waters. This means the
challenges are becoming even greater.”
Bergen Group BMV is well positioned to meet
those challenges because it focuses on the market segment that is the most in demand, namely
large, state-of-the-art ships. Ships are becoming
larger and more advanced to meet the challenges
of oil and gas exploration in the coming decades.
The same trend is true for seismic vessels, which
need to use more and longer cables to explore
more effectively in larger areas.
“The new generation of offshore construction
vessels will typically be about 150 metres long
and 30 metres wide,” explains Sjumarken. “The
hull of Fugro Symphony was built in Poland and
outfitted at Bergen Group BMV’s yard. BMV has
built most of its hulls in Poland, as well as some
in Turkey, and is also looking into Ukraine,” he
says.
Challenges
“The high cost level in Norway compared to the
international market is a challenge for us. Our
competitive strength is that we’re able to offer
the market a top-quality product at the agreed
delivery time. In order to do so, we are dependent on innovative sub-contractors that can provide us with leading technology from their re-
spective areas. Kongsberg is a good example of
this,” continues Sjumarken.
Following the delivery of Fugro Symphony on
May 3, there will be a gap before the hull for the
next new build arrives to be equipped and outfitted at the Bergen Group BMV yard in March
2012. In the meantime, the company will focus
on ship repair work and conversion work. “We’re
working on a lot of projects so the next few years
look promising. We’re submitting bids for three
or four large offshore new build projects and are
comfortable with the outlook for the yard – both
in the short term and in the long term,” he says.
The order book for the shipbuilding operations
of Bergen Group stood at 4.3 billion Norwegian
kroner at the end of last year, up from 3.6 billion
a year earlier. The order book at the end of last
year consisted of eight vessels, mainly construction vessels and anchor handlers, as well as two
cruise ferries.
41
THEME Offshore Opportunities
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
BERGEN GROUP FACT BOX
BERGEN GROUP BMV FACT BOX
• A maritime industrial group focusing on the offshore industry and advanced vessels
• 1,700 employees
• Established in 2007 after a series of acquisitions
• Earlier known as Bergen Yard Holding
• Delivered world’s largest seismic vessel in 2007
• Listed on the Oslo Stock Exchange in 2008
• Four business areas:
1. Shipbuilding
2. Maritime Service
3. Offshore
4. Technology
• One of three units in the shipbuilding
business area of Bergen Group, which also
includes Bergen Group Fosen and Bergen
Group ShipDesign
• Previously known as Bergen Mekaniske
Verksted
• 270 employees
• Established in 2002 with traditions
that date back more than 100 years
“Now that we put
everything on the chair,
the operator doesn’t
need to move to control
all the different systems.
Everything is an arm’s
length away.”
Stein-Roar Veberg, Project Manager at Kongsberg
KONGSBERG K-MASTER PROJECTS
IN THE PIPELINE
This year has already started out well for the
group’s shipbuilding business, which has landed
contracts for another three ships, these ones being multi-purpose vessels. Bergen Group BMV’s
yard lies near other companies in the shipping
and oil and gas industries in the Bergen region
on Norway’s west coast; one of the country’s
maritime clusters of expertise built up through
centuries as a seafaring nation. ::
The Centre of the Hub
42
MAY
JUNE
SEPTEMBER
OCTOBER
JANUARY
MARCH
JUNE
SEPTEMBER
2011
2011
2011
2011
2012
2012
2012
2012
Bergen Group
BMV NB 166
(ROV/OCV)
Kleven Maritime
NB 344
(PSV)
Kleven Maritime
NB 345
(PSV)
Havyard
NB 102
(PSV)
Kleven Maritime
NB 349
(PSV)
Yuexin
Shipbuilding
YX3138
(AHTS)
Kleven Maritime
NB 350
(PSV)
Kleven Maritime
NB 347
(PSV)
Havyard
NB 106
(PSV)
Kleven Maritime
NB 346
(PSV)
Seated at the K-Master, the operator is at the
centre of a hub of information, giving him complete awareness of all situations at all times. The
workstation consolidates the five- to six-metre
console into one operator chair and uses touchcontrol technology, which is replacing mechanical switches in bridge applications, except for in
critical operations.
The chair’s two armrests contain touch-control
panels, multi-function split screens that display
pop-up menus from a series of stored menus
that the operator can select, a joystick, buttons
for emergency stop and safety override and
thruster command levers.
The Dynamic Positioning systems controller
calculates the force exerted by the thrusters/
propellers in order for the vessel to remain on
station. It can work in several modes, including
high-precision control for any weather condition,
relaxed control for calm weather and Green DP®
control for minimum power consumption, which
is applicable to all weather conditions.
Operators can perform key operations on one
screen, while viewing relevant information on
the other and have a full overview of machinery,
support systems and situational information. The
workstation is user friendly and colour coded so
that the operator knows what to press and what
not to press.
The levers, controls and displays all are located
with intuitive and logical operations in mind to
reduce operator fatigue, while increasing operational awareness. The ergonomic design is
important because an operator may need to sit
at the chair for 3 hours at a time, working 12hour shifts.
The design of the workstation is also important
for safety reasons, especially in stressful situations, because operations where vessels work in
harsh offshore conditions can be both difficult
and dangerous.
Without a K-Master, an operator would be using
different computers and different systems with
bigger bridges and consoles to fit all the computers. If the operator needed to get out of his
chair or lean forward to check something on a
different computer, those few seconds his attention is elsewhere could make a big difference.
The K-Master solves that problem.
The K-Master has been designed to meet strict
industry standards for the bridges of offshore
service vessels (OSVs), which often work under
demanding conditions. OSVs are unique because
they have a fore bridge and a fully operational
aft bridge. The fore bridge has equipment used
for the ship’s navigation, while the aft bridge
is used for ship handling and support when the
vessel is near structures or performing tasks like
anchor handling, diving operations and construction work at sea.
Kongsberg already has a product on the market
for the forward bridge known as the K-Bridge.
The new K-Master, considered to be the most
advanced aft bridge system solution on the market, means Kongsberg can now offer a complete
bridge solution for OSVs.
“Ship owners have started investing more money
in a captain’s working environment, which goes
hand-in-hand with safety,” says Stein-Roar
Veberg, Project Manager at Kongsberg.
“We’re focusing on the offshore service vessel
market, but we hope to expand by adding the
K-Master to all the vessels we supply in the future,” he adds.
43
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
You-Centred
Design
Technology and functionality have a way of growing. Unfortunately this trend doesn’t
always benefit the user. Kongsberg Maritime is working to ensure that users’ needs
are at the heart of new technology development. Here’s how we are doing it.
:: Simplification. If you had to boil down much of the
work going on these days in product development at Kongsberg Maritime into one word, that
would be it. We’re talking about simplification
akin to the iPhone – that is, the products may
not be simple, but they should feel simple and be
intuitive to operate.
Innovative within a conservative industry
“We’re trying to be innovative within a conservative industry,” says Kongsberg’s Thor Hukkelås,
who has led the company’s cutting-edge work on
K-Master and user-centred design.
It is very important to be on the same team
as the classification societies. Kongsberg Maritime has worked closely with Det Norske Veritas
(DNV) to expand the scope for meeting rules,
and even for promoting changes in rules.
“K-Master challenged class quite a bit. We
studied the notes for aft bridge operations,
called NAUT-OSV, very carefully, and challenged
areas, when we felt it was necessary. We had a
very positive dialogue with DNV, which resulted
in the approval of many of the suggestions for
design changes that we had,” says Hukkelås.
A user-centred designer on putting
you in the centre
It’s important to note that user-centred design
isn’t a new technology; it’s a philosophy, and a
new way of thinking about tasks.
In Designing for Situational Awareness, here’s
what Endsley, Bolte and Jones have to say:
44
“Document what information operators need
to perform their job and how the operator integrates or combines information to address a
particular decision.”
“We’re trying to be
innovative within a
conservative industry.”
Thor Hukkelås, Principal Engineer Marine
Operations Business Development
Kongsberg Maritime
The Full Picture asked Hukkelås for his comments describing how user-centred design
works. Here’s what he said:
“Simplicity is at the heart of what we’re trying to achieve. We are constantly trying to strip
down functionality to what is really needed instead of adding more and more ‘nice to have’
functions. We focus on the 20 percent of the
functions that are used 80 percent of the time.
“Today’s situation is such that there’s a large
gap between the vast amount of data that is produced and presented to the user, and the information that is really needed by the user. We are
trying to close this information gap by designing systems for maximum Situational Awareness
(SA).
“Basically, SA is being aware of what is happening around you and understanding what that
information means to you now and in the future.
Systems designed to achieve maximum SA support decision making and thus increase the performance of the user.
“We are trying to change the focus from boxes,
systems and equipment to function, information
and operation.
“In an alarm scenario, for example, your first
task must be to bring the operator’s heart rate
down, make him or her feel like he or she is in
control of the situation.
“All computerised systems have a tendency to
grow and gain functions until you lose sight of
the main task that is supposed to be supported.
“We’re focusing on adapting user functions to
their operational context and building functionality across traditional bridge activities in order
to support the operation that the vessel is built
for. We think about what is actually needed to
support the vessel as a tool for performing, for
example, an anchor-handling operation.
“Anyone who has worked with software development has seen that user interaction and the
human-machine interface is tacked on at the end
of the process. We’re trying to include it from
the start of the design process.
“Onboard computer systems are designed today to present information or provide control.
I believe the next wave of systems will support
decisions.
“There’s a spiral of development where the user
is in the centre all the way: We design a little,
build a little, test a little and learn a lot.” ::
45
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine :: Photos by Magne Ekerum Høiby / Hareide Design
From SAAB to OSV
you-centred inspirations
EMOTIONAL VALUES
Trust
Pride
Brand Knowledge
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
What are the users feeling
when using KM products?
Kongsberg Maritime partners with leading industrial design company Hareide Design – a house with roots
at Saab and Mercedes-Benz – in order to ensure our systems offer industry leading ergonomics and useability.
Einar Hareide and colleague Magne Ekerum Høiby discuss what makes a user-oriented design process a success.
AESTHETICAL VALUES
Which identity elements are
equal in all KM products?
Essential and significant
Precision in all details
Quality materials
FUNCTIONALITY
Intuitive, safe, logical, efficient interaction
Good usability
Good construction
What are KM’s functional
values?
What’s wrong, what can be done and what will look better from the user’s perspective
What’s wrong with the current situation
What can be done to improve the situation
What will a better situation look like
Users are flooded with too much information, and
lose mastery over the situation.
Incoming signals and information are combined
in more intuitive graphic user interfaces (GUI).
Users can obtain an understanding of the situation at a glance and query the system where
necessary.
Users need to criss-cross the bridge consulting
screens to create a cohesive picture of the situation.
Traditional stand-alone systems are brought together in one unified operator interface, accessible at multiple points.
Users can get what they need in one place, or
from any place with a display.
In an alarm situation, many buttons and indicators
start flashing. Heartbeats race, without a sense of
what can be done.
Design of systems should strive to bring down
the heartbeat of the user in an alarm situation.
Rather than presenting problems, an operating
system presents a diagnosis and a few courses of
action to redress the situation.
Technology is built around what is possible, not
around what users want or need.
Take the product design focus on human-machine interface from something done at the end
of the process, to something done at the start.
Consoles provide what the user wants and needs,
with as much functionality as they might need
under the covers.
A technology is not, or is hardly, used until it is
sold to its first customer, and that customer takes
it into operation.
New interfaces are developed rapidly, tested
against real users, and redeveloped if needed –
prior to first customer delivery.
A technology has demonstrated its user-friendliness and performance through several iterations
before a customer starts using it.
The number of systems and sensors effectively
hide the current status of the ship from the operator.
Systems are created to provide users with an accurate picture of the ship’s status.
Users have an immediate understanding of the
state of the ship, and get support for future
decision-making.
Feedback from users
The first step in the design process is understanding the user. Kongsberg Maritime
undertook numerous interviews with users
of advanced operational systems. Here’s an
example of some of their feedback.
Keeping it Simple
Feedback from a user on DPS 112, the new
Kongsberg Seatex GPS-based position reference
system:
“The system has the good looks of a high-end
audio product and beauty is not skin deep for
when you turn it on the enjoyment continues.
“The menus and graphics are simple, easy to
navigate and graphically impressive.
“Like a star NFL quarterback, the 112’s good
looks come with seemingly effortless performance.”
Feedback from a user when he saw eBird for the
first time:
“You see that it will work just by looking at it.”
46
“It is not a secret that my favourite Dynamic
Positioning Systems manufacturer is Kongsberg
Maritime. Why? Because, despite the fact that
their DP Systems run off common Windowsbased desktop computers, they aspire to the
Apple model of good design, intuitive graphic
interfaces and reliability. Their systems just
work.”
Information
“Information is key. The more we know, the better we can control it.”
“No information is dangerous.”
Emergency shutdown systems and Fire & Gas
systems
“ESD is horribly confusing on drillships. We need
a visual presentation.”
“ESD is scary – better not to touch it.”
“Emergency teams mark up a GA drawing to
mark temperatures and know what’s been done.
3D could be faster.”
Alarms
“Audio alarms are distracting and tiring. Loud
noises lead to irritated and angry operators.”
“When the screen is filled up with alarms, the
operator just has to pick out some using gut
instinct.”
Human-Machine Interface (HMI)
“Today there are too many buttons and too
much text.”
“I have trouble with reading text in stressful
situations. It must be self-explanatory.”
“Use pictures instead. We think with our spine.”
“We don’t read manuals.”
A dream solution
“Like an iPhone. It must be easy to navigate.”
“See 3D with ducts and valves, like CSI.”
“Automatic is always good – when it works.”
“Remove all the trash and keep it simple.”
:: ”Design is about communication,” starts Einar Hareide, founder and leader of Hareide Design. “It
communicates function, origin and quality. Our
design goal has been to simplify, peel away all of
the superficial artifacts and present something
interesting and beautiful.”
Hareide Design was called in by Kongsberg
Maritime late in 2008 to collaborate on the development of a new aft operator’s chair (what
would become K-Master). The company had
worked with Kongsberg since 2004 and brought
with it experience from leading massive design
projects at the likes of Saab and Mercedes.
The Full Picture Magazine met the two principal designers behind this collaboration to understand the processes and thoughts behind such
successful industrial design projects.
Humility
Hareide and his designer colleague Høiby indicate that the start of such a project involves humility for the expertise of others and openness
to new impulses and users’ needs.
“There are a number of skills involved in the
picture, including the engineers, designers,
product managers and others. It’s important that
we communicate that we’re not designing for the
client, but designing together with them. You
need to show humility for the different skills
around the table,” says Høiby.
Influences for the Kongsberg Maritime K-Master
project came from many directions, but the designers were quick to note that users now expect high
technology. “Officers use an iPad at home, and
they’re expecting to see the same kind of functionality on their offshore vessels at sea,” says Høiby.
During the concept phase, the designers developed a number of different ideas, then reduced
them to a few final options to present to the client. The final design was one inspired by the
company’s past work on Kongsberg’s AutoChief
systems. It features very stylistically clean
shapes, widening circles and carefully machined
edges. “It’s most reminiscent of Bang & Olufsen
hi-fi stereos from the 80s – clean and beautiful,”
says Høiby.
Function
At the root of Hareide Design’s work was always
the end user: “We kept in mind that the user
spends 80 percent of his time on 20 percent of
the total functionality. It’s important to see how
we radically streamlined the interface for the
user,” says Kongsberg’s Thor Hukkelås, who has
lead the company’s work on K-Master and usercentred design.
K-Master features basically five separate levers. From a production standpoint, this is a
huge improvement, and the virtuous upshot is
that users prefer to deal with fewer controls.
Many additional functionalities (those rarely
used) were hidden or subordinated. Simple effects – like hiding the seat adjustment buttons
under an armrest and putting some settings
into sub-menus on the touch screens – radically
clears clutter from the user’s perspective.
“We started by asking users about their dream
scenario, and then listened carefully. Then we
made a strategic decision to make a few things
far better than on other such systems, rather
than making everything just a little better,” says
Høiby.
Finalising
Hundreds of sketches went into a project like KMaster. By the time Hareide Design’s work was
done, there was a single prototype. This prototype then became the plaything for engineers,
who have been involved in, and dreaming of,
how to realise the shared vision from the start
of the process.
“Kongsberg operates with a pretty strict philosophy: six months after showing a prototype, the
product should be on the market,” says Høiby.
“That deadline pressure creates a special kind of
motivation. Our final sketch was basically ready
for production.”
Today Hareide Design is working with Kongsberg on the next step of the same process – converting the philosophies that inform the K-Master aft bridge into a navigation bridge solution.
It’s another chance to combine beauty with utility. ::
47
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine
Design Award
Success
Kongsberg Maritime received no less than two prestigious awards for design
excellence from the Norwegian Design Council during this year’s annual Design Day.
The awards are an important recognition of the company’s focus on design.
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
:: Kongsberg Seatex was given an Award for Design Excellence in the Industrial Design Category
for its eBird seismic streamer control system,
while Kongsberg Maritime Simulation received
the Award for Design Excellence in the Interactive Design category for its new Offshore Vessel Simulator Instructor System. eBird was also
nominated for the highest award of the day, the
Honours Award, as one of four candidates.
Both awards reflect Kongsberg Maritime’s commitment to design and to meeting the safety and
operational efficiency needs of the oil and gas
industry, as exploration and production takes
place in deeper waters, much further from land.
eBird Seismic Streamer Control System
Kongsberg’s eBird is a novel bird concept for lateral, vertical and roll streamer control in marine
seismic acquisition that enables fault tolerant
and efficient multi streamer steering by employing a wide range of innovative and patented
technological solutions.
“Our in-house designers and engineers worked
with a team from Inventas in Trondheim to develop eBird in response to requests from the
industry for enhanced seismic streamer control.
They succeeded in this goal and to be recognised
by the industry through the system’s growing acceptance. The Norwegian Design Council
Award for industrial design excellence is a strong
acknowledgement and a great inspiration for future innovation and development endeavours,”
comments Gard Ueland, President of Kongsberg
Seatex AS.
Offshore Vessel Simulator Instructor
System
Collaboration was also important in Kongsberg
Maritime Simulation’s win in the Interactive Design category, as the Kongsberg Offshore Vessel
Simulator Instructor System was developed in
conjunction with Norwegian design company
Halogen in order to meet the oil and gas industry’s demand for simulator training to raise skills
and reduce risk during demanding operations.
The awards jury had the following to say about
the system:
“This PC application is used to prepare, implement and evaluate computer-simulated exercises
for maritime offshore operations. Simulation exercises like these require a lot of the instructor.
Large quantities of information have to be displayed at once, and extensive changes must be
made quickly. A new tool with industry-leading
usability was required.
48
“The Kongsberg training simulator creates a realistic training environment where maritime personnel can practice demanding offshore tasks.
A good tool is needed to plan training events,
adjust them along the way and review the events
retrospectively. Instructors’ needs have been the
focus of the development project.
“The tool is designed around real training;
it is easy to construct the main scenarios and
straightforward to add a wealth of detail. The
user interface utilises the familiar Windows
screen components as well as customised features. The frame itself is muted and draws attention to the training content, which can be
extremely complicated if required. To train crew
and officers, instructors need an expert tool that
renders the situation at sea realistically. This do-
main is extremely complex. Kongsberg has taken
up the challenge and has built a clear, powerful
tool for offshore simulation.”
Kongsberg Maritime Product Manager for the
Offshore Vessel Simulator, Geir Lilje adds: “We
are honoured to have won this prestigious award.
The new Instructor System offers a broad range
of functionalities and a user interface that is
unique in the simulator world. The award reflects
our commitment to modern design and innovation, while recognising the improved possibility
for users to create and assess advanced exercises
on demanding operations at sea.”
The Award for Design Excellence is a leading
award for design in Norway and is given to both
manufacturers and designers that have cooperated on the development of new products. ::
49
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Epic training
At the Samsung Heavy Industries shipyard in South Korea, three gigantic vessels are emerging to join their
predecessor Corcovado. Their epic names – Olympia, Poseidon and Mykonos – are appropriate both for sixth
generation ultra-deepwater drill rigs and the training challenges they pose.
ferent training options, like simulators, and a
range of training facilities to choose from, like
their Korean centre at Busan, which is conveniently located for the shipyard.”
Hi-tech and highly skilled
:: Arne Jacobsen, assistant rig manager involved in
building Ocean Rig’s four ultra-deepwater drill
rigs at the Samsung Heavy Industries shipyard
in South Korea, has a bewildering list of key
responsibilities. He has to liaise with the shipyard and vendors to prepare the ships for operation, while always keeping an attentive eye
on site safety, environmental impacts and emergency preparedness – which means being well
acquainted with national and international laws
and regulations.
As if this isn’t enough, Jacobsen is also intimately involved in organising the training programme that Kongsberg Maritime is running for
the rig crews: “I have been involved in negotiating the training packages with Kongsberg and coordinating this with our commissioning activity
to ensure that we also have necessary personnel
on site at any given time,” he explains, adding
that: “this reflects just some of my responsibility
for the prepping of the ships for operation.”
Fast track training...
Although Ocean Rig regularly uses Kongsberg for
ad hoc training needs, the task of bringing 120
new employees quickly up to speed in the middle of the rig construction period is quite a dif50
ferent ballgame. In autumn 2010, Jacobsen began a close collaboration with Kongsberg’s global
operations training manager, Nils-Ivar Pedersen.
After an initial phase training the marine and operational personnel for the first rig, Corcovado,
the duo began meeting weekly to tailor more
comprehensive training packages for the three
rigs still under construction.
“We need to man up six to seven months before we take delivery of a rig. And all personnel
have to be trained while they are participating
in the commissioning, getting to know the vessel and the equipment onboard,” says Jacobsen, who underlines that getting four 40-strong
crews, many of them new employees, on the
same page at the same time is a major challenge.
“Pulling off 75 courses for electrical, technical
and marine crew during a really intensive period requires enormous coordination. We need a
steep learning curve in order to deliver on time
and budget – it’s a real fast track!”
Pedersen confirms, especially with newbuild
rigs and many staff new to Kongsberg’s technology, that this tight cooperation is essential for
creating a good planning horizon and succeeding with tailored training for the equipment onboard.
... for tailor-made success
The duo’s solution is a complete package of
training carefully tailored to Ocean Rig’s ambitious rollout plan for the four rigs. As there are
many new hires, Jacobsen also wants to gather
the crews as part of a team building process. All
the marine crews, for example, train together in
a three-week module, getting to know one another while getting up to speed on technical and
operational aspects.
As Pedersen explains, Kongsberg’s training programmes are module based, allowing course participants to take part in training that is tailored to
their needs: “We have a lot of different training
modules in Kongsberg Maritime. Many clients
want roughly half of the same core modules and
the rest of the training adapted to their specific
needs. Consequently, we offer modules that the
instructor can mix and match into a complete
training package.”
What are the key elements of successful training? Jacobsen is unequivocal: “We need assured quality and in-built flexibility. Kongsberg is
highly committed to its training services and has
had them certified by Det Norske Veritas, so the
quality is excellent. Kongsberg’s flexibility means
that we get tailored training packages, plus dif-
In January, Ocean Rig took delivery of the Corcovado rig from Samsung. The three remaining
drill ships, based upon the Saipem 10K design,
are scheduled for delivery this March, July and
September. Construction is running smoothly.
On his first posting in Asia, Jacobsen has been
positively surprised by the South Korean work
ethic: “Local people hardly seem to have ‘no’ in
their vocabulary, and the enormous pride they
put into their work results in high quality. They
are highly skilled and work well in hi-tech environments,” he enthuses.
It is hardly surprising that Ocean Rig, owner of
advanced fifth- and sixth-generation semi-submersible drill rigs, leverages knowledge as a key
competitive advantages. “Our rigs are equipped
with state-of-the-art technology operated by
highly skilled crews, so top-notch training is pivotal for our business success,” Arne underlines.
Neither is it surprising that Kongsberg Maritime’s sophisticated new DPS 4D differential positioning and hydro acoustic systems are part of
the new rigs’ equipment. KM delivers systems to
almost every ship that leaves the Samsung shipyard in Korea.
Uncompromising approach
State-of-the-art technology is not the only thing
that differentiates Ocean Rig from the competition. They also have an uncompromising attitude
to providing optimally safe, efficient and environmentally sound drilling services for oil and
gas exploration and development in ultra deepwaters and harsh environments.
“Our vision is to be the drilling contractor of
choice for our customers, employees and shareholders, and we therefore develop our HES&Q
and management systems to ensure that we
exceed client expectations of both operational
efficiency and environmental and safety standards,” explains Jacobsen. “On the safety side, we
aim for incident-free environments and on the
environment side for zero discharge systems
Arne Jacobsen, Assistant Rig Manager, Ocean Rig
with low emissions. To achieve this, key knowledge and experience must go hand-in-hand with
functional systems and knowledgeable people.
“Add operating in ultra deepwaters and harsh
environments to the equation, and you can see
this is a tall order. That’s why thorough, specialised training is needed to quality assure our employees’ skills.”
An epic story continues
Ocean Rig and Kongsberg have already achieved
some milestones together. In January 2010, Ocean
Rig’s semi-submersible, Leiv Eiriksson, successfully navigated the Bosphorus Strait thanks to an
earlier training and technology delivery collaboration. The rig is one of the first vessels to apply
Kongsberg’s DPS 4D dynamic positioning technology, which was essential for avoiding the bridges
and other hazards to satellite-based systems the
Bosporus is famous for.
Back in the Samsung shipyard, the Olympia
and Poseidon are nearing completion and the
Mykonos is 50 percent complete. The close partnership between Jacobsen and Pedersen will
continue until September.
“I will follow the entire process through to
the final delivery,” says Jacobsen, sounding eager. “However, we have the option of building
four more rigs at the shipyard, so Nils-Ivar may
not be finished with adapting his training programmes to our needs quite yet.” ::
DPS 4D Differential
Positioning System
• Uses the latest advances in GPS/GLONASS
technology, aided by inertial technology
• Has an intuitive and easy to use Human
Machine Interface (HMI) developed in close
co-operation with end-users
• Developed by specialist position reference
and satellite positioning division, Kongsberg
Seatex
Kongsberg Maritime
training programmes
• About 5,000 students attend Kongsberg
Maritime training courses globally every
year
• Types of training: Simulators, lab exercises,
classroom
• Availability: KM labs and facilities in
Kongsberg, Horten and Trondheim
(Norway), Aberdeen (Scotland), Singapore,
Korea, China, Houston (USA), Brazil and
Dubai
• DNV certified learning modules
51
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Marvin Elvebakk,
Kongsberg Instructor
and Course Developer
Full ECDIS
Training
Starting this year, Kongsberg Maritime now offers generic ECDIS training that satisfies recent requirements
set down by the IMO. Customers can now get a turnkey package, including bridge systems and training from
Kongsberg.
:: Last summer in Manila, the IMO approved changes
to the STCW convention that, among other
things, made generic training in the use of ECDIS
for officers-of-the-watch mandatory. Before 1
January 2012, thousands of seafarers will need
to go through an ECDIS course that meets specific requirements.
“We’ll be offering this course in order to support our customers and prepare them for this
requirement,” says Eirik Hågensen, Kongsberg
Maritime’s Project Manager. “We’re providing
the bridge equipment, so it’s only natural to provide the kind of training required by IMO rules.”
52
The new 5-day course from Kongsberg Maritime has been designed according to the IMO
Model Course – a blueprint published by the IMO
for a generic ECDIS course that should satisfy
any and all flag states. Thus the course examines:
1. Legal aspects and requirements
2. Main types of electronic charts
3. ECDIS data
4. Presentation of data
5. Sensors
6. Basic navigational functions
7. Special functions for route planning
8. Special functions for route monitoring
9. Updating
10. Additional navigational functions
and indications
11. Errors in displayed data
12. Errors of interpretation
13. Status information, warnings and alarms
14. Voyage documentation
15. System integrity monitoring
16. ECDIS back-up
17. Dangers of over-reliance on ECDIS
Kongsberg’s instructor and course developer
Marvin Elvebakk believes that the offering will
be very attractive to future customers. “We’ll be
combining all of the necessary elements, with a
great amount of practical exercises, work on the
simulators and debriefings. We’ve also set aside
time to talk about accidents that have happened
because of improper use, or lack of proper training, on ECDIS,” says Elvebakk.
The generic ECDIS courses, which officially
start in August, received temporary approval
from Det Norske Veritas (DNV) in April and are
expected to receive final approval by June. They
will be available at Kongsberg in Norway as well
as in Singapore and in Busan, South Korea.
While not all maritime flag states have made
training mandatory, the UK’s MCA has indicated
that it will expect navigation officers to complete
both this generic ECDIS course and a course specific to the ECDIS make being used (so-called
‘type-specific ECDIS training’ or a ‘knobs and
buttons’ course).
Elvebakk comments: “We originally planned to
combine our generic ECDIS course with the typespecific training (K-Bridge Operator course) we of-
fer today, but we discovered that this was not possible. Because ECDIS systems and interfaces are
evolving so quickly, a functional approach, not a
product-oriented approach, is a better approach.”
Guidelines developed by the European Union
for port state controllers explicitly require them
to determine: ‘Are the Master and deck watchkeeping officers able to produce appropriate documentation that generic and type-specific ECDIS
familiarisation has been undertaken?’
“We are now able to offer both generic and
type-specific training, so that users of Kongsberg
bridge systems will be able to satisfy requirements from the authorities,” says Elvebakk.
Kongsberg believes that customers and users of
Kongsberg bridge systems will appreciate the opportunity to get their mandatory training directly
from their supplier. Says Hågensen: “We’re not
only supporting owners with products, but we’re
also supporting the kind of mandatory training
that relates to those products. It’s a kind of onestop-shopping where you get the best products
and the best training from the same supplier.” ::
Kongsberg Maritime ECDIS IMO
Model Course 1.27
Participants: Officers-of-the-watch, nautical
officers, any party involved in marine navigation
Teaching method: Theoretical lessons and
practical exercises, using stand-alone operator
station and K-Bridge simulator
Duration: 5 days
Participants: Max. 8
Locations: Kongsberg, Norway; Busan, South
Korea; Singapore
Orders: km.training@kongsberg.com
53
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine :: Photos by Stephen Wong.
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
An Almost
Impossible
Task
Nobody really believed it possible to complete a complex
refit of Offshore Works’ Dynamically Positioned Diving
Support Vessel, Offshore Stephaniturm, in six weeks.
The refit team from Kongsberg proved them wrong.
Six weeks after contract signing, the vessel was
back in business.
A.Majid Maidin,
Senior General Manager Offshore Works
:: From its headquarters in Kuala Lumpur, Offshore
Works has a stunning view of the city’s main
landmark, the Petronas Towers. Situated in the
heart of the city, this impressive building, which
was the world’s tallest until 2004, is Offshore
Works’ next-door neighbour. This unique location is testimony to the company’s strong position in the Malaysian market. Offshore Works
entered this market in 1997, and has since then
maintained its position as one of the leading Malaysian providers to the oil and gas industry, with
services within geophysical surveying, subsea
services as well as construction and engineering.
The company has steadily expanded its opera54
tions to other countries, and today employs 400
people working in areas stretching from the Asia
Pacific region to the Middle East.
“We are one of the pioneers in this industry. In
Malaysia, we are the first company of this kind
and we are one of the biggest in the region,” says
A Majid Maidin, Senior General Manager at Offshore Works.
The pride of the subsea division
The pride of the company’s subsea division is
the Dynamically Positioned Diving Support Vessel (DPDSV) Offshore Stephaniturm. The vessel
was originally built at J.G. Hitzler in Germany
in 1978 and has been upgraded several times. It
was bought by Offshore Works in 2006, making
it the foundation for the entire subsea business
of the company. The subsea division is primarily
involved in providing professional underwater
inspection, repair and maintenance services to
the oil and gas industry. Offshore Stephaniturm,
which is wholly owned and operated by Offshore
Subsea Sdn Bhd, is presently the only dedicated
state-of-the-art DPDSV in Malaysia, giving Offshore Works’ subsea division a unique position
in the Malaysian market.
So when the DP system started showing signs
of weakness in 2009, management decided that
something had to be done: “Our management
made the right decision to upgrade Offshore Stephaniturm. Because our entire subsea business is
based on this vessel, we could not just leave it as it
was. It gives us a unique position in the local market, and if we had not done the upgrade, our capabilities would have been limited,” explains Majid.
Good business relations
Offshore Works carried out some research in the
market, approached several suppliers and decided to give the upgrade to Kongsberg for several
reasons. “The number one reason was the good
relations, which is important in any business. In
addition, Kongsberg is a well known, reputable
company, and of course they had the equipment and reliability that we were looking for.
One of the most important factors, however, is
the worldwide support. This is very important to
any customer. Kongsberg has also done a lot of
research in the market and has a good protocol,”
explains Majid.
Kongsberg Maritime signed the contract with
Offshore Works in 2010, with a scheduled delivery time of only six weeks from contract signing. The owners did not really believe it possible,
but they were pleasantly surprised. The scope
of supply was a complex one, including an Au-
toChief C20 remote control for main engines, TC
500 Thruster control system for remote control
of azimuth thrusters and side thrusters, SC 500
remote control for rudders, K-Chief 500 alarm
system for engine room installations and K-POS
DP22 Dynamic Positioning System for DPII class
vessels.
“I thought there was no way this upgrade could
be complete in only six weeks,” says Chan Kong
Foo, Equipment and Project Manager at Offshore
Works. “A refit like this normally takes about
three months. However, the team from Kongsberg Maritime worked hard and it was a smooth
process from start to finish. Everything was
55
THEME Offshore Opportunities
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
“I thought there was no
way this upgrade could
be complete in only six
weeks, a refit like this
normally takes about
three months. However,
the team from
Kongsberg Maritime
worked hard and it was
a smooth process from
start to finish.”
Chan Kong Foo, Equipment and Project Manager
at Offshore Works
completed quite on time without any complaints
from the crew, despite quite hard working conditions.”
A real record
The first thing that had to be done was to remove the old system onboard, something which
took nearly a month to complete. With 40 to 50
people working onboard quite a small vessel, it’s
vital that everyone knows what their tasks are.
Once the old systems were cleaned out, it was
time for commissioning.
“It is not an easy task to remove every single
system, including miles and miles of cables, and
install new ones. With so many people working
onboard at the same time, you cannot afford any
mistakes. The second phase was to hook everything up, and this is where you see if everything
works. If one cable is not correctly connected,
nothing works. However, everything worked
smoothly, and everyone knew their task. Completing the entire upgrade within this short time
period is a real record, you know,” says Chan
Kong Foo.
One of the challenges met by the team during
the process was interpreting the old drawings
belonging to the old systems. “The old draw56
From left: A.Majid Maidi, Senior General Manager Offshore Works, Chan Kong Foo, Equipment and Project
Manager Offshore Works, Tan Keir Lai, General Manager Technical Offshore Works, Soon Hoe Sim, Local Project
Manager Kongsberg Maritime Singapore
ings onboard the ship were difficult to read, and
some of the systems were obsolete, which posed
an extra challenge to our team,” says Chan Kong
Foo.
Like a general hospital
The upgrade was run from Kongsberg’s local office in Singapore, with additional resources from
Norway coming to Singapore from time to time.
The upgrade is Kongsberg’s first ever refit contract in Malaysia.
“Kongsberg Maritime is just like a general hospital, you know. We have doctors for everything.
You just leave the vessel with us, and we will make
it better. This project is quite unique, and a lot of
eyes were on us during the process. However, nobody was scared off by the hard work. We had a
team that really went the extra mile to complete
this,” comments Soon Hoe Sim, the local Project
Manager for Kongsberg Maritime Singapore.
Stable positions
As a diving support vessel, the Offshore Stephaniturm’s ability to maintain a stable position is
of vital importance to the diving crew. Like any
company, Offshore Works values the safety of
its crew highly, which is one of the initial reasons
for the upgrade.
“We are working on the seabed, so if the ship
cannot hold its position, it will be very dangerous for the divers to do their job. To come up
from 300 metres depth is not easy unless the
vessel is in the same position. There could be
fatalities if the system did not work properly.
The new system has really improved the safety
of the vessel and the people working onboard.
That was one of the reasons we needed a new DP
system in the first place,” says Chan Kong Foo.
A bright future
Since the sea trials, the new and improved Offshore Stephaniturm seems to be working perfectly. During the vessel’s annual sea trial, the
intent was to demonstrate the vessel’s ability to
maintain a stable position under normal circumstances. No points of failure were detected.
“This vessel´s DP2 performance has been
smooth and to our satisfaction. All those who
have sailed with the vessel are happily impressed
with the systems, and we hope that Stephaniturm will regain her former glory days,” says
Tan Keir Lai, General Manager Technical. “Kongsberg Singapore has always been responsive, supportive and fast to react. This is a project both
we and the owner are quite proud of with regards to the end result. The system is very reliable, especially the Power Management System,
which is working beautifully so far. It’s a good
system,” he says.
With the new and upgraded Offshore Stephaniturm, Offshore Works is back as the main
player within subsea services in the Malaysian
market, and has a bright future ahead.
“The most important thing for us was to prepare the vessel for the market and to get it approved by the buyer. Now that the vessel is
accepted, we are back in business and we have
reached our number one priority. I can truly say
that this is the result of good team work,” says
Majid, and adds: “I think the future of the business in diving is going to grow. New fields are
being developed, especially in this region, and I
think diving will be one of the major contributions to the company in the future.” ::
“Kongsberg Maritime
is just like a general
hospital. We have
doctors for everything.
You just leave the vessel
with us, and we will make
it better. This project is
quite unique, and a lot of
eyes were on us during
the process.”
Soon Hoe Sim, Local Project Manager for
Kongsberg Maritime Singapore
57
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine :: Photos by Eugene Choy / Sea Trucks.
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
A Reliable
Partner
When Sea Trucks Group decided to expand its fleet with pipe-lay vessels
in the late ’90s, they looked to the market for an experienced supplier
of DP systems. Kongsberg was selected as the preferred supplier,
and the partnership has lasted ever since.
58
:: The Full Picture Magazine visited the Sea Trucks
Group’s office at Kwong Soon Engineering Co Pte
Ltd in Singapore, where the company will outfit its latest addition to the Jascon series of DP3
pipe-lay construction vessels, Jascon 18. With a
22-strong local project team, including designers
from China, the company is well prepared for the
task at hand. In addition, it can draw from extensive experience. This is not the company’s first
project of this kind. After the successful delivery
of its first offshore pipe-lay vessel, Jascon 5, in
April 2004, Sea Trucks entered the global contracting business. Based on the design of the Jascon 5, the group launched a massive newbuilding
program of 7 DP3 ‘hybrid’ offshore marine construction vessels. The first five were delivered
between 2007 and 2010, and the remaining two
are scheduled for delivery in the next two years.
“These DP3 construction vessels are unique
in the offshore industry. We call them ‘hybrid
vessels’ since they are able to install both rigid
pipelines in S-lay as well as flexible pipelines.
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THEME Offshore Opportunities
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Rakesh Lal Sea Trucks Group, Tom Ford, E&I Manager Sea Trucks, Roy de Mink,
Manager Purchasing & Subcontracting Sea Trucks Group
“These DP3 construction
vessels are unique in
the offshore industry.
We call them ‘hybrid
vessels’ since they are
able to install both rigid
pipelines in S-lay as well
as flexible pipelines.”
Roy de Mink, Manager for Purchasing &
Subcontracting with the Sea Trucks Group
They also have big unobstructed decks, large
permanent accommodation facilities and crane
capacities between 270 and 1800 tonnes,” explains Roy de Mink, Manager for Purchasing &
Subcontracting.
Worldwide presence
With the Jascon series of DP3 construction vessels, Sea Trucks offers marine services to the offshore oil and gas industry worldwide. Although
its headquarters is in West Africa, the Sea Trucks
Group also has operational and supporting offices in the Middle East, Europe, South East
Asia and Australia. The company offers services
60
ranging from subsea construction and SURF solutions to accommodation hook-up, decommissioning and heavy lift services as well as fabrication supported by a multi-cultural workforce of
more than 2,400. Most of the vessels are built
in China, outfitted in Singapore and sent off to
operate worldwide, which is why the company
needs suppliers that can provide support anywhere in the world. Since most of the vessels
carrying Kongsberg equipment are outfitted in
Singapore, local presence during construction is
vital.
“One of our criteria when looking for a supplier
was the ability to offer worldwide customer sup-
port. With our international presence, we need
good backup and service people in all areas of
the world, from Africa to South America to the
Far East. The Kongsberg people seated here are in
the same time zone. This makes it easier to get on
the phone and talk to people and they can come
down and talk face-to-face with us,” says Tom
Ford, E&I Manager for Sea Trucks Group.
The flagship
When Jascon 18 is completed in about a year,
it will be the deepwater flagship of Sea Trucks’s
construction vessel fleet. As one of the last vessels to be delivered in the group’s seven new-
build pipe-lay programme, Jascon 18 is fitted
with a Full Picture DP-3 system, K-Bridge integrated bridge system, K-Thrust thrusters control system and K-Chief 700 marine automation system. It’s not the first time Sea Trucks
has chosen Kongsberg. No less than 15 of the
company’s previous vessels are equipped with
Kongsberg systems, and 7 of these construction
newbuilds feature Kongsberg DP-3 and automation systems.
“Back in the 1990s, we were looking for a supplier that really knew the market. We needed
a company which had been in the market for
a long time and had extensive experience with
DP systems and control and monitoring systems
for bigger vessels. After evaluating various suppliers and manufacturers, we decided to go for
Kongsberg because of the company’s vast experience, long track record and reliable hardware,”
explains Roy de Mink.
Impossible to black out
A lot has happened since the cooperation between the two companies started. In the DP3
vessels’ early beginnings, there was a lot to be
learnt about the Kongsberg systems: “We bought
this very nice Power Management System from
Kongsberg and we only used a small part of it,”
explains Ford, but emphasising that this was
only true of the older vessels. “We’ve moved
a long way forward from there. For instance,
during commissioning of Jascon 31, Sea Trucks
Group’s latest delivery, we tested all sides of the
system. We tried very hard to black the ship out,
but couldn’t manage it. Today, Kongsberg’s Power
Management System has become far more critical than on the older vessels, because the new
ones are diesel electric. The demand for Jascon
18 is going to be high, so we need a system that
will not allow the vessel to black out,” concludes
Ford. ::
61
THEME Offshore Opportunities
Article by The Full Picture Magazine
Article by The Full Picture Magazine
The FULL PICTURE magazine 01/11
Service that
lOOKs forward
Customer Support
Growth in Singapore
Response time and quality service are key factors to providing customer
satisfaction. Kongsberg Maritime focuses on both, by getting closer to
customers and by offering a more proactive approach to global service.
In 2010, Kongsberg Maritime Singapore accounted for 10 percent of the services the company provided worldwide.
Bjørn Mørken, Regional Manager Customer Support, believes demand will continue to increase and is planning to
man his department accordingly.
:: By 2016, Kongsberg Maritime will be servicing
around 17,000 vessels worldwide. So, if there is
anyone who needs to be at the top of his game, it
would be the company’s head of Global Customer
Support, Lars Kristian Moen.
Kongsberg Maritime customers expect support
that gives them an opportunity to plan necessary
changes and upgrades in due time. To make this
happen, Kongsberg Maritime will increase focus
on Lifecycle Management during technology and
product development, the delivery phase and the
operational phase of each Kongsberg project.
Planned, preventive maintenance has been identified by customers as one of the main factors for
reducing service-related costs.
“For many of our large customers, downtime is
by far the most expensive aspect of any service,”
says Moen. “Anything that can be done to prevent downtime pays off.”
Moen points to Service Level Agreements and
increased, improved communication as key ways
for Kongsberg Maritime to enhance support for
its customers.
be made available to customers who want to follow the status on their own installations through
web-based access.
Key Support Managers
Lars Kristian Moen, EVP Global Customer Support,
Kongsberg Maritime
Regional Service Hubs
Kongsberg Maritime has established a global organisation with Regional Service Hubs in Norway,
Singapore, the United States and Brazil. The Brazilian hub, though relatively new, is undergoing
rapid growth. In addition, the company runs dedicated offices in China, Korea, India, Dubai, Italy,
Poland, Germany, Holland, the UK and Canada.
“We’re steadily increasing our local presence.
This year we will add dedicated Kongsberg offices
in Greece and Mexico to accommodate the growing markets in these regions,” says Moen.
Kongsberg has set up 24/7 on-call availability
from its four service hubs, and Moen indicates
that this capability will be pushed to additional
markets.
Customer Relationship Management
To provide more efficient and accurate support
in a global market, Kongsberg Maritime will
introduce Customer Relationship Management
62
(CRM) throughout its global organisation in the
summer of 2011. CRM will store information related to the customer and the installation from
initial sales to After Market Support. CRM will
ensure that everyone in Kongsberg Maritime –
from sales and marketing through the project
delivery team to Customer Support – is on the
same page in terms of specifications, the scope
of supply, the services made, as well as past and
on-going communication with the customer.
Access to the same real-time information means
improved communication between Kongsberg
and time-strapped clients. CRM information can
Kongsberg Maritime has for many years developed and delivered Integrated Automation Systems (IAS), including, for example, functionality
such as Dynamic Positioning, Power Management Systems and Safety Systems. To support
the large number of installations with IAS delivery and to meet the needs of customers operating internationally, more Key Support Managers
will be appointed to focus on dedicated customers and ‘Full Picture’ deliveries within applications such as Drilling and LNG.
“The Key Support Manager will also contribute
to bridging the transition from the building and
commissioning phase to the operational phase,”
says Moen.
Currently, this is normally a priority for fixed
and floating installations with a large communications infrastructure, but it’s being pushed into
steadily more scenarios. It will one day be a must
for everyone in the industry, but right now a few
factors are slowing implementation:
• Security: Operators are concerned that the IP
links might not provide enough protection from
unwanted access.
• Benefit: Proven benefit from remote diagnostics compared with traditional ‘in person service’.
• Expert-to-expert: Unfortunately, many early
implementations have not involved two operational experts talking, but two IT guys sorting
out communication issues related to, for example, Firewall configuration.
Predictability reduces downtime
Clearly, the theme for Kongsberg Maritime’s
customer service is changing from ‘incident and
response’ to ‘plan and pre-empt’. By moving the
service agenda to address technical issues before
they are problems, both Kongsberg Maritime
and clients benefit from predictability and reduced downtime. ::
:: “Last year, Kongsberg Maritime in Singapore
serviced 1,150 vessels out of the total 10,000
services our company performed worldwide.
This says something about the demand in this
area. Singapore is one of the world’s largest shipping regions and all the important yards and
owners are present here,” says Mørken..
The right competence
When Mørken took over as head of customer
support in Singapore in 2009, demand was already increasing. The department has experienced steady growth during the past years and
intends to double its activity and the number of
employees within five years. Today Mørken is
in charge of a team of 39 experienced customer
support employees, and is planning to increase
this number to 46 already by the end of the year.
“All of our engineers are trained to a specialist
level. They need to go through our training programme and be certified for each product before
attending a service job. In Singapore, our pro-
ject department conducts a lot of our engineering and commissioning activity. By sharing our
internal resources, we ensure that we have the
right competence wherever and whenever we
need it,” says Mørken.
“It’s a challenge for us that vessels often make
short stops in Singapore. This means that our
team must be prepared to step in at very short
notice. We need to be ready 24/7,” says Mørken.
Investment in training
Support 24/7
The Customer Support team in Singapore offers
full support for spare parts, technical advice, oncall service, training and onboard supervision for
Kongsberg Maritime’s entire product range. The
department serves as a hub for a large region
stretching from India to New Zealand, with separate offices in China, Korea and India. In order to
ensure the best possible service for the customer
at all times, the various locations within the region cooperate closely by sharing knowledge,
spare parts, engineers and instructors.
Because many merchant vessels only make
short stops in Singapore for bunker oil and storage, Mørken expects future demand in the region to come mainly from this market segment.
Due to an increase in newbuildings for advanced
vessels in Singapore, the demand for crew training is high. In order to maximise the use of its
resources, Kongsberg Maritime Singapore has
organised the training and customer support
departments under the same management. The
training centre, with its four classrooms, offers a
wide variety of courses at different levels within
most of Kongsberg Maritime’s product areas. The
training centre is also experiencing an enormous
increase in demand.
“Last year, we had 48 training courses. This
year, we are aiming to reach 70 courses with
more than 400 students. During the first half of
this year alone, 46 courses have already been
booked,” concludes Mørken. ::
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THEME Offshore Opportunities
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Article by The Full Picture Magazine
Less Sound,
Less Stress
norway
Imagine trying to concentrate on your job as an officer on the bridge of a ship when an emergency situation arises
and thousands of alarms go off within a few minutes, creating a surge of noise and chaos. That’s exactly what a
team led by Kongsberg Maritime has done – envisioned a situation and developed a solution.
Russia
Sweden
british columbia (canada)
newfoundland (canada)
nova scotia (canada)
Washington (usa)
connecticut (usa)
“This system can help reduce accidents as sea,
both on ships and on rigs, because it reduces the
noise level dramatically while delivering high
situation awareness, allowing officers to focus on
the routines that must be carried out during an
emergency situation without panicking,” Hasnes
explains.
germany
the netherlands
Massachusetts (usa)
utah (usa)
texas (usa)
Poland
england
italy
south Korea
Spain
Louisiana (usa)
china
Dubai
India
singapore
brazil
Many applications
:: Kongsberg and Flagship, the Pan-European
maritime transport project partly funded by the
European Union, developed software that enables massive suppression of audible alarms during emergency situations, preventing officers
from being distracted by the flood of noise and
allowing them to instead focus on the tasks at
hand.
A prototype of the alarm system has been completed and tested. It was partly based on experience from the offshore industry and was used
in the simulation of a real incident on an LNG
tanker, with a full blackout generated by thousands of alarms over the span of a few minutes
and thousands more during the next few days.
“We’ve had very positive feedback from several ship owners, from the European Community
Shipowners’ Associations and from Statoil,” says
Geir Hasnes, Principal Engineer at the Offshore,
DP & Navigation unit of Kongsberg Maritime.
The European Community Shipowners’ Association (ECSA) has in fact made a promotional
video of the alarm system to spread the message
to all European ship owners.
64
“Commercialisation is right around the corner.
We are now planning the first implementation
on a ship in order to see it work in a lifelike environment,” he says.
Alarm grouping
The so-called iCAS (intelligent Central Alarm
System) is designed to reduce the number of distractions that are caused by alarms on the bridge
and in the engine room when a critical situation
occurs. As ships and their systems have become
more complex, the number of alarms connected
to those systems has also increased enormously.
The iCAS system focuses on alarm grouping,
which provides an overview and level of criticality, and also uses temporary shelving of spurious or non-informative alarms, thereby reducing
non-essential disturbances and allowing officers
to instead focus more on critical operations.
Disturbances are reduced because only one
alarm per system or sub-system sounds when
a problem arises. When an alarm is shut off, it
won’t go off again unless a new problem in another system or sub-system occurs.
The system meets the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate standard for process automation, which
has been enhanced in order to be applicable for
vessels. While the main applications for iCAS will
be ships and rigs, the concept could have a variety
of applications.
“In principle, iCAS could be used in everything
from households to big oil rigs, but in reality the
system will only be necessary where there is
alarm flooding or a certain amount of spurious
alarms,” says Hasnes.
“One can ask why no one has done this before.
It’s simple, but we worked hard to make it simple,”
he adds.
FLAGSHIP
The FLAGSHIP project was led by Kongsberg in
conjunction with MARINTEK, the Norwegian
Marine Technology Research Centre, Autronica
Fire and Security of Norway, and the shipowners
Teekay of Norway and ASME and Minoan Lines
of Greece.
FLAGSHIP is a consortium of more than 40 European maritime organisations with the aim of
improving the safety, environmental friendliness
and competitiveness of European maritime transport.
The project was designed to further increase the
capacity and reliability of freight and passenger
services and to further reduce the impact from
accidents and emissions. It emphasises on-board
systems and procedures, ship management systems on shore, the impact of new technology on
ship-, owner- and operator organisations, effective and efficient communication interfaces and
the impact of standards and regulations. ::
Global support
World-wide main contact
Call +47 815 35 355
km.support@kongsberg.com
Regional Support Centres 24h
Europe, Africa & Middle East
(Norway)
Kongsberg Maritime AS
24h Hotline: +47 815 35 355
km.support@kongsberg.com
North America (Louisiana)
Kongsberg Maritime Inc.
24h Hotline: +1 504 234 3934
km.support.neworleans@kongsberg.com
South America (Brazil)
Kongsberg Maritime do Brazil
24h Hotline: +55 21 9965 5170
km.support.rio@kongsberg.com
Far East & Oceania (Singapore)
Kongsberg Maritime Pte. Ltd.
24h Hotline: +65 9862 2881
km.support.singapore@kongsberg.com
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Expo
Nor-Shipping
www.nor-shipping.com
May. 24-27
Seawork 2011
www.seawork.com
June 14-16
Offshore Europe
www.offshore-europe.co.uk
Sep. 6-8
Monaco Yacht Show
www.monacoyachtshow.com
Sep. 21-24
Oceans 2011 IEEE-OES
www.oceans11ieeesantander.org
June 6-9
Indesec
www.indesec-expo.com
June 20-22
Kongsberg Maritime, Simulation
& Training’s American User
Conference
Sep. 11-14
ICERS
gma.ru/#/rus/icers10
Sep. 22-24
UDT Europe
www.udt-europe.com
June 7-9
MIOGE
www.mioge.com/2011/applyexhibit.html
June 21-23
UTC - Underwater Technology
Conference
www.utc.no
June 8-9
Multi Agency Craft Conference
(MACC)
www.navalengineers.org/events/
individualeventwebsites/MACC
June 14-16
RenewableUK Offshore Wind
2011
www.renewable-uk.com/events/
offshore-wind-conference
June 29-30
Canadian Marine Pilots
Association Congress 2011
www.cmpacongress2011.com
July 5-9
SEG 2011
Sep. 18-23
UUVS
www.uuvs.net
Sep. 18-21
Oceans 2011
www.oceans11mtsieeekona.org
Sep. 19-22
NEVA
neva.transtec-neva.com/about.html
Sep. 20-23
Kongsberg Maritime, Simulation
& Training’s European User
Conference
www.viaregi.com/registration/deltagerweb.aspx?kid=2790&aid=25375
Sep. 28-30
INMEX 2011
www.inmexindia.com
Sep. 29 - Oct. 01
Middle East Workboats
www.middleeastworkboats.com
Oct. 03-05
The FULL PICTURE magazine
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01/11
SAY: PR & Communications
Kongsberg Maritime AS
Kirkegårdsveien 45
P.O. Box 483
NO-3601 Kongsberg
NORWAY
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